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Sample records for gas-rich turbulent clumpy

  1. THE THICK DISKS OF SPIRAL GALAXIES AS RELICS FROM GAS-RICH, TURBULENT, CLUMPY DISKS AT HIGH REDSHIFT

    SciTech Connect

    Bournaud, Frederic; Martig, Marie; Elmegreen, Bruce G.

    2009-12-10

    The formation of thick stellar disks in spiral galaxies is studied. Simulations of gas-rich young galaxies show formation of internal clumps by gravitational instabilities, clump coalescence into a bulge, and disk thickening by strong stellar scattering. The bulge and thick disks of modern galaxies may form this way. Simulations of minor mergers make thick disks too, but there is an important difference. Thick disks made by internal processes have a constant scale height with galactocentric radius, but thick disks made by mergers flare. The difference arises because in the first case, perpendicular forcing and disk-gravity resistance are both proportional to the disk column density, so the resulting scale height is independent of this density. In the case of mergers, perpendicular forcing is independent of the column density and the low-density regions get thicker; the resulting flaring is inconsistent with observations. Late-stage gas accretion and thin-disk growth are shown to preserve the constant scale heights of thick disks formed by internal evolution. These results reinforce the idea that disk galaxies accrete most of their mass smoothly and acquire their structure by internal processes, in particular through turbulent and clumpy phases at high redshift.

  2. NEARBY CLUMPY, GAS RICH, STAR-FORMING GALAXIES: LOCAL ANALOGS OF HIGH-REDSHIFT CLUMPY GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Garland, C. A.; Pisano, D. J.; Rabidoux, K.; Low, M.-M. Mac; Kreckel, K.; Guzmán, R. E-mail: djpisano@mail.wvu.edu E-mail: mordecai@amnh.org E-mail: guzman@astro.ufl.edu

    2015-07-10

    Luminous compact blue galaxies (LCBGs) have enhanced star formation rates (SFRs) and compact morphologies. We combine Sloan Digital Sky Survey data with H i data of 29 LCBGs at redshift z ∼ 0 to understand their nature. We find that local LCBGs have high atomic gas fractions (∼50%) and SFRs per stellar mass consistent with some high-redshift star-forming galaxies (SFGs). Many local LCBGs also have clumpy morphologies, with clumps distributed across their disks. Although rare, these galaxies appear to be similar to the clumpy SFGs commonly observed at z ∼ 1–3. Local LCBGs separate into three groups: (1) interacting galaxies (∼20%); (2) clumpy spirals (∼40%); and (3) non-clumpy, non-spirals with regular shapes and smaller effective radii and stellar masses (∼40%). It seems that the method of building up a high gas fraction, which then triggers star formation, is not the same for all local LCBGs. This may lead to a dichotomy in galaxy characteristics. We consider possible gas delivery scenarios and suggest that clumpy spirals, preferentially located in clusters and with companions, are smoothly accreting gas from tidally disrupted companions and/or intracluster gas enriched by stripped satellites. Conversely, as non-clumpy galaxies are preferentially located in the field and tend to be isolated, we suggest clumpy, cold streams, which destroy galaxy disks and prevent clump formation, as a likely gas delivery mechanism for these systems. Other possibilities include smooth cold streams, a series of minor mergers, or major interactions.

  3. Low Angular Momentum in Clumpy, Turbulent Disk Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obreschkow, Danail; Glazebrook, Karl; Bassett, Robert; Fisher, David B.; Abraham, Roberto G.; Wisnioski, Emily; Green, Andrew W.; McGregor, Peter J.; Damjanov, Ivana; Popping, Attila; Jørgensen, Inger

    2015-12-01

    We measure the stellar specific angular momentum {j}s={J}s/{M}s in four nearby (z ≈ 0.1) disk galaxies that have stellar masses {M}s near the break {M}s* of the galaxy mass function but look like typical star-forming disks at z ≈ 2 in terms of their low stability (Q ≈ 1), clumpiness, high ionized gas dispersion (40-50 {km} {{{s}}}-1), high molecular gas fraction (20%-30%), and rapid star formation (˜ 20{M}⊙ {{yr}}-1). Combining high-resolution (Keck-OSIRIS) and large-radius (Gemini-GMOS) spectroscopic maps, only available at low z, we discover that these targets have ˜ 3 times less stellar angular momentum than typical local spiral galaxies of equal stellar mass and bulge fraction. Theoretical considerations show that this deficiency in angular momentum is the main cause of their low stability, while the high gas fraction plays a complementary role. Interestingly, the low {j}s values of our targets are similar to those expected in the {M}s* population at higher z from the approximate theoretical scaling {j}s\\propto {(1+z)}-1/2 at fixed {M}s. This suggests that a change in angular momentum, driven by cosmic expansion, is the main cause for the remarkable difference between clumpy {M}s* disks at high z (which likely evolve into early-type galaxies) and mass-matched local spirals.

  4. Extreme Gas Fractions in Clumpy, Turbulent Disk Galaxies at z ~ 0.1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, David B.; Glazebrook, Karl; Bolatto, Alberto; Obreschkow, Danail; Mentuch Cooper, Erin; Wisnioski, Emily; Bassett, Robert; Abraham, Roberto G.; Damjanov, Ivana; Green, Andy; McGregor, Peter

    2014-08-01

    In this Letter, we report the discovery of CO fluxes, suggesting very high gas fractions in three disk galaxies seen in the nearby universe (z ~ 0.1). These galaxies were investigated as part of the DYnamics of Newly Assembled Massive Objects (DYNAMO) survey. High-resolution Hubble Space Telescope imaging of these objects reveals the presence of large star forming clumps in the bodies of the galaxies, while spatially resolved spectroscopy of redshifted Hα reveals the presence of high dispersion rotating disks. The internal dynamical state of these galaxies resembles that of disk systems seen at much higher redshifts (1 < z < 3). Using CO(1-0) observations made with the Plateau de Bure Interferometer, we find gas fractions of 20%-30% and depletion times of t dep ~ 0.5 Gyr (assuming a Milky-Way-like αCO). These properties are unlike those expected for low-redshift galaxies of comparable specific star formation rate, but they are normal for their high-z counterparts. DYNAMO galaxies break the degeneracy between gas fraction and redshift, and we show that the depletion time per specific star formation rate for galaxies is closely tied to gas fraction, independent of redshift. We also show that the gas dynamics of two of our local targets corresponds to those expected from unstable disks, again resembling the dynamics of high-z disks. These results provide evidence that DYNAMO galaxies are local analogs to the clumpy, turbulent disks, which are often found at high redshift.

  5. EXTREME GAS FRACTIONS IN CLUMPY, TURBULENT DISK GALAXIES AT z ∼ 0.1

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, David B.; Glazebrook, Karl; Bassett, Robert; Bolatto, Alberto; Obreschkow, Danail; Cooper, Erin Mentuch; Wisnioski, Emily; Abraham, Roberto G.; Damjanov, Ivana; Green, Andy; McGregor, Peter

    2014-08-01

    In this Letter, we report the discovery of CO fluxes, suggesting very high gas fractions in three disk galaxies seen in the nearby universe (z ∼ 0.1). These galaxies were investigated as part of the DYnamics of Newly Assembled Massive Objects (DYNAMO) survey. High-resolution Hubble Space Telescope imaging of these objects reveals the presence of large star forming clumps in the bodies of the galaxies, while spatially resolved spectroscopy of redshifted Hα reveals the presence of high dispersion rotating disks. The internal dynamical state of these galaxies resembles that of disk systems seen at much higher redshifts (1 < z < 3). Using CO(1-0) observations made with the Plateau de Bure Interferometer, we find gas fractions of 20%-30% and depletion times of t {sub dep} ∼ 0.5 Gyr (assuming a Milky-Way-like α{sub CO}). These properties are unlike those expected for low-redshift galaxies of comparable specific star formation rate, but they are normal for their high-z counterparts. DYNAMO galaxies break the degeneracy between gas fraction and redshift, and we show that the depletion time per specific star formation rate for galaxies is closely tied to gas fraction, independent of redshift. We also show that the gas dynamics of two of our local targets corresponds to those expected from unstable disks, again resembling the dynamics of high-z disks. These results provide evidence that DYNAMO galaxies are local analogs to the clumpy, turbulent disks, which are often found at high redshift.

  6. Clumpy cold dark matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silk, Joseph; Stebbins, Albert

    1993-01-01

    A study is conducted of cold dark matter (CDM) models in which clumpiness will inhere, using cosmic strings and textures suited to galaxy formation. CDM clumps of 10 million solar mass/cu pc density are generated at about z(eq) redshift, with a sizable fraction surviving. Observable implications encompass dark matter cores in globular clusters and in galactic nuclei. Results from terrestrial dark matter detection experiments may be affected by clumpiness in the Galactic halo.

  7. Chemical evolution during gas-rich galaxy interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, Josefa; Michel-Dansac, Leo; Tissera, Patricia B.

    2011-10-01

    We perform and analyse a set of galaxy interactions performed by using a self-consistent chemo-hydrodynamical model which includes star formation, supernova (SN) feedback and chemical evolution. In agreement with previous works, we find that tidally induced low-metallicity gas inflows dilute the central oxygen abundance and contribute to the flattening of the metallicity gradients. The tidally induced inflows trigger starbursts which increase the impact of Type II supernova (SN II) feedback injecting new chemical elements and driving galactic winds which modulate the metallicity distribution. Although α-enhancement in the central regions is detected as a result of the induced starbursts in agreement with previous works, our simulations suggest that this parameter can only provide a timing of the first pericentre mainly for non-retrograde encounters. In order to reproduce wet major mergers at low and high redshifts, we have run simulations with respectively 20 and 50 per cent of the disc in the form of gas. We find that the more gas-rich encounters behave similarly to the less rich ones, between the first and second pericentre, where low-metallicity gas inflows are triggered. However, the higher strength of the inflows triggered in the more gas-rich interactions produces larger metal dilution factors, which are modulated afterwards by the new chemical production by SN. We find that the more gas-rich interaction develops violent and clumpy star formation triggered by local instabilities all over the disc before the first pericentre, so that if these galaxies were observed at these early stages where no important tidally induced inflows have been able to be developed yet, they would tend to show an excess of oxygen. We find a global mean correlation of both the central abundances and the gradients with the strength of the star formation activity. However, the correlations are affected by orbital parameters, gas inflows and outflows, suggesting that it might be

  8. Clumpy and Extended Starbursts in the Brightest Unlensed Submillimeter Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iono, Daisuke; Yun, Min S.; Aretxaga, Itziar; Hatsukade, Bunyo; Hughes, David; Ikarashi, Soh; Izumi, Takuma; Kawabe, Ryohei; Kohno, Kotaro; Lee, Minju; Matsuda, Yuichi; Nakanishi, Kouichiro; Saito, Toshiki; Tamura, Yoichi; Ueda, Junko; Umehata, Hideki; Wilson, Grant; Michiyama, Tomonari; Ando, Misaki

    2016-09-01

    The central structure in three of the brightest unlensed z = 3-4 submillimeter galaxies is investigated through 0.″015-0.″05 (120-360 pc) 860 μm continuum images obtained using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA). The distribution in the central kiloparsec in AzTEC1 and AzTEC8 is extremely complex, and they are composed of multiple ˜200 pc clumps. AzTEC4 consists of two sources that are separated by ˜1.5 kpc, indicating a mid-stage merger. The peak star formation rate densities in the central clumps are ˜300-3000 M ⊙ yr-1 kpc-2, suggesting regions with extreme star formation near the Eddington limit. By comparing the flux obtained by ALMA and Submillimeter Array, we find that 68%-90% of the emission is extended (≳1 kpc) in AzTEC4 and 8. For AzTEC1, we identify at least 11 additional compact (˜200 pc) clumps in the extended 3-4 kpc region. Overall, the data presented here suggest that the luminosity surface densities observed at ≲150 pc scales are roughly similar to that observed in local ULIRGs, as in the eastern nucleus of Arp 220. Between 10% and 30% of the 860 μm continuum is concentrated in clumpy structures in the central kiloparsec, while the remaining flux is distributed over ≳1 kpc regions, some of which could also be clumpy. These sources can be explained by a rapid inflow of gas such as a merger of gas-rich galaxies, surrounded by extended and clumpy starbursts. However, the cold mode accretion model is not ruled out.

  9. Evolution of gas-rich meteorites: Clues from cosmogenic nuclides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goswami, J. N.

    1986-01-01

    The evolution of gas-rich meteorites in general, and the setting in which the observed solar-wind, solar-flare irradiation records were imprinted in individual components of these meteorites are understood only in qualitative terms, although contrary viewpoints do exist. The regolith irradiation hypothesis, bolstered by the observations of irradiation features in lunar regolith materials, similar to those observed in gas-rich meteorites, is accepted by many workers in this field. However, a close analysis of the problem suggests that the regolith irradiation may not be the dominant mode in producing the observed precompaction irradiation features in the gas-rich meteorites.

  10. Unusually gas-rich central galaxies in small groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janowiecki, Steven; xGASS Team

    2017-01-01

    Observations of gas in galaxies have shown dramatic differences between rich clusters and isolated field environments. However, pre-processing in intermediate group environments is expected to be responsible for much of the transformation between gas-rich blue and gas-poor red galaxies. We investigate this by taking advantage of the deepest observations to date of atomic and molecular gas in local galaxies from the GASS and COLD GASS surveys and their extensions to low stellar masses. This sample is uniquely suited to quantify gas and star formation properties of galaxies across environments, reaching the gas-poor regime of groups and clusters. We find that central galaxies in small groups are unusually gas rich and star-forming, compared to isolated galaxies. Below log Mst/Msun = 10, gas-poor group central galaxies are rare. We suggest that these central galaxies are being fed by the filaments of the cosmic web.

  11. On volatile element trends in gas-rich meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bart, G.; Lipschutz, M. E.

    1979-01-01

    Study of 10 volatile elements (and non-volatile Co) in co-existing light and dark portions of 6 gas-rich chondrites indicates patterns of distinct but non-uniform enrichment of volatile elements. Only Cs is enriched in all samples; Bi and Tl enrichments covary. The observed enrichments are inconsistent with prior suggestions of admixture of C1 or C2 chondritic matter, whether pristine or partly devolatilized, but suggest that both light and dark portions of each chondrite represents a compositionally more extended sampling of parental nebular material than hitherto known.

  12. Solar flares, the lunar surface, and gas rich meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barber, D. J.; Cowsik, R.; Hutcheon, I. D.; Price, P. B.; Rajan, R. S.

    1972-01-01

    Investigations on the Fe-group nuclei track density vs depth in lunar rocks and Surveyor 3 TV camera filter glass were critically examined considering more factors than previously. The analysis gives a firmer basis to the observation of the preferential leakage of low energy Fe nuclei from the accelerating region of the sun. The track density gradients in lunar rock 12022 and filter glass are used to determine the lunar erosion rate of 3 angstroms/yr. Track gradients are less steep than predicted from energy spectrum observed in the Surveyor glass, perhaps due to sputtering. High densities of etchable tracks were found at all depths down to 60 cm in fines from Apollo cores and also in thin sections of the Pesjanoe, Pantar, and Fayetteville gas-rich meteorites. It is felt unlikely that suprathermal heavy ions were responsible for the high track densities.

  13. Noble-gas-rich separates from ordinary chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moniot, R. K.

    1980-02-01

    Acid-resistant residues were prepared by HCl-HF demineralization of three H-type ordinary chondrites: Brownfield 1937 (H3), Dimmitt (H3, 4), and Estacado (H6). These residues were found to contain a large proportion of the planetary-type trapped Ar, Kr, and Xe in the meteorites. The similarity of these acid residues to those from carbonaceous chondrites and LL-type ordinary chondrites suggests that the same phase carries the trapped noble gases in all these diverse meteorite types. Because the H group represents a large fraction of all meteorites, this result indicates that the gas-rich carrier phase is as universal as the trapped noble-gas component itself. When treated with an oxidizing etchant, the acid residues lost almost all their complement of noble gases.

  14. Novel test of modified Newtonian dynamics with gas rich galaxies.

    PubMed

    McGaugh, Stacy S

    2011-03-25

    The current cosmological paradigm, the cold dark matter model with a cosmological constant, requires that the mass-energy of the Universe be dominated by invisible components: dark matter and dark energy. An alternative to these dark components is that the law of gravity be modified on the relevant scales. A test of these ideas is provided by the baryonic Tully-Fisher relation (BTFR), an empirical relation between the observed mass of a galaxy and its rotation velocity. Here, I report a test using gas rich galaxies for which both axes of the BTFR can be measured independently of the theories being tested and without the systematic uncertainty in stellar mass that affects the same test with star dominated spirals. The data fall precisely where predicted a priori by the modified Newtonian dynamics. The scatter in the BTFR is attributable entirely to observational uncertainty, consistent with a single effective force law.

  15. Gas-rich meteorites - Probes for particle environment and dynamical processes in the inner solar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goswami, J. N.; Lal, D.; Wilkening, L. L.

    1984-01-01

    Although the asteroids are the most plausible candidates for the parent bodies of gas-rich meteorites, dynamical theories have been adduced which favor a cometary origin in certain cases, and some recent studies have indicated that, in the case of gas-rich carbonaceous chondrites, the solar flare irradiation of grains may have occurred prior to the formation of parent bodies. Attention is presently given to advances that have been made in the multidisciplinary studies, encompassing petrography, chemistry, and radiation effects, of the gas-rich meteorites. An evaluation is undertaken of the present understanding of gas-rich meteorite origin and evolution.

  16. Characterizing Gas Rich Companion Galaxies of z~6 QSOs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzucchelli, Chiara; Banados, Eduardo; Bertoldi, Frank; Decarli, Roberto; Fan, Xiaohui; Farina, Emanuele Paolo; Riechers, Dominik; Strauss, Michael; Venemans, Bram; Walter, Fabian; Wang, Ran

    2016-08-01

    Luminous QSOs at z>6 are formidable probes of the early Universe, and are believed to reside in overdense regions. However, previous UV-based observational searches did not provide concurring evidence for such galaxy overdensities. Our on-going ALMA Cycle 3 survey to detect [CII] and FIR dust emission in a large sample of high-z QSOs has revealed the presence of bright, close companion galaxies at the same redshift of six QSOs. These newly discovered gas-rich companion galaxies promise to shed new light on early structure formation at the very dawn of time. Now we want to unveil the properties of these companion sources. The ALMA measurement only inform us on the cool gas/dust content; observations of their rest-frame optical emission are needed to characterize the bulk of the stellar population. Spitzer/IRAC is the only instrument available to date which can provide these sensitive information at z>6. Here, we propose to collect deep photometry with Spitzer/IRAC of six companion sources to z>6 QSOs. Together with ALMA data in hand, they will allow us to assess, or place strong limits on, the shape of their spectral energy distributions and to obtain their stellar masses. The observations requested here will provide a unique observational benchmark for theoretical studies of early galaxy formation.

  17. Tidal dwarf galaxies in gas-rich groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sweet, Sarah M.

    2014-09-01

    I develop new methods for identifying and measuring tidal dwarf galaxies, using a sample of galaxies within Hi-rich groups that have no evidence of advanced major mergers. These groups are taken from the Survey of Ionization in Neutral Gas Galaxies (SINGG, Meurer et al., 2006), an optical follow-up survey to the HI Parkes All Sky Survey (HIPASS, Barnes et al., 2001). Fifteen of the fields contain four or more emission line galaxies and are named Choir groups. I detect new dwarf galaxies that are too small to be individually detectable in HIPASS; they are detectable in the SINGG narrow-band imaging because of their star formation and membership of these HI-rich groups. The Choir groups are compact, with a mean projected separation between the two brightest members of 190 kpc. They have comparable star formation efficiency (the ratio of star formation rate to HI mass) to the remaining SINGG fields. The Choir member galaxies also match the wider SINGG sample in their radii, Hα equivalent width and surface brightness. I define a new, more robust calibration for the metallicity diagnostic for identifying tidal dwarf galaxy candidates in the absence of tidal tails, based on the luminosity-metallicity relation with a consistent metallicity definition. Using that calibration, SDSS dwarfs fainter than MR = -16 have a mean metallicity of 12 + log(O/H) = 8.28 (±) 0.10, regardless of their luminosity. Tidal dwarf galaxy candidates in the literature are elevated above this at 12 + log(O/H) = 8.70 (±) 0.05 on average. Our hydrodynamical simulations also predict that tidal dwarf galaxies should have metallicities elevated above the normal luminosity-metallicity relation. I compare 53 star-forming galaxies in 9 of the Hi gas-rich Choir groups and find those brighter than MR ~ -16 to be consistent with the normal relation defined by the SDSS sample. At fainter magnitudes my sample has a wide range in metallicity, suggestive of varying Hi content and environment. Three (16%) of

  18. CLUMPY ACCRETION ONTO BLACK HOLES. I. CLUMPY-ADVECTION-DOMINATED ACCRETION FLOW STRUCTURE AND RADIATION

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Jianmin; Cheng Cheng; Li Yanrong

    2012-04-01

    We investigate the dynamics of clumps embedded in and confined by the advection-dominated accretion flows (ADAFs), in which collisions among the clumps are neglected. We start from the collisionless Boltzmann equation and assume that interaction between the clumps and the ADAF is responsible for transporting the angular momentum of clumps outward. The inner edge of the clumpy-ADAF is set to be the tidal radius of the clumps. We consider strong- and weak-coupling cases, in which the averaged properties of clumps follow the ADAF dynamics and are mainly determined by the black hole potential, respectively. We propose the analytical solution of the dynamics of clumps for the two cases. The velocity dispersion of clumps is one magnitude higher than the ADAF for the strong-coupling case. For the weak-coupling case, we find that the mean radial velocity of clumps is linearly proportional to the coefficient of the drag force. We show that the tidally disrupted clumps would lead to an accumulation of the debris to form a debris disk in the Shakura-Sunyaev regime. The entire hot ADAF will be efficiently cooled down by photons from the debris disk, giving rise to a collapse of the ADAF, and quench the clumpy accretion. Subsequently, evaporation of the collapsed ADAF drives resuscitate of a new clumpy-ADAF, resulting in an oscillation of the global clumpy-ADAF. Applications of the present model are briefly discussed to X-ray binaries, low ionization nuclear emission regions, and BL Lac objects.

  19. Clumpy Galaxies in the Early Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elmegreen, Debra Meloy

    2007-05-01

    High redshift galaxies larger than 10 pixels were observed with the HST ACS in the Ultra Deep Field and Tadpole galaxy field in order to determine their morphological classes and photometric properties. Over 1300 galaxies were studied; most are at redshifts 1 to 3, although several dozen Lyman Break Galaxies were observed at redshifts 4 and 5. Galaxy types include chains, clump-clusters, doubles, tadpoles, spirals, and ellipticals. Ordinary spiral and elliptical galaxies are rare in the early universe; clumpy galaxies dominate at fainter than magnitude 25. Face-on spirals are scarce at high z because of surface brightness selection effects. Chain galaxies and clump-cluster galaxies appear to be a single galaxy type viewed at different orientations; they have no bulges or exponential profiles. Spiral galaxies at high z have exponential profiles with scale lengths that average half that of local galaxies, implying that disks must grow from the inside out with time. Star-forming clusters in both clump-clusters and spirals have exponential radial distributions, suggesting that the clumps in clump-clusters will eventually disperse to form exponential disks. There is a nearly uniform fraction of barred galaxies with z, suggesting that bar dissolution is not a prominent occurrence. The appearance of blue clumpy bars suggests that bar formation sometimes occurs from gas-phase disk instabilities rather than stellar instabilities. Thirty percent of elliptical galaxies at high z contain blue clumps. The prominent star-forming clumps in clump clusters and ellipticals were compared with stellar evolution models to determine ages and masses; these regions are unlike star-forming regions in the local universe. They have ages less than 1 Gyr and contain one billion solar masses. They resemble isolated clumps in the UDF, suggesting accretion in a hierarchical build-up model.

  20. Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frisch, Uriel

    1996-01-01

    Written five centuries after the first studies of Leonardo da Vinci and half a century after A.N. Kolmogorov's first attempt to predict the properties of flow, this textbook presents a modern account of turbulence, one of the greatest challenges in physics. "Fully developed turbulence" is ubiquitous in both cosmic and natural environments, in engineering applications and in everyday life. Elementary presentations of dynamical systems ideas, probabilistic methods (including the theory of large deviations) and fractal geometry make this a self-contained textbook. This is the first book on turbulence to use modern ideas from chaos and symmetry breaking. The book will appeal to first-year graduate students in mathematics, physics, astrophysics, geosciences and engineering, as well as professional scientists and engineers.

  1. Parameters of type IIP SN 2012A and clumpiness effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utrobin, V. P.; Chugai, N. N.

    2015-03-01

    Context. The explosion energy and the ejecta mass of a type IIP supernova (SN IIP) derived from hydrodynamic simulations are principal parameters of the explosion theory. Few SNe IIP have been studied by hydrodynamic modeling so far, however. Some doubts exist about the reliability of the derived SN IIP parameters. Aims: We studied the well-observed type IIP SN 2012A with hydrodynamic modeling. We examined its early spectra for ejecta clumpiness. We also explored other observational effects of clumpiness. Methods: We determined the supernova parameters by means of standard hydrodynamic modeling. We used the early hydrogen Hα and Hβ lines as clumpiness diagnostics. We used a modified hydrodynamic code to study the clumpiness effect in the light curve and expansion kinematics. Results: We found that SN 20012A is the result of the explosion of a red supergiant with a radius of 715 ± 100 R⊙. The explosion energy is (5.25 ± 0.6) × 1050 erg, the ejecta mass is 13.1 ± 0.7 M⊙, and the total 56Ni mass is 0.012 ± 0.002 M⊙. The estimated mass of a progenitor, a main-sequence star, is 15 ± 1 M⊙. The Hα and Hβ lines in early spectra indicate that outer ejecta are clumpy. Hydrodynamic simulations show that the clumpiness modifies the early light curve and increases the maximum velocity of the outer layers. Conclusions: The pre-SN 2012A was a normal red supergiant with the progenitor mass of ≈ 15 M⊙. The outer layers of ejecta indicate the clumpy structure. The clumpiness of the external layers can increase the maximum expansion velocity.

  2. SPECTROPOLARIMETRIC SIGNATURES OF CLUMPY SUPERNOVA EJECTA

    SciTech Connect

    Hole, K. T.; Nordsieck, K. H.; Kasen, D.

    2010-09-10

    Polarization has been detected at early times for all types of supernovae (SNe), indicating that all such systems result from or quickly develop some form of asymmetry. In addition, the detection of strong line polarization in SNe is suggestive of chemical inhomogeneities ('clumps') in the layers above the photosphere, which may reflect hydrodynamical instabilities during the explosion. We have developed a fast, flexible, approximate semi-analytic code for modeling polarized line radiative transfer within three-dimensional inhomogeneous rapidly expanding atmospheres. Given a range of model parameters, the code generates random sets of clumps in the expanding ejecta and calculates the emergent line profile and Stokes parameters for each configuration. The ensemble of these configurations represents the effects both of various host geometries and of different viewing angles. We present results for the first part of our survey of model geometries, specifically the effects of the number and size of clumps (and the related effect of filling factor) on the emergent spectrum and Stokes parameters. Our simulations show that random clumpiness can produce line polarization in the range observed in SNe Ia, as well as the Q-U loops that are frequently seen in all SNe. We have also developed a method to connect the results of our simulations to robust observational parameters such as maximum polarization and polarized equivalent width in the line. Our models, in connection with spectropolarimetric observations, can constrain the three-dimensional structure of SN ejecta and offer important insight into the SN explosion physics and the nature of their progenitor systems.

  3. Massive black hole binaries in gas-rich galaxy mergers; multiple regimes of orbital decay and interplay with gas inflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, Lucio

    2013-12-01

    gas inflows in gas-rich galaxies undergoing major mergers. We derive a condition for the maximum inflow rate that a circumnuclear disc can host while still maintaining a sufficiently high gas density at large radii to sustain the decay of a BH binary. We find that gas inflows rates exceeding 10 M⊙ yr-1, postulated to form massive BH seeds in some direct collapse models, would stifle the sinking of massive BH binaries in gas-dominated galactic nuclei. Vice-versa, lower inflow rates, below a solar mass per year, as required to feed typical active galactic nuclei (AGNs), are compatible with a fast orbital decay of BH binaries across a wide range of masses.

  4. MAPPING THE CLUMPY STRUCTURES WITHIN SUBMILLIMETER GALAXIES USING LASER-GUIDE STAR ADAPTIVE OPTICS SPECTROSCOPY

    SciTech Connect

    Menendez-Delmestre, Karin; Goncalves, Thiago S.; Blain, Andrew W.; Swinbank, Mark; Smail, Ian; Ivison, Rob J.; Chapman, Scott C.

    2013-04-20

    We present the first integral-field spectroscopic observations of high-redshift submillimeter-selected galaxies (SMGs) using Laser-Guide Star Adaptive Optics. We target H{alpha} emission of three SMGs at redshifts z {approx} 1.4-2.4 with the OH-Suppressing Infrared Imaging Spectrograph on Keck. The spatially resolved spectroscopy of these galaxies reveals unresolved broad-H{alpha} line regions (FWHM >1000 km s{sup -1}) likely associated with an active galactic nucleus (AGN) and regions of diffuse star formation traced by narrow-line H{alpha} emission (FWHM {approx}< 500 km s{sup -1}) dominated by multiple H{alpha}-bright stellar clumps, each contributing 1%-30% of the total clump-integrated H{alpha} emission. We find that these SMGs host high star formation rate surface densities, similar to local extreme sources, such as circumnuclear starbursts and luminous infrared galaxies. However, in contrast to these local environments, SMGs appear to be undergoing such intense activity on significantly larger spatial scales as revealed by extended H{alpha} emission over 4-16 kpc. H{alpha} kinematics show no evidence of ordered global motion as would be found in a disk, but rather large velocity offsets ({approx}few Multiplication-Sign 100 km s{sup -1}) between the distinct stellar clumps. Together with the asymmetric distribution of the stellar clumps around the AGN in these objects, it is unlikely that we are unveiling a clumpy disk structure as has been suggested in other high-redshift populations of star-forming galaxies. The SMG clumps in this sample may correspond to remnants of originally independent gas-rich systems that are in the process of merging, hence triggering the ultraluminous SMG phase.

  5. Supermassive black hole pairs in clumpy galaxies at high redshift: delayed binary formation and concurrent mass growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamburello, Valentina; Capelo, Pedro R.; Mayer, Lucio; Bellovary, Jillian M.; Wadsley, James W.

    2017-01-01

    Massive gas-rich galaxy discs at z ˜ 1-3 host massive star-forming clumps with typical baryonic masses in the range 107-108 M⊙ which can affect the orbital decay and concurrent growth of supermassive black hole (BH) pairs. Using a set of high-resolution simulations of isolated clumpy galaxies hosting a pair of unequal-mass BHs, we study the interaction between massive clumps and a BH pair at kiloparsec scales, during the early phase of the orbital decay. We find that both the interaction with massive clumps and the heating of the cold gas layer of the disc by BH feedback tend to delay significantly the orbital decay of the secondary, which in many cases is ejected and then hovers for a whole gigayear around a separation of 1-2 kpc. In the envelope, dynamical friction is weak and there is no contribution of disc torques: these lead to the fastest decay once the orbit of the secondary BH has circularized in the disc mid-plane. In runs with larger eccentricities the delay is stronger, although there are some exceptions. We also show that, even in discs with very sporadic transient clump formation, a strong spiral pattern affects the decay time-scale for BHs on eccentric orbits. We conclude that, contrary to previous belief, a gas-rich background is not necessarily conducive to a fast BH decay and binary formation, which prompts more extensive investigations aimed at calibrating event-rate forecasts for ongoing and future gravitational-wave searches, such as with Pulsar Timing Arrays and the future evolved Laser Interferometer Space Antenna.

  6. Star formation and chemical abundances in clumpy irregular galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Boesgaard, A.M.; Edwards, S.; Heidmann, J.

    1982-01-15

    Clumpy irregular galaxies consist of several bright clumps which are huge H II complexes (about 100 times brighter and more massive than 30 Doradus) and contain about 10/sup 5/ O and B stars. Image-tube spectrograms with 1--3 A resolution have been obtained of the brightest emission regions of three clumpy galaxies and one candidate clumpy galaxy with the Mauna Kea 2.24 m telescope. The electron temperatures were found to be in the range 7000--9000 K and electron densities a few hundred cm/sup 3/: quite typical for normal H II regions. The abundances of O, N. S in Mrk 432 are comparable to those in Orion, while the three clumpy galaxies are slightly deficient in O and S (by factors of 2 to 4) and N (by factors of 3 to 6). The galaxies appear to be normal (like Sc galaxies) in mass and composition. Supernovae remnants are indicated by the high (S II)/H..cap alpha.. ratio. Possible triggering mechanisms for the exceptional star formation activity are discussed.

  7. Solar flare neon and solar cosmic ray fluxes in the past using gas-rich meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nautiyal, C. M.; Rao, M. N.

    1986-01-01

    Methods were developed earlier to deduce the composition of solar flare neon and to determine the solar cosmic ray proton fluxes in the past using etched lunar samples and at present, these techniques are extended to gas rich meteorites. By considering high temperature Ne data points for Pantar, Fayetteville and other gas rich meteorites and by applying the three component Ne-decomposition methods, the solar cosmic ray and galactic cosmic ray produced spallation Ne components from the trapped SF-Ne was resolved. Using appropiate SCR and GCR production rates, in the case of Pantar, for example, a GCR exposure age of 2 m.y. was estimated for Pantar-Dark while Pantar-Light yielded a GCR age of approx. 3 m.y. However the SCR exposure age of Pantar-Dark is two orders of magnitude higher than the average surface exposure ages of lunar soils. The possibility of higher proton fluxes in the past is discussed.

  8. Modulation of solar flare particles and track density profiles in gas-rich meteorite grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, M. A.

    1976-01-01

    A solution is presented to the problem concerning the time-averaged solar flare particle flux as a function of kinetic energy and distance from the sun for a given particle injection spectrum at the sun within the framework of standard diffusion-convection-adiabatic deceleration theory with the diffusion coefficient independent of distance from the sun. Results of the calculations which give best agreement with observations at 1 AU are presented and discussed, with particular reference to their implications for gas-rich meteorites. Normalization at the orbit of earth is achieved via observed track density versus depth profiles in lunar vug crystals. It is shown that if gas-rich meteorite grains were irradiated in the asteroid belt and if source and modulation parameters have changed little since irradiation, the track density should be 'harder' than the lunar vug profile by about 0.2-0.3 in the index. Quantitative estimation of solar flare particle exposure ages is discussed.

  9. Competition drives clumpy species coexistence in estuarine phytoplankton.

    PubMed

    Segura, A M; Kruk, C; Calliari, D; García-Rodriguez, F; Conde, D; Widdicombe, C E; Fort, H

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms that maintain biodiversity is a fundamental problem in ecology. Competition is thought to reduce diversity, but hundreds of microbial aquatic primary producers species coexist and compete for a few essential resources (e.g., nutrients and light). Here, we show that resource competition is a plausible mechanism for explaining clumpy distribution on individual species volume (a proxy for the niche) of estuarine phytoplankton communities ranging from North America to South America and Europe, supporting the Emergent Neutrality hypothesis. Furthermore, such a clumpy distribution was also observed throughout the Holocene in diatoms from a sediment core. A Lotka-Volterra competition model predicted position in the niche axis and functional affiliation of dominant species within and among clumps. Results support the coexistence of functionally equivalent species in ecosystems and indicate that resource competition may be a key process to shape the size structure of estuarine phytoplankton, which in turn drives ecosystem functioning.

  10. Kinematic imprint of clumpy disk formation on halo objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Shigeki

    2013-02-01

    Context. Clumpy disk galaxies in the distant universe, at redshift of z ≳ 1, have been observed to host several giant clumps in their disks. They are thought to correspond to early formative stages of disk galaxies. On the other hand, halo objects, such as old globular clusters and halo stars, are likely to consist of the oldest stars in a galaxy (age ≳ 10 Gyr), clumpy disk formation can thus be presumed to take place in a pre-existing halo system. Aims: Giant clumps orbit in the same direction in a premature disk and are so massive that they may be expected to interact gravitationally with halo objects and exercise influence on the kinematic state of the halo. Accordingly, I scrutinize the possibility that the clumps leave a kinematic imprint of the clumpy disk formation on a halo system. Methods: I perform a restricted N-body calculation with a toy model to study the kinematic influence on a halo by orbital motions of clumps and the dependence of the results on masses (mass loss), number, and orbital radii of the clumps. Results: I show that halo objects can catch clump motions and acquire disky rotation in a dynamical friction time scale of the clumps, ~0.5 Gyr. The influence of clumps is limited within a region around the disk, while the halo system shows vertical gradients of net rotation velocity and orbital eccentricity. The significance of the kinematic influence strongly depends on the clump masses; the lower limit of postulated clump mass would be ~5 × 108 M⊙. The result also depends on whether the clumps are subjected to rapid mass loss or not, which is an open question under debate in recent studies. The existence of such massive clumps is not unrealistic. I therefore suggest that the imprints of past clumpy disk formation could remain in current galactic halos.

  11. The long lives of giant clumps and the birth of outflows in gas-rich galaxies at high redshift

    SciTech Connect

    Bournaud, Frédéric; Renaud, Florent; Daddi, Emanuele; Duc, Pierre-Alain; Elbaz, David; Gabor, Jared M.; Juneau, Stéphanie; Kraljic, Katarina; Le Floch', Emeric; Dekel, Avishai; Elmegreen, Bruce G.; Elmegreen, Debra M.; Teyssier, Romain

    2014-01-01

    Star-forming disk galaxies at high redshift are often subject to violent disk instability, characterized by giant clumps whose fate is yet to be understood. The main question is whether the clumps disrupt within their dynamical timescale (≤50 Myr), like the molecular clouds in today's galaxies, or whether they survive stellar feedback for more than a disk orbital time (≈300 Myr) in which case they can migrate inward and help building the central bulge. We present 3.5-7 pc resolution adaptive mesh refinement simulations of high-redshift disks including photoionization, radiation pressure, and supernovae feedback. Our modeling of radiation pressure determines the mass loading and initial velocity of winds from basic physical principles. We find that the giant clumps produce steady outflow rates comparable to and sometimes somewhat larger than their star formation rate, with velocities largely sufficient to escape the galaxy. The clumps also lose mass, especially old stars, by tidal stripping, and the stellar populations contained in the clumps hence remain relatively young (≤200 Myr), as observed. The clumps survive gaseous outflows and stellar loss, because they are wandering in gas-rich turbulent disks from which they can reaccrete gas at high rates compensating for outflows and tidal stripping, overall keeping realistic and self-regulated gaseous and stellar masses. The outflow and accretion rates have specific timescales of a few 10{sup 8} yr, as opposed to rapid and repeated dispersion and reformation of clumps. Our simulations produce gaseous outflows with velocities, densities, and mass loading consistent with observations, and at the same time suggest that the giant clumps survive for hundreds of Myr and complete their migration to the center of high-redshift galaxies. These long-lived clumps are gas-dominated and contain a moderate mass fraction of stars; they drive inside-out disk evolution, thickening, spheroid growth, and fueling of the central

  12. Quantifying the Effects of Gas-Rich Flyby Encounters on Galaxy Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumas, Julie; Holley-Bockelmann, Kelly; Lang, Meagan

    2017-01-01

    Recent work has shown that flyby encounters may be a common event in a galaxy's lifetime. Galaxy flybys are a one-time encounter when two halos interpenetrate, but unlike a galaxy merger, the two halos later detach. Relatively little work has been done to assess how flybys affect galaxy evolution. We present preliminary results of a suite of high-resolution hydrodynamical + N-body simulations of gas-rich flyby encounters, concentrating on Milky Way-like primaries. We track the bulk changes in structure, star formation history, kinematics, and morphology over a broad span of flyby encounters.

  13. SLOWLY ROTATING GAS-RICH GALAXIES IN MODIFIED NEWTONIAN DYNAMICS (MOND)

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez-Salcedo, F. J.; Martinez-Garcia, E. E.; Hidalgo-Gamez, A. M.

    2013-03-15

    We have carried out a search for gas-rich dwarf galaxies that have lower rotation velocities in their outskirts than MOdified Newtonian Dynamics (MOND) predicts, so that the amplitude of their rotation curves cannot be fitted by arbitrarily increasing the mass-to-light ratio of the stellar component or by assuming additional undetected matter. With presently available data, the gas-rich galaxies UGC 4173, Holmberg II, ESO 245-G05, NGC 4861, and ESO 364-G029 deviate most from MOND predictions and, thereby, provide a sample of promising targets in testing the MOND framework. In the case of Holmberg II and NGC 4861, we find that their rotation curves are probably inconsistent with MOND, unless their inclinations and distances differ significantly from the nominal ones. The galaxy ESO 364-G029 is a promising target because its baryonic mass and rotation curve are similar to Holmberg II but presents a higher inclination. Deeper photometric and H I observations of ESO 364-G029, together with further decreasing systematic uncertainties, may provide a strong test to MOND.

  14. Extinction and dust properties in a clumpy medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scicluna, P.; Siebenmorgen, R.

    2015-12-01

    The dust content of the universe is primarily explored via its interaction with stellar photons, which are absorbed or scattered by the dust, producing the effect known as interstellar extinction. However, owing to the physical extension of the observing beam, real observations may detect a significant number of dust-scattered photons. This may result in a change in the observed (or effective) extinction with a dependence on the spatial distribution of the dust and the spatial resolution of the instrument. We investigate the influence of clumpy dust distributions on the effective extinction toward both embedded sources and those seen through the diffuse interstellar medium (ISM). We use a Monte Carlo radiative transfer code to examine the effective extinction for various geometries. By varying the number, optical depth and volume-filling factor of clumps inside the model for spherical shells and the diffuse interstellar medium (ISM), we explore the evolution of the extinction curve and effective optical depth. Depending on the number of scattering events in the beam, the extinction curve is observed to steepen in homogeneous media and flatten in clumpy media. As a result, clumpy dust distributions are able to reproduce extinction curves with arbitrary RV,eff, the effective ratio of total-to-selective extinction. The flattening is also able to "wash out" the 2175 Å bump and results in a shift of the peak to shorter wavelengths. The mean RV,eff of a shell is shown to correlate with the optical depth of an individual clump and the wavelength at which a clump becomes optically thick. Similar behaviour is seen for edge-on discs or tori. However, at grazing inclinations the combination of extinction and strong forward scattering results in chaotic behaviour. Caution is therefore advised when attempting to measure extinction in AGN tori for example or toward SNIa or GRB afterglows. In face-on discs, the shape of the scattered continuum is observed to change significantly

  15. Gas-Rich Mergers in LCDM: Disk Survivability and the Baryonic Assembly of Galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, Kyle R.; Bullock, James S.; Wechsler, Risa H.; Maller, Ariyeh H.; /New York City Coll. Tech.

    2009-08-03

    We use N-body simulations and observationally-normalized relations between dark matter halo mass, stellar mass, and cold gas mass to derive robust expectations about the baryonic content of major mergers out to redshift z {approx} 2. First, we find that the majority of major mergers (m/M > 0.3) experienced by Milky Way size dark matter halos should have been gas-rich, and that gas-rich mergers are increasingly common at high redshift. Though the frequency of major mergers into galaxy halos in our simulations greatly exceeds the observed late-type galaxy fraction, the frequency of gas-poor major mergers is consistent with the observed fraction of bulge-dominated galaxies across the halo mass range M{sub DM} {approx} 10{sup 11} - 10{sup 13} M{sub {circle_dot}}. These results lend support to the conjecture that mergers with high baryonic gas fractions play an important role in building and/or preserving disk galaxies in the universe. Secondly, we find that there is a transition mass below which a galaxy's past major mergers were primarily gas-rich and above which they were gas poor. The associated stellar mass scale corresponds closely to that marking the observed bimodal division between blue, star-forming, disk-dominated systems and red, bulge-dominated systems with old populations. Finally, we find that the overall fraction of a galaxy's cold baryons deposited directly via major mergers is substantial. Approximately 30% of the cold baryonic material in M{sub star} {approx} 10{sup 10} M{sub {circle_dot}} (M{sub DM} {approx} 10{sup 11.5} M{sub {circle_dot}}) galaxies is accreted as cold gas in major mergers. For more massive galaxies with M{sub star} {approx} 10{sup 11} M{sub {circle_dot}} (M{sub DM} {approx} 10{sup 13} M{sub {circle_dot}} the fraction of baryons amassed in mergers is even higher, {approx} 50%, but most of these accreted baryons are delivered directly in the form of stars. This baryonic mass deposition is almost unavoidable, and provides a limit on

  16. A Unique Gas-Rich Debris Disk: Herschel Imaging and Spectroscopy of 49 Ceti

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberge, Aki

    2012-01-01

    Gas-poor debris disks represent a fundamentally different class of circumstellar disk than gas-rich protoplanetary disks. Their gas probably originates from the same source as the dust, i.e. planetesimal destruction, but the low gas densities make it difficult to detect. So far, Herschel has detected far-IR gas emission from only one or two debris disks, Beta Pictoris being one of them. Here we present Herschel GASPS observations of a well-known debris disk system, 49 Ceti. The dust disk is spatially resolved in thermal emission at 70 _m. Most interestingly, weak far-IR gas emission is detected. Preliminary modeling suggests that reconciling the sub-mm CO emission seen from this system with the far-IR gas detection and upper limits requires a low gas-to-dust ratio and possibly an unusual gas composition.

  17. Gas-rich Local Dwarf Star-Forming Galaxies and Their Connection With the Distant Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunth, D.

    1999-07-01

    I discuss the properties of gas-rich forming galaxies. I particularlyemphasize the latest results on Lyα emission that are relevant to the search of distant young galaxies. The interdependance of the Lyα escape with the properties of the ISM in starburst galaxies is outlined. A new modelfrom G. Tenorio-Tagle and his collaborators explains Lyα profiles instarburst galaxies from the hydrodynamics of superbubbles powered by massivestars. I stress again that since Lyα is primarely a diagnostic ofthe ISM, it is mandatory to understand how the ISM and Lyα arerelated to firmly relate Lyα to the cosmic star-formation rate.

  18. On the irradiation history and origin of gas-rich meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rajan, R. S.

    1974-01-01

    Transmission electron microscope study of the track density gradients and irradiation geometries of track-rich grains and chondrules in sections of Fayetteville and Kapoeta, and in sections of lunar breccias and grains from lunar soil. A substantial fraction (50 to 90%) of the meteoritic track-rich grains and chondrules show evidence of having been irradiated anisotropically in their different faces, as would be expected for irradiation on the surface of a parent body. The observations thus support the hypothesis that the irradiation of these grains and chondrules took place on the regoliths of asteroidal-sized bodies. Measurements of steepest track density gradients indicate that, while there are finite differences between spectra exhibited by individual gas-rich meteorites, the average solar flare spectral shapes have been similar over the last 4 b.y. or so.

  19. Spiral galaxies in clusters. III. Gas-rich galaxies in the Pegasus I cluster of galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Bothun, G.D.; Schommer, R.A.; Sullivan, W.T. III

    1982-05-01

    We report the results of a 21-cm and optical survey of disk galaxies in the vicinity of the Pegasus I cluster of galaxies. The color--gas content relation (log(M/sub H//L/sub B/) vs (B-V)/sup T//sub 0/ ) for this particular cluster reveals the presence of a substantial number of blue, gas-rich galaxies. With few exceptions, the disk systems in Pegasus I retain large amounts of neutral hydrogen despite their presence in a cluster. This directly shows that environmental processes have not yet removed substantial amounts of gas from these disk galaxies. We conclude that the environment has had little or no observable effect upon the evolution of disk galaxies in Pegasus I. The overall properties of the Pegasus I spirals are consistent with the suggestion that this cluster is now at an early stage in its evolution.

  20. The frequency and properties of young tidal dwarf galaxies in nearby gas-rich groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee-Waddell, K.; Spekkens, K.; Chandra, P.; Patra, N.; Cuillandre, J.-C.; Wang, J.; Haynes, M. P.; Cannon, J.; Stierwalt, S.; Sick, J.; Giovanelli, R.

    2016-08-01

    We present high-resolution Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) H I observations and deep Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) optical imaging of two galaxy groups: NGC 4725/47 and NGC 3166/9. These data are part of a multi-wavelength unbiased survey of the gas-rich dwarf galaxy populations in three nearby interacting galaxy groups. The NGC 4725/47 group hosts two tidal knots and one dwarf irregular galaxy (dIrr). Both tidal knots are located within a prominent H I tidal tail, appear to have sufficient mass (Mgas ≈ 108 M⊙) to evolve into long-lived tidal dwarf galaxies (TDGs) and are fairly young in age. The NGC 3166/9 group contains a TDG candidate, AGC 208457, at least three dIrrs and four H I knots. Deep CFHT imaging confirms that the optical component of AGC 208457 is bluer - with a 0.28 mag g - r colour - and a few Gyr younger than its purported parent galaxies. Combining the results for these groups with those from the NGC 871/6/7 group reported earlier, we find that the H I properties, estimated stellar ages and baryonic content of the gas-rich dwarfs clearly distinguish tidal features from their classical counterparts. We optimistically identify four potentially long-lived tidal objects associated with three separate pairs of interacting galaxies, implying that TDGs are not readily produced during interaction events as suggested by some recent simulations. The tidal objects examined in this survey also appear to have a wider variety of properties than TDGs of similar mass formed in current simulations of interacting galaxies, which could be the result of pre- or post-formation environmental influences.

  1. Cold, clumpy accretion onto an active supermassive black hole.

    PubMed

    Tremblay, Grant R; Oonk, J B Raymond; Combes, Françoise; Salomé, Philippe; O'Dea, Christopher P; Baum, Stefi A; Voit, G Mark; Donahue, Megan; McNamara, Brian R; Davis, Timothy A; McDonald, Michael A; Edge, Alastair C; Clarke, Tracy E; Galván-Madrid, Roberto; Bremer, Malcolm N; Edwards, Louise O V; Fabian, Andrew C; Hamer, Stephen; Li, Yuan; Maury, Anaëlle; Russell, Helen R; Quillen, Alice C; Urry, C Megan; Sanders, Jeremy S; Wise, Michael W

    2016-06-09

    Supermassive black holes in galaxy centres can grow by the accretion of gas, liberating energy that might regulate star formation on galaxy-wide scales. The nature of the gaseous fuel reservoirs that power black hole growth is nevertheless largely unconstrained by observations, and is instead routinely simplified as a smooth, spherical inflow of very hot gas. Recent theory and simulations instead predict that accretion can be dominated by a stochastic, clumpy distribution of very cold molecular clouds--a departure from the 'hot mode' accretion model--although unambiguous observational support for this prediction remains elusive. Here we report observations that reveal a cold, clumpy accretion flow towards a supermassive black hole fuel reservoir in the nucleus of the Abell 2597 Brightest Cluster Galaxy (BCG), a nearby (redshift z = 0.0821) giant elliptical galaxy surrounded by a dense halo of hot plasma. Under the right conditions, thermal instabilities produce a rain of cold clouds that fall towards the galaxy's centre, sustaining star formation amid a kiloparsec-scale molecular nebula that is found at its core. The observations show that these cold clouds also fuel black hole accretion, revealing 'shadows' cast by the molecular clouds as they move inward at about 300 kilometres per second towards the active supermassive black hole, which serves as a bright backlight. Corroborating evidence from prior observations of warmer atomic gas at extremely high spatial resolution, along with simple arguments based on geometry and probability, indicate that these clouds are within the innermost hundred parsecs of the black hole, and falling closer towards it.

  2. Cold, clumpy accretion onto an active supermassive black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremblay, Grant R.; Oonk, J. B. Raymond; Combes, Françoise; Salomé, Philippe; O'Dea, Christopher P.; Baum, Stefi A.; Voit, G. Mark; Donahue, Megan; McNamara, Brian R.; Davis, Timothy A.; McDonald, Michael A.; Edge, Alastair C.; Clarke, Tracy E.; Galván-Madrid, Roberto; Bremer, Malcolm N.; Edwards, Louise O. V.; Fabian, Andrew C.; Hamer, Stephen; Li, Yuan; Maury, Anaëlle; Russell, Helen R.; Quillen, Alice C.; Urry, C. Megan; Sanders, Jeremy S.; Wise, Michael W.

    2016-06-01

    Supermassive black holes in galaxy centres can grow by the accretion of gas, liberating energy that might regulate star formation on galaxy-wide scales. The nature of the gaseous fuel reservoirs that power black hole growth is nevertheless largely unconstrained by observations, and is instead routinely simplified as a smooth, spherical inflow of very hot gas. Recent theory and simulations instead predict that accretion can be dominated by a stochastic, clumpy distribution of very cold molecular clouds—a departure from the ‘hot mode’ accretion model—although unambiguous observational support for this prediction remains elusive. Here we report observations that reveal a cold, clumpy accretion flow towards a supermassive black hole fuel reservoir in the nucleus of the Abell 2597 Brightest Cluster Galaxy (BCG), a nearby (redshift z = 0.0821) giant elliptical galaxy surrounded by a dense halo of hot plasma. Under the right conditions, thermal instabilities produce a rain of cold clouds that fall towards the galaxy’s centre, sustaining star formation amid a kiloparsec-scale molecular nebula that is found at its core. The observations show that these cold clouds also fuel black hole accretion, revealing ‘shadows’ cast by the molecular clouds as they move inward at about 300 kilometres per second towards the active supermassive black hole, which serves as a bright backlight. Corroborating evidence from prior observations of warmer atomic gas at extremely high spatial resolution, along with simple arguments based on geometry and probability, indicate that these clouds are within the innermost hundred parsecs of the black hole, and falling closer towards it.

  3. HD 100453: A Link Between Gas-Rich Protoplanetary Disks and Gas-Poor Debris Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, K. A.; Grady, C. A.; Hamaguchi, K.; Wisniewski, J. P.; Brittain, S.; Sitko, M.; Carpenter, W. J.; Williams, J. P.; Mathews, G. S.; Williger, G. M.; van Boekel, R.; Carmona, A.; Henning, Th.; van den Ancker, M. E.; Meeus, G.; Chen, X. P.; Petre, R.; Woodgate, B. E.

    2009-05-01

    HD 100453 has an IR spectral energy distribution (SED) which can be fit with a power law plus a blackbody. Previous analysis of the SED suggests that the system is a young Herbig Ae star with a gas-rich, flared disk. We reexamine the evolutionary state of the HD 100453 system by refining its age (based on a candidate low-mass companion) and by examining limits on the disk extent, mass accretion rate, and gas content of the disk environment. We confirm that HD 100453B is a common proper motion companion to HD 100453A, with a spectral type of M4.0V-M4.5V, and derive an age of 10 ± 2 Myr. We find no evidence of mass accretion onto the star. Chandra ACIS-S imagery shows that the Herbig Ae star has L x/L bol and an X-ray spectrum similar to nonaccreting β Pic Moving Group early F stars. Moreover, the disk lacks the conspicuous Fe II emission and excess FUV continuum seen in spectra of actively accreting Herbig Ae stars, and from the FUV continuum, we find the accretion rate is < 1.4 × 10-9 M sun yr-1. A sensitive upper limit to the CO J = 3-2 intensity indicates that the gas in the outer disk is likely optically thin. Assuming a [CO]/[H2] abundance of 1 × 10-4 and a depletion factor of 103, we find that the mass of cold molecular gas is less than ~0.33 M J and that the gas-to-dust ratio is no more than ~4:1 in the outer disk. The combination of a high fractional IR excess luminosity, a relatively old age, an absence of accretion signatures, and an absence of detectable circumstellar molecular gas suggests that the HD 100453 system is in an unusual state of evolution between a gas-rich protoplanetary disk and a gas-poor debris disk.

  4. COLDz: KARL G. JANSKY VERY LARGE ARRAY DISCOVERY OF A GAS-RICH GALAXY IN COSMOS

    SciTech Connect

    Lentati, L.; Wagg, J.; Carilli, C. L.; Riechers, D.; Sharon, C.; Capak, P.; Scoville, N.; Walter, F.; Da Cunha, E.; Decarli, R.; Aravena, M.; Hodge, J. A.; Ivison, R. J.; Smail, I.; Daddi, E.; Dickinson, M.; Sargent, M.; Smolčć, V.

    2015-02-10

    The broad spectral bandwidth at millimeter and centimeter wavelengths provided by the recent upgrades to the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) has made it possible to conduct unbiased searches for molecular CO line emission at redshifts, z > 1.31. We present the discovery of a gas-rich, star-forming galaxy at z = 2.48 through the detection of CO J = 1-0 line emission in the COLDz survey and through a sensitive, Ka-band (31-39 GHz) VLA survey of a 6.5 arcmin{sup 2} region of the COSMOS field. We argue that the broad line (FWHM ∼ 570 ± 80 km s{sup –1}) is most likely to be CO J = 1-0 at z = 2.48, as the integrated emission is spatially coincident with an infrared-detected galaxy with a photometric redshift estimate of z {sub phot} = 3.2 ± 0.4. The CO J = 1-0 line luminosity is L{sub CO}{sup ′}=(2.2±0.3)×10{sup 10} K km s{sup –1} pc{sup 2}, suggesting a cold molecular gas mass of M {sub gas} ∼ (2-8) × 10{sup 10} M {sub ☉} depending on the assumed value of the molecular gas mass to CO luminosity ratio α{sub CO}. The estimated infrared luminosity from the (rest-frame) far-infrared spectral energy distribution (SED) is L {sub IR} = 2.5 × 10{sup 12} L {sub ☉} and the star formation rate is ∼250 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}, with the SED shape indicating substantial dust obscuration of the stellar light. The infrared to CO line luminosity ratio is ∼114 ± 19 L {sub ☉}/(K km s{sup –1} pc{sup 2}), similar to galaxies with similar SFRs selected at UV/optical to radio wavelengths. This discovery confirms the potential for molecular emission line surveys as a route to study populations of gas-rich galaxies in the future.

  5. Quantifying Hydrate Formation in Gas-rich Environments Using the Method of Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, K.; Flemings, P. B.; DiCarlo, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    Methane hydrates hold a vast amount of methane globally, and have huge energy potential. Methane hydrates in gas-rich environments are the most promising production targets. We develop a one-dimensional analytical solution based on the method of characteristics to explore hydrate formation in such environments (Figure 1). Our solution shows that hydrate saturation is constant with time and space in a homogeneous system. Hydrate saturation is controlled by the initial thermodynamic condition of the system, and changed by the gas fractional flow. Hydrate saturation increases with the initial distance from the hydrate phase boundary. Different gas fractional flows behind the hydrate solidification front lead to different gas saturations at the hydrate solidification front. The higher the gas saturation at the front, the less the volume available to be filled by hydrate, and hence the lower the hydrate saturation. The gas fractional flow depends on the relative permeability curves, and the forces that drive the flow. Viscous forces (the drive for flow induced from liquid pressure gradient) dominate the flow, and hydrate saturation is independent on the gas supply rates and the flow directions at high gas supply rates. Hydrate saturation can be estimated as one minus the ratio of the initial to equilibrium salinity. Gravity forces (the drive for flow induced from the gravity) dominate the flow, and hydrate saturation depends on the flow rates and the flow directions at low gas supply rates. Hydrate saturation is highest for upward flow, and lowest for downward flow. Hydrate saturation decreases with the flow rate for upward flow, and increases with the flow rate for downward flow. This analytical solution illuminates how hydrate is formed by gas (methane, CO2, ethane, propane) flowing into brine-saturated sediments at both the laboratory and geological scales (Figure 1). It provides an approach to generalize the understanding of hydrate solidification in gas-rich

  6. Snow Lines in Gas Rich Protoplanetary Disks and the Delivery of Volatiles to Planetary Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blake, Geoffrey A.

    2016-06-01

    Compared to the Sun and to the gas+dust composition of the interstellar medium from which the solar system formed, the Carbon and Nitrogen content of the bulk silicate Earth (mantle+hydrosphere+atmosphere) is reduced by several orders of magnitude, relative to Silicon. Evidence from primitive bodies as a function of distance from the Sun suggests that at least part of this depletion must occur early in the process of planetesimal assembly. With combined infrared and (sub)mm observations such as those enabled by ground-based 8-10m class telescopes (and in future the James Webb Space Telescope) and the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA), we can now examine the principal volatile reservoirs of gas rich disks as a function position within the disk and evolutionary state. Key to these studies is the concept of condensation fronts, or 'snow lines,' in disks - locations at which key volatiles such as water, carbon monoxide, or nitrogen first condense from the gas. This talk will review the observational characterization of snow lines in protoplanetary disks, especially recent ALMA observations, and highlight the laboratory astrophysics studies and theoretical investigations that are needed to tie the observational results to the delivery of volatiles to planetary surfaces in the habitable zones around Sun-like stars.

  7. Sulfur Isotopes in Gas-rich Impact-Melt Glasses in Shergottites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, M. N.; Hoppe, P.; Sutton, S. R.; Nyquist, Laurence E.; Huth, J.

    2010-01-01

    Large impact melt glasses in some shergottites contain huge amounts of Martian atmospheric gases and they are known as gas-rich impact-melt (GRIM) glasses. By studying the neutron-induced isotopic deficits and excesses in Sm-149 and Sm-150 isotopes resulting from Sm-149 (n,gamma) 150Sm reaction and 80Kr excesses produced by Br-79 (n,gamma) Kr-80 reaction in the GRIM glasses using mass-spectrometric techniques, it was shown that these glasses in shergottites EET79001 and Shergotty contain regolith materials irradiated by a thermal neutron fluence of approx.10(exp 15) n/sq cm near Martian surface. Also, it was shown that these glasses contain varying amounts of sulfates and sulfides based on the release patterns of SO2 (sulfate) and H2S (sulfide) using stepwise-heating mass-spectrometric techniques. Furthermore, EMPA and FE-SEM studies in basaltic-shergottite GRIM glasses EET79001, LithB (,507& ,69), Shergotty (DBS I &II), Zagami (,992 & ,994) showed positive correlation between FeO and "SO3" (sulfide + sulfate), whereas those belonging to olivine-phyric shergottites EET79001, LithA (,506, & ,77) showed positive correlation between CaO/Al2O3 and "SO3".

  8. A SiO 2-1 SURVEY TOWARD GAS-RICH ACTIVE GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Junzhi; Zhang, Jiangshui; Shi, Yong; Zhang, Zhiyu

    2013-12-01

    In order to study the feedback from active galactic nuclei (AGNs), we performed a survey of SiO J = 2-1 (v = 0) transition toward ten gas-rich active galaxies with the IRAM 30 m telescope. As the first survey of SiO in such galaxies, we detected SiO J = 2-1 (v = 0) emission in six galaxies above the 3σ level and one galaxy (NGC 3690) at the 2.7σ level. The detection rate is not related to the AGN type or to star formation activity. In comparison with M82, which is a pure star-forming galaxy without nuclear activity, our SiO detections could not be completely ascribed to being due to star formation activity. This suggests that the AGN feedback may be efficient in producing SiO molecules in such galaxies. Further surveys with large single-dish millimeter telescopes and interferometers are necessary for understanding the origin of SiO in galaxies with nuclear activity.

  9. MIXING OF CLUMPY SUPERNOVA EJECTA INTO MOLECULAR CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect

    Pan Liubin; Desch, Steven J.; Scannapieco, Evan; Timmes, F. X.

