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Sample records for gas-phase release characteristics

  1. Dissociation energy for O2 release from gas-phase iron oxide clusters measured by temperature-programmed desorption experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyama, Kohei; Kudoh, Satoshi; Miyajima, Ken; Mafuné, Fumitaka

    2015-04-01

    Thermal dissociation of gas phase iron oxide cluster ions, FenOm+ (n = 2-6), was observed by mass spectrometry. The dissociation processes were investigated by temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) measurements for different sized clusters. Oxygen molecules were found to be released from the cluster ions. The threshold energy required for dissociation, determined by analyzing TPD, was compared with the energies obtained by experiments of collision-induced dissociation and by calculations of density functional theory. The agreement of the energies indicates that the oxygen atoms bonded to the terminal site of clusters are more readily released into the gas phase than those in the bridge site.

  2. Detergent release prolongs the lifetime of native-like membrane protein conformations in the gas-phase.

    PubMed

    Borysik, Antoni J; Hewitt, Dominic J; Robinson, Carol V

    2013-04-24

    Recent studies have suggested that detergents can protect the structure of membrane proteins during their transition from solution to the gas-phase. Here we provide mechanistic insights into this process by interrogating the structures of membrane protein-detergent assemblies in the gas-phase using ion mobility mass spectrometry. We show a clear correlation between the population of native-like protein conformations and the degree of detergent attachment to the protein in the gas-phase. Interrogation of these protein-detergent assemblies, by tandem mass spectrometry, enables us to define the mechanism by which detergents preserve native-like protein conformations in a solvent free environment. We show that the release of detergent is more central to the survival of these conformations than the physical presence of detergent bound to the protein. We propose that detergent release competes with structural collapse for the internal energy of the ion and permits the observation of transient native-like membrane protein conformations that are otherwise lost to structural rearrangement in the gas-phase.

  3. Comparison of electrical and optical characteristics in gas-phase and gas-liquid phase discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qazi, H. I. A.; Nie, Qiu-Yue; Li, He-Ping; Zhang, Xiao-Fei; Bao, Cheng-Yu

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents an AC-excited argon discharge generated using a gas-liquid (two-phase) hybrid plasma reactor, which mainly consists of a powered needle electrode enclosed in a conical quartz tube and grounded deionized water electrode. The discharges in the gas-phase, as well as in the two-phase, exhibit two discharge modes, i.e., the low current glow-like diffuse mode and the high current streamer-like constrict mode, with a mode transition, which exhibits a negative resistance of the discharges. The optical emission spectral analysis shows that the stronger diffusion of the water vapor into the discharge region in the two-phase discharges boosts up the generation of OH (A-X) radicals, and consequently, leads to a higher rotational temperature in the water-phase plasma plume than that of the gas-phase discharges. Both the increase of the power input and the decrease of the argon flow rate result in the increase of the rotational temperature in the plasma plume of the water-phase discharge. The stable two-phase discharges with a long plasma plume in the water-phase under a low power input and gas flow rate may show a promising prospect for the degradation of organic pollutants, e.g., printing and dyeing wastewater, in the field of environmental protection.

  4. Comparison of electrical and optical characteristics in gas-phase and gas-liquid phase discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Qazi, H. I. A.; Li, He-Ping Zhang, Xiao-Fei; Bao, Cheng-Yu; Nie, Qiu-Yue

    2015-12-15

    This paper presents an AC-excited argon discharge generated using a gas-liquid (two-phase) hybrid plasma reactor, which mainly consists of a powered needle electrode enclosed in a conical quartz tube and grounded deionized water electrode. The discharges in the gas-phase, as well as in the two-phase, exhibit two discharge modes, i.e., the low current glow-like diffuse mode and the high current streamer-like constrict mode, with a mode transition, which exhibits a negative resistance of the discharges. The optical emission spectral analysis shows that the stronger diffusion of the water vapor into the discharge region in the two-phase discharges boosts up the generation of OH (A–X) radicals, and consequently, leads to a higher rotational temperature in the water-phase plasma plume than that of the gas-phase discharges. Both the increase of the power input and the decrease of the argon flow rate result in the increase of the rotational temperature in the plasma plume of the water-phase discharge. The stable two-phase discharges with a long plasma plume in the water-phase under a low power input and gas flow rate may show a promising prospect for the degradation of organic pollutants, e.g., printing and dyeing wastewater, in the field of environmental protection.

  5. Release of gas-phase halogens by photolytic generation of OH in frozen halide-nitrate solutions: an active halogen formation mechanism?

    PubMed

    Abbatt, J; Oldridge, N; Symington, A; Chukalovskiy, V; McWhinney, R D; Sjostedt, S; Cox, R A

    2010-06-17

    To better define the mechanisms by which condensed-phase halides may be oxidized to form gas-phase halogens under polar conditions, experiments have been conducted whereby frozen solutions containing chloride (1 M), bromide (1.6 x 10(-3) to 5 x 10(-2) M), iodide (<1 x 10(-5) M), and nitrate (0.01 to 1 M) have been illuminated by ultraviolet light in a continually flushed cell. Gas-phase products are quantified using chemical ionization mass spectrometry, and experiments were conducted at both 248 and 263 K. Br(2) was the dominant product, along with smaller yields of IBr and trace BrCl and I(2). The Br(2) yields were largely independent of the Br(-)/Cl(-) ratio of the frozen solution, down to seawater composition. However, the yields of halogens were strongly dependent on the levels of NO(3)(-) and acidity in solution, consistent with a mechanism whereby NO(3)(-) photolysis yields OH that oxidizes the condensed-phase halides. In support, we observed the formation of gas-phase NO(2), formed simultaneously with OH. Gas-phase HONO was also observed, suggesting that halide oxidation by HONO in the condensed phase may also occur to some degree. By measuring the production rate of condensed-phase OH, using benzoic acid as a radical trap, we determine that the molar yield of Br(2) formation relative to OH generation is 0.6, consistent with each OH being involved in halide oxidation. These studies suggest that gas-phase halogen formation should occur simultaneously with NO(x) release from frozen sea ice and snow surfaces that contain sufficient halides and deposited nitrate.

  6. Transport characteristics of gas phase ozone in unsaturated porous media for in-situ chemical oxidation.

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, H.; Lim, H-N; Kang, J-W; Hwang, T-M; Kim, J.; Environmental Research; Kwangju Inst. of Science and Technology; Yonsei Univ.

    2002-07-01

    Laboratory column experiments were conducted by employing various porous media to delineate the characteristics of gaseous ozone transport in the unsaturated zone under various conditions. Water content, soil organic matter (SOM), and metal oxides (MOs) were found to be the factors most influential in the fate and transport of gaseous ozone in unsaturated porous media. The migration velocity of the gaseous ozone front was inversely proportional to the MO content of the porous media. Increased water content at fixed gas flux decreased the ozone breakthrough time proportionally as a result of reduced gas pore volume (PV) in the column, and increased pore water interfered with reactions of gaseous ozone with SOM and MOs on the surface of porous media. The feasibility of in-situ ozone injection for the remediation of unsaturated soils contaminated with either phenanthrene or diesel-range organics (DROs) was investigated under various conditions. The maximum removal after 1 h of ozone injection was achieved in columns packed with baked sand, followed, in descending order, by glass beads and by sand, indicating that catalytic ozone decomposition with MOs in columns packed with baked sand enhanced hydroxyl radical formation and resulted in increased contaminant removal. Overall removal efficiency of multicomponent C{sub 10}-C{sub 24} DROs after 14 h of ozonation was 78.7%. Ozone transport was retarded considerably because of the high ozone demand of DROs, requiring more than 6 h for the gaseous ozone to initially break through the soil column under the experimental conditions tested in this study. Overall, gaseous ozone was readily delivered and transported to remediate unsaturated soils contaminated with phenanthrene and DROs.

  7. Gas phase kinetics during normal combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Price, C. F.; Boggs, T. L.; Eisel, J. L.; Atwood, A. I.; Zurn, D. E.

    1980-01-01

    The role of gas phase kinetics during combustion was explored in the steady state modeling efforts and in the analysis of ignition phenomena. In both cases it was shown that the combustion characteristics of some high energy ingredients and propellants are strongly affected, if not dictated, by the gas phase reactions which take place.

  8. Volatile out gassing characteristics of highly filled ethylene vinyl acetate binder materials: Gas phase infra-red spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, Mogon; Bowditch, Martin; Jones, Ben; Netherton, David; Khan, Niaz; Letant, Sonia; Maxwell, Robert S.; Birdsell, Stephen A.

    2012-12-08

    Gas phase Infra-red (IR) spectroscopy has been used to investigate volatile out gassing properties of highly filled poly (ethylene-co-vinyl acetate) materials. In these studies, a Scout-ENTM heated gas cell was interfaced to a vacuum FTIR spectrometer, and the quantification of evolved species was achieved through calibration of the gas cell with certified gas standards. The volatile out gassing properties were monitored as a function of time during storage at 75°C under vacuum conditions (< 1mbar). Acetic acid, carbon dioxide and water were identified as the major out gassing products through IR absorption peaks at 1797, 2354 and 3853 cm-1, respectively. We present a comparison of three highly filled poly (ethyleneco- vinyl acetate) resins.

  9. Volatile out gassing characteristics of highly filled ethylene vinyl acetate binder materials: Gas phase infra-red spectroscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Patel, Mogon; Bowditch, Martin; Jones, Ben; ...

    2012-12-08

    Gas phase Infra-red (IR) spectroscopy has been used to investigate volatile out gassing properties of highly filled poly (ethylene-co-vinyl acetate) materials. In these studies, a Scout-ENTM heated gas cell was interfaced to a vacuum FTIR spectrometer, and the quantification of evolved species was achieved through calibration of the gas cell with certified gas standards. The volatile out gassing properties were monitored as a function of time during storage at 75°C under vacuum conditions (< 1mbar). Acetic acid, carbon dioxide and water were identified as the major out gassing products through IR absorption peaks at 1797, 2354 and 3853 cm-1, respectively.more » We present a comparison of three highly filled poly (ethyleneco- vinyl acetate) resins.« less

  10. Gas Phase Nanoparticle Synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granqvist, Claes; Kish, Laszlo; Marlow, William

    This book deals with gas-phase nanoparticle synthesis and is intended for researchers and research students in nanomaterials science and engineering, condensed matter physics and chemistry, and aerosol science. Gas-phase nanoparticle synthesis is instrumental to nanotechnology - a field in current focus that raises hopes for environmentally benign, resource-lean manufacturing. Nanoparticles can be produced by many physical, chemical, and even biological routes. Gas-phase synthesis is particularly interesting since one can achieve accurate manufacturing control and hence industrial viability.

  11. Gas-phase chemical dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Weston, R.E. Jr.; Sears, T.J.; Preses, J.M.

    1993-12-01

    Research in this program is directed towards the spectroscopy of small free radicals and reactive molecules and the state-to-state dynamics of gas phase collision, energy transfer, and photodissociation phenomena. Work on several systems is summarized here.

  12. Probing the kinetic energy-release dynamics of H-atom products from the gas-phase reaction of O(3P) with vinyl radical C2H3.

    PubMed

    Jang, Su-Chan; Choi, Jong-Ho

    2014-11-21

    The gas-phase radical-radical reaction dynamics of ground-state atomic oxygen O((3)P) with vinyl radicals C2H3 has been studied by combining the results of vacuum-ultraviolet laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy in a crossed beam configuration with ab initio calculations. The two radical reactants O((3)P) and C2H3 were produced by photolysis of NO2 and supersonic flash pyrolysis of C2H3I, respectively. Doppler profile analysis of the kinetic energy release of the nascent H-atom products from the title reaction O((3)P) + C2H3→ H((2)S) + CH2CO (ketene) revealed that the average translational energy of the products and the average fraction of the total available energy were 7.03 ± 0.30 kcal mol(-1) and 7.2%. The empirical data combined with CBS-QB3 level ab initio theory and statistical calculations demonstrated that the title oxygen-hydrogen exchange reaction is a major reaction channel, through an addition-elimination mechanism involving the formation of a short-lived, dynamical complex on the doublet potential energy surface. On the basis of systematic comparison with several exchange reactions of hydrocarbon radicals, the observed kinetic energy release can be explained in terms of the weak impulse at the moment of decomposition in the loose transition state with a product-like geometry and a small reverse barrier along the exit channel.

  13. Gas phase chemistry in comets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oppenheimer, M.

    1976-01-01

    The significance of gas phase reactions in determining the nuclear structure of comets is discussed. The sublimation of parent molecules such as H2O, CH4, CO2, and NH3 from the surface of the nucleus and their subsequent photodissociation and ionization in forming observed cometary molecular species are elaborated.

  14. Characteristics of retention and enthalpies of sorption from the gas phase of esters of trimethylolpropane and C2-C5 acids on DB-1 stationary phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasnykh, E. L.; Aleksandrov, A. Yu.; Sokolova, A. A.; Levanova, S. V.

    2017-02-01

    Characteristics of retention and their temperature dependences, along with the thermodynamic characteristics of sorption on DB-1 nonpolar phase, are determined in the temperature range of 220-280°C for 21 mono-, di-, and trisubstituted esters of trimethylolpropane and monobasic acids with a variety of structures containing from 2 to 6 carbon atoms.

  15. Rate processes in gas phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, C. F.

    1983-01-01

    Reaction-rate theory and experiment are given a critical review from the engineers' point of view. Rates of heavy-particle, collision-induced reaction in gas phase are formulated in terms of the cross sections and activation energies for reaction. The effect of cross section function shape and of excited state contributions to reaction both cause the slope of Arrhenius plots to differ from the true activation energy, except at low temperature. The master equations for chemically reacting gases are introduced, and dissociation and ionization reactions are shown to proceed primarily from excited states about kT from the dissociation or ionization limit. Collision-induced vibration, vibration-rotation, and pure rotation transitions are treated, including three-dimensional effects and conservation of energy, which have usually been ignored. The quantum theory of transitions at potential surface crossing is derived, and results are found to be in fair agreement with experiment in spite of some questionable approximations involved.

  16. CREKID: A computer code for transient, gas-phase combustion of kinetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pratt, D. T.; Radhakrishnan, K.

    1984-01-01

    A new algorithm was developed for fast, automatic integration of chemical kinetic rate equations describing homogeneous, gas-phase combustion at constant pressure. Particular attention is paid to the distinguishing physical and computational characteristics of the induction, heat-release and equilibration regimes. The two-part predictor-corrector algorithm, based on an exponentially-fitted trapezoidal rule, includes filtering of ill-posed initial conditions, automatic selection of Newton-Jacobi or Newton iteration for convergence to achieve maximum computational efficiency while observing a prescribed error tolerance. The new algorithm was found to compare favorably with LSODE on two representative test problems drawn from combustion kinetics.

  17. Estimation of gas phase mixing in packed beds

    SciTech Connect

    Frigerio, S.; Thunman, H.; Leckner, B.; Hermansson, S.

    2008-04-15

    An improved model is presented for estimation of the mixing of gaseous species in a packed bed for fuel conversion. In particular, this work clarifies the main characteristics of mixing of volatiles and oxidizers in a burning bed of high-volatile solid fuel. Expressions are introduced to represent the active role of degradation of the solid particles in the mixing within the gas phase. During drying and devolatilization the solids modify the behavior of the gas flow: the volatiles released from the surface of the particles increase the turbulence in the system, and hence the rates of the homogeneous reactions under mixing-limited conditions. Numerical experiments are carried out to test the validity of this conclusion regarding mixing in different geometries. The flow of volatiles leaving the fuel particles is shown to contribute significantly to mixing, especially at low air flows through a bed. However, the fraction of the particle surface where volatiles are released and its orientation in the bed should be better determined in order to increase the accuracy of the estimates of turbulent mixing. (author)

  18. Oscillatory burning of solid propellants including gas phase time lag.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    T'Ien, J. S.

    1972-01-01

    An analysis has been performed for oscillatory burning of solid propellants including gas phase time lag. The gaseous flame is assumed to be premixed and laminar with a one-step overall chemical reaction. The propellant is assumed to decompose according to the Arrenhius Law, with no condensed phase reaction. With this model, strong gas phase resonance has been found in certain cases at the characteristic gas-phase frequencies, but the peaking of the acoustic admittance is in the direction favoring the damping of pressure waves. At still higher frequencies, moderate wave-amplifying ability was found. The limit of low frequency response obtained previously by Denison and Baum was recovered, and the limitations of the quasi-steady theory were investigated.

  19. [Nutrient release characteristics and use efficiency of slow- and controlled release fertilizers].

    PubMed

    Duan, Lu-Lu; Zhang, Min; Liu, Gang; Shang, Zhao-Cong; Yang, Yi

    2009-05-01

    Water extraction method and soil incubation method were used to study the nutrient release characteristics of four slow- and controlled release fertilizers (CRF1, CRF2, SCU, and IBDU), and pot experiment was conducted to assess the effects of the release characteristics on the nutrient requirements of canola (Brassica napus L.). The nutrient release curves of test fertilizers in water were S pattern for CRF1 and CRF2, burst pattern for SCU, and reverse L pattern for IBDU. The nutrient release characteristics of the four fertilizers in water and in soil all fitted binomial equations, suggesting that there existed some similarities in the nutrient release in the two media. The nutrient uptake and biomass of canola plants treated with CRF1 and CRF2 were significantly higher than those treated with SCU and IBDU, and CRF2 had the greatest effect. The nutrient release curves of CRF1 and CRF2 accorded more closely with the nutrient requirements of canola.

  20. Hydrated metal ions in the gas phase.

    PubMed

    Beyer, Martin K

    2007-01-01

    Studying metal ion solvation, especially hydration, in the gas phase has developed into a field that is dominated by a tight interaction between experiment and theory. Since the studied species carry charge, mass spectrometry is an indispensable tool in all experiments. Whereas gas-phase coordination chemistry and reactions of bare metal ions are reasonably well understood, systems containing a larger number of solvent molecules are still difficult to understand. This review focuses on the rich chemistry of hydrated metal ions in the gas phase, covering coordination chemistry, charge separation in multiply charged systems, as well as intracluster and ion-molecule reactions. Key ideas of metal ion solvation in the gas phase are illustrated with rare-gas solvated metal ions.

  1. An approximate calculation of advective gas-phase transport of 14C at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knapp, R. B.

    1990-01-01

    A quasilinear partial differential equation, which describes gas-phase transport of a 14C kinematic wave through a porous medium, is derived, its sensitivity to system variables is analyzed and it is applied to one possible release scenarion at the porposed Yucca Mountain, Nevada high-level radioactive waste repository. Advection, isotope exchange between CO 2 in a flowing gas phase and HCO 3- in a static aqueous phase, and radioactive decay are incorporated. The governing equation is solved analytically by the method of characteristics. The mass fraction of 14C in the gas phase,X 14g, is controlled by radioactive decay. The relatively long half-line of 14C, about 5720 years, and the relatively shallow proposed burial depth of the radioactive waste, about 350m, requires significant retardation of the 14C wave velocity for significant reduction in X 14g. 14C wave velocity is most sensitive to temperature and pH which control the distribution of total carbon between gas and liquid phase; the greater the partitioning of carbon into the liquid phase, the greater the retardation of the 14C wave velocity and the greater the ultimate reduction in X 14g from initial conditions. Partitioning of total carbon into the liquid phase is greatest at low temperatures, < 100° C, and high pH values, > 8. Increasing water saturation also tends to retard 14C wave velocity but to a lesser extent. The governing equation has been applied using conditions that may possibly occur at the proposed Yucca Mountain repository. Calculations indicate that the 14C wave takes about 5900 years to reach the surface with a X 14g equal to 25 ppm. Diffusion and dispersion are not of major importance for these conditions. These calculations are approximate due to the number of assumptions involved. Discharge of 14C into the gas before the selected time would accelerate wave arrival and increase the amount of 14C reaching the surface.

  2. Continuous-Flow Gas-Phase Bioreactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wise, Donald L.; Trantolo, Debra J.

    1994-01-01

    Continuous-flow gas-phase bioreactors proposed for biochemical, food-processing, and related industries. Reactor contains one or more selected enzymes dehydrated or otherwise immobilized on solid carrier. Selected reactant gases fed into reactor, wherein chemical reactions catalyzed by enzyme(s) yield product biochemicals. Concept based on discovery that enzymes not necessarily placed in traditional aqueous environments to function as biocatalysts.

  3. EPA GAS PHASE CHEMISTRY CHAMBER STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gas-phase smog chamber experiments are being performed at EPA in order to evaluate a number of current chemical mechanisms for inclusion in EPA regulatory and research models. The smog chambers are 9000 L in volume and constructed of 2-mil teflon film. One of the chambers is co...

  4. Gas-Phase Infrared; JCAMP Format

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 35 NIST/EPA Gas-Phase Infrared; JCAMP Format (PC database for purchase)   This data collection contains 5,228 infrared spectra in the JCAMP-DX (Joint Committee for Atomic and Molecular Physical Data "Data Exchange") format.

  5. Characteristics of microbial aerosols released from chicken and swine feces.

    PubMed

    Chien, Yeh-Chung; Chen, Chiou-Jong; Lin, Tzu-Hsien; Chen, Shih-Hsun; Chien, Yu-Ching

    2011-08-01

    Bioaerosols generated during livestock and poultry production are significant occupational hazards. This study investigates the characteristics of bioaerosols released from animal feces. Fresh feces from pigs and chickens were obtained and tested in a controlled-environment facility. Airborne viable (culturable) bacteria and fungi were sampled hourly for 48 hr. The predominant species were identified via polymerase chain reaction analysis. The number of bacterial colonies released from chicken feces increased gradually, peaked at approximately 20 hr, and remained relatively constant to test end; however, the bacterial colonies released from swine feces did not increase significantly. The chicken feces released significantly (P < 0.05) more bacterial aerosols than swine feces over 40 hr, by approximately 1 order of magnitude. However, the difference in total fungal aerosols released from the two feces types was relatively small (30-40%) and insignificant (P > 0.05). Aerosols sized between approximately 0.65 and 1.1 microm were predominant for bacteria, whereas aerosols sized between approximately 2.1 and 3.3 microm prevailed for fungi. Genera Stenotrophomonas were the predominant bacterial aerosols, whereas Cladosporium and Acremonium accounted for the greatest amounts of fungi from chicken and swine feces, respectively. More than 1000 culturable bacterial colonies can be released from 1 g of chicken feces per hour, and approximately 80% of these bioaerosols are respirable. Most bacterial aerosols released from swine and chicken feces were opportunistic human pathogens; thus, the significance of their presence warrants further investigations.

  6. Experimental Thermochemistry of Gas Phase Cytosine Tautomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, A. M.; Douberly, G. E.

    2011-06-01

    Enthalpies of interconversion are measured for the three lowest energy tautomers of isolated cytosine. The equilibrium distribution of tautomers near 600 K is frozen upon the capture of the gas phase species by low temperature helium nanodroplets. The temperature dependence of the gas phase cytosine tautomer populations is determined with infrared laser spectroscopy of the helium solvated species. The interconverison enthalpies obtained from the van't Hoff relation are 1.14 ± 0.21 and 1.63 ± 0.12 for the C31 rightleftharpoons C32 and C31 rightleftharpoons C1 equilibria, respectively. C31 and C32 are rotamers of an enol tautomer, and C1 is a keto tautomer. The interconversion enthalpies are compared to recent CCSD(T) thermochemistry calculations of cytosine tautomers.

  7. Enzyme-catalyzed, gas-phase reactions.

    PubMed

    Barzana, E; Klibanov, A M; Karel, M

    1987-06-01

    Dehydrated preparations of alcohol oxidase adsorbed on DEAE-cellulose vigorously catalyze a gas-phase oxidation of ethanol vapors with molecular oxygen. The gas-phase reaction is strongly dependent on the water activity of the system. The enzymatic activity is severely inhibited by the product hydrogen peroxide. This inhibition can be alleviated, however, by an addition of catalase or peroxidase to the dry preparation. Such dehydrated, bienzymic catalysts afford a complete and selective conversion of the substrate to acetaldehyde. Dry alcohol oxidase is much more thermostable than in aqueous solution. The results of this work suggest that dehydrated enzymes have potential applications in the analysis of gaseous compounds and in the development of novel gas-solid bioreactors.

  8. Laser Studies of Gas Phase Radical Reactions.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-01

    Acremonium chrysogenum , was prepared according to the published procedure [6]. This fungal enzyme had a specific activity of 0.023 IUmg1, and was estimated to...Dist-lbitionj Avdielbiity Codes jAvail atidjor Dist 6a A-I . p -1- Laser Studies of Gas Phase Radical Reactions G. Hancock Physical Chemistry...some additional experiments concerning the formation of carbene radicals in liquid phase enzyme cleavage studies are described. Keywords Laser

  9. Release characteristics of encapsulated formulations incorporating plant growth factors.

    PubMed

    Wybraniec, Slawomir; Schwartz, Liliana; Wiesman, Zeev; Markus, Arie; Wolf, David

    2002-05-01

    The release characteristics of encapsulated formulations containing a combination of plant growth factors (PGF)--plant hormones (IBA, paclobutrazol), nutrients (fertilizers, microelements), and fungicide (prochloraz)--were studied. The formulations were prepared by encapsulating the active ingredients in a polyethylene matrix and, in some cases, subsequently coating the product with polyurethane. Dissolution experiments were carried out with both coated and non-coated formulations to determine the sustained release patterns of the active ingredients. The PGF controlled-release systems obtained have been shown to promote development of root systems, vegetative growth, and reproductive development in cuttings, potted plants, or garden plants of various plant species. These beneficial effects are attributable to the lasting and balanced PGF availability provided by these systems.

  10. Gas-Phase Photoionization Of A Protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milosavljevic, A. R.; Giuliani, A.; Nicolas, C.; Gil, J.-F.; Lemaire, J.; Refregiers, M.; Nahon, L.

    2010-07-01

    We present preliminary results on gas phase photoionization of electrosprayproduced multiply protonated cytochrome c protein (104 amino acids; ˜12.4 kDa), which has been achieved with a newly developed experimental system for spectroscopy of electrosprayed ions in a linear quadrupole ion trap using a monochromatized vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) synchrotron radiation and tandem mass spectrometry method. The investigation of proteins in the gas phase, where they are free of the influence of counterions and solvent molecules, offer a possibility to understand their intrinsic molecular properties. However, due to limited both ion densities and available number of photons, the use of synchrotron radiation for the trapped ions spectroscopy is a rather challenging task. The feasibility of coupling a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance ion trap with soft x-ray synchrotron beamline and the first successful use of synchrotron radiation for spectroscopy of electrosprayed negative ions stored in a three-dimensional quadrupole ion trap have been demonstrated only recently (R. Thissen et al., 2008, Phys. Rev. Lett., 100, 223001; A. Giulliani et al., Proc. 57th ASMS Conf., Philadelphia, 2009). The present results are the first reported on photoionization of kDa species in the gas phase and are valuable regarding both a fundamental interest of accessing physical properties of large biological ions isolated in vacuo and potential development of a new technique for proteomics.

  11. Gas-phase Dissociation of homo-DNA Oligonucleotides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stucki, Silvan R.; Désiron, Camille; Nyakas, Adrien; Marti, Simon; Leumann, Christian J.; Schürch, Stefan

    2013-12-01

    Synthetic modified oligonucleotides are of interest for diagnostic and therapeutic applications, as their biological stability, pairing selectivity, and binding strength can be considerably increased by the incorporation of unnatural structural elements. Homo-DNA is an oligonucleotide homologue based on dideoxy-hexopyranosyl sugar moieties, which follows the Watson-Crick A-T and G-C base pairing system, but does not hybridize with complementary natural DNA and RNA. Homo-DNA has found application as a bioorthogonal element in templated chemistry applications. The gas-phase dissociation of homo-DNA has been investigated by ESI-MS/MS and MALDI-MS/MS, and mechanistic aspects of its gas-phase dissociation are discussed. Experiments revealed a charge state dependent preference for the loss of nucleobases, which are released either as neutrals or as anions. In contrast to DNA, nucleobase loss from homo-DNA was found to be decoupled from backbone cleavage, thus resulting in stable products. This renders an additional stage of ion activation necessary in order to generate sequence-defining fragment ions. Upon MS3 of the primary base-loss ion, homo-DNA was found to exhibit unspecific backbone dissociation resulting in a balanced distribution of all fragment ion series.

  12. Gas phase thermochemistry of organogermanium compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Engel, J.P.

    1993-12-07

    A variety of silyl- and alkyl-germylene precursors have been synthesized and subsequently pyrolyzed in the gas phase. Arrhenius parameters were obtained employing a pulsed-stirred flow reactor for these unimolecular decompositions. These precursors are divided into two major categories by mechanism of germylene extrusion: {alpha}-elimination precursors and germylacetylenes. The extrusion of germylenes from germylacetylene precursors is of primary interest. A mechanism is proposed employing a germacyclopropene intermediate. Evidence supporting this mechanism is presented. In the process of exploring germylacetylenes as germylene precursors, an apparent dyatropic rearrangement between germanium and silicon was observed. This rearrangement was subsequently explored.

  13. Receptors useful for gas phase chemical sensing

    DOEpatents

    Jaworski, Justyn W; Lee, Seung-Wuk; Majumdar, Arunava; Raorane, Digvijay A

    2015-02-17

    The invention provides for a receptor, capable of binding to a target molecule, linked to a hygroscopic polymer or hydrogel; and the use of this receptor in a device for detecting the target molecule in a gaseous and/or liquid phase. The invention also provides for a method for detecting the presence of a target molecule in the gas phase using the device. In particular, the receptor can be a peptide capable of binding a 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) or 2,4,-dinitrotoluene (DNT).

  14. Ignition and flame characteristics of cryogenic hydrogen releases

    SciTech Connect

    Panda, Pratikash P.; Hecht, Ethan S.

    2017-01-01

    In this work, under-expanded cryogenic hydrogen jets were investigated experimentally for their ignition and flame characteristics. The test facility described herein, was designed and constructed to release hydrogen at a constant temperature and pressure, to study the dispersion and thermo-physical properties of cryogenic hydrogen releases and flames. In this study, a non-intrusive laser spark focused on the jet axis was used to measure the maximum ignition distance. The radiative power emitted by the corresponding jet flames was also measured for a range of release scenarios from 37 K to 295 K, 2–6 barabs through nozzles with diameters from 0.75 to 1.25 mm. The maximum ignition distance scales linearly with the effective jet diameter (which scales as the square root of the stagnant fluid density). A 1-dimensional (stream-wise) cryogenic hydrogen release model developed previously at Sandia National Laboratories (although this model is not yet validated for cryogenic hydrogen) was exercised to predict that the mean mole fraction at the maximum ignition distance is approximately 0.14, and is not dependent on the release conditions. The flame length and width were extracted from visible and infra-red flame images for several test cases. The flame length and width both scale as the square root of jet exit Reynolds number, as reported in the literature for flames from atmospheric temperature hydrogen. As shown in previous studies for ignited atmospheric temperature hydrogen, the radiative power from the jet flames of cold hydrogen scales as a logarithmic function of the global flame residence time. The radiative heat flux from jet flames of cold hydrogen is higher than the jet flames of atmospheric temperature hydrogen, for a given mass flow rate, due to the lower choked flow velocity of low-temperature hydrogen. Lastly, this study provides critical information with regard to the development of models to inform the safety codes and standards of hydrogen

  15. Ignition and flame characteristics of cryogenic hydrogen releases

    DOE PAGES

    Panda, Pratikash P.; Hecht, Ethan S.

    2017-01-01

    In this work, under-expanded cryogenic hydrogen jets were investigated experimentally for their ignition and flame characteristics. The test facility described herein, was designed and constructed to release hydrogen at a constant temperature and pressure, to study the dispersion and thermo-physical properties of cryogenic hydrogen releases and flames. In this study, a non-intrusive laser spark focused on the jet axis was used to measure the maximum ignition distance. The radiative power emitted by the corresponding jet flames was also measured for a range of release scenarios from 37 K to 295 K, 2–6 barabs through nozzles with diameters from 0.75 tomore » 1.25 mm. The maximum ignition distance scales linearly with the effective jet diameter (which scales as the square root of the stagnant fluid density). A 1-dimensional (stream-wise) cryogenic hydrogen release model developed previously at Sandia National Laboratories (although this model is not yet validated for cryogenic hydrogen) was exercised to predict that the mean mole fraction at the maximum ignition distance is approximately 0.14, and is not dependent on the release conditions. The flame length and width were extracted from visible and infra-red flame images for several test cases. The flame length and width both scale as the square root of jet exit Reynolds number, as reported in the literature for flames from atmospheric temperature hydrogen. As shown in previous studies for ignited atmospheric temperature hydrogen, the radiative power from the jet flames of cold hydrogen scales as a logarithmic function of the global flame residence time. The radiative heat flux from jet flames of cold hydrogen is higher than the jet flames of atmospheric temperature hydrogen, for a given mass flow rate, due to the lower choked flow velocity of low-temperature hydrogen. Lastly, this study provides critical information with regard to the development of models to inform the safety codes and standards of hydrogen

  16. Gas Phase Model of Surface Reactions for N{2} Afterglows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marković, V. Lj.; Petrović, Z. Lj.; Pejović, M. M.

    1996-07-01

    The adequacy of the homogeneous gas phase model as a representation of the surface losses of diffusing active particles in gas phase is studied. As an example the recent data obtained for the surface recombination coefficients are reanalyzed. The data were obtained by the application of the breakdown delay times which consists of the measurements of the breakdown delay times t_d as a function of the afterglow period tau. It was found that for the conditions of our experiment, the diffusion should not be neglected as the final results are significantly different when obtained by approximate gas phase representation and by exact numerical solution to the diffusion equation. While application of the gas phase effective coefficients to represent surface losses gives an error in the value of the recombination coefficient, it reproduces correctly other characteristics such as order of the process which can be obtained from simple fits to the experimental data. Dans cet article, nous étudions la validité du modèle approximatif représentant les pertes superficielles des particules actives qui diffusent de la phase gazeuse comme pertes dans la phase homogène du gaz. Les données actuelles du coefficient de recombination en surface sont utilisées par cette vérification . Les données experimentales sont obtenues en utilisant la technique qui consiste en la mesure du temps de retard du début de la décharge en fonction de la période de relaxation. Nous avons trouvé que, pour nos conditions expérimentales, la diffusion ne peut être négligée. Aussi, les résultats finals sont considérablement différents quand ils sont obtenus en utilisant le modèle approximatif par comparaison aves les résultats obtenus par la solution numérique exacte de l'équation de la diffusion. L'application des coefficients effectifs dans la phase gaseuse pour la présentation des pertes superficielles donne, pour les coefficients de la recombinaison, des valeurs qui diffèrent en

  17. The gas-phase metallicity of central and satellite galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasquali, Anna; Gallazzi, Anna; van den Bosch, Frank C.

    2012-09-01

    We exploit the galaxy groups catalogue of Yang et al. and the galaxy properties measured in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Releases 4 and 7 to study how the gas-phase metallicities of star-forming galaxies depend on environment. We find that satellite and central galaxies follow a qualitatively similar stellar mass (M★)-gas-phase metallicity relation, whereby their gas-phase metallicity increases with M★. Satellites, though, have higher gas-phase metallicities than equally massive centrals, and this difference increases with decreasing stellar mass. We find a maximum offset of 0.06 dex at log(M★/h-2 M⊙) ≃ 8.25. At fixed halo mass, centrals are more metal rich than satellites by ˜0.5 dex on average. This is simply due to the fact that, by definition, centrals are the most massive galaxies in their groups, and the fact that gas-phase metallicity increases with stellar mass. More interestingly, we also find that the gas-phase metallicity of satellites increases with halo mass (Mh) at fixed stellar mass. This increment is more pronounced for less massive galaxies, and, at M★ ≃ 109 h-2 M⊙, corresponds to ˜0.15 dex across the range 11 < log (Mh/h-1 M⊙) < 14. We also show that low-mass satellite galaxies have higher gas-phase metallicities than central galaxies of the same stellar metallicity. This difference becomes negligible for more massive galaxies of roughly solar metallicity. We demonstrate that the observed differences in gas-phase metallicity between centrals and satellites at fixed M★ are not a consequence of stellar mass stripping (advocated by Pasquali et al. in order to explain similar differences but in stellar metallicity), nor to the past star formation history of these galaxies as quantified by their surface mass density or gas mass fraction. Rather, we argue that these trends probably originate from a combination of three environmental effects: (i) strangulation, which prevents satellite galaxies from accreting new, low

  18. Fundamentals of gas phase plasmas for treatment of human tissue.

    PubMed

    Kushner, Mark J; Babaeva, Natalia Yu

    2011-01-01

    The use of gas phase plasmas for treating human tissue is at the intersection of two disciplines - plasma physics and engineering, and medicine. In this paper, a primer will be provided for the medical practitioner on the fundamentals of generating gas phase plasmas at atmospheric pressure in air for the treatment of human tissue. The mechanisms for gas phase plasmas interacting with tissue and biological fluids will also be discussed using results from computer modeling.

  19. Why do disk galaxies present a common gas-phase metallicity gradient?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, R.; Zhang, Shuhui; Shen, Shiyin; Yin, Jun; Hou, Jinliang

    2017-03-01

    CALIFA data show that isolated disk galaxies present a common gas-phase metallicity gradient, with a characteristic slope of -0.1dex/re between 0.3 and 2 disk effective radius re (Sanchez et al. 2014). Here we construct a simple model to investigate which processes regulate the formation and evolution.

  20. Gas phase hydration of organic ions.

    PubMed

    Momoh, Paul O; El-Shall, M Samy

    2008-08-28

    In this work, we study the hydration phenomenon on a molecular level in the gas phase where a selected number of water molecules can interact with the organic ion of interest. The stepwise binding energies (DeltaH degrees (n-1,n)) of 1-7 water molecules to the phenyl acetylene cation are determined by equilibrium measurements using an ion mobility drift cell. The stepwise hydration energies DeltaH degrees (n-1,n) are nearly constant at 39.7 +/- 6.3 kJ mol(-1) from n = 1 to 7. The entropy change is larger in the n = 7 step, suggesting cyclic or cage-like water structures. No water addition is observed on the ionized phenyl acetylene trimer consistent with cyclization of the trimer ion to form triphenyl benzene cations C(24)H(18) (+) which are expected to interact weakly with the water molecules due to steric interactions and the delocalization of the charge on the large organic ion. The work demonstrates that hydration studies of organic ions can provide structural information on the organic ions.

  1. Intramolecular photoelectron diffraction in the gas phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueda, K.; Miron, C.; Plésiat, E.; Argenti, L.; Patanen, M.; Kooser, K.; Ayuso, D.; Mondal, S.; Kimura, M.; Sakai, K.; Travnikova, O.; Palacios, A.; Decleva, P.; Kukk, E.; Martín, F.

    2013-09-01

    We report unambiguous experimental and theoretical evidence of intramolecular photoelectron diffraction in the collective vibrational excitation that accompanies high-energy photoionization of gas-phase CF4, BF3, and CH4 from the 1s orbital of the central atom. We show that the ratios between vibrationally resolved photoionization cross sections (v-ratios) exhibit pronounced oscillations as a function of photon energy, which is the fingerprint of electron diffraction by the surrounding atomic centers. This interpretation is supported by the excellent agreement between first-principles static-exchange and time-dependent density functional theory calculations and high resolution measurements, as well as by qualitative agreement at high energies with a model in which atomic displacements are treated to first order of perturbation theory. The latter model allows us to rationalize the results for all the v-ratios in terms of a generalized v-ratio, which contains information on the structure of the above three molecules and the corresponding molecular cations. A fit of the measured v-ratios to a simple formula based on this model suggests that the method could be used to obtain structural information of both neutral and ionic molecular species.

  2. Intramolecular photoelectron diffraction in the gas phase.

    PubMed

    Ueda, K; Miron, C; Plésiat, E; Argenti, L; Patanen, M; Kooser, K; Ayuso, D; Mondal, S; Kimura, M; Sakai, K; Travnikova, O; Palacios, A; Decleva, P; Kukk, E; Martín, F

    2013-09-28

    We report unambiguous experimental and theoretical evidence of intramolecular photoelectron diffraction in the collective vibrational excitation that accompanies high-energy photoionization of gas-phase CF4, BF3, and CH4 from the 1s orbital of the central atom. We show that the ratios between vibrationally resolved photoionization cross sections (v-ratios) exhibit pronounced oscillations as a function of photon energy, which is the fingerprint of electron diffraction by the surrounding atomic centers. This interpretation is supported by the excellent agreement between first-principles static-exchange and time-dependent density functional theory calculations and high resolution measurements, as well as by qualitative agreement at high energies with a model in which atomic displacements are treated to first order of perturbation theory. The latter model allows us to rationalize the results for all the v-ratios in terms of a generalized v-ratio, which contains information on the structure of the above three molecules and the corresponding molecular cations. A fit of the measured v-ratios to a simple formula based on this model suggests that the method could be used to obtain structural information of both neutral and ionic molecular species.

  3. Instabilities in Lean Gas-Phase Combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, K.; Bockhorn, H.; Eigenbrod, Ch.; Emerson, D.; Haldenwang, P.; Hoffmann, F.; Roekaerts, D.; Ronney, P.; Triebel, W.; Tummers, M.

    2005-06-01

    Lean burning is the burning of fuel-air mixtures with less than the chemically- balanced (stoichiometric) mixture. It produces a significant increase in fuel efficiency and reduction in pollution. However, the limits and control of lean burning are still not well understood.This is the motivation behind the study of instabilities in lean gas-phase combustion under microgravity conditions via direct numerical simulations and comparison of the results with experimental data.The goal is to gain fundamental insights in order to identify and understand the intrinsic chemical and fluid dynamical mechanisms responsible for these instabilities.The potential of this microgravity combustion research includes the development of technology that would reduce pollution and fire and explosion hazards, improve hazardous waste incineration and increase efficiency of the conversion of chemical energy to electric power or motive force.The results from this fundamental research will thus benefit chemical engineering and power generation. Its wide range of applications in industry includes lean-burning car engines.

  4. Hydrocarbon radical thermochemistry: Gas-phase ion chemistry techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Ervin, Kent M.

    2014-03-21

    Final Scientific/Technical Report for the project "Hydrocarbon Radical Thermochemistry: Gas-Phase Ion Chemistry Techniques." The objective of this project is to exploit gas-phase ion chemistry techniques for determination of thermochemical values for neutral hydrocarbon radicals of importance in combustion kinetics.

  5. Pressure Dependence of Gas-Phase Reaction Rates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Persis, Stephanie; Dollet, Alain; Teyssandier, Francis

    2004-01-01

    It is presented that only simple concepts, mainly taken from activated-complex or transition-state theory, are required to explain and analytically describe the influence of pressure on gas-phase reaction kinetics. The simplest kind of elementary gas-phase reaction is a unimolecular decomposition reaction.

  6. Humidity independent mass spectrometry for gas phase chemical analysis via ambient proton transfer reaction.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hongying; Huang, Guangming

    2015-03-31

    In this work, a humidity independent mass spectrometric method was developed for rapid analysis of gas phase chemicals. This method is based upon ambient proton transfer reaction between gas phase chemicals and charged water droplets, in a reaction chamber with nearly saturate humidity under atmospheric pressure. The humidity independent nature enables direct and rapid analysis of raw gas phase samples, avoiding time- and sample-consuming sample pretreatments in conventional mass spectrometry methods to control sample humidity. Acetone, benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and meta-xylene were used to evaluate the analytical performance of present method. The limits of detection for benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and meta-xylene are in the range of ∼0.1 to ∼0.3 ppbV; that of benzene is well below the present European Union permissible exposure limit for benzene vapor (5 μg m(-3), ∼1.44 ppbV), with linear ranges of approximately two orders of magnitude. The majority of the homemade device contains a stainless steel tube as reaction chamber and an ultrasonic humidifier as the source of charged water droplets, which makes this cheap device easy to assemble and facile to operate. In addition, potential application of this method was illustrated by the real time identification of raw gas phase chemicals released from plants at different physiological stages.

  7. The 'sticky business' of cleaning gas-phase membrane proteins: a detergent oriented perspective.

    PubMed

    Borysik, Antoni J; Robinson, Carol V

    2012-11-14

    In recent years the properties of gas-phase detergent clusters have come under close scrutiny due in part to their participation in the analysis of intact membrane protein complexes by mass spectrometry. The detergent molecules that cover the protein complex are removed in the gas-phase by thermally agitating the ions by collision-induced dissociation. This process however, is not readily controlled and can frequently result in the disruption of protein structure. Improved methods of releasing proteins from detergent clusters are clearly required. To facilitate this the structural properties of detergent clusters along with the mechanistic details of their dissociation need to be understood. Pivotal to understanding the properties of gas-phase detergent clusters is the technique of ion mobility mass spectrometry. This technique can be used to assign polydisperse detergent clusters and provide information about their geometries and packing densities. In this article we consider the shapes of detergent clusters and show that these clusters possess geometries that are inconsistent with those in solution. We analyse the distributions of clusters in detail using tandem mass spectrometry and suggest that the mean charge of clusters formed from certain detergents is governed by electrostatic repulsion. We discuss the dissociation of detergent clusters and propose that detergent evaporation it a key process in the protection of protein complexes during high energy collisions in the gas-phase.

  8. Gas-phase nitronium ion affinities.

    PubMed Central

    Cacace, F; de Petris, G; Pepi, F; Angelelli, F

    1995-01-01

    Evaluation of nitronium ion-transfer equilibria, L1NO2+ + L2 = L2NO2+ + L1 (where L1 and L2 are ligands 1 and 2, respectively) by Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry and application of the kinetic method, based on the metastable fragmentation of L1(NO2+)L2 nitronium ion-bound dimers led to a scale of relative gas-phase nitronium ion affinities. This scale, calibrated to a recent literature value for the NO2+ affinity of water, led for 18 ligands, including methanol, ammonia, representative ketones, nitriles, and nitroalkanes, to absolute NO2+ affinities, that fit a reasonably linear general correlation when plotted vs. the corresponding proton affinities (PAs). The slope of the plot depends to a certain extent on the specific nature of the ligands and, hence, the correlations between the NO2+ affinities, and the PAs of a given class of compounds display a better linearity than the general correlation and may afford a useful tool for predicting the NO2+ affinity of a molecule based on its PA. The NO2+ binding energies are considerably lower than the corresponding PAs and well below the binding energies of related polyatomic cations, such as NO+, a trend consistent with the available theoretical results on the structure and the stability of simple NO2+ complexes. The present study reports an example of extension of the kinetic method to dimers, such as L1(NO2+)L2, bound by polyatomic ions, which may considerably widen its scope. Finally, measurement of the NO2+ affinity of ammonia allowed evaluation of the otherwise inaccessible PA of the amino group of nitramide and, hence, direct experimental verification of previous theoretical estimates. PMID:11607578

  9. Release characteristics of selected carbon nanotube polymer composites

    EPA Science Inventory

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are commonly used in polymer formulations to improve strength, conductivity, and other attributes. A developing concern is the potential for carbon nanotube polymer nanocomposites to release nanoparticles into the environment as the polymer ...

  10. Thermodynamic analysis of fuels in gas phase: ethanol, gasoline and ethanol - gasoline predicted by DFT method.

    PubMed

    Neto, A F G; Lopes, F S; Carvalho, E V; Huda, M N; Neto, A M J C; Machado, N T

    2015-10-01

    This paper presents a theoretical study using density functional theory to calculate thermodynamics properties of major molecules compounds at gas phase of fuels like gasoline, ethanol, and gasoline-ethanol mixture in thermal equilibrium on temperature range up to 1500 K. We simulated a composition of gasoline mixture with ethanol for a thorough study of thermal energy, enthalpy, Gibbs free energy, entropy, heat capacity at constant pressure with respect to temperature in order to study the influence caused by ethanol as an additive to gasoline. We used semi-empirical computational methods as well in order to know the efficiency of other methods to simulate fuels through this methodology. In addition, the ethanol influence through the changes in percentage fractions of chemical energy released in combustion reaction and the variations on thermal properties for autoignition temperatures of fuels was analyzed. We verified how ethanol reduces the chemical energy released by gasoline combustion and how at low temperatures the gas phase fuels in thermal equilibrium have similar thermodynamic behavior. Theoretical results were compared with experimental data, when available, and showed agreement. Graphical Abstract Thermodynamic analysis of fuels in gas phase.

  11. Time Dependent Studies of Reactive Shocks in the Gas Phase

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-11-16

    1 LEVEL NRL Memorandum Report 3W tO Time Dependent Studies of Reactive Shocks in the Gas Phase E.S. ORAN, ’T.R. YOUNG and J.P. BORIS Laboratory for...34-• TIME DEPENDENT STUDIES OF REACTIVE SHOCKS IN THE GAS PHASE I. Introduction This paper presents results obtained from a detailed numerical...chemical kinetics, reaction products, and intermediates produced in reactive gas mixtures ignited by the propagation of a shock front. The model is based

  12. Mass Spectrometry of Protein-Ligand Complexes: Enhanced Gas Phase Stability of Ribonuclease-Nucleotide Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Sheng; Xie, Yongming; Loo, Joseph A.

    2008-01-01

    Noncovalent protein-ligand complexes are readily detected by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). Ligand binding stoichiometry can be determined easily by the ESI-MS method. The ability to detect noncovalent protein-ligand complexes depends, however, on the stability of the complexes in the gas phase environment. Solution binding affinities may or may not be accurate predictors of their stability in vacuo. Complexes composed of cytidine nucleotides bound to ribonuclease A (RNase A) and ribonuclease S (RNase S) were detected by ESI-MS and were further analyzed by MS/MS. RNase A and RNase S share similar structures and biological activity. Subtilisin-cleavage of RNase A yields an S-peptide and an S-protein; the S-peptide and S-protein interact through hydrophobic interactions with a solution binding constant in the nanomolar range to generate an active RNase S. Cytidine nucleotides bind to the ribonucleases through electrostatic interactions with a solution binding constant in the micromolar range. Collisionally activated dissociation (CAD) of the 1:1 RNase A-CDP and CTP complexes yields cleavage of the covalent phosphate bonds of the nucleotide ligands, releasing CMP from the complex. CAD of the RNase S-CDP and CTP complexes dissociates the S-peptide from the remaining S-protein/nucleotide complex; further dissociation of the S-protein/nucleotide complex fragments a covalent phosphate bond of the nucleotide with subsequent release of CMP. Despite a solution binding constant favoring the S-protein/S-peptide complex, CDP/CTP remains electrostatically bound to the S-protein in the gas phase dissociation experiment. This study highlights the intrinsic stability of electrostatic interactions in the gas phase and the significant differences in solution and gas phase stabilities of noncovalent complexes that can result. PMID:18565758

  13. Characteristics of releases from TREAT source term experiment STEP-3

    SciTech Connect

    Fink, J.K.; Schlenger, B.J.; Baker, L. Jr.; Ritzman, R.L.

    1987-01-01

    Four in-pile experiments designed to characterize the radiological source term associated with postulated severe light water reactor accidents were performed at the Transient Reactor Test Facility. STEP-3 simulated a high-pressure TMLB' pressurized water reactor accident sequence that includes the extended loss of all ac power and leads to the loss of long-term decay heat removal. In STEP-3, four fuel elements from the Belgonucleaire BR3 reactor were subjected to temperature and pressures approaching those of a TMLB' accident. A description of the experiment and thermal-hydraulic analysis is reported elsewhere. The aerosols released into the flow stream were collected on coupons, settling plates, and wire impactors. Examination of the collected aerosol deposits was performed using scanning electron microscopy, electron microprobe microanalysis, and secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS), to provide information about the chemical composition and morphology of the release. This paper describes the aerosol deposits and elemental composition of the release.

  14. Surface induced dissociation: dissecting noncovalent protein complexes in the gas phase.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Mowei; Wysocki, Vicki H

    2014-04-15

    The quaternary structures of proteins are both important and of interest to chemists, because many proteins exist as complexes in vivo, and probing these structures allows us to better understand their biological functions. Conventional structural biology methods such as X-ray crystallography and nuclear magnetic resonance provide high-resolution information on the structures of protein complexes and are the gold standards in the field. However, other emerging biophysical methods that only provide low-resolution data (e.g. stoichiometry and subunit connectivity) on the structures of the protein complexes are also becoming more important to scientists. Mass spectrometry is one of these approaches that provide lower than atomic structural resolution, but the approach is higher throughput and provides not only better mass information than other techniques but also stoichiometry and topology. Fragile noncovalent interactions within the protein complexes can be preserved in the gas phase of MS under gentle ionization and transfer conditions. Scientists can measure the masses of the complexes with high confidence to reveal the stoichiometry and composition of the proteins. What makes mass spectrometry an even more powerful method is that researchers can further isolate the protein complexes and activate them in the gas phase to release subunits for more structural information. The caveat is that, upon gas-phase activation, the released subunits need to faithfully reflect the native topology so that useful information on the proteins can be extracted from mass spectrometry experiments. Unfortunately, many proteins tend to favor unfolding upon collision with neutral gas (the most common activation method in mass spectrometers). Therefore, this typically results in limited insights on the quaternary structure of the precursor without further manipulation of other experimental factors. Scientists have observed, however, that valuable structural information can be obtained

  15. Atomic and Molecular Gas Phase Spectrometry.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-09-30

    Puil dstrlbutbl1o P e a s e 173~ V evaluation of the spatial and spectral characteristics of the EIKAC (CERMAX) xenon point arc source ; study of the...of the EIMAC (CERMAX) xenon point arc source ; study of the reaction sequences and quantitative changes of alkaline earth phosphates in the presence of

  16. Gas phase depletion and flow dynamics in horizontal MOCVD reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van de Ven, J.; Rutten, G. M. J.; Raaijmakers, M. J.; Giling, L. J.

    1986-08-01

    Growth rates of GaAs in the MOCVD process have been studied as a function of both lateral and axial position in horizontal reactor cells with rectangular cross-sections. A model to describe growth rates in laminar flow systems on the basis of concentration profiles under diffusion controlled conditions has been developed. The derivation of the growth rate equations includes the definition of an entrance length for the concentration profile to developed. In this region, growth rates appear to decrease with the 1/3 power of the axial position. Beyond this region, an exponential decrease is found. For low Rayleigh number conditions, the present experimental results show a very satisfactory agreement with the model without parameter fitting for both rectangular and tapered cells, and with both H 2 and N 2 as carrier gases. Theory also predicts that uniform deposition can be obtained over large areas in the flow direction for tapered cells, which has indeed been achieved experimentally. The influence of top-cooling in the present MOCVD system has been considered in more detail. From the experimental results, conclusions could be drawn concerning the flow characteristics. For low Rayleigh numbers (present study ≲ 700) it follows that growth rate distributions correspond with forced laminar flow characteristics. For relatively high Rayleigh numbers (present work 1700-2800), free convective effects with vortex formation are important. These conclusions are not specific for the present system, but apply to horizontal cold-wall reactors in general. On the basis of the present observations, recommendations for a cell design to obtain large area homogeneous deposition have been formulated. In addition, this work supports the conclusion that the final decomposition of trimethylgallium in the MOCVD process mainly takes place at the hot substrate and susceptor and not in the gas phase.

  17. Gas-phase saturation and evaporative cooling effects during wet compression of a fuel aerosol under RCM conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Goldsborough, S.S.; Johnson, M.V.; Zhu, G.S.; Aggarwal, S.K.

    2011-01-15

    Wet compression of a fuel aerosol has been proposed as a means of creating gas-phase mixtures of involatile diesel-representative fuels and oxidizer + diluent gases for rapid compression machine (RCM) experiments. The use of high concentration aerosols (e.g., {proportional_to}0.1 mL{sub fuel}/L{sub gas}, {proportional_to}1 x 10{sup 9} droplets/L{sub gas} for stoichiometric fuel loading at ambient conditions) can result in droplet-droplet interactions which lead to significant gas-phase fuel saturation and evaporative cooling during the volumetric compression process. In addition, localized stratification (i.e., on the droplet scale) of the fuel vapor and of temperature can lead to non-homogeneous reaction and heat release processes - features which could prevent adequate segregation of the underlying chemical kinetic rates from rates of physical transport. These characteristics are dependent on many factors including physical parameters such as overall fuel loading and initial droplet size relative to the compression rate, as well as fuel and diluent properties such as the boiling curve, vaporization enthalpy, heat capacity, and mass and thermal diffusivities. This study investigates the physical issues, especially fuel saturation and evaporative cooling effects, using a spherically-symmetric, single-droplet wet compression model. n-Dodecane is used as the fuel with the gas containing 21% O{sub 2} and 79% N{sub 2}. An overall compression time and compression ratio of 15.3 ms and 13.4 are used, respectively. It is found that smaller droplets (d{sub 0}{proportional_to} 2-3 {mu}m) are more affected by 'far-field' saturation and cooling effects, while larger droplets (d{sub 0}{proportional_to} 14 {mu}m) result in greater localized stratification of the gas-phase due to the larger diffusion distances for heat and mass transport. Vaporization of larger droplets is more affected by the volumetric compression process since evaporation requires more time to be completed

  18. Gas-Phase Chemistry of Multiply Charged Bioions in Analytical Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Teng-Yi; McLuckey, Scott A.

    2011-01-01

    Ion chemistry has long played an important role in molecular mass spectrometry (MS), as it is central to the use of MS as a structural characterization tool. With the advent of ionization methods capable of producing gaseous ions from large biomolecules, the chemistry of gaseous bioions has become a highly active area of research. Gas-phase biomolecule-ion reactions are usually driven by interactions with neutral molecules, photons, electrons, ions, or surfaces. Ion dissociation or transformation into different ion types can be achieved. The types of reaction products observed depend on the characteristics of the ions, the transformation methods, and the time frame of observation. This review focuses on the gas-phase chemistries of ions derived from the electrospray ionization of peptides, proteins, and oligonucleotides, with particular emphasis on their utility in bioanalysis. Various ion-transformation strategies, which further facilitate structural interrogation by converting ions from one type to another, are also summarized. PMID:20636047

  19. Effect of duty-cycles on the air plasma gas-phase of dielectric barrier discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barni, R.; Biganzoli, I.; Dell'Orto, E. C.; Riccardi, C.

    2015-10-01

    An experimental investigation concerning the effects of a duty-cycle in the supply of a dielectric barrier discharge in atmospheric pressure air has been performed. Electrical characteristics of the discharge have been measured, focusing mainly on the statistical properties of the current filaments and on dielectric surface charging, both affected by the frequent repetition of breakdown imposed by the duty-cycle. Information on the gas-phase composition was gathered too. In particular, a strong enhancement in the ozone formation rate is observed when suitable long pauses separate the active discharge phases. A simulation of the chemical kinetics in the gas-phase, based on a simplified discharge modeling, is briefly described in order to shed light on the observed increase in ozone production. The effect of a duty-cycle on surface modification of polymeric films in order to increase their wettability has been investigated too.

  20. MOVPE GaN gas phase chemistry for reactor design and optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Safvi, S.A.; Thon, A.; Kuech, T.F.; Redwing, J.M.; Flynn, J.S.; Tischler, M.A.

    1997-12-31

    The results of gas phase decomposition studies are used to construct a chemistry model which is compared to data obtained from an experimental MOVPE reactor. A flow tube reactor is used to study gas phase reactions between trimethylgallium (TMG) and ammonia at high temperatures, characteristic to the metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE) of GaN. Experiments were performed to determine the effect of the mixing of the Group III precursors and Group V precursors on the growth rate, growth uniformity and film properties. Growth rates are predicted for simple reaction mechanisms and compared to those obtained experimentally. Quantification of the loss of reacting species due to oligomerization is made based on experimentally observed growth rates. The model is used to obtain trends in growth rate and uniformity with the purpose of moving towards better operating conditions.

  1. Gas phase metal cluster model systems for heterogeneous catalysis.

    PubMed

    Lang, Sandra M; Bernhardt, Thorsten M

    2012-07-14

    Since the advent of intense cluster sources, physical and chemical properties of isolated metal clusters are an active field of research. In particular, gas phase metal clusters represent ideal model systems to gain molecular level insight into the energetics and kinetics of metal-mediated catalytic reactions. Here we summarize experimental reactivity studies as well as investigations of thermal catalytic reaction cycles on small gas phase metal clusters, mostly in relation to the surprising catalytic activity of nanoscale gold particles. A particular emphasis is put on the importance of conceptual insights gained through the study of gas phase model systems. Based on these concepts future perspectives are formulated in terms of variation and optimization of catalytic materials e.g. by utilization of bimetals and metal oxides. Furthermore, the future potential of bio-inspired catalytic material systems are highlighted and technical developments are discussed.

  2. Negative ion gas-phase chemistry of arenes.

    PubMed

    Danikiewicz, Witold; Zimnicka, Magdalena

    2016-01-01

    Reactions of aromatic and heteroaromatic compounds involving anions are of great importance in organic synthesis. Some of these reactions have been studied in the gas phase and are occasionally mentioned in reviews devoted to gas-phase negative ion chemistry, but no reviews exist that collect all existing information about these reactions. This work is intended to fill this gap. In the first part of this review, methods for generating arene anions in the gas phase and studying their physicochemical properties and fragmentation reactions are presented. The main topics in this part are as follows: processes in which gas-phase arene anions are formed, measurements and calculations of the proton affinities of arene anions, proton exchange reactions, and fragmentation processes of substituted arene anions, especially phenide ions. The second part is devoted to gas-phase reactions of arene anions. The most important of these are reactions with electrophiles such as carbonyl compounds and α,β-unsaturated carbonyl and related compounds (Michael acceptors). Other reactions including oxidation of arene anions and halogenophilic reactions are also presented. In the last part of the review, reactions of electrophilic arenes with nucleophiles are discussed. The best known of these is the aromatic nucleophilic substitution (SN Ar) reaction; however, other processes that lead to the substitution of a hydrogen atom in the aromatic ring are also very important. Aromatic substrates in these reactions are usually but not always nitroarenes bearing other substituents in the ring. The first step in these reactions is the formation of an anionic σ-adduct, which, depending on the substituents in the aromatic ring and the structure of the attacking nucleophile, is either an intermediate or a transition state in the reaction path. In the present review, we attempted to collect the results of both experimental and computational studies of the aforementioned reactions conducted since the

  3. Macro- and micro-nutrient release characteristics of three polymer-coated fertilizers: Theory and measurements

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In spite of several published studies we have an incomplete understanding of the ion release mechanisms and characteristics of primary polymer-coated fertilizer (PCF) technologies. Here we extend current conceptual models describing release mechanisms and describe the critical effects of substrate m...

  4. Characteristics of pollutant gas releases from swine, dairy, beef, and layer manure, and municipal wastewater.

    PubMed

    Dai, Xiao-Rong; Saha, Chayan Kumer; Ni, Ji-Qin; Heber, Albert J; Blanes-Vidal, Victoria; Dunn, James L

    2015-06-01

    Knowledge about characteristics of gas releases from various types of organic wastes can assist in developing gas pollution reduction technologies and establishing environmental regulations. Five different organic wastes, i.e., four types of animal manure (swine, beef, dairy, and layer hen) and municipal wastewater, were studied for their characteristics of ammonia (NH3), carbon dioxide (CO2), hydrogen sulfide (H2S), and sulfur dioxide (SO2) releases for 38 or 43 days in reactors under laboratory conditions. Weekly waste additions and continuous reactor headspace ventilation were supplied to simulate waste storage conditions. Results demonstrated that among the five waste types, layer hen manure and municipal wastewater had the highest and lowest NH3 release potentials, respectively. Layer manure had the highest and dairy manure had the lowest CO2 release potentials. Dairy manure and layer manure had the highest and lowest H2S release potentials, respectively. Beef manure and layer manure had the highest and lowest SO2 releases, respectively. The physicochemical characteristics of the different types of wastes, especially the total nitrogen, total ammoniacal nitrogen, dry matter, and pH, had strong influence on the releases of the four gases. Even for the same type of waste, the variation in physicochemical characteristics affected the gas releases remarkably.

  5. Gas Phase Hydration of Methyl Glyoxal to Form the Gemdiol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroll, Jay A.; Axson, Jessica L.; Vaida, Veronica

    2016-06-01

    Methylglyoxal is a known oxidation product of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in Earth's atmosphere. While the gas phase chemistry of methylglyoxal is fairly well understood, its modeled concentration and role in the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) continues to be controversial. The gas phase hydration of methylglyoxal to form a gemdiol has not been widely considered for water-restricted environments such as the atmosphere. However, this process may have important consequences for the atmospheric processing of VOCs. We will report on spectroscopic work done in the Vaida laboratory studying the hydration of methylglyoxal and discuss the implications for understanding the atmospheric processing and fate of methylglyoxal and similar molecules.

  6. Gas-phase interactions of organotin compounds with cysteine.

    PubMed

    Latrous, Latifa; Salpin, Jean-Yves; Haldys, Violette; Léon, Emmanuelle; Correia, Catarina; Lamsabhi, Al Mokhtar

    2016-11-01

    The gas-phase interactions of cysteine with di-organotin and tri-organotin compounds have been studied by mass spectrometry experiments and quantum calculations. Positive-ion electrospray spectra show that the interaction of di- and tri-organotins with cysteine results in the formation of [(R)2 Sn(Cys-H)](+) and [(R)3 Sn(Cys)](+) ions, respectively. MS/MS spectra of [(R)2 Sn(Cys-H)](+) complexes are characterized by numerous fragmentation processes, notably associated with elimination of NH3 and (C,H2 ,O2 ). Several dissociation routes are characteristic of each given organic species. Upon collision, both the [(R)3 Sn(Gly)](+) and [(R)3 Sn(Cys)](+) complexes are associated with elimination of the intact amino acid, leading to the formation of [(R)3 Sn](+) cation. But for the latter complex, two additional fragmentation processes are observed, associated with the elimination of NH3 and C3 H4 O2 S. Calculations indicate that the interaction between organotins and cysteine is predominantly electrostatic but also exhibits a considerable covalent character, which is slightly more pronounced in tri-organotin complexes. A preferred bidentate interaction of the type -η(2) -S-NH2 , with sulfur and the amino group, is observed. As for the [(R)3 Sn(Cys)](+) complexes, their stability is due to the combination of the hydrogen bond taking place between the amino group and the sulfur lone pair and the interaction between the carboxylic oxygen atom and the metal. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Correlation between the FT-IR characteristics and metoprolol tartrate release of methylcellulose-based patches.

    PubMed

    Papp, József; Horgos, József; Szente, Virág; Zelkó, Romána

    2010-06-15

    The aim of the present study was to investigate how the drug release and FT-IR characteristics of metolose patches were influenced by the changes of Metolose SM 4000 (methylcellulose) and Metolose 90SH 100.000SR (hypromellose) proportions. FT-IR spectroscopy measurements were performed in parallel with the metoprolol tartrate release study to track the effect of the composition on the drug release. The metoprolol tartrate release profile of the patches was evaluated by Weibull distribution. Linear relationship was found with good correlation between the logarithm of time interval necessary to release 63.2% of metoprolol tartrate (tau(d) values) and the peak area measured within the characteristic FT-IR wavenumbers of patches. The application of FT-IR measurements can be recommended as a rapid, non-destructive screening method during the in-process control of patches.

  8. Gas-phase reactivity of carboxylic acid functional groups with carbodiimides.

    PubMed

    Prentice, Boone M; Gilbert, Joshua D; Stutzman, John R; Forrest, William P; McLuckey, Scott A

    2013-01-01

    Gas-phase modification of carboxylic acid functionalities is performed via ion/ion reactions with carbodiimide reagents [N-cyclohexyl-N'-(2-morpholinoethyl)carbodiimide (CMC) and [3-(3-Ethylcarbodiimide-1-yl)propyl]trimethylaminium (ECPT)]. Gas-phase ion/ion covalent chemistry requires the formation of a long-lived complex. In this instance, the complex is stabilized by an electrostatic interaction between the fixed charge quaternary ammonium group of the carbodiimide reagent cation and the analyte dianion. Subsequent activation results in characteristic loss of an isocyanate derivative from one side of the carbodiimide functionality, a signature for this covalent chemistry. The resulting amide bond is formed on the analyte at the site of the original carboxylic acid. Reactions involving analytes that do not contain available carboxylic acid groups (e.g., they have been converted to sodium salts) or reagents that do not have the carbodiimide functionality do not undergo a covalent reaction. This chemistry is demonstrated using PAMAM generation 0.5 dendrimer, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), and the model peptide DGAILDGAILD. This work demonstrates the selective gas-phase covalent modification of carboxylic acid functionalities.

  9. Ion-Molecule Reactions in Gas Phase Radiation Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willis, Clive

    1981-01-01

    Discusses some aspects of the radiation chemistry of gases, focusing on the ion-molecule and charge neutralization reactions which set study of the gas phase apart. Uses three examples that illustrate radiolysis, describing the radiolysis of (1) oxygen, (2) carbon dioxide, and (3) acetylene. (CS)

  10. CHEMKIN2. General Gas-Phase Chemical Kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Rupley, F.M.

    1992-01-24

    CHEMKIN is a high-level tool for chemists to use to describe arbitrary gas-phase chemical reaction mechanisms and systems of governing equations. It remains, however, for the user to select and implement a solution method; this is not provided. It consists of two major components: the Interpreter and the Gas-phase Subroutine Library. The Interpreter reads a symbolic description of an arbitrary, user-specified chemical reaction mechanism. A data file is generated which forms a link to the Gas-phase Subroutine Library, a collection of about 200 modular subroutines which may be called to return thermodynamic properties, chemical production rates, derivatives of thermodynamic properties, derivatives of chemical production rates, or sensitivity parameters. Both single and double precision versions of CHEMKIN are included. Also provided is a set of FORTRAN subroutines for evaluating gas-phase transport properties such as thermal conductivities, viscosities, and diffusion coefficients. These properties are an important part of any computational simulation of a chemically reacting flow. The transport properties subroutines are designed to be used in conjunction with the CHEMKIN Subroutine Library. The transport properties depend on the state of the gas and on certain molecular parameters. The parameters considered are the Lennard-Jones potential well depth and collision diameter, the dipole moment, the polarizability, and the rotational relaxation collision number.

  11. The Dipeptide Ala-Gly in the Gas Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bermúdez, Celina; Varela, Marcelino; Cabezas, Carlos; Peña, Isabel; Alonso, José L.

    2014-06-01

    The dipeptide Ala-Gly has been examined in gas phase by laser ablation molecular beam Fourier transform microwave (LA-MB-FTMW) spectroscopy in the frequency region 3-12 GHz. Three rotamers have been detected in the supersonic expansion. The quadrupole hyperfine structure of two 14N (I=1) nuclei has been totally resolved allowing the conclusive identification of one conformer.

  12. INVESTIGATION OF GAS-PHASE OZONE AS A POTENTIAL BIOCIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper presents data on the effect of ozone on both vegetative and spore-forming fungi as well as on spore-forming bacteria. (NOTE: Despite the wide use of ozone generators in indoor air cleaning, there is little research data on ozone's biocidal activity in the gas phase.) Dr...

  13. Release characteristics of alkali and alkaline earth metallic species during biomass pyrolysis and steam gasification process.

    PubMed

    Long, Jiang; Song, Hu; Jun, Xiang; Sheng, Su; Lun-Shi, Sun; Kai, Xu; Yao, Yao

    2012-07-01

    Investigating the release characteristics of alkali and alkaline earth metallic species (AAEMs) is of potential interest because of AAEM's possible useful service as catalysts in biomass thermal conversion. In this study, three kinds of typical Chinese biomass were selected to pyrolyse and their chars were subsequently steam gasified in a designed quartz fixed-bed reactor to investigate the release characteristics of alkali and alkaline earth metallic species (AAEMs). The results indicate that 53-76% of alkali metal and 27-40% of alkaline earth metal release in pyrolysis process, as well as 12-34% of alkali metal and 12-16% of alkaline earth metal evaporate in char gasification process, and temperature is not the only factor to impact AAEMs emission. The releasing characteristics of AAEMs during pyrolysis and char gasification process of three kinds of biomass were discussed in this paper.

  14. Effect of heat release on movement characteristics of shock train in an isolator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chenlin; Chang, Juntao; Liu, MengMeng; Feng, Shuo; Shi, Wen; Bao, Wen

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, the effect of heat release on movement characteristics of shock train is numerically investigated in an isolator. It is found that the combustion heat release has a distinct effect on the shock train movement characteristics in the isolator. With increasing heat release, a shock train gradually forms and then propagates toward isolator entrance. In process of shock train formation, separation bubbles before injection ports entrain the high temperature burning gas into the boundary layer, which causes the shock train to shrink and stretch, and changes in configuration and number of shock waves. At the same time, the system force fluctuates. In addition, the shock train movement is divided into three stages, which have different wall pressure distribution. It is believed that these findings have a help the better understanding of the effect of heat release on the movement characteristics of shock train in an isolator.

