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Sample records for gastric carcinogenesis induced

  1. High dietary salt intake exacerbates Helicobacter pylori-induced gastric carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Gaddy, Jennifer A; Radin, Jana N; Loh, John T; Zhang, Feng; Washington, M Kay; Peek, Richard M; Algood, Holly M Scott; Cover, Timothy L

    2013-06-01

    Persistent colonization of the human stomach with Helicobacter pylori is a risk factor for gastric adenocarcinoma, and H. pylori-induced carcinogenesis is dependent on the actions of a bacterial oncoprotein known as CagA. Epidemiological studies have shown that high dietary salt intake is also a risk factor for gastric cancer. To investigate the effects of a high-salt diet, we infected Mongolian gerbils with a wild-type (WT) cagA(+) H. pylori strain or an isogenic cagA mutant strain and maintained the animals on a regular diet or a high-salt diet. At 4 months postinfection, gastric adenocarcinoma was detected in 100% of the WT-infected/high-salt-diet animals, 58% of WT-infected/regular-diet animals, and none of the animals infected with the cagA mutant strain (P < 0.0001). Among animals infected with the WT strain, those fed a high-salt diet had more severe gastric inflammation, higher gastric pH, increased parietal cell loss, increased gastric expression of interleukin 1β (IL-1β), and decreased gastric expression of hepcidin and hydrogen potassium ATPase (H,K-ATPase) compared to those on a regular diet. Previous studies have detected upregulation of CagA synthesis in response to increased salt concentrations in the bacterial culture medium, and, concordant with the in vitro results, we detected increased cagA transcription in vivo in animals fed a high-salt diet compared to those on a regular diet. Animals infected with the cagA mutant strain had low levels of gastric inflammation and did not develop hypochlorhydria. These results indicate that a high-salt diet potentiates the carcinogenic effects of cagA(+) H. pylori strains.

  2. Autophagy impairment by Helicobacter pylori-induced methylation silencing of MAP1LC3Av1 promotes gastric carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Muhammad, Jibran Sualeh; Nanjo, Sohachi; Ando, Takayuki; Yamashita, Satoshi; Maekita, Takao; Ushijima, Toshikazu; Tabuchi, Yoshiaki; Sugiyama, Toshiro

    2017-05-15

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection induces methylation silencing of tumor suppressor genes causing gastric carcinogenesis. Impairment of autophagy induces DNA damage leading to genetic instability and carcinogenesis. We aimed to identify whether H. pylori infection induced methylation silencing of host autophagy-related (Atg) genes, impairing autophagy and enhancing gastric carcinogenesis. Gastric mucosae were obtained from 41 gastric cancer patients and 11 healthy volunteers (8 H. pylori-uninfected and 3 H. pylori-infected). Methylation status of Atg genes was analyzed by a methylation microarray and quantitative methylation-specific PCR (qMSP); mRNA expression was assessed by quantitative reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR). Cell proliferation, migration and invasion were assessed in normal rat gastric epithelial cells. Gene knock-down was performed by siRNA. Autophagy was assessed by western blotting. Of 34 Atg genes, MAP1LC3A variant 1 (MAP1LC3Av1) and ULK2 were identified by methylation microarray analysis as exhibiting specific methylation in H. pylori-infected mucosae and gastric cancer tissues. Methylation silencing of MAP1LC3Av1 was confirmed by qMSP, qRT-PCR and de-methylation treatment in two gastric cancer cell lines. Knock-down of map1lc3a, the rat homolog of the human MAP1LC3Av1, inhibited autophagy response and increased cell proliferation, migration and invasion in normal rat gastric epithelial cells, despite the presence of map1lc3b, the rat homolog of the human MAP1LC3B gene important for autophagy. Furthermore, MAP1LC3Av1 was methylation-silenced in 23.3% of gastric cancerous mucosae and 40% of non-cancerous mucosae with H. pylori infection. MAP1LC3Av1 is essential for autophagy and H. pylori-induced methylation silencing of MAP1LC3Av1 may impair autophagy, facilitating gastric carcinogenesis.

  3. Mouse Models of Gastric Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Sungsook; Yang, Mijeong

    2014-01-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the most common cancers in the world. Animal models have been used to elucidate the details of the molecular mechanisms of various cancers. However, most inbred strains of mice have resistance to gastric carcinogenesis. Helicobacter infection and carcinogen treatment have been used to establish mouse models that exhibit phenotypes similar to those of human gastric cancer. A large number of transgenic and knockout mouse models of gastric cancer have been developed using genetic engineering. A combination of carcinogens and gene manipulation has been applied to facilitate development of advanced gastric cancer; however, it is rare for mouse models of gastric cancer to show aggressive, metastatic phenotypes required for preclinical studies. Here, we review current mouse models of gastric carcinogenesis and provide our perspectives on future developments in this field. PMID:25061535

  4. JMJD2B is required for Helicobacter pylori-induced gastric carcinogenesis via regulating COX-2 expression.

    PubMed

    Han, Fengjuan; Ren, Juchao; Zhang, Jinjin; Sun, Yundong; Ma, Fang; Liu, Zhifang; Yu, Han; Jia, Jihui; Li, Wenjuan

    2016-06-21

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is the strongest risk factor for the initiation and progression of gastric cancer. However, the mechanism of H. pylori-induced pathogenesis remains unclear. In this study, we investigate the role of H. pylori infection in JMJD2B upregulation and the mechanism underlying gastric carcinogenesis. We find that JMJD2B can be induced by H. pylori infection via β-catenin pathway. β-catenin directly binds to JMJD2B promoter and stimulates JMJD2B expression following H. pylori infection. Increased JMJD2B, together with NF-κB, binds to COX-2 promoter to enhance its transcription by demethylating H3K9me3 locally. JMJD2B and COX-2 expression is upregulated in H. pylori infected mice in vivo. Furthermore, JMJD2B and COX-2 expression is gradually increased in human gastric tissues from gastritis to gastric cancer. The level of JMJD2B and COX-2 in H. pylori-positive gastritis tissues is significantly higher than that in H. pylori-negative tissues. Moreover, a positive correlation between JMJD2B and COX-2 expression is found in both gastritis and gastric cancer tissues. Therefore, JMJD2B is a crucial factor in triggering H. pylori-induced chronic inflammation and progression of gastric carcinogenesis and it may serve as a novel target for the intervention of gastric cancer.

  5. JMJD2B is required for Helicobacter pylori-induced gastric carcinogenesis via regulating COX-2 expression

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jinjin; Sun, Yundong; Ma, Fang; Liu, Zhifang; Yu, Han; Jia, Jihui; Li, Wenjuan

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is the strongest risk factor for the initiation and progression of gastric cancer. However, the mechanism of H. pylori-induced pathogenesis remains unclear. In this study, we investigate the role of H. pylori infection in JMJD2B upregulation and the mechanism underlying gastric carcinogenesis. We find that JMJD2B can be induced by H. pylori infection via β-catenin pathway. β-catenin directly binds to JMJD2B promoter and stimulates JMJD2B expression following H. pylori infection. Increased JMJD2B, together with NF-κB, binds to COX-2 promoter to enhance its transcription by demethylating H3K9me3 locally. JMJD2B and COX-2 expression is upregulated in H. pylori infected mice in vivo. Furthermore, JMJD2B and COX-2 expression is gradually increased in human gastric tissues from gastritis to gastric cancer. The level of JMJD2B and COX-2 in H. pylori-positive gastritis tissues is significantly higher than that in H. pylori-negative tissues. Moreover, a positive correlation between JMJD2B and COX-2 expression is found in both gastritis and gastric cancer tissues. Therefore, JMJD2B is a crucial factor in triggering H. pylori-induced chronic inflammation and progression of gastric carcinogenesis and it may serve as a novel target for the intervention of gastric cancer. PMID:27232941

  6. Helicobacter pylori-induced inflammation and epigenetic changes during gastric carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Valenzuela, Manuel A; Canales, Jimena; Corvalán, Alejandro H; Quest, Andrew F G

    2015-12-07

    The sequence of events associated with the development of gastric cancer has been described as "the gastric precancerous cascade". This cascade is a dynamic process that includes lesions, such as atrophic gastritis, intestinal metaplasia and dysplasia. According to this model, Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection targets the normal gastric mucosa causing non-atrophic gastritis, an initiating lesion that can be cured by clearing H. pylori with antibiotics or that may then linger in the case of chronic infection and progress to atrophic gastritis. The presence of virulence factors in the infecting H. pylori drives the carcinogenesis process. Independent epidemiological and animal studies have confirmed the sequential progression of these precancerous lesions. Particularly long-term follow-up studies estimated a risk of 0.1% for atrophic gastritis/intestinal metaplasia and 6% in case of dysplasia for the long-term development of gastric cancer. With this in mind, a better understanding of the genetic and epigenetic changes associated with progression of the cascade is critical in determining the risk of gastric cancer associated with H. pylori infection. In this review, we will summarize some of the most relevant mechanisms and focus predominantly but not exclusively on the discussion of gene promoter methylation and miRNAs in this context.

  7. Helicobacter pylori-induced inflammation and epigenetic changes during gastric carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Valenzuela, Manuel A; Canales, Jimena; Corvalán, Alejandro H; Quest, Andrew FG

    2015-01-01

    The sequence of events associated with the development of gastric cancer has been described as “the gastric precancerous cascade”. This cascade is a dynamic process that includes lesions, such as atrophic gastritis, intestinal metaplasia and dysplasia. According to this model, Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection targets the normal gastric mucosa causing non-atrophic gastritis, an initiating lesion that can be cured by clearing H. pylori with antibiotics or that may then linger in the case of chronic infection and progress to atrophic gastritis. The presence of virulence factors in the infecting H. pylori drives the carcinogenesis process. Independent epidemiological and animal studies have confirmed the sequential progression of these precancerous lesions. Particularly long-term follow-up studies estimated a risk of 0.1% for atrophic gastritis/intestinal metaplasia and 6% in case of dysplasia for the long-term development of gastric cancer. With this in mind, a better understanding of the genetic and epigenetic changes associated with progression of the cascade is critical in determining the risk of gastric cancer associated with H. pylori infection. In this review, we will summarize some of the most relevant mechanisms and focus predominantly but not exclusively on the discussion of gene promoter methylation and miRNAs in this context. PMID:26668499

  8. Deoxycholic Acid Could Induce Apoptosis and Trigger Gastric Carcinogenesis on Gastric Epithelial Cells by Quantitative Proteomic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Ying; Zhang, Jing; Wang, Ye

    2016-01-01

    Background. Pathologic duodenogastric reflux can induce or aggravate gastritis because of the presence of bile acids. Bile reflux has been generally considered to be associated with intestinal metaplasia and gastric cancer. However, the pathogenic mechanisms of the effects of bile acids on gastric mucosa are still unknown. Methods. To explore the mechanisms by which bile acids induce gastric mucosal lesions, we examined cell apoptosis in the gastric epithelial cell line GES-1 and investigated the changes in protein profiles of GES-1 cells in response to a bile acid deoxycholic acid using a proteomics approach. Changes in the profiles of the differently expressed proteins were analyzed using the DAVID and STRING programs. Results. We found apoptosis was significantly induced in GES-1 cells by deoxycholic acid. Using liquid chromatographic/tandem mass spectrometric (LC-MS/MS) methods, 134 upregulated proteins and 214 downregulated proteins were identified in the bile acid treated GES-1 cells. Bioinformatics analysis revealed the interactions and signaling networks of these differentially expressed proteins. Conclusion. These findings may improve the understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenicity of bile acids on gastric mucosa. PMID:28070185

  9. Deoxycholic Acid Could Induce Apoptosis and Trigger Gastric Carcinogenesis on Gastric Epithelial Cells by Quantitative Proteomic Analysis.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yanyan; Wei, Ying; Zhang, Ting; Zhang, Jing; Wang, Ye; Ding, Shigang

    2016-01-01

    Background. Pathologic duodenogastric reflux can induce or aggravate gastritis because of the presence of bile acids. Bile reflux has been generally considered to be associated with intestinal metaplasia and gastric cancer. However, the pathogenic mechanisms of the effects of bile acids on gastric mucosa are still unknown. Methods. To explore the mechanisms by which bile acids induce gastric mucosal lesions, we examined cell apoptosis in the gastric epithelial cell line GES-1 and investigated the changes in protein profiles of GES-1 cells in response to a bile acid deoxycholic acid using a proteomics approach. Changes in the profiles of the differently expressed proteins were analyzed using the DAVID and STRING programs. Results. We found apoptosis was significantly induced in GES-1 cells by deoxycholic acid. Using liquid chromatographic/tandem mass spectrometric (LC-MS/MS) methods, 134 upregulated proteins and 214 downregulated proteins were identified in the bile acid treated GES-1 cells. Bioinformatics analysis revealed the interactions and signaling networks of these differentially expressed proteins. Conclusion. These findings may improve the understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenicity of bile acids on gastric mucosa.

  10. Anticancer Effect of Lycopene in Gastric Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Mi Jung; Kim, Hyeyoung

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer ranks as the most common cancer and the second leading cause of cancer-related death in the world. Risk factors of gastric carcinogenesis include oxidative stress, DNA damage, Helicobacter pylori infection, bad eating habits, and smoking. Since oxidative stress is related to DNA damage, smoking, and H. pylori infection, scavenging of reactive oxygen species may be beneficial for prevention of gastric carcinogenesis. Lycopene, one of the naturally occurring carotenoids, has unique structural and chemical features that contributes to a potent antioxidant activity. It shows a potential anticancer activity and reduces gastric cancer incidence. This review will summarize anticancer effect and mechanism of lycopene on gastric carcinogenesis based on the recent experimental and clinical studies. PMID:26151041

  11. Effect of Dendrobium officinale Extraction on Gastric Carcinogenesis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yan; Lan, Xi-Ming; Xu, Guo-Liang; Sun, You-Zhi; Li, Fei

    2016-01-01

    Dendrobium officinale (Tie Pi Shi Hu in Chinese) has been widely used to treat different diseases in China. Anticancer effect is one of the important effects of Dendrobium officinale. However, the molecular mechanism of its anticancer effect remains unclear. In the present study, gastric carcinogenesis in rats was used to evaluate the effect of Dendrobium officinale on cancer, and its pharmacological mechanism was explored. Dendrobium officinale extracts (4.8 and 2.4 g/kg) were orally administered to the rats of the gastric carcinogenesis model. Compared with the cancer model group, the high dose of Dendrobium officinale extracts significantly inhibited the rate of carcinogenesis. Further analysis revealed that Dendrobium officinale extracts could regulate the DNA damage, oxidative stress, and cytokines related with carcinogenesis and induce cell apoptosis in order to prevent gastric cancer. PMID:28119756

  12. Attenuation by genistein of sodium-chloride-enhanced gastric carcinogenesis induced by N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Tatsuta, M; Iishi, H; Baba, M; Yano, H; Uehara, H; Nakaizumi, A

    1999-01-29

    The effects of prolonged administration of genistein, a tyrosine-kinase inhibitor, on sodium-chloride-enhanced induction of gastric carcinogenesis induced by N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine, and the labeling and apoptotic indices and vessel counts in the gastric mucosa and gastric cancers, were investigated in Wistar rats. After 25 weeks of the carcinogen treatment, rats were fed chow pellets containing 10% sodium chloride and were given s.c. injections of genistein at dosages of 15 mg/kg or 30 mg/kg body weight every other day. In week 52, the incidence of gastric cancers was significantly greater in rats fed sodium chloride than in untreated control rats. Prolonged administration of genistein at a dosage of 30 mg/kg, but not 15 mg/kg, body weight significantly reduced the incidence of gastric cancers, which was increased by oral treatment with sodium chloride. Genistein at the higher dose significantly decreased the labeling index and vessel counts of the antral mucosa and the gastric cancers (which were increased by treatment with sodium chloride) and significantly increased the apoptotic index of the antral mucosa and the cancers (which was lowered by the treatment with sodium chloride). These findings suggest that genistein attenuates gastric carcinogenesis promoted by sodium chloride, by inducing increased apoptosis and lower cell proliferation and angiogenesis of antral mucosa and gastric cancers.

  13. Preventive effect of rebamipide on N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine-induced gastric carcinogenesis in rats.

    PubMed

    Tsukamoto, Hironobu; Mizoshita, Tsutomu; Katano, Takahito; Hayashi, Noriyuki; Ozeki, Keiji; Ebi, Masahide; Shimura, Takaya; Mori, Yoshinori; Tanida, Satoshi; Kataoka, Hiromi; Tsukamoto, Tetsuya; Tatematsu, Masae; Joh, Takashi

    2015-03-01

    Chemoprevention strategies against gastric cancer (GC) need to be explored in light of the fact that stomach cancer still occurs in the absence of Helicobacter pylori (HP) infection and following HP eradication. We evaluated the effect of rebamipide on N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG)-induced carcinogenesis in SD rats. Thirty-nine male rats were divided into four groups based on whether or not they were treated with rebamipide and/or MNNG: Control, Rebamipide, Control-M, and Rebamipide-M groups. From 8 weeks of age, rats in the Control-M and Rebamipide-M groups received MNNG in drinking water for 30 weeks. The Rebamipide and Rebamipide-M groups were administered 5mg/kg/day of rebamipide. At 50 weeks, cancerous lesions were not observed in either the Control or Rebamipide groups. Nine rats in the Control-M group had developed GC, while four rats in the Rebamipide-M group had developed GC. The incidence of cancer in the Rebamipide-M group was significantly less than in the Control-M group (p<0.05), with a trend toward a lower incidence of invasive carcinoma in the Rebamipide-M group. Carcinomatous invasion into the muscularis propria was not observed in the Rebamipide-M group. In conclusion, the present study demonstrates that rebamipide suppresses. MNNG-induced carcinogenesis and may also inhibit progression of cancer in rats.

  14. Suppression by iron chelator phenanthroline of sodium chloride-enhanced gastric carcinogenesis induced by N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Tatsuta, Masaharu; Iishi, Hiroyasu; Baba, Miyako; Mikuni, Tomiko; Narahara, Hiroyuki; Uedo, Noriya; Yano, Hiroyuki

    2003-02-28

    The effect of prolonged administration of iron chelator phenanthroline on sodium chloride-enhanced gastric carcinogenesis induced by N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine, and the labeling and apoptotic indices in the gastric cancers was investigated in Wistar rats. After 25 weeks of carcinogen treatment, the rats were given chow pellets containing 10% sodium chloride and intraperitoneal injections of phenanthroline at doses of 15 or 30 mg/kg body weight every other day. At week 52, feeding of sodium chloride significantly increased the incidence of gastric cancers, as compared with the control group. Prolonged injections of phenanthroline at both doses significantly reduced the incidence of gastric cancers, which was enhanced by oral supplementation with sodium chloride. Phenanthroline at both doses significantly decreased the labeling index of gastric cancers, which was enhanced by sodium chloride, and significantly increased the apoptotic index of gastric cancers, which was lowered by sodium chloride. In vitro examination using electron spin resonance revealed that sodium chloride promotes the production of hydroxyl radical during Fe(2+) oxidation by Fenton's reaction. These findings suggest that enhancement by sodium chloride of gastric carcinogenesis may be mediated by hydroxyl radicals.

  15. What gastric cancer proteomic studies show about gastric carcinogenesis?

    PubMed

    Leal, Mariana Ferreira; Wisnieski, Fernanda; de Oliveira Gigek, Carolina; do Santos, Leonardo Caires; Calcagno, Danielle Queiroz; Burbano, Rommel Rodriguez; Smith, Marilia Cardoso

    2016-08-01

    Gastric cancer is a complex, heterogeneous, and multistep disease. Over the past decades, several studies have aimed to determine the molecular factors that lead to gastric cancer development and progression. After completing the human genome sequencing, proteomic technologies have presented rapid progress. Differently from the relative static state of genome, the cell proteome is dynamic and changes in pathologic conditions. Proteomic approaches have been used to determine proteome profiles and identify differentially expressed proteins between groups of samples, such as neoplastic and nonneoplastic samples or between samples of different cancer subtypes or stages. Therefore, proteomic technologies are a useful tool toward improving the knowledge of gastric cancer molecular pathogenesis and the understanding of tumor heterogeneity. This review aimed to summarize the proteins or protein families that are frequently identified by using high-throughput screening methods and which thus may have a key role in gastric carcinogenesis. The increased knowledge of gastric carcinogenesis will clearly help in the development of new anticancer treatments. Although the studies are still in their infancy, the reviewed proteins may be useful for gastric cancer diagnosis, prognosis, and patient management.

  16. In-vivo evaluation of apocynin for prevention of Helicobacter pylori-induced gastric carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Horemans, Tessa; Boulet, Gaëlle; van Kerckhoven, Marian; Bogers, Johannes; Thys, Sofie; Vervaet, Chris; Vervaeck, Anouck; Delputte, Peter; Maes, Louis; Cos, Paul

    2017-01-01

    The emergence of antibiotic-resistant Helicobacter pylori strains impacts the efficacy of eradication therapy and promotes the development of alternative treatment strategies. Apocynin inhibits neutrophil NADPH oxidase and hence may decrease reactive oxygen species-mediated tissue damage in H. pylori-infected stomach tissue. Apocynin was tested in vitro for its cytotoxic and direct antibacterial effects. The therapeutic efficacy of orally administered apocynin (100 mg/kg/day through drinking water or 200 mg/kg/day through combined administration of drinking water and slow-release formulation) was assessed at 9 weeks after infection in the Mongolian gerbil model. Bacterial burdens were quantified by viable plate count and quantitative PCR. Histopathological evaluation of antrum and pylorus provided insight into mucosal inflammation and injury. Apocynin showed no cytotoxic or direct antibacterial effects in vitro or in vivo. Nine weeks of apocynin treatment at 200 mg/kg/day reduced active H. pylori gastritis as neutrophil infiltration in the mucous neck region and pit abscess formation decreased significantly. In our gerbil model, prolonged high-dose apocynin treatment significantly improved H. pylori-induced pit abscess formation without indications of drug toxicity and thus further investigation of the dosage regimen and formulation and the long-term impact on neoplastic development should be carried out.

  17. Attenuation by d-limonene of sodium chloride-enhanced gastric carcinogenesis induced by N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Yano, H; Tatsuta, M; Iishi, H; Baba, M; Sakai, N; Uedo, N

    1999-08-27

    The effects of prolonged administration of d-limonene, a monocyclic monoterpene, on sodium chloride-enhanced induction of gastric carcinogenesis by N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine, the labeling and apoptotic indices, and ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) activity of gastric cancers were investigated in Wistar rats. After 25 weeks of carcinogen treatment, rats were given chow pellets containing 10% sodium chloride and 1% limonene ad libitum. In week 52, the incidence of gastric cancers, the labeling index and ODC activity were significantly higher and the apoptotic index was significantly lower in rats given sodium chlolide than in untreated control rats. However, in rats given both sodium chloride and d-limonene, the incidence of gastric cancers, the labeling index and ODC activity were significantly lower and the apoptotic index was significantly higher than in rats given sodium chloride alone. Our findings suggest that limonene attenuates the gastric carcinogenesis enhanced by sodium chloride via increased apoptosis and decreased ODC activity in gastric cancers.

  18. Evaluation of anti-cancer and anti-oxidative potential of Syzygium Cumini against benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) induced gastric carcinogenesis in mice.

    PubMed

    Goyal, P K; Verma, Preeti; Sharma, Priyanka; Parmar, Jyoti; Agarwal, Annapurna

    2010-01-01

    Syzygium cummini extract (SCE) was used in the present study to explore anti-tumor promoting activity in a stomach carcinogenesis model in mice. For this purpose, Swiss albino mice were administered with 1 mg of benzo-a-pyrene (BaP) in 100?l sesame oil by oral gavage twice a week for 4 consecutive weeks. The animals were sacrificed 14 weeks after the last administration of BaP. Oral administration of the extract to pre-treated (i.e. SCE as 25mg/kg b. wt./ day before BaP application for 2 weeks), post-treated (i.e. SCE after BaP application for 8 weeks) and pre-post treated (i.e. SCE for 2 weeks before treatment of BaP followed by the concomitant treatment with SCE and BaP for 4 weeks during and 2 weeks after the last dose of BaP) groups provided a significant reduction in tumor incidence, tumor burden and cumulative number of gastric carcinomas along with a significant elevation of phase II detoxifying enzymes, and inhibition of lipid per oxidation in the stomach. Thus, the present data suggest that the Syzygium cummini extract has anti-tumor and anti-oxidative potential against chemical induced stomach carcinogenesis.

  19. Modulatory effect of naringenin on N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine- and saturated sodium chloride-induced gastric carcinogenesis in male Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Ganapathy, Ekambaram; Peramaiyan, Rajendran; Rajasekaran, Devaraja; Venkataraman, Magesh; Dhanapal, Sakthisekaran

    2008-10-01

    Naringenin is a flavanone that is believed to have many biological actions, including as an anti-oxidant, free radical scavenger and an antiproliferative agent. The global incidence of gastric carcinoma is increasing rapidly, more than for any other cancer. Therefore, in the present study, we tested the effects of naringenin on gastric carcinogenesis induced by N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) and saturated sodium chloride (S-NaCl) in rats. Male Wistar rats were divided into five groups and treated over a period of 20 weeks as follows: (i) a control group given corn oil (1 mL/rat, p.o.) daily 20 weeks; (ii) 200 mg/kg, p.o., MNNG on Days 0 and 14 with S-NaCl (1 mL/rat) administered twice a week for the first 3 weeks; (iii) 200 mg/kg, p.o., MNNG on Days 0 and 14, with naringenin (200 mg/kg, p.o., daily) treatment for the entire 20 weeks; (iv) 200 mg/kg, p.o., MNNG on Days 0 and 14, with naringenin treatment (200 mg/kg, p.o., daily) initiated from 6 to 20 weeks; (v) 200 mg/kg, p.o., naringenin alone daily for 20 weeks. In Group II rats in which gastric cancer was inducted with MNNG and S-NaCl, there was a significant increase in hydrogen peroxide and lipid peroxidation levels, with decreases in reduced glutathione, oxidized glutathione, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase and glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase. In addition, in Group II rats with gastric cancer, there were significant increases in the activity of cytochrome P450, cytochrome b(5) and NADPH cytochrome c reductase, with concomitant decreases in the activity of the phase II enzymes glutathione S-transferase and UDP-glucuronosyl transferase. Naringenin treatment (Groups III and IV) restored enzyme activity to near control levels. These results indicate that naringenin has a chemopreventive action against MNNG-induced gastric carcinoma in experimental rats.

  20. Helicobacter pylori infection, gastrin and cyclooxygenase-2 in gastric carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Shao, Yun; Sun, Kun; Xu, Wei; Li, Xiao-Lin; Shen, Hong; Sun, Wei-Hao

    2014-09-28

    Gastric cancer is one of the most frequent neoplasms and a main cause of death worldwide, especially in China and Japan. Numerous epidemiological, animal and experimental studies support a positive association between chronic Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection and the development of gastric cancer. However, the exact mechanism whereby H. pylori causes gastric carcinogenesis remains unclear. It has been demonstrated that expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is elevated in gastric carcinomas and in their precursor lesions. In this review, we present the latest clinical and experimental evidence showing the role of gastrin and COX-2 in H. pylori-infected patients and their possible association with gastric cancer risk.

