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Sample records for gas release internal

  1. Gas releases from salt

    SciTech Connect

    Ehgartner, B.; Neal, J.; Hinkebein, T.

    1998-06-01

    The occurrence of gas in salt mines and caverns has presented some serious problems to facility operators. Salt mines have long experienced sudden, usually unexpected expulsions of gas and salt from a production face, commonly known as outbursts. Outbursts can release over one million cubic feet of methane and fractured salt, and are responsible for the lives of numerous miners and explosions. Equipment, production time, and even entire mines have been lost due to outbursts. An outburst creates a cornucopian shaped hole that can reach heights of several hundred feet. The potential occurrence of outbursts must be factored into mine design and mining methods. In caverns, the occurrence of outbursts and steady infiltration of gas into stored product can effect the quality of the product, particularly over the long-term, and in some cases renders the product unusable as is or difficult to transport. Gas has also been known to collect in the roof traps of caverns resulting in safety and operational concerns. The intent of this paper is to summarize the existing knowledge on gas releases from salt. The compiled information can provide a better understanding of the phenomena and gain insight into the causative mechanisms that, once established, can help mitigate the variety of problems associated with gas releases from salt. Outbursts, as documented in mines, are discussed first. This is followed by a discussion of the relatively slow gas infiltration into stored crude oil, as observed and modeled in the caverns of the US Strategic Petroleum Reserve. A model that predicts outburst pressure kicks in caverns is also discussed.

  2. Gas release in comet nuclei.

    PubMed

    Prialnik, D; Bar-Nun, A

    1990-11-01

    The evolution of a comet nucleus is investigated, taking into account the crystallization process by which the gas trapped in the ice is released to flow through the porous ice matrix. The equations of conservation of the energy and of the masses of ice and gas are solved throughout the nucleus, to obtain the evolution of the temperature, gas pressure and density profiles. A spherical nucleus composed of cold, porous amorphous ice, with 10% of CO trapped in it, serves as initial model. Several values of density (porosity) and pore size are considered. For each combination of parameters the model is evolved for 20-30 revolutions in comet P/Halley's orbit. Two aspects of the release of gas upon crystallization are analyzed and discussed: (a) the resulting continuous outward flux with high peaks at the time of crystallization, which is a cyclic process in the low-density models and sporadic in the high-density ones; (b) the internal pressures obtained down to depths of a few tens to approximately 200 m (depending on parameters), that are found to exceed the compressional strength of cometary ice. As a result, both cracking and explosions of the overlying ice layer and ejection of gas and ice/dust grains are expected to follow crystallization. They should appear as outbursts or sudden brightening of the comet. The model of 0.2 g cm-3 density is found to reproduce quite well many of the light-curve and activity characteristics of comet P/Halley.

  3. Gas release and conductivity modification studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linson, L. M.; Baxter, D. C.

    1979-01-01

    The behavior of gas clouds produced by releases from orbital velocity in either a point release or venting mode is described by the modification of snowplow equations valid in an intermediate altitude regime. Quantitative estimates are produced for the time dependence of the radius of the cloud, the average internal energy, the translational velocity, and the distance traveled. The dependence of these quantities on the assumed density profile, the internal energy of the gas, and the ratio of specific heats is examined. The new feature is the inclusion of the effect of the large orbital velocity. The resulting gas cloud models are used to calculate the characteristics of the field line integrated Pedersen conductivity enhancements that would be produced by the release of barium thermite at orbital velocity in either the point release or venting modes as a function of release altitude and chemical payload weight.

  4. Gas cylinder release rate testing and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Despres, Joseph; Sweeney, Joseph; Yedave, Sharad; Chambers, Barry

    2012-11-01

    There are varying cylinder technologies employed for the storage of gases, each resulting in a potentially different hazard level to the surroundings in the event of a gas release. Subatmospheric Gas delivery Systems Type I (SAGS I) store and deliver gases subatmospherically, while Subatmospheric Gas delivery Systems Type II (SAGS II) deliver gases subatmospherically, but store them at high pressure. Standard high pressure gas cylinders store and deliver their contents at high pressure. Due to the differences in these cylinder technologies, release rates in the event of a leak or internal component failure, can vary significantly. This paper details the experimental and theoretical results of different Arsine (AsH3) gas cylinder release scenarios. For the SAGS II experimental analysis, Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) was used to determine the spatial concentration profiles when a surrogate gas, CF4, was released via a simulated leak within an ion implanter. Various SAGS I and SAGS II cylinder types and failure modes were tested. Additionally, theoretical analysis was performed to support an understanding of the different potential AsH3 leak rates. The results of this work show that the effects of a leak from the various cylinder types can be quite different, with the concentrations resulting from cylinders containing high pressure gas often being in excess of IDLH levels.

  5. Gas release in comet nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prialnik, Dina; Bar-Nun, Akiva

    1990-01-01

    Processes taking place during the evolution of a comet nucleus are examined, taking into account the release of gas on crystallization and the gas flow through the porous nucleus. In particular, the stresses caused by the gas pressure, the contribution of gas flow to the heat transfer, and the rate of gas emission by the comet along its orbit were determined using a model of spherically symmetric comet nucleus made of porous amorphous ice, with 10 percent CO gas trapped in it. Several values of density and pore size are considered, and for each combination of parameters, the model is evolved for 20-30 revolutions in Comet P/Halley's orbit. It is shown that a model of 0.2 g/cu cm density reproduces well many of the light-curve and activity characteristics of Comet P/Halley.

  6. A model of gas buildup and release in crater lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chau, H. F.; Kwok, Peter K.; Mak, Louis

    1996-12-01

    The sudden release of carbon dioxide gas, which may accumulate gradually within the stratified water bodies of a crater lake, caused two fatal disasters in Cameroon during the past decade. We model the various processes that may have led to the release by considering (1) gas injection, (2) an internal triggering mechanism, (3) propagation of a disturbance after triggering, and (4) the forces that end the outburst. We suggest that the 1986 Lake Nyos outburst was triggered at the lake bottom. The final explosive stage of the release ended quickly when a sufficiently large volume of gas bubbles prevented circulation of water eddies within the lake. A cellular automaton model is used to estimate the amount of carbon dioxide gas released and the characteristic time interval between successive outbursts. If both the gas accumulation rate and the diffusion rate of carbon dioxide through water are constant, then rapid gas release will occur at fairly regular intervals. In which case, the amount of gas released from Lake Nyos is 0.17 ± 0.05 km3 at standard temperature and pressure each 37 ± 10 years. It is possible, however, that an external event could trigger a sudden release or that the diffusion rate of carbon dioxide may change as more gas accumulates, which could shorten the release time.

  7. Morphology of Gas Release in Physical Simulants

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel, Richard C.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Crawford, Amanda D.; Hylden, Laura R.; Bryan, Samuel A.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.

    2014-07-03

    This report documents testing activities conducted as part of the Deep Sludge Gas Release Event Project (DSGREP). The testing described in this report focused on evaluating the potential retention and release mechanisms of hydrogen bubbles in underground radioactive waste storage tanks at Hanford. The goal of the testing was to evaluate the rate, extent, and morphology of gas release events in simulant materials. Previous, undocumented scoping tests have evidenced dramatically different gas release behavior from simulants with similar physical properties. Specifically, previous gas release tests have evaluated the extent of release of 30 Pa kaolin and 30 Pa bentonite clay slurries. While both materials are clays and both have equivalent material shear strength using a shear vane, it was found that upon stirring, gas was released immediately and completely from bentonite clay slurry while little if any gas was released from the kaolin slurry. The motivation for the current work is to replicate these tests in a controlled quality test environment and to evaluate the release behavior for another simulant used in DSGREP testing. Three simulant materials were evaluated: 1) a 30 Pa kaolin clay slurry, 2) a 30 Pa bentonite clay slurry, and 3) Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) Simulant (a simulant designed to support DSGREP RT instability testing. Entrained gas was generated in these simulant materials using two methods: 1) application of vacuum over about a 1-minute period to nucleate dissolved gas within the simulant and 2) addition of hydrogen peroxide to generate gas by peroxide decomposition in the simulants over about a 16-hour period. Bubble release was effected by vibrating the test material using an external vibrating table. When testing with hydrogen peroxide, gas release was also accomplished by stirring of the simulant.

  8. Deep Sludge Gas Release Event Analytical Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Sams, Terry L.

    2013-08-15

    Long Abstract. Full Text. The purpose of the Deep Sludge Gas Release Event Analytical Evaluation (DSGRE-AE) is to evaluate the postulated hypothesis that a hydrogen GRE may occur in Hanford tanks containing waste sludges at levels greater than previously experienced. There is a need to understand gas retention and release hazards in sludge beds which are 200 -300 inches deep. These sludge beds are deeper than historical Hanford sludge waste beds, and are created when waste is retrieved from older single-shell tanks (SST) and transferred to newer double-shell tanks (DST).Retrieval of waste from SSTs reduces the risk to the environment from leakage or potential leakage of waste into the ground from these tanks. However, the possibility of an energetic event (flammable gas accident) in the retrieval receiver DST is worse than slow leakage. Lines of inquiry, therefore, are (1) can sludge waste be stored safely in deep beds; (2) can gas release events (GRE) be prevented by periodically degassing the sludge (e.g., mixer pump); or (3) does the retrieval strategy need to be altered to limit sludge bed height by retrieving into additional DSTs? The scope of this effort is to provide expert advice on whether or not to move forward with the generation of deep beds of sludge through retrieval of C-Farm tanks. Evaluation of possible mitigation methods (e.g., using mixer pumps to release gas, retrieving into an additional DST) are being evaluated by a second team and are not discussed in this report. While available data and engineering judgment indicate that increased gas retention (retained gas fraction) in DST sludge at depths resulting from the completion of SST 241-C Tank Farm retrievals is not expected and, even if gas releases were to occur, they would be small and local, a positive USQ was declared (Occurrence Report EM-RP--WRPS-TANKFARM-2012-0014, "Potential Exists for a Large Spontaneous Gas Release Event in Deep Settled Waste Sludge"). The purpose of this technical

  9. Preventing and controlling accidental gas releases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moskowitz, P. D.; Fthenakis, V. M.; Kalb, P. D.

    1988-07-01

    Toxic, flammable, and explosive gases may be used in photovoltaic cell research laboratories and in commercial manufacturing facilities. Accidental release of these materials can present hazards to life and property. Accidents can arise from a variety of mechanical and human related failures. These can occur from the time materials are received at the loading dock of the facility to the time treated gases are discharged to the atmosphere through a stack. Each type of initiating event may require a different control approach. These may range from the training and certification of plant workers charged with the handling of gas cylinder hookups to installation of emergency pollution control systems. Since engineering options for controlling released materials are limited, emphasis should be placed on administrative and engineering approaches for preventing such accidents. These are likely to be the most effective approaches for protecting life and property.

  10. Release of fission gas during transient heating of LWR fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Gehl, S.M.

    1982-05-01

    The direct electrical heating technique was used to study fission-gas release and mechanical behavior of irradiated light-water reactor (LWR) fuels during thermal transients. An empirical correlation between fission-gas release and transient temperature history was developed for power-cooling mismatch (PCM) and anticipated transients. Gas release during the refill portion of a design-basis loss of cooling accident was estimated to be less than 1%. Fission-gas release during PCM accidents was found to be controlled by intergranular microcracking and the interlinkage of tunnels on grain edges. For high-gas-release transients, the fractional gas release was shown to be equal to the fractional coverage of grain boundaries by microcracks. Temperature calculations indicated that microcracking causes a significant decrease in the fuel thermal conductivity.

  11. 14 CFR 1213.109 - News releases concerning international activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false News releases concerning international... RELEASE OF INFORMATION TO NEWS AND INFORMATION MEDIA § 1213.109 News releases concerning international... report all visits proposed by representatives of foreign news media to the Public Affairs Officer of the...

  12. 14 CFR 1213.109 - News releases concerning international activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false News releases concerning international... RELEASE OF INFORMATION TO NEWS AND INFORMATION MEDIA § 1213.109 News releases concerning international... report all visits proposed by representatives of foreign news media to the Public Affairs Officer of the...

  13. 14 CFR 1213.109 - News releases concerning international activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false News releases concerning international... RELEASE OF INFORMATION TO NEWS AND INFORMATION MEDIA § 1213.109 News releases concerning international... report all visits proposed by representatives of foreign news media to the Public Affairs Officer of the...

  14. 14 CFR 1213.109 - News releases concerning international activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2011-01-01 2010-01-01 true News releases concerning international... RELEASE OF INFORMATION TO NEWS AND INFORMATION MEDIA § 1213.109 News releases concerning international... report all visits proposed by representatives of foreign news media to the Public Affairs Officer of the...

  15. A fission gas release correlation for uranium nitride fuel pins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinstein, M. B.; Davison, H. W.

    1973-01-01

    A model was developed to predict fission gas releases from UN fuel pins clad with various materials. The model was correlated with total release data obtained by different experimentors, over a range of fuel temperatures primarily between 1250 and 1660 K, and fuel burnups up to 4.6 percent. In the model, fission gas is transported by diffusion mechanisms to the grain boundaries where the volume grows and eventually interconnects with the outside surface of the fuel. The within grain diffusion coefficients are found from fission gas release rate data obtained using a sweep gas facility.

  16. Modeling of Fission Gas Release in UO2

    SciTech Connect

    MH Krohn

    2006-01-23

    A two-stage gas release model was examined to determine if it could provide a physically realistic and accurate model for fission gas release under Prometheus conditions. The single-stage Booth model [1], which is often used to calculate fission gas release, is considered to be oversimplified and not representative of the mechanisms that occur during fission gas release. Two-stage gas release models require saturation at the grain boundaries before gas is release, leading to a time delay in release of gases generated in the fuel. Two versions of a two-stage model developed by Forsberg and Massih [2] were implemented using Mathcad [3]. The original Forsbers and Massih model [2] and a modified version of the Forsberg and Massih model that is used in a commercially available fuel performance code (FRAPCON-3) [4] were examined. After an examination of these models, it is apparent that without further development and validation neither of these models should be used to calculate fission gas release under Prometheus-type conditions. There is too much uncertainty in the input parameters used in the models. In addition. the data used to tune the modified Forsberg and Massih model (FRAPCON-3) was collected under commercial reactor conditions, which will have higher fission rates relative to Prometheus conditions [4].

  17. Real-time noble gas release signaling rock deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, S. J.; Gardner, W. P.; Lee, H.

    2016-12-01

    We present empirical results/relationships of rock strain, microfracture density, acoustic emissions, and noble gas release from laboratory triaxial experiments for a granite and basalt. Noble gases are contained in most crustal rock at inter/intra granular sites, their release during natural and manmade stress and strain changes represents a signal of brittle/semi brittle deformation. The gas composition depends on lithology, geologic history and age, fluids present, and uranium, thorium and potassium-40 concentrations in the rocks that affect radiogenic noble gases (helium, argon) production. Noble gas emission and its relationship to crustal processes have been studied, including correlations to tectonic velocities and qualitative estimates of deep permeability from surface measurements, finger prints of nuclear weapon detonation, and as potential precursory signals to earthquakes attributed to gas release due to pre-seismic stress, dilatancy and/or rock fracturing. Helium emission has been shown as a precursor of volcanic activity. Real-time noble gas release is observed using an experimental system utilizing mass spectrometers to measure gases released during triaxial rock deformation. Noble gas release is shown to represent a sensitive precursor signal of rock deformation by relating real-time noble gas release to stress-strain state changes and acoustic emissions. We propose using noble gas release to also signal rock deformation in boreholes, mines and nuclear waste repositories. We postulate each rock exhibits a gas release signature which is microstructure, stress/strain state, and or permanent deformation dependent. Such relationships, when calibrated, may be used to sense rock deformation and then develop predictive models. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corp., for the US Dept. of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under

  18. Fission-gas-release rates from irradiated uranium nitride specimens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinstein, M. B.; Kirchgessner, T. A.; Tambling, T. N.

    1973-01-01

    Fission-gas-release rates from two 93 percent dense UN specimens were measured using a sweep gas facility. Specimen burnup rates averaged .0045 and .0032 percent/hr, and the specimen temperatures ranged from 425 to 1323 K and from 552 to 1502 K, respectively. Burnups up to 7.8 percent were achieved. Fission-gas-release rates first decreased then increased with burnup. Extensive interconnected intergranular porosity formed in the specimen operated at over 1500 K. Release rate variation with both burnup and temperature agreed with previous irradiation test results.

  19. Intergas `95: International unconventional gas symposium. Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-01

    The International Unconventional Gas Symposium was held on May 14--20, 1995 in Tuscaloosa, Alabama where 52 reports were presented. These reports are grouped in this proceedings under: geology and resources; mine degasification and safety; international developments; reservoir characterization/coal science; and environmental/legal and regulatory. Each report has been processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  20. Fission gas release restrictor for breached fuel rod

    DOEpatents

    Kadambi, N. Prasad; Tilbrook, Roger W.; Spencer, Daniel R.; Schwallie, Ambrose L.

    1986-01-01

    In the event of a breach in the cladding of a rod in an operating liquid metal fast breeder reactor, the rapid release of high-pressure gas from the fission gas plenum may result in a gas blanketing of the breached rod and rods adjacent thereto which impairs the heat transfer to the liquid metal coolant. In order to control the release rate of fission gas in the event of a breached rod, the substantial portion of the conventional fission gas plenum is formed as a gas bottle means which includes a gas pervious means in a small portion thereof. During normal reactor operation, as the fission gas pressure gradually increases, the gas pressure interiorly of and exteriorly of the gas bottle means equalizes. In the event of a breach in the cladding, the gas pervious means in the gas bottle means constitutes a sufficient restriction to the rapid flow of gas therethrough that under maximum design pressure differential conditions, the fission gas flow through the breach will not significantly reduce the heat transfer from the affected rod and adjacent rods to the liquid metal heat transfer fluid flowing therebetween.

  1. Modeling internal ballistics of gas combustion guns.

    PubMed

    Schorge, Volker; Grossjohann, Rico; Schönekess, Holger C; Herbst, Jörg; Bockholdt, Britta; Ekkernkamp, Axel; Frank, Matthias

    2016-05-01

    Potato guns are popular homemade guns which work on the principle of gas combustion. They are usually constructed for recreational rather than criminal purposes. Yet some serious injuries and fatalities due to these guns are reported. As information on the internal ballistics of homemade gas combustion-powered guns is scarce, it is the aim of this work to provide an experimental model of the internal ballistics of these devices and to investigate their basic physical parameters. A gas combustion gun was constructed with a steel tube as the main component. Gas/air mixtures of acetylene, hydrogen, and ethylene were used as propellants for discharging a 46-mm caliber test projectile. Gas pressure in the combustion chamber was captured with a piezoelectric pressure sensor. Projectile velocity was measured with a ballistic speed measurement system. The maximum gas pressure, the maximum rate of pressure rise, the time parameters of the pressure curve, and the velocity and path of the projectile through the barrel as a function of time were determined according to the pressure-time curve. The maximum gas pressure was measured to be between 1.4 bar (ethylene) and 4.5 bar (acetylene). The highest maximum rate of pressure rise was determined for hydrogen at (dp/dt)max = 607 bar/s. The muzzle energy was calculated to be between 67 J (ethylene) and 204 J (acetylene). To conclude, this work provides basic information on the internal ballistics of homemade gas combustion guns. The risk of injury to the operator or bystanders is high, because accidental explosions of the gun due to the high-pressure rise during combustion of the gas/air mixture may occur.

  2. Early User Test: BISON for Fission Gas Release Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Johns, Russell C.

    2014-01-28

    As a test to develop an understanding of the capabilities and input of the nuclear fuel performance code BISON, we modeled the fission gas release of the Oconee rod 15309 as there is benchmark data available for comparison. BISON has two fission gas models available, the Forsber-Massih model and the Simple Integrated Fission Gas Release and Swelling [sifgrs] model. Due to time constraints and availability of model parameters [we did not have all of the parameters for the sifgrs model already in hand] we only tested the Forsberg-Massih model. The Oconee rod test has been used in a number of benchmark studies including the integral assessment of FRAPCON 3.4. The Oconee Rod test is a 5-cycle test bundle with an average burnup of 50GWd/MTU. The FRAPCON assessment predicted that Oconee Rod15309 Test case would release 1.25% of all fission gas produced, while experimentally only 0.8% was released at EOL. Other studies using BISON with the sifgrs model have under predicted EOL fission gas release [FGR].

  3. 77 FR 28667 - Land Release for Plattsburgh International Airport

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration Land Release for Plattsburgh International Airport AGENCY: Federal... Secretary may waive a Sponsor's Federal obligation to use certain airport land for aeronautical use. Issued...

  4. EPA Releases Internal Report on Gold King Mine Response

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    WASHINGTON - Today the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) released the findings of an internal review of the agency's response to the Gold King Mine incident. Led by five EPA personnel from multiple EPA regions and Headquarters, the reviewer

  5. NASTRAN internal improvements for 1992 release

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, Gordon C.

    1992-01-01

    The 1992 NASTRAN release incorporates a number of improvements transparent to users. The NASTRAN executable was made smaller by 70 pct. for the RISC base Unix machines by linking NASTRAN into a single program, freeing some 33 megabytes of system disc space that can be used by NASTRAN for solving larger problems. Some basic matrix operations, such as forward-backward substitution (FBS), multiply-add (MPYAD), matrix transpose, and fast eigensolution extraction routine (FEER), have been made more efficient by including new methods, new logic, new I/O techniques, and, in some cases, new subroutines. Some of the improvements provide ground work ready for system vectorization. These are finite element basic operations, and are used repeatedly in a finite element program such as NASTRAN. Any improvements on these basic operations can be translated into substantial cost and cpu time savings. NASTRAN is also discussed in various computer platforms.

  6. Internal cooling circuit for gas turbine bucket

    SciTech Connect

    Hyde, Susan Marie; Davis, Richard Mallory

    2005-10-25

    In a gas turbine bucket having a shank portion and an airfoil portion having leading and trailing edges and pressure and suction sides, an internal cooling circuit, the internal cooling circuit having a serpentine configuration including plural radial outflow passages and plural radial inflow passages, and wherein a coolant inlet passage communicates with a first of the radial outflow passages along the trailing edge, the first radial outflow passage having a plurality of radially extending and radially spaced elongated rib segments extending between and connecting the pressure and suction sides in a middle region of the first passage to prevent ballooning of the pressure and suction sides at the first radial outflow passage.

  7. Application of dispersion modeling to indoor gas release scenarios.

    PubMed

    Rasouli, F; Williams, T A

    1995-03-01

    Many complex models are available to study the dispersion of contaminants or ventilation effectiveness in indoor spaces. Because of the computationally complex numerical schemes employed, most of these models require mainframe computers or workstations. However, simple design tools or guidelines are needed, in addition to complicated models. A dispersion model based on the basic governing equations was developed and uses an analytical solution. Because the concentration is expressed by an analytical solution, the grid size and time steps are user definable. A computer program was used to obtain numerical results and to obtain release history from a thermodynamic source model. The model can be used to estimate three-dimensional spatial and temporal variations in concentrations resulting from transient gas releases in an enclosure. The model was used to study a gas release scenario from a pressurized cylinder into a large ventilated building, in this case, a transit parking and fueling facility.

  8. Gas release from the LUSI eruption site: large scale estimates.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sciarra, A.; Mazzini, A.; Etiope, G.; Husein, A.; Hadi, S.

    2015-12-01

    The spectacular Indonesian Lusi mud eruption started in May 2006 following to a 6.3 M earthquake striking the island of Java. Previous studies investigated the mechanisms of reactivation of the Watukosek fault system that crosses Lusi locality and continues to the NE of Java. Results show that the quake triggered lateral movement of this strike-slip system resulting in several aligned eruptions sites including Lusi. Geochemical studies of the erupted fluids reveal a mantle signature and point to a connection with the neighboring Arjuno-Welirang volcanic complex indicating that Lusi is a sedimentary hosted geothermal system. In order to better understand 1) the geometry of the Lusi subsurface plumbing system, 2) to estimate the type and the amount of gas released, and 3) how tectonic structures may control this activity, we conducted a comprehensive survey around the Lusi crater. We sampled more than 60 seepage sites to analyze the composition of the gas released and conducted a flux measurements survey of over 350 stations (CO2 and CH4). In addition we completed three CO2, CH4, radon profiles (120 points) perpendicular to the NE-SW oriented Watukosek strike-slip fault system and complemented that with geoelectric surveys. Results show that the whole area is characterized by diffused gas release through seeps, fractures, microfractures and soil degassing. Overall the highest gas flux were recorded at stations crossing the fractured zones that coincide with the position of the Watukosek fault system. The fractures release mainly CO2 (with peaks up to 400 g/m2day) and display higher temperatures (up to 41°C). This main shear zone is populated by numerous seeps that expel mostly CH4. Flux measurements in the seeping pools reveal that φCO2 is an order of magnitude higher than that measured in the fractures, and two orders of magnitude for φCH4. Radon measurements vary from 30 and 90 Bq/m3 on the edges of the study area to 6000 Bq/m3in the proximity of the faulted

  9. Modeling gas phase nitric oxide release in lung epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Jingjing; George, Steven C.

    2012-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is present in exhaled breath and is generally considered to be a noninvasive marker of airway inflammation, and is thus of particular relevance to monitoring asthma. NO is produced when l-arginine is converted to l-citrulline by NO synthase (NOS); however, l-arginine is also the substrate for arginase and both enzymes are upregulated in asthma. Recent reports have speculated that enhanced expression of one or both enzymes could lead to a limitation in substrate availability, and hence impact downstream targets or markers such as exhaled NO. The non-linear nature and vastly different kinetics of the enzymes make predictions difficult, particularly over the wide range of enzyme activity between baseline and inflammation. In this study, we developed a steady state model of l-arginine transmembrane transport, NO production, diffusion, and gas phase NO release from lung epithelial cells. We validated our model with experimental results of gas phase NO release and intracellular l-arginine concentration in A549 cells, and then performed a sensitivity analysis to determine relative impact of each enzyme on NO production. Our model predicts intracellular l-arginine and gas phase NO release over a wide range of initial extracellular l-arginine concentrations following stimulation with cytomix (10 ng/ml TNF-α, IL-1β, and INF-γ). Relative sensitivity analysis demonstrates that enhanced arginase activity has little impact on l-arginine bioavailability for NOS. In addition, NOS activity is the dominant parameter which impacts gas phase NO release. PMID:21550413

  10. Proposed gas release experiment on the argos satellite. Interim report

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, S.T.; Murad, E.; Pike, C.P.

    1992-01-29

    We propose to release xenon and carbon dioxide gases from nozzles on the Advanced Research and Global Observation Satellite (ARGOS) satellite orbiting with a velocity of about 7.4 km/s at an altitude of about 800 km. The releases will be conducted mostly in darkness over the Maui telescope site. The vector sum of the satellite and gas velocities will exceed the velocity requirement for the critical ionization velocity (CIV) process of xenon. It is feasible that the xenon gas will achieve critical velocity ionization. Associative ionization and collisional stripping will not occur for the xenon gas and there is no photo-ionization in darkness; ionization processes competing with CIV are absent. Neutral density, ambient magnetic field, and seed ionization effects on the xenon gas CIV will be discussed. Unlike xenon, carbon dioxide will not undergo CIV because of its higher velocity requirement. However, it is feasible that carbon dioxide colliding with the atmospheric species will form excited CO and OH molecules, which will radiate subsequently. Optical, IR, and UV observations on the satellite and at Maui will provide diagnostic measurements for the experiment.

  11. Unconventional mechanisms control cyclic respiratory gas release in flying Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Fritz-Olaf; Heymann, Nicole

    2005-10-01

    The high power output of flight muscles places special demands on the respiratory gas exchange system in insects. In small insects, respiration relies on diffusion, and for elevated locomotor performance such as flight, instantaneous gas exchange rates typically co-vary with the animal's metabolic activity. By contrast, under certain conditions, instantaneous release rate of carbon dioxide from the fruit fly Drosophila flying in a virtual-reality flight arena may oscillate distinctly at low frequency (0.37+/-0.055 Hz), even though flight muscle mechanical power output requires constant metabolic activity. Cross-correlation analysis suggests that this uncoupling between respiratory and metabolic rate is not driven by conventional types of convective flow reinforcement such as abdominal pumping, but might result from two unusual mechanisms for tracheal breathing. Simplified analytical modeling of diffusive tracheal gas exchange suggests that cyclic release patterns in the insect occur as a consequence of the stochastically synchronized control of spiracle opening area by the four large thoracic spiracles. Alternatively, in-flight motion analysis of the abdomen and proboscis using infra-red video imaging suggests utilization of the proboscis extension reflex (PER) for tracheal convection. Although the respiratory benefit of synchronized spiracle opening activity in the fruit fly is unclear, proboscis-induced tracheal convection might potentially help to balance the local oxygen supply between different body compartments of the flying animal.

  12. Thermal Release of Gases in Achondrites: 1. Gas Release During Melting of Eucrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assonov, S. S.; Ivanova, M. A.; Shukolyukov, Yu. A.

    1995-09-01

    steps, which each lasted ~1.3 hours. The real correspondence of the gas release temperatures within the 1300 C fraction to the temperature interval of equilibrium melting of Pomozdino suggests that the major mechanism of Xe release is likely to be melting. The release curves of other Ar and Kr isotopes formed in situ, aside from the common peak, have peaks at lower temperatures. The ratio between amount of gas released within the limits of these peaks is various; and 40Ar has the highest release at low temperatures. The presence of several peaks suggests that various gas migration mechanisms may exist. The application of thermodynamic models of crystallization appears to be appropriate for estimating melting temperatures of other achondrites that formed from melt during crystallization, for example in diogenites. Acknowledgments: We are very grateful to Dr. A. A. Ariskin for the LUNAMAG program. References: [1] Assonov S. S. et al. (1992) Ann. Geophys., 11, Suppl. III, Part III, 475. [2] Karpenko S. F. et al. (1991) 16th NIPR Symp. Antarc. Meteorites, 178-179. [3] Ariskin A. A. et al. (1994) LPS XXV, 37-38. [4] Warren P. H. et al. (1990) Proc. LPS, Vol. 20, 281-297.

  13. Promoting international deployment of greenhouse gas technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, M.A.; Kelley, J.S.; Voss, M.K.

    1995-12-31

    Increasing emission of greenhouse gases from human activities are predicted to lead to significant global warming and possible undesirable Environmental effects by the middle of the next century. These gases trap solar energy that is reradiated from the earth`s surface, raising its temperature. The gases-carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, and chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs)-are emitted as the result of a wide range of anthropogenic activities, including the production and conversion of energy from fossil fuels, the operation of air conditioning and refrigeration equipment, and coal mining, domestic sewage treatment, and the manufacture of cement and nylon. To slow global warming, technologies are being developed, promoted, and deployed to reduce these emissions. To make a practical response to global environmental issues such as greenhouse gas emissions, it is recognized that international collaboration is needed. Because of the accelerating pace of technology innovation and the increasingly interconnected world economy, national efforts to adapt to global environmental challenges are no longer sufficient. Through international collaboration, scarce resources can be shared and technological solutions can be adapted and replicated. ORNL is responsible for managing and supporting the U.S, involvement in many of the implementing agreements. In addition to collaborating with GREENTIE, ORNL is involved with the following other IEA implementing agreements, either as executive committee members, national team leaders, or operating agents: the Center for the Analysis and Dissemination of Demonstrated Energy Technologies, Heat Pump Program, Buildings and Community Systems, Alternative Motor Fuels, and Fusion Energy Stellerator Concept.

  14. Thermodynamic Changes in the Coal Matrix - Gas - Moisture System Under Pressure Release and Phase Transformations of Gas Hydrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyrdin, V. V.; Smirnov, V. G.; Kim, T. L.; Manakov, A. Yu.; Fofanov, A. A.; Kartopolova, I. S.

    2017-06-01

    The physical processes occurring in the coal - natural gas system under the gas pressure release were studied experimentally. The possibility of gas hydrates presence in the inner space of natural coal was shown, which decomposition leads to an increase in the amount of gas passing into the free state. The decomposition of gas hydrates can be caused either by the seam temperature increase or the pressure decrease to lower than the gas hydrates equilibrium curve. The contribution of methane released during gas hydrates decomposition should be taken into account in the design of safe mining technologies for coal seams prone to gas dynamic phenomena.

  15. Gas Release During Saltwell Pumping: Interpretation of Operational Data

    SciTech Connect

    J.L. Huckaby; L.M. Peurrung; P.A. Gauglitz

    1999-09-16

    The Hanford Site has 149 single-shell tanks (SSTs) containing radioactive waste that is a complex mix of radioactive and chemical products. Of these, 67 are known or suspected to have leaked liquid into the surrounding soil, while 82 are considered sound (Hanlon 1999). To minimize the amount of material that potentially could leak into the surrounding soil, all of the SSTs are scheduled to have drainable liquid removed and to be designated as interim stabilized. Of the SSTs, 119 have been declared stabilized, and only 30 require further processing (Hanlon 1999). Many of the tanks have been declared stabilized administratively, with only 45 tanks having had drainable liquid removed. The pending consent decree between the Washington State Department of Ecology and the Office of River Protection. (U.S. District Court Eastern District of Washington, 1999) sets a milestone to complete interim stabilization by September 2004. While process equipment exists for removing drainable liquid, and its operation is well known from previous pumping campaigns, a number of safety issues associated with the release and potential ignition of flammable gases within the tanks needs to be addressed. The safety concerns associated with flammable gases stem from the observation that some of the waste in the SSTs generates and retains hazardous quantities of flammable gases, including hydrogen, nitrous oxide, and ammonia. Of the 30 SSTs remaining to be declared interim stabilized, 29 need to have drainable liquid removed by saltwell pumping (waste in tank 241-C-106 will be removed by sluicing), and 16 of these are on the Flammable Gas Watch List (FGWL) (Hopkins 1995; Hanlon 1999). Most of these tanks are in Facility Group 2 (Noorani 1997); that is, it is believed that tank operations may induce the release of significant quantities of flammable gas, but gas release does not occur spontaneously. In particular, saltwell pumping to remove the interstitial liquid from SSTs is expected to cause

  16. Transport of dissolved gas and its ecological impact after a gas release from deepwater.

    PubMed

    Wimalaratne, Malinda R; Yapa, Poojitha D; Nakata, Kisaburo; Premathilake, Lakshitha T

    2015-11-15

    Previous models on simulating gas releases in deepwater were not focused on the dissolved component and its impact on water quality. This paper presents a new model developed for simulating the transport/spread of dissolved methane from an underwater release and its impact on dissolved oxygen in ambient water. Methane dissolves into ambient water from gas phase, direct from hydrate phase, and from dissociating hydrates formed earlier. Dissolved methane affects the dissolved oxygen levels in ambient water due to microbial interaction and possible direct absorption of oxygen into methane bubbles. We use new model simulations of Deepspill field experiments to compare with instantaneous profiles which were unpublished until now. The comparisons are very good with a short time lag, but are within the acceptable discrepancy for models for emergency response and contingency planning. Scenario simulations show the effect on dissolved oxygen due to different methane release situations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Strategies to Mitigate Ammonia Release on the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macatangay, Ariel V.; Prokhorov, Kimberlee S.; Sweterlitsch, Jeffrey J.

    2007-01-01

    International Space Station (ISS) is crucial to its continuous operation. Off-nominal situations can arise from virtually any aspect of ISS operations. One situation of particular concern is the inadvertent release of a chemical into the ISS atmosphere. In sufficient quantities, a chemical release can render the ISS uninhabitable regardless of the chemical s toxicity as a result of its effect on the hardware used to maintain the environment. This is certainly true with system chemicals which are integral components to the function and purpose of the system. Safeguards, such as design for minimum risk, multiple containment, hazard assessments, rigorous safety reviews, and others, are in place to minimize the probability of a chemical release to the ISS environment thereby allowing the benefits of system chemicals to outweigh the risks associated with them. The thermal control system is an example of such a system. Heat generated within the ISS is transferred from the internal thermal control system (ITCS) to the external thermal control system (ETCS) via two, single-barrier interface heat exchangers (IFHX). The ITCS and ETCS are closed-loop systems which utilize water and anhydrous ammonia, respectively, as heat-transfer fluids. There is approximately 1200 lbs. (208 gallons) of anhydrous ammonia in the ETCS circulating through the two heat exchangers, transferring heat from the ITCS water lines. At the amounts present in the ETCS, anhydrous ammonia is one system chemical that can easily overwhelm the station atmosphere scrubbing capabilities and render the ISS uninhabitable in the event of a catastrophic rupture. Although safeguards have certainly minimized the risk of an ammonia release into the Station atmosphere, credible release scenarios and controls to manage these scenarios are examined.

  18. Strategies to Mitigate Ammonia Release on the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macatangay, Ariel V.; Prokhorov, Kimberlee S.; Sweterlitsch, Jeffrey J.

    2007-01-01

    International Space Station (ISS) is crucial to its continuous operation. Off-nominal situations can arise from virtually any aspect of ISS operations. One situation of particular concern is the inadvertent release of a chemical into the ISS atmosphere. In sufficient quantities, a chemical release can render the ISS uninhabitable regardless of the chemical s toxicity as a result of its effect on the hardware used to maintain the environment. This is certainly true with system chemicals which are integral components to the function and purpose of the system. Safeguards, such as design for minimum risk, multiple containment, hazard assessments, rigorous safety reviews, and others, are in place to minimize the probability of a chemical release to the ISS environment thereby allowing the benefits of system chemicals to outweigh the risks associated with them. The thermal control system is an example of such a system. Heat generated within the ISS is transferred from the internal thermal control system (ITCS) to the external thermal control system (ETCS) via two, single-barrier interface heat exchangers (IFHX). The ITCS and ETCS are closed-loop systems which utilize water and anhydrous ammonia, respectively, as heat-transfer fluids. There is approximately 1200 lbs. (208 gallons) of anhydrous ammonia in the ETCS circulating through the two heat exchangers, transferring heat from the ITCS water lines. At the amounts present in the ETCS, anhydrous ammonia is one system chemical that can easily overwhelm the station atmosphere scrubbing capabilities and render the ISS uninhabitable in the event of a catastrophic rupture. Although safeguards have certainly minimized the risk of an ammonia release into the Station atmosphere, credible release scenarios and controls to manage these scenarios are examined.

  19. Exhaust gas recirculation system for an internal combustion engine

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Ko-Jen

    2013-05-21

    An exhaust gas recirculation system for an internal combustion engine comprises an exhaust driven turbocharger having a low pressure turbine outlet in fluid communication with an exhaust gas conduit. The turbocharger also includes a low pressure compressor intake and a high pressure compressor outlet in communication with an intake air conduit. An exhaust gas recirculation conduit fluidly communicates with the exhaust gas conduit to divert a portion of exhaust gas to a low pressure exhaust gas recirculation branch extending between the exhaust gas recirculation conduit and an engine intake system for delivery of exhaust gas thereto. A high pressure exhaust gas recirculation branch extends between the exhaust gas recirculation conduit and the compressor intake and delivers exhaust gas to the compressor for mixing with a compressed intake charge for delivery to the intake system.

  20. Preparation and properties of an internal mold release for rigid urethane foam

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, B.G.

    1980-08-01

    Internal mold releases which can be added to urethane foam resin were synthesized and evaluated. The use of this type of release agent eliminates the repeated cleaning and recoating of molds, a procedure required with surface-applied mold releases. The internal mold releases investigated are the reaction products of a fatty acid ester, containing an active hydrogen, and a monoisocycanate. The use of an internal mold release resulted in urethane foam with good releasability and excellent surface bondability. Several properties of rigid urethane foam formulated with the use of an internal mold release are presented.

  1. THETRIS: A MICRO-SCALE TEMPERATURE AND GAS RELEASE MODEL FOR TRISO FUEL

    SciTech Connect

    J. Ortensi; A.M. Ougouag

    2011-12-01

    The dominating mechanism in the passive safety of gas-cooled, graphite-moderated, high-temperature reactors (HTRs) is the Doppler feedback effect. These reactor designs are fueled with sub-millimeter sized kernels formed into TRISO particles that are imbedded in a graphite matrix. The best spatial and temporal representation of the feedback effect is obtained from an accurate approximation of the fuel temperature. Most accident scenarios in HTRs are characterized by large time constants and slow changes in the fuel and moderator temperature fields. In these situations a meso-scale, pebble and compact scale, solution provides a good approximation of the fuel temperature. Micro-scale models are necessary in order to obtain accurate predictions in faster transients or when parameters internal to the TRISO are needed. Since these coated particles constitute one of the fundamental design barriers for the release of fission products, it becomes important to understand the transient behavior inside this containment system. An explicit TRISO fuel temperature model named THETRIS has been developed and incorporated into the CYNOD-THERMIX-KONVEK suite of coupled codes. The code includes gas release models that provide a simple predictive capability of the internal pressure during transients. The new model yields similar results to those obtained with other micro-scale fuel models, but with the added capability to analyze gas release, internal pressure buildup, and effects of a gap in the TRISO. The analyses show the instances when the micro-scale models improve the predictions of the fuel temperature and Doppler feedback. In addition, a sensitivity study of the potential effects on the transient behavior of high-temperature reactors due to the presence of a gap is included. Although the formation of a gap occurs under special conditions, its consequences on the dynamic behavior of the reactor can cause unexpected responses during fast transients. Nevertheless, the strong

  2. Endoscopic release of internal snapping hip: a review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Via, Alessio Giai; Basile, Attilio; Wainer, Mauricio; Musa, Carlos; Padulo, Johnny; Mardones, Rodrigo

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Internal snapping hip is a common clinical condition, characterized by an audible or palpable snap of the medial compartment of the hip. In most cases it is asymptomatic, while in a few patients, mostly in athletes who participate in activities requiring extremes of hip range of motion, the snap may become painful (internal snapping hip syndrome - ISHS). Materials and methods This is a review of current literature, focused on the pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment of ISHS. Conclusion The pathogenesis of ISHS is multifactorial, and it is traditionally believed to be caused by the tendon snapping over the anterior femoral head or the iliopectineal ridge. Most cases of ISHS resolve with conservative treatment, which includes avoidance of aggravating activities, stretching, and NSAIDs. In recalcitrant cases, surgery may be indicated. Better results have been reported with endoscopic iliopsoas tendon release compared with open techniques, which may be related to the treatment of concomitant intra-articular pathologies. Furthermore, endoscopic treatment showed fewer complications, decreased failure rate and postop erative pain. It is important to remember that in most cases, a multiple iliopsoas tendon may exist, and that the incomplete release of the iliopsoas tendon can be a reason for refractory pain and poor results. Then, even if of not clinical relevance at long term follow-up, patients should be told about the inevitable loss of flexion strength after iliopsoas tenotomy. Level of evidence II. PMID:28066743

  3. Gas Hydrates Research Programs: An International Review

    SciTech Connect

    Jorge Gabitto; Maria Barrufet

    2009-12-09

    Gas hydrates sediments have the potential of providing a huge amount of natural gas for human use. Hydrate sediments have been found in many different regions where the required temperature and pressure conditions have been satisfied. Resource exploitation is related to the safe dissociation of the gas hydrate sediments. Basic depressurization techniques and thermal stimulation processes have been tried in pilot efforts to exploit the resource. There is a growing interest in gas hydrates all over the world due to the inevitable decline of oil and gas reserves. Many different countries are interested in this valuable resource. Unsurprisingly, developed countries with limited energy resources have taken the lead in worldwide gas hydrates research and exploration. The goal of this research project is to collect information in order to record and evaluate the relative strengths and goals of the different gas hydrates programs throughout the world. A thorough literature search about gas hydrates research activities has been conducted. The main participants in the research effort have been identified and summaries of their past and present activities reported. An evaluation section discussing present and future research activities has also been included.

  4. Analysis of fission gas release in LWR fuel using the BISON code

    SciTech Connect

    G. Pastore; J.D. Hales; S.R. Novascone; D.M. Perez; B.W. Spencer; R.L. Williamson

    2013-09-01

    Recent advances in the development of the finite-element based, multidimensional fuel performance code BISON of Idaho National Laboratory are presented. Specifically, the development, implementation and testing of a new model for the analysis of fission gas behavior in LWR-UO2 fuel during irradiation are summarized. While retaining a physics-based description of the relevant mechanisms, the model is characterized by a level of complexity suitable for application to engineering-scale nuclear fuel analysis and consistent with the uncertainties pertaining to some parameters. The treatment includes the fundamental features of fission gas behavior, among which are gas diffusion and precipitation in fuel grains, growth and coalescence of gas bubbles at grain faces, grain growth and grain boundary sweeping effects, thermal, athermal, and transient gas release. The BISON code incorporating the new model is applied to the simulation of irradiation experiments from the OECD/NEA International Fuel Performance Experiments database, also included in the IAEA coordinated research projects FUMEX-II and FUMEX-III. The comparison of the results with the available experimental data at moderate burn-up is presented, pointing out an encouraging predictive accuracy, without any fitting applied to the model parameters.

  5. Gas retention and release behavior in Hanford double-shell waste tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, P.A.; Brewster, M.E.; Bryan, S.A.

    1997-05-01

    This report describes the current understanding of flammable gas retention and release in Hanford double-shell waste tanks AN-103, AN-104, AN-105, AW-101, SY-101, and SY-103. This knowledge is based on analyses, experimental results, and observations of tank behavior. The applicable data available from the void fraction instrument, retained gas sampler, ball rheometer, tank characterization, and field monitoring are summarized. Retained gas volumes and void fractions are updated with these new data. Using the retained gas compositions from the retained gas sampler, peak dome pressures during a gas burn are calculated as a function of the fraction of retained gas hypothetically released instantaneously into the tank head space. Models and criteria are given for gas generation, initiation of buoyant displacement, and resulting gas release; and predictions are compared with observed tank behavior.

  6. Effects of Globally Waste Disturbing Activities on Gas Generation, Retention, and Release in Hanford Waste Tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, Charles W.; Fountain, Matthew S.; Huckaby, James L.; Mahoney, Lenna A.; Meyer, Perry A.; Wells, Beric E.

    2005-08-02

    Various operations are authorized in Hanford single- and double-shell tanks that disturb all or a large fraction of the waste. These globally waste-disturbing activities have the potential to release a large fraction of the retained flammable gas and to affect future gas generation, retention, and release behavior. This report presents analyses of the expected flammable gas release mechanisms and the potential release rates and volumes resulting from these activities. The background of the flammable gas safety issue at Hanford is summarized, as is the current understanding of gas generation, retention, and release phenomena. Considerations for gas monitoring and assessment of the potential for changes in tank classification and steady-state flammability are given.

  7. International Natural Gas Model 2011, Model Documentation Report

    EIA Publications

    2013-01-01

    This report documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the International Natural Gas Model (INGM). It also catalogues and describes critical assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code.

  8. International Natural Gas Model 2011, Model Documentation Report

    EIA Publications

    2013-01-01

    This report documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the International Natural Gas Model (INGM). It also catalogues and describes critical assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code.

  9. Internal combustion engine for natural gas compressor operation

    DOEpatents

    Hagen, Christopher; Babbitt, Guy

    2016-12-27

    This application concerns systems and methods for compressing natural gas with an internal combustion engine. In a representative embodiment, a method is featured which includes placing a first cylinder of an internal combustion engine in a compressor mode, and compressing a gas within the first cylinder, using the cylinder as a reciprocating compressor. In some embodiments a compression check valve system is used to regulate pressure and flow within cylinders of the engine during a compression process.

  10. Gas turbine premixer with internal cooling

    DOEpatents

    York, William David; Johnson, Thomas Edward; Lacy, Benjamin Paul; Stevenson, Christian Xavier

    2012-12-18

    A system that includes a turbine fuel nozzle comprising an air-fuel premixer. The air-fuel premixed includes a swirl vane configured to swirl fuel and air in a downstream direction, wherein the swirl vane comprises an internal coolant path from a downstream end portion in an upstream direction through a substantial length of the swirl vane.

  11. Gas retention and release behavior in Hanford single-shell waste tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, C.W.; Brewster, M.E.; Gauglitz, P.A.; Mahoney, L.A.; Meyer, P.A.; Recknagle, K.P.; Reid, H.C.

    1996-12-01

    This report describes the current understanding of flammable gas retention and release in Hanford single-shell waste tanks based on theory, experimental results, and observations of tank behavior. The single-shell tanks likely to pose a flammable gas hazard are listed and described, and photographs of core extrusions and the waste surface are included. The credible mechanisms for significant flammable gas releases are described, and release volumes and rates are quantified as much as possible. The only mechanism demonstrably capable of producing large ({approximately}100 m{sup 3}) spontaneous gas releases is the buoyant displacement, which occurs only in tanks with a relatively deep layer of supernatant liquid. Only the double-shell tanks currently satisfy this condition. All release mechanisms believed plausible in single-shell tanks have been investigated, and none have the potential for large spontaneous gas releases. Only small spontaneous gas releases of several cubic meters are likely by these mechanisms. The reasons several other postulated gas release mechanisms are implausible or incredible are also given.

  12. Ocean circulation promotes methane release from gas hydrate outcrops at the NEPTUNE Canada Barkley Canyon node

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomsen, Laurenz; Barnes, Christopher; Best, Mairi; Chapman, Ross; Pirenne, Benoît; Thomson, Richard; Vogt, Joachim

    2012-08-01

    The NEPTUNE Canada cabled observatory network enables non-destructive, controlled experiments and time-series observations with mobile robots on gas hydrates and benthic community structure on a small plateau of about 1 km2 at a water depth of 870 m in Barkley Canyon, about 100 km offshore Vancouver Island, British Columbia. A mobile Internet operated vehicle was used as an instrument platform to monitor and study up to 2000 m2 of sediment surface in real-time. In 2010 the first mission of the robot was to investigate the importance of oscillatory deep ocean currents on methane release at continental margins. Previously, other experimental studies have indicated that methane release from gas hydrate outcrops is diffusion-controlled and should be much higher than seepage from buried hydrate in semipermeable sediments. Our results show that periods of enhanced bottom currents associated with diurnal shelf waves, internal semidiurnal tides, and also wind-generated near-inertial motions can modulate methane seepage. Flow dependent destruction of gas hydrates within the hydrate stability field is possible from enhanced bottom currents when hydrates are not covered by either seafloor biota or sediments. The calculated seepage varied between 40-400 μmol CH4 m-2 s-1. This is 1-3 orders of magnitude higher than dissolution rates of buried hydrates through permeable sediments and well within the experimentally derived range for exposed gas hydrates under different hydrodynamic boundary conditions. We conclude that submarine canyons which display high hydrodynamic activity can become key areas of enhanced seepage as a result of emerging weather patterns due to climate change.

  13. Dynamics of Crust Dissolution and Gas Release in Tank 241-SY-101

    SciTech Connect

    Rassat, Scot D.; Stewart, Charles W.; Wells, Beric E.; Kuhn, William L.; Antoniak, Zenen I.; Cuta, Judith M.; Recknagle, Kurtis P.; Terrones, Guillermo; Viswanathan, Vilayanur V.; Sukamto, Johanes H.; Mendoza, Donaldo P.

    2000-01-24

    Due primarily to an increase in floating crust thickness, the waste level in Tank 241-SY-101 has grown appreciably and the flammable gas volume stored in the crust has become a potential hazard. To remediate gas retention in the crust and the potential for buoyant displacement gas releases from the nonconvective layer at the bottom of the tank, SY-101 will be diluted to dissolve a large fraction of the solids that allow the waste to retain gas. The plan is to transfer some waste out and back-dilute with water in several steps. In this work, mechanisms and rates of waste solids dissolution and gas releases are evaluated theoretically and experimentally. Particular emphasis is given to crust dissolution processes and associated gas releases, although dissolution and gas release from the mixed-slurry and nonconvective layers are also considered. The release of hydrogen gas to the tank domespace is modeled for a number of scenarios. Under the tank conditions expected at the time of back-dilution, no plausible continuous or sudden gas release scenarios resulting in flammable hydrogen concentrations were identified.

  14. Capture and release of acid-gasses with acid-gas binding organic compounds

    DOEpatents

    Heldebrant, David J; Yonker, Clement R; Koech, Phillip K

    2015-03-17

    A system and method for acid-gas capture wherein organic acid-gas capture materials form hetero-atom analogs of alkyl-carbonate when contacted with an acid gas. These organic-acid gas capture materials include combinations of a weak acid and a base, or zwitterionic liquids. This invention allows for reversible acid-gas binding to these organic binding materials thus allowing for the capture and release of one or more acid gases. These acid-gas binding organic compounds can be regenerated to release the captured acid gasses and enable these organic acid-gas binding materials to be reused. This enables transport of the liquid capture compounds and the release of the acid gases from the organic liquid with significant energy savings compared to current aqueous systems.

  15. Internal combustion engine for natural gas compressor operation

    SciTech Connect

    Hagen, Christopher L.; Babbitt, Guy; Turner, Christopher; Echter, Nick; Weyer-Geigel, Kristina

    2016-04-19

    This application concerns systems and methods for compressing natural gas with an internal combustion engine. In a representative embodiment, a system for compressing a gas comprises a reciprocating internal combustion engine including at least one piston-cylinder assembly comprising a piston configured to travel in a cylinder and to compress gas in the cylinder in multiple compression stages. The system can further comprise a first pressure tank in fluid communication with the piston-cylinder assembly to receive compressed gas from the piston-cylinder assembly until the first pressure tank reaches a predetermined pressure, and a second pressure tank in fluid communication with the piston-cylinder assembly and the first pressure tank. The second pressure tank can be configured to receive compressed gas from the piston-cylinder assembly until the second pressure tank reaches a predetermined pressure. When the first and second pressure tanks have reached the predetermined pressures, the first pressure tank can be configured to supply gas to the piston-cylinder assembly, and the piston can be configured to compress the gas supplied by the first pressure tank such that the compressed gas flows into the second pressure tank.

  16. The International Pulsar Timing Array: First data release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verbiest, J. P. W.; Lentati, L.; Hobbs, G.; van Haasteren, R.; Demorest, P. B.; Janssen, G. H.; Wang, J.-B.; Desvignes, G.; Caballero, R. N.; Keith, M. J.; Champion, D. J.; Arzoumanian, Z.; Babak, S.; Bassa, C. G.; Bhat, N. D. R.; Brazier, A.; Brem, P.; Burgay, M.; Burke-Spolaor, S.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chatterjee, S.; Christy, B.; Cognard, I.; Cordes, J. M.; Dai, S.; Dolch, T.; Ellis, J. A.; Ferdman, R. D.; Fonseca, E.; Gair, J. R.; Garver-Daniels, N. E.; Gentile, P.; Gonzalez, M. E.; Graikou, E.; Guillemot, L.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Jones, G.; Karuppusamy, R.; Kerr, M.; Kramer, M.; Lam, M. T.; Lasky, P. D.; Lassus, A.; Lazarus, P.; Lazio, T. J. W.; Lee, K. J.; Levin, L.; Liu, K.; Lynch, R. S.; Lyne, A. G.; Mckee, J.; McLaughlin, M. A.; McWilliams, S. T.; Madison, D. R.; Manchester, R. N.; Mingarelli, C. M. F.; Nice, D. J.; Osłowski, S.; Palliyaguru, N. T.; Pennucci, T. T.; Perera, B. B. P.; Perrodin, D.; Possenti, A.; Petiteau, A.; Ransom, S. M.; Reardon, D.; Rosado, P. A.; Sanidas, S. A.; Sesana, A.; Shaifullah, G.; Shannon, R. M.; Siemens, X.; Simon, J.; Smits, R.; Spiewak, R.; Stairs, I. H.; Stappers, B. W.; Stinebring, D. R.; Stovall, K.; Swiggum, J. K.; Taylor, S. R.; Theureau, G.; Tiburzi, C.; Toomey, L.; Vallisneri, M.; van Straten, W.; Vecchio, A.; Wang, Y.; Wen, L.; You, X. P.; Zhu, W. W.; Zhu, X.-J.

    2016-05-01

    The highly stable spin of neutron stars can be exploited for a variety of (astro)physical investigations. In particular, arrays of pulsars with rotational periods of the order of milliseconds can be used to detect correlated signals such as those caused by gravitational waves. Three such `pulsar timing arrays' (PTAs) have been set up around the world over the past decades and collectively form the `International' PTA (IPTA). In this paper, we describe the first joint analysis of the data from the three regional PTAs, i.e. of the first IPTA data set. We describe the available PTA data, the approach presently followed for its combination and suggest improvements for future PTA research. Particular attention is paid to subtle details (such as underestimation of measurement uncertainty and long-period noise) that have often been ignored but which become important in this unprecedentedly large and inhomogeneous data set. We identify and describe in detail several factors that complicate IPTA research and provide recommendations for future pulsar timing efforts. The first IPTA data release presented here (and available online) is used to demonstrate the IPTA's potential of improving upon gravitational-wave limits placed by individual PTAs by a factor of ˜2 and provides a 2σ limit on the dimensionless amplitude of a stochastic gravitational-wave background of 1.7 × 10-15 at a frequency of 1 yr-1. This is 1.7 times less constraining than the limit placed by Shannon et al., due mostly to the more recent, high-quality data they used.

  17. Enhanced efficiency of internal combustion engines by employing spinning gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geyko, V. I.; Fisch, N. J.

    2014-08-01

    The efficiency of the internal combustion engine might be enhanced by employing spinning gas. A gas spinning at near sonic velocities has an effectively higher heat capacity, which allows practical fuel cycles, which are far from the Carnot efficiency, to approach more closely the Carnot efficiency. A remarkable gain in fuel efficiency is shown to be theoretically possible for the Otto and Diesel cycles. The use of a flywheel, in principle, could produce even greater increases in efficiency.

  18. Enhanced Efficiency of Internal Combustion Engines By Employing Spinning Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Geyko, Vasily; Fisch, Nathaniel

    2014-02-27

    The efficiency of the internal combustion engine might be enhanced by employing spinning gas. A gas spinning at near sonic velocities has an effectively higher heat capacity, which allows practical fuel cycles, which are far from the Carnot efficiency, to approach more closely the Carnot efficiency. A gain in fuel efficiency of several percent is shown to be theoretically possible for the Otto and Diesel cycles. The use of a flywheel, in principle, could produce even greater increases in the efficiency.

  19. Enhanced efficiency of internal combustion engines by employing spinning gas.

    PubMed

    Geyko, V I; Fisch, N J

    2014-08-01

    The efficiency of the internal combustion engine might be enhanced by employing spinning gas. A gas spinning at near sonic velocities has an effectively higher heat capacity, which allows practical fuel cycles, which are far from the Carnot efficiency, to approach more closely the Carnot efficiency. A remarkable gain in fuel efficiency is shown to be theoretically possible for the Otto and Diesel cycles. The use of a flywheel, in principle, could produce even greater increases in efficiency.

  20. Transition of RF internal antenna plasma by gas control

    SciTech Connect

    Hamajima, Takafumi; Yamauchi, Toshihiko; Kobayashi, Seiji; Hiruta, Toshihito; Kanno, Yoshinori

    2012-07-11

    The transition between the capacitively coupled plasma (CCP) and the inductively coupled plasma (ICP) was investigated with the internal radio frequency (RF) multi-turn antenna. The transition between them showed the hysteresis curve. The radiation power and the period of the self-pulse mode became small in proportion to the gas pressure. It was found that the ICP transition occurred by decreasing the gas pressure from 400 Pa.

  1. Editorial and Introduction of the Special Issue for the Ninth International Conference on Greenhouse Gas Control Technologies in the International Journal of Greenhouse Gas Control

    SciTech Connect

    Dooley, James J.; Benson, Sally M.; Karimjee, Anhar; Rubin, Edward S.

    2010-03-01

    Short one page editorial to introduce the +30 peer reviewed papers contained within the Special Issue for the Ninth International Conference on Greenhouse Gas Control Technologies in the International Journal of Greenhouse Gas Control

  2. Shale Gas in China: Prospects, Concerns, and Potential International Collaboration

    SciTech Connect

    Bazillian, Morgan; Pedersen, Ascha Lychett; Pless, Jacuelyn; Logan, Jeffrey; Medlock, Kenneth, III, O'Sullivan, Francis; Nakano, Jane

    2013-10-01

    Shale gas resource potential in China is assessed to be large, and its development could have wide-ranging economic, environmental, and energy security implications. Although commercial scale shale gas development has not yet begun in China, it holds the potential to change the global energy landscape. Chinese decision-makers are wrestling with the challenges associated with bringing the potential to reality: geologic complexity; infrastructure and logistical difficulties; technological, institutional, social and market development issues; and environmental impacts, including greenhouse gas emissions, impacts on water availability and quality, and air pollution. This paper briefly examines the current situation and outlook for shale gas in China, and explores existing and potential avenues for international cooperation. We find that despite some barriers to large-scale development, Chinese shale gas production has the potential to grow rapidly over the medium-term.

  3. 14 CFR § 1213.109 - News releases concerning international activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false News releases concerning international... ADMINISTRATION RELEASE OF INFORMATION TO NEWS AND INFORMATION MEDIA § 1213.109 News releases concerning... report all visits proposed by representatives of foreign news media to the Public Affairs Officer of the...

  4. Modeling fracture propagation and seafloor gas release during seafloor warming-induced hydrate dissociation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stranne, C.; O'Regan, M.; Jakobsson, M.

    2017-08-01

    The stability of marine methane hydrates and the potential release of methane gas to the ocean and atmosphere have received considerable attention in the past decade. Sophisticated hydraulic-thermodynamic models are increasingly being applied to investigate the dynamics of bottom water warming, hydrate dissociation, and gas escape from the seafloor. However, these models often lack geomechanical coupling and neglect how overpressure development and fracture propagation affect the timing, rate, and magnitude of methane escape. In this study we integrate a geomechanical coupling into the widely used TOUGH + Hydrate model. It is shown that such coupling is crucial in sediments with permeability ≤10-16 m2, as fracture formation dramatically affects rates of dissociation and seafloor gas release. The geomechanical coupling also results in highly nonlinear seafloor gas release, which presents an additional mechanism for explaining the widely observed episodic nature of gas flares from seafloor sediments in a variety of tectonic and oceanographic settings.

  5. Mechanistic analysis of double-shell tank gas release

    SciTech Connect

    Allemann, R.T.; Antoniak, Z.I.; Friley, J.R.; Haines, C.E.; Liljegren, L.M.; Somasundaram, S.

    1991-12-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is studying possible mechanisms and fluid dynamics contributing to the periodic release of gases from the double-shell waste storage tanks at Hanford. This study is being conducted for Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC), a contractor for the US Department of Energy (DOE). This interim report discusses the work done through November 1990. Safe management of the wastes at Hanford depends on an understanding of the chemical and physical mechanisms that take place in the waste tanks. An example of the need to understand these mechanisms is tank 101-SY. The waste in this tank is generating and periodically releasing potentially flammable gases into the tank vent system according to observations of the tank. How these gases are generated and become trapped, the causes of periodic release, and the mechanism of the release are not known in detail. In order to develop a safe mitigation strategy, possible physical mechanisms for the periodic release of flammable gases need to be understood.

  6. An approach for estimating toxic releases of H2S-containing natural gas.

    PubMed

    Jianwen, Zhang; Da, Lei; Wenxing, Feng

    2014-01-15

    China is well known being rich in sulfurous natural gas with huge deposits widely distributed all over the country. Due to the toxic nature, the release of hydrogen sulfide-containing natural gas from the pipelines intends to impose serious threats to the human, society and environment around the release sources. CFD algorithm is adopted to simulate the dispersion process of gas, and the results prove that Gaussian plume model is suitable for determining the affected region of the well blowout of sulfide hydrogen-containing natural gas. In accordance with the analysis of release scenarios, the present study proposes a new approach for estimating the risk of hydrogen sulfide poisoning hazards, as caused by sulfide-hydrogen-containing natural gas releases. Historical accident-statistical data from the EGIG (European Gas Pipeline Incident Data Group) and the Britain Gas Transco are integrated into the approach. Also, the dose-load effect is introduced to exploit the hazards' effects by two essential parameters - toxic concentration and exposure time. The approach was applied to three release scenarios occurring on the East-Sichuan Gas Transportation Project, and the individual risk and societal risk are classified and discussed. Results show that societal risk varies significantly with different factors, including population density, distance from pipeline, operating conditions and so on. Concerning the dispersion process of hazardous gas, available safe egress time was studied from the perspective of individual fatality risks. The present approach can provide reliable support for the safety management and maintenance of natural gas pipelines as well as evacuations that may occur after release incidents. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Bench-Scale Evaluation of Gas Ebullition On The Release of Contaminants From Sediments

    EPA Science Inventory

    The release of gas bubbles from sediments into overlying water (ebullition) is a major mechanism for the discharge of biogenic and geogenic gases into the water body. Microbial breakdown of sedimentary organic matter produces gas bubbles which are inherently hydrophobic and tend...

  8. Bench-Scale Evaluation of Gas Ebullition On The Release of Contaminants From Sediments

    EPA Science Inventory

    The release of gas bubbles from sediments into overlying water (ebullition) is a major mechanism for the discharge of biogenic and geogenic gases into the water body. Microbial breakdown of sedimentary organic matter produces gas bubbles which are inherently hydrophobic and tend...

  9. Calculation of gas release from DC and AC arc furnaces in a foundry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krutyanskii, M. M.; Nekhamin, S. M.; Rebikov, E. M.

    2016-12-01

    A procedure for the calculation of gas release from arc furnaces is presented. The procedure is based on the stoichiometric ratios of the oxidation of carbon in liquid iron during the oxidation heat period and the oxidation of iron from a steel charge by oxygen in the period of solid charge melting during the gas exchange of the furnace cavity with the external atmosphere.

  10. STS-39 Critical Ionization Velocity (CIV) gas release from OV-103 payload bay

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1991-05-06

    STS039-367-006 (1 May 1991) --- One of the four compressed gas canisters on the forward port side of Discovery's cargo bay releases gas on flight day 4 of the STS-39 mission. The canisters are part of STS-39's Critical Ionization Velocity (CIV) experiment.

  11. Exhaust gas recirculation method for internal combustion engines

    SciTech Connect

    Kawanabe, T.; Kimura, K.; Asakura, M.; Shiina, T.

    1988-07-19

    This patent describes a method of controlling exhaust gas recirculation in an internal combustion engine having an exhaust passage, an intake passage, an exhaust gas recirculating passage communicating the exhaust passage with the intake passage, and exhaust gas recirculating valve; and a transmission having a shift lever. The valve opening of the exhaust gas recirculating valve is controlled in response to operating conditions of the engine so as to regulate the amount of exhaust gas recirculation to values appropriate to the operating conditions of the engine. The method comprising the steps of (1) determining whether or not the engine is in at least one of a predetermined accelerating condition and a predetermined decelerating condition; (2) varying the valve opening of the exhaust gas recirculating valve by a predetermined value when the engine is determined to be in at least one of the predetermined accelerating condition and the predetermined decelerating condition; (3) detecting a position of the shift lever of the transmission; and (4) correcting the predetermined value in accordance with the detected position of the shift lever so as to increase the valve opening of the exhaust gas recirculating valve as the shift lever of the transmission is set to a higher speed position.

  12. Conditions for long-lasting gas eruptions: The 2013 event at Fiumicino International Airport (Rome, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giordano, G.; Carapezza, M. L.; Monica, G. Della; Todesco, M.; Tuccimei, P.; Carlucci, G.; De Benedetti, A. A.; Gattuso, A.; Lucchetti, C.; Piersanti, M.; Ranaldi, M.; Tarchini, L.; Pagliuca, N. M.; Ricci, T.; Facchini, S.; D'Ambrosio, F.; Misuraca, M.; Bonamico, A.; Geshi, N.

    2016-10-01

    A hazardous gas eruption from two very close shallow boreholes occurred near the Fiumicino International Airport of Roma (Italy) from August to December 2013. The erupted gas was mostly CO2 of deep origin and gas output was high and sustained over time reaching values of nearly 20 t day- 1. After 3 months, the gas flux was still above 5 t day- 1 and was only stopped in December 2013 by long and expensive works of closure of the boreholes. The gas eruption was uncommon as being associated with the building of two mud volcanoes. This style of sustained deep CO2 eruptions contrasts with the more common short-lived eruptions of shallow biogenic methane-dominated gas pockets. In this work, we present the chronology of the event, the results of geological, geochemical, and geophysical monitoring and a numerical modeling. We propose that the August-December 2013 sustained and prolonged event does not relate to the simple degassing of a shallow, isolated pocket of gas. On the contrary, it reflects very specific conditions in a shallow reservoir (hosted in a 10 m thick gravel layer at - 40 m within the Tiber river delta deposits), related to the interplay between the total pressure and the fraction of free CO2 initially present, across very narrow value ranges around 0.59 MPa and 0.18, respectively. The coexistence of short-lived and long-lived eruptions from the same reservoir suggest that these conditions are not achieved everywhere in the gas reservoir, despite its homogeneous properties. This consideration implies either a pressure compartmentalization of the reservoir, or the occurrence of a transient, possibly associated with an impulsive release of gas from greater depths. The involvement of deeper and larger gas reservoirs connected along faults is evidenced by geophysical investigations. This conceptual model bears significant implications for gas hazard studies.

  13. Dynamics of Crust Dissolution and Gas Release in Tank 241-SY-101

    SciTech Connect

    SD Rassat; CW Stewart; BE Wells; WL Kuhn; ZI Antoniak; JM Cuta; KP Recknagle; G Terrones; VV Viswanathan; JH Sukamto; DP Mendoza

    2000-01-26

    Due primarily to an increase in floating crust layer thickness, the waste level in Hanford Tank 241-SY-101 (SY-101) has grown appreciably, and the flammable gas volume stored in the crust has become a potential hazard. To remediate gas retention in the crust and the potential for buoyant displacement gas releases from the nonconnective layer at the bottom of the tank, SY-101 will be diluted to dissolve a large fraction of the solids that allow the waste to retain gas. In this work we develop understanding of the state of the tank waste and some of its physical properties, investigate how added water will be distributed in the tank and affect the waste, and use the information to evaluate mechanisms and rates of waste solids dissolution and gas release. This work was completed to address these questions and in support of planning and development of controls for the SY-101 Surface Level Rise Remediation Project. Particular emphasis is given to dissolution of and gas release from the crust, although the effects of back-dilution on all waste layers are addressed. The magnitude and rates of plausible gas release scenarios are investigated, and it is demonstrated that none of the identified mechanisms of continuous (dissolution-driven) or sudden gas release, even with conservative assumptions, lead to domespace hydrogen concentrations exceeding the lower flammability limit. This report documents the results of studies performed in 1999 to address the issues of the dynamics, of crust dissolution and gas release in SY-101. It contains a brief introduction to the issues at hand; a summary of our knowledge of the SY-101 crust and other waste properties, including gas fractions, strength and volubility; a description of the buoyancy and dissolution models that are applied to predict the crust response to waste transfers and back dilution; and a discussion of the effectiveness of mixing for water added below the crust and the limited potential for significant stratification

  14. Swelling and gas release in oxide fuels during fast temperature transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dollins, C. C.; Jursich, M.