    2012-09-01

    Several lines of evidence, from isotopic analyses of meteorites to studies of the Sun's elemental and isotopic composition, indicate that the solar system was contaminated early in its evolution by ejecta from a nearby supernova. Previous models have invoked supernova material being injected into an extant protoplanetary disk, or isotropically expanding ejecta sweeping over a distant (>10 pc) cloud core, simultaneously enriching it and triggering its collapse. Here, we consider a new astrophysical setting: the injection of clumpy supernova ejecta, as observed in the Cassiopeia A supernova remnant, into the molecular gas at the periphery of an H II region created by the supernova's progenitor star. To track these interactions, we have conducted a suite of high-resolution (1500{sup 3} effective) three-dimensional numerical hydrodynamic simulations that follow the evolution of individual clumps as they move into molecular gas. Even at these high resolutions, our simulations do not quite achieve numerical convergence, due to the challenge of properly resolving the small-scale mixing of ejecta and molecular gas, although they do allow some robust conclusions to be drawn. Isotropically exploding ejecta do not penetrate into the molecular cloud or mix with it, but, if cooling is properly accounted for, clumpy ejecta penetrate to distances {approx}10{sup 18} cm and mix effectively with large regions of star-forming molecular gas. In fact, the {approx}2 M{sub Sun} of high-metallicity ejecta from a single core-collapse supernova is likely to mix with {approx}2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} M{sub Sun} of molecular gas material as it is collapsing. Thus, all stars forming late ( Almost-Equal-To 5 Myr) in the evolution of an H II region may be contaminated by supernova ejecta at the level {approx}10{sup -4}. This level of contamination is consistent with the abundances of short-lived radionuclides and possibly some stable isotopic shifts in the early solar system and is

  10. First Scattered-light Images of the Gas-rich Debris Disk around 49 Ceti

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choquet, Élodie; Milli, Julien; Wahhaj, Zahed; Soummer, Rémi; Roberge, Aki; Augereau, Jean-Charles; Booth, Mark; Absil, Olivier; Boccaletti, Anthony; Chen, Christine H.; Debes, John H.; del Burgo, Carlos; Dent, William R. F.; Ertel, Steve; Girard, Julien H.; Gofas-Salas, Elena; Golimowski, David A.; Gómez González, Carlos A.; Brendan Hagan, J.; Hibon, Pascale; Hines, Dean C.; Kennedy, Grant M.; Lagrange, Anne-Marie; Matrà, Luca; Mawet, Dimitri; Mouillet, David; N’Diaye, Mamadou; Perrin, Marshall D.; Pinte, Christophe; Pueyo, Laurent; Rajan, Abhijith; Schneider, Glenn; Wolff, Schuyler; Wyatt, Mark

    2017-01-01

    We present the first scattered-light images of the debris disk around 49 Ceti, a ∼40 Myr A1 main-sequence star at 59 pc, famous for hosting two massive dust belts as well as large quantities of atomic and molecular gas. The outer disk is revealed in reprocessed archival Hubble Space Telescope NICMOS-F110W images, as well as new coronagraphic H-band images from the Very Large Telescope SPHERE instrument. The disk extends from 1.″1 (65 au) to 4.″6 (250 au) and is seen at an inclination of 73°, which refines previous measurements at lower angular resolution. We also report no companion detection larger than 3 MJup at projected separations beyond 20 au from the star (0.″34). Comparison between the F110W and H-band images is consistent with a gray color of 49 Ceti’s dust, indicating grains larger than ≳2 μm. Our photometric measurements indicate a scattering efficiency/infrared excess ratio of 0.2–0.4, relatively low compared to other characterized debris disks. We find that 49 Ceti presents morphological and scattering properties very similar to the gas-rich HD 131835 system. From our constraint on the disk inclination we find that the atomic gas previously detected in absorption must extend to the inner disk, and that the latter must be depleted of CO gas. Building on previous studies, we propose a schematic view of the system describing the dust and gas structure around 49 Ceti and hypothetical scenarios for the gas nature and origin.

  11. Black hole growth and AGN feedback under clumpy accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeGraf, C.; Dekel, A.; Gabor, J.; Bournaud, F.

    2017-04-01

    High-resolution simulations of supermassive black holes in isolated galaxies have suggested the importance of short (∼10 Myr) episodes of rapid accretion caused by interactions between the black hole and massive dense clouds within the host. Accretion of such clouds could potentially provide the dominant source for black hole growth in high-z galaxies, but it remains unresolved in cosmological simulations. Using a stochastic subgrid model calibrated by high-resolution isolated galaxy simulations, we investigate the impact that variability in black hole accretion rates has on black hole growth and the evolution of the host galaxy. We find this clumpy accretion to more efficiently fuel high-redshift black hole growth. This increased mass allows for more rapid accretion even in the absence of high-density clumps, compounding the effect and resulting in substantially faster overall black hole growth. This increased growth allows the black hole to efficiently evacuate gas from the central region of the galaxy, driving strong winds up to ∼2500 km s-1, producing outflows ∼10 × stronger than the smooth accretion case, suppressing the inflow of gas on to the host galaxy, and suppressing the star formation within the galaxy by as much as a factor of 2. This suggests that the proper incorporation of variability is a key factor in the co-evolution between black holes and their hosts.

  12. UGC 3672: an unusual merging triplet of gas-rich galaxies in the Lynx-Cancer void

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chengalur, J. N.; Pustilnik, S. A.; Egorova, E. S.

    2017-02-01

    We present H I 21 cm and optical observations of UGC 3672 which is located near the centre of the nearby Lynx-Cancer void. We find that UGC 3672 consists of an approximately linearly aligned triplet of gas-rich dwarfs with large-scale velocity continuity along the triplet axis. The faintest component of the triplet is extremely gas-rich M_{H I}/L_B ˜ 17) and also extremely metal deficient (12 + log (O/H) ∼ 7.0). The metallicity of this dwarf is close to the 'floor' observed in star-forming galaxies. Low-resolution H I images show that the galaxy triplet is located inside a common H I envelope, with fairly regular, disc-like kinematics. At high angular resolution however, the gas is found to be confined to several filamentary tidal tails and bridges. The linear alignment of the galaxies, along with the velocity continuity that we observe, is consistent with the galaxies lying along a filament. We argue that the location of this highly unusual system in an extremely low-density environment is not a coincidence, but is a consequence of structure formation proceeding more slowly and also probing smaller scales than in regions with average density. Our observations also indicate that wet mergers of galaxies flowing along filaments is a possible pathway for the formation of gas-rich discs. The UGC 3672 system provides an interesting opportunity to study the kind of interactions typical between high-redshift extremely gas-rich unevolved small systems that lie at base of the hierarchical galaxy formation model.

  13. Discovery of an extremely gas rich dwarf triplet near the centre of the Lynx-Cancer void

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chengalur, J. N.; Pustilnik, S. A.

    2013-01-01

    The Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) H i observations, done as part of an ongoing study of dwarf galaxies in the Lynx-Cancer void, resulted in the discovery of a triplet of extremely gas rich galaxies located near the centre of the void. The triplet members SDSS J0723+3621, SDSS J0723+3622 and SDSS J0723+3624 have absolute magnitudes MB of -14.2, -11.9 and -9.7 and M(H i)/LB of ˜2.9, ˜10 and ˜25, respectively. The gas mass fractions, as derived from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) photometry and the GMRT data, are 0.93, 0.997 and 0.997, respectively. The faintest member of this triplet, SDSS J0723+3624, is one of the most gas rich galaxies known. We find that all three galaxies deviate significantly from the Tully-Fisher relation, but follow the baryonic Tully-Fisher relation. All three galaxies also have a baryon fraction that is significantly smaller than the cosmic baryon fraction. For the largest galaxy in the triplet, this is in contradiction to numerical simulations. The discovery of this very unique dwarf triplet lends further support to the idea that the void environment is conducive to the formation of galaxies with unusual properties. These observations provide further motivation to do deep searches of voids for a `hidden' very gas rich galaxy population with MB ≳ -11.

  14. CLUMPY GALAXIES IN CANDELS. I. THE DEFINITION OF UV CLUMPS AND THE FRACTION OF CLUMPY GALAXIES AT 0.5 < z < 3

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Yicheng; Koo, David C.; Barro, Guillermo; Faber, Sandra M.; Fang, Jerome J.; Bell, Eric F.; Conselice, Christopher J.; Giavalisco, Mauro; Lu, Yu; Mandelker, Nir; Dekel, Avishai; McIntosh, Daniel M.; Primack, Joel R.; Ceverino, Daniel; and others

    2015-02-10

    Although giant clumps of stars are thought to be crucial to galaxy formation and evolution, the most basic demographics of clumps are still uncertain, mainly because the definition of clumps has not been thoroughly discussed. In this paper, we carry out a study of the basic demographics of clumps in star-forming galaxies at 0.5 < z < 3, using our proposed physical definition that UV-bright clumps are discrete star-forming regions that individually contribute more than 8% of the rest-frame UV light of their galaxies. Clumps defined this way are significantly brighter than the H II regions of nearby large spiral galaxies, either individually or blended, when physical spatial resolution and cosmological dimming are considered. Under this definition, we measure the fraction of star-forming galaxies that have at least one off-center clump (f {sub clumpy}) and the contributions of clumps to the rest-frame UV light and star formation rate (SFR) of star-forming galaxies in the CANDELS/GOODS-S and UDS fields, where our mass-complete sample consists of 3239 galaxies with axial ratio q > 0.5. The redshift evolution of f {sub clumpy} changes with the stellar mass (M {sub *}) of the galaxies. Low-mass (log (M {sub *}/M {sub ☉}) < 9.8) galaxies keep an almost constant f {sub clumpy} of ∼60% from z ∼ 3 to z ∼ 0.5. Intermediate-mass and massive galaxies drop their f {sub clumpy} from 55% at z ∼ 3 to 40% and 15%, respectively, at z ∼ 0.5. We find that (1) the trend of disk stabilization predicted by violent disk instability matches the f {sub clumpy} trend of massive galaxies; (2) minor mergers are a viable explanation of the f {sub clumpy} trend of intermediate-mass galaxies at z < 1.5, given a realistic observability timescale; and (3) major mergers are unlikely responsible for the f {sub clumpy} trend in all masses at z < 1.5. The clump contribution to the rest-frame UV light of star-forming galaxies shows a broad peak around galaxies with log (M {sub *}/M {sub

  15. Formation and evolution of clumpy tidal tails in globular clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Matteo, P.; Miocchi, P.; Capuzzo Dolcetta, R.

    2004-05-01

    Numerical simulations of a globular cluster orbiting in the central region of a triaxial galaxy have been performed, in order to study the formation and subsequent evolution of tidal tails and their main features. Tails begin to form after about a quarter of the cluster orbital period and tend to lie along its orbit, with a leading tail that precedes the cluster and an outer tail that trails behind it. Tails show clumpy substructures; the most prominent ones (for a globular cluster moving on a quasi-circular orbit around the galaxy) are located at a distance from the cluster center between 50 pc and 80 pc and, after 3 orbital periods, contain about 10% of the cluster mass at that epoch. The morphology of tails and clumps will be compared with available observational data, in particular with that concerning Palomar 5, for which evident clumps in the tails have been detected. Kinematical properties of stars in the tails (line-of-sight velocities and velocity dispersion profiles) will be presented and compared to kinematical data of M15 and ω Centauri, two galactic globular clusters for which there is evidence that the velocity dispersion remains constant at large radii. All the simulations have been performed with our own implementation of a tree-code, that uses a multipolar expansion of the potential truncated at the quadrupole moment and that ran on high performance computers employing an original parallelization approach implemented via MPI routines. The time-integration of the `particles' trajectories is performed by a 2nd order leap-frog algorithm, using individual and variable time-steps. Part of this work has been done using the IBM SP4 platform located at CINECA (Bologna, Italy) thanks to the grant inarm007 obtained in the framework of INAF-CINECA agreements.

  16. AGN Survey to characterize the clumpy torus using FORCAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez-Rodriguez, Enrique

    2015-10-01

    A geometrically and optically thick torus of gas and dust obscures the black hole and accretion disk in active galactic nuclei (AGN) in some lines of sight. One of the most important question that still remain uncertain is: How do the properties, such as torus geometry and distribution of clumps, of the torus depend on the AGN luminosity and/or activity class? Infrared (IR) observations are essential to these investigations as the torus intercepts and re-radiates (peaking within 30-40 um) a substantial amount of flux from the central engine. Near-IR (NIR) and mid-IR (MIR) observations from the ground have been key to advance our knowledge in this field. However, the atmosphere is opaque to the 30-40 um range and observations are impossible from ground-based telescopes. FORCAST presents a unique opportunity to explore AGN, providing the best angular resolution observations within the 30-40 um range for the current suite of instruments. From our analysis using Cycle 2 observations, we found that FORCAST provides the largest constraining power of the clumpy torus models in the suggested wavelength range. We therefore request an AGN Survey using FORCAST of snapshot imaging observations of a flux-limited (>500 mJy at 37.1 um) sample of 23 Seyfert galaxies with existing high-angular resolution MIR spectra observed on 8-m class telescopes. Using the FORCAST data requested here in combination with already acquired NIR and MIR data, we will have an unprecedentedly homogeneous AGN sample of IR (1-40 um) SED at the largest spatial-resolution, which yield to a better knowledge of the torus structure in the AGN unified model.

  17. AN X-RAY SPECTRAL MODEL OF REPROCESSING BY SMOOTH AND CLUMPY MOLECULAR TORI IN ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI WITH THE MONACO FRAMEWORK

    SciTech Connect

    Furui, Shun’ya; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Ohno, Masanori; Hayashi, Kazuma; Odaka, Hirokazu; Kawaguchi, Toshihiro

    2016-02-20

    We construct an X-ray spectral model of reprocessing by a torus in an active galactic nucleus (AGN) with the Monte Carlo simulation framework MONACO. Two torus geometries of smooth and clumpy cases are considered and compared. In order to reproduce a Compton shoulder accurately, MONACO includes not only free electron scattering but also bound electron scattering. Raman and Rayleigh scattering are also treated, and scattering cross sections dependent on chemical states of hydrogen and helium are included. Doppler broadening by turbulence velocity can be implemented. Our model gives results consistent with other available models, such as MYTorus, except for differences due to different physical parameters and assumptions. We studied the dependence on torus parameters for a Compton shoulder, and found that a intensity ratio of a Compton shoulder to the line core mainly depends on column density, inclination angle, and metal abundance. For instance, an increase of metal abundance makes a Compton shoulder relatively weak. Also, the shape of a Compton shoulder depends on the column density. Furthermore, these dependences become different between smooth and clumpy cases. Then, we discuss the possibility of ASTRO-H/SXS spectroscopy of Compton shoulders in AGN reflection spectra.

  18. Non-LTE line formation in clumpy and turbulent molecular clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegmann, M.; Kegel, W. H.

    2000-07-01

    Extending previous work (Albrecht & Kegel \\cite{alb87}, Kegel et al. \\cite{keg93}, Piehler & Kegel \\cite{pie94}), we investigated the formation of interstellar molecular lines in a medium with stochastic density and velocity fluctuations. We solved the full NLTE-problem, i.e. the generalized radiative transfer equation simultaneously with the rate equations, for a 6-level CO molecule and a plane-parallel slab geometry. Our results indicate that accounting for a finite correlation length of both, the density and velocity field, strongly affects the line profile and the line width as well as the intensity ratios of different rotational transitions.

  19. EVIDENCE FOR A GAS-RICH MAJOR MERGER IN A PROTO-CLUSTER AT z = 2.5

    SciTech Connect

    Tadaki, Ken-ichi; Kodama, Tadayuki; Hayashi, Masao; Koyama, Yusei; Hatsukade, Bunyo; Tamura, Yoichi; Kohno, Kotaro; Suzuki, Kenta; Shimakawa, Rhythm; Tanaka, Ichi

    2014-06-20

    Gas-rich major mergers in high-redshift proto-clusters are important events, perhaps leading to the creation of the slowly rotating remnants seen in the cores of clusters in the present day. Here, we present a deep Jansky Very Large Array observation of CO J = 1-0 emission line in a proto-cluster at z = 2.5, USS1558-003. The target field is an extremely dense region, where 20 Hα emitters (HAEs) are clustering. We have successfully detected the CO emission line from three HAEs and discovered a close pair of red and blue CO-emitting HAEs. Given their close proximity (∼30 kpc), small velocity offset (∼300 km s{sup –1}), and similar stellar masses, they could be in the early phase of a gas-rich major merger. For the red HAE, we derive a total infrared luminosity of L {sub IR} = 5.1 × 10{sup 12} L {sub ☉} using MIPS 24 μm and radio continuum images. The L{sub IR}/L{sub CO}{sup ′} ratio is significantly enhanced compared to local spirals and high-redshift disks with a similar CO luminosity, which is indicative of a starburst mode. We find the gas depletion timescale is shorter than that of normal star-forming galaxies regardless of adopted CO-H{sub 2} conversion factors. The identification of such a rare event suggests that gas-rich major mergers frequently take place in proto-clusters at z > 2 and may involve the formation processes of slow rotators seen in local massive clusters.

  20. Formation of Andromeda II via a gas-rich major merger and an interaction with M31

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fouquet, Sylvain; Łokas, Ewa L.; del Pino, Andrés; Ebrová, Ivana

    2017-01-01

    Andromeda II (And II) has been known for a few decades but only recently observations have unveiled new properties of this dwarf spheroidal galaxy. The presence of two stellar populations, the bimodal star formation history (SFH) and an unusual rotation velocity of And II put strong constrains on its formation and evolution. Following Łokas et al., we propose a detailed model to explain the main properties of And II involving (1) a gas-rich major merger between two dwarf galaxies at high redshift in the field and (2) a close interaction with M31 about 5 Gyr ago. The model is based on N-body/hydrodynamical simulations including gas dynamics, star formation and feedback. One simulation is designed to reproduce the gas-rich major merger explaining the origin of stellar populations and the SFH. Other simulations are used to study the effects of tidal forces and the ram-pressure stripping during the interaction between And II and M31. The model successfully reproduces the SFH of And II including the properties of stellar populations, its morphology, kinematics and the lack of gas. Further improvements to the model are possible via joint modelling of all processes and better treatment of baryonic physics.

  1. Krypton and xenon in Apollo 14 samples - Fission and neutron capture effects in gas-rich samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drozd, R.; Hohenberg, C.; Morgan, C.

    1975-01-01

    Gas-rich Apollo 14 breccias and trench soil are examined for fission xenon from the decay of the extinct isotopes Pu-244 and I-129, and some samples have been found to have an excess fission component which apparently was incorporated after decay elsewhere and was not produced by in situ decay. Two samples have excess Xe-129 resulting from the decay of I-129. The excess is correlated at low temperatures with excess Xe-128 resulting from neutron capture on I-127. This neutron capture effect is accompanied by related low-temperature excesses of Kr-80 and Kr-82 from neutron capture on the bromine isotopes. Surface correlated concentrations of iodine and bromine are calculated from the neutron capture excesses.

  2. Alfalfa discovery of the nearby gas-rich dwarf galaxy Leo P. IV. Distance measurement from LBT optical imaging

    SciTech Connect

    McQuinn, Kristen B. W.; Skillman, Evan D.; Berg, Danielle; Cannon, John M.; Salzer, John J.; Rhode, Katherine L.; Adams, Elizabeth A. K.; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Haynes, Martha P.; Dolphin, Andrew E-mail: skillman@astro.umn.edu E-mail: jcannon@macalester.edu E-mail: slaz@astro.indiana.edu E-mail: riccardo@astro.cornell.edu

    2013-12-01

    Leo P is a low-luminosity dwarf galaxy discovered through the blind H I Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA survey. The H I and follow-up optical observations have shown that Leo P is a gas-rich dwarf galaxy with both active star formation and an underlying older population, as well as an extremely low oxygen abundance. Here, we measure the distance to Leo P by applying the tip of the red giant branch (TRGB) distance method to photometry of the resolved stellar population from new Large Binocular Telescope V and I band imaging. We measure a distance modulus of 26.19{sub −0.50}{sup +0.17} mag corresponding to a distance of 1.72{sub −0.40}{sup +0.14} Mpc. Although our photometry reaches 3 mag below the TRGB, the sparseness of the red giant branch yields higher uncertainties on the lower limit of the distance. Leo P is outside the Local Group with a distance and velocity consistent with the local Hubble flow. While located in a very low-density environment, Leo P lies within ∼0.5 Mpc of a loose association of dwarf galaxies which include NGC 3109, Antlia, Sextans A, and Sextans B, and 1.1 Mpc away from its next nearest neighbor, Leo A. Leo P is one of the lowest metallicity star-forming galaxies known in the nearby universe, comparable in metallicity to I Zw 18 and DDO 68, but with stellar characteristics similar to dwarf spheriodals (dSphs) in the Local Volume such as Carina, Sextans, and Leo II. Given its physical properties and isolation, Leo P may provide an evolutionary link between gas-rich dwarf irregular galaxies and dSphs that have fallen into a Local Group environment and been stripped of their gas.

  3. VizieR Online Data Catalog: NGC2548 clumpy spatial and kinematic structure (Vicente+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vicente, B.; Sanchez, N.; Alfaro, E.

    2016-10-01

    We used precise astrometric data from the Carte du Ciel - San Fernando catalogue to study the clumpy structure in NGC 2548. We have completed our spatial and kinematic information with photometric data from the UCAC4 catalogue. With this, we derived positions and proper motions for each of the detected cores in this cluster. This table contains all the astrometric and photometric data for the 1655 stars toward NGC 2548. (1 data file).

  4. An X-ray spectral model for clumpy tori in active galactic nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yuan; Li, Xiaobo E-mail: lixb@ihep.ac.cn

    2014-05-20

    We construct an X-ray spectral model for the clumpy torus in an active galactic nucleus (AGN) using Geant4, which includes the physical processes of the photoelectric effect, Compton scattering, Rayleigh scattering, γ conversion, fluorescence line, and Auger process. Since the electrons in the torus are expected to be bounded instead of free, the deviation of the scattering cross section from the Klein-Nishina cross section has also been included, which changes the X-ray spectra by up to 25% below 10 keV. We have investigated the effect of the clumpiness parameters on the reflection spectra and the strength of the fluorescent line Fe Kα. The volume filling factor of the clouds in the clumpy torus only slightly influences the reflection spectra, however, the total column density and the number of clouds along the line of sight significantly change the shapes and amplitudes of the reflection spectra. The effect of column density is similar to the case of a smooth torus, while a small number of clouds along the line of sight will smooth out the anisotropy of the reflection spectra and the fluorescent line Fe Kα. The smoothing effect is mild in the low column density case (N {sub H} = 10{sup 23} cm{sup –2}), whereas it is much more evident in the high column density case (N {sub H} = 10{sup 25} cm{sup –2}). Our model provides a quantitative tool for the spectral analysis of the clumpy torus. We suggest that the joint fits of the broad band spectral energy distributions of AGNs (from X-ray to infrared) should better constrain the structure of the torus.

  5. A Game of Hide and Seek: Expectations of Clumpy Resources Influence Hiding and Searching Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Wilke, Andreas; Minich, Steven; Panis, Megane; Langen, Tom A.; Skufca, Joseph D.; Todd, Peter M.

    2015-01-01

    Resources are often distributed in clumps or patches in space, unless an agent is trying to protect them from discovery and theft using a dispersed distribution. We uncover human expectations of such spatial resource patterns in collaborative and competitive settings via a sequential multi-person game in which participants hid resources for the next participant to seek. When collaborating, resources were mostly hidden in clumpy distributions, but when competing, resources were hidden in more dispersed (random or hyperdispersed) patterns to increase the searching difficulty for the other player. More dispersed resource distributions came at the cost of higher overall hiding (as well as searching) times, decreased payoffs, and an increased difficulty when the hider had to recall earlier hiding locations at the end of the experiment. Participants’ search strategies were also affected by their underlying expectations, using a win-stay lose-shift strategy appropriate for clumpy resources when searching for collaboratively-hidden items, but moving equally far after finding or not finding an item in competitive settings, as appropriate for dispersed resources. Thus participants showed expectations for clumpy versus dispersed spatial resources that matched the distributions commonly found in collaborative versus competitive foraging settings. PMID:26154661

  6. A Game of Hide and Seek: Expectations of Clumpy Resources Influence Hiding and Searching Patterns.

    PubMed

    Wilke, Andreas; Minich, Steven; Panis, Megane; Langen, Tom A; Skufca, Joseph D; Todd, Peter M

    2015-01-01

    Resources are often distributed in clumps or patches in space, unless an agent is trying to protect them from discovery and theft using a dispersed distribution. We uncover human expectations of such spatial resource patterns in collaborative and competitive settings via a sequential multi-person game in which participants hid resources for the next participant to seek. When collaborating, resources were mostly hidden in clumpy distributions, but when competing, resources were hidden in more dispersed (random or hyperdispersed) patterns to increase the searching difficulty for the other player. More dispersed resource distributions came at the cost of higher overall hiding (as well as searching) times, decreased payoffs, and an increased difficulty when the hider had to recall earlier hiding locations at the end of the experiment. Participants' search strategies were also affected by their underlying expectations, using a win-stay lose-shift strategy appropriate for clumpy resources when searching for collaboratively-hidden items, but moving equally far after finding or not finding an item in competitive settings, as appropriate for dispersed resources. Thus participants showed expectations for clumpy versus dispersed spatial resources that matched the distributions commonly found in collaborative versus competitive foraging settings.

  7. Sulfur and Iron Speciation in Gas-rich Impact-melt Glasses from Basaltic Shergottites Determined by Microxanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutton, S. R.; Rao, M. N.; Nyquist, L. E.

    2008-01-01

    Sulfur is abundantly present as sulfate near Martian surface based on chemical and mineralogical investigations on soils and rocks in Viking, Pathfinder and MER missions. Jarosite is identified by Mossbauer studies on rocks at Meridian and Gusev, whereas MgSO4 is deduced from MgO - SO3 correlations in Pathfinder MER and Viking soils. Other sulfate minerals such as gypsum and alunogen/ S-rich aluminosilicates and halides are detected only in martian meteorites such as shergottites and nakhlites using SEM/FE-SEM and EMPA techniques. Because sulfur has the capacity to occur in multiple valence states, determination of sulfur speciation (sulfide/ sulfate) in secondary mineral assemblages in soils and rocks near Mars surface may help us understand whether the fluid-rock interactions occurred under oxidizing or reducing conditions. To understand the implications of these observations for the formation of the Gas-rich Impact-melt (GRIM) glasses, we determined the oxidation state of Fe in the GRIM glasses using Fe K micro-XANES techniques.

  8. Three-dimensional Non-LTE Radiative Transfer of CS in Clumpy Dense Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Y.-S.; Hong, S. S.

    1998-02-01

    With a Monte Carlo radiative transfer code we have investigated excitation conditions of the CS molecule in dense cores and synthesized line profiles for several transitions of both CS and C34S. We took two kinds of models of the dense core: a clumpy and a smooth model. In the clumpy model, the core is composed of many small clumps, whose volume filling factor f is unity in the central region of r <= 0.2R and then declines as f ~ r-1.5. However, H2 number density in the clump is kept constant and also independent of the clump position. The mean number density, nH2(r), is thus constant in the central part and then decreases as the same power law. In the smooth model, the gas fills the core completely, and its local density exactly follows the mean density of the clumpy model. For both models, each clump has thermal as well as bulk motions, velocity dispersion of the latter being proportional to r0.5. In the clumpy structured core, the excitation temperature of the CS transitions is found to be generally constant over an entire region. As a consequence, the synthesized profile is of a Gaussian shape superposed with some wiggles, which reflects the existence of clumps under the bulk motion. The trend of flat distribution of excitation temperature becomes more prominent for optically thin transitions of the rarer species C34S. The profiles develop flat-top features with minor wiggles only when the core becomes extremely thick in the optical sense. On the other hand, wider profiles that have self-absorption are synthesized in the smooth core. The self-absorption is formed by a steep gradient in the radial distribution of the excitation temperature. For optically thin C34S transitions, both the clumpy and the smooth cores exhibit profiles close to a Gaussian shape. Comparing line parameters derived in the Monte Carlo code and those by the large-scale velocity gradient calculations, we found that only the clumpy models can give correct estimations of the density and

  9. Kinematics of dwarf galaxies in gas-rich groups, and the survival and detectability of tidal dwarf galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sweet, Sarah M.; Drinkwater, Michael J.; Meurer, Gerhardt; Kilborn, Virginia; Audcent-Ross, Fiona; Baumgardt, Holger; Bekki, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    We present DEIMOS multi-object spectroscopy (MOS) of 22 star-forming dwarf galaxies located in four gas-rich groups, including six newly discovered dwarfs. Two of the galaxies are strong tidal dwarf galaxy (TDG) candidates based on our luminosity-metallicity relation definition. We model the rotation curves of these galaxies. Our sample shows low mass-to-light ratios (M/L = 0.73 ± 0.39 M⊙/L⊙) as expected for young, star-forming dwarfs. One of the galaxies in our sample has an apparently strongly falling rotation curve, reaching zero rotational velocity outside the turnover radius of rturn = 1.2re. This may be (1) a polar ring galaxy, with a tilted bar within a face-on disc; (2) a kinematic warp. These scenarios are indistinguishable with our current data due to limitations of slit alignment inherent to MOS-mode observations. We consider whether TDGs can be detected based on their tidal radius, beyond which tidal stripping removes kinematic tracers such as Hα emission. When the tidal radius is less than about twice the turnover radius, the expected falling rotation curve cannot be reliably measured. This is problematic for as much as half of our sample, and indeed more generally, galaxies in groups like these. Further to this, the Hα light that remains must be sufficiently bright to be detected; this is only the case for three (14 per cent) galaxies in our sample. We conclude that the falling rotation curves expected of TDGs are intrinsically difficult to detect.

  10. Delayed triggering of radio active galactic nuclei in gas-rich minor mergers in the local Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shabala, S. S.; Deller, A.; Kaviraj, S.; Middelberg, E.; Turner, R. J.; Ting, Y. S.; Allison, J. R.; Davis, T. A.

    2017-02-01

    We examine the processes triggering star formation and active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity in a sample of 25 low-redshift (z < 0.13) gas-rich galaxy mergers observed at milliarcsecond resolution with Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) as part of the mJy Imaging VLBA Exploration at 20 cm (mJIVE-20) survey. The high (>107 K) brightness temperature required for an mJIVE-20 detection allows us to unambiguously identify the radio AGN in our sample. We find three such objects. Our VLBI AGN identifications are classified as Seyferts or low-ionization nuclear emission-line regions (LINERs) in narrow line optical diagnostic plots; mid-infrared colours of our targets and the comparison of Hα star formation rates with integrated radio luminosity are also consistent with the VLBI identifications. We reconstruct star formation histories in our galaxies using optical and UV photometry, and find that these radio AGN are not triggered promptly in the merger process, consistent with previous findings for non-VLBI samples of radio AGN. This delay can significantly limit the efficiency of feedback by radio AGN triggered in galaxy mergers. We find that radio AGN hosts have lower star formation rates than non-AGN radio-selected galaxies at the same starburst age. Conventional and VLBI radio imaging shows these AGN to be compact on arcsecond scales. Our modelling suggests that the actual sizes of AGN-inflated radio lobes may be much larger than this, but these are too faint to be detected in existing observations. Deep radio imaging is required to map out the true extent of the AGN, and to determine whether the low star formation rates in radio AGN hosts are a result of the special conditions required for radio jet triggering, or the effect of AGN feedback.

  11. Interaction of clumpy dark matter with interstellar medium in astrophysical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baushev, A. N.

    2012-02-01

    Contemporary cosmological conceptions suggest that the dark matter in haloes of galaxies and galaxy clusters has most likely a clumpy structure. If a stream of gas penetrates through it, a small-scale gravitational field created by the clumps disturbs the flow resulting in momentum exchange between the stream and the dark matter. In this article, we perform an analysis of this effect, based on the hierarchical halo model of the dark matter structure and Navarro-Frenk-White density profiles. We consider the clumps of various masses, from the smallest up to the highest ones M≥ 109 M⊙. It has been found that in any event the effect grows with the mass of the clump: not only the drag force ? acting on the clump but also its acceleration ? increases. We discuss various astrophysical systems. The mechanism proved to be ineffective in the case of galaxy or galaxy cluster collisions. On the other hand, it played an important role during the process of galaxy formation. As a result, the dark matter should have formed a more compact, oblate and faster rotating substructure in the halo of our Galaxy. We have shown that this thick disc should be more clumpy than the halo. This fact is very important for the indirect detection experiments since it is the clumps that give the main contribution to the annihilation signal. Our calculations show that the mechanism of momentum exchange between the dark and baryon matter is ineffective on the outskirts of the galactic halo. It means that the clumps from there were not transported to the thick disc, and this region should be more clumpy than the halo on the average.

  12. Modeling optical and UV polarization of AGNs. III. From uniform-density to clumpy regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marin, F.; Goosmann, R. W.; Gaskell, C. M.

    2015-05-01

    Context. A growing body of evidence suggests that some, if not all, scattering regions of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) are clumpy. The inner AGN components cannot be spatially resolved with current instruments and must be studied by numerical simulations of observed spectroscopy and polarization data. Aims: We run radiative transfer models in the optical/UV for a variety of AGN reprocessing regions with different distributions of clumpy scattering media. We obtain geometry-sensitive polarization spectra and images to improve our previous AGN models and their comparison with the observations. Methods: We use the latest public version 1.2 of the Monte Carlo code stokes presented in the first two papers of this series to model AGN reprocessing regions of increasing morphological complexity. We replace previously uniform-density media with up to thousands of constant-density clumps. We couple a continuum source to fragmented equatorial scattering regions, polar outflows, and toroidal obscuring dust regions and investigate a wide range of geometries. We also consider different levels of fragmentation in each scattering region to evaluate the importance of fragmentation for the net polarization of the AGN. Results: In comparison with uniform-density models, equatorial distributions of gas and dust clouds result in grayer spectra and show a decrease in the net polarization percentage at all lines of sight. The resulting polarization position angle depends on the morphology of the clumpy structure, with extended tori favoring parallel polarization while compact tori produce orthogonal polarization position angles. In the case of polar scattering regions, fragmentation increases the net polarization unless the cloud filling factor is small. A complete AGN model constructed from the individual, fragmented regions can produce low polarization percentages (<2%), with a parallel polarization angle for observer inclinations up to 70° for a torus half opening angle of 60°. For

  13. Clumpy Molecular Structures Revolving the B[e] Supergiant MWC 137

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraus, M.; Cidale, L. S.; Liimets, T.; Cappa, C. E.; Duronea, N.; Gunawan, D. S.; Oksala, M. E.; Santander-García, M.; Arias, M. L.; Nickeler, D. H.; Maravelias, G.; Borges Fernandes, M.; Curé, M.

    2017-02-01

    The peculiar emission-line star MWC 137 with its extended optical nebula was recently classified as a B[e] supergiant. To study the spatial distribution of its circumstellar molecular gas on small and large scales, we obtained near-infrared and radio observations using SINFONI and APEX, respectively. We find that the hot CO gas is arranged in a moving clumpy ring and shell structures close to the star, while a cold CO envelope is encircling the borders of the optical nebula from South to West.

  14. MASSIVE BLACK HOLE PAIRS IN CLUMPY, SELF-GRAVITATING CIRCUMNUCLEAR DISKS: STOCHASTIC ORBITAL DECAY

    SciTech Connect

    Fiacconi, Davide; Mayer, Lucio; Roškar, Rok; Colpi, Monica

    2013-11-01

    We study the dynamics of massive black hole pairs in clumpy gaseous circumnuclear disks. We track the orbital decay of the light, secondary black hole M {sub .2} orbiting around the more massive primary at the center of the disk, using N-body/smoothed particle hydrodynamic simulations. We find that the gravitational interaction of M {sub .2} with massive clumps M {sub cl} erratically perturbs the otherwise smooth orbital decay. In close encounters with massive clumps, gravitational slingshots can kick the secondary black hole out of the disk plane. The black hole moving on an inclined orbit then experiences the weaker dynamical friction of the stellar background, resulting in a longer orbital decay timescale. Interactions between clumps can also favor orbital decay when the black hole is captured by a massive clump that is segregating toward the center of the disk. The stochastic behavior of the black hole orbit emerges mainly when the ratio M {sub .2}/M {sub cl} falls below unity, with decay timescales ranging from ∼1 to ∼50 Myr. This suggests that describing the cold clumpy phase of the interstellar medium in self-consistent simulations of galaxy mergers, albeit so far neglected, is important to predict the black hole dynamics in galaxy merger remnants.

  15. Characterizing Clumpy Structure of z 2 Galaxies in HST Observations from CANDELS and Hydrodynamical Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mozena, Mark; Faber, S. M.; Primack, J. R.; Dekel, A.; Ceverino, D.; Koo, D. C.; Fumagalli, M.; Wuyts, S.; Rosario, D. J.; Lai, K.; Kocevski, D. D.; McGrath, E. J.; Trump, J. R.; CANDELS

    2011-01-01

    The first data from the HST Multi-Cycle Treasury CANDELS (Cosmic Assembly Near Infra-red Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey - candels.ucolick.org) are producing images of thousands of z 2 galaxies in observed optical (ACS) and NIR (WFC3) bands. We have developed a new visual classification scheme for z 2 galaxies which is motivated by the significant population of galaxies that are dominated by giant clumps in the HST images, and by the theoretical predictions for clumpy galaxies based on analytic studies and zoom-in hydrodynamical cosmological simulations. This classification method was developed using about a thousand z 2 galaxies in the GOODS-S Early Release Survey (ERS) region imaged with ACS and WFC3. The ERS data have been observed in a way similar to the CANDELS observations. I will also discuss the latest cosmologically motivated ART hydrodynamical simulations by Ceverino, Dekel, and Primack. We render these simulated z 2 galaxies to mimic our HST ACS and WFC3 images and visually classify their stellar structure to compare them with the galaxies observed in ERS. We have compared the effects of dust extinction due to the complex clumpy distribution of gas within these simulations. Comparing the visual classification of the HST observations with the simulations provides new clues to galaxy assembly.

  16. NGC 2548: clumpy spatial and kinematic structure in an intermediate-age Galactic cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vicente, Belén; Sánchez, Néstor; Alfaro, Emilio J.

    2016-09-01

    NGC 2548 is a ˜400-500 Myr old open cluster with evidence of spatial substructures likely caused by its interaction with the Galactic disc. In this work we use precise astrometric data from the Carte du Ciel - San Fernando (CdC-SF) catalogue to study the clumpy structure in this cluster. We confirm the fragmented structure of NGC 2548 but, additionally, the relatively high precision of our kinematic data lead us to the first detection of substructures in the proper motion space of a stellar cluster. There are three spatially separated cores each of which has its own counterpart in the proper motion distribution. The two main cores lie nearly parallel to the Galactic plane whereas the third one is significantly fainter than the others and it moves towards the Galactic plane separating from the rest of the cluster. We derive core positions and proper motions, as well as the stars belonging to each core.

  17. Sub-millimeter Galaxies: Dusty, Clumpy and Messy Starbursts in the Distant Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menéndez-Delmestre, K.; Blain, A. W.; Swinbank, M.; Smail, I.; Ivison, R.; Chapman, S. C.; Gonçalves, T. S.

    2014-10-01

    We present the first spatially-resolved observations of the Hα emission in three z˜2 sub-millimeter selected galaxies (SMGs) using the Keck OH-Suppressing Infrared Imaging Spectrograph (OSIRIS) with Laser Guide Star Adaptive Optics (LGS-AO). With the unprecedent kpc-scale resolution - up to ten times that achieved with previous seeing-limited studies - and the kinematic insight that these observations provide, we unveil a clumpy Hα structure and reveal velocity offsets that suggest these systems are in an advanced merging phase. The spatially-resolved spectral information also allows us to disentangle the Hα emission arising from an active galactic nucleus (AGN) from that associated with star formation.

  18. Radiative Transfer Model of Dust Attenuation Curves in Clumpy, Galactic Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seon, Kwang-Il; Draine, Bruce T.

    2016-12-01

    The attenuation of starlight by dust in galactic environments is investigated through models of radiative transfer in a spherical, clumpy interstellar medium (ISM). We show that the attenuation curves are primarily determined by the wavelength dependence of absorption rather than by the underlying extinction (absorption+scattering) curve; the observationally derived attenuation curves cannot constrain a unique extinction curve unless the absorption or scattering efficiency is specified. Attenuation curves consistent with the “Calzetti curve” are found by assuming the silicate-carbonaceous dust model for the Milky Way (MW), but with the 2175 Å bump suppressed or absent. The discrepancy between our results and previous work that claimed the Small Magellanic Cloud dust to be the origin of the Calzetti curve is ascribed to the difference in adopted albedos; we use the theoretically calculated albedos, whereas the previous works adopted albedos derived empirically from observations of reflection nebulae. It is found that the attenuation curves calculated with the MW dust model are well represented by a modified Calzetti curve with a varying slope and UV bump strength. The strong correlation between the slope and UV bump strength, as found in star-forming galaxies at 0.5\\lt z\\lt 2.0, is well reproduced when the abundance of the UV bump carriers is assumed to be 30%-40% of that of the MW dust; radiative transfer effects lead to shallower attenuation curves with weaker UV bumps as the ISM is more clumpy and dustier. We also argue that some local starburst galaxies have a UV bump in their attenuation curves, albeit very weak.

  19. Turbulence forecasting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandler, C. L.

    1987-01-01

    In order to forecast turbulence, one needs to have an understanding of the cause of turbulence. Therefore, an attempt is made to show the atmospheric structure that often results when aircraft encounter moderate or greater turbulence. The analysis is based on thousands of hours of observations of flights over the past 39 years of aviation meteorology.

  20. The subcontinental mantle beneath southern New Zealand, characterised by helium isotopes in intraplate basalts and gas-rich springs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoke, L.; Poreda, R.; Reay, A.; Weaver, S. D.

    2000-07-01

    relationship with either age or proximity to the Cenozoic intraplate volcanic centres or with major faults. In general, areas characterised by mantle 3He emission are interpreted to define those regions beneath which mantle melting and basalt magma addition to the crust are recent. The strongest mantle 3He anomaly (equivalent to >80% mantle helium component) is centred over southern Dunedin, measured in magmatic CO 2-rich mineral water springs issuing from crystalline basement rocks which outcrop at the southern extent of Miocene intraplate basaltic volcanism which ceased 9 Ma ago. This mantle helium anomaly overlaps with an area characterised by elevated surface high heat flow, compatible with a long-lived mantle melt/heat input into the crust. In comparison Banks Peninsula, another Miocene intraplate basaltic centre, is characterised by relatively low surface heat flow and a small mantle helium contribution measured in a nitrogen-rich spring. Here the thermal transient induced by the magmatic event has either dissipated or has not reached the surface. In the former case one might be dealing with storage and mixing of magmatic and crustal gases at shallow crustal levels and in the latter with active to recent mantle-melt degassing at depth. Along the most actively deforming part of the plate boundary zone, the transpressional Alpine Fault and Marlborough fault systems, mantle helium is present in gas-rich springs in all those areas underlain by actively subducting oceanic crust (the Australian plate in the south and Pacific plate in the north), whereas the central part of the Alpine transpressional fault is characterised by pure crustal radiogenic helium. Areas where the mantle helium component is negligible are restricted to the centre part of the South Island, extending along its length from Southland to northern Canterbury and Murchison. These areas are interpreted to delineate the extent of thicker and colder lithosphere compared to all other areas where mantle helium

  1. Searching for AGN Signatures in HST WFC3/IR Grism Spectra of Clumpy Galaxies at 0.5 < z < 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Anna; Schawinski, K.; Simmons, B. D.; Urry, C. M.; Glikman, E.; Bamford, S.; Lintott, C.

    2012-01-01

    The recent discovery of a "clumpy” galaxy with three actively growing black holes in separate clumps at z = 1.35 raises the possibility of supermassive black holes (SMBHs) forming in situ within gas clouds at later epochs than previously expected. We carry out a systematic search for 0.5 < z < 2 galaxies containing multiple active galactic nuclei (AGN) by examining clumpy galaxies with Hubble Space Telescope WFC3/IR grism survey data. We select our sample of clumpy galaxies using SExtractor and galaxy classifications from the Hubble Zoo citizen science project. We then analyze the grism data of individual clumps within each galaxy to characterize the probability of SMBHs forming and growing in the clumps of forming disk galaxies at 0.5 < z < 2.

  2. No more active galactic nuclei in clumpy disks than in smooth galaxies at z ∼ 2 in CANDELS/3D-HST

    SciTech Connect

    Trump, Jonathan R.; Luo, Bin; Brandt, W. N.; Barro, Guillermo; Guo, Yicheng; Koo, David C.; Faber, S. M.; Brammer, Gabriel B.; Ferguson, Henry C.; Grogin, Norman A.; Kartaltepe, Jeyhan; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Bell, Eric F.; Dekel, Avishai; Hopkins, Philip F.; Kocevski, Dale D.; McIntosh, Daniel H.; Momcheva, Ivelina; and others

    2014-10-01

    We use CANDELS imaging, 3D-HST spectroscopy, and Chandra X-ray data to investigate if active galactic nuclei (AGNs) are preferentially fueled by violent disk instabilities funneling gas into galaxy centers at 1.3 < z < 2.4. We select galaxies undergoing gravitational instabilities using the number of clumps and degree of patchiness as proxies. The CANDELS visual classification system is used to identify 44 clumpy disk galaxies, along with mass-matched comparison samples of smooth and intermediate morphology galaxies. We note that despite being mass-matched and having similar star formation rates, the smoother galaxies tend to be smaller disks with more prominent bulges compared to the clumpy galaxies. The lack of smooth extended disks is probably a general feature of the z ∼ 2 galaxy population, and means we cannot directly compare with the clumpy and smooth extended disks observed at lower redshift. We find that z ∼ 2 clumpy galaxies have slightly enhanced AGN fractions selected by integrated line ratios (in the mass-excitation method), but the spatially resolved line ratios indicate this is likely due to extended phenomena rather than nuclear AGNs. Meanwhile, the X-ray data show that clumpy, smooth, and intermediate galaxies have nearly indistinguishable AGN fractions derived from both individual detections and stacked non-detections. The data demonstrate that AGN fueling modes at z ∼ 1.85—whether violent disk instabilities or secular processes—are as efficient in smooth galaxies as they are in clumpy galaxies.

  3. Modelling clumpy photon-dominated regions in 3D. Understanding the Orion Bar stratification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andree-Labsch, S.; Ossenkopf-Okada, V.; Röllig, M.

    2017-01-01

    Context. Models of photon-dominated regions (PDRs) still fail to fully reproduce some of the observed properties. In particular they do not reproduce the combination of the intensities of different PDR cooling lines together with the chemical stratification, as observed for example for the Orion Bar PDR. Aims: We aim to construct a numerical PDR model, KOSMA-τ 3D, to simulate full spectral cubes of line emission from arbitrary PDRs in three dimensions (3D). The model will reproduce the intensity of the main cooling lines from the Orion Bar PDR and the observed layered structure of the different transitions. Methods: We built up a 3D compound, made of voxels (3D pixels) that contain a discrete mass distribution of spherical "clumpy" structures, approximating the fractal ISM. To analyse each individual clump the new code was combined with the KOSMA-τ PDR model. Probabilistic algorithms were used to calculate the local FUV flux for each voxel as well as the voxel-averaged line emissivities and optical depths, based on the properties of the individual clumps. Finally, the computation of the radiative transfer through the compound provided full spectral cubes. To test the new model we tried to simulate the structure of the Orion Bar PDR and compared the results to observations from HIFI/Herschel and from the Caltech Submillimetre Observatory (CSO). In this context new Herschel data from the HEXOS guaranteed-time key program is presented. Results: Our model is able to reproduce the line-integrated intensities within a factor of 2.5 and the observed stratification pattern within 0.016 pc for the [Cii] 158 μm and different 12/13CO and HCO+ transitions, based on the representation of the Orion Bar PDR by a clumpy edge-on cavity wall. In the cavity wall, a large fraction of the total mass needs to be contained in clumps. The mass of the interclump medium is constrained by the FUV penetration. Furthermore, the stratification profile cannot be reproduced by a model that has

  4. Probing the clumpy winds of giant stars with high mass X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grinberg, Victoria; Hell, Natalie; Hirsch, Maria; Garcia, Javier; Huenemoerder, David; Leutenegger, Maurice A.; Nowak, Michael; Pottschmidt, Katja; Schulz, Norbert S.; Sundqvists, Jon O.; Townsend, Richard D.; Wilms, Joern

    2016-04-01

    Line-driven winds from early type stars are structured, with small, overdense clumps embedded in tenuous hot gas. High mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs), systems where a neutron star or a black hole accretes from the line-driven stellar wind of an O/B-type companion, are ideal for studying such winds: the wind drives the accretion onto the compact object and thus the X-ray production. The radiation from close to the compact object is quasi-pointlike and effectively X-rays the wind.We used RXTE and Chandra-HETG observations of two of the brightest HMXBs, Cyg X-1 and Vela X-1, to decipher their wind structure. In Cyg X-1, we show that the orbital variability of absorption can be only explained by a clumpy wind model and constrain the porosity of the wind as well as the onion-like structure of the clumps. In Vela X-1 we show, using the newest reference energies for low ionization Si-lines obtained with LLNL’s EBIT-I, that the ionized phase of the circumstellar medium and the cold clumps have different velocities.

  5. A Chandra view of the clumpy reflector at the heart of the Circinus galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinucci, A.; Miniutti, G.; Bianchi, S.; Matt, G.; Risaliti, G.

    2013-12-01

    We present a spectral and imaging analysis of the X-ray reflecting structure at the heart of the Circinus galaxy, investigating the innermost regions surrounding the central black hole. By studying an archival 200 ks Chandra Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer-S observation, we are able to image the extended clumpy structure responsible for both cold reflection of the primary radiation and neutral iron Kα line emission. We measure an excess of the equivalent width of the iron Kα line which follows an axisymmetric geometry around the nucleus on a hundred pc scale. Spectra extracted from different regions confirm a scenario in which the dominant mechanism is the reflection of the nuclear radiation from Compton-thick gas. Significant differences in the equivalent width of the iron Kα emission line (up to a factor of 2) are found. It is argued that these differences are due to different scattering angles with respect to the line of sight rather than to different iron abundances.

  6. From Mirrors to Windows: Lyman-alpha Radiative Transfer in a Very Clumpy Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gronke, Max; Dijkstra, Mark; McCourt, Michael; Oh, S. Peng

    2016-12-01

    Lyman-alpha (Lyα) is the strongest emission line in the universe and is frequently used to detect and study the most distant galaxies. Because Lyα is a resonant line, photons typically scatter prior to escaping; this scattering process complicates the interpretation of Lyα spectra, but also encodes a wealth of information about the structure and kinematics of neutral gas in the Galaxy. Modeling the Lyα line therefore allows us to study tiny-scale features of the gas. Curiously, observed Lyα spectra can be modeled successfully with very simple, homogeneous geometries (such as an expanding, spherical shell), whereas more realistic, multiphase geometries often fail to reproduce the observed spectra. This seems paradoxical since the gas in galaxies is known to be multiphase. In this Letter, we show that spectra emerging from clumpy geometries with a large number (≳ 10 for a clump column density of {N}{{H}{{I}},{cl}}∼ {10}17 {{cm}}-2) of clouds along the line of sight converge to the predictions from simplified, homogeneous models. We suggest that this resolves the apparent discrepancy and may provide a way to study the gas structure in galaxies on scales far smaller than can be probed in either cosmological simulations or direct (i.e., spatially resolved) observations.

  7. Clumpy Disks as a Testbed for Feedback-regulated Galaxy Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, Lucio; Tamburello, Valentina; Lupi, Alessandro; Keller, Ben; Wadsley, James; Madau, Piero

    2016-10-01

    We study the dependence of fragmentation in massive gas-rich galaxy disks at z > 1 on stellar feedback schemes and hydrodynamical solvers, employing the GASOLINE2 SPH code and the lagrangian mesh-less code GIZMO in finite mass mode. Non-cosmological galaxy disk runs with the standard delayed-cooling blastwave feedback are compared with runs adopting a new superbubble feedback, which produces winds by modeling the detailed physics of supernova-driven bubbles and leads to efficient self-regulation of star formation. We find that, with blastwave feedback, massive star-forming clumps form in comparable number and with very similar masses in GASOLINE2 and GIZMO. Typical clump masses are in the range 107-108 M ⊙, lower than in most previous works, while giant clumps with masses above 109 M ⊙ are exceedingly rare. By contrast, superbubble feedback does not produce massive star-forming bound clumps as galaxies never undergo a phase of violent disk instability. In this scheme, only sporadic, unbound star-forming overdensities lasting a few tens of Myr can arise, triggered by non-linear perturbations from massive satellite companions. We conclude that there is severe tension between explaining massive star-forming clumps observed at z > 1 primarily as the result of disk fragmentation driven by gravitational instability and the prevailing view of feedback-regulated galaxy formation. The link between disk stability and star formation efficiency should thus be regarded as a key testing ground for galaxy formation theory.

  8. Quantum Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsubota, Makoto

    2008-11-01

    The present article reviews the recent developments in the physics of quantum turbulence. Quantum turbulence (QT) was discovered in superfluid 4He in the 1950s, and the research has tended toward a new direction since the mid 90s. The similarities and differences between quantum and classical turbulence have become an important area of research. QT is comprised of quantized vortices that are definite topological defects, being expected to yield a model of turbulence that is much simpler than the classical model. The general introduction of the issue and a brief review on classical turbulence are followed by a description of the dynamics of quantized vortices. Then, we discuss the energy spectrum of QT at very low temperatures. At low wavenumbers, the energy is transferred through the Richardson cascade of quantized vortices, and the spectrum obeys the Kolmogorov law, which is the most important statistical law in turbulence; this classical region shows the similarity to conventional turbulence. At higher wavenumbers, the energy is transferred by the Kelvin-wave cascade on each vortex. This quantum regime depends strongly on the nature of each quantized vortex. The possible dissipation mechanism is discussed. Finally, important new experimental studies, which include investigations into temperature-dependent transition to QT, dissipation at very low temperatures, QT created by vibrating structures, and visualization of QT, are reviewed. The present article concludes with a brief look at QT in atomic Bose-Einstein condensates.

  9. Wing galaxies: A formation mechanism of the clumpy irregular galaxy Markarian 297

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taniguchi, Yoshiaki; Noguchi, Masafumi

    1990-01-01

    In order to contribute to an understanding of collision-induced starburst activities, the authors present a detailed case study on the starburst galaxy Markarian 297 (= NGC 6052 = Arp 209; hereafter Mrk 297). This galaxy is classified as a clumpy irregular galaxy (CIG) according to its morphological properties (cf. Heidmann, 1987). Two major clumps and many small clumps are observed in the entire region of Mrk 297 (Hecquet, Coupinot, and Maucherat 1987). The overall morphology of Mrk 297 is highly chaotic and thus it seems difficult to determine possible orbits of galaxy-galaxy collision. However, the authors have serendipitously found a possible orbit during a course of numerical simulations for a radial-penetration collision between galaxies. The radial-penetration collision means that an intruder penetrates a target galaxy radially passing by its nucleus. This kind of collision is known to explain a formation mechanism of ripples around disk galaxies (Wallin and Struck-Marcell 1988). Here, the authors show that the radial-penetration collision between galaxies successfully explains both overall morphological and kinematical properties of Mrk 297. The authors made two kinds of numerical simulations for Mrk 297. One is N-body (1x10(exp 4) particles) simulations in which effects of self gravity of the stellar disk are taken into account. These simulations are used to study detailed morphological feature of Mrk 297. The response of gas clouds are also investigated in order to estimate star formation rates in such collisions. The other is test-particle simulations, which are utilized to obtain a rough picture of Mrk 297 and to analyze the velocity field of Mrk 297. The techniques of the numerical simulations are the same as those in Noguchi (1988) and Noguchi and Ishibashi (1986). In the present model, an intruding galaxy with the same mass of a target galaxy moves on a rectilinear orbit which passes the center of the target.

  10. NEAR-INFRARED REVERBERATION BY DUSTY CLUMPY TORI IN ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect

    Kawaguchi, Toshihiro; Mori, Masao

    2011-08-20

    According to recent models, the accretion disk and black hole in active galactic nuclei (AGNs) are surrounded by a clumpy torus. We investigate the NIR flux variation of the torus in response to a UV flash for various geometries. Anisotropic illumination by the disk and the torus self-occultation contrast our study with earlier works. Both the waning effect of each clump and the torus self-occultation selectively reduce the emission from the region with a short delay. Therefore, the NIR delay depends on the viewing angle (where a more inclined angle leads to a longer delay), and the time response shows an asymmetric profile with negative skewness, opposing the results for optically thin tori. The range of the computed delay coincides with the observed one, suggesting that the viewing angle is primarily responsible for the scatter of the observed delay. We also propose that the red NIR-to-optical color of type 1.8/1.9 objects is caused not only by the dust extinction but also the intrinsically red color. Compared with the modest torus thickness, both a thick and a thin tori display weaker NIR emission. A selection bias is thus expected such that NIR-selected AGNs tend to possess moderately thick tori. A thicker torus shows a narrower and more heavily skewed time profile, while a thin torus produces a rapid response. A super-Eddington accretion rate leads to much weaker NIR emission due to the disk self-occultation and the disk truncation by self-gravity. A long delay is expected from an optically thin and/or a largely misaligned torus. Very weak NIR emission, such as in hot-dust-poor active nuclei, can arise from a geometrically thin torus, a super-Eddington accretion rate, or a slightly misaligned torus.

  11. EVIDENCE FOR A CLUMPY, ROTATING GAS DISK IN A SUBMILLIMETER GALAXY AT z = 4

    SciTech Connect

    Hodge, J. A.; Walter, F.; Carilli, C. L.; De Blok, W. J. G.; Riechers, D.; Daddi, E.

    2012-11-20

    We present Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array observations of the CO(2-1) emission in the z = 4.05 submillimeter galaxy (SMG) GN20. These high-resolution data allow us to image the molecular gas at 1.3 kpc resolution just 1.6 Gyr after the big bang. The data reveal a clumpy, extended gas reservoir, 14 {+-} 4 kpc in diameter, in unprecedented detail. A dynamical analysis shows that the data are consistent with a rotating disk of total dynamical mass 5.4 {+-} 2.4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 11} M {sub Sun }. We use this dynamical mass estimate to constrain the CO-to-H{sub 2} mass conversion factor ({alpha}{sub CO}), finding {alpha}{sub CO} = 1.1 {+-} 0.6 M {sub Sun }(K km s{sup -1} pc{sup 2}){sup -1}. We identify five distinct molecular gas clumps in the disk of GN20 with masses a few percent of the total gas mass, brightness temperatures of 16-31K, and surface densities of >3200-4500 Multiplication-Sign ({alpha}{sub CO}/0.8) M {sub Sun} pc{sup -2}. Virial mass estimates indicate they could be self-gravitating, and we constrain their CO-to-H{sub 2} mass conversion factor to be <0.2-0.7 M {sub Sun }(K km s{sup -1} pc{sup 2}){sup -1}. A multiwavelength comparison demonstrates that the molecular gas is concentrated in a region of the galaxy that is heavily obscured in the rest-frame UV/optical. We investigate the spatially resolved gas excitation and find that the CO(6-5)/CO(2-1) ratio is constant with radius, consistent with star formation occurring over a large portion of the disk. We discuss the implications of our results in the context of different fueling scenarios for SMGs.

  12. Synthetic absorption lines for a clumpy medium: a spectral signature for cloud acceleration in AGN?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waters, Tim; Proga, Daniel; Dannen, Randall; Kallman, Timothy R.

    2017-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that the highly ionised multiphase components of AGN disc winds may be due to thermal instability. The ions responsible for forming the observed X-ray absorption lines may only exist in relatively cool clumps that can be identified with the so-called `warm absorbers'. Here we calculate synthetic absorption lines for such warm absorbers from first principles by combining 2D hydrodynamic solutions of a two-phase medium with a dense grid of photoionization models to determine the detailed ionization structure of the gas. Our calculations reveal that cloud disruption, which leads to a highly complicated velocity field (i.e. a clumpy flow), will only mildly affect line shapes and strengths when the warm gas becomes highly mixed but not depleted. Prior to complete disruption, clouds which are optically thin to the driving UV resonance lines will cause absorption at an increasingly blueshifted line of sight velocity as they are accelerated. This behavior will imprint an identifiable signature on the line profile if warm absorbers are enshrouded in an even broader absorption line produced by a high column of intercloud gas. Interestingly, we show that it is possible to develop a spectral diagnostic for cloud acceleration by differencing the absorption components of a doublet line, a result which can be qualitatively understood using a simple partial covering model. Our calculations also permit us to comment on the spectral differences between cloud disruption and ionization changes driven by flux variability. Notably, cloud disruption offers another possibility for explaining absorption line variability.

  13. Radiative transfer in a clumpy universe: The colors of high-redshift galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madau, Piero

    1995-01-01

    We assess the effects of the stochastic attenuation produced by intervening QSO absorption systems on the broadband colors of galaxies at cosmological distances. We compute the H I opacity of a clumpy universe as a function of redshift, including scattering in resonant lines, such as Lyman alpha, Lyman beta, Lyman gamma, and higher order members, and Lyman-continuum absorption. Both the numerous, optically thin Lyman-alpha forest clouds and the rarer, optically thick Lyman limit systems are found to contribute to the obscuration of background sources. We study the mean properties of primeval galaxies at high redshift in four broad optical passbands, U(sub n), B, G, and R. Even if young galaxies radiated a significant amount of ionizing photons, the attenuation due to the accumulated photoelectric opacity along the path is so severe that sources beyond z approximately 3 will drop out of the U(sub n) image together. We also show that the observed B-R color of distant galaxies can be much redder than expected from a stellar population. At z approximately 3.5, the blanketing by discrete absorption lines in the Lyman series is so effective that background galaxies appear, on average, 1 mag fainter in B. By z approximately 4, the observed B magnitude increment due to intergalactic absorption exceeds 2 mag. By modeling the intrinsic UV spectral energy distribution of star-forming galaxies with a stellar population synthesis code, we show that the (B-R)(sub AB) approximately 0 criterion for identifying 'flat-spectrum,' metal-producing galaxies is biased against objects at z greater than 3. The continuum blanketing from the Lyman series produces a characteristic staircase profile in the transmitted power. We suggest that this cosmic Lyman decrement might be used as a tool to identify high-z galaxies.

  14. Wall Turbulence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanratty, Thomas J.

    1980-01-01

    This paper gives an account of research on the structure of turbulence close to a solid boundary. Included is a method to study the flow close to the wall of a pipe without interferring with it. (Author/JN)

  15. Wave turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazarenko, Sergey

    2015-07-01

    Wave turbulence is the statistical mechanics of random waves with a broadband spectrum interacting via non-linearity. To understand its difference from non-random well-tuned coherent waves, one could compare the sound of thunder to a piece of classical music. Wave turbulence is surprisingly common and important in a great variety of physical settings, starting with the most familiar ocean waves to waves at quantum scales or to much longer waves in astrophysics. We will provide a basic overview of the wave turbulence ideas, approaches and main results emphasising the physics of the phenomena and using qualitative descriptions avoiding, whenever possible, involved mathematical derivations. In particular, dimensional analysis will be used for obtaining the key scaling solutions in wave turbulence - Kolmogorov-Zakharov (KZ) spectra.