  1. Experimental Gastric Carcinogenesis in Cebus apella Nonhuman Primates

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Tanielly Cristina Raiol; Andrade Junior, Edilson Ferreira; Rezende, Alexandre Pingarilho; Carneiro Muniz, José Augusto Pereira; Lacreta Junior, Antonio Carlos Cunha; Assumpção, Paulo Pimentel; Calcagno, Danielle Queiroz; Demachki, Samia; Rabenhorst, Silvia Helena Barem; Smith, Marília de Arruda Cardoso; Burbano, Rommel Rodriguez

    2011-01-01

    The evolution of gastric carcinogenesis remains largely unknown. We established two gastric carcinogenesis models in New-World nonhuman primates. In the first model, ACP03 gastric cancer cell line was inoculated in 18 animals. In the second model, we treated 6 animals with N-methyl-nitrosourea (MNU). Animals with gastric cancer were also treated with Canova immunomodulator. Clinical, hematologic, and biochemical, including C-reactive protein, folic acid, and homocysteine, analyses were performed in this study. MYC expression and copy number was also evaluated. We observed that all animals inoculated with ACP03 developed gastric cancer on the 9th day though on the 14th day presented total tumor remission. In the second model, all animals developed pre-neoplastic lesions and five died of drug intoxication before the development of cancer. The last surviving MNU-treated animal developed intestinal-type gastric adenocarcinoma observed by endoscopy on the 940th day. The level of C-reactive protein level and homocysteine concentration increased while the level of folic acid decreased with the presence of tumors in ACP03-inoculated animals and MNU treatment. ACP03 inoculation also led to anemia and leukocytosis. The hematologic and biochemical results corroborate those observed in patients with gastric cancer, supporting that our in vivo models are potentially useful to study this neoplasia. In cell line inoculated animals, we detected MYC immunoreactivity, mRNA overexpression, and amplification, as previously observed in vitro. In MNU-treated animals, mRNA expression and MYC copy number increased during the sequential steps of intestinal-type gastric carcinogenesis and immunoreactivity was only observed in intestinal metaplasia and gastric cancer. Thus, MYC deregulation supports the gastric carcinogenesis process. Canova immunomodulator restored several hematologic measurements and therefore, can be applied during/after chemotherapy to increase the tolerability and

  2. Long non-coding RNA HOTAIR promotes carcinogenesis and invasion of gastric adenocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Na Keum; Lee, Jung Hwa; Park, Chan Hyuk; Yu, Dayeon; Lee, Yong Chan; Cheong, Jae-Ho; Noh, Sung Hoon; Lee, Sang Kil

    2014-08-22

    Highlights: • HOTAIR expression was tested in fifty patients with gastric cancer. • Cell proliferation was measured after HOTAIR silencing in gastric cancer cell line. • siRNA–HOTAIR suppresses cell invasiveness and capacity of migration. • Knock down of HOTAR leads to decreased expression of EMT markers. • Inhibition of HOTAIR induces apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. - Abstract: Gastric cancer is one of the major causes of cancer death worldwide; however, the mechanism of carcinogenesis is complex and poorly understood. Long non-coding RNA HOTAIR (HOX transcript antisense RNA) recently emerged as a promoter of metastasis in various cancers including gastric cancer. Here we investigated the impact of HOTAIR on apoptosis, cell proliferation and cell cycle to dissect the carcinogenesis of gastric cancer. We examined the mechanism of invasion and metastasis and analyzed the clinical significance of HOTAIR. Downregulation of HOTAIR was confirmed by two different siRNAs. The expression of HOTAIR was significantly elevated in various gastric cancer cell lines and tissues compared to normal control. si-HOTAIR significantly reduced viability in MKN 28, MKN 74, and KATO III cells but not in AGS cells. si-HOTAIR induced apoptosis in KATO III cells. Lymphovascular invasion and lymph node metastasis were more common in the high level of HOTAIR group. si-HOTAIR significantly decreased invasiveness and migration. si-HOTAIR led to differential expression of epithelial to mesenchymal transition markers. We found that HOTAIR was involved in inhibition of apoptosis and promoted invasiveness, supporting a role for HOTAIR in carcinogenesis and progression of gastric cancer.

  3. Differential network analysis reveals dysfunctional regulatory networks in gastric carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Mu-Shui; Liu, Bing-Ya; Dai, Wen-Tao; Zhou, Wei-Xin; Li, Yi-Xue; Li, Yuan-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Gastric Carcinoma is one of the most common cancers in the world. A large number of differentially expressed genes have been identified as being associated with gastric cancer progression, however, little is known about the underlying regulatory mechanisms. To address this problem, we developed a differential networking approach that is characterized by including a nascent methodology, differential coexpression analysis (DCEA), and two novel quantitative methods for differential regulation analysis. We first applied DCEA to a gene expression dataset of gastric normal mucosa, adenoma and carcinoma samples to identify gene interconnection changes during cancer progression, based on which we inferred normal, adenoma, and carcinoma-specific gene regulation networks by using linear regression model. It was observed that cancer genes and drug targets were enriched in each network. To investigate the dynamic changes of gene regulation during carcinogenesis, we then designed two quantitative methods to prioritize differentially regulated genes (DRGs) and gene pairs or links (DRLs) between adjacent stages. It was found that known cancer genes and drug targets are significantly higher ranked. The top 4% normal vs. adenoma DRGs (36 genes) and top 6% adenoma vs. carcinoma DRGs (56 genes) proved to be worthy of further investigation to explore their association with gastric cancer. Out of the 16 DRGs involved in two top-10 DRG lists of normal vs. adenoma and adenoma vs. carcinoma comparisons, 15 have been reported to be gastric cancer or cancer related. Based on our inferred differential networking information and known signaling pathways, we generated testable hypotheses on the roles of GATA6, ESRRG and their signaling pathways in gastric carcinogenesis. Compared with established approaches which build genome-scale GRNs, or sub-networks around differentially expressed genes, the present one proved to be better at enriching cancer genes and drug targets, and prioritizing

  4. Alterations in Gastric Microbiota After H. Pylori Eradication and in Different Histological Stages of Gastric Carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Li, Tung Hiu; Qin, Youwen; Sham, Pak Chung; Lau, K S; Chu, Kent-Man; Leung, Wai K

    2017-03-21

    The role of bacteria other than Helicobacter pylori (HP) in the stomach remains elusive. We characterized the gastric microbiota in individuals with different histological stages of gastric carcinogenesis and after receiving HP eradication therapy. Endoscopic gastric biopsies were obtained from subjects with HP gastritis, gastric intestinal metaplasia (IM), gastric cancer (GC) and HP negative controls. Gastric microbiota was characterized by Illumina MiSeq platform targeting the 16 S rDNA. Apart from dominant H. pylori, we observed other Proteobacteria including Haemophilus, Serratia, Neisseria and Stenotrophomonas as the major components of the human gastric microbiota. Although samples were largely converged according to the relative abundance of HP, a clear separation of GC and other samples was recovered. Whilst there was a strong inverse association between HP relative abundance and bacterial diversity, this association was weak in GC samples which tended to have lower bacterial diversity compared with other samples with similar HP levels. Eradication of HP resulted in an increase in bacterial diversity and restoration of the relative abundance of other bacteria to levels similar to individuals without HP. In conclusion, HP colonization results in alterations of gastric microbiota and reduction in bacterial diversity, which could be restored by antibiotic treatment.

  5. Alterations in Gastric Microbiota After H. Pylori Eradication and in Different Histological Stages of Gastric Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tung Hiu; Qin, Youwen; Sham, Pak Chung; Lau, K.S.; Chu, Kent-Man; Leung, Wai K.

    2017-01-01

    The role of bacteria other than Helicobacter pylori (HP) in the stomach remains elusive. We characterized the gastric microbiota in individuals with different histological stages of gastric carcinogenesis and after receiving HP eradication therapy. Endoscopic gastric biopsies were obtained from subjects with HP gastritis, gastric intestinal metaplasia (IM), gastric cancer (GC) and HP negative controls. Gastric microbiota was characterized by Illumina MiSeq platform targeting the 16 S rDNA. Apart from dominant H. pylori, we observed other Proteobacteria including Haemophilus, Serratia, Neisseria and Stenotrophomonas as the major components of the human gastric microbiota. Although samples were largely converged according to the relative abundance of HP, a clear separation of GC and other samples was recovered. Whilst there was a strong inverse association between HP relative abundance and bacterial diversity, this association was weak in GC samples which tended to have lower bacterial diversity compared with other samples with similar HP levels. Eradication of HP resulted in an increase in bacterial diversity and restoration of the relative abundance of other bacteria to levels similar to individuals without HP. In conclusion, HP colonization results in alterations of gastric microbiota and reduction in bacterial diversity, which could be restored by antibiotic treatment. PMID:28322295

  6. Factors that modify radiation-induced carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Ann R

    2009-11-01

    It is known that numerous factors can influence radiation carcinogenesis in animals; these factors include the specific characteristics of the radiation (radiation type and dose, dose-rate, dose-fractionation, dose distribution, etc.) as well as many other contributing elements that are not specific to the radiation exposure, such as animal genetic characteristics and age, the environment of the animal, dietary factors and whether specific modifying agents for radiation carcinogenesis have been utilized in the studies. This overview focuses on the modifying factors for radiation carcinogenesis, in both in vivo and in vitro systems, and includes a discussion of agents that enhance (e.g., promoting agents) or suppress (e.g., cancer preventive agents) radiation-induced carcinogenesis. The agents that enhance or suppress radiation carcinogenesis in experimental model systems have been shown to lead to effects equally as large as other known modifying factors for radiation-induced carcinogenesis (e.g., dose-rate, dose-fractionation, linear energy transfer). It is known that dietary factors play an important role in determining the yields of radiation-induced cancers in animal model systems, and it is likely that they also influence radiation-induced cancer risks in human populations.

  7. Prevention of spontaneous and chemically induced carcinogenesis using activated carbon fiber adsorbent. II. Inhibitory effect of the activated carbon fiber adsorbent 'Aqualen' on N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine-induced gastric carcinogenesis in rats.

    PubMed

    Anisimov, V N; Zabezhinski, M A; Popovich, I G; Lieberman, A I; Shmidt, J L

    1999-04-26

    Two-month-old female LIO rats were given N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) with tap water in a concentration of 100 mg/l for 12 months (groups 1 and 2) or were kept without the carcinogen treatment (groups 3 and 4). From the first day of exposure to MNNG rats from groups 2 and 3 were given activated carbon fiber adsorbent Aqualen in their diet five times per week together with lab chow in a daily dose of 100 mg/kg of body weight. The experiment was finalized 16 months after first exposure to the carcinogen. The total stomach adenocarcinoma incidence was 43% in group 1 and 39% in group 2, whereas invasive stomach adenocarcinomas occurred in 36% and 8% of rats from groups 1 and 2, respectively (P < 0.05). Tumors other then stomach sites (duodenum and liver) only developed in rats from group 1 (29%). No lesions were observed in rats exposed to Aqualen without MNNG. Thus, our results demonstrate the inhibitory effect of the activated carbon fiber adsorbent Aqualen on stomach carcinogenesis in rats.

  8. Metabolomic analysis reveals altered metabolic pathways in a rat model of gastric carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Jinping; Hu, Xiaomin; Shao, Wei; Ji, Tianhai; Yang, Wensheng; Zhuo, Huiqin; Jin, Zeyu; Huang, Huiying; Chen, Jiacheng; Huang, Caihua; Lin, Donghai

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) is one of the most malignant tumors with a poor prognosis. Alterations in metabolic pathways are inextricably linked to GC progression. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain elusive. We performed NMR-based metabolomic analysis of sera derived from a rat model of gastric carcinogenesis, revealed significantly altered metabolic pathways correlated with the progression of gastric carcinogenesis. Rats were histologically classified into four pathological groups (gastritis, GS; low-grade gastric dysplasia, LGD; high-grade gastric dysplasia, HGD; GC) and the normal control group (CON). The metabolic profiles of the five groups were clearly distinguished from each other. Furthermore, significant inter-metabolite correlations were extracted and used to reconstruct perturbed metabolic networks associated with the four pathological stages compared with the normal stage. Then, significantly altered metabolic pathways were identified by pathway analysis. Our results showed that oxidative stress-related metabolic pathways, choline phosphorylation and fatty acid degradation were continually disturbed during gastric carcinogenesis. Moreover, amino acid metabolism was perturbed dramatically in gastric dysplasia and GC. The GC stage showed more changed metabolite levels and more altered metabolic pathways. Two activated pathways (glycolysis; glycine, serine and threonine metabolism) substantially contributed to the metabolic alterations in GC. These results lay the basis for addressing the molecular mechanisms underlying gastric carcinogenesis and extend our understanding of GC progression. PMID:27527852

  9. Effect of S-allylcysteine on oxidant-antioxidant status during N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine and saturated sodium chloride-induced gastric carcinogenesis in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Velmurugan, Balaiya; Bhuvaneswari, Vaidhyanathan; Nagini, Siddavaram

    2003-01-01

    We investigated the chemopreventive effect of S-allylcysteine (SAC), a water-soluble garlic constituent against gastric carcinogenesis induced in male Wistar rats by N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) and saturated sodium chloride (S-NaCl). The animals were divided into four groups of six animals. Rats in groups 1 and 2 were administered MNNG (200 mg/kg body weight) on days 0 and 14 as well as S-NaCl (1 mL/rat) three days during weeks 0 to 3, and thereafter placed on basal diet until the end of the experiment. Rats in group 2 in addition received SAC (200 mg/kg body weight) three times per week starting on the day following the first exposure to MNNG and continued until the end of the experimental period. Group 3 animals were given SAC alone as in group 2. Group 4 animals received basal diet and tap water throughout the experiment and served as the untreated control. The animals were sacrificed after an experimental period of 21 weeks. Measurement of lipid peroxidation and antioxidants of the glutathione redox cycle in the stomach tissue, liver and venous blood was used to monitor the chemopreventive potential of SAC. All animals that received MNNG and S-NaCl alone, developed tumours, identified histologically as squamous cell carcinomas. In the tumour tissue, diminished lipid peroxidation was accompanied by increase in reduced glutathione (GSH) and GSH-dependent enzymes, whereas in the liver and circulation, enhanced lipid peroxidation was associated with antioxidant depletion. Administration of SAC suppressed the incidence of MNNG+S-NaCl-induced gastric tumours as revealed by the absence of carcinomas. SAC ameliorated MNNG-induced decreased susceptibility of the gastric mucosa to lipid peroxidation, whilst simultaneously increasing the antioxidant status. In the liver and blood, SAC reduced the extent of lipid peroxidation and significantly enhanced antioxidant activities. We suggest that SAC exerts its chemopreventive effects by modulating lipid

  10. Gastric Carcinogenesis in the miR-222/221 Transgenic Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Boram; Yu, Jieun; Han, Tae-Su; Kim, Young-Kook; Hur, Keun; Kang, Byeong-Cheol; Kim, Woo-Ho; Kim, Dae-Yong; Lee, Hyuk-Joon; Kim, V. Narry; Yang, Han-Kwang

    2017-01-01

    Purpose MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate various cellular functions, including development, cell proliferation, apoptosis, and tumorigenesis. Different signatures associated with various tissue types, diagnosis, progression, prognosis, staging, and treatment response have been identified by miRNA expression profiling of human tumors. miRNAs function as oncogenes or as tumor suppressors. The relationship between gastric cancer and miRNA garnered attention due to the high incidence of gastric cancer in Asian countries. miR-222/221 expression increases in gastric tumor tissues. The oncogenic effect of miR-222/221 was previously determined in functional studies and xenograft models. In this study, transgenic mice over-expressing miR-222/221 were generated to confirm the effect of miR-222/221 on gastric carcinogenesis. Materials and Methods At 6 weeks of age, 65 transgenic mice and 53 wild-type mice were given drinking water containing N-nitroso-N-methylurea (MNU) for 5 alternating weeks to induce gastric cancer. The mice were euthanized at 36 weeks of age and histologic analysis was performed. Results Hyperplasia was observed in 3.77% of the wild-type mice and in 18.46% of the transgenic mice (p=0.020). Adenoma was observed in 20.75% of the wild-type mice and 26.15% of the transgenic mice (p=0.522). Carcinoma was observed in 32.08% of the wild-type mice and 41.54% of the transgenic mice (p=0.341). The frequency of hyperplasia, adenoma, and carcinoma was higher in transgenic mice, but the difference was statistically significant only in hyperplasia. Conclusion These results suggest that hyperplasia, a gastric pre-cancerous lesion, is associated with miR-222/221 expression but miR-222/221 expression does not affect tumorigenesis itself. PMID:27338035

  11. The Role of PPARγ in Helicobacter pylori Infection and Gastric Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jong-Min; Kim, Sung Soo; Cho, Young-Seok

    2012-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) is a nuclear receptor that is important in many physiological and pathological processes, such as lipid metabolism, insulin sensitivity, inflammation, cell proliferation, and carcinogenesis. Several studies have shown that PPARγ plays an important role in gastric mucosal injury due to Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori). As H. pylori infection is the main etiologic factor in chronic gastritis and gastric cancer, understanding of the potential roles of PPARγ in H. pylori infection may lead to the development of a therapeutic target. In this paper, the authors discuss the current knowledge on the role of PPARγ in H. pylori infection and its related gastric carcinogenesis. PMID:22936949

  12. The chronological sequence of somatic mutations in early gastric carcinogenesis inferred from multiregion sequencing of gastric adenomas

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Chul-Hyun; Cho, Yu Kyung; Kim, Sang Woo; Choi, Myung-Gyu; Rhee, Je-Keun; Chung, Yeun-Jun; Lee, Sug-Hyung; Kim, Tae-Min

    2016-01-01

    Mutation profiles and intratumoral heterogeneity are not well understood for benign gastric adenomas, some of which progress into malignant gastric adenocarcinomas. In this study, we performed whole-exome sequencing of three microsatellite stable (MSS) and two microsatellite instability-high (MSI-H) gastric adenomas with three regional tumor biopsies per case. We observed that the mutation abundance of benign gastric adenomas was comparable to those of gastric adenocarcinomas, suggesting that the mutational makeup for gastric carcinogenesis may already be achieved in benign adenomas. The extent of intratumoral heterogeneity was more substantial for MSS genomes in that only 1% - 14% of somatic mutations were common across the regional biopsies or ‘public’, while 50% - 94% of mutations were public in MSI-H gastric adenomas. We observed biallelic, loss-of-functional events of APC with truncating mutations and/or 5q losses for all cases, mostly as public events. All MSS gastric adenomas also harbored ARID2 truncating mutations, often as multiple, region-specific ones indicative of convergent evolution. Hotspot missense mutations on known cancer genes such as ERBB2 and KRAS were largely observed as region-specific aberrations. These findings suggest that biallelic functional APC inactivation initiates the gastric carcinogenesis and is followed by mutations of histone modifiers and then activation of known cancer-related genes. As the first exome-wide multi-region mutational profiling of gastric adenomas, our study provides clues on the chronological sequence of somatic mutations and their clonal architectures in early gastric carcinogenesis. PMID:27175599

  13. The Role of microRNAs in Helicobacter pylori Pathogenesis and Gastric Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Noto, Jennifer M.; Peek, Richard M.

    2012-01-01

    Gastric carcinogenesis is a multistep process orchestrated by aberrancies in the genetic and epigenetic regulation of oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes. Chronic infection with Helicobacter pylori is the strongest known risk factor for the development of gastric cancer. H. pylori expresses a spectrum of virulence factors that dysregulate host intracellular signaling pathways that lower the threshold for neoplastic transformation. In addition to bacterial determinants, numerous host and environmental factors increase the risk of gastric carcinogenesis. Recent discoveries have shed new light on the involvement of microRNAs (miRNAs) in gastric carcinogenesis. miRNAs represent an abundant class of small, non-coding RNAs involved in global post-transcriptional regulation and, consequently, play an integral role at multiple steps in carcinogenesis, including cell cycle progression, proliferation, apoptosis, invasion, and metastasis. Expression levels of miRNAs are frequently altered in malignancies, where they function as either oncogenic miRNAs or tumor suppressor miRNAs. This review focuses on miRNAs dysregulated by H. pylori and potential etiologic roles they play in H. pylori-mediated gastric carcinogenesis. PMID:22919587

  14. Study of chemical and radiation induced carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Chmura, A.

    1995-11-01

    The study of chemical and radiation induced carcinogenesis has up to now based many of its results on the detection of genetic aberrations using the fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) technique. FISH is time consuming and this tends to hinder its use for looking at large numbers of samples. We are currently developing new technological advances which will increase the speed, clarity and functionality of the FISH technique. These advances include multi-labeled probes, amplification techniques, and separation techniques.

  15. Latest insights into the effects of Helicobacter pylori infection on gastric carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, Kazunari; Kodama, Masaaki; Fujioka, Toshio

    2006-01-01

    There appears to be the strong association between Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) and gastric cancer. We reviewed the latest evidences about the effects of H pylori infection on gastric carcinogenesis, classified into epidemiology, dynamics of gastric mucosal changes, DNA damages, virulence factors, host factors, and source of gastric malignancy. Through the considerable progress made in research into virulence factors resulting from differences between H pylori strains, such as cagA positivity, as well as into host factors, such as gene polymorphisms, a diverse spectrum of H pylori-associated diseases, including gastric cancer, is beginning to lend itself to elucidation. The impact of the novel hypothesis advanced by Houghton et al proposing bone-marrow derived stem cells (BMDC) as a potential source of gastric malignancy on evolving research remains to be seen with interest. Further progress in research into H pylori eradication as a viable prophylaxis of gastric cancer, as well as into the mechanisms of gastric carcinogenesis, is to be eagerly awaited for the current year and beyond. PMID:16718758

  16. Role of Helicobacter pylori infection in gastric carcinogenesis: Current knowledge and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Sokic-Milutinovic, Aleksandra; Alempijevic, Tamara; Milosavljevic, Tomica

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) plays a role in the pathogenesis of gastric cancer. The outcome of the infection depends on environmental factors and bacterial and host characteristics. Gastric carcinogenesis is a multistep process that is reversible in the early phase of mucosal damage, but the exact point of no return has not been identified. Therefore, two main therapeutic strategies could reduce gastric cancer incidence: (1) eradication of the already present infection; and (2) immunization (prior to or during the course of the infection). The success of a gastric cancer prevention strategy depends on timing because the prevention strategy must be introduced before the point of no return in gastric carcinogenesis. Although the exact point of no return has not been identified, infection should be eradicated before severe atrophy of the gastric mucosa develops. Eradication therapy rates remain suboptimal due to increasing H. pylori resistance to antibiotics and patient noncompliance. Vaccination against H. pylori would reduce the cost of eradication therapies and lower gastric cancer incidence. A vaccine against H. pylori is still a research challenge. An effective vaccine should have an adequate route of delivery, appropriate bacterial antigens and effective and safe adjuvants. Future research should focus on the development of rescue eradication therapy protocols until an efficacious vaccine against the bacterium becomes available. PMID:26556993

  17. Critical pathogenic steps to high risk Helicobacter pylori gastritis and gastric carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Inchul

    2014-06-07

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) gastritis may progress to high risk gastropathy and cancer. However, the pathological progression has not been characterized in detail. H. pylori induce persistent inflammatory infiltration. Neutrophils are unique in that they directly infiltrate into foveolar epithelium aiming the proliferative zone specifically. Neutrophilic proliferative zone foveolitis is a critical pathogenic step in H. pylori gastritis inducing intensive epithelial damage. Epithelial cells carrying accumulated genomic damage and mutations show the Malgun (clear) cell change, characterized by large clear nucleus and prominent nucleolus. Malgun cells further undergo atypical changes, showing nuclear folding, coarse chromatin, and multiple nucleoli. The atypical Malgun cell (AMC) change is a novel premalignant condition in high risk gastropathy, which may progress and undergo malignant transformation directly. The pathobiological significance of AMC in gastric carcinogenesis is reviewed. A new diagnosis system of gastritis is proposed based on the critical pathologic steps classifying low and high risk gastritis for separate treatment modality. It is suggested that the regulation of H. pylori-induced neutrophilic foveolitis might be a future therapeutic goal replacing bactericidal antibiotics approach.

  18. Critical pathogenic steps to high risk Helicobacter pylori gastritis and gastric carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Inchul

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) gastritis may progress to high risk gastropathy and cancer. However, the pathological progression has not been characterized in detail. H. pylori induce persistent inflammatory infiltration. Neutrophils are unique in that they directly infiltrate into foveolar epithelium aiming the proliferative zone specifically. Neutrophilic proliferative zone foveolitis is a critical pathogenic step in H. pylori gastritis inducing intensive epithelial damage. Epithelial cells carrying accumulated genomic damage and mutations show the Malgun (clear) cell change, characterized by large clear nucleus and prominent nucleolus. Malgun cells further undergo atypical changes, showing nuclear folding, coarse chromatin, and multiple nucleoli. The atypical Malgun cell (AMC) change is a novel premalignant condition in high risk gastropathy, which may progress and undergo malignant transformation directly. The pathobiological significance of AMC in gastric carcinogenesis is reviewed. A new diagnosis system of gastritis is proposed based on the critical pathologic steps classifying low and high risk gastritis for separate treatment modality. It is suggested that the regulation of H. pylori-induced neutrophilic foveolitis might be a future therapeutic goal replacing bactericidal antibiotics approach. PMID:24914362

  19. Alterations of the TP53 Gene in Gastric and Esophageal Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Bellini, Marilanda Ferreira; Cadamuro, Aline Cristina Targa; Succi, Maysa; Proença, Marcela Alcântara; Silva, Ana Elizabete

    2012-01-01

    TP53 genes is one of more important tumor suppressor gene, which acts as a potent transcription factor with fundamental role in the maintenance of genetic stability. The development of esophageal and gastric cancers is a multistep process resulting in successive accumulation of genetic alterations that culminates in the malignant transformation. Thus, this study highlights the participation of the main genetic alterations of the TP53 gene in esophageal and gastric carcinogenesis. Among these changes, high frequency of TP53 mutations, loss of heterozygosity (LOH), overexpression of the p53 protein, and consequently loss of p53 function, which would be early events in esophageal and gastric cancers, as well as an important biomarker of the prognosis and treatment response. Furthermore, Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) of TP53 have been implicated in the development and prognosis of several cancers, mainly TP53 codon 72 polymorphism whose role has been extensively studied in relation to susceptibility for esophageal and gastric cancer development. PMID:22919278

  20. Relatedness of Helicobacter pylori populations to gastric carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Quan-Jiang; Zhan, Shu-Hui; Wang, Li-Li; Xin, Yong-Ning; Jiang, Man; Xuan, Shi-Ying

    2012-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a Gram-negative bacterium that infects half of the human population. The infection is associated with chronic inflammation of the gastric mucosa and peptic ulcers. It is also a major risk factor for gastric cancer. Phylogenetic analysis of global strains reveals there are seven populations of H. pylori, including hpAfrica1, hpAfrica2, hpEastAsia, hpEurope, hpNEAfrica, hpAsia2 and hpSahul. These populations are consistent with their geographical origins, and possibly result from geographical separation of the bacterium leading to reduced bacterial recombination in some populations. For each population, H. pylori has evolved to possess genomic contents distinguishable from others. The hpEurope population is distinct in that it has the largest genome of 1.65 mbp on average, and the highest number of coding sequences. This confers its competitive advantage over other populations but at the cost of a lower infection rate. The large genomic size could be a cause of the frequent occurrence of the deletion of the cag pathogenicity island in H. pylori strains from hpEurope. The incidence of gastric cancer varies among different geographical regions. This can be attributed in part to different rates of infection of H. pylori. Recent studies found that different populations of H. pylori vary in their carcinogenic potential and contribute to the variation in incidence of gastric cancer among geographical regions. This could be related to the ancestral origin of H. pylori. Further studies are indicated to investigate the bacterial factors contributing to differential virulence and their influence on the clinical features in infected individuals. PMID:23236231

  1. [Mechanisms of asbestos-induced carcinogenesis].