  15. Gas-phase IR spectra of intact [alpha]-helical coiled coil protein complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagel, Kevin; Kupser, Peter; Bierau, Frauke; Polfer, Nicolas C.; Steill, Jeffrey D.; Oomens, Jos; Meijer, Gerard; Koksch, Beate; von Helden, Gert

    2009-06-01

    Electrospray ionization (ESI) is the softest ionization method that is currently available and it is widely accepted, that ESI generated ions of proteins and protein assemblies at certain conditions retain characteristic aspects of their solution-state conformation. ESI mass spectrometry (MS) therefore evolved as a useful tool to obtain information on composition, stoichiometry, and dynamics of non-covalently associated protein complexes. While tertiary structure information of proteins can be obtained from ion mobility spectrometry (IMS), only a few techniques yield direct information on the secondary structure of gas-phase peptides and proteins. We present here the mid-IR spectroscopic secondary structural analysis of three de novo designed [alpha]-helical coiled coil model peptides and their non-covalently associated complexes in the gas-phase. The conformational stability of such coiled coil peptides in solution is primarily driven by aggregation. Isolated monomers usually remain unfolded. Two of the investigated peptides were designed to assemble into stable [alpha]-helical complexes in acidic solution, while the third one remains monomeric and unfolded at these conditions. Monomer ions of all three peptides show comparable photodissociation IR spectra and therefore suggest an unfolded conformation in the gas phase. In contrast, considerable CO stretch (amide-I) and N-H bend (amide-II) band shifts have been observed for the dimers which is consistent with an elevated H-bond content. These findings provide evidence that at least a fraction of the condensed phase [alpha]-helical structure is retained in the gas-phase coiled coil complexes.

  16. Effect of carboxymethylation on rheological and drug release characteristics of locust bean gum matrix tablets.

    PubMed

    Chakravorty, Amrita; Barman, Gouranga; Mukherjee, Sudipta; Sa, Biswanath

    2016-06-25

    This study was undertaken to investigate correlation between the carboxymethylation-induced rheological changes and drug release characteristics of locust bean gum (LBG) matrix tablets. LBG was derivatized to carboxymethyl LBG (CMLBG) and characterized by (13)C NMR, FTIR and elemental analyses. Rheological studies revealed that LBG, in contact with water, produced a strong elastic gel which swelled less due to lower penetration of water resulting in slower drug release. On the other hand, CMLBG formed a viscous polymer solution through which higher influx of water resulted in rapid swelling of the matrix and faster drug release. Although the release from a particular matrix was dependent on drugs' solubilities, CMLBG matrix tablet produced faster release of all the drugs than LBG matrix tablets. In conclusion, rheological study appeared to be an useful tool to predict release of drugs from polysaccharide matrix tablets.

  17. Flavin Adenine Dinucleotide Structural Motifs: From Solution to Gas Phase

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) is involved in important metabolic reactions where the biological function is intrinsically related to changes in conformation. In the present work, FAD conformational changes were studied in solution and in gas phase by measuring the fluorescence decay time and ion-neutral collision cross sections (CCS, in a trapped ion mobility spectrometer, TIMS) as a function of the solvent conditions (i.e., organic content) and gas-phase collisional partner (i.e., N2 doped with organic molecules). Changes in the fluorescence decay suggest that FAD can exist in four conformations in solution, where the abundance of the extended conformations increases with the organic content. TIMS-MS experiments showed that FAD can exist in the gas phase as deprotonated (M = C27H31N9O15P2) and protonated forms (M = C27H33N9O15P2) and that multiple conformations (up to 12) can be observed as a function of the starting solution for the [M + H]+ and [M + Na]+molecular ions. In addition, changes in the relative abundances of the gas-phase structures were observed from a “stack” to a “close” conformation when organic molecules were introduced in the TIMS cell as collision partners. Candidate structures optimized at the DFT/B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) were proposed for each IMS band, and results showed that the most abundant IMS band corresponds to the most stable candidate structure. Solution and gas-phase experiments suggest that the driving force that stabilizes the different conformations is based on the interaction of the adenine and isoalloxazine rings that can be tailored by the “solvation” effect created with the organic molecules. PMID:25222439

  18. [Release characteristics in vitro and pharmacokinetics of da chuanxiong fang multiunit drug delivery system in rats].

    PubMed

    Wei, Yuan-feng; Zhang, Ning; Lin, Xiao; Feng, Yi

    2011-09-01

    The drug release characteristics ofDa Chuanxiong Fang multiunit drug delivery system (DCXFMDDS) in vivo and in vitro were evaluated. Ferulic acid (FA) and senkyunolide I (SI) were used as marker components, which were two of the effective components of Da Chuanxiong Fang. And their contents were determined by HPLC. Drug release characteristics in vitro of DCXFMDDS and Da Chuanxiong pills and pharmacokinetics characteristics of DCXFMDDS and Da Chuanxiong Fang active fraction (DCXFAF) in rats were compared. It was obvious that FA released from the DCXFMDDS in a sustained fashion but SI in a fast fashion both in vitro and in vivo. The releasing process and the releasing mechanism of FA and SI from DCXFMDDS were different, but the AUC value indicated that compared with DCXFAF the extent of absorption of FA and SI from DCXFMDDS was increased. Though from the same multiunit drug delivery system, FA an SI had different drug release characteristics both in vitro and in vivo, and that may be one of the reason why DCXFMDDS has the good properties such as rapid and long-lasting effect and high efficiency.

  19. Measuring Uptake Coefficients and Henry's Law Constants of Gas-Phase Species with Models for Secondary Organic Aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fairhurst, M. C.; Waring-Kidd, C.; Ezell, M. J.; Finlayson-Pitts, B. J.

    2014-12-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOC) are oxidized in the atmosphere and their products contribute to secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation. These particles have been shown to have effects on visibility, climate, and human health. Current models typically under-predict SOA concentrations from field measurements. Underestimation of these concentrations could be a result of how models treat particle growth. It is often assumed that particles grow via instantaneous thermal equilibrium partitioning between liquid particles and gas-phase species. Recent work has shown that growth may be better represented by irreversible, kinetically limited uptake of gas-phase species onto more viscous, tar-like SOA. However, uptake coefficients for these processes are not known. The goal of this project is to measure uptake coefficients and solubilities for different gases onto models serving as proxies for SOA and determine how they vary based on the chemical composition of the gas and the condensed phase. Experiments were conducted using two approaches: attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy and a flow system coupled to a mass spectrometer. The ATR crystal was coated with the SOA proxy and the gas-phase species introduced via a custom flow system. Uptake of the gas-phase species was characterized by measuring the intensity of characteristic IR bands as a function of time, from which a Henry's law constant and initial estimate of uptake coefficients could be obtained. Uptake coefficients were also measured in a flow system where the walls of the flow tube were coated with the SOA proxy and gas-phase species introduced via a moveable inlet. Uptake coefficients were derived from the decay in gas-phase species measured by mass spectrometry. The results of this work will establish a structure-interaction relationship for uptake of gases into SOA that can be implemented into regional and global models.

  20. Impact of release characteristics of sinomenine hydrochloride dosage forms on its pharmacokinetics in beagle dogs

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jin; Shi, Jie-Ming; Zhang, Tian-Hong; Gao, Kun; Mao, Jing-Jing; Li, Bing; Sun, Ying-Hua; He, Zhong-Gui

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of release behavior of sustained-release dosage forms of sinomenine hydrochloride (SM•HCl) on its pharmacokinetics in beagle dogs. METHODS: The in vitro release behavior of two SM•HCl dosage forms, including commercial 12-h sustained-release tablets and 24-h sustained-release pellets prepared in our laboratory, was examined. The two dosage forms were orally administrated to beagle dogs, and then the in vivo SM•HCl pharmacokinetics was investigated and compared. RESULTS: The optimal SM•HCl sustained-release formulation was achieved by mixing slow- and rapid-release pellets (9:1, w/w). The SM•HCl release profiles of the sustained-release pellets were scarcely influenced by the pH of the dissolution medium. Release from the 12-h sustained-release tablets was markedly quicker than that from the 24-h sustained-release pellets, the cumulative release up to 12-h was 99.9% vs 68.7%. From a pharmacokinetic standpoint, the 24-h SM•HCl sustained-release pellets had longer tmax and lower Cmax compared to the 12-h sustained-release tablets, the tmax being 2.67×0.52 h vs 9.83×0.98 h and the Cmax being 1 334.45±368.76 ng/mL vs 893.12±292.55 ng/mL, respectively. However, the AUC0-tn of two SM•HCl dosage forms was comparable and both preparations were statistically bioequivalent. Furthermore, the two preparations had good correlations between SM•HCl percentage absorption in vivo and the cumulative percentage release in vitro. CONCLUSION: The in vitro release properties of the dosage forms strongly affect their pharmacokinetic behavior in vivo. Therefore, managing the in vitro release behavior of dosage forms is a promising strategy for obtaining the optimal in vivo pharmacokinetic characteristics and safe therapeutic drug concentration-time curves. PMID:16052686

  1. A study of critical functionality-related characteristics of HPMC for sustained-release tablets.

    PubMed

    Košir, Darjan; Ojsteršek, Tadej; Baumgartner, Saša; Vrečer, Franc

    2016-12-23

    The drug release profile from hydrophilic matrix tablets can be crucially affected by the variability of physicochemical properties of the controlled release agent. This study investigates and seeks to understand the functionality-related characteristics (FRCs) of hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) type 2208, K4M grade, that influence the release rate of the model drug carvedilol from hydrophilic matrix tablets during the entire dissolution profile. The following FRCs were examined: particle size distribution, degree of substitution, and viscosity. Eight different HPMC samples were used to create a suitable design space. Multiple linear regression (MLR) and partial least squares regression (PLSR) analyses were used to create models for each time point. The PLSR results show that the first part of the drug release profiles is mainly regulated by the HPMC particle size. Apparent viscosity and hydroxypropoxy content (%HP) become important in later stages of the drug release profile, when the influence of particle size distribution decreases. These findings make it possible to better understand the importance of FRCs. Larger HPMC particles increase drug release in the first part of the drug release profile, whereas decreased apparent viscosity and a higher degree of %HP increase the drug release rate in the later part of the drug release profile.

  2. Gas-phase interactions of organotin compounds with glycine.

    PubMed

    Latrous, Latifa; Tortajada, Jeanine; Haldys, Violette; Léon, Emmanuelle; Correia, Catarina; Salpin, Jean-Yves

    2013-07-01

    Gas-phase interactions of organotins with glycine have been studied by combining mass spectrometry experiments and quantum calculations. Positive-ion electrospray spectra show that the interaction of di- and tri-organotins with glycine results in the formation of [(R)2Sn(Gly)-H](+) and [(R)3Sn(Gly)](+) ions, respectively. Di-organotin complexes appear much more reactive than those involving tri-organotins. (MS/MS) spectra of the [(R)3Sn(Gly)](+) ions are indeed simple and only show elimination of intact glycine, generating the [(R)3Sn](+) carbocation. On the other hand, MS/MS spectra of [(R)2Sn(Gly)-H](+) complexes are characterized by numerous fragmentation processes. Six of them, associated with elimination of H2O, CO, H2O + CO and formation of [(R)2SnOH](+) (-57 u),[(R)2SnNH2](+) (-58 u) and [(R)2SnH](+) (-73 u), are systematically observed. Use of labeled glycines notably concludes that the hydrogen atoms eliminated in water and H2O + CO are labile hydrogens. A similar conclusion can be made for hydrogens of [(R2)SnOH](+) and [(R2)SnNH2](+) ions. Interestingly, formation [(R)2SnH](+) ions is characterized by a migration of one the α hydrogen of glycine onto the metallic center. Finally, several dissociation routes are observed and are characteristic of a given organic substituent. Calculations indicated that the interaction between organotins and glycine is mostly electrostatic. For [(R)2Sn(Gly)-H](+) complexes, a preferable bidentate interaction of the type η(2)-O,NH2 is observed, similar to that encountered for other metal ions. [(R)3Sn](+) ions strongly stabilize the zwitterionic form of glycine, which is practically degenerate with respect to neutral glycine. In addition, the interconversion between both forms is almost barrierless. Suitable mechanisms are proposed in order to account for the most relevant fragmentation processes.

  3. Enantiomeric Excess Determination for Monosaccharides Using Chiral Transmission to Cold Gas-Phase Tryptophan in Ultraviolet Photodissociation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujihara, Akimasa; Maeda, Naoto; Doan, Thuc N.; Hayakawa, Shigeo

    2017-02-01

    Chiral transmission between monosaccharides and amino acids via photodissociation in the gas phase was examined using a tandem mass spectrometer fitted with an electrospray ionization source and a cold ion trap in order to investigate the origin of the homochirality of biomolecules in molecular clouds. Ultraviolet photodissociation mass spectra of cold gas-phase noncovalent complexes of the monosaccharide enantiomers glucose (Glc) and galactose (Gal) with protonated l-tryptophan H+( l-Trp) were obtained by photoexcitation of the indole ring of l-Trp. l-Trp dissociated via Cα-Cβ bond cleavage when noncovalently complexed with d-Glc; however, no dissociation of l-Trp occurred in the homochiral H+( l-Trp)( l-Glc) noncovalent complex, where the energy absorbed by l-Trp was released through the evaporation of l-Glc. This enantioselective photodissociation of Trp was due to the transmission of chirality from Glc to Trp via photodissociation in the gas-phase noncovalent complexes, and was applied to the quantitative chiral analysis of monosaccharides. The enantiomeric excess of monosaccharides in solution could be determined by measuring the relative abundance of the two product ions in a single photodissociation mass spectrum of the cold gas-phase noncovalent complex with H+( l-Trp), and by referring to the linear relationships derived in this work.

  4. Estimate of radionuclide release characteristics into containment under severe accident conditions. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Nourbakhsh, H.P.

    1993-11-01

    A detailed review of the available light water reactor source term information is presented as a technical basis for development of updated source terms into the containment under severe accident conditions. Simplified estimates of radionuclide release and transport characteristics are specified for each unique combination of the reactor coolant and containment system combinations. A quantitative uncertainty analysis in the release to the containment using NUREG-1150 methodology is also presented.

  5. Spectroscopic studies of cold, gas-phase biomolecular ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzo, Thomas R.; Stearns, Jaime A.; Boyarkin, Oleg V.

    While the marriage of mass spectrometry and laser spectroscopy is not new, developments over the last few years in this relationship have opened up new horizons for the spectroscopic study of biological molecules. The combination of electrospray ionisation for producing large biological molecules in the gas phase together with cooled ion traps and multiple-resonance laser schemes are allowing spectroscopic investigation of individual conformations of peptides with more than a dozen amino acids. Highly resolved infrared spectra of single conformations of such species provide important benchmarks for testing the accuracy of theoretical calculations. This review presents a number of techniques employed in our laboratory and in others for measuring the spectroscopy of cold, gas-phase protonated peptides. We show examples that demonstrate the power of these techniques and evaluate their extension to still larger biological molecules.

  6. Gas-Phase Studies of Formamidopyrimidine Glycosylase (Fpg) Substrates.

    PubMed

    Kiruba, G S M; Xu, Jiahui; Zelikson, Victoria; Lee, Jeehiun K

    2016-03-07

    Gas-phase thermochemical properties (tautomerism, acidity, and proton affinity) have been measured and calculated for a series of nucleobase derivatives that have not heretofore been examined under vacuum. The studied species are substrates for the enzyme formamidopyrimidine glycosylase (Fpg), which cleaves damaged nucleobases from DNA. The gas-phase results are compared and contrasted to solution-phase data, to afford insight into the Fpg mechanism. Calculations are also used to probe the energetics of various possible mechanisms and to predict isotope effects that could potentially allow for discrimination between different mechanisms. Specifically, (18) O substitution at the ribose O4' is predicted to result in a normal kinetic isotope effect (KIE) for a ring-opening "endocyclic" mechanism and an inverse KIE for a direct base excision "exocyclic" pathway.

  7. The physical chemistry of Criegee intermediates in the gas phase

    DOE PAGES

    Osborn, David L.; Taatjes, Craig A.

    2015-07-24

    Here, carbonyl oxides, also known as Criegee intermediates, are key intermediates in both gas phase ozonolysis of unsaturated hydrocarbons in the troposphere and solution phase organic synthesis via ozonolysis. Although the study of Criegee intermediates in both arenas has a long history, direct studies in the gas phase have only recently become possible through new methods of generating stabilised Criegee intermediates in sufficient quantities. This advance has catalysed a large number of new experimental and theoretical investigations of Criegee intermediate chemistry. In this article we review the physical chemistry of Criegee intermediates, focusing on their molecular structure, spectroscopy, unimolecular andmore » bimolecular reactions. These recent results have overturned conclusions from some previous studies, while confirming others, and have clarified areas of investigation that will be critical targets for future studies. In addition to expanding our fundamental understanding of Criegee intermediates, the rapidly expanding knowledge base will support increasingly predictive models of their impacts on society.« less

  8. The physical chemistry of Criegee intermediates in the gas phase

    SciTech Connect

    Osborn, David L.; Taatjes, Craig A.

    2015-07-24

    Here, carbonyl oxides, also known as Criegee intermediates, are key intermediates in both gas phase ozonolysis of unsaturated hydrocarbons in the troposphere and solution phase organic synthesis via ozonolysis. Although the study of Criegee intermediates in both arenas has a long history, direct studies in the gas phase have only recently become possible through new methods of generating stabilised Criegee intermediates in sufficient quantities. This advance has catalysed a large number of new experimental and theoretical investigations of Criegee intermediate chemistry. In this article we review the physical chemistry of Criegee intermediates, focusing on their molecular structure, spectroscopy, unimolecular and bimolecular reactions. These recent results have overturned conclusions from some previous studies, while confirming others, and have clarified areas of investigation that will be critical targets for future studies. In addition to expanding our fundamental understanding of Criegee intermediates, the rapidly expanding knowledge base will support increasingly predictive models of their impacts on society.

  9. Hydration of Gas-Phase Ions Formed by Electrospray Ionization

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Cruz, Sandra E.; Klassen, John S.; Williams, Evan R.

    2005-01-01

    The hydration of gas-phase ions produced by electrospray ionization was investigated. Evidence that the hydrated ions are formed by two mechanisms is presented. First, solvent condensation during the expansion inside the electrospray source clearly occurs. Second, some solvent evaporation from more extensively solvated ions or droplets is apparent. To the extent that these highly solvated ions have solution-phase structures, then the final isolated gas-phase structure of the ion will be determined by the solvent evaporation process. This process was investigated for hydrated gramicidin S in a Fourier-transform mass spectrometer. Unimolecular dissociation rate constants of isolated gramicidin S ions with between 2 and 14 associated water molecules were measured. These rate constants increased from 16 to 230 s−1 with increasing hydration, with smaller values corresponding to magic numbers. PMID:10497808

  10. Gas Phase Reactivity of Carboxylates with N-Hydroxysuccinimide Esters

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Zhou; McGee, William M.; Bu, Jiexun; Barefoot, Nathan Z.; McLuckey, Scott A.

    2015-01-01

    N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) esters have been used for gas phase conjugation reactions with peptides at nucleophilic sites, such as primary amines (N-terminus, ε-amine of lysine) or guanidines, by forming amide bonds through a nucleophilic attack on the carbonyl carbon. The carboxylate has recently been found to also be a reactive nucleophile capable of initiating a similar nucleophilic attack to form a labile anhydride bond. The fragile bond is easily cleaved, resulting in an oxygen transfer from the carboxylate-containing species to the reagent, nominally observed as a water transfer. This reactivity is shown for both peptides and non-peptidic species. Reagents isotopically labeled with O18 were used to confirm reactivity. This constitutes an example of distinct differences in reactivity of carboxylates between the gas-phase, where they are shown to be reactive, and the solution-phase, where they are not regarded as reactive with NHS esters. PMID:25338221

  11. Gas Phase Reactivity of Carboxylates with N-Hydroxysuccinimide Esters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Zhou; McGee, William M.; Bu, Jiexun; Barefoot, Nathan Z.; McLuckey, Scott A.

    2015-01-01

    N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) esters have been used for gas-phase conjugation reactions with peptides at nucleophilic sites, such as primary amines (N-terminus, ɛ-amine of lysine) or guanidines, by forming amide bonds through a nucleophilic attack on the carbonyl carbon. The carboxylate has recently been found to also be a reactive nucleophile capable of initiating a similar nucleophilic attack to form a labile anhydride bond. The fragile bond is easily cleaved, resulting in an oxygen transfer from the carboxylate-containing species to the reagent, nominally observed as a water transfer. This reactivity is shown for both peptides and non-peptidic species. Reagents isotopically labeled with O18 were used to confirm reactivity. This constitutes an example of distinct differences in reactivity of carboxylates between the gas phase, where they are shown to be reactive, and the solution phase, where they are not regarded as reactive with NHS esters.

  12. Gas Phase Chiral Separations By Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Dwivedi, Prabha; Wu, Ching; Hill, Herbert H.

    2013-01-01

    This manuscript introduces the concept of Chiral Ion Mobility Spectrometry (CIMS) and presents examples demonstrating the gas phase separation of enantiomers of a wide range of racemates including pharmaceuticals, amino acids and carbohydrates. CIMS is similar to traditional ion mobility spectrometry (IMS), where gas phase ions, when subjected to a potential gradient are separated at atmospheric pressure due to differences in their shapes and sizes. In addition to size and shape, CIMS separates ions based on their stereospecific interaction with a chiral gas. In order to achieve chiral discrimination by CIMS, an asymmetric environment was provided by doping the drift gas with a volatile chiral reagent. In this study S-(+)-2-butanol was used as a chiral modifier to demonstrate enantiomeric separations of atenolol, serine, methionine, threonine, methyl-α-glucopyranoside, glucose, penicillamine, valinol, phenylalanine, and tryptophan from their respective racemic mixtures. PMID:17165808

  13. Substituent effects on the gas-phase acidity of silane

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, M.S.; Volk, D.E. ); Gano, D.R. )

    1989-12-20

    In a previous paper, the gas-phase acidities of XH{sub n} compounds (X = C, N, O, F, Si, P, S, Cl) were predicted with ab initio wave functions. At the MP4{sup 2} level of theory with extended basis sets acidities for these species were determined to be within 2 kcal/mol of experimental value. In the present work, with 6-31G(d) geometries and full MP4/MC-311++G{sup 6}(3df,2pd) energies, the effects of CH{sub 3}, NH{sub 2}, OH, F, SiH{sub 3}, PH{sub 2}, SH, and Cl on the gas-phase acidity of silane are examined. Only a few related calculations have been carried out. All calculations were performed with Gaussian86, and all structures were verified as minima by diagonalizing the analytically determined hessians. Only the valence electrons were correlated in the perturbation theory calculations.

  14. Para-Hydrogen-Enhanced Gas-Phase Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Bouchard, Louis-S.; Kovtunov, Kirill V.; Burt, Scott R.; Anwar,M. Sabieh; Koptyug, Igor V.; Sagdeev, Renad Z.; Pines, Alexander

    2007-02-23

    Herein, we demonstrate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) inthe gas phase using para-hydrogen (p-H2)-induced polarization. A reactantmixture of H2 enriched in the paraspin state and propylene gas is flowedthrough a reactor cell containing a heterogenized catalyst, Wilkinson'scatalyst immobilized on modified silica gel. The hydrogenation product,propane gas, is transferred to the NMR magnet and is spin-polarized as aresult of the ALTADENA (adiabatic longitudinal transport and dissociationengenders net alignment) effect. A polarization enhancement factor of 300relative to thermally polarized gas was observed in 1D1H NMR spectra.Enhancement was also evident in the magnetic resonance images. This isthe first demonstration of imaging a hyperpolarized gaseous productformed in a hydrogenation reaction catalyzed by a supported catalyst.This result may lead to several important applications, includingflow-through porous materials, gas-phase reaction kinetics and adsorptionstudies, and MRI in low fields, all using catalyst-free polarizedfluids.

  15. Gas phase adduct reactions in MOCVD growth of GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Thon, A.; Kuech, T.F.

    1996-11-01

    Gas phase reactions between trimethylgallium (TMG) and ammonia were studied at high temperatures, characteristic to MOCVD of GaN reactors, by means of in situ mass spectroscopy in a flow tube reactor. It is shown, that a very fast adduct formation followed by elimination of methane occurs. The decomposition of TMG and the adduct-derived compounds are both first order and have similar apparent activation energy. The pre-exponential factor of the adduct decomposition is smaller, and hence is responsible for the higher full decomposition temperature of the adduct relative to that of TMG.

  16. Going clean: structure and dynamics of peptides in the gas phase and paths to solvation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldauf, Carsten; Rossi, Mariana

    2015-12-01

    The gas phase is an artificial environment for biomolecules that has gained much attention both experimentally and theoretically due to its unique characteristic of providing a clean room environment for the comparison between theory and experiment. In this review we give an overview mainly on first-principles simulations of isolated peptides and the initial steps of their interactions with ions and solvent molecules: a bottom up approach to the complexity of biological environments. We focus on the accuracy of different methods to explore the conformational space, the connections between theory and experiment regarding collision cross section evaluations and (anharmonic) vibrational spectra, and the challenges faced in this field.

  17. The nucleoside uridine isolated in the gas phase.

    PubMed

    Peña, Isabel; Cabezas, Carlos; Alonso, José L

    2015-03-02

    Herein we present the first experimental observation of the isolated nucleoside uridine, placed in the gas phase by laser ablation and characterized by Fourier transform (FT) microwave techniques. Free from the bulk effects of their native environments, anti/C2'-endo-g+ conformation has been revealed as the most stable form of uridine. Intramolecular hydrogen bonds involving uracil and ribose moieties have been found to play an important role in the stabilization of the nucleoside.

  18. A Uranyl Peroxide Dimer in the Gas Phase.

    PubMed

    Dau, Phuong D; Dau, Phuong V; Rao, Linfeng; Kovács, Attila; Gibson, John K

    2017-04-03

    The gas-phase uranyl peroxide dimer, [(UO2)2(O2)(L)2](2+) where L = 2,2'-trifluoroethylazanediyl)bis(N,N'-dimethylacetamide), was synthesized by electrospray ionization of a solution of UO2(2+) and L. Collision-induced dissociation of this dimer resulted in endothermic O atom elimination to give [(UO2)2(O)(L)2](2+), which was found to spontaneously react with water via exothermic hydrolytic chemisorption to yield [(UO2)2(OH)2(L)2](2+). Density functional theory computations of the energies for the gas-phase reactions are in accord with observations. The structures of the observed uranyl dimer were computed, with that of the peroxide of particular interest, as a basis to evaluate the formation of condensed phase uranyl peroxides with bent structures. The computed dihedral angle in [(UO2)2(O2)(L)2](2+) is 145°, indicating a substantial deviation from the planar structure with a dihedral angle of 180°. Energies needed to induce bending in the most elementary gas-phase uranyl peroxide complex, [(UO2)2(O2)](2+), were computed. It was found that bending from the lowest-energy planar structure to dihedral angles up to 140° required energies of <10 kJ/mol. The gas-phase results demonstrate the inherent stability of the uranyl peroxide moiety and support the notion that the uranyl-peroxide-uranyl structural unit is intrinsically planar, with only minor energy perturbations needed to form the bent structures found in studtite and uranyl peroxide nanostructures.

  19. Gas phase fractionation method using porous ceramic membrane

    DOEpatents

    Peterson, Reid A.; Hill, Jr., Charles G.; Anderson, Marc A.

    1996-01-01

    Flaw-free porous ceramic membranes fabricated from metal sols and coated onto a porous support are advantageously used in gas phase fractionation methods. Mean pore diameters of less than 40 .ANG., preferably 5-20 .ANG. and most preferably about 15 .ANG., are permeable at lower pressures than existing membranes. Condensation of gases in small pores and non-Knudsen membrane transport mechanisms are employed to facilitate and increase membrane permeability and permselectivity.

  20. Optically-Based Diagnostics for Gas-Phase Laser Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-08-01

    Phase Laser Development Acknowledgement of Support and Disclaimer This material is based upon work supported by Air Force Office of Scientific...00-2010 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Optically-Based Diagnostics for Gas-Phase Laser Development 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM...Sciences Inc. Role of Optical Diagnostics in High Energy Gas Laser Development  Chemically rich, energetic, reacting flow with competing phenomena

  1. Gas phase chemical detection with an integrated chemical analysis system

    SciTech Connect

    CASALNUOVO,STEPHEN A.; FRYE-MASON,GREGORY CHARLES; KOTTENSTETTE,RICHARD; HELLER,EDWIN J.; MATZKE,CAROLYN M.; LEWIS,PATRICK R.; MANGINELL,RONALD P.; BACA,ALBERT G.; HIETALA,VINCENT M.

    2000-04-12

    Microfabrication technology has been applied to the development of a miniature, multi-channel gas phase chemical laboratory that provides fast response, small size, and enhanced versatility and chemical discrimination. Each analysis channel includes a sample preconcentrator followed by a gas chromatographic separator and a chemically selective surface acoustic wave detector array to achieve high sensitivity and selectivity. The performance of the components, individually and collectively, is described.

  2. The Nucleoside Uridine Isolated in the Gas Phase**

    PubMed Central

    Peña, Isabel; Cabezas, Carlos; Alonso, José L.

    2016-01-01

    Herein we present the first experimental observation of the isolated nucleoside uridine, placed in the gas phase by laser ablation and characterized by Fourier transform microwave techniques. Free from the bulk effects of their native environments, anti/C2’-endo-g+ conformation has been revealed as the most stable form of uridine. Intramolecular hydrogen bonds involving uracil and ribose moieties have been found to play an important role in the stabilization of the nucleoside. PMID:25683559

  3. Understanding Gas-Phase Ammonia Chemistry in Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambers, Lauren; Oberg, Karin I.; Cleeves, Lauren Ilsedore

    2017-01-01

    Protoplanetary disks are dynamic regions of gas and dust around young stars, the remnants of star formation, that evolve and coagulate over millions of years in order to ultimately form planets. The chemical composition of protoplanetary disks is affected by both the chemical and physical conditions in which they develop, including the initial molecular abundances in the birth cloud, the spectrum and intensity of radiation from the host star and nearby systems, and mixing and turbulence within the disk. A more complete understanding of the chemical evolution of disks enables a more complete understanding of the chemical composition of planets that may form within them, and of their capability to support life. One element known to be essential for life on Earth is nitrogen, which often is present in the form of ammonia (NH3). Recent observations by Salinas et al. (2016) reveal a theoretical discrepancy in the gas-phase and ice-phase ammonia abundances in protoplanetary disks; while observations of comets and protostars estimate the ice-phase NH3/H2O ratio in disks to be 5%, Salinas reports a gas-phase NH3/H2O ratio of ~7-84% in the disk surrounding TW Hydra, a young nearby star. Through computational chemical modeling of the TW Hydra disk using a reaction network of over 5000 chemical reactions, I am investigating the possible sources of excess gas-phase NH3 by determining the primary reaction pathways of NH3 production; the downstream chemical effects of ionization by ultraviolet photons, X-rays, and cosmic rays; and the effects of altering the initial abundances of key molecules such as N and N2. Beyond providing a theoretical explanation for the NH3 ice/gas discrepancy, this new model may lead to fuller understanding of the gas-phase formation processes of all nitrogen hydrides (NHx), and thus fuller understanding of the nitrogen-bearing molecules that are fundamental for life as we know it.

  4. Gender differences in treatment and clinical characteristics among patients receiving extended release naltrexone.

    PubMed

    Herbeck, Diane M; Jeter, Kira E; Cousins, Sarah J; Abdelmaksoud, Reham; Crèvecoeur-MacPhail, Desirée

    2016-01-01

    Further research is needed to investigate real-world acceptability of extended-release naltrexone for alcohol and opioid use disorders, and potential gender differences. This study examines treatment and clinical characteristics among men and women receiving extended-release naltrexone in a large, publicly funded substance use disorder treatment system (N = 465; 52% female). Patient demographics, treatment characteristics, and the number of extended-release naltrexone doses received were collected from administrative data and treatment program staff. Additionally, patients provided information on experiences with extended-release naltrexone in an open-ended format at 1, 2, and 3 weeks following their first injection. For a subsample of patients (N = 220), alcohol/opioid cravings and specific adverse effects were also assessed. Compared to men, women reported experiencing a higher rate and mean number of adverse effects. Overall, craving scores showed substantial reductions over time. However, among patients taking extended-release naltrexone for alcohol use, women showed a significantly greater reduction in craving scores compared to men. No gender differences were observed in the number of extended-release naltrexone doses received. Although women may have a greater need for additional support in managing early adverse effects, extended-release naltrexone as an adjunct to psychosocial treatment may be an acceptable and promising treatment approach for both men and women, and particularly for women prescribed extended-release naltrexone for alcohol use. This study contributes further information on patients' experiences during the early course of extended-release naltrexone treatment in real-world settings. Understanding these experiences may assist policy makers and treatment providers in addressing challenges of implementing this treatment into wider practice.

  5. 3D Printing of Medicines: Engineering Novel Oral Devices with Unique Design and Drug Release Characteristics.

    PubMed

    Goyanes, Alvaro; Wang, Jie; Buanz, Asma; Martínez-Pacheco, Ramón; Telford, Richard; Gaisford, Simon; Basit, Abdul W

    2015-11-02

    Three dimensional printing (3D printing) was used to fabricate novel oral drug delivery devices with specialized design configurations. Each device was loaded with multiple actives, with the intent of applying this process to the production of personalized medicines tailored at the point of dispensing or use. A filament extruder was used to obtain drug-loaded--paracetamol (acetaminophen) or caffeine--filaments of poly(vinyl alcohol) with characteristics suitable for use in fused-deposition modeling 3D printing. A multinozzle 3D printer enabled fabrication of capsule-shaped solid devices containing the drug with different internal structures. The design configurations included a multilayer device, with each layer containing drug, whose identity was different to the drug in the adjacent layers, and a two-compartment device comprising a caplet embedded within a larger caplet (DuoCaplet), with each compartment containing a different drug. Raman spectroscopy was used to collect 2-dimensional hyper spectral arrays across the entire surface of the devices. Processing of the arrays using direct classical least-squares component matching to produce false color representations of distribution of the drugs was used. This clearly showed a definitive separation between the drug layers of paracetamol and caffeine. Drug release tests in biorelevant bicarbonate media showed unique drug release profiles dependent on the macrostructure of the devices. In the case of the multilayer devices, release of both paracetamol and caffeine was simultaneous and independent of drug solubility. With the DuoCaplet design, it was possible to engineer either rapid drug release or delayed release by selecting the site of incorporation of the drug in the device; the lag-time for release from the internal compartment was dependent on the characteristics of the external layer. The study confirms the potential of 3D printing to fabricate multiple-drug containing devices with specialized design

  6. Gas phase laser synthesis and processing of calcium phosphate nanoparticles for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bapat, Parimal V.

    Biochemical processes make pervasive use of calcium and phosphate ions. Calcium phosphate salts that are naturally nontoxic and bioactive have been used for several medical applications in form of coatings and micropowders. Nanoparticle-based calcium phosphates have been shown to be internalized by living cells and be effective in DNA transfection, drug delivery, and transport of fluorophores for imaging of intracellular processes. They are also expected to interact strongly with cell adhesive proteins and are therefore promising elements in approaches to mimic the complex environment of the extra cellular matrix of bone. Harnessing this biomedical potential requires the ability to control the numerous characteristics of nanophase calcium phosphates that affect biological response, including nanoparticle chemical composition, crystal phase, crystallinity, crystallographic orientation of exposed faces, size, shape, surface area, number concentration, and degree of aggregation. This dissertation focuses on the use of laser-induced gas-phase synthesis for creation of calcium phosphate nanoparticles, and corresponding nanoparticle-based substrates that could offer new opportunities for guiding biological responses through well-controlled biochemical and topological cues. Gas-phase synthesis of nanoparticles has several characteristics that could enhance control over particle morphology, crystallinity, and surface area, compared to liquid-phase techniques. Synthesis from gas-phase precursors can be carried out at high temperatures and in high-purity inert or reactive gas backgrounds, enabling good control of chemistry, crystal structure, and purity. Moreover, the particle mean free path and number concentration can be controlled independently. This allows regulation of interparticle collision rates, which can be adjusted to limit aggregation. High-temperature synthesis of well-separated particles is therefore possible. In this work high power lasers are employed to

  7. Gas-phase chemistry of ruthenium and rhodium carbonyl complexes.

    PubMed

    Cao, Shiwei; Wang, Yang; Qin, Zhi; Fan, Fangli; Haba, Hiromitsu; Komori, Yukiko; Wu, Xiaolei; Tan, Cunmin; Zhang, Xin

    2016-01-07

    Short-lived ruthenium and rhodium isotopes were produced from a (252)Cf spontaneous fission (SF) source. Their volatile carbonyl complexes were formed in gas-phase reactions in situ with the carbon-monoxide containing gas. A gas-jet system was employed to transport the volatile carbonyls from the recoil chamber to the chemical separation apparatus. The gas-phase chemical behaviors of these carbonyl complexes were studied using an online low temperature isothermal chromatography (IC) technique. Long IC columns made up of FEP Teflon were used to obtain the chemical information of the high-volatile Ru and Rh carbonyls. By excluding the influence of precursor effects, short-lived isotopes of (109-110)Ru and (111-112)Rh were used to represent the chemical behaviours of Ru and Rh carbonyls. Relative chemical yields of about 75% and 20% were measured for Ru(CO)5 and Rh(CO)4, respectively, relative to the yields of KCl aerosols transported in Ar gas. The adsorption enthalpies of ruthenium and rhodium carbonyl complexes on a Teflon surface were determined to be around ΔHads = -33(+1)(-2) kJ mol(-1) and -36(+2)(-1) kJ mol(-1), respectively, by fitting the breakthrough curves of the corresponding carbonyl complexes with a Monte Carlo simulation program. Different from Mo and Tc carbonyls, a small amount of oxygen gas was found to be not effective for the chemical yields of ruthenium and rhodium carbonyl complexes. The general chemical behaviors of short-lived carbonyl complexes of group VI-IX elements were discussed, which can be used in the future study on the gas-phase chemistry of superheavy elements - Bh, Hs, and Mt carbonyls.

  8. Fluorescence Spectroscopy of Gas-phase Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, J. D.; Witt, A. N.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to produce fluorescence spectra of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules in the gas-phase for comparison with blue luminescence (BL) emission observed in astrophysical sources Vijh et al. (2004, 2005a,b). The BL occurs roughly from 350 to 450 nm, with a sharp peak near 380 nm. PAHs with three to four rings, e.g. anthracene and pyrene, were found to produce luminescence in the appropriate spectral region, based on existing studies. Relatively few studies of the gas-phase fluorescence of PAHs exist; those that do exist have dealt primarily with the same samples commonly available for purchase such as pyrene and anthracene. In an attempt to understand the chemistry of the nebular environment we also obtained several nitrogen substituted PAHs from our colleagues at NASA Ames. In order to simulate the astrophysical environment we also took spectra by heating the PAHs in a flame. The flame environment counteracts the formation of eximers and permits the spectroscopy of free-flying neutral molecules. Experiments with coal tar demonstrate that fluorescence spectroscopy reveals primarily the presence of the smallest molecules, which are most abundant and which possess the highest fluorescence efficiencies. One gas-phase PAH that seems to fit the BL spectrum most closely is phenanthridine. In view of the results from the spectroscopy of coal tar, a compound containing a mixture of PAHs ranging from small to very large PAH molecules, we can not preclude the presence of larger PAHs in interstellar sources exhibiting BL.

  9. Tramadol loading, release and iontophoretic characteristics of ion-exchange fiber.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yanan; Yuan, Jing; Liu, Hongzhuo; Yang, Yang; Hou, Yanlong; Li, Sanming

    2014-04-25

    The objective of this study was to investigate the drug loading, release and iontophoretic characteristics of strong acidic ion-exchange fiber, using tramadol hydrochloride as a model drug. The complex of charged model drug and ion-exchange fiber was studied as a new approach to achieve controlled drug delivery. Structural characterization of the fiber was elucidated through different approaches including differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and infrared spectroscopy (IR). And the mechanism of drug binding into ion-exchange fibers was validated to be ion-exchange. The drug loading into and release from ion-exchange fiber were affected by the concentration, volume and valence of the counter-ions in the external solution. Iontophoresis could significantly increase the delivery rate and amount of transdermal drug, and the iontophoretic dose could be easily controlled by adjusting the current intensity and the amount of release medium. The tramadol could be steadily released both from the drug-loaded fiber and drug solution when applied the iontophoretic method, which was in disagreement with the previous publications. As a drug reservoir, ion-exchange fiber has good regularity of drug loading, release and iontophoretic characteristics.

  10. Neurotransmitters in the Gas Phase: La-Mb Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabezas, C.; Mata, S.; López, J. C.; Alonso, J. L.

    2011-06-01

    LA-MB-FTMW spectroscopy combines laser ablation with Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy in supersonic jets overcoming the problems of thermal decomposition associated with conventional heating methods. We present here the results on LA-MB-FTMW studies of some neurotransmitters. Six conformers of dopamine, four of adrenaline, five of noradrenaline and three conformers of serotonin have been characterized in the gas phase. The rotational and nuclear quadrupole coupling constants extracted from the analysis of the rotational spectrum are directly compared with those predicted by ab initio methods to achieve the conclusive identification of different conformers and the experimental characterization of the intramolecular forces at play which control conformational preferences.

  11. Gas Phase Chemical Detection with an Integrated Chemical Analysis System

    SciTech Connect

    Baca, Albert G.; Casalnuovo, Stephen A.; Frye-Mason, Gregory C.; Heller, Edwin J.; Hietala, Susan L.; Hietala, Vincent M.; Kottenstette, Richard J.; Lewis, Patrick R.; Manginell, Ronald P.; Matzke, Carloyn M.; Reno, John L.; Sasaki, Darryl Y.; Schubert, W. Kent

    1999-07-08

    Microfabrication technology has been applied to the development of a miniature, multi-channel gas phase chemical laboratory that provides fast response, small size, and enhanced versatility and chemical discrimination. Each analysis channel includes a sample concentrator followed by a gas chromatographic separator and a chemically selective surface acoustic wave detector array to achieve high sensitivity and selectivity. The performance of the components, individually and collectively, is described. The design and performance of novel micromachined acoustic wave devices, with the potential for improved chemical sensitivity, are also described.

  12. Multiscale Aspects of Modeling Gas-Phase Nanoparticle Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Buesser, B.; Gröhn, A.J.

    2013-01-01

    Aerosol reactors are utilized to manufacture nanoparticles in industrially relevant quantities. The development, understanding and scale-up of aerosol reactors can be facilitated with models and computer simulations. This review aims to provide an overview of recent developments of models and simulations and discuss their interconnection in a multiscale approach. A short introduction of the various aerosol reactor types and gas-phase particle dynamics is presented as a background for the later discussion of the models and simulations. Models are presented with decreasing time and length scales in sections on continuum, mesoscale, molecular dynamics and quantum mechanics models. PMID:23729992

  13. Theoretical calculations of EPR parameters of gas phase hydracrylonitrile radical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarikaya, Ebru Karakaş; Dereli, Ömer

    2017-02-01

    As a result of detailed conformational search of the hydracrylonitrile, four different conformers of molecule have been obtained. For these conformations, eleven possible radicals were modelled by using density functional theory (DFT) computations with respect to molecular structure. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance parameters of these model radicals were calculated and then they were compared with the experimental ones. Geometry optimizations of the molecule and modeled radicals were calculated by B3LYP method using 6-311++G(d,p) basis sets in gas phase.

  14. Seven Conformers of Pipecolic Acid Identified in the Gas Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabezas, Carlos; Simao, Alcides; Alonso, José L.

    2016-06-01

    The multiconformational landscape of the non-proteinogenic cyclic amino acid pipecolic acid has been explored in the gas phase. Solid pipecolic acid (m.p. 280°C) was vaporized by laser ablation (LA) and expanded in a supersonic jet where the rotational spectra of seven conformers were obtained by broadband microwave spectroscopy (CP-FTMW). All conformers were conclusively identified by comparison of the experimental spectroscopic constants with those predicted theoretically. The relative stability of the conformers rests on a delicate balance of the different intramolecular hydrogen bonds established between the carboxylic and the amino groups.

  15. Femtosecond analysis of free molecular rotation in the gas phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisevich, N. A.; Khoroshilov, E. V.; Kryukov, I. V.; Kryukov, P. G.; Sharkov, A. V.; Blokhin, A. P.; Tolstorozhev, G. B.

    1992-04-01

    The time-resolved S 1→S *n absorption anisotropy decay resulting from rotation of free gas phase POPOP molecules at 593 K and PPO molecules at 483 K was studied after S 0→S *1 excitation by femtosecond linearly polarized pulses at 308 nm. The time evolution of the anisotropy measured through a few picoseconds after excitation is in agreement with the results of calculations made for POPOP and PPO using orientational correlation functions developed for rigid asymmetric top molecules.

  16. The solar system/interstellar medium connection - Gas phase abundances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lutz, Barry L.

    1987-01-01

    Gas-phase abundances in the outer solar system are presented as diagnostics of the interstellar medium at the time of the solar system formation, some 4.55 billion years ago. Possible influences of the thermal and chemical histories of the primitive solar nebula and of the processes which led to the formation and evolution of the outer planets and comets on the elemental and molecular composition of the primordial matter are outlined. The major components of the atmospheres of the outer planets and of the comae of comets are identified, and the cosmogonical and cosmological implications are discussed.

  17. Gas-phase energetics of thorium fluorides and their ions.

    PubMed

    Irikura, Karl K

    2013-02-14

    Gas-phase thermochemistry for neutral ThF(n) and cations ThF(n)(+) (n = 1-4) is obtained from large-basis CCSD(T) calculations, with a small-core pseudopotential on thorium. Electronic partition functions are computed with the help of relativistic MRCI calculations. Geometries, vibrational spectra, electronic fine structure, and ion appearance energies are tabulated. These results support the experimental results by Lau, Brittain, and Hildenbrand for the neutral species, except for ThF. The ion thermochemistry is presented here for the first time.

  18. Drug Release Characteristics and Tissue Distribution of Rifapentine Polylactic Acid Sustained-Release Microspheres in Rabbits after Paravertebral Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zheng; Wu, Linbo; Li, Haijian; Long, Zhicheng; Song, Xinghua

    2016-01-01

    Background Rates of drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB) and TB associated with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection have increased dramatically, intensifying challenges in TB control. New formulations of TB treatment drugs that control drug release and increase local drug concentrations will have a significant impact on mitigating the toxic side effects and increasing the clinical efficacy of anti-TB drugs. Objectives The aim was to observe the sustained release characteristics of rifapentine polylactic acid sustained-release microspheres in vivo and the accumulation of rifapentine in other tissues following paravertebral implantation. Methods This study is a basic animal experimental study that began on July 17, 2014 in the Fifth Affiliated hospital of Xinjiang Medical University. One hundred and eight New Zealand white rabbits (weighing 2.8 - 3.0 kg, male and female, China) were randomly divided into three groups of 36 rabbits each. Blood and tissue samples from the liver, lungs, kidneys, vertebrae, and paravertebral muscle were collected at different time points post-surgery. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis with a biological internal standard was used to determine the drug concentrations in samples. Results In group A, no significant differences in rifapentine concentrations in the liver were detected between any two time points (P > 0.05). However, the differences in rifapentine concentrations between day 10 and day 21 were statistically significant (P < 0.05); for days 21, 35, 46, and 60, the differences in rifapentine concentrations between two sequential time points were not statistically significant (P > 0.05). In group B, the differences in rifapentine concentration between days 3 and 10 in vertebral bone and in paravertebral muscles were statistically significant (P < 0.05). Rifapentine was detected in the vertebral bone tissue in the group C animals. The rifapentine concentrations between two sequential time points were

  19. Electrons Mediate the Gas-Phase Oxidation of Formic Acid with Ozone.

    PubMed

    van der Linde, Christian; Tang, Wai-Kit; Siu, Chi-Kit; Beyer, Martin K

    2016-08-26

    Gas-phase reactions of CO3 (.-) with formic acid are studied using Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometry. Signal loss indicates the release of a free electron, with the formation of neutral reaction products. This is corroborated by adding traces of SF6 to the reaction gas, which scavenges 38 % of the electrons. Quantum chemical calculations of the reaction potential energy surface provide a reaction path for the formation of neutral carbon dioxide and water as the thermochemically favored products. From the literature, it is known that free electrons in the troposphere attach to O2 , which in turn transfer the electron to O3 . O3 (.-) reacts with CO2 to form CO3 (.-) . The reaction reported here formally closes the catalytic cycle for the oxidation of formic acid with ozone, catalyzed by free electrons.

  20. Chemical reactivity on gas-phase metal clusters driven by blackbody infrared radiation.

    PubMed

    Parry, Imogen S; Kartouzian, Aras; Hamilton, Suzanne M; Balaj, O Petru; Beyer, Martin K; Mackenzie, Stuart R

    2015-01-19

    We report the observation of chemical reactions in gas-phase Rh(n)(N2O)m(+) complexes driven by absorption of blackbody radiation. The experiments are performed under collision-free conditions in a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer. Mid-infrared absorption by the molecularly adsorbed N2O moieties promotes a small fraction of the cluster distribution sufficiently to drive the N2O decomposition reaction, leading to the production of cluster oxides and the release of molecular nitrogen. N2O decomposition competes with molecular desorption and the branching ratios for the two processes show marked size effects, reflecting variations in the relative barriers. The rate of decay is shown to scale approximately linearly with the number of infrared chromophores. The experimental findings are interpreted in terms of calculated infrared absorption rates assuming a sudden-death limit.

  1. Preconceptual design of the gas-phase decontamination demonstration cart

    SciTech Connect

    Munday, E.B.

    1993-12-01

    Removal of uranium deposits from the interior surfaces of gaseous diffusion equipment will be a major portion of the overall multibillion dollar effort to decontaminate and decommission the gaseous diffusion plants. Long-term low-temperature (LTLT) gas-phase decontamination is being developed at the K-25 Site as an in situ decontamination process that is expected to significantly lower the decontamination costs, reduce worker exposure to radioactive materials, and reduce safeguard concerns. This report documents the preconceptual design of the process equipment that is necessary to conduct a full-scale demonstration of the LTLT method in accordance with the process steps listed above. The process equipment and method proposed in this report are not intended to represent a full-scale production campaign design and operation, since the gas evacuation, gas charging, and off-gas handling systems that would be cost effective in a production campaign are not cost effective for a first-time demonstration. However, the design presented here is expected to be applicable to special decontamination projects beyond the demonstration, which could include the Deposit Recovery Program. The equipment will therefore be sized to a 200 ft size 1 converter (plus a substantial conservative design margin), which is the largest item of interest for gas phase decontamination in the Deposit Recovery Program. The decontamination equipment will allow recovery of the UF{sub 6}, which is generated from the reaction of ClF{sub 3} with the uranium deposits, by use of NaF traps.

  2. Gas-Phase Fragmentation Analysis of Nitro-Fatty Acids

    PubMed Central

    Bonacci, Gustavo; Asciutto, Eliana K.; Woodcock, Steven R.; Salvatore, Sonia R.; Freeman, Bruce A.; Schopfer, Francisco J.

    2012-01-01

    Nitro-fatty acids are electrophilic signaling mediators formed in increased amounts during inflammation by nitric oxide and nitrite-dependent redox reactions. A more rigorous characterization of endogenously-generated species requires additional understanding of their gas-phase induced fragmentation. Thus, collision induced dissociation (CID) of nitroalkane and nitroalkene groups in fatty acids were studied in the negative ion mode to provide mass spectrometric tools for their structural characterization. Fragmentation of nitroalkanes occurred mainly through loss of the NO2− anion or neutral loss of HNO2. The CID of nitroalkenes proceeds via a more complex cyclization, followed by fragmentation to nitrile and aldehyde products. Gas-phase fragmentation of nitroalkene functional groups with additional γ or δ unsaturation occurred through a multiple step cyclization reaction process, leading to 5 and 6 member ring heterocyclic products and carbon chain fragmentation. Cyclization products were not obtained during nitroalkane fragmentation, highlighting the role of double bond π electrons during NO2− rearrangements, stabilization and heterocycle formation. The proposed structures, mechanisms and products of fragmentation are supported by analysis of 13C and 15N labeled parent molecules, 6 different nitroalkene positional isomers, 6 nitroalkane positional isomers, accurate mass determinations at high resolution and quantum mechanics calculations. Multiple key diagnostic ion fragments were obtained through this analysis, allowing for the precise placement of double bonds and sites of fatty acid nitration, thus supporting an ability to predict nitro positions in biological samples. PMID:21953257

  3. Star formation and gas phase history of the cosmic web

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snedden, Ali; Coughlin, Jared; Phillips, Lara Arielle; Mathews, Grant; Suh, In-Saeng

    2016-01-01

    We present a new method of tracking and characterizing the environment in which galaxies and their associated circumgalactic medium evolve. We have developed a structure finding algorithm that uses the rate of change of the density gradient to self-consistently parse and follow the evolution of groups/clusters, filaments and voids in large-scale structure simulations. We use this to trace the complete evolution of the baryons in the gas phase and the star formation history within each structure in our simulated volume. We vary the structure measure threshold to probe the complex inner structure of star-forming regions in poor clusters, filaments and voids. We find that the majority of star formation occurs in cold, condensed gas in filaments at intermediate redshifts (z ˜ 3). We also show that much of the star formation above a redshift z = 3 occurs in low-contrast regions of filaments, but as the density contrast increases at lower redshift, star formation switches to the high-contrast regions, or inner parts, of filaments. Since filaments bridge the void and cluster regions, it suggests that the majority of star formation occurs in galaxies in intermediate density regions prior to the accretion on to groups/clusters. We find that both filaments and poor clusters are multiphase environments distinguishing themselves by different distributions of gas phases.

  4. High resolution dissociative electron attachment to gas phase adenine

    SciTech Connect

    Huber, D.; Beikircher, M.; Denifl, S.; Zappa, F.; Matejcik, S.; Bacher, A.; Grill, V.; Maerk, T. D.; Scheier, P.

    2006-08-28

    The dissociative electron attachment to the gas phase nucleobase adenine is studied using two different experiments. A double focusing sector field mass spectrometer is utilized for measurements requiring high mass resolution, high sensitivity, and relative ion yields for all the fragment anions and a hemispherical electron monochromator instrument for high electron energy resolution. The negative ion mass spectra are discussed at two different electron energies of 2 and 6 eV. In contrast to previous gas phase studies a number of new negative ions are discovered in the mass spectra. The ion efficiency curves for the negative ions of adenine are measured for the electron energy range from about 0 to 15 eV with an electron energy resolution of about 100 meV. The total anion yield derived via the summation of all measured fragment anions is compared with the total cross section for negative ion formation measured recently without mass spectrometry. For adenine the shape of the two cross section curves agrees well, taking into account the different electron energy resolutions; however, for thymine some peculiar differences are observed.

  5. Gas phase oxidation downstream of a catalytic combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tien, J. S.; Anderson, D. N.

    1979-01-01

    Effect of the length available for gas-phase reactions downstream of the catalytic reactor on the emission of CO and unburned hydrocarbons was investigated. A premixed, prevaporized propane/air feed to a 12/cm/diameter catalytic/reactor test section was used. The catalytic reactor was made of four 2.5 cm long monolithic catalyst elements. Four water cooled gas sampling probes were located at positions between 0 and 22 cm downstream of the catalytic reactor. Measurements of unburned hydrocarbon, CO, and CO2 were made. Tests were performed with an inlet air temperature of 800 K, a reference velocity of 10 m/s, pressures of 3 and 600,000 Pa, and fuel air equivalence ratios of 0.14 to 0.24. For very lean mixtures, hydrocarbon emissions were high and CO continued to be formed downstream of the catalytic reactor. At the highest equivalence ratios tested, hydrocarbon levels were much lower and CO was oxidized to CO2 in the gas phase downstream. To achieve acceptable emissions, a downstream region several times longer than the catalytic reactor could be required.

  6. Nahoon: Time-dependent gas-phase chemical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakelam, V.

    2014-09-01

    Nahoon is a gas-phase chemical model that computes the chemical evolution in a 1D temperature and density structure. It uses chemical networks downloaded from the KInetic Database for Astrochemistry (KIDA) but the model can be adapted to any network. The program is written in Fortran 90 and uses the DLSODES (double precision) solver from the ODEPACK package to solve the coupled stiff differential equations. The solver computes the chemical evolution of gas-phase species at a fixed temperature and density and can be used in one dimension (1D) if a grid of temperature, density, and visual extinction is provided. Grains, both neutral and negatively charged, and electrons are considered as chemical species and their concentrations are computed at the same time as those of the other species. Nahoon contains a test to check the temperature range of the validity of the rate coefficients and avoid extrapolations outside this range. A test is also included to check for duplication of chemical reactions, defined over complementary ranges of temperature.

  7. Diesel-related hydrocarbons can dominate gas phase reactive carbon in megacities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunmore, R. E.; Hopkins, J. R.; Lidster, R. T.; Lee, J. D.; Evans, M. J.; Rickard, A. R.; Lewis, A. C.; Hamilton, J. F.

    2015-03-01

    Hydrocarbons are key precursors to two priority air pollutants, ozone and particulate matter. Those with two to seven carbons have historically been straightforward to observe and have been successfully reduced in many developed cities through air quality policy interventions. Longer chain hydrocarbons released from diesel vehicles are not considered explicitly as part of air quality strategies and there are few direct measurements of their gaseous abundance in the atmosphere. This study describes the chemically comprehensive and continuous measurements of organic compounds in a developed megacity (London), which demonstrate that on a seasonal median basis, diesel-related hydrocarbons represent only 20-30% of the total hydrocarbon mixing ratio but comprise more than 50% of the atmospheric hydrocarbon mass and are a dominant local source of secondary organic aerosols. This study shows for the first time that, 60% of the winter primary hydrocarbon hydroxyl radical reactivity is from diesel-related hydrocarbons and using the maximum incremental reactivity scale, we predict that they contribute up to 50% of the ozone production potential in London. Comparing real-world urban composition with regulatory emissions inventories in the UK and US highlights a previously unaccounted for but, very significant under-reporting of diesel related hydrocarbons; an underestimation of a factor ~ 4 for C9 species rising to a factor of over 70 for C12 during winter. These observations show that hydrocarbons from diesel vehicles can dominate gas phase reactive carbon in cities with high diesel fleet fractions. Future control of urban particulate matter and ozone in such locations requires a shift in policy focus onto gas phase hydrocarbons released from diesels as this vehicle type continues to displace gasoline world-wide.

  8. Diesel-related hydrocarbons can dominate gas phase reactive carbon in megacities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunmore, R. E.; Hopkins, J. R.; Lidster, R. T.; Lee, J. D.; Evans, M. J.; Rickard, A. R.; Lewis, A. C.; Hamilton, J. F.

    2015-09-01

    Hydrocarbons are key precursors to two priority air pollutants, ozone and particulate matter. Those with two to seven carbons have historically been straightforward to observe and have been successfully reduced in many developed cities through air quality policy interventions. Longer chain hydrocarbons released from diesel vehicles are not considered explicitly as part of air quality strategies and there are few direct measurements of their gaseous abundance in the atmosphere. This study describes the chemically comprehensive and continuous measurements of organic compounds in a developed megacity (London), which demonstrate that on a seasonal median basis, diesel-related hydrocarbons represent only 20-30 % of the total hydrocarbon mixing ratio but comprise more than 50 % of the atmospheric hydrocarbon mass and are a dominant local source of secondary organic aerosols. This study shows for the first time that 60 % of the winter primary hydrocarbon hydroxyl radical reactivity is from diesel-related hydrocarbons and using the maximum incremental reactivity scale, we predict that they contribute up to 50 % of the ozone production potential in London. Comparing real-world urban composition with regulatory emissions inventories in the UK and US highlights a previously unaccounted for, but very significant, under-reporting of diesel-related hydrocarbons; an underestimation of a factor ~4 for C9 species rising to a factor of over 70 for C12 during winter. These observations show that hydrocarbons from diesel vehicles can dominate gas phase reactive carbon in cities with high diesel fleet fractions. Future control of urban particulate matter and ozone in such locations requires a shift in policy focus onto gas phase hydrocarbons released from diesels as this vehicle type continues to displace gasoline world-wide.

  9. A simple and rapid method for standard preparation of gas phase extract of cigarette smoke.

    PubMed

    Higashi, Tsunehito; Mai, Yosuke; Noya, Yoichi; Horinouchi, Takahiro; Terada, Koji; Hoshi, Akimasa; Nepal, Prabha; Harada, Takuya; Horiguchi, Mika; Hatate, Chizuru; Kuge, Yuji; Miwa, Soichi

    2014-01-01

    Cigarette smoke consists of tar and gas phase: the latter is toxicologically important because it can pass through lung alveolar epithelium to enter the circulation. Here we attempt to establish a standard method for preparation of gas phase extract of cigarette smoke (CSE). CSE was prepared by continuously sucking cigarette smoke through a Cambridge filter to remove tar, followed by bubbling it into phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). An increase in dry weight of the filter was defined as tar weight. Characteristically, concentrations of CSEs were represented as virtual tar concentrations, assuming that tar on the filter was dissolved in PBS. CSEs prepared from smaller numbers of cigarettes (original tar concentrations ≤ 15 mg/ml) showed similar concentration-response curves for cytotoxicity versus virtual tar concentrations, but with CSEs from larger numbers (tar ≥ 20 mg/ml), the curves were shifted rightward. Accordingly, the cytotoxic activity was detected in PBS of the second reservoir downstream of the first one with larger numbers of cigarettes. CSEs prepared from various cigarette brands showed comparable concentration-response curves for cytotoxicity. Two types of CSEs prepared by continuous and puff smoking protocols were similar regarding concentration-response curves for cytotoxicity, pharmacology of their cytotoxicity, and concentrations of cytotoxic compounds. These data show that concentrations of CSEs expressed by virtual tar concentrations can be a reference value to normalize their cytotoxicity, irrespective of numbers of combusted cigarettes, cigarette brands and smoking protocols, if original tar concentrations are ≤15 mg/ml.

  10. Evaluation of a detailed gas-phase atmospheric reaction mechanism using environmental chamber data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, William P. L.; Lurmann, Fredrick W.

    This paper describes an evaluation of the performance of a detailed gas-phase reaction mechanism in simulating the results of 561 experiments carried out in four different environmental chambers. The experiments included background air, NO x-air, CONO x-air and aldehyde-air irradiations used for chamber characterization, NO x-air irradiations of single organics as well as simple and complex organic mixtures, and irradiations of auto exhaust. The methods used to represent the major chamber effects and the lighting characteristics in the model simulations of the experiments are described and their associated uncertainties are discussed. Statistical measures of the performance of the mechanism in simulating results of the various types of experiments are summarized and discussed. The mechanism was able to predict maximum ozone yields and rates of NO oxidation to within ±30% for 63% of the experiments modeled, and to within ±50% for 85% of the runs. There is a slight bias (˜15%) towards overprediction of ozone in mixture runs. Although there are cases where the simulations suggest possible problems with the gas-phase mechanism, much of the variability in the goodness of the fits could be attributed to uncertainties in chamber effects. It is concluded that better characterization of chamber conditions are needed if more comprehensive tests of atmospheric photochemical mechanisms are desired.

  11. Cold energy release characteristics of an ice/air direct contact heat exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Ohira, Akiyoshi; Yanadori, Michio; Iwabuchi, Kunihiko; Kimura, Toshikatsu; Tsubota, Yuji

    1998-12-31

    This paper deals with the cold energy release characteristics of an ice/air direct contact heat exchanger in a refined cold energy conveyance system. Characteristics of the outlet temperature, the humidity, and time history of released heat are examined when the initial height of the ice-cube-packed bed in the heat exchanger is changed. The following are the results obtained in these experiments: (1) Inlet air of 30 C is lowered to about 0 C by passing the air through the heat exchanger, and absolute humidity of the outlet air is reduced to about a quarter of that of the inlet air. (2) There is an optimum height of the ice-cube-packed bed for maximizing the amount of cold energy released. (3) This heat exchange method can supply about twice the amount of cold energy released by an ordinary fin-tube-type heat exchanger even if the air velocity in the heat exchanger is reduced to about 0.38 times that of the fin-tube-type heat exchanger.

  12. Absolute bioavailability and absorption characteristics of divalproex sodium extended-release tablets in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Sandeep; Reed, Ronald C; Cavanaugh, John H

    2004-07-01

    Conventional delayed-release, enteric-coated divalproex sodium tablet has an absolute bioavailability of approximately 100%. Divalproex sodium extended-release (ER) tablet is a novel formulation of valproic acid (VPA) designed to release the drug slowly at a constant zero-order rate. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the absolute bioavailability and absorption characteristics of divalproex ER. Healthy adult volunteers (n = 16) received divalproex ER and intravenous VPA in crossover fashion. Absolute bioavailability was calculated as the divalproex ER/intravenous VPA ratio of area under the curve extrapolated to infinity. The duration and rate of absorption of VPA from divalproex ER tablets were determined by deconvolution analysis. The geometric mean absolute bioavailability of divalproex ER was 0.896. The mean (coefficient of variation) duration of drug absorption from divalproex ER was 21.8 (17%) hours, and the zero-order absorption rate was 21.6 (24%) mg/h for a 500-mg tablet. Divalproex ER has a lower absolute bioavailability than conventional divalproex tablets but exhibits good extended-release characteristics without any dose dumping.

  13. Novel Solid Encapsulation of Ethylene Gas Using Amorphous α-Cyclodextrin and the Release Characteristics.

    PubMed

    Ho, Binh T; Bhandari, Bhesh R

    2016-05-04

    This research investigated the encapsulation of ethylene gas into amorphous α-cyclodextrins (α-CDs) at low (LM) and high (HM) moisture contents at 1.0-1.5 MPa for 24-120 h and its controlled release characteristics at 11.2-52.9% relative humidity (RH) for 1-168 h. The inclusion complexes (ICs) were characterized using X-ray diffractometry (XRD), nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (CP-MAS (13)C NMR), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Ethylene concentrations in the ICs were from 0.45 to 0.87 mol of ethylene/mol CD and from 0.42 to 0.54 mol of ethylene/mol CD for LM and HM α-CDs, respectively. Ethylene gas released from the encapsulated powder at higher rates with increasing RH. An analysis of release kinetics using Avrami's equation showed that the LM and HM amorphous α-CDs were not associated with significant differences in release constant k and parameter n for any given RH condition. NMR spectra showed the presence of the characteristic carbon-carbon double bond of ethylene gas in the encapsulated α-CD powder.

  14. Physicochemical and drug release characteristics of acetylated starches of five Lagenaria siceraria cultivars.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Sameer D; Sinha, Barij N; Kumar, K Jayaram

    2015-01-01

    Modified starches play a crucial role in the pharmaceutical industries in controlling the drug release at a pre-determined rate. The effect of acetylation on the physicochemical and drug release characteristics of the starches from five different Indian L. siceraria cultivars was investigated. Starches isolated from the seeds of L. siceraria were subjected to varying degrees of acetylation. Using a range of characterization methods including amylose content, elemental analysis, light transmittance, swelling power, scanning electron microscopy, FT-IR and X-ray diffraction, the effect of acetylation was determined. The swelling power of starch acetates improved significantly (P < 0.05) with the increase in degree of substitution. The increase in swelling shows that acetylation improved the accessibility of an amorphous area to the water. The formation of V-type of complex crystalline structures confirmed the acetylation of L. siceraria starch. Modification in the crystalline structure of starch acetate retarded the drug release, which is controlled by water uptake. The starch acetates from all the cultivars showed better sustained release properties with the increase in degree of substitution. Drug release through the swellable matrix was found to be controlled by fickian diffusion from the gel layer as indicated by Korsmeyer-Peppas models (R(2)) 0.9885-0.9984.

  15. Gas-phase reactions of halogen species of atmospheric importance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heard, Anne C.

    A low-pressure discharge-flow technique, with various optical detection methods, has been used to determine bimolecular rate coefficients for a number of reactions in the gas-phase between OH radicals and organic halogen-containing molecules and between NO3 radicals and the iodine species I2 and I. These experiments have shown that: (1) the reaction of methyl iodide with OH accounts for approximately 2 percent of the removal of CH3I from the troposphere as compared with photolysis; (2) abstraction of I-atoms from a C-I bond by OH is probable in the gas-phase; (3) the halogen-containing anaesthetic substances halothane CF3CClBrH, enflurane CF2HOCF2CFClH, isoflurane CF2HOCClHCF3 and sevoflurane (CF3)2CHOCFH2 have significantly shorter tropospheric lifetimes than the fully halogenated CFCs and halons because of reaction with the OH radical and are thus unlikely to be transported up to the stratosphere where they could contribute to the depletion of ozone. Data obtained for reactions between OH and some 'CFC alternatives' along with measurements of the integrated absorption cross-sections of the compounds in the spectral region 800-1200 cm(exp -1) were used to calculate ozone depletion potentials (ODP) and greenhouse warming potentials relative to CFCl3 for each compound. The study of the reactions between OH and CF3CFBrH and CF2BrH was used to provide a useful first estimate of the environmental acceptability of these compounds in the context of their possible use as replacements for the conventional CFCs. A method was developed to provide a first estimate of the ODP of a halogenated alkane without use of a complicated (and expensive) computer modeling scheme. A reaction between molecular iodine and the nitrate radical in the gas-phase was discovered and the kinetics of this reaction have been studied. No temperature or pressure dependence was observed for the rate of reaction, the rate constant of which was found to be (1.5 +/- 0.5) x 10(exp -12)/cu cm

  16. Gas-phase folding and unfolding of cytochrome c cations.

    PubMed Central

    Wood, T D; Chorush, R A; Wampler, F M; Little, D P; O'Connor, P B; McLafferty, F W

    1995-01-01

    Water is thought to play a dominant role in protein folding, yet gaseous multiply protonated proteins from which the water has been completely removed show hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchange behavior similar to that used to identify conformations in solution. Indicative of the gas-phase accessibility to D2O, multiply-charged (6+ to 17+) cytochrome c cations exchange at six (or more) distinct levels of 64 to 173 out of 198 exchangeable H atoms, with the 132 H level found at charge values 8+ to 17+. Infrared laser heating and fast collisions can apparently induce ions to unfold to exchange at a higher distinct level, while charge-stripping ions to lower charge values yields apparent folding as well as unfolding. PMID:7708663

  17. Regenerable Air Purification System for Gas-Phase Contaminant Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Constantinescu, Ileana C.; Finn, John E.; LeVan, M. Douglas; Lung, Bernadette (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Tests of a pre-prototype regenerable air purification system (RAPS) that uses water vapor to displace adsorbed contaminants from an adsorbent column have been performed at NASA Ames Research Center. A unit based on this design can be used for removing trace gas-phase contaminants from spacecraft cabin air or from polluted process streams including incinerator exhaust. During the normal operation mode, contaminants are removed from the air on the column. Regeneration of the column is performed on-line. During regeneration, contaminants are displaced and destroyed inside the closed oxidation loop. In this presentation we discuss initial experimental results for the performance of RAPS in the removal and treatment of several important spacecraft contaminant species from air.

  18. Enhancement of gas phase heat transfer by acoustic field application.

    PubMed

    Komarov, Sergey; Hirasawa, Masahiro

    2003-06-01

    This study discusses a possibility for enhancement of heat transfer between solids and ambient gas by application of powerful acoustic fields. Experiments are carried out by using preheated Pt wires (length 0.1-0.15 m, diameter 50 and 100 micro m) positioned at the velocity antinode of a standing wave (frequency range 216-1031 Hz) or in the path of a travelling wave (frequency range 6.9-17.2 kHz). A number of experiments were conducted under conditions of gas flowing across the wire surface. Effects of sound frequency, sound strength, gas flow velocity and wire preheating temperature on the Nusselt number are examined with and without sound application. The gas phase heat transfer rate is enhanced with acoustic field strength. Higher temperatures result in a vigorous radiation from the wire surface and attenuate the effect of sound. The larger the gas flow velocity, the smaller is the effect of sound wave on heat transfer enhancement.

  19. Regenerable Air Purification System for Gas-Phase Contaminant Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Constantinescu, Ileana C.; Qi, Nan; LeVan, M. Douglas; Finn, Cory K.; Finn, John E.; Luna, Bernadette (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    A regenerable air purification system (RAPS) that uses water vapor to displace adsorbed contaminants from an. adsorbent column into a closed oxidation loop is under development through cooperative R&D between Vanderbilt University and NASA Ames Research Center. A unit based on this design can be used for removing trace gas-phase contaminants from spacecraft cabin air or from polluted process streams including incinerator exhaust. Recent work has focused on fabrication and operation of a RAPS breadboard at NASA Ames, and on measurement of adsorption isotherm data for several important organic compounds at Vanderbilt. These activities support the use and validation of RAPS modeling software also under development at Vanderbilt, which will in turn be used to construct a prototype system later in the project.

  20. The intrinsic (gas-phase) acidities of bridgehead alcohols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrero, Rebeca; Dávalos, Juan Z.; Abboud, José-Luis M.; Alkorta, I.; Koppel, I.; Koppel, I. A.; Sonoda, T.; Mishima, M.

    2007-11-01

    The gas-phase acidities of 1-adamantanol and perfluoro1-adamantanol were determined by means of Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance spectrometry (FT-ICR). The acidity of perfluoro1-adamantanol seems to be the highest ever reported for an alcohol. A computational study of these species and their anions at both the MP2/6-311 + G(d,p) and B3LYP/6-311 + G(d,p) levels was performed. Also studied were the tertiary alcohols (including their perfluorinated forms) derived from norbornane, bicyclo[2.2E2]octane and cubane. It was found that: (i) the intrinsic acidity of non-fluorinated bridgehead alcohols increases with the strain of the hydrocarbon framework and, (ii) perfluorination of these compounds strongly increases their acidity and, likely, significantly modifies their internal strain.

