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Sample records for gas-carrier ultrasound contrast

  1. Section 6—Mechanical Bioeffects in the Presence of Gas-Carrier Ultrasound Contrast Agents

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    This review addresses the issue of mechanical ultrasound-induced bioeffects in the presence of gas carrier contrast agents (GCAs). Here, the term “contrast agent” refers to those agents that provide ultrasound contrast by being composed of microbubbles, encapsulated or not, containing one or more gases. Provided in this section are summaries on how contrast agents work, some of their current uses, and the potential for bio-effects associated with their presence in an ultrasonic field. PMID:10680618

  2. Ultrasound contrast agents

    PubMed Central

    Ignee, Andre; Atkinson, Nathan S. S.; Schuessler, Gudrun; Dietrich, Christoph F.

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) plays an important role in imaging of the mediastinum and abdominal organs. Since the introduction of US contrast agents (UCA) for transabdominal US, attempts have been made to apply contrast-enhanced US techniques also to EUS. Since 2003, specific contrast-enhanced imaging was possible using EUS. Important studies have been published regarding contrast-enhanced EUS and the characterization of focal pancreatic lesions, lymph nodes, and subepithelial tumors. In this manuscript, we describe the relevant UCA, their application, and specific image acquisition as well as the principles of image tissue characterization using contrast-enhanced EUS. Safety issues, potential future developments, and EUS-specific issues are reviewed. PMID:27824024

  3. Towards Dynamic Contrast Specific Ultrasound Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demi, Libertario; van Sloun, Ruud J. G.; Wijkstra, Hessel; Mischi, Massimo

    2016-10-01

    We report on the first study demonstrating the ability of a recently-developed, contrast-enhanced, ultrasound imaging method, referred to as cumulative phase delay imaging (CPDI), to image and quantify ultrasound contrast agent (UCA) kinetics. Unlike standard ultrasound tomography, which exploits changes in speed of sound and attenuation, CPDI is based on a marker specific to UCAs, thus enabling dynamic contrast-specific ultrasound tomography (DCS-UST). For breast imaging, DCS-UST will lead to a more practical, faster, and less operator-dependent imaging procedure compared to standard echo-contrast, while preserving accurate imaging of contrast kinetics. Moreover, a linear relation between CPD values and ultrasound second-harmonic intensity was measured (coefficient of determination = 0.87). DCS-UST can find clinical applications as a diagnostic method for breast cancer localization, adding important features to multi-parametric ultrasound tomography of the breast.

  4. Towards Dynamic Contrast Specific Ultrasound Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Demi, Libertario; Van Sloun, Ruud J. G.; Wijkstra, Hessel; Mischi, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    We report on the first study demonstrating the ability of a recently-developed, contrast-enhanced, ultrasound imaging method, referred to as cumulative phase delay imaging (CPDI), to image and quantify ultrasound contrast agent (UCA) kinetics. Unlike standard ultrasound tomography, which exploits changes in speed of sound and attenuation, CPDI is based on a marker specific to UCAs, thus enabling dynamic contrast-specific ultrasound tomography (DCS-UST). For breast imaging, DCS-UST will lead to a more practical, faster, and less operator-dependent imaging procedure compared to standard echo-contrast, while preserving accurate imaging of contrast kinetics. Moreover, a linear relation between CPD values and ultrasound second-harmonic intensity was measured (coefficient of determination = 0.87). DCS-UST can find clinical applications as a diagnostic method for breast cancer localization, adding important features to multi-parametric ultrasound tomography of the breast. PMID:27703251

  5. Ultrasound microbubble contrast and current clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Dindyal, Shiva; Kyriakides, Constantinos

    2011-01-01

    Ultrasound imaging is widely used worldwide principally because it is cheap, easily available and contains no exposure to ionizing radiation. The advent of microbubble ultrasound contrast has further increased the diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of this technique thus widening its clinical applications. The third generation of ultrasound contrast agents consist of sulphur hexafluoride microbubbles encased in a phospholipid shell. This review will elaborate on the pharmacology, safety profile and method of action of these agents. We also aim to discuss the ever expanding uses for contrast enhanced ultrasound in a number of clinical specialities which include the liver, kidney, prostate, sentinel node detection, vascular tree and endovascular stent surveillance. We will also discuss some of the recent patents regarding the future uses of ultrasound microbubble contrast and recent technological advances in clinical applications.

  6. Contrast enhanced ultrasound of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cassano, E; Rizzo, S; Bozzini, A; Menna, S; Bellomi, M

    2006-01-01

    The importance of ultrasound examination in the diagnosis of breast cancer has been widely demonstrated. During the last few years, the introduction of ultrasound contrast media has been considered a promising tool for studying the vascular pattern of focal lesions within the breast. Our purpose was to assess whether contrast-enhanced (CE) ultrasound examination, performed using specific contrast imaging modes, can be helpful for detection and characterization of breast lesions, and for prediction of the response of breast cancer to therapy. PMID:16478698

  7. Microbubble ultrasound contrast agents: a review.

    PubMed

    Stride, E; Saffari, N

    2003-01-01

    The superior scattering properties of gas bubbles compared with blood cells have made microbubble ultrasound contrast agents important tools in ultrasound diagnosis. Over the past 2 years they have become the focus of a wide and rapidly expanding field of research, with their benefits being repeatedly demonstrated, both in ultrasound image enhancement, and more recently in drug and gene delivery applications. However, despite considerable investigation, their behaviour is by no means fully understood and, while no definite evidence of harmful effects has been obtained, there remain some concerns as to their safety. In this review the existing theoretical and experimental evidence is examined in order to clarify the extent to which contrast agents are currently understood and to identify areas for future research. In particular the disparity between the conditions considered in theoretical models and those encountered both in vitro, and more importantly in vivo is discussed, together with the controversy regarding the risk of harmful bio-effects.

  8. Contrast-enhanced and targeted ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Postema, Michiel; Gilja, Odd Helge

    2011-01-07

    Ultrasonic imaging is becoming the most popular medical imaging modality, owing to the low price per examination and its safety. However, blood is a poor scatterer of ultrasound waves at clinical diagnostic transmit frequencies. For perfusion imaging, markers have been designed to enhance the contrast in B-mode imaging. These so-called ultrasound contrast agents consist of microscopically small gas bubbles encapsulated in biodegradable shells. In this review, the physical principles of ultrasound contrast agent microbubble behavior and their adjustment for drug delivery including sonoporation are described. Furthermore, an outline of clinical imaging applications of contrast-enhanced ultrasound is given. It is a challenging task to quantify and predict which bubble phenomenon occurs under which acoustic condition, and how these phenomena may be utilized in ultrasonic imaging. Aided by high-speed photography, our improved understanding of encapsulated microbubble behavior will lead to more sophisticated detection and delivery techniques. More sophisticated methods use quantitative approaches to measure the amount and the time course of bolus or reperfusion curves, and have shown great promise in revealing effective tumor responses to anti-angiogenic drugs in humans before tumor shrinkage occurs. These are beginning to be accepted into clinical practice. In the long term, targeted microbubbles for molecular imaging and eventually for directed anti-tumor therapy are expected to be tested.

  9. Molecular imaging with targeted contrast ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Piedra, Mark; Allroggen, Achim; Lindner, Jonathan R

    2009-01-01

    Molecular imaging with contrast-enhanced ultrasound uses targeted microbubbles that are retained in diseased tissue. The resonant properties of these microbubbles produce acoustic signals in an ultrasound field. The microbubbles are targeted to diseased tissue by using certain chemical constituents in the microbubble shell or by attaching disease-specific ligands such as antibodies to the microbubble. In this review, we discuss the applications of this technique to pathological states in the cerebrovascular system including atherosclerosis, tumor angiogenesis, ischemia, intravascular thrombus, and inflammation.

  10. Superhydrophobic silica nanoparticles as ultrasound contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Jin, Qiaofeng; Lin, Chih-Yu; Kang, Shih-Tsung; Chang, Yuan-Chih; Zheng, Hairong; Yang, Chia-Min; Yeh, Chih-Kuang

    2017-05-01

    Microbubbles have been widely studied as ultrasound contrast agents for diagnosis and as drug/gene carriers for therapy. However, their size and stability (lifetime of 5-12min) limited their applications. The development of stable nanoscale ultrasound contrast agents would therefore benefit both. Generating bubbles persistently in situ would be one of the promising solutions to the problem of short lifetime. We hypothesized that bubbles could be generated in situ by providing stable air nuclei since it has been found that the interfacial nanobubbles on a hydrophobic surface have a much longer lifetime (orders of days). Mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) with large surface areas and different levels of hydrophobicity were prepared to test our hypothesis. It is clear that the superhydrophobic and porous nanoparticles exhibited a significant and strong contrast intensity compared with other nanoparticles. The bubbles generated from superhydrophobic nanoparticles sustained for at least 30min at a MI of 1.0, while lipid microbubble lasted for about 5min at the same settings. In summary MSNs have been transformed into reliable bubble precursors by making simple superhydrophobic modification, and made into a promising contrast agent with the potentials to serve as theranostic agents that are sensitive to ultrasound stimulation.

  11. Synthesis of laboratory Ultrasound Contrast Agents.

    PubMed

    Park, Jingam; Park, Donghee; Shin, Unchul; Moon, Sanghyub; Kim, Chihyun; Kim, Han Sung; Park, Hyunjin; Choi, Kiju; Jung, Bongkwang; Oh, Jaemin; Seo, Jongbum

    2013-10-21

    Ultrasound Contrast Agents (UCAs) were developed to maximize reflection contrast so that organs can be seen clearly in ultrasound imaging. UCAs increase the signal to noise ratio (SNR) by linear and non-linear mechanisms and thus help more accurately visualize the internal organs and blood vessels. However, the UCAs on the market are not only expensive, but are also not optimized for use in various therapeutic research applications such as ultrasound-aided drug delivery. The UCAs fabricated in this study utilize conventional lipid and albumin for shell formation and perfluorobutane as the internal gas. The shape and density of the UCA bubbles were verified by optical microscopy and Cryo SEM, and compared to those of the commercially available UCAs, Definity® and Sonovue®. The size distribution and characteristics of the reflected signal were also analyzed using a particle size analyzer and ultrasound imaging equipment. Our experiments indicate that UCAs composed of spherical microbubbles, the majority of which were smaller than 1 um, were successfully synthesized. Microbubbles 10 um or larger were also identified when different shell characteristics and filters were used. These laboratory UCAs can be used for research in both diagnoses and therapies.

  12. Nano/microparticles and ultrasound contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Shu-Guang; Xu, Hui-Xiong; Chen, Hang-Rong

    2013-12-28

    Microbubbles have been used for many years now in clinical practice as contrast agents in ultrasound imaging. Recently, their therapeutic applications have also attracted more attention. However, the short circulation time (minutes) and relatively large size (two to ten micrometers) of currently used commercial microbubbles do not allow effective extravasation into tumor tissue, preventing efficient tumor targeting. Fortunately, more multifunctional and theranostic nanoparticles with some special advantages over the traditional microbubbles have been widely investigated and explored for biomedical applications. The way to synthesize an ideal ultrasound contrast agent based on nanoparticles in order to achieve an expected effect on contrast imaging is a key technique. Currently a number of nanomaterials, including liposomes, polymers, micelles, dendrimers, emulsions, quantum dots, solid nanoparticles etc., have already been applied to pre or clinical trials. Multifunctional and theranostic nanoparticles with some special advantages, such as the tumor-targeted (passive or active), multi-mode contrast agents (magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasonography or fluorescence), carrier or enhancer of drug delivery, and combined chemo or thermal therapy etc., are rapidly gaining popularity and have shown a promising application in the field of cancer treatment. In this mini review, the trends and the advances of multifunctional and theranostic nanoparticles are briefly discussed.

  13. Covert contrast in velar fronting: An acoustic and ultrasound study

    PubMed Central

    Byun, Tara McAllister; Buchwald, Adam; Mizoguchi, Ai

    2016-01-01

    There is growing evidence that speech sound acquisition is a gradual process, with instrumental measures frequently revealing covert contrast in errors perceived to involve phonemic substitution. Ultrasound imaging has the potential to expand our understanding of covert contrast by showing whether a child uses different tongue shapes while producing sounds that are perceived as neutralized. This study used an ultrasound measure (Dorsum Excursion Index) and acoustic measures (VOT and spectral moments of the burst) to investigate overt and covert contrast between velar and alveolar stops in child speech. Participants were two children who produced a perceptually overt velar-alveolar contrast and two children who neutralized the contrast via velar fronting. Both acoustic and ultrasound measures revealed significant differences between perceptually distinct velar and alveolar targets. One child with velar fronting demonstrated covert contrast in one acoustic and one ultrasound measure; the other showed no evidence of contrast. Clinical implications are discussed. PMID:26325303

  14. Temperature dependent behavior of ultrasound contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Mulvana, Helen; Stride, Eleanor; Hajnal, Jo V; Eckersley, Robert J

    2010-06-01

    Recent interest in ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) as tools for quantitative imaging and therapy has increased the need for accurate characterization. Laboratory investigations are frequently undertaken in a water bath at room temperature; however, implications for in vivo applications are not presented. Acoustic investigation of a bulk suspension of SonoVue (Bracco Research, Geneva, Switzerland) was made in a water bath at temperatures of 20-45 degrees C. UCA characteristics were significantly affected by temperature, particularly between 20 and 40 degrees C, leading to an increase in attenuation from 1.7-2.5 dB, respectively (p = 0.002) and a 2-dB increase in scattered signal over the same range (p = 0.05) at an insonation pressure of 100 kPa. Optical data supported the hypothesis that a temperature-mediated increase in diameter was the dominant cause, and revealed a decrease in bubble stability. In conclusion, measurements made at room temperature require careful interpretation with regard to behavior in vivo.

  15. High-Accuracy Ultrasound Contrast Agent Detection Method for Diagnostic Ultrasound Imaging Systems.

    PubMed

    Ito, Koichi; Noro, Kazumasa; Yanagisawa, Yukari; Sakamoto, Maya; Mori, Shiro; Shiga, Kiyoto; Kodama, Tetsuya; Aoki, Takafumi

    2015-12-01

    An accurate method for detecting contrast agents using diagnostic ultrasound imaging systems is proposed. Contrast agents, such as microbubbles, passing through a blood vessel during ultrasound imaging are detected as blinking signals in the temporal axis, because their intensity value is constantly in motion. Ultrasound contrast agents are detected by evaluating the intensity variation of a pixel in the temporal axis. Conventional methods are based on simple subtraction of ultrasound images to detect ultrasound contrast agents. Even if the subject moves only slightly, a conventional detection method will introduce significant error. In contrast, the proposed technique employs spatiotemporal analysis of the pixel intensity variation over several frames. Experiments visualizing blood vessels in the mouse tail illustrated that the proposed method performs efficiently compared with conventional approaches. We also report that the new technique is useful for observing temporal changes in microvessel density in subiliac lymph nodes containing tumors. The results are compared with those of contrast-enhanced computed tomography.

  16. Perfusion imaging with non-contrast ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tierney, Jaime E.; Dumont, Douglas M.; Byram, Brett C.

    2016-04-01

    A Doppler ultrasound clutter filter that enables estimation of low velocity blood flow could considerably improve ultrasound as a tool for clinical diagnosis and monitoring, including for the evaluation of vascular diseases and tumor perfusion. Conventional Doppler ultrasound is currently used for visualizing and estimating blood flow. However, conventional Doppler is limited by frame rate and tissue clutter caused by involuntary movement of the patient or sonographer. Spectral broadening of the clutter due to tissue motion limits ultrasound's ability to detect blood flow less than about 5mm/s at an 8MHz center frequency. We propose a clutter filtering technique that may increase the sensitivity of Doppler measurements to at least as low as 0.41mm/s. The proposed filter uses an adaptive demodulation scheme that decreases the bandwidth of the clutter. To test the performance of the adaptive demodulation method at removing sonographer hand motion, six volunteer subjects acquired data from a basic quality assurance phantom. Additionally, to test initial in vivo feasibility, an arterial occlusion reactive hyperemia study was performed to assess the efficiency of the proposed filter at preserving signals from blood velocities 2mm/s or greater. The hand motion study resulted in initial average bandwidths of 577Hz (28.5mm/s), which were decreased to 7.28Hz (0.36mm/s) at -60 dB at 3cm using our approach. The in vivo power Doppler study resulted in 15.2dB and 0.15dB dynamic ranges between the lowest and highest blood flow time points for the proposed filter and conventional 50Hz high pass filter, respectively.

  17. Cardiac arrhythmias produced by ultrasound and contrast agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rota, Claudio

    Ultrasound is used widely in medicine for both diagnostic and therapeutic applications. Ultrasound contrast agents are suspensions of gas-filled microbubbles used to enhance diagnostic imaging. Microbubble contrast agents can increase the likelihood of bioeffects of ultrasound associated with acoustic cavitation. Under certain exposure conditions, the interaction of ultrasound with cardiac tissues can produce cardiac arrhythmias. The general objective of this thesis was to develop a greater understanding of ultrasound-induced premature cardiac beats. The hypothesis guiding this work was that acoustic cavitation is the physical mechanism for the production of arrhythmias with ultrasound. This hypothesis was tested through a series of experiments with mice in vivo and theoretical investigations. Results of this research supported the acoustic cavitation hypothesis. The acoustic pressure threshold for premature beats was significantly lower with microbubble contrast agents present in the blood than without. With microbubbles, the threshold for premature beats was below the current output limits of diagnostic devices. The threshold was not significantly dependent upon contrast agent type and was not influenced by contrast agent dose over three orders of magnitude. Furthermore, the dependence of the threshold on acoustic frequency was consistent with the frequency dependence of acoustic cavitation. Experimentally determined thresholds for premature beats in vivo were in excellent agreement with theoretically estimated thresholds for inertial cavitation. A passive cavitation detector (PCD) was used to measure the acoustic emissions produced by cavitating microbubbles in vivo. A direct correlation between the amplitude of the PCD and the percentage of ultrasound pulses producing a premature beat was consistent with cavitation as a mechanism for this bioeffect. Although this thesis focused on the mechanistic understanding of ultrasound-induced arrhythmias, more persistent

  18. Acoustic bubble sorting for ultrasound contrast agent enrichment.

    PubMed

    Segers, Tim; Versluis, Michel

    2014-05-21

    An ultrasound contrast agent (UCA) suspension contains encapsulated microbubbles with a wide size distribution, with radii ranging from 1 to 10 μm. Medical transducers typically operate at a single frequency, therefore only a small selection of bubbles will resonate to the driving ultrasound pulse. Thus, the sensitivity can be improved by narrowing down the size distribution. Here, we present a simple lab-on-a-chip method to sort the population of microbubbles on-chip using a traveling ultrasound wave. First, we explore the physical parameter space of acoustic bubble sorting using well-defined bubble sizes formed in a flow-focusing device, then we demonstrate successful acoustic sorting of a commercial UCA. This novel sorting strategy may lead to an overall improvement of the sensitivity of contrast ultrasound by more than 10 dB.

  19. Sonophoresis Using Ultrasound Contrast Agents: Dependence on Concentration.

    PubMed

    Park, Donghee; Song, Gillsoo; Jo, Yongjun; Won, Jongho; Son, Taeyoon; Cha, Ohrum; Kim, Jinho; Jung, Byungjo; Park, Hyunjin; Kim, Chul-Woo; Seo, Jongbum

    2016-01-01

    Sonophoresis can increase skin permeability to various drugs in transdermal drug delivery. Cavitation is recognized as the predominant mechanism of sonophoresis. Recently, a new logical approach to enhance the efficiency of transdermal drug delivery was tried. It is to utilize the engineered microbubble and its resonant frequency for increase of cavitation activity. Actively-induced cavitation with low-intensity ultrasound (less than ~1 MPa) causes disordering of the lipid bilayers and the formation of aqueous channels by stable cavitation which indicates a continuous oscillation of bubbles. Furthermore, the mutual interactions of microbubble determined by concentration of added bubble are also thought to be an important factor for activity of stable cavitation, even in different characteristics of drug. In the present study, we addressed the dependence of ultrasound contrast agent concentration using two types of drug on the efficiency of transdermal drug delivery. Two types of experiment were designed to quantitatively evaluate the efficiency of transdermal drug delivery according to ultrasound contrast agent concentration. First, an experiment of optical clearing using a tissue optical clearing agent was designed to assess the efficiency of sonophoresis with ultrasound contrast agents. Second, a Franz diffusion cell with ferulic acid was used to quantitatively determine the amount of drug delivered to the skin sample by sonophoresis with ultrasound contrast agents. The maximum enhancement ratio of sonophoresis with a concentration of 1:1,000 was approximately 3.1 times greater than that in the ultrasound group without ultrasound contrast agent and approximately 7.5 times greater than that in the control group. These results support our hypothesis that sonophoresis becomes more effective in transdermal drug delivery due to the presence of engineered bubbles, and that the efficiency of transdermal drug delivery using sonophoresis with microbubbles depends on the

  20. Sonophoresis Using Ultrasound Contrast Agents: Dependence on Concentration

    PubMed Central

    Park, Donghee; Song, Gillsoo; Jo, Yongjun; Won, Jongho; Son, Taeyoon; Cha, Ohrum; Kim, Jinho; Jung, Byungjo; Park, Hyunjin; Kim, Chul-Woo; Seo, Jongbum

    2016-01-01

    Sonophoresis can increase skin permeability to various drugs in transdermal drug delivery. Cavitation is recognized as the predominant mechanism of sonophoresis. Recently, a new logical approach to enhance the efficiency of transdermal drug delivery was tried. It is to utilize the engineered microbubble and its resonant frequency for increase of cavitation activity. Actively-induced cavitation with low-intensity ultrasound (less than ~1 MPa) causes disordering of the lipid bilayers and the formation of aqueous channels by stable cavitation which indicates a continuous oscillation of bubbles. Furthermore, the mutual interactions of microbubble determined by concentration of added bubble are also thought to be an important factor for activity of stable cavitation, even in different characteristics of drug. In the present study, we addressed the dependence of ultrasound contrast agent concentration using two types of drug on the efficiency of transdermal drug delivery. Two types of experiment were designed to quantitatively evaluate the efficiency of transdermal drug delivery according to ultrasound contrast agent concentration. First, an experiment of optical clearing using a tissue optical clearing agent was designed to assess the efficiency of sonophoresis with ultrasound contrast agents. Second, a Franz diffusion cell with ferulic acid was used to quantitatively determine the amount of drug delivered to the skin sample by sonophoresis with ultrasound contrast agents. The maximum enhancement ratio of sonophoresis with a concentration of 1:1,000 was approximately 3.1 times greater than that in the ultrasound group without ultrasound contrast agent and approximately 7.5 times greater than that in the control group. These results support our hypothesis that sonophoresis becomes more effective in transdermal drug delivery due to the presence of engineered bubbles, and that the efficiency of transdermal drug delivery using sonophoresis with microbubbles depends on the

  1. Ultrasound imaging beyond the vasculature with new generation contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Perera, Reshani H; Hernandez, Christopher; Zhou, Haoyan; Kota, Pavan; Burke, Alan; Exner, Agata A

    2015-01-01

    Current commercially available ultrasound contrast agents are gas-filled, lipid- or protein-stabilized microbubbles larger than 1 µm in diameter. Because the signal generated by these agents is highly dependent on their size, small yet highly echogenic particles have been historically difficult to produce. This has limited the molecular imaging applications of ultrasound to the blood pool. In the area of cancer imaging, microbubble applications have been constrained to imaging molecular signatures of tumor vasculature and drug delivery enabled by ultrasound-modulated bubble destruction. Recently, with the rise of sophisticated advancements in nanomedicine, ultrasound contrast agents, which are an order of magnitude smaller (100-500 nm) than their currently utilized counterparts, have been undergoing rapid development. These agents are poised to greatly expand the capabilities of ultrasound in the field of targeted cancer detection and therapy by taking advantage of the enhanced permeability and retention phenomenon of many tumors and can extravasate beyond the leaky tumor vasculature. Agent extravasation facilitates highly sensitive detection of cell surface or microenvironment biomarkers, which could advance early cancer detection. Likewise, when combined with appropriate therapeutic agents and ultrasound-mediated deployment on demand, directly at the tumor site, these nanoparticles have been shown to contribute to improved therapeutic outcomes. Ultrasound's safety profile, broad accessibility and relatively low cost make it an ideal modality for the changing face of healthcare today. Aided by the multifaceted nano-sized contrast agents and targeted theranostic moieties described herein, ultrasound can considerably broaden its reach in future applications focused on the diagnosis and staging of cancer.

  2. Methods for blood flow measurements using ultrasound contrast agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fowlkes, J. Brian

    2003-10-01

    Blood flow measurements using ultrasound contrast agents are being investigated for myocardial perfusion and more recently in other organ systems. The methods are based largely on the relative increase in echogenicity due to the concentration of bubbles present in the ultrasound beam. In the simplest form, regional differences in blood volume can be inferred but the possibility exists to extract perfusion from the transit of contrast agent through tissue. Perfusion measurements rely on determining the flux of blood through a tissue volume and as such require knowledge of the fractional blood volume (FBV), i.e., ml blood/g tissue and the rate of exchange, commonly measured as the mean transit time (MTT). This presentation will discuss methods of determining each of these values and their combination to estimate tissue perfusion. Underlying principles of indicator-dilution theory will be provided in the context of ultrasound contrast agents. Current methods for determining MTT will include imaging of the intravenous bolus, in-plane contrast disruption with interval and real-time contrast recovery imaging, and control of contrast agent flow using arterial disruption (contrast interruption). The advantages and limitations of the methods will be examined along with current applications. [Work supported in part by NIH.

  3. Contrast Imaging in Mouse Embryos Using High-frequency Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Denbeigh, Janet M.; Nixon, Brian A.; Puri, Mira C.; Foster, F. Stuart

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound contrast-enhanced imaging can convey essential quantitative information regarding tissue vascularity and perfusion and, in targeted applications, facilitate the detection and measure of vascular biomarkers at the molecular level. Within the mouse embryo, this noninvasive technique may be used to uncover basic mechanisms underlying vascular development in the early mouse circulatory system and in genetic models of cardiovascular disease. The mouse embryo also presents as an excellent model for studying the adhesion of microbubbles to angiogenic targets (including vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) or αvβ3) and for assessing the quantitative nature of molecular ultrasound. We therefore developed a method to introduce ultrasound contrast agents into the vasculature of living, isolated embryos. This allows freedom in terms of injection control and positioning, reproducibility of the imaging plane without obstruction and motion, and simplified image analysis and quantification. Late gestational stage (embryonic day (E)16.6 and E17.5) murine embryos were isolated from the uterus, gently exteriorized from the yolk sac and microbubble contrast agents were injected into veins accessible on the chorionic surface of the placental disc. Nonlinear contrast ultrasound imaging was then employed to collect a number of basic perfusion parameters (peak enhancement, wash-in rate and time to peak) and quantify targeted microbubble binding in an endoglin mouse model. We show the successful circulation of microbubbles within living embryos and the utility of this approach in characterizing embryonic vasculature and microbubble behavior. PMID:25867243

  4. Contrast imaging in mouse embryos using high-frequency ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Denbeigh, Janet M; Nixon, Brian A; Puri, Mira C; Foster, F Stuart

    2015-03-04

    Ultrasound contrast-enhanced imaging can convey essential quantitative information regarding tissue vascularity and perfusion and, in targeted applications, facilitate the detection and measure of vascular biomarkers at the molecular level. Within the mouse embryo, this noninvasive technique may be used to uncover basic mechanisms underlying vascular development in the early mouse circulatory system and in genetic models of cardiovascular disease. The mouse embryo also presents as an excellent model for studying the adhesion of microbubbles to angiogenic targets (including vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) or αvβ3) and for assessing the quantitative nature of molecular ultrasound. We therefore developed a method to introduce ultrasound contrast agents into the vasculature of living, isolated embryos. This allows freedom in terms of injection control and positioning, reproducibility of the imaging plane without obstruction and motion, and simplified image analysis and quantification. Late gestational stage (embryonic day (E)16.6 and E17.5) murine embryos were isolated from the uterus, gently exteriorized from the yolk sac and microbubble contrast agents were injected into veins accessible on the chorionic surface of the placental disc. Nonlinear contrast ultrasound imaging was then employed to collect a number of basic perfusion parameters (peak enhancement, wash-in rate and time to peak) and quantify targeted microbubble binding in an endoglin mouse model. We show the successful circulation of microbubbles within living embryos and the utility of this approach in characterizing embryonic vasculature and microbubble behavior.

  5. Ultrasound Activated Contrast Imaging for Prostate Cancer Detection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-01

    Goldberg. Nonlinear imaging with a new contrast agent. Ultrasound Med Biol, vol. 29, pp. S97, 2003. R. J. Ro, F. Forsberg, M. Knauer, W. T. Shi, P. A ... Lewin , R. Bernardi. On the temperature and concentration dependency of excitation-enhanced imaging. Proc Biomed Eng Soc Ann Fall Meetg, abstract no

  6. Cumulative phase delay imaging - A new contrast enhanced ultrasound modality

    SciTech Connect

    Demi, Libertario Sloun, Ruud J. G. van; Mischi, Massimo; Wijkstra, Hessel

    2015-10-28

    Recently, a new acoustic marker for ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) has been introduced. A cumulative phase delay (CPD) between the second harmonic and fundamental pressure wave field components is in fact observable for ultrasound propagating through UCAs. This phenomenon is absent in the case of tissue nonlinearity and is dependent on insonating pressure and frequency, UCA concentration, and propagation path length through UCAs. In this paper, ultrasound images based on this marker are presented. The ULA-OP research platform, in combination with a LA332 linear array probe (Esaote, Firenze Italy), were used to image a gelatin phantom containing a PVC plate (used as a reflector) and a cylindrical cavity measuring 7 mm in diameter (placed in between the observation point and the PVC plate). The cavity contained a 240 µL/L SonoVueO{sup ®} UCA concentration. Two insonating frequencies (3 MHz and 2.5 MHz) were used to scan the gelatine phantom. A mechanical index MI = 0.07, measured in water at the cavity location with a HGL-0400 hydrophone (Onda, Sunnyvale, CA), was utilized. Processing the ultrasound signals backscattered from the plate, ultrasound images were generated in a tomographic fashion using the filtered back-projection method. As already observed in previous studies, significantly higher CPD values are measured when imaging at a frequency of 2.5 MHz, as compared to imaging at 3 MHz. In conclusion, these results confirm the applicability of the discussed CPD as a marker for contrast imaging. Comparison with standard contrast-enhanced ultrasound imaging modalities will be the focus of future work.

  7. Cumulative phase delay imaging - A new contrast enhanced ultrasound modality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demi, Libertario; van Sloun, Ruud J. G.; Wijkstra, Hessel; Mischi, Massimo

    2015-10-01

    Recently, a new acoustic marker for ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) has been introduced. A cumulative phase delay (CPD) between the second harmonic and fundamental pressure wave field components is in fact observable for ultrasound propagating through UCAs. This phenomenon is absent in the case of tissue nonlinearity and is dependent on insonating pressure and frequency, UCA concentration, and propagation path length through UCAs. In this paper, ultrasound images based on this marker are presented. The ULA-OP research platform, in combination with a LA332 linear array probe (Esaote, Firenze Italy), were used to image a gelatin phantom containing a PVC plate (used as a reflector) and a cylindrical cavity measuring 7 mm in diameter (placed in between the observation point and the PVC plate). The cavity contained a 240 µL/L SonoVueO® UCA concentration. Two insonating frequencies (3 MHz and 2.5 MHz) were used to scan the gelatine phantom. A mechanical index MI = 0.07, measured in water at the cavity location with a HGL-0400 hydrophone (Onda, Sunnyvale, CA), was utilized. Processing the ultrasound signals backscattered from the plate, ultrasound images were generated in a tomographic fashion using the filtered back-projection method. As already observed in previous studies, significantly higher CPD values are measured when imaging at a frequency of 2.5 MHz, as compared to imaging at 3 MHz. In conclusion, these results confirm the applicability of the discussed CPD as a marker for contrast imaging. Comparison with standard contrast-enhanced ultrasound imaging modalities will be the focus of future work.

  8. How to Develop a Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound Program.

    PubMed

    Barr, Richard G

    2017-02-02

    With the recent Food and Drug Administration approval of Lumason (sulfur hexafluoride lipid-type A microsphere, Bracco Diagnostics Inc, Monroe Township, NJ) for contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) to characterize focal liver lesions in both adult and pediatric patients, widespread use of CEUS is expected in the United States. This paper provides guidance in setting up a CEUS program, and reviews the practical details that will need to be instituted in a standard ultrasound department to provide both safe and efficient use of CEUS. A review of the indications, contraindications, adverse events, instructions for performing the exam, and image interpretation are discussed.

  9. Pinched flow fractionation of microbubbles for ultrasound contrast agent enrichment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Versluis, Michel; Kok, Maarten; Segers, Tim

    2014-11-01

    An ultrasound contrast agent (UCA) suspension contains a wide size distribution of encapsulated microbubbles (typically 1-10 μm in diameter) that resonate to the driving ultrasound field by the intrinsic relationship between bubble size and ultrasound frequency. Medical transducers, however, operate in a narrow frequency range, which severely limits the number of bubbles that contribute to the echo signal. Thus, the sensitivity can be improved by narrowing down the size distribution of the bubble suspension. Here, we present a novel, low-cost, lab-on-a-chip method for the sorting of contrast microbubbles by size, based on a microfluidic separation technique known as pinched flow fractionation (PFF). We show by experimental and numerical investigation that the inclusion of particle rotation is essential for an accurate physical description of the sorting behavior of the larger bubbles. Successful sorting of a bubble suspension with a narrow size distribution (3.0 +/- 0.6 μm) has been achieved with a PFF microdevice. This sorting technique can be easily parallelized, and may lead to a significant improvement in the sensitivity of contrast-enhanced medical ultrasound. This work is supported by NanoNextNL, a micro and nanotechnology consortium of the Government of the Netherlands and 130 partners.

  10. Contrast ultrasound molecular imaging of inflammation in cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Lindner, Jonathan R

    2009-11-01

    The cellular immune response plays an important role in almost every major form of cardiovascular disease. The ability to image the key aspects of the immune response in the clinical setting could be used to improve diagnostic information, to provide important prognostic or risk information, and to customize therapy according to disease phenotype. Accordingly, targeted imaging probes for assessing inflammation have been developed for essentially all forms of medical imaging. Molecular imaging of inflammation with contrast ultrasound relies on the detection of targeted microbubble or other gas-filled particle contrast agents. These agents are confined to the vascular space and, hence, have been targeted to either activated leucocytes or endothelial cell adhesion molecules that are upregulated in inflammation and mediate leucocyte recruitment and adhesion. This review focuses on the inflammation-targeting strategies for ultrasound contrast agents and how they have been matched to cardiovascular disease states such as myocardial ischaemia, infarction, atherosclerosis, transplant rejection, and arteriogenesis.

  11. Multifunctional ultrasound contrast agents for imaging guided photothermal therapy.

    PubMed

    Guo, Caixin; Jin, Yushen; Dai, Zhifei

    2014-05-21

    Among all the imaging techniques, ultrasound imaging has a unique advantage due to its features of real-time, low cost, high safety, and portability. Ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) have been widely used to enhance ultrasonic signals. One of the most exciting features of UCAs for use in biomedicine is the possibility of easily putting new combinations of functional molecules into microbubbles (MBs), which are the most routinely used UCAs. Various therapeutic agents and medical nanoparticles (quantum dots, gold, Fe3O4, etc.) can be loaded into ultrasound-responsive MBs. Hence, UCAs can be developed as multifunctional agents that integrate capabilities for early detection and diagnosis and for imaging guided therapy of various diseases. The current review will focus on such state-of-the-art UCA platforms that have been exploited for multimodal imaging and for imaging guided photothermal therapy.

  12. 3D imaging options and ultrasound contrast agents for the ultrasound assessment of pediatric rheumatic patients.

    PubMed

    Madej, Tomasz

    2013-12-01

    The application of 3D imaging in pediatric rheumatology helps to make the assessment of inflammatory changes more objective and to estimate accurately their volume and the actual response to treatment in the course of follow-up examinations. Additional interesting opportunities are opened up by the vascularity analysis with the help of power Doppler and color Doppler in 3D imaging. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound examinations enable a more sensitive assessment of the vascularity of inflamed structures of the locomotor system, and a more accurate analysis of treatment's effect on changes in vascularity, and thereby the inflammation process activity, as compared to the classical options of power and color Doppler. The equipment required, time limitations, as well as the high price in the case of contrast-enhanced ultrasound, contribute to the fact that the 3D analysis of inflammatory changes and contrast-enhanced ultrasound examinations are not routinely applied for pediatric patients.

  13. Dual-frequency piezoelectric transducers for contrast enhanced ultrasound imaging.

    PubMed

    Martin, K Heath; Lindsey, Brooks D; Ma, Jianguo; Lee, Mike; Li, Sibo; Foster, F Stuart; Jiang, Xiaoning; Dayton, Paul A

    2014-11-04

    For many years, ultrasound has provided clinicians with an affordable and effective imaging tool for applications ranging from cardiology to obstetrics. Development of microbubble contrast agents over the past several decades has enabled ultrasound to distinguish between blood flow and surrounding tissue. Current clinical practices using microbubble contrast agents rely heavily on user training to evaluate degree of localized perfusion. Advances in separating the signals produced from contrast agents versus surrounding tissue backscatter provide unique opportunities for specialized sensors designed to image microbubbles with higher signal to noise and resolution than previously possible. In this review article, we describe the background principles and recent developments of ultrasound transducer technology for receiving signals produced by contrast agents while rejecting signals arising from soft tissue. This approach relies on transmitting at a low-frequency and receiving microbubble harmonic signals at frequencies many times higher than the transmitted frequency. Design and fabrication of dual-frequency transducers and the extension of recent developments in transducer technology for dual-frequency harmonic imaging are discussed.

  14. Dual-Frequency Piezoelectric Transducers for Contrast Enhanced Ultrasound Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Martin, K. Heath; Lindsey, Brooks D.; Ma, Jianguo; Lee, Mike; Li, Sibo; Foster, F. Stuart; Jiang, Xiaoning; Dayton, Paul A.

    2014-01-01

    For many years, ultrasound has provided clinicians with an affordable and effective imaging tool for applications ranging from cardiology to obstetrics. Development of microbubble contrast agents over the past several decades has enabled ultrasound to distinguish between blood flow and surrounding tissue. Current clinical practices using microbubble contrast agents rely heavily on user training to evaluate degree of localized perfusion. Advances in separating the signals produced from contrast agents versus surrounding tissue backscatter provide unique opportunities for specialized sensors designed to image microbubbles with higher signal to noise and resolution than previously possible. In this review article, we describe the background principles and recent developments of ultrasound transducer technology for receiving signals produced by contrast agents while rejecting signals arising from soft tissue. This approach relies on transmitting at a low-frequency and receiving microbubble harmonic signals at frequencies many times higher than the transmitted frequency. Design and fabrication of dual-frequency transducers and the extension of recent developments in transducer technology for dual-frequency harmonic imaging are discussed. PMID:25375755

  15. Characterization and Ultrasound-Pulse Mediated Destruction of Ultrasound Contrast Microbubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Kausik; Jain, Pankaj; Chatterjee, Dhiman

    2006-05-01

    Intravenously injected encapsulated microbubbles improve the contrast of an ultrasound image. Their destruction is used in measuring blood flow, stimulating arteriogenesis, and drug delivery. We measure attenuation and scattering of ultrasound through solution of commercial contrast agents such as Sonazoid and Definity. We have developed a number of different interfacial rheology models for the encapsulation of such microbubbles. By matching with experimentally measured attenuation, we obtain the characteristic rheological parameters. We compare model predictions with measured subharmonic responses. We also investigate microbubble destruction under acoustic excitation by measuring time-varying attenuation data.

  16. A theoretical investigation of chirp insonification of ultrasound contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Barlow, Euan; Mulholland, Anthony J; Gachagan, Anthony; Nordon, Alison

    2011-08-01

    A theoretical investigation of second harmonic imaging of an Ultrasound Contrast Agent (UCA) under chirp insonification is considered. By solving the UCA's dynamical equation analytically, the effect that the chirp signal parameters and the UCA shell parameters have on the amplitude of the second harmonic frequency are examined. This allows optimal parameter values to be identified which maximise the UCA's second harmonic response. A relationship is found for the chirp parameters which ensures that a signal can be designed to resonate a UCA for a given set of shell parameters. It is also shown that the shell thickness, shell viscosity and shell elasticity parameter should be as small as realistically possible in order to maximise the second harmonic amplitude. Keller-Herring, Second Harmonic, Chirp, Ultrasound Contrast Agent.

  17. Ultrasound Activated Contrast Imaging for Prostate Cancer Detection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-03-01

    ultrasound engine with a P4-2 phased array transducer were modified to perform EEI on a vector-by-vector basis in fundamental and pulse inversion harmonic...albumin-encapsulated Abunex® bubble is 18 times greater than that for a free bubble if the two bubbles oscillate with the same relative amplitude at...utilizes two acoustic fields: the activation field for intermittently activating contrast bubbles and the imaging field, applied shortly afterwards, for

  18. Dynamic contrast-enhanced endoscopic ultrasound: A quantification method

    PubMed Central

    Dietrich, Christoph F.; Dong, Yi; Froehlich, Eckhart; Hocke, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasound (DCE-US) has been recently standardized by guidelines and recommendations. The European Federation of Societies for US in Medicine and Biology position paper describes the use for DCE-US. Comparatively, little is known about the use of contrast-enhanced endoscopic US (CE-EUS). This current paper reviews and discusses the clinical use of CE-EUS and DCE-US. The most important clinical use of DCE-US is the prediction of tumor response to new drugs against vascular angioneogenesis. PMID:28218195

  19. Value of contrast-enhanced ultrasound in rheumatic disease.

    PubMed

    Klauser, Andrea Sabine

    2005-12-01

    Ultrasound (US) is a useful tool in the assessment of rheumatic disease. It permits assessment of early erosive changes and vascularity detection in synovial proliferation, caused by inflammatory activity by using colour/power Doppler US (CDUS/PDUS). In the detection of slow flow and flow in small vessels, the CDUS/PDUS technique is limited. Contrast enhanced US can improve the detection of inflammatory vascularity but is not yet included in routine diagnosis of this condition. However, contrast enhanced US shows promising results in diagnosis, assessment of disease activity and follow up of inflammatory rheumatic diseases.

  20. Feasibility of ultrasound phase contrast for heating localization.

    PubMed

    Farny, Caleb H; Clement, Greg T

    2008-03-01

    Ultrasound-based methods for temperature monitoring could greatly assist focused ultrasound visualization and treatment planning based on sound speed-induced change in phase as a function of temperature. A method is presented that uses reflex transmission integration, planar projection, and tomographic reconstruction techniques to visualize phase contrast by measuring the sound field before and after heat deposition. Results from experiments and numerical simulations employing a through-transmission setup are presented to demonstrate feasibility of using phase contrast methods for identifying temperature change. A 1.088-MHz focused transducer was used to interrogate a medium with a phase contrast feature, following measurement of the baseline reference field with a hydrophone. A thermal plume in water and a tissue phantom with multiple water columns was used in separate experiments to produce a phase contrast. The reference and phase contrast field scans were numerically backprojected and the phase difference correctly identified the position and orientation of the features. The peak temperature reconstructed from the phase shift was within 0.2 degrees C of the measured temperature in the plume. Simulated results were in good agreement with experimental results. Finally, employment of reflex transmission imaging techniques for adopting a pulse-echo arrangement was simulated, and its future experimental application is discussed.

  1. Effects of nonlinear propagation in ultrasound contrast agent imaging.

    PubMed

    Tang, Meng-Xing; Kamiyama, Naohisa; Eckersley, Robert J

    2010-03-01

    This paper investigates two types of nonlinear propagation and their effects on image intensity and contrast-to-tissue ratio (CTR) in contrast ultrasound images. Previous studies have shown that nonlinear propagation can occur when ultrasound travels through tissue and microbubble clouds, making tissue farther down the acoustic path appear brighter in pulse inversion (PI) images, thus reducing CTR. In this study, the effect of nonlinear propagation through tissue or microbubbles on PI image intensity and CTR are compared at low mechanical index. A combination of simulation and experiment with SonoVue microbubbles were performed using a microbubble dynamics model, a laboratory ultrasound system and a clinical prototype scanner. The results show that, close to the bubble resonance frequency, nonlinear propagation through a bubble cloud of a few centimeter thickness with a modest concentration (1:10000 dilution of SonoVue microbubbles) is much more significant than through tissue-mimicking material. Consequently, CTR in regions distal to the imaging probe is greatly reduced for nonlinear propagation through the bubble cloud, with as much as a 12-dB reduction compared with nonlinear propagation through tissue-mimicking material. Both types of nonlinear propagation cause only a small change in bubble PI signals at the bubble resonance frequency. When the driving frequency increases beyond bubble resonance, nonlinear propagation through bubbles is greatly reduced in absolute values. However because of a greater reduction in nonlinear scattering from bubbles at higher frequencies, the corresponding CTR is much lower than that at bubble resonance frequency.

  2. Ultrasound contrast agent fabricated from microbubbles containing instant adhesives, and its ultrasound imaging ability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makuta, T.; Tamakawa, Y.

    2012-04-01

    Non-invasive surgery techniques and drug delivery system with acoustic characteristics of ultrasound contrast agent have been studied intensively in recent years. Ultrasound contrast agent collapses easily under the blood circulating and the ultrasound irradiating because it is just a stabilized bubble without solid-shell by surface adsorption of surfactant or lipid. For improving the imaging stability, we proposed the fabrication method of the hollow microcapsule with polymer shell, which can be fabricated just blowing vapor of commonly-used instant adhesive (Cyanoacrylate monomer) into water as microbubbles. Therefore, the cyanoacrylate vapor contained inside microbubble initiates polymerization on the gasliquid interface soon after microbubbles are generated in water. Consequently, hollow microspheres coated by cyanoacrylate thin film are generated. In this report, we revealed that diameter distributions of microbubbles and microcapsules were approximately same and most of them were less than 10 μm, that is, smaller than blood capillary. In addition, we also revealed that hollow microcapsules enhanced the acoustic signal especially in the harmonic contrast imaging and were broken or agglomerated under the ultrasound field. As for the yield of hollow microcapsules, we revealed that sodium dodecyl sulfate addition to water phase instead of deoxycolic acid made the fabrication yield increased.

  3. Contrast harmonic endoscopic ultrasound: Instrumentation, echoprocessors, and echoendoscopes

    PubMed Central

    Iglesias-Garcia, Julio; Lariño-Noia, Jose; Domínguez-Muñoz, J. Enrique

    2017-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) has become as one the best diagnostic and therapeutic methods for the management of several intraintestinal and extraintestinal diseases, among them to highlight pancreaticobiliary indications, mediastinal evaluation, and the analysis of gastrointestinal lesions. Over the years, there has been an enormous evolution in the systems available to perform EUS. Newer processors and echoendoscopes are available nowadays, with the ability to perform new imaging analysis, such as elastography and contrast enhancement. In the present article, we will review which systems are available nowadays, focusing also in the technical advances associated. PMID:28218199

  4. Nanobubble-Affibody: Novel ultrasound contrast agents for targeted molecular ultrasound imaging of tumor.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hengli; Cai, Wenbin; Xu, Lei; Lv, Xiuhua; Qiao, Youbei; Li, Pan; Wu, Hong; Yang, Yilin; Zhang, Li; Duan, Yunyou

    2015-01-01

    Nanobubbles (NBs), as novel ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs), have attracted increasing attention in the field of molecular ultrasound imaging for tumors. However, the preparation of uniform-sized NBs is considered to be controversial, and poor tumor selectivity in in vivo imaging has been reported. In this study, we fabricated uniform nano-sized NBs (478.2 ± 29.7 nm with polydispersity index of 0.164 ± 0.044, n = 3) using a thin-film hydration method by controlling the thickness of phospholipid films; we then conjugated the NBs with Affibody molecules to produce nano-sized UCAs referred to as NB-Affibody with specific affinity to human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2 (HER2)-overexpressing tumors. NB-Affibody presented good ultrasound enhancement, demonstrating a peak intensity of 104.5 ± 2.1 dB under ultrasound contrast scanning. Ex vivo experiments further confirmed that the NB-Affibody conjugates were capable of targeting HER2-expressing tumor cells in vivo with high affinity. The newly prepared nano-sized NB-Affibody conjugates were observed to be novel targeted UCAs for efficient and safe specific molecular imaging and may have potential applications in early cancer quantitative diagnosis and targeted therapy in the future.

  5. Second harmonic inversion for ultrasound contrast harmonic imaging.

    PubMed

    Pasovic, Mirza; Danilouchkine, Mike; Faez, Telli; van Neer, Paul L M J; Cachard, Christian; van der Steen, Antonius F W; Basset, Olivier; de Jong, Nico

    2011-06-07

    Ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) are small micro-bubbles that behave nonlinearly when exposed to an ultrasound wave. This nonlinear behavior can be observed through the generated higher harmonics in a back-scattered echo. In past years several techniques have been proposed to detect or image harmonics produced by UCAs. In these proposed works, the harmonics generated in the medium during the propagation of the ultrasound wave played an important role, since these harmonics compete with the harmonics generated by the micro-bubbles. We present a method for the reduction of the second harmonic generated during nonlinear-propagation-dubbed second harmonic inversion (SHI). A general expression for the suppression signals is also derived. The SHI technique uses two pulses, p' and p″, of the same frequency f(0) and the same amplitude P(0) to cancel out the second harmonic generated by nonlinearities of the medium. Simulations show that the second harmonic is reduced by 40 dB on a large axial range. Experimental SHI B-mode images, from a tissue-mimicking phantom and UCAs, show an improvement in the agent-to-tissue ratio (ATR) of 20 dB compared to standard second harmonic imaging and 13 dB of improvement in harmonic power Doppler.

  6. Ultrasound Induced Fluorescence of Nanoscale Liposome Contrast Agents

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qimei; Morgan, Stephen P.; O’Shea, Paul; Mather, Melissa L.

    2016-01-01

    A new imaging contrast agent is reported that provides an increased fluorescent signal upon application of ultrasound (US). Liposomes containing lipids labelled with pyrene were optically excited and the excimer fluorescence emission intensity was detected in the absence and presence of an ultrasound field using an acousto-fluorescence setup. The acousto-fluorescence dynamics of liposomes containing lipids with pyrene labelled on the fatty acid tail group (PyPC) and the head group (PyPE) were compared. An increase in excimer emission intensity following exposure to US was observed for both cases studied. The increased intensity and time constants were found to be different for the PyPC and PyPE systems, and dependent on the applied US pressure and exposure time. The greatest change in fluorescence intensity (130%) and smallest rise time constant (0.33 s) are achieved through the use of PyPC labelled liposomes. The mechanism underlying the observed increase of the excimer emission intensity in PyPC labelled liposomes is proposed to arise from the “wagging” of acyl chains which involves fast response and requires lower US pressure. This is accompanied by increased lipid lateral diffusivity at higher ultrasound pressures, a mechanism that is also active in the PyPE labelled liposomes. PMID:27467748

  7. Usefulness of ultrasound contrast for image enhancement during stress echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Ten Cate, Folkert J

    2002-10-01

    Although stress echocardiography has been established as a diagnostic technique for the detection and assessment of ischemia, there are still a number of limitations to the technique. These are related to suboptimal image quality with poor visualization of endocardial borders. Because assessment of wall motion is fundamental to the diagnostic value of stress echocardiography (both pharmacologic and exercise), endocardial border visualization is of utmost importance. Furthermore, interinstitutional observer agreement of 100% in highest image quality patients to a cumbersome 43% in low image quality patients is present. Therefore, improvements of image quality during stress are essential. One of the recent improvements is harmonic imaging, which improves visualization of endocardial borders at rest and during dobutamine stress. However, there is room for improvement. Since the introduction of ultrasound contrast agents, contrast has been increasingly used for better endocardial border visualization. Data from centers with a large number of stress echocardiography tests have shown that the addition of contrast agents decreases the number of more redundant diagnostic testing. Data obtained in our center in a subset of patients administered with SonoVue, a new generation contrast agent made of stabilized microbubbles containing sulfur hexafluoride, an inert gas, showed an improvement in the number of evaluable segments with fundamental and harmonic imaging and in the endocardial border detection during dobutamine stress echocardiography. Contrast also enables future quantitative analysis using acoustic quantification (AQ), and color kinesis. These studies should be carried out now that contrast has been approved for introduction to the market.

  8. Current topics in ultrasound contrast agent application and design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, John S.; Kruse, Dustin E.; May, Donovan J.

    2001-05-01

    Ultrasound contrast agents are bubbles, 1-10 microns in radius, encapsulated by a lipid, protein, polymer or fluid shell. The agents have been used to distinguish the acoustic scattering signatures of blood from those of the surrounding tissue. This is possible due to the nonlinear response of the agent, which is similar to that of a free gas bubble. Upon sufficient forcing the agents will oscillate nonlinearly about their equilibrium radius, and for specific conditions, produce nonlinear resonance responses which are integer multiples of the primary resonance. Ultrasound tissue perfusion studies have been developed which are based on the destruction of contract agents coupled to the measurement of blood flow. Nevertheless, many outstanding issues remain in contrast agent design especially with respect to emerging applications. Even with the use of higher order harmonics there is a lack of an acoustic signature or destruction mechanism at frequencies above approximately 5.0 MHz with conventional agents. The design and use of a high frequency contrast agent is addressed by exploiting the multiple scattering response of agents modled as spherical elastic shells. Also considered is the nonlinear response of elastic-shelled agents. The considerations of shells modeled as linear and nonlinear elastic materials are discussed. The use of contrast agents for targeted drug delivery has recently received much attention. More specifically, the ImaRx Corporation (Tucson, Arizona) has developed thick fluid shelled agents, which release suspended taxol-based drugs from their shells upon destruction. Shape instabilities and surface waves correspond with the fragmentation and destruction of the agents. Finally, the interaction of multiple contrast agents has received little attention with respect to these emerging applications.

  9. Mechanically Tunable Hollow Silica Ultrathin Nanoshells for Ultrasound Contrast Agents

    PubMed Central

    Liberman, A.; Wang, J.; Lu, N.; Viveros, R.D.; Allen, C. A.; Mattrey, R.F.; Blair, S.L.; Trogler, W.C.; Kim, M. J.; Kummel, A.C.

    2015-01-01

    Perfluoropentane (PFP) gas filled biodegradable iron-doped silica nanoshells have been demonstrated as long-lived ultrasound contrast agents. Nanoshells are synthesized by a sol-gel process with tetramethyl orthosilicate (TMOS) and iron ethoxide. Substituting a fraction of the TMOS with R-substituted trialkoxysilanes produces ultrathin nanoshells with varying shell thicknesses and morphologies composed of fused nanoflakes. The ultrathin nanoshells had continuous ultrasound Doppler imaging lifetimes exceeding 3 hours, were twice as bright using contrast specific imaging, and had decreased pressure thresholds compared to control nanoshells synthesized with just TMOS. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed that the R-group substituted trialkoxysilanes could reduce the mechanically critical nanoshell layer to 1.4 nm. These ultrathin nanoshells have the mechanical behavior of weakly linked nanoflakes but the chemical stability of silica. The synthesis can be adapted for general fabrication of three-dimensional nanostructures composed of nanoflakes, which have thicknesses from 1.4–3.8 nm and diameters from 2–23 nm. PMID:26955300

  10. Mechanically Tunable Hollow Silica Ultrathin Nanoshells for Ultrasound Contrast Agents.

    PubMed

    Liberman, A; Wang, J; Lu, N; Viveros, R D; Allen, C A; Mattrey, R F; Blair, S L; Trogler, W C; Kim, M J; Kummel, A C

    2015-07-08

    Perfluoropentane (PFP) gas filled biodegradable iron-doped silica nanoshells have been demonstrated as long-lived ultrasound contrast agents. Nanoshells are synthesized by a sol-gel process with tetramethyl orthosilicate (TMOS) and iron ethoxide. Substituting a fraction of the TMOS with R-substituted trialkoxysilanes produces ultrathin nanoshells with varying shell thicknesses and morphologies composed of fused nanoflakes. The ultrathin nanoshells had continuous ultrasound Doppler imaging lifetimes exceeding 3 hours, were twice as bright using contrast specific imaging, and had decreased pressure thresholds compared to control nanoshells synthesized with just TMOS. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed that the R-group substituted trialkoxysilanes could reduce the mechanically critical nanoshell layer to 1.4 nm. These ultrathin nanoshells have the mechanical behavior of weakly linked nanoflakes but the chemical stability of silica. The synthesis can be adapted for general fabrication of three-dimensional nanostructures composed of nanoflakes, which have thicknesses from 1.4-3.8 nm and diameters from 2-23 nm.

  11. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound for liver imaging: recent advances.

    PubMed

    Salvatore, Veronica; Borghi, Alberto; Piscaglia, Fabio

    2012-01-01

    Contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (CEUS), providing relevant informations not available with non-enhanced ultrasonography, greatly impacted the practice of liver imaging. The characterization of focal liver lesions (FLLs), is obtained in a rapid, accurate and safe way and is considered the main hepatic indication; however CEUS offers other established or emergent relevant applications. Metastases detection and assessment of response to locoregional tumor treatment are accepted applications with specific indications. Needle guidance in case of poorly or non visible target lesions at conventional ultrasound is also accepted. The early assessment of response to systemic treatment, and in particular to antiangiogenic ones, by quantification software is an emergent application. The manageability of CEUS determined also its use in the operating theatre, improving the accuracy of intraoperatory US with a significant impact on final surgical strategy. In cirrhotic patients, the role of CEUS was proven highly accurate and sensitive in the characterization of portal vein thrombosis, by identification of contrast arterial enhancement inside the thrombus, that occurs only in case of neoplastic origin. In recent years microbubbles taken up by Kupffer cells, thus possessing a "postvascular" phase, were registered as ultrasound contrast agent in Japan (Sonazoid). During the post-vascular phase tumoral tissue tend to appear as a contrast defect image due to the lack of Kupffer cells, strongly contributing to tumor staging beside characterization. Newly developed techniques, such as fusion imaging or real-time three dimensional US, in addition to other applications of CEUS, in terms of post-transplantation or cholecystitis-related complications, have been recently proposed and will be discussed.

  12. [Transabdominal ultrasound examination, contrast-enhanced ultrasound examination and endoscopic ultrasound scanning in the determination of the aetiology and the degree of severity in acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Møller Andersen, Anders; Malmstrøm, Marie Louise; Novovic, Srdan; Jørgensen, Lars Nannestad; Nissen, Flemming Helge; Hansen, Mark Berner

    2013-05-20

    A transabdominal ultrasound examination is part of the standard work-up for patients with acute pancreatitis. Transabdominal ultrasound examination displays a high sensitivity for the detection of gallbladder stones. With the recent introduction of contrast enhancement in ultrasound it has become possible to determine the severity of acute pancreatitis. Endoscopic ultrasound has shown a high sensitivity in the diagnosis of stones in the common bile duct and is an important peroperative surgical tool in endoscopic transgastric necrosectomi as well.

  13. Role of contrast-enhanced endoscopic ultrasound in lymph nodes

    PubMed Central

    Hocke, Michael; Ignee, Andre; Dietrich, Christoph

    2017-01-01

    Diagnosing unclear lymph node (LN) enlargements in the mediastinum and abdomen is the most important indication of endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-fine needle aspiration (FNA) after the diagnosis and treatment of pancreatic diseases. Investigating LNs in these areas can happen in different clinical settings. Mostly, it is the first modality in general LN diseases without any peripheral LN enlargements. On the other hand, it can be the question of LN involvement in a known or suspected primary tumor. Due to EUS-FNA cytology, those questions can be answered highly, accurately. However, a primary discrimination of LNs might be helpful to increase the diagnostic value of the FNA cytology, especially in cases with multiple LN enlargements and hard to reach enlarged LNs for example by vessel interposition. Because of the unreliability of B-mode criteria, further diagnostic improvements such as elastography and contrast-enhanced EUS are investigated to increase the accuracy of the initial diagnosis. PMID:28218194

  14. Vascular flow and perfusion imaging with ultrasound contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Bruce, Matthew; Averkiou, Mike; Tiemann, Klaus; Lohmaier, Stefan; Powers, Jeff; Beach, Kirk

    2004-06-01

    Current techniques for imaging ultrasound (US) contrast agents (UCA) make no distinction between low-velocity microbubbles in the microcirculation and higher-velocity microbubbles in the larger vasculature. A combination of radiofrequency (RF) and Doppler filtering on a low mechanical index (MI) pulse inversion acquisition is presented that differentiates low-velocity microbubbles (on the order of mm/s) associated with perfusion, from the higher-velocity microbubbles (on the order of cm/s) in larger vessels. In vitro experiments demonstrate the ability to separate vascular flow using both harmonic and fundamental Doppler signals. Fundamental and harmonic Doppler signals from microbubbles using a low-MI pulse-inversion acquisition are compared with conventional color Doppler signals in vivo. Due to the lower transmit amplitude and enhanced backscatter from microbubbles, the in vivo signal to clutter ratios for both the fundamental (-11 dB) and harmonic (-4 dB) vascular flow signals were greater than with conventional power Doppler (-51 dB) without contrast agent. The processing investigated here, in parallel with conventional pulse-inversion processing, enables the simultaneous display of both perfusion and vascular flow. In vivo results demonstrating the feasibility and potential utility of the real-time display of both perfusion and vascular flow using US contrast agents are presented and discussed.

  15. Role of contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) in the diagnosis of endometrial pathology

    PubMed Central

    POP, CIPRIAN MIHAITA; MIHU, DAN; BADEA, RADU

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound is the reference imaging procedure used for the exploration of endometrial pathology. As medical procedures improve and the requirements of modern medicine become more demanding, gray-scale ultrasound is insufficient in establishing gynecological diagnosis. Thus, more complex examination techniques are required: Doppler ultrasound, contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS), 3D ultrasound, etc. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound is a special examination technique that gains more and more ground. This allows a detailed real-time evaluation of microcirculation in a certain territory, which is impossible to perform by Doppler ultrasound. The aim of this review is to synthesize current knowledge regarding CEUS applications in endometrial pathology, to detail the technical aspects of endometrial CEUS and the physical properties of the equipment and contrast agents used, as well as to identify the limitations of the method. PMID:26733740

  16. Harmonic chirp imaging method for ultrasound contrast agent.

    PubMed

    Borsboom, Jerome M G; Chin, Chien Ting; Bouakaz, Ayache; Versluis, Michel; de Jong, Nico

    2005-02-01

    Coded excitation is currently used in medical ultrasound to increase signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and penetration depth. We propose a chirp excitation method for contrast agents using the second harmonic component of the response. This method is based on a compression filter that selectively compresses and extracts the second harmonic component from the received echo signal. Simulations have shown a clear increase in response for chirp excitation over pulse excitation with the same peak amplitude. This was confirmed by two-dimensional (2-D) optical observations of bubble response with a fast framing camera. To evaluate the harmonic compression method, we applied it to simulated bubble echoes, to measured propagation harmonics, and to B-mode scans of a flow phantom and compared it to regular pulse excitation imaging. An increase of approximately 10 dB in SNR was found for chirp excitation. The compression method was found to perform well in terms of resolution. Axial resolution was in all cases within 10% of the axial resolution from pulse excitation. Range side-lobe levels were 30 dB below the main lobe for the simulated bubble echoes and measured propagation harmonics. However, side-lobes were visible in the B-mode contrast images.

  17. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound of histologically proven hepatic epithelioid hemangioendothelioma

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Yi; Wang, Wen-Ping; Cantisani, Vito; D’Onofrio, Mirko; Ignee, Andre; Mulazzani, Lorenzo; Saftoiu, Adrian; Sparchez, Zeno; Sporea, Ioan; Dietrich, Christoph F

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To analyze contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) features of histologically proven hepatic epithelioid hemangioendothelioma (HEHE) in comparison to other multilocular benign focal liver lesions (FLL). METHODS: Twenty-five patients with histologically proven HEHE and 45 patients with histologically proven multilocular benign FLL were retrospectively reviewed. Four radiologists assessed the CEUS enhancement pattern in consensus. RESULTS: HEHE manifested as a single (n = 3) or multinodular (n = 22) FLL. On CEUS, HEHE showed rim-like (18/25, 72%) or heterogeneous hyperenhancement (7/25, 28%) in the arterial phase and hypoenhancement (25/25, 100%) in the portal venous and late phases (PVLP), a sign of malignancy. Eighteen patients showed central unenhanced areas (18/25, 72%); in seven patients (7/25, 28%), more lesions were detected in the PVLP. In contrast, all patients with hemangioma and focal nodular hyperplasia showed hyperenhancement as the most distinctive feature (P < 0.01). CONCLUSION: CEUS allows for characterization of unequivocal FLL. By analyzing the hypoenhancement in the PVLP, CEUS can determine the malignant nature of HEHE. PMID:27217705

  18. Ultrasound modulated optical tomography contrast enhancement with non-linear oscillation of microbubbles

    PubMed Central

    Ruan, Haowen; Mather, Melissa L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Ultrasound modulated optical tomography (USMOT) is an imaging technique used to provide optical functional information inside highly scattering biological tissue. One of the challenges facing this technique is the low image contrast. Methods A contrast enhancement imaging technique based on the non-linear oscillation of microbubbles is demonstrated to improve image contrast. The ultrasound modulated signal was detected using a laser pulse based speckle contrast detection system. Better understanding of the effects of microbubbles on the optical signals was achieved through simultaneous measurement of the ultrasound scattered by the microbubbles. Results The length of the laser pulse was found to affect the system response of the speckle contrast method with shorter pulses suppressing the fundamental ultrasound modulated optical signal. Using this property, image contrast can be enhanced by detection of the higher harmonic ultrasound modulated optical signals due to nonlinear oscillation and destruction of the microbubbles. Experimental investigations were carried out to demonstrate a doubling in contrast by imaging a scattering phantom containing an embedded silicone tube with microbubbles flowing through it. Conclusions The contrast enhancement in USMOT resulting from the use of ultrasound microbubbles has been demonstrated. Destruction of the microbubbles was shown to be the dominant effect leading to contrast improvement as shown by simultaneously detecting the ultrasound and speckle contrast signals. Line scans of a microbubble filled silicone tube embedded in a scattering phantom demonstrated experimentally the significant image contrast improvement that can be achieved using microbubbles and demonstrates the potential as a future clinical imaging tool. PMID:25694948

  19. Ultrasound Contrast Materials in Cardiovascular Medicine: from Perfusion Assessment to Molecular Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Klibanov, Alexander L

    2013-01-01

    Ultrasound imaging is widely used in cardiovascular diagnostics. Contrast agents expand the range of tasks that ultrasound can perform. In the clinic in US, endocardial border delineation and left ventricle opacification have been an approved indication for more than a decade. However, myocardial perfusion contrast ultrasound studies are still at the clinical trials stage. Blood pool contrast and perfusion in other tissues might be an easier indication to achieve: general blood pool ultrasound contrast is in wider use in Europe, Canada, Japan, and China. Targeted (molecular) contrast microbubbles will be the next generation of ultrasound imaging probes, capable of specific delineation of the areas of disease by adherence to molecular targets. The shell of targeted microbubbles (currently in the preclinical research and early stage clinical trials) is decorated with the ligands (antibodies, peptides or mimetics, hormones, carbohydrates) that ensure firm binding to the molecular markers of disease. PMID:23913363

  20. Degradation of X-ray contrast media compounds by combined ozone and ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Ning, Bo; Graham, Nigel J D; Lickiss, Paul D

    2007-11-01

    The aqueous degradation of iodinated X-ray contrast media (ICM) by the combination of ozone and ultrasound has been studied. Experiments were conducted at a constant ultrasound frequency of 20 kHz, at five power densities up to 0.235 W/mL, and various ozone centrations. In experiments involving dissolved ozone in solution, the addition of ultrasound significantly decreased the oxidation performance of the dissolved ozone, while the combination of dissolved oxygen and ultrasound gave a greater oxidation performance than ultrasound alone. However, the combination of gaseous ozone and ultrasound was found to give a higher degree of compound degradation than either ozone or ultrasound alone. In the experiments with final effluent, the degradation of ICM compounds by gaseous ozone and ultrasound was found to depend on the ozone dose applied. The degradation of ICM compounds in final effluent was modeled, which was found to moderately overestimate the observed compound degradation.

  1. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound in ovarian tumors – diagnostic parameters: method presentation and initial experience

    PubMed Central

    MAXIM, ANITA-ROXANA; BADEA, RADU; TAMAS, ATILLA; TRAILA, ALEXANDRU

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to discuss and illustrate the use of contrast-enhanced ultrasound in evaluating ovarian tumors compared to conventional ultrasound, Doppler ultrasound and the histopathological analysis and suggest how this technique may best be used to distinguish benign from malignant ovarian masses. We present the method and initial experience of our center by analyzing the parameters used in contrast-enhanced ultrasound in 6 patients with ovarian tumors of uncertain etiology. For examination we used a Siemens ultrasound machine with dedicated contrast software and the contrast agent SonoVue, Bracco. The patients underwent conventional ultrasound, Doppler ultrasound and i.v. administration of the contrast agent. The parameters studied were: inflow of contrast (rise time), time to peak enhancement, mean transit time. The series of patients is part of an extensive prospective PhD study aimed at elaborating a differential diagnosis protocol for benign versus malignant ovarian tumors, by validating specific parameters for contrast-enhanced ultrasound. Although the method is currently used with great success in gastroenterology, urology and senology, its validation in gynecology is still in the early phases. Taking into consideration that the method is minimally invasive and much less costly that CT/MRI imaging, demonstrating its utility in oncologic gynecology would be a big step in preoperative evaluation of these cases. PMID:26527912

  2. [An adaptive ultrasound sound speed optimization based on image contrast analysis].

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoying; Liu, Dongquan

    2011-12-01

    In order to get real time ultrasound images with clear structure and improved contrast, an adaptive ultrasound sound speed optimization method based on image contrast analysis was investigated. It firstly introduced the dynamic beamforming of ultrasound system, as well as the definition of assumed system's sound speed and the true sound speed propagated in tissues the degrade image quality due to their mismatch was also discussed. After given the pixel gray level value based ultrasound image contrast ratio, the basic idea to precisely estimate the true sound speed for real time system sound speed was proposed. Algorithms have been verified both in tissue-mimicking phantoms with known sound speeds and in vivo ultrasound images, compared with other existing method. The testing results showed that this new method not only produced accurate sound speed for ultrasound image optimization, but also finely met the critical computation requirement for real time applications.

  3. Gauging the likelihood of stable cavitation from ultrasound contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Bader, Kenneth B; Holland, Christy K

    2013-01-07

    The mechanical index (MI) was formulated to gauge the likelihood of adverse bioeffects from inertial cavitation. However, the MI formulation did not consider bubble activity from stable cavitation. This type of bubble activity can be readily nucleated from ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) and has the potential to promote beneficial bioeffects. Here, the presence of stable cavitation is determined numerically by tracking the onset of subharmonic oscillations within a population of bubbles for frequencies up to 7 MHz and peak rarefactional pressures up to 3 MPa. In addition, the acoustic pressure rupture threshold of an UCA population was determined using the Marmottant model. The threshold for subharmonic emissions of optimally sized bubbles was found to be lower than the inertial cavitation threshold for all frequencies studied. The rupture thresholds of optimally sized UCAs were found to be lower than the threshold for subharmonic emissions for either single cycle or steady state acoustic excitations. Because the thresholds of both subharmonic emissions and UCA rupture are linearly dependent on frequency, an index of the form I(CAV) = P(r)/f (where P(r) is the peak rarefactional pressure in MPa and f is the frequency in MHz) was derived to gauge the likelihood of subharmonic emissions due to stable cavitation activity nucleated from UCAs.

  4. Nanomaterials incorporated ultrasound contrast agents for cancer theranostics.

    PubMed

    Fu, Lei; Ke, Heng-Te

    2016-09-01

    Nanotechnology provides various nanomaterials with tremendous functionalities for cancer diagnostics and therapeutics. Recently, theranostics has been developed as an alternative strategy for efficient cancer treatment through combination of imaging diagnosis and therapeutic interventions under the guidance of diagnostic results. Ultrasound (US) imaging shows unique advantages with excellent features of real-time imaging, low cost, high safety and portability, making US contrast agents (UCAs) an ideal platform for construction of cancer theranostic agents. This review focuses on the development of nanomaterials incorporated multifunctional UCAs serving as theranostic agents for cancer diagnostics and therapeutics, via conjugation of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIOs), CuS nanoparticles, DNA, siRNA, gold nanoparticles (GNPs), gold nanorods (GNRs), gold nanoshell (GNS), graphene oxides (GOs), polypyrrole (PPy) nanocapsules, Prussian blue (PB) nanoparticles and so on to different types of UCAs. The cancer treatment could be more effectively and accurately carried out under the guidance and monitoring with the help of the achieved theranostic agents. Furthermore, nanomaterials incorporated theranostic agents based on UCAs can be designed and constructed by demand for personalized and accurate treatment of cancer, demonstrating their great potential to address the challenges of cancer heterogeneity and adaptation, which can provide alternative strategies for cancer diagnosis and therapeutics.