    PubMed

    Toyokuni, Shinya; Jiang, Li; Hu, Qian; Nagai, Hirotaka; Okazaki, Yasumasa; Akatsuka, Shinya; Yamashita, Yoriko

    2011-05-01

    Several types of fibrous stone called asbestos have been an unexpected cause of human cancer in the history. This form of mineral is considered precious in that they are heat-, friction-, and acid-resistant, are obtained easily from mines, and can be modified to any form with many industrial merits. However, it became evident that the inspiration of asbestos causes a rare cancer called malignant mesothelioma. Because of the long incubation period, the peak year for malignant mesothelioma is expected to be 2025 in Japan. Thus, it is necessary to elucidate the mechanisms of asbestos-induced mesothelial carcinogenesis. In this review, we summarize the cutting edge results of our 5-year project funded by a MEXT grant, in which local iron deposition and the characteristics of mesothelial cells are the key issues.

  2. Telomere length in the gastric mucosa after Helicobacter pylori eradication and its potential role in the gastric carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Tahara, Tomomitsu; Tahara, Sayumi; Tuskamoto, Tetsuya; Horiguchi, Noriyuki; Kawamura, Tomohiko; Okubo, Masaaki; Ishizuka, Takamitsu; Nagasaka, Mitsuo; Nakagawa, Yoshihito; Shibata, Tomoyuki; Kuroda, Makoto; Ohmiya, Naoki

    2017-02-14

    The molecular mechanisms of gastric carcinogenesis after Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) eradication remain unclear. We examined the telomere length of gastric mucosa samples after successful H. pylori eradication in patients without and those with gastric cancer. Telomere length was measured by the real-time PCR among four different groups of biopsies: gastric body from subjects without history of H. pylori infection (Hp-: n = 23), gastric body from cancer-free subjects after H. pylori eradication (cancer-free body: n = 24), gastric body from early gastric cancer patients diagnosed after H. pylori eradication (EGC body: n = 35) and its paired samples from adjacent mucosa of cancerous area (EGC ADJ: n = 35). The Hp-group presented the longest telomeres among the all groups (Hp- vs. all others, all P < 0.05). Samples from EGC body group showed shorter telomere length than the samples from cancer-free body groups (P < 0.05). Conversely, samples from EGC ADJ group showed rather longer telomere length compared to the EGC body group (P < 0.05), which was also confirmed by the comparison of 35 matched samples (P = 0.0007). Among the samples after H. pylori eradication, shorter telomere length was associated with higher expression of IL-1B and NF-kB (P < 0.0001, 0.0006, respectively). Longer telomere length was also associated with higher expression of TNF-A (P = 0.01). Telomere shortening seems to be important initial steps in gastric cancer predisposition after H. pylori eradication, while it might shift to lengthening to acquire more aggressive pathway to develop cancer.

  3. Carcinogenesis, prevention and early detection of gastric cancer: where we are and where we should go.

    PubMed

    González, Carlos A; Agudo, Antonio

    2012-02-15

    Helicobacter pylori is the most common cause of gastric cancer (GC), though smoking, alcohol, diet, genetics and epigenetic factors may also have a role in the occurrence of the disease. Why H. pylori cause GC in only a minority of those infected remains unknown. Although mechanisms of H. pylori-induced carcinogenesis are not yet well understood, several genotypes of H. pylori have been associated with strain virulence and disease risk. Primary prevention of GC should be addressed by avoiding exposure to factors that increase the risk and to promote factors associated with decrease risk. Vaccines against H. pylori are an ongoing promise and not yet available. Chemoprevention through vitamin supplementation has shown no benefit. Screening and eradication of H. pylori in the general population is not advised. Given that GC is a multiple-steps process, the identification of patients with preneoplastic lesions with high risk of progression, and periodic endoscopic surveillance of them represents the most effective way for early diagnosis of GC. However, clinical guidelines for surveillance are lacking and there are no clear criteria to classify patients into high or low risk of progressing to GC. No study has shown the potential usefulness of combining the information on the type of preneoplastic lesions, genetic and epigenetic, lifestyle and virulence bacterial factors in order to identify high risk patients who need more intensive surveillance. The integration of all this information, in a prediction model requires further research and could be the most important contribution for reducing the burden of GC.

  4. p53, a potential predictor of Helicobacter pylori infection-associated gastric carcinogenesis?

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Nong-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is an ancient and persistent inhabitant of the human stomach that is closely linked to the development of gastric cancer (GC). . Emerging evidence suggests that H. pylori strain interactions with gastric epithelial cells subvert the best- characterized p53 tumour suppressor pathway. A high prevalence of p53 mutations is related to H. pylori infection. H. pylori also accelerates p53 protein degradation by disturbing the MDM2-P53 feedback loop. Additionally, H. pylori triggers the alteration of other p53 isoforms. Dysregulation of p53 by H. pylori infection contributes to gastric carcinogenesis by mediating cell proliferation and apoptosis. This review focuses on the regulation of p53 in H. pylori infection-associated GC. PMID:27556187

  5. Chronic inflammation-related DNA damage response: a driving force of gastric cardia carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Runhua; Xiao, Dejun; Guo, Yi; Tian, Dongping; Yun, Hailong; Chen, Donglin; Su, Min

    2015-02-20

    Gastric cardia cancer (GCC) is a highly aggressive disease associated with chronic inflammation. To investigate the relationship between DNA damage response (DDR) and chronic inflammation, we collected 100 non-tumor gastric cardia specimens of Chaoshan littoral, a high-risk region for esophageal and gastric cardia cancer. A significantly higher proportion of severe chronic inflammation was found in dysplastic epithelia (80.9%) in comparison with that in non-dysplastic tissues (40.7%) (P<0.001). Immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated that DNA damage response was parallel with the chronic inflammation degrees from normal to severe inflammation (P<0.05). We found that DNA damage response was progressively increased with the progression of precancerous lesions (P<0.05). These findings provide pathological evidence that persistent chronic inflammation-related DNA damage response may be a driving force of gastric cardia carcinogenesis. Based on these findings, DNA damage response in non-malignant tissues may become a promising biomedical marker for predicting malignant transformation in the gastric cardia.

  6. Gastric cancer stem cells in gastric carcinogenesis, progression, prevention and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Li, Kang; Dan, Zeng; Nie, Yu-Qiang

    2014-01-01

    In recent decades, the study of the mechanism of tumorigenesis has brought much progress to cancer treatment. However, cancer stem cell (CSC) theory has changed previous views of tumors, and has provided a new method for treatment of cancer. The discovery of CSCs and their characteristics have contributed to understanding the molecular mechanism of tumor genesis and development, resulting in a new effective strategy for cancer treatment. Gastric CSCs (GCSCs) are the basis for the onset of gastric cancer. They may be derived from gastric stem cells in gastric tissues, or bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. As with other stem cells, GCSCs highly express drug-resistance genes such as aldehyde dehydrogenase and multidrug resistance, which are resistant to chemotherapy and thus form the basis of drug resistance. Many specific molecular markers such as CD44 and CD133 have been used for identification and isolation of GCSCs, diagnosis and grading of gastric cancer, and research on GCSC-targeted therapy for gastric cancer. Therefore, discussion of the recent development and advancements in GCSCs will be helpful for providing novel insight into gastric cancer treatment. PMID:24833872

  7. Identification of novel genes involved in gastric carcinogenesis by suppression subtractive hybridization.

    PubMed

    Mottaghi-Dastjerdi, N; Soltany-Rezaee-Rad, M; Sepehrizadeh, Z; Roshandel, G; Ebrahimifard, F; Setayesh, N

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) is one of the most common and life-threatening types of malignancies. Identification of the differentially expressed genes in GC is one of the best approaches for establishing new diagnostic and therapeutic targets. Furthermore, these investigations could advance our knowledge about molecular biology and the carcinogenesis of this cancer. To screen for the overexpressed genes in gastric adenocarcinoma, we performed suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) on gastric adenocarcinoma tissue and the corresponding normal gastric tissue, and eight genes were found to be overexpressed in the tumor compared with those of the normal tissue. The genes were ribosomal protein L18A, RNase H2 subunit B, SEC13, eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4A1, tetraspanin 8, cytochrome c oxidase subunit 2, NADH dehydrogenase subunit 4, and mitochondrially encoded ATP synthase 6. The common functions among the identified genes include involvement in protein synthesis, involvement in genomic stability maintenance, metastasis, metabolic improvement, cell signaling pathways, and chemoresistance. Our results provide new insights into the molecular biology of GC and drug discovery: each of the identified genes could be further investigated as targets for prognosis evaluation, diagnosis, treatment, evaluation of the response to new anticancer drugs, and determination of the molecular pathogenesis of GC.

  8. Role of EZH2 protein expression in gastric carcinogenesis among Asians: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Guo, Lin; Yang, Teng-Fei; Liang, Shi-Chao; Guo, Ji-Xiang; Wang, Qiang

    2014-07-01

    The present meta-analysis aggregated the results of relevant studies to identify the role of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2) expression in gastric carcinogenesis among Asians. Related articles were found by searching the following electronic databases without language restrictions: PubMed, SpringerLink, Karger Medical and Scientific Publishers, Chinese Biomedical Database (CBM), Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI), and Google Scholar. Meta-analysis was performed using STATA statistical software. Crude odds ratios (ORs) or hazard ratios (HRs) with their corresponding 95 % confidence interval (95 % CI) were calculated. Ten relevant studies, which enrolled a total of 872 gastric cancer patients, were selected for statistical analysis. The most important findings of our meta-analysis was that cancer tissues exhibited higher expression levels of EZH2 protein than normal, adjacent and benign tissues (cancer tissues vs normal tissues: OR = 32.15, 95 % CI 22.58 ~ 45.79, P < 0.001; cancer tissues vs adjacent tissues: OR = 16.10, 95 % CI 11.35 ~ 22.84, P < 0.001; cancer tissues vs benign tissues: OR = 2.66, 95 % CI 1.89 ~ 3.75, P < 0.001; respectively). Furthermore, we observed positive correlations between EZH2 expression and the TNM stage (OR = 2.86, 95 % CI 1.72 ~ 4.75, P < 0.001) as well as lymph node metastasis (OR = 3.02, 95 % CI 2.01 ~ 4.53, P < 0.001) of patients with gastric carcinoma. The correlation between EZH2 expression and gastric cancer prognosis was also evaluated in the meta-analysis. Statistical analysis demonstrated that the overall survival (OS) of EZH2-negative patients was shorter than that of patients with positive expressions of EZH2 (HR = 0.54, 95 % CI = 0.05 ~ 1.03, P = 0.032). Our meta-analysis confirmed the view that EZH2 expression might participate in the development of gastric carcinogenesis. Thus, EZH2 protein may be a valuable biomarker for the diagnosis and prognosis of gastric cancer.

  9. Hydrogen Metabolism in Helicobacter pylori Plays a Role in Gastric Carcinogenesis through Facilitating CagA Translocation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ge; Romero-Gallo, Judith; Benoit, Stéphane L.; Piazuelo, M. Blanca; Dominguez, Ricardo L.; Morgan, Douglas R.; Peek, Richard M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT A known virulence factor of Helicobacter pylori that augments gastric cancer risk is the CagA cytotoxin. A carcinogenic derivative strain, 7.13, that has a greater ability to translocate CagA exhibits much higher hydrogenase activity than its parent noncarcinogenic strain, B128. A Δhyd mutant strain with deletion of hydrogenase genes was ineffective in CagA translocation into human gastric epithelial AGS cells, while no significant attenuation of cell adhesion was observed. The quinone reductase inhibitor 2-n-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline-N-oxide (HQNO) was used to specifically inhibit the H2-utilizing respiratory chain of outer membrane-permeabilized bacterial cells; that level of inhibitor also greatly attenuated CagA translocation into AGS cells, indicating the H2-generated transmembrane potential is a contributor to toxin translocation. The Δhyd strain showed a decreased frequency of DNA transformation, suggesting that H. pylori hydrogenase is also involved in energizing the DNA uptake apparatus. In a gerbil model of infection, the ability of the Δhyd strain to induce inflammation was significantly attenuated (at 12 weeks postinoculation), while all of the gerbils infected with the parent strain (7.13) exhibited a high level of inflammation. Gastric cancer developed in 50% of gerbils infected with the wild-type strain 7.13 but in none of the animals infected with the Δhyd strain. By examining the hydrogenase activities from well-defined clinical H. pylori isolates, we observed that strains isolated from cancer patients (n = 6) have a significantly higher hydrogenase (H2/O2) activity than the strains isolated from gastritis patients (n = 6), further supporting an association between H. pylori hydrogenase activity and gastric carcinogenesis in humans. PMID:27531909

  10. STUDIES INTO THE MECHANISMS OF POTASSIUM BROMATE INDUCED THYROID CARCINOGENESIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Studies into the Mechanisms of Potassium Bromate Induced Thyroid Carcinogenesis.

    Potassium bromate (KBrO3) occurs in finished drinking water as a by-product of the ozonation disinfection process and has been found to induce thyroid follicular cell tumors in the rat after ...

  11. Yin Yang 1 is a target of microRNA-34 family and contributes to gastric carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Wang, An-Ming; Huang, Tzu-Ting; Hsu, Kai-Wen; Huang, Kuo-Hung; Fang, Wen-Liang; Yang, Muh-Hwa; Lo, Su-Shun; Chi, Chin-Wen; Lin, Jing-Jer; Yeh, Tien-Shun

    2014-07-15

    Gastric cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Herein, we investigated the role of transcription factor Yin Yang 1 (YY1), a multi-functional protein, in tumorigenesis of gastric cancer cells. Results showed that YY1 contributed to gastric carcinogenesis of SC-M1 cells including growth, viability, and abilities of colony formation, migration, invasion, and tumorsphere formation. Levels of pluripotency genes CD44, Oct4, SOX-2, and Nanog were also up-regulated by YY1 in SC-M1 cells. Additionally, the 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR) of YY1 mRNA was the target of microRNA-34 (miR-34) family consisting of miR-34a, miR-34b, and miR-34c. Overexpression of miR-34 family suppressed carcinogenesis through down-regulation of YY1 in NUGC-3 gastric cancer cells scarcely expressing miR-34 family. Alternatively, knockdown of miR-34 family promoted tumorigenesis via up-regulation of YY1 in SC-M1 and AZ521 gastric cancer cells with higher levels of miR-34 family. The miR-34 family also affected tumorsphere ultra-structure and inhibited the xenografted tumor growth as well as lung metastasis of SC-M1 cells through YY1. Expressions of miR-34a and miR-34c in gastric cancer tissues of patients were lower than those in normal tissues. Taken together, these results suggest that miR-34 family-YY1 axis plays an important role in the control of gastric carcinogenesis.

  12. Chemopreventive Activity of MGN-3/Biobran Against Chemical Induction of Glandular Stomach Carcinogenesis in Rats and Its Apoptotic Effect in Gastric Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Badr El-Din, Nariman K; Abdel Fattah, Salma M; Pan, Deyu; Tolentino, Lucilene; Ghoneum, Mamdooh

    2016-12-01

    In the current study, we investigated the chemopreventive activity of arabinoxylan rice bran, MGN-3/Biobran, against chemical induction of glandular stomach carcinogenesis in rats. Gastric cancer was induced by carcinogen methylnitronitrosoguanidine (MNNG), and rats received MNNG alone or MNNG plus Biobran (40 mg/kg body weight) for a total of 8 months. Averaged results from 2 separate readings showed that exposure to MNNG plus Biobran caused gastric dysplasia and cancer (adenocarcinoma) in 4.5/12 rats (9/24 readings, 37.5%), with 3.5/12 rats (7/24 readings, 29.2%) showing dysplasia and 1/12 rats (8.3%) developing adenocarcinoma. In contrast, in rats treated with MNNG alone, 8/10 (80%) developed dysplasia and adenocarcinoma, with 6/10 rats (60%) showing dysplasia and 2/10 rats (20%) developing adenocarcinoma. The effect of combining both agents was also associated with significant suppression of the expression of the tumor marker Ki-67 and remarkable induction in the apoptotic gastric cancer cells via mitochondrial-dependent pathway as indicated by the upregulation in p53 expression, Bax expression, downregulation in Bcl-2 expression, an increase in Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, and an activation of caspase-3. In addition, Biobran treatment induced cell-cycle arrest in the subG1 phase, where the hypodiploid cell population was markedly increased. Moreover, Biobran treatment protected rats against MNNG-induced significant decrease in lymphocyte levels. We conclude that Biobran provides protection against chemical induction of glandular stomach carcinogenesis in rats and may be useful for the treatment of human patients with gastric cancer.

  13. A nonsense mutation in the Xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group F (XPF) gene is associated with gastric carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Wei, Zhong-Hua; Guo, Wen-Huan; Wu, Jun; Suo, Wen-Hao; Fu, Guo-Hui

    2014-03-10

    XPF/ERCC1 endonuclease is required for DNA lesion repair. To assess effects of a C2169A nonsense mutation in XPF at position 2169 in gastric cancer tissues and cell lines, genomic DNA was extracted from blood samples of 488 cancer patients and 64 gastric tumors. The mutation was mapped using a TaqMan MGB probe. In addition, gastric cancer cell lines were transfected with mutated XPF to explore XPF/ERCC1 interaction, XPF degradation, and DNA repair by a comet assay. The C2169A mutation was not detected in 488 samples of blood genomic DNA, yet was found in 32 of 64 gastric cancer tissue samples (50.0%), resulting in a 194C-terminal amino acid loss in XPF protein and lower expression. Laser micro-dissection confirmed that this point mutation was not present in surrounding normal tissues from the same patients. The truncated form of XPF (tXPF) impaired interaction with ERCC1, was rapidly degraded via ubiquitination, and resulted in reduced DNA repair. In gastric cancers, the mutation was monoallelic, indicating that XPF is a haplo-insufficient DNA repair gene. As the C2169A mutation is closely associated with gastric carcinogenesis in the Chinese population, our findings shine light on it as a therapeutic target for early diagnosis and treatment of gastric cancer.

  14. Luteolin supplementation adjacent to aspirin treatment reduced dimethylhydrazine-induced experimental colon carcinogenesis in rats.

    PubMed

    Osman, Neamt H A; Said, Usama Z; El-Waseef, Ahmed M; Ahmed, Esraa S A

    2015-02-01

    Previous studies have shown that aspirin is used in colon cancer treatment. However, long-term of Aspirin usage is limited to gastric and renal toxicity. Luteolin (LUT) has cancer prevention and anti-inflammatory effects. The present study was designed to investigate the effect of LUT supplementation and Aspirin treatment in dimethylhydrazine (DMH)-induced carcinogenesis in rats. DMH (20 mg/kg BW/week) treated rats received gavages with Aspirin (50 mg/kg BW/week) and LUT (0.2 mg/kg BW/day) for 15 weeks. DMH injections induce colon polyps and renal bleeding, significantly increasing carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), oxidative stress, and kidney function tests and reducing antioxidant markers. Either Aspirin or LUT gavages alone or combined produce a significant decrease in colon polyp number and size, significantly decreasing CEA, COX-2, and oxidative stress and increasing antioxidant markers. In conclusion, the supplementations of LUT adjacent to Aspirin in the treatment of DMH-induced carcinogenesis in rats reflect a better effect than the use of Aspirin alone.

  15. Langerhans Cells Facilitate UVB-induced Epidermal Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Julia M.; Bürgler, Christina D.; Freudzon, Marianna; Golubets, Kseniya; Gibson, Juliet F.; Filler, Renata B.; Girardi, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Ultraviolet B (UVB) light is considered the major environmental inducer of human keratinocyte DNA mutations, including within the tumor-suppressor gene p53, and chronic exposure is associated with cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) formation. Langerhans cells (LC) comprise a dendritic network within the suprabasilar epidermis, yet the role of LC in UVB-induced carcinogenesis is largely unknown. Herein, we show that LC-intact epidermis develops UVB-induced tumors more readily than LC-deficient epidermis. While levels of epidermal cyclopyrimidine dimers (CPD) following acute UVB exposure are equivalent in the presence or absence of LC, chronic UVB-induced p53 mutant clonal islands expand more readily in association with LC which remain largely intact and are preferentially found in proximity to the expanding mutant keratinocyte populations. The observed LC facilitation of mutant p53 clonal expansion is completely αβ and γδ T-cell independent, and is associated with increased intraepidermal expression of interleukin (IL)-22 and the presence of group 3 innate lymphoid cells (ILC3). These data demonstrate that LC play a key role in UVB-induced cutaneous carcinogenesis, and suggest that LC locally stimulate keratinocyte proliferation and innate immune cells that provoke tumor outgrowth. PMID:26053049

  16. DNA damage induced by chronic inflammation contributes to colon carcinogenesis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Meira, Lisiane B.; Bugni, James M.; Green, Stephanie L.; Lee, Chung-Wei; Pang, Bo; Borenshtein, Diana; Rickman, Barry H.; Rogers, Arlin B.; Moroski-Erkul, Catherine A.; McFaline, Jose L.; Schauer, David B.; Dedon, Peter C.; Fox, James G.; Samson, Leona D.

    2008-01-01

    Chronic inflammation increases cancer risk. While it is clear that cell signaling elicited by inflammatory cytokines promotes tumor development, the impact of DNA damage production resulting from inflammation-associated reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) on tumor development has not been directly tested. RONS induce DNA damage that can be recognized by alkyladenine DNA glycosylase (Aag) to initiate base excision repair. Using a mouse model of episodic inflammatory bowel disease by repeated administration of dextran sulfate sodium in the drinking water, we show that Aag-mediated DNA repair prevents colonic epithelial damage and reduces the severity of dextran sulfate sodium–induced colon tumorigenesis. Importantly, DNA base lesions expected to be induced by RONS and recognized by Aag accumulated to higher levels in Aag-deficient animals following stimulation of colonic inflammation. Finally, as a test of the generality of this effect we show that Aag-deficient animals display more severe gastric lesions that are precursors of gastric cancer after chronic infection with Helicobacter pylori. These data demonstrate that the repair of DNA lesions formed by RONS during chronic inflammation is important for protection against colon carcinogenesis. PMID:18521188

  17. ETS2 and Twist1 promote invasiveness of Helicobacter pylori-infected gastric cancer cells by inducing Siah2

    PubMed Central

    Das, Lopamudra; Kokate, Shrikant Babanrao; Rath, Suvasmita; Rout, Niranjan; Singh, Shivaram Prasad; Crowe, Sheila Eileen; Mukhopadhyay, Asish K.; Bhattacharyya, Asima

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is one of the most potent factors leading to gastric carcinogenesis. The seven in absentia homologue (Siah2) is an E3 ubiquitin ligase which has been implicated in various cancers but its role in H. pylori-mediated gastric carcinogenesis has not been established. We investigated the involvement of Siah2 in gastric cancer metastasis which was assessed by invasiveness and migration of H. pylori-infected gastric epithelial cancer cells. Cultured gastric cancer cells (GCCs) MKN45, AGS and Kato III showed significantly induced expression of Siah2, increased invasiveness and migration after being challenged with the pathogen. Siah2-expressing stable cells showed increased invasiveness and migration after H. pylori infection. Siah2 was transcriptionally activated by E26 transformation-specific sequence 2 (ETS2)- and Twist-related protein 1 (Twist1) induced in H. pylori-infected gastric epithelial cells. These transcription factors dose-dependently enhanced the aggressiveness of infected GCCs. Our data suggested that H. pylori-infected GCCs gained cell motility and invasiveness through Siah2 induction. As gastric cancer biopsy samples also showed highly induced expression of ETS2, Twist1 and Siah2 compared with noncancerous gastric tissue, we surmise that ETS2- and Twist1-mediated Siah2 up-regulation has potential diagnostic and prognostic significance and could be targeted for therapeutic purpose. PMID:27048589

  18. The roles of BTG3 expression in gastric cancer: a potential marker for carcinogenesis and a target molecule for gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Gou, Wen-feng; Yang, Xue-feng; Shen, Dao-fu; Zhao, Shuang; Liu, Yun-peng; Sun, Hong-zhi; Takano, Yasuo; Su, Rong-jian; Luo, Jun-sheng; Zheng, Hua-chuan

    2015-08-14

    BTG (B-cell translocation gene) can inhibit cell proliferation, metastasis and angiogenesis, cell cycle progression, and induce differentiation in various cells. Here, we found that BTG3 overexpression inhibited proliferation, induced S/G2 arrest, differentiation, autophagy, apoptosis, suppressed migration and invasion in MKN28 and MGC803 cells (p < 0.05). BTG3 transfectants showed a higher mRNA expression of p27, Bax, 14-3-3, Caspase-3, Caspase-9, Beclin 1, NF-κB, IL-1, -2, -4, -10 and -17, but a lower mRNA expression of p21, MMP-9 and VEGF than the control and mock (p < 0.05). At protein level, BTG3 overexpression increased the expression of CDK4, AIF, LC-3B, Beclin 1 and p38 (p < 0.05), but decreased the expression of p21 and β-catenin in both transfectants (p < 0.05). After treated with cisplatin, MG132, paclitaxel and SAHA, both BTG3 transfectants showed lower viability and higher apoptosis than the control in both time- and dose-dependent manners (p < 0.05). BTG3 expression was restored after 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine or MG132 treatment in gastric cancer cells. BTG3 expression was decreased in gastric cancer in comparison to the adjacent mucosa (p < 0.05), and positively correlated with venous invasion and dedifferentiation of cancer (p < 0.05). It was suggested that BTG3 expression might contribute to gastric carcinogenesis. BTG3 overexpression might reverse the aggressive phenotypes and be employed as a potential target for gene therapy of gastric cancer.

  19. Viral Carcinogenesis: Factors Inducing DNA Damage and Virus Integration

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yan; Williams, Vonetta; Filippova, Maria; Filippov, Valery; Duerksen-Hughes, Penelope

    2014-01-01

    Viruses are the causative agents of 10%–15% of human cancers worldwide. The most common outcome for virus-induced reprogramming is genomic instability, including accumulation of mutations, aberrations and DNA damage. Although each virus has its own specific mechanism for promoting carcinogenesis, the majority of DNA oncogenic viruses encode oncogenes that transform infected cells, frequently by targeting p53 and pRB. In addition, integration of viral DNA into the human genome can also play an important role in promoting tumor development for several viruses, including HBV and HPV. Because viral integration requires the breakage of both the viral and the host DNA, the integration rate is believed to be linked to the levels of DNA damage. DNA damage can be caused by both endogenous and exogenous factors, including inflammation induced by either the virus itself or by co-infections with other agents, environmental agents and other factors. Typically, cancer develops years to decades following the initial infection. A better understanding of virus-mediated carcinogenesis, the networking of pathways involved in transformation and the relevant risk factors, particularly in those cases where tumorigenesis proceeds by way of virus integration, will help to suggest prophylactic and therapeutic strategies to reduce the risk of virus-mediated cancer. PMID:25340830

  20. Gastric and oesophageal carcinogenesis: models for the identification of risk and protective factors.

    PubMed

    Newberne, P M; Charnley, G; Adams, K; Cantor, M; Roth, D; Supharkarn, V; Fong, L

    1986-01-01

    Male weanling rats of the Charles River Sprague-Dawley strain were exposed to N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) in the water for 3 months at the concentration of 75 ml/litre. Other real or potential risk factors were administered, alone or in combination with MNNG. When MNNG was administered in combination with NaCl, bile acids, aspirin or BHA, forestomach tumours were enhanced. MNNG-induced tumours were inhibited by selenium or by difluoromethylornithine, an ornithine decarboxylase inhibitor. BHA alone caused forestomach tumours. When BHA was administered by dietary means or by gavage, alone or in combination with MNNG, the gavage method resulted in greater tumorigenesis than dietary exposure. This increase was associated with increased [3H]thymidine labelling of forestomach epithelium and increased hyperplasia. Oesophageal carcinogenesis induced by methylbenzylnitrosamine (MBN) was enhanced by zinc deficiency, alcohol and 13-cis-retinoic acid. Zinc deficiency also resulted in oesophageal tumours in rats exposed to the hepatocarcinogen dimethylnitrosamine. Riboflavin deficiency injured oral and oesophageal epithelium and increased sensitivity to MBN-induced oesophageal tumours.