  1. Gas-phase synthesis of magnetic metal/polymer nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Starsich, Fabian H L; Hirt, Ann M; Stark, Wendelin J; Grass, Robert N

    2014-12-19

    Highly magnetic metal Co nanoparticles were produced via reducing flame spray pyrolysis, and directly coated with an epoxy polymer in flight. The polymer content in the samples varied between 14 and 56 wt% of nominal content. A homogenous dispersion of Co nanoparticles in the resulting nanocomposites was visualized by electron microscopy. The size and crystallinity of the metallic fillers was not affected by the polymer, as shown by XRD and magnetic hysteresis measurements. The good control of the polymer content in the product nanocomposite was shown by elemental analysis. Further, the successful polymerization in the gas phase was demonstrated by electron microscopy and size measurements. The presented effective, dry and scalable one-step synthesis method for highly magnetic metal nanoparticle/polymer composites presented here may drastically decrease production costs and increase industrial yields.

  2. Gas-phase synthesis of magnetic metal/polymer nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starsich, Fabian H. L.; Hirt, Ann M.; Stark, Wendelin J.; Grass, Robert N.

    2014-12-01

    Highly magnetic metal Co nanoparticles were produced via reducing flame spray pyrolysis, and directly coated with an epoxy polymer in flight. The polymer content in the samples varied between 14 and 56 wt% of nominal content. A homogenous dispersion of Co nanoparticles in the resulting nanocomposites was visualized by electron microscopy. The size and crystallinity of the metallic fillers was not affected by the polymer, as shown by XRD and magnetic hysteresis measurements. The good control of the polymer content in the product nanocomposite was shown by elemental analysis. Further, the successful polymerization in the gas phase was demonstrated by electron microscopy and size measurements. The presented effective, dry and scalable one-step synthesis method for highly magnetic metal nanoparticle/polymer composites presented here may drastically decrease production costs and increase industrial yields.

  3. Dissociative attachment reactions of electrons with gas phase superacids

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, X.

    1992-01-01

    Using the flowing afterglow Langmuir probe (FALP) technique, dissociative attachment coefficients [beta] for reactions of electrons with gas phase superacids HCo(PF[sub 3])[sub 4], HRh(PF[sub 3])[sub 4] and carbonyl hydride complexes HMn(CO)[sub 5], HRe(CO)[sub 5] have been determined under thermal conditions over the approximate temperature range 300[approximately]550 K. The superacids react relatively slowly (<1/20 of [beta][sub max]) with free electrons in a thermal plasma, and the values of [beta] obtained this far do not show a correlation between acidity and [beta]. The pioneer researchers in this field had speculated that any superacid would be a rapid attacher of electrons; it was found that this speculation is not true in general. The product distribution of electron attachment reaction to HCo(PF[sub 3])[sub 4] was found to be independent of temperature even though the [beta][HCo(PF[sub 3])[sub 4

  4. Silicon Nanowire-Based Devices for Gas-Phase Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Anping; Sudhölter, Ernst J.R.; de Smet, Louis C.P.M.

    2014-01-01

    Since their introduction in 2001, SiNW-based sensor devices have attracted considerable interest as a general platform for ultra-sensitive, electrical detection of biological and chemical species. Most studies focus on detecting, sensing and monitoring analytes in aqueous solution, but the number of studies on sensing gases and vapors using SiNW-based devices is increasing. This review gives an overview of selected research papers related to the application of electrical SiNW-based devices in the gas phase that have been reported over the past 10 years. Special attention is given to surface modification strategies and the sensing principles involved. In addition, future steps and technological challenges in this field are addressed. PMID:24368699

  5. Infrared photodissociation spectroscopy of protonated neurotransmitters in the gas phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacLeod, N. A.; Simons, J. P.

    2007-03-01

    Protonated neurotransmitters have been produced in the gas phase via a novel photochemical scheme: complexes of the species of interest, 1-phenylethylamine, 2-amino-1-phenylethanol and the diastereo-isomers, ephedrine and pseudoephedrine, with a suitable proton donor, phenol (or indole), are produced in a supersonic expansion and ionized by resonant two photon ionization of the donor. Efficient proton transfer generates the protonated neurotransmitters, complexed to a phenoxy radical. Absorption of infrared radiation, and subsequent evaporation of the phenoxy tag, coupled with time of flight mass spectrometry, provides vibrational spectra of the protonated (and also hydrated) complexes for comparison with the results of quantum chemical computation. Comparison with the conformational structures of the neutral neurotransmitters (established previously) reveals the effect of protonation on their structure. The photochemical proton transfer strategy allows spectra to be recorded from individual laser shots and their quality compares favourably with that obtained using electro-spray or matrix assisted laser desorption ion sources.

  6. Synthesis and Gas Phase Thermochemistry of Germanium-Containing Compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Classen, Nathan Robert

    2002-01-01

    The driving force behind much of the work in this dissertation was to gain further understanding of the unique olefin to carbene isomerization observed in the thermolysis of 1,1-dimethyl-2-methylenesilacyclobutane by finding new examples of it in other silicon and germanium compounds. This lead to the examination of a novel phenylmethylenesilacyclobut-2-ene, which did not undergo olefin to carbene rearrangement. A synthetic route to methylenegermacyclobutanes was developed, but the methylenegermacyclobutane system exhibited kinetic instability, making the study of the system difficult. In any case the germanium system decomposed through a complex mechanism which may not include olefin to carbene isomerization. However, this work lead to the study of the gas phase thermochemistry of a series of dialkylgermylene precursors in order to better understand the mechanism of the thermal decomposition of dialkylgermylenes. The resulting dialkylgermylenes were found to undergo a reversible intramolecular β C-H insertion mechanism.

  7. Ceramic microreactors for heterogeneously catalysed gas-phase reactions.

    PubMed

    Knitter, Regina; Liauw, Marcel A

    2004-08-01

    The high surface to volume ratio of microchannel components offers many advantages in micro chemical engineering. It is obvious, however, that the reactor material and corrosion phenomena play an important role when applying these components. For chemical reactions at very high temperatures or/and with corrosive reactants involved, microchannel components made of metals or polymers are not suited. Hence, a modular microreactor system made of alumina was developed and fabricated using a rapid prototyping process chain. With exchangeable inserts the system can be adapted to the requirements of various reactions. Two heterogeneously catalysed gas-phase reactions (oxidative coupling of methane, isoprene selective oxidation to citraconic anhydride) were investigated to check the suitability of the system at temperatures of up to 1000 degrees C. Apart from the high thermal and chemical resistance, the lack of any blind activity was found to be another advantage of ceramic components.

  8. Surfactants from the gas phase may promote cloud droplet formation

    PubMed Central

    Sareen, Neha; Schwier, Allison N.; Lathem, Terry L.; Nenes, Athanasios; McNeill, V. Faye

    2013-01-01

    Clouds, a key component of the climate system, form when water vapor condenses upon atmospheric particulates termed cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). Variations in CCN concentrations can profoundly impact cloud properties, with important effects on local and global climate. Organic matter constitutes a significant fraction of tropospheric aerosol mass, and can influence CCN activity by depressing surface tension, contributing solute, and influencing droplet activation kinetics by forming a barrier to water uptake. We present direct evidence that two ubiquitous atmospheric trace gases, methylglyoxal (MG) and acetaldehyde, known to be surface-active, can enhance aerosol CCN activity upon uptake. This effect is demonstrated by exposing acidified ammonium sulfate particles to 250 parts per billion (ppb) or 8 ppb gas-phase MG and/or acetaldehyde in an aerosol reaction chamber for up to 5 h. For the more atmospherically relevant experiments, i.e., the 8-ppb organic precursor concentrations, significant enhancements in CCN activity, up to 7.5% reduction in critical dry diameter for activation, are observed over a timescale of hours, without any detectable limitation in activation kinetics. This reduction in critical diameter enhances the apparent particle hygroscopicity up to 26%, which for ambient aerosol would lead to cloud droplet number concentration increases of 8–10% on average. The observed enhancements exceed what would be expected based on Köhler theory and bulk properties. Therefore, the effect may be attributed to the adsorption of MG and acetaldehyde to the gas–aerosol interface, leading to surface tension depression of the aerosol. We conclude that gas-phase surfactants may enhance CCN activity in the atmosphere. PMID:23382211

  9. Femtosecond gas phase electron diffraction with MeV electrons.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jie; Guehr, Markus; Vecchione, Theodore; Robinson, Matthew S; Li, Renkai; Hartmann, Nick; Shen, Xiaozhe; Coffee, Ryan; Corbett, Jeff; Fry, Alan; Gaffney, Kelly; Gorkhover, Tais; Hast, Carsten; Jobe, Keith; Makasyuk, Igor; Reid, Alexander; Robinson, Joseph; Vetter, Sharon; Wang, Fenglin; Weathersby, Stephen; Yoneda, Charles; Wang, Xijie; Centurion, Martin

    2016-12-16

    We present results on ultrafast gas electron diffraction (UGED) experiments with femtosecond resolution using the MeV electron gun at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. UGED is a promising method to investigate molecular dynamics in the gas phase because electron pulses can probe the structure with a high spatial resolution. Until recently, however, it was not possible for UGED to reach the relevant timescale for the motion of the nuclei during a molecular reaction. Using MeV electron pulses has allowed us to overcome the main challenges in reaching femtosecond resolution, namely delivering short electron pulses on a gas target, overcoming the effect of velocity mismatch between pump laser pulses and the probe electron pulses, and maintaining a low timing jitter. At electron kinetic energies above 3 MeV, the velocity mismatch between laser and electron pulses becomes negligible. The relativistic electrons are also less susceptible to temporal broadening due to the Coulomb force. One of the challenges of diffraction with relativistic electrons is that the small de Broglie wavelength results in very small diffraction angles. In this paper we describe the new setup and its characterization, including capturing static diffraction patterns of molecules in the gas phase, finding time-zero with sub-picosecond accuracy and first time-resolved diffraction experiments. The new device can achieve a temporal resolution of 100 fs root-mean-square, and sub-angstrom spatial resolution. The collimation of the beam is sufficient to measure the diffraction pattern, and the transverse coherence is on the order of 2 nm. Currently, the temporal resolution is limited both by the pulse duration of the electron pulse on target and by the timing jitter, while the spatial resolution is limited by the average electron beam current and the signal-to-noise ratio of the detection system. We also discuss plans for improving both the temporal resolution and the spatial resolution.

  10. Surfactants from the gas phase may promote cloud droplet formation.

    PubMed

    Sareen, Neha; Schwier, Allison N; Lathem, Terry L; Nenes, Athanasios; McNeill, V Faye

    2013-02-19

    Clouds, a key component of the climate system, form when water vapor condenses upon atmospheric particulates termed cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). Variations in CCN concentrations can profoundly impact cloud properties, with important effects on local and global climate. Organic matter constitutes a significant fraction of tropospheric aerosol mass, and can influence CCN activity by depressing surface tension, contributing solute, and influencing droplet activation kinetics by forming a barrier to water uptake. We present direct evidence that two ubiquitous atmospheric trace gases, methylglyoxal (MG) and acetaldehyde, known to be surface-active, can enhance aerosol CCN activity upon uptake. This effect is demonstrated by exposing acidified ammonium sulfate particles to 250 parts per billion (ppb) or 8 ppb gas-phase MG and/or acetaldehyde in an aerosol reaction chamber for up to 5 h. For the more atmospherically relevant experiments, i.e., the 8-ppb organic precursor concentrations, significant enhancements in CCN activity, up to 7.5% reduction in critical dry diameter for activation, are observed over a timescale of hours, without any detectable limitation in activation kinetics. This reduction in critical diameter enhances the apparent particle hygroscopicity up to 26%, which for ambient aerosol would lead to cloud droplet number concentration increases of 8-10% on average. The observed enhancements exceed what would be expected based on Köhler theory and bulk properties. Therefore, the effect may be attributed to the adsorption of MG and acetaldehyde to the gas-aerosol interface, leading to surface tension depression of the aerosol. We conclude that gas-phase surfactants may enhance CCN activity in the atmosphere.

  11. Ion yields for some salts in MALDI: mechanism for the gas-phase ion formation from preformed ions.

    PubMed

    Moon, Jeong Hee; Shin, Young Sik; Bae, Yong Jin; Kim, Myung Soo

    2012-01-01

    Preformed ion emission is the main assumption in one of the prevailing theories for peptide and protein ion formation in matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI). Since salts are in preformed ion forms in the matrix-analyte mixture, they are ideal systems to study the characteristics of preformed ion emission. In this work, a reliable method to measure the ion yield (IY) in MALDI was developed and used for a solid salt benzyltriphenylphosphonium chloride and two room-temperature ionic liquids 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate and trihexyltetradecylphosphonium bis(2,4,4-trimethylpentyl)phosphinate. IY for the matrix (α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid, CHCA) was also measured. Taking 1 pmol salts in 25 nmol CHCA as examples, IYs for three salts were similar, (4-8) × 10(-4), and those for CHCA were (0.8-1.2) × 10(-7). Even though IYs for the salts and CHCA remained virtually constant at low analyte concentration, they decreased as the salt concentrations increased. Two models, Model 1 and Model 2, were proposed to explain low IYs for the salts and the concentration dependences. Both models are based on the fact that the ion-pair formation equilibrium is highly shifted toward the neutral ion pair. In Model 1, the gas-phase analyte cations were proposed to originate from the same cations in the solid that were dielectrically screened from counter anions by matrix neutrals. In Model 2, preformed ions were assumed to be released from the solid sample in the form of neutral ion pairs and the anions in the ion pairs were assumed to be eliminated via reactions with matrix-derived cations.

  12. Release characteristics of single-wall carbon nanotubes during manufacturing and handling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogura, I.; Kotake, M.; Hashimoto, N.; Gotoh, K.; Kishimoto, A.

    2013-04-01

    We investigated the release characteristics of single-wall carbon nanotubes (CNTs) synthesized by a pilot-scale plant. In addition to on-site aerosol measurements at the pilot-scale plant where the CNTs were synthesized, harvested, and packed, we conducted dustiness tests by vortex shaking and by transferring CNTs from one bowl to another. In the results of the on-site aerosol measurements, slight increases in the concentration were observed by aerosol monitoring instruments in the enclosure where CNTs were harvested and packed. In filter samples collected in this enclosure, micron-sized CNT clusters were observed by electron microscopy analysis. For samples collected outside the enclosure or during other processes, no CNTs were observed. The concentrations of elemental carbon at all locations were lower than the proposed occupational exposure limits of CNTs. The results of the dustiness tests revealed that submicron-sized particles were dominant in the number concentration measured by aerosol monitoring instruments, whereas micron-sized CNT clusters were mainly observed by electron microscopy analysis. The results of dustiness tests indicate that these CNTs have a low release characteristic. The lower drop impact of CNT clusters due to their lower bulk density resulted in lower CNT release from falling CNTs.

  13. Modifying release characteristics from 3D printed drug-eluting products.

    PubMed

    Boetker, Johan; Water, Jorrit Jeroen; Aho, Johanna; Arnfast, Lærke; Bohr, Adam; Rantanen, Jukka

    2016-07-30

    This work describes an approach to modify the release of active compound from a 3D printed model drug product geometry intended for flexible dosing and precision medication. The production of novel polylactic acid and hydroxypropyl methylcellulose based feed materials containing nitrofurantoin for 3D printing purposes is demonstrated. Nitrofurantoin, Metolose® and polylactic acid were successfully co-extruded with up to 40% Metolose® content, and subsequently 3D printed into model disk geometries (ø10mm, h=2mm). Thermal analysis with differential scanning calorimetry and solid phase identification with Raman spectroscopy showed that nitrofurantoin remained in its original solid form during both hot-melt extrusion and subsequent 3D printing. Rheological measurements of the different compositions showed that the flow properties were sensitive to the amount of undissolved particles present in the formulation. Release of nitrofurantoin from the disks was dependent on Metolose® loading, with higher accumulated release observed for higher Metolose® loads. This work shows the potential of custom-made, drug loaded feed materials for 3D printing of precision drug products with tailored drug release characteristics.

  14. Influence of formulation composition and process on the characteristics and in vitro release from PLGA-based sustained release injectables.

    PubMed

    Meeus, Joke; Scurr, David J; Appeltans, Bernard; Amssoms, Katie; Annaert, Pieter; Davies, Martyn C; Roberts, Clive J; Van den Mooter, Guy

    2015-02-01

    Understanding and controlling the in vitro release behavior of a formulation is a first step toward rationalized selection of a solubility enhancing formulation strategy with a desired release profile in vivo. Therefore six model formulations, representing three different formulation strategies, were physicochemically analyzed and their in vitro release was determined. Solid dispersions based on a PLGA/PVP matrix were compared to solid dispersions in a pure PLGA matrix. Additionally these solid dispersion strategies were compared to the strategy of particle size reduction by means of an API microsuspension. Depending on composition and manufacturing method, formulations varied in particle size, porosity, phase behavior, surface coverage and physical state of the API. This resulted in observed differences in their in vitro release profile. For the various formulation strategies tested both a porous PLGA-based formulation and PLGA/PVP-based formulations, resulted in vitro in sustained release of the poorly soluble API with over 50% of drug released after 24h. For PLGA-based formulations the porosity was identified as a critical parameter influencing in vitro drug release. For the PLGA/PVP-based formulations the release rate can be tailored by the amount of PLGA present. Particle size reduction resulted in immediate total drug release.

  15. High resolution ion mobility measurements for gas phase proteins: correlation between solution phase and gas phase conformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudgins, Robert R.; Woenckhaus, Jürgen; Jarrold, Martin F.

    1997-11-01

    Our high resolution ion mobility apparatus has been modified by attaching an electrospray source to perform measurements for biological molecules. While the greater resolving power permits the resolution of more conformations for BPTI and cytochrome c, the resolved features are generally much broader than expected for a single rigid conformation. A major advantage of the new experimental configuration is the much gentler introduction of ions into the drift tube, so that the observed gas phase conformations appear to more closely reflect those present in solution. For example, it is possible to distinguish between the native state of cytochrome c and the methanol-denatured form on the basis of the ion mobility measurements; the mass spectra alone are not sensitive enough to detect this change. Thus this approach may provide a quick and sensitive tool for probing the solution phase conformations of biological molecules.

  16. Dissociative Water Adsorption by Al3O4(+) in the Gas Phase.

    PubMed

    Fagiani, Matias R; Song, Xiaowei; Debnath, Sreekanta; Gewinner, Sandy; Schöllkopf, Wieland; Asmis, Knut R; Bischoff, Florian A; Müller, Fabian; Sauer, Joachim

    2017-03-06

    We use cryogenic ion trap vibrational spectroscopy in combination with density functional theory (DFT) to study the adsorption of up to four water molecules on Al3O4(+). The infrared photodissociation spectra of [Al3O4(D2O)1-4](+) are measured in the O-D stretching (3000-2000 cm(-1)) as well as the fingerprint spectral region (1300-400 cm(-1)) and are assigned based on a comparison with simulated harmonic infrared spectra for global minimum-energy structures obtained with DFT. We find that dissociative water adsorption is favored in all cases. The unambiguous assignment of the vibrational spectra of these gas phase model systems allows identifying characteristic spectral regions for O-D and O-H stretching modes of terminal (μ1) and bridging (μ2) hydroxyl groups in aluminum oxide/water systems, which sheds new light on controversial assignments for solid Al2O3 phases.

  17. GAS-PHASE FLAME SYNTHESIS AND PROPERTIES OF MAGNETIC IRON OXIDE NANOPARTICLES WITH REDUCED OXIDATION STATE

    PubMed Central

    Kumfer, Benjamin M; Shinoda, Kozo; Jeyadevan, Balachandran; Kennedy, Ian M

    2010-01-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles of reduced oxidation state, mainly in the form of magnetite, have been synthesized utilizing a new continuous, gas-phase, nonpremixed flame method using hydrocarbon fuels. This method takes advantage of the characteristics of the inverse flame, which is produced by injection of oxidizer into a surrounding flow of fuel. Unlike traditional flame methods, this configuration allows for the iron particle formation to be maintained in a more reducing environment. The effects of flame temperature, oxygen-enrichment and fuel dilution (i.e. the stoichiometric mixture fraction), and fuel composition on particle size, Fe oxidation state, and magnetic properties are evaluated and discussed. The crystallite size, Fe(II) fraction, and saturation magnetization were all found to increase with flame temperature. Flames of methane and ethylene were used, and the use of ethylene resulted in particles containing metallic Fe(0), in addition to magnetite, while no Fe(0) was present in samples synthesized using methane. PMID:20228941

  18. Characteristics and kinetics simulation of controlled-release KMnO4 for phenol remediation.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Houfeng; Huo, Mingxin; Zhou, Dandan; Dong, Shuangshi; Zou, Donglei

    Controlled-release KMnO4 (CRP) technology has been recently developed as an improved, highly efficient technique in wastewater treatment. In this study, batch-style experiments were conducted to evaluate this technology. The release characteristics of CRP in distilled water and the reaction between CRP and phenol were studied and fitted using MATLAB software. Results indicated that in distilled water, temperature (T) and pH value had a larger effect than dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration on the release characteristics of KMnO4, and this relationship can be accurately described by the following kinetic equation: logQ = log[1.141T(0.152)(pH)(-1.0536)(DO)(0.4674)] + [0.0048T(0.3756)(pH)(1.8854)(DO)(-0.0509)]logt. KMnO4 released from CRP can effectively degrade phenol-contaminated water with different concentrations. A simulated equation (r = -dCA/dt = -15.1705 CA(0.6840)CP(-0.1406)) characterizing phenol degradation was developed using MATLAB software. Comparison between the theoretical phenol removal rates deduced by the above two equations and the initial phenol concentration as well as the CRP dosage with the experimental data indicates that the differences between them were less than 20%. The results indicate phenol can be effectively removed by CRP and smaller dosage of KMnO4 was required compared with literature values. The models can provide guidance for CRP application in real polluted sites, which can lower the cost for site remediation.

  19. Formation and emissions of carbonyls during and following gas-phase ozonation of indoor materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poppendieck, D. G.; Hubbard, H. F.; Weschler, C. J.; Corsi, R. L.

    Ozone concentrations that are several orders of magnitude greater than typical urban ambient concentrations are necessary for gas-phase ozonation of buildings, either for deodorization or for disinfection of biological agents. However, there is currently no published literature on the interaction of building materials and ozone under such extreme conditions. It would be useful to understand, for example in the case of building re-occupation planning, what types and amounts of reaction products may form and persist in a building after ozonation. In this study, 24 materials were exposed to ozone at concentrations of 1000 ppm in the inlet stream of experimental chambers. Fifteen target carbonyls were selected and measured as building ozonation by-products (BOBPs). During the 36 h that include the 16 h ozonation and 20 h persistence phase, the total BOBP mass released from flooring and wall coverings ranged from 1 to 20 mg m -2, with most of the carbonyls being of lower molecular weight (C 1-C 4). In contrast, total BOBP mass released from wood-based products ranged from 20 to 100 mg m -2, with a greater fraction of the BOBPs being heavier carbonyls (C 5-C 9). The total BOBP mass released during an ozonation event is a function of both the total surface area of the material and the BOBP emission rate per unit area of material. Ceiling tile, carpet, office partition, and gypsum wallboard with flat latex paint often have large surface areas in commercial buildings and these same materials exhibited relatively high BOBP releases. The greatest overall BOBP mass releases were observed for three materials that building occupants might have significant contact with: paper, office partition, and medium density fiberboard, e.g., often used in office furniture. These materials also exhibited extended BOBP persistence following ozonation; some BOBPs (e.g., nonanal) persist for months or more at emission rates large enough to result in indoor concentrations that exceed their odor

  20. Ignition and flame characteristics of [under-expanded] cryogenic hydrogen releases

    DOE PAGES

    Panda, Pratikash P.; Hecht, Ethan S.

    2016-09-04

    In this work, under-expanded cryogenic hydrogen jets were investigated experimentally for their ignition and flame characteristics. The test facility described herein, was designed and constructed to release hydrogen at a constant temperature and pressure, to study the dispersion and thermo-physical properties of cryogenic hydrogen releases and flames. In this study, a non-intrusive laser spark focused on the jet axis was used to measure the maximum ignition distance. The radiative power emitted by the corresponding jet flames was also measured for a range of release scenarios from 37 K to 295 K, 2–6 barabs through nozzles with diameters from 0.75 tomore » 1.25 mm. The maximum ignition distance scales linearly with the effective jet diameter (which scales as the square root of the stagnant fluid density). A 1-dimensional (stream-wise) cryogenic hydrogen release model developed previously at Sandia National Laboratories (although this model is not yet validated for cryogenic hydrogen) was exercised to predict that the mean mole fraction at the maximum ignition distance is approximately 0.14, and is not dependent on the release conditions. The flame length and width were extracted from visible and infra-red flame images for several test cases. The flame length and width both scale as the square root of jet exit Reynolds number, as reported in the literature for flames from atmospheric temperature hydrogen. As shown in previous studies for ignited atmospheric temperature hydrogen, the radiative power from the jet flames of cold hydrogen scales as a logarithmic function of the global flame residence time. The radiative heat flux from jet flames of cold hydrogen is higher than the jet flames of atmospheric temperature hydrogen, for a given mass flow rate, due to the lower choked flow velocity of low-temperature hydrogen. Lastly, this study provides critical information with regard to the development of models to inform the safety codes and standards of hydrogen

  1. Evaluating the Impact of Releasing an Item Pool on a Test's Empirical Characteristics.

    PubMed

    Buckendahl, Chad W; Gerrow, Jack D

    2016-10-01

    Protecting the security of examination questions is an important task for high-stakes examining boards/agencies and university programs. To maintain the security of questions, examining boards and university programs use a combination of prevention, detection, and enforcement strategies. A common prevention strategy is to establish a number of controls on access to questions; however, restricting access can motivate examinees to try harder to reconstruct questions that may appear on future versions of the test. Moreover, access to study materials by some groups and not others can present a challenge to the fairness of examinations. The aim of this study was to evaluate the empirical stability of test characteristics. Specifically, the primary research objective was to investigate the empirical stability of the items and test forms of a written examination before and after a specific policy decision was implemented. As a response to both of these concerns, this article describes a study that evaluated how psychometric (i.e., statistical) properties of test forms and individual questions might be affected by publicly releasing a larger number of questions from an item question pool. A series of analyses were conducted, including item drift to evaluate stability of the characteristics. The results suggest that empirical characteristics of the test forms and individual questions have remained relatively stable since the release policy was implemented. Specifically, statistical properties of the test forms have continued to perform similarly to test forms that were constructed prior to the release. Although the results of this study were promising, the context of this specific testing program may have offered additional protections such as a limited number of administrations that others may not. Therefore, testing/examining agencies and university programs may want to consider this strategy with appropriate caution.

  2. Gas-phase impregnation of porous media with pyrocarbon as a promising trend in the manufacturing technology of carbon-graphite materials and products for reactor engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Gurin, V.A.; Zelensky, V.F.; Konotop, Yu.F.

    1993-12-31

    This paper presents some special features of producing carbon-graphite materials by gas-phase methods. Main differences between these methods and the traditional one of graphite fabrication are discussed; basic characteristics of the equipment available at the KIPT are given. The HTGR type reactors need radiation resistant grades of graphite with a normal operation guaranteed for a specified time.

  3. Gas-phase synthesis of semiconductor nanocrystals and its applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, Rajib

    Luminescent nanomaterials is a newly emerging field that provides challenges not only to fundamental research but also to innovative technology in several areas such as electronics, photonics, nanotechnology, display, lighting, biomedical engineering and environmental control. These nanomaterials come in various forms, shapes and comprises of semiconductors, metals, oxides, and inorganic and organic polymers. Most importantly, these luminescent nanomaterials can have different properties owing to their size as compared to their bulk counterparts. Here we describe the use of plasmas in synthesis, modification, and deposition of semiconductor nanomaterials for luminescence applications. Nanocrystalline silicon is widely known as an efficient and tunable optical emitter and is attracting great interest for applications in several areas. To date, however, luminescent silicon nanocrystals (NCs) have been used exclusively in traditional rigid devices. For the field to advance towards new and versatile applications for nanocrystal-based devices, there is a need to investigate whether these NCs can be used in flexible and stretchable devices. We show how the optical and structural/morphological properties of plasma-synthesized silicon nanocrystals (Si NCs) change when they are deposited on stretchable substrates made of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). Synthesis of these NCs was performed in a nonthermal, low-pressure gas phase plasma reactor. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of direct deposition of NCs onto stretchable substrates. Additionally, in order to prevent oxidation and enhance the luminescence properties, a silicon nitride shell was grown around Si NCs. We have demonstrated surface nitridation of Si NCs in a single step process using non?thermal plasma in several schemes including a novel dual-plasma synthesis/shell growth process. These coated NCs exhibit SiNx shells with composition depending on process parameters. While measurements including

  4. The gas-phase ozonolysis of α-humulene.

    PubMed

    Beck, M; Winterhalter, R; Herrmann, F; Moortgat, G K

    2011-06-21

    α-Humulene contains three double bonds (DB), and after ozonolysis of the first DB the first-generation products are still reactive towards O(3) and produce second- and third-generation products. The primary aim of this study consisted of identifying the products of the three generations, focusing on the carboxylic acids, which are known to have a high aerosol formation potential. The experiments were performed in a 570 litre spherical glass reactor at 295 K and 730 Torr. Initial mixing ratios were 260-2090 ppb for O(3) and 250-600 ppb for α-humulene in synthetic air. Reactants and gas-phase products were measured by in situ FTIR spectroscopy. Particulate products were sampled on Teflon filters, extracted with methanol and analyzed by LC-MS/MS-TOF. Using cyclohexane (10-100 ppm) as an OH-radical scavenger and by monitoring the yield of cyclohexanone by PTR-MS, an OH-yield of (10.5 ± 0.7)% was determined for the ozonolysis of the first DB, and (12.9 ± 0.7)% of the first-generation products. The rate constant of the reaction of O(3) with α-humulene is known as k(0) = 1.17 × 10(-14) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) [Y. Shu and R. Atkinson, Int. J. Chem. Kinet., 1994, 26, 1193-1205]. The reaction rate constants of O(3) with the first-generation products and the second-generation products were, respectively, determined as k(1) = (3.6 ± 0.9) × 10(-16) and k(2) = (3.0 ± 0.7) × 10(-17) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) by Facsimile-simulation of the observed ozone decay by FTIR. A total of 37 compounds in the aerosol phase and 5 products in the gas phase were tentatively identified: 25 compounds of the first-generation products contained C13-C15 species, 9 compounds of the second-generation products contained C8-C11 species, whereas 8 compounds of the third-generation products contained C4-C6 species. The products of all three generations consisted of a variety of dicarboxylic-, hydroxy-oxocarboxylic- and oxo-carboxylic acids. The formation mechanisms of some of the products are

  5. Gas-Phase Reactions of Halogen Species of Atmospheric Importance.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heard, Anne C.

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. A low-pressure discharge-flow technique, with various optical detection methods, has been used to determine bimolecular rate coefficients for a number of reactions in the gas-phase between OH radicals and organic halogen -containing molecules and between NO_3 radicals and the iodine species I_2 and I. These experiments have shown that: (i) the reaction of methyl iodide with OH accounts for approximately 2% of the removal of CH_3I from the troposphere as compared with photolysis; (ii) abstraction of I-atoms from a C-I bond by OH is probable in the gas -phase; (iii) the halogen-containing anaesthetic substances halothane CF_3CCl BrH, enflurane CF_2HOCF _2CFClH, isoflurane CF_2HOCClHCF _3 and sevoflurane (CF_3) _2CHOCFH_2 have significantly shorter tropospheric lifetimes than the fully halogenated CFCs and halons because of reaction with the OH radical and are thus unlikely to be transported up to the stratosphere where they could contribute to the depletion of ozone. Data obtained for reactions between OH and some 'CFC alternatives' along with measurements of the integrated absorption cross -sections of the compounds in the spectral region 800-1200 cm^{-1} were used to calculate ozone depletion potentials (ODP) and greenhouse warming potentials relative to CFCl_3 for each compound. The study of the reactions between OH and CF_3CFBrH and CF _2BrH was used to provide a useful first estimate of the environmental acceptability of these compounds in the context of their possible use as replacements for the conventional CFCs. A method was developed to provide a first estimate of the ODP of a halogenated alkane without use of a complicated (and expensive) computer modeling scheme. A reaction between molecular iodine and the nitrate radical in the gas-phase was discovered and the kinetics of this reaction have been studied. No temperature or pressure dependence was observed for the rate of

  6. Preparation, Characterization and in vivo Evaluation of Simple Monolithic Ethylcellulose-coated Pellets Containing Topiramate with Biphasic Release Characteristics.

    PubMed

    Gong, Wei; Wang, Yuli; Shao, Shuai; Xie, Si; Shan, Li; Yang, Meiyan; Gao, Chunsheng; Zhong, Wu

    2016-01-01

    In our previous study, polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) was used both as a binder and a pore-former to prepare ethylcellulose (EC)-coated pellets to deliver topiramate (TPM) for a controlled release profile. The objective of this work was to further optimize the formulation and evaluate the in vivo profiles of TPM sustained-release pellets. Similar to the previous formulation with no binder, the in vitro drug release of TPM sustained-release pellets with 50% PVP binder in drug layer was sensitive to pore-former PVP level ranged from 27.0% to 29.0%. The higher the level of PVP was, the quicker release rate in vitro was. Moreover, when the proportion of poreformer PVP decreased, the Cmax decreased, and the tmax and mean residence time of TPM coated pellets were both prolonged. The in vitro release profile of optimal formulation showed biphasic release characteristics similar to reference formulation Trokendi XR(®), i.e., involving immediate release of TPM in initial release stage followed by a sustained release up to 24 h. Moreover, the impact of the pH of release medium on the drug release rate of TPM sustained-release pellets was not significant. The release mechanism of TPM from the sustained-release pellets might be the interaction of diffusion (coating-film) and corrosion (drug layer). The in vivo pharmacokinetics results showed the TPM sustained-release pellets had the similar in vivo pattern compared with Trokendi XR(®). These studies provide valuable basis for further development of TPM sustained-release pellets.

  7. Effect of carboxymethylation on physicochemical and release characteristics of Indian Palo starch.

    PubMed

    Das, D; Jha, S; Kumar, K Jayaram

    2015-01-01

    Limited application of native starch has created the interest in the modification of starch to extend its asset for pharmaceutical application. An effort has been made to study the influence of carboxymethylation on morphological, physicochemical and drug release properties of wild Indian Palo (Curcuma angustifolia) starch. Carboxymethyl starches of different degree of substitution (0.046-0.256) were prepared using varying amount of monochloroacetic acid. The characteristic peaks at around 1600cm(-1) confirmed the carboxymethylation of starch. Morphological studies showed that porous structure formed on the surface of the starch granules and degree of deformity was found to be increased with the increment in the degree of substitution. Amylose content was decreased with the increase in degree of substitution. The TGA data showed that the carboxymethyl starches were thermally stable. Swelling and solubility power was found to be improved with the increase in the temperature. Micromeritic properties of carboxymethyl starches proved its usefulness as excipients in tablet manufacturing. Release profile of paracetamol was found to be decreased with the increase in the degree of substitution, and this proves the suitability of carboxymethyl Indian Palo starch in sustained-release tablets.

  8. Experimental Determination of Gas Phase Thermodynamic Properties of Bimolecular Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Anne S.; Maroun, Zeina; Mackeprang, Kasper; Kjaergaard, Henrik G.

    2016-06-01

    Accurate determination of the atmospheric abundance of hydrogen bound bimolecular complexes is necessary, as hydrogen bonds are partly responsible for the formation and growth of aerosol particles. The abundance of a complex is related to the Gibbs free energy of complex formation (Δ G), which is often obtained from quantum chemical calculations that rely on calculated values of the enthalpy (Δ H) and entropy (Δ S) of complex formation. However, calculations of Δ H and in particular Δ S are associated with large uncertainties, and accurate experimental values are therefore crucial for theoretical benchmarking studies. Infrared measurements of gas phase hydrogen bound complexes were performed in the 300 to 373 K range, and lead to a purely experimental determination of Δ H using the van't Hoff equation. Equilibrium constants were determined by combining an experimental and calculated OH-stretching intensity, from which values of Δ G and hence Δ S could be determined. Thus we can determine Δ G, Δ H and Δ S for a bimolecular complex. We find that in the 300 to 373 K temperature range the determined Δ H and Δ S values are independent of temperature.

  9. Gas phase plasma impact on phenolic compounds in pomegranate juice.

    PubMed

    Herceg, Zoran; Kovačević, Danijela Bursać; Kljusurić, Jasenka Gajdoš; Jambrak, Anet Režek; Zorić, Zoran; Dragović-Uzelac, Verica

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of gas phase plasma on phenolic compounds in pomegranate juice. The potential of near infrared reflectance spectroscopy combined with partial least squares for monitoring the stability of phenolic compounds during plasma treatment was explored, too. Experiments are designed to investigate the effect of plasma operating conditions (treatment time 3, 5, 7 min; sample volume 3, 4, 5 cm(3); gas flow 0.75, 1, 1.25 dm(3) min(-1)) on phenolic compounds and compared to pasteurized and untreated pomegranate juice. Pasteurization and plasma treatment resulted in total phenolic content increasing by 29.55% and 33.03%, respectively. Principal component analysis and sensitivity analysis outputted the optimal treatment design with plasma that could match the pasteurized sample concerning the phenolic stability (5 min/4 cm(3)/0.75 dm(3) min(-1)). Obtained results demonstrate the potential of near infrared reflectance spectroscopy that can be successfully used to evaluate the quality of pomegranate juice upon plasma treatment considering the phenolic compounds.

  10. Gas phase production and loss of isoprene epoxydiols.

    PubMed

    Bates, Kelvin H; Crounse, John D; St Clair, Jason M; Bennett, Nathan B; Nguyen, Tran B; Seinfeld, John H; Stoltz, Brian M; Wennberg, Paul O

    2014-02-20

    Isoprene epoxydiols (IEPOX) form in high yields from the OH-initiated oxidation of isoprene under low-NO conditions. These compounds contribute significantly to secondary organic aerosol formation. Their gas-phase chemistry has, however, remained largely unexplored. In this study, we characterize the formation of IEPOX isomers from the oxidation of isoprene by OH. We find that cis-β- and trans-β-IEPOX are the dominant isomers produced, and that they are created in an approximate ratio of 1:2 from the low-NO oxidation of isoprene. Three isomers of IEPOX, including cis-β- and trans-β, were synthesized and oxidized by OH in environmental chambers under high- and low-NO conditions. We find that IEPOX reacts with OH at 299 K with rate coefficients of (0.84 ± 0.07) × 10(-11), (1.52 ± 0.07) × 10(-11), and (0.98 ± 0.05) × 10(-11) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) for the δ1, cis-β, and trans-β isomers. Finally, yields of the first-generation products of IEPOX + OH oxidation were measured, and a new mechanism of IEPOX oxidation is proposed here to account for the observed products. The substantial yield of glyoxal and methylglyoxal from IEPOX oxidation may help explain elevated levels of those compounds observed in low-NO environments with high isoprene emissions.

  11. Gas-phase Electronic Spectra of Coronene and Corannulene Cations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardy, F.-X.; Rice, Corey A.; Maier, John P.

    2017-02-01

    Gas-phase electronic spectra of the coronene ({{{C}}}24{{{{H}}}12}+) and corannulene ({{{C}}}20{{{{H}}}10}+) cations complexed with helium have been recorded in a quadrupole ion trap at 5 K by photodissociation. The electronic spectrum of {{{C}}}20{{{{H}}}10}+ with two helium atoms was also measured to estimate the perturbation. This method is sufficient for an astronomical comparison because the shift due to the weakly bound helium is on the order of 0.2 Å. {{{C}}}24{{{{H}}}12}+{--}{He} has the origin band of the {{{A}}}2{{{E}}}1g≤ftarrow X{}2{{{E}}}2u transition at 9438.3 Å and that to a much higher state {{{D}}}3≤ftarrow X{}2{{{E}}}2u at 4570 Å. The corannulene cation is subject to a Jahn–Teller distortion in the electronic ground state, leading to the {3}2{{A}}\\prime ≤ftarrow {{X}}{}2{{A}}\\prime \\prime and {3}2{{A}}\\prime \\prime ≤ftarrow {{X}}{}2{{A}}\\prime transitions with origin band maxima when complexed with helium at 5996.1 and 5882.6 Å. These absorptions lie in a region where there is a congestion of diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs). However, the recorded features have no match with astronomical observations, removing coronene and corannulene cations and probably other aromatic hydrocarbons of this size as possible carriers of the DIBs.

  12. Microwave spectrum and the gas phase structure of phthalimide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pejlovas, Aaron M.; Lin, Wei; Oncer, Onur; Kukolich, Stephen G.

    2015-11-01

    The microwave spectrum of phthalimide (PhI) was measured in the 4.8-9.5 GHz range using a Flygare-Balle type, pulsed-beam Fourier transform microwave spectrometer. Rotational transitions were measured for the parent and all unique single 13C substituted isotopologues. The rotational (MHz), centrifugal distortion (kHz), and quadrupole coupling constants (MHz) were determined for the parent to be A = 1745.6655(10), B = 1199.3309(6), C = 711.0864(3), DJ = 0.012(7), DJK = -0.05(9), 1.5χaa = 2.719(11), and 0.25(χbb - χcc) = 1.236(3). Using the measured rotational constants of the isotopologues, a nonlinear least squares fit was performed to obtain the best fit gas phase structure. The inertial defect is Δ = -0.175 amu Å2, indicating a planar structure for PhI. Calculations using B3LYP/aug-cc-pVQZ provided rotational constants which are much closer to the experimental values compared to the MP2/6-311++G∗∗ calculated values.

  13. Microwave spectrum and gas phase structure of maleimide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pejlovas, Aaron M.; Oncer, Onur; Kang, Lu; Kukolich, Stephen G.

    2016-01-01

    The rotational spectrum of maleimide was measured in the 5-12 GHz range using a Flygare-Balle type, pulsed-beam Fourier transform microwave spectrometer. Rotational transitions were measured for the parent, all unique singly substituted 13C isotopologues, and an sbnd ND, deuterium substituted isotopologue. The parent (or normal isotopologue) rotational constants, centrifugal distortion constants, and quadrupole coupling constants are A = 6815.3251(12) MHz, B = 2361.85011(64) MHz, C = 1754.32750(64) MHz, DJ = 0.232(24) kHz, DJK = 0.546(54) kHz, 1.5χaa = 2.4227(53) MHz, and 0.25(χbb-χcc) = 1.3679(15) MHz. A best fit gas phase structure was determined using the experimental rotational constants of the isotopologues and some parameters from calculations. The inertial defect is Δ = -0.054 amu Å2, indicating a planar structure for maleimide, with no large amplitude motions observed on the sbnd NH hydrogen atom. Calculations using B3LYP/aug-cc-pVTZ provided rotational constants which are much closer (within 1-2%) to the experimental values compared to the MP2/aug-cc-pVTZ calculated values.

  14. Project ARGO: Gas phase formation in simulated microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, Michael R.; Waligora, James M.; Norfleet, William T.; Kumar, K. Vasantha

    1993-01-01

    The ARGO study investigated the reduced incidence of joint pain decompression sickness (DCS) encountered in microgravity as compared with an expected incidence of joint pain DCS experienced by test subjects in Earth-based laboratories (unit gravity) with similar protocols. Individuals who are decompressed from saturated conditions usually acquire joint pain DCS in the lower extremities. Our hypothesis is that the incidence of joint pain DCS can be limited by a significant reduction in the tissue gas micronuclei formed by stress-assisted nucleation. Reductions in dynamic and kinetic stresses in vivo are linked to hypokinetic and adynamic conditions of individuals in zero g. We employed the Doppler ultrasound bubble detection technique in simulated microgravity studies to determine quantitatively the degree of gas phase formation in the upper and lower extremities of test subjects during decompression. We found no evidence of right-to-left shunting through pulmonary vasculature. The volume of gas bubble following decompression was examined and compared with the number following saline contrast injection. From this, we predict a reduced incidence of DCS on orbit, although the incidence of predicted mild DCS still remains larger than that encountered on orbit.

  15. Surface plasmon sensing of gas phase contaminants using optical fiber.

    SciTech Connect

    Thornberg, Steven Michael; White, Michael I.; Rumpf, Arthur Norman; Pfeifer, Kent Bryant

    2009-10-01

    Fiber-optic gas phase surface plasmon resonance (SPR) detection of several contaminant gases of interest to state-of-health monitoring in high-consequence sealed systems has been demonstrated. These contaminant gases include H{sub 2}, H{sub 2}S, and moisture using a single-ended optical fiber mode. Data demonstrate that results can be obtained and sensitivity is adequate in a dosimetric mode that allows periodic monitoring of system atmospheres. Modeling studies were performed to direct the design of the sensor probe for optimized dimensions and to allow simultaneous monitoring of several constituents with a single sensor fiber. Testing of the system demonstrates the ability to detect 70mTorr partial pressures of H{sub 2} using this technique and <280 {micro}Torr partial pressures of H{sub 2}S. In addition, a multiple sensor fiber has been demonstrated that allows a single fiber to measure H{sub 2}, H{sub 2}S, and H{sub 2}O without changing the fiber or the analytical system.

  16. Full field gas phase velocity measurements in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, Devon W.; Yanis, William

    1995-01-01

    Measurement of full-field velocities via Particle Imaging Velocimetry (PIV) is common in research efforts involving fluid motion. While such measurements have been successfully performed in the liquid phase in a microgravity environment, gas-phase measurements have been beset by difficulties with seeding and laser strength. A synthesis of techniques developed at NASA LeRC exhibits promise in overcoming these difficulties. Typical implementation of PIV involves forming the light from a pulsed laser into a sheet that is some fraction of a millimeter thick and 50 or more millimeters wide. When a particle enters this sheet during a pulse, light scattered from the particle is recorded by a detector, which may be a film plane or a CCD array. Assuming that the particle remains within the boundaries of the sheet for the second pulse and can be distinguished from neighboring particles, comparison of the two images produces an average velocity vector for the time between the pulses. If the concentration of particles in the sampling volume is sufficiently large but the particles remain discrete, a full field map may be generated.

  17. Gas phase structures of peroxides: experiments and computational problems.

    PubMed

    Oberhammer, Heinz

    2015-02-02

    Gas-phase structures of several organic and inorganic peroxides X-O-O-X and X-O-O-X', which have been determined experimentally by gas electron diffraction and/or microwave spectroscopy, are discussed. The OO bond length in these peroxides varies from 1.481(8) Å in Me3 SiOOSiMe3 to 1.214(2) Å in FOOF and the dihedral angle ϕ(XO-OX) between 0° in HC(O)O-OH and near 180° in Bu(t) O-OBu(t) . Some of the peroxides cause problems for quantum chemistry, since several computational methods fail to reproduce the experimental structures. Extreme examples are MeO-OMe and FO-OF. In the case of MeO-OMe only about half of the more than 100 computational methods reported in the literature reproduce the experimentally determined double-minimum shape of the torsional potential around the OO bond correctly. For FO-OF only a small number of close to 200 computational methods reproduce the OO and OF bond lengths better than ±0.02 Å.

  18. Effect of carboxymethylation on physicochemical, micromeritics and release characteristics of Kyllinga nemoralis starch.

    PubMed

    Paramakrishnan, N; Jha, S; Kumar, K Jayaram

    2016-11-01

    Lesser usages of native starch has attracted attention in the modification of starch to incorporate its benefits for pharmaceutical application. A work has been carried out to study the influence of carboxymethylation on the morphological, physico-chemical, powder, spectroscopical and drug discharge characteristics of native starch. Various amount of monochloroacetic acid was used to study the influence of degree of substitution (DS) on the diverse characteristics of modified starch. Amylose content was found to be reduced with the increase in degree of substitution. An enhanced degree of structure deformation was observed with the increment in the DS by the help of scanning electron micrographs. The FT-IR spectra established the polysaccharide nature and the carboxymethylation of the chemically modified starch molecules through the new bands at 1602cm(-1), and 1418.69cm(-1). The stability of carboxymethyl starches pertaining to the temperature has been revealed by thermogravimetric analysis. Micromeritics of carboxymethylated starches shows their effectiveness as excipients in tablet formulation. The delayed % release of the drug, with the rise in degree of substitution from the tablets prepared marks that the carboxymethyl derivatives of Kyllinga nemoralis rhizomes starch may be used as a suitable source of excipient for sustained release formulations.

  19. Characteristic odor of Osmoderma eremita identified as a male-released pheromone.

    PubMed

    Larsson, Mattias C; Hedin, Jonas; Svensson, Glenn P; Tolasch, Till; Francke, Wittko

    2003-03-01

    Osmoderma eremita (Scopoli) is an endangered scarab beetle living in hollow trees. It has mainly been known for its characteristic odor, typically described as a fruity, peachlike or plumlike aroma. The odor emanating from a single beetle can sometimes be perceived from a distance of several meters. In this paper, we show that the characteristic odor from O. eremita is caused by the compound (R)-(+)-gamma-decalactone, released in large quantities mainly or exclusively by male beetles. Antennae from male and female beetles responded in a similar way to (R)-(+)-gamma-decalactone in electroantennographic recordings. Field trapping experiments showed that (R)-(+)-gamma-decalactone is a pheromone attracting female beetles. Lactones similar to (R)-(+)-gamma-decalactone are frequently used as female-released sex pheromones by phytophagous scarabs. This is, however, the first evidence of a lactone used as a male-produced pheromone in scarab beetles. We propose that the strong signal from males is a sexually selected trait used to compete for females and matings. The signal could work within trees but also act as a guide to tree hollows, which are an essential resource for O. eremita. Males may, thus, attract females dispersing from their natal tree by advertising a suitable habitat. This signal could also be exploited by other males searching for tree hollows or for females, which would explain the catch of several males in our traps.

  20. A Phosphohistidine Proteomics Strategy Based on Elucidation of a Unique Gas-Phase Phosphopeptide Fragmentation Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Protein histidine phosphorylation is increasingly recognized as a critical posttranslational modification (PTM) in central metabolism and cell signaling. Still, the detection of phosphohistidine (pHis) in the proteome has remained difficult due to the scarcity of tools to enrich and identify this labile PTM. To address this, we report the first global proteomic analysis of pHis proteins, combining selective immunoenrichment of pHis peptides and a bioinformatic strategy based on mechanistic insight into pHis peptide gas-phase fragmentation during LC–MS/MS. We show that collision-induced dissociation (CID) of pHis peptides produces prominent characteristic neutral losses of 98, 80, and 116 Da. Using isotopic labeling studies, we also demonstrate that the 98 Da neutral loss occurs via gas-phase phosphoryl transfer from pHis to the peptide C-terminal α-carboxylate or to Glu/Asp side chain residues if present. To exploit this property, we developed a software tool that screens LC–MS/MS spectra for potential matches to pHis-containing peptides based on their neutral loss pattern. This tool was integrated into a proteomics workflow for the identification of endogenous pHis-containing proteins in cellular lysates. As an illustration of this strategy, we analyzed pHis peptides from glycerol-fed and mannitol-fed Escherichia coli cells. We identified known and a number of previously speculative pHis sites inferred by homology, predominantly in the phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar transferase system (PTS). Furthermore, we identified two new sites of histidine phosphorylation on aldehyde-alcohol dehydrogenase (AdhE) and pyruvate kinase (PykF) enzymes, previously not known to bear this modification. This study lays the groundwork for future pHis proteomics studies in bacteria and other organisms. PMID:25156620

  1. GAS PHASE SELECTIVE PHOTOXIDATION OF ALCOHOLS USING LIGHT-ACTIVATED TITANIUM DIOXIDE AND MOLECULAR OXYGEN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gas Phase Selective Oxidation of Alcohols Using Light-Activated Titanium Dioxide and Molecular Oxygen

    Gas phase selective oxidations of various primary and secondary alcohols are studied in an indigenously built stainless steel up-flow photochemical reactor using ultravi...

  2. Gas-phase chemistry of technetium carbonyl complexes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Qin, Zhi; Fan, Fang-Li; Haba, Hiromitsu; Komori, Yukiko; Cao, Shi-Wei; Wu, Xiao-Lei; Tan, Cun-Min

    2015-05-28

    Gas-phase chemical behaviors of short-lived technetium carbonyl complexes were studied using a low temperature isothermal chromatograph (IC) coupled with a (252)Cf spontaneous fission (SF) source. Fission products recoiled from the (252)Cf SF source were thermalized in a mixed gas containing CO, and then technetium carbonyl complexes were formed from reactions between CO gas and various technetium isotopes. A gas-jet system was employed to transport the volatile carbonyl complexes from a recoil chamber to the IC. Short IC columns made of Fluorinated Ethylene Propylene (FEP) Teflon and quartz were used to obtain chemical information about the technetium carbonyl complexes. The results for the (104)Tc-(106)Tc carbonyl complexes were found to be strongly influenced by the precursors, and showed the chemical behaviors of (104)Mo-(106)Mo carbonyl complexes, respectively. However, (107)Tc and (108)Tc could represent the chemical information of the element technetium due to their high independent yields and the very short half-lives of their precursors (107)Mo and (108)Mo. An adsorption enthalpy of about ΔHads = -43 kJ mol(-1) was determined for the Tc carbonyl complexes on both the Teflon and quartz surfaces by fitting the breakthrough curves of the (107)Tc and (108)Tc carbonyl complexes with a Monte Carlo simulation program. Chemical yields of around 25% were measured for the Tc carbonyl complexes relative to the transport yields obtained with the gas-jet transport of KCl aerosol particles with Ar carrier gas. Furthermore, the influence of a small amount of O2 gas on the yields of the Mo and Tc carbonyl complexes was studied.

  3. Ozone Cross-Section Measurement by Gas Phase Titration.

    PubMed

    Viallon, Joële; Moussay, Philippe; Flores, Edgar; Wielgosz, Robert I

    2016-11-01

    Elevated values of ground-level ozone damage health, vegetation, and building materials and are the subject of air quality regulations. Levels are monitored by networks using mostly ultraviolet (UV) absorption instruments, with traceability to standard reference photometers, relying on the UV absorption of ozone at the 253.65 nm line of mercury. We have redetermined the ozone cross-section at this wavelength based on gas phase titration (GPT) measurements. This is a well-known chemical method using the reaction of ozone (O3) with nitrogen monoxide (NO) resulting in nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and oxygen (O2). The BIPM GPT facility uses state-of-the-art flow measurement, chemiluminescence for NO concentration measurements, a cavity phase shift analyzer (CAPS) for NO2 measurements, and a UV ozone analyzer. The titration experiment is performed over the concentration range 100-500 nmol/mol, with NO and NO2 reactants/calibrants diluted down from standards with nominal mole fractions of 50 μmol/mol. Accurate measurements of NO, NO2, and O3 mole fractions allow the calculation of ozone absorption cross section values at 253.65 nm, and we report a value of 11.24 × 10(-18) cm(2) molecule(-1) with a relative expanded uncertainty of 1.8% (coverage factor k = 2) based on nitrogen monoxide titration values and a value of 11.22 × 10(-18) cm(2) molecule(-1) with a relative expanded uncertainty of 1.4% (coverage factor k = 2) based on nitrogen dioxide titration values. The excellent agreement between these values and recently published absorption cross-section measurements directly on pure ozone provide strong evidence for revising the conventionally accepted value of ozone cross section at 253.65 nm.

  4. Gas-phase spin relaxation of Xe129

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anger, B. C.; Schrank, G.; Schoeck, A.; Butler, K. A.; Solum, M. S.; Pugmire, R. J.; Saam, B.

    2008-10-01

    We have completed an extensive study of Xe129 longitudinal spin relaxation in the gas phase, involving both intrinsic and extrinsic mechanisms. The dominant intrinsic relaxation is mediated by the formation of persistent Xe2 van der Waals dimers. The dependence of this relaxation on applied magnetic field yields the relative contributions of the spin-rotation and chemical-shift-anisotropy interactions; the former dominates at magnetic fields below a few tesla. This relaxation also shows an inverse quadratic dependence on temperature T ; the maximum low-field intrinsic relaxation for pure xenon at room temperature (measured here to be 4.6h , in agreement with previous work) increases by ≈60% for T=100°C . The dominant extrinsic relaxation is mediated by collisions with the walls of the glass container. Wall relaxation was studied in silicone-coated alkali-metal-free cells, which showed long (many hours or more) and robust relaxation times, even at the low magnetic fields typical for spin-exchange optical pumping (≈3mT) . The further suppression of wall relaxation for magnetic fields above a few tesla is consistent with the interaction of Xe129 with paramagnetic spins on or inside the surface coating. At 14.1T and sufficiently low xenon density, we measured a relaxation time T1=99h , with an inferred wall-relaxation time of 174h . A prototype large storage cell ( 12cm diameter) was constructed to take advantage of the apparent increase in wall-relaxation time for cells with a smaller surface-to-volume ratio. The measured relaxation time in this cell at 3mT and 100°C was 5.75h . Such a cell (or one even larger) could be used to store many liters of hyperpolarized Xe129 produced by a flow-through polarizer and accumulator for up to three times longer than currently implemented schemes involving freezing xenon in liquid nitrogen.

  5. Gas-Phase Combustion Synthesis of Nonoxide Nanoparticles in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Axelbaum, R. L.; Kumfer, B. M.; Sun, Z.; Chao, B. H.

    2001-01-01

    Gas-phase combustion synthesis is a promising process for creating nanoparticles for the growing nanostructure materials industry. The challenges that must be addressed are controlling particle size, preventing hard agglomerates, maintaining purity, and, if nonoxides are synthesized, protecting the particles from oxidation and/or hydrolysis during post-processing. Sodium-halide Flame Encapsulation (SFE) is a unique methodology for producing nonoxide nanoparticles that addresses these challenges. This flame synthesis process incorporates sodium and metal-halide chemistry, resulting in nanoparticles that are encapsulated in salt during the early stages of their growth in the flame. Salt encapsulation has been shown to allow control of particle size and morphology, while serving as an effective protective coating for preserving the purity of the core particles. Metals and compounds that have been produced using this technology include Al, W, Ti, TiB2, AlN, and composites of W-Ti and Al-AlN. Oxygen content in SFE synthesized nano- AlN has been measured by neutron activation analysis to be as low as 0.54wt.%, as compared to over 5wt.% for unprotected AlN of comparable size. The overall objective of this work is to study the SFE process and nano-encapsulation so that they can be used to produce novel and superior materials. SFE experiments in microgravity allow the study of flame and particle dynamics without the influence of buoyancy forces. Spherical sodium-halide flames are produced in microgravity by ejecting the halide from a spherical porous burner into a quiescent atmosphere of sodium vapor and argon. Experiments are performed in the 2.2 sec Drop Tower at the NASA-Glenn Research Center. Numerical models of the flame and particle dynamics were developed and are compared with the experimental results.

  6. Uridine Nucleoside Thiation: Gas-Phase Structures and Energetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamlow, Lucas; Lee, Justin; Rodgers, M. T.; Berden, Giel; Oomens, Jos

    2016-06-01

    The naturally occurring thiated uridine nucleosides, 4-thiouridine (s4Urd) and 2-thiouridine (s2Urd), play important roles in the function and analysis of a variety of RNAs. 2-Thiouridine and its C5 modified analogues are commonly found in tRNAs and are believed to play an important role in codon recognition possibly due to their different structure, which has been shown by NMR to be predominantly C3'-endo. 2-Thiouridine may also play an important role in facilitating nonenzymatic RNA replication and transcription. 4-Thiouridine is a commonly used photoactivatable crosslinker that is often used to study RNA-RNA and RNA-protein cross-linking behavior. Differences in the base pairing between uracil and 4-thiouracil with adenine and guanine are an important factor in their role as a cross linker. The photoactivity of s4Urd may also aid in preventing near-UV lethality in cells. An understanding of their intrinsic structure in the gas-phase may help further elucidate the roles these modified nucleosides play in the regulation of RNAs. In this work, infrared multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD) action spectra of the protonated forms of s2Urd and s4Urd were collected in the IR fingerprint region. Structural information is determined by comparison with theoretical linear IR spectra generated from density functional theory calculations using molecular modeling to generate low-energy candidate structures. Present results are compared with analogous results for the protonated forms of uridine and 2'-deoxyuridine as well as solution phase NMR data and crystal structures.

  7. IV-VI semiconductor lasers for gas phase biomarker detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCann, Patrick; Namjou, Khosrow; Roller, Chad; McMillen, Gina; Kamat, Pratyuma

    2007-09-01

    A promising absorption spectroscopy application for mid-IR lasers is exhaled breath analysis where sensitive, selective, and speedy measurement of small gas phase biomarker molecules can be used to diagnose disease and monitor therapies. Many molecules such as nitric oxide, ethane, formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, acetone, carbonyl sulfide, and carbon disulfide have been connected to diseases or conditions such as asthma, oxidative stress, breast cancer, lung cancer, diabetes, organ transplant rejection, and schizophrenia. Measuring these and other, yet to be discovered, biomarker molecules in exhaled breath with mid-IR lasers offers great potential for improving health care since such tests are non-invasive, real-time, and do not require expensive consumables or chemical reagents. Motivated by these potential benefits, mid-IR laser spectrometers equipped with presently available cryogenically-cooled IV-VI lasers mounted in compact Stirling coolers have been developed for clinical research applications. This paper will begin with a description of the development of mid-IR laser instruments and their use in the largest known exhaled breath clinical study ever performed. It will then shift to a description of recent work on the development of new IV-VI semiconductor quantum well materials and laser fabrication methods that offer the promise of low power consumption (i.e. efficient) continuous wave emission at room temperature. Taken together, the demonstration of compelling clinical applications with large market opportunities and the clear identification of a viable pathway to develop low cost mid-IR laser instrumentation can create a renewed focus for future research and development efforts within the mid-IR materials and devices area.

  8. Measurement of Gas-phase Acids in Diesel Exhaust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wentzell, J. J.; Liggio, J.; Li, S.; Vlasenko, A. L.; Staebler, R. M.; Brook, J.; Lu, G.; Poitras, M.; Chan, T.

    2012-12-01

    Gas-phase acids were measured using chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS) as part of the Diesel Engine Emission Research Experiment (DEERE). The CIMS technique, utilizing acetate ion (CH3COO-) as a reagent ion, proved to be a rapid (measurements on the order of seconds) and sensitive (several counts/pptv) method of quantifying the acid emissions. Diluted diesel exhaust measurements were made from a Constant Volume Sampling dilution tunnel using a light duty (1.9L turbocharged Volkswagen Jetta TDI) diesel engine equipped with an OEM diesel oxidation catalyst and exhaust gas recirculation, mounted on an engine dynamometer. Acids measured included isocyanic, nitrous, nitric, propionic and sum of lactic and oxalic, as well as other unidentified compounds. Complimentary measurements of CO, CO2, Total Hydrocarbon (THC), and NOx, were also performed. Several engine modes (different engine rpm and torque outputs) at steady state were examined to determine their effect on acid emissions. Emission rates with respect to NOx and fuel based emission factors were determined. Measurements of HONO fuel emission factors agree well with real-world measurements within a traffic tunnel.1 The first estimate of isocyanic acid emission factors from a diesel engine is reported, and suggests that the emission of this highly toxic compound in diesel exhaust should not be ignored. 1. Kurtenbach, R., Becker, K. H., Gomes, J. A. G., Kleffmann, J.,Lorzer, J. C., Spittler, M., Wiesen, P., Ackermann, R., Geyer, A.,and Platt, U.: Investigations of emissions and heterogeneous formation of HONO in a road traffic tunnel, Atmos. Environ., 35, 3385-3394, doi:10.1016/S1352-2310(01)00138-8, 2001.

  9. Dissociative electron attachment to the gas-phase nucleobase hypoxanthine

    SciTech Connect

    Dawley, M. Michele; Tanzer, Katrin; Denifl, Stephan E-mail: Sylwia.Ptasinska.1@nd.edu; Carmichael, Ian; Ptasińska, Sylwia E-mail: Sylwia.Ptasinska.1@nd.edu

    2015-06-07

    We present high-resolution measurements of the dissociative electron attachment (DEA) to isolated gas-phase hypoxanthine (C{sub 5}H{sub 4}N{sub 4}O, Hyp), a tRNA purine base. The anion mass spectra and individual ion efficiency curves from Hyp were measured as a function of electron energy below 9 eV. The mass spectra at 1 and 6 eV exhibit the highest anion yields, indicating possible common precursor ions that decay into the detectable anionic fragments. The (Hyp − H) anion (C{sub 5}H{sub 3}N{sub 4}O{sup −}) exhibits a sharp resonant peak at 1 eV, which we tentatively assign to a dipole-bound state of the keto-N1H,N9H tautomer in which dehydrogenation occurs at either the N1 or N9 position based upon our quantum chemical computations (B3LYP/6-311+G(d,p) and U(MP2-aug-cc-pVDZ+)) and prior studies with adenine. This closed-shell dehydrogenated anion is the dominant fragment formed upon electron attachment, as with other nucleobases. Seven other anions were also observed including (Hyp − NH){sup −}, C{sub 4}H{sub 3}N{sub 4}{sup −}/C{sub 4}HN{sub 3}O{sup −}, C{sub 4}H{sub 2}N{sub 3}{sup −}, C{sub 3}NO{sup −}/HC(HCN)CN{sup −}, OCN{sup −}, CN{sup −}, and O{sup −}. Most of these anions exhibit broad but weak resonances between 4 and 8 eV similar to many analogous anions from adenine. The DEA to Hyp involves significant fragmentation, which is relevant to understanding radiation damage of biomolecules.

  10. Gas-Phase Combustion Synthesis of Aluminum Nitride Powder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Axelbaum, R. L.; Lottes, C. R.; Huertas, J. I.; Rosen, L. J.

    1996-01-01

    Due to its combined properties of high electrical resistivity and high thermal conductivity aluminum nitride (AlN) is a highly desirable material for electronics applications. Methods are being sought for synthesis of unagglomerated, nanometer-sized powders of this material, prepared in such a way that they can be consolidated into solid compacts having minimal oxygen content. A procedure for synthesizing these powders through gas-phase combustion is described. This novel approach involves reacting AlCl3, NH3, and Na vapors. Equilibrium thermodynamic calculations show that 100% yields can be obtained for these reactants with the products being AlN, NaCl, and H2. The NaCl by-product is used to coat the AlN particles in situ. The coating allows for control of AlN agglomeration and protects the powders from hydrolysis during post-flame handling. On the basis of thermodynamic and kinetic considerations, two different approaches were employed to produce the powder, in co-flow diffusion flame configurations. In the first approach, the three reactants were supplied in separate streams. In the second, the AlCl3 and NH3 were premixed with HCl and then reacted with Na vapor. X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectra of as-produced powders show only NaCl for the first case and NaCl and AlN for the second. After annealing at 775 C tinder dynamic vacuum, the salt was removed and XRD spectra of powders from both approaches show only AlN. Aluminum metal was also produced in the co-flow flame by reacting AlCl3 with Na. XRD spectra of as-produced powders show the products to be only NaCl and elemental aluminum.

  11. CHAOS III: Gas-phase Abundances in NGC 5457

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croxall, Kevin V.; Pogge, Richard W.; Berg, Danielle A.; Skillman, Evan D.; Moustakas, John

    2016-10-01

    We present Large Binocular Telescope observations of 109 H ii regions in NGC 5457 (M101) obtained with the Multi-Object Double Spectrograph. We have robust measurements of one or more temperature-sensitive auroral emission lines for 74 H ii regions, permitting the measurement of “direct” gas-phase abundances. Comparing the temperatures derived from the different ionic species, we find: (1) strong correlations of T[N ii] with T[S iii] and T[O iii], consistent with little or no intrinsic scatter; (2) a correlation of T[S iii] with T[O iii], but with significant intrinsic dispersion; (3) overall agreement between T[N ii], T[S ii], and T[O ii], as expected, but with significant outliers; (4) the correlations of T[N ii] with T[S iii] and T[O iii] match the predictions of photoionization modeling while the correlation of T[S iii] with T[O iii] is offset from the prediction of photoionization modeling. Based on these observations, which include significantly more observations of lower excitation H ii regions, missing in many analyses, we inspect the commonly used ionization correction factors (ICFs) for unobserved ionic species and propose new empirical ICFs for S and Ar. We have discovered an unexpected population of H ii regions with a significant offset to low values in Ne/O, which defies explanation. We derive radial gradients in O/H and N/O which agree with previous studies. Our large observational database allows us to examine the dispersion in abundances, and we find intrinsic dispersions of 0.074 ± 0.009 in O/H and 0.095 ± 0.009 in N/O (at a given radius). We stress that this measurement of the intrinsic dispersion comes exclusively from direct abundance measurements of H ii regions in NGC 5457.

  12. Experimental study of PLLA/INH slow release implant fabricated by three dimensional printing technique and drug release characteristics in vitro

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Local slow release implant provided long term and stable drug release in the lesion. The objective of this study was to fabricate biodegradable slow release INH/PLLA tablet via 3 dimensional printing technique (3DP) and to compare the drug release characteristics of three different structured tablets in vitro. Methods Three different drug delivery systems (columnar-shaped tablet (CST), doughnut-shaped tablet (DST) and multilayer doughnut-shaped tablet (MDST)) were manufactured by the three dimensional printing machine and isoniazid was loaded into the implant. Dynamic soaking method was used to study the drug release characteristics of the three implants. MTT cytotoxicity test and direct contact test were utilized to study the biocompatibility of the implant. The microstructures of the implants’ surfaces were observed with electron microscope. Results The PLLA powder in the tablet could be excellently combined through 3DP without disintegration. Electron microscope observations showed that INH distributed evenly on the surface of the tablet in a “nest-shaped” way, while the surface of the barrier layer in the multilayer doughnut shaped tablet was compact and did not contain INH. The concentration of INH in all of the three tablets were still higher than the effective bacteriostasis concentration (Isoniazid: 0.025 ~ 0.05 μg/ml) after 30 day’s release in vitro. All of the tablets showed initial burst release of the INH in the early period. Drug concentration of MDST became stable and had little fluctuation starting from the 6th day of the release. Drug concentration of DST and CST decreased gradually and the rate of decrease in concentration was faster in DST than CST. MTT cytotoxicity test and direct contact test indicated that the INH-PLLA tablet had low cytotoxicity and favorable biocompatibility. Conclusions Three dimensional printing technique was a reliable technique to fabricate complicated implants. Drug release pattern in MDST was

  13. Optimization of caseinate-coated simvastatin-zein nanoparticles: improved bioavailability and modified release characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Osama AA; Hosny, Khaled M; Al-Sawahli, Majid M; Fahmy, Usama A

    2015-01-01

    The current study focuses on utilization of the natural biocompatible polymer zein to formulate simvastatin (SMV) nanoparticles coated with caseinate, to improve solubility and hence bioavailability, and in addition, to modify SMV-release characteristics. This formulation can be utilized for oral or possible depot parenteral applications. Fifteen formulations were prepared by liquid–liquid phase separation method, according to the Box–Behnken design, to optimize formulation variables. Sodium caseinate was used as an electrosteric stabilizer. The factors studied were: percentage of SMV in the SMV-zein mixture (X1), ethanol concentration (X2), and caseinate concentration (X3). The selected dependent variables were mean particle size (Y1), SMV encapsulation efficiency (Y2), and cumulative percentage of drug permeated after 1 hour (Y3). The diffusion of SMV from the prepared nanoparticles specified by the design was carried out using an automated Franz diffusion cell apparatus. The optimized SMV-zein formula was investigated for in vivo pharmacokinetic parameters compared with an oral SMV suspension. The optimized nanosized SMV-zein formula showed a 131 nm mean particle size and 89% encapsulation efficiency. In vitro permeation studies displayed delayed permeation characteristics, with about 42% and 85% of SMV cumulative amount released after 12 and 48 hours, respectively. Bioavailability estimation in rats revealed an augmentation in SMV bioavailability from the optimized SMV-zein formulation, by fourfold relative to SMV suspension. Formulation of caseinate-coated SMV-zein nanoparticles improves the pharmacokinetic profile and bioavailability of SMV. Accordingly, improved hypolipidemic activities for longer duration could be achieved. In addition, the reduced dosage rate of SMV-zein nanoparticles improves patient tolerability and compliance. PMID:25670883

  14. A new method for measurement of gas-phase ammonia and amines in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, M. L.; Gomez, A.; Arquero, K. D.; Perraud, V. M.; Finlayson-Pitts, B. J.