    1982-05-01

    A previously reported intergranular swelling and gas release model for oxide fuels has been modified to predict fission gas behavior during fast temperature transients. Under steady state or slowly varying conditions it has been assumed in the previous model that the pressure caused by the fission gas within the gas bubbles is in equilibrium with the surface tension of the bubbles. During a fast transient, however, net vacancy migration to the bubbles may be insufficient to maintain this equilibrium. In order to ascertain the net vacancy flow, it is necessary to model the point defect behavior in the fuel. Knowing the net flow of vacancies to the bubble and the bubble size, the bubble diffusivity can be determined and the long range migration of the gas out of the fuel can be calculated. The model has also been modified to allow release of all the gas on the grain boundaries during a fast temperature transient. The gas release predicted by the revised model shows good agreement to fast transient gas release data from an EBR-II TREAT H-3 (Transient Reactor Test Facility) test. Agreement has also been obtained between predictions using the model and gas release data obtained by Argonne National Laboratory from out-of-reactor transient heating experiments on irradiated UO 2. It was found necessary to increase the gas bubble diffusivity used in the model by a factor of thirty during the transient to provide agreement between calculations and measurements. Other workers have also found that such an increase is necessary for agreement and attribute the increased diffusivity to yielding at the bubble surface due to the increased pressure.

  15. Internal flows of relevance to gas-turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuirk, J. J.; Whitelaw, J. H.

    An attempt is made to formulate the best combination of equations, numerical discretization, and turbulence modeling assumptions for internal aerodynamic flows relevant to gas turbines. Typical of the problems treated are the solution of the three-dimensional, time-averaged Navier-Stokes equations for laminar and turbulent flow in 90-deg bends, and the relative advantages obtainable from parabolized forms in bends, in S-type intake ducts, in turbine blade passages, and in forced mixers. In the present discussion of the influence of numerical assumptions on the calculation of isothermal flow in gas turbine combustors, emphasis is given to the assessment and removal of numerical errors.

  16. Prediction of strongly-heated internal gas flows

    SciTech Connect

    McEligot, D.M. ||; Shehata, A.M.; Kunugi, Tomoaki |

    1997-12-31

    The purposes of the present article are to remind practitioners why the usual textbook approaches may not be appropriate for treating gas flows heated from the surface with large heat fluxes and to review the successes of some recent applications of turbulence models to this case. Simulations from various turbulence models have been assessed by comparison to the measurements of internal mean velocity and temperature distributions by Shehata for turbulent, laminarizing and intermediate flows with significant gas property variation. Of about fifteen models considered, five were judged to provide adequate predictions.

  17. Numerical simulation of high pressure release and dispersion of hydrogen into air with real gas model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaksarfard, R.; Kameshki, M. R.; Paraschivoiu, M.

    2010-06-01

    Hydrogen is a renewable and clean source of energy, and it is a good replacement for the current fossil fuels. Nevertheless, hydrogen should be stored in high-pressure reservoirs to have sufficient energy. An in-house code is developed to numerically simulate the release of hydrogen from a high-pressure tank into ambient air with more accuracy. Real gas models are used to simulate the flow since high-pressure hydrogen deviates from ideal gas law. Beattie-Bridgeman and Abel Noble equations are applied as real gas equation of state. A transport equation is added to the code to calculate the concentration of the hydrogen-air mixture after release. The uniqueness of the code is to simulate hydrogen in air release with the real gas model. Initial tank pressures of up to 70 MPa are simulated.

  18. Gas release during salt well pumping: model predictions and comparisons to laboratory experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Peurrung, L.M.; Caley, S.M.; Bian, E.Y.; Gauglitz, P.A.

    1996-09-01

    The Hanford Site has 149 single-shell tanks (SSTs) containing radioactive wastes that are complex mixes of radioactive and chemical products. Some of these wastes are known to generate mixtures of flammable gases, including hydrogen, nitrous oxide, and ammonia. Nineteen of these SSTs have been placed on the Flammable Gas Watch List (FGWL) because they are known or suspected, in all but one case, to retain these flammable gases. Salt well pumping to remove the interstitial liquid from SSTs is expected to cause the release of much of the retained gas, posing a number of safety concerns. Research at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has sought to quantify the release of flammable gases during salt well pumping operations. This study is being conducted for Westinghouse Hanford Company as part of the PNNL Flammable Gas Project. Understanding and quantifying the physical mechanisms and waste properties that govern gas release during salt well pumping will help to resolve the associated safety issues.

  19. Preventing Buoyant Displacement Gas Release Events in Hanford Double-Shell Waste Tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Perry A.; Stewart, Charles W.

    2001-01-01

    This report summarizes the predictive methods used to ensure that waste transfer operations in Hanford waste tanks do not create waste configurations that lead to unsafe gas release events. The gas release behavior of the waste in existing double-shell tanks has been well characterized, and the flammable gas safety issues associated with safe storage of waste in the current configuration are being formally resolved. However, waste is also being transferred between double-shell tanks and from single-shell tanks into double-shell tanks by saltwell pumping and sluicing that create new wastes and waste configurations that have not been studied as well. Additionally, planning is underway for various waste transfer scenarios to support waste feed delivery to the proposed vitrification plant. It is critical that such waste transfers do not create waste conditions with the potential for dangerous gas release events.

  20. Characteristics of pollutant gas releases from swine, dairy, beef, and layer manure, and municipal wastewater.

    PubMed

    Dai, Xiao-Rong; Saha, Chayan Kumer; Ni, Ji-Qin; Heber, Albert J; Blanes-Vidal, Victoria; Dunn, James L

    2015-06-01

    Knowledge about characteristics of gas releases from various types of organic wastes can assist in developing gas pollution reduction technologies and establishing environmental regulations. Five different organic wastes, i.e., four types of animal manure (swine, beef, dairy, and layer hen) and municipal wastewater, were studied for their characteristics of ammonia (NH3), carbon dioxide (CO2), hydrogen sulfide (H2S), and sulfur dioxide (SO2) releases for 38 or 43 days in reactors under laboratory conditions. Weekly waste additions and continuous reactor headspace ventilation were supplied to simulate waste storage conditions. Results demonstrated that among the five waste types, layer hen manure and municipal wastewater had the highest and lowest NH3 release potentials, respectively. Layer manure had the highest and dairy manure had the lowest CO2 release potentials. Dairy manure and layer manure had the highest and lowest H2S release potentials, respectively. Beef manure and layer manure had the highest and lowest SO2 releases, respectively. The physicochemical characteristics of the different types of wastes, especially the total nitrogen, total ammoniacal nitrogen, dry matter, and pH, had strong influence on the releases of the four gases. Even for the same type of waste, the variation in physicochemical characteristics affected the gas releases remarkably.

  1. Hydrocarbon Release During Fuel Storage and Transfer at Gas Stations: Environmental and Health Effects.

    PubMed

    Hilpert, Markus; Mora, Bernat Adria; Ni, Jian; Rule, Ana M; Nachman, Keeve E

    2015-12-01

    At gas stations, fuel is stored and transferred between tanker trucks, storage tanks, and vehicle tanks. During both storage and transfer, a small fraction of unburned fuel is typically released to the environment unless pollution prevention technology is used. While the fraction may be small, the cumulative release can be substantial because of the large quantities of fuel sold. The cumulative release of unburned fuel is a public health concern because gas stations are widely distributed in residential areas and because fuel contains toxic and carcinogenic chemicals. We review the pathways through which gasoline is chronically released to atmospheric, aqueous, and subsurface environments, and how these releases may adversely affect human health. Adoption of suitable pollution prevention technology should not only be based on equipment and maintenance cost but also on energy- and health care-saving benefits.

  2. Recently released EIA report presents international forecasting data

    SciTech Connect

    1995-05-01

    This report presents information from the Energy Information Administration (EIA). Articles are included on international energy forecasting data, data on the use of home appliances, gasoline prices, household energy use, and EIA information products and dissemination avenues.

  3. Pressure Systems Energy Release Protection (Gas Pressurized Systems)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, S. J. (Editor)

    1986-01-01

    A survey of studies into hazards associated with closed or pressurized system rupture and preliminary guidelines for the performance design of primary, secondary, and protective receptors of these hazards are provided. The hazards discussed in the survey are: blast, fragments, ground motion, heat radiation, biological, and chemical. Performance guidelines for receptors are limited to pressurized systems that contain inert gas. The performance guidelines for protection against the remaining unaddressed degenerative hazards are to be covered in another study.

  4. Modeling of modification experiments involving neutral-gas release

    SciTech Connect

    Bernhardt, P.A.

    1983-01-01

    Many experiments involve the injection of neutral gases into the upper atmosphere. Examples are critical velocity experiments, MHD wave generation, ionospheric hole production, plasma striation formation, and ion tracing. Many of these experiments are discussed in other sessions of the Active Experiments Conference. This paper limits its discussion to: (1) the modeling of the neutral gas dynamics after injection, (2) subsequent formation of ionosphere holes, and (3) use of such holes as experimental tools.

  5. Fission-gas release from uranium nitride at high fission rate density

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinstein, M. B.; Kirchgessner, T. A.; Tambling, T. N.

    1973-01-01

    A sweep gas facility has been used to measure the release rates of radioactive fission gases from small UN specimens irradiated to 8-percent burnup at high fission-rate densities. The measured release rates have been correlated with an equation whose terms correspond to direct recoil release, fission-enhanced diffusion, and atomic diffusion (a function of temperature). Release rates were found to increase linearly with burnups between 1.5 and 8 percent. Pore migration was observed after operation at 1550 K to over 6 percent burnup.

  6. STS-39 Critical Ionization Velocity (CIV) gas release from OV-103 payload bay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    A plume of nitrous oxide gas is released from a compressed gas canister mounted on the increased capacity adaptive payload carrier 1 (ICAPC-1) on the forward port side of Discovery's, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103's, payload bay (PLB). The gas release is part of the Critical Ionization Velocity (CIV) experiment conducted during STS-39. The Shuttle Pallet Satellite II (SPAS-II) 'parked' about two kilometers (km) away, is taking infrared, visible, and ultraviolet radiometric spatial, spectral, and temporal measurements of the gas plumes. Surrounding the CIV ICAPC-1 are: the ICAPC-2 payload support subsystem, radiometer, and Langmuir probe also mounted on the port side; the Space Test Payload 1 (STP-1) multipurpose experiment support structure (MPESS) (just beyond gas beam); and the Air Force Program 675 (AFP-675) experiment support structure (ESS).

  7. STS-39 Critical Ionization Velocity (CIV) gas release from OV-103 payload bay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    A plume of nitrous oxide gas is released from a compressed gas canister mounted on the increased capacity adaptive payload carrier 1 (ICAPC-1) on the forward port side of Discovery's, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103's, payload bay (PLB). The gas release is part of the Critical Ionization Velocity (CIV) experiment conducted during STS-39. The Shuttle Pallet Satellite II (SPAS-II) 'parked' about two kilometers (km) away, is taking infrared, visible, and ultraviolet radiometric spatial, spectral, and temporal measurements of the gas plumes. Surrounding the CIV ICAPC-1 are: the ICAPC-2 payload support subsystem, radiometer, and Langmuir probe also mounted on the port side; the Space Test Payload 1 (STP-1) multipurpose experiment support structure (MPESS) (just beyond gas beam); and the Air Force Program 675 (AFP-675) experiment support structure (ESS).

  8. A review of selected aspects of the effect of water vapor on fission gas release from uranium oxycarbide

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, B.F.

    1994-04-01

    A selective review is presented of previous measurements and the analysis of experiments on the effect of water vapor on fission gas release from uranium oxycarbide. Evidence for the time-dependent composition of the uranium oxycarbide fuel; the diffusional release of fission gas; and the initial, rapid and limited release of stored fission gas is discussed. In regard to the initial, rapid release of fission gas, clear restrictions on mechanistic hypotheses can be deduced from the experimental data. However, more fundamental experiments may be required to establish the mechanism of the rapid release.

  9. Internal friction and gas desorption of {C}/{C} composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serizawa, H.; Sato, S.; Kohyama, A.

    1994-09-01

    {C}/{C} composites are the most promising candidates as high heat flux component materials, where temperature dependence of mechanical properties and gas desorption behavior at elevated temperature are important properties. At the beginning, the newly developed internal friction measurement apparatus, which enables the accurate measurement of dynamic elastic properties up to 1373 K along with the measurement of gas desorption behavior, was used. The materials studied were unidirectional (UD) {C}/{C} composites reinforced with mesophase pitch-based carbon fibers, which were heat treated at temperatures ranging from 1473 to 2773 K which produced a variety of graphitized microstructures. Two-dimensional (2D) {C}/{C} composites reinfored with flat woven fabrics of PAN type carbon fibers were also studied. These materials were heat treated at 1873 K. From the temperature spectrum of internal friction of 2D {C}/{C} composites, these internal friction peaks were detected and were related to gas desorption. Also the temperature dependence of Young's modulus of UD {C}/{C} composites, negative and positive dependence of Young's modulus were observed reflecting microstructure changes resulting from the heat treatments.

  10. Gas hydrate formation in the deep sea: In situ experiments with controlled release of methane, natural gas, and carbon dioxide

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brewer, P.G.; Orr, F.M.; Friederich, G.; Kvenvolden, K.A.; Orange, D.L.

    1998-01-01

    We have utilized a remotely operated vehicle (ROV) to initiate a program of research into gas hydrate formation in the deep sea by controlled release of hydrocarbon gases and liquid CO2 into natural sea water and marine sediments. Our objectives were to investigate the formation rates and growth patterns of gas hydrates in natural systems and to assess the geochemical stability of the reaction products over time. The novel experimental procedures used the carrying capacity, imaging capability, and control mechanisms of the ROV to transport gas cylinders to depth and to open valves selectively under desired P-T conditions to release the gas either into contained natural sea water or into sediments. In experiments in Monterey Bay, California, at 910 m depth and 3.9??C water temperature we find hydrate formation to be nearly instantaneous for a variety of gases. In sediments the pattern of hydrate formation is dependent on the pore size, with flooding of the pore spaces in a coarse sand yielding a hydrate cemented mass, and gas channeling in a fine-grained mud creating a veined hydrate structure. In experiments with liquid CO2 the released globules appeared to form a hydrate skin as they slowly rose in the apparatus. An initial attempt to leave the experimental material on the sea floor for an extended period was partially successful; we observed an apparent complete dissolution of the liquid CO2 mass, and an apparent consolidation of the CH4 hydrate, over a period of about 85 days.

  11. 78 FR 63562 - Notice of Request To Release Airport Property at Charleston International Airport, Charleston...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-24

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Notice of Request To Release Airport Property at Charleston International Airport, Charleston, South Carolina AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice... sale of three parcels totaling 266.954-acres of airport property located at the...

  12. Reduction of prostate intrafraction motion using gas-release rectal balloons

    SciTech Connect

    Su Zhong; Zhao Tianyu; Li Zuofeng; Hoppe, Brad; Henderson, Randy; Mendenhall, William; Nichols, R. Charles; Marcus, Robert; Mendenhall, Nancy

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: To analyze prostate intrafraction motion using both non-gas-release (NGR) and gas-release (GR) rectal balloons and to evaluate the ability of GR rectal balloons to reduce prostate intrafraction motion. Methods: Twenty-nine patients with NGR rectal balloons and 29 patients with GR balloons were randomly selected from prostate patients treated with proton therapy at University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute (Jacksonville, FL). Their pretreatment and post-treatment orthogonal radiographs were analyzed, and both pretreatment setup residual error and intrafraction-motion data were obtained. Population histograms of intrafraction motion were plotted for both types of balloons. Population planning target-volume (PTV) margins were calculated with the van Herk formula of 2.5{Sigma}+ 0.7{sigma} to account for setup residual errors and intrafraction motion errors. Results: Pretreatment and post-treatment radiographs indicated that the use of gas-release rectal balloons reduced prostate intrafraction motion along superior-inferior (SI) and anterior-posterior (AP) directions. Similar patient setup residual errors were exhibited for both types of balloons. Gas-release rectal balloons resulted in PTV margin reductions from 3.9 to 2.8 mm in the SI direction, 3.1 to 1.8 mm in the AP direction, and an increase from 1.9 to 2.1 mm in the left-right direction. Conclusions: Prostate intrafraction motion is an important uncertainty source in radiotherapy after image-guided patient setup with online corrections. Compared to non-gas-release rectal balloons, gas-release balloons can reduce prostate intrafraction motion in the SI and AP directions caused by gas buildup.

  13. Modeling the flow regime near the source in underwater gas releases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Premathilake, Lakshitha T.; Yapa, Poojitha D.; Nissanka, Indrajith D.; Kumarage, Pubudu

    2016-12-01

    Recent progress in calculating gas bubble sizes in a plume, based on phenomenological approaches using the release conditions is a significant improvement to make the gas plume models self-reliant. Such calculations require details of conditions Near the Source of Plume (NSP); (i.e. the plume/jet velocity and radius near the source), which inspired the present work. Determining NSP conditions for gas plumes are far more complex than that for oil plumes due to the substantial density difference between gas and water. To calculate NSP conditions, modeling the early stage of the plume is important. A novel method of modeling the early stage of an underwater gas release is presented here. Major impact of the present work is to define the correct NSP conditions for underwater gas releases, which is not possible with available methods as those techniques are not based on the physics of flow region near the source of the plume/jet. We introduce super Gaussian profiles to model the density and velocity variations of the early stages of plume, coupled with the laws of fluid mechanics to define profile parameters. This new approach, models the velocity profile variation from near uniform, across the section at the release point to Gaussian some distance away. The comparisons show that experimental data agrees well with the computations.

  14. 76 FR 54287 - Notice of Intent To Release Federally-Obligated Airport Properties, Tampa International Airport...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-31

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Notice of Intent To Release Federally-Obligated Airport Properties, Tampa International Airport, Tampa, FL AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Request for public comment. SUMMARY: The FAA hereby provides notice of intent to release certain airport properties,...

  15. Detergent release prolongs the lifetime of native-like membrane protein conformations in the gas-phase.

    PubMed

    Borysik, Antoni J; Hewitt, Dominic J; Robinson, Carol V

    2013-04-24

    Recent studies have suggested that detergents can protect the structure of membrane proteins during their transition from solution to the gas-phase. Here we provide mechanistic insights into this process by interrogating the structures of membrane protein-detergent assemblies in the gas-phase using ion mobility mass spectrometry. We show a clear correlation between the population of native-like protein conformations and the degree of detergent attachment to the protein in the gas-phase. Interrogation of these protein-detergent assemblies, by tandem mass spectrometry, enables us to define the mechanism by which detergents preserve native-like protein conformations in a solvent free environment. We show that the release of detergent is more central to the survival of these conformations than the physical presence of detergent bound to the protein. We propose that detergent release competes with structural collapse for the internal energy of the ion and permits the observation of transient native-like membrane protein conformations that are otherwise lost to structural rearrangement in the gas-phase.

  16. PolyPole-1: An accurate numerical algorithm for intra-granular fission gas release

    SciTech Connect

    Pizzocri, D.; Rabiti, C.; Luzzi, L.; Barani, T.; Van Uffelen, P.; Pastore, G.

    2016-09-01

    This paper describes the development of a new numerical algorithm (called PolyPole-1) to efficiently solve the equation for intra-granular fission gas release in nuclear fuel. The work was carried out in collaboration with Politecnico di Milano and Institute for Transuranium Elements. The PolyPole-1 algorithms is being implemented in INL's fuels code BISON code as part of BISON's fission gas release model. The transport of fission gas from within the fuel grains to the grain boundaries (intra-granular fission gas release) is a fundamental controlling mechanism of fission gas release and gaseous swelling in nuclear fuel. Hence, accurate numerical solution of the corresponding mathematical problem needs to be included in fission gas behaviour models used in fuel performance codes. Under the assumption of equilibrium between trapping and resolution, the process can be described mathematically by a single diffusion equation for the gas atom concentration in a grain. In this work, we propose a new numerical algorithm (PolyPole-1) to efficiently solve the fission gas diffusion equation in time-varying conditions. The PolyPole-1 algorithm is based on the analytic modal solution of the diffusion equation for constant conditions, with the addition of polynomial corrective terms that embody the information on the deviation from constant conditions. The new algorithm is verified by comparing the results to a finite difference solution over a large number of randomly generated operation histories. Furthermore, comparison to state-of-the-art algorithms used in fuel performance codes demonstrates that the accuracy of the PolyPole-1 solution is superior to other algorithms, with similar computational effort. Finally, the concept of PolyPole-1 may be extended to the solution of the general problem of intra-granular fission gas diffusion during non-equilibrium trapping and resolution, which will be the subject of future work.

  17. Internal sleeve air release control apparatus in seismic air gun

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, R.C.; Thomson, J.T.

    1981-01-27

    Disclosed is a seismic source device, known in the industry as an air gun, having internal sleeve and shuttle control for allowing a predetermined discharge of compressed air into water for purposes of seismic exploration. The shuttle engages an internal sleeve having ports that momentarily align with exhaust ports and then moves past, sealing off the exhaust ports before all of the compressed air in the firing chamber of the air gun is exhausted. By preventing further discharge of air with little or no loss in acoustic output, pulses are greatly reduced, thereby enhancing the operation of the entire system. Further by preventing all the air in the firing chamber from being discharged, the system becomes more efficient and more cost effective.

  18. Determination of fission gas release of spent nuclear fuel in puncturing test and in leaching experiments under anoxic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Robles, E.; Metz, V.; Wegen, D. H.; Herm, M.; Papaioannou, D.; Bohnert, E.; Gretter, R.; Müller, N.; Nasyrow, R.; de Weerd, W.; Wiss, T.; Kienzler, B.

    2016-10-01

    During reactor operation the fission gases Kr and Xe are formed within the UO2 matrix of nuclear fuel. Their quantification is important to evaluate their impact on critical parameters regarding the fuel behaviour during irradiation and (long-term) interim storage, such as internal pressure of the fuel rod and fuel swelling. Moreover the content of Kr and Xe in the plenum of a fuel rod and their content in the UO2 fuel itself are widely used as indicators for the release properties of 129I, 137Cs, and other safety relevant radionuclides with respect to final disposal of spent nuclear fuel. The present study deals with the fission gas release from spent nuclear fuel exposed to simulated groundwater in comparison with the fission gas previously released to the fuel rod plenum during irradiation in reactor. In a unique approach we determined both the Kr and Xe inventories in the plenum by means of a puncturing test and in leaching experiments with a cladded fuel pellet and fuel fragments in bicarbonate water under 3.2 bar H2 overpressure. The fractional inventory of the fission gases released during irradiation into the plenum was (8.3 ± 0.9) %. The fraction of inventory of fission gases released during the leaching experiments was (17 ± 2) % after 333 days of leaching of the cladded pellet and (25 ± 2) % after 447 days of leaching of the fuel fragments, respectively. The relatively high release of fission gases in the experiment with fuel fragments was caused by the increased accessibility of water to the Kr and Xe occluded in the fuel.

  19. The Effects of Neutral Gas Release on Vehicle Charging: Experiment and Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, D. N.; Amatucci, W. E.; Bowles, J. H.; Fernsler, R. F.; Siefring, C. L.; Antoniades, J. A.; Keskinen, M. J.

    1998-11-01

    This paper describes an experimental and theoretical research effort related to the mitigation of spacecraft charging by Neutral Gas Release (NGR). The Space Power Experiments Aboard Rockets programs (SPEAR I and III) [Mandel et al., 1998; Berg et al., 1995] and other earlier efforts have demonstrated that NGR is an effective method of controlling discharges in space. The laboratory experimentswere conducted in the large volume Space Physics Simulation Chamber (SPSC) at the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL). A realistic near-earth space environment can be simulated in this device for whichminimumscalingneeds to be performedtorelate the data to space plasma regimes. This environment is similar to that encountered by LEO spacecraft, e.g., the Space Station, Shuttle, and high inclination satellites. The experimental arrangement consists of an aluminum cylinder which can be biased to high negative voltage (0.4 kVgas release valve designed for millisec release times, a pressure-regulated neutral gas reservoir, and variable Mach number nozzles. After the cylinder is charged to high voltage, the neutral gas is released, inducing a breakdown of the gas in the strong electric field about the cylinder. Collection of ions from the newly created dense plasma, along with secondary electron emission from the cylinder surface, provide the return current necessary for grounding the body. The theoretical treatment assumes a simple Townsend discharge along with the fundamental assumption of exponential electron growth in an avalanche fashion as one proceeds from the cathode toward the anode during neutral gas breakdown in the presence of high potentials. In addition the nozzle release of neutral gas is modeled and a simple linear spatial dependence of the applied potential is assumed. This basic model produces quite good results when compared to the experiment.

  20. Hybrid continuum-molecular modelling of multiscale internal gas flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patronis, Alexander; Lockerby, Duncan A.; Borg, Matthew K.; Reese, Jason M.

    2013-12-01

    We develop and apply an efficient multiscale method for simulating a large class of low-speed internal rarefied gas flows. The method is an extension of the hybrid atomistic-continuum approach proposed by Borg et al. (2013) [28] for the simulation of micro/nano flows of high-aspect ratio. The major new extensions are: (1) incorporation of fluid compressibility; (2) implementation using the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method for dilute rarefied gas flows, and (3) application to a broader range of geometries, including periodic, non-periodic, pressure-driven, gravity-driven and shear-driven internal flows. The multiscale method is applied to micro-scale gas flows through a periodic converging-diverging channel (driven by an external acceleration) and a non-periodic channel with a bend (driven by a pressure difference), as well as the flow between two eccentric cylinders (with the inner rotating relative to the outer). In all these cases there exists a wide variation of Knudsen number within the geometries, as well as substantial compressibility despite the Mach number being very low. For validation purposes, our multiscale simulation results are compared to those obtained from full-scale DSMC simulations: very close agreement is obtained in all cases for all flow variables considered. Our multiscale simulation is an order of magnitude more computationally efficient than the full-scale DSMC for the first and second test cases, and two orders of magnitude more efficient for the third case.

  1. Gas Releases During Saltcake Dissolution for Retrieval of Single-Shell Tank Waste

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, Charles W.

    2001-07-31

    It is possible to retrieve a large fraction of soluble waste from the Hanford single-shell waste tanks (SST) by dissolving it with water. This retrieval method will be demonstrated in U-107 and S-112 in the next few years. If saltcake dissolution proves practical and effective, many of the saltcake SSTs may be retrieved by this method. Many of the SSTs retain a large volume of flammable gas that will be released into the tank headspace as the waste dissolves. This report describes the physical processes that control dissolution and gas release. Calculation results are shown describing the headspace hydrogen concentration transient during dissolution. The observed spontaneous and induced gas releases from SSTs is summarized and the dissolution of the crust layer in SY-101 is discussed as a recent example of full-scale dissolution of saltcake containing a very large volume of retained gas. The report concludes that the dissolution rate is self limiting and gas release rates are relatively low.

  2. Gas Releases During Saltcake Dissolution for Retrieval of Single-Shell Tank Waste, Rev. 1

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, Charles W.

    2001-12-28

    It is possible to retrieve a large fraction of soluble waste from the Hanford single-shell waste tanks (SSTs) by dissolving it with water. This retrieval method will be demonstrated in Tanks U-107 and S-112 in the next few years. If saltcake dissolution proves practical and effective, many of the saltcake SSTs may be retrieved by this method. Many of the SSTs retain flammable gas that will be released into the tank headspace as the waste dissolves. This report describes the physical processes that control dissolution and gas release. Calculation results are shown and describe how the headspace hydrogen concentration evolves during dissolution. The observed spontaneous and induced gas releases from SSTs are summarized, and the dissolution of the crust layer in SY-101 is discussed as a recent example of full-scale dissolution of saltcake containing a large volume of retained gas. The report concludes that the dissolution rate is self-limiting and that gas release rates are relatively low.

  3. Measurement and analysis of fission gas release from BNFL's SBR MOX fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, R. J.; Fisher, S. B.; Cook, P. M. A.; Stratton, R.; Walker, C. T.; Palmer, I. D.

    2001-01-01

    Puncture results are presented for seven SBR MOX fuel rods from the first prototypical commercial irradiation that was carried out in the Beznau-1 PWR. The rod average burn-up ranged from 31.2 to 35.6 MWd/kgHM. Comparison is made with the percentage of gas released from French MOX fuels and UO 2 fuel. The results show that in the burn-up range investigated, SBR MOX fuel and MIMAS MOX fuel perform similarly, releasing up to about 1% of the fission gas inventory. Comparisons with the Halden Criterion show that SBR MOX has the same release threshold as UO 2 and this suggests that the mechanisms of release in the two fuels are similar. This is further supported by calculations made with the ENIGMA fuel performance code. It is concluded that the apparent differences in fission gas release between SBR MOX and UO 2 fuel, at least in the early stages of release, can be explained by the higher temperatures experienced by MOX fuel.

  4. Hydrostatic support sleeve and gas release probe. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    The very bottom line of our year's study, as shown on the detail graphs and analysis, is that the two prototypes showed a total increase of 1013%, which thus makes the average production increase 84.5%. The energy savings was similarly rewarding. On the total of 12 test units there was realized a total energy savings of 556%, with an average energy saving of 44.3% per unit. It is the theory of both this inventor and those field men with whom we have worked that with the increased carbon dioxide injections into the formations there will soon be significant problems with such gases. In those wells, as well as ones afflicted with natural gas, the pumps tested in this project will be, without a doubt, beneficial. It is estimated that there is an excellent market at the present time, and will continue to increase in the future. As an example, several producers have recently shut down wells of marginal quality and quantity due to the oil glut. However, one cannot reasonably expect that glut to continue, and in the future when those wells are reactivated, it would be appropriate to equip them with these new pump designs, which would increase production if reserves existed, and still decrease the cost to them by doing so. 2 figs.

  5. EQUATIONS FOR GAS RELEASING PROCESS FROM PRESSURIZED VESSELS IN ODH EVALUATION.

    SciTech Connect

    JIA,L.X.; WANG,L.

    2001-07-16

    IN THE EVALUATION OF ODH, THE CALCULATION OF THE SPILL RATE FROM THE PRESSURIZED VESSEL IS THE CENTRAL TASK. THE ACCURACY OF THE ENGINEERING ESTIMATION BECOMES ONE OF THE SAFETY DESIGN ISSUES. THIS PAPER SUMMARIZES THE EQUATIONS FOR THE OXYGEN CONCENTRATION CALCULATION IN DIFFERENT CASES, AND DISCUSSES THE EQUATIONS FOR THE GAS RELEASE PROCESS CALCULATION BOTH FOR THE HIGH-PRESSURE GAS TANK AND THE LOW-TEMPERATURE LIQUID CONTAINER.

  6. Laboratory Measurements of Oxygen Gas Release from Basaltic Minerals Exposed to UV- Radiation: Implications for the Viking Gas Exchange Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurowitz, J. A.; Yen, A. S.

    2007-12-01

    The biology experiments onboard the Viking Landers determined that the Martian soils at Chryse and Utopia Planitia contain an unknown chemical compound of a highly oxidizing nature. The Gas Exchange Experiments (GEx) demonstrated that the humidification of a 1-cc Martian soil sample resulted in the production of as much as 790 nanomoles of oxygen gas. Yen et al. (2000) have provided experimental evidence that superoxide radicals can be generated on plagioclase feldspar (labradorite) grain surfaces by exposure to ultraviolet (UV) light in the presence of oxygen gas. Adsorbed superoxide radicals are thought to react readily with water vapor, and produce oxygen gas in quantities sufficient to explain the Viking GEx results. Direct evidence for the formation of oxygen gas, however, was not provided in the experiments of Yen et al (2000). Accordingly, the motivation of this study is to determine whether superoxide radicals adsorbed on labradorite surfaces are capable of producing oxygen gas upon exposure to water vapor. We have constructed an experimental apparatus that is capable of monitoring oxygen gas release from basaltic mineral powders that have been exposed to UV-radiation under Martian atmospheric pressure conditions. The apparatus consists of a stainless-steel vacuum chamber with a UV- transparent window where sample radiation exposures are performed. The vacuum chamber has multiple valved ports for injection of gases and water vapor. The vacuum chamber is connected via a precision leak valve to a quadrupole mass spectrometer, which measures changes in the composition of the headspace gases over our mineral samples. We will report on the results of our experiments, which are aimed at detecting and quantifying oxygen gas release from UV-exposed basaltic mineral samples using this new experimental facility. These results will further constrain whether superoxide ions adsorbed on mineral surfaces provide a viable explanation for the Viking GEx results, which have

  7. Internal hysteresis experienced on a high pressure syn gas compressor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeidan, F. Y.

    1984-01-01

    A vibration instability phenomenon experienced in operating high pressure syn gas centrifugal compressors in two ammonia plants is described. The compressors were monitored by orbit and spectrum analysis for changes from baseline readings. It is found that internal hysteresis was the major destabilizing force; however, the problem was further complicated by seal lockup at the suction end of the compressor. A coupling lockup problem and a coupling fit problem, which frettage of the shaft, are also considered as contributors to the self excited vibrations.

  8. International oil and gas exploration and development activities

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-10-29

    This report is part of an ongoing series of quarterly publications that monitors discoveries of oil and natural gas in foreign countries and provides an analysis of the reserve additions that result. The report is prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the US Department of Energy (DOE) under the Foreign Energy Supply Assessment Program (FESAP). It presents a summary of discoveries and reserve additions that result from recent international exploration and development activities. It is intended for use by petroleum industry analysts, various government agencies, and political leaders in the development, implementation, and evaluation of energy plans, policy, and legislation. 25 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.

  9. Gas motion through porous objects with nonuniform local distribution of heat-release sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levin, V. A.; Lutsenko, N. A.

    2008-09-01

    The gas motion through porous objects in the gravity force field with a non-uniform distribution of heat sources, which may arise as a result of natural or man-caused catastrophes (as the damaged power unit of the Chernobyl NPP), is investigated. The influence of different parameters of the heat-releasing zone on the process of cooling of such objects is analyzed with the aid of computational experiment. It is shown that the porous element heating is affected not only by the height of the heat-releasing zone and the heat-release intensity therein but also by the distance of the heat-releasing zone from the element inlet as well as by the width of the heat-releasing zone. The phenomenon of a reduction of the porous element heating with increasing distance of the heat-releasing zone from the porous element inlet is revealed. An ambiguous dependence of the porous object heating on the width of the heat-release zone is identified: at a growth of the heat-releasing zone width, the heating of the element may both increase and decrease depending on the distance of the heat-release zone from the element inlet.

  10. Environmental controls of greenhouse gas release in a restoring peat bog in NW Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glatzel, S.; Forbrich, I.; Krüger, C.; Lemke, S.; Gerold, G.

    2008-01-01

    In Central Europe, most bogs have a history of drainage and many of them are currently being restored. Success of restoration as well as greenhouse gas exchange of these bogs is influenced by environmental stress factors as drought and atmospheric nitrogen deposition. We determined the methane and nitrous oxide exchange of sites in the strongly decomposed center and less decomposed edge of the Pietzmoor bog in NW Germany in 2004. Also, we examined the methane and nitrous oxide exchange of mesocosms from the center and edge before, during, and following a drainage experiment as well as carbon dioxide release from disturbed unfertilized and nitrogen fertilized surface peat. In the field, methane fluxes ranged from 0 to 3.8 mg m-2 h-1 and were highest from hollows. Field nitrous oxide fluxes ranged from 0 to 574 μg m-2 h-1 and were elevated at the edge. A large Eriophorum vaginatum tussock showed decreasing nitrous oxide release as the season progressed. Drainage of mesocosms decreased methane release to 0, even during rewetting. There was a tendency for a decrease of nitrous oxide release during drainage and for an increase in nitrous oxide release during rewetting. Nitrogen fertilization did not increase decomposition of surface peat. Our examinations suggest a competition between vascular vegetation and denitrifiers for excess nitrogen. We also provide evidence that the von Post humification index can be used to explain greenhouse gas release from bogs, if the role of vascular vegetation is also considered. An assessment of the greenhouse gas release from nitrogen saturated restoring bogs needs to take into account elevated release from fresh Sphagnum peat as well as from sedges growing on decomposed peat. Given the high atmospheric nitrogen deposition, restoration will not be able to achieve an oligotrophic ecosystem in the short term.

  11. PolyPole-1: An accurate numerical algorithm for intra-granular fission gas release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pizzocri, D.; Rabiti, C.; Luzzi, L.; Barani, T.; Van Uffelen, P.; Pastore, G.

    2016-09-01

    The transport of fission gas from within the fuel grains to the grain boundaries (intra-granular fission gas release) is a fundamental controlling mechanism of fission gas release and gaseous swelling in nuclear fuel. Hence, accurate numerical solution of the corresponding mathematical problem needs to be included in fission gas behaviour models used in fuel performance codes. Under the assumption of equilibrium between trapping and resolution, the process can be described mathematically by a single diffusion equation for the gas atom concentration in a grain. In this paper, we propose a new numerical algorithm (PolyPole-1) to efficiently solve the fission gas diffusion equation in time-varying conditions. The PolyPole-1 algorithm is based on the analytic modal solution of the diffusion equation for constant conditions, combined with polynomial corrective terms that embody the information on the deviation from constant conditions. The new algorithm is verified by comparing the results to a finite difference solution over a large number of randomly generated operation histories. Furthermore, comparison to state-of-the-art algorithms used in fuel performance codes demonstrates that the accuracy of PolyPole-1 is superior to other algorithms, with similar computational effort. Finally, the concept of PolyPole-1 may be extended to the solution of the general problem of intra-granular fission gas diffusion during non-equilibrium trapping and resolution, which will be the subject of future work.

  12. Impact of Dissociation and Sensible Heat Release on Pulse Detonation and Gas Turbine Engine Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Povinelli, Louis A.

    2001-01-01

    A thermodynamic cycle analysis of the effect of sensible heat release on the relative performance of pulse detonation and gas turbine engines is presented. Dissociation losses in the PDE (Pulse Detonation Engine) are found to cause a substantial decrease in engine performance parameters.

  13. Internal gas target system for the DarkLight experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friscic, Ivica

    2017-01-01

    The DarkLight experiment at Jefferson National Laboratory (JLab) will perform a search for a dark photon in the mass range from 10 to 100 MeV/c2. The experimental design requires very high luminosity, but at the same time must keep the background rate as low as possible. Therefore, the experiment will use the 100 MeV electron beam from JLab's Low Energy Recirculator Facility (LERF) and a windowless gas target. In the summer of 2016 we deployed Phase 1A of this experiment, including a thin-walled, windowless target, using narrow apertures to restrict the flow of gas and aggressive pumping systems to reduce the pressure outside of the target region. Here we present the current design of the DarkLight internal gas target system, its performance during the 2016 summer beam tests, and future prospects. This work is supported by DOE grant DE-FG02-94ER40818 and NSF grant PHY-1437402.

  14. The Combination of Internal-Combustion Engine and Gas Turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zinner, K.

    1947-01-01

    While the gas turbine by itself has been applied in particular cases for power generation and is in a state of promising development in this field, it has already met with considerable success in two cases when used as an exhaust turbine in connection with a centrifugal compressor, namely, in the supercharging of combustion engines and in the Velox process, which is of particular application for furnaces. In the present paper the most important possibilities of combining a combustion engine with a gas turbine are considered. These "combination engines " are compared with the simple gas turbine on whose state of development a brief review will first be given. The critical evaluation of the possibilities of development and fields of application of the various combustion engine systems, wherever it is not clearly expressed in the publications referred to, represents the opinion of the author. The state of development of the internal-combustion engine is in its main features generally known. It is used predominantly at the present time for the propulsion of aircraft and road vehicles and, except for certain restrictions due to war conditions, has been used to an increasing extent in ships and rail cars and in some fields applied as stationary power generators. In the Diesel engine a most economical heat engine with a useful efficiency of about 40 percent exists and in the Otto aircraft engine a heat engine of greatest power per unit weight of about 0.5 kilogram per horsepower.

  15. Twenty Years of Continuous gas Release at Kilauea: Effusive Lessons in a Volatile Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutton, A. J.; Elias, T.

    2002-12-01

    The observatory worker who has lived a quarter of a century with Hawaiian lavas frothing in action, cannot fail to realize that gas chemistry is the heart of the volcano magma problem. T.A. Jaggar, 1940 Kilauea's Pu`u `O`o-Kupaianaha eruption has presented workers with a nearly ideal setting to develop and test models of how this volcano and others like it work, from the viewpoint of magma transport, gas release, and eruption dynamics. Gas sampling studies, and in-situ and remote emission measurements can be conducted more easily at Kilauea than at other volcanoes because of its approachable nature and because of advances in instrumentation and analytical techniques. Analyses of gases from the eruption and from early in the last century have, with studies of volatiles trapped in submarine lavas, been used to conceptualize a degassing model for Kilauea concordant with contemporaneous geologic and geophysical evidence delineating the volcano's internal structure. More recent studies have revealed a greater CO2 emission rate than previously thought. The revised estimates have been used to infer changes in magma supply rate. Meanwhile, SO2 emission rates and our improved knowledge of residual volatiles are being used in parallel with geophysical methods, to monitor the eruption rate. Continuous monitoring studies using on-site species-selective sensors are a rapidly evolving part of the gas studies effort for the eruption. The Pu`u `O`o-Kupaianaha eruption has also provided an opportunity to study hazards associated with long-term environmental effects of volcanic emissions. Beginning in mid-1986, when activity changed from episodic fountaining to continuous effusion, volcanic air pollution, known locally as vog, became an unfortunate part of everyday life for Hawai`i residents and visitors. Since then, Kilauea has on average released about 1,600 tonnes of SO2 per day, roughly 6,000 times the daily amount judged by the EPA to classify an emitter as a major industrial

  16. Increasing of MERARG experimental performances: on-line fission gas release measurement by mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Pontillon, Y.; Capdevila, H.; Clement, S.; Guigues, E.; Janulyte, A.; Zerega, Y.; Andre, J.

    2015-07-01

    The MERARG device - implemented at the LECASTAR Hot Laboratory, at the CEA Cadarache - allows characterizing nuclear fuels with respect to the behaviour of fission gases during thermal transients representative of normal or off normal operating nuclear power plant conditions. The fuel is heated in order to extract a part or the total gas inventory it contains. Fission Gas Release (FGR) is actually recorded by mean of both on-line gamma spectrometry station and micro gas chromatography. These two devices monitor the quantity and kinetics of fission gas release rate. They only address {sup 85}Kr radioactive isotope and the elemental quantification of Kr, Xe and He (with a relatively low detection limit in the latter case, typically 5-10 ppm). In order to better estimate the basic mechanisms that promote fission gas release from irradiated nuclear fuels, the CEA fuel study department decided to improve its experimental facility by modifying MERARG to extend the studies of gamma emitter fission gases to all gases (including Helium) with a complete isotopic distribution capability. To match these specifications, a Residual Gas Analyser (RGA) has been chosen as mass spectrometer. This paper presents a review of the main aspects of the qualification/calibration phase of the RGA type analyser. In particular, results recorded over three mass ranges 1-10 u, 80-90 u and 120-140 u in the two classical modes of MERARG, i.e. on-line and off-line measurements are discussed. Results obtained from a standard gas bottle show that the quantitative analysis at a few ppm levels can be achieved for all isotopes of Kr and Xe, as well as masses 2 and 4 u. (authors)

  17. Novel Solid Encapsulation of Ethylene Gas Using Amorphous α-Cyclodextrin and the Release Characteristics.

    PubMed

    Ho, Binh T; Bhandari, Bhesh R

    2016-05-04

    This research investigated the encapsulation of ethylene gas into amorphous α-cyclodextrins (α-CDs) at low (LM) and high (HM) moisture contents at 1.0-1.5 MPa for 24-120 h and its controlled release characteristics at 11.2-52.9% relative humidity (RH) for 1-168 h. The inclusion complexes (ICs) were characterized using X-ray diffractometry (XRD), nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (CP-MAS (13)C NMR), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Ethylene concentrations in the ICs were from 0.45 to 0.87 mol of ethylene/mol CD and from 0.42 to 0.54 mol of ethylene/mol CD for LM and HM α-CDs, respectively. Ethylene gas released from the encapsulated powder at higher rates with increasing RH. An analysis of release kinetics using Avrami's equation showed that the LM and HM amorphous α-CDs were not associated with significant differences in release constant k and parameter n for any given RH condition. NMR spectra showed the presence of the characteristic carbon-carbon double bond of ethylene gas in the encapsulated α-CD powder.

  18. Gas Generation and Release in Near-Surface Repository at Armenian NPP - 13372

    SciTech Connect

    Grigoryan, G.; Amirjanyan, A.; Hovhannisyan, A.; Gondakyan, Y.

    2013-07-01

    The potential nuclear waste repository at Armenian Nuclear Power Plant (ANPP) can store Low and Intermediate Level Radioactive waste (LL/ILW). In this kind of near-surface repository for radioactive waste, significant quantities of gases may be generated as a result of microbial degradation and corrosion. A discussion is presented of the microbial and chemical degradation of cellulose. For the release of gas, it is assumed that the complete conversion of cellulosic wastes to gases by the action of microbes, is, in principle, permitted. Released radioactive gases such as {sup 14}CO{sub 2} and {sup 14}CH{sub 4} could have a direct pathway to the atmosphere. The potential impact of gas generation, accumulation and migration on the long-term of repository, should therefore be assessed properly. We present here safety assessment result of gas producing radioactive waste disposal by the inhalation dose to a maximally exposed individual above ground, based on some conservative assumptions about release from waste as well as gas generation calculations. (authors)

  19. Health impacts of large releases of radionuclides. Internal exposure of populations to long-lived radionuclides released into the environment.

    PubMed

    Balonov, M I

    1997-01-01

    This chapter discusses the events that led to the contamination of environments with the long-lived radionuclides of caesium, strontium and other elements, and to the internal exposure of populations living in contaminated areas. Among these events are radioactive releases into the river Techa from the Soviet nuclear weapons facility Mayak in 1949-1956, thermonuclear weapons tests in the 1950s and 1960s, the Kyshtim and Windscale accidents in 1957, and the Chernobyl and Tomsk-7 accidents in 1986 and 1993, respectively. Methods of environmental monitoring and individual internal dose monitoring of inhabitants are described. These are based on measuring the content of radionuclides not only in the air, drinking water and local food products, but also in humans using whole-body counters and analysing excreta and autopsy samples. The dynamics of internal exposure of people of different ages to radionuclides of caesium, strontium and plutonium from the environment are considered. Examples of radionuclide distributions in the environment, and of individual/collective internal doses and related medical effects are presented.

  20. Analysis of fission gas release kinetics by on-line mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Zerega, Y.; Reynard-Carette, C.; Parrat, D.; Carette, M.; Brkic, B.; Lyoussi, A.; Bignan, G.; Janulyte, A.; Andre, J.; Pontillon, Y.; Ducros, G.; Taylor, S.

    2011-07-01

    The release of fission gas (Xe and Kr) and helium out of nuclear fuel materials in normal operation of a nuclear power reactor can constitute a strong limitation of the fuel lifetime. Moreover, radioactive isotopes of Xe and Kr contribute significantly to the global radiological source term released in the primary coolant circuit in case of accidental situations accompanied by fuel rod loss of integrity. As a consequence, fission gas release investigation is of prime importance for the nuclear fuel cycle economy, and is the driven force of numerous R and D programs. In this domain, for solving current fuel behavior understanding issues, preparing the development of new fuels (e.g. for Gen IV power systems) and for improving the modeling prediction capability, there is a marked need for innovations in the instrumentation field, mainly for: . Quantification of very low fission gas concentrations, released from fuel sample and routed in sweeping lines. Monitoring of quick gas release variations by quantification of elementary release during a short period of time. Detection of a large range of atomic masses (e.g. H{sub 2}, HT, He, CO, CO{sub 2}, Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe), together with a performing separation of isotopes for Xe and Kr elements. Coupling measurement of stable and radioactive gas isotopes, by using in parallel mass spectrometry and gamma spectrometry techniques. To fulfill these challenging needs, a common strategy for analysis equipment implementation has been set up thanks to a recently launched collaboration between the CEA and the Univ. of Provence, with the technological support of the Liverpool Univ.. It aims at developing a chronological series of mass spectrometer devices based upon mass filter and 2D/3D ion traps with Fourier transform operating mode and having increasing levels of performances to match the previous challenges for out-of pile and in-pile experiments. The final objective is to install a high performance online mass spectrometer coupled to

  1. International Space Station (ISS) Gas Logistics Planning in the Post Shuttle Era

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leonard, Daniel J.; Cook, Anthony J.; Lehman, Daniel A.

    2011-01-01

    Over its life the International Space Station (ISS) has received gas (nitrogen, oxygen, and air) from various sources. Nitrogen and oxygen are used in the cabin to maintain total pressure and oxygen partial pressures within the cabin. Plumbed nitrogen is also required to support on-board experiments and medical equipment. Additionally, plumbed oxygen is required to support medical equipment as well as emergency masks and most importantly EVA support. Gas are supplied to ISS with various methods and vehicles. Vehicles like the Progress and ATV deliver nitrogen (both as a pure gas and as air) and oxygen via direct releases into the cabin. An additional source of nitrogen and oxygen is via tanks on the ISS Airlock. The Airlock nitrogen and oxygen tanks can deliver to various users via pressurized systems that run throughout the ISS except for the Russian segment. Metabolic oxygen is mainly supplied via cabin release from the Elektron and Oxygen Generator Assembly (OGA), which are water electrolyzers. As a backup system, oxygen candles (Solid Fuel Oxygen Generators-SFOGs) supply oxygen to the cabin as well. In the past, a major source of nitrogen and oxygen has come from the Shuttle via both direct delivery to the cabin as well as to recharge the ISS Airlock tanks. To replace the Shuttle capability to recharge the ISS Airlock tanks, a new system was developed called Nitrogen/Oxygen Recharge System (NORS). NIORS consists of high pressure (7000 psi) tanks which recharge the ISS Airlock tanks via a blowdown fill for both nitrogen and oxygen. NORS tanks can be brought up on most logistics vehicles such as the HTV, COTS, and ATV. A proper balance must be maintained to insure sufficient gas resources are available on-orbit so that all users have the required gases via the proper delivery method (cabin and/or plumbed).

  2. Predicting Peak Hydrogen Concentrations from Spontaneous Gas Releases in Hanford Waste Tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, Charles W.; Hartley, Stacey A.; Meyer, Perry A.; Wells, Beric E.

    2005-07-15

    Buoyant displacement gas release events (BDGRE) are spontaneous gas releases that occur in a few of the Hanford radioactive waste storage tanks when gas accumulation makes the sediment layer buoyant with respect to the liquid. BDGREs are assumed to be likely if the ratio of the predicted sediment gas fraction and neutral buoyancy gas fraction, or buoyancy ratio, exceeds unity. Based on the observation that the buoyancy ratio is also an empirical indicator of BDGRE size, a new methodology is derived that formally correlates the buoyancy ratio and the peak headspace hydrogen concentration resulting from BDGREs. The available data on the six historic BDGRE tanks, AN-103, AN-104, AN-105, AW-101, SY-103, and SY-101, are studied in detail to describe both the waste state and the corresponding distribution of BDGREs. The range of applicability of the buoyancy ratio-based models is assessed based on the modeling assumptions and availability of tank data. Recommendations are given for extending the range of the models applicability.

  3. Laser-driven nuclear-polarized hydrogen internal gas target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seely, J.; Crawford, C.; Clasie, B.; Xu, W.; Dutta, D.; Gao, H.

    2006-06-01

    We report the performance of a laser-driven polarized internal hydrogen gas target (LDT) in a configuration similar to that used in scattering experiments. This target used the technique of spin-exchange optical pumping to produce nuclear spin polarized hydrogen gas that was fed into a cylindrical storage (target) cell. We present in this paper the performance of the target, methods that were tried to improve the figure-of-merit (FOM) of the target, and a Monte Carlo simulation of spin-exchange optical pumping. The dimensions of the apparatus were optimized using the simulation and the experimental results were in good agreement with the results from the simulation. The best experimental result achieved was at a hydrogen flow rate of 1.1×1018atoms/s , where the sample beam exiting the storage cell had 58.2% degree of dissociation and 50.5% polarization. Based on this measurement, the atomic fraction in the storage cell was 49.6% and the density averaged nuclear polarization was 25.0%. This represents the highest FOM for hydrogen from an LDT and is higher than the best FOM reported by atomic beam sources that used storage cells.

  4. Laser-driven nuclear-polarized hydrogen internal gas target

    SciTech Connect

    Seely, J.; Crawford, C.; Clasie, B.; Xu, W.; Dutta, D.; Gao, H.

    2006-06-15

    We report the performance of a laser-driven polarized internal hydrogen gas target (LDT) in a configuration similar to that used in scattering experiments. This target used the technique of spin-exchange optical pumping to produce nuclear spin polarized hydrogen gas that was fed into a cylindrical storage (target) cell. We present in this paper the performance of the target, methods that were tried to improve the figure-of-merit (FOM) of the target, and a Monte Carlo simulation of spin-exchange optical pumping. The dimensions of the apparatus were optimized using the simulation and the experimental results were in good agreement with the results from the simulation. The best experimental result achieved was at a hydrogen flow rate of 1.1x10{sup 18} atoms/s, where the sample beam exiting the storage cell had 58.2% degree of dissociation and 50.5% polarization. Based on this measurement, the atomic fraction in the storage cell was 49.6% and the density averaged nuclear polarization was 25.0%. This represents the highest FOM for hydrogen from an LDT and is higher than the best FOM reported by atomic beam sources that used storage cells.

  5. Non-Volcanic release of CO2 in Italy: quantification, conceptual models and gas hazard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiodini, G.; Cardellini, C.; Caliro, S.; Avino, R.

    2011-12-01

    Central and South Italy are characterized by the presence of many reservoirs naturally recharged by CO2 of deep provenance. In the western sector, the reservoirs feed hundreds of gas emissions at the surface. Many studies in the last years were devoted to (i) elaborating a map of CO2 Earth degassing of the region; (ii) to asses the gas hazard; (iii) to develop methods suitable for the measurement of the gas fluxes from different types of emissions; (iv) to elaborate the conceptual model of Earth degassing and its relation with the seismic activity of the region and (v) to develop physical numerical models of CO2 air dispersion. The main results obtained are: 1) A general, regional map of CO2 Earth degassing in Central Italy has been elaborated. The total flux of CO2 in the area has been estimated in ~ 10 Mt/a which are released to the atmosphere trough numerous dangerous gas emissions or by degassing spring waters (~ 10 % of the CO2 globally estimated to be released by the Earth trough volcanic activity). 2) An on line, open access, georeferenced database of the main CO2 emissions (~ 250) was settled up (http://googas.ov.ingv.it). CO2 flux > 100 t/d characterise 14% of the degassing sites while CO2 fluxes from 100 t/d to 10 t/d have been estimated for about 35% of the gas emissions. 3) The sites of the gas emissions are not suitable for life: the gas causes many accidents to animals and people. In order to mitigate the gas hazard a specific model of CO2 air dispersion has been developed and applied to the main degassing sites. A relevant application regarded Mefite d'Ansanto, southern Apennines, which is the largest natural emission of low temperature CO2 rich gases, from non-volcanic environment, ever measured in the Earth (˜2000 t/d). Under low wind conditions, the gas flows along a narrow natural channel producing a persistent gas river which has killed over a period of time many people and animals. The application of the physical numerical model allowed us to

  6. Droplet and bubble formation of combined oil and gas releases in subsea blowouts.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lin; Boufadel, Michel C; King, Thomas; Robinson, Brian; Gao, Feng; Socolofsky, Scott A; Lee, Kenneth

    2017-07-15

    Underwater blowouts from gas and oil operations often involve the simultaneous release of oil and gas. Presence of gas bubbles in jets/plumes could greatly influence oil droplet formation. With the aim of understanding and quantifying the droplet formation from Deepwater Horizon blowout (DWH) we developed a new formulation for gas-oil interaction with jets/plumes. We used the jet-droplet formation model VDROP-J with the new module and the updated model was validated against laboratory and field experimental data. Application to DWH revealed that, in the absence of dispersant, gas input resulted in a reduction of d50 by up to 1.5mm, and maximum impact occurred at intermediate gas fractions (30-50%). In the presence of dispersant, reduction in d50 due to bubbles was small because of the promoted small sizes of both bubbles and droplets by surfactants. The new development could largely enhance the prediction and response to oil and gas blowouts. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. 77 FR 24252 - Notice of Release From Federal Grant Assurance Obligations for Sacramento International Airport...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... International Airport (SMF), Sacramento, CA AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration, US DOT. ACTION: Notice of Request to Release Airport Land. SUMMARY: The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) proposes to rule and...

  8. Subsonic Jet Noise Reduced With Improved Internal Exhaust Gas Mixers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Aircraft noise pollution is becoming a major environmental concern for the world community. The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is responding to this concern by imposing more stringent noise restrictions for aircraft certification then ever before to keep the U.S. industry competitive with the rest of the world. At the NASA Lewis Research Center, attempts are underway to develop noise-reduction technology for newer engines and for retrofitting existing engines so that they are as quiet as (or quieter than) required. Lewis conducted acoustic and Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV) tests using Pratt & Whitney's Internal Exhaust Gas Mixers (IEGM). The IEGM's mix the core flow with the fan flow prior to their common exhaust. All tests were conducted in Lewis' Aero-Acoustic Propulsion Laboratory--a semihemispheric dome open to the ambient atmosphere. This was the first time Laser Doppler Velocimetry was used in such a facility at Lewis. Jet exhaust velocity and turbulence and the internal velocity fields were detailed. Far-field acoustics were also measured. Pratt & Whitney provided 1/7th scale model test hardware (a 12-lobe mixer, a 20-lobe mixer, and a splitter) for 1.7 bypass ratio engines, and NASA provided the research engineers, test facility, and test time. The Pratt & Whitney JT8D-200 engine power conditions were used for all tests.

  9. SPEAR 3 flight analysis: Grounding by neutral gas release, and magnetic field effects on current distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandell, M. J.; Jongeward, G. A.; Cooke, D. L.; Raitt, W. J.

    1998-01-01

    The Space Power Experiment Aboard Rockets (SPEAR) 3 experiment was launched on March 15, 1993, to test grounding devices for negative payloads. In this paper we review two aspects of the high-altitude flight data and compare them with preflight predictions. The SPEAR 3 neutral gas release experiment studied a grounding mechanism observed on previous flights during attitude control system (ACS) firings. Preflight calculations using Paschen law physics generalized to three dimensions predicted that the high rate gas release (about one order of magnitude below normal ACS) would reduce the rocket potential to within 200-300 V of plasma ground. The flight data is well fit by a value of -225V. Orientation relative to Earth's magnetic field had no effect on the floating potential or grounding operations but had a large effect on the portion of the current collected by the boom. We compare these flight measurements with preflight calculations made with the DynaPAC computer code.

  10. Mitigation of dense gas releases within buildings: validation of CFD modelling.

    PubMed

    Gilham, S; Deaves, D M; Woodburn, P

    2000-01-07

    When an accidental release of a hazardous material is considered within a safety case or risk assessment, its off-site effects are generally assessed by calculating the dispersion of vapour from the site. Although most installations handling flammable materials will be in the open air, many types of plant, particularly those handling toxics, are enclosed, partly to provide some form of containment and hence, to mitigate the effects of any release. When such a release occurs within a building, the gas or vapour will undergo some mixing before emerging from any opening. The degree of mixing will depend upon the building geometry and the nature of the ventilation, which in turn may be modified by the leak. This situation is considered in this paper, with specific application to calculating the rate of release of a dense vapour from a building. The paper describes the application of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) techniques to modelling the release and mixing processes within buildings. Examples of validation calculations for simple geometric arrangements, as well as more complex geometries representative of an industrial site, are described. The results demonstrate the capabilities of CFD for this application but highlight the need for careful modelling of the near-wall flows and heat transfer, and need for an accurate fluid dynamics and thermodynamic representation of the release source.

  11. Arctic greenhouse-gas storage and release modulated by late-glacial ice sheet fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portnov, Alexey; Mienert, Jurgen; Vadakkepuliyambatta, Sunil; Patton, Henry; Andreassen, Karin; Winsborrow, Monica; Knies, Jochen; Hubbard, Alun I.

    2016-04-01

    The subglacial footprint of the Barents Sea Ice sheet which advanced across northern Eurasia from 26 to 22 ka BP had a major impact on the underlying gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ) leading to storage of methane and other hydrocarbons. With the onset of deglaciation, these hydrocarbon rich hydrates dissociated, releasing potent greenhouse gas into the ocean and possibly atmosphere over a period of thousands of years. We present a wide-range of observational data acquired from offshore western Svalbard and the Barents Sea to robustly constrain a coupled model of the subglacial evolution of gas hydrate reservoirs during and after the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). Our results indicate that even under minimum ice thickness reconstructions, an extensive, ~500-meter thick GHSZ existed beneath the ice sheet in our study area offshore of western Svalbard (Portnov et al., 2016). An offshore corridor of methane release did though also persist throughout maximum ice conditions on the upper continental margin. Throughout the LGM a marine ice sheet directly comparable to those of Greenland and Antarctica today inundated the continental margin offshore of western Svalbard and the vast shelf areas of the Barents Sea. However, with climatic amelioration the Barents Sea ice sheet experienced a 4ka period of dynamic retreat with concurrent flooding of the shelf by rising sea levels, which provided a high magnitude perturbation to the substrate pressure and temperature domains. By analogy, the future response of Polar ice sheets is an emerging concern as their ongoing thinning and retreat will likewise perturb the present day subglacial GHSZ leading to potential widespread gas hydrate destabilisation and release. Portnov, Alexey, et al. "Ice-sheet-driven methane storage and release in the Arctic", Nature Comm. DOI: 10.1038/ncomms10314. (2016).

  12. The role of sediment structure in gas bubble storage and release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, L.; Wilkinson, J.; Koca, K.; Buchmann, C.; Lorke, A.

    2016-07-01

    Ebullition is an important pathway for methane emission from inland waters. However, the mechanisms controlling methane bubble formation and release in aquatic sediments remain unclear. A laboratory incubation experiment was conducted to investigate the dynamics of methane bubble formation, storage, and release in response to hydrostatic head drops in three different types of natural sediment. Homogenized clayey, silty, and sandy sediments (initially quasi-uniform through the depth of the columns) were incubated in chambers for 3 weeks. We observed three distinct stages of methane bubble formation and release: stage I—microbubble formation-displacing mobile water from sediment pores with negligible ebullition; stage II—formation of large bubbles, displacing the surrounding sediment with concurrent increase in ebullition; and stage III—formation of conduits with relatively steady ebullition. The maximum depth-averaged volumetric gas content at steady state varied from 18.8% in clayey to 12.0% in silty and 13.2% in sandy sediment. Gas storage in the sediment columns showed strong vertical stratification: most of the free gas was stored in an upper layer, whose thickness varied with sediment grain size. The magnitude of individual ebullition episodes was linearly correlated to hydrostatic head drop and decreased from clayey to sandy to silty sediment and was in excess of that estimated from gas expansion alone, indicating the release of pore water methane. These findings combined with a hydrodynamic model capable of determining dominant sediment type and depositional zones could help resolve spatial heterogeneities in methane ebullition at medium to larger scales in inland waters.

  13. Control of neurotransmitter release by an internal gel matrix in synaptic vesicles.

    PubMed

    Reigada, David; Díez-Pérez, Ismael; Gorostiza, Pau; Verdaguer, Albert; Gómez de Aranda, Inmaculada; Pineda, Oriol; Vilarrasa, Jaume; Marsal, Jordi; Blasi, Joan; Aleu, Jordi; Solsona, Carles

    2003-03-18

    Neurotransmitters are stored in synaptic vesicles, where they have been assumed to be in free solution. Here we report that in Torpedo synaptic vesicles, only 5% of the total acetylcholine (ACh) or ATP content is free, and that the rest is adsorbed to an intravesicular proteoglycan matrix. This matrix, which controls ACh and ATP release by an ion-exchange mechanism, behaves like a smart gel. That is, it releases neurotransmitter and changes its volume when challenged with small ionic concentration change. Immunodetection analysis revealed that the synaptic vesicle proteoglycan SV2 is the core of the intravesicular matrix and is responsible for immobilization and release of ACh and ATP. We suggest that in the early steps of vesicle fusion, this internal matrix regulates the availability of free diffusible ACh and ATP, and thus serves to modulate the quantity of transmitter released.

  14. Are greenhouse gas emissions from international shipping a type of marine pollution?

    PubMed

    Shi, Yubing

    2016-12-15

    Whether greenhouse gas emissions from international shipping are a type of marine pollution is a controversial issue and is currently open to debate. This article examines the current treaty definitions of marine pollution, and applies them to greenhouse gas emissions from ships. Based on the legal analysis of treaty definitions and relevant international and national regulation on this issue, this article asserts that greenhouse gas emissions from international shipping are a type of 'conditional' marine pollution.

  15. 76 FR 82347 - Public Notice for Release of Aeronautical Property at Erie International Airport (ERI), Erie, PA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-30

    ... land for substitute right-of-way, and release of land for permanent gas line easement. (1) Permanent... granting of of the substitute Gas Line easement to National Fuel Gas (NFG) for installing the relocated... feet in width and approximately 800 linear feet long consisting mostly of natural growth grass...

  16. Crystallization, sublimation, and gas release in the interior of a porous comet nucleus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prialnik, Dina

    1992-01-01

    A numerical code is developed for evolutionary calculations of the thermal structure and composition of a porous comet nucleus made of water ice, in amorphous or crystalline form, other volatiles, dust, and gases trapped in amorphous ice. Bulk evaporation, crystallization, gas release, and free (Knudsen) flow of gases through the pores are taken into account. The numerical scheme yields exact conservation laws for mass and energy. The code is used to study the effect of bulk evaporation of ice in the interior of a comet nucleus during crystallization. It is found that evaporation controls the temperature distribution; the vapor prevents cooling of the crystallized layer of ice, by recondensation and release of latent heat. Thus high temperatures are maintained below the surface of the nucleus and down to depths of tens or hundreds of meters, even at large heliocentric distances, as long as crystallization goes on. Gas trapped in the ice and released during the phase transition flows both toward the interior and toward the surface and out of the nucleus. The progress of crystallization is largely determined by the contribution of gas fluxes to heat transfer.

  17. Striatal dopamine release and biphasic pattern of locomotor and motor activity under gas narcosis.

    PubMed

    Balon, Norbert; Risso, Jean-Jacques; Blanc, François; Rostain, Jean-Claude; Weiss, Michel

    2003-05-02

    Inert gas narcosis is a neurological syndrome appearing when humans or animals are exposed to hyperbaric inert gases (nitrogen, argon) composed by motor and cognitive impairments. Inert gas narcosis induces a decrease of the dopamine release at the striatum level, structure involved in the regulation of the extrapyramidal motricity. We have investigated, in freely moving rats exposed to different narcotic conditions, the relationship between the locomotor and motor activity and the striatal dopamine release, using respectively a computerized device that enables a quantitative analysis of this behavioural disturbance and voltammetry. The use of 3 MPa of nitrogen, 2 MPa of argon and 0.1 MPa of nitrous oxide, revealed after a transient phase of hyperactivity, a lower level of the locomotor and motor activity, in relation with the decrease of the striatal dopamine release. It is concluded that the striatal dopamine decrease could be related to the decrease of the locomotor and motor hyperactivity, but that other(s) neurotransmitter(s) could be primarily involved in the behavioural motor disturbances induced by narcotics. This biphasic effect could be of major importance for future pharmacological investigations, and motor categorization, on the basic mechanisms of inert gas at pressure.

  18. Crystallization, sublimation, and gas release in the interior of a porous comet nucleus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prialnik, Dina

    1992-01-01

    A numerical code is developed for evolutionary calculations of the thermal structure and composition of a porous comet nucleus made of water ice, in amorphous or crystalline form, other volatiles, dust, and gases trapped in amorphous ice. Bulk evaporation, crystallization, gas release, and free (Knudsen) flow of gases through the pores are taken into account. The numerical scheme yields exact conservation laws for mass and energy. The code is used to study the effect of bulk evaporation of ice in the interior of a comet nucleus during crystallization. It is found that evaporation controls the temperature distribution; the vapor prevents cooling of the crystallized layer of ice, by recondensation and release of latent heat. Thus high temperatures are maintained below the surface of the nucleus and down to depths of tens or hundreds of meters, even at large heliocentric distances, as long as crystallization goes on. Gas trapped in the ice and released during the phase transition flows both toward the interior and toward the surface and out of the nucleus. The progress of crystallization is largely determined by the contribution of gas fluxes to heat transfer.

  19. Models for recurrent gas release event behavior in hazardous waste tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, D.N.; Arnold, B.C.

    1994-08-01

    Certain radioactive waste storage tanks at the United States Department of Energy Hanford facilities continuously generate gases as a result of radiolysis and chemical reactions. The congealed sludge in these tanks traps the gases and causes the level of the waste within the tanks to rise. The waste level continues to rise until the sludge becomes buoyant and ``rolls over``, changing places with heavier fluid on top. During a rollover, the trapped gases are released, resulting, in a sudden drop in the waste level. This is known as a gas release event (GRE). After a GRE, the wastes leading to another GRE. We present nonlinear time waste re-congeals and gas again accumulates leading to another GRE. We present nonlinear time series models that produce simulated sample paths that closely resemble the temporal history of waste levels in these tanks. The models also imitate the random GRE, behavior observed in the temporal waste level history of a storage tank. We are interested in using the structure of these models to understand the probabilistic behavior of the random variable ``time between consecutive GRE`s``. Understanding the stochastic nature of this random variable is important because the hydrogen and nitrous oxide gases released from a GRE, are flammable and the ammonia that is released is a health risk. From a safety perspective, activity around such waste tanks should be halted when a GRE is imminent. With credible GRE models, we can establish time windows in which waste tank research and maintenance activities can be safely performed.