  1. Chemopreventive potential of zinc in experimentally induced colon carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Dani, Vijayta; Goel, Ajay; Vaiphei, K; Dhawan, D K

    2007-06-15

    The present study was performed to evaluate the efficacy of zinc treatment on colonic antioxidant defense system and histoarchitecture in 1,2-dimethylhydrazine- (DMH) induced colon carcinogenesis in male Sprague-Dawley rats. The rats were segregated into four groups viz., normal control, DMH treated, zinc treated, DMH+zinc treated. Colon carcinogenesis was induced through weekly subcutaneous injections of DMH (30 mg/kg body weight) for 16 weeks. Zinc (in the form of zinc sulphate) was supplemented to rats at a dose level of 227 mg/L in drinking water, ad libitum for the entire duration of the study. Increased tumor incidence, tumor size and number of aberrant crypt foci (ACF) were accompanied by a decrease in lipid peroxidation, glutathione-S-transferase, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase. On the contrary, significantly increased levels of reduced glutathione (GSH) and glutathione reductase (GR) were observed in DMH treated rats. Administration of zinc to DMH treated rats significantly decreased the tumor incidence, tumor size and aberrant crypt foci number with simultaneous enhancement of lipid peroxidation, SOD, catalase and glutathione-S-transferase. Further, the levels of GSH and GR were also decreased following zinc supplementation to DMH treated rats. Well-differentiated signs of dysplasia were evident in colonic tissue sections by DMH administration alone. However, zinc treatment to DMH treated rats greatly restored normalcy in the colonic histoarchitecture, with no apparent signs of neoplasia. EDXRF studies revealed a significant decrease in tissue concentrations of zinc in the colon following DMH treatment, which upon zinc supplementation were recovered to near normal levels. In conclusion, the results of this study suggest that zinc has a positive beneficial effect against chemically induced colonic preneoplastic progression in rats induced by DMH.

  2. Chemically induced skin carcinogenesis: Updates in experimental models (Review)

    PubMed Central

    NEAGU, MONICA; CARUNTU, CONSTANTIN; CONSTANTIN, CAROLINA; BODA, DANIEL; ZURAC, SABINA; SPANDIDOS, DEMETRIOS A.; TSATSAKIS, ARISTIDIS M.

    2016-01-01

    Skin cancer is one of the most common malignancies affecting humans worldwide, and its incidence is rapidly increasing. The study of skin carcinogenesis is of major interest for both scientific research and clinical practice and the use of in vivo systems may facilitate the investigation of early alterations in the skin and of the mechanisms involved, and may also lead to the development of novel therapeutic strategies for skin cancer. This review outlines several aspects regarding the skin toxicity testing domain in mouse models of chemically induced skin carcinogenesis. There are important strain differences in view of the histological type, development and clinical evolution of the skin tumor, differences reported decades ago and confirmed by our hands-on experience. Using mouse models in preclinical testing is important due to the fact that, at the molecular level, common mechanisms with human cutaneous tumorigenesis are depicted. These animal models resemble human skin cancer development, in that genetic changes caused by carcinogens and pro-inflammatory cytokines, and simultaneous inflammation sustained by pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines favor tumor progression. Drugs and environmental conditions can be tested using these animal models. keeping in mind the differences between human and rodent skin physiology. PMID:26986013

  3. Sewage sludge does not induce genotoxicity and carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Silva, Paula Regina Pereira; Barbisan, Luis Fernando; Dagli, Maria Lúcia Zaidan; Saldiva, Paulo Hilário Nascimento

    2012-07-01

    Through a series of experiments, the genotoxic/mutagenic and carcinogenic potential of sewage sludge was assessed. Male Wistar rats were randomly assigned to four groups: Group 1 - negative control; Group 2 - liver carcinogenesis initiated by diethylnitrosamine (DEN; 200 mg/kg i.p.); Group 3 and G4-liver carcinogenesis initiated by DEN and fed 10,000 ppm or 50,000 ppm of sewage sludge. The animals were submitted to a 70% partial hepatectomy at the 3(rd) week. Livers were processed for routine histological analysis and immunohistochemistry, in order to detect glutathione S-transferase positive altered hepatocyte foci (GST-P(+) AHF). Peripheral blood samples for the comet assay were obtained from the periorbital plexus immediately prior to sacrificing. Polychromatic erythrocytes (PCEs) were analyzed in femoral bone-marrow smears, and the frequencies of those micronucleated (MNPCEs) registered. There was no sewage-sludge-induced increase in frequency of either DNA damage in peripheral blood leucocytes, or MNPCEs in the femoral bone marrow. Also, there was no increase in the levels of DNA damage, in the frequency of MNPCEs, and in the development of GST-P AHF when compared with the respective control group.

  4. Sewage sludge does not induce genotoxicity and carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Paula Regina Pereira; Barbisan, Luis Fernando; Dagli, Maria Lúcia Zaidan; Saldiva, Paulo Hilário Nascimento

    2012-01-01

    Through a series of experiments, the genotoxic/mutagenic and carcinogenic potential of sewage sludge was assessed. Male Wistar rats were randomly assigned to four groups: Group 1 - negative control; Group 2 - liver carcinogenesis initiated by diethylnitrosamine (DEN; 200 mg/kg i.p.); Group 3 and G4-liver carcinogenesis initiated by DEN and fed 10,000 ppm or 50,000 ppm of sewage sludge. The animals were submitted to a 70% partial hepatectomy at the 3rd week. Livers were processed for routine histological analysis and immunohistochemistry, in order to detect glutathione S-transferase positive altered hepatocyte foci (GST-P+ AHF). Peripheral blood samples for the comet assay were obtained from the periorbital plexus immediately prior to sacrificing. Polychromatic erythrocytes (PCEs) were analyzed in femoral bone-marrow smears, and the frequencies of those micronucleated (MNPCEs) registered. There was no sewage-sludge-induced increase in frequency of either DNA damage in peripheral blood leucocytes, or MNPCEs in the femoral bone marrow. Also, there was no increase in the levels of DNA damage, in the frequency of MNPCEs, and in the development of GST-P AHF when compared with the respective control group. PMID:23055806

  5. The Interplay of LncRNA-H19 and Its Binding Partners in Physiological Process and Gastric Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Li; Zhou, Yuhang; Huang, Tingting; Cheng, Alfred S. L.; Yu, Jun; Kang, Wei; To, Ka Fai

    2017-01-01

    Long non-coding RNA (lncRNA), a novel and effective modulator in carcinogenesis, has become a study hotspot in recent years. The imprinted oncofetal lncRNA H19 is one of the first identified imprinted lncRNAs with a high expression level in embryogenesis but is barely detectable in most tissues after birth. Aberrant alterations of H19 expression have been demonstrated in various tumors, including gastric cancer (GC), implicating a crucial role of H19 in cancer progression. As one of the top malignancies in the world, GC has already become a serious concern to public health with poor prognosis. The regulatory roles of H19 in gastric carcinogenesis have been explored by various research groups, which leads to the development of GC therapy. This review comprehensively summarizes the current knowledge of H19 in tumorigenesis, especially in GC pathogenesis, with emphasis on the underneath molecular mechanisms depicted from its functional partners. Furthermore, the accumulated knowledge of H19 will provide better understanding on targeted therapy of GC. PMID:28230721

  6. The Interplay of LncRNA-H19 and Its Binding Partners in Physiological Process and Gastric Carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Zhou, Yuhang; Huang, Tingting; Cheng, Alfred S L; Yu, Jun; Kang, Wei; To, Ka Fai

    2017-02-20

    Long non-coding RNA (lncRNA), a novel and effective modulator in carcinogenesis, has become a study hotspot in recent years. The imprinted oncofetal lncRNA H19 is one of the first identified imprinted lncRNAs with a high expression level in embryogenesis but is barely detectable in most tissues after birth. Aberrant alterations of H19 expression have been demonstrated in various tumors, including gastric cancer (GC), implicating a crucial role of H19 in cancer progression. As one of the top malignancies in the world, GC has already become a serious concern to public health with poor prognosis. The regulatory roles of H19 in gastric carcinogenesis have been explored by various research groups, which leads to the development of GC therapy. This review comprehensively summarizes the current knowledge of H19 in tumorigenesis, especially in GC pathogenesis, with emphasis on the underneath molecular mechanisms depicted from its functional partners. Furthermore, the accumulated knowledge of H19 will provide better understanding on targeted therapy of GC.

  7. Inhibitory effects of polysaccharides isolated from Phellinus gilvus on benzo(a)pyrene-induced forestomach carcinogenesis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Jae-Sung; Jang, Kwang-Ho; Yim, Hyunee; Park, Seung-Chun; Jin, Hee-Kyung

    2005-01-01

    AIM: Although polysaccharides from Phellinus mushrooms are a well-known material with anti-tumor properties, there is no information about the effect of polysaccharides from Phellinus gilvus (PG) on tumor. The modulating effect of polysaccharides isolated from PG on the benzo(a)pyrene (BaP)-induced forestomach carcinogenesis in ICR female mice was investigated in this study. METHODS: A forestomach carcinogenesis model was established in 40 ICR female mice receiving oral administration of BaP for 4 wk. The mice were randomly assigned to 4 groups (10 each). The mice in each group were treated with sterile water or PG for 4 and 8 wk (SW4, PGW4, SW8, and PGW8 groups). Eight or 12 wk after the first dose of BaP, forestomachs were removed for histopathological and RT-PCR analysis. RESULTS: In histopathological changes and RT-PCR analysis, sterile water-treated mice showed significant hyperplasia of the gastric mucosa with a significantly increased expression of mutant p53 mRNA compared to mice treated with PG for 8 wk. CONCLUSION: Polysaccharides isolated from PG may inhibit BaP-induced forestomach carcinogenesis in mice bydown-regulating mutant p53 expression. PMID:15641149

  8. Iron medication-induced gastric mucosal injury.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuchen; Ouyang, Jie; Wieczorek, Rosemary; DeSoto, Fidelina

    2009-01-01

    Severe gastrointestinal erosion, ulcer, necrosis and strictures after an acute iron overdose are well described. However, gastric mucosal injury in patients receiving therapeutic iron has received only scant recognition despite its wide use. We report a case of iron medication-induced gastric mucosal injury in a 76-year-old male who presented with iron deficiency anemia and had been taking ferrous sulfate tablet for 4 years. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) revealed a pale, villous appearing flat lesion along the lesser curvature of gastric body. Histopathologic examination of EGD biopsies of the flat lesion showed brown crystalline materials deposited in the lamina propria of gastric mucosa, which was accompanied with fibrosis, chronic inflammation, and foreign body reaction. The crystalline materials were covered and admixed with gastric epithelium. Prussian blue iron stain confirmed that the brown crystalline materials were iron. The iron and hemosiderin accumulation was also seen in cytoplasm of epithelial cells and lumen of fundic gastric glands. The recognition and reporting by pathologists of iron-induced changes in EGD biopsies will alert clinicians to this underrecognized but easily correctable complication by alternative forms of iron therapy, such as liquid preparation.

  9. Novel application of proton pump inhibitor for the prevention of colitis-induced colorectal carcinogenesis beyond acid suppression.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yoon Jae; Lee, Jeong Sang; Hong, Kyung Sook; Chung, Jun Won; Kim, Ju Hyun; Hahm, Ki Baik

    2010-08-01

    Colitis-associated cancers arise in the setting of chronic inflammation wherein an "inflammation-dysplasia-carcinoma" sequence prevails. Based on our previous findings in which the proton pump inhibitor could impose significant levels of anti-inflammatory, antiangiogenic, and selective apoptosis induction beyond gastric acid suppression, we investigated whether omeprazole could prevent the development of colitis-associated cancer in a mouse model induced by repeated bouts of colitis. Omeprazole, 10 mg/kg, was given i.p. all through the experimental periods for colitis-associated carcinogenesis. Molecular changes regarding inflammation and carcinogenesis were compared between control groups and colitis-associated cancer groups treated with omeprazole in addition to chemopreventive outcome. Nine of 12 (75.0%) mice in the control group developed multiple colorectal tumors, whereas tumors were noted in only 3 of 12 (25.0%) mice treated with daily injections of omeprazole. The cancer-preventive results of omeprazole treatment was based on significant decreases in the levels of nitric oxide, thiobarbituric acid-reactive substance, and interleukin-6 accompanied with attenuated expressions of tumor necrosis factor-alpha, inducible nitric oxide synthase, and cyclooxygenase-2. The expressions of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9, MMP-11, and MT1-MMMP were significantly decreased in mice treated with omeprazole in accordance with significant decreases in the number of beta-catenin-accumulated crypts. A significant induction of apoptosis was observed in tumor tissue treated with omeprazole. Omeprazole could block the trophic effect of gastrin in colon epithelial cells. The significant anti-inflammatory, antioxidative, and antimutagenic activities of omeprazole played a cancer-preventive role against colitis-induced carcinogenesis, and our novel in vivo evidence is suggestive of chemopreventive action independent of gastric acid suppression.

  10. hsa-miR-29c and hsa-miR-135b differential expression as potential biomarker of gastric carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Vidal, Amanda Ferreira; Cruz, Aline MP; Magalhães, Leandro; Pereira, Adenilson L; Anaissi, Ana KM; Alves, Nélisson CF; Albuquerque, Paulo JBS; Burbano, Rommel MR; Demachki, Samia; Ribeiro-dos-Santos, Ândrea

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the expression profiles of hsa-miR-29c and hsa-miR-135b in gastric mucosal samples and their values as gastric carcinogenesis biomarkers. METHODS: The expression levels of hsa-miR-29c and hsa-miR-135b in normal gastric mucosa, non-atrophic chronic gastritis, intestinal metaplasia and intestinal-type gastric adenocarcinoma were analysed using quantitative real-time PCR. The difference between hsa-miR-29c and hsa-miR-135b expression profiles in the grouped samples was evaluated by ANOVA and Student’s t-test tests. The results were adjusted for multiple testing by using Bonferroni’s correction. P values ≤ 0.05 were considered statistically significant. To evaluate hsa-miR-29c and hsa-miR-135b expressions as potential biomarkers of gastric carcinogenesis, we performed a receiver operating characteristic curve analysis and the derived area under the curve, and a Categorical Principal Components Analysis. In silico identification of the genetic targets of hsa-miR-29c and hsa-miR-135b was performed using different prediction tools, in order to identify possible genes involved in gastric carcinogenesis. RESULTS: The expression levels of hsa-miR-29c were higher in normal gastric mucosal samples, and decreased progressively in non-atrophic chronic gastritis samples, intestinal metaplasia samples and intestinal-type gastric adenocarcinoma samples. The expression of hsa-miR-29c in the gastric lesions showed that non-atrophic gastritis have an intermediate profile to gastric normal mucosa and intestinal-type gastric adenocarcinoma, and that intestinal metaplasia samples presented an expression pattern similar to that in intestinal-type gastric adenocarcinoma. This microRNA (miRNA) has a good discriminatory accuracy between normal gastric samples and (1) intestinal-type gastric adenocarcinoma; and (2) intestinal metaplasia, and regulates the DMNT3A oncogene. hsa-miR-135b is up-regulated in non-atrophic chronic gastritis and intestinal metaplasia samples

  11. Evidence of cell fusion in carcinogen-induced mice gastric carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yongjia; Hsu, Yiling; He, Xianghui; Lu, Ning; Wei, Wei; Zhang, Zhixiang; Zhu, Liwei

    2015-07-01

    The role of bone marrow-derived cells in gastric cancer formation was not fully understood. In this study, bone marrow from female green fluorescent protein transgenic mice was transplanted into male wild-type mice to generate sex-mismatched chimeric mice. The chimeric mice were treated with carcinogen to induce gastric cancer. At time of sacrifice, 18.2 % (2/11) of mice showed severe dysplasia and 25 % (3/12) of mice successfully induced with cancer. Fluorescence in situ hybridization results showed that bone marrow-derived cells participated in renewal of gastric mucosa and cell fusion was observed in both precancerous lesions and adenocarcinoma, but no sign of fusion was observed in squamous cell carcinoma. Our findings suggest that bone marrow-derived cells participate in renewal of gastric mucosa during chronic damage and might have acquired the phenotype of gastric epithelial cells through cell fusion. Fusion between gastric epithelial cells and bone marrow-derived cells was involved in increased carcinogenesis.

  12. Role of Viral miRNAs and Epigenetic Modifications in Epstein-Barr Virus-Associated Gastric Carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Giudice, Aldo; D'Arena, Giovanni; Crispo, Anna; Tecce, Mario Felice; Nocerino, Flavia; Grimaldi, Maria; Rotondo, Emanuela; D'Ursi, Anna Maria; Scrima, Mario; Galdiero, Massimiliano; Ciliberto, Gennaro; Capunzo, Mario; Franci, Gianluigi; Barbieri, Antonio; Bimonte, Sabrina; Montella, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs are short (21-23 nucleotides), noncoding RNAs that typically silence posttranscriptional gene expression through interaction with target messenger RNAs. Currently, miRNAs have been identified in almost all studied multicellular eukaryotes in the plant and animal kingdoms. Additionally, recent studies reported that miRNAs can also be encoded by certain single-cell eukaryotes and by viruses. The vast majority of viral miRNAs are encoded by the herpesviruses family. These DNA viruses including Epstein-Barr virus encode their own miRNAs and/or manipulate the expression of cellular miRNAs to facilitate respective infection cycles. Modulation of the control pathways of miRNAs expression is often involved in the promotion of tumorigenesis through a specific cascade of transduction signals. Notably, latent infection with Epstein-Barr virus is considered liable of causing several types of malignancies, including the majority of gastric carcinoma cases detected worldwide. In this review, we describe the role of the Epstein-Barr virus in gastric carcinogenesis, summarizing the functions of the Epstein-Barr virus-encoded viral proteins and related epigenetic alterations as well as the roles of Epstein-Barr virus-encoded and virally modulated cellular miRNAs.

  13. Role of Viral miRNAs and Epigenetic Modifications in Epstein-Barr Virus-Associated Gastric Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Giudice, Aldo; D'Arena, Giovanni; Crispo, Anna; Tecce, Mario Felice; Nocerino, Flavia; Grimaldi, Maria; Rotondo, Emanuela; D'Ursi, Anna Maria; Scrima, Mario; Galdiero, Massimiliano; Ciliberto, Gennaro; Capunzo, Mario; Franci, Gianluigi; Barbieri, Antonio; Bimonte, Sabrina; Montella, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs are short (21–23 nucleotides), noncoding RNAs that typically silence posttranscriptional gene expression through interaction with target messenger RNAs. Currently, miRNAs have been identified in almost all studied multicellular eukaryotes in the plant and animal kingdoms. Additionally, recent studies reported that miRNAs can also be encoded by certain single-cell eukaryotes and by viruses. The vast majority of viral miRNAs are encoded by the herpesviruses family. These DNA viruses including Epstein-Barr virus encode their own miRNAs and/or manipulate the expression of cellular miRNAs to facilitate respective infection cycles. Modulation of the control pathways of miRNAs expression is often involved in the promotion of tumorigenesis through a specific cascade of transduction signals. Notably, latent infection with Epstein-Barr virus is considered liable of causing several types of malignancies, including the majority of gastric carcinoma cases detected worldwide. In this review, we describe the role of the Epstein-Barr virus in gastric carcinogenesis, summarizing the functions of the Epstein-Barr virus-encoded viral proteins and related epigenetic alterations as well as the roles of Epstein-Barr virus-encoded and virally modulated cellular miRNAs. PMID:26977250

  14. Transgenic cyclooxygenase-2 expression and high salt enhanced susceptibility to chemical-induced gastric cancer development in mice.

    PubMed

    Leung, Wai K; Wu, Kai-chun; Wong, Christine Y P; Cheng, Alfred S L; Ching, Arthur K K; Chan, Anthony W H; Chong, Wilson W S; Go, Minnie Y Y; Yu, Jun; To, Ka-Fai; Wang, Xin; Chui, Y L; Fan, D M; Sung, Joseph J Y

    2008-08-01

    Cyclooxoygenase (COX)-2 overexpression is involved in gastric carcinogenesis. While high-salt intake is a known risk factor for gastric cancer development, we determined the effects of high salt on gastric chemical carcinogenesis in COX-2 transgenic (TG) mice. COX-2 TG mice were developed in C57/BL6 strain using the full-length human cox-2 complementary DNA construct. Six-week-old COX-2 TG and wild-type (WT) littermates were randomly allocated to receive alternate week of N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU, 240 p.p.m.) in drinking water or control for 10 weeks. Two groups of mice were further treated with 10% NaCl during the initial 10 weeks. All mice were killed at the end of week 50. Both forced COX-2 overexpression and high-salt intake significantly increased the frequency of gastric cancer development in mice as compared with WT littermates treated with MNU alone. However, no additive effect was observed on the combination of high salt and COX-2 expression. We further showed that MNU and high-salt treatment increased chronic inflammatory infiltrates and induced prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) production in the non-cancerous stomach. Whereas high-salt treatment markedly increased the expression of inflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interferon-gamma, interleukin (IL)-1 beta and IL-6) in the gastric mucosa, COX-2 overexpression significantly altered the cell kinetics in the MNU-induced gastric cancer model. In conclusion, both high salt and COX-2 overexpression promote chemical-induced gastric carcinogenesis, possibly related to chronic inflammation, induction of PGE(2), disruption of cell kinetics and induction of inflammatory cytokines.

  15. The Mongolian Gerbil: A Robust Model of Helicobacter pylori-Induced Gastric Inflammation and Cancer.

    PubMed

    Noto, Jennifer M; Romero-Gallo, Judith; Piazuelo, M Blanca; Peek, Richard M

    2016-01-01

    The Mongolian gerbil is an efficient, robust, and cost-effective rodent model that recapitulates many features of H. pylori-induced gastric inflammation and carcinogenesis in humans, allowing for targeted investigation of the bacterial determinants and environmental factors and, to a lesser degree, host constituents that govern H. pylori-mediated disease. This chapter discusses means through which the Mongolian gerbil model has been used to define mechanisms of H. pylori-inflammation and cancer as well as the current materials and methods for utilizing this model of microbially induced disease.

  16. LncRNA-RMRP promotes carcinogenesis by acting as a miR-206 sponge and is used as a novel biomarker for gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Shao, Yongfu; Ye, Meng; Li, Qier; Sun, Weiliang; Ye, Guoliang; Zhang, Xinjun; Yang, Yunben; Xiao, Bingxiu; Guo, Junming

    2016-06-21

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) play crucial roles in tumorigenesis. However, the mechanisms of most lncRNAs in cancers are largely unknown. Because the RNA component of mitochondrial RNA processing endoribonuclease (RMRP) is one of the dysregulated lncRNAs in gastric cancer, this study explored its molecular mechanisms in carcinogenesis. RMRP levels in 792 tissues, plasma and gastric juices from patients with various stages of gastric tumorigenesis were analyzed by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Overexpression and RNA interference were used to manipulate RMRP expression by RMRP expression vector and small interfering RNAs, respectively. Its mechanisms were evaluated by flow cytometry, real-time cell analysis, plate colony formation assays, and xenograft models. RMRP levels in tissue, plasma and gastric juices from patients with gastric cancer were significantly different from those from controls. Its levels were significantly associated with Borrmann type and metastasis. Plasma and gastric juice RMRP had higher sensitivity and specificity than commonly used markers (such as carcinoembryonic antigen and carbohydrate antigen 19-9). Knockdown of RMRP significantly inhibited cell proliferation in vitro and in vivo, whereas overexpression of RMRP promoted cell growth. Acting as a miR-206 sponge, RMRP modulated cell cycle by regulating Cyclin D2 expression. RMRP plays a crucial role in gastric cancer occurrence and can be used as a novel biomarker for gastric cancer.

  17. Deletion of IQGAP1 promotes Helicobacter pylori-induced gastric dysplasia in mice and acquisition of cancer stem cell properties in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Bessède, Emilie; Molina, Silvia; Amador, Luis Acuña; Dubus, Pierre; Staedel, Cathy; Chambonnier, Lucie; Buissonnière, Alice; Sifré, Elodie; Giese, Alban; Bénéjat, Lucie; Rousseau, Benoît; Costet, Pierre; Sacks, David B.; Mégraud, Francis; Varon, Christine

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is responsible for gastric carcinogenesis but host factors are also implicated. IQGAP1, a scaffolding protein of the adherens junctions interacting with E-cadherin, regulates cellular plasticity and proliferation. In mice, IQGAP1 deficiency leads to gastric hyperplasia. The aim of this study was to elucidate the consequences of IQGAP1 deletion on H. pylori-induced gastric carcinogenesis. Transgenic mice deleted for iqgap1 and WT littermates were infected with Helicobacter sp., and histopathological analyses of the gastric mucosa were performed. IQGAP1 and E-cadherin expression was evaluated in gastric tissues and in gastric epithelial cell lines in response to H. pylori infection. The consequences of IQGAP1 deletion on gastric epithelial cell behaviour and on the acquisition of cancer stem cell (CSC)-like properties were evaluated. After one year of infection, iqgap1+/- mice developed more preneoplastic lesions and up to 8 times more gastro-intestinal neoplasia (GIN) than WT littermates. H. pylori infection induced IQGAP1 and E-cadherin delocalization from cell-cell junctions. In vitro, knock-down of IQGAP1 favoured the acquisition of a mesenchymal phenotype and CSC-like properties induced by H. pylori infection. Our results indicate that alterations in IQGAP1 signalling promote the emergence of CSCs and gastric adenocarcinoma development in the context of an H. pylori infection. PMID:27729612

  18. [Radiation carcinogenesis].

    PubMed

    Hosoi, Yoshio

    2013-11-01

    Misrepair of DNA damage induced by ionizing radiation is a potential cause of carcinogenesis following exposure to radiation. Radiation exposure increases the incidence of the same types of mutations that occur spontaneously in a given population. A high incidence of DNA double-strand breaks is characteristic of damage by ionizing radiation compared with those induced by other environmental mutagens. In China, residents living in areas with high level background radiation(6mSv/y) had a significantly higher frequency of dicentric and ring chromosomes compared to that for the residents living in the control areas(2mSv/y). Radiation-associated increases in risk were seen for most sites. Gender-averaged excess absolute risk rates estimated at age 70, after exposure at age 30, differ in the sites, and the risks of gastric cancer, breast cancer, colon cancer, and lung cancer were highly increased, in that order. Latent periods for the development of leukemia and thyroid cancer after radiation exposure at ages younger than 18 were shorter compared to those for other solid cancers.

  19. PROPICONAZOLE-INDUCED CARCINOGENESIS: ROLE OF OXIDATIVE STRESS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Propiconazole is a systemic foliar fungicide with a broad range of activity. Rodents fed with propiconazole at high dose resulted in diminished body weight, increased liver weight of adults and pups, and eventually liver carcinogenesis. In order to unravel the toxic processes inv...