  16. SHOCKED SUPERWINDS FROM THE z {approx} 2 CLUMPY STAR-FORMING GALAXY, ZC406690

    SciTech Connect

    Newman, Sarah F.; Genzel, Reinhard; Shapiro Griffin, Kristen; Davies, Ric; Foerster-Schreiber, Natascha M.; Tacconi, Linda J.; Kurk, Jaron; Wuyts, Stijn; Genel, Shy; Buschkamp, Peter; Eisenhauer, Frank; Lutz, Dieter; Lilly, Simon J.; Carollo, C. Marcella; Renzini, Alvio; Mancini, Chiara; Bouche, Nicolas; Burkert, Andreas; Cresci, Giovanni; Hicks, Erin; and others

    2012-06-20

    We have obtained high-resolution data of the z {approx} 2 ring-like, clumpy star-forming galaxy (SFG) ZC406690 using the VLT/SINFONI with adaptive optics (in K band) and in seeing-limited mode (in H and J bands). Our data include all of the main strong optical emission lines: [O II], [O III], H{alpha}, H{beta}, [N II], and [S II]. We find broad, blueshifted H{alpha} and [O III] emission line wings in the spectra of the galaxy's massive, star-forming clumps ({sigma} {approx} 85 km s{sup -1}) and even broader wings (up to 70% of the total H{alpha} flux, with {sigma} {approx} 290 km s{sup -1}) in regions spatially offset from the clumps by {approx}2 kpc. The broad emission likely originates from large-scale outflows with mass outflow rates from individual clumps that are 1-8 Multiplication-Sign the star formation rate (SFR) of the clumps. Based on emission line ratio diagnostics ([N II]/H{alpha} and [S II]/H{alpha}) and photoionization and shock models, we find that the emission from the clumps is due to a combination of photoionization from the star-forming regions and shocks generated in the outflowing component, with 5%-30% of the emission deriving from shocks. In terms of the ionization parameter (6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 7} to 10{sup 8} cm s{sup -1}, based on both the SFR and the O{sub 32} ratio), density (local electron densities of 300-1800 cm{sup -3} in and around the clumps, and ionized gas column densities of 1200-8000 M{sub Sun }pc{sup -2}), and SFR (10-40 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}), these clumps more closely resemble nuclear starburst regions of local ultraluminous infrared galaxies and dwarf irregulars than H II regions in local galaxies. However, the star-forming clumps are not located in the nucleus as in local starburst galaxies but instead are situated in a ring several kpc from the center of their high-redshift host galaxy, and have an overall disk-like morphology. The two brightest clumps are quite different in terms of their internal properties

  17. Shocked Superwinds from the z ~ 2 Clumpy Star-forming Galaxy, ZC406690

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, Sarah F.; Shapiro Griffin, Kristen; Genzel, Reinhard; Davies, Ric; Förster-Schreiber, Natascha M.; Tacconi, Linda J.; Kurk, Jaron; Wuyts, Stijn; Genel, Shy; Lilly, Simon J.; Renzini, Alvio; Bouché, Nicolas; Burkert, Andreas; Cresci, Giovanni; Buschkamp, Peter; Carollo, C. Marcella; Eisenhauer, Frank; Hicks, Erin; Lutz, Dieter; Mancini, Chiara; Naab, Thorsten; Peng, Yingjie; Vergani, Daniela

    2012-06-01

    We have obtained high-resolution data of the z ~ 2 ring-like, clumpy star-forming galaxy (SFG) ZC406690 using the VLT/SINFONI with adaptive optics (in K band) and in seeing-limited mode (in H and J bands). Our data include all of the main strong optical emission lines: [O II], [O III], Hα, Hβ, [N II], and [S II]. We find broad, blueshifted Hα and [O III] emission line wings in the spectra of the galaxy's massive, star-forming clumps (σ ~ 85 km s-1) and even broader wings (up to 70% of the total Hα flux, with σ ~ 290 km s-1) in regions spatially offset from the clumps by ~2 kpc. The broad emission likely originates from large-scale outflows with mass outflow rates from individual clumps that are 1-8× the star formation rate (SFR) of the clumps. Based on emission line ratio diagnostics ([N II]/Hα and [S II]/Hα) and photoionization and shock models, we find that the emission from the clumps is due to a combination of photoionization from the star-forming regions and shocks generated in the outflowing component, with 5%-30% of the emission deriving from shocks. In terms of the ionization parameter (6 × 107 to 108 cm s-1, based on both the SFR and the O32 ratio), density (local electron densities of 300-1800 cm-3 in and around the clumps, and ionized gas column densities of 1200-8000 M ⊙pc-2), and SFR (10-40 M ⊙ yr-1), these clumps more closely resemble nuclear starburst regions of local ultraluminous infrared galaxies and dwarf irregulars than H II regions in local galaxies. However, the star-forming clumps are not located in the nucleus as in local starburst galaxies but instead are situated in a ring several kpc from the center of their high-redshift host galaxy, and have an overall disk-like morphology. The two brightest clumps are quite different in terms of their internal properties, energetics, and relative ages, and thus we are given a glimpse at two different stages in the formation and evolution of rapidly star-forming giant clumps at high

  18. A total and polarized infrared flux view of the AGN clumpy torus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez Rodriguez, Enrique

    2013-12-01

    Magnetohydrodynamical theories consider the torus of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) to be part of an outflow wind moving away from the central engine. In this framework, the torus is a particular region of the wind, where dusty and optically thick clouds are formed. The outflows are strongly related to the accretion rate and magnetic field strength, which play an important role in the creation, morphology and evolution of the torus. Through infrared (IR) imaging and polarimetry observations, this dissertation (1) searches for signatures of dusty tori in low-luminosity AGN (LLAGN); (2) explores the role and strength of magnetic field in the torus; and (3) investigates the nucleus of radio-loud AGN. Recent theoretical models predicted that LLAGN do not host a Seyfert-like torus, since low-luminosities (<1042 erg s-1 ) cannot sustain the required outflow rate. High-spatial resolution mid-IR (MIR) imaging and nuclear spectral energy distribution of 22 LLAGN reveals different IR characteristics by dividing the sample in terms of the Eddington ratio. These galaxies show a diversity of nuclear morphologies and have a high MIR/X-ray luminosity ratio compared to higher-luminosity AGN. Star formation, jets and/or truncated accretion disk can explain the MIR excess. Although several models have been made to account for the outflowing dusty winds from the central engine, the magnetic field strength at the position of the torus remains poorly characterized. Through a novel study using near-IR polarimetry, the magnetic field strength in the clumpy torus was estimated. Specifically, if paramagnetic alignment is assumed in the dusty clouds of the torus, the magnetic field strength of the torus of IC5063 is estimated to be in the range of 12--128 mG. Alternatively, Chandrasekhar-Fermi method suggests a lower-limit magnetic field strength of 13 mG. For the archetypical radio-loud AGN, Cygnus A, MIR polarimetry using CanariCam on the 10.4-m Gran Telescopio de Canarias revealed a high

  19. The evidence for clumpy accretion in the Herbig Ae star HR 5999

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perez, M. R.; Grady, C. A.; The, P. S.

    1993-01-01

    Analysis of IUE high- and low-dispersion spectra of the young Herbig Ae star HR 5999 (HD 144668) covering 1978-1992 revealed dramatic changes in the Mg II h and k (2795.5, 2802.7 A) emission profiles, changes in the column density and distribution in radial velocity of accreting gas, and flux in the Ly(alpha), O I, and C IV emission lines, which are correlated with the UV excess luminosity. Variability in the spectral type inferred from the UV spectral energy distribution, ranging from A5 IV-III in high state to A7 III in the low state, was also observed. The trend of earlier inferred spectral type with decreasing wavelength and with increasing UV continuum flux has previously been noted as a signature of accretion disks in lower mass pre-main sequence stars (PMS) and in systems undergoing FU Orionis-type outbursts. Our data represent the first detection of similar phenomena in an intermediate mass (M greater than or equal to 2 solar mass) PMS star. Recent IUE spectra show gas accreting toward the star with velocities as high as plus 300 km/s, much as is seen toward beta Pic, and suggest that we also view this system through the debris disk. The absence of UV lines with the rotational broadening expected given the optical data (A7 IV, V sini=180 plus or minus 20 km/s for this system) also suggests that most of the UV light originates in the disk, even in the low continuum state. The dramatic variability in the column density of accreting gas, is consistent with clumpy accretion, such as has been observed toward beta Pic, is a hallmark of accretion onto young stars, and is not restricted to the clearing phase, since detectable amounts of accretion are present for stars with 0.5 Myr less than t(sub age) less than 2.8 Myr. The implications for models of beta Pic and similar systems are briefly discussed.

  20. Soliton turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tchen, C. M.

    1986-01-01

    Theoretical and numerical works in atmospheric turbulence have used the Navier-Stokes fluid equations exclusively for describing large-scale motions. Controversy over the existence of an average temperature gradient for the very large eddies in the atmosphere suggested that a new theoretical basis for describing large-scale turbulence was necessary. A new soliton formalism as a fluid analogue that generalizes the Schrodinger equation and the Zakharov equations has been developed. This formalism, processing all the nonlinearities including those from modulation provided by the density fluctuations and from convection due to the emission of finite sound waves by velocity fluctuations, treats large-scale turbulence as coalescing and colliding solitons. The new soliton system describes large-scale instabilities more explicitly than the Navier-Stokes system because it has a nonlinearity of the gradient type, while the Navier-Stokes has a nonlinearity of the non-gradient type. The forced Schrodinger equation for strong fluctuations describes the micro-hydrodynamical state of soliton turbulence and is valid for large-scale turbulence in fluids and plasmas where internal waves can interact with velocity fluctuations.

  1. Submillimeter and far infrared line observations of M17 SW: A clumpy molecular cloud penetrated by UV radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stutzki, J.; Stacey, G. J.; Genzel, R.; Harris, A. I.; Jaffe, d. T.; Lugten, J. B.

    1987-01-01

    Millimeter, submillimeter, and far infrared spectroscopic observations of the M17 SW star formation region are discussed. The results require the molecular cloud near the interface to be clumpy or filamentary. As a consequence, far ultraviolet radiation from the central OB stellar cluster can penetrate into the dense molecular cloud to a depth of several pc, thus creating bright and extended (CII) emission from the photodissociated surfaces of dense atomic and molecular clumps or sheets. The extended (CII) emission throughout the molecular cloud SW of the M17 complex has a level 20 times higher than expected from a single molecular cloud interface exposed to an ultraviolet radiation field typical of the solar neighborhood. This suggests that the molecular cloud as a whole is penetrated by ultraviolet radiation and has a clumpy or filamentary structure. The number of B stars expected to be embedded in the M17 molecular cloud probably can provide the UV radiation necessary for the extended (CII) emission. Alternatively, the UV radiation could be external, if the interstellar radiation in the vicinity of M17 is higher than in the solar neighborhood.

  2. Quantum turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skrbek, L.

    2011-12-01

    We review physical properties of quantum fluids He II and 3He-B, where quantum turbulence (QT) has been studied experimentally. Basic properties of QT in these working fluids are discussed within the phenomenological two-fluid model introduced by Landau. We consider counterflows in which the normal and superfluid components flow against each other, as well as co-flows in which the direction of the two fluids is the same. We pay special attention to the important case of zero temperature limit, where QT represents an interesting and probably the simplest prototype of three-dimensional turbulence in fluids. Experimental techniques to explore QT such as second sound attenuation, Andreev reflection, NMR, ion propagation are briefly introduced and results of various experiments on so-called Vinen QT and Kolmogorov QT both in He II and 3He are discussed, emphasizing similarities and differences between classical and quantum turbulence.

  3. Turbulence in Compressible Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Lecture notes for the AGARD Fluid Dynamics Panel (FDP) Special Course on 'Turbulence in Compressible Flows' have been assembled in this report. The following topics were covered: Compressible Turbulent Boundary Layers, Compressible Turbulent Free Shear Layers, Turbulent Combustion, DNS/LES and RANS Simulations of Compressible Turbulent Flows, and Case Studies of Applications of Turbulence Models in Aerospace.

  4. Turbulent combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Talbot, L.; Cheng, R.K.

    1993-12-01

    Turbulent combustion is the dominant process in heat and power generating systems. Its most significant aspect is to enhance the burning rate and volumetric power density. Turbulent mixing, however, also influences the chemical rates and has a direct effect on the formation of pollutants, flame ignition and extinction. Therefore, research and development of modern combustion systems for power generation, waste incineration and material synthesis must rely on a fundamental understanding of the physical effect of turbulence on combustion to develop theoretical models that can be used as design tools. The overall objective of this program is to investigate, primarily experimentally, the interaction and coupling between turbulence and combustion. These processes are complex and are characterized by scalar and velocity fluctuations with time and length scales spanning several orders of magnitude. They are also influenced by the so-called {open_quotes}field{close_quotes} effects associated with the characteristics of the flow and burner geometries. The authors` approach is to gain a fundamental understanding by investigating idealized laboratory flames. Laboratory flames are amenable to detailed interrogation by laser diagnostics and their flow geometries are chosen to simplify numerical modeling and simulations and to facilitate comparison between experiments and theory.

  5. Turbulence Modeling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-10-01

    and complexity of thermochemistry . Accordingly a practical viewpoint is required to meet near-term work required for use in advanced CFD codes...teachers the opportunity to learn/explore/ teach turbulence issues. While such a product could be an invaluable eductaional tool (university), it also

  6. Turbulence modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bardina, Jorge E.

    1995-01-01

    The objective of this work is to develop, verify, and incorporate the baseline two-equation turbulence models which account for the effects of compressibility into the three-dimensional Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) code and to provide documented descriptions of the models and their numerical procedures so that they can be implemented into 3-D CFD codes for engineering applications.

  7. H I emission and absorption in nearby, gas-rich galaxies - II. Sample completion and detection of intervening absorption in NGC 5156

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeves, S. N.; Sadler, E. M.; Allison, J. R.; Koribalski, B. S.; Curran, S. J.; Pracy, M. B.; Phillips, C. J.; Bignall, H. E.; Reynolds, C.

    2016-04-01

    We present the results of a survey for intervening 21 cm H I absorption in a sample of 10 nearby, gas-rich galaxies selected from the H I Parkes All-Sky Survey (HIPASS). This follows the six HIPASS galaxies searched in previous work and completes our full sample. In this paper, we searched for absorption along 17 sightlines with impact parameters between 6 and 46 kpc, making one new detection. We also obtained simultaneous H I emission-line data, allowing us to directly relate the absorption-line detection rate to the H I distribution. From this, we find the majority of the non-detections in the current sample are because sightline does not intersect the H I disc of the galaxy at sufficiently high column density, but that source structure is also an important factor. The detected absorption-line arises in the galaxy NGC 5156 (z = 0.01) at an impact parameter of 19 kpc. The line is deep and narrow with an integrated optical depth of 0.82 km s-1. High-resolution Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) images at 5 and 8 GHz reveal that the background source is resolved into two components with a separation of 2.6 arcsec (500 pc at the redshift of the galaxy), with the absorption likely occurring against a single component. We estimate that the ratio of the spin temperature and covering factor, TS/f, is approximately 950 K in the outer disc of NGC 5156, but further observations using very long baseline interferometry would allow us to accurately measure the covering factor and spin temperature of the gas.

  8. First X-ray Statistical Tests for Clumpy-Torus Models: Constraints from RXTEmonitoring of Seyfert AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markowitz, Alex; Krumpe, Mirko; Nikutta, R.

    2016-06-01

    In two papers (Markowitz, Krumpe, & Nikutta 2014, and Nikutta et al., in prep.), we derive the first X-ray statistical constraints for clumpy-torus models in Seyfert AGN by quantifying multi-timescale variability in line of-sight X-ray absorbing gas as a function of optical classification.We systematically search for discrete absorption events in the vast archive of RXTE monitoring of 55 nearby type Is and Compton-thin type IIs. We are sensitive to discrete absorption events due to clouds of full-covering, neutral/mildly ionized gas transiting the line of sight. Our results apply to both dusty and non-dusty clumpy media, and probe model parameter space complementary to that for eclipses observed with XMM-Newton, Suzaku, and Chandra.We detect twelve eclipse events in eight Seyferts, roughly tripling the number previously published from this archive. Event durations span hours to years. Most of our detected clouds are Compton-thin, and most clouds' distances from the black hole are inferred to be commensurate with the outer portions of the BLR or the inner regions of infrared-emitting dusty tori.We present the density profiles of the highest-quality eclipse events; the column density profile for an eclipsing cloud in NGC 3783 is doubly spiked, possibly indicating a cloud that is being tidallysheared. We discuss implications for cloud distributions in the context of clumpy-torus models. We calculate eclipse probabilities for orientation-dependent Type I/II unification schemes.We present constraints on cloud sizes, stability, and radial distribution. We infer that clouds' small angular sizes as seen from the SMBH imply 107 clouds required across the BLR + torus. Cloud size is roughly proportional to distance from the black hole, hinting at the formation processes (e.g., disk fragmentation). All observed clouds are sub-critical with respect to tidal disruption; self-gravity alone cannot contain them. External forces, such as magnetic fields or ambient pressure, are

  9. Starburst galaxies in the COSMOS field: clumpy star-formation at redshift 0 < z < 0.5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinojosa-Goñi, R.; Muñoz-Tuñón, C.; Méndez-Abreu, J.

    2016-08-01

    Context. At high redshift, starburst galaxies present irregular morphologies with 10-20% of their star formation occurring in giant clumps. These clumpy galaxies are considered the progenitors of local disk galaxies. To understand the properties of starbursts at intermediate and low redshift, it is fundamental to track their evolution and the possible link with the systems at higher z. Aims: We present an extensive, systematic, and multiband search and analysis of the starburst galaxies at redshift (0 < z < 0.5) in the COSMOS field, as well as detailed characteristics of their star-forming clumps by using Hubble Space Telescope/Advance Camera for Surveys (HST/ACS) images. Methods: The starburst galaxies are identified using a tailor-made intermediate-band color excess selection, tracing the simultaneous presence of Hα and [OIII] emission lines in the galaxies. Our methodology uses previous information from the zCOSMOS spectral database to calibrate the color excess as a function of the equivalent width of both spectral lines. This technique allows us to identify 220 starburst galaxies at redshift 0 < z < 0.5 using the SUBARU intermediate-band filters. Combining the high spatial resolution images from the HST/ACS with ground-based multi-wavelength photometry, we identify and parametrize the star-forming clumps in every galaxy. Their principal properties, sizes, masses, and star formation rates are provided. Results: The mass distribution of the starburst galaxies is remarkably similar to that of the whole galaxy sample with a peak around M/M⊙ ~ 2 × 108 and only a few galaxies with M/M⊙ > 1010. We classify galaxies into three main types, depending on their HST morphology: single knot (Sknot), single star-forming knot plus diffuse light (Sknot+diffuse), and multiple star-forming knots (Mknots/clumpy) galaxy. We found a fraction of Mknots/clumpy galaxy fclumpy = 0.24 considering out total sample of starburst galaxies up to z ~ 0.5. The individual star

  10. First X-ray Statistical Tests for Clumpy Torii Models: Constraints from RXTE monitoring of Seyfert AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markowitz, A.

    2015-09-01

    We summarize two papers providing the first X-ray-derived statistical constraints for both clumpy-torus model parameters and cloud ensemble properties. In Markowitz, Krumpe, & Nikutta (2014), we explored multi-timescale variability in line-of-sight X-ray absorbing gas as a function of optical classification. We examined 55 Seyferts monitored with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer, and found in 8 objects a total of 12 eclipses, with durations between hours and years. Most clouds are commensurate with the outer portions of the BLR, or the inner regions of infrared-emitting dusty tori. The detection of eclipses in type Is disfavors sharp-edged tori. We provide probabilities to observe a source undergoing an absorption event for both type Is and IIs, yielding constraints in [N_0, sigma, i] parameter space. In Nikutta et al., in prep., we infer that the small cloud angular sizes, as seen from the SMBH, imply the presence of >10^7 clouds in BLR+torus to explain observed covering factors. Cloud size is roughly proportional to distance from the SMBH, hinting at the formation processes (e.g. disk fragmentation). All observed clouds are sub-critical with respect to tidal disruption; self-gravity alone cannot contain them. External forces (e.g. magnetic fields, ambient pressure) are needed to contain them, or otherwise the clouds must be short-lived. Finally, we infer that the radial cloud density distribution behaves as 1/r^{0.7}, compatible with VLTI observations. Our results span both dusty and non-dusty clumpy media, and probe model parameter space complementary to that for short-term eclipses observed with XMM-Newton, Suzaku, and Chandra.

  11. Controlling turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kühnen, Jakob; Hof, Björn

    2015-11-01

    We show that a simple modification of the velocity profile in a pipe can lead to a complete collapse of turbulence and the flow fully relaminarises. The annihilation of turbulence is achieved by a steady manipulation of the streamwise velocity component alone, greatly reducing control efforts. Several different control techniques are presented: one with a local modification of the flow profile by means of a stationary obstacle, one employing a nozzle injecting fluid through a small gap at the pipe wall and one with a moving wall, where a part of the pipe is shifted in the streamwise direction. All control techniques act on the flow such that the streamwise velocity profile becomes more flat and turbulence gradually grows faint and disappears. In a smooth straight pipe the flow remains laminar downstream of the control. Hence a reduction in skin friction by a factor of 8 and more can be accomplished. Stereoscopic PIV-measurements and movies of the development of the flow during relaminarisation are presented.

  12. Discovery of concentric broken rings at sub-arcsec separations in the HD 141569A gas-rich, debris disk with VLT/SPHERE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrot, C.; Boccaletti, A.; Pantin, E.; Augereau, J.-C.; Lagrange, A.-M.; Galicher, R.; Maire, A.-L.; Mazoyer, J.; Milli, J.; Rousset, G.; Gratton, R.; Bonnefoy, M.; Brandner, W.; Buenzli, E.; Langlois, M.; Lannier, J.; Mesa, D.; Peretti, S.; Salter, G.; Sissa, E.; Chauvin, G.; Desidera, S.; Feldt, M.; Vigan, A.; Di Folco, E.; Dutrey, A.; Péricaud, J.; Baudoz, P.; Benisty, M.; De Boer, J.; Garufi, A.; Girard, J. H.; Menard, F.; Olofsson, J.; Quanz, S. P.; Mouillet, D.; Christiaens, V.; Casassus, S.; Beuzit, J.-L.; Blanchard, P.; Carle, M.; Fusco, T.; Giro, E.; Hubin, N.; Maurel, D.; Moeller-Nilsson, O.; Sevin, A.; Weber, L.

    2016-05-01

    Context. Transition disks correspond to a short stage between the young protoplanetary phase and older debris phase. Along this evolutionary sequence, the gas component disappears leaving room for a dust-dominated environment where already-formed planets signpost their gravitational perturbations. Aims: We endeavor to study the very inner region of the well-known and complex debris, but still gas-rich disk, around HD 141569A using the exquisite high-contrast capability of SPHERE at the VLT. Recent near-infrared (IR) images suggest a relatively depleted cavity within ~200 au, while former mid-IR data indicate the presence of dust at separations shorter than ~100 au. Methods: We obtained multi-wavelength images in the near-IR in J, H2, H3 and Ks-bands with the IRDIS camera and a 0.95-1.35 μm spectral data cube with the IFS. Data were acquired in pupil-tracking mode, thus allowing for angular differential imaging. Results: We discovered several new structures inside 1'', of which the most prominent is a bright ring with sharp edges (semi-major axis: 0.4'') featuring a strong north-south brightness asymmetry. Other faint structures are also detected from 0.4'' to 1'' in the form of concentric ringlets and at least one spiral arm. Finally, the VISIR data at 8.6 μm suggests the presence of an additional dust population closer in. Besides, we do not detect companions more massive than 1-3 mass of Jupiter. Conclusions: The performance of SPHERE allows us to resolve the extended dust component, which was previously detected at thermal and visible wavelengths, into very complex patterns with strong asymmetries; the nature of these asymmetries remains to be understood. Scenarios involving shepherding by planets or dust-gas interactions will have to be tested against these observations. Based on data collected at the European Southern Observatory, Chile, ESO programs 095.C-0381 and 095.C-0298.

  13. DWARF GALAXY FORMATION WITH H{sub 2}-REGULATED STAR FORMATION. II. GAS-RICH DARK GALAXIES AT REDSHIFT 2.5

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhlen, Michael; Madau, Piero; Krumholz, Mark R.

    2013-10-10

    We present a cosmological hydrodynamic simulation of the formation of dwarf galaxies at redshifts z ∼> 2.5 using a physically motivated model for H{sub 2}-regulated star formation. Our simulation, performed using the Enzo code and reaching a peak resolution of 109 proper parsecs at z = 2.5, extends the results of Kuhlen et al. to significantly lower redshifts. We show that a star formation prescription regulated by the local H{sub 2} abundance leads to the suppression of star formation in dwarf galaxy halos with M{sub h} ∼< 10{sup 10} M{sub ☉} and to a large population of gas-rich 'dark galaxies' at z = 2.5 with low star formation efficiencies and gas depletion timescales >20 Gyr. The fraction of dark galaxies is 60% at M{sub h} ≅ 10{sup 10} M{sub ☉} and increases rapidly with decreasing halo mass. Dark galaxies form late and their gaseous disks never reach the surface densities, ∼> 5700 M{sub ☉} pc{sup –2} (Z/10{sup –3} Z{sub ☉}){sup –0.88}, that are required to build a substantial molecular fraction. Despite this large population of dark galaxies, we show that our H{sub 2}-regulated simulation is consistent with both the observed luminosity function of galaxies and the cosmological mass density of neutral gas at z ∼> 2.5. Moreover, our results provide a theoretical explanation for the recent detection in fluorescent Lyα emission of gaseous systems at high redshift with little or no associated star formation. We further propose that H{sub 2}-regulation may offer a fresh solution to a number of outstanding 'dwarf galaxy problems' in ΛCDM. In particular, H{sub 2}-regulation leads galaxy formation to become effectively stochastic on mass scales of M{sub h} ∼ 10{sup 10} M{sub ☉}, and thus these massive dwarfs are not 'too big to fail'.

  14. The Mice at play in the CALIFA survey. A case study of a gas-rich major merger between first passage and coalescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wild, Vivienne; Rosales-Ortega, Fabian; Falcón-Barroso, Jesus; García-Benito, Rubén; Gallazzi, Anna; González Delgado, Rosa M.; Bekeraité, Simona; Pasquali, Anna; Johansson, Peter H.; García Lorenzo, Begoña; van de Ven, Glenn; Pawlik, Milena; Peréz, Enrique; Monreal-Ibero, Ana; Lyubenova, Mariya; Cid Fernandes, Roberto; Méndez-Abreu, Jairo; Barrera-Ballesteros, Jorge; Kehrig, Carolina; Iglesias-Páramo, Jorge; Bomans, Dominik J.; Márquez, Isabel; Johnson, Benjamin D.; Kennicutt, Robert C.; Husemann, Bernd; Mast, Damian; Sánchez, Sebastian F.; Walcher, C. Jakob; Alves, João; Aguerri, Alfonso L.; Alonso Herrero, Almudena; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Catalán-Torrecilla, Cristina; Florido, Estrella; Gomes, Jean Michel; Jahnke, Knud; López-Sánchez, Á. R.; de Lorenzo-Cáceres, Adriana; Marino, Raffaella A.; Mármol-Queraltó, Esther; Olden, Patrick; del Olmo, Ascensión; Papaderos, Polychronis; Quirrenbach, Andreas; Vílchez, Jose M.; Ziegler, Bodo

    2014-07-01

    We present optical integral field spectroscopy (IFS) observations of the Mice, a major merger between two massive (≳1011 M⊙) gas-rich spirals NGC 4676A and B, observed between first passage and final coalescence. The spectra provide stellar and gas kinematics, ionised gas properties, and stellar population diagnostics, over the full optical extent of both galaxies with ~1.6 kpc spatial resolution. The Mice galaxies provide a perfect case study that highlights the importance of IFS data for improving our understanding of local galaxies. The impact of first passage on the kinematics of the stars and gas has been significant, with strong bars most likely induced in both galaxies. The barred spiral NGC 4676B exhibits a strong twist in both its stellar and ionised gas disk. The edge-on disk galaxy NGC 4676A appears to be bulge free, with a strong bar causing its "boxy" light profile. On the other hand, the impact of the merger on the stellar populations has been minimal thus far. By combining the IFS data with archival multiwavelength observations we show that star formation induced by the recent close passage has not contributed significantly to the total star formation rate or stellar mass of the galaxies. Both galaxies show bicones of high ionisation gas extending along their minor axes. In NGC 4676A the high gas velocity dispersion and Seyfert-like line ratios at large scaleheight indicate a powerful outflow. Fast shocks (vs ~ 350 km s-1) extend to ~6.6 kpc above the disk plane. The measured ram pressure (P/k = 4.8 × 106 K cm-3) and mass outflow rate (~8-20 M⊙ yr-1) are similar to superwinds from local ultra-luminous infrared galaxies, although NGC 4676A only has a moderate infrared luminosity of 3 × 1010 L⊙. Energy beyond what is provided by the mechanical energy of the starburst appears to be required to drive the outflow. Finally, we compare the observations to mock kinematic and stellar population maps extracted from a hydrodynamical merger simulation

  15. Magnetohydrodynamic Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montgomery, David C.

    2004-01-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence theory is modeled on neutral fluid (Navier-Stokes) turbulence theory, but with some important differences. There have been essentially no repeatable laboratory MHD experiments wherein the boundary conditions could be controlled or varied and a full set of diagnostics implemented. The equations of MHD are convincingly derivable only in the limit of small ratio of collision mean-free-paths to macroscopic length scales, an inequality that often goes the other way for magnetofluids of interest. Finally, accurate information on the MHD transport coefficients-and thus, the Reynolds-like numbers that order magnetofluid behavior-is largely lacking; indeed, the algebraic expressions used for such ingredients as the viscous stress tensor are often little more than wishful borrowing from fluid mechanics. The one accurate thing that has been done extensively and well is to solve the (strongly nonlinear) MHD equations numerically, usually in the presence of rectangular periodic boundary conditions, and then hope for the best when drawing inferences from the computations for those astrophysical and geophysical MHD systems for which some indisputably turbulent detailed data are available, such as the solar wind or solar prominences. This has led to what is perhaps the first field of physics for which computer simulations are regarded as more central to validating conclusions than is any kind of measurement. Things have evolved in this way due to a mixture of the inevitable and the bureaucratic, but that is the way it is, and those of us who want to work on the subject have to live with it. It is the only game in town, and theories that have promised more-often on the basis of some alleged ``instability''-have turned out to be illusory.

  16. Connecting Clump Sizes in Turbulent Disk Galaxies to Instability Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, David B.; Glazebrook, Karl; Abraham, Roberto G.; Damjanov, Ivana; White, Heidi A.; Obreschkow, Danail; Basset, Robert; Bekiaris, Georgios; Wisnioski, Emily; Green, Andy; Bolatto, Alberto D.

    2017-04-01

    In this letter we study the mean sizes of Hα clumps in turbulent disk galaxies relative to kinematics, gas fractions, and Toomre Q. We use ∼100 pc resolution HST images, IFU kinematics, and gas fractions of a sample of rare, nearby turbulent disks with properties closely matched to z∼ 1.5{--}2 main-sequence galaxies (the DYNAMO sample). We find linear correlations of normalized mean clump sizes with both the gas fraction and the velocity dispersion-to-rotation velocity ratio of the host galaxy. We show that these correlations are consistent with predictions derived from a model of instabilities in a self-gravitating disk (the so-called “violent disk instability model”). We also observe, using a two-fluid model for Q, a correlation between the size of clumps and self-gravity-driven unstable regions. These results are most consistent with the hypothesis that massive star-forming clumps in turbulent disks are the result of instabilities in self-gravitating gas-rich disks, and therefore provide a direct connection between resolved clump sizes and this in situ mechanism.

  17. Aspects of Turbulent / Non-Turbulent Interfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bisset, D. K.; Hunt, J. C. R.; Rogers, M. M.; Koen, Dennis (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    A distinct boundary between turbulent and non-turbulent regions in a fluid of otherwise constant properties is found in many laboratory and engineering turbulent flows, including jets, mixing layers, boundary layers and wakes. Generally, the flow has mean shear in at least one direction within t he turbulent zone, but the non-turbulent zones have no shear (adjacent laminar shear is a different case, e.g. transition in a boundary layer). There may be purely passive differences between the turbulent and non-turbulent zones, e.g. small variations in temperature or scalar concentration, for which turbulent mixing is an important issue. The boundary has several major characteristics of interest for the present study. Firstly, the boundary advances into the non-turbulent fluid, or in other words, nonturbulent fluid is entrained. Secondly, the change in turbulence properties across the boundary is remarkably abrupt; strong turbulent motions come close to the nonturbulent fluid, promoting entrainment. Thirdly, the boundary is irregular with a continually changing convoluted shape, which produces statistical intermittency. Its shape is contorted at all scales of the turbulent motion.

  18. Turbulence and turbulent mixing in natural fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, Carl H.

    2010-12-01

    Turbulence and turbulent mixing in natural fluids begin with big bang turbulence powered by spinning combustible combinations of Planck particles and Planck antiparticles. Particle prograde accretions on a spinning pair release 42% of the particle rest mass energy to produce more fuel for turbulent combustion. Negative viscous stresses and negative turbulence stresses work against gravity, extracting mass-energy and space-time from the vacuum. Turbulence mixes cooling temperatures until strong-force viscous stresses freeze out turbulent mixing patterns as the first fossil turbulence. Cosmic microwave background temperature anisotropies show big bang turbulence fossils along with fossils of weak plasma turbulence triggered as plasma photon-viscous forces permitting gravitational fragmentation on supercluster to galaxy mass scales. Turbulent morphologies and viscous-turbulent lengths appear as linear gas-protogalaxy-clusters in the Hubble ultra-deep field at z~7. Protogalaxies fragment into Jeans mass clumps of primordial-gas planets at decoupling: the dark matter of galaxies. Shortly after the plasma-to-gas transition, planet mergers produce stars that explode on overfeeding to fertilize and distribute the first life.

  19. Statistical turbulence theory and turbulence phenomenology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herring, J. R.

    1973-01-01

    The application of deductive turbulence theory for validity determination of turbulence phenomenology at the level of second-order, single-point moments is considered. Particular emphasis is placed on the phenomenological formula relating the dissipation to the turbulence energy and the Rotta-type formula for the return to isotropy. Methods which deal directly with most or all the scales of motion explicitly are reviewed briefly. The statistical theory of turbulence is presented as an expansion about randomness. Two concepts are involved: (1) a modeling of the turbulence as nearly multipoint Gaussian, and (2) a simultaneous introduction of a generalized eddy viscosity operator.

  20. Ribbon turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venaille, Antoine; Nadeau, Louis-Philippe; Vallis, Geoffrey

    2014-12-01

    We investigate the non-linear equilibration of a two-layer quasi-geostrophic flow in a channel with an initial eastward baroclinically unstable jet in the upper layer, paying particular attention to the role of bottom friction. In the limit of low bottom friction, classical theory of geostrophic turbulence predicts an inverse cascade of kinetic energy in the horizontal with condensation at the domain scale and barotropization in the vertical. By contrast, in the limit of large bottom friction, the flow is dominated by ribbons of high kinetic energy in the upper layer. These ribbons correspond to meandering jets separating regions of homogenized potential vorticity. We interpret these results by taking advantage of the peculiar conservation laws satisfied by this system: the dynamics can be recast in such a way that the initial eastward jet in the upper layer appears as an initial source of potential vorticity levels in the upper layer. The initial baroclinic instability leads to a turbulent flow that stirs this potential vorticity field while conserving the global distribution of potential vorticity levels. Statistical mechanical theory of the 1 1/2 layer quasi-geostrophic model predicts the formation of two regions of homogenized potential vorticity separated by a minimal interface. We explain that cascade phenomenology leads to the same result. We then show that the dynamics of the ribbons results from a competition between a tendency to reach the equilibrium state and baroclinic instability that induces meanders of the interface. These meanders intermittently break and induce potential vorticity mixing, but the interface remains sharp throughout the flow evolution. We show that for some parameter regimes, the ribbons act as a mixing barrier which prevents relaxation toward equilibrium, favouring the emergence of multiple zonal (eastward) jets.

  1. Supernova feedback in a local vertically stratified medium: interstellar turbulence and galactic winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martizzi, Davide; Fielding, Drummond; Faucher-Giguère, Claude-André; Quataert, Eliot

    2016-07-01

    We use local Cartesian simulations with a vertical gravitational potential to study how supernova (SN) feedback in stratified galactic discs drives turbulence and launches galactic winds. Our analysis includes three disc models with gas surface densities ranging from Milky Way-like galaxies to gas-rich ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs), and two different SN driving schemes (random and correlated with local gas density). In order to isolate the physics of SN feedback, we do not include additional feedback processes. We find that, in these local box calculations, SN feedback excites relatively low mass-weighted gas turbulent velocity dispersions ≈3-7 km s-1 and low wind mass loading factors η ≲ 1 in all the cases we study. The low turbulent velocities and wind mass loading factors predicted by our local box calculations are significantly below those suggested by observations of gas-rich and rapidly star-forming galaxies; they are also in tension with global simulations of disc galaxies regulated by stellar feedback. Using a combination of numerical tests and analytic arguments, we argue that local Cartesian boxes cannot predict the properties of galactic winds because they do not capture the correct global geometry and gravitational potential of galaxies. The wind mass loading factors are in fact not well defined in local simulations because they decline significantly with increasing box height. More physically realistic calculations (e.g. including a global galactic potential and disc rotation) will likely be needed to fully understand disc turbulence and galactic outflows, even for the idealized case of feedback by SNe alone.

  2. Submillimeter and far-infrared line observations of M17 SW - A clumpy molecular cloud penetrated by ultraviolet radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stutzki, J.; Genzel, R.; Harris, A. I.; Stacey, G. J.; Jaffe, D. T.

    1988-01-01

    Millimeter, submillimeter, and far-IR spectroscopic observations of the M17 SW star formation region are reported. Strong forbidden C II 158 micron and CO J = 7 - 6 line emission arises in an H II region/molecular cloud interface of several pc thickness. Weaker forbidden C II emission appears to be extended over 15 pc throughout the molecular cloud. CO J = 14 - 13 and forbidden O I 145 micron spectra indicate high temperatures and densities for both molecular and atomic gas in the interface. The results require the molecular cloud near the interface to be clumpy or filamentary. The extended forbidden C II emission throughout the molecular cloud has a level around 20 times higher than expected from a single molecular cloud interface exposed to an ultraviolet radiation field typical of the solar neighborhood. The high gas temperature of molecular material in the UV-illuminated interface region suggests that CO self-shielding and heating of CO by photoelectrons are important.

  3. The young low-mass star ISO-Oph-50: extreme variability induced by a clumpy, evolving circumstellar disc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholz, Alexander; Mužić, Koraljka; Geers, Vincent

    2015-07-01

    ISO-Oph-50 is a young low-mass object in the ˜1 Myr old Ophiuchus star-forming region undergoing dramatic changes in its optical/near/mid-infrared brightness by 2-4 mag. We present new multi-band photometry and near-infrared spectra, combined with a synopsis of the existing literature data. Based on the spectroscopy, the source is confirmed as a mid-M dwarf, with evidence for ongoing accretion. The near-infrared light curves show large-scale variations, with 2-4 mag amplitude in the bands IJHK, with the object generally being bluer when faint. Near its brightest state, the object shows colour changes consistent with variable extinction of ΔAV ˜ 7 mag. High-cadence monitoring at 3.6 μm reveals quasi-periodic variations with a typical time-scale of 1-2 weeks. The best explanation for these characteristics is a low-mass star seen through circumstellar matter, whose complex variability is caused by changing inhomogeneities in the inner parts of the disc. When faint, the direct stellar emission is blocked; the near-infrared radiation is dominated by scattered light. When bright, the emission is consistent with a photosphere strongly reddened by circumstellar dust. Based on the available constraints, the inhomogeneities have to be located at or beyond ˜0.1 au distance from the star. If this scenario turns out to be correct, a major portion of the inner disc has to be clumpy, structured, and/or in turmoil. In its observational characteristics, this object resembles other types of young stellar objects with variability caused in the inner disc. Compared to other objects, however, ISO-Oph-50 is clearly an extreme case, given the large amplitude of the brightness and colour changes combined with the erratic behaviour. ISO-Oph-50 has been near its brightest state since 2013; further monitoring is highly encouraged.

  4. The dusty heart of nearby active galaxies. II. From clumpy torus models to physical properties of dust around AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hönig, S. F.; Kishimoto, M.

    2010-11-01

    With the possibilities of high spatial resolution imaging and spectroscopy as well as infrared (IR) interferometry, the dusty environments (= “dusty torus”) of active galactic nuclei (AGN) are now in reach of observations. Following our Paper I on ground-based mid-IR spectro-photometry, we present an upgrade to our radiative transfer model of three-dimensional clumpy dust tori. The upgrade with respect to earlier work concerns an improved handling of the diffuse radiation field in the torus, which is approximated by a statistical approach. The models are presented as tools to translate classical and interferometric observations into characteristic properties of the dust distribution. We compare model spectral energy distributions (SEDs) for different chemical and grain-size compositions of the dust and find that clouds with standard interstellar matter (ISM) dust and optical depth τV ~ 50 appear in overall agreement with observed IR SEDs. By studying parameter dependencies, it is shown that type 1 AGN SEDs, in particular the mid-IR spectral index, can be used to constrain the radial dust cloud distribution power law index a, while other parameters are more difficult to assess using SEDs only. Interferometry adds important additional information for modeling when it is interpreted concurrently with the SED. Although type 2 AGN can in principle be used to constrain model parameters as well, obscuration effects make the analysis more ambiguous. We propose a simple, interferometry-based method to distinguish between “compact” and “extended” radial dust distributions without detailed modeling of the data and introduce a way to easily determine individual or sample average model parameters using the observed optical depth in the silicate feature and the mid-IR spectral index.

  5. Turbulent heating in galaxy clusters brightest in X-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuravleva, I.; Churazov, E.; Schekochihin, A. A.; Allen, S. W.; Arévalo, P.; Fabian, A. C.; Forman, W. R.; Sanders, J. S.; Simionescu, A.; Sunyaev, R.; Vikhlinin, A.; Werner, N.

    2014-11-01

    The hot (107 to 108 kelvin), X-ray-emitting intracluster medium (ICM) is the dominant baryonic constituent of clusters of galaxies. In the cores of many clusters, radiative energy losses from the ICM occur on timescales much shorter than the age of the system. Unchecked, this cooling would lead to massive accumulations of cold gas and vigorous star formation, in contradiction to observations. Various sources of energy capable of compensating for these cooling losses have been proposed, the most promising being heating by the supermassive black holes in the central galaxies, through inflation of bubbles of relativistic plasma. Regardless of the original source of energy, the question of how this energy is transferred to the ICM remains open. Here we present a plausible solution to this question based on deep X-ray data and a new data analysis method that enable us to evaluate directly the ICM heating rate from the dissipation of turbulence. We find that turbulent heating is sufficient to offset radiative cooling and indeed appears to balance it locally at each radius--it may therefore be the key element in resolving the gas cooling problem in cluster cores and, more universally, in the atmospheres of X-ray-emitting, gas-rich systems on scales from galaxy clusters to groups and elliptical galaxies.

  6. Turbulent heating in galaxy clusters brightest in X-rays.

    PubMed

    Zhuravleva, I; Churazov, E; Schekochihin, A A; Allen, S W; Arévalo, P; Fabian, A C; Forman, W R; Sanders, J S; Simionescu, A; Sunyaev, R; Vikhlinin, A; Werner, N

    2014-11-06

    The hot (10(7) to 10(8) kelvin), X-ray-emitting intracluster medium (ICM) is the dominant baryonic constituent of clusters of galaxies. In the cores of many clusters, radiative energy losses from the ICM occur on timescales much shorter than the age of the system. Unchecked, this cooling would lead to massive accumulations of cold gas and vigorous star formation, in contradiction to observations. Various sources of energy capable of compensating for these cooling losses have been proposed, the most promising being heating by the supermassive black holes in the central galaxies, through inflation of bubbles of relativistic plasma. Regardless of the original source of energy, the question of how this energy is transferred to the ICM remains open. Here we present a plausible solution to this question based on deep X-ray data and a new data analysis method that enable us to evaluate directly the ICM heating rate from the dissipation of turbulence. We find that turbulent heating is sufficient to offset radiative cooling and indeed appears to balance it locally at each radius-it may therefore be the key element in resolving the gas cooling problem in cluster cores and, more universally, in the atmospheres of X-ray-emitting, gas-rich systems on scales from galaxy clusters to groups and elliptical galaxies.

  7. Introduction to quantum turbulence

    PubMed Central

    Barenghi, Carlo F.; Skrbek, Ladislav; Sreenivasan, Katepalli R.

    2014-01-01

    The term quantum turbulence denotes the turbulent motion of quantum fluids, systems such as superfluid helium and atomic Bose–Einstein condensates, which are characterized by quantized vorticity, superfluidity, and, at finite temperatures, two-fluid behavior. This article introduces their basic properties, describes types and regimes of turbulence that have been observed, and highlights similarities and differences between quantum turbulence and classical turbulence in ordinary fluids. Our aim is also to link together the articles of this special issue and to provide a perspective of the future development of a subject that contains aspects of fluid mechanics, atomic physics, condensed matter, and low-temperature physics. PMID:24704870

  8. Modeling Compressed Turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Israel, Daniel M.

    2012-07-13

    From ICE to ICF, the effect of mean compression or expansion is important for predicting the state of the turbulence. When developing combustion models, we would like to know the mix state of the reacting species. This involves density and concentration fluctuations. To date, research has focused on the effect of compression on the turbulent kinetic energy. The current work provides constraints to help development and calibration for models of species mixing effects in compressed turbulence. The Cambon, et al., re-scaling has been extended to buoyancy driven turbulence, including the fluctuating density, concentration, and temperature equations. The new scalings give us helpful constraints for developing and validating RANS turbulence models.

  9. Turbulent Spots Inside the Turbulent Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skarda, Jinhie; Wu, Xiaohua; Moin, Parviz; Lozano-Duran, Adrian; Wallace, James; Hickey, Jean-Pierre

    2016-11-01

    We present evidence that the buffer region of the canonical turbulent boundary layer is populated by locally generated turbulent spots, which cause strong indentations on the near-wall low-momentum streaks. This evidence is obtained from a spatially-developing direct numerical simulation carrying the inlet Blasius boundary layer through a bypass transition to the turbulent boundary layer state over a moderate Reynolds number range. The turbulent spots are structurally analogous to their transitional counter-parts but without any direct causality connection. High-pass filtered time-history records are used to calculate the period of turbulent spot detection and this period is compared to the boundary layer bursting period reported in hot-wire experiments. The sensitivity of the results to parameters such as the high pass filter frequency and the amplitude discriminator level is examined. The characteristics of these turbulent spots are also quantified using a spatial connectivity based conditional sampling technique. This evidence seems to be at odds with the notion that the buffer region is dominated by quasi-streamwise vortices, and contributes to the potential unification of the studies on near-wall turbulent boundary layer dynamics.

  10. Turbulence, Turbulence Control, and Drag Reduction.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-08-01

    Onsager (1945) and Weizs~cker (1948). has made remarkable strides in advancing our understanding of turbulent flows. It is this description of turbulent...tujrbuilce Inl thle lar to thle Intermiittenit trans’ition to turbulence lus.t ,iedipen itlik. N\\N.tern onI the other. O pen0 * ~ ~ h 1 ~ kdinition10 po...Some Studies of Non-Simple Pipe Flows K R SREENIVASAN 2.AR’ .\\ variety o phenooena occrs ’.5’, ,sTecla’., f we stray,’ away from straight circ- lar i es a

  11. Acceleration of thin flyer foils with a 1 MA pulsed power device for shock-wave experiments in clumpy foam targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neff, Stephan; Ford, Jessica; Martinez, David; Plechaty, Christopher; Wright, Sandra; Presura, Radu

    2007-11-01

    The dynamics of shock waves in clumpy media are important for understanding many astrophysical processes, including the triggering of star formation in interstellar gas clouds by passing shock waves. This phenomena can be studied in the laboratory by launching a flyer plate into a low density foam with clumps. Low density foams offer the advantage of relative low sound speeds (a few hundred meters per second) compared to normal solids, thus reducing the flyer speed required to create shock waves. In first experiments aluminum foils with thicknesses between 20 micrometer and 130 micrometer were accelerated to speeds up to 2.3 km/s. In addition, the impact of the flyers on plexiglas targets was studied. Additional measurements will focus on optimizing the flyer properties (thicker flyers, higher velocities) and on characterizing the flyer in more detail (temperature of the flyer and plasma ablation from the flyer). The results of these measurements will be used to design an experiment studying the dynamics of shock waves in clumpy foams, using the 100 TW laser system Leopard for back-lighting the foam target.

  12. Turbulence generation by waves

    SciTech Connect

    Kaftori, D.; Nan, X.S.; Banerjee, S.

    1995-12-31

    The interaction between two-dimensional mechanically generated waves, and a turbulent stream was investigated experimentally in a horizontal channel, using a 3-D LDA synchronized with a surface position measuring device and a micro-bubble tracers flow visualization with high speed video. Results show that although the wave induced orbital motion reached all the way to the wall, the characteristics of the turbulence wall structures and the turbulence intensity close to the wall were not altered. Nor was the streaky nature of the wall layer. On the other hand, the mean velocity profile became more uniform and the mean friction velocity was increased. Close to the free surface, the turbulence intensity was substantially increased as well. Even in predominantly laminar flows, the introduction of 2-D waves causes three dimensional turbulence. The turbulence enhancement is found to be proportional to the wave strength.

  13. One-dimensional turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Kerstein, A.R.

    1996-12-31

    One-Dimensional Turbulence is a new turbulence modeling strategy involving an unsteady simulation implemented in one spatial dimension. In one dimension, fine scale viscous and molecular-diffusive processes can be resolved affordably in simulations at high turbulence intensity. The mechanistic distinction between advective and molecular processes is thereby preserved, in contrast to turbulence models presently employed. A stochastic process consisting of mapping {open_quote}events{close_quote} applied to a one-dimensional velocity profile represents turbulent advection. The local event rate for given eddy size is proportional to the velocity difference across the eddy. These properties cause an imposed shear to induce an eddy cascade analogous in many respects to the eddy cascade in turbulent flow. Many scaling and fluctuation properties of self-preserving flows, and of passive scalars introduced into these flows, are reproduced.

  14. Turbulence in astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canuto, V. M.

    1990-01-01

    Some of the astrophysical scenarios in which turbulence plays an important role are discussed in view of the comparative advantages of currently available models of turbulence phenomena; attention is given to a specific model that has undergone continuous refinement since 1985. The desideratum in this inquiry is a turbulence model which incorporates the best features of an a priori deterministic model, as well as a redundant set of results from full numerical simulations for a wide variety of turbulent flows; there should also be a simplification of the former, and an enlargement of the complexities of the latter.

  15. Tactical missile turbulence problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickson, Richard E.

    1987-01-01

    Of particular interest is atmospheric turbulence in the atmospheric boundary layer, since this affects both the launch and terminal phase of flight, and the total flight for direct fire systems. Brief discussions are presented on rocket artillery boost wind problems, mean wind correction, turbulent boost wind correction, the Dynamically Aimed Free Flight Rocket (DAFFR) wind filter, the DAFFR test, and rocket wake turbulence problems. It is concluded that many of the turbulence problems of rockets and missiles are common to those of aircraft, such as structural loading and control system design. However, these problems have not been solved at this time.

  16. String Theory and Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jejjala, Vishnu; Minic, Djordje; Ng, Y. Jack; Tze, Chia-Hsiung

    We propose a string theory of turbulence that explains the Kolmogorov scaling in 3+1 dimensions and the Kraichnan and Kolmogorov scalings in 2+1 dimensions. This string theory of turbulence should be understood in light of the AdS/CFT dictionary. Our argument is crucially based on the use of Migdal's loop variables and the self-consistent solutions of Migdal's loop equations for turbulence. In particular, there is an area law for turbulence in 2+1 dimensions related to the Kraichnan scaling.

  17. MHD turbulent processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, David

    1988-01-01

    Three areas of study in MHD turbulence are considered. These are the turbulent relaxation of the toroidal Z pinch, density fluctuations in MHD fluids, and MHD cellular automata. A Boolean computer game that updates a cellular representation in parallel and that has macroscopic averages converging to solutions of the two-dimensional MHD equations is discussed.

  18. Elasto-inertial turbulence

    PubMed Central

    Samanta, Devranjan; Dubief, Yves; Holzner, Markus; Schäfer, Christof; Morozov, Alexander N.; Wagner, Christian; Hof, Björn

    2013-01-01

    Turbulence is ubiquitous in nature, yet even for the case of ordinary Newtonian fluids like water, our understanding of this phenomenon is limited. Many liquids of practical importance are more complicated (e.g., blood, polymer melts, paints), however; they exhibit elastic as well as viscous characteristics, and the relation between stress and strain is nonlinear. We demonstrate here for a model system of such complex fluids that at high shear rates, turbulence is not simply modified as previously believed but is suppressed and replaced by a different type of disordered motion, elasto-inertial turbulence. Elasto-inertial turbulence is found to occur at much lower Reynolds numbers than Newtonian turbulence, and the dynamical properties differ significantly. The friction scaling observed coincides with the so-called “maximum drag reduction” asymptote, which is exhibited by a wide range of viscoelastic fluids. PMID:23757498

  19. MHD turbulent mixing layers

    SciTech Connect

    Esquivel, A.; Lazarian, A.; Benjamin, R.A.; Cho, J.; Leitner, S.N.

    2005-09-28

    Turbulent mixing layers have been proposed to explain observations of line ratios of highly ionized elements in the interstellar medium. We present preliminary results of numerical simulations of turbulent mixing layers in a magnetized medium. We developed a MHD code with radiative cooling. The magnetic field is expected to be a controlling factor by suppressing instabilities that lead to the turbulent mixing. Our results suggest that the difference in turbulent mixing in the unmagnetized case as compared to the case of a weak magnetic field, {beta} = Pgas/Pmag {approx} 10, is insignificant. With a more thorough exploration of parameter space, this work will provide more reliable diagnostics of turbulent mixing layers than those available today.

  20. Edge turbulence in tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nedospasov, A. V.

    1992-12-01

    Edge turbulence is of decisive importance for the distribution of particle and energy fluxes to the walls of tokamaks. Despite the availability of extensive experimental data on the turbulence properties, its nature still remains a subject for discussion. This paper contains a review of the most recent theoretical and experimental studies in the field, including mainly the studies to which Wootton (A.J. Wooton, J. Nucl. Mater. 176 & 177 (1990) 77) referred to most in his review at PSI-9 and those published later. The available theoretical models of edge turbulence with volume dissipation due to collisions fail to fully interpret the entire combination of experimental facts. In the scrape-off layer of a tokamak the dissipation prevails due to the flow of current through potential shifts near the surface of limiters of divertor plates. The different origins of turbulence at the edge and in the core plasma due to such dissipation are discussed in this paper. Recent data on the electron temperature fluctuations enabled one to evaluate the electric probe measurements of turbulent flows of particles and heat critically. The latest data on the suppression of turbulence in the case of L-H transitions are given. In doing so, the possibility of exciting current instabilities in biasing experiments (rather than only to the suppression of existing turbulence) is given some attention. Possible objectives of further studies are also discussed.

  1. Turbulent scaling in fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Ecke, R.; Li, Ning; Chen, Shiyi; Liu, Yuanming

    1996-11-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The project was a study of turbulence in fluids that are subject to different body forces and to external temperature gradients. Our focus was on the recent theoretical prediction that the Kolomogorov picture of turbulence may need to be modified for turbulent flows driven by buoyancy and subject to body forces such as rotational accelerations. Models arising from this research are important in global climate modeling, in turbulent transport problems, and in the fundamental understanding of fluid turbulence. Experimentally, we use (1) precision measurements of heat transport and local temperature; (2) flow visualization using digitally- enhanced optical shadowgraphs, particle-image velocimetry, thermochromic liquid-crystal imaging, laser-doppler velocimetry, and photochromic dye imaging; and (3) advanced image- processing techniques. Our numerical simulations employ standard spectral and novel lattice Boltzmann algorithms implemented on parallel Connection Machine computers to simulate turbulent fluid flow. In laboratory experiments on incompressible fluids, we measure probability distribution functions and two-point spatial correlations of temperature T and velocity V (both T-T and V-T correlations) and determine scaling relations for global heat transport with Rayleigh number. We also explore the mechanism for turbulence in thermal convection and the stability of the thermal boundary layer.

  2. Modeling turbulent flame propagation

    SciTech Connect

    Ashurst, W.T.

    1994-08-01

    Laser diagnostics and flow simulation techniques axe now providing information that if available fifty years ago, would have allowed Damkoehler to show how turbulence generates flame area. In the absence of this information, many turbulent flame speed models have been created, most based on Kolmogorov concepts which ignore the turbulence vortical structure, Over the last twenty years, the vorticity structure in mixing layers and jets has been shown to determine the entrainment and mixing behavior and these effects need to be duplicated by combustion models. Turbulence simulations reveal the intense vorticity structure as filaments and simulations of passive flamelet propagation show how this vorticity Creates flame area and defines the shape of the expected chemical reaction surface. Understanding how volume expansion interacts with flow structure should improve experimental methods for determining turbulent flame speed. Since the last decade has given us such powerful new tools to create and see turbulent combustion microscopic behavior, it seems that a solution of turbulent combustion within the next decade would not be surprising in the hindsight of 2004.

  3. Classical Vs. Superfluid Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roche, P.-E.

    2008-11-01

    Thanks to a zero-viscosity, superfluids offer a unique testing ground for hydrodynamic models, in particular for turbulence ones. In Kolmogorov's turbulence model, viscosity is well known to damp the kinetic energy of the smallest eddies, and thus to introduce a cut-off at one end of the turbulent cascade. Significant differences between this ``classical'' turbulence and the turbulence of a superfluid are therefore expected, but --surprisingly- most experiments rather evidenced strong similarities. We will give an overview of a set of experiments designed to compare in details the classical versus superfluid turbulences, up to a record mass flow of superfluid (700g/s of He @ 1.6K). Then, we will focus on some unexpected vorticity measurements, which can be interpreted assuming that the superfluid vortices are passively advected by the largest scales of the flow, in contrast with the ``classical'' turbulence counterpart. Numerical simulations -based on regular DNS- will be presented to complete this interpretation. In collaboration with C. Barenghi, University of Newcastle; B. Castaing and E. Levèque, ENSL, Lyon; S. David, IEF, CNRS, Orsay; B. Rousset, SBT/CEA, Grenoble; and P. Tabeling, H. Willaime MMN, ESPCI, Paris.

  4. Wall turbulence control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkinson, Stephen P.; Lindemann, A. Margrethe; Beeler, George B.; Mcginley, Catherine B.; Goodman, Wesley L.; Balasubramanian, R.

    1986-01-01

    A variety of wall turbulence control devices which were experimentally investigated are discussed; these include devices for burst control, alteration of outer flow structures, large eddy substitution, increased heat transfer efficiency, and reduction of wall pressure fluctuations. Control of pre-burst flow was demonstrated with a single, traveling surface depression which is phase-locked to elements of the burst production process. Another approach to wall turbulence control is to interfere with the outer layer coherent structures. A device in the outer part of a boundary layer was shown to suppress turbulence and reduce drag by opposing both the mean and unsteady vorticity in the boundary layer. Large eddy substitution is a method in which streamline curvature is introduced into the boundary layer in the form of streamwise vortices. Riblets, which were already shown to reduce turbulent drag, were also shown to exhibit superior heat transfer characteristics. Heat transfer efficiency as measured by the Reynolds Analogy Factor was shown to be as much as 36 percent greater than a smooth flat plate in a turbulent boundary layer. Large Eddy Break-Up (LEBU) which are also known to reduce turbulent drag were shown to reduce turbulent wall pressure fluctuation.

  5. Modeling of turbulent chemical reaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, J.-Y.

    1995-01-01

    Viewgraphs are presented on modeling turbulent reacting flows, regimes of turbulent combustion, regimes of premixed and regimes of non-premixed turbulent combustion, chemical closure models, flamelet model, conditional moment closure (CMC), NO(x) emissions from turbulent H2 jet flames, probability density function (PDF), departures from chemical equilibrium, mixing models for PDF methods, comparison of predicted and measured H2O mass fractions in turbulent nonpremixed jet flames, experimental evidence of preferential diffusion in turbulent jet flames, and computation of turbulent reacting flows.

  6. Turbulent flow through screens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, R. D.

    1984-01-01

    A detailed experimental investigation has been carried out on the effects of different types of screens on turbulent flow, in particular turbulent boundary layers. The effect of a screen on a turbulent boundary layer is to give it a 'new lease of life'. The boundary layer turbulence is reorganized and the thickness reduced, thus making it less susceptible to separation. The aerodynamic properties of plastic screens are found to differ significantly from those of the conventional metal screens, evidently because of differences in the weaving properties. The 'overshoot' in mean velocity profile near the boudnary layer edge is shown to be a result of the effect of screen inclination on pressure drop coefficient. A more accurate formulation for the deflection coefficient of a screen is also proposed.

  7. Containerless Ripple Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putterman, Seth; Wright, William; Duval, Walter; Panzarella, Charles

    2002-01-01

    One of the longest standing unsolved problems in physics relates to the behavior of fluids that are driven far from equilibrium such as occurs when they become turbulent due to fast flow through a grid or tidal motions. In turbulent flows the distribution of vortex energy as a function of the inverse length scale [or wavenumber 'k'] of motion is proportional to 1/k(sup 5/3) which is the celebrated law of Kolmogorov. Although this law gives a good description of the average motion, fluctuations around the average are huge. This stands in contrast with thermally activated motion where large fluctuations around thermal equilibrium are highly unfavorable. The problem of turbulence is the problem of understanding why large fluctuations are so prevalent which is also called the problem of 'intermittency'. Turbulence is a remarkable problem in that its solution sits simultaneously at the forefront of physics, mathematics, engineering and computer science. A recent conference [March 2002] on 'Statistical Hydrodynamics' organized by the Los Alamos Laboratory Center for Nonlinear Studies brought together researchers in all of these fields. Although turbulence is generally thought to be described by the Navier-Stokes Equations of fluid mechanics the solution as well as its existence has eluded researchers for over 100 years. In fact proof of the existence of such a solution qualifies for a 1 M$ millennium prize. As part of our NASA funded research we have proposed building a bridge between vortex turbulence and wave turbulence. The latter occurs when high amplitude waves of various wavelengths are allowed to mutually interact in a fluid. In particular we have proposed measuring the interaction of ripples [capillary waves] that run around on the surface of a fluid sphere suspended in a microgravity environment. The problem of ripple turbulence poses similar mathematical challenges to the problem of vortex turbulence. The waves can have a high amplitude and a strong nonlinear

  8. Inflow Turbulence Generation Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiaohua

    2017-01-01

    Research activities on inflow turbulence generation methods have been vigorous over the past quarter century, accompanying advances in eddy-resolving computations of spatially developing turbulent flows with direct numerical simulation, large-eddy simulation (LES), and hybrid Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes–LES. The weak recycling method, rooted in scaling arguments on the canonical incompressible boundary layer, has been applied to supersonic boundary layer, rough surface boundary layer, and microscale urban canopy LES coupled with mesoscale numerical weather forecasting. Synthetic methods, originating from analytical approximation to homogeneous isotropic turbulence, have branched out into several robust methods, including the synthetic random Fourier method, synthetic digital filtering method, synthetic coherent eddy method, and synthetic volume forcing method. This article reviews major progress in inflow turbulence generation methods with an emphasis on fundamental ideas, key milestones, representative applications, and critical issues. Directions for future research in the field are also highlighted.

  9. Containerless Ripple Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putterman, Seth; Wright, William; Duval, Walter; Panzarella, Charles

    2002-11-01

    One of the longest standing unsolved problems in physics relates to the behavior of fluids that are driven far from equilibrium such as occurs when they become turbulent due to fast flow through a grid or tidal motions. In turbulent flows the distribution of vortex energy as a function of the inverse length scale [or wavenumber 'k'] of motion is proportional to 1/k5/3 which is the celebrated law of Kolmogorov. Although this law gives a good description of the average motion, fluctuations around the average are huge. This stands in contrast with thermally activated motion where large fluctuations around thermal equilibrium are highly unfavorable. The problem of turbulence is the problem of understanding why large fluctuations are so prevalent which is also called the problem of 'intermittency'. Turbulence is a remarkable problem in that its solution sits simultaneously at the forefront of physics, mathematics, engineering and computer science. A recent conference [March 2002] on 'Statistical Hydrodynamics' organized by the Los Alamos Laboratory Center for Nonlinear Studies brought together researchers in all of these fields. Although turbulence is generally thought to be described by the Navier-Stokes Equations of fluid mechanics the solution as well as its existence has eluded researchers for over 100 years. In fact proof of the existence of such a solution qualifies for a 1 M millennium prize. As part of our NASA funded research we have proposed building a bridge between vortex turbulence and wave turbulence. The latter occurs when high amplitude waves of various wavelengths are allowed to mutually interact in a fluid. In particular we have proposed measuring the interaction of ripples [capillary waves] that run around on the surface of a fluid sphere suspended in a microgravity environment. The problem of ripple turbulence poses similar mathematical challenges to the problem of vortex turbulence. The waves can have a high amplitude and a strong nonlinear

  10. Turbulence of swarming sperm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creppy, Adama; Praud, Olivier; Druart, Xavier; Kohnke, Philippa L.; Plouraboué, Franck

    2015-09-01

    Collective motion of self-sustained swarming flows has recently provided examples of small-scale turbulence arising where viscous effects are dominant. We report the first observation of universal enstrophy cascade in concentrated swarming sperm consistent with a body of evidence built from various independent measurements. We found a well-defined k-3 power-law decay of a velocity field power spectrum and relative dispersion of small beads consistent with theoretical predictions in 2D turbulence. Concentrated living sperm displays long-range, correlated whirlpool structures of a size that provides an integral scale of turbulence. We propose a consistent explanation for this quasi-2D turbulence based on self-structured laminated flow forced by steric interactions and alignment, a state of active matter that we call "swarming liquid crystal." We develop scaling arguments consistent with this interpretation.