  20. Encapsulation of Ethylene Gas into Granular Cold-Water-Soluble Starch: Structure and Release Kinetics.

    PubMed

    Shi, Linfan; Fu, Xiong; Tan, Chin Ping; Huang, Qiang; Zhang, Bin

    2017-03-15

    Ethylene gas was introduced into granular cold-water-soluble (GCWS) starches using a solid encapsulation method. The morphological and structural properties of the novel inclusion complexes (ICs) were characterized using scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffractometry, and Raman spectroscopy. The V-type single helix of GCWS starches was formed through controlled gelatinization and ethanol precipitation and was approved to host ethylene gas. The controlled release characteristics of ICs were also investigated at various temperature and relative humidity conditions. Avrami's equation was fitted to understand the release kinetics and showed that the release of ethylene from the ICs was accelerated by increasing temperature or RH and was decelerated by increased degree of amylose polymerization. The IC of Hylon-7 had the highest ethylene concentration (31.8%, w/w) among the five starches, and the IC of normal potato starch showed the best controlled release characteristics. As a renewable and inexpensive material, GCWS starch is a desirable solid encapsulation matrix with potential in agricultural and food applications.

  1. Fission Product Monitoring and Release Data for the Advanced Gas Reactor -1 Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Dawn M. Scates; John B. Walter; Jason M. Harp; Mark W. Drigert; Edward L. Reber

    2010-10-01

    The AGR-1 experiment is a fueled multiple-capsule irradiation experiment that was irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) from December 26, 2006 until November 6, 2009 in support of the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Technology Development Office (TDO) Fuel Development and Qualification program. An important measure of the fuel performance is the quantification of the fission product releases over the duration of the experiment. To provide this data for the inert fission gasses(Kr and Xe), a fission product monitoring system (FPMS) was developed and implemented to monitor the individual capsule effluents for the radioactive species. The FPMS continuously measured the concentrations of various krypton and xenon isotopes in the sweep gas from each AGR-1 capsule to provide an indicator of fuel irradiation performance. Spectrometer systems quantified the concentrations of Kr-85m, Kr-87, Kr-88, Kr-89, Kr-90, Xe-131m, Xe-133, Xe 135, Xe 135m, Xe-137, Xe-138, and Xe-139 accumulated over repeated eight hour counting intervals.-. To determine initial fuel quality and fuel performance, release activity for each isotope of interest was derived from FPMS measurements and paired with a calculation of the corresponding isotopic production or birthrate. The release activities and birthrates were combined to determine Release-to-Birth ratios for the selected nuclides. R/B values provide indicators of initial fuel quality and fuel performance during irradiation. This paper presents a brief summary of the FPMS, the release to birth ratio data for the AGR-1 experiment and preliminary comparisons of AGR-1 experimental fuels data to fission gas release models.

  2. Acute health effects after exposure to chlorine gas released after a train derailment.

    PubMed

    Van Sickle, David; Wenck, Mary Anne; Belflower, Amy; Drociuk, Dan; Ferdinands, Jill; Holguin, Fernando; Svendsen, Erik; Bretous, Lena; Jankelevich, Shirley; Gibson, James J; Garbe, Paul; Moolenaar, Ronald L

    2009-01-01

    In January 2005, a train derailment on the premises of a textile mill in South Carolina released 42 to 60 tons of chlorine gas in the middle of a small town. Medical records and autopsy reports were reviewed to describe the clinical presentation, hospital course, and pathology observed in persons hospitalized or deceased as a result of chlorine gas exposure. Eight persons died before reaching medical care; of the 71 persons hospitalized for acute health effects as a result of chlorine exposure, 1 died in the hospital. The mean age of the hospitalized persons was 40 years (range, 4 months-76 years); 87% were male. The median duration of hospitalization was 4 days (range, 1-29 days). Twenty-five (35%) persons were admitted to the intensive care unit; the median length of stay was 3 days. Many surviving victims developed significant pulmonary signs and severe airway inflammation; 41 (58%) hospitalized persons met PO2/FiO2 criteria for acute respiratory distress syndrome or acute lung injury. During their hospitalization, 40 (57%) developed abnormal x-ray findings, 74% of those within the first day. Hypoxia on room air and PO2/FiO2 ratio predicted severity of outcome as assessed by the duration of hospitalization and the need for intensive care support. This community release of chlorine gas caused widespread exposure and resulted in significant acute health effects and substantial health care requirements. Pulse oximetry and arterial blood gas analysis provided early indications of outcome severity.

  3. Acute health effects after exposure to chlorine gas released after a train derailment⋆

    PubMed Central

    Van Sickle, David; Wenck, Mary Anne; Belflower, Amy; Drociuk, Dan; Ferdinands, Jill; Holguin, Fernando; Svendsen, Erik; Bretous, Lena; Jankelevich, Shirley; Gibson, James J.; Garbe, Paul; Moolenaar, Ronald L.

    2015-01-01

    In January 2005, a train derailment on the premises of a textile mill in South Carolina released 42 to 60 tons of chlorine gas in the middle of a small town. Medical records and autopsy reports were reviewed to describe the clinical presentation, hospital course, and pathology observed in persons hospitalized or deceased as a result of chlorine gas exposure. Eight persons died before reaching medical care; of the 71 persons hospitalized for acute health effects as a result of chlorine exposure, 1 died in the hospital. The mean age of the hospitalized persons was 40 years (range, 4 months-76 years); 87% were male. The median duration of hospitalization was 4 days (range, 1-29 days). Twenty-five (35%) persons were admitted to the intensive care unit; the median length of stay was 3 days. Many surviving victims developed significant pulmonary signs and severe airway inflammation; 41 (58%) hospitalized persons met Po2/Fio2 criteria for acute respiratory distress syndrome or acute lung injury. During their hospitalization, 40 (57%) developed abnormal x-ray findings, 74% of those within the first day. Hypoxia on room air and Po2/Fio2 ratio predicted severity of outcome as assessed by the duration of hospitalization and the need for intensive care support. This community release of chlorine gas caused widespread exposure and resulted in significant acute health effects and substantial health care requirements. Pulse oximetry and arterial blood gas analysis provided early indications of outcome severity. PMID:19041527

  4. Modeling the influence of bubble pressure on grain boundary separation and fission gas release

    SciTech Connect

    Pritam Chakraborty; Michael R. Tonks; Giovanni Pastore

    2014-09-01

    Grain boundary (GB) separation as a mechanism for fission gas release (FGR), complementary to gas bubble interlinkage, has been experimentally observed in irradiated light water reactor fuel. However there has been limited effort to develop physics-based models incorporating this mechanism for the analysis of FGR. In this work, a computational study is carried out to investigate GB separation in UO2 fuel under the effect of gas bubble pressure and hydrostatic stress. A non-dimensional stress intensity factor formula is obtained through 2D axisymmetric analyses considering lenticular bubbles and Mode-I crack growth. The obtained functional form can be used in higher length-scale models to estimate the contribution of GB separation to FGR.

  5. Recent Operational Experience with the Internal Thermal Control System Dual-Membrane Gas Trap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leimkuehler, Thomas O.; Lukens, Clark; Reeves, Daniel R.; Holt, James M.

    2004-01-01

    A dual-membrane gas trap is currently used to remove gas bubbles from the Internal Thermal Control System (ITCS) coolant on board the International Space Station. The gas trap consists of concentric tube membrane pairs, comprised of outer hydrophilic tubes and inner hydrophobic fibers. Liquid coolant passes through the outer hydrophilic membrane, which traps the gas bubbles. The inner hydrophobic fiber allows the trapped gas bubbles to pass through and vent to the ambient atmosphere in the cabin. The gas removal performance and operational lifetime of the gas trap have been affected by contamination in the ITCS coolant. However, the gas trap has performed flawlessly with regard to its purpose of preventing gas bubbles from causing depriming, overspeed, and shutdown of the ITCS pump. This paper discusses on-orbit events over the course of the last year related to the performance and functioning of the gas trap.

  6. Proceedings from the GRCDA 9th international landfill gas symposium

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    This book presents the papers given at a conference on methane recovery from sanitary landfills. Topics considered at the conference included hazardous wastes, gaseous wastes, emission, pollution regulations, landfill testing, ambient air monitoring, landfill gas control, methane collection system operation and maintenance, estimating landfill gas yields, the production of high BTU gas, medium BTU gas, the pressure swing MDEA process, landfill gas power conversion, and methane fuel cells.

  7. Peptidases prevent μ-opioid receptor internalization in dorsal horn neurons by endogenously released opioids

    PubMed Central

    Song, Bingbing; Marvizón, Juan Carlos G.

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of peptidases on μ-opioid receptor (MOR) activation by endogenous opioids, we measured MOR-1 internalization in rat spinal cord slices. A mixture of inhibitors of aminopeptidases (amastatin), dipeptidyl carboxypeptidase (captopril), and neutral endopeptidase (phosphoramidon) dramatically increased the potencies of Leu-enkephalin and dynorphin A to produce MOR-1 internalization, and also enhanced the effects of Met-enkephalin and α-neoendorphin, but not endomorphins or β-endorphin. Omission of any one inhibitor abolished Leu-enkephalin-induced internalization, indicating that all three peptidases degraded enkephalins. Amastatin preserved dynorphin A-induced internalization, and phosphoramidon, but not captopril, increased this effect, indicating that the effect of dynorphin A was prevented by aminopeptidases and neutral endopeptidase. Veratridine (30 μM) or 50 mM KCl produced MOR-1 internalization in the presence of peptidase inhibitors, but little or no internalization in their absence. These effects were attributed to opioid release, because they were abolished by the selective MOR antagonist CTAP and were Ca2+-dependent. The effect of veratridine was protected by phosphoramidon plus amastatin or captopril, but not by amastatin plus captopril or by phosphoramidon alone, indicating that released opioids are mainly cleaved by neutral endopeptidase, with a lesser involvement of aminopeptidases and dipeptidyl carboxypeptidase. Therefore, since the potencies of endomorphin-1 and -2 to elicit internalization were unaffected by peptidase inhibitors, the opioids released by veratridine were not endomorphins. Confocal microscopy revealed that MOR-1-expressing neurons were in close proximity to terminals containing opioids with enkephalin-like sequences. These findings indicate that peptidases prevent the activation of extrasynaptic MOR-1 in dorsal horn neurons. PMID:12629189

  8. Substrate lability and plant activity controls greenhouse gas release from Neotropical peatland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sjogersten, Sofie; Hoyos, Jorge; Lomax, Barry; Turner, Ben; Wright, Emma

    2014-05-01

    Almost one third of global CO2 emissions resulting from land use change and substantial CH4 emissions originate from tropical peatlands. However, our understanding of the controls of CO2 and CH4 release from tropical peatlands are limited. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of peat lability and the activity of the vegetation on gas release using a combination of field and laboratory experiments. We demonstrated that peat lability constrained CH4 production to the surface peat under anaerobic conditions. The presence of plants shifted the C balance from a C source to a C sink with respect to CO2 while the activity of the root system strongly influenced CH4 emissions through its impact on soil O2 inputs. Both field and laboratory data suggest a coupling between the photosynthetic activity of the vegetation and the release of both CO2 and CH4 following the circadian rhythm of the dominant plant functional types. Forest clearance for agriculture resulted in elevated CH4 release, which we attribute in part to the cessation of root O2 inputs to the peat. We conclude that high emissions of CO2 and CH4 from forested tropical peatlands are likely driven by labile C inputs from the vegetation but that root O2 release may limit CH4 emissions.

  9. A physiological model of the release of gas bubbles from crevices under decompression.

    PubMed

    Chappell, M A; Payne, S J

    2006-09-28

    Moving bubbles have been observed in the blood during or after decompression using ultrasonic techniques. It has been proposed that these may grow from nuclei housed on the blood vessel wall. One candidate for bubble nucleation is hydrophobic crevices. This work explores the growth of gas pockets that might exist in conical crevices and the release of bubbles from these crevices under decompression. An existing dynamic mathematical model for the stability of gas pockets in crevices [Chappell, M.A., Payne, S.J., in press. A physiological model of gas pockets in crevices and their behavior under compression. Respir. Physiol. Neurobiol.] is extended to include the behavior as the gas pocket reaches the crevice mouth and bubbles seed into the bloodstream. The behavior of the crevice bubble is explored for a single inert gas, both alone and with metabolic gases included. It was found that the presence of metabolic gases has a significant effect on the behavior under decompression and that this appears to be due to the high diffusivity of these gases.

  10. The influence of cladding on fission gas release from irradiated U-Mo monolithic fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkes, Douglas E.; Casella, Amanda J.; Casella, Andrew M.

    2017-04-01

    The monolithic uranium-molybdenum (U-Mo) alloy has been proposed as a fuel design capable of converting the world's highest power research reactors from use of high enriched uranium to low enriched uranium. However, a zirconium (Zr) diffusion barrier must be used to eliminate interactions that form between the U-Mo monolith and aluminum alloy 6061 (AA6061) cladding during fabrication and are enhanced during irradiation. One aspect of fuel development and qualification is to demonstrate an appropriate understanding of the extent of fission product release from the fuel under anticipated service environments. An exothermic reaction has previously been observed between the AA6061 cladding and Zr diffusion layer. In this paper, two fuel segments with different irradiation history were subjected to specified thermal profiles under a controlled atmosphere using a thermogravimetric/differential thermal analyzer coupled with a mass spectrometer inside a hot cell. Samples from each segment were tested with cladding and without cladding to investigate the effect, if any, that the exothermic reaction has on fission gas release mechanisms. Measurements revealed there is an instantaneous effect of the cladding/Zr exothermic reaction, but not necessarily a cumulative effect above approximately 973 K (700 °C). The mechanisms responsible for fission gas release events are discussed.

  11. Measurement of fission gas release from irradiated UMo dispersion fuel samples

    SciTech Connect

    Burkes, Douglas E.; Casella, Amanda J.; Casella, Andrew M.

    2016-09-01

    The uranium-molybdenum (U-Mo) alloy dispersed in an Al-Si matrix has been proposed as one fuel design capable of converting some of the world’s highest power research reactors from the use of high enriched uranium (HEU) to low enriched uranium (LEU). One aspect of the fuel development and qualification process is to demonstrate appropriate understanding of the extent of fission product release from the fuel under anticipated service environments. In this paper, two irradiated samples containing 53.6 vol% U-7wt% Mo fuel particles dispersed in an Al-2wt% Si matrix were subjected to specified thermal profiles under a controlled atmosphere using a thermogravimetric/differential thermal analyzer coupled with a mass spectrometer inside a hot cell. Measurements revealed three distinct fission gas release events for the samples from 400 to 700 oC, as well as a number of minor fission gas releases below and above this temperature range. The mechanisms responsible for these events are discussed, and the results have been compared with available information in the literature with exceptional agreement.

  12. Measurement of fission gas release from irradiated Usbnd Mo dispersion fuel samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkes, Douglas E.; Casella, Amanda J.; Casella, Andrew M.

    2016-09-01

    The uranium-molybdenum (Usbnd Mo) alloy dispersed in an Alsbnd Si matrix has been proposed as one fuel design capable of converting some of the world's highest power research reactors from the use of high enriched uranium (HEU) to low enriched uranium (LEU). One aspect of the fuel development and qualification process is to demonstrate appropriate understanding of the extent of fission product release from the fuel under anticipated service environments. In this paper, two irradiated samples containing 53.9 vol% U-7wt% Mo fuel particles dispersed in an Al-2wt% Si matrix were subjected to specified thermal profiles under a controlled atmosphere using a thermogravimetric/differential thermal analyzer coupled with a mass spectrometer inside a hot cell. Measurements revealed three distinct fission gas release events for the samples from 400 to 700 °C, as well as a number of minor fission gas releases below and above this temperature range. The mechanisms responsible for these events are discussed, and the results have been compared with available information in the literature with exceptional agreement.

  13. Recommendations from the 2008 International Summit on Proteomics Data Release and Sharing Policy: the Amsterdam principles.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Henry; Snyder, Mike; Uhlén, Mathias; Andrews, Phil; Beavis, Ronald; Borchers, Christoph; Chalkley, Robert J; Cho, Sang Yun; Cottingham, Katie; Dunn, Michael; Dylag, Tomasz; Edgar, Ron; Hare, Peter; Heck, Albert J R; Hirsch, Roland F; Kennedy, Karen; Kolar, Patrik; Kraus, Hans-Joachim; Mallick, Parag; Nesvizhskii, Alexey; Ping, Peipei; Pontén, Fredrik; Yang, Liming; Yates, John R; Stein, Stephen E; Hermjakob, Henning; Kinsinger, Christopher R; Apweiler, Rolf

    2009-07-01

    Policies supporting the rapid and open sharing of genomic data have directly fueled the accelerated pace of discovery in large-scale genomics research. The proteomics community is starting to implement analogous policies and infrastructure for making large-scale proteomics data widely available on a precompetitive basis. On August 14, 2008, the National Cancer Institute (NCI) convened the "International Summit on Proteomics Data Release and Sharing Policy" in Amsterdam, The Netherlands, to identify and address potential roadblocks to rapid and open access to data. The six principles agreed upon by key stakeholders at the summit addressed issues surrounding (1) timing, (2) comprehensiveness, (3) format, (4) deposition to repositories, (5) quality metrics, and (6) responsibility for proteomics data release. This summit report explores various approaches to develop a framework of data release and sharing principles that will most effectively fulfill the needs of the funding agencies and the research community.

  14. Estimation of Internal Radiation Dose from both Immediate Releases and Continued Exposures to Contaminated Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Napier, Bruce A.

    2012-03-26

    A brief description is provided of the basic concepts related to 'internal dose' and how it differs from doses that result from radioactive materials and direct radiation outside of the body. The principles of radiation dose reconstruction, as applied to both internal and external doses, is discussed based upon a recent publication prepared by the US National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements. Finally, ideas are introduced related to residual radioactive contamination in the environment that has resulted from the releases from the damaged reactors and also to the management of wastes that may be generated in both regional cleanup and NPP decommissioning.

  15. Internal Wire Guide For Gas/Tungsten-Arc Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Gene E.; Dyer, Gerald E.

    1990-01-01

    Wire kept in shielding gas, preventing oxidation. Guide inside gas cup of gas/tungsten-arc welding torch feeds filler wire to weld pool along line parallel to axis of torch. Eliminates problem of how to place and orient torch to provide clearance for external wire guide.

  16. Medical planning for toxic releases into the community: the example of chlorine gas.

    PubMed Central

    Baxter, P J; Davies, P C; Murray, V

    1989-01-01

    Emergency planning for a major accidental release of chlorine gas from industrial installations into the community is outlined for emergency services and hospitals. Realistic planning has been made possible with the advent of computer models for gas dispersion which may be used to estimate the numbers of deaths and casualties, according to their severity. For most purposes sufficient accuracy may be obtained by using a small number of computer analyses for the most serious reasonably foreseeable events under typical day and night weather conditions, and allowing for the emergency response to be scaled up or down according to the size of an actual release. In highly populated areas triage should be preplanned to deal with a large number of victims; field stations will be needed for the treatment and observation of minor casualties. The management and treatment of casualties is summarised. The best protection against a gas cloud is afforded by buildings whose windows, doors, and ventilation systems have been closed. Hospitals in the vicinity of an installation should draw up plans to protect patients and staff. Coordination in a disaster will require toxicological and epidemiological expertise and hospital plans should allow for this. PMID:2713283

  17. Hydrogen Gas Retention and Release from WTP Vessels: Summary of Preliminary Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Bontha, Jagannadha R.; Daniel, Richard C.; Mahoney, Lenna A.; Rassat, Scot D.; Wells, Beric E.; Bao, Jie; Boeringa, Gregory K.; Buchmiller, William C.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Chun, Jaehun; Karri, Naveen K.; Li, Huidong; Tran, Diana N.

    2015-07-01

    The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is currently being designed and constructed to pretreat and vitrify a large portion of the waste in the 177 underground waste storage tanks at the Hanford Site. A number of technical issues related to the design of the pretreatment facility (PTF) of the WTP have been identified. These issues must be resolved prior to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of River Protection (ORP) reaching a decision to proceed with engineering, procurement, and construction activities for the PTF. One of the issues is Technical Issue T1 - Hydrogen Gas Release from Vessels (hereafter referred to as T1). The focus of T1 is identifying controls for hydrogen release and completing any testing required to close the technical issue. In advance of selecting specific controls for hydrogen gas safety, a number of preliminary technical studies were initiated to support anticipated future testing and to improve the understanding of hydrogen gas generation, retention, and release within PTF vessels. These activities supported the development of a plan defining an overall strategy and approach for addressing T1 and achieving technical endpoints identified for T1. Preliminary studies also supported the development of a test plan for conducting testing and analysis to support closing T1. Both of these plans were developed in advance of selecting specific controls, and in the course of working on T1 it was decided that the testing and analysis identified in the test plan were not immediately needed. However, planning activities and preliminary studies led to significant technical progress in a number of areas. This report summarizes the progress to date from the preliminary technical studies. The technical results in this report should not be used for WTP design or safety and hazards analyses and technical results are marked with the following statement: “Preliminary Technical Results for Planning – Not to be used for WTP Design

  18. Modeling of Oceanic Gas Hydrate Instability and Methane Release in Response to Climate Change

    SciTech Connect

    Reagan, Matthew; Reagan, Matthew T.; Moridis, George J.

    2008-04-15

    Paleooceanographic evidence has been used to postulate that methane from oceanic hydrates may have had a significant role in regulating global climate, implicating global oceanic deposits of methane gas hydrate as the main culprit in instances of rapid climate change that have occurred in the past. However, the behavior of contemporary oceanic methane hydrate deposits subjected to rapid temperature changes, like those predicted under future climate change scenarios, is poorly understood. To determine the fate of the carbon stored in these hydrates, we performed simulations of oceanic gas hydrate accumulations subjected to temperature changes at the seafloor and assessed the potential for methane release into the ocean. Our modeling analysis considered the properties of benthic sediments, the saturation and distribution of the hydrates, the ocean depth, the initial seafloor temperature, and for the first time, estimated the effect of benthic biogeochemical activity. The results show that shallow deposits--such as those found in arctic regions or in the Gulf of Mexico--can undergo rapid dissociation and produce significant methane fluxes of 2 to 13 mol/yr/m{sup 2} over a period of decades, and release up to 1,100 mol of methane per m{sup 2} of seafloor in a century. These fluxes may exceed the ability of the seafloor environment (via anaerobic oxidation of methane) to consume the released methane or sequester the carbon. These results will provide a source term to regional or global climate models in order to assess the coupling of gas hydrate deposits to changes in the global climate.

  19. The Effect of Increased Salinity and Temperature in Peat Soils from the Everglades: Implications for Biogenic Gas Production and Release Under a Sea Level Rise Scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirianni, M.; Comas, X.

    2015-12-01

    Sea level rise (SLR) is an increasingly important topic for many low-lying coastal areas such as South Florida. The United States Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) projects that sea level change in South Florida, over the next 50 years, will increase between 0.1 and 0.6 meters. Given the low elevation and its shallow slope, the Everglades region is highly susceptible to changes in sea level. Based on the USACE SLR projections it seems inevitable that previously unexposed freshwater areas of the southern Everglades will become increasingly exposed to saline water. The effects of such saline water intrusion into the current C dynamics of the Everglades (particularly in terms of biogenic gas production and emissions, i.e. CH4 and CO2) is however uncertain. As previously proposed by others, increases in salinity in peat soils will result in dilation of pore spaces and thus increases in hydraulic conductivity, while limiting methanogenesis. However, increases in temperature may induce the opposite effect, particularly in terms of methanogenic activity. Previous studies investigating the effects of increased salinity on freshwater peat soils in the Everglades are very limited, and to our knowledge none have intended to monitor the internal gas dynamics within the peat matrix using an array of geophysical and hydrological methods such as ground penetrating radar (GPR), time-lapse photography, gas chromatography, and constant head permeameter tests. Preliminary laboratory results showed (1) a progressive decrease in gas content within the peat matrix (i.e. production) and gas releases once fluid conductivity is increased; (2) a progressive increase in hydraulic conductivity once fluid conductivity is increased; and (3) maximum gas releases detected during early stages of pore dilation (after increasing salinity) followed by a progressive decrease in gas release as salinity increased. This study has implications for better understanding how C dynamics in the Everglades may be

  20. Periodic gas release from the LUSI mud volcano (East Java, Indonesia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanderkluysen, L.; Burton, M. R.; Clarke, A. B.; Hartnett, H. E.; Smekens, J.

    2012-12-01

    The LUSI mud volcano has been erupting since May 2006 in a densely populated district of the Sidoarjo regency (East Java, Indonesia), forcing the evacuation of 40,000 people and destroying industries, farmlands, and 10,000 homes. Peak mud extrusion rates of 180,000 m3/d were measured in the first few months of the eruption, which have decreased to <20,000 m3/d in 2012. Mud volcanoes often release fluids in a pulsating fashion, with periodic timescales ranging from minutes to days, and LUSI is no exception. These oscillations, common in natural systems of multi-phase fluid flow, are thought to result from some combination of complex feedback mechanisms between conduit and source geometry, fluid compressibility, viscosity and density, changes in lithostatic stresses, reservoir pressure, fluid phases or vent conditions. Crisis management workers and local residents reported observations of pulsating eruptive cycles lasting a few hours during the first two years of the eruption, and possibly beyond. Since that time, activity has shifted to individual transient eruptions recurring at intervals of a few minutes. In May and October of 2011, we documented the periodic explosive release of fluids at LUSI using a combination of high-resolution time-lapse photography, continuous webcam, open path FTIR, and thermal infrared imagery. The mud, consisting of approximately 70% water, is erupted at temperatures close to boiling. Gases are periodically released by the bursting of bubbles approximately 3 m in diameter, triggering mud fountains ~20 m in height. No appreciable gas seepage was detected in the quiescent intervals between bubble bursts. Absorption spectrometry in the infrared spectrum reveals that the gas released during explosions consists of 98.5% water vapor, 1% carbon dioxide, and 0.3% methane. On rare occasions, minor amounts of ammonia were also detected. Using simplified plume geometries based on observations, we estimate that LUSI releases approximately 1,500 T

  1. Historical Doses from Tritiated Water and Tritiated Hydrogen Gas Released to the Atmosphere from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Part 5. Accidental Releases

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, S

    2007-08-15

    Over the course of fifty-three years, LLNL had six acute releases of tritiated hydrogen gas (HT) and one acute release of tritiated water vapor (HTO) that were too large relative to the annual releases to be included as part of the annual releases from normal operations detailed in Parts 3 and 4 of the Tritium Dose Reconstruction (TDR). Sandia National Laboratories/California (SNL/CA) had one such release of HT and one of HTO. Doses to the maximally exposed individual (MEI) for these accidents have been modeled using an equation derived from the time-dependent tritium model, UFOTRI, and parameter values based on expert judgment. All of these acute releases are described in this report. Doses that could not have been exceeded from the large HT releases of 1965 and 1970 were calculated to be 43 {micro}Sv (4.3 mrem) and 120 {micro}Sv (12 mrem) to an adult, respectively. Two published sets of dose predictions for the accidental HT release in 1970 are compared with the dose predictions of this TDR. The highest predicted dose was for an acute release of HTO in 1954. For this release, the dose that could not have been exceeded was estimated to have been 2 mSv (200 mrem), although, because of the high uncertainty about the predictions, the likely dose may have been as low as 360 {micro}Sv (36 mrem) or less. The estimated maximum exposures from the accidental releases were such that no adverse health effects would be expected. Appendix A lists all accidents and large routine puff releases that have occurred at LLNL and SNL/CA between 1953 and 2005. Appendix B describes the processes unique to tritium that must be modeled after an acute release, some of the time-dependent tritium models being used today, and the results of tests of these models.

  2. Composition and flux of explosive gas release at LUSI mud volcano (East Java, Indonesia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanderkluysen, Loïc; Burton, Michael R.; Clarke, Amanda B.; Hartnett, Hilairy E.; Smekens, Jean-François

    2014-07-01

    LUSI mud volcano has been erupting since May 2006 in the densely populated Sidoarjo regency (East Java, Indonesia), forcing the evacuation of 40,000 people and destroying industry, farmland, and over 10,000 homes. Mud extrusion rates of 180,000 m3 d-1 were measured in the first few months of the eruption, decreasing to a loosely documented <20,000 m3 d-1 in 2012. The last few years of activity have been characterized by periodic short-lived eruptive bursts. In May and October 2011, we documented this activity using high-resolution time-lapse photography, open-path FTIR, and thermal infrared imagery. Gases (98% water vapor, 1.5% carbon dioxide, 0.5% methane) were periodically released by the bursting of bubbles approximately 3 m in diameter which triggered mud fountains to ˜10 m and gas plumes to hundreds of meters above the vent. During periods of quiescence (1-3 min), no appreciable gas seepage occurred. We estimate that LUSI releases approximately 2300 t yr-1 of methane, 30,000 t yr-1 of CO2, and 800,000 t yr-1 of water vapor. Gas bubble nucleation depths are >4000 m for methane and approximately 600 m for carbon dioxide; however, the mass fractions of these gases are insufficient to explain the observed dynamics. Rather, the primary driver of the cyclic bubble-bursting activity is decompressional boiling of water, which initiates a few tens of meters below the surface, setting up slug flow in the upper conduit. Our measured gas flux and conceptual model lead to a corresponding upper-bound estimate for the mud-water mass flux of 105 m3 d-1.

  3. Acute health impact of the gas release at Lake Nyos, Cameroon, 1986

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baxter, Peter J.; Kapila, Mukesh

    1989-11-01

    Available medical evidence on the acute health impact of the gas release at Lake Nyos is summarised, including the results of a survey of medical records of 845 survivors treated at Wum and Nkambe hospitals. The main clinical features were compatible with exposure to an asphyxiant gas such as CO 2 but confirmation of the identity of the gas or gases involved was not possible. Exposure to CO 2 over such a large inhabited area and reversible coma lasting for hours after CO 2 gassing do not appear to have been reported before. In some victims, blistering or ulceration of the skin was present which could not be readily explained by local injury from pressure, or burns from acid, or falling near fires. Further epidemiological studies on survivors are unlikely to be feasible, but the possibility of long-term anoxic brain damage among adults and children who had been rendered comatose by the gas should be considered, though overt evidence of major neurological or respiratory disability was not apparent in survivors in the weeks following the disaster. The inadequacy of the toxicological and forensic evidence obtained points to the need for the rapid mobilisation of medical scientists in future disasters of this kind.

  4. 76 FR 3142 - Release of Exposure Draft Technical Bulletins; Accounting for Oil and Gas Resources and Federal...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL ACCOUNTING STANDARDS ADVISORY BOARD Release of Exposure Draft Technical Bulletins; Accounting for Oil and Gas Resources and Federal Natural Resources Other Than Oil and Gas AGENCY: Federal Accounting Standards Advisory Board...

  5. Air Embolism During TEVAR: Carbon Dioxide Flushing Decreases the Amount of Gas Released from Thoracic Stent-Grafts During Deployment.

    PubMed

    Rohlffs, Fiona; Tsilimparis, Nikolaos; Saleptsis, Vasilis; Diener, Holger; Debus, E Sebastian; Kölbel, Tilo

    2017-02-01

    To investigate the amount of gas released from Zenith thoracic stent-grafts using standard saline flushing vs the carbon dioxide flushing technique. In an experimental bench setting, 20 thoracic stent-grafts were separated into 2 groups of 10 endografts. One group of grafts was flushed with 60 mL saline and the other group was flushed with carbon dioxide for 5 minutes followed by 60 mL saline. All grafts were deployed into a water-filled container with a curved plastic pipe; the deployment was recorded and released gas was measured using a calibrated setup. Gas was released from all grafts in both study groups during endograft deployment. The average amount of released gas per graft was significantly lower in the study group with carbon dioxide flushing (0.79 vs 0.51 mL, p=0.005). Thoracic endografts release significant amounts of air during deployment if flushed according to the instructions for use. Application of carbon dioxide for the flushing of thoracic stent-grafts prior to standard saline flush significantly reduces the amount of gas released during deployment. The additional use of carbon dioxide should be considered as a standard flush technique for aortic stent-grafts, especially in those implanted in proximal aortic segments, to reduce the risk of air embolism and stroke.

  6. Experimental analysis of internal gas flow configurations for a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell stack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedl, A.; Fraser, S. D.; Baumgartner, W. R.; Hacker, V.

    The internal gas distribution system utilised for supplying fresh reactants and removing reaction products from the individual cells of a fuel cell stack can be designed in a parallel, a serial or a mixture of parallel and serial gas flow configuration. In order to investigate the interdependence between the internal stack gas distribution configuration and single cell as well as overall stack performance, a small laboratory-scale fuel cell stack consisting of identical unit cells was subject to operation with different gas distribution configurations and different operating parameters. The current/voltage characteristics measured with the different gas distribution configurations are analysed and compared on unit cell- as well as on stack-level. The results show the significant impact of the internal stack gas distribution system on operation and performance of the individual unit cells and the overall stack.

  7. Strong-Sludge Gas Retention and Release Mechanisms in Clay Simulants

    SciTech Connect

    Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Buchmiller, William C.; Probert, Samuel G.; Owen, Antionette T.; Brockman, Fred J.

    2012-02-24

    The Hanford Site has 28 double-shell tanks (DSTs) and 149 single-shell tanks (SSTs) containing radioactive wastes that are complex mixes of radioactive and chemical products. The mission of the Department of Energy's River Protection Project is to retrieve and treat the Hanford tank waste for disposal and close the tank farms. A key aspect of the mission is to retrieve and transfer waste from the SSTs, which are at greater risk for leaking, into DSTs for interim storage until the waste is transferred to and treated in the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant. There is, however, limited space in the existing DSTs to accept waste transfers from the SSTs, and approaches to overcoming the limited DST space will benefit the overall mission. The purpose of this study is to summarize and analyze the key previous experiment that forms the basis for the relaxed controls and to summarize progress and results on new experiments focused on understanding the conditions that result in low gas retention. The previous large-scale test used about 50 m3 of sediment, which would be unwieldy for doing multiple parametric experiments. Accordingly, experiments began with smaller-scale tests to determine whether the desired mechanisms can be studied without the difficulty of conducting very large experiments. The most significant results from the current experiments are that progressively lower gas retention occurs in tests with progressively deeper sediment layers and that the method of gas generation also affects the maximum retention. Based on the results of this study, it is plausible that relatively low gas retention could occur in sufficiently deep tank waste in DSTs. The current studies and previous work, however, have not explored how gas retention and release will behave when two or more layers with different properties are present.

  8. Chlorine gas release associated with employee language barrier--Arkansas, 2011.

    PubMed

    2012-12-07

    On June 27, 2011, a worker at a poultry processing plant in Arkansas began to pour sodium hypochlorite into a 55-gallon drum that contained residual acidic antimicrobial solution. When the sodium hypochlorite reacted with the solution, greenish-yellow chlorine gas was released into the small room where the drum was located and then spread into the plant, where approximately 600 workers were present. These workers promptly were evacuated. Chlorine is a respiratory irritant and can produce symptoms ranging from mild eye, nose, and throat irritation to severe inflammation of the lung, which can lead to death. Of the approximately 600 workers who were evacuated; 545 were later interviewed, 195 reported seeking medical treatment, 152 reported being hospitalized, and the plant nurse reported that five were admitted to intensive-care units. The next day, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) asked for technical assistance from CDC's National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) to evaluate health effects of the release and make recommendations to prevent future occurrences. This report describes the results of that evaluation, including findings from two follow-up site visits conducted approximately 4 and 6 months after the release. Of the 545 workers who participated in the evaluation, three developed reactive airways dysfunction syndrome (RADS), an irritant-induced form of asthma that can persist for life. The worker who inadvertently mixed the two solutions indicated that the drum was labeled in English but he could only read Spanish. This incident underscores the danger posed by chlorine gas and the importance of employers providing adequate training and communication of health and safety precautions to employees.

  9. Modeling Gas Transport in the Shallow Subsurface During the ZERT CO2 Release Test

    SciTech Connect

    Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Lewicki, Jennifer L.; Dobeck, Laura; Spangler, Lee

    2009-01-15

    We used the multiphase and multicomponent TOUGH2/EOS7CA model to carry out predictive simulations of CO{sub 2} injection into the shallow subsurface of an agricultural field in Bozeman, Montana. The purpose of the simulations was to inform the choice of CO{sub 2} injection rate and design of monitoring and detection activities for a CO{sub 2} release experiment. The release experiment configuration consists of a long horizontal well (70 m) installed at a depth of approximately 2.5 m into which CO{sub 2} is injected to mimic leakage from a geologic carbon sequestration site through a linear feature such as a fault. We estimated the permeability of the soil and cobble layers present at the site by manual inversion of measurements of soil CO{sub 2} flux from a vertical-well CO{sub 2} release. Based on these estimated permeability values, predictive simulations for the horizontal well showed that CO{sub 2} injection just below the water table creates an effective gas-flow pathway through the saturated zone up to the unsaturated zone. Once in the unsaturated zone, CO{sub 2} spreads out laterally within the cobble layer, where liquid saturation is relatively low. CO{sub 2} also migrates upward into the soil layer through the capillary barrier and seeps out at the ground surface. The simulations predicted a breakthrough time of approximately two days for the 100kg d{sup -1} injection rate, which also produced a flux within the range desired for testing detection and monitoring approaches. The seepage area produced by the model was approximately five meters wide above the horizontal well, compatible with the detection and monitoring methods tested. For a given flow rate, gas-phase diffusion of CO{sub 2} tends to dominate over advection near the ground surface, where the CO{sub 2} concentration gradient is large, while advection dominates deeper in the system.

  10. Sulfur and chlorine in late Cretaceous Deccan magmas and eruptive gas release.

    PubMed

    Self, Stephen; Blake, Stephen; Sharma, Kirti; Widdowson, Mike; Sephton, Sarah

    2008-03-21

    Large-volume pāhoehoe lava flows erupted 67 to 65 million years ago, forming the Deccan Traps, India. The impact of these flood basalt eruptions on the global atmosphere and the coeval end-Cretaceous mass extinction has been uncertain. To assess the potential gas release from this volcanism, we measured sulfur and chlorine concentrations in rare glass inclusions inside crystals and on glassy selvages preserved within lavas. Concentrations range from approximately 1400 parts per million of S and 900 parts per million of Cl in inclusions down to a few hundred parts per million in the lava. These data indicate that eruptions of Deccan lavas could have released at most 0.103 weight % of S, yielding up to 5.4 teragrams of SO2 per cubic kilometer of lava. A more conservative estimate is 0.07 weight % of S and 0.04 weight % of Cl, yielding 3.5 teragrams of SO2 and 1 teragram of HCl for every cubic kilometer of lava erupted. The flows were very large in volume, and these results imply that huge amounts of S and Cl gases were released. The environmental impact from even individual eruptions during past flood basalt activity was probably severe.

  11. Measurement of fission gas release from irradiated U-Mo monolithic fuel samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkes, Douglas E.; Casella, Amanda J.; Casella, Andrew M.; Luscher, Walter G.; Rice, Francine J.; Pool, Karl N.

    2015-06-01

    The uranium-molybdenum (U-Mo) alloy in a monolithic form has been proposed as one fuel design capable of converting some of the world's highest power research reactors from the use of high enriched uranium (HEU) to low enriched uranium (LEU). One aspect of the fuel development and qualification process is to demonstrate appropriate understanding of the extent of fission product release from the fuel under anticipated service environments. An apparatus capable of heating post-irradiated small-scale samples cut from larger fuel segments according to specified thermal profiles under a controlled atmosphere has been installed into a hot cell. Results show that optimized experimental parameters to investigate fission product release from small samples have been established. Initial measurements conducted on aluminum alloy clad uranium-molybdenum monolithic fuel samples reveal three clear fission gas release events over the temperature range of 30-1000 °C. The mechanisms responsible for these events are discussed, and the results have been compared with available information in the literature.

  12. Species production and heat release rates in two-layered natural gas fires

    SciTech Connect

    Zukoski, E.E.; Morehart, J.H.; Kubota, T.; Toner, S.J. )

    1991-02-01

    A fire burning in an enclosure with restricted ventilation will result in the accumulation of a layer of warm products of combustion mixed with entrained air adjacent to the ceiling. For many conditions, the depth of this layer will extend to occupy a significant fraction of the volume of the room. Eventually, the interface between this vitiated ceiling layer and the uncontaminated environment below will position itself so that a large portion of the combustion processes occur in this vitiated layer. A description is given of experimental work concerning the rates of formation of product species and heat release in a turbulent, buoyant natural gas diffusion flame burning in this two-layered configuration. The enclosure was modeled by placing a hood above a burner so that it accumulated the plume gases, and the unsteady development of the ceiling layer was modeled by the direct addition of air into the upper portion of the hood. Measurements of the composition of these gases allowed the computation of stoichiometries and heat release rates. These investigations showed that the species produced in the flame depend primarily on the stoichiometry of the gases present in the ceiling layer and weakly on the temperature of the layer, but are independent of the fuel pair ratio of the mass transported into the layer by the plume. Heat release rates in the fires were compared to a theoretical limit based on a stoichiometric reaction of fuel and air with excess components left unchanged by the combustion.

  13. Measurement of fission gas release from irradiated U–Mo monolithic fuel samples

    SciTech Connect

    Burkes, Douglas E.; Casella, Amanda J.; Casella, Andrew M.; Luscher, Walter G.; Rice, Francine J.; Pool, Karl N.

    2015-06-01

    The uranium–molybdenum (U-Mo) alloy in a monolithic form has been proposed as one fuel design capable of converting some of the world’s highest power research reactors from the use of high enriched uranium (HEU) to low enriched uranium (LEU). One aspect of the fuel development and qualification process is to demonstrate appropriate understanding of the extent of fission product release from the fuel under anticipated service environments. An apparatus capable of heating post-irradiated small-scale samples cut from larger fuel segments according to specified thermal profiles under a controlled atmosphere has been installed into a hot cell. Results show that optimized experimental parameters to investigate fission product release from small samples have been established. Initial measurements conducted on aluminum alloy clad uranium–molybdenum monolithic fuel samples reveal three clear fission gas release events over the temperature range of 30-1000 °C. The mechanisms responsible for these events are discussed, and the results have been compared with available information in the literature.

  14. Measurement of Fission Gas Release from Irradiated U-Mo Monolithic Fuel Samples

    SciTech Connect

    Burkes, Douglas; Casella, Amanda J.; Casella, Andrew M.; Luscher, Walter G.; Rice, Francine; Pool, Karl N.

    2015-06-01

    The uranium-molybdenum (U-Mo) alloy in a monolithic form has been proposed as one fuel design capable of converting some of the world’s highest power research reactors from the use of high enriched uranium (HEU) to low enriched uranium (LEU). One aspect of the fuel development and qualification process is to demonstrate appropriate understanding of the extent of fission product release from the fuel under anticipated service environments. An apparatus capable of annealing post-irradiated small-scale samples cut from larger fuel segments according to specified thermal profiles under a controlled atmosphere has been installed into a hot cell. Results show that optimized experimental parameters to investigate fission product release from small samples have been established. Initial measurements conducted on aluminum alloy clad uranium-molybdenum monolithic fuel samples reveal three clear fission gas release events over the temperature range of 30-1050 C. The mechanisms responsible for these events are discussed, and the results have been compared with available information in literature.

  15. Sulfur and Chlorine in Late Cretaceous Deccan Magmas and Eruptive Gas Release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Self, Stephen; Blake, Stephen; Sharma, Kirti; Widdowson, Mike; Sephton, Sarah

    2008-03-01

    Large-volume pāhoehoe lava flows erupted 67 to 65 million years ago, forming the Deccan Traps, India. The impact of these flood basalt eruptions on the global atmosphere and the coeval end-Cretaceous mass extinction has been uncertain. To assess the potential gas release from this volcanism, we measured sulfur and chlorine concentrations in rare glass inclusions inside crystals and on glassy selvages preserved within lavas. Concentrations range from ~1400 parts per million of S and 900 parts per million of Cl in inclusions down to a few hundred parts per million in the lava. These data indicate that eruptions of Deccan lavas could have released at most 0.103 weight % of S, yielding up to 5.4 teragrams of SO2 per cubic kilometer of lava. A more conservative estimate is 0.07 weight % of S and 0.04 weight % of Cl, yielding 3.5 teragrams of SO2 and 1 teragram of HCl for every cubic kilometer of lava erupted. The flows were very large in volume, and these results imply that huge amounts of S and Cl gases were released. The environmental impact from even individual eruptions during past flood basalt activity was probably severe.

  16. Diagenetic Features in Yellowknife Bay, Gale Crater, Mars: Implications for Substrate Rheology and Potential Gas Release

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kah, L. C.; Stack, K; Siebach, K.; Grotzinger, J.; Summer, D.; Farien, A.; Oehler, D.; Schieber, J.; Leville, R.; Edgar, L; Rice, M.

    2014-01-01

    Multiple diagenetic features have been observed in clay­-bearing mudstone exposed within Yellowknife Bay, Gale Crater, Mars. These features occurred during at least two separate episodes: an early generation of spheroidal concretions that co-­occur with a dense networks of mineralized fractures, and a later generation of mineralized veins. Concretions consist of mm-sized spheroids (0.4 to 8.0 mm, mean diameter of 1.2 mm) that are distinctly more resistant than the encompassing mudstone. Dissected spheroids suggest an origin via compaction and incipient lithification of the substrate at the perimeter of syndepositional void space. Concretions are generally patchy in their distribution within clay--bearing mudstone, but in places can be the dominant fabric element. Locally dense networks of mineralized fractures occur in regions of low concretion abundance. These consist of short (< 50 cm), curvilinear to planar mineralized voids that occur across a range of orientations from vertical to subhorizontal. Fractures are filled by multi-phase cement consisting of two isopachous, erosionally resistant outer bands, and a central less resistant fill. Physical relationships suggests that original fractures may have formed as both interconnected voids and as discrete cross--cutting features. Co--occurrence of early diagenetic concretions and fracture networks suggests a common origin via gas release within a subaqueous, shallow substrate. We suggest that gas release within weakly cohesive subsurface sediments resulted in substrate dewatering and an increase in the cohesive strength of the substrate. Local differences in substrate strength and rate of gas production would have result in formation of either discrete voids or fracture networks. A second generation of mineralized veins is characterized by a regionally low spatial density, predominantly vertical or horizontal orientations, and a single phase of Ca--sulfate mineral fill. These veins cross-cut the early diagenetic

  17. Dehydration kinetics and thermochemistry of selected hydrous phases, and simulated gas release pattern in carbonaceous chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bose, Kunal; Ganguly, J.

    1992-01-01

    As part of our continued program of study on the volatile bearing phases and volatile resource potential of carbonaceous chondrite, results of our experimental studies on the dehydration kinetics of talc as a function of temperature and grain size (50 to 0.5 microns), equilibrium dehydration boundary of talc to 40 kbars, calorimetric study of enthalpy of formation of both natural and synthetic talc as a function of grain size, and preliminary results on the dehydration kinetics of epsomite are reported. In addition, theoretical calculations on the gas release pattern of Murchison meteorite, which is a C2(CM) carbonaceous chondrite, were performed. The kinetic study of talc leads to a dehydration rate constant for 40-50 microns size fraction of k = (3.23 x 10(exp 4))exp(-Q/RT)/min with the activation energy Q = 376 (plus or minus 20) kJ/mole. The dehydration rate was found to increase somewhat with decreasing grain size. The enthalpy of formation of talc from elements was measured to be -5896(10) kJ/mol. There was no measurable effect of grain size on the enthalpy beyond the limits of precision of the calorimetric studies. Also the calorimetric enthalpy of both synthetic and natural talc was found to be essentially the same, within the precision of measurements, although the natural talc had a slightly larger field of stability in our phase equilibrium studies. The high pressure experimental data the dehydration equilibrium of talc (talc = enstatite + coesite + H2O) is in strong disagreement with that calculated from the available thermochemical data, which were constrained to fit the low pressure experimental results. The calculated gas release pattern of Murchison meteorite were in reasonable agreement with that determined by stepwise heating in a gas chromatograph.

  18. Microstructure of irradiated SBR MOX fuel and its relationship to fission gas release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, S. B.; White, R. J.; Cook, P. M. A.; Bremier, S.; Corcoran, R. C.; Stratton, R.; Walker, C. T.; Ivison, P. K.; Palmer, I. D.

    2002-12-01

    SEM and EPMA examinations of the microstructure and microchemistry of British Nuclear Fuel's quasi-homogeneous SBR MOX fuel following irradiation suggests behaviour which is very similar to that observed in UO 2. Most significantly, a fission gas release of 1% in three-cycle SBR MOX PWR rods is associated with the development of a well-defined intergranular bubble network, which has not been seen previously in the more heterogeneous MOX fuels irradiated under similar conditions. The contrast between the observations is attributed to the relatively low volume fraction and small size of the Pu rich inhomogeneities in the SBR fuel which generate only 4% of the total fission gas and eject most of this into the surrounding mixed oxide matrix. The resulting perturbation in the Xe distribution has a negligible influence on the evolution of the microstructure. A key observation is made from the results of recent post-irradiation annealing experiments performed on SBR MOX and UO 2. These confirm near identical fission gas behaviour in the two fuel types when the influence of thermal conductivity and rod rating are removed.

  19. Mechanisms of gas retention and release: Experimental results for Hanford waste tanks 241-AW-101 and 241-AN-103

    SciTech Connect

    Rassat, S.D.; Gauglitz, P.A.; Bredt, P.R.; Mahoney, L.A.; Forbes, S.V.; Tingey, S.M.

    1997-09-01

    The 177 storage tanks at Hanford contain a vast array of radioactive waste forms resulting, primarily, from nuclear materials processing. Through radiolytic, thermal, and other decomposition reactions of waste components, gaseous species including hydrogen, ammonia, and the oxidizer nitrous oxide are generated within the waste tanks. Many of these tanks are known to retain and periodically release quantities of these flammable gas mixtures. The primary focus of the Flammable Gas Project is the safe storage of Hanford tank wastes. To this end, we strive to develop an understanding of the mechanisms of flammable gas retention and release in Hanford tanks through laboratory investigations on actual tank wastes. These results support the closure of the Flammable Gas Unreviewed Safety Question (USQ) on the safe storage of waste tanks known to retain flammable gases and support resolution of the broader Flammable Gas Safety Issue. The overall purpose of this ongoing study is to develop a comprehensive and thorough understanding of the mechanisms of flammable gas retention and release. The first objective of the current study was to classify bubble retention and release mechanisms in two previously untested waste materials from Tanks 241-AN-103 (AN-103) and 241-AW-101 (AW-101). Results were obtained for retention mechanisms, release characteristics, and the maximum gas retention. In addition, unique behavior was also documented and compared with previously studied waste samples. The second objective was to lengthen the duration of the experiments to evaluate the role of slowing bubble growth on the retention and release behavior. Results were obtained for experiments lasting from a few hours to a few days.

  20. Uranium and noble gas isotopes to decipher naturally-occuring radionuclide release into aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Méjean, Pauline; Pinti, Daniele Luigi; Ghaleb, Bassam; Larocque, Marie

    2017-04-01

    Previously unknown relationships between helium isotopes and 234U/238U activity ratios in granular and fractured aquifers of the St. Lawrence Lowlands, Canada might help to resolve the long-standing debate of internal vs. internal sources of natural radionuclides in aquifers. Indeed, radiogenic 4He found in groundwater more than what could be produced in situ during the residence time of water has often been related to basal fluxes entering the bottom of aquifers. Other views suggest that only small portions of accumulated radiogenic helium in aquifer rocks can be released at steady-state. Most of locally produced helium would be released episodically during thermo-tectonic events. Here we show that 4He is correlated with 234U/238U activity ratios in local aquifers of Ordovician age of the St. Lawrence Lowlands, Québec. Groundwater flow and aquifer geometry was largely modified during the last post-glacial episode as observed for most periglacial aquifers of North America. This relation suggests the occurrence of three water masses: 1) freshwater containing atmospheric helium and 234U/238U activity ratios close to the secular equilibrium, indicating local and very shallow recharge; 2) freshwater penetrating the ground, dissolving rocks, and releasing 234U/238U activity ratios slightly higher than the secular equilibrium and large amount of radiogenic helium, indicating that rocks still preserve a reservoir of helium; 3) post-glacial groundwater containing large amount of helium and 234U/238U out of the secular equilibrium, indicating a fossil water having modified its U and He content during water-rock interactions. The U-He relationship is not straightforward. We suggest that post-glacial rebound and increased fracturing has favored the opening of new cracks and increased the specific surface of aquifer rocks. Along these newly created surfaces, He is released by diffusion and 234U by alpha-recoil, increasing the content of these two radionuclides in the water

  1. Internal gas and liquid distributor for electrodeionization device

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, YuPo J.; Snyder, Seth W.; Henry, Michael P.; Datta, Saurav

    2016-05-17

    The present invention provides a resin-wafer electrodeionization (RW-EDI) apparatus including cathode and anode electrodes separated by a plurality of porous solid ion exchange resin wafers, which when in use are filled with an aqueous fluid. The apparatus includes one or more wafers comprising a basic ion exchange medium, and preferably includes one or more wafers comprising an acidic ion exchange medium. The wafers are separated from one another by ion exchange membranes. The gas and aqueous fluid are introduced into each basic wafer via a porous gas distributor which disperses the gas as micro-sized bubbles laterally throughout the distributor before entering the wafer. The fluid within the acidic and/or basic ion exchange wafers preferably includes, or is in contact with, a carbonic anhydrase (CA) enzyme or inorganic catalyst to facilitate conversion of bicarbonate ion to carbon dioxide within the acidic medium.

  2. Optimized loading and sustained release of hydrophilic proteins from internally nanostructured particles.

    PubMed

    Chemelli, Angela; Maurer, Manuela; Geier, Roman; Glatter, Otto

    2012-12-11

    In this study, we demonstrate that emulsified microemulsions and micellar cubosomes are suitable as sustained delivery vehicles for water-soluble proteins. Through structural modifications, the loading efficiency of two model proteins, namely bovine serum albumin (BSA) and cytochrome c could be remarkably increased. A procedure for preparing these particles loaded with optimized amounts of sensitive substances is presented. Loading and dispersion at low temperatures is performed in two successive steps. First, a water-in-oil microemulsion is loaded with the proteins. Subsequently, this phase is dispersed in water resulting in particles with microemulsion and micellar cubic internal structure and a size of approximately 620 nm. This two-step method ensures optimal loading of the particles with the proteins. These nanostructured particles are able to sustain the release of the water-soluble BSA and cytochrome c. Within one day, less than 10% of BSA and 15% of cytochrome c are released. The release rate of cytochrome c is influenced by the nanostructure of the particles.

  3. Smart bridge and building materials in which cyclic motion is controlled by internally released adhesives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dry, Carolyn M.

    1996-04-01

    The object of this research is to assess the feasibility of using the concept of self-healing concretes for structural highway elements such as bridges, and roadway pavements. Our research has concentrated on the material behavior of self-healing cements which internally release adhesive when crack damage occurs. The focus of this research is on the use of self- healing concretes in structural highway members, such as bridges, that may be damaged by dynamic events such as earthquakes, impacts. A following study will investigate the influence of different types of adhesives and release mechanisms in the concrete elements under several load histories, for self-healing of the structural element. In the experimental program, the first set of specimens used typical elements, such as frames containing adhesive loaded fibers. The results were positive. From there we next go on to joints containing several types of adhesives and release mechanisms. These are tested on a small shake table in which actuators, load sensors, and a deflection monitor are mounted on a base. The adhesives have different set times, strength of bond with the matrix, and elastic moduli. The specimens are tested for the effect of adhesive type on deflection, stiffness, and damping of the members.

  4. Hybrid Catalysis Enabling Room-Temperature Hydrogen Gas Release from N-Heterocycles and Tetrahydronaphthalenes.

    PubMed

    Kato, Shota; Saga, Yutaka; Kojima, Masahiro; Fuse, Hiromu; Matsunaga, Shigeki; Fukatsu, Arisa; Kondo, Mio; Masaoka, Shigeyuki; Kanai, Motomu

    2017-02-15

    Hybrid catalyst systems to achieve acceptorless dehydrogenation of N-heterocycles and tetrahydronaphthalenes-model substrates for liquid organic hydrogen carriers-were developed. A binary hybrid catalysis comprising an acridinium photoredox catalyst and a Pd metal catalyst was effective for the dehydrogenation of N-heterocycles, whereas a ternary hybrid catalysis comprising an acridinium photoredox catalyst, a Pd metal catalyst, and a thiophosphoric imide organocatalyst achieved dehydrogenation of tetrahydronaphthalenes. These hybrid catalyst systems allowed for 2 molar equiv of H2 gas release from six-membered N-heterocycles and tetrahydronaphthalenes under mild conditions, i.e., visible light irradiation at rt. The combined use of two or three different catalyst types was essential for the catalytic activity.

  5. Modeling dispersion from toxic gas released after a train collision in Graniteville, SC.

    PubMed

    Buckley, Robert L; Hunter, Charles H; Addis, Robert P; Parker, Matthew J

    2007-03-01

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Weather Information and Display System was used to provide meteorological and atmospheric modeling/consequence assessment support to state and local agencies after the collision of two Norfolk Southern freight trains on the morning of January 6, 2005. This collision resulted in the release of several toxic chemicals to the environment, including chlorine. The dense and highly toxic cloud of chlorine gas that formed in the vicinity of the accident was responsible for 9 fatalities and caused injuries to more than 500 others. Transport model results depicting the forecast path of the ongoing release were made available to emergency managers in the county's Unified Command Center shortly after SRNL received a request for assistance. Support continued over the ensuing 2 days of the active response. The SRNL also provided weather briefings and transport/consequence assessment model results to responders from the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control, the Savannah River Site (SRS) Emergency Operations Center, Department of Energy headquarters, and hazard material teams dispatched from the SRS. Operational model-generated forecast winds used in consequence assessments conducted during the incident were provided at 2-km horizontal grid spacing during the accident response. High-resolution Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS, version 4.3.0) simulation was later performed to examine potential influences of local topography on plume migration in greater detail. The detailed RAMS simulation was used to determine meteorology using multiple grids with an innermost grid spacing of 125 m. Results from the two simulations are shown to generally agree with meteorological observations at the time; consequently, local topography did not significantly affect wind in the area. Use of a dense gas dispersion model to simulate localized plume behavior using the higher-resolution winds indicated agreement with

  6. Does iodine gas released from seaweed contribute to dietary iodine intake?

    PubMed

    Smyth, P P A; Burns, R; Huang, R J; Hoffman, T; Mullan, K; Graham, U; Seitz, K; Platt, U; O'Dowd, C

    2011-08-01

    Thyroid hormone levels sufficient for brain development and normal metabolism require a minimal supply of iodine, mainly dietary. Living near the sea may confer advantages for iodine intake. Iodine (I(2)) gas released from seaweeds may, through respiration, supply a significant fraction of daily iodine requirements. Gaseous iodine released over seaweed beds was measured by a new gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS)-based method and iodine intake assessed by measuring urinary iodine (UI) excretion. Urine samples were obtained from female schoolchildren living in coastal seaweed rich and low seaweed abundance and inland areas of Ireland. Median I(2) ranged 154-905 pg/L (daytime downwind), with higher values (~1,287 pg/L) on still nights, 1,145-3,132 pg/L (over seaweed). A rough estimate of daily gaseous iodine intake in coastal areas, based upon an arbitrary respiration of 10,000L, ranged from 1 to 20 μg/day. Despite this relatively low potential I(2) intake, UI in populations living near a seaweed hotspot were much higher than in lower abundance seaweed coastal or inland areas (158, 71 and 58 μg/L, respectively). Higher values >150 μg/L were observed in 45.6% of (seaweed rich), 3.6% (lower seaweed), 2.3% (inland)) supporting the hypothesis that iodine intake in coastal regions may be dependent on seaweed abundance rather than proximity to the sea. The findings do not exclude the possibility of a significant role for iodine inhalation in influencing iodine status. Despite lacking iodized salt, coastal communities in seaweed-rich areas can maintain an adequate iodine supply. This observation brings new meaning to the expression "Sea air is good for you!"

  7. ECO LOGIC INTERNATIONAL GAS-PHASE CHEMICAL REDUCTION PROCESS - THE REACTOR SYSTEM - APPLICATIONS ANALYSIS REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ELI Eco Logic International Inc. (Eco Logic) process thermally separates organics, then chemically reduces them in a hydrogen atmosphere, converting them to a reformed gas that consists of light hydrocarbons and water. A scrubber treats the reformed gas to remove hydrogen chl...

  8. ECO LOGIC INTERNATIONAL GAS-PHASE CHEMICAL REDUCTION PROCESS - THE REACTOR SYSTEM - APPLICATIONS ANALYSIS REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ELI Eco Logic International Inc. (Eco Logic) process thermally separates organics, then chemically reduces them in a hydrogen atmosphere, converting them to a reformed gas that consists of light hydrocarbons and water. A scrubber treats the reformed gas to remove hydrogen chl...

  9. CRITERIA POLLUTANT EMISSIONS FROM INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINES IN THE NATURAL GAS INDUSTRY VOLUME 1. TECHNICAL REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report summarizes emission factors for criteria pollutants (NOx, CO, CH4, C2H6, THC, NMHC, and NMEHC) from stationary internal combustion engines and gas turbines used in the natural gas industry. The emission factors were calculated from test results from five test campaigns...

  10. CRITERIA POLLUTANT EMISSIONS FROM INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINES IN THE NATURAL GAS INDUSTRY VOLUME 1. TECHNICAL REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report summarizes emission factors for criteria pollutants (NOx, CO, CH4, C2H6, THC, NMHC, and NMEHC) from stationary internal combustion engines and gas turbines used in the natural gas industry. The emission factors were calculated from test results from five test campaigns...

  11. Internal coating of air cooled gas turbine blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahuja, P. L.

    1979-01-01

    Six coating systems were evaluated for internal coating of decent stage (DS) eutectic high pressure turbine blades. Sequential deposition of electroless Ni by the hydrazine process, slurry Cr, and slurry Al, followed by heat treatment provided the coating composition and thickness for internal coating of DS eutectic turbine blades. Both NiCr and NiCrAl coating compositions were evaluated for strain capability and ductile to brittle transition temperature.

  12. The 1257 Samalas eruption (Lombok, Indonesia): the single greatest stratospheric gas release of the Common Era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidal, Céline M.; Métrich, Nicole; Komorowski, Jean-Christophe; Pratomo, Indyo; Michel, Agnès; Kartadinata, Nugraha; Robert, Vincent; Lavigne, Franck

    2016-10-01

    Large explosive eruptions inject volcanic gases and fine ash to stratospheric altitudes, contributing to global cooling at the Earth’s surface and occasionally to ozone depletion. The modelling of the climate response to these strong injections of volatiles commonly relies on ice-core records of volcanic sulphate aerosols. Here we use an independent geochemical approach which demonstrates that the great 1257 eruption of Samalas (Lombok, Indonesia) released enough sulphur and halogen gases into the stratosphere to produce the reported global cooling during the second half of the 13th century, as well as potential substantial ozone destruction. Major, trace and volatile element compositions of eruptive products recording the magmatic differentiation processes leading to the 1257 eruption indicate that Mt Samalas released 158 ± 12 Tg of sulphur dioxide, 227 ± 18 Tg of chlorine and a maximum of 1.3 ± 0.3 Tg of bromine. These emissions stand as the greatest volcanogenic gas injection of the Common Era. Our findings not only provide robust constraints for the modelling of the combined impact of sulphur and halogens on stratosphere chemistry of the largest eruption of the last millennium, but also develop a methodology to better quantify the degassing budgets of explosive eruptions of all magnitudes.

  13. Gas dynamics of heat-release-induced waves in supercritical fluids: revisiting the Piston Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Migliorino, Mario Tindaro; Scalo, Carlo

    2016-11-01

    We investigate a gasdynamic approach to the modeling of heat-release-induced compression waves in supercritical fluids. We rely on highly resolved one-dimensional fully compressible Navier-Stokes simulations of CO2 at pseudo-boiling conditions in a closed duct inspired by the experiments of Miura et al.. Near-critical fluids exhibit anomalous variations of thermodynamic variables taken into account by adopting the Peng-Robinson equation of state and Chung's Method. An idealized heat source is applied, away from the boundaries, resulting in the generation of compression waves followed by contact discontinuities bounding a region of hot expanding fluid. For higher heat-release rates such compressions are coalescent with distinct shock-like features (i.e. non-isentropicity and propagation Mach numbers measurably greater than unity) and a non-uniform post-shock state, not present in ideal gas simulations, caused by the highly nonlinear equation of state. Thermoacoustic effects are limited to: (1) a one-way/one-time thermal-to-acoustic energy conversion, and (2) cumulative non-isentropic bulk heating due to the resonating compression waves, resulting in what is commonly referred to as the Piston Effect.

  14. The 1257 Samalas eruption (Lombok, Indonesia): the single greatest stratospheric gas release of the Common Era

    PubMed Central

    Vidal, Céline M.; Métrich, Nicole; Komorowski, Jean-Christophe; Pratomo, Indyo; Michel, Agnès; Kartadinata, Nugraha; Robert, Vincent; Lavigne, Franck

    2016-01-01

    Large explosive eruptions inject volcanic gases and fine ash to stratospheric altitudes, contributing to global cooling at the Earth’s surface and occasionally to ozone depletion. The modelling of the climate response to these strong injections of volatiles commonly relies on ice-core records of volcanic sulphate aerosols. Here we use an independent geochemical approach which demonstrates that the great 1257 eruption of Samalas (Lombok, Indonesia) released enough sulphur and halogen gases into the stratosphere to produce the reported global cooling during the second half of the 13th century, as well as potential substantial ozone destruction. Major, trace and volatile element compositions of eruptive products recording the magmatic differentiation processes leading to the 1257 eruption indicate that Mt Samalas released 158 ± 12 Tg of sulphur dioxide, 227 ± 18 Tg of chlorine and a maximum of 1.3 ± 0.3 Tg of bromine. These emissions stand as the greatest volcanogenic gas injection of the Common Era. Our findings not only provide robust constraints for the modelling of the combined impact of sulphur and halogens on stratosphere chemistry of the largest eruption of the last millennium, but also develop a methodology to better quantify the degassing budgets of explosive eruptions of all magnitudes. PMID:27721477

  15. The 1257 Samalas eruption (Lombok, Indonesia): the single greatest stratospheric gas release of the Common Era.

    PubMed

    Vidal, Céline M; Métrich, Nicole; Komorowski, Jean-Christophe; Pratomo, Indyo; Michel, Agnès; Kartadinata, Nugraha; Robert, Vincent; Lavigne, Franck

    2016-10-10

    Large explosive eruptions inject volcanic gases and fine ash to stratospheric altitudes, contributing to global cooling at the Earth's surface and occasionally to ozone depletion. The modelling of the climate response to these strong injections of volatiles commonly relies on ice-core records of volcanic sulphate aerosols. Here we use an independent geochemical approach which demonstrates that the great 1257 eruption of Samalas (Lombok, Indonesia) released enough sulphur and halogen gases into the stratosphere to produce the reported global cooling during the second half of the 13th century, as well as potential substantial ozone destruction. Major, trace and volatile element compositions of eruptive products recording the magmatic differentiation processes leading to the 1257 eruption indicate that Mt Samalas released 158 ± 12 Tg of sulphur dioxide, 227 ± 18 Tg of chlorine and a maximum of 1.3 ± 0.3 Tg of bromine. These emissions stand as the greatest volcanogenic gas injection of the Common Era. Our findings not only provide robust constraints for the modelling of the combined impact of sulphur and halogens on stratosphere chemistry of the largest eruption of the last millennium, but also develop a methodology to better quantify the degassing budgets of explosive eruptions of all magnitudes.

  16. Dissociation energy for O2 release from gas-phase iron oxide clusters measured by temperature-programmed desorption experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyama, Kohei; Kudoh, Satoshi; Miyajima, Ken; Mafuné, Fumitaka

    2015-04-01

    Thermal dissociation of gas phase iron oxide cluster ions, FenOm+ (n = 2-6), was observed by mass spectrometry. The dissociation processes were investigated by temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) measurements for different sized clusters. Oxygen molecules were found to be released from the cluster ions. The threshold energy required for dissociation, determined by analyzing TPD, was compared with the energies obtained by experiments of collision-induced dissociation and by calculations of density functional theory. The agreement of the energies indicates that the oxygen atoms bonded to the terminal site of clusters are more readily released into the gas phase than those in the bridge site.

  17. Antimicrobial activity of controlled-release chlorine dioxide gas on fresh blueberries.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiuxiu; Bai, Jinhe; Ference, Christopher; Wang, Zhe; Zhang, Yifan; Narciso, Jan; Zhou, Kequan

    2014-07-01

    The effect of chlorine dioxide (ClO2) gas on the safety and quality of blueberries was studied. In vitro studies revealed that both ClO2 gas fumigation and ClO2 direct contact in water killed food pathogen bacterium Escherichia coli and fruit decay pathogen fungus Colletotrichum acutatum. In vivo studies were conducted using noninoculated berries and berries inoculated with postharvest decay and foodborne pathogens. Berries were inoculated with either E. coli (5.2 log CFU/g) or C. acutatum (3.9 log CFU/g). Inoculated fruit were dried for 2 h at room temperature in a climate-controlled laboratory and packed in perforated commercial clamshells, with or without ClO2 pads, and stored at 10°C for up to 9 days. The effects of ClO2 on microbial populations and fruit firmness were monitored during storage. In the inoculation experiment, treatment with ClO2 reduced populations of E. coli and C. acutatum by 2.2 to 3.3 and 1.3 to 2.0 log CFU/g, respectively. For the noninoculated blueberries, the initial total aerobic bacteria count and the yeast and mold count were 4.2 and 4.1 log CFU/g, respectively. ClO2 treatment reduced total aerobic bacteria count and yeast and mold count by 1.5 to 1.8 and 1.3 to 1.7 log CFU/g, respectively. The firmness of both inoculated and noninoculated blueberries was maintained by ClO2 treatment. Thus, controlled-release ClO2 gas fumigation technology shows promise as an effective and practical antimicrobial agent in commercial clamshell packaging of blueberry and other fruits.

  18. A method for simulating the release of natural gas from the rupture of high-pressure pipelines in any terrain.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yajun; Hu, Hongbing; Yu, Bo; Sun, Dongliang; Hou, Lei; Liang, Yongtu

    2017-08-24

    The rupture of a high-pressure natural gas pipeline can pose a serious threat to human life and environment. In this research, a method has been proposed to simulate the release of natural gas from the rupture of high-pressure pipelines in any terrain. The process of gas releases from the rupture of a high-pressure pipeline is divided into three stages, namely the discharge, jet, and dispersion stages. Firstly, a discharge model is established to calculate the release rate of the orifice. Secondly, an improved jet model is proposed to obtain the parameters of the pseudo source. Thirdly, a fast-modeling method applicable to any terrain is introduced. Finally, based upon these three steps, a dispersion model, which can take any terrain into account, is established. Then, the dispersion scenarios of released gas in four different terrains are studied. Moreover, the effects of pipeline pressure, pipeline diameter, wind speed and concentration of hydrogen sulfide on the dispersion scenario in real terrain are systematically analyzed. The results provide significant guidance for risk assessment and contingency planning of a ruptured natural gas pipeline. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Controlled Release of Antimicrobial ClO2 Gas from a Two-Layer Polymeric Film System.