  5. Nanomaterials incorporated ultrasound contrast agents for cancer theranostics

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Lei; Ke, Heng-Te

    2016-01-01

    Nanotechnology provides various nanomaterials with tremendous functionalities for cancer diagnostics and therapeutics. Recently, theranostics has been developed as an alternative strategy for efficient cancer treatment through combination of imaging diagnosis and therapeutic interventions under the guidance of diagnostic results. Ultrasound (US) imaging shows unique advantages with excellent features of real-time imaging, low cost, high safety and portability, making US contrast agents (UCAs) an ideal platform for construction of cancer theranostic agents. This review focuses on the development of nanomaterials incorporated multifunctional UCAs serving as theranostic agents for cancer diagnostics and therapeutics, via conjugation of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIOs), CuS nanoparticles, DNA, siRNA, gold nanoparticles (GNPs), gold nanorods (GNRs), gold nanoshell (GNS), graphene oxides (GOs), polypyrrole (PPy) nanocapsules, Prussian blue (PB) nanoparticles and so on to different types of UCAs. The cancer treatment could be more effectively and accurately carried out under the guidance and monitoring with the help of the achieved theranostic agents. Furthermore, nanomaterials incorporated theranostic agents based on UCAs can be designed and constructed by demand for personalized and accurate treatment of cancer, demonstrating their great potential to address the challenges of cancer heterogeneity and adaptation, which can provide alternative strategies for cancer diagnosis and therapeutics. PMID:27807499

  6. Acoustic response of compliable microvessels containing ultrasound contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Qin, Shengping; Ferrara, Katherine W

    2006-10-21

    The existing models of the dynamics of ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) have largely been focused on an UCA surrounded by an infinite liquid. Preliminary investigations of a microbubble's oscillation in a rigid tube have been performed using linear perturbation, under the assumption that the tube diameter is significantly larger than the UCA diameter. In the potential application of drug and gene delivery, it may be desirable to fragment the agent shell within small blood vessels and in some cases to rupture the vessel wall, releasing drugs and genes at the site. The effect of a compliant small blood vessel on the UCA's oscillation and the microvessel's acoustic response are unknown. The aim of this work is to propose a lumped-parameter model to study the interaction of a microbubble oscillation and compliable microvessels. Numerical results demonstrate that in the presence of UCAs, the transmural pressure through the blood vessel substantially increases and thus the vascular permeability is predicted to be enhanced. For a microbubble within an 8 to 40 microm vessel with a peak negative pressure of 0.1 MPa and a centre frequency of 1 MHz, small changes in the microbubble oscillation frequency and maximum diameter are observed. When the ultrasound pressure increases, strong nonlinear oscillation occurs, with an increased circumferential stress on the vessel. For a compliable vessel with a diameter equal to or greater than 8 microm, 0.2 MPa PNP at 1 MHz is predicted to be sufficient for microbubble fragmentation regardless of the vessel diameter; however, for a rigid vessel 0.5 MPa PNP at 1 MHz may not be sufficient to fragment the bubbles. For a centre frequency of 1 MHz, a peak negative pressure of 0.5 MPa is predicted to be sufficient to exceed the stress threshold for vascular rupture in a small (diameter less than 15 microm) compliant vessel. As the vessel or surrounding tissue becomes more rigid, the UCA oscillation and vessel dilation decrease; however the

  7. Acoustic response of compliable microvessels containing ultrasound contrast agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Shengping; Ferrara, Katherine W.

    2006-10-01

    The existing models of the dynamics of ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) have largely been focused on an UCA surrounded by an infinite liquid. Preliminary investigations of a microbubble's oscillation in a rigid tube have been performed using linear perturbation, under the assumption that the tube diameter is significantly larger than the UCA diameter. In the potential application of drug and gene delivery, it may be desirable to fragment the agent shell within small blood vessels and in some cases to rupture the vessel wall, releasing drugs and genes at the site. The effect of a compliant small blood vessel on the UCA's oscillation and the microvessel's acoustic response are unknown. The aim of this work is to propose a lumped-parameter model to study the interaction of a microbubble oscillation and compliable microvessels. Numerical results demonstrate that in the presence of UCAs, the transmural pressure through the blood vessel substantially increases and thus the vascular permeability is predicted to be enhanced. For a microbubble within an 8 to 40 µm vessel with a peak negative pressure of 0.1 MPa and a centre frequency of 1 MHz, small changes in the microbubble oscillation frequency and maximum diameter are observed. When the ultrasound pressure increases, strong nonlinear oscillation occurs, with an increased circumferential stress on the vessel. For a compliable vessel with a diameter equal to or greater than 8 µm, 0.2 MPa PNP at 1 MHz is predicted to be sufficient for microbubble fragmentation regardless of the vessel diameter; however, for a rigid vessel 0.5 MPa PNP at 1 MHz may not be sufficient to fragment the bubbles. For a centre frequency of 1 MHz, a peak negative pressure of 0.5 MPa is predicted to be sufficient to exceed the stress threshold for vascular rupture in a small (diameter less than 15 µm) compliant vessel. As the vessel or surrounding tissue becomes more rigid, the UCA oscillation and vessel dilation decrease; however the

  8. Acoustic response of compliable microvessels containing ultrasound contrast agents

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Shengping; Ferrara, Katherine W.

    2010-01-01

    The existing models of the dynamics of ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) have largely been focused on an UCA surrounded by an infinite liquid. Preliminary investigations of a microbubble’s oscillation in a rigid tube have been performed using linear perturbation, under the assumption that the tube diameter is significantly larger than UCA size. In the potential application of drug and gene delivery, it may be desirable to fragment the agent shell within small blood vessels and in some cases to rupture the vessel wall, releasing drugs and genes at the site. The effect of a compliant small blood vessel on the UCA’s oscillation and the microvessel’s acoustic response are unknown. The aim of this work is to propose a lumped-parameter model to study the interaction of a microbubble oscillation and compliable microvessels. Numerical results demonstrate that in the presence of UCAs, the transmural pressure through the blood vessel substantially increases and thus the vascular permeability is predicted to be enhanced. For a microbubble within an 8 to 40 micron vessel with a peak negative pressure of 0.1MPa and a center frequency of 1MHz, small changes in the microbubble oscillation frequency and maximum diameter are observed. When the ultrasound pressure increases, strong nonlinear oscillation occurs, with an increased circumferential stress on the vessel. For a compliable vessel with the range of diameters considered in this work, 0.2 MPa PNP at 1 MHz is predicted to be sufficient for microbubble fragmentation regardless the vessel diameter, however, for a rigid vessel 0.5 MPa PNP at 1 MHz may not be sufficient to fragment the bubbles. For a center frequency of 1MHz, a peak negative pressure of 0.5 MPa is predicted to be sufficient to exceed the stress threshold for vascular rupture in a small (diameter less than 15 μm) compliant vessel. As the vessel or surrounding tissue becomes more rigid, the UCA oscillation and vessel dilation decrease, however the

  9. A preliminary evaluation of self-made nanobubble in contrast-enhanced ultrasound imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chunfang; Wu, Kaizhi; Li, Jing; Liu, Haijuan; Zhou, Qibing; Ding, Mingyue

    2014-03-01

    Nanoscale bubbles (nanobubbles) have been reported to improve contrast in tumor-targeted ultrasound imaging due to the enhanced permeation and retention effects at tumor vascular leaks. In this work, a self-made nanobubble ultrasound contrast agent was preliminarily characterized and evaluated in-vitro and in-vivo. Fundamental properties such as morphology appearance, size distribution, zeta potential, bubble concentration (bubble numbers per milliliter contrast agent suspension) and the stability of nanobubbles were assessed by light microscope and particle sizing analysis. Then the concentration intensity curve and time intensity curves (TICs) were acquired by ultrasound imaging experiment in-vitro. Finally, the contrast-enhanced ultrasonography was performed on rat to investigate the procedure of liver perfusion. The results showed that the nanobubbles had good shape and uniform distribution with the average diameter of 507.9 nm, polydispersity index (PDI) of 0.527, and zeta potential of -19.17 mV. Significant contrast enhancement was observed in in-vitro ultrasound imaging, demonstrating that the self-made nanobubbles can enhance the contrast effect of ultrasound imaging efficiently in-vitro. Slightly contrast enhancement was observed in in-vivo ultrasound imaging, indicating that the nanobubbles are not stable enough in-vivo. Future work will be focused on improving the ultrasonic imaging performance, stability, and antibody binding of the nanoscale ultrasound contrast agent.

  10. Ultrasound guided site specific gene delivery system using adenoviral vectors and commercial ultrasound contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Howard, Candace M; Forsberg, Flemming; Minimo, Corrado; Liu, Ji-Bin; Merton, Daniel A; Claudio, Pier Paolo

    2006-11-01

    We have evaluated if ultrasound imaging (US) and various commercially available contrast microbubbles can serve as a non-invasive systemically administered delivery vehicle for site-specific adenoviral-mediated gene transfer in vitro and in vivo. The contrast agents were tested for their ability to enclose and to protect an adenoviral vector carrying the GFP marker gene (Ad-GFP) into the microbubbles. We have also evaluated the ability of the innate immune system to inactivate free adenoviruses as well as unenclosed viruses adsorbed on the surface of the contrast agents and in turn the ability of the microbubbles to enclose and to protect the viral vectors from such agents. In vitro as well as in vivo, innate components of the immune system were able to serve as inactivating agents to clear free viral particles and unenclosed adenoviruses adsorbed on the microbubbles' surface. Systemic delivery of Ad-GFP enclosed into microbubbles in the tail vein of nude mice resulted in specific targeting of the GFP transgene. Both fluorescence microscopy and GFP immunohistochemistry demonstrated US guided specific transduction in the targeted cells only, with no uptake in either heart, lungs or liver using complement-pretreated Ad-GFP microbubbles. This approach enhances target specificity of US microbubble destruction as a delivery vehicle for viral-mediated gene transfer.

  11. Contrast-enhanced (endoscopic) ultrasound and endoscopic ultrasound elastography in gastrointestinal stromal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Ignee, Andre; Jenssen, Christian; Hocke, Michael; Dong, Yi; Wang, Wen-Ping; Cui, Xin-Wu; Woenckhaus, Matthias; Iordache, Sevastita; Saftoiu, Adrian; Schuessler, Gudrun; Dietrich, Christoph F.

    2017-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) represent the largest group of subepithelial tumors (SET) of the upper gastrointestinal (GI) tract. They may show malignant behavior, in contrast to other SET. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) is frequently used to characterize SET. With the introduction of contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) into EUS (CE-EUS), distinct enhancement patterns can be detected. In the presented study, the characteristic features of CE-EUS in GIST are analyzed and compared with those of other SET. Materials and Methods: Consecutive patients from four centers with SET of the upper and middle GI tract were included and received endoscopic or transcutaneous CEUS. The results were compared with EUS-guided tissue acquisition, forceps biopsy, or surgical resection. Results: Forty-two out of 62 (68%) patients had SET of the stomach, 17/62 (27%) of the small intestine, 2/62 (3%) of the esophagus, and 1/62 (2%) extraintestinal. Eighty-one percent underwent surgery. Leiomyoma was found in 5/62 (8%) and GIST in 57/62 patients (92%). Thirty-nine out of 57 (68%) patients had GIST lesions in the stomach, 17/57 (30%) had GIST of the small intestine, and 1/57 (2%) patients had extraintestinal GISTs. GIST size was 62.6 ± 42.1 (16–200) mm. Hyperenhancement had a sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and accuracy of 98%, 100%, 100%, 93%, and 98% for the diagnosis of GIST. Fifty out of 57 patients with GIST (88%) showed avascular areas in the center of the lesions. Conclusion: CE-EUS and CEUS show hyperenhancement and avascular areas in a high percentage of GIST but not in leiomyoma. Thus, GIST and leiomyoma can be discriminated accurately. PMID:28218202

  12. Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound Imaging for the Detection of Focused Ultrasound-Induced Blood-Brain Barrier Opening

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Ching-Hsiang; Lin, Wun-Hao; Ting, Chien-Yu; Chai, Wen-Yen; Yen, Tzu-Chen; Liu, Hao-Li; Yeh, Chih-Kuang

    2014-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) can be transiently and locally opened by focused ultrasound (FUS) in the presence of microbubbles (MBs). Various imaging modalities and contrast agents have been used to monitor this process. Unfortunately, direct ultrasound imaging of BBB opening with MBs as contrast agent is not feasible, due to the inability of MBs to penetrate brain parenchyma. However, FUS-induced BBB opening is accompanied by changes in blood flow and perfusion, suggesting the possibility of perfusion-based ultrasound imaging. Here we evaluated the use of MB destruction-replenishment, which was originally developed for analysis of ultrasound perfusion kinetics, for verifying and quantifying FUS-induced BBB opening. MBs were intravenously injected and the BBB was disrupted by 2 MHz FUS with burst-tone exposure at 0.5-0.7 MPa. A perfusion kinetic map was estimated by MB destruction-replenishment time-intensity curve analysis. Our results showed that the scale and distribution of FUS-induced BBB opening could be determined at high resolution by ultrasound perfusion kinetic analysis. The accuracy and sensitivity of this approach was validated by dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI. Our successful demonstration of ultrasound imaging to monitor FUS-induced BBB opening provides a new approach to assess FUS-dependent brain drug delivery, with the benefit of high temporal resolution and convenient integration with the FUS device. PMID:25161701

  13. Evolution of contrast agents for ultrasound imaging and ultrasound-mediated drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Paefgen, Vera; Doleschel, Dennis; Kiessling, Fabian

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound (US) is one of the most frequently used diagnostic methods. It is a non-invasive, comparably inexpensive imaging method with a broad spectrum of applications, which can be increased even more by using bubbles as contrast agents (CAs). There are various different types of bubbles: filled with different gases, composed of soft- or hard-shell materials, and ranging in size from nano- to micrometers. These intravascular CAs enable functional analyses, e.g., to acquire organ perfusion in real-time. Molecular analyses are achieved by coupling specific ligands to the bubbles' shell, which bind to marker molecules in the area of interest. Bubbles can also be loaded with or attached to drugs, peptides or genes and can be destroyed by US pulses to locally release the entrapped agent. Recent studies show that US CAs are also valuable tools in hyperthermia-induced ablation therapy of tumors, or can increase cellular uptake of locally released drugs by enhancing membrane permeability. This review summarizes important steps in the development of US CAs and introduces the current clinical applications of contrast-enhanced US. Additionally, an overview of the recent developments in US probe design for functional and molecular diagnosis as well as for drug delivery is given.

  14. Evolution of contrast agents for ultrasound imaging and ultrasound-mediated drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Paefgen, Vera; Doleschel, Dennis; Kiessling, Fabian

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound (US) is one of the most frequently used diagnostic methods. It is a non-invasive, comparably inexpensive imaging method with a broad spectrum of applications, which can be increased even more by using bubbles as contrast agents (CAs). There are various different types of bubbles: filled with different gases, composed of soft- or hard-shell materials, and ranging in size from nano- to micrometers. These intravascular CAs enable functional analyses, e.g., to acquire organ perfusion in real-time. Molecular analyses are achieved by coupling specific ligands to the bubbles’ shell, which bind to marker molecules in the area of interest. Bubbles can also be loaded with or attached to drugs, peptides or genes and can be destroyed by US pulses to locally release the entrapped agent. Recent studies show that US CAs are also valuable tools in hyperthermia-induced ablation therapy of tumors, or can increase cellular uptake of locally released drugs by enhancing membrane permeability. This review summarizes important steps in the development of US CAs and introduces the current clinical applications of contrast-enhanced US. Additionally, an overview of the recent developments in US probe design for functional and molecular diagnosis as well as for drug delivery is given. PMID:26441654

  15. Voiding urosonography: Contrast-enhanced ultrasound cystography to diagnose vesico-ureteric reflux: A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Babu, Ramesh; Gopinath, Vinu; Sai, Venkata

    2015-01-01

    We report two children with hydronephrosis, in whom we have utilized voiding urosonography (VUS) in the evaluation of vesico-ureteric reflux. With wider availability of ultrasound contrast agents and high-end ultrasound machines, VUS is likely to become a popular tool to diagnose or exclude VUR.

  16. Quantitative measurement of ultrasound pressure field by optical phase contrast method and acoustic holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oyama, Seiji; Yasuda, Jun; Hanayama, Hiroki; Yoshizawa, Shin; Umemura, Shin-ichiro

    2016-07-01

    A fast and accurate measurement of an ultrasound field with various exposure sequences is necessary to ensure the efficacy and safety of various ultrasound applications in medicine. The most common method used to measure an ultrasound pressure field, that is, hydrophone scanning, requires a long scanning time and potentially disturbs the field. This may limit the efficiency of developing applications of ultrasound. In this study, an optical phase contrast method enabling fast and noninterfering measurements is proposed. In this method, the modulated phase of light caused by the focused ultrasound pressure field is measured. Then, a computed tomography (CT) algorithm used to quantitatively reconstruct a three-dimensional (3D) pressure field is applied. For a high-intensity focused ultrasound field, a new approach that combines the optical phase contrast method and acoustic holography was attempted. First, the optical measurement of focused ultrasound was rapidly performed over the field near a transducer. Second, the nonlinear propagation of the measured ultrasound was simulated. The result of the new approach agreed well with that of the measurement using a hydrophone and was improved from that of the phase contrast method alone with phase unwrapping.

  17. Constrained Adaptive Beamforming for Improved Contrast in Breast Ultrasound

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-01

    led us to utilize a recently proposed method, Spatial Processing Optimized and Constrained ( SPOC ). In initial simulations this method not only...6 Review of the Adaptive Beamforming Literature ................... 7 SPOC Progress...given the parameters of in vivo ultrasound imaging. SPOC Progress: Most of the Adaptive Beamforming algorithms previously described fail when applied to

  18. Evaluation of a targeted nanobubble ultrasound contrast agent for potential tumor imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chunfang; Shen, Chunxu; Liu, Haijuan; Wu, Kaizhi; Zhou, Qibing; Ding, Mingyue

    2015-03-01

    Targeted nanobubbles have been reported to improve the contrast effect of ultrasound imaging due to the enhanced permeation and retention effects at tumor vascular leaks. In this work, the contrast enhancement abilities and the tumor targeting potential of a self-made VEGFR2-targeted nanobubble ultrasound contrast agent was evaluated in-vitro and in-vivo. Size distribution and zeta potential were assessed. Then the contrast-enhanced ultrasound imaging of the VEGFR2 targeted nanobubbles were evaluated with a custom-made experimental apparatus and in normal Wistar rats. Finally, the in-vivo tumor-targeting ability was evaluated on nude mice with subcutaneous tumor. The results showed that the target nanobubbles had uniform distribution with the average diameter of 208.1 nm, polydispersity index (PDI) of 0.411, and zeta potential of -13.21 mV. Significant contrast enhancement was observed in both in-vitro and in-vivo ultrasound imaging, demonstrating that the self-made target nanobubbles can enhance the contrast effect of ultrasound imaging efficiently. Targeted tumor imaging showed less promising result, due to the fact that the targeted nanobubbles arriving and permeating through tumor vessels were not many enough to produce significant enhancement. Future work will focus on exploring new imaging algorithm which is sensitive to targeted nanobubbles, so as to correctly detect the contrast agent, particularly at a low bubble concentration.

  19. Encapsulated microbubbles and echogenic liposomes for contrast ultrasound imaging and targeted drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Shirshendu; Nahire, Rahul; Mallik, Sanku; Sarkar, Kausik

    2014-01-01

    Micron- to nanometer-sized ultrasound agents, like encapsulated microbubbles and echogenic liposomes, are being developed for diagnostic imaging and ultrasound mediated drug/gene delivery. This review provides an overview of the current state of the art of the mathematical models of the acoustic behavior of ultrasound contrast microbubbles. We also present a review of the in vitro experimental characterization of the acoustic properties of microbubble based contrast agents undertaken in our laboratory. The hierarchical two-pronged approach of modeling contrast agents we developed is demonstrated for a lipid coated (Sonazoid™) and a polymer shelled (poly D-L-lactic acid) contrast microbubbles. The acoustic and drug release properties of the newly developed echogenic liposomes are discussed for their use as simultaneous imaging and drug/gene delivery agents. Although echogenicity is conclusively demonstrated in experiments, its physical mechanisms remain uncertain. Addressing questions raised here will accelerate further development and eventual clinical approval of these novel technologies. PMID:26097272

  20. Photoacoustic and ultrasound imaging using dual contrast perfluorocarbon nanodroplets triggered by laser pulses at 1064 nm.

    PubMed

    Hannah, Alexander S; VanderLaan, Donald; Chen, Yun-Sheng; Emelianov, Stanislav Y

    2014-09-01

    Recently, a dual photoacoustic and ultrasound contrast agent-named photoacoustic nanodroplet-has been introduced. Photoacoustic nanodroplets consist of a perfluorocarbon core, surfactant shell, and encapsulated photoabsorber. Upon pulsed laser irradiation the perfluorocarbon converts to gas, inducing a photoacoustic signal from vaporization and subsequent ultrasound contrast from the resulting gas microbubbles. In this work we synthesize nanodroplets which encapsulate gold nanorods with a peak absorption near 1064 nm. Such nanodroplets are optimal for extended photoacoustic imaging depth and contrast, safety and system cost. We characterized the nanodroplets for optical absorption, image contrast and vaporization threshold. We then imaged the particles in an ex vivo porcine tissue sample, reporting contrast enhancement in a biological environment. These 1064 nm triggerable photoacoustic nanodroplets are a robust biomedical tool to enhance image contrast at clinically relevant depths.

  1. Intraoperative high-resolution ultrasound and contrast-enhanced ultrasound of peripheral nerve tumors and tumorlike lesions.

    PubMed

    Pedro, Maria Teresa; Antoniadis, Gregor; Scheuerle, Angelika; Pham, Mirko; Wirtz, Christian Rainer; Koenig, Ralph W

    2015-09-01

    The diagnostic workup and surgical therapy for peripheral nerve tumors and tumorlike lesions are challenging. Magnetic resonance imaging is the standard diagnostic tool in the preoperative workup. However, even with advanced pulse sequences such as diffusion tensor imaging for MR neurography, the ability to differentiate tumor entities based on histological features remains limited. In particular, rare tumor entities different from schwannomas and neurofibromas are difficult to anticipate before surgical exploration and histological confirmation. High-resolution ultrasound (HRU) has become another important tool in the preoperative evaluation of peripheral nerves. Ongoing software and technical developments with transducers of up to 17-18 MHz enable high spatial resolution with tissue-differentiating properties. Unfortunately, high-frequency ultrasound provides low tissue penetration. The authors developed a setting in which intraoperative HRU was used and in which the direct sterile contact between the ultrasound transducer and the surgically exposed nerve pathology was enabled to increase structural resolution and contrast. In a case-guided fashion, the authors report the sonographic characteristics of rare tumor entities shown by intraoperative HRU and contrast-enhanced ultrasound.

  2. Contrast-enhanced endobronchial ultrasound: Potential value of a new method

    PubMed Central

    Dietrich, Christoph F.

    2017-01-01

    Endobronchial ultrasound (EBUS) has gained importance for mediastinal lymph node staging. Contrast-enhanced EBUS is so far not a discussed technique including contrast-enhanced high mechanical index (MI)-EBUS and potentially contrast-enhanced low MI-EBUS. Possible use could include characterization of mediastinal lymph nodes for better selection of biopsies, differential diagnosis of the primary tumor, and evaluation of thrombosis or tumor in vein infiltration. PMID:28218200

  3. The Expanding Role of Contrast-Enhanced Endoscopic Ultrasound in Pancreatobiliary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jun-Ho; Seo, Dong Wan

    2015-01-01

    Since its introduction into clinical practice in the 1980s, endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) has been described as a good imaging modality for the diagnosis of pancreatobiliary diseases. However, differential diagnosis of certain lesions based only on B-mode ultrasound images can be challenging. Clinical use of ultrasound contrast agents has expanded the utility of EUS from that of detection to characterization of pancreatobiliary lesions based on the enhancement features of contrast-enhanced EUS (CE-EUS). Current low mechanical index techniques for CE-EUS using second-generation contrast agents have a number of distinct advantages over conventional diagnostic modalities in evaluating pancreatobiliary lesions, including real-time assessment of perfusion pattern, availability, and the absence of exposure to radiation. This article describes the technical aspects of CE-EUS and reviews the expanding indications in pancreatobiliary diseases and further development of this technique. PMID:26503571

  4. Development and evaluation of a novel VEGFR2-targeted nanoscale ultrasound contrast agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Houqiang; Li, Chunfang; He, Xiaoling; Zhou, Qibing; Ding, Mingyue

    2016-04-01

    Recent literatures have reported that the targeted nanoscale ultrasound contrast agents are becoming more and more important in medical application, like ultrasound imaging, detection of perfusion, drug delivery and molecular imaging and so on. In this study, we fabricated an uniform nanoscale bubbles (257 nm with the polydispersity index of 0.458) by incorporation of antibody targeted to vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) into the nanobubbles membrane by using avidin-biotin interaction. Some fundamental characterizations such as nanobubble suspension, surface morphology, particle size distribution and zeta potential were investigated. The concentration and time-intensity curves (TICs) were obtained with a self-made ultrasound experimental setup in vitro evaluation. In addition, in order to evaluate the contrast enhancement ability and the potential tumor-targeted ability in vivo, normal Wistar rats and nude female BALB/c mice were intravascular administration of the nanobubbles via tail vein injection, respectively. Significant contrast enhancement of ultrasound imaging within liver and tumor were visualized. These experiments demonstrated that the targeted nanobubbles is efficient in ultrasound molecular imaging by enhancement of the contrast effect and have potential capacity for targeted tumor diagnosis and therapy in the future.

  5. Vascular Structure Identification in Intraoperative 3D Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound Data

    PubMed Central

    Ilunga-Mbuyamba, Elisee; Avina-Cervantes, Juan Gabriel; Lindner, Dirk; Cruz-Aceves, Ivan; Arlt, Felix; Chalopin, Claire

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a method of vascular structure identification in intraoperative 3D Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound (CEUS) data is presented. Ultrasound imaging is commonly used in brain tumor surgery to investigate in real time the current status of cerebral structures. The use of an ultrasound contrast agent enables to highlight tumor tissue, but also surrounding blood vessels. However, these structures can be used as landmarks to estimate and correct the brain shift. This work proposes an alternative method for extracting small vascular segments close to the tumor as landmark. The patient image dataset involved in brain tumor operations includes preoperative contrast T1MR (cT1MR) data and 3D intraoperative contrast enhanced ultrasound data acquired before (3D-iCEUSstart) and after (3D-iCEUSend) tumor resection. Based on rigid registration techniques, a preselected vascular segment in cT1MR is searched in 3D-iCEUSstart and 3D-iCEUSend data. The method was validated by using three similarity measures (Normalized Gradient Field, Normalized Mutual Information and Normalized Cross Correlation). Tests were performed on data obtained from ten patients overcoming a brain tumor operation and it succeeded in nine cases. Despite the small size of the vascular structures, the artifacts in the ultrasound images and the brain tissue deformations, blood vessels were successfully identified. PMID:27070610

  6. Dynamical analysis of the nonlinear response of ultrasound contrast agent microbubbles.

    PubMed

    Carroll, James M; Calvisi, Michael L; Lauderbaugh, Leal K

    2013-05-01

    The nonlinear response of spherical ultrasound contrast agent microbubbles is investigated to understand the effects of common shells on the dynamics. A compressible form of the Rayleigh-Plesset equation is combined with a thin-shell model developed by Lars Hoff to simulate the radial response of contrast agents subject to ultrasound. The responses of Albunex, Sonazoid, and polymer shells are analyzed through the application of techniques from dynamical systems theory such as Poincaré sections, phase portraits, and bifurcation diagrams to illustrate the qualitative dynamics and transition to chaos that occurs under certain changes in system parameters. Corresponding calculations of Lyapunov exponents provide quantitative data on the system dynamics. The results indicate that Albunex and polymer shells sufficiently stabilize the response to prevent transition to the chaotic regime throughout typical clinical ranges of ultrasound pressure and frequency. By contrast, Sonazoid shells delay the onset of chaos relative to an unshelled bubble but do not prevent it. A contour plot identifying regions of periodic and chaotic behavior over clinical ranges of ultrasound pressure and frequency is provided for Sonazoid. This work characterizes the nonlinear response of various ultrasound contrast agents, and shows that shell properties have a profound influence on the dynamics.

  7. Applications of contrast-enhanced harmonic endoscopic ultrasound on biliary, focal liver lesions and vascular diseases

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jun-Ho; Seo, Dong-Wan

    2017-01-01

    Over the last decade, the clinical applications of contrast-enhanced harmonic endoscopic ultrasound (CH-EUS) have increased steadily. The development of second-generation ultrasound contrast agents has allowed superior visualization of the microvasculature and tissue perfusion of the target lesion. This methodology has proven useful in the differential diagnosis of solid pancreatic masses and lymph nodes. In addition, the applicability of CH-EUS has expanded to nonpancreas structures such as biliary, focal liver lesions, and vascular disease. This article focuses primarily on the novel applications of CH-EUS in biliary tract and visceral vascular diseases. PMID:28218196

  8. Application of nonlinear sliding mode control to ultrasound contrast agent microbubbles.

    PubMed

    Carroll, James M; Lauderbaugh, Leal K; Calvisi, Michael L

    2013-07-01

    A sliding mode control system is developed and applied to a spherical model of a contrast agent microbubble that simulates its radial response to ultrasound. The model uses a compressible form of the Rayleigh-Plesset equation combined with a thin-shell model. A nonlinear control law for the second-order model is derived and used to design and simulate the controller. The effect of the controller on the contrast agent response is investigated for various control scenarios. This work demonstrates the feasibility of using a nonlinear control system to modulate the dynamic response of ultrasound contrast agents, but highlights the need for improved feedback mechanisms and control input methods. Possible applications of the nonlinear control system to contrast agents illustrated in this work include radius stabilization in the presence of an acoustic wave, radial growth and subsequent collapse, and generation of periodic radial oscillations while a contrast agent is within an acoustic forcing regime known to cause a chaotic response.

  9. Porphyrin Nanodroplets: Sub-micrometer Ultrasound and Photoacoustic Contrast Imaging Agents.

    PubMed

    Paproski, Robert J; Forbrich, Alexander; Huynh, Elizabeth; Chen, Juan; Lewis, John D; Zheng, Gang; Zemp, Roger J

    2016-01-20

    A novel class of all-organic nanoscale porphyrin nanodroplet agents is presented which is suitable for multimodality ultrasound and photoacoustic molecular imaging. Previous multimodality photoacoustic-ultrasound agents are either not organic, or not yet demonstrated to exhibit enhanced accumulation in leaky tumor vasculature, perhaps because of large diameters. In the current study, porphyrin nanodroplets are created with a mean diameter of 185 nm which is small enough to exhibit the enhanced permeability and retention effect. Porphyrin within the nanodroplet shell has strong optical absorption at 705 nm with an estimated molar extinction coefficient >5 × 10(9) m(-1) cm(-1) , allowing both ultrasound and photoacoustic contrast in the same nanoparticle using all organic materials. The potential of nanodroplets is that they may be phase-changed into microbubbles using high pressure ultrasound, providing ultrasound contrast with single-bubble sensitivity. Multispectral photoacoustic imaging allows visualization of nanodroplets when injected intratumorally in an HT1080 tumor in the chorioallantoic membrane of a chicken embryo. Intravital microscopy imaging of Hep3-GFP and HT1080-GFP tumors in chicken embryos determines that nanodroplets accumulated throughout or at the periphery of tumors, suggesting that porphyrin nanodroplets may be useful for enhancing the visualization of tumors with ultrasound and/or photoacoustic imaging.

  10. Stability analysis of ultrasound thick-shell contrast agents

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xiaozhen; Chahine, Georges L.; Hsiao, Chao-Tsung

    2012-01-01

    The stability of thick shell encapsulated bubbles is studied analytically. 3-D small perturbations are introduced to the spherical oscillations of a contrast agent bubble in response to a sinusoidal acoustic field with different amplitudes of excitation. The equations of the perturbation amplitudes are derived using asymptotic expansions and linear stability analysis is then applied to the resulting differential equations. The stability of the encapsulated microbubbles to nonspherical small perturbations is examined by solving an eigenvalue problem. The approach then identifies the fastest growing perturbations which could lead to the breakup of the encapsulated microbubble or contrast agent. PMID:22280568

  11. Assessment and Monitoring Tumor Vascularity With Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound Maximum Intensity Persistence Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Pysz, Marybeth A.; Foygel, Kira; Panje, Cedric M.; Needles, Andrew; Tian, Lu; Willmann, Jürgen K.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Contrast-enhanced ultrasound imaging is increasingly being used in the clinic for assessment of tissue vascularity. The purpose of our study was to evaluate the effect of different contrast administration parameters on the in vivo ultrasound imaging signal in tumor-bearing mice using a maximum intensity persistence (MIP) algorithm and to evaluate the reliability of in vivo MIP imaging in assessing tumor vascularity. The potential of in vivo MIP imaging for monitoring tumor vascularity during antiangiogenic cancer treatment was further evaluated. Materials and Methods In intraindividual experiments, varying contrast microbubble concentrations (5 × 105, 5 × 106, 5 × 107, 5 × 108 microbubbles in 100 µL saline) and contrast injection rates (0.6, 1.2, and 2.4 mL/min) in subcutaneous tumor-bearing mice were applied and their effects on in vivo contrast-enhanced ultrasound MIP imaging plateau values were obtained using a dedicated small animal ultrasound imaging system (40 MHz). Reliability of MIP ultrasound imaging was tested following 2 injections of the same micro-bubble concentration (5 × 107 microbubbles at 1.2 mL/min) in the same tumors. In mice with subcutaneous human colon cancer xenografts, longitudinal contrast-enhanced ultrasound MIP imaging plateau values (baseline and at 48 hours) were compared between mice with and without antiangiogenic treatment (anti-vascular endothelial growth factor antibody). Ex vivo CD31 immunostaining of tumor tissue was used to correlate in vivo MIP imaging plateau values with microvessel density analysis. Results In vivo MIP imaging plateau values correlated significantly (P = 0.001) with contrast microbubble doses. At 3 different injection rates of 0.6, 1.2, and 2.4 mL/min, MIP imaging plateau values did not change significantly (P = 0.61). Following 2 injections with the same microbubble dose and injection rate, MIP imaging plateau values were obtained with high reliability with an intraclass correlation

  12. Real-Time 3D Contrast-Enhanced Transcranial Ultrasound and Aberration Correction

    PubMed Central

    Ivancevich, Nikolas M.; Pinton, Gianmarco F.; Nicoletto, Heather A.; Bennett, Ellen; Laskowitz, Daniel T.; Smith, Stephen W.

    2008-01-01

    Contrast-enhanced (CE) transcranial ultrasound (US) and reconstructed 3D transcranial ultrasound have shown advantages over traditional methods in a variety of cerebrovascular diseases. We present the results from a novel ultrasound technique, namely real-time 3D contrast-enhanced transcranial ultrasound. Using real-time 3D (RT3D) ultrasound and micro-bubble contrast agent, we scanned 17 healthy volunteers via a single temporal window and 9 via the sub-occipital window and report our detection rates for the major cerebral vessels. In 71% of subjects, both of our observers identified the ipsilateral circle of Willis from the temporal window, and in 59% we imaged the entire circle of Willis. From the sub-occipital window, both observers detected the entire vertebrobasilar circulation in 22% of subjects, and in 44% the basilar artery. After performing phase aberration correction on one subject, we were able to increase the diagnostic value of the scan, detecting a vessel not present in the uncorrected scan. These preliminary results suggest that RT3D CE transcranial US and RT3D CE transcranial US with phase aberration correction have the potential to greatly impact the field of neurosonology. PMID:18395321

  13. [Enhancement of in vitro protoscolicidal effects of high-intensity focused ultrasound by a superabsorbent polymer and ultrasound contrast agent].

    PubMed

    Cai, Hui; Chen, Lu-Lu; Ye, Bin; Zhao, Hai-Long; Liu, Ai-Bo; Zhang, Jing; Zhao, Yi-Feng

    2013-08-01

    This study evaluated whether or not a superabsorbent polymer (SAP) combined with ultrasound contrast agent (UCA) could enhance damage efficacy of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) on Echinococcus granulosus protoscoleces in vitro. Thirty test tubes each with 6 000-7 500 protoscolices were divided into 5 groups: group A (blank control) without HIFU treatment, group B treated with HIFU (50 W) only, group C treated with 10 microl UCA and HIFU, group D treated with 0.01 g SAP and HIFU, group E treated with 10 microl UCA, 0.01 g SAP, and HIFU. In group B, echo enhancement of ultrasound image, suspension temperature (26.0 degrees C +/- 0.2 degrees C) and protoscoleces mortality (30.4%) were higher than that of group A (18.0 degrees C +/- 0.1 degrees C, 1.9%) (P < 0.01). Compared with group B, the echo enhancement of ultrasound image, suspension temperature (27.0 degrees C +/- 0.2 degrees C, 28.2 degrees C +/- 0.2 degrees C) and protoscoleces mortality (50.0%, 53.7%) of groups C and D increased significantly (P < 0.01). In group E, more protoscoleces were stained in red and their internal structures were indistinct. By chi-square test, the protoscoleces mortality of group E (69.7%) was higher than that of groups C and D (P < 0.01). There was no significant difference in suspension temperature among the 3 groups.

  14. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) in nephrology: Has the time come for its widespread use?

    PubMed

    Granata, Antonio; Zanoli, Luca; Insalaco, Monica; Valentino, Massimo; Pavlica, Pietro; Di Nicolò, Pier Paolo; Scuderi, Mario; Fiorini, Fulvio; Fatuzzo, Pasquale; Bertolotto, Michele

    2015-08-01

    Grey-scale ultrasound has an important diagnostic role in nephrology. The absence of ionizing radiations and nephrotoxicity, rapidity of execution, excellent repeatability, the possibility to perform the test at the patient's bed and the low cost represent important advantages of this technique. Paired with real-time sonography and colour-power-Doppler contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) reduces the diagnostic gap with computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) and represents a major step in the evolution of clinical ultrasound. Although there are several situations in which contrast-enhanced CT and MR are indicated (i.e. evaluation of cystic or ischemic lesions, traumatisms and ablative therapies of the native and transplanted kidney), the use of CT contrast media presents a high risk of contrast-induced nephropathy (i.e. in elderly people, subjects with comorbidities and those with renal dysfunction), while gadolinium-based RM contrast agents are contraindicated for the risk of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (i.e. in patients with severe renal dysfunction). In these situations, CEUS may be a viable alternative, however, as any technique associated with the infusion of pharmacological substances, the potential advantages and risks of CEUS should be critically evaluated. In this regard, the European Federation of Societies for Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology (EFSUMB) has published the guidelines for the use of CEUS for the kidney imaging and the International Contrast Ultrasound Society (ICUS) has been recently founded. The aim of this review is to offer an updated overview of the potential applications of CEUS in nephrology, reporting some indications and possible risks associated to its use.

  15. Counterbalancing the use of ultrasound contrast agents by a cavitation-regulated system.

    PubMed

    Desjouy, C; Fouqueray, M; Lo, C W; Muleki Seya, P; Lee, J L; Bera, J C; Chen, W S; Inserra, C

    2015-09-01

    The stochastic behavior of cavitation can lead to major problems of initiation and maintenance of cavitation during sonication, responsible of poor reproducibility of US-induced bioeffects in the context of sonoporation for instance. To overcome these disadvantages, the injection of ultrasound contrast agents as cavitation nuclei ensures fast initiation and lower acoustic intensities required for cavitation activity. More recently, regulated-cavitation devices based on the real-time modulation of the applied acoustic intensity have shown their potential to maintain a stable cavitation state during an ultrasonic shot, in continuous or pulsed wave conditions. In this paper is investigated the interest, in terms of cavitation activity, of using such regulated-cavitation device or injecting ultrasound contrast agents in the sonicated medium. When using fixed applied acoustic intensity, results showed that introducing ultrasound contrast agents increases reproducibility of cavitation activity (coefficient of variation 62% and 22% without and with UCA, respectively). Moreover, the use of the regulated-cavitation device ensures a given cavitation activity (coefficient of variation less 0.4% in presence of UCAs or not). This highlights the interest of controlling cavitation over time to free cavitation-based application from the use of UCAs. Interestingly, during a one minute sonication, while ultrasound contrast agents progressively disappear, the regulated-cavitation device counterbalance their destruction to sustain a stable inertial cavitation activity.

  16. Diagnostic value of contrast-enhanced ultrasound in thyroid nodules with calcification.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jue; Shang, Xu; Wang, Hua; Xu, Yong-Bo; Gao, Ya; Zhou, Qi

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the diagnostic values of conventional ultrasound and contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) in benign and malignant thyroid nodules with calcification. Conventional ultrasound and CEUS were performed in 122 patients with thyroid nodules with calcification. The thyroid nodules were characterized as benign or malignant by pathological diagnosis. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and diagnostic accordance rate of the two imaging methods were determined. The area under the receiver operating characteristics curve (AUC) was used to assess the diagnostic values of the two imaging methods. In 122 cases of thyroid nodules with calcification, 73 benign nodules and 49 malignant nodules were verified by pathological diagnosis. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and diagnostic accordance rate of conventional ultrasound were 50%, 77%, 59%, 69%, and 66%, respectively, and those of CEUS were 90%, 92%, 88%, 93%, and 91%, respectively. There were significant differences between the two imaging methods. AUCs of conventional ultrasound and CEUS were 0.628 ± 0.052 and 0.908 ± 0.031, suggesting low and high diagnostic values, respectively. CEUS has high diagnostic values, being significantly greater than those of conventional ultrasound, in differential diagnosis of benign and malignant thyroid nodules with calcification.

  17. Cavitation and contrast: the use of bubbles in ultrasound imaging and therapy.

    PubMed

    Stride, E P; Coussios, C C

    2010-01-01

    Microbubbles and cavitation are playing an increasingly significant role in both diagnostic and therapeutic applications of ultrasound. Microbubble ultrasound contrast agents have been in clinical use now for more than two decades, stimulating the development of a range of new contrast-specific imaging techniques which offer substantial benefits in echocardiography, microcirculatory imaging, and more recently, quantitative and molecular imaging. In drug delivery and gene therapy, microbubbles are being investigated/developed as vehicles which can be loaded with the required therapeutic agent, traced to the target site using diagnostic ultrasound, and then destroyed with ultrasound of higher intensity energy burst to release the material locally, thus avoiding side effects associated with systemic administration, e.g. of toxic chemotherapy. It has moreover been shown that the motion of the microbubbles increases the permeability of both individual cell membranes and the endothelium, thus enhancing therapeutic uptake, and can locally increase the activity of drugs by enhancing their transport across biologically inaccessible interfaces such as blood clots or solid tumours. In high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) surgery and lithotripsy, controlled cavitation is being investigated as a means of increasing the speed and efficacy of the treatment. The aim of this paper is both to describe the key features of the physical behaviour of acoustically driven bubbles which underlie their effectiveness in biomedical applications and to review the current state of the art.

  18. [Baseline and contrast-enhanced ultrasound of the liver in tumor patients].

    PubMed

    Oldenburg, A; Albrecht, T

    2008-10-01

    In patients with known malignancy, correct detection and characterization of liver lesions has important therapeutic consequences. Conventional sonography is the most commonly used modality for liver imaging in tumor patients. However, it has a lower sensitivity for the detection of liver metastases compared to contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The majority of liver metastases are hypoechoic and well defined in baseline ultrasound (US), while detection of isoechoic or small liver metastases <1 cm is difficult and the differentiation of liver metastases from benign liver lesions and other malignant liver tumors can be impossible with baseline US. The use of microbubble-based ultrasound contrast agents and contrast-specific imaging techniques advanced the accuracy of ultrasound in liver imaging. Levovist and SonoVue are the US contrast agents approved for liver imaging in Europe. Compared to Levovist, SonoVue allows continuous imaging of the liver in real-time over a period of up to 5 minutes. As a result, SonoVue became the preferred contrast agent for liver imaging in the recent years, while Levovist became less important. Important for the detection of liver metastases are the portal venous and late phases in which metastases show a wash-out and can be detected as hypoechoic lesions in homogeneous enhanced liver parenchyma. The detection of hepatic metastases is substantially improved by CEUS compared to conventional B-mode sonography. Several studies showed sensitivity in detecting liver metastases comparable to that of contrast-enhanced CT and MRI. Furthermore, the typical enhancement patterns of the different benign and malignant liver lesions allow reliable characterization and differentiation from liver metastases in the majority of cases. This paper provides information about the advantages and expedient application of contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) in tumor patients.

  19. Acoustic characterization of ultrasound contrast microbubbles and echogenic liposomes: Applications to imaging and drug-delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Shirshendu

    Micron- to nanometer - sized ultrasound agents, like encapsulated microbubbles and echogenic liposomes (ELIPs), are being actively developed for possible clinical implementations in diagnostic imaging and ultrasound mediated drug/gene delivery. The primary objective of this thesis is to characterize the acoustic behavior of and the ultrasound-mediated contents release from these contrast agents for developing multi-functional ultrasound contrast agents. Subharmonic imaging using contrast microbubbles can improve image quality by providing a higher signal to noise ratio. However, the design and development of contrast microbubbles with favorable subharmonic behavior requires accurate mathematical models capable of predicting their nonlinear dynamics. To this goal, 'strain-softening' viscoelastic interfacial models of the encapsulation were developed and subsequently utilized to simulate the dynamics of encapsulated microbubbles. A hierarchical two-pronged approach of modeling --- a model is applied to one set of experimental data to obtain the model parameters (material characterization), and then the model is validated against a second independent experiment --- is demonstrated in this thesis for two lipid coated (SonazoidRTM and DefinityRTM) and a few polymer (polylactide) encapsulated microbubbles. The proposed models were successful in predicting several experimentally observed behaviors e.g., low subharmonic thresholds and "compression-only" radial oscillations. Results indicate that neglecting the polydisperse size distribution of contrast agent suspensions, a common practice in the literature, can lead to inaccurate results. In vitro experimental investigation of the dependence of subharmonic response from these microbubbles on the ambient pressure is also in conformity with the recent numerical investigations, showing both increase or decrease under appropriate excitation conditions. Experimental characterization of the ELIPs and polymersomes was performed

  20. Thresholds for visual detection of Young's modulus contrast in simulated ultrasound image movies.

    PubMed

    Miller, N R; Bamber, J C

    2000-08-01

    Elasticity imaging (EI) is being developed to allow the evaluation of the mechanical properties of soft tissue, but these properties are already assessed in routine ultrasound breast examination using a method that involves the subjective interpretation of tissue motion seen in real-time B-mode image movies during palpation. We refer to this method as relative motion assessment (RMA). The purpose of this study was to begin a process of learning about the usefulness and limitations of RMA relative to the emerging method of elasticity imaging. Perception experiments were performed to measure Young's modulus contrast thresholds for positive contrast lesions under controlled conditions that could subsequently be repeated to evaluate elasticity imaging for the same task. Observer ability to grade relative lesion contrast using RMA was also assessed. Simulated sequences of B-scans of tissue moving in response to an applied force were generated and used in a two-alternative forced-choice (2-AFC) experiment to measure contrast thresholds for the detection of disc-shaped elastic lesions by RMA in the absence of ultrasound echo contrast. Results were obtained for four observers at a lesion area of about 77 speckle cells and for five observers at lesion areas of about 42 and 139 speckle cells. Young's modulus contrast thresholds were found to decrease with increasing lesion size and were well within the range of contrast values that have been measured for breast tumours in vitro. It was also found that observers were quite skilled at using RMA to grade the relative strain contrast of lesions. The nonlinear relationship between the object contrast (Young's modulus contrast) and the image contrast (strain contrast) prevented observers from detecting very small lesions with 100% accuracy, no matter how high the object contrast. A preliminary comparison of the results for RMA with published thresholds for elastography indicated that elastography is likely to offer great benefit

  1. The role of contrast-enhanced endoscopic ultrasound in pancreatic adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Săftoiu, Adrian; Vilmann, Peter; Bhutani, Manoop S.

    2016-01-01

    Contrast-enhanced endoscopic ultrasound (CE-EUS) allows characterization, differentiation, and staging of focal pancreatic masses. The method has a high sensitivity and specificity for the diagnosis of pancreatic adenocarcinoma which is visualized as hypo-enhanced as compared to the rest of the parenchyma while chronic pancreatitis and neuroendocrine tumors are generally either iso-enhanced or hyper-enhanced. The development of contrast-enhanced low mechanical index harmonic imaging techniques used in real time during endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) allowed perfusion imaging and the quantification of intensity of the contrast signal through time-intensity curve analysis. Thus, contrast harmonic imaging-EUS has been used to differentiate pancreatic adenocarcinoma based on lower values of the peak enhancement. Future applications of CE-EUS in pancreatic adenocarcinoma include not only use of targeted contrast agents for early detection, tridimensional and fusion techniques for enhanced staging and resectability assessment but also novel applications of perfusion imaging for monitoring ablative therapy, improved local detection through EUS-guided sampling of portal vein flow or enhanced drug delivery through sonoporation and ultrasound-induced release of the drugs locally. PMID:28000627

  2. Prospective comparison of use of contrast-enhanced ultrasound and contrast-enhanced computed tomography in the Bosniak classification of complex renal cysts

    PubMed Central

    Ragel, Matthew; Nedumaran, Anbu

    2016-01-01

    Aim To compare contrast-enhanced ultrasound and contrast-enhanced computed tomography in the evaluation of complex renal cysts using the Bosniak classification. Methods Forty-six patients with 51 complex renal cysts were prospectively examined using contrast-enhanced ultrasound and contrast-enhanced computed tomography and images analysed by two observers using the Bosniak classification. Adverse effects and patients’ preference were assessed for both modalities. Results There was complete agreement in Bosniak classification between both modalities and both observers in six cysts (11.8%). There was agreement of Bosniak classification on both modalities in 21 of 51 cysts (41.2%) for observer 1 and in 17 of 51 cysts (33.3%) for observer 2. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound gave a higher Bosniak classification than corresponding contrast-enhanced computed tomography in 31 % of cysts by both observers. Histological correlation was available in three lesions, all of which were malignant and classified as such simultaneously on both modalities by at least one observer, with remaining patients followed up with US or CT for 6–24 months. No adverse or side effects were reported following the use of US contrast, whilst 63.6% of patients suffered minor side effects following the use of CT contrast. 81.8% of the surveyed patients preferred contrast-enhanced ultrasound to contrast-enhanced computed tomography. Conclusion Contrast-enhanced ultrasound is a feasible tool in the evaluation of complex renal cysts in a non-specialist setting. Increased contrast-enhanced ultrasound sensitivity to enhancement compared to contrast-enhanced computed tomography, resulting in upgrading the Bosniak classification on contrast-enhanced ultrasound, has played a role in at best moderate agreement recorded by the observers with limited experience, but this would be overcome as the experience grows. To this end, we propose a standardised proforma for the contrast-enhanced ultrasound report. The

  3. Application of high-resolution ultrasound, real-time elastography, and contrast-enhanced ultrasound in differentiating solid thyroid nodules

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu-Zhi; Xu, Ting; Gong, Hai-Yan; Li, Cui-Ying; Ye, Xin-Hua; Lin, Hong-Jun; Shen, Mei-Ping; Duan, Yu; Yang, Tao; Wu, Xiao-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract High-resolution ultrasound (HRUS) is a sensitive tool for identifying thyroid nodules. Real-time elastography (RTE) and contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) are newly developed methods which could measure tissue elasticity and perfusion features. The aim of the present study was to evaluate and compare the diagnostic efficiency of HRUS, RTE, CEUS and their combined use in the differentiation of benign and malignant solid thyroid nodules. In total, 111 consecutive patients with 145 thyroid nodules who were scheduled for surgery were included in the study. All of them underwent HRUS, RTE, and CEUS examination. The independent ultrasound (US) predictors for malignancy were determined and quantified using logistic regression analysis, based on which a risk-scoring model was established for each method. The diagnostic efficiency of each method was assessed by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. HRUS showed the best diagnostic efficiency among the 3 US methods, with 74.6% sensitivity and 87.8% specificity. CEUS had higher sensitivity (85.7%), whereas RTE alone did not show much advantage. Combined use of RTE and HRUS increased the sensitivity (92.1%). The HRUS-RTE-CEUS combination could increase both the sensitivity and specificity (87.3%, 91.5%), with the best AUC (0.935) among all the methods. The overall diagnostic value of HRUS in predicting malignancy is the best among the 3 US methods. Combined use of RTE and CEUS and HRUS could improve the diagnostic efficiency for solid thyroid nodules. PMID:27828854

  4. Improving the contrast of breast cancer masses in ultrasound using an autoregressive model based filter.

    PubMed

    von Lavante, Etienne; Noble, J Alison

    2007-01-01

    The assessment and diagnosis of breast cancer with ultrasound is a challenging problem due to the low contrast between cancer masses and benign tissue. Due to this low contrast it has proven to be difficult to achieve reliable segmentation results on breast cancer masses. An autoregressive model has been employed to filter out of the backscattered RF-signal from a tissue harmonic image which is not degraded by harmonic leakage. Measurements on the filtered image have shown a significant (up to 45%) increase in contrast between cancer masses and benign tissue.

  5. Mesoporous silica nanoparticles as a breast cancer targeting contrast agent for ultrasound imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milgroom, Andrew Carson

    Current clinical use of ultrasound for breast cancer diagnostics is strictly limited to a role as a supplementary detection method to other modalities, such as mammography or MRI. A major reason for ultrasound’s role as a secondary method is its inability to discern between cancerous and non-cancerous bodies of similar density, like dense calcifications or benign fibroadenomas. Its detection capabilities are further diminished by the variable density of the surrounding breast tissue with the progression of age. Preliminary studies suggest that mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) are a good candidate as an in situ contrast agent for ultrasound. By tagging the silica particle surface with the cancer-targeting antibody trastuzumab (Herceptin), suspect regions of interest can be better identified in real time with standard ultrasound equipment. Once the silica-antibody conjugate is injected into the bloodstream and enters the cancerous growth’s vasculature, the antibody arm will bind to HER2, a cell surface receptor known to be dysfunctional or overexpressed in certain types of breast cancer. As more particles aggregate at the cell surface, backscatter of the ultrasonic waves increases as a result of the higher porous silica concentration. This translates to an increased contrast around the lesion boundary. Tumor detection through ultrasound contrast enhancement provides a tremendous advantage over current cancer diagnostics because is it significantly cheaper and can be monitored in real time. Characterization of MCM-41 type MSNs suggests that these particles have sufficient stability and particle size distribution to penetrate through fenestrated tumor vasculature and accumulate in HER2+ breast cancer cells through the enhanced permeation and retention (EPR) effect. A study of acoustic properties showed that particle concentration is linearly correlated to image contrast in clinical frequency-range ultrasound, although less pronounced than typical microbubble

  6. Contrast-enhanced harmonic endoscopic ultrasound imaging: basic principles, present situation and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Sánchez, María-Victoria; Napoléon, Bertrand

    2014-11-14

    Over the last decade, the development of stabilised microbubble contrast agents and improvements in available ultrasonic equipment, such as harmonic imaging, have enabled us to display microbubble enhancements on a greyscale with optimal contrast and spatial resolution. Recent technological advances made contrast harmonic technology available for endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) for the first time in 2008. Thus, the evaluation of microcirculation is now feasible with EUS, prompting the evolution of contrast-enhanced EUS from vascular imaging to images of the perfused tissue. Although the relevant experience is still preliminary, several reports have highlighted contrast-enhanced harmonic EUS (CH-EUS) as a promising noninvasive method to visualise and characterise lesions and to differentiate benign from malignant focal lesions. Even if histology remains the gold standard, the combination of CH-EUS and EUS fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) can not only render EUS more accurate but may also assist physicians in making decisions when EUS-FNA is inconclusive, increasing the yield of EUS-FNA by guiding the puncture with simultaneous imaging of the vascularity. The development of CH-EUS has also opened up exciting possibilities in other research areas, including monitoring responses to anticancer chemotherapy or to ethanol-induced pancreatic tissue ablation, anticancer therapies based on ultrasound-triggered drug and gene delivery, and therapeutic adjuvants by contrast ultrasound-induced apoptosis. Contrast harmonic imaging is gaining popularity because of its efficacy, simplicity and non-invasive nature, and many expectations are currently resting on this technique. If its potential is confirmed in the near future, contrast harmonic imaging will become a standard practice in EUS.

  7. Measurement of the contrast agent intrinsic and native harmonic response with single transducer pulse waved ultrasound systems.

    PubMed

    Verbeek, X A; Willigers, J M; Brands, P J; Ledoux, L A; Hoeks, A P

    1999-01-01

    Ultrasound contrast agents, i.e., small gas filled microbubbles, enhance the echogenicity of blood and have the potential to be used for tissue perfusion assessment. The contrast agents scatter ultrasound in a nonlinear manner and thereby introduce harmonics in the ultrasound signal. This property is exploited in new ultrasound techniques like harmonic imaging, which aims to display only the contrast agent presence. Much attention has already been given to the physical properties of the contrast agent. The present study focuses on practical aspects of the measurement of the intrinsic harmonic response of ultrasound contrast agents with single transducer pulse waved ultrasound systems. Furthermore, the consequences of two other sources of harmonics are discussed. These sources are the nonlinear distortion of ultrasound in a medium generating native harmonics, and the emitted signal itself which might contain contaminating harmonics. It is demonstrated conceptually and by experiments that optimization of the contrast agent harmonic response measured with a single transducer is governed by the transducer spectral sensitivity distribution rather than the resonance properties of the contrast agent. Both native and contaminating harmonics may be of considerable strength and can be misinterpreted as intrinsic harmonics of the contrast agent. Practical difficulties to filter out the harmonic component selectively, without deteriorating the image, may cause misinterpretation of the fundamental as a harmonic.

  8. Streaming flow from ultrasound contrast agents by acoustic waves in a blood vessel model.

    PubMed

    Cho, Eunjin; Chung, Sang Kug; Rhee, Kyehan

    2015-09-01

    To elucidate the effects of streaming flow on ultrasound contrast agent (UCA)-assisted drug delivery, streaming velocity fields from sonicated UCA microbubbles were measured using particle image velocimetry (PIV) in a blood vessel model. At the beginning of ultrasound sonication, the UCA bubbles formed clusters and translated in the direction of the ultrasound field. Bubble cluster formation and translation were faster with 2.25MHz sonication, a frequency close to the resonance frequency of the UCA. Translation of bubble clusters induced streaming jet flow that impinged on the vessel wall, forming symmetric vortices. The maximum streaming velocity was about 60mm/s at 2.25MHz and decreased to 15mm/s at 1.0MHz for the same acoustic pressure amplitude. The effect of the ultrasound frequency on wall shear stress was more noticeable. Maximum wall shear stress decreased from 0.84 to 0.1Pa as the ultrasound frequency decreased from 2.25 to 1.0MHz. The maximum spatial gradient of the wall shear stress also decreased from 1.0 to 0.1Pa/mm. This study showed that streaming flow was induced by bubble cluster formation and translation and was stronger upon sonication by an acoustic wave with a frequency near the UCA resonance frequency. Therefore, the secondary radiant force, which is much stronger at the resonance frequency, should play an important role in UCA-assisted drug delivery.

  9. CONTRAST-ENHANCED INTRAVASCULAR ULTRASOUND PULSE SEQUENCES FOR BANDWIDTH-LIMITED TRANSDUCERS

    PubMed Central

    Maresca, David; Renaud, Guillaume; van Soest, Gijs; Li, Xiang; Zhou, Qifa; Shung, K. Kirk; de Jong, Nico; van der Steen, Antonius F. W.

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate two methods for vasa vasorum imaging using contrast-enhanced intravascular ultrasound, which can be performed using commercial catheters. Plaque neovascularization was recognized as an independent marker of coronary artery plaque vulnerability. IVUS-based methods to image the microvessels available to date require high bandwidth (−6 dB relative frequency bandwidth >70%), which are not routinely available commercially. We explored the potential of ultraharmonic imaging and chirp reversal imaging for vasa vasorum imaging. In vitro recordings were performed on a tissue-mimicking phantom using a commercial ultrasound contrast agent and a transducer with a center frequency of 34 MHz and a −6 dB relative bandwidth of 56%. Acoustic peak pressures <500 kPa were used. A tissue-mimicking phantom with channels down to 200 μm in diameter was successfully imaged by the two contrast detection sequences while the smallest channel stayed invisible in conventional intravascular ultrasound images. Ultraharmonic imaging provided the best contrast agent detection. PMID:23384459

  10. Gray scale and contrast-enhanced ultrasound imaging of malignant liver tumors of vascular origin

    PubMed Central

    Schweitzer, Nora; Soudah, Bisharah; Gebel, Michael; Manns, Michael Peter

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Malignant vascular tumors of the liver are rare. The aim of this study was to investigate the applicability of gray scale and contrast-enhanced ultrasonography in patients with epithelioid hemangioendothelioma (EHE) of the liver and hepatic angiosarcoma (HA) and to describe the clinical presentation. Methods We retrospectively analyzed all patients with epithelioid hemangioendothelioma or hemangiosarcoma of the liver from 1998 to 2011, who underwent ultrasound investigation. We describe the findings in gray scale and contrast-enhanced ultrasound and the clinical course of the disease of seven patients with EHE and five patients with HA. Results Ultrasound investigation in EHE showed mostly multiple hypoechoic irregular lesions close to the liver capsule and with a halo in some cases. Contrast enhancement revealed inhomogeneously and through all contrast phases vascularized tumors with a rim enhancement in 50%, with or without early wash out. All tumors had avascular parts. HA presented as multiple and irregular hypo-, iso- or hyperechoic lesions. After contrast enhancement, hypervascularization with individual patterns was evident in all patients. Of five, three had liquid parts. Patients with HA were significantly older (58 vs. 37 years, p = 0.014) and presented with lower thrombocyte counts (84 vs. 264, p = 0.0025) and with higher CEA levels (4.6 vs. 1.5, p = 0.03). Conclusion EHE and HA are inhomogeneous tumors, explaining the high inter-individual variability and heterogeneity in ultrasound examination. The presence of multifocal lesions, heterogeneity and undefined margins may differentiate EHE or HA from hemangioma. A biopsy is essential in the diagnosis of vascular tumors. PMID:25653860

  11. Pitfalls of contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) in the diagnosis of splenic sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Tana, C; Iannetti, G; D'Alessandro, P; Tana, M; Mezzetti, A; Schiavone, C

    2013-01-01

    By observing the real-time behavior of focal liver lesions at three vascular phases (arterial, portal-venous, and late), contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) has been successfully applied to differentiate benign from malignant hepatic nodules. In recent years, numerous studies highlighted the usefulness of CEUS also for other applications such as abdominal trauma, renal, pancreatic, thyroid, and inflammatory bowel diseases, supporting its role even in differentiating benign from malignant splenic nodules. Therefore, the European Federation of Societies for Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology (EFSUMB) recently updated the guidelines for the use of ultrasound contrast agents in clinical practice, pointing out the indication to characterize splenic parenchymal inhomogeneity or suspected lesions found on conventional ultrasound (BUS). We describe the case of a patient with a history of colon cancer and finding, at BUS and CEUS, of hypoechoic lesions with a highly suggestive pattern for metastases, subsequently histologically proved to be splenic localizations of a benign and multisystemic granulomatous disease such as sarcoidosis. We therefore reviewed the current literature focusing on the role of CEUS in differentiating benign from malignant splenic lesions, emphasizing on the lack of data and numerical shortage of sarcoidosis derived-lesions in the available studies. We conclude that sarcoidosis remains a diagnosis of exclusion and new studies are needed before defining precise indications of CEUS in these patients.

  12. Contrast enhanced ultrasound by real-time spatiotemporal filtering of ultrafast images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desailly, Yann; Tissier, Anne-Marie; Correas, Jean-Michel; Wintzenrieth, Frédéric; Tanter, Mickaël; Couture, Olivier

    2017-01-01

    Contrast enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) takes advantage of the nonlinear behaviour of injected microbubbles. If these contrast techniques yield good specificity between bubbles and tissues, they suffer some drawbacks, inherently linked to their dependence on nonlinear content. In recent years, plane-wave ultrasound reached frame rates of up to 20 000 fps. In this study we propose a linear technique for CEUS that takes advantage of these very high frame rates to separate bubbles from tissue without requiring nonlinearities. Data-driven spatiotemporal filtering operations are used to separate different features in the image on the basis of coherence both in space and time. Such filter recently proved to improve Doppler sensitivity (Demene et al 2015 IEEE Trans. Med. Imaging 34 2271-85). In contrast with bubbles, even slow moving ones, tissues are highly coherent both in space and time. Therefore, singular value decomposition (SVD) seems to be a powerful tool for the separation of contrast agents and tissues. In this paper, we apply SVD processing to linear ultrafast ultrasound images for CEUS Doppler. The contrast levels reached by this technique were compared to those of a nonlinear gold standard sequence (PMPI Doppler) through a flow phantom study. The SVD technique reached contrast-to-tissue ratios (CTR) up to 10 dB higher in vitro, and proved to be robust in terms of probe motion and slow flow. A trial was also conducted on a transplanted human kidney, already imaged by means of power Doppler (Claudon et al 1999 Am. J. Roentgenol. 173 41-6) and microbubbles (Kay et al 2009 Clin. Radiol. 64 1081-7). Contrast levels yielded by the SVD technique measured up to 13 dB higher than those of PMPI Doppler.

  13. Early Diagnosis of Intrahepatic Pseudoaneurysm during Radiofrequency Ablation using Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, S Krishna; Oon, Ong Keh; Horgan, Paul; Leen, Edward

    2015-01-01

    Radiofrequency ablation is one of the more established forms of local treatment in patients with unresectable tumours, including colorectal hepatic metastases. Complications associated with this method of intervention include thermal and mechanical injuries, including vascular insults resulting in haemorrhage or pseudoaneurysm formation. This is the first case demonstrating the detection of post-ablation acute pseudoaneurysm formation identified on the table using contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) and the subsequent successful management. PMID:28223887

  14. The Subharmonic Behavior and Thresholds of High Frequency Ultrasound Contrast Agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, John

    2016-11-01

    Ultrasound contrast agents are encapsulated micro-bubbles used for diagnostic and therapeutic biomedical ultrasound. The agents oscillate nonlinearly about their equilibrium radii upon sufficient acoustic forcing and produce unique acoustic signatures that allow them to be distinguished from scattering from the surrounding tissue. The subharmonic response occurs below the fundamental and is associated with an acoustic pressure threshold. Subharmonic imaging using ultrasound contrast agents has been established for clinical applications at standard diagnostic frequencies typically below 20 MHz. However, for emerging applications of high frequency applications (above 20 MHz) subharmonic imaging is an area of on-going research. The effects of attenuation from tissue are more significant and the characterization of agents is not as well understood. Due to specificity and control production, polymer agents are useful for high frequency applications. In this study, we highlight novel measurement techniques to measure and characterize the mechanical properties of the shell of polymer contrast agents. The definition of the subharmonic threshold is investigated with respect to mono-frequency and chirp forcing waveforms which have been used to achieve optimal subharmonic content in the backscattered signal. Time frequency analysis using the Empirical Mode Decomposition (EMD) and the Hilbert-Huang transform facilitates a more sensitive and robust methodology for characterization of subharmonic content with respect to non-stationary forcing. A new definition of the subharmonic threshold is proposed with respect to the energy content of the associated adaptive basis decomposition. Additional studies with respect to targeted agent behavior and cardiovascular disease are discussed. NIH, ONR.

  15. Injectable microbubbles as contrast agents for diagnostic ultrasound imaging: the key role of perfluorochemicals.

    PubMed

    Schutt, Ernest G; Klein, David H; Mattrey, Robert M; Riess, Jean G

    2003-07-21

    Ultrasonography has, until recently, lacked effective contrast-enhancing agents. Micrometer-sized gas bubbles that resonate at a diagnostic frequency are ideal reflectors for ultrasound. However, simple air bubbles, when injected into the blood stream, disappear within seconds through the combined effects of Laplace pressure, blood pressure, and exposure to ultrasound energy. Use of fluorocarbon vapor, by extending the persistence of microbubbles in vivo from seconds to minutes, propelled contrast ultrasonography into clinical practice. Imaging techniques that selectively suppress tissue, but not microbubble signal, further increase image contrast. Approved products consist of C3F8 or SF6 microbubbles, and N2 microbubbles osmotically stabilized with C6F14. These agents allow the detection and characterization of cardiovascular abnormalities and solid organ lesions, such as tumors. By providing higher quality images, they improve the accuracy and confidence of disease diagnosis, and can play a decisive role in clinical decision making. New objectives include agents that target specific cells for the molecular imaging of disease, and drug and gene delivery, including ultrasound-triggered delivery.

  16. Piezoelectric Composite Micromachined Multifrequency Transducers for High-Resolution, High-Contrast Ultrasound Imaging for Improved Prostate Cancer Assessment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-01

    682. S. Li, W. Chang, W. Huang, and X. Jiang, ൰-MHz Micromachined PMN-PT Composite Ultrasound Array for Medical Imaging ," in ASME 2015...Jiang, ൰-MHz Micromachined PMN-PT Composite Ultrasound Array for Medical Imaging ," in ASME 2015 International Mechanical Engineering Congress...Resolution, High- Contrast Ultrasound Imaging For Improved Prostate Cancer Assessment PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Paul A. Dayton CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION

  17. Nonspherical dynamics and shape mode stability of ultrasound contrast agent microbubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvisi, Michael

    2016-11-01

    Ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) are shell encapsulated microbubbles developed originally for ultrasound imaging enhancement. UCAs are more recently being exploited for therapeutic applications, such as for drug delivery, gene therapy, and tissue ablation. Ultrasound transducer pulses can induce spherical (radial) UCA oscillations, translation, and nonspherical shape oscillations, the dynamics of which are highly coupled. If driven sufficiently strongly, the ultrasound can induce breakup of UCAs, which can facilitate drug or gene delivery but should be minimized for imaging purposes to increase residence time and maximize diagnostic effect. Therefore, an understanding of the interplay between the acoustic driving and nonspherical shape mode stability of UCAs is essential for both diagnostic and therapeutic applications. In this work, we use both analytical and numerical methods to analyze shape mode stability for cases of small and large nonspherical oscillations, respectively. To analyze shape mode stability in the limit of small nonspherical perturbations, we couple a radial model of a lipid-coated microbubble with a model for bubble translation and nonspherical shape oscillation. This hybrid model is used to predict shape mode stability for ultrasound driving frequencies and pressure amplitudes of clinical interest. In addition, calculations of the stability of individual shape modes, residence time, maximum radius, and translation are provided with respect to acoustic driving parameters and compared to an unshelled bubble. The effects of shell elasticity, shell viscosity, and initial radius on stability are investigated. Furthermore, the well-established boundary element method (BEM) is used to investigate the dynamics and shape stability of large amplitude nonspherical oscillations of an ultrasonically-forced, polymer-coated microbubble near a rigid boundary. Different instability modes are identified based on the degree of jetting and proximity to the

  18. Endoscopic ultrasound in the diagnosis of acinar cell carcinoma of the pancreas: contrast-enhanced endoscopic ultrasound, endoscopic ultrasound elastography, and pathological correlation.

    PubMed

    Chantarojanasiri, Tanyaporn; Hirooka, Yoshiki; Kawashima, Hiroki; Ohno, Eizaburo; Yamamura, Takeshi; Funasaka, Kohei; Nakamura, Masanao; Miyahara, Ryoji; Ishigami, Masatoshi; Watanabe, Osamu; Nakaguro, Masato; Shimoyama, Yoshie; Nakamura, Shigeo; Goto, Hidemi

    2016-11-01

    We report a case series of five patients with pancreatic acinar cell carcinoma who received surgical treatment and compared the preoperative contrast-enhanced endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) and EUS elastography patterns with the surgical specimens. The contrast-enhanced EUS indicated vascular tumors with gradual enhancement in four patients and a hypovascular tumor in one patient. The elastography indicated an elastic score of 3 (hard lesion with softer border) in two patients and a score of 5 (hard lesion, which included the surrounding area) in two patients. In tumors with an elastic score of 5, the pathology exhibited abundant hyalinizing fibrous stroma or massive tumor invasion to the surrounding tissue. We concluded that acinar cell carcinoma of the pancreas has various patterns of EUS contrast-enhancement and elastography, depending on the pathologic phenotype.

  19. Endoscopic ultrasound in the diagnosis of acinar cell carcinoma of the pancreas: contrast-enhanced endoscopic ultrasound, endoscopic ultrasound elastography, and pathological correlation

    PubMed Central

    Chantarojanasiri, Tanyaporn; Hirooka, Yoshiki; Kawashima, Hiroki; Ohno, Eizaburo; Yamamura, Takeshi; Funasaka, Kohei; Nakamura, Masanao; Miyahara, Ryoji; Ishigami, Masatoshi; Watanabe, Osamu; Nakaguro, Masato; Shimoyama, Yoshie; Nakamura, Shigeo; Goto, Hidemi

    2016-01-01

    We report a case series of five patients with pancreatic acinar cell carcinoma who received surgical treatment and compared the preoperative contrast-enhanced endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) and EUS elastography patterns with the surgical specimens. The contrast-enhanced EUS indicated vascular tumors with gradual enhancement in four patients and a hypovascular tumor in one patient. The elastography indicated an elastic score of 3 (hard lesion with softer border) in two patients and a score of 5 (hard lesion, which included the surrounding area) in two patients. In tumors with an elastic score of 5, the pathology exhibited abundant hyalinizing fibrous stroma or massive tumor invasion to the surrounding tissue. We concluded that acinar cell carcinoma of the pancreas has various patterns of EUS contrast-enhancement and elastography, depending on the pathologic phenotype. PMID:27853750

  20. [Radiographic, MR or ultrasound contrast media in pregnant or breast-feeding women: what are the key issues?].

    PubMed

    Fröhlich, J M; Kubik-Huch, R A

    2013-01-01

    The use and the safety of radiographic, MR- or ultrasound contrast media in the diagnostic work-up of pregnant or lactating patients is a frequently discussed question. As only sparse clinical data is available, a careful benefit-risk assessment must contain physico-chemical properties, preclinical data including teratogeneity and embryotoxicity, as well as maternal and foetal exposure. With consideration to the individual risks, iodinated contrast media, macrocyclic MR contrast media with increased stability or sulphur hexafluoride ultrasound contrast media may, if clinically justified, be administered in the smallest possible doses throughout pregnancy. After parental administration of an iodinated contrast medium after the 12th week of pregnancy, the neonate's thyroidal function should be checked during the first week after birth. After parental administration of iodinated, stable macrocyclic, gadolinium or ultrasound contrast media, lactation can be continued normally. In any case, contrast media should be used with caution and only if the benefits outweigh the risk.