    2013-12-01

    Accurately predicting particle formation and growth from gas phase precursors is an essential component of modeling the impact of particulate matter on human health, visibility and climate. While the reactions of ammonia with nitric and sulfuric acids to form particulate nitrate and sulfate particles is well known, it has been recently recognized that gas-phase amines, even at low ppb levels, significantly enhance particle formation from common atmospheric acids. As a result, accurate data on the sources, sinks and typical background concentrations of gas-phase amines, are crucial to predicting new particle formation in the atmosphere. However, gas-phase amines are notoriously difficult to measure, as they have a tendency to stick to surfaces, including sampling lines and inlets. In addition, background amine concentrations in the atmosphere are typically a few ppb or lower, requiring low detection limits for ambient sampling techniques. Here we report the development of a simple, reliable method for detection of gas-phase amines at atmospherically relevant concentrations using collection on a cation exchange sorbent followed by in-line extraction and ion chromatography. Gas-phase standards of several amines and ammonia are used to characterize the technique and results from ambient samples in an agricultural area are presented. The application of this technique to field measurements as well as to laboratory measurements of new particle formation from gas-phase ammonia and amines are discussed.

  15. Gas-Phase Synthesis and Characterization of CH4-Loaded Hydroquinone Clathrates

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.; Lee, Y; Takeya, S; Kawamura, T; Yamamoto, Y; Lee, Y; Yoon, J

    2010-01-01

    A CH{sub 4}-loaded hydroquinone (HQ) clathrate was synthesized via a gas-phase reaction using the {alpha}-form of crystalline HQ and CH{sub 4} gas at 12 MPa and room temperature. Solid-state {sup 13}C cross-polarization/magic angle spinning (CP/MAS) NMR and Raman spectroscopic measurements confirm the incorporation of CH{sub 4} molecules into the cages of the HQ clathrate framework. The chemical analysis indicates that about 69% of the cages are filled by CH{sub 4} molecules, that is, 0.69 CH{sub 4} per three HQ molecules. Rietveld refinement using synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) data shows that the CH{sub 4}-loaded HQ clathrate adopts the {beta}-form of HQ clathrate in a hexagonal space group R3 with lattice parameters of a = 16.6191 {angstrom} and c = 5.5038 {angstrom}. Time-resolved synchrotron XRD and quadrupole mass spectroscopic measurements show that the CH{sub 4}-loaded HQ clathrate is stable up to 368 K and gradually transforms to the {alpha}-form by releasing the confined CH{sub 4} gases between 368-378 K. Using solid-state {sup 13}C CP/MAS NMR, the reaction kinetics between the {alpha}-form HQ and CH{sub 4} gas is qualitatively described in terms of the particle size of the crystalline HQ.

  16. Gas-phase synthesis and characterization of CH4-loaded hydroquinone clathrates.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong-Won; Lee, Yongjae; Takeya, Satoshi; Kawamura, Taro; Yamamoto, Yoshitaka; Lee, Yun-Je; Yoon, Ji-Ho

    2010-03-11

    A CH(4)-loaded hydroquinone (HQ) clathrate was synthesized via a gas-phase reaction using the alpha-form of crystalline HQ and CH(4) gas at 12 MPa and room temperature. Solid-state (13)C cross-polarization/magic angle spinning (CP/MAS) NMR and Raman spectroscopic measurements confirm the incorporation of CH(4) molecules into the cages of the HQ clathrate framework. The chemical analysis indicates that about 69% of the cages are filled by CH(4) molecules, that is, 0.69 CH(4) per three HQ molecules. Rietveld refinement using synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) data shows that the CH(4)-loaded HQ clathrate adopts the beta-form of HQ clathrate in a hexagonal space group R3 with lattice parameters of a = 16.6191 A and c = 5.5038 A. Time-resolved synchrotron XRD and quadrupole mass spectroscopic measurements show that the CH(4)-loaded HQ clathrate is stable up to 368 K and gradually transforms to the alpha-form by releasing the confined CH(4) gases between 368-378 K. Using solid-state (13)C CP/MAS NMR, the reaction kinetics between the alpha-form HQ and CH(4) gas is qualitatively described in terms of the particle size of the crystalline HQ.

  17. Removal of pyridine from liquid and gas phase by copper forms of natural and synthetic zeolites.

    PubMed

    Reháková, Mária; Fortunová, Lubica; Bastl, Zdeněk; Nagyová, Stanislava; Dolinská, Silvia; Jorík, Vladimír; Jóna, Eugen

    2011-02-15

    Zeoadsorbents on the basis of copper forms of synthetic zeolite ZSM5 and natural zeolite of the clinoptilolite type (CT) have been studied taking into account their environmental application in removing harmful pyridine (py) from liquid and gas phase. Sorption of pyridine by copper forms of zeolites (Cu-ZSM5 and Cu-CT) has been studied by CHN, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray powder diffractometry, FTIR spectroscopy, thermal analysis (TG, DTA and DTG) and analysis of the surface areas and the pore volumes by low-temperature adsorption of nitrogen. The results of thermal analyses of Cu-ZSM5, Cu-(py)(x)ZSM5, Cu-CT and Cu-(py)(x)CT zeolitic products with different composition (x depends on the experimental conditions of sorption of pyridine) clearly confirmed their different thermal properties as well as the sorption of pyridine. In the zeolitic pyridine containing samples the main part of the pyridine release process occurs at considerably higher temperatures than is the boiling point of pyridine, which proves strong bond and irreversibility of py-zeolite interaction. FTIR spectra of Cu-(py)(x)zeolite samples showed well resolved bands of pyridine. The results of thermal analysis and FTIR spectroscopy are in a good agreement with the results of other used methods.

  18. Peptide bond formation via glycine condensation in the gas phase.

    PubMed

    Van Dornshuld, Eric; Vergenz, Robert A; Tschumper, Gregory S

    2014-07-24

    Four unique gas phase mechanisms for peptide bond formation between two glycine molecules have been mapped out with quantum mechanical electronic structure methods. Both concerted and stepwise mechanisms, each leading to a cis and trans glycylglycine product (four mechanisms total), were examined with the B3LYP and MP2 methods and Gaussian atomic orbital basis sets as large as aug-cc-pVTZ. Electronic energies of the stationary points along the reaction pathways were also computed with explicitly correlated MP2-F12 and CCSD(T)-F12 methods. The CCSD(T)-F12 computations indicate that the electronic barriers to peptide bond formation are similar for all four mechanisms (ca. 32-39 kcal mol(-1) relative to two isolated glycine fragments). The smallest barrier (32 kcal mol(-1)) is associated with the lone transition state for the concerted mechanism leading to the formation of a trans peptide bond, whereas the largest barrier (39 kcal mol(-1)) was encountered along the concerted pathway leading to the cis configuration of the glycylglycine dipeptide. Two significant barriers are encountered for the stepwise mechanisms. For both the cis and trans pathways, the early electronic barrier is 36 kcal mol(-1) and the subsequent barrier is approximately 1 kcal mol(-1) lower. A host of intermediates and transition states lie between these two barriers, but they all have very small relative electronic energies (ca. ± 4 kcal mol(-1)). The isolated cis products (glycylglycine + H2O) are virtually isoenergetic with the isolated reactants (within -1 kcal mol(-1)), whereas the trans products are about 5 kcal mol(-1) lower in energy. In both products, however, the water can hydrogen bond to the dipeptide and lower the energy by roughly 5-9 kcal mol(-1). This study indicates that the concerted process leading to a trans configuration about the peptide bond is marginally favored both thermodynamically (exothermic by ca. 5 kcal mol(-1)) and kinetically (barrier height ≈ 32 kcal mol(-1

  19. Electron attachment to ? and ? in the gas phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, David; Spanel, Patrik

    1996-11-01

    The fullerene molecule 0953-4075/29/21/030/img3 is known to attach several electrons in the solid phase, but only recently has it been recognized that it can also attach electrons in the gas phase. The first electron - molecular beam results showed that 0953-4075/29/21/030/img3 and 0953-4075/29/21/030/img5 molecules non-dissociatively attached a single electron over the unusually wide electron energy range from near thermal to about 10 eV, but these studies were not able to provide either the magnitude of the cross sections or describe the low-energy attachment behaviour. But using our flowing afterglow - Langmuir probe (FALP) apparatus we have been able to determine the absolute attachment rate coefficients for both 0953-4075/29/21/030/img3 and 0953-4075/29/21/030/img5 over the electron temperature range 300 - 4500 K. These FALP experiments have shown that attachment to 0953-4075/29/21/030/img3 at low electron energies (<1 eV) proceeds predominantly by p-wave electron capture, and that a centrifugal barrier of 0.26 eV is evident which was corroborated by subsequent theory. A similar situation is observed for attachment to 0953-4075/29/21/030/img5 except that for this fullerene molecule there is evidence that at very low electron energies (< 0.05 eV) inefficient s-wave capture may also occur. These FALP data further indicate that at energies above about 0.3 eV extraordinarily efficient electron attachment occurs to both 0953-4075/29/21/030/img3 and 0953-4075/29/21/030/img5, and when the mean thermal cross sections derived from these FALP data are used to normalize the crossed electron - molecular beam data at the common low energies accessible in both experiments, it is clear that electron attachment to these fullerene molecules is very efficient over a wide electron energy range from about 0.3 - 10 eV above which electron thermionic emission occurs from the hot 0953-4075/29/21/030/img12 and 0953-4075/29/21/030/img13 nascent negative ions.

  20. Detection of Gas-Phase Ammonia Using Photothermal Interferometry.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owens, Melody Avery

    1995-01-01

    Ammonia in the atmosphere plays an important chemical role in diverse ecological and physical systems. It is challenging to measure because it adheres to many commonly used sampling materials, is soluble in water, and forms particles. A new instrument has been built to detect gas -phase ammonia in ambient air by photothermal interferometry. Ammonia molecules in sampled air are excited to upper vibrational rotational states of the nu_2 band of ammonia by absorption of 9.22 mu m light from the 9R30 line of a carbon dioxide laser. Excited ammonia molecules transfer this energy as heat to the air by collisions. The temperature and consequent refractive index change is measured as a phase shift in one arm of a sensitive homodyne interferometer. The CO_2 laser output is modulated at 1.2 kHz, and the AC signal from the interferometer is measured with a lock -in amplifier. The +/-2sigma detection limit of the interferometer at this frequency is 1.2 times 10^{ -7} radians, only a factor of four above the quantum noise limit. The ammonia detector is calibrated by dynamic dilution of two permeation tube outputs and by standard addition. Permeation rates are verified by NH _3 conversion to nitric oxide on hot platinum foil followed by chemiluminescent NO detection, and are monitored by mass loss history. The sample cell, inlet and calibration plumbing is glass to minimize NH _3 sample loss by wall adsorption. Sample flow is 2 l/min, with residence time less than one second. The detector is zeroed by sampling through tubing filled with H_3PO_4-coated Teflon. A Stark signal shift of 7.9 mV was measured for 507 ppb of NH_3 with 925 V/mm of applied field density as an alternative zeroing method. The linear dynamic range of the detector is broad, (greater than 5 orders of magnitude), and the detector is sensitive, with a 31 ppt 4sigma lower detection limit measured in 100 s. Signal gain is insensitive to water vapor and CO_2. The instrument response is fast, with a 1 s e

  1. Sociolegal characteristics and parole infractions among Israeli released prisoners during electronic monitoring.

    PubMed

    Shoham, Efrat; Yehosha-Stern, Shirley; Efodi, Rotem

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this study is to examine the part played by sociolegal characteristics such as ethnic background, family status, or criminal past in the rate of infractions among ex-prisoners in Electronic Monitoring (EM) Programs. In addition, it focuses on the nature of the formal decisions made by community supervision agents regarding such infractions and their correlation with the sociolegal characteristics of the participants. The research population included all prisoners on license (i.e., prisoners who have been granted conditional early release) who took part in the EM project from mid-2007 until mid-2009 (24 months), altogether 155 participants. The data show no significant correlation between the number of infractions and the participant's sociolegal background. In spite of the fact that the EM coordinators have extensive discretionary power, which is likely to lead to discrimination attributable to variables such as ethnicity, this research shows that the most efficacious variable for explaining formal responses is an objective one-the number of infractions.

  2. Thermal degradation events as health hazards: Particle vs gas phase effects, mechanistic studies with particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberdörster, G.; Ferin, J.; Finkelstein, J.; Soderholm, S.

    Exposure to thermal degradation products arising from fire or smoke could be a major concern for manned space missions. Severe acute lung damage has been reported in people after accidental exposure to fumes from plastic materials, and animal studies revealed the extremely high toxicity of freshly generated fumes whereas a decrease in toxicity of aged fumes has been found. This and the fact that toxicity of the freshly generated fumes can be prevented with filters raises the question whether the toxicity may be due to the particulate rather than the gas phase components of the thermodegradation products. Indeed, results from recent studies implicate ultrafine particles (particle diameter in the nm range) as potential severe pulmonary toxicants. We have conducted a number of in vivo (inhalation and instillation studies in rats) and in vitro studies to test the hypothesis that ultrafine particles possess an increased potential to injure the lung compared to larger-sized particles. We used as surrogate particles ultrafine TiO 2 particles (12 and 20 nm diameter). Results in exposed rats showed that the ultrafine TiO 2 particles not only induce a greater acute inflammatory reaction in the lung than larger-sized TiO 2 particles, but can also lead to persistent chronic effects, as indicated by an adverse effect on alveolar macrophage mediated clearance function of particles. Release of mediators from alveolar macrophages during phagocytosis of the ultrafine particles and an increased access of the ultrafine particles to the pulmonary interstitium are likely factors contributing to their pulmonary toxicity. In vitro studies with lung cells (alveolar macrophages) showed, in addition, that ultrafine TiO 2 particles have a greater potential to induce cytokines than larger-sized particles. We conclude from our present studies that ultrafine particles have a significant potential to injure the lung and that their occurrence in thermal degradation events can play a major role in

  3. Mm/submm Study of Gas-Phase Photoproducts from Methanol Interstellar Ice Analogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mesko, AJ; Smith, Houston Hartwell; Milam, Stefanie N.; Widicus Weaver, Susanna L.

    2016-06-01

    Icy grain reactions have gained quite the popularity in the astrochemistry community to explain the formation of complex organic molecules. Through temperature programmed desorption and photolysis experiments we use rotational spectroscopy to measure the gas-phase products of icy grain reactions. Previous results include testing detection limits of the system by temperature programmed desorption of methanol and water ices, photochemistry of gas-phase methanol, and detection of photodesorbed water from a pure water ice surface. Current work that will be discussed focuses on the detection of gas-phase CO and other photoproducts from an ice surface.

  4. Secondary organic aerosol formation from low-NO(x) photooxidation of dodecane: evolution of multigeneration gas-phase chemistry and aerosol composition.

    PubMed

    Yee, Lindsay D; Craven, Jill S; Loza, Christine L; Schilling, Katherine A; Ng, Nga Lee; Canagaratna, Manjula R; Ziemann, Paul J; Flagan, Richard C; Seinfeld, John H

    2012-06-21

    The extended photooxidation of and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation from dodecane (C(12)H(26)) under low-NO(x) conditions, such that RO(2) + HO(2) chemistry dominates the fate of the peroxy radicals, is studied in the Caltech Environmental Chamber based on simultaneous gas and particle-phase measurements. A mechanism simulation indicates that greater than 67% of the initial carbon ends up as fourth and higher generation products after 10 h of reaction, and simulated trends for seven species are supported by gas-phase measurements. A characteristic set of hydroperoxide gas-phase products are formed under these low-NO(x) conditions. Production of semivolatile hydroperoxide species within three generations of chemistry is consistent with observed initial aerosol growth. Continued gas-phase oxidation of these semivolatile species produces multifunctional low volatility compounds. This study elucidates the complex evolution of the gas-phase photooxidation chemistry and subsequent SOA formation through a novel approach comparing molecular level information from a chemical ionization mass spectrometer (CIMS) and high m/z ion fragments from an Aerodyne high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS). Combination of these techniques reveals that particle-phase chemistry leading to peroxyhemiacetal formation is the likely mechanism by which these species are incorporated in the particle phase. The current findings are relevant toward understanding atmospheric SOA formation and aging from the "unresolved complex mixture," comprising, in part, long-chain alkanes.

  5. Photophysics of sunscreen molecules in the gas phase: a stepwise approach towards understanding and developing next-generation sunscreens

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Natércia D. N.; Staniforth, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation and skin cancer urges the need for extra photoprotection, which is presently provided by widespread commercially available sunscreen lotions. Apart from having a large absorption cross section in the UVA and UVB regions of the electromagnetic spectrum, the chemical absorbers in these photoprotective products should also be able to dissipate the excess energy in a safe way, i.e. without releasing photoproducts or inducing any further, harmful, photochemistry. While sunscreens are tested for both their photoprotective capability and dermatological compatibility, phenomena occurring at the molecular level upon absorption of UV radiation are largely overlooked. To date, there is only a limited amount of information regarding the photochemistry and photophysics of these sunscreen molecules. However, a thorough understanding of the intrinsic mechanisms by which popular sunscreen molecular constituents dissipate excess energy has the potential to aid in the design of more efficient, safer sunscreens. In this review, we explore the potential of using gas-phase frequency- and time-resolved spectroscopies in an effort to better understand the photoinduced excited-state dynamics, or photodynamics, of sunscreen molecules. Complementary computational studies are also briefly discussed. Finally, the future outlook of expanding these gas-phase studies into the solution phase is considered. PMID:27956888

  6. Photophysics of sunscreen molecules in the gas phase: a stepwise approach towards understanding and developing next-generation sunscreens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, Natércia D. N.; Staniforth, Michael; Stavros, Vasilios G.

    2016-11-01

    The relationship between exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation and skin cancer urges the need for extra photoprotection, which is presently provided by widespread commercially available sunscreen lotions. Apart from having a large absorption cross section in the UVA and UVB regions of the electromagnetic spectrum, the chemical absorbers in these photoprotective products should also be able to dissipate the excess energy in a safe way, i.e. without releasing photoproducts or inducing any further, harmful, photochemistry. While sunscreens are tested for both their photoprotective capability and dermatological compatibility, phenomena occurring at the molecular level upon absorption of UV radiation are largely overlooked. To date, there is only a limited amount of information regarding the photochemistry and photophysics of these sunscreen molecules. However, a thorough understanding of the intrinsic mechanisms by which popular sunscreen molecular constituents dissipate excess energy has the potential to aid in the design of more efficient, safer sunscreens. In this review, we explore the potential of using gas-phase frequency- and time-resolved spectroscopies in an effort to better understand the photoinduced excited-state dynamics, or photodynamics, of sunscreen molecules. Complementary computational studies are also briefly discussed. Finally, the future outlook of expanding these gas-phase studies into the solution phase is considered.

  7. Co-delivery nanoparticles with characteristics of intracellular precision release drugs for overcoming multidrug resistance

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, DanDan; Kong, Yan Yan; Sun, Jia Hui; Huo, Shao Jie; Zhou, Min; Gui, Yi Ling; Mu, Xu; Chen, Huan; Yu, Shu Qin; Xu, Qian

    2017-01-01

    Combination chemotherapy in clinical practice has been generally accepted as a feasible strategy for overcoming multidrug resistance (MDR). Here, we designed and successfully prepared a co-delivery system named S-D1@L-D2 NPs, where denoted some smaller nanoparticles (NPs) carrying a drug doxorubicin (DOX) were loaded into a larger NP containing another drug (vincristine [VCR]) via water-in-oil-in-water double-emulsion solvent diffusion-evaporation method. Chitosan-alginate nanoparticles carrying DOX (CS-ALG-DOX NPs) with a smaller diameter of about 20 nm formed S-D1 NPs; vitamin E D-α-tocopheryl polyethylene glycol 1000 succinate-modified poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) nanoparticles carrying VCR (TPGS-PLGA-VCR NPs) with a larger diameter of about 200 nm constituted L-D2 NPs. Some CS-ALG-DOX NPs loaded into TPGS-PLGA-VCR NPs formed CS-ALG-DOX@TPGS-PLGA-VCR NPs. Under the acidic environment of cytosol and endosome or lysosome in MDR cell, CS-ALG-DOX@TPGS-PLGA-VCR NPs released VCR and CS-ALG-DOX NPs. VCR could arrest cell cycles at metaphase by inhibiting microtubule polymerization in the cytoplasm. After CS-ALG-DOX NPs escaped from endosome, they entered the nucleus through the nuclear pore and released DOX in the intra-nuclear alkaline environment, which interacted with DNA to stop the replication of MDR cells. These results indicated that S-D1@L-D2 NPs was a co-delivery system of intracellular precision release loaded drugs with pH-sensitive characteristics. S-D1@L-D2 NPs could obviously enhance the in vitro cytotoxicity and the in vivo anticancer efficiency of co-delivery drugs, while reducing their adverse effects. Overall, S-D1@L-D2 NPs can be considered an innovative platform for the co-delivery drugs of clinical combination chemotherapy for the treatment of MDR tumor. PMID:28356731

  8. Spectroscopy of PAH species in the gas phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Michael S.; Beegle, Luther W.; Wdowiak, Thomas J.

    1995-02-01

    At elevated temperatures, the structured CH stretch absorption occurring at room temperature of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules encapsulated in KBr coalesces to a single peak whose wavelength is a very close match for that of the observed 3.3 μm unidentified infrared band (UIR) emission feature (Flickinger and Wdowiak. Astrophys. J.362, L71-L74. 1990). The temperature of approximately 800 K is significant because a PAH molecule in the interstellar radiation field, upon absorption of an ultraviolet photon, is expected to be excited to an energy equivalent to temperatures of this order (Sellgren, Astrophys. J.277, 623 1984). Our previous study of PAH molecules in the vapor phase at 600-800 K showed that the C-H stretch PAH feature near 3.3 μm is at a shorter wavelength than in the condensed state (Flickinger et al., Astrophys. J.380, L43-L46, 1991). Recent work by Joblin et al. ( 1st Symp. on the Infrared Cirrus and Diffuse Interstellar Clouds. 1994) in a short path length diamond cell indicates the gas phase wavelength of the 3.3 μm region C-H stretch feature of naphthalene is directly proportional to temperature over a large temperature range. Laser-excited IR fluorescence studies have also suggested that the wavelength is sensitive to laser photon energy in a direct relationship (Williams and Leone, The Diffuse Interstellar Bands Conf., 1994). Comprehensive studies of PAHs thermally excited up to the decomposition temperature are therefore important to carry out. We have utilized a long-path-length optical heat pipe to confirm that the wavelength of the peak of the C-H stretch band of naphthalene vapor obeys a direct relationship with temperature as reported by Joblin, and to demonstrate that this feature undergoes a strengthening with respect to the longer wavelength band due to an out-of-plane deformation (782 cm -1) as temperature increases. The shift from 3067.6 to 3063.7 cm -1 over the temperature range of 316-996 K seems to be linear

  9. Titanium defect structure change after gas-phase hydrogenation at different temperatures and cooling rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhaylov, Andrey A.; Laptev, Roman S.; Kudiiarov, Viktor N.; Volokitina, Tatiana L.

    2016-11-01

    Influence of gas-phase hydrogenation temperature and cooling rate on defect structure of commercially pure titanium alloy was experimentally studied by means of positron annihilation spectroscopy. The change of temperature in the process of gas-phase hydrogenation was in the range of 500-700°C, while the change of cooling rate was in the range of 0.4-10.4°C/min. With increasing of gas-phase hydrogenation temperature, significant increase of hydrogen sorption rate was found. High temperature gas-phase hydrogenation of commercially pure titanium alloy lead to the formation of vacancy and hydrogen-vacancy complexes. For the same concentration of hydrogen, temperature variation or variation of cooling rate had no effect on the type of defect. However, this variation provides significant changes in defect concentration.

  10. Characteristics of CO2 release from forest soil in the mountains near Beijing.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiang Yang; Gao, Cheng Da; Zhang, Lin; Li, Su Yan; Qiao, Yong

    2011-04-01

    CO2 release from forest soil is a key driver of carbon cycling between the soil and atmosphere ecosystem. The rate of CO2 released from soil was measured in three forest stands (in the mountainous region near Beijing, China) by the alkaline absorption method from 2004 to 2006. The rate of CO2 released did not differ among the three stands. The CO2 release rate ranged from - 341 to 1,193 mg m(-2) h(-1), and the mean value over all three forests and sampling times was 286 mg m(-2) h(-1). CO2 release was positively correlated with soil water content and the soil temperature. Diurnally, CO2 release was higher in the day than at night. Seasonally, CO2 release was highest in early autumn and lowest in winter; in winter, negative values of CO2 release suggested that CO2 was absorbed by soil.

  11. Excitation and dissociation of molecules by femtosecond IR laser radiation in the gas phase and on dielectric surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Kompanets, V O; Laptev, Vladimir B; Makarov, Aleksandr A; Pigulskii, S V; Ryabov, Evgenii A; Chekalin, Sergei V

    2013-04-30

    This paper presents an overview of early studies and new experimental data on the effect of near-IR (0.8-1.8 {mu}m) and mid-IR (3.3-5.8 {mu}m) intense femtosecond (130-350 fs) laser pulses on polyatomic molecules in the gas phase and on the surface of substrates. We examine the vibrational dynamics of nine molecules containing a C=O chromophore group, which are initiated by resonance femtosecond IR laser radiation at a wavelength of {approx}5 {mu}m, and report measured characteristic times of intramolecular vibrational redistribution. The characteristic time of molecules containing a single C=O group lies in the range 2.4-20 ps and that of the Fe(CO){sub 5} and Cr(CO){sub 6} molecules lies in the nanosecond range ({approx}1.0 and {approx}1.5 ns, respectively). Carbon structures have been observed for the first time to result from the decomposition of (CF{sub 3}){sub 2}CCO molecules on the surface of metal fluorides under the effect of femtosecond IR laser radiation in the wavelength range 3.3-5.4 {mu}m with no gas-phase decomposition of the molecules. (extreme light fields and their applications)

  12. Molecular characteristics of continuously released DOM during one year of root and leaf litter decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altmann, Jens; Jansen, Boris; Kalbitz, Karsten; Filley, Timothy

    2013-04-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) is one of the most dynamic carbon pools linking the terrestrial with the aquatic carbon cycle. Besides the insecure contribution of terrestrial DOM to the greenhouse effect, DOM also plays an important role for the mobility and availability of heavy metals and organic pollutants in soils. These processes depend very much on the molecular characteristics of the DOM. Surprisingly the processes that determine the molecular composition of DOM are only poorly understood. DOM can originate from various sources, which influence its molecular composition. It has been recognized that DOM formation is not a static process and DOM characteristics vary not only between different carbon sources. However, molecular characteristics of DOM extracts have scarcely been studied continuously over a longer period of time. Due to constant molecular changes of the parent litter material or soil organic matter during microbial degradation, we assumed that also the molecular characteristics of litter derived DOM varies at different stages during root and needle decomposition. For this study we analyzed the chemical composition of root and leaf samples of 6 temperate tree species during one year of litter decomposition in a laboratory incubation. During this long-term experiment we measured continuously carbon and nitrogen contents of the water extracts and the remaining residues, C mineralization rates, and the chemical composition of water extracts and residues by Curie-point pyrolysis mass spectrometry with TMAH We focused on the following questions: (I) How mobile are molecules derived from plant polymers like tannin, lignin, suberin and cutin? (II) How does the composition of root and leaf derived DOM change over time in dependence on the stage of decomposition and species? Litter derived DOM was generally dominated by aromatic compounds. Substituded fatty acids as typically cutin or suberin derived were not detected in the water extracts. Fresh leaf and

  13. Drug release characteristics from chitosan-alginate matrix tablets based on the theory of self-assembled film.

    PubMed

    Li, Liang; Wang, Linlin; Shao, Yang; Ni, Rui; Zhang, Tingting; Mao, Shirui

    2013-06-25

    The aim of this study was to better understand the underlying drug release characteristics from chitosan-alginate matrix tablets containing different types of drugs. Theophylline, paracetamol, metformin hydrochloride and trimetazidine hydrochloride were used as model drugs exhibiting significantly different solubilities (12, 16, 346 and >1000 mg/ml at 37 °C in water). A novel concept raised was that drugs were released from chitosan-alginate matrix tablets based on the theory of a self-assembled film-controlled release system. The film was only formed on the surface of tablets in gastrointestinal environment and originated from chitosan-alginate polyelectrolyte complex, confirmed by differential scanning calorimetry characterization. The formed film could decrease the rate of polymer swelling to a degree, also greatly limit the erosion of tablets. Drugs were all released through diffusion in the hydrated matrix and polymer relaxation, irrespective of the drug solubility. The effects of polymer level and initial drug loading on release depended on drug properties. Drug release was influenced by the change of pH. In contrast, the impact of ionic strength of the release medium within the physiological range was negligible. Importantly, hydrodynamic conditions showed a key factor determining the superiority of the self-assembled film in controlling drug release compared with conventional matrix tablets. The new insight into chitosan-alginate matrix tablets can help to broaden the application of this type of dosage forms.

  14. Detection Of Gas-Phase Polymerization in SiH4 And GeH4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shing, Yuh-Han; Perry, Joseph W.; Allevato, Camillo E.

    1990-01-01

    Inelastic scattering of laser light found to indicate onset of gas-phase polymerization in plasma-enhanced chemical-vapor deposition (PECVD) of photoconductive amorphous hydrogenated silicon/germanium alloy (a-SiGe:H) film. In PECVD process, film deposited from radio-frequency glow-discharge plasma of silane (SiH4) and germane (GeH4) diluted with hydrogen. Gas-phase polymerization undesirable because it causes formation of particulates and defective films.

  15. Triplet-state energies and substituent effects of excited aroyl compounds in the gas phase.

    PubMed

    Lin, Z P; Aue, W A

    2000-01-01

    Triplet-state energy values obtained from the gas phase are still scarce. In this study, the triplet-state energies of 58 aroyl compounds, introduced as gas chromatographic peaks at atmospheric pressure and typically 473 K, have been determined from the 0-0 bands of their n --> pi* type phosphorescence spectra in excited nitrogen. Correlations of those gas-phase triplet-state energies with Hammett constants could be observed for substituted acetophenones, benzaldehydes and benzophenones.

  16. An atmospheric pressure flow reactor: Gas phase kinetics and mechanism in tropospheric conditions without wall effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koontz, Steven L.; Davis, Dennis D.; Hansen, Merrill

    1988-01-01

    A new type of gas phase flow reactor, designed to permit the study of gas phase reactions near 1 atm of pressure, is described. A general solution to the flow/diffusion/reaction equations describing reactor performance under pseudo-first-order kinetic conditions is presented along with a discussion of critical reactor parameters and reactor limitations. The results of numerical simulations of the reactions of ozone with monomethylhydrazine and hydrazine are discussed, and performance data from a prototype flow reactor are presented.

  17. Gas-Phase Molecular Dynamics: High Resolution Spectroscopy and Collision Dynamics of Transient Species

    SciTech Connect

    Hall,G.E.; Sears, T.J.

    2009-04-03

    This research is carried out as part of the Gas-Phase Molecular Dynamics program in the Chemistry Department at Brookhaven National Laboratory. High-resolution spectroscopy, augmented by theoretical and computational methods, is used to investigate the structure and collision dynamics of chemical intermediates in the elementary gas-phase reactions involved in combustion chemistry. Applications and methods development are equally important experimental components of this work.

  18. Theory and Computing of Gas Phase Chemical Reactions: From Exact Quantum to Approximates Dynamical Treatments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-02-08

    Phys. 110, 5526 (1999); Chem. Phys. 242, 341(1999). [51] R. M. Dreizler and E. K. U. Gross, Density Functional Theory (Springer Verlag, Berlin, 1990...the right hand side member of expression 3 can be derived from the square modulus of the S matrix Theory and Computing of Gas Phase Chemical...deal at the same time with different terms of the electronic functions manifolds (15). In these approaches the Theory and Computing of Gas Phase

  19. Gas-Phase Molecular Dynamics: High Resolution Spectroscopy and Collision Dynamics of Transient Species

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, G.E.

    2011-05-31

    This research is carried out as part of the Gas-Phase Molecular Dynamics program in the Chemistry Department at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Chemical intermediates in the elementary gas-phase reactions involved in combustion chemistry are investigated by high resolution spectroscopic tools. Production, reaction, and energy transfer processes are investigated by transient, double resonance, polarization and saturation spectroscopies, with an emphasis on technique development and connection with theory, as well as specific molecular properties.

  20. Gas-Phase Molecular Dynamics: High Resolution Spectroscopy and Collision Dynamics of Transient Species

    SciTech Connect

    Hall G. E.; Goncharov, V.

    2012-05-29

    This research is carried out as part of the Gas-Phase Molecular Dynamics program in the Chemistry Department at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Chemical intermediates in the elementary gas-phase reactions involved in combustion chemistry are investigated by high resolution spectroscopic tools. Production, reaction, and energy transfer processes are investigated by transient, double resonance, polarization and saturation spectroscopies, with an emphasis on technique development and connection with theory, as well as specific molecular properties.

  1. On the role of ethenol in equilibrium gas-phase ethanal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slanina, Zdeněk

    1984-03-01

    The ethenol content in gas-phase ethanal has been evaluated under equilibrium conditions within a broad temperature interval, and it has been shown that the content thresholds of 1% and 1% can be crossed at about 650 and 1000 K, respectively. At moderate and higher temperatures the presence of ethenol is manifested by contributions to thermodynamic functions of the equilibrium gas-phase ethanal which can be even higher than the usual anharmonicity and non-rigidity corrections.

  2. Electronic Effects of 11β Substituted 17β-Estradiol Derivatives and Instrumental Effects on the Relative Gas Phase Acidity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourgoin-Voillard, Sandrine; Fournier, Françoise; Afonso, Carlos; Zins, Emilie-Laure; Jacquot, Yves; Pèpe, Claude; Leclercq, Guy; Tabet, Jean-Claude

    2012-12-01

    Numerous studies have highlighted the role of the proton donor characteristics of the phenol group of 17β-estradiol (E2) in its association with the estrogen receptor alpha (ERα). Since the substitutions at position C(11) have been reported to modulate this association, we hypothesized that such substitutions may modify the phenol acidity. Hence, phenol gas-phase acidity of nine C(11)-substituted E2-derivatives were evaluated using the extended Cooks' kinetic method, which is a method widely used to determine thermochemical properties by mass spectrometry. To enhance accuracy in data collection we recorded data from several instruments, including quadrupole ion trap, triple quadrupole, and hybrid QqTOF. Indeed, we report for the first time the use of the QqTOF instrument to provide a novel means to improve data accuracy by giving access to an intermediate effective temperature range. All experimental gas-phase acidity values were supported by theoretical calculations. Our results confirmed the ability of distant substituents at C(11) to modulate the phenol acidity through electrostatic interactions, electron withdrawing inductive effects, and mesomeric effects. However, no relationship was found between the phenol gas-phase acidity of investigated steroids and their binding affinity for ERα assessed in solution. Thus, our results highlight that the intrinsic properties of the hormone do not influence sufficiently the stabilization of the hormone/ERα complex. It is more likely that such stabilization would be more related to factors depending on the environment within the binding pocket such as hydrophobic, steric as well as direct intermolecular electrostatic effects between ERα residues and the substituted steroidal estrogens.

  3. The enormous apparent gas-phase acidity of cubylamine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abboud, José-Luis M.; Alkorta, Ibon; Burk, Peeter; Dávalos, Juan Z.; Quintanilla, Esther; Della, Ernest W.; Koppel, Ilmar A.; Koppel, Ivar

    2004-11-01

    The high acidity of cubylamine ( 1NH 2) seems to originate in the release of strain energy attending the breaking of some C-C bonds in 1NH -. This process is greatly facilitated by the strong stereoelectronic interactions in 1NH -. The anionic species thus formed are less strained, and their corresponding conjugate acids seem unable to 'borrow strength' from the residual strain, at least within the time-scale of the FT ICR experiments.

  4. Impact of pore characteristics of silica materials on loading capacity and release behavior of ibuprofen.

    PubMed

    Numpilai, Thanapha; Muenmee, Suthaporn; Witoon, Thongthai

    2016-02-01

    Impact of pore characteristics of porous silica supports on loading capacity and release behavior of ibuprofen was investigated. The porous silica materials and ibuprofen-loaded porous silica materials were thoroughly characterized by N2-sorption, thermal gravimetric and derivative weight analyses (TG-DTW), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM) to determine the physical properties of materials, amount of ibuprofen adsorbed and position of ibuprofen. The detailed characterization reveals that the ibuprofen molecules adsorbed inside the mesopores. Increasing the mesopore size from 5nm to 10nm increased the ibuprofen loading from 0.74 to 0.85mmol/g, respectively. Incorporation of macropore into the structure of porous silica materials enhanced the ibuprofen loading capacity of 11.8-20.3%. The ibuprofen-loaded bimodal meso-macroporous silica materials exhibited the highest dissolution of 92wt.% within an hour. The ibuprofen particles deposited on the external surface of the porous silica materials showed a lower dissolution rate than the ibuprofen adsorbed inside the mesopores due to the formation of ibuprofen crystalline.

  5. Cumulative release characteristics of controlled-release nitrogen and potassium fertilizers and their effects on soil fertility, and cotton growth

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiuyi; Geng, Jibiao; Li, Chengliang; Zhang, Min; Tian, Xiaofei

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the interacting effects of polymer coated urea (PCU) and polymer coated potassium chloride (PCPC) on cotton growth, an experiment was conducted with containerized plants in 2014 and 2015. There were two kinds of nitrogen fertilizer, PCU and urea, which were combined with PCPC at three application rates (40, 80 and 120 kg ha−1). The kinds of nitrogen fertilizer formed the main plot, while individual rates of PCPC were the subplots. The results suggested N and K release patterns for PCU and PCPC in the soil were closely matched to the N and K requirements by cotton. Soil inorganic nitrogen contents significantly increased by using PCU instead of urea, and the same trend was observed with soil available potassium contents, which also had increased rates. Meanwhile, the number of bolls and lint yields of cotton in the PCU treatments were 4.9–35.3% and 2.9–40.7% higher than from urea treatments. Lint yields also increased by 9.1–12.7% with PCPC80 and PCPC120 treatments compared with PCPC40 treatment at the same nitrogen type. Hence, application of PCU combined with 80 kg ha−1 of PCPC fertilizer on cotton increased the yields and fertilizer use efficiencies in addition to improving fiber quality and delaying leaf senescence. PMID:27966638

  6. Cumulative release characteristics of controlled-release nitrogen and potassium fertilizers and their effects on soil fertility, and cotton growth.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiuyi; Geng, Jibiao; Li, Chengliang; Zhang, Min; Tian, Xiaofei

    2016-12-14

    To investigate the interacting effects of polymer coated urea (PCU) and polymer coated potassium chloride (PCPC) on cotton growth, an experiment was conducted with containerized plants in 2014 and 2015. There were two kinds of nitrogen fertilizer, PCU and urea, which were combined with PCPC at three application rates (40, 80 and 120 kg ha(-1)). The kinds of nitrogen fertilizer formed the main plot, while individual rates of PCPC were the subplots. The results suggested N and K release patterns for PCU and PCPC in the soil were closely matched to the N and K requirements by cotton. Soil inorganic nitrogen contents significantly increased by using PCU instead of urea, and the same trend was observed with soil available potassium contents, which also had increased rates. Meanwhile, the number of bolls and lint yields of cotton in the PCU treatments were 4.9-35.3% and 2.9-40.7% higher than from urea treatments. Lint yields also increased by 9.1-12.7% with PCPC80 and PCPC120 treatments compared with PCPC40 treatment at the same nitrogen type. Hence, application of PCU combined with 80 kg ha(-1) of PCPC fertilizer on cotton increased the yields and fertilizer use efficiencies in addition to improving fiber quality and delaying leaf senescence.

  7. Characterization of ultrafast hard x-ray pulses for LCLS using gas phase techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hertlein, Marcus P.; Kienberger, Reinhard; Adaniya, Hidehito

    2005-05-01

    The availability of ultrafast (sub-100 fs) hard x-ray pulses (E > 1000 eV) promises new experimental opportunities, but also requires new techniques for their use. The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) is such a source that is expected to provide a high flux of 230 fs monochromatic x-ray photons with energy between 0.8 and 8 keV. Characterization methods for beams with such characteristics still need to be developed. We are presenting several techniques that show promise for the spatial and temporal characterization of ultrafast hard x-rays. They were developed and used at the Advanced Light Source (ALS), and will undergo further testing at the Sub-Picosecond Photon Source (SPPS) at SLAC. Our methods exploit effects such as ultrafast core-hole binding energy changes in atoms after laser excitation, and creation of energy sidebands on Auger electrons that are emitted in a laser field. We have demonstrated the usefulness of these effects on a picosecond time scale, but their use can be extended well into the femtosecond domain. We will also discuss time-of-flight techniques which offer the possibility of nondestructive x-ray spatial mode characterization. Our focus is on gas phase experiments, since they offer the possibility of nondestructive, transparent monitoring of the x-rays, leaving the main beam nearly undisturbed and available for experiments.

  8. Gas-Phase Oxidation via Ion/Ion Reactions: Pathways and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilo, Alice L.; Zhao, Feifei; McLuckey, Scott A.

    2017-01-01

    Here, we provide an overview of pathways available upon the gas-phase oxidation of peptides and DNA via ion/ion reactions and explore potential applications of these chemistries. The oxidation of thioethers (i.e., methionine residues and S-alkyl cysteine residues), disulfide bonds, S-nitrosylated cysteine residues, and DNA to the [M+H+O]+ derivative via ion/ion reactions with periodate and peroxymono-sulfate anions is demonstrated. The oxidation of neutral basic sites to various oxidized structures, including the [M+H+O]+, [M-H]+, and [M-H-NH3]+ species, via ion/ion reactions is illustrated and the oxidation characteristics of two different oxidizing reagents, periodate and persulfate anions, are compared. Lastly, the highly efficient generation of molecular radical cations via ion/ion reactions with sulfate radical anion is summarized. Activation of the newly generated molecular radical peptide cations results in losses of various neutral side chains, several of which generate dehydroalanine residues that can be used to localize the amino acid from which the dehydroalanine was generated. The chemistries presented herein result in a diverse range of structures that can be used for a variety of applications, including the identification and localization of S-alkyl cysteine residues, the oxidative cleavage of disulfide bonds, and the generation of molecular radical cations from even-electron doubly protonated peptides.

  9. Gas Phase Pressure Effects on the Apparent Thermal Conductivity of JSC-1A Lunar Regolith Simulant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuan, Zeng-Guang; Kleinhenz, Julie E.

    2011-01-01

    Gas phase pressure effects on the apparent thermal conductivity of a JSC-1A/air mixture have been experimentally investigated under steady state thermal conditions from 10 kPa to 100 kPa. The result showed that apparent thermal conductivity of the JSC-1A/air mixture decreased when pressure was lowered to 80 kPa. At 10 kPa, the conductivity decreased to 0.145 W/m/degree C, which is significantly lower than 0.196 W/m/degree C at 100 kPa. This finding is consistent with the results of previous researchers. The reduction of the apparent thermal conductivity at low pressures is ascribed to the Knudsen effect. Since the characteristic length of the void space in bulk JSC-1A varies over a wide range, both the Knudsen regime and continuum regime can coexist in the pore space. The volume ratio of the two regimes varies with pressure. Thus, as gas pressure decreases, the gas volume controlled by Knudsen regime increases. Under Knudsen regime the resistance to the heat flow is higher than that in the continuum regime, resulting in the observed pressure dependency of the apparent thermal conductivity.

  10. Interaction of gas phase oxalic acid with ammonia and its atmospheric implications.

    PubMed

    Peng, Xiu-Qiu; Liu, Yi-Rong; Huang, Teng; Jiang, Shuai; Huang, Wei

    2015-04-14

    Oxalic acid is believed to play an important role in the formation and growth of atmospheric organic aerosols. However, as a common organic acid, the understanding of the larger clusters formed by gas phase oxalic acid with multiple ammonia molecules is incomplete. In this work, the structural characteristics and thermodynamics of oxalic acid clusters with up to six ammonia molecules have been investigated at the PW91PW91/6-311++G(3df,3pd) level of theory. We found that oxalic acid forms relatively stable clusters with ammonia molecules, and that ionization events play a key role. The analyses of the thermodynamics and atmospheric relevance indicate that the heterodimer (H2C2O4)(NH3) shows an obvious relative concentration in the atmosphere, and thus likely participates in new particle formation. However, with increasing number of ammonia molecules, the concentration of clusters decreases gradually. Additionally, clusters of oxalic acid with ammonia molecules are predicted to form favorably in low temperature conditions and show high Rayleigh scattering intensities.

  11. Interaction of Gas Phase Oxalic Acid with Ammonia and its Atmospheric Implications

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Xiu-Qiu; Liu, Yi-Rong; Huang, Teng; Jiang, Shuai; Huang, Wei

    2015-04-14

    Oxalic acid is believed to play an important role in the formation and growth of atmospheric organic aerosols. However, as a common organic acid, the understanding of the larger clusters formed by gas phase oxalic acid with multiple ammonia molecules is incomplete. In this work, the structural characteristics and thermodynamics of oxalic acid clusters with up to six ammonia molecules have been investigated at the PW91PW91/6-311++G(3df,3pd) level of theory. We found that oxalic acid forms relatively stable clusters with ammonia molecules, and that ionization events play a key role. The analyses of the thermodynamics and atmospheric relevance indicate that the heterodimer (H2C2O4)(NH3) shows an obvious relative concentration in the atmosphere, and thus likely participates in new particle formation. However, with increasing number of ammonia molecules, the concentration of clusters decreases gradually. Additionally, clusters of oxalic acid with ammonia molecules are predicted to form favorably in low temperature conditions and show high Rayleigh scattering intensities.

  12. Selective transport of amino acids into the gas phase: driving forces for amino acid solubilization in gas-phase reverse micelles.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yigang; Bennett, Andrew; Liu, Jianbo

    2011-01-28

    We report a study on encapsulation of various amino acids into gas-phase sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate (NaAOT) reverse micelles, using electrospray ionization guided-ion-beam tandem mass spectrometry. Collision-induced dissociation of mass-selected reverse micellar ions with Xe was performed to probe structures of gas-phase micellar assemblies, identify solute-surfactant interactions, and determine preferential incorporation sites of amino acids. Integration into gas-phase reverse micelles depends upon amino acid hydrophobicity and charge state. For examples, glycine and protonated amino acids (such as protonated tryptophan) are encapsulated within the micellar core via electrostatic interactions; while neutral tryptophan is adsorbed in the surfactant layer. As verified using model polar hydrophobic compounds, the hydrophobic effect and solute-interface hydrogen-bonding do not provide sufficient driving force needed for interfacial solubilization of neutral tryptophan. Neutral tryptophan, with a zwitterionic structure, is intercalated at the micellar interface between surfactant molecules through complementary effects of electrostatic interactions between tryptophan backbone and AOT polar heads, and hydrophobic interactions between tryptophan side chain and AOT alkyl tails. Protonation of tryptophan could significantly improve its incorporation capacity into gas-phase reverse micelles, and displace its incorporation site from the micellar interfacial zone to the core; protonation of glycine, on the other hand, has little effect on its encapsulation capacity. Another interesting observation is that amino acids of different isoelectric points could be selectively encapsulated into, and transported by, reverse micelles from solution to the gas phase, based upon their competition for protonation and subsequent encapsulation within the micellar core.

  13. Evaluation of in vitro release rate and in vivo absorption characteristics of four metoprolol tartrate immediate-release tablet formulations.

    PubMed

    Rekhi, G S; Eddington, N D; Fossler, M J; Schwartz, P; Lesko, L J; Augsburger, L L

    1997-02-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to examine the impact of formulation and process changes on dissolution and bioavailability/bioequivalency of metoprolol tartrate tablets manufactured using a high-shear granulation process. A half-factorial (2(4-1), Res IV) design was undertaken to study the selected formulation and processing variables during scale-up. Levels and ranges for excipients and processing changes studied represented level 2 or greater changes as indicated by the SUPAC-IR Guidance. Blend and tableting properties were evaluated. Changes in sodium starch glycolate and magnesium stearate levels, and the order of addition microcrystalline cellulose (intra- vs. extragranular) were significant only in affecting percent drug released (Q) in 5, 10, and 15 min. Statistical analysis of data showed no significant curvature. No interaction effects were found to be statistically significant. To examine the impact of formulation and processing variables on in vivo absorption, three batches were selected for a bioavailability study based on their dissolution profiles. Subjects received four metoprolol treatments (Lopressor, slow-, medium-, and fast-dissolving formulations) separated by 1 week according to a randomized crossover design. After an overnight fast, subjects were administered one tablet (100 mg), blood samples were collected over 24 hr and plasma samples were analyzed. The formulations were found to be bioequivalent with respect to the log Cmax and log AUC0-infinity. The results of this study suggest that: (i) bioavailability/bioequivalency studies may not be necessary for metoprolol tartrate and perhaps other class 1 drugs after level 2 type changes and (ii) in vitro dissolution tests may be used to show bioequivalence of metoprolol formulations with processing or formulation changes within the specified level 2 ranges for the equipment examined.

  14. Characteristics of nitrogen release from synthetic zeolite Na-P1 occluding NH4NO3.

    PubMed

    Park, Man; Kim, Jong Su; Choi, Choong Lyeal; Kim, Jang-Eok; Heo, Nam Ho; Komarneni, Sridhar; Choi, Jyung

    2005-08-18

    Zeolites can accommodate a considerable amount of occluded salt such as NH4NO3, which can serve as a good source of slow-release plant nutrient. This study evaluates the kinetics of ion release from NH4NO3-occluded Na-P1 (N-NaP) using a simulated soil solution and deionized water as leaching solutions. The patterns of ion releases were examined as a function of leaching time under both static and continuous-flow conditions for more than one month. Releases of both NH4+ and NO3- from N-NaP were found to be slow and steady under both the above conditions. The soil solution affected the release of NH4+ and NO3- differently, while deionized water released nearly the same equivalents of these ions. This clearly indicates that ion release from salt-occluded zeolite involves two different reactions, cation exchange and dissolution. The kinetics of ion release from occluded NH4NO3 under static condition was best described by the standard Elovich model while the power function model best expressed these under continuous-flow condition. The initial ion release patterns under both conditions exhibited considerable deviation from the simulated models, probably as a result of the presence of hydrated occluded NH4NO3. Flow condition and the presence of electrolytes in leaching solution affected the release kinetics significantly. Release of occluded NH4NO3 was delayed by the presence of the NH4NO3 coated on zeolite crystals. These results indicate that the ion release property of occluded salt could be predicted and controlled. This study clearly shows that NH4NO3-occluded zeolites could be developed as slow release fertilizers.

  15. Processes forming Gas, Tar, and Coke in Cellulose Gasification from Gas-Phase Reactions of Levoglucosan as Intermediate.

    PubMed

    Fukutome, Asuka; Kawamoto, Haruo; Saka, Shiro

    2015-07-08

    The gas-phase pyrolysis of levoglucosan (LG), the major intermediate species during cellulose gasification, was studied experimentally over the temperature range of 400-900 °C. Gaseous LG did not produce any dehydration products, which include coke, furans, and aromatic substances, although these are characteristic products of the pyrolysis of molten LG. Alternatively, at >500 °C, gaseous LG produced only fragmentation products, such as noncondensable gases and condensable C1 -C3 fragments, as intermediates during noncondensable gas formation. Therefore, it was determined that secondary reactions of gaseous LG can result in the clean (tar- and coke-free) gasification of cellulose. Cooling of the remaining LG in the gas phase caused coke formation by the transition of the LG to the molten state. The molecular mechanisms that govern the gas- and molten-phase reactions of LG are discussed in terms of the acid catalyst effect of intermolecular hydrogen bonding to promote the molten-phase dehydration reactions.

  16. Absolute configuration assignment of a chiral molecule in the gas phase using foil-induced Coulomb explosion imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herwig, Philipp; Zawatzky, Kerstin; Schwalm, Dirk; Grieser, Manfred; Heber, Oded; Jordon-Thaden, Brandon; Krantz, Claude; Novotný, Oldřich; Repnow, Roland; Schurig, Volker; Vager, Zeev; Wolf, Andreas; Trapp, Oliver; Kreckel, Holger

    2014-11-01

    Chiral molecules exist in two configurations that are nonsuperposable mirror images of one another. The underlying molecular structure is referred to as the absolute configuration. In chiral environments, the handedness of molecules influences their chemical characteristics dramatically, and therefore the determination of absolute configurations is of fundamental interest in organic chemistry and biology. Commonly applied techniques to assign absolute configuration are anomalous single-crystal x-ray diffraction and vibrational circular dichroism. However, these techniques become increasingly more challenging when applied to molecules that are made out of light atoms exclusively. Furthermore, there is no established method to determine the absolute handedness of gas-phase molecules that are not optically active. In this work, we apply the foil-induced Coulomb explosion imaging technique to determine directly the absolute configuration of the chiral molecule trans-2,3-dideuterooxirane (C2OD2H2) in the gas phase. The experiment leads to the definitive assignment of the (R ,R ) configuration to an enantio-selected dideuterooxirane sample with a statistical confidence of 5 σ . As the handedness of trans-2,3-dideuterooxirane is unambiguously linked by chemical synthesis to the stereochemical key reference glyceraldehyde, our results provide an independent verification of the absolute configuration of the stereochemical reference standard.

  17. Generation of gas-phase zirconium fluoroanions by electrospray of an ionic liquid

    SciTech Connect

    Gary S. Groenewold; James E. Delmore; Michael T. Benson; Tetsuya Tsuda; Rika Hagiwara

    2014-06-01

    RATIONALE: When measuring extremely wide isotope ratios (= 1 x 109) accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is the instrument of choice, however it requires an anion for injection into the tandem accelerator. Since many elements do not have positive electronegativities they do not form stable negative atomic ions, and hence are not compatible for isotope ratio measurement using AMS. Thus new approaches for forming anions are sought; fluoroanions are particularly attractive because fluorine is monoisotopic, and thus will not have overlapping isobars with the isotope of interest. METHODS: An approach is described for making zirconium fluoroanions using the fluorinating ionic liquid (IL) 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium fluorohydrogenate, which was used to generate abundant [ZrF5-] using electrospray ionization. The IL was dissolved in acetonitrile, combined with a dilute solution of either Zr4+ or ZrO2+, and then electrosprayed. Mass analysis and collision induced dissociation were conducted using a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Cluster structures were predicted using density functional theory calculations. RESULTS: The fluorohydrogenate IL solutions generated abundant [ZrF5-] starting from solutions of both Zr4+ and ZrO2+. The mass spectra also contained IL-bearing cluster ions, whose compositions indicated the presence of [ZrF6]2- in solution, a conclusion supported by the structural calculations. Rinsing out the zirconium-IL solution with acetonitrile decreased the IL clusters, but enhanced [ZrF5]-, which was sorbed by the polymeric electrospray supply capillary, and then released upon rinsing. This reduced the ion background in the mass spectrum. CONCLUSIONS: The fluorohydrogenate-IL solutions are a facile way to form zirconium fluoroanions in the gas phase using electrospray. The approach has potential as a source of fluoroanions for injection into an AMS, which would enable high-sensitivity measurement of minor zirconium isotopes, and benefits from the absence of

  18. Exposure characteristics of ferric oxide nanoparticles released during activities for manufacturing ferric oxide nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Xing, Mingluan; Zhang, Yuanbao; Zou, Hua; Quan, Changjian; Chang, Bing; Tang, Shichuan; Zhang, Meibian

    2015-02-01

    The exposure characteristics of Fe2O3 nanoparticles (NPs) released in a factory were investigated, as exposure data on this type of NP is absent. The nature of the particles was identified in terms of their concentrations [i.e. number concentration (NC(20-1000 nm)), mass concentration (MC(100-1000 nm)), surface area concentration (SAC(10-1000 nm))], size distribution, morphology and elemental composition. The relationships between different exposure metrics were determined through analyses of exposure ranking (ER), concentration ratios (CR), correlation coefficients and shapes of the particle concentration curves. Work activities such as powder screening, material feeding and packaging generated higher levels of NPs as compared to those of background particles (p < 0.01). The airborne Fe2O3 NPs exhibited a unimodal size distribution and a spindle-like morphology and consisted predominantly of the elements O and Fe. Periodic and activity-related characteristics were noticed in the temporal variations in NC(20-1000 nm) and SAC(10-1000 nm). The modal size of the Fe2O3 NPs remained relatively constant (ranging from 10 to 15 nm) during the working periods. The ER, CR values and the shapes of NC(20-1000 nm) and SAC(10-1000 nm) curves were similar; however, these were significantly different from those for MC(100-1000 nm). There was a high correlation between NC(20-1000 nm) and SAC(10-1000 nm), and relatively lower correlations between the two and MC(100-1000 nm). These findings suggest that the work activities during the manufacturing processes generated high levels of primary Fe2O3 NPs. The particle concentrations exhibited periodicity and were activity dependent. The number and SACs were found to be much more relevant metrics for characterizing NPs than was the mass concentration.

  19. Imidazole and imidazolium porphyrins: gas-phase chemistry of multicharged ions.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Catarina I V; Pereira, Patrícia M R; Santana-Marques, M Graça; De Paula, Rodrigo; Simões, Mário M Q; Neves, M Graça P M S; Cavaleiro, José A S

    2014-05-01

    Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry in the positive ion mode was used to investigate the gas-phase chemistry of multicharged ions from solutions of porphyrins with 1,3-dimethylimidazolium-2-yl (DMIM) and 1-methylimidazol-2-yl (MIm) meso-substituents. The studied compounds include two free bases and 12 complexes with transition metals (Cu(II), Zn(II), Mn(III), and Fe(III)). The observed multicharged ions are either preformed or formed during the electrospraying process by reduction or protonation and comprise closed-shell and hypervalent mono-radical and bi-radical ions. The observed extensive and abundant fragmentation of the DMIM and MIm meso-substituents is a characteristic feature of these porphyrins. Fragments with the same mass values can be lost from the meso-substituents either as charged or neutral species and from closed-shell and hypervalent radical ions. Reduction processes are observed for both the free bases and the metallated DMIM porphyrins and occur predominantly by formation of hypervalent radicals that fragment, at low energy collisions, by loss of methyl radicals with formation of the corresponding MIm functionalities. These findings confirm that, when using electrospray ionization, reduction is an important characteristic of cationic meso-substituted tetrapyrrolic macrocycles, always occurring when delocalization of the formed hypervalent radicals is possible. For the Fe(III) and Mn(III) complexes, reduction of the metal centers is also observed as the predominant fragmentation of the corresponding reduced ions through losses of charged fragments testifies. The fragmentation of the closed-shell ions formed by protonation of the MIm porphyrins mirrors the fragmentation of the closed-shell ions of their DMIM counterparts.

  20. Qualitative characteristics of histamine release from human basophils by covalently cross-linked LgE

    SciTech Connect

    Kagey-Sobotka, A.; Dembo, M.; Goldstein, B.; Metzger, H.; Lichtenstein, L.M.

    1981-12-01

    The effects of permanent oligomers of human lgE produced was studied using the cross-linking reagent, dimethyl suberimidate, on histamine release from human basophils. lgE dimers were found to be sufficient stimuli for both release and desensitization of these cells; monomeric lgE had no effect. Histamine release was augmented by deuterium oxide (D/sub 2/O) in the media, but D/sub 2/O was not an absolute requirement to observe release. Desensitization by the dimeric lgE was specific in that the response to anti-lgE was not affected by preincubation of the leukocytes with the lgE dimer under suboptimal releasing conditions. lgE trimers and higher oligomers of lgE also caused both release and desensitization. lgE also trimers were 3- to 4-fold more effective than lgE dimers with regard to the amount required for 50% histamine release. Dilution studies with monomeric lgE suggested that the difference was due to the presence of more ''active'' dimers in the trimeric lgE fractions. We conclude that dimeric lgE, by juxtaposing 2 receptors on the basophil membrane, is the ''unit signal'' for both release and desensitization of these cells.

  1. Characteristics of histamine release from rat mast cells in relation to the valency of the stimulating ligand.

    PubMed Central

    Healicon, R M; Foreman, J C

    1986-01-01

    The relationship between the valency of a ligand and the subsequent characteristics of histamine release was investigated in rat peritoneal mast cells. The cells were passively sensitized to the DNP hapten and a series of DNP-human serum albumin conjugates of known valency were used to induce histamine release. The rate of release of histamine induced by these conjugates was independent of the DNP/HSA ratio when the ratio was between 71.3 and 7.2. Marked slowing of the release occurred as the ratio was reduced below 7.2. The rate of desensitization of the cells slowed as a continuous function as the DNP/HSA ratio was reduced. 45Calcium uptake measurements showed that the changes in histamine release were paralleled by changes in the membrane permeability to calcium. The rate of release of histamine from mast cells and the rate of desensitization of the cells are discussed in terms of the size of IgE receptor complexes on the cell membrane. PMID:2420710

  2. The load and release characteristics on a strong cationic ion-exchange fiber: kinetics, thermodynamics, and influences.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Jing; Gao, Yanan; Wang, Xinyu; Liu, Hongzhuo; Che, Xin; Xu, Lu; Yang, Yang; Wang, Qifang; Wang, Yan; Li, Sanming

    2014-01-01

    Ion-exchange fibers were different from conventional ion-exchange resins in their non-cross-linked structure. The exchange was located on the surface of the framework, and the transport resistance reduced significantly, which might mean that the exchange is controlled by an ionic reaction instead of diffusion. Therefore, this work aimed to investigate the load and release characteristics of five model drugs with the strong cationic ion-exchange fiber ZB-1. Drugs were loaded using a batch process and released in United States Pharmacopoeia (USP) dissolution apparatus 2. Opposing exchange kinetics, suitable for the special structure of the fiber, were developed for describing the exchange process with the help of thermodynamics, which illustrated that the load was controlled by an ionic reaction. The molecular weight was the most important factor to influence the drug load and release rate. Strong alkalinity and rings in the molecular structures made the affinity between the drug and fiber strong, while logP did not cause any profound differences. The drug-fiber complexes exhibited sustained release. Different kinds and concentrations of counter ions or different amounts of drug-fiber complexes in the release medium affected the release behavior, while the pH value was independent of it. The groundwork for in-depth exploration and further application of ion-exchange fibers has been laid.

  3. Efficient and directed peptide bond formation in the gas phase via ion/ion reactions.

    PubMed

    McGee, William M; McLuckey, Scott A

    2014-01-28

    Amide linkages are among the most important chemical bonds in living systems, constituting the connections between amino acids in peptides and proteins. We demonstrate the controlled formation of amide bonds between amino acids or peptides in the gas phase using ion/ion reactions in a mass spectrometer. Individual amino acids or peptides can be prepared as reagents by (i) incorporating gas phase-labile protecting groups to silence otherwise reactive functional groups, such as the N terminus; (ii) converting the carboxyl groups to the active ester of N-hydroxysuccinimide; and (iii) incorporating a charge site. Protonation renders basic sites (nucleophiles) unreactive toward the N-hydroxysuccinimide ester reagents, resulting in sites with the greatest gas phase basicities being, in large part, unreactive. The N-terminal amines of most naturally occurring amino acids have lower gas phase basicities than the side chains of the basic amino acids (i.e., those of histidine, lysine, or arginine). Therefore, reagents may be directed to the N terminus of an existing "anchor" peptide to form an amide bond by protonating the anchor peptide's basic residues, while leaving the N-terminal amine unprotonated and therefore reactive. Reaction efficiencies of greater than 30% have been observed. We propose this method as a step toward the controlled synthesis of peptides in the gas phase.

  4. Formation of complex organic molecules in cold objects: the role of gas-phase reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balucani, Nadia; Ceccarelli, Cecilia; Taquet, Vianney

    2015-04-01

    While astrochemical models are successful in reproducing many of the observed interstellar species, they have been struggling to explain the observed abundances of complex organic molecules. Current models tend to privilege grain surface over gas-phase chemistry in their formation. One key assumption of those models is that radicals trapped in the grain mantles gain mobility and react on lukewarm ( ≳ 30 K) dust grains. Thus, the recent detections of methyl formate (MF) and dimethyl ether (DME) in cold objects represent a challenge and may clarify the respective role of grain-surface and gas-phase chemistry. We propose here a new model to form DME and MF with gas-phase reactions in cold environments, where DME is the precursor of MF via an efficient reaction overlooked by previous models. Furthermore, methoxy, a precursor of DME, is also synthesized in the gas phase from methanol, which is desorbed by a non-thermal process from the ices. Our new model reproduces fairly well the observations towards L1544. It also explains, in a natural way, the observed correlation between DME and MF. We conclude that gas-phase reactions are major actors in the formation of MF, DME and methoxy in cold gas. This challenges the exclusive role of grain-surface chemistry and favours a combined grain-gas chemistry.

  5. Effect of additives on gas-phase catalysis with immobilised Thermoanaerobacter species alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH T).

    PubMed

    Trivedi, A H; Spiess, A C; Daussmann, T; Büchs, J

    2006-07-01

    This paper presents a strategy for preparing an efficient immobilised alcohol dehydrogenase preparation for a gas-phase reaction. The effects of additives such as buffers and sucrose on the immobilisation efficiency (residual activity and protein loading) and on the gas-phase reaction efficiency (initial reaction rate and half-life) of Thermoanaerobacter sp. alcohol dehydrogenase were studied. The reduction of acetophenone to 1-phenylethanol under in situ cofactor regeneration using isopropanol as co-substrate was used as a model reaction at fixed reaction conditions (temperature and thermodynamic activities). A strongly enhanced thermostability of the enzyme in the gas-phase reaction was achieved when the enzyme was immobilised with 50 mM phosphate buffer (pH 7) containing sucrose five times the protein amount (on weight/weight basis). This resulted in a remarkable productivity of 200 g L(-1) day(-1) even at non-optimised reaction conditions. The interaction of additives with the enzyme and water affects the immobilisation and gas-phase efficiencies of the enzyme. However, it was not possible to predict the effect of additives on the gas-phase reaction efficiency even after knowing their effect on the immobilisation efficiency.

  6. Structural effect of the in situ generated titania on its ability to oxidize and capture the gas-phase elemental mercury.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tai Gyu; Hyun, Jung Eun

    2006-01-01

    Structural effect of the in situ generated TiO(2) sorbent particle was examined for its ability to capture elemental mercury under UV irradiation in a simulated combustion flue gas. Titania particles were prepared by thermal gas-phase oxidation of Titanium (IV) isopropoxide (TTIP) using a high temperature electric furnace reactor. The structural characteristics of the in situ generated TiO(2) at various synthesis temperatures were investigated; size distribution and the geometric mean diameter were measured using a scanning mobility particle sizer, while fractal dimension and radius of gyration were evaluated from the transmission electron microscopy images. Results from the Hg(0) capture experiment show that with increasing titania synthesis temperature, the overall aggregate size increases and the morphology becomes more open-structured to gas-phase Hg(0) and UV light, resulting in the improved mercury removal capability.

  7. Gas-phase and liquid-phase pre-irradiation grafting of AAc onto LDPE and HDPE films for pervaporation membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhigong, Rao; Guixiang, Li; Sugo, Takanobu; Okamoto, Jiro

    A study has been made on gas-phase and liquid-phase pre-irradiation grafting of acrylic acid onto LDPE and HDPE films for pervaporation membranes of ethanol-water mixtures. It was found that the degree of grafting, percent volume change of grafted membranes and length of grafting chains depend on the methods of grafting, crystal state of substrate films and diffusion rate of the monomer in the films. The pervaporation characteristics of grafted membranes is influenced directly by the surface hydrophilicity of grafted membranes, temperature of the feed, degree of grafting, crosslinking of grafted chains and alkaline metal ions in the functional groups. The potassium ion exchange membrane of HDPE synthesized by gas-phase grafting has better pervaporation efficiency. At 80 wt% ethanol in the feed, 25°C feed temperature and 70% degree of grafting a grafted membrane has a 0.65 kg/m 2h flux and a separation factor of 20.

  8. Experimental study of Gas Phase Formation and Evolution in Low fO2 Planetary Basalts.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutherford, M. J.; Wetzel, D. T.; Saal, A. E.; Hauri, E. H.

    2012-12-01

    The existence of a gas phase in planetary basaltic magmas is demonstrated by the ubiquitous presence of vesicles in returned lunar samples and meteorites as well as basalts from Earth and Mars. Additionally, formation of the fine-grained glass bead deposits during eruption of lunar picritic glasses required a large gas-bubble volume (> 90%) at the time of eruption/fragmentation. Up to 100-200 ppm levels of H, S, Cl and F still remain as diffusion-loss profiles in individual lunar glass beads SIMS (1), and higher volatile concentrations occur in olivine melt inclusions (2). The composition and origin of such volcanic gases were investigated by experiments on a volatile (C-O-H-S-Cl-F)-bearing picritic glass composition as a function of fO2 near iron-wustite (IW). The C-O-H species dissolved in gas-saturated basaltic melt above IW-0.5 are carbonate, OH and H2O with 100 to 10,000 ppm H2O in the sample; below IW-0.5, the C-species present (Raman and FTIR) are Fe(CO)5 (iron pentacarbonyl) and lesser CH4 [3]. The change in melt speciation in part reflects a change in calculated speciation in the coexisting gas [4]. The carbon solubility in these experimental melts increases linearly with increasing pressure; the more oxidized glasses contain 32-620 ppm C for pressures of 98 to 980 MPa, the reduced glasses contain 8-240 ppm C for pressures between 36 and 900 MPa. Thus, the C solubility of the more reduced Fe-carbonyl and CH4 is about one-half that of carbonate at the same pressure, and indicates the carrying capacity for C in reduced (i.e., lunar) magmas is much lower than it is in present day terrestrial magmas. Varioles up to 200 um in diameter formed in some experiments with higher dissolved water contents (1%); they have radiating crystalline textures (olivine, glass and poorly crystallized graphite) initiated at a central nucleation site. A sharp peak in the variole Ramen spectra indicates methane as well as CO is released during variole formation and a reaction such

  9. Insights into diastereoisomeric characterization of tetrahydropyridazine amino acid derivatives: crystal structures and gas phase ion chemistry.

    PubMed

    Giorgi, Gianluca; Favi, Gianfranco; Attanasi, Orazio A

    2013-08-14

    Structural, conformational properties, and gas phase reactivity of two representative diastereoisomeric members of a series of α,α-tetrahydropyridazine amino acid derivatives have been investigated by using X-ray crystallography, tandem mass spectrometry and theoretical calculations. Both diastereoisomers show an unusual screw-boat conformation of the tetrahydropyridazine ring. While protonated molecules mainly decompose in the gas phase by loss of acetamide, the main reactivity of the [M + Na](+) species consists of loss of PhNCO followed by acetamide and it is strictly dependent upon the stereochemistry of the parent compound. The most stable energy minimized structures obtained by theoretical calculations are in full agreement with the experimental data and allowed us to rationalize the gas phase reaction pathways.

  10. Native biomolecules in the gas phase? The case of green fluorescent protein.

    PubMed

    Frankevich, Vladimir; Barylyuk, Konstantin; Chingin, Konstantin; Nieckarz, Robert; Zenobi, Renato

    2013-04-02

    Green fluorescent protein (GFP) was ionized by native electrospray ionization and trapped for many seconds in high vacuum, allowing fluorescence emission to be measured as a probe of its biological function, to answer the question whether GFP exists in the native form in the gas phase or not. Although a narrow charge-state distribution, a collision cross-section very close to that expected for correctly folded GFP, and a large stability against dissociation all support a near-native gas-phase structure, no fluorescence emission was observed. The loss of the native form is attributed to the absence of residual water in the gas phase, which normally stabilizes the para-hydroxybenzylidene imidazolone chromophore of GFP.

  11. Direct observation of the gas-phase Criegee intermediate (CH2OO).

    PubMed

    Taatjes, Craig A; Meloni, Giovanni; Selby, Talitha M; Trevitt, Adam J; Osborn, David L; Percival, Carl J; Shallcross, Dudley E

    2008-09-10

    Carbonyl oxide species play a key role in tropospheric oxidation of organic molecules and in low-temperature combustion processes. In the late 1940s, Criegee first postulated the participation of carbonyl oxides, now often called "Criegee intermediates," in ozonolysis of alkenes. However, despite decades of effort, no gas phase Criegee intermediate has before been observed. As a result, knowledge of gas phase carbonyl oxide reactions has heretofore been inferred by indirect means, with derived rate coefficients spanning orders of magnitude. We have directly detected the primary Criegee intermediate, formaldehyde oxide (CH2OO), in the chlorine-initiated gas-phase oxidation of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). This work not only establishes that the Criegee intermediate is formed in DMSO oxidation also but opens the possibility for explicit kinetics studies on this critical atmospheric species.

  12. Device for two-dimensional gas-phase separation and characterization of ion mixtures

    DOEpatents

    Tang, Keqi; Shvartsburg, Alexandre A.; Smith, Richard D.

    2006-12-12

    The present invention relates to a device for separation and characterization of gas-phase ions. The device incorporates an ion source, a field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) analyzer, an ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) drift tube, and an ion detector. In one aspect of the invention, FAIMS operating voltages are electrically floated on top of the IMS drift voltage. In the other aspect, the FAIMS/IMS interface is implemented employing an electrodynamic ion funnel, including in particular an hourglass ion funnel. The present invention improves the efficiency (peak capacity) and sensitivity of gas-phase separations; the online FAIMS/IMS coupling creates a fundamentally novel two-dimensional gas-phase separation technology with high peak capacity, specificity, and exceptional throughput.