    PubMed

    Bai, Zhifeng; Cristancho, Diego E; Rachford, Aaron A; Reder, Amy L; Williamson, Alexander; Grzesiak, Adam L

    2016-11-16

    We report a two-component label system comprising a chlorite-containing polymer film and an acid-containing polymer film that can release antimicrobial ClO2 gas upon adhering the two films together to enable a reaction of the chlorite and acid under moisture exposure. The chlorite-containing film comprises a commercial acrylate-based pressure-sensitive adhesive polymer impregnated with sodium chlorite. The acid-containing film comprises a commercial poly(vinyl alcohol) polymer loaded with tartaric acid. Both of the films were prepared on low ClO2-absorbing substrate films from stable aqueous systems of the polymers with high reagent loading. Rapid and sustained releases of significant amounts of ClO2 gas from the label system were observed in an in situ quantification system using UV-vis spectroscopy. It was found that the ClO2 release is slower at a lower temperature and can be accelerated by moisture in the atmosphere and the films. Controlled release of ClO2 gas from the label system was demonstrated by tailoring film composition and thickness. A model was developed to extract release kinetics and revealed good conversions of the label system. This two-component system can potentially be applied as a two-part label without premature release for applications in food packaging.

  20. Blow-by gas processing arrangement for automotive internal combustion engines

    SciTech Connect

    Anno, N.; Arai, T.

    1987-07-21

    This patent describes a blow-by gas processing arrangement for an internal combustion engine, comprising: a cylinder block having a chamber for collecting a blow-by gas, a blow-by gas passage communicating with the chamber, and spaced journal walls for supporting a crankshaft; a relatively large oil mist separating passage defined in the cylinder block and laterally extending into one of the journal walls beyond the blow-by gas passage. The oil mist separates passage communicating with the blow-by gas passage for preliminary separating an oil mist from the blow-by gas supplied from the chamber; an oil separator communicating with the oil mist separates passage for separating an oil mist from the blow-by gas supplied from the oil mist separating passage; and a PCV valve is connected to the oil mist separator; and an intake manifold connected to the PCV valve.

  1. Internal Waves, Upwelling, Convection: which Facilitates Greenhouse Gas Evasion?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacIntyre, S.; Cortés, A.; Miller, S. D.; Amaral, J. H.; Barbosa, P.; Forsberg, B. R.; Melack, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    The diffusive flux of greenhouse gases can be considered as a two-step process: dissolved gases must be brought to the air-water interface and they must subsequently be transported across it. Internal waves are ubiquitous features in aquatic ecosystems. Via internal wave induced upwelling, dissolved gases can directly reach surface waters and their breaking, combined with eddies from cooling, can deliver them to the interface. Whether turbulence is greater near the air-water interface during periods with convective cooling or surface heating with high frequency near-surface internal waves is an unsettled question. Using data from time series temperature and oxygen arrays and turbulence computed from temperature-gradient microstructure profilers, we provide examples of fluxes from these processes in a tropical reservoir, a floodplain lake, a temperate lake during fall cooling, and an arctic lake at ice off and subsequent stratification.

  2. West European economic security and international natural gas trade: optimal portfolios of gas imports

    SciTech Connect

    Greer, B.I.

    1985-01-01

    In 1981 the dependence of Western Europe on the Soviet Union for natural gas imports became a major issue in the debate over the European involvement in the Urengoi natural gas project. This analysis addresses the question spawned by this debate: how should West Europe diversify its natural gas imports to achieve the greatest security for its economy. The analysis presents a summary of the policy and institutional background of this Western European gas market, explains the nature of European gas markets, and establishes the relationship, between contract structure and economic vulnerability. By characterizing Western Europe's gas import problem as a portfolio decision, the analysis develops a simple static model that articulates the relationship between the cost of gas imports and commensurate risk. Using the portfolio framework, the analysis develops a dynamic model to characterize the intertemporal tradeoffs that are characteristic of a depletable resource in the optimal portfolio selection. An optimal control formulation provides insights that generalize the static portfolio model. Both the static and dynamic formulations provide the basis of computational models that produce empirical estimates of optimal natural gas import portfolios for Western Europe.

  3. Study on Mechanism of gas explosion induced by Coal mine internal fire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei-dong, Lu; Bin, Yin

    2017-04-01

    The occurrence of mine gas explosion is mainly caused by internal fire. To explore the relationship of mechanism between gas explosion and coal mine internal fire. That of spontaneous combustion in coal mine goaf was set breakthrough point. According to different stages of coal spontaneous combustion, the calculation was going on by means of numerical simulation software, so the result of change were got about temperature, pressure, explosion time, free radical and critical reaction step in explosion process were got. Calculation results of comparative analysis showed that: the gas explosion was inhibited in the slow oxidation stage; the gas explosion was promoted in the accelerating oxidation stage; the gas explosion was slightly promoted in the violent oxidation stage.

  4. Removal of PCDD/Fs from contaminated sediment and released effluent gas by charcoal in a proposed cost-effective thermal treatment process.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Long; Hou, Hong; Iwasaki, Kanae; Terada, Akihiko; Hosomi, Masaaki

    2013-11-01

    A novel cost-effective thermal treatment technology has been proposed for the removal of PCDD/Fs from contaminated sediment and released effluent gas using charcoal as both an adsorbent and a thermal source. When a reactor was used for thermal treatment, the PCDD/Fs removal efficiency exceeded 98% from the sediment at the three different air superficial velocities employed in this study. The total PCDD/F international toxic equivalent (I-TEQ) contents, both in the treated sediments and effluent gas, were below the Japanese emission standard limit. Analysis of the PCDD/F contents in different fractions showed that large quantities of PCDDs but not PCDFs were evaporated from the sediment and adsorbed in the moist sediment column. This difference was attributed to the formation of PCDDs from pentachlorophenol (PCP) during the cooling process following the thermal treatment process in the reactor. This proposed thermal process provides a promising alternative to the conventional methods.

  5. REPORT ON THE INTERNATIONAL CENTRE FOR GAS TECHNOLOGY INFORMATION'S 2002 ACCOMPLISHMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Mary Lang

    2003-03-01

    This is the final technical report for the U.S. Department of Energy Grant DE-FG26-02NT41445 for Membership in the International Centre for Gas Technology Information. The grant period began January 1, 2002 and ended December 31, 2002. The primary purpose of this grant was to continue U.S. country membership in the International Energy Agency's International Centre for Gas Technology Information (ICGTI) for calendar year 2002. The mission of ICGTI is to promote international cooperation and collaboration on natural gas technology development and commercialization. This final technical report describes ICGTI's 2002 activities, in which U.S. country membership in ICGTI was sustained and supported, but ICGTI's activities were curtailed by loss of funding.

  6. Kinetic theory of a gas with internal degrees of freedom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jehring, L.

    Balance equations for density, momentum, angular momentum, stress and couple-stress tensor, and heat flux are derived for a gas composed of nonrigid dumb-bell shaped particles. Some simple approximations for particle interactions are investigated analytically. By averaging the equations over all values of size and orientation of the particles, new balance equations are derived for particles whose structure changes more rapidly than the position of their mass centers. In a limiting case, the volume viscosity is given in terms of the collision frequency.

  7. Operational Experience with the Internal Thermal Control System Dual-Membrane Gas Trap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leimkuehler, Thomas O.; Lukens, Clark; Reeves, Daniel R.; Holt, James M.

    2003-01-01

    A dual-membrane gas trap is currently used to remove non-condensed gases (NCG) from the Internal Thermal Control System (ITCS) coolant on board the International Space Station. The gas trap consists of concentric tube membrane pairs, comprised of outer hydrophilic tubes and inner hydrophobic fibers. Liquid coolant passes through the outer hydrophilic membrane, which traps the NCG. The inner hydrophobic fiber allows the trapped NCG to pass through and vent to the ambient atmosphere in the cabin. The purpose of the gas trap is to prevent gas bubbles from causing depriming, overspeed, and shutdown of the ITCS pump, and the current gas trap has performed flawlessly in this regard. However, because of actual operational conditions on-orbit, its gas removal performance and operational lifetime have been affected. This paper discusses experiences with several of these dual- membrane gas traps, including on-orbit gas venting rate, effects due to the presence of nickel in the ITCS coolant, and subsequent refurbishing to remove the nickel from the gas trap.

  8. A Novel Repair Technique for the Internal Thermal Control System Dual-Membrane Gas Trap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leimkuehler, Thomas O.; Patel, Vipul; Reeves, Daniel R.; Holt, James M.

    2005-01-01

    A dual-membrane gas trap is currently used to remove gas bubbles from the Internal Thermal Control System (ITCS) coolant on board the International Space Station (ISS). The gas trap consists of concentric tube membrane pairs, comprised of outer hydrophilic tubes and inner hydrophobic fibers. Liquid coolant passes through the outer hydrophilic membrane, which traps the gas bubbles. The inner hydrophobic fiber allows the trapped gas bubbles to pass through and vent to the ambient atmosphere in the cabin. The gas trap was designed to last for the entire lifetime of the ISS, and therefore was not designed to be repaired. However, repair of these gas traps is now a necessity due to contamination from the on-orbit ITCS fluid and other sources on the ground as well as a limited supply of flight gas traps. This paper describes a novel repair technique that has been developed that will allow the refurbishment of contaminated gas traps and their return to flight use.

  9. International comparison CCQM-K77: Refinery gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieuwenkamp, G.; Wessel, R. M.; van der Veen, A. M. H.; Ziel, P. R.; Han, Qiao; Tuma, Dirk; Woo, Jin-Chun; Tóthné Fuko, Judit; Szilágyi, Nagyné; Büki, Tamás; Konopelko, L. A.; Kustikov, Y. A.; Popova, T. A.; Pankratov, V. V.; Pir, M. N.; Nazarov, E. V.; Ehvalov, L. V.; Timofeev, A. U.; Kuzmina, T. A.; Meshkov, A. V.; Valkova, Miroslava; Pätoprsty, Viliam; Downey, Michael; Vargha, Gergely; Brown, Andrew; Milton, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Refinery gas is a complex mixture of hydrocarbons and non-combustible gases (e.g., carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, nitrogen, helium). It is obtained as part of the refining and conversion of crude oil. This key comparison aims to evaluate the measurement capabilities for these types of mixtures. The results of the key comparison indicate that the analysis of a refinery-type gas mixture is for some laboratories a challenge. Overall, four laboratories (VSL, NIM, NPL and VNIIM) have satisfactory results. The results of some participants highlight some non-trivial issues, such as appropriate separation between saturated and unsaturated hydrocarbons, and issues with the measurement of nitrogen, hydrogen and helium. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCQM, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (MRA).

  10. International workshop on greenhouse gas mitigation technologies and measures: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-31

    More than 150 countries are now Party to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (FCCC), which seeks to stabilize atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases at a level that would prevent dangerous human interference with the global climate system. Climate change country studies are a significant step for developing countries and countries with economies in transition to meet their national reporting commitments to the FCCC. These studies also provide the basis for preparation of National Climate Change Action Plans and implementation of technologies and practices which reduce greenhouse gas emissions or enhance carbon sinks. The broad goals of the workshop were to: (1) present results of country study mitigation assessments, (2) identify promising no-regrets greenhouse gas mitigation options in land-use and energy sectors, (3) share information on development of mitigation technologies and measures which contribute to improved National Climate Change Actions Plans, and (4) begin the process of synthesizing mitigation assessments for use by FCCC subsidiary bodies. The 59 papers are arranged into the following topical sections: (1) national mitigation assessments, technology priorities, and measures; (2) sector-specific mitigation assessment results, subdivided further into: energy sector; non-energy sector; renewable energy; energy efficiency in industry and buildings; transportation; electricity supply; forestry; and methane mitigation; (3) support for mitigation technologies and measures; and (4) activities implemented jointly. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  11. Relationships between energy release, fuel mass loss, and trace gas and aerosol emissions during laboratory biomass fires

    Treesearch

    Patrick H. Freeborn; Martin J. Wooster; Wei Min Hao; Cecily A. Nordgren Ryan; Stephen P. Baker; Charles Ichoku

    2008-01-01

    Forty-four small-scale experimental fires were conducted in a combustion chamber to examine the relationship between biomass consumption, smoke production, convective energy release, and middle infrared (MIR) measurements of fire radiative energy (FRE). Fuel bed weights, trace gas and aerosol particle concentrations, stack flow rate and temperature, and concurrent...

  12. Characterization of nonlinear heat release-acoustic interactions in gas turbine combustors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellows, Benjamin D.

    This thesis describes an experimental investigation of the flame transfer function between flow disturbances and heat release oscillations in lean, premixed combustors. This research effort was motivated by the fact that modern gas turbines, operating fuel lean to minimize exhaust emissions, are susceptible to self-excited combustion oscillations. These instabilities generally occur when the unsteady combustion process couples with the acoustic modes of the combustion chamber. The resultant flow and structural vibrations can substantially reduce hot section part life. As such, avoiding operating regimes where high dynamics occur often requires operating at lower power outputs and/or higher pollutant emissions than the turbine is otherwise capable. This work demonstrated nonlinearities in the chemiluminescence response at large amplitude velocity oscillations in a turbulent, swirling flame. It is observed that the nonlinear flame response can exhibit a variety of behaviors, both in the shape of the response curve and the forcing amplitude at which nonlinearity is first observed depending on the operating conditions of the combustor. The phase between the flow oscillations and heat release is also seen to have substantial amplitude dependence. In addition, the interactions between the fundamental frequency and the higher and subharmonics of the measured signals can significantly influence the flame as well as the frequency response of the system. The nonlinear flame dynamics are governed by different mechanisms in different frequency and flowrate regimes. Three mechanisms, vortex rollup, unsteady flame liftoff, and parametric instability, are identified to influence the nonlinear flame response in these combustors. Analysis of the results shows that the mechanisms responsible for nonlinearity m the flame response are influenced by the Strouhal number, the mean velocity at the combustor dump plane, and the ratio of the oscillating velocity amplitude to the laminar

  13. Detection of cold gas releases in space via low energy neutral atom imaging

    SciTech Connect

    McComas, D.J.; Funsten, H.O.; Moore, K.R.; Scime, E.E.; Thomsen, M.F.

    1993-01-01

    Low energy neutral atoms (LENAs) are produced in space plasmas by charge exchange between the ambient magnetospheric plasma ions and cold neutral atoms. Under normal conditions these cold neutrals come from the terrestrial geocorona, a shroud of few-ev hydrogen atoms surrounding the Earth. As a consequence of this charge exchange, it has become possible to remotely image many regions of the magnetosphere for the first time utilizing recently developed LENA imaging technology. In addition to the natural hydrogen geocorona, conventional explosions and maneuvering thruster firings can also introduce large amounts of cold gas into the space environment. In this paper we examine whether such potentially clandestine activities could also be remotely observed for the first time via LENA imaging. First, we examine the fluxes of LENAs produced in the space environment from a conventional explosion. Then we review the present state of the art in the emerging field of LENA detection and imaging. Recent work has shown that LENAs can be imaged by first converting the neutrals to ions with ultra-thin (10s of [Angstrom]) foils and then electrostatically analyzing these newly created ions to reject the large (>10[sup 10] cm[sup [minus]2] [sup [minus]1]) UV background to which the low energy detectors are sensitive. We conclude that the sensitivities for present LENA imager designs may be just adequate for detecting some man-made releases. With additional improvements in LENA detection capabilities, this technique could become an important new method for monitoring for conventional explosions, as well as other man-made neutral releases, in the space environment.

  14. Detection of cold gas releases in space via low energy neutral atom imaging

    SciTech Connect

    McComas, D.J.; Funsten, H.O.; Moore, K.R.; Scime, E.E.; Thomsen, M.F.

    1993-04-01

    Low energy neutral atoms (LENAs) are produced in space plasmas by charge exchange between the ambient magnetospheric plasma ions and cold neutral atoms. Under normal conditions these cold neutrals come from the terrestrial geocorona, a shroud of few-ev hydrogen atoms surrounding the Earth. As a consequence of this charge exchange, it has become possible to remotely image many regions of the magnetosphere for the first time utilizing recently developed LENA imaging technology. In addition to the natural hydrogen geocorona, conventional explosions and maneuvering thruster firings can also introduce large amounts of cold gas into the space environment. In this paper we examine whether such potentially clandestine activities could also be remotely observed for the first time via LENA imaging. First, we examine the fluxes of LENAs produced in the space environment from a conventional explosion. Then we review the present state of the art in the emerging field of LENA detection and imaging. Recent work has shown that LENAs can be imaged by first converting the neutrals to ions with ultra-thin (10s of {Angstrom}) foils and then electrostatically analyzing these newly created ions to reject the large (>10{sup 10} cm{sup {minus}2} {sup {minus}1}) UV background to which the low energy detectors are sensitive. We conclude that the sensitivities for present LENA imager designs may be just adequate for detecting some man-made releases. With additional improvements in LENA detection capabilities, this technique could become an important new method for monitoring for conventional explosions, as well as other man-made neutral releases, in the space environment.

  15. Optimization of simultaneous tritium–radiocarbon internal gas proportional counting

    SciTech Connect

    Bonicalzi, R. M.; Aalseth, C. E.; Day, A. R.; Hoppe, E. W.; Mace, E. K.; Moran, J. J.; Overman, C. T.; Panisko, M. E.; Seifert, A.

    2016-03-01

    Specific environmental applications can benefit from dual tritium and radiocarbon measurements in a single compound. Assuming typical environmental levels, it is often the low tritium activity relative to the higher radiocarbon activity that limits the dual measurement. In this paper, we explore the parameter space for a combined tritium and radiocarbon measurement using a methane sample mixed with an argon fill gas in low-background proportional counters of a specific design. We present an optimized methane percentage, detector fill pressure, and analysis energy windows to maximize measurement sensitivity while minimizing count time. The final optimized method uses a 9-atm fill of P35 (35% methane, 65% argon), and a tritium analysis window from 1.5 to 10.3 keV, which stops short of the tritium beta decay endpoint energy of 18.6 keV. This method optimizes tritium counting efficiency while minimizing radiocarbon beta decay interference.

  16. Optimization of simultaneous tritium-radiocarbon internal gas proportional counting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonicalzi, R. M.; Aalseth, C. E.; Day, A. R.; Hoppe, E. W.; Mace, E. K.; Moran, J. J.; Overman, C. T.; Panisko, M. E.; Seifert, A.

    2016-03-01

    Specific environmental applications can benefit from dual tritium and radiocarbon measurements in a single compound. Assuming typical environmental levels, it is often the low tritium activity relative to the higher radiocarbon activity that limits the dual measurement. In this paper, we explore the parameter space for a combined tritium and radiocarbon measurement using a natural methane sample mixed with an argon fill gas in low-background proportional counters of a specific design. We present an optimized methane percentage, detector fill pressure, and analysis energy windows to maximize measurement sensitivity while minimizing count time. The final optimized method uses a 9-atm fill of P35 (35% methane, 65% argon), and a tritium analysis window from 1.5 to 10.3 keV, which stops short of the tritium beta decay endpoint energy of 18.6 keV. This method optimizes tritium-counting efficiency while minimizing radiocarbon beta-decay interference.

  17. Radioautographic study of binding and internalization of corticotropin-releasing factor by rat anterior pituitary corticotrophs

    SciTech Connect

    Leroux, P.; Pelletier, G.

    1984-01-01

    In order to identify the anterior pituitary cell type(s) containing corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) receptors and to study the internalization processes of this peptide by the target cells, radioautography was performed on rat anterior pituitaries removed at specific intervals (2-60 min) after intracarotid injection of (/sup 125/I)iodo-CRF into intact and adrenalectomized female rats. In intact animals, all corticotrophs were labeled, whereas in the adrenalectomized animals about 80% of the hypertrophied corticotrophs (adrenalectomy cells) were. In control animals injected with both iodinated CRF and an excess of unlabeled peptide, no specific reaction could be detected. The time-course study in intact animals showed that 2 min after injection most silver grains were found over or within 160 nm of the plasma membrane. At the 5-min time intervals, grains were observed both over the plasma membrane and within the cytoplasm, associated with lysosomes, and the Golgi apparatus. Fifteen minutes after injection, grains were mostly found over lysosomes and the Golgi apparatus, whereas at the longest time intervals (30 and 60 min) almost no labeling could be detected. The results obtained in this study indicate that in the anterior pituitary CRF receptors are restricted to corticotrophs (as identified by electron microscopy) and that, after binding to the plasma membrane, CRF is rapidly internalized to Golgi elements and lysosomes.

  18. Internalization and recycling of receptor-bound gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist in pituitary gonadotropes

    SciTech Connect

    Schvartz, I.; Hazum, E.

    1987-12-15

    The fate of cell surface gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) receptors on pituitary cells was studied utilizing lysosomotropic agents and monensin. Labeling of pituitary cells with a photoreactive GnRH derivative, (azidobenzoyl-D-Lys6)GnRH, revealed a specific band of Mr = 60,000. When photoaffinity-labeled cells were exposed to trypsin immediately after completion of the binding, the radioactivity incorporated into the Mr = 60,000 band decreased, with a concomitant appearance of a proteolytic fragment (Mr = 45,000). This fragment reflects cell surface receptors. Following GnRH binding, the hormone-receptor complexes underwent internalization, partial degradation, and recycling. The process of hormone-receptor complex degradation was substantially prevented by lysosomotropic agents, such as chloroquine and methylamine, or the proton ionophore, monensin. Chloroquine and monensin, however, did not affect receptor recycling, since the tryptic fragment of Mr = 45,000 was evident after treatment with these agents. This suggests that recycling of GnRH receptors in gonadotropes occurs whether or not the internal environment is acidic. Based on these findings, we propose a model describing the intracellular pathway of GnRH receptors.

  19. Health Effects of Cut Gas Lines and Other Petroleum Product Release Incidents - Seven States, 2010-2012.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Ayana R

    2015-06-12

    Large mass casualty gas explosions and catastrophic oil spills are widely reported and receive considerable regulatory attention. Smaller, less catastrophic petroleum product releases are less likely to receive publicity, although study of these incidents might help focus and prioritize prevention efforts. To describe the causes and health impacts of petroleum product release incidents (including gas explosions and oil spills), the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) analyzed 2010-2012 data from the National Toxic Substance Incidents Program (NTSIP). A total of 1,369 petroleum product release incidents were reported from seven states, resulting in 512 injuries and 36 deaths. Approximately one fourth of the incidents were associated with utilities, and approximately one fifth were associated with private vehicles or residences. Approximately 10% of petroleum product releases resulted from inadvertent damage to utility lines. Understanding the characteristics of acute petroleum product releases can aid the public and utility workers in the development of preventive strategies and reduce the morbidity and mortality associated with such releases.

  20. Internal coating of air-cooled gas turbine blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, L. L.; Stetson, A. R.

    1980-01-01

    Four modified aluminide coatings were developed for IN-792 + Hf alloy using a powder pack method applicable to internal surfaces of air-cooled blades. The coating compositions are Ni-19Al-1Cb, Ni-19Al-3Cb, Ni-17Al-20Cr, and Ni-12Al-20Cr. Cyclic burner rig hot corrosion (900 C) and oxidation (1050 C) tests indicated that Ni-Al-Cb coatings provided better overall resistance than Ni-Al-Cr coatings. Tensile properties of Ni-19Al-1Cb and Ni-12Al-20Cr coated test bars were fully retained at room temperature and 649 C. Stress rupture results exhibited wide scatter around uncoated IN-792 baseline, especially at high stress levels. High cycle fatigue lives of Ni-19Al-1Cb and Ni-12Al-20Cr coated bars (as well as RT-22B coated IN-792) suffered approximately 30 percent decrease at 649 C. Since all test bars were fully heat treated after coating, the effects of coating/processing on IN-792 alloy were not recoverable. Internally coated Ni-19Al-1Cb, Ni-19Al-3Cb, and Ni-12Al-20Cr blades were included in 500-hour endurance engine test and the results were similar to those obtained in burner rig oxidation testing.

  1. Internally coated air-cooled gas turbine blading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, L.; Stevens, W. G.; Stetson, A. R.

    1979-01-01

    Ten candidate modified nickel-aluminide coatings were developed using the slip pack process. These coatings contain additives such as silicon, chromium and columbium in a nickel-aluminum coating matrix with directionally solidified MAR-M200 + Hf as the substrate alloy. Following a series of screening tests which included strain tolerance, dynamic oxidation and hot corrosion testing, the Ni-19A1-1Cb (nominal composition) coating was selected for application to the internal passages of four first-stage turbine blades. Process development results indicate that a dry pack process is suitable for internal coating application resulting in 18 percent or less reduction in air flow. Coating uniformity, based on coated air-cooled blades, was within + or - 20 percent. Test results show that the presence of additives (silicon, chromium or columbium) appeared to improve significantly the ductility of the NiA1 matrix. However, the environmental resistance of these modified nickel-aluminides were generally inferior to the simple aluminides.

  2. The effect of chitosan as internal or external coating on the 5-ASA release from calcium alginate microparticles.

    PubMed

    Tapia, Cristián; Molina, Sergio; Diaz, Alvaro; Abugoch, Lilian; Diaz-Dosque, Mario; Valenzuela, Fernando; Yazdani-Pedram, Mehrdad

    2010-09-01

    The effect of chitosan as internal or external coating on the mesalamine (5-ASA) release from calcium alginate microparticles (CaAl) was studied, and a delayed release of 5-ASA system intended for colonic drug delivery was developed. The external chitosan coating was developed by immersion of wetted CaAl in chitosan solution and the internal coating by mixing 5-ASA with chitosan solution and drying before the preparation of CaAl. Both systems were coated with Acryl-EZE® using combined fluid bed coating and immersion procedure. The results showed that in phosphate medium (pH 7.5), chitosan as 5-ASA coating promotes a quick erosion process accelerating drug release, but chitosan as external coating (CaAlCS) does not increase the T (50) value compared with the microparticles without chitosan (CaAl). Chitosan as internal or external coating was not effective to avoid the quick 5-ASA release in acidic medium (pH 1.2). The presence of β-glucosidase enzymes increases significantly the 5-ASA release for CaAl, while no effect was observed with chitosan as internal or external coating. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, and X-ray data revealed that 5-ASA did not form a solid solution but was dispersed in the microparticles. The Acryl-EZE® coating of microparticles was effective because all the formulations showed a low release, less than 15%, of 5-ASA in acid medium at pH 1.2. Significant differences in the percentage of 5-ASA released between formulations were observed in phosphate buffer at pH 6.0. In phosphate buffer at pH 7.2, all the formulations released 100% of 5-ASA.

  3. STEADY STATE FLAMMABLE GAS RELEASE RATE CALCULATION AND LOWER FLAMMABILITY LEVEL EVALUATION FOR HANFORD TANK WASTE

    SciTech Connect

    MEACHAM JE

    2008-11-17

    This report assesses the steady state flammability level under off normal ventilation conditions in the tank headspace for 28 double-shell tanks (DST) and 149 single shell-tanks (SST) at the Hanford Site. Flammability was calculated using estimated gas release rates, Le Chatelier's rule, and lower flammability limits of fuels in an air mixture. This revision updates the hydrogen generation rate input data for al1 177 tanks using waste composition information from the Best Basis Inventory Detail Report (data effective as of August 4,2008). Assuming only barometric breathing, the shortest time to reach 25% of the lower flammability limit is 13 days for DSTs (i.e., tank 241-AZ-102) and 36 days for SSTs (i.e., tank 241-B-203). Assuming zero ventilation, the shortest time to reach 25% of the lower flammability limit is 12 days for DSTs (i.e., tank 241-AZ-102) and 34 days for SSTs (i.e., tank 241-B-203).

  4. On-site gamma-ray spectroscopic measurements of fission gas release in irradiated nuclear fuel.

    PubMed

    Matsson, I; Grapengiesser, B; Andersson, B

    2007-01-01

    An experimental, non-destructive in-pool, method for measuring fission gas release (FGR) in irradiated nuclear fuel has been developed. Using the method, a significant number of experiments have been performed in-pool at several nuclear power plants of the BWR type. The method utilises the 514 keV gamma-radiation from the gaseous fission product (85)Kr captured in the fuel rod plenum volume. A submergible measuring device (LOKET) consisting of an HPGe-detector and a collimator system was utilised allowing for single rod measurements on virtually all types of BWR fuel. A FGR database covering a wide range of burn-ups (up to average rod burn-up well above 60 MWd/kgU), irradiation history, fuel rod position in cross section and fuel designs has been compiled and used for computer code benchmarking, fuel performance analysis and feedback to reactor operators. Measurements clearly indicate the low FGR in more modern fuel designs in comparison to older fuel types.

  5. STEADY STATE FLAMMABLE GAS RELEASE RATE CALCULATION AND LOWER FLAMMABILITY LEVEL EVALUATION FOR HANFORD TANK WASTE

    SciTech Connect

    MEACHAM JE

    2009-10-26

    This report assesses the steady state flammability level under off normal ventilation conditions in the tank headspace for 28 double-shell tanks (DST) and 149 single shell-tanks (SST) at the Hanford Site. Flammability was calculated using estimated gas release rates, Le Chatelier's rule, and lower flammability limits of fuels in an air mixture. This revision updates the hydrogen generation rate input data for all 177 tanks using waste composition information from the Best Basis Inventory Detail Report (data effective as of August 4,2008). Assuming only barometric breathing, the shortest time to reach 25% of the lower flammability limit is 11 days for DSTs (i.e., tank 241-AZ-10l) and 36 days for SSTs (i.e., tank 241-B-203). Assuming zero ventilation, the shortest time to reach 25% of the lower flammability limit is 10 days for DSTs (i.e., tank 241-AZ-101) and 34 days for SSTs (i.e., tank 241-B-203).

  6. Impact Of Melter Internal Design On Off-Gas Flammability

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, A. S.; Lee, S. Y.

    2012-05-30

    The purpose of this study was to: (1) identify the more dominant design parameters that can serve as the quantitative measure of how prototypic a given melter is, (2) run the existing DWPF models to simulate the data collected using both DWPF and non-DWPF melter configurations, (3) confirm the validity of the selected design parameters by determining if the agreement between the model predictions and data is reasonably good in light of the design and operating conditions employed in each data set, and (4) run Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations to gain new insights into how fluid mixing is affected by the configuration of melter internals and to further apply the new insights to explaining, for example, why the agreement is not good.

  7. Nitrogen enriched combustion of a natural gas internal combustion engine to reduce NO.sub.x emissions

    DOEpatents

    Biruduganti, Munidhar S.; Gupta, Sreenath Borra; Sekar, R. Raj; McConnell, Steven S.

    2008-11-25

    A method and system for reducing nitrous oxide emissions from an internal combustion engine. An input gas stream of natural gas includes a nitrogen gas enrichment which reduces nitrous oxide emissions. In addition ignition timing for gas combustion is advanced to improve FCE while maintaining lower nitrous oxide emissions.

  8. Analysis of internal cooling geometry variations in gas turbine blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eifel, M.; Caspary, V.; Hönen, H.; Jeschke, P.

    2009-12-01

    The present investigation analyzes the effects of major geometrical modifications to the interior of a convection cooled gas turbine rotor blade. The main focus lies on the flow of the leading edge channels and the impact on the heat transfer. An experimental approach is performed with flow visualization via paint injection into water. Also numerical calculations are carried out in two sets, on the one hand water calculations accompanying the experiments and on the other hand conjugate heat transfer calculations under realistic engine conditions. The latter calculations are still ongoing delivering preliminary results. Five geometry configurations are investigated, three of them with differing turbulator arrangements in the leading edge channels. The operating point of the base configuration is set to Re = 50,000 at the inlet while for the modified geometries the pressure ratio is held constant compared to the base. Among several investigated configurations one could be identified that leads to a heat transfer enhancement in one leading edge channel 7 % larger compared to the base.

  9. Composition and fate of gas and oil released to the water column during the Deepwater Horizon oil spill

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Christopher M.; Arey, J. Samuel; Seewald, Jeffrey S.; Sylva, Sean P.; Lemkau, Karin L.; Nelson, Robert K.; Carmichael, Catherine A.; McIntyre, Cameron P.; Fenwick, Judith; Ventura, G. Todd; Van Mooy, Benjamin A. S.; Camilli, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Quantitative information regarding the endmember composition of the gas and oil that flowed from the Macondo well during the Deepwater Horizon oil spill is essential for determining the oil flow rate, total oil volume released, and trajectories and fates of hydrocarbon components in the marine environment. Using isobaric gas-tight samplers, we collected discrete samples directly above the Macondo well on June 21, 2010, and analyzed the gas and oil. We found that the fluids flowing from the Macondo well had a gas-to-oil ratio of 1,600 standard cubic feet per petroleum barrel. Based on the measured endmember gas-to-oil ratio and the Federally estimated net liquid oil release of 4.1 million barrels, the total amount of C1-C5 hydrocarbons released to the water column was 1.7 × 1011 g. The endmember gas and oil compositions then enabled us to study the fractionation of petroleum hydrocarbons in discrete water samples collected in June 2010 within a southwest trending hydrocarbon-enriched plume of neutrally buoyant water at a water depth of 1,100 m. The most abundant petroleum hydrocarbons larger than C1-C5 were benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and total xylenes at concentrations up to 78 μg L-1. Comparison of the endmember gas and oil composition with the composition of water column samples showed that the plume was preferentially enriched with water-soluble components, indicating that aqueous dissolution played a major role in plume formation, whereas the fates of relatively insoluble petroleum components were initially controlled by other processes. PMID:21768331

  10. Composition and fate of gas and oil released to the water column during the Deepwater Horizon oil spill.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Christopher M; Arey, J Samuel; Seewald, Jeffrey S; Sylva, Sean P; Lemkau, Karin L; Nelson, Robert K; Carmichael, Catherine A; McIntyre, Cameron P; Fenwick, Judith; Ventura, G Todd; Van Mooy, Benjamin A S; Camilli, Richard

    2012-12-11

    Quantitative information regarding the endmember composition of the gas and oil that flowed from the Macondo well during the Deepwater Horizon oil spill is essential for determining the oil flow rate, total oil volume released, and trajectories and fates of hydrocarbon components in the marine environment. Using isobaric gas-tight samplers, we collected discrete samples directly above the Macondo well on June 21, 2010, and analyzed the gas and oil. We found that the fluids flowing from the Macondo well had a gas-to-oil ratio of 1,600 standard cubic feet per petroleum barrel. Based on the measured endmember gas-to-oil ratio and the Federally estimated net liquid oil release of 4.1 million barrels, the total amount of C(1)-C(5) hydrocarbons released to the water column was 1.7 10(11) g. The endmember gas and oil compositions then enabled us to study the fractionation of petroleum hydrocarbons in discrete water samples collected in June 2010 within a southwest trending hydrocarbon-enriched plume of neutrally buoyant water at a water depth of 1,100 m. The most abundant petroleum hydrocarbons larger than C(1)-C(5) were benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and total xylenes at concentrations up to 78 μg L(-1). Comparison of the endmember gas and oil composition with the composition of water column samples showed that the plume was preferentially enriched with water-soluble components, indicating that aqueous dissolution played a major role in plume formation, whereas the fates of relatively insoluble petroleum components were initially controlled by other processes.

  11. Small scale controls of greenhouse gas release under elevated N deposition rates in a restoring peat bog in NW Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glatzel, S.; Forbrich, I.; Krüger, C.; Lemke, S.; Gerold, G.

    2008-06-01

    In Central Europe, most bogs have a history of drainage and many of them are currently being restored. Success of restoration as well as greenhouse gas exchange of these bogs is influenced by environmental stress factors as drought and atmospheric nitrogen deposition. We determined the methane and nitrous oxide exchange of sites in the strongly decomposed center and less decomposed edge of the Pietzmoor bog in NW Germany in 2004. Also, we examined the methane and nitrous oxide exchange of mesocosms from the center and edge before, during, and following a drainage experiment as well as carbon dioxide release from disturbed unfertilized and nitrogen fertilized surface peat. In the field, methane fluxes ranged from 0 to 3.8 mg m-2 h-1 and were highest from hollows. Field nitrous oxide fluxes ranged from 0 to 574 μg m-2 h-1 and were elevated at the edge. A large Eriophorum vaginatum tussock showed decreasing nitrous oxide release as the season progressed. Drainage of mesocosms decreased methane release to 0, even during rewetting. There was a tendency for a decrease of nitrous oxide release during drainage and for an increase in nitrous oxide release during rewetting. Nitrogen fertilization did not increase decomposition of surface peat. Our examinations suggest a competition between vascular vegetation and denitrifiers for excess nitrogen. We also provide evidence that the von Post humification index can be used to explain nitrous oxide release from bogs, if the role of vascular vegetation is also considered. An assessment of the greenhouse gas release from nitrogen saturated restoring bogs needs to take into account elevated release from fresh Sphagnum peat as well as from sedges growing on decomposed peat. Given the high atmospheric nitrogen deposition, restoration will not be able to achieve an oligotrophic ecosystem in the short term.

  12. Historical Doses from Tritiated Water and Tritiated Hydrogen Gas Released to the Atmosphere from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Part 1. Description of Tritium Dose Model (DCART) for Routine Releases from LLNL

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, S R

    2006-09-27

    DCART (Doses from Chronic Atmospheric Releases of Tritium) is a spreadsheet model developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) that calculates doses from inhalation of tritiated hydrogen gas (HT), inhalation and skin absorption of tritiated water (HTO), and ingestion of HTO and organically bound tritium (OBT) to adult, child (age 10), and infant (age 6 months to 1 year) from routine atmospheric releases of HT and HTO. DCART is a deterministic model that, when coupled to the risk assessment software Crystal Ball{reg_sign}, predicts doses with a 95% confidence interval. The equations used by DCART are described and all distributions on parameter values are presented. DCART has been tested against the results of other models and several sets of observations in the Tritium Working Groups of the International Atomic Energy Agency's programs, Biosphere Modeling and Assessment and Environmental Modeling for Radiation Safety. The version of DCART described here has been modified to include parameter values and distributions specific to conditions at LLNL. In future work, DCART will be used to reconstruct dose to the hypothetical maximally exposed individual from annual routine releases of HTO and HT from all LLNL facilities and from the Sandia National Laboratory's Tritium Research Laboratory over the last fifty years.

  13. Internal Snapping Hip Syndrome: Incidence of Multiple-Tendon Existence and Outcome After Endoscopic Transcapsular Release.

    PubMed

    Ilizaliturri, Victor M; Suarez-Ahedo, Carlos; Acuña, Marco

    2015-10-01

    To report the frequency of presentation of bifid or multiple iliopsoas tendons in patients who underwent endoscopic release for internal snapping hip syndrome (ISHS) and to compare both groups. A consecutive series of patients with ISHS were treated with endoscopic transcapsular release of the iliopsoas tendon at the central compartment and prospectively followed up. The inclusion criteria were patients with a diagnosis of ISHS with failure of conservative treatment. During the procedure, the presence of a bifid tendon was intentionally looked for. Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) scores were evaluated preoperatively and at last follow-up. Four patients presented with a bifid tendon and one patient had 3 tendons. At a minimum of 12 months' follow-up, the presence of snapping recurrence was evaluated and the WOMAC scores were compared between both groups. Among 279 hip arthroscopies, 28 patients underwent central transcapsular iliopsoas tendon release. The mean age was 29.25 years (range, 16 to 65 years; 6 left and 22 right hips). Group 1 included 5 patients with multiple tendons; the remaining patients formed group 2 (n = 23). None of the patients presented with ISHS recurrence. The mean WOMAC score in group 1 was 39 points (95% confidence interval [CI], 26.2 to 55.4 points) preoperatively and 73.6 points (95% CI, 68.4 to 79.6 points) at last follow-up. In group 2 the mean WOMAC score was 47.21 points (95% CI, 44.4 to 58.2 points) preoperatively and 77.91 points (95% CI, 67.8 to 83.4 points) at last follow-up. We identified a bifid tendon retrospectively on magnetic resonance arthrograms in 3 of the 5 cases that were found to have multiple tendons during surgery. None of these were recognized before the procedures. In this series the surgeon intentionally looked for multiple tendons, which were found in 17.85% of the cases. Clinical results in patients with single- and multiple-tendon snapping seem to be similarly adequate

  14. Effects of oil on internal gas transport, radial oxygen loss, gas films and bud growth in Phragmites australis

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, Jean; Keep, Rory; Armstrong, William

    2009-01-01

    Background and Aims Oil pollution of wetlands is a world-wide problem but, to date, research has concentrated on its influences on salt marsh rather than freshwater plant communities. The effects of water-borne light oils (liquid paraffin and diesel) were investigated on the fresh/brackish wetland species Phragmites australis in terms of routes of oil infiltration, internal gas transport, radial O2 loss (ROL), underwater gas films and bud growth. Methods Pressure flow resistances of pith cavities of nodes and aerenchyma of leaf sheaths, with or without previous exposure to oil, were recorded from flow rates under applied pressure. Convective flows were measured from living excised culms with oiled and non-oiled nodes and leaf sheaths. The effect of oil around culm basal nodes on ROL from rhizome and root apices was measured polarographically. Surface gas films on submerged shoots with and without oil treatment were recorded photographically. Growth and emergence of buds through water with and without an oil film were measured. Key Results Internodes are virtually impermeable, but nodes of senesced and living culms are permeable to oils which can block pith cavity diaphragms, preventing flows at applied pressures of 1 kPa, natural convective transport to the rhizome, and greatly decreasing ROL to phyllospheres and rhizospheres. Oil infiltrating or covering living leaf sheaths prevents humidity-induced convection. Oil displaces surface gas films from laminae and leaf sheaths. Buds emerge only a few centimetres through oil and die. Conclusions Oil infiltrates the gas space system via nodal and leaf sheath stomata, reducing O2 diffusion and convective flows into the rhizome system and decreasing oxygenation of phyllospheres and rhizospheres; underwater gas exchange via gas films will be impeded. Plants can be weakened by oil-induced failure of emerging buds. Plants will be most at risk during the growing season. PMID:18996951

  15. IBCSO v1 - The first release of the International Bathymetric Chart of the Southern Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schenke, H. W.; Arndt, J.

    2012-12-01

    The International Bathymetric Chart of the Southern Ocean (IBCSO) is an expert group of the Scientific Committee on Antarctic Research (SCAR) since the XXVIII SCAR Conference held on 30th July 2004 in Bremen Germany and a regional mapping project of the General Bathymetric Chart of the Ocean (GEBCO) operated under the joint auspices of the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission (IOC) (of UNESCO) and the International Hydrographic Organization (IHO). The objective of IBCSO was to produce the first seamless bathymetric grid for the area south of latitude 60° S surrounding Antarctica. The IBCSO is going to be highly beneficial many scientific investigations. These include (a) interpretation of seabed geology, (b) the building of habitat models and maps, and (c) mapping and tracing of deep ocean current pathways. In addition the IBCSO is going to serve as an indispensable database for new nautical Charts in the Southern Ocean to improve the safety of navigation in Antarctic waters. After the inaugural meeting in 2004, the Editorial Board was then established at the 1st IBCSO Meeting at Santa Barbara in 2007 including representatives from several SCAR member countries. Since then, plenty of institutions holding bathymetric data in the Southern Ocean have been asked for a contribution to the IBCSO dataset. After the time consuming gathering, compilation and analyses of bathymetric data, finally the first version of the IBCSO is close to be released. Besides the grid an adjacent map has been developed, which is also going to be released in the near future. It is proposed to give an overview in what has been done in the IBCSO project in the last years for the creation of IBCSO v1. This will include acknowledgements to the data contributors and a short explanation of the working steps data acquisition, homogenization, cleaning and gridding. Previews of the new grid are going to demonstrate the improvement that has been achieved by IBCSO v1 compared to other bathymetric

  16. Development of the Next Generation Gas Trap for the Space Station Internal Thermal Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leimkuehler, Thomas O.; Spelbring, Chris; Reeves, Daniel R.; Holt, James M.

    2003-01-01

    The current dual-membrane gas trap is designed to remove non-condensed gases (NCG) from the Internal Thermal Control System (ITCS) coolant on board the International Space Station (ISS). To date it has successfully served its purpose of preventing depriming, overspeed, and shutdown of the ITCS pump. However, contamination in the ITCS coolant has adversely affected the gas venting rate and lifetime of the gas trap, warranting a development effort for a next-generation gas trap. Design goals are to meet or exceed the current requirements to (1) include greater operating ranges and conditions, (2) eliminate reliance on the current hydrophilic tube fabrication process, and (3) increase operational life and tolerance to particulate and microbial growth fouling. In addition, the next generation gas trap will essentially be a 'dropin" design such that no modifications to the ITCS pump package assembly (PPA) will be required, and the implementation of the new design will not affect changes to the ITCS operational conditions, interfaces, or software. This paper will present the initial membrane module design and development work which has included (1) a trade study among several conceptual designs, (2) performance modeling of a hydrophobic-only design, and (3) small-scale development test data for the hydrophobic-only design. Testing has shown that the hydrophobic-only design is capable of performing even better than the current dual-membrane design for both steady-state gas removal and gas slug removal.

  17. Development of the Next Generation Gas Trap for the Space Station Internal Thermal Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leimkuehler, Thomas O.; Spelbring, Chris; Reeves, Daniel R.; Holt, James M.

    2003-01-01

    The current dual-membrane gas trap is designed to remove non-condensed gases (NCG) from the Internal Thermal Control System (ITCS) coolant on board the International Space Station (ISS). To date it has successfully served its purpose of preventing depriming, overspeed, and shutdown of the ITCS pump. However, contamination in the ITCS coolant has adversely affected the gas venting rate and lifetime of the gas trap, warranting a development effort for a next-generation gas trap. Design goals are to meet or exceed the current requirements to (1) include greater operating ranges and conditions, (2) eliminate reliance on the current hydrophilic tube fabrication process, and (3) increase operational life and tolerance to particulate and microbial growth fouling. In addition, the next generation gas trap will essentially be a 'dropin" design such that no modifications to the ITCS pump package assembly (PPA) will be required, and the implementation of the new design will not affect changes to the ITCS operational conditions, interfaces, or software. This paper will present the initial membrane module design and development work which has included (1) a trade study among several conceptual designs, (2) performance modeling of a hydrophobic-only design, and (3) small-scale development test data for the hydrophobic-only design. Testing has shown that the hydrophobic-only design is capable of performing even better than the current dual-membrane design for both steady-state gas removal and gas slug removal.

  18. Pingos, craters and methane-leaking seafloor in the central Barents Sea: signals of decomposing gas hydrate releasing gas from deeper hydrocarbon reservoirs?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreassen, K.; Plaza-Faverola, A. A.; Winsborrow, M.; Deryabin, A.; Mattingsdal, R.; Vadakkepuliyambatta, S.; Serov, P.; Mienert, J.; Bünz, S.

    2015-12-01

    A cluster of large craters and mounds appear on the gas-leaking sea floor in the central Barents Sea around the upper limit for methane hydrate stability, covering over 360 km2. We use multibeam bathymetry, single-beam echo sounder and high-resolution seismic data to reveal the detailed geomorphology and internal structure of craters and mounds, map the distribution gas in the water and to unravel the subsurface plumbing system and sources of gas leakage. Distinct morphologies and geophysical signatures of mounds and craters are inferred to reflect different development stages of shallow gas hydrate formation and dissociation. Over 600 gas flares extending from the sea floor into the water are mapped, many of these from the seafloor mounds and craters, but most from their flanks and surroundings. Analysis of geophysical data link gas flares in the water, craters and mounds to seismic indications of gas advection from deeper hydrocarbon reservoirs along faults and fractures. We present a conceptual model for formation of mounds, craters and gas leakage of the area.

  19. Gas holdup in a bubble column in the presence of coaxially placed string of spheres promoter as internal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohinikumar, P.; Reddy, M. G. Muni; Venkateswarlu, P.; Ramesh, K. V.

    2017-07-01

    Gas holdup was obtained in a gas-liquid upflow bubble column using quick-closing valve technique. Coaxially placed string of spheres is the promoter internal. An electrolyte solution of ferri-ferro redox couple was the liquid phase and nitrogen was the gas phase. Using promoter the gas holdup obtained was about 22 percent more. The influence of liquid velocity and rod diameter on gas holdup was found to be negligible. The gas holdup increased with gas velocity, pitch and sphere diameter. A correlation equation is obtained for the prediction of gas holdup as a function of Reynolds number and Froude number.

  20. The diversity of methoxyphenols released by pyrolysis-gas chromatography as predictor of soil carbon storage.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-González, Marco A; Álvarez, Ana M; Carral, Pilar; González-Vila, Francisco J; Almendros, Gonzalo

    2017-07-28

    The variable extent to which environmental factors are involved in soil carbon storage is currently a subject of controversy. In fact, justifying why some soils accumulate more organic matter than others is not trivial. Some abiotic factors such as organo-mineral associations have classically been invoked as the main drivers for soil C stabilization. However, in this research indirect evidences based on correlations between soil C storage and compositional descriptors of the soil organic matter are presented. It is assumed that the intrinsic structure of soil organic matter should have a bearing in the soil carbon storage. This is examined here by focusing on the methoxyphenols released by direct pyrolysis from a wide variety of topsoil samples from continental Mediterranean ecosystems from Spain with different properties and carbon content. Methoxyphenols are typical signature compounds presumptively informing on the occurrence and degree of alteration of lignin in soils. The methoxyphenol assemblages (12 major guaiacyl- and syringyl-type compounds) were analyzed by pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The Shannon-Wiener diversity index was chosen to describe the complexity of this phenolic signature. A series of exploratory statistical analyses (simple regression, partial least squares regression, multidimensional scaling) were applied to analyze the relationships existing between chemical and spectroscopic characteristics and the carbon content in the soils. These treatments coincided in pointing out that significant correlations exist between the progressive molecular diversity of the methoxyphenol assemblages and the concentration of organic carbon stored in the corresponding soils. This potential of the diversity in the phenolic signature as a surrogate index of the carbon storage in soils is tentatively interpreted as the accumulation of plant macromolecules altered into microbially reworked structures not readily recognized by soil enzymes. From

  1. How can an inert gas counterbalance a NMDA-induced glutamate release?

    PubMed

    Vallee, Nicolas; Rostain, Jean-Claude; Risso, Jean-Jacques

    2009-12-01

    Previous neurochemical studies performed in rats have revealed a decrease of striatal dopamine and glutamate induced by inert gas narcosis. We sought to establish the hypothetical role of glutamate and its main receptor, the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor, in this syndrome. We aimed to counteract the nitrogen narcosis-induced glutamate and dopamine decreases by stimulating the NMDA receptor in the striatum. We used bilateral retrodialysis on awake rats, submitted to nitrogen under pressure (3 MPa). Continuous infusion of 2 mM of NMDA under normobaric conditions (0.01 MPa) (n = 8) significantly increased extracellular average levels of glutamate, aspartate, glutamine, and asparagine by 241.8%, 292.5%, 108.3%, and 195.3%, respectively. The same infusion conducted under nitrogen at 3 MPa (n = 6) revealed significant lower levels of these amino acids (n = 8/6, P > 0.001). In opposition, the NMDA-induced effects on dopamine, dihydrophenylacetic acid (DOPAC), and homovanillic acid (HVA) levels were statistically not affected by the nitrogen at 3 MPa exposure (n = 8/6, P > 0.05). Dopamine was increased by >240% on average. HVA was decreased (down to 40%), and there was no change in DOPAC levels, in both conditions. Results highlight that the NMDA receptor is not directly affected by nitrogen under pressure as indicated by the elevation in NMDA-induced dopamine release under hyperbaric nitrogen. On the other hand, the NMDA-evoked glutamate increase is counteracted by nitrogen narcosis. No improvement in motor and locomotor disturbances was observed with high striatal concentration in dopamine. Further experiments have to be done to specify why the striatal glutamate pathways, in association with the inhibition of its metabolism, only are affected by nitrogen narcosis in this study.

  2. Lung Function before and after a Large Chlorine Gas Release in Graniteville, South Carolina.

    PubMed

    Clark, Kathleen A; Karmaus, Wilfried J J; Mohr, Lawrence C; Cai, Bo; Balte, Pallavi; Gibson, James J; Ownby, Dennis; Lawson, Andrew B; Vena, John E; Svendsen, Erik R

    2016-03-01

    On January 6, 2005 a train derailment led to an estimated 54,915-kg release of chlorine at a local textile mill in Graniteville, South Carolina. We used the employee health spirometry records of the textile to identify enduring effects of chlorine gas exposure resulting from the incident on the lung function of workers employed at the textile mill. Spirometry records from 1,807 mill workers (7,332 observations) were used from 4 years before and 18 months after the disaster. Longitudinal analysis using marginal regression models produced annual population mean estimates for FEV1, FVC, and FEV1/FVC ratio. Covariate adjustment was made for sex, age, smoking, height, season tested, technician, obesity, season × year interactions, and smoker × year interactions. The increased prevalence of mill workers having accelerated FEV1 decline was also evaluated after the chlorine spill. In the year of the accident, we observed a significant reduction in mean FEV1 (-4.2% predicted; P = 0.019) when compared with the year before the incident. In the second year, partial recovery in the mean FVC % predicted level was seen, but the cohort's average FEV1/FVC ratio continued to decrease over time. Severe annual FEV1 decline was most prevalent in the year of the accident, and independent of mill worker smoking status. The Graniteville mill worker cohort revealed significant reductions in lung function immediately after the chlorine incident. Improvement was seen in the second year; but the proportion of mill workers experiencing accelerated FEV1 annual decline significantly increased in the 18 months after the chlorine incident.

  3. The Effelsberg-Bonn H i Survey: Milky Way gas. First data release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkel, B.; Kerp, J.; Flöer, L.; Kalberla, P. M. W.; Ben Bekhti, N.; Keller, R.; Lenz, D.

    2016-01-01

    Context. The Effelsberg-Bonn H i Survey (EBHIS) is a new 21-cm survey performed with the 100-m telescope at Effelsberg. It covers the whole northern sky out to a redshift of z ~ 0.07 and comprises H i line emission from the Milky Way and the Local Volume. Aims: We aim to substitute the northern-hemisphere part of the Leiden/Argentine/Bonn Milky Way H i survey (LAB) with this first EBHIS data release, which presents the H i gas in the Milky Way regime. Methods: The use of a seven-beam L-band array made it feasible to perform this all-sky survey with a 100-m class telescope in a reasonable amount of observing time. State-of-the-art fast-Fourier-transform spectrometers provide the necessary data read-out speed, dynamic range, and spectral resolution to apply software radio-frequency interference mitigation. EBHIS is corrected for stray radiation and employs frequency-dependent flux-density calibration and sophisticated baseline-removal techniques to ensure the highest possible data quality. Results: Detailed analyses of the resulting data products show that EBHIS is not only outperforming LAB in terms of sensitivity and angular resolution, but also matches the intensity-scale of LAB extremely well, allowing EBHIS to be used as a drop-in replacement for LAB. Data products are made available to the public in a variety of forms. Most important, we provide a properly gridded Milky Way H i column density map in HEALPix representation. To maximize the usefulness of EBHIS data, we estimate uncertainties in the H i column density and brightness temperature distributions, accounting for systematic effects. EBHIS Milky Way HI data is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/585/A41

  4. Lung Function before and after a Large Chlorine Gas Release in Graniteville, South Carolina

    PubMed Central

    Karmaus, Wilfried J. J.; Mohr, Lawrence C.; Cai, Bo; Balte, Pallavi; Gibson, James J.; Ownby, Dennis; Lawson, Andrew B.; Vena, John E.; Svendsen, Erik R.

    2016-01-01

    Rationale: On January 6, 2005 a train derailment led to an estimated 54,915-kg release of chlorine at a local textile mill in Graniteville, South Carolina. Objectives: We used the employee health spirometry records of the textile to identify enduring effects of chlorine gas exposure resulting from the incident on the lung function of workers employed at the textile mill. Methods: Spirometry records from 1,807 mill workers (7,332 observations) were used from 4 years before and 18 months after the disaster. Longitudinal analysis using marginal regression models produced annual population mean estimates for FEV1, FVC, and FEV1/FVC ratio. Covariate adjustment was made for sex, age, smoking, height, season tested, technician, obesity, season × year interactions, and smoker × year interactions. The increased prevalence of mill workers having accelerated FEV1 decline was also evaluated after the chlorine spill. Measurements and Main Results: In the year of the accident, we observed a significant reduction in mean FEV1 (–4.2% predicted; P = 0.019) when compared with the year before the incident. In the second year, partial recovery in the mean FVC % predicted level was seen, but the cohort’s average FEV1/FVC ratio continued to decrease over time. Severe annual FEV1 decline was most prevalent in the year of the accident, and independent of mill worker smoking status. Conclusions: The Graniteville mill worker cohort revealed significant reductions in lung function immediately after the chlorine incident. Improvement was seen in the second year; but the proportion of mill workers experiencing accelerated FEV1 annual decline significantly increased in the 18 months after the chlorine incident. PMID:26695511

  5. [Suspension-sedimentation of sediment and release amount of internal load in Lake Taihu affected by wind].

    PubMed

    Pang, Yong; Yan, Run-run; Yu, Zhong-bo; Li, Yi-ping; Li, Rui-ling

    2008-09-01

    The water quality in Meiliang Bay of the Taihu Lake was totally tested five times in the four seasons. The suspension samples were obtained by using a sediment trap. The sediment settling flux and resuspended flux were calculated according to the observation data by using Gansith formula, and the relationships between these fluxes and wind speeds were established. Seven experiments were conducted in Laboratory for hydrostatic settling behavior of suspended matter affected by different wind speeds in Lake Taihu. The hydrostatic settling fluxes of suspended matter were calculated and the relationships between the fluxes and suspended matter concentrations were established. Base on these works, the suspension-sedimentation process was decomposed and generalized according to the critical wind speed of 3.7 m/s. Daily sediment resuspended amount and settling amount of the year 2005 was calculated and annual average release amount of internal load in Lake Taihu was estimated using the wind data of nearly 10 years. The results indicate that daily release amount of internal load in Lake Taihu significantly influenced by wind and have the same trend of change with wind, while the release amount of different nutrients in the same condition are different. The Lake Taihu has an annual average release amount of internal load with COD 49,600 t, TN 7773.0 t and TP 275.5 t, of which summer has the markedly highest release amount than other seasons.

  6. ITRF2014: A new release of the International Terrestrial Reference Frame modeling nonlinear station motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altamimi, Zuheir; Rebischung, Paul; Métivier, Laurent; Collilieux, Xavier

    2016-08-01

    For the first time in the International Terrestrial Reference Frame (ITRF) history, the ITRF2014 is generated with an enhanced modeling of nonlinear station motions, including seasonal (annual and semiannual) signals of station positions and postseismic deformation for sites that were subject to major earthquakes. Using the full observation history of the four space geodetic techniques (very long baseline interferometry (VLBI), satellite laser ranging (SLR), Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS), and Doppler orbitography and radiopositioning integrated by satellite (DORIS)), the corresponding international services provided reprocessed time series (weekly from SLR and DORIS, daily from GNSS, and 24 h session-wise from VLBI) of station positions and daily Earth Orientation Parameters. ITRF2014 is demonstrated to be superior to past ITRF releases, as it precisely models the actual station trajectories leading to a more robust secular frame and site velocities. The ITRF2014 long-term origin coincides with the Earth system center of mass as sensed by SLR observations collected on the two LAGEOS satellites over the time span between 1993.0 and 2015.0. The estimated accuracy of the ITRF2014 origin, as reflected by the level of agreement with the ITRF2008 (both origins are defined by SLR), is at the level of less than 3 mm at epoch 2010.0 and less than 0.2 mm/yr in time evolution. The ITRF2014 scale is defined by the arithmetic average of the implicit scales of SLR and VLBI solutions as obtained by the stacking of their respective time series. The resulting scale and scale rate differences between the two solutions are 1.37 (±0.10) ppb at epoch 2010.0 and 0.02 (±0.02) ppb/yr. While the postseismic deformation models were estimated using GNSS/GPS data, the resulting parametric models at earthquake colocation sites were applied to the station position time series of the three other techniques, showing a very high level of consistency which enforces more the link

  7. ECO LOGIC INTERNATIONAL GAS-PHASE CHEMICAL REDUCTION PROCESS - THE THERMAL DESORPTION UNIT - APPLICATIONS ANALYSIS REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    ELI ECO Logic International, Inc.'s Thermal Desorption Unit (TDU) is specifically designed for use with Eco Logic's Gas Phase Chemical Reduction Process. The technology uses an externally heated bath of molten tin in a hydrogen atmosphere to desorb hazardous organic compounds fro...

  8. ECO LOGIC INTERNATIONAL GAS-PHASE CHEMICAL REDUCTION PROCESS - THE THERMAL DESORPTION UNIT - APPLICATIONS ANALYSIS REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    ELI ECO Logic International, Inc.'s Thermal Desorption Unit (TDU) is specifically designed for use with Eco Logic's Gas Phase Chemical Reduction Process. The technology uses an externally heated bath of molten tin in a hydrogen atmosphere to desorb hazardous organic compounds fro...

  9. Measurement of spin observables using a storage ring with polarized beam and polarized internal gas target

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, K.; Miller, M.A.; Smith, A.; Hansen, J.; Bloch, C.; van den Brand, J.F.J.; Bulten, H.J.; Ent, R.; Goodman, C.D.; Jacobs, W.W.; Jones, C.E.; Korsch, W.; Leuschner, M.; Lorenzon, W.; Marchlenski, D.; Meyer, H.O.; Milner, R.G.; Neal, J.S.; Pancella, P.V.; Pate, S.F.; Pitts, W.K.; von Przewoski, B.; Rinckel, T.; Sowinski, J.; Sperisen, F.; Sugarbaker, E.; Tschalaer, C.; Unal, O.; Zhou, Z. Indiana University Cyclotron Facility, Bloomington, Indiana 47405 MIT-Bates Linear Accelerator Center and Laboratory for Nuclear Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 University of Wisconsin enMadison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, Michigan 49007 )

    1993-02-08

    We report the first measurement of analyzing powers and spin correlation parameters using a storage ring with both beam and internal target polarized. Spin observables were measured for elastic scattering of 45 and 198 MeV protons from polarized [sup 3]He nuclei in a new laser-pumped internal gas target at the Indiana University Cyclotron Facility Cooler Ring. Scattered protons and recoil [sup 3]He nuclei were detected in coincidence with large acceptance plastic scintillators and silicon detectors. The internal-target technique demonstrated in this experiment has broad applicability to the measurement of spin-dependent scattering in nuclear and particle physics.

  10. Release of sulfur and chlorine during cofiring RDF and coal in an internally circulating fluidized bed

    SciTech Connect

    Xiaolin Wei; Yang Wang; Dianfu Liu; Hongzhi Sheng; Wendong Tian; Yunhan Xiao

    2009-03-15

    An internally circulating fluidized bed (ICFB) was applied to investigate the behavior of chlorine and sulfur during cofiring RDF and coal. The pollutant emissions in the flue gas were measured by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometry (Gasmet DX-3000). In the tests, the concentrations of the species CO, CO{sub 2}, HCl, and SO{sub 2} were measured online. Results indicated when cofiring RDF and char, due to the higher content of chlorine in RDF, the formation of HCl significantly increases. The concentration of SO{sub 2} is relatively low because alkaline metal in the fuel ash can absorb SO{sub 2}. The concentration of CO emission during firing pure RDF is relatively higher and fluctuates sharply. With the CaO addition, the sulfur absorption by calcium quickly increases, and the desulfurization ratio is bigger than the dechlorination ratio. The chemical equilibrium method is applied to predict the behavior of chlorine. Results show that gaseous HCl emission increases with increasing RDF fraction, and gaseous KCl and NaCl formation might occur. 35 refs., 18 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Impact of leaching conditions on constituents release from Flue Gas Desulfurization Gypsum (FGDG) and FGDG-soil mixture.

    PubMed

    Koralegedara, N H; Al-Abed, S R; Arambewela, M K J; Dionysiou, D D

    2017-02-15

    The interest in using Flue Gas Desulfurization Gypsum (FGDG) for land applications has increased recently. This study evaluates the leaching characteristics of trace elements in "modern" FGDG (produced after fly ash removal) and FGDG-mixed soil (SF) under different environmental conditions using recently approved EPA leaching methods (1313-1316). These methods employ various pH and liquid-solid (LS) ratios under batch leaching, column percolation and diffusion controlled release scenarios. Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Protocol (TCLP) and Synthetic Precipitation Leaching Protocol (SPLP) were used for comparison. The data obtained from new EPA methods provide broad insight into constituent release from FGDG and SF when compared to TCLP and SPLP. The release of toxic elements such as Hg, As, Pb, Co, Cd and Cr from SF was negligible. High release of B from FGDG was observed under all tested conditions; however, its release from SF was low. Both FGDG and SF released Se under all pH conditions (2-13) and LS ratios (1-10) in low concentrations (0.02-0.2mg/L). The data from this study could be used to investigate potential use of "modern" FGDG for new beneficial land applications. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. OGRE/MOD1: A computer model for predicting off-gas release from In Situ Vitrification melts

    SciTech Connect

    MacKinnon, R.J.; Mousseau, V.A.

    1990-07-01

    The OGRE program is designed to compute off-gas release from In Situ Vitrification melt pools. This document describes the theoretical basis and computational algorithms used in the program. An outline of the computer program is described including presentation of an example user input deck. Two model problems are examined to verify the program and an example problem is given to demonstrate program usage.

  13. Results of Large-Scale Testing on Effects of Anti-Foam Agent on Gas Retention and Release

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, Charles W.; Guzman-Leong, Consuelo E.; Arm, Stuart T.; Butcher, Mark G.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Jagoda, Lynette K.; Park, Walter R.; Slaugh, Ryan W.; Su, Yin-Fong; Wend, Christopher F.; Mahoney, Lenna A.; Alzheimer, James M.; Bailey, Jeffrey A.; Cooley, Scott K.; Hurley, David E.; Johnson, Christian D.; Reid, Larry D.; Smith, Harry D.; Wells, Beric E.; Yokuda, Satoru T.

    2008-01-03

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of River Protection’s Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) will process and treat radioactive waste that is stored in tanks at the Hanford Site. The waste treatment process in the pretreatment facility will mix both Newtonian and non-Newtonian slurries in large process tanks. Process vessels mixing non-Newtonian slurries will use pulse jet mixers (PJMs), air sparging, and recirculation pumps. An anti-foam agent (AFA) will be added to the process streams to prevent surface foaming, but may also increase gas holdup and retention within the slurry. The work described in this report addresses gas retention and release in simulants with AFA through testing and analytical studies. Gas holdup and release tests were conducted in a 1/4-scale replica of the lag storage vessel operated in the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Applied Process Engineering Laboratory using a kaolin/bentonite clay and AZ-101 HLW chemical simulant with non-Newtonian rheological properties representative of actual waste slurries. Additional tests were performed in a small-scale mixing vessel in the PNNL Physical Sciences Building using liquids and slurries representing major components of typical WTP waste streams. Analytical studies were directed at discovering how the effect of AFA might depend on gas composition and predicting the effect of AFA on gas retention and release in the full-scale plant, including the effects of mass transfer to the sparge air. The work at PNNL was part of a larger program that included tests conducted at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) that is being reported separately. SRNL conducted gas holdup tests in a small-scale mixing vessel using the AZ-101 high-level waste (HLW) chemical simulant to investigate the effects of different AFAs, their components, and of adding noble metals. Full-scale, single-sparger mass transfer tests were also conducted at SRNL in water and AZ-101 HLW simulant to provide data for PNNL

  14. Effect of asphaltene deposition on the internal corrosion in the oil and gas industry

    SciTech Connect

    Palacios T, C.A.; Morales, J.L.; Viloria, A.

    1997-08-01

    Crude oil from Norte de Monagas field, in Venezuela, contains large amounts of asphaltenes. Some of them are very unstable with a tendency to precipitate. Because liquid is carried over from the separation process in the flow stations, asphaltenes are also present in the gas gathering and transmission lines, precipitating on the inner wall of pipelines. The gas gathering and transmission lines contain gas with high partial pressures of CO{sub 2}, some H{sub 2}S and are water saturated; therefore, inhibitors are used to control internal corrosion. There is uncertainty on how inhibitors perform in the presence of asphaltene deposition. The purpose of this paper is to describe the causes that enhance asphaltene deposition in gas pipelines and present some results from an ongoing research project carried out by the Venezuelan Oil Companies.

  15. Treatment of clinical endometritis in dairy cows by previously used controlled internal drug release devices.

    PubMed

    Eslami, Mohsen; Bolourchi, Mahmoud; Seifi, Hesam A; Asadi, Farzad; Akbari, Rahmat

    2015-08-01

    Postpartum endometritis is considered as one of the diseases that lead to a potential profit reduction in dairy cows. The aims of the present study were to promote follicle growth by a previously used controlled internal drug release (CIDR) device and to evaluate its effect on the likelihood of recovery and the reproductive performance of clinical endometritis (CE) cows. Endometritis was diagnosed using ultrasonographic examination at 31 ± 3 (Day 0 of the experiment) days in milk, and CE cows were included in one of the three experimental groups according to the presence of a CL on their ovaries. Cows without CL on their ovaries received a reused CIDR device, which was previously used for 14 days (CIDR-14, n = 108), or PGF2α (PG-1, n = 112) on Day 0. In the third group, those with CL on their ovaries received PGF2α (PG-2, n = 107) at the same time. Ovarian structures, serum estradiol and progesterone concentrations were measured on Days 0, 7, and 14. Controlled internal drug release devices were removed, and response to treatment was evaluated in all treated cows on Day 14. Diameters of ovarian follicles were 11.61 ± 0.50, 12.46 ± 0.25, and 18.36 ± 0.60 mm on Day 7 and 11.63 ± 0.58, 14.35 ± 0.40, and 21.96 ± 0.77 mm on Day 14 in PG-1, PG-2, and CIDR-14 cows, respectively (P < 0.05). Serum estradiol concentrations were higher in CIDR-14 cows (141.17 ± 1.04 pg/mL) than in PG-1 (116.85 ± 1.05 pg/mL) and PG-2 (119.10 ± 1.05 pg/mL) cows on Day 7 (P < 0.05). Higher progesterone concentrations were observed in PG-2 cows than in PG-1 and CIDR-14 cows on Days 0, 7, and 14 (P < 0.001). The likelihood of clinical cure was 54.46%, 62.61%, and 64.81% in PG-1, PG-2, and CIDR-14 cows, respectively (P = 0.11). First-service conception risk, days to the first service, calving to conception interval, proportion of cows bred and pregnant by 120 days in milk did not differ among the treated groups (P > 0.05). The cumulative pregnancy risk was lower in PG-1 (77.67%) cows

  16. Linking Volcanism and Gas Release from the North East Atlantic Volcanic Province to the PETM: Challenges and Updates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svensen, H.; Jones, M. T.; Jerram, D. A.; Planke, S.; Kjoberg, S.; Schmid, D. W.; Iyer, K.; Tegner, C.