  1. Combined ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging of pancreatic cancer using nanocage contrast agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homan, Kimberly; Shah, Jignesh; Gomez, Sobeyda; Gensler, Heidi; Karpiouk, Andrei; Brannon-Peppas, L.; Emelianov, Stanislav

    2009-02-01

    A new metallodielectric nanoparticle consisting of a silica core and silver outer cage was developed for the purpose of enhancing photoacoustic imaging contrast in pancreatic tissue. These nanocages were injected into an ex vivo porcine pancreas and imaged using a combined photoacoustic and ultrasound (PAUS) assembly. This custom-designed PAUS assembly delivered 800 nm light through a fiber optical light delivery system integrated with 128 element linear array transducer operating at 7.5 MHz center frequency. Imaging results prove that the nanocage contrast agents have the ability to enhance photoacoustic imaging contrast. Furthermore, the value of the combined PAUS imaging modality was demonstrated as the location of nanocages against background native tissue was evident. Future applications of these nanocage contrast agents could include targeting them to pancreatic cancer for enhancement of photoacoustic imaging for diagnosis and therapy.

  2. On-chip preparation of nanoscale contrast agents towards high-resolution ultrasound imaging.

    PubMed

    Peyman, Sally A; McLaughlan, James R; Abou-Saleh, Radwa H; Marston, Gemma; Johnson, Benjamin R G; Freear, Steven; Coletta, P Louise; Markham, Alexander F; Evans, Stephen D

    2016-02-21

    Micron-sized lipid-stabilised bubbles of heavy gas have been utilised as contrast agents for diagnostic ultrasound (US) imaging for many years. Typically bubbles between 1 and 8 μm in diameter are produced to enhance imaging in US by scattering sound waves more efficiently than surrounding tissue. A potential area of interest for Contrast Enhanced Ultrasound (CEUS) are bubbles with diameters <1 μm or 'nanobubbles.' As bubble diameter decreases, ultrasonic resonant frequency increases, which could lead to an improvement in resolution for high-frequency imaging applications when using nanobubbles. In addition, current US contrast agents are limited by their size to the vasculature in vivo. However, molecular-targeted nanobubbles could penetrate into the extra-vascular space of cancerous tissue providing contrast in regions inaccessible to traditional microbubbles. This paper reports a new microfluidic method for the generation of sub-micron sized lipid stabilised particles containing perfluorocarbon (PFC). The nanoparticles are produced in a unique atomisation-like flow regime at high production rates, in excess of 10(6) particles per s and at high concentration, typically >10(11) particles per mL. The average particle diameter appears to be around 100-200 nm. These particles, suspected of being a mix of liquid and gaseous C4F10 due to Laplace pressure, then phase convert into nanometer sized bubbles on the application of US. In vitro ultrasound characterisation from these nanoparticle populations showed strong backscattering compared to aqueous filled liposomes of a similar size. The nanoparticles were stable upon injection and gave excellent contrast enhancement when used for in vivo imaging, compared to microbubbles with an equivalent shell composition.

  3. Logistic Regression Analysis of Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound and Conventional Ultrasound Characteristics of Sub-centimeter Thyroid Nodules.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Rui-Na; Zhang, Bo; Yang, Xiao; Jiang, Yu-Xin; Lai, Xing-Jian; Zhang, Xiao-Yan

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of the study described here was to determine specific characteristics of thyroid microcarcinoma (TMC) and explore the value of contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) combined with conventional ultrasound (US) in the diagnosis of TMC. Characteristics of 63 patients with TMC and 39 with benign sub-centimeter thyroid nodules were retrospectively analyzed. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to determine independent risk factors. Four variables were included in the logistic regression models: age, shape, blood flow distribution and enhancement pattern. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.919. With 0.113 selected as the cutoff value, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value and accuracy were 90.5%, 82.1%, 89.1%, 84.2% and 87.3%, respectively. Independent risk factors for TMC determined with the combination of CEUS and conventional US were age, shape, blood flow distribution and enhancement pattern. Age was negatively correlated with malignancy, whereas shape, blood flow distribution and enhancement pattern were positively correlated. The logistic regression model involving CEUS and conventional US was found to be effective in the diagnosis of sub-centimeter thyroid nodules.

  4. Transdermal Drug Delivery Aided by an Ultrasound Contrast Agent: An In Vitro Experimental Study

    PubMed Central

    Park, Donghee; Yoon, Jinhee; Park, Jingam; Jung, Byungjo; Park, Hyunjin; Seo, Jongbum

    2010-01-01

    Sonophoresis temporarily increases skin permeability such that medicine can be delivered transdermally. Cavitation is believed to be the predominant mechanism in sonophoresis. In this study, an ultrasound contrast agent (UCA) strategy was adopted instead of low frequency ultrasound to assure that cavitation occurred, and the efficacy of sonophoresis with UCA was quantitatively analyzed by optical measurements. The target drug used in this study was 0.1 % Definity® in 70% glycerol, which was delivered into porcine skin samples. Glycerol was used because it is an optical clearing agent, and the efficiency of glycerol delivery could be analyzed with optical measurements. The applied acoustic pressure was approximately 600 kPa at 1 MHz ultrasound with a 10% duty cycle for 60 minutes. Experimental results indicated that the measured relative contrast (RC) after sonophoresis with UCA was approximately 80% higher than RC after sonophoresis without UCA. In addition, the variance of RC was also reduced by more than 50% with the addition of a UCA. The use of a UCA appeared to increase cavitation, demonstrating that the use of a UCA can be effective in transdermal drug delivery (TDD). PMID:20448793

  5. Transdermal drug delivery aided by an ultrasound contrast agent: an in vitro experimental study.

    PubMed

    Park, Donghee; Yoon, Jinhee; Park, Jingam; Jung, Byungjo; Park, Hyunjin; Seo, Jongbum

    2010-02-11

    Sonophoresis temporarily increases skin permeability such that medicine can be delivered transdermally. Cavitation is believed to be the predominant mechanism in sonophoresis. In this study, an ultrasound contrast agent (UCA) strategy was adopted instead of low frequency ultrasound to assure that cavitation occurred, and the efficacy of sonophoresis with UCA was quantitatively analyzed by optical measurements. The target drug used in this study was 0.1 % Definity(R) in 70% glycerol, which was delivered into porcine skin samples. Glycerol was used because it is an optical clearing agent, and the efficiency of glycerol delivery could be analyzed with optical measurements. The applied acoustic pressure was approximately 600 kPa at 1 MHz ultrasound with a 10% duty cycle for 60 minutes. Experimental results indicated that the measured relative contrast (RC) after sonophoresis with UCA was approximately 80% higher than RC after sonophoresis without UCA. In addition, the variance of RC was also reduced by more than 50% with the addition of a UCA. The use of a UCA appeared to increase cavitation, demonstrating that the use of a UCA can be effective in transdermal drug delivery (TDD).

  6. Surface modes and acoustic scattering of microspheres and ultrasound contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Falou, Omar; Jafari Sojahrood, Amin; Kumaradas, J Carl; Kolios, Michael C

    2012-09-01

    Surface modes of spherical objects subject to ultrasound excitation have been recently proposed to explain experimental measurements of scattering from microspheres and ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs). In this work, the relationship between surface modes and resonance frequencies of microspheres and UCAs is investigated. A finite-element model, built upon the fundamentals of wave propagation and structural mechanics, was introduced and validated against analytical solutions (error <5%). Numerical results showed the existence of a systematic relationship between resonance frequencies and surface modes of a 30 μm microsphere driven at 1-70 MHz. On the contrary, for a 100 nm shelled, 4 μm diameter UCA, no clear relationship between the resonance frequencies and the surface modes was found in the frequency range examined. Instead, the UCA exhibited a collection of complex oscillations, which appear to be a combination of various surface modes and displacements. A study of the effects of varying the shell properties on the backscatter showed the presence of peaks in the backscatter of thick-shelled UCAs, which are not predicted by previous models. In summary, this work presents a systematic effort to examine scattering and surface modes from ultrasound contrast agents using finite-element models.

  7. Methylene blue microbubbles as a model dual-modality contrast agent for ultrasound and activatable photoacoustic imaging.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Mansik; Song, Wentao; Huynh, Elizabeth; Kim, Jungho; Kim, Jeesu; Helfield, Brandon L; Leung, Ben Y C; Goertz, David E; Zheng, Gang; Oh, Jungtaek; Lovell, Jonathan F; Kim, Chulhong

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging are highly complementary modalities since both use ultrasonic detection for operation. Increasingly, photoacoustic and ultrasound have been integrated in terms of hardware instrumentation. To generate a broadly accessible dual-modality contrast agent, we generated microbubbles (a standard ultrasound contrast agent) in a solution of methylene blue (a standard photoacoustic dye). This MB2 solution was formed effectively and was optimized as a dual-modality contrast solution. As microbubble concentration increased (with methylene blue concentration constant), photoacoustic signal was attenuated in the MB2 solution. When methylene blue concentration increased (with microbubble concentration held constant), no ultrasonic interference was observed. Using an MB2 solution that strongly attenuated all photoacoustic signal, high powered ultrasound could be used to burst the microbubbles and dramatically enhance photoacoustic contrast (>800-fold increase), providing a new method for spatiotemporal control of photoacoustic signal generation.

  8. Methylene blue microbubbles as a model dual-modality contrast agent for ultrasound and activatable photoacoustic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Mansik; Song, Wentao; Huynh, Elizabeth; Kim, Jungho; Kim, Jeesu; Helfield, Brandon L.; Leung, Ben Y. C.; Goertz, David E.; Zheng, Gang; Oh, Jungtaek; Lovell, Jonathan F.; Kim, Chulhong

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging are highly complementary modalities since both use ultrasonic detection for operation. Increasingly, photoacoustic and ultrasound have been integrated in terms of hardware instrumentation. To generate a broadly accessible dual-modality contrast agent, we generated microbubbles (a standard ultrasound contrast agent) in a solution of methylene blue (a standard photoacoustic dye). This MB2 solution was formed effectively and was optimized as a dual-modality contrast solution. As microbubble concentration increased (with methylene blue concentration constant), photoacoustic signal was attenuated in the MB2 solution. When methylene blue concentration increased (with microbubble concentration held constant), no ultrasonic interference was observed. Using an MB2 solution that strongly attenuated all photoacoustic signal, high powered ultrasound could be used to burst the microbubbles and dramatically enhance photoacoustic contrast (>800-fold increase), providing a new method for spatiotemporal control of photoacoustic signal generation.

  9. Numerical Modeling of 3-D Dynamics of Ultrasound Contrast Agent Microbubbles Using the Boundary Integral Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvisi, Michael; Manmi, Kawa; Wang, Qianxi

    2014-11-01

    Ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) are microbubbles stabilized with a shell typically of lipid, polymer, or protein and are emerging as a unique tool for noninvasive therapies ranging from gene delivery to tumor ablation. The nonspherical dynamics of contrast agents are thought to play an important role in both diagnostic and therapeutic applications, for example, causing the emission of subharmonic frequency components and enhancing the uptake of therapeutic agents across cell membranes and tissue interfaces. A three-dimensional model for nonspherical contrast agent dynamics based on the boundary integral method is presented. The effects of the encapsulating shell are approximated by adapting Hoff's model for thin-shell, spherical contrast agents to the nonspherical case. A high-quality mesh of the bubble surface is maintained by implementing a hybrid approach of the Lagrangian method and elastic mesh technique. Numerical analyses for the dynamics of UCAs in an infinite liquid and near a rigid wall are performed in parameter regimes of clinical relevance. The results show that the presence of a coating significantly reduces the oscillation amplitude and period, increases the ultrasound pressure amplitude required to incite jetting, and reduces the jet width and velocity.

  10. Preliminary Analysis of Clinical Situations Involved in Quantification of Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound in Crohn's Disease.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Wenjie; Gao, Xiang; Wang, Weili; Zhi, Min; Tang, Jian; Wen, Yan-Ling; Yu, Junli; Chen, Yao; Liu, Xiaoyin; Yang, Chuan; Hu, Pinjin; Liu, Guangjian

    2016-08-01

    To assess influencing factors for quantitative analysis of contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) in Crohn's disease (CD), dynamic CEUS examinations from 77 consecutive CD patients were recorded. Peak intensity (PI) values were calculated using the pre-installed quantification software of the ultrasound scanner. The influence of depth, pressure from the ultrasound probe and intraluminal gas was analyzed. The PI value of the anterior wall was lower than that of the posterior wall when the depth was ≤3.4 cm (17.9 dB vs. 21.3 dB; p < 0.05) or evident pressure was exerted (19.1 dB vs. 22.5 dB; p < 0.01). In the presence of intraluminal gas, the PI of the anterior wall was higher than that of the posterior wall (20.7 dB vs. 18.8 dB; p < 0.05). Nevertheless, no significant difference was found between the PI value of anterior and posterior walls when the depth was >3.4 cm (19.8 dB vs. 20.3 dB), moderate pressure was exerted (20.5 dB vs. 21.1 dB) or luminal gas was excluded between the two bowel walls (18.9 dB vs. 21.2 dB; p ≥ 0.05). The factors of depth, pressure from the ultrasound probe and intraluminal gas can affect the quantification results of CEUS. It is preferable to place the region of interest in the posterior wall when luminal gas is absent and in the anterior wall when luminal gas is present. In the latter case, more attention should be paid to reducing pressure by the ultrasound probe.

  11. Investigations on the destruction of ultrasound contrast agents: Fragmentation thresholds, inertial cavitation, and bioeffects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wen-Shiang

    Ultrasound contrast agents (UCA) have shown great potential in both diagnostic and therapeutic applications recently. To fully explore the possible applications and the safety concerns of using UCA, a complete understanding of the UCA responses to various acoustic fields is necessary. Therefore, we performed a series of experiments and simulations to investigate the various acoustic properties of UCA with different gases and shells. We also investigated the mechanisms of some UCA-enhanced bioeffects including thrombolysis, hemolysis and high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) tumor ablation. Two pressure thresholds were found: the fragmentation threshold and continuous inertial cavitation (IC) threshold. At the fragmentation threshold, bubbles were destroyed and the released gas dissolved in the surrounding solution at a rate which depended on the bubble's initial size and type of gas. The continuous IC threshold occurred at a higher pressure, where fragments of destroyed UCA (derivative bubbles) underwent violent inertial collapse; the period of activity depending on acoustic parameters such as frequency, pressure, pulse length, and pulse repetition frequency (PRF). Different UCA had different threshold pressures and demonstrated different magnitudes of IC activity after destruction. The amount of derivative bubbles generated by IC was determined by several acoustic parameters including pressure, pulse length and PRE For the same acoustic energy delivered, longer pulses generated more bubbles. More IC could be induced if the derivative bubbles could survive through the 'off' period of the pulsed ultrasound waves, and served as nuclei for the subsequent IC. In therapeutic applications, evidences of IC activity were recorded during the hemolysis, thrombolysis, and the lesion-formation processes with UCA. Hemolysis and thrombolysis were highly correlated to the presence of ultrasound and UCA, and correlated well with the amount of the IC activity. Finally, the

  12. Nonlinear response of ultrasound contrast agent microbubbles: From fundamentals to applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teng, Xu-Dong; Guo, Xia-Sheng; Tu, Juan; Zhang, Dong

    2016-12-01

    Modelling and biomedical applications of ultrasound contrast agent (UCA) microbubbles have attracted a great deal of attention. In this review, we summarize a series of researches done in our group, including (i) the development of an all-in-one solution of characterizing coated bubble parameters based on the light scattering technique and flow cytometry; (ii) a novel bubble dynamic model that takes into consideration both nonlinear shell elasticity and viscosity to eliminate the dependences of bubble shell parameters on bubble size; (iii) the evaluation of UCA inertial cavitation threshold and its relationship with shell parameters; and (iv) the investigations of transfection efficiency and the reduction of cytotoxicity in gene delivery facilitated by UCAs excited by ultrasound exposures. Projects supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 81127901, 81227004, 11374155, 11274170, 11274176, 11474001, 11474161, 11474166, and 11674173), the National High-Technology Research and Development Program, China (Grant No. 2012AA022702), and Qing Lan Project of Jiangsu Province, China.

  13. Current consensus and guidelines of contrast enhanced ultrasound for the characterization of focal liver lesions

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Jae Young; Kim, Moon Young; Jeong, Soung Won; Kim, Tae Yeob; Kim, Seung Up; Lee, Sae Hwan; Suk, Ki Tae; Park, Soo Young; Woo, Hyun Young; Kim, Sang Gyune; Heo, Jeong; Baik, Soon Koo; Kim, Hong Soo

    2013-01-01

    The application of ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) is considered essential when evaluating focal liver lesions (FLLs) using ultrasonography (US). Microbubble UCAs are easy to use and robust; their use poses no risk of nephrotoxicity and requires no ionizing radiation. The unique features of contrast enhanced US (CEUS) are not only noninvasiveness but also real-time assessing of liver perfusion throughout the vascular phases. The later feature has led to dramatic improvement in the diagnostic accuracy of US for detection and characterization of FLLs as well as the guidance to therapeutic procedures and evaluation of response to treatment. This article describes the current consensus and guidelines for the use of UCAs for the FLLs that are commonly encountered in US. After a brief description of the bases of different CEUS techniques, contrast-enhancement patterns of different types of benign and malignant FLLs and other clinical applications are described and discussed on the basis of our experience and the literature data. PMID:23593604

  14. Mesoporous silica nanoparticles as a breast-cancer targeting ultrasound contrast agent

    PubMed Central

    Milgroom, Andrew; Intrator, Miranda; Madhavan, Krishna; Mazzaro, Luciano; Shandas, Robin; Liu, Bolin; Park, Daewon

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasound (US) is used widely in the context of breast cancer. While it is advantageous for a number of reasons, it has low specificity and requires the use of a contrast agent. Its use as a standalone diagnostic and real-time imaging modality could be achieved by development of a tumor-targeted ultrasound contrast agent (UCA); functionalizing the UCA with a tumor-targeting agent would also allow the targeted administration of anti-cancer drugs at the tumor site. In this article, clinical US techniques are used to show that mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs), functionalized with the monoclonal antibody Herceptin®, can be used as an effective UCA by increasing US image contrast. Furthermore, in vitro assays show the successful localization and binding of the MSN-Herceptin conjugate to HER2+ cancer cells, resulting in tumor-specific cytotoxicity. These results demonstrate the potential of MSNs as a stable, biocompatible, and effective therapeutic and diagnostic (“theranostic”) agent for US-based breast cancer imaging, diagnosis, and treatment. PMID:24269054

  15. The Natural Frequency of Nonlinear Oscillation of Ultrasound Contrast Agents in Microvessels

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Shengping; Ferrara, Katherine W.

    2009-01-01

    Ultrasound Contrast Agent (UCAs) are under intensive investigation for their applications in physiological and molecular imaging and drug delivery. Prediction of the natural frequency of the oscillation of UCAs in microvessels has drawn increasing attention. To our knowledge, the existing models to predict the natural frequency of oscillation of UCAs in microvessels all apply the linear approximation and treat the blood vessel wall as a rigid boundary. In the potential applications of ultrasound imaging drug and gene delivery, the compliance of small vessels may play an important role in the bubble’s oscillation. The goal of this work is to provide a lumped-parameter model to study the natural frequency of nonlinear oscillation of UCAs in microvessels. Three types of the blood vessel conditions have been considered. i.e. rigid vessels, normal compliable vessels and vessels with increasing stiffness that could correspond to tumor vasculature. The corresponding bubble oscillation frequencies in the vessels with radius less than 100 μm are examined in detail. When a bubble with a radius of 4 μm is confined in a compliable vessel (inner radius 5 μm and length 100μm), the natural frequency of bubble oscillation increases by a factor of 1.7 as compared with a bubble in an unbounded field. The natural frequency of oscillation of a bubble in a compliable vessel increases with decreasing vessel size while decreasing with increasing values of vessel rigidity. This model suggests that contrast agent size, blood vessel size distribution and the type of vasculature should be comprehensively considered for choosing the transmitted frequency in ultrasound contrast imaging and drug delivery. PMID:17478030

  16. RENAL RETENTION OF LIPID MICROBUBBLES: A POTENTIAL MECHANISM FOR FLANK DISCOMFORT DURING ULTRASOUND CONTRAST ADMINISTRATION

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ya Ni; Khangura, Jaspreet; Xie, Aris; Belcik, J. Todd; Qi, Yue; Davidson, Brian P.; Zhao, Yan; Kim, Sajeevani; Inaba, Yoichi; Lindner, Jonathan R.

    2013-01-01

    Background The etiology for flank pain sometimes experienced during administration of ultrasound contrast agents is unknown. We investigated whether microbubble ultrasound contrast agents are retained within the renal microcirculation which could lead to either flow disturbance or local release of vasoactive and pain mediators downstream from complement activation. Methods Retention of lipid-shelled microbubbles in the renal microcirculation of mice was assessed by confocal fluorescent microscopy and contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEU) imaging with dose-escalating intravenous injection. Studies were performed with size-segregated microbubbles to investigate physical entrapment, after glycocalyx degradation, and in wild-type and C3-deficient mice to investigate complement-mediated retention. Urinary bradykinin was measured before and after microbubbles. Renal CEU in human subjects (n=13) was performed 7–10 min after completion of lipid microbubble administration. Results In both mice and humans, microbubble retention was detected in the renal cortex by persistent CEU signal enhancement. Microbubble retention in mice was linearly related to dose and occurred almost exclusively in cortical glomerular microvessels. Microbubble retention did not affect microsphere-derived renal blood flow. Microbubble retention was not influenced by glycocalyx degradation nor by microbubble size, thereby excluding lodging, but was reduced by 90% (p<0.01) in C3-deficient mice. Urinary bradykinin increased by 65% five minutes after microbubble injection. Conclusion Lipid-shelled microbubbles are retained in the renal cortex due to complement-mediated interactions with glomerular microvascular endothelium. Microbubble retention does not adversely affect renal perfusion but does generate complement-related intermediates that are known to mediate nociception and could be responsible for flank pain. PMID:24035699

  17. Stimulus-Responsive Ultrasound Contrast Agents for Clinical Imaging: Motivations, Demonstrations, and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Goodwin, Andrew P.; Nakatsuka, Matthew A.; Mattrey, Robert F.

    2014-01-01

    Microbubble ultrasound contrast agents allow imaging of the vasculature with excellent resolution and signal-to-noise ratios. Contrast in microbubbles derives from their interaction with an ultrasound wave to generate signal at harmonic frequencies of the stimulating pulse; subtracting the elastic echo caused by the surrounding tissue can enhance the specificity of these harmonic signals significantly. The nonlinear acoustic emission is caused by pressure-driven microbubble size fluctuations, which in both theoretical descriptions and empirical measurements was found to depend on the mechanical properties of the shell that encapsulates the microbubble as well as stabilizes it against the surrounding aqueous environment. Thus biochemically-induced switching between a rigid “off” state and a flexible “on” state provides a mechanism for sensing chemical markers for disease. In our research, we coupled DNA oligonucleotides to a stabilizing lipid monolayer to modulate stiffness of the shell and thereby induce stimulus-responsive behavior. In initial proof-of-principle studies, it was found that signal modulation came primarily from DNA crosslinks preventing the microbubble size oscillations rather than merely damping the signal. Next, these microbubbles were redesigned to include an aptamer sequence in the crosslinking strand, which not only allowed the sensing of the clotting enzyme thrombin but also provided a general strategy for sensing other soluble biomarkers in the bloodstream. Finally, the thrombin-sensitive microbubbles were validated in a rabbit model, presenting the first example of an ultrasound contrast agent that could differentiate between active and inactive clots for the diagnosis of Deep Venous Thrombosis. PMID:25195785

  18. RGD-Targeted Ultrasound Contrast Agent for Longitudinal Assessment of Hep-2 Tumor Angiogenesis In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Qiao; Wang, Xiao-Yan; Kang, Li-Ke; Wei, Hai-Ming; Xu, Chun-Mei; Wang, Tao; Wen, Zong-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Objective To prepare arginine-glycine-aspartate (RGD)-targeted ultrasound contrast microbubbles (MBs) and explore the feasibility of their use in assessing dynamic changes in αvβ3 integrin expression in a murine model of tumor angiogenesis. Methods RGD peptides were conjugated to the surfaces of microbubbles via biotin-avidin linkage. Microbubbles bearing RADfK peptides were prepared as controls. The RGD-MBs were characterized using an Accusizer 780 and optical microscopy. The binding specificity of the RGD-MBs for ανβ3-expressing endothelial cells (bEnd.3) was demonstrated in vitro by a competitive inhibition experiment. In an in vivo study, mice bearing tumors of three different stages were intravenously injected with RGD-MBs and subjected to targeted, contrast-enhanced, high-frequency ultrasound. Subsequently, tumors were harvested and sectioned for immunofluorescence analysis of ανβ3 expression. Results The mean size of the RGD-MBs was 2.36 ± 1.7 μm. The RGD-MBs showed significantly higher adhesion levels to bEnd.3 cells compared to control MBs (P < 0.01). There was rarely binding of RGD-MBs to αvβ3-negative MCF-7 cells. Adhesion of the RGD-MBs to the bEnd.3 cells was significantly inhibited following treatment with anti-alpha(v) antibodies. The quantitative acoustic video intensity for high-frequency, contrast-enhanced ultrasound imaging of subcutaneous human laryngeal carcinoma (Hep-2) tumor xenografts was significantly higher in small tumors (19.89 ± 2.49) than in medium tumors (11.25 ± 2.23) and large tumors (3.38 ± 0.67) (P < 0.01). Conclusions RGD-MBs enable noninvasive in vivo visualization of changes in tumor angiogenesis during tumor growth in subcutaneous cancer xenografts. PMID:26862757

  19. Acoustic angiography: a new high frequency contrast ultrasound technique for biomedical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelton, Sarah E.; Lindsey, Brooks D.; Gessner, Ryan; Lee, Yueh; Aylward, Stephen; Lee, Hyunggyun; Cherin, Emmanuel; Foster, F. Stuart; Dayton, Paul A.

    2016-05-01

    Acoustic Angiography is a new approach to high-resolution contrast enhanced ultrasound imaging enabled by ultra-broadband transducer designs. The high frequency imaging technique provides signal separation from tissue which does not produce significant harmonics in the same frequency range, as well as high resolution. This approach enables imaging of microvasculature in-vivo with high resolution and signal to noise, producing images that resemble x-ray angiography. Data shows that acoustic angiography can provide important information about the presence of disease based on vascular patterns, and may enable a new paradigm in medical imaging.

  20. Sonographic imaging of extra-testicular focal lesions: comparison of grey-scale, colour Doppler and contrast-enhanced ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Rafailidis, Vasileios; Robbie, Hasti; Konstantatou, Eleni; Huang, Dean Y; Deganello, Annamaria; Sellars, Maria E; Cantisani, Vito; Isidori, Andrea M

    2016-01-01

    Extra-testicular lesions are usually benign but present with nonspecific grey-scale sonography findings. This study assesses conventional sonographic characteristics in the differentiation of extra-testicular tumoural from inflammatory lesions and whether contrast-enhanced ultrasound has a role. A retrospective database analysis was performed. All patients were examined by experienced sonographers employing standard techniques combining grey-scale, colour Doppler sonography and contrast-enhanced ultrasound. Features recorded were: clinical symptoms, size, location, echogenicity, colour Doppler sonography and contrast-enhanced ultrasound enhancement. Vascularity on colour Doppler sonography and contrast-enhanced ultrasound was graded and compared. The lesions were classified as tumoural or inflammatory. The Chi-square test was used to analyse the sonographic patterns and kappa coefficient to measure the agreement between colour Doppler sonography and contrast-enhanced ultrasound. A total of 30 lesions were reviewed (median diameter 12 mm, range 5–80 mm, median age 52 years, range 18–86 years), including 13/30 tumoural and 17/30 inflammatory lesions. Lesions were hypoechoic (n = 12), isoechoic (n = 6), hyperechoic (n = 2) or mixed (n = 10). Grey-scale characteristics of tumoural vs. inflammatory lesions differed significantly (P = 0.026). On colour Doppler sonography, lesions had no vessels (n = 16), 2–3 vessels (n = 10) and ≥4 vessels (n = 4). On contrast-enhanced ultrasound, lesions showed no vascularity (n = 17), perfusion similar to testis (n = 7) and higher (n = 6). All abscesses identified (n = 9) showed no vascularity on both colour Doppler sonography and contrast-enhanced ultrasound. There was good agreement between these techniques in evaluating vascularity (κ = 0.719) and no significant difference between colour Doppler sonography and contrast-enhanced ultrasound of tumoural vs. inflammatory

  1. The nonlinear dynamics of microbubble contrast agents used in medical ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, Anil J.

    Microbubbles are used as contrast agents in diagnostic ultrasound, and as transport agents or to engender physical effects in therapeutic ultrasound. The distinguishing characteristic of bubbles is their small size, on the order of microns, which allows them to traverse the smallest capillaries in the human body. Furthermore, when subject to acoustic forcing (ultrasound), the oscillations of bubbles become highly nonlinear, leading to a unique echo characteristic. Bubble echo improves the clinician's ability to distinguish between blood carrying contrast agent from the surrounding tissue. Present ultrasound techniques, however, do not take full advantage of the nonlinear properties of oscillating microbubbles. In this work, a novel method to maximize the bubble echo, thereby improving image quality, is suggested. Pulse-inversion imaging is utilized as a means of filtering out the linear echo of surrounding tissue. A norm is defined for the nonlinear bubble echo and it is shown how the norm may be maximized, given a limit on ultrasound intensity, by optimizing the acoustic pulse shape using optimal control theory. The optimization is performed for a single bubble of a particular size. The optimal pulse yields a several-fold increase in the echo norm over conventional pulse driving. It is also shown that the optimal pulse effectively maximizes the echo of a bubble cloud with mean size equal to that of the single bubble. Increased bubble response comes as a result of severe radial collapse, which in turn drives the translation dynamics of the bubble. These motions have been observed by others in experiment, but have, up this point, been inadequately explained. The erratic translation of a bubble is found to be intimately coupled to the radial dynamics, especially in the case of violent oscillations. The assumption of spherical symmetry is relaxed and it is considered how bubble translation can be a mechanism for shape instability, thereby leading to bubble destruction

  2. Enhanced Thermal Ablation by Combining Ultrasound Contrast Agents with a Miniature Flat Transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murillo, A.; Goldendstedt, C.; Lafon, C.; Cathignol, D.; Chapelon, J.-Y.

    2007-05-01

    Miniature transducers can be used for performing interstitial thermal ablation. Increasing the frequency of non-focused transducers enhances energy deposition but limits the therapeutic range. In order to treat extended tumors, new therapeutic strategies must be explored. This work aimed to combine ultrasound contrast agents (UCA) with flat transducers for increasing the treatment depth. The idea consists in increasing attenuation away from the transducer to favor remote heat deposition. Thermal ablation is induced in three steps. 1- Attenuation raises by injecting UCA; 2- Destruction of bubbles next to the transducer by pulsed high intensity bursts, results in a gradient of attenuation; 3- Continuous ultrasound are applied for generating a localized thermal lesion. In vitro tests were performed on temperature-sensitive tissue phantoms in which the UCA BR14 (Bracco) was injected during the liquid phase. The feasibility of the idea was demonstrated in three stages. 1- The coefficient of attenuation was measured with the force balance as a function of the concentration of BR14. For 0.8 and 4.8% attenuation at 10MHz was found to be 0.35 and 1.33 Np/cm respectively. 2- Pulsed ultrasound was applied on phantoms to destroy UCA. Based on the echogenicity decay evidenced on ultrasound images, a 1MPa-pressure was required at 10MHz. 3- Heating beams were applied on phantoms presenting a gradient in attenuation. Lesions were 1.5 times larger than in phantoms with constant attenuation. This study demonstrates that UCA can be selectively destroyed in order to generate a gradient of attenuation and extended thermal lesions.

  3. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound in differentiating malignant from benign portal vein thrombosis in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Tarantino, Luciano; Ambrosino, Pasquale; Di Minno, Matteo Nicola Dario

    2015-01-01

    Portal vein thrombosis (PVT) may occur in liver cirrhosis patients. Malignant PVT is a common complication in cirrhotic patients with concomitant hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and, in some cases, it may be even the initial sign of an undetected HCC. Detection of malignant PVT in a patient with liver cirrhosis heavily affects the therapeutic strategy. Gray-scale ultrasound (US) is widely unreliable for differentiating benign and malignant thrombi. Although effective for this differential diagnosis, fine-needle biopsy remains an invasive technique. Sensitivity of color-doppler US in detection of malignant thrombi is highly dependent on the size of the thrombus. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) and contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance (MRI) can be useful to assess the nature of portal thrombus, while limited data are currently available about the role of positron emission tomography (PET) and PET-CT. In contrast with CT, MRI, PET, and PET-CT, contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) is a fast, effective, well tolerated and cheap technique, that can be performed even in the same session in which the thrombus has been detected. CEUS can be performed bedside and can be available also in transplanted patients. Moreover, CT and MRI only yield a snapshot analysis during contrast diffusion, while CEUS allows for a continuous real-time imaging of the microcirculation that lasts several minutes, so that the whole arterial phase and the late parenchymal phase of the contrast diffusion can be analyzed continuously by real-time US scanning. Continuous real-time monitoring of contrast diffusion entails an easy detection of thrombus maximum enhancement. Moreover, continuous quantitative analyses of enhancement (wash in - wash out studies) by CEUS during contrast diffusion is nowadays available in most CEUS machines, thus giving a more sophisticated and accurate evaluation of the contrast distribution and an increased confidence in diagnosis in difficult cases. In conclusion

  4. Vascular imaging with ultrasound contrast agents: Characterization of pharmaceutical, physiological, and instrumentation parameters that influence clinical efficacy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinbach, Gregory Curtis

    Over the last decade, ultrasound contrast media have become important diagnostic tools. Their development lagged behind that of some of the other imaging modalities, even though ultrasound is used worldwide and is a technology that would benefit from an increased signal-to-noise ratio. Ultrasound contrast agents, used as a tool to improve signal, could have global diagnostic applications as well as the possibility of extending the diagnostic capabilities of outdated or inexpensive instruments, which often have poor sensitivity. Part of the lag in contrast agent development was due to the pharmaceutical challenge of creating a safe material that effectively scattered ultrasound. The challenge was further increased by the difficulty of reproducibly predicting and characterizing the properties of these materials in-vitro with results that correlated with clinical data. Additional significant problems included demonstrating the benefits of contrast agents and teaching the clinicians about the interactions between instrumentation and contrast materials so that they could use both tools synergistically to derive maximum diagnostic benefit. The purpose of this work is to reduce these challenges by characterizing the clinically relevant enhancement properties of two different classes of ultrasound contrast materials. The enhancement mechanisms of these agents differ considerably and will be discussed in detail. These differences provide a unique view of the variety of physical characteristics that can be utilized to design ultrasound contrast agents for a range of applications. The in-vitro characterization requirements of the agents differ, and the experimental model characteristics for each are described and demonstrated. The clinical enhancement characteristics are also described, as well as the differing impact of contrast- instrumentation interactions on the efficacy of the agents. Understanding these principles is important because ultrasound contrast agents are

  5. Quantitative assessment of tumor angiogenesis using real-time motion-compensated contrast-enhanced ultrasound imaging

    PubMed Central

    Pysz, Marybeth A.; Guracar, Ismayil; Foygel, Kira; Tian, Lu; Willmann, Jürgen K.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To develop and test a real-time motion compensation algorithm for contrast-enhanced ultrasound imaging of tumor angiogenesis on a clinical ultrasound system. Materials and methods The Administrative Institutional Panel on Laboratory Animal Care approved all experiments. A new motion correction algorithm measuring the sum of absolute differences in pixel displacements within a designated tracking box was implemented in a clinical ultrasound machine. In vivo angiogenesis measurements (expressed as percent contrast area) with and without motion compensated maximum intensity persistence (MIP) ultrasound imaging were analyzed in human colon cancer xenografts (n = 64) in mice. Differences in MIP ultrasound imaging signal with and without motion compensation were compared and correlated with displacements in x- and y-directions. The algorithm was tested in an additional twelve colon cancer xenograft-bearing mice with (n = 6) and without (n = 6) anti-vascular therapy (ASA-404). In vivo MIP percent contrast area measurements were quantitatively correlated with ex vivo microvessel density (MVD) analysis. Results MIP percent contrast area was significantly different (P < 0.001) with and without motion compensation. Differences in percent contrast area correlated significantly (P < 0.001) with x- and y-displacements. MIP percent contrast area measurements were more reproducible with motion compensation (ICC = 0.69) than without (ICC = 0.51) on two consecutive ultrasound scans. Following anti-vascular therapy, motion-compensated MIP percent contrast area significantly (P = 0.03) decreased by 39.4 ± 14.6 % compared to non-treated mice and correlated well with ex vivo MVD analysis (Rho = 0.70; P = 0.05). Conclusion Real-time motion-compensated MIP ultrasound imaging allows reliable and accurate quantification and monitoring of angiogenesis in tumors exposed to breathing-induced motion artifacts. PMID:22535383

  6. Update on the safety and efficacy of commercial ultrasound contrast agents in cardiac applications.

    PubMed

    Appis, Andrew W; Tracy, Melissa J; Feinstein, Steven B

    2015-06-01

    Ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) are currently used throughout the world in both clinical and research settings. The concept of contrast-enhanced ultrasound imaging originated in the late 1960s, and the first commercially available agents were initially developed in the 1980s. Today's microbubbles are designed for greater utility and are used for both approved and off-label indications. In October 2007, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) imposed additional product label warnings that included serious cardiopulmonary reactions, several new disease-state contraindications, and a mandated 30 min post-procedure monitoring period for the agents Optison and Definity. These additional warnings were prompted by reports of cardiopulmonary reactions that were temporally related but were not clearly attributable to these UCAs. Subsequent published reports over the following months established not only the safety but also the improved efficacy of clinical ultrasound applications with UCAs. The FDA consequently updated the product labeling in June 2008 and reduced contraindications, although it continued to monitor select patients. In addition, a post-marketing program was proposed to the sponsors for a series of safety studies to further assess the risk of UCAs. Then in October 2011, the FDA leadership further downgraded the warnings after hearing the results of the post-marketing data, which revealed continued safety and improved efficacy. The present review focuses on the use of UCAs in today's clinical practice, including the approved indications, a variety of off-label uses, and the most recent data, which affirms the safety and efficacy of UCAs.

  7. Update on the safety and efficacy of commercial ultrasound contrast agents in cardiac applications

    PubMed Central

    Tracy, Melissa J; Feinstein, Steven B

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) are currently used throughout the world in both clinical and research settings. The concept of contrast-enhanced ultrasound imaging originated in the late 1960s, and the first commercially available agents were initially developed in the 1980s. Today's microbubbles are designed for greater utility and are used for both approved and off-label indications. In October 2007, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) imposed additional product label warnings that included serious cardiopulmonary reactions, several new disease-state contraindications, and a mandated 30 min post-procedure monitoring period for the agents Optison and Definity. These additional warnings were prompted by reports of cardiopulmonary reactions that were temporally related but were not clearly attributable to these UCAs. Subsequent published reports over the following months established not only the safety but also the improved efficacy of clinical ultrasound applications with UCAs. The FDA consequently updated the product labeling in June 2008 and reduced contraindications, although it continued to monitor select patients. In addition, a post-marketing program was proposed to the sponsors for a series of safety studies to further assess the risk of UCAs. Then in October 2011, the FDA leadership further downgraded the warnings after hearing the results of the post-marketing data, which revealed continued safety and improved efficacy. The present review focuses on the use of UCAs in today's clinical practice, including the approved indications, a variety of off-label uses, and the most recent data, which affirms the safety and efficacy of UCAs. PMID:26693339

  8. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound after endovascular aortic repair—current status and future perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Partovi, Sasan; Kaspar, Mathias; Aschwanden, Markus; Lopresti, Charles; Madan, Shivanshu; Uthoff, Heiko; Imfeld, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    An increasing number of patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) are undergoing endovascular aortic repair (EVAR) instead of open surgery. These patients require lifelong surveillance, and the follow-up imaging modality of choice has been traditionally computed tomography angiography (CTA). Repetitive CTA imaging is associated with cumulative radiation exposure and requires the administration of multiple doses of nephrotoxic contrast agents. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) has emerged as an alternative strategy in the follow-up of patients with EVAR and demonstrates high sensitivity and specificity for detection of endoleaks. In fact, a series of studies have shown that CEUS is at least performing equal to computed tomography for the detection and classification of endoleaks. This article summarizes current evidence of CEUS after EVAR and demonstrates its usefulness via various patient cases. PMID:26673398

  9. Role of contrast harmonic-endoscopic ultrasound in pancreatic cystic lesions

    PubMed Central

    Serrani, Marta; Lisotti, Andrea; Caletti, Giancarlo; Fusaroli, Pietro

    2017-01-01

    Incidental pancreatic cysts (PCs) are frequently encountered in the general population often in asymptomatic patients who undergo imaging tests to investigate unrelated conditions. The detection of a PC poses a significant clinical dilemma, as the differential diagnosis is quite broad ranging from benign to malignant conditions. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) with fine-needle aspiration (FNA) has been reported to be an accurate tool in the differential diagnosis; however, its sensitivity is suboptimal and false negative results do occur. Contrast harmonic EUS (CH-EUS) was demonstrated to be a useful tool to investigate pancreatic solid lesions to differentiate between benign and malignant ones. In the setting of PCs, CH-EUS could help identify areas of malignant growth inside the cystic cavities. Several studies have reported promising results showing malignant areas in PCs as hyperenhanced lesions. Confirmation of malignancy can then be obtained by FNA, which should be precisely targeted according to the findings of the contrast harmonic study. PMID:28218197

  10. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound: A promising method for renal microvascular perfusion evaluation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ling; Mohan, Chandra

    2016-09-01

    This article reviews the application of contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) in gauging renal microvascular perfusion in diverse renal diseases. The unique nature of the contrast agents used in CEUS provides real-time and quantitative imaging of the vasculature. In addition to the traditional use of CEUS for evaluation of kidney masses, it also emerges as a safe and effective imaging approach to assess microvascular perfusion in diffuse renal lesions, non-invasively. Although the precise CEUS parameters that may best predict disease still warrant systematic evaluation, animal models and limited clinical trials in humans raise hopes that CEUS could outcompete competing modalities as a first-line tool for assessing renal perfusion non-invasively, even in ailments such as acute kidney injury and chronic kidney disease.

  11. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound: A promising method for renal microvascular perfusion evaluation

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This article reviews the application of contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) in gauging renal microvascular perfusion in diverse renal diseases. The unique nature of the contrast agents used in CEUS provides real-time and quantitative imaging of the vasculature. In addition to the traditional use of CEUS for evaluation of kidney masses, it also emerges as a safe and effective imaging approach to assess microvascular perfusion in diffuse renal lesions, non-invasively. Although the precise CEUS parameters that may best predict disease still warrant systematic evaluation, animal models and limited clinical trials in humans raise hopes that CEUS could outcompete competing modalities as a first-line tool for assessing renal perfusion non-invasively, even in ailments such as acute kidney injury and chronic kidney disease. PMID:28191530

  12. Ultrasound contrast microbubbles in imaging and therapy: physical principles and engineering

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Shengping; Caskey, Charles F; Ferrara, Katherine W

    2010-01-01

    Microbubble contrast agents and the associated imaging systems have developed over the past twenty-five years, originating with manually-agitated fluids introduced for intra-coronary injection. Over this period, stabilizing shells and low diffusivity gas materials have been incorporated in microbubbles, extending stability in vitro and in vivo. Simultaneously, the interaction of these small gas bubbles with ultrasonic waves has been extensively studied, resulting in models for oscillation and increasingly sophisticated imaging strategies. Early studies recognized that echoes from microbubbles contained frequencies that are multiples of the microbubble resonance frequency. Although individual microbubble contrast agents cannot be resolved—given that their diameter is on the order of microns—nonlinear echoes from these agents are used to map regions of perfused tissue and to estimate the local microvascular flow rate. Such strategies overcome a fundamental limitation of previous ultrasound blood flow strategies; the previous Doppler-based strategies are insensitive to capillary flow. Further, the insonation of resonant bubbles results in interesting physical phenomena that have been widely studied for use in drug and gene delivery. Ultrasound pressure can enhance gas diffusion, rapidly fragment the agent into a set of smaller bubbles or displace the microbubble to a blood vessel wall. Insonation of a microbubble can also produce liquid jets and local shear stress that alter biological membranes and facilitate transport. In this review, we focus on the physical aspects of these agents, exploring microbubble imaging modes, models for microbubble oscillation and the interaction of the microbubble with the endothelium. PMID:19229096

  13. Material characterization of poly-lactic acid shelled ultrasound contrast agent and their dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Shirshendu; Russakow, Daniel; Rodgers, Tyler; Sarkar, Kausik; Cochran, Michael; Wheatley, Margaret

    2011-11-01

    Micron-size gas bubbles encapsulated with lipids and proteins are used as contrast enhancing agents for ultrasound imaging. Biodegradable polymer poly-lactic acid (PLA) has recently been suggested as a possible means of encapsulation. Here, we report in vitro measurement of attenuation and scattering of ultrasound through an emulsion of PLA agent as well as theoretical modeling of the encapsulated bubble dynamics. The attenuation measured with three different transducers of central frequencies 2.25, 3.5 and 5 MHz, shows a peak around 2-3 MHz. These bubbles also show themselves to possess excellent scattering characteristics including strong non-linear response that can be used for harmonic and sub-harmonic contrast imaging. Our recently developed interfacial rheological models are applied to describe the dynamics of these bubbles; rheological model properties are estimated using measured attenuation data. The model is then applied to predict nonlinear scattered response, and the prediction is compared against experimental observation. Partially supported by NSF and NIH.

  14. Quantitative contrast-enhanced ultrasound imaging: a review of sources of variability

    PubMed Central

    Tang, M.-X.; Mulvana, H.; Gauthier, T.; Lim, A. K. P.; Cosgrove, D. O.; Eckersley, R. J.; Stride, E.

    2011-01-01

    Ultrasound provides a valuable tool for medical diagnosis offering real-time imaging with excellent spatial resolution and low cost. The advent of microbubble contrast agents has provided the additional ability to obtain essential quantitative information relating to tissue vascularity, tissue perfusion and even endothelial wall function. This technique has shown great promise for diagnosis and monitoring in a wide range of clinical conditions such as cardiovascular diseases and cancer, with considerable potential benefits in terms of patient care. A key challenge of this technique, however, is the existence of significant variations in the imaging results, and the lack of understanding regarding their origin. The aim of this paper is to review the potential sources of variability in the quantification of tissue perfusion based on microbubble contrast-enhanced ultrasound images. These are divided into the following three categories: (i) factors relating to the scanner setting, which include transmission power, transmission focal depth, dynamic range, signal gain and transmission frequency, (ii) factors relating to the patient, which include body physical differences, physiological interaction of body with bubbles, propagation and attenuation through tissue, and tissue motion, and (iii) factors relating to the microbubbles, which include the type of bubbles and their stability, preparation and injection and dosage. It has been shown that the factors in all the three categories can significantly affect the imaging results and contribute to the variations observed. How these factors influence quantitative imaging is explained and possible methods for reducing such variations are discussed. PMID:22866229

  15. TOPICAL REVIEW: Ultrasound contrast microbubbles in imaging and therapy: physical principles and engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Shengping; Caskey, Charles F.; Ferrara, Katherine W.

    2009-03-01

    Microbubble contrast agents and the associated imaging systems have developed over the past 25 years, originating with manually-agitated fluids introduced for intra-coronary injection. Over this period, stabilizing shells and low diffusivity gas materials have been incorporated in microbubbles, extending stability in vitro and in vivo. Simultaneously, the interaction of these small gas bubbles with ultrasonic waves has been extensively studied, resulting in models for oscillation and increasingly sophisticated imaging strategies. Early studies recognized that echoes from microbubbles contained frequencies that are multiples of the microbubble resonance frequency. Although individual microbubble contrast agents cannot be resolved—given that their diameter is on the order of microns—nonlinear echoes from these agents are used to map regions of perfused tissue and to estimate the local microvascular flow rate. Such strategies overcome a fundamental limitation of previous ultrasound blood flow strategies; the previous Doppler-based strategies are insensitive to capillary flow. Further, the insonation of resonant bubbles results in interesting physical phenomena that have been widely studied for use in drug and gene delivery. Ultrasound pressure can enhance gas diffusion, rapidly fragment the agent into a set of smaller bubbles or displace the microbubble to a blood vessel wall. Insonation of a microbubble can also produce liquid jets and local shear stress that alter biological membranes and facilitate transport. In this review, we focus on the physical aspects of these agents, exploring microbubble imaging modes, models for microbubble oscillation and the interaction of the microbubble with the endothelium.

  16. Destruction of contrast microbubbles used for ultrasound imaging and drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Pankaj; Sarkar, Kausik; Chatterjee, Dhiman

    2005-09-01

    Microbubble contrast agent destruction by ultrasound pulse is useful in real-time blood-flow velocity measurement, stimulating arteriogenesis, or targeted drug delivery. We investigated in vitro destruction of contrast agent Definity (Bristol Meyer-Squibb Imaging, North Billerica, MA) by measuring attenuation of ultrasound through it. The measurement is performed with single-cycle bursts for varying pressure amplitudes at 50-, 100-, and 200-Hz pulse repetition frequencies (PRF). At low excitation levels, the attenuation increases with time, indicating an increase in bubble size due to ingress of dissolved air from the surrounding liquid. With increased excitation levels, the attenuation level decreases with time, indicating destruction of microbubbles. A critical pressure amplitude (1.2 MPa) was found for all three PRFs, below which there is no significant bubble destruction. Above the critical excitation level, the rate of destruction depends on excitation levels. But, at high pressure amplitudes destruction becomes independent of excitation pressure amplitude. The results are interpreted to identify two different mechanisms of bubble destruction by its signature in attenuation, namely, slow dissolution by diffusion at intermediate pressure amplitudes and catastrophic shell rupture at high amplitudes.

  17. Ultrasound contrast microbubbles in imaging and therapy: physical principles and engineering.

    PubMed

    Qin, Shengping; Caskey, Charles F; Ferrara, Katherine W

    2009-03-21

    Microbubble contrast agents and the associated imaging systems have developed over the past 25 years, originating with manually-agitated fluids introduced for intra-coronary injection. Over this period, stabilizing shells and low diffusivity gas materials have been incorporated in microbubbles, extending stability in vitro and in vivo. Simultaneously, the interaction of these small gas bubbles with ultrasonic waves has been extensively studied, resulting in models for oscillation and increasingly sophisticated imaging strategies. Early studies recognized that echoes from microbubbles contained frequencies that are multiples of the microbubble resonance frequency. Although individual microbubble contrast agents cannot be resolved-given that their diameter is on the order of microns-nonlinear echoes from these agents are used to map regions of perfused tissue and to estimate the local microvascular flow rate. Such strategies overcome a fundamental limitation of previous ultrasound blood flow strategies; the previous Doppler-based strategies are insensitive to capillary flow. Further, the insonation of resonant bubbles results in interesting physical phenomena that have been widely studied for use in drug and gene delivery. Ultrasound pressure can enhance gas diffusion, rapidly fragment the agent into a set of smaller bubbles or displace the microbubble to a blood vessel wall. Insonation of a microbubble can also produce liquid jets and local shear stress that alter biological membranes and facilitate transport. In this review, we focus on the physical aspects of these agents, exploring microbubble imaging modes, models for microbubble oscillation and the interaction of the microbubble with the endothelium.

  18. The ultrasound contrast imaging properties of lipid microbubbles loaded with urokinase in dog livers and their thrombolytic effects when combined with low-frequency ultrasound in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ren, Shu-Ting; Kang, Xiao-Ning; Liao, Yi-Ran; Wang, Wei; Ai, Hong; Chen, Li-Na; Luo, Hui-Ting; Fu, Rong-Guo; Tan, Li-Fang; Shen, Xin-Liang; Wang, Bing

    2014-04-01

    A new microbubble loaded with urokinase (uPA-MB) was explored in a previous study. However, its zeta potential and ultrasound contrast imaging properties and its thrombolytic effects when combined with low-frequency ultrasound (LFUS) were unclear. The zeta potential and ultrasound contrast imaging property of 5 uPA-MBs loading with 50,000 IU uPA was respectively detected using a Malvern laser particle analyzer and a Logiq 9 digital premium ultrasound system. Its ultrasound contrast imaging property was performed on the livers of two healthy dogs to compare with SonoVue. And the clot mass loss rate, D-dimer concentration and surface morphology of the clot residues were measured to evaluate the thrombolytic effect after treatment with three doses of 5 uPA-MBs combined with LFUS in vitro. The zeta potential of 5 uPA-MBs (-27.0 ± 2.40 mV) was higher than that of normal microbubbles (-36.95 ± 1.77 mV). Contrast-enhanced imaging of the hepatic vessels using 5 uPA-MBs was similar to SonoVue, while the imaging duration of 5 uPA-MBs (10 min) was longer than SonoVue (6 min). The thrombolytic effect of three doses of uPA-MBs combined with LFUS was significantly better than that of the control group and showed dose dependence. The 5 uPA-MBs have a negative charge on their surface and good echogenicity as ultrasound contrast agents. The 5 uPA-MBs combined with LFUS can promote thrombolysis in a dose-dependent manner.

  19. Computation of nonlinear ultrasound fields using a linearized contrast source method.

    PubMed

    Verweij, Martin D; Demi, Libertario; van Dongen, Koen W A

    2013-08-01

    Nonlinear ultrasound is important in medical diagnostics because imaging of the higher harmonics improves resolution and reduces scattering artifacts. Second harmonic imaging is currently standard, and higher harmonic imaging is under investigation. The efficient development of novel imaging modalities and equipment requires accurate simulations of nonlinear wave fields in large volumes of realistic (lossy, inhomogeneous) media. The Iterative Nonlinear Contrast Source (INCS) method has been developed to deal with spatiotemporal domains measuring hundreds of wavelengths and periods. This full wave method considers the nonlinear term of the Westervelt equation as a nonlinear contrast source, and solves the equivalent integral equation via the Neumann iterative solution. Recently, the method has been extended with a contrast source that accounts for spatially varying attenuation. The current paper addresses the problem that the Neumann iterative solution converges badly for strong contrast sources. The remedy is linearization of the nonlinear contrast source, combined with application of more advanced methods for solving the resulting integral equation. Numerical results show that linearization in combination with a Bi-Conjugate Gradient Stabilized method allows the INCS method to deal with fairly strong, inhomogeneous attenuation, while the error due to the linearization can be eliminated by restarting the iterative scheme.

  20. Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... your test will be done. Alternative Names Sonogram Images Abdominal ultrasound Ultrasound in pregnancy 17 week ultrasound ... urac.org). URAC's accreditation program is an independent audit to verify that A.D.A.M. follows ...

  1. Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    Ultrasound is a type of imaging. It uses high-frequency sound waves to look at organs and ... liver, and other organs. During pregnancy, doctors use ultrasound to view the fetus. Unlike x-rays, ultrasound ...

  2. Correlation of Rupture Dynamics to the Nonlinear Backscatter Response From Polymer-Shelled Ultrasound Contrast Agents

    PubMed Central

    Koppolu, Sujeethraj; Chitnis, Parag V.; Mamou, Jonathan; Allen, John S.; Ketterling, Jeffrey A.

    2016-01-01

    Polymer-shelled ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) may expel their encapsulated gas subject to ultrasound-induced shell buckling or rupture. Nonlinear oscillations of this gas bubble can produce a subharmonic component in the ultrasound backscatter. This study investigated the relationship between this gas-release mechanism and shell-thickness–to–radius ratios (STRRs) of polymer-shelled UCAs. Three types of polylactide-shelled UCAs with STRRs of 7.5, 40, and 100 nm/µm were studied. Each UCA population had a nominal mean diameter of 2 µm. UCAs were subjected to increasing static overpressure ranging from 2 to 330 kPa over a duration of 2 h in a custom-designed test chamber while being imaged using a 200× magnification video microscope at a frame rate of 5 frames/s. Digitized video images were binarized and processed to obtain the cross-sectional area of individual UCAs. Integration of the normalized cross-sectional area over normalized time, defined as buckling factor (Bf), provided a dimensionless parameter for quantifying and comparing the degree of pre-rupture buckling exhibited by the UCAs of different STRRs in response to overpressure. The UCAs with an STRR of 7.5 nm/µm exhibited a distinct shell-buckling phase before shell rupture (Bf < 1), whereas the UCAs with higher STRRs (40 and 100 nm/µm) did not undergo significant pre-rupture buckling (Bf ≈ 1). The difference in the overpressure response was correlated with the subharmonic response produced by these UCAs. When excited using 20-MHz ultrasound, individual UCAs (N = 3000) in populations that did not exhibit a buckling phase produced a subharmonic response that was an order of magnitude greater than the UCA population with a prominent pre-rupture buckling phase. These results indicate the mechanism of gas expulsion from these UCAs might be a relevant factor in determining the level of subharmonic response in response to high-frequency ultrasound. PMID:25935932

  3. Feasibility of Dual Optics/Ultrasound Imaging and Contrast Media for the Detection and Characterization of Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-01

    acousto - optic effect will be used to only modulate light (at the ultrasound frequency) which propagates through a small ultrasound focal zone. This...DOD Idea Development Award is concerned with the development of a novel acousto - optic detection idea based on quadrature measurements with a gain...perform acousto - optic molecular imaging of prostate cancer with incoherent photons using endogenous contrast, e.g. hypoxia, and with fluorescent probes and microbubbles for increased specificity and signal enhancement.

  4. Perfusion estimation using contrast enhanced three-dimensional subharmonic ultrasound imaging: an in vivo study

    PubMed Central

    Sridharan, Anush; Eisenbrey, John R.; Liu, Ji-Bin; Machado, Priscilla; Halldorsdottir, Valgerdur G.; Dave, Jaydev K.; Zhao, Hongjia; He, Yu; Park, Suhyun; Dianis, Scott; Wallace, Kirk; Thomenius, Kai E.; Forsberg, Flemming

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The ability to estimate tissue perfusion (in mL/min/g) in vivo using contrast-enhanced three-dimensional (3D) harmonic and subharmonic ultrasound imaging was investigated. Materials and Methods A Logiq 9 scanner (GE Healthcare, Milwaukee, WI) equipped with a 4D10L probe was modified to perform 3D harmonic imaging (HI; ftransmit = 5 MHz and freceive = 10 MHz) and subharmonic imaging (SHI; ftransmit= 5.8 MHz and freceive= 2.9 MHz). In vivo imaging was performed in the lower pole of both kidneys in five open-abdomen canines after injection of the ultrasound contrast agent (UCA) Definity (Lantheus Medical Imaging, N Billerica, MA). The canines received a 5 μL/kg bolus injection of Definity for HI and a 20 μL/kg bolus for SHI in triplicate for each kidney. Ultrasound data acquisition was started just prior to injection of UCA (in order to capture the wash-in) and continued until washout. A microvascular staining technique based on stable (non-radioactive) isotope-labeled microspheres (Biophysics Assay Laboratory Inc, Worcester, MA) was used to quantify the degree of perfusion in each kidney (the reference standard). Ligating a surgically exposed branch of the renal arteries induced lower perfusion rates. This was followed by additional contrast-enhanced imaging and microsphere injections to measure post-ligation perfusion. Slice data were extracted from the 3D ultrasound volumes and used to generate time-intensity curves off-line in the regions corresponding to the tissue samples used for microvascular staining. The mid-line plane was also selected from the 3D volume (as a quasi-2D image) and compared to the 3D imaging modes. Perfusion was estimated from the initial slope of the fractional blood volume uptake (for both HI and SHI) and compared to the reference standard using linear regression analysis. Results Both 3D HI and SHI were able to provide visualization of flow and, thus, perfusion in the kidneys. However, SHI provided near complete tissue

  5. Ultrasound Molecular Imaging of Tumor Angiogenesis with an Integrin Targeted Microbubble Contrast Agent

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Christopher R.; Hu, Xiaowen; Tlaxca, Jose; Decleves, Anne-Emilie; Houghtaling, Robert; Sharma, Kumar; Lawrence, Michael; Ferrara, Katherine; Rychak, Joshua J.

    2010-01-01

    Rationale and Objectives Ultrasound molecular imaging is an emerging technique for sensitive detection of intravascular targets. Molecular imaging of angiogenesis has strong potential for both clinical use and as a research tool in tumor biology and the development of anti-angiogenic therapies. Our objective is to develop a robust microbubble (MB) ultrasound contrast agent platform to which targeting ligands can be conjugated by biocompatible, covalent conjugation chemistry, and to develop a pure low mechanical index imaging processing method and corresponding quantifying method. The microbubbles and the imaging methods were evaluated in a mouse model of breast cancer in vivo. Materials and Methods We utilized a cyclic RGD (cRGD) pentapeptide containing a terminal cysteine group conjugated to the surface of MB bearing pyridyldithio-propionate (PDP) for targeting αvβ3 integrins. As negative controls, MB without a ligand or MB bearing a scrambled sequence (cRAD) were prepared. To enable characterization of peptides bound to MB surfaces, the cRGD peptide was labeled with FITC and detected by plate fluorometry, flow cytometry, and fluorescence microscopy. Targeted adhesion of cRGD-MB was demonstrated in an in vitro flow adhesion assay against recombinant murine αvβ3 integrin protein and αvβ3 integrin-expressing endothelial cells (bEnd.3). The specificity of cRGD-MB for αvβ3 integrin was demonstrated by treating bEnd.3 EC with a blocking antibody. A murine model of mammary carcinoma was used to assess targeted adhesion and ultrasound molecular imaging in vivo. The targeted microbubbles were visualized using a low mechanical index contrast imaging pulse sequence, and quantified by intensity normalization and two-dimensional Fourier transform analysis, Results The cRGD ligand concentration on the MB surface was ~8.2 × 106 molecules/MB. At a wall shear stress of 1.0 dynes/cm2, cRGD-MB exhibited 5-fold higher adhesion to immobilized recombinant αvβ3 integrin

  6. Cavitation thresholds of contrast agents in an in vitro human clot model exposed to 120-kHz ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Gruber, Matthew J.; Bader, Kenneth B.; Holland, Christy K.

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) can be employed to nucleate cavitation to achieve desired bioeffects, such as thrombolysis, in therapeutic ultrasound applications. Effective methods of enhancing thrombolysis with ultrasound have been examined at low frequencies (<1 MHz) and low amplitudes (<0.5 MPa). The objective of this study was to determine cavitation thresholds for two UCAs exposed to 120-kHz ultrasound. A commercial ultrasound contrast agent (Definity®) and echogenic liposomes were investigated to determine the acoustic pressure threshold for ultraharmonic (UH) and broadband (BB) generation using an in vitro flow model perfused with human plasma. Cavitation emissions were detected using two passive receivers over a narrow frequency bandwidth (540–900 kHz) and a broad frequency bandwidth (0.54–1.74 MHz). UH and BB cavitation thresholds occurred at the same acoustic pressure (0.3 ± 0.1 MPa, peak to peak) and were found to depend on the sensitivity of the cavitation detector but not on the nucleating contrast agent or ultrasound duty cycle. PMID:25234874

  7. Cavitation thresholds of contrast agents in an in vitro human clot model exposed to 120-kHz ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Gruber, Matthew J; Bader, Kenneth B; Holland, Christy K

    2014-02-01

    Ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) can be employed to nucleate cavitation to achieve desired bioeffects, such as thrombolysis, in therapeutic ultrasound applications. Effective methods of enhancing thrombolysis with ultrasound have been examined at low frequencies (<1 MHz) and low amplitudes (<0.5 MPa). The objective of this study was to determine cavitation thresholds for two UCAs exposed to 120-kHz ultrasound. A commercial ultrasound contrast agent (Definity(®)) and echogenic liposomes were investigated to determine the acoustic pressure threshold for ultraharmonic (UH) and broadband (BB) generation using an in vitro flow model perfused with human plasma. Cavitation emissions were detected using two passive receivers over a narrow frequency bandwidth (540-900 kHz) and a broad frequency bandwidth (0.54-1.74 MHz). UH and BB cavitation thresholds occurred at the same acoustic pressure (0.3 ± 0.1 MPa, peak to peak) and were found to depend on the sensitivity of the cavitation detector but not on the nucleating contrast agent or ultrasound duty cycle.

  8. Predictive Value of Conventional Ultrasound and Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound in Early Recurrence of Hepatocellular Carcinoma after Surgical Resection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yibin; Liao, Jintang; Qi, Wenjun; Xie, Lulu; Li, Yueyi

    2016-05-01

    The goals of the work described here were to study the pre-operative risk factors associated with early recurrence (ER) of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) after surgical resection and discuss the value of conventional ultrasound (US) and contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) in predicting ER of HCC, so as to provide more information for optimizing clinical treatment and improving prognosis. A retrospective analysis was conducted on 59 patients who underwent both US and CEUS examinations pre-operatively and surgical resection for HCC between December 2010 and January 2014 in our hospital. The patients' clinical data, laboratory examination data and ultrasonic imaging diagnostic data were collected. Univariate analysis and logistic regression analysis were performed to determine the independent risk factors for ER of HCC after surgical resection. Diagnostic values of independent risk factors in predicting ER were further evaluated. The 59 patients were divided into the ER group (27 cases) and ER-free group (32 cases). There were no significant differences in age and sex between the two groups (p > 0.05). Univariate analysis revealed that differences in pre-operative serum α-fetoprotein level ≥400 ng/mL (p = 0.008), tumor diameter ≥5 cm (p = 0.012), macroscopic vascular invasion (p = 0.040), "fast wash-out" enhancement pattern (p = 0.006) and inhomogeneous distribution of contrast agent (p = 0.031) statistically significantly differed between the two groups. Logistic regression analysis indicated that pre-operative serum AFP level ≥400 ng/mL (p = 0.024), tumor diameter ≥5 cm (p = 0.042) and "fast wash-out" enhancement pattern (p = 0.009) were independent risk factors for ER of HCC; macrovascular invasion (p = 0.095) and inhomogeneous distribution of contrast agent (p = 0.628) did not statistically significantly differ between two groups (p = 0.628). Predictive values of the independent risk factors were further evaluated. The sensitivity of a "fast wash

  9. An in vitro system for the study of ultrasound contrast agents using a commercial imaging system.

    PubMed

    Sboros, V; Moran, C M; Anderson, T; Gatzoulis, L; Criton, A; Averkiou, M; Pye, S D; McDicken, W N

    2001-12-01

    An in vitro system for the investigation of the behaviour of contrast microbubbles in an ultrasound field, that provides a full diagnostic range of settings, is yet to be presented in the literature. The evaluation of a good compromise of such a system is presented in this paper. It is based on (a) an HD13000 ATL scanner (Bothell, WA, USA) externally controlled by a PC and (b) on the use of well-defined reference materials. The suspensions of the reference ultrasonic scattering material are placed in an anechoic tank. The pulse length ranges from 2 to 10 cycles, the acoustic pressure from 0.08 to 1.8 MPa, the transmit frequency from 1 to 4.3 MHz, and the receive frequency from 1 to 8 MHz. The collection of 256 samples of RF data, at an offset distance from the transducer face, was performed at 20 MHz digitization rate, which corresponds to approximately 1 cm depth in water. Two particle suspensions are also presented for use as reference scatterers for contrast studies: (a) a suspension of Orgasol (ELF Atochem, Paris, France) particles (approximately 5 microm mean diameter) and (b) a suspension of Eccosphere (New Metals & Chemicals Ltd, Essex, UK) particles (approximately 50 microm mean diameter). A preliminary experiment with the contrast agent Definity (DuPont Pharmaceutical Co, Waltham, MA) showed that the above two materials are suitable for use as a reference for contrast backscatter.

  10. Kupffer-phase findings of hepatic hemangiomas in contrast-enhanced ultrasound with sonazoid.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Katsutoshi; Moriyasu, Fuminori; Saito, Kazuhiro; Yoshiara, Hiroki; Imai, Yasuharu

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to assess quantitatively the Kupffer-phase enhancement patterns of hepatic hemangiomas in contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) with Sonazoid. A total of 46 patients with 46 hepatic hemangiomas (17.1 ± 6.2 mm in diameter, 34 typical type and 12 high-flow type) underwent CEUS in the Kupffer phase. The lesion-to-liver contrast ratio in the Kupffer phase was quantitatively assessed for both types of hemangioma. Most of the hepatic hemangiomas, whether or not they were the high-flow type, were iso- to hypo-echoic relative to the surrounding liver parenchyma. The contrast ratio was -5.33 ± 6.70 dB for the high-flow hemangiomas and -4.54 ± 6.28 dB for the typical hemangiomas. There was no significant difference in contrast ratio between the two types of lesions (p = 0.73). All of the hemangiomas, whether of typical or high-flow type, are iso- to hypo-echoic relative to the surrounding liver parenchyma on Kupffer-phase imaging.

  11. Thermal dependence of ultrasound contrast agents scattering efficiency for echographic imaging techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biagioni, Angelo; Bettucci, Andrea; Passeri, Daniele; Alippi, Adriano

    2015-06-01

    Ultrasound contrast agents are used in echographic imaging techniques to enhance image contrast. In addition, they may represent an interesting solution to the problem of non-invasive temperature monitoring inside the human body, based on some thermal variations of their physical properties. Contrast agents, indeed, are inserted into blood circulation and they reach the most important organs inside the human body; consequently, any thermometric property that they may possess, could be exploited for realizing a non-invasive thermometer. They essentially are a suspension of microbubbles containing a gas enclosed in a phospholipid membrane; temperature variations induce structural modifications of the microbubble phospholipid shell, thus causing thermal dependence of contrast agent's elastic characteristics. In this paper, the acoustic scattering efficiency of a bulk suspension of of SonoVue® (Bracco SpA Milan, Italy) has been studied using a pulse-echo technique in the frequency range 1-17 MHz, as it depends upon temperatures between 25 and 65°C. Experimental data confirm that the ultrasonic attenuation coefficient of SonoVue® depends on temperature between 25 and 60°C. Chemical composition of the bubble shell seem to support the hypothesis that a phase transition in the microstructure of lipid-coated microbubbles could play a key role in explaining such effect.

  12. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound improves accurate identification of appendiceal mucinous adenocarcinoma in an old patient

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Jing; Ruan, Li-tao; Dang, Ying; Wang, Yun-yue; Song, Yan; Lian, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Adenocarcinoma of appendiceal origin is far rarer than other colorectal carcinomas and its preoperative diagnosis is challenging. To our knowledge, utility of contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) to diagnose it is much less. Method: A 61-year-old man presented with abdominal pain in the right lower quadrant for 20 days. In order to fulfill an accurately preoperative diagnosis, he received laboratory and imaging tests such as carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), computer tomography (CT), CEUS and endoscope. Diagnosis and Intervention: He was initially suspected of suffering appendicitis, while his white blood cell count was normal and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) in serum was remarkably increased. Both routine ultrasound and computer tomography (CT) examinations supported suppurative appendicitis. The overall data, however, failed to excluded neoplastic pathology thoroughly. Therefore, CEUS was carried out and showed an inhomogeneous enhancement intra the lesion located in the body of the appendix, which made our consideration of neoplasm. The result of the follow-up biopsy guided by endoscope was consistent with appendiceal tumor. The patient received laparoscopic right hemicolectomy. Histopathology confirmed as well differentiated mucinous adenocarcinoma of appendix origin. His postoperative course was uneventful, and he had a regular diet again without any complaint. Result: Serum CEA was remarkably increased (12.00 ng/mL). Both routine ultrasound and CT examinations supported suppurative appendicitis. However, CEUS examination showed an inhomogeneous enhancement intra the lesion located in the body of the appendix, which made our consideration of neoplasm. The follow-up biopsy guided by endoscope and surgical specimens confirmed as well differentiated mucinous adenocarcinoma of appendix origin. Conclusion: Most mucinous adenocarcinoma mimicking appendicitis results in difficult diagnosis preoperatively. Clinician and radiologist should be

  13. Quantitative ultrasound molecular imaging by modeling the binding kinetics of targeted contrast agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turco, Simona; Tardy, Isabelle; Frinking, Peter; Wijkstra, Hessel; Mischi, Massimo

    2017-03-01

    Ultrasound molecular imaging (USMI) is an emerging technique to monitor diseases at the molecular level by the use of novel targeted ultrasound contrast agents (tUCA). These consist of microbubbles functionalized with targeting ligands with high-affinity for molecular markers of specific disease processes, such as cancer-related angiogenesis. Among the molecular markers of angiogenesis, the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) is recognized to play a major role. In response, the clinical-grade tUCA BR55 was recently developed, consisting of VEGFR2-targeting microbubbles which can flow through the entire circulation and accumulate where VEGFR2 is over-expressed, thus causing selective enhancement in areas of active angiogenesis. Discrimination between bound and free microbubbles is crucial to assess cancer angiogenesis. Currently, this is done non-quantitatively by looking at the late enhancement, about 10 min after injection, or by calculation of the differential targeted enhancement, requiring the application of a high-pressure ultrasound (US) burst to destroy all the microbubbles in the acoustic field and isolate the signal coming only from bound microbubbles. In this work, we propose a novel method based on mathematical modeling of the binding kinetics during the tUCA first pass, thus reducing the acquisition time and with no need for a destructive US burst. Fitting time-intensity curves measured with USMI by the proposed model enables the assessment of cancer angiogenesis at both the vascular and molecular levels. This is achieved by estimation of quantitative parameters related to the microvascular architecture and microbubble binding. The proposed method was tested in 11 prostate-tumor bearing rats by performing USMI after injection of BR55, and showed good agreement with current USMI methods. The novel information provided by the proposed method, possibly combined with the current non-quantitative methods, may bring deeper insight into

  14. Development and characterization of hollow polymeric microcapsules for use as contrast agents for diagnostic ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayan, Padma Jyothi

    1999-09-01

    This thesis concerns the development and characterization of a new type of rigid-shelled ultrasound contrast agent. A novel method was devised for producing hollow, gas- filled, polymer microcapsules, sized to less than 10 μm in diameter for contrast imaging. This method involved the encapsulation of a solid, volatile core material, and its subsequent evacuation by sublimation. The biodegradable polymer, 50/50 poly(D,L-lactide-co- glycolide), was the main focus of this study. Polymer- based contrast agents have many advantages, such as their applicability for concomitant imaging and drug delivery. Three encapsulation techniques were evaluated: solvent evaporation, coacervation, and spray drying. The polymer molecular weight and polydispersity in the solvent evaporation and coacervation techniques strongly affected microcapsule size and morphology. Efficient mechanical agitation and shear were crucial for obtaining high yields in the desired size range (less than 6 μm). In spray drying, a factorial design approach was used to optimize conditions to produce microcapsules. The main factors affecting spray drying were found to be the temperature driving force for drying and initial polymer concentration. The smallest microcapsule mean diameters were produced by spray drying (3-4 μm) and solvent evaporation (5-6 μm). Zeta potential (ζ) studies for all microcapsule types indicated that the encapsulation technique affected their surface properties due to the orientation of the polymer chains within nascent polymer droplets. Microcapsules with the most hydrophilic tendency were produced with solvent evaporation (ζ ~ -50 mV). In vitro acoustic testing revealed that the 20-41 μm size fractions of coacervate microcapsules were the most echogenic. In vivo ultrasound studies with both solvent evaporation and coacervate microcapsules showed visible enhancement of the color Doppler image in the rabbit kidney for the samples less than 10 μm in diameter. A mathematical

  15. Efficacy of contrast-enhanced ultrasound washout rate in predicting hepatocellular carcinoma differentiation.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yan; Qin, Xia-Chuan; Luo, Yan; Li, Yong-Zhong; Zhou, Xiang

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate the efficacy of contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) washout rate in predicting hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) differentiation. Two hundred seventy-one patients underwent liver resection for HCC between April 2008 and December 2012 after being examined by CEUS using the contrast agent SonoVue with a low mechanical index (<0.1) in a routine procedure. Contrast agent washout rates obtained from video images were divided into four categories from slow to fast: WR1 = no washout in all phases (slowest); WR2 = washout after 120 s from contrast injection (late-phase washout); WR3 = washout between 41 and 120 s from contrast injection (portal venous washout); WR4 = washout before 40 s from contrast injection (fastest washout rate). HCC nodules were graded as well, moderately and poorly differentiated. Spearman rank correlation and χ(2)-tests were used to assess group relationships and differences. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis was used to determine the diagnostic predictive value of CEUS. Among the 271 patients, 18 (6.6%) had well differentiated, 150 (55.4%) had moderately differentiated and 103 (38.0%) had poorly differentiated HCC. Statistical tests indicated that washout rate was significantly correlated with tumor differentiation (p < 0.05), and the poorly differentiated HCCs had earlier washout. At the cutoff point of WR4, CEUS based on washout rate performed poorly in distinguishing poorly differentiated from moderately and well-differentiated HCCs, with a sensitivity, specificity and accuracy (area under the curve) of 24%, 97% and 0.68, respectively. However, at the cutoff point of WR2, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of CEUS in differentiating well-differentiated HCC from other HCCs were significantly better: 98%, 78% and 0.96, respectively. Thus, CEUS washout rate may have a role in identifying patients with well-differentiated HCC.