  13. Influence of gas phase equilibria on the chemical vapor deposition of graphene.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Amanda M; Derby, Brian; Kinloch, Ian A

    2013-04-23

    We have investigated the influence of gas phase chemistry on the chemical vapor deposition of graphene in a hot wall reactor. A new extended parameter space for graphene growth was defined through literature review and experimentation at low pressures (≥0.001 mbar). The deposited films were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and dark field optical microscopy, with the latter showing promise as a rapid and nondestructive characterization technique for graphene films. The equilibrium gas compositions have been calculated across this parameter space. Correlations between the graphene films grown and prevalent species in the equilibrium gas phase revealed that deposition conditions associated with a high acetylene equilibrium concentration lead to good quality graphene deposition, and conditions that stabilize large hydrocarbon molecules in the gas phase result in films with multiple defects. The transition between lobed and hexagonal graphene islands was found to be linked to the concentration of the monatomic hydrogen radical, with low concentrations associated with hexagonal islands.

  14. OMVPE growth and gas-phase reactions of AlGaN for UV emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Han, J.; Figiel, J.J.; Crawford, M.H.; Banas, M.A.; Bartram, M.E.; Biefeld, R.M.; Song, Y.K.; Nurmikko, A.V.

    1998-06-01

    Gas-phase parasitic reactions among TMG, TMA, and NH3, are investigated by monitoring of the growth rate/incorporation efficiency of GaN and AlN using an in-situ optical reflectometer. It is suggested that gas phase adduct (TMA: NH{sub 3}) reactions not only reduce the incorporation efficiency of TMA but also affect the incorporation behavior of TMGa. The observed phenomena can be explained by either a synergistic gas-phase scavenging effect or a surface site-blocking effect. Relatively low reactor pressures (30--50 Torr) are employed to grow an AlGaN/GaN QW p-n diode structure. The UV emission at 354 nm (FWHM {approximately} 6 nm) represents the first report of LED operation from an indium-free GaN QW diode.

  15. Gonadotropin-releasing Hormone Agonist Overuse: Urologists’ Response to Reimbursement and Characteristics Associated with Persistent Overuse

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Shellie D.; Nielsen, Matthew E.; Carpenter, William R.; Jackson, George L.; Wheeler, Stephanie B.; Liu, Huan; Weinberger, Morris

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Medicare reimbursement cuts have been associated with declining Gonadotropin-releasing Hormone (GnRH) agonist overuse in localized prostate cancer. Medical school affiliation and foreign training have been associated with persistent overuse. However, physician-level prescribing changes and the practice type of persistent overusers have not been examined. We sought to describe physician-level changes in GnRH agonist overuse and test the association of time in practice and solo practice type with GnRH agonist overuse. METHODS We matched American Medical Association physician data for 2,138 urologists to SEER–Medicare data for 12,943 men diagnosed with early stage and lower grade adenocarcinoma of the prostate between 2000 and 2007. We conducted a population-based, retrospective study using multi-level modeling to control for patient and provider characteristics. RESULTS Three distinct patterns of GnRH agonist overuse were observed. Urologists’ time in practice was not associated with GnRH agonist overuse (OR 0.89; 95% CI 0.75–1.05).However, solo practice type (OR 1.65; 95% CI 1.34–2.02), medical school affiliation (OR 0.65; 95% CI 0.55–0.77), and patient race were. Compared to non-Hispanic whites, non-Hispanic blacks (OR 1.76; 95% CI 1.37–2.27), Hispanics (OR 1.41; 95% CI 1.12–1.79) and men of “other” race (OR 1.44; 95% CI 1.04–1.99) had greater odds of receiving unnecessary GnRH agonists. CONCLUSIONS GnRH agonist overuse remains high among some urologists who may be professionally isolated and difficult to reach. These urologists treat more vulnerable populations, which may contribute to health disparities in prostate cancer treatment quality. Nonetheless, these findings provide guidance to develop interventions to address overuse in prostate cancer. PMID:25849354

  16. Diffusion characteristics and controlled release of bacterial fertilizers from modified calcium alginate capsules.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chien-Hung; Wu, Jane-Yii; Chang, Jo-Shu

    2008-04-01

    An indigenous Cellulosimicrobium cellulans GS6 isolate able to solubilize insoluble phosphate complexes in soil is a potential bacterial fertilizer. Enclosure of the phosphate-solubilizing bacterium (PSB) in biodegradable capsules may protect the PSB cells inoculated into soil and, in the meantime, enable the control of cell release that confers long-term fertilizing effects. In this study, calcium alginate (CA) was used as the core matrix to encapsulate cells of C. cellulans GS6. The cell-liberating properties of the CA-based capsules were modified by blending with a variety of supplemental materials (SM), including chitin, cellulose, olive oil, and gelatin. The experimental results showed that the maximum cell-release percentage (MCR%) of the capsules decreased in the order of CA-cellulose>CA-olive oil>CA-chitin>CA-gelatin>CA. Furthermore, a mass transport model was developed to accurately describe the kinetics of cell release results for each capsule. The diffusion coefficient (D(e)) of each capsule was also determined from the model simulation. We found that the estimated D(e) values are positively correlated to the release rate with rare exceptions. Lastly, as our results underscored the crucial roles that the type of capsules plays in the rate and amount of cell release, controlled release of the bacterial fertilizer (C. cellulans GS6 cells) may be achieved via the design of capsule materials.

  17. Strategies for the Gas Phase Modification of Cationized Arginine via Ion/ion Reactions.

    PubMed

    Prentice, Boone M; McGee, William M; Stutzman, John R; McLuckey, Scott A

    2013-11-15

    The gas phase acetylation of cationized arginine residues is demonstrated here using ion/ion reactions with sulfosuccinimidyl acetate (sulfo-NHS acetate) anions. Previous reports have demonstrated the gas phase modification of uncharged primary amine (the N-terminus and ε-amino side chain of lysine) and uncharged guanidine (the arginine side chain) functionalities via sulfo-NHS ester chemistry. Herein, charge-saturated arginine-containing peptides that contain sodium ions as the charge carriers, such as [ac-ARAAARA+2Na](2+), are shown to exhibit strong reactivity towards sulfo-NHS acetate whereas the protonated peptide analogues exhibit no such reactivity. This difference in reactivity is attributed to the lower sodium ion (as compared to proton) affinity of the arginine, which results in increased nucleophilicity of the cationized arginine guanidinium functionality. This increased nucleophilicity improves the arginine residue's reactivity towards sulfo-NHS esters and enhances the gas phase covalent modification pathway. No such dramatic increase in reactivity towards sulfo-NHS acetate has been observed upon sodium cationization of lysine amino acid residues, indicating that this behavior appears to be unique to arginine. The sodium cationization process is demonstrated in the condensed phase by simply spiking sodium chloride into the peptide sample solution and in the gas phase by a peptide-sodium cation exchange process with a sulfo-NHS acetate sodium-bound dimer cluster reagent. This methodology demonstrates several ways by which arginine can be covalently modified in the gas phase even when it is charged. Collisional activation of an acetylated arginine product can result in deguanidination of the residue, generating an ornithine. This gas phase ornithination exhibits similar site-specific fragmentation behavior to that observed with peptides ornithinated in solution and may represent a useful approach for inducing selective peptide cleavages.

  18. Amphipols Outperform Dodecylmaltoside Micelles in Stabilizing Membrane Protein Structure in the Gas Phase

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Noncovalent mass spectrometry (MS) is emerging as an invaluable technique to probe the structure, interactions, and dynamics of membrane proteins (MPs). However, maintaining native-like MP conformations in the gas phase using detergent solubilized proteins is often challenging and may limit structural analysis. Amphipols, such as the well characterized A8-35, are alternative reagents able to maintain the solubility of MPs in detergent-free solution. In this work, the ability of A8-35 to retain the structural integrity of MPs for interrogation by electrospray ionization-ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry (ESI-IMS-MS) is compared systematically with the commonly used detergent dodecylmaltoside. MPs from the two major structural classes were selected for analysis, including two β-barrel outer MPs, PagP and OmpT (20.2 and 33.5 kDa, respectively), and two α-helical proteins, Mhp1 and GalP (54.6 and 51.7 kDa, respectively). Evaluation of the rotationally averaged collision cross sections of the observed ions revealed that the native structures of detergent solubilized MPs were not always retained in the gas phase, with both collapsed and unfolded species being detected. In contrast, ESI-IMS-MS analysis of the amphipol solubilized MPs studied resulted in charge state distributions consistent with less gas phase induced unfolding, and the presence of lowly charged ions which exhibit collision cross sections comparable with those calculated from high resolution structural data. The data demonstrate that A8-35 can be more effective than dodecylmaltoside at maintaining native MP structure and interactions in the gas phase, permitting noncovalent ESI-IMS-MS analysis of MPs from the two major structural classes, while gas phase dissociation from dodecylmaltoside micelles leads to significant gas phase unfolding, especially for the α-helical MPs studied. PMID:25495802

  19. Probing the energetics of dissociation of carbonic anhydrase-ligand complexes in the gas phase.

    PubMed Central

    Gao, J; Wu, Q; Carbeck, J; Lei, Q P; Smith, R D; Whitesides, G M

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes the use of electrospray ionization-Fourier transform ion cyclotron mass spectrometry (ESI-FTICR-MS) to study the relative stabilities of noncovalent complexes of carbonic anhydrase II (CAII, EC 4.2.1.1) and benzenesulfonamide inhibitors in the gas phase. Sustained off-resonance irradiation collision-induced dissociation (SORI-CID) was used to determine the energetics of dissociation of these CAII-sulfonamide complexes in the gas phase. When two molecules of a benzenesulfonamide (1) were bound simultaneously to one molecule of CAII, one of them was found to exhibit significantly weaker binding (DeltaE50 = 0.4 V, where E50 is defined as the amplitude of sustained off-resonance irradiation when 50% of the protein-ligand complexes are dissociated). In solution, the benzenesulfonamide group coordinates as an anion to a Zn(II) ion bound at the active site of the enzyme. The gas phase stability of the complex with the weakly bound inhibitor was the same as that of the inhibitor complexed with apoCAII (i.e., CAII with the Zn(II) ion removed from the binding site). These results indicate that specific interactions between the sulfonamide group on the inhibitor and the Zn(II) ion on CAII were preserved in the gas phase. Experiments also showed a higher gas phase stability for the complex of para-NO2-benzenesulfonamide-CAII than that for ortho-NO2-benzenesulfonamide-CAII complex. This result further suggests that steric interactions of the inhibitors with the binding pocket of CAII parallel those in solution. Overall, these results are consistent with the hypothesis that CAII retains, at least partially, the structure of its binding pocket in the gas phase on the time scale (seconds to minutes) of the ESI-FTICR measurements. PMID:10354450

  20. Liquid-gas phase transitions in a multicomponent nuclear system with Coulomb and surface effects

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S. J.; Mekjian, A. Z.

    2001-04-01

    The liquid-gas phase transition is studied in a multicomponent nuclear system using a local Skyrme interaction with Coulomb and surface effects. Some features are qualitatively the same as the results of Mu''ller and Serot where a relativistic mean field was used without Coulomb and surface effects. Surface tension brings the coexistence binodal surface to lower pressure. The Coulomb interaction makes the binodal surface smaller and causes another pair of binodal points at low pressure and large proton fraction with fewer protons in the liquid phase and more protons in the gas phase.

  1. Fischer Indole Synthesis in the Gas Phase, the Solution Phase, and at the Electrospray Droplet Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bain, Ryan M.; Ayrton, Stephen T.; Cooks, R. Graham

    2017-02-01

    Previous reports have shown that reactions occurring in the microdroplets formed during electrospray ionization can, under the right conditions, exhibit significantly greater rates than the corresponding bulk solution-phase reactions. The observed acceleration under electrospray ionization could result from a solution-phase, a gas-phase, or an interfacial reaction. This study shows that a gas-phase ion/molecule (or ion/ion) reaction is not responsible for the observed rate enhancement in the particular case of the Fischer indole synthesis. The results show that the accelerated reaction proceeds in the microdroplets, and evidence is provided that an interfacial process is involved.

  2. Study of Hind Limb Tissue Gas Phase Formation in Response to Suspended Adynamia and Hypokinesia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, Bruce D.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the hypothesis that reduced joint/muscle activity (hypo kinesia) as well as reduced or null loading of limbs (adynamia) in gravity would result in reduced decompression-induced gas phase and symptoms of decompression sickness (DCS). Finding a correlation between the two phenomena would correspond to the proposed reduction in tissue gas phase formation in astronauts undergoing decompression during extravehicular activity (EVA) in microgravity. The observation may further explain the reported low incidence of DCS in space.

  3. Gas-phase reactions in extraterrestrial environments: laboratory investigations by crossed molecular beams.

    PubMed

    Balucani, Nadia; Casavecchia, Piergiorgio

    2006-12-01

    We have investigated gas-phase reactions of N((2)D) with the most abundant hydrocarbons in the atmosphere of Titan by the crossed molecular beam technique. In all cases, molecular products containing a novel CN bond are formed, thus suggesting possible routes of formation of gas-phase nitriles in the atmosphere of Titan and primordial Earth. The same approach has been recently extended to the study of radical-radical reactions, such as the reaction of atomic oxygen with the CH(3) and C(3)H(5) radicals. Products other than those already considered in the modeling of planetary atmospheres and interstellar medium have been identified.

  4. Resonance Energy Transfer Relates the Gas-Phase Structure and Pharmacological Activity of Opioid Peptides.

    PubMed

    Kopysov, Vladimir; Boyarkin, Oleg V

    2016-01-11

    Enkephalins are efficient pain-relief drugs that bind to transmembrane opioid receptors. One key structural parameter that governs the pharmacological activity of these opioid peptides and is typically determined from condensed-phase structures is the distance between the aromatic rings of their Tyr and Phe residues. We use resonance energy transfer, detected by a combination of cold ion spectroscopy and mass spectrometry, to estimate the Tyr-Phe spacing for enkephalins in the gas phase. In contrast to the condensed-phase structures, these distances appear to differ substantially in enkephalins with different pharmacological efficiencies, suggesting that gas-phase structures might be a better pharmacophoric metric for ligand peptides.

  5. Gas phase infrared spectra and corresponding DFT calculations of α, ω-diphenylpolyenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biemann, Lars; Braun, Michaela; Kleinermanns, Karl

    2010-01-01

    We present gas phase Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectra of the homologue series of α, ω-diphenylpolyenes consisting of trans- and cis-stilbene, diphenylbutadiene (DPB) and diphenylhexatriene (DPH) obtained by a fast thermal heating technique that enables vaporization without decomposition. Infrared marker bands for the cis-isomers of the polyenes have been identified by density functional calculations at the B3LYP/TZVP level of theory. The all trans isomers of DPB and DPH do not interconvert to the cis-isomers in the gas phase at 200 °C.

  6. Coupled Variations in HNO3 and Soluble Gas Phase Chloride in the Houston Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dibb, J. E.; Corr, C. A.; Lefer, B. L.; Flynn, J. H.

    2010-12-01

    The University of New Hampshire mist chamber/ion chromatography (MC/IC) system was operated on the north Moody Tower as part of the Study of Houston Atmospheric and Radical Precursors (SHARP) during April-May, 2009. The MC/IC system provided 5-minute resolution measurements of HONO, HNO3, and soluble gas phase chloride (soluble Cl-) throughout the intensive campaign. Several other papers in this session discuss the HONO results, here we focus on HNO3, and soluble Cl-. These gases were highly correlated on short (minutes to hours time scales) throughout the SHARP campaign but anticorrelated when binned by broad wind direction sectors. Peak mixing ratios of HNO3, occurred during transport from the north and east and minima were observed under southerly flow, with the opposite true for soluble Cl-, yet strong correlation from sample to sample and diurnally were observed regardless of wind direction. It should be noted that the mixing ratios of soluble Cl- are substantial in Houston. Even during intervals with sustained northerly flow (relatively low Cl-) daytime maxima routinely exceeded 1 ppbv. Similar observations made during TexAQS 2006 on the Moody Tower and the NOAA vessel Ronald H Brown indicate that abundant soluble Cl-, linked with HNO3, by processes not yet understood, is characteristic of the Houston-Galveston Bay region during both spring and summer. Limited data on bulk aerosol composition at Moody Tower suggest that displacement of HCl from sea salt is not sufficient to account for all of the soluble Cl- observed in Houston.

  7. Time-slice last millennium experiments with interactive gas-phase chemistry and aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsigaridis, K.; Legrande, A. N.; Koch, D. M.

    2010-12-01

    Preliminary results from coupled atmosphere-ocean simulations with interactive gas-phase chemistry and aerosols are presented. These experiments are decadal scale time-slices within millennial-length simulations performed with the GISS GCM (ModelE), using two different ocean models. The boundary conditions for the transient simulations follow the last millennium coordinated PMIP3 experiment protocol. This experiment directly links in with other pre-Industrial experiments being completed as part of IPCC AR5, using the same model and resolution as in GISS IPCC AR5. Preliminary time-slice results from the early medieval and Maunder Minimum periods will be presented. The impact of the presence of short-lived gases and aerosols on the simulated climate is studied. An initial attempt to identify previously omitted additional forcing mechanisms will be performed during these contrasting climate periods, in short duration experiments driven by ocean conditions from the transient experiments. The results presented are the initial runs from a larger set of experiments that will assess the climate impact of changes to dust, sea-salt, and ocean-derived sulfate, biomass burning ozone-precursors and aerosols, organic carbon, wetland methane emissions, and a final set with all components. These species are standard components in the GISS model’s 20th century simulations, so that we may compare millennial variability characteristics with those better constrained from more recent climate periods. Dust and sea-salt are wind-driven aerosols from deserts and oceans, sulfate comes from oxidation of volcanic and oceanic precursors, while organic carbon comes from biomass burning, secondary plant sources and primary oceanic emissions. Comparison of model and proxy records will test model-simulated mechanisms while the model provides insight into factors contributing to proxy variability. The addition of potentially important forcing mechanisms will enable a more comprehensive

  8. Effect of food characteristics, storage conditions, and electron beam irradiation on active agent release from polyamide-coated LDPE films.

    PubMed

    Han, J; Castell-Perez, M E; Moreira, R G

    2008-03-01

    We investigated the effect of electron beam irradiation, storage conditions, and model food pH on the release characteristics of trans-cinnamaldehyde incorporated into polyamide-coated low-density polyethylene (LDPE) films. Active agent release rate on irradiated films (up to 20.0 kGy) decreased by 69% compared with the nonirradiated controls, from 0.252 to 0.086 microg/mL/h. Storage temperature (4, 21, and 35 degrees C) and pH (4, 7, and 10) of the food simulant solutions (10% aqueous ethanol) affected the release rate of trans-cinnamaldehyde. As expected, antimicrobial release rate decreased to 0.013 microg/mL/h at the refrigerated temperature (4 degrees C) compared to the higher temperatures (0.029 and 0.035 microg/mL/h at 21 and 35 degrees C). The fastest release rate occurred when exposed to the acidic food simulant solution (pH 4). In aqueous solution, trans-cinnamaldehyde was highly unstable to ionizing radiation, with loss in concentration from 24.50 to 1.36 microg/mL after exposure to 2.0 kGy. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) analysis revealed that exposure to ionizing radiation up to 10.0 kGy did not affect the structural conformation of LDPE/polyamide films and the trans-cinnamaldehyde in the films, though it induced changes in the functional group of trans-cinnamaldehyde when dose increased up to 20.0 kGy. Studies with a radiation-stable compound (naphthalene) showed that ionizing radiation induced the crosslinking in polymer networks of LDPE/polyamide film and caused slow and gradual release of the compound. This study demonstrated that irradiation serves as a controlling factor for release of active compounds, with potential applications in the development of antimicrobial packaging systems.

  9. Theoretical studies on the deacylation step of serine protease catalysis in the gas phase, in solution, and in elastase.

    PubMed

    Topf, Maya; Richards, W Graham

    2004-11-10

    The deacylation step of serine protease catalysis is studied using DFT and ab initio QM/MM calculations combined with MD/umbrella sampling calculations. Free energies of the entire reaction are calculated in the gas phase, in a continuum solvent, and in the enzyme elastase. The calculations show that a concerted mechanism in the gas phase is replaced by a stepwise mechanism when solvent effects or an acetate ion are added to the reference system, with the tetrahedral intermediate being a shallow minimum on the free energy surface. In the enzyme, the tetrahedral intermediate is a relatively stable species ( approximately 7 kcal/mol lower in energy than the transition state), mainly due to the electrostatic effects of the oxyanion hole and Asp102. It is formed in the first step of the reaction, as a result of a proton transfer from the nucleophilic water to His57 and of an attack of the remaining hydroxyl on the ester carbonyl. This is the rate-determining step of the reaction, which requires approximately 22 kcal/mol for activation, approximately 5 kcal/mol less than the reference reaction in water. In the second stage of the reaction, only small energy barriers are detected to facilitate the proton transfer from His57 to Ser195 and the breakdown of the tetrahedral intermediate. Those are attributed mainly to a movement of Ser195 and to a rotation of the His57 side chain. During the rotation, the imidazolium ion is stabilized by a strong H-bond with Asp102, and the C(epsilon)(1)-H...O H-bond with Ser214 is replaced by one with Thr213, suggesting that a "ring-flip mechanism" is not necessary as a driving force for the reaction. The movements of His57 and Ser195 are highly correlated with rearrangements of the binding site, suggesting that product release may be implicated in the deacylation process.

  10. Ion mobility-mass spectrometry and orthogonal gas-phase techniques to study amyloid formation and inhibition.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Waldemar; von Helden, Gert; Pagel, Kevin

    2017-03-23

    Amyloidogenic peptide oligomers are responsible for a variety of neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease. Due to their dynamic, polydisperse, and polymorphic nature, these oligomers are very challenging to characterize using traditional condensed-phase methods. In the last decade, ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IM-MS) and related gas-phase techniques have emerged as a powerful alternative to disentangle the structure and assembly characteristics of amyloid forming systems. This review highlights recent advances in which IM-MS was used to characterize amyloid oligomers and their underlying assembly pathway. In addition, we summarize recent studies in which IM-MS was used to size- and mass-select species for a further spectroscopic investigation and outline the potential of IM-MS as a tool for the screening of amyloid inhibitors.

  11. Coordinated coupling control of tethered space robot using releasing characteristics of space tether

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Panfeng; Zhang, Fan; Xu, Xiudong; Meng, Zhongjie; Liu, Zhengxiong; Hu, Yongxin

    2016-04-01

    Tethered space robot (TSR) is a new concept of space robot, which is released from the platform satellite, and retrieved via connected tether after space debris capture. In this paper, we propose a new coordinate control scheme for optimal trajectory and attitude tracking, and use releasing motor torque to instead the tension force, since it is difficult to track in practical. Firstly, the 6-DOF dynamics model of TSR is derived, in which the dynamics of tether releasing system is taken into account. Then, we propose and design the coordinated coupled controller, which is composed of a 6-DOF sliding mode controller and a PD controller tether's releasing. Thrust is treated as control input of the 6-DOF sliding mode controller to control the in-plane and out-of-plane angle of the tether and attitude angles of the TSR. The torque of releasing motor is used as input of PD controller, which controls the length rate of space tether. After the verification of the control scheme, finally, the simulation experiment is presented in order to validate the effectiveness of this control method. The results show that TSR can track the optimal approaching trajectory accurately. Simultaneously, the attitude angles can be changed to the desired attitude angles in control period, and the terminal accuracy is ±0.3°.

  12. Characteristics and kinetics of iron release from the ferritin under the EGCG reduction.

    PubMed

    Ji, Xuetao; Huang, Lin; Lin, Qing; Huang, Heqing

    2012-04-01

    The mechanism of iron release from ferritin in vivo is still unclear even though it represents a key step of the metabolism of iron in vivo. Here, both interaction intensity and binding stability between epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) from tea and liver ferritin of Dasyatis akajei (DALF) were investigated using UV-visible, fluorescence and circular dichroism (CD) spectrometry, respectively. The results indicated that EGCG could reduce the iron within the ferritin shell directly in the absence of chemical reducers such as Na(2)S(2)O(4), but this process was strictly pH-dependent, and the rate of iron release is faster at low pH than at high pH. The kinetic study of iron release showed that this process fitted the law of zero order reaction, which differed from that of first order reaction by various chemical reducers such as Vitamin C. In addition, Both fluorescence and CD spectrometry were further used to study the reduction mechanism of iron release in vitro, showing that there was a slight conformation change of the ferritin shell during EGCG reduction because of a complex formation of DALF-EGCG. It appears that chemical reducers with large molecular sizes reduce the iron across the protein shell by the way of an electron transfer pathway (ETP). A novel pathway for iron release from DALF with EGCG reduction is suggested to explain for a reductive route of iron metabolism by biological reducers in vivo.

  13. Numerical Computation of Flame Spread over a Thin Solid in Forced Concurrent Flow with Gas-phase Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiang, Ching-Biau; T'ien, James S.

    1994-01-01

    Excerpts from a paper describing the numerical examination of concurrent-flow flame spread over a thin solid in purely forced flow with gas-phase radiation are presented. The computational model solves the two-dimensional, elliptic, steady, and laminar conservation equations for mass, momentum, energy, and chemical species. Gas-phase combustion is modeled via a one-step, second order finite rate Arrhenius reaction. Gas-phase radiation considering gray non-scattering medium is solved by a S-N discrete ordinates method. A simplified solid phase treatment assumes a zeroth order pyrolysis relation and includes radiative interaction between the surface and the gas phase.

  14. Preparation and Analysis of Type II Xerogel Films with Antifouling/Foul Release Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolova, Anastasiya

    In order to combat biofouling, xerogel coatings comprised of aminopropyl, fluorocarbon, and hydrocarbon silanes were prepared and tested for their antifouling/foul release properties against Ulva, Navicula, barnacles, and tubeworms. Many of the coatings showed settlement and removal of Ulva to be as good as or better than the poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMSE) standard. Barnacle removal assays showed excellent results for some coatings while others did not fair so well. The best foul release coatings for barnacles were comprised of aminopropyl/hydrocarbon- and fluorocarbon/hydrocarbon-modified silanes. For the majority of coatings tested, water wettability and surface energy did not play a role in the antifouling/ foul release properties of the coatings.

  15. Gamma-oryzanol-loaded calcium pectinate microparticles reinforced with chitosan: optimization and release characteristics.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji-Soo; Kim, Jong Soo; Lee, Hyeon Gyu

    2009-05-01

    Response surface methodology was used to optimize microparticle preparation conditions, including the ratio of pectin:gamma-oryzanol (OZ) (X(1)), agitation speed (X(2)), and the concentration of emulsifier (X(3)), for maximal entrapment efficiency (EE) of OZ-loaded Ca pectinate microparticles. The optimized values of X(1), X(2), and X(3) were found to be 2.72:5.28, 1143.5 rpm, and 2.61%, respectively. Experimental results obtained for the optimum formulation agreed favorably with the predicted results, indicating the usefulness of predicting models for EE. In order to evaluate the effect of chitosan-coating and blending on the release pattern of the entrapped OZ from microparticles, chitosan-coated and blended Ca pectinate microparticles were prepared. Release studies revealed that the chitosan treatments, especially the chitosan-coating, were effective in suppressing the release in both simulated gastric fluid (SGF) and intestinal fluid (SIF).

  16. New citrus rootstocks released by USDA 2001-2010: Field performance and nursery characteristics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Four new citrus rootstocks developed by USDA, ARS and released between 2001 and 2010 have gained considerable commercial popularity in Florida and have been used for propagation of more than 2 million trees over the last two years. Trends in commercial use of these rootstocks are discussed. Results ...

  17. SELECTIVE OXIDATION OF ALCOHOLS IN GAS PHASE USING LIGHT-ACTIVATED TITANIUM DIOXIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Selective oxidations of various primary and secondary alcohols were studied in a gas phase photochemical reactor using immobilized TiO2 catalyst. An annular photoreactor was used at 463K with an average contact time of 32sec. The system was found to be specifically suited for the...

  18. SPECIATION OF GAS-PHASE AND FINE PARTICLE EMISSIONS FROM BURNING OF FOLIAR FUELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Particle size distributions (10-1000 nm aerodynamic diameter), physical and chemical properties of fine particle matter (PM2.5) with aerodynamic diameter <2.5 micrometers, and gas-phase emissions from controlled open burning of assorted taxa were measured. Chemical speciation of ...

  19. GAS-PHASE OXIDATION PRODUCTS OF BIPHENYL AND POLYCHLORINATED BIPHENYLS (R825377)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Our laboratory recently measured the gas-phase reaction rate constants of
    polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) with the hydroxyl radical (OH) and concluded
    that OH reactions are the primary removal pathway of PCBs from the atmosphere.
    With the reaction system previousl...

  20. ANALYSIS OF A GAS-PHASE PARTITIONING TRACER TEST CONDUCTED THROUGH FRACTURED MEDIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The gas-phase partitioning tracer method was used to estimate non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL), water, and air saturations in the vadose zone at a chlorinated-solvent contaminated field site in Tucson, AZ. The tracer test was conducted in a fractured clay system that is the confin...

  1. Specific and reproducible gas sensors utilizing gas-phase chemical reaction on organic transistors.

    PubMed

    Zang, Yaping; Zhang, Fengjiao; Huang, Dazhen; Di, Chong-an; Meng, Qing; Gao, Xike; Zhu, Daoben

    2014-05-01

    Utilizing a textbook reaction on the surface of an organic active channel, achieves sensitive detection of HCl, NH3 and NO2, with good selectivity, excellent reproducibility, and satisfactory stability. These results reveal gas-phase reaction assisted detection as a unique and promising approach to construct practical applicable gas sensors with typical organic transistors.

  2. OH REACTION KINETICS OF GAS-PHASE A- AND G-HEXACHLOROCYCLOHEXANE AND HEXACHLOROBENZENE. (R825377)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rate constants for the gas-phase reactions of the hydroxyl
    radical (OH) with - and -hexachlorocyclohexane (-
    and DEMONSTRATION BULLETIN: GAS-PHASE CHEMICAL REDUCTION - ECO LOGIC INTERNATIONAL, INC.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The patented Eco Logic Process employs a gas-phase reduction reaction of hydrogen with organic and chlorinated organic compounds at elevated temperatures to convert aqueous and oily hazardous contaminants into a hydrocarbon-rich gas product. After passing through a scrubber, the ...

  3. Chemical studies of elements with Z ⩾ 104 in gas phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Türler, Andreas; Eichler, Robert; Yakushev, Alexander

    2015-12-01

    Chemical investigations of superheavy elements in the gas-phase, i.e. elements with Z ≥ 104, allow assessing the influence of relativistic effects on their chemical properties. Furthermore, for some superheavy elements and their compounds quite unique gas-phase chemical properties were predicted. The experimental verification of these properties yields supporting evidence for a firm assignment of the atomic number. Prominent examples are the high volatility observed for HsO4 or the very weak interaction of Cn with gold surfaces. The unique properties of HsO4 were exploited to discover the doubly-magic even-even nucleus 270Hs and the new isotope 271Hs. The combination of kinematic pre-separation and gas-phase chemistry allowed gaining access to a new class of relatively fragile compounds, the carbonyl complexes of elements Sg through Mt. A not yet resolved issue concerns the interaction of Fl with gold surfaces. While competing experiments agree on the fact that Fl is a volatile element, there are discrepancies concerning its adsorption on gold surfaces with respect to its daughter Cn. The elucidation of these and other questions amounts to the fascination that gas-phase chemical investigations exert on current research at the extreme limits of chemistry today.

  4. Multiple Multidentate Halogen Bonding in Solution, in the Solid State, and in the (Calculated) Gas Phase.

    PubMed

    Jungbauer, Stefan H; Schindler, Severin; Herdtweck, Eberhardt; Keller, Sandro; Huber, Stefan M

    2015-09-21

    The binding properties of neutral halogen-bond donors (XB donors) bearing two multidentate Lewis acidic motifs toward halides were investigated. Employing polyfluorinated and polyiodinated terphenyl and quaterphenyl derivatives as anion receptors, we obtained X-ray crystallographic data of the adducts of three structurally related XB donors with tetraalkylammonium chloride, bromide, and iodide. The stability of these XB complexes in solution was determined by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), and the results were compared to X-ray analyses as well as to calculated binding patterns in the gas phase. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations on the gas-phase complexes indicated that the experimentally observed distortion of the XB donors during multiple multidentate binding can be reproduced in 1:1 complexes with halides, whereas adducts with two halides show a symmetric binding pattern in the gas phase that is markedly different from the solid state structures. Overall, this study demonstrates the limitations in the transferability of binding data between solid state, solution, and gas phase in the study of complex multidentate XB donors.

  5. Generation of naphthoquinone radical anions by electrospray ionization: solution, gas-phase, and computational chemistry studies.

    PubMed

    Vessecchi, Ricardo; Naal, Zeki; Lopes, José N C; Galembeck, Sérgio E; Lopes, Norberto P

    2011-06-02

    Radical anions are present in several chemical processes, and understanding the reactivity of these species may be described by their thermodynamic properties. Over the last years, the formation of radical ions in the gas phase has been an important issue concerning electrospray ionization mass spectrometry studies. In this work, we report on the generation of radical anions of quinonoid compounds (Q) by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. The balance between radical anion formation and the deprotonated molecule is also analyzed by influence of the experimental parameters (gas-phase acidity, electron affinity, and reduction potential) and solvent system employed. The gas-phase parameters for formation of radical species and deprotonated species were achieved on the basis of computational thermochemistry. The solution effects on the formation of radical anion (Q(•-)) and dianion (Q(2-)) were evaluated on the basis of cyclic voltammetry analysis and the reduction potentials compared with calculated electron affinities. The occurrence of unexpected ions [Q+15](-) was described as being a reaction between the solvent system and the radical anion, Q(•-). The gas-phase chemistry of the electrosprayed radical anions was obtained by collisional-induced dissociation and compared to the relative energy calculations. These results are important for understanding the formation and reactivity of radical anions and to establish their correlation with the reducing properties by electrospray ionization analyses.

  6. Regio-Selective Intramolecular Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange in Gas-Phase Electron Transfer Dissociation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamuro, Yoshitomo

    2017-02-01

    Protein backbone amide hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) typically utilizes enzymatic digestion after the exchange reaction and before MS analysis to improve data resolution. Gas-phase fragmentation of a peptic fragment prior to MS analysis is a promising technique to further increase the resolution. The biggest technical challenge for this method is elimination of intramolecular hydrogen/deuterium exchange (scrambling) in the gas phase. The scrambling obscures the location of deuterium. Jørgensen's group pioneered a method to minimize the scrambling in gas-phase electron capture/transfer dissociation. Despite active investigation, the mechanism of hydrogen scrambling is not well-understood. The difficulty stems from the fact that the degree of hydrogen scrambling depends on instruments, various parameters of mass analysis, and peptide analyzed. In most hydrogen scrambling investigations, the hydrogen scrambling is measured by the percentage of scrambling in a whole molecule. This paper demonstrates that the degree of intramolecular hydrogen/deuterium exchange depends on the nature of exchangeable hydrogen sites. The deuterium on Tyr amide of neurotensin (9-13), Arg-Pro-Tyr-Ile-Leu, migrated significantly faster than that on Ile or Leu amides, indicating the loss of deuterium from the original sites is not mere randomization of hydrogen and deuterium but more site-specific phenomena. This more precise approach may help understand the mechanism of intramolecular hydrogen exchange and provide higher confidence for the parameter optimization to eliminate intramolecular hydrogen/deuterium exchange during gas-phase fragmentation.

  7. Methylation of 2-Naphthol Using Dimethyl Carbonate under Continuous-Flow Gas-Phase Conditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tundo, Pietro; Rosamilia, Anthony E.; Arico, Fabio

    2010-01-01

    This experiment investigates the methylation of 2-naphthol with dimethyl carbonate. The volatility of the substrates, products, and co-products allows the reaction to be performed using a continuous-flow gas-phase setup at ambient pressure. The reaction uses catalytic quantities of base, achieves high conversion, produces little waste, and…

  8. Bond-Specific Dissociation Following Excitation Energy Transfer for Distance Constraint Determination in the Gas Phase

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Herein, we report chemistry that enables excitation energy transfer (EET) to be accurately measured via action spectroscopy on gaseous ions in an ion trap. It is demonstrated that EET between tryptophan or tyrosine and a disulfide bond leads to excited state, homolytic fragmentation of the disulfide bond. This phenomenon exhibits a tight distance dependence, which is consistent with Dexter exchange transfer. The extent of fragmentation of the disulfide bond can be used to determine the distance between the chromophore and disulfide bond. The chemistry is well suited for the examination of protein structure in the gas phase because native amino acids can serve as the donor/acceptor moieties. Furthermore, both tyrosine and tryptophan exhibit unique action spectra, meaning that the identity of the donating chromophore can be easily determined in addition to the distance between donor/acceptor. Application of the method to the Trpcage miniprotein reveals distance constraints that are consistent with a native-like fold for the +2 charge state in the gas phase. This structure is stabilized by several salt bridges, which have also been observed to be important previously in proteins that retain native-like structures in the gas phase. The ability of this method to measure specific distance constraints, potentially at numerous positions if combined with site-directed mutagenesis, significantly enhances our ability to examine protein structure in the gas phase. PMID:25174489

  9. Bond-specific dissociation following excitation energy transfer for distance constraint determination in the gas phase.

    PubMed

    Hendricks, Nathan G; Lareau, Nichole M; Stow, Sarah M; McLean, John A; Julian, Ryan R

    2014-09-24

    Herein, we report chemistry that enables excitation energy transfer (EET) to be accurately measured via action spectroscopy on gaseous ions in an ion trap. It is demonstrated that EET between tryptophan or tyrosine and a disulfide bond leads to excited state, homolytic fragmentation of the disulfide bond. This phenomenon exhibits a tight distance dependence, which is consistent with Dexter exchange transfer. The extent of fragmentation of the disulfide bond can be used to determine the distance between the chromophore and disulfide bond. The chemistry is well suited for the examination of protein structure in the gas phase because native amino acids can serve as the donor/acceptor moieties. Furthermore, both tyrosine and tryptophan exhibit unique action spectra, meaning that the identity of the donating chromophore can be easily determined in addition to the distance between donor/acceptor. Application of the method to the Trpcage miniprotein reveals distance constraints that are consistent with a native-like fold for the +2 charge state in the gas phase. This structure is stabilized by several salt bridges, which have also been observed to be important previously in proteins that retain native-like structures in the gas phase. The ability of this method to measure specific distance constraints, potentially at numerous positions if combined with site-directed mutagenesis, significantly enhances our ability to examine protein structure in the gas phase.

  10. ECO LOGIC INTERNATIONAL GAS-PHASE CHEMICAL REDUCTION PROCESS - THE THERMAL DESORPTION UNIT - APPLICATIONS ANALYSIS REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    ELI ECO Logic International, Inc.'s Thermal Desorption Unit (TDU) is specifically designed for use with Eco Logic's Gas Phase Chemical Reduction Process. The technology uses an externally heated bath of molten tin in a hydrogen atmosphere to desorb hazardous organic compounds fro...

  11. Molecular recognition properties of tartrates and metal-tartrates in solution and gas phase.

    PubMed

    Wijeratne, Aruna B; Schug, Kevin A

    2009-05-01

    Solution phase and gas phase chiral molecular recognition properties of tartrates (salts or esters of tartaric acid) and metal tartrates (binuclear tartrato(4-)-metal-bridged complexes) are reviewed in conjunction with their applications in enantiomeric separation science and their mass spectrometric chiral discrimination properties.

  12. Dominant factors controlling concentrations of aldehydes in rain, fog, dew water, and in the gas phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Kiyoshi; Kawai, Shunji; Igawa, Manabu

    Low-molecular weight aldehyde compounds in rain, fog, dew water, and in the gas phase were measured at urban and suburban mountain sites, to characterize the chemical composition of aldehydes in liquid droplets and in the gas phase in the ambient atmosphere, and discuss the factors controlling wet removal processes of aldehydes. Higher concentrations of total aldehydes were found in dew water than in rain and fog water due to the small amount of water volume. Both formaldehyde and acetaldehyde were detected as dominant aldehydes in the gas phase. Secondary formation processes are dominant sources for both aldehydes in the suburban site, whereas primary sources are relatively important for the urban atmosphere. In rainwater, by contrast, formaldehyde was the most abundant aldehyde, followed by glyoxal. Glyoxal was detected as the most dominant aldehyde in fog and dew water. Acetaldehyde was not detected as a main component in liquid droplets in spite of its abundance in the gas phase. Water solubility of each aldehyde compound and dilution effect by water are critical factors that control the compositions and concentrations of these aldehydes in ambient liquid droplets.

  13. Physiological characteristics and related gene expression of after-ripening on seed dormancy release in rice.

    PubMed

    Du, W; Cheng, J; Cheng, Y; Wang, L; He, Y; Wang, Z; Zhang, H

    2015-11-01

    After-ripening is a common method used for dormancy release in rice. In this study, the rice variety Jiucaiqing (Oryza sativa L. subsp. japonica) was used to determine dormancy release following different after-ripening times (1, 2 and 3 months). Germination speed, germination percentage and seedling emergence increased with after-ripening; more than 95% germination and 85% seedling emergence were observed following 1 month of after-ripening within 10 days of imbibition, compared with <45% germination and 20% seedling emergence in freshly harvested seed. Hence, 3 months of after-ripening could be considered a suitable treatment period for rice dormancy release. Dormancy release by after-ripening is mainly correlated with a rapid decline in ABA content and increase in IAA content during imbibition. Subsequently, GA(1)/ABA, GA(7)/ABA, GA(12)/ABA, GA(20)/ABA and IAA/ABA ratios significantly increased, while GA(3)/ABA, GA(4)/ABA and GAs/IAA ratio significantly decreased in imbibed seeds following 3 months of after-ripening, thereby altering α-amylase activity during seed germination. Peak α-amylase activity occurred at an earlier germination stage in after-ripened seeds than in freshly harvested seeds. Expression of ABA, GA and IAA metabolism genes and dormancy-related genes was regulated by after-ripening time upon imbibition. Expression of OsCYP707A5, OsGA2ox1, OsGA2ox2, OsGA2ox3, OsILR1, OsGH3-2, qLTG3-1 and OsVP1 increased, while expression of Sdr4 decreased in imbibed seeds following 3 months of after-ripening. Dormancy release through after-ripening might be involved in weakening tissues covering the embryo via qLTG3-1 and decreased ABA signalling and sensitivity via Sdr4 and OsVP1.

  14. Comparison of different gas-phase mechanisms and aerosol modules for simulating particulate matter formation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Youngseob; Couvidat, Florian; Sartelet, Karine; Seigneur, Christian

    2011-11-01

    The effects of two gas-phase chemical kinetic mechanisms, Regional Atmospheric Chemistry Mechanism version 2 (RACM2) and Carbon-Bond 05 (CB05), and two secondary organic aerosol (SOA) modules, the Secondary Organic Aerosoi Model (SORGAM) and AER/EPRI/Caltech model (AEC), on fine (aerodynamic diameter < or =2.5 microm) particulate matter (PM2.5) formation is studied. The major sources of uncertainty in the chemistry of SOA formation are investigated. The use of all major SOA precursors and the treatment of SOA oligomerization are found to be the most important factors for SOA formation, leading to 66% and 60% more SOA, respectively. The explicit representation of high-NO, and low-NOx gas-phase chemical regimes is also important with increases in SOA of 30-120% depending on the approach used to implement the distinct SOA yields within the gas-phase chemical kinetic mechanism; further work is needed to develop gas-phase mechanisms that are fully compatible with SOA formation algorithms. The treatment of isoprene SOA as hydrophobic or hydrophilic leads to a significant difference, with more SOA being formed in the latter case. The activity coefficients may also be a major source of uncertainty, as they may differ significantly between atmospheric particles, which contain a myriad of SOA, primary organic aerosol (POA), and inorganic aerosol species, and particles formed in a smog chamber from a single precursor under dry conditions. Significant interactions exist between the uncertainties of the gas-phase chemistry and those of the SOA module.

  15. Influence of magnesium aluminium silicate on rheological, release and permeation characteristics of diclofenac sodium aqueous gels in-vitro.

    PubMed

    Pongjanyakul, Thaned; Priprem, Aroonsri; Puttipipatkhachorn, Satit

    2005-04-01

    The effect of magnesium aluminium silicate (MAS) on rheological, release and permeation characteristics of diclofenac sodium (DS) aqueous gels was investigated. DS aqueous gels were prepared using various gelling agents, such as 15% w/w poloxamer 407 (PM407), 1% w/w hydroxypropylmethylcellulose (HPMC), and 1% w/w high and low viscosity grades of sodium alginate (HV-SA and LV-SA, respectively). Different amounts of MAS (0.5, 1.0 and 1.5% w/w) were incorporated into the DS gels. Incorporation of MAS into the DS gels prepared using SA or PM407 caused a statistical increase in viscosity (P<0.05) and a shift from Newtonian flow to pseudoplastic flow with thixotropic property. The DS release rates of these composite gels were significantly decreased (P<0.05) when compared with the control gels. This was due to an interaction between MAS and PM407 or SA, and adsorption of DS onto MAS particles. Moreover, a longer lag time and no change in DS permeation flux were found when MAS was added to the gels. The findings suggest that the rheological characteristics of gels prepared using PM407 or SA could be improved by incorporating MAS. However, the use of MAS could retard the DS release and extend the lag time of DS permeation.

  16. Influence of excipients on characteristics and release profiles of poly(ε-caprolactone) microspheres containing immunoglobulin G.

    PubMed

    Erdemli, Özge; Keskin, Dilek; Tezcaner, Ayşen

    2015-03-01

    Protein instability during microencapsulation has been one of the major drawbacks of protein delivery systems. In this study, the effects of various excipients (poly vinyl alcohol, glucose, starch, heparin) on the stability of encapsulated human immunoglobulin G (IgG) in poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) microspheres and on microsphere characteristics were investigated before and after γ-sterilization. Microspheres formulated without any excipients and with glucose had a mean particle size around 3-4μm whereas the mean particle sizes of other microspheres were around 5-6μm. Use of PVA significantly increased the IgG-loading and encapsulation efficiency of microspheres. After γ-irradiation, IgG stability was mostly maintained in the microspheres with excipients compared to microspheres without any excipients. According to the μBCA results, microspheres without any excipient showed a high initial burst release as well as a fast release profile among all groups. Presence of PVA decreased the loss in the activity of IgG released before (completely retained after 6h and 15.69% loss after 7days) and after γ-irradiation (26.04% loss and 52.39% loss after 6h and 7days, respectively). The stabilization effect of PVA on the retention of the activity of released IgG was found more efficient compared to other groups formulated with carbohydrates.

  17. Intermolecular interactions of trifluorohalomethanes with Lewis bases in the gas phase: An ab initio study

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yi-Siang; Yin, Chih-Chien; Chao, Sheng D.

    2014-10-07

    We perform an ab initio computational study of molecular complexes with the general formula CF{sub 3}X—B that involve one trifluorohalomethane CF{sub 3}X (X = Cl or Br) and one of a series of Lewis bases B in the gas phase. The Lewis bases are so chosen that they provide a range of electron-donating abilities for comparison. Based on the characteristics of their electron pairs, we consider the Lewis bases with a single n-pair (NH{sub 3} and PH{sub 3}), two n-pairs (H{sub 2}O and H{sub 2}S), two n-pairs with an unsaturated bond (H{sub 2}CO and H{sub 2}CS), and a single π-pair (C{sub 2}H{sub 4}) and two π-pairs (C{sub 2}H{sub 2}). The aim is to systematically investigate the influence of the electron pair characteristics and the central atom substitution effects on the geometries and energetics of the formed complexes. The counterpoise-corrected supermolecule MP2 and coupled-cluster single double with perturbative triple [CCSD(T)] levels of theory have been employed, together with a series of basis sets up to aug-cc-pVTZ. The angular and radial configurations, the binding energies, and the electrostatic potentials of the stable complexes have been compared and discussed as the Lewis base varies. For those complexes where halogen bonding plays a significant role, the calculated geometries and energetics are consistent with the σ-hole model. Upon formation of stable complexes, the C–X bond lengths shorten, while the C–X vibrational frequencies increase, thus rendering blueshifting halogen bonds. The central atom substitution usually enlarges the intermolecular bond distances while it reduces the net charge transfers, thus weakening the bond strengths. The analysis based on the σ-hole model is grossly reliable but requires suitable modifications incorporating the central atom substitution effects, in particular, when interaction components other than electrostatic contributions are involved.

  18. Release characteristics of reattached barnacles to non-toxic silicone coatings.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jongsoo; Nyren-Erickson, Erin; Stafslien, Shane; Daniels, Justin; Bahr, James; Chisholm, Bret J

    2008-01-01

    Release mechanisms of barnacles (Amphibalanus amphitrite or Balanus amphitrite) reattached to platinum-cured silicone coatings were studied as a function of coating thickness (210-770 microm), elastic modulus (0.08-1.3 MPa), and shear rate (2-22 microm s(-1)). It was found that the shear stress of the reattached, live barnacles necessary to remove from the silicone coatings was controlled by the combined term (E/t)(0.5) of the elastic modulus (E) and thickness (t). As the ratio of the elastic modulus to coating thickness decreased, the barnacles were more readily removed from the silicone coatings, showing a similar release behavior to pseudobarnacles (epoxy glue). The barnacle mean shear stress ranged from 0.017 to 0.055 MPa whereas the pseudobarnacle mean shear stress ranged from 0.022 to 0.095 MPa.

  19. Surface elastic modulus of barnacle adhesive and release characteristics from silicone surfaces.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yujie; Guo, Senli; Walker, Gilbert C; Kavanagh, Christopher J; Swain, Geoffrey W

    2004-12-01

    The properties of barnacle adhesive on silicone surfaces were studied by AFM indentation, imaging, and other tests and compared to the barnacle shear adhesion strength. A multilayered structure of barnacle adhesive plaque is proposed based on layered modulus regions measured by AFM indentation. The fracture of barnacles from PDMS surfaces was found to include both interfacial and cohesive failure of barnacle adhesive plaque, as determined by protein staining of the substratum after forced barnacle release from the substrate. Data for freshly released barnacles showed that there was a strong correlation between the mean Young's modulus of the outermost (softest) adhesive layer (E<0.3 MPa) and the shear strength of adhesion, but no correlation for other higher modulus regions. Linear, quadratic, and Griffith's failure criterion (based on rough estimate of crack length) regressions were used in the fit, and showed significance.

  1. [Spectral characteristics of dissolved organic matter released during the metabolic process of small medusa].

    PubMed

    Guo, Dong-Hui; Yi, Yue-Yuan; Zhao, Lei; Guo, Wei-Dong

    2012-06-01

    The metabolic processes of jellyfish can produce dissolved organic matter (DOM) which will influence the functioning of the aquatic ecosystems, yet the optical properties of DOM released by jellyfish are unknown. Here we report the absorption and fluorescence properties of DOM released by a medusa species Black fordia virginica during a 24 h incubation experiment. Compared with the control group, an obvious increase in the concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), absorption coefficient (a280) and total dissolved nitrogen (TDN) was observed in incubation group. This clearly demonstrated the release of DOM, chromophoric DOM (CDOM) and dissolved nutrients by B. virginica which feed on enough of Artemia sp. before the experiment. The increase in spectral slope ratio (SR) and decrease in humification index (HIX) indicated that the released DOM was less-humified and had relatively lower molecular weight. Parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) decomposed the fluorescence matrices of DOM into three humic-like components (C1-C3) and one protein-like component (C4). The Fmax of two components (C2: < 250, 295/386 nm; C4: 275/334 nm) with the emission wavelength < 400 nm increased significantly during the metabolic process of B. virginica. However, the Fmax of the other two components with the emission wavelength > 400 nm showed little changes. Thus, we suggested a zooplankton index (ZIX) to trace and characterize the DOM excreted by metabolic activity of zooplankton, which is calculated as the ratio of the sum of Fmax of all fluorescence components with the emission wavelength < 400 nm to the sum of Fmax of the other components with the emission wavelength > 400 nm.

  2. Phosphorus release rates from sediments and pollutant characteristics in Han River, Seoul, Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Lee-Hyung; Choi, Euiso; Gil, Kyung-Ik; Stenstrom, Michael K

    2004-04-05

    The Han River is 469.7-km long and drains a 26219-km(2) watershed. The sediments in the river are highly polluted due to inputs from upstream tributaries as well as partially treated municipal wastewaters that are discharged to the river. The water quality and strategy for control are important because the river is the primary drinking water supply for the City of Seoul, as well as being a major source for irrigation and industrial water. The Jamsil submerged dam partitions the river to isolate an upstream area for drinking water, but also captures sediments. Samples from four sites were studied to determine sediment pollutant concentrations and phosphorus release rates. Phosphorus tends to desorb from sediments when the concentration of overlying water is less than 1.4 mg/l. Water column P concentrations range from 0.04 to 0.1 mg/l, which suggests that sediments will act as a P source. In a series of batch experiments, P was released at approximately 15-20 mg/m(2)week in the winter (1-5 degrees C) and as much as 90 mg/m(2)week in the summer (20-24 degrees C), and is also a function of pH and dissolved oxygen concentration. The sediment total phosphorus concentration, which averages 833 mg/kg, is evenly distributed among non-apatite-P (33%), apatite-P (32%) and residual-P (34%). An equilibrium model is proposed to describe release rate.

  3. Quantitative measurements of vaporization, burst ionization, and emission characteristics of shaped charge barium releases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoch, Edward L.; Hallinan, Thomas J.; Stenbaek-Nielsen, Hans C.

    1994-01-01

    Intensity-calibrated color video recordings of three barium-shaped charge injections in the ionopshere were used to determine the initial ionization, the column density corresponding to unity optical depth, and the yield of vaporized barium in the fast jet. It was found that the initial ionization at the burst was less than 1% and that 0% burst ionization was consistent with the observations. Owing to the Doppler shift, the column density for optical thickness in the neutral barium varies somewhat according to the velocity distribution. For the cases examined here, the column density was 2-5 x 10(exp 10) atoms/sq cm. This value, which occurred 12 to 15 s after release, should be approximately valid for most shaped charge experiments. The yield was near 30% (15% in the fast jet) for two of the releases and was somewhat lower in the third, which also had a lower peak velocity. This study also demonstrated the applicability of the computer simulation code developed for chemical releases by Stenbaek-Nielsen and provided experimental verification of the Doppler-corrected emission rates calculated b Stenbaek-Nielsen (1989).

  4. Organic contaminant release from melting snow. 2. Influence of snow pack and melt characteristics.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Torsten; Lei, Ying Duan; Muradi, Ibrahim; Wania, Frank

    2009-02-01

    Large reservoirs of organic contaminants in seasonal snowpack can be released in short pulses during spring snowmelt, potentially impacting the receiving ecosystems. Laboratory experiments using artificial snow spiked with organic target substances were conducted to investigate the behavior of six organic contaminants with widely variable distribution properties in melting snow. Whereas the influence of a chemical's equilibrium phase partitioning on the elution behavior is explored in a companion paper, we discuss here the impact of snow properties and melt features, including the snowpack depth, the temperature at the interface between soil and snow, the meltwater content the internal ice surface area, and the existence of distinct snow layers. Water-soluble organic substances are released in high concentrations at the beginning of a melt period when a deep and aged snowpack undergoes intense melting. Warm ground can cause notable melting at the snow bottom leading to a delayed and dampened concentration peak. Hydraulic barriers in layered snow packs cause preferential meltwater flow which also mitigates the early contaminant flush. Hydrophobic organic pollutants that are associated with particles accumulate near the snow surface and are released at the end of melting. Dirt cones at the surface of a dense snowpack enhance this enrichment. The findings of this laboratory study will aid in the understanding of the behavior of organic pollutants during the melting of more complex, natural snow covers.

  5. Thermokarst dynamics and soil organic matter characteristics controlling initial carbon release from permafrost soils in the Siberian Yedoma region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Niels; Blok, Daan; Elberling, Bo; Hugelius, Gustaf; Jørgensen, Christian Juncher; Siewert, Matthias Benjamin; Kuhry, Peter

    2016-07-01

    This study relates soil organic matter (SOM) characteristics to initial soil incubation carbon release from upper permafrost samples in Yedoma region soils of northeastern Siberia, Russia. Carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) content, carbon to nitrogen ratios (C:N), δ13C and δ15N values show clear trends that correspond with SOM age and degree of decomposition. Incubation results indicate that older and more decomposed soil material shows higher C respiration rates per unit incubated C than younger and less decomposed samples with higher C content. This is important as undecomposed material is often assumed to be more reactive upon thawing. Large stocks of SOM and their potential decomposability, in combination with complex landscape dynamics that include one or more events of Holocene thaw in most of the landscape, are of consequence for potential greenhouse gas release from permafrost soils in the Yedoma region.

  6. Laser-ablated nanofunctional polymers for the formulation of slow-release powders for dry powder inhalers: physicochemical characterization and slow-release characteristics.

    PubMed

    Coowanitwong, Intira; Arya, Vikram; Patel, Gina; Kim, Won-Seok; Craciun, Valentin; Rocca, James R; Singh, Rajiv; Hochhaus, Günther

    2007-11-01

    Recently, dry powder inhalation (DPI) powders coated with nanometre-thin layers of biodegradable polymers, prepared using pulse laser deposition (PLD), have been evaluated as a slow-release formulation for DPI use, with the goal of improving pulmonary selectivity. This paper describes evaluation of the chemical stability of one potential polymer, poly lactic acid (PLA), during the ablation process, the resulting respirable properties and potential cytotoxicity of coated glucocorticoid powders, and the resulting sustained-release characteristics of PLA-coated glucocorticoids creating using PLD. Triamcinolone acetonide (TA) and budesonide (BUD) were used as two model glucocorticoids to determine pulmonary targeting (PT) in-vivo. The chemical stability of PLA was determined at various laser energy densities. The respirable fraction and the cytotoxicity of the micronized particles of TA and BUD, coated using optimum laser energy density, were determined. In-vitro dissolution profiles were generated for the coated/uncoated formulations and an ex-vivo receptor binding assay was used to determine PT in rats. Increasing laser energy density led to decreases in molecular weight and film density, and increases in degradation products, roughness and thickness of the film. The mean dissolution time of coated formulations of BUD was longer (4 h) than with the less lipophilic TA (2 h). This correlated well with a more pronounced pulmonary selectivity observed for coated BUD ex-vivo. Stability and the physical properties of the film correlated with the laser energy density. We observed a direct relationship between the dissolution rate of the uncoated and coated formulation and the degree of PT; however, physiochemical properties of the drug (e.g. lipophilicity) may also contribute to the improved PT.

  7. The role of gas phase reactions in the deflagration-to-detonation transition of high energy propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boggs, T. L.; Price, C. F.; Atwood, A. I.; Zurn, D. E.; Eisel, J. L.; Derr, R. L.

    1980-01-01

    The inadequacies of the two commonly used assumptions are shown, along with the need for considering gas phase reactions. Kinetic parameters that describe the gas phase reactions for several ingredients are provided, and the first steps in convective combustion leading to deflagration to detonation transition are described.

  8. Comprehensive Gas-Phase Peptide Ion Structure Studies Using Ion Mobility Techniques: Part 2. Gas-Phase Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange for Ion Population Estimation.

    PubMed

    Khakinejad, Mahdiar; Ghassabi Kondalaji, Samaneh; Tafreshian, Amirmahdi; Valentine, Stephen J

    2017-03-17

    Gas-phase hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) using D2O reagent and collision cross-section (CCS) measurements are utilized to monitor the ion conformers of the model peptide acetyl-PAAAAKAAAAKAAAAKAAAAK. The measurements are carried out on a home-built ion mobility instrument coupled to a linear ion trap mass spectrometer containing electron transfer dissociation (ETD) capabilities. ETD is utilized to obtain per-residue deuterium uptake data for select ion conformers, and a new algorithm is presented for interpreting the HDX data. Using molecular dynamics (MD) production data and a hydrogen accessibility scoring (HAS)-number of effective collisions (NEC) model, hypothetical HDX behavior is attributed to various in-silico candidate (CCS match) structures. The HAS-NEC model is applied to all candidate structures, and non-negative linear regression is employed to determine structure contributions resulting in the best match to deuterium uptake. The accuracy of the HAS-NEC model is tested with the comparison of predicted and experimental isotopic envelopes for several of the observed c-ions. It is proposed that gas-phase HDX can be utilized effectively as a second criterion (after CCS matching) for filtering suitable MD candidate structures. In this study, the second step of structure elucidation, 13 nominal structures were selected (from a pool of 300 candidate structures) and each with a population contribution proposed for these ions. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  9. Comprehensive Gas-Phase Peptide Ion Structure Studies Using Ion Mobility Techniques: Part 2. Gas-Phase Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange for Ion Population Estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khakinejad, Mahdiar; Ghassabi Kondalaji, Samaneh; Tafreshian, Amirmahdi; Valentine, Stephen J.

    2017-03-01

    Gas-phase hydrogen/deuterium exchange (HDX) using D2O reagent and collision cross-section (CCS) measurements are utilized to monitor the ion conformers of the model peptide acetyl-PAAAAKAAAAKAAAAKAAAAK. The measurements are carried out on a home-built ion mobility instrument coupled to a linear ion trap mass spectrometer containing electron transfer dissociation (ETD) capabilities. ETD is utilized to obtain per-residue deuterium uptake data for select ion conformers, and a new algorithm is presented for interpreting the HDX data. Using molecular dynamics (MD) production data and a hydrogen accessibility scoring (HAS)-number of effective collisions (NEC) model, hypothetical HDX behavior is attributed to various in-silico candidate (CCS match) structures. The HAS-NEC model is applied to all candidate structures, and non-negative linear regression is employed to determine structure contributions resulting in the best match to deuterium uptake. The accuracy of the HAS-NEC model is tested with the comparison of predicted and experimental isotopic envelopes for several of the observed c-ions. It is proposed that gas-phase HDX can be utilized effectively as a second criterion (after CCS matching) for filtering suitable MD candidate structures. In this study, the second step of structure elucidation, 13 nominal structures were selected (from a pool of 300 candidate structures) and each with a population contribution proposed for these ions.

  10. Bone regenerating effect of surface-functionalized titanium implants with sustained-release characteristics of strontium in ovariectomized rats

    PubMed Central

    Offermanns, Vincent; Andersen, Ole Zoffmann; Riede, Gregor; Andersen, Inge Hald; Almtoft, Klaus Pagh; Sørensen, Søren; Sillassen, Michael; Jeppesen, Christian Sloth; Rasse, Michael; Foss, Morten; Kloss, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Since strontium (Sr) is known for its anabolic and anticatabolic effect on bone, research has been focused on its potential impact on osseointegration. The objective of this study was to investigate the performance of nanotopographic implants with a Sr-functionalized titanium (Ti) coating (Ti–Sr–O) with respect to osseointegration in osteoporotic bone. The trial was designed to examine the effect of sustained-release characteristics of Sr in poor-quality bone. Three Ti–Sr–O groups, which differed from each other in coating thickness, Sr contents, and Sr release, were examined. These were prepared by a magnetron sputtering process and compared to uncoated grade 4 Ti. Composition, morphology, and mechanical stability of the coatings were analyzed, and Sr release data were gained from in vitro washout experiments. In vivo investigation was carried out in an osteoporotic rat model and analyzed histologically, 6 weeks and 12 weeks after implantation. Median values of bone-to-implant contact and new bone formation after 6 weeks were found to be 84.7% and 54.9% (best performing Sr group) as compared to 65.2% and 23.8% (grade 4 Ti reference), respectively. The 12-week observation period revealed 84.3% and 56.5% (best performing Sr group) and 81.3% and 39.4% (grade 4 Ti reference), respectively, for the same measurements. The increase in new bone formation was found to correlate with the amount of Sr released in vitro. The results indicate that sputtered nanostructured Ti–Sr–O coatings showed sustained release of Sr and accelerate osseointegration even in poor-quality bone, and thus, may have impact on practical applications for medical implants. PMID:27313456

  11. Application of terahertz pulsed imaging to analyse film coating characteristics of sustained-release coated pellets.

    PubMed

    Haaser, M; Karrout, Y; Velghe, C; Cuppok, Y; Gordon, K C; Pepper, M; Siepmann, J; Rades, T; Taday, P F; Strachan, C J

    2013-12-05

    Terahertz pulsed imaging (TPI) was employed to explore its suitability for detecting differences in the film coating thickness and drug layer uniformity of multilayered, sustained-release coated, standard size pellets (approximately 1mm in diameter). Pellets consisting of a sugar starter core and a metoprolol succinate layer were coated with a Kollicoat(®) SR:Kollicoat(®) IR polymer blend for different times giving three groups of pellets (batches I, II and III), each with a different coating thickness according to weight gain. Ten pellets from each batch were mapped individually to evaluate the coating thickness and drug layer thickness between batches, between pellets within each batch, and across individual pellets (uniformity). From the terahertz waveform the terahertz electric field peak strength (TEFPS) was used to define a circular area (approximately 0.13 mm(2)) in the TPI maps, where no signal distortion was found due to pellet curvature in the measurement set-up used. The average coating thicknesses were 46 μm, 71 μm and 114 μm, for batches I, II and III respectively, whilst no drug layer thickness difference between batches was observed. No statistically significant differences in the average coating thickness and drug layer thickness within batches (between pellets) but high thickness variability across individual pellets was observed. These results were confirmed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The coating thickness results correlated with the subsequent drug release behaviour. The fastest drug release was obtained from batch I with the lowest coating thickness and the slowest from batch III with the highest coating thickness. In conclusion, TPI is suitable for detailed, non-destructive evaluation of film coating and drug layer thicknesses in multilayered standard size pellets.

  12. Gas-phase chemistry in dense interstellar clouds including grain surface molecular depletion and desorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergin, E. A.; Langer, W. D.; Goldsmith, P. F.

    1995-01-01

    We present time-dependent models of the chemical evolution of molecular clouds which include depletion of atoms and molecules onto grain surfaces and desorption, as well as gas-phase interactions. We have included three mechanisms to remove species from the grain mantles: thermal evaporation, cosmic-ray-induced heating, and photodesorption. A wide range of parameter space has been explored to examine the abundance of species present both on the grain mantles and in the gas phase as a function of both position in the cloud (visual extinction) and of evolutionary state (time). The dominant mechanism that removes molecules from the grain mantles is cosmic-ray desorption. At times greater than the depletion timescale, the abundances of some simple species agree with abundances observed in the cold dark cloud TMC-1. Even though cosmic-ray desorption preserves the gas-phase chemistry at late times, molecules do show significant depletions from the gas phase. Examination of the dependence of depletion as a function of density shows that when the density increases from 10(exp 3)/cc to 10(exp 5)/cc several species including HCO(+), HCN, and CN show gas-phase abundance reductions of over an order of magnitude. The CO: H2O ratio in the grain mantles for our standard model is on the order of 10:1, in reasonable agreement with observations of nonpolar CO ice features in rho Ophiuchus and Serpens. We have also examined the interdependence of CO depletion with the space density of molecular hydrogen and binding energy to the grain surface. We find that the observed depletion of CO in Taurus in inconsistent with CO bonding in an H2O rich mantle, in agreement with observations. We suggest that if interstellar grains consist of an outer layer of CO ice, then the binding energies for many species to the grain mantle may be lower than commonly used, and a significant portion of molecular material may be maintained in the gas phase.

  13. Determination of gas phase protein ion densities via ion mobility analysis with charge reduction.

    PubMed

    Maisser, Anne; Premnath, Vinay; Ghosh, Abhimanyu; Nguyen, Tuan Anh; Attoui, Michel; Hogan, Christopher J

    2011-12-28

    We use a charge reduction electrospray (ESI) source and subsequent ion mobility analysis with a differential mobility analyzer (DMA, with detection via both a Faraday cage electrometer and a condensation particle counter) to infer the densities of single and multiprotein ions of cytochrome C, lysozyme, myoglobin, ovalbumin, and bovine serum albumin produced from non-denaturing (20 mM aqueous ammonium acetate) and denaturing (1 : 49.5 : 49.5, formic acid : methanol : water) ESI. Charge reduction is achieved through use of a Po-210 radioactive source, which generates roughly equal concentrations of positive and negative ions. Ions produced by the source collide with and reduce the charge on ESI generated drops, preventing Coulombic fissions, and unlike typical protein ESI, leading to gas-phase protein ions with +1 to +3 excess charges. Therefore, charge reduction serves to effectively mitigate any role that Coulombic stretching may play on the structure of the gas phase ions. Density inference is made via determination of the mobility diameter, and correspondingly the spherical equivalent protein volume. Through this approach it is found that for both non-denaturing and denaturing ESI-generated ions, gas-phase protein ions are relatively compact, with average densities of 0.97 g cm(-3) and 0.86 g cm(-3), respectively. Ions from non-denaturing ESI are found to be slightly more compact than predicted from the protein crystal structures, suggesting that low charge state protein ions in the gas phase are slightly denser than their solution conformations. While a slight difference is detected between the ions produced with non-denaturing and denaturing ESI, the denatured ions are found to be much more dense than those examined previously by drift tube mobility analysis, in which charge reduction was not employed. This indicates that Coulombic stretching is typically what leads to non-compact ions in the gas-phase, and suggests that for gas phase

  14. Synthesis of aspirin-loaded polymer-silica composites and their release characteristics.

    PubMed

    Kierys, Agnieszka

    2014-08-27

    This study describes a novel approach to the synthesis of polymer-drug-silica nanocomposites via encapsulation/isolation of drug molecules, introduced into the polymer matrix by the silica gel. For the first time, tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) gelation in the vapor phase of the acidic catalyst is presented as an efficient method to enter the silica gel nanoparticles into the polymer-aspirin conjugate. The conducted studies reveal that the internal structure of the polymer carrier is significantly reorganized after the embedding of aspirin molecules and the silica gel. The total porosity of the polymer-drug-silica nanocomposites and the molecular structure of the silica gel embedded in the system strongly depend on the conditions of the silica source transformation. Additionally, the release of the drug was fine-tuned by adapting the conditions of hydrolysis and condensation of the silica gel precursor. Finally, to prove the usefulness of the proposed synthesis, the controlled release of aspirin from the polymer-drug-silica nanocomposites is demonstrated.

  15. Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry Techniques for Measurements of Gas-Phase Ammonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowak, J. B.; Neuman, J. A.; Yoshida, K.; Ryerson, T. B.; Huey, L. G.; Tanner, D. J.; Sjostedt, S. J.; Hubler, G.; Fortin, T. J.; Sueper, D. J.; Fehsenfeld, F. C.

    2005-12-01

    Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry (CIMS) can be a highly selective technique with fast time response for measuring many atmospheric trace gases (e.g., hydroxyl radical (OH), sulfuric acid (H2SO4), nitric acid (HNO3)). CIMS is highly versatile and has been used under a wide variety of conditions with many different ion-molecule detection schemes, even for detecting the same molecule. Because of its high proton affinity (853.6 kJ/mol), ammonia (NH3) is another ideal candidate for detection by CIMS. NH3, the dominant gas-phase base in the atmosphere, is a precursor of ammonium nitrate and ammonium sulfates, compounds that are important constituents of airborne fine particulate matter that affect air quality. The characterization of three NH3 CIMS instruments: an atmospheric pressure ionization instrument and a low-pressure flow tube reactor instrument, both utilizing protonated ethanol cluster ion chemistry, and a different low-pressure flow tube reactor instrument using protonated acetone dimer ion chemistry, is presented here. Instrument performance is assessed using ambient data from both ground-based and airborne field programs to examine detection sensitivity, background signal, and time response. Laboratory characterization of different inlet materials is also presented. All three instruments used PFA Teflon sampling inlets. Instrumental backgrounds were determined by scrubbing NH3 from ambient air using silicon phosphates that release phosphoric acid when exposed to ambient levels of humidity. Standard addition calibrations were performed using NH3 permeation devices whose output was determined via 185nm optical absorption. Regardless of CIMS technique or ion chemistry used, the observed detection sensitivities were all adequate for detecting changes in NH3 at the 10 pptv level on a 1s timescale. The time responses, defined by a 1/e2 decay in the calibration signal, ranged from 5s to 45s for the different sampling inlet configurations and are rapid enough

  16. Drug-loaded electrospun mats of poly(vinyl alcohol) fibres and their release characteristics of four model drugs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taepaiboon, Pattama; Rungsardthong, Uracha; Supaphol, Pitt

    2006-05-01

    Mats of PVA nanofibres were successfully prepared by the electrospinning process and were developed as carriers of drugs for a transdermal drug delivery system. Four types of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug with varying water solubility property, i.e. sodium salicylate (freely soluble in water), diclofenac sodium (sparingly soluble in water), naproxen (NAP), and indomethacin (IND) (both insoluble in water), were selected as model drugs. The morphological appearance of the drug-loaded electrospun PVA mats depended on the nature of the model drugs. The 1H-nuclear magnetic resonance results confirmed that the electrospinning process did not affect the chemical integrity of the drugs. Thermal properties of the drug-loaded electrospun PVA mats were analysed by differential scanning calorimetry and thermogravimetric analysis. The molecular weight of the model drugs played a major role on both the rate and the total amount of drugs released from the as-prepared drug-loaded electrospun PVA mats, with the rate and the total amount of the drugs released decreasing with increasing molecular weight of the drugs. Lastly, the drug-loaded electrospun PVA mats exhibited much better release characteristics of the model drugs than drug-loaded as-cast films.