    2016-12-01

    The main phase of the development of the North East Atlantic Volcanic Province took place about 56 Ma and coincides with the Paleocene Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM). The volcanic activity was characterized by voluminous flood basalts, large plutonic complexes, sub-marine eruptions, widespread tephra deposition, and emplacement of sills and dikes along the continental margins of Norway, Greenland, Ireland, and the UK. Here we review the style and tempo of volcanism during this important period of Earth's history and discuss the sources and volumes of the carbon gases emitted to the ocean and atmosphere. Moreover, we present new data and models from 1) West Greenland showing the impact on sill intrusions on gas generation from heated Cretaceous mudstones, 2) a 3D seismic survey of gas release structures offshore Norway, and 3) Paleocene-Eocene tephra layers from Svalbard and Denmark. Gas migrated out of the contact aureoles by either explosive venting or by slower seepage towards the seafloor as demonstrated by 3D seismic data. Some of the gas was permanently trapped (dry gas and CO2-rich gas) in the source rocks and aureoles. Combined with high-precision zircon ages and a time model for the PETM, our approach may give robust fluxes that can explain both the onset and the body of the PETM.

  17. Oil separator for a blowby gas ventilation system of an internal combustion engine

    SciTech Connect

    Yokoi, T.; Nishi, Y.; Takeya, E.

    1988-02-09

    An oil separator for a blowby gas ventilation system of an internal combustion engine is described comprising: a cylinder head cover; a baffle plate housed in the cylinder head cover; blowby gas path means formed between the cylinder head cover and the baffle plate; a blowby gas inlet formed by a space formed between the cylinder head cover and the baffle plate and a blowby gas outlet provided at the cylinder head cover; and a filter provided in the blowby gas path means between the blowby gas inlet and the blowby gas outlet. The filter extends from the cylinder head cover to the baffle plate in a vertical direction wherein a groove is formed in the baffle plate. The groove is located below the filter and extends along the filter over an entire width portion of the baffle plate wherein the baffle plate comprises side walls extending downward from the width ends of the top wall of the baffle plate. A space is formed between each of the side walls of the baffle plate and a side wall of the cylinder head cover, and the length ends of the groove open to each space formed between the side walls of the baffle plate and the side wall of the cylinder head cover.

  18. From spin noise to systematics: stochastic processes in the first International Pulsar Timing Array data release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lentati, L.; Shannon, R. M.; Coles, W. A.; Verbiest, J. P. W.; van Haasteren, R.; Ellis, J. A.; Caballero, R. N.; Manchester, R. N.; Arzoumanian, Z.; Babak, S.; Bassa, C. G.; Bhat, N. D. R.; Brem, P.; Burgay, M.; Burke-Spolaor, S.; Champion, D.; Chatterjee, S.; Cognard, I.; Cordes, J. M.; Dai, S.; Demorest, P.; Desvignes, G.; Dolch, T.; Ferdman, R. D.; Fonseca, E.; Gair, J. R.; Gonzalez, M. E.; Graikou, E.; Guillemot, L.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Hobbs, G.; Janssen, G. H.; Jones, G.; Karuppusamy, R.; Keith, M.; Kerr, M.; Kramer, M.; Lam, M. T.; Lasky, P. D.; Lassus, A.; Lazarus, P.; Lazio, T. J. W.; Lee, K. J.; Levin, L.; Liu, K.; Lynch, R. S.; Madison, D. R.; McKee, J.; McLaughlin, M.; McWilliams, S. T.; Mingarelli, C. M. F.; Nice, D. J.; Osłowski, S.; Pennucci, T. T.; Perera, B. B. P.; Perrodin, D.; Petiteau, A.; Possenti, A.; Ransom, S. M.; Reardon, D.; Rosado, P. A.; Sanidas, S. A.; Sesana, A.; Shaifullah, G.; Siemens, X.; Smits, R.; Stairs, I.; Stappers, B.; Stinebring, D. R.; Stovall, K.; Swiggum, J.; Taylor, S. R.; Theureau, G.; Tiburzi, C.; Toomey, L.; Vallisneri, M.; van Straten, W.; Vecchio, A.; Wang, J.-B.; Wang, Y.; You, X. P.; Zhu, W. W.; Zhu, X.-J.

    2016-05-01

    We analyse the stochastic properties of the 49 pulsars that comprise the first International Pulsar Timing Array (IPTA) data release. We use Bayesian methodology, performing model selection to determine the optimal description of the stochastic signals present in each pulsar. In addition to spin-noise and dispersion-measure (DM) variations, these models can include timing noise unique to a single observing system, or frequency band. We show the improved radio-frequency coverage and presence of overlapping data from different observing systems in the IPTA data set enables us to separate both system and band-dependent effects with much greater efficacy than in the individual pulsar timing array (PTA) data sets. For example, we show that PSR J1643-1224 has, in addition to DM variations, significant band-dependent noise that is coherent between PTAs which we interpret as coming from time-variable scattering or refraction in the ionized interstellar medium. Failing to model these different contributions appropriately can dramatically alter the astrophysical interpretation of the stochastic signals observed in the residuals. In some cases, the spectral exponent of the spin-noise signal can vary from 1.6 to 4 depending upon the model, which has direct implications for the long-term sensitivity of the pulsar to a stochastic gravitational-wave (GW) background. By using a more appropriate model, however, we can greatly improve a pulsar's sensitivity to GWs. For example, including system and band-dependent signals in the PSR J0437-4715 data set improves the upper limit on a fiducial GW background by ˜60 per cent compared to a model that includes DM variations and spin-noise only.

  19. Computer Associates International, CA-ACF2/VM Release 3.1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-09-09

    Associates CA-ACF2/VM Bibliography International Business Machines Corporation, IBM Virtual Machine/Directory Maintenance Program Logic Manual...publication number LY20-0889 International Business Machines International Business Machines Corporation, IBM System/370 Principles of Operation...publication number GA22-7000 International Business Machines Corporation, IBM Virtual Machine/Directory Maintenance Installation and System Administrator’s

  20. Effect of oxygen on the internal corrosion of natural gas pipelines

    SciTech Connect

    Durr, C.L.; Beavers, J.A.

    1996-08-01

    Internal corrosion is a problem in wet natural gas gathering lines. Literature on the subject suggests that dissolved oxygen (O{sub 2}) is one of the more corrosive contaminants in natural gas. Immersion tests, funded by a major gas transmission company, were performed on C1018 (UNS G10180) specimens to assess the influence of O{sub 2} concentration on the internal corrosion of the wet gathering system in their storage field. Twenty-eight day tests were performed in a flow-through (gas phase only) autoclave at 70 F (21 C) and 1,200 psi (8,274 kPa) with simulated natural gas mixtures containing 10, 100, 500 and 1,000 ppm (by volume) O{sub 2}. Specimens were exposed to the vapor, vapor/liquid (V/L) interface, and liquid phases of pure water and saltwater in these tests. The highest corrosion rate, based on groove depth, was measured for the V/L specimens in pure water with 1,000 ppm O{sub 2}. Corrosion rates, based on weight loss, generally maximized at an O{sub 2} concentration of 100 ppm.

  1. 77 FR 26601 - Notice of Opportunity for Public Comment on Surplus Property Release at Portsmouth International...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-04

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Notice of Opportunity for Public Comment on Surplus Property Release at... Pease to waive the surplus property requirements for 65.42 acres of airport property located at... release 65.42 acres of airport property from surplus property obligations. The State of New Hampshire is...

  2. ICCS 2009 User Guide for the International Database. Supplement 5: ICCS 2009 Released Items

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brese, Falk; Jung, Michael; Mirazchiyski, Plamen; Schulz, Wolfram; Zuehlke, Olaf

    2011-01-01

    This document contains released items used in the ICCS 2009 main survey. Seven clusters of items were used in the study in a rotated booklet design with three clusters per test booklet. Clusters 1 and 7 comprise the released item set. Cluster 1 comprises items that were newly developed for ICCS 2009 and Cluster 7 is drawn from previously secure…

  3. Effects of Surfactant Contamination on the Next Generation Gas Trap for the ISS Internal Thermal Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leimkuehler, Thomas O.; Lukens, Clark; Reeves, Daniel R.; Holt, James M.

    2004-01-01

    The current dual-membrane gas trap is designed to remove non-condensed gas bubbles from the Internal Thermal Control System (ITCS) coolant on board the International Space Station (ISS). To date it has successfully served its purpose of preventing gas bubbles from causing depriming, overspeed, and shutdown of the ITCS pump. However, contamination in the ITCS coolant has adversely affected the gas venting rate and lifetime of the gas trap, warranting a development effort for a next-generation gas trap. Previous testing has shown that a hydrophobic-only design is capable of performing even better than the current dual-membrane design for both steady-state gas removal and gas slug removal in clean deionized water. This paper presents results of testing to evaluate the effects of surfactant contamination on the steady-state performance of the hydrophobic-only design.

  4. Effects of Surfactant Contamination on the Next Generation Gas Trap for the ISS Internal Thermal Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leimkuehler, Thomas O.; Lukens, Clark; Reeves, Daniel R.; Holt, James M.

    2004-01-01

    The current dual-membrane gas trap is designed to remove non-condensed gas bubbles from the Internal Thermal Control System (ITCS) coolant on board the International Space Station (ISS). To date it has successfully served its purpose of preventing gas bubbles from causing depriming, overspeed, and shutdown of the ITCS pump. However, contamination in the ITCS coolant has adversely affected the gas venting rate and lifetime of the gas trap, warranting a development effort for a next-generation gas trap. Previous testing has shown that a hydrophobic-only design is capable of performing even better than the current dual-membrane design for both steady-state gas removal and gas slug removal in clean deionized water. This paper presents results of testing to evaluate the effects of surfactant contamination on the steady-state performance of the hydrophobic-only design.

  5. Quantitation of gas-phase perfluoroalkyl surfactants and fluorotelomer alcohols released from nonstick cookware and microwave popcorn bags.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, Ewan; Kim, Seung Kyu; Akinleye, Henry B; Kannan, Kurunthachalam

    2007-02-15

    Fluoropolymer dispersions are used for coating certain cookware products and food-contact packaging to impart oil and water repellency. Since salts of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) are used as a processing aid in the manufacture of many fluoropolymers, it is necessary to determine if these compounds are still present as residuals after the process used to coat nonstick cookware or packaging, and could be released during typical cooking conditions. In this study, we identified and measured perfluoroalkyl carboxylates (PFCAs), particularly PFOA, and fluorotelomer alcohols (FTOHs; 6:2 FTOH and 8:2 FTOH), released from nonstick cookware into the gas phase under normal cooking temperatures (179 to 233 degrees C surface temperature). PFOA was released into the gas phase at 7-337 ng (11-503 pg/cm2) per pan from four brands of nonstick frying pans. 6:2 FTOH and 8:2 FTOH were found in the gas phase of four brands of frying pans, and the sources of FTOHs released from nonstick cookware are under investigation. We observed a significant decrease in gas-phase PFOA following repeated use of one brand of pan, whereas the other brand did not show a significant reduction in PFOA release following multiple uses. PFOA was found at >5 ng during the fourth use of both brands of pans. FTOHs were not found after the second use of either brand of pans. PFOA was found at 5-34 ng in the vapors produced from a prepacked microwave popcorn bag. PFOA was not found in the vapors produced from plain white corn kernels popped in a polypropylene container. 6:2 FTOH and 8:2 FTOH were measured in the vapors produced from one brand of prepacked microwave popcorn at 223 + 37 ng and 258 +/- 36 ng per bag, respectively, but not measured at >20 ng (LOQ) in the other two brands. On the packaging surface of one brand of microwave popcorn several PFCAs, including C5-C12, 6:2 FTOH, and 8:2 FTOH, were found at concentrations in the order of 0.5-6.0 ng/cm2. This study suggests that residual PFOA is not

  6. Methods for ensuring compliance in an international greenhouse gas trading system

    SciTech Connect

    Hargrave, T.; Helme, E.A.

    1998-12-31

    At the third Conference of the Parties to the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change held in December, 1997, the international community established binding greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions obligations for industrialized countries. The Parties to the new Kyoto Protocol also agreed on the use of a number of market-based mechanisms, including international GHG emissions trading. These market mechanisms were of critical to the importance because they have the potential to significantly reduce the costs of treaty compliance. In principle, an international cap-and-trade system appears to be one of the most cost-effective means of reducing GHG emissions. Maintaining the integrity of the trading system is of primary importance in ensuring that trading helps countries to meet their GHG commitments. This paper explores methods for ensuring compliance in an international greenhouse gas trading system, starting with a discussion of preconditions for participation in trading and then moving to features of an international compliance system. Achieving maximum compliance with international requirements may best be accomplished by limiting participation in trading to Annex I countries that maintain strong domestic compliance systems. Prior to the climate negotiations in Kyoto in December 1997, the US Administration proposed a number of preconditions for participation in trading, including the adoption of international measurement standards and the establishment of domestic compliance and enforcement programs. This paper explores these and other preconditions, including the establishment of tough domestic financial penalties on companies that exceed allowed emissions and seller responsibility for the delivery of real reductions. The paper also discusses several necessary features of the international compliance system.

  7. Washington Seafood Companies Agree to Cut Ozone-Depleting and Greenhouse Gas Refrigerant Releases

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    (Seattle - March 8, 2016) Two seafood processing and cold storage companies, Ocean Gold Seafoods Inc. and Ocean Cold LLC, have agreed to cut their releases of ozone-depleting and greenhouse gases from leaking refrigeration equipment at their facilities in

  8. IV INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON ATOM AND MOLECULAR PULSED LASERS (AMPL'99): IV International Conference on Atomic and Molecular Pulsed Gas Lasers (AMPL'99)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evtushenko, Gennadii S.; Kopylova, T. N.; Soldatov, A. N.; Tarasenko, Viktor F.; Yakovlenko, Sergei I.; Yancharina, A. M.

    2000-06-01

    A brief review of the most interesting papers presented at the IV International Conference on Atomic and Molecular Pulsed Gas Lasers (AMPL'99), which was held in Tomsk, September 13-17, 1999, is provided.

  9. Characteristics of three-phase internal loop airlift bioreactors with complete gas recirculation for non-Newtonian fluids.

    PubMed

    Wen, Jianping; Jia, Xiaoqiang; Cheng, Xianrui; Yang, Peng

    2005-05-01

    Hydrodynamic and gas-liquid mass transfer characteristics, such as liquid velocity, gas holdup, solid holdup and gas-liquid volumetric mass transfer coefficient, in the riser and downcomer of the gas-liquid-solid three-phase internal loop airlift bioreactors with complete gas recirculation for non-Newtonian fluids, were investigated. A mathematical model for the description of flow behavior and gas-liquid mass transfer of these bioreactors was developed. The predicted results of this model agreed well with the experimental data.

  10. Internally staged permeator prepared from annular hollow fibers for gas separation

    SciTech Connect

    Li, K.; Wang, D.; Li, D.; Teo, W.K.

    1998-04-01

    A polysulfone/polyethersulfone annular hollow-fiber (tube) membrane was prepared using a phase-inversion process, which is useful for further preparation of an internally staged permeator (ISP) for gas separation. This study focused on the techniques of fabricating the polysulfone/polyethersulfone annular-hollow-fiber membranes and its membrane permeators for gas enrichment. Two homogeneous polymer solutions comprising polysulfone/DMAc and polyethersulfone/NMP/water, respectively, were prepared and extruded with a triple-orifice spinneret into an annular-hollow-fiber membrane that possesses two distinct skin layers and is capable of providing two separation stages internally for gas separation. The performance of the ISP fabricated from the prepared annular hollow-fiber membrane was evaluated theoretically and experimentally under co/countercurrent and countercurrent flow patterns for various binary gas mixtures. The mathematical models generally describe satisfactorily the observed experimental results. A parametric study reveals that while, in general, better separation is available at lower values of overall stage cuts, highly purified permeate products could be achieved at higher values of overall stage cuts if the concentration of a permeating component in the feed stock is relatively high.

  11. Temporal and Spatial Aspects of Gas Release During the 2010 Apparition of Comet 103P/Hartley-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonev, B. P.; Villanueva, G. L.; Paganini, L.; DiSanti, M. A.; Gibb, E. L.; Keane, J. V.; Meech, K. J.; Blake, G. A.; Ellis, R. S.; Lippi, M.; Boehnhardt, H.; Magee-Sauer, K.

    2011-01-01

    We report measurements of eight primary volatiles (H2O, HCN, CH4, C2H6, CH3OH, C2H2, H2CO, and NH3) and two product species (OH and NH2) in comet 103P/Hartley-2 using high dispersion infrared spectroscopy. We present production rates for individual volatiles species, their mixing ratios relative to water, and their spatial distributions in the coma on multiple dates that span the interval Sept. - Dec. 2010. The production rates vary strongly with nucleus rotation, but the mixing ratios remain constant throughout the campaign. The released primary volatiles exhibit diverse spatial properties which favor the presence of separate polar and apolar ice phases in the nucleus, establish dust and gas release from icy clumps (and also, directly from the nucleus), and provide insights into the driver for the cyanogen (CN) polar jet.

  12. Interaction between hydrothermal and magmatic systems: modelling of magmatic gas release and ascent at Campi Flegrei (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todesco, Micol; Afanasyev, Andrey; Montagna, Chiara Paola; Longo, Antonella

    2016-04-01

    We model the perturbation of a hydrothermal system caused by the gas release from sub-surface magma chambers. First, we simulate the evolution of the magmatic system composed by two magma reservoirs: a small and shallow chamber, filled with degassed phonolite, connected to a deeper reservoir of gas-rich shoshonite through a vertical dyke. The fluid-dynamics governing the replenishment of the upper chamber is computed with a 2D code solving conservation equations of mass, momentum and energy for a homogeneous multicomponent, multiphase Newtonian mixture, accounting for exsolution and dissolution of volatiles (H2O+CO2). We then assume that the volatiles that accumulate at the top of the upper chamber, escape from the reservoir and enter a steady state hydrothermal system. The response of the hydrothermal circulation is simulated with two multi-phase, multi-component porous media codes (MUFITS and TOUGH2) that describe the propagation of magmatic volatiles toward the surface. We create a simple model of Campi Flegrei hydrothermal system covering both shallow and deep regions where the temperature exceeds the critical temperature for water. Simulation results suggest that the rate at which volatiles are released from the magma chamber, the permeability distribution and the conditions of the hydrothermal system when degassing takes place can determine very different evolutions: accordingly, carbon dioxide may reach the surface within a time span ranging from weeks to millennia. The simulations indicate also that a single unrest event, associated with volatiles release from the chamber, can result in a periodic behaviour of observable parameters such as gas flux and fumarole composition. Duration of the period is of the order of 10 years, which is comparable with the time span between major unrest events observed at Campi Flegrei.

  13. Mechanistic analysis of double-shell tank gas release. Progress report, November 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Allemann, R.T.; Antoniak, Z.I.; Friley, J.R.; Haines, C.E.; Liljegren, L.M.; Somasundaram, S.

    1991-12-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is studying possible mechanisms and fluid dynamics contributing to the periodic release of gases from the double-shell waste storage tanks at Hanford. This study is being conducted for Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC), a contractor for the US Department of Energy (DOE). This interim report discusses the work done through November 1990. Safe management of the wastes at Hanford depends on an understanding of the chemical and physical mechanisms that take place in the waste tanks. An example of the need to understand these mechanisms is tank 101-SY. The waste in this tank is generating and periodically releasing potentially flammable gases into the tank vent system according to observations of the tank. How these gases are generated and become trapped, the causes of periodic release, and the mechanism of the release are not known in detail. In order to develop a safe mitigation strategy, possible physical mechanisms for the periodic release of flammable gases need to be understood.

  14. On the thermodynamics of waste heat recovery from internal combustion engine exhaust gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meisner, G. P.

    2013-03-01

    The ideal internal combustion (IC) engine (Otto Cycle) efficiency ηIC = 1-(1/r)(γ - 1) is only a function of engine compression ratio r =Vmax/Vmin and exhaust gas specific heat ratio γ = cP/cV. Typically r = 8, γ = 1.4, and ηIC = 56%. Unlike the Carnot Cycle where ηCarnot = 1-(TC/TH) for a heat engine operating between hot and cold heat reservoirs at TH and TC, respectively, ηIC is not a function of the exhaust gas temperature. Instead, the exhaust gas temperature depends only on the intake gas temperature (ambient), r, γ, cV, and the combustion energy. The ejected exhaust gas heat is thermally decoupled from the IC engine and conveyed via the exhaust system (manifold, pipe, muffler, etc.) to ambient, and the exhaust system is simply a heat engine that does no useful work. The maximum fraction of fuel energy that can be extracted from the exhaust gas stream as useful work is (1-ηIC) × ηCarnot = 32% for TH = 850 K (exhaust) and TC = 370 K (coolant). This waste heat can be recovered using a heat engine such as a thermoelectric generator (TEG) with ηTEG> 0 in the exhaust system. A combined IC engine and TEG system can generate net useful work from the exhaust gas waste heat with efficiency ηWH = (1-ηIC) × ηCarnot ×ηTEG , and this will increase the overall fuel efficiency of the total system. Recent improvements in TEGs yield ηTEG values approaching 15% giving a potential total waste heat conversion efficiency of ηWH = 4.6%, which translates into a fuel economy improvement approaching 5%. This work is supported by the US DOE under DE-EE0005432.

  15. Effects of gonadotropin-releasing hormone administration or a controlled internal drug-releasing insert after timed artificial insemination on pregnancy rates of dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Jae Kwan; Choi, In Soo; Kang, Hyun Gu; Hur, Tai Young; Kim, Ill Hwa

    2016-12-30

    This study investigated the effects of gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) administration (Experiment 1) and a controlled internal drug-releasing (CIDR) insert (Experiment 2) after timed artificial insemination (TAI) on the pregnancy rates of dairy cows. In Experiment 1, 569 dairy cows that underwent TAI (day 0) following short-term synchronization with prostaglandin F2α were randomly allocated into two groups: no further treatment (control, n = 307) or injection of 100 µg of gonadorelin on day 5 (GnRH, n = 262). In Experiment 2, 279 dairy cows that underwent TAI (day 0) following Ovsynch were randomly allocated into two groups: no further treatment (control, n = 140) or CIDR insert treatment from days 3.5 to 18 (CIDR, n = 139). The probability of pregnancy following TAI did not differ between the GnRH (34.4%) and control (31.6%, p > 0.05) groups. However, the probability of pregnancy following TAI was higher (odds ratio: 1.74, p < 0.05) in the CIDR group (51.1%) than in the control group (39.3%). Overall, CIDR insert treatment at days 3.5 to 18 increased pregnancy rates relative to non-treated controls, whereas a single GnRH administration on day 5 did not affect the pregnancy outcomes of dairy cows.

  16. Effects of gonadotropin-releasing hormone administration or a controlled internal drug-releasing insert after timed artificial insemination on pregnancy rates of dairy cows

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Jae Kwan; Choi, In Soo; Kang, Hyun Gu; Hur, Tai Young

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) administration (Experiment 1) and a controlled internal drug-releasing (CIDR) insert (Experiment 2) after timed artificial insemination (TAI) on the pregnancy rates of dairy cows. In Experiment 1, 569 dairy cows that underwent TAI (day 0) following short-term synchronization with prostaglandin F2α were randomly allocated into two groups: no further treatment (control, n = 307) or injection of 100 µg of gonadorelin on day 5 (GnRH, n = 262). In Experiment 2, 279 dairy cows that underwent TAI (day 0) following Ovsynch were randomly allocated into two groups: no further treatment (control, n = 140) or CIDR insert treatment from days 3.5 to 18 (CIDR, n = 139). The probability of pregnancy following TAI did not differ between the GnRH (34.4%) and control (31.6%, p > 0.05) groups. However, the probability of pregnancy following TAI was higher (odds ratio: 1.74, p < 0.05) in the CIDR group (51.1%) than in the control group (39.3%). Overall, CIDR insert treatment at days 3.5 to 18 increased pregnancy rates relative to non-treated controls, whereas a single GnRH administration on day 5 did not affect the pregnancy outcomes of dairy cows. PMID:27030200

  17. STEADY STATE FLAMMABLE GAS RELEASE RATE CALCULATION & LOWER FLAMMABILITY LEVEL EVALUATION FOR HANFORD TANK WASTE [SEC 1 & 2

    SciTech Connect

    HU, T.A.

    2003-09-30

    Flammable gases such as hydrogen, ammonia, and methane are observed in the tank dome space of the Hanford Site high-level waste tanks. This report assesses the steady-state flammability level under normal and off-normal ventilation conditions in the tank dome space for 177 double-shell tanks and single-shell tanks at the Hanford Site. The steady-state flammability level was estimated from the gas concentration of the mixture in the dome space using estimated gas release rates, Le Chatelier's rule and lower flammability limits of fuels in an air mixture. A time-dependent equation of gas concentration, which is a function of the gas release and ventilation rates in the dome space, has been developed for both soluble and insoluble gases. With this dynamic model, the time required to reach the specified flammability level at a given ventilation condition can be calculated. In the evaluation, hydrogen generation rates can be calculated for a given tank waste composition and its physical condition (e.g., waste density, waste volume, temperature, etc.) using the empirical rate equation model provided in Empirical Rate Equation Model and Rate Calculations of Hydrogen Generation for Hanford Tank Waste, HNF-3851. The release rate of other insoluble gases and the mass transport properties of the soluble gas can be derived from the observed steady-state gas concentration under normal ventilation conditions. The off-normal ventilation rate is assumed to be natural barometric breathing only. A large body of data is required to do both the hydrogen generation rate calculation and the flammability level evaluation. For tank waste that does not have sample-based data, a statistical-based value from probability distribution regression was used based on data from tanks belonging to a similar waste group. This report (Revision 3) updates the input data of hydrogen generation rates calculation for 177 tanks using the waste composition information in the Best-Basis Inventory Detail

  18. Modeling of occupational exposure to accidentally released manufactured nanomaterials in a production facility and calculation of internal doses by inhalation

    PubMed Central

    Vaquero-Moralejo, Celina; Jaén, María; Lopez De Ipiña Peña, Jesús; Neofytou, Panagiotis

    2016-01-01

    Background Occupational exposure to manufactured nanomaterials (MNMs) and its potential health impacts are of scientific and practical interest, as previous epidemiological studies associate exposure to nanoparticles with health effects, including increased morbidity of the respiratory and the circulatory system. Objectives To estimate the occupational exposure and effective internal doses in a real production facility of TiO2 MNMs during hypothetical scenarios of accidental release. Methods Commercial software for geometry and mesh generation, as well as fluid flow and particle dispersion calculation, were used to estimate occupational exposure to MNMs. The results were introduced to in-house software to calculate internal doses in the human respiratory tract by inhalation. Results Depending on the accidental scenario, different areas of the production facility were affected by the released MNMs, with a higher dose exposure among individuals closer to the particles source. Conclusions Granted that the study of the accidental release of particles can only be performed by chance, this numerical approach provides valuable information regarding occupational exposure and contributes to better protection of personnel. The methodology can be used to identify occupational settings where the exposure to MNMs would be high during accidents, providing insight to health and safety officials. PMID:27670588

  19. WRAITH - A Computer Code for Calculating Internal and External Doses Resulting From An Atmospheric Release of Radioactive Material

    SciTech Connect

    Scherpelz, R. I.; Borst, F. J.; Hoenes, G. R.

    1980-12-01

    WRAITH is a FORTRAN computer code which calculates the doses received by a standard man exposed to an accidental release of radioactive material. The movement of the released material through the atmosphere is calculated using a bivariate straight-line Gaussian distribution model, with Pasquill values for standard deviations. The quantity of material in the released cloud is modified during its transit time to account for radioactive decay and daughter production. External doses due to exposure to the cloud can be calculated using a semi-infinite cloud approximation. In situations where the semi-infinite cloud approximation is not a good one, the external dose can be calculated by a "finite plume" three-dimensional point-kernel numerical integration technique. Internal doses due to acute inhalation are cal.culated using the ICRP Task Group Lung Model and a four-segmented gastro-intestinal tract model. Translocation of the material between body compartments and retention in the body compartments are calculated using multiple exponential retention functions. Internal doses to each organ are calculated as sums of cross-organ doses, with each target organ irradiated by radioactive material in a number of source organs. All doses are calculated in rads, with separate values determined for high-LET and low-LET radiation.

  20. Gas Loss by Ram Pressure Stripping and Internal Feedback from Low-mass Milky Way Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emerick, Andrew; Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark; Grcevich, Jana; Gatto, Andrea

    2016-08-01

    The evolution of dwarf satellites in the Milky Way (MW) is affected by a combination of ram pressure stripping (RPS), tidal stripping, and internal feedback from massive stars. We investigate gas loss processes in the smallest satellites of the MW using three-dimensional, high-resolution, idealized wind tunnel simulations, accounting for gas loss through both ram pressure stripping and expulsion by supernova feedback. Using initial conditions appropriate for a dwarf galaxy like Leo T, we investigate whether or not environmental gas stripping and internal feedback can quench these low-mass galaxies on the expected timescales, shorter than 2 Gyr. We find that supernova feedback contributes negligibly to the stripping rate for these low star formation rate galaxies. However, we also find that RPS is less efficient than expected in the stripping scenarios we consider. Our work suggests that although RPS can eventually completely strip these galaxies, other physics is likely at play to reconcile our computed stripping times with the rapid quenching timescales deduced from observations of low-mass MW dwarf galaxies. We discuss the roles additional physics may play in this scenario, including host-satellite tidal interactions, cored versus cuspy dark matter profiles, reionization, and satellite preprocessing. We conclude that a proper accounting of these physics together is necessary to understand the quenching of low-mass MW satellites.

  1. Antimicrobial activity of controlled-release chlorine dioxide gas on fresh blueberries

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The effect of chlorine dioxide (ClO2) on the safety and quality of blueberries was studied. In vitro studies revealed that both ClO2 gas fumigation and ClO2 water direct contact killed food pathogen bacterium, Escherichia coli and fruit decay pathogen fungus, Colletotrichum acutatum. In vivo studies...

  2. Natural Gas and Crude Oil Prices in AEO (released in AEO2009)

    EIA Publications

    2009-01-01

    If oil and natural gas were perfect substitutes in all markets where they are used, market forces would be expected to drive their delivered prices to near equality on an energy-equivalent basis. The price of West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil generally is denominated in terms of barrels, where 1 barrel has an energy content of approximately 5.8 million Btu. The price of natural gas (at the Henry Hub), in contrast, generally is denominated in million Btu. Thus, if the market prices of the two fuels were equal on the basis of their energy contents, the ratio of the crude oil price (the spot price for WTI, or low-sulfur light, crude oil) to the natural gas price (the Henry Hub spot price) would be approximately 6.0. From 1990 through 2007, however, the ratio of natural gas prices to crude oil prices averaged 8.6; and in the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 projections from 2008 through 2030, it averages 7.7 in the low oil price case, 14.6 in the reference case, and 20.2 in the high oil price case.

  3. 77 FR 12906 - Notice of Release From Federal Grant Assurance Obligations at Fresno Yosemite International...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration Notice of Release From Federal Grant Assurance Obligations at Fresno... is for water recharge, ponding basin, and passive wetlands. The property will be kept mitigated...

  4. The Relationship Between the Evolution of an Internal Structure and Drug Dissolution from Controlled-Release Matrix Tablets.

    PubMed

    Kulinowski, Piotr; Hudy, Wiktor; Mendyk, Aleksander; Juszczyk, Ewelina; Węglarz, Władysław P; Jachowicz, Renata; Dorożyński, Przemysław

    2016-06-01

    In the last decade, imaging has been introduced as a supplementary method to the dissolution tests, but a direct relationship of dissolution and imaging data has been almost completely overlooked. The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility of relating magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and dissolution data to elucidate dissolution profile features (i.e., kinetics, kinetics changes, and variability). Commercial, hydroxypropylmethyl cellulose-based quetiapine fumarate controlled-release matrix tablets were studied using the following two methods: (i) MRI inside the USP4 apparatus with subsequent machine learning-based image segmentation and (ii) dissolution testing with piecewise dissolution modeling. Obtained data were analyzed together using statistical data processing methods, including multiple linear regression. As a result, in this case, zeroth order release was found to be a consequence of internal structure evolution (interplay between region's areas-e.g., linear relationship between interface and core), which eventually resulted in core disappearance. Dry core disappearance had an impact on (i) changes in dissolution kinetics (from zeroth order to nonlinear) and (ii) an increase in variability of drug dissolution results. It can be concluded that it is feasible to parameterize changes in micro/meso morphology of hydrated, controlled release, swellable matrices using MRI to establish a causal relationship between the changes in morphology and drug dissolution. Presented results open new perspectives in practical application of combined MRI/dissolution to controlled-release drug products.

  5. The Jack Rabbit chlorine release experiments: implications of dense gas removal from a depression and downwind concentrations.

    PubMed

    Hanna, Steven; Britter, Rex; Argenta, Edward; Chang, Joseph

    2012-04-30

    The Jack Rabbit (JR) field experiment, involving releases of one or two tons of pressurized liquefied chlorine and ammonia into a depression, took place in 2010 at Dugway Proving Ground, Utah, USA. The releases, of duration about 30 s from a short pipe at a height of 2m, were directed towards the ground. The dense two phase cloud was initially confined in a depression of 2 m depth and 50 m diameter. With wind speedsabout 1.5 m s(-1), the initial cloud was not well-confined in the depression and moved downwind. Formulas suggested by Briggs et al. in 1990 in this journal satisfactorily predict the time durations of confinement. Sensitivity runs with the SLAB dense gas model show that the effect of a long confinement on maximum downwind concentrations is strongest near the depression. The model-predicted and observed maximum 20 s chlorine concentrations agree within a factor of two most of the time, as long as the release times based on Briggs' theory are used.

  6. Quantification of 2-keto-3-deoxyoctonate in (lipo)polysaccharides by methanolytic release, trifluoroacetylation and capillary gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Bryn, K; Jantzen, E

    1986-11-26

    Several conditions of acidic anhydrous methanolysis were examined to optimize the release and minimize the degradation of unphosphorylated 2-keto-3-deoxy-D-manno-octonic acid (KDO) from bacterial lipopolysaccharides and polysaccharides. The reaction was monitored by capillary gas chromatography after derivatization by trifluoroacetic anhydride. The best results were obtained by use of 2 M hydrochloric acid at 60 degrees C for 2 h. Under these conditions a single KDO component appeared, and KDO was quantitatively released from all model compounds except when glycosidically linked to hexosamines. For quantitative cleavage of this linkage a reaction time of 6 h was required at 60 degrees C, giving rise to 5-10% of secondary KDO products. The KDO detection limit was about 250 pmol (50 ng) and the molar response was the same as for glucose. The KDO derivative gave a mass spectrometric fragmentation pattern consistent with a pyranosidic methylketoside methyl ester structure. Differentiation of KDO linkage types could be obtained by determination of the rates of KDO release by mild methanolysis.

  7. Energy Release Rate in a Constrained Polymeric Disk under Internal Pressure and Thermal Loads

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-31

    Polymeric Disk under Internal Pressure and Thermal Loads H. K. Chinga, C. T. Liub, and S. C. Yena aMaterials Technology Center, Southern Illinois...centrally perforated star-shaped disk, which was made of a polymeric material, under internal pressure and thermal loads, were determined. The deformations...as flaws and cracks may form in polymeric materials due to the manufacturing, handling or ageing. To ensure the integrity and reliability for such

  8. Lander based hydroacoustic monitoring of marine single bubble releases in Eckernförde Bay utilizing the multibeam based GasQuant II system.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urban, Peter; Schneider von Deimling, Jens; Greinert, Jens

    2015-04-01

    The GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel is currently developing a Imagenex Delta T based lander system for monitoring and quantifying marine gas release (bubbles). The GasQuant II is built as the successor of the GasQuant I system (Greinert, 2008), that has been successfully used for monitoring tempo-spatial variability of gas release in the past (Schneider von Deimling et al., 2010). The new system is lightweight (40 kg), energy efficient, flexible to use and built for ROV deployment with autonomous operation of up to three days. A prototype has been successfully deployed in Eckernförde Bay during the R/V ALKOR cruise AL447 in October/November 2014 to monitor the tempo-spatial variability of gas bubble seepage and to detect a possible correlation with tidal variations. Two deployments, one in forward- and one in upward looking mode, reveal extensive but scattered single bubble releases rather than distinct and more continuous sources. While these releases are difficult to detect in forward looking mode, they can unambiguously be detected in the upward looking mode even for minor gas releases, bubble rising speeds can be determined. Greinert, J., 2008. Monitoring temporal variability of bubble release at seeps: The hydroacoustic swath system GasQuant. J. Geophys. Res. Oceans Vol. 113 Issue C7 CiteID C07048 113, 7048. doi:10.1029/2007JC004704 Schneider von Deimling, J., Greinert, J., Chapman, N.R., Rabbel, W., Linke, P., 2010. Acoustic imaging of natural gas seepage in the North Sea: Sensing bubbles controlled by variable currents. Limnol. Oceanogr. Methods 8, 155. doi:10.4319/lom.2010.8.155

  9. Stepwise Internal Energy Control for Protonated Methanol Clusters by Using the Inert Gas Tagging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimamori, Takuto; Kuo, Jer-Lai; Fujii, Asuka

    2016-06-01

    Preferred isomer structures of hydrogen-bonded clusters should depend on their temperature because of the entropy term in the free energy. To observe such temperature dependence, we propose a new approach to control the internal energy (vibrational temperature) of protonated clusters in the gas phase. We performed IR spectroscopy of protonated methanol clusters, H+ (CH{_3}OH) {_n}, n= 5 and 7, with the tagging by various inert gas species (Ar, CO{_2}, CO, CS{_2}, C{_2}H{_2}, and C{_6}H{_6}). We found that vibrational temperature of the tagged clusters raises with increase of the interaction energy with the tag species, and the observed cluster structures follow the theoretical prediction of the temperature dependence of the isomer population.

  10. Cerebellopontine angle and internal auditory canal: neurovascular anatomy on gas CT cisternograms

    SciTech Connect

    Bird, C.R.; Hasso, A.N.; Drayer, B.P.; Hinshaw, D.B. Jr.; Thompson, J.R.

    1985-03-01

    The authors reviewed 103 normal gas CT cisternograms to delineate the appearance of normal neurovascular structures in the cerebellopontine angle (CPA) and internal auditory canal (IAC). Cranial nerves VII and VIII were identified in the CPA in 97% of cases, either separately (53%) or as a bundle (44%). Intracanalicular branches of the VIIIth cranial nerve were identified in 20% of cases, and cranial nerve V was visualized in the CPA in 14%. The characteristic vascular loop, usually the anterior inferior cerebellar artery, was visible in 35% of cases, and, in 22% of visualized cases, was in an intracanalicular location. In 10% of cases, greater than 66% of the IAC was occupied by the neurovascular bundle. Familiarity with the normal anatomy and variations seen on gas CT cisternograms is necessary to prevent false-positive interpretations.

  11. Gas-turbine expander power generating systems for internal needs of compressor stations of gas-main pipelines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimanov, A. A.; Biryuk, V. V.; Sheludko, L. P.; Shabanov, K. Yu.

    2017-08-01

    In the framework of this paper, there have been analyzed power station building methods to construct a power station for utilities for gas-main pipelines compressor stations. The application efficiency of turbo expanders in them to expand the power gas of compressor stations' gas compressor units has been shown. New schemes for gas-turbine expander power generating systems have been proposed.

  12. TAT-mediated photochemical internalization results in cell killing by causing the release of calcium into the cytosol of cells

    PubMed Central

    Muthukrishnan, Nandhini; Johnson, Gregory A.; Lim, Jongdoo; Simanek, Eric E.; Pellois, Jean-Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Background Lysis of endocytic organelles is a necessary step in many cellular delivery methodologies. This is achieved efficiently in the photochemical internalization approach but the cell death that accompanies this process remains a problem. Methods We investigate the mechanisms of cell death that accompanies photochemical internalization of the fluorescent peptide TMR-TAT. Results TMR-TAT kills cells after endocytosis and light irradiation. The lysis of endocytic organelles by TMR-TAT causes a rapid increase in the concentration of calcium in the cytosol. TMR-TAT co-localizes with endocytic organelles containing calcium prior to irradiation and photochemical internalization leads to the release of the lumenal content of these organelles. Ruthenium red and cyclosporin A, inhibitors of calcium import in mitochondria and of the mitochondria permeability transition pore, inhibit cell death. Conclusions TMR-TAT mediated photochemical internalization leads to a disruption of calcium homeostasis. The subsequent import of calcium in mitochondria is a causative factor of the cell death that accompanies photochemical internalization. General Significance Understanding how the lysis of endocytic organelles affects cellular physiology and causes cell death is crucial to the development of optimal delivery methodologies. PMID:22771830

  13. CRITERIA POLLUTANT EMISSIONS FROM INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINES IN THE NATURAL GAS INDUSTRY VOLUME II. APPENDICES A-I

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report summarizes emission factors for criteria pollutants (NOx, CO, CH4, C2H6, THC, NMHC, and NMEHC) from stationary internal combustion engines and gas turbines used in the natural gas industry. The emission factors were calculated from test results from five test campaigns...

  14. CRITERIA POLLUTANT EMISSIONS FROM INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINES IN THE NATURAL GAS INDUSTRY VOLUME II. APPENDICES A-I

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report summarizes emission factors for criteria pollutants (NOx, CO, CH4, C2H6, THC, NMHC, and NMEHC) from stationary internal combustion engines and gas turbines used in the natural gas industry. The emission factors were calculated from test results from five test campaigns...

  15. New tracers identify hydraulic fracturing fluids and accidental releases from oil and gas operations.

    PubMed

    Warner, N R; Darrah, T H; Jackson, R B; Millot, R; Kloppmann, W; Vengosh, A

    2014-11-04

    Identifying the geochemical fingerprints of fluids that return to the surface after high volume hydraulic fracturing of unconventional oil and gas reservoirs has important applications for assessing hydrocarbon resource recovery, environmental impacts, and wastewater treatment and disposal. Here, we report for the first time, novel diagnostic elemental and isotopic signatures (B/Cl, Li/Cl, δ11B, and δ7Li) useful for characterizing hydraulic fracturing flowback fluids (HFFF) and distinguishing sources of HFFF in the environment. Data from 39 HFFFs and produced water samples show that B/Cl (>0.001), Li/Cl (>0.002), δ11B (25-31‰) and δ7Li (6-10‰) compositions of HFFF from the Marcellus and Fayetteville black shale formations were distinct in most cases from produced waters sampled from conventional oil and gas wells. We posit that boron isotope geochemistry can be used to quantify small fractions (∼0.1%) of HFFF in contaminated fresh water and likely be applied universally to trace HFFF in other basins. The novel environmental application of this diagnostic isotopic tool is validated by examining the composition of effluent discharge from an oil and gas brine treatment facility in Pennsylvania and an accidental spill site in West Virginia. We hypothesize that the boron and lithium are mobilized from exchangeable sites on clay minerals in the shale formations during the hydraulic fracturing process, resulting in the relative enrichment of boron and lithium in HFFF.

  16. An MDO Application for a Weapon Released from an Internal Bay

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-06-01

    geometry and meshing tool GAMBIT 1 [5] Cavity "* the Fluent Inc. CFD analysis tool Fluent 5.1.1 [6] Computational Domain "* the CFD visualisation and...essential tool for the development of an engineering analysis viewpoints, and be embedded within a aircraft design. Recent engineering emphasis has been on...The releasing weapons safely whilst maintaining equipment study was limited to a 2D case to ease the CFD processing functionality and structural

  17. Flare Energy Release: Internal Conflict, Contradiction with High Resolution Observations, Possible Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pustilnik, L.

    2017-06-01

    All accepted paradigm of solar and stellar flares energy release based on 2 whales: 1. Source of energy is free energy of non-potential force free magnetic field in atmosphere above active region; 2. Process of ultrafast dissipation of magnetic fields is Reconnection in Thin Turbulent Current Sheet (RTTCS). Progress in observational techniques in last years provided ultra-high spatial resolution and in physics of turbulent plasma showed that real situation is much more complicated and standard approach is in contradiction both with observations and with problem of RTTCS stability. We present critical analysis of classic models of pre-flare energy accumulation and its dissipation during flare energy release from pioneer works Giovanelli (1939, 1947) up to topological reconnection. We show that all accepted description of global force-free fields as source of future flare cannot be agreed with discovered in last years fine and ultra-fine current-magnetic structure included numerouse arcs-threads with diameters up to 100 km with constant sequence from photosphere to corona. This magnetic skeleton of thin current magnetic threads with strong interaction between them is main source of reserved magnetic energy insolar atmosphere. Its dynamics will be controlled by percolation of magnetic stresses through network of current-magnetic threads with transition to flare state caused by critical value of global current. We show that thin turbulent current sheet is absolutely unstable configuration both caused by splitting to numerous linear currents by dissipative modes like to tearing, and as sequence of suppress of plasma turbulence caused by anomalous heating of turbulent plasma. In result of these factors primary RTTCS will be disrupted in numerous turbulent and normal plasma domains like to resistors network. Current propagation through this network will have percolation character with all accompanied properties of percolated systems: self-organization with formation power

  18. Optical Multi-Gas Monitor Technology Demonstration on the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pilgrim, Jeffrey S.; Wood, William R.; Casias, Miguel E.; Vakhtin, Andrei B,; Johnson, Michael D.; Mudgett, Paul D.

    2014-01-01

    There are a variety of both portable and fixed gas monitors onboard the International Space Station (ISS). Devices range from rack-mounted mass spectrometers to hand-held electrochemical sensors. An optical Multi-Gas Monitor has been developed as an ISS Technology Demonstration to evaluate long-term continuous measurement of 4 gases. Based on tunable diode laser spectroscopy, this technology offers unprecedented selectivity, concentration range, precision, and calibration stability. The monitor utilizes the combination of high performance laser absorption spectroscopy with a rugged optical path length enhancement cell that is nearly impossible to misalign. The enhancement cell serves simultaneously as the measurement sampling cell for multiple laser channels operating within a common measurement volume. Four laser diode based detection channels allow quantitative determination of ISS cabin concentrations of water vapor (humidity), carbon dioxide, ammonia and oxygen. Each channel utilizes a separate vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL) at a different wavelength. In addition to measuring major air constituents in their relevant ranges, the multiple gas monitor provides real time quantitative gaseous ammonia measurements between 5 and 20,000 parts-per-million (ppm). A small ventilation fan draws air with no pumps or valves into the enclosure in which analysis occurs. Power draw is only about 3 W from USB sources when installed in Nanoracks or when connected to 28V source from any EXPRESS rack interface. Internal battery power can run the sensor for over 20 hours during portable operation. The sensor is controlled digitally with an FPGA/microcontroller architecture that stores data internally while displaying running average measurements on an LCD screen and interfacing with the rack or laptop via USB. Design, construction and certification of the Multi-Gas Monitor were a joint effort between Vista Photonics, Nanoracks and NASA-Johnson Space Center (JSC

  19. Spatial characterization of the internal gas target at the ESR for the FOCAL experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gassner, T.; Beyer, H. F.

    2015-11-01

    The FOCAL experiment involves a highly accurate twin crystal spectrometer, designed for the measurement of the ground state Lamb shift of stored highly charged ions, like hydrogen-like Au78+, via spectroscopy in the hard-x-ray regime with an accuracy down to the few-eV level where higher-order QED contributions become accessible. For this level of accuracy all geometrical parameters including the position of the x-ray source are of crucial importance. In this conference proceeding we present our efforts to characterize the internal gas target at the experiment storage ring at GSI Darmstadt where in 2012 the FOCAL experiment was conducted.

  20. Gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric analysis of plasma oxybutynin using a deuterated internal standard.

    PubMed

    Patrick, K S; Markowitz, J S; Jarvi, E J; Straughn, A B; Meyer, M C

    1989-01-27

    A gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric method is described for the quantitative analysis of plasma oxybutynin. Deuterated oxybutynin served as the internal standard and its synthesis is described. Chromatographic separation on a methylsilicone capillary column avoided the thermal decomposition observed using a packed column. Electron-impact ionization and selected-ion monitoring of the alpha-cleavage fragments of drug and internal standard permitted quantitation of oxybutynin down to 0.25 ng/ml of plasma. At the 2 ng/ml level the accuracy and precision are 4 and 10%, respectively, and improved at higher drug concentrations. Application of the method to the pharmacokinetics of oral oxybutynin in man demonstrated rapid absorption and elimination of the drug.

  1. On the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment III on the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hernandez, Gloria; Zawodny, Joseph M.; Cisewski, Michael S.; Thornton, Brooke M.; Panetta, Andrew D,; Roell, Marilee M.; Vernier, Jean-Paul

    2014-01-01

    The Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment III on International Space Station (SAGE3/ISS) is anticipated to be delivered to Cape Canaveral in the spring of 2015. This is the fourth generation, fifth instrument, of visible/near-IR solar occultation instruments operated by the National Aeronautics and Space Agency (NASA) to investigate the Earth's upper atmosphere. The instrument is a moderate resolution spectrometer covering wavelengths from 290 nm to 1550 nm. The nominal science products include vertical profiles of trace gases, such as ozone, nitrogen dioxide and water vapor, along with multi-wavelength aerosol extinction. The SAGE3/ISS validation program will be based upon internal consistency of the measurements, detailed analysis of the retrieval algorithm, and comparisons with independent correlative measurements. The Instrument Payload (IP), mission architecture, and major challenges are also discussed.

  2. Validation of a fast gas chromatographic method for the study of semiochemical slow release formulations.

    PubMed

    Heuskin, Stéphanie; Rozet, Eric; Lorge, Stéphanie; Farmakidis, Julien; Hubert, Philippe; Verheggen, François; Haubruge, Eric; Wathelet, Jean-Paul; Lognay, Georges

    2010-12-01

    The validation of a fast GC-FID analytical method for the quantitative determination of semiochemical sesquiterpenes (E-beta-farnesene and beta-caryophyllene) to be used in an integrated pest management approach is described. Accuracy profiles using total error as decision criteria for validation were used to verify the overall accuracy of the method results within a well defined range of concentrations and to determine the lowest limit of quantification for each analyte. Furthermore it allowed to select a very simple and reliable regression model for calibration curve for the quantification of both analytes as well as to provide measurement uncertainty without any additional experiments. Finally, this validated method was used for the quantification of semiochemicals in slow release formulations. The goal was to verify the protection efficiency of alginate gel beads formulations against oxidation and degradation of sesquiterpenes. The results showed that the alginate beads are adequate slow release devices which protect the bio-active molecules during at least twenty days. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Towards the inclusion of open fabrication porosity in a fission gas release model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claisse, Antoine; Van Uffelen, Paul

    2015-11-01

    A model is proposed for fission product release in oxide fuels that takes into account the open porosity in a mechanistic manner. Its mathematical framework, assumptions and limitations are presented. It is based on the model for open porosity in the sintering process of crystalline solids. More precisely, a grain is represented by a tetrakaidecahedron and the open porosity is represented by a continuous cylinder along the grain edges. It has been integrated in the TRANSURANUS fuel performance code and applied to the first case of the first FUMEX project as well as to neptunium and americium containing pins irradiated during the SUPERFACT experiment and in the JOYO reactor. The results for LWR and FBR fuels are consistent with the experimental data and the predictions of previous empirical models when the thermal mechanisms are the main drivers of the release, even without using a fitting parameter. They also show a different but somewhat expected behaviour when very high porosity fuels are irradiated at a very low burn-up and at low temperature.

  4. TEMPORAL AND SPATIAL ASPECTS OF GAS RELEASE DURING THE 2010 APPARITION OF COMET 103P/HARTLEY 2

    SciTech Connect

    Mumma, M. J.; Bonev, B. P.; Villanueva, G. L.; Paganini, L.; DiSanti, M. A.; Gibb, E. L.; Keane, J. V.; Meech, K. J.; Blake, G. A.; Ellis, R. S.; Lippi, M.; Boehnhardt, H.; Magee-Sauer, K.

    2011-06-10

    We report measurements of eight primary volatiles (H{sub 2}O, HCN, CH{sub 4}, C{sub 2}H{sub 6}, CH{sub 3}OH, C{sub 2}H{sub 2}, H{sub 2}CO, and NH{sub 3}) and two product species (OH and NH{sub 2}) in comet 103P/Hartley 2 using high-dispersion infrared spectroscopy. We quantified the long- and short-term behavior of volatile release over a three-month interval that encompassed the comet's close approach to Earth, its perihelion passage, and flyby of the comet by the Deep Impact spacecraft during the EPOXI mission. We present production rates for individual species, their mixing ratios relative to water, and their spatial distributions in the coma on multiple dates. The production rates for water, ethane, HCN, and methanol vary in a manner consistent with independent measures of nucleus rotation, but mixing ratios for HCN, C{sub 2}H{sub 6}, and CH{sub 3}OH are independent of rotational phase. Our results demonstrate that the ensemble average composition of gas released from the nucleus is well defined and relatively constant over the three-month interval (September 18 through December 17). If individual vents vary in composition, enough diverse vents must be active simultaneously to approximate (in sum) the bulk composition of the nucleus. The released primary volatiles exhibit diverse spatial properties which favor the presence of separate polar and apolar ice phases in the nucleus, establish dust and gas release from icy clumps (and from the nucleus), and provide insights into the driver for the cyanogen (CN) polar jet. The spatial distributions of C{sub 2}H{sub 6} and HCN along the near-polar jet (UT October 19.5) and nearly orthogonal to it (UT October 22.5) are discussed relative to the origin of CN. The ortho-para ratio (OPR) of water was 2.85 {+-} 0.20; the lower bound (2.65) defines T{sub spin} > 32 K. These values are consistent with results returned from the Infrared Space Observatory in 1997.

  5. Temporal and Spatial Aspects of Gas Release During the 2010 Apparition of Comet 103P/Hartley-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mumma, M. J.; Bonev, B. P.; Villanueva, G. L.; Paganini, L.; DiSanti, M. A.; Gibb, E. L.; Keane, J. V.; Meech, K. J.; Blake, G. A.; Ellis, R. S.; hide

    2011-01-01

    We report measurements of eight primary volatiles (H2O, HCN, CH4, C2H6, CH3OH, C2H2, H2CO, and NH3) and two product species (OH and NH2) in comet lO3P/Hartley-2 using high dispersion infrared spectroscopy. We quantified the long- and short-term behavior of volatile release over a three-month interval that encompassed the comet's close approach to Earth, its perihelion passage, and flyby of the comet by the Deep Impact spacecraft during the EPOXI mission. We present production rates for individual species, their mixing ratios relative to water, and their spatial distributions in the coma on multiple dates. The production rates for water, ethane, HCN, and methanol vary in a manner consistent with independent measures of nucleus rotation, but mixing ratios for HCN, C2H6, & CH3OH are independent of rotational phase. Our results demonstrate that the ensemble average composition of gas released from the nucleus is well defined, and relatively constant over the three-month interval (September 18 through December 1,7). If individual vents vary in composition, enough diverse vents must be active simultaneously to approximate (in sum) the bulk composition of the nucleus. The released primary volatiles exhibit diverse spatial properties which favor the presence of separate polar and apolar ice phases in the nucleus, establish dust and gas release from icy clumps, and from the nucleus, and provide insights into the driver for the cyanogen (CN) polar jet. The spatial distributions of C2H6 & HCN along the near-polar jet (UT 19.5 October) and nearly orthogonal to it (UT 22.5 October) are discussed relative to the origin of CN. The ortho-para ratio (OPR) of water was 2.85 +/- 0.20; the lower bound (2.65) defines T(sub spin) > 32 K. These values are consistent with results returned from ISO in 1997 .

  6. Temporal and Spatial Aspects of Gas Release During the 2010 Apparition of Comet 103P/Hartley 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mumma, M. J.; Bonev, B. P.; Villanueva, G. L.; Paganini, L.; DiSanti, M. A.; Gibb, E. L.; Keane, J. V.; Meech, K. J.; Blake, G. A.; Ellis, R. S.; Lippi, M.; Boehnhardt, H.; Magee-Sauer, K.

    2011-06-01

    We report measurements of eight primary volatiles (H2O, HCN, CH4, C2H6, CH3OH, C2H2, H2CO, and NH3) and two product species (OH and NH2) in comet 103P/Hartley 2 using high-dispersion infrared spectroscopy. We quantified the long- and short-term behavior of volatile release over a three-month interval that encompassed the comet's close approach to Earth, its perihelion passage, and flyby of the comet by the Deep Impact spacecraft during the EPOXI mission. We present production rates for individual species, their mixing ratios relative to water, and their spatial distributions in the coma on multiple dates. The production rates for water, ethane, HCN, and methanol vary in a manner consistent with independent measures of nucleus rotation, but mixing ratios for HCN, C2H6, and CH3OH are independent of rotational phase. Our results demonstrate that the ensemble average composition of gas released from the nucleus is well defined and relatively constant over the three-month interval (September 18 through December 17). If individual vents vary in composition, enough diverse vents must be active simultaneously to approximate (in sum) the bulk composition of the nucleus. The released primary volatiles exhibit diverse spatial properties which favor the presence of separate polar and apolar ice phases in the nucleus, establish dust and gas release from icy clumps (and from the nucleus), and provide insights into the driver for the cyanogen (CN) polar jet. The spatial distributions of C2H6 and HCN along the near-polar jet (UT October 19.5) and nearly orthogonal to it (UT October 22.5) are discussed relative to the origin of CN. The ortho-para ratio (OPR) of water was 2.85 ± 0.20; the lower bound (2.65) defines T spin > 32 K. These values are consistent with results returned from the Infrared Space Observatory in 1997. Based on data collected at the W. M. Keck Observatory, Mauna Kea, Hawaii, and at ESO's Very Large Telescope, Paranal, Chile, under program 085.C-0229(A).

  7. International Space Station Science Information for Public Release on the NASA Web Portal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Julie A.; Tate, Judy M.

    2009-01-01

    This document contains some of the descriptions of payload and experiment related to life support and habitation. These describe experiments that have or are scheduled to fly on the International Space Station. There are instructions, and descriptions of the fields that make up the database. The document is arranged in alphabetical order by the Payload

  8. 77 FR 39794 - Notice of Release From Federal Grant Assurance Obligations at Fresno Yosemite International...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-05

    ... Fresno Metropolitan Flood Control District will continue use of the property as storm water detention... of approximately 13.35 acres of airport property at the Fresno Yosemite International Airport (FAT... the northwest corner of the airport property. The property will be sold for its fair market value to...

  9. 76 FR 70532 - Release of Airport Property: Melbourne International Airport, Melbourne, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-14

    ..., along the west side of Neiman Avenue and south of Laurie Street in Brevard County, Florida. The parcel... acres at the Melbourne International Airport, Melbourne, Florida from the conditions, reservations, and... is located west of Apollo Boulevard and North of General Aviation Drive in Brevard County,...

  10. 32 CFR 635.15 - Release of law enforcement information furnished by foreign governments or international...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... governments or international organizations is subject to disclosure, unless exempted by AR 25-55, AR 340-21... express pledge of confidentiality as described in AR 25-55 and AR 340-21 (or under an implied pledge of... outlined in AR 340-21 and AR 25-55. (2) Information received under an express promise of confidentiality...

  11. 32 CFR 635.15 - Release of law enforcement information furnished by foreign governments or international...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... governments or international organizations is subject to disclosure, unless exempted by AR 25-55, AR 340-21... express pledge of confidentiality as described in AR 25-55 and AR 340-21 (or under an implied pledge of... outlined in AR 340-21 and AR 25-55. (2) Information received under an express promise of confidentiality...

  12. 32 CFR 635.15 - Release of law enforcement information furnished by foreign governments or international...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... governments or international organizations is subject to disclosure, unless exempted by AR 25-55, AR 340-21... express pledge of confidentiality as described in AR 25-55 and AR 340-21 (or under an implied pledge of... outlined in AR 340-21 and AR 25-55. (2) Information received under an express promise of confidentiality...

  13. 32 CFR 635.15 - Release of law enforcement information furnished by foreign governments or international...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... governments or international organizations is subject to disclosure, unless exempted by AR 25-55, AR 340-21... express pledge of confidentiality as described in AR 25-55 and AR 340-21 (or under an implied pledge of... outlined in AR 340-21 and AR 25-55. (2) Information received under an express promise of...

  14. Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment III on the International Space Station (SAGE III/ISS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gasbarre, Joseph; Walker, Richard; Cisewski, Michael; Zawodny, Joseph; Cheek, Dianne; Thornton, Brooke

    2015-01-01

    The Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment III on the International Space Station (SAGE III/ISS) mission will extend the SAGE data record from the ideal vantage point of the International Space Station (ISS). The ISS orbital inclination is ideal for SAGE measurements providing coverage between 70 deg north and 70 deg south latitude. The SAGE data record includes an extensively validated data set including aerosol optical depth data dating to the Stratospheric Aerosol Measurement (SAM) experiments in 1975 and 1978 and stratospheric ozone profile data dating to the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) in 1979. These and subsequent data records, notably from the SAGE II experiment launched on the Earth Radiation Budget Satellite in 1984 and the SAGE III experiment launched on the Russian Meteor-3M satellite in 2001, have supported a robust, long-term assessment of key atmospheric constituents. These scientific measurements provide the basis for the analysis of five of the nine critical constituents (aerosols, ozone (O3), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), water vapor (H2O), and air density using O2) identified in the U.S. National Plan for Stratospheric Monitoring. SAGE III on ISS was originally scheduled to fly on the ISS in the same timeframe as the Meteor-3M mission, but was postponed due to delays in ISS construction. The project was re-established in 2009.

  15. INTERNAL REPAIR OF GAS PIPLINES SURVEY OF OPERATOR EXPERIENCE AND INDUSTRY NEEDS REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    Ian D. Harris

    2003-09-01

    A repair method that can be applied from the inside of a gas transmission pipeline (i.e., a trenchless repair) is an attractive alternative to conventional repair methods since the need to excavate the pipeline is precluded. This is particularly true for pipelines in environmentally sensitive and highly populated areas. The objectives of the project are to evaluate, develop, demonstrate, and validate internal repair methods for pipelines; develop a functional specification for an internal pipeline repair system; and prepare a recommended practice for internal repair of pipelines. The purpose of this survey is to better understand the needs and performance requirements of the natural gas transmission industry regarding internal repair. A total of fifty-six surveys were sent to pipeline operators. A total of twenty completed surveys were returned, representing a 36% response rate, which is considered very good given the fact that tailored surveys are known in the marketing industry to seldom attract more than a 10% response rate. The twenty survey responses produced the following principal conclusions: (1) Use of internal weld repair is most attractive for river crossings, under other bodies of water (e.g., lakes and swamps) in difficult soil conditions, under highways, under congested intersections, and under railway crossings. All these areas tend to be very difficult and very costly if, and where, conventional excavated repairs may be currently used. (2) Internal pipe repair offers a strong potential advantage to the high cost of horizontal direct drilling (HDD) when a new bore must be created to solve a leak or other problem in a water/river crossing. (3) The typical travel distances required can be divided into three distinct groups: up to 305 m (1,000 ft.); between 305 m and 610 m (1,000 ft. and 2,000 ft.); and beyond 914 m (3,000 ft.). In concept, these groups require pig-based systems; despooled umbilical systems could be considered for the first two groups

  16. Facile fabrication of polyurethane microcapsules carriers for tracing cellular internalization and intracellular pH-triggered drug release.

    PubMed

    Niu, Yuqing; Stadler, Florian J; Song, Jun; Chen, Siping; Chen, Shiguo

    2017-02-17

    A tailor-made traceable pH-sensitive drug delivery system based on polyurethane (PU) microcapsules was fabricated using a facile double-emulsion method containing 3,3'-dioctadecyloxacarbocyanine perchlorate, doxorubicin (DOX) and sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3). When PU microcapsules were immersed in acidic media, NaHCO3 could react with the H(+) to quickly produce CO2 bubbles to puncture the PU shell, resulting in rapid release of DOX to promptly reach the intracellular drug therapeutic threshold to kill cancer cells in a short period. Confocal laser scanning microscopic analysis showed that these traceable pH-sensitive drug carriers can be easily internalized by BGC 823 and Hela cells, and the loaded DOX can quickly release from PU microcapsules in the endo-/lysosomes to be mainly resided in cell nuclei. This traceable pH-sensitive drug carrier can achieve on-demand controlled release profiles for visualization of cancer therapy. Thus, it is a potential candidate for anticancer drug delivery system in advanced cancer therapy.

  17. Optical Multi-Gas Monitor Technology Demonstration on the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pilgrim, Jeffrey S.; Wood, William R.; Casias, Miguel E.; Vakhtin, Andrei B.; Johnson, Michael D.; Mudgett, Paul D.

    2014-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) employs a suite of portable and permanently located gas monitors to insure crew health and safety. These sensors are tasked with functions ranging from fixed mass spectrometer based major constituents analysis to portable electrochemical sensor based combustion product monitoring. An all optical multigas sensor is being developed that can provide the specificity of a mass spectrometer with the portability of an electrochemical cell. The technology, developed under the Small Business Innovation Research program, allows for an architecture that is rugged, compact and low power. A four gas version called the Multi-Gas Monitor was launched to ISS in November 2013 aboard Soyuz and activated in February 2014. The portable instrument is comprised of a major constituents analyzer (water vapor, carbon dioxide, oxygen) and high dynamic range real-time ammonia sensor. All species are sensed inside the same enhanced path length optical cell with a separate vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL) targeted at each species. The prototype is controlled digitally with a field-programmable gate array/microcontroller architecture. The optical and electronic approaches are designed for scalability and future versions could add three important acid gases and carbon monoxide combustion product gases to the four species already sensed. Results obtained to date from the technology demonstration on ISS are presented and discussed.

  18. Effect of ethanol, temperature, and gas flow rate on volatile release from aqueous solutions under dynamic headspace dilution conditions.

    PubMed

    Tsachaki, Maroussa; Gady, Anne-Laure; Kalopesas, Michalis; Linforth, Robert S T; Athès, Violaine; Marin, Michele; Taylor, Andrew J

    2008-07-09

    On the basis of a mechanistic model, the overall and liquid mass transfer coefficients of aroma compounds were estimated during aroma release when an inert gas diluted the static headspace over simple ethanol/water solutions (ethanol concentration = 120 mL x L(-1)). Studied for a range of 17 compounds, they were both increased in the ethanol/water solution compared to the water solution, showing a better mass transfer due to the presence of ethanol, additively to partition coefficient variation. Thermal imaging results showed differences in convection of the two systems (water and ethanol/water) arguing for ethanol convection enhancement inside the liquid. The effect of ethanol in the solution on mass transfer coefficients at different temperatures was minor. On the contrary, at different headspace dilution rates, the effect of ethanol in the solution helped to maintain the volatile headspace concentration close to equilibrium concentration, when the headspace was replenished 1-3 times per minute.

  19. Public release of performance data and quality improvement: internal responses to external data by US health care providers

    PubMed Central

    Davies, H

    2001-01-01

    Health policy in many countries emphasises the public release of comparative data on clinical performance as one way of improving the quality of health care. Evidence to date is that it is health care providers (hospitals and the staff within them) that are most likely to respond to such data, yet little is known about how health care providers view and use these data. Case studies of six US hospitals were studied (two academic medical centres, two private not-for-profit medical centres, a group model health maintenance organisation hospital, and an inner city public provider "safety net" hospital) using semi-structured interviews followed by a broad thematic analysis located within an interpretive paradigm. Within these settings, 35 interviews were held with 31 individuals (chief executive officer, chief of staff, chief of cardiology, senior nurse, senior quality managers, and front line staff). The results showed that key stakeholders in these providers were often (but not always) antipathetic towards publicly released comparative data. Such data were seen as lacking in legitimacy and their meanings were disputed. Nonetheless, the public nature of these data did lead to some actions in response, more so when the data showed that local performance was poor. There was little integration between internal and external data systems. These findings suggest that the public release of comparative data may help to ensure that greater attention is paid to the quality agenda within health care providers, but greater efforts are needed both to develop internal systems of quality improvement and to integrate these more effectively with external data systems. Key Words: quality of health care; quality improvement; comparative performance data; public disclosure PMID:11389319

  20. Flow-flame interactions causing acoustically coupled heat release fluctuations in a thermo-acoustically unstable gas turbine model combustor

    SciTech Connect

    Steinberg, A.M.; Boxx, I.; Stoehr, M.; Meier, W.; Carter, C.D.

    2010-12-15

    A detailed analysis of the flow-flame interactions associated with acoustically coupled heat-release rate fluctuations was performed for a 10 kW, CH{sub 4}/air, swirl stabilized flame in a gas turbine model combustor exhibiting self-excited thermo-acoustic oscillations at 308 Hz. High-speed stereoscopic particle image velocimetry, OH planar laser induced fluorescence, and OH* chemiluminescence measurements were performed at a sustained repetition rate of 5 kHz, which was sufficient to resolve the relevant combustor dynamics. Using spatio-temporal proper orthogonal decomposition, it was found that the flow-field contained several simultaneous periodic motions: the reactant flux into the combustion chamber periodically oscillated at the thermo-acoustic frequency (308 Hz), a helical precessing vortex core (PVC) circumscribed the burner nozzle at 515 Hz, and the PVC underwent axial contraction and extension at the thermo-acoustic frequency. The global heat release rate fluctuated at the thermo-acoustic frequency, while the heat release centroid circumscribed the combustor at the difference between the thermo-acoustic and PVC frequencies. Hence, the three-dimensional location of the heat release fluctuations depended on the interaction of the PVC with the flame surface. This motivated the compilation of doubly phase resolved statistics based on the phase of both the acoustic and PVC cycles, which showed highly repeatable periodic flow-flame configurations. These include flames stabilized between the inflow and inner recirculation zone, large-scale flame wrap-up by the PVC, radial deflection of the inflow by the PVC, and combustion in the outer recirculation zones. Large oscillations in the flame surface area were observed at the thermo-accoustic frequency that significantly affected the total heat-release oscillations. By filtering the instantaneous reaction layers at different scales, the importance of the various flow-flame interactions affecting the flame area was

  1. Template copolymerization to control site structure around metal ions: Applications towards sensing and gas storage and release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell-Koch, Jeremy T.