  16. In vitro evaluation of the impact of ultrasound scanner settings and contrast bolus volume on time-intensity curves.

    PubMed

    Gauthier, Thomas P; Chebil, Mohamed; Peronneau, Pierre; Lassau, Nathalie

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess in vitro the impact of ultrasound scanner settings and contrast bolus volume on time-intensity curves formed from dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasound image loops. An indicator-dilution experiment was developed with an in vitro flow phantom setup used with SonoVue contrast agent (Bracco SpA, Milan, Italy). Imaging was performed with a Philips iU22 scanner and two transducers (L9-3 linear and C5-1 curvilinear). The following ultrasound scanner settings were investigated, along with contrast bolus volume: contrast-specific nonlinear pulse sequence, gain, mechanical index, focal zone depth, acoustic pulse center frequency and bandwidth. Four parameters (rise time, mean transit time, peak intensity, and area under the curve) were derived from time-intensity curves which were obtained after pixel by pixel linearization of log-compressed data (also referred to as video data) included in a region of interest. Rise time was found to be the parameter least impacted by changes to ultrasound scanner settings and contrast bolus volume; the associated coefficient of variation varied between 0.7% and 6.9% while it varied between 0.8% and 19%, 12% and 71%, and 9.2% and 66%, for mean transit time, peak intensity, and area under the curve, respectively. The present study assessed the impact of ultrasound scanner settings and contrast bolus volume on time-intensity curve analysis. One should be aware of these issues to standardize their technique in each specific organ of interest and to achieve accurate, sensitive, and reproducible data using dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasound. One way to mitigate the impact of ultrasound scanner settings in longitudinal, multi-center quantitative dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasound studies may be to prohibit any adjustments to those settings throughout a given study. Further clinical studies are warranted to confirm the reproducibility and diagnostic or prognostic value of time-intensity curve

  17. The diagnostic value of contrast-enhanced ultrasound in differentiating small renal carcinoma and angiomyolipoma.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lin; Wang, Ling; Diao, Xuehong; Qian, Weiqing; Fang, Liang; Pang, Yun; Zhan, Jia; Chen, Yue

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the value of contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) in differentiating small renal masses. A total of 102 small renal masses (≤ 3 cm) in 99 patients were examined using conventional ultrasound (CUS) and CEUS, and the findings were reviewed and evaluated in comparison to pathology. Significant differences between renal cell carcinomas (RCCs) and angiomyolipomas (AMLs) were noted in terms of the orientation and echogenicity on CUS (p < 0.05 for both), but the location, shape, margins, homogeneity, and blood flow signals of RCCs on color Doppler flow imaging (CDFI) were similar to those of AMLs (p > 0.05 for all). On CEUS, however, the enhancement intensity, washout in the late phase, and perilesional rim-like enhancement differed significantly for RCCs and AMLs (p = 0.000 for all). Significant differences between CEUS and CUS in terms of sensitivity (88.9% vs. 55.6%), the negative predictive value (68.0% vs. 29.5%), the false negative rate (9.9% vs. 44.5%), and accuracy (88.3% vs. 58.9%) were noted (p < 0.05 for all). CEUS, with its unique features, has value in diagnosing small RCCs and AMLs and outperforms CUS in differentiation of small RCCs and AMLs.

  18. Ultrasound contrast agent loaded with nitric oxide as a theranostic microdevice

    PubMed Central

    Grishenkov, Dmitry; Gonon, Adrian; Weitzberg, Eddie; Lundberg, Jon O; Harmark, Johan; Cerroni, Barbara; Paradossi, Gaio; Janerot-Sjoberg, Birgitta

    2015-01-01

    The current study describes novel multifunctional polymer-shelled microbubbles (MBs) loaded with nitric oxide (NO) for integrated therapeutic and diagnostic applications (ie, theranostics) of myocardial ischemia. We used gas-filled MBs with an average diameter of 4 μm stabilized by a biocompatible shell of polyvinyl alcohol. In vitro acoustic tests showed sufficient enhancement of the backscattered power (20 dB) acquired from the MBs’ suspension. The values of attenuation coefficient (0.8 dB/cm MHz) and phase velocities (1,517 m/s) were comparable with those reported for the soft tissue. Moreover, polymer MBs demonstrate increased stability compared with clinically approved contrast agents with a fracture threshold of about 900 kPa. In vitro chemiluminescence measurements demonstrated that dry powder of NO-loaded MBs releases its gas content in about 2 hours following an exponential decay profile with an exponential time constant equal to 36 minutes. The application of high-power ultrasound pulse (mechanical index =1.2) on the MBs resuspended in saline decreases the exponential time constant from 55 to 4 minutes in air-saturated solution and from 17 to 10 minutes in degassed solution. Thus, ultrasound-triggered release of NO is achieved. Cytotoxicity tests indicate that phagocytosis of the MBs by macrophages starts within 6–8 hours. This is a suitable time for initial diagnostics, treatment, and monitoring of the therapeutic effect using a single injection of the proposed multifunctional MBs. PMID:25995614

  19. Applicability of contrast-enhanced ultrasound in the diagnosis of plantar fasciitis.

    PubMed

    Broholm, Rikke; Pingel, Jessica; Simonsen, Lene; Bülow, Jens; Johannsen, Finn

    2017-02-27

    Contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) is used to visualize the microvascularisation in various tissues. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether CEUS could be used to visualize the microvascular volume (MV) in the plantar fascia, and to compare the method to clinical symptoms and B-mode ultrasound (US) in patients with plantar fasciitis (PF). 20 patients with unilateral PF were included and were divided by US in insertional thickening (10), midsubstance thickening (5) and no US changes (5). The MV was measured simultaneously in both heels. Four areas in the plantar fascia and plantar fat pad were measured independently by two observers. Inter- and intra-observer correlation analyses were performed. The asymptomatic heels showed a constantly low MV, and for the whole group of patients a significantly higher MV was found in the symptomatic plantar fascia and plantar fat pad. Inter-observer correlation as well as intra-observer agreement was excellent. The MV in the plantar fascia and plantar fat pad can be measured reliably using CEUS, suggesting that it is a reproducible method to examine patients with plantar fasciitis. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  20. Ultrasound contrast agent loaded with nitric oxide as a theranostic microdevice.

    PubMed

    Grishenkov, Dmitry; Gonon, Adrian; Weitzberg, Eddie; Lundberg, Jon O; Harmark, Johan; Cerroni, Barbara; Paradossi, Gaio; Janerot-Sjoberg, Birgitta

    2015-01-01

    The current study describes novel multifunctional polymer-shelled microbubbles (MBs) loaded with nitric oxide (NO) for integrated therapeutic and diagnostic applications (ie, theranostics) of myocardial ischemia. We used gas-filled MBs with an average diameter of 4 μm stabilized by a biocompatible shell of polyvinyl alcohol. In vitro acoustic tests showed sufficient enhancement of the backscattered power (20 dB) acquired from the MBs' suspension. The values of attenuation coefficient (0.8 dB/cm MHz) and phase velocities (1,517 m/s) were comparable with those reported for the soft tissue. Moreover, polymer MBs demonstrate increased stability compared with clinically approved contrast agents with a fracture threshold of about 900 kPa. In vitro chemiluminescence measurements demonstrated that dry powder of NO-loaded MBs releases its gas content in about 2 hours following an exponential decay profile with an exponential time constant equal to 36 minutes. The application of high-power ultrasound pulse (mechanical index =1.2) on the MBs resuspended in saline decreases the exponential time constant from 55 to 4 minutes in air-saturated solution and from 17 to 10 minutes in degassed solution. Thus, ultrasound-triggered release of NO is achieved. Cytotoxicity tests indicate that phagocytosis of the MBs by macrophages starts within 6-8 hours. This is a suitable time for initial diagnostics, treatment, and monitoring of the therapeutic effect using a single injection of the proposed multifunctional MBs.

  1. Sonophoresis using ultrasound contrast agents for transdermal drug delivery: an in vivo experimental study.

    PubMed

    Park, Donghee; Ryu, Heungil; Kim, Han Sung; Kim, Young-Sun; Choi, Kyu-Sil; Park, Hyunjin; Seo, Jongbum

    2012-04-01

    Sonophoresis temporally increases skin permeability such that various medications can be delivered noninvasively. Previous sonophoresis studies have suggested that cavitation plays an important role in enhancing transdermal drug delivery (TDD). In this study, the feasibility of controlled cavitation using ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) at high frequency was explored through in vivo experiments in a rat model. Two commercially available UCAs, SonoVue® and Definity®, were used at 2.47 MHz and 1.12 MHz, respectively. Fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-dextran with 0.1% UCA was used as the drug to be delivered through the skin. Ultrasound with a 10 ms pulse and a 1% duty cycle at 1 MPa acoustic pressure for 30 min was applied in all sonication sessions. The efficacy of sonophoresis with UCAs was quantitatively analyzed using an optical imaging system that was used to count photons emitted from fluorescein. The results showed that the proposed sonophoresis method significantly improved drug penetration compared with the traditional sonophoresis method with 4 kD, 20 kD and 150 kD FITC-dextrans at 1.12 MHz, and with 4 kD and 20 kD FITC-dextrans at 2.47 MHz. Sonophoresis for TDD was performed more effectively with the aid of UCAs. Sonophoresis with UCAs has excellent potential for broad applications in drug delivery for diseases requiring the chronic administration of medications such as diabetes.

  2. Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound Guided Biopsy of Undetermined Abdominal Lesions: A Multidisciplinary Decision-Making Approach

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Feng; Dong, Yi; Ji, Zhengbiao; Cao, Jiaying

    2017-01-01

    Aim. To investigate the value of contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) guided biopsy of undetermined abdominal lesions in multidisciplinary treatment (MDT) decision-making approach. Methods. Between Jan 2012 and Dec 2015, 60 consecutive patients (male, 37; female, 23; mean age, 51.3 years ± 14.6) who presented with undetermined abdominal lesions were included. CEUS and core needle percutaneous biopsy was performed under real-time CEUS guidance in all lesions. Data were recorded and compared with conventional ultrasound (US) guidance group (n = 75). All CEUS findings and clinical data were evaluated in MDT. Results. CEUS enabled the delimitation of more (88.3% versus 41.3%) and larger (14.1 ± 10.7 mm versus 32.3 ± 18.5 mm) nonenhanced necrotic areas. More inner (20.0% versus 6.7%) and surrounding (18.3% versus 2.7%) major vessels were visualized and avoided during biopsies. CEUS-guided biopsy increased the diagnostic accuracy from 93.3% to 98.3%, with correct diagnosis in 57 of 60 lesions (95.0%). The therapeutic plan was influenced by CEUS guided biopsies findings in the majority of patients (98.3%). Conclusion. The combination of CEUS guided biopsy and MDT decision-making approach is useful in the diagnostic work-up and therapeutic management. PMID:28133613

  3. A model for the dynamics of ultrasound contrast agents in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Shengping; Ferrara, Katherine W.

    2010-01-01

    The Rayleigh-Plesset (RP) equation for a clean gas bubble in an incompressible and infinite liquid has previously been applied to approximately simulate the behavior of ultrasound contrast agents (UCA) in vivo, and extended RP equations have been proposed to account for the effects of the UCA shell or surrounding soft tissue. These models produce results that are consistent with experimental measurements for low acoustic pressure scenarios. For applications of UCAs in therapeutic medicine, the transmitted acoustic pulse can have a peak negative pressure (PNP) up to a few megapascals, resulting in discrepancies between measurements and predictions using these extended RP equations. Here, a model was developed to describe the dynamics of UCAs in vivo while taking account of the effects of liquid compressibility, the shell and the surrounding tissue. Liquid compressibility is approximated to first order and the shell is treated either as a Voigt viscoelastic solid or a Newtonian viscous liquid. Finite deformation of the shell and tissue is derived. Dynamics of UCAs with a shell of lipid, polymer, albumin and liquid are investigated for typical therapeutic ultrasound pulses. The effects of liquid compressibility and shell and tissue parameters are analyzed. PMID:20815486

  4. Accuracy of Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound in the Diagnosis of Bile Duct Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Fontán, F. J. P.; Reboredo, Á. R.; Siso, A. R.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the ability of contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) to differentiate benign from malignant lesions causing biliary duct obstruction. Materials and Methods: Between November 2006 and December 2013, 59 patients with bile duct obstruction of undetermined cause in baseline ultrasound underwent CEUS study. The enhancement and posterior washout were analyzed in real time all along the study duration (5′). The final diagnosis suggested by CEUS was compared with histologic diagnosis (47.5%) or with radiologic follow-up with TC, RM or ERCP. Results: Final diagnoses included 42 malignant lesions (cholangiocarcinoma n=22, metastases n=6, pancreatic carcinoma n=6, hepatocarcinoma n=4, gallbladder carcinoma n=2, ampullary carcinoma n=1 and lymphoma n=1) and 17 benign lesions (lithiasis or biliary sludge n=15, xanthogranulomatous cholecystitis n=1 and indeterminate n=1). CEUS accuracy compared with final diagnoses based on combined reference standard was 86.4%. CEUS correctly identified 36 of 42 malignant lesions (sensibility 85.7%) and 15 of 17 benign lesions (specificity 88.2%). The positive predictive value of CEUS for malignancy was 94.7%, while the negative predictive value was 71.4%. Conclusion: CEUS is useful to differentiate between benign and malignant causes of obstructive jaundice. This technique improves the detection of bile duct invasion in hepatic neoplasms and permits better evaluation of intra- and extraductal extension of hilar hepatobiliary tumors. PMID:27689143

  5. Contrast enhanced ultrasound in urothelial carcinoma of urinary bladder: An underutilized staging and grading modality

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Vijayant Govinda; Singh, Shrawan Kumar; Lal, Anupam; Kakkar, Nandita

    2016-01-01

    Introduction To evaluate contrast enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) as a modality to predict T stage of cancer of urinary bladder (CAUB) and to predict the grade of the tumor preoperatively. Material and methods 110 patients with CAUB presenting to the Department of Urology at our institution between July 2014 and December 2015 underwent CEUS prior to endoscopic resection and the CEUS findings were compared with histopathology results. Results CEUS had a sensitivity of 75, 65 and 90% and specificity of 95, 85 and 92% in detecting Ta, T1 and muscle invasion respectively. CEUS had a sensitivity of 78% and specificity of 85% in detecting the grade of the lesion. Conclusions CEUS is a good alternative for T staging and grading of CAUB preoperatively. It is uniquely advantageous in detecting clots or necrosis and in patients with low eGFR where other imaging modalities are contraindicated. PMID:28127451

  6. Radial Modulation Contrast Imaging Using a 20-MHz Single-Element Intravascular Ultrasound Catheter

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Francois T. H.; Villanueva, Flordeliza S.; Chen, Xucai

    2014-01-01

    Contrast-enhanced intravascular ultrasound imaging is a promising tool for the characterization of coronary vasa vasorum proliferation, which has been identified as a marker of, and possible etiologic factor in, the development of high-risk atherosclerotic plaques. Resonance-based nonlinear detection methods have required the development of prototype catheters which are not commercially available, thus limiting clinical translation. In this study, we investigated the performances of a radial modulation imaging approach (25/3 MHz combination) using simulations, implemented it on a clinical 20-MHz rotating catheter, and tested it in a wall-less tissue-mimicking flow phantom perfused with lipid-encapsulated microbubbles (MBs). The effects of the phase lag, low-frequency pressure, and MB concentration on the envelope subtracted radial modulation signals were investigated as a function of depth. Our dual-pulse dual-frequency approach produced contrast-specific images with contrast-to-tissue improvements over B-mode of 15.1 ± 2.1 dB at 2 mm and 6.8 ± 0.1 dB at 4 mm depths. Using this imaging strategy, 200-μm-diameter cellulose tubing perfused with MBs could be resolved while surrounding tissue scattering was suppressed. These results raise promise for the detection of coronary vasa vasorum and may ultimately facilitate the detection of plaque at risk for rupture. PMID:24803134

  7. New generation ICG-based contrast agents for ultrasound-switchable fluorescence imaging

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Shuai; Cheng, Bingbing; Yao, Tingfeng; Xu, Cancan; Nguyen, Kytai T.; Hong, Yi; Yuan, Baohong

    2016-01-01

    Recently, we developed a new technology, ultrasound-switchable fluorescence (USF), for high-resolution imaging in centimeter-deep tissues via fluorescence contrast. The success of USF imaging highly relies on excellent contrast agents. ICG-encapsulated poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) nanoparticles (ICG-NPs) are one of the families of the most successful near-infrared (NIR) USF contrast agents. However, the first-generation ICG-NPs have a short shelf life (<1 month). This work significantly increases the shelf life of the new-generation ICG-NPs (>6 months). In addition, we have conjugated hydroxyl or carboxyl function groups on the ICG-NPs for future molecular targeting. Finally, we have demonstrated the effect of temperature-switching threshold (Tth) and the background temperature (TBG) on the quality of USF images. We estimated that the Tth of the ICG-NPs should be controlled at ~38–40 °C (slightly above the body temperature of 37 °C) for future in vivo USF imaging. Addressing these challenges further reduces the application barriers of USF imaging. PMID:27775014

  8. Magnetic resonance and ultrasound contrast imaging of polymer-shelled microbubbles loaded with iron oxide nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Sciallero, Claudia; Balbi, Luca; Paradossi, Gaio; Trucco, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Dual-mode contrast agents (CAs) have great potential for improving diagnostics. However, the effectiveness of CAs is strictly related to both the solution adopted to merge the two agents into a single probe unit, and the ratio between the two agents. In this study, two dual-mode CAs for simultaneous magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and ultrasound imaging (UI) were assessed. For this purpose, different densities of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) were anchored to the external surface of polymer-shelled microbubbles (MBs) or were physically entrapped into the shell. In vitro static and dynamic experiments were carried out with a limited concentration of modified MBs (106 bubbles ml−1) by avoiding destruction during UI (performed at a peak pressure lower than 320 kPa) and by using a low-field MRI system (with a magnetic flux density equal to 0.25 T). Under these conditions, different imaging techniques, set-up parameters and SPION densities were used to achieve satisfactory detection of the CAs by using both UI and MRI. However, when the SPION density was increased, the MRI contrast improved, whereas the UI contrast worsened due to the reduced elasticity of the MB shell. For both UI and MRI, MBs with externally anchored SPIONs provided better performance than MBs with SPIONs entrapped into the shell. In particular, a SPION density of 29% with respect to the mass of the MBs was successfully tested. PMID:27853587

  9. New generation ICG-based contrast agents for ultrasound-switchable fluorescence imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Shuai; Cheng, Bingbing; Yao, Tingfeng; Xu, Cancan; Nguyen, Kytai T.; Hong, Yi; Yuan, Baohong

    2016-10-01

    Recently, we developed a new technology, ultrasound-switchable fluorescence (USF), for high-resolution imaging in centimeter-deep tissues via fluorescence contrast. The success of USF imaging highly relies on excellent contrast agents. ICG-encapsulated poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) nanoparticles (ICG-NPs) are one of the families of the most successful near-infrared (NIR) USF contrast agents. However, the first-generation ICG-NPs have a short shelf life (<1 month). This work significantly increases the shelf life of the new-generation ICG-NPs (>6 months). In addition, we have conjugated hydroxyl or carboxyl function groups on the ICG-NPs for future molecular targeting. Finally, we have demonstrated the effect of temperature-switching threshold (Tth) and the background temperature (TBG) on the quality of USF images. We estimated that the Tth of the ICG-NPs should be controlled at ~38–40 °C (slightly above the body temperature of 37 °C) for future in vivo USF imaging. Addressing these challenges further reduces the application barriers of USF imaging.

  10. Development of Ultrasound-switchable Fluorescence Imaging Contrast Agents based on Thermosensitive Polymers and Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Bingbing; Wei, Ming-Yuan; Liu, Yuan; Pitta, Harish; Xie, Zhiwei; Hong, Yi; Nguyen, Kytai T.; Yuan, Baohong

    2015-01-01

    In this work we first introduced a recently developed high-resolution, deep-tissue imaging technique, ultrasound-switchable fluorescence (USF). The imaging principles based on two types of USF contrast agents were reviewed. To improve USF imaging techniques further, excellent USF contrast agents were developed based on high-performance thermoresponsive polymers and environment-sensitive fluorophores. Herein, such contrast agents were synthesized and characterized with five key parameters: (1) peak excitation and emission wavelengths (λex and λem), (2) the fluorescence intensity ratio between on and off states (IOn/IOff), (3) the fluorescence lifetime ratio between on and off states (τOn/τOff), (4) the temperature threshold to switch on fluorophores (Tth), and (5) the temperature transition bandwidth (TBW). We mainly investigated fluorescence intensity and lifetime changes of four environment-sensitive dyes [7-(2-Aminoethylamino)-N,N-dimethyl-4-benzofurazansulfonamide (DBD-ED), St633, Sq660, and St700] as a function of temperature, while the dye was attached to poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) linear polymers or encapsulated in nanoparticles. Six fluorescence resonance energy transfer systems were invented in which both the donor (DBD-ED or ST425) and the acceptor (Sq660) were adopted. Our results indicate that three Förster resonance energy transfer systems, where both IOn/IOff and τOn/τOff are larger than 2.5, are promising for application in future surface tissue bioimaging by USF technique. PMID:26052192

  11. Diagnostic Accuracy of Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound Enhancement Patterns for Thyroid Nodules

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yan; Luo, Yu-kun; Zhang, Ming-bo; Li, Jie; Li, Junlai; Tang, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to investigate the accuracy of contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) enhancement patterns in the assessment of thyroid nodules. Material/Methods A total of 158 patients with suspected thyroid cancer underwent conventional ultrasound (US) and CEUS examinations. The contrast enhancement patterns of the lesions, including the peripheries of the lesions, were assessed by CEUS scans. The relationship between the size of the lesions and the degree of enhancement was also studied. US- and/or CEUS-guided biopsy was used to obtain specimens for histopathological diagnosis. Results The final data included 148 patients with 157 lesions. Seventy-five patients had 82 malignant lesions and 73 patients had 75 benign lesions. Peripheral ring enhancement was seen in 40 lesions. The differences of enhancement patterns and peripheral rings between benign and malignant nodules were significant (p=0.000, 0.000). The diagnostic sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy for malignant were 88%, 65.33%, and 88.32%, respectively, for CEUS, whereas they were 98.33%, 42.67%, and 71.97%, respectively, for TC by conventional US. The misdiagnosis rate by conventional US was 57.33% and 34.67% by CEUS (p=0.005). With regard to the size of lesions, a significant difference was found between low-enhancement, iso-enhancement, high-enhancement, iso-enhancement with no-enhancement area and no-enhancement (p=0.000). Conclusions In patients with suspicious US characteristics, CEUS had high specificity and contributed to establishing the diagnosis. Therefore, CEUS could avoid unnecessary biopsy. PMID:27916971

  12. In Vivo Quantification of Flow Dynamics in Intracranial Aneurysms Using Intra-Operative Contrast-Specific Ultrasound and PIV Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    CantÓN, G.Á.}Dor

    2005-11-01

    The goal of this study is to assess in vivo the hemodynamics of intracranial aneurysms using ultrasound and Digital Particle Imaging Velocimetry (DPIV) techniques. An ultrasound machine, equipped with an intra-operative transducer, was used to visualize the flow features inside an aneurysm with the aid of microbubbles as ultrasound contrast agent. The ultrasound studies were done using a Phase Inversion technique. Operating in the Doppler mode, the flow velocities in the afferent and the downstream vascular segments as well as inside the aneurysm were recorded and assessed. We analyzed the ultrasound data sets with a DPIV technique using backscattered signals from the microbubbles. The spatial and temporal distribution of velocity, vorticity, and stress fields was measured. These quantities were also measured in an in vitro aneurysmal model using the DPIV system. Our study shows that an advanced contrast-specific ultrasound technique in combination with a DPIV technique can be used to quantify in real time the flow-mechanical patterns inside the aneurysm.

  13. Detection of acoustic cavitation in the heart with microbubble contrast agents in vivo: a mechanism for ultrasound-induced arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Rota, Claudio; Raeman, Carol H; Child, Sally Z; Dalecki, Diane

    2006-11-01

    Ultrasound fields can produce premature cardiac contractions under appropriate exposure conditions. The pressure threshold for ultrasound-induced premature contractions is significantly lowered when microbubble contrast agents are present in the vasculature. The objective of this study was to measure directly ultrasound-induced cavitation in the murine heart in vivo and correlate the occurrence of cavitation with the production of premature cardiac contractions. A passive cavitation detection technique was used to quantify cavitation activity in the heart. Experiments were performed with anesthetized, adult mice given intravenous injections of either a contrast agent (Optison) or saline. Murine hearts were exposed to ultrasound pulses (200 kHz, 1 ms, 0.1-0.25 MPa). Premature beats were produced in mice injected with Optison and the likelihood of producing a premature beat increased with increasing pressure amplitude. Similarly, cavitation was detected in mice injected with Optison and the amplitude of the passive cavitation detector signal increased with increasing exposure amplitude. Furthermore, there was a direct correlation between the extent of cavitation and the likelihood of ultrasound producing a premature beat. Neither premature beats nor cavitation activity were observed in animals injected with saline and exposed to ultrasound. These results are consistent with acoustic cavitation as a mechanism for this bioeffect.

  14. A comparison of ultrasound-based advanced oxidation processes for the removal of X-ray contrast media.

    PubMed

    Ning, B; Graham, N J D; Lickiss, P D

    2009-01-01

    The degradation of specific iodinated X-ray contrast media (ICM) compounds (viz: diatrizoate, iomeprol, iopromide, and iopamidol) by ultrasound irradiation in aqueous solution, with and without the presence of hydrogen peroxide or ozone, has been studied. Experiments were carried out at a constant ultrasound frequency of 20 kHz, at two power intensity values of 17.6 and 200.1 W cm(-2), and at five power densities up to 0.235 W ml(-1). Zero-order kinetic rate constants for the ICM degradation by ultrasound alone were calculated under certain sonication conditions. Pyrolysis appeared to contribute approximately 30%, and radical attack 70%, of the overall ICM degradation performance. The effect of ultrasound intensity on compound degradation (at a given power density) was found to play a negligible role, whereas ultrasound power density was found to be a major factor controlling the overall oxidation process under these conditions. The compound degradation by ultrasound alone was relatively minor, but the addition of hydrogen peroxide in the sonication process gave some improvement with a doubling in the degradation performance at the greatest applied peroxide concentration. The combination of gaseous ozone and ultrasound was found to be very effective in degrading ICM compounds and an almost complete compound removal could be achieved.

  15. Biodegradable double-targeted PTX-mPEG-PLGA nanoparticles for ultrasound contrast enhanced imaging and antitumor therapy in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Ying; Duan, You Rong; Du, Lian Fang

    2016-01-01

    A porous-structure nano-scale ultrasound contrast agent (UCA) was made of monomethoxypoly (ethylene glycol)-poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) (mPEG-PLGA), and modified by double-targeted antibody: anti-carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and anti-carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9), as a double-targeted nanoparticles (NPs). Anti-tumor drug paclitaxel (PTX) was encapsulated in the double-targeted nanoparticles (NPs). The morphor and release curve were characterized. We verified a certain anticancer effect of PTX-NPs through cytotoxicity experiments. The cell uptake result showed much more NPs may be facilitated to ingress the cells or tissues with ultrasound (US) or ultrasound targeted microbubble destruction (UTMD) transient sonoporation in vitro. Ultrasound contrast-enhanced images in vitro and in vivo were investigated. Compared with SonoVue, the NPs prolonged imaging time in rabbit kidneys and tumor of nude mice, which make it possible to further enhance anti-tumor effects by extending retention time in the tumor region. The novel double-targeted NPs with the function of ultrasound contrast enhanced imaging and anti-tumor therapy can be a promising way in clinic. PMID:27835907

  16. Ultrasound contrast agent imaging: Real-time imaging of the superharmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peruzzini, D.; Viti, J.; Tortoli, P.; Verweij, M. D.; de Jong, N.; Vos, H. J.

    2015-10-01

    Currently, in medical ultrasound contrast agent (UCA) imaging the second harmonic scattering of the microbubbles is regularly used. This scattering is in competition with the signal that is caused by nonlinear wave propagation in tissue. It was reported that UCA imaging based on the third or higher harmonics, i.e. "superharmonic" imaging, shows better contrast. However, the superharmonic scattering has a lower signal level compared to e.g. second harmonic signals. This study investigates the contrast-to-tissue ratio (CTR) and signal to noise ratio (SNR) of superharmonic UCA scattering in a tissue/vessel mimicking phantom using a real-time clinical scanner. Numerical simulations were performed to estimate the level of harmonics generated by the microbubbles. Data were acquired with a custom built dual-frequency cardiac phased array probe. Fundamental real-time images were produced while beam formed radiofrequency (RF) data was stored for further offline processing. The phantom consisted of a cavity filled with UCA surrounded by tissue mimicking material. The acoustic pressure in the cavity of the phantom was 110 kPa (MI = 0.11) ensuring non-destructivity of UCA. After processing of the acquired data from the phantom, the UCA-filled cavity could be clearly observed in the images, while tissue signals were suppressed at or below the noise floor. The measured CTR values were 36 dB, >38 dB, and >32 dB, for the second, third, and fourth harmonic respectively, which were in agreement with those reported earlier for preliminary contrast superharmonic imaging. The single frame SNR values (in which `signal' denotes the signal level from the UCA area) were 23 dB, 18 dB, and 11 dB, respectively. This indicates that noise, and not the tissue signal, is the limiting factor for the UCA detection when using the superharmonics in nondestructive mode.

  17. Ultrasound contrast agent imaging: Real-time imaging of the superharmonics

    SciTech Connect

    Peruzzini, D.; Viti, J.; Tortoli, P.; Verweij, M. D.; Jong, N. de; Vos, H. J.

    2015-10-28

    Currently, in medical ultrasound contrast agent (UCA) imaging the second harmonic scattering of the microbubbles is regularly used. This scattering is in competition with the signal that is caused by nonlinear wave propagation in tissue. It was reported that UCA imaging based on the third or higher harmonics, i.e. “superharmonic” imaging, shows better contrast. However, the superharmonic scattering has a lower signal level compared to e.g. second harmonic signals. This study investigates the contrast-to-tissue ratio (CTR) and signal to noise ratio (SNR) of superharmonic UCA scattering in a tissue/vessel mimicking phantom using a real-time clinical scanner. Numerical simulations were performed to estimate the level of harmonics generated by the microbubbles. Data were acquired with a custom built dual-frequency cardiac phased array probe. Fundamental real-time images were produced while beam formed radiofrequency (RF) data was stored for further offline processing. The phantom consisted of a cavity filled with UCA surrounded by tissue mimicking material. The acoustic pressure in the cavity of the phantom was 110 kPa (MI = 0.11) ensuring non-destructivity of UCA. After processing of the acquired data from the phantom, the UCA-filled cavity could be clearly observed in the images, while tissue signals were suppressed at or below the noise floor. The measured CTR values were 36 dB, >38 dB, and >32 dB, for the second, third, and fourth harmonic respectively, which were in agreement with those reported earlier for preliminary contrast superharmonic imaging. The single frame SNR values (in which ‘signal’ denotes the signal level from the UCA area) were 23 dB, 18 dB, and 11 dB, respectively. This indicates that noise, and not the tissue signal, is the limiting factor for the UCA detection when using the superharmonics in nondestructive mode.

  18. Noninvasive Ambient Pressure Estimation using Ultrasound Contrast Agents -- Invoking Subharmonics for Cardiac and Hepatic Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dave, Jaydev K.

    Ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) are encapsulated microbubbles that provide a source for acoustic impedance mismatch with the blood, due to difference in compressibility between the gas contained within these microbubbles and the blood. When insonified by an ultrasound beam, these UCAs act as nonlinear scatterers and enhance the echoes of the incident pulse, resulting in scattering of the incident ultrasound beam and emission of fundamental (f0), subharmonic (f0/2), harmonic (n*f0; n ∈ N) and ultraharmonic (((2n-1)/2)*f0; n ∈ N & n > 1) components in the echo response. A promising approach to monitor in vivo pressures revolves around the fact that the ultrasound transmit and receive parameters can be selected to induce an ambient pressure amplitude dependent subharmonic signal. This subharmonic signal may be used to estimate ambient pressure amplitude; such technique of estimating ambient pressure amplitude is referred to as subharmonic aided pressure estimation or SHAPE. This project develops and evaluates the feasibility of SHAPE to noninvasively monitor cardiac and hepatic pressures (using commercially available ultrasound scanners and UCAs) because invasive catheter based pressure measurements are used currently for these applications. Invasive catheter based pressure measurements pose risk of introducing infection while the catheter is guided towards the region of interest in the body through a percutaneous incision, pose risk of death due to structural or mechanical failure of the catheter (which has also triggered product recalls by the USA Food and Drug Administration) and may potentially modulate the pressures that are being measured. Also, catheterization procedures require fluoroscopic guidance to advance the catheter to the site of pressure measurements and such catheterization procedures are not performed in all clinical centers. Thus, a noninvasive technique to obtain ambient pressure values without the catheterization process is clinically

  19. Contrast-enhanced imaging of SPIO-labeled platelets using magnetomotive ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pope, Ava G.; Wu, Gongting; McWhorter, Frances Y.; Merricks, Elizabeth P.; Nichols, Timothy C.; Czernuszewicz, Tomasz J.; Gallippi, Caterina M.; Oldenburg, Amy L.

    2013-10-01

    The ability to image platelets in vivo can provide insight into blood clotting processes and coagulopathies, and aid in identifying sites of vascular endothelial damage related to trauma or cardiovascular disease. Toward this end, we have developed a magnetomotive ultrasound (MMUS) system that provides contrast-enhanced imaging of superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) labeled platelets via magnetically-induced vibration. Platelets are a promising platform for functional imaging contrast because they readily take up SPIOs and are easily harvested from blood. Here we report a novel MMUS system that accommodates an arbitrarily thick sample while maintaining portability. We employed a frequency- and phase-locked motion detection algorithm based on bandpass filtering of the differential RF phase, which allows for the detection of sub-resolution vibration amplitudes on the order of several nanometers. We then demonstrated MMUS in homogenous tissue phantoms at SPIO concentrations as low as 0.09 mg ml-1 Fe (p < 0.0001, n = 6, t-test). Finally, we showed that our system is capable of three-dimensional imaging of a 185 µL simulated clot containing SPIO-platelets. This highlights the potential utility for non-invasive imaging of platelet-rich clots, which would constitute a fundamental advance in technology for the study of hemostasis and detection of clinically relevant thrombi.

  20. An in vitro study of a microbubble contrast agent using a clinical ultrasound imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sboros, V.; Moran, C. M.; Pye, S. D.; McDicken, W. N.

    2004-01-01

    Optimal insonation settings for contrast imaging are yet to be specified, mainly due to the lack of good understanding of the behaviour of the microbubbles. A satisfactory model that explains the behaviour of individual contrast agent scatterers has not yet been reported in the literature. An in vitro system based on a commercial scanner (ATL HDI3000) has been developed to investigate the backscatter of such agents. Suspensions of Definity® were introduced in an anechoic tank. The frequency of transmitted ultrasound varied from 1 to 5 MHz, pulse period from 2 to 10 periods and peak negative acoustic pressure from 0.08 to 1.7 MPa. The backscatter at the fundamental and second harmonic frequency windows from the agent was normalized in terms of the corresponding components of backscatter from a blood mimicking fluid suspension. The agent provided a dominant resonance effect at 1.6 MHz transmit frequency. Second harmonic normalized backscatter averaged around 9 dB higher than the fundamental. The normalized fundamental backscatter intensity was linear with peak negative pressure. The second harmonic at resonance peaked at 0.5 MPa suggestive of bubble disruption above such pressure. The system proved capable of illustrating the ultrasonic behaviour of Definity® in vitro, and the investigation suggested particular insonation conditions for optimal image enhancement using Definity®.

  1. Ultrasound contrast imaging: influence of scatterer motion in multi-pulse techniques.

    PubMed

    Lin, Fanglue; Cachard, Christian; Mori, Riccardo; Varray, Francois; Guidi, Francesco; Basset, Olivier

    2013-10-01

    In ultrasound contrast imaging, many techniques based on multiple transmissions have been proposed to increase the contrast-to-tissue ratio (CTR). They are generally based on the response of static scatterers inside the imaged region. However, scatterer motion, for example in blood vessels, has an inevitable influence on multi-pulse techniques, which can either enhance or degrade the technique involved. This paper investigates the response of static nonlinear media insonated by multi-pulses with various phase shifts, and the influence of scatterer motion on multi-pulse techniques. Simulations and experimental results from a single bubble and clouds of bubbles show that the phase shift of the echoes backscattered from bubbles is dependent on the transmissions' phase shift, and that the bubble motion influences the efficiency of multi-pulse techniques: fundamental and second-harmonic amplitudes of the processed signal change periodically, exhibiting maximum or minimum values, according to scatterer motion. Furthermore, experimental results based on the second-harmonic inversion (SHI) technique reveal that bubble motion can be taken into account to regulate the pulse repetition frequency (PRF). With the optimal PRF, the CTR of SHI images can be improved by about 12 dB compared with second-harmonic images.

  2. Contrast-enhanced imaging of SPIO-labeled platelets using magnetomotive ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Pope, Ava G.; Wu, Gongting; McWhorter, Frances Y.; Merricks, Elizabeth C.; Nichols, Timothy C.; Czernuszewicz, Tomasz J.; Gallippi, Caterina M.; Oldenburg, Amy L.

    2013-01-01

    The ability to image platelets in vivo can provide insight into blood clotting processes and coagulopathies, and aid in identifying sites of vascular endothelial damage related to trauma or cardiovascular disease. Toward this end, we have developed a magnetomotive ultrasound (MMUS) system that provides contrast-enhanced imaging of superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) labeled platelets via magnetically-induced vibration. Platelets are a promising platform for functional imaging contrast because they readily take up SPIOs and are easily harvested from blood. Here we report a novel MMUS system that accommodates an arbitrarily thick sample while maintaining portability. We employed a frequency- and phase-locked motion detection algorithm based on bandpass filtering of the differential RF phase, which allows for the detection of sub-resolution vibration amplitudes on the order of several nanometers. We then demonstrated MMUS in homogenous tissue phantoms at SPIO concentrations as low as 0.09 mg/ml Fe (p < 0.0001, n = 6, t-test). Finally, we showed that our system is capable of 3-dimensional imaging of a 185 μL simulated clot containing SPIO-platelets. This highlights the potential utility for non-invasive imaging of platelet-rich clots, which would constitute a fundamental advance in technology for the study of hemostasis and detection of clinically relevant thrombi. PMID:24077004

  3. Evaluation of the thrombus of abdominal aortic aneurysms using contrast enhanced ultrasound - preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Łukasiewicz, Adam; Garkowski, Adam; Rutka, Katarzyna; Janica, Jacek; Łebkowska, Urszula

    2016-09-01

    It is hypothesized that the degree of vascularization of the thrombus may have a significant impact on the rupture of aortic aneurysms. The presence of neovascularization of the vessel wall and mural thrombus has been confirmed only in histopathological studies. However, no non-invasive imaging technique of qualitative assessment of thrombus and neovascularization has been implemented so far. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) has been proposed as a feasible and minimally invasive technique for in vivo visualization of neovascularization in the evaluation of tumors and atherosclerotic plaques. The aim of this study was the evaluation of mural thrombus and AAAs wall with CEUS. CEUS was performed in a group of seventeen patients with AAAs. The mural thrombus enhancement was recognized in 12 cases, yet no significant correlation between the degree of contrast enhancement and AAAs diameter, thrombus width, and thrombus echogenicity was found. We observed a rise in AAAs thrombus heterogeneity with the increase in the aneurysm diameter (r = 0.62, p = 0.017). In conclusion CEUS can visualize small channels within AAAs thrombus, which could be a result of an ongoing angiogenesis. There is a need for further research to find out whether the degree of vascularization of the thrombus may have a significant impact on the rupture of aneurysms.

  4. Analysis of flash echo from contrast agent for designing optimal ultrasound diagnostic systems.

    PubMed

    Kamiyama, N; Moriyasu, F; Mine, Y; Goto, Y

    1999-03-01

    Microbubble-based contrast agents can enhance echoes in areas of low blood flow, but the bubbles are extremely sensitive and collapse easily when exposed to ultrasound (US) irradiation. An experimental study of bubble collapse was carried out to design new functions for US diagnostic systems to detect echoes from microbubbles more efficiently. For contrast agent (Levovist) solution, a high-intensity, but momentary, echo (flash echo), was observed in the first frame image after a several-second suspension of transmission, but was not seen in the second frame image. These "flash echo" signals were analyzed and categorized based on microscopic observation, and the results showed that the longevity of the microbubbles was reduced by conditions such as B-mode imaging. Next, a numerical simulation of the bubbles in liquid was performed under the same conditions as in the in vitro experiment. The results showed that even bubbles less than 1 microm in diameter expand and collapse within one pulse drive, which would generate flash echoes. The flash echo imaging system described here permits flexible intermittent scanning with variable intervals, with a variable number of frames at the trigger, and with simultaneous monitoring at low power output. Animal experiments were also conducted to evaluate the system. As the interval between frames was increased, the flash echoes gradually increased, and perfusion in the parenchyma was clearly observed with an interval of 4 s.

  5. A General Framework for Modeling Sub- and Ultraharmonics of Ultrasound Contrast Agent Signals with MISO Volterra Series

    PubMed Central

    Charara, Jamal; Girault, Jean-Marc

    2013-01-01

    Sub- and ultraharmonics generation by ultrasound contrast agents makes possible sub- and ultraharmonics imaging to enhance the contrast of ultrasound images and overcome the limitations of harmonic imaging. In order to separate different frequency components of ultrasound contrast agents signals, nonlinear models like single-input single-output (SISO) Volterra model are used. One important limitation of this model is its incapacity to model sub- and ultraharmonic components. Many attempts are made to model sub- and ultraharmonics using Volterra model. It led to the design of mutiple-input singe-output (MISO) Volterra model instead of SISO Volterra model. The key idea of MISO modeling was to decompose the input signal of the nonlinear system into periodic subsignals at the subharmonic frequency. In this paper, sub- and ultraharmonics modeling with MISO Volterra model is presented in a general framework that details and explains the required conditions to optimally model sub- and ultraharmonics. A new decomposition of the input signal in periodic orthogonal basis functions is presented. Results of application of different MISO Volterra methods to model simulated ultrasound contrast agents signals show its efficiency in sub- and ultraharmonics imaging. PMID:23554840

  6. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) appearances of an adrenal phaeochromocytoma in a child with Von Hippel-Lindau disease.

    PubMed

    Al Bunni, Faise; Deganello, Annamaria; Sellars, Maria E; Schulte, Klaus-Martin; Al-Adnani, Mudher; Sidhu, Paul S

    2014-12-01

    A phaeochromocytoma is a rare catecholamine-secreting tumour arising from the chromaffin cells. We describe a case of a child with Von Hippel-Lindau disease, with an adrenal phaeochromocytoma who presented with severe dilated cardiomyopathy driven by secondary hypertension. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound findings are described and compared with both magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography imaging.

  7. Role of intra-operative contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) in robotic-assisted nephron-sparing surgery.

    PubMed

    Alenezi, Ahmad N; Karim, Omer

    2015-03-01

    This review examines studies of intra-operative contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) and its emerging role and advantages in robotic-assisted nephron-sparing surgery. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound is a technology that combines the use of second-generation contrast agents consisting of microbubbles with existent ultrasound techniques. Until now, this novel technology has aided surgeons with procedures involving the liver. However, with recent advances in the CEUS technique and the introduction of robotics in nephron-sparing surgery, CEUS has proven to be efficacious in answering several clinical questions with respect to the kidneys. In addition, the introduction of the microbubble-based contrast agents has increased the image quality and signal uptake by the ultrasound probe. This has led to better, enhanced scanning of the macro and microvasculature of the kidneys, making CEUS a powerful diagnostic modality. This imaging method is capable of further lowering the learning curve and warm ischemia time (WIT) during robotic-assisted nephron-sparing surgery, with its increased level of capillary perfusion and imaging. CEUS has the potential to increase the sensitivity and specificity of intra-operative images, and can significantly improve the outcome of robotic-assisted nephron-sparing surgery by increasing the precision and diagnostic insight of the surgeon. The purpose of this article is to review the practical and potential uses of CEUS as an intra-operative imaging technique during robotic-assisted nephron-sparing surgery.

  8. Investigation on the inertial cavitation threshold and shell properties of commercialized ultrasound contrast agent microbubbles.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiasheng; Li, Qian; Zhang, Zhe; Zhang, Dong; Tu, Juan

    2013-08-01

    The inertial cavitation (IC) activity of ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) plays an important role in the development and improvement of ultrasound diagnostic and therapeutic applications. However, various diagnostic and therapeutic applications have different requirements for IC characteristics. Here through IC dose quantifications based on passive cavitation detection, IC thresholds were measured for two commercialized UCAs, albumin-shelled KangRun(®) and lipid-shelled SonoVue(®) microbubbles, at varied UCA volume concentrations (viz., 0.125 and 0.25 vol. %) and acoustic pulse lengths (viz., 5, 10, 20, 50, and 100 cycles). Shell elastic and viscous coefficients of UCAs were estimated by fitting measured acoustic attenuation spectra with Sarkar's model. The influences of sonication condition (viz., acoustic pulse length) and UCA shell properties on IC threshold were discussed based on numerical simulations. Both experimental measurements and numerical simulations indicate that IC thresholds of UCAs decrease with increasing UCA volume concentration and acoustic pulse length. The shell interfacial tension and dilatational viscosity estimated for SonoVue (0.7 ± 0.11 N/m, 6.5 ± 1.01 × 10(-8) kg/s) are smaller than those of KangRun (1.05 ± 0.18 N/m, 1.66 ± 0.38 × 10(-7) kg/s); this might result in lower IC threshold for SonoVue. The current results will be helpful for selecting and utilizing commercialized UCAs for specific clinical applications, while minimizing undesired IC-induced bioeffects.

  9. Relationship between cavitation and loss of echogenicity from ultrasound contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Radhakrishnan, Kirthi; Bader, Kenneth B; Haworth, Kevin J; Kopechek, Jonathan A; Raymond, Jason L; Huang, Shao-Ling; McPherson, David D; Holland, Christy K

    2013-09-21

    Ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) have the potential to nucleate cavitation and promote both beneficial and deleterious bioeffects in vivo. Previous studies have elucidated the pulse-duration-dependent pressure amplitude threshold for rapid loss of echogenicity due to UCA fragmentation. Previous studies have demonstrated that UCA fragmentation was concomitant with inertial cavitation. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between stable and inertial cavitation thresholds and loss of echogenicity of UCAs as a function of pulse duration. Determining the relationship between cavitation thresholds and loss of echogenicity of UCAs would enable monitoring of cavitation based upon the onscreen echogenicity in clinical applications. Two lipid-shelled UCAs, echogenic liposomes (ELIP) and Definity®, were insonified by a clinical ultrasound scanner in duplex spectral Doppler mode at four pulse durations ('sample volumes') in both a static system and a flow system. Cavitation emissions from the UCAs insonified by Doppler pulses were recorded using a passive cavitation detection system and stable and inertial cavitation thresholds ascertained. Loss of echogenicity from ELIP and Definity® was assessed within regions of interest on B-mode images. A numerical model based on UCA rupture predicted the functional form of the loss of echogenicity from ELIP and Definity®. Stable and inertial cavitation thresholds were found to have a weak dependence on pulse duration. Stable cavitation thresholds were lower than inertial cavitation thresholds. The power of cavitation emissions was an exponential function of the loss of echogenicity over the investigated range of acoustic pressures. Both ELIP and Definity® lost more than 80% echogenicity before the onset of stable or inertial cavitation. Once this level of echogenicity loss occurred, both stable and inertial cavitation were detected in the physiologic flow phantom. These results imply that stable and inertial

  10. Diagnostic and prognostic values of contrast-enhanced ultrasound in breast cancer: a retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yi-Xuan; Liu, Shuang; Hu, Yan-Bing; Ge, Yan-Yan; Lv, Dong-Mei

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to explore the diagnostic and prognostic values of contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) in breast cancer. Between September 2009 and October 2011, a total of 143 breast cancer patients and 161 healthy people were selected as case group and control group, respectively. After the identification of lesions by conventional ultrasound, all patients underwent CEUS. The CEUS images were analyzed, and time–intensity curves (TICs) were obtained. Hematoxylin–eosin and immunohistochemistry staining was performed on tissue specimens, according to which the expressions of estrogen receptor (ER), c-erb-B2, p53, and Ki-67 were measured. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to compare CEUS and TIC parameters between the two groups. Compared with the control group, cancer patients showed high enhancement, heterogeneous enhancement or defects in the central region, expansion of lesion diameter after enhancement and crab-like blur lesion edges. The peak intensity (PI), relative start time of enhancement, relative PI, and relative area under the curve in the case group were significantly higher than those in the control group. Logistic analysis showed that the uniformity of enhancement, expansion of lesion diameter, and relative PI were significant diagnostic parameters of breast cancer, with area under the curve being 0.798, 0.776, and 0.919, respectively. There were strong associations between CEUS characteristics and expressions of prognostic factors in breast cancer: the heterogeneous enhancement was common in c-erb-B2-positive tumors; the centripetal enhancement occurred more in ER-negative tumors; perforator vessels were often seen in tumors at high histological grade; perfusion defects were common in ER-negative, c-erb-B2-positive, and Ki-67-positive tumors. CEUS is a useful tool for the early diagnosis and prognosis of breast cancer. PMID:28260926

  11. Do Anesthetic Techniques Influence the Threshold for Glomerular Capillary Hemorrhage induced in Rats by Contrast Enhanced Diagnostic Ultrasound?

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Douglas L.; Lu, Xiaofang; Fabiilli, Mario; Dou, Chunyan

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Glomerular capillary hemorrhage (GCH) can be induced by ultrasonic cavitation during contrast enhanced diagnostic ultrasound (CEDUS), an important nonthermal ultrasound bioeffect. Recent studies of pulmonary ultrasound exposure have shown that thresholds for another nonthermal bioeffect of ultrasound, pulmonary capillary hemorrhage, is strongly influenced by whether or not xylazine is included in the specific anesthetic technique. Methods In this study, anesthesia with ketamine only was compared to ketamine plus xylazine for the induction of GCH in rats by 1.6 MHz intermittent diagnostic ultrasound with contrast agent (similar to Definity). GCH was measured as a percentage of glomeruli with hemorrhage found in histological sections for groups of rats scanned at different peak rarefactional pressure amplitudes. Results There was a significant difference between the magnitude of the GCH between the two anesthetics at 2.3 MPa with 45.6 % GCH for ketamine only, increasing to 63.2 % GCH for ketamine plus xylazine anesthesia (P<0.001). However, the thresholds for the two anesthesia methods were virtually identical at 1.0 MPa, based on linear regression of the exposure response data. Conclusions Therefore, thresholds for CEDUS induced injury of the microvasculature appears to be minimally affected by anesthesia methods. PMID:26764276

  12. Quantitative contrast-enhanced ultrasound measurement of cerebrospinal fluid flow for the diagnosis of ventricular shunt malfunction

    PubMed Central

    Hartman, Robin; Aglyamov, Salavat; Fox, Douglas J.; Emelianov, Stanislav

    2015-01-01

    Object Cerebral shunt malfunction is common but often difficult to effectively diagnose. Current methods are invasive, involve ionizing radiation, and can be costly. This work investigated the feasibility of quantitatively measuring cerebrospinal fluid flow in a shunt catheter using contrast-enhanced ultrasound. Methods A syringe pump was used to push a solution of gas-filled microbubbles at specific flow rates through a shunt catheter while a high-frequency ultrasound imaging system was used to collect ultrasound images for off-line processing. Displacement maps and velocity profiles were generated using a speckle tracking method based on a cross-correlation algorithm. An additional correction factor, to account for a predictable underestimation and to adjust the measured flow rates, was calculated based on the geometry of the ultrasound imaging plane and assuming a simple model of laminar flow. Results The developed method was able to differentiate between physiologically relevant flow rates from 0.0 to 0.09 ml/min with reasonable certainty. The quantitative measurement of flow rates through the catheter using this method was determined to be in good agreement with the expected flow rate. Conclusions This study demonstrated that contrast-enhanced ultrasound has the potential to be used as a minimally invasive and cost-effective alternative method for outpatient shunt malfunction diagnosis. PMID:26090831

  13. Parametric imaging using subharmonic signals from ultrasound contrast agents in patients with breast lesions.

    PubMed

    Eisenbrey, John R; Dave, Jaydev K; Merton, Daniel A; Palazzo, Juan P; Hall, Anne L; Forsberg, Flemming

    2011-01-01

    Parametric maps showing perfusion of contrast media can be useful tools for characterizing lesions in breast tissue. In this study we show the feasibility of parametric subharmonic imaging (SHI), which allows imaging of a vascular marker (the ultrasound contrast agent) while providing near complete tissue suppression. Digital SHI clips of 16 breast lesions from 14 women were acquired. Patients were scanned using a modified LOGIQ 9 scanner (GE Healthcare, Waukesha, WI) transmitting/receiving at 4.4/2.2 MHz. Using motion-compensated cumulative maximum intensity (CMI) sequences, parametric maps were generated for each lesion showing the time to peak (TTP), estimated perfusion (EP), and area under the time-intensity curve (AUC). Findings were grouped and compared according to biopsy results as benign lesions (n = 12, including 5 fibroadenomas and 3 cysts) and carcinomas (n = 4). For each lesion CMI, TTP, EP, and AUC parametric images were generated. No significant variations were detected with CMI (P = .80), TTP (P = .35), or AUC (P = .65). A statistically significant variation was detected for the average pixel EP (P = .002). Especially, differences were seen between carcinoma and benign lesions (mean ± SD, 0.10 ± 0.03 versus 0.05 ± 0.02 intensity units [IU]/s; P = .0014) and between carcinoma and fibroadenoma (0.10 ± 0.03 versus 0.04 ± 0.01 IU/s; P = .0044), whereas differences between carcinomas and cysts were found to be nonsignificant. In conclusion, a parametric imaging method for characterization of breast lesions using the high contrast to tissue signal provided by SHI has been developed. While the preliminary sample size was limited, results show potential for breast lesion characterization based on perfusion flow parameters.

  14. Improved Linear Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound Imaging via Analysis of First-Order Speckle Statistics.

    PubMed

    Lowerison, Matthew R; Hague, M Nicole; Chambers, Ann F; Lacefield, James C

    2016-09-01

    The linear subtraction methods commonly used for preclinical contrast-enhanced imaging are susceptible to registration errors and motion artifacts that lead to reduced contrast-to-tissue ratios. To address this limitation, a new approach to linear contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) is proposed based on the analysis of the temporal dynamics of the speckle statistics during wash-in of a bolus injection of microbubbles. In the proposed method, the speckle signal is approximated as a mixture of temporally varying random processes, representing the microbubble signal, superimposed onto spatially heterogeneous tissue backscatter in multiple subvolumes within the region of interest. A wash-in curve is constructed by plotting the effective degrees of freedom (EDoFs) of the histogram of the speckle signal as a function of time. The proposed method is, therefore, named the EDoF method. The EDoF parameter is proportional to the shape parameter of the Nakagami distribution. Images acquired at 18 MHz from a murine mammary fat pad breast cancer xenograft model were processed using gold-standard nonlinear amplitude modulation, conventional linear subtraction, and the proposed statistical method. The EDoF method shows promise for improving the robustness of linear CEUS based on reduced frame-to-frame variability compared with the conventional linear subtraction time-intensity curves. Wash-in curve parameters estimated using the EDoF method also demonstrate higher correlation to nonlinear CEUS than the conventional linear method. The conceptual basis of the statistical method implies that EDoF wash-in curves may carry information about vascular complexity that could provide valuable new imaging biomarkers for cancer research.

  15. Epithelial cell biocompatibility of silica nanospheres for contrast-enhanced ultrasound molecular imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiriacò, Fernanda; Conversano, Francesco; Soloperto, Giulia; Casciaro, Ernesto; Ragusa, Andrea; Sbenaglia, Enzo Antonio; Dipaola, Lucia; Casciaro, Sergio

    2013-07-01

    Nanosized particles are receiving increasing attention as future contrast agents (CAs) for ultrasound (US) molecular imaging, possibly decorated on its surface with biological recognition agents for targeted delivery and deposition of therapeutics. In particular, silica nanospheres (SiNSs) have been demonstrated to be feasible in terms of contrast enhancement on conventional US systems. In this work, we evaluated the cytotoxicity of SiNSs on breast cancer (MCF-7) and HeLa (cervical cancer) cells employing NSs with sizes ranging from 160 to 330 nm and concentration range of 1.5-5 mg/mL. Cell viability was evaluated in terms of size, dose and time dependence, performing the MTT reduction assay with coated and uncoated SiNSs. Whereas uncoated SiNSs caused a variable significant decrease in cell viability on both cell lines mainly depending on size and exposure time, PEGylated SiNSs (SiNSs-PEG) exhibit a high level of biocompatibility. In fact, after 72-h incubation, viability of both cell types was above the cutoff value of 70 % at concentration up to 5 mg/mL. We also investigated the acoustical behavior of coated and uncoated SiNSs within conventional diagnostic US fields in order to determine a suitable configuration, in terms of particle size and concentration, for their employment as targetable CAs. Our results indicate that the employment of SiNSs with diameters around 240 nm assures the most effective contrast enhancement even at the lowest tested concentration, coupled with the possibility of targeting all tumor tissues, being the SiNSs still in a size range where reticuloendothelial system trapping effect is relatively low.

  16. Research on respiratory motion correction method based on liver contrast-enhanced ultrasound images of single mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ji; Li, Tao; Zheng, Shiqiang; Li, Yiyong

    2015-03-01

    To reduce the effects of respiratory motion in the quantitative analysis based on liver contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) image sequencesof single mode. The image gating method and the iterative registration method using model image were adopted to register liver contrast-enhanced ultrasound image sequences of single mode. The feasibility of the proposed respiratory motion correction method was explored preliminarily using 10 hepatocellular carcinomas CEUS cases. The positions of the lesions in the time series of 2D ultrasound images after correction were visually evaluated. Before and after correction, the quality of the weighted sum of transit time (WSTT) parametric images were also compared, in terms of the accuracy and spatial resolution. For the corrected and uncorrected sequences, their mean deviation values (mDVs) of time-intensity curve (TIC) fitting derived from CEUS sequences were measured. After the correction, the positions of the lesions in the time series of 2D ultrasound images were almost invariant. In contrast, the lesions in the uncorrected images all shifted noticeably. The quality of the WSTT parametric maps derived from liver CEUS image sequences were improved more greatly. Moreover, the mDVs of TIC fitting derived from CEUS sequences after the correction decreased by an average of 48.48+/-42.15. The proposed correction method could improve the accuracy of quantitative analysis based on liver CEUS image sequences of single mode, which would help in enhancing the differential diagnosis efficiency of liver tumors.

  17. Color duplex ultrasound and contrast-enhanced ultrasound in comparison to MS-CT in the detection of endoleak following endovascular aneurysm repair.

    PubMed

    Clevert, D-A; Minaifar, N; Weckbach, S; Kopp, R; Meimarakis, G; Clevert, D-A; Reiser, M

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare Color Duplex Ultrasound (CDU), Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound (CEUS) and Multislice Computed Tomography (MS-CT) angiography in the routine follow up of patients following Endovascular Repair (EVAR) of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA).43 consecutive patients with AAA underwent endovascular aneurysm repair and were imaged with CDU, CEUS and MS-CT angiography at regular intervals after the procedure. Each imaging modality was evaluated for the detection of endoleaks. The presence of endoleaks was analyzed and the conspicuity of findings was assessed.CTA was used as gold standard in determining the presence of endoleaks. CDU was true positive for endoleaks in 5/43 patients (11.6%) and false positive for endoleaks in 2/43 patients (4.6%). The sensitivity of CDU was therefore 33.3% and its specificity 92.8%; the positive and negative predictive values were 0.71 and 0.72, respectively. CEUS was true positive for the detection of endoleaks in 15/43 patients (34.9%) and false positive in 2/43 patients (4.6%). The sensitivity of CEUS was therefore 100% and its specificity 93%; the positive and negative predictive values were 0.88 and 1. In the follow up the two false positive endoleaks in CEUS were confirmed as true positive endoleaks by CEUS and MS-CT. In our small patient group, contrast-enhanced ultrasound seemed to be more accurately in demonstrating endoleaks after EVAR than MS-CT angiography and may be considered as a primary surveillance modality whereas duplex ultrasound scanning alone is not as sensitive as CEUS and MS-CT angiography in detection of endoleaks. Especially in patients with contraindications for CT contrast agents (e.g. due to renal failure or severe allergy) CEUS provides a good alternative to MS-CT.

  18. Role of contrast-enhanced harmonic endoscopic ultrasound in submucosal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez-Sanchez, Maria Victoria; Gincul, Rodica; Lefort, Christine; Napoleon, Bertrand

    2016-01-01

    With the widespread use of endoscopy, gastrointestinal submucosal lesions are now more commonly discovered. Although endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) is superior to all other imaging techniques for the diagnosis of submucosal tumors (SMTs), it is still suboptimal for differentiating hypoechoic lesions arising from the fourth sonographic gastrointestinal wall layer, which encompass tumors with very different prognosis. EUS tissue acquisition has provided with the unique opportunity to obtain histological confirmation, but it is not accurate enough to evaluate the malignant potential of gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs). In the last years, contrast-enhanced harmonic EUS (CH-EUS) emerged as a powerful imaging modality to assess the microperfusion patterns of pancreatic tumors. Based on the distinct microvascularity of malignant SMTs, it was hypothesized that CH-EUS might also assist in the differential diagnosis of SMTs. Preliminary experience in this field is now available and suggests CH-EUS as a performant modality to distinguish between benign SMTs and GISTs and to evaluate the malignant potential of GISTs. High expectations are also relied on CH-EUS for the monitoring of antiangiogenic treatments of GISTs and the evaluation of gastrointestinal neuroendocrine tumors (NETs). PMID:28000626

  19. Role of contrast-enhanced harmonic endoscopic ultrasound in submucosal tumors.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Sanchez, Maria Victoria; Gincul, Rodica; Lefort, Christine; Napoleon, Bertrand

    2016-01-01

    With the widespread use of endoscopy, gastrointestinal submucosal lesions are now more commonly discovered. Although endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) is superior to all other imaging techniques for the diagnosis of submucosal tumors (SMTs), it is still suboptimal for differentiating hypoechoic lesions arising from the fourth sonographic gastrointestinal wall layer, which encompass tumors with very different prognosis. EUS tissue acquisition has provided with the unique opportunity to obtain histological confirmation, but it is not accurate enough to evaluate the malignant potential of gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs). In the last years, contrast-enhanced harmonic EUS (CH-EUS) emerged as a powerful imaging modality to assess the microperfusion patterns of pancreatic tumors. Based on the distinct microvascularity of malignant SMTs, it was hypothesized that CH-EUS might also assist in the differential diagnosis of SMTs. Preliminary experience in this field is now available and suggests CH-EUS as a performant modality to distinguish between benign SMTs and GISTs and to evaluate the malignant potential of GISTs. High expectations are also relied on CH-EUS for the monitoring of antiangiogenic treatments of GISTs and the evaluation of gastrointestinal neuroendocrine tumors (NETs).

  20. Erythrocytes and microbubble contrast agents, improve the therapeutic efficiency of high intensity focused ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takegami, Kenji; Kaneko, Yukio; Watanabe, Toshiaki; Maruyama, Toshiyuki; Matsumoto, Yoichiro; Nagawa, Hirokazu

    2005-03-01

    Erythrocytes, an well as Levovist microbubble contrast agent, enhance the heating effect of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) and increase the coagulation volume produced by HIFU irradiation. In vitro experiments used human plasma with various concentrations of human erythrocytes in combination with or without Levovist. In vivo experiments used eight Japan white rabbits with three levels of anaemia. Using a 2.17 MHz transducer, HIFU was applied for 60 seconds, and the temperature rise and the volume of coagulation necrosis was evaluated. There was a significant correlation between the HIFU-induced temperature rise and hematocrit, with a correlation coefficient of 0.998 (p=0.0001). Although the temperature rise was smaller at low hematocrit, it was significantly increased by adding Levovist to the suspension (p<0.01). The mean volume of coagulation necrosis was significantly higher in the rabbits with higher hematocrit (p<0.01), and that in the moderate anaemia group was significantly increased by using Levovist (p<0.01).

  1. Marriage Strategy of Structure and Composition Designs for Intensifying Ultrasound & MR & CT Trimodal Contrast Imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kun; Chen, Hangrong; Li, Pei; Bo, Xiaowan; Li, Xiaolong; Zeng, Zeng; Xu, Huixiong

    2015-08-26

    Despite great efforts having been devoted to the design of multimodal imaging probe, almost all design principles of nanotheranostic agents subordinate to simple assemblies of building blocks, resulting in complex preparation process and discounted ability, that is, 1 + 1 < 2. In this report, a novel design strategy, marriage of structure design and composition design that can maximize imaging ability of each building block, ultimately achieving 1 + 1 ≥ 2, has been established. Moreover, a high-efficient ultrasound (US) & MR & CT trimodal contrast agent acts as model to instantiate this design strategy, wherein nanoparticles-induced nonlinear scattering and rattle-type structure-induced double scattering enhancing US imaging, and uniform distribution of Mn(2+) paramagentic centers and "core-satellite" structure of Au atoms favoring enhanced MR imaging and CT imaging, respectively have been validated, achieving optimization of structure design. Importantly, the selected components, silica, Au and MnO are endowed with excellent biocompatibility, displaying the marriage strategy of composition design with aforementioned structure optimization. In in vivo evaluations, such a biocompatible trimodal probe is demonstrated of excellent performance in intensifying CT, MR and US imaging in vivo, especially after positively charged modification by PEI promoting more probes retained in tumor. More importantly, as a universal design strategy, the involved principles in constructing such a US&MR&CT trimodal imaging probe promise great potentials in guiding designs of other materials-based multimodal imaging probe.

  2. Detection of Early Tumor Response to Axitinib in Advanced Hepatocellular Carcinoma by Dynamic Contrast Enhanced Ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Lo, Glen M; Al Zahrani, Hassan; Jang, Hyun Jung; Menezes, Ravi; Hudson, John; Burns, Peter; McNamara, Mairéad G; Kandel, Sonja; Khalili, Korosh; Knox, Jennifer; Rogalla, Patrik; Kim, Tae Kyoung

    2016-06-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the utility of dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasound (DCE-US) in measuring early tumor response of advanced hepatocellular carcinoma to axitinib. Twenty patients were enrolled (aged 18-78 y; median 65). DCE-US was performed with bolus injection and infusion/disruption replenishment. Median overall survival was 7.1 mo (1.8-27.3) and progression free survival was 3.6 mo (1.8-17.4). Fifteen patients completed infusion scans and 12 completed bolus scans at 2 wk. Among the perfusion parameters, fractional blood volume at infusion (INFBV) decreased at 2 wk in 10/15 (16%-81% of baseline, mean 47%) and increased in 5/15 (116%-535%, mean 220%). This was not significantly associated with progression free survival (p = 0.310) or progression at 16 wk (p = 0.849), but was borderline statistically significant (p = 0.050) with overall survival, limited by a small sample size. DCE-US is potentially useful in measuring early tumor response of advanced hepatocellular carcinoma to axitinib, but a larger trial is needed.

  3. Evaluation of Perfusion Quantification Methods with Ultrasound Contrast Agents in a Machine-Perfused Pig Liver.

    PubMed

    Averkiou, M; Keravnou, C P; Izamis, M L; Leen, E

    2016-05-03

    Purpose: To evaluate dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasound (DCEUS) as a tool for measuring blood flow in the macro- and microcirculation of an ex-vivo machine-perfused pig liver and to confirm the ability of DCEUS to accurately detect induced flow rate changes so that it could then be used clinically for monitoring flow changes in liver tumors. Materials and Methods: Bolus injections of contrast agents in the hepatic artery (HA) and portal vein (PV) were administered to 3 machine-perfused pig livers. Flow changes were induced by the pump of the machine perfusion system. The induced flow rates were of clinical relevance (150 - 400 ml/min for HA and 400 - 1400 ml/min for PV). Quantification parameters from time-intensity curves [rise time (RT), mean transit time (MTT), area under the curve (AUC) and peak intensity (PI)] were extracted in order to evaluate whether the induced flow changes were reflected in these parameters. Results: A linear relationship between the image intensity and the microbubble concentration was confirmed first, while time parameters (RT and MMT) were found to be independent of concentration. The induced flow changes which propagated from the larger vessels to the parenchyma were reflected in the quantification parameters. Specifically, RT, MTT and AUC correlated with flow rate changes. Conclusion Machine-perfused pig liver is an excellent test bed for DCEUS quantification approaches for the study of the hepatic vascular networks. DCEUS quantification parameters (RT, MTT, and AUC) can measure relative flow changes of about 20 % and above in the liver vasculature. DCEUS quantification is a promising tool for real-time monitoring of the vascular network of tumors.