  20. Biochemical changes induced by Campylobacter pylori in the gastric juice.

    PubMed

    Andreica, V; Suciu, A; Dumitraşcu, D; Drăghici, A; Pascu, O; Suciu, M; Ban, A

    1990-01-01

    The biochemical changes induced in the gastric juice by the presence of Campylobacter pylori (CP) were followed up in 151 patients with various gastric and duodenal diseases. The diagnosis of CP infection was made by the urease test. In the presence of CP urea decreased in the gastric juice and ammonia increased. The sialic acid, fucose and hexoses, glucide components of the mucus glycoproteins dissolved in the gastric juice, underwent no change in the presence of CP. The hexosamines in the gastric mucus increased significantly in CP patients. Urease activity is present in the gastric juice even in the absence of CP, probably due to other microorganisms present in the human stomach. This does not exclude the use of the urease test for the diagnosis of CP infection. However the test can only be used in the bioptically removed gastric mucosa samples, not in the gastric juice.

  1. Gastrin and Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Waldum, Helge L.; Sagatun, Liv; Mjønes, Patricia

    2017-01-01

    Gastric cancer although occurring in reduced frequency is still an important disease, partly because of the bad prognosis when occurring in western countries. This decline in occurrence may mainly be due to the reduced prevalence of Helicobacter pylori (Hp) infection, which is the most important cause of gastric cancer. There exist many different pathological classifications of gastric carcinomas, but the most useful seems to be the one by Lauren into intestinal and diffuse types since these types seldom transform into the other and also have different epidemiology. During the nearly 30 years that have passed since the groundbreaking description of Hp as the cause of gastritis and gastric cancer, a continuous search for the mechanism by which Hp infection causes gastric cancer has been done. Interestingly, it is mainly atrophic gastritis of the oxyntic mucosa that predisposes to gastric cancer possibly by inducing hypoacidity and hypergastrinemia. There are many arguments in favor of an important role of gastrin and its target cell, the enterochromaffin-like cell, in gastric carcinogenesis. The role of gastrin in gastric carcinogenesis implies caution in the long-term treatment with inhibitors of gastric acid secretion inducing secondary hypergastrinemia, in a common disease like gastroesophageal reflux disease. PMID:28144230

  2. Green tea catechin extract in intervention of chronic breast cell carcinogenesis induced by environmental carcinogens.

    PubMed

    Rathore, Kusum; Wang, Hwa-Chain Robert

    2012-03-01

    Sporadic breast cancers are mainly attributable to long-term exposure to environmental factors, via a multi-year, multi-step, and multi-path process of tumorigenesis involving cumulative genetic and epigenetic alterations in the chronic carcinogenesis of breast cells from a non-cancerous stage to precancerous and cancerous stages. Epidemiologic and experimental studies have suggested that green tea components may be used as preventive agents for breast cancer control. In our research, we have developed a cellular model that mimics breast cell carcinogenesis chronically induced by cumulative exposures to low doses of environmental carcinogens. In this study, we used our chronic carcinogenesis model as a target system to investigate the activity of green tea catechin extract (GTC) at non-cytotoxic levels in intervention of cellular carcinogenesis induced by cumulative exposures to pico-molar 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK) and benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P). We identified that GTC, at a non-cytotoxic, physiologically achievable concentration of 2.5 µg/mL, was effective in suppressing NNK- and B[a]P-induced cellular carcinogenesis, as measured by reduction of the acquired cancer-associated properties of reduced dependence on growth factors, anchorage-independent growth, increased cell mobility, and acinar-conformational disruption. We also detected that intervention of carcinogen-induced elevation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), increase of cell proliferation, activation of the ERK pathway, DNA damage, and changes in gene expression may account for the mechanisms of GTC's preventive activity. Thus, GTC may be used in dietary and chemoprevention of breast cell carcinogenesis associated with long-term exposure to low doses of environmental carcinogens.

  3. APOPTOSIS AND PROLIFERATION DURING DICHLOROACETIC ACID (DCA) INDUCED HEPTACELLULAR CARCINOGENESIS IN THE F344 MALE RAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Apoptosis and Proliferation During DicWoroacetic Acid (DCA) Induced Hepatocellular
    Carcinogenesis in the F344 Male Rat

    Chlorine, introduced into public drinking \\\\'ater supplies for disinfection, can react with organic compounds in surface waters to form toxic by-prod...

  4. Chronic estrogen-induced cervical and vaginal squamous carcinogenesis in human papillomavirus type 16 transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Arbeit, J M; Howley, P M; Hanahan, D

    1996-04-02

    High-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs), including type 16, have been identified as factors in cervical carcinogenesis. However, the presence and expression of the virus per se appear to be insufficient for carcinogenesis. Rather, cofactors most likely are necessary in addition to viral gene expression to initiate neoplasia. One candidate cofactor is prolonged exposure to sex hormones. To examine the possible effects of estrogen on HPV-associated neoplasia, we treated transgenic mice expressing the oncogenes of HPV16 under control of the human keratin-14 promoter (K14-HPV16 transgenic mice) and nontransgenic control mice with slow release pellets of 17beta-estradiol. Squamous carcinomas developed in a multistage pathway exclusively in the vagina and cervix of K14-HPV16 transgenic mice. Estrogen-induced carcinogenesis was accompanied by an incremental increase in the incidence and distribution of proliferating cells solely within the cervical and vaginal squamous epithelium of K14-HPV16 mice. Expression of the HPV transgenes in untreated transgenic mice was detectable only during estrus; estrogen treatment resulted in transgene expression that was persistent but not further upregulated, remaining at low levels at all stages of carcinogenesis. The data demonstrate a novel mechanism of synergistic cooperation between chronic estrogen exposure and the oncogenes of HPV16 that coordinates squamous carcinogenesis in the female reproductive tract of K14-HPV16 transgenic mice.

  5. Vection-induced gastric dysrhythmias and motion sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, K. L.; Stern, R. M.

    1986-01-01

    Gastric electrical and mechanical activity during vection-induced motion sickness was investigated. The contractile events of the antrum and gastric myoelectric activity in healthy subjects exposed to vection were measured simultaneously. Symptomatic and myoelectric responses of subjects with vagotomy and gastric resections during vection stimuli were determined. And laboratory based computer systems for analysis of the myoelectric signal were developed. Gastric myoelectric activity was recorded from cutaneous electrodes, i.e., electrogastrograms (EGGs), and antral contractions were measured with intraluminal pressure transducers. Vection was induced by a rotating drum. gastric electromechanical activity was recorded during three periods: 15 min baseline, 15 min drum rotation (vection), and 15 to 30 min recovery. Preliminary results showed that catecholamine responses in nauseated versus symptom-free subjects were divergent and pretreatment with metoclopramide HC1 (Reglan) prevented vection-induced nausea and reduced tachygastrias in two previously symptomatic subjects.

  6. Dual preventive benefits of iron elimination by desferal in asbestos-induced mesothelial carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Li; Chew, Shan-Hwu; Nakamura, Kosuke; Ohara, Yuuki; Akatsuka, Shinya; Toyokuni, Shinya

    2016-07-01

    Asbestos-induced mesothelial carcinogenesis is currently a profound social issue due to its extremely long incubation period and high mortality rate. Therefore, procedures to prevent malignant mesothelioma in people already exposed to asbestos are important. In previous experiments, we established an asbestos-induced rat peritoneal mesothelioma model, which revealed that local iron overload is a major cause of pathogenesis and that the induced genetic alterations are similar to human counterparts. Furthermore, we showed that oral administration of deferasirox modified the histology from sarcomatoid to the more favorable epithelioid subtype. Here, we used i.p. administration of desferal to evaluate its effects on asbestos-induced peritoneal inflammation and iron deposition, as well as oxidative stress. Nitrilotriacetate was used to promote an iron-catalyzed Fenton reaction as a positive control. Desferal significantly decreased peritoneal fibrosis, iron deposition, and nuclear 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine levels in mesothelial cells, whereas nitrilotriacetate significantly increased all of them. Desferal was more effective in rat peritoneal mesothelial cells to counteract asbestos-induced cytotoxicity than in murine macrophages (RAW264.7). Furthermore, rat sarcomatoid mesothelioma cells were more dependent on iron for proliferation than rat peritoneal mesothelial cells. Because inflammogenicity of a fiber is proportionally associated with subsequent mesothelial carcinogenesis, iron elimination from the mesothelial environment can confer dual merits for preventing asbestos-induced mesothelial carcinogenesis by suppressing inflammation and mesothelial proliferation simultaneously.

  7. Pathogenesis of NSAID-induced gastric damage: Importance of cyclooxygenase inhibition and gastric hypermotility

    PubMed Central

    Takeuchi, Koji

    2012-01-01

    This article reviews the pathogenic mechanism of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID)-induced gastric damage, focusing on the relation between cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibition and various functional events. NSAIDs, such as indomethacin, at a dose that inhibits prostaglandin (PG) production, enhance gastric motility, resulting in an increase in mucosal permeability, neutrophil infiltration and oxyradical production, and eventually producing gastric lesions. These lesions are prevented by pretreatment with PGE2 and antisecretory drugs, and also via an atropine-sensitive mechanism, not related to antisecretory action. Although neither rofecoxib (a selective COX-2 inhibitor) nor SC-560 (a selective COX-1 inhibitor) alone damages the stomach, the combined administration of these drugs provokes gastric lesions. SC-560, but not rofecoxib, decreases prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production and causes gastric hypermotility and an increase in mucosal permeability. COX-2 mRNA is expressed in the stomach after administration of indomethacin and SC-560 but not rofecoxib. The up-regulation of indomethacin-induced COX-2 expression is prevented by atropine at a dose that inhibits gastric hypermotility. In addition, selective COX-2 inhibitors have deleterious influences on the stomach when COX-2 is overexpressed under various conditions, including adrenalectomy, arthritis, and Helicobacter pylori-infection. In summary, gastric hypermotility plays a primary role in the pathogenesis of NSAID-induced gastric damage, and the response, causally related with PG deficiency due to COX-1 inhibition, occurs prior to other pathogenic events such as increased mucosal permeability; and the ulcerogenic properties of NSAIDs require the inhibition of both COX-1 and COX-2, the inhibition of COX-1 upregulates COX-2 expression in association with gastric hypermotility, and PGs produced by COX-2 counteract the deleterious effect of COX-1 inhibition. PMID:22611307

  8. Resveratrol inhibits estrogen-induced breast carcinogenesis through induction of NRF2-mediated protective pathways

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Bhupendra; Shoulson, Rivka; Chatterjee, Anwesha; Ronghe, Amruta; Bhat, Nimee K.; Dim, Daniel C.; Bhat, Hari K.

    2014-01-01

    The importance of estrogens in the etiology of breast cancer is widely recognized. Estrogen-induced oxidative stress has been implicated in this carcinogenic process. Resveratrol (Res), a natural antioxidant phytoestrogen has chemopreventive effects against a variety of illnesses including cancer. The objective of the present study was to characterize the mechanism(s) of Res-mediated protection against estrogen-induced breast carcinogenesis. Female August Copenhagen Irish rats were treated with 17β-estradiol (E2), Res and Res + E2 for 8 months. Cotreatment of rats with Res and E2 inhibited E2-mediated proliferative changes in mammary tissues and significantly increased tumor latency and reduced E2-induced breast tumor development. Resveratrol treatment alone or in combination with E2 significantly upregulated expression of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (NRF2) in mammary tissues. Expression of NRF2-regulated antioxidant genes NQO1, SOD3 and OGG1 that are involved in protection against oxidative DNA damage was increased in Res- and Res + E2-treated mammary tissues. Resveratrol also prevented E2-mediated inhibition of detoxification genes AOX1 and FMO1. Inhibition of E2-mediated alterations in NRF2 promoter methylation and expression of NRF2 targeting miR-93 after Res treatment indicated Res-mediated epigenetic regulation of NRF2 during E2-induced breast carcinogenesis. Resveratrol treatment also induced apoptosis and inhibited E2-mediated increase in DNA damage in mammary tissues. Increased apoptosis and decreased DNA damage, cell migration, colony and mammosphere formation in Res- and Res + E2-treated MCF-10A cells suggested a protective role of Res against E2-induced mammary carcinogenesis. Small-interfering RNA-mediated silencing of NRF2 inhibited Res-mediated preventive effects on the colony and mammosphere formation. Taken together, these results suggest that Res inhibits E2-induced breast carcinogenesis via induction of NRF2-mediated protective

  9. Suppressive function of RKTG on chemical carcinogen-induced skin carcinogenesis in mouse.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xiaoduo; Zhang, Yixuan; Jiang, Yuhui; Liu, Weizhong; Ma, Hong; Wang, Zhenzhen; Chen, Yan

    2008-08-01

    Raf kinase trapping to Golgi (RKTG) is a newly characterized negative regulator of the Ras-Raf-MEK-ERK signaling pathway via sequestrating Raf-1 to the Golgi apparatus. However, little is known about the physiological functions of RKTG in mitogenic pathway and carcinogenesis. Here, we describe a suppressive role of RKTG in skin carcinogenesis by analyzing chemical carcinogen-induced tumorigenesis. Epidermis hyperplasia and proliferation are increased in RKTG-deficient mice (RKTG(-/-)) after acute treatment with 7, 12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) and 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA). Using a two-stage DMBA/TPA carcinogenesis protocol on mouse skin, the number and size of papillomas are increased in RKTG(-/-) mice, accompanied by shortened tumor latency and enhanced keratinocyte proliferation. The regression of the carcinogen-induced tumors is also prolonged in RKTG(-/-) mice. Consistently, the levels of Raf-1 and extracellular signal-regulated kinase phosphorylation in primary keratinocytes as well as skin tumors are elevated when RKTG is disrupted. Collectively, our results indicate that RKTG has a suppressive activity in chemical carcinogen-induced mitogenesis and tumor formation in mouse skin.

  10. Effects of immunostimulation with OK432, coenzyme Q10, or levamisole on dimethylhydrazine-induced colonic carcinogenesis in rats.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, H; Yamamoto, J; Iwata, Y; Matsumoto, K; Iriyama, K

    1986-03-01

    Effects of immunostimulation with OK432, Coenzyme Q10 (Co-Q10), or levamisole on dimethylhydrazine (DMH)-induced colonic carcinogenesis were investigated in 45 Donryu-rats. The manipulation with one of these immunopotentiators did not prevent DMH-induced colonic carcinogenesis in these rats. However, the number of tumors was significantly reduced and the incidence of invasive carcinomas decreased by immunostimulation. The treatment also reduced the number of lesions with epithelial dysplasia within the flat colonic mucosa.

  11. Neglected role of hookah and opium in gastric carcinogenesis: a cohort study on risk factors and attributable fractions.

    PubMed

    Sadjadi, Alireza; Derakhshan, Mohammad H; Yazdanbod, Abbas; Boreiri, Majid; Parsaeian, Mahbubeh; Babaei, Masoud; Alimohammadian, Masoomeh; Samadi, Fatemeh; Etemadi, Arash; Pourfarzi, Farhad; Ahmadi, Emad; Delavari, Alireza; Islami, Farhad; Farzadfar, Farshad; Sotoudeh, Masoud; Nikmanesh, Arash; Alizadeh, Behrooz Z; de Bock, Geertruida H; Malekzadeh, Reza

    2014-01-01

    A recent study showed an association between hookah/opium use and gastric cancer but no study has investigated the relationship with gastric precancerous lesions. We examined the association between hookah/opium and gastric precancerous lesions and subsequent gastric cancer. In a population-based cohort study, 928 randomly selected, healthy, Helicobacter pylori-infected subjects in Ardabil Province, Iran, were followed for 10 years. The association between baseline precancerous lesions and lifestyle risk factors (including hookah/opium) was analyzed using logistic regression and presented as odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). We also calculated hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% CIs for the associations of lifestyle risk factors and endoscopic and histological parameters with incident gastric cancers using Cox regression models. Additionally, the proportion of cancers attributable to modifiable risk factors was calculated. During 9,096 person-years of follow-up, 36 new cases of gastric cancer were observed (incidence rate: 3.96/1,000 persons-years). Opium consumption was strongly associated with baseline antral (OR: 3.2; 95% CI: 1.2-9.1) and body intestinal metaplasia (OR: 7.3; 95% CI: 2.5-21.5). Opium (HR: 3.2; 95% CI: 1.4-7.7), hookah (HR: 3.4; 95% CI: 1.7-7.1) and cigarette use (HR: 3.2; 95% CI: 1.4-7.5), as well as high salt intake, family history of gastric cancer, gastric ulcer and histological atrophic gastritis and intestinal metaplasia of body were associated with higher risk of gastric cancer. The fraction of cancers attributable jointly to high salt, low fruit intake, smoking (including hookah) and opium was 93% (95% CI: 83-98). Hookah and opium use are risk factors for gastric cancer as well as for precancerous lesions. Hookah, opium, cigarette and high salt intake are important modifiable risk factors in this high-incidence gastric cancer area.

  12. Radiation-induced instability and its relation to radiation carcinogenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ullrich, R. L.; Ponnaiya, B.

    1998-01-01

    PURPOSE: A model that identifies radiation-induced genetic instability as the earliest cellular event in the multi-step sequence leading to radiation-induced cancer was previously proposed. In this paper ongoing experiments are discussed which are designed to test this model and its predictions in mouse mammary epithelial cells. RESULTS: Several lines of evidence are presented that appear to support this model: first, the development of delayed mutations in p53 following irradiation in altered growth variants; secondly, the high frequencies for the induction of both instability and transformation following irradiation in mammary epithelial cells; and finally, the demonstration that susceptibility to the induction of cytogenetic instability is a heritable trait that correlates with susceptibility to transformation and radiation-induced mammary cancer. Mice resistant to transformation and mammary cancer development are also resistant to the development of instability after irradiation. In contrast, mice sensitive to transformation and cancer are also sensitive to the development of cytogenetic instability. CONCLUSIONS: Data from this laboratory and from the studies cited above suggest a specific, and perhaps unique, role for radiation-induced instability as a critical early event associated with initiation of the carcinogenic process.

  13. Suppression of osteopontin inhibits chemically induced hepatic carcinogenesis by induction of apoptosis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Su-Hyung; Park, Jun-Won; Woo, Sang-Ho; Go, Du-Min; Kwon, Hyo-Jung; Jang, Ja-June; Kim, Dae-Yong

    2016-01-01

    Previous clinical reports have found elevated osteopontin (OPN) levels in tumor tissues to be indicative of greater malignancy in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, the role of OPN on carcinogenesis and its underlying mechanism remain unclear. In the present study, we investigated the oncogenic role of OPN in diethylnitrosamine (DEN)-induced hepatic carcinogenesis in mice. The overall incidence of hepatic tumors at 36 weeks was significantly lower in OPN knockout (KO) mice than in wild-type (WT) mice. Apoptosis was significantly enhanced in OPN KO mice, and was accompanied by the downregulation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). In the in vitro study, OPN suppression also led to lower mRNA and protein levels of EGFR associated with the downregulation of c-Jun in Hep3B and Huh7 human HCC cells lines, which resulted in increased apoptotic cell death in both cell lines. Moreover, a positive correlation was clearly identified between the expression of OPN and EGFR in human HCC tissues. These data demonstrate that the OPN deficiency reduced the incidence of chemically induced HCC by suppressing EGFR-mediated anti-apoptotic signaling. An important implication of our findings is that OPN positively contributes to hepatic carcinogenesis. PMID:27888617

  14. Duodenogastric reflux and foregut carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Miwa, K; Hattori, T; Miyazaki, I

    1995-03-15

    Epidemiologic cohort studies have established that after distal gastric resection, there is a higher risk of gastric carcinoma. It is likely that a main factor of this higher risk is the excessive duodenogastric reflux induced by surgery, because the incidence of stump carcinomas is higher in Billroth II than in Billroth I, and most of the stump carcinomas are located near the stoma. In addition, several groups of investigators have suggested that duodenogastric reflux per se induces stump carcinomas in rats. There is another human duodenogastric reflux, the primary duodenogastric reflux, through the pylorus. Experiments in animals have demonstrated that this type of duodenal reflux also induces gastric carcinomas in the antrum of the stomach that has not undergone surgery. Recent clinical attention has focused on the role of duodenogastric reflux in the pathogenesis of Barrett's esophagus and subsequent esophageal adenocarcinomas. Experimentally, reflux of duodenal contents into the esophagus can cause not only Barrett's esophagus and subsequent adenocarcinomas, but also squamous cell carcinomas. These findings suggest that duodenogastric reflux may be implicated in gastric and esophageal, that is, foregut carcinogenesis.

  15. Sequential gene promoter methylation during HPV-induced cervical carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Henken, F E; Wilting, S M; Overmeer, R M; van Rietschoten, J G I; Nygren, A O H; Errami, A; Schouten, J P; Meijer, C J L M; Snijders, P J F; Steenbergen, R D M

    2007-11-19

    We aimed to link DNA methylation events occurring in cervical carcinomas to distinct stages of HPV-induced transformation. Methylation specific-multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MS-MLPA) analysis of cervical carcinomas revealed promoter methylation of 12 out of 29 tumour suppressor genes analysed, with MGMT being most frequently methylated (92%). Subsequently, consecutive stages of HPV16/18-transfected keratinocytes (n=11), ranging from pre-immortal to anchorage-independent phenotypes, were analysed by MS-MLPA. Whereas no methylation was evident in pre-immortal cells, progression to anchorage independence was associated with an accumulation of frequent methylation events involving five genes, all of which were also methylated in cervical carcinomas. TP73 and ESR1 methylation became manifest in early immortal cells followed by RARbeta and DAPK1 methylation in late immortal passages. Complementary methylation of MGMT was related to anchorage independence. Analysis of nine cervical cancer cell lines, representing the tumorigenic phenotype, revealed in addition to these five genes frequent methylation of CADM1, CDH13 and CHFR. In conclusion, eight recurrent methylation events in cervical carcinomas could be assigned to different stages of HPV-induced transformation. Hence, our in vitro model system provides a valuable tool to further functionally address the epigenetic alterations that are common in cervical carcinomas.

  16. Sequential gene promoter methylation during HPV-induced cervical carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Henken, F E; Wilting, S M; Overmeer, R M; van Rietschoten, J G I; Nygren, A O H; Errami, A; Schouten, J P; Meijer, C J L M; Snijders, P J F; Steenbergen, R D M

    2007-01-01

    We aimed to link DNA methylation events occurring in cervical carcinomas to distinct stages of HPV-induced transformation. Methylation specific-multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MS-MLPA) analysis of cervical carcinomas revealed promoter methylation of 12 out of 29 tumour suppressor genes analysed, with MGMT being most frequently methylated (92%). Subsequently, consecutive stages of HPV16/18-transfected keratinocytes (n=11), ranging from pre-immortal to anchorage-independent phenotypes, were analysed by MS-MLPA. Whereas no methylation was evident in pre-immortal cells, progression to anchorage independence was associated with an accumulation of frequent methylation events involving five genes, all of which were also methylated in cervical carcinomas. TP73 and ESR1 methylation became manifest in early immortal cells followed by RARβ and DAPK1 methylation in late immortal passages. Complementary methylation of MGMT was related to anchorage independence. Analysis of nine cervical cancer cell lines, representing the tumorigenic phenotype, revealed in addition to these five genes frequent methylation of CADM1, CDH13 and CHFR. In conclusion, eight recurrent methylation events in cervical carcinomas could be assigned to different stages of HPV-induced transformation. Hence, our in vitro model system provides a valuable tool to further functionally address the epigenetic alterations that are common in cervical carcinomas. PMID:17971771

  17. Prevention by alpha-difluoromethylornithine of skin carcinogenesis and immunosuppression induced by ultraviolet irradiation.

    PubMed

    Gensler, H L

    1991-01-01

    Administration of alpha-difluoromethylornithine (DFMO) to mice was found to inhibit both the cutaneous carcinogenesis and the immunosuppression induced by ultraviolet B (UVB) irradiation. BALB/cAnNTacfBR mice were given 1% F2MeOrn in their drinking water throughout the experiment. After 3 weeks, mice received UVB irradiation consisting of five 30-min exposures per week to banks of six FS40 Westinghouse sunlamps. In the photocarcinogenesis study, mice received a total dose of approximately 1273 kJ m-2. Skin cancer incidence in UV-irradiated mice was 38% 28 weeks after the first UV exposure; DFMO reduced this incidence to 9% (P = 0.025, log-rank test). Although DFMO has been demonstrated to be chemopreventive of chemical carcinogenesis, this is the first report that it is effective against cancers induced by a physical carcinogen. The immunosuppression induced by UVB irradiation prevents the host from rejecting antigenic, syngeneic UV-induced tumors, which normal mice can reject. The level of immunosuppression in UV-irradiated mice treated with DFMO was measured by a passive-transfer assay. Splenocytes from UV-irradiated mice to naive mice prevented the recipients from rejecting 20/24 UV-induced tumor challenges, whereas splenocytes from UV-irradiated mice treated with DFMO did not prevent recipients from rejecting such challenges (2/24 grew). The difference between these values was significant (P less than 0.001, two-sample test for binomial proportions). Phenotypic analysis of splenocytes used in the passive transfer, using a biotin-avidin-immunoperoxidase technique, revealed that DFMO treatment prevented the reduction of Ia expression normally seen in UV-irradiated mice. Thus, administration of DFMO reduced skin carcinogenesis and immunosuppression induced by UVB irradiation.

  18. Roles of cyclooxygenase-2 and microsomal prostaglandin E synthase-1 expression and beta-catenin activation in gastric carcinogenesis in N-methyl-N-nitrosourea-treated K19-C2mE transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Takasu, Shinji; Tsukamoto, Tetsuya; Cao, Xue-Yuan; Toyoda, Takeshi; Hirata, Akihiro; Ban, Hisayo; Yamamoto, Masami; Sakai, Hiroki; Yanai, Tokuma; Masegi, Toshiaki; Oshima, Masanobu; Tatematsu, Masae

    2008-12-01

    K19-C2mE transgenic (Tg) mice, simultaneously expressing cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and microsomal prostaglandin E synthase-1 (mPGES-1) in the gastric mucosa under the cytokeratin 19 gene promoter, were here treated with N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU) and inoculated with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) to investigate gastric carcinogenesis. Wild-type (WT) and Tg mice undergoing MNU treatment frequently developed tumors in the pyloric region (100% and 94.7%, respectively); multiplicity in Tg was higher than that in WT (P < 0.05) with H. pylori infection. Larger pyloric tumors were more frequently observed in Tg than in WT (P < 0.05). In addition, Tg developed fundic tumors, where WT did not. No gastric tumors were observed without MNU treatment. Transcripts of TNF-alpha, iNOS, IL-1beta, and CXCL14 were up-regulated with H. pylori infection in both genotypes and were also increased more in Tg than in WT within H. pylori-inoculated animals. Immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated significantly greater beta-catenin accumulation in pyloric tumors, compared with those in the fundus (P < 0.01) with mutations of exon 3; 18.2% and 31.6% in MNU-alone and MNU + H. pylori-treated WT, whereas 21.4% and 62.5% was observed in the Tg, respectively; the latter significantly higher (P < 0.05), suggesting the role of H. pylori in Wnt activation. In conclusion, K19-C2mE mice promoted gastric cancer in both fundic and pyloric regions. Furthermore beta-catenin activation may play the important role of pyloric carcinogenesis especially in H. pylori-infected Tg. Induction of various inflammatory cytokines in addition to overexpression of COX-2/mPGES-1 could be risk factors of gastric carcinogenesis and may serve as a better gastric carcinogenesis model.