    The development of functional materials for sensing and gas storage and release is useful in a number of chemical and biological applications. Investigating function of molecularly imprinted polymers (MIP), often used for these purposes, has relied on circumstantial evidence because direct examination of immobilized sites is not possible. Described in this dissertation is the design, synthesis, characterization and function studies of materials synthesized by template copolymerization methods. Metal ions exhibit unique spectroscopic properties and their utilization makes site examination more feasible. Ligand binding modulates these properties such that the event can be measured by spectroscopy. The metal ion's secondary coordination environment can also be tuned to increase or decrease function of the material. In Chapter Two the utilization of template copolymerization to immobilize a europium-containing compound for the detection of volatile organic compounds is described. Luminescence of the immobilized complex is quenched in the presence of volatile organic compounds (VOC). The quenching effect is dependent on concentration of VOC and the nature of polymeric host. Chapters Three and Four describe the development of materials for the photolytic release of nitric oxide (NO). In Chapter Three, a novel manipulation of the immobilized complex is employed to produce binding sites that contain ligands covalently embedded into the host in a position to bind the metal ion upon NO release in order to block rebinding. Incompatible binding affinities of the iron-containing templates made it impossible to study NO photo-release from this material. Second-row transition metals are more compatible with NO binding, and Chapter Four describes a ruthenium salen-containing polymer that releases NO in response to light. Additionally, transfer of NO to a metalloporphyrin and myoglobin has been achieved. This is the first report of photolytic heterogeneous NO transfer by a material

  2. Fate of internalized thyrotropin-releasing hormone receptors monitored with a timer fusion protein.

    PubMed

    Cook, Laurie B; Hinkle, Patricia M

    2004-07-01

    Trafficking of TRH receptors was studied in a stable HEK293 cell line expressing receptor fused to a Timer protein (TRHR-Timer) that spontaneously changes from green to red over 10 h. Cells expressing TRHR-Timer responded to TRH with an 11-fold increase in inositol phosphate formation, increased intracellular free calcium, and internalization of 75% of bound [(3)H][N(3)-methyl-His(2)]TRH within 10 min. After a 20-min exposure to TRH at 37 C, 75-80% of surface binding sites disappeared as receptors internalized. When TRH was removed and cells incubated in hormone-free medium, approximately 75% of [(3)H][N(3)-methyl-His(2)]TRH binding sites reappeared at the surface over the next 2 h with or without cycloheximide. Trafficking of TRHR-Timer was monitored microscopically after addition and withdrawal of TRH. In untreated cells, both new (green) and old (red) receptors were seen at the plasma membrane, and TRH caused rapid movement of young and old receptors into cytoplasmic vesicles. When TRH was withdrawn, some TRHR-Timer reappeared at the plasma membrane after several hours, but much of the internalized receptor remained intracellular in vesicles that condensed to larger structures in perinuclear regions deeper within the cell. Strikingly, receptors that moved to the plasma membrane were generally younger (more green) than those that underwent endocytosis. There was no change in the red to green ratio over the course of the experiment in cells exposed to vehicle. The results indicate that, after agonist-driven receptor internalization, the plasma membrane is replenished with younger receptors, arising either from an intracellular pool or preferential recycling of younger receptors.

  3. Effect of duckweed cover on greenhouse gas emissions and odour release from waste stabilisation ponds.

    PubMed

    van der Steen, N P; Nakiboneka, P; Mangalika, L; Ferrer, A V M; Gijzen, H J

    2003-01-01

    Treatment of wastewater in stabilisation pond systems prevents the negative environmental impact of uncontrolled disposal of sewage. However, even a natural treatment system may generate secondary negative environmental impacts in terms of energy consumption, emission of greenhouse gases and emission of odorous compounds. Whereas natural systems have an advantage over electro-mechanical systems in that they use less hardware and less energy, it is not yet known whether secondary environmental effects in the form of greenhouse gas emissions are lower for these systems. This research intends to be a first step in the direction of answering this question by assessing gas emissions from two types of natural systems, namely algae-based and duckweed-based stabilisation ponds. The H2S volatilisation from laboratory scale pond-reactors has been determined by drawing the air above the water surface continuously through a solution of 1 M NaOH for absorption of sulphide. The amount of H2S that volatilised from the algae pond-reactor, and was trapped in the NaOH trap, was found to be 2.5-86 mg/m2/day. The H2S volatilisation from the duckweed pond-reactor was found to be negligible, even though the sulphide concentration was 9.7 mg/l S(2-). The duckweed cover was a physical barrier for volatilisation, since bubbles were trapped in the cover. In addition the duckweed layer was found to be afavourable environment for both aerobic sulphide oxidisers (Beggiatoa gigantae) as well as for photosynthetic purple sulphur bacteria belonging to the genus Chromatium. These may also have contributed to the prevention of H2S volatilisation. Results on methane emissions were not conclusive so far, but the same mechanisms that prevent H2S volatilisation may also prevent methane volatilisation. Therefore it was concluded that duckweed covers on stabilisation ponds may reduce the emission of both odorous and greenhouse gases.

  4. Assessing changes in stratospheric mean age of air and fractional release using historical trace gas observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laube, Johannes; Bönisch, Harald; Engel, Andreas; Röckmann, Thomas; Sturges, William

    2014-05-01

    Large-scale stratospheric transport is pre-dominantly governed by the Brewer-Dobson circulation. Due to climatic change a long-term acceleration of this residual stratospheric circulation has been proposed (e.g. Austin et al.,2006). Observational evidence has revealed indications for temporary changes (e.g. Bönisch et al., 2011) but a confirmation of a significant long-term trend is missing so far (e.g. Engel et al., 2009). A different aspect is a possible long-term change in the break-down of chemically important species such as chlorofluorocarbons as proposed by Butchart et al. 2001. Recent studies show significant differences adding up to more than 20 % in the chlorine released from such compounds (Newman et al., 2007; Laube et al., 2013). We here use a data set of three long-lived trace gases, namely SF6, CF2Cl2, and N2O, as measured in whole-air samples collected during balloon and aircraft flights between 1975 and 2011, to assess changes in stratospheric transport and chemistry. For this purpose we utilise the mean stratospheric transit times (or mean ages of air) in combination with a measure of the chemical decomposition (i.e. fractional release factors). We also evaluate the influence of different trend correction methods on these quantities and explore their variability with latitude, altitude, and season. References Austin, J. & Li, F.: On the relationship between the strength of the Brewer-Dobson circulation and the age of stratospheric air, Geophys. Res. Lett., 33, L17807, 2006. Bönisch, H., Engel, A., Birner, Th., Hoor, P., Tarasick, D. W., and Ray, E. A.: On the structural changes in the Brewer-Dobson circulation after 2000, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 11, 3937-3948, 2011. Butchart, N. & Scaife, A. A. Removal of chlorofluorocarbons by increased mass exchange between the stratosphere and troposphere in a changing climate. Nature, 410, 799-802, 2001. Engel, A., Möbius, T., Bönisch, H., Schmidt, U., Heinz, R., Levin, I., Atlas, E., Aoki, S., Nakazawa, T

  5. Determination of aromatic hydrocarbons in asphalt release agents using headspace solid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Tang, Bing; Isacsson, Ulf

    2005-04-01

    The possibility of quantitative analysis of aromatic hydrocarbons in oil-based asphalt release agents was investigated using headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The target analytes studied were benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, p-, m-, and o-xylene (BTEX) and 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene and 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene. Experimental parameters influencing HS-SPME efficiency were studied (equilibration time between sample and headspace and between headspace and SPME fiber, sample amount and sample matrice effects). A HS-SPME method using hexadecane as a surrogate matrice was developed. The detection limit was estimated as 0.03-0.08 ppm (w/w) for the target analytes investigated. Good linearity was observed (R2 > 0.999) for all calibration curves at high, medium and low concentration level. The repeatability of the method (RSD, relative standard deviation) was found to be less than 10% (generally less than 5%) in triplicate samples and approximately 2% at eight consecutive tests on one and the same sample. The accuracy of the method given by recovery of spiked samples was between 85 and 106% (generally between 95 and 105%). The HS-SPME method developed was applied to four commercially available asphalt release agents. External calibration and standard addition approaches were investigated regarding accuracy. The results showed that standard addition generates higher accuracy than external calibration. The contents of target aromatic hydrocarbons in the asphalt release agents studied varied greatly from approximately 0.1-700 ppm. The method described looks promising, and could be a valuable tool for determination of aromatic hydrocarbons in different types of organic matrices.

  6. Patient release criteria following radioactive iodine-131 treatment in the light of international practice: where does South Africa fit in?

    PubMed

    Mongane, Modisenyane S; Rae, William I D

    2017-10-01

    The release from hospital of patients treated with radioactive iodine-131 (I) remains a controversial issue as a result of the range of guidelines implemented by national regulatory bodies responsible for radiation protection in various countries worldwide. The aim of this study was to review and analyse the literature on patient release criteria (PRC) applied internationally in an attempt to achieve a justifiable approach to setting equivalent criteria in South Africa. In 2016, the South African Department of Health, Directorate: Radiation Control added conditions (numbers 50 and 90), to licences to use radioactive nuclides. These conditions state that patients must be hospitalized when the dose rate at 1 m is above 25 μSv/h, or more than 555 MBq of iodine-131 was administered to the patient. However, these criteria do not consider patients' socioeconomic conditions. A literature survey was carried out of articles detailing PRC from high-income countries as well as those in the middle-income and lower-income groups. Socioeconomic conditions within countries were determined using the International Monetary Fund lists of gross domestic product. The results from the literature have shown that in setting PRC, several countries have considered the socioeconomic conditions prevailing in their countries to achieve harmony between public protection and cost associated with hospitalization. The South African authority conditions must be seen in the context of the approach followed by other countries. Considering the international context, a justifiable, and potentially implementable, guideline or policy for improving individualized and more caring patient management is advocated.

  7. Screening of inorganic gases released from firework-rockets by a gas chromatography/whistle-accelerometer method.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kuan-Fu; Wu, Hui-Hsin; Lin, Chien-Hung; Lin, Cheng-Huang

    2013-08-30

    The use of an accelerometer for detecting inorganic gases in gas chromatography (GC) is described. A milli-whistle was connected to the outlet of the GC capillary and was used instead of a classical GC detector. When the GC carrier gases and the sample gases pass through the milli-whistle, a sound is produced, leading to vibrational changes, which can be recorded using an accelerometer. Inorganic gases, including SO2, N2 and CO2, which are released from traditional Chinese firework-rockets at relatively high levels as the result of burning the propellant and explosive material inside could be rapidly determined using the GC/whistle-accelerometer system. The method described herein is safe, the instrumentation is compact and has potential to be modified so as to be portable for use in the field. It also can be used in conjunction with FID (flame ionization detector) or TCD (thermal conductivity detector), in which either no response for FID (CO2, N2, NO2, SO2, etc.) or helium gas is needed for TCD, respectively. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Effects of energy release on near field flow structure of gas jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agrawal, Ajay K.; Gollahalli, Subramanyam R.; Griffin, Devon

    1995-01-01

    The primary objective is to understand how buoyancy affects the structure of the shear layer, the development of fluid dynamic instabilities, and formation of the coherent structures in the near-nozzle regions of gas jets. The secondary objectives are to study the role of buoyancy in lifting and reattachment process of diffusion flames, to evaluate the scaling behavior of diffusion flames, and to aid development and/or validation of theoretical models by providing quantitative data in the absence of buoyancy. Fast reacting hydrogen or hydrogen-inert fuels are used to isolate the effects of buoyancy on fluid dynamics without masking the flame behavior by soot and radiative heat transfer. This choice of fuel also permits an evaluation of simulating low gravity in low pressure ground experiments because the similarity constraints are relaxed for the fast reacting, nonsooting diffusion flames. The diagnostics consists primarily of a color schlieren system coupled with computer generated rainbow filters, video recording, and image analysis. The project involves (1) drop tower experiments, (2) ground experiments, and (3) theoretical analysis.

  9. Release model for in situ vitrification large-field test off-gas treatment system

    SciTech Connect

    Pafford, D.J.; Tung, V.X.

    1992-03-01

    A conceptual model for the vapor and aerosol transport and deposition in the in situ vitrification large-field test off-gas system (OGS) has been developed. This model can be used to predict the emissions from the OGS under normal and off-normal conditions. Results generated by the model can be used to evaluate design and/or procedural modifications, define tests, and predict results. The OGS vapor and aerosol transport and deposition is modeled using the PULSE/MOD-ISV/VER 1.0.0 developmental computer code. Input data requirements for this code include the specific geometries of the OGS components; the composition, rate, and temperature of the vapors and aerosols entering the OGS; and the OGS component surface temperatures or heat fluxes. Currently, not all of these model inputs are available. Therefore, conceptual input parameters are developed. Using this input data, preliminary calculations with the code have been performed. These calculations include a demonstration that the code predicts convergent results, a comparison of predicted results with performance data for one of the OGS components, and a preliminary sensitivity study of the complete model.

  10. Preliminary Study of Strong-Sludge Gas Retention and Release Mechanisms in Clay Simulants

    SciTech Connect

    Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Buchmiller, William C.; Probert, Samuel G.; Owen, Antionette T.

    2010-10-12

    The Hanford Site has 28 double-shell tanks (DSTs) and 149 single-shell tanks (SSTs) containing radioactive wastes that are complex mixes of radioactive and chemical products. The mission of the Department of Energy’s River Protection Project is to retrieve and treat the Hanford tank waste for disposal and close the tank farms. A key aspect of the mission is to retrieve and transfer waste from the SSTs, which are at greater risk for leaking, into DSTs for interim storage until the waste is transferred to and treated in the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant. There is, however, limited space in the existing DSTs to accept waste transfers from the SSTs, and approaches to overcoming the limited DST space will benefit the overall mission. The purpose of this study is to summarize and analyze the key previous experiment that forms the basis for the relaxed controls and to summarize initial progress and results on new experiments focused on understanding the conditions that result in low gas retention. The work is ongoing; this report provides a summary of the initial findings. The previous large-scale test used about 50 m3 of sediment, which would be unwieldy for doing multiple parametric experiments. Accordingly, experiments will begin with smaller-scale tests to determine whether the desired mechanisms can be studied without the difficulty of conducting very large experiments.

  11. Characterization of internal wetting in polymer electrolyte membrane gas diffusion layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, Perry; Fairweather, Joseph D.; Schwartz, Daniel T.

    Capillary pressure vs. saturation (P C(S L)) curves are fundamental to understanding liquid water transport and flooding in PEM gas diffusion layers (GDLs). P C(S L) curves convolute the influence of GDL pore geometry and internal contact angles at the three-phase liquid/solid/gas boundary. Even simple GDL materials are a spatially non-uniform mixture of carbon fiber and binder, making a Gaussian distribution of contact angles likely, based on the Cassie-Baxter equation. For a given Gaussian contact angle distribution with mean (θ Mean) and standard deviation (σ), a realistic P C(S L) curve can be computed using a bundle of capillaries model and GDL pore size distribution data. As expected, computed P C(S L) curves show that θ Mean sets the overall hydrophilic (θ Mean < 90°) or hydrophobic (θ Mean > 90°) character of the GDL (i.e., liquid saturation level at a given capillary pressure), and σ affects the slope of the P C(S L) curve. The capillary bundle model also can be used with (θ Mean, σ) as unknown parameters that are best-fit to experimentally acquired P C(S L) and pore size distribution data to find (θ Mean, σ) values for actual GDL materials. To test this, pore size distribution data was acquired for Toray TGP-H-090 along with hysteretic liquid and gas intrusion capillary pressure curve data. High quality best-fits were found between the model and combined datasets, with GDL liquid intrusion showing fairly neutral internal surface wetting properties (θ Mean = 92° and σ = 10°) whereas gas intrusion displayed a hydrophilic character (θ Mean = 52° and σ = 8°). External liquid advancing and receding contact angles were also measured on this same material and they also showed major hysteresis. The new methods described here open the door for better understanding of the link between GDL material processing and the wetting properties that affect flooding.

  12. Improvements in Heat Transfer for Anti-Icing of Gas-Heated Airfoils with Internal Fins and Partitions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, Vernon H.

    1950-01-01

    The effect of modifying the gas passage of hollow metal airfoils by the additIon of internal fins and partitions was experimentally investigated and comparisons were made among a basic unfinned airfoil section and two airfoil designs having metal fins attached at the leading edge of the internal gas passage. An analysis considering the effects of heat conduction in the airfoil metal was made to determine the internal modification effectiveness that may be obtained in gas-heated components, such as turbojet-inlet guide vanes, support struts, hollow propeller blades, arid. thin wings. Over a wide range of heated-gas flow and tunnel-air velocity, the increase In surface-heating rates with internal finning was marked (up to 3.5 times), with the greatest increase occurring at the leading edge where anti-icing heat requirements are most critical. Variations in the amount and the location of internal finning and. partitioning provided. control over the local rates of surface heat transfer and permitted efficient anti-icing utilization of the gas-stream heat content.

  13. Evaluation of Approval Request 47; Call for Release Procedures for Charlotte Douglas International Airport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevens, Lindsay; Martin, Lynne; Jobe, Kimberly; Parke, Bonny; Chevalley, Eric; Lee, Hanbong; Verma, Savita; Dulchinos, Victoria

    2017-01-01

    NASA is collaborating with the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and aviation industry partners to develop and demonstrate new concepts and technologies for Integrated Arrival, Departure, and Surface (IADS) traffic management capabilities under the Airspace Technology Demonstration 2 (ATD-2) project. One of the goals of the IADS capabilities in the ATD-2 project is to increase predictability and throughput of airspace operations by improving Traffic Management Initiative (TMI) compliance. This paper focuses on the Approval Request (APREQ) procedures developed for the ATD-2 project between the Air Traffic Control (ATC) Tower at Charlotte Douglas International Airport and Washington Center. In March 2017, NASA conducted a Human-in-the-Loop (HITL) simulation to evaluate the operational procedures and information requirements for the APREQ procedures in the ATD-2 IADS system between ATC Tower and Center. The findings from the HITL are used to compare ATD-2 APREQ procedures with information about current day APREQ procedures.

  14. On the Internal Gas Dynamics and Efficiency of a Vortex Water-Vapor Plasma Generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charakhovski, L.; Essiptchouk, A.; Otani, C.; Petraconi, G.; Marquesi, A.; Sauchyn, V.; Khvedchyn, I.; Olenovich, A.; Liavonchyk, A.; Skamarokhau, D.; Halinouski, A.

    2017-05-01

    Results of experimental investigations of a new-type generator of an arc water plasma, having a high thermal efficiency close to 100%, are presented. This generator represents a system comprising a vortex arc plasma generator, in which an electric arc is stabilized by water vapor and a straight-through-flow tubular electric steam generator. Such a high efficiency of the plasma generator system was achieved due to the refinement of the internal gas dynamics of the plasma generator and the heat and mass transfer in its discharge channel as a result of the improvement of the vortex stabilization and thermal insulation of an arc discharge in it by the specially organized ″instantly permeable″ channel wall cooled by only the working water used for generation of the plasma.

  15. Stepwise Internal Energy Change of Protonated Methanol Clusters By Using the Inert Gas Tagging.

    PubMed

    Shimamori, Takuto; Kuo, Jer-Lai; Fujii, Asuka

    2016-11-23

    Structural isomer population of a hydrogen-bonded cluster generally depends on temperature. Therefore, determination of an isomer population profile in a wide temperature range is important to understand the nature of hydrogen bond networks of the cluster. To explore an isomer population profile, stepwise changes of internal vibrational energy of a protonated hydrogen-bonded cluster are performed by inert gas tagging. We observe infrared spectra of the protonated methanol pentamer with various tag species. The bare protonated methanol pentamer practically has only two possible isomer types. With the tagging, the relative population of the two isomer types changes according to the binding energy with the tag species. The observed relative population follows its theoretically predicted temperature dependence.

  16. Internal Kinematics of Groups of Galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Cheng; Jing, Y. P.; Mao, Shude; Han, Jiaxin; Peng, Qiuying; Yang, Xiaohu; Mo, H. J.; van den Bosch, Frank

    2012-10-01

    We present measurements of the velocity dispersion profile (VDP) for galaxy groups in the final data release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). For groups of given mass, we estimate the redshift-space cross-correlation function (CCF) with respect to a reference galaxy sample, ξ(s)(rp , π), the projected CCF, wp (rp ), and the real-space CCF, ξcg(r). The VDP is then extracted from the redshift distortion in ξ(s)(rp , π), by comparing ξ(s)(rp , π) with ξcg(r). We find that the velocity dispersion (VD) within virial radius (R 200) shows a roughly flat profile, with a slight increase at radii below ~0.3R 200 for high-mass systems. The average VD within the virial radius, σ v , is a strongly increasing function of central galaxy mass. We apply the same methodology to N-body simulations with the concordance Λ cold dark matter cosmology but different values of the density fluctuation parameter σ8, and we compare the results to the SDSS results. We show that the σ v - M * relation from the data provides stringent constraints on both σ8 and σ ms , the dispersion in log M * of central galaxies at fixed halo mass. Our best-fitting model suggests σ8 = 0.86 ± 0.03 and σ ms = 0.16 ± 0.03. The slightly higher value of σ8 compared to the WMAP7 result might be due to a smaller matter density parameter assumed in our simulations. Our VD measurements also provide a direct measure of the dark matter halo mass for central galaxies of different luminosities and masses, in good agreement with the results obtained by Mandelbaum et al. from stacking the gravitational lensing signals of the SDSS galaxies.

  17. International comparison of a hydrocarbon gas standard at the picomol per mol level.

    PubMed

    Rhoderick, George C; Duewer, David L; Apel, Eric; Baldan, Annarita; Hall, Bradley; Harling, Alice; Helmig, Detlev; Heo, Gwi Suk; Hueber, Jacques; Kim, Mi Eon; Kim, Yong Doo; Miller, Ben; Montzka, Steve; Riemer, Daniel

    2014-03-04

    Studies of climate change increasingly recognize the diverse influences of hydrocarbons in the atmosphere, including roles in particulates and ozone formation. Measurements of key nonmethane hydrocarbons (NMHCs) suggest atmospheric mole fractions ranging from low picomoles per mol (ppt) to nanomoles per mol (ppb), depending on location and compound. To accurately establish mole fraction trends and to relate measurement records from many laboratories and researchers, it is essential to have accurate, stable, calibration standards. In February of 2008, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) developed and reported on picomoles per mol standards containing 18 nonmethane hydrocarbon compounds covering the mole fraction range of 60 picomoles per mol to 230 picomoles per mol. The stability of these gas mixtures was only characterized over a short time period (2 to 3 months). NIST recently prepared a suite of primary standard gas mixtures by gravimetric dilution to ascertain the stability of the 2008 picomoles per mol NMHC standards suite. The data from this recent chromatographic intercomparison of the 2008 to the 2011 suites confirm a much longer stability of almost 5 years for 15 of the 18 hydrocarbons; the double-bonded alkenes of propene, isobutene, and 1-pentene showed instability, in line with previous publications. The agreement between the gravimetric values from preparation and the analytical mole fractions determined from regression illustrate the internal consistency of the suite within ±2 pmol/mol. However, results for several of the compounds reflect stability problems for the three double-bonded hydrocarbons. An international intercomparison on one of the 2008 standards has also been completed. Participants included National Metrology Institutes, United States government laboratories, and academic laboratories. In general, results for this intercomparison agree to within about ±5% with the gravimetric mole fractions of the hydrocarbons.

  18. The Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE III) on the International Space Station (ISS) Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cisewski, Michael; Zawodny, Joseph; Gasbarre, Joseph; Eckman, Richard; Topiwala, Nandkishore; Rodriquez-Alvarez, Otilia; Cheek, Dianne; Hall, Steve

    2014-01-01

    The Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment III on the International Space Station (SAGE III/ISS) mission will provide the science community with high-vertical resolution and nearly global observations of ozone, aerosols, water vapor, nitrogen dioxide, and other trace gas species in the stratosphere and upper-troposphere. SAGE III/ISS measurements will extend the long-term Stratospheric Aerosol Measurement (SAM) and SAGE data record begun in the 1970s. The multi-decadal SAGE ozone and aerosol data sets have undergone intense scrutiny and are considered the international standard for accuracy and stability. SAGE data have been used to monitor the effectiveness of the Montreal Protocol. Key objectives of the mission are to assess the state of the recovery in the distribution of ozone, to re-establish the aerosol measurements needed by both climate and ozone models, and to gain further insight into key processes contributing to ozone and aerosol variability. The space station mid-inclination orbit allows for a large range in latitude sampling and nearly continuous communications with payloads. The SAGE III instrument is the fifth in a series of instruments developed for monitoring atmospheric constituents with high vertical resolution. The SAGE III instrument is a moderate resolution spectrometer covering wavelengths from 290 nm to 1550 nm. Science data is collected in solar occultation mode, lunar occultation mode, and limb scatter measurement mode. A SpaceX Falcon 9 launch vehicle will provide access to space. Mounted in the unpressurized section of the Dragon trunk, SAGE III will be robotically removed from the Dragon and installed on the space station. SAGE III/ISS will be mounted to the ExPRESS Logistics Carrier-4 (ELC-4) location on the starboard side of the station. To facilitate a nadir view from this location, a Nadir Viewing Platform (NVP) payload was developed which mounts between the carrier and the SAGE III Instrument Payload (IP).

  19. First Experiments with the Polarized Internal Gas Target (PIT) at ANKE/COSY

    SciTech Connect

    Engels, R.; Lorentz, B.; Prasuhn, D.; Rathmann, F.; Sarkadi, J.; Schleichert, R.; Seyfarth, H.; Stroeher, H.; Chiladze, D.; Dymov, S.; Grigoryev, K.; Mikirtychyants, M.; Kacharava, A.; Klehr, F.; Mikirtychyants, S.; Vasilyev, A.; Schieck, H. Paetz gen.; Steffens, E.

    2009-08-04

    For future few-nucleon interaction studies with polarized beams and targets at COSY-Juelich, a polarized internal storage-cell gas target was implemented at the magnet spectrometer ANKE. First commissioning of the polarized Atomic Beam Source (ABS) at ANKE was carried out and some improvements of the system have been done. Storage-cell tests to determine the COSY beam dimensions have been performed. Electron cooling combined with stacking and stochastic cooling have been studied. Experiments with N{sub 2} gas in the storage cell to simulate the background produced by beam interaction with the aluminum cell walls were performed to investigate the beam heating by the target gas. The analysis of the d-vectorp-vector->dp and d-vectorp-vector->(dp{sub sp})pi{sup 0} reactions showed that events from different positions of the extended target can be clearly identified in the ANKE detector system. The polarization of the atomic beam of the ABS, positioned close to the strong dipole magnet D2 of ANKE, was tuned with a Lamb-shift polarimeter (LSP) beneath the target chamber. With use of the known analyzing powers of the quasi-free np->dpi{sup 0} reaction, the polarization in the storage cell was measured to be Q{sub y} = 0.79+-0.07 in the vertical stray field of the D2 magnet acting as a holding field. The target thickness achieved was 2x10{sup 13} atoms/cm{sup 2} for one hyperfine state populated in the ABS beam only. With a COSY beam intensity of 6x10{sup 9} stored polarized deuterons in the ring, the luminosity for double polarized experiments was 1x10{sup 29} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}.

  20. First Experiments with the Polarized Internal Gas Target (PIT) at ANKE/COSY

    SciTech Connect

    Engels, R.; Lorentz, B.; Prasuhn, D.; Rathmann, F.; Sarkadi, J.; Schleichert, R.; Seyfarth, H.; Stroeher, H.; Chiladze, D.; Dymov, S.; Grigoryev, K.; Mikirtychyants, M.; Kacharava, A.; Klehr, F.; Mikirtychyants, S.; Vasilyev, A.; Schieck, H. Paetz gen.; Steffens, E.

    2008-02-06

    For future few-nucleon interaction studies with polarized beams and targets at COSY-Juelich, a polarized internal storage-cell gas target was implemented at the magnet spectrometer ANKE in summer 2005. First commissioning of the polarized Atomic Beam Source (ABS) at ANKE was carried out and some improvements of the system have been done. Storage-cell tests to determine the COSY beam dimensions have been performed. Electron cooling combined with stacking and stochastic cooling have been studied. Experiments with N{sub 2} gas in the storage cell to simulate the background produced by beam interaction with the aluminum cell walls were performed to investigate the beam heating by the target gas. The analysis of the d-vector p-vector {yields}dp and d-vector p-vector{yields}(dp{sub sp}){pi}{sup 0} reactions showed that events from the extended target can be clearly identified in the ANKE detector system.The polarization of the atomic beam of the ABS, positioned close to the strong dipole magnet D2 of ANKE, was tuned with a Lamb-shift polarimeter (LSP) beneath the target chamber. With use of the known analyzing powers of the quasi-free np{yields}d{pi}{sup 0} reaction, the polarization in the storage cell was measured to be Q{sub y} = 0.79{+-}0.07 in the vertical stray field of the D2 magnet acting as a holding field. The achieved target thickness was 2x10{sup 13} atoms/cm{sup 2} for one hyperfine state populated in the ABS beam only. With a COSY beam intensity of 6x10{sup 9} stored polarized deuterons in the ring, the luminosity for double polarized experiments was 1x10{sup 29} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}.

  1. The treatment of solid tumors by alpha emitters released from 224Ra-loaded sources—internal dosimetry analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arazi, L.; Cooks, T.; Schmidt, M.; Keisari, Y.; Kelson, I.

    2010-02-01

    Diffusing alpha-emitters radiation therapy (DART) is a proposed new form of brachytherapy, allowing the treatment of solid tumors by alpha particles. DART utilizes implantable sources carrying small activities of radium-224, which continually release into the tumor radon-220, polonium-216 and lead-212 atoms, while radium-224 itself remains fixed to the source. The released atoms disperse inside the tumor by diffusive and convective processes, creating, through their alpha emissions, a high-dose region measuring several mm in diameter about each source. The efficacy of DART has been demonstrated in preclinical studies on mice-borne squamous cell carcinoma and lung tumors and the method is now being developed toward clinical trials. This work studies DART safety with respect to the dose delivered to distant organs as a result of lead-212 leakage from the tumor through the blood, relying on a biokinetic calculation coupled to internal dose assessments. It is found that the dose-limiting organs are the kidneys and red bone marrow. Assuming a typical source spacing of ~5 mm and a typical radium-224 activity density of 0.4-0.8 MBq g-1 of tumor tissue, it is predicted that tumors weighing up to several hundred grams may be treated without reaching the tolerance dose in any organ.

  2. Solid lipid nanoparticles comprising internal Compritol 888 ATO, tripalmitin and cacao butter for encapsulating and releasing stavudine, delavirdine and saquinavir.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Yung-Chih; Chung, Chiu-Yen

    2011-12-01

    Solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) with complex internal phase were fabricated for formulating stavudine (D4T), delavirdine (DLV), and saquinavir (SQV). The lipids including Compritol 888 ATO, tripalmitin, and cacao butter were stabilized by L-α-phospatidylcholine, cholesteryl hemisuccinate, and taurocholate to form SLNs. The results revealed that the morphology of SLNs was spheroidal with shallow surface pits. An increase in the weight percentage of Compritol 888 ATO increased the average diameter of D4T-entrapping SLNs and decreased that of DLV- and SQV-entrapping SLNs. Preservation at 4°C over 6 weeks slightly enhanced the size of SLNs. For a specific drug, an increase in the entrapment efficiency enlarged the nanocarriers. The order of drug in the average particle diameter and in the entrapment efficiency was SQV>DLV>D4T, in general. In addition, the dissolution of the three drugs from SLNs showed the characteristics of sustained release. The order of drug in the cumulative release percentage was D4T>DLV>SQV. SLNs containing Compritol 888 ATO, tripalmitin, and cacao butter are efficient in carrying antiretroviral agents for medicinal application.

  3. Scaling Laws for Reduced-Scale Tests of Pulse Jet Mixing Systems in Non-Newtonian Slurries: Gas Retention and Release Behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, Charles W.; Meyer, Perry A.; Kurath, Dean E.; Barnes, Steven M.

    2006-03-02

    The Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) under construction at the Hanford Site will use pulse jet mixer (PJM) technology for mixing and gas retention control applications in tanks expected to contain waste slurries exhibiting a non-Newtonian rheology. This paper presents the results of theoretical and experimental studies performed to establish the methodology to perform reduced-scale gas retention and release tests with PJM systems in non-Newtonian fluids with gas generation. The technical basis for scaled testing with unsteady jet mixing systems in gas-generating non-Newtonian fluids is presented in the form of a bubble migration model that accounts for the gas generation rate, the average bubble rise velocity, and the geometry of the vessel. Scaling laws developed from the model were validated with gas holdup and release tests conducted at three scales: large scale, 1/4 scale, and 1/9 scale. Experiments were conducted with two non-Newtonian simulants with in-situ gas generation by decomposition of hydrogen peroxide. The data were compared non-dimensionally, and the important scale laws were examined. From these results, scaling laws are developed which allow the design of mixing systems at a reduced scale.

  4. Release and Gas-Particle Partitioning Behaviors of Short-Chain Chlorinated Paraffins (SCCPs) During the Thermal Treatment of Polyvinyl Chloride Flooring.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Faqiang; Zhang, Haijun; Wang, Jing; Xu, Jiazhi; Yuan, Heping; Gao, Yuan; Su, Fan; Chen, Jiping

    2017-08-15

    Chlorinated paraffin (CP) mixture is a common additive in polyvinyl chloride (PVC) products as a plasticizer and flame retardant. During the PVC plastic life cycle, intentional or incidental thermal processes inevitably cause an abrupt release of short-chain CPs (SCCPs). In this study, the thermal processing of PVC plastics was simulated by heating PVC flooring at 100-200 °C in a chamber. The 1 h thermal treatment caused the release of 1.9-10.7% of the embedded SCCPs. A developed emission model indicated that SCCP release was mainly controlled by material-gas partitioning at 100 °C. However, release control tended to be subjected to material-phase diffusion above 150 °C, especially for SCCP congeners with shorter carbon-chain lengths. A cascade impactor (NanoMoudi) was used to collect particles of different sizes and gas-phase SCCPs. The elevated temperature resulted in a higher partition of SCCPs from the gas-phase to particle-phase. SCCPs were not strongly inclined to form aerosol particles by nucleation, and less present in the Aitken mode particles. Junge-Pankow adsorption model well fitted the partitioning of SCCPs between the gas-phase and accumulation mode particles. Inhalation exposure estimation indicated that PVC processing and recycling workers could face a considerably high risk for exposure to SCCPs.

  5. Gas-liquid pressure drop in vertical internally wavy 90 bend

    SciTech Connect

    Benbella, Shannak; Al-Shannag, Mohammad; Al-Anber, Zaid A.

    2009-01-15

    Experiments of air water two-phase flow pressure drop in vertical internally wavy 90 bend have been carried out. The tested bends are flexible and made of stainless steel with inner diameter of 50 mm and various curvature radiuses of 200, 300, 400 and 500 mm. The experiments were performed under the following conditions of two-phase parameters; mass flux from 350 to 750 kg/m{sup 2} s. Gas quality from 1% to 50% and system pressure from 4 to 7.5 bar. The results demonstrate that the effect of the above-mentioned parameters is very significant at high ranges of mass flow quality. Due to the increasing of two-phase flow resistance, energy dissipations, friction losses and interaction of the two-phases in the vertical internally wavy 90 bend the total pressure drops are perceptible about 2-5 times grater than that in smooth bends. Based on the mass and energy balance as well as the presented experimental results, new empirical correlation has been developed to calculate the two-phase pressure drop and hence the two-phase friction factor of the tested bends. The correlation includes the relevant primary parameter, fit the data well, and is sufficiency accurate for engineering purposes. (author)

  6. Valid internal standard technique for arson detection based on gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Salgueiro, Pedro A S; Borges, Carlos M F; Bettencourt da Silva, Ricardo J N

    2012-09-28

    The most popular procedures for the detection of residues of accelerants in fire debris are the ones published by the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM E1412-07 and E1618-10). The most critical stages of these tests are the conservation of fire debris from the sampling to the laboratory, the extraction of residues of accelerants from the debris to the activated charcoal strips (ACS) and from those to the final solvent, as well as the analysis of sample extract by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and the interpretation of the instrumental signal. This work proposes a strategy for checking the quality of the sample conservation, the accelerant residues transference to final solvent and GC-MS analysis, using internal standard additions. It is used internal standards ranging from a highly volatile compound for checking debris conservation to low volatile compound for checking GC-MS repeatability. The developed quality control (QC) parameters are not affected by GC-MS sensitivity variation and, specifically, the GC-MS performance control is not affected by ACS adsorption saturation that may mask test performance deviations. The proposed QC procedure proved to be adequate to check GC-MS repeatability, ACS extraction and sample conservation since: (1) standard additions are affected by negligible uncertainty and (2) observed dispersion of QC parameters are fit for its intended use.

  7. Venting of gas explosion through relief ducts: interaction between internal and external explosions.

    PubMed

    Ferrara, G; Willacy, S K; Phylaktou, H N; Andrews, G E; Di Benedetto, A; Salzano, E; Russo, G

    2008-06-30

    Relief ducts fitted to venting openings is a widespread configuration in the industrial practice. The presence of a duct has been reported to severely increase the violence of the vented explosion posing a problem for the proper design of the venting device. Several studies have reported the leading importance--in the whole complex explosion phenomenology--of a secondary explosion in the duct. Modern approaches in the study of simply vented explosions (without ducts) have focused on the study of the interaction between internal and external explosion as a key issue in the mechanisms of pressure generation. The issue is even more relevant when a duct is fitted to the vent due the confined nature of the external explosion. In this work the interaction between internal and external events is experimentally investigated for gas explosions vented through a relief duct. The work has aimed at studying mechanisms underlying the pressure rise of this venting configuration. The study has put the emphasis on the mutual nature of the interaction. A larger scale than laboratory has been investigated allowing drawing results with a greater degree of generality with respect to data so far presented in literature.

  8. Velocity field measurements in gas phase internal flows by molecular tagging velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samouda, F.; Brandner, J. J.; Barrot, C.; Colin, S.

    2012-05-01

    The goal of the present work is to implement Molecular Tagging Velocimetry (MTV) for the analysis of internal gas flows in mini-channels. A MTV experimental setup has been designed. Tagging and detecting steps are respectively insured by a UV laser and a CCD camera coupled to intensified relay optics. A specific channel with 1 × 5 mm2 rectangular cross section has been designed and equipped with integrated temperature sensors along its 20 cm length. It has been manufactured in PEEK (PolyEtherEther-Ketone) and Suprasil® optical windows have been integrated for the tagging access. Image processing allows extraction of velocity profiles for a pressure driven steady flow of argon through this channel. These profiles are compared to the theoretical profiles of laminar flows and the accuracy of the method is discussed. The MTV potential for the analysis of internal gaseous flows is commented on, with a discussion on perspectives for velocity measurement in rarefied flows and direct access to slip velocity at the walls.

  9. Innovative method for carbon dioxide determination in human postmortem cardiac gas samples using headspace-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and stable labeled isotope as internal standard.

    PubMed

    Varlet, V; Smith, F; de Froidmont, S; Dominguez, A; Rinaldi, A; Augsburger, M; Mangin, P; Grabherr, S

    2013-06-19

    A novel approach to measure carbon dioxide (CO2) in gaseous samples, based on a precise and accurate quantification by (13)CO2 internal standard generated in situ is presented. The main goal of this study was to provide an innovative headspace-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (HS-GC-MS) method applicable in the routine determination of CO2. The main drawback of the GC methods discussed in the literature for CO2 measurement is the lack of a specific internal standard necessary to perform quantification. CO2 measurement is still quantified by external calibration without taking into account analytical problems which can often occur considering gaseous samples. To avoid the manipulation of a stable isotope-labeled gas, we have chosen to generate in situ an internal labeled standard gas ((13)CO2) on the basis of the stoichiometric formation of CO2 by the reaction of hydrochloric acid (HCl) with sodium hydrogen carbonate (NaH(13)CO3). This method allows a precise measurement of CO2 concentration and was validated on various human postmortem gas samples in order to study its efficiency. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Internally heated membrane interfaced to a gas chromatography flame ionization detector.

    PubMed

    Kanu, A Bakarr; Thomas, C L P

    2013-07-15

    Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) mixtures in aqueous solutions have been investigated using a simple and efficient all-in-one on-line sampling, isolation, enrichment and pre-concentration internally heated membrane connected to a gas chromatography flame ionization detector (GC-FID). In our previous study with the internally heated membrane, no GC column was used in the instrument. In this new study, we introduce a GC column in the instrument design and this makes it possible for mixtures to be investigated. This new experimental design enabled high resolution separation of analyte mixtures capable of being adsorbed, diffused, and desorbed from the device for detection with an FID. With the new design we present data from investigation of competitive adsorption effects on the membrane. The data showed that analyte adsorption and diffusion onto the membrane can be affected when mixtures of analytes are introduced. The application of multiple linear regressions approach to the data enabled us to correct for the problem of competitive adsorption. Analyte adsorption and diffusion was affected by the diffusion coefficients of the analytes; the higher the diffusion coefficient the better the extraction from the membrane. Increasing the sampling time from 1 to 4 min increases the response by 77%. The sampling time responses were linear up to 4 min sampling time. Above 4 min sampling time, the data deviate from linearity. The effect of adding salt to standards has no effect on analyte absorption onto the membrane. The detection limits for key VOCs studied with an internal standard calibration ranged from 0.2 to 194 ng cm(-3).

  11. Rarefied gas dynamics; Proceedings of the Eighth International Symposium, Stanford University, Stanford, Calif., July 10-14, 1972

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karamcheti, K.

    1974-01-01

    Recent studies in the theory of rarefied gases (kinetic theory, shock structure, molecular forces and interactions, evaporation and condensation, expansions and jets, flow past bodies, gas-solid interactions) are presented along with descriptions of numerous experiments in these areas. Some of the topics covered include: singular limits of solutions of Boltzmann's equations, the Boltzmann and Klimontovich formalisms with reference to turbulent resolution, higher-order kinetic theory for the Lorentz gas, intermolecular potentials from shock structure experiments, cooling of particles in aerosol beams, hypersonic-subsonic transition in spherically symmetric expanding flows, absolute velocity measurements in a rarefied gas flow by an ion time-of-flight technique, the product distribution of gas-solid reactions from absolute rate theory, and relaxation of a gas with internal degrees of freedom. Individual items are announced in this issue.

  12. Gas

    MedlinePlus

    ... intestine. Certain foods may cause gas. Foods that produce gas in one person may not cause gas in another. You can reduce the amount of gas you have by Drinking lots of water and non-fizzy drinks Eating more slowly so you swallow less air ...

  13. Dorsal horn neurons firing at high frequency, but not primary afferents, release opioid peptides that produce μ-opioid receptor internalization in the rat spinal cord

    PubMed Central

    Song, Bingbing; Marvizón, Juan Carlos G.

    2008-01-01

    To determine what neural pathways trigger opioid release in the dorsal horn, we stimulated the dorsal root, the dorsal horn or the dorsolateral funiculus (DLF) in spinal cord slices, while superfusing them with peptidase inhibitors to prevent opioid degradation. Internalization of μ-opioid receptors (MORs) and neurokinin 1 receptors (NK1Rs) was measured to assess opioid and neurokinin release, respectively. Dorsal root stimulation at low, high or mixed frequencies produced abundant NK1R internalization but no MOR internalization, indicating that primary afferents do not release opioids. Moreover, capsaicin and NMDA also failed to produce MOR internalization. In contrast, dorsal horn stimulation elicited MOR internalization that increased with the frequency, being negligible at <10 Hz and maximal at 500 Hz. The internalization was abolished by the MOR antagonist CTAP, in the presence of low Ca2+, and by the Na+ channel blocker lidocaine, confirming that it was caused by opioid release and neuronal firing. DLF stimulation in “oblique” slices (encompassing the DLF and the dorsal horn of T11-L4) produced MOR internalization, but only in areas near the stimulation site. Moreover, cutting oblique slices across the dorsal horn (but not across the DLF) eliminated MOR internalization in areas distal to the cut, indicating that it was produced by signals traveling in the dorsal horn and not via the DLF. These findings demonstrate that some dorsal horn neurons release opioids when they fire at high frequencies, perhaps by integrating signals from the rostral ventromedial medulla, primary afferents and other areas of the spinal cord. PMID:14534251

  14. An experimental model of episodic gas release through fracture of fluid confined within a pressurized elastic reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocco, Stefano; Woods, Andrew W.; Harrington, Jon; Norris, Simon

    2017-01-01

    We present new experiments that identify a mechanism for episodic release of gas from a pressurized, deformable reservoir confined by a clay seal, as a result of the transition from bulk deformation to channel growth through the clay. Air is injected into the center of a thin cylindrical cell initially filled with a mixture of bentonite clay and water. For sufficiently dry mixtures, the pressure initially increases with little volume change. On reaching the yield stress of the clay-water mixture, the lid of the cell then deforms elastically and an air-filled void forms in the center of the cell as the clay is driven radially outward. With continued supply of air, the pressure continues to increase until reaching the fracture strength of the clay. A fracture-like channel then forms and migrates to the outer edge of the cell, enabling the air to escape. The pressure then falls, and the clay flows back toward the center of the cell and seals the channel so the cycle can repeat. The phenomena may be relevant at mud volcanoes.

  15. FEMAXI-V benchmarking study on peak temperature and fission gas release prediction of PWR rod fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suwardi, Dewayatna, W.; Briyatmoko, B.

    2012-06-01

    The present paper reports a study of FEMAXI-V code and related report on code benchmarking. Capabilities of the FEMAXI-V code to predict the thermal and fission gas release have been tested on MOX fuels in LWRs which has been done in SCK.CEN & Belgonucleaire by using PRIMO MOX rod BD8 irradiation experiment after V Sobolev as reported O. J. Ott [2]. Base irradiation in the BR3 reactor, the BD8 rod was transported to CEA-Saclay for irradiation in the OSIRIS reactor (ramp power excursion). The irradiation device used for the PRIMO ramps was the ISABELLE 1 loop, installed on a movable structure of the core periphery. The power variations were obtained by inwards/backwards movements of the loop in the core water. The preconditioning phase for rod BD8 occurred at a peak power level of 189 W/cm with a hold time of 27 hours. The subsequent power excursion rate amounted to 77 W/ (cm.min), reaching a terminal peak power level of 395 W/cm that lasted for 20 hours.

  16. FEMAXI-V benchmarking study on peak temperature and fission gas release prediction of PWR rod fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Suwardi; Dewayatna, W.; Briyatmoko, B.

    2012-06-06

    The present paper reports a study of FEMAXI-V code and related report on code benchmarking. Capabilities of the FEMAXI-V code to predict the thermal and fission gas release have been tested on MOX fuels in LWRs which has been done in SCK{center_dot}CEN and Belgonucleaire by using PRIMO MOX rod BD8 irradiation experiment after V Sobolev as reported O. J. Ott. Base irradiation in the BR3 reactor, the BD8 rod was transported to CEA-Saclay for irradiation in the OSIRIS reactor (ramp power excursion). The irradiation device used for the PRIMO ramps was the ISABELLE 1 loop, installed on a movable structure of the core periphery. The power variations were obtained by inwards/backwards movements of the loop in the core water. The preconditioning phase for rod BD8 occurred at a peak power level of 189 W/cm with a hold time of 27 hours. The subsequent power excursion rate amounted to 77 W/ (cm.min), reaching a terminal peak power level of 395 W/cm that lasted for 20 hours.

  17. Column density distribution and cosmological mass density of neutral gas: Sloan Digital Sky Survey-III Data Release 9

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noterdaeme, P.; Petitjean, P.; Carithers, W. C.; Pâris, I.; Font-Ribera, A.; Bailey, S.; Aubourg, E.; Bizyaev, D.; Ebelke, G.; Finley, H.; Ge, J.; Malanushenko, E.; Malanushenko, V.; Miralda-Escudé, J.; Myers, A. D.; Oravetz, D.; Pan, K.; Pieri, M. M.; Ross, N. P.; Schneider, D. P.; Simmons, A.; York, D. G.

    2012-11-01

    We present the first results from an ongoing survey for damped Lyman-α systems (DLAs) in the spectra of z > 2 quasars observed in the course of the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS), which is part of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) III. Our full (non-statistical) sample, based on Data Release 9, comprises 12 081 systems with log N(H i) ≥ 20, out of which 6839 have log N(H i) ≥ 20.3. This is the largest DLA sample ever compiled, superseding that from SDSS-II by a factor of seven. Using a statistical sub-sample and estimating systematics from realistic mock data, we probe the N(H i) distribution at ⟨z⟩ = 2.5. Contrary to what is generally believed, the distribution extends beyond 1022 cm-2 with a moderate slope of index ≈-3.5. This result matches the opacity-corrected distribution observed at z = 0 surprisingly well. The cosmological mass density of neutral gas in DLAs is found to be ωgdla ≈ 10-3, evolving only mildly over the past 12 billion years. Table 3 is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/547/L1

  18. Effect of release rate of the SF(6) tracer on methane emission estimates based on ruminal and breath gas samples.

    PubMed

    Martin, C; Koolaard, J; Rochette, Y; Clark, H; Jouany, J P; Pinares-Patiño, C S

    2012-03-01

    The release rate (RR) of sulphur hexafluoride (SF(6)) gas from permeation tube in the rumen appears to be positively related with methane (CH(4)) emissions calculated using the SF(6) tracer technique. Gas samples of breath and ruminal headspace were collected simultaneously in order to evaluate the hypothesis that transactions of SF(6) in the rumen are the source for this relationship. Six non-lactating dairy cows fitted with rumen cannulae were subdivided into two groups and randomly assigned to a two-period crossover design to permeation tubes with low RR (LRR = 1.577 mg/day) or two-times higher RR (HRR = 3.147 mg/day) RR. The cows were fed limited amounts of maize silage (80% ad libitum) split into two meals (40% at 0800 h and 60% at 1600 h). Each period consisted of 3-day gas sampling. Immediately before the morning feed and then each hour over 8 h, ruminal gas samples (50 ml) were withdrawn through the cannula fitted with stoppers to prevent opening. Simultaneously, 8-h integrated breath gas samples were collected over the same period. Ratios of concentration of CH(4)/SF(6), CO(2)/SF(6) and CO(2)/CH(4) and emission estimates of CH(4) and CO(2) were calculated for each sample source using the SF(6) tracer technique principles. The LRR treatment yielded higher (P < 0.001) ruminal CH(4)/SF(6) (by 1.79 times) and CO(2)/SF(6) (by 1.90 times) ratios than the HRR treatment; however, these differences were lower than the 2.0 times difference expected from the RR between the LRR and HRR. Consequently, the LRR treatment was associated with lower (P < 0.01) ruminal emissions of CH(4) over the 8-h collection period than with the HRR treatment (+11%), a difference also confirmed by the breath samples (+11%). RR treatments did not differ (P = 0.53) in ruminal or breath CO(2) emissions; however, our results confirm that the SF(6) tracer seems inappropriate for CO(2) emissions estimation in ruminants. Irrespective of the RR treatment, breath samples yielded 8% to 9% higher CH

  19. Measurements of gas sorption from seawater and the influence of gas release on open-cycle ocean thermal energy conversion (OC-OTEC) system performance

    SciTech Connect

    Penney, T R; Althof, J A

    1985-06-01

    The technical community has questioned the validity and cost-effectiveness of open-cycle ocean thermal energy conversion (OC-OTEC) systems because of the unknown effect of noncondensable gas on heat exchanger performance and the power needed to run vacuum equipment to remove this gas. To date, studies of seawater gas desorption have not been prototypical for system level analysis. This study gives preliminary gas desorption data on a vertical spout, direct contact evaporator and multiple condenser geometries. Results indicate that dissolved gas can be substantially removed before the seawater enters the heat exchange process, reducing the uncertainty and effect of inert gas on heat exchanger performance.

  20. SITE PROGRAM DEMONSTRATION ECO LOGIC INTERNATIONAL GAS-PHASE CHEMICAL REDUCTION PROCESS, BAY CITY, MICHIGAN TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The SITE Program funded a field demonstration to evaluate the Eco Logic Gas-Phase Chemical Reduction Process developed by ELI Eco Logic International Inc. (ELI), Ontario, Canada. The Demonstration took place at the Middleground Landfill in Bay City, Michigan using landfill wa...

  1. Controlled breeding and reproductive management in water buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis) using Eazi Breed controlled internal drug release.

    PubMed

    Hiremath, Shivayogi; Ramesha, Kerekoppa P

    2015-06-04

    Buffalo reproduction is considerably affected by late maturity, poor oestrus symptoms and long postpartum periods. This study was undertaken to evaluate the efficiency of Eazi Breed controlled internal drug release (CIDR), an intravaginal progesterone-releasing device, in relation to oestrus and fertility. Five hundred true anoestrus buffalo cows, in the age group 4-6 years in 10 villages of Dharwad district in Karnataka state in India, were randomly selected and treated with CIDR for 9 days. Two mL of Cidirol (1 mg oestradiol benzoate) was administered intramuscularly to all animals on day 10. Forty-two buffaloes (8.4%) that failed to show oestrus signs (1.6%) or showed weak signs of oestrus (6.8%) after the first treatment were treated again 72 h after the Cidriol injection with a new device, and inseminated after the expression of oestrus. After the second treatment all the animals showed oestrus signs. The percentage of buffaloes showing intense oestrus was 67.40%, intermediate oestrus was shown by 25.80%, whilst 6.80% buffaloes showed weak oestrus even after the second treatment. The buffaloes showing oestrus signs were inseminated twice with an interval of 12 h, starting 12 h after the start of the oestrus signs. In 86 buffaloes showing prolonged oestrus signs a third insemination was done. The conception rates were 85.16%, 60.47% and 44.11% respectively in buffaloes showing intense, intermediate and weak oestrus. Transrectal palpation of the genital tract was performed 45-60 days post-insemination to diagnose pregnancy status, and in doubtful cases pregnancy was reconfirmed at 90 days after insemination. Out of 500 buffaloes treated in this way 380 animals became pregnant and the pregnancy rate was 76%. This study revealed the usefulness of Eazi Breed CIDR along with Cidirol treatment in buffaloes to improve their reproductive performance.

  2. Certain hormonal profiles of postpartum anestrus jersey crossbred cows treated with controlled internal drug release and ovsynch protocol

    PubMed Central

    Jena, Dayanidhi; Das, S.; Patra, B. K.; Biswal, S. S.; Mohanty, D. N.; Samal, P.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The study was conducted to determine the serum levels of certain hormones in post-partum anestrus cows following treatment with controlled internal drug release (CIDR) and Ovsynch protocol. Materials and Methods: A total of 30 postpartum anestrus cows were divided into three equal groups after thorough gynecoclinical examination. The Group 1 animals received an intravaginal progesterone device on day 0 and 2 ml of prostaglandin F2α (PGF2α) on day of CIDR removal (7th day), Group 2 cows were treated with ovsynch protocol (gonadotropin-releasing hormone [GnRH]-PGF2α-GnRH) on day 0, 7 and 9, respectively, and Group 3 cows were supplemented with mineral mixture and treated as control. The serum estrogen, progesterone, triiodothyronine, and thyroxine concentration were estimated using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kit and absorbance was read at 450 nm with Perkin Elmer Wallac 1420 Microplate Reader. Results: There was a significant increase in progesterone level in Group 1 after withdrawal of CIDR as compared to other two groups. However, the estrogen assay revealed a greater concentration in Group 2 against Group 1 on day 7 of sampling. However, there was no significant difference for serum triiodothyronine (T3) and thyroxine (T4) irrespective of treatment protocols and days of sampling. Conclusion: Treatment with CIDR based progesterone therapy and drug combinations may affect the reproductive hormonal balance like estrogen and progesterone, which is inevitable for successful return to cyclicity and subsequent fertilization and conception. However, as far as serum T3 and T4 concentration concerned it may not give an astounding result. PMID:27847419

  3. The effect of water vapor on the release of fission gas from the fuel elements of high temperature, gas-cooled reactors: A preliminary assessment of experiments HRB-17, HFR-B1, HFR-K6 and KORA

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, B.F.

    1995-09-01

    The effect of water vapor on the release of fission gas from the fuel elements of high temperature, gas-cooled reactors has been measured in different laboratories under both irradiation and post irradiation conditions. The data from experiments HRB-17, HFR-B1, HFR-K6, and in the KORA facility are compared to assess their consistency and complimentarily. The experiments are consistent under comparable experimental conditions and reveal two general mechanisms involving exposed fuel kernels embedded in carbonaceous materials. One is manifest as a strong dependence of fission gas release on the partial pressure of water vapor below 1 kPa and the other, as a weak dependence above 1 kPa.

  4. A mathematical model for the release of noble gas and Cs from porous nuclear fuel based on VEGA 1&2 experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simones, M. P.; Reinig, M. L.; Loyalka, S. K.

    2014-05-01

    Release of fission products from nuclear fuel in accidents is an issue of major concern in nuclear reactor safety, and there is considerable room for development of improved models, supported by experiments, as one needs to understand and elucidate role of various phenomena and parameters. The VEGA (Verification Experiments of radionuclides Gas/Aerosol release) program on several irradiated nuclear fuels investigated the release rates of radionuclides and results demonstrated that the release rates of radionuclides from all nuclear fuels tested decreased with increasing external gas pressure surrounding the fuel. Hidaka et al. (2004-2011) accounted for this pressure effect by developing a 2-stage diffusion model describing the transport of radionuclides in porous nuclear fuel. We have extended this 2-stage diffusion model to account for mutual binary gas diffusion in the open pores as well as to introduce the appropriate parameters to cover the slip flow regime (0.01 ⩽ Kn ⩽ 0.1). While we have directed our numerical efforts toward the simulation of the VEGA experiments and assessments of differences from the results of Hidaka et al., the model and the techniques reported here are of larger interest as these would aid in modeling of diffusion in general (e.g. in graphite and other nuclear materials of interest).

  5. Noxious mechanical stimulation evokes the segmental release of opioid peptides that induce μ-opioid receptor internalization in the presence of peptidase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Lao, Lijun; Song, Bingbing; Chen, Wenling; Marvizón, Juan Carlos G.

    2008-01-01

    The internalization of μ-opioid receptors (MORs) provides an ideal way to locate areas of opioid peptide release. We used this method to study opioid release in the spinal cord evoked by noxious stimuli in anesthetized rats. Previous studies have shown that opioids released in the spinal cord produce MOR internalization only when they are protected from peptidase degradation. Accordingly, rats were implanted with chronic intrathecal catheters that were used to inject a mixture of peptidase inhibitors (amastatin, captopril and phosphoramidon) onto the lumbar spinal cord. Five minutes later, a noxious stimulus was delivered to the paw. Lumbar spinal segments were double-stained with antibodies against MORs and neurokinin 1 receptors (NK1Rs) using immunofluorescence. Mechanical stimulation of the hindpaw consisted of repeated 10 sec clamps with a hemostat for 10 min. In the ipsilateral dorsal horn, the stimulus produced abundant NK1R internalization in segments L3–L6, and a more modest but significant MOR internalization in segments L5 and L6. In the contralateral dorsal horn, NK1R was substantially lower and MOR internalization was negligible. The same mechanical stimulus applied to a forepaw did not produce NK1R or MOR internalization in the lumbar spinal cord. Thermal stimulation consisted of immersing a hindpaw in water at 52 °C for 2 min. It produced substantial NK1R internalization ipsilaterally in segment L6, but no MOR internalization. These results show that mechanical stimulation induces segmental opioid release, i.e., in the dorsal horn receiving the noxious signals and not in other spinal segments. PMID:18207137

  6. Greenhouse gas emissions and reactive nitrogen releases from rice production with simultaneous incorporation of wheat straw and nitrogen fertilizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Longlong; Xia, Yongqiu; Ma, Shutan; Wang, Jinyang; Wang, Shuwei; Zhou, Wei; Yan, Xiaoyuan

    2016-08-01

    Impacts of simultaneous inputs of crop straw and nitrogen (N) fertilizer on greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and N losses from rice production are not well understood. A 2-year field experiment was established in a rice-wheat cropping system in the Taihu Lake region (TLR) of China to evaluate the GHG intensity (GHGI) as well as reactive N intensity (NrI) of rice production with inputs of wheat straw and N fertilizer. The field experiment included five treatments of different N fertilization rates for rice production: 0 (RN0), 120 (RN120), 180 (RN180), 240 (RN240), and 300 kg N ha-1 (RN300, traditional N application rate in the TLR). Wheat straws were fully incorporated into soil before rice transplantation. The meta-analytic technique was employed to evaluate various Nr losses. Results showed that the response of rice yield to N rate successfully fitted a quadratic model, while N fertilization promoted Nr discharges exponentially (nitrous oxide emission, N leaching, and runoff) or linearly (ammonia volatilization). The GHGI of rice production ranged from 1.20 (RN240) to 1.61 kg CO2 equivalent (CO2 eq) kg-1 (RN0), while NrI varied from 2.14 (RN0) to 10.92 g N kg-1 (RN300). Methane (CH4) emission dominated the GHGI with a proportion of 70.2-88.6 % due to direct straw incorporation, while ammonia (NH3) volatilization dominated the NrI with proportion of 53.5-57.4 %. Damage costs to environment incurred by GHG and Nr releases from current rice production (RN300) accounted for 8.8 and 4.9 % of farmers' incomes, respectively. Cutting N application rate from 300 (traditional N rate) to 240 kg N ha-1 could improve rice yield and nitrogen use efficiency by 2.14 and 10.30 %, respectively, while simultaneously reducing GHGI by 13 %, NrI by 23 %, and total environmental costs by 16 %. Moreover, the reduction of 60 kg N ha-1 improved farmers' income by CNY 639 ha-1, which would provide them with an incentive to change the current N application rate. Our study suggests that GHG

  7. Solutions for VOC and HAPS control on natural gas fired internal combustion engines

    SciTech Connect

    Marcus, J.Z.; Sleigh, S.; Cotherman, R.

    1996-12-31

    Natural gas fired stationary internal combustion engines (IC engines) emit volatile organic compounds (VOC) and hazardous air pollutants (HAP) as part of their normal operations. VOC and HAP emissions are coming under increased scrutiny with the advent of such Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 regulations as Title I`s Reasonably Available Control Technology (RACT), Title III`s Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) and Title V`s Operating Permit Program (Title V). In addition, many states are imposing more stringent emission limits on these sources. These emissions may also contribute to the reportable chemicals from the total facility under SARA Title III. Numerous facilities nationwide are interested in reducing these emissions in order to comply with current requirements, to opt out of requirements or to reduce reportable chemicals. This paper will examine the source of these emissions, and discuss combustion control technologies and system operating flexibility, end-of-pipe control technologies, and system tuning opportunities which have the potential to reduce VOC and HAP emissions from IC engines. Data will be presented on potential emission reduction efficiencies achievable using the various control options. 7 refs., 4 tabs.

  8. Dynamics of pulsed expansion of polyatomic gas cloud: Internal-translational energy transfer contribution

    SciTech Connect

    Morozov, A. A.

    2007-08-15

    Polyatomic gas cloud expansion under pulsed laser evaporation is studied on the basis of one-dimensional direct Monte Carlo simulation. The effect of rotational-translational (RT) and vibrational-translational (VT) energy transfer on dynamics of the cloud expansion is considered. Efficiency of VT energy transfer dependence on the amount of evaporated matter is discussed. To analyze VT energy transfer impact, the number of collisions per molecule during the expansion is calculated. The data are generally in good agreement with available analytical and numerical predictions. Dependencies of the effective number of vibrational degrees of freedom on the number of vibrationally inelastic collisions are obtained and generalized. The importance of the consideration of energy transfer from the internal degrees of freedom to the translational ones is illustrated by an example of pulsed laser evaporation of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE). Based on the obtained regularities, analysis of experimental data on pulsed laser evaporation of aniline is performed. The calculated aniline vibrational temperature correlates well with the experimentally measured one.

  9. The Nickel Assisted Decomposition of Pentanal in the Gas Phase at Various Internal Energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansell, Adam; Bellert, Darrin

    2014-06-01

    The rate constants for the dissociation of Ni+Pentanal at various internal energies (15000 cm-1-18800 cm-1) were measured using a custom time of flight instrument. Clusters are generated in a large source chamber by ablating the surface of a rotating nickel rod with an excimer and entraining the ablated metal atoms in a helium gas plume slightly doped with pentanal vapor. The molecular beam enters a Wiley-Mclaren type acceleration grid, and cations are accelerated along a 1.8 meter long time-of-flight mass spectrometer (TOFMS). At the other end of the TOF is a sector and a detector. The sector allows ions of a particular kinetic energy through to the detector. If an ion breaks apart in the time it takes to reach the sector, the mass (and therefore kinetic energy) is reduced, and the sector can be set to allow these fragment ions to reach the detector (fig 2). In our experiment, the energy required to initiate the breakdown is provided by a laser pulse between 15000 cm-1 and 18800 cm-1.

  10. Evolution of the cosmological mass density of neutral gas from Sloan Digital Sky Survey II - Data Release 7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noterdaeme, P.; Petitjean, P.; Ledoux, C.; Srianand, R.

    2009-10-01

    We present the results of a search for damped Lyman-α (DLA) systems in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey II (SDSS), Data Release 7. We use a fully automatic procedure to identify DLAs and derive their column densities. The procedure is checked against the results of previous searches for DLAs in SDSS. We discuss the agreements and differences and show the robustness of our procedure. For each system, we obtain an accurate measurement of the absorber's redshift, the H I column density and the equivalent width of associated metal absorption lines, without any human intervention. We find 1426 absorbers with 2.15 < z < 5.2 with log N(H I) ≥ 20, out of which 937 systems have log N(H I) ≥ 20.3. This is the largest DLA sample ever built, made available to the scientific community through the electronic version of this paper. In the course of the survey, we discovered the intervening DLA with highest H I column density known to date with log N(H I) = 22.0±0.1. This single system provides a strong constraint on the high-end of the N(H I) frequency distribution now measured with high accuracy. We show that the presence of a DLA at the blue end of a QSO spectrum can lead to important systematic errors and propose a method to avoid them. This has important consequences for the measurement of the cosmological mass density of neutral gas at z ~ 2.2 and therefore on our understanding of galaxy evolution over the past 10 billion years. We find a significant decrease of the cosmological mass density of neutral gas in DLAs, Ω_g^DLA, from z = 4 to z = 2.2, consistent with the result of previous SDSS studies. However, and contrary to other SDSS studies, we find that Ω_g^DLA(z = 2.2) is about twice the value at z = 0. This implies that Ω_g^DLA keeps decreasing at z < 2.2. Catalog is only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/505/1087

  11. Greenhouse gas fluxes and NO release from a Chinese subtropical rice-winter wheat rotation system under nitrogen fertilizer management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Zhisheng; Zheng, Xunhua; Wang, Rui; Dong, Haibo; Xie, Baohua; Mei, Baoling; Zhou, Zaixing; Zhu, Jianguo

    2013-06-01

    synthetic nitrogen fertilizers play an important role in increasing cereal grain yields, there have been increased concerns about their intensive utilization and environmental consequences. The overall goal of this study is to gain an insight into the integrated evaluation of greenhouse gas emission and nitric oxide (NO) release and grain yield as affected by nitrogen fertilization in a subtropical rice-wheat rotation system. The assessment was based on four consecutive yearly measurements of the fluxes of methane (CH4), nitrous oxide (N2O) and ecosystem respiration (CO2), and the simultaneous observation of NO emissions in nonrice seasons under three fertilization practices (i.e., the conventional farmers' practice with common nitrogen application rate, an alternative practice with reduced nitrogen input, and no nitrogen application as a control). Clearly, these trace gas fluxes showed largely intra-annual and interannual variations, highlighting the importance of entire year measurement for multiple years to achieve representative annual estimates. The annual mean CH4 fluxes varied from 95 kg C ha-1 (7.8 kg C t-1 grain) for the farmers' practice to 205 kg C ha-1 (25.7 kg C t-1 grain) for the control, indicating that nitrogen fertilization inhibited CH4 emissions. Across all the years, the annual N2O emissions increased exponentially with an increasing nitrogen rate and harvested aboveground biomass. The annual N2O emission averaged 1.3-5.3 kg N ha-1(159-444 g N t-1 grain) for all treatments. The annual direct emission factors of N2O-N tended to increase with increasing nitrogen rate and averaged 0.61% and 0.85% for the alternative and farmers' practices, respectively. Over all nonrice seasons, the seasonal mean NO emissions ranged from 0.15 to 1.4 kg N ha-1(58-253 g N t-1 grain), and were equivalent to 0.43% to 0.54% of the applied nitrogen. Averaging across the 4 years, the annual aggregate emissions of CH4 and N2O were 7.4 t CO2-eq ha-1(928 kg CO2-eq t-1grain

  12. Mechanisms of gas bubble retention and release: results for Hanford Waste Tanks 241-S-102 and 241-SY-103 and single-shell tank simulants

    SciTech Connect

    Gauglitz, P.A.; Rassat, S.D.; Bredt, P.R.; Konynenbelt, J.H.; Tingey, S.M.; Mendoza, D.P.

    1996-09-01

    Research at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has probed the physical mechanisms and waste properties that contribute to the retention and release of flammable gases from radioactive waste stored in underground tanks at Hanford. This study was conducted for Westinghouse Hanford Company as part of the PNNL Flammable Gas Project. The wastes contained in the tanks are mixes of radioactive and chemical products, and some of these wastes are known to generate mixtures of flammable gases, including hydrogen, nitrous oxide, and ammonia. Because these gases are flammable, their retention and episodic release pose a number of safety concerns.

  13. Mechanisms of gas retention and release: Experimental results for Hanford single-shell waste tanks 241-A-101, 241-S-106, and 241-U-103

    SciTech Connect

    Rassat, S.D.; Caley, S.M.; Bredt, P.R.; Gauglitz, P.A.; Rinehart, D.E.; Forbes, S.V.

    1998-09-01

    The 177 underground waste storage tanks at the Hanford Site contain millions of gallons of radioactive waste resulting from the purification of nuclear materials and related processes. Through various mechanisms, flammable gas mixtures of hydrogen, ammonia, methane, and nitrous oxide are generated and retained in significant quantities within the waste in many ({approximately}25) of these tanks. The potential for large releases of retained gas from these wastes creates a flammability hazard. It is a critical component of the effort to understand the flammability hazard and a primary goal of this laboratory investigation to establish an understanding of the mechanisms of gas retention and release in these wastes. The results of bubble retention experimental studies using waste samples from several waste tanks and a variety of waste types support resolution of the Flammable Gas Safety Issue. Gas bubble retention information gained in the pursuit of safe storage will, in turn, benefit future waste operations including salt-well pumping, waste transfers, and sluicing/retrieval.