  4. In Vivo Noninvasive Characterization of Brown Adipose Tissue Blood Flow by Contrast Ultrasound in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Baron, David M.; Clerte, Maeva; Brouckaert, Peter; Raher, Michael J.; Flynn, Aidan W.; Zhang, Haihua; Carter, Edward A.; Picard, Michael H.; Bloch, Kenneth D.; Buys, Emmanuel S.; Scherrer-Crosbie, Marielle

    2012-01-01

    Background Interventions to increase brown adipose tissue (BAT) volume and activation are being extensively investigated as therapies to decrease the body weight in obese subjects. Noninvasive methods to monitor these therapies in animal models and humans are rare. We investigated whether contrast ultrasound (CU) performed in mice could detect BAT and measure its activation by monitoring BAT blood flow. After validation, CU was used to study the role of uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) and nitric oxide synthases in the acute regulation of BAT blood flow. Methods and Results Blood flow of interscapular BAT was assessed in mice (n=64) with CU by measuring the signal intensity of continuously infused contrast microbubbles. Blood flow of BAT estimated by CU was 0.5±0.1 (mean±SEM) dB/s at baseline and increased 15-fold during BAT stimulation by norepinephrine (NE, 1 μg·kg−1·min−1). Assessment of BAT blood flow using CU was correlated to that performed with fluorescent microspheres (R2=0.86, p<0.001). To evaluate whether intact BAT activation is required to increase BAT blood flow, CU was performed in UCP1-deficient (UCP1−/−) mice with impaired BAT activation. Norepinephrine infusion induced a smaller increase in BAT blood flow in UCP1−/− mice than in wild-type mice. Finally, we investigated whether NOS played a role in acute NE-induced changes of BAT blood flow. Genetic and pharmacologic inhibition of NOS3 attenuated the NE-induced increase in BAT blood flow. Conclusions These results indicate that CU can detect BAT in mice, and estimate BAT blood flow in mice with functional differences in BAT. PMID:22776888

  5. Processing of subharmonic signals from ultrasound contrast agents to determine ambient pressures.

    PubMed

    Dave, Jaydev K; Halldorsdottir, Valgerdur G; Eisenbrey, John R; Forsberg, Flemming

    2012-04-01

    Subharmonic-aided pressure estimation (SHAPE) is a technique that utilizes the subharmonic emissions, occurring at half the insonation frequency, from ultrasound contrast agents to estimate ambient pressures. The purpose of this work was to compare the performance of different processing techniques for the raw radiofrequency (rf) data acquired for SHAPE. A closed loop flow system was implemented circulating reconstituted Sonazoid (GE Healthcare, Oslo, Norway; 0.2 ml for 750 ml diluent) and the beam-formed unprocessed rf data were obtained from a 4 mm diameter lumen of a Doppler flow phantom (ATS Laboratories, Inc., Bridgeport, CT) using a SonixRP scanner (Ultrasonix, Richmond, BC, Canada). The transmit frequency and incident acoustic pressures were set to 2.5 MHz and 0.22 MPa, respectively, in order to elicit Sonazoid subharmonic emissions that are ambient-pressure sensitive. The time-varying ambient pressures within the flow phantom were recorded by a Millar pressure catheter. Four techniques for extracting the subharmonic amplitude from the rf data were tested along with two noise filtering techniques to process this data. Five filter orders were tested for the noise removing filters. The performance was evaluated based on the least root-mean-square errors reported after linear least-square regression analyses of the subharmonic data and the pressure catheter data and compared using a repeated ANOVA. When the subharmonic amplitudes were extracted as the mean value within a 0.2 MHz bandwidth about 1.25 MHz and when the resulting temporally-varying subharmonic signal was median filtered with an order of 500, the filtered subharmonic signal significantly predicted the ambient pressures (r2 = 0.90; p < 0.001) with the least error. The resulting root mean square and mean absolute errors were 8.16 +/- 0.26 mmHg and 6.70 +/- 0.17 mmHg, respectively. Thus, median processing the subharmonic data extracted as the mean value within a 0.2 MHz bandwidth about the theoretical

  6. Specific contrast ultrasound using sterically stabilized microbubbles for early diagnosis of thromboembolic disease in a rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Vlašín, Michal; Lukáč, Robert; Kauerová, Zuzana; Kohout, Pavel; Mašek, Josef; Bartheldyová, Eliška; Koudelka, Štěpán; Korvasová, Zina; Plocková, Jana; Hronová, Nikola; Turánek, Jaroslav

    2014-04-01

    Specific contrast ultrasound is widely applied in diagnostic procedures on humans but remains underused in veterinary medicine. The objective of this study was to evaluate the use of microbubble-based contrast for rapid ultrasonographic diagnosis of thrombosis in small animals, using male New Zealand white rabbits (average weight about 3.5 kg) as a model. It was hypothesized that the use of microbubble-based contrast agents will result in a faster and more precise diagnosis in our model of thrombosis. A pro-coagulant environment had been previously established by combining endothelial denudation and external vessel wall damage. Visualization of thrombi was achieved by application of contrast microbubbles [sterically stabilized, phospholipid-based microbubbles filled with sulfur hexafluoride (SF₆) gas] and ultrasonography. As a result, rapid and clear diagnosis of thrombi in aorta abdominalis was achieved within 10 to 30 s (mean: 17.3 s) by applying microbubbles as an ultrasound contrast medium. In the control group, diagnosis was not possible or took 90 to 180 s. Therefore, sterically stabilized microbubbles were found to be a suitable contrast agent for the rapid diagnosis of thrombi in an experimental model in rabbits. This contrast agent could be of practical importance in small animal practice for rapid diagnosis of thrombosis.

  7. Quantification of tumor perfusion using dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasound: impact of mathematical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doury, Maxime; Dizeux, Alexandre; de Cesare, Alain; Lucidarme, Olivier; Pellot-Barakat, Claire; Bridal, S. Lori; Frouin, Frédérique

    2017-02-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasound has been proposed to monitor tumor therapy, as a complement to volume measurements. To assess the variability of perfusion parameters in ideal conditions, four consecutive test-retest studies were acquired in a mouse tumor model, using controlled injections. The impact of mathematical modeling on parameter variability was then investigated. Coefficients of variation (CV) of tissue blood volume (BV) and tissue blood flow (BF) based-parameters were estimated inside 32 sub-regions of the tumors, comparing the log-normal (LN) model with a one-compartment model fed by an arterial input function (AIF) and improved by the introduction of a time delay parameter. Relative perfusion parameters were also estimated by normalization of the LN parameters and normalization of the one-compartment parameters estimated with the AIF, using a reference tissue (RT) region. A direct estimation (rRTd) of relative parameters, based on the one-compartment model without using the AIF, was also obtained by using the kinetics inside the RT region. Results of test-retest studies show that absolute regional parameters have high CV, whatever the approach, with median values of about 30% for BV, and 40% for BF. The positive impact of normalization was established, showing a coherent estimation of relative parameters, with reduced CV (about 20% for BV and 30% for BF using the rRTd approach). These values were significantly lower (p  <  0.05) than the CV of absolute parameters. The rRTd approach provided the smallest CV and should be preferred for estimating relative perfusion parameters.

  8. High-contrast and low-computational complexity medical ultrasound imaging using beamspace capon method.

    PubMed

    Okumura, Shigeaki; Taki, Hirofumi; Sato, Toru

    2015-01-01

    Several adaptive beamforming techniques have been proposed to improve the quality of medical ultrasound images. The beamspace (BS) Capon method is one common method used to depict high-resolution images with low computational complexity. However, the complexity is not low enough for real-time imaging in clinical situations because the conventional BS Capon method employs a time-delay process and a transition process from elementspace signal processing to BS signal processing at all points of interest. Thus, we propose a technique that replaces the time-delay process using a steering vector. In addition, the Capon method employs a spatial averaging (SA) technique to stabilize the estimation in intensity. However, when the averaging size is not adequate, the estimated intensity might be smaller than that given by the delay-and-sum (DAS) method. Because most medical diagnoses are presented based on the estimation of intensity acquired by the DAS beamformer, accurate estimation of intensity is also required. Therefore, we propose a compensation technique that uses both small and large sizes for SA. In an experiment, the -6 dB beam width, sidelobe level, and estimation error in the intensity of the proposed method were 0.17 mm, -27 dB, and 0.92 dB, respectively, where those of the conventional BS Capon method were 0.29 mm, -22 dB, and 8.1 dB. The complexity of the proposed method is one-fourteenth that of the conventional method. Compared with conventional methods, the proposed method succeeded in depicting a higher-contrast image with accurate intensity estimation and lower computational complexity.

  9. Using a Commercial Ultrasound Contrast Agent for Viral-Mediated Gene Transfer In Vitro and In Vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, Candace M.; Forsberg, Flemming; Liu, Ji-Bin; Merton, Daniel A.; Minimo, Corrado; Claudio, Pier P.

    2007-05-01

    This study evaluated the feasibility of site-specific gene delivery mediated by diagnostic ultrasound using genes encapsulated in commercially available ultrasound contrast agents in vitro and in vivo. Five different commercially available contrast agents were tested in vitro for their ability to enclose an adenoviral vector carrying GFP. Prostate cancer cells (DU 145) or non small cell lung cancer cells (H23) were plated in 80 culture wells and insonified at 207 or 535 kPa peak negative pressure for 1 min after administration of 0.1 ml of bubbles reconstituted with the viral vector. Experiments were repeated with the delivery vehicle incubated with complement to inactivate unenclosed Adeno-GFP and with controls. After 24 hours transduction efficiency was demonstrated by fluorescent microscopy. In vivo 15 nude mice with 21 melanoma tumors (DB-1) implanted received 0.1 ml injections of contrast. Mice were split into 3 control and 4 active groups and ultrasound was performed for 4 min at 4 MHz using an Aplio scanner (Toshiba America Medical Systems, Tustin, CA). Tumors, heart, lungs and liver were harvested 48 hours later. Specimens underwent regular and fluorescent microscopy and were stained using an antibody against GFP. In vitro all contrast agents produced more fluorescence at 207 kPa than at 535 kPa. However, only Imagent (IMCOR Pharmaceuticals, San Diego, CA) was able to induce marked gene transduction with the inactivating agent. In vivo systemic delivery of Adeno-GFP carrying microbubbles following pre-treatment with the inactivating agent resulted in specific transduction of the tumor cells only with no uptake in heart, lungs or liver (unlike the controls). In conclusion, specific viral gene transduction has been obtained in vitro and in vivo through the use of ultrasound and Imagent microbubbles as delivery vehicles.

  10. Stability of echogenic liposomes as a blood pool ultrasound contrast agent in a physiologic flow phantom.

    PubMed

    Radhakrishnan, Kirthi; Haworth, Kevin J; Huang, Shao-Ling; Klegerman, Melvin E; McPherson, David D; Holland, Christy K

    2012-11-01

    Echogenic liposomes (ELIP) are multifunctional ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) with a lipid shell encapsulating both air and an aqueous core. ELIP are being developed for molecular imaging and image-guided therapeutic delivery. Stability of the echogenicity of ELIP in physiologic conditions is crucial to their successful translation to clinical use. In this study, we determined the effects of the surrounding media's dissolved air concentration, temperature transition and hydrodynamic pressure on the echogenicity of a chemically modified formulation of ELIP to promote stability and echogenicity. ELIP samples were diluted in porcine plasma or whole blood and pumped through a pulsatile flow system with adjustable hydrodynamic pressures and temperature. B-mode images were acquired using a clinical diagnostic scanner every 5 s for a total duration of 75 s. Echogenicity in porcine plasma was assessed as a function of total dissolved gas saturation. ELIP were added to plasma at room temperature (22 °C) or body temperature (37 °C) and pumped through a system maintained at 22 °C or 37 °C to study the effect of temperature transitions on ELIP echogenicity. Echogenicity at normotensive (120/80 mmHg) and hypertensive pressures (145/90 mmHg) was measured. ELIP were echogenic in plasma and whole blood at body temperature under normotensive to hypertensive pressures. Warming of samples from room temperature to body temperature did not alter echogenicity. However, in plasma cooled rapidly from body temperature to room temperature or in degassed plasma, ELIP lost echogenicity within 20 s at 120/80 mmHg. The stability of echogenicity of a modified ELIP formulation was determined in vitro at body temperature, physiologic gas concentration and throughout the physiologic pressure range. However, proper care should be taken to ensure that ELIP are not cooled rapidly from body temperature to room temperature as they will lose their echogenic properties. Further in

  11. Impact of Filling Gas on Subharmonic Emissions of Phospholipid Ultrasound Contrast Agents.

    PubMed

    Kanbar, Emma; Fouan, Damien; Sennoga, Charles A; Doinikov, Alexander A; Bouakaz, Ayache

    2017-02-14

    Subharmonic signals backscattered from gas-filled lipid-shelled microbubbles have generated significant research interest because they can improve the detection and sensitivity of contrast-enhanced ultrasound imaging. However, the emission of subharmonic signals is strongly characterized by a temporal dependence, the origins of which have not been sufficiently elucidated. The features that influence subharmonic emissions need to be identified not only to better develop next-generation microbubble contrast agents, but also to develop more efficient subharmonic imaging (SHI) modes and therapeutic strategies. We examined the effect of microbubble filling gas on subharmonic emissions. Phospholipid shelled-microbubbles with different gaseous compositions such as sulfur hexafluoride (SF6), octafluoropropane (C3F8) or decafluorobutane (C4F10), nitrogen (N2)/C4F10 or air were insonated using a driving frequency of 10 MHz and peak negative pressure of 450 kPa, and their acoustic responses were tracked by monitoring both second harmonic and subharmonic emissions. Microbubbles were first acoustically characterized with their original gas and then re-characterized after substitution of the original gas with air, SF6 or C4F10. A measureable change in intensity of the subharmonic emissions with a 20- to 40-min delayed onset and increasing subharmonic emissions of the order 12-18 dB was recorded for microbubbles filled with C4F10. Substitution of C4F10 with air eliminated the earlier observed delay in subharmonic emissions. Significantly, substitution of SF6 for C4F10 successfully triggered a delay in the subharmonic emissions of the resultant agents, whereas substitution of C4F10 for SF6 eliminated the earlier observed suppression of subharmonic emissions, clearly suggesting that the type of filling gas contained in the microbubble agent influences subharmonic emissions in a time-dependent manner. Because our agents were dispersed in air-stabilized phosphate-buffered saline

  12. Impact of contrast-enhanced ultrasound in patients with renal function impairment

    PubMed Central

    Girometti, Rossano; Stocca, Tiziano; Serena, Elena; Granata, Antonio; Bertolotto, Michele

    2017-01-01

    AIM To investigate the role of contrast enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) in evaluating patients with renal function impairment (RFI) showing: (1) acute renal failure (ARF) of suspicious vascular origin; or (2) suspicious renal lesions. METHODS We retrospectively evaluated patients addressed to CEUS over an eight years period to rule-out vascular causes of ARF (first group of 50 subjects) or assess previously found suspicious renal lesions (second group of 41 subjects with acute or chronic RFI). After preliminary grey-scale and color Doppler investigation, each kidney was investigated individually with CEUS, using 1.2-2.4 mL of a sulfur hexafluoride-filled microbubble contrast agent. Image analysis was performed in consensus by two readers who reviewed digital clips of CEUS. We calculated the detection rate of vascular abnormalities in the first group and performed descriptive statistics of imaging findings for the second group. RESULTS In the first group, CEUS detected renal infarction or cortical ischemia in 18/50 patients (36%; 95%CI: 23.3-50.9) and 1/50 patients (2%; 95%CI: 0.1-12), respectively. The detection rate of infarction was significantly higher (P = 0.0002; McNemar test) compared to color Doppler ultrasonography (10%). No vascular causes of ARF were identified in the remaining 31/50 patients (62%). In the second group, CEUS detected 41 lesions on 39 patients, allowing differentiation between solid lesions (21/41; 51.2%) vs complex cysts (20/41; 48.8%), and properly addressing 15/39 patients to intervention when feasible based on clinical conditions (surgery and cryoablation in 13 and 2 cases, respectively). Cysts were categorized Bosniak II, IIF, III and IV in 8, 5, 4 and 3 cases, respectively. In the remaining two patients, CEUS found 1 pseudolesion and 1 subcapsular hematoma. CONCLUSION CEUS showed high detection rate of renal perfusion abnormalities in patients with ARF, influencing the management of patients with acute or chronic RFI and renal masses

  13. Pulmonary transit time measurement by contrast-enhanced ultrasound in left ventricular dyssynchrony

    PubMed Central

    Saporito, Salvatore; Mischi, Massimo; van Assen, Hans C; Bouwman, R Arthur; de Lepper, Anouk G W; van den Bosch, Harrie C M; Korsten, Hendrikus H M; Houthuizen, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Background Pulmonary transit time (PTT) is an indirect measure of preload and left ventricular function, which can be estimated using the indicator dilution theory by contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS). In this study, we first assessed the accuracy of PTT-CEUS by comparing it with dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI). Secondly, we tested the hypothesis that PTT-CEUS correlates with the severity of heart failure, assessed by MRI and N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP). Methods and results Twenty patients referred to our hospital for cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) were enrolled. DCE-MRI, CEUS, and NT-proBNP measurements were performed within an hour. Mean transit time (MTT) was obtained by estimating the time evolution of indicator concentration within regions of interest drawn in the right and left ventricles in video loops of DCE-MRI and CEUS. PTT was estimated as the difference of the left and right ventricular MTT. Normalized PTT (nPTT) was obtained by multiplication of PTT with the heart rate. Mean PTT-CEUS was 10.5±2.4s and PTT-DCE-MRI was 10.4±2.0s (P=0.88). The correlations of PTT and nPTT by CEUS and DCE-MRI were strong; r=0.75 (P=0.0001) and r=0.76 (P=0.0001), respectively. Bland–Altman analysis revealed a bias of 0.1s for PTT. nPTT-CEUS correlated moderately with left ventricle volumes. The correlations for PTT-CEUS and nPTT-CEUS were moderate to strong with NT-proBNP; r=0.54 (P=0.022) and r=0.68 (P=0.002), respectively. Conclusions (n)PTT-CEUS showed strong agreement with that by DCE-MRI. Given the good correlation with NT-proBNP level, (n)PTT-CEUS may provide a novel, clinically feasible measure to quantify the severity of heart failure. Clinical Trial Registry: NCT01735838 PMID:27249553

  14. Detection of the Single-Session Complete Ablation Rate by Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound during Ultrasound-Guided Laser Ablation for Benign Thyroid Nodules: A Prospective Study.

    PubMed

    Ma, Shuhua; Zhou, Ping; Wu, Xiaomin; Tian, Shuangming; Zhao, Yongfeng

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the single-session complete ablation rate of ultrasound-guided percutaneous laser ablation (LA) for benign thyroid nodules. LA was performed in 90 patients with 118 benign thyroid nodules. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) was used to evaluate complete nodule ablation one day after ablation. Thyroid nodule volumes, thyroid functions, clinical symptoms and complications were evaluated 1, 3, 6, 12, and 18 months after ablation. Results showed that all benign thyroid nodules successfully underwent LA. The single-session complete ablation rates for nodules with maximum diameters ≤2 cm, 2-3 cm and ≥3 cm were 93.4%, 70.3% and 61.1%, respectively. All nodule volumes significantly decreased than that one day after ablation (P < 0.05); at the final evaluation, the volume decreased from 6.16 ± 5.21 mL to 0.05 ± 0.01 mL. Thyroid functions did not show significant differences at one month after ablation compared with that before (P > 0.05). Three patients had obvious pain during ablation; one (1.1%) had recurrent laryngeal nerve injury, but the voice returned to normal within 6 months after treatment. Thus, ultrasound-guided LA can effectively inactivate benign thyroid nodules. LA is a potentially viable minimally invasive treatment that offers good cosmetic effects.

  15. Detection of the Single-Session Complete Ablation Rate by Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound during Ultrasound-Guided Laser Ablation for Benign Thyroid Nodules: A Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Shuhua; Wu, Xiaomin; Tian, Shuangming; Zhao, Yongfeng

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the single-session complete ablation rate of ultrasound-guided percutaneous laser ablation (LA) for benign thyroid nodules. LA was performed in 90 patients with 118 benign thyroid nodules. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) was used to evaluate complete nodule ablation one day after ablation. Thyroid nodule volumes, thyroid functions, clinical symptoms and complications were evaluated 1, 3, 6, 12, and 18 months after ablation. Results showed that all benign thyroid nodules successfully underwent LA. The single-session complete ablation rates for nodules with maximum diameters ≤2 cm, 2-3 cm and ≥3 cm were 93.4%, 70.3% and 61.1%, respectively. All nodule volumes significantly decreased than that one day after ablation (P < 0.05); at the final evaluation, the volume decreased from 6.16 ± 5.21 mL to 0.05 ± 0.01 mL. Thyroid functions did not show significant differences at one month after ablation compared with that before (P > 0.05). Three patients had obvious pain during ablation; one (1.1%) had recurrent laryngeal nerve injury, but the voice returned to normal within 6 months after treatment. Thus, ultrasound-guided LA can effectively inactivate benign thyroid nodules. LA is a potentially viable minimally invasive treatment that offers good cosmetic effects. PMID:27999819

  16. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound with SonoVue in the evaluation of postoperative complications in pediatric liver transplant recipients

    PubMed Central

    Bonini, G.; Pezzotta, G.; Morzenti, C.; Agazzi, R.; Nani, R.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the utility of contrast-enhanced sonography in the study of pediatric liver transplant recipients and its potential impact in reducing the need for invasive diagnostic procedures. Materials and methods From October 2002 to December 2003 we performed routine color Doppler ultrasound and contrast-enhanced ultrasound studies on 30 pediatric patients who had undergone liver transplantation. Findings indicative of complications were confirmed with invasive studies (angiography, computed tomography, and PTC). Results Contrast-enhanced sonography correctly identified four of the five cases of hepatic artery thrombosis and all those involving the portal (n = 6) and hepatic vein (n = 3) thrombosis. It failed to identify one case of hepatic artery thrombosis characterized by collateral circulation arising from the phrenic artery and the single case of hepatic artery stenosis. The latter was more evident on color Doppler, which revealed a typical tardus parvus waveform. The use of contrast offered no significant advantages in the study of biliary complications although it did provide better visualization of bile leaks. Conclusions Contrast-enhanced sonography improves diagnostic confidence and reduces the need for more invasive imaging studies in the postoperative follow-up of pediatric liver transplant recipients. PMID:23396596

  17. Ultrasound-Triggered Phase Transition Sensitive Magnetic Fluorescent Nanodroplets as a Multimodal Imaging Contrast Agent in Rat and Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yunchao; Luo, Binhua; Liu, Xuhan; Liu, Wei; Xu, Haibo; Yang, Xiangliang

    2013-01-01

    Ultrasound-triggered phase transition sensitive nanodroplets with multimodal imaging functionality were prepared via premix Shirasu porous glass (SPG) membrane emulsification method. The nanodroplets with fluorescence dye DiR and SPIO nanoparticles (DiR-SPIO-NDs) had a polymer shell and a liquid perfluoropentane (PFP) core. The as-formed DiR-SPIO-NDs have a uniform size of 385±5.0 nm with PDI of 0.169±0.011. The TEM and microscopy imaging showed that the DiR-SPIO-NDs existed as core-shell spheres, and DiR and SPIO nanoparticles dispersed in the shell or core. The MTT and hemolysis studies demonstrated that the nanodroplets were biocompatible and safe. Moreover, the proposed nanodroplets exhibited significant ultrasound-triggered phase transition property under clinical diagnostic ultrasound irradiation due to the vaporization of PFP inside. Meanwhile, the high stability and R2 relaxivity of the DiR-SPIO-NDs suggested its applicability in MRI. The in vivo T2-weighted images of MRI and fluorescence images both showed that the image contrast in liver and spleen of rats and mice model were enhanced after the intravenous injection of DiR-SPIO-NDs. Furthermore, the ultrasound imaging (US) in mice tumor as well as MRI and fluorescence imaging in liver of rats and mice showed that the DiR-SPIO-NDs had long-lasting contrast ability in vivo. These in vitro and in vivo findings suggested that DiR-SPIO-NDs could potentially be a great MRI/US/fluorescence multimodal imaging contrast agent in the diagnosis of liver tissue diseases. PMID:24391983

  18. Microbubbles as drug-delivery vectors: steering ultrasound contrast agents in arterial flow using the Bjerknes force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliseda, Alberto; Clark, Alicia

    2012-11-01

    Micron-sized coated microbubbles, commonly referred to as ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs), have been identified as potential targeted drug delivery vectors with applications in cancer chemotherapy and thrombolysis. The Bjerknes force, produced by the fluctuating pressure field created by the ultrasound waves acting on the oscillating bubble with a phase lag induced by the liquid's inertia and viscosity, can be used to direct the microbubbles to specific targeted areas in the circulatory system. While this phenomenon is well understood in a quiescent fluid, we need a better understanding of the dynamics of microbubbles in the complex pulsatile flow found in the human circulatory system. The non-linear interactions of ultrasound volume oscillations and flow-induced stresses are explored via high speed imaging of UCAs under in vitro flow that reproduces conditions in large arteries (relatively high Reynolds and Womersley numbers). This improved understanding will be used to manipulate and steer UCAs with ultrasound, in conjunction with hydrodynamic forces. NSF CAREER, NSF Graduate Research Fellowship.

  19. The destructive effects of high-intensity focused ultrasound on hydatid cysts enhanced by ultrasound contrast agent and superabsorbent polymer alone or in combination.

    PubMed

    Cai, Hui; Chen, Lu-Lu; Ye, Bin; Liu, Ai-Bo; Zhang, Jing; Zhao, Yi-Feng

    2013-02-01

    Cystic echinococcosis, caused by the metacestode stage of Echincoccus granulosus, remains endemic in many regions around the world. The present work evaluated whether or not a superabsorbent polymer (SAP) and ultrasound contrast agent (UCA) alone or in combination could enhance damage efficacy of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) on hydatid cysts in vitro. HIFU of 100 W acoustic power, with the aid of 0.1 ml UCA and 0.1 g SAP alone or in combination, was used to ablate hydatid cysts in vitro. The comparison of ultrasound image for each layer of hydatid cyst before and after HIFU ablation was made immediately, and the protoscolices of the cysts were stained by eosin exclusion assay, and the structures of protoscolices were observed by light microscopy. To understand the destructive effects of HIFU, the pathological changes in cyst walls of hydatid cyst ablated with HIFU were examined. The results demonstrated that HIFU had some lethal effect on hydatid cysts: echo enhancement of ultrasound image, increase of mortality rate of protoscolices, serious structural damage of protoscolices, and complete destruction or even disappearance of laminated layer and germinal layer was observed in the group of HIFU combined with UCA and SAP alone or in combination. It was found that the destructive effect of HIFU aided with a combination of UCA and SAP to hydatid cysts was more effective than that of HIFU just aided with UCA or SAP alone. These results suggested that UCA and SAP might be used as a HIFU enhancing agent to improve the efficacy of HIFU ablation to hydatid cysts, which could be a possible therapeutic option for cystic echinococcosis.

  20. Quantitative Analysis of Vascular Heterogeneity in Breast Lesions Using Contrast-Enhanced 3-D Harmonic and Subharmonic Ultrasound Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Sridharan, Anush; Eisenbrey, John R.; Machado, Priscilla; Ojeda-Fournier, Haydee; Wilkes, Annina; Sevrukov, Alexander; Mattrey, Robert F.; Wallace, Kirk; Chalek, Carl L.; Thomenius, Kai E.; Forsberg, Flemming

    2015-01-01

    Ability to visualize breast lesion vascularity and quantify the vascular heterogeneity using contrast-enhanced 3-D harmonic (HI) and subharmonic (SHI) ultrasound imaging was investigated in a clinical population. Patients (n = 134) identified with breast lesions on mammography were scanned using power Doppler imaging, contrast-enhanced 3-D HI, and 3-D SHI on a modified Logiq 9 scanner (GE Healthcare). A region of interest corresponding to ultrasound contrast agent flow was identified in 4D View (GE Medical Systems) and mapped to raw slice data to generate a map of time-intensity curves for the lesion volume. Time points corresponding to baseline, peak intensity, and washout of ultrasound contrast agent were identified and used to generate and compare vascular heterogeneity plots for malignant and benign lesions. Vascularity was observed with power Doppler imaging in 84 lesions (63 benign and 21 malignant). The 3-D HI showed flow in 8 lesions (5 benign and 3 malignant), whereas 3-D SHI visualized flow in 68 lesions (49 benign and 19 malignant). Analysis of vascular heterogeneity in the 3-D SHI volumes found benign lesions having a significant difference in vascularity between central and peripheral sections (1.71 ± 0.96 vs. 1.13 ± 0.79 dB, p < 0.001, respectively), whereas malignant lesions showed no difference (1.66 ± 1.39 vs. 1.24 ± 1.14 dB, p = 0.24), indicative of more vascular coverage. These preliminary results suggest quantitative evaluation of vascular heterogeneity in breast lesions using contrast-enhanced 3-D SHI is feasible and able to detect variations in vascularity between central and peripheral sections for benign and malignant lesions. PMID:25935933

  1. Quantitative analysis of vascular heterogeneity in breast lesions using contrast-enhanced 3-D harmonic and subharmonic ultrasound imaging.

    PubMed

    Sridharan, Anush; Eisenbrey, John R; Machado, Priscilla; Ojeda-Fournier, Haydee; Wilkes, Annina; Sevrukov, Alexander; Mattrey, Robert F; Wallace, Kirk; Chalek, Carl L; Thomenius, Kai E; Forsberg, Flemming

    2015-03-01

    Ability to visualize breast lesion vascularity and quantify the vascular heterogeneity using contrast-enhanced 3-D harmonic (HI) and subharmonic (SHI) ultrasound imaging was investigated in a clinical population. Patients (n = 134) identified with breast lesions on mammography were scanned using power Doppler imaging, contrast-enhanced 3-D HI, and 3-D SHI on a modified Logiq 9 scanner (GE Healthcare). A region of interest corresponding to ultrasound contrast agent flow was identified in 4D View (GE Medical Systems) and mapped to raw slice data to generate a map of time-intensity curves for the lesion volume. Time points corresponding to baseline, peak intensity, and washout of ultrasound contrast agent were identified and used to generate and compare vascular heterogeneity plots for malignant and benign lesions. Vascularity was observed with power Doppler imaging in 84 lesions (63 benign and 21 malignant). The 3-D HI showed flow in 8 lesions (5 benign and 3 malignant), whereas 3-D SHI visualized flow in 68 lesions (49 benign and 19 malignant). Analysis of vascular heterogeneity in the 3-D SHI volumes found benign lesions having a significant difference in vascularity between central and peripheral sections (1.71 ± 0.96 vs. 1.13 ± 0.79 dB, p < 0.001, respectively), whereas malignant lesions showed no difference (1.66 ± 1.39 vs. 1.24 ± 1.14 dB, p = 0.24), indicative of more vascular coverage. These preliminary results suggest quantitative evaluation of vascular heterogeneity in breast lesions using contrast-enhanced 3-D SHI is feasible and able to detect variations in vascularity between central and peripheral sections for benign and malignant lesions.

  2. Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... called multiples) To screen for birth defects, like spina bifida or heart defects . Screening means seeing if your ... example, if the ultrasound shows your baby has spina bifida, she may be treated in the womb before ...

  3. Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... baby's development in the uterus. Ultrasound uses inaudible sound waves to produce a two-dimensional image of the baby while inside the mother's uterus. The sound waves bounce off solid structures in the body ...

  4. Assessment of murine colorectal cancer by micro-ultrasound using three dimensional reconstruction and non-linear contrast imaging

    PubMed Central

    Freeling, Jessica L; Rezvani, Khosrow

    2016-01-01

    The relatively low success rates of current colorectal cancer (CRC) therapies have led investigators to search for more specific treatments. Vertebrate models of colorectal cancer are essential tools for the verification of new therapeutic avenues such as gene therapy. The evaluation of colorectal cancer in mouse models has been limited due to the lack of an accurate quantitative and longitudinal noninvasive method. This work introduces a method of three-dimensional micro-ultrasound reconstruction and microbubble administration for the comprehensive and longitudinal evaluation of CRC progression. This approach enabled quantification of both tumor volume and relative vascularity using a well-established inducible murine model of colon carcinogenesis. This inducible model recapitulated the adenocarcinoma sequence that occurs in human CRC allowing systematic in situ evaluation of the ultrasound technique. The administration of intravenous microbubbles facilitated enhancement of colon vascular contrast and quantification of relative vascularity of the mid and distal colon of the mouse in three dimensions. In addition, two-dimensional imaging in the sagittal orientation of the colon using Non-Linear Contrast Mode enabled calculation of relative blood volume and perfusion as the microbubbles entered the colon microvasculature. Quantitative results provided by the outlined protocol represent a noninvasive tool that can more accurately define CRC development and progression. This ultrasound technique will allow the practical and economical longitudinal study of murine CRC in both basic and preclinical studies. PMID:28053998

  5. Contrast enhancement and elastography in endoscopic ultrasound: an update of clinical applications in pancreatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Serrani, Marta; Lisotti, Andrea; Caletti, Giancarlo; Fusaroli, Pietro

    2016-08-01

    It is well established that endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) is fundamental in the characterization of many diseases concerning different organs, i.e. pancreaticobiliary diseases, gastrointestinal pathologic conditions, and lymph nodes of unknown origin. It is also well known that many factors can hamper the accuracy of EUS, i.e. biliary stents, chronic pancreatitis, poor operator's expertise. These factors can also lead to suboptimal accuracy when cytological confirmation through EUS-fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) is indicated. In recent years, new technological tools have rapidly increased their clinical impact improving the diagnostic power of EUS and EUS-FNA. Among these new tools, the most investigated and useful ones are represented by contrast harmonic-EUS (CH-EUS) and EUS-elastography (EUS-E). The purpose of this paper is to provide, through a review of the literature, an update of the applications of CH-EUS and EUS-E in the routine clinical practice in pancreatic diseases. We discussed the first reports and applications of these techniques in our previous review published in Minerva Medica. The applications of CH-EUS and EUS-E to the study of pancreatic diseases appear feasible and safe. The use of both techniques is very simple and does not require any relevant additional workload for the endoscopic personnel. CH-EUS is now considered an important and accurate tool in the diagnosis of solid pancreatic masses and in the differential diagnosis of pancreatic cystic lesions. CH-EUS targeted FNA is an active field of research. However the available studies show that CH-EUS increases FNA accuracy by a little extent, without statistical significance; moreover, CH-EUS FNA showed a trend toward being more efficient vs. simple EUS FNA (less needle passes and more abundance in cytological material) but this trend did not reach statistical significance. On the other hand, the clinical impact of EUS-E in terms of differential diagnosis of pancreatic masses is still under

  6. High Resolution Ultrasound Superharmonic Perfusion Imaging: In Vivo Feasibility and Quantification of Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Acoustic Angiography.

    PubMed

    Lindsey, Brooks D; Shelton, Sarah E; Martin, K Heath; Ozgun, Kathryn A; Rojas, Juan D; Foster, F Stuart; Dayton, Paul A

    2017-04-01

    Mapping blood perfusion quantitatively allows localization of abnormal physiology and can improve understanding of disease progression. Dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasound is a low-cost, real-time technique for imaging perfusion dynamics with microbubble contrast agents. Previously, we have demonstrated another contrast agent-specific ultrasound imaging technique, acoustic angiography, which forms static anatomical images of the superharmonic signal produced by microbubbles. In this work, we seek to determine whether acoustic angiography can be utilized for high resolution perfusion imaging in vivo by examining the effect of acquisition rate on superharmonic imaging at low flow rates and demonstrating the feasibility of dynamic contrast-enhanced superharmonic perfusion imaging for the first time. Results in the chorioallantoic membrane model indicate that frame rate and frame averaging do not affect the measured diameter of individual vessels observed, but that frame rate does influence the detection of vessels near and below the resolution limit. The highest number of resolvable vessels was observed at an intermediate frame rate of 3 Hz using a mechanically-steered prototype transducer. We also demonstrate the feasibility of quantitatively mapping perfusion rate in 2D in a mouse model with spatial resolution of ~100 μm. This type of imaging could provide non-invasive, high resolution quantification of microvascular function at penetration depths of several centimeters.

  7. Neural progenitor cells labeling with microbubble contrast agent for ultrasound imaging in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Wenjin; Tavri, Sidhartha; Benchimol, Michael J.; Itani, Malak; Olson, Emilia S.; Zhang, Hong; Decyk, Marika; Ramirez, Rosemarie G.; Barback, Christopher V.; Kono, Yuko; Mattrey, Robert F.

    2013-01-01

    Tracking neuroprogenitor cells (NPCs) that are used to target tumors, infarction or inflammation, is paramount for cell-based therapy. We employed ultrasound imaging that can detect a single microbubble because it can distinguish its unique signal from those of surrounding tissues. NPCs efficiently internalized positively charged microbubbles allowing a clinical ultrasound system to detect a single cell at 7 MHz. When injected intravenously, labeled NPCs traversed the lungs to be imaged in the left ventricle and the liver where they accumulated. Internalized microbubbles were not only less sensitive to destruction by ultrasound, but remained visible in vivo for days as compared to minutes when given free. The extended longevity provides ample time to allow cells to reach their intended target. We were also able to transfect NPCs in vitro when microbubbles were preloaded with GFP plasmid only when cells were insonated. Transfection efficiency and cell viability were both greater than 90%. PMID:23578557

  8. Development of a theoretical model describing sonoporation activity of cells exposed to ultrasound in the presence of contrast agents

    PubMed Central

    Forbes, Monica M.; O’Brien, William D.

    2012-01-01

    Sonoporation uses ultrasound, with the aid of ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs), to enhance cell permeabilization, thereby allowing delivery of therapeutic compounds noninvasively into specific target cells. The objective of this study was to determine if a computational model describing shear stress on a cell membrane due to microstreaming would successfully reflect sonoporation activity with respect to the peak rarefactional pressure. The theoretical models were compared to the sonoporation results from Chinese hamster ovary cells using Definity® at 0.9, 3.15, and 5.6 MHz and were found to accurately describe the maximum sonoporation activity, the pressure where a decrease in sonoporation activity occurs, and relative differences between maximum activity and the activity after that decrease. Therefore, the model supports the experimental findings that shear stress on cell membranes secondary to oscillating UCAs results in sonoporation. PMID:22501051

  9. Percutaneous Ultrasound-Guided Laser Ablation with Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasonography for Hyperfunctioning Parathyroid Adenoma: A Preliminary Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Tianan; Chen, Fen; Zhou, Xiang; Hu, Ying; Zhao, Qiyu

    2015-01-01

    The study was to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of ultrasound-guided percutaneous laser ablation (pLA) as a nonsurgical treatment for primary parathyroid adenoma. Surgery was contraindicated in, or refused by, the included patients. No lesion enhancement on contrast-enhanced ultrasound immediately after pLA was considered “complete ablation.” Nodule size, serum calcium, and parathyroid hormone level were compared before and after pLA. Complete ablation was achieved in all 21 patients with 1 (n = 20) or 2 (n = 1) sessions. Nodule volume decreased from 0.93 ± 0.58 mL at baseline to 0.53 ± 0.38 and 0.48 ± 0.34 mL at 6 and 12 months after pLA (P < 0.05). At 1 day, 6 months, and 12 months after pLA, serum PTH decreased from 15.23 ± 3.00 pmol/L at baseline to 7.41 ± 2.79, 6.95 ± 1.78, and 6.90 ± 1.46 pmol/L, serum calcium decreased from 3.77 ± 0.77 mmol/L at baseline to 2.50 ± 0.72, 2.41 ± 0.37, and 2.28 ± 0.26 mmol/L, respectively (P < 0.05). At 12 months, treatment success (normalization of PTH and serum calcium) was achieved in 81%. No serious complications were observed. Ultrasound-guided pLA with contrast-enhanced ultrasound is a viable alternative to surgery for primary parathyroid adenoma. PMID:26788059

  10. Optimization of Contrast-to-Tissue Ratio by Adaptation of Transmitted Ternary Signal in Ultrasound Pulse Inversion Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Girault, Jean-Marc

    2013-01-01

    Ultrasound contrast imaging has provided more accurate medical diagnoses thanks to the development of innovating modalities like the pulse inversion imaging. However, this latter modality that improves the contrast-to-tissue ratio (CTR) is not optimal, since the frequency is manually chosen jointly with the probe. However, an optimal choice of this command is possible, but it requires precise information about the transducer and the medium which can be experimentally difficult to obtain, even inaccessible. It turns out that the optimization can become more complex by taking into account the kind of generators, since the generators of electrical signals in a conventional ultrasound scanner can be unipolar, bipolar, or tripolar. Our aim was to seek the ternary command which maximized the CTR. By combining a genetic algorithm and a closed loop, the system automatically proposed the optimal ternary command. In simulation, the gain compared with the usual ternary signal could reach about 3.9 dB. Another interesting finding was that, in contrast to what is generally accepted, the optimal command was not a fixed-frequency signal but had harmonic components. PMID:23573167

  11. Ultrasonograpy of VX-2 Liver Tumor in Rabbit Treated by High Intensity Focused Ultrasound Combined with Microbubble Contrast Agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiaojuan, Ji; Jinqing, Li; Zhibiao, Wang; Jianzhong, Zou; Wenzhi, Chen; Jin, Bai

    2007-05-01

    Objective: To assess the value of sonographic appearance and to investigate the sonographic character of VX-2 liver tumor in rabbit treated by high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) combined with microbubble contrast agent. Methods: Forty-five rabbits bearing VX-2 tumors were randomly averagely assigned into three groups. In group A irradiation was sustained until the target region became hyperechoic. In group B therapy was stopped as soon as hyperecho occurred, and in group C irradiation time was prolonged to ensure the occurrence of coagulation necrosis. Results: Exposure duration for tumors treated purely with HIFU was the longest, whilst the use of microbubble contrast agent combined with HIFU shortened the exposure duration significantly. The gross examination and ultrasonogram coagulation necrosis area measurements correlated strongly (r=0.986,P<0.05) in the microbubble-enhanced HIFU group. Conclusion: It was feasible to enhance HIFU therapy with microbubble contrast agent. The characteristic change in the ultrasound images made it possible to assess the enhanced HIFU therapeutic efficacy in order to adjust the treatment program.

  12. MRI contrast variation of thermosensitive magnetoliposomes triggered by focused ultrasound: a tool for image-guided local drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Lorenzato, Cyril; Cernicanu, Alexandru; Meyre, Marie-Edith; Germain, Matthieu; Pottier, Agnès; Levy, Laurent; de Senneville, Baudouin Denis; Bos, Clemens; Moonen, Chrit; Smirnov, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Improved drug delivery control during chemotherapy has the potential to increase the therapeutic index. MRI contrast agent such as iron oxide nanoparticles can be co-encapsulated with drugs in nanocarrier liposomes allowing their tracking and/or visualization by MRI. Furthermore, the combination of a thermosensitive liposomal formulation with an external source of heat such as high intensity focused ultrasound guided by MR temperature mapping allows the controlled local release of the content of the liposome. MRI-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU), in combination represents a noninvasive technique to generate local hyperthermia for drug release. In this study we used ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (USPIO) encapsulated in thermosensitive liposomes to obtain thermosensitive magnetoliposomes (TSM). The transverse and longitudinal relaxivities of this MRI contrast agent were measured upon TSM membrane phase transition in vitro using a water bath or HIFU. The results showed significant differences for MRI signal enhancement and relaxivities before and after heating, which were absent for nonthermosensitive liposomes and free nanoparticles used as controls. Thus, incorporation of USPIO as MRI contrast agents into thermosensitive liposomes should, besides TSM tumor accumulation monitoring, allow the visualization of TSM membrane phase transition upon temperature elevation. In conclusion, HIFU under MR image guidance in combination with USPIO-loaded thermosensitive liposomes as drug delivery system has the potential for a better control of drug delivery and to increase the drug therapeutic index.

  13. Evaluation of Liver Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury in Rabbits Using a Nanoscale Ultrasound Contrast Agent Targeting ICAM-1

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Fang; Li, Zhi-Ping; Wang, Hong-Wei; Fei, Xiang; Jiao, Zi-Yu; Tang, Wen-Bo; Tang, Jie; Luo, Yu-Kun

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess the feasibility of ultrasound molecular imaging in the early diagnosis of liver ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) using a nanoscale contrast agent targeting anti-intracellular adhesion molecule-1 (anti-ICAM-1). Methods The targeted nanobubbles containing anti-ICAM-1 antibody were prepared using the avidin-biotin binding method. Human hepatic sinusoidal endothelial cells (HHSECs) were cultured at the circumstances of hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R) and low temperature. The rabbit liver IRI model (I/R group) was established using the Pringle’s maneuver. The time-intensity curve of the liver contrast ultrasonographic images was plotted and the peak intensity, time to peak, and time of duration were calculated. Results The size of the targeted nanobubbles were 148.15 ± 39.75 nm and the concentration was 3.6–7.4 × 109/ml, and bound well with the H/R HHSECs. Animal contrast enhanced ultrasound images showed that the peak intensity and time of duration of the targeted nanobubbles were significantly higher than that of common nanobubbles in the I/R group, and the peak intensity and time of duration of the targeted nanobubbles in the I/R group were also significantly higher than that in the SO group. Conclusion The targeted nanobubbles have small particle size, stable characteristic, and good targeting ability, which can assess hepatic ischemia-reperfusion injury specifically, noninvasively, and quantitatively at the molecular level. PMID:27120181

  14. Perfusion quantification in contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS)--ready for research projects and routine clinical use.

    PubMed

    Tranquart, F; Mercier, L; Frinking, P; Gaud, E; Arditi, M

    2012-07-01

    With contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) now established as a valuable imaging modality for many applications, a more specific demand has recently emerged for quantifying perfusion and using measured parameters as objective indicators for various disease states. However, CEUS perfusion quantification remains challenging and is not well integrated in daily clinical practice. The development of VueBox™ alleviates existing limitations and enables quantification in a standardized way. VueBox™ operates as an off-line software application, after dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasound (DCE-US) is performed. It enables linearization of DICOM clips, assessment of perfusion using patented curve-fitting models, and generation of parametric images by synthesizing perfusion information at the pixel level using color coding. VueBox™ is compatible with most of the available ultrasound platforms (nonlinear contrast-enabled), has the ability to process both bolus and disruption-replenishment kinetics loops, allows analysis results and their context to be saved, and generates analysis reports automatically. Specific features have been added to VueBox™, such as fully automatic in-plane motion compensation and an easy-to-use clip editor. Processing time has been reduced as a result of parallel programming optimized for multi-core processors. A long list of perfusion parameters is available for each of the two administration modes to address all possible demands currently reported in the literature for diagnosis or treatment monitoring. In conclusion, VueBox™ is a valid and robust quantification tool to be used for standardizing perfusion quantification and to improve the reproducibility of results across centers.

  15. Monitoring of Blood Vessel Density Using Contrast-Enhanced High Frequency Ultrasound May Facilitate Early Diagnosis of Lymph Node Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Takuma; Takemura, Tomoaki; Ouchi, Tomoki; Mori, Shiro; Sakamoto, Maya; Arai, Yoichi; Kodama, Tetsuya

    2017-01-01

    Time-dependent alterations in the ultrasonography characteristics of lymph nodes during early-stage metastasis have not been compared with those of tumor-draining lymph nodes that do not develop tumor; this is partly due to the absence of an appropriate experimental model. In a previous study of lymph nodes with experimental early-stage metastasis, we used contrast-enhanced high-frequency ultrasound to demonstrate that an increase in lymph node blood vessel density preceded any changes in lymph node volume. In the present study, we used an experimental model of lymph node metastasis in which tumor cells metastasized from the subiliac lymph node to the proper axillary lymph node (the tumor-draining lymph node). We utilized contrast-enhanced high-frequency ultrasound to perform a longitudinal analysis of tumor-draining lymph nodes, comparing those at an early-stage of metastasis with those that did not develop detectable metastasis. We found that the normalized blood vessel density of an early-stage metastatic lymph node exhibited a progressive rise, whereas that of a tumor-draining lymph node not containing tumor began to increase later. For both types of lymph nodes, the normalized blood vessel density on the final day of experiments showed a trend towards being higher than that measured in controls. We further found that mice with an initially low value for lymph node blood vessel density subsequently showed a larger increase in the blood vessel density of the metastatic lymph node; this differed significantly from measurements in controls. The present study indicates that a longitudinal analysis of the blood vessel densities of tumor-draining lymph nodes, made using contrast-enhanced high-frequency ultrasound imaging, may be a potentially promising method for detecting early-stage lymph node metastasis in selected patients. Furthermore, our findings suggest that tumor in an upstream lymph node may induce alteration of the vascular structures in draining lymph

  16. Rational design of magnetic nanorattles as contrast agents for ultrasound/magnetic resonance dual-modality imaging.

    PubMed

    Yang, Peng; Wang, Fang; Luo, Xianfu; Zhang, Yuting; Guo, Jia; Shi, Weibin; Wang, Changchun

    2014-08-13

    Nanorattles, as promising functional hollow nanomaterials, show considerable advantages in a variety of applications for drug delivery, biosensors, and biomedical imaging because of their tailored ability in both the movable core and shell. In this study, we formulate a facile controllable route to synthesize a monodisperse magnetic nanorattle with an Fe3O4 superparticle as the core and poly(vinylsilane) (PVS) as the outer shell (Fe3O4@air@PVS) using the polymer-backbone-transition strategy. In the process of synthesis, besides acting as the precursor for the PVS shells of nanorattles, organosilica (o-SiO2) plays the role of template for the middle cavities. The structures of nanorattles can be easily formed via etching treatment of NaOH solution. Through encapsulating sensitive perfluorohexane (PFH) in the cavities of Fe3O4@air@PVS, the biocompatible magnetic nanosystem shows a relatively stable ultrasound signal intensity and a high r2 value of 62.19 mM(-1) s(-1) for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). After intravenous administration of nanorattles to a healthy rat, dramatically positively enhanced ultrasound imaging and negatively enhanced T2-weighted MRI are detected in the liver. Furthermore, when the Fe3O4@PFH@PVS nanorattles are administered to tumor-bearing mice, a significant passive accumulation in the tumor via an electron paramagnetic resonance effect is detected by both ultrasound imaging and MRI. In vivo experiments indicate that the obtained Fe3O4@PFH@PVS nanorattles can be used as dual-modality contrast agents for simultaneous ultrasound and MRI detection.

  17. Surfactant shedding and gas diffusion during pulsed ultrasound through a microbubble contrast agent suspension.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Jean-Pierre; Stride, Eleanor; Ovenden, Nicholas

    2013-08-01

    Interest in coated microbubbles as agents for therapeutic and quantitative imaging applications in biomedical ultrasound has increased the need for their accurate theoretical characterization. Effects such as gas diffusion, variation in the properties of the coating and the resulting changes in bubble behavior under repeated exposure to ultrasound pulses are, however, still not well understood. In this study, a revised equation for microbubble motion is proposed that includes the effects of gas diffusion, as well as adsorption, desorption and shedding of a surfactant from the bubble surface. This is incorporated into a nonlinear wave propagation model to account for these additional time dependent effects in the response of microbubble populations. The results from the model indicate there can be significant changes in both bubble behavior and the propagated pulse over time. This is in agreement with existing experimental data but is not predicted by existing propagation models. The analysis indicates that changes in bubble dynamics are dominated by surfactant shedding on the timescale of a diagnostic ultrasound pulse and gas diffusion over the timescale of the pulse repetition frequency. The implications of these results for the development of more accurate algorithms for quantitative imaging and for therapeutic applications are discussed.

  18. HematoPorphyrin Monomethyl Ether polymer contrast agent for ultrasound/photoacoustic dual-modality imaging-guided synergistic high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Sijing; Lu, Min; Ding, Xiaoya; Chen, Fei; He, Xuemei; Xu, Chunyan; Zhou, Hang; Wang, Qi; Hao, Lan; Zou, Jianzhong

    2016-08-01

    This study is to prepare a hematoporphyrin monomethyl ether (HMME)-loaded poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microcapsules (HMME/PLGA), which could not only function as efficient contrast agent for ultrasound (US)/photoacoustic (PA) imaging, but also as a synergistic agent for high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) ablation. Sonosensitizer HMME nanoparticles were integrated into PLGA microcapsules with the double emulsion evaporation method. After characterization, the cell-killing and cell proliferation-inhibiting effects of HMME/PLGA microcapsules on ovarian cancer SKOV3 cells were assessed. The US/PA imaging-enhancing effects and synergistic effects on HIFU were evaluated both in vitro and in vivo. HMME/PLGA microcapsules were highly dispersed with well-defined spherical morphology (357 ± 0.72 nm in diameter, PDI = 0.932). Encapsulation efficiency and drug-loading efficiency were 58.33 ± 0.95% and 4.73 ± 0.15%, respectively. The HMME/PLGA microcapsules remarkably killed the SKOV3 cells and inhibited the cell proliferation, significantly enhanced the US/PA imaging results and greatly enhanced the HIFU ablation effects on ovarian cancer in nude mice by the HMME-mediated sono-dynamic chemistry therapy (SDT). HMME/PLGA microcapsules represent a potential multifunctional contrast agent for HIFU diagnosis and treatment, which might provide a novel strategy for the highly efficient imaging-guided non-invasive HIFU synergistic therapy for cancers by SDT in clinic.

  19. HematoPorphyrin Monomethyl Ether polymer contrast agent for ultrasound/photoacoustic dual-modality imaging-guided synergistic high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapy

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Sijing; LU, Min; Ding, Xiaoya; Chen, Fei; He, Xuemei; Xu, Chunyan; Zhou, Hang; Wang, Qi; Hao, Lan; Zou, Jianzhong

    2016-01-01

    This study is to prepare a hematoporphyrin monomethyl ether (HMME)-loaded poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microcapsules (HMME/PLGA), which could not only function as efficient contrast agent for ultrasound (US)/photoacoustic (PA) imaging, but also as a synergistic agent for high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) ablation. Sonosensitizer HMME nanoparticles were integrated into PLGA microcapsules with the double emulsion evaporation method. After characterization, the cell-killing and cell proliferation-inhibiting effects of HMME/PLGA microcapsules on ovarian cancer SKOV3 cells were assessed. The US/PA imaging-enhancing effects and synergistic effects on HIFU were evaluated both in vitro and in vivo. HMME/PLGA microcapsules were highly dispersed with well-defined spherical morphology (357 ± 0.72 nm in diameter, PDI = 0.932). Encapsulation efficiency and drug-loading efficiency were 58.33 ± 0.95% and 4.73 ± 0.15%, respectively. The HMME/PLGA microcapsules remarkably killed the SKOV3 cells and inhibited the cell proliferation, significantly enhanced the US/PA imaging results and greatly enhanced the HIFU ablation effects on ovarian cancer in nude mice by the HMME-mediated sono-dynamic chemistry therapy (SDT). HMME/PLGA microcapsules represent a potential multifunctional contrast agent for HIFU diagnosis and treatment, which might provide a novel strategy for the highly efficient imaging-guided non-invasive HIFU synergistic therapy for cancers by SDT in clinic. PMID:27535093

  20. Volume quantification by contrast-enhanced ultrasound: an in-vitro comparison with true volumes and thermodilution

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) has recently been proposed as a minimally- invasive, alternative method for blood volume measurement. This study aims at comparing the accuracy of CEUS and the classical thermodilution techniques for volume assessment in an in-vitro set-up. Methods The in-vitro set-up consisted of a variable network between an inflow and outflow tube and a roller pump. The inflow and outflow tubes were insonified with an ultrasound array transducer and a thermistor was placed in each tube. Indicator dilution curves were made by injecting indicator which consisted of an ultrasound-contrast-agent diluted in ice-cold saline. Both acoustic intensity- and thermo-dilution curves were used to calculate the indicator mean transit time between the inflow and outflow tube. The volumes were derived by multiplying the estimated mean transit time by the flow rate. We compared the volumes measured by CEUS with the true volumes of the variable network and those measured by thermodilution by Bland-Altman and intraclass-correlation analysis. Results The measurements by CEUS and thermodilution showed a very strong correlation (rs = 0.94) with a modest volume underestimation by CEUS of −40 ± 28 mL and an overestimation of 84 ± 62 mL by thermodilution compared with the true volumes. Both CEUS and thermodilution showed a high statistically significant correlation with the true volume (rs = 0.97 (95% CI, 0.95 - 0.98; P<0.0001) and rs = 0.96 (95% CI, 0.94 - 0.98; P<0.0001, respectively). Conclusions CEUS volume estimation provides a strong correlation with both the true volumes in-vitro and volume estimation by thermodilution. It may therefore represent an interesting alternative to the standard, invasive thermodilution technique. PMID:24134671

  1. A new formalism for the quantification of tissue perfusion by the destruction-replenishment method in contrast ultrasound imaging.

    PubMed

    Arditi, Marcel; Frinking, Peter J A; Zhou, Xiang; Rognin, Nicolas G

    2006-06-01

    A new formalism is presented for the destruction-replenishment perfusion quantification approach at low mechanical index. On the basis of physical considerations, best-fit methods should be applied using perfusion functions with S-shape characteristics. These functions are first described for the case of a geometry with a single flow velocity, then extended to the case of vascular beds with blood vessels having multiple flow velocity values and directions. The principles guiding the analysis are, on one hand, a linearization of video echo signals to overcome the log-compression of the imaging instrument, and, on the other hand, the spatial distribution of the transmit-receive ultrasound beam in the elevation direction. An in vitro model also is described; it was used to confirm experimentally the validity of the approach using a commercial contrast agent. The approach was implemented in the form of a computer program, taking as input a sequence of contrast-specific images, as well as parameters related to the ultrasound imaging equipment used. The generated output is either flow-parameter values computed in regions-of-interest, or parametric flow-images (e.g., mean velocity, mean transit time, mean flow, flow variance, or skewness). This approach thus establishes a base for extracting information about the morphology of vascular beds in vivo, and could allow absolute quantification provided that appropriate instrument calibration is implemented.

  2. Blood perfusion of the contralateral testis evaluated with contrast-enhanced ultrasound in rabbits with unilateral testicular torsion.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lin; Zhan, Wei-Wei; Shen, Zhou-Jun; Rui, Wen-Bin; Lv, Chen; Chen, Man; Zhou, Jian-Qiao; Zhou, Ping; Zhou, Mi; Zhu, Ying

    2009-03-01

    The changes of blood perfusion of contralateral testis after unilateral testicular torsion remain controversial. In this study, 28 New Zealand white male rabbits were randomly divided into five groups. Group A (n = 8), the control group, underwent a sham operation on the unilateral testis without inducing testicular torsion. In groups B, C, and D (n = 5 each), unilateral testicular torsion was induced, and, after 3, 6 or 24 h, respectively, detorsion was performed. In group E (n = 5), permanent unilateral testicular torsion was applied. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound was used to observe the blood perfusion of the contralateral testis at the following stages: pre-torsion (preopration), immediately post-torsion (postopration), pre-detorsion, immediately post-detorsion, and late-stage post-detorsion (6-12 h post-detorsion in groups B-D) or at a similar time point (15-21 h post-torsion in group E). Time-intensity curves were generated, and the following parameters were derived and analyzed: arrival time, time to peak intensity, peak intensity, and half-time of the descending peak intensity. The analysis revealed that blood perfusion of the contralateral testis increased immediately after testicular torsion on the opposite side (P < 0.05), which increased with prolonged testicular torsion of the other testis. This research demonstrated that contrast-enhanced ultrasound was valuable in evaluating blood perfusion of the contralateral testis after unilateral testicular torsion.

  3. Skeletonization approach for characterization of benign vs. malignant single thyroid nodules using 3D contrast enhanced ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molinari, Filippo; Mantovani, Alice; Deandrea, Maurilio; Limone, Paolo; Garberoglio, Roberto; Suri, Jasjit S.

    2011-03-01

    High-resolution ultrasonography (HRUS) has potentialities in differential diagnosis between malignant and benign thyroid lesions, but interpretative pitfalls remain and accuracy is still poor. We developed an image processing technique for characterizing the intra-nodular vascularization of thyroid lesions. Twenty nodules (ten malignant) were analyzed by 3-D contrast-enhanced ultrasound imaging. The 3-D volumes were preprocessed and skeletonized. Seven vascular parameters were computed on the skeletons: number of vascular trees (NT); vascular density (VD); number of branching nodes (or branching points) (NB); mean vessel radius (MR); 2-D (DM) and 3-D (SOAM) tortuosity; and inflection count metric (ICM). Results showed that the malignant nodules had higher values of NT (83.1 vs. 18.1), VD (00.4 vs. 0.01), NB (1453 vs. 552), DM (51 vs. 18), ICM (19.9 vs. 8.7), and SOAM (26 vs. 11). Quantification of nodular vascularization based on 3-D contrast-enhanced ultrasound and skeletonization could help differential diagnosis of thyroid lesions.

  4. Conditionally Increased Acoustic Pressures in Nonfetal Diagnostic Ultrasound Examinations Without Contrast Agents: A Preliminary Assessment.

    PubMed

    Nightingale, Kathryn R; Church, Charles C; Harris, Gerald; Wear, Keith A; Bailey, Michael R; Carson, Paul L; Jiang, Hui; Sandstrom, Kurt L; Szabo, Thomas L; Ziskin, Marvin C

    2015-07-01

    The mechanical index (MI) has been used by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) since 1992 for regulatory decisions regarding the acoustic output of diagnostic ultrasound equipment. Its formula is based on predictions of acoustic cavitation under specific conditions. Since its implementation over 2 decades ago, new imaging modes have been developed that employ unique beam sequences exploiting higher-order acoustic phenomena, and, concurrently, studies of the bioeffects of ultrasound under a range of imaging scenarios have been conducted. In 2012, the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine Technical Standards Committee convened a working group of its Output Standards Subcommittee to examine and report on the potential risks and benefits of the use of conditionally increased acoustic pressures (CIP) under specific diagnostic imaging scenarios. The term "conditionally" is included to indicate that CIP would be considered on a per-patient basis for the duration required to obtain the necessary diagnostic information. This document is a result of that effort. In summary, a fundamental assumption in the MI calculation is the presence of a preexisting gas body. For tissues not known to contain preexisting gas bodies, based on theoretical predications and experimentally reported cavitation thresholds, we find this assumption to be invalid. We thus conclude that exceeding the recommended maximum MI level given in the FDA guidance could be warranted without concern for increased risk of cavitation in these tissues. However, there is limited literature assessing the potential clinical benefit of exceeding the MI guidelines in these tissues. The report proposes a 3-tiered approach for CIP that follows the model for employing elevated output in magnetic resonance imaging and concludes with summary recommendations to facilitate Institutional Review Board (IRB)-monitored clinical studies investigating CIP in specific tissues.

  5. Conditionally Increased Acoustic Pressures in Nonfetal Diagnostic Ultrasound Examinations Without Contrast Agents: A Preliminary Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Nightingale, Kathryn R.; Church, Charles C.; Harris, Gerald; Wear, Keith A.; Bailey, Michael R.; Carson, Paul L.; Jiang, Hui; Sandstrom, Kurt L.; Szabo, Thomas L.; Ziskin, Marvin C.

    2016-01-01

    The mechanical index (MI) has been used by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) since 1992 for regulatory decisions regarding the acoustic output of diagnostic ultrasound equipment. Its formula is based on predictions of acoustic cavitation under specific conditions. Since its implementation over 2 decades ago, new imaging modes have been developed that employ unique beam sequences exploiting higher-order acoustic phenomena, and, concurrently, studies of the bioeffects of ultrasound under a range of imaging scenarios have been conducted. In 2012, the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine Technical Standards Committee convened a working group of its Output Standards Subcommittee to examine and report on the potential risks and benefits of the use of conditionally increased acoustic pressures (CIP) under specific diagnostic imaging scenarios. The term “conditionally” is included to indicate that CIP would be considered on a per-patient basis for the duration required to obtain the necessary diagnostic information. This document is a result of that effort. In summary, a fundamental assumption in the MI calculation is the presence of a preexisting gas body. For tissues not known to contain preexisting gas bodies, based on theoretical predications and experimentally reported cavitation thresholds, we find this assumption to be invalid. We thus conclude that exceeding the recommended maximum MI level given in the FDA guidance could be warranted without concern for increased risk of cavitation in these tissues. However, there is limited literature assessing the potential clinical benefit of exceeding the MI guidelines in these tissues. The report proposes a 3-tiered approach for CIP that follows the model for employing elevated output in magnetic resonance imaging and concludes with summary recommendations to facilitate Institutional Review Board (IRB)-monitored clinical studies investigating CIP in specific tissues. PMID:26112617

  6. 33 CFR 165.110 - Safety and Security Zone; Liquefied Natural Gas Carrier Transits and Anchorage Operations, Boston...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...; Liquefied Natural Gas Carrier Transits and Anchorage Operations, Boston, Massachusetts. 165.110 Section 165... Limited Access Areas First Coast Guard District § 165.110 Safety and Security Zone; Liquefied Natural Gas... ahead and one mile astern, and 500 yards on each side of any liquefied natural gas carrier (LNGC)...

  7. Clinical Applications of Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound in the Pediatric Work-Up of Focal Liver Lesions and Blunt Abdominal Trauma: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Laugesen, Nicolaj Grønbæk; Nolsoe, Christian Pallson; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2017-02-01

    In pediatrics ultrasound has long been viewed more favorably than imaging that exposes patients to radiation and iodinated contrast or requires sedation. It is child-friendly and diagnostic capabilities have been improved with the advent of contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS). The application of CEUS is indeed promising. However, no ultrasound contrast agent manufactured today is registered for pediatric use in Europe. The contrast agent SonoVue(®) has recently been approved by the FDA under the name of Lumason(®) to be used in hepatic investigations in adults and children. This article reviews the literature with respect to 2 specific applications of CEUS in children: 1) identification of parenchymal injuries following blunt abdominal trauma, and 2) classification of focal liver lesions. Applications were chosen through the CEUS guidelines published by the European Federation of Societies for Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology and World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology. Literature was obtained by searching Medline and Pubmed Central (using Pubmed), Scopus database and Embase. CEUS proved to be an effective investigation in the hemodynamically stable child for identifying parenchymal injuries and for the characterization of focal liver lesions. CEUS showed comparable performance to CT and MRI with a specificity of 98% for identifying benign lesions and a negative predictive value of 100%. For the applications reviewed here, CEUS holds promising perspectives and can help reduce radiation exposure and use of iodinated contrast agents in pediatrics, thereby potentially reducing complications in routine imaging.

  8. Clinical Applications of Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound in the Pediatric Work-Up of Focal Liver Lesions and Blunt Abdominal Trauma: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Laugesen, Nicolaj Grønbæk; Nolsoe, Christian Pallson; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2017-01-01

    In pediatrics ultrasound has long been viewed more favorably than imaging that exposes patients to radiation and iodinated contrast or requires sedation. It is child-friendly and diagnostic capabilities have been improved with the advent of contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS). The application of CEUS is indeed promising. However, no ultrasound contrast agent manufactured today is registered for pediatric use in Europe. The contrast agent SonoVue® has recently been approved by the FDA under the name of Lumason® to be used in hepatic investigations in adults and children. This article reviews the literature with respect to 2 specific applications of CEUS in children: 1) identification of parenchymal injuries following blunt abdominal trauma, and 2) classification of focal liver lesions. Applications were chosen through the CEUS guidelines published by the European Federation of Societies for Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology and World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology. Literature was obtained by searching Medline and Pubmed Central (using Pubmed), Scopus database and Embase. CEUS proved to be an effective investigation in the hemodynamically stable child for identifying parenchymal injuries and for the characterization of focal liver lesions. CEUS showed comparable performance to CT and MRI with a specificity of 98% for identifying benign lesions and a negative predictive value of 100%. For the applications reviewed here, CEUS holds promising perspectives and can help reduce radiation exposure and use of iodinated contrast agents in pediatrics, thereby potentially reducing complications in routine imaging. PMID:28255580

  9. The damages of high intensity focused ultrasound to transplanted hydatid cysts in abdominal cavities of rabbits with aids of ultrasound contrast agent and superabsorbent polymer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ai-Bo; Cai, Hui; Ye, Bin; Chen, Lu-Lu; Wang, Meng-Ying; Zhang, Jing; Zhao, Yi-Feng

    2013-05-01

    The present study investigates the damages of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) to transplanted hydatid cysts in abdominal cavities of rabbits with aids of ultrasound contrast agent (UCA) and superabsorbent polymer (SAP) alone or in combination. A rabbit model with transplanted hydatid cyst was established by implanting hydatid cyst isolated from infected sheep liver, and HIFU was used to ablate the transplanted cysts with the aid of UCA and SAP alone or in combination. The hydatid cyst with thin wall, good elasticity, approximately spherical, and a diameter of approximately 30 mm was selected for the following experiments. According to our previous studies, a mixture of 0.1 g SAP and 0.5 ml anhydrous ethanol, and the solution of 0.1 ml UCA SonoVue, or both materials were injected into different cyst before HIFU ablation, respectively. The cyst inoculated with the SAP and UCA alone or in combination was immediately implanted into the abdominal cavity of rabbit for HIFU ablation at a dosage of 100 W acoustic powers. The ablation mode was spot scanning at the speed of 3 mm/s. Every target point was scanned three times; every ablating time lasted 3 s. The distance of each ablated layer was 5 mm. The total ablation time depended on the volume of cyst. The comparison of ultrasound image for each layer of hydatid cyst was made before and after HIFU ablation. The protoscolices in ablated cysts were stained by trypan blue exclusion assay, and their structures were observed by light microscopy. To estimate ablation effects of HIFU to the walls of hydatid cysts, the ultrastructure changes of cyst walls were examined by electron microscopy. The pathological changes of rabbits' skins through which ultrasound penetrated were observed to investigate the side effects of HIFU ablation. The results demonstrated that HIFU had some lethal effects to hydatid cysts in vivo, namely, echo enhancements of ultrasound images of cysts, increases in mortality rate of

  10. Material characterization of the encapsulation of an ultrasound contrast microbubble and its subharmonic response: Strain-softening interfacial elasticity model

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Shirshendu; Katiyar, Amit; Sarkar, Kausik; Chatterjee, Dhiman; Shi, William T.; Forsberg, Flemming

    2010-01-01

    Two nonlinear interfacial elasticity models—interfacial elasticity decreasing linearly and exponentially with area fraction—are developed for the encapsulation of contrast microbubbles. The strain softening (decreasing elasticity) results from the decreasing association between the constitutive molecules of the encapsulation. The models are used to find the characteristic properties (surface tension, interfacial elasticity, interfacial viscosity and nonlinear elasticity parameters) for a commercial contrast agent. Properties are found using the ultrasound attenuation measured through a suspension of contrast agent. Dynamics of the resulting models are simulated, compared with other existing models and discussed. Imposing non-negativity on the effective surface tension (the encapsulation experiences no net compressive stress) shows “compression-only” behavior. The exponential and the quadratic (linearly varying elasticity) models result in similar behaviors. The validity of the models is investigated by comparing their predictions of the scattered nonlinear response for the contrast agent at higher excitations against experimental measurement. All models predict well the scattered fundamental response. The nonlinear strain softening included in the proposed elastic models of the encapsulation improves their ability to predict subharmonic response. They predict the threshold excitation for the initiation of subharmonic response and its subsequent saturation. PMID:20550283

  11. Effects of ambient hydrostatic pressure on the material properties of the encapsulation of an ultrasound contrast microbubble.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Krishna N; Sarkar, Kausik

    2015-08-01

    Ultrasound contrast microbubbles experience widely varying ambient blood pressure in different organs, which can also change due to diseases. Pressure change can alter the material properties of the encapsulation of these microbubbles. Here the characteristic rheological parameters of contrast agent Definity are determined by varying the ambient pressure (in a physiologically relevant range 0-200 mm Hg). Four different interfacial rheological models are used to characterize the microbubbles. Effects of gas diffusion under excess ambient pressure are investigated in detail accounting for size decrease of contrast microbubbles. Definity contrast agent show a change in their interfacial dilatational viscosity (3.6 × 10(-8) Ns/m at 0 mm Hg to 4.45 × 10(-8) Ns/m at 200 mm Hg) and interfacial dilatational elasticity (0.86 N/m at 0 mm Hg to 1.06 N/m at 200 mm Hg) with ambient pressure increase. The increase results from material consolidation, similar to such enhancement in bulk properties under pressure. The model that accounts for enhancement in material properties with increasing ambient pressure matches with experimentally measured subharmonic response as a function of ambient pressure, while assuming constant material parameters does not.

  12. Dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasound of the bowel wall with quantitative assessment of Crohn’s disease activity in childhood

    PubMed Central

    Vidmar, Dubravka; Urlep, Darja; Dezman, Rok

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background Contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) has become an established non-invasive, patient-friendly imaging technique which improves the characterization of lesions. In addition, dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasound (DCE-US) provides valuable information concerning perfusion of examined organs. This review addresses current applications of CEUS in children, focused on DCE-US of the bowel wall in patients with Crohn disease, which enables realtime assessment of the bowel wall vascularity with semi-quantitative and quantitative assessment of disease activity and response to medical treatment. Conclusions Crohn’s disease is a chronic inflammatory relapsing disease. Frequent imaging re-evaluation is necessary. Therefore, imaging should be as little invasive as possible, children friendly with high diagnostic accuracy. US with wide varieties of techniques, including CEUS/DCE-US, can provide an important contribution for diagnosing and monitoring a disease activity. Even if the use of US contrast agent is off-label in children, it is welcome and widely accepted for intravesical use, and a little less for intravenous use, manly in evaluation of parenchymal lesions. To our knowledge this is the first time that the use of DCE-US in the evaluation of activity of small bowel Crohn disease with quantitative assessment of kinetic parameters is being described in children. Even if the results of the value and accuracy of different quantitative kinetic parameters in published studies in adult population often contradict one another there is a great potential of DCE-US to become a part of the entire sonographic evaluation not only in adults, but also in children. Further control studies should be performed. PMID:27904441

  13. Ultrasound Molecular Imaging of the Breast Cancer Neovasculature using Engineered Fibronectin Scaffold Ligands: A Novel Class of Targeted Contrast Ultrasound Agent

    PubMed Central

    Abou-Elkacem, Lotfi; Wilson, Katheryne E.; Johnson, Sadie M.; Chowdhury, Sayan M.; Bachawal, Sunitha; Hackel, Benjamin J.; Tian, Lu; Willmann, Jürgen K.

    2016-01-01

    Molecularly-targeted microbubbles (MBs) are increasingly being recognized as promising contrast agents for oncological molecular imaging with ultrasound. With the detection and validation of new molecular imaging targets, novel binding ligands are needed that bind to molecular imaging targets with high affinity and specificity. In this study we assessed a novel class of potentially clinically translatable MBs using an engineered 10th type III domain of human-fibronectin (MB-FN3VEGFR2) scaffold-ligand to image VEGFR2 on the neovasculature of cancer. The in vitro binding of MB-FN3VEGFR2 to a soluble VEGFR2 was assessed by flow-cytometry (FACS) and binding to VEGFR2-expressing cells was assessed by flow-chamber cell attachment studies under flow shear stress conditions. In vivo binding of MB-FN3VEGFR2 was tested in a transgenic mouse model (FVB/N Tg(MMTV/PyMT634Mul) of breast cancer and control litter mates with normal mammary glands. In vitro FACS and flow-chamber cell attachment studies showed significantly (P<0.01) higher binding to VEGFR2 using MB-FN3VEGFR2 than control agents. In vivo ultrasound molecular imaging (USMI) studies using MB-FN3VEGFR2 demonstrated specific binding to VEGFR2 and was significantly higher (P<0.01) in breast cancer compared to normal breast tissue. Ex vivo immunofluorescence-analysis showed significantly (P<0.01) increased VEGFR2-expression in breast cancer compared to normal mammary tissue. Our results suggest that MBs coupled to FN3-scaffolds can be designed and used for USMI of breast cancer neoangiogenesis. Due to their small size, stability, solubility, the lack of glycosylation and disulfide bonds, FN3-scaffolds can be recombinantly produced with the advantage of generating small, high affinity ligands in a cost efficient way for USMI. PMID:27570547

  14. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound in combination with color Doppler ultrasound can improve the diagnostic performance of focal nodular hyperplasia and hepatocellular adenoma.