  17. Antibody Binding Alters the Characteristics and Contents of Extracellular Vesicles Released by Histoplasma capsulatum

    PubMed Central

    Nakayasu, Ernesto S.; Sobreira, Tiago J. P.; Choi, Hyungwon; Casadevall, Arturo; Nimrichter, Leonardo; Nosanchuk, Joshua D.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Histoplasma capsulatum produces extracellular vesicles containing virulence-associated molecules capable of modulating host machinery, benefiting the pathogen. Treatment of H. capsulatum cells with monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) can change the outcome of infection in mice. We evaluated the sizes, enzymatic contents, and proteomic profiles of the vesicles released by fungal cells treated with either protective MAb 6B7 (IgG1) or nonprotective MAb 7B6 (IgG2b), both of which bind H. capsulatum heat shock protein 60 (Hsp60). Our results showed that treatment with either MAb was associated with changes in size and vesicle loading. MAb treatments reduced vesicle phosphatase and catalase activities compared to those of vesicles from untreated controls. We identified 1,125 proteins in vesicles, and 250 of these manifested differences in abundance relative to that of proteins in vesicles isolated from yeast cells exposed to Hsp60-binding MAbs, indicating that surface binding of fungal cells by MAbs modified protein loading in the vesicles. The abundance of upregulated proteins in vesicles upon MAb 7B6 treatment was 44.8% of the protein quantities in vesicles from fungal cells treated with MAb 6B7. Analysis of orthologous proteins previously identified in vesicles from other fungi showed that different ascomycete fungi have similar proteins in their extracellular milieu, many of which are associated with virulence. Our results demonstrate that antibody binding can modulate fungal cell responses, resulting in differential loading of vesicles, which could alter fungal cell susceptibility to host defenses. This finding provides additional evidence that antibody binding modulates microbial physiology and suggests a new function for specific immunoglobulins through alterations of fungal secretion. IMPORTANCE Diverse fungal species release extracellular vesicles, indicating that this is a common pathway for the delivery of molecules to the extracellular space. However

  18. [Effects of controlled-release fertilizer on chrysanthemum leaf chlorophyll fluorescence characteristics and ornamental quality].

    PubMed

    Song, Xu-xu; Zheng, Cheng-shu; Sun, Xia; Ma, Hai-yan

    2011-07-01

    Taking cut flower chrysanthemum 'Baima' as test material, a pot experiment was conducted to study the effects of controlled-release fertilizer on the leaf chlorophyll fluorescence parameters, chlorophyll and nutrient contents, and ornamental quality of chrysanthemum. Under no fertilization, the maximal photochemical efficiency of PS II in dark (F(v)/F(m)), potential photochemical efficiency of PS II (F(v)/F(0)), and quantum yield of PS II electron transport (phi(PS II)) decreased significantly, compared with those under fertilization. With the application of conventional compound fertilizers CCFA (N:P:K=20:8:10) and CCFB (N:P:K= 14:14:14), the F(v)/F(m), F(v)/F(0) and phi(PS II) had a slight increase in early period (30-60 d) but a remarkable decrease in mid and later periods (75 - 120 d), compared with those under the application of controlled-release fertilizers CRFA (N:P:K = 20:8:10) and CRFB (N:P:K= 14:14:14). Under the application of CRFA, the F(v)/F(m), phi(PS II), and photochemical quenching (q(P)) had somewhat increase, as compared with the application of CRFB. The non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) under the application of CRFA and CRFB decreased significantly, compared with that under the application of CCFA and CCFB and the control. The chlorophyll content had a similar change trend with F(v)/F(m), F(v)/F(0), and phi(PS II). The leaf N, P, and K contents, flower stalk length and stalk diameter, flower diameter, and flower fresh and dry mass at harvest stage all increased under the application of CRFA and CRFB, compared with those under the application of CCFA and CCFB and the control, and the flower fresh and dry mass was significantly higher under the application of CRFA than of CRFB. This study showed that controlled-release fertilizer could improve the ornamental quality of chrysanthemum via improving the leaf chlorophyll content, photochemical transduction rate, and nutrient uptake, and CRFA had better effects than CRFB.

  19. Gas-phase reactivity of [Ca(formamide)](2+) complex: an example of different dynamical behaviours.

    PubMed

    Martin-Somer, Ana; Spezia, Riccardo; Yáñez, Manuel

    2017-04-28

    In the present contribution, we have summarized our recent work on the comprehension of [Ca(formamide)](2+) complex gas-phase unimolecular dissociation. By using different theoretical approaches, we were able to revise the original (and typical for such kind of problems) understanding given in terms of stationary points on the potential energy surface, which did not provide a satisfactory explanation of the experimentally observed reactivity. In particular, we point out how non-statistical and non-intrinsic reaction coordinate mechanisms are of fundamental importance.This article is part of the themed issue 'Theoretical and computational studies of non-equilibrium and non-statistical dynamics in the gas phase, in the condensed phase and at interfaces'.

  20. Selective covalent bond formation in polypeptide ions via gas-phase ion/ion reaction chemistry.

    PubMed

    Han, Hongling; McLuckey, Scott A

    2009-09-16

    Primary amines present in protonated polypeptides can be covalently modified via gas-phase ion/ion reactions using bifunctional reagent ions. The use of reagent anions with a charge-bearing site that leads to strong interactions with the polypeptide, such as sulfonic acid, gives rise to the formation of a long-lived adduct. A distinct reactive functional group, an aldehyde in the present case, can then undergo reaction with the peptide. Collisional activation of the adduct ion formed from a reagent with an aldehyde group and a peptide ion with a primary amine gives rise to water loss in conjunction with imine (Schiff base) formation. The covalently bound modification is retained upon subsequent collisional activation. This work demonstrates the ability to selectively modify polypeptide ions in the gas phase within the context of a multistage mass spectrometry experiment.

  1. Unusual hydroxyl migration in the fragmentation of β-alanine dication in the gas phase.

    PubMed

    Piekarski, Dariusz Grzegorz; Delaunay, Rudy; Maclot, Sylvain; Adoui, Lamri; Martín, Fernando; Alcamí, Manuel; Huber, Bernd A; Rousseau, Patrick; Domaracka, Alicja; Díaz-Tendero, Sergio

    2015-07-14

    We present a combined experimental and theoretical study of the fragmentation of doubly positively charged β-alanine molecules in the gas phase. The dissociation of the produced dicationic molecules, induced by low-energy ion collisions, is analysed by coincidence mass spectrometric techniques; the coupling with ab initio molecular dynamics simulations allows rationalisation of the experimental observations. The present strategy gives deeper insights into the chemical mechanisms of multiply charged amino acids in the gas phase. In the case of the β-alanine dication, in addition to the expected Coulomb explosion and hydrogen migration processes, we have found evidence of hydroxyl-group migration, which leads to unusual fragmentation products, such as hydroxymethyl cation, and is necessary to explain some of the observed dominant channels.

  2. Gas-Phase Femtosecond Particle Spectroscopy: A Bottom-Up Approach to Nucleotide Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stavros, Vasilios G.; Verlet, Jan R. R.

    2016-05-01

    We summarize how gas-phase ultrafast charged-particle spectroscopy has been used to provide an understanding of the photophysics of DNA building blocks. We focus on adenine and discuss how, following UV excitation, specific interactions determine the fates of its excited states. The dynamics can be probed using a systematic bottom-up approach that provides control over these interactions and that allows ever-larger complexes to be studied. Starting from a chromophore in adenine, the excited state decay mechanisms of adenine and chemically substituted or clustered adenine are considered and then extended to adenosine mono-, di-, and trinucleotides. We show that the gas-phase approach can offer exquisite insight into the dynamics observed in aqueous solution, but we also highlight stark differences. An outlook is provided that discusses some of the most promising developments in this bottom-up approach.

  3. Photoelectron Velocity Map Imaging of Vibrationally Excited, Gas-Phase Biomolecules and Their Anions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakker, Daniël; Bakels, Sjors; van der Made, Rutger; Peters, Atze; Rijs, Anouk

    2016-06-01

    A powerful method in spectroscopy to characterize the structure of large, gas phase molecules is to probe the ionization yield upon irradiating the molecules with infrared (IR) and/or ultraviolet (UV) radiation. When this spectroscopic technique is employed, the photodetached electrons are usually ignored, although they contain information on, for example, the ionization threshold of the molecule and the excited states of the formed ions. Here, the novel combination of a molecular beam mass spectrometer equipped with a laser desorption source, the free electron laser FELIX and the powerful velocity map imaging (VMI) technique is presented. With this extended set of tools we can bring large molecules intact into the gas phase and prepare them in specific vibrationally excited states. UV or VUV radiation can subsequently be used to ionize the molecules. The kinetic energy and the radial distribution of the photoelectrons can be measured using VMI combined with ion detection using a time-of-flight mass spectrometer.

  4. Gas-Phase Synthesis of 1-Silacyclopenta-2,4-diene.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tao; Dangi, Beni B; Thomas, Aaron M; Sun, Bing-Jian; Chou, Tzu-Jung; Chang, Agnes H H; Kaiser, Ralf I

    2016-07-04

    Silole (1-silacyclopenta-2,4-diene) was synthesized for the first time by the bimolecular reaction of the simplest silicon-bearing radical, silylidyne (SiH), with 1,3-butadiene (C4 H6 ) in the gas phase under single-collision conditions. The absence of consecutive collisions of the primary reaction product prevents successive reactions of the silole by Diels-Alder dimerization, thus enabling the clean gas-phase synthesis of this hitherto elusive cyclic species from acyclic precursors in a single-collision event. Our method opens up a versatile and unconventional path to access a previously rather obscure class of organosilicon molecules (substituted siloles), which have been difficult to access through classical synthetic methods.

  5. Simplification of the CBS-QB3 method for predicting gas-phase deprotonation free energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casasnovas, Rodrigo; Frau, Juan; Ortega-Castro, Joaquín; Salvà, Antoni; Donoso, Josefa; Muñoz, Francisco

    Simplified versions of CBS-QB3 model chemistry were used to calculate the free energies of 36 deprotonation reactions in the gas phase. The best such version, S9, excluded coupled cluster calculation [CCSD(T)], and empirical (ΔEemp) and spin-orbit (ΔEint) correction terms. The mean absolute deviation and root mean square thus obtained (viz. 1.24 and 1.56 kcal/mol, respectively) were very-close to those provided by the original CBS-QB3 method (1.19 and 1.52 kcal/mol, respectively). The high-accuracy of the proposed simplification and its computational expeditiousness make it an excellent choice for energy calculations on gas-phase deprotonation reactions in complex systems.

  6. Taming molecular beams; towards a gas-phase molecular laboratory on a chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meek, Samuel A.; Santambrogio, Gabriele; Conrad, Horst; Meijer, Gerard

    2009-11-01

    The manipulation of gas-phase molecules with electric and magnetic fields above a chip is an emerging field of research. Miniaturization of the electric and magnetic field structures allows for the creation of large field gradients and tight traps above the chip. Present-day microelectronics technology enables the integration of complicated tools and devices on a compact surface area. The molecules can be positioned extremely accurately and reproducibly above the chip where they can be held isolated from their environment and where there is excellent access to them. It is expected that several of the gas-phase molecular beam experiments that are currently being done in machines that are up to several meters in length can in the future be performed on a surface area of a few cm2 and that many new experiments will become possible.

  7. Infrared Action Spectroscopy of Low-Temperature Neutral Gas-Phase Molecules of Arbitrary Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yatsyna, Vasyl; Bakker, Daniël J.; Salén, Peter; Feifel, Raimund; Rijs, Anouk M.; Zhaunerchyk, Vitali

    2016-09-01

    We demonstrate a technique for IR action spectroscopy that enables measuring IR spectra in a background-free fashion for low-temperature neutral gas-phase molecules of arbitrary structure. The method is exemplified experimentally for N -methylacetamide molecules in the mid-IR spectral range of 1000 - 1800 cm-1 , utilizing the free electron laser FELIX. The technique involves the resonant absorption of multiple mid-IR photons, which induces molecular dissociation. The dissociation products are probed with 10.49 eV vacuum ultraviolet photons and analyzed with a mass spectrometer. We also demonstrate the capability of this method to record, with unprecedented ease, mid-IR spectra for the molecular associates, such as clusters and oligomers, present in a molecular beam. In this way the mass-selected spectra of low-temperature gas-phase dimers and trimers of N -methylacetamide are measured in the full amide I-III range.

  8. Hydration energies of deprotonated amino acids from gas phase equilibria measurements.

    PubMed

    Wincel, Henryk

    2008-08-01

    Singly hydrated clusters of deprotonated amino acids were studied using an electrospray high-pressure mass spectrometer equipped with a pulsed ion-beam reaction chamber. Thermochemical data, DeltaH(o), DeltaS(o), and DeltaG(o), for the hydration reaction [AA - H](-) + H(2)O = [AA - H](-).(H(2)O) were obtained from gas-phase equilibria determinations for AA = Gly, Ala, Val, Pro, Phe, Lys, Met, Trp, Gln, Arg, and Asp. The hydration free-energy changes are found to depend significantly on the side-chain substituents. The water binding energy in [AA - H](-).(H(2)O) increases with the gas-phase acidity of AA. The anionic hydrogen bond strengths in [AA - H](-).(H(2)O) are compared with those of the cationic bonds in the corresponding AAH(+).(H(2)O) systems.

  9. Imaging molecular structure through femtosecond photoelectron diffraction on aligned and oriented gas-phase molecules.

    PubMed

    Boll, Rebecca; Rouzée, Arnaud; Adolph, Marcus; Anielski, Denis; Aquila, Andrew; Bari, Sadia; Bomme, Cédric; Bostedt, Christoph; Bozek, John D; Chapman, Henry N; Christensen, Lauge; Coffee, Ryan; Coppola, Niccola; De, Sankar; Decleva, Piero; Epp, Sascha W; Erk, Benjamin; Filsinger, Frank; Foucar, Lutz; Gorkhover, Tais; Gumprecht, Lars; Hömke, André; Holmegaard, Lotte; Johnsson, Per; Kienitz, Jens S; Kierspel, Thomas; Krasniqi, Faton; Kühnel, Kai-Uwe; Maurer, Jochen; Messerschmidt, Marc; Moshammer, Robert; Müller, Nele L M; Rudek, Benedikt; Savelyev, Evgeny; Schlichting, Ilme; Schmidt, Carlo; Scholz, Frank; Schorb, Sebastian; Schulz, Joachim; Seltmann, Jörn; Stener, Mauro; Stern, Stephan; Techert, Simone; Thøgersen, Jan; Trippel, Sebastian; Viefhaus, Jens; Vrakking, Marc; Stapelfeldt, Henrik; Küpper, Jochen; Ullrich, Joachim; Rudenko, Artem; Rolles, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    This paper gives an account of our progress towards performing femtosecond time-resolved photoelectron diffraction on gas-phase molecules in a pump-probe setup combining optical lasers and an X-ray free-electron laser. We present results of two experiments aimed at measuring photoelectron angular distributions of laser-aligned 1-ethynyl-4-fluorobenzene (C(8)H(5)F) and dissociating, laser-aligned 1,4-dibromobenzene (C(6)H(4)Br(2)) molecules and discuss them in the larger context of photoelectron diffraction on gas-phase molecules. We also show how the strong nanosecond laser pulse used for adiabatically laser-aligning the molecules influences the measured electron and ion spectra and angular distributions, and discuss how this may affect the outcome of future time-resolved photoelectron diffraction experiments.

  10. Distinct Fragmentation Pathways of Anticancer Drugs Induced by Charge-Carrying Cations in the Gas Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Areum; Lee, Hong Hee; Heo, Chae Eun; Cho, Yunju; Kim, Sunghwan; Kang, Dukjin; Kim, Hugh I.

    2016-12-01

    With the growth of the pharmaceutical industry, structural elucidation of drugs and derivatives using tandem mass spectrometry (MS2) has become essential for drug development and pharmacokinetics studies because of its high sensitivity and low sample requirement. Thus, research seeking to understand fundamental relationships between fragmentation patterns and precursor ion structures in the gas phase has gained attention. In this study, we investigate the fragmentation of the widely used anticancer drugs, doxorubicin (DOX), vinblastine (VBL), and vinorelbine (VRL), complexed by a singly charged proton or alkali metal ion (Li+, Na+, K+) in the gas phase. The drug-cation complexes exhibit distinct fragmentation patterns in tandem mass spectra as a function of cation size. The trends in fragmentation patterns are explicable in terms of structures derived from ion mobility mass spectrometry (IM-MS) and theoretical calculations.

  11. Fundamental studies of gas phase ionic reactions by ion mobility spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giles, K.; Knighton, W. B.; Sahlstrom, K. E.; Grimsrud, E. P.

    1995-01-01

    Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) provides a promising approach to the study of gas phase ionic reactions in buffer gases at unusually high pressures. This point is illustrated here by studies of the Sn2 nucleophilic displacement reaction, Cl(-) + CH3Br yields Br + CH3Br, using IMS at atmospheric pressure. The equilibrium clustering reaction, Cl(-)(CHCI3)(n - 1) + CHCI3 yields Cl(-)(CHCI3)(n), where n = 1 and 2, and the effect of clustering on the Sn2 reaction with CH3Br have also been characterized by this IMS-based kinetic method. Present problems and anticipated improvements in the application of ion mobility spectrometry to studies of other gas phase ionic processes are discussed.

  12. Gas-phase catalysis by atomic and cluster metal ions: the ultimate single-site catalysts.

    PubMed

    Böhme, Diethard K; Schwarz, Helmut

    2005-04-15

    Gas-phase experiments with state-of-the-art techniques of mass spectrometry provide detailed insights into numerous elementary processes. The focus of this Review is on elementary reactions of ions that achieve complete catalytic cycles under thermal conditions. The examples chosen cover aspects of catalysis pertinent to areas as diverse as atmospheric chemistry and surface chemistry. We describe how transfer of oxygen atoms, bond activation, and coupling of fragments can be mediated by atomic or cluster metal ions. In some cases truly unexpected analogies of the idealized gas-phase ion catalysis can be drawn with related chemical transformations in solution or the solid state, and so improve our understanding of the intrinsic operation of a practical catalyst at a strictly molecular level.

  13. Anchoring the gas-phase acidity scale: From formic acid to methanethiol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eyet, Nicole; Villano, Stephanie M.; Bierbaum, Veronica M.

    2009-06-01

    We have measured the gas-phase acidities of nine compounds: formic acid, acetic acid, 1,3-propanedithiol, 2-methyl-2-propanethiol, 3-methyl-1-butanethiol, 2-propanethiol, 1-propanethiol, ethanethiol, and methanethiol, with acidities ranging from 338.6 to 351.1 kcal mol-1 using proton transfer kinetics and the resulting equilibrium constants. These acids were anchored to the well-known acidity of hydrogen sulfide; the measured acidities are in good agreement with previous experimental values, but error bars are significantly reduced. The gas-phase acidity of 3-methyl-1-butanethiol was determined to be 347.1 (5) kcal mol-1; there were no previous measurements of this value. Entropies of deprotonation were calculated and enthalpies of deprotonation were determined.

  14. Gas-phase acidities of tetrahedral oxyacids from ab initio electronic structure theory

    SciTech Connect

    Rustad, J.R.; Dixon, D.A.; Kubicki, J.D.; Felmy, A.R.

    2000-05-04

    Density functional calculations have been performed on several protonation states of the oxyacids of Si, P, V, As, Cr, and S. Structures and vibrational frequencies are in good agreement with experimental values where these are available. A reasonably well-defined correlation between the calculated gas-phase acidities and the measured pK{sub a} in aqueous solution has been found. The pK{sub a}/gas-phase acidity slopes are consistent with those derived from previous molecular mechanics calculations on ferric hydrolysis and the first two acidity constants for orthosilicic acid. The successive deprotonation of other H{sub n}TO{sub 4} species, for a given tetrahedral anion T are roughly consistent with this slope, but not to the extent that there is a universal correlation among all species.

  15. Characteristics and applications of controlled-release KMnO4 for groundwater remediation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eung Seok; Schwartz, Franklin W

    2007-02-01

    In situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) using potassium permanganate (KMnO4) has been widely used as a practical approach for remediation of groundwater contaminated by chlorinated solvents like trichloroethylene. The most common applications are active flushing schemes, which target the destruction of some contaminant source by injecting concentrated permanganate (MnO4(-)) solution into the subsurface over a short period of time. Despite many promising results, KMnO4 flushing is often frustrated by inefficiency associated with pore plugging by MnO2 and bypassing. Opportunities exist for the development of new ISCO systems based on KMnO4. The new scheme described in this paper uses controlled-release KMnO4 (CRP) as an active component in the well-based reactive barrier system. This scheme operates to control spreading of a dissolved contaminant plume. Prototype CRP was manufactured by dispersing fine KMnO4 granules in liquid crystal polymer resin matrix. Scanning electron microscope data verified the formation of micro-scale (ID=20-200 microm) secondary capillary permeability through which MnO4(-) is released by a reaction-diffusion process. Column and numerical simulation data indicated that the CRP could deliver MnO4(-) in a controlled manner for several years without replenishment. A proof-of-concept flow-tank experiment and model simulations suggested that the CRP scheme could potentially be developed as a practical approach for in situ remediation of contaminated aquifers. This scheme may be suitable for remediation of sites where accessibility is limited or some low-concentration contaminant plume is extensive. Development of delivery systems that can facilitate lateral spreading and mixing of MnO4(-) with the contaminant plume is warranted.

  16. Abundant gas-phase H2O in absorption toward massive protostars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boonman, A. M. S.; van Dishoeck, E. F.

    2003-06-01

    We present infrared spectra of gas-phase H2O around 6 mu m toward 12 deeply embedded massive protostars obtained with the Short Wavelength Spectrometer on board the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO). The nu2 ro-vibrational band has been detected toward 7 of the sources and the excitation temperatures indicate an origin in the warm gas at Tex>~ 250 K. Typical derived gas-phase H2O abundances are ~ 5*E-6-6*E-5, with the abundances increasing with the temperature of the warm gas. The inferred gas/solid ratios show a similar trend with temperature and suggest that grain-mantle evaporation is important. The increasing gas/solid ratio correlates with other indicators of increased temperatures. If the higher temperatures are due to a larger ratio of source luminosity to envelope mass, this makes gas-phase H2O a good evolutionary tracer. Comparison with chemical models shows that three different chemical processes, ice evaporation, high-T chemistry, and shocks, can reproduce the high inferred gas-phase H2O abundances. In a forthcoming paper each of these processes are investigated in more detail in comparison with data from the Long Wavelength Spectrometer on board ISO and the Submillimeter Wave Astronomy Satellite (SWAS). Comparison with existing SWAS data indicates that a jump in the H2O abundance is present and that the observed nu2 ro-vibrational band traces primarily the warm inner envelope. Based on observations with ISO, an ESA project with instruments funded by ESA Member States (especially the PI countries: France, Germany, the Netherlands and the United Kingdom) and with the participation of ISAS and NASA.

  17. Test and Characterization of Some Zeolite Supported Gas Phase Desulfurization Sorbents

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-01

    of-the-art SOFC electrode material is improving, the gas phase desulfurization step at high temperature is still essential to SOFCs . Our report ...NOTICES Disclaimers The findings in this report are not to be construed as an official Department of the Army position unless so...the use thereof. Destroy this report when it is no longer needed. Do not return it to the originator. Army Research Laboratory Adelphi, MD

  18. Gas phase heterogeneous catalytic oxidation of alkanes to aliphatic ketones and/or other oxygenates

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Manhua; Wang, Xiang; Yeom, Younghoon

    2015-03-17

    A catalyst, its method of preparation and its use for producing aliphatic ketones by subjecting alkanes C.sub.3 to C.sub.9 to a gas phase catalytic oxidation in the presence of air or oxygen, and, optionally, steam and/or one or more diluting gases. The catalyst comprises a catalytically active mixed metal oxide phase and a suitable support material onto and/or into which the active catalytic phase id dispersed.

  19. Comparison of ozone determinations by ultraviolet photometry and gas-phase titration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demore, W. B.; Patapoff, M.

    1976-01-01

    A comparison of ozone determinations based on ultraviolet absorption photometry and gas-phase titration (GPT) shows good agreement between the two methods. Together with other results, these findings indicate that three candidate reference methods for ozone, UV photometry, IR photometry, and GPT are in substantial agreement. However, the GPT method is not recommended for routine use by air pollution agencies for calibration of ozone monitors because of susceptibility to experimental error.

  20. Method and apparatus for selective capture of gas phase analytes using metal .beta.-diketonate polymers

    DOEpatents

    Harvey, Scott D [Kennewick, WA

    2011-06-21

    A process and sensor device are disclosed that employ metal .beta.-diketonate polymers to selectively capture gas-phase explosives and weaponized chemical agents in a sampling area or volume. The metal .beta.-diketonate polymers can be applied to surfaces in various analytical formats for detection of: improvised explosive devices, unexploded ordinance, munitions hidden in cargo holds, explosives, and chemical weapons in public areas.

  1. a Nucleoside Under Observation in the Gas Phase: a Rotational Study of Uridine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peña, Isabel; Alonso, José L.

    2014-06-01

    The nucleoside of uridine has been placed in the gas phase by laser ablation and the most stable C2{'}-anti conformation characterized by broadband chirped pulse (CP-FTMW) and narrowband molecular beam Fourier transform microwave (LA-MB-FTMW) spectroscopies. The quadrupole hyperfine structure, originated by two 14N nuclei, has been completely resolved. Intramolecular hydrogen bonds involving uracil and ribose moieties have been found to play an important role in the stabilization of the nucleoside.

  2. Missing gas-phase source of HONO inferred from Zeppelin measurements in the troposphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xin; Rohrer, Franz; Hofzumahaus, Andreas; Brauers, Theo; Häseler, Rolf; Bohn, Birger; Broch, Sebastian; Fuchs, Hendrik; Gomm, Sebastian; Holland, Frank; Jäger, Julia; Kaiser, Jennifer; Keutsch, Frank N.; Lohse, Insa; Tillmann, Ralf; Wegener, Robert; Wolfe, Glenn M.; Mentel, Thomas F.; Kiendler-Scharr, Astrid; Wahner, Andreas

    2014-05-01

    Nitrous acid (HONO) is an important trace gas in the atmosphere due to its contribution to the cycles of nitrogen oxides (NOX) and hydrogen oxides (HOX). In the past decades, ground-based observations of HONO around the world showed much higher daytime concentrations than can be explained by the known gas-phase chemistry (i.e., HONO + hν → OH + NO, HONO + OH → NO2 + H2O, OH + NO + M → HONO + M). Different light-dependent reactions on ground surfaces have been proposed as additional daytime HONO sources. However, due to lack of measurements, little is known about the concentrations of HONO and its sources in the planetary boundary layer (PBL) at higher altitudes above the earth's surface. The airship Zeppelin NT is an ideal platform to investigate the chemistry and dynamics of the PBL. During the PEGASOS field campaigns in 2012 and 2013, HONO and its gas-phase sources and sinks were measured simultaneously on-board the airship Zeppelin NT, for the lowest 1 km of the PBL. In the upper part of the altitude range during morning hours, when the airmass is still isolated from processes at the earth's surface by the remaining nocturnal boundary layer, we find unexpectedly large concentrations of HONO which can neither be explained by heterogeneous reactions on aerosol and ground surfaces, nor by known gas-phase reactions. Our observations show evidence for an unknown gas-phase light-dependent HONO production which dominates the overall HONO formation in the lower troposphere. This new HONO source requires NOX and possibly OH or HO2 radicals. As a result, the general impact of HONO on the OH formation is likely overestimated.

  3. pH- and thermo-responsive microcontainers as potential drug delivery systems: Morphological characteristic, release and cytotoxicity studies.

    PubMed

    Efthimiadou, Eleni K; Tapeinos, Christos; Tziveleka, Leto-Aikaterini; Boukos, Nikos; Kordas, George

    2014-04-01

    Polymeric pH- and thermo-sensitive microcontainers (MCs) were developed as a potential drug delivery system for cancer therapy. It is well known that cancer cells exhibit notable characteristics such as acidic pH due to glycolytic cycle and higher temperature due to their higher proliferation rate. Based on these characteristics, we constructed a dual pH- and thermo-sensitive material for specific drug release on the pathological tissue. The MC's fabrication is based on a two-step procedure, in which, the first step involves the core synthesis and the second one is related to the shell formation. The core consists of poly(methyl methacrylate (PMMA), while the shell consists of PMMA, poly(isopropylacrylamide), poly(acrylic acid) and poly(divinylbenzene). Three different types of MCs were synthesized based on the seed polymerization method. The synthesized MCs were characterized structurally by Fourier transform infrared and morphologically by scanning electron microscopy. Dynamic light scattering was also used to study their behavior in aqueous solution under different pH and temperature conditions. For the loading and release study, the anthracycline drug daunorubicin (DNR) was used as a model drug, and its release properties were evaluated under different pH and thermo-conditions. Cytotoxicity studies were also carried out against MCF-7 breast cancer and 3T3 mouse embryonic fibroblast cells. According to our results, the synthesized microcontainers present desired pH and thermo behavior and can be applied in drug delivery systems. It is worth mentioning that the synthesized microcontainers which incorporated the drug DNR exhibit higher toxicity than the free drug.

  4. The characteristics of inhibition of histamine release from human lung fragments by sodium cromoglycate, salbutamol and chlorpromazine

    PubMed Central

    Church, Martin K.; Young, Kevin D.

    1983-01-01

    characteristics shown by sodium cromoglycate, salbutamol and chlorpromazine indicate that these drugs inhibit histamine release by interfering with the secretory mechanisms in different ways. PMID:6189542

  5. Determination of solid state characteristics of spray-congealed Ibuprofen solid lipid microparticles and their impact on sustaining drug release.

    PubMed

    Wong, Priscilla Chui Hong; Heng, Paul Wan Sia; Chan, Lai Wah

    2015-05-04

    This study was used to find solid state characteristics of ibuprofen loaded spray-congealed solid lipid microparticles (SLMs) by employing simple lipids as matrices, with or without polymeric additives, and the impact of solid drug-matrix miscibility on sustaining drug release. Solid miscibility of ibuprofen with two lipids, cetyl alcohol (CA) and stearic acid (SA), were investigated using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). SLMs containing 20% w/w ibuprofen with or without polymeric additives, PVP/VA and EC, were produced by spray congealing, and the resultant microparticles were subjected to visual examination by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), thermal analysis using DSC, and hot-stage microscopy. Intermolecular interactions between lipids and drug as well as additives were investigated by Fourier-transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR). X-ray diffractometry (XRD) was utilized to study polymorphic changes of drug and matrix over the course of a year. Ibuprofen was found to depress the melting points of CA and SA in a colligative manner, reaching maximum solubility at 10% w/w and 30% w/w for CA and SA, respectively. Drug encapsulation efficiencies and yields of spray-congealed SLMs containing 20% w/w ibuprofen were consistently high for both lipid matrices. CA and SA were found to adopt their stable γ- and β-polymorphs, respectively, immediately after spray congealing. The spray congealing process resulted in ibuprofen adopting an amorphous or poorly crystalline state, with no further changes over the course of a year. SEM, DSC, and hot stage microscope studies on the SLMs confirmed the formation of a solid dispersion between ibuprofen and CA and a solid solution between ibuprofen and SA. SA was found to sustain the release of ibuprofen significantly better than CA. PVP/VA and EC showed some interactions with CA, which led to an expansion of unit cell dimensions of CA upon spray congealing, whereas they

  6. Survey: calculation of the characteristics of oral diffusion-controlled release dosage forms related to the drug.

    PubMed

    Rosca, I D; Vergnaud, J M

    2010-09-01

    Oral dosage forms with controlled release exhibit various advantages over their immediate release counterparts, but they must be built adequately by dispersing the drug through the well-defined polymer matrix. This study is concerned with diffusion-controlled dosage forms to resolve the problems that appear: in vitro tests generally used for determining the kinetics of drug release do not take into account the nature of the drug. On the contrary, the plasma drug profiles obtained through in vivo tests strongly depend on the nature of the drug, through their typical pharmacokinetic parameters. Moreover, the effect of the stirring rate is difficult to evaluate. Following the demand from the FDA concerned with the in vitro/in vivo correlation, a numerical model was built so as to evaluate the plasma drug profile obtained with any drug delivered from a diffusion-controlled release dosage form. The results are expressed by connecting the half-life times of the drugs obtained either with bolus injection or with the dosage forms, for various values of the parameters of interest: the diffusivity of the matrix polymer and the size of the dosage form. Thus, these diagrams make it possible to promptly determine the characteristics of the dosage forms able to give the desired plasma drug profile for any drug. Of course, for each drug being defined by its pharmacokinetic parameters, the polymer matrix should be selected as a function of its diffusivity. Finally, the evaluation of the plasma drug profile is of effective help to determine quantitatively the effect of the intervariability of the patients as well as the effect of the patient's noncompliance.

  7. Gas-phase transformation of phosphatidylcholine cations to structurally informative anions via ion/ion chemistry.

    PubMed

    Stutzman, John R; Blanksby, Stephen J; McLuckey, Scott A

    2013-04-02

    Gas-phase transformation of synthetic phosphatidylcholine (PC) monocations to structurally informative anions is demonstrated via ion/ion reactions with doubly deprotonated 1,4-phenylenedipropionic acid (PDPA). Two synthetic PC isomers, 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (PC(16:0/18:1)) and 1-oleoyl-2-palmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (PC(18:1/16:0)), were subjected to this ion/ion chemistry. The product of the ion/ion reaction is a negatively charged complex, [PC + PDPA - H](-). Collisional activation of the long-lived complex causes transfer of a proton and methyl cation to PDPA, generating [PC - CH3](-). Subsequent collisional activation of the demethylated PC anions produces abundant fatty acid carboxylate anions and low-abundance acyl neutral losses as free acids and ketenes. Product ion spectra of [PC - CH3](-) suggest favorable cleavage at the sn-2 position over the sn-1 due to distinct differences in the relative abundances. In contrast, collisional activation of PC cations is absent of abundant fatty acid chain-related product ions and typically indicates only the lipid class via formation of the phosphocholine cation. A solution phase method to produce the gas-phase adducted PC anion is also demonstrated. Product ion spectra derived from the solution phase method are similar to the results generated via ion/ion chemistry. This work demonstrates a gas-phase means to increase structural characterization of phosphatidylcholines via ion/ion chemistry.

  8. A Gas-phase Formation Route to Interstellar Trans-methyl Formate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, Callie A.; Wehres, Nadine; Yang, Zhibo; Thomsen, Ditte L.; Snow, Theodore P.; Bierbaum, Veronica M.

    2012-07-01

    The abundance of methyl formate in the interstellar medium has previously been underpredicted by chemical models. Additionally, grain surface chemistry cannot account for the relative abundance of the cis- and trans-conformers of methyl formate, and the trans-conformer is not even formed at detectable abundance on these surfaces. This highlights the importance of studying formation pathways to methyl formate in the gas phase. The rate constant and branching fractions are reported for the gas-phase reaction between protonated methanol and formic acid to form protonated trans-methyl formate and water as well as adduct ion: Rate constants were experimentally determined using a flowing afterglow-selected ion flow tube apparatus at 300 K and a pressure of 530 mTorr helium. The results indicate a moderate overall rate constant of (3.19 ± 0.39) × 10-10 cm3 s-1 (± 1σ) and an average branching fraction of 0.05 ± 0.04 for protonated trans-methyl formate and 0.95 ± 0.04 for the adduct ion. These experimental results are reinforced by ab initio calculations at the MP2(full)/aug-cc-pVTZ level of theory to examine the reaction coordinate and complement previous density functional theory calculations. This study underscores the need for continued observational studies of trans-methyl formate and for the exploration of other gas-phase formation routes to complex organic molecules.

  9. Gas-Phase Structure Determination of Dihydroxycarbene, One of the Smallest Stable Singlet Carbenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Womack, Carrie; Crabtree, Kyle N.; McCaslin, Laura; Martinez, Oscar, Jr.; Field, Robert W.; Stanton, John F.; McCarthy, Michael C.

    2014-06-01

    Carbenes (R1-C-R2) are a reactive class of compounds, usually characterized by an electron-deficient divalent carbon atom, found in applications ranging from organic synthesis to gas phase oxidation chemistry. Carbenes with 2- or 3-atom substituents often undergo rapid unimolecular isomerization, but may be stabilized if these substituents are electron-donating. Dihydroxycarbene (HO-C-OH) is one of the smallest singlet carbenes to be afforded this stability, due to its two electron-donating hydroxyl groups. We report the first gas-phase detection and structural characterization of this reactive species, using a combination of Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy and high level electronic structure calculations. Detection in the gas phase indicates that it is fairly stable relative to its isomers, formic acid (HCOOH) and the simplest Criegee intermediate (CH_2OO), the latter of which has recently received a great deal of attention for its role in the atmospheric ozonolysis of alkenes. Our experimental results yield a precise structure of HO-C-OH, and we comment on upcoming experiments investigating its stability and reactivity with other common atmospheric species.

  10. All-gas-phase synthesis of UiO-66 through modulated atomic layer deposition

    PubMed Central

    Lausund, Kristian Blindheim; Nilsen, Ola

    2016-01-01

    Thin films of stable metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) such as UiO-66 have enormous application potential, for instance in microelectronics. However, all-gas-phase deposition techniques are currently not available for such MOFs. We here report on thin-film deposition of the thermally and chemically stable UiO-66 in an all-gas-phase process by the aid of atomic layer deposition (ALD). Sequential reactions of ZrCl4 and 1,4-benzenedicarboxylic acid produce amorphous organic–inorganic hybrid films that are subsequently crystallized to the UiO-66 structure by treatment in acetic acid vapour. We also introduce a new approach to control the stoichiometry between metal clusters and organic linkers by modulation of the ALD growth with additional acetic acid pulses. An all-gas-phase synthesis technique for UiO-66 could enable implementations in microelectronics that are not compatible with solvothermal synthesis. Since this technique is ALD-based, it could also give enhanced thickness control and the possibility to coat irregular substrates with high aspect ratios. PMID:27876797

  11. Gas-phase structures and thermochemistry of neutral histidine and its conjugated acid and base.

    PubMed

    Riffet, Vanessa; Bouchoux, Guy

    2013-04-28

    Extensive exploration of the conformational space of neutral, protonated and deprotonated histidine has been conducted at the G4MP2 level. Theoretical protonation and deprotonation thermochemistry as well as heats of formation of gaseous histidine and its ionized forms have been calculated at the G4 level considering either the most stable conformers or an equilibrium population of conformers at 298 K. These theoretical results were compared to evaluated experimental determinations. Recommended proton affinity and protonation entropy deduced from these comparisons are PA(His) = 980 kJ mol(-1) and ΔpS(His) ∼ 0 J mol(-1) K(-1), thus leading to a gas-phase basicity value of GB(His) = 947.5 kJ mol(-1). Similarly, gas phase acidity parameters are ΔacidH(o)(His) = 1373 kJ mol(-1), ΔacidS(His) ∼ 10 J mol(-1) K(-1) and ΔacidG(o)(His) = 1343 kJ mol(-1). Computed G4 heats of formation values are equal to -290, 265 and -451 kJ mol(-1) for gaseous neutral histidine and its protonated and deprotonated forms, respectively. The present computational data correct, and complete, previous thermochemical parameter estimates proposed for gas-phase histidine and its acido-basic properties.

  12. Gas-phase self-assembly of uniform silica nanostructures decorated and doped with silver nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Chao-Shun; Chen, Yi-Chen; Wang, Hsiao-Fang; Ho, Hsin-Chia; Ho, Rong-Ming; Tsai, De-Hao

    2017-01-01

    We report a systematic study of the controlled gas-phase synthesis of silver-silica hybrid nanostructures (Ag-SiO2 NP) using the concept of evaporation-induced self-assembly. The approach includes the use of a direct gas-phase electrophoresis for size classification and in situ characterization of mobility size. Transmission electron microscopy and ultraviolet-visible light spectroscopy were employed complementarily to determine the morphology and surface plasmon resonance of Ag-SiO2 NP. Results show that two types of Ag-SiO2 NPs were successfully synthesized: (1) AgNPs decorated on a SiO2-NP (Ag-T-SiO2 NP), and (2) AgNPs doped in a cluster of SiO2-NPs (Ag-C-SiO2 NP). The physical size, morphology, and compositions of Ag-SiO2 NPs were tunable through the adjustments of precursor concentrations and the selected mobility sizes. The results also show that SPR performance, colloidal stability, and dispersibility of AgNPs enhanced significantly in an aqueous environment after the hybridization with SiO2-NP (especially for Ag-C-SiO2 NP). The results and corresponding methodology summarized here provide the proof of concept to fabricate high-purity AgNP-based hybrid nanostructures through gas-phase evaporation-induced self-assembly for future biomedical applications (e.g., hyperthermal therapy, targeted drug delivery, and antibacterial applications).

  13. Gas-Phase Oxidation, Particle Uptake, and Product Studies of Isoprene Epoxydiols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bates, K. H.; Nguyen, T. B.; St Clair, J. M.; Crounse, J.; Zhang, X.; Coggon, M.; Schwantes, R.; Bennett, N.; Stoltz, B.; Wennberg, P. O.; Seinfeld, J.

    2013-12-01

    Isoprene epoxydiols (IEPOX), discovered in 2009 as low-NOx atmospheric oxidation products of the ubiquitous biogenic precursor isoprene, are key intermediates in the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) from biogenic emissions. Recent studies carried out in the Caltech environmental chambers have elucidated the gas-phase OH oxidation rates and products, particle uptake rates, and particle-phase OH oxidation products of three isomers of IEPOX synthesized in-house. Gas-phase oxidation studies were conducted in 1 m3 chambers at both high- and low-NOx conditions, and were monitored by GC-FID, two types of chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS), and GC-CIMS. Comparisons with previous studies on isoprene showed that the two β-IEPOX isomers dominate over the ∂ isomers under atmospheric conditions, and the use of propene as an internal standard provided a robust estimate of OH oxidation rates between 0.99*10-11 and 1.67*10-11 cm3molec-1s-1 for the three isomers. Particle uptake and oxidation studies were conducted in 28 m3 chambers, and were monitored by GC-FID, CIMS, an aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS), and a differential mobility analyzer (DMA). Particle uptake showed a strong dependence on humidity, with no uptake on dry seed, and was faster on ammonium sulfate seed than sodium chloride seed. Particle-phase oxidation gave similar products to gas-phase oxidation by OH radicals.

  14. Rupture of the cell envelope by induced intracellular gas phase expansion in gas vacuolate bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Hemmingsen, B B; Hemmingsen, E A

    1980-01-01

    Using a new approach, we estimated the physical strength of the cell envelopes of three species of gram-negative, gas vacuolate bacteria (Microcyclus aquaticus, Prosthecomicrobium pneumaticum, and Meniscus glaucopis). Populations of cells were slowly (0.5 to 2.9 h) saturated with argon, nitrogen, or helium to final pressures up to 100 atm (10, 132 kPa). The gas phases of the vesicles remained intact and, upon rapid (1 to 2 s) decompression to atmospheric pressure, expanded and ruptured the cells; loss of colony-forming units was used as an index of rupture. Because the cell envelope is the cellular component most likely to resist the expanding intracellular gas phase, its strength can be estimated from the minimum gas pressures that produce rupture. The viable counts indicated that these minimum pressures were between 25 and 50 atm; the majority of the cell envelopes were ruptured at pressures between 50 and 100 atm. Cells in which the gas vesicles were collapsed and the gas phases were effectively dissolved by rapid compression tolerated decompression from much higher gas saturations. Cells that do not normally possess gas vesicles (Escherichia coli) or that had been prevented from forming them by addition of L-lysine to the medium (M. aquaticus) were not harmed by decompression from gas saturation pressures up to 300 atm. PMID:7204336

  15. Gas-phase Ion Isomer Analysis Reveals the Mechanism of Peptide Sequence Scrambling

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Chenxi; Wu, Zhe; Lietz, Christopher B.; Liang, Zhidan; Cui, Qiang; Li, Lingjun

    2014-01-01

    Peptide sequence scrambling during mass spectrometry-based gas-phase fragmentation analysis causes misidentification of peptides and proteins. Thus, there is a need to develop an efficient approach to probing the gas-phase fragment ion isomers related to sequence scrambling and the underlying fragmentation mechanism, which will facilitate the development of bioinformatics algorithm for proteomics research. Herein, we report on the first use of electron transfer dissociation (ETD)-produced diagnostic fragment ions to probe the components of gas-phase peptide fragment ion isomers. In combination with ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) and formaldehyde labeling, this novel strategy enables qualitative and quantitative analysis of b-type fragment ion isomers. ETD fragmentation produced diagnostic fragment ions indicative of the precursor ion isomer components, and subsequent IMS analysis of b ion isomers provided their quantitative and structural information. The isomer components of three representative b ions (b9, b10, and b33 from three different peptides) were accurately profiled by this method. IMS analysis of the b9 ion isomers exhibited dynamic conversion among these structures. Furthermore, molecular dynamics simulation predicted theoretical drift time values which were in good agreement with experimentally measured values. Our results strongly support the mechanism of peptide sequence scrambling via b ion cyclization, and provide the first experimental evidence to support that the conversion from molecular precursor ion to cyclic b ion (M→cb) pathway is less energetically (or kinetically) favored. PMID:24313304

  16. Direct Numerical Simulation of biomass pyrolysis and combustion with gas phase reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awasthi, A.; Kuerten, J. G. M.; Geurts, B. J.

    2016-09-01

    We present Direct Numerical Simulation of biomass pyrolysis and combustion in a turbulent channel flow. The model includes simplified models for biomass pyrolysis and char combustion along with a model for particle tracking. The gas phase is modelled as a mixture of reacting gas species. The gas-particle interactions for mass, momentum, and energy exchange are included by two-way coupling terms. The effect of two-way coupling on the conversion time of biomass particles is found noticeable for particle volume fractions > 10-5. We also observe that at constant volume fraction the effect of two-way coupling increases as the particle size is reduced, due to the higher total heat exchange area in case of smaller particles. The inclusion of gas phase homogeneous reactions in the DNS model decreases the biomass pyrolysis time due to higher gas temperatures. In contrast, including gas phase reactions increases the combustion time of biomass due to the lower concentration of oxygen at the particle surface.

  17. The Decomposition of Hydrazine in the Gas Phase and over an Iridium Catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, Michael W.; Gordon, Mark S.

    2013-09-30

    Hydrazine is an important rocket fuel, used as both a monopropellant and a bipropellant. This paper presents theoretical results to complement the extensive experimental studies of the gas phase and Ir catalyzed decompositions involved in the monopropellant applications of hydrazine. Gas phase electronic structure theory calculations that include electron correlation predict that numerous molecular and free radical reactions occur within the same energy range as the basic free radical pathways: NN bond breaking around 65 kcal/mol and NH bond breaking around 81 kcal/mol. The data suggest that a revision to existing kinetics modeling is desirable, based on the energetics and the new elementary steps reported herein. A supported Ir-6 octahedron model for the Shell 405 Iridium catalyst used in thrusters was developed. Self-Consistent Field and electron correlation calculations (with core potentials and associated basis sets) find a rich chemistry for hydrazine on this catalyst model. The model catalyst provides dramatically lower NN and NH bond cleavage energies and an even smaller barrier to breaking the NH bond by NH2 abstractions. Thus, the low temperature decomposition over the catalyst is interpreted in terms of consecutive NH2 abstractions to produce ammonia and nitrogen. The higher temperature channel, which has hydrogen and nitrogen products, may be due to a mixture of two mechanisms. These two mechanisms are successive NH cleavages with surface H + H recombinations, and the same type of assisted H-2 eliminations found to occur in the gas phase part of this study.

  18. Revision of the gas-phase acidity scale below 300 kcal mol(-1).

    PubMed

    Leito, Ivo; Raamat, Elin; Kütt, Agnes; Saame, Jaan; Kipper, Karin; Koppel, Ilmar A; Koppel, Ivar; Zhang, Min; Mishima, Masaaki; Yagupolskii, Lev M; Garlyauskayte, Romute Yu; Filatov, Andrey A

    2009-07-23

    The gas-phase acidity (GA) scale from (CF(3)CO)(2)NH to (C(2)F(5)SO(2))(2)NH--about a 24 kcal mol(-1) range of gas-phase acidities--was reexamined using the Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance equilibrium measurement approach. Some additions and modifications to the standard methodology of GA measurements were introduced (estimation of partial pressures from mass spectra of the compounds, instead of the pressure gauge readings and use of long reaction times) to achieve higher reliability. Gas-phase acidities of 18 compounds were determined for the first time. The results reveal a contraction of the previously published values in this part of the scale. In particular, the GA values of (CF(3)SO(2))(2)NH and (C(2)F(5)SO(2))(2)NH (important components of lithium ion battery electrolytes and ionic liquids) were revised toward stronger acidities from 291.8 kcal mol(-1) to 286.5 kcal mol(-1) and from 289.4 kcal mol(-1) to 283.7 kcal mol(-1) (i.e., by 5.3 and 5.7 kcal mol(-1)), respectively. Experimental and computational evidence is presented in support of the current results.

  19. Gas-phase ion isomer analysis reveals the mechanism of peptide sequence scrambling.

    PubMed

    Jia, Chenxi; Wu, Zhe; Lietz, Christopher B; Liang, Zhidan; Cui, Qiang; Li, Lingjun

    2014-03-18

    Peptide sequence scrambling during mass spectrometry-based gas-phase fragmentation analysis causes misidentification of peptides and proteins. Thus, there is a need to develop an efficient approach to probing the gas-phase fragment ion isomers related to sequence scrambling and the underlying fragmentation mechanism, which will facilitate the development of bioinformatics algorithm for proteomics research. Herein, we report on the first use of electron transfer dissociation (ETD)-produced diagnostic fragment ions to probe the components of gas-phase peptide fragment ion isomers. In combination with ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) and formaldehyde labeling, this novel strategy enables qualitative and quantitative analysis of b-type fragment ion isomers. ETD fragmentation produced diagnostic fragment ions indicative of the precursor ion isomer components, and subsequent IMS analysis of b ion isomers provided their quantitative and structural information. The isomer components of three representative b ions (b9, b10, and b33 from three different peptides) were accurately profiled by this method. IMS analysis of the b9 ion isomers exhibited dynamic conversion among these structures. Furthermore, molecular dynamics simulation predicted theoretical drift time values, which were in good agreement with experimentally measured values. Our results strongly support the mechanism of peptide sequence scrambling via b ion cyclization, and provide the first experimental evidence to support that the conversion from molecular precursor ion to cyclic b ion (M → (c)b) pathway is less energetically (or kinetically) favored.

  20. Gas-phase diagnostic by time-resolved rotational coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seeger, Thomas; Leipertz, A.

    2011-05-01

    Dual-broadband pure rotational CARS (RCARS) is nowadays a well-developed gas phase measurement technique. Nevertheless there are challenges for technical applications due to stray light interference, soot emission or droplets. Beside this for diffusion flames also a strong, unknown and varying non-resonant background signal is contributing to the CARS signal. Possible applications of time-resolved pure rotational coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy for different applications are demonstrated and its potential of for gas-phase thermometry is investigated. The field of application covers studies on flame research especially sooting flames as well as its use in technical combustion systems e.g., for the determination of the gas-phase temperature in the vaporizing spray of a GDI injector. A new advantageous approach by using picosecond (ps) laser sources as a diagnostic tool is also demonstrated. By time-delaying the ps probe laser beam problems due to stray light interference, soot emission or droplets can be reduced tremendously of even eliminated.

  1. All-gas-phase synthesis of UiO-66 through modulated atomic layer deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lausund, Kristian Blindheim; Nilsen, Ola

    2016-11-01

    Thin films of stable metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) such as UiO-66 have enormous application potential, for instance in microelectronics. However, all-gas-phase deposition techniques are currently not available for such MOFs. We here report on thin-film deposition of the thermally and chemically stable UiO-66 in an all-gas-phase process by the aid of atomic layer deposition (ALD). Sequential reactions of ZrCl4 and 1,4-benzenedicarboxylic acid produce amorphous organic-inorganic hybrid films that are subsequently crystallized to the UiO-66 structure by treatment in acetic acid vapour. We also introduce a new approach to control the stoichiometry between metal clusters and organic linkers by modulation of the ALD growth with additional acetic acid pulses. An all-gas-phase synthesis technique for UiO-66 could enable implementations in microelectronics that are not compatible with solvothermal synthesis. Since this technique is ALD-based, it could also give enhanced thickness control and the possibility to coat irregular substrates with high aspect ratios.

  2. All-gas-phase synthesis of UiO-66 through modulated atomic layer deposition.

    PubMed

    Lausund, Kristian Blindheim; Nilsen, Ola

    2016-11-23

    Thin films of stable metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) such as UiO-66 have enormous application potential, for instance in microelectronics. However, all-gas-phase deposition techniques are currently not available for such MOFs. We here report on thin-film deposition of the thermally and chemically stable UiO-66 in an all-gas-phase process by the aid of atomic layer deposition (ALD). Sequential reactions of ZrCl4 and 1,4-benzenedicarboxylic acid produce amorphous organic-inorganic hybrid films that are subsequently crystallized to the UiO-66 structure by treatment in acetic acid vapour. We also introduce a new approach to control the stoichiometry between metal clusters and organic linkers by modulation of the ALD growth with additional acetic acid pulses. An all-gas-phase synthesis technique for UiO-66 could enable implementations in microelectronics that are not compatible with solvothermal synthesis. Since this technique is ALD-based, it could also give enhanced thickness control and the possibility to coat irregular substrates with high aspect ratios.

  3. Gas phase condensation of superparamagnetic iron oxide-silica nanoparticles - control of the intraparticle phase distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stötzel, C.; Kurland, H.-D.; Grabow, J.; Müller, F. A.

    2015-04-01

    Spherical, softly agglomerated and superparamagnetic nanoparticles (NPs) consisting of maghemite (γ-Fe2O3) and amorphous silica (SiO2) were prepared by CO2 laser co-vaporization (CoLAVA) of hematite powder (α-Fe2O3) and quartz sand (SiO2). The α-Fe2O3 portion of the homogeneous starting mixtures was gradually increased (15 mass%-95 mass%). It was found that (i) with increasing iron oxide content the NPs' morphology changes from a nanoscale SiO2 matrix with multiple γ-Fe2O3 inclusions to Janus NPs consisting of a γ-Fe2O3 and a SiO2 hemisphere to γ-Fe2O3 NPs each carrying one small SiO2 lens on its surface, (ii) the multiple γ-Fe2O3 inclusions accumulate at the NPs' inner surfaces, and (iii) all composite NPs are covered by a thin layer of amorphous SiO2. These morphological characteristics are attributed to (i) the phase segregation of iron oxide and silica within the condensed Fe2O3-SiO2 droplets, (ii) the temperature gradient within these droplets which arises during rapid cooling in the CoLAVA process, and (iii) the significantly lower surface energy of silica when compared to iron oxide. The proposed growth mechanism of these Fe2O3-SiO2 composite NPs during gas phase condensation can be transferred to other systems comprising a glass-network former and another component that is insoluble in the regarding glass. Thus, our model will facilitate the development of novel functional composite NPs for applications in biomedicine, optics, electronics, or catalysis.Spherical, softly agglomerated and superparamagnetic nanoparticles (NPs) consisting of maghemite (γ-Fe2O3) and amorphous silica (SiO2) were prepared by CO2 laser co-vaporization (CoLAVA) of hematite powder (α-Fe2O3) and quartz sand (SiO2). The α-Fe2O3 portion of the homogeneous starting mixtures was gradually increased (15 mass%-95 mass%). It was found that (i) with increasing iron oxide content the NPs' morphology changes from a nanoscale SiO2 matrix with multiple γ-Fe2O3 inclusions to Janus NPs

  4. Encapsulation of lemongrass oil with cyclodextrins by spray drying and its controlled release characteristics.

    PubMed

    Phunpee, Sarunya; Ruktanonchai, Uracha Rangsadthong; Yoshii, Hidefumi; Assabumrungrat, Suttichai; Soottitantawat, Apinan

    2017-04-01

    Inclusion of the two isomers of citral (E-citral and Z-citral), components of lemongrass oil, was investigated within the confines of various cyclodextrin (α-CD, β-CD and γ-CD) host molecules. Aqueous complex formation constants for E-citral with α-CD, β-CD and γ-CD were determined to be 123, 185, and 204 L/mol, respectively, whereas Z-citral exhibited stronger affinities (157, 206, and 253 L/mol, respectively). The binding trend γ-CD > β-CD > α-CD is a reflection of the more favorable geometrical accommodation of the citral isomers with increasing cavity size. Encapsulation of lemongrass oil within CDs was undertaken through shaking citral:CD (1:1, 1.5:1, and 2:1 molar ratio) mixtures followed by spray drying. Maximum citral retention occurred at a 1:1 molar ratio with β-CD and α-CD demonstrating the highest levels of total E-citral and Z-citral retention, respectively. Furthermore, the β-CD complex demonstrated the slowest release rate of all inclusion complex powders.

  5. The observed characteristics of flare energy release. II - High-speed soft X-ray fronts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Machado, Marcos E.; Xiao, Y. C.; Wu, S. T.; Prokakis, TH.; Dialetis, D.

    1988-01-01

    Flare-associated large-scale brightenings of magnetic loop structures have recently been shown to be related to the propagation of soft X-ray fronts, moving at speeds of the order of 1000 km/s. These are also linked with the brightening of remote H-alpha patches and, in many cases, with type II or U radio emission. A detailed study of the best example found in the Solar Maximum Mission's Hard X-ray Imaging Spectrometer data was performed and with the help of numerical simulations and additional information provided by H-alpha records, it is shown that all together the three energy transport processes proposed by previous authors, namely high-energy particles, conduction fronts, and shocks, play significant roles in the redistribution of flare energy within the loops. The observable evidence of thermal flux limitation and the implication of these and previous results on the efficiency ratio between thermal and nonthermal processes in flares are discussed. Finally, these results are placed under the perspective of the interacting loop model of flares discussed in previous papers, to show that only about 10 percent of the total energy conversion occurs at the interface between loops. The bulk of the flare energy seems to be released internally within one of the bipolar loop structures.

  6. Dynamical characteristics of Rydberg electrons released by a weak electric field

    DOE PAGES

    Diesen, Elias; Saalmann, Ulf; Richter, Martin; ...

    2016-04-08

    This paper discuss the dynamics of ultraslow electrons in the combined potential of an ionic core and a static electric field. With state-of-the-art detection it is possible to create such electrons through strong intense-field photoabsorption and to detect them via high-resolution time-of-flight spectroscopy despite their very low kinetic energy. The characteristic feature of their momentum spectrum, which emerges at the same position for different laser orientations, is derived and could be revealed experimentally with an energy resolution of the order of 1 meV.

  7. Dynamical Characteristics of Rydberg Electrons Released by a Weak Electric Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diesen, Elias; Saalmann, Ulf; Richter, Martin; Kunitski, Maksim; Dörner, Reinhard; Rost, Jan M.

    2016-04-01

    The dynamics of ultraslow electrons in the combined potential of an ionic core and a static electric field is discussed. With state-of-the-art detection it is possible to create such electrons through strong intense-field photoabsorption and to detect them via high-resolution time-of-flight spectroscopy despite their very low kinetic energy. The characteristic feature of their momentum spectrum, which emerges at the same position for different laser orientations, is derived and could be revealed experimentally with an energy resolution of the order of 1 meV.

  8. Nanoparticle collisions in the gas phase in the presence of singular contact potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, Hui; Gopalakrishnan, Ranganathan; Hogan, Christopher J.

    2012-08-01

    Collisional growth and ionization is commonplace for gas phase nanoparticles (i.e., in aerosols). Nanoparticle collisions in atmospheric pressure environments occur in the mass transfer transition regime, and further attractive singular contact potentials (which arise when modeling nanoparticles as condensed matter and for which the potential energy approaches -∞ when two entities contact) often have a non-negligible influence on collision processes. For these reasons collision rate calculations for nanoparticles in the gas phase are not straightforward. We use mean first passage time calculations to develop a simple relationship to determine the collision rate in the gas phase, accounting for the influences of both the transition regime and singular contact potentials (specifically the non-retarded van der Waals and image potentials). In the presented analysis, methods to determine the degree of enhancement in collision rate due to attractive singular potentials in the continuum (diffusive) regime, ηC, and the degree of enhancement in the free molecular (ballistic) regime, ηFM, are first reviewed. Accounting for these enhancement factors, with mean first passage time calculations it is found that the collision rate for gas phase nanoparticles with other gas phase entities can be determined from a relationship between the dimensionless collision rate coefficient, H, and the diffusive Knudsen number, KnD, i.e., the ratio of the mean collision persistence distance to the collision length scale. This coincides with the H(KnD) relationship found to appropriately describe collisions between entities interacting via a hard-sphere potential, but with ηC and ηFM incorporated into the definitions of both H and KnD, respectively. The H(KnD) relationship is compared to the predictions of flux matching theory, used prevalently in prior work for collision rate calculation, and through this comparison it is found that at high potential energy to thermal energy ratios, flux

  9. MOLECULAR SPECTROSCPY AND REACTIONS OF ACTINIDES IN THE GAS PHASE AND CRYOGENIC MATRICES

    SciTech Connect

    Heaven, Michael C.; Gibson, John K.; Marcalo, Joaquim

    2009-02-01

    In this chapter we review the spectroscopic data for actinide molecules and the reaction dynamics for atomic and molecular actinides that have been examined in the gas phase or in inert cryogenic matrices. The motivation for this type of investigation is that physical properties and reactions can be studied in the absence of external perturbations (gas phase) or under minimally perturbing conditions (cryogenic matrices). This information can be compared directly with the results from high-level theoretical models. The interplay between experiment and theory is critically important for advancing our understanding of actinide chemistry. For example, elucidation of the role of the 5f electrons in bonding and reactivity can only be achieved through the application of experimentally verified theoretical models. Theoretical calculations for the actinides are challenging due the large numbers of electrons that must be treated explicitly and the presence of strong relativistic effects. This topic has been reviewed in depth in Chapter 17 of this series. One of the goals of the experimental work described in this chapter has been to provide benchmark data that can be used to evaluate both empirical and ab initio theoretical models. While gas-phase data are the most suitable for comparison with theoretical calculations, there are technical difficulties entailed in generating workable densities of gas-phase actinide molecules that have limited the range of species that have been characterized. Many of the compounds of interest are refractory, and problems associated with the use of high temperature vapors have complicated measurements of spectra, ionization energies, and reactions. One approach that has proved to be especially valuable in overcoming this difficulty has been the use of pulsed laser ablation to generate plumes of vapor from refractory actinide-containing materials. The vapor is entrained in an inert gas, which can be used to cool the actinide species to room

  10. Conditional Release of Forensic Psychiatric Patients Consistent with or Contrary to Behavioral Experts' Recommendations in the Netherlands: Prevalence Rates, Patient Characteristics and Recidivism After Discharge from Conditional Release.

    PubMed

    Nagtegaal, Maria H; Boonmann, Cyril

    2016-03-01

    The present study examined a group of 447 Dutch forensic psychiatric patients on conditional release (CR). After a brief overview of the Dutch CR system for forensic psychiatric patients is presented, two sets of factors were studied: factors associated with behavioral experts' recommendations on CR readiness (prevalence rates of recommendations in contrast to or consistent with the judge's decision on CR, written vs. oral recommendations and consensus among parties); and characteristics of forensic psychiatric patients on CR imposed consistent with or contrary to behavioral experts' recommendations (i.e., demographic variables, psychopathology, judicial background and outcomes of violent behavior). Patients on CR consistent with or contrary to the behavioral experts' recommendations did not differ in demographic background variables and psychopathology. Patients on CR contrary to the behavioral experts' recommendations, however, had more prior convictions, and their index offense more often included a sex offense and a property offense (with or without violence) as compared to patients on CR consistent with the behavioral experts' recommendations. In addition, decisions contrary to the behavioral experts' recommendations were more often reached after a 3-month continuation adjournment and after an appeal. Also, patients on CR contrary to the behavioral experts' recommendations were less often found to have been on trial leave before their CR. Finally, recidivism rates were found to be much higher for those on CR contrary to, as compared with those on CR consistent with the behavioral experts' recommendations. However, when corrected for other well-known static predictors of recidivism, this significant difference was no longer prevalent. The implications for evaluators' CR readiness reports and lessons that may be learned from the Dutch forensic psychiatric CR system are discussed. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Gas phase emissions from cooking processes and their secondary aerosol production potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Felix; Platt, Stephen; Bruns, Emily; Termime-roussel, Brice; Detournay, Anais; Mohr, Claudia; Crippa, Monica; Slowik, Jay; Marchand, Nicolas; Baltensperger, Urs; Prevot, Andre; El Haddad, Imad

    2014-05-01

    -ToF-MS) were used to quantify OA and VOC emissions, respectively. SOA production potential of the different emissions was quantified by introducing them into the PSI mobile smog chamber and a potential aerosol chamber (PAM) where they were photochemically aged. The measurements of primary emissions suggest that the COA factor identified in ambient atmospheric aerosols is mostly related to fat release from frying with vegetable oils or grilling fatty-meats. In contrast, vegetable cooking (boiling and frying) was associated with significant VOC emissions. The VOC emissions from frying consist mainly of aldehydes which are formed through breaking of fatty acids. Gas phase composition, emission factors and SAPP from all these processes will be presented. This work was supported by the Swiss National Science Foundation as well as the Swiss Federal Office for the Environment. The research leading to these results has received funding from the European Community's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under grant agreement n.° 290605 (COFUND: PSI-FELLOW). J. Allan et al, Atmos. Chem. Phys. 10, 647-668 (2010) X.-F. Huang et al, Atmos. Chem. Phys. 10, 8933-8945 (2010) Y.-L. Sun et al, Atmos. Chem. Phys. 11, 1581-1602 (2011)

  12. [Depth dose characteristics of photon beams released from a scanning-type racetrack microtron].

    PubMed

    Sato, Tomoharu

    2002-06-01

    The MM50 is a racetrack microtron that can emit photon beams or electron beams up to 50 MeV. The MM22 using the scanning beam method and the MM22 using a flattening filter method both to flatten the emission field and a water phantom with particular function measurable of PDD etc. in an accelerator using the scanning beam method to make up the PDD curve of photon beams from the linear accelerator. The Clinac21EX was thus employed. The maximum depth of beam flux was shallow, the gradient of the flux decrement large, the surface dose large, and the estimated nominal energy low to the same nominal energy. From these findings, it can be said that thorough comprehension of the characteristics of beam flux properties for these units is necessary when photon beams are to be used.

  13. Development of a technical approach for assessing environmental release and migration characteristics of Hanford Grout

    SciTech Connect

    Serne, R. J.; Treat, R. L.; Lokken, R. O.

    1985-09-01

    A Transportable Grout Facility is being constructed at the Hanford Site to immobilize low-level liquid radioactive waste in grout. This report addresses the grout and sediment testing methodology that is being developed at PNL to support assessments of the long-term performance of the disposed grout. Sediment is the soil that surrounds and underlies the disposed grout. A goal of these efforts is to certify tests for application at Hanford. An assessment of the long-term risks posed by grout requires data on the ability of grout to resist leaching of wastes contained within the grout. Additionally, data are needed on the ability of the sediments to retard the mobility of any wastes released from grout. The effects of aging on the ability of grout to retain waste must also be understood. Aging of grout can reduce or enhance the ability of the grout to contain waste. Credible predictive modeling of the fate of hazardous constituents in disposed grout for periods of up to 10,000 years would best be performed using comprehensive, coupled hydrologic and chemical reaction codes based on knowledge of the mechanisms that control waste release and mobility. It is not clear yet how soon such codes will be available or which types of waste disposal options they will apply to. In the interim we must be content with simpler and separate models that address individual reactions such as leaching and adsorption. One of these models, the Semi-Infinite Solid Diffusion Leach Model, is a popular release model used to describe the leaching of grouts and other cemented waste forms. Because others have found success in describing laboratory leach experiments with cemented waste forms using this leach model and because it appears likely to err on the conservative side for the Hanford application, we currently endorse the use of this model and its supporting experimental methodology for approximations of grout waste release rates. At the present time it is believed that the leachate from

  14. Reproductive characteristics of grass-fed, luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone-immunocastrated Bos indicus bulls.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, J A; Zanella, E L; Bogden, R; de Avila, D M; Gaskins, C T; Reeves, J J

    2005-12-01

    Two field trials were conducted in Brazil to evaluate LHRH immunocastration of Bos indicus bulls (d 0 = 2 yr of age). In Study I, 72 bulls were assigned randomly to one of three treatment groups: LHRH0-immunized, castrated, and intact. Immunized animals (n = 25) received a primary and two booster injections of ovalbumin-LHRH-7 and thioredoxin-LHRH-7 fusion proteins on d 0, 141, and 287. Twenty-three bulls were surgically castrated on d 141, and 24 served as intact controls. All animals were slaughtered on d 385, at approximately 3 yr of age. In Study II, 216 bulls were assigned randomly to the same three treatments as in Study I; however, because of a drought in the area, bulls were kept on pasture an additional year, and a fourth treatment was added, in which one-half the LHRH-immunized bulls received an additional booster on d 639 (fourth immunization). All animals in Study II were slaughtered on d 741 (4 yr of age). Luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone antibodies increased following each immunization for immunized bulls, but they were not detectable in castrate or intact animals in either study. Consequently, scrotal circumference was suppressed in immunized bulls compared with intact controls in both studies. By d 287, serum concentrations of testosterone in LHRH-immunized bulls were decreased compared with intact controls (P < 0.01). In both studies, testes and epididymal weights at slaughter were greater (P < 0.01) for intact (500 +/- 17 and 60 +/- 2 g, respectively) than for immunized bulls (173 +/- 22 and 26 +/- 2 g, respectively) and fourth immunization bulls (78 +/- 23 and 20 +/- 2 g, respectively; Study II). At the end of each study, BW was greater (P < 0.01) for intact bulls than for castrated and LHRH-immunized animals. In these two studies, the efficacy of the LHRH fusion proteins to induce an effect similar to that of surgical castration was considered 92 and 93%, respectively. These data support the concept that immunocastration of bulls at 2 yr of

  15. Electrospun gelatin fiber mats containing a herbal—Centella asiatica—extract and release characteristic of asiaticoside

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sikareepaisan, Panprung; Suksamrarn, Apichart; Supaphol, Pitt

    2008-01-01

    Ultra-fine gelatin (type A, porcine skin, ~180 Bloom) fiber mats containing a methanolic crude extract of Centella asiatica (L.) Urban, a medicinal plant widely known for its traditional medical applications including its wound healing ability, were fabricated, for the first time, from the neat gelatin solution (22% w/v in 70 vol% acetic acid) containing the crude extract (mCA) in various amounts (i.e. 5-30 wt% based on the weight of gelatin powder) by electrospinning. Incorporation of mCA in the neat gelatin solution did not affect both the morphology and the size of the mCA-loaded gelatin fibers, as both of the neat and the mCA-loaded gelatin fibers were smooth and the average diameters of these fibers ranged between 226 and 232 nm. The cross-linked mCA-loaded e-spun gelatin fiber mat from the neat gelatin solution containing 30 wt% of mCA was further investigated for the release characteristic of asiaticoside, identified as the most active compound associated with the healing of wounds, in two different types of releasing medium, i.e. acetate buffer and the buffer containing 10 vol% of methanol, based on the thin-layer chromatography (TLC)-densitometry technique. Based on the unit weight of the actual amount of asiaticoside present in the specimens, the total amount of asiaticoside released from the fiber mat specimens was lower than that from the film counterparts while, based on the unit weight of the specimens, an opposite trend was observed.