  11. Turbulence in quantum fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsubota, Makoto

    2014-02-01

    This paper reviews briefly the recent important developments in the physics of quantum turbulence (QT) in superfluid helium and atomic Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs). After giving the basics of quantum hydrodynamics, we discuss energy spectrum, QT created by vibrating structures, and visualization among the topics on superfluid helium. For atomic BECs we review three-dimensional QT, two-component BECs, and spin turbulence in spinor BECs. The last part is devoted to some perspectives of this issue.

  12. Perturbing turbulence beyond collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kühnen, Jakob; Scarselli, Davide; Hof, Björn; Nonlinear Dynamics; Turbulence Group Team

    2016-11-01

    Wall-bounded turbulent flows are considered to be in principle stable against perturbations and persist as long as the Reynolds number is sufficiently high. We show for the example of pipe flow that a specific perturbation of the turbulent flow field disrupts the genesis of new turbulence at the wall. This leads to an immediate collapse of the turbulent flow and causes complete relaminarisation further downstream. The annihilation of turbulence is effected by a steady manipulation of the streamwise velocity component only, greatly simplifying control efforts which usually require knowledge of the highly complex three dimensional and time dependent velocity fields. We present several different control schemes from laboratory experiments which achieve the required perturbation of the flow for total relaminarisation. Transient growth, a linear amplification mechanism measuring the efficiency of eddies in redistributing shear that quantifies the maximum perturbation energy amplification achievable over a finite time in a linearized framework, is shown to set a clear-cut threshold below which turbulence is impeded in its formation and thus permanently annihilated.

  13. Anisotropic Particles in Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voth, Greg A.; Soldati, Alfredo

    2017-01-01

    Anisotropic particles are common in many industrial and natural turbulent flows. When these particles are small and neutrally buoyant, they follow Lagrangian trajectories while exhibiting rich orientational dynamics from the coupling of their rotation to the velocity gradients of the turbulence field. This system has proven to be a fascinating application of the fundamental properties of velocity gradients in turbulence. When particles are not neutrally buoyant, they experience preferential concentration and very different preferential alignment than neutrally buoyant tracer particles. A vast proportion of the parameter range of anisotropic particles in turbulence is still unexplored, with most existing research focusing on the simple foundational cases of axisymmetric ellipsoids at low concentrations in homogeneous isotropic turbulence and in turbulent channel flow. Numerical simulations and experiments have recently developed a fairly comprehensive picture of alignment and rotation in these cases, and they provide an essential foundation for addressing more complex problems of practical importance. Macroscopic effects of nonspherical particle dynamics include preferential concentration in coherent structures and drag reduction by fiber suspensions. We review the models used to describe nonspherical particle motion, along with numerical and experimental methods for measuring particle dynamics.

  14. Characterizing glottal jet turbulence.

    PubMed

    Alipour, Fariborz; Scherer, Ronald C

    2006-02-01

    Air pressure associated with airflow from the lungs drives the vocal folds into oscillation and allows the air to exit the glottis as a turbulent jet, even though laminar flow may enter the glottis from the trachea. The separation of the turbulence from the deterministic portion of the glottal jet was investigated in the excised canine larynx model. The present study is methodological in that the main goal was to examine three methods of obtaining reasonable representations of both the deterministic signal and the residual turbulence portion: (a) smoothing, (b) wavelet denoising, and (c) ensemble averaging. Ensemble averaging resulted in a deterministic signal that disregarded gross cyclic alterations while exaggerating the turbulence intensity. Wavelet denoising can perform an excellent analysis and synthesis of the glottal velocity, but was problematic in determining which levels of analysis to choose to represent both the deterministic and turbulence appropriately. Smoothing appeared to be the most appropriate for phonation velocities because it preserved gross cyclic variations important to perturbations and modulations, while extracting turbulence at what appears to be reasonable levels.

  15. Unsteady turbulence cascades.

    PubMed

    Goto, Susumu; Vassilicos, J C

    2016-11-01

    We have run a total of 311 direct numerical simulations (DNSs) of decaying three-dimensional Navier-Stokes turbulence in a periodic box with values of the Taylor length-based Reynolds number up to about 300 and an energy spectrum with a wide wave-number range of close to -5/3 power-law dependence at the higher Reynolds numbers. On the basis of these runs, we have found a critical time when (i) the rate of change of the square of the integral length scale turns from increasing to decreasing, (ii) the ratio of interscale energy flux to high-pass filtered turbulence dissipation changes from decreasing to very slowly increasing in the inertial range, (iii) the signature of large-scale coherent structures disappears in the energy spectrum, and (iv) the scaling of the turbulence dissipation changes from the one recently discovered in DNSs of forced unsteady turbulence and in wind tunnel experiments of turbulent wakes and grid-generated turbulence to the classical scaling proposed by G. I. Taylor [Proc. R. Soc. London, Ser. A 151, 421 (1935)1364-502110.1098/rspa.1935.0158] and A. N. Kolmogorov [Dokl. Akad. Nauk SSSR 31, 538 (1941)]. Even though the customary theoretical basis for this Taylor-Kolmogorov scaling is a statistically stationary cascade where large-scale energy flux balances dissipation, this is not the case throughout the entire time range of integration in all our DNS runs. The recently discovered dissipation scaling can be reformulated physically as a situation in which the dissipation rates of the small and large scales evolve together. We advance two hypotheses that may form the basis of a theoretical approach to unsteady turbulence cascades in the presence of large-scale coherent structures.

  16. Unsteady turbulence cascades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, Susumu; Vassilicos, J. C.

    2016-11-01

    We have run a total of 311 direct numerical simulations (DNSs) of decaying three-dimensional Navier-Stokes turbulence in a periodic box with values of the Taylor length-based Reynolds number up to about 300 and an energy spectrum with a wide wave-number range of close to -5 /3 power-law dependence at the higher Reynolds numbers. On the basis of these runs, we have found a critical time when (i) the rate of change of the square of the integral length scale turns from increasing to decreasing, (ii) the ratio of interscale energy flux to high-pass filtered turbulence dissipation changes from decreasing to very slowly increasing in the inertial range, (iii) the signature of large-scale coherent structures disappears in the energy spectrum, and (iv) the scaling of the turbulence dissipation changes from the one recently discovered in DNSs of forced unsteady turbulence and in wind tunnel experiments of turbulent wakes and grid-generated turbulence to the classical scaling proposed by G. I. Taylor [Proc. R. Soc. London, Ser. A 151, 421 (1935), 10.1098/rspa.1935.0158] and A. N. Kolmogorov [Dokl. Akad. Nauk SSSR 31, 538 (1941)]. Even though the customary theoretical basis for this Taylor-Kolmogorov scaling is a statistically stationary cascade where large-scale energy flux balances dissipation, this is not the case throughout the entire time range of integration in all our DNS runs. The recently discovered dissipation scaling can be reformulated physically as a situation in which the dissipation rates of the small and large scales evolve together. We advance two hypotheses that may form the basis of a theoretical approach to unsteady turbulence cascades in the presence of large-scale coherent structures.

  17. A tale of three galaxies: A "CLUMPY" view of the spectroscopically anomalous galaxies IRAS F10398+1455, IRAS F21013-0739 and SDSS J0808+3948

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yanxia; Nikutta, Robert; Hao, Lei; Li, Aigen

    2016-11-01

    We investigate the dust properties in three spectroscopically anomalous galaxies (IRAS F10398+1455, IRAS F21013-0739 and SDSS J0808+3948). Their Spitzer/IRS spectra are characterized by a steep ∼5-8 μm emission continuum, strong emission bands from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules, and prominent 10 μm silicate emission. The steep ∼5-8 μm continuum and strong PAH emission features suggest the presence of starbursts, while the silicate emission is indicative of significant heating from AGNs. The simultaneous detection of these two observational properties has rarely been reported on galactic scale. We employ the PAHFIT software to estimate their starlight contributions, and the CLUMPY model for the components contributed by the AGN tori. We find that the CLUMPY model is generally successful in explaining the overall dust infrared emission, although it appears to emit too flat at the ∼5-8 μm continuum to be consistent with that observed in IRAS F10398+1455 and IRAS F21013-0739. The flat ∼5-8 μm continuum calculated from the CLUMPY model could arise from the adopted specific silicate opacity of Ossenkopf et al. (1992) which exceeds that of the Draine and Lee (1984) "astronomical silicate" by a factor up to 2 in the ∼5-8 μm wavelength range. Future models with a variety of dust species incorporated in the CLUMPY radiation transfer regime are needed for a thorough understanding of the dust properties of these spectroscopically anomalous galaxies.

  18. Turbulence in Natural Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Tirtha

    Problems in the area of land/biosphere-atmosphere interaction, hydrology, climate modeling etc. can be systematically organized as a study of turbulent flow in presence of boundary conditions in an increasing order of complexity. The present work is an attempt to study a few subsets of this general problem of turbulence in natural environments- in the context of neutral and thermally stratified atmospheric surface layer, the presence of a heterogeneous vegetation canopy and the interaction between air flow and a static water body in presence of flexible protruding vegetation. The main issue addressed in the context of turbulence in the atmospheric surface layer is whether it is possible to describe the macro-states of turbulence such as mean velocity and turbulent velocity variance in terms of the micro-states of the turbulent flow, i.e., a distribution of turbulent kinetic energy across a multitude of scales. This has been achieved by a `spectral budget approach' which is extended for thermal stratification scenarios as well, in the process unifying the seemingly different and unrelated theories of turbulence such as Kolmogorov's hypothesis, Heisenberg's eddy viscosity, Monin Obukhov Similarity Theory (MOST) etc. under a common framework. In the case of a more complex scenario such as presence of a vegetation canopy with edges and gaps, the question that is addressed is in what detail the turbulence is needed to be resolved in order to capture the bulk flow features such as recirculation patterns. This issue is addressed by a simple numerical framework and it has been found out that an explicit prescription of turbulence is not necessary in presence of heterogeneities such as edges and gaps where the interplay between advection, pressure gradients and drag forces are sufficient to capture the first order dynamics. This result can be very important for eddy-covariance flux calibration strategies in non-ideal environments and the developed numerical model can be

  19. Linearly Forced Isotropic Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lundgren, T. S.

    2003-01-01

    Stationary isotropic turbulence is often studied numerically by adding a forcing term to the Navier-Stokes equation. This is usually done for the purpose of achieving higher Reynolds number and longer statistics than is possible for isotropic decaying turbulence. It is generally accepted that forcing the Navier-Stokes equation at low wave number does not influence the small scale statistics of the flow provided that there is wide separation between the largest and smallest scales. It will be shown, however, that the spectral width of the forcing has a noticeable effect on inertial range statistics. A case will be made here for using a broader form of forcing in order to compare computed isotropic stationary turbulence with (decaying) grid turbulence. It is shown that using a forcing function which is directly proportional to the velocity has physical meaning and gives results which are closer to both homogeneous and non-homogeneous turbulence. Section 1 presents a four part series of motivations for linear forcing. Section 2 puts linear forcing to a numerical test with a pseudospectral computation.

  20. Gyrokinetic turbulent heating

    SciTech Connect

    Hinton, F. L.; Waltz, R. E.

    2006-10-15

    Expressions for particle and energy fluxes and heating rates due to turbulence are derived. These fluxes and heating rates are identified from moments of an extended drift-kinetic equation for the equilibrium distribution function. These include neoclassical as well as turbulent diffusion and heating. Phase-space conservation is demonstrated, allowing the drift-kinetic equation to be expressed in conservative form. This facilitates taking moments with few approximations, mainly those consistent with drift kinetics for the equilibrium distribution function and the relative smallness of the fluctuations. The turbulent heating is uniquely defined by choosing the standard gyrokinetic definition for the energy flux. With this definition, most of the heating can be expressed in the form of ohmic heating from turbulent parallel and perpendicular current density perturbations. The latter current is identified with grad-B and curvature drifts, plus terms involving magnetic perturbations (which are smaller for low beta). A small contribution to the heating comes from the divergence of an energy flux that is dependent on the finite gyroradius of the ions. The fluxes and heating rates are expressed in a form that can be easily evaluated from gyrokinetic turbulence simulations.

  1. Phenomenology of turbulent convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Mahendra; Chatterjee, Anando; Kumar, Abhishek; Samtaney, Ravi

    2016-11-01

    We simulate Rayleigh-Bénard convection (RBC) in which a fluid is confined between two thermally conducting plates. We report results from direct numerical simulation (DNS) of RBC turbulence on 40963 grid, the highest resolution hitherto reported, on 65536 cores of Cray XC40, Shaheen II, at KAUST. The non-dimensional parameters of our simulation are: the Rayleigh number Ra = 1 . 1 ×1011 (the highest ever for a pseudo-spectral simulation) and Prandtl number of unity. We present energy flux diagnostics of shell-to-shell (in wave number space) transfer. Furthermore, noting that convective flows are anisotropic due to buoyancy, we quantify anisotropy by subdividing each wavenumber shell into rings and quantify ring energy spectrum. An outstanding question in convective turbulence is the wavenumber scaling of the energy spectrum. Our pseudo-spectral simulations of turbulent thermal convection coupled with novel energy transfer diagnostics have provided a definitive answer to this question. We conclude that convective turbulence exhibits behavior similar to fluid turbulence, that is, Kolmogorov's k - 5 / 3 spectrum with forward and local energy transfers, along with a nearly isotropic energy distribution. The supercomputer Shaheen at KAUST was utilized for the simulations.

  2. Turbulence and fossil turbulence in oceans and lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, Pak Tao; Gibson, Carl H.

    2013-01-01

    Turbulence is defined as an eddy-like state of fluid motion where the intertial-vortex forces of the eddies are larger than any of the other forces that tend to damp the eddies out. Energy cascades of irrotational flows from large scales to small are non-turbulent, even if they supply energy to turbulence. Turbulent flows are rotational and cascade from small scales to large, with feedback. Viscous forces limit the smallest turbulent eddy size to the Kolmogorov scale. In stratified fluids, buoyancy forces limit large vertical overturns to the Ozmidov scale and convert the largest turbulent eddies into a unique class of saturated, non-propagating, internal waves, termed fossil-vorticity-turbulence. These waves have the same energy but different properties and spectral forms than the original turbulence patch. The Gibson (1980, 1986) theory of fossil turbulence applies universal similarity theories of turbulence and turbulent mixing to the vertical evolution of an isolated patch of turbulence in a stratified fluid as its growth is constrained and fossilized by buoyancy forces. Quantitative hydrodynamic-phase-diagrams (HPDs) from the theory are used to classify microstructure patches according to their hydrodynamic states. When analyzed in HPD space, previously published oceanic datasets showed their dominant microstructure patches are fossilized at large scales in all layers. Laboratory and field measurements suggested phytoplankton species with different swimming abilities adjust their growth strategies by pattern recognition of turbulence-fossil-turbulence dissipation and persistence times that predict survival-relevant surface layer sea changes. New data collected near a Honolulu waste-water outfall showed the small-to-large evolution of oceanic turbulence microstructure from active to fossil states, and revealed the ability of fossil-density-tubulence patches to absorb, and vertically radiate, internal wave energy, information, and enhanced turbulent

  3. Turbulent black holes.

    PubMed

    Yang, Huan; Zimmerman, Aaron; Lehner, Luis

    2015-02-27

    We demonstrate that rapidly spinning black holes can display a new type of nonlinear parametric instability-which is triggered above a certain perturbation amplitude threshold-akin to the onset of turbulence, with possibly observable consequences. This instability transfers from higher temporal and azimuthal spatial frequencies to lower frequencies-a phenomenon reminiscent of the inverse cascade displayed by (2+1)-dimensional fluids. Our finding provides evidence for the onset of transitory turbulence in astrophysical black holes and predicts observable signatures in black hole binaries with high spins. Furthermore, it gives a gravitational description of this behavior which, through the fluid-gravity duality, can potentially shed new light on the remarkable phenomena of turbulence in fluids.

  4. Bacterial turbulence in motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusconi, Roberto; Smriga, Steven; Stocker, Roman; Secchi, Eleonora; Buzzaccaro, Stefano; Piazza, Roberto

    2014-11-01

    Dense suspensions of motile bacteria exhibit collective dynamics akin to those observed in classic, high Reynolds number turbulence, yet this analogy has remained largely qualitative. Here we present experiments in which a dense suspension of Bacillus subtilis bacteria was flown through narrow microchannels and the velocity statistics of the flowing suspension were accurately quantified with a recently developed velocimetry technique. This revealed a robust intermittency phenomenon, whereby the average velocity profile of the flowing suspension oscillated between a plug-like flow and a parabolic flow. This intermittency is a hallmark of classic turbulence and was associated with the presence of collective structures in the suspension. Furthermore, quantification of the Reynolds stress profile revealed a direct link between the turbulent nature of the suspension and its anomalous viscosity.

  5. High star formation rates as the origin of turbulence in early and modern disk galaxies.

    PubMed

    Green, Andrew W; Glazebrook, Karl; McGregor, Peter J; Abraham, Roberto G; Poole, Gregory B; Damjanov, Ivana; McCarthy, Patrick J; Colless, Matthew; Sharp, Robert G

    2010-10-07

    Observations of star formation and kinematics in early galaxies at high spatial and spectral resolution have shown that two-thirds are massive rotating disk galaxies, with the remainder being less massive non-rotating objects. The line-of-sight-averaged velocity dispersions are typically five times higher than in today's disk galaxies. This suggests that gravitationally unstable, gas-rich disks in the early Universe are fuelled by cold, dense accreting gas flowing along cosmic filaments and penetrating hot galactic gas halos. These accreting flows, however, have not been observed, and cosmic accretion cannot power the observed level of turbulence. Here we report observations of a sample of rare, high-velocity-dispersion disk galaxies in the nearby Universe where cold accretion is unlikely to drive their high star formation rates. We find that their velocity dispersions are correlated with their star formation rates, but not their masses or gas fractions, which suggests that star formation is the energetic driver of galaxy disk turbulence at all cosmic epochs.

  6. Joint Agency Turbulence Experiment.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-01-21

    Time Series of Aircraft Longitudinal Gust Data For Penetration 1 on 1 July 1981 63 C5. Time Series of Turbulence Severity Estimates Derived From 400 m...spectral analysis of aircraft longitudinal gust data is shown in Figure B1. Figure B2 shows a modeled turbulence field. The model displays the expected...centered about Location C o %-. -. °,4 0- S E - oo -12 -4 - to 20 so O so s 7D -U. TIME (sec) Figure C4. Time Series of Aircraft Longitudinal Gust Data

  7. Electromagnetic strong plasma turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Melatos, A.; Jenet, F. A.; Robinson, P. A.

    2007-02-15

    The first large-scale simulations of continuously driven, two-dimensional electromagnetic strong plasma turbulence are performed, for electron thermal speeds 0.01c{<=}v{<=}0.57c, by integrating the Zakharov equations for coupled Langmuir and transverse (T) waves near the plasma frequency. Turbulence scalings and wave number spectra are calculated, a transition is found from a mix of trapped and free T eigenstates for v{>=}0.1c to just free eigenstates for v{<=}0.1c, and wave energy densities are observed to undergo slow quasiperiodic oscillations.

  8. Turbulence in Reynolds' flashes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerbus, Rory; Liu, Chien-Chia; Gioia, Gustavo; Chakraborty, Pinaki

    2016-11-01

    Osborne Reynolds' seminal work from 1883 revealed that the transition from quiescent, laminar flow to a turbulent pipe filled with roiling eddies is mediated by localized flashes of fluctuations. Later work has unveiled many features of these flashes: they proliferate or fade away, maintain their shape or continually expand. The nature of the fluctuations in the flashes, however, has remained mysterious. Here, using measures traditionally attributed to high Reynolds number (Re) flows, we present experimental results on the fluctuations of the flashes. Our results suggest that the transition to turbulence is the low Re limit of the high Re, fully developed flow. Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology.

  9. Turbulence characteristics inside a turbulent spot in plane Poiseuille flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henningson, Dan S.; Kim, John

    1989-01-01

    Turbulence characteristics inside a turbulent spot in plane Poiseuille flow are investigated by analyzing a database obtained from a direct simulation. The spot area is divided into two distinct regions - a turbulent area and a wave area. It is found that the flow structures inside the turbulent area have strong resemblance to those found in the fully-developed turbulent channel flow. A suitably defined mean and rms fluctuations as well as the internal shear-layer structures are found to be similar to the turbulent counterpart. In the wave area the inflexional mean spanwise profiles cause a rapid growth of oblique waves, which break down to turbulence. The rms fluctuations and Reynolds stress are found to be higher in that area, and the shear-layer structures are similar to those observed in the secondary instability of two-dimensional Tollmien-Schlichting waves.

  10. Flows, Turbulence, and Mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazarian, Alex

    2003-07-01

    HST and FUSE spectra of distant UV-bright sources reveal interstellar absorption lines of high stages of ionization {O VI, C IV, N V, Si IV} arising in many different astrophysical environments such as superbubbles, interstellar chimneys, high-velocity clouds, galaxy halos and cosmic filaments. Turbulence, always present in the magnetized ISM, must mix the hot { 10^6 K} gas with cooler gas within "turbulent mixing layers". Present theory, based on 1D steady-state flows, suggest the line ratios in these layers differ significantly from photoionized gas, radiative shocks, cooling zones, or conduction fronts. These models are use to infer mass and energy fluxes important to understanding the ISM. We propose to develop a suite of 3D time-dependent models that properly calculate turbulent mixing. We will produce synthetic UV absorption lines and optical emission lines directly relevant to HST observations that use GHRS, STIS, and eventually, COS. These models will allow us to explore the sensitivity of the spectral diagnostics to magnetic field strength, turbulence intensity, and relative velocity of the hot and cold gas. We will publish the resulting grid of spectral diagnostics and make them available through the Web.

  11. Chemically Reacting Turbulent Flow.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-04-14

    two stages of gen I tubes equipped with P-47 phosphor screens The detector chosen for the camera was a Reticon RL128S* line detectoI- .,hich consists...the Stud’, of Turbulent Mixing," William M. Pitts, Nuclear Engineering Seminar of the Department of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering, University of

  12. Dissipation in unsteady turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bos, Wouter J. T.; Rubinstein, Robert

    2017-02-01

    Recent experiments and simulations have shown that unsteady turbulent flows display a universal behavior at short and intermediate times, different from classical scaling relations. The origin of these observations is explained using a nonequilibrium correction to Kolmogorov's energy spectrum, and the exact form of the observed universal scaling is derived.

  13. Multilevel turbulence simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Tziperman, E.

    1994-12-31

    The authors propose a novel method for the simulation of turbulent flows, that is motivated by and based on the Multigrid (MG) formalism. The method, called Multilevel Turbulence Simulations (MTS), is potentially more efficient and more accurate than LES. In many physical problems one is interested in the effects of the small scales on the larger ones, or in a typical realization of the flow, and not in the detailed time history of each small scale feature. MTS takes advantage of the fact that the detailed simulation of small scales is not needed at all times, in order to make the calculation significantly more efficient, while accurately accounting for the effects of the small scales on the larger scale of interest. In MTS, models of several resolutions are used to represent the turbulent flow. The model equations in each coarse level incorporate a closure term roughly corresponding to the tau correction in the MG formalism that accounts for the effects of the unresolvable scales on that grid. The finer resolution grids are used only a small portion of the simulation time in order to evaluate the closure terms for the coarser grids, while the coarse resolution grids are then used to accurately and efficiently calculate the evolution of the larger scales. The methods efficiency relative to direct simulations is of the order of the ratio of required integration time to the smallest eddies turnover time, potentially resulting in orders of magnitude improvement for a large class of turbulence problems.

  14. Spirituality in Turbulent Times.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wheatley, Margaret J.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses the importance of spiritual leadership in turbulent, uncertain times. Describes several spiritual principles--for example, life is cyclical; all life is interconnected. Offers six suggestions for personal health: Start day peacefully, learn to be mindful, slow things down, create own measures, expect surprise, practice gratefulness. (PKP)

  15. Heart rate turbulence.

    PubMed

    Cygankiewicz, Iwona

    2013-01-01

    Heart rate turbulence (HRT) is a baroreflex-mediated biphasic reaction of heart rate in response to premature ventricular beats. Heart rate turbulence is quantified by: turbulence onset (TO) reflecting the initial acceleration of heart rate following premature beat and turbulence slope (TS) describing subsequent deceleration of heart rate. Abnormal HRT identifies patients with autonomic dysfunction or impaired baroreflex sensitivity due to variety of disorders, but also may reflect changes in autonomic nervous system induced by different therapeutic modalities such as drugs, revascularization, or cardiac resynchronization therapy. More importantly, impaired HRT has been shown to identify patients at high risk of all-cause mortality and sudden death, particularly in postinfarction and congestive heart failure patients. It should be emphasized that abnormal HRT has a well-established role in stratification of postinfarction and heart failure patients with relatively preserved left ventricular ejection fraction. The ongoing clinical trials will document whether HRT can be used to guide implantation of cardioverter-defibrillators in this subset of patients, not covered yet by ICD guidelines. This review focuses on the current state-of-the-art knowledge regarding clinical significance of HRT in detection of autonomic dysfunction and regarding the prognostic significance of this parameter in predicting all-cause mortality and sudden death.

  16. The Theories of Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bass, J; Agostini, L

    1955-01-01

    The theory of turbulence reached its full growth at the end of the 19th century as a result of the work by Boussinesq and Reynolds. It then underwent a long period of stagnation which ended under the impulse given to it by the development of wind tunnels caused by the needs of aviation. Numerous researchers, attempted to put Reynolds' elementary statistical theory into a more precise form. During the war, some isolated scientists - von Weizsacker and Heisenberg in Germany, Kolmogoroff in Russia, Onsager in the U.S.A. - started a program of research. By a system of assumptions which make it possible to approach the structure of turbulence in well-defined limiting conditions quantitatively, they obtained a certain number of laws on the correlations and the spectrum. Since the late reports have improved the mathematical language of turbulence, it was deemed advisable to start with a detailed account of the mathematical methods applicable to turbulence, inspired at first by the work of the French school, above all for the basic principles, then the work of the foreigners, above all for the theory of the spectrum.

  17. Workshop on Computational Turbulence Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    This document contains presentations given at Workshop on Computational Turbulence Modeling held 15-16 Sep. 1993. The purpose of the meeting was to discuss the current status and future development of turbulence modeling in computational fluid dynamics for aerospace propulsion systems. Papers cover the following topics: turbulence modeling activities at the Center for Modeling of Turbulence and Transition (CMOTT); heat transfer and turbomachinery flow physics; aerothermochemistry and computational methods for space systems; computational fluid dynamics and the k-epsilon turbulence model; propulsion systems; and inlet, duct, and nozzle flow.

  18. Aircraft Dynamic Modeling in Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morelli, Eugene A.; Cunninham, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    A method for accurately identifying aircraft dynamic models in turbulence was developed and demonstrated. The method uses orthogonal optimized multisine excitation inputs and an analytic method for enhancing signal-to-noise ratio for dynamic modeling in turbulence. A turbulence metric was developed to accurately characterize the turbulence level using flight measurements. The modeling technique was demonstrated in simulation, then applied to a subscale twin-engine jet transport aircraft in flight. Comparisons of modeling results obtained in turbulent air to results obtained in smooth air were used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the approach.

  19. Remarks on turbulent constitutive relations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, Tsan-Hsing; Lumley, John L.

    1993-01-01

    The paper demonstrates that the concept of turbulent constitutive relations can be used to construct general models for various turbulent correlations. Some of the Generalized Cayley-Hamilton formulas for relating tensor products of higher extension to tensor products of lower extension are introduced. The combination of dimensional analysis and invariant theory can lead to 'turbulent constitutive relations' (or general turbulence models) for, in principle, any turbulent correlations. As examples, the constitutive relations for Reynolds stresses and scalar fluxes are derived. The results are consistent with ones from Renormalization Group (RNG) theory and two-scale Direct-Interaction Approximation (DIA) method, but with a more general form.

  20. Turbulence Modeling Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubinstein, R. (Editor); Rumsey, C. L. (Editor); Salas, M. D. (Editor); Thomas, J. L. (Editor); Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Advances in turbulence modeling are needed in order to calculate high Reynolds number flows near the onset of separation and beyond. To this end, the participants in this workshop made the following recommendations. (1) A national/international database and standards for turbulence modeling assessment should be established. Existing experimental data sets should be reviewed and categorized. Advantage should be taken of other efforts already under-way, such as that of the European Research Community on Flow, Turbulence, and Combustion (ERCOFTAC) consortium. Carefully selected "unit" experiments will be needed, as well as advances in instrumentation, to fill the gaps in existing datasets. A high priority should be given to document existing turbulence model capabilities in a standard form, including numerical implementation issues such as grid quality and resolution. (2) NASA should support long-term research on Algebraic Stress Models and Reynolds Stress Models. The emphasis should be placed on improving the length-scale equation, since it is the least understood and is a key component of two-equation and higher models. Second priority should be given to the development of improved near-wall models. Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) and Large Eddy Simulations (LES) would provide valuable guidance in developing and validating new Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) models. Although not the focus of this workshop, DNS, LES, and hybrid methods currently represent viable approaches for analysis on a limited basis. Therefore, although computer limitations require the use of RANS methods for realistic configurations at high Reynolds number in the foreseeable future, a balanced effort in turbulence modeling development, validation, and implementation should include these approaches as well.

  1. Satellite sensing of submerged fossil turbulence and zombie turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, Carl H.

    2004-11-01

    Surface brightness anomalies from a submerged municipal wastewater outfall trapped by buoyancy in an area 0.1 km^2 are surprisingly detected from space satellites in areas > 200 km^2. How is this possible? Microstructure measurements near the outfall diffuser reveal enhanced turbulence and temperature dissipation rates above the 50 m trapping depth. Near-vertical radiation of internal waves by fossil and zombie turbulence microstructure patches produce wind ripple smoothing with 30-50 m internal wave patterns in surface Fourier brightness anomalies near the outfall. Detections at 10-14 km distances are at 100-220 m bottom boundary layer (BBL) fossil turbulence scales. Advected outfall fossils form zombie turbulence patches in internal wave patterns as they extract energy, vorticity, turbulence and ambient vertical internal wavelength information as their density gradients are tilted by the waves. As the zombies fossilize, patterned energy radiates near-vertically to produce the detected Fourier anomalies. Zombie turbulence patches beam extracted energy in a preferred direction with a special frequency, like energized metastable molecules in a chemical maser. Thus, kilowatts to produce the submerged field of advected fossil outfall turbulence patches are amplified by beamed zombie turbulence maser action (BZTMA) into megawatts of turbulence dissipation to affect sea surface brightness on wide surface areas using gigawatts of BBL fossil turbulence wave energy available.

  2. An overview of the Icelandic Volcano Observatory response to the on-going rifting event at Bárðarbunga (Iceland) and the SO2 emergency associated with the gas-rich eruption in Holuhraun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barsotti, Sara; Jonsdottir, Kristin; Roberts, Matthew J.; Pfeffer, Melissa A.; Ófeigsson, Benedikt G.; Vögfjord, Kristin; Stefánsdóttir, Gerður; Jónasdóttir, Elin B.

    2015-04-01

    On 16 August, 2014, Bárðarbunga volcano entered a new phase of unrest. Elevated seismicity in the area with up to thousands of earthquakes detected per day and significant deformation was observed around the Bárðarbunga caldera. A dike intrusion was monitored for almost two weeks until a small, short-lived effusive eruption began on 29 August in Holuhraun. Two days later a second, more intense, tremendously gas-rich eruption started that is still (as of writing) ongoing. The Icelandic Volcano Observatory (IVO), within the Icelandic Meteorological Office (IMO), monitors all the volcanoes in Iceland. Responsibilities include evaluating their related hazards, issuing warnings to the public and Civil Protection, and providing information regarding risks to aviation, including a weekly summary of volcanic activity provided to the Volcanic Ash Advisory Center in London. IVO has monitored the Bárðarbunga unrest phase since its beginning with the support of international colleagues and, in collaboration with the University of Iceland and the Environment Agency of Iceland, provides scientific support and interpretation of the ongoing phenomena to the local Civil Protection. The Aviation Color Code, for preventing hazards to aviation due to ash-cloud encounter, has been widely used and changed as soon as new observations and geophysical data from the monitoring network have suggested a potential evolution in the volcanic crisis. Since the onset of the eruption, IVO is monitoring the gas emission by using different and complementary instrumentations aimed at analyzing the plume composition as well as estimating the gaseous fluxes. SO2 rates have been measured with both real-time scanning DOASes and occasional mobile DOAS traveses, near the eruption site and in the far field. During the first month-and-a-half of the eruption, an average flux equal to 400 kg/s was registered, with peaks exceeding 1,000 kg/s. Along with these measurements the dispersal model CALPUFF has

  3. Multiple-scale turbulence modeling of free turbulent flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fabris, G.; Harsha, P. T.

    1981-01-01

    As part of an investigation into the application of turbulence models to the computation of flows in advanced scramjet combustors, the multiple-scale turbulence model has been applied to a variety of flowfield predictions. The model appears to have a potential for improved predictions in a variety of areas relevant to combustor problems. This potential exists because of the partition of the turbulence energy spectrum that is the major feature of the model and which allows the turbulence energy dissipation rate to be out of phase with turbulent energy production. To establish the general reliability of the approach, it has been tested through comparison of predictions with experimental data. An appreciable overall improvement in the generality of the predictions is observed, as compared to those of the basic two-equation turbulence model. A Mach number-related correction is found to be necessary to satisfactorily predict the spreading rate of the supersonic jet and mixing layer.

  4. Modeling Transition to Turbulence using the Turbulent Potential Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Wang; Perot, Blair

    2001-11-01

    While transition is a very different phenomenon from fully developed turbulence, it is governed, on average, by equations with are mathematically the same as the RANS equations for fully turbulent flow. It is therefore theoretically possible for RANS equation systems to display transition-like behavior a very rapid growth in turbulent kinetic energy levels, skin friction, etc. In this work, the ability of the turbulent potential model to accurately predict laminar to turbulent transition in flat plate boundary layers is examined. The model accurately predicts the entire range of free-stream turbulence levels from strong bypass transition (6natural transition (0.03It shows correct sensitivity to favorable and adverse pressure gradients, as well as acoustic noise levels. Past results indicated the ability of the model to relaminarize the flow. Recent work has focused attention on the model’s ability to predict transition in mixing layers.

  5. Controlled-Turbulence Bioreactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolf, David A.; Schwartz, Ray; Trinh, Tinh

    1989-01-01

    Two versions of bioreactor vessel provide steady supplies of oxygen and nutrients with little turbulence. Suspends cells in environment needed for sustenance and growth, while inflicting less damage from agitation and bubbling than do propeller-stirred reactors. Gentle environments in new reactors well suited to delicate mammalian cells. One reactor kept human kidney cells alive for as long as 11 days. Cells grow on carrier beads suspended in liquid culture medium that fills cylindrical housing. Rotating vanes - inside vessel but outside filter - gently circulates nutrient medium. Vessel stationary; magnetic clutch drives filter cylinder and vanes. Another reactor creates even less turbulence. Oxygen-permeable tubing wrapped around rod extending along central axis. Small external pump feeds oxygen to tubing through rotary coupling, and oxygen diffuses into liquid medium.

  6. Homogeneous quantum electrodynamic turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shebalin, John V.

    1992-01-01

    The electromagnetic field equations and Dirac equations for oppositely charged wave functions are numerically time-integrated using a spatial Fourier method. The numerical approach used, a spectral transform technique, is based on a continuum representation of physical space. The coupled classical field equations contain a dimensionless parameter which sets the strength of the nonlinear interaction (as the parameter increases, interaction volume decreases). For a parameter value of unity, highly nonlinear behavior in the time-evolution of an individual wave function, analogous to ideal fluid turbulence, is observed. In the truncated Fourier representation which is numerically implemented here, the quantum turbulence is homogeneous but anisotropic and manifests itself in the nonlinear evolution of equilibrium modal spatial spectra for the probability density of each particle and also for the electromagnetic energy density. The results show that nonlinearly interacting fermionic wave functions quickly approach a multi-mode, dynamic equilibrium state, and that this state can be determined by numerical means.

  7. Turbulent nonreacting swirling flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, J. I.

    1984-06-01

    Numerical results for incompressible confined swirling flows in a model combustor were obtained using the k-epsilon and k-l models of turbulence developed by Ramos (1980, 1981). Calculations were performed for a model combustor consisting of a 3.43-cm diameter inner pipe and a 14.5-cm diameter outer pipe. The outside diameter of the inner pipe is 3.86 cm. It is shown that the k-epsilon model does predict a recirculation zone for both coswirl and counterswirl flow conditions if suitable inlet conditions are used. Both turbulence models predict a nonexistent recirculation zone under coswirl conditions. The calculated mean axial and tangential velocity profiles are compared with the experimental data of Vu and Gouldin (1980).

  8. Measurements of Turbulent Dissipation During the Bahamas Optical Turbulence Experiment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-16

    Bahamas Optical Turbulence Experiment 0601153N 73-6604-03-5 Silvia Matt, Weilin Hou, Sarah Woods, Ewa Jarosz, Wesley Goode and Alan Weidemann Naval...of turbulent dissipation during the Bahamas Optical Turbulence Experiment Silvia Matt 1,2, Weilin Hou 2, Sarah Woods 3, Ewa Jarosz 2, Wesley Goode 2...SPEC Inc., Boulder, CO, USA Corresponding author: Silvia Matt: E-mail: silvia.matt.ctr.de@nrlssc.navy.mil Figure 1. Location of stations during BOTEX

  9. TURBULENT GENERAL MAGNETIC RECONNECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Eyink, G. L.

    2015-07-10

    Plasma flows with a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD)-like turbulent inertial range, such as the solar wind, require a generalization of general magnetic reconnection (GMR) theory. We introduce the slip velocity source vector per unit arclength of field line, the ratio of the curl of the non-ideal electric field in the generalized Ohm’s Law and magnetic field strength. It diverges at magnetic nulls, unifying GMR with null-point reconnection. Only under restrictive assumptions is the slip velocity related to the gradient of quasi-potential (which is the integral of parallel electric field along magnetic field lines). In a turbulent inertial range, the non-ideal field becomes tiny while its curl is large, so that line slippage occurs even while ideal MHD becomes accurate. The resolution is that ideal MHD is valid for a turbulent inertial range only in a weak sense that does not imply magnetic line freezing. The notion of weak solution is explained in terms of renormalization group (RG) type theory. The weak validity of the ideal Ohm’s law in the inertial range is shown via rigorous estimates of the terms in the generalized Ohm’s Law. All non-ideal terms are irrelevant in the RG sense and large-scale reconnection is thus governed solely by ideal dynamics. We discuss the implications for heliospheric reconnection, in particular for deviations from the Parker spiral model. Solar wind observations show that reconnection in a turbulence-broadened heliospheric current sheet, which is consistent with Lazarian–Vishniac theory, leads to slip velocities that cause field lines to lag relative to the spiral model.

  10. Turbulence Environment Characterization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-06-01

    of ro is consistent with the simultaneous measurement made with the Seeing Monitor. An average turbulent profile developed primarily from microthermal ...data. The operation of the routine meteorological instrumentation, microthermal probes, acoustic sounder, Seeing Monitor and Star Sensor have been...and J. Spencer of RADC gave sub- stantial support and assistance with the microthermal probes, acoustic sounder and PDP-8 software. We acknowledge R

  11. Fountain-Jet Turbulence.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-09-01

    and 3 times higher than expected from free- jet results. Hill et al., (Reference 6) in work with foun- tain jets impacting fuselage models, detected ...delineate the origins of the turbulent anomalies associated with fountain jets by extending the previous studies. The results are presented herein...jet velocities were detected with a Thermal Systems Inc. Model 1050 dual-channel constant-temperature anemometer equipped with a Thermal Systems Inc

  12. Controllability of flow turbulence.

    PubMed

    Guan, Shuguang; Wei, G W; Lai, C-H

    2004-06-01

    In this paper, we study the controllability of real-world flow turbulence governed by the two-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations, using strategies developed in chaos control. A case of control/synchronization of turbulent dynamics is observed when only one component of the velocity field vector is unidirectionally coupled to a target state, while the other component is uncoupled. Unlike previous results, it is shown that the dynamics of the whole velocity field cannot be completely controlled/synchronized to the target, even in the limit of long time and strong coupling strength. It is further revealed that the controlled component of the velocity field can be fully controlled/synchronized to the target, but the other component, which is not directly coupled to the target, can only be partially controlled/synchronized to the target. By extending an auxiliary method to distributed dynamic systems, the partial synchronization of two turbulent orbits in the present study can be categorized in the domain of generalized synchronization of spatiotemporal dynamics.

  13. Magnetosheath electrostatic turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriquez, P.

    1977-01-01

    The spectrum of electrostatic plasma waves in the terrestrial magnetosheath was studied using the plasma wave experiment on the IMP-6 satellite. Electrostatic plasma wave turbulence is almost continuously present throughout the magnetosheath with broadband (20 Hz- 70 kHz) r.m.s. field intensities typically 0.01 - 1.0 millivolts/m. Peak intensities of about 1.0 millivolts/m near the electron plasma frequency (30 - 60 kHz) were detected occasionally. The components usually identified in the spectrum of magnetosheath electrostatic turbulence include a high frequency ( or = 30 kHz) component peaking at the electron plasma frequency f sub pe, a low frequency component with a broad intensity maximum below the nominal ion plasma frequency f sub pi (approximately f sub pe/43), and a less well defined intermediate component in the range f sub pi f f sub pe. The intensity distribution of magnetosheath electrostatic turbulence clearly shows that the low frequency component is associated with the bow shock, suggesting that the ion heating begun at the shock continues into the downstream magnetosheath.

  14. Suppression of turbulent resistivity in turbulent Couette flow

    SciTech Connect

    Si, Jiahe Sonnenfeld, Richard G.; Colgate, Arthur S.; Westpfahl, David J.; Romero, Van D.; Martinic, Joe; Colgate, Stirling A.; Li, Hui; Nornberg, Mark D.

    2015-07-15

    Turbulent transport in rapidly rotating shear flow very efficiently transports angular momentum, a critical feature of instabilities responsible both for the dynamics of accretion disks and the turbulent power dissipation in a centrifuge. Turbulent mixing can efficiently transport other quantities like heat and even magnetic flux by enhanced diffusion. This enhancement is particularly evident in homogeneous, isotropic turbulent flows of liquid metals. In the New Mexico dynamo experiment, the effective resistivity is measured using both differential rotation and pulsed magnetic field decay to demonstrate that at very high Reynolds number rotating shear flow can be described entirely by mean flow induction with very little contribution from correlated velocity fluctuations.

  15. Dynamic multiscaling in magnetohydrodynamic turbulence.

    PubMed

    Ray, Samriddhi Sankar; Sahoo, Ganapati; Pandit, Rahul

    2016-11-01

    We present a study of the multiscaling of time-dependent velocity and magnetic-field structure functions in homogeneous, isotropic magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence in three dimensions. We generalize the formalism that has been developed for analogous studies of time-dependent structure functions in fluid turbulence to MHD. By carrying out detailed numerical studies of such time-dependent structure functions in a shell model for three-dimensional MHD turbulence, we obtain both equal-time and dynamic scaling exponents.

  16. Turbulent wakes of fractal objects.

    PubMed

    Staicu, Adrian; Mazzi, Biagio; Vassilicos, J C; van de Water, Willem

    2003-06-01

    Turbulence of a windtunnel flow is stirred using objects that have a fractal structure. The strong turbulent wakes resulting from three such objects which have different fractal dimensions are probed using multiprobe hot-wire anemometry in various configurations. Statistical turbulent quantities are studied within inertial and dissipative range scales in an attempt to relate changes in their self-similar behavior to the scaling of the fractal objects.

  17. Predicting two-dimensional turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerbus, R. T.; Goldburg, W. I.

    2015-04-01

    Prediction is a fundamental objective of science. It is more difficult for chaotic and complex systems like turbulence. Here we use information theory to quantify spatial prediction using experimental data from a turbulent soap film. At high Reynolds number, Re, where a cascade exists, turbulence becomes easier to predict as the inertial range broadens. The development of a cascade at low Re is also detected.

  18. Turbulent Distortion of Condensate Accretion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hazoume, R.; Orou Chabi, J.; Johnson, J. A., III

    1997-01-01

    When a simple model for the relationship between the density-temperature fluctuation correlation and mean values is used, we determine that the rate of change of turbulent intensity can influence directly the accretion rate of droplets. Considerable interest exists in the accretion rate for condensates in nonequilibrium flow with icing and the potential role which reactant accretion can play in nonequilibrium exothermic reactant processes. Turbulence is thought to play an important role in such flows. It has already been experimentally determined that turbulence influences the sizes of droplets in the heterogeneous nucleation of supersaturated vapors. This paper addresses the issue of the possible influence of turbulence on the accretion rate of droplets.

  19. The Calern atmospheric turbulence station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chabé, Julien; Ziad, Aziz; Fantéï-Caujolle, Yan; Aristidi, Éric; Renaud, Catherine; Blary, Flavien; Marjani, Mohammed

    2016-07-01

    From its long expertise in Atmospheric Optics, the Observatoire de la Côte d'Azur and the J.L. Lagrange Laboratory have equipped the Calern Observatory with a station of atmospheric turbulence measurement (CATS: Calern Atmospheric Turbulence Station). The CATS station is equipped with a set of complementary instruments for monitoring atmospheric turbulence parameters. These new-generation instruments are autonomous within original techniques for measuring optical turbulence since the first meters above the ground to the borders of the atmosphere. The CATS station is also a support for our training activities as part of our Masters MAUCA and OPTICS, through the organization of on-sky practical works.

  20. Critical exponents of Nikolaevskii turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Dan

    2005-02-01

    We study the spatial power spectra of Nikolaevskii turbulence in one-dimensional space. First, we show that the energy distribution in wave-number space is extensive in nature. Then, we demonstrate that, when varying a particular parameter, the spectrum becomes qualitatively indistinguishable from that of Kuramoto-Sivashinsky turbulence. Next, we derive the critical exponents of turbulent fluctuations. Finally, we argue that in some previous studies, parameter values for which this type of turbulence does not appear were mistakenly considered, and we resolve inconsistencies obtained in previous studies.

  1. Fluid turbulence - Deterministic or statistical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Sin-I.

    The deterministic view of turbulence suggests that the classical theory of fluid turbulence may be treating the wrong entity. The paper explores the physical implications of such an abstract mathematical result, and provides a constructive computational demonstration of the deterministic and the wave nature of fluid turbulence. The associated pressure disturbance for restoring solenoidal velocity is the primary agent, and its reflection from solid surface(s) the dominant mechanism of turbulence production. Statistical properties and their modeling must address to the statistics of the uncertainties of initial boundary data of the ensemble.

  2. Some Basic Laws of Isotropic Turbulent Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loitsianskii, L. G.

    1945-01-01

    An Investigation is made of the diffusion of artificially produced turbulence behind screens or other turbulence producers. The method is based on the author's concept of disturbance moment as a certain theoretically well-founded measure of turbulent disturbances.

  3. Turbulent and Mesoscale Flow in Stable Conditions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    turbulence. The upside-down regime is generally temporary as downward transport of turbulence energy leads to full coupling with the ground surface. This...advection of turbulent patches explain about 25% of the variance of the turbulence energy at the main tower. This advective influence does not include...near the surface because of either horizontal advection or downward propagation of the turbulent events. Evaluation of the turbulence energy budget

  4. Turbulence modeling and experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shabbir, Aamir

    1992-01-01

    The best way of verifying turbulence is to do a direct comparison between the various terms and their models. The success of this approach depends upon the availability of the data for the exact correlations (both experimental and DNS). The other approach involves numerically solving the differential equations and then comparing the results with the data. The results of such a computation will depend upon the accuracy of all the modeled terms and constants. Because of this it is sometimes difficult to find the cause of a poor performance by a model. However, such a calculation is still meaningful in other ways as it shows how a complete Reynolds stress model performs. Thirteen homogeneous flows are numerically computed using the second order closure models. We concentrate only on those models which use a linear (or quasi-linear) model for the rapid term. This, therefore, includes the Launder, Reece and Rodi (LRR) model; the isotropization of production (IP) model; and the Speziale, Sarkar, and Gatski (SSG) model. Which of the three models performs better is examined along with what are their weaknesses, if any. The other work reported deal with the experimental balances of the second moment equations for a buoyant plume. Despite the tremendous amount of activity toward the second order closure modeling of turbulence, very little experimental information is available about the budgets of the second moment equations. Part of the problem stems from our inability to measure the pressure correlations. However, if everything else appearing in these equations is known from the experiment, pressure correlations can be obtained as the closing terms. This is the closest we can come to in obtaining these terms from experiment, and despite the measurement errors which might be present in such balances, the resulting information will be extremely useful for the turbulence modelers. The purpose of this part of the work was to provide such balances of the Reynolds stress and heat

  5. High Reynolds Number Turbulence

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-27

    wall relation of McKeon et al. (2005), and the results for the smallest sandgrain roughness used by Nikuradse (1933). 3 57xI03 "eI : uhp - 2 8 1 6 8 x l 0...Reynolds Number Turbulent Pipe Flow," ASME International Mechanical Engineering Conference and Exposition, Washington, D.C., November 16-21, 2003... Engineering Sciences, Vol. 365 (1852) pp. 699-714, 2007. 14 ’Pipe flow roughness Allen, J.J., Shockling, M.A. and Smits, A.J. "Effects of a machined rough

  6. Magnetized Turbulent Dynamo in Protogalaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Leonid Malyshkin; Russell M. Kulsrud

    2002-01-28

    The prevailing theory for the origin of cosmic magnetic fields is that they have been amplified to their present values by the turbulent dynamo inductive action in the protogalactic and galactic medium. Up to now, in calculation of the turbulent dynamo, it has been customary to assume that there is no back reaction of the magnetic field on the turbulence, as long as the magnetic energy is less than the turbulent kinetic energy. This assumption leads to the kinematic dynamo theory. However, the applicability of this theory to protogalaxies is rather limited. The reason is that in protogalaxies the temperature is very high, and the viscosity is dominated by magnetized ions. As the magnetic field strength grows in time, the ion cyclotron time becomes shorter than the ion collision time, and the plasma becomes strongly magnetized. As a result, the ion viscosity becomes the Braginskii viscosity. Thus, in protogalaxies the back reaction sets in much earlier, at field strengths much lower than those which correspond to field-turbulence energy equipartition, and the turbulent dynamo becomes what we call the magnetized turbulent dynamo. In this paper we lay the theoretical groundwork for the magnetized turbulent dynamo. In particular, we predict that the magnetic energy growth rate in the magnetized dynamo theory is up to ten times larger than that in the kinematic dynamo theory. We also briefly discuss how the Braginskii viscosity can aid the development of the inverse cascade of magnetic energy after the energy equipartition is reached.

  7. Workshop on Computational Turbulence Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shabbir, A. (Compiler); Shih, T.-H. (Compiler); Povinelli, L. A. (Compiler)

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this meeting was to discuss the current status and future development of turbulence modeling in computational fluid dynamics for aerospace propulsion systems. Various turbulence models have been developed and applied to different turbulent flows over the past several decades and it is becoming more and more urgent to assess their performance in various complex situations. In order to help users in selecting and implementing appropriate models in their engineering calculations, it is important to identify the capabilities as well as the deficiencies of these models. This also benefits turbulence modelers by permitting them to further improve upon the existing models. This workshop was designed for exchanging ideas and enhancing collaboration between different groups in the Lewis community who are using turbulence models in propulsion related CFD. In this respect this workshop will help the Lewis goal of excelling in propulsion related research. This meeting had seven sessions for presentations and one panel discussion over a period of two days. Each presentation session was assigned to one or two branches (or groups) to present their turbulence related research work. Each group was asked to address at least the following points: current status of turbulence model applications and developments in the research; progress and existing problems; and requests about turbulence modeling. The panel discussion session was designed for organizing committee members to answer management and technical questions from the audience and to make concluding remarks.

  8. Advances in compressible turbulent mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Dannevik, W.P.; Buckingham, A.C.; Leith, C.E.

    1992-01-01

    This volume includes some recent additions to original material prepared for the Princeton International Workshop on the Physics of Compressible Turbulent Mixing, held in 1988. Workshop participants were asked to emphasize the physics of the compressible mixing process rather than measurement techniques or computational methods. Actual experimental results and their meaning were given precedence over discussions of new diagnostic developments. Theoretical interpretations and understanding were stressed rather than the exposition of new analytical model developments or advances in numerical procedures. By design, compressibility influences on turbulent mixing were discussed--almost exclusively--from the perspective of supersonic flow field studies. The papers are arranged in three topical categories: Foundations, Vortical Domination, and Strongly Coupled Compressibility. The Foundations category is a collection of seminal studies that connect current study in compressible turbulent mixing with compressible, high-speed turbulent flow research that almost vanished about two decades ago. A number of contributions are included on flow instability initiation, evolution, and transition between the states of unstable flow onset through those descriptive of fully developed turbulence. The Vortical Domination category includes theoretical and experimental studies of coherent structures, vortex pairing, vortex-dynamics-influenced pressure focusing. In the Strongly Coupled Compressibility category the organizers included the high-speed turbulent flow investigations in which the interaction of shock waves could be considered an important source for production of new turbulence or for the enhancement of pre-existing turbulence. Individual papers are processed separately.

  9. PDF Modeling of Turbulent Combustion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-11-30

    extend methodologies for the modeling and simulation of turbulent combustion. Probability density function (PDF) calculations were performed of piloted...were developed to implement the combined methodology of large-eddy simulation (LES) and filtered density function (FDF). Second-order schemes were...was to advance and extend methodologies for the modeling and simulation of turbulent combustion. Probability density function (PDF) calculations were

  10. Recent Results of Turbulence Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prandtl, L

    1933-01-01

    The first sections of this report deal with two prominent questions, namely the origin of turbulence and the characteristics of turbulent currents. In the third section conclusions are drawn for the flow along a rough wall, whereby an important relation for the velocity distribution is revealed. The principles are also applied to straight rough and smooth tubes.

  11. Airborne Turbulence Warning System Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogue, Rod

    2003-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides information on the development of a system by which aircraft pilots will be warned of turbulence. This networked system of in situ sensors will be mounted on various aircraft all of which are linked through a ground based parabolic antenna. As its end result, this system will attempt to reduce the number of accidents arising from turbulence.

  12. Scaling in Supersonic Isothermal Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kritsuk, A. G.; Wagner, R.; Norman, M. L.

    2015-10-01

    An exact relation for third-order structure functions in isothermal compressible turbulence (Galtier & Banerjee 2011) is verified using numerical data from a simulation at Mach 6. The analysis supports a Kolmogorov-like cascade phenomenology and yields a reduced version of the relation for high Mach number turbulence.

  13. Magnetohydrodynamic Turbulence and the Geodynamo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shebalin, John V.

    2016-01-01

    Recent research results concerning forced, dissipative, rotating magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence will be discussed. In particular, we present new results from long-time Fourier method (periodic box) simulations in which forcing contains varying amounts of magnetic and kinetic helicity. Numerical results indicate that if MHD turbulence is forced so as to produce a state of relatively constant energy, then the largest-scale components are dominant and quasistationary, and in fact, have an effective dipole moment vector that aligns closely with the rotation axis. The relationship of this work to established results in ideal MHD turbulence, as well as to models of MHD turbulence in a spherical shell will also be presented. These results appear to be very pertinent to understanding the Geodynamo and the origin of its dominant dipole component. Our conclusion is that MHD turbulence, per se, may well contain the origin of the Earth's dipole magnetic field.

  14. Theory of hydromagnetic turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, D.

    1983-01-01

    The present state of MHD turbulence theory as a possible solar wind research tool is surveyed. The theory is statistical, and does not make statements about individual events. The ensembles considered typically have individual realizations which differ qualitatively, unlike equilibrium statistical mechanics. Most of the theory deals with highly symmetric situations; most of these symmetries have yet to be tested in the solar wind. The applicability of MHD itself to solar wind parameters is highly questionable; yet it has no competitors, as a potentially comprehensive dynamical description. The purpose of solar wind research require sharper articulation. If they are to understand radial turbulent plasma flows from spheres, laboratory experiments and numerical solution of equations of motion may be cheap alternative to spacecraft. If "real life" information is demanded, multiple spacecraft with variable separation may be necessary to go further. The principal emphasis in the theory so far has been on spectral behavior for spatial covariances in wave number space. There is no respectable theory of these for highly anisotropic situations. A rather slow development of theory acts as a brake on justifiable measurement, at this point.

  15. Turbulent premixed flames on fractal-grid-generated turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soulopoulos, N.; Kerl, J.; Sponfeldner, T.; Beyrau, F.; Hardalupas, Y.; Taylor, A. M. K. P.; Vassilicos, J. C.

    2013-12-01

    A space-filling, low blockage fractal grid is used as a novel turbulence generator in a premixed turbulent flame stabilized by a rod. The study compares the flame behaviour with a fractal grid to the behaviour when a standard square mesh grid with the same effective mesh size and solidity as the fractal grid is used. The isothermal gas flow turbulence characteristics, including mean flow velocity and rms of velocity fluctuations and Taylor length, were evaluated from hot-wire measurements. The behaviour of the flames was assessed with direct chemiluminescence emission from the flame and high-speed OH-laser-induced fluorescence. The characteristics of the two flames are considered in terms of turbulent flame thickness, local flame curvature and turbulent flame speed. It is found that, for the same flow rate and stoichiometry and at the same distance downstream of the location of the grid, fractal-grid-generated turbulence leads to a more turbulent flame with enhanced burning rate and increased flame surface area.

  16. Turbulent Fluid Motion 6: Turbulence, Nonlinear Dynamics, and Deterministic Chaos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deissler, Robert G.

    1996-01-01

    Several turbulent and nonturbulent solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations are obtained. The unaveraged equations are used numerically in conjunction with tools and concepts from nonlinear dynamics, including time series, phase portraits, Poincare sections, Liapunov exponents, power spectra, and strange attractors. Initially neighboring solutions for a low-Reynolds-number fully developed turbulence are compared. The turbulence is sustained by a nonrandom time-independent external force. The solutions, on the average, separate exponentially with time, having a positive Liapunov exponent. Thus, the turbulence is characterized as chaotic. In a search for solutions which contrast with the turbulent ones, the Reynolds number (or strength of the forcing) is reduced. Several qualitatively different flows are noted. These are, respectively, fully chaotic, complex periodic, weakly chaotic, simple periodic, and fixed-point. Of these, we classify only the fully chaotic flows as turbulent. Those flows have both a positive Liapunov exponent and Poincare sections without pattern. By contrast, the weakly chaotic flows, although having positive Liapunov exponents, have some pattern in their Poincare sections. The fixed-point and periodic flows are nonturbulent, since turbulence, as generally understood, is both time-dependent and aperiodic.

  17. Transonic Turbulent Flow Predictions With Two-Equation Turbulence Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, William W.; Shih, Tsan-Hsing

    1996-01-01

    Solutions of the Favre-averaged Navier-Stokes equations for two well-documented transonic turbulent flows are compared in detail with existing experimental data. While the boundary layer in the first case remains attached, a region of extensive flow separation has been observed in the second case. Two recently developed k-epsilon, two-equation, eddy-viscosity models are used to model the turbulence field. These models satisfy the realizability constraints of the Reynolds stresses. Comparisons with the measurements are made for the wall pressure distribution, the mean streamwise velocity profiles, and turbulent quantities. Reasonably good agreement is obtained with the experimental data.

  18. Turbulence, Spontaneous Stochasticity and Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eyink, Gregory

    Turbulence is well-recognized as important in the physics of climate. Turbulent mixing plays a crucial role in the global ocean circulation. Turbulence also provides a natural source of variability, which bedevils our ability to predict climate. I shall review here a recently discovered turbulence phenomenon, called ``spontaneous stochasticity'', which makes classical dynamical systems as intrinsically random as quantum mechanics. Turbulent dissipation and mixing of scalars (passive or active) is now understood to require Lagrangian spontaneous stochasticity, which can be expressed by an exact ``fluctuation-dissipation relation'' for scalar turbulence (joint work with Theo Drivas). Path-integral methods such as developed for quantum mechanics become necessary to the description. There can also be Eulerian spontaneous stochasticity of the flow fields themselves, which is intimately related to the work of Kraichnan and Leith on unpredictability of turbulent flows. This leads to problems similar to those encountered in quantum field theory. To quantify uncertainty in forecasts (or hindcasts), we can borrow from quantum field-theory the concept of ``effective actions'', which characterize climate averages by a variational principle and variances by functional derivatives. I discuss some work with Tom Haine (JHU) and Santha Akella (NASA-Goddard) to make this a practical predictive tool. More ambitious application of the effective action is possible using Rayleigh-Ritz schemes.

  19. Quantitative vortex models of turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pullin, D. I.

    2001-11-01

    This presentation will review attempts to develop models of turbulence, based on compact vortex elements, that can be used both to obtain quantitative estimates of various statistical properties of turbulent fine scales and also to formulate subgrid-transport models for large-eddy simulation (LES). Attention will be focused on a class of stretched-vortex models. Following a brief review of prior work, recent studies of vortex-based modeling of the small-scale behavior of a passive scalar will be discussed. The large-wavenumber spectrum of a passive scalar undergoing mixing by the velocity field of a stretched-spiral vortex will be shown to consist of the sum of two classical power laws, a k-1 Batchelor spectrum for wavenumbers up to the inverse Batchelor scale, and a k-5/3 Obukov-Corrsin spectrum for wavenumbers less than the inverse Kolmogorov scale (joint work with T.S. Lundgren). We will then focus on the use of stretched vortices as the basic subgrid structure in subgrid-scale (SGS) modeling for LES of turbulent flows. An SGS stress model and a vortex-based scalar-flux model for the LES of flows with turbulent mixing will be outlined. Application of these models to the LES of decaying turbulence, channel flow, the mixing of a passive scalar by homogeneous turbulence in the presence of a mean scalar gradient, and to the LES of compressible turbulence will be described.

  20. Turbulence modeling for separated flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durbin, Paul A.

    1994-01-01

    Two projects are described in this report. The first involves assessing turbulence models in separated flow. The second addresses the anomalous behavior of certain turbulence models in stagnation point flow. The primary motivation for developing turbulent transport models is to provide tools for computing non-equilibrium, or complex, turbulent flows. Simple flows can be analyzed using data correlations or algebraic eddy viscosities, but in more complicated flows such as a massively separated boundary layer, a more elaborate level of modeling is required. It is widely believed that at least a two-equation transport model is required in such cases. The transport equations determine the evolution of suitable velocity and time-scales of the turbulence. The present study included assessment of second-moment closures in several separated flows, including sharp edge separation; smooth wall, pressure driven separation; and unsteady vortex shedding. Flows with mean swirl are of interest for their role in enhancing mixing both by turbulent and mean motion. The swirl can have a stabilizing effect on the turbulence. An axi-symmetric extension to the INS-2D computer program was written adding the capability of computing swirling flow. High swirl can produce vortex breakdown on the centerline of the jet and it occurs in various combustors.

  1. Transport Barriers and Turbulent Equipartition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volker, Naulin; Jonas, Nycander; Juul, Rasmussen Jens

    2000-10-01

    Turbulent equipartition and the formation and dynamics of transport barriers in the form of zonal flows are investigated. We consider pressure gradient driven flute modes in an inhomogeneous magnetic field with curvature. Numerical solutions of the model equations on a bounded domain with sources and sinks show that the turbulent fluctuations introduce an equipartition of the relevant Lagrangian invariants by effective mixing. The time averaged equilibrium density and temperature approach the profiles n ~ B and T ~ B^2/3 predicted by turbulent equipartition. However, below a critical aspect ration alpha = L_y/Lx = 3.8 large scale poloidal flows are found to develop. These so-called zonal flows quench the turbulence locally and form barriers for the turbulence flux. These barriers move on the timescale of diffusion. As the turbulence is quenched the Reynoldsstress driving the flows ceases. The transport barrier is then temporarily destroyed, triggering a large transport event. The formation and dynamics of the transport barrier and the related intermittent turbulent flux are investigated.