  19. Tungsten-induced carcinogenesis in human bronchial epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Laulicht, Freda; Brocato, Jason; Cartularo, Laura; Vaughan, Joshua; Wu, Feng; Kluz, Thomas; Sun, Hong; Oksuz, Betul Akgol; Shen, Steven; Paena, Massimilano; Medici, Serenella; Zoroddu, Maria Antonietta; Costa, Max

    2015-01-01

    Metals such as arsenic, cadmium, beryllium, and nickel are known human carcinogens; however, other transition metals, such as tungsten (W), remain relatively uninvestigated with regard to their potential carcinogenic activity. Tungsten production for industrial and military applications has almost doubled over the past decade and continues to increase. Here, for the first time, we demonstrate tungsten’s ability to induce carcinogenic related endpoints including cell transformation, increased migration, xenograft growth in nude mice, and the activation of multiple cancer related pathways in transformed clones as determined by RNA seq. Human bronchial epithelial cell line (Beas-2B) exposed to tungsten developed carcinogenic properties. In a soft agar assay, tungsten-treated cells formed more colonies than controls and the tungsten-transformed clones formed tumors in nude mice. RNA-sequencing data revealed that the tungsten-transformed clones altered the expression of many cancer-associated genes when compared to control clones. Genes involved in lung cancer, leukemia, and general cancer genes were deregulated by tungsten. Taken together, our data shows the carcinogenic potential of tungsten. Further tests are needed, including in vivo and human studies, in order to validate tungsten as a carcinogen to humans. PMID:26164860

  20. Localization of gastric peroxidase and its inhibition by mercaptomethylimidazole, an inducer of gastric acid secretion.

    PubMed Central

    Bandyopadhyay, U; Bhattacharyya, D K; Chatterjee, R; Banerjee, R K

    1992-01-01

    Mercaptomethylimidazole (MMI) is a potent inducer of gastric acid secretion which is associated with significant inhibition of peroxidase activity of rat gastric mucosa in vivo. A time-dependent increase in acid secretion correlates well with time-dependent decrease in the peroxidase activity. In a chamber experiment in vitro using isolated gastric mucosa, MMI stimulates acid secretion, showing an almost linear response up to 600 microM. The time-dependent increase in acid secretion is also correlated with time-dependent inhibition of the peroxidase activity. This effect is not mediated through oxidation of MMI by flavin-containing mono-oxygenase, which is absent from gastric mucosa. The peroxidase has been localized mainly in parietal cells isolated and purified from gastric mucosa by controlled digestion with collagenase followed by Percoll-density-gradient centrifugation. Peroxidase activity was further localized in the outer membrane of the purified mitochondria of the parietal cell by some membrane-impermeant reagents, indicating outward orientation of the enzyme. MMI can inhibit the peroxidase activity of both the parietal cell and its mitochondria in a concentration-dependent manner. The possible involvement of the parietal-cell peroxidase-H2O2 system in MMI-induced acid secretion may be suggested. PMID:1318028

  1. 65Zn kinetics as a biomarker of DMH induced colon carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Chadha, Vijayta Dani; Dhawan, Davinder

    2010-01-01

    Dietary factors are considered crucial for the prevention of initiating events in the multistep progression of colon carcinoma. There is substantial evidence that zinc may play a pivotal role in host defense against several malignancies, including colon cancer. The present study was conducted to evaluate the kinetics of (65)Zn utilization following experimental colon carcinogenesis in rat model. Twenty rats were segregated into two groups viz., untreated control and dimethylhydrazine (DMH) treated. Colon carcinogenesis was established through weekly subcutaneous injections of DMH (30 mg/kg body weight) for 16 weeks. Whole body (65)Zn kinetics followed two compartment kinetics, with Tb(1) representing the initial fast component of the biological half-life and Tb(2), the slower component. The present study revealed a significant depression in the Tb(1) and Tb(2) components of (65)Zn in DMH treated rats. Further, DMH treatment caused a significant increase in the percent uptake values of (65)Zn in the colon, small intestine, kidney and blood, whereas a significant decrease was observed in the liver. Subcellular distribution revealed a significant increase in (65)Zn uptake in the mitochondrial and microsomal fractions following 16 weeks of DMH supplementation. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated a slow mobilization of (65)Zn during promotion of experimentally induced colon carcinogenesis and provides a physiological basis for the role of (65)Zn in colon tumorigenesis, which may have clinical implications in the management of colon cancer.

  2. Inhibition of azoxymethane-induced rat colon carcinogenesis by potassium hydrogen D-glucarate.

    PubMed

    Yoshimi, N; Walaszek, Z; Mori, H; Hanausek, M; Szemraj, J; Slaga, T J

    2000-01-01

    While calcium D-glucarate was shown to inhibit chemical carcinogenesis in various animal models, the effect of potassium hydrogen D-glucarate has not been extensively investigated. In the present study, potassium hydrogen D-glucarate markedly inhibited azoxymethane (AOM)-induced colon carcinogenesis in male F344 rats. Potassium hydrogen D-glucarate (PHG) or potassium hydrogen carbonate (PHC) were administered to rats in a diet (140 mmol/kg). Continual post-initiation treatment with potassium hydrogen D-glucarate reduced both tumor incidence and multiplicity at sacrifice by ca. 60%, while PHC had no effect. amelioration of overexpression of the betaG gene in rat colon carcinomas was observed using RT-PCR and Northern blot analysis. We hypothesize that previously demonstrated conversion of PHG to D-glucaro-1,4-lactone, a potent inhibitor of beta-glucuronidase (betaG), may be responsible for this effect. The mechanism of PHG inhibition of colon carcinogenesis may also involve suppression of cell proliferation and possibly alterations in cholesterol synthesis or cholesterol metabolism to bile acids. In conclusion, PHG possesses excellent potential as a natural, apparently non-toxic inhibitor to prevent colon cancer.

  3. Chronic ultraviolet exposure-induced p53 gene alterations in sencar mouse skin carcinogenesis model

    SciTech Connect

    Tong, Ying; Smith, M.A.; Tucker, S.B.

    1997-06-27

    Alterations of the tumor suppressor gene p53 have been found in ultraviolet radiation (UVR) related human skin cancers and in UVR-induced murine skin tumors. However, links between p53 gene alterations and the stages of carcinogenesis induced by UVR have not been clearly defined. We established a chronic UVR exposure-induced Sencar mouse skin carcinogenesis model to determine the frequency of p53 gene alterations in different stages of carcinogenesis, including UV-exposed skin, papillomas, squamous-cell carcinomas (SCCs), and malignant spindle-cell tumors (SCTs). A high incidence of SCCs and SCTs were found in this model. Positive p53 nuclear staining was found in 10137 (27%) of SCCs and 12124 (50%) of SCTs, but was not detected in normal skin or papillomas. DNA was isolated from 40 paraffin-embedded normal skin, UV-exposed skin, and tumor sections. The p53 gene (exons 5 and 6) was amplified from the sections by using nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Subsequent single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) assay and sequencing analysis revealed one point mutation in exon 6 (coden 193, C {r_arrow} A transition) from a UV-exposed skin sample, and seven point mutations in exon 5 (codens 146, 158, 150, 165, and 161, three C {r_arrow} T, two C {r_arrow} A, one C {r_arrow} G, and one A {r_arrow} T transition, respectively) from four SCTs, two SCCs and one UV-exposed skin sample. These experimental results demonstrate that alterations in the p53 gene are frequent events in chronic UV exposure-induced SCCs and later stage SCTs in Sencar mouse skin. 40 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Antioxidant butylated hydroxyanisole inhibits estrogen-induced breast carcinogenesis in female ACI rats.

    PubMed

    Singh, Bhupendra; Mense, Sarah M; Remotti, Fabrizio; Liu, Xinhua; Bhat, Hari K

    2009-01-01

    Exposure to estrogens is suggested to be a risk factor in human breast cancer development. The mechanisms underlying estrogen-induced cancer have not been fully elucidated. Both estrogen receptor (ER)-mediated proliferative processes and ER-independent generation of oxidative stress are suggested to play important roles in estrogen-induced breast carcinogenesis. In the current study, we investigated the role of oxidative stress in breast carcinogenesis using the ACI rat model of mammary tumorigenesis. Female ACI rats were treated with 17beta-estradiol (E(2)), butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA), or a combination of E(2) + BHA for up to 240 days. Cotreatment of rats with E(2) + BHA reduced estrogen-induced breast tumor development with tumor incidence of 24%, a significant decrease relative to E(2) where tumor incidence was 82%. Proliferative changes in the breast tissue of E(2) + BHA-treated animals were similar to those observed in E(2)-treated animals. Tissue levels of 8-isoprostane, a marker of oxidant stress, as well as the activities of antioxidant enzymes including glutathione peroxidase, superoxide dismutase, and catalase were quantified in the breast tissues of rats treated with E(2) + BHA and compared to activity levels found in E(2)-treated animals and respective age-matched controls. Cotreatment with BHA inhibited E(2)-mediated increases in 8-isoprostane levels as well as activities of antioxidant enzymes. In summary, these data suggest that estrogen-mediated oxidant stress plays a critical role in the development of estrogen-dependent breast cancers and BHA inhibits E(2)-dependent breast carcinogenesis by decreasing oxidant stress.

  5. Protective Effect of Lactobacillus casei on DMH-Induced Colon Carcinogenesis in Mice.

    PubMed

    Irecta-Nájera, Cesar Antonio; Del Rosario Huizar-López, María; Casas-Solís, Josefina; Castro-Félix, Patricia; Santerre, Anne

    2017-03-18

    The administration of probiotics is a promising approach to reduce the prevalence of colon cancer, a multifactorial disease, with hereditary factors, as well as environmental lifestyle-related risk factors. Biogenic polyamines, putrescine, spermidine, and spermine are small cationic molecules with great roles in cell proliferation and differentiation as well as regulation of gene expression. Ornithine decarboxylase is the first rate-limiting enzyme for polyamine synthesis, and upregulation of ornithine decarboxylase activity and polyamine metabolism has been associated with abnormal cell proliferation. This paper is focused on studying the protective role of Lactobacillus casei ATCC 393 in a chemically induced mouse model of colon carcinogenesis, directing our attention on aberrant crypt foci as preneoplastic markers, and on polyamine metabolism as a possible key player in carcinogenesis. BALB/c mice were administered 1,2-dimethylhydrazine dihydrochloride (DMH) to induce colon cancer (20 mg/kg body weight, subcutaneous, twice a week for 24 weeks). L. casei ATCC 393 was given orally (10(6) CFU, twice a week), 2 weeks before DMH administration. Hematoxylin and eosin staining, high-performance liquid chromatography, and Western blotting were used to evaluate aberrant crypt foci, urinary polyamines, and ornithine decarboxylase expression in the colon. The experimental data showed that the preventive administration of L. casei ATCC 393 may delay the onset of cancer as it significantly reduced the number of DMH-induced aberrant crypt foci, the levels of putrescine, and the expression of ornithine decarboxylase. Hence, this probiotic strain has a prospective role in protection against colon carcinogenesis, and its antimutagenic activity may be associated with the maintenance of polyamine metabolism.

  6. Human papillomavirus-induced carcinogenesis and the ubiquitin-proteasome system.

    PubMed

    Scheffner, Martin; Whitaker, Noel J

    2003-02-01

    Certain types of human papillomaviruses have been etiologically associated with malignant lesions, most notably with cervical cancer. The major oncoproteins of these cancer-associated viruses are encoded by the viral E6 and E7 genes. Thorough characterization of these oncoproteins and their interaction with cellular proteins has shown that both E6 and E7 exploit the ubiquitin-proteasome system to degrade and, thus, to functionally inactivate negative cell-regulatory proteins including members of the p110(RB) family and p53. This act of piracy is assumed to contribute to both the efficient propagation of HPVs and HPV-induced carcinogenesis.

  7. Multifaceted role of TREX2 in the skin defense against UV-induced skin carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Manils, Joan; Gómez, Diana; Salla-Martret, Mercè; Fischer, Heinz; Fye, Jason M.; Marzo, Elena; Marruecos, Laura; Serrano, Inma; Salgado, Rocío; Rodrigo, Juan P.; Garcia-Pedrero, Juana M.; Serafin, Anna M.; Cañas, Xavier; Benito, Carmen; Toll, Agustí; Forcales, Sònia-Vanina; Perrino, Fred W.; Eckhart, Leopold; Soler, Concepció

    2015-01-01

    TREX2 is a 3′-DNA exonuclease specifically expressed in keratinocytes. Here, we investigated the relevance and mechanisms of TREX2 in ultraviolet (UV)-induced skin carcinogenesis. TREX2 expression was up-regulated by chronic UV exposure whereas it was de-regulated or lost in human squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs). Moreover, we identified SNPs in the TREX2 gene that were more frequent in patients with head and neck SCCs than in healthy individuals. In mice, TREX2 deficiency led to enhanced susceptibility to UVB-induced skin carcinogenesis which was preceded by aberrant DNA damage removal and degradation as well as reduced inflammation. Specifically, TREX2 loss diminished the up-regulation of IL12 and IFNγ, key cytokines related to DNA repair and antitumor immunity. In UV-treated keratinocytes, TREX2 promoted DNA repair and passage to late apoptotic stages. Notably, TREX2 was recruited to low-density nuclear chromatin and micronuclei, where it interacted with phosphorylated H2AX histone, which is a critical player in both DNA repair and cell death. Altogether, our data provide new insights in the molecular mechanisms of TREX2 activity and establish cell autonomous and non-cell autonomous functions of TREX2 in the UVB-induced skin response. PMID:26090614

  8. Multifaceted role of TREX2 in the skin defense against UV-induced skin carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Manils, Joan; Gómez, Diana; Salla-Martret, Mercè; Fischer, Heinz; Fye, Jason M; Marzo, Elena; Marruecos, Laura; Serrano, Inma; Salgado, Rocío; Rodrigo, Juan P; Garcia-Pedrero, Juana M; Serafin, Anna M; Cañas, Xavier; Benito, Carmen; Toll, Agustí; Forcales, Sònia-Vanina; Perrino, Fred W; Eckhart, Leopold; Soler, Concepció

    2015-09-08

    TREX2 is a 3'-DNA exonuclease specifically expressed in keratinocytes. Here, we investigated the relevance and mechanisms of TREX2 in ultraviolet (UV)-induced skin carcinogenesis. TREX2 expression was up-regulated by chronic UV exposure whereas it was de-regulated or lost in human squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs). Moreover, we identified SNPs in the TREX2 gene that were more frequent in patients with head and neck SCCs than in healthy individuals. In mice, TREX2 deficiency led to enhanced susceptibility to UVB-induced skin carcinogenesis which was preceded by aberrant DNA damage removal and degradation as well as reduced inflammation. Specifically, TREX2 loss diminished the up-regulation of IL12 and IFNγ, key cytokines related to DNA repair and antitumor immunity. In UV-treated keratinocytes, TREX2 promoted DNA repair and passage to late apoptotic stages. Notably, TREX2 was recruited to low-density nuclear chromatin and micronuclei, where it interacted with phosphorylated H2AX histone, which is a critical player in both DNA repair and cell death. Altogether, our data provide new insights in the molecular mechanisms of TREX2 activity and establish cell autonomous and non-cell autonomous functions of TREX2 in the UVB-induced skin response.

  9. Radiation-induced genomic instability and its implications for radiation carcinogenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Lei; Snyder, Andrew R.; Morgan, William F.

    2003-01-01

    Radiation-induced genomic instability is characterized by an increased rate of genetic alterations including cytogenetic rearrangements, mutations, gene amplifications, transformation and cell death in the progeny of irradiated cells multiple generations after the initial insult. Chromosomal rearrangements are the best-characterized end point of radiation-induced genomic instability, and many of the rearrangements described are similar to those found in human cancers. Chromosome breakage syndromes are defined by chromosome instability, and individuals with these diseases are cancer prone. Consequently, chromosomal instability as a phenotype may underlie some fraction of those changes leading to cancer. Here we attempt to relate current knowledge regarding radiation-induced chromosome instability with the emerging molecular information on the chromosome breakage syndromes. The goal is to understand how genetic and epigenetic factors might influence the onset of chromosome instability and the role of chromosomal instability in carcinogenesis.

  10. Effects of adlay on azoxymethane-induced colon carcinogenesis in rats.

    PubMed

    Shih, Chun-Kuang; Chiang, Wenchang; Kuo, Min-Liang

    2004-08-01

    Adlay (Coix lachryma-jobi L. var. ma-yuen Stapf) is a grass crop used in traditional Chinese medicine and as a nutritious food. It has been reported that adlay has anti-inflammatory and anti-tumor activity. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is an inducible enzyme functionally related to both inflammation and colon carcinogenesis and is the target of many chemopreventive agents. This study investigated the effect of adlay on colon carcinogenesis and COX-2 expression. In a short-term experiment, male F344 rats were fed diets containing different doses of dehulled adlay and received the colon-specific carcinogen, azoxymethane (AOM), by intraperitoneal injection. All rats were killed after 5 weeks of feeding, and the colons were examined for the preneoplastic lesion, aberrant crypt foci (ACF). Dietary dehulled adlay at levels of 10%, 20%, or 40% significantly reduced the numbers of ACF and aberrant crypts. Dehulled adlay reduced the number of ACF of different sizes but did not affect the crypt multiplicity. Most ACF were found in the middle and distal colons; dehulled adlay significantly suppressed the formation of ACF in the middle colon. In a long-term experiment, male F344 rats were fed diets containing different doses of dehulled adlay and injected with AOM. All rats were killed after 52 weeks of feeding, and colons were examined for tumors and COX-2 protein expression. The results indicated that dehulled adlay did not inhibit colon tumors in spite of a slight suppressing effect in the proximal colon. Rats fed diets containing 20% dehulled adlay had less COX-2 protein expression in both proximal and distal colon tumors. The inconsistent effects between COX-2 protein expression and tumor outcome may be due to regional differences in the colon and the malignancy of the tumors. These findings suggest that dehulled adlay suppresses early events in colon carcinogenesis but not the formation of tumors.

  11. Effect of light/dark regimen on N-nitrosoethylurea-induced transplacental carcinogenesis in rats.

    PubMed

    Beniashvili, D S; Benjamin, S; Baturin, D A; Anisimov, V N

    2001-02-10

    Pregnant females were randomly subdivided into three groups (24 rats per group) and kept at the 12:12 h light/dark regimen (group 1), at the constant light illumination (24 h a day, group 2) or at the continuous darkness (group 3). N-nitrosoethylurea (NEU) has been injected into the tail vein of all rats (80 mg/kg) on the 18-19th day of the pregnancy. After the delivery the lacting dams and their progeny during the lactation period (1 month after delivery) were kept also at the three different light/dark regimens. Then all offspring from each group was kept at the 12:12 h light/dark regimen, males and females separately, and were observed until natural death. The exposure to constant light significantly promoted the transplacental carcinogenesis whereas the exposure to constant darkness inhibited it. The incidence of total tumors, tumors of both a peripheral nervous system and kidney was 2.6; 2.5 and 8.5 times higher, and survival significantly shorter, correspondingly, in rats from the group 2 exposed to the constant light regimen as compared to the group 1 (12:12 h light/dark regimen) (P<0.05). On the other hand, the exposure to the continuous darkness during the pregnancy and the lactation period significantly inhibited the transplacental carcinogenesis in the offspring of rats treated with NEU. The incidence of total tumors, tumors of a peripheral nervous system was by 2.4 and 2.7 times less, and survival longer, respectively, in exposed to the darkness rats from the group 3 as compared to the group 1 (12:12 h light/dark regimen) (P<0.05). Thus, our data firstly have shown the modifying effect of light-dark regimen on the realization of the transplacental carcinogenesis induced by NEU in rats.

  12. The Role of Oxidative Stress in Carcinogenesis Induced by Metals and Xenobiotics

    PubMed Central

    Henkler, Frank; Brinkmann, Joep; Luch, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    In addition to a wide range of adverse effects on human health, toxic metals such as cadmium, arsenic and nickel can also promote carcinogenesis. The toxicological properties of these metals are partly related to generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that can induce DNA damage and trigger redox-dependent transcription factors. The precise mechanisms that induce oxidative stress are not fully understood. Further, it is not yet known whether chronic exposures to low doses of arsenic, cadmium or other metals are sufficient to induce mutations in vivo, leading to DNA repair responses and/or tumorigenesis. Oxidative stress can also be induced by environmental xenobiotics, when certain metabolites are generated that lead to the continuous release of superoxide, as long as the capacity to reduce the resulting dions (quinones) into hydroquinones is maintained. However, the specific significance of superoxide-dependent pathways to carcinogenesis is often difficult to address, because formation of DNA adducts by mutagenic metabolites can occur in parallel. Here, we will review both mechanisms and toxicological consequences of oxidative stress triggered by metals and dietary or environmental pollutants in general. Besides causing DNA damage, ROS may further induce multiple intracellular signaling pathways, notably NF-κB, JNK/SAPK/p38, as well as Erk/MAPK. These signaling routes can lead to transcriptional induction of target genes that could promote proliferation or confer apoptosis resistance to exposed cells. The significance of these additional modes depends on tissue, cell-type and is often masked by alternate oncogenic mechanisms being activated in parallel. PMID:24281075

  13. Matrix metalloproteinase 7 restrains Helicobacter pylori-induced gastric inflammation and premalignant lesions in the stomach by altering macrophage polarization.

    PubMed

    Krakowiak, M S; Noto, J M; Piazuelo, M B; Hardbower, D M; Romero-Gallo, J; Delgado, A; Chaturvedi, R; Correa, P; Wilson, K T; Peek, R M

    2015-04-02

    Helicobacter pylori is the strongest risk factor for the development of gastric cancer. Although the specific mechanisms by which this pathogen induces carcinogenesis have not been fully elucidated, high-expression interleukin (IL)-1β alleles are associated with increased gastric cancer risk among H. pylori-infected persons. In addition, loss of matrix metalloproteinase 7 (MMP7) increases mucosal inflammation in mouse models of epithelial injury, and we have shown that gastric inflammation is increased in H. pylori-infected MMP7(-/-) C57BL/6 mice. In this report, we define mechanisms that underpin such responses and extend these results into a genetic model of MMP7 deficiency and gastric cancer. Wild-type (WT) or MMP7(-/-) C57BL/6 mice were challenged with broth alone as an uninfected control or the H. pylori strain PMSS1. All H. pylori-challenged mice were successfully colonized. As expected, H. pylori-infected MMP7(-/-) C57BL/6 mice exhibited a significant increase in gastric inflammation compared with uninfected or infected WT C57BL/6 animals. Loss of MMP7 resulted in M1 macrophage polarization within H. pylori-infected stomachs, as assessed by Luminex technology and immunohistochemistry, and macrophages isolated from infected MMP7-deficient mice expressed significantly higher levels of the M1 macrophage marker IL-1β compared with macrophages isolated from WT mice. To extend these findings into a model of gastric cancer, hypergastrinemic WT INS-GAS or MMP7(-/-) INS-GAS mice were challenged with H. pylori strain PMSS1. Consistent with findings in the C57BL/6 model, H. pylori-infected MMP7-deficient INS-GAS mice exhibited a significant increase in gastric inflammation compared with either uninfected or infected WT INS-GAS mice. In addition, the incidence of gastric hyperplasia and dysplasia was significantly increased in H. pylori-infected MMP7(-/-) INS-GAS mice compared with infected WT INS-GAS mice, and loss of MMP7 promoted M1 macrophage polarization. These

  14. High salt diets dose-dependently promote gastric chemical carcinogenesis in Helicobacter pylori-infected Mongolian gerbils associated with a shift in mucin production from glandular to surface mucous cells.

    PubMed

    Kato, Sosuke; Tsukamoto, Tetsuya; Mizoshita, Tsutomu; Tanaka, Harunari; Kumagai, Toshiko; Ota, Hiroyoshi; Katsuyama, Tsutomu; Asaka, Masahiro; Tatematsu, Masae

    2006-10-01

    Intake of salt and salty food is known as a risk factor for gastric carcinogenesis. To examine the dose-dependence and the mechanisms underlying enhancing effects, Mongolian gerbils were treated with N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU), Helicobacter pylori and food containing various concentrations of salt, and were sacrificed after 50 weeks. Among gerbils treated with MNU and H. pylori, the incidences of glandular stomach cancers were 15% in the normal diet group and 33%, 36% and 63% in the 2.5%, 5% and 10% NaCl diet groups, showing dose-dependent increase (p < 0.01). Intermittent intragastric injection of saturated NaCl solution, in contrast, did not promote gastric carcinogenesis. In gerbils infected with H. pylori, a high salt diet was associated with elevation of anti-H. pylori antibody titers, serum gastrin levels and inflammatory cell infiltration in a dose-dependent fashion. Ten percent NaCl diet upregulated the amount of surface mucous cell mucin (p < 0.05), suitable for H. pylori colonization, despite no increment of MUC5AC mRNA, while H. pylori infection itself had an opposing effect, stimulating transcription of MUC6 and increasing the amount of gland mucous cell mucin (GMCM). High salt diet, in turn, decreased the amount of GMCM, which acts against H. pylori infection. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated dose-dependent enhancing effects of salt in gastric chemical carcinogenesis in H. pylori-infected Mongolian gerbils associated with alteration of the mucous microenvironment. Reduction of salt intake could thus be one of the most important chemopreventive methods for human gastric carcinogenesis.

  15. Role of neutrophils in acrylonitrile-induced gastric mucosal damage.

    PubMed

    Hamdy, Nadia M; Al-Abbasi, Fahad A; Alghamdi, Hassan A; Tolba, Mai F; Esmat, Ahmed; Abdel-Naim, Ashraf B

    2012-01-25

    Acrylonitrile (ACN) is a widely used intermediate in the manufacture of plastics, acrylic fibers, synthetic rubbers and resins that are used in a variety of products including food containers and medical devices. ACN is a possible human carcinogen and a documented animal carcinogen, with the stomach being an important target of its toxicity. ACN has been previously reported to require metabolic activation to reactive intermediates and finally to cyanide (CN⁻). The current study aimed at exploring the potential role of neutrophils in ACN-induced gastric damage in rats. Experimental neutropenia was attained by injecting rats with methotrexate. This significantly ameliorated gastric mucosal injury induced by ACN. This is evidenced by protection against the increase in gastric ulcer index, myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity and CN⁻ level. Also, neutropenia guarded against the decrease in prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), induction of oxidative stress and reduction of total nitrites and alleviated histopathological alterations in rat stomachs. These data indicate that neutrophil infiltration is, at least partly, involved in ACN-induced gastric damage in rats.