    PubMed

    Kong, Wen-Tao; Wang, Wen-Ping; Huang, Bei-Jian; Ding, Hong; Mao, Feng; Si, Qin

    2015-04-01

    The aim of our study was to evaluate the value of combining color Doppler ultrasound (CDUS) with contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) in identifying and comparing features of focal nodular hyperplasia (FNH) and hepatocellular adenoma (HCA). Thirty-eight patients with FNH (n = 28) or HCA (n = 10), whose diagnoses were later confirmed by pathology, were examined with conventional ultrasonography and CEUS between 2010 and 2013. Two doctors blinded to the pathology results independently reviewed the conventional ultrasound and CEUS images and then reached a consensus through discussion. The following parameters evaluated for all lesions included vascularity pattern on CDUS or CEUS, enhancement characteristics on CEUS and the presence of a central scar. Statistical analysis was performed with the independent sample t-test and Fisher exact test. On CDUS, FNH was characterized by the presence of abundant blood flow signals exhibiting dendritic (53.6%, 15/28) and spoke-wheel (28.6%, 8/28) patterns, whereas blood flow signal of HCA was slightly less than FNH and often showed subcapsular short rod-like (50%, 5/10) appearance. On CEUS, the most common arterial enhancement pattern was centrifugal or homogeneous enhancement in FNH (both, 12/28, 42.9%) and homogeneous enhancement in HCA (6/10, 60%). Spoke-wheel arteries, feeding artery and central scar were detected in 5 (17.9%), 8 (28.6%) and 5 (17.9%) of 28 FNHs. Hypo-echogenic pattern during delayed phase was more common in HCA (60%, 6/10) than in FNH (3/28, 10.7%) (p = 0.010). A total of 25 (25/38, 65.8%) lesions were correctly assessed using CDUS in combination with CEUS, whereas the number decreased to 15 (15/38, 39.5%) when CDUS was used alone (p = 0.038). The areas under the ROC curves before and after CEUS administration were 0.768 and 0.879, respectively. In conclusion, CEUS in combination with CDUS improve the diagnostic performance of FNH and HCA. Blood signal of HCA was less than FNH on CDUS. The differences of

  15. Heterogeneous delayed enhancement of the liver after ultrasound contrast agent injection--a normal variant.

    PubMed

    Okada, Masahiro; Albrecht, Thomas; Blomley, Martin J; Heckemann, Rolf A; Cosgrove, David O; Wolf, Karl-Jürgen

    2002-08-01

    We report a characteristic heterogeneous delayed liver enhancement pattern that we have encountered in a total of 6 of approximately 1500 subjects who underwent contrast-enhanced liver ultrasonography. The heterogeneous enhancement occurred several min after contrast injection and persisted for up to 1 h. It was seen in diseased as well as healthy livers and appears to represent a "normal variant" of liver enhancement. It was observed with two different contrast agents. The cause of the described effect is unknown; it may be related to the formation of large bubbles and vascular entrapment of these bubbles in the liver.

  16. Ultrasound microbubble contrast agents: fundamentals and application to gene and drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Ferrara, Katherine; Pollard, Rachel; Borden, Mark

    2007-01-01

    This review offers a critical analysis of the state of the art of medical microbubbles and their application in therapeutic delivery and monitoring. When driven by an ultrasonic pulse, these small gas bubbles oscillate with a wall velocity on the order of tens to hundreds of meters per second and can be deflected to a vessel wall or fragmented into particles on the order of nanometers. While single-session molecular imaging of multiple targets is difficult with affinity-based strategies employed in some other imaging modalities, microbubble fragmentation facilitates such studies. Similarly, a focused ultrasound beam can be used to disrupt delivery vehicles and blood vessel walls, offering the opportunity to locally deliver a drug or gene. Clinical translation of these vehicles will require that current challenges be overcome, where these challenges include rapid clearance and low payload. The technology, early successes with drug and gene delivery, and potential clinical applications are reviewed.

  17. THREE-DIMENSIONAL MODELING OF THE DYNAMICS OF THERAPEUTIC ULTRASOUND CONTRAST AGENTS

    PubMed Central

    Hsiao, Chao-Tsung; Lu, Xiaozhen; Chahine, Georges

    2010-01-01

    A 3-D thick-shell contrast agent dynamics model was developed by coupling a finite volume Navier-Stokes solver and a potential boundary element method flow solver to simulate the dynamics of thick-shelled contrast agents subjected to pressure waves. The 3-D model was validated using a spherical thick-shell model validated by experimental observations. We then used this model to study shell break-up during nonspherical deformations resulting from multiple contrast agent interaction or the presence of a nearby solid wall. Our simulations indicate that the thick viscous shell resists the contrast agent from forming a re-entrant jet, as normally observed for an air bubble oscillating near a solid wall. Instead, the shell thickness varies significantly from location to location during the dynamics, and this could lead to shell break-up caused by local shell thinning and stretching. PMID:20950929

  18. Neuropeptide Y Y1 receptor-mediated biodegradable photoluminescent nanobubbles as ultrasound contrast agents for targeted breast cancer imaging.

    PubMed

    Li, Juan; Tian, Yuchen; Shan, Dingying; Gong, An; Zeng, Leyong; Ren, Wenzhi; Xiang, Lingchao; Gerhard, Ethan; Zhao, Jinshun; Yang, Jian; Wu, Aiguo

    2017-02-01

    Targeted molecular imaging has attracted great attention in cancer diagnosis and treatment. However, most clinically used ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) are non-targeted microbubbles seldom used for cancer imaging. Here, we fabricated fluorescent nanobubbles (NBs) by encapsulation of liquid tetradecafluorohexane (C6F14) within biodegradable photoluminescent polymers (BPLPs) through an emulsion-evaporation process and conjugation of PNBL-NPY ligand for specific targeting of Y1 receptors overexpressed in breast tumors. The developed PNBL-NPY modified NBs were uniform in size with good dispersibility and photostability, presenting good ultrasound enhancement. Further, in vitro and in vivo results indicated that the fabricated NBs exhibit high affinity and specificity to Y1 receptor-overexpressing breast cancer cells and tumors with minimal toxicity and damage to organs. Our developed PNBL-NPY-modified NBs are novel targeted UCAs for safe, efficient and specific targeted breast cancer imaging, and may provide a new nanoplatform for early cancer diagnosis and treatment in the future.

  19. Numerical modeling of the 3D dynamics of ultrasound contrast agent microbubbles using the boundary integral method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qianxi; Manmi, Kawa; Calvisi, Michael L.

    2015-02-01

    Ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) are microbubbles stabilized with a shell typically of lipid, polymer, or protein and are emerging as a unique tool for noninvasive therapies ranging from gene delivery to tumor ablation. While various models have been developed to describe the spherical oscillations of contrast agents, the treatment of nonspherical behavior has received less attention. However, the nonspherical dynamics of contrast agents are thought to play an important role in therapeutic applications, for example, enhancing the uptake of therapeutic agents across cell membranes and tissue interfaces, and causing tissue ablation. In this paper, a model for nonspherical contrast agent dynamics based on the boundary integral method is described. The effects of the encapsulating shell are approximated by adapting Hoff's model for thin-shell, spherical contrast agents. A high-quality mesh of the bubble surface is maintained by implementing a hybrid approach of the Lagrangian method and elastic mesh technique. The numerical model agrees well with a modified Rayleigh-Plesset equation for encapsulated spherical bubbles. Numerical analyses of the dynamics of UCAs in an infinite liquid and near a rigid wall are performed in parameter regimes of clinical relevance. The oscillation amplitude and period decrease significantly due to the coating. A bubble jet forms when the amplitude of ultrasound is sufficiently large, as occurs for bubbles without a coating; however, the threshold amplitude required to incite jetting increases due to the coating. When a UCA is near a rigid boundary subject to acoustic forcing, the jet is directed towards the wall if the acoustic wave propagates perpendicular to the boundary. When the acoustic wave propagates parallel to the rigid boundary, the jet direction has components both along the wave direction and towards the boundary that depend mainly on the dimensionless standoff distance of the bubble from the boundary. In all cases, the jet

  20. Assessment of cerebral autoregulation with transcranial Doppler sonography in poor bone windows using constant infusion of an ultrasound contrast agent.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, Matthias W; Thoelen, Nina; Loesel, Nadine; Lienerth, Christian; Gonzalez, Marilen; Humpich, Marek; Roelz, Waltraud; Dvorak, Florian; Sitzer, Matthias

    2008-03-01

    Cerebral autoregulation is an important pathophysiological and prognostic parameter for a variety of neurologic conditions. It can be assessed quickly and safely using transcranial Doppler sonography (TCD). In elderly patients, poor insonation conditions decrease the number of examinable patients and can cause a systematic bias in autoregulation parameters. The aim of this study was to investigate whether a constant infusion of an ultrasound contrast agent (Levovist((R))) can counteract these effects. We examined two cohorts of unselected neurologic patients. In 45 patients with good insonation windows (cohort 1), we used a thin aluminium foil between the skin and the TCD probe to artificially decrease the insonation quality. We determined two parameters of cerebral autoregulation (phase difference [PD] and a cross-correlation coefficient [Mx]) in native patients, with aluminium foil and with aluminium foil and a constant infusion of Levovist. In 30 patients with poor insonation windows (cohort 2), we measured the autoregulation twice, with and without an infusion of Levovist, to assess the reproducibility of the autoregulation parameters. In cohort 1, the foil model significantly decreased the Doppler signal quality, i.e., the mean spectrum energy decreased from 33.9 +/- 2.7 dB to 26.3 +/- 2.4 dB (p < 0.001). This introduced a significant bias to all autoregulation parameters (PD: decreased from 38.2 +/- 10.0 degrees to 27.9 +/- 12.5 degrees (p < 0.001); Mx: decreased from 0.308 +/- 0.170 to 0.254 +/- 0.162 (p < 0.01)). Both effects were compensated largely by a constant infusion of Levovist (300 mg/min). In cohort 2, infusion of the contrast agent at the same rate increased insonation quality, too, but to a lesser degree (27.4 +/- 2.4 dB to 32.0 +/- 3.7 dB, p < 0.001). This smaller increase did not cause a significant change in the autoregulation parameters, but the reproducibility of the PD was significantly improved (intraclass coefficient coefficient [ICC] 0

  1. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound for the evaluation of acute renal infarction.

    PubMed

    Miyoshi, Toru; Okayama, Hideki; Hiasa, Go; Kawata, Yoshitaka; Yamada, Tadakatsu; Kazatani, Yukio

    2016-01-01

    A 65-year-old male in the dilated phase of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and with persistent atrial fibrillation was admitted to our hospital because of an episode of ventricular fibrillation following an appropriate shock from an implantable cardiac defibrillator (ICD). At admission, electrocardiography showed a normal sinus rhythm. He had complained of back pain 7 days after the ICD shock. Renal infarction was suspected, although computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging could not be performed because of chronic renal failure and the presence of his ICD. We, therefore, used contrast-enhanced ultrasonography with a contrast agent to evaluate his acute kidney injury. This showed the left kidney contained a wedge-shaped area that was not enhanced by the contrast agent, indicating an area of infarction.

  2. Correction of Non-Linear Propagation Artifact in Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound Imaging of Carotid Arteries: Methods and in Vitro Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Yildiz, Yesna O; Eckersley, Robert J; Senior, Roxy; Lim, Adrian K P; Cosgrove, David; Tang, Meng-Xing

    2015-07-01

    Non-linear propagation of ultrasound creates artifacts in contrast-enhanced ultrasound images that significantly affect both qualitative and quantitative assessments of tissue perfusion. This article describes the development and evaluation of a new algorithm to correct for this artifact. The correction is a post-processing method that estimates and removes non-linear artifact in the contrast-specific image using the simultaneously acquired B-mode image data. The method is evaluated on carotid artery flow phantoms with large and small vessels containing microbubbles of various concentrations at different acoustic pressures. The algorithm significantly reduces non-linear artifacts while maintaining the contrast signal from bubbles to increase the contrast-to-tissue ratio by up to 11 dB. Contrast signal from a small vessel 600 μm in diameter buried in tissue artifacts before correction was recovered after the correction.

  3. Role of contrast-enhanced ultrasound arterial mapping in surgical planning for patients with critical limb ischemia.

    PubMed

    Mestre, Xavier Martí; Coll, Ramon Vila; Villegas, Antoni Romera; Rico, Carlos Martínez

    2015-06-01

    The goal of the study described here was to evaluate the role of contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) arterial mapping in surgical planning in cases of critical limb ischemia. From March 2007 to December 2012, 565 consecutive patients with critical limb ischemia of the lower limbs were treated and initially examined with only ultrasound (US) arterial mapping. For 479 of the 565 patients, basic US examination results were deemed sufficient for surgical planning (group A). That is, US examination provided sufficient information to decide a surgical plan to treat those patients. In the remaining 86 patients, basic US examination was insufficient for revascularization planning, and CEUS examination was performed (group B). In 5 cases, CEUS results were also insufficient for surgical planning, as a suitable outflow vessel was not visualized. In these cases, a pre-operative arteriogram was performed. To assess the usefulness of CEUS, we compared results of examinations with and without contrast administration, surgical findings and angiographic findings when available. Data were collected prospectively. Examinations were compared by establishing the degree of agreement between results of paired examinations and degree of agreement between CEUS results and surgical findings. Clinical, hemodynamic (ankle-brachial index) and duplex follow-up was performed at 1 and 3 mo to evaluate cumulative patency of the procedures in each group. Within group B, degree of agreement between basic US and CEUS was 46.5%. CEUS resulted in a change in the surgical plan in 46 of 86 patients. Among all 565 patients, degree of agreement between surgical decision based on basic ultrasound arterial mapping and final decision based on surgical findings was 87.1%, and improved to 95.2% with CEUS (p = 0.00001, κ index = 0.823). Degree of agreement between the ultrasound-based decision and surgical findings was 97.5% in group A (κ index = 0.818) and 94.2% in group B (κ = 0.848). There was no

  4. A comparative study of contrast enhanced ultrasound and contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging for the detection and characterization of hepatic hemangiomas.

    PubMed

    Fang, Liang; Zhu, Zheng; Huang, Beijian; Ding, Hong; Mao, Feng; Li, Chaolun; Zeng, Mengsu; Zhou, Jianjun; Wang, Ling; Wang, Wenping; Chen, Yue

    2015-04-01

    This study aims to compare contrast enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) and contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (CEMRI) for the detection and characterization of hepatic hemangiomas. Included in this retrospective study were 83 histopathologically confirmed lesions of hemangioma in 66 hospitalized patients who underwent both CEUS and CEMRI and received surgery. The enhancement patterns on CEUS and CEMRI in each lesion were compared and analyzed. In addition, data obtained by the two modalities were then compared with the pathological findings to determine their value in differential diagnosis of hepatic hemangiomas. CEUS diagnosed 78 lesions of hemangioma against 80 by CEMRI. There were no statistical significant differences in the diagnostic value between CEUS and CEMRI in terms of sensitivity (88.0% vs. 92.8%), specificity (99.0% vs. 99.4%), accuracy (97.3% vs. 98.4%), positive predictive value (93.6% vs. 96.3%), and negative predictive value (98.0% vs. 98.8%) (p > 0.05, all). In the arterial phase, the main enhancement pattern on both CEUS and CEMRI was peripheral nodular enhancement (73 vs. 76), but lesions with diffuse enhancement on CEUS outnumbered those on CEMRI (3 vs. 1) and lesions with circular enhancement on CEMRI outnumbered those on CEUS (3 vs. 2). In the portal venous phase and delayed phase, the main enhancement pattern was hyperechoic change on CEUS and hyperintense on CEMRI (66 vs. 65), some lesions presented isoechoic change (12 vs. 15). These results suggested CEUS, an equivalent to CEMRI, may have an added diagnostic value in hemangiomas.

  5. Synthesis, characterization and in vitro and in vivo investigation of C₃F₈-filled poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) nanoparticles as an ultrasound contrast agent.

    PubMed

    Wang, Cui-Wei; Yang, Shi-Ping; Hu, He; Du, Jing; Li, Feng-Hua

    2015-03-01

    The present study aimed to prepare perfluoropropane (C3F8)-filled poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles and investigate the feasibility of using PLGA nanoparticles as an ultrasound contrast agent. The PLGA nanoscale ultrasound contrast agent was prepared using a modified double-emulsion solvent evaporation method. Camphor in the form of a sublimable porogen was added to render the nanoparticles hollow and enable C3F8 gas introduction. Various physicochemical properties of PLGA nanoparticles, including morphology, size and dispersion, were analyzed by electron microscopy and dynamic laser scattering. In vitro ultrasound imaging of C3F8-filled PLGA nanoparticles was also investigated under various imaging conditions. Further in vivo ultrasound imaging was conducted on male rats following intratesticular injection of PLGA nanoparticles. C3F8-filled PLGA nanoparticles with a mean diameter of 152.0±58.08 nm were obtained. Electron microscopy revealed spherical-shaped nanoparticles with smooth surfaces, a capsular morphology and a large hollow within. In vitro ultrasound imaging of hollow PLGA nanoparticles indicated marked signal enhancement. Local intensity of the acoustical signal continued to increase during PLGA-nanoparticle injection into the testicle and the ability of hollow PLGA nanoparticles to enhance ultrasound imaging in vivo was demonstrated. The enhancement image of testicular tissue following injection with C3F8-filled PLGA nanoparticles was sustained for a minimum of five minutes. In conclusion, the hollow C3F8-filled PLGA nanoparticles were demonstrated to have potential for applications as a novel ultrasound contrast agent.

  6. Versatile utilization of real-time intraoperative contrast-enhanced ultrasound in cranial neurosurgery: technical note and retrospective case series

    PubMed Central

    Lekht, Ilya; Brauner, Noah; Bakhsheshian, Joshua; Chang, Ki-Eun; Gulati, Mittul; Shiroishi, Mark S.; Grant, Edward G.; Christian, Eisha; Zada, Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Intraoperative contrast-enhanced ultrasound (iCEUS) offers dynamic imaging and provides functional data in real time. However, no standardized protocols or validated quantitative data exist to guide its routine use in neurosurgery. The authors aimed to provide further clinical data on the versatile application of iCEUS through a technical note and illustrative case series. METHODS Five patients undergoing craniotomies for suspected tumors were included. iCEUS was performed using a contrast agent composed of lipid shell microspheres enclosing perflutren (octafluoropropane) gas. Perfusion data were acquired through a time-intensity curve analysis protocol obtained using iCEUS prior to biopsy and/or resection of all lesions. RESULTS Three primary tumors (gemistocytic astrocytoma, glioblastoma multiforme, and meningioma), 1 metastatic lesion (melanoma), and 1 tumefactive demyelinating lesion (multiple sclerosis) were assessed using real-time iCEUS. No intraoperative complications occurred following multiple administrations of contrast agent in all cases. In all neoplastic cases, iCEUS replicated enhancement patterns observed on preoperative Gd-enhanced MRI, facilitated safe tumor de-bulking by differentiating neoplastic tissue from normal brain parenchyma, and helped identify arterial feeders and draining veins in and around the surgical cavity. Intraoperative CEUS was also useful in guiding a successful intraoperative needle biopsy of a cerebellar tumefactive demyelinating lesion obtained during real-time perfusion analysis. CONCLUSIONS Intraoperative CEUS has potential for safe, real-time, dynamic contrast-based imaging for routine use in neurooncological surgery and image-guided biopsy. Intraoperative CEUS eliminates the effect of anatomical distortions associated with standard neuronavigation and provides quantitative perfusion data in real time, which may hold major implications for intraoperative diagnosis, tissue differentiation, and quantification of

  7. High-resolution functional imaging with ultrasound contrast agents based on RF processing in an in vivo kidney experiment.

    PubMed

    Verbeek, X A; Willigers, J M; Prinzen, F W; Peschar, M; Ledoux, L A; Hoeks, A P

    2001-02-01

    Knowledge of the relative tissue perfusion distribution is valuable in the diagnosis of numerous diseases. Techniques for the assessment of the relative perfusion distribution, based on ultrasound (US) contrast agents, have several advantages compared to established nuclear techniques. These are, among others, a better spatial and temporal resolution, the lack of exposure of the patient to ionizing radiation and the relatively low cost. In the present study, US radiofrequency (RF) image sequences are acquired, containing the signal intensity changes associated with the transit of a bolus contrast agent through the microvasculature of a dog kidney. The primary objective is to explore the feasibility of calculating functional images with high spatial resolution. The functional images characterize the transit of the contrast agent bolus and represent distributions of peak time, peak value, transit time, peak area, wash-in rate and wash-out decay constant. For the evaluation of the method, dog experiments were performed under optimized conditions where motion artefacts were minimized and an IA injection of the contrast agent Levovist was employed. It was demonstrated that processing of RF signals obtained with a 3.5-MHz echo system can provide functional images with a high spatial resolution of 2 mm in axial resolution, 2 to 5 mm in lateral resolution and a slice thickness of 2 mm. The functional images expose several known aspects of kidney perfusion, like perfusion heterogeneity of the kidney cortex and a different peripheral cortical perfusion compared to the inner cortex. Based on the findings of the present study, and given the results of complimentary studies, it is likely that the functional images reflect the relative perfusion distribution of the kidney.

  8. The fabrication of novel nanobubble ultrasound contrast agent for potential tumor imaging.

    PubMed

    Xing, Zhanwen; Wang, Jinrui; Ke, Hengte; Zhao, Bo; Yue, Xiuli; Dai, Zhifei; Liu, Jibin

    2010-04-09

    Novel biocompatible nanobubbles were fabricated by ultrasonication of a mixture of Span 60 and polyoxyethylene 40 stearate (PEG40S) followed by differential centrifugation to isolate the relevant subpopulation from the parent suspensions. Particle sizing analysis and optical microscopy inspection indicated that the freshly generated micro/nanobubble suspension was polydisperse and the size distribution was bimodal with large amounts of nanobubbles. To develop a nano-sized contrast agent that is small enough to leak through tumor pores, a fractionation to extract smaller bubbles by variation in the time of centrifugation at 20g (relative centrifuge field, RCF) was suggested. The results showed that the population of nanobubbles with a precisely controlled mean diameter could be sorted from the initial polydisperse suspensions to meet the specified requirements. The isolated bubbles were stable over two weeks under the protection of perfluoropropane gas. The acoustic behavior of the nano-sized contrast agent was evaluated using power Doppler imaging in a normal rabbit model. An excellent power Doppler enhancement was found in vivo renal imaging after intravenous injection of the obtained nanobubbles. Given the broad spectrum of potential clinical applications, the nano-sized contrast agent may provide a versatile adjunct for ultrasonic imaging enhancement and/or treatment of tumors.

  9. An In Vitro Study of the Correlation Between Bubble Distribution, Acoustic Emission, and Cell Damage by Contrast Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Fowlkes, J. Brian; Miller, Douglas L.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the influences of total exposure duration and pulse-to-pulse bubble distribution on contrast-mediated cell damage. Murine macrophage cells were grown as monolayers on thin polyester sheets. Contrast agent microbubbles were attached to these cells by incubation. Focused ultrasound exposures (Pr = 2 MPa) were implemented at a frequency of 2.25 MHz with 46 cycle pulses and pulse repetition frequencies (PRF) of 1 kHz, 500 Hz, 100 Hz, and 10 Hz in a degassed water bath at 10 or 100 pulses. A 1 MHz receive transducer measured the scattered signal. The frequency spectrum was normalized to a control spectrum from linear scatterers. Photomicrographs were captured before, during, and after exposure at a frame rate of 2000 fps and a pixel resolution of 960 × 720. Results clearly show that cell death is increased, up to 60%, by increasing total exposure duration from 0 ms to 100 ms. There was an increasing difference in cell damage between a 10-pulse exposure and a 100-pulse exposure with increasing PRF. The greatest change in damage occurred at 1000 Hz PRF with a 53% increase between 10-pulse and 100-pulse exposures. For each pulse from 0 to 10, an overlay of the 2 μm bubble count with corresponding emission shows consistent behavior in its pulse-to-pulse changes, indicating a correlation between acoustic emission, bubble distribution, and cell damage. PMID:19411217

  10. Contrast Enhanced Abdominal Ultrasound in the Assessment of Ileal Inflammation in Crohn’s Disease: A Comparison with MR Enterography

    PubMed Central

    Horjus Talabur Horje, C. S.; Roovers, L.; Groenen, M. J. M.; Wahab, P. J.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims To prospectively examine the feasibility and accuracy of Contrast Enhanced Ultrasound (CEUS) in the assessment of Crohn’s disease (CD) activity in the terminal ileum in comparison to Magnetic Resonance Enterography (MRE), using endoscopy as a reference standard. Methods 105 consecutive patients with alleged clinically active CD were assessed by MRE and CEUS. CEUS of the terminal ileum was performed using an intravenous microbubble contrast enhancer. Accuracy values of CEUS and MRE for the presence of active terminal ileitis were evaluated using the Receiver Operating Characteristic method, using endoscopic findings as a reference standard. Sensitivity and specificity values of MRE and CEUS were compared by the McNemar test. Results CEUS was feasible in 98% of patients, MRE in all. Optimal diagnostic accuracy in CEUS was obtained at a peak intensity value of 10%, showing 100% sensitivity, 92% specificity and an accuracy of 99% in demonstrating ileal mucosal inflammation. For MRE, overall sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were, 87%, 100%, and 88%, respectively. CEUS and MRE were highly correlated in assessing length and wall thickness of the terminal ileum. CEUS identified 11 of 16 MRE-detected strictures, but no fistulae. Conclusion The accuracy of CEUS is comparable to that of MRE in the assessment of active, uncomplicated terminal ileal CD and therefore a valuable bedside alternative to MRE in the follow-up of these patients. PMID:26322970

  11. Contrast enhanced ultrasound with quantitative perfusion analysis for objective characterization of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma: A feasibility study.

    PubMed

    D'Onofrio, Mirko; Canestrini, Stefano; Crosara, Stefano; De Robertis, Riccardo; Pozzi Mucelli, Roberto

    2014-03-28

    The aim of this study was to determine whether contrast enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) quantitative perfusion analysis allows an objective characterization of ductal adenocarcinoma (ADK) of the pancreas. Patients with pancreatic ADK underwent CEUS. All examinations were performed on an Acuson S2000 system (Siemens, Erlangen, Germany) after the iv administration of 2.4 mL contrast agent (SonoVue(®), Bracco, Milan, Italy). All lesions were pathologically proved. An operator manually drew different regions of interest within the tumor and the adjacent parenchyma to allow the quantitative perfusion analysis. The mean values of peak of enhancement, time to peak and ascending curve were calculated and compared using the Student's t test. The quantitative perfusion analysis was possible in all lesions. The mean values of the peak of enhancement, time to peak and ascending curve were 17.19%, 7.97 s and 159.52% s within the tumor and 33.57%, 8.89 s and 355.29% s within the adjacent parenchyma. The peak of enhancement and the ascending curve values were significantly different within the tumor and the adjacent parenchyma. Thus, CEUS allows the quantitative perfusion analysis of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma.

  12. An approximate nonlinear model for time gain compensation of amplitude modulated images of ultrasound contrast agent perfusion.

    PubMed

    Mari, Jean; Hibbs, Kathryn; Stride, Eleanor; Eckersley, Robert; Tang, Meng

    2010-04-01

    Microbubble ultrasound contrast agents allow blood perfusion to be imaged at the cost of an increased attenuation that is not properly handled by existing time gain compensation methods. An automatic TGC has been developed that is able to account for different microbubble concentrations. The technique is an extension of a previously tested approach for modeling the nonlinear dependence of microbubble backscattering upon insonating pressure. The proposed method involves modeling in amplitude of the nonlinear attenuation for both forward and backward propagation, and the solution is achieved through an approximation set to overestimate the attenuation. The resulting equations are used to model and compensate amplitude modulation (AM) images; they are tested on radiofrequency data acquired using a clinical scanner from a gelatin tissue-mimicking phantom submerged in a contrast agent solution in the 0.08 MI to 0.51 MI range at 2 MHz. The nonlinear estimation equation presented here provides a significantly improved amplification profile compared with standard TGC algorithms, resulting in more accurate attenuation correction of the AM image.

  13. Interaction of an ultrasound-activated contrast microbubble with a wall at arbitrary separation distances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doinikov, Alexander A.; Bouakaz, Ayache

    2015-10-01

    Both in vitro and in vivo, contrast agent microbubbles move near bounding surfaces, such as the wall of an experimental container or the wall of a blood vessel. This problem inspires interest in theoretical models that predict the effect of a wall on the dynamics of a contrast microbubble. There are models for a bubble at a large distance from a wall and for a bubble adherent to a wall. The aim of the present study is to develop a generalized model that describes the dynamics of a contrast microbubble at arbitrary distances from a wall and thereby make it possible to simulate the acoustic response of the bubble starting from large separation distances up to contact between the bubble and the wall. The wall is assumed to be a plane. Therefore, the developed model applies for in vitro investigations of contrast agents in experimental containers. It can also be used as a first approximation to the case of a contrast microbubble within a large blood vessel. The derivation of the model is based on the multipole expansion of the bubble velocity potential, the image source method, and the Lagrangian formalism. The model consists of two coupled equations, one of which describes the bubble radial oscillation and the second describes the translation of the bubble center. Numerical simulations are performed to determine how the acoustic response of a contrast microbubble depends on the separation distance near walls of different types: rigid, plastic, arterial, etc. The dynamics of the bubble encapsulation is described by the Marmottant shell model. The properties of the plastic wall correspond to OptiCell chambers commonly used in experiments. The results of the simulations show that the bubble resonance frequency near a wall depends on both the separation distance and the wall material properties. In particular, the rigid wall makes the resonance frequency decrease with decreasing separation distance, whereas in the vicinity of the OptiCell wall and the arterial wall, the

  14. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound improved performance of breast imaging reporting and data system evaluation of critical breast lesions

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Jun; Chen, Ji-Dong; Chen, Qing; Yue, Lin-Xian; Zhou, Guo; Lan, Cheng; Li, Yi; Wu, Chi-Hua; Lu, Jing-Qiao

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To determine whether contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) can improve the precision of breast imaging reporting and data system (BI-RADS) categorization. METHODS: A total of 230 patients with 235 solid breast lesions classified as BI-RADS 4 on conventional ultrasound were evaluated. CEUS was performed within one week before core needle biopsy or surgical resection and a revised BI-RADS classification was assigned based on 10 CEUS imaging characteristics. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis was then conducted to evaluate the diagnostic performance of CEUS-based BI-RADS assignment with pathological examination as reference criteria. RESULTS: The CEUS-based BI-RADS evaluation classified 116/235 (49.36%) lesions into category 3, 20 (8.51%), 13 (5.53%) and 12 (5.11%) lesions into categories 4A, 4B and 4C, respectively, and 74 (31.49%) into category 5. Selecting CEUS-based BI-RADS category 4A as an appropriate cut-off gave sensitivity and specificity values of 85.4% and 87.8%, respectively, for the diagnosis of malignant disease. The cancer-to-biopsy yield was 73.11% with CEUS-based BI-RADS 4A selected as the biopsy threshold compared with 40.85% otherwise, while the biopsy rate was only 42.13% compared with 100% otherwise. Overall, only 4.68% of invasive cancers were misdiagnosed. CONCLUSION: This pilot study suggests that evaluation of BI-RADS 4 breast lesions with CEUS results in reduced biopsy rates and increased cancer-to-biopsy yields. PMID:27358689

  15. Nonrigid motion compensation in B-mode and contrast enhanced ultrasound image sequences of the carotid artery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, Diego D. B.; Akkus, Zeynettin; Bosch, Johan G.; van den Oord, Stijn C. H.; Niessen, Wiro J.; Klein, Stefan

    2014-03-01

    In this work, we investigate nonrigid motion compensation in simultaneously acquired (side-by-side) B-mode ultrasound (BMUS) and contrast enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) image sequences of the carotid artery. These images are acquired to study the presence of intraplaque neovascularization (IPN), which is a marker of plaque vulnerability. IPN quantification is visualized by performing the maximum intensity projection (MIP) on the CEUS image sequence over time. As carotid images contain considerable motion, accurate global nonrigid motion compensation (GNMC) is required prior to the MIP. Moreover, we demonstrate that an improved lumen and plaque differentiation can be obtained by averaging the motion compensated BMUS images over time. We propose to use a previously published 2D+t nonrigid registration method, which is based on minimization of pixel intensity variance over time, using a spatially and temporally smooth B-spline deformation model. The validation compares displacements of plaque points with manual trackings by 3 experts in 11 carotids. The average (+/- standard deviation) root mean square error (RMSE) was 99+/-74μm for longitudinal and 47+/-18μm for radial displacements. These results were comparable with the interobserver variability, and with results of a local rigid registration technique based on speckle tracking, which estimates motion in a single point, whereas our approach applies motion compensation to the entire image. In conclusion, we evaluated that the GNMC technique produces reliable results. Since this technique tracks global deformations, it can aid in the quantification of IPN and the delineation of lumen and plaque contours.

  16. Maxwell rheological model for lipid-shelled ultrasound microbubble contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Doinikov, Alexander A; Dayton, Paul A

    2007-06-01

    The present paper proposes a model that describes the encapsulation of microbubble contrast agents by the linear Maxwell constitutive equation. The model also incorporates the translational motion of contrast agent microbubbles and takes into account radiation losses due to the compressibility of the surrounding liquid. To establish physical features of the proposed model, comparative analysis is performed between this model and two existing models, one of which treats the encapsulation as a viscoelastic solid following the Kelvin-Voigt constitutive equation and the other assumes that the encapsulating layer behaves as a viscous Newtonian fluid. Resonance frequencies, damping coefficients, and scattering cross sections for the three shell models are compared in the regime of linear oscillation. Translational displacements predicted by the three shell models are examined by numerically calculating the general, nonlinearized equations of motion for weakly nonlinear excitation. Analogous results for free bubbles are also presented as a basis to which calculations made for encapsulated bubbles can be related. It is shown that the Maxwell shell model possesses specific physical features that are unavailable in the two other models.

  17. A two-pulse technique for extracting 3rd harmonic from ultrasound contrast agent echo signal.

    PubMed

    Song, Jae-hee; Kim, Sang-min; Song, Tai-kyong

    2008-01-01

    Multi-pulse techniques like CPS (contrast pulse sequence) and TPS (triplet pulse sequence) are the most popular methods for separating the 3rd harmonic signals from received signal. Those two methods, however, transmit a pulse at least three times along each scanline with different phase and amplitude, which results in the frame rate reduction. In this paper, we propose a technique using two pulses whose phase difference is 90 degrees and a simple digital filter. The second harmonic signal is eliminated by summing two received signals as their phase difference becomes 180 degrees and then the fundamental signals are eliminated by using a digital filter. Computer simulations are performed for different values of signal bandwidths and filter specifications. The results show the maximum error is -35.5 dB compared to TPS.

  18. Harmonic contrast-enhanced endoscopic ultrasound fine-needle aspiration: Fact or fiction?

    PubMed

    Seicean, Andrada; Jinga, Mariana

    2017-01-01

    The negative predictive value of endoscopic ultrasonography fine-needle aspiration is relatively low. To achieve the improvement of the diagnostic yield, the following were proposed: a higher number of passes, the presence of the rapid on-site cytopathologist evaluation, the fanning technique, or the repetition of the fine needle biopsy. Harmonic contrast-enhanced endosonography may better identify the targeted area in the lesions by avoiding the inside necrosis and the vessels of fibrosis, so it can guide the fine-needle aspiration. Both techniques are complementary, not competitive, and they can be done in the same session. The combined technique is simple, safe, and requires only a few minutes with minimal extra costs compared to standard fine-needle aspiration. It minimally increases the diagnostic rate, and it permits the decrease of the number of passes. However, we will know its real clinical impact only in the future and whether it will be incorporated into the lesion assessment process.

  19. Harmonic contrast-enhanced endoscopic ultrasound fine-needle aspiration: Fact or fiction?

    PubMed Central

    Seicean, Andrada; Jinga, Mariana

    2017-01-01

    The negative predictive value of endoscopic ultrasonography fine-needle aspiration is relatively low. To achieve the improvement of the diagnostic yield, the following were proposed: a higher number of passes, the presence of the rapid on-site cytopathologist evaluation, the fanning technique, or the repetition of the fine needle biopsy. Harmonic contrast-enhanced endosonography may better identify the targeted area in the lesions by avoiding the inside necrosis and the vessels of fibrosis, so it can guide the fine-needle aspiration. Both techniques are complementary, not competitive, and they can be done in the same session. The combined technique is simple, safe, and requires only a few minutes with minimal extra costs compared to standard fine-needle aspiration. It minimally increases the diagnostic rate, and it permits the decrease of the number of passes. However, we will know its real clinical impact only in the future and whether it will be incorporated into the lesion assessment process. PMID:28218198

  20. Additional Targeted Biopsy in Clinically Suspected Prostate Cancer: Prospective Randomized Comparison between Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound and Sonoelastography Guidance.

    PubMed

    Koh, Jieun; Jung, Dae Chul; Oh, Young Taik; Yoo, Moon Gyu; Noh, Songmi; Han, Kyung Hwa; Rha, Koon-Ho; Choi, Young Deuk; Hong, Sung Joon

    2015-11-01

    Our aim was to improve the detection of prostate cancer by evaluating whether contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) or sonoelastography (SE) is more helpful in guiding targeted biopsy (TB) performed before systematic biopsy (SB). A total of 52 patients suspected of having prostate cancer were prospectively included and randomly assigned to either the CEUS or SE group. Different, independent radiologists performed TB and twelve-core SB. Within each group, cancer detection rates based on core number were compared between SB and TB. We evaluated the effect of TB on core-based cancer detection rates between the CEUS and SE groups. Cancer detection was higher in overall TB cores 16.4% (28/171) than SB cores 11.4% (71/624) in both groups. In the SE group, TB cores revealed higher cancer detection than did SB cores from 4.49% (14/312) to 12.86% (9/70) (p = 0.01). Compared with CEUS, SE may improve detection rates when considering additional TB guidance methods.

  1. The correlation of contrast-enhanced ultrasound and MRI perfusion quantitative analysis in rabbit VX2 liver cancer.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Zhiming; Liang, Qianwen; Liang, Changhong; Zhong, Guimian

    2014-12-01

    Our objective is to explore the value of liver cancer contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) and MRI perfusion quantitative analysis in liver cancer and the correlation between these two analysis methods. Rabbit VX2 liver cancer model was established in this study. CEUS was applied. Sono Vue was applied in rabbits by ear vein to dynamically observe and record the blood perfusion and changes in the process of VX2 liver cancer and surrounding tissue. MRI perfusion quantitative analysis was used to analyze the mean enhancement time and change law of maximal slope increasing, which were further compared with the pathological examination results. Quantitative indicators of liver cancer CEUS and MRI perfusion quantitative analysis were compared, and the correlation between them was analyzed by correlation analysis. Rabbit VX2 liver cancer model was successfully established. CEUS showed that time-intensity curve of rabbit VX2 liver cancer showed "fast in, fast out" model while MRI perfusion quantitative analysis showed that quantitative parameter MTE of tumor tissue increased and MSI decreased: the difference was statistically significant (P < 0.01). The diagnostic results of CEUS and MRI perfusion quantitative analysis were not significantly different (P > 0.05). However, the quantitative parameter of them were significantly positively correlated (P < 0.05). CEUS and MRI perfusion quantitative analysis can both dynamically monitor the liver cancer lesion and surrounding liver parenchyma, and the quantitative parameters of them are correlated. The combined application of both is of importance in early diagnosis of liver cancer.

  2. The Value of the Model and Quantitative Parameters of Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound in Judging the Severity of SHPT

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Xing-xin; Li, Fan; Gao, Feng; Liu, Yang; Qiao, Xiao-hui; Zhang, Zheng

    2016-01-01

    Using the model and quantitative parameters of contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) to assess the severity of secondary hyperparathyroidism (SHPT) was proposed. 42 SHPT patients who underwent CEUS examination were divided into three groups, light, moderate, and heavy as per parathyroid hormone (PTH). The process of CEUS was divided into two phases, wash-in phase and wash-out phase. The three groups were analyzed with their enhancing model in the two phases. The quantitative parameters of CEUS such as Arrival Time (AT), Time to Peak (TTP), Mean Transit Time (MTT), and Maximum Intensity (IMAX) were measured by time-intensity curve (TIC) and compared among the three groups. The enhancing model of light SHPT, moderate SHPT, and heavy SHPT showed statistical significance in wash-in phase and wash-out phase (P < 0.05). No difference was observed in AT and TTP among the three groups (P > 0.05) while MTT and IMAX showed statistical significance (P < 0.05). The CEUS of light SHPT was characterized by “slow-in, fast-out, and lower-enhancement” with short enhancement time; the CEUS of moderate SHPT was characterized by “fast-in, fast-out, and higher-enhancement” with slightly long enhancement time; the CEUS of heavy SHPT was characterized by “fast-in, slow-out, and higher-enhancement” with long enhancement time. Therefore, the model and quantitative parameters of CEUS can be benefit for the assessment of the severity of SHPT. PMID:28078296

  3. Multi-planar dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasound assessment of blood flow in a rabbit model of testicular torsion.

    PubMed

    Paltiel, Harriet J; Estrada, Carlos R; Alomari, Ahmad I; Stamoulis, Catherine; Passerotti, Carlo C; Meral, F Can; Lee, Richard S; Clement, Gregory T

    2014-02-01

    To assess correlation between multi-planar, dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasound (US) blood flow measurements and radiolabeled microsphere blood flow measurements, five groups of six rabbits underwent unilateral testicular torsion of 0°, 180°, 360°, 540° or 720°. Five US measurements per testis (three transverse/two longitudinal) were obtained pre-operatively and immediately and 4 and 8 h post-operatively using linear transducers (7-4 MHz/center frequency 4.5 MHz/10 rabbits; 9-3 MHz/center frequency 5.5 MHz/20 rabbits). Björck's linear least-squares method fit the rise phase of mean pixel intensity over a 7-s period for each time curve. Slope of fit and intervention/control US pixel intensity ratios were calculated. Means of transverse, longitudinal and combined transverse/longitudinal US ratios as a function of torsion degree were compared with radiolabeled microsphere ratios using Pearson's correlation coefficient, ρ. There was high correlation between the two sets of ratios (ρ ≥ 0.88, p ≤ 0.05), except for the transverse US ratio in the immediate post-operative period (ρ = 0.79, p = 0.11). These results hold promise for future clinical applications.

  4. Power modulation contrast enhanced ultrasound for postoperative perfusion monitoring following free tissue transfer in head and neck surgery.

    PubMed

    Sharma, S; Anand, R; Hickman, M; Senior, R; Walji, S; Ramchandani, P L; Culliford, D; Ilankovan, V; Greaves, K

    2010-12-01

    This feasibility study evaluated whether contrast enhanced ultrasound (CEU) was able to assess free flap perfusion following free tissue transfer in the head and neck region. Thirty-six patients underwent standard clinical monitoring (SCM) and CEU postoperatively. The time taken for each technique to detect flap failure was recorded. Qualitative CEU analysis by visual assessment predicted survival in 30/30 (100%) and failure in 5/6 (83%) flaps with sensitivity, specificity, positive (PPV) and negative (NPV) predictive values of 100, 86, 97 and 100%, respectively. Quantitative CEU measurement of blood volume (α) values within healthy perfused flaps was over 60 times higher than in failing flaps (8.25±2.82dB vs. 0.12±0.17dB, respectively, P<0.0001). If a cut-off α value of <1.5dB was used to predict future flap failure, the accuracy of the test was 100% (sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV). If a cut-off α value of >1.9dB indicated flap success, the PPV and NPV are 100%. Following surgery, SCM took 76 (±15) h to detect flap failure compared with 18 (±38) h with CEU (P<0.05). CEU is highly accurate in its ability to distinguish between perfused and failing flaps. The technique is quick (<10min) and capable of imaging all flap types.

  5. Single-Antenna Microwave Ablation Under Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound Guidance for Treatment of Small Renal Cell Carcinoma: Preliminary Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Carrafiello, Gianpaolo Mangini, Monica Fontana, Federico Recaldini, Chiara Piacentino, Filippo Pellegrino, Carlo Lagana, Domenico; Cuffari, Salvatore; Marconi, Alberto; Fugazzola, Carlo

    2010-04-15

    The purpose of this study was to determine the safety, effectiveness, and feasibility of microwave ablation (MWA) of small renal cell carcinomas (RCCs) in selected patients. Institutional review board and informed consent were obtained. From December 2007 to January 2009, 12 patients (8 male, 4 female) were enrolled in a treatment group, in which percutaneous MWA of small RCCs was performed under contrast-enhanced ultrasound guidance. The tumors were 1.7-2.9 cm in diameter (mean diameter, 2.0 cm).Therapeutic effects were assessed at follow-up with computed tomography. All patients were followed up for 3-14 months (mean, 6 months) to observe the therapeutic effects and complications (according to SIR classification). Assessment was carried out with CT imaging. No severe complications or unexpected side effects were observed after the MWA procedures. In all cases technical success was achieved. Clinical effectiveness was 100%; none of the patients showed recurrence on imaging. In conclusion, our preliminary results support the use of MWA for the treatment of small renal tumors. This technology can be applied in select patients who are not candidates for surgery, as an alternative to other ablative techniques.

  6. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound with perfusion analysis for the identification of malignant and benign tumours of the thyroid gland.

    PubMed

    Wendl, C M; Janke, M; Jung, W; Stroszczysnski, C; Jung, E M

    2015-10-27

    The aim of our study was to evaluate, whether the analysis of time intensity curves (TIC) of contrast enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) could help to differentiate between thyroid adenomas and carcinomas in daily clinical routine.B-mode, Colour Coded Doppler Sonography (CCDS), Power Doppler (PD) and CEUS were applied for 50 patients (27 men, 23 women; mean age 51 years, range 16-81 years).CEUS cine-sequences were analysed using time intensity curves (TIC) and calculating time to peak (TTP) as well as the area under the curve (AUC).All 20 patients with carcinomas presented with a complete wash-out in the late phase of CEUS while this occurred only in three out of the 30 patients with adenomas.Marked differences were observed between adenomas and carcinomas concerning the mean AUC in the surrounding thyroid tissue (p = 0.041). In addition, TTP differed clearly between the centre and the surrounding of the carcinomas (p < 0.05) as well as between TTP in the border area and the surrounding tissue (p = 0.01). CEUS in combination with TIC analysis allows a dynamic evaluation of the microvascularisation of thyroid nodules and is helpful for the differentiation of benign and malignant nodules.

  7. Permeability assessment of the focused ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier opening using dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlachos, F.; Tung, Y.-S.; Konofagou, E. E.

    2010-09-01

    Focused ultrasound (FUS) in conjunction with microbubbles has been shown to successfully open the blood-brain barrier (BBB) in the mouse brain. In this study, we compute the BBB permeability after opening in vivo. The spatial permeability of the BBB-opened region was assessed using dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI). The DCE-MR images were post-processed using the general kinetic model (GKM) and the reference region model (RRM). Permeability maps were generated and the Ktrans values were calculated for a predefined volume of interest in the sonicated and the control area for each mouse. The results demonstrated that Ktrans in the BBB-opened region (0.02 ± 0.0123 for GKM and 0.03 ± 0.0167 min-1 for RRM) was at least two orders of magnitude higher when compared to the contra-lateral (control) side (0 and 8.5 × 10-4 ± 12 × 10-4 min-1, respectively). The permeability values obtained with the two models showed statistically significant agreement and excellent correlation (R2 = 0.97). At histological examination, it was concluded that no macroscopic damage was induced. This study thus constitutes the first permeability assessment of FUS-induced BBB opening using DCE-MRI, supporting the fact that the aforementioned technique may constitute a safe, non-invasive and efficacious drug delivery method.

  8. A Lipopeptide-Based αvβ₃ Integrin-Targeted Ultrasound Contrast Agent for Molecular Imaging of Tumor Angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Yan, Fei; Xu, Xiuxia; Chen, Yihan; Deng, Zhiting; Liu, Hongmei; Xu, Jianrong; Zhou, Jie; Tan, Guanghong; Wu, Junru; Zheng, Hairong

    2015-10-01

    The design and fabrication of targeted ultrasound contrast agents are key factors in the success of ultrasound molecular imaging applications. Here, we introduce a transformable αvβ3 integrin-targeted microbubble (MB) by incorporation of iRGD-lipopeptides into the MB membrane for non-invasive ultrasound imaging of tumor angiogenesis. First, the iRGD-lipopeptides were synthesized by conjugating iRGD peptides to distearoylphosphatidylethanolamine-polyethylene glycol 2000-maleimide. The resulting iRGD-lipopeptides were used for fabrication of the iRGD-carrying αvβ3 integrin-targeted MBs (iRGD-MBs). The binding specificity of iRGD-MBs for endothelial cells was found to be significantly stronger than that of control MBs (p < 0.01) under in vitro static and dynamic conditions. The binding of iRGD-MBs on the endothelial cells was competed off by pre-incubation with the anti-αv or anti-β3 antibody (p < 0.01). Ultrasound images taken of mice bearing 4T1 breast tumors after intravenous injections of iRGD-MBs or control MBs revealed strong contrast enhancement within the tumors from iRGD-MBs but not from the control MBs; the mean acoustic signal intensity was 10.71 ± 2.75 intensity units for iRGD-MBs versus 1.13 ± 0.18 intensity units for the control MBs (p < 0.01). The presence of αvβ3 integrin was confirmed by immunofluorescence staining. These data indicate that iRGD-MBs can be used as an ultrasound imaging probe for the non-invasive molecular imaging of tumor angiogenesis, and may have further implications for ultrasound image-guided tumor targeting drug delivery.

  9. A three dimensional model of an ultrasound contrast agent gas bubble and its mechanical effects on microvessels

    PubMed Central

    Hosseinkhah, N.; Hynynen, K.

    2012-01-01

    Ultrasound contrast agents inside a microvessel, when driven by ultrasound, oscillate and induce mechanical stresses on the vessel wall. These mechanical stresses can produce beneficial therapeutic effects but also induce vessel rupture if the stresses are too high. Therefore, it is important to use sufficiently low pressure amplitudes to avoid rupturing the vessels while still inducing the desired therapeutic effects. In this work, we developed a comprehensive three dimensional model of a confined microbubble inside a vessel while considering the bubble shell properties, blood viscosity, vessel wall curvature and the mechanical properties of the vessel wall. Two bubble models with the assumption of a spherical symmetric bubble and a simple asymmetrical bubble were simulated. This work was validated with previous experimental results and enabled us to evaluate the microbubbles’ behaviour and the resulting mechanical stresses induced on the vessel walls. In this study the fluid shear and circumferential stresses were evaluated as indicators of the mechanical stresses. The effects of acoustical parameters, vessel viscoelasticity and rigidity, vessel/bubble size and off-center bubbles on bubble behaviour and stresses on the vessel were investigated. The fluid shear and circumferential stresses acting on the vessel varied with time and location. As the frequency changed, the microbubble oscillated with the highest amplitude at its resonance frequency which was different from the resonance frequency of an unbound bubble. The bubble resonance frequency increased as the rigidity of a flexible vessel increased. The fluid shear and circumferential stresses peaked at frequencies above the bubble’s resonance frequency. The more rigid the vessels were, the more damped the bubble oscillations. The synergistic effect of acoustic frequency and vessel elasticity had also been investigated, since the circumferential stress showed either an increasing trend or a decreasing one

  10. High-Resolution, High-Contrast Ultrasound Imaging Using a Prototype Dual-Frequency Transducer: In Vitro and In Vivo Studies

    PubMed Central

    Gessner, Ryan; Lukacs, Marc; Lee, Mike; Cherin, Emmanuel; Foster, F. Stuart; Dayton, Paul A.

    2010-01-01

    With recent advances in animal models of disease, there has been great interest in capabilities for high-resolution contrast-enhanced ultrasound imaging. Microbubble contrast agents are unique in that they scatter broadband ultrasound energy because of their nonlinear behavior. For optimal response, it is desirable to excite the microbubbles near their resonant frequency. To date, this has been challenging with high-frequency imaging systems because most contrast agents are resonant at frequencies in the order of several megahertz. Our team has developed a unique dual-frequency confocal transducer which enables low-frequency excitation of bubbles near their resonance with one element, and detection of their emitted high-frequency content with the second element. Using this imaging approach, we have attained an average 12.3 dB improvement in contrast-to-tissue ratios over fundamental mode imaging, with spatial resolution near that of the high-frequency element. Because this detection method does not rely on signal decorrelation, it is not susceptible to corruption by tissue motion. This probe demonstrates contrast imaging capability with significant tissue suppression, enabling high-resolution contrast-enhanced images of microvascular blood flow. Additionally, this probe can readily produce radiation force on flowing contrast agents, which may be beneficial for targeted imaging or therapy. PMID:20679006

  11. 2-tier in-plane motion correction and out-of-plane motion filtering for contrast-enhanced ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Ta, Casey N.; Eghtedari, Mohammad; Mattrey, Robert F.; Kono, Yuko; Kummel, Andrew C.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) cines of focal liver lesions (FLL) can be quantitatively analyzed to measure tumor perfusion on a pixel-by-pixel basis for diagnostic indication. However, CEUS cines acquired freehand and during free breathing cause non-uniform in-plane and out-of-plane motion from frame to frame. These motions create fluctuations in the time-intensity curves (TIC), reducing accuracy of quantitative measurements. Out-of-plane motion cannot be corrected by image registration in 2D CEUS and degrades the quality of in-plane motion correction (IPMC). A 2-tier IPMC strategy and adaptive out-of-plane motion filter (OPMF) are proposed to provide a stable correction of non-uniform motion to reduce the impact of motion on quantitative analyses. Materials and Methods 22 cines of FLLs were imaged with dual B-mode and contrast specific imaging to acquire a 3-minute TIC. B-mode images were analyzed for motion, and the motion correction was applied to both B-mode and contrast images. For IPMC, the main reference frame was automatically selected for each cine, and subreference frames were selected in each respiratory cycle and sequentially registered toward the main reference frame. All other frames were sequentially registered toward the local subreference frame. Four OPMFs were developed and tested: subsample Normalized Correlation (NC), subsample Sum of Absolute Differences (SAD), mean frame NC, and histogram. The frames that were most dissimilar to the OPMF reference frame using one of the four above criteria in each respiratory cycle were adaptively removed by thresholding against the low-pass filter of the similarity curve. OPMF was quantitatively evaluated by an out-of-plane motion metric (OPMM) that measured normalized variance in the high-pass filtered time-intensity curve within the tumor region-of-interest with low OPMM being the goal. IPMC and OPMF results were qualitatively evaluated by two blinded observers who ranked the motion in the

  12. Comparison of dynamic contrast enhanced MRI and Doppler ultrasound in the pre-operative assessment of the portal venous system.

    PubMed

    Naik, K S; Ward, J; Irving, H C; Robinson, P J

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare dynamic contrast enhanced MRI (DCEMR) with Doppler ultrasound (US) in the assessment of portal venous anatomy and to analyse the causes of discrepancy. Over a 1 year period, 97 patients undergoing assessment prior to hepatic surgery underwent imaging of the liver and portal venous system using US with colour and spectral Doppler and MRI with axial T2 weighted spin echo (SE) and coronal oblique T1 weighted rapid gradient echo (GRE) imaging before and immediately after bolus injection of Gd-DTPA (0.1 mmol kg-1). When the US and MRI findings were discrepant, the images were reviewed by two observers and compared with surgical findings. US and DCEMR were concordant in 90 patients (portal vein patent in 80, occluded in 10). In three patients with cirrhosis and gross ascites the portal vein was reported as occluded on US and patent on MRI; surgery confirmed the MRI findings. In one patient the portal vein was patient on US but not on MRI, but there was a 3 week interval between the examinations. In three patients the portal vein was patent on US, but MRI detected occlusion of intrahepatic portal vein branches in two, and encasement of an intrahepatic branch in the third case. Spontaneous splenorenal shunts were seen in 15 patients only on MRI; varices were seen in 39 patients on MRI and in 22 patients on US. Both US and DCEMR contribute to the pre-operative assessment of the portal venous system. MRI provides additional information over US in assessing intrahepatic portal branches and detecting varices and splenorenal shunts, and is recommended for all surgical candidates and in patients with abnormal portal venous anatomy and equivocal US findings.

  13. Motion compensation method using dynamic programming for quantification of neovascularization in carotid atherosclerotic plaques with contrast enhanced ultrasound (CEUS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akkus, Zeynettin; Hoogi, Assaf; Renaud, Guillaume; ten Kate, Gerrit L.; van den Oord, Stijn C. H.; Schinkel, Arend F. L.; de Jong, Nico; van der Steen, Antonius F. W.; Bosch, Johan G.

    2012-03-01

    Intraplaque neovascularization (IPN) has been linked with progressive atherosclerotic disease and plaque instability in several studies. Quantification of IPN may allow early detection of vulnerable plaques. A dedicated motion compensation method with normalized-cross-correlation (NCC) block matching combined with multidimensional (2D+time) dynamic programming (MDP) was developed for quantification of IPN in small plaques (<30% diameter stenosis). The method was compared to NCC block matching without MDP (forward tracking (FT)) and showed to improve motion tracking. Side-by-side CEUS and B-mode ultrasound images of carotid arteries were acquired by a Philips iU22 system with a L9-3 linear array probe. The motion pattern for the plaque region was obtained from the Bmode images with MDP. MDP results were evaluated in-vitro by a phantom and in-vivo by comparing to manual tracking of three experts for multibeat-image-sequences (MIS) of 11 plaques. In the in-vivo images, the absolute error was 72+/-55μm (mean+/-SD) for X (longitudinal) and 34+/-23μm for Y (radial). The method's success rate was visually assessed on 67 MIS. The tracking was considered failed if it deviated >2 pixels (~200μm) from true motion in any frame. Tracking was scored as fully successful in 63 MIS (94%) for MDP vs. 52(78%) for FT. The range of displacement over these 63 was 1045+/-471μm (X) and 395+/-216μm (Y). The tracking sporadically failed in 4 MIS (6%) due to poor image quality, jugular vein proximity and out-of-plane motion. Motion compensation showed improved lumen-plaque contrast separation. In conclusion, the proposed method is sufficiently accurate and successful for in vivo application.

  14. Endovascular Surgery for Inflammatory Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm with Contrast Allergy—Usefulness of Carbon Dioxide Angiography and Intravascular Ultrasound: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Morito, Haruna; Hoshina, Katsuyuki; Hosaka, Akihiro; Okamoto, Hiroyuki; Shigematsu, Kunihiro; Miyata,, Tetsuro

    2012-01-01

    We report a patient with inflammatory abdominal aortic aneurysm who underwent endovascular aneurysm repair, despite his having an allergy to iodinated contrast medium and anatomy unsuitable for the procedure. Intravascular ultrasound-guided and CO2-assisted aortic stent graft placement was performed, and the procedures resulted in the successful exclusion of the aneurysm with regression of the mantle sign and resolution of hydronephrosis. PMID:23555498

  15. Age-related differences in skeletal muscle microvascular response to exercise as detected by contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS)

    PubMed Central

    Hildebrandt, Wulf; Schwarzbach, Hans; Pardun, Anita; Hannemann, Lena; Bogs, Björn; König, Alexander M.; Mahnken, Andreas H.; Hildebrandt, Olaf; Koehler, Ulrich; Kinscherf, Ralf

    2017-01-01

    Background Aging involves reductions in exercise total limb blood flow and exercise capacity. We hypothesized that this may involve early age-related impairments of skeletal muscle microvascular responsiveness as previously reported for insulin but not for exercise stimuli in humans. Methods Using an isometric exercise model, we studied the effect of age on contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) parameters, i.e. microvascular blood volume (MBV), flow velocity (MFV) and blood flow (MBF) calculated from replenishment of Sonovue contrast-agent microbubbles after their destruction. CEUS was applied to the vastus lateralis (VLat) and intermedius (VInt) muscle in 15 middle-aged (MA, 43.6±1.5 years) and 11 young (YG, 24.1±0.6 years) healthy males before, during, and after 2 min of isometric knee extension at 15% of peak torque (PT). In addition, total leg blood flow as recorded by femoral artery Doppler-flow. Moreover, fiber-type-specific and overall capillarisation as well as fiber composition were additionally assessed in Vlat biopsies obtained from CEUS site. MA and YG had similar quadriceps muscle MRT-volume or PT and maximal oxygen uptake as well as a normal cardiovascular risk factors and intima-media-thickness. Results During isometric exercise MA compared to YG reached significantly lower levels in MFV (0.123±0.016 vs. 0.208±0.036 a.u.) and MBF (0.007±0.001 vs. 0.012±0.002 a.u.). In the VInt the (post-occlusive hyperemia) post-exercise peaks in MBV and MBF were significantly lower in MA vs. YG. Capillary density, capillary fiber contacts and femoral artery Doppler were similar between MA and YG. Conclusions In the absence of significant age-related reductions in capillarisation, total leg blood flow or muscle mass, healthy middle-aged males reveal impaired skeletal muscle microcirculatory responses to isometric exercise. Whether this limits isometric muscle performance remains to be assessed. PMID:28273102

  16. A method to expedite data acquisition for multiple spatial-temporal analyses of tissue perfusion by contrast-enhanced ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Christian; Hüttebräuker, Nils; Wilkening, Wilko; Ermert, Helmut

    2009-03-01

    For semiquantitative analyses of tissue perfusion using contrast-enhanced ultrasound the acquisition and processing of time intensity curves (TIC) is required. These TICs can be computed for each pixel of an image plane, yielding parametric images of classification numbers like "blood volume" and "flow rate." The expenditure of time for data acquisition and analysis typically limits semiquantitative perfusion imaging to a single image plane in 2-D. 3-D techniques, however, provide a higher diagnostic value since more information (e.g., of an entire lesion) is obtained. Moreover, spatial compounding, being a 2-D-technique where an object is imaged from different viewing angles, is known to improve image quality by reducing artifacts and speckle noise. Both techniques, 3-D and compounding, call for optimized acquisition and processing of TICs in several image planes (3-D) or in several (overlapping) sections of the same image plane (compounding) to decrease the time needed for data acquisition. Here, an approach of interleaved imaging is presented which is applicable, among others, to contrast perfusion imaging using the replenishment method. The total acquisition time is decreased by sequentially scanning image planes twice for short time spans - first, immediately after microbubble destruction to record the initial rise of the TICs, and second, a sufficient time thereafter to assess final values of the TIC. Data from both periods are combined to fit a model function from which parameters are extracted such as perfusion rate and blood volume. This approach was evaluated by in vitro measurements on a perfusion-mimicking phantom for both, individual images such as would be used for volume reconstruction in 3-D and compound images obtained from full angle spatial compounding (FASC, 360 degrees ). An error analysis is conducted to derive the deviation of the extracted parameters of the proposed method compared with the conventional one. These deviations are entailed by

  17. Quantitative assessment of cancer vascular architecture by skeletonization of high-resolution 3-D contrast-enhanced ultrasound images: role of liposomes and microbubbles.

    PubMed

    Molinari, F; Meiburger, K M; Giustetto, P; Rizzitelli, S; Boffa, C; Castano, M; Terreno, E

    2014-12-01

    The accurate characterization and description of the vascular network of a cancer lesion is of paramount importance in clinical practice and cancer research in order to improve diagnostic accuracy or to assess the effectiveness of a treatment. The aim of this study was to show the effectiveness of liposomes as an ultrasound contrast agent to describe the 3-D vascular architecture of a tumor. Eight C57BL/6 mice grafted with syngeneic B16-F10 murine melanoma cells were injected with a bolus of 1,2-Distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocoline (DSPC)-based non-targeted liposomes and with a bolus of microbubbles. 3-D contrast-enhanced images of the tumor lesions were acquired in three conditions: pre-contrast, after the injection of microbubbles, and after the injection of liposomes. By using a previously developed reconstruction and characterization image processing technique, we obtained the 3-D representation of the vascular architecture in these three conditions. Six descriptive parameters of these networks were also computed: the number of vascular trees (NT), the vascular density (VD), the number of branches, the 2-D curvature measure, the number of vascular flexes of the vessels, and the 3-D curvature. Results showed that all the vascular descriptors obtained by liposome-based images were statistically equal to those obtained by using microbubbles, except the VD which was found to be lower for liposome images. All the six descriptors computed in pre-contrast conditions had values that were statistically lower than those computed in presence of contrast, both for liposomes and microbubbles. Liposomes have already been used in cancer therapy for the selective ultrasound-mediated delivery of drugs. This work demonstrated their effectiveness also as vascular diagnostic contrast agents, therefore proving that liposomes can be used as efficient "theranostic" (i.e. therapeutic 1 diagnostic) ultrasound probes.

  18. Ultrasound pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    Pregnancy sonogram; Obstetric ultrasonography; Obstetric sonogram; Ultrasound - pregnancy; IUGR - ultrasound; Intrauterine growth - ultrasound; Polyhydramnios - ultrasound; Oligohydramnios - ultrasound; ...

  19. Transvaginal ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... Uterine bleeding - transvaginal ultrasound; Menstrual bleeding - transvaginal ultrasound; Infertility - transvaginal ultrasound; Ovarian - transvaginal ultrasound; Abscess - transvaginal ultrasound

  20. Comparison of dynamic contrast-enhanced MR, ultrasound and optical imaging modalities to evaluate the antiangiogenic effect of PF-03084014 and sunitinib

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Cathy C; Yan, Zhengming; Giddabasappa, Anand; Lappin, Patrick B; Painter, Cory L; Zhang, Qin; Li, Gang; Goodman, James; Simmons, Brett; Pascual, Bernadette; Lee, Joseph; Levkoff, Ted; Nichols, Tim; Xie, Zhiyong

    2014-01-01

    Noninvasive imaging has been widely applied for monitoring antiangiogenesis therapy in cancer drug discovery. In this report, we used different imaging modalities including high-frequency ultrasound (HFUS), dynamic contrast enhanced-MR (DCE-MR), and fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT) imaging systems to monitor the changes in the tumor vascular properties after treatment with γ-secretase inhibitor PF-03084014. Sunitinib was tested in parallel for comparison. In the MDA-MB-231Luc model, we demonstrated that antiangiogenesis was one of the contributing mechanisms for the therapeutic effect of PF-03084014. By immunohistochemistry and FITC-lectin perfusion assays, we showed that the vascular defects upon treatment with PF-03084014 were associated with Notch pathway modulation, evidenced by a decrease in the HES1 protein and by the changes in VEGFR2 and HIF1α levels, which indicates down-stream effects. Using a 3D power Doppler scanning method, ultrasound imaging showed that the% vascularity in the MDA-MB-231Luc tumor decreased significantly at 4 and 7 days after the treatment with PF-03084014. A decrease in the tumor vessel function was also observed through contrast-enhanced ultrasound imaging with microbubble injection. These findings were consistent with the PF-03084014-induced functional vessel changes measured by suppressing the Ktrans values using DCE-MRI. In contrast, the FMT imaging with the AngioSence 680EX failed to detect any treatment-associated tumor vascular changes. Sunitinib demonstrated an outcome similar to PF-03084014 in the tested imaging modalities. In summary, ultrasound and DCE-MR imaging successfully provided longitudinal measurement of the phenotypic and functional changes in tumor vasculature after treatment with PF-03084014 and sunitinib. PMID:24573979

  1. Preparation and Characterization of Novel Perfluorooctyl Bromide Nanoparticle as Ultrasound Contrast Agent via Layer-by-Layer Self-Assembly for Folate-Receptor-Mediated Tumor Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yue; Jiang, Jianshuai; Han, Baosan; Zhang, Shengmin; Li, Keshi; Ge, ShuXiong

    2016-01-01

    A folate-polyethylene glycol-chitosan derivative was synthesized and its structure was characterized. An optimal perfluorooctyl bromide nanocore template was obtained via utilizing the ultrasonic emulsification method combining with orthogonal design. The targeted nanoparticles containing targeted shell of folate-polyethylene glycol-chitosan derivative and perfluorooctyl bromide nanocore template of ultrasound imaging were prepared successfully by exploiting layer-by-layer self-assembly as contrast agent for ultrasound. Properties of the novel perfluorooctyl bromide nanoparticle were extensively studied by Dynamic Light Scattering and Transmission Electron Microscopy. The targeted nanoparticle diameter, polydispersity, and zeta potential are around 229.5 nm, 0.205, and 44.7 ± 0.6 mV, respectively. The study revealed that spherical core-shell morphology was preserved. Excellent stability of targeted nanoparticle is evidenced by two weeks of room temperature stability tests. The results of the cell viability assay and the hemolysis test confirmed that the targeted nanoparticle has an excellent biocompatibility for using in cell studies and ultrasound imaging in vivo. Most importantly, in vitro cell experiments demonstrated that an increased amount of targeted nanoparticles was accumulated in hepatocellular carcinoma cell line Bel7402 relative to hepatoma cell line L02. And targeted nanoparticles had also shown better ultrasound imaging abilities in vitro. The data suggest that the novel targeted nanoparticle may be applicable to ultrasonic molecular imaging of folate-receptor overexpressed tumor. PMID:27652265

  2. Preparation and Characterization of Novel Perfluorooctyl Bromide Nanoparticle as Ultrasound Contrast Agent via Layer-by-Layer Self-Assembly for Folate-Receptor-Mediated Tumor Imaging.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yue; Wang, Yong; Jiang, Jianshuai; Han, Baosan; Zhang, Shengmin; Li, Keshi; Ge, ShuXiong; Liu, Yahui

    2016-01-01

    A folate-polyethylene glycol-chitosan derivative was synthesized and its structure was characterized. An optimal perfluorooctyl bromide nanocore template was obtained via utilizing the ultrasonic emulsification method combining with orthogonal design. The targeted nanoparticles containing targeted shell of folate-polyethylene glycol-chitosan derivative and perfluorooctyl bromide nanocore template of ultrasound imaging were prepared successfully by exploiting layer-by-layer self-assembly as contrast agent for ultrasound. Properties of the novel perfluorooctyl bromide nanoparticle were extensively studied by Dynamic Light Scattering and Transmission Electron Microscopy. The targeted nanoparticle diameter, polydispersity, and zeta potential are around 229.5 nm, 0.205, and 44.7 ± 0.6 mV, respectively. The study revealed that spherical core-shell morphology was preserved. Excellent stability of targeted nanoparticle is evidenced by two weeks of room temperature stability tests. The results of the cell viability assay and the hemolysis test confirmed that the targeted nanoparticle has an excellent biocompatibility for using in cell studies and ultrasound imaging in vivo. Most importantly, in vitro cell experiments demonstrated that an increased amount of targeted nanoparticles was accumulated in hepatocellular carcinoma cell line Bel7402 relative to hepatoma cell line L02. And targeted nanoparticles had also shown better ultrasound imaging abilities in vitro. The data suggest that the novel targeted nanoparticle may be applicable to ultrasonic molecular imaging of folate-receptor overexpressed tumor.

  3. Focused Ultrasound-Induced Blood-Brain Barrier Opening: Association with Mechanical Index and Cavitation Index Analyzed by Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic-Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Po-Chun; Chai, Wen-Yen; Tsai, Chih-Hung; Kang, Shih-Tsung; Yeh, Chih-Kuang; Liu, Hao-Li

    2016-01-01

    Focused ultrasound (FUS) with microbubbles can temporally open the blood-brain barrier (BBB), and the cavitation activities of microbubbles play a key role in the BBB-opening process. Previous attempts used contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (CE-MRI) to correlate the mechanical index (MI) with the scale of BBB-opening, but MI only partially gauged acoustic activities, and CE-MRI did not fully explore correlations of pharmacodynamic/pharmacokinetic behaviors. Recently, the cavitation index (CI) has been derived to serve as an indicator of microbubble-ultrasound stable cavitation, and may also serve as a valid indicator to gauge the level of FUS-induced BBB opening. This study investigates the feasibility of gauging FUS-induced BBB opened level via the two indexes, MI and CI, through dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE)-MRI analysis as well as passive cavitation detection (PCD) analysis. Pharmacodynamic/pharmacokinetic parameters derived from DCE-MRI were characterized to identify the scale of FUS-induced BBB opening. Our results demonstrated that DCE-MRI can successfully access pharmacodynamic/pharmacokinetic BBB-opened behavior, and was highly correlated both with MI and CI, implying the feasibility in using these two indices to gauge the scale of FUS-induced BBB opening. The proposed finding may facilitate the design toward using focused ultrasound as a safe and reliable noninvasive CNS drug delivery. PMID:27630037

  4. Splanchnic Hemodynamics and Intestinal Vascularity in Crohn's Disease: An In Vivo Evaluation Using Doppler and Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound and Biochemical Parameters.

    PubMed

    Maconi, Giovanni; Asthana, Anil K; Bolzacchini, Elena; Dell'Era, Alessandra; Furfaro, Federica; Bezzio, Cristina; Salvatore, Veronica; Maier, Jeanette A M

    2016-01-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) is characterized by inflammation and angiogenesis of affected bowel. We evaluated the correlation among vascularity of intestinal wall in CD, splanchnic hemodynamics, clinical activity and biochemical parameters of inflammation and angiogenesis. Sixteen patients with ileal CD and 10 healthy controls were investigated by means of Doppler ultrasound of the superior mesenteric artery and color Doppler and contrast-enhanced ultrasound of the ileal wall. In parallel, serum levels of vascular endothelial growth factor, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and nitric oxide, before and 30 min after a standard meal, were evaluated. In CD patients, there was a significant post-prandial reduction in the resistance index and pulsatility index of the superior mesenteric artery, associated with increased levels of nitric oxide and decreased amounts of TNF-α. A correlation was observed between vascular endothelial growth factor and contrast-enhanced ultrasound parameters of intestinal wall vascularity (r = 0.63-0.71, p < 0.05) and between these parameters and superior mesenteric artery blood flow after fasting (resistance and pulsatility indexes: r = -0.64 and -0.72, p < 0.05). Our results revealed a post-prandial increase in nitric oxide and decrease in TNF-α in CD patients in vivo. They also confirm the role of vascular endothelial growth factor in angiogenesis and in pathologic vascular remodeling of CD and its effect on splanchnic blood flow.