  2. Numerical methods for turbulent flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, James C., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    It has generally become accepted that the Navier-Strokes equations predict the dynamic behavior of turbulent as well as laminar flows of a fluid at a point in space away form a discontinuity such as a shock wave. Turbulence is also closely related to the phenomena of non-uniqueness of solutions of the Navier-Strokes equations. These second order, nonlinear partial differential equations can be solved analytically for only a few simple flows. Turbulent flow fields are much to complex to lend themselves to these few analytical methods. Numerical methods, therefore, offer the only possibility of achieving a solution of turbulent flow equations. In spite of recent advances in computer technology, the direct solution, by discrete methods, of the Navier-Strokes equations for turbulent flow fields is today, and in the foreseeable future, impossible. Thus the only economically feasible way to solve practical turbulent flow problems numerically is to use statistically averaged equations governing mean-flow quantities. The objective is to study some recent developments relating to the use of numerical methods to study turbulent flow.

  3. Sudden Viscous Dissipation of Compressing Turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Davidovits, Seth; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2016-03-11

    Here we report compression of turbulent plasma can amplify the turbulent kinetic energy, if the compression is fast compared to the viscous dissipation time of the turbulent eddies. A sudden viscous dissipation mechanism is demonstrated, whereby this amplified turbulent kinetic energy is rapidly converted into thermal energy, suggesting a new paradigm for fast ignition inertial fusion.

  4. Structure of wind-shear turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trevino, G.; Laituri, T. R.

    1989-01-01

    The statistical characteristics of wind shear turbulence are modelled. Isotropic turbulence serves as the basis of comparison for the anisotropic turbulence which exists in wind shear. The question of turbulence scales in wind shear is addressed from the perspective of power spectral density.

  5. Saturation of the turbulent dynamo.

    PubMed

    Schober, J; Schleicher, D R G; Federrath, C; Bovino, S; Klessen, R S

    2015-08-01

    The origin of strong magnetic fields in the Universe can be explained by amplifying weak seed fields via turbulent motions on small spatial scales and subsequently transporting the magnetic energy to larger scales. This process is known as the turbulent dynamo and depends on the properties of turbulence, i.e., on the hydrodynamical Reynolds number and the compressibility of the gas, and on the magnetic diffusivity. While we know the growth rate of the magnetic energy in the linear regime, the saturation level, i.e., the ratio of magnetic energy to turbulent kinetic energy that can be reached, is not known from analytical calculations. In this paper we present a scale-dependent saturation model based on an effective turbulent resistivity which is determined by the turnover time scale of turbulent eddies and the magnetic energy density. The magnetic resistivity increases compared to the Spitzer value and the effective scale on which the magnetic energy spectrum is at its maximum moves to larger spatial scales. This process ends when the peak reaches a characteristic wave number k☆ which is determined by the critical magnetic Reynolds number. The saturation level of the dynamo also depends on the type of turbulence and differs for the limits of large and small magnetic Prandtl numbers Pm. With our model we find saturation levels between 43.8% and 1.3% for Pm≫1 and between 2.43% and 0.135% for Pm≪1, where the higher values refer to incompressible turbulence and the lower ones to highly compressible turbulence.

  6. Seasonality in submesoscale turbulence.

    PubMed

    Callies, Jörn; Ferrari, Raffaele; Klymak, Jody M; Gula, Jonathan

    2015-04-21

    Although the strongest ocean surface currents occur at horizontal scales of order 100 km, recent numerical simulations suggest that flows smaller than these mesoscale eddies can achieve important vertical transports in the upper ocean. These submesoscale flows, 1-100 km in horizontal extent, take heat and atmospheric gases down into the interior ocean, accelerating air-sea fluxes, and bring deep nutrients up into the sunlit surface layer, fueling primary production. Here we present observational evidence that submesoscale flows undergo a seasonal cycle in the surface mixed layer: they are much stronger in winter than in summer. Submesoscale flows are energized by baroclinic instabilities that develop around geostrophic eddies in the deep winter mixed layer at a horizontal scale of order 1-10 km. Flows larger than this instability scale are energized by turbulent scale interactions. Enhanced submesoscale activity in the winter mixed layer is expected to achieve efficient exchanges with the permanent thermocline below.

  7. Turbulent Inflow Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, Albert R.

    1996-01-01

    In the present research, tilt rotor aeroacoustics have been studied experimentally and computationally. Experimental measurements were made on a 1/12.5 scale model. A dimensional analysis showed that the model was a good aeroacoustic approximation to the full-scale aircraft, and scale factors were derived to extrapolate the model measurements to the full-scale XV-15. The experimental measurements included helium bubble flow visualization, silk tuft flow visualization, 2-component hot wire anemometry, 7-hole pressure probe measurements, vorticity measurements, and outdoor far field acoustic measurements. The hot wire measurements were used to estimate the turbulence statistics of the flow field into the rotors, such as length scales, velocity scales, dissipation, and turbulence intermittency. To date, these flow measurements are the only ones in existence for a hovering tilt rotor. Several different configurations of the model were tested: (1) standard configurations (single isolated rotor, two rotors without the aircraft, standard tilt rotor configuration); (2) flow control devices (the 'plate', the 'diagonal fences'); (3) basic configuration changes (increasing the rotor/rotor spacing, reducing the rotor plane/wing clearance, operating the rotors out of phase). Also, an approximation to Sikorsky's Variable Diameter Tilt Rotor (VDTR) configuration was tested, and some flow measurements were made on a semi-span configuration of the model. Acoustic predictions were made using LOWSON.M, a Mathematica code. This hover prediction code, from HOVER.FOR, used blade element theory for the aerodynamics, and Prandtl's Vortex theory to model the wake, along with empirical formulas for the effects of Reynolds number, Mach number, and stall. Aerodynamic models were developed from 7-hole pressure probe measurements of the mean velocity into the model rotors. LOWSON.M modeled a rotor blade as a single force and source/sink combination separated in the chordwise direction, at an

  8. Bumblebee Flight in Heavy Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engels, T.; Kolomenskiy, D.; Schneider, K.; Lehmann, F.-O.; Sesterhenn, J.

    2016-01-01

    High-resolution numerical simulations of a tethered model bumblebee in forward flight are performed superimposing homogeneous isotropic turbulent fluctuations to the uniform inflow. Despite tremendous variation in turbulence intensity, between 17% and 99% with respect to the mean flow, we do not find significant changes in cycle-averaged aerodynamic forces, moments, or flight power when averaged over realizations, compared to laminar inflow conditions. The variance of aerodynamic measures, however, significantly increases with increasing turbulence intensity, which may explain flight instabilities observed in freely flying bees.

  9. Turbulent reconnection and its implications

    PubMed Central

    Lazarian, A.; Eyink, G.; Vishniac, E.; Kowal, G.

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic reconnection is a process of magnetic field topology change, which is one of the most fundamental processes happening in magnetized plasmas. In most astrophysical environments, the Reynolds numbers corresponding to plasma flows are large and therefore the transition to turbulence is inevitable. This turbulence, which can be pre-existing or driven by magnetic reconnection itself, must be taken into account for any theory of magnetic reconnection that attempts to describe the process in the aforementioned environments. This necessity is obvious as three-dimensional high-resolution numerical simulations show the transition to the turbulence state of initially laminar reconnecting magnetic fields. We discuss ideas of how turbulence can modify reconnection with the focus on the Lazarian & Vishniac (Lazarian & Vishniac 1999 Astrophys. J. 517, 700–718 ()) reconnection model. We present numerical evidence supporting the model and demonstrate that it is closely connected to the experimentally proven concept of Richardson dispersion/diffusion as well as to more recent advances in understanding of the Lagrangian dynamics of magnetized fluids. We point out that the generalized Ohm's law that accounts for turbulent motion predicts the subdominance of the microphysical plasma effects for reconnection for realistically turbulent media. We show that one of the most dramatic consequences of turbulence is the violation of the generally accepted notion of magnetic flux freezing. This notion is a cornerstone of most theories dealing with magnetized plasmas, and therefore its change induces fundamental shifts in accepted paradigms, for instance, turbulent reconnection entails reconnection diffusion process that is essential for understanding star formation. We argue that at sufficiently high Reynolds numbers the process of tearing reconnection should transfer to turbulent reconnection. We discuss flares that are predicted by turbulent reconnection and relate this process to

  10. Outer scale of atmospheric turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukin, Vladimir P.

    2005-10-01

    In the early 70's, the scientists in Italy (A.Consortini, M.Bertolotti, L.Ronchi), USA (R.Buser, Ochs, S.Clifford) and USSR (V.Pokasov, V.Lukin) almost simultaneously discovered the phenomenon of deviation from the power law and the effect of saturation for the structure phase function. During a period of 35 years we have performed successively the investigations of the effect of low-frequency spectral range of atmospheric turbulence on the optical characteristics. The influence of the turbulence models as well as a outer scale of turbulence on the characteristics of telescopes and systems of laser beam formations has been determined too.

  11. Turbulence in the First Stars

    SciTech Connect

    Iocco, Fabio; /Naples U. /INFN, Naples

    2007-09-28

    We present preliminary results of 2-D simulations of the effects of turbulence in the mixing of Pair Instability Supenovae. We make use of the FLASH code to evolve initial 1-D models of post-bounce PISNe and seed turbulence in form of velocity perturbations. We identify the energetic and spatial scale for the turbulence to have mixing effects on the metal shells inside the star. Under the conditions we examine, we observe some mixing but the onion structure of the metal distribution is not disrupted.

  12. Calculation of Turbulent Expansion Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tollmien, Walter

    1945-01-01

    On the basis of certain formulas recently established by L. Prandtl for the turbulent interchange of momentum in stationary flows, various cases of "free turbulence" - that is, of flows without boundary walls - are treated in the present report. Prandtl puts the apparent shearing stress introduced by the turbulent momentum interchange. This present report deals first with the mixing of an air stream of uniform velocity with the adjacent still air, than with the expansion or diffusion of an air jet in the surrounding air space.

  13. Turbulent reconnection and its implications.

    PubMed

    Lazarian, A; Eyink, G; Vishniac, E; Kowal, G

    2015-05-13

    Magnetic reconnection is a process of magnetic field topology change, which is one of the most fundamental processes happening in magnetized plasmas. In most astrophysical environments, the Reynolds numbers corresponding to plasma flows are large and therefore the transition to turbulence is inevitable. This turbulence, which can be pre-existing or driven by magnetic reconnection itself, must be taken into account for any theory of magnetic reconnection that attempts to describe the process in the aforementioned environments. This necessity is obvious as three-dimensional high-resolution numerical simulations show the transition to the turbulence state of initially laminar reconnecting magnetic fields. We discuss ideas of how turbulence can modify reconnection with the focus on the Lazarian & Vishniac (Lazarian & Vishniac 1999 Astrophys. J. 517, 700-718 (doi:10.1086/307233)) reconnection model. We present numerical evidence supporting the model and demonstrate that it is closely connected to the experimentally proven concept of Richardson dispersion/diffusion as well as to more recent advances in understanding of the Lagrangian dynamics of magnetized fluids. We point out that the generalized Ohm's law that accounts for turbulent motion predicts the subdominance of the microphysical plasma effects for reconnection for realistically turbulent media. We show that one of the most dramatic consequences of turbulence is the violation of the generally accepted notion of magnetic flux freezing. This notion is a cornerstone of most theories dealing with magnetized plasmas, and therefore its change induces fundamental shifts in accepted paradigms, for instance, turbulent reconnection entails reconnection diffusion process that is essential for understanding star formation. We argue that at sufficiently high Reynolds numbers the process of tearing reconnection should transfer to turbulent reconnection. We discuss flares that are predicted by turbulent reconnection and relate

  14. Turbulent Mixing of Multiphase Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Y.-N.; Ferziger, J.; Ham, F. E.; Herrmann, M.

    2003-01-01

    Thus we conduct numerical simulations of multiphase fluids stirred by two-dimensional turbulence to assess the possibility of self-similar drop size distribution in turbulence. In our turbulence simulations, we also explore the non-diffusive limit, where molecular mobility for the interface is vanishing. Special care is needed to transport the non-diffusive interface. Numerically, we use the particle level set method to evolve the interface. Instead of using the usual methods to calculate the surface tension force from the level set function, we reconstruct the interface based on phase- field modeling, and calculate the continuum surface tension forcing from the reconstructed interface.

  15. Compound cooling flow turbulator for turbine component

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Ching-Pang; Jiang, Nan; Marra, John J; Rudolph, Ronald J

    2014-11-25

    Multi-scale turbulation features, including first turbulators (46, 48) on a cooling surface (44), and smaller turbulators (52, 54, 58, 62) on the first turbulators. The first turbulators may be formed between larger turbulators (50). The first turbulators may be alternating ridges (46) and valleys (48). The smaller turbulators may be concave surface features such as dimples (62) and grooves (54), and/or convex surface features such as bumps (58) and smaller ridges (52). An embodiment with convex turbulators (52, 58) in the valleys (48) and concave turbulators (54, 62) on the ridges (46) increases the cooling surface area, reduces boundary layer separation, avoids coolant shadowing and stagnation, and reduces component mass.

  16. Turbulence Modeling Verification and Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rumsey, Christopher L.

    2014-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software that solves the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations has been in routine use for more than a quarter of a century. It is currently employed not only for basic research in fluid dynamics, but also for the analysis and design processes in many industries worldwide, including aerospace, automotive, power generation, chemical manufacturing, polymer processing, and petroleum exploration. A key feature of RANS CFD is the turbulence model. Because the RANS equations are unclosed, a model is necessary to describe the effects of the turbulence on the mean flow, through the Reynolds stress terms. The turbulence model is one of the largest sources of uncertainty in RANS CFD, and most models are known to be flawed in one way or another. Alternative methods such as direct numerical simulations (DNS) and large eddy simulations (LES) rely less on modeling and hence include more physics than RANS. In DNS all turbulent scales are resolved, and in LES the large scales are resolved and the effects of the smallest turbulence scales are modeled. However, both DNS and LES are too expensive for most routine industrial usage on today's computers. Hybrid RANS-LES, which blends RANS near walls with LES away from walls, helps to moderate the cost while still retaining some of the scale-resolving capability of LES, but for some applications it can still be too expensive. Even considering its associated uncertainties, RANS turbulence modeling has proved to be very useful for a wide variety of applications. For example, in the aerospace field, many RANS models are considered to be reliable for computing attached flows. However, existing turbulence models are known to be inaccurate for many flows involving separation. Research has been ongoing for decades in an attempt to improve turbulence models for separated and other nonequilibrium flows. When developing or improving turbulence models, both verification and validation are important

  17. Blowing in the Wind: II. Creation and Redistribution of Refractory Inclusions in a Turbulent Protoplanetary Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuzzi, Jeffrey N.; Davis, Sanford S.; Dobrovolskis, Anthony R.

    2003-01-01

    Ca-Al rich refractory mineral inclusions (CAIs) found at 1-6% mass fraction in primitive chondrites appear to be 1-3 million years older than the dominant (chondrule) components which were accreted into the same parent bodies. A prevalent concern is that it is difficult to retain CAIs for this long against gas-drag-induced radial drift into the sun. We reassess the situation in terms of a hot inner (turbulent) nebula context for CAI formation, using analytical models of nebula evolution and particle diffusion. We show that outward radial diffusion in a weakly turbulent nebula can overwhelm inward drift, and prevent significant numbers of CAI-size particles from being lost into the sun for times on the order of 10(exp 6) years. CAIs can form early, when the inner nebula was hot, and persist in sufficient abundance to be incorporated into primitive planetesimals at a much later time. Small (less than or approx. equal to 0.1 mm diameter) CAIs persist for longer times than large (greater than or approx. equal to 5mm diameter ones). To obtain a quantitative match t o the observed volume fractions of CAIs in chondrites, another process must be allowed for: a substantial enhancement of the inner hot nebula in silicate-forming material, which we suggest was caused by rapid inward drift of meter-sized objects. This early in nebula history, the drifting rubble would have a carbon content probably an order of magnitude larger than even the most primitive (CI) carbonaceous chondrites. Abundant carbon in the evaporating material would help keep the nebula oxygen fugacity low, plausably solar, as inferred for the formation environment of CAIs. The associated production of a larger than canonical amount of CO2 might also play a role in mass-independent fractionation of oxygen isotopes, leaving the gas rich in l60 as inferred from CAIs and other high temperature condensates.

  18. Blowing in the Wind: II. Creation and Redistribution of Refractory Inclusions in a Turbulent Protoplanetary Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuzzi, Jeffrey N.; Davis, Sanford S.; Dobrovolskis, Anthony R.

    2003-01-01

    Ca-A1 rich refractory mineral inclusions (CAIs) found at 1-6% mass fraction in primitive chondrites appear to be 1-3 million years older than the dominant (chondrule) components which were accreted into the same parent bodies. A prevalent concern is that it is difficult to retain CAIs for this long against gas-drag-induced radial drift into the sun. We reassess the situation in terms of a hot inner (turbulent) nebula context for CAI formation, using analytical models of nebula evolution and particle diffusion. We show that outward radial diffusion in a weakly turbulent nebula can overwhelm inward drift, and prevent significant numbers of CAI-size particles from being lost into the sun for times on the order of 10(exp 6) years. CAIs can form early, when the inner nebula was hot, and persist in sufficient abundance to be incorporated into primitive planetesimals at a much later time. Small (less than or approximately 0.1 mm diameter) CAIs persist for longer times than large (greater than or approximately 5mm diameter ones. To obtain a quantitative match to the observed volume fractions of CAIs in chondrites, another process must be allowed for: a substantial enhancement of the inner hot nebula in silicate-forming material, which we suggest was caused by rapid inward drift of meter-sized objects. This early in nebula history, the drifting rubble would have a carbon content probably an order of magnitude larger than even the most primitive (CI) carbonaceous chondrites. Abundant carbon in the evaporating material would help keep the nebula oxygen fugacity low, plausibly solar; as inferred for the formation environment of CAIs. The associated production of a larger than canonical amount of CO2 might also play a role in mass-independent fractionation of oxygen isotopes, leaving the gas rich in O-16 as inferred from CAIs and other high temperature condensates.

  19. Measurements of turbulent dissipation during the Bahamas Optical Turbulence Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matt, Silvia; Hou, Weilin; Woods, Sarah; Jarosz, Ewa; Goode, Wesley; Weidemann, Alan

    2013-06-01

    The Bahamas Optical Turbulence Experiment (BOTEX) was conducted in the summer of 2011 to investigate the impact of turbulence on underwater optical imaging. Underwater optical properties can be affected by turbulence in the water, due to localized changes in the index of refraction. We discuss measurements of current velocity and temperature, made with a Nortek Vector Acoustic Doppler Velocimeter (ADV) and PME Conductivity- Temperature (CT) probe, as well as observations made with a Rockland Oceanographic Vertical Microstructure Profiler (VMP). The instruments were deployed in close proximity in the field and in the context of measurements of optical target clarity. Turbulent kinetic energy dissipation (TKED) and temperature dissipation (TD) rates are calculated from the ADV/CT measurements and compared to TKED and TD estimated from the data collected with the VMP. The results show reasonable agreement between the two methods; differences are attributed to turbulence patchiness and intermittence, as well as sampling challenges. The study also highlights the importance of collecting concurrent data on temperature, current velocity, and current shear to assess the turbulence impact on underwater optical properties.

  20. Stochastic differential equations and turbulent dispersion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durbin, P. A.

    1983-01-01

    Aspects of the theory of continuous stochastic processes that seem to contribute to an understanding of turbulent dispersion are introduced and the theory and philosophy of modelling turbulent transport is emphasized. Examples of eddy diffusion examined include shear dispersion, the surface layer, and channel flow. Modeling dispersion with finite-time scale is considered including the Langevin model for homogeneous turbulence, dispersion in nonhomogeneous turbulence, and the asymptotic behavior of the Langevin model for nonhomogeneous turbulence.

  1. Passive adaptive imaging through turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tofsted, David

    2016-05-01

    Standard methods for improved imaging system performance under degrading optical turbulence conditions typically involve active adaptive techniques or post-capture image processing. Here, passive adaptive methods are considered where active sources are disallowed, a priori. Theoretical analyses of short-exposure turbulence impacts indicate that varying aperture sizes experience different degrees of turbulence impacts. Smaller apertures often outperform larger aperture systems as turbulence strength increases. This suggests a controllable aperture system is advantageous. In addition, sub-aperture sampling of a set of training images permits the system to sense tilts in different sub-aperture regions through image acquisition and image cross-correlation calculations. A four sub-aperture pattern supports corrections involving five realizable operating modes (beyond tip and tilt) for removing aberrations over an annular pattern. Progress to date will be discussed regarding development and field trials of a prototype system.

  2. Premixed autoignition in compressible turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konduri, Aditya; Kolla, Hemanth; Krisman, Alexander; Chen, Jacqueline

    2016-11-01

    Prediction of chemical ignition delay in an autoignition process is critical in combustion systems like compression ignition engines and gas turbines. Often, ignition delay times measured in simple homogeneous experiments or homogeneous calculations are not representative of actual autoignition processes in complex turbulent flows. This is due the presence of turbulent mixing which results in fluctuations in thermodynamic properties as well as chemical composition. In the present study the effect of fluctuations of thermodynamic variables on the ignition delay is quantified with direct numerical simulations of compressible isotropic turbulence. A premixed syngas-air mixture is used to remove the effects of inhomogeneity in the chemical composition. Preliminary results show a significant spatial variation in the ignition delay time. We analyze the topology of autoignition kernels and identify the influence of extreme events resulting from compressibility and intermittency. The dependence of ignition delay time on Reynolds and turbulent Mach numbers is also quantified. Supported by Basic Energy Sciences, Dept of Energy, United States.

  3. Simulation of turbulent wall pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ash, R. L.

    1976-01-01

    A computer program has been developed to simulate the transient wall pressure field produced by a low speed fully turbulent boundary layer. The theoretical basis for the simulation has been discussed and preliminary results from a pressure simulation are presented.

  4. Optimizing Stellarators for Turbulent Transport

    SciTech Connect

    H.E. Mynick, N.Pomphrey, and P. Xanthopoulos

    2010-05-27

    Up to now, the term "transport-optimized" stellarators has meant optimized to minimize neoclassical transport, while the task of also mitigating turbulent transport, usually the dominant transport channel in such designs, has not been addressed, due to the complexity of plasma turbulence in stellarators. Here, we demonstrate that stellarators can also be designed to mitigate their turbulent transport, by making use of two powerful numerical tools not available until recently, namely gyrokinetic codes valid for 3D nonlinear simulations, and stellarator optimization codes. A first proof-of-principle configuration is obtained, reducing the level of ion temperature gradient turbulent transport from the NCSX baseline design by a factor of about 2.5.

  5. Mathematical representations of turbulent mixing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farmer, R. C.; Audeh, B.

    1973-01-01

    A basic description is given of the mathematical tools and models which are presently used to represent turbulent, free shear layers. Recommendations are included for ways in which current modeling techniques can be improved.

  6. Workshop on Engineering Turbulence Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Povinelli, Louis A. (Editor); Liou, W. W. (Editor); Shabbir, A. (Editor); Shih, T.-H. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    Discussed here is the future direction of various levels of engineering turbulence modeling related to computational fluid dynamics (CFD) computations for propulsion. For each level of computation, there are a few turbulence models which represent the state-of-the-art for that level. However, it is important to know their capabilities as well as their deficiencies in order to help engineers select and implement the appropriate models in their real world engineering calculations. This will also help turbulence modelers perceive the future directions for improving turbulence models. The focus is on one-point closure models (i.e., from algebraic models to higher order moment closure schemes and partial differential equation methods) which can be applied to CFD computations. However, other schemes helpful in developing one-point closure models, are also discussed.

  7. Structure and modeling of turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Novikov, E.A.

    1995-12-31

    The {open_quotes}vortex strings{close_quotes} scale l{sub s} {approximately} LRe{sup -3/10} (L-external scale, Re - Reynolds number) is suggested as a grid scale for the large-eddy simulation. Various aspects of the structure of turbulence and subgrid modeling are described in terms of conditional averaging, Markov processes with dependent increments and infinitely divisible distributions. The major request from the energy, naval, aerospace and environmental engineering communities to the theory of turbulence is to reduce the enormous number of degrees of freedom in turbulent flows to a level manageable by computer simulations. The vast majority of these degrees of freedom is in the small-scale motion. The study of the structure of turbulence provides a basis for subgrid-scale (SGS) models, which are necessary for the large-eddy simulations (LES).

  8. Incompressible Rayleigh–Taylor Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boffetta, Guido; Mazzino, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    Basic fluid equations are the main ingredient in the development of theories of Rayleigh–Taylor buoyancy-induced instability. Turbulence arises in the late stage of the instability evolution as a result of the proliferation of active scales of motion. Fluctuations are maintained by the unceasing conversion of potential energy into kinetic energy. Although the dynamics of turbulent fluctuations is ruled by the same equations controlling the Rayleigh–Taylor instability, here only phenomenological theories are currently available. The present review provides an overview of the most relevant (and often contrasting) theoretical approaches to Rayleigh–Taylor turbulence together with numerical and experimental evidence for their support. Although the focus is mainly on the classical Boussinesq Rayleigh–Taylor turbulence of miscible fluids, the review extends to other fluid systems with viscoelastic behavior, affected by rotation of the reference frame, and, finally, in the presence of reactions.

  9. Rotating Rayleigh-Taylor turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boffetta, G.; Mazzino, A.; Musacchio, S.

    2016-09-01

    The turbulent Rayleigh-Taylor system in a rotating reference frame is investigated by direct numerical simulations within the Oberbeck-Boussinesq approximation. On the basis of theoretical arguments, supported by our simulations, we show that the Rossby number decreases in time, and therefore the Coriolis force becomes more important as the system evolves and produces many effects on Rayleigh-Taylor turbulence. We find that rotation reduces the intensity of turbulent velocity fluctuations and therefore the growth rate of the temperature mixing layer. Moreover, in the presence of rotation the conversion of potential energy into turbulent kinetic energy is found to be less effective, and the efficiency of the heat transfer is reduced. Finally, during the evolution of the mixing layer we observe the development of a cyclone-anticyclone asymmetry.

  10. Energy transfer in compressible turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bataille, Francoise; Zhou, YE; Bertoglio, Jean-Pierre

    1995-01-01

    This letter investigates the compressible energy transfer process. We extend a methodology developed originally for incompressible turbulence and use databases from numerical simulations of a weak compressible turbulence based on Eddy-Damped-Quasi-Normal-Markovian (EDQNM) closure. In order to analyze the compressible mode directly, the well known Helmholtz decomposition is used. While the compressible component has very little influence on the solenoidal part, we found that almost all of the compressible turbulence energy is received from its solenoidal counterpart. We focus on the most fundamental building block of the energy transfer process, the triadic interactions. This analysis leads us to conclude that, at low turbulent Mach number, the compressible energy transfer process is dominated by a local radiative transfer (absorption) in both inertial and energy containing ranges.

  11. Decay of capillary wave turbulence.

    PubMed

    Deike, Luc; Berhanu, Michael; Falcon, Eric

    2012-06-01

    We report on the observation of freely decaying capillary wave turbulence on the surface of a fluid. The capillary wave turbulence spectrum decay is found to be self-similar in time with the same power law exponent as the one found in the stationary regime, in agreement with weak turbulence predictions. The amplitude of all Fourier modes are found to decrease exponentially with time at the same damping rate. The longest wavelengths involved in the system are shown to be damped by a viscous surface boundary layer. These long waves play the role of an energy source during the decay that sustains nonlinear interactions to keep capillary waves in a wave turbulent state.

  12. Turbulent Shear and Internal Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munroe, James; Sutherland, Bruce

    2008-11-01

    A series of experiments is presented that model the generation of non-hydrostatic internal gravity waves in upper ocean by the forcing of wind driven turbulent eddies in the surface mixed layer. A turbulent shear layer is forced by a conveyor belt with affixed flat plates near the surface of a stratified fluid and downward propagating internal waves are generated. The turbulence in the shear layer is characterized using particle image velocimetry to measure the kinetic energy as well as length and time scales. The internal waves are measured using synthetic schlieren to determine the amplitudes, frequencies, momentum fluxes, and the energy of the generated waves. The fraction of energy that leaks from the mixed layer to the internal wave field is presented. Consistent with other studies, it is found that the frequencies of internal waves generated by turbulence are an approximate constant fraction of the buoyancy frequency. Implications to internal waves propagating into the deep ocean will be discussed.

  13. On turbulence in dilatant dispersions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumert, Helmut Z.; Wessling, Bernhard

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents a new theory on the behaviour of shear-thickening (dilatant) fluids under turbulent conditions. The structure of a dilatant colloidal fluid in turbulent motion may be characterized by (at least) four characteristic length scales: (i) the ‘statistically largest’ turbulent scale, {λ }0, labeling the begin of the inertial part of the wavenumber spectrum; (ii) the energy-containing scale, { L }; (iii) Kolmogorov’s micro-scale, {λ }{ K }, related with the size of the smallest vortices existing for a given kinematic viscosity and forcing; (iv) the inner (‘colloidal’) micro-scale, {λ }i, typically representing a major stable material property of the colloidal fluid. In particular, for small ratios r={λ }i/{λ }{ K }∼ { O }(1), various interactions between colloidal structures and smallest turbulent eddies can be expected. In the present paper we discuss particularly that for ρ ={λ }0/{λ }{ K }\\to { O }(1) turbulence (in the narrow, inertial sense) is strangled and chaotic but less mixing fluid motions remain. We start from a new stochastic, micro-mechanical turbulence theory without empirical parameters valid for inviscid fluids as seen in publications by Baumert in 2013 and 2015. It predicts e.g. von Karman’s constant correctly as 1/\\sqrt{2 π }=0.399. In its generalized version for non-zero viscosity and shear-thickening behavior presented in this contribution, it predicts two solution branches for the steady state: The first characterizes a family of states with swift (inertial) turbulent mixing and small {λ }{ K }, potentially approaching {λ }i. The second branch characterizes a state family with ρ \\to { O }(1) and thus strangled turbulence, ρ ≈ { O }(1). Stability properties and a potential dynamic commuting between the two solution branches had to be left for future research.

  14. Turbulence modeling for compressible flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marvin, J. G.

    1977-01-01

    Material prepared for a course on Applications and Fundamentals of Turbulence given at the University of Tennessee Space Institute, January 10 and 11, 1977, is presented. A complete concept of turbulence modeling is described, and examples of progess for its use in computational aerodynimics are given. Modeling concepts, experiments, and computations using the concepts are reviewed in a manner that provides an up-to-date statement on the status of this problem for compressible flows.

  15. An introduction to quantum turbulence.

    PubMed

    Vinen, W F

    2008-08-28

    This paper provides a brief introduction to quantum turbulence in simple superfluids, in which the required rotational motion in the superfluid component is due entirely to the topological defects that are identified as quantized vortices. Particular emphasis is placed on the basic dynamical behaviour of the quantized vortices and on turbulent decay mechanisms at a very low temperature. There are possible analogies with the behaviour of cosmic strings.

  16. Atmospheric Turbulence Research at DFVLR

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-07-01

    the chairmanship of Dr G.Coupry. Ce rapport fournit une synthese des travaux effecues au DFVLR sur Ia turbulence atmospherique , avec une description des...Turbulent trarsport in the convective bundary layer. Proc. EUPASAP Sympos. on Aircraft Measurements in Relation to Air pollution , Garmscd, -.- 9. Sept...convective boundayr layer structure for usne in pollution dispersion model . J. Climate App1. Meteorol., 25, 1609-1624. Wygaard. J.C., 1986-: Measrment

  17. Shell models of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plunian, Franck; Stepanov, Rodion; Frick, Peter

    2013-02-01

    Shell models of hydrodynamic turbulence originated in the seventies. Their main aim was to describe the statistics of homogeneous and isotropic turbulence in spectral space, using a simple set of ordinary differential equations. In the eighties, shell models of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence emerged based on the same principles as their hydrodynamic counter-part but also incorporating interactions between magnetic and velocity fields. In recent years, significant improvements have been made such as the inclusion of non-local interactions and appropriate definitions for helicities. Though shell models cannot account for the spatial complexity of MHD turbulence, their dynamics are not over simplified and do reflect those of real MHD turbulence including intermittency or chaotic reversals of large-scale modes. Furthermore, these models use realistic values for dimensionless parameters (high kinetic and magnetic Reynolds numbers, low or high magnetic Prandtl number) allowing extended inertial range and accurate dissipation rate. Using modern computers it is difficult to attain an inertial range of three decades with direct numerical simulations, whereas eight are possible using shell models. In this review we set up a general mathematical framework allowing the description of any MHD shell model. The variety of the latter, with their advantages and weaknesses, is introduced. Finally we consider a number of applications, dealing with free-decaying MHD turbulence, dynamo action, Alfvén waves and the Hall effect.

  18. A multiple-time-scale turbulence model based on variable partitioning of turbulent kinetic energy spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, S.-W.; Chen, C.-P.

    1988-01-01

    The paper presents a multiple-time-scale turbulence model of a single point closure and a simplified split-spectrum method. Consideration is given to a class of turbulent boundary layer flows and of separated and/or swirling elliptic turbulent flows. For the separated and/or swirling turbulent flows, the present turbulence model yielded significantly improved computational results over those obtained with the standard k-epsilon turbulence model.

  19. Advanced Turbulence Modeling Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, Tsan-Hsing

    2005-01-01

    The ZCET program developed at NASA Glenn Research Center is to study hydrogen/air injection concepts for aircraft gas turbine engines that meet conventional gas turbine performance levels and provide low levels of harmful NOx emissions. A CFD study for ZCET program has been successfully carried out. It uses the most recently enhanced National combustion code (NCC) to perform CFD simulations for two configurations of hydrogen fuel injectors (GRC- and Sandia-injector). The results can be used to assist experimental studies to provide quick mixing, low emission and high performance fuel injector designs. The work started with the configuration of the single-hole injector. The computational models were taken from the experimental designs. For example, the GRC single-hole injector consists of one air tube (0.78 inches long and 0.265 inches in diameter) and two hydrogen tubes (0.3 inches long and 0.0226 inches in diameter opposed at 180 degree). The hydrogen tubes are located 0.3 inches upstream from the exit of the air element (the inlet location for the combustor). To do the simulation, the single-hole injector is connected to a combustor model (8.16 inches long and 0.5 inches in diameter). The inlet conditions for air and hydrogen elements are defined according to actual experimental designs. Two crossing jets of hydrogen/air are simulated in detail in the injector. The cold flow, reacting flow, flame temperature, combustor pressure and possible flashback phenomena are studied. Two grid resolutions of the numerical model have been adopted. The first computational grid contains 0.52 million elements, the second one contains over 1.3 million elements. The CFD results have shown only about 5% difference between the two grid resolutions. Therefore, the CFD result obtained from the model of 1.3-million grid resolution can be considered as a grid independent numerical solution. Turbulence models built in NCC are consolidated and well tested. They can handle both coarse and

  20. Recent developments in plasma turbulence and turbulent transport

    SciTech Connect

    Terry, P.W.

    1997-09-22

    This report contains viewgraphs of recent developments in plasma turbulence and turbulent transport. Localized nonlinear structures occur under a variety of circumstances in turbulent, magnetically confined plasmas, arising in both kinetic and fluid descriptions, i.e., in either wave-particle or three-wave coupling interactions. These structures are non wavelike. They cannot be incorporated in the collective wave response, but interact with collective modes through their shielding by the plasma dielectric. These structures are predicted to modify turbulence-driven transport in a way that in consistent with, or in some cases are confirmed by recent experimental observations. In kinetic theory, non wavelike structures are localized perturbations of phase space density. There are two types of structures. Holes are self-trapped, while clumps have a self-potential that is too weak to resist deformation and mixing by ambient potential fluctuations. Clumps remain correlated in turbulence if their spatial extent is smaller than the correlation length of the scattering fields. In magnetic turbulence, clumps travel along stochastic magnetic fields, shielded by the plasma dielectric. A drag on the clump macro-particle is exerted by the shielding, inducing emission into the collective response. The emission in turn damps back on the particle distribution via Landau dampling. The exchange of energy between clumps and particles, as mediated by the collective mode, imposes constraints on transport. For a turbulent spectrum whose mean wavenumber along the equilibrium magnetic field is nonzero, the electron thermal flux is proportional to the ion thermal velocity. Conventional predictions (which account only for collective modes) are larger by the square root of the ion to electron mass ratio. Recent measurements are consistent with the small flux. In fluid plasma,s localized coherent structures can occur as intense vortices.

  1. Seasonality in submesoscale turbulence

    PubMed Central

    Callies, Jörn; Ferrari, Raffaele; Klymak, Jody M.; Gula, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Although the strongest ocean surface currents occur at horizontal scales of order 100 km, recent numerical simulations suggest that flows smaller than these mesoscale eddies can achieve important vertical transports in the upper ocean. These submesoscale flows, 1–100 km in horizontal extent, take heat and atmospheric gases down into the interior ocean, accelerating air–sea fluxes, and bring deep nutrients up into the sunlit surface layer, fueling primary production. Here we present observational evidence that submesoscale flows undergo a seasonal cycle in the surface mixed layer: they are much stronger in winter than in summer. Submesoscale flows are energized by baroclinic instabilities that develop around geostrophic eddies in the deep winter mixed layer at a horizontal scale of order 1–10 km. Flows larger than this instability scale are energized by turbulent scale interactions. Enhanced submesoscale activity in the winter mixed layer is expected to achieve efficient exchanges with the permanent thermocline below. PMID:25897832

  2. Multidimensional Potential Burgers Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boritchev, Alexandre

    2016-03-01

    We consider the multidimensional generalised stochastic Burgers equation in the space-periodic setting: partial {u}/partial t+(nabla f({u}) \\cdot nabla) {u}-ν Δ {u}= nabla η, quad t ≥ 0, {x} in{T}^d=({R}/ {Z})^d, under the assumption that u is a gradient. Here f is strongly convex and satisfies a growth condition, ν is small and positive, while η is a random forcing term, smooth in space and white in time. For solutions u of this equation, we study Sobolev norms of u averaged in time and in ensemble: each of these norms behaves as a given negative power of ν. These results yield sharp upper and lower bounds for natural analogues of quantities characterising the hydrodynamical turbulence, namely the averages of the increments and of the energy spectrum. These quantities behave as a power of the norm of the relevant parameter, which is respectively the separation ℓ in the physical space and the wavenumber k in the Fourier space. Our bounds do not depend on the initial condition and hold uniformly in {ν}. We generalise the results obtained for the one-dimensional case in [10], confirming the physical predictions in [4, 30]. Note that the form of the estimates does not depend on the dimension: the powers of {ν, |{{k}}|, ℓ} are the same in the one- and the multi-dimensional setting.

  3. Turbulent boundary layer heat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finson, M. L.; Clarke, A. S.; Wu, P. K. S.

    1981-01-01

    A Reynolds stress model for turbulent boundary layers is used to study surface roughness effects on skin friction and heat transfer. The issues of primary interest are the influence of roughness character (element shape and spacing) and the nature of roughness effects at high Mach numbers. Computations based on the model compare satisfactorily with measurements from experiments involving variations in roughness character, in low speed and modestly supersonic conditions. The more limited data base at hypersonic Mach numbers is also examined with reasonable success, although no quantitative explanation is offered for the reduction of heat transfer with increasing roughness observed by Holden at Me -9.4. The present calculations indicate that the mean velocity is approximately uniform over much of the height range below the tops of the elements, y less than or equal to k. With this constant (roughness velocity,) it is simple to estimate the form drag on the elements. This roughness velocity has been investigated by systematically exercising the present model over ranges of potential parameters. The roughness velocity is found to be primarily a function of the projected element frontal area per unit surface area, thus providing a new and simple method for predicting roughness character effects. The model further suggests that increased boundary layer temperatures should be generated by roughness at high edge Mach numbers, which would tend to reduce skin friction and heat transfer, perhaps below smooth wall levels.

  4. Heat transfer and turbulence in a turbulated blade cooling circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abuaf, N.; Kercher, D. M.

    1992-06-01

    The aero-thermal performance of a typical turbine blade three-pass turbulated cooling circuit geometry was investigated in a 10X plexiglas test model. The model closely duplicated the blade's leading edge, midchord and trailing edge cooling passage geometries. Steady state heat transfer coefficient distributions along the blade pressure side wall (convex surface) of the cooling circuit passages were measured with a thin-foil heater and a liquid crystal temperature sensor assembly. The heat transfer experiments were conducted on rib-roughened channels with staggered turbulators along the convex and concave surfaces of the cooling passages. Mid-channel axial velocity and turbulence intensity measurements were taken by hot wire anemometry at each passage end of the three-pass cooling circuit to characterize and relate the local thermal performance to the turbulence intensity levels. The near-atmospheric experimental data are compared with results of a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis at the operating internal environment for a 1X rotating model of the blade cooling circuit and other turbulator channel geometry heat transfer data investigations. The comparison between the measurements and analysis is encouraging. Differences with other heat transfer data appear reasonably understood and explainable.

  5. Turbulent transport phenomena in a channel with periodic rib turbulators

    SciTech Connect

    Liou, T.M.; Hwang, J.J.; Chen, S.H. )

    1992-09-01

    Periodic fully developed turbulent flow in a 2D channel with rib turbulators on two opposite walls has been studied numerically and experimentally. In numerical predictions, an algebraic Reynolds stress turbulence model is adopted, and a smoothed hybrid central/skew upstream difference scheme is developed. In experiments, the laser-Doppler velocimetry and laser holographic interferometry are employed to measure the local flow and heat transfer characteristics. The results are obtained with the ratio of pitch to rib height 5, 10, 15, and 20, for Reynolds number of 3.3 x 10 exp 4 and are presented in terms of the reattachment length, mean velocity and turbulent kinetic energy profiles, isotherm patterns, and distributions of local pressure recovery and Nusselt number. A detailed comparison with experimental data shows that the present calculations have an improvement over the previous work in the prediction of periodic ribbed-wall flow and heat transfer. In addition, regions susceptible to hot spots are identified by examining the distributions of the local Nusselt number. Furthermore, the enhancement of mean Nusselt number is documented in terms of relative contributions of the increased turbulence intensity and surface area provided by the ribs. 32 refs.

  6. Turbulence characteristics inside a turbulent spot in plane Poiseuille flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henningson, D. S.; Kim, John; Alfredsson, P. Henrik

    1988-01-01

    In wall-bounded shear flows the transition to turbulence through localized disturbances goes through a pattern starting with a development of shear layers. The localized normal velocity fluctuations induce normal vorticity through the lift-up effect. These shear layers become unstable to secondary disturbances, and if the amplitudes of the disturbances are large enough, a turbulent spot develops. Investigations of the spot in boundary layers has shown that the turbulent part of the spot is very similar to a fully developed boundary layer. Wygnanski et al. (1976) showed that the mean profile at the center-symmetry plane has a logarithmic region and Johansson et al. (1987) showed that both the higher-order statistics and flow structures in the spot were the same as in the corresponding fully developed flow. In what respects the turbulence inside the Poiseuille spot is similar to fully developed turbulent channel flow is studied. The numerically simulated spot is used, where the characteristics inside the spot are compared to those of the wave packet in the wingtip area. A recent experimental investigation of the velocity field associated with the Poiseuille spot by Klingmann et al. is used for comparison.

  7. The Turbulent Life of Phytoplankton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghosal, S.; Rogers, M.; Wray, A.

    2000-01-01

    Phytoplankton is a generic name for photosynthesizing microscopic organisms that inhabit the upper sunlit layer (euphotic zone) of almost all oceans and bodies of freshwater. They are agents for "primary production," the incorporation of carbon from the environment into living organisms, a process that, sustains the aquatic food web. It is estimated that phytoplankton contribute about half of the global primary production, the other half being due to terrestrial plants. By sustaining the aquatic food web and controlling the biogeochemical cycles through primary production, phytoplankton exert a dominant influence on life on earth. Turbulence influences this process in three very important ways. First, essential mineral nutrients are transported from the deeper layers to the euphotic zone through turbulence. Second, turbulence helps to suspend phytoplankton in the euphotic zone since in still water, the phytoplankton, especially the larger species, tend to settle out of the sunlit layers. Third, turbulence transports phytoplankton from the surface to the dark sterile waters, and this is an important mechanism of loss. Thus, stable phytoplankton populations are maintained through a delicate dynamic balance between the processes of turbulence, reproduction, and sinking. The first quantitative model for this was introduced by Riley, Stommel and Bumpus in 1949. This is an attempt to extend their efforts through a combination of analysis and computer simulation in order to better understand the principal qualitative aspects of the physical/biological coupling of this natural system.

  8. TEM turbulence optimisation in stellarators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proll, J. H. E.; Mynick, H. E.; Xanthopoulos, P.; Lazerson, S. A.; Faber, B. J.

    2016-01-01

    With the advent of neoclassically optimised stellarators, optimising stellarators for turbulent transport is an important next step. The reduction of ion-temperature-gradient-driven turbulence has been achieved via shaping of the magnetic field, and the reduction of trapped-electron mode (TEM) turbulence is addressed in the present paper. Recent analytical and numerical findings suggest TEMs are stabilised when a large fraction of trapped particles experiences favourable bounce-averaged curvature. This is the case for example in Wendelstein 7-X (Beidler et al 1990 Fusion Technol. 17 148) and other Helias-type stellarators. Using this knowledge, a proxy function was designed to estimate the TEM dynamics, allowing optimal configurations for TEM stability to be determined with the STELLOPT (Spong et al 2001 Nucl. Fusion 41 711) code without extensive turbulence simulations. A first proof-of-principle optimised equilibrium stemming from the TEM-dominated stellarator experiment HSX (Anderson et al 1995 Fusion Technol. 27 273) is presented for which a reduction of the linear growth rates is achieved over a broad range of the operational parameter space. As an important consequence of this property, the turbulent heat flux levels are reduced compared with the initial configuration.

  9. PDF turbulence modeling and DNS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, A. T.

    1992-01-01

    The problem of time discontinuity (or jump condition) in the coalescence/dispersion (C/D) mixing model is addressed in probability density function (pdf). A C/D mixing model continuous in time is introduced. With the continuous mixing model, the process of chemical reaction can be fully coupled with mixing. In the case of homogeneous turbulence decay, the new model predicts a pdf very close to a Gaussian distribution, with finite higher moments also close to that of a Gaussian distribution. Results from the continuous mixing model are compared with both experimental data and numerical results from conventional C/D models. The effect of Coriolis forces on compressible homogeneous turbulence is studied using direct numerical simulation (DNS). The numerical method used in this study is an eight order compact difference scheme. Contrary to the conclusions reached by previous DNS studies on incompressible isotropic turbulence, the present results show that the Coriolis force increases the dissipation rate of turbulent kinetic energy, and that anisotropy develops as the Coriolis force increases. The Taylor-Proudman theory does apply since the derivatives in the direction of the rotation axis vanishes rapidly. A closer analysis reveals that the dissipation rate of the incompressible component of the turbulent kinetic energy indeed decreases with a higher rotation rate, consistent with incompressible flow simulations (Bardina), while the dissipation rate of the compressible part increases; the net gain is positive. Inertial waves are observed in the simulation results.

  10. Light propagation through anisotropic turbulence.

    PubMed

    Toselli, Italo; Agrawal, Brij; Restaino, Sergio

    2011-03-01

    A wealth of experimental data has shown that atmospheric turbulence can be anisotropic; in this case, a Kolmogorov spectrum does not describe well the atmospheric turbulence statistics. In this paper, we show a quantitative analysis of anisotropic turbulence by using a non-Kolmogorov power spectrum with an anisotropic coefficient. The spectrum we use does not include the inner and outer scales, it is valid only inside the inertial subrange, and it has a power-law slope that can be different from a Kolmogorov one. Using this power spectrum, in the weak turbulence condition, we analyze the impact of the power-law variations α on the long-term beam spread and scintillation index for several anisotropic coefficient values ς. We consider only horizontal propagation across the turbulence cells, assuming circular symmetry is maintained on the orthogonal plane to the propagation direction. We conclude that the anisotropic coefficient influences both the long-term beam spread and the scintillation index by the factor ς(2-α).

  11. Turbulent character of wind energy.

    PubMed

    Milan, Patrick; Wächter, Matthias; Peinke, Joachim

    2013-03-29

    Wind turbines generate electricity from turbulent wind. Large fluctuations, and, more importantly, frequent wind gusts cause a highly fluctuating electrical power feed into the grid. Such effects are the hallmark of high-frequency turbulence. Here we show evidence that it is the complex structure of turbulence that dominates the power output for one single wind turbine as well as for an entire wind farm. We illustrate the highly intermittent, peaked nature of wind power fed into the grid. Multifractal scaling is observed, as described initially by Kolmogorov's 1962 theory of turbulence. In parallel, we propose a stochastic model that converts wind speed signals into power output signals with appropriate multifractal statistics. As more and more wind turbines become integrated into our electric grids, a proper understanding of this intermittent power source must be worked out to ensure grid stability in future networks. Thus, our results stress the need for a profound understanding of the physics of turbulence and its impact on wind energy.

  12. A complete model of turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, D. C.; Traci, R. M.

    1976-01-01

    A set of constitutive equations suitable for a priori computation of turbulent shear flows has been developed. Since no properties of a given turbulent flow need be known in advance in order to obtain a solution, the equations comprise a complete model of turbulence. Perturbation analysis shows that the model predicts a composite five-layer structure for an incompressible turbulent boundary layer, viz, a defect layer, a law-of-the-wall layer, a viscous sublayer, a near-surface roughness layer, and a viscous superlayer at the boundary-layer edge. Analysis of the defect layer demonstrates the key improvement of the model over its predecessor, the Saffman-Wilcox two-equation model of turbulence. Examination of model-predicted sublayer structure yields model-parameter boundary conditions appropriate for surfaces with roughness and mass injection. Results of numerical computations of compressible and incompressible equilibrium boundary layers show that, for such flows, the model is as accurate as mixing-length theory. Applications to transitional boundary layers and to nonequilibrium relaxation of a boundary layer passing from a rough to a smooth surface indicate that the model's applicability extends far beyond that of mixing-length theory's.

  13. Dynamical properties of superfluid turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Lorenson, C.P.

    1985-01-01

    Despite all the experimental work done in recent years to study superfluid turbulence, the understanding of the dynamical properties of this system is still poor. The author designed a new cryogenic probe to perform a series of experiments to study the dynamical response of the vortex line density in turbulent thermal counterflow. The apparatus uses a small glass flow tube to probe the fluctuations in the line density around the two turbulent states (TI, TII) present in this system. A chemical potential gradiometer is used that measures the chemical potential across the flow tube. This quantity is directly related to the vortex line density. The gradiometer also enabled both the steady state and the dynamical properties of the turbulence to be studied. These experiments have established the existence of fluctuations in the chemical potential in turbulent counterflow. For the first time fluctuations in the dissipation were observed in the TI/TII transition region. The fluctuations are characteristic of broad-band noise showing no evidence of fluctuations at preferred frequency. The TI/TII transition is characterized by a sharp increase in the noise power amplitude and its variation with heat current reveals a complex structure.

  14. Modeling of Turbulent Swirling Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, Tsan-Hsing; Zhu, Jiang; Liou, William; Chen, Kuo-Huey; Liu, Nan-Suey; Lumley, John L.

    1997-01-01

    Aircraft engine combustors generally involve turbulent swirling flows in order to enhance fuel-air mixing and flame stabilization. It has long been recognized that eddy viscosity turbulence models are unable to appropriately model swirling flows. Therefore, it has been suggested that, for the modeling of these flows, a second order closure scheme should be considered because of its ability in the modeling of rotational and curvature effects. However, this scheme will require solution of many complicated second moment transport equations (six Reynolds stresses plus other scalar fluxes and variances), which is a difficult task for any CFD implementations. Also, this scheme will require a large amount of computer resources for a general combustor swirling flow. This report is devoted to the development of a cubic Reynolds stress-strain model for turbulent swirling flows, and was inspired by the work of Launder's group at UMIST. Using this type of model, one only needs to solve two turbulence equations, one for the turbulent kinetic energy k and the other for the dissipation rate epsilon. The cubic model developed in this report is based on a general Reynolds stress-strain relationship. Two flows have been chosen for model evaluation. One is a fully developed rotating pipe flow, and the other is a more complex flow with swirl and recirculation.

  15. Transit times in turbulent flows.

    PubMed

    Pécseli, H L; Trulsen, J

    2010-04-01

    Statistics of the motion of passively convected point particles in turbulent flows are studied. The database used is obtained by direct numerical solution of the Navier-Stokes equation. We estimate the probability distribution of the transit times of such particles through reference volumes with given forms and sizes. A selected position within the reference volume is moving with the local flow velocity, thus determining the motion of the entire surface. The transit time is defined as the interval between entrance and exit times of surrounding particles convected through the volume by the turbulent motions. Spherical as well as hemispherical surfaces are studied. Scale sizes in the inertial as well as in the viscous subranges of the turbulence are considered. Simple, and seemingly universal, scaling laws are obtained for the probability density of the transit times in terms of the basic properties of the turbulent flow and the geometry. In the present formulation, the results of the analysis are relevant for chemical reactions, but also for understanding details of the feeding rate of micro-organisms in turbulent waters, for instance.

  16. Phytoplankton's motion in turbulent ocean.

    PubMed

    Fouxon, Itzhak; Leshansky, Alexander

    2015-07-01

    We study the influence of turbulence on upward motion of phytoplankton. Interaction with the flow is described by the Pedley-Kessler model considering spherical microorganisms. We find a range of parameters when the upward drift is only weakly perturbed or when turbulence completely randomizes the drift direction. When the perturbation is small, the drift is either determined by the local vorticity or is Gaussian. We find a range of parameters where the phytoplankton interaction with the flow can be described consistently as diffusion of orientation in effective potential. By solving the corresponding Fokker-Planck equation we find exponential steady-state distribution of phytoplankton's propulsion orientation. We further identify the range of parameters where phytoplankton's drift velocity with respect to the flow is determined uniquely by its position. In this case, one can describe phytoplankton's motion by a smooth flow and phytoplankton concentrates on fractal. We find fractal dimensions and demonstrate that phytoplankton forms vertical stripes in space with a nonisotropic pair-correlation function of concentration increased in the vertical direction. The probability density function of the distance between two particles obeys power law with the negative exponent given by the ratio of integrals of the turbulent energy spectrum. We find the regime of strong clustering where the exponent is of order one so that turbulence increases the rate of collisions by a large factor. The predictions hold for Navier-Stokes turbulence and stand for testing.

  17. Turbulent Character of Wind Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milan, Patrick; Wächter, Matthias; Peinke, Joachim

    2013-03-01

    Wind turbines generate electricity from turbulent wind. Large fluctuations, and, more importantly, frequent wind gusts cause a highly fluctuating electrical power feed into the grid. Such effects are the hallmark of high-frequency turbulence. Here we show evidence that it is the complex structure of turbulence that dominates the power output for one single wind turbine as well as for an entire wind farm. We illustrate the highly intermittent, peaked nature of wind power fed into the grid. Multifractal scaling is observed, as described initially by Kolmogorov’s 1962 theory of turbulence. In parallel, we propose a stochastic model that converts wind speed signals into power output signals with appropriate multifractal statistics. As more and more wind turbines become integrated into our electric grids, a proper understanding of this intermittent power source must be worked out to ensure grid stability in future networks. Thus, our results stress the need for a profound understanding of the physics of turbulence and its impact on wind energy.

  18. Direct simulation of turbulent combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poinsot, T. J.

    1990-01-01

    Understanding and modeling of turbulent combustion are key-problems in the computation of numerous practical systems. Because of the lack of analytical theories in this field and of the difficulty of performing precise experiments, direct simulation appears to be one of the most attractive tools to use in addressing this problem. The present work can be split into two parts: (1) Development and validation of a direct simulation method for turbulent combustion; (2) Applications of the method to premixed turbulent combustion problems. The goal of part 1 is to define and to test a numerical method for direct simulation of reacting flows. A high level of confidence should be attached to direct simulation results, and this can only be achieved through extensive validation tests. In part 2, direct simulation is used to address some of the many critical problems related to turbulent combustion. At the present time, I have limited this work to premixed combustion and considered only four basic issues: (1) The effect of pressure waves on flame propagation; (2) The interaction between flame fronts and vortices; (3) The influence of curvature on premixed flame fronts; and (4) The validation of flamelet models for premixed turbulent combustion.

  19. Remote Sensing of Turbulence in Natural Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, Carl H.

    2010-11-01

    It is generally agreed that natural fluids including the atmosphere, ocean, and astrophysical objects are mixed by turbulence against the forces of gravity. However, the basic mechanisms, definition, and even the direction of the turbulence kinetic energy cascade remain controversial. Broadband remote sensing gives strong evidence to resolve such questions. Turbulence is found to be an eddy-like state of fluid motion where the inertial-vortex forces of the eddies are larger than any other forces that tend to damp the eddies out. Irrotational flows are non-turbulent by definition. Because turbulent vorticity is always produced at the Kolmogorov scale, the direction of the turbulent energy cascade is always from small scales to large. Fossilization of the turbulence occurs at its largest scales. Fossil turbulence is any perturbation of a hydrophysical field produced by turbulence that is no longer turbulent at the scale of the perturbation. In the ocean, fossil vorticity turbulence internal waves carry bottom turbulence energy to the sea surface by means of beamed zombie turbulence maser action mixing chimneys, a generic process of natural fluids. Spectral analysis of the sea surface brightness from space satellites combined with simultaneous ocean microstructure sea truth reveals the generic mechanism, also supported by recent astrophysical observations http://arxiv.org/abs/1005.2772v4.

  20. Turbulence modeling in shock wave/turbulent boundary layer interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smits, A. J.

    1992-01-01

    The research performed was an experimental program to help develop turbulence models for shock wave boundary layer interactions. The measurements were taken in a Mach 3, 16 deg compression corner interaction, at a unit Reynolds number of 63 x 10(exp 6)/m. The data consisted of heat transfer data taken upstream and downstream of the interaction, hot wire measurements of the instantaneous temperature and velocity fluctuations to verify the Strong Reynolds Analogy, and single- and double-pulsed Rayleigh scattering images to study the development of the instantaneous shock/turbulence interaction.

  1. Two-dimensional convective turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Gruzinov, A.V.; Kukharkin, N.; Sudan, R.N.

    1996-02-01

    We show that 2D {bold E{times}B} ionospheric turbulence of the electron density in the equatorial electrojet is isomorphic to the viscous convection of an ordinary fluid in a porous medium due to temperature gradients. Numerical simulations reveal the strong anisotropy in the turbulence, which consists of rising hot bubbles and falling cool bubbles. These bubbles break up into fingers leading to the formation of stable shear flows. After reaching a quasisteady state, the omnidirectional energy spectrum approaches a {ital k}{sup {minus}2} behavior, rather than {ital k}{sup {minus}5/3} as expected from isotropic turbulence. Physical mechanisms that lead to anisotropy are analyzed. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  2. Turbulent optimization of toroidal configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mynick, H.; Xanthopoulos, P.; Faber, B.; Lucia, M.; Rorvig, M.; Talmadge, J. N.

    2014-09-01

    Recent progress in ‘turbulent optimization’ of toroidal configurations is described, using a method recently developed for evolving such configurations to ones having reduced turbulent transport. The method uses the GENE gyrokinetic code to compute the radial heat flux Qgk, and the STELLOPT optimization code with a theory-based ‘proxy’ figure of merit Qpr to stand in for Qgk for computational speed. Improved expressions for Qpr have been developed, involving further geometric quantities beyond those in the original proxy, which can also be used as ‘control knobs’ to reduce Qgk. Use of a global search algorithm has led to the discovery of turbulent-optimized configurations not found by the standard, local algorithm usually employed, as has use of a mapping capability which STELLOPT has been extended to provide, of figures of merit over the search space.

  3. Turbulent mix experiments and simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Dimonte, G.; Schneider, M.; Frerking, C.E.

    1995-08-01

    Hydrodynamic instabilities produce material mixing that can significantly degrade weapons performance. We investigate the Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) and Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instabilities in the turbulent regime in two experimental venues. RM experiments are conducted on the Nova laser with strong radiatively driven shocks (Mach > 20) in planar, two fluid targets. Interfacial perturbations are imposed with single sinusoidal modes to test linear theory and with three dimensional (3D) random modes to produce turbulent mix. RT experiments are conducted on a new facility, the Linear Electric Motor (LEM), in which macroscopic fluids are accelerated with arbitrary temporal profiles. This allows detailed diagnosis of the turbulence over a wide range of conditions. The Nova experiments study the high compression regime whereas the LEM experiments are incompressible. The results are compared to hydrodynamic simulations with the arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian code (CALE). The goal is to develop and test engineering models of mix.

  4. Turbulence in transient solar phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cross, M.

    1982-01-01

    If theta dependence is kept in the Navier-Stokes equations for the solar wind, than a density enhancement will grow. This growth is followed in the nonlinear equations until a streamer is formed. Viscosity stops the streamer's growth when there is a large difference in speeds inside and outside of the streamer. Using classical fluid mechanics and a latitude dependent hydrodynamical model, it is shown that unmagnetized perturbed flow evolves into high and low density regions. The growth mechanisms for density enrichments are discussed along with a nonlinear solution for their large amplitude development. It was found that a higher Reynolds number is needed to start turbulence in the presence of a magnetic field because energy is required to bend the field lines attached to the fluid. If cosmological gas was turbulent shortly after the big bang, then galaxies could have been formed by turbulent eddies.

  5. Magnetohydrodynamic turbulence: Observation and experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, M. R.; Schaffner, D. A.; Weck, P. J.

    2015-05-15

    We provide a tutorial on the paradigms and tools of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence. The principal paradigm is that of a turbulent cascade from large scales to small, resulting in power law behavior for the frequency power spectrum for magnetic fluctuations E{sub B}(f). We will describe five useful statistical tools for MHD turbulence in the time domain: the temporal autocorrelation function, the frequency power spectrum, the probability distribution function of temporal increments, the temporal structure function, and the permutation entropy. Each of these tools will be illustrated with an example taken from MHD fluctuations in the solar wind. A single dataset from the Wind satellite will be used to illustrate all five temporal statistical tools.

  6. Turbulent transport in premixed flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutland, C. J.; Cant, R. S.

    1994-01-01

    Simulations of planar, premixed turbulent flames with heat release were used to study turbulent transport. Reynolds stress and Reynolds flux budgets were obtained and used to guide the investigation of important physical effects. Essentially all pressure terms in the transport equations were found to be significant. In the Reynolds flux equations, these terms are the major source of counter-gradient transport. Viscous and molecular terms were also found to be significant, with both dilatational and solenoidal terms contributing to the Reynolds stress dissipation. The BML theory of premixed turbulent combustion was critically examined in detail. The BML bimodal pdf was found to agree well with the DNS data. All BML decompositions, through the third moments, show very good agreement with the DNS results. Several BML models for conditional terms were checked using the DNS data and were found to require more extensive development.

  7. Collisional Aggregation Due to Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pumir, Alain; Wilkinson, Michael

    2016-03-01

    Collisions between particles suspended in a fluid play an important role in many physical processes. As an example, collisions of microscopic water droplets in clouds are a necessary step in the production of macroscopic raindrops. Collisions of dust grains are also conjectured to be important for planet formation in the gas surrounding young stars and to play a role in the dynamics of sand storms. In these processes, collisions are favored by fast turbulent motions. Here we review recent advances in the understanding of collisional aggregation due to turbulence. We discuss the role of fractal clustering of particles and caustic singularities of their velocities. We also discuss limitations of the Smoluchowski equation for modeling such processes. These advances lead to a semiquantitative understanding on the influence of turbulence on collision rates and point to deficiencies in the current understanding of rainfall and planet formation.

  8. ANISOTROPIC INTERMITTENCY OF MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC TURBULENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Osman, K. T.; Kiyani, K. H.; Chapman, S. C.; Hnat, B.

    2014-03-10

    A higher-order multiscale analysis of spatial anisotropy in inertial range magnetohydrodynamic turbulence is presented using measurements from the STEREO spacecraft in fast ambient solar wind. We show for the first time that, when measuring parallel to the local magnetic field direction, the full statistical signature of the magnetic and Elsässer field fluctuations is that of a non-Gaussian globally scale-invariant process. This is distinct from the classic multiexponent statistics observed when the local magnetic field is perpendicular to the flow direction. These observations are interpreted as evidence for the weakness, or absence, of a parallel magnetofluid turbulence energy cascade. As such, these results present strong observational constraints on the statistical nature of intermittency in turbulent plasmas.