  16. The Balance Between Initiation and Promotion in Radiation-Induced Murine Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Shuryak, Igor; Ullrich, Robert L.; Sachs, Rainer K.; Brenner, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Studies of radiation carcinogenesis in animals allow detailed investigation of how the risk depends on age at exposure and time since exposure and of the mechanisms that determine this risk, e.g., induction of new pre-malignant cells (initiation) and enhanced proliferation of already existing pre-malignant cells (promotion). To assist the interpretation of these patterns, we apply a newly developed biologically based mathematical model to data on several types of solid tumors induced by acute whole-body radiation in mice. The model includes both initiation and promotion and analyzes pre-malignant cell dynamics on two different time scales: comparatively short-term during irradiation and long-term during the entire life span. Our results suggest general mechanistic similarities between radiation carcinogenesis in mice and in human atomic bomb survivors. The excess relative risk (ERR) in mice decreases with age at exposure up to an exposure age of 1 year, which corresponds to mid-adulthood in humans; the pattern for older ages at exposure, for which there is some evidence of increasing ERRs in atomic bomb survivors, cannot be evaluated using the data set analyzed here. Also similar to findings in humans, initiation dominates the ERR at young ages in mice, when there are few background pre-malignant cells, and promotion becomes important at older ages. PMID:20726716

  17. Dark field optical imaging reveals vascular changes in an inducible hamster cheek pouch model during carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Fangyao; Morhard, Robert; Murphy, Helen A.; Zhu, Caigang; Ramanujam, Nimmi

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we propose a low-cost cross-polarized dark field microscopy system for in vivo vascular imaging to detect head and neck cancer. A simple-to-use Gabor-filter-based image processing technique was developed to objectively and automatically quantify several important vascular features, including tortuosity, length, diameter and area fraction, from vascular images. Simulations were performed to evaluate the accuracies of vessel segmentation and feature extraction for our algorithm. Sensitivity and specificity for vessel segmentation of the Gabor masks both remained above 80% at all contrast levels when compared to gold-standard masks. Errors for vascular feature extraction were under 5%. Moreover, vascular contrast and vessel diameter were identified to be the two primary factors which affected the segmentation accuracies. After our algorithm was validated, we monitored the blood vessels in an inducible hamster cheek pouch carcinogen model over 17 weeks and quantified vascular features during carcinogenesis. A significant increase in vascular tortuosity and a significant decrease in vessel length were observed during carcinogenesis. PMID:27699096

  18. URI prevents potassium dichromate-induced oxidative stress and cell death in gastric cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Dongwei; Xu, Zhonghai; Hu, Xiaoxia; Zhang, Fei; Bian, Huiqin; Li, Na; Wang, Qian; Lu, Yaojuan; Zheng, Qiping; Gu, Junxia

    2016-01-01

    Chromium VI can provoke oxidative stress, DNA damage, cytotoxicity, mutagenesis and carcinogenesis. Aberrantly high level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) has been associated with oxidative stress and subsequent DNA damage. Notably, multiple previous studies have shown the increased level of ROS in chromium (VI) induced oxidative stress, but its effect on cell death and the underlying mechanism remain to be determined. In this study, we aimed to investigate the role of URI, an unconventional prefoldin RBP5 interactor, in potassium dichromate induced oxidative stress and cell death through in vitro loss-of-function studies. We have shown that knockdown of URI in human gastric cancer SGC-7901 cells by URI siRNA enhanced potassium dichromate-induced production of ROS. The level of rH2AX, a marker of DNA damage, was significantly increased, along with a reduced cell viability in URI siRNA treated cells that were also exposed to potassium dichromate. Comet assay showed that URI knockdown increased the tail moment in potassium dichromate-treated SGC-7901 cells. Accordingly, the cell rates of apoptosis and necrosis were also increased in URI knockdown cells treated with potassium dichromate at different concentrations. Together, these results suggest that URI is preventive for the oxidative stress and cell death induced by potassium dichromate, which potentially leads to cancer cell survival and therapeutic resistance. PMID:28078011

  19. Green and black tea inhibit cytokine-induced IL-8 production and secretion in AGS gastric cancer cells via inhibition of NF-κB activity.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez-Orozco, Fabiola; Stephens, Brian R; Neilson, Andrew P; Green, Rodney; Ferruzzi, Mario G; Bomser, Joshua A

    2010-10-01

    Consumption of tea is associated with a reduced risk for several gastrointestinal cancers. Inflammatory processes, such as secretion of IL-8 from the gastric epithelium in response to chronic chemokine or antigen exposure, serve both as a chemoattractant for white blood cells and a prerequisite for gastric carcinogenesis. In this study, the gastric adenocarcinoma cell line AGS was used to investigate the effect of green tea extract, black tea extract, and epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), the most abundant catechin in tea, on cytokine-induced inflammation. AGS cells were stimulated with interleukin-1β (IL-1β) to initiate inflammation, followed by exposure to either tea extracts or EGCG. We found that both green and black tea extracts at concentrations of 20 and 2 µM total catechins, respectively, significantly (p < 0.05) inhibited IL-1β-induced IL-8 production and secretion to a similar extent. Treatment of AGS cells with EGCG (8 µM) produced similar reductions in IL-1β-induced IL-8 production and secretion. Inhibition of NF-κB activity was found to be responsible, in part, for these observed effects. Our findings demonstrate that both green and black tea extracts with distinctly different catechin profiles, are capable of disrupting the molecular link between inflammation and carcinogenesis via inhibition of NF-κB activity in AGS cells.

  20. Cancer-promoting role of adipocytes in asbestos-induced mesothelial carcinogenesis through dysregulated adipocytokine production.

    PubMed

    Chew, Shan Hwu; Okazaki, Yasumasa; Nagai, Hirotaka; Misawa, Nobuaki; Akatsuka, Shinya; Yamashita, Kyoko; Jiang, Li; Yamashita, Yoriko; Noguchi, Michio; Hosoda, Kiminori; Sekido, Yoshitaka; Takahashi, Takashi; Toyokuni, Shinya

    2014-01-01

    Like many other human cancers, the development of malignant mesothelioma is closely associated with a chronic inflammatory condition. Both macrophages and mesothelial cells play crucial roles in the inflammatory response caused by asbestos exposure. Here, we show that adipocytes can also contribute to asbestos-induced inflammation through dysregulated adipocytokine production. 3T3-L1 preadipocytes were differentiated into mature adipocytes prior to use. These cells took up asbestos fibers (chrysotile, crocidolite and amosite) but were more resistant to asbestos-induced injury than macrophages and mesothelial cells. Expression microarray analysis followed by reverse transcription-PCR revealed that adipocytes respond directly to asbestos exposure with an increased production of proinflammatory adipocytokines [e.g. monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1)], whereas the production of anti-inflammatory adipocytokines (e.g. adiponectin) is suppressed. This was confirmed in epididymal fat pad of mice after intraperitoneal injection of asbestos fibers. Such dysregulated adipocytokine production favors the establishment of a proinflammatory environment. Furthermore, MCP-1 marginally promoted the growth of MeT-5A mesothelial cells and significantly enhanced the wound healing of Y-MESO-8A and Y-MESO-8D human mesothelioma cells. Our results suggest that increased levels of adipocytokines, such as MCP-1, can potentially contribute to the promotion of mesothelial carcinogenesis through the enhanced recruitment of inflammatory cells as well as a direct growth and migration stimulatory effect on mesothelial and mesothelioma cells. Taken together, our findings support a potential cancer-promoting role of adipocytes in asbestos-induced mesothelial carcinogenesis.

  1. Harmine combined with paclitaxel inhibits tumor proliferation and induces apoptosis through down-regulation of cyclooxygenase-2 expression in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xiao-Juan; Sun, Kun; Tang, Xiao-He; Zhou, Cun-Jin; Sun, Hui; Yan, Zhe; Fang, Ling; Wu, Hong-Wen; Xie, Yi-Kui; Gu, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) serves an important role in the carcinogenesis and progression of gastric cancer. Harmine (HM) and paclitaxel (PTX) are reported as promising drug candidates for cancer therapy, but whether a synergistic anti-tumor effect of HM combined with PTX exists in human gastric cancer remains unknown. The present study evaluated the effects of HM and/or PTX on cell proliferation and apoptosis in a gastric cancer cell line, SGC-7901. HM and PTX inhibited cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner. Both HM and PTX alone induced apoptosis in gastric cancer cells. The combination of HM and PTX exerted synergistic effects on proliferation inhibition and apoptosis induction in SGC-7901 cells, with down-regulation of COX-2, PCNA and Bcl-2 and up-regulation of Bax expression. The results indicated that combination chemotherapy using HM with PTX exerts an anti-tumor effect for treating gastric cancer. The combination of the two drugs inhibits gastric cancer development more effectively than each drug alone through down-regulation of COX-2 expression. PMID:27446381

  2. Chestnut extract induces apoptosis in AGS human gastric cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun Sook; Kim, Eun Ji; Kim, Sun Hyo

    2011-06-01

    In Korea, chestnut production is increasing each year, but consumption is far below production. We investigated the effect of chestnut extracts on antioxidant activity and anticancer effects. Ethanol extracts of raw chestnut (RCE) or chestnut powder (CPE) had dose-dependent superoxide scavenging activity. Viable numbers of MDA-MD-231 human breast cancer cells, DU145 human prostate cancer cells, and AGS human gastric cancer cells decreased by 18, 31, and 69%, respectively, following treatment with 200 µg/mL CPE for 24 hr. CPE at various concentrations (0-200 µg/mL) markedly decreased AGS cell viability and increased apoptotic cell death dose and time dependently. CPE increased the levels of cleaved caspase-8, -7, -3, and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase in a dose-dependent manner but not cleaved caspase-9. CPE exerted no effects on Bcl-2 and Bax levels. The level of X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein decreased within a narrow range following CPE treatment. The levels of Trail, DR4, and Fas-L increased dose-dependently in CPE-treated AGS cells. These results show that CPE decreases growth and induces apoptosis in AGS gastric cancer cells and that activation of the death receptor pathway contributes to CPE-induced apoptosis in AGS cells. In conclusion, CPE had more of an effect on gastric cancer cells than breast or prostate cancer cells, suggesting that chestnuts would have a positive effect against gastric cancer.

  3. Dosimetric Analysis of Radiation-Induced Gastric Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Mary; Normolle, Daniel; Pan, Charlie C.; Dawson, Laura A.; Amarnath, Sudha; Ensminger, William D.; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Ten Haken, Randall K.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Radiation-induced gastric bleeding has been poorly understood. In this study, we describe dosimetric predictors for gastric bleeding after fractionated radiotherapy and compare several predictive models. Materials & Methods The records of 139 sequential patients treated with 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) for intrahepatic malignancies between January 1999 and April 2002 were reviewed. Median follow-up was 7.4 months. Logistic regression and Lyman normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) models for the occurrence of ≥ grade 3 gastric bleed were fit to the data. The principle of maximum likelihood was used to estimate parameters for all models. Results Sixteen of 116 evaluable patients (14%) developed gastric bleeds, at a median time of 4.0 months (mean 6.5 months, range 2.1–28.3 months) following completion of RT. The median and mean of the maximum doses to the stomach were 61 and 63 Gy (range 46 Gy–86 Gy), respectively, after bio-correction to equivalent 2 Gy daily fractions. The Lyman NTCP model with parameters adjusted for cirrhosis was most predictive of gastric bleed (AUROC=0.92). Best fit Lyman NTCP model parameters were n =0.10, and m =0.21, with TD50(normal) =56 Gy and TD50(cirrhosis) = 22 Gy. The low n value is consistent with the importance of maximum dose; a lower TD50 value for the cirrhosis patients points out their greater sensitivity. Conclusion This study demonstrates that the Lyman NTCP model has utility for predicting gastric bleeding, and that the presence of cirrhosis greatly increases this risk. These findings should facilitate the design of future clinical trials involving high-dose upper abdominal radiation. PMID:22541965

  4. Dosimetric Analysis of Radiation-induced Gastric Bleeding

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Mary; Normolle, Daniel; Pan, Charlie C.; Dawson, Laura A.; Amarnath, Sudha; Ensminger, William D.; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Ten Haken, Randall K.

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: Radiation-induced gastric bleeding has been poorly understood. In this study, we described dosimetric predictors for gastric bleeding after fractionated radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: The records of 139 sequential patients treated with 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) for intrahepatic malignancies were reviewed. Median follow-up was 7.4 months. The parameters of a Lyman normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) model for the occurrence of {>=}grade 3 gastric bleed, adjusted for cirrhosis, were fitted to the data. The principle of maximum likelihood was used to estimate parameters for NTCP models. Results: Sixteen of 116 evaluable patients (14%) developed gastric bleeds at a median time of 4.0 months (mean, 6.5 months; range, 2.1-28.3 months) following completion of RT. The median and mean maximum doses to the stomach were 61 and 63 Gy (range, 46-86 Gy), respectively, after biocorrection of each part of the 3D dose distributions to equivalent 2-Gy daily fractions. The Lyman NTCP model with parameters adjusted for cirrhosis predicted gastric bleed. Best-fit Lyman NTCP model parameters were n=0.10 and m=0.21 and with TD{sub 50} (normal) = 56 Gy and TD{sub 50} (cirrhosis) = 22 Gy. The low n value is consistent with the importance of maximum dose; a lower TD{sub 50} value for the cirrhosis patients points out their greater sensitivity. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that the Lyman NTCP model has utility for predicting gastric bleeding and that the presence of cirrhosis greatly increases this risk. These findings should facilitate the design of future clinical trials involving high-dose upper abdominal radiation.

  5. Toxicogenomic Effects in Rat Blood Leukocytes and Chemoprophylaxis of Radiation-Induced Carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, S D; Bespalov, V G; Semenov, A L; Kovan'ko, E G; Aleksandrov, V A

    2016-03-01

    Toxicogenomic parameters were studied in the blood of female rats after exposure to ionizing γ-radiation in a dose of 4 Gy and chemoprophylaxis with α-difluoromethylornithine, eleutherococcus or leuzea extracts, which were used in animals with morphological manifestations of tumor growth under conditions of radiation-induced carcinogenesis. Life-time evaluation of toxicogenomic effects was carried out by express method for measurements of blood nucleotid DNA - fluorescent indication. The level of hyperaneu/polyploidy increased in the blood leukocytes of control rats 30 days after radiation exposure. A significant decrease of genotoxicity as a result of drug treatment in comparison with the number and multiplicity of tumors in irradiated animals was found only in the endocrine and reproductive organs of rats treated by eleutherococcus extract.

  6. IDENTIFICATION OF THE ROLE OF APOPTOSIS PATHWAYS POTENTIALLY INVOLVED IN FORMALDEHYDE-INDUCED CARCINOGENESIS USING CDNA ARRAYS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Identification of the Role of Apoptosis Pathways Potentially Involved in Formaldehyde- Induced Carcinogenesis Using cDNA Arrays.

    Formaldehyde (FA) is a genotoxic chemical found in household, medicinal, and industrial products. Although the major source of human exposure is...

  7. QKI5-mediated alternative splicing of the histone variant macroH2A1 regulates gastric carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Feng; Yi, Ping; Pi, Jingnan; Li, Lanfang; Hui, Jingyi; Wang, Fang; Liang, Aihua; Yu, Jia

    2016-01-01

    Alternative pre-mRNA splicing is a key mechanism for increasing proteomic diversity and modulating gene expression. Emerging evidence indicated that the splicing program is frequently dysregulated during tumorigenesis. Cancer cells produce protein isoforms that can promote growth and survival. The RNA-binding protein QKI5 is a critical regulator of alternative splicing in expanding lists of primary human tumors and tumor cell lines. However, its biological role and regulatory mechanism are poorly defined in gastric cancer (GC) development and progression. In this study, we demonstrated that the downregulation of QKI5 was associated with pTNM stage and pM state of GC patients. Re-introduction of QKI5 could inhibit GC cell proliferation, migration, and invasion in vitro and in vivo, which might be due to the altered splicing pattern of macroH2A1 pre-mRNA, leading to the accumulation of macroH2A1.1 isoform. Furthermore, QKI5 could inhibit cyclin L1 expression via promoting macroH2A1.1 production. Thus, this study identified a novel regulatory axis involved in gastric tumorigenesis and provided a new strategy for GC therapy. PMID:27092877

  8. Thrombospondin-2 overexpression in the skin of transgenic mice reduces the susceptibility to chemically-induced multistep skin carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kunstfeld, Rainer; Hawighorst, Thomas; Streit, Michael; Hong, Young-Kwon; Nguyen, Lynh; Brown, Lawrence F.; Detmar, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Background We have previously reported stromal upregulation of the endogenous angiogenesis inhibitor thrombospondin-2 (TSP-2) during multistep carcinogenesis, and we found accelerated and enhanced skin angiogenesis and carcinogenesis in TSP-2 deficient mice. Goals To investigate whether enhanced levels of TSP-2 might protect from skin cancer development. Methods We established transgenic mice with targeted overexpression of TSP-2 in the skin and subjected hemizygous TSP-2 transgenic mice and their wild-type littermates to a chemical skin carcinogenesis regimen. Results TSP-2 transgenic mice showed a significantly delayed onset of tumor formation compared to wild-type mice, whereas the ratio of malignant conversion to squamous cell carcinomas was comparable in both genotypes. Computer-assisted morphometric analysis of blood vessels revealed pronounced tumor angiogenesis already in the early stages of carcinogenesis in wild type mice. TSP-2 overexpression significantly reduced tumor blood vessel density in transgenic mice but had no overt effect on LYVE-1 positive lymphatic vessels. The percentage of desmin surrounded, mature tumor-associated blood vessels and the degree of epithelial differentiation remained unaffected. The antiangiogenic effect of transgenic TSP-2 was accompanied by a significantly increased number of apoptotic tumor cells in transgenic mice. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that enhanced levels of TSP-2 in the skin result in reduced susceptibility to chemically-induced skin carcinogenesis and identify TSP-2 as a new target for the prevention of skin cancer. PMID:24507936

  9. Targeting Slit-Roundabout signaling inhibits tumor angiogenesis in chemical-induced squamous cell carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li-Jing; Zhao, Yuan; Han, Bing; Ma, Yu-Guang; Zhang, Jie; Yang, Ding-Ming; Mao, Jian-Wen; Tang, Fu-Tian; Li, Wei-Dong; Yang, Yang; Wang, Rui; Geng, Jian-Guo

    2008-03-01

    Slit is a secreted protein known to function through the Roundabout (Robo) receptor as a repellent for axon guidance and neuronal migration, and as an inhibitor in leukocyte chemotaxis. We have previously shown that Slit2 is also secreted by a variety of human cancer cells whereby it acts as a chemoattractant to vascular endothelial cells for tumor angiogenesis. We used a blocking antibody to investigate the role of Slit-Robo signaling in tumor angiogenesis during oral carcinogenesis. In this report we undertook a multistage model of 7,12-dimethyl-1,2-benzanthracene-induced squamous cell carcinoma in the hamster buccal pouch. R5, a monoclonal antibody against the first immunoglobulin domain of Robo1, was used to study whether R5 blocks the Slit-Robo interaction and furthermore inhibits tumor angiogenesis and growth in our model. In addition, the expression of Slit2, von Willebrand factor, and vascular endothelial growth factor were examined using human tissue of oral cheek mucosa with oral squamous cell carcinoma. Our data showed that Slit2 was expressed minimally in normal and hyperplastic mucosa, moderately in dysplastic mucosa, and highly in neoplastic mucosa obtained from hamster buccal pouch. We also found that increased Slit2 expression was associated with higher tumor angiogenesis, as reflected by increased vascular endothelial growth factor expression and microvessel density. A similar Slit2 expression profile was found in human tissue. Importantly, interruption of the Slit2-Robo interaction using R5 inhibited tumor angiogenesis and growth in our in vivo model, which indicates that Slit2-mediated tumor angiogenesis is a critical process underlying the carcinogenesis of chemical-induced squamous cell carcinoma. Therefore, targeting Slit-Robo signaling may offer a novel antiangiogenesis approach for oral cancer therapy.

  10. Chemopreventive effect of sinapic acid on 1,2-dimethylhydrazine-induced experimental rat colon carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Balaji, C; Muthukumaran, J; Nalini, N

    2014-12-01

    Sinapic acid (SA) is a naturally occurring phenolic acid found in various herbal plants which is attributed with numerous pharmacological properties. This study was aimed to investigate the chemopreventive effect of SA on 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH)-induced rat colon carcinogenesis. Rats were treated with DMH injections (20 mg kg(-1) bodyweight (b.w.) subcutaneously once a week for the first 4 consecutive weeks and SA (20, 40 and 80 mg kg(-1) b.w.) post orally for 16 weeks. At the end of the 16-week experimental period, all the rats were killed, and the tissues were evaluated biochemically. Our results reveal that DMH alone treatment decreased the levels/activities of lipid peroxidation by-products such as thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, conjugated dienes and antioxidants such as superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione reductase, glutathione peroxidase and reduced glutathione in the intestine and colonic tissues which were reversed on supplementation with SA. Moreover, the activities of drug-metabolizing enzymes of phase I (cytochrome P450 and P4502E1) were enhanced and those of phase II (glutathione-S-transferase, DT-diaphorase and uridine diphosphate glucuronosyl transferase) were diminished in the liver and colonic mucosa of DMH alone-treated rats and were reversed on supplementation with SA. All the above changes were supported by the histopathological observations of the rat liver and colon. These findings suggest that SA at the dose of 40 mg kg(-1) b.w. was the most effective dose against DMH-induced colon carcinogenesis, and thus, SA could be used as a potential chemopreventive agent.

  11. In vitro and in vivo studies on antitumor effects of gossypol on human stomach adenocarcinoma (AGS) cell line and MNNG induced experimental gastric cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Gunassekaran, G.R.; Kalpana Deepa Priya, D.; Gayathri, R.; Sakthisekaran, D.

    2011-08-12

    Highlights: {yields} Gossypol is a well known polyphenolic compound used for anticancer studies but we are the first to report that gossypol has antitumor effect on MNNG induced gastric cancer in experimental animal models. {yields} Our study shows that gossypol inhibits the proliferation of AGS (human gastric adenocarcinoma) cell line. {yields} In animal models, gossypol extends the survival of cancer bearing animals and also protects the cells from carcinogenic effect. {yields} So we suggest that gossypol would be a potential chemotherapeutic and chemopreventive agent for gastric cancer. -- Abstract: The present study has evaluated the chemopreventive effects of gossypol on N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG)-induced gastric carcinogenesis and on human gastric adenocarcinoma (AGS) cell line. Gossypol, C{sub 30}H{sub 30}O{sub 8}, is a polyphenolic compound that has anti proliferative effect and induces apoptosis in various cancer cells. The aim of this work was to delineate in vivo and in vitro anti-initiating mechanisms of orally administered gossypol in target (stomach) tissues and in human gastric adenocarcinoma (AGS) cell line. In vitro results prove that gossypol has potent cytotoxic effect and inhibit the proliferation of adenocarcinoma (AGS) cell line. In vivo results prove gossypol to be successful in prolonging the survival of MNNG induced cancer bearing animals and in delaying the onset of tumor in animals administrated with gossypol and MNNG simultaneously. Examination of the target (stomach) tissues in sacrificed experimental animals shows that administration of gossypol significantly reduces the level of tumor marker enzyme (carcino embryonic antigen) and pepsin. The level of Nucleic acid contents (DNA and RNA) significantly reduces, and the membrane damage of glycoprotein subsides, in the target tissues of cancer bearing animals, with the administration of gossypol. These data suggest that gossypol may create a beneficial effect in patients

  12. Modifying effects of Terminalia catappa on azoxymethane-induced colon carcinogenesis in male F344 rats.

    PubMed

    Morioka, T; Suzui, M; Nabandith, V; Inamine, M; Aniya, Y; Nakayama, T; Ichiba, T; Yoshimi, N

    2005-04-01

    The modifying effects of dietary administration of an herb, Terminalia catappa (TC), were investigated on rat colon carcinogenesis induced by a carcinogen azoxymethane (AOM). The number of aberrant crypt foci (ACF) and beta-catenin accumulated crypts (BCACs) in the colon, and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) labelling index in the colonic epithelium were examined in a total of 36 male F344 rats. All animals were randomly divided into five experimental groups (4-10 rats in each group). At 6 weeks of age, rats in groups 1, 2 and 3 were given s.c. injections of AOM once a week for 2 weeks at a concentration of 20 mg/kg body weight. One week before the first injection of AOM, rats in groups 2 and 3 were fed a diet containing 0.02 and 0.1% TC, respectively, throughout the experiment. Rats in group 4 were fed a diet containing 0.1% TC. Rats in group 5 were served as untreated controls. All animals were sacrificed at the experimental week 5 after the start of the experiment. Oral administration of TC at both doses significantly decreased the numbers of both ACF/colon/rat (P<0.05 for 0.02% TC, P<0.005 for 0.1% TC) and BCAC/cm/rat (P<0.05 for both 0.02 and 0.1% TC), when compared with the control group (group 1). Colonic PCNA labelling index in groups 2 and 3 was also significantly lower than that in group 1 (P<0.001 for 0.02% TC, P<0.005 for 0.1% TC). These results suggest that TC has a potent short-term chemopreventive effect on biomarkers of colon carcinogenesis and this effect may be associated with the inhibition of the development of ACF and BCACs.

  13. Formation of acrolein-derived 2'-deoxyadenosine adduct in an iron-induced carcinogenesis model.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Yoshichika; Furuhata, Atsunori; Toyokuni, Shinya; Aratani, Yasuaki; Uchida, Koji

    2003-12-12

    Acrolein is a representative carcinogenic aldehyde found ubiquitously in the environment and formed endogenously through oxidation reactions, such as lipid peroxidation and myeloperoxidase-catalyzed amino acid oxidation. It shows facile reactivity toward DNA to form an exocyclic DNA adduct. To verify the formation of acrolein-derived DNA adduct under oxidative stress in vivo, we raised a novel monoclonal antibody (mAb21) against the acrolein-modified DNA and found that the antibody most significantly recognized an acrolein-modified 2' -deoxyadenosine. On the basis of chemical and spectroscopic evidence, the major antigenic product of mAb21 was the 1,N6-propano-2' -deoxyadenosine adduct. The exposure of rat liver epithelial RL34 cells to acrolein resulted in a significant accumulation of the acrolein-2' -deoxyadenosine adduct in the nuclei. Formation of this adduct under oxidative stress in vivo was immunohistochemically examined in rats exposed to ferric nitrilotriacetate, a carcinogenic iron chelate that specifically induces oxidative stress in the kidneys of rodents. It was observed that the acrolein-2' -deoxyadenosine adduct was formed in the nuclei of the proximal tubular cells, the target cells of this carcinogenesis model. The same cells were stained with a monoclonal antibody 5F6 that recognizes an acrolein-lysine adduct, by which cytosolic accumulation of acrolein-modified proteins appeared. Similar results were also obtained from myeloperoxidase knockout mice exposed to the iron complex, suggesting that the myeloperoxidase-catalyzed oxidation system might not be essential for the generation of acrolein in this experimental animal carcinogenesis model. The data obtained in this study suggest that the formation of a carcinogenic aldehyde through lipid peroxidation may be causally involved in the pathophysiological effects associated with oxidative stress.

  14. Chemopreventive effect of Cynodon dactylon (L.) Pers. extract against DMH-induced colon carcinogenesis in experimental animals.

    PubMed

    Albert-Baskar, Arul; Ignacimuthu, Savarimuthu

    2010-07-01

    The present study was aimed at evaluating the chemopreventive property of Cynodon dactylon. The antioxidant, antiproliferative and apoptotic potentials of the plant were investigated by 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) assay, nitric oxide radical scavenging activity (NO(-)) and MTT assay on four cancer cell lines (COLO 320 DM, MCH-7, AGS, A549) and a normal cell line (VERO). In vivo chemopreventive property of the plant extract was studied in DMH-induced colon carcinogenesis. The methanolic extract of C. dactylon was found to be antiproliferative and antioxidative at lower concentrations and induced apoptotic cell death in COLO 320 DM cells. Treatment with methanolic extract of C. dactylon increased the levels of antioxidant enzymes and reduced the number of dysplastic crypts in DMH-induced colon of albino rats. The present investigation revealed the anticancer potential of methanolic extract of C. dactylon in COLO 320 DM cells and experimentally induced colon carcinogenesis in rats.