  5. Combined contrast-enhanced ultrasound and rt-PA treatment is safe and improves impaired microcirculation after reperfusion of middle cerebral artery occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Nedelmann, Max; Ritschel, Nouha; Doenges, Simone; Langheinrich, Alexander C; Acker, Till; Reuter, Peter; Yeniguen, Mesut; Pukropski, Jan; Kaps, Manfred; Mueller, Clemens; Bachmann, Georg; Gerriets, Tibo

    2010-01-01

    In monitoring of recanalization and in sonothrombolysis, contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) is applied in extended time protocols. As extended use may increase the probability of unwanted effects, careful safety evaluation is required. We investigated the safety profile and beneficial effects of CEUS in a reperfusion model. Wistar rats were subjected to filament occlusion of the right middle cerebral artery (MCA). Reperfusion was established after 90 minutes, followed by recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator (rt-PA) treatment and randomization to additional CEUS (contrast agent: SonoVue; 60 minutes). Blinded outcome evaluation consisted of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), neurologic assessment, and histology and, in separate experiments, quantitative 3D nano-computed tomography (CT) angiography (900 nm3 voxel size). Nano-CT revealed severely compromised microcirculation in untreated animals after MCA reperfusion. The rt-PA partially improved hemispheric perfusion. Impairment was completely reversed in animals receiving rt-PA and CEUS. This combination was more effective than treatment with either CEUS without rt-PA or rt-PA and ultrasound or ultrasound alone. In MRI experiments, CEUS and rt-PA treatment resulted in a significantly reduced ischemic lesion volume and edema formation. No unwanted effects were detected on MRI, histology, and intracranial temperature assessment. This study shows that CEUS and rt-PA is safe in the situation of reperfusion and displays beneficial effects on the level of the microvasculature. PMID:20531462

  6. Focused Ultrasound-Induced Blood-Brain Barrier Opening: Association with Mechanical Index and Cavitation Index Analyzed by Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic-Resonance Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Po-Chun; Chai, Wen-Yen; Tsai, Chih-Hung; Kang, Shih-Tsung; Yeh, Chih-Kuang; Liu, Hao-Li

    2016-09-01

    Focused ultrasound (FUS) with microbubbles can temporally open the blood-brain barrier (BBB), and the cavitation activities of microbubbles play a key role in the BBB-opening process. Previous attempts used contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (CE-MRI) to correlate the mechanical index (MI) with the scale of BBB-opening, but MI only partially gauged acoustic activities, and CE-MRI did not fully explore correlations of pharmacodynamic/pharmacokinetic behaviors. Recently, the cavitation index (CI) has been derived to serve as an indicator of microbubble-ultrasound stable cavitation, and may also serve as a valid indicator to gauge the level of FUS-induced BBB opening. This study investigates the feasibility of gauging FUS-induced BBB opened level via the two indexes, MI and CI, through dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE)-MRI analysis as well as passive cavitation detection (PCD) analysis. Pharmacodynamic/pharmacokinetic parameters derived from DCE-MRI were characterized to identify the scale of FUS-induced BBB opening. Our results demonstrated that DCE-MRI can successfully access pharmacodynamic/pharmacokinetic BBB-opened behavior, and was highly correlated both with MI and CI, implying the feasibility in using these two indices to gauge the scale of FUS-induced BBB opening. The proposed finding may facilitate the design toward using focused ultrasound as a safe and reliable noninvasive CNS drug delivery.

  7. Focused Ultrasound-Induced Blood-Brain Barrier Opening: Association with Mechanical Index and Cavitation Index Analyzed by Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic-Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Chu, Po-Chun; Chai, Wen-Yen; Tsai, Chih-Hung; Kang, Shih-Tsung; Yeh, Chih-Kuang; Liu, Hao-Li

    2016-09-15

    Focused ultrasound (FUS) with microbubbles can temporally open the blood-brain barrier (BBB), and the cavitation activities of microbubbles play a key role in the BBB-opening process. Previous attempts used contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (CE-MRI) to correlate the mechanical index (MI) with the scale of BBB-opening, but MI only partially gauged acoustic activities, and CE-MRI did not fully explore correlations of pharmacodynamic/pharmacokinetic behaviors. Recently, the cavitation index (CI) has been derived to serve as an indicator of microbubble-ultrasound stable cavitation, and may also serve as a valid indicator to gauge the level of FUS-induced BBB opening. This study investigates the feasibility of gauging FUS-induced BBB opened level via the two indexes, MI and CI, through dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE)-MRI analysis as well as passive cavitation detection (PCD) analysis. Pharmacodynamic/pharmacokinetic parameters derived from DCE-MRI were characterized to identify the scale of FUS-induced BBB opening. Our results demonstrated that DCE-MRI can successfully access pharmacodynamic/pharmacokinetic BBB-opened behavior, and was highly correlated both with MI and CI, implying the feasibility in using these two indices to gauge the scale of FUS-induced BBB opening. The proposed finding may facilitate the design toward using focused ultrasound as a safe and reliable noninvasive CNS drug delivery.

  8. Rectal melanoma presenting as a solitary complex cystic liver lesion: role of contrast-specific low-MI real-time ultrasound imaging.

    PubMed

    Corvino, Antonio; Catalano, Orlando; Corvino, Fabio; Petrillo, Antonella

    2016-01-01

    Cystic hepatic metastases arising from malignant melanoma are extremely rare, with the few such cases reported in the literature to date describing indeterminate imaging findings, being focused more on computed tomography. To the best of our knowledge, there is no prior report describing contrast-enhanced ultrasound findings of a solitary cystic liver metastasis from a primary rectal melanoma. We herein describe a case of a 41-year-old patient with a rectal melanoma, in whom the first manifestation of disease was a solitary complex cystic liver metastasis incidentally detected by ultrasound. On admission, our patient was free of specific symptoms and his laboratory test was normal. In this setting, contrast-enhanced ultrasound showed some distinctive features that helped us to make the correct diagnosis, confirmed subsequently by FNAC examination, thus allowing to provide the correct management for our patient. Although cystic metastases are rare, knowledge of CEUS imaging findings will be invaluable for radiologists and other medical subspecialties that may face such cases in the future in helping to provide adequate management for affected patients.

  9. ABNORMAL REGULATION OF MICROVASCULAR TONE IN A MURINE MODEL OF SICKLE CELL DISEASE ASSESSED BY CONTRAST ULTRASOUND

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Melinda D.; Belcik, J. Todd; Qi, Yue; Zhao, Yan; Benner, Cameron; Pei, Hong; Linden, Joel; Lindner, Jonathan R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Microvascular dysregulation, abnormal rheology, and vaso-occlusive events play a role in the pathophysiology of sickle cell disease (SCD). We hypothesized that abnormalities in skeletal muscle perfusion in a murine model of SCD could be parametrically assessed by quantitative contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEU) perfusion imaging. Methods We studied a murine model of moderate SCD without anemia produced by homozygous β-globin deletion replaced by human βs-globin transgene (NY1DD−/−, n=18), heterozygous transgene replacement (NY1DD+/−, n=19), and C57Bl/6 control mice (n=14). Quantitative CEU of the proximal hindlimb skeletal muscle was performed at rest and during contractile exercise (2 Hz). Time-intensity data were analyzed to measure microvascular blood volume (MBV), microvascular blood transit rate (β), and microvascular blood flow (MBF). Erythrocyte deformability was measured by elongation at various rotational shears. Results At rest, muscle MBV was similar between strains whereas β was significantly (ANOVA p=0.0015) reduced to a similar degree in NY1DD−/− and NY1DD+/− compared to wild-type mice (0.24±0.10, 0.16±0.07, and 0.34±0.14 s−1, respectively), resulting in a reduction in MBF. During contractile exercise, there were no group-wise differences in β (1.43±0.67 s−1, 1.09±0.42 s−1, 1.36±0.49 s−1; for NY1DD−/−, NY1DD+/−, and wild-type, respectively), nor for MBF or MBV. Erythrocyte deformability at high shear stress (≥5 Pa) was mildly reduced in both transgenic groups, although it did not correlate with the blood flow or β. Conclusions CEU in skeletal muscle has revealed a lower microvascular blood transit rate in the NY1DD model of SCD and sickle trait but no alterations in MBV. The abnormality in microvascular blood transit rate is likely due to vasomotor dysfunction since it abrogated by contractile exercise and at rest is only weakly related to erythrocyte deformability. PMID:26123012

  10. CONTRAST-ENHANCED ULTRASOUND ASSESSMENT OF IMPAIRED ADIPOSE TISSUE AND MUSCLE PERFUSION IN INSULIN-RESISTANT MICE

    PubMed Central

    Belcik, J. Todd; Davidson, Brian P.; Foster, Ted; Qi, Yue; Zhao, Yan; Peters, Dawn; Lindner, Jonathan R.

    2015-01-01

    Background In diabetes mellitus reduced perfusion and capillary surface area in skeletal muscle, which is a major glucose storage site, contributes to abnormal glucose homeostasis. Using contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEU) we investigated whether abdominal adipose tissue perfusion is abnormal in insulin resistance (IR) and correlates with glycemic control. Methods and Results Abdominal adipose tissue and skeletal muscle CEU perfusion imaging was performed in obese IR (db/db) mice at 11-12 or 14-16 weeks of age, and in control lean mice. Time-intensity data were analyzed to quantify microvascular blood flow (MBF) and capillary blood volume (CBV). Blood glucose response over one hour was measured after insulin challenge (1 u/Kg, I.P.). Compared to control mice, db/db mice at 11-12 and 14-16 weeks had a higher glucose concentration area-under-the-curve after insulin (11.8±2.8, 20.6±4.3, and 28.4±5.9 mg·min/dL [×1000], respectively, p=0.0002), and also had lower adipose MBF (0.094±0.038, 0.035±0.010, and 0.023±0.01 mL/min/g, p=0.0002) and CBV (1.6±0.6, 1.0±0.3, and 0.5±0.1 mL/100 g, p=0.0017). The glucose area-under-the-curve correlated in a non-linear fashion with both adipose and skeletal muscle MBF and CBV. There were significant linear correlations between adipose and muscle MBF (r=0.81) and CBV (r=0.66). Adipocyte cell volume on histology was 25-fold higher in 14-16 week db/db versus control mice. Conclusions Abnormal adipose MBF and CBV in IR can be detected by CEU and correlates with the degree of impairment in glucose storage. Abnormalities in adipose tissue and muscle appear to be coupled. Impaired adipose tissue perfusion is in part explained by an increase in adipocyte size without proportional vascular response. PMID:25855669

  11. Solid focal liver lesions indeterminate by contrast-enhanced CT or MR imaging: the added diagnostic value of contrast-enhanced ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Quaia, Emilio

    2012-08-01

    The main clinically recognized application of contrast-enhanced US (CEUS) with microbubble contrast agents is the characterization of incidental focal liver lesions. CEUS with low transmit power insonation allows the real-time assessment of contrast enhancement in a focal liver lesion after microbubble contrast agent injection, during the arterial (10-25 s), portal venous (from 35 s up to 2 min) and late phase (4-6 min after microbubble injection). During the portal venous and late phase benign lesions appear hyper or iso-enhancing in comparison to the adjacent liver parenchyma, while malignant lesions prevalently present contrast washout with hypo-enhancing appearance. CEUS may provide an added diagnostic value in those incidental focal liver lesions in which contrast-enhanced CT or MR imaging are not conclusive. In particular, CEUS may provide an added diagnostic value in those focal liver lesions appearing indeterminate on single-phase CT scan, or on CT scans performed by an incorrect delay time or also after injection of a low dose of iodinated contrast agent, or also in those focal liver lesions revealing equivocal enhancement patterns on contrast-enhanced CT or MR imaging. CEUS may have an added diagnostic value also in hepatocellular nodules in a cirrhotic liver and can be considered a complementary imaging technique to CT.

  12. 33 CFR 165.110 - Safety and Security Zone; Liquefied Natural Gas Carrier Transits and Anchorage Operations, Boston...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Safety and Security Zone; Liquefied Natural Gas Carrier Transits and Anchorage Operations, Boston, Massachusetts. 165.110 Section 165... Carrier Transits and Anchorage Operations, Boston, Massachusetts. (a) Definitions. As used in this...

  13. 33 CFR 165.110 - Safety and Security Zone; Liquefied Natural Gas Carrier Transits and Anchorage Operations, Boston...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Safety and Security Zone; Liquefied Natural Gas Carrier Transits and Anchorage Operations, Boston, Massachusetts. 165.110 Section 165... Carrier Transits and Anchorage Operations, Boston, Massachusetts. (a) Definitions. As used in this...

  14. 33 CFR 165.110 - Safety and Security Zone; Liquefied Natural Gas Carrier Transits and Anchorage Operations, Boston...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Safety and Security Zone; Liquefied Natural Gas Carrier Transits and Anchorage Operations, Boston, Massachusetts. 165.110 Section 165... Carrier Transits and Anchorage Operations, Boston, Massachusetts. (a) Definitions. As used in this...

  15. 33 CFR 165.110 - Safety and Security Zone; Liquefied Natural Gas Carrier Transits and Anchorage Operations, Boston...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Safety and Security Zone; Liquefied Natural Gas Carrier Transits and Anchorage Operations, Boston, Massachusetts. 165.110 Section 165... Carrier Transits and Anchorage Operations, Boston, Massachusetts. (a) Definitions. As used in this...

  16. Dynamics of encapsulated microbubbles for contrast ultrasound imaging and drug delivery: from pressure dependent subharmonic to collapsing jet and acoustic streaming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Kausik

    2016-11-01

    Intravenously injected microbubbles used as ultrasound contrast enhancing agents are encapsulated by a nanometer-thick layer of lipids, proteins or polymers to stabilize them against premature dissolution. Over the years, we have developed interfacial rheological models for the encapsulation and used them to characterize several contrast agents by acoustic means. We will present an overview of our research emphasizing recent efforts in two directions. The first is on using subharmonic signals from the contrast microbubbles for non-invasive pressure estimation. Experimental measurement and modeling show that the subharmonic signal can both increase or decrease with pressure depending on frequency. Secondly, we will discuss boundary element (BEM) simulation of the collapse of an encapsulated microbubbles forming a jet near a blood vessel wall. Different rheology models of the encapsulation have been rigorously implemented in the BEM formulation. We will discuss the resulting stresses and the acoustic streaming near the wall leading to sonoporation and other bioeffects. Partially supported by Natinal Science Foundation.

  17. Influence of nesting shell size on brightness longevity and resistance to ultrasound-induced dissolution during enhanced B-mode contrast imaging.

    PubMed

    Wallace, N; Dicker, S; Lewin, P; Wrenn, S P

    2014-12-01

    This study aims to bridge the gap between transport mechanisms of an improved ultrasound contrast agent (UCA) and its resulting behavior in a clinical imaging study. Phospholipid-shelled microbubbles nested within the aqueous core of a polymer microcapsule are examined for their use and feasibility as an improved UCA. The nested formulation provides contrast comparable to traditional formulations, specifically an SF6 microbubble coated by a DSPC PEG-3000 monolayer, with the advantage that contrast persists at least nine times longer in a mock clinical, in vitro setting. The effectiveness of the sample was measured using a contrast ratio in units of decibels (dB) which compares the brightness of the nested microbubbles to a reference value of a phantom tissue mimic. During a 40min imaging study, six nesting formulations with average outer capsule diameters of 1.95, 2.53, 5.55, 9.95, 14.95, and 20.51μm reached final contrast ratio values of 0.25, 2.35, 3.68, 4.51, 5.93, and 8.00dB, respectively. The starting contrast ratio in each case was approximately 8dB and accounts for the brightness attributed to the nesting shell. As compared with empty microcapsules (no microbubbles nested within), enhancement of the initial contrast ratio increased systematically with decreasing microcapsule size. The time required to reach a steady state in the temporal contrast ratio profile also varied with microcapsule diameter and was found to be 420s for each of the four smallest shell diameters and 210s and 150s, respectively, for the largest two shell diameters. All nested formulations were longer-lived and gave higher final contrast ratios than a control sample comprising un-nested, but otherwise equivalent, microbubbles. Specifically, the contrast ratio of the un-nested microbubbles decreased to a negative value after 4min of continuous ultrasound exposure with complete disappearance of the microbubbles after 15min whereas all nested formulations maintained positive contrast ratio

  18. Decrease of uteroplacental blood flow after feticide during second-trimester pregnancy termination with complete placenta previa: quantitative analysis using contrast-enhanced ultrasound imaging.

    PubMed

    Poret-Bazin, H; Simon, E G; Bleuzen, A; Dujardin, P A; Patat, F; Perrotin, F

    2013-11-01

    Contrast enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) was used to quantify the dynamic changes in uteroplacental blood flow before and after the interruption of fetal villus circulation resulting from feticide during a second trimester pregnancy termination in a patient with complete placenta previa. Quantitative analysis was performed on time-intensity curves acquired 24 h before and 48 h and 120 h after feticide and demonstrated the persistence of utero-placental blood flow with a progressive and two-step reduction in intervillous space and uteroplacental blood flow. Our results suggest that placental blood flow reduction after interruption of fetal circulation is a progressive and delayed mechanism.

  19. High-Resolution Ultrasound-Switchable Fluorescence Imaging in Centimeter-Deep Tissue Phantoms with High Signal-To-Noise Ratio and High Sensitivity via Novel Contrast Agents

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Bingbing; Bandi, Venugopal; Wei, Ming-Yuan; Pei, Yanbo; D’Souza, Francis; Nguyen, Kytai T.; Hong, Yi; Yuan, Baohong

    2016-01-01

    For many years, investigators have sought after high-resolution fluorescence imaging in centimeter-deep tissue because many interesting in vivo phenomena—such as the presence of immune system cells, tumor angiogenesis, and metastasis—may be located deep in tissue. Previously, we developed a new imaging technique to achieve high spatial resolution in sub-centimeter deep tissue phantoms named continuous-wave ultrasound-switchable fluorescence (CW-USF). The principle is to use a focused ultrasound wave to externally and locally switch on and off the fluorophore emission from a small volume (close to ultrasound focal volume). By making improvements in three aspects of this technique: excellent near-infrared USF contrast agents, a sensitive frequency-domain USF imaging system, and an effective signal processing algorithm, for the first time this study has achieved high spatial resolution (~ 900 μm) in 3-centimeter-deep tissue phantoms with high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and high sensitivity (3.4 picomoles of fluorophore in a volume of 68 nanoliters can be detected). We have achieved these results in both tissue-mimic phantoms and porcine muscle tissues. We have also demonstrated multi-color USF to image and distinguish two fluorophores with different wavelengths, which might be very useful for simultaneously imaging of multiple targets and observing their interactions in the future. This work has opened the door for future studies of high-resolution centimeter-deep tissue fluorescence imaging. PMID:27829050

  20. Clinical value of contrast-enhanced ultrasound in improving diagnostic accuracy rate of transthoracic biopsy of anterior-medial mediastinal lesions

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Jingjing; Yang, Wei; Wang, Song; Bai, Jing; Wu, Hao; Wang, Haiyue; Yan, Kun; Chen, Minhua

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the clinical value of contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) in transthoracic biopsy of anterior-medial mediastinal lesions. Methods A total of 123 patients with anterior or middle mediastinum lesions required ultrasound guided transthoracic biopsy for pathological diagnosis. Among them, 72 patients received CEUS examinations before biopsy. After CEUS, 8 patients were excluded from biopsy and the rest 64 patients underwent biopsy (CEUS group). During the same period, 51 patients received biopsy without CEUS examination (US group). The ultrasonography characteristics, the number of biopsy puncture attempts, diagnostic accuracy rate and the incidence of complications were recorded and compared between the two groups. Results A large portion of necrosis area or superficial large vessels was found in 8 patients, so the biopsy was cancelled. The internal necrosis was demonstrated in 43.8% of the lesions in CEUS group and in 11.8% of US group (P>0.001). For thymic carcinoma, CEUS increased the detection rate of internal necrosis and pericardial effusion than conventional ultrasound (62.5% vs. 18.8%, P=0.012; 56.3% vs. 12.5%, P=0.023). The average number of punctures in CEUS group and US group was 2.36±0.70 and 2.21±0.51 times, respectively (P>0.05). The diagnostic accuracy rate of biopsy in CEUS group (96.9%, 62/64) was significantly higher than that in US group (84.3%, 43/51) (P=0.022). In US group, 2 patients suffered from mediastinal bleeding (3.9%), while no major complications occurred in CEUS group. Conclusions CEUS examination provided important information before transthoracic mediastinum biopsy and improved diagnostic accuracy rate in biopsy of anterior and middle mediastinum lesions than conventional ultrasound. PMID:28174490

  1. Cyanine 5.5 Conjugated Nanobubbles as a Tumor Selective Contrast Agent for Dual Ultrasound-Fluorescence Imaging in a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jing; Wei, Qiong; Yuchi, Ming; He, Xiaoling; Ding, Mingyue; Zhou, Qibing

    2013-01-01

    Nanobubbles and microbubbles are non-invasive ultrasound imaging contrast agents that may potentially enhance diagnosis of tumors. However, to date, both nanobubbles and microbubbles display poor in vivo tumor-selectivity over non-targeted organs such as liver. We report here cyanine 5.5 conjugated nanobubbles (cy5.5-nanobubbles) of a biocompatible chitosan–vitamin C lipid system as a dual ultrasound-fluorescence contrast agent that achieved tumor-selective imaging in a mouse tumor model. Cy5.5-nanobubble suspension contained single bubble spheres and clusters of bubble spheres with the size ranging between 400–800 nm. In the in vivo mouse study, enhancement of ultrasound signals at tumor site was found to persist over 2 h while tumor-selective fluorescence emission was persistently observed over 24 h with intravenous injection of cy5.5-nanobubbles. In vitro cell study indicated that cy5.5-flurescence dye was able to accumulate in cancer cells due to the unique conjugated nanobubble structure. Further in vivo fluorescence study suggested that cy5.5-nanobubbles were mainly located at tumor site and in the bladder of mice. Subsequent analysis confirmed that accumulation of high fluorescence was present at the intact subcutaneous tumor site and in isolated tumor tissue but not in liver tissue post intravenous injection of cy5.5-nanobubbles. All these results led to the conclusion that cy5.5-nanobubbles with unique crosslinked chitosan–vitamin C lipid system have achieved tumor-selective imaging in vivo. PMID:23637799

  2. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound imaging and in vivo circulatory kinetics with low-boiling-point nanoscale phase-change perfluorocarbon agents.

    PubMed

    Sheeran, Paul S; Rojas, Juan D; Puett, Connor; Hjelmquist, Jordan; Arena, Christopher B; Dayton, Paul A

    2015-03-01

    Many studies have explored phase-change contrast agents (PCCAs) that can be vaporized by an ultrasonic pulse to form microbubbles for ultrasound imaging and therapy. However, few investigations have been published on the utility and characteristics of PCCAs as contrast agents in vivo. In this study, we examine the properties of low-boiling-point nanoscale PCCAs evaluated in vivo and compare data with those for conventional microbubbles with respect to contrast generation and circulation properties. To do this, we develop a custom pulse sequence to vaporize and image PCCAs using the Verasonics research platform and a clinical array transducer. Results indicate that droplets can produce contrast enhancement similar to that of microbubbles (7.29 to 18.24 dB over baseline, depending on formulation) and can be designed to circulate for as much as 3.3 times longer than microbubbles. This study also reports for the first time the ability to capture contrast washout kinetics of the target organ as a measure of vascular perfusion.

  3. A modified commercial ultrasound scanner used for in vivo photoacoustic imaging of nude mice injected with non-targeted contrast agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jankovic, Ladislav; Shahzad, Khalid; Wang, Yao; Burcher, Michael; Scholle, Frank-Detlef; Hauff, Peter; Mofina, Sabine; Skobe, Mihaela

    2008-02-01

    Photoacoustic (PA) experiments were performed using a modified commercial ultrasound scanner equipped with an array transducer and a Nd:YAG pumped OPO laser. The contrast agent SIDAG (Bayer Schering Pharma AG, Germany), used to enhance the optical absorption, demonstrated an expected pharmacokinetic behavior of the dye in the tumor and in the bladder of the nude mice. A typical behavior in the tumor consisted of an initial linear increase in PA signal followed by an exponential decay. PA signal approached the pre-injection level after about one hour following the dye injection, which was consistent with the behavior for such contrast agents when used in other imaging modalities, such as fluorescence imaging. The in-vivo spectral PA data from the mouse bladder, conducted 1.5 hours after the dye injection, clearly demonstrated presence of the dye. The multi-spectral PA data was obtained at 760nm, 784nm and 850nm laser excitations. The PA intensities obtained at these three wavelengths accurately matched the dye absorption spectrum. In addition, in the kidney, a clearance organ for this contrast agent, both in-vivo and ex-vivo results demonstrated a significant increase (~ 40%) in the ratio of PA signal at 760nm (the peak of the dye absorption) relative to the signal at 850nm (<1% absorption), indicating significant amounts of the dye in this organ. Our initial results confirm the desired photoacoustic properties of the contrast agent, indicating its great potential to be used for imaging with a commercial array-based ultrasound scanner.

  4. Hepatic transit time analysis using contrast-enhanced ultrasound with BR1: A prospective study comparing patients with liver metastases from colorectal cancer with healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Hohmann, Joachim; Müller, Christine; Oldenburg, Anja; Skrok, Jan; Frericks, Bernd B; Wolf, Karl-Jürgen; Albrecht, Thomas

    2009-09-01

    We prospectively compared hepatic transit time (HTT) measurements in subjects with liver metastases from colorectal cancer (group a) and healthy volunteers (group b) using contrast-enhanced ultrasound with BR1. The purpose of this study was to verify our hypothesis that the hemodynamic changes of the liver, which occur during metastasis seeding, would shorten the HTT, and we expect that such changes could be used for the detection of occult liver metastases from colorectal cancer in the future. The study had institutional review board approval and all subjects gave informed written consent. Group a and group b consisted of 22 subjects each. Baseline and post contrast images were acquired starting 10 s before and ending 40 s after administration of BR1, using nonlinear imaging at a frame rate of 5/s. The baseline images were used to determine the signal intensity without contrast enhancement as the reference signal. Arrival times (AT) of the contrast agent for the hepatic artery, the portal vein and one hepatic vein were determined using (i) quantitative analysis and (ii) subjective analysis by two blinded readers. HTT was calculated based on arrival time measurements. Quantitative and subjective analysis showed significantly shorter arterial to venous and portal to venous HTT in group a compared with group b (p < 0.001). Arterial to venous HTT (quantitative analysis) was < or = 9 s in 19 of 22 subjects of group a and >9 s in 18 of 22 subjects of group b (sensitivity 86%, specificity 82%, positive predictive value 83%, negative predictive value 86%, area under the curve [AUC] 0.87). Portal to venous HTT (quantitative analysis) was < 7 s in 21 of 22 subjects of group a and > 7s in 15 of 22 subjects of group b (sensitivity 95%, specificity 68%, PPV 75%, NPV 94%, AUC 0.85). There was an inverse relation with number of liver segments involved for arterial to venous and portal to venous HTT in group a (p < 0.05), but no correlation between HTT and overall volume of

  5. Multi-modal detection of colon malignancy by NIR-tagged recognition polymers and ultrasound contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Bloch, Meital; Jablonowski, Lauren; Yavin, Eylon; Moradov, Dorit; Djavsarov, Irena; Nyska, Abraham; Wheatley, Margaret; Rubinstein, Abraham

    2015-01-30

    To increase colonoscopy capability to discriminate benign from malignant polyps, we suggest combining two imaging approaches based on targeted polymeric platforms. Water-soluble cationized polyacrylamide (CPAA) was tagged with the near infrared (NIR) dye IR-783-S-Ph-COOH to form Flu-CPAA. The recognition peptide VRPMPLQ (reported to bind specifically to CRC tissues) was then conjugated with the Flu-CPAA to form Flu-CPAA-Pep which was then incorporated into echogenic microbubbles (MBs) made of polylactic acid (PLA) that are highly responsive to ultrasound. The ultimate design includes intravenous administration combined with local ultrasound and intra-colon inspection at the NIR range. In this proof of principle study PLA MBs were prepared by the double emulsion technique and loaded with several types of Flu-CPAA-Pep polymers. After insonation the submicron PLA fragments (SPF)-containing Flu-CPAA-Pep were examined in vitro for their ability to attach to colon cancer cells and in vivo (DMH induced rat model) for their ability to attach to colon malignant tissues and compared to the specific attachment of the free Flu-CPAA-Pep. The generation of SPF-containing Flu-CPAA-Pep resulted in a tissue attachment similar to that of the free, unloaded Flu-CPAA-Pep. The addition of VRPMPLQ to the polymeric backbone of the Flu-CPAA reduced cytotoxicity and improved the specific binding.

  6. Duplex ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    Vascular ultrasound; Peripheral vascular ultrasound ... A duplex ultrasound combines: Traditional ultrasound: This uses sound waves that bounce off blood vessels to create pictures. Doppler ultrasound: This ...

  7. Three-dimensional transcranial ultrasound imaging with bilateral phase aberration correction of multiple isoplanatic patches: A pilot human study with microbubble contrast enhancement

    PubMed Central

    Lindsey, Brooks D.; Nicoletto, Heather A.; Bennett, Ellen R.; Laskowitz, Daniel T.; Smith, Stephen W.

    2013-01-01

    With stroke currently the second-leading cause of death globally, and 87% of all strokes classified as ischemic, the development of a fast, accessible, cost-effective approach for imaging occlusive stroke could have a significant impact on healthcare outcomes and costs. While clinical examination and standard CT alone do not provide adequate information for understanding the complex temporal events that occur during an ischemic stroke, ultrasound imaging is well-suited to the task of examining blood flow dynamics in real-time and may allow for localization of a clot. A prototype bilateral 3D ultrasound imaging system utilizing two matrix array probes on either side of the head allows for correction of skull-induced aberration throughout two entire phased array imaging volumes. We investigated the feasibility of applying this custom correction technique in 5 healthy volunteers with Definity® microbubble contrast enhancement. Subjects were scanned simultaneously via both temporal acoustic windows in 3D color flow mode. The number of color flow voxels above a common threshold increased due to aberration correction in 5/5 subjects, with a mean increase of 33.9%. The percentage of large arteries visualized in 3D color Doppler imaging increased from 46% without aberration correction to 60% with aberration correction. PMID:24239360

  8. 3-D transcranial ultrasound imaging with bilateral phase aberration correction of multiple isoplanatic patches: a pilot human study with microbubble contrast enhancement.

    PubMed

    Lindsey, Brooks D; Nicoletto, Heather A; Bennett, Ellen R; Laskowitz, Daniel T; Smith, Stephen W

    2014-01-01

    With stroke currently the second-leading cause of death globally, and 87% of all strokes classified as ischemic, the development of a fast, accessible, cost-effective approach for imaging occlusive stroke could have a significant impact on health care outcomes and costs. Although clinical examination and standard computed tomography alone do not provide adequate information for understanding the complex temporal events that occur during an ischemic stroke, ultrasound imaging is well suited to the task of examining blood flow dynamics in real time and may allow for localization of a clot. A prototype bilateral 3-D ultrasound imaging system using two matrix array probes on either side of the head allows for correction of skull-induced aberration throughout two entire phased array imaging volumes. We investigated the feasibility of applying this custom correction technique in five healthy volunteers with Definity microbubble contrast enhancement. Subjects were scanned simultaneously via both temporal acoustic windows in 3-D color flow mode. The number of color flow voxels above a common threshold increased as a result of aberration correction in five of five subjects, with a mean increase of 33.9%. The percentage of large arteries visualized by 3-D color Doppler imaging increased from 46% without aberration correction to 60% with aberration correction.

  9. Temperature-dependent differences in the nonlinear acoustic behavior of ultrasound contrast agents revealed by high-speed imaging and bulk acoustics.

    PubMed

    Mulvana, Helen; Stride, Eleanor; Tang, Mengxing; Hajnal, Jo V; Eckersley, Robert

    2011-09-01

    Previous work by the authors has established that increasing the temperature of the suspending liquid from 20°C to body temperature has a significant impact on the bulk acoustic properties and stability of an ultrasound contrast agent suspension (SonoVue, Bracco Suisse SA, Manno, Lugano, Switzerland). In this paper the influence of temperature on the nonlinear behavior of microbubbles is investigated, because this is one of the most important parameters in the context of diagnostic imaging. High-speed imaging showed that raising the temperature significantly influences the dynamic behavior of individual microbubbles. At body temperature, microbubbles exhibit greater radial excursion and oscillate less spherically, with a greater incidence of jetting and gas expulsion, and therefore collapse, than they do at room temperature. Bulk acoustics revealed an associated increase in the harmonic content of the scattered signals. These findings emphasize the importance of conducting laboratory studies at body temperature if the results are to be interpreted for in vivo applications.

  10. Contrast-enhanced, real-time volumetric ultrasound imaging of tissue perfusion: preliminary results in a rabbit model of testicular torsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paltiel, H. J.; Padua, H. M.; Gargollo, P. C.; Cannon, G. M., Jr.; Alomari, A. I.; Yu, R.; Clement, G. T.

    2011-04-01

    Contrast-enhanced ultrasound (US) imaging is potentially applicable to the clinical investigation of a wide variety of perfusion disorders. Quantitative analysis of perfusion is not widely performed, and is limited by the fact that data are acquired from a single tissue plane, a situation that is unlikely to accurately reflect global perfusion. Real-time perfusion information from a tissue volume in an experimental rabbit model of testicular torsion was obtained with a two-dimensional matrix phased array US transducer. Contrast-enhanced imaging was performed in 20 rabbits during intravenous infusion of the microbubble contrast agent Definity® before and after unilateral testicular torsion and contralateral orchiopexy. The degree of torsion was 0° in 4 (sham surgery), 180° in 4, 360° in 4, 540° in 4, and 720° in 4. An automated technique was developed to analyze the time history of US image intensity in experimental and control testes. Comparison of mean US intensity rate of change and of ratios between mean US intensity rate of change in experimental and control testes demonstrated good correlation with testicular perfusion and mean perfusion ratios obtained with radiolabeled microspheres, an accepted 'gold standard'. This method is of potential utility in the clinical evaluation of testicular and other organ perfusion.

  11. Contrast-enhanced, real-time volumetric ultrasound imaging of tissue perfusion: preliminary results in a rabbit model of testicular torsion.

    PubMed

    Paltiel, H J; Padua, H M; Gargollo, P C; Cannon, G M; Alomari, A I; Yu, R; Clement, G T

    2011-04-07

    Contrast-enhanced ultrasound (US) imaging is potentially applicable to the clinical investigation of a wide variety of perfusion disorders. Quantitative analysis of perfusion is not widely performed, and is limited by the fact that data are acquired from a single tissue plane, a situation that is unlikely to accurately reflect global perfusion. Real-time perfusion information from a tissue volume in an experimental rabbit model of testicular torsion was obtained with a two-dimensional matrix phased array US transducer. Contrast-enhanced imaging was performed in 20 rabbits during intravenous infusion of the microbubble contrast agent Definity® before and after unilateral testicular torsion and contralateral orchiopexy. The degree of torsion was 0° in 4 (sham surgery), 180° in 4, 360° in 4, 540° in 4, and 720° in 4. An automated technique was developed to analyze the time history of US image intensity in experimental and control testes. Comparison of mean US intensity rate of change and of ratios between mean US intensity rate of change in experimental and control testes demonstrated good correlation with testicular perfusion and mean perfusion ratios obtained with radiolabeled microspheres, an accepted 'gold standard'. This method is of potential utility in the clinical evaluation of testicular and other organ perfusion.

  12. Development of a new Sonovue™ contrast-enhanced ultrasound approach reveals temporal and age-related features of muscle microvascular responses to feeding

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, William Kyle; Phillips, Bethan E; Williams, John P; Rankin, Debbie; Smith, Kenneth; Lund, Jonathan N; Atherton, Philip J

    2013-01-01

    Compromised limb blood flow in aging may contribute to the development of sarcopenia, frailty, and the metabolic syndrome. We developed a novel contrast-enhanced ultrasound technique using Sonovue™ to characterize muscle microvasculature responses to an oral feeding stimulus (15 g essential amino acids) in young (∼20 years) and older (∼70 years) men. Intensity-time replenishment curves were made via an ultrasound probe “fixed” over the quadriceps, with intermittent high mechanical index destruction of microbubbles within muscle vasculature. This permitted real-time measures of microvascular blood volume (MBV), microvascular flow velocity (MFV) and their product, microvascular blood flow (MBF). Leg blood flow (LBF) was measured by Doppler and insulin by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Steady-state contrast concentrations needed for comparison between different physiological states were achieved <150 sec from commencing Sonovue™ infusion, and MFV and MBV measurements were completed <120 sec thereafter. Interindividual coefficients of variation in MBV and MFV were 35–40%, (N = 36). Younger men (N = 6) exhibited biphasic vascular responses to feeding with early increases in MBV (+36%, P < 0.008 45 min post feed) reflecting capillary recruitment, and late increases in MFV (+77%, P < 0.008) and MBF (+130%, P < 0.007 195 min post feed) reflecting more proximal vessel dilatation. Early MBV responses were synchronized with peak insulin but not increased LBF, while later changes in MFV and MBF occurred with insulin at post absorptive values but alongside increased LBF. All circulatory responses were absent in old men (N = 7). Thus, impaired postprandial circulation could impact age-related declines in muscle glucose disposal, protein anabolism, and muscle mass. PMID:24303186

  13. Molecular Imaging of Vasa Vasorum Neovascularization via DEspR-targeted Contrast-enhanced Ultrasound Micro-imaging in Transgenic Atherosclerosis Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Decano, Julius L.; Moran, Anne Marie; Ruiz-Opazo, Nelson; Herrera, Victoria L. M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Given that carotid vasa vasorum neovascularization is associated with increased risk for stroke and cardiac events, the present in vivo study was designed to investigate molecular imaging of carotid artery vasa vasorum neovascularization via target-specific contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEU) micro-imaging. Procedures Molecular imaging was performed in male transgenic rats with carotid artery disease and non-transgenic controls using dual endothelin1/VEGFsp receptor (DEspR)-targeted microbubbles (MBD) and the Vevo770 micro-imaging system and CEU imaging software. Results DEspR-targeted CEU-positive imaging exhibited significantly higher contrast intensity signal (CIS)-levels and pre-/post-destruction CIS-differences in seven of 13 transgenic rats, in contrast to significantly lower CIS-levels and differences in control isotype-targeted microbubble (MBC)-CEU imaging (n =8) and in MBD CEU-imaging of five non-transgenic control rats (P<0.0001). Ex vivo immunofluorescence analysis demonstrated binding of MBD to DEspR-positive endothelial cells; and association of DEspR-targeted increased contrast intensity signals with DEspR expression in vasa vasorum neovessel and intimal lesions. In vitro analysis demonstrated dose-dependent binding of MBD to DEspR-positive human endothelial cells with increasing %cells bound and number of MBD per cell, in contrast to MBC or non-labeled microbubbles (P<0.0001). Conclusion In vivo DEspR-targeted molecular imaging detected increased DEspR-expression in carotid artery lesions and in expanded vasa vasorum neovessels in transgenic rats with carotid artery disease. Future studies are needed to determine predictive value for stroke or heart disease in this transgenic atherosclerosis rat model and translational applications. PMID:20972637

  14. Can Doppler or contrast-enhanced ultrasound analysis add diagnostically important information about the nature of breast lesions?

    PubMed Central

    Stanzani, Daniela; Chala, Luciano F.; de Barros, Nestor; Cerri, Giovanni G.; Chammas, Maria Cristina

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Despite evidence suggesting that Doppler ultrasonography can help to differentiate between benign and malignant breast lesions, it is rarely applied in clinical practice. The aim of this study was to determine whether certain vascular features of breast masses observed by duplex Doppler and color Doppler ultrasonography (before and/or after microbubble contrast injection) add information to the gray-scale analysis and support the Breast Imaging-Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) classification. METHODS: Seventy solid lesions were prospectively evaluated with gray-scale ultrasonography, color Doppler ultrasonography, and contrast-enhanced ultrasonography. The morphological analysis and lesion vascularity were correlated with the histological results. RESULTS: Percutaneous core biopsies revealed that 25/70 (17.5%) lesions were malignant, while 45 were benign. Hypervascular lesions with tortuous and central vessels, a resistive index (RI)≥0.73 before contrast injection, and an RI≥0.75 after contrast injection were significantly predictive of malignancy (p<0.001). CONCLUSION: The combination of gray-scale ultrasonography data with unenhanced or enhanced duplex Doppler and color Doppler US data can provide diagnostically useful information. These techniques can be easily implemented because Doppler devices are already present in most health centers. PMID:24519198

  15. The antiangiogenic effects of a vascular endothelial growth factor decoy receptor can be monitored in vivo using contrast-enhanced ultrasound imaging.

    PubMed

    Forsberg, Flemming; Ro, Raymond J; Marshall, Andrew; Liu, Ji-Bin; Chiou, See-Ying; Merton, Daniel A; Machado, Priscilla; Dicker, Adam P; Nazarian, Levon N

    2014-01-01

    The development of antiangiogenic therapies has stimulated interest in noninvasive imaging methods to monitor response. We investigated whether the effects of a vascular endothelial growth factor decoy receptor (VEGF Trap, Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Tarrytown, NY) could be monitored in vivo using contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (CEUS). Twenty nude mice (in two groups) were implanted with a human melanoma cell line (DB-1). The active group received VEGF Trap (4 × 25 mg/kg over 2 weeks), whereas the control group received an inactive protein. An ultrasound contrast agent was injected followed by power Doppler imaging (PDI) and pulse inversion harmonic imaging (PIHI; regular and intermittent). Specimens were sectioned in the same planes as the images and stained for endothelial cells (CD31), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), VEGF, and hypoxia (Glut1). Measures of tumor vascularity obtained with the different imaging modes were compared to immunohistochemical markers of angiogenesis. Mean tumor volume was smaller in the active group than in the control group (656 ± 225 vs 1,160 ± 605 mm3). Overall, PDI and VEGF correlated (r  =  .34; p =  .037). Vascularity decreased from control to treated mice with intermittent PIHI, as did the expression of CD31 and COX-2 (p ≤ .02), whereas VEGF increased (p  =  .05). CEUS appears to allow in vivo monitoring of the antiangiogenic effects of VEGF Trap in the DB-1 human melanoma xenograft model.

  16. Gold-nanorod contrast-enhanced photoacoustic micro-imaging of focused-ultrasound induced blood-brain-barrier opening in a rat model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Po-Hsun; Liu, Hao-Li; Hsu, Po-Hung; Lin, Chia-Yu; Chris Wang, Churng-Ren; Chen, Pin-Yuan; Wei, Kuo-Chen; Yen, Tzu-Chen; Li, Meng-Lin

    2012-06-01

    In this study, we develop a novel photoacoustic imaging technique based on gold nanorods (AuNRs) for quantitatively monitoring focused-ultrasound (FUS) induced blood-brain barrier (BBB) opening in a rat model in vivo. This study takes advantage of the strong near-infrared absorption (peak at ~800 nm) of AuNRs and the extravasation tendency from BBB opening foci due to their nano-scale size to passively label the BBB disruption area. Experimental results show that AuNR contrast-enhanced photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) successfully reveals the spatial distribution and temporal response of BBB disruption area in the rat brains. The quantitative measurement of contrast enhancement has potential to estimate the local concentration of AuNRs and even the dosage of therapeutic molecules when AuNRs are further used as nano-carrier for drug delivery or photothermal therapy. The photoacoustic results also provide complementary information to MRI, being helpful to discover more details about FUS induced BBB opening in small animal models.

  17. Comparison of photoacoustically derived hemoglobin and oxygenation measurements with contrast-enhanced ultrasound estimated vascularity and immunohistochemical staining in a breast cancer model.

    PubMed

    Eisenbrey, John R; Merton, Daniel A; Marshall, Andrew; Liu, Ji-Bin; Fox, Traci B; Sridharan, Anush; Forsberg, Flemming

    2015-01-01

    In this preliminary study, we compared two noninvasive techniques for imaging intratumoral physiological conditions to immunohistochemical staining in a murine breast cancer model. MDA-MB-231 tumors were implanted in the mammary pad of 11 nude rats. Ultrasound and photoacoustic (PA) scanning were performed using a Vevo 2100 scanner (Visualsonics, Toronto, Canada). Contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) was used to create maximum intensity projections as a measure of tumor vascularity. PAs were used to determine total hemoglobin signal (HbT), oxygenation levels in detected blood (SO2 Avg), and oxygenation levels over the entire tumor area (SO2 Tot). Tumors were then stained for vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2), and the platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule CD31. Correlations between findings were analyzed using Pearson's coefficient. Significant correlation was observed between CEUS-derived vascularity measurements and both PA indicators of blood volume (r = 0.49 for HbT, r = 0.50 for SO2 Tot). Cox-2 showed significant negative correlation with SO2 Avg (r = -0.49, p = 0.020) and SO2 Tot (r = -0.43, p = 0.047), while CD31 showed significant negative correlation with CEUS-derived vascularity (r = -0.47, p = 0.036). However, no significant correlation was observed between VEGF expression and any imaging modality (p > 0.08). Photoacoustically derived HbT and SO2 Tot may be a good indicator of tumor fractional vascularity. While CEUS correlates with CD31 expression, photoacoustically derived SO2 Avg appears to be a better predictor of Cox-2 expression.

  18. Discrete or diffuse intramedullary tumor? Contrast-enhanced intraoperative ultrasound in a case of intramedullary cervicothoracic hemangioblastomas mimicking a diffuse infiltrative glioma: technical note and case report.

    PubMed

    Vetrano, Ignazio G; Prada, Francesco; Nataloni, Ilaria F; Bene, Massimiliano Del; Dimeco, Francesco; Valentini, Laura G

    2015-08-01

    Hemangioblastomas are benign, highly vascularized intramedullary lesions that may also extend into the intradural space. Surgery represents the standard therapy, with the goal of obtaining complete resection even at the risk of neurological morbidity. MRI is the gold standard for diagnosis and assessment of intramedullary tumors. Nevertheless, sometimes MRI may not accurately differentiate between different types of intramedullary tumors, in particular if they are associated with syringes or intra- and peritumoral cysts. This could subsequently affect surgical strategies. Intraoperative ultrasound (ioUS) has become in the last few years a very useful tool for use during neurosurgical procedures. Various ioUS modalities such as B-mode and Doppler have been applied during neurosurgical procedures. On the other hand, the use of contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) is not yet well defined and standardized in this field. We report a case of a young patient harboring a cervicothoracic intramedullary tumor, for which the preoperative neuroradiologi-cal diagnosis was in favor of a diffuse astrocytoma with nodular components whereas ioUS demonstrated 3 distinct intramedullary nodules. CEUS showed highly vascularized lesions, compatible with hemangioblastomas. These findings, particularly those obtained with CEUS, allowed better definition of the lesions for diagnosis, enhanced understanding of the physiopathological aspects, and permitted the localization of all 3 nodules, thus limiting spinal cord manipulation and allowing complete resection of the lesions, with an uneventful postoperative neurological course. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of the use of intraoperative CEUS in a case of intramedullary hemangioblastoma.

  19. Quantification of phosphatidylserine, phosphatidic acid and free fatty acids in an ultrasound contrast agent by normal-phase high-performance liquid chromatography with evaporative light scattering detection.

    PubMed

    Hvattum, Erlend; Uran, Steinar; Sandbaek, Anne Gunvor; Karlsson, Anders A; Skotland, Tore

    2006-10-11

    Sonazoid is a new contrast agent for ultrasound imaging. The product is an aqueous suspension of perfluorobutane microbubbles coated with phospholipids obtained from hydrogenated egg phosphatidylserine (H-EPS). A normal-phase high-performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) method with evaporative light scattering detection was developed for quantification of free fatty acids, phosphatidylserine and phosphatidic acid in H-EPS and Sonazoid. Separation of the lipids was carried out on an HPLC diol column and a gradient of chloroform and methanol with 0.2% formic acid titrated to pH 7.5 with ammonia. The calibration standards contained stearic acid, distearoyl-phosphatidic acid (DSPA) and distearoyl-phosphatidylserine (DSPS) in the concentration range of 0.016-1.0mg/ml (0.4-25microg injected). The method was validated with a limit of quantification of the three lipids set to 0.4microg (approximately 20-60microM). The best fit of the three calibration curves were obtained when the logarithmic transformed theoretical lipid concentration was plotted against the logarithmic transformed area under the peak and fitted to a second order polynomial equation. Stearic acid, DSPA and DSPS were analysed with an intermediate precision ranging from 4.4% to 5.3% R.S.D. and they were extracted from an aqueous suspension with a recovery ranging from 103.3% to 113.3%. The sum of total phospholipid concentration determined in H-EPS ranged from 96.4% to 103.2% of the theoretical values. The lipids in the ultrasound product were quantitated with a repeatability ranging from 6.2% to 11.7% R.S.D.

  20. MS2 Virus Inactivation by Atmospheric-Pressure Cold Plasma Using Different Gas Carriers and Power Levels

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yan; Liang, Yongdong; Wei, Kai; Li, Wei; Grinshpun, Sergey A.

    2014-01-01

    In this study, airborne MS2 bacteriophages were exposed for subsecond time intervals to atmospheric-pressure cold plasma (APCP) produced using different power levels (20, 24, and 28 W) and gas carriers (ambient air, Ar-O2 [2%, vol/vol], and He-O2 [2%, vol/vol]). In addition, waterborne MS2 viruses were directly subjected to the APCP treatment for up to 3 min. MS2 viruses with and without the APCP exposure were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR), and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Viral inactivation was shown to exhibit linear relationships with the APCP generation power and exposure time (R2 > 0.95 for all energy levels tested) up to 95% inactivation (1.3-log reduction) after a subsecond airborne exposure at 28 W; about the same inactivation level was achieved for waterborne viruses with an exposure time of less than 1 min. A larger amount of reactive oxygen species (ROS), such as atomic oxygen, in APCP was detected for a higher generation power with Ar-O2 and He-O2 gas carriers. SEM images, SDS-PAGE, and agarose gel analysis of exposed waterborne viruses showed various levels of damage to both surface proteins and their related RNA genes after the APCP exposure, thus leading to the loss of their viability and infectivity. PMID:25416775

  1. Contrast M-mode power Doppler ultrasound in the detection of right-to-left shunts: utility of submandibular internal carotid artery recording.

    PubMed

    Topçuoglu, M A; Palacios, I F; Buonanno, F S

    2003-10-01

    Cardiac right-to-left shunts (RLSs) can be detected by echocardiography and transcranial Doppler ultrasound (TCD). In patients without adequate transtemporal bone windows, results may be obtained by insonating extracranial arteries; however, the sensitivity and practicality of this approach is unknown. In 34 patients evaluated with echocardiography for RLSs, 73 studies were performed with unilateral, simultaneous contrast TCD (cTCD) of the middle cerebral artery (MCA) and anterior cerebral artery (ACA) and submandibular power M-mode Doppler (PMD) ultrasound of the extracranial internal carotid artery (ecICA). The number of microbubble (MB) signals and their times of first appearance were determined. RLS volume was graded on 6 levels (I = trace, II = small, III = medium, IVa = large, IVb = shower, IVc = curtain) and compared between MCA and ecICA recordings. In 2 of 24 cTCD studies in 15 patients without evidence of RLSs on single-gated MCA monitoring, low-volume RLSs (grades I and II) were detected via ecICA insonation; in both, MB signatures were tracked in the ecICA, passing into the ipsilateral ACA. In 40 of 49 studies (26 patients) in which RLSs were demonstrated with single-gated MCA monitoring, more MBs were detected in the ecICA than the MCA, with either single-gated or M-mode images, with increases of 76.9% and 66.1%, respectively (P = .027). Compared to single-gated studies, M-mode technology detected nonsignificant increases in MB number in both the MCA and the ecICA (by 20.2% and 14.0%, respectively). Contrast PMD with cervical ICA recording is at least as sensitive and specific as the traditional MCA method in detecting RLSs; furthermore, this method seems to be more sensitive for low-volume RLSs (grades I-III) because of air MB decay (9.2%) and entry into the ipsilateral ACA (34.2%). This is in concordance with the increase of detected RLS grades observed in 32.7% of patients with echocardiography-documented RLSs. The authors therefore suggest the

  2. Testing the Efficacy of Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound in Detecting Transplant Rejection Using a Murine Model of Heart Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Fischer, K; Ohori, S; Meral, F C; Uehara, M; Giannini, S; Ichimura, T; Smith, R N; Jolesz, F A; Guleria, I; Zhang, Y; White, P J; McDannold, N J; Hoffmeister, K; Givertz, M M; Abdi, R

    2016-12-23

    One of the key unmet needs to improve long-term outcomes of heart transplantation is to develop accurate, noninvasive, and practical diagnostic tools to detect transplant rejection. Early intragraft inflammation and endothelial cell injuries occur prior to advanced transplant rejection. We developed a novel diagnostic imaging platform to detect early declines in microvascular perfusion (MP) of cardiac transplants using contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (CEUS). The efficacy of CEUS in detecting transplant rejection was tested in a murine model of heart transplants, a standard preclinical model of solid organ transplant. As compared to the syngeneic groups, a progressive decline in MP was demonstrated in the allografts undergoing acute transplant rejection (40%, 64%, and 92% on days 4, 6, and 8 posttransplantation, respectively) and chronic rejection (33%, 33%, and 92% on days 5, 14, and 30 posttransplantation, respectively). Our perfusion studies showed restoration of MP following antirejection therapy, highlighting its potential to help monitor efficacy of antirejection therapy. Our data suggest that early endothelial cell injury and platelet aggregation contributed to the early MP decline observed in the allografts. High-resolution MP mapping may allow for noninvasive detection of heart transplant rejection. The data presented have the potential to help in the development of next-generation imaging approaches to diagnose transplant rejection.

  3. Liver Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound Improves Detection of Liver Metastases in Patients with Pancreatic or Periampullary Cancer.

    PubMed

    Taimr, Pavel; Jongerius, Vivian L; Pek, Chulja J; Krak, Nanda C; Hansen, Bettina E; Janssen, Harry L A; Metselaar, Herold J; van Eijck, Casper H J

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study is to provide a diagnostic performance evaluation of contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (CEUS) in detecting liver metastases in patients with suspected of pancreatic or periampullary cancer. Computed tomography (CT) is often insufficient for detection of liver metastases, but their presence plays a crucial role in the choice of therapy. Eighty-nine patients with suspected pancreatic or periampullary cancer were included in this prospective study with retrospective analysis. Patients underwent an abdominal CT and CEUS. Fifteen patients had liver metastases. The CT sensitivity was 73.3% (11/15), the specificity 93.2% (69/74), the positive predictive value (PPV) 68.8% (11/16) and the negative predictive value (NPV) 94.6% (69/73). Based on CEUS, the sensitivity was 80% (12/15), specificity 98.6% (73/74), PPV 92.3% (12/13) and NPV 96.1% (73/76). CEUS improved characterization of liver lesions in patients with suspected pancreatic or periampullary cancer compared with CT. CEUS can better detect benign liver lesions and distinguish false-positive or indeterminate CT results.

  4. Does hepatic vein transit time performed with contrast-enhanced ultrasound predict the severity of hepatic fibrosis?

    PubMed

    Tang, An; Kim, Tae Kyoung; Heathcote, Jenny; Guindi, Maha; Jang, Hyun-Jung; Karshafian, Raffi; Burns, Peter N; Wilson, Stephanie R

    2011-12-01

    Previously published data suggest a hepatic vein transit time (HVTT) threshold of more than 24 s can distinguish mild to moderate from advanced fibrosis. In this study, we attempted to validate HVTT as a noninvasive index of hepatic fibrosis. Patients were scanned using real-time, pulse-inversion mode following bolus injections of the contrast agent Definity. HVTT was correlated with the degree of fibrosis obtained from contemporaneous liver biopsy. The study population included 40 patients with chronic liver disease and five healthy volunteers. Mean HVTT correlated with histologic grade as follows: absence/minimal fibrosis (n = 18), 25.6 ± 11.8 s; moderate fibrosis (n = 17), 21.5 ± 5.9 s; and severe fibrosis (n = 8), 20.9 ± 5.5 s, (p = .615). Poor sensitivity (57%) and specificity (43%) prevent validation of the previously published HVTT threshold as a surrogate marker of hepatic fibrosis. Further work investigating the different interaction of Definity, SonoVue and Levovist with the reticulo-endothelial system may help explain the discrepant results reported here.

  5. Added Value of Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound on Biopsies of Focal Hepatic Lesions Invisible on Fusion Imaging Guidance

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Tae Wook; Song, Kyoung Doo; Kim, Mimi; Kim, Seung Soo; Kim, Seong Hyun; Ha, Sang Yun

    2017-01-01

    Objective To assess whether contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (CEUS) with Sonazoid can improve the lesion conspicuity and feasibility of percutaneous biopsies for focal hepatic lesions invisible on fusion imaging of real-time ultrasonography (US) with computed tomography/magnetic resonance images, and evaluate its impact on clinical decision making. Materials and Methods The Institutional Review Board approved this retrospective study. Between June 2013 and January 2015, 711 US-guided percutaneous biopsies were performed for focal hepatic lesions. Biopsies were performed using CEUS for guidance if lesions were invisible on fusion imaging. We retrospectively evaluated the number of target lesions initially invisible on fusion imaging that became visible after applying CEUS, using a 4-point scale. Technical success rates of biopsies were evaluated based on histopathological results. In addition, the occurrence of changes in clinical decision making was assessed. Results Among 711 patients, 16 patients (2.3%) were included in the study. The median size of target lesions was 1.1 cm (range, 0.5–1.9 cm) in pre-procedural imaging. After CEUS, 15 of 16 (93.8%) focal hepatic lesions were visualized. The conspicuity score was significantly increased after adding CEUS, as compared to that on fusion imaging (p < 0.001). The technical success rate of biopsy was 87.6% (14/16). After biopsy, there were changes in clinical decision making for 11 of 16 patients (68.8%). Conclusion The addition of CEUS could improve the conspicuity of focal hepatic lesions invisible on fusion imaging. This dual guidance using CEUS and fusion imaging may affect patient management via changes in clinical decision-making. PMID:28096725

  6. Predictive model for contrast-enhanced ultrasound of the breast: Is it feasible in malignant risk assessment of breast imaging reporting and data system 4 lesions?

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Jun; Chen, Ji-Dong; Chen, Qing; Yue, Lin-Xian; Zhou, Guo; Lan, Cheng; Li, Yi; Wu, Chi-Hua; Lu, Jing-Qiao

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To build and evaluate predictive models for contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) of the breast to distinguish between benign and malignant lesions. METHODS: A total of 235 breast imaging reporting and data system (BI-RADS) 4 solid breast lesions were imaged via CEUS before core needle biopsy or surgical resection. CEUS results were analyzed on 10 enhancing patterns to evaluate diagnostic performance of three benign and three malignant CEUS models, with pathological results used as the gold standard. A logistic regression model was developed basing on the CEUS results, and then evaluated with receiver operating curve (ROC). RESULTS: Except in cases of enhanced homogeneity, the rest of the 9 enhancement appearances were statistically significant (P < 0.05). These 9 enhancement patterns were selected in the final step of the logistic regression analysis, with diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of 84.4% and 82.7%, respectively, and the area under the ROC curve of 0.911. Diagnostic sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of the malignant vs benign CEUS models were 84.38%, 87.77%, 86.38% and 86.46%, 81.29% and 83.40%, respectively. CONCLUSION: The breast CEUS models can predict risk of malignant breast lesions more accurately, decrease false-positive biopsy, and provide accurate BI-RADS classification. PMID:27358688

  7. Contrast-enhanced transrectal ultrasound for prediction of prostate cancer aggressiveness: The role of normal peripheral zone time-intensity curves

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hui; Zhu, Zheng-Qiu; Zhou, Zheng-Guo; Chen, Ling-Shan; Zhao, Ming; Zhang, Yang; Li, Hong-Bo; Yin, Li-Ping

    2016-01-01

    To assess the role of time-intensity curves (TICs) of the normal peripheral zone (PZ) in the identification of biopsy-proven prostate nodules using contrast-enhanced transrectal ultrasound (CETRUS). This study included 132 patients with 134 prostate PZ nodules. Arrival time (AT), peak intensity (PI), mean transit time (MTT), area under the curve (AUC), time from peak to one half (TPH), wash in slope (WIS) and time to peak (TTP) were analyzed using multivariate linear logistic regression and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves to assess whether combining nodule TICs with normal PZ TICs improved the prediction of prostate cancer (PCa) aggressiveness. The PI, AUC (p < 0.001 for both), MTT and TPH (p = 0.011 and 0.040 respectively) values of the malignant nodules were significantly higher than those of the benign nodules. Incorporating the PI and AUC values (both, p < 0.001) of the normal PZ TIC, but not the MTT and TPH values (p = 0.076 and 0.159 respectively), significantly improved the AUC for prediction of malignancy (PI: 0.784–0.923; AUC: 0.758–0.891) and assessment of cancer aggressiveness (p < 0.001). Thus, all these findings indicate that incorporating normal PZ TICs with nodule TICs in CETRUS readings can improve the diagnostic accuracy for PCa and cancer aggressiveness assessment. PMID:27929134

  8. Incorporating Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound into the BI-RADS Scoring System Improves Accuracy in Breast Tumor Diagnosis: A Preliminary Study in China.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Xiaoyun; Dong, Licong; Jiang, Qiongchao; Guan, Xiaofeng; Wu, Huan; Luo, Baoming

    2016-11-01

    The aim of the study was to develop a scoring model incorporating the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) and the contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) scoring system to differentiate between malignant and benign breast lesions. A total of 524 solid breast masses in 490 consecutive patients were evaluated with conventional US and CEUS in this prospective study. Each lesion was scored according to BI-RADS, CEUS, and CEUS-rerated BI-RADS. The diagnostic specificity, sensitivity and accuracy of BI-RADS were 77.9%, 88.9% and 84.0%, respectively, and the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.834. The corresponding values for rerated BI-RADS were 82.1%, 96.9%, 90.3% and 0.895. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of BI-RADS alone was significantly smaller than that of CEUS and the rerated BI-RADS (p = 0.008 compared with CEUS, p = 0.002 compared with rerated BI-RADS). This study indicates that rerating BI-RADS with the CEUS scoring system improves its diagnostic accuracy.

  9. Comparison of Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound and Computed Tomography in Classifying Endoleaks After Endovascular Treatment of Abdominal Aorta Aneurysms: Preliminary Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Carrafiello, Gianpaolo Lagana, Domenico; Recaldini, Chiara; Mangini, Monica; Bertolotti, Elena; Caronno, Roberto; Tozzi, Matteo; Piffaretti, Gabriele; Annibale Genovese, Eugenio; Fugazzola, Carlo

    2006-12-15

    The purpose of the study was to assess the effectiveness of contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (CEUS) in endoleak classification after endovascular treatment of an abdominal aortic aneurysm compared to computed tomography angiography (CTA). From May 2001 to April 2003, 10 patients with endoleaks already detected by CTA underwent CEUS with Sonovue (registered) to confirm the CTA classification or to reclassify the endoleak. In three conflicting cases, the patients were also studied with conventional angiography. CEUS confirmed the CTA classification in seven cases (type II endoleaks). Two CTA type III endoleaks were classified as type II using CEUS and one CTA type II endoleak was classified as type I by CEUS. Regarding the cases with discordant classification, conventional angiography confirmed the ultrasound classification. Additionally, CEUS documented the origin of type II endoleaks in all cases. After CEUS reclassification of endoleaks, a significant change in patient management occurred in three cases. CEUS allows a better attribution of the origin of the endoleak, as it shows the flow in real time. CEUS is more specific than CTA in endoleak classification and gives more accurate information in therapeutic planning.

  10. Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound in Detection and Follow-Up of an Infrarenal Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm with Aorto-Caval Fistula and Endovascular Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Clevert, D.-A. Stickel, M.; Flach, P.; Strautz, T.; Horng, A.; Jauch, K. W.; Reiser, M.

    2007-06-15

    An aorto-caval fistula is a rare complication of a symptomatic or ruptured infrarenal aortic aneurysm having a frequency of 3-6%. Patients typically present with clinical signs of diffuse abdominal pain associated with increasing venous congestion and tachycardia, rapid cardiopulmonary decompensation with acute dyspnea, and an audible machinerylike bruit. Perioperative mortality is high, ranging from 20% to 60%. We report a case of an endovascular aortic repair in a patient with a symptomatic infrarenal aortic aneurysm and an aorto-caval fistula. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound seems to be a promising new diagnostic option for the diagnosis and preoperative treatment planning for patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms with rupture into the inferior vena cava. It is in addition to computed tomography angiography. It might allow a more rapid and noninvasive diagnosis, especially for patients in intensive care because of its bedside availability. Because the examination is dynamic, additional information about blood flow between the aorta and inferior cava vein can be evaluated.

  11. Sol-gel Synthesis and Electrospraying of Biodegradable (P2O5)55-(CaO)30-(Na2O)15 Glass Nanospheres as a Transient Contrast Agent for Ultrasound Stem Cell Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Gambhir, Sanjiv S.; Vermesh, Ophir; Kim, Hae-Won; Knowles, Jonathan C.

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound imaging is a powerful tool in medicine because of the millisecond temporal resolution and sub-millimeter spatial resolution of acoustic imaging. However, the current generation of acoustic contrast agents is primarily limited to vascular targets due to their large size. Nano-size particles have the potential to be used as a contrast agent for ultrasound molecular imaging. Silica-based nanoparticles have shown promise here, however their slow degradation rate may limit their applications as a contrast agent. Phosphate-based glasses are an attractive alternative with controllable degradation rate and easily metabolized degradation components in the body. In this study, biodegradable P2O5-CaO-Na2O phosphate-based glass nanospheres (PGNs) were synthesized and characterized as contrast agents for ultrasound imaging. The structure of the PGNs was characterised using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), X-ray diffraction (XRD), 31P nuclear magnetic resonance (31P MAS-NMR), and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The SEM images indicated a spherical shape with a diameter size range of 200-500 nm. The XRD, 31P NMR and FTIR results revealed the amorphous and glassy nature of PGNs that consisted of mainly Q1 and Q2 phosphate units. We used this contrast to label mesenchymal stem cells and determined in vitro and in vivo detection limits of 5 and 9 μg/mL, respectively. Cell counts down to 4000 could be measured with ultrasound imaging with no cytoxicity at doses needed for imaging. Importantly, ion release studies confirmed these PGNs biodegrade into aqueous media with degradation products that can be easily metabolized in the body. PMID:25625373

  12. Sol-gel synthesis and electrospraying of biodegradable (P2O5)55-(CaO)30-(Na2O)15 glass nanospheres as a transient contrast agent for ultrasound stem cell imaging.

    PubMed

    Foroutan, Farzad; Jokerst, Jesse V; Gambhir, Sanjiv S; Vermesh, Ophir; Kim, Hae-Won; Knowles, Jonathan C

    2015-02-24

    Ultrasound imaging is a powerful tool in medicine because of the millisecond temporal resolution and submillimeter spatial resolution of acoustic imaging. However, the current generation of acoustic contrast agents is primarily limited to vascular targets due to their large size. Nanosize particles have the potential to be used as a contrast agent for ultrasound molecular imaging. Silica-based nanoparticles have shown promise here; however, their slow degradation rate may limit their applications as a contrast agent. Phosphate-based glasses are an attractive alternative with controllable degradation rate and easily metabolized degradation components in the body. In this study, biodegradable P2O5-CaO-Na2O phosphate-based glass nanospheres (PGNs) were synthesized and characterized as contrast agents for ultrasound imaging. The structure of the PGNs was characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), X-ray diffraction (XRD), (31)P magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance ((31)P MAS NMR), and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The SEM images indicated a spherical shape with a diameter size range of 200-500 nm. The XRD, (31)P NMR, and FTIR results revealed the amorphous and glassy nature of PGNs that consisted of mainly Q(1) and Q(2) phosphate units. We used this contrast to label mesenchymal stem cells and determined in vitro and in vivo detection limits of 5 and 9 μg/mL, respectively. Cell counts down to 4000 could be measured with ultrasound imaging with no cytoxicity at doses needed for imaging. Importantly, ion-release studies confirmed these PGNs biodegrade into aqueous media with degradation products that can be easily metabolized in the body.

  13. Contrast-enhanced transrectal ultrasound for assessing vascularization of hypoechoic BPH nodules in the transition and peripheral zones: comparison with pathological examination.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jing Chun; Tang, Jie; Li, Yanmi; Fei, Xiang; Shi, Huaiyin

    2008-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the vascularization of zonal location of hypoechoic benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) nodules and to evaluate the clinical value of contrast-enhanced transrectal ultrasound (CETRUS) for assessing vascularity of hypoechoic BPH nodules. Sixty-two patients with hypoechoic biopsy-proven BPH nodules in transition zone (TZ) (32 patients) or peripheral zone (PZ) (30 patients) of the prostate gland underwent CETRUS examination between January 2006 and September 2006. The enhancement characteristics of hypoechoic BPH nodules were observed and time to enhancement (AT), time to peak intensity (TTP) and peak intensity (PI) were measured with ACQ time-intensity curve analysis software. In addition, microvessel density (MVD) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) immunoreactivity were determined in the biopsy specimens. Microvessels were identified by immunohistochemical staining of endothelial cells for CD34. Findings were compared between hypoechoic BPH nodules located in PZ and TZ. The most common enhancement characteristic of hypoechoic BPH nodules in PZ was nonenhanced area inside (21/30), while most of hypoechoic BPH nodules in TZ appeared homogeneous enhancement (28/32). The average AT and TTP were significantly longer, the average PI was significantly lower in hypoechoic BPH nodules located in PZ than TZ (p < 0.01). The VEGF expression and MVD were significantly higher in hypoechoic BPH nodules located in TZ than PZ (p < 0.01). PI was found to be an important parameter strongly correlated with degree of vascularity of hypoechoic BPH nodules. Hypoechoic BPH nodules located in PZ and TZ showed significant difference in vascularization, which indirectly verified our finding that BPH nodule could occur in the peripheral zone. CETRUS could afford information on the vascularity of hypoechoic BPH nodules in a noninvasive manner and this could be used to improve selection of nodules for biopsy.

  14. Correlations of microvascular blood flow of contrast-enhanced ultrasound and HGF/c-Met signaling pathway with clinicopathological features and prognosis of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Peng-Hui; Xu, Lei; Gao, Lu; Lu, Wei; Ruan, Li-Tao; Yang, Jin

    2017-01-01

    The study is designed to explore the correlations of microvascular blood flow of contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) and hepatocyte growth factor (HGF)/c-Met signaling pathway with clinicopathological features and prognosis of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). One hundred and eighteen patients pathologically diagnosed as primary HCC were selected. All HCC patients underwent CEUS examination before operation. HCC tissues and adjacent normal tissue specimens were obtained to detect the protein rates of HGF and c-Met expressions by immunohistochemistry. The mRNA expressions of HGF and c-Met were detected by quantitative real-time polymerase chase reaction assay. The microvessel density (MVD) was tested by CD34 immunohistochemistry. Compared with liver parenchyma, the HCC lesions had higher MVD, preoperative peak intensity (PI), area under the curve (AUC), lower preoperative time to peak (TTP), and washout time (WOT). Compared with adjacent normal tissues, the protein and mRNA expressions of HGF were reduced in HCC tissues, but the protein and mRNA expressions of c-Met and MVD were increased. The protein expressions of HGF and c-Met exhibited evident correlations with TNM stage, tumor size, vascular invasion, liver cirrhosis, and hepatitis B virus and hepatitis C virus infection of HCC patients. The tumor size and number, vascular invasion, the protein expressions of HGF and c-Met, and MVD were associated with the TTP, PI, WOT, and AUC of CEUS in HCC patients. The protein expressions of HGF and c-Met, MVD and preoperative PI revealed negative associations with the prognosis of HCC patients. In conclusion, quantitative parameters of CEUS and HGF/c-Met signaling pathway-related proteins may be helpful for early diagnosis and prognosis prediction of HCC patients. PMID:28243120

  15. Correlations of microvascular blood flow of contrast-enhanced ultrasound and HGF/c-Met signaling pathway with clinicopathological features and prognosis of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Peng-Hui; Xu, Lei; Gao, Lu; Lu, Wei; Ruan, Li-Tao; Yang, Jin

    2017-01-01

    The study is designed to explore the correlations of microvascular blood flow of contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) and hepatocyte growth factor (HGF)/c-Met signaling pathway with clinicopathological features and prognosis of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). One hundred and eighteen patients pathologically diagnosed as primary HCC were selected. All HCC patients underwent CEUS examination before operation. HCC tissues and adjacent normal tissue specimens were obtained to detect the protein rates of HGF and c-Met expressions by immunohistochemistry. The mRNA expressions of HGF and c-Met were detected by quantitative real-time polymerase chase reaction assay. The microvessel density (MVD) was tested by CD34 immunohistochemistry. Compared with liver parenchyma, the HCC lesions had higher MVD, preoperative peak intensity (PI), area under the curve (AUC), lower preoperative time to peak (TTP), and washout time (WOT). Compared with adjacent normal tissues, the protein and mRNA expressions of HGF were reduced in HCC tissues, but the protein and mRNA expressions of c-Met and MVD were increased. The protein expressions of HGF and c-Met exhibited evident correlations with TNM stage, tumor size, vascular invasion, liver cirrhosis, and hepatitis B virus and hepatitis C virus infection of HCC patients. The tumor size and number, vascular invasion, the protein expressions of HGF and c-Met, and MVD were associated with the TTP, PI, WOT, and AUC of CEUS in HCC patients. The protein expressions of HGF and c-Met, MVD and preoperative PI revealed negative associations with the prognosis of HCC patients. In conclusion, quantitative parameters of CEUS and HGF/c-Met signaling pathway-related proteins may be helpful for early diagnosis and prognosis prediction of HCC patients.