  9. Aircraft Cabin Turbulence Warning Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogue, Rodney K.; Larcher, Kenneth

    2006-01-01

    New turbulence prediction technology offers the potential for advance warning of impending turbulence encounters, thereby allowing necessary cabin preparation time prior to the encounter. The amount of time required for passengers and flight attendants to be securely seated (that is, seated with seat belts fastened) currently is not known. To determine secured seating-based warning times, a consortium of aircraft safety organizations have conducted an experiment involving a series of timed secured seating trials. This demonstrative experiment, conducted on October 1, 2, and 3, 2002, used a full-scale B-747 wide-body aircraft simulator, human passenger subjects, and supporting staff from six airlines. Active line-qualified flight attendants from three airlines participated in the trials. Definitive results have been obtained to provide secured seating-based warning times for the developers of turbulence warning technology

  10. Stimulated neutrino transformation through turbulence

    DOE PAGES

    Patton, Kelly M.; Kneller, James P.; McLaughlin, Gail C.

    2014-04-30

    We derive an analytical solution for the flavor evolution of a neutrino through a turbulent density profile which is found to accurately predict the amplitude and transition wavelength of numerical solutions on a case-by-case basis. The evolution is seen to strongly depend upon those Fourier modes in the turbulence which are approximately the same as the splitting between neutrino eigenvalues. Transitions are strongly enhanced by those Fourier modes in the turbulence which are approximately the same as the splitting between neutrino eigenvalues. Lastly, we also find a suppression of transitions due to the long wavelength modes when the ratio ofmore » their amplitude and the wavenumber is of order, or greater than, the first root of the Bessel function J0.« less

  11. Stimulated neutrino transformation through turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Patton, Kelly M.; Kneller, James P.; McLaughlin, Gail C.

    2014-04-30

    We derive an analytical solution for the flavor evolution of a neutrino through a turbulent density profile which is found to accurately predict the amplitude and transition wavelength of numerical solutions on a case-by-case basis. The evolution is seen to strongly depend upon those Fourier modes in the turbulence which are approximately the same as the splitting between neutrino eigenvalues. Transitions are strongly enhanced by those Fourier modes in the turbulence which are approximately the same as the splitting between neutrino eigenvalues. Lastly, we also find a suppression of transitions due to the long wavelength modes when the ratio of their amplitude and the wavenumber is of order, or greater than, the first root of the Bessel function J0.

  12. Magnetohydrodynamic turbulence: Observation and experimenta)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, M. R.; Schaffner, D. A.; Weck, P. J.

    2015-05-01

    We provide a tutorial on the paradigms and tools of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence. The principal paradigm is that of a turbulent cascade from large scales to small, resulting in power law behavior for the frequency power spectrum for magnetic fluctuations EB(f ) . We will describe five useful statistical tools for MHD turbulence in the time domain: the temporal autocorrelation function, the frequency power spectrum, the probability distribution function of temporal increments, the temporal structure function, and the permutation entropy. Each of these tools will be illustrated with an example taken from MHD fluctuations in the solar wind. A single dataset from the Wind satellite will be used to illustrate all five temporal statistical tools.

  13. On turbulent spots in plane Poiseuille flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henningson, Dan S.; Kim, John

    1991-01-01

    Turbulence characteristics inside a turbulent spot in plane Poiseuille flow are investigated by analyzing a database obtained from a direct numerical simulation. The spot is found to consist of two distinct regions - a turbulent area and a wave area. The flow inside the turbulent area has a strong resemblance to that found in the fully developed turbulent channel. Suitably defined mean and r.m.s. fluctuations as well as the internal shear-layer structures are found to be similar to the turbulent counterpart. In the wave area the inflexional mean spanwise profiles cause a rapid growth of oblique waves, which break down to turbulence. The breakdown process of the oblique waves is reminiscent of the secondary instability observed during transition to turbulence in channel and boundary-layer flows. Other detailed characteristics associated with the Poiseuille spot are presented and are compared with experimental results.

  14. On turbulent spots in plane Poiseuille flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henningson, Dan S.; Kim, John

    1992-01-01

    Turbulence characteristics inside a turbulent spot in plume Poiseuille flow are investigated by analyzing a data base obtained from a direct numerical simulation. The spot is found to consist of two distinct regions - a turbulent area and a wave area. The flow inside the turbulent area has a strong resemblance to that found in the fully developed turbulent channel. Suitably defined mean and rms fluctuations as well as the internal shear layer structures are found to be similar to the turbulent counterpart. In the wave area, the inflexional mean spanwise profiles cause a rapid growth of oblique waves, which break down to turbulence. The breakdown process of the oblique waves is reminiscent of the secondary instability observed during transition to turbulence in channel and boundary layer flows. Other detailed characteristics associated with the Poiseuille spot are presented and are compared with experimental results.

  15. Confined Turbulent Swirling Recirculating Flow Predictions. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abujelala, M. T.

    1984-01-01

    Turbulent swirling flow, the STARPIC computer code, turbulence modeling of turbulent flows, the k-xi turbulence model and extensions, turbulence parameters deduction from swirling confined flow measurements, extension of the k-xi to confined swirling recirculating flows, and general predictions for confined turbulent swirling flow are discussed.

  16. Mixing in Magnetized Turbulent Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sur, Sharanya; Pan, Liubin; Scannapieco, Evan

    2014-04-01

    Turbulent motions are essential to the mixing of entrained fluids and are also capable of amplifying weak initial magnetic fields by small-scale dynamo action. Here we perform a systematic study of turbulent mixing in magnetized media, using three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations that include a scalar concentration field. We focus on how mixing depends on the magnetic Prandtl number, Pm, from 1 to 4 and the Mach number, { {M}}, from 0.3 to 2.4. For all subsonic flows, we find that the velocity power spectrum has a k -5/3 slope in the early kinematic phase, but steepens due to magnetic back reactions as the field saturates. The scalar power spectrum, on the other hand, flattens compared to k -5/3 at late times, consistent with the Obukohov-Corrsin picture of mixing as a cascade process. At higher Mach numbers, the velocity power spectrum also steepens due to the presence of shocks, and the scalar power spectrum again flattens accordingly. Scalar structures are more intermittent than velocity structures in subsonic turbulence, whereas for supersonic turbulence, velocity structures appear more intermittent than the scalars only in the kinematic phase. Independent of the Mach number of the flow, scalar structures are arranged in sheets in both the kinematic and saturated phases of the magnetic field evolution. For subsonic turbulence, scalar dissipation is hindered in the strong magnetic field regions, probably due to Lorentz forces suppressing the buildup of scalar gradients, whereas for supersonic turbulence, scalar dissipation increases monotonically with increasing magnetic field strength. At all Mach numbers, mixing is significantly slowed by the presence of dynamically important small-scale magnetic fields, implying that mixing in the interstellar medium and in galaxy clusters is less efficient than modeled in hydrodynamic simulations.

  17. Formation of turbulence around flow singularities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zak, M.

    1983-01-01

    The formation of turbulence around singular points of a flow such as stagnation points, tangential jumps of velocity, are analyzed. It is proved that turbulence is inevitably generated by the rear stagnation point, but cannot be generated by the nose stagnation point of a streamlined body. Special attention is paid to an evolution of turbulence induced by a tangential jump of velocity. A qualitative analysis of a turbulent flow between two rotating concentric cylinders and around a streamlined cylinder is given.

  18. Active Control of Transition and Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maestrello, Lucio

    1987-01-01

    Two active means of manipulating boundary-layer flow developed, one controlling laminar-to-turbulent transition, other controlling amplitude of turbulent fluctuation. Purpose to control skin-friction drag over surfaces inside inlets and ducts. Resulting turbulence downstream has lower skin-friction drag than equivalent flow developing over same surfaces in absence of intervention. Heating strips trigger turbulence while transition amplitude and bandwidth controlled by acoustic signal.

  19. Lacunarity and intermittency in fluid turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, L. A.; Fournier, J.-D.; Spiegel, E. A.

    1986-01-01

    It is shown that oscillations in the high-order moments of turbulent velocity fields are inherent to the fractal character of intermittent turbulence and are a feature of the lacunarity of fractal sets. Oscillations in simple Cantor sets are described, and a single parameter to measure lacunarity is identified. The connection between oscillations in fractals and in the turbulent velocity correlations is discussed using the phenomenological beta model of intermittent turbulence (Frisch et al., 1978).

  20. Development of Turbulent Biological Closure Parameterizations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-30

    the role of TIBI term in the ADR equation a simple example, that of upwelling of seed nutrients and phytoplankton into a turbulent optically active...overall role that turbulence plays in determining the mean phytoplankton profile and in contributing to total phytoplankton production . As indicated... nutrients , phytoplankton , and zooplankton embedded in the turbulent field. Contrast the TIBI terms with the biological turbulent flux terms ’ , ’ , ’i

  1. Experience with turbulence interaction and turbulence-chemistry models at Fluent Inc.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choudhury, D.; Kim, S. E.; Tselepidakis, D. P.; Missaghi, M.

    1995-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation discusses (1) turbulence modeling: challenges in turbulence modeling, desirable attributes of turbulence models, turbulence models in FLUENT, and examples using FLUENT; and (2) combustion modeling: turbulence-chemistry interaction and FLUENT equilibrium model. As of now, three turbulence models are provided: the conventional k-epsilon model, the renormalization group model, and the Reynolds-stress model. The renormalization group k-epsilon model has broadened the range of applicability of two-equation turbulence models. The Reynolds-stress model has proved useful for strongly anisotropic flows such as those encountered in cyclones, swirlers, and combustors. Issues remain, such as near-wall closure, with all classes of models.

  2. On laminar and turbulent friction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Von Karman, TH

    1946-01-01

    Report deals, first with the theory of the laminar friction flow, where the basic concepts of Prandtl's boundary layer theory are represented from mathematical and physical points of view, and a method is indicated by means of which even more complicated cases can be treated with simple mathematical means, at least approximately. An attempt is also made to secure a basis for the computation of the turbulent friction by means of formulas through which the empirical laws of the turbulent pipe resistance can be applied to other problems on friction drag. (author)

  3. The effects of anisotropic free-stream turbulence on turbulent boundary layer behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liang-Wei, F.; Hoffman, J. A.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of near-isotropic and highly anisotropic free-stream turbulence on mean flow properties of the turbulence structure of turbulent boundary layers in a near zero pressure gradient flow has been experimentally evaluated. Turbulence levels vary from 0.5% to 8.0% and the momentum thickness Reynolds number varies from 800 to 1100. The results indicate that the effects of free-stream turbulence on the classical boundary layer properties for near-isotropic turbulence which have been published by other investigators are similar to the case of highly anisotropic turbulence fields, while the effects of free-stream turbulence on the properties of the turbulent structure within the boundary layer for the case of near-isotropic turbulence are quite different compared to the highly anisotropic case.

  4. Heat transfer and turbulence in a turbulated blade cooling circuit

    SciTech Connect

    Abuaf, N. ); Kercher, D.M. )

    1994-01-01

    The aerothermal performance of a typical turbine blade three-pass turbulated cooling circuit geometry was investigated in a 10X plexiglass test model. The model closely duplicated the blade's leading edge, midchord, and trailing edge cooling passage geometries. Steady-state heat transfer coefficient distributions along the blade pressure side wall (convex surface) of the cooling circuit passages were measured with a thin-foil heater and a liquid crystal temperature sensor assembly. The heat transfer experiments were conducted on rib-roughened channels with staggered turbulators along the convex and concave surfaces of the cooling passages. Midchannel axial velocity and turbulence intensity measurements were taken by hot-wire anemometry at each passage end of the three-pass cooling circuit to characterize and relate the experimental data are compared with results of a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis at the operating internal environment for a 1X rotating model of the blade cooling circuit and other turbulator channel geometry heat transfer data investigations. The comparison between the measurements and analysis is encouraging. Differences with other heat transfer data appear reasonably understood and explainable.

  5. Turbulence Modulation and Particle Segregation in a Turbulent Channel Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fong, Kee Onn; Toloui, Mostafa; Amili, Omid; Hong, Jiarong; Coletti, Filippo

    2016-11-01

    Particle-laden flows are ubiquitous in biological, environmental, and engineering flows, but our understanding of the mechanism by which particles modulate turbulence is incomplete. Simulations involve a wide range of scales, and shall be corroborated by measurements that reconstruct the motion of both the continuous and dispersed phases. We present experimental observations on the interaction between inertial particles and turbulent flow through a vertical channel in two-way coupled regime. The working fluid is air laden with size-selected glass particles, which we investigate by planar particle image velocimetry and digital inline holography. Unlike most previous experiments, we focus on a regime in which particle segregation and turbulence modulation are both strong. PIV shows that turbulence modulation is especially pronounced near the wall, where particles accumulate by turbophoresis. The segregation, however, is much weaker than what suggested by one-way coupled simulations. Results from digital holography confirm the trends in particle concentration and velocities, and additionally provide information on the three-dimensional clustering. The findings are compared to previous investigations and discussed in the context of modeling strategies.

  6. Protostellar Outflow Evolution in Turbulent Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Cunningham, A; Frank, A; Carroll, J; Blackman, E; Quillen, A

    2008-04-11

    The link between turbulence in star formatting environments and protostellar jets remains controversial. To explore issues of turbulence and fossil cavities driven by young stellar outflows we present a series of numerical simulations tracking the evolution of transient protostellar jets driven into a turbulent medium. Our simulations show both the effect of turbulence on outflow structures and, conversely, the effect of outflows on the ambient turbulence. We demonstrate how turbulence will lead to strong modifications in jet morphology. More importantly, we demonstrate that individual transient outflows have the capacity to re-energize decaying turbulence. Our simulations support a scenario in which the directed energy/momentum associated with cavities is randomized as the cavities are disrupted by dynamical instabilities seeded by the ambient turbulence. Consideration of the energy power spectra of the simulations reveals that the disruption of the cavities powers an energy cascade consistent with Burgers-type turbulence and produces a driving scale-length associated with the cavity propagation length. We conclude that fossil cavities interacting either with a turbulent medium or with other cavities have the capacity to sustain or create turbulent flows in star forming environments. In the last section we contrast our work and its conclusions with previous studies which claim that jets can not be the source of turbulence.

  7. Laminar flamelet modeling of turbulent diffusion flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mell, W. E.; Kosaly, G.; Planche, O.; Poinsot, T.; Ferziger, J. H.

    1990-12-01

    In modeling turbulent combustion, decoupling the chemistry from the turbulence is of great practical significance. In cases in which the equilibrium chemistry model breaks down, laminar flamelet modeling (LFM) is a promising approach to decoupling. Here, the validity of this approach is investigated using direct numerical simulation of a simple chemical reaction in two-dimensional turbulence.

  8. The PDF method for turbulent combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pope, S. B.

    1991-01-01

    Probability Density Function (PDF) methods provide a means of calculating the properties of turbulent reacting flows. They have been successfully applied to many turbulent flames, including some with finite rate kinetic effects. Here the methods are reviewed with an emphasis on computational issues and their application to turbulent combustion.

  9. Aeroacoustics of subsonic turbulent shear flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, Marvin E.

    1987-01-01

    Sound generation in turbulent shear flows is examined. The emphasis is on simultaneous calculation of the turbulent flow along with the resulting sound generation rather than the alternative acoustic analogy approach. The first part of the paper is concerned with solid surface interaction. The second part concentrates on the sound generated by turbulence interacting with itself.

  10. The Stellar IMF from turbulent fragmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padoan, P.; Nordlund, A.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper they conclude that turbulent fragmentation is unavoidable in super-sonically turbulent molecular clouds, and given the success of the present model to predict the observed shape of the Stellar IMF, they conclude that turbulent fragmentation is essential to the origin of the stellar IMF.

  11. Contributions to the simulation of turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dutton, J. A.; Kerman, B. R.; Petersen, E. L.

    1976-01-01

    The simulation modeling of turbulence in the boundary layer in consolidated in terms of boundary layer similarity principles and empirical results. The modeling is extended for some aspects of the nonlinear and non-Gaussian structure of the turbulence. Properties of the discrete gust form structure of the modeled turbulence are identified.

  12. Wake Turbulence Mitigation for Arrivals (WTMA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Daniel M.; Lohr, Gary W.; Trujillo, Anna C.

    2008-01-01

    The preliminary Wake Turbulence Mitigation for Arrivals (WTMA) concept of operations is described in this paper. The WTMA concept provides further detail to work initiated by the Wake Vortex Avoidance System Concept Evaluation Team and is an evolution of the Wake Turbulence Mitigation for Departure concept. Anticipated benefits about reducing wake turbulence separation standards in crosswind conditions, and candidate WTMA system considerations are discussed.

  13. Mathematical Analysis of Problems in Turbulence and Turbulent Diffusion with Many Statistical Scales

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-01-01

    Person 1. AGENCY USE ONLY (Leave blank) 2. REPORT DATE 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Mathematical Analysis of Problems in Turbulence and Turbulent Diffusion ...emphasizes problems in turbulence and turbulent diffusion which are inherently statistical and involve many spatio-temporal scales. XeJt?in? H-ff...reS6ar^ ^S.t0 achieve a be"er theoretical understanding of turbulent (reaction) diffusion which is crucial for many applications in environmental science

  14. Group-kinetic theory and modeling of atmospheric turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tchen, C. M.

    1989-01-01

    A group kinetic method is developed for analyzing eddy transport properties and relaxation to equilibrium. The purpose is to derive the spectral structure of turbulence in incompressible and compressible media. Of particular interest are: direct and inverse cascade, boundary layer turbulence, Rossby wave turbulence, two phase turbulence; compressible turbulence, and soliton turbulence. Soliton turbulence can be found in large scale turbulence, turbulence connected with surface gravity waves and nonlinear propagation of acoustical and optical waves. By letting the pressure gradient represent the elementary interaction among fluid elements and by raising the Navier-Stokes equation to higher dimensionality, the master equation was obtained for the description of the microdynamical state of turbulence.

  15. Dynamics of turbulent falling films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Naraigh, Lennon; Matar, Omar

    2012-11-01

    The dynamics of laminar falling films have received considerable attention over the past several decades. In contrast, turbulent falling films have been the subject of far fewer studies. We seek to redress this balance by studying the stability of falling films which have already undergone a transition from a laminar to a turbulent flow regime. We derive a uniform-film base-state for this flow by assuming the averaged turbulent velocity field to be steady and fully-developed, and by employing a modified version of mixing-length theory. The latter features an interpolation function for the eddy viscosity, and van Driest-type functions for turbulence-damping near the wall and interface regions. The predicted base-state streamwise velocity component is in good agreement with experimental data. A linear stability analysis of this base-state is then carried out by solving a modified version of the Orr-Sommerfeld equation. Our results suggest that the unstable mode is a long-wave one. This provides motivation for the derivation of long-wave equations for the nonlinear evolution of the film.

  16. Optical turbulence in fiber lasers.

    PubMed

    Wabnitz, Stefan

    2014-03-15

    We analyze the nonlinear stage of modulation instability in passively mode-locked fiber lasers leading to chaotic or noise-like emission. We present the phase-transition diagram among different regimes of chaotic emission in terms of the key cavity parameters: amplitude or phase turbulence, and spatio-temporal intermittency.

  17. Turbulence and energy conversion research

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchinson, R.A.

    1985-07-01

    This report examines the role of fluid mechanics research (particularly turbulence research) in improving energy conversion systems. In this report two of the listed application areas are selected as examples: fluidization and cavitation. Research needs in general, and research possibilities for ECUT in particular, are examined.

  18. THOR Turbulence Electron Analyser: TEA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fazakerley, Andrew; Moore, Tom; Owen, Chris; Pollock, Craig; Wicks, Rob; Samara, Marilia; Rae, Jonny; Hancock, Barry; Kataria, Dhiren; Rust, Duncan

    2016-04-01

    Turbulence Heating ObserveR (THOR) is the first mission ever flown in space dedicated to plasma turbulence. The Turbulence Electron Analyser (TEA) will measure the plasma electron populations in the mission's Regions of Interest. It will collect a 3D electron velocity distribution with cadences as short as 5 ms. The instrument will be capable of measuring energies up to 30 keV. TEA consists of multiple electrostatic analyser heads arranged so as to measure electrons arriving from look directions covering the full sky, i.e. 4 pi solid angle. The baseline concept is similar to the successful FPI-DES instrument currently operating on the MMS mission. TEA is intended to have a similar angular resolution, but a larger geometric factor. In comparison to earlier missions, TEA improves on the measurement cadence. For example, MMS FPI-DES routinely operates at 30 ms cadence. The objective of measuring distributions at rates as fast as 5 ms is driven by the mission's scientific requirements to resolve electron gyroscale size structures, where plasma heating and fluctuation dissipation is predicted to occur. TEA will therefore be capable of making measurements of the evolution of distribution functions across thin (a few km) current sheets travelling past the spacecraft at up to 600 km/s, of the Power Spectral Density of fluctuations of electron moments and of distributions fast enough to match frequencies with waves expected to be dissipating turbulence (e.g. with 100 Hz whistler waves).

  19. Turbulence: Does Energy Cascade Exist?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Josserand, Christophe; Le Berre, Martine; Lehner, Thierry; Pomeau, Yves

    2016-11-01

    To answer the question whether a cascade of energy exists or not in turbulence, we propose a set of correlation functions able to test if there is an irreversible transfert of energy, step by step, from large to small structures. These tests are applied to real Eulerian data of a turbulent velocity flow, taken in the wind grid tunnel of Modane, and also to a prototype model equation for wave turbulence. First we demonstrate the irreversible character of the flow by using multi-time correlation function at a given point of space. Moreover the unexpected behavior of the test function leads us to connect irreversibility and finite time singularities (intermittency). Secondly we show that turbulent cascade exists, and is a dynamical process, by using a test function depending on time and frequency. The cascade shows up only in the inertial domain where the kinetic energy is transferred more rapidly (on average) from the wavenumber k1 to k2 than from k1 to k'2 larger than k2.

  20. Turbulence Instrumentation for Stratospheric Airships

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-01

    ALTERNATIVES ...................................................................................................2 3.1 Pitot - Static Tube...Illustrations 1. Pressure difference for a pitot -static probe at HAA altitudes for wind velocities up to 50ft/s for a velocity difference of 3ft/s...a high altitude velocity turbulence sensor: the pitot -static tube, the hot wire anemometer, the propeller anemometer, and the ionic anemometer

  1. Turbulent Mixing Chemistry in Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenov, D.; Wiebe, D.

    2006-11-01

    A gas-grain chemical model with surface reaction and 1D/2D turbulent mixing is available for protoplanetary disks and molecular clouds. Current version is based on the updated UMIST'95 database with gas-grain interactions (accretion, desorption, photoevaporation, etc.) and modified rate equation approach to surface chemistry (see also abstract for the static chemistry code).

  2. Turbulent Premixed Flames in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menon, Suresh

    1996-01-01

    The experimental cold-flow facility is now full operational and is currently being used to obtain baseline turbulence data in a Couette flow. The baseline turbulence data is necessary to confirm the capability of the chosen device to generate and maintain the required turbulence intensity. Subsequent reacting flow studies will assume that a similar turbulent flow field exists ahead of the premixed flame. Some modifications and refinements had to be made to enable accurate measurements. It consists of two rollers, one (driven by a motor) which drives a continuous belt and four smaller rollers used to set the belt spacing and tension to minimize belt flutter. The entire assemble is enclosed in a structure that has the dimensions to enable future drop tower experiments of the hot facility. All critical dimensions are the same as the original plans except for the pulley ratio which has been changed to enable a wider operating regime in terms of the Reynolds number. With the current setup, Reynolds numbers as low as 100 and as high as 14,000 can be achieved. This is because the in-between belt spacing can be varied from 1 cm to 7.6 cm, and the belt speed can be accurately varied from .15 m/sec to 3.1 m/sec.

  3. Wave turbulence in quantum fluids

    PubMed Central

    Kolmakov, German V.; McClintock, Peter Vaughan Elsmere; Nazarenko, Sergey V.

    2014-01-01

    Wave turbulence (WT) occurs in systems of strongly interacting nonlinear waves and can lead to energy flows across length and frequency scales much like those that are well known in vortex turbulence. Typically, the energy passes although a nondissipative inertial range until it reaches a small enough scale that viscosity becomes important and terminates the cascade by dissipating the energy as heat. Wave turbulence in quantum fluids is of particular interest, partly because revealing experiments can be performed on a laboratory scale, and partly because WT among the Kelvin waves on quantized vortices is believed to play a crucial role in the final stages of the decay of (vortex) quantum turbulence. In this short review, we provide a perspective on recent work on WT in quantum fluids, setting it in context and discussing the outlook for the next few years. We outline the theory, review briefly the experiments carried out to date using liquid H2 and liquid 4He, and discuss some nonequilibrium excitonic superfluids in which WT has been predicted but not yet observed experimentally. By way of conclusion, we consider the medium- and longer-term outlook for the field. PMID:24704881

  4. The problem of atmospheric turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toomre, J.; HILL; MERRYFIELD; GOUGH

    1984-01-01

    All ground-based observations of the solar five-minute oscillations are affected by turbulence in the Earth's atmosphere that leads to substantial refractive index variations. The turbulent motions serve to mix an air mass that is thermally stratified in the vertical, thereby producing intermittent thermal fluctuations over a wide range of heights in the atmosphere. These thermal structures yield refractive index changes that deflect the light path in a complicated way, producing intricate variations of amplitude and phase in what might have started out as simple plane waves. Since the fluid turbulence is statistical in nature, so too is the optical turbulence which is an integral measure of the refractive index changes along the light travel path. All of this produces what is usually called atmospheric seeing, which consists of image motion, blurring and distortion across the field of view. The effects of atmospheric seeing upon observations of five-minute oscillations carried out from the ground were assessed. This will help to provide a baseline estimate of the scienctific benefits that might accrue if one were able to observe the same oscillations from a space observatory unfettered by seeing effects.

  5. Models for Turbulent Transport Processes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, James C.

    1979-01-01

    Since the statistical theories of turbulence that have developed over the last twenty or thirty years are too abstract and unreliable to be of much use to chemical engineers, this paper introduces the techniques of single point models and suggests some areas of needed research. (BB)

  6. Distorted turbulence in axisymmetric flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durbin, P. A.

    1981-01-01

    A solution to the rapid-distortion theory for small-scale turbulence in flow round an axisymmetric obstacle is derived. General formulae for velocity covariances and Eulerian time scales are obtained and are evaluated for the particular case of flow round a sphere. The large-scale limit for this flow is also discussed.

  7. Turbulent Flow Between Rotating Cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih-I, Pai

    1943-01-01

    The turbulent air flow between rotating cylinders was investigated. The distributions of mean speed and of turbulence were measured in the gap between a rotating inner and a stationary outer cylinder. The measurements led to the conclusion that the turbulent flow in the gap cannot be considered two dimensional, but that a particular type of secondary motion takes place. It is shown that the experimentally found velocity distribution can be fully understood under the assumption that this secondary motion consists of three-dimensional ring-shape vortices. The vortices occur only in pairs, and their number and size depend on the speed of the rotating cylinder; the number was found to decrease with increasing speed. The secondary motion has an essential part in the transmission of the moment of momentum. In regions where the secondary motion is negligible, the momentum transfer follows the laws known for homologous turbulence. Ring-shape vortices are known to occur in the laminar flow between rotating cylinders, but it was hitherto unknown that they exist even at speeds that are several hundred times the critical limit.

  8. Turbulent resistivity, diffusion and heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fried, B. D.; Kennel, C. F.; Mackenzie, K.; Coroniti, F. V.; Kindel, J. M.; Stenzel, R.; Taylor, R. J.; White, R.; Wong, A. Y.; Bernstein, W.

    1971-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical studies are reported on ion acoustic and ion cyclotron turbulence and their roles in anomalous resistivity, viscosity, diffusion and heating and in the structure of collisionless electrostatic shocks. Resistance due to ion acoustic turbulence has been observed in experiments with a streaming cesium plasma in which electron current, potential rise due to turbulent resistivity, spectrum of unstable ion acoustic waves, and associated electron heating were all measured directly. Kinetic theory calculations for an expanding, unstable plasma, give results in agreement with the experiment. In a strong magnetic field, with T sub e/T sub i approximately 1 and current densities typical for present Tokomaks, the plasma is stable to ion acoustic but unstable to current driven electrostatic ion cyclotron waves. Relevant characteristics of these waves are calculated and it is shown that for ion, beta greater than m sub e/m sub i, the electromagnetic ion cyclotron wave has a lower instability threshold than the electrostatic one. However, when ion acoustic turbulence is present experiments with double plasma devices show rapid anomalous heating of an ion beam streaming through a plasma.

  9. Experimental Investigation of Particle Deagglomeration using Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köksoy, Çaǧatay; Ertunç, Özgür; Hüttner, Sebastian; Wachtel, Herbert; Delgado, Antonio

    2011-12-01

    The effect of turbulence on powder aerosol deagglomeration was investigated. Two impinging jets were used to generate turbulence. Lactose particles, whose fully dispersed fine particle fraction (FPF) - number percentage of the particles whose diameter smaller than 5 μm- is above 90 %, were applied as aerosol powder. The particle size distribution after the dispersion unit were measured by using phase Doppler anemometer (PDA) and turbulence level were quantified at the impingement point of two jets with laser Doppler anemometer. As the turbulence level increases turbulent time and length scales decrease, and the ratio of fine particle fraction (FPF) increases from 36% to 86%.

  10. Vortices and turbulence in trapped atomic condensates

    PubMed Central

    White, Angela C.; Anderson, Brian P.; Bagnato, Vanderlei S.

    2014-01-01

    After more than a decade of experiments generating and studying the physics of quantized vortices in atomic gas Bose–Einstein condensates, research is beginning to focus on the roles of vortices in quantum turbulence, as well as other measures of quantum turbulence in atomic condensates. Such research directions have the potential to uncover new insights into quantum turbulence, vortices, and superfluidity and also explore the similarities and differences between quantum and classical turbulence in entirely new settings. Here we present a critical assessment of theoretical and experimental studies in this emerging field of quantum turbulence in atomic condensates. PMID:24704880

  11. Turbulent phenomena in protein folding.

    PubMed

    Kalgin, Igor V; Chekmarev, Sergei F

    2011-01-01

    Protein folding and hydrodynamic turbulence are two long-standing challenges, in molecular biophysics and fluid dynamics, respectively. The theories of these phenomena have been developed independently and used different formalisms. Here we show that the protein folding flows can be surprisingly similar to turbulent fluid flows. Studying a benchmark model protein (an SH3 domain), we have found that the flows for the slow folding trajectories of the protein, in which a partly formed N- and C-terminal β sheet hinders the RT loop from attaching to the protein core, have many properties of turbulent flows of a fluid. The flows are analyzed in a three-dimensional (3D) space of collective variables, which are the numbers of native contacts between the terminal β strands, between the RT loop and the protein core, and the rest of the native contacts. We have found that the flows have fractal nature and are filled with 3D eddies; the latter contain strange attractors, at which the tracer flow paths behave as saddle trajectories. Two regions of the space increment have been observed, in which the flux variations are self-similar with the scaling exponent h=1/3, in surprising agreement with the Kolmogorov inertial range theory of turbulence. In one region, the cascade of protein rearrangements is directed from larger to smaller scales (net folding), and in the other, it is oppositely directed (net unfolding). Folding flows for the fast trajectories are essentially "laminar" and do not have the property of self-similarity. Based on the results of our study, we infer, and support this inference by simulations, that the origin of the similarity between the protein folding and turbulent motion of a fluid is in a cascade mechanism of structural transformations in the systems that underlies these phenomena.

  12. Investigating the relationship between turbulence and lightning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, T. J.; Guy, N.; Bruning, E. C.; Berkseth, S.

    2015-12-01

    Thunderstorms commonly produce turbulent airflows, which can have important implications for cloud structure and evolution, the transport of chemical species, and the safety of aircraft. Recent studies have indicated that turbulence also may control lightning characteristics, such as flash rate and size. Moreover, there are indications that the onset of lightning may be related to rapid intensification of turbulence within a growing convective storm. This observation is consistent with the known good empirical correlation between eddy dissipation rate (EDR, a measure of the strength of turbulence) and updraft strength. An algorithm to estimate EDR for in-cloud turbulence from Doppler radar data has been incorporated into open source software developed at NASA. This software (called the Python Turbulence Detection Algorithm, or PyTDA), which can be applied to data from almost any Doppler radar, is in the process of being validated against in situ measurements , as well as compared with other turbulence algorithms. Early validation results will be reported in this presentation. Then, the application of the turbulence retrievals to specific thunderstorm case studies, which have available Doppler radar and lightning mapping array (LMA) data, will be reported. Specific inquiries that will be addressed will include relationships between lightning onset and turbulence, relationships between flash rate/size and turbulence, the ability of turbulence retrievals to serve as proxies for updraft strength/location, and the implications of all these relationships for satellite-based lightning observations.

  13. Contribution to the study of turbulence spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dumas, R.

    1979-01-01

    An apparatus suitable for turbulence measurement between ranges of 1 to 5000 cps and from 6 to 16,000 cps was developed and is described. Turbulence spectra downstream of the grills were examined with reference to their general characteristics, their LF qualities, and the effects of periodic turbulence. Medium and HF are discussed. Turbulence spectra in the boundary layers are similarly examined, with reference to their fluctuations at right angles to the wall, and to lateral fluctuations. Turbulence spectra in a boundary layer with suction to the wall is discussed. Induced turbulence, and turbulence spectra at high Reynolds numbers. Calculations are presented relating to the effect of filtering on the value of the correlations in time and space.

  14. Observations of velocity shear driven plasma turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kintner, P. M., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    Electrostatic and magnetic turbulence observations from HAWKEYE-1 during the low altitude portion of its elliptical orbit over the Southern Hemisphere are presented. The magnetic turbulence is confined near the auroral zone and is similar to that seen at higher altitudes by HEOS-2 in the polar cusp. The electrostatic turbulence is composed of a background component with a power spectral index of 1.89 + or - .26 and an intense component with a power spectral index of 2.80 + or - .34. The intense electrostatic turbulence and the magnetic turbulence correlate with velocity shears in the convective plasma flow. Since velocity shear instabilities are most unstable to wave vectors perpendicular to the magnetic field, the shear correlated turbulence is anticipated to be two dimensional in character and to have a power spectral index of 3 which agrees with that observed in the intense electrostatic turbulence.

  15. Explosive Turbulent Magnetic Reconnection: A New Approach of MHD-Turbulent Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshino, Masahiro; Yokoi, Nobumitsu; Higashimori, Katsuaki

    2013-04-01

    Turbulent flows are often observed in association with magnetic reconnection in space and astrophysical plasmas, and it is often hypothesized that the turbulence can contribute to the fast magnetic reconnection through the enhancement of magnetic dissipation. In this presentation, we demonstrate that an explosive turbulent reconnection can happen by using a new turbulent MHD simulation, in which the evolution of the turbulent transport coefficients are self-consistently solved together with the standard MHD equations. In our model, the turbulent electromotive force defined by the correlation of turbulent fluctuations between v and B is added to the Ohm's law. We discuss that the level of turbulent can control the topology of reconnection, namely the transition from the Sweet-Parker reconnection to the Petscheck reconnection occurs when the level of fluctuations becomes of order of the ambient physical quantities, and show that the growth of the turbulent Petscheck reconnection becomes much faster than the conventional one.

  16. Structure of the turbulent/non-turbulent interface of turbulent boundary layers - DNS results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishihara, Takashi; Ogasawara, Hiroki; Hunt, Julian C. R.

    2013-11-01

    Direct numerical simulations (DNS) of turbulent boundary layers (TBL) along a flat plate are used to study the properties of turbulent/non-turbulent (T/NT) interface of the TBL. The values of the momentum-thickness-based Reynolds numbers, Reθ , used for this study, are 500 - 2200 . Analysis of the conditional statistics near the interface of the TBL shows that there is a small peak in the span-wise vorticity, and an associated small jump in stream-wise velocity. It is shown that the interfacial layer has a double structure which consists of a turbulent sub-layer with thickness of the order of the Taylor micro scale and its outer boundary (super layer) with thickness of the order of the Kolmogorov length scale. An approximate profile of the conditional average of span-wise vorticity near the interface fits well to the DNS data. The velocity jump near the T/NT interface of the TBL is of the order of the rms value of velocity fluctuations near the interface. Conditional cross correlations of the stream-wise or the wall-normal velocity fluctuations change sharply across the interface, which are consistent with the blocking mechanism of the interface (Hunt and Durbin 1999).

  17. Studying Turbulence Using Numerical Simulation Databases. 3: Proceedings of the 1990 Summer Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spinks, Debra (Compiler)

    1990-01-01

    Papers that cover the following topics are presented: subgrid scale modeling; turbulence modeling; turbulence structure, transport, and control; small scales mixing; turbulent reacting flows; and turbulence theory.

  18. Statistical Mechanics of Turbulent Dynamos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shebalin, John V.

    2014-01-01

    Incompressible magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence and magnetic dynamos, which occur in magnetofluids with large fluid and magnetic Reynolds numbers, will be discussed. When Reynolds numbers are large and energy decays slowly, the distribution of energy with respect to length scale becomes quasi-stationary and MHD turbulence can be described statistically. In the limit of infinite Reynolds numbers, viscosity and resistivity become zero and if these values are used in the MHD equations ab initio, a model system called ideal MHD turbulence results. This model system is typically confined in simple geometries with some form of homogeneous boundary conditions, allowing for velocity and magnetic field to be represented by orthogonal function expansions. One advantage to this is that the coefficients of the expansions form a set of nonlinearly interacting variables whose behavior can be described by equilibrium statistical mechanics, i.e., by a canonical ensemble theory based on the global invariants (energy, cross helicity and magnetic helicity) of ideal MHD turbulence. Another advantage is that truncated expansions provide a finite dynamical system whose time evolution can be numerically simulated to test the predictions of the associated statistical mechanics. If ensemble predictions are the same as time averages, then the system is said to be ergodic; if not, the system is nonergodic. Although it had been implicitly assumed in the early days of ideal MHD statistical theory development that these finite dynamical systems were ergodic, numerical simulations provided sufficient evidence that they were, in fact, nonergodic. Specifically, while canonical ensemble theory predicted that expansion coefficients would be (i) zero-mean random variables with (ii) energy that decreased with length scale, it was found that although (ii) was correct, (i) was not and the expected ergodicity was broken. The exact cause of this broken ergodicity was explained, after much

  19. MHD Turbulence and Magnetic Dynamos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shebalin, John V

    2014-01-01

    Incompressible magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence and magnetic dynamos, which occur in magnetofluids with large fluid and magnetic Reynolds numbers, will be discussed. When Reynolds numbers are large and energy decays slowly, the distribution of energy with respect to length scale becomes quasi-stationary and MHD turbulence can be described statistically. In the limit of infinite Reynolds numbers, viscosity and resistivity become zero and if these values are used in the MHD equations ab initio, a model system called ideal MHD turbulence results. This model system is typically confined in simple geometries with some form of homogeneous boundary conditions, allowing for velocity and magnetic field to be represented by orthogonal function expansions. One advantage to this is that the coefficients of the expansions form a set of nonlinearly interacting variables whose behavior can be described by equilibrium statistical mechanics, i.e., by a canonical ensemble theory based on the global invariants (energy, cross helicity and magnetic helicity) of ideal MHD turbulence. Another advantage is that truncated expansions provide a finite dynamical system whose time evolution can be numerically simulated to test the predictions of the associated statistical mechanics. If ensemble predictions are the same as time averages, then the system is said to be ergodic; if not, the system is nonergodic. Although it had been implicitly assumed in the early days of ideal MHD statistical theory development that these finite dynamical systems were ergodic, numerical simulations provided sufficient evidence that they were, in fact, nonergodic. Specifically, while canonical ensemble theory predicted that expansion coefficients would be (i) zero-mean random variables with (ii) energy that decreased with length scale, it was found that although (ii) was correct, (i) was not and the expected ergodicity was broken. The exact cause of this broken ergodicity was explained, after much

  20. Helicity statistics in homogeneous and isotropic turbulence and turbulence models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahoo, Ganapati; De Pietro, Massimo; Biferale, Luca

    2017-02-01

    We study the statistical properties of helicity in direct numerical simulations of fully developed homogeneous and isotropic turbulence and in a class of turbulence shell models. We consider correlation functions based on combinations of vorticity and velocity increments that are not invariant under mirror symmetry. We also study the scaling properties of high-order structure functions based on the moments of the velocity increments projected on a subset of modes with either positive or negative helicity (chirality). We show that mirror symmetry is recovered at small scales, i.e., chiral terms are subleading and they are well captured by a dimensional argument plus anomalous corrections. These findings are also supported by a high Reynolds numbers study of helical shell models with the same chiral symmetry of Navier-Stokes equations.

  1. PREFACE: Turbulent Mixing and Beyond Turbulent Mixing and Beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abarzhi, Snezhana I.; Gauthier, Serge; Rosner, Robert

    2008-10-01

    The goals of the International Conference `Turbulent Mixing and Beyond' are to expose the generic problem of Turbulence and Turbulent Mixing in Unsteady Flows to a wide scientific community, to promote the development of new ideas in tackling the fundamental aspects of the problem, to assist in the application of novel approaches in a broad range of phenomena, where the non-canonical turbulent processes occur, and to have a potential impact on technology. The Conference provides the opportunity to bring together scientists from the areas which include, but are not limited to, high energy density physics, plasmas, fluid dynamics, turbulence, combustion, material science, geophysics, astrophysics, optics and telecommunications, applied mathematics, probability and statistics, and to have their attention focused on the long-standing formidable task. The Turbulent Mixing and Turbulence in Unsteady Flows, including multiphase flows, plays a key role in a wide variety of phenomena, ranging from astrophysical to nano-scales, under either high or low energy density conditions. Inertial confinement and magnetic fusion, light-matter interaction and non-equilibrium heat transfer, properties of materials under high strain rates, strong shocks, explosions, blast waves, supernovae and accretion disks, stellar non-Boussinesq and magneto-convection, planetary interiors and mantle-lithosphere tectonics, premixed and non-premixed combustion, oceanography, atmospheric flows, unsteady boundary layers, hypersonic and supersonic flows, are a few examples to list. A grip on unsteady turbulent processes is crucial for cutting-edge technology such as laser-micromachining and free-space optical telecommunications, and for industrial applications in aeronautics. Unsteady Turbulent Processes are anisotropic, non-local and multi-scale, and their fundamental scaling, spectral and invariant properties depart from the classical Kolmogorov scenario. The singular aspects and similarity of the

  2. Memory function of turbulent fluctuations in soft-mode turbulence.

    PubMed

    Narumi, Takayuki; Yoshitani, Junichi; Suzuki, Masaru; Hidaka, Yoshiki; Nugroho, Fahrudin; Nagaya, Tomoyuki; Kai, Shoichi

    2013-01-01

    Modal relaxation dynamics has been observed experimentally to clarify statistical-physical properties of soft-mode turbulence, the spatiotemporal chaos observed in homeotropically aligned nematic liquid crystals. We found a dual structure, dynamical crossover associated with violation of time-reversal invariance, the corresponding time scales satisfying a dynamical scaling law. To specify the origin of the dual structure, the memory function due to nonthermal fluctuations has been defined by a projection-operator method and obtained numerically using experimental results. The results of the memory function suggest that the nonthermal fluctuations can be divided into Markov and non-Markov contributions; the latter is called the turbulent fluctuation (TF). Consequently, the relaxation dynamics is separated into three characteristic stages: bare-friction, early, and late stages. If the dissipation due to TFs dominates over that of the Markov contribution, the bare-friction stage contracts; the early and late stages then configure the dual structure. The memory effect due to TFs results in a time-reversible relaxation at the early stage, and the disappearance of the memory by turbulent mixing leads to a simple exponential relaxation at the late stage. Furthermore, the memory effect due to TFs is shown to originate from characteristic spatial coherency called the patch structure.

  3. Hot and turbulent gas in clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, W.; Engels, J. F.; Niemeyer, J. C.; Almgren, A. S.

    2016-06-01

    The gas in galaxy clusters is heated by shock compression through accretion (outer shocks) and mergers (inner shocks). These processes additionally produce turbulence. To analyse the relation between the thermal and turbulent energies of the gas under the influence of non-adiabatic processes, we performed numerical simulations of cosmic structure formation in a box of 152 Mpc comoving size with radiative cooling, UV background, and a subgrid scale model for numerically unresolved turbulence. By smoothing the gas velocities with an adaptive Kalman filter, we are able to estimate bulk flows towards cluster cores. This enables us to infer the velocity dispersion associated with the turbulent fluctuation relative to the bulk flow. For haloes with masses above 1013 M⊙, we find that the turbulent velocity dispersions averaged over the warm-hot intergalactic medium (WHIM) and the intracluster medium (ICM) are approximately given by powers of the mean gas temperatures with exponents around 0.5, corresponding to a roughly linear relation between turbulent and thermal energies and transonic Mach numbers. However, turbulence is only weakly correlated with the halo mass. Since the power-law relation is stiffer for the WHIM, the turbulent Mach number tends to increase with the mean temperature of the WHIM. This can be attributed to enhanced turbulence production relative to dissipation in particularly hot and turbulent clusters.

  4. Submerged turbulence detection with optical satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, Carl H.; Keeler, R. Norris; Bondur, Valery G.; Leung, Pak T.; Prandke, H.; Vithanage, D.

    2007-09-01

    During fall periods in 2002, 2003 and 2004 three major oceanographic expeditions were carried out in Mamala Bay, Hawaii. These were part of the RASP Remote Anthropogenic Sensing Program. Ikonos and Quickbird optical satellite images of sea surface glint revealed ~100 m spectral anomalies in km2 averaging patches in regions leading from the Honolulu Sand Island Municipal Outfall diffuser to distances up to 20 km. To determine the mechanisms behind this phenomenon, the RASP expeditions monitored the waters adjacent to the outfall with an array of hydrographic, optical and turbulence microstructure sensors in anomaly and ambient background regions. Drogue tracks and mean turbulence parameters for 2 × 10 4 microstructure patches were analyzed to understand complex turbulence, fossil turbulence and zombie turbulence near-vertical internal wave transport processes. The dominant mechanism appears to be generic to stratified natural fluids including planet and star atmospheres and is termed beamed zombie turbulence maser action (BZTMA). Most of the bottom turbulent kinetic energy is converted to ~ 100 m fossil turbulence waves. These activate secondary (zombie) turbulence in outfall fossil turbulence patches that transmit heat, mass, chemical species, momentum and information vertically to the sea surface for detection in an efficient maser action. The transport is beamed in intermittent mixing chimneys.

  5. Submerged turbulence detection with optical satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, Carl H.; Keeler, R. Norris; Bondur, Valery G.; Leung, Pak T.; Prandke, H.; Vithanage, D.

    2013-01-01

    During fall periods in 2002, 2003 and 2004 three major oceanographic expeditions were carried out in Mamala Bay, Hawaii. These were part of the RASP Remote Anthropogenic Sensing Program. Ikonos and Quickbird optical satellite images of sea surface glint revealed !100 m spectral anomalies in km2 averaging patches in regions leading from the Honolulu Sand Island Municipal Outfall diffuser to distances up to 20 km. To determine the mechanisms behind this phenomenon, the RASP expeditions monitored the waters adjacent to the outfall with an array of hydrographic, optical and turbulence microstructure sensors in anomaly and ambient background regions. Drogue tracks and mean turbulence parameters for 2 ! 104 microstructure patches were analyzed to understand complex turbulence, fossil turbulence and zombie turbulence near-vertical internal wave transport processes. The dominant mechanism appears to be generic to stratified natural fluids including planet and star atmospheres and is termed beamed zombie turbulence maser action (BZTMA). Most of the bottom turbulent kinetic energy is converted to ! 100 m fossil turbulence waves. These activate secondary (zombie) turbulence in outfall fossil turbulence patches that transmit heat, mass, chemical species, momentum and information vertically to the sea surface for detection in an efficient maser action. The transport is beamed in intermittent mixing chimneys.

  6. Turbulence Modeling for Shock Wave/Turbulent Boundary Layer Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lillard, Randolph P.

    2011-01-01

    Accurate aerodynamic computational predictions are essential for the safety of space vehicles, but these computations are of limited accuracy when large pressure gradients are present in the flow. The goal of the current project is to improve the state of compressible turbulence modeling for high speed flows with shock wave / turbulent boundary layer interactions (SWTBLI). Emphasis will be placed on models that can accurately predict the separated region caused by the SWTBLI. These flows are classified as nonequilibrium boundary layers because of the very large and variable adverse pressure gradients caused by the shock waves. The lag model was designed to model these nonequilibrium flows by incorporating history effects. Standard one- and two-equation models (Spalart Allmaras and SST) and the lag model will be run and compared to a new lag model. This new model, the Reynolds stress tensor lag model (lagRST), will be assessed against multiple wind tunnel tests and correlations. The basis of the lag and lagRST models are to preserve the accuracy of the standard turbulence models in equilibrium turbulence, when the Reynolds stresses are linearly related to the mean strain rates, but create a lag between mean strain rate effects and turbulence when nonequilibrium effects become important, such as in large pressure gradients. The affect this lag has on the results for SWBLI and massively separated flows will be determined. These computations will be done with a modified version of the OVERFLOW code. This code solves the RANS equations on overset grids. It was used for this study for its ability to input very complex geometries into the flow solver, such as the Space Shuttle in the full stack configuration. The model was successfully implemented within two versions of the OVERFLOW code. Results show a substantial improvement over the baseline models for transonic separated flows. The results are mixed for the SWBLI assessed. Separation predictions are not as good as the

  7. Lyapunov spectrum in turbulent combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassanaly, Malik; Raman, Venkat

    2016-11-01

    Transient flame evolution is an important flow problem for many practical applications (for example high-altitude relight, ignition in internal combustion engines, unstart in scramjets). Current approaches to combustion modeling utilize assumptions that are valid mainly for statistically stationary processes. In order to understand the transient problem, a dynamic systems approach is followed here. The propagation of a flame in a turbulent channel flow is used as a canonical turbulent combustion system and is analyzed with the Lyapunov theory. In particular, the Lyapunov spectrum for this flow is computed using multiple coordinated simulations. For a range of flow conditions, dimensionality of the state-space is determined. It is shown that the internal structure of the flame plays a critical role in determining the response of the system to perturbations in the flow.

  8. Fluid dynamics of bacterial turbulence.

    PubMed

    Dunkel, Jörn; Heidenreich, Sebastian; Drescher, Knut; Wensink, Henricus H; Bär, Markus; Goldstein, Raymond E

    2013-05-31

    Self-sustained turbulent structures have been observed in a wide range of living fluids, yet no quantitative theory exists to explain their properties. We report experiments on active turbulence in highly concentrated 3D suspensions of Bacillus subtilis and compare them with a minimal fourth-order vector-field theory for incompressible bacterial dynamics. Velocimetry of bacteria and surrounding fluid, determined by imaging cells and tracking colloidal tracers, yields consistent results for velocity statistics and correlations over 2 orders of magnitude in kinetic energy, revealing a decrease of fluid memory with increasing swimming activity and linear scaling between kinetic energy and enstrophy. The best-fit model allows for quantitative agreement with experimental data.

  9. Clear air turbulence forecasting techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, J. L.

    1980-01-01

    A method to improve clear air turbulence (CAT) forecasting by more effectively using the currently operational rawinsonde (RW) system is discussed. The method is called the Diagnostic Richardson Number Tendency (DRT) technique. The technique does not attempt to use the RW as a direct detector of the turbulent motion or even of the CAT mechanism structure but rather senses the synoptic scale centers of action which provide the energy to the CAT mechanism at the mesoscale level. The DRT algorithm is deterministic rather than statistical in nature, using the hydrodynamic equations (equations of motion) relevant to the synoptic scale. However, interpretation, by necessity, is probabilistic. What is most important with respect to its operational implementation is that this method uses the same input data as currently used by the operational National Meteorological Center prognostic models.

  10. Numerical Investigations of Magnetohydrodynamic Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, W. C.

    2006-12-01

    Incompressible magnetohydrodynamic turbulence studied by large-scale direct numerical simulations has revealed a number of new interesting facets. The Goldreich-Sridhar phenomenology partly breaks down in turbulence subject to a strong mean magnetic field. This leads to a measureable anisotropy of two-point statistics. The nonlinear dynamics of kinetic (E^K) and magnetic energy (E^M) is the result of a dynamical equilibrium of Alfvén effect and a small-sale dynamo leading to a scaling relation between total and residual energy: (E^M-E^K)~ k(E^K+E^M)2. The probability density functions of cascading quantities are found to exhibit mono-scaling.

  11. Extreme events in computational turbulence

    PubMed Central

    Yeung, P. K.; Zhai, X. M.; Sreenivasan, Katepalli R.

    2015-01-01

    We have performed direct numerical simulations of homogeneous and isotropic turbulence in a periodic box with 8,1923 grid points. These are the largest simulations performed, to date, aimed at improving our understanding of turbulence small-scale structure. We present some basic statistical results and focus on “extreme” events (whose magnitudes are several tens of thousands the mean value). The structure of these extreme events is quite different from that of moderately large events (of the order of 10 times the mean value). In particular, intense vorticity occurs primarily in the form of tubes for moderately large events whereas it is much more “chunky” for extreme events (though probably overlaid on the traditional vortex tubes). We track the temporal evolution of extreme events and find that they are generally short-lived. Extreme magnitudes of energy dissipation rate and enstrophy occur simultaneously in space and remain nearly colocated during their evolution. PMID:26424452

  12. Turbulent spots in hypervelocity flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jewell, Joseph S.; Leyva, Ivett A.; Shepherd, Joseph E.

    2017-04-01

    The turbulent spot propagation process in boundary layer flows of air, nitrogen, carbon dioxide, and air/carbon dioxide mixtures in thermochemical nonequilibrium at high enthalpy is investigated. Experiments are performed in a hypervelocity reflected shock tunnel with a 5-degree half-angle axisymmetric cone instrumented with flush-mounted fast-response coaxial thermocouples. Time-resolved and spatially demarcated heat transfer traces are used to track the propagation of turbulent bursts within the mean flow, and convection rates at approximately 91, 74, and 63% of the boundary layer edge velocity, respectively, are observed for the leading edge, peak, and trailing edge of the spots. A simple model constructed with these spot propagation parameters is used to infer spot generation rates from observed transition onset to completion distance. Spot generation rates in air and nitrogen are estimated to be approximately twice the spot generation rates in air/carbon dioxide mixtures.

  13. Optical distortions by compressible turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mani, Ali

    Optical distortions induced by refractive index fluctuations in turbulent flows are a serious concern in airborne communication and imaging systems. This project focuses on aero-optical flows in which compressible turbulence is the dominant source of optical distortions. These flows include boundary layers, free shear layers, cavity flows, and wakes typically associated with flight conditions. The present study consists of two theoretical analyses and an extensive numerical investigation of optical distortions by separated shear layers and turbulent wakes. We present an analysis of far-field optical statistics in a general aero-optical framework. Based on this analysis, measures of far-field distortion, such as tilt, spread, and loss of focus-depth, are linked to key flow statistics. By employing these measures, we quantify distortion effects through a set of norms that have provable scaling properties with key optical parameters. The second analysis presents a theoretical estimate of the range of optically important flow scales in an arbitrary aero-optical flowfield. We show that in the limit of high Reynolds numbers, the smallest optically important scale does not depend on the Kolmogorov scale. For a given geometry this length scale depends only on the flow Mach number, freestream refractive index, and the optical wavelength. The provided formula can be used to estimate grid resolution requirements for numerical simulations of aero-optical phenomena. A rough estimate indicates that resolution requirements for accurate prediction of aero-optics is not much higher than typical LES requirements. As a model problem, compressible turbulent flows over a circular cylinder is considered to study the fundamental physics of aero-optical effects. Large-eddy simulation with a high-resolution numerical scheme is employed to compute variations of the refractive index field in the separated shear layers and turbulent wakes in a range of flow Mach numbers (0.2--0.85) and

  14. The onset of vortex turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Huber, G. |

    1992-12-01

    It is the goal of this thesis to investigate some of the unusual and spectacular properties near the transition to turbulence in a two-dimensional field of limit-cycle oscillators. Of particular interest are the dynamics of topological defects (vortices) associated with the onset of turbulence. The complex Ginzburg-Landau equation describes an extended reaction-diffusion system close to the bifurcation of a steady state into a stable, periodic orbit. In the jargon of nonlinear dynamics, it is the amplitude equation corresponding to a Hopf bifurcation. Because of the generality of the assumptions under which it is derived, the complex Ginzburg-Landau equation describes systems in contexts other than chemical reactions with diffusion. Examples include Rayleigh-Benard convection and the phase fields of multimode lasers. The reaction-diffusion model is however, a sufficiently general model to frame our discussion.

  15. Renormalization group analysis of turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Leslie M.

    1989-01-01

    The objective is to understand and extend a recent theory of turbulence based on dynamic renormalization group (RNG) techniques. The application of RNG methods to hydrodynamic turbulence was explored most extensively by Yakhot and Orszag (1986). An eddy viscosity was calculated which was consistent with the Kolmogorov inertial range by systematic elimination of the small scales in the flow. Further, assumed smallness of the nonlinear terms in the redefined equations for the large scales results in predictions for important flow constants such as the Kolmogorov constant. It is emphasized that no adjustable parameters are needed. The parameterization of the small scales in a self-consistent manner has important implications for sub-grid modeling.

  16. Biphoton states in correlated turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roux, Filippus S.

    2017-02-01

    The effect of turbulence on a pair of photons propagating together through the same medium is analyzed. The behavior is compared to the case where these photons propagate separately through different turbulent media. The analysis is done with a multiple phase screen approach, by deriving and solving an infinitesimal propagation equation. We apply these results to the case where the initial photons are entangled in their spatial degrees of freedom with the aid of spontaneous parametric down-conversion. It is found that for this input state, the decay of entanglement in correlated media under the weak scintillation approximation is quicker than in uncorrelated media. Beyond the weak scintillation approximation, the entanglement in correlated media decays slower when it is close to zero—approaching zero asymptotically as a function of scintillation strength. This is contrary to the case in uncorrelated media where entanglement becomes zero at a finite scintillation strength.

  17. Bayesian estimation of turbulent motion.

    PubMed

    Héas, Patrick; Herzet, Cédric; Mémin, Etienne; Heitz, Dominique; Mininni, Pablo D

    2013-06-01

    Based on physical laws describing the multiscale structure of turbulent flows, this paper proposes a regularizer for fluid motion estimation from an image sequence. Regularization is achieved by imposing some scale invariance property between histograms of motion increments computed at different scales. By reformulating this problem from a Bayesian perspective, an algorithm is proposed to jointly estimate motion, regularization hyperparameters, and to select the most likely physical prior among a set of models. Hyperparameter and model inference are conducted by posterior maximization, obtained by marginalizing out non--Gaussian motion variables. The Bayesian estimator is assessed on several image sequences depicting synthetic and real turbulent fluid flows. Results obtained with the proposed approach exceed the state-of-the-art results in fluid flow estimation.

  18. Interparticle collision mechanism in turbulence.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jung-Il; Park, Yongnam; Kwon, Ohjoon; Lee, Changhoon

    2016-01-01

    Direct numerical simulations of particle-laden homogeneous isotropic turbulence are performed to investigate interparticle collisions in a wide range of Stokes numbers. Dynamics of the particles are described by Stokes drag including particle-particle interactions via hard-sphere collisions, while fluid turbulence is solved using a pseudospectral method. Particular emphasis is placed on interparticle-collision-based conditional statistics of rotation and dissipation rates of the fluid experienced by heavy particles, which provide essential information on the collision process. We also investigate the collision statistics of collision time interval and angle. Based on a Lamb vortex model for a vortex structure, we claim that collision events occur in the edge region for vortical structures in the intermediate-Stokes-number regime, suggesting that the sling effect enhances collision as well as clustering.

  19. Numerical experiments in homogeneous turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogallo, R. S.

    1981-01-01

    The direct simulation methods developed by Orszag and Patternson (1972) for isotropic turbulence were extended to homogeneous turbulence in an incompressible fluid subjected to uniform deformation or rotation. The results of simulations for irrotational strain (plane and axisymmetric), shear, rotation, and relaxation toward isotropy following axisymmetric strain are compared with linear theory and experimental data. Emphasis is placed on the shear flow because of its importance and because of the availability of accurate and detailed experimental data. The computed results are used to assess the accuracy of two popular models used in the closure of the Reynolds-stress equations. Data from a variety of the computed fields and the details of the numerical methods used in the simulation are also presented.

  20. Topics in strong Langmuir turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicholson, D. R.

    1983-01-01

    Progress in two approaches to the study of strong Langmuir turbulence is reported. In two spatial dimensions, numerical solution of the Zakharov equations yields a steady state involving linear growth, linear damping, and a collection of coherent, long-lived entities which might loosely be called solitons. In one spatial dimension, a statistical theory is applied to the cubically nonlinear Schroedinger equation and is solved analytically in a special case.

  1. Topics in strong Langmuir turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicholson, D. R.

    1982-01-01

    Progress in two approaches to the study of strong Langmuir turbulence is reported. In two spatial dimensions, numerical solution of the Zakharov equations yields a steady state involving linear growth, linear damping, and a collection of coherent, long-lived entities which might loosely be called solitons. In one spatial dimension, a statistical theory is applied to the cubically nonlinear Schroedinger equation and is solved analytically in a special case.

  2. Trajectory structures in turbulent plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Vlad, Madalina; Spineanu, Florin

    2006-11-03

    Particle stochastic advection in two dimensional divergence free velocity fields is studied. The special statistical properties of this process (non-Gaussian distribution, memory effects and quasi-coherent behavior) are determined using a new approach, the nested subensemble method. The effect of the statistics of trajectories on the evolution of drift turbulence in magnetized plasmas is studied. It essentialy consists in the tendency of structure formation.

  3. Turbulence modeling for hypersonic flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bardina, Jorge E.

    1993-01-01

    The objective of the proposed work is to continue to develop, verify, and incorporate the baseline two-equation turbulence models, which account for the effects of compressibility at high speeds, into a three-dimensional Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) code. Additionally, we plan to provide documented descriptions of the models and their numerical procedures so that they can be implemented into the NASP CFD codes.

  4. Magnetic Turbulence in the WIM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minter, A.

    2004-10-01

    The turbulence in the Galactic magnetic field can be measured using Faraday rotation measures towards extra-galactic radio sources along with Hα emission measures from the Warm Ionized Medium in our galaxy. This has now been done for two 10° by 10° regions of the sky centered on (l,b)=145°, -20° (Minter & Spangler 1996), and 185°, +20°. I will present preliminary results for the 185°,+20° region.

  5. Electron magnetohydrodynamics: Dynamics and turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyutikov, Maxim

    2013-11-01

    We consider dynamics and turbulent interaction of whistler modes within the framework of inertialess electron magnetohydrodynamics (EMHD). We argue that there is no energy principle in EMHD: any stationary closed configuration is neutrally stable. On the other hand, the relaxation principle, the long term evolution of a weakly dissipative system towards Taylor-Beltrami state, remains valid in EMHD. We consider the turbulent cascade of whistler modes. We show that (i) harmonic whistlers are exact nonlinear solutions; (ii) collinear whistlers do not interact (including counterpropagating); (iii) waves with the same value of the wave vector k1=k2 do not interact; (iv) whistler modes have a dispersion that allows a three-wave decay, including into a zero frequency mode; (v) the three-wave interaction effectively couples modes with highly different wave numbers and propagation angles. In addition, linear interaction of a whistler with a single zero mode can lead to spatially divergent structures via parametric instability. All these properties are drastically different from MHD, so that the qualitative properties of the Alfvén turbulence can not be transferred to the EMHD turbulence. We derive the Hamiltonian formulation of EMHD, and using Bogoliubov transformation reduce it to the canonical form; we calculate the matrix elements for the three-wave interaction of whistlers. We solve numerically the kinetic equation and show that, generally, the EMHD cascade develops within a broad range of angles, while transiently it may show anisotropic, nearly two-dimensional structures. Development of a cascade depends on the forcing (nonuniversal) and often fails to reach a steady state. Analytical estimates predict the spectrum of magnetic fluctuations for the quasi-isotropic cascade ∝k-2. The cascade remains weak (not critically balanced). The cascade is UV local, while the infrared locality is weakly (logarithmically) violated.

  6. Simulation of turbulent wall pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ash, R. L.

    1978-01-01

    A Monte Carlo procedure was developed to simulate turbulent boundary layer wall pressure fluctuations. The approach utilizes much of the newly available conditional sampling information to construct the required distribution functions. Various disturbance wave forms were examined, as well as the effect of frequency-dependent decay. Good agreement between the simulation and experimental data was achieved for root mean square pressure level, power spectrum, and space time correlation.