  14. Radiation-induced insulator discharge pulses in the CRRES Internal Discharge Monitor satellite experiment. [Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frederickson, A. R.; Mullen, E. G.; Brautigam, D. H.; Kerns, K. J.; Robinson, P. A., Jr.; Holman, E. G.

    1991-01-01

    The Internal Discharge Monitor (IDM) is designed to observe electrical pulses from common electrical insulators in space service. The IDM is flying on the Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite (CRRES). The sixteen insulator samples include G10 circuit boards, FR4 and PTFE fiberglass circuit boards, FEP Teflon, alumina, and wires with common insulations. The samples are fully enclosed, mutually isolated, and space radiation penetrates 0.02 cm of aluminum before striking the samples. The IDM results indicate the rate at which insulator pulses occur. Pulsing began on the seventh orbit. The maximum pulse rate occurred near orbit 600 when over 50 pulses occurred. The average pulse rate is approximately two per orbit, but nearly half of the first 600 orbits experienced no pulses. The pulse rate per unit flux of high energy electrons has not changed dramatically over the first ten months in space. These pulse rates are in agreement with laboratory experience on shorter time scales. Several of the samples have never pulsed. IDM pulses are the seeds of larger satellite electrical anomalies. The pulse rates are compared with space radiation intensities, L shell location, and spectral distributions from the radiation spectrometers on CRRES.

  15. Seventh international conference on liquefied natural gas. Volume 2. Septieme congres international sur le gaz naturel liquefie. Tome 2

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-01-01

    Four sessions of the conference included: (1) LNG and world wide energy supplies; (2) liquefaction of natural gas and vaporization of LNG; (3) LNG transport, handling and storage; and (4) legal, economic and financial aspects of LNG trade. This volume contains sessions three and four. Individual papers were abstracted separately. (DP)

  16. Seventh international conference on liquefied natural gas. Volume 1. Septieme Congres international sur le gaz naturel liquefie. Tome 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-01-01

    Four sessions of the conference included: (1) LNG and woroldwide energy supplies; (2) liquefaction of natural gas and vaporization of LNG; (3) LNG transport, handling and storage; and (4) legal, economic and financial aspects of LNG trade. Two volumes were published. This volume contains the sessions one and two. Separate abstracts were prepared for individual papers. (DP)

  17. Gas release of the dielectric coating of an anode and its effect on the characteristics of an ion diode with electron flux insulation by a radial magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopatin, V. S.; Stepanov, A. V.; Remnev, G. E.; Shamanin, V. I.; Veresov, A. E.

    2017-01-01

    Generation of an ion beam by an ion diode is accompanied by the release of gas from the surface of the dielectric coating of the anode. The magnitude of the pulse pressure of gas in the vacuum chamber depends on the type of the dielectric used and can reach 6 × 10-4-2 × 10-3 mm Hg. The magnitude of the limit vacuum chamber pressure at which ion beam parameters remain constant has been found. Characteristics of the ion beam current in the vacuum chamber pressure range of 2 × 10-4-1.3 × 10-3 mm Hg are presented.

  18. Radiologic comparison of posterior release, internal distraction, final PSO and spinal fusion with one-stage posterior vertebral column resection for multi-level severe congenital scoliosis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shichang; Zhang, Nannan; Song, Yueming; Song, Zongrang; Zhang, Liping; Liu, Jijun; Xie, En; Wu, Qining; Hao, Dingjun

    2017-06-20

    To compare radiologic results of posterior release, internal distraction, and final pedicle subtraction osteotomy (PSO) and spinal fusionwith one-stage posterior vertebral column resection (PVCR) in treating multi-level severe congenital scoliosis. Forty-onesevere congenital scoliosis patients were used in the study. Group A comprised 24 patients who underwent one-stage PVCR. Group B comprised 17 patients who underwent posterior release with internal distraction, followed by final posterior fusion and instrumentation. The average preoperative main curve was 110.4° (95-130°) in group A and 109.4° (range 90°-126°) in group B. Postoperative follow-up time was ≥2 years (2.0-4.5 years) to analyze the radiographic and clinical outcomes. A comparison of posterior release, internal distraction, and final spinal fusion with PVCR showed no significant differences in postoperative main curve and compensatory caudal curve correction, coronal and sagittal imbalance. However, significant differences were found between the 2 groups in compensatory cranial curve correction. Posterior release, internal distraction, and final spinal fusion produce better corrective results in compensatory cranial curve correction than PVCR in treating severe multi-level congenital scoliosis.

  19. The effects of internal and receptor pH on the rate of drug release from water-in-oil emulsions.

    PubMed

    Fujihira, Atsushi; Shimizu, Nobuaki

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated the effects of internal phase and receptor solution pH on the rate of drug release from water-in-oil emulsions using methylene blue as a model drug. The water-in-oil emulsions were prepared using an aqueous solution of methylene blue, squalene, and a non-ionic-lipophilic surfactant. The methylene blue release rate was strongly dependent on both internal phase and receptor solution pH. Methylene blue dissolved in squalene in the presence of a surfactant. The water-squalene distribution of methylene blue changed with pH, whereas its ionic state did not. The pH dependence of the methylene blue release rate may have been due to this distribution change. We also investigated the pH dependence in terms of the mobility of water molecules using time-domain NMR. The mobility of water in water-in-oil emulsions was also dependent on the internal phase pH. Water-in-oil emulsions that showed high water mobility also released drug more rapidly. These results suggest that methylene blue is released from the water-in-oil emulsion through a reverse micelle mechanism. Methylene blue moves from the internal phase to a soluble reverse micelle of the surfactant, diffuses through the oil phase within this reverse micelle, and is transferred to the receptor solution. It appeared that the reverse micelles could diffuse in oil more freely than water droplets of the water-in-oil emulsion because the micelles were much smaller than the droplets. We found that the drug release rate from a water-in-oil emulsion comprising squalene and a non-ionic surfactant could be controlled by pH optimization.

  20. Prediction of Peak Hydrogen Concentrations for Deep Sludge Retrieval in Tanks AN-101 and AN-106 from Historical Data of Spontaneous Gas Release Events

    SciTech Connect

    Wells, Beric E.; Cooley, Scott K.; Meacham, Joseph E.

    2013-10-21

    Radioactive and chemical wastes from nuclear fuel processing are stored in large underground storage tanks at the Hanford Site. The Tank Operations Contractor is continuing a program of moving solid wastes from single-shell tanks (SSTs) to double-shell tanks (DSTs) and preparing for waste feed delivery (WFD). A new mechanism for a large spontaneous gas release event (GRE) in deep sludge sediments has been postulated. The creation of this potential new GRE hazard, deep sludge gas release events (DSGREs), is the retrieval of sludge waste into a single DST that results in a sediment depth greater than operating experience has demonstrated is safe. The Tank Operations Contractor program of moving solid wastes from SSTs to DSTs and preparing for WFD is being negatively impacted by this sediment depth limit.

  1. Controlled release of encapsulated bioactive volatiles by rupture of the capsule wall through the light-induced generation of a gas.

    PubMed

    Paret, Nicolas; Trachsel, Alain; Berthier, Damien L; Herrmann, Andreas

    2015-02-09

    The encapsulation of photolabile 2-oxoacetates in core-shell microcapsules allows the light-induced, controlled release of bioactive compounds. On irradiation with UVA light these compounds degrade to generate an overpressure of gas inside the capsules, which expands or breaks the capsule wall. Headspace measurements confirmed the light-induced formation of CO and CO2 and the successful release of the bioactive compound, while optical microscopy demonstrated the formation of gas bubbles, the cleavage of the capsule wall, and the leakage of the oil phase out of the capsule. The efficiency of the delivery system depends on the structure of the 2-oxoacetate, the quantity used with respect to the thickness of the capsule wall, and the intensity of the irradiating UVA light. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. A safety assessment for proposed pump mixing operations to mitigate episodic gas releases in tank 241-SY-101: Hanford Site,Richland, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Lentsch, J.W.

    1996-07-01

    This safety assessment addresses each of the elements required for the proposed action to remove a slurry distributor and to install, operate, and remove a mixing pump in Tank 241-SY-101,which is located within the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington.The proposed action is required as part of an ongoing evaluation of various mitigation concepts developed to eliminate episodic gas releases that result in hydrogen concentrations in the tank dome space that exceed the lower flammability limit.

  3. Safety assessment for proposed pump mixing operations to mitigate episodic gas releases in tank 241-101-SY: Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Lentsch, J.W., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-05-16

    This safety assessment addresses each of the elements required for the proposed action to remove a slurry distributor and to install, operate, and remove a mixing pump in Tank 241-SY-101, which is located within the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington. The proposed action is required as part of an ongoing evaluation of various mitigation concepts developed to eliminate episodic gas releases that result in hydrogen concentrations in the tank dome space that exceed the lower flammability limit.

  4. Comparing PAH availability from manufactured gas plant soils and sediments with chemical and biological tests. 1. PAH release during water desorption and supercritical carbon dioxide extraction.

    PubMed

    Hawthorne, Steven B; Poppendieck, Dustin G; Grabanski, Carol B; Loehr, Raymond C

    2002-11-15

    Soil and sediment samples from oil gas (OG) and coal gas (CG) manufactured gas plant (MGP) sites were selected to represent a range of PAH concentrations (150-40,000 mg/kg) and sample matrix compositions. Samples varied from vegetated soils to lampblack soot and had carbon contents from 3 to 87 wt %. SFE desorption (120 min) and water/XAD2 desorption (120 days) curves were determined and fit with a simple two-site model to determine the rapid-released fraction (F) for PAHs ranging from naphthalene to benzo[ghi]perylene. F values varied greatly among the samples, from ca. 10% to >90% for the two- and three-ring PAHs and from <1% to ca. 50% for the five- and six-ring PAHs. Release rates did not correlate with sample matrix characteristics including PAH concentrations, elemental composition (C, H, N, S), or "hard" and "softs" organic carbon, indicating that PAH release cannot easily be estimated on the basis of sample matrix composition. Fvalues for CG site samples obtained with SFE and water desorption agreed well (linear correlation coefficient, r2 = 0.87, slope = 0.93), but SFE yielded higher F values for the OG samples. These behaviors were attributed to the stronger ability of carbon dioxide than water to desorb PAHs from the highly aromatic (hard) carbon of the OG matrixes, while carbon dioxide and water showed similar abilities to desorb PAHs from the more polar (soft) carbon of the CG samples. The combined SFE and water desorption approaches should improve the understanding of PAH sequestration and release from contaminated soils and sediments and provide the basis for subsequent studies using the same samples to compare PAH release with PAH availability to earthworms.

  5. Overview of the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment III (SAGE III) on the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flittner, David; Pitts, Michael; Zawodny, Joe; Hill, Charles; Damadeo, Robert; Moore, Randy; Cisewski, Michael

    2012-07-01

    The Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) III is the fourth generation of solar occultation instruments operated by NASA, the first coming under a different acronym, to investigate the Earth's upper atmosphere. Three flight-ready SAGE III instruments were built by Ball Aerospace in the late 1990s, with one launched aboard the former Russian Avaiation and Space Agency (now known as Roskosmos) Meteor-3M (M3M) platform on 10 December 2001 (continuing until the platform lost power in 2006). Another of the original instruments was manifested for the International Space Station (ISS) in the 2004 time frame, but was delayed because of budgetary considerations. Fortunately, that SAGE III/ISS mission was restarted in 2009 with a major focus upon filling an anticipated gap in ozone and aerosol observations in the second half of this decade. This exciting mission utilizes contributions from both the Science Mission Directorate and the Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate within the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and the European Space Agency to enable scientific measurements that will provide the basis for the analysis of five of the nine critical constituents identified in the U.S. National Plan for Stratospheric Monitoring. A related paper by Anderson et al. discusses the. Presented here is an overview of the mission architecture, its implementation and the data that will be produced by SAGE III/ISS, including their expected accuracy and coverage. The 52-degree inclined orbit of the ISS is well-suited for solar occultation and provides near-global observations on a monthly basis with excellent coverage of low and mid-latitudes. This is similar to that of the SAGE II mission (1985-2005), whose data set has served the international atmospheric science community as a standard for stratospheric ozone and aerosol measurements. The nominal science products include vertical profiles of trace gases, such as ozone, nitrogen dioxide and water

  6. Spectroscopy of low-energy atoms released from a solid noble-gas matrix: Proposal for a trap-loading technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambo, R.; Rodegheri, C. C.; Silveira, D. M.; Cesar, C. L.

    2007-12-01

    We have studied the velocity distribution of chromium atoms released from a solid neon matrix at cryogenic temperatures via Doppler spectroscopy. The Ne matrix is grown by directing a small flux of gas onto a cold substrate, while Cr atoms are simultaneously implanted by laser ablation, with the resultant plume directed toward the growing matrix. The atoms are then released by a heat pulse. We have observed neutral Cr atoms at temperatures around 13K with densities close to 1012cm-3 . The released atoms have a large initial drift velocity, explained by simple kinetic theory arguments, due to the light species’ drag force. The scheme could be adapted to produce cryogenic beams of atoms, molecules, and possibly ions, for collisional studies and spectroscopy. However, our main motivation was the construction of a hydrogen trap, and here we discuss the prospects and problems of using this technique for this purpose.

  7. Spectroscopy of low-energy atoms released from a solid noble-gas matrix: Proposal for a trap-loading technique

    SciTech Connect

    Lambo, R.; Rodegheri, C. C.; Silveira, D. M.; Cesar, C. L.

    2007-12-15

    We have studied the velocity distribution of chromium atoms released from a solid neon matrix at cryogenic temperatures via Doppler spectroscopy. The Ne matrix is grown by directing a small flux of gas onto a cold substrate, while Cr atoms are simultaneously implanted by laser ablation, with the resultant plume directed toward the growing matrix. The atoms are then released by a heat pulse. We have observed neutral Cr atoms at temperatures around 13 K with densities close to 10{sup 12} cm{sup -3}. The released atoms have a large initial drift velocity, explained by simple kinetic theory arguments, due to the light species' drag force. The scheme could be adapted to produce cryogenic beams of atoms, molecules, and possibly ions, for collisional studies and spectroscopy. However, our main motivation was the construction of a hydrogen trap, and here we discuss the prospects and problems of using this technique for this purpose.

  8. Historical Doses from Tritiated Water and Tritiated Hydrogen Gas Relesed to the Atmosphere from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Part 1. Description of Tritium Dose Model (DCART) for Chronic Releases from LLNL

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, S

    2004-06-30

    DCART (Doses from Chronic Atmospheric Releases of Tritium) is a spreadsheet model developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) that calculates doses from inhalation of tritiated hydrogen gas (HT), inhalation and skin absorption of tritiated water (HTO), and ingestion of HTO and organically bound tritium (OBT) to adult, child (age 10), and infant (age 6 months to 1 year) from routine atmospheric releases of HT and HTO. DCART is a deterministic model that, when coupled to the risk assessment software Crystal Ball{reg_sign}, predicts doses with a 95th percentile confidence interval. The equations used by DCART are described and all distributions on parameter values are presented. DCART has been tested against the results of other models and several sets of observations in the Tritium Working Group of the International Atomic Energy Agency's Biosphere Modeling and Assessment Programme. The version of DCART described here has been modified to include parameter values and distributions specific to conditions at LLNL. In future work, DCART will be used to reconstruct dose to the hypothetical maximally exposed individual from annual routine releases of HTO and HT from all LLNL facilities and from the Sandia National Laboratory's Tritium Research Laboratory over the last fifty years.

  9. The Benefits of Internalizing Air Quality and Greenhouse Gas Externalities in the US Energy System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Kristen E.

    The emission of pollutants from energy use has effects on both local air quality and the global climate, but the price of energy does not reflect these externalities. This study aims to analyze the effect that internalizing these externalities in the cost of energy would have on the US energy system, emissions, and human health. In this study, we model different policy scenarios in which fees are added to emissions related to generation and use of energy. The fees are based on values of damages estimated in the literature and are applied to upstream and combustion emissions related to electricity generation, industrial energy use, transportation energy use, residential energy use, and commercial energy use. The energy sources and emissions are modeled through 2055 in five-year time steps. The emissions in 2045 are incorporated into a continental-scale atmospheric chemistry and transport model, CMAQ, to determine the change in air quality due to different emissions reduction scenarios. A benefit analysis tool, BenMAP, is used with the air quality results to determine the monetary benefit of emissions reductions related to the improved air quality. We apply fees to emissions associated with health impacts, climate change, and a combination of both. We find that the fees we consider lead to reductions in targeted emissions as well as co-reducing non-targeted emissions. For fees on the electric sector alone, health impacting pollutant (HIP) emissions reductions are achieved mainly through control devices while Greenhouse Gas (GHG) fees are addressed through changes in generation technologies. When sector specific fees are added, reductions come mainly from the industrial and electricity generation sectors, and are achieved through a mix of energy efficiency, increased use of renewables, and control devices. Air quality is improved in almost all areas of the country with fees, including when only GHG fees are applied. Air quality tends to improve more in regions with

  10. Imaging endogenous opioid peptide release with [11C]carfentanil and [3H]diprenorphine: influence of agonist-induced internalization.

    PubMed

    Quelch, Darren R; Katsouri, Loukia; Nutt, David J; Parker, Christine A; Tyacke, Robin J

    2014-10-01

    Understanding the cellular processes underpinning the changes in binding observed during positron emission tomography neurotransmitter release studies may aid translation of these methodologies to other neurotransmitter systems. We compared the sensitivities of opioid receptor radioligands, carfentanil, and diprenorphine, to amphetamine-induced endogenous opioid peptide (EOP) release and methadone administration in the rat. We also investigated whether agonist-induced internalization was involved in reductions in observed binding using subcellular fractionation and confocal microscopy. After radioligand administration, significant reductions in [(11)C]carfentanil, but not [(3)H]diprenorphine, uptake were observed after methadone and amphetamine pretreatment. Subcellular fractionation and in vitro radioligand binding studies showed that amphetamine pretreatment only decreased total [(11)C]carfentanil binding. In vitro saturation binding studies conducted in buffers representative of the internalization pathway suggested that μ-receptors are significantly less able to bind the radioligands in endosomal compared with extracellular compartments. Finally, a significant increase in μ-receptor-early endosome co-localization in the hypothalamus was observed after amphetamine and methadone treatment using double-labeling confocal microscopy, with no changes in δ- or κ-receptor co-localization. These data indicate carfentanil may be superior to diprenorphine when imaging EOP release in vivo, and that alterations in the ability to bind internalized receptors may be a predictor of ligand sensitivity to endogenous neurotransmitter release.

  11. Imaging endogenous opioid peptide release with [11C]carfentanil and [3H]diprenorphine: influence of agonist-induced internalization

    PubMed Central

    Quelch, Darren R; Katsouri, Loukia; Nutt, David J; Parker, Christine A; Tyacke, Robin J

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the cellular processes underpinning the changes in binding observed during positron emission tomography neurotransmitter release studies may aid translation of these methodologies to other neurotransmitter systems. We compared the sensitivities of opioid receptor radioligands, carfentanil, and diprenorphine, to amphetamine-induced endogenous opioid peptide (EOP) release and methadone administration in the rat. We also investigated whether agonist-induced internalization was involved in reductions in observed binding using subcellular fractionation and confocal microscopy. After radioligand administration, significant reductions in [11C]carfentanil, but not [3H]diprenorphine, uptake were observed after methadone and amphetamine pretreatment. Subcellular fractionation and in vitro radioligand binding studies showed that amphetamine pretreatment only decreased total [11C]carfentanil binding. In vitro saturation binding studies conducted in buffers representative of the internalization pathway suggested that μ-receptors are significantly less able to bind the radioligands in endosomal compared with extracellular compartments. Finally, a significant increase in μ-receptor-early endosome co-localization in the hypothalamus was observed after amphetamine and methadone treatment using double-labeling confocal microscopy, with no changes in δ- or κ-receptor co-localization. These data indicate carfentanil may be superior to diprenorphine when imaging EOP release in vivo, and that alterations in the ability to bind internalized receptors may be a predictor of ligand sensitivity to endogenous neurotransmitter release. PMID:25005876

  12. Heat transfer technology for internal passages of air-cooled blades for heavy-duty gas turbines.

    PubMed

    Weigand, B; Semmler, K; von Wolfersdorf, J

    2001-05-01

    The present review paper, although far from being complete, aims to give an overview about the present state of the art in the field of heat transfer technology for internal cooling of gas turbine blades. After showing some typical modern cooled blades, the different methods to enhance heat transfer in the internal passages of air-cooled blades are discussed. The complicated flows occurring in bends are described in detail, because of their increasing importance for modern cooling designs. A short review about testing of cooling design elements is given, showing the interaction of the different cooling features as well. The special focus of the present review has been put on the cooling of blades for heavy-duty gas turbines, which show several differences compared to aero-engine blades.

  13. Ion transport membrane module and vessel system with directed internal gas flow

    DOEpatents

    Holmes, Michael Jerome; Ohrn, Theodore R.; Chen, Christopher Ming-Poh

    2010-02-09

    An ion transport membrane system comprising (a) a pressure vessel having an interior, an inlet adapted to introduce gas into the interior of the vessel, an outlet adapted to withdraw gas from the interior of the vessel, and an axis; (b) a plurality of planar ion transport membrane modules disposed in the interior of the pressure vessel and arranged in series, each membrane module comprising mixed metal oxide ceramic material and having an interior region and an exterior region; and (c) one or more gas flow control partitions disposed in the interior of the pressure vessel and adapted to change a direction of gas flow within the vessel.

  14. The Siberian Traps and the end-Permian event: Geology, geochemistry and atmospheric modeling of gas release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svensen, Henrik; Stordal, Frode; Roscher, Marco; Sokalska, Ewa; Planke, Sverre

    2013-04-01

    The Siberian Traps were emplaces through sedimentary basins covering the Siberian Craton, passing thick accumulations of carbonates and evaporites. Contact metamorphism of the sedimentary rocks around dolerite sills and dikes generated greenhouse gases and halocarbons to such an extent that the process could be responsible for both the end-Permian carbon isotope excursion and the mass extinction. The key processes are suggested to be 1) metamorphism of oil-saturated rock salt sequences (halocarbon production), 2) methane generation from metamorphism of organic-rich shales (methane production), and 3) decarbonation of dolostones (carbon dioxide production). We have analyzed the petrography and geochemistry (including carbon isotopes) of contact metamorphic carbonates from outcrops, and can document the devolatilization processes. In addition, we have explored the potential global warming effects of CO2 and CH4 emissions to the end-Permian atmosphere from the volatile generation. We have constrained the effect of century scale degassing events using the atmospheric lifetime of CH4 and CO2, the pre-event atmospheric composition in terms of methane and carbon-dioxide as well as H2S, the gas flux to the atmosphere, the IR absorption efficiency, the radiative forcing and the climate sensitivity. Assuming rapid emplacement of one single major sill intrusion into the Tunguska Basin, and 100 year gas release with 60% CH4 and 40% CO2, the global annual mean temperature could rise by 2-5°C (best estimate ~3.5°C). In contrast, degassing from subaerial lava flows with the same magma volume as a sill has one order of magnitude lower influence on the global climate, resulting in a warming of about 0.1°C. Per molecule CH4 is much more efficient in absorbing and re-emitting IR radiation than CO2, yielding a much stronger greenhouse effect in the Earth's atmosphere. Considering that the heat trapped in the atmosphere over a 100 year period resulting from an emission of CH4 is

  15. Case report: automated machine checkout leaves an internal gas leak undetected: the need for complete checkout procedures.

    PubMed

    Eng, Timothy S; Durieux, Marcel E

    2012-01-01

    We report a complete internal fresh gas flow disconnect within a Dräger Fabius GS anesthesia machine without any alarms being triggered. This was undetected primarily because of an incomplete machine checkout in which the step of ensuring proper gas flows by using a "test lung" was omitted. Machine-specific factors, however, also contributed to prevent diagnosis: (1) the machine passed its leak test because the flowmeter bobbin (i.e., floating ball) sealed the flowmeter when back pressure was applied; (2) the mechanical ventilator entrains room air, thus functioning in the absence of fresh gas flow; and (3) the electronic flow sensors functioned "appropriately" because the leak was downstream. Despite the advent of highly automated machines, manual checkout procedures remain crucial to minimizing undiagnosed failures.

  16. DEMONSTRATION BULLETIN: GAS-PHASE CHEMICAL REDUCTION - ECO LOGIC INTERNATIONAL, INC.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The patented Eco Logic Process employs a gas-phase reduction reaction of hydrogen with organic and chlorinated organic compounds at elevated temperatures to convert aqueous and oily hazardous contaminants into a hydrocarbon-rich gas product. After passing through a scrubber, the ...

  17. DEMONSTRATION BULLETIN: GAS-PHASE CHEMICAL REDUCTION - ECO LOGIC INTERNATIONAL, INC.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The patented Eco Logic Process employs a gas-phase reduction reaction of hydrogen with organic and chlorinated organic compounds at elevated temperatures to convert aqueous and oily hazardous contaminants into a hydrocarbon-rich gas product. After passing through a scrubber, the ...

  18. A 15N-aided artificial atmosphere gas flow technique for online determination of soil N2 release using the zeolite Köstrolith SX6.

    PubMed

    Spott, Oliver; Russow, Rolf; Apelt, Bernd; Stange, C Florian

    2006-01-01

    N2 is one of the major gaseous nitrogen compounds released by soils due to N-transformation processes. Since it is also the major constituent of the earth's atmosphere (78.08% vol.), the determination of soil N2 release is still one of the main methodological challenges with respect to a complete evaluation of the gaseous N-loss of soils. Commonly used approaches are based either on a C2H2 inhibition technique, an artificial atmosphere or a 15N-tracer technique, and are designed either as closed systems (non-steady state) or gas flow systems (steady state). The intention of this work has been to upgrade the current gas flow technique using an artificial atmosphere for a 15N-aided determination of the soil N2 release simultaneously with N2O. A 15N-aided artificial atmosphere gas flow approach has been developed, which allows a simultaneous online determination of N2 as well as N2O fluxes from an open soil system (steady state). Fluxes of both gases can be determined continuously over long incubation periods and with high sampling frequency. The N2 selective molecular sieve Köstrolith SX6 was tested successfully for the first time for dinitrogen collection. The presented paper mainly focuses on N2 flux determination. For validation purposes soil aggregates of a Haplic Phaeozem were incubated under aerobic (21 and 6 vol.% O2) and anaerobic conditions. Significant amounts of N2 were released only during anaerobic incubation (0.4 and 640.2 pmol N2 h(-1) g(-1) dry soil). However, some N2 formation also occurred during aerobic incubation. It was also found that, during ongoing denitrification, introduced [NO3]- will be more strongly delivered to microorganisms than the original soil [NO3]-.

  19. Historical Doses from Tritiated Water and Tritiated Hydrogen Gas Released to the Atmosphere from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Part 3. Routine Releases, 1973 - 2005

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, S

    2007-08-15

    Annual mean concentrations of tritium in air moisture, calculated from data obtained from an air tritium sampler near the LLNL Discovery Center, were compared with annual mean air moisture concentrations predicted from atmospheric releases of tritium for the years 1973 through 2005. The 95% confidence intervals on the predictions and observations usually overlapped. When the distributions of predictions and observations were different, predictions were higher. Using both the observed and predicted air concentrations as input to the tritium dose model, DCART, annual doses to a hypothetical adult, child (age 10) and infant (age 6 months to 1 year) assumed to be living at LLNL's Discovery Center were calculated. Although the doses based on predicted air concentrations tended to be higher, they were nevertheless indistinguishable from doses based on observed air concentrations when uncertainties were taken into account. Annual doses, calculated by DCART and based on observed and predicted air concentrations, were compared with historical tritium doses reported annually by LLNL. Although the historical doses were calculated using various assumptions over the years, their agreement with the DCART predictions is remarkable. The Discovery Center was not the location of the site-wide maximally exposed individual (SWMEI) from 1974 through 1978. However, doses at the location of the SW-MEI for those years were indistinguishable from those at the Discovery Center when uncertainties were taken into account. The upper confidence limits for all doses were always well below the current regulatory limit for dose to a member of the public (100 {micro}Sv or 10 mrem per year) from atmospheric releases (40 CFR Part 61, Subpart H). Based on observed air concentrations, the 97.5% confidence limit on the cumulative dose to the hypothetical person born in 1973 and living through 2005 at the Discovery Center was 150 {micro}Sv (15 mrem), while that of the hypothetical adult who spent his

  20. Historical Doses from Tritiated Water and Tritiated Hydrogen Gas Released to the Atmosphere from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Part 4. Routine Releases, 1953 - 1972

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, S

    2007-08-15

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory was founded in September 1952. By 1953, operations involving tritium were underway. Annual doses to an adult, a child (age 10), and an infant (age six months to one year) from tritium released routinely from the Livermore site between 1953 and 1972 were calculated using the tritium dose model, DCART. Uncertainties about sources and release rates are high, particularly for the 1950's, and it was difficult, and sometimes impossible (e.g., when a source was only assumed to have existed) to quantify them accurately. Because of this, every effort was made to assure that the uncertainties applied to the input parameters used in DCART would result in doses that could not have been exceeded. Doses were calculated at the potential locations of the hypothetical site-wide maximally exposed individual (SWMEI), which were at a residence on Vasco Road inside the present west perimeter of the Laboratory (1953 - 1958), at an automotive garage on East Avenue (1961), and at the Discovery Center (1959, 1960, 1962 - 1972, years which predate the facility). Even with the most conservative, screening model assumptions, the highest dose to the SW-MEI (in 1957) was predicted with 95% probability to have been between 27 and 370 {micro}Sv (2.7 and 37 mrem), with the most likely dose being 130 {micro}Sv (13 mrem). Using more realistic, but still conservative assumptions about what fraction of the diet could have been contaminated, these predictions were reduced by more than a factor of two. All other annual doses (at the 97.5% confidence limits) to the SW-MEI, calculated with the most conservative and health protective assumptions, were less than 200 {micro}Sv (20 mrem), and no dose after 1958 could have exceeded 100 {micro}Sv (10 mren). The cumulative dose to the hypothetical individual at the west perimeter location for 1953 through 1972 would have been no greater than 860 {micro}Sv (83 mrem), while the dose to the individual born and raised there

  1. Determination of odor release in hydrocolloid model systems containing original or carboxylated cellulose at different pH values using static headspace gas chromatographic (SHS-GC) analysis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Mi; Shin, Gil-Ok; Park, Kyung Min; Chang, Pahn-Shick; Kim, Young-Suk

    2013-02-27

    Static headspace gas chromatographic (SHS-GC) analysis was performed to determine the release of 13 odorants in hydrocolloid model systems containing original or regio-selectively carboxylated cellulose at different pH values. The release of most odor compounds was decreased in the hydrocolloid solutions compared to control, with the amounts of 2-propanol, 3-methyl-1-butanol, and 2,3-butanedione released into the headspace being less than those of any other odor compound in the hydrocolloid model systems. However, there was no considerable difference between original cellulose-containing and carboxylated-cellulose containing systems in the release of most compounds, except for relatively long-chain esters such as ethyl caprylate and ethyl nonanoate. The release from the original and carboxylated cellulose solutions controlled to pH 10 was significantly higher than that from solutions adjusted to pH 4 and 7 in the case of some esters (ethyl acetate, methyl propionate, ethyl propionate, ethyl butyrate, butyl propionate, ethyl caproate) and alcohols (2-propanol, 3-methyl-1-butanol), in particular, ethyl butyrate and 3-methyl-1-butanol. In contrast, the release of 2,3-butanedione from both the original and carboxylated cellulose solutions was increased at pH 4 and 7 compared to that at pH 10 by about 70% and 130%, respectively. Our study demonstrated that the release of some odorants could be changed significantly by addition of both original and carboxylated cellulose in hydrocolloid model systems, but only minor effect was observed in pH of the solution.

  2. Determination of Odor Release in Hydrocolloid Model Systems Containing Original or Carboxylated Cellulose at Different pH Values Using Static Headspace Gas Chromatographic (SHS-GC) Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang Mi; Shin, Gil-Ok; Park, Kyung Min; Chang, Pahn-Shick; Kim, Young-Suk

    2013-01-01

    Static headspace gas chromatographic (SHS-GC) analysis was performed to determine the release of 13 odorants in hydrocolloid model systems containing original or regio-selectively carboxylated cellulose at different pH values. The release of most odor compounds was decreased in the hydrocolloid solutions compared to control, with the amounts of 2-propanol, 3-methyl-1-butanol, and 2,3-butanedione released into the headspace being less than those of any other odor compound in the hydrocolloid model systems. However, there was no considerable difference between original cellulose-containing and carboxylated-cellulose containing systems in the release of most compounds, except for relatively long-chain esters such as ethyl caprylate and ethyl nonanoate. The release from the original and carboxylated cellulose solutions controlled to pH 10 was significantly higher than that from solutions adjusted to pH 4 and 7 in the case of some esters (ethyl acetate, methyl propionate, ethyl propionate, ethyl butyrate, butyl propionate, ethyl caproate) and alcohols (2-propanol, 3-methyl-1-butanol), in particular, ethyl butyrate and 3-methyl-1-butanol. In contrast, the release of 2,3-butanedione from both the original and carboxylated cellulose solutions was increased at pH 4 and 7 compared to that at pH 10 by about 70% and 130%, respectively. Our study demonstrated that the release of some odorants could be changed significantly by addition of both original and carboxylated cellulose in hydrocolloid model systems, but only minor effect was observed in pH of the solution. PMID:23447013

  3. Releases of whooping cranes to the Florida nonmigratory flock: a structured decision-making approach: report to the International Whooping Crane Recovery Team, September 22, 2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, Clinton T.; Converse, Sarah J.; Folk, Martin J.; Boughton, Robin; Brooks, Bill; French, John B.; O'Meara, Timothy; Putnam, Michael; Rodgers, James; Spalding, Marilyn

    2008-01-01

    We used a structured decision-making approach to inform the decision of whether the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission should request of the International Whooping Crane Recovery Team that additional whooping crane chicks be released into the Florida Non-Migratory Population (FNMP). Structured decision-making is an application of decision science that strives to produce transparent, replicable, and defensible decisions that recognize the appropriate roles of management policy and science in decision-making. We present a multi-objective decision framework, where management objectives include successful establishment of a whooping crane population in Florida, minimization of costs, positive public relations, information gain, and providing a supply of captive-reared birds to alternative crane release projects, such as the Eastern Migratory Population. We developed models to predict the outcome relative to each of these objectives under 29 different scenarios of the release methodology used from 1993 to 2004, including options of no further releases and variable numbers of releases per year over the next 5-30 years. In particular, we developed a detailed set of population projection models, which make substantially different predictions about the probability of successful establishment of the FNMP. We used expert elicitation to develop prior model weights (measures of confidence in population model predictions); the results of the population model weighting and modelaveraging exercise indicated that the probability of successful establishment of the FNMP ranged from 9% if no additional releases are made, to as high as 41% with additional releases. We also used expert elicitation to develop weights (relative values) on the set of identified objectives, and we then used a formal optimization technique for identifying the optimal decision, which considers the tradeoffs between objectives. The optimal decision was identified as release of 3 cohorts (24

  4. Hydrogen gas attenuates sevoflurane neurotoxicity through inhibiting nuclear factor κ-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells signaling and proinflammatory cytokine release in neonatal rats.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yiwei; Wang, Gang; Li, Jinyuan; Yu, Wenli

    2017-09-18

    Anesthesia neurotoxicity in developing brain has gained increasing attention. However, knowledge regarding its mitigating strategies remains scant. Sevoflurane, a commonly used anesthetic, is responsible for learning and memory deficits in neonates. Molecular hydrogen is reported to be a potential neuroprotective agent because of its antioxidative and anti-inflammatory activities. This study aimed to investigate the effect of hydrogen gas on sevoflurane neurotoxicity. The newborn rats were treated with sevoflurane and/or hydrogen gas for 2 h. Spatial recognition memory and fear memory were determined by Y-maze and fear conditioning tests at 10 weeks of age. Nuclear factor κ-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) and proinflammatory cytokine levels were detected using western blot analysis. The data showed that the spatial recognition memory and fear memory of the rats treated with sevoflurane decreased compared with the control, and the cognitive function of the rats treated with sevoflurane and hydrogen gas significantly increased in comparison with treatment with sevoflurane alone. Moreover, hydrogen gas suppressed NF-κB phosphorylation and nuclear translocation and reduced the production of interleukin-1β, interleukin-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α following sevoflurane administration. Thus, the results proposed that hydrogen gas might protect against sevoflurane neurotoxicity by inhibiting NF-κB activation and proinflammatory cytokine release, providing a novel therapeutic strategy for anesthesia neurotoxicity.

  5. Some effects of gas adsorption on the high temperature volatile release behavior of a terrestrial basalt, tektite and lunar soil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graham, D. G.; Muenow, D. W.; Gibson, E. K., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    Mass pyrograms obtained from high-temperature, mass psectrometric pyrolysis of a glassy theoleiitic submarine basalt and a tektite, ground in air to less than 64 microns, have shown N2 and SO release patterns very similar to those from the pyrolysis of mature lunar soil fines. The N2 and CO release behavior from the terrestrial samples reproduces the biomodal, high-temperature (approximately 700 and 1050 C) features from the lunar samples. Unground portions of the basalt and tektite show no release of N2 and CO during pyrolysis. Grinding also alters the release behavior and absolute amounts of H2O and CO2. It is suggested that adsorption of atmospheric gases in addition to solar wind implantation of ions may account for the wide range of values in previously reported concentrations of carbon and nitrogen from lunar fines.

  6. Real-time monitoring of fragrance release from cotton towels by low thermal mass gas chromatography using a longitudinally modulating cryogenic system for headspace sampling and injection.

    PubMed

    Haefliger, Olivier P; Jeckelmann, Nicolas; Ouali, Lahoussine; León, Géraldine

    2010-01-15

    An innovative headspace sampling and injection system for gas chromatography was designed using a longitudinally modulating cryogenic system mounted around the sampling loop of a two-position loop injector. The setup was hyphenated to a fast low thermal mass gas chromatograph, allowing transient concentrations of semivolatile analytes to be monitored in real time with a time resolution of 4.5 min. The performance of the instrument, and in particular its cryotrapping efficiency, was characterized using a mixture of long-chain alkanes, methyl esters, ethyl esters, and alcohols of different volatilities. The device was found to be ideally suited to the analysis of semivolatile compounds with boiling points ranging between 190 and 320 degrees C, which are typical for a majority of perfumery raw materials. The new instrument was successfully used to monitor the release of eight odorant compounds from cotton towels to which fabric softener had been applied that alternatively contained the fragrance in free form or in microencapsulated form. The analytical results, unprecedented in their level of precision and time resolution for such an application, evidenced the major impact of microencapsulation technology on the kinetics of fragrance release during the drying of the towels and on the triggering of additional fragrance release by applying mechanical stress to the fabric to rupture the microcapsule walls.

  7. An Effective Continuum Model for the Gas Evolution in Internal Steam Drives

    SciTech Connect

    Tsimpanogiannis, Ioannis N.; Yortsos, Yanis C.

    2002-06-11

    This report examines the gas phase growth from a supersaturated, slightly compressible, liquid in a porous medium, driven by heat transfer and controlled by the application of a constant-rate decline of the system pressure.

  8. 77 FR 54650 - Intent To Rule on Request To Release Airport Property at the El Paso International Airport, El...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-05

    .... Guillermo Y. Villalobos, Program Manager, Federal Aviation Administration, Texas Airports Development Office....Villalobos@faa.gov , Fax: (817) 222-5989. The request to release property may be reviewed in person at this...

  9. 77 FR 16891 - Notice of Intent To Rule on Request To Release Airport Property at Tulsa International Airport...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-22

    ... Modernization and Reform Act of 2012. DATES: Comments must be received on or before April 30, 2012. ADDRESSES... Modernization and Reform Act of 2012. On June 18, 2010, the FAA determined that the request to release property...

  10. Comparison of a 16- versus a 19-day interval between controlled internal drug release removal and prostaglandin F2α following a 14-day controlled internal drug release treatment and fixed-time artificial insemination in postpartum beef cows.

    PubMed

    Martin, N T; Thomas, J M; Nash, J M; Mallory, D A; Ellersieck, M R; Poock, S E; Smith, M F; Patterson, D J

    2014-04-01

    This experiment compared 2 long-term controlled internal drug release (CIDR)-based protocols to synchronize estrus before fixed-time artificial insemination (FTAI) in postpartum beef cows. Cows were assigned to treatments by age, BCS, and days postpartum. Cows assigned to the 14- to 19-d CIDR-PGF2α protocol (n = 196) received CIDR inserts (1.38 g progesterone [P4]) from d 0 to 14 and PGF2α (25 mg, i.m.) 19 d after CIDR removal on d 33. Cows assigned to the 14-to-16-d CIDR-PGF2α protocol (n = 195) received CIDR inserts from d 3 to 17 and PGF2α 16 d after CIDR removal on d 33. Cows were artificially inseminated on d 36, 72 h after PGF2α, with GnRH (100 μg, i.m.) at FTAI. Cows were exposed for natural service 14 d after FTAI for 75 d. Blood samples for P4 were collected at d -10 and 0 to determine pretreatment estrous cyclicity status and again at PGF2α. Blood samples for estradiol (E2) were collected at PGF2α and FTAI. HeatWatch estrus detection transmitters were used from CIDR removal until FTAI to determine onset of estrus after CIDR removal and PGF2α. Dominant follicle diameter was determined at PGF2α and FTAI. Pregnancy diagnosis was performed 70 d after FTAI and confirmed at d 140 of gestation. Estrous response after CIDR removal was similar between treatments. Cows in both treatments had similar size dominant follicles on d 33 at PGF2α and d 36 at FTAI. Progesterone at PGF2α was greater (P = 0.03) for 14-to-16-d compared to 14-to-19-d treated cows. Mean concentrations of E2 at PGF2α were similar between treatments but were greater (P = 0.01) at FTAI for 14-to-16-d compared to 14-to-19-d treated cows. Estrous response after PGF2α was greater (P < 0.01) for 14-to-19-d compared to 14-to-16-d treated cows (47.4 vs. 29.7%, respectively). Pregnancy rate resulting from FTAI was affected by the treatment × age group interaction (P = 0.08). Pregnancy rate after FTAI among cows ≥ 4 yr tended to be greater (P = 0.06) for 14-to-19-d compared to the 14-to

  11. Historical Doses from Tritiated Water and Tritiated Hydrogen Gas Released to the Atmosphere from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Part 6. Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, S

    2007-09-05

    Throughout fifty-three years of operations, an estimated 792,000 Ci (29,300 TBq) of tritium have been released to the atmosphere at the Livermore site of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); about 75% was tritium gas (HT) primarily from the accidental releases of 1965 and 1970. Routine emissions contributed slightly more than 100,000 Ci (3,700 TBq) HT and about 75,000 Ci (2,800 TBq) tritiated water vapor (HTO) to the total. A Tritium Dose Reconstruction was undertaken to estimate both the annual doses to the public for each year of LLNL operations and the doses from the few accidental releases. Some of the dose calculations were new, and the others could be compared with those calculated by LLNL. Annual doses (means and 95% confidence intervals) to the potentially most exposed member of the public were calculated for all years using the same model and the same assumptions. Predicted tritium concentrations in air were compared with observed mean annual concentrations at one location from 1973 onwards. Doses predicted from annual emissions were compared with those reported in the past by LLNL. The highest annual mean dose predicted from routine emissions was 34 {micro}Sv (3.4 mrem) in 1957; its upper confidence limit, based on very conservative assumptions about the speciation of the release, was 370 {micro}Sv (37 mrem). The upper confidence limits for most annual doses were well below the current regulatory limit of 100 {micro}Sv (10 mrem) for dose to the public from release to the atmosphere; the few doses that exceeded this were well below the regulatory limits of the time. Lacking the hourly meteorological data needed to calculate doses from historical accidental releases, ingestion/inhalation dose ratios were derived from a time-dependent accident consequence model that accounts for the complex behavior of tritium in the environment. Ratios were modified to account for only those foods growing at the time of the releases. The highest dose from an

  12. Internally gas-cooled radiofrequency applicators as an alternative to conventional radiofrequency and microwave ablation devices: an in vivo comparison.

    PubMed

    Rempp, Hansjörg; Voigtländer, Matthias; Schenk, Martin; Enderle, Markus D; Scharpf, Marcus; Greiner, Tim O; Neugebauer, Alexander; Hoffmann, Rüdiger; Claussen, Claus D; Clasen, Stephan

    2013-08-01

    To test the efficacy of internally CO2-cooled radiofrequency (RF) ablation in vivo and to compare its effectiveness to a standard water-cooled RF probe and to a gas-cooled microwave (MW) device. 49 ablations were performed on 15 pigs under general anesthesia using 15G monopolar CO2-cooled RF applicators, 17G monopolar water-cooled RF applicators and 15G internally CO2-cooled microwave devices. The power of the MW device was 45W, the current of the gas-cooled RF device was 1200-1600mA. At the water-cooled RF probe, maximum power of 200W was set. Ablation time was 15min. The short and long axes of the ablation zone were measured. Histological analyses and NADH-staining were performed. The diameters and the ablation volumes were compared using an analysis of variance. No spots of untreated tissue were observed close to the cooled needle track in any of the ablation zones. The largest short axis diameter was 3.4±0.5cm achieved with the gas-cooled monopolar applicator. With the water-cooled applicators, short axis diameter was significantly smaller, reaching 2.5±0.4cm. Gas-cooled MW probes achieved 2.9±1.0cm. The largest ablation volume was 31.5±12ml (gas-cooled RF), and the smallest was 12.7±4ml (water-cooled RF). Short/long axis ratio was largest for gas-cooled RF probes with 0.73±0.08 versus 0.64±0.04 for the water-cooled probes and 0.49±0.25 for the microwave applicator. Gas-cooled RF applicators may have a higher potential for effective destruction of liver lesions than comparable water-cooled RF systems, and may be an alternative to standard RF and MW ablation devices. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Contributions from the 10th International Conference on Gas in Marine Sediments, Listvyanka (Russia), 6-11 September 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Batist, Marc; Khlystov, Oleg

    2012-12-01

    The 10th International Conference on Gas in Marine Sediments (GIMS10) took place from 6 to 11 September 2010 in Listvyanka (Russia), on the shores of Lake Baikal. The conference was organized as a double jubilee, celebrating both the fact that it was the 10th event in this series and the 20th anniversary of the series. A total of 72 oral and 47 poster presentations were given in eight thematic sessions and the presentations were discussed by 126 participants from academic, governmental and commercial institutions from 19 countries, consisting of geologists, biologists, microbiologists, geophysicists, geochemists, oceanographers and limnologists. Volume 32(5/6) of Geo-Marine Letters is a double issue containing 16 selected papers from GIMS10, and has been guest edited by M. De Batist and O. Khlystov. The papers reflect the broad-spectrum disciplines represented at the conference and cover a wide range of aspects of gas in marine sediments from many parts of the world, but with a special emphasis on the gas seeps, gas hydrates and mud volcanoes of Lake Baikal.

  14. Apparatus for controlling the flow of exhaust gas in an internal combustion engine with a turbocharger and a catalytic converter

    SciTech Connect

    Iwamoto, K.; Omata, K.

    1984-03-20

    An apparatus for controlling the flow of the exhaust gas in an internal combustion engine including a turbocharger, a catalytic converter in an exhaust duct, and a throttle valve in an intake duct, wherein the apparatus comprises a bypass passage bypassing a turbine of the turbocharger, a waste gate valve which controls the amount of the exhaust gas passing therethrough, an actuator for actuating the waste gate valve which has first and second pressure chambers separated from one another, and a switching valve which selectively connects the second pressure chamber to the atmosphere or to the intake vacuum area, the first pressure chamber being connected to the delivery pressure area of the turbocharger by means of a conduit which is connected to an atmospheric pressure area via a restriction.

  15. International.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoover, Linn

    1979-01-01

    The International Geological Correlation Project has attained scientific maturity and broad support and participation by geologists world wide. Its purpose is to provide a mechanism for international cooperation and information exchange about geological problems that transcend national boundaries. (Author/BB)

  16. The Gaia-ESO Survey: the chemical structure of the Galactic discs from the first internal data release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikolaitis, Š.; Hill, V.; Recio-Blanco, A.; de Laverny, P.; Allende Prieto, C.; Kordopatis, G.; Tautvaišiene, G.; Romano, D.; Gilmore, G.; Randich, S.; Feltzing, S.; Micela, G.; Vallenari, A.; Alfaro, E. J.; Bensby, T.; Bragaglia, A.; Flaccomio, E.; Lanzafame, A. C.; Pancino, E.; Smiljanic, R.; Bergemann, M.; Carraro, G.; Costado, M. T.; Damiani, F.; Hourihane, A.; Jofré, P.; Lardo, C.; Magrini, L.; Maiorca, E.; Morbidelli, L.; Sbordone, L.; Sousa, S. G.; Worley, C. C.; Zaggia, S.

    2014-12-01

    Aims: Until recently, most high-resolution spectroscopic studies of the Galactic thin and thick discs were mostly confined to objects in the solar vicinity. Here we aim at enlarging the volume in which individual chemical abundances are used to characterise the thin and thick discs, using the first internal data release of the Gaia-ESO survey (GES iDR1). Methods: We used the spectra of around 2000 FGK dwarfs and giants from the GES iDR1, obtained at resolutions of up to R ~ 20 000 with the FLAMES/GIRAFFE spectrograph. We derive and discuss the abundances of eight elements (Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Ti, Fe, Cr, Ni, and Y). Results: We show that the trends of these elemental abundances with iron are very similar to those in the solar neighbourhood. We find a natural division between α-rich and α-poor stars, best seen in the bimodality of the [Mg/M] distributions in bins of metallicity, which we attribute to thick- and thin-disc sequences, respectively. This separation is visible for most α-elements and for aluminium. With the possible exception of Al, the observed dispersion around the trends is well described by the expected errors, leaving little room for astrophysical dispersion. Using previously derived distances from the first paper from this series for our sample, we further find that the thick-disc is more extended vertically and is more centrally concentrated towards the inner Galaxy than the thin-disc, which indicates a shorter scale-length. We derive the radial (4 to 12 kpc) and vertical (0 to 3.5 kpc) gradients in metallicity, iron, four α-element abundances, and aluminium for the two populations, taking into account the identified correlation between RGC and | Z |. Similarly to other works, a radial metallicity gradient is found in the thin disc. The positive radial individual [α/M] gradients found are at variance from the gradients observed in the RAVE survey. The thin disc also hosts a negative vertical metallicity gradient in the solar cylinder, accompanied

  17. Research on combustion processes associated with natural gas used as an internal-combustion-engine fuel. Final report, May 1988-July 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Ronney, P.D.

    1990-07-01

    The report assesses the mechanisms responsible for the observed ignition, flammability, stability, and knock limits in natural gas fueled internal combustion engines, particularly in strongly turbulent flows, and to devise ways to improve natural-gas engine performance based on these findings.

  18. [Characteristics of gas release during combustion of main arbor and shrub species in Xiaoxing'an Mountain].

    PubMed

    Hu, Hai-Qing; Li, Ao-Bin

    2008-07-01

    The amounts of CO2, CO, CxHy, SO2 and NO released from the combustion of 10 arbor and 9 shrub species in Liangshui Forest Farm of Xiaoxing'an Mountain were determined, with the release amounts and emission factors of these gases calculated. The results showed that the released CO2, the total amount of carbon-containing gases, and the mean value of the total amount of the 5 gases during combustion were larger for arbors than for shrubs, being 1277.04 and 1149.06 mg x g(-1), 1476.27 and 1147.18 mg x g(-1), and 1486.21 and 1459.67 mg x g(-1), respectively, while an opposite pattern of the mean release of CO, NO and SO2 was observed, being 231.58 and 282.93 mg x g(-1), 3.61 and 5.03 mg x g(-1), and 6.32 and 7.46 mg x g(-1) for the arbor and shrub species, respectively. The emission factors of CO2 and CO were also larger for arbors than for shrubs, being 2.8853 and 2.7718, and 0.4558 and 0.2425, respectively.

  19. ASME 1986 International Gas Turbine Conference - Transpiration cooling: Contribution of film cooling to the overall cooling effectiveness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, G. E.; Asere, A. A.; Mkpadi, M. C.; Tirmahi, A.

    1986-06-01

    A comprehensive evaluation is made of the state-of-the-art and prospective development trends in the field of film cooling techniques for gas turbine combustion chambers and blades. The full coverage discrete hole film or effusion cooling techniques encompassed by the presently assessed researches have as their goal the achievement of performance levels comparable to those of transpiration cooling. It is recommended that attempts to improve on the current cooling effectiveness of full coverage discrete hole designs should concentrate on increasing the degree of internal wall cooling, while retaining good film-cooling characteristics.

  20. Internalizing production externalities: A structural estimation of real options in the upstream oil and gas industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muehlenbachs, Lucija

    There are hundreds of thousands of crude oil and natural gas wells across North America that are currently not producing oil or gas. Many of these wells have not been permanently decommissioned to meet environmental standards for permanent closure, but are in an inactive state that enables them to be more easily reactivated. Some of these wells have been in this inactive state for more than sixty years which begs the question of whether they will ever contribute to our energy supply, or whether they are being left inactive because the environmental remediation costs are prohibitively high. I estimate a structural model of optimal well operations over time and under uncertainty to determine what conditions or policies might push any of the inactive wells out of the hysteresis in which they reside. The model is further used to forecast production from existing wells and recoverable reserves from existing pools. The estimation uses data on production decisions from 84 thousand conventional oil and gas wells and estimates of the remaining reserves of 47 thousand pools. As the producer's decision depends on their subjective belief for how prices and recoverable reserves change over time, I also estimate the probability of changes in prices and recovery technology. I model increases and decreases in the estimated recoverable reserves to depend on price, and predict that natural gas reserves are more responsive to changes in price than conventional oil reserves. Under high prices there is potential for large increases in gas reserves, however this is not the case for oil reserves when the oil price is high. And likewise, under low prices, gas reserves decrease more than oil reserves. The dynamic programming model predicts that with only a drastic, arguably implausible, increase in prices and recovery rates will there be a significant increase in the number of inactive wells that are reactivated. If ideal conditions are not enough to induce well reactivation then this

  1. Measuring in situ dissolved methane concentrations in gas hydrate-rich systems, Part 1: Investigating the correlation between tectonics and methane release from sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapham, L.; Wilson, R. M.; Paull, C. K.; Chanton, J.; Riedel, M.

    2010-12-01

    In 2009, an area of extended methane venting at 1200 meters water depth was found with high resolution AUV bathymetry scans on the Northern Cascadia Margin that was previously unknown. When visited by ROV, we found seafloor cracks with active bubble streams and thin bacterial mats suggesting shallow gas and possible pore-fluid saturation. Upon coring into the cracks, a hard-substrate (carbonate or gas hydrate) was punctured and gas flows began. With these observations, we asked the question “is this shallow gas released from the seafloor from regional tectonic activity, and, if so, what is the temporal variability of such release events?” To answer this, we deployed a long term pore-water collection device at one of these gas crack sites, informally named “bubbly gulch”, for 9 months. The device is made up of 4 OsmoSamplers that were each plumbed to a port along a 1-meter probe tip using small diameter tubing. By osmosis, the samplers collected water samples slowly through the ports and maintained them within a 300 meter-long copper tubing coil. Because of the high methane concentrations anticipated, in situ pressures were maintained within the coil by the addition of a high pressure valve. Water samples were collected from the overlying water, at the sediment-water interface, and 6 and 10 cm into the sediments. Bottom water temperatures were also measured over the time series to determine pumping rates of the samplers but also to look for any temporal variability. In May 2010, the samplers were retrieved by ROV during efforts to install seafloor instruments for Neptune Canada. In a land-based lab, the coils were sub-sampled by cutting every 4 meters of tubing. With a pumping rate of 0.5 mL/day, this allowed a temporal resolution of 6 days. To date, one sampler coil has been sub-sampled and measured for methane concentrations and stable carbon isotopes. Preliminary results from this coil show pore-fluids nearly saturated with respect to methane, ~45 m

  2. 76 FR 37874 - Notice of Intent To Rule on Request To Release Airport Property at Lehigh Valley International...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-28

    ... capital and operating costs of the airport. Interested persons are invited to comment on the proposed... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration Notice of Intent To Rule on Request To Release Airport Property at Lehigh...

  3. 78 FR 6401 - Public Notice for Release of Aeronautical Property at the Wilkes-Barre/Scranton International...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-30

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Public Notice for Release of Aeronautical Property at the Wilkes- Barre...: Request for public comment. SUMMARY: The Federal Aviation Administration is requesting public comment on... the Airport Owner to sell and convey title of 16.037 acres for public roadway, 0.20 acres for a...

  4. Gas release-based prescreening combined with reversed-phase HPLC quantitation for efficient selection of high-γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-producing lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qinglong; Shah, Nagendra P

    2015-02-01

    High γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-producing lactobacilli are promising for the manufacture of GABA-rich foods and to synthesize GRAS (generally recognized as safe)-grade GABA. However, common chromatography-based screening is time-consuming and inefficient. In the present study, Korean kimchi was used as a model of lactic acid-based fermented foods, and a gas release-based prescreening of potential GABA producers was developed. The ability to produce GABA by potential GABA producers in de Man, Rogosa, and Sharpe medium supplemented with or without monosodium glutamate was further determined by HPLC. Based on the results, 9 isolates were regarded as high GABA producers, and were further genetically identified as Lactobacillus brevis based on the sequences of 16S rRNA gene. Gas release-based prescreening combined with reversed-phase HPLC confirmation was an efficient and cost-effective method to identify high-GABA-producing LAB, which could be good candidates for probiotics. The GABA that is naturally produced by these high-GABA-producing LAB could be used as a food additive. Copyright © 2015 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Evidence for faulting related to dissociation of gas hydrate and release of methane off the southeastern United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dillon, William P.; Danforth, W.W.; Hutchinson, D.R.; Drury, R.M.; Taylor, M.H.; Booth, J.S.

    1998-01-01

    This paper is part of the special publication Gas hydrates: relevance to world margin stability and climatic change (eds J.P. Henriet and J. Mienert). An irregular, faulted, collapse depression about 38 x 18 km in extent is located on the crest of the Blake Ridge offshore from the south- eastern United States. Faults disrupt the sea floor and terminate or sole out about 40-500 m below the sea floor at the base of the gas hydrate stable zone, which is identified from the location of the bottom simulating reflection (BSR). Normal faults are common but reverse faults and folds also are widespread. Folds commonly convert upward into faults. Sediment diapirs and deposits of sediments that were erupted onto the sea floor are also present. Sea-floor depressions at faults may represent locations of liquid/gas vents. The collapse was probably caused by overpressures and by the decoupling of the overlying sediments by gassy muds that existed just beneath the zone of gas hydrate stability.

  6. Impact of Leaching Conditions on Constituents Release from Flue Gas Desulfurization Gypsum (FGDG) and FGDG-Soil Mixture

    EPA Science Inventory

    The interest in using Flue Gas Desulfurization Gypsum(FGDG) has increased recently. This study evaluates the leaching characteristics of trace elements in "modern" FGDG (produced after fly ash removal) and FGDG-mixed soil (SF) under different environmental conditions using rece...

  7. [The gas chromatographic determination of sulfur- and oxygen-containing organic compounds released into the air of cellulose sulfate works].

    PubMed

    Taranenko, N A; Dorogova, V B

    1992-01-01

    The article presents data on the design of sensitive, selective, useful in group analysis method to detect dimethylsulphide, dimethyldisulphide, acetic, propionic, butyric and valeric acids, methyl alcohol and phenol by means of gas chromatography in the air of cellulose sulphate production working zone. The methods were tested in examining the work conditions in Bratsk found-lavage shops.

  8. Effects of intravaginally inserted controlled-release dinoprostone and oxytocin for labor induction on umbilical cord blood gas parameters

    PubMed Central

    Keskin, Hüseyin Levent; Kabacaoğlu, Gökalp; Seçen, Elçin İşlek; Üstüner, Işık; Yeğin, Gülin; Avşar, Ayşe Filiz

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To compare the effects of oxytocin and dinoprostone used in labor induction on fetal blood gas parameters. Material and Methods: This prospective randomized trial involved 108 women who completed 37 gestational weeks and who required labor induction prior to normal vaginal birth. Labor was induced in 57 women with an intravenous low dose oxytocin regimen and in 51 with intravaginal dinoprostone (PGE2). Following childbirth, umbilical artery blood gas was analyzed, with pH, pCO2, pO2, HCO3 and base excess (BE) compared in the two groups. Results: Mean age and obstetrical data (gravidity, parity, gestational weeks and birthweight) were similar in the two groups (p>0.05). All infants had 1 and 5 minute APGAR scores ≥7. Umbilical artery blood pH was similar in the oxytocin and dinoprostone groups (7.31±0.07 vs. 7.31±0.05, p=0.780), as were the other blood gas parameters (pCO2, pO2, base excess and HCO3; p>0.05 each). Conclusion: Induction of labor with either oxytocin or dinoprostone in women with uncomplicated term pregnancies had no adverse effects on umbilical artery blood gas parameters. PMID:24592052

  9. Impact of Leaching Conditions on Constituents Release from Flue Gas Desulfurization Gypsum (FGDG) and FGDG-Soil Mixture

    EPA Science Inventory

    The interest in using Flue Gas Desulfurization Gypsum(FGDG) has increased recently. This study evaluates the leaching characteristics of trace elements in "modern" FGDG (produced after fly ash removal) and FGDG-mixed soil (SF) under different environmental conditions using rece...

  10. KEY COMPARISON: Final report on international comparison COOMET.QM-K23b: Natural gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konopelko, L. A.; Kustikov, Y. A.; Gromova, E. V.; Rozhnov, M. S.; Mironchik, A. M.; Kluchits, A. S.; Heine, H.-J.; Valkova, M.; Musil, S.; Tichy, J.

    2010-01-01

    The composition of natural gas is one of the significant objects for comparison study. Since 2000 three key comparisons of natural gas within CCQM have been implemented: CCQM-K1e-g, CCQM-K16a-b and CCQM-K23a-c. In 2007 VNIIM offered to organize within COOMET a key comparison of natural gas linked to CCQM-K23b. There were five NMIs that decided to take part in COOMET.QM-K23b in order to claim new or improve present CMCs: Ukrmetrteststandard (Ukraine), BelGIM (Belarus), BAM (Germany), SMU (Slovak Republic) and CMI (Czech Republic). Most of the NMIs (VNIIM, BAM, SMU, CMI) participated in CCQM-K23b; BelGIM and Ukrmetrteststandard participated in a comparison of natural gas for the first time. The gas mixtures for study contained nitrogen, carbon dioxide, ethane, propane, iso-butane, n-butane and methane. The key comparison reference value (KCRV) was based on the gravimetric preparation for all components. In order to determine the link between COOMET.QM-K23b and CCQM-K23b the uncertainty of degrees of equivalence of all the participants included the degree of equivalence of VNIIM in CCQM-K23b. The agreement of the results in this key comparison is very good. Most of the results agree with the KCRV within 0.5% relative. BelGIM and Ukrmetrteststandard participated in a comparison of natural gas for the first time, and both laboratories performed well in this key comparison. CMI obtained better results than in CCQM-K23b. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCQM, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (MRA).

  11. A proposal for a test method for assessment of hazard property HP 12 ("Release of an acute toxic gas") in hazardous waste classification - Experience from 49 waste.

    PubMed

    Hennebert, Pierre; Samaali, Ismahen; Molina, Pauline

    2016-12-01

    A stepwise method for assessment of the HP 12 is proposed and tested with 49 waste samples. The hazard property HP 12 is defined as "Release of an acute toxic gas": waste which releases acute toxic gases (Acute Tox. 1, 2 or 3) in contact with water or an acid. When a waste contains a substance assigned to one of the following supplemental hazards EUH029, EUH031 and EUH032, it shall be classified as hazardous by HP 12 according to test methods or guidelines (EC, 2014a, 2014b). When the substances with the cited hazard statement codes react with water or an acid, they can release HCl, Cl2, HF, HCN, PH3, H2S, SO2 (and two other gases very unlikely to be emitted, hydrazoic acid HN3 and selenium oxide SeO2 - a solid with low vapor pressure). Hence, a method is proposed:For a set of 49 waste, water addition did not produce gas. Nearly all the solid waste produced a gas in contact with hydrochloric acid in 5 min in an automated calcimeter with a volume >0.1L of gas per kg of waste. Since a plateau of pressure is reached only for half of the samples in 5 min, 6 h trial with calorimetric bombs or glass flasks were done and confirmed the results. Identification of the gases by portable probes showed that most of the tested samples emit mainly CO2. Toxic gases are emitted by four waste: metallic dust from the aluminum industry (CO), two air pollution control residue of industrial waste incinerator (H2S) and a halogenated solvent (organic volatile(s) compound(s)). HF has not been measured in these trials started before the present definition of HP 12. According to the definition of HP 12, only the H2S emission of substances with hazard statement EUH031 is accounted for. In view of the calcium content of the two air pollution control residue, the presence of calcium sulphide (EUH031) can be assumed. These two waste are therefore classified potentially hazardous for HP 12, from a total of 49 waste. They are also classified as hazardous for other properties (HP 7, 10and14 for one

  12. Release of gas-phase halogens by photolytic generation of OH in frozen halide-nitrate solutions: an active halogen formation mechanism?

    PubMed

    Abbatt, J; Oldridge, N; Symington, A; Chukalovskiy, V; McWhinney, R D; Sjostedt, S; Cox, R A

    2010-06-17

    To better define the mechanisms by which condensed-phase halides may be oxidized to form gas-phase halogens under polar conditions, experiments have been conducted whereby frozen solutions containing chloride (1 M), bromide (1.6 x 10(-3) to 5 x 10(-2) M), iodide (<1 x 10(-5) M), and nitrate (0.01 to 1 M) have been illuminated by ultraviolet light in a continually flushed cell. Gas-phase products are quantified using chemical ionization mass spectrometry, and experiments were conducted at both 248 and 263 K. Br(2) was the dominant product, along with smaller yields of IBr and trace BrCl and I(2). The Br(2) yields were largely independent of the Br(-)/Cl(-) ratio of the frozen solution, down to seawater composition. However, the yields of halogens were strongly dependent on the levels of NO(3)(-) and acidity in solution, consistent with a mechanism whereby NO(3)(-) photolysis yields OH that oxidizes the condensed-phase halides. In support, we observed the formation of gas-phase NO(2), formed simultaneously with OH. Gas-phase HONO was also observed, suggesting that halide oxidation by HONO in the condensed phase may also occur to some degree. By measuring the production rate of condensed-phase OH, using benzoic acid as a radical trap, we determine that the molar yield of Br(2) formation relative to OH generation is 0.6, consistent with each OH being involved in halide oxidation. These studies suggest that gas-phase halogen formation should occur simultaneously with NO(x) release from frozen sea ice and snow surfaces that contain sufficient halides and deposited nitrate.

  13. The secondary release of mercury in coal fly ash-based flue-gas mercury removal technology.

    PubMed

    He, Jingfeng; Duan, Chenlong; Lei, Mingzhe; Zhu, Xuemei

    2016-01-01

    The secondary release of mercury from coal fly ash is a negative by-product from coal-fired power plants, and requires effective control to reduce environmental pollution. Analysing particle size distribution and composition of the coal fly ash produced by different mercury removing technologies indicates that the particles are generally less than 0.5 mm in size and are composed mainly of SiO2, Al2O3, and Fe2O3. The relationships between mercury concentration in the coal fly ash, its particle size, and loss of ignition were studied using different mercury removing approaches. The research indicates that the coal fly ash's mercury levels are significantly higher after injecting activated carbon or brominating activated carbon when compared to regular cooperating-pollution control technology. This is particularly true for particle size ranges of >0.125, 0.075-0.125, and 0.05-0.075 mm. Leaching experiments revealed the secondary release of mercury in discarded coal fly ash. The concentration of mercury in the coal fly ash increases as the quantity of injecting activated carbon or brominating activated carbon increases. The leached concentrations of mercury increase as the particle size of the coal fly ash increases. Therefore, the secondary release of mercury can be controlled by adding suitable activated carbon or brominating activated carbon when disposing of coal fly ash. Adding CaBr2 before coal combustion in the boiler also helps control the secondary release of mercury, by increasing the Hg(2+) concentration in the leachate. This work provides a theoretical foundation for controlling and removing mercury in coal fly ash disposal.

  14. Porous nuclear fuel element with internal skeleton for high-temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactors

    DOEpatents

    Youchison, Dennis L.; Williams, Brian E.; Benander, Robert E.

    2013-09-03

    Porous nuclear fuel elements for use in advanced high temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactors (HTGR's), and to processes for fabricating them. Advanced uranium bi-carbide, uranium tri-carbide and uranium carbonitride nuclear fuels can be used. These fuels have high melting temperatures, high thermal conductivity, and high resistance to erosion by hot hydrogen gas. Tri-carbide fuels, such as (U,Zr,Nb)C, can be fabricated using chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) to simultaneously deposit each of the three separate carbides, e.g., UC, ZrC, and NbC in a single CVI step. By using CVI, the nuclear fuel may be deposited inside of a highly porous skeletal structure made of, for example, reticulated vitreous carbon foam.

  15. Rapid Dissolution of Quicklime into Molten Slag by Internally Formed Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruoka, Nobuhiro; Nogami, Hiroshi

    2017-02-01

    In steelmaking process, quicklime is used to produce CaO-based slag. Although rapid dissolution of quicklime is required for high-efficiency refining, it is known that the rate decreases when dicalcium silicate (C2S) layer forms around the quicklime by reacting with slag. The equation that driving force is the difference of CaO content between in slag and a liquid phase of slag saturated by C2S has been often used for estimating the dissolution rate of lime, in which this saturated value is thermodynamically determined. The authors, however, revealed that the quicklime used in actual operation showed much faster dissolving rate than that of completely calcined lime that is covered by C2S layer during dissolution into slag. This was caused by a gas formation due to a thermal decomposition of residual limestone existed in quicklime. In this study, the dissolution rate of quicklime with the gas formation is quantitatively investigated.

  16. An international comparison of governmental disclosure of hydrocarbon spills from offshore oil and gas installations.

    PubMed

    Fraser, G S; Ellis, J; Hussain, L

    2008-01-01

    The cumulative effect of accidental spills from oil and gas extraction in the marine environment can have significant impacts on marine wildlife. Oil and gas operators are typically required to report spill data as part of a regulatory process. We conducted a survey of the public disclosure of hydrocarbon spill data for four countries, Australia, Canada, United Kingdom and United States. There was significant variation in the spill data statistics that were publicly reported by the regulators. No country provided full disclosure of spill data or follow-up actions taken by the regulator on their website. The lack of disclosure of spill data is of concern because the scale of environmental effects is more difficult to assess, insufficient information is available to assess the accuracy of predictions made in the environmental assessment process, and without consistency of spill reporting there is no method to compare regional differences of spill rates.