  16. Nano electrospray gas-phase electrophoretic mobility molecular analysis (nES GEMMA) of liposomes: applicability of the technique for nano vesicle batch control

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Victor U.; Urey, Carlos; Gondikas, Andreas; Golesne, Monika; Friedbacher, Gernot; von der Kammer, Frank; Hofmann, Thilo; Andersson, Roland; Marko-Varga, György; Marchetti-Deschmann, Martina

    2016-01-01

    Liposomes are biodegradable nanoparticle vesicles consisting of a lipid bilayer encapsulating an aqueous core. Entrapped cargo material is shielded from the extra-vesicular medium and sustained release of encapsulated material can be achieved. However, application of liposomes as nano-carriers demands their characterization concerning size and size distribution, particle-number concentration, occurrence of vesicle building blocks in solution and determination of the resulting vesicle encapsulation capacity. These questions can be targeted via gas-phase electrophoretic mobility molecular analysis (GEMMA) based on a nano electrospray (nES) charge-reduction source. This instrument separates single-charged nanoparticles in the gas-phase according to size in a high-laminar sheath-flow by means of an orthogonal, tunable electric field. nES GEMMA analysis enables to confirm liposome integrity after passage through the instrument (in combination with atomic force microscopy) as well as to exclude vesicle aggregation. Additionally, nanoparticle diameters at peak apexes and size distribution data are obtained. Differences of hydrodynamic and dry particle diameter values, as well as the effect of number- and mass-based concentration data analysis on obtained liposome diameters are shown. Furthermore, the repeatability of liposome preparation is studied, especially upon incorporation of PEGylated lipids in the bilayer. Finally, the instruments applicability to monitor mechanical stress applied to vesicles is demonstrated. PMID:27549027

  17. Nano electrospray gas-phase electrophoretic mobility molecular analysis (nES GEMMA) of liposomes: applicability of the technique for nano vesicle batch control.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Victor U; Urey, Carlos; Gondikas, Andreas; Golesne, Monika; Friedbacher, Gernot; von der Kammer, Frank; Hofmann, Thilo; Andersson, Roland; Marko-Varga, György; Marchetti-Deschmann, Martina; Allmaier, Günter

    2016-10-17

    Liposomes are biodegradable nanoparticle vesicles consisting of a lipid bilayer encapsulating an aqueous core. Entrapped cargo material is shielded from the extra-vesicular medium and sustained release of encapsulated material can be achieved. However, application of liposomes as nano-carriers demands their characterization concerning size and size distribution, particle-number concentration, occurrence of vesicle building blocks in solution and determination of the resulting vesicle encapsulation capacity. These questions can be targeted via gas-phase electrophoretic mobility molecular analysis (GEMMA) based on a nano electrospray (nES) charge-reduction source. This instrument separates single-charged nanoparticles in the gas-phase according to size in a high-laminar sheath-flow by means of an orthogonal, tunable electric field. nES GEMMA analysis enables to confirm liposome integrity after passage through the instrument (in combination with atomic force microscopy) as well as to exclude vesicle aggregation. Additionally, nanoparticle diameters at peak apexes and size distribution data are obtained. Differences of hydrodynamic and dry particle diameter values, as well as the effect of number- and mass-based concentration data analysis on obtained liposome diameters are shown. Furthermore, the repeatability of liposome preparation is studied, especially upon incorporation of PEGylated lipids in the bilayer. Finally, the instruments applicability to monitor mechanical stress applied to vesicles is demonstrated.

  18. Influence of formulation and process parameters on the release characteristics of ethylcellulose sustained-release mini-matrices produced by hot-melt extrusion.

    PubMed

    Verhoeven, E; De Beer, T R M; Van den Mooter, G; Remon, J P; Vervaet, C

    2008-05-01

    Mini-matrices (multiple unit dosage form) with release-sustaining properties were developed by hot-melt extrusion (cylindrical die: 3mm) using metoprolol tartrate as model drug and ethylcellulose as sustained-release agent. Dibutyl sebacate was selected as plasticizer and its concentration was optimized to 50% (w/w) of the ethylcellulose concentration. Xanthan gum, a hydrophilic polymer, was added to the formulation to increase drug release. Changing the xanthan gum concentration modified the in vitro drug release: increasing xanthan gum concentrations (1%, 2.5%, 5%, 10% and 20%, w/w) yielded a faster drug release. Zero-order drug release was obtained at 5% (w/w) xanthan gum. Using kneading paddles, smooth extrudates were obtained when processed at 60 degrees C. At least one mixing zone was required to obtain smooth and homogeneous extrudates. The mixing efficacy and drug release were not affected by the number of mixing zones or their position along the extruder barrel. Raman analysis revealed that metoprolol tartrate was homogeneously distributed in the mini-matrices, independent of screw design and processing conditions. Simultaneously changing the powder feed rate (6-25-50 g/min) and screw speed (30-100-200 rpm) did not alter extrudate quality or dissolution properties.

  19. Design and development of a novel nuclear magnetic resonance detection for the gas phase ions by magnetic resonance acceleration technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuke, K.; Tona, M.; Fujihara, A.; Sakurai, M.; Ishikawa, H.

    2012-08-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technique is a well-established powerful tool to study the physical and chemical properties of a wide range of materials. However, presently, NMR applications are essentially limited to materials in the condensed phase. Although magnetic resonance was originally demonstrated in gas phase molecular beam experiments, no application to gas phase molecular ions has yet been demonstrated. Here, we present a novel principle of NMR detection for gas phase ions based on a "magnetic resonance acceleration" technique and describe the design and construction of an apparatus which we are developing. We also present an experimental technique and some results on the formation and manipulation of cold ion packets in a strong magnetic field, which are the key innovations to detect NMR signal using the present method. We expect this novel method to lead new realm for the study of mass-selected gas-phase ions with interesting applications in both fundamental and applied sciences.

  20. Dark current reduction of Ge photodetector by GeO₂ surface passivation and gas-phase doping.

    PubMed

    Takenaka, Mitsuru; Morii, Kiyohito; Sugiyama, Masakazu; Nakano, Yoshiaki; Takagi, Shinichi

    2012-04-09

    We have investigated the dark current of a germanium (Ge) photodetector (PD) with a GeO₂ surface passivation layer and a gas-phase-doped n+/p junction. The gas-phase-doped PN diodes exhibited a dark current of approximately two orders of magnitude lower than that of the diodes formed by a conventional ion implantation process, indicating that gas-phase doping is suitable for low-damage PN junction formation. The bulk leakage (Jbulk) and surface leakage (Jsurf) components of the dark current were also investigated. We have found that GeO₂ surface passivation can effectively suppress the dark current of a Ge PD in conjunction with gas-phase doping, and we have obtained extremely low values of Jbulk of 0.032 mA/cm² and Jsurf of 0.27 μA/cm.

  1. Methods for Using Ab Initio Potential Energy Surfaces in Studies of Gas-Phase Reactions of Energetic Molecules

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-20

    Ab Initio Potential Energy Surfaces in Studies of Gas-Phase Reactions of Energetic Molecules The focus of this research was to apply efficient...methods for using ab initio potential energy surfaces (PESs) computed with high levels of quantum chemistry theory to predict chemical reaction properties...in non peer-reviewed journals: Methods for Using Ab Initio Potential Energy Surfaces in Studies of Gas-Phase Reactions of Energetic Molecules Report

  2. Formation of a superatom monolayer using gas-phase-synthesized Ta@Si16 nanocluster ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakaya, Masato; Iwasa, Takeshi; Tsunoyama, Hironori; Eguchi, Toyoaki; Nakajima, Atsushi

    2014-11-01

    The controlled assembly of superatomic nanocluster ions synthesized in the gas phase is a key technology for constructing a novel series of functional nanomaterials. However, it is generally difficult to immobilize them onto a conductive surface while maintaining their original properties owing to undesirable modifications of their geometry and charge state. In this study, it has been shown that this difficulty can be overcome by controlling the donor-acceptor interaction between nanoclusters and surfaces. Cations of Ta-atom-encapsulated Si16 cage nanoclusters (Ta@Si16) behaving as rare-gas-like superatoms are synthesized in the gas phase and deposited on conductive surfaces terminated with acceptor-like C60 and donor-like α-sexithiophene (6T) molecules. Scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy have demonstrated that Ta@Si16 cations can be densely immobilized onto C60-terminated surfaces while retaining their cage shape and positive charge, which is realized by creating binary charge transfer complexes (Ta@Si16+-C60-) on the surfaces. The Ta@Si16 nanoclusters exhibit excellent thermal stability on C60-teminated surfaces similar to those in the gas phase, whereas the nanoclusters destabilize at room temperature on 6T-terminated surfaces owing to the loss of electronic closure via a change in the charge state.The controlled assembly of superatomic nanocluster ions synthesized in the gas phase is a key technology for constructing a novel series of functional nanomaterials. However, it is generally difficult to immobilize them onto a conductive surface while maintaining their original properties owing to undesirable modifications of their geometry and charge state. In this study, it has been shown that this difficulty can be overcome by controlling the donor-acceptor interaction between nanoclusters and surfaces. Cations of Ta-atom-encapsulated Si16 cage nanoclusters (Ta@Si16) behaving as rare-gas-like superatoms are synthesized in the gas phase and deposited on

  3. [Impacts of Eichhornia crassipes (Mart.) Solms stress on the growth characteristics, microcystins and nutrients release of Microcystis aeruginosa].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qing; Han, Shi-Qun; Yan, Shao-Hua; Song, Wei; Liu, Guo-Feng

    2014-02-01

    Due to the large-scale application of Eichhornia crassipes (Mart.) Solms on the bioremediation of eutrophic lake in China, the influence of growth, physiological characteristics, microcystins production and release of M. aeruginosa by E. crassipes was investigated. Meanwhile, the release risk of nutrients from M. aeruginosa and the accumulation risk of microcystins in E. crassipe were explored through semi-continuous co-existence experiments. Our results indicated that M. aeruginosa was promoted by E. crassipes to undergo the cell death. Under the stress of E. crassipes, direct damage of phycocyanin and phycocyanin/allophycocyanin ratio in M. aeruginosa occurred, while the photosystem II-Hill reaction in M. aeruginosa was not interrupted. The PC/APC levels in the treatment of 10% and 20% water exchange rate were respectively decreased to 54.93% +/- 7.07% and 55.81% +/- 1.97% of the level in their relative controls after 8 days. Then, the final significant decrease of specific superoxide dismutase activity and the striking elevation of malondialdehyde content in M. aeruginosa could be the results of oxidative damage by E. crassipes. Algal malondialdehyde content in the treatment of 10% and 20% water exchange rate were respectively 2.95 +/- 0.074 and 2.22 +/- 0.086 times of the level in their relative controls on day 8. The release of nutrients from M. aeruginosa was accelerated because the decay and lysis of algal cells were promoted by E. crassipes. After 12-day co-existence experiments, the concentration of total dissolved nitrogen in water was brought back to the initial level and the release of total dissolved phosphorus was faster than nitrogen nutrients under the stress of E. crassipes. In addition, the microcystins production in M. aeruginosa was not stimulated and the extracellular microcystins were significantly eliminated by the influence of E. crassipes. The extracellular microcystins contents in the treatment of 10% and 20% water exchange rate were

  4. Gas-phase naphthalene concentration data recovery in ambient air and its relevance as a tracer of sources of volatile organic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uria-Tellaetxe, Iratxe; Navazo, Marino; de Blas, Maite; Durana, Nieves; Alonso, Lucio; Iza, Jon

    2016-04-01

    Despite the toxicity of naphthalene and the fact that it is a precursor of atmospheric photooxidants and secondary aerosol, studies on ambient gas-phase naphthalene are generally scarce. Moreover, as far as we are concerned, this is the first published one using long-term hourly ambient gas-phase naphthalene concentrations. In this work, it has been also demonstrated the usefulness of ambient gas-phase naphthalene to identify major sources of volatile organic compounds (VOC) in complex scenarios. Initially, in order to identify main benzene emission sources, hourly ambient measurements of 60 VOC were taken during a complete year together with meteorological data in an urban/industrial area. Later, due to the observed co-linearity of some of the emissions, a procedure was developed to recover naphthalene concentration data from recorded chromatograms to use it as a tracer of the combustion and distillation of petroleum products. The characteristic retention time of this compound was determined comparing previous GC-MS and GC-FID simultaneous analysis by means of relative retention times, and its concentration was calculated by using relative response factors. The obtained naphthalene concentrations correlated fairly well with ethene (r = 0.86) and benzene (r = 0.92). Besides, the analysis of daily time series showed that these compounds followed a similar pattern, very different from that of other VOC, with minimum concentrations at day-time. This, together with the results from the assessment of the meteorological dependence pointed out a coke oven as the major naphthalene and benzene emitting sources in the study area.

  5. Enhanced Lipidome Coverage in Shotgun Analyses by using Gas-Phase Fractionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazari, Milad; Muddiman, David C.

    2016-11-01

    A high resolving power shotgun lipidomics strategy using gas-phase fractionation and data-dependent acquisition (DDA) was applied toward comprehensive characterization of lipids in a hen ovarian tissue in an untargeted fashion. Using this approach, a total of 822 unique lipids across a diverse range of lipid categories and classes were identified based on their MS/MS fragmentation patterns. Classes of glycerophospholipids and glycerolipids, such as glycerophosphocholines (PC), glycerophosphoethanolamines (PE), and triglycerides (TG), are often the most abundant peaks observed in shotgun lipidomics analyses. These ions suppress the signal from low abundance ions and hinder the chances of characterizing low abundant lipids when DDA is used. These issues were circumvented by utilizing gas-phase fractionation, where DDA was performed on narrow m/z ranges instead of a broad m/z range. Employing gas-phase fractionation resulted in an increase in sensitivity by more than an order of magnitude in both positive- and negative-ion modes. Furthermore, the enhanced sensitivity increased the number of lipids identified by a factor of ≈4, and facilitated identification of low abundant lipids from classes such as cardiolipins that are often difficult to observe in untargeted shotgun analyses and require sample-specific preparation steps prior to analysis. This method serves as a resource for comprehensive profiling of lipids from many different categories and classes in an untargeted manner, as well as for targeted and quantitative analyses of individual lipids. Furthermore, this comprehensive analysis of the lipidome can serve as a species- and tissue-specific database for confident identification of other MS-based datasets, such as mass spectrometry imaging.

  6. Gas-phase acid-base properties of melamine and cyanuric acid.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Sumit; Ren, Jianhua

    2010-10-01

    The thermochemical properties of melamine and cyanuric acid were characterized using mass spectrometry measurements along with computational studies. A triple-quadrupole mass spectrometer was employed with the application of the extended Cooks kinetic method. The proton affinity (PA), gas-phase basicity (GB), and protonation entropy (Δ(p)S) of melamine were determined to be 226.2 ± 2.0 kcal/mol, 218.4 ± 2.0 kcal/mol, and 26.2 ± 2.0 cal/mol K, respectively. The deprotonation enthalpy (Δ(acid)H), gas-phase acidity (Δ(acid)G), and deprotonation entropy (Δ(acid)S) of cyanuric acid were determined to be 330.7 ± 2.0 kcal/mol, 322.9 ± 2.0 kcal/mol, and 26.1 ± 2.0 cal/mol K, respectively. The geometries and energetics of melamine, cyanuric acid, and related ionic species were calculated at the B3LYP/6-31+G(d) level of theory. The computationally predicted proton affinity of melamine (225.9 kcal/mol) and gas-phase deprotonation enthalpy of cyanuric acid (328.4 kcal/mol) agree well with the experimental results. Melamine is best represented as the imide-like triazine-triamine form and the triazine nitrogen is more basic than the amino group nitrogen. Cyanuric acid is best represented as the keto-like tautomer and the N-H group is the most probable proton donor.

  7. Aqueous nitrite ion determination by selective reduction and gas phase nitric oxide chemiluminescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunham, A. J.; Barkley, R. M.; Sievers, R. E.; Clarkson, T. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    An improved method of flow injection analysis for aqueous nitrite ion exploits the sensitivity and selectivity of the nitric oxide (NO) chemilluminescence detector. Trace analysis of nitrite ion in a small sample (5-160 microL) is accomplished by conversion of nitrite ion to NO by aqueous iodide in acid. The resulting NO is transported to the gas phase through a semipermeable membrane and subsequently detected by monitoring the photoemission of the reaction between NO and ozone (O3). Chemiluminescence detection is selective for measurement of NO, and, since the detection occurs in the gas-phase, neither sample coloration nor turbidity interfere. The detection limit for a 100-microL sample is 0.04 ppb of nitrite ion. The precision at the 10 ppb level is 2% relative standard deviation, and 60-180 samples can be analyzed per hour. Samples of human saliva and food extracts were analyzed; the results from a standard colorimetric measurement are compared with those from the new chemiluminescence method in order to further validate the latter method. A high degree of selectivity is obtained due to the three discriminating steps in the process: (1) the nitrite ion to NO conversion conditions are virtually specific for nitrite ion, (2) only volatile products of the conversion will be swept to the gas phase (avoiding turbidity or color in spectrophotometric methods), and (3) the NO chemiluminescence detector selectively detects the emission from the NO + O3 reaction. The method is free of interferences, offers detection limits of low parts per billion of nitrite ion, and allows the analysis of up to 180 microL-sized samples per hour, with little sample preparation and no chromatographic separation. Much smaller samples can be analyzed by this method than in previously reported batch analysis methods, which typically require 5 mL or more of sample and often need chromatographic separations as well.

  8. Ditechnetium heptoxide revisited: Solid-state, gas-phase, and theoretical studies

    DOE PAGES

    Childs, Bradley C.; Braband, Henrik; Lawler, Keith; ...

    2016-10-04

    Here, ditechnetium heptoxide was synthesized from the oxidation of TcO2 with O2 at 450 °C and characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction (SCXRD), electron impact mass spectrometry (EI-MS) and theoretical methods. Refinement of the structure at 100 K indicates that Tc2O7 crystallizes as a molecular solid in the orthorhombic space group Pbca (a = 7.312(3) Å, b = 5.562(2) Å, c = 13.707(5) Å, V = 557.5(3) Å3). The Tc2O7 molecule can be described as corner-sharing TcO4 tetrahedra (Tc---Tc = 3.698(1) Å and Tc-OBri-Tc = 180.0°). The EI-MS spectrum of Tc2O7 consists of both mononuclear and dinuclear species. The mainmore » dinuclear species in the gas-phase are Tc2O7 (100%) and Tc2O5 (56%), while the main mononuclear species are TcO3 (33.9%) and TcO2 (42.8%). The difference in the relative intensities of the M2O5 (M = Tc, Re) fragments (1.7% for Re) indicate that these Group 7 elements exhibit different gas phase chemistry. The solid-state structure of Tc2O7 was investigated by density functional theory (DFT) methods. The optimized structure of the Tc2O7 molecule is in good agreement with the experimental one. Simulations indicate that the more favorable geometry for the Tc2O7 molecule in the gas-phase is bent (Tc-OBri-Tc = 156.5°), while linear (Tc-OBri-Tc = 180.0°) is favored in the solid state.« less

  9. Gas-phase advanced oxidation for effective, efficient in situ control of pollution.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Matthew S; Nilsson, Elna J K; Svensson, Erik A; Langer, Sarka

    2014-01-01

    In this article, gas-phase advanced oxidation, a new method for pollution control building on the photo-oxidation and particle formation chemistry occurring in the atmosphere, is introduced and characterized. The process uses ozone and UV-C light to produce in situ radicals to oxidize pollution, generating particles that are removed by a filter; ozone is removed using a MnO2 honeycomb catalyst. This combination of in situ processes removes a wide range of pollutants with a comparatively low specific energy input. Two proof-of-concept devices were built to test and optimize the process. The laboratory prototype was built of standard ventilation duct and could treat up to 850 m(3)/h. A portable continuous-flow prototype built in an aluminum flight case was able to treat 46 m(3)/h. Removal efficiencies of >95% were observed for propane, cyclohexane, benzene, isoprene, aerosol particle mass, and ozone for concentrations in the range of 0.4-6 ppm and exposure times up to 0.5 min. The laboratory prototype generated a OH(•) concentration derived from propane reaction of (2.5 ± 0.3) × 10(10) cm(-3) at a specific energy input of 3 kJ/m(3), and the portable device generated (4.6 ± 0.4) × 10(9) cm(-3) at 10 kJ/m(3). Based on these results, in situ gas-phase advanced oxidation is a viable control strategy for most volatile organic compounds, specifically those with a OH(•) reaction rate higher than ca. 5 × 10(-13) cm(3)/s. Gas-phase advanced oxidation is able to remove compounds that react with OH and to control ozone and total particulate mass. Secondary pollution including formaldehyde and ultrafine particles might be generated, depending on the composition of the primary pollution.

  10. Position for determining gas-phase volatile organic compound concentrations in transuranic waste containers. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect

    Connolly, M.J.; Liekhus, K.J.; Djordjevic, S.M.; Loehr, C.A.; Spangler, L.R.

    1998-06-01

    In the conditional no-migration determination (NMD) for the test phase of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) imposed certain conditions on the US Department of Energy (DOE) regarding gas phase volatile organic compound (VOC) concentrations in the void space of transuranic (TRU) waste containers. Specifically, the EPA required the DOE to ensure that each waste container has no layer of confinement that contains flammable mixtures of gases or mixtures of gases that could become flammable when mixed with air. The EPA also required that sampling of the headspace of waste containers outside inner layers of confinement be representative of the entire void space of the container. The EPA stated that all layers of confinement in a container would have to be sampled until DOE can demonstrate to the EPA that sampling of all layers is either unnecessary or can be safely reduced. A test program was conducted at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) to demonstrate that the gas phase VOC concentration in the void space of each layer of confinement in vented drums can be estimated from measured drum headspace using a theoretical transport model and that sampling of each layer of confinement is unnecessary. This report summarizes the studies performed in the INEEL test program and extends them for the purpose of developing a methodology for determining gas phase VOC concentrations in both vented and unvented TRU waste containers. The methodology specifies conditions under which waste drum headspace gases can be said to be representative of drum gases as a whole and describes a method for predicting drum concentrations in situations where the headspace concentration is not representative. The methodology addresses the approach for determining the drum VOC gas content for two purposes: operational period drum handling and operational period no-migration calculations.

  11. Partitioning of phthalates among the gas phase, airborne particles and settled dust in indoor environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weschler, Charles J.; Salthammer, Tunga; Fromme, Hermann

    A critical evaluation of human exposure to phthalate esters in indoor environments requires the determination of their distribution among the gas phase, airborne particles and settled dust. If sorption from the gas phase is the dominant mechanism whereby a given phthalate is associated with both airborne particles and settled dust, there should be a predictable relationship between its particle and dust concentrations. The present paper tests this for six phthalate esters (DMP, DEP, DnBP, DiBP, BBzP and DEHP) that have been measured in both the air and the settled dust of 30 Berlin apartments. The particle concentration, CParticle, of a given phthalate was calculated from its total airborne concentration and the concentration of airborne particles (PM 4). This required knowledge of the particle-gas partition coefficient, Kp, which was estimated from either the saturation vapor pressure ( ps) or the octanol/air partition coefficient ( KOA). For each phthalate in each apartment, the ratio of its particle concentration to its dust concentration ( CParticle/ CDust) was calculated. The median values of this ratio were within an order of magnitude of one another for five of the phthalate esters despite the fact that their vapor pressures span four orders of magnitude. This indicates that measurements of phthalate ester concentrations in settled dust can provide an estimate of their concentration in airborne particles. When the latter information is coupled with measurements of airborne particle concentrations, the gas-phase concentrations of phthalates can also be estimated and, subsequently, the contribution of each of these compartments to indoor phthalate exposures.

  12. Deliberate and Accidental Gas-Phase Alkali Doping of Chalcogenide Semiconductors: Cu(In,Ga)Se2.

    PubMed

    Colombara, Diego; Berner, Ulrich; Ciccioli, Andrea; Malaquias, João C; Bertram, Tobias; Crossay, Alexandre; Schöneich, Michael; Meadows, Helene J; Regesch, David; Delsante, Simona; Gigli, Guido; Valle, Nathalie; Guillot, Jérome; El Adib, Brahime; Grysan, Patrick; Dale, Phillip J

    2017-02-24

    Alkali metal doping is essential to achieve highly efficient energy conversion in Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGSe) solar cells. Doping is normally achieved through solid state reactions, but recent observations of gas-phase alkali transport in the kesterite sulfide (Cu2ZnSnS4) system (re)open the way to a novel gas-phase doping strategy. However, the current understanding of gas-phase alkali transport is very limited. This work (i) shows that CIGSe device efficiency can be improved from 2% to 8% by gas-phase sodium incorporation alone, (ii) identifies the most likely routes for gas-phase alkali transport based on mass spectrometric studies, (iii) provides thermochemical computations to rationalize the observations and (iv) critically discusses the subject literature with the aim to better understand the chemical basis of the phenomenon. These results suggest that accidental alkali metal doping occurs all the time, that a controlled vapor pressure of alkali metal could be applied during growth to dope the semiconductor, and that it may have to be accounted for during the currently used solid state doping routes. It is concluded that alkali gas-phase transport occurs through a plurality of routes and cannot be attributed to one single source.

  13. Deliberate and Accidental Gas-Phase Alkali Doping of Chalcogenide Semiconductors: Cu(In,Ga)Se2

    PubMed Central

    Colombara, Diego; Berner, Ulrich; Ciccioli, Andrea; Malaquias, João C.; Bertram, Tobias; Crossay, Alexandre; Schöneich, Michael; Meadows, Helene J.; Regesch, David; Delsante, Simona; Gigli, Guido; Valle, Nathalie; Guillot, Jérome; El Adib, Brahime; Grysan, Patrick; Dale, Phillip J.

    2017-01-01

    Alkali metal doping is essential to achieve highly efficient energy conversion in Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGSe) solar cells. Doping is normally achieved through solid state reactions, but recent observations of gas-phase alkali transport in the kesterite sulfide (Cu2ZnSnS4) system (re)open the way to a novel gas-phase doping strategy. However, the current understanding of gas-phase alkali transport is very limited. This work (i) shows that CIGSe device efficiency can be improved from 2% to 8% by gas-phase sodium incorporation alone, (ii) identifies the most likely routes for gas-phase alkali transport based on mass spectrometric studies, (iii) provides thermochemical computations to rationalize the observations and (iv) critically discusses the subject literature with the aim to better understand the chemical basis of the phenomenon. These results suggest that accidental alkali metal doping occurs all the time, that a controlled vapor pressure of alkali metal could be applied during growth to dope the semiconductor, and that it may have to be accounted for during the currently used solid state doping routes. It is concluded that alkali gas-phase transport occurs through a plurality of routes and cannot be attributed to one single source. PMID:28233864

  14. Deliberate and Accidental Gas-Phase Alkali Doping of Chalcogenide Semiconductors: Cu(In,Ga)Se2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colombara, Diego; Berner, Ulrich; Ciccioli, Andrea; Malaquias, João C.; Bertram, Tobias; Crossay, Alexandre; Schöneich, Michael; Meadows, Helene J.; Regesch, David; Delsante, Simona; Gigli, Guido; Valle, Nathalie; Guillot, Jérome; El Adib, Brahime; Grysan, Patrick; Dale, Phillip J.

    2017-02-01

    Alkali metal doping is essential to achieve highly efficient energy conversion in Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGSe) solar cells. Doping is normally achieved through solid state reactions, but recent observations of gas-phase alkali transport in the kesterite sulfide (Cu2ZnSnS4) system (re)open the way to a novel gas-phase doping strategy. However, the current understanding of gas-phase alkali transport is very limited. This work (i) shows that CIGSe device efficiency can be improved from 2% to 8% by gas-phase sodium incorporation alone, (ii) identifies the most likely routes for gas-phase alkali transport based on mass spectrometric studies, (iii) provides thermochemical computations to rationalize the observations and (iv) critically discusses the subject literature with the aim to better understand the chemical basis of the phenomenon. These results suggest that accidental alkali metal doping occurs all the time, that a controlled vapor pressure of alkali metal could be applied during growth to dope the semiconductor, and that it may have to be accounted for during the currently used solid state doping routes. It is concluded that alkali gas-phase transport occurs through a plurality of routes and cannot be attributed to one single source.

  15. Critical temperature for the nuclear liquid-gas phase transition (from multifragmentation and fission)

    SciTech Connect

    Karnaukhov, V. A.; Oeschler, H.; Budzanowski, A.; Avdeyev, S. P.; Botvina, A. S.; Cherepanov, E. A.; Karcz, W.; Kirakosyan, V. V.; Rukoyatkin, P. A.; Skwirczynska, I.; Norbeck, E.

    2008-12-15

    Critical temperature T{sub c} for the nuclear liquid-gas phase transition is estimated from both the multifragmentation and fission data. In the first case, the critical temperature is obtained by analysis of the intermediate-mass-fragment yields in p(8.1 GeV) + Au collisions within the statistical model of multifragmentation. In the second case, the experimental fission probability for excited {sup 188}Os is compared with the calculated one with T{sub c} as a free parameter. It is concluded for both cases that the critical temperature is higher than 15 MeV.

  16. Gas phase NMR spectra of N,N-dimethylnitrosamine. Environmental effects on kinetic parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauvel, J. Paul; Leung, Doris Y.; True, Nancy S.

    1984-04-01

    Gas phase 1H NMR spectra of N,N-dimethylnitrosamine are consistent with first order chemical exchange rate constants which are ca. 25 times faster than those observed in neat liquids at corresponding temperatures. The associated kinetic parameters: Eact(∞), 20.5(1.1) kcal mol -1, Δ H‡, 19.7(1.0) kcal mol -1 and Δ G‡, 21.1(0.4) kcal mol -1 are approximately 2.5 kcal mol -1 lower than the most recently reported values for the neat liquid. The observed phase dependence is consistent with a process proceeding via a freely rotating transition state.

  17. An index of the literature for bimolecular gas phase cation-molecule reaction kinetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anicich, V. G.

    2003-01-01

    This is an index to the literature for gas phase bimolecular positive ionmolecule reactions. Over 2300 references are cited. Reaction rate coefficients and product distributions of the reactions are abstracted out of the original citations where available. This index is intended to cover the literature from 1936 to 2003. This is a continuation of several surveys: the original (Huntress Astrophys. J. Suppl. Ser., 33, 495 (1977)), an expansion (Anicich and Huntress, Astrophys. J. Suppl. Ser. 62, 553 (1986)), a supplement (Anicich, Astrophys. J. Suppl. Ser. 84, 215 (1993)), and an evaluation (Anicich, V. G. J. Phys. Chem. Ref. Data 22,1469 (1993b). The Table of reactions is listed by reactant ion.

  18. UV/Vis Action Spectroscopy and Structures of Tyrosine Peptide Cation Radicals in the Gas Phase.

    PubMed

    Viglino, Emilie; Shaffer, Christopher J; Tureček, František

    2016-06-20

    We report the first application of UV/Vis photodissociation action spectroscopy for the structure elucidation of tyrosine peptide cation radicals produced by oxidative intramolecular electron transfer in gas-phase metal complexes. Oxidation of Tyr-Ala-Ala-Ala-Arg (YAAAR) produces Tyr-O radicals by combined electron and proton transfer involving the phenol and carboxyl groups. Oxidation of Ala-Ala-Ala-Tyr-Arg (AAAYR) produces a mixture of cation radicals involving electron abstraction from the Tyr phenol ring and N-terminal amino group in combination with hydrogen-atom transfer from the Cα positions of the peptide backbone.

  19. Forming NCO– in Dense Molecular Clouds: Possible Gas-Phase Chemical Paths From Quantum Calculations

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The existence of NCO– anions in the interstellar medium (ISM) has been suggested and searched for over the years but without any formal definitive sighting of that molecule. We discuss in this work the possible formation of either NCO– directly or of NCO neutral as a precursor to NCO– formation by electron attachment. We follow simple, gas-phase chemical reactions for which the general features are obtained from accurate quantum calculations. The results are shedding some additional light on the likely presence of this anion in the ISM environment, drawing further information from the specific features of the considered reactions on the additional chemical options that exist for its formation. PMID:26696323

  20. Adsorption of CO on gas phase and zeolite supported gold monomers: A computational study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deka, Ajanta; Deka, Ramesh Chandra; Choudhury, Amarjyoti

    2010-04-01

    We report for the first time the interaction of carbon monoxide with gold monomer in three oxidation states 0, +1 and +3 on FAU zeolite support using density functional theory. The gas phase structures of the gold carbonyls are retained on the zeolite support with only a slight change in the O-C-Au bond angle. For the supported cluster the CO vibrational frequency shows a blue shift on going to higher oxidation states. The CO binding energies on the supported gold monomers are 1.01, 1.15 and 1.12 eV in the oxidation states 0, +1 and +3, respectively.

  1. Influence of the coulomb interaction on the liquid-gas phase transition and nuclear multifragmentation.

    PubMed

    Gulminelli, F; Chomaz, Ph; Raduta, Al H; Raduta, Ad R

    2003-11-14

    The liquid-gas phase transition is analyzed from the topologic properties of the event distribution in the observables space. A multicanonical formalism allows one to directly relate the standard phase transition with neutral particles to the case where the nonsaturating Coulomb interaction is present, and to interpret the Coulomb effect as a deformation of the probability distributions and a rotation of the order parameter. This formalism is applied to a statistical multifragmentation model and consequences for the nuclear multifragmentation phase transitions are drawn.

  2. Gas Phase Vibrational Spectroscopy of Weakly Volatil Safe Taggants Using a Synchrotron Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuisset, Arnaud; Hindle, Francis; Mouret, Gael; Gruet, Sebastien; Pirali, Olivier; Roy, Pascale

    2013-06-01

    The high performances of the AILES beamline of SOLEIL allow to study at medium resolution (0.5 cm^{-1}) the gas phase THz vibrational spectra of weakly volatil compounds. Between 2008 and 2010 we recorded and analyzed the THz/Far-IR spectra of phosphorous based nerve agents thanks to sufficient vapour pressures from liquid samples at room temperature. Recently, we extended these experiments towards the vibrational spectroscopy of vapour pressures from solid samples. This project is quite challenging since we target lower volatile compounds, and so requires very high sensitive spectrometers. Moreover a specially designed heated multipass-cell have been developped for the gas phase study of very weak vapor pressures. Thanks to skills acquired during initial studies and recent experiments performed on AILES with solid PAHs, we have recorded and assigned the gas phase vibrational fingerprints from the THz to the NIR spectral domain (10-4000 cm-1) of a set of targeted nitro-derivatives. The study was focused onto the para, ortho-mononitrotoluene (p-NT, o-NT), the 1,4 Dinitrobenzene (1,4 DNB), the 2,3-dimethyl-2,3-dinitrobutane (DMNB), and 2,4 and 2,6-dinitrotoluene (2,4-2,6 DNT), which are safe taggants widely used for the detection of commercial explosives. These taggants are usually added to plastic explosives in order to facilitate their vapour detection. Therefore, there is a continuous interest for their detection and identification in realistic conditions via optical methods. A first step consists in the recording of their gas phase vibrational spectra. These expected spectra focused onto molecules involved into defence and security domains are not yet available to date and will be very useful for the scientific community. This work is supported by the contract ANR-11-ASTR-035-01. A. Cuisset, G. Mouret, O. Pirali, P. Roy, F. Cazier, H. Nouali, J. Demaison, J. Phys. Chem. B, 2008, 112:, 12516-12525 I. Smirnova, A. Cuisset, R. Bocquet, F. Hindle, G. Mouret, O

  3. Gas-phase photocatalytic oxidation: Cost comparison with other air pollution control technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Turchi, C S; Wolfrum, E J; Miller, R A

    1994-11-01

    Gas-phase photocatalytic oxidation (PCO) appears to be particularly well suited for waste streams with low pollutant concentrations (1000 ppm or less) and low to moderate flow rates (< 20,000 cubic feet per minute, cfm). The PCO technology is modular in nature and thus is well suited to treat dispersed or low flow rate streams. This same attribute minimizes the advantages of scale for PCO and makes the technology comparatively less attractive for high volume waste streams. Key advantages for PCO lie in its low operating cost and ability to completely destroy pollutants at ambient temperature and pressure.

  4. Gas Phase Chromatography of some Group 4, 5, and 6 Halides

    SciTech Connect

    Sylwester, Eric Robert

    1998-10-01

    Gas phase chromatography using The Heavy Element Volatility Instrument (HEVI) and the On Line Gas Apparatus (OLGA III) was used to determine volatilities of ZrBr4, HfBr4, RfBr4, NbBr5, TaOBr3, HaCl5, WBr6, FrBr, and BiBr3. Short-lived isotopes of Zr, Hf, Rf, Nb, Ta, Ha, W, and Bi were produced via compound nucleus reactions at the 88-Inch Cyclotron at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and transported to the experimental apparatus using a He gas transport system. The isotopes were halogenated, separated from the other reaction products, and their volatilities determined by isothermal gas phase chromatography. Adsorption Enthalpy (ΔHa) values for these compounds were calculated using a Monte Carlo simulation program modeling the gas phase chromatography column. All bromides showed lower volatility than molecules of similar molecular structures formed as chlorides, but followed similar trends by central element. Tantalum was observed to form the oxybromide, analogous to the formation of the oxychloride under the same conditions. For the group 4 elements, the following order in volatility and ΔHa was observed: RfBr4 > ZrBr4 > HfBr4. The ΔHa values determined for the group 4, 5, and 6 halides are in general agreement with other experimental data and theoretical predictions. Preliminary experiments were performed on Me-bromides. A new measurement of the half-life of 261Rf was performed. 261Rf was produced via the 248Cm(18O, 5n) reaction and observed with a half-life of 74-6+7 seconds, in excellent agreement with the previous measurement of 78-6+11 seconds. We recommend a new half-life of 75±7 seconds for 261Rf based on these two measurements. Preliminary studies in transforming HEVI from an isothermal (constant

  5. Fluorometric method for the determination of gas-phase hydrogen peroxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kok, Gregory L.; Lazrus, Allan L.

    1986-01-01

    The fluorometric gas-phase hydrogen peroxide procedure is based on the technique used by Lazrus et. al. for the determination of H2O2 in the liquid phase. The analytical method utilizes the reaction of H2O2 with horseradish peroxidase and p-hydroxphenylacetic acid (POPHA) to form the fluorescent dimer of POPHA. The analytical reaction responds stoichiometrically to both H2O2 and some organic hydroperoxides. To discriminate H2O2 from organic hydroperoxides, catalase is used to preferentially destroy H2O2. Using a dual-channel flow system the H2O2 concentration is determined by difference.

  6. Gas-phase purification enables accurate, large-scale, multiplexed proteome quantification with isobaric tagging

    PubMed Central

    Wenger, Craig D; Lee, M Violet; Hebert, Alexander S; McAlister, Graeme C; Phanstiel, Douglas H; Westphall, Michael S; Coon, Joshua J

    2011-01-01

    We describe a mass spectrometry method, QuantMode, which improves the accuracy of isobaric tag–based quantification by alleviating the pervasive problem of precursor interference—co-isolation of impurities—through gas-phase purification. QuantMode analysis of a yeast sample ‘contaminated’ with interfering human peptides showed substantially improved quantitative accuracy compared to a standard scan, with a small loss of spectral identifications. This technique will allow large-scale, multiplexed quantitative proteomics analyses using isobaric tagging. PMID:21963608

  7. Spectroscopic evidence of α,α-dimethylbenzyl radicals in the gas phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chae, Sang Youl; Lim, Manho; Lee, Sang Kuk

    2016-11-01

    We report the spectroscopic evidence of the jet-cooled α,α-dimethylbenzyl radical, which was generated in a technique of corona excited supersonic expansion using a pinhole-type glass nozzle. For identification of the α,α-dimethylbenzyl radical, precursors that form a common molecular radical, as a result of dissociation of either a Csbnd H bond or Csbnd C bond of alkyl group in a corona discharge, were employed. Based on comparisons of the spectra observed from the corona discharges of isopropylbenzene and tert-butylbenzene, evidence was obtained of the existence of the α,α-dimethylbenzyl radical in the gas phase.

  8. Gas-Phase Molecular Dynamics: Theoretical Studies In Spectroscopy and Chemical Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Yu H. G.; Muckerman, J.T.

    2012-05-29

    The main goal of this program is the development and application of computational methods for studying chemical reaction dynamics and molecular spectroscopy in the gas phase. We are interested in developing rigorous quantum dynamics algorithms for small polyatomic systems and in implementing approximate approaches for complex ones. Particular focus is on the dynamics and kinetics of chemical reactions and on the rovibrational spectra of species involved in combustion processes. This research also explores the potential energy surfaces of these systems of interest using state-of-the-art quantum chemistry methods, and extends them to understand some important properties of materials in condensed phases and interstellar medium as well as in combustion environments.

  9. Gas-Phase Molecular Dynamics: Theoretical Studies in Spectroscopy and Chemical Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, H.G.; Muckerman, J.T.

    2010-06-01

    The goal of this program is the development and application of computational methods for studying chemical reaction dynamics and molecular spectroscopy in the gas phase. We are interested in developing rigorous quantum dynamics algorithms for small polyatomic systems and in implementing approximate approaches for complex ones. Particular focus is on the dynamics and kinetics of chemical reactions and on the rovibrational spectra of species involved in combustion processes. This research also explores the potential energy surfaces of these systems of interest using state-of-the-art quantum chemistry methods.

  10. The organic matter of Comet Halley as inferred by joint gas phase and solid phase analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krueger, F. R.; Korth, A.; Kissel, J.

    1991-04-01

    During encounters with Comet Halley, the experiment PICCA onboard Giotto measured the gas-phase organic ion composition of the coma, and the experiment PUMA onboard Vega-1 measured the dust composition. Joining both results gives a consistent picture of the parent organic matter from which dust and gas is produced: a complex unsaturated polycondensate, which splits during coma formation into the more refractory C=C,C-N-containing dust part and the more volatile C=C,C-O-containing gas part. The responsible exothermal chemical reactions, which are triggered by sunlight, may play a major role in the dynamics of coma formation.

  11. Ab initio studies of aspartic acid conformers in gas phase and in solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Mingliang; Lin, Zijing

    2007-10-01

    Systematic and extensive conformational searches of aspartic acid in gas phase and in solution have been performed. For the gaseous aspartic acid, a total of 1296 trial canonical structures and 216 trial zwitterionic structures were generated by allowing for all combinations of internal single-bond rotamers. All the trial structures were optimized at the B3LYP /6-311G* level and then subjected to further optimization at the B3LYP /6-311++G** level. A total of 139 canonical conformers were found, but no stable zwitterionic structure was found. The rotational constants, dipole moments, zero-point vibrational energies, harmonic frequencies, and vertical ionization energies of the canonical conformers were determined. Single-point energies were also calculated at the MP2/6-311++G** and CCSD /6-311++G** levels. The equilibrium distributions of the gaseous conformers at various temperatures were calculated. The proton affinity and gas phase basicity were calculated and the results are in excellent agreement with the experiments. The conformations in the solution were studied with different solvation models. The 216 trial zwitterionic structures were first optimized at the B3LYP /6-311G* level using the Onsager self-consistent reaction field model (SCRF) and then optimized at the B3LYP /6-311++G** level using the conductorlike polarized continuum model (CPCM) SCRF theory. A total of 22 zwitterions conformers were found. The gaseous canonical conformers were combined with the CPCM model and optimized at the B3LYP /6-311++G** level. The solvated zwitterionic and canonical structures were further examined by the discrete/SCRF model with one and two water molecules. The incremental solvation of the canonical and zwitterionic structures with up to six water molecules in gas phase was systematically examined. The studies show that combining aspartic acid with at least six water molecules in the gas phase or two water molecules and a SCRF solution model is required to provide

  12. Review: gas-phase ion chemistry of the noble gases: recent advances and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Grandinetti, Felice

    2011-01-01

    This review article surveys recent experimental and theoretical advances in the gas-phase ion chemistry of the noble gases. Covered issues include the interaction of the noble gases with metal and non-metal cations, the conceivable existence of covalent noble-gas anions, the occurrence of ion-molecule reactions involving singly-charged xenon cations, and the occurrence of bond-forming reactions involving doubly-charged cations. Research themes are also highlighted, that are expected to attract further interest in the future.

  13. Gas-Phase Photochemical Overall H2 S Splitting by UV Light Irradiation.

    PubMed

    Baldovi, Herme G; Albero, Josep; Ferrer, Belen; Mateo, Diego; Alvaro, Mercedes; García, Hermenegildo

    2017-04-11

    Splitting of hydrogen sulfide is achieved to produce value-added chemicals. Upon irradiation at 254 nm in the gas phase and in the absence of catalysts or photocatalysts at near room temperature, H2 S splits into stoichiometric amounts of H2 and S with a quantum efficiency close to 50 %. No influence of the presence of CH4 and CO2 (typical components in natural gas and biogas in which H2 S is an unwanted component) on the efficiency of overall H2 S splitting was observed. A mechanism for the H2 and S formation is proposed.

  14. Stainless steel corrosion scale formed in reclaimed water: Characteristics, model for scale growth and metal element release.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yong; Liu, Shuming; Smith, Kate; Hu, Hongying; Tang, Fusheng; Li, Yuhong; Yu, Kanghua

    2016-10-01

    Stainless steels generally have extremely good corrosion resistance, but are still susceptible to pitting corrosion. As a result, corrosion scales can form on the surface of stainless steel after extended exposure to aggressive aqueous environments. Corrosion scales play an important role in affecting water quality. These research results showed that interior regions of stainless steel corrosion scales have a high percentage of chromium phases. We reveal the morphology, micro-structure and physicochemical characteristics of stainless steel corrosion scales. Stainless steel corrosion scale is identified as a podiform chromite deposit according to these characteristics, which is unlike deposit formed during iron corrosion. A conceptual model to explain the formation and growth of stainless steel corrosion scale is proposed based on its composition and structure. The scale growth process involves pitting corrosion on the stainless steel surface and the consecutive generation and homogeneous deposition of corrosion products, which is governed by a series of chemical and electrochemical reactions. This model shows the role of corrosion scales in the mechanism of iron and chromium release from pitting corroded stainless steel materials. The formation of corrosion scale is strongly related to water quality parameters. The presence of HClO results in higher ferric content inside the scales. Cl(-) and SO4(2-) ions in reclaimed water play an important role in corrosion pitting of stainless steel and promote the formation of scales.

  15. Spectroscopic investigation of H atom transfer in a gas-phase dissociation reaction: McLafferty rearrangement of model gas-phase peptide ions.

    PubMed

    Van Stipdonk, Michael J; Kerstetter, Dale R; Leavitt, Christopher M; Groenewold, Gary S; Steill, Jeffrey; Oomens, Jos

    2008-06-14

    Wavelength-selective infrared multiple-photon photodissociation (WS-IRMPD) was used to study isotopically-labeled ions generated by McLafferty rearrangement of nicotinyl-glycine-tert-butyl ester and betaine-glycine-tert-butyl ester. The tert-butyl esters were incubated in a mixture of D(2)O and CH(3)OD to induce solution-phase hydrogen-deuterium exchange and then converted to gas-phase ions using electrospray ionization. McLafferty rearrangement was used to generate the free-acid forms of the respective model peptides through transfer of an H atom and elimination of butene. The specific aim was to use vibrational spectra generated by WS-IRMPD to determine whether the H atom remains at the acid group, or migrates to one or more of the other exchangeable sites. Comparison of the IRMPD results in the region from 1200-1900 cm(-1) to theoretical spectra for different isotopically-labeled isomers clearly shows that the H atom is situated at the C-terminal acid group and migration to amide positions is negligible on the time scale of the experiment. The results of this study suggest that use of the McLafferty rearrangement for peptide esters could be an effective approach for generation of H-atom isotope tracers, in situ, for subsequent investigation of intramolecular proton migration during peptide fragmentation studies.

  16. Spectroscopic Investigation of H Atom Transfer in a Gas-phase Dissociation Reaction: McLafferty Rearrangement of Model Gas-phase Peptide Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Michael J. Van Stipdonk; Dale R. Kersetter; Christopher M. Leavitt; Gary S. Groenewold; Jeffrey Steill; Jos Oomens

    2008-07-01

    Wavelength-selective infrared multiple-photon photodissociation (WS-IRMPD) was used to study isotopically-labeled ions generated by McLafferty rearrangement of nicotinyl-glycine-tert-butyl ester and betaine-glycine-tert-butyl ester. The tert-butyl esters were incubated in a mixture of D2O and CH3OD to induce solution-phase hydrogen-deuterium exchange and then converted to gas-phase ions using electrospray ionization. McLafferty rearrangement was used to generate the free-acid forms of the respective model peptides through transfer of an H atom and elimination of butene. The specific aim was to use vibrational spectra generated by WS-IRMPD technique to determine whether the H atom remains at the acid group, or migrates to one or more of the other exchangeable sites. Comparison of the IRMPD results in the region from 1200-1900 cm-1 to theoretical spectra for different isotopically-labeled isomers clearly shows that the H atom is situated at the C-terminal acid group and migration to amide positions is negligible on the time scale of the experiment. The results of this study suggest that use of the McLafferty rearrangement for peptide esters could be an effective approach for generation of H-atom isotope tracers, in-situ, for subsequent investigation of intra-molecular proton migration during peptide fragmentation studies.

  17. The gas-phase iron abundance in Herbig-Haro objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beck-Winchatz, B.; Bohm, K. H.; Noriega-Crespo, A.

    1994-01-01

    The gas-phase abundance ratios Fe/S and Fe/O have been determined for the Herbig-Haro objects HH 1, HH 7, HH 11, HH 43A, and 'Burnham's Nebula' (HH 255). It is the purpose of this study to decide whether a sizeable fraction of the Fe in these HH objects is still bound in dust grains or whether the observed matter has gone through sufficiently fast shock waves so that the dust grains have been essentially destroyed and most of the iron has gone back into the gas phase. We have determined the abundance ratios using statistical equilibrium calculations for the ions Fe(+), S(+), and O(+). (These are the most abundant ions of the elements in question.) Abundance determinations have been made using homogeneous models of the HH objects for which electron temperatures and densities have been determined observationally from forbidden line ratios. The results show that the Fe/S ratio in the objects HH 1, HH 7, HH 11, and HH 43A agrees very well with the Population I abundance ratio. Only Burnham's Nebula (HH255) shows an Fe/S ratio which is about three times lower indicating a shock-wave history which is quite different from that of the other HH objects.

  18. Microsolvated and chelated butylzinc cations: formation, relative stability, and unimolecular gas-phase chemistry.

    PubMed

    Fleckenstein, Julia E; Koszinowski, Konrad

    2009-11-23

    Solutions of butylzinc iodide in tetrahydrofuran, acetonitrile, and N,N-dimethylformamide were analyzed by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. In all cases, microsolvated butylzinc cations [ZnBu(solvent)(n)](+), n=1-3, were detected. The parallel observation of the butylzincate anion [ZnBuI(2)](-) suggests that these ions result from disproportionation of neutral butylzinc iodide in solution. In the presence of simple bidentate ligands (1,2-dimethoxyethane, N,N-dimethyl-2-methoxyethylamine, and N,N,N',N'-tetramethylethylenediamine), chelate complexes of the type [ZnBu(ligand)](+) form quite readily. The relative stabilities of these complexes were probed by competition experiments and analysis of their unimolecular gas-phase reactivity. Fragmentation of mass-selected [ZnBu(ligand)](+) leads to the elimination of butene and formation of [ZnH(ligand)](+). In marked contrast, the microsolvated cations [ZnBu(solvent)(n)](+) lose the attached solvent molecules upon gas-phase fragmentation to produce bare [ZnBu](+), which subsequently dissociates into [C(4)H(9)](+) and Zn. This difference in reactivity resembles the situation in organozinc solution chemistry, in which chelating ligands are needed to activate dialkylzinc compounds for the nucleophilic addition to aldehydes.

  19. Gas-Phase Amidation of Carboxylic Acids with Woodward's Reagent K Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Zhou; Pilo, Alice L.; Luongo, Carl A.; McLuckey, Scott A.

    2015-06-01

    Gas-phase amidation of carboxylic acids in multiply-charged peptides is demonstrated via ion/ion reactions with Woodward's reagent K (wrk) in both positive and negative mode. Woodward's reagent K, N-ethyl-3-phenylisoxazolium-3'-sulfonate, is a commonly used reagent that activates carboxylates to form amide bonds with amines in solution. Here, we demonstrate that the analogous gas-phase chemistry occurs upon reaction of the wrk ions and doubly protonated (or doubly deprotonated) peptide ions containing the carboxylic acid functionality. The reaction involves the formation of the enol ester intermediate in the electrostatic complex. Upon collisional activation, the ethyl amine on the reagent is transferred to the activated carbonyl carbon on the peptide, resulting in the formation of an ethyl amide (addition of 27 Da to the peptide) with loss of a neutral ketene derivative. Further collision-induced dissociation (CID) of the products and comparison with solution-phase amidation product confirms the structure of the ethyl amide.

  20. Bacteria and fungi inactivation by photocatalysis under UVA irradiation: liquid and gas phase.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues-Silva, Caio; Miranda, Sandra M; Lopes, Filipe V S; Silva, Mário; Dezotti, Márcia; Silva, Adrián M T; Faria, Joaquim L; Boaventura, Rui A R; Vilar, Vítor J P; Pinto, Eugénia

    2016-06-29

    In the last decade, environmental risks associated with wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) have become a concern in the scientific community due to the absence of specific legislation governing the occupational exposure limits (OEL) for microorganisms present in indoor air. Thus, it is necessary to develop techniques to effectively inactivate microorganisms present in the air of WWTPs facilities. In the present work, ultraviolet light A radiation was used as inactivation tool. The microbial population was not visibly reduced in the bioaerosol by ultraviolet light A (UVA) photolysis. The UVA photocatalytic process for the inactivation of microorganisms (bacteria and fungi, ATCC strains and isolates from indoor air samples of a WWTP) using titanium dioxide (TiO2 P25) and zinc oxide (ZnO) was tested in both liquid-phase and airborne conditions. In the slurry conditions at liquid phase, P25 showed a better performance in inactivation. For this reason, gas-phase assays were performed in a tubular photoreactor packed with cellulose acetate monolithic structures coated with P25. The survival rate of microorganisms under study decreased with the catalyst load and the UVA exposure time. Inactivation of fungi was slower than resistant bacteria, followed by Gram-positive bacteria and Gram-negative bacteria. Graphical abstract Inactivation of fungi and bacteria in gas phase by photocatalitic process performed in a tubular photoreactor packed with cellulose acetate monolith structures coated with TiO2.

  1. TRANSITION STATE FOR THE GAS-PHASE REACTION OF URANIUM HEXAFLUORIDE WITH WATER

    SciTech Connect

    Garrison, S; James Becnel, J

    2008-03-18

    Density Functional Theory and small-core, relativistic pseudopotentials were used to look for symmetric and asymmetric transitions states of the gas-phase hydrolysis reaction of uranium hexafluoride, UF{sub 6}, with water. At the B3LYP/6-31G(d,p)/SDD level, an asymmetric transition state leading to the formation of a uranium hydroxyl fluoride, U(OH)F{sub 5}, and hydrogen fluoride was found with an energy barrier of +77.3 kJ/mol and an enthalpy of reaction of +63.0 kJ/mol (both including zero-point energy corrections). Addition of diffuse functions to all atoms except uranium led to only minor changes in the structure and relative energies of the reacting complex and transition state. However, a significant change in the product complex structure was found, significantly reducing the enthalpy of reaction to +31.9 kJ/mol. Similar structures and values were found for PBE0 and MP2 calculations with this larger basis set, supporting the B3LYP results. No symmetric transition state leading to the direct formation of uranium oxide tetrafluoride, UOF{sub 4}, was found, indicating that the reaction under ambient conditions likely includes several more steps than the mechanisms commonly mentioned. The transition state presented here appears to be the first published transition state for the important gas-phase reaction of UF{sub 6} with water.

  2. Graphene quantum dots modified silicon nanowire array for ultrasensitive detection in the gas phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, T. Y.; Duan, C. Y.; Zhu, Y. X.; Chen, Y. F.; Wang, Y.

    2017-03-01

    Si nanostructure-based gas detectors have attracted much attention due to their huge surface areas, relatively high carrier mobility, maneuverability for surface functionalization and compatibility to modern electronic industry. However, the unstable surface of Si, especially for the nanostructures in a corrosive atmosphere, hinders their sensitivity and reproducibility when used for detection in the gas phase. In this study, we proposed a novel strategy to fabricate a Si-based gas detector by using the vertically aligned Si nanowire (SiNW) array as a skeleton and platform, and decorated chemically inert graphene quantum dots (GQDs) to protect the SiNWs from oxidation and promote the carriers’ interaction with the analytes. The radial core–shell structures of the GQDs/SiNW array were then assembled into a resistor-based gas detection system and evaluated by using nitrogen dioxide (NO2) as the model analyte. Compared to the bare SiNW array, our novel sensor exhibited ultrahigh sensitivity for detecting trace amounts of NO2 with the concentration as low as 10 ppm in room temperature and an immensely reduced recovery time, which is of significant importance for their practical application. Meanwhile, strikingly, reproducibility and stability could also be achieved by showing no sensitivity decline after storing the GQDs/SiNW array in air for two weeks. Our results demonstrate that protecting the surface of the SiNW array with chemically inert GQDs is a feasible strategy to realize ultrasensitive detection in the gas phase.

  3. Continuous-wave terahertz by photomixing: applications to gas phase pollutant detection and quantification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hindle, Francis; Cuisset, Arnaud; Bocquet, Robin; Mouret, Gaël

    2008-03-01

    Recent advances in the development of monochromatic continuous-wave terahertz sources suitable for high resolution gas phase spectroscopy and pollution monitoring are reviewed. Details of a source using an ultra fast opto-electronic photomixing element are presented. The construction of a terahertz spectrometer using this source has allowed spectroscopic characterisation and application studies to be completed. Analysis of H 2S and OCS under laboratory conditions are used to demonstrate the spectrometer performance, and the determination of the transition line strengths and pressure self broadening coefficients for pure rotational transitions of OCS. The spectral purity 5 MHz, tunability 0.3 to 3 THz, and long wavelength ≈200 μm of this source have been exploited to identify and quantify numerous chemical species in cigarette smoke. The key advantages of this frequency domain are its high species selectivity and the possibility to make reliable measurements of gas phase samples heavily contaminated by aerosols and particles. To cite this article: F. Hindle et al., C. R. Physique 9 (2008).

  4. Prediction of the basicities of pyridines in the gas phase and in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Hawe, Glenn I; Alkorta, Ibon; Popelier, Paul L A

    2010-01-01

    The basicities of 125 pyridine derivatives in the gas phase and in water have been correlated with the electron density properties within the framework of quantum topological molecular similarity (QTMS). We used the theory of quantum chemical topology (QCT) to provide ab initio descriptors that are able to predict pK(b) values. Partial least squares (PLS) and the machine-learning technique Kriging generated validated models. Properties were considered for systems in their neutral and protonated forms. The compounds were divided into a training set, used to develop the models, and a test set, for which the predicted values of the different models were compared with the experimental ones. The results were found to be good for those compounds with substituents in the meta and para positions, whereas the use of Kriging was required to obtain reasonable results when ortho derivatives were included. The basicity was found to be better described in the gas phase than in water. Special attention was paid to external validation.

  5. Gas-phase photolytic production of hydroxyl radicals in an ultraviolet purifier for air and surfaces.

    PubMed

    Crosley, David R; Araps, Connie J; Doyle-Eisele, Melanie; McDonald, Jacob D

    2017-02-01

    We have measured the concentration of hydroxyl radicals (OH) produced in the gas phase by a commercially available purifier for air and surfaces, using the time rate of decay of n-heptane added to an environmental chamber. The hydroxyl generator, an Odorox® BOSS™ model, produces the OH through 185-nm photolysis of ambient water vapor. The steady-state concentration of OH produced in the 120 m(3) chamber is, with 2σ error bars, (3.25 ± 0.80) × 10(6) cm(-3). The properties of the hydroxyl generator, in particular the output of the ultraviolet lamps and the air throughput, together with an estimation of the water concentration, were used to predict the amount of OH produced by the device, with no fitted parameters. To relate this calculation to a steady-state concentration, we must estimate the OH loss rate within the chamber owing to reaction with the n-heptane and the 7 ppb of background hydrocarbons that are present. The result is a predicted steady-state concentration in excellent agreement with the measured value. This shows we understand well the processes occurring in the gas phase during operation of this hydroxyl radical purifier.

  6. Nanoparticles-chemistry, new synthetic approaches, gas phase clustering and novel applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sreekumaran Nair, A.; Subramaniam, Chandramouli; Rosemary, M. J.; Tom, Renjis T.; Rajeev Kumar, V. R.; Jeba Singh, D. M. David; Cyriac, Jobin; Jain, Prashant; Kalesh, K. A.; Bhattacharya, Shreya; Pradeep, T.

    2005-10-01

    In this paper, an overview of the synthesis, chemistry and applications of nanosystems carried out in our laboratory is presented. The discussion is divided into four sections, namely (a) chemistry of nanoparticles, (b) development of new synthetic approaches, (c) gas phase clusters and (d) device structures and applications. In `chemistry of nanoparticles' we describe a novel reaction between nanoparticles of Ag and Au with halocarbons. The reactions lead to the formation of various carbonaceous materials and metal halides. In `development of new synthetic approaches' our one-pot methodologies for the synthesis of core-shell nanosystems of Au, Ag and Cu protected with TiO_2 and ZrO_2 as well as various polymers are discussed. Some results on the interaction of nanoparticles with biomolecules are also detailed in this section. The third section covers the formation of gas phase aggregates/clusters of thiol-protected sub-nanoparticles. Laser desorption of H_2MoO_4, H_2WO_4, MoS_2, and WS_2 giving novel clusters is discussed. The fourth section deals with the development of simple devices and technologies using nanomaterials described above.

  7. Oxidation of Methionine Residues in Polypeptide Ions Via Gas-Phase Ion/Ion Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilo, Alice L.; McLuckey, Scott A.

    2014-06-01

    The gas-phase oxidation of methionine residues is demonstrated here using ion/ion reactions with periodate anions. Periodate anions are observed to attach in varying degrees to all polypeptide ions irrespective of amino acid composition. Direct proton transfer yielding a charge-reduced peptide ion is also observed. In the case of methionine and, to a much lesser degree, tryptophan-containing peptide ions, collisional activation of the complex ion generated by periodate attachment yields an oxidized peptide product (i.e., [M + H + O]+), in addition to periodic acid detachment. Detachment of periodic acid takes place exclusively for peptides that do not contain either a methionine or tryptophan side chain. In the case of methionine-containing peptides, the [M + H + O]+ product is observed at a much greater abundance than the proton transfer product (viz., [M + H]+). Collisional activation of oxidized Met-containing peptides yields a signature loss of 64 Da from the precursor and/or product ions. This unique loss corresponds to the ejection of methanesulfenic acid from the oxidized methionine side chain and is commonly used in solution-phase proteomics studies to determine the presence of oxidized methionine residues. The present work shows that periodate anions can be used to `label' methionine residues in polypeptides in the gas phase. The selectivity of the periodate anion for the methionine side chain suggests several applications including identification and location of methionine residues in sequencing applications.

  8. Variable air temperature response of gas-phase atmospheric polychlorinated biphenyls near a former manufacturing facility.

    PubMed

    Hermanson, Mark H; Scholten, Cheryl A; Compher, Kevin

    2003-09-15

    Many investigations of gas-phase atmospheric PCB show a strong relationship between concentration and air temperature, especially near PCB sources. Comparative gas-phase atmospheric PCB trends during an annual temperature regime at two sites near a former PCB manufacturing plant and nearby PCB landfills in Anniston, AL, indicate a departure from this trend. The Mars Hill sampling site, located closest to the plant and landfills, shows an annual average sigmaPCB concentration of 27 ng m(-3) (ranging from 8.7 to 82 ng m(-3)) three times the average at Carter, 1.5 km away (9 ng m(-3), ranging from 1.1 to 39). However, total PCB and congener concentrations vary more with air temperature at Carter where PCB are evaporating from surfaces during warmer weather. The slopes of the Clausius-Clapeyron plots of 18 of the most concentrated congeners representing dichloro- through heptachlorobiphenyl homologues are significantly higher at the Carter site. While some of the atmospheric PCB at Mars Hill is derived from ground surface evaporation, the source of much of it apparently is the material buried in the landfills, which has different thermal properties than surface materials and is not in equilibrium with air temperature.

  9. Probing Vitamine C, Aspirin and Paracetamol in the Gas Phase: High Resolution Rotational Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mata, S.; Cabezas, C.; Varela, M.; Pena, I.; Nino, A.; López, J. C.; Alonso, J. L.; Grabow, J.-U.

    2011-06-01

    A solid sample of Vitamin C (m.p. 190°C) vaporized by laser ablation has been investigated in gas phase and characterized through their rotational spectra. Two spectroscopy techniques has been used to obtain the spectra: a new design of broadband chirped pulse Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy with in-phase/quadrature-phase-modulation passage-acquired-coherence technique (IMPACT) and conventional laser ablation molecular beam Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy (LA-MB-FTMW). Up to now, two low-energy conformer have been observed and their rotational constants determined. Ab initio calculations at the MP2/6-311++G (d,p) level of theory predicted rotational constants which helped us to identify these conformers unequivocally. Among the molecules to benefit from the LA-MB-FTMW technique there are common important drugs never observed in the gas phase through rotational spectroscopy. We present here the results on acetyl salicylic acid and acetaminophen (m.p. 136°C), commonly known as aspirin and paracetamol respectively. We have observed two stable conformers of aspirin and two for paracetamol. The internal rotation barrier of the methyl group in aspirin has been determined for both conformers from the analysis of the A-E splittings due to the coupling of internal and overall rotation. J. L. Alonso, C. Pérez, M. E. Sanz, J. C. López, S. Blanco, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 11,617-627 (2009)and references therein

  10. Oxidation of methionine residues in polypeptide ions via gas-phase ion/ion chemistry.

    PubMed

    Pilo, Alice L; McLuckey, Scott A

    2014-06-01

    The gas-phase oxidation of methionine residues is demonstrated here using ion/ion reactions with periodate anions. Periodate anions are observed to attach in varying degrees to all polypeptide ions irrespective of amino acid composition. Direct proton transfer yielding a charge-reduced peptide ion is also observed. In the case of methionine and, to a much lesser degree, tryptophan-containing peptide ions, collisional activation of the complex ion generated by periodate attachment yields an oxidized peptide product (i.e., [M + H + O](+)), in addition to periodic acid detachment. Detachment of periodic acid takes place exclusively for peptides that do not contain either a methionine or tryptophan side chain. In the case of methionine-containing peptides, the [M + H + O](+) product is observed at a much greater abundance than the proton transfer product (viz., [M + H](+)). Collisional activation of oxidized Met-containing peptides yields a signature loss of 64 Da from the precursor and/or product ions. This unique loss corresponds to the ejection of methanesulfenic acid from the oxidized methionine side chain and is commonly used in solution-phase proteomics studies to determine the presence of oxidized methionine residues. The present work shows that periodate anions can be used to 'label' methionine residues in polypeptides in the gas phase. The selectivity of the periodate anion for the methionine side chain suggests several applications including identification and location of methionine residues in sequencing applications.

  11. A novel model to predict gas-phase hydroxyl radical oxidation kinetics of polychlorinated compounds.

    PubMed

    Luo, Shuang; Wei, Zongsu; Spinney, Richard; Yang, Zhihui; Chai, Liyuan; Xiao, Ruiyang

    2017-04-01

    In this study, a novel model based on aromatic meta-substituent grouping was presented to predict the second-order rate constants (k) for OH oxidation of PCBs in gas-phase. Since the oxidation kinetics are dependent on the chlorination degree and position, we hypothesized that it may be more accurate for k value prediction if we group PCB congeners based on substitution positions (i.e., ortho (o), meta (m), and para (p)). To test this hypothesis, we examined the correlation of polarizability (α), a quantum chemical based descriptor for k values, with an empirical Hammett constant (σ(+)) on each substitution position. Our result shows that α is highly linearly correlated to ∑σo,m,p(+) based on aromatic meta-substituents leading to the grouping based predictive model. With the new model, the calculated k values exhibited an excellent agreement with experimental measurements, and greater predictive power than the quantum chemical based quantitative structure activity relationship (QSAR) model. Further, the relationship of α and ∑σo,m,p(+) for PCDDs congeners, together with highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) distribution, were used to validate the aromatic meta-substituent grouping method. This newly developed model features a combination of good predictability of quantum chemical based QSAR model and simplicity of Hammett relationship, showing a great potential for fast and computational tractable prediction of k values for gas-phase OH oxidation of polychlorinated compounds.

  12. Gas-Phase Oxidation of Neutral Basic Residues in Polypeptide Cations by Periodate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilo, Alice L.; Bu, Jiexun; McLuckey, Scott A.

    2016-12-01

    The gas-phase oxidation of doubly protonated peptides containing neutral basic residues to various products, including [M + H + O]+, [M - H]+, and [M - H - NH3]+, is demonstrated here via ion/ion reactions with periodate. It was previously demonstrated that periodate anions are capable of oxidizing disulfide bonds and methionine, tryptophan, and S-alkyl cysteine residues. However, in the absence of these easily oxidized sites, we show here that systems containing neutral basic residues can undergo oxidation. Furthermore, we show that these neutral basic residues primarily undergo different types of oxidation (e.g., hydrogen abstraction) reactions than those observed previously (i.e., oxygen transfer to yield the [M + H + O]+ species) upon gas-phase ion/ion reactions with periodate anions. This chemistry is illustrated with a variety of systems, including a series of model peptides, a cell-penetrating peptide containing a large number of unprotonated basic sites, and ubiquitin, a roughly 8.6 kDa protein.

  13. Native like helices in a specially designed β peptide in the gas phase.

    PubMed

    Schubert, Franziska; Pagel, Kevin; Rossi, Mariana; Warnke, Stephan; Salwiczek, Mario; Koksch, Beate; von Helden, Gert; Blum, Volker; Baldauf, Carsten; Scheffler, Matthias

    2015-02-21

    In the natural peptides, helices are stabilized by hydrogen bonds that point backward along the sequence direction. Until now, there is only little evidence for the existence of analogous structures in oligomers of conformationally unrestricted β amino acids. We specifically designed the β peptide Ac-(β(2)hAla)6-LysH(+) to form native like helical structures in the gas phase. The design follows the known properties of the peptide Ac-Ala6-LysH(+) that forms a α helix in isolation. We perform ion-mobility mass-spectrometry and vibrational spectroscopy in the gas phase, combined with state-of-the-art density-functional theory simulations of these molecular systems in order to characterize their structure. We can show that the straightforward exchange of alanine residues for the homologous β amino acids generates a system that is generally capable of adopting native like helices with backward oriented H-bonds. By pushing the limits of theory and experiments, we show that one cannot assign a single preferred structure type due to the densely populated energy landscape and present an interpretation of the data that suggests an equilibrium of three helical structures.

  14. Prediction of (L)-methionine VCD spectra in the gas phase and water solution.

    PubMed

    Rode, Joanna E; Dobrowolski, Jan Cz; Sadlej, Joanna

    2013-11-21

    In this paper we provide a computational study of the l-methionine conformational landscape and VCD spectra in the gas phase and a water environment simulated by implicit PCM and the hybrid model, i.e., a combination of explicit "microsolvation" and implicit models. In the gas phase, two groups of conformers differing in H-bonding, i.e., OH···NH2 and NH···O═C, could be distinguished based solely on the IR ν(OH) and ν(NH) stretching vibrations range. On the other hand, VCD better reflected chain differences. The most stable OH···NH2 conformer was predicted to be easily detected, and the presence of two out of four NH···O═C conformers could be confirmed. Three zwitterionic methionine conformers were shown to dominate in water. Their VCD spectra, simulated within the hybrid model at the B3LYP-IEF-PCM/aug-cc-pVDZ level of theory, indicated that they could be recognized in the mixture. Use of the hybrid model is crucial for good reproduction of the hydrogen bonding pattern in the VCD spectra of methionine in water solution. However, the 1300-800 cm(-1) region of the skeleton vibrations of methionine appeared to be relatively insensitive to the model of the solvent.

  15. Reagent Cluster Anions for Multiple Gas-phase Covalent Modifications of Peptide and Protein Cations

    PubMed Central

    Prentice, Boone M.; Stutzman, John R.; McLuckey, Scott A.

    2013-01-01

    Multiple gas phase ion/ion covalent modifications of peptide and protein ions are demonstrated here using cluster-type reagent anions of N-hydroxysulfosuccinimide acetate (sulfo-NHS acetate) and 2-formyl-benzenesulfonic acid (FBMSA). These reagents are used here to selectively modify unprotonated primary amine functionalities of peptides and proteins. Multiple reactive reagent molecules can be present in a single cluster ion, which allows for multiple covalent modifications to be achieved in a single ion/ion encounter and at the ‘cost’ of only a single analyte charge. Multiple derivatizations are demonstrated when the number of available reactive sites on the analyte cation exceeds the number of reagent molecules in the anionic cluster (e.g., data shown here for reactions between the polypeptide [K10+3H]3+ and the reagent cluster [5R5Na-Na]−). This type of gas phase ion chemistry is also applicable to whole protein ions. Here, ubiquitin was successfully modified using an FBMSA cluster anions which, upon collisional activation, produced fragment ions with various numbers of modifications. Data for the pentamer cluster are included here as illustrative of the results obtained for the clusters comprised of 2–6 reagent molecules. PMID:23702708

  16. Supramolecular Adducts of Cucurbit[7]uril and Amino Acids in the Gas Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalenko, Ekaterina; Vilaseca, Marta; Díaz-Lobo, Mireia; Masliy, A. N.; Vicent, Cristian; Fedin, Vladimir P.