  7. Noble-gas-rich separates from the Allende meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ott, U.; Mack, R.; Chang, S.

    1981-01-01

    Predominantly carbonaceous HF/HCl-resistant residues from the Allende meteorite are studied. Samples are characterized by SEM/EDXA, X-ray diffraction, INAA, C, S, H, N, and noble gas analyses. Isotopic data for carbon show variations no greater than 5%, while isotopic data from noble gases confirm previously established systematics. Noble gas abundances correlate with those of C and N, and concomitant partial loss of C and normal trapped gas occur during treatments with oxidizing acids. HF/HCl demineralization of bulk meteorite results in similar fractional losses of C and trapped noble gases, which leads to the conclusion that various macromolecular carbonaceous substances serve as the main host phase for normal trapped noble gases and anomalous gases in acid-resistant residues, and as the carrier of the major part of trapped noble gases lost during HF/HCl demineralization. Limits on the possible abundances of dense mineralic host phases in the residues are obtained, and considerations of the nucleogenetic origin for CCF-XE indicate that carbonaceous host phases and various forms of organic matter in carbonaceous meteorites may have a presolar origin.

  8. Rare-gas-rich separates from carbonaceous chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, J. H.; Frick, U.; Neil, J. M.; Phinney, D. L.

    1978-01-01

    This paper describes an analysis of carbon-rich separates prepared by demineralization of colloidal fractions after disaggregation of bulk samples of the type C2 meteorites Murray, Murchison, and Cold Bokkeveld, as well as a methanol colloid extracted from acid-resistant residues of the Allende meteorite (type C3V) obtained by dissolution of most of the minerals in HCl and HF acids. The carbonaceous separates, or lAlates (a coined word designating colloids prepared sometimes before and sometimes after acid treatment), are characterized incompletely and with difficulty. A stepwise heating experiment on a Murray lAlate is discussed which revealed bimodal release of all noble gases, with similar patterns for Ar, Kr, and Xe. Chemical reactions are suggested as the likely mechanism for gas release. The results are shown to support the concept of a carbonaceous gas carrier uniformly present in meteorites of various types.

  9. Following Black Hole Scaling Relations through Gas-rich Mergers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medling, Anne M.; U, Vivian; Max, Claire E.; Sanders, David B.; Armus, Lee; Holden, Bradford; Mieda, Etsuko; Wright, Shelley A.; Larkin, James E.

    2015-04-01

    We present black hole mass measurements from kinematic modeling of high-spatial resolution integral field spectroscopy of the inner regions of nine nearby (ultra-)luminous infrared galaxies in a variety of merger stages. These observations were taken with OSIRIS and laser guide star adaptive optics on the Keck I and Keck II telescopes, and reveal gas and stellar kinematics inside the spheres of influence of these supermassive black holes. We find that this sample of black holes are overmassive (˜107-9 {{M}}) compared to the expected values based on black hole scaling relations, and suggest that the major epoch of black hole growth occurs in early stages of a merger, as opposed to during a final episode of quasar-mode feedback. The black hole masses presented are the dynamical masses enclosed in ˜25 pc, and could include gas which is gravitationally bound to the black hole but has not yet lost sufficient angular momentum to be accreted. If present, this gas could in principle eventually fuel active galactic nucleus feedback or be itself blown out from the system.

  10. Observing eruptions of gas-rich compressible magmas from space

    PubMed Central

    Kilbride, Brendan McCormick; Edmonds, Marie; Biggs, Juliet

    2016-01-01

    Observations of volcanoes from space are a critical component of volcano monitoring, but we lack quantitative integrated models to interpret them. The atmospheric sulfur yields of eruptions are variable and not well correlated with eruption magnitude and for many eruptions the volume of erupted material is much greater than the subsurface volume change inferred from ground displacements. Up to now, these observations have been treated independently, but they are fundamentally linked. If magmas are vapour-saturated before eruption, bubbles cause the magma to become more compressible, resulting in muted ground displacements. The bubbles contain the sulfur-bearing vapour injected into the atmosphere during eruptions. Here we present a model that allows the inferred volume change of the reservoir and the sulfur mass loading to be predicted as a function of reservoir depth and the magma's oxidation state and volatile content, which is consistent with the array of natural data. PMID:28000791

  11. Observing eruptions of gas-rich compressible magmas from space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilbride, Brendan Mccormick; Edmonds, Marie; Biggs, Juliet

    2016-12-01

    Observations of volcanoes from space are a critical component of volcano monitoring, but we lack quantitative integrated models to interpret them. The atmospheric sulfur yields of eruptions are variable and not well correlated with eruption magnitude and for many eruptions the volume of erupted material is much greater than the subsurface volume change inferred from ground displacements. Up to now, these observations have been treated independently, but they are fundamentally linked. If magmas are vapour-saturated before eruption, bubbles cause the magma to become more compressible, resulting in muted ground displacements. The bubbles contain the sulfur-bearing vapour injected into the atmosphere during eruptions. Here we present a model that allows the inferred volume change of the reservoir and the sulfur mass loading to be predicted as a function of reservoir depth and the magma's oxidation state and volatile content, which is consistent with the array of natural data.

  12. Observing eruptions of gas-rich compressible magmas from space.

    PubMed

    Kilbride, Brendan McCormick; Edmonds, Marie; Biggs, Juliet

    2016-12-21

    Observations of volcanoes from space are a critical component of volcano monitoring, but we lack quantitative integrated models to interpret them. The atmospheric sulfur yields of eruptions are variable and not well correlated with eruption magnitude and for many eruptions the volume of erupted material is much greater than the subsurface volume change inferred from ground displacements. Up to now, these observations have been treated independently, but they are fundamentally linked. If magmas are vapour-saturated before eruption, bubbles cause the magma to become more compressible, resulting in muted ground displacements. The bubbles contain the sulfur-bearing vapour injected into the atmosphere during eruptions. Here we present a model that allows the inferred volume change of the reservoir and the sulfur mass loading to be predicted as a function of reservoir depth and the magma's oxidation state and volatile content, which is consistent with the array of natural data.

  13. Star forming regions in gas-rich SO galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pogge, Richard W.; Eskridge, Paul B.

    1987-01-01

    The first results of an H alpha imaging survey of HI rich SO galaxies, which were searched for HII regions and other sources of emission, are presented. The charge coupled device H alpha interference filter images were made of 16 galaxies. Eight of these galaxies show evidence for on-going star formation, one has nuclear emission but no HII regions, and the remaining seven have no emissions detected within well defined upper limits. With the exception of one notably peculiar galaxy in which the emission from HII regions appears pervasive, the HII regions are either organized into inner-disk rings or randomly distributed throughout the disk. A few of these galaxies are found to be clearly not SO's; or peculiar objects atypical of the SO class. Using simple models star formation rates (SFRs) and gas depletion times from the observed H alpha fluxes were estimated. In general, the derived SFRs are much lower than those found in isolated field spiral galaxies and the corresponding gas depletion time scales are also longer.

  14. Gas-rich dwarf galaxies in dense and sparse environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, G. Lyle

    1993-01-01

    Dwarf irregular galaxies (generically labelled Im for the present purposes) pose an enigma to students of galaxy evolution. In nearby groups and the Virgo cluster, Im galaxies are at least as abundant as spiral galaxies, and their low surface brightnesses and high gas-to-stars ratios suggest that (at least in the stochastic self-propagating star formation scenario) there should be significant numbers of HI clouds with masses approaching 10(exp 8) solar mass which have undergone very little or no star formation. To date, however, no clouds with so little star formation that they would not be recognized as Im galaxies on high-quality photographic plates have been identified. There have been suggestions that such dwarfs may be tidally disrupted in regions of high galactic density, but may be prevalent in low density regions. We offer data from three parallel programs relevant to this issue. (1) A large number of Im galaxies throughout the Local Supercluster have been mapped in the HI spectral line using the Arecibo Radiotelescope, and we can establish the frequency with which HI disks much more extended than their optically visible portions are found. (2) Our extensive mapping of spiral and dwarf galaxies in the Virgo cluster allows us to set stringent limits on the density of star-free Hi clouds in that cluster. (3) We have conducted a sampling of the void in the distribution of galaxies toward the super galactic pole, optimized for finding low-mass HI clouds at redshifts out to approximately 2000 km/s.

  15. Gyrokinetic Turbulence Simulations for Stellarators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merz, F.; Xanthopoulos, P.; Gorler, T.; Jenko, F.; Mikkelsen, D.

    2007-11-01

    While there is an abundance of publications on plasma microturbulence in tokamaks, not much is presently known about its character in nonaxisymmetric devices. The present work constitutes the first attempt to investigate turbulent transport in modern stellarators, using the gyrokinetic turbulence code Gene and realistic magnetic equilibria. First, linear and nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations of ion-temperature-gradient (ITG) and trapped electron modes are presented for the optimized stellarator Wendelstein 7-X which is currently under construction at Greifswald, Germany. The newly developed code Tracer -- based on field line tracing -- is employed to extract the required geometric information from the MHD equilibria [Phys. Plasmas 13, 092301 (2006)]. Extensive linear studies reveal substantial differences with respect to axisymmetric geometry [Phys. Plasmas 14, 042501 (2007)]. Nonlinear ITG simulations are also presented [Phys. Rev. Lett., in print]. Several fundamental features are discussed, including the role of zonal flows for turbulence saturation, the resulting flux-gradient relationship and the co-existence of ITG modes with trapped ion modes in the saturated state. Similar studies will be presented for the stellarator experiment NCSX at PPPL with the aim to comprehend the effects of quasi-axisymmetric geometry on the properties - both linear and nonlinear - of various microinstabilities.

  16. Electromagnetic scattering from turbulent plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Resendes, D.G. Instituto Superior Tecnico, Rua Rovisco Pais, Lisboa )

    1992-11-15

    A self-consistent multiple-scattering theory of vector electromagnetic waves scattered from a turbulent plasma is presented. This approach provides a general and systematic treatment to all orders in turbulence of the scattering of electromagnetic waves in terms of the properties of the turbulent structure of the scattering system and is applicable in the full regime from underdense to overdense plasmas. To illustrate the theory, a plasma consisting of a finite number density of discrete scatterers with a simple geometry and statistical properties is chosen. In this approach the exact solution for a single scatterer is obtained first. From it the configuration-dependent solution for {ital N} scatterers is constructed. Rather than solving explicitly for this solution and then averaging, the averaging operation will be taken first in order to find an approximate equation obeyed by the mean or coherent field. The coherent and incoherent scattering are then determined in terms of the coherent field and the backscatter is evaluated. The coherent and incoherent scattering, our principal results, are expressed in a plane-wave basis in a form suitable for numerical computation. A number of interesting phenomena which may readily be incorporated into the theory are indicated.

  17. Locomotion in a turbulent world

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koehl, M.

    2014-11-01

    When organisms swim or crawl in aquatic habitats, the water through which they travel is usually moving. Therefore, an important part of understanding how aquatic organisms locomote is determining how they interact with the fluctuating turbulent water currents through which they move. The research systems we have been using to address this question are microscopic marine animals swimming in turbulent, wavy water flow or crawling on surfaces in spatially-complex habitats exposed to such flow. Using a combination of field studies, wave-flume experiments, experiments in fluidic devices, and mathematical modeling, we have discovered that small organisms swimming or crawling in turbulent flow are not subjected to steady velocities. The shears, accelerations, and odor concentrations encountered by small swimmers and crawlers fluctuate rapidly, with peaks much higher than mean values. Although microscopic organisms swim slowly relative to ambient water flow, their locomotory behavior in response to the rapidly-fluctuating shears and odors they encounter can affect where they are transported by ambient water movement. Furthermore, the ability of small organisms to walk on surfaces without being dislodged by pulses of rapid flow constrains the microhabitats in which they can forage. Supported by NSF Grant #IOS-0842685.

  18. Turbulence modeling for hypersonic flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bardina, Jorge E.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of the present work is to develop, verify, and incorporate two equation turbulence models which account for the effect of compressibility at high speeds into a three dimensional Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes code and to provide documented model descriptions and numerical procedures so that they can be implemented into the National Aerospace Plane (NASP) codes. A summary of accomplishments is listed: (1) Four codes have been tested and evaluated against a flat plate boundary layer flow and an external supersonic flow; (2) a code named RANS was chosen because of its speed, accuracy, and versatility; (3) the code was extended from thin boundary layer to full Navier-Stokes; (4) the K-omega two equation turbulence model has been implemented into the base code; (5) a 24 degree laminar compression corner flow has been simulated and compared to other numerical simulations; and (6) work is in progress in writing the numerical method of the base code including the turbulence model.

  19. Odor Landscapes in Turbulent Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celani, Antonio; Villermaux, Emmanuel; Vergassola, Massimo

    2014-10-01

    The olfactory system of male moths is exquisitely sensitive to pheromones emitted by females and transported in the environment by atmospheric turbulence. Moths respond to minute amounts of pheromones, and their behavior is sensitive to the fine-scale structure of turbulent plumes where pheromone concentration is detectible. The signal of pheromone whiffs is qualitatively known to be intermittent, yet quantitative characterization of its statistical properties is lacking. This challenging fluid dynamics problem is also relevant for entomology, neurobiology, and the technological design of olfactory stimulators aimed at reproducing physiological odor signals in well-controlled laboratory conditions. Here, we develop a Lagrangian approach to the transport of pheromones by turbulent flows and exploit it to predict the statistics of odor detection during olfactory searches. The theory yields explicit probability distributions for the intensity and the duration of pheromone detections, as well as their spacing in time. Predictions are favorably tested by using numerical simulations, laboratory experiments, and field data for the atmospheric surface layer. The resulting signal of odor detections lends itself to implementation with state-of-the-art technologies and quantifies the amount and the type of information that male moths can exploit during olfactory searches.

  20. Structure in turbulent thermal convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balachandar, S.

    1992-12-01

    Small-scale features of vorticity, strain rate, and temperature gradients are considered in a Rayleigh-Bénard convection. The results reported are from a direct numerical simulation of turbulent convection performed in a rectangular box of aspect ratio 2√2 at a Rayleigh number of 6.5×106 and a Prandtl number of 0.72. In agreement with earlier results [Ashurst et al., Phys. Fluids 30, 2343 (1987) and Ruetsch and Maxey, Phys. Fluids A 3, 1587 (1991)], the intermediate strain rate is on an average positive, but the ratio of alpha, beta, and gamma strain rates are measured to be 5.3:1.0:-6.3. This result differs from the earlier result of 3:1:-4 obtained in homogeneous isotropic and shear turbulences. Buoyancy-induced vorticity production makes significant contribution to the overall enstrophy balance, especially close to the boundaries. Vorticity production by buoyancy is exclusively in the horizontal direction and is balanced by preferred production by stretching and tilting in the vertical direction, due to the preferred alignment of extensional alpha strain rate with the vertical direction. Such directional alignment of vorticity, strain rate, and scalar gradient is explained on the basis of preferred spatial orientation of coherent structures in thermal turbulence.

  1. Towards understanding turbulent scalar mixing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Girimaji, Sharath S.

    1992-01-01

    In an effort towards understanding turbulent scalar mixing, we study the effect of molecular mixing, first in isolation and then by accounting for the effects of the velocity field. The chief motivation for this approach stems from the strong resemblance of the scalar probability density function (PDF) obtained from the scalar field evolving from the heat conduction equation that arises in a turbulent velocity field. However, the evolution of the scalar dissipation is different for the two cases. We attempt to account for these differences, which are due to the velocity field, using a Lagrangian frame analysis. After establishing the usefulness of this approach, we use the heat-conduction simulations (HCS), in lieu of the more expensive direct numerical simulations (DNS), to study many of the less understood aspects of turbulent mixing. Comparison between the HCS data and available models are made whenever possible. It is established that the beta PDF characterizes the evolution of the scalar PDF during mixing from all types of non-premixed initial conditions.

  2. New Thermodynamical Force in Plasma Phase Space that Controls Turbulence and Turbulent Transport

    PubMed Central

    Itoh, Sanae-I.; Itoh, Kimitaka

    2012-01-01

    Physics of turbulence and turbulent transport has been developed on the central dogma that spatial gradients constitute the controlling parameters, such as Reynolds number and Rayleigh number. Recent experiments with the nonequilibrium plasmas in magnetic confinement devices, however, have shown that the turbulence and transport change much faster than global parameters, after an abrupt change of heating power. Here we propose a theory of turbulence in inhomogeneous magnetized plasmas, showing that the heating power directly influences the turbulence. New mechanism, that an external source couples with plasma fluctuations in phase space so as to affect turbulence, is investigated. A new thermodynamical force in phase-space, i.e., the derivative of heating power by plasma pressure, plays the role of new control parameter, in addition to spatial gradients. Following the change of turbulence, turbulent transport is modified accordingly. The condition under which this new effect can be observed is also evaluated. PMID:23155481

  3. Turbulence and surface heat transfer near the stagnation point of a circular cylinder in turbulent flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, C. R.

    1983-01-01

    A turbulent boundary layer flow analysis of the momentum and thermal flow fields near the forward stagnation point due to a circular cylinder in turbulent cross flow is presented. Turbulence modeling length scale, anisotropic turbulence initial profiles and boundary conditions were identified as functions of the cross flow turbulence intensity and the boundary layer flow far field velocity. These parameters were used in a numerical computational procedure to calculate the mean velocity, mean temperature, and turbulence double correlation profiles within the flow field. The effects of the cross flow turbulence on the stagnation region momentum and thermal flow fields were investigated. This analysis predicted the existing measurements of the stagnation region mean velocity and surface heat transfer rate with cross flow Reynolds number and turbulence intensity less than 250,000 and 0.05, respectively.

  4. Turbulence in electrostatic ion acoustic shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Means, R. W.; Coroniti, F. V.; Wong, A. Y.; White, R. B.

    1973-01-01

    Three types of collisionless electrostatic ion acoustic shocks are investigated using a double plasma (DP) device: (1) laminar shocks; (2) small amplitude turbulent shocks in which the turbulence is confined to be upstream of the shock potential jump; and (3) large amplitude turbulent shocks in which the wave turbulence occurs throughout the shock transition. The wave turbulence is generated by ions which are reflected from the shock potential; linear theory spatial growth increments agree with experimental values. The experimental relationship between the shock Mach number and the shock potential is shown to be inconsistent with theoretical shock models which assume that the electrons are isothermal. Theoretical calculations which assume a trapped electron equation of a state and a turbulently flattened velocity distrubution function for the reflected ions yields a Mach number vs potential relationship in agreement with experiment.

  5. Dynamics of quantum turbulence of different spectra

    PubMed Central

    Walmsley, Paul; Zmeev, Dmitry; Pakpour, Fatemeh; Golov, Andrei

    2014-01-01

    Turbulence in a superfluid in the zero-temperature limit consists of a dynamic tangle of quantized vortex filaments. Different types of turbulence are possible depending on the level of correlations in the orientation of vortex lines. We provide an overview of turbulence in superfluid 4He with a particular focus on recent experiments probing the decay of turbulence in the zero-temperature regime below 0.5 K. We describe extensive measurements of the vortex line density during the free decay of different types of turbulence: ultraquantum and quasiclassical turbulence in both stationary and rotating containers. The observed decays and the effective dissipation as a function of temperature are compared with theoretical models and numerical simulations. PMID:24704876

  6. RELATIVISTIC ACCRETION MEDIATED BY TURBULENT COMPTONIZATION

    SciTech Connect

    Socrates, Aristotle E-mail: socrates@astro.princeton.ed

    2010-08-10

    Black hole and neutron star accretion flows display unusually high levels of hard coronal emission in comparison to all other optically thick, gravitationally bound, turbulent astrophysical systems. Since these flows sit in deep relativistic gravitational potentials, their random bulk motions approach the speed of light, therefore allowing turbulent Comptonization to be an important effect. We show that the inevitable production of hard X-ray photons results from turbulent Comptonization in the limit where the turbulence is trans-sonic and the accretion power approaches the Eddington limit. In this regime, the turbulent Compton y-parameter approaches unity and the turbulent Compton temperature is a significant fraction of the electron rest mass energy, in agreement with the observed phenomena.

  7. Turbulence in unsteady flow at high frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhn, Gary D.

    1990-01-01

    Turbulent flows subjected to oscillations of the mean flow were simulated using a large-eddy simulation computer code for flow in a channel. The objective of the simulations was to provide better understanding of the effects of time-dependent disturbances on the turbulence of a boundary layer and of the underlying physical phenomena regarding the basic interaction between the turbulence and external disturbances. The results confirmed that turbulence is sensitive to certain ranges of frequencies of disturbances. However, no direct connection was found between the frequency of imposed disturbances and the characteristic 'burst' frequency of turbulence. New insight into the nature of turbulence at high frequencies was found. Viscous phenomena near solid walls were found to be the dominant influence for high-frequency perturbations.

  8. Global Variation of Meteor Trail Plasma Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyrud, L. P.; Hinrichs, J.; Urbina, J.

    2011-01-01

    We present the first global simulations on the occurrence of meteor trail plasma irregularities. These results seek to answer the following questions: when a meteoroid disintegrates in the atmosphere will the resulting trail become plasma turbulent, what are the factors influencing the development of turbulence, and how do they vary on a global scale. Understanding meteor trail plasma turbulence is important because turbulent meteor trails are visible as non-specular trails to coherent radars, and turbulence influences the evolution of specular radar meteor trails, particularly regarding the inference of mesospheric temperatures from trail diffusion rates, and their usage for meteor burst communication. We provide evidence of the significant effect that neutral atmospheric winds and density, and ionospheric plasma density have on the variability of meteor trail evolution and the observation of nonspecular meteor trails, and demonstrate that trails are far less likely to become and remain turbulent in daylight, explaining several observational trends using non-specular and specular meteor trails.

  9. Improved detection of atmospheric turbulence with SLODAR.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, Michael; Jenkins, Charles; Lambert, Andrew

    2007-10-29

    We discuss several improvements in the detection of atmospheric turbulence using SLOpe Detection And Ranging (SLODAR). Frequently, SLODAR observations have shown strong ground-layer turbulence, which is beneficial to adaptive optics. We show that current methods which neglect atmospheric propagation effects can underestimate the strength of high altitude turbulence by up to ~ 30%. We show that mirror and dome seeing turbulence can be a significant fraction of measured ground-layer turbulence, some cases up to ~ 50%. We also demonstrate a novel technique to improve the nominal height resolution, by a factor of 3, called Generalized SLODAR. This can be applied when sampling high-altitude turbulence, where the nominal height resolution is the poorest, or for resolving details in the important ground-layer.

  10. Quantifying Turbulence for Tidal Power Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Thomson, Jim; Richmond, Marshall C.; Polagye, Brian; Durgesh, Vibhav

    2010-08-01

    Using newly collected data from a tidal power site in Puget Sound, WA, metrics for turbulence quantification are assessed and discussed. The quality of raw ping Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) data for turbulence studies is evaluated against Acoustic Doppler Velocimeter (ADV) data at a point. Removal of Doppler noise from the raw ping data is shown to be a crucial step in turbulence quantification. Excluding periods of slack tide, the turbulent intensity estimates at a height of 4.6 m above the seabed are 8% and 11% from the ADCP and ADV, respectively. Estimates of the turbulent dissipation rate are more variable, from 10e-3 to 10e-1 W/m^3. An example analysis of coherent Turbulent Kinetic Energy (TKE) is presented.

  11. Energy Transfer in Rotating Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cambon, Claude; Mansour, Nagi N.; Godeferd, Fabien S.; Rai, Man Mohan (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    The influence or rotation on the spectral energy transfer of homogeneous turbulence is investigated in this paper. Given the fact that linear dynamics, e.g. the inertial waves regime tackled in an RDT (Rapid Distortion Theory) fashion, cannot Affect st homogeneous isotropic turbulent flow, the study of nonlinear dynamics is of prime importance in the case of rotating flows. Previous theoretical (including both weakly nonlinear and EDQNM theories), experimental and DNS (Direct Numerical Simulation) results are gathered here and compared in order to give a self-consistent picture of the nonlinear effects of rotation on tile turbulence. The inhibition of the energy cascade, which is linked to a reduction of the dissipation rate, is shown to be related to a damping due to rotation of the energy transfer. A model for this effect is quantified by a model equation for the derivative-skewness factor, which only involves a micro-Rossby number Ro(sup omega) = omega'/(2(OMEGA))-ratio of rms vorticity and background vorticity as the relevant rotation parameter, in accordance with DNS and EDQNM results fit addition, anisotropy is shown also to develop through nonlinear interactions modified by rotation, in an intermediate range of Rossby numbers (Ro(omega) = (omega)' and Ro(omega)w greater than 1), which is characterized by a marco-Rossby number Ro(sup L) less than 1 and Ro(omega) greater than 1 which is characterized by a macro-Rossby number based on an integral lengthscale L and the micro-Rossby number previously defined. This anisotropy is mainly an angular drain of spectral energy which tends to concentrate energy in tile wave-plane normal to the rotation axis, which is exactly both the slow and the two-dimensional manifold. In Addition, a polarization of the energy distribution in this slow 2D manifold enhances horizontal (normal to the rotation axis) velocity components, and underlies the anisotropic structure of the integral lengthscales. Finally is demonstrated the

  12. Losses in Channels with Increased External Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaryankin, A. Y.; Soloveva, G. S.

    1986-01-01

    An approximate method for determining the effect of the level of turbulence on the aerodynamic characteristics of convergent and diffuser channels is examined. A momentum equation for the boundary layer is in the method, introducing external flow turbulence on the basis of experimental values of the coefficient of friction and the form factor. It is found that at significant levels of external turbulence, losses must be considered not only in the boundary layer but also in the central region of the channel.

  13. Turbulence Modeling in Stratified Flows over Topography

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-30

    Details of the basic LES model can be found in Armenio and Sarkar [1]. To avoid the need to resolve the very small turbulent motions near the lower... Armenio and S. Sarkar. An investigation of stably stratified turbulent channel flow using large-eddy simulation. J. Fluid Mech., 459:1–42, 2002. [2...276, 1994. [12] J. Taylor, S. Sarkar, and V. Armenio . An investigation of stably stratified turbulent channel flow using large-eddy simulation. Phys

  14. Multiphase Turbulence Modeling for Computational Ship Hydrodynamics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-30

    to the SGS model as bubbles become under-resolved, passing through the numerical Hinze scale. 3 iii. URANS closure modeling by analysis of the...variable density turbulence) for URANS models have been developed and tested a priori for turbulent mass flux and kinetic energy. The iLES...well as established the importance of turbulent mass flux and anisotropy in the wake that has guided the development of URANS closure models. This

  15. An equation of turbulent motion in tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melamed, L. E.

    2015-12-01

    An equation of turbulent motion in a round cylindrical channel, which involves no empirical quantities, is proposed for the first time. A solution of this equation describes the average velocity profile in all regions of the channel cross section in the entire range of turbulent Reynolds numbers. The computational model is based on taking into account the internal distributed resistance created by a turbulent "vortex backfill."

  16. Numerical Study of a Convective Turbulence Encounter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Proctor, Fred H.; Hamilton, David W.; Bowles, Roland L.

    2002-01-01

    A numerical simulation of a convective turbulence event is investigated and compared with observational data. The specific case was encountered during one of NASA's flight tests and was characterized by severe turbulence. The event was associated with overshooting convective turrets that contained low to moderate radar reflectivity. Model comparisons with observations are quite favorable. Turbulence hazard metrics are proposed and applied to the numerical data set. Issues such as adequate grid size are examined.

  17. Turbulence and waves in the solar wind

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, D.A.; Goldstein, M.L. )

    1991-01-01

    Studies of turbulence and waves in the solar wind is discussed. Consideration is given to the observations and theory concerning the origin and evolution of interplanetary MHD fluctuations and to the observations, theory, and simulations of compressive fluctuations. Particular attention is given to extrapolations to near-sun and polar fields regions. Results obtained on turbulence at comets and magnetic turbulence of low-frequency waves excited by unstable distributions of ions are discussed. 230 refs.

  18. Oceanic turbulence - Big bangs or continuous creation?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caldwell, D. R.

    1983-01-01

    A hypothesis concerning the turbulence characteristics of 'microstructure' patches in the ocean is proposed in which a turbulence field is driven at the same time and scale at which it is observed. The driving energy is converted into turbulence kinetic energy in such a way that the observed overturning thickness scale is linearly related to the length scale. This hypothesis is contrasted with that of Gibson (1982), in which the 'patches' are produced by rare, powerful turbulence generators that have 'fossilized' prior to their observation. Careful attention is given to the sampling process and its assumptions.

  19. Turbulent transport in the solar nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Kevin W.

    1989-01-01

    It is likely that turbulence played a major role in the evolution of the solar nebula, which is the flattened disk of dust and gas out of which our solar system formed. Relevant turbulent processes include the transport of angular momentum, mass, and heat, which were critically important to the formation of the solar system. This research will break ground in the modeling of compressible turbulence and its effects on the evolution of the solar nebula. The computational techniques which were developed should be of interest to researchers studying other astrophysical disk systems (e.g., active galactic nuclei), as well as turbulence modelers outside the astrophysics community.

  20. Bulk Comptonization by turbulence in accretion discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufman, J.; Blaes, O. M.

    2016-06-01

    Radiation pressure dominated accretion discs around compact objects may have turbulent velocities that greatly exceed the electron thermal velocities within the disc. Bulk Comptonization by the turbulence may therefore dominate over thermal Comptonization in determining the emergent spectrum. Bulk Comptonization by divergenceless turbulence is due to radiation viscous dissipation only. It can be treated as thermal Comptonization by solving the Kompaneets equation with an equivalent `wave' temperature, which is a weighted sum over the power present at each scale in the turbulent cascade. Bulk Comptonization by turbulence with non-zero divergence is due to both pressure work and radiation viscous dissipation. Pressure work has negligible effect on photon spectra in the limit of optically thin turbulence, and in this limit radiation viscous dissipation alone can be treated as thermal Comptonization with a temperature equivalent to the full turbulent power. In the limit of extremely optically thick turbulence, radiation viscous dissipation is suppressed, and the evolution of local photon spectra can be understood in terms of compression and expansion of the strongly coupled photon and gas fluids. We discuss the consequences of these effects for self-consistently resolving and interpreting turbulent Comptonization in spectral calculations in radiation magnetohydrodynamic simulations of high luminosity accretion flows.

  1. Observation of gravity-capillary wave turbulence.

    PubMed

    Falcon, Eric; Laroche, Claude; Fauve, Stéphan

    2007-03-02

    We report the observation of the crossover between gravity and capillary wave turbulence on the surface of mercury. The probability density functions of the turbulent wave height are found to be asymmetric and thus non-Gaussian. The surface wave height displays power-law spectra in both regimes. In the capillary region, the exponent is in fair agreement with weak turbulence theory. In the gravity region, it depends on the forcing parameters. This can be related to the finite size of the container. In addition, the scaling of those spectra with the mean energy flux is found in disagreement with weak turbulence theory for both regimes.

  2. Distinct Turbulence Saturation Regimes in Stellarators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plunk, G. G.; Xanthopoulos, P.; Helander, P.

    2017-03-01

    In the complex 3D magnetic fields of stellarators, ion-temperature-gradient turbulence is shown to have two distinct saturation regimes, as revealed by petascale numerical simulations and explained by a simple turbulence theory. The first regime is marked by strong zonal flows and matches previous observations in tokamaks. The newly observed second regime, in contrast, exhibits small-scale quasi-two-dimensional turbulence, negligible zonal flows, and, surprisingly, a weaker heat flux scaling. Our findings suggest that key details of the magnetic geometry control turbulence in stellarators.

  3. Mathematical Models Of Turbulence In Hypersonic Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marvin, J. G.; Coakley, T. J.

    1991-01-01

    Report discusses mathematical models of turbulence used in numerical simulations of complicated viscous, hypersonic flows. Includes survey of essential features of models and their statuses in applications.

  4. Turbulence originating from convectively stable internal waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindzen, R. S.; Forbes, J.

    1983-01-01

    The Lindzen (1981) theory for the generation of turbulence by unstable tides and gravity omits consideration of the possibility that turbulence may be generated by gravity waves which are not convectively unstable, as suggested by the McComas and Bretherton (1977) demonstration that internal gravity waves are unstable to other gravity waves with shorter wavelengths. Attention is presently given to the estimation of the maximum turbulence that might be generated by such a process, and it is shown that even such turbulence would not significantly alter earlier results.

  5. Using random forests to diagnose aviation turbulence.

    PubMed

    Williams, John K

    Atmospheric turbulence poses a significant hazard to aviation, with severe encounters costing airlines millions of dollars per year in compensation, aircraft damage, and delays due to required post-event inspections and repairs. Moreover, attempts to avoid turbulent airspace cause flight delays and en route deviations that increase air traffic controller workload, disrupt schedules of air crews and passengers and use extra fuel. For these reasons, the Federal Aviation Administration and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration have funded the development of automated turbulence detection, diagnosis and forecasting products. This paper describes a methodology for fusing data from diverse sources and producing a real-time diagnosis of turbulence associated with thunderstorms, a significant cause of weather delays and turbulence encounters that is not well-addressed by current turbulence forecasts. The data fusion algorithm is trained using a retrospective dataset that includes objective turbulence reports from commercial aircraft and collocated predictor data. It is evaluated on an independent test set using several performance metrics including receiver operating characteristic curves, which are used for FAA turbulence product evaluations prior to their deployment. A prototype implementation fuses data from Doppler radar, geostationary satellites, a lightning detection network and a numerical weather prediction model to produce deterministic and probabilistic turbulence assessments suitable for use by air traffic managers, dispatchers and pilots. The algorithm is scheduled to be operationally implemented at the National Weather Service's Aviation Weather Center in 2014.

  6. Turbulence velocimetry of density fluctuation imaging data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKee, G. R.; Fonck, R. J.; Gupta, D. K.; Schlossberg, D. J.; Shafer, M. W.; Holland, C.; Tynan, G.

    2004-10-01

    Analysis techniques to measure the time-resolved flow field of turbulence are developed and applied to images of density fluctuations obtained with the beam emission spectroscopy diagnostic system on the DIII-D tokamak. Velocimetry applications include measurement of turbulent particle flux, zonal flows, and the Reynolds stress. The flow field of turbulent eddies exhibits quasisteady poloidal flows as well as high-frequency radial and poloidal motion associated with electrostatic potential fluctuations and strongly nonlinear multifield interactions. The orthogonal dynamic programming technique, developed for fluid-based particle and amorphous shape (smoke) flow analysis, is investigated to measure such turbulence flows. Sensitivity and accuracy are assessed and sample results discussed.

  7. New Atmospheric Turbulence Model for Shuttle Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justus, C. G.; Campbell, C. W.; Doubleday, M. K.; Johnson, D. L.

    1990-01-01

    An updated NASA atmospheric turbulence model, from 0 to 200 km altitude, which was developed to be more realistic and less conservative when applied to space shuttle reentry engineering simulation studies involving control system fuel expenditures is presented. The prior model used extreme turbulence (3 sigma) for all altitudes, whereas in reality severe turbulence is patchy within quiescent atmospheric zones. The updated turublence model presented is designed to be more realistic. The prior turbulence statistics (sigma and L) were updated and were modeled accordingly.

  8. Approximate Model for Turbulent Stagnation Point Flow.

    SciTech Connect

    Dechant, Lawrence

    2016-01-01

    Here we derive an approximate turbulent self-similar model for a class of favorable pressure gradient wedge-like flows, focusing on the stagnation point limit. While the self-similar model provides a useful gross flow field estimate this approach must be combined with a near wall model is to determine skin friction and by Reynolds analogy the heat transfer coefficient. The combined approach is developed in detail for the stagnation point flow problem where turbulent skin friction and Nusselt number results are obtained. Comparison to the classical Van Driest (1958) result suggests overall reasonable agreement. Though the model is only valid near the stagnation region of cylinders and spheres it nonetheless provides a reasonable model for overall cylinder and sphere heat transfer. The enhancement effect of free stream turbulence upon the laminar flow is used to derive a similar expression which is valid for turbulent flow. Examination of free stream enhanced laminar flow suggests that the rather than enhancement of a laminar flow behavior free stream disturbance results in early transition to turbulent stagnation point behavior. Excellent agreement is shown between enhanced laminar flow and turbulent flow behavior for high levels, e.g. 5% of free stream turbulence. Finally the blunt body turbulent stagnation results are shown to provide realistic heat transfer results for turbulent jet impingement problems.

  9. Energy fluxes in turbulent separated flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mollicone, J.-P.; Battista, F.; Gualtieri, P.; Casciola, C. M.

    2016-10-01

    Turbulent separation in channel flow containing a curved wall is studied using a generalised form of Kolmogorov equation. The equation successfully accounts for inhomogeneous effects in both the physical and separation spaces. We investigate the scale-by-scale energy dynamics in turbulent separated flow induced by a curved wall. The scale and spatial fluxes are highly dependent on the shear layer dynamics and the recirculation bubble forming behind the lower curved wall. The intense energy produced in the shear layer is transferred to the recirculation region, sustaining the turbulent velocity fluctuations. The energy dynamics radically changes depending on the physical position inside the domain, resembling planar turbulent channel dynamics downstream.

  10. Quenching and anisotropy of hydromagnetic turbulent transport

    SciTech Connect

    Karak, Bidya Binay; Brandenburg, Axel; Rheinhardt, Matthias; Käpylä, Petri J.; Käpylä, Maarit J.

    2014-11-01

    Hydromagnetic turbulence affects the evolution of large-scale magnetic fields through mean-field effects like turbulent diffusion and the α effect. For stronger fields, these effects are usually suppressed or quenched, and additional anisotropies are introduced. Using different variants of the test-field method, we determine the quenching of the turbulent transport coefficients for the forced Roberts flow, isotropically forced non-helical turbulence, and rotating thermal convection. We see significant quenching only when the mean magnetic field is larger than the equipartition value of the turbulence. Expressing the magnetic field in terms of the equipartition value of the quenched flows, we obtain for the quenching exponents of the turbulent magnetic diffusivity about 1.3, 1.1, and 1.3 for Roberts flow, forced turbulence, and convection, respectively. However, when the magnetic field is expressed in terms of the equipartition value of the unquenched flows, these quenching exponents become about 4, 1.5, and 2.3, respectively. For the α effect, the exponent is about 1.3 for the Roberts flow and 2 for convection in the first case, but 4 and 3, respectively, in the second. In convection, the quenching of turbulent pumping follows the same power law as turbulent diffusion, while for the coefficient describing the Ω×J effect nearly the same quenching exponent is obtained as for α. For forced turbulence, turbulent diffusion proportional to the second derivative along the mean magnetic field is quenched much less, especially for larger values of the magnetic Reynolds number. However, we find that in corresponding axisymmetric mean-field dynamos with dominant toroidal field the quenched diffusion coefficients are the same for the poloidal and toroidal field constituents.

  11. Buoyancy-generated variable-density turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Sandoval, D.L.; Clark, T.T.; Riley, J.J.

    1996-07-01

    Because of the importance of turbulence mixing in many applications, a number of turbulence mixing models have been proposed for variable- density flows. These engineering models (one- point statistical models) typically include the transport of the turbulent kinetic energy and the turbulent energy dissipation rate (i.e., k - {epsilon} models). The model presented by Besnard, Harlow, Rauenzahn and Zemach (1992) (herein referred to as BHRZ) is a one-point model intended to describe variable-density turbulent flows. Transport equations for the Reynolds stress tensor, R{sub ij}, and the turbulent energy dissipation rate, the density-velocity correlation, a{sub i}, and the density-specific volume correlation, b are derived. This model employs- techniques and concepts from incompressible, constant- density turbulence modeling and incorporates ideas from two-phase flow models. Clark and Spitz (1994) present a two-point model for variable-density turbulence. Their derivation is based on transport equations that, are based 0481 on two-point- generalizations of R{sub ij}, a{sub ij}, and b. These equations are Fourier transformed with respect to the separation distance between the two points. Transport equations are derived for R{sub ij}, a{sub i}, b. As in the one-point model, this model contains many ad-hoc assumptions and unknown model coefficients that must be determined by comparison with experimental and numerical data. However, the two-point formalism requires fewer equilibrium assumptions then does a single-point model. Our primary concern in this paper lies in the nonlinear processes of turbulence and the influence of large density variations (not within the Boussinesq limit) on these processes. To. isolate the effects of variable-density on the turbulence we restrict our flow to be incompressible, statistically homogeneous buoyancy-generated. turbulence. To our knowledge there have not been any simulations reported for this problem.

  12. Computation of unsteady turbulent boundary layers with flow reversal and evaluation of two separate turbulence models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cebeci, T.; Carr, L. W.

    1981-01-01

    A procedure which solves the governing boundary layer equations within Keller's box method was developed for calculating unsteady laminar flows with flow reversal. This method is extended to turbulent boundary layers with flow reversal. Test cases are used to investigate the proposition that unsteady turbulent boundary layers also remain free of singularities. Turbulent flow calculations are performed. The governing equations for both models are solved. As in laminar flows, the unsteady turbulent boundary layers are free from singularities, but there is a clear indication of rapid thickening of the boundary layer with increasing flow reversal. Predictions of both turbulence models are the same for all practical purposes.

  13. Prediction of free turbulent mixing using a turbulent kinetic energy method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harsha, P. T.

    1973-01-01

    Free turbulent mixing of two-dimensional and axisymmetric one- and two-stream flows is analyzed by a relatively simple turbulent kinetic energy method. This method incorporates a linear relationship between the turbulent shear and the turbulent kinetic energy and an algebraic relationship for the length scale appearing in the turbulent kinetic energy equation. Good results are obtained for a wide variety of flows. The technique is shown to be especially applicable to flows with heat and mass transfer, for which nonunity Prandtl and Schmidt numbers may be assumed.

  14. Breather turbulence versus soliton turbulence: Rogue waves, probability density functions, and spectral features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhmediev, N.; Soto-Crespo, J. M.; Devine, N.

    2016-08-01

    Turbulence in integrable systems exhibits a noticeable scientific advantage: it can be expressed in terms of the nonlinear modes of these systems. Whether the majority of the excitations in the system are breathers or solitons defines the properties of the turbulent state. In the two extreme cases we can call such states "breather turbulence" or "soliton turbulence." The number of rogue waves, the probability density functions of the chaotic wave fields, and their physical spectra are all specific for each of these two situations. Understanding these extreme cases also helps in studies of mixed turbulent states when the wave field contains both solitons and breathers, thus revealing intermediate characteristics.

  15. Breather turbulence versus soliton turbulence: Rogue waves, probability density functions, and spectral features.

    PubMed

    Akhmediev, N; Soto-Crespo, J M; Devine, N

    2016-08-01

    Turbulence in integrable systems exhibits a noticeable scientific advantage: it can be expressed in terms of the nonlinear modes of these systems. Whether the majority of the excitations in the system are breathers or solitons defines the properties of the turbulent state. In the two extreme cases we can call such states "breather turbulence" or "soliton turbulence." The number of rogue waves, the probability density functions of the chaotic wave fields, and their physical spectra are all specific for each of these two situations. Understanding these extreme cases also helps in studies of mixed turbulent states when the wave field contains both solitons and breathers, thus revealing intermediate characteristics.

  16. Turbulent reconnection of magnetic bipoles in stratified turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jabbari, S.; Brandenburg, A.; Mitra, Dhrubaditya; Kleeorin, N.; Rogachevskii, I.

    2016-07-01

    We consider strongly stratified forced turbulence in a plane-parallel layer with helicity and corresponding large-scale dynamo action in the lower part and non-helical turbulence in the upper. The magnetic field is found to develop strongly concentrated bipolar structures near the surface. They form elongated bands with a sharp interface between opposite polarities. Unlike earlier experiments with imposed magnetic field, the inclusion of rotation does not strongly suppress the formation of these structures. We perform a systematic numerical study of this phenomenon by varying magnetic Reynolds number, scale-separation ratio, and Coriolis number. We focus on the formation of a current sheet between bipolar regions where reconnection of oppositely oriented field lines occurs. We determine the reconnection rate by measuring either the inflow velocity in the vicinity of the current sheet or by measuring the electric field in the reconnection region. We demonstrate that for large Lundquist numbers, S > 103, the reconnection rate is nearly independent of S in agreement with results of recent numerical simulations performed by other groups in simpler settings.

  17. Turbulent flows near flat plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kambe, R.; Imamura, T.; Doi, M.

    1980-08-01

    The method to study the effect of the plate moving in the homogeneous or isotropic turbulence is presented. The crucial point of this method is to solve the Orr-Sommerfeld like equation, which is satisfied by the kernel of the Wiener-Hermite expansion of the velocity field, under the inhomogeneous boundary condition. In the special case of constant mean flow, our method gives the same result as that of Hunt and Graham and succeeds in explaining the experimental results of Thomas and Hancock. The method is also applied to the case of nonuniform mean flow, where the shear effect comes up.

  18. Gyrokinetic simulations of ETG Turbulence*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nevins, William

    2005-10-01

    Recent gyrokinetic simulations of electron temperature gradient (ETG) turbulence [1,2] produced different results despite similar plasma parameters. Ref.[1] differs from Ref.[2] in that [1] eliminates magnetically trapped particles ( r/R=0 ), while [2] retains magnetically trapped particles ( r/R 0.18 ). Differences between [1] and [2] have been attributed to insufficient phase-space resolution and novel physics associated with toroidicity and/or global simulations[2]. We have reproduced the results reported in [2] using a flux-tube, particle-in-cell (PIC) code, PG3EQ[3], thereby eliminating global effects as the cause of the discrepancy. We observe late-time decay of ETG turbulence and the steady-state heat transport in agreement with [2], and show this results from discrete particle noise. Discrete particle noise is a numerical artifact, so both the PG3EQ simulations reported here and those reported in Ref.[2] have little to say about steady-state ETG turbulence and the associated anomalous electron heat transport. Our attempts to benchmark PIC and continuum[4] codes at the plasma parameters used in Ref.[2] produced very large, intermittent transport. We will present an alternate benchmark point for ETG turbulence, where several codes reproduce the same transport levels. Parameter scans about this new benchmark point will be used to investigate the parameter dependence of ETG transport and to elucidate saturation mechanisms proposed in Refs.[1,2] and elsewhere[5-7].*In collaboration with A. Dimits (LLNL), J. Candy, C. Estrada-Mila (GA), W. Dorland (U of MD), F. Jenko, T. Dannert (Max-Planck Institut), and G. Hammett (PPPL). Work at LLNL performed for US DOE under Contract W7405-ENG-48.[1] F. Jenko and W. Dorland, PRL 89, 225001 (2002).[2] Z. Lin et al, 2004 Sherwood Mtg.; 2004 TTF Mtg.; Fusion Energy 2004 (IAEA, Vienna, 2005); Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. (November, 2004); 2005 TTF Mtg.; 2005 Sherwood Mtg.; Z. Lin, et al, Phys. Plasmas 12, 056125 (2005). [3] A.M. Dimits

  19. Impulsively started incompressible turbulent jet

    SciTech Connect

    Witze, P O

    1980-10-01

    Hot-film anemometer measurements are presented for the centerline velocity of a suddenly started jet of air. The tip penetration of the jet is shown to be proportional to the square-root of time. A theoretical model is developed that assumes the transient jet can be characterized as a spherical vortex interacting with a steady-state jet. The model demonstrates that the ratio of nozzle radius to jet velocity defines a time constant that uniquely characterizes the behavior and similarity of impulsively started incompressible turbulent jets.

  20. Turbulent Flow Computations in Ejectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogoi, A.; Siddesha, H.

    2010-09-01

    The paper presents computations in ejectors using in-house code NUMBERS. Computations are carried out in a 2D ejector and in a cylindrical ejector. Computations on the cylindrical ejector are done for various nozzle pressure ratios. The ejector flow is dominated by complex mixing of primary and secondary jets. The Spalart-Allmaras and Menter SST turbulence models are used. The results with the Menter SST model are superior to Spalart-Allmaras model at higher nozzle pressure ratios for the cylindrical ejector.

  1. Thermal dissipation in quantum turbulence.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Michikazu; Tsubota, Makoto

    2006-10-06

    The microscopic mechanism of thermal dissipation in quantum turbulence is numerically studied by solving the coupled system involving the Gross-Pitaevskii equation and the Bogoliubov-de Gennes equation. At low temperatures, the obtained dissipation does not work at scales greater than the vortex core size. However, as the temperature increases, dissipation works at large scales and it affects the vortex dynamics. We successfully obtain the mutual friction coefficients of the vortex in dilute Bose-Einstein condensates dynamics as functions of temperature.

  2. Thermal Dissipation in Quantum Turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Michikazu; Tsubota, Makoto

    2006-10-06

    The microscopic mechanism of thermal dissipation in quantum turbulence is numerically studied by solving the coupled system involving the Gross-Pitaevskii equation and the Bogoliubov-de Gennes equation. At low temperatures, the obtained dissipation does not work at scales greater than the vortex core size. However, as the temperature increases, dissipation works at large scales and it affects the vortex dynamics. We successfully obtain the mutual friction coefficients of the vortex in dilute Bose-Einstein condensates dynamics as functions of temperature.

  3. Light Propagation through Anisotropic Turbulence

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-01

    Kolmogorov stratospheric turbulence on star image motion,” Proc. SPIE 3126, 113–123 (1997). 5. B. E . Stribling, B. M . Welsh, and M . C. Roggemann...746407 (2009). 10. M . Chang, C. O. Font, F. Santiago, Y. Luna, E . Roura, and S. Restaino, “Marine environment optical propagation measure- ments,” Proc...Anisotropic factor as a function of alpha for several zeta values. Toselli et al. Vol. 28, No. 3 / March 2011 / J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 487 14. M . S

  4. Noise produced by turbulent flow into a rotor: Theory manual for atmospheric turbulence prediction and mean flow and turbulence contraction prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simonich, J. C.

    1989-01-01

    Prediction of helicopter main rotor noise due to ingestion of atmospheric turbulence was analyzed. The analysis combines several different models that describe the fluid mechanics of the turbulence and the ingestion process. Two models, atmospheric turbulence, and mean flow and turbulence contraction were covered. The third model, covered in a separate report, describes the rotor acoustic mode. The method incorporates the atmospheric turbulence model and a rapid distortion turbulence contraction description to determine the statistics of the anisotropic turbulence at the rotor plane. The analytical basis for a module was provided which was incorporated in NASA's ROTONET helicopter noise prediction program. The mean flow and turbulence statistics associated with the atmospheric boundary layer were modeled including effects of atmospheric stability length, wind speed, and altitude. The turbulence distortion process is modeled as a deformation of vortex filaments (which represent the turbulence field) by a mean flow field due to the rotor inflow.

  5. Energetics of the Beamed Zombie Turbulence Maser Action Mechanism for Remote Detection of Submerged Oceanic Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, C. H.; Bondur, V. G.; Keeler, R. N.; Leung, P. T.

    2011-11-01

    Sea surface brightness spectral anomalies from a Honolulu municipal outfall have been detected from space satellites in 200 km2 areas extending 20 km from the wastewater diffuser (Bondur 2005, Keeler et al. 2005, Gibson et al. 2005). Dropsonde and towed body microstructure measurements show outfall enhanced viscous and temperature dissipation rates above the turbulence trapping layer. Fossil turbulence waves and secondary (zombie, zebra) turbulence waves break as they propagate near-vertically and then break again near the surface to produce wind ripple smoothing in narrow frequency band (zebra) patterns from soliton-like sources of secondary turbulence energy acting on fossils advected from the outfall. The 30-250 m solitons reflect a nonlinear cascade from tidal and current kinetic energy to boundary layer turbulence events, to fossil turbulence waves, to internal soliton and tidal waves. Secondary (zombie) turbulence acts on outfall fossil patches to amplify, channel in chimneys, and vertically beam ambient internal wave energy just as energized metastable molecules around stars amplify and beam quantum frequencies in astrophysical masers. Kilowatts of buoyancy power from the treatment plant produces fossil turbulence patches trapped below the thermocline. Beamed zombie turbulence maser action (BZTMA) in mixing chimneys amplifies these kilowatts into the megawatts of surface turbulence dissipation required to affect brightness on wide sea surface areas by maser action vertical beaming of fossil-wave-power extracted from gigawatts dissipated by intermittent bottom turbulence events on topography from the tides and currents.

  6. The effect of finite turbulence spatial scale on the amplification of turbulence by a contracting stream

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, M. E.; Durbin, P. A.

    1980-01-01

    The turbulence downstream of a rapid contraction is calculated for the case when the turbulence scale can have the same magnitude as the mean-flow spatial scale. The approach used is based on the formulation of Goldstein (1978) for turbulence downstream of a contraction, with the added assumptions of a parallel mean flow at downstream infinity and turbulence calculated far enough downstream so that the nonuniformity of the mean flow field has decayed, and by treating the inverse contraction ratio as a small parameter. Consideration is given to the large-contraction-ratio and classical rapid-distortion theory limits, and to results at an arbitrary contraction ratio. It is shown that the amplification effect of the contraction is reduced when the spatial scale of the turbulence increases, with the upstream turbulence actually suppressed for a contraction ratio less than five and a turbulence spatial scale greater than three times the transverse dimensions of the downstream channel.

  7. Cyclone separator having boundary layer turbulence control

    DOEpatents

    Krishna, Coimbatore R.; Milau, Julius S.

    1985-01-01

    A cyclone separator including boundary layer turbulence control that is operable to prevent undue build-up of particulate material at selected critical areas on the separator walls, by selectively varying the fluid pressure at those areas to maintain the momentum of the vortex, thereby preventing particulate material from inducing turbulence in the boundary layer of the vortical fluid flow through the separator.

  8. Stochastic models for turbulent reacting flows

    SciTech Connect

    Kerstein, A.

    1993-12-01

    The goal of this program is to develop and apply stochastic models of various processes occurring within turbulent reacting flows in order to identify the fundamental mechanisms governing these flows, to support experimental studies of these flows, and to further the development of comprehensive turbulent reacting flow models.

  9. CHARACTERIZING MAGNETIZED TURBULENCE IN M51

    SciTech Connect

    Houde, Martin; Fletcher, Andrew; Beck, Rainer; Hildebrand, Roger H.; Vaillancourt, John E.; Stil, Jeroen M.

    2013-03-20

    We use previously published high-resolution synchrotron polarization data to perform an angular dispersion analysis with the aim of characterizing magnetized turbulence in M51. We first analyze three distinct regions (the center of the galaxy, and the northwest and southwest spiral arms) and can clearly discern the turbulent correlation length scale from the width of the magnetized turbulent correlation function for two regions and detect the imprint of anisotropy in the turbulence for all three. Furthermore, analyzing the galaxy as a whole allows us to determine a two-dimensional Gaussian model for the magnetized turbulence in M51. We measure the turbulent correlation scales parallel and perpendicular to the local mean magnetic field to be, respectively, {delta}{sub ||} = 98 {+-} 5 pc and {delta} = 54 {+-} 3 pc, while the turbulent-to-ordered magnetic field strength ratio is found to be B{sub t}/B{sub 0} = 1.01 {+-} 0.04. These results are consistent with those of Fletcher et al., who performed a Faraday rotation dispersion analysis of the same data, and our detection of anisotropy is consistent with current magnetized turbulence theories.

  10. A detailed look at turbulence intensity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effect of turbulence intensity on energy capture by small wind turbines has been a point of debate in the last few years. Claims of 25% de-rating of the power curve for turbines installed at sites with high turbulence are not uncommon. Over the years, many attempts have been made to model the ef...

  11. Numerical Simulation of Turbulent Fluid Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leonard, A.

    1983-01-01

    Numerical simulation of turbulent flows is discussed. Computational requirements for the direct simulaton of turbulence, simulation of arbitrary homogeneous flows, an expansion technique for wall bounded flows with application to pipe flow, and possibilities of flow representations or modeling techniques that allow the simulation of high Reynolds number flows with a relatively small number of dependent variables are included.

  12. Vortex burst as a source of turbulence.

    PubMed

    Cuypers, Yannis; Maurel, Agnès; Petitjeans, Philippe

    2003-11-07

    An important issue in turbulence theory is to understand what kinds of elementary flow structures are responsible for the part of the turbulent energy spectrum described by Kolmogorov's celebrated k(-5/3) law. A model for such structure has been proposed by Lundgren [Phys. Fluids 25, 2193-2203 (1982)

  13. Vortex unwinding in a turbulent boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcginley, Catherine B.; Beeler, George B.

    1987-01-01

    The vortex unwinding method is used as a tool in performing vortex cancellation in a turbulent boundary layer. Sufficient reduction in the isotach variation was achieved to verify the usefulness of this technique, for the cases of both wall turbulence control and horseshoe vortex alleviation. More detailed measurements of vortex strength and position improve the optimization process and increase the amount of vortex unwinding.

  14. The second turbulence and the first galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carl, Gibson

    2005-11-01

    The first turbulence was the strongly exothermic turbulent combustion that produced the big bang (1). Strong force freeze-out by quark-gluon-viscous forces damped the turbulence and inflated space (2). The second turbulence occurred in the plasma epoch, triggered by the expansion of space and gravitational fragmentation of the H-He plasma into proto-supercluster-voids. Proto-galaxies formed in chains just before the transition to gas, reflecting viscous straining along vortex lines, where maximum positive rate-of-strain plus the positive straining of the expanding universe stretched and separated proto-galaxies caused by gravity and maximum negative rate-of-strain compression opposing universe expansion. The dim most distant galaxies revealed by the Hubble Space Telescope (figure) are in chains of clumps (3) with ˜1500 times more dark matter (planets) than luminous matter (stars). See figure at http://www-acs.ucsd.edu/˜ir118 1. Gibson, C. H., ``The First Turbulent Combustion,'' Combustion Science and Technology, 177: 1049--1071, 2005 2. Gibson, C. H., ``The first turbulence and the first fossil turbulence.'' Flow Turbulence and Combustion, 72, 161--179, 2004 3. Elmegreen, D. M. et al., ``Chain galaxies '', ApJ 603:75, 2004

  15. Transport Coefficients in Rotating Weakly Compressible Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubinstein, Robert; Zhou, Ye; Erlebacher, Gordon

    1998-01-01

    Analytical studies of compressible turbulence have found that compressible velocity fluctuations create both effective fluid transport properties and an effective equation of state. This paper investigates the effects of rotation on compressible turbulence. It is shown that rotation modifies the transport properties of compressible turbulence by replacing the turbulence time scale by a rotational time scale, much as rotation modifies the transport properties of incompressible turbulence. But thermal equilibrium properties are modified in a more complex manner. Two regimes are possible: one dominated by incompressible fluctuations, in which the sound speed is modified as it is in non-rotating turbulence, and a rotation dominated regime in which the sound speed enhancement is rotation dependent. The dimensionless parameter which discriminates between regimes is identified. In general, rotation is found to suppress the effects of compressibility. A novel feature of the present analysis is the use of a non-Kolmogorov steady state as the reference state of turbulence. introduction of such steady states expands the power and utility of analytical turbulence closures to a wider range of problems.

  16. Turbulent transport models for scramjet flowfields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sindir, M. M.; Harsha, P. T.

    1984-01-01

    Turbulence modeling approaches were examined from the standpoint of their capability to predict the complex flowfield features observed in scramjet combustions. Thus, for example, the accuracy of each turbulence model, with respect to the prediction of recirculating flows, was examined. It was observed that for large diameter ratio axisymmetric sudden expansion flows, a choice of turbulence model was not critical because of the domination of their flowfields by pressure forces. For low diameter ratio axisymmetric sudden expansions and planar backward-facing steps flows, where turbulent shear stresses are of greater significance, the algebraic Reynolds stress approach, modified to increase its sensitivity to streamline curvature, was found to provide the best results. Results of the study also showed that strongly swirling flows provide a stringent test of turbulence model assumptions. Thus, although flows with very high swirl are not of great practical interest, they are useful for turbulence model development. Finally, it was also noted that numerical flowfields solution techniques have a strong interrelation with turbulence models, particularly with the turbulent transport models which involve source-dominated transport equations.

  17. Turbulence modelling of thermal plasma flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shigeta, Masaya

    2016-12-01

    This article presents a discussion of the ideas for modelling turbulent thermal plasma flows, reviewing the challenges, efforts, and state-of-the-art simulations. Demonstrative simulations are also performed to present the importance of numerical methods as well as physical models to express turbulent features. A large eddy simulation has been applied to turbulent thermal plasma flows to treat time-dependent and 3D motions of multi-scale eddies. Sub-grid scale models to be used should be able to express not only turbulent but also laminar states because both states co-exist in and around thermal plasmas which have large variations of density as well as transport properties under low Mach-number conditions. Suitable solution algorithms and differencing schemes must be chosen and combined appropriately to capture multi-scale eddies and steep gradients of temperature and chemical species, which are turbulent features of thermal plasma flows with locally variable Reynolds and Mach numbers. Several simulations using different methods under different conditions show commonly that high-temperature plasma regions exhibit less turbulent structures, with only large eddies, whereas low-temperature regions tend to be more turbulent, with numerous small eddies. These numerical results agree with both theoretical insight and photographs that show the characteristics of eddies. Results also show that a turbulence transition of a thermal plasma jet through a generation-breakup process of eddies in a torch is dominated by fluid dynamic instability after ejection rather than non-uniform or unsteady phenomena.

  18. Turbulent fluid motion 3: Basic continuum equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deissler, Robert G.

    1991-01-01

    A derivation of the continuum equations used for the analysis of turbulence is given. These equations include the continuity equation, the Navier-Stokes equations, and the heat transfer or energy equation. An experimental justification for using a continuum approach for the study of turbulence is given.

  19. Development of turbulence in a dusty plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwabe, Mierk; Zhdanov, Sergey; Räth, Christoph

    2016-10-01

    Complex or dusty plasmas are low temperature plasmas which contain micrometer-sized particles (``dust''). The microparticles obtain high charges and interact with each other, effectively forming a solid, liquid or gas state in which the microparticles take over the role of molecules in conventional systems. Complex plasmas often are in a turbulent state, for instance when instabilities like the ``heartbeat'' instability or intense waves are present. The movement of the microparticles, the carriers of the turbulent interactions in complex plasmas, can be directly followed, unlike that of atoms and molecules in conventional experiments on turbulence. Here we present results of an experiment on the development of turbulence in a complex plasma in the PK-3 Plus laboratory on board the International Space Station. The microparticle cloud was first stabilized against an instability. Once the stabilization was turned off, the cloud became unstable, and the movement of the particles became turbulent. In the report, we show how the energy spectra evolve during the development of turbulence. In the case of fully developed turbulence, the spectra display multiple cascades explaining well the transport of turbulent energy and enstrophy.

  20. Laminar and Turbulent Flow in Water

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riveros, H. G.; Riveros-Rosas, D.

    2010-01-01

    There are many ways to visualize flow, either for laminar or turbulent flows. A very convincing way to show laminar and turbulent flows is by the perturbations on the surface of a beam of water coming out of a cylindrical tube. Photographs, taken with a flash, show the nature of the flow of water in pipes. They clearly show the difference between…

  1. Two-Dimensional Turbulence in Magnetized Plasmas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kendl, A.

    2008-01-01

    In an inhomogeneous magnetized plasma the transport of energy and particles perpendicular to the magnetic field is in general mainly caused by quasi two-dimensional turbulent fluid mixing. The physics of turbulence and structure formation is of ubiquitous importance to every magnetically confined laboratory plasma for experimental or industrial…

  2. Assessing and Developing Administrators for Turbulent Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunsaker, Phillip; And Others

    1975-01-01

    Notes the turbulence of the environments in which administrators must operate, presents an assessment model for identifying and developing administrators with the necessary capabilities for coping effectively with turbulent field environments, and suggests applications for and further investigations of the model. (Author/IRT)

  3. Internal structure of a premixed turbulent flame

    SciTech Connect

    Rajan, S.; Smith, J.R.; Rambach, G.D.