  17. Commandant’s International Technical Series. Volume 7. Regulations and Guidelines for Inert Gas Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-04-01

    come into force on 25 May 1Q80, NOTING ALSO that the Maritime Safety Committee at its forty-first session approved a revised text of Regulation 62 for...related to individual scrubber designs and materials. MSC/Circ. 282 Page 25 .2 The water level in the scrubber shall be monitored by a high water...19 Inert Gas Distribution System 19 Chapter 6 - BLOWERS 21 Blower Service 21 Blower Type 22 Blower Component Requirements 22 Chapter 7 - VALVES 25

  18. Oxygen Release from Cationic Niobium-Vanadium Oxide Clusters, NbnVmOk(+), Revealed by Gas Phase Thermal Desorption Spectrometry and Density Functional Theory Calculations.

    PubMed

    Masuzaki, Daigo; Nagata, Toshiaki; Mafuné, Fumitaka

    2017-05-25

    Thermal dissociation of the cationic niobium-vanadium oxide clusters, NbnVmOk(+) (n + m = 2-8), was investigated by gas phase thermal desorption spectrometry. The oxygen-rich NbnVmOk(+) released O and O2 for odd and even values of n + m, respectively. Substitution of more than one Nb atom in NbnOk(+) by V drastically lowered the desorption temperature of O2 for even values of n + m, whereas the substitution of more than two Nb atoms opened a new desorption path involving the release of O2 for odd values of n + m. The substitution effects can be explained by the fact that Nb atoms display the +5 state, whereas V atoms can exist in either the +4 or +5 states. The geometrical structures of selected NbnVmOk(+) clusters were optimized and the energetics of the release of O/O2 from the clusters was discussed on the basis of the results of DFT calculations.

  19. A Possible Organic Contribution to the Low Temperature CO2 Release Seen in Mars Phoenix Thermal and Evolved Gas Analyzer Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Archer, P. D. Jr.; Lauer, H. V., Jr.; Sutter, B.; Ming, D. W.; Niles, P. B.; Boynton, W. V.

    2012-01-01

    Two of the most important discoveries of the Phoenix Mars Lander were the discovery of approx.0.6% perchlorate [1] and 3-5% carbonate [2] in the soils at the landing site in the martian northern plains. The Thermal and Evolved Gas Analyzer (TEGA) instrument was one of the tools that made this discovery. After soil samples were delivered to TEGA and transferred into small ovens, the samples could be heated up to approx.1000 C and the gases that evolved during heating were monitored by a mass spectrometer. A CO2 signal was detected at high temperature (approx.750 C) that has been attributed to calcium carbonate decomposition. In addition to this CO2 release, a lower temperature signal was seen. This lower temperature CO2 release was postulated to be one of three things: 1) desorption of CO2, 2) decomposition of a different carbonate mineral, or 3) CO2 released due to organic combustion. Cannon et al. [3] present another novel hypothesis involving the interaction of decomposition products of a perchlorate salt and calcium carbonate.

  20. CFD analysis of the influence of meteorological conditions on motion of gas ammonia in the case of emergency release in urban development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavila, O.; Bojko, M.; Kozubková, M.; Danihelka, P.; Maléřová, L.

    2013-10-01

    Ammonia in all physical states is a toxic substance that can endanger people's health. It is used in various industrial technologies, including freezing of ice surfaces in ice stadiums. There exist advanced ammonia-free technologies but in many places liquid ammonia is still used in large volumes. It is no exception that objects using ammonia cooling and freezing technologies are placed in densely populated urban areas or in their immediate vicinities. An accidental ammonia release can pose a risk to health and lives of humans located in the release source immediate vicinity. The article presents the results of a numerical CFD model of gas ammonia plume motion and dispersion after an accidental release from a real ice stadium situated in an urban area. The CFD analysis was performed using the ANSYS Fluent 14.0 for two seasons and eight wind directions. Sixteen tasks emerged, the results of which can define the influence of meteorological conditions (wind direction, wind speed, temperature, etc.) and surrounding buildings on the motion and dispersion of pollutant plume. The simulation was performed with real local meteorological data. The numerical model had been verified by tasks performed in a low-speed wind tunnel. The results show that the influence of meteorological conditions, especially the influence of calendar seasons, on the pollutant plume propagation can be very pronounced. Principles and conclusions drawn from this and similar analyses may have great benefits for emergency planning in complex urban areas.

  1. Evaluation of simulated dredging to control internal phosphorus release from sediments: Focused on phosphorus transfer and resupply across the sediment-water interface.

    PubMed

    Yu, Juhua; Ding, Shiming; Zhong, Jicheng; Fan, Chengxin; Chen, Qiuwen; Yin, Hongbin; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Yinlong

    2017-03-16

    Sediment dredging is an effective restoration method to control the internal phosphorus (P) loading of eutrophic lakes. However, the core question is that the real mechanism of dredging responsible for sediment internal P release still remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the P exchange across the sediment-water interface (SWI) and the internal P resupply ability from the sediments after dredging. The study is based on a one-year field simulation study in Lake Taihu, China, using a Rhizon soil moisture sampler, high-resolution dialysis (HR-Peeper), ZrO-Chelex diffusive gradients in thin film (ZrO-Chelex DGT), and P fractionation and adsorption isotherm techniques. The results showed low concentration of labile P in the pore water with a low diffusion potential and a low resupply ability from the sediments after dredging. The calculated flux of P from the post-dredged sediments decreased by 58% compared with that of non-dredged sediments. Furthermore, the resupply in the upper 20mm of the post-dredged sediments was reduced significantly after dredging (P<0.001). Phosphorus fractionation analysis showed a reduction of 25% in the mobile P fractions in the post-dredged sediments. Further analysis demonstrated that the zero equilibrium P concentration (EPC0), partitioning coefficient (Kp), and adsorption capacity (Qmax) on the surface sediments increased after dredging. Therefore, dredging could effectively reduce the internal P resupply ability of the sediments. The reasons for this reduction are probably the lower contributions of mobile P fractions, higher retention ability, and the adsorption capacity of P for post-dredged sediments. Overall, this investigation indicated that dredging was capable of effectively controlling sediment internal P release, which could be ascribed to the removal of the surface sediments enriched with total phosphorus (TP) and/or organic matter (OM), coupled with the inactivation of P to iron (Fe) (hydr)oxides in the upper 20mm

  2. Development of advanced material composites for use as internal insulation for LH2 tanks (gas layer concept)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gille, J. P.

    1972-01-01

    A program is described that was conducted to develop an internal insulation system for potential application to the liquid hydrogen tanks of a reusable booster, where the tanks would be subjected to repeated high temperatures. The design of the internal insulation is based on a unique gas layer concept, in which capillary or surface tension effects are used to maintain a stable gas layer, within a cellular core structure, between the tank wall and the contained liquid hydrogen. Specific objectives were to select materials for insulation systems that would be compatible with wall temperatures of 350 F and 650 F during reentry into the earth's atmosphere, and to fabricate and test insulation systems under conditions simulating the operating environment. A materials test program was conducted to evaluate the properties of candidate materials at elevated temperatures and at the temperature of liquid hydrogen, and to determine the compatibility of the materials with a hydrogen atmosphere at the appropriate elevated temperature. The materials that were finally selected included Kapton polyimide films, silicone adhesives, fiber glass batting, and in the case of the 350 F system, Teflon film.

  3. Hemoglobin encapsulation in vesicles retards NO and CO binding and O2 release when perfused through narrow gas-permeable tubes.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Hiromi; Okuda, Naoto; Sato, Atsushi; Yamaue, Tatsuya; Takeoka, Shinji; Tsuchida, Eishun

    2010-03-01

    Intravenous administration of cell-free Hb induces vasoconstriction and circulatory disorders, presumably because of the intrinsic affinities to endogenous nitric oxide (NO) and carbon monoxide (CO) as vasorelaxation factors and because of the facilitated O(2) release that might induce autoregulatory vasoconstriction. We examined these gas reactions when Hb-containing solutions of four kinds were perfused through artificial narrow tubes at a practical Hb concentration (10 g/dl). Purified Hb solution, polymerized bovine Hb (Poly(B)Hb), encapsulated Hb [Hb-vesicles (HbV), 279 nm], and red blood cells (RBCs) were perfused through a gas-permeable narrow tube (25 microm inner diameter) at 1 mm/s centerline velocity. The level of reactions was determined microscopically based on the visible-light absorption spectrum of Hb. When the tube was immersed in NO and CO atmospheres, both NO binding and CO binding of deoxygenated Hb (deoxy-Hb) and Poly(B)Hb in the tube was faster than those of HbV and RBCs, and HbV and RBCs showed almost identical binding rates. When the tube was immersed in a N(2) atmosphere, oxygenated Hb and Poly(B)Hb showed much faster O(2) release than did HbV and RBCs. Poly(B)Hb showed a faster reaction than Hb because of the lower O(2) affinity of Poly(B)Hb than Hb. The diffusion process of the particles was simulated using Navier-Stokes and Maxwell-Stefan equations. Results clarified that small Hb (6 nm) diffuses laterally and mixes rapidly. However, the large-dimension HbV shows no such rapid diffusion. The purely physicochemical differences in diffusivity of the particles and the resulting reactivity with gas molecules are one factor inducing biological vasoconstriction of Hb-based oxygen carriers.

  4. Fast Spatially Resolved Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) Distribution Measurements in an Internal Combustion Engine Using Absorption Spectroscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Yoo, Jihyung; Prikhodko, Vitaly; Parks, James E.; ...

    2015-09-01

    One effective method of reducing NOx emissions while improving efficiency is exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) in internal combustion engines. But, insufficient mixing between fresh air and exhaust gas can lead to cycle-to-cycle and cylinder-to-cylinder nonuniform charge gas mixtures of a multi-cylinder engine, which can in turn reduce engine performance and efficiency. Furthermore, a sensor packaged into a compact probe was designed, built and applied to measure spatiotemporal EGR distributions in the intake manifold of an operating engine. The probe promotes the development of more efficient and higher-performance engines by resolving high-speed in situ CO2 concentration at various locations in themore » intake manifold. Our study employed mid-infrared light sources tuned to an absorption band of CO2 near 4.3 μm, an industry standard species for determining EGR fraction. The calibrated probe was used to map spatial EGR distributions in an intake manifold with high accuracy and monitor cycle-resolved cylinder-specific EGR fluctuations at a rate of up to 1 kHz.« less

  5. Fast spatially resolved exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) distribution measurements in an internal combustion engine using absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Jihyung; Prikhodko, Vitaly; Parks, James E; Perfetto, Anthony; Geckler, Sam; Partridge, William P

    2015-09-01

    Exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) in internal combustion engines is an effective method of reducing NOx emissions while improving efficiency. However, insufficient mixing between fresh air and exhaust gas can lead to cycle-to-cycle and cylinder-to-cylinder non-uniform charge gas mixtures of a multi-cylinder engine, which can in turn reduce engine performance and efficiency. A sensor packaged into a compact probe was designed, built and applied to measure spatiotemporal EGR distributions in the intake manifold of an operating engine. The probe promotes the development of more efficient and higher-performance engines by resolving high-speed in situ CO2 concentration at various locations in the intake manifold. The study employed mid-infrared light sources tuned to an absorption band of CO2 near 4.3 μm, an industry standard species for determining EGR fraction. The calibrated probe was used to map spatial EGR distributions in an intake manifold with high accuracy and monitor cycle-resolved cylinder-specific EGR fluctuations at a rate of up to 1 kHz.

  6. Fast Spatially Resolved Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) Distribution Measurements in an Internal Combustion Engine Using Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, Jihyung; Prikhodko, Vitaly; Parks, James E.; Perfetto, Anthony; Geckler, Sam; Partridge, William P.

    2015-09-01

    One effective method of reducing NOx emissions while improving efficiency is exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) in internal combustion engines. But, insufficient mixing between fresh air and exhaust gas can lead to cycle-to-cycle and cylinder-to-cylinder nonuniform charge gas mixtures of a multi-cylinder engine, which can in turn reduce engine performance and efficiency. Furthermore, a sensor packaged into a compact probe was designed, built and applied to measure spatiotemporal EGR distributions in the intake manifold of an operating engine. The probe promotes the development of more efficient and higher-performance engines by resolving high-speed in situ CO2 concentration at various locations in the intake manifold. Our study employed mid-infrared light sources tuned to an absorption band of CO2 near 4.3 μm, an industry standard species for determining EGR fraction. The calibrated probe was used to map spatial EGR distributions in an intake manifold with high accuracy and monitor cycle-resolved cylinder-specific EGR fluctuations at a rate of up to 1 kHz.

  7. Tuberculosis screening using a T-cell interferon-γ release assay in Japanese medical students and non-Japanese international students.

    PubMed

    Ogiwara, Takayuki; Kimura, Takao; Tokue, Yutaka; Watanabe, Rumi; Nara, Makoto; Obuchi, Toshiko; Yaegashi, Akiko; Yomoda, Sachie; Ohshima, Kihachi; Murakami, Masami

    2013-06-01

    Screening of medical students and international students for tuberculosis (TB) at the time of admission is a key strategy to control and prevent the spread of infection on university campus and teaching hospitals because of the high risk of exposure to TB patients. The Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigen-specific T-cell interferon-γ release assays (IGRAs) are specific latent tuberculosis detection methods used in such groups. Currently, in Japan, there are no guidelines and no baseline data on IGRAs to evaluate the risk of TB in these high-risk groups. In order to evaluate TB risk at the time of admission in university campus and medical schools in Japan, a retrospective study was conducted. A total of 969 students (585 Japanese students and 384 international students) were screened for TB using the IGRAs at the time of admission. Eight Japanese students (0.9%) were positive for IGRAs, but none were diagnosed with active TB at the follow-up. In contrast, 30 international students (7.8%) were positive for IGRAs, including two students diagnosed with active TB during follow up. Positive ratio of IGRAs in international students was significantly higher than that of medical students at the time of admission. Here we propose a standard approach for TB screening with IGRAs at the time of admission for medical students and international students in Japan.

  8. 75 FR 82040 - Notice of Public Meeting on the International Maritime Organization Guidelines for Exhaust Gas...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-29

    ... regulation 14 of Annex VI of the International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships (MARPOL 73/78). On July 21, 2008, the Maritime Pollution Prevention Act of 2008, Public Law 110-280, was enacted. This legislation amended the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships (APPS), 33 U.S.C. 1901-1915...

  9. 76 FR 58288 - International Maritime Organization Guidelines for Exhaust Gas Cleaning Systems for Marine...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-20

    ... 4 of the International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution by Ships, 1973 as modified by the... effective in reducing sulfur oxide emissions as the requirements of MARPOL Annex VI regulation 14. DATES... systems for marine engines to remove sulfur oxide emissions. Annex VI regulation 4 of the...

  10. STEADY-STATE FLAMMABLE GAS RELEASE RATE CALCULATION AND LOWER FLAMMABILITY LEVEL EVALUATION FOR HANFORD TANK WASTE

    SciTech Connect

    HU TA

    2007-10-26

    Assess the steady-state flammability level at normal and off-normal ventilation conditions. The methodology of flammability analysis for Hanford tank waste is developed. The hydrogen generation rate model was applied to calculate the gas generation rate for 177 tanks. Flammability concentrations and the time to reach 25% and 100% of the lower flammability limit, and the minimum ventilation rate to keep from 100 of the LFL are calculated for 177 tanks at various scenarios.

  11. EFFECTS OF ALTERNATE ANTIFOAM AGENTS, NOBLE METALS, MIXING SYSTEMS AND MASS TRANSFER ON GAS HOLDUP AND RELEASE FROM NONNEWTONIAN SLURRIES

    SciTech Connect

    Guerrero, H; Mark Fowley, M; Charles Crawford, C; Michael Restivo, M; Robert Leishear, R

    2007-12-24

    Gas holdup tests performed in a small-scale mechanically-agitated mixing system at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) were reported in 2006. The tests were for a simulant of waste from the Hanford Tank 241-AZ-101 and featured additions of DOW Corning Q2-3183A Antifoam agent. Results indicated that this antifoam agent (AFA) increased gas holdup in the waste simulant by about a factor of four and, counter intuitively, that the holdup increased as the simulant shear strength decreased (apparent viscosity decreased). These results raised questions about how the AFA might affect gas holdup in Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) vessels mixed by air sparging and pulse-jet mixers (PJMs). And whether the WTP air supply system being designed would have the capacity to handle a demand for increased airflow to operate the sparger-PJM mixing systems should the AFA increase retention of the radiochemically generated flammable gases in the waste by making the gas bubbles smaller and less mobile, or decrease the size of sparger bubbles making them mix less effectively for a given airflow rate. A new testing program was developed to assess the potential effects of adding the DOW Corning Q2-3183A AFA to WTP waste streams by first confirming the results of the work reported in 2006 by Stewart et al. and then determining if the AFA in fact causes such increased gas holdup in a prototypic sparger-PJM mixing system, or if the increased holdup is just a feature of the small-scale agitation system. Other elements of the new program include evaluating effects other variables could have on gas holdup in systems with AFA additions such as catalysis from trace noble metals in the waste, determining mass transfer coefficients for the AZ-101 waste simulant, and determining whether other AFA compositions such as Dow Corning 1520-US could also increase gas holdup in Hanford waste. This new testing program was split into two investigations, prototypic sparger

  12. Controlling thermal properties of dense gas fluidized beds for concentrated solar power by internal and external solids circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ammendola, Paola; Bareschino, Piero; Chirone, Riccardo; Salatino, Piero; Solimene, Roberto

    2017-06-01

    Fluidization technology displays a long record of success stories, mostly related to applications to thermal and thermochemical processes, which are fostering extension to novel and relatively unexplored fields. Application of fluidized beds to collection and thermal storage of solar radiation in Concentrated Solar Power (CSP) is one of the most promising, a field which poses challenging issues and great opportunities to fluidization scientists and technologists. The potential of this growing field calls for reconsideration of some of the typical design and operation guidelines and criteria, with the goal of exploiting the inherently good thermal performances of gas-fluidized beds at their best. "Creative" and non-conventional design and operation of fluidized beds, like those based on internal and external solids circulation, may be beneficial to the enhancement of thermal diffusivity and surface-to-bed heat transfer, improving the potential for application in the very demanding context of CSP with thermal energy storage. This paper investigated: i) a fluidized bed configuration with an uneven distribution of the fluidizing gas to promote vortices in the scale of bed height (internal solids circulation); ii) a dual fluidized bed configuration characterized by an external solids circulation achieved by the operation of a riser and a bubbling fluidized bed. CFD simulations showed the hydrodynamics conditions under which the internal solids circulation was established. The hydrodynamic characterization of the external solids circulation was achieved by an experimental study carried out with different cold models. The dual fluidized bed system was optimized in terms of operating conditions and geometrical features of the connections between two fluidized beds.

  13. Internal energy distribution of carboxylate negative-ions of the herbicide diclofop acid in the gas-phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Headley, J. V.; Peru, K. M.

    1997-11-01

    Unimolecular dissociations of diclofop acid and three of its esters were studied using electron capture negative-ion mass spectrometry, to determine to what extent the gas-phase chemistry correlated with transformation products reported for the herbicide in soils and microbial biofilms. Electron capture of the trimethylsilyl (TMS) and pentafluorobenzyl (PFB) esters along with H+ abstraction of diclofop acid were used to form the carboxylate ion at m / z 325. The degree of dissociation of this ion was strongly dependent on the relative distribution of internal energies, chemical nature and size of the ester group. For carboxylate ions formed with relatively low distribution of internal energies (PFB ester), elimination of HCl only was the preferred pathway. In contrast, m / z 325 from the TMS ester and diclofop acid, underwent loss of Cl, followed by loss of HCl to give m / z 254 with some direct loss of HCl for the TMS ester. For carboxylate ions formed with little or no internal energy under electrospray ionization, no unimolecular dissociations were observed. However, a wide range of product-ions were observed for the latter using collision-induced dissociations. For the methyl ester there was a preponderance for initial formation of a chlorodibenzofuran oxide ion (m / z 217) instead of electron attachment on the carbonyl function. The ion (m / z 217) was also prevalent for fragmentation of m / z 253 produced directly by electron capture of diclofop acid and the TMS ester. In general, the gas-phase ion chemistry correlated well with the distribution of some transformation products reported in the literature for the herbicide in soils and microbial biofilms.

  14. Mechanism of internal browning of pineapple: The role of gibberellins catabolism gene (AcGA2ox) and GAs

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qin; Rao, Xiuwen; Zhang, Lubin; He, Congcong; Yang, Fang; Zhu, Shijiang

    2016-01-01

    Internal browning (IB), a physiological disorder (PD) that causes severe losses in harvested pineapple, can be induced by exogenous gibberellins (GAs). Over the years, studies have focused on roles of Gibberellin 2-oxidase (GA2oxs), the major GAs catabolic enzyme in plants, in the regulation of changes in morphology or biomass. However, whether GA2oxs could regulate PD has not been reported. Here, a full-length AcGA2ox cDNA was isolated from pineapple, with the putative protein sharing 23.59% to 72.92% identity with GA2oxs from five other plants. Pineapples stored at 5 °C stayed intact, while those stored at 20 °C showed severe IB. Storage at 5 °C enhanced AcGA2ox expression and decreased levels of a GAs (GA4) ‘compared with storage at 20 °C. However, at 20 °C, exogenous application of abscisic acid (ABA) significantly suppressed IB. ABA simultaneously upregulated AcGA2ox and reduced GA4. Ectopic expression of AcGA2ox in Arabidopsis resulted in reduced GA4, lower seed germination, and shorter hypocotyls and roots, all of which were restored by exogenous GA4/7. Moreover, in pineapple, GA4/7 upregulated polyphenol oxidase, while storage at 5 °C and ABA downregulated it. These results strongly suggest the involvement of AcGA2ox in regulation of GAs levels and a role of AcGA2ox in regulating IB. PMID:27982026

  15. Mechanism of internal browning of pineapple: The role of gibberellins catabolism gene (AcGA2ox) and GAs.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qin; Rao, Xiuwen; Zhang, Lubin; He, Congcong; Yang, Fang; Zhu, Shijiang

    2016-12-16

    Internal browning (IB), a physiological disorder (PD) that causes severe losses in harvested pineapple, can be induced by exogenous gibberellins (GAs). Over the years, studies have focused on roles of Gibberellin 2-oxidase (GA2oxs), the major GAs catabolic enzyme in plants, in the regulation of changes in morphology or biomass. However, whether GA2oxs could regulate PD has not been reported. Here, a full-length AcGA2ox cDNA was isolated from pineapple, with the putative protein sharing 23.59% to 72.92% identity with GA2oxs from five other plants. Pineapples stored at 5 °C stayed intact, while those stored at 20 °C showed severe IB. Storage at 5 °C enhanced AcGA2ox expression and decreased levels of a GAs (GA4) 'compared with storage at 20 °C. However, at 20 °C, exogenous application of abscisic acid (ABA) significantly suppressed IB. ABA simultaneously upregulated AcGA2ox and reduced GA4. Ectopic expression of AcGA2ox in Arabidopsis resulted in reduced GA4, lower seed germination, and shorter hypocotyls and roots, all of which were restored by exogenous GA4/7. Moreover, in pineapple, GA4/7 upregulated polyphenol oxidase, while storage at 5 °C and ABA downregulated it. These results strongly suggest the involvement of AcGA2ox in regulation of GAs levels and a role of AcGA2ox in regulating IB.

  16. Detection of internal defects in a liquid natural gas tank by use of infrared thermography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kantsios, A. G.

    1978-01-01

    The use of an infrared scanning technique to detect defects in the secondary barrier of a liquid natural gas tank is described. The method works by detecting leak-caused temperature differences as low as 0.2 K, but can provide only an approximate idea of the extent of the defect. The nondestructive method was tested in a study of a LNG tank already at its location in a ship; the secondary barrier was located inside the tank wall. Defective areas indicated by the infrared radiometric measurements were confirmed by other probe techniques and by physical examination.

  17. Detection of internal defects in a liquid natural gas tank by use of infrared thermography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kantsios, A. G.

    1978-01-01

    The use of an infrared scanning technique to detect defects in the secondary barrier of a liquid natural gas tank is described. The method works by detecting leak-caused temperature differences as low as 0.2 K, but can provide only an approximate idea of the extent of the defect. The nondestructive method was tested in a study of a LNG tank already at its location in a ship; the secondary barrier was located inside the tank wall. Defective areas indicated by the infrared radiometric measurements were confirmed by other probe techniques and by physical examination.

  18. An inert-gas furnace for neutron scattering measurements of internal stresses in engineering materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haynes, R.; Paradowska, A. M.; Chowdhury, M. A. H.; Goodway, C. M.; Done, R.; Kirichek, O.; Oliver, E. C.

    2012-04-01

    The ENGIN-X beamline is a dedicated engineering science facility at ISIS optimized for the measurement of strain, and thus stress, deep within crystalline materials using the atomic lattice planes as an atomic ‘strain gauge’. Internal stresses in materials have a considerable effect on material properties including fatigue resistance, fracture toughness and strength. The growing interest in properties of materials at high temperatures may be attributed to the dynamic development in technologies where materials are exposed to a high-temperature environment for example in the aerospace industry or fission and fusion nuclear reactors. This article describes in detail the design and construction of a furnace for neutron scattering measurements of internal stress in engineering materials under mechanical load and in elevated temperature environments, designed to permit a range of gases to provide a non-oxidizing atmosphere for hot samples.

  19. Estimation of internal heat transfer coefficients and detection of rib positions in gas turbine blades from transient surface temperature measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heidrich, P.; Wolfersdorf, J. v.; Schmidt, S.; Schnieder, M.

    2008-11-01

    This paper describes a non-invasive, non-destructive, transient inverse measurement technique that allows one to determine internal heat transfer coefficients and rib positions of real gas turbine blades from outer surface temperature measurements after a sudden flow heating. The determination of internal heat transfer coefficients is important during the design process to adjust local heat transfer to spatial thermal load. The detection of rib positions is important during production to fulfill design and quality requirements. For the analysis the one-dimensional transient heat transfer problem inside of the turbine blade's wall was solved. This solution was combined with the Levenberg-Marquardt method to estimate the unknown boundary condition by an inverse technique. The method was tested with artificial data to determine uncertainties with positive results. Then experimental testing with a reference model was carried out. Based on the results, it is concluded that the presented inverse technique could be used to determine internal heat transfer coefficients and to detect rib positions of real turbine blades.

  20. Towards a Novel Integrated Approach for Estimating Greenhouse Gas Emissions in Support of International Agreements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reimann, S.; Vollmer, M. K.; Henne, S.; Brunner, D.; Emmenegger, L.; Manning, A.; Fraser, P. J.; Krummel, P. B.; Dunse, B. L.; DeCola, P.; Tarasova, O. A.

    2016-12-01

    In the recently adopted Paris Agreement the community of signatory states has agreed to limit the future global temperature increase between +1.5 °C and +2.0 °C, compared to pre-industrial times. To achieve this goal, emission reduction targets have been submitted by individual nations (called Intended Nationally Determined Contributions, INDCs). Inventories will be used for checking progress towards these envisaged goals. These inventories are calculated by combining information on specific activities (e.g. passenger cars, agriculture) with activity-related, typically IPCC-sanctioned, emission factors - the so-called bottom-up method. These calculated emissions are reported on an annual basis and are checked by external bodies by using the same method. A second independent method estimates emissions by translating greenhouse gas measurements made at regionally representative stations into regional/global emissions using meteorologically-based transport models. In recent years this so-called top-down approach has been substantially advanced into a powerful tool and emission estimates at the national/regional level have become possible. This method is already used in Switzerland, in the United Kingdom and in Australia to estimate greenhouse gas emissions and independently support the national bottom-up emission inventories within the UNFCCC framework. Examples of the comparison of the two independent methods will be presented and the added-value will be discussed. The World Meteorological Organization (WMO) and partner organizations are currently developing a plan to expand this top-down approach and to expand the globally representative GAW network of ground-based stations and remote-sensing platforms and integrate their information with atmospheric transport models. This Integrated Global Greenhouse Gas Information System (IG3IS) initiative will help nations to improve the accuracy of their country-based emissions inventories and their ability to evaluate the

  1. Flow structure and heat exchange analysis in internal cooling channel of gas turbine blade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szwaba, Ryszard; Kaczynski, Piotr; Doerffer, Piotr; Telega, Janusz

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents the study of the flow structure and heat transfer, and also their correlations on the four walls of a radial cooling passage model of a gas turbine blade. The investigations focus on heat transfer and aerodynamic measurements in the channel, which is an accurate representation of the configuration used in aeroengines. Correlations for the heat transfer coefficient and the pressure drop used in the design of radial cooling passages are often developed from simplified models. It is important to note that real engine passages do not have perfect rectangular cross sections, but include corner fillet, ribs with fillet radii and special orientation. Therefore, this work provides detailed fluid flow and heat transfer data for a model of radial cooling geometry which possesses very realistic features.

  2. International comparison CCQM-K113—noble gas mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Jeong Sik; Lee, Jinbok; Moon, Dongmin; Tshilongo, James; Qiao, Han; Shuguo, Hu; Tiqiang, Zhang; Kelley, Michael E.; Rhoderick, George C.; Konopelko, L. A.; Kolobova, A. V.; Vasserman, I. I.; Zavyalov, S. V.; Gromova, E. V.; Efremova, O. V.

    2017-01-01

    Noble gases are one of the key elements used in the various processes of the bulbs industry, automotive industry, space industry, lasers industry, display industry as well as the semiconductor industry. Considering continuous growth, the provision of a reliable standard is required for those industries to improve their productivity. In this report, a result of the key comparison, CCQM-K113: noble gas mixture, is presented. Nominal amount-of-substance fractions of argon, neon, krypton, and xenon in helium are 20, 10, 2, and 1 cmol/mol, respectively. Main text To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCQM, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  3. Performance, Efficiency, and Emissions Characterization of Reciprocating Internal Combustion Engines Fueled with Hydrogen/Natural Gas Blends

    SciTech Connect

    Kirby S. Chapman; Amar Patil

    2007-06-30

    Hydrogen is an attractive fuel source not only because it is abundant and renewable but also because it produces almost zero regulated emissions. Internal combustion engines fueled by compressed natural gas (CNG) are operated throughout a variety of industries in a number of mobile and stationary applications. While CNG engines offer many advantages over conventional gasoline and diesel combustion engines, CNG engine performance can be substantially improved in the lean operating region. Lean operation has a number of benefits, the most notable of which is reduced emissions. However, the extremely low flame propagation velocities of CNG greatly restrict the lean operating limits of CNG engines. Hydrogen, however, has a high flame speed and a wide operating limit that extends into the lean region. The addition of hydrogen to a CNG engine makes it a viable and economical method to significantly extend the lean operating limit and thereby improve performance and reduce emissions. Drawbacks of hydrogen as a fuel source, however, include lower power density due to a lower heating value per unit volume as compared to CNG, and susceptibility to pre-ignition and engine knock due to wide flammability limits and low minimum ignition energy. Combining hydrogen with CNG, however, overcomes the drawbacks inherent in each fuel type. Objectives of the current study were to evaluate the feasibility of using blends of hydrogen and natural gas as a fuel for conventional natural gas engines. The experiment and data analysis included evaluation of engine performance, efficiency, and emissions along with detailed in-cylinder measurements of key physical parameters. This provided a detailed knowledge base of the impact of using hydrogen/natural gas blends. A four-stroke, 4.2 L, V-6 naturally aspirated natural gas engine coupled to an eddy current dynamometer was used to measure the impact of hydrogen/natural gas blends on performance, thermodynamic efficiency and exhaust gas emissions

  4. Internal limiting membrane peeling and gas tamponade for myopic foveoschisis: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Meng, Bo; Zhao, Lu; Yin, Yi; Li, Hongyang; Wang, Xiaolei; Yang, Xiufen; You, Ran; Wang, Jialin; Zhang, Youjing; Wang, Hui; Du, Ran; Wang, Ningli; Zhan, Siyan; Wang, Yanling

    2017-09-08

    Myopic foveoschisis (MF) is among the leading causes of visual loss in high myopia. However, it remains controversial whether internal limiting membrane (ILM) peeling or gas tamponade is necessary treatment option for MF. PubMed, EMBASE, CBM, CNKI, WANFANG DATA and VIP databases were systematically reviewed. Outcome indicators were myopic foveoschisis resolution rate, visual acuity improvement and postoperative complications. Nine studies that included 239 eyes were selected. The proportion of resolution of foveoschisis was higher in ILM peeling group than non-ILM peeling group (OR = 2.15, 95% CI: 1.06-4.35; P = 0.03). The proportion of postoperative complications was higher in Tamponade group than non-Tamponade group (OR = 10.81, 95% CI: 1.26-93.02; P = 0.03). However, the proportion of visual acuity improvement (OR = 1.63, 95% CI: 0.56-4.80; P = 0.37) between ILM peeling group and non-ILM peeling group and the proportion of resolution of foveoschisis (OR = 1.80, 95% CI: 0.76-4.28; P = 0.18) between Tamponade group and non-Tamponade group were similar. Vitrectomy with internal limiting membrane peeling could contribute to better resolution of myopic foveoschisis than non-peeling, however it does not significantly influence the proportion of visual acuity improvement and postoperative complications. Vitrectomy with gas tamponade is associated with more complications than non-tamponade and does not significantly influence the proportion of visual acuity improvement and resolution of myopic foveoschisis.

  5. International challenge to predict the impact of radioxenon releases from medical isotope production on a comprehensive nuclear test ban treaty sampling station

    SciTech Connect

    Eslinger, Paul W.; Bowyer, Ted W.; Achim, Pascal; Chai, Tianfeng; Deconninck, Benoit; Freeman, Katie; Generoso, Sylvia; Hayes, Philip; Heidmann, Verena; Hoffman, Ian; Kijima, Yuichi; Krysta, Monika; Malo, Alain; Maurer, Christian; Ngan, Fantine; Robins, Peter; Ross, J. Ole; Saunier, Olivier; Schlosser, Clemens; Schöppner, Michael; Schrom, Brian T.; Seibert, Petra; Stein, Ariel F.; Ungar, Kurt; Yi, Jing

    2016-06-01

    Abstract The International Monitoring System (IMS) is part of the verification regime for the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban-Treaty Organization (CTBTO). At entry-into-force, half of the 80 radionuclide stations will be able to measure concentrations of several radioactive xenon isotopes produced in nuclear explosions, and then the full network may be populated with xenon monitoring afterward (Bowyer et al., 2013). Fission-based production of 99Mo for medical purposes also releases radioxenon isotopes to the atmosphere (Saey, 2009). One of the ways to mitigate the effect of emissions from medical isotope production is the use of stack monitoring data, if it were available, so that the effect of radioactive xenon emissions could be subtracted from the effect from a presumed nuclear explosion, when detected at an IMS station location. To date, no studies have addressed the impacts the time resolution or data accuracy of stack monitoring data have on predicted concentrations at an IMS station location. Recently, participants from seven nations used atmospheric transport modeling to predict the time-history of 133Xe concentration measurements at an IMS station in Germany using stack monitoring data from a medical isotope production facility in Belgium. Participants received only stack monitoring data and used the atmospheric transport model and meteorological data of their choice. Some of the models predicted the highest measured concentrations quite well (a high composite statistical model comparison rank or a small mean square error with the measured values). The results suggest release data on a 15 min time spacing is best. The model comparison rank and ensemble analysis suggests that combining multiple models may provide more accurate predicted concentrations than any single model. Further research is needed to identify optimal methods for selecting ensemble members and those methods may depend on the specific transport problem. None of the submissions based only

  6. FEMO, A FLOW AND ENRICHMENT MONITOR FOR VERIFYING COMPLIANCE WITH INTERNATIONAL SAFEGUARDS REQUIREMENTS AT A GAS CENTRIFUGE ENRICHMENT FACILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Gunning, John E; Laughter, Mark D; March-Leuba, Jose A

    2008-01-01

    A number of countries have received construction licenses or are contemplating the construction of large-capacity gas centrifuge enrichment plants (GCEPs). The capability to independently verify nuclear material flows is a key component of international safeguards approaches, and the IAEA does not currently have an approved method to continuously monitor the mass flow of 235U in uranium hexafluoride (UF6) gas streams. Oak Ridge National Laboratory is investigating the development of a flow and enrichment monitor, or FEMO, based on an existing blend-down monitoring system (BDMS). The BDMS was designed to continuously monitor both 235U mass flow and enrichment of UF6 streams at the low pressures similar to those which exists at GCEPs. BDMSs have been installed at three sites-the first unit has operated successfully in an unattended environment for approximately 10 years. To be acceptable to GCEP operators, it is essential that the instrument be installed and maintained without interrupting operations. A means to continuously verify flow as is proposed by FEMO will likely be needed to monitor safeguards at large-capacity plants. This will enable the safeguards effectiveness that currently exists at smaller plants to be maintained at the larger facilities and also has the potential to reduce labor costs associated with inspections at current and future plants. This paper describes the FEMO design requirements, operating capabilities, and development work required before field demonstration.

  7. Apparatus for material tests using an internal loading system in high-pressure gas at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imade, M.; Fukuyama, S.; Yokogawa, K.

    2008-07-01

    A new type of apparatus for material tests using an internal loading system in high-pressure gas up to 100MPa at room temperature without conventional material testing equipment was developed. The apparatus consists of a high-pressure control system and a pressure vessel, in which a piston is installed in the cylinder of the pressure vessel. The load caused by the pressure difference between spaces separated by the piston in the vessel cylinder is applied on the specimen connected to the piston in the vessel cylinder. The actual load on the specimen is directly measured by an external load cell and the displacement of the specimen is also measured by an external extensometer. As an example of the application of the apparatus, a tensile test on SUS316 stainless steel the Japanese Industrial Standard (JIS) G4303, which is comparable to the type 316 stainless steel ASTM A276, was conducted in 90MPa hydrogen and argon. Hydrogen showed a marked effect on the tensile property of the material. The hydrogen gas embrittlement of the material was briefly discussed.

  8. Apparatus for material tests using an internal loading system in high-pressure gas at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Imade, M; Fukuyama, S; Yokogawa, K

    2008-07-01

    A new type of apparatus for material tests using an internal loading system in high-pressure gas up to 100 MPa at room temperature without conventional material testing equipment was developed. The apparatus consists of a high-pressure control system and a pressure vessel, in which a piston is installed in the cylinder of the pressure vessel. The load caused by the pressure difference between spaces separated by the piston in the vessel cylinder is applied on the specimen connected to the piston in the vessel cylinder. The actual load on the specimen is directly measured by an external load cell and the displacement of the specimen is also measured by an external extensometer. As an example of the application of the apparatus, a tensile test on SUS316 stainless steel the Japanese Industrial Standard (JIS) G4303, which is comparable to the type 316 stainless steel ASTM A276, was conducted in 90 MPa hydrogen and argon. Hydrogen showed a marked effect on the tensile property of the material. The hydrogen gas embrittlement of the material was briefly discussed.

  9. Modelling of heat and mass transfer in a granular medium during high-temperature air drying. Effect of the internal gas pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Othmani, Hammouda; Hassini, Lamine; Lamloumi, Raja; El Cafsi, Mohamed Afif

    2016-02-01

    A comprehensive internal heat and water transfer model including the gas pressure effect has been proposed in order to improve the industrial high-temperature air drying of inserts made of agglomerated sand. In this model, the internal gas phase pressure effect was made perfectly explicit, by considering the liquid and vapour transfer by filtration and the liquid expulsion at the surface. Wet sand enclosed in a tight cylindrical glass bottle dried convectively at a high temperature was chosen as an application case. The model was validated on the basis of the experimental average water content and core temperature curves for drying trials at different operating conditions. The simulations of the spatio-temporal distribution of internal gas pressure were performed and interpreted in terms of product potential damage. Based on a compromise between the drying time and the pressure increase, a simple drying cycle was implemented in order to optimize the drying process.

  10. Reaction and internal energy relaxation rates in viscous thermochemically non-equilibrium gas flows

    SciTech Connect

    Kustova, E. V.; Oblapenko, G. P.

    2015-01-15

    In the present paper, reaction and energy relaxation rates as well as the normal stress are studied for viscous gas flows with vibrational and chemical non-equilibrium. Using the modified Chapman-Enskog method, multi-temperature models based on the Treanor and Boltzmann vibrational distributions are developed for the general case taking into account all kinds of vibrational energy transitions, exchange reactions, dissociation, and recombination. Integral equations specifying the first-order corrections to the normal mean stress and reaction rates are derived, as well as approximate systems of linear equations for their numerical computation. Generalized thermodynamic driving forces associated with all non-equilibrium processes are introduced. It is shown that normal stresses and rates of non-equilibrium processes can be expressed in terms of the same driving forces; the symmetry of kinetic coefficients in these expressions is proven. The developed general model is applied to a particular case of a pure N{sub 2} viscous flow with slow VT relaxation. Normal stress and rates of vibrational relaxation are studied for various ratios of vibrational and translational temperatures. The cross effects between different vibrational transitions in viscous flows are evaluated, along with the influence of anharmonicity and flow compressibility on the first-order corrections to the relaxation rate. Limits of validity for the widely used Landau–Teller model of vibrational relaxation are indicated.

  11. National greenhouse-gas accounting for effective climate policy on international trade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kander, Astrid; Jiborn, Magnus; Moran, Daniel D.; Wiedmann, Thomas O.

    2015-05-01

    National greenhouse-gas accounting should reflect how countries’ policies and behaviours affect global emissions. Actions that contribute to reduced global emissions should be credited, and actions that increase them should be penalized. This is essential if accounting is to serve as accurate guidance for climate policy. Yet this principle is not satisfied by the two most common accounting methods. Production-based accounting used under the Kyoto Protocol does not account for carbon leakage--the phenomenon of countries reducing their domestic emissions by shifting carbon-intensive production abroad. Consumption-based accounting (also called carbon footprinting) does not credit countries for cleaning up their export industries, and it also punishes some types of trade that could contribute to more carbon efficient production worldwide. We propose an improvement to consumption-based carbon accounting that takes technology differences in export sectors into account and thereby tends to more correctly reflect how national policy changes affect total global emissions. We also present empirical results showing how this new measure redraws the global emissions map.

  12. Teams release first reports on Cameroon Lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katzoff, Judith A.

    The U.S. scientific and medical teams sent to Cameroon by the Office of Foreign Disaster Assistance of the Agency for International Development (AID) to investigate the cause of the lethal gas release at Lake Nyos, Cameroon, have submitted their preliminary reports to the agency. While neither team could reach definitive conclusions without the opportunity to conduct laboratory analyses on their samples, they were able to make tentative statements about what may have occurred at the volcanic crater lake on the evening of August 21, 1986 (Eos, September 2, 1986, p. 659). At this early stage, it seems most likely that the gas release was triggered by a limnological phenomenon, such as an overturn of the lake, rather than by a sudden injection of volcanic gases. The origin of the gas seems most likely to be magmatic, but a biogenic origin has not been ruled out.

  13. Environmental Stress Testing of the Single Sample Cylinder: A Proven Consensus Standard for Internal Gas Analysis (IGA) or Residual Gas Analysis (RGA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuessler, Philipp WH

    2010-01-01

    In August 2008, Schuessler Consulting was contracted by NASA GSFC in support of the NASA Electronic Parts and Packaging (NEPP) program to perform two separate studies on moisture laden air in a stainless steel cylinder that had been designed to become a consensus standard for Test Method 1018. This Test Method was originally released for hybrids under Mil. Std. 883 but was quickly utilized on other microelectronic devices under the auspice of Mil. Std. 750. The cylinder had subsequently been fabricated for the 750 community. It was back-filled with moist air and subsequently analyzed over a period of time under a previous NASA contract. It had been shown that moisture in the 4000 - 5000 ppm range could be analyzed rather precisely with a mass spectrometer, commonly referred to as a Residual Gas Analyzer (RGA). The scope of this study was to ascertain if the composition and precision varied as a function of thermal shock at sub-zero temperatures and whether there was consensus when the standard was submitted to other RGA units. It was demonstrated and published that the consensus standard would yield precise RGA data for moisture within +/- 1% when optimized for a given RGA unit. It has been subsequently shown in this study at Oneida Research Services, that sub-zero storage did not affect that precision when a well-defined protocol for the analysis was followed. The consensus standard was taken to a second facility for analysis where it was found that moisture adsorption on the transfer lines caused precision to drop to +/- 12%. The Single Sample Cylinder (SSC) is a one liter stainless steel cylinder with associated sampling valves and has considerable weight and volume. But this considerable size allows for approximately 300 gas samples of the same composition to be delivered to any RGA unit. Lastly, a smaller cylinder, approximately 75 cc, of a second consensus standard was fabricated and tested with a different mix of fixed gases where moisture was kept in the

  14. Pituitary binding and internalization of radioiodinated gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist and antagonist ligands in vitro and in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Wynn, P.C.; Suarez-Quian, C.A.; Childs, G.V.; Catt, K.J.

    1986-10-01

    In rat pituitary gonadotrophs, the rates of binding and endocytosis of two GnRH superagonist analogs, (D-Ala6,Pro9-NEt)GnRH and (D-Lys6,Pro9-NEt)GnRH, were compared with those of the potent antagonist analog (N-acetyl-D-pCl-Phe1,2,D-Trp3,D-Lys6,D-Ala10)GnRH by quantitative electron microscopic autoradiography. In dispersed pituitary cells, the two agonist analogs showed similar binding kinetics and comparable degrees of sequestration, as measured by their resistance to dissociation by low pH buffer. However, quantification of silver grain localization suggested that cellular internalization of the (D-Ala6)GnRH agonist increased more rapidly than that of the (D-Lys6)GnRH analog. These discrepancies, and the finding that a larger amount of the specifically bound /sup 125/I-(D-Ala6)GnRH agonist was removed during glutaraldehyde fixation, indicated that the proportional internalization of this analog was over estimated by quantitative autoradiography owing to loss of cell surface-bound radioligand. We, therefore, employed radioiodinated D-Lys6-substituted analogs to analyze the receptor binding and cellular uptake of GnRH agonist and antagonist derivatives in vivo. After iv injection, a high proportion of the /sup 125/I-(D-Lys6)GnRH agonist was translocated into pituitary gonadotrophs within 60 min, whereas the D-Lys6 antagonist was predominantly associated with the plasma membrane during that time. Four hours after injection of the antagonist, an appreciable proportion of silver grains was associated with intracellular organelles, and this trend increased progressively at later time points. The relatively prolonged cellular processing of the GnRH antagonist is consistent with in vivo binding kinetics, and its slower internalization may reflect the basal rate of GnRH receptor turnover in the cell membrane.

  15. Thermal investigation of an internally cooled strut injector for scramjet application at moderate and hot gas conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dröske, Nils C.; Förster, Felix J.; Weigand, Bernhard; von Wolfersdorf, Jens

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, we present a combined experimental and numerical approach to assess the thermal loads and the cooling mechanism of an internally cooled strut injector for a supersonic combustion ramjet. Infrared measurements of the injector surface are conducted at a moderate external flow temperature. In addition, the main flow field is investigated with the LITA technique. Main features of the cooling mechanism are identified based on experimental data. However, a full evaluation can only be obtained using a complex, conjugate CFD simulation, which couples the external and internal flow fields to the heat conduction inside the injector body. Furthermore, numerical simulations are also presented for hot gas conditions corresponding to combustion experiments. Both hydrogen, which would be used as fuel for flight tests, and air are considered as coolants. While the main features of the cooling mechanism will be shown to remain unchanged, the combustor wall temperature is found to have a significant influence on the cooling. This emphasizes the importance and the usefulness of such complex conjugate numerical simulations.

  16. Catalytic modification of conventional SOFC anodes with a view to reducing their activity for direct internal reforming of natural gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boder, M.; Dittmeyer, R.

    When using natural gas as fuel for the solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC), direct internal reforming lowers the requirement for cell cooling and, theoretically, offers advantages with respect to capital cost and efficiency. The high metal content of a nickel/zirconia anode and the high temperature, however, cause the endothermic reforming reaction to take place very fast. The resulting drop of temperature at the inlet produces thermal stresses, which may lower the system efficiency and limit the stack lifetime. To reduce the reforming rate without lowering the electrochemical activity of the cell, a wet impregnation procedure for modifying conventional cermets by coverage with a less active metal was developed. As the coating material copper was chosen. Copper is affordable, catalytically inert for the reforming reaction and exhibits excellent electronic conductivity. The current density-voltage characteristics of the modified units showed that it is possible to maintain a good electrochemical performance of the cells despite the catalytic modification. A copper to nickel ratio of 1:3 resulted in a strong diminution of the catalytic reaction rate. This indicates that the modification could be a promising method to improve the performance of solid oxide fuel cells with direct internal reforming of hydrocarbons.

  17. Internal surface modification of zeolite MFI particles and membranes for gas separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kassaee, Mohamad H.

    Zeolites are a well-known class of crystalline oxide materials with tunable compositions and nanoporous structures, and have been used extensively in catalysis, adsorption, and ion exchange. The zeolite MFI is one of the well-studied zeolites because it has a pore size and structure suitable for separation or chemical conversion of many industrially important molecules. I synthesized MFI membranes with [h0h] out-of-plane orientation on α-alumina supports. The membranes were modified by the same procedures as used for MFI particles and with 1-butanol, 3-amino-1-propanol, 2-[(2-aminoethyl)amino]ethanol, and benzenemethanol. The existence of functional groups in the pores of the zeolite was confirmed by PA-FTIR measurements. Permeation measurements of H2, N2, CO2, CH 4, and SF6, were performed at room temperature before and after modification. Permeation of n-butane, and i-butane were measured before and after modification with 1-butanol. For all of the studied gases, gas permeances decreased by 1-2 orders of magnitude compared to bare MFI membranes for modified membranes. This is a strong indication that the organic species in the MFI framework are interacting with or blocking the gas molecule transport through the MFI pores. The CO2/CH 4 permeation selectivity was close to the Knudsen selectivity (0.6) for the membranes before modification. CO2/CH4 selectivity increased for MFI/benzenemethanol modified membrane (1.0), whereas it decreased for the MFI/2-[(2-aminoethyl)amino]ethanol modified membrane (0.5). MFI/benzenemethanol crystals were shown to have a highest sorption capacity for CH4, whereas, MFI/2-[(2-aminoethyl)amino]ethanol crystals were shown to have a highest sorption capacity for CO2 over all other studied molecules Higher sorption of CH4 in MFI/benzenemethanol and higher sorption of CO2 in MFI/2-[(2-aminoethyl)amino]ethanol and their strong binding to the modified membrane are likely the reasons for observing higher and lower CO2/CH4 permeation

  18. The Bubble Box: Towards an Automated Visual Sensor for 3D Analysis and Characterization of Marine Gas Release Sites

    PubMed Central

    Jordt, Anne; Zelenka, Claudius; Schneider von Deimling, Jens; Koch, Reinhard; Köser, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    Several acoustic and optical techniques have been used for characterizing natural and anthropogenic gas leaks (carbon dioxide, methane) from the ocean floor. Here, single-camera based methods for bubble stream observation have become an important tool, as they help estimating flux and bubble sizes under certain assumptions. However, they record only a projection of a bubble into the camera and therefore cannot capture the full 3D shape, which is particularly important for larger, non-spherical bubbles. The unknown distance of the bubble to the camera (making it appear larger or smaller than expected) as well as refraction at the camera interface introduce extra uncertainties. In this article, we introduce our wide baseline stereo-camera deep-sea sensor bubble box that overcomes these limitations, as it observes bubbles from two orthogonal directions using calibrated cameras. Besides the setup and the hardware of the system, we discuss appropriate calibration and the different automated processing steps deblurring, detection, tracking, and 3D fitting that are crucial to arrive at a 3D ellipsoidal shape and rise speed of each bubble. The obtained values for single bubbles can be aggregated into statistical bubble size distributions or fluxes for extrapolation based on diffusion and dissolution models and large scale acoustic surveys. We demonstrate and evaluate the wide baseline stereo measurement model using a controlled test setup with ground truth information. PMID:26690168

  19. Spatial distribution and temporal variation of 3He/ 4He in hot spring gas released from Unzen volcanic area, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Notsu, K.; Nakai, S.; Igarashi, G.; Ishibashi, J.; Mori, T.; Suzuki, M.; Wakita, H.

    2001-11-01

    Following the first phreatic explosion on 17 November 1990, hot spring gases were collected periodically over the next 10 years for 3He/ 4He isotopic ratio and chemical analyses from three hot springs (Obanma, Unzen and Shimabara) located around Unzen volcano, Japan. The 3He/ 4He ratios, although showing some scatter at each site, show an increase from west to east (Obamagas contribution as shown by the CH 4 content. The 3He/ 4He ratios at Shimabara and Unzen after 1990 were significantly higher than the single values for the 1983 sample ( Marty et al., 1989), possibly due to an additional supply of magmatic helium related to the recent post-1990 volcanic activity. The 3He/ 4He ratio at Shimabara hot spring increased slightly after November 1990, reaching a maximum value in July 1992, and decreasing later. This suggests that magmatic helium with relatively high 3He/ 4He ratios took about one year to travel 5 km from beneath Fugendake volcanic cone to Shimabara hot spring site, because the magma effusion rate (and magma degassing rate) reached a maximum in June 1991.

  20. Internal calcium release and activation of sea urchin eggs by cGMP are independent of the phosphoinositide signaling pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Whalley, T; McDougall, A; Crossley, I; Swann, K; Whitaker, M

    1992-01-01

    We show that microinjecting cyclic GMP (cGMP) into unfertilized sea urchin eggs activates them by stimulating a rise in the intracellular free calcium ion concentration ([Ca2+]i). The increase in [Ca2+]i is similar in both magnitude and duration to the transient that activates the egg at fertilization. It is due to mobilization of calcium from intracellular stores but is not prevented by the inositol trisphosphate (InsP3) antagonist heparin. Furthermore, cGMP does not stimulate the eggs Na+/H+ antiport when the [Ca2+]i transient is blocked by the calcium chelator bis-(O-aminophenoxy)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (BAPTA), suggesting that cGMP does not activate eggs by interacting with the their phosphoinositide signaling pathway. However, the [Ca2+]i increase and activation are prevented in eggs in which the InsP3-sensitive calcium stores have been emptied by the prior microinjection of the InsP3 analogue inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphorothioate. These data indicate that cGMP activates eggs by stimulating the release of calcium from an InsP3-sensitive calcium store via a novel, though unidentified, route independent of the InsP3 receptor. PMID:1320962

  1. Greenhouse gas emissions and reactive nitrogen releases during the life-cycles of staple food production in China and their mitigation potential.

    PubMed

    Xia, Longlong; Ti, Chaopu; Li, Bolun; Xia, Yongqiu; Yan, Xiaoyuan

    2016-06-15

    Life-cycle analysis of staple food (rice, flour and corn-based fodder) production and assessments of the associated greenhouse gas (GHG) and reactive nitrogen (Nr) releases, from environmental and economic perspectives, help to develop effective mitigation options. However, such evaluations have rarely been executed in China. We evaluated the GHG and Nr releases per kilogram of staple food production (carbon and Nr footprints) and per unit of net economic benefit (CO2-NEB and Nr-NEB), and explored their mitigation potential. Carbon footprints of food production in China were obviously higher than those in some developed countries. There was a high spatial variation in the footprints, primarily attributable to differences in synthetic N use (or CH4 emissions) per unit of food production. Provincial carbon footprints had a significant linear relationship with Nr footprints, attributed to large contribution of N fertilizer use to both GHG and Nr releases. Synthetic N fertilizer applications and CH4 emissions dominated the carbon footprints, while NH3 volatilization and N leaching were the main contributors to the Nr footprints. About 564 (95% uncertainty range: 404-701) TgCO2eqGHG and 10 (7.4-12.4) Tg Nr-N were released every year during 2001-2010 from staple food production. This caused the total damage costs of 325 (70-555) billion ¥, equivalent to nearly 1.44% of the Gross Domestic Product of China. Moreover, the combined damage costs and economic input costs, accounted for 66%-80% of the gross economic benefit generated from food production. A reduction of 92.7TgCO2eqyr(-1) and 2.2TgNr-Nyr(-1) could be achieved by reducing synthetic N inputs by 20%, increasing grain yields by 5% and implementing off-season application of straw and mid-season drainage practices for rice cultivation. In order to realize these scenarios, an ecological compensation scheme should be established to incentivize farmers to gradually adopt knowledge-based managements.

  2. Tailoring the internal structure of liquid crystalline nanoparticles responsive to fungal lipases: A potential platform for sustained drug release.

    PubMed

    Poletto, F S; Lima, F S; Lundberg, D; Nylander, T; Loh, W

    2016-11-01

    Lipases are key components in the mechanisms underlying the persistence and virulence of infections by fungi, and thus also promising triggers for bioresponsive lipid-based liquid crystalline nanoparticles. We here propose a platform in which only a minor component of the formulation is susceptible to cleavage by lipase and where hydrolysis triggers a controlled phase transition within the nanoparticles that can potentially allow for an extended drug release. The responsive formulations were composed of phytantriol, which was included as a non-cleavable major component and polysorbate 80, which serves both as nanoparticle stabilizer and potential lipase target. To monitor the structural changes resulting from lipase activity with sufficient time resolution, we used synchrotron small angle x-ray scattering. Comparing the effect of the two different lipases used in this work, lipase B from Candida Antarctica, (CALB) and lipase from Rhizomucor miehei (RMML), only CALB induced phase transition from bicontinuous reverse cubic to reverse hexagonal phase within the particles. This phase transition can be attributed to an increasing amount of oleic acid formed on cleavage of the polysorbate 80. However, when also a small amount of a cationic surfactant was included in the formulation, RMML could trigger the corresponding phase transition as well. The difference in activity between the two lipases can tentatively be explained by a difference in their interaction with the nanoparticle surface. Thus, a bioresponsive system for treating fungal infections, with a tunable selectivity for different types of lipases, could be obtained by tuning the composition of the nanoparticle formulation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Spatiotemporal dynamics of phosphorus release, oxygen consumption and greenhouse gas emissions after localised soil amendment with organic fertilisers.

    PubMed

    Christel, Wibke; Zhu, Kun; Hoefer, Christoph; Kreuzeder, Andreas; Santner, Jakob; Bruun, Sander; Magid, Jakob; Jensen, Lars Stoumann

    2016-06-01

    Organic fertilisation inevitably leads to heterogeneous distribution of organic matter and nutrients in soil, i.e. due to uneven surface spreading or inhomogeneous incorporation. The resulting localised hotspots of nutrient application will induce various biotic and abiotic nutrient turnover processes and fixation in the residue sphere, giving rise to distinct differences in nutrient availability, soil oxygen content and greenhouse gas (GHG) production. In this study we investigated the spatiotemporal dynamics of the reaction of manure solids and manure solids char with soil, focusing on their phosphorus (P) availability, as current emphasis on improving societal P efficiency through recycling waste or bio-based fertilisers necessitates a sound understanding of their behaviour. Soil layers amended at a constant P application rate with either pig manure solids or char made from pig manure solids were incubated for three weeks between layers of non-amended, P-depleted soil. Spatial and temporal changes in and around the amendment layers were simultaneously investigated in this study using a sandwich sensor consisting of a planar oxygen optode and multi-element diffusive gradients in thin films (DGT) gels, combined with GHG emission measurements. After three weeks of incubation, the soil containing a layer amended with manure solids had a lower overall O2 content and had emitted significantly more CO2 than the non-amended control or the char-amended soil. The P availability from manure solids was initially higher than that from the char, but decreased over time, whereas from the char-amended layer P availability increased in the same period. In both treatments, increases in P availability were confined to the amended soil layer and did not greatly affect P availability in the directly adjacent soil layers during the three-week incubation. These results highlight the importance of placing organic P fertilisers close to where the plant roots will grow in order to

  4. Detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Sputum by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry of Methyl Mycocerosates Released by Thermochemolysis

    PubMed Central

    O'Sullivan, Denise M.; Nicoara, Simona C.; Mutetwa, Reggie; Mungofa, Stanley; Lee, Oona Y-C.; Minnikin, David E.; Bardwell, Max W.; Corbett, Elizabeth L.; McNerney, Ruth; Morgan, Geraint H.

    2012-01-01

    Tuberculosis requires rapid diagnosis to prevent further transmission and allow prompt administration of treatment. Current methods for diagnosing pulmonary tuberculosis lack sensitivity are expensive or are extremely slow. The identification of lipids using gas chromatography- electron impact mass spectrometry (GC-EI/MS) could provide an alternative solution. We have studied mycocerosic acid components of the phthiocerol dimycocerosate (PDIM) family of lipids using thermochemolysis GC-EI/MS. To facilitate use of the technology in a routine diagnostic laboratory a simple extraction procedure was employed where PDIMs were extracted from sputum using petroleum ether, a solvent of low polarity. We also investigated a method using methanolic tetramethylammonium hydroxide, which facilitates direct transesterification of acidic components to methyl esters in the inlet of the GC-MS system. This eliminates conventional chemical manipulations allowing rapid and convenient analysis of samples. When applied to an initial set of 40 sputum samples, interpretable results were obtained for 35 samples with a sensitivity relative to culture of 94% (95%CI: 69.2,100) and a specificity of 100% (95%CI: 78.1,100). However, blinded testing of a larger set of 395 sputum samples found the assay to have a sensitivity of 61.3% (95%CI: 54.9,67.3) and a specificity of 70.6% (95%CI: 62.3,77.8) when compared to culture. Using the results obtained we developed an improved set of classification criteria, which when applied in a blinded re-analysis increased the sensitivity and specificity of the assay to 64.9% (95%CI: 58.6,70.8) and 76.2% (95%CI: 68.2,82.8) respectively. Highly variable levels of background signal were observed from individual sputum samples that inhibited interpretation of the data. The diagnostic potential of using thermochemolytic GC-EI/MS of PDIM biomarkers for diagnosis of tuberculosis in sputum has been established; however, further refinements in sample processing are

  5. Metformin extended-release versus immediate-release: an international, randomized, double-blind, head-to-head trial in pharmacotherapy-naïve patients with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Naresh; Singla, Anuj; Mathieu, Chantal; Montanya, Eduard; Pfeiffer, Andreas F H; Johnsson, Eva; Zhao, June; Iqbal, Nayyar; Bailey, Clifford

    2017-08-31

    This international, randomized, double-blind trial (NCT01864174) compared the efficacy and safety of metformin extended-release (XR) and immediate-release (IR) in patients with type 2 diabetes. After a 4-week placebo lead-in, pharmacotherapy-naïve adults with glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) 7.0%-9.2% were randomized (1:1) to receive once-daily metformin XR 2000 mg or twice-daily metformin IR 1000 mg for 24 weeks. The primary endpoint was change in HbA1c after 24 weeks. Secondary endpoints were change in fasting plasma glucose (FPG), mean daily glucose (MDG), and patients (%) with HbA1c <7.0% after 24 weeks. Overall, 539 patients were randomized (metformin XR, N = 268; metformin IR, N = 271). Adjusted mean changes in HbA1c, FPG, MDG, and patients (%) with HbA1c <7.0% after 24 weeks were similar for XR vs IR: -0.93% vs -0.96%; -21.1 vs -20.6 mg/dL (-1.2 vs -1.1 mmol/L); -24.7 vs -27.1 mg/dL (-1.4 vs -1.5 mmol/L); and 70.9% vs 72.0%, respectively. Adverse events were similar between groups and consistent with previous studies. Overall, metformin XR demonstrated similar efficacy and safety to metformin IR over 24 weeks, with the advantage of once-daily dosing. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  6. Return to high-level throwing after combination infraspinatus repair, SLAP repair, and release of glenohumeral internal rotation deficit.

    PubMed

    Van Kleunen, Jonathan P; Tucker, Scott A; Field, Larry D; Savoie, Felix H

    2012-11-01

    The overhead-throwing athlete is a unique patient, requiring an elite, precise functional ability. Superior labral tears are quite common, and the percentage of athletes who return to play after superior labrum anterior-posterior (SLAP) repair has been variable. A tear of the infraspinatus caused by either internal impingement or tension overload may compromise this return. The rate of return to a level of play similar to or greater than the preinjury level after repair of combined SLAP and infraspinatus injuries will be lower than in previous reports of SLAP repair alone. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. In the current study, we examined a series of overhead-throwing athletes with diagnoses of both a SLAP tear and a significant (>50%) tear of the infraspinatus tendon who underwent surgical repair of both injuries. We identified 17 high-level baseball players younger than 25 years who underwent simultaneous arthroscopic repairs of a SLAP tear with a standard suture anchor technique and of an infraspinatus tear with either a free polydioxanone (PDS) suture or suture anchor between 2005 and 2008. The postoperative records of all patients were reviewed to determine their ability to return to play and their postoperative level of performance. All patients were then contacted to determine their Kerlan-Jobe Orthopaedic Clinic Overhead Athlete Shoulder and Elbow score and their current sport participation level. All 17 patients in the series attempted to return to their prior sport after completion of postoperative rehabilitation. Only 6 patients (35%) were able to return to the same or a superior preinjury level of performance. Five of the remaining 11 patients returned to play at a lower level, either playing the same position or else forced to switch to another position of play because of a decline in throwing velocity. Six patients were unable to return to play. No complications or reoperations occurred in any of the patients following surgery. A significant (>50

  7. International challenge to predict the impact of radioxenon releases from medical isotope production on a comprehensive nuclear test ban treaty sampling station.

    PubMed

    Eslinger, Paul W; Bowyer, Ted W; Achim, Pascal; Chai, Tianfeng; Deconninck, Benoit; Freeman, Katie; Generoso, Sylvia; Hayes, Philip; Heidmann, Verena; Hoffman, Ian; Kijima, Yuichi; Krysta, Monika; Malo, Alain; Maurer, Christian; Ngan, Fantine; Robins, Peter; Ross, J Ole; Saunier, Olivier; Schlosser, Clemens; Schöppner, Michael; Schrom, Brian T; Seibert, Petra; Stein, Ariel F; Ungar, Kurt; Yi, Jing

    2016-06-01

    The International Monitoring System (IMS) is part of the verification regime for the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban-Treaty Organization (CTBTO). At entry-into-force, half of the 80 radionuclide stations will be able to measure concentrations of several radioactive xenon isotopes produced in nuclear explosions, and then the full network may be populated with xenon monitoring afterward. An understanding of natural and man-made radionuclide backgrounds can be used in accordance with the provisions of the treaty (such as event screening criteria in Annex 2 to the Protocol of the Treaty) for the effective implementation of the verification regime. Fission-based production of (99)Mo for medical purposes also generates nuisance radioxenon isotopes that are usually vented to the atmosphere. One of the ways to account for the effect emissions from medical isotope production has on radionuclide samples from the IMS is to use stack monitoring data, if they are available, and atmospheric transport modeling. Recently, individuals from seven nations participated in a challenge exercise that used atmospheric transport modeling to predict the time-history of (133)Xe concentration measurements at the IMS radionuclide station in Germany using stack monitoring data from a medical isotope production facility in Belgium. Participants received only stack monitoring data and used the atmospheric transport model and meteorological data of their choice. Some of the models predicted the highest measured concentrations quite well. A model comparison rank and ensemble analysis suggests that combining multiple models may provide more accurate predicted concentrations than any single model. None of the submissions based only on the stack monitoring data predicted the small measured concentrations very well. Modeling of sources by other nuclear facilities with smaller releases than medical isotope production facilities may be important in understanding how to discriminate those releases from

  8. [Comparative analysis of occupational health services practice of international companies of oil and gas industry and ILO Convention "Occupational Health Services"].

    PubMed

    Gevorkian, É V; Spiridonov, V L; Shatokhin, A S; Ékgardt, E V; Avdokhin, A V; Iakovlev, A P

    2013-01-01

    A comparative analysis of current work practices of occupational health services of international companies of Russian oil & gas industry and provisions of ILO Convention 161 and Recommendation 171 "Occupational Health Services" has been carried out. Proposals for improvement and harmonization of labor legislation related to this problem have been formulated.

  9. A simple headspace gas chromatography/mass spectrometry method for the quantitative determination of the release of the antioxidants butylated hydroxyanisole and butylated hydroxytoluene from chewing gum.

    PubMed

    Davoli, Enrico; Bastone, Antonio; Bianchi, Giancarlo; Salmona, Mario; Diomede, Luisa

    2017-05-30

    Butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA) and butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) are widely used to prevent oxidation and rancidity in foodstuffs, pharmaceutical preparations and cosmetic formulations. Although their safety has been thoroughly investigated, possible endocrine side-effects have been suggested. A useful method for the determination of BHA and BHT in foods is needed to estimate their daily intake through the diet. We selected commercial chewing gums as a model of a complex food matrix and developed a new method based on gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. This allows the determination of 130 pg/gum of BHA and 9 pg/gum of BHT. Analysis of different chewing gums from the European market indicated that the two antioxidants were never used together and that the content of BHA was in the range of 220-348 μg/gum and BHT ranged from 278 up to 479 μg/gum. These amounts correspond to 86-157 mg/kg gum for BHA and 170-185 mg/kg gum for BHT, and are both within the maximum levels established by the European Food Safety Authority. Chewing a piece of gum for 15 min resulted in the release of up to 28% of BHA, but no release of BHT was detectable. A new, simple and rapid method for the determination of BHA and BHT in chewing gums was described. This analytical method, based on headspace sampling, did not require the extraction of antioxidants from chewing gum samples, assuring the absence of any gum material contaminants that might affect the instrumentation. It is also automatable, employing a sequential automatic sampler. This method could be of interest to academic researchers and to food industrialists looking for a new methodological approach for BHA and BHT determination in foodstuffs with complex matrices. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Multiphase Transport in Porous Media: Gas-Liquid Separation Using Capillary Pressure Gradients International Space Station (ISS) Flight Experiment Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, Richard R., Jr.; Holtsnider, John T.; Dahl, Roger W.; Deeks, Dalton; Javanovic, Goran N.; Parker, James M.; Ehlert, Jim

    2013-01-01

    Advances in the understanding of multiphase flow characteristics under variable gravity conditions will ultimately lead to improved and as of yet unknown process designs for advanced space missions. Such novel processes will be of paramount importance to the success of future manned space exploration as we venture into our solar system and beyond. In addition, because of the ubiquitous nature and vital importance of biological and environmental processes involving airwater mixtures, knowledge gained about fundamental interactions and the governing properties of these mixtures will clearly be