    2016-02-01

    The complexation of the macrocyclic cavitand cucurbit[7]uril (Q7) with a series of amino acids (AA) with different side chains (Asp, Asn, Gln, Ser, Ala, Val, and Ile) is investigated by ESI-MS techniques. The 1:1 [Q7 + AA + 2H]2+ adducts are observed as the base peak when equimolar Q7:AA solutions are electrosprayed, whereas the 1:2 [Q7 + 2AA + 2H]2+ dications are dominant when an excess of the amino acid is used. A combination of ion mobility mass spectrometry (IM-MS) and DFT calculations of the 1:1 [Q7 + AA + 2H]2+ (AA = Tyr, Val, and Ser) adducts is also reported and proven to be unsuccessful at discriminating between exclusion or inclusion-type conformations in the gas phase. Collision induced dissociation (CID) revealed that the preferred dissociation pathways of the 1:1 [Q7 + AA + 2H]2+ dications are strongly influenced by the identity of the amino acid side chain, whereas ion molecule reactions towards N-butylmethylamine displayed a common reactivity pattern comprising AA displacement. Special emphasis is given on the differences between the gas-phase behavior of the supramolecular adducts with amino acids (AA = Asp, Asn, Gln, Ser, Ala, Val, and Ile) and those featuring basic (Lys and Arg) and aromatic (Tyr and Phe) side chains.

  17. Encapsulating Cytochrome c in Silica Aerogel Nanoarchitectures without Metal Nanoparticles while Retaining Gas-phase Bioactivity

    PubMed Central

    Harper-Leatherman, Amanda S.; Pacer, Elizabeth R.; Kosciuszek, Nina D.

    2016-01-01

    Applications such as sensors, batteries, and fuel cells have been improved through the use of highly porous aerogels when functional compounds are encapsulated within the aerogels. However, few reports on encapsulating proteins within sol–gels that are processed to form aerogels exist. A procedure for encapsulating cytochrome c (cyt. c) in silica (SiO2) sol-gels that are supercritically processed to form bioaerogels with gas-phase activity for nitric oxide (NO) is presented. Cyt. c is added to a mixed silica sol under controlled protein concentration and buffer strength conditions. The sol mixture is then gelled and the liquid filling the gel pores is replaced through a series of solvent exchanges with liquid carbon dioxide. The carbon dioxide is brought to its critical point and vented off to form dry aerogels with cyt. c encapsulated inside. These bioaerogels are characterized with UV-visible spectroscopy and circular dichroism spectroscopy and can be used to detect the presence of gas-phase nitric oxide. The success of this procedure depends on regulating the cyt. c concentration and the buffer concentration and does not require other components such as metal nanoparticles. It may be possible to encapsulate other proteins using a similar approach making this procedure important for potential future bioanalytical device development. PMID:26967257

  18. Potential health hazards from thermal degradation events - Particulate vs. gas phase effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oberdorster, Gunter; Ferin, Juraj; Finkelstein, Jacob; Baggs, Raymond; Stavert, D. M.; Lehnert, Bruce E.

    1992-01-01

    The effect of instillation of ultrafine TiO2 particles (10-nm anatase-TiO2 and 12-nm rutile-TiO2 (administered in doses from 60 to 1000 microg/rat and 500 microg/rat, respectively) on the respiratory tract of exposed rats was compared to the effects of larger (250 nm anatase-TiO2 and 220-nm rutile-TiO2 particles (given in doses 500 or 1000 microg/rat and 500 microg/rat, respectively). These effects were also compared to the effects of inhalation of 20-nm and 250-nm anatase-TiO2 particles and inhalation with surrogate gas phase components (HF and HCl). It was found that ultrafine TiO2 particles induced greater inflammatory reaction in the lung, had greater adverse effect on alveolar macrophage-mediated clearance function, and had a greater potential to induce mediators which can adversely affect other lung cells than did larger-sized particles. Inhalation of surrogate gas phase components caused injury only to the upper respiratory tract, in contrast to the ultrafine particles, which affected the deep lung.

  19. Gas-Phase Oxidation of Neutral Basic Residues in Polypeptide Cations by Periodate.

    PubMed

    Pilo, Alice L; Bu, Jiexun; McLuckey, Scott A

    2016-12-01

    The gas-phase oxidation of doubly protonated peptides containing neutral basic residues to various products, including [M + H + O](+), [M - H](+), and [M - H - NH3](+), is demonstrated here via ion/ion reactions with periodate. It was previously demonstrated that periodate anions are capable of oxidizing disulfide bonds and methionine, tryptophan, and S-alkyl cysteine residues. However, in the absence of these easily oxidized sites, we show here that systems containing neutral basic residues can undergo oxidation. Furthermore, we show that these neutral basic residues primarily undergo different types of oxidation (e.g., hydrogen abstraction) reactions than those observed previously (i.e., oxygen transfer to yield the [M + H + O](+) species) upon gas-phase ion/ion reactions with periodate anions. This chemistry is illustrated with a variety of systems, including a series of model peptides, a cell-penetrating peptide containing a large number of unprotonated basic sites, and ubiquitin, a roughly 8.6 kDa protein. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  20. Gas-phase concentration, purification, and identification of whole proteins from complex mixtures.

    PubMed

    Reid, Gavin E; Shang, Hao; Hogan, Jason M; Lee, Gil U; McLuckey, Scott A

    2002-06-26

    Five proteins present in a relatively complex mixture derived from a whole cell lysate fraction of E. coli have been concentrated, purified, and dissociated in the gas phase, using a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer. Concentration of intact protein ions was effected using gas-phase ion/ion proton-transfer reactions in conjunction with mass-to-charge dependent ion "parking" to accumulate protein ions initially dispersed over a range of charge states into a single lower charge state. Sequential ion isolation events interspersed with additional ion parking ion/ion reaction periods were used to "charge-state purify" the protein ion of interest. Five of the most abundant protein components present in the mixture were subjected to this concentration/purification procedure and then dissociated by collisional activation of their intact multiply charged precursor ions. Four of the five proteins were subsequently identified by matching the uninterpreted product ion spectra against a partially annotated protein sequence database, coupled with a novel scoring scheme weighted for the relative abundances of the experimentally observed product ions and the frequency of fragmentations occurring at preferential cleavage sites. The identification of these proteins illustrates the potential of this "top-down" protein identification approach to reduce the reliance on condensed-phase chemistries and extensive separations for complex protein mixture analysis.

  1. Complex Organic Molecules Formation in Space Through Gas Phase Reactions: A Theoretical Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redondo, Pilar; Barrientos, Carmen; Largo, Antonio

    2017-02-01

    Chemistry in the interstellar medium (ISM) is capable of producing complex organic molecules (COMs) of great importance to astrobiology. Gas phase and grain surface chemistry almost certainly both contribute to COM formation. Amino acids as building blocks of proteins are some of the most interesting COMs. The simplest one, glycine, has been characterized in meteorites and comets and, its conclusive detection in the ISM seems to be highly plausible. In this work, we analyze the gas phase reaction of glycine and {{{CH}}5}+ to establish the role of this process in the formation of alanine or other COMs in the ISM. Formation of protonated α- and β-alanine in spite of being exothermic processes is not viable under interstellar conditions because the different paths leading to these isomers present net activation energies. Nevertheless, glycine can evolve to protonated 1-imide-2, 2-propanediol, protonated amino acetone, protonated hydroxyacetone, and protonated propionic acid. However, formation of acetic acid and protonated methylamine is also a favorable process and therefore will be a competitive channel with the evolution of glycine to COMs.

  2. Gas-phase Mechanisms of Sulfur Isotope Mass-independent Fractionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyons, J. R.

    2006-12-01

    Mass-independent fractionation (MIF) in sulfur isotopes in ancient sulfur-bearing rocks (Farquhar et al. 2000a) is interpreted as evidence for gas-phase MIF processes in the early Earth atmosphere. This interpretation is made by analogy with oxygen isotope MIF in the modern atmosphere (produced during ozone formation), and by laboratory photolysis experiments on SO2 (Farquhar et al. 2001; Wing et al. 2004) that yield both elemental sulfur and sulfate with S MIF signatures at wavelengths above and below the SO2 dissociation limit. What is lacking is a quantitative understanding of the mechanisms of gas-phase S MIF. Quantification is essential in order to extract the full implications of sulfur MIF throughout Earth history, including for bacterial sulfate reduction processes which largely conserve D33S and D36S. Several sulfur MIF mechanisms are possible. The most obvious is the gas-phase thiozone reaction, which is isovalent to the ozone formation reaction. Ozone formation produces a well-known MIF signature in oxygen isotopes (Thiemens and Heidenreich 1983), and a symmetry-dependent non-RRKM mechanism has been proposed as the origin of O MIF (Gao and Marcus 2001). It is possible and perhaps likely that S3 formation also proceeds by a non-RRKM process. Data are lacking on isotopic (an even non-isotopic) rates of S3 formation, so it is not possible to make definitive statements about MIF in S3 at this time. However modeling results suggest that the vapor pressure of S2 is too low for gas-phase S3 formation to be significant. Two additional species that may exhibit a non-RRKM MIF signature are S2O2 and S4. Again, there is a lack of isotopomer-specific kinetic data for these reactions, and gas-phase formation of S4 is likely inconsequential. Perhaps the most obvious mechanism is simply the primary act of SO2 photolysis. The SO2 absorption spectrum is highly structured, with strong vibronic bands above and below the dissociation limit. In contrast H2S, with its mostly

  3. Real-Time Characterization of Particle and Gas Phase Diesel Emissions - Understanding the Influence of a Diesel Particulate Filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, E. S.; Sappok, A.; Carrasquillo, A. J.; Onasch, T. B.; Fortner, E.; Jayne, J.; Wong, V.; Worsnop, D. R.; Kroll, J. H.

    2010-12-01

    Diesel engine emissions constitute an important source of particulate black carbon (BC) and gas phase organics in the atmosphere. Particles composed of black carbon absorb incoming solar radiation having a net positive radiative forcing effect on the climate. Black carbon also has major air quality implications as BC particles from combustion sources are often coated with poly-aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and are generally emitted in higher concentrations close to population centers. Regulations of diesel emissions target the mass of particulate matter (PM) and concentration of volatile gas phase organic compounds (VOC) produced. A third, potentially important component of diesel exhaust, is low volatility organic compounds (LVOC). Both the VOCs and LVOCs can lead to the formation of ultrafine particles (via homogeneous nucleation) and secondary organic aerosols (via oxidation). Recent development of mass spectrometric techniques to measure particulate black carbon and gas phase organics provide the opportunity to quantify and chemically characterize diesel emissions in real-time. Measurements of both the particulate and gas phase emissions from a medium-duty diesel engine will be presented. The experimental apparatus includes a diesel particulate filter (DPF) integrated in the exhaust line, which is a requirement for all 2007 and newer on-road diesel engines in the U.S. Measurements taken over the regeneration cycle of the DPF provide insight into how this after-treatment technology influences the gas phase and particle phase composition of the emissions. Gas phase measurements were made with a newly developed Total Gas-Phase Organic (TGO) instrument. Particulate species were characterized with a Soot Particle Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (SP-AMS). The combined utility of the TGO and SP-AMS instruments for emissions characterization studies will be demonstrated.

  4. Gas-phase reactivity of peptide thiyl (RS•), perthiyl (RSS•), and sulfinyl (RSO•) radical ions formed from atmospheric pressure ion/radical reactions.

    PubMed

    Tan, Lei; Xia, Yu

    2013-04-01

    In this study, we demonstrated the formation of gas-phase peptide perthiyl (RSS•) and thiyl (RS•) radical ions besides sulfinyl radical (RSO•) ions from atmospheric pressure (AP) ion/radical reactions of peptides containing inter-chain disulfide bonds. The identity of perthiyl radical was verified from characteristic 65 Da (•SSH) loss in collision-induced dissociation (CID). This signature loss was further used to assess the purity of peptide perthiyl radical ions formed from AP ion/radical reactions. Ion/molecule reactions combined with CID were carried out to confirm the formation of thiyl radical. Transmission mode ion/molecule reactions in collision cell (q2) were developed as a fast means to estimate the population of peptide thiyl radical ions. The reactivity of peptide thiyl, perthiyl, and sulfinyl radical ions was evaluated based on ion/molecule reactions toward organic disulfides, allyl iodide, organic thiol, and oxygen, which followed in order of thiyl (RS•) > perthiyl (RSS•) > sulfinyl (RSO•). The gas-phase reactivity of these three types of sulfur-based radicals is consistent with literature reports from solution studies.

  5. From Compact to String—The Role of Secondary and Tertiary Structure in Charge-Induced Unzipping of Gas-Phase Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warnke, Stephan; Hoffmann, Waldemar; Seo, Jongcheol; De Genst, Erwin; von Helden, Gert; Pagel, Kevin

    2016-12-01

    In the gas phase, protein ions can adopt a broad range of structures, which have been investigated extensively in the past using ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IM-MS)-based methods. Compact ions with low number of charges undergo a Coulomb-driven transition to partially folded species when the charge increases, and finally form extended structures with presumably little or no defined structure when the charge state is high. However, with respect to the secondary structure, IM-MS methods are essentially blind. Infrared (IR) spectroscopy, on the other hand, is sensitive to such structural details and there is increasing evidence that helices as well as β-sheet-like structures can exist in the gas phase, especially for ions in low charge states. Very recently, we showed that also the fully extended form of highly charged protein ions can adopt a distinct type of secondary structure that features a characteristic C5-type hydrogen bond pattern. Here we use a combination of IM-MS and IR spectroscopy to further investigate the influence of the initial, native conformation on the formation of these structures. Our results indicate that when intramolecular Coulomb-repulsion is large enough to overcome the stabilization energies of the genuine secondary structure, all proteins, regardless of their sequence or native conformation, form C5-type hydrogen bond structures. Furthermore, our results suggest that in highly charged proteins the positioning of charges along the sequence is only marginally influenced by the basicity of individual residues.

  6. The Contribution of the Activation Entropy to the Gas-Phase Stability of Modified Nucleic Acid Duplexes.

    PubMed

    Hari, Yvonne; Dugovič, Branislav; Istrate, Alena; Fignolé, Annabel; Leumann, Christian J; Schürch, Stefan

    2016-07-01

    Tricyclo-DNA (tcDNA) is a sugar-modified analogue of DNA currently tested for the treatment of Duchenne muscular dystrophy in an antisense approach. Tandem mass spectrometry plays a key role in modern medical diagnostics and has become a widespread technique for the structure elucidation and quantification of antisense oligonucleotides. Herein, mechanistic aspects of the fragmentation of tcDNA are discussed, which lay the basis for reliable sequencing and quantification of the antisense oligonucleotide. Excellent selectivity of tcDNA for complementary RNA is demonstrated in direct competition experiments. Moreover, the kinetic stability and fragmentation pattern of matched and mismatched tcDNA heteroduplexes were investigated and compared with non-modified DNA and RNA duplexes. Although the separation of the constituting strands is the entropy-favored fragmentation pathway of all nucleic acid duplexes, it was found to be only a minor pathway of tcDNA duplexes. The modified hybrid duplexes preferentially undergo neutral base loss and backbone cleavage. This difference is due to the low activation entropy for the strand dissociation of modified duplexes that arises from the conformational constraint of the tc-sugar-moiety. The low activation entropy results in a relatively high free activation enthalpy for the dissociation comparable to the free activation enthalpy of the alternative reaction pathway, the release of a nucleobase. The gas-phase behavior of tcDNA duplexes illustrates the impact of the activation entropy on the fragmentation kinetics and suggests that tandem mass spectrometric experiments are not suited to determine the relative stability of different types of nucleic acid duplexes. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  7. The Contribution of the Activation Entropy to the Gas-Phase Stability of Modified Nucleic Acid Duplexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hari, Yvonne; Dugovič, Branislav; Istrate, Alena; Fignolé, Annabel; Leumann, Christian J.; Schürch, Stefan

    2016-07-01

    Tricyclo-DNA (tcDNA) is a sugar-modified analogue of DNA currently tested for the treatment of Duchenne muscular dystrophy in an antisense approach. Tandem mass spectrometry plays a key role in modern medical diagnostics and has become a widespread technique for the structure elucidation and quantification of antisense oligonucleotides. Herein, mechanistic aspects of the fragmentation of tcDNA are discussed, which lay the basis for reliable sequencing and quantification of the antisense oligonucleotide. Excellent selectivity of tcDNA for complementary RNA is demonstrated in direct competition experiments. Moreover, the kinetic stability and fragmentation pattern of matched and mismatched tcDNA heteroduplexes were investigated and compared with non-modified DNA and RNA duplexes. Although the separation of the constituting strands is the entropy-favored fragmentation pathway of all nucleic acid duplexes, it was found to be only a minor pathway of tcDNA duplexes. The modified hybrid duplexes preferentially undergo neutral base loss and backbone cleavage. This difference is due to the low activation entropy for the strand dissociation of modified duplexes that arises from the conformational constraint of the tc-sugar-moiety. The low activation entropy results in a relatively high free activation enthalpy for the dissociation comparable to the free activation enthalpy of the alternative reaction pathway, the release of a nucleobase. The gas-phase behavior of tcDNA duplexes illustrates the impact of the activation entropy on the fragmentation kinetics and suggests that tandem mass spectrometric experiments are not suited to determine the relative stability of different types of nucleic acid duplexes.

  8. Strategies and methodologies to develop techniques for computer-assisted analysis of gas phase formation during altitude decompression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, Michael R.; Hall, W. A.

    1993-01-01

    It would be of operational significance if one possessed a device that would indicate the presence of gas phase formation in the body during hypobaric decompression. Automated analysis of Doppler gas bubble signals has been attempted for 2 decades but with generally unfavorable results, except with surgically implanted transducers. Recently, efforts have intensified with the introduction of low-cost computer programs. Current NASA work is directed towards the development of a computer-assisted method specifically targeted to EVA, and we are most interested in Spencer Grade 4. We note that Spencer Doppler Grades 1 to 3 have increased in the FFT sonogram and spectrogram in the amplitude domain, and the frequency domain is sometimes increased over that created by the normal blood flow envelope. The amplitude perturbations are of very short duration, in both systole and diastole and at random temporal positions. Grade 4 is characteristic in the amplitude domain but with modest increases in the FFT sonogram and spectral frequency power from 2K to 4K over all of the cardiac cycle. Heart valve motion appears to characteristic display signals: (1) the demodulated Doppler signal amplitude is considerably above the Doppler-shifted blow flow signal (even Grade 4); and (2) demodulated Doppler frequency shifts are considerably greater (often several kHz) than the upper edge of the blood flow envelope. Knowledge of these facts will aid in the construction of a real-time, computer-assisted discriminator to eliminate cardiac motion artifacts. There could also exist perturbations in the following: (1) modifications of the pattern of blood flow in accordance with Poiseuille's Law, (2) flow changes with a change in the Reynolds number, (3) an increase in the pulsatility index, and/or (4) diminished diastolic flow or 'runoff.' Doppler ultrasound devices have been constructed with a three-transducer array and a pulsed frequency generator.

  9. First detection of gas-phase ammonia in a planet-forming disk. NH3, N2H+, and H2O in the disk around TW Hydrae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salinas, Vachail N.; Hogerheijde, Michiel R.; Bergin, Edwin A.; Cleeves, L. Ilsedore; Brinch, Christian; Blake, Geoffrey A.; Lis, Dariusz C.; Melnick, Gary J.; Panić, Olja; Pearson, John C.; Kristensen, Lars; Yıldız, Umut A.; van Dishoeck, Ewine F.

    2016-06-01

    literature estimates that were based on lower excitation transitions. These masses correspond to a disk-averaged abundances of 0.2-17.0 × 10-11, 0.1-9.0 × 10-10 and 7.6 × 10-11 for NH3, H2O and N2H+ respectively. Conclusions: Only in the most compact and settled adopted configuration is the inferred NH3/H2O consistent with interstellar ices and solar system bodies of ~5%-10%; all other spatial distributions require additional gas-phase NH3 production mechanisms. Volatile release in the midplane may occur through collisions between icy bodies if the available surface for subsequent freeze-out is significantly reduced, for instance, through growth of small grains into pebbles or larger bodies.

  10. Ditechnetium heptoxide revisited: Solid-state, gas-phase, and theoretical studies

    SciTech Connect

    Childs, Bradley C.; Braband, Henrik; Lawler, Keith; Mast, Daniel S.; Bigler, Laurent; Stalder, Urs; Forster, Paul M.; Czerwinski, Kenneth R.; Alberto, Roger; Sattelberger, Alfred P.; Poineau, Frederic

    2016-10-04

    Here, ditechnetium heptoxide was synthesized from the oxidation of TcO2 with O2 at 450 °C and characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction (SCXRD), electron impact mass spectrometry (EI-MS) and theoretical methods. Refinement of the structure at 100 K indicates that Tc2O7 crystallizes as a molecular solid in the orthorhombic space group Pbca (a = 7.312(3) Å, b = 5.562(2) Å, c = 13.707(5) Å, V = 557.5(3) Å3). The Tc2O7 molecule can be described as corner-sharing TcO4 tetrahedra (Tc---Tc = 3.698(1) Å and Tc-OBri-Tc = 180.0°). The EI-MS spectrum of Tc2O7 consists of both mononuclear and dinuclear species. The main dinuclear species in the gas-phase are Tc2O7 (100%) and Tc2O5 (56%), while the main mononuclear species are TcO3 (33.9%) and TcO2 (42.8%). The difference in the relative intensities of the M2O5 (M = Tc, Re) fragments (1.7% for Re) indicate that these Group 7 elements exhibit different gas phase chemistry. The solid-state structure of Tc2O7 was investigated by density functional theory (DFT) methods. The optimized structure of the Tc2O7 molecule is in good agreement with the experimental one. Simulations indicate that the more favorable geometry for the Tc2O7 molecule in the gas-phase is bent (Tc-OBri-Tc = 156.5°), while linear (Tc-OBri-Tc = 180.0°) is favored in the solid state.

  11. Gas-phase lithium cation basicity of histamine and its agonist 2-([beta]-aminoethyl)-pyridine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallmann, M.; Raczynska, E. D.; Gal, J. F.; Maria, P. C.

    2007-11-01

    The gas-phase lithium cation basicities (LCBs) were obtained for histamine (HA) and its agonist 2-([beta]-aminoethyl)-pyridine (AEP) from collision-induced dissociation of lithium adducts using Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR-MS). For measurements, MeO(CH2)2OMe, Et3PO and (Me2N)3PO (HMPA) were used as the reference compounds. The experimental LCB of AEP was located between those of Et3PO and (Me2N)3PO. The experimental LCB of HA was found to be higher than those of AEP and HMPA by more than 2 kcal mol-1 clearly indicating that the LCB of HA is higher than any LCB for a neutral base yet measured (crown-ethers excepted). The experimental LCBs of the parent bases (pyridine and imidazole) are lower by more than 10 kcal mol-1. In parallel, DFT calculations {B3LYP/6-31G*//B3LYP/6-31G* and B3LYP/6-311+G**//B3LYP/6-31G*} were performed for HA, AEP and their lithium adducts. Among the 22 reasonable conformations of the HA-Li+ adduct, only one appears to be significantly more stable than the others. This is also the case for one structure among seven conformations of the AEP-Li+ adduct. These two stable structures have the [`]scorpion' conformation, in which the Li+ cation is almost equally chelated by two basic nitrogen atoms, the ring N-aza and the chain N-amino. Other HA-Li+ and AEP-Li+ conformations have noticeably higher energies than the [`]scorpion' structures. The difference between the DFT calculated LCBs of HA and AEP (about 4 kcal mol-1) is in agreement with that experimentally obtained (>2 kcal mol-1). The high experimental and theoretical values of LCB for HA and AEP militate in favor of a strong chelation of Li+ by both ligands in the gas-phase. This chelation effect was also evidenced previously for the proton gas-phase basicity.

  12. Comparing the gas-phase fragmentation reactions of protonated and radical cations of the tripeptides GXR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wee, Sheena; O'Hair, Richard A. J.; McFadyen, W. David

    2004-05-01

    Electrospray ionization (ESI) mass spectrometry of methanolic solutions of mixtures of the copper salt (2,2':6',2''-terpyridine)copper(II) nitrate monohydrate ([Cu(II)(tpy)(NO3)2].H2O) and a tripeptide GXR (where X = 1 of the 20 naturally occurring amino acids) yielded [Cu(II)(tpy)(GXR)][radical sign]2+ ions, which were then subjected to collision induced dissociation (CID). In all but one case (GRR), these [Cu(II)(tpy)(GXR)][radical sign]2+ ions fragment to form odd electron GXR[radical sign]+ radical cations with sufficient abundance to examine their gas-phase fragmentation reactions. The GXR[radical sign]+ radical cations undergo a diverse range of fragmentation reactions which depend on the nature of the side chain of X. Many of these reactions can be rationalized as arising from the intermediacy of isomeric distonic ions in which the charge (i.e. proton) is sequestered by the highly basic arginine side chain and the radical site is located at various positions on the tripeptide including the peptide back bone and side chains. The radical sites in these distonic ions often direct the fragmentation reactions via the expulsion of small radicals (to yield even electron ions) or small neutrals (to form radical cations). Both classes of reaction can yield useful structural information, allowing for example, distinction between leucine and isoleucine residues. The gas-phase fragmentation reactions of the GXR[radical sign]+ radical cations are also compared to their even electron [GXR+H]+ and [GXR+2H]2+ counterparts. The [GXR+H]+ ions give fewer sequence ions and more small molecule losses while the [GXR+2H]2+ ions yield more sequence information, consistent with the [`]mobile proton model' described in previous studies. In general, all three classes of ions give complementary structural information, but the GXR[radical sign]+ radical cations exhibit a more diverse loss of small species (radicals and neutrals). Finally, links between these gas-phase results and key

  13. Far-Ir Spectroscopy of Neutral Gas Phase Peptides: Signatures from Combined Experiments and Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahé, Jérôme; Gaigeot, Marie-Pierre; Bakker, Daniël; Jaeqx, Sander; Rijs, Anouk

    2016-06-01

    Within the past two decades, action vibrational spectroscopy has become an almost routine experimental method to probe the structures of molecules and clusters in the gas phase (neutral and ions). Such experiments are mainly performed in the 1000-4000 wn fingerprint regions. Though successful in many respects, these spectral domains can be however restrictive in the information provided, and sometimes reach limitations for unravelling structures without ambiguity. In a collaborative work with the group of Dr A.M. Rijs (FELIX laboratory, Radbout University, The Netherlands) we have launched a new strategy where the far-IR/Tera-Hertz domain (100-800 wn domain) is experimentally probed for neutral gas phase molecules. Our group in Paris apply finite temperature DFT-based molecular dynamics (DFT-MD) simulations in order to unravel the complex signatures arising in the far-IR domain, and provide an unambiguous assignment both of the structural conformation of the gas phase molecules (taking into account the experimental conditions) and an understanding of the spectral signatures/fingerprints. We will discuss our experimental and theoretical investigations on two neutral peptides in the 100-800 wn far-IR spectral domain, i.e. Z-Ala6 and PheGly dipeptide, that represent two systems which definitive conformational assignment was not possible without the far IR signatures. We will also present our very recent results on the Phe-X peptide series, where X stands for Gly, Ala, Pro, Val, Ser, Cys, combining experiments and DFT-MD simulations, providing a detailed understanding of the vibrational fingerprints in the far-IR domain. In all exemples, we will show how DFT-MD simulations is the proper theoretical tool to account for vibrational anharmonicities and mode couplings, of prime importance in the far-IR domain. References : J. Mahé, S. Jaeqx, A.M. Rijs, M.P. Gaigeot, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 17 :25905 (2015) S. Jaeqx, J. Oomens, A. Cimas, M.P. Gaigeot, A.M. Rijs, Angew

  14. Guanidinophosphazenes: design, synthesis, and basicity in THF and in the gas phase.

    PubMed

    Kolomeitsev, Alexander A; Koppel, Ilmar A; Rodima, Toomas; Barten, Jan; Lork, Enno; Röschenthaler, Gerd-Volker; Kaljurand, Ivari; Kütt, Agnes; Koppel, Ivar; Mäemets, Vahur; Leito, Ivo

    2005-12-21

    A principle for creating a new generation of nonionic superbases is presented. It is based on attachment of tetraalkylguanidino, 1,3-dimethylimidazolidine-2-imino, or bis(tetraalkylguanidino)carbimino groups to the phosphorus atom of the iminophosphorane group using tetramethylguanidine or easily available 1,3-dimethylimidazolidine-2-imine. Seven new nonionic superbasic phosphazene bases, tetramethylguanidino-substituted at the P atom, have been synthesized. Their base strengths are established in tetrahydrofuran (THF) solution by means of spectrophotometric titration and compared with those of eight reference superbases designed specially for this study, P2- and P4-iminophosphoranes. The gas-phase basicities of several guanidino- and N',N',N'',N''-tetramethylguanidino (tmg)-substituted phosphazenes and their cyclic analogues are calculated, and the crystal structures of (tmg)3P=N-t-Bu and (tmg)3P=N-t-Bu x HBF4 are determined. The enormous basicity-increasing effect of this principle is experimentally verified for the tetramethylguanidino groups in the THF medium: the basicity increase when moving from (dma)3P=N-t-Bu (pKalpha = 18.9) to (tmg)3P=N-t-Bu (pKalpha = 29.1) is 10 orders of magnitude. A significantly larger basicity increase (up to 20 powers of 10) is expected (based on the high-level density functional theory calculations) to accompany the similar gas-phase transfer between the (dma)3P=NH and (tmg)3P=NH bases. Far stronger basicities still are expected when, in the latter two compounds, all three dimethylamino (or tetramethylguanidino) fragments are replaced by methylated triguanide fragments, (tmg)2C=N-. The gas-phase basicity (around 300-310 kcal/mol) of the resulting base, [(tmg)2C=N-]3P=NH, having only one phosphorus atom, is predicted to exceed the basicity of (dma)3P=NH by more than 40 powers of 10 and to surpass also the basicity of the widely used commercial [(dma)3P=N]3P=N-t-Bu (t-BuP4) superbase.

  15. Heterogeneity-enhanced gas phase formation in shallow aquifers during leakage of CO2-saturated water from geologic sequestration sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plampin, Michael R.; Lassen, Rune N.; Sakaki, Toshihiro; Porter, Mark L.; Pawar, Rajesh J.; Jensen, Karsten H.; Illangasekare, Tissa H.

    2014-12-01

    A primary concern for geologic carbon storage is the potential for leakage of stored carbon dioxide (CO2) into the shallow subsurface where it could degrade the quality of groundwater and surface water. In order to predict and mitigate the potentially negative impacts of CO2 leakage, it is important to understand the physical processes that CO2 will undergo as it moves through naturally heterogeneous porous media formations. Previous studies have shown that heterogeneity can enhance the evolution of gas phase CO2 in some cases, but the conditions under which this occurs have not yet been quantitatively defined, nor tested through laboratory experiments. This study quantitatively investigates the effects of geologic heterogeneity on the process of gas phase CO2 evolution in shallow aquifers through an extensive set of experiments conducted in a column that was packed with layers of various test sands. Soil moisture sensors were utilized to observe the formation of gas phase near the porous media interfaces. Results indicate that the conditions under which heterogeneity controls gas phase evolution can be successfully predicted through analysis of simple parameters, including the dissolved CO2 concentration in the flowing water, the distance between the heterogeneity and the leakage location, and some fundamental properties of the porous media. Results also show that interfaces where a less permeable material overlies a more permeable material affect gas phase evolution more significantly than interfaces with the opposite layering.

  16. [Seasonal release characteristics of Ca, Mg and Mn of foliar litter of six tree species in subtropical evergreen broadleaved forest].

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhi-liang; Gao, Shun; Yang, Wan-qin; Wu, Fu-zhong

    2015-10-01

    Seasonal release dynamics of Ca, Mg and Mn during decomposition of foliar litter of Pinus massoniana, Cryptomeria fortunei, Cunninghamia lanceolata, Cinnamomum camphora, Toona ciliate, and Quercus acutissima were investigated in subtropical evergreen broad-leaved forest employing the method of litterbag. After one-year decomposition, the release rates of Ca, Mg and Mn in foliar litter of the studied tree species ranged from -13.8% to 92.3%, from 4.0% to 64.8%, and from 41.6% to 81.1%, respectively. Ca dynamics in foliar litter of P. massoniana, C. camphora exhibited the pattern of accumulating early and releasing later, while that of the other four tree species showed direct release. Similarly, the dynamics of Mg released from foliar litter of C. camphora showed the pattern of accumulating early and then releasing, while that of the other five tree species exhibited continuous release. Meanwhile, the dynamics of Mn released from foliar litter of C. fortunei and T. ciliate exhibited early accumulation, and subsequent release, while that of the other four tree species showed continuous release. The releases of Ca, Mg and Mn in foliar litter were greatly influenced by seasonal rainfall, and varied with tree species. Furthermore, the rates and amounts of Ca, Mg and Mn released from foliar litter were higher in rainy season than in dry season. In conclusion, the initial nutrient concentrations and precipitation were two key factors influencing the release dynamics of Ca, Mg and Mn during decomposition of foliar litter in the subtropical evergreen broad-leaved forest.

  17. Physicochemical Characteristics and Slow Release Performances of Chlorpyrifos Encapsulated by Poly(butyl acrylate-co-styrene) with the Cross-Linker Ethylene Glycol Dimethacrylate.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Gao, Zideng; Shen, Feng; Li, Yang; Zhang, Sainan; Ren, Xueqin; Hu, Shuwen

    2015-06-03

    Chlorpyrifos' application and delivery to the target substrate needs to be controlled to improve its use. Herein, poly(butyl acrylate-co-styrene) (poly(BA/St)) and poly(BA/St/ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA)) microcapsules loaded with chlorpyrifos as a slow release formulation were prepared by emulsion polymerization. The effects of structural characteristics on the chlorpyrifos microcapsule particle size, entrapment rate (ER), pesticide loading (PL), and release behaviors in ethyl alcohol were investigated. Fourier transform infrared and thermogravimetric analysis confirmed the successful entrapment of chlorpyrifos. The ER and PL varied with the BA/St monomer ratio, chlorpyrifos/monomer core-to-shell ratio, and EGDMA cross-linker content with consequence that suitable PL was estimated to be smaller than 3.09% and the highest ER was observed as 96.74%. The microcapsule particle size (88.36-101.8 nm) remained mostly constant. The extent of sustainable release decreased with increasing content of BA, St, or chlorpyrifos in the oil phase. Specifically, an adequate degree of cross-linking with EGMDA (0.5-2.5%) increased the extent of sustainable release considerably. However, higher levels of cross-linking with EGDMA (5-10%) reduced the extent of sustainable release. Chlorpyrifos release from specific microcapsules (monomer ratio 1:2 with 0.5% EGDMA or 5 g chlopyrifos) tended to be a diffusion-controlled process, while for others, the kinetics probably indicated the initial rupture release.

  18. STM and HREELS investigation of gas phase silanization on hydroxylated Si(100)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, C.; Lopinski, G. P.

    2010-06-01

    The gas phase anhydrous reaction of glycidoxypropyldimethylethoxysilane (GPDMES) with a model hydroxylated surface has been investigated using high-resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS) and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). Water dissociation on the clean reconstructed (2 × 1)-Si(100) surface was used to create an atomically flat surface with ~ 0.5 ML of hydroxyl groups. Exposure of this surface to GPDMES at room temperature under vacuum was found to lead to formation of covalent Si-O-Si bonds although high exposures (6 × 10 8 L) were required for saturation. STM images at the early stages of reaction indicate that the reaction occurs randomly on the surface with no apparent clustering. The STM images together with semi-empirical (AM1) calculations provide evidence for hydrogen bonding interactions between the oxygen atoms in the molecule and surface hydroxyl groups at low coverage.

  19. Gas-phase reactions of microsolvated fluoride ions: an investigation of different solvents.

    PubMed

    Eyet, Nicole; Villano, Stephanie M; Bierbaum, Veronica M

    2013-02-14

    The gas-phase reactions of F(-)(DMSO), F(-)(CH(3)CN), and F(-)(C(6)H(6)) with t-butyl halides were investigated. Reaction rate constants, kinetic isotope effects, and product ion branching ratios were measured using the flowing afterglow selected ion flow tube technique (FA-SIFT). Additionally, the structure of F(-)(DMSO) was investigated both computationally and experimentally, and two stable isomers were identified. The reactions generally proceed by elimination mechanisms; however, the reaction of F(-)(C(6)H(6)) with t-butyl chloride occurs by a switching mechanism. These reactions are compared to previous studies of microsolvated reactions of t-butyl halides where the solvent molecules were polar, protic molecules.

  20. Gas phase catalytic hydrodechlorination of chlorobenzene over cobalt phosphide catalysts with different P contents.

    PubMed

    Cecilia, J A; Infantes-Molina, A; Rodríguez-Castellón, E; Jiménez-López, A

    2013-09-15

    The gas phase catalytic hydrodechlorination (HDC) of chlorobenzene (CB) at atmospheric pressure was investigated over silica-supported cobalt and cobalt phosphide catalysts containing different P loading and a fixed amount of cobalt (5 wt.%). The effect of the initial P/Co molar ratio on the stoichiometry of the cobalt phosphide phase, the acidity and the hydrogen activation capability were discussed and these properties correlated with the catalytic activity. Catalytic results indicated that the cobalt phosphide phase is much more active than the monometallic cobalt one. The activity raised with the P content present in the sample due to the formation of the CoP phase instead of the Co₂P one, which favored the formation of hydrogen spillover species, increased the amount of weak acid sites and the number of exposed superficial cobalt atoms probably related to a better dispersion of the active phase. All the catalysts gave rise benzene as the main reaction product.

  1. Gas-phase study on uridine: Conformation and X-ray photofragmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Itälä, Eero Kooser, Kuno; Levola, Helena; Rachlew, Elisabeth; Ha, Dang Trinh; Kukk, Edwin

    2015-05-21

    Fragmentation of RNA nucleoside uridine, induced by carbon 1s core ionization, has been studied. The measurements by combined electron and ion spectroscopy have been performed in gas phase utilizing synchrotron radiation. As uridine is a combination of d-ribose and uracil, which have been studied earlier with the same method, this study also considers the effect of chemical environment and the relevant functional groups. Furthermore, since in core ionization the initial core hole is always highly localized, charge migration prior to fragmentation has been studied here. This study also demonstrates the destructive nature of core ionization as in most cases the C 1s ionization of uridine leads to concerted explosions producing only small fragments with masses ≤43 amu. In addition to fragmentation patterns, we found out that upon evaporation the sugar part of the uridine molecule attains hexagonal form.

  2. Recovery of bromine from waste gas-phase hydrogen bromide streams using an electrolytic membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Wauters, C.N; Winnick, J.

    1996-09-01

    An electrochemical cell is used to demonstrate a significant improvement in the recovery of bromine (Br{sub 2}) from waste gas-phase hydrogen bromide (HBr) streams. The continuous process operates at 300 C and utilizes reticulated vitreous carbon gas-diffusion electrodes, a molten (Li{sub 0.575}K{sub 0.133}Cs{sub 0.292})Br electrolyte, and borosilicate glass fiber membrane. HBr is simultaneously electrolytically decomposed and separated into a hydrogen enriched waste stream and pure anhydrous Br{sub 2} product stream. Simulated industrial waste streams containing HBr, nitrogen, water vapor, and organic compounds have been tested. These results include removals of greater than 90% and current densities approaching 1.0 A/cm{sup 2}.

  3. Electronic Structure and Gas-Phase Behaviour of the Heaviest Elements

    SciTech Connect

    Pershina, V.; Anton, J.; Jacob, T.; Borschevsky, A.

    2010-04-30

    Electronic structures and gas-phase adsorption behaviour of the heaviest elements 112, 113 and 114 and of their lighter homologs Hg, Tl and Pb is studied on the basis of ab initio Dirac-Coulomb atomic and four-component Density Functional Theory molecular and cluster calculations. The heaviest elements were shown to have low adsorption enthalpies on Teflon and should, therefore, be well transported through Teflon capillaries from the target chamber to the chemistry set up. Adsorption enthalpies of these elements on the Au(111) surface are predicted as -44.5 kJ/mol, -158.6 kJ/mol and -68.5 kJ/mol, respectively, giving the following sequence in the adsorption temperatures 113>114>112.

  4. Quantifying the stabilizing effects of protein–ligand interactions in the gas phase

    PubMed Central

    Allison, Timothy M.; Reading, Eamonn; Liko, Idlir; Baldwin, Andrew J.; Laganowsky, Arthur; Robinson, Carol V.

    2015-01-01

    The effects of protein–ligand interactions on protein stability are typically monitored by a number of established solution-phase assays. Few translate readily to membrane proteins. We have developed an ion-mobility mass spectrometry approach, which discerns ligand binding to both soluble and membrane proteins directly via both changes in mass and ion mobility, and assesses the effects of these interactions on protein stability through measuring resistance to unfolding. Protein unfolding is induced through collisional activation, which causes changes in protein structure and consequently gas-phase mobility. This enables detailed characterization of the ligand-binding effects on the protein with unprecedented sensitivity. Here we describe the method and software required to extract from ion mobility data the parameters that enable a quantitative analysis of individual binding events. This methodology holds great promise for investigating biologically significant interactions between membrane proteins and both drugs and lipids that are recalcitrant to characterization by other means. PMID:26440106

  5. Femtosecond pure-rotational coherent anti-stokes raman scattering gas phase diagnostics.

    SciTech Connect

    Kearney, Sean Patrick; Serrano, Justin Raymond

    2010-12-01

    We discuss recent experiments for the characterization of our femtosecond pure rotational CARS facility for observation of Raman transients in N{sub 2} and atmospheric air. The construction of a simplified femtosecond four-wave mixing system with only a single laser source is presented. Pure-rotational Raman transients reveal well-ordered time-domain recurrence peaks associated with the near-uniform spacing of rotational Raman peaks in the spectral domain. Long-time, 100-ps duration observations of the transient Raman polarization are presented, and the observed transients are compared to simulated results. Fourier transformation of the transients reveals two distinct sets of beat frequencies. Simulation results for temperatures from 300-700 K are used to illustrate the temperature sensitivity of the time-domain transients and their Fourier-transform counterparts. And strategies for diagnostics are briefly discussed. These results are being utilized to develop gas-phase measurement strategies for temperature and species concentration.

  6. The Northwest Infrared (NWIR) gas-phase spectral database of industrial and environmental chemicals: Recent updates

    SciTech Connect

    Brauer, Carolyn S.; Johnson, Timothy J.; Blake, Thomas A.; Sharpe, Steven W.; Sams, Robert L.; Tonkyn, Russell G.

    2014-05-22

    With continuing improvements in both standoff- and point-sensing techniques, there is an ongoing need for high-quality infrared spectral databases. The Northwest Infrared Database (NWIR) contains quantitative, gas-phase infrared spectra of nearly 500 pure chemical species that can be used for a variety of applications such as atmospheric monitoring, biomass burning studies, etc. The data, recorded at 0.1 cm-1 resolution, are pressure broadened to one atmosphere (N2) in order to mimic atmospheric conditions. Each spectrum is a composite composed of multiple individual measurements. Recent updates to the database include over 60 molecules that are known or suspected biomass-burning effluents. Examples from this set of measurements will be presented and experimental details will be discussed in the context of the utility of NWIR for environmental applications.

  7. Onset conditions for gas phase reaction and nucleation in the CVD of transition metal oxides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, J.; Rosner, D. E.; Castillo, J.

    1992-01-01

    A combined experimental/theoretical study is presented of the onset conditions for gas phase reaction and particle nucleation in hot substrate/cold gas CVD of transition metal oxides. Homogeneous reaction onset conditions are predicted using a simple high activation energy reacting gas film theory. Experimental tests of the basic theory are underway using an axisymmetric impinging jet CVD reactor. No vapor phase ignition has yet been observed in the TiCl4/O2 system under accessible operating conditions (below substrate temperature Tw = 1700 K). The goal of this research is to provide CVD reactor design and operation guidelines for achieving acceptable deposit microstructures at the maximum deposition rate while simultaneously avoiding homogeneous reaction/nucleation and diffusional limitations.

  8. On the Zwitterionic Nature of Gas-Phase Peptides and Protein Ions

    PubMed Central

    Marchese, Roberto; Grandori, Rita; Carloni, Paolo; Raugei, Simone

    2010-01-01

    Determining the total number of charged residues corresponding to a given value of net charge for peptides and proteins in gas phase is crucial for the interpretation of mass-spectrometry data, yet it is far from being understood. Here we show that a novel computational protocol based on force field and massive density functional calculations is able to reproduce the experimental facets of well investigated systems, such as angiotensin II, bradykinin, and tryptophan-cage. The protocol takes into account all of the possible protomers compatible with a given charge state. Our calculations predict that the low charge states are zwitterions, because the stabilization due to intramolecular hydrogen bonding and salt-bridges can compensate for the thermodynamic penalty deriving from deprotonation of acid residues. In contrast, high charge states may or may not be zwitterions because internal solvation might not compensate for the energy cost of charge separation. PMID:20463874

  9. Investigation of some numerical issues in a chemistry-transport model: Gas-phase simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallet, Vivien; Pourchet, AdéLaïDe; QuéLo, Denis; Sportisse, Bruno

    2007-08-01

    Many numerical strategies have been specifically developed for chemistry-transport models. Since no exact solutions are available for 3-D real problems, there are only few insights to choose between alternative numerical schemes and approximations, or to estimate the performance discrepancy between two approaches. However it is possible to assess the importance of numerical approximations through the comparison of different strategies. We estimated the impact of several numerical schemes for advection, diffusion and stiff chemistry. We also addressed operator splitting with different methods and operator orders. The study is performed with a gas-phase Eulerian model from the modeling platform Polyphemus. It is applied to ozone forecasts mainly over Europe, with focus on a few key species: ozone, nitric oxide, nitrogen dioxide, sulfur dioxide and hydroxy radical. The outcome is a ranking of the most sensitive numerical choices. It stresses the prominent impact of the advection scheme and of the splitting time step.

  10. High-order-harmonic generation using gas-phase H{sub 2}O molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao Songfeng; Jin, Cheng; Le, Anh-Thu; Lin, C. D.; Lucchese, R. R.

    2011-03-15

    We investigate high-order-harmonic generation of isotropically distributed gas-phase H{sub 2}O molecules exposed to an intense laser field. The induced dipole of each individual molecule by the laser field is first calculated using the recently developed quantitative rescattering theory. In a thin medium, harmonic spectra generated coherently from all the molecules are then calculated by solving Maxwell's equation of propagation. By using accurate transition dipoles of H{sub 2}O, we show that the harmonics in the lower plateau region are quite different from models that employ the simpler strong-field approximation. We also examine the magnitude and phase of the harmonics and their dependence on laser focusing conditions.

  11. Technical Basis for Gas-Phase Vadose Zone Remediation Technologies at Hanford: A Review - 12186

    SciTech Connect

    Truex, M.J.; Oostrom, M.; Szecsody, J.E.; Strickland, C.E.; Chronister, G.B.; Benecke, M.W.

    2012-07-01

    In situ vadose zone remediation approaches are being evaluated as potential options to mitigate the transport of inorganic and radionuclide contaminants from the vadose zone to the groundwater. Some of the candidate approaches are based on changing the contaminant or subsurface conditions in a way that slows downward migration of the contaminants through the vadose zone using amendments delivered in the gas-phase. Two promising approaches that have undergone testing at Hanford include soil desiccation to address technetium-99 contamination and ammonia-induced sequestration of uranium. For soil desiccation, a dry gas is injected to desiccate a targeted portion of the subsurface and thereby decrease contaminant movement by removing moisture and decreasing the hydraulic conductivity of the desiccated zone. Ammonia-induced sequestration of uranium relies on changing the pore water chemistry, primarily through pH changes, to induce dissolution and precipitation processes that decrease the amount of mobile uranium in the vadose zone. (authors)

  12. Relaxation rates of low-field gas-phase ^129Xe storage cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limes, Mark; Saam, Brian

    2010-10-01

    A study of longitudinal nuclear relaxation rates T1 of ^129Xe and Xe-N2 mixtures in a magnetic field of 3.8 mT is presented. In this regime, intrinsic spin relaxation is dominated by the intramolecular spin-rotation interaction due to persistent xenon dimers, a mechanism that can be quelled by introducing large amounts of N2 into the storage cell. Extrinsic spin relaxation is dominated by the wall-relaxation rate, which is the primary quantity of interest for the various low-field storage cells and coatings that we have tested. Previous group work has shown that extremely long gas-phase relaxation times T1 can be obtained, but only at large magnetic fields and low xenon densities. The current work is motivated by the practical benefits of retaining hyperpolarized ^129Xe for extended periods of time in a small magnetic field.

  13. Theoretical investigation of the long-lived metastable AlO2+ dication in gas phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sghaier, Onsi; Abdallah, Hassan H.; Abdullah, Hewa Y.; Jaidane, Nejm Eddine; Al Mogren, Muneerah Mogren; Hochlaf, Majdi

    2016-09-01

    We report the results of a detailed theoretical study of the electronic ground and excited states of the gas-phase doubly charged ion AlO2+ using high-level ab initio computer calculations. Both standard and explicitly correlated methods were used to calculate their potential energy curves and spectroscopic parameters. These computations show that the ground state of AlO2+ is X2Π. The internuclear equilibrium distance of AlO2+(X2Π) is computed 1.725 Å. We also deduced the adiabatic double ionization and charge stripping energies of AlO to be about 27.45 eV and 17.80 eV, respectively.

  14. Infrared and Ultraviolet Spectroscopy of Gas-Phase Imidazolium and Pyridinium Ionic Liquids.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Justin W.; Booth, Ryan S.; Annesley, Christopher; Stearns, Jaime A.

    2015-06-01

    Ionic liquids (ILs) are a highly variable and potentially game-changing class of molecules for a number of Air Force applications such as satellite propulsion, but the complex nature of IL structure and intermolecular interactions makes it difficult to adequately predict structure-property relationships in order to make new IL-based technology a reality. For example, methylation of imidazolium ionic liquids leads to a substantial increase in viscosity but the underlying physical mechanism is not understood. In addition, the role of hydrogen bonding in ILs, and especially its relationship to macroscopic properties, is a matter of ongoing research. Here we describe the gas-phase spectroscopy of a series of imidazolium- and pyridinium-based ILs, using a combination of infrared spectroscopy and density functional theory to establish the intermolecular interactions present in various ILs, to assess how well they are described by theory, and to relate microscopic structure to macroscopic properties.

  15. A catalytic reactor for the trapping of free radicals from gas phase oxidation reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conte, Marco; Wilson, Karen; Chechik, Victor

    2010-10-01

    A catalytic reactor for the trapping of free radicals originating from gas phase catalytic reactions is described and discussed. Radical trapping and identification were initially carried out using a known radical generator such as dicumyl peroxide. The trapping of radicals was further demonstrated by investigating genuine radical oxidation processes, e.g., benzaldehyde oxidation over manganese and cobalt salts. The efficiency of the reactor was finally proven by the partial oxidation of cyclohexane over MoO3, Cr2O3, and WO3, which allowed the identification of all the radical intermediates responsible for the formation of the products cyclohexanol and cyclohexanone. Assignment of the trapped radicals was carried out using spin trapping technique and X-band electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy.

  16. Averaged electron collision cross sections for thermal mixtures of \\alpha -alanine conformers in the gas phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimoto, Milton M.; de Lima, Erik V. R.; Tennyson, Jonathan

    2016-11-01

    A theoretical study of elastic electron collisions with 9 conformers of the gas-phase amino acid α-alanine (CH3CH(NH2)COOH) is performed. The eigenphase sums, resonance features, differential and integral cross sections are computed for each individual conformer. Resonance positions for the low-energy {π }* shape resonance are found to vary from 2.6 to 3.1 eV and the resonance widths from 0.3 to 0.5 eV. Averaged cross sections for thermal mixtures of the 9 conformers are presented. Both theoretical and experimental population ratios are considered. Thermally averaged cross sections obtained using the best theoretical estimates give reasonable agreement with the observed thermal cross sections. Excited conformers IIA and IIB make a large contribution to this average due to their large permanent dipole moments.

  17. Gas-Phase Hydration Thermochemistry of Sodiated and Potassiated Nucleic Acid Bases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wincel, Henryk

    2012-09-01

    Hydration reactions of sodiated and potassiated nucleic acid bases (uracil, thymine, cytosine, and adenine) produced by electrospray have been studied in a gas phase using the pulsed ion-beam high-pressure mass spectrometer. The thermochemical properties, ΔH o n , ΔS o n , and ΔG o n , for the hydrated systems were obtained from hydration equilibrium measurement. The structural aspects of the hydrated complexes are discussed in conjunction with available literature data. The correlation between water binding energies in the hydrated complexes and the corresponding metal ion affinities of nucleobases suggests that a significant (if not dominant) amount of the canonical structure of cytosine undergoes tautomerization during electrospray ionization, and the thermochemical values for cationized cytosine probably correspond to a mixture of tautomeric complexes.

  18. Stability of polyphenols in chokeberry juice treated with gas phase plasma.

    PubMed

    Bursać Kovačević, Danijela; Gajdoš Kljusurić, Jasenka; Putnik, Predrag; Vukušić, Tomislava; Herceg, Zoran; Dragović-Uzelac, Verica

    2016-12-01

    Chokeberry juice was subjected to cold atmospheric gas phase plasma and changes in hydroxycinnamic acids, flavonols and anthocyanins were monitored. Plasma treatments were carried out under different treatment times and juice volumes under constant gas flow (0.75dm(3)min(-1)). The results were compared against control (untreated) and pasteurized chokeberry juice (80°C/2min). During pasteurization, the most unstable were hydroxycinnamic acids with losses of up to 59%, while flavonols and anthocyanins increased by 5% and 9%, respectively. On the contrary, plasma treated chokeberry juice showed higher concentrations of hydroxycinnamic acids and 23% loss of anthocyanins in comparison to untreated juice. In order to obtain the optimal cold plasma treatment parameters principal component and sensitivity analysis were used. Such parameters can be potentially used for pasteurization in terms of phenolic stability of chokeberry juice. Optimal treatment was at 4.1min and sample volume of 3cm(3).

  19. Gas phase spectroscopy of HNO3 in the region 2000-8500 cm(-1).

    PubMed

    Feierabend, K J; Havey, D K; Vaida, V

    2004-10-01

    Spectra of gas phase HNO3 were collected in the region 2000-8500 cm(-1) using Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. This region is dominated by the nu1 O-H stretching mode but also contains many previously unreported combination bands and overtones. This work marks the first observation of Fermi resonance the 2nu1 O-H stretching overtone. Previously unobserved bands were assigned and integrated intensities were obtained. For bands already reported in the literature, comparisons of relative intensities are presented when possible. This work gives a brief discussion on the trends in overtone intensities and on mode mixing in HNO3 in relation to previous experimental and theoretical studies.

  20. Kinetic study of model reactions in the gas phase at the early stage of coke formation

    SciTech Connect

    Nohara, D.; Sakai, T. )

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports that the most probable gas-phase reactions at the early stage of coke formation were elucidated by kinetic study on the model reactions adopted for formation of cyclic compounds and growth of ring. It was revealed that the formation and growth of ring proceeded mainly through cycloaddition of butadiene or allyl radicals to unsaturated hydrocarbons at relatively low temperatures ({approximately}600{degrees}C), i.e., through a Diels-Alder type reaction. On the other hand, such growth of ring as formation of biphenyl accompanying dehydrogenation from benzene can proceed only at the higher temperatures. It was also revealed that in the growth of the ring, cycloaddition of butadiene favors a cyclic olefin molecule that possesses a nonconjugated double bond and a nearly planar structure.

  1. Microbial use of gas phase organic compounds in the surface ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arrieta, Jesus M.; Duarte, Carlos M.; Monserrat Sala, M.; Dachs, Jordi

    2016-04-01

    Large diffusive air-sea fluxes of gas-phase organic carbon (GOC) have been identified, indicating that the ocean may be a major sink for these compounds. However, little is known about the fate of these GOC compounds entering the surface ocean. We report efficient use of atmospheric GOC by marine prokaryotes at different locations in the NE Subtropical Atlantic Ocean, the Arctic Ocean and the Mediterranean Sea. Our results indicate that between 2 to 27% of the prokaryotic carbon demand was supported by GOC. Between 1 and 94% of the GOC entering the ocean was consumed by prokaryotes depending on locations, thus sustaining a disequilibrium, which drives the transfer of GOC from the atmosphere into the ocean. The magnitude of this, previously unnoticed, microbial GOC utilization stresses the need for incorporating the oceanic uptake of gaseous organic carbon into the global carbon budget.

  2. The modeling of gas phase permeation through iron and nickel membranes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhn, David K.; Shanabarger, Mickey R.

    1989-01-01

    The gas phase permeation of hydrogen through metal membranes encompasses many kinetic processes. This paper reviews a permeation model which incorporates second order gas-surface reaction kinetics with simple bulk diffusion. The model is used to investigate the effect of this particular surface reaction of steady-state permeation. The dependence of the steady-state permeation flux on temperature, pressure, and thickness of the membrane has been calculated. The model predicts that the bulk controlled steady-state flux will change to a surface limited steady-state flux as either the temperature or thickness of the membrane is reduced. Finally, using independently derived parameters, the model is compared with permeation measurements on iron and nickel membranes.

  3. Cyclization of 1,4-hydroxycarbonyls is not a homogenous gas phase process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dibble, Theodore S.

    2007-10-01

    Previous studies of 1,4-hydroxycarbonyls derived from alkanes have suggested that they can cyclize to saturated furans, which can subsequently eliminate water to form the corresponding dihydrofurans. CBS-QB3 and G3 studies of 5-hydroxy-2-pentanone and 2-hydroxypentanal show that both steps have activation barriers far too large for these reactions to occur as homogenous gas phase reactions. Similar results were obtained in CBS-QB3 studies of the analogous process leading from 2- and 3-methyl-4-hydroxy-2-butenal (species posited to form in the degradation of isoprene) to 3-methylfuran. The latter two processes are much more favorable, thermodynamically, than the formation of dihydrofurans from the saturated 1,4-hydroxycarbonyls.

  4. Gas-phase hydration thermochemistry of sodiated and potassiated nucleic acid bases.

    PubMed

    Wincel, Henryk

    2012-09-01

    Hydration reactions of sodiated and potassiated nucleic acid bases (uracil, thymine, cytosine, and adenine) produced by electrospray have been studied in a gas phase using the pulsed ion-beam high-pressure mass spectrometer. The thermochemical properties, ΔH(o)(n), ΔS(o)(n), and ΔG(o)(n), for the hydrated systems were obtained from hydration equilibrium measurement. The structural aspects of the hydrated complexes are discussed in conjunction with available literature data. The correlation between water binding energies in the hydrated complexes and the corresponding metal ion affinities of nucleobases suggests that a significant (if not dominant) amount of the canonical structure of cytosine undergoes tautomerization during electrospray ionization, and the thermochemical values for cationized cytosine probably correspond to a mixture of tautomeric complexes.

  5. Gas-phase activation of methane by ligated transition-metal cations

    PubMed Central

    Schröder, Detlef; Schwarz, Helmut

    2008-01-01

    Motivated by the search for ways of a more efficient usage of the large, unexploited resources of methane, recent progress in the gas-phase activation of methane by ligated transition-metal ions is discussed. Mass spectrometric experiments demonstrate that the ligands can crucially influence both reactivity and selectivity of transition-metal cations in bond-activation processes, and the most reactive species derive from combinations of transition metals with the electronegative elements fluorine, oxygen, and chlorine. Furthermore, the collected knowledge about intramolecular kinetic isotope effects associated with the activation of C–H(D) bonds of methane can be used to distinguish the nature of the bond activation as a mere hydrogen-abstraction, a metal-assisted mechanism or more complex reactions such as formation of insertion intermediates or σ-bond metathesis. PMID:18955709

  6. Gas phase reaction of phosphorus trichloride and methanol: Matrix isolation infrared and DFT studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Prasad Ramesh; Ramanathan, N.; Sundararajan, K.; Sankaran, K.

    2015-11-01

    Gas phase reaction of phosphorus trichloride (PCl3) and methanol (CH3OH) was carried out with different ratios of PCl3:CH3OH:N2 (1:1:1000, 1:2:1000 and 1:3:1000) and the products were identified using matrix isolation infrared spectroscopy. For the 1:1 and 1:2 ratios of PCl3:CH3OH, dichloro methyl phosphite (DCMP) and methyl chloride (CH3Cl) were the products formed. Interestingly, only methyl chloride (CH3Cl) was observed for the 1:3 ratio of PCl3:CH3OH. DFT computations were carried out at B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) level of theory to give insights into the formation of the reaction products. Based on the experimental findings and computations a reaction mechanism has been proposed through a nucleophilic substitution reaction to explain the formation of the products.

  7. New studies on molecular chirality in the gas phase: enantiomer differentiation and determination of enantiomeric excess.

    PubMed

    Patterson, David; Schnell, Melanie

    2014-06-21

    Chirality plays a fundamental role in the activity of biological molecules and broad classes of chemical reactions. The chemistry of life is built almost exclusively on left-handed amino acids and right-handed sugars, a phenomenon known as "homochirality of life". Furthermore, most drugs developed in the last decade are of specified chirality. Thus, fast and reliable methods that can differentiate molecules of different handedness, determine the enantiomeric excess of even molecular mixtures, and allow for an unambiguous determination of molecular handedness are of great interest, in particular with respect to complex mixtures. In this perspective article, we discuss the recent developments, with an emphasis on modern spectroscopic methods using gas-phase samples, such as photoelectron circular dichroism, Coulomb explosion imaging, and microwave three-wave mixing.

  8. Contact Forces between Single Metal Oxide Nanoparticles in Gas-Phase Applications and Processes

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    In this work we present a comprehensive experimental study to determine the contact forces between individual metal oxide nanoparticles in the gas-phase using atomic force microscopy. In addition, we determined the amount of physisorbed water for each type of particle surface. By comparing our results with mathematical models of the interaction forces, we could demonstrate that classical continuum models of van der Waals and capillary forces alone cannot sufficiently describe the experimental findings. Rather, the discrete nature of the molecules has to be considered, which leads to ordering at the interface and the occurrence of solvation forces. We demonstrate that inclusion of solvation forces in the model leads to quantitative agreement with experimental data and that tuning of the molecular order by addition of isopropanol vapor allows us to control the interaction forces between the nanoparticles. PMID:28186771

  9. Radicals and molecular products from the gas-phase pyrolysis of lignin model compounds. Cinnamyl alcohol

    PubMed Central

    Khachatryan, Lavrent; Xu, Meng-xia; Wu, Ang-jian; Pechagin, Mikhail; Asatryan, Rubik

    2016-01-01

    The experimental results on detection and identification of intermediate radicals and molecular products from gas-phase pyrolysis of cinnamyl alcohol (CnA), the simplest non-phenolic lignin model compound, over the temperature range of 400–800 °C are reported. The low temperature matrix isolation – electron paramagnetic resonance (LTMI-EPR) experiments along with the theoretical calculations, provided evidences on the generation of the intermediate carbon and oxygen centered as well as oxygen-linked, conjugated radicals. A mechanistic analysis is performed based on density functional theory to explain formation of the major products from CnA pyrolysis; cinnamaldehyde, indene, styrene, benzaldehyde, 1-propynyl benzene, and 2-propenyl benzene. The evaluated bond dissociation patterns and unimolecular decomposition pathways involve dehydrogenation, dehydration, 1,3-sigmatropic H-migration, 1,2-hydrogen shift, C—O and C—C bond cleavage processes. PMID:28344372

  10. Multifunctional acid formation from the gas-phase ozonolysis of beta-pinene.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yan; Marston, George

    2008-10-28

    The gas-phase ozonolysis of beta-pinene was studied in static chamber experiments, using gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometric and flame ionisation detection to separate and detect products. A range of multifunctional organic acids-including pinic acid, norpinic acid, pinalic-3-acid, pinalic-4-acid, norpinalic acid and OH-pinalic acid-were identified in the condensed phase after derivatisation. Formation yields for these products under systematically varying reaction conditions (by adding different OH radical scavengers and Criegee intermediate scavengers) were investigated and compared with those observed from alpha-pinene ozonolysis, allowing detailed information on product formation mechanisms to be elucidated. In addition, branching ratios for the initial steps of the reaction were inferred from quantitative measurements of primary carbonyl formation. Atmospheric implications of this work are discussed.

  11. Nanoparticle films made by gas phase synthesis: comparison of various techniques and sensor applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heszler, Peter; Reyes, L. F.; Hoel, Anders; Landstrom, Lars; Lantto, V.; Granqvist, Claes-Goran

    2003-07-01

    Nanoparticles can be generated by several different gas phase methods, such as gas deposition, laser-assisted chemical vapor deposition, and laser ablation. Some of the most important aspects - such as size-distribution, structure, and chemical composition of the generated nanoparticles (specifically W and WO3) - are presented and compared. WO3 nanoparticle films were deposited by an advanced gas deposition technique and were tested for sensor applications. Two different sensor devices were fabricated: Firstly, a thin Au-WO3 nanoparticle sandwich film was constructed, and conductance fluctuations of the Au film were measured as the sensor was exposed to alcohol vapor. Secondly, conductivity changes of a thick WO3 nanoparticle film were detected as it was exposed to test gases (H2S, NO2, and CO).

  12. Analysis of organic gas phase compounds formed by hydrothermal liquefaction of Dried Distillers Grains with Solubles.

    PubMed

    Madsen, René B; Christensen, Per S; Houlberg, Kasper; Lappa, Elpiniki; Mørup, Anders J; Klemmer, Maika; Olsen, Eva M; Jensen, Mads M; Becker, Jacob; Iversen, Bo B; Glasius, Marianne

    2015-09-01

    This work provides a comprehensive characterization of the gas phase from hydrothermal liquefaction of Dried Distillers Grains with Solubles (DDGS) collected during a 24-h continuous experiment. The gas consisted mainly of CO2, CO, H2, CH4 and C2H6 accounting for 96 v/v% while further analysis by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS) showed additionally 62 compounds of which 54 were tentatively identified. These products included methanethiol, dimethyl sulfide, various olefins and several aromatic compounds. The composition provided clear indication of the steady state of the system. Apart from CO2, olefins were the most abundant compound class and could provide a source of revenue.

  13. ORTHO-PARA SELECTION RULES IN THE GAS-PHASE CHEMISTRY OF INTERSTELLAR AMMONIA

    SciTech Connect

    Faure, A.; Hily-Blant, P.; Le Gal, R.; Rist, C.

    2013-06-10

    The ortho-para chemistry of ammonia in the cold interstellar medium is investigated using a gas-phase chemical network. Branching ratios for the primary reaction chain involved in the formation and destruction of ortho- and para-NH{sub 3} were derived using angular momentum rules based on the conservation of the nuclear spin. We show that the 'anomalous' ortho-to-para ratio of ammonia ({approx}0.7) observed in various interstellar regions is in fact consistent with nuclear spin selection rules in a para-enriched H{sub 2} gas. This ratio is found to be independent of temperature in the range 5-30 K. We also predict an ortho-to-para ratio of {approx}2.3 for NH{sub 2}. We conclude that a low ortho-to-para ratio of H{sub 2} naturally drives the ortho-to-para ratios of nitrogen hydrides below the statistical values.

  14. LSENS, a general chemical kinetics and sensitivity analysis code for gas-phase reactions: User's guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radhakrishnan, Krishnan; Bittker, David A.

    1993-01-01

    A general chemical kinetics and sensitivity analysis code for complex, homogeneous, gas-phase reactions is described. The main features of the code, LSENS, are its flexibility, efficiency and convenience in treating many different chemical reaction models. The models include static system, steady, one-dimensional, inviscid flow, shock initiated reaction, and a perfectly stirred reactor. In addition, equilibrium computations can be performed for several assigned states. An implicit numerical integration method, which works efficiently for the extremes of very fast and very slow reaction, is used for solving the 'stiff' differential equation systems that arise in chemical kinetics. For static reactions, sensitivity coefficients of all dependent variables and their temporal derivatives with respect to the initial values of dependent variables and/or the rate coefficient parameters can be computed. This paper presents descriptions of the code and its usage, and includes several illustrative example problems.

  15. Activation of Methane by the Pyridine Radical Cation and its Substituted Forms in the Gas Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Guohua; Stewart, Hamish; Liu, Zeyu; Wang, Yongcheng; Stace, Anthony J.

    2015-08-01

    We present an experimental study of methane activation by pyridine cation and its substituents in the gas phase. Mass spectrometric experiments in an ion trap demonstrate that pyridine cation and some of its substituent cations are able to react with methane. The deuterated methane experiment has confirmed that the hydrogen atom in the ionic product of reaction does come from methane. The collected information about kinetic isotope effects has been used to distinguish the nature of the bond activation as a hydrogen abstraction. Furthermore, experimental results demonstrated that the substituent groups on the pyridine ring can crucially influence their reactivity in methane bond activation processes. Density functional calculation (DFT) was employed to study the electronic structures of the complex and reaction mechanism of CH4+C5H5N+. The calculations confirmed the hypothesis from the experimental observation, namely, the reaction is rapid with no energy barrier.

  16. Accurate Structure Parameters for Tunneling Ionization Rates of Gas-Phase Linear Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Song-Feng; Li, Jian-Ke; Wang, Guo-Li; Li, Peng-Cheng; Zhou, Xiao-Xin

    2017-03-01

    In the molecular Ammosov–Delone–Krainov (MO-ADK) model of Tong et al. [Phys. Rev. A 66 (2002) 033402], the ionization rate depends on the structure parameters of the molecular orbital from which the electron is removed. We determine systematically and tabulate accurate structure parameters of the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) for 123 gas-phase linear molecules by solving time-independent Schrödinger equation with B-spline functions and molecular potentials which are constructed numerically using the modified Leeuwen–Baerends (LBα) model. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos. 11664035, 11674268, 11465016, 11364038, 11364039, the Specialized Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China under Grant No. 20116203120001 and the Basic Scientific Research Foundation for Institution of Higher Learning of Gansu Province

  17. Second order rate constants for intramolecular conversions: Application to gas-phase NMR relaxation times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, S. H.; Lazaar, K. I.

    1983-09-01

    The usually quoted expression for the second order rate constant, for a unimolecular reaction at the low pressure limit, is valid only for strictly irreversible processes. Its application to isomerization reactions (which are to some extent reversible) is demonstrably in error; corrected expressions have been published. Attention is directed to intramolecular conversions over low barriers, for which the inappropriateness of the unidirectional expression becomes obvious. For such isomerizations we propose a model which incorporates only operationally observable states, so that an essential conceptual ambiguity is avoided. Use of this model is illustrated for the syn⇄anti conversions of methyl nitrite, derived from a gas phase NMR coalescence curve (Mc:Tc). The present data suggest that during isomerization the alkyl nitrites may not be completely ergodic on a time scale of 10-9 s. A regional phase-space model is proposed which has the appropriate formalism to account for this behavior.

  18. Thermodynamic and kinetic stability of zwitterionic histidine: Effects of gas phase hydration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sung-Sik; Kim, Ju-Young; Han, Yuna; Shim, Hyun-Jin; Lee, Sungyul

    2015-09-01

    We present calculations for histidine-(H2O)n (n = 0-6) to examine the effects of micro-hydrating water molecules on the relative stability of the zwitterionic vs. canonical forms of histidine. We calculate the structures and Gibbs free energies of the conformers at wB97XD/6-311++G(d,p) level of theory. We find that six water molecules are required to produce the thermodynamically stable histidine zwitterion. By calculating the barriers of canonical ↔ zwitterionic transformation, we predict that both the most stable canonical and zwitterionic forms of histidine-(H2O)6 may be observed in low temperature gas phase environment.

  19. A detailed investigation of proposed gas-phase syntheses of ammonia in dense interstellar clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herbst, Eric; Defrees, D. J.; Mclean, A. D.

    1987-01-01

    The initial reactions of the Herbst and Klemperer (1973) and the Dalgarno (1974) schemes (I and II, respectively) for the gas-phase synthesis of ammonia in dense interstellar clouds were investigated. The rate of the slightly endothermic reaction between N(+) and H2 to yield NH(+) and H (scheme I) under interstellar conditions was reinvestigated under thermal and nonthermal conditions based on laboratory data. It was found that the relative importance of this reaction in synthesizing ammonia is determined by how the laboratory data at low temperature are interpreted. On the other hand, the exothermic reaction between N and H3(+) to form NH2(+) + H (scheme II) was calculated to possess significant activation energy and, therefore, to have a negligible rate coefficient under interstellar conditions. Consequently, this reaction cannot take place appreciably in interstellar clouds.

  20. Structural Isomerization of the Gas Phase 2-NORBORNYL Cation Revealed with Infrared Spectroscopy and Computational Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauney, Daniel; Mosley, Jonathan; Duncan, Michael A.

    2014-06-01

    The non-classical structure of the 2-norborny cation (C_7H11+) which was at the center of "the most heated chemical controversy of our time" has been observed in the condensed phase and recently using X-ray crystallography. However, no gas phase vibrational spectrum has been collected. The C_7H11+ cation is produced via H_3+ protonation of norbornene by pulsed discharge in a supersonic expansion of H_2/Ar. Ions are mass-selected and probed using infrared photodissociation spectroscopy. Due to high exothermicity, protonation via H_3+ leads to a structural isomerization to the global minimum structure 1,3-dimethylcyclopentenyl (DMCP+). Experiments are currently being conducted to find softer protonation techniques that could lead to the authentic 2-norbornyl cation. Schleyer,P.v.R. et. al.; Stable Carbocation Chemistry, John Wiley & Sons,Inc.; New York, 1997, Chapter 2