  16. Effectiveness of contrast-enhanced endoscopic ultrasound for detecting mural nodules in intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm of the pancreas and for making therapeutic decisions

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Mitsuru; Itoi, Takao; Ikeuchi, Nobuhito; Sofuni, Atsushi; Tsuchiya, Takayoshi; Ishii, Kentaro; Kamada, Kentaro; Umeda, Junko; Tanaka, Reina; Tonozuka, Ryosuke; Honjo, Mitsuyoshi; Mukai, Shuntaro; Moriyasu, Fuminori

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: There have been few studies to date evaluating the effectiveness of contrast-enhanced endoscopic ultrasound (CE-EUS) for detecting mural nodules in patients with branch duct-type intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (BD-IPMN) of the pancreas. We aim to evaluate the effectiveness of CE-EUS for detecting mural nodules in BD-IPMN. Patients and Methods: Of the 427 BD-IPMN patients, 21 patients (4.9%) in whom the presence of mural nodules was suggested by CE computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), or in whom the presence of nodule-like lesions as shown by fundamental EUS, were examined by CE-EUS. Results: The mean diameter of cystic lesions was 29.8 ± 12.8 mm. The mean diameter of mural nodules was 9.5 ± 5.7 mm. BD-IPMN was detected in the pancreatic head in 16 cases, pancreatic body in 2 cases, and pancreatic tail in 3 cases. The mean follow-up period was 17.2 ± 11.9 months. The detection rates of mural nodule-like lesions in BD-IPMN patients on CT, MRI, and fundamental EUS were 36.8%, 63.2%, and 100%, respectively. The detection rates of true mural nodules in BD-IPMN patients on CT, MRI, and fundamental EUS were 85.7%, 71.4%, and 100%, respectively. The echo levels of mural nodule-like lesions on fundamental EUS were hyperechoic in 6 patients, isoechoic in 9 patients, and hypoechoic in 6 patients. The final diagnosis was mucus lumps in 14 patients and mural nodules in 7 patients. The contrast patterns observed were avascular, isovascular, and hypervascular in 14, 3, and 4 patients, respectively. No patients showed a hypovascular pattern. Fourteen patients showing an avascular pattern were diagnosed as having mucus lumps, and they were able to avoid surgical resection. Of the 7 patients who were diagnosed as having mural nodules, 5 underwent surgical resection. The pathological findings were adenocarcinoma in 2 patients and adenoma in 3 patients. Of the 3 adenoma patients, fundamental EUS demonstrated a hypoechoic

  17. Abdominal Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ultrasound - Abdomen Ultrasound imaging of the abdomen uses sound waves to produce pictures of the structures within ... pictures of the inside of the body using sound waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or ...

  18. Hip Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... Index A-Z Hip Ultrasound Hip ultrasound uses sound waves to produce pictures of muscles, tendons, ligaments, ... pictures of the inside of the body using sound waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or ...

  19. Obstetrical Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... Index A-Z Obstetric Ultrasound Obstetric ultrasound uses sound waves to produce pictures of a baby (embryo ... pictures of the inside of the body using sound waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or ...

  20. Contrast Enhanced Ultrasound - A Novel Non-Invasive Non-Ionizing Method for the Detection of Brown Adipose Tissue in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Flynn, A.; Li, Q.; Panagia, M.; Abdelbaky, A.; MacNabb, M.; Samir, A.; Cypess, AM.; Weyman, AE.; Tawakol, A.; Scherrer-Crosbie, M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Brown adipose tissue (BAT) consumes glucose when it is activated by cold exposure, allowing its detection in humans by 18-F fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography with computed tomography (18F-FDG PET-CT). We recently described a novel non-invasive and non-ionizing imaging method to assess BAT in mice using contrast enhanced ultrasound (CEUS). Here, we report the application of this method in healthy humans. Methods Thirteen healthy volunteers were recruited. CEUS was performed before and after cold exposure in all subjects using a continuous intravenous infusion of perflutren gas filled lipid microbubbles and triggered imaging of the supraclavicular space. The first 5 subjects received microbubbles at a lower infusion rate than the subsequent 8 subjects, and are analyzed as a separate group. Blood flow was estimated by the product of the plateau (A) and the slope (β) of microbubble replenishment curves. All underwent 18F-FDG PET-CT after cold exposure. Results An increase in the acoustic signal was noted in the supraclavicular adipose tissue area with increasing triggering intervals in all subjects, demonstrating the presence of blood flow. The area imaged by CEUS co-localized with BAT, as detected by 18F-FDG PET-CT. In a cohort of 8 subjects with an optimized CEUS protocol, CEUS-derived BAT blood flow increased with cold exposure compared to basal BAT blood flow in warm conditions (Aβ 3.3 [0.5–5.7] AU/s vs. 1.25 [0.5–2.6] AU/s; p=0.02). Of these 8 subjects, 5 had a >2-fold increase in their blood flow after cold exposure; these responders had higher BAT activity measured by 18F-FDG PET-CT (SUVmax 2.25 [1.53–4.57] vs. 0.51 [0.47–0.73]; p=0.02). Conclusions The present study demonstrates the feasibility of using CEUS as a non-invasive, non-ionizing imaging modality in estimating BAT blood flow in young, healthy humans. CEUS may be a useful and scalable tool in the assessment of BAT and BAT-targeted therapies. PMID:26255029

  1. WE-D-210-04: Radiation-Induced Polymerization of Ultrasound Contrast Agents in View of Non-Invasive Dosimetry in External Beam Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Callens, M; Verboven, E; Van Den Abeele, K; D’Agostino, E; Pfeiffer, H; D’hooge, J

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Ultrasound contrast agents (UCA’s) based on gas-filled microbubbles encapsulated by an amphiphilic shell are well established as safe and effective echo-enhancers in diagnostic imaging. In view of an alternative application of UCA’s, we investigated the use of targeted microbubbles as radiation sensors for external beam radiation therapy. As radiation induces permanent changes in the microbubble’s physico-chemical properties, a robust measure of these changes can provide a direct or indirect estimate of the applied radiation dose. For instance, by analyzing the ultrasonic dispersion characteristics of microbubble distributions before and after radiation treatment, an estimate of the radiation dose at the location of the irradiated volume can be made. To increase the radiation sensitivity of microbubbles, polymerizable diacetylene molecules can be incorporated into the shell. This study focuses on characterizing the acoustic response and quantifying the chemical modifications as a function of radiation dose. Methods: Lipid/diacetylene microbubbles were irradiated with a 6 MV photon beam using dose levels in the range of 0–150 Gy. The acoustic response of the microbubbles was monitored by ultrasonic through-transmission measurements in the range of 500 kHz to 20 MHz, thereby providing the dispersion relations of the phase velocity, attenuation and nonlinear coefficient. In addition, the radiation-induced chemical modifications were quantified using UV-VIS spectroscopy. Results: UV-VIS spectroscopy measurements indicate that ionizing radiation induces the polymerization of diacetylenes incorporated in the microbubble shell. The polymer yield strongly depends on the shell composition and the radiation-dose. The acoustic response is inherently related to the visco-elastic properties of the shell and is strongly influenced by the shell composition and the physico-chemical changes in the environment. Conclusion: Diacetylene-containing microbubbles are

  2. Feasibility of Using Volumetric Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound with a 3-D Transducer to Evaluate Therapeutic Response after Targeted Therapy in Rabbit Hepatic VX2 Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeehyun; Kim, Jung Hoon; Yoon, Soon Ho; Choi, Won Seok; Kim, Young Jae; Han, Joon Koo; Choi, Byung-Ihn

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of using dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasound (DCE-US) with a 3-D transducer to evaluate therapeutic responses to targeted therapy. Rabbits with hepatic VX2 carcinomas, divided into a treatment group (n = 22, 30 mg/kg/d sorafenib) and a control group (n = 13), were evaluated with DCE-US using 2-D and 3-D transducers and computed tomography (CT) perfusion imaging at baseline and 1 d after the first treatment. Perfusion parameters were collected, and correlations between parameters were analyzed. In the treatment group, both volumetric and 2-D DCE-US perfusion parameters, including peak intensity (33.2 ± 19.9 vs. 16.6 ± 10.7, 63.7 ± 20.0 vs. 30.1 ± 19.8), slope (15.3 ± 12.4 vs. 5.7 ± 4.5, 37.3 ± 20.4 vs. 15.7 ± 13.0) and area under the curve (AUC; 1004.1 ± 560.3 vs. 611.4 ± 421.1, 1332.2 ± 708.3 vs. 670.4 ± 388.3), had significantly decreased 1 d after the first treatment (p = 0.00). In the control group, 2-D DCE-US revealed that peak intensity, time to peak and slope had significantly changed (p < 0.05); however, volumetric DCE-US revealed that peak intensity, time-intensity AUC, AUC during wash-in and AUC during wash-out had significantly changed (p = 0.00). CT perfusion imaging parameters, including blood flow, blood volume and permeability of the capillary vessel surface, had significantly decreased in the treatment group (p = 0.00); however, in the control group, peak intensity and blood volume had significantly increased (p = 0.00). It is feasible to use DCE-US with a 3-D transducer to predict early therapeutic response after targeted therapy because perfusion parameters, including peak intensity, slope and AUC, significantly decreased, which is similar to the trend observed for 2-D DCE-US and CT perfusion imaging parameters.

  3. Global strength assessment in oblique waves of a large gas carrier ship, based on a non-linear iterative method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domnisoru, L.; Modiga, A.; Gasparotti, C.

    2016-08-01

    At the ship's design, the first step of the hull structural assessment is based on the longitudinal strength analysis, with head wave equivalent loads by the ships' classification societies’ rules. This paper presents an enhancement of the longitudinal strength analysis, considering the general case of the oblique quasi-static equivalent waves, based on the own non-linear iterative procedure and in-house program. The numerical approach is developed for the mono-hull ships, without restrictions on 3D-hull offset lines non-linearities, and involves three interlinked iterative cycles on floating, pitch and roll trim equilibrium conditions. Besides the ship-wave equilibrium parameters, the ship's girder wave induced loads are obtained. As numerical study case we have considered a large LPG liquefied petroleum gas carrier. The numerical results of the large LPG are compared with the statistical design values from several ships' classification societies’ rules. This study makes possible to obtain the oblique wave conditions that are inducing the maximum loads into the large LPG ship's girder. The numerical results of this study are pointing out that the non-linear iterative approach is necessary for the computation of the extreme loads induced by the oblique waves, ensuring better accuracy of the large LPG ship's longitudinal strength assessment.

  4. Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound with VEGFR2-Targeted Microbubbles for Monitoring Regorafenib Therapy Effects in Experimental Colorectal Adenocarcinomas in Rats with DCE-MRI and Immunohistochemical Validation

    PubMed Central

    Clevert, Dirk-Andre; Hirner-Eppeneder, Heidrun; Ingrisch, Michael; Moser, Matthias; Schuster, Jessica; Tadros, Dina; Schneider, Moritz; Kazmierczak, Philipp Maximilian; Reiser, Maximilian; Cyran, Clemens C.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To investigate contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) with VEGFR2-targeted microbubbles for monitoring therapy effects of regorafenib on experimental colon carcinomas in rats with correlation to dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) and immunohistochemistry. Materials and Methods Human colorectal adenocarcinoma xenografts (HT-29) were implanted subcutaneously in n = 21 (n = 11 therapy group; n = 10 control group) female athymic nude rats (Hsd: RH-Foxn1rnu). Animals were imaged at baseline and after a one-week daily treatment with regorafenib or a placebo (10 mg/kg bodyweight), using CEUS with VEGFR2-targeted microbubbles and DCE-MRI. In CEUS tumor perfusion was assessed during an early vascular phase (wash-in area under the curve = WiAUC) and VEGFR2-specific binding during a late molecular phase (signal intensity after 8 (SI8min) and 10 minutes (SI10min)), using a conventional 15L8 linear transducer (transmit frequency 7 MHz, dynamic range 80 dB, depth 25 mm). In DCE-MRI functional parameters plasma flow (PF) and plasma volume (PV) were quantified. For validation purposes, CEUS parameters were correlated with DCE-MRI parameters and immunohistochemical VEGFR2, CD31, Ki-67 and TUNEL stainings. Results CEUS perfusion parameter WiAUC decreased significantly (116,989 ± 77,048 a.u. to 30,076 ± 27,095a.u.; p = 0.005) under therapy with no significant changes (133,932 ± 65,960 a.u. to 84,316 ± 74,144 a.u.; p = 0.093) in the control group. In the therapy group, the amount of bound microbubbles in the late phase was significantly lower in the therapy than in the control group on day 7 (SI8min: 283 ± 191 vs. 802 ± 460 a.u.; p = 0.006); SI10min: 226 ± 149 vs. 645 ± 461 a.u.; p = 0.009). PF and PV decreased significantly (PF: 147 ± 58 mL/100 mL/min to 71 ± 15 mL/100 mL/min; p = 0.003; PV: 13 ± 3% to 9 ± 4%; p = 0.040) in the therapy group. Immunohistochemistry revealed significantly fewer VEGFR2 (7.2 ± 1.8 vs. 17.8 ± 4.6; p < 0.001), CD31 (8.1 ± 3.0 vs

  5. Ultrasound -- Vascular

    MedlinePlus

    ... waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the ...

  6. Ultrasound - Breast

    MedlinePlus

    ... waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the ...

  7. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    MedlinePlus

    ... waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the ...

  8. Prostate Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the ...

  9. Abdominal Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the ...

  10. Obstetrical Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the ...

  11. Musculoskeletal Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the ...

  12. Hip Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the ...

  13. Ultrasound - Scrotum

    MedlinePlus

    ... waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the ...

  14. Ultrasound - Breast

    MedlinePlus

    ... the examination. top of page What does the equipment look like? Ultrasound scanners consist of a console ... ultrasound that require biopsy are not cancers. Many facilities do not offer ultrasound screening, and the procedure ...

  15. Cranial Ultrasound/Head Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the ...

  16. Synthesis, characterization, and in vitro evaluation of targeted gold nanoshelled poly(d,l-lactide-co-glycolide) nanoparticles carrying anti p53 antibody as a theranostic agent for ultrasound contrast imaging and photothermal therapy.

    PubMed

    Xu, Li; Wan, Caifeng; Du, Jing; Li, Hongli; Liu, Xuesong; Yang, Hong; Li, Fenghua

    2017-03-01

    Breast cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths in women and earlier detection can substantially reduce deaths from breast cancer. Polymers with targeted ligands are widely used in the field of molecular ultrasound imaging and targeted tumor therapy. In our study, the nanotheranostic agent was fabricated through filling perfluoropropane (C3F8) into poly(d,l-lactic-co-glycolic acid) nanoparticles (PLGA NPs), followed by the formation of gold nanoshell on the surface, then conjugated with anti p53 antibody which has high specificity with the p53 protein overexpressing in breast cancer. The average diameter of the gold nanoshelled PLGA NPs carrying anti p53 antibody (p53-PLGA@Au NPs) was 247 ± 108.2 nm. The p53-PLGA@Au NPs had well-defined spherical morphology and hollow interiors observed by electron microscope, and had a good photothermal effect under the irradiation of an 808 nm laser. The results of laser scanning confocal microscope (LSCM) and flow cytometer (FCM) indicated the specific targeting of p53-PLGA@Au NPs conjugating with breast cancer MCF-7 cells overexpressing p53 protein in vitro. Also the ultrasound imaging experiments in vitro showed that p53-PLGA@Au NPs were suitable for ultrasound contrast imaging. In conclusion, the p53-PLGA@Au NPs are demonstrated to be novel targeted UCAs and may have potential applications in the early diagnosis and targeted near-infrared (NIR) photothermal therapy of breast cancer in the future.

  17. Combined photoacoustic and ultrasound biomicroscopy.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Tyler; Ranasinghesagara, Janaka C; Lu, Huihong; Mathewson, Kory; Walsh, Andrew; Zemp, Roger J

    2009-11-23

    We report on the development of an imaging system capable of combined ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging based on a fast-scanning single-element 25-MHz ultrasound transducer and a unique light-delivery system. The system is capable of 20 ultrasound frames per second and slower photoacoustic frame rates limited by laser pulse-repetition rates. Laser and ultrasound pulses are interlaced for co-registration of photoacoustic and ultrasound images. In vivo imaging of a human finger permits ultrasonic visualization of vessel structures and speckle changes indicative of blood flow, while overlaid photoacoustic images highlight some small vessels that are not clear from the ultrasound scan. Photoacoustic images provide optical absorption contrast co-registered in the structural and blood-flow context of ultrasound with high-spatial resolution and may prove important for clinical diagnostics and basic science of the microvasculature.

  18. Medical Imaging with Ultrasound: Some Basic Physics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gosling, R.

    1989-01-01

    Discussed are medical applications of ultrasound. The physics of the wave nature of ultrasound including its propagation and production, return by the body, spatial and contrast resolution, attenuation, image formation using pulsed echo ultrasound techniques, measurement of velocity and duplex scanning are described. (YP)

  19. Abdominal ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... Kidney - blood and urine flow Abdominal ultrasound References Chen L. Abdominal ultrasound imaging. In: Sahani DV, Samir ... the Health on the Net Foundation (www.hon.ch). The information provided herein should not be used ...

  20. Endoscopic ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007646.htm Endoscopic ultrasound To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Endoscopic ultrasound is a type of imaging test. It is ...

  1. Thyroid ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, Vikas; Bano, Shahina

    2013-01-01

    Thyroid ultrasonography has established itself as a popular and useful tool in the evaluation and management of thyroid disorders. Advanced ultrasound techniques in thyroid imaging have not only fascinated the radiologists but also attracted the surgeons and endocrinologists who are using these techniques in their daily clinical and operative practice. This review provides an overview of indications for ultrasound in various thyroid diseases, describes characteristic ultrasound findings in these diseases, and illustrates major diagnostic pitfalls of thyroid ultrasound. PMID:23776892

  2. Carotid Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page from the NHLBI on Twitter. Carotid Ultrasound Also known as carotid duplex. Carotid ultrasound is a painless imaging test that uses high- ... of your carotid arteries. This test uses an ultrasound machine, which includes a computer, a screen, and ...

  3. Coherent photoacoustic-ultrasound correlation and imaging.

    PubMed

    Gao, Fei; Feng, Xiaohua; Zheng, Yuanjin

    2014-09-01

    Both photoacoustics and ultrasound have been researched extensively but separately. In this letter, we report an initial study on the coherent correlation between pulsed photoacoustic wave and pulse-echo ultrasound wave. By illuminating an object with a pulsed laser and external ultrasound sequentially, both the endogenous photoacoustic wave and pulse-echo ultrasound wave are received and coherently correlated, demonstrating enhanced signal-to-noise ratio. Image contrast of the proposed coherent photoacoustic-ultrasound imaging is also demonstrated to be improved significantly on vessel-mimicking phantom, due to fusion of the optical absorption and ultrasound reflection contrasts by coherent correlation of either conventional laser-induced photoacoustic imaging or pulse-echo ultrasound imaging separately.

  4. Ultrasound physics.

    PubMed

    Shriki, Jesse

    2014-01-01

    Bedside ultrasound has become an important modality for obtaining critical information in the acute care of patients. It is important to understand the physics of ultrasound in order to perform and interpret images at the bedside. The physics of both continuous wave and pulsed wave sound underlies diagnostic ultrasound. The instrumentation, including transducers and image processing, is important in the acquisition of appropriate sonographic images. Understanding how these concepts interplay with each other enables practitioners to obtain the best possible images.

  5. What's new in urologic ultrasound?

    PubMed Central

    Lal, Anupam; Naranje, Priyanka; Pavunesan, Santhosh Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound is an imaging technology that has evolved swiftly and has come a long way since its beginnings. It is a commonly used initial diagnostic imaging modality as it is rapid, effective, portable, relatively inexpensive, and causes no harm to human health. In the last few decades, there have been significant technological improvements in the equipment as well as the development of contrast agents that allowed ultrasound to be even more widely adopted for urologic imaging. Ultrasound is an excellent guidance tool for an array of urologic interventional procedures and also has therapeutic application in the form of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) for tumor ablation. This article focuses on the recent advances in ultrasound technology and its emerging clinical applications in urology. PMID:26166960

  6. Quo vadis medical ultrasound?

    PubMed

    Lewin, Peter A

    2004-04-01

    The last three decades of development in diagnostic ultrasound imaging and technology are briefly reviewed and the impact of the crucial link between the two apparently independent research efforts, which eventually facilitated implementation of harmonic imaging modality is explored. These two efforts included the experiments with piezoelectric PVDF polymer material and studies of the interaction between ultrasound energy and biological tissue. Harmonic imaging and its subsequent improvements revolutionized the diagnostic power of clinical ultrasound and brought along images of unparalleled resolution, close to that of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) quality. The nonlinear propagation effects and their implications for both diagnostic and therapeutic applications of ultrasound are also briefly addressed. In diagnostic applications, the impact of these effects on image resolution and tissue characterization is reviewed; in therapeutic applications, the influence of nonlinear propagation effects on highly localized tissue ablation and cauterization is examined. Next, the most likely developments and future trends in clinical ultrasound technology, including 3D and 4D imaging, distant palpation, image enhancement using contrast agents, monitoring, and merger of diagnostic and therapeutic applications by e.g. introducing ultrasonically controlled targeted drug delivery are reviewed. Finally, a possible competition from other imaging modalities is discussed.

  7. Repeat Targeted Prostate Biopsy under Guidance of Multiparametric MRI-Correlated Real-Time Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound for Patients with Previous Negative Biopsy and Elevated Prostate-Specific Antigen: A Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Dong Ryul; Jung, Dae Chul; Oh, Young Taik; Noh, Songmi; Han, Kyunghwa; Kim, Kiwook; Rha, Koon-Ho; Choi, Young Deuk; Hong, Sung Joon

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To prospectively determine whether multi-parametric MRI (mpMRI) - contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) correlated, imaging-guided target biopsy (TB) method could improve the detection of prostate cancer in re-biopsy setting of patients with prior negative biopsy. Methods From 2012 to 2014, a total of 42 Korean men with a negative result from previous systematic biopsy (SB) and elevated prostate-specific antigen underwent 3T mpMRI and real-time CEUS guided TB. Target lesions were determined by fusion of mpMRI and CEUS. Subsequently, 12-core SB was performed by a different radiologist. We compared core-based cancer detection rates (CaDR) using the generalized linear mixed model (GLIMMIX) for each biopsy method. Results Core-based CaDR was higher in TB (17.92%, 38 of 212 cores) than in SB (6.15%, 31 of 504 cores) (p < 0.0001; GLIMMIX). In the cancer-positive TB cores, CaDR with suspicious lesions by mpMRI was higher than that by CEUS (86.8% vs. 60.5%, p= 0.02; paired t-test) and concordant rate between mpMRI and CEUS was significantly different with discordant rate (48% vs. 52%, p=0.04; McNemar’s test). Conclusion The mpMRI-CEUS correlated TB technique for the repeat prostate biopsy of patients with prior negative biopsy can improve CaDR based on the number of cores taken. PMID:26083348

  8. Cranial Ultrasound/Head Ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... sickle cell disease. It is also used to measure conditions affecting blood flow to and within the brain, such as: Stenosis : ... saved. Doppler ultrasound, a special application of ultrasound, measures ... represent the flow of blood through the blood vessels. top of ...

  9. Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound (CEUS) for Echographic Detection of Hepato Cellular Carcinoma in Cirrhotic Patients Previously Treated with Multiple Techniques: Comparison of Conventional US, Spiral CT and 3-Dimensional CEUS with Navigator Technique (3DNav CEUS)

    PubMed Central

    Giangregorio, Francesco

    2011-01-01

    A commercially available technique named “NAVIGATOR” (Esaote, Italy) easily enables a 3-D reconstruction of a single 2-D acquisition of Contrast Enhanced Ultrasound (CEUS) imaging of the whole liver (with a volumetric correction thanks to the electromagnetic device of NAVIGATOR). Aim of the study was to evaluate this “panoramic” technique in comparison with conventional US and spiral CT in the detection of new hepatic lesions. 144 cirrhotic patients (previously treated for hepato cellular carcinoma (HCC)) in follow-up with detection of 98 new nodules (N), 28 multinodular (Nmulti), 14 loco-regional regrowth (LR) 94 efficaciously treated without new nodules (neg) and four multinodular without new nodules, were submitted to 200 examinations with this new technique from November 2008 to November 2009. 3DNavCEUS was performed using SonoVue (Bracco), as contrast agent, and a machine (Technos MPX, Esaote). Spiral CT and 3DNav CEUS were performed in the same month during follow up. Sens.,Spec.,diagn.-Acc.,PPV and NPV were evaluated; comparison and differences between the techniques were obtained with chi-square (SPSS release-15). Final diagnosis was: 98 new lesions (N) (one to three), 28 multinodular HCC (Nmulti) and 14 loco-regional regrowth (LR); in 94 no more lesions were observed during follow-up; conventional US obtained: 58 N (+18 multinodularN and 8 LR), 40 false negative (+10 Nmulti and 6 LR) (sens:59.2, spec:100%, Diagn Accur:73.6, PPV:100; NPV:70.1); spiral CT obtained: 84N (+26-multinodularN and 14-LR), 14 false-negative (+2-Nmulti), and one false-positive (sens:85.7, spec:97.9%, Diagn Accur:90.9, PPV:97.7; NPV:86.8); 3DNAV obtained: 92N (+28 multinodularN and 14LR), 6 false-negative, and two false-positives (sens:93.9, spec:97.9%, Diagn Accur:95.6, PPV:97.9; NPV:93.9). 3-DNav CEUS is significantly better than US and almost similar to spiral CT for detection of new HCC. This technique, in particular, showed the presence of lesions even in the cases not

  10. Endobronchial ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Falcone, Franco; Fois, Flavio; Grosso, Daniele

    2003-01-01

    Complex technical problems interfered with the application of thoracic ultrasound (US) for studies and clinical research. Moreover, in contrast to radiologists, cardiologists, gastroenterologists, internists, obstetricians, gynecologists and others, pulmonologists were not trained in the basics of US images. However, endoscopic US methods were developed in the last 20 years and these methods also provided important results for pulmonologists. As soon as the technical problems interfering with US application in air-containing spaces were solved, endobronchial US (EBUS) became a valuable technique as well. With EBUS, the delicate multilayer structure of the tracheobronchial wall can be analyzed. This knowledge became decisive for the management of early cancer in the central airways. These lesions can undergo local treatment instead of surgical intervention if the bronchial cartilage is intact and if the adjacent lymph nodes are not involved. EBUS proved valuable as well for the staging of more advanced lung cancer, especially with regard to endoluminal, intramural and extraluminal tumor spread. Endobronchial endosonographers are able to diagnose mediastinal lymph nodes similar to the experience of gastrointestinal endosonographers. EBUS-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (TBNA) improved the results of N-staging of lung cancer, especially in difficult lymph node levels without any clear endoscopic landmarks. The possibility of identifying N2 and N3 stages by means of a nonsurgical procedure can modify the management of lung cancer and decrease the number of unnecessary surgical interventions. EBUS can reduce the need for more invasive procedures such as thoracoscopy or mediastinoscopy. It is also useful for biopsying peripheral lesions or solitary pulmonary nodules instead of fluoroscopic guidance and also plays an important role in the strategy of interventional endoscopy.

  11. Ultrasound -- Vascular

    MedlinePlus

    ... plan for their effective treatment. detect blood clots (deep venous thrombosis (DVT) in the major veins of ... What are the limitations of Vascular Ultrasound? Vessels deep in the body are harder to see than ...

  12. Trauma Ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Wongwaisayawan, Sirote; Suwannanon, Ruedeekorn; Prachanukool, Thidathit; Sricharoen, Pungkava; Saksobhavivat, Nitima; Kaewlai, Rathachai

    2015-10-01

    Ultrasound plays a pivotal role in the evaluation of acute trauma patients through the use of multi-site scanning encompassing abdominal, cardiothoracic, vascular and skeletal scans. In a high-speed polytrauma setting, because exsanguinations are the primary cause of trauma morbidity and mortality, ultrasound is used for quick and accurate detection of hemorrhages in the pericardial, pleural, and peritoneal cavities during the primary Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) survey. Volume status can be assessed non-invasively with ultrasound of the inferior vena cava (IVC), which is a useful tool in the initial phase and follow-up evaluations. Pneumothorax can also be quickly detected with ultrasound. During the secondary survey and in patients sustaining low-speed or localized trauma, ultrasound can be used to help detect abdominal organ injuries. This is particularly helpful in patients in whom hemoperitoneum is not identified on an initial scan because findings of organ injuries will expedite the next test, often computed tomography (CT). Moreover, ultrasound can assist in detection of fractures easily obscured on radiography, such as rib and sternal fractures.

  13. Ultrasound molecular imaging: Moving toward clinical translation.

    PubMed

    Abou-Elkacem, Lotfi; Bachawal, Sunitha V; Willmann, Jürgen K

    2015-09-01

    Ultrasound is a widely available, cost-effective, real-time, non-invasive and safe imaging modality widely used in the clinic for anatomical and functional imaging. With the introduction of novel molecularly-targeted ultrasound contrast agents, another dimension of ultrasound has become a reality: diagnosing and monitoring pathological processes at the molecular level. Most commonly used ultrasound molecular imaging contrast agents are micron sized, gas-containing microbubbles functionalized to recognize and attach to molecules expressed on inflamed or angiogenic vascular endothelial cells. There are several potential clinical applications currently being explored including earlier detection, molecular profiling, and monitoring of cancer, as well as visualization of ischemic memory in transient myocardial ischemia, monitoring of disease activity in inflammatory bowel disease, and assessment of arteriosclerosis. Recently, a first clinical grade ultrasound contrast agent (BR55), targeted at a molecule expressed in neoangiogenesis (vascular endothelial growth factor receptor type 2; VEGFR2) has been introduced and safety and feasibility of VEGFR2-targeted ultrasound imaging is being explored in first inhuman clinical trials in various cancer types. This review describes the design of ultrasound molecular imaging contrast agents, imaging techniques, and potential future clinical applications of ultrasound molecular imaging.

  14. Automatic Contour Tracking in Ultrasound Images

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Min; Kambhamettu, Chandra; Stone, Maureen

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, a new automatic contour tracking system, EdgeTrak, for the ultrasound image sequences of human tongue is presented. The images are produced by a head and transducer support system (HATS). The noise and unrelated high-contrast edges in ultrasound images make it very difficult to automatically detect the correct tongue surfaces. In…

  15. A Tactile Sensor for Ultrasound Imaging Systems.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yiyan; Shkel, Yuri M; Hall, Timothy J

    2016-02-15

    Medical ultrasound systems are capable of monitoring a variety of health conditions while avoiding invasive procedures. However this function is complicated by ultrasound contrast of the tissue varying with contact pressure exerted by the probe. The knowledge of the contact pressure is beneficial for a variety of screening and diagnostic procedures involving ultrasound. This paper introduces a solid-state sensor array which measures the contact pressure distribution between the probe and the tissue marginally affecting the ultrasound imaging capabilities. The probe design utilizes the dielectrostriction mechanism which relates the change in dielectric properties of the sensing layer to deformation. The concept, structure, fabrication, and performance of this sensor array are discussed. The prototype device is highly tolerant to overloads (>1 MPa tested) and provides stress measurements in the range of 0.14 to 10 kPa. Its loss of ultrasound transmissivity is less 3dB at 9 MHz ultrasound frequency. This performance is satisfactory for clinical and biomedical research in ultrasound image formation and interpretation, however for commercial product, a higher ultrasound transmissivity is desired. Directions for improving the sensor ultrasound transparency and electrical performance are discussed. The sensor array described in this paper has been developed specifically for ultrasound diagnosis during breast cancer screening. However, the same sensing mechanism, similar configuration and sensor array structure can be applied to other applications involving ultrasound tools for medical diagnostics.

  16. A Tactile Sensor for Ultrasound Imaging Systems

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Yiyan; Shkel, Yuri M.; Hall, Timothy J.

    2015-01-01

    Medical ultrasound systems are capable of monitoring a variety of health conditions while avoiding invasive procedures. However this function is complicated by ultrasound contrast of the tissue varying with contact pressure exerted by the probe. The knowledge of the contact pressure is beneficial for a variety of screening and diagnostic procedures involving ultrasound. This paper introduces a solid-state sensor array which measures the contact pressure distribution between the probe and the tissue marginally affecting the ultrasound imaging capabilities. The probe design utilizes the dielectrostriction mechanism which relates the change in dielectric properties of the sensing layer to deformation. The concept, structure, fabrication, and performance of this sensor array are discussed. The prototype device is highly tolerant to overloads (>1 MPa tested) and provides stress measurements in the range of 0.14 to 10 kPa. Its loss of ultrasound transmissivity is less 3dB at 9 MHz ultrasound frequency. This performance is satisfactory for clinical and biomedical research in ultrasound image formation and interpretation, however for commercial product, a higher ultrasound transmissivity is desired. Directions for improving the sensor ultrasound transparency and electrical performance are discussed. The sensor array described in this paper has been developed specifically for ultrasound diagnosis during breast cancer screening. However, the same sensing mechanism, similar configuration and sensor array structure can be applied to other applications involving ultrasound tools for medical diagnostics. PMID:26880870

  17. Carotid Ultrasound Imaging

    MedlinePlus

    ... Index A-Z Ultrasound - Carotid Carotid ultrasound uses sound waves to produce pictures of the carotid arteries ... pictures of the inside of the body using sound waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or ...

  18. Droplets, Bubbles and Ultrasound Interactions.

    PubMed

    Shpak, Oleksandr; Verweij, Martin; de Jong, Nico; Versluis, Michel

    2016-01-01

    The interaction of droplets and bubbles with ultrasound has been studied extensively in the last 25 years. Microbubbles are broadly used in diagnostic and therapeutic medical applications, for instance, as ultrasound contrast agents. They have a similar size as red blood cells, and thus are able to circulate within blood vessels. Perfluorocarbon liquid droplets can be a potential new generation of microbubble agents as ultrasound can trigger their conversion into gas bubbles. Prior to activation, they are at least five times smaller in diameter than the resulting bubbles. Together with the violent nature of the phase-transition, the droplets can be used for local drug delivery, embolotherapy, HIFU enhancement and tumor imaging. Here we explain the basics of bubble dynamics, described by the Rayleigh-Plesset equation, bubble resonance frequency, damping and quality factor. We show the elegant calculation of the above characteristics for the case of small amplitude oscillations by linearizing the equations. The effect and importance of a bubble coating and effective surface tension are also discussed. We give the main characteristics of the power spectrum of bubble oscillations. Preceding bubble dynamics, ultrasound propagation is introduced. We explain the speed of sound, nonlinearity and attenuation terms. We examine bubble ultrasound scattering and how it depends on the wave-shape of the incident wave. Finally, we introduce droplet interaction with ultrasound. We elucidate the ultrasound-focusing concept within a droplets sphere, droplet shaking due to media compressibility and droplet phase-conversion dynamics.

  19. A respiration-metabolism chamber system and a GC-MS method developed for studying exhalation of perfluorobutane in rats after intravenous injection of the ultrasound contrast agent Sonazoid.

    PubMed

    Uran, Steinar; Landmark, Kristin; Normann, Per Trygve; Hals, Petter-Arnt; Toft, Kim Gunnar; Skotland, Tore

    2005-09-15

    Sonazoid is a new contrast agent for ultrasound imaging comprising an aqueous suspension of lipid-stabilised perfluorobutane (PFB) gas microbubbles. A respiration-metabolism chamber system was developed to collect exhaled air following intravenous administration of Sonazoid to rats. Analysis of PFB in the exhaled rat air was performed using a modified version of an earlier published method for blood samples, i.e. an automatic headspace gas chromatographic mass spectrometric (GC-MS) method using electron impact ionisation. The calibration standards were PFB diluted in air (2.5-1800 pg/ml). Perfluoropentane (PFP) was used as an internal standard and the MS detector was set to single ion monitoring of the base fragment ions of PFB (m/z 69 and 119) and PFP (m/z 69). The calibration curve, made by plotting the peak area ratios of PFB (m/z 69) to PFP (m/z 69) against the theoretical concentration of PFB, was fitted to a linear equation with weighting 1/y2 and found to be reproducible. The lower limit of quantification (LLOQ) was 2.5 pg PFB/ml. The between-day variation of the method was below 2.6% relative standard deviation (R.S.D.) and the within-day variation of the method was below 6.4% R.S.D. The accuracy of the method was evaluated and showed a relative error less than 5.2%. PFB was found to be stable for 14 days when stored in Tedlar sample bags at room temperature. An even lower detection limit may be obtained by using the more time-consuming process of solid-phase micro extraction; thus, by concentrating PFB on carboxen-PDMS fibres an LLOQ of 0.5 pg PFB/ml was obtained. When five rats were given an i.v. bolus injection of Sonazoid at a dose of 8 microl microbubbles/kg a mean recovery of 96% (range, 81-110%) was found during 24 h; more than 50% was exhaled during the first 30 min after injection.

  20. Ultrasound for molecular imaging and therapy in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kaneko, Osamu F.

    2012-01-01

    Over the past decade, molecularly-targeted contrast enhanced ultrasound (ultrasound molecular imaging) has attracted significant attention in preclinical research of cancer diagnostic and therapy. Potential applications for ultrasound molecular imaging run the gamut from early detection and characterization of malignancies to monitoring treatment responses and guiding therapies. There may also be a role for ultrasound contrast agents for improved delivery of chemotherapeutic drugs and gene therapies across biological barriers. Currently, a first Phase 0 clinical trial in patients with prostate cancer assesses toxicity and feasibility of ultrasound molecular imaging using contrast agents targeted at the angiogenic marker vascular endothelial growth factor receptor type 2 (VEGFR2). This mini-review highlights recent advances and potential applications of ultrasound molecular imaging and ultrasound-guided therapy in cancer. PMID:23061039

  1. [High frequency ultrasound].

    PubMed

    Sattler, E

    2015-07-01

    Diagnostic ultrasound has become a standard procedure in clinical dermatology. Devices with intermediate high frequencies of 7.5-15 MHz are used in dermato-oncology for the staging and postoperative care of skin tumor patients and in angiology for improved vessel diagnostics. In contrast, the high frequency ultrasound systems with 20-100 MHz probes offer a much higher resolution, yet with a lower penetration depth of about 1 cm. The main indications are the preoperative measurements of tumor thickness in malignant melanoma and other skin tumors and the assessment of inflammatory and soft tissue diseases, offering information on the course of these dermatoses and allowing therapy monitoring. This article gives an overview on technical principles, devices, mode of examination, influencing factors, interpretation of the images, indications but also limitations of this technique.

  2. [Ultrasound diagnostics of diffuse liver diseases].

    PubMed

    Jung, E M; Wiggermann, P; Stroszczynski, C; Reiser, M F; Clevert, D-A

    2012-08-01

    The current improvements in modern high resolution ultrasound technology, like Tissue Harmonic Imaging (THI), Speckle Reduction Imaging (SRI), partial color coding of B-mode (Color Coded Imaging), and also the advent of ultrasound based elastography as well as contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) offer fundamentally new ways to characterize diffuse alterations of the liver parenchyma. Besides metabolic disease, disorders of liver fat distribution, infectious and malignant diseases can cause diffuse alterations of the liver parenchyma. In case of liver fibrosis, only a combination of different ultrasound techniques including CEUS, allows the differentiation between benign dysplastic and malignant lesions. Ultrasound elastography allows assessing the extent of the fibrosis. This article focuses on the different ultrasound based diagnostic possibilities in case of diffuse liver disease.

  3. Ultrasound - Scrotum

    MedlinePlus

    ... especially when the mass is solid). Blood flow images of the testicles are not always reliable in determining the presence or absence of blood supply to a testicle that has twisted. When searching for an absent testicle, ultrasound may not be ...

  4. Contrast Materials

    MedlinePlus

    ... veins of the body, including vessels in the brain, neck, chest, abdomen, pelvis and legs soft tissues of the body, including the muscles, fat and skin brain breast Microbubble Contrast Materials Microbubble contrast materials are ...

  5. Ultrasound Annual, 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Sanders, R.C.; Hill, M.C.

    1984-01-01

    The 1984 edition of Ultrasound Annual explores new applications of ultrasound in speech and swallowing and offers guidelines on the use of ultrasound and nuclear medicine in thyroid and biliary tract disease. Other areas covered include Doppler sonography of the abdomen, intraoperative abdominal ultrasound, sonography of the placenta, ultrasound of the neonatal head and abdomen, and sonographic echo patterns created by fat.

  6. General Ultrasound Imaging

    MedlinePlus

    ... waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the ...

  7. Venous Ultrasound (Extremities)

    MedlinePlus

    ... waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the ...

  8. Carotid Ultrasound Imaging

    MedlinePlus

    ... waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the ...

  9. Breast ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Ueno, E

    1996-03-01

    In ultrasound, ultrasonic images are formed by means of echoes among tissues with different acoustic impedance. Acoustic impedance is the product of sound speed and bulk modulus. The bulk modulus expresses the elasticity of an object, and in the human body, the value is increased by conditions such as fibrosis and calcification. The sound speed is usually high in elastic tissues and low in water. In the body, it is lowest in the fatty tissue. Ultrasound echoes are strong on the surface of bones which are hard and have a high sound speed. In organs filled with air such as the lungs, the bulk modulus is low and the sound speed is extremely low at 340 m/s, which produce strong echoes (the sound speed in solid tissues is 1,530 m/s). Human tissue is constructed of units smaller than the ultrasonic beam, and it is necessary to understand back-scattering in order to understand the ultrasonic images of these tissues. When ultrasound passes through tissue, it is absorbed as thermal energy and attenuated. Fiber is a tissue with a high absorption and attenuation rate. When the rate increases, the posterior echoes are attenuated. However, in masses with a high water content such as cysts, the posterior echoes are accentuated. This phenomenon is an important, basic finding for determining the properties of tumors. Breast cancer can be classified into two types: stellate carcinoma and circumscribed carcinoma. Since stellate carcinoma is rich in fiber, the posterior echoes are attenuated or lacking. However, circumscribed carcinoma has a high cellularity and the posterior echoes are accentuated. The same tendency is also seen in benign tumors. In immature fibroadenomas, posterior echoes are accentuated, while in fibroadenomas with hyalinosis, the posterior echoes are attenuated. Therefore, if the fundamentals of this tissue characterization and the histological features are understood, reading of ultrasound becomes easy. Color Doppler has also been developed and has contributed

  10. Eye and orbit ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    Echography - eye orbit; Ultrasound - eye orbit; Ocular ultrasonography; Orbital ultrasonography ... ophthalmology department of a hospital or clinic. Your eye is numbed with medicine (anesthetic drops). The ultrasound ...

  11. Microbubbles and ultrasound: a bird's eye view.

    PubMed

    Kaul, Sanjiv

    2004-01-01

    Gas-filled microbubbles were initially used as ultrasound contrast agent because of their intravascular rheology, which is similar to that of red blood cells. Their transit through tissue can thus be quantified with ultrasound. More recently, these bubbles have been successfully used for molecular imaging by incorporating ligands on their surfaces that will adhere to cellular and other components within the microvasculature and can be detected by ultrasound. These bubbles have also been used for delivery of genes and drugs which can be released locally by disruption of the bubbles with high-energy ultrasound. Finally, bioeffects produced by localized ultrasound disruption of microbubbles have been shown to induce angiogenesis. This brief review will provide a bird's eye view of these applications.

  12. Contrastive Lexicology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartmann, R. R. K.

    This paper deals with the relation between etymologically related words in different languages. A survey is made of seven stages in the development of contrastive lexicology. These are: prelinguistic word studies, semantics, lexicography, translation, foreign language learning, bilingualism, and finally contrastive analysis. Concerning contrastive…

  13. Contrastive Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Carl

    Contrastive analysis is viewed as an interlinguistic, bidirectional phenomenon which is concerned with both the form and function of language. As such, contrastive analysis must view language psycholinguistically and sociolinguistically as a system to be both described and acquired. Due to the need for a psychological component in the analysis,…

  14. Theranostic Multilayer Capsules for Ultrasound Imaging and Guided Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jun; Ratnayaka, Sithira; Alford, Aaron; Kozlovskaya, Veronika; Liu, Fei; Xue, Bing; Hoyt, Kenneth; Kharlampieva, Eugenia

    2017-03-28

    Despite the accessibility of ultrasound, the clinical potential of ultrasound-active theranostic agents has not been fully realized because it requires combining sufficient imaging contrast, high encapsulation efficiency, and ultrasound-triggered release in one entity. We report on theranostic polymer microcapsules composed of hydrogen-bonded multilayers of tannic acid and poly(N-vinylpyrrolidone) that produce high imaging contrast and deliver the anticancer drug doxorubicin upon low-power diagnostic or high-power therapeutic ultrasound irradiation. These capsules exhibit excellent imaging contrast in both brightness and harmonic modes and show prolonged contrast over six months, unlike commercially available microbubbles. We also demonstrate low-dose gradual and high-dose fast release of doxorubicin from the capsules by diagnostic (∼100 mW/cm(2)) and therapeutic (>10 W/cm(2)) ultrasound irradiation, respectively. We show that the imaging contrast of the capsules can be controlled by varying the number of layers, polymer type (relatively rigid tannic acid versus more flexible poly(methacrylic acid)), and polymer molecular weight. In vitro studies demonstrate that 50% doxorubicin release from ultrasound-treated capsules induces 97% cytotoxicity to MCF-7 human cancer cells, while no cytotoxicity is found without the treatment. Considering the strong ultrasound imaging contrast, high encapsulation efficiency, biocompatibility, and tunable drug release, these microcapsules can be used as theranostic agents for ultrasound-guided chemotherapy.

  15. [Liver ultrasound: focal lesions and diffuse diseases].

    PubMed

    Segura Grau, A; Valero López, I; Díaz Rodríguez, N; Segura Cabral, J M

    2016-01-01

    Liver ultrasound is frequently used as a first-line technique for the detection and characterization of the most common liver lesions, especially those incidentally found focal liver lesions, and for monitoring of chronic liver diseases. Ultrasound is not only used in the Bmode, but also with Doppler and, more recently, contrast-enhanced ultrasound. It is mainly used in the diagnosis of diffuse liver diseases, such as steatosis or cirrhosis. This article presents a practical approach for diagnosis workup, in which the different characteristics of the main focal liver lesions and diffuse liver diseases are reviewed.

  16. Imaging optically scattering objects with ultrasound-modulated optical tomography.

    PubMed

    Kothapalli, Sri-Rajasekhar; Sakadzić, Sava; Kim, Chulhong; Wang, Lihong V

    2007-08-15

    We show the feasibility of imaging objects having different optical scattering coefficients relative to the surrounding scattering medium using ultrasound-modulated optical tomography (UOT). While the spatial resolution depends on ultrasound parameters, the image contrast depends on the difference in scattering coefficient between the object and the surrounding medium. Experimental measurements obtained with a CCD-based speckle contrast detection scheme are in agreement with Monte Carlo simulations and analytical calculations. This study complements previous UOT experiments that demonstrated optical absorption contrast.

  17. Ultrasound and Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lafon, Cyril

    This paper begins with an overview and a description of the interactions between ultrasound and biological tissues encountered during treatment protocols. In a second part of this seminar, two clinical applications of therapeutic ultrasound will be described in details: -Kidney stone destruction by ultrasound (lithotripsy) and High Intensity Focused Ultrasound for treating prostate cancer (HIFU).

  18. [Ultrasound in emergency medicine].

    PubMed

    Lapostolle, F; Deltour, S; Petrovic, T

    2015-12-01

    Ultrasound has revolutionized the practice of emergency medicine, particularly in prehospital setting. About a patient with dyspnea, we present the role of ultrasound in the diagnosis and emergency treatment. Echocardiography, but also hemodynamic ultrasound (vena cava) and lung exam are valuable tools. Achieving lung ultrasound and diagnostic value of B lines B are detailed.

  19. Ultrasound annual, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Sanders, R.C.; Hill, M.C.

    1986-01-01

    This book provides an analyses of developments in the field of diagnostic ultrasound. Endoscopic ultrasound and ultrasound-guided aspiration of ovarian follicles for in vitro fertilization are addressed. The use of Doppler ultrasound to measure blood flow in obstetrics is also examined.

  20. Ultrasound in Space Medicine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dulchavsky, Scott A.; Sargsyan, A.E.

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the use of ultrasound as a diagnostic tool in microgravity environments. The goals of research in ultrasound usage in space environments are: (1) Determine accuracy of ultrasound in novel clinical conditions. (2) Determine optimal training methodologies, (3) Determine microgravity associated changes and (4) Develop intuitive ultrasound catalog to enhance autonomous medical care. Also uses of Ultrasound technology in terrestrial applications are reviewed.

  1. Contrast lipocryolysis

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Hernán; Melamed, Graciela

    2014-01-01

    Alternative crystal structures are possible for all lipids and each different crystal structure is called a polymorphic form. Inter-conversion between polymorphisms would imply the possibility of leaning crystal formation toward the most effective polymorphism for adipocyte destruction. Food industry has been tempering lipids for decades. Tempering technology applied to lipocryolysis gave birth to “contrast lipocryolysis”, which involves pre- and post-lipocryolysis fat layer heating as part of a specific tempering protocol. In this study, we evaluated the skinfold thickness of 10 subjects after a single contrast lipocryolysis session and witnessed important and fast reductions. PMID:25068088

  2. Hybrid ultrasound imaging techniques (fusion imaging).

    PubMed

    Sandulescu, Daniela Larisa; Dumitrescu, Daniela; Rogoveanu, Ion; Saftoiu, Adrian

    2011-01-07

    Visualization of tumor angiogenesis can facilitate non-invasive evaluation of tumor vascular characteristics to supplement the conventional diagnostic imaging goals of depicting tumor location, size, and morphology. Hybrid imaging techniques combine anatomic [ultrasound, computed tomography (CT), and/or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)] and molecular (single photon emission CT and positron emission tomography) imaging modalities. One example is real-time virtual sonography, which combines ultrasound (grayscale, colour Doppler, or dynamic contrast harmonic imaging) with contrast-enhanced CT/MRI. The benefits of fusion imaging include an increased diagnostic confidence, direct comparison of the lesions using different imaging modalities, more precise monitoring of interventional procedures, and reduced radiation exposure.

  3. Ultrasound mediated nanoparticle drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullin, Lee B.

    Ultrasound is not only a powerful diagnostic tool, but also a promising therapeutic technology that can be used to improve localized drug delivery. Microbubble contrast agents are micron sized encapsulated gas filled bubbles that are administered intravenously. Originally developed to enhance ultrasound images, microbubbles are highly echogenic due to the gas core that provides a detectable impedance difference from the surrounding medium. The core also allows for controlled response of the microbubbles to ultrasound pulses. Microbubbles can be pushed using acoustic radiation force and ruptured using high pressures. Destruction of microbubbles can increase permeability at the cellular and vascular level, which can be advantageous for drug delivery. Advances in drug delivery methods have been seen with the introduction of nanoparticles, nanometer sized objects often carrying a drug payload. In chemotherapy, nanoparticles can deliver drugs to tumors while limiting systemic exposure due to abnormalities in tumor vasculature such large gaps between endothelial cells that allow nanoparticles to enter into the interstitial space; this is referred to as the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect. However, this effect may be overestimated in many tumors. Additionally, only a small percentage of the injected dose accumulates in the tumor, which most the nanoparticles accumulating in the liver and spleen. It is hypothesized that combining the acoustic activity of an ultrasound contrast agent with the high payload and extravasation ability of a nanoparticle, localized delivery to the tumor with reduced systemic toxicity can be achieved. This method can be accomplished by either loading nanoparticles onto the shell of the microbubble or through a coadministration method of both nanoparticles and microbubbles. The work presented in this dissertation utilizes novel and commercial nanoparticle formulations, combined with microbubbles and a variety of ultrasound systems

  4. Model-based visualization of ultrasound images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kogan, Robert G.; Desai, Mukund N.; Pien, Homer H.; Grimson, W. Eric L.

    1999-07-01

    Ultrasound imaging is the most pervasive, cost effective, portable, high-resolution, and non-ionizing modality of diagnostic imaging available. The use of ultrasounds, however, has been hampered by the noise properties and poor contrast inherent in such imagery. A novel processing system is currently being developed that overcomes some of these disadvantages by producing a high-quality rendering of the anatomical structure of interest. In particular, a normal anatomical atlas is used as the starting point; this atlas is produced from either CT or MR imagery. As the ultrasound probe is moved along the body, image registration techniques, as well as external instrumentation that monitors the position and attitude of the ultrasound probe, are used to provide a continuous mapping between the ultrasound observations and the atlas. As discrepancies between the atlas and the observed anatomy occur, the atlas is deformed to reflect actual observations. Operated in this mode, the system displays the deformed high-resolution atlas to the user, providing a high- contrast, low-noise rendering of the patient's anatomy. In scenarios such as battlefield critical care, where large, immobile C/T or MR scanners are not feasible, deformation of a high quality atlas to match real-time ultrasound imagery can provide for much improved assessment and treatment possibilities.

  5. Nonlinear ultrasound imaging of nanoscale acoustic biomolecules.

    PubMed

    Maresca, David; Lakshmanan, Anupama; Lee-Gosselin, Audrey; Melis, Johan M; Ni, Yu-Li; Bourdeau, Raymond W; Kochmann, Dennis M; Shapiro, Mikhail G

    2017-02-13

    Ultrasound imaging is widely used to probe the mechanical structure of tissues and visualize blood flow. However, the ability of ultrasound to observe specific molecular and cellular signals is limited. Recently, a unique class of gas-filled protein nanostructures called gas vesicles (GVs) was introduced as nanoscale (∼250 nm) contrast agents for ultrasound, accompanied by the possibilities of genetic engineering, imaging of targets outside the vasculature and monitoring of cellular signals such as gene expression. These possibilities would be aided by methods to discriminate GV-generated ultrasound signals from anatomical background. Here, we show that the nonlinear response of engineered GVs to acoustic pressure enables selective imaging of these nanostructures using a tailored amplitude modulation strategy. Finite element modeling predicted a strongly nonlinear mechanical deformation and acoustic response to ultrasound in engineered GVs. This response was confirmed with ultrasound measurements in the range of 10 to 25 MHz. An amplitude modulation pulse sequence based on this nonlinear response allows engineered GVs to be distinguished from linear scatterers and other GV types with a contrast ratio greater than 11.5 dB. We demonstrate the effectiveness of this nonlinear imaging strategy in vitro, in cellulo, and in vivo.

  6. Nonlinear ultrasound imaging of nanoscale acoustic biomolecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maresca, David; Lakshmanan, Anupama; Lee-Gosselin, Audrey; Melis, Johan M.; Ni, Yu-Li; Bourdeau, Raymond W.; Kochmann, Dennis M.; Shapiro, Mikhail G.

    2017-02-01

    Ultrasound imaging is widely used to probe the mechanical structure of tissues and visualize blood flow. However, the ability of ultrasound to observe specific molecular and cellular signals is limited. Recently, a unique class of gas-filled protein nanostructures called gas vesicles (GVs) was introduced as nanoscale (˜250 nm) contrast agents for ultrasound, accompanied by the possibilities of genetic engineering, imaging of targets outside the vasculature and monitoring of cellular signals such as gene expression. These possibilities would be aided by methods to discriminate GV-generated ultrasound signals from anatomical background. Here, we show that the nonlinear response of engineered GVs to acoustic pressure enables selective imaging of these nanostructures using a tailored amplitude modulation strategy. Finite element modeling predicted a strongly nonlinear mechanical deformation and acoustic response to ultrasound in engineered GVs. This response was confirmed with ultrasound measurements in the range of 10 to 25 MHz. An amplitude modulation pulse sequence based on this nonlinear response allows engineered GVs to be distinguished from linear scatterers and other GV types with a contrast ratio greater than 11.5 dB. We demonstrate the effectiveness of this nonlinear imaging strategy in vitro, in cellulo, and in vivo.

  7. Ultrasound of the Thyroid Gland

    MedlinePlus

    ... Index A-Z Ultrasound - Thyroid Thyroid ultrasound uses sound waves to produce pictures of the thyroid gland ... pictures of the inside of the body using sound waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or ...

  8. Role of ultrasound in colorectal diseases

    PubMed Central

    Bor, Renáta; Fábián, Anna; Szepes, Zoltán

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasound is an undervalued non-invasive examination in the diagnosis of colonic diseases. It has been replaced by the considerably more expensive magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography, despite the fact that, as first examination, it can usefully supplement the diagnostic process. Transabdominal ultrasound can provide quick information about bowel status and help in the choice of adequate further examinations and treatment. Ultrasonography, as a screening imaging modality in asymptomatic patients can identify several colonic diseases such as diverticulosis, inflammatory bowel disease or cancer. In addition, it is widely available, cheap, non-invasive technique without the use of ionizing radiation, therefore it is safe to use in childhood or during pregnancy, and can be repeated at any time. New ultrasound techniques such as elastography, contrast enhanced and Doppler ultrasound, mini-probes rectal and transperineal ultrasonography have broadened the indication. It gives an overview of the methodology of various ultrasound examinations, presents the morphology of normal bowel wall and the typical changes in different colonic diseases. We will pay particular attention to rectal and transperineal ultrasound because of their outstanding significance in the diagnosis of rectal and perineal disorders. This article seeks to overview the diagnostic impact and correct indications of bowel ultrasound. PMID:27920469

  9. Ultrasound Annual, 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Sanders, R.C.; Hill, M.C.

    1983-01-01

    The 1983 edition of Ultrasound Annual features a state-of-the-art assessment of real-time ultrasound technology and a look at improvements in real-time equipment. Chapters discuss important new obstetric applications of ultrasound in measuring fetal umbilical vein blood flow and monitoring ovarian follicular development in vivo and in vitro fertilization. Other topics covered include transrectal prostate ultrasound using a linear array system; ultrasound of the common bile duct; ultrasound in tropical diseases; prenatal diagnosis of craniospinal anomalies; scrotal ultrasonography; opthalmic ultrasonography; and sonography of the upper abdominal venous system.

  10. Clinical application of modern ultrasound techniques after liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Teegen, Eva Maria; Denecke, Timm; Eisele, Robert; Lojewski, Christian; Neuhaus, Peter; Chopra, Sascha Santosh

    2016-10-01

    Liver transplantation has been established as a first-line therapy for a number of indications. Conventional ultrasound and contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) are methods of choice during the postoperative period as a safe and fast tool to detect potential complications and to enable early intervention if necessary. CEUS increases diagnostic quality and is an appropriate procedure for the examination of vessels and possibly bile ducts. This article presents the state of the art of ultrasound application during the early period after liver transplantation. It addresses common vascular complications and describes the identification of postoperative abnormal findings using ultrasound and CEUS.

  11. Quantitative Ultrasound in Cancer Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Feleppa, Ernest J.; Mamou, Jonathan; Porter, Christopher R.; Machi, Junji

    2010-01-01

    Ultrasound is a relatively inexpensive, portable, and versatile imaging modality that has a broad range of clinical uses. It incorporates many imaging modes, such as conventional gray-scale “B-mode” imaging to display echo amplitude in a scanned plane; M-mode imaging to track motion at a given fixed location over time; duplex, color, and power Doppler imaging to display motion in a scanned plane; harmonic imaging to display non-linear responses to incident ultrasound; elastographic imaging to display relative tissue stiffness; and contrast-agent imaging with simple contrast agents to display blood-filled spaces or with targeted agents to display specific agent-binding tissue types. These imaging modes have been well described in the scientific, engineering, and clinical literature. A less well-known ultrasonic imaging technology is based on quantitative ultrasound or (QUS), which analyzes the distribution of power as a function of frequency in the original received echo signals from tissue and exploits the resulting spectral parameters to characterize and distinguish among tissues. This article discusses the attributes of QUS-based methods for imaging cancers and providing improved means of detecting and assessing tumors. The discussion will include applications to imaging primary prostate cancer and metastatic cancer in lymph nodes to illustrate the methods. PMID:21362522

  12. Contrast cystography.

    PubMed

    Essman, Stephanie C

    2005-02-01

    Cystography is a radiographic study performed to aid in evaluation of the urinary bladder for extramural, mural, or intraluminal lesions. These lesions may primarily involve the urinary bladder or may be an extension of disease from adjacent organs. Cystography is easy to perform with relatively few complications. Different types of cystography (positive versus negative contrast) may be used depending on the type of information that the clinician hopes to obtain. Although a valuable technique, it is important to correlate the findings on cystography with other clinical information to arrive at the final diagnosis.

  13. Clinical ultrasound physics.

    PubMed

    Abu-Zidan, Fikri M; Hefny, Ashraf F; Corr, Peter

    2011-10-01

    Understanding the basic physics of ultrasound is essential for acute care physicians. Medical ultrasound machines generate and receive ultrasound waves. Brightness mode (B mode) is the basic mode that is usually used. Ultrasound waves are emitted from piezoelectric crystals of the ultrasound transducer. Depending on the acoustic impedance of different materials, which depends on their density, different grades of white and black images are produced. There are different methods that can control the quality of ultrasound waves including timing of ultrasound wave emission, frequency of waves, and size and curvature of the surface of the transducer. The received ultrasound signal can be amplified by increasing the gain. The operator should know sonographic artifacts which may distort the studied structures or even show unreal ones. The most common artifacts include shadow and enhancement artifacts, edge artifact, mirror artifact and reverberation artifact.

  14. Medical Ultrasound Imaging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Stephen

    2001-01-01

    Explains the basic principles of ultrasound using everyday physics. Topics include the generation of ultrasound, basic interactions with material, and the measurement of blood flow using the Doppler effect. (Author/MM)

  15. Transvaginal ultrasound (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Transvaginal ultrasound is a method of imaging the genital tract in females. A hand held probe is inserted directly ... vaginal cavity to scan the pelvic structures, while ultrasound pictures are viewed on a monitor. The test ...

  16. Abdominal ultrasound (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Abdominal ultrasound is a scanning technique used to image the interior of the abdomen. Like the X-ray, MRI, ... it has its place as a diagnostic tool. Ultrasound scans use high frequency sound waves to produce ...

  17. Prenatal ultrasound - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100197.htm Prenatal ultrasound - series—Procedure, part 1 To use the sharing ... Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Prenatal Testing Ultrasound A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited by ...

  18. CT and Ultrasound Guided Stereotactic High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU)

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, Bradford J.; Frenkel, V.; Viswanathan, A.; Dromi, S.; Oh, K.; Kam, A.; Li, K. C. P.; Yanof, J.; Bauer, C.; Kruecker, J.; Seip, R.

    2006-05-08

    To demonstrate the feasibility of CT and B-mode Ultrasound (US) targeted HIFU, a prototype coaxial focused ultrasound transducer was registered and integrated to a CT scanner. CT and diagnostic ultrasound were used for HIFU targeting and monitoring, with the goals of both thermal ablation and non-thermal enhanced drug delivery. A 1 megahertz coaxial ultrasound transducer was custom fabricated and attached to a passive position-sensing arm and an active six degree-of-freedom robotic arm via a CT stereotactic frame. The outer therapeutic transducer with a 10 cm fixed focal zone was coaxially mounted to an inner diagnostic US transducer (2-4 megahertz, Philips Medical Systems). This coaxial US transducer was connected to a modified commercial focused ultrasound generator (Focus Surgery, Indianapolis, IN) with a maximum total acoustic power of 100 watts. This pre-clinical paradigm was tested for ability to heat tissue in phantoms with monitoring and navigation from CT and live US. The feasibility of navigation via image fusion of CT with other modalities such as PET and MRI was demonstrated. Heated water phantoms were tested for correlation between CT numbers and temperature (for ablation monitoring). The prototype transducer and integrated CT/US imaging system enabled simultaneous multimodality imaging and therapy. Pre-clinical phantom models validated the treatment paradigm and demonstrated integrated multimodality guidance and treatment monitoring. Temperature changes during phantom cooling corresponded to CT number changes. Contrast enhanced or non-enhanced CT numbers may potentially be used to monitor thermal ablation with HIFU. Integrated CT, diagnostic US, and therapeutic focused ultrasound bridges a gap between diagnosis and therapy. Preliminary results show that the multimodality system may represent a relatively inexpensive, accessible, and simple method of both targeting and monitoring HIFU effects. Small animal pre-clinical models may be translated to large

  19. Ultrasound Imaging System Video

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    In this video, astronaut Peggy Whitson uses the Human Research Facility (HRF) Ultrasound Imaging System in the Destiny Laboratory of the International Space Station (ISS) to image her own heart. The Ultrasound Imaging System provides three-dimension image enlargement of the heart and other organs, muscles, and blood vessels. It is capable of high resolution imaging in a wide range of applications, both research and diagnostic, such as Echocardiography (ultrasound of the heart), abdominal, vascular, gynecological, muscle, tendon, and transcranial ultrasound.

  20. Advances in Molecular Imaging with Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Gessner, Ryan; Dayton, Paul A.

    2010-01-01

    Ultrasound imaging has long demonstrated utility in the study and measurement of anatomic features and noninvasive observation of blood flow. Within the last decade, advances in molecular biology and contrast agents have allowed researchers to use ultrasound to detect changes in the expression of molecular markers on the vascular endothelium and other intravascular targets. This new technology, referred to as ultrasonic molecular imaging, is still in its infancy. However, in preclinical studies, ultrasonic molecular imaging has shown promise in assessing angiogenesis, inflammation, and thrombus. In this review, we discuss recent advances in microbubble-type contrast agent development, ultrasound technology, and signal processing strategies that have the potential to substantially improve the capabilities and utility of ultrasonic molecular imaging. PMID:20487678

  1. Nonlinear acoustics in biomedical ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleveland, Robin O.

    2015-10-01

    Ultrasound is widely used to image inside the body; it is also used therapeutically to treat certain medical conditions. In both imaging and therapy applications the amplitudes employed in biomedical ultrasound are often high enough that nonlinear acoustic effects are present in the propagation: the effects have the potential to be advantageous in some scenarios but a hindrance in others. In the case of ultrasound imaging the nonlinearity produces higher harmonics that result in images of greater quality. However, nonlinear effects interfere with the imaging of ultrasound contrast agents (typically micron sized bubbles with a strong nonlinear response of their own) and nonlinear effects also result in complications when derating of pressure measurements in water to in situ values in tissue. High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is emerging as a non-invasive therapeutic modality which can result in thermal ablation of tissue. For thermal ablation, the extra effective attenuation resulting from nonlinear effects can result in enhanced heating of tissue if shock formation occurs in the target region for ablation - a highly desirable effect. However, if nonlinearity is too strong it can also result in undesired near-field heating and reduced ablation in the target region. The disruption of tissue (histotripsy) and fragmentation of kidney stones (lithotripsy) exploits shock waves to produce mechanically based effects, with minimal heating present. In these scenarios it is necessary for the waves to be of sufficient amplitude that a shock exists when the waveform reaches the target region. This talk will discuss how underlying nonlinear phenomenon act in all the diagnostic and therapeutic applications described above.

  2. The use of ultrasound in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Kucharzik, Torsten; Kannengiesser, Klaus; Petersen, Frauke

    2017-01-01

    Imaging in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) plays a pivotal role in the primary diagnosis, as well as during the management of patients with known IBD. The evolution of ultrasound equipment and the growing expertise of examiners have both enhanced the role of intestinal ultrasound in the assessment of the gastrointestinal tract in IBD patients. Intestinal ultrasound has been shown to have high sensitivity and specificity, as well as high positive and negative predictive value, in the detection or exclusion of intestinal inflammatory activity in IBD. The obvious advantages of intestinal ultrasound over other imaging modalities include non-invasiveness, rapid availability and low costs. This review summarizes the current developments in the use of intestinal ultrasound for the detection of IBD and its complications, and discusses its use in the management of patients with IBD. Indications for the use of intestinal ultrasound in daily practice are presented, expanded by new developments such as contrast-enhanced ultrasonography and elastography. PMID:28243033

  3. Drug Delivery to Extravascular Tissue by Ultrasound-activated Microbubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kooiman, Klazina; Harteveld, Miranda; de Jong, Nico; van Wamel, Annemieke

    2007-05-01

    Drugs will be delivered to tissue more efficiently if the vascular endothelial permeability is increased. Although recent studies have established that the permeability of single-cell membranes is increased by ultrasound in combination with contrast agents, it is not known whether this combination can also increase the permeability of an endothelial layer. To investigate endothelial layer permeability, we treated monolayers of human umbilical vein endothelial cells with ultrasound and the contrast agent BR14. Endothelial layer permeability was assessed by measuring the transendothelial electrical resistance (TEER) and the transendothelial transport of fluorescein. Ultrasound in combination with BR14 significantly decreased TEER to 68.0 ± 3.1% of initial values and temporally increased endothelial permeability for fluorescein by 38.1 ± 16.4 %. After treatment, no cell loss or damage was observed. In conclusion, ultrasound in combination with BR14 increased the endothelial layer permeability. This feature may be used for future ultrasound-guided drug delivery systems.

  4. Acoustically modulated x-ray phase contrast imaging.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Theron J; Bailat, Claude J; Rose-Petruck, Christoph; Diebold, Gerald J

    2004-11-07

    We report the use of ultrasonic radiation pressure with phase contrast x-ray imaging to give an image proportional to the space derivative of a conventional phase contrast image in the direction of propagation of an ultrasonic beam. Intense ultrasound is used to exert forces on objects within a body giving displacements of the order of tens to hundreds of microns. Subtraction of images made with and without the ultrasound field gives an image that removes low spatial frequency features and highlights high frequency features. The method acts as an acoustic 'contrast agent' for phase contrast x-ray imaging, which in soft tissue acts to highlight small density changes.

  5. Characterization of individual ultrasound microbubble dynamics with a light-scattering system

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Mark J.; Eghtedari, Mohammad; Goodwin, Andrew P.; Hall, David J.; Mattrey, Robert F.; Esener, Sadik C.

    2011-01-01

    Ultrasound microbubbles are contrast agents used for diagnostic ultrasound imaging and as carriers for noninvasive payload delivery. Understanding the acoustic properties of individual microbubble formulations is important for optimizing the ultrasound imaging parameters for improved image contrast and efficient payload delivery. We report here a practical and simple optical tool for direct real-time characterization of ultrasound contrast microbubble dynamics based on light scattering. Fourier transforms of raw linear and nonlinear acoustic oscillations, and microbubble cavitations are directly recorded. Further, the power of this tool is demonstrated by comparing clinically relevant microbubble cycle-to-cycle dynamics and their corresponding Fourier transforms. PMID:21721823

  6. The clinical applications of contrast echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Olszewski, Robert; Timperley, Jon; Szmigielski, Cezary; Cezary, Szmigielski; Monaghan, Mark; Nihoyannopoulos, Petros; Nihoyannopoulis, Petros; Senior, Roxy; Becher, Harald

    2007-06-01

    Ultrasound contrast agents are approved for opacification of the heart chambers and to improve endocardial border definition. The myocardial contrast enhancement is also very useful for assessing thickening of the myocardium and myocardial perfusion. Several multicentre and numerous single-centre trials have demonstrated the usefulness of contrast echocardiography in clinical practice. Contrast echocardiography is probably one of the best validated echocardiographic techniques. Improved accuracy of contrast-enhanced images is not restricted to patients with a poor baseline image quality. Even with an optimal baseline image quality the borders are not as well defined as after LV opacification. Usage of contrast can improve image alignment and helps to avoid off-axis scanning. Contrast studies are particularly useful when a precise measurement of LV function is needed: 1. To decide about the need of implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs), cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT), 2. Follow-up of patients with moderate valvular disease and decision for surgical treatment, 3. Selection and monitoring of patients undergoing chemotherapy with cardiotoxic drugs, 4. Assessment of LV function in patients in intensive care and coronary care units. Optimal endocardial border delineation is crucial and often can be achieved only by ultrasound contrast: 1. Assessment of LV thrombi and masses, 2. Left ventricular non-compaction/apical hypertrophy, 3. Right ventricular dysplasia, right ventricular thrombus, 4. Stress echocardiography and regional wall motion assessment. Future echocardiography will be more 3D and more quantitative than current echocardiography. And contrast echocardiography has already proven its value for both applications.

  7. Quality Improvement of Liver Ultrasound Images Using Fuzzy Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Bayani, Azadeh; Langarizadeh, Mostafa; Radmard, Amir Reza; Nejad, Ahmadreza Farzaneh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Liver ultrasound images are so common and are applied so often to diagnose diffuse liver diseases like fatty liver. However, the low quality of such images makes it difficult to analyze them and diagnose diseases. The purpose of this study, therefore, is to improve the contrast and quality of liver ultrasound images. Methods: In this study, a number of image contrast enhancement algorithms which are based on fuzzy logic were applied to liver ultrasound images - in which the view of kidney is observable - using Matlab2013b to improve the image contrast and quality which has a fuzzy definition; just like image contrast improvement algorithms using a fuzzy intensification operator, contrast improvement algorithms applying fuzzy image histogram hyperbolization, and contrast improvement algorithms by fuzzy IF-THEN rules. Results: With the measurement of Mean Squared Error and Peak Signal to Noise Ratio obtained from different images, fuzzy methods provided better results, and their implementation - compared with histogram equalization method - led both to the improvement of contrast and visual quality of images and to the improvement of liver segmentation algorithms results in images. Conclusion: Comparison of the four algorithms revealed the power of fuzzy logic in improving image contrast compared with traditional image processing algorithms. Moreover, contrast improvement algorithm based on a fuzzy intensification operator was selected as the strongest algorithm considering the measured indicators. This method can also be used in future studies on other ultrasound images for quality improvement and other image processing and analysis applications. PMID:28077898

  8. [Ultrasound in pediatric dermatology].

    PubMed

    García-Martínez, F J; Muñoz-Garza, F Z; Hernández-Martín, A

    2015-11-01

    Cutaneous ultrasound is particularly useful in pediatric dermatology to diagnose numerous diseases without the need to use invasive tests. The present articles reviews some frequent dermatological entities in children whose study can be simplified through cutaneous ultrasound. This article also provides practical recommendations reported in the literature that may facilitate ultrasound examination, with special mention of benign tumoural disease, both congenital and acquired, and vascular anomalies.