    1982-10-01

    A pulsed laser and a multielement detector have been used to make instantaneous Rayleigh profiles along a line through a turbulent flame front thus eliminating the effects of flame front motion. The flame front in a premixed turbulent flame moves randomly about a mean position, giving rise to the visually observed flame brush or time-averaged flame thickness which is larger than the instantaneous thickness of the reaction zone. The physical characteristics and statistical properties of such turbulent flames reported previously were deduced from the time histories of Rayleigh scattered laser light at one or two points within the reaction zone. The study was conducted on a premixed propane-air flame stabilized on a rod at the exit plane of a square burner. Turbulence-producing screens below the burner exit controlled turbulent length scales while intensity was controlled with inlet mixture velocity. Turbulence properties of the cold reactants were determined by hot-wire anemometry. Mean and fluctuating velocity in the unburnt and burnt gases were measured using laser Doppler velocimetry. At the low level of turbulence studied, the instantaneous flame front thickness was found to be only slightly greater than the laminar flame thickness, and the magnitude of the density fluctuations only slightly greater than the cold flow turbulence intensity. Mean and rms values of density and velocity; density and velocity probability density functions; spatial density correlations; and comparison of data with the Bray-Moss-Libby model are presented.

  4. Small-scale universality in fluid turbulence

    PubMed Central

    Schumacher, Jörg; Scheel, Janet D.; Krasnov, Dmitry; Donzis, Diego A.; Yakhot, Victor; Sreenivasan, Katepalli R.

    2014-01-01

    Turbulent flows in nature and technology possess a range of scales. The largest scales carry the memory of the physical system in which a flow is embedded. One challenge is to unravel the universal statistical properties that all turbulent flows share despite their different large-scale driving mechanisms or their particular flow geometries. In the present work, we study three turbulent flows of systematically increasing complexity. These are homogeneous and isotropic turbulence in a periodic box, turbulent shear flow between two parallel walls, and thermal convection in a closed cylindrical container. They are computed by highly resolved direct numerical simulations of the governing dynamical equations. We use these simulation data to establish two fundamental results: (i) at Reynolds numbers Re ∼ 102 the fluctuations of the velocity derivatives pass through a transition from nearly Gaussian (or slightly sub-Gaussian) to intermittent behavior that is characteristic of fully developed high Reynolds number turbulence, and (ii) beyond the transition point, the statistics of the rate of energy dissipation in all three flows obey the same Reynolds number power laws derived for homogeneous turbulence. These results allow us to claim universality of small scales even at low Reynolds numbers. Our results shed new light on the notion of when the turbulence is fully developed at the small scales without relying on the existence of an extended inertial range. PMID:25024175

  5. Numerical tokamak turbulence project (OFES grand challenge)

    SciTech Connect

    Beer, M; Cohen, B I; Crotinger, J; Dawson, J; Decyk, V; Dimits, A M; Dorland, W D; Hammett, G W; Kerbel, G D; Leboeuf, J N; Lee, W W; Lin, Z; Nevins, W M; Reynders, J; Shumaker, D E; Smith, S; Sydora, R; Waltz, R E; Williams, T

    1999-08-27

    The primary research objective of the Numerical Tokamak Turbulence Project (NTTP) is to develop a predictive ability in modeling turbulent transport due to drift-type instabilities in the core of tokamak fusion experiments, through the use of three-dimensional kinetic and fluid simulations and the derivation of reduced models.

  6. Flames in fractal grid generated turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goh, K. H. H.; Geipel, P.; Hampp, F.; Lindstedt, R. P.

    2013-12-01

    Twin premixed turbulent opposed jet flames were stabilized for lean mixtures of air with methane and propane in fractal grid generated turbulence. A density segregation method was applied alongside particle image velocimetry to obtain velocity and scalar statistics. It is shown that the current fractal grids increase the turbulence levels by around a factor of 2. Proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) was applied to show that the fractal grids produce slightly larger turbulent structures that decay at a slower rate as compared to conventional perforated plates. Conditional POD (CPOD) was also implemented using the density segregation technique and the results show that CPOD is essential to segregate the relative structures and turbulent kinetic energy distributions in each stream. The Kolmogorov length scales were also estimated providing values ∼0.1 and ∼0.5 mm in the reactants and products, respectively. Resolved profiles of flame surface density indicate that a thin flame assumption leading to bimodal statistics is not perfectly valid under the current conditions and it is expected that the data obtained will be of significant value to the development of computational methods that can provide information on the conditional structure of turbulence. It is concluded that the increase in the turbulent Reynolds number is without any negative impact on other parameters and that fractal grids provide a route towards removing the classical problem of a relatively low ratio of turbulent to bulk strain associated with the opposed jet configuration.

  7. Clumpy dust clouds and extended atmosphere of the AGB star W Hydrae revealed with VLT/SPHERE-ZIMPOL and VLTI/AMBER. II. Time variations between pre-maximum and minimum light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohnaka, K.; Weigelt, G.; Hofmann, K.-H.

    2017-01-01

    Aims: Our recent visible polarimetric images of the well-studied AGB star W Hya taken at pre-maximum light (phase 0.92) with VLT/SPHERE-ZIMPOL have revealed clumpy dust clouds close to the star at 2 R⋆. We present second-epoch SPHERE-ZIMPOL observations of W Hya at minimum light (phase 0.54) as well as high-spectral resolution long-baseline interferometric observations with the AMBER instrument at the Very Large Telescope Interferometer (VLTI). Methods: We observed W Hya with VLT/SPHERE-ZIMPOL at three wavelengths in the continuum (645, 748, and 820 nm), in the Hα line at 656.3 nm, and in the TiO band at 717 nm. The VLTI/AMBER observations were carried out in the wavelength region of the CO first overtone lines near 2.3 μm with a spectral resolution of 12 000. Results: The high-spatial resolution polarimetric images obtained with SPHERE-ZIMPOL have allowed us to detect clear time variations in the clumpy dust clouds as close as 34-50 mas (1.4-2.0 R⋆) to the star. We detected the formation of a new dust cloud as well as the disappearance of one of the dust clouds detected at the first epoch. The Hα and TiO emission extends to 150 mas ( 6 R⋆), and the Hα images obtained at two epochs reveal time variations. The degree of linear polarization measured at minimum light, which ranges from 13 to 18%, is higher than that observed at pre-maximum light. The power-law-type limb-darkened disk fit to the AMBER data in the continuum results in a limb-darkened disk diameter of 49.1 ± 1.5 mas and a limb-darkening parameter of 1.16 ± 0.49, indicating that the atmosphere is more extended with weaker limb-darkening compared to pre-maximum light. Our Monte Carlo radiative transfer modeling shows that the second-epoch SPHERE-ZIMPOL data can be explained by a shell of 0.1 μm grains of Al2O3, Mg2SiO4, and MgSiO3 with a 550 nm optical depth of 0.6 ± 0.2 and an inner and outer radii of 1.3 R⋆ and 10 ± 2R⋆, respectively. Our modeling suggests the predominance of small (0

  8. DYNAMO-HST survey: clumps in nearby massive turbulent discs and the effects of clump clustering on kiloparsec scale measurements of clumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, David B.; Glazebrook, Karl; Damjanov, Ivana; Abraham, Roberto G.; Obreschkow, Danail; Wisnioski, Emily; Bassett, Robert; Green, Andy; McGregor, Peter

    2017-01-01

    We present ˜100 pc resolution Hubble Space Telescope Hα images of 10 galaxies from the DYnamics of Newly-Assembled Massive Objects (DYNAMO) survey of low-z turbulent disc galaxies, and use these to undertake the first detailed systematic study of the effects of resolution and clump clustering on observations of clumps in turbulent discs. In the DYNAMO-HST sample, we measure clump diameters spanning the range dclump ˜ 100-800 pc, and individual clump star formation rates as high as ˜5 M⊙ yr-1. DYNAMO clumps have very high SFR surface densities, ΣSFR ˜ 1 - 15 M⊙ yr-1 kpc-2, ˜100 × higher than in H II regions of nearby spirals. Indeed, SFR surface density provides a simple dividing line between massive star-forming clumps and local star-forming regions, where massive star-forming clumps have ΣSFR > 0.5 M⊙ yr-1 kpc-2. When degraded to match the observations of galaxies in z ˜ 1-3 surveys, DYNAMO galaxies are similar in morphology and measured clump properties to clumpy galaxies observed in the high-z Universe. Emission peaks in the simulated high-redshift maps typically correspond to multiple clumps in full resolution images. This clustering of clumps systematically increases the apparent size and SFR of clumps in 1 kpc resolution maps, and decreases the measured SFR surface density of clumps by as much as a factor of 20×. From these results we can infer that clump clustering is likely to strongly affect the measured properties of clumps in high-z galaxies, which commonly have kiloparsec scale resolution.

  9. Scaling laws in magnetized plasma turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Boldyrev, Stanislav

    2015-06-28

    Interactions of plasma motion with magnetic fields occur in nature and in the laboratory in an impressively broad range of scales, from megaparsecs in astrophysical systems to centimeters in fusion devices. The fact that such an enormous array of phenomena can be effectively studied lies in the existence of fundamental scaling laws in plasma turbulence, which allow one to scale the results of analytic and numerical modeling to the sized of galaxies, velocities of supernovae explosions, or magnetic fields in fusion devices. Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) provides the simplest framework for describing magnetic plasma turbulence. Recently, a number of new features of MHD turbulence have been discovered and an impressive array of thought-provoking phenomenological theories have been put forward. However, these theories have conflicting predictions, and the currently available numerical simulations are not able to resolve the contradictions. MHD turbulence exhibits a variety of regimes unusual in regular hydrodynamic turbulence. Depending on the strength of the guide magnetic field it can be dominated by weakly interacting Alfv\\'en waves or strongly interacting wave packets. At small scales such turbulence is locally anisotropic and imbalanced (cross-helical). In a stark contrast with hydrodynamic turbulence, which tends to ``forget'' global constrains and become uniform and isotropic at small scales, MHD turbulence becomes progressively more anisotropic and unbalanced at small scales. Magnetic field plays a fundamental role in turbulent dynamics. Even when such a field is not imposed by external sources, it is self-consistently generated by the magnetic dynamo action. This project aims at a comprehensive study of universal regimes of magnetic plasma turbulence, combining the modern analytic approaches with the state of the art numerical simulations. The proposed study focuses on the three topics: weak MHD turbulence, which is relevant for laboratory devices, the solar

  10. Effects of small-scale freestream turbulence on turbulent boundary layers with and without thermal convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagata, Kouji; Sakai, Yasuhiko; Komori, Satoru

    2011-06-01

    Effects of weak, small-scale freestream turbulence on turbulent boundary layers with and without thermal convection are experimentally investigated using a wind tunnel. Two experiments are carried out: the first is isothermal boundary layers with and without grid turbulence, and the second is non-isothermal boundary layers with and without grid turbulence. Both boundary layers develop under a small favorable pressure gradient. For the latter case, the bottom wall of the test section is heated at a constant wall temperature to investigate the effects of thermal convection under the effects of freestream turbulence. For both cases, the turbulence intensity in the freestream is Tu = 1.3% ˜ 2.4%, and the integral length scale of freestream turbulence, L∞, is much smaller than the boundary layer thickness δ, i.e., L∞/δ ≪1. The Reynolds numbers Reθ based on the momentum thickness and freestream speed U∞ are Reθ = 560, 1100, 1310, and 2330 in isothermal boundary layers without grid turbulence. Instantaneous velocities, U and V, and instantaneous temperature T are simultaneously measured using a hot-wire anemometry and a constant-current resistance thermometer. The results show that the rms velocities and Reynolds shear stress normalized by the friction velocity are strongly suppressed by the freestream turbulence throughout the boundary layer in both isothermal and non-isothermal boundary layers. In the non-isothermal boundary layers, the normalized rms temperature and vertical turbulent heat flux are also strongly suppressed by the freestream turbulence. Turbulent momentum and heat transfer at the wall are enhanced by the freestream turbulence and the enhancement is notable in unstable stratification. The power spectra of u, v, and θ and their cospectra show that motions of almost all scales are suppressed by the freestream turbulence in both the isothermal and non-isothermal boundary layers.

  11. Transport Coefficients in weakly compressible turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubinstein, Robert; Erlebacher, Gordon

    1996-01-01

    A theory of transport coefficients in weakly compressible turbulence is derived by applying Yoshizawa's two-scale direct interaction approximation to the compressible equations of motion linearized about a state of incompressible turbulence. The result is a generalization of the eddy viscosity representation of incompressible turbulence. In addition to the usual incompressible eddy viscosity, the calculation generates eddy diffusivities for entropy and pressure, and an effective bulk viscosity acting on the mean flow. The compressible fluctuations also generate an effective turbulent mean pressure and corrections to the speed of sound. Finally, a prediction unique to Yoshizawa's two-scale approximation is that terms containing gradients of incompressible turbulence quantities also appear in the mean flow equations. The form these terms take is described.

  12. Ray Traces Through Unsteady Jet Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freund, J. B.; Fleischman, T. G.

    2002-01-01

    Results of an ongoing effort to quantify the role turbulence in scattering sound in jets are reported. Using a direct numerical simulation database to provide the flow data, ray paths traced through the mean flow are compared with those traced through the actual time evolving turbulent flow. Significant scattering by the turbulence is observed. The most notable effect is that upstream traveling waves that are trapped in the potential core by the mean flow, which acts as a wave guide, easily escape in the turbulent flow. A crude statistical estimate based on ray number density suggests that directivity is modified by the turbulence, but no rigorous treatment of non-uniformities in the high-frequency approximation is attempted.

  13. Visualization of Turbulence with OpenGL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avril, A.; Makowski, M. A.; Umansky, M.; Kalling, R.; Schissel, D. P.

    2009-11-01

    Turbulence is an all-pervasive phenomenon in plasmas. The edge turbulence is of particular interest for the containment of plasmas during fusion processes. It is simulated with BOUT, a 4D (3 spatial + time coordinates) edge turbulence simulation code that is typical of modern codes in many ways. While predictive, the 4D outputs of these codes are difficult to visualize. In an effort to better understand the macroscopic trends of edge turbulence in toroidal plasmas, we are developing routines to render the BOUT output, using the OpenGL framework in C^++. These routines will allow us to follow the evolution of isosurfaces through time, and we anticipate gaining insight into the nonlinear dynamics of turbulence as a result. Additionally, these routines could potentially be used to visualize the output of other modeling codes.

  14. Turbulence structure at high shear rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Moon Joo; Kim, John; Moin, Parviz

    1987-01-01

    The structure of homogeneous turbulence in the presence of a high shear rate is studied using results obtained from three-dimensional time-dependent numerical simulations of the Navier-Stokes equations on a grid of 512 x 128 x 128 node points. It is shown that high shear rate enhances the streamwise fluctuating motion to such an extent that a highly anisotropic turbulence state with a one-dimensional velocity field and two-dimensional small-scale turbulence develops asymptotically as total shear increases. Instantaneous velocity fields show that high shear rate in homogeneous turbulent shear flow produces structures which are similar to the streaks present in the viscous sublayer of turbulent boundary layers.

  15. Nusselt number scaling in tokamak plasma turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Takeda, K.; Benkadda, S.; Hamaguchi, S.; Wakatani, M.

    2005-05-15

    Anomalous heat transport caused by ion temperature gradient (ITG) driven turbulence in tokamak plasmas is evaluated from numerical simulations of the two-dimensional (2D) partial-differential equations of the ITG model and of a reduced 1D version derived from a quasilinear approximation. In the strongly turbulent state, intermittent bursts of thermal transport are observed in both cases. In the strongly turbulent regime, the reduced model as well as the direct numerical simulation show that the Nusselt number Nu (normalized heat flux) scales with the normalized ion pressure gradient K{sub i} as Nu{proportional_to}K{sub i}{sup 1/3}. Since the Rayleigh number for ITG turbulence is proportional to K{sub i}, the Nusselt number scaling for ITG turbulence is thus similar to the classical thermal transport scaling for Rayleigh-Benard convections in neutral fluids.

  16. Effects of core turbulence on jet excitability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mankbadi, Reda R.; Raman, Ganesh; Rice, Edward J.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of varying freestream core turbulence on the evolution of a circular jet with and without tonal excitation are examined. Measurements are made on an 8.8 cm diameter jet at a Mach number of 0.3. The jet is excitated by plane waves at Strouhal number 0.5. For the excited and unexcited cases the turbulence level is varied by screens and grids placed upstream of the nozzle exit. The experiment results are compared with a theoretical model which incorporates a variable core turbulence and considers the energy interactions between the mean flow, the turbulence and the forced component. Both data and theory indicate that increasing the freestream turbulence diminishes the excitability of the jet and reduces the effect of excitation on the spreading rate of the jet.

  17. Characterizing Wake Turbulence with Staring Lidar Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastine, D.; Wächter, M.; Peinke, J.; Trabucchi, D.; Kühn, M.

    2015-06-01

    Lidar measurements in the German offshore wind farm Alpha Ventus were performed to investigate the turbulence characteristics of wind turbine wakes. In particular, we compare measurements of the free flow in the surroundings of the wind turbines with measurements in the inner region of a wake flow behind one turbine. Our results indicate that wind turbines modulate the turbulent structures of the flow on a wide range of scales. For the data of the wake flow, the power spectrum as well as the multifractal intermittency coefficient reveal features of homogeneous isotropic turbulence. Thus, we conjecture that on scales of the rotor a new turbulent cascade is initiated, which determines the features of the turbulent wake flow quite independently from the more complex wind flow in the surroundings of the turbine.

  18. Acceleration of particles in imbalanced magnetohydrodynamic turbulence.

    PubMed

    Teaca, Bogdan; Weidl, Martin S; Jenko, Frank; Schlickeiser, Reinhard

    2014-08-01

    The present work investigates the acceleration of test particles, relevant to the solar-wind problem, in balanced and imbalanced magnetohydrodynamic turbulence (terms referring here to turbulent states possessing zero and nonzero cross helicity, respectively). These turbulent states, obtained numerically by prescribing the injection rates for the ideal invariants, are evolved dynamically with the particles. While the energy spectrum for balanced and imbalanced states is known, the impact made on particle heating is a matter of debate, with different considerations giving different results. By performing direct numerical simulations, resonant and nonresonant particle accelerations are automatically considered and the correct turbulent phases are taken into account. For imbalanced turbulence, it is found that the acceleration rate of charged particles is reduced and the heating rate diminished. This behavior is independent of the particle gyroradius, although particles that have a stronger adiabatic motion (smaller gyroradius) tend to experience a larger heating.

  19. Numerical Simulation of a Convective Turbulence Encounter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Proctor, Fred H.; Hamilton, David W.; Bowles, Roland L.

    2002-01-01

    A numerical simulation of a convective turbulence event is investigated and compared with observational data. The numerical results show severe turbulence of similar scale and intensity to that encountered during the test flight. This turbulence is associated with buoyant plumes that penetrate the upper-level thunderstorm outflow. The simulated radar reflectivity compares well with that obtained from the aircraft's onboard radar. Resolved scales of motion as small as 50 m are needed in order to accurately diagnose aircraft normal load accelerations. Given this requirement, realistic turbulence fields may be created by merging subgrid-scales of turbulence to a convective-cloud simulation. A hazard algorithm for use with model data sets is demonstrated. The algorithm diagnoses the RMS normal loads from second moments of the vertical velocity field and is independent of aircraft motion.

  20. Linear Controllers for Turbulent Boundary Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Junwoo; Kim, John; Kang, Sung-Moon; Speyer, Jason

    2000-11-01

    Several recent studies have shown that controllers based on a linear system theory work surprisingly well in turbulent flows, suggesting that a linear mechanism may play an important role even in turbulent flows. It has been also shown that non-normality of the linearized Navier-Stokes equations is an essential characteristic in the regeneration of near-wall turbulence structures in turbulent boundary layers. A few controllers designed to reduce the role of different linear mechanisms, including that to minimize the non-normality of the linearized Navier-Stokes equations, have been developed and applied to a low Reynolds nubmer turbulent channel flow. A reduced-order model containing the most controllable and observables modes is derived for each system. Other existing control schemes, such as Choi et al's opposition control, have been examined from the point of a linear system control. Further discussion on controller design, such as choice of cost function and other control parameters, will be presented.

  1. ULF turbulence in the Neptunian polar cusp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrell, W. M.; Lepping, R. P.; Smith, C. W.

    1993-03-01

    Results of a spectral analysis of the ULF wave turbulence in the Neptunian polar cusp are presented. The activity is characterized as broadbanded, extending up to a maximum frequency of about 0.5 Hz, and having maximum wave amplitudes as large as 6 percent of the dc magnetic field. Activity in the cusp region was particularly intense at its frontside and backside, associated with the magnetopause and cusp/magnetosphere boundaries, respectively. The turbulence, particularly that above f(ci), is tentatively identified as whistler mode. It is argued that such whistler mode turbulence should resonate with electrons having energies in the tens of kiloelectron volts. Observations indicate a very strong correlation of the ULF turbulence with the energetic electrons between 22 and 35 keV measured by Voyager's low-energy charged particle experiment. A vigorous interaction between the two is inferred. ULF wave turbulence in the cusp may represent a significant but not complete power source for the magnetosphere.

  2. Turbulent Flow Past Spinning Cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehmedagic, Igbal; Carlucci, Donald; Carlucci, Pasquale; Thangam, Siva

    2009-11-01

    Flow past cylinders aligned along their axis where a base freely spins while attached to a non-spinning forebody is considered from a computational and experimental point of view. The time-averaged equations of motion and energy are solved using the modeled form of transport equations for the turbulence kinetic energy and the scalar form of turbulence dissipation with an efficient finite-volume algorithm. An anisotropic two-equation Reynolds-stress model that incorporates the effect of rotation-modified energy spectrum and swirl is used to perform computations for the flow past axially rotating cylinders. Both rigid cylinders as well as that of cylinders with free-spinning base are considered from a computational point of view. A subsonic wind tunnel with a forward-sting mounted spinning cylinder is used for experiments. Experiments are performed for a range of spin rates and free stream flow conditions. The experimental results of Carlucci & Thangam (2001) are used to benchmark flow over spinning cylinders. The data is extended to munitions spinning in the wake of other munitions. Applications involving the design of projectiles are discussed.

  3. Compressibility effects on turbulent mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panickacheril John, John; Donzis, Diego

    2016-11-01

    We investigate the effect of compressibility on passive scalar mixing in isotropic turbulence with a focus on the fundamental mechanisms that are responsible for such effects using a large Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) database. The database includes simulations with Taylor Reynolds number (Rλ) up to 100, turbulent Mach number (Mt) between 0.1 and 0.6 and Schmidt number (Sc) from 0.5 to 1.0. We present several measures of mixing efficiency on different canonical flows to robustly identify compressibility effects. We found that, like shear layers, mixing is reduced as Mach number increases. However, data also reveal a non-monotonic trend with Mt. To assess directly the effect of dilatational motions we also present results with both dilatational and soleniodal forcing. Analysis suggests that a small fraction of dilatational forcing decreases mixing time at higher Mt. Scalar spectra collapse when normalized by Batchelor variables which suggests that a compressive mechanism similar to Batchelor mixing in incompressible flows might be responsible for better mixing at high Mt and with dilatational forcing compared to pure solenoidal mixing. We also present results on scalar budgets, in particular on production and dissipation. Support from NSF is gratefully acknowledged.

  4. PREFACE Turbulent Mixing and Beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abarzhi, Snezhana I.; Gauthier, Serge; Niemela, Joseph J.

    2010-12-01

    The goals of the International Conference 'Turbulent Mixing and Beyond', TMB-2009, are to expose the generic problem of non-equilibrium turbulent processes to a broad scientific community, to promote the development of new ideas in tackling the fundamental aspects of the problem, to assist in the application of novel approaches in a broad range of phenomena, where the turbulent processes occur, and to have a potential impact on technology. The Conference provides the opportunity to bring together researchers from different areas, which include but are not limited to fluid dynamics, plasmas, high energy density physics, astrophysics, material science, combustion, atmospheric and Earth sciences, nonlinear and statistical physics, applied mathematics, probability and statistics, data processing and computations, optics and telecommunications, and to have their attention focused on the long-standing formidable task of non-equilibrium processes. Non-equilibrium turbulent processes play a key role in a broad variety of phenomena spanning astrophysical to atomistic scales and high or low energy density regimes. Inertial confinement and magnetic fusion, light-matter interaction and non-equilibrium heat transfer, strong shocks and explosions, material transformation under high strain rate, supernovae and accretion disks, stellar non-Boussinesq and magneto-convection, planetary interiors and mantle-lithosphere tectonics, premixed and non-premixed combustion, non-canonical wall-bounded flows, hypersonic and supersonic boundary layers, dynamics of atmosphere and oceanography, are just a few examples. A grip on non-equilibrium turbulent processes is crucial for cutting-edge technology such as laser micro-machining, nano-electronics, free-space optical telecommunications, and for industrial applications in the areas of aeronautics and aerodynamics. Non-equilibrium turbulent processes are anisotropic, non-local, multi-scale and multi-phase, and often are driven by shocks or

  5. Bubble-induced turbulence study in homogeneous turbulent flow using DNS approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Jinyong; Bolotnov, Igor

    2015-11-01

    The effect of a single bubble on the energy transfer to a homogeneous turbulent flow using DNS approach is investigated for various conditions. The single-phase turbulence is numerically generated by pressure-gradient driven uniform flow through a fully resolved turbulence generating grid. The turbulent intensity measured is uniform normal to the flow direction. The decay rate of the turbulent kinetic energy is validated against analytical power law. The collected instantaneous velocity is used as inflow condition for single-bubble simulations to study the bubble-induced turbulence (BIT). In interface-resolved two-phase simulation the bubble is kept at fixed positions by using a proportional-integral-derivative controller. This simulation set allows estimating the turbulent kinetic energy before and after the bubble, quantifying the BIT. Effects of bubble deformability, velocity and turbulent intensity are separately studied. We observe that for a nearly spherical bubble, the bubble-induced turbulence is positive, increasing the level of turbulent kinetic energy in the liquid phase. BIT is influenced by the other studied parameters and the presented work will contribute to the closure BIT model development in multiphase computational fluid dynamics modeling. The work is supported by NSF-CBET-Fluid Dynamics, Award #1333993.

  6. Range of turbulence-independent propagation and Rayleigh range of partially coherent beams in atmospheric turbulence.

    PubMed

    Dan, Youquan; Zeng, Shuguang; Hao, Bangyuan; Zhang, Bin

    2010-03-01

    Two characteristic distances for partially coherent beams propagating in atmospheric turbulence have been proposed. The turbulent Rayleigh range is used for characterizing the range over which the beams propagate in turbulence without spreading appreciably; i.e., the concept of the well-known Rayleigh range in free space is extended to the case of turbulence. In this paper the range of turbulence-independent propagation of the beams, in contrast to similar characteristic distances in previous published works, is based on the formula of the beam propagation factor (M(2) factor) and is used for describing the range over which the spatial and angular spreading and the M(2) factor increase due to turbulence are sufficiently small and negligible. Several simple formulas used for calculating the approximate values of these distances are given, and the formulas are applied to Gaussian Schell-model (GSM) beams and illustrated by examples. Furthermore, as a typical example, the effect of the angular spread of GSM beams in turbulence on a thin-lens optical system is also discussed. We show that the turbulent Rayleigh range depends on the Rayleigh range in free space, the waist width, and the spatial power spectrum of the refractive-index fluctuations of the turbulent atmosphere, and that the range of turbulence-independent propagation depends on the waist width, the initial angular spread in the waist plane, and the spatial power spectrum.

  7. Decaying versus stationary turbulence in particle-laden isotropic turbulence: Heavy particle statistics modifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelsamie, Abouelmagd H.; Lee, Changhoon

    2013-03-01

    The current paper examines the heavy particle statistics modification by two-way interaction in particle-laden isotropic turbulence in an attempt to interpret their statistics modification using the information of modulated turbulence. Moreover, we clarify the distinctions of this modification between decaying and stationary turbulence as an extension of our previous work [A. H. Abdelsamie and C. Lee, "Decaying versus stationary turbulence in particle-laden isotropic turbulence: Turbulence modulation mechanism," Phys. Fluids 24, 015106 (2012), 10.1063/1.3678332]. Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) was carried out using 1283 grid points at a Taylor micro-scale Reynolds number of Rλ ˜ 70. The effect of O(10^6) solid particles with a different Stokes number (St) was implemented as a point-force approximation in the Navier-Stokes equation. Various statistics associated with particle dispersion are investigated, and the auto-correlations models which was provided by Jung et al. ["Behavior of heavy particles in isotropic turbulence," Phys. Rev. E 77, 016307 (2008), 10.1103/PhysRevE.77.016307] are extended in the current paper. DNS results reveal that the two-way coupling interaction enhances the fluid and heavy particle auto-correlation functions and the alignment between their velocity vectors for all Stokes numbers in decaying and stationary turbulence, but for different reasons. The modification mechanisms of particle dispersion statistics in stationary turbulence are different from those in decaying turbulence depending on the Stokes number, particularly for St <1.

  8. Measurement of the Turbulence Kinetic Energy Budget of a Turbulent Planar Wake Flow in Pressure Gradients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Xiao-Feng; Thomas, Flint O.; Nelson, Robert C.

    2001-01-01

    Turbulence kinetic energy (TKE) is a very important quantity for turbulence modeling and the budget of this quantity in its transport equation can provide insight into the flow physics. Turbulence kinetic energy budget measurements were conducted for a symmetric turbulent wake flow subjected to constant zero, favorable and adverse pressure gradients in year-three of research effort. The purpose of this study is to clarify the flow physics issues underlying the demonstrated influence of pressure gradient on wake development and provide experimental support for turbulence modeling. To ensure the reliability of these notoriously difficult measurements, the experimental procedure was carefully designed on the basis of an uncertainty analysis. Four different approaches, based on an isotropic turbulence assumption, a locally axisymmetric homogeneous turbulence assumption, a semi-isotropy assumption and a forced balance of the TKE equation, were applied for the estimate of the dissipation term. The pressure transport term is obtained from a forced balance of the turbulence kinetic energy equation. This report will present the results of the turbulence kinetic energy budget measurement and discuss their implication on the development of strained turbulent wakes.

  9. Environmental forecasting and turbulence modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, J. C. R.

    This review describes the fundamental assumptions and current methodologies of the two main kinds of environmental forecast; the first is valid for a limited period of time into the future and over a limited space-time ‘target’, and is largely determined by the initial and preceding state of the environment, such as the weather or pollution levels, up to the time when the forecast is issued and by its state at the edges of the region being considered; the second kind provides statistical information over long periods of time and/or over large space-time targets, so that they only depend on the statistical averages of the initial and ‘edge’ conditions. Environmental forecasts depend on the various ways that models are constructed. These range from those based on the ‘reductionist’ methodology (i.e., the combination of separate, scientifically based, models for the relevant processes) to those based on statistical methodologies, using a mixture of data and scientifically based empirical modeling. These are, as a rule, focused on specific quantities required for the forecast. The persistence and predictability of events associated with environmental and turbulent flows and the reasons for variation in the accuracy of their forecasts (of the first and second kinds) are now better understood and better modeled. This has partly resulted from using analogous results of disordered chaotic systems, and using the techniques of calculating ensembles of realizations, ideally involving several different models, so as to incorporate in the probabilistic forecasts a wider range of possible events. The rationale for such an approach needs to be developed. However, other insights have resulted from the recognition of the ordered, though randomly occurring, nature of the persistent motions in these flows, whose scales range from those of synoptic weather patterns (whether storms or ‘blocked’ anticyclones) to small scale vortices. These eigen states can be predicted

  10. Wind turbulence characterization for wind energy development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wendell, L. L.; Gower, G. L.; Morris, V. R.; Tomich, S. D.

    1991-09-01

    As part of its support of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Federal Wind Energy Program, the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has initiated an effort to work jointly with the wind energy community to characterize wind turbulence in a variety of complex terrains at existing or potential sites of wind turbine installation. Five turbulence characterization systems were assembled and installed at four sites in the Tehachapi Pass in California, and one in the Green Mountains near Manchester, Vermont. Data processing and analyses techniques were developed to allow observational analyses of the turbulent structure; this analysis complements the more traditional statistical and spectral analyses. Preliminary results of the observational analyses, in the rotating framework or a wind turbine blade, show that the turbulence at a site can have two major components: (1) engulfing eddies larger than the rotor, and (2) fluctuating shear due to eddies smaller than the rotor disk. Comparison of the time series depicting these quantities at two sites showed that the turbulence intensity (the commonly used descriptor of turbulence) did not adequately characterize the turbulence at these sites.

  11. Turbulence-chemistry interactions in reacting flows

    SciTech Connect

    Barlow, R.S.; Carter, C.D.

    1993-12-01

    Interactions between turbulence and chemistry in nonpremixed flames are investigated through multiscalar measurements. Simultaneous point measurements of major species, NO, OH, temperature, and mixture fraction are obtained by combining spontaneous Raman scattering, Rayleigh scattering, and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF). NO and OH fluorescence signals are converted to quantitative concentrations by applying shot-to-shot corrections for local variations of the Boltzmann fraction and collisional quenching rate. These measurements of instantaneous thermochemical states in turbulent flames provide insights into the fundamental nature of turbulence-chemistry interactions. The measurements also constitute a unique data base for evaluation and refinement of turbulent combustion models. Experimental work during the past year has focused on three areas: (1) investigation of the effects of differential molecular diffusion in turbulent combustion: (2) experiments on the effects of Halon CF{sub 3}Br, a fire retardant, on the structure of turbulent flames of CH{sub 4} and CO/H{sub 2}/N{sub 2}; and (3) experiments on NO formation in turbulent hydrogen jet flames.

  12. Wind turbulence characterization for wind energy development

    SciTech Connect

    Wendell, L.L.; Gower, G.L.; Morris, V.R.; Tomich, S.D.

    1991-09-01

    As part of its support of the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Federal Wind Energy Program, the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has initiated an effort to work jointly with the wind energy community to characterize wind turbulence in a variety of complex terrains at existing or potential sites of wind turbine installation. Five turbulence characterization systems were assembled and installed at four sites in the Tehachapi Pass in California, and one in the Green Mountains near Manchester, Vermont. Data processing and analyses techniques were developed to allow observational analyses of the turbulent structure; this analysis complements the more traditional statistical and spectral analyses. Preliminary results of the observational analyses, in the rotating framework or a wind turbine blade, show that the turbulence at a site can have two major components: (1) engulfing eddies larger than the rotor, and (2) fluctuating shear due to eddies smaller than the rotor disk. Comparison of the time series depicting these quantities at two sites showed that the turbulence intensity (the commonly used descriptor of turbulence) did not adequately characterize the turbulence at these sites. 9 refs., 10 figs.,

  13. Density distributions of outflow-driven turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moraghan, Anthony; Kim, Jongsoo; Yoon, Suk-Jin

    2013-05-01

    Protostellar jets and outflows are signatures of star formation and promising mechanisms for driving supersonic turbulence in molecular clouds. We quantify outflow-driven turbulence through three-dimensional numerical simulations using an isothermal version of the robust total variation diminishing code. We drive turbulence in real space using a simplified spherical outflow model, analyse the data through density probability distribution functions (PDFs), and investigate the core formation rate per free-fall time (CFRff). The real-space turbulence-driving method produces a negatively skewed density PDF possessing an enhanced tail on the low-density side. It deviates from the log-normal distributions typically obtained from Fourier-space turbulence driving at low densities, but can provide a good fit at high densities, particularly in terms of mass-weighted rather than volume-weighted density PDF. Due to this fact, we suggest that the CFRff determined from a Fourier-driven turbulence model could be comparable to that of our particular real-space-driving model, which has a ratio of solenoidal to compressional components from the resulting turbulence velocity fields of ˜0.6.

  14. Learning to soar in turbulent environments

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Gautam; Celani, Antonio; Sejnowski, Terrence J.; Vergassola, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Birds and gliders exploit warm, rising atmospheric currents (thermals) to reach heights comparable to low-lying clouds with a reduced expenditure of energy. This strategy of flight (thermal soaring) is frequently used by migratory birds. Soaring provides a remarkable instance of complex decision making in biology and requires a long-term strategy to effectively use the ascending thermals. Furthermore, the problem is technologically relevant to extend the flying range of autonomous gliders. Thermal soaring is commonly observed in the atmospheric convective boundary layer on warm, sunny days. The formation of thermals unavoidably generates strong turbulent fluctuations, which constitute an essential element of soaring. Here, we approach soaring flight as a problem of learning to navigate complex, highly fluctuating turbulent environments. We simulate the atmospheric boundary layer by numerical models of turbulent convective flow and combine them with model-free, experience-based, reinforcement learning algorithms to train the gliders. For the learned policies in the regimes of moderate and strong turbulence levels, the glider adopts an increasingly conservative policy as turbulence levels increase, quantifying the degree of risk affordable in turbulent environments. Reinforcement learning uncovers those sensorimotor cues that permit effective control over soaring in turbulent environments. PMID:27482099

  15. Mechanics of Turbulence of Multicomponent Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marov, Mikhail Ya.; Kolesnichenko, Aleksander V.

    2002-02-01

    Turbulence in multicomponent reacting gas mixtures is an important mechanism underlying numerous natural phenomena closely related to the study of our space environment. This book develops a new mathematical approach for modelling multicomponent gas turbulence that adequately describes the combined processes of dynamics and heat and mass transfer when chemical kinetics and turbulent mixing are equally important. The developed models include the evolutionary transfer equations for the single-point second correlation moments of turbulent fluctuations of thermohydrodynamical parameters. The phenomenological approach to the closure problem in hydrodynamic equations of mean motion at the level of the first order moments is based on the thermodynamics of irreversible processes and enables defining relationships in a more general form as compared to those conventionally deduced using the mixing path concept. Based on the developed approach, turbulent exchange factors for a planetary upper atmosphere are evaluated, and a turbulent model of a protoplanetary accretion gas-dust disk involving heat and mass transfer and coagulation is also considered. As compared to previously published books on the problem of turbulence, this book deals, for the first time, with the complicated models of reacting gas mixtures. It is intended for graduate and postgraduate students in the fields of fluid gas dynamics, astrophysics, space physics, planetary sciences, and aeronomy, and especially for those dealing with computer modelling of the processes in such natural media. The book may also be of interest to specialists in the relevant fields of ecology, engineering, and material processing.

  16. The Statistical Mechanics of Ideal MHD Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shebalin, John V.

    2003-01-01

    Turbulence is a universal, nonlinear phenomenon found in all energetic fluid and plasma motion. In particular. understanding magneto hydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence and incorporating its effects in the computation and prediction of the flow of ionized gases in space, for example, are great challenges that must be met if such computations and predictions are to be meaningful. Although a general solution to the "problem of turbulence" does not exist in closed form, numerical integrations allow us to explore the phase space of solutions for both ideal and dissipative flows. For homogeneous, incompressible turbulence, Fourier methods are appropriate, and phase space is defined by the Fourier coefficients of the physical fields. In the case of ideal MHD flows, a fairly robust statistical mechanics has been developed, in which the symmetry and ergodic properties of phase space is understood. A discussion of these properties will illuminate our principal discovery: Coherent structure and randomness co-exist in ideal MHD turbulence. For dissipative flows, as opposed to ideal flows, progress beyond the dimensional analysis of Kolmogorov has been difficult. Here, some possible future directions that draw on the ideal results will also be discussed. Our conclusion will be that while ideal turbulence is now well understood, real turbulence still presents great challenges.

  17. Regimes of turbulence without an energy cascade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barenghi, C. F.; Sergeev, Y. A.; Baggaley, A. W.

    2016-10-01

    Experiments and numerical simulations of turbulent 4He and 3He-B have established that, at hydrodynamic length scales larger than the average distance between quantum vortices, the energy spectrum obeys the same 5/3 Kolmogorov law which is observed in the homogeneous isotropic turbulence of ordinary fluids. The importance of the 5/3 law is that it points to the existence of a Richardson energy cascade from large eddies to small eddies. However, there is also evidence of quantum turbulent regimes without Kolmogorov scaling. This raises the important questions of why, in such regimes, the Kolmogorov spectrum fails to form, what is the physical nature of turbulence without energy cascade, and whether hydrodynamical models can account for the unusual behaviour of turbulent superfluid helium. In this work we describe simple physical mechanisms which prevent the formation of Kolmogorov scaling in the thermal counterflow, and analyze the conditions necessary for emergence of quasiclassical regime in quantum turbulence generated by injection of vortex rings at low temperatures. Our models justify the hydrodynamical description of quantum turbulence and shed light into an unexpected regime of vortex dynamics.

  18. Numerical simulation of premixed turbulent methane combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, John B.; Day, Marcus S.; Grcar, Joseph F.

    2001-12-14

    In this paper we study the behavior of a premixed turbulent methane flame in three dimensions using numerical simulation. The simulations are performed using an adaptive time-dependent low Mach number combustion algorithm based on a second-order projection formulation that conserves both species mass and total enthalpy. The species and enthalpy equations are treated using an operator-split approach that incorporates stiff integration techniques for modeling detailed chemical kinetics. The methodology also incorporates a mixture model for differential diffusion. For the simulations presented here, methane chemistry and transport are modeled using the DRM-19 (19-species, 84-reaction) mechanism derived from the GRIMech-1.2 mechanism along with its associated thermodynamics and transport databases. We consider a lean flame with equivalence ratio 0.8 for two different levels of turbulent intensity. For each case we examine the basic structure of the flame including turbulent flame speed and flame surface area. The results indicate that flame wrinkling is the dominant factor leading to the increased turbulent flame speed. Joint probability distributions are computed to establish a correlation between heat release and curvature. We also investigate the effect of turbulent flame interaction on the flame chemistry. We identify specific flame intermediates that are sensitive to turbulence and explore various correlations between these species and local flame curvature. We identify different mechanisms by which turbulence modulates the chemistry of the flame.

  19. Regimes of turbulence without an energy cascade

    PubMed Central

    Barenghi, C. F.; Sergeev, Y. A.; Baggaley, A. W.

    2016-01-01

    Experiments and numerical simulations of turbulent 4He and 3He-B have established that, at hydrodynamic length scales larger than the average distance between quantum vortices, the energy spectrum obeys the same 5/3 Kolmogorov law which is observed in the homogeneous isotropic turbulence of ordinary fluids. The importance of the 5/3 law is that it points to the existence of a Richardson energy cascade from large eddies to small eddies. However, there is also evidence of quantum turbulent regimes without Kolmogorov scaling. This raises the important questions of why, in such regimes, the Kolmogorov spectrum fails to form, what is the physical nature of turbulence without energy cascade, and whether hydrodynamical models can account for the unusual behaviour of turbulent superfluid helium. In this work we describe simple physical mechanisms which prevent the formation of Kolmogorov scaling in the thermal counterflow, and analyze the conditions necessary for emergence of quasiclassical regime in quantum turbulence generated by injection of vortex rings at low temperatures. Our models justify the hydrodynamical description of quantum turbulence and shed light into an unexpected regime of vortex dynamics. PMID:27761005

  20. Learning to soar in turbulent environments.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Gautam; Celani, Antonio; Sejnowski, Terrence J; Vergassola, Massimo

    2016-08-16

    Birds and gliders exploit warm, rising atmospheric currents (thermals) to reach heights comparable to low-lying clouds with a reduced expenditure of energy. This strategy of flight (thermal soaring) is frequently used by migratory birds. Soaring provides a remarkable instance of complex decision making in biology and requires a long-term strategy to effectively use the ascending thermals. Furthermore, the problem is technologically relevant to extend the flying range of autonomous gliders. Thermal soaring is commonly observed in the atmospheric convective boundary layer on warm, sunny days. The formation of thermals unavoidably generates strong turbulent fluctuations, which constitute an essential element of soaring. Here, we approach soaring flight as a problem of learning to navigate complex, highly fluctuating turbulent environments. We simulate the atmospheric boundary layer by numerical models of turbulent convective flow and combine them with model-free, experience-based, reinforcement learning algorithms to train the gliders. For the learned policies in the regimes of moderate and strong turbulence levels, the glider adopts an increasingly conservative policy as turbulence levels increase, quantifying the degree of risk affordable in turbulent environments. Reinforcement learning uncovers those sensorimotor cues that permit effective control over soaring in turbulent environments.

  1. Turbulent pipe flows subjected to temporal decelerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Wongwan; Lee, Jae Hwa

    2016-11-01

    Direct numerical simulations of temporally decelerating turbulent pipe flows were performed to examine effects of temporal decelerations on turbulence. The simulations were started with a fully developed turbulent pipe flow at a Reynolds number, ReD =24380, based on the pipe radius (R) and the laminar centerline velocity (Uc 0). Three different temporal decelerations were imposed to the initial flow with f= | d Ub / dt | =0.00127, 0.00625 and 0.025, where Ub is the bulk mean velocity. Comparison of Reynolds stresses and turbulent production terms with those for steady flow at a similar Reynolds number showed that turbulence is highly intensified with increasing f due to delay effects. Furthermore, inspection of the Reynolds shear stress profiles showed that strong second- and fourth-quadrant Reynolds shear stresses are greatly increased, while first- and third-quadrant components are also increased. Decomposition of streamwise Reynolds normal stress with streamwise cutoff wavelength (λx) 1 R revealed that the turbulence delay is dominantly originated from delay of strong large-scale turbulent structures in the outer layer, although small-scale motions throughout the wall layer adjusted more rapidly to the temporal decelerations. This research was supported by Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) funded by the Ministry of Education (NRF-2014R1A1A2057031).

  2. Hot Jupiter Radii: A Turbulent History

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youdin, Andrew N.; Komacek, Thaddeus D.

    2014-11-01

    Many hot Jupiters, i.e. giant exoplanets with short orbital periods, are bloated, with radii that greatly exceed those of colder gas giants. In models that neglect atmospheric motion, the enhanced irradiation of hot Jupiters is insufficient to explain their large radii. However uneven surface irradiation drives atmospheric circulation. These atmospheric motions deposit heat at deeper layers than irradiation alone, and can explain their large radii. The specific dissipation mechanism for atmospheric circulation can involve a turbulent cascade and/or the driving of electric currents that undergo Ohmic dissipation. The “Mechanical Greenhouse” model (Youdin & Mitchell, 2010) showed that turbulence in hot Jupiter atmospheres does mechanical work against the stable stratification of upper radiative zones, thereby driving a heat flux deeper into the interior. This poster will describe the first efforts to include this turbulent heat flux in planetary structure models. The goal is to understand the effects of turbulent mixing on hot Jupiter radius evolution. To perform these calculations we modify the publicly available stellar structure code MESA. We show how the effects of turbulence can be included in MESA — and understood physically — as an effective dissipation profile. We compare the radius evolution of hot Jupiters for different dissipation prescriptions, including our turbulent mixing model and others from the literature. We find that turbulent mixing is an energetically efficient way to explain the bloated radii of hot Jupiters.

  3. Turbulence Characteristics of Swirling Flowfields. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, T. W.

    1983-01-01

    Combustor design phenomena; recirculating flows research; single-wire, six-orientation, eddy dissipation rate, and turbulence modeling measurement; directional sensitivity (DS); calibration equipment, confined jet facility, and hot-wire instrumentation; effects of swirl, strong contraction nozzle, and expansion ratio; and turbulence parameters; uncertain; and DS in laminar jets; turbulent nonswirling jets, and turbulent swirling jets are discussed.

  4. Physical Mechanisms of Two-Dimensional Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ecke, Robert

    2004-03-01

    Turbulence has slowly yielded its mysteries through over 100 years of persistent effort. Recently experimental techniques and computation power have reached the stage where significant progress has been made on this very challenging problem. Two dimensional turbulence offers some real advantages in terms of reduced degrees of freedom such that the problem can now be thoroughly explored from many perspectives. Further, two-dimensional turbulence exhibits the basic phenomena of direct-enstrophy and inverse-energy cascades thought to apply to oceanic and atmospheric systems. We have investigated the properties of turbulence in two spatial dimensions using experimental measurements of the grid turbulence in a flowing soap film^1 and of the electromagnetically-forced turbulence in a thin salt layer floating on a dense immiscible fluid underlayer. We have also explored 2D turbulence using several different direct numerical simulations of homogeneous, isotropic turbulence in a periodic box^2. The data for both consist of high resolution fields of velocity; some are statistically independent sets and others are temporally resolved for dynamics. From this data we construct conventional Eulerian statistics, directly measure energy and enstrophy transfer^1, identify coherent structures in the flow, determine Lagrangian quantities, and calculate stretching fields. This comprehensive experimental and numerical characterization elucidates the physical mechanisms of two-dimensional turbulence. ^1 M.K. Rivera, W.B. Daniel and R.E. Ecke, Phys. Rev. Lett. 90, 104502 (2003). ^2 S. Chen, R.E. Ecke, G. Eyink, X. Wang, and Z. Xiao, Phys. Rev. Lett. 91, 214501 (2003).

  5. Ignition transition in turbulent premixed combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Shy, S.S.; Liu, C.C.; Shih, W.T.

    2010-02-15

    Recently, Shy and his co-workers reported a turbulent ignition transition based on measurements of minimum ignition energies (MIE) of lean premixed turbulent methane combustion in a centrally-ignited, fan-stirred cruciform burner capable of generating intense isotropic turbulence. Using the same methodology, this paper presents new complete MIE data sets for stoichiometric and rich cases at three different equivalence ratios {phi} = 1.0, 1.2 and 1.3, each covering a wide range of a turbulent Karlovitz number (Ka) indicating a time ratio between chemical reaction and turbulence. Thus, ignition transition in premixed turbulent combustion depending on both Ka and {phi} can be identified for the first time. It is found that there are two distinct modes on ignition in randomly stirred methane-air mixtures (ignition transition) separated by a critical Ka where values of Ka{sub c} {approx} 8-26 depending on {phi} with the minimum Ka{sub c} occurring near {phi} = 1. For Ka < Ka{sub c}, MIE increases gradually with Ka, flame kernel formation is similar to laminar ignition remaining a torus, and 2D laser tomography images of subsequent outwardly-propagating turbulent flames show sharp fronts. For Ka > Ka{sub c}, MIE increases abruptly with Ka, flame kernel is disrupted, and subsequent randomly-propagating turbulent flames reveal distributed-like fronts. Moreover, we introduce a reaction zone Peclet number (P{sub RZ}) indicating the diffusivity ratio between turbulence and chemical reaction, such that the aforementioned very scattering MIE data depending on Ka and {phi} can be collapsed into a single curve having two drastically different increasing slopes with P{sub RZ} which are separated by a critical P{sub RZ} {approx} 4.5 showing ignition transition. Finally, a physical model is proposed to explain these results. (author)

  6. Lagrangian statistics in laboratory 2D turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Hua; Francois, Nicolas; Punzmann, Horst; Shats, Michael

    2014-05-01

    Turbulent mixing in liquids and gases is ubiquitous in nature and industrial flows. Understanding statistical properties of Lagrangian trajectories in turbulence is crucial for a range of problems such as spreading of plankton in the ocean, transport of pollutants, etc. Oceanic data on trajectories of the free-drifting instruments, indicate that the trajectory statistics can often be described by a Lagrangian integral scale. Turbulence however is a state of a flow dominated by a hierarchy of scales, and it is not clear which of these scales mostly affect particle dispersion. Moreover, coherent structures often coexist with turbulence in laboratory experiments [1]. The effect of coherent structures on particle dispersion in turbulent flows is not well understood. Recent progress in scientific imaging and computational power made it possible to tackle this problem experimentally. In this talk, we report the analysis of the higher order Lagrangian statistics in laboratory two-dimensional turbulence. Our results show that fluid particle dispersion is diffusive and it is determined by a single measurable Lagrangian scale related to the forcing scale [2]. Higher order moments of the particle dispersion show strong self-similarity in fully developed turbulence [3]. Here we introduce a new dispersion law that describes single particle dispersion during the turbulence development [4]. These results offer a new way of predicting dispersion in turbulent flows in which one of the low energy scales are persistent. It may help better understanding of drifter Lagrangian statistics in the regions of the ocean where small scale coherent eddies are present [5]. Reference: 1. H. Xia, H. Punzmann, G. Falkovich and M. Shats, Physical Review Letters, 101, 194504 (2008) 2. H. Xia, N. Francois, H. Punzmann, and M. Shats, Nature Communications, 4, 2013 (2013) 3. R. Ferrari, A.J. Manfroi , W.R. Young, Physica D 154 111 (2001) 4. H. Xia, N. Francois, H. Punzmann and M. Shats, submitted (2014

  7. Kinetic Magnetorotational Turbulence and Dynamo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunz, Matthew; Stone, James; Quataert, Eliot

    2016-10-01

    Low-luminosity black-hole accretion flows, such as that at the Galactic center, are collisionless. A kinetic approach is thus necessary to understand the transport of heat and angular momentum, the acceleration of particles, and the growth and structure of the magnetic field in these systems. We present results from the first 6D kinetic numerical simulation of magnetorotational turbulence and dynamo, using the local shearing-box model. Special attention will be paid to the enhanced transport of angular momentum by field-aligned pressure anisotropies, as well as to the ion-Larmor-scale kinetic instabilities (firehose, mirror, ion-cyclotron) which regulate those anisotropies. Energy spectra and phase-space evolution will be discussed. Time permitting, dedicated nonlinear studies of firehose and mirror instabilities in a shearing plasma will also be presented as a complement to the study of the magnetorotational instability. The profits, perils, and price of using a kinetic approach will be briefly mentioned.

  8. Supporting excellence in turbulent times.

    PubMed

    Weaver, D; Ringhouse, B A

    1997-01-01

    Re-engineering offers an organization the opportunity to identify and strengthen critical system values and enhance employee commitment despite needed downsizing and major role changes. Anticipated distress during turbulent transitions can be decreased by managers paying close attention to employees' realistic concerns and offering opportunities for discussion about unaltered values as well as concretizing operational guideposts during the "in between" phase. Leaders must develop significant new skills to help staff develop competencies related to change management. Chief among the needed capabilities are direct communication techniques, enhanced self knowledge and desired team role behaviors. The expanded span of accountability for managers offers opportunities for staff empowerment through their needed participation in peer reviews, as well as the concomitant changes in position descriptions, role expectations, and financial rewards.

  9. Turbulence modeling for hypersonic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marvin, J. G.; Coakley, T. J.

    1989-01-01

    Turbulence modeling for high speed compressible flows is described and discussed. Starting with the compressible Navier-Stokes equations, methods of statistical averaging are described by means of which the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations are developed. Unknown averages in these equations are approximated using various closure concepts. Zero-, one-, and two-equation eddy viscosity models, algebraic stress models and Reynolds stress transport models are discussed. Computations of supersonic and hypersonic flows obtained using several of the models are discussed and compared with experimental results. Specific examples include attached boundary layer flows, shock wave boundary layer interactions and compressible shear layers. From these examples, conclusions regarding the status of modeling and recommendations for future studies are discussed.

  10. Geometry dependence of stellarator turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mynick, H. E.; Xanthopoulos, P.; Boozer, A. H.

    2009-11-01

    Using the nonlinear gyrokinetic code package GENE/GIST [F. Jenko, W. Dorland, M. Kotschenreuther, and B. N. Rogers, Phys. Plasmas 7, 1904 (2000); P. Xanthopoulos, W. A. Cooper, F. Jenko, Yu. Turkin, A. Runov, and J. Geiger, Phys. Plasmas 16, 082303 (2009)], we study the turbulent transport in a broad family of stellarator designs, to understand the geometry dependence of the microturbulence. By using a set of flux tubes on a given flux surface, we construct a picture of the two-dimensional structure of the microturbulence over that surface and relate this to relevant geometric quantities, such as the curvature, local shear, and effective potential in the Schrödinger-like equation governing linear drift modes.

  11. Coshcous turbulence and its thermalization

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Jian-zhou; Taylor, Mark

    2008-01-01

    Dissipation rate {mu}[cosh(k/k{sub c}) - 1] in Fourier space, which reduces to the Newtonian viscosity dissipation rate {nu}k{sup 2} for small k/k{sub c}, can be scaled to make a hydrodynamic system either actually or potentially converge to its Galerkin truncation. The former case acquires convergence to the truncation at a finite wavenumber k{sub G}; the latter realizes as the wavenumber grows to infinity. Intermittency reduction and vitiation of extended self-similarity (ESS) in the partially thermalized regime of turbulence are confirmed and clarified. Onsager's pictures of intermittent versus nonintermittent flows are visualized from thermalized numerical fields, showing cleanly spotty versus mistily uniform properties, the latter of which destroys self-organization and so the ESS property.

  12. Magnetohydrodynamic Turbulence and the Geodynamo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shebalin, John V.

    2014-01-01

    The ARES Directorate at JSC has researched the physical processes that create planetary magnetic fields through dynamo action since 2007. The "dynamo problem" has existed since 1600, when William Gilbert, physician to Queen Elizabeth I, recognized that the Earth was a giant magnet. In 1919, Joseph Larmor proposed that solar (and by implication, planetary) magnetism was due to magnetohydrodynamics (MHD), but full acceptance did not occur until Glatzmaier and Roberts solved the MHD equations numerically and simulated a geomagnetic reversal in 1995. JSC research produced a unique theoretical model in 2012 that provided a novel explanation of these physical observations and computational results as an essential manifestation of broken ergodicity in MHD turbulence. Research is ongoing, and future work is aimed at understanding quantitative details of magnetic dipole alignment in the Earth as well as in Mercury, Jupiter and its moon Ganymede, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and the Sun and other stars.

  13. Development of relaxation turbulence models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, C. M.

    1976-01-01

    Relaxation turbulence models have been intensively studied. The complete time dependent mass averaged Navier-Stokes equations have been solved for flow into a two dimensional compression corner. A new numerical scheme has been incorporated into the developed computed code with an attendant order of magnitude reduction in computation time. Computed solutions are compared with experimental measurements of Law for supersonic flow. Details of the relaxation process have been studied; several different relaxation models, including different relaxation processes and varying relaxation length, are tested and compared. Then a parametric study has been conducted in which both Reynolds number and wedge angle are varied. To assess effects of Reynolds number and wedge angle, the parametric study includes the comparison of computed separation location and upstream extent of pressure rise; numerical results are also compared with the measurements of surface pressure, skin friction and mean velocity field.

  14. Conservational PDF Equations of Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, Tsan-Hsing; Liu, Nan-Suey

    2010-01-01

    Recently we have revisited the traditional probability density function (PDF) equations for the velocity and species in turbulent incompressible flows. They are all unclosed due to the appearance of various conditional means which are modeled empirically. However, we have observed that it is possible to establish a closed velocity PDF equation and a closed joint velocity and species PDF equation through conditions derived from the integral form of the Navier-Stokes equations. Although, in theory, the resulted PDF equations are neither general nor unique, they nevertheless lead to the exact transport equations for the first moment as well as all higher order moments. We refer these PDF equations as the conservational PDF equations. This observation is worth further exploration for its validity and CFD application

  15. Broken symmetry in ideal magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shebalin, John V.

    1993-01-01

    A numerical study of the long-time evolution of a number of cases of inviscid, isotropic, incompressible, three-dimensional fluid, and magneto-fluid turbulence has been completed. The results confirm that ideal magnetohydrodynamic turbulence is non-ergodic if there is no external magnetic field present. This is due essentially to a canonical symmetry being broken in an arbitrary dynamical representation. The broken symmetry manifests itself as a coherent structure, i.e., a non-zero time-averaged part of the turbulent magnetic field. The coherent structure is observed, in one case, to contain about eighteen percent of the total energy.

  16. Turbulence indicators for Space Shuttle launches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Susko, Michael

    1992-01-01

    A report on the research and analysis for identifying turbulent regions from the surface to 16 km for Space Shuttle launches is presented. The research demonstrates that the results from the FPS-16 radar/jimsphere balloon system in measuring winds can indicate the presence of or conditions ripe for turbulence in the troposphere and lower stratosphere. It is shown that atmospheric data obtained during the Shuttle launches by the rawinsonde in conjunction with the jimsphere provide the necessary meteorological data to compute aerodynamic parameters to identify turbulence.

  17. Investigating prominence turbulence with Hinode SOT Dopplergrams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillier, A.; Matsumoto, T.; Ichimoto, K.

    2017-01-01

    Quiescent prominences host a diverse range of flows, including Rayleigh-Taylor instability driven upflows and impulsive downflows, and so it is no surprise that turbulent motions also exist. As prominences are believed to have a mean horizontal guide field, investigating any turbulence they host could shed light on the nature of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence in a wide range of astrophysical systems. In this paper we have investigated the nature of the turbulent prominence motions using structure function analysis on the velocity increments estimated from Hα Dopplergrams constructed with observational data from Hinode Solar Optical Telescope (SOT). The probability density function of the velocity increments shows that as we look at increasingly small spatial separations the distribution displays greater departure from a reference Gaussian distribution, hinting at intermittency in the velocity field. Analysis of the even order structure functions for both the horizontal and vertical separations showed the existence of two distinct regions displaying different exponents of the power law with the break in the power law at approximately 2000 km. We hypothesise this to be a result of internal turbulence excited in the prominence by the dynamic flows of the system found at this spatial scale. We found that the scaling exponents of the pth order structure functions for these two regions generally followed the p/ 2 (smaller scales) and p/ 4 (larger scales) laws that are the same as those predicted for weak MHD turbulence and Kraichnan-Iroshnikov turbulence respectively. However, the existence of the p/ 4 scaling at larger scales than the p/ 2 scaling is inconsistent with the increasing nonlinearity expected in MHD turbulence. We also found that as we went to higher order structure functions, the dependence of the scaling exponent on the order p is nonlinear implying that intermittency may be playing an important role in the turbulent cascade. Estimating the heating

  18. Bahamas Optical Turbulence Exercise (BOTEX): preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Weilin; Jorosz, Ewa; Dalgleish, Fraser; Nootz, Gero; Woods, Sarah; Weidemann, Alan D.; Goode, Wesley; Vuorenkoski, Anni; Metzger, B.; Ramos, B.

    2012-06-01

    The Bahamas Optical Turbulence Exercise (BOTEX) was conducted in the coastal waters of Florida and the Bahamas from June 30 to July 12 2011, onboard the R/V FG Walton Smith. The primary objective of the BOTEX was to obtain field measurements of optical turbulence structures, in order to investigate the impacts of the naturally occurring turbulence on underwater imaging and optical beam propagation. In order to successfully image through optical turbulence structures in the water and examine their impacts on optical transmission, a high speed camera and targets (both active and passive) were mounted on a rigid frame to form the Image Measurement Assembly for Subsurface Turbulence (IMAST). To investigate the impacts on active imaging systems such as the laser line scan (LLS), the Telescoping Rigid Underwater Sensor Structure (TRUSS) was designed and implemented by Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institute. The experiments were designed to determine the resolution limits of LLS systems as a function of turbulence induced beam wander at the target. The impact of natural turbulence structures on lidar backscatter waveforms was also examined, by means of a telescopic receiver and a short pulse transmitter, co-located, on a vertical profiling frame. To include a wide range of water types in terms of optical and physical conditions, data was collected from four different locations. . Impacts from optical turbulence were observed under both strong and weak physical structures. Turbulence measurements were made by two instruments, the Vertical Microstructure Profiler (VMP) and a 3D acoustical Doppler velocimeter with fast conductivity and temperature probes, in close proximity in the field. Subsequently these were mounted on the IMAST during moored deployments. The turbulence kinetic energy dissipation rate and the temperature dissipation rates were calculated from both setups in order to characterize the physical environments and their impacts. Beam deflection by multiple point

  19. Origin and turbulence spreading of plasma blobs

    SciTech Connect

    Manz, P.; Birkenmeier, G.; Stroth, U.; Ribeiro, T. T.; Scott, B. D.; Carralero, D.; Müller, S. H.; Müller, H. W.; Wolfrum, E.; Fuchert, G.

    2015-02-15

    The formation of plasma blobs is studied by analyzing their trajectories in a gyrofluid simulation in the vicinity of the separatrix. Most blobs arise at the maximum radial electric field outside the separatrix. In general, blob generation is not bound to one particular radial position or instability. A simple model of turbulence spreading for the scrape-off layer is derived. The simulations show that the blob dynamics can be represented by turbulence spreading, which constitutes a substantial energy drive for far scrape-off layer turbulence and is a more suitable quantity to study blob generation compared to the skewness.

  20. Velocity and turbulence measurements in combustion systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, R. J.; Lau, K. Y.; Leung, C. C.

    1983-06-01

    A laser-Doppler velocimeter is used in the measurement of high-temperature gas flows. A two-stage fluidization particle generator provides magnesium oxide particles to serve as optical scattering centers. The one-dimensional dual-beam system is frequency shifted to permit measurements of velocities up to 300 meters per second and turbulence intensities greater than 100 percent. Exiting flows from can-type gas turbine combustors and burners with pre-mixed oxy-acetylene flames are described in terms of the velocity, turbulence intensity, and temperature profiles. The results indicate the influence of the combustion process on turbulence.