  15. Mechanisms of epigenetic silencing of the Rassf1a gene during estrogen-induced breast carcinogenesis in ACI rats.

    PubMed

    Starlard-Davenport, Athena; Tryndyak, Volodymyr P; James, Smitha R; Karpf, Adam R; Latendresse, John R; Beland, Frederick A; Pogribny, Igor P

    2010-03-01

    Breast cancer, the most common malignancy in women, emerges through a multistep process, encompassing the progressive sequential evolution of morphologically distinct stages from a normal cell to hyperplasia (with and without atypia), carcinoma in situ, invasive carcinoma and metastasis. The success of treatment of breast cancer could be greatly improved by the detection at early stages of cancer. In the present study, we investigated the underlying molecular mechanisms involved in breast carcinogenesis in Augustus and Copenhagen-Irish female rats, a cross between the ACI strains, induced by continuous exposure to 17beta-estradiol. The results of our study demonstrate that early stages of estrogen-induced breast carcinogenesis are characterized by altered global DNA methylation, aberrant expression of proteins responsible for the proper maintenance of DNA methylation pattern and epigenetic silencing of the critical Rassf1a (Ras-association domain family 1, isoform A) tumor suppressor gene. Interestingly, transcriptional repression of the Rassf1a gene in mammary glands during early stages of breast carcinogenesis was associated with an increase in trimethylation of histones H3 lysine 9 and H3 lysine 27 and de novo CpG island methylation and at the Rassf1a promoter and first exon. In conclusion, we demonstrate that epigenetic alterations precede formation of preneoplastic lesions indicating the significance of epigenetic events in induction of oncogenic pathways in early stages of carcinogenesis.

  16. Aripiprazole an atypical antipsychotic protects against ethanol induced gastric ulcers in rats

    PubMed Central

    Asmari, Abdulrahman Al; Arshaduddin, Mohammed; Elfaki, Ibrahim; Kadasah, Saeed; Robayan, Abdulrahman Al; Asmary, Saeed Al

    2014-01-01

    The present investigation was undertaken, to study the gastro-protective potential of aripiprazole (ARI) an atypical antipsychotic drug in ethanol induced gastric ulcers in rats. ARI (10, 30, 100 mg/kg) was tested for gastric secretion and antiulcer activity in different groups of male Sprague Dawley rats. Gastric secretion and acidity studies were performed in pylorus ligated rats while indices of gastric ulcers were measured in ethanol (1 ml-100%) induced gastric ulcers. Histological changes and the levels of gastric wall mucus, malondialdehyde (MDA), non-protein sulfhydryls (NP-SH), myeloperoxidase (MPO), and serotonin were used to assess ethanol induced gastric mucosal injuries. Exposure of rats to ethanol resulted in gastric mucosal injury and a high index of ulcer. Pretreatment with ARI significantly (P < 0.001), reduced the gastric lesions induced by ethanol and also resulted in a significant decrease in the gastric secretion, and total acidity in pylorus ligated rats. ARI also significantly attenuated the ethanol induced reduction in the levels of gastric wall mucus, and NP-SH (P < 0.001). The histological changes and the increased MDA and MPO activity were also significantly (P < 0.001) inhibited by ARI. Ethanol induced depletion in the levels of serotonin in the gastric tissue were also significantly restored by pretreatment with ARI (p < 0.001). ARI showed significant antiulcer and gastroprotective activity against ethanol induced gastric ulcers. The gastroprotective effects of ARI may be due to its anti-secretory, antioxidant and anti-inflammatory action and also due to the restoration of the depleted gastric serotonin levels. PMID:25232384

  17. YWHAE silencing induces cell proliferation, invasion and migration through the up-regulation of CDC25B and MYC in gastric cancer cells: new insights about YWHAE role in the tumor development and metastasis process.

    PubMed

    Leal, Mariana Ferreira; Ribeiro, Helem Ferreira; Rey, Juan Antonio; Pinto, Giovanny Rebouças; Smith, Marília Cardoso; Moreira-Nunes, Caroline Aquino; Assumpção, Paulo Pimentel; Lamarão, Leticia Martins; Calcagno, Danielle Queiroz; Montenegro, Raquel Carvalho; Burbano, Rommel Rodriguez

    2016-12-20

    We previously observed reduced YWHAE (14-3-3ε) protein expression in a small set of gastric cancer samples. YWHAE may act as a negative regulator of the cyclin CDC25B, which is a transcriptional target of MYC oncogene. The understanding of YWHAE role and its targets is important for the better knowledge of gastric carcinogenesis. Thus, we aimed to evaluate the relationship among YWHAE, CDC25B, and MYC in vitro and in vivo. For this, we analyzed the YWHAE, CDC25B, and MYC expression in YWHA-silenced, CDC25B-silenced, and MYC-silenced gastric cancer cell lines, as well as in gastric cancer and non-neoplastic gastric samples. In gastric cancer cell lines, YWHAE was able to inhibit the cell proliferation, invasion and migration through the reduction of MYC and CDC25B expression. Conversely, MYC induced the cell proliferation, invasion and migration through the induction of CDC25B and the reduction of YWHAE. Most of the tumors presented reduced YWHAE and increased CDC25B expression, which seems to be important for tumor development. Increased MYC expression was a common finding in gastric cancer and has a role in poor prognosis. In the tumor initiation, the opposite role of YWHAE and CDC25B in gastric carcinogenesis seems to be independent of MYC expression. However, the inversely correlation between YWHAE and MYC expression seems to be important for gastric cancer cells invasion and migration. The interaction between YWHAE and MYC and the activation of the pathways related to this interaction play a role in the metastasis process.

  18. Calcium accentuates injury induced by ethanol in human gastric cells.

    PubMed

    Kokoska, E R; Smith, G S; Deshpande, Y; Wolff, A B; Rieckenberg, C; Miller, T A

    1999-01-01

    The mechanism(s) whereby ethanol induces cellular injury remains poorly understood. Furthermore, the role of calcium in gastric mucosal injury under in vitro conditions is poorly defined. The major objectives of this study were to (1) define the temporal relationship between intracellular calcium accumulation induced by ethanol and cellular injury, (2) characterize the mechanism(s) whereby ethanol increases cellular calcium content, and (3) determine whether calcium removal would attenuate ethanol-induced cellular injury. Human gastric cells (AGS) were used for all experiments. Sustained intracellular calcium accumulation induced by ethanol, but not transient changes, preceded and directly correlated with cellular injury. Cells exposed to damaging concentrations of ethanol demonstrated an initial calcium surge that appeared to be a consequence of inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3) generation and subsequent internal store release followed by a sustained plateau resulting from extracellular calcium influx through store-operated calcium channels. Finally, both morphologic (cellular injury) and functional (clearance of bovine serum albumin) changes induced by ethanol were significantly attenuated when extracellular Ca(+&plus) influx was prevented, and further decreased when intracellular Ca(++) stores were depleted. These data indicate that calcium plays a significant role in cellular injury induced by ethanol.

  19. Soluble Epoxide Hydrolase Deficiency Inhibits Dextran Sulfate Sodium-induced Colitis and Carcinogenesis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    DONG, HUA; LIAO, JIE; HAMMOCK, BRUCE D.; YANG, GUANG-YU

    2014-01-01

    Soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) hydrolyses/inactivates anti-inflammatory epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) to their corresponding diols, and targeting sEH leads to strong anti-inflammatory effects. In the present study, using a tissue microarray and immunohistochemical approach, a significant increase of sEH expression was identified in ulcerative colitis (UC)-associated dysplasia and adenocarcinoma. The effects of deficiency in the sEH gene were determined on dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) colitis-induced carcinogenesis. The effects of EETs on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated macrophages were analyzed in vitro. With extensive histopathological and immunohistochemical analyses, compared to wild-type mice, sEH−/− mice exhibited a significant decrease in tumor incidence (13/20 vs. 6/19, p<0.05) and a markedly reduced average tumor size (59.62±20.91 mm3 vs. 22.42±11.22 mm3), and a significant number of pre-cancerous dysplasia (3±1.18 vs. 2±0.83, p<0.01). The inflammatory activity, as measured by the extent/proportion of erosion/ulceration/dense lymphoplasmacytosis (called active colitis index) in the colon, was significantly lower in sEH−/− mice (44.7%±24.9% vs. 20.2%±16.2%, p<0.01). The quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assays demonstrated significantly low levels of cytokines/chemokines including monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP-1), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), vasopressin-activated calcium-mobilizing (VCAM-1), interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α). In vitro, LPS-activated macrophages treated with 14,15-EET showed a significant reduction of LPS-triggered IL-1β and TNF-α expression. Eicosanoic acid metabolic profiling revealed a significant increase of the ratios of EETs/dihydroeicosatrienoic acids (DHETs) and epoxyoctadecennoic acid/dihydroxyoctadecenoic acid (EpOMEs/DiHOMEs). These results indicate that sEH plays an important role in the development of colitis and in inducing carcinogenesis

  20. The Role of TLR2, TLR4 and CD14 Genetic Polymorphisms in Gastric Carcinogenesis: A Case-Control Study and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Castaño-Rodríguez, Natalia; Kaakoush, Nadeem O.; Goh, Khean-Lee; Fock, Kwong Ming; Mitchell, Hazel M.

    2013-01-01

    Background In addition to Helicobacter pylori infection, host genetic factors contribute to gastric cancer (GC). Recognition of H. pylori is known to involve Toll-like receptors (TLR), which subsequently leads to activation of NF-κB. Thus, the overall aim of this study was to estimate for the first time the pooled effect size of polymorphisms in TLR2, TLR4 and CD14 on GC development through a meta-analysis. Methods A case-control study comprising 284 ethnic Chinese individuals (70 non-cardia GC cases and 214 functional dyspepsia controls) was conducted for the genotyping of TLR2 -196 to -174del, CD14 -260 C/T and TLR4 rs11536889 using PCR, RT-PCR and mass spectrometry. Case-control studies of TLR2, TLR4 and CD14 polymorphisms and GC were searched up to June 2012. Pooled odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were obtained by means of the random effects model. Results In our ethnic Chinese case-control study, the TLR4 rs11536889 C allele increased the risk of GC (OR: 1.89, 95%CI: 1.23–2.92) while the CD14 -260 T allele was protective (OR: 0.62, 95%CI: 0.42–0.91). TLR2 -196 to -174 increased the risk of GC only in H. pylori-infected individuals (OR: 3.10, 95%CI: 1.27–7.60). In the meta-analysis, TLR4 Asp299Gly showed borderline results in the general analysis (pooled OR: 1.58, 95%CI: 0.98–2.60), nevertheless, stratified analysis by ethnicity showed that the mutant allele was a definitive risk factor for GC in Western populations (pooled OR: 1.87, 95%CI: 1.31–2.65). There was a potential association between the TLR2 -196 to -174 deletion allele and GC in Japanese (pooled OR: 1.18, 95%CI: 0.96–1.45). TLR4 Thr399Ile did not provide significant results. Conclusions TLR4 rs11536889 and CD14 -260 C/T are associated with non-cardia GC in Chinese. Based on our meta-analysis, the TLR signalling pathway is involved in gastric carcinogenesis, TLR4 Asp299Gly and TLR2 -196 to -174del showing associations with GC in an ethnic-specific manner. PMID:23565226

  1. Iron overload as a major targetable pathogenesis of asbestos-induced mesothelial carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Toyokuni, Shinya

    2014-01-01

    Few people expected that asbestos, a fibrous mineral, would be carcinogenic to humans. In fact, asbestos is a definite carcinogen in humans, causing a rare but aggressive cancer called malignant mesothelioma (MM). Mesothelial cells line the three somatic cavities and thus do not face the outer surface, but reduce the friction among numerous moving organs. MM has several characteristics: extremely long incubation period of 30-40 years after asbestos exposure, difficulty in clinical diagnosis at an early stage, and poor prognosis even under the current multimodal therapies. In Japan, 'Kubota shock' attracted considerable social attention in 2005 for asbestos-induced mesothelioma and, thereafter, the government enacted a law to provide the people suffering from MM a financial allowance. Several lines of recent evidence suggest that the major pathology associated with asbestos-induced MM is local iron overload, associated with asbestos exposure. Preclinical studies to prevent MM after asbestos exposure with iron reduction are in progress. In addition, novel target genes in mesothelial carcinogenesis have been discovered with recently recognized mesothelioma-prone families. Development of an effective preventive strategy is eagerly anticipated because of the long incubation period for MM.

  2. Summary of chemically induced pulmonary lesions in the National Toxicology Program (NTP) toxicology and carcinogenesis studies.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Darlene; Herbert, Ronald A; Kissling, Grace E; Brix, Amy E; Miller, Rodney A; Maronpot, Robert R

    2008-04-01

    The lung is the second most common target site of neoplasia of chemicals tested by the National Toxicology Program (NTP). Of all peer-reviewed NTP studies to date (N = 545), a total of sixty-four chemicals in sixty-six reports produced significant site-specific neoplasia in the lungs of rats and/or mice. Of the studies associated with lung tumor induction, approximately 35% were inhalation and 35% were gavage studies, with dosed-feed, dosed-water, topical, intraperitoneal, or in utero routes of chemical administration accounting for 18%, 6%, 3%, 1%, and 1% of the studies, respectively. The most commonly induced lung tumors were alveolar/bronchiolar (A/B) adenoma and/or carcinoma for both species. The most frequently observed nonneoplastic lesions included hyperplasia and inflammation in both species. The liver was the most common primary site of origin of metastatic lesions to the lungs of mice; however, skin was most often the primary site of origin of metastatic lesions to the lungs of rats. In summary, A/B adenoma and carcinoma were the most frequently diagnosed chemically induced tumors in the lungs of both rats and mice in the NTP toxicology and carcinogenesis bioassays, and hyperplasia and inflammation were the most common nonneoplastic changes observed.

  3. Epidermal Rac1 regulates the DNA damage response and protects from UV-light-induced keratinocyte apoptosis and skin carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Deshmukh, Jayesh; Pofahl, Ruth; Haase, Ingo

    2017-03-09

    Non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) is the most common type of cancer. Increased expression and activity of Rac1, a small Rho GTPase, has been shown previously in NMSC and other human cancers; suggesting that Rac1 may function as an oncogene in skin. DMBA/TPA skin carcinogenesis studies in mice have shown that Rac1 is required for chemically induced skin papilloma formation. However, UVB radiation by the sun, which causes DNA damage, is the most relevant cause for NMSC. A potential role of Rac1 in UV-light-induced skin carcinogenesis has not been investigated so far. To investigate this, we irradiated mice with epidermal Rac1 deficiency (Rac1-EKO) and their controls using a well-established protocol for long-term UV-irradiation. Most of the Rac1-EKO mice developed severe skin erosions upon long-term UV-irradiation, unlike their controls. These skin erosions in Rac1-EKO mice healed subsequently. Surprisingly, we observed development of squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) within the UV-irradiation fields. This shows that the presence of Rac1 in the epidermis protects from UV-light-induced skin carcinogenesis. Short-term UV-irradiation experiments revealed increased UV-light-induced apoptosis of Rac1-deficient epidermal keratinocytes in vitro as well as in vivo. Further investigations using cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer photolyase transgenic mice revealed that the observed increase in UV-light-induced keratinocyte apoptosis in Rac1-EKO mice is DNA damage dependent and correlates with caspase-8 activation. Furthermore, Rac1-deficient keratinocytes showed reduced levels of p53, γ-H2AX and p-Chk1 suggesting an attenuated DNA damage response upon UV-irradiation. Taken together, our data provide direct evidence for a protective role of Rac1 in UV-light-induced skin carcinogenesis and keratinocyte apoptosis probably through regulating mechanisms of the DNA damage response and repair pathways.

  4. Notch1 directly induced CD133 expression in human diffuse type gastric cancers

    PubMed Central

    Konishi, Hidetomo; Asano, Naoki; Imatani, Akira; Kimura, Osamu; Kondo, Yutaka; Jin, Xiaoyi; Kanno, Takeshi; Hatta, Waku; Ara, Nobuyuki; Asanuma, Kiyotaka; Koike, Tomoyuki; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2016-01-01

    CD133 is considered as a stem-like cell marker in some cancers including gastric cancers, and Notch1 signaling is known to play an important role in the maintenance and differentiation of stem-like cells. We aimed to investigate whether Notch1 signaling contributes to the carcinogenesis of gastric cancers and CD133 induction. CD133 expression was detected in 51.4% of diffuse type gastric cancers while it was not detected in intestinal type gastric cancers. Similarly, only poorly-differentiated gastric cancer cell lines expressed CD133 and activated-Notch1. Inhibiting Notch1 signaling resulted in decreased CD133 expression, side population cells, cell proliferation and anchorage independent cell growth. Chromatin immunoprecipitation suggested that this Notch1 dependent regulation of CD133 was caused by direct binding of activated-Notch1 to the RBP-Jκ binding site in the 5′ promoter region of CD133 gene. In addition, knocking down RBP-Jκ reduced CD133 induction in activated-Notch1 transfected cells. These findings suggested that Notch1 signaling plays an important role in the maintenance of the cancer stem-like phenotype in diffuse type gastric cancer through an RBP-Jκ dependent pathway and that inhibiting Notch1 signaling could be an effective therapy against CD133 positive diffuse type gastric cancers. PMID:27489358

  5. DNA repair by MGMT, but not AAG, causes a threshold in alkylation-induced colorectal carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Fahrer, Jörg; Frisch, Janina; Nagel, Georg; Kraus, Alexander; Dörsam, Bastian; Thomas, Adam D; Reißig, Sonja; Waisman, Ari; Kaina, Bernd

    2015-10-01

    Epidemiological studies indicate that N-nitroso compounds (NOC) are causally linked to colorectal cancer (CRC). NOC induce DNA alkylations, including O (6)-methylguanine (O (6)-MeG) and N-methylated purines, which are repaired by O (6)-MeG-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) and N-alkyladenine-DNA glycosylase (AAG)-initiated base excision repair, respectively. In view of recent evidence of nonlinear mutagenicity for NOC-like compounds, the question arises as to the existence of threshold doses in CRC formation. Here, we set out to determine the impact of DNA repair on the dose-response of alkylation-induced CRC. DNA repair proficient (WT) and deficient (Mgmt (-/-), Aag (-/-) and Mgmt (-/-)/Aag (-/-)) mice were treated with azoxymethane (AOM) and dextran sodium sulfate to trigger CRC. Tumors were quantified by non-invasive mini-endoscopy. A non-linear increase in CRC formation was observed in WT and Aag (-/-) mice. In contrast, a linear dose-dependent increase in tumor frequency was found in Mgmt (-/-) and Mgmt (-/-)/Aag (-/-) mice. The data were corroborated by hockey stick modeling, yielding similar carcinogenic thresholds for WT and Aag (-/-) and no threshold for MGMT lacking mice. O (6)-MeG levels and depletion of MGMT correlated well with the observed dose-response in CRC formation. AOM induced dose-dependently DNA double-strand breaks in colon crypts including Lgr5-positive colon stem cells, which coincided with ATR-Chk1-p53 signaling. Intriguingly, Mgmt (-/-) mice displayed significantly enhanced levels of γ-H2AX, suggesting the usefulness of γ-H2AX as an early genotoxicity marker in the colorectum. This study demonstrates for the first time a non-linear dose-response for alkylation-induced colorectal carcinogenesis and reveals DNA repair by MGMT, but not AAG, as a key node in determining a carcinogenic threshold.

  6. Beef meat promotion of dimethylhydrazine-induced colorectal carcinogenesis biomarkers is suppressed by dietary calcium.

    PubMed

    Pierre, Fabrice; Santarelli, Raphaëlle; Taché, Sylviane; Guéraud, Françoise; Corpet, Denis E

    2008-05-01

    Red meat consumption is associated with increased risk of colorectal cancer. We have previously shown that haemin, Hb and red meat promote carcinogen-induced preneoplastic lesions: aberrant crypt foci (ACF) and mucin-depleted foci (MDF) in rats. We have also shown that dietary Ca, antioxidant mix and olive oil inhibit haemin-induced ACF promotion, and normalize faecal lipoperoxides and cytotoxicity. Here we tested if these strategies are effective also against red meat promotion in dimethylhydrazine-induced rats. Three diets with 60 % beef meat were supplemented with calcium phosphate (31 g/kg), antioxidant agents (rutin and butylated hydroxyanisole, 0.05 % each) and olive oil (5 %). ACF, MDF, faecal water cytotoxicity, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and urinary 1,4-dihydroxynonane mercapturic acid (DHN-MA) were measured. Beef meat diet increased the number of ACF (+30 %) and MDF (+100 %) (P < 0.001), which confirms our previous findings. Promotion was associated with increased faecal water TBARs ( x 4) and cytotoxicity ( x 2), and urinary DHN-MA excretion ( x 15). Ca fully inhibited beef meat-induced ACF and MDF promotion, and normalized faecal TBARS and cytotoxicity, but did not reduce urinary DHN-MA. Unexpectedly, high-calcium control diet-fed rats had more MDF and ACF in the colon than low-Ca control diet-fed rats. Antioxidant mix and olive oil did not normalize beef meat promotion nor biochemical factors. The results confirm that haem causes promotion of colon carcinogenesis by red meat. They suggest that Ca can reduce colorectal cancer risk in meat-eaters. The results support the concept that toxicity associated with the excess of a useful nutrient may be prevented by another nutrient.

  7. Protective effect of Matricaria chamomilla on ethanol-induced acute gastric mucosal injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Cemek, Mustafa; Yilmaz, Ezgi; Büyükokuroğlu, Mehmet Emin

    2010-07-01

    The antiulcerogenic and antioxidant properties of Matricaria chamomilla L. (Compositae) hydroalcoholic extract (MCE) on ethanol-induced gastric mucosal injury were investigated in rats. After the induction of gastric mucosal injury, all groups were sacrificed; the gastric ulcer index was calculated, and malondialdehyde (MDA) and reduced glutathione (GSH) in whole blood and gastric tissue, and serum ascorbic acid, retinol, and beta-carotene levels were measured in all groups. Pretreatment with MCE at some doses significantly reduced gastric lesions. Again, some doses of MCE significantly reduced the MDA, and significantly increased GSH levels in gastric tissue or whole blood. Serum beta-carotene and retinol levels were significantly higher in the 200 mg/kg MCE-administered group with respect to control. As a result, MCE clearly has a protective effect against ethanol-induced gastric mucosal lesions, and this effect, at least in part, depends upon the reduction in lipid peroxidation and augmentation in antioxidant activity.

  8. Multi-step lung carcinogenesis model induced by oral administration of N-nitrosobis(2-hydroxypropyl)amine in rats.

    PubMed

    Tsujiuchi, Toshifumi; Nakae, Dai; Konishi, Yoichi

    2014-03-01

    N-Nitrosobis(2-hydroxypropyl)amine (BHP) was first synthesized by Krüger et al. (1974), and has been shown to primarily induce pancreatic duct adenocarcinomas by a subcutaneous injection in Syrian hamsters. By contrast, the carcinogenic effect of BHP has been indicated at the different target organs in rats, namely the lung. When rats are received by an oral administration of BHP in drinking water for 25 weeks, a high incidence of lung carcinomas are induced, which include adenocarcinomas, squamous cell carcinomas and combined squamous cell and adenocarcinomas. So many similarities are observed in terms of not only histological appearances but also gene alterations between human and BHP-induced rat lung cancers. Moreover, the step by step development of lung lesions, from preneoplastic lesions to cancers in rat lung carcinogenesis by BHP offers a good model to investigate the mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of lung cancers. Because data for genetic and epigenetic alterations have indeed been accumulated during the BHP-induced rat lung carcinogenesis, we will introduce them in this review and hence demonstrate that this lung carcinogenesis model provides a useful opportunity for the research on the pathogenesis of lung cancers of both humans and rats.

  9. Sensations induced by medium and long chain triglycerides: role of gastric tone and hormones

    PubMed Central

    Barbera, R; Peracchi, M; Brighenti, F; Cesana, B; Bianchi, P; Basilisco, G

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—The relative roles of gastric relaxation and the neuroendocrine signals released by the small intestine in the perception of nutrient induced sensations are controversial. The different effects of long chain (LCT) and medium chain (MCT) triglyceride ingestion on perception, gastric relaxation, and hormonal release may help to elucidate the mechanisms underlying nutrient induced sensations.
AIMS—To compare the effects of intraduodenal LCT and MCT infusions on perception, gastric tone, and plasma gut hormone levels in healthy subjects.
SUBJECTS—Nine fasting healthy volunteers.
METHODS—The subjects received duodenal infusions of saline followed by LCTs and MCTs in a randomised order on two different days. The sensations were rated on a visual analogue scale. Gastric tone was measured using a barostat, and plasma gut hormone levels by radioimmunoassay.
RESULTS—LCT infusion increased satiation scores, reduced gastric tone, and increased the levels of plasma cholecystokinin, gastric inhibitory polypeptide, neurotensin, and pancreatic polypeptide. MCT infusion reduced gastric tone but did not significantly affect perception or plasma gut hormone levels. LCTs produced greater gastric relaxation than MCTs.
CONCLUSIONS—The satiation induced by intraduodenal LCT infusion seems to involve changes in gastric tone and plasma gut hormone levels. The gastric relaxation induced by MCT infusion, together with the absence of any significant change in satiation scores and plasma hormone levels, suggests that, at least up to a certain level, gastric relaxation is not sufficient to induce satiation and that nutrient induced gastric relaxation may occur through cholecystokinin independent mechanisms.


Keywords: gastric tone; triglyceride; hormones; satiation; cholecystokinin; nutrients PMID:10601051

  10. A Role for HSP70 in Protecting against Indomethacin-induced Gastric Lesions*

    PubMed Central

    Suemasu, Shintaro; Tanaka, Ken-Ichiro; Namba, Takushi; Ishihara, Tomoaki; Katsu, Takashi; Fujimoto, Mitsuaki; Adachi, Hiroaki; Sobue, Gen; Takeuchi, Koji; Nakai, Akira; Mizushima, Tohru

    2009-01-01

    A major clinical problem encountered with the use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), such as indomethacin, is gastrointestinal complications. Both NSAID-dependent cyclooxygenase inhibition and gastric mucosal apoptosis are involved in NSAID-produced gastric lesions, and this apoptosis is mediated by the endoplasmic reticulum stress response and resulting activation of Bax. Heat shock proteins (HSPs) have been suggested to protect gastric mucosa from NSAID-induced lesions; here we have tested this idea genetically. The severity of gastric lesions produced by indomethacin was worse in mice lacking heat shock factor 1 (HSF1), a transcription factor for hsp genes, than in control mice. Indomethacin administration up-regulated the expression of gastric mucosal HSP70. Indomethacin-induced gastric lesions were ameliorated in transgenic mice expressing HSP70. After indomethacin administration, fewer apoptotic cells were observed in the gastric mucosa of transgenic mice expressing HSP70 than in wild-type mice, whereas the gastric levels of prostaglandin E2 for the two were indistinguishable. This suggests that expression of HSP70 ameliorates indomethacin-induced gastric lesions by affecting mucosal apoptosis. Suppression of HSP70 expression in vitro stimulated indomethacin-induced apoptosis and activation of Bax but not the endoplasmic reticulum stress response. Geranylgeranylacetone induced HSP70 at gastric mucosa in an HSF1-dependent manner and suppressed the formation of indomethacin-induced gastric lesions in wild-type mice but not in HSF1-null mice. The results of this study provide direct genetic evidence that expression of HSP70 confers gastric protection against indomethacin-induced lesions by inhibiting the activation of Bax. The HSP inducing activity of geranylgeranylacetone seems to contribute to its gastroprotective activity against indomethacin. PMID:19439408

  11. Dietary tocopherols inhibit PhIP-induced prostate carcinogenesis in CYP1A-humanized mice

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jayson X.; Li, Guangxun; Wang, Hong; Liu, Anna; Lee, Mao-Jung; Reuhl, Kenneth; Suh, Nanjoo; Bosland, Maarten C.; Yang, Chung S.

    2015-01-01

    Tocopherols, the major forms of vitamin E, exist as alpha-tocopherol (α-T), β-T, γ-T and δ-T. The cancer preventive activity of vitamin E is suggested by epidemiological studies, but recent large-scale cancer prevention trials with high dose of α-T yielded disappointing results. Our hypothesis that other forms of tocopherols have higher cancer preventive activities than α-T was tested, herein, in a novel prostate carcinogenesis model induced by 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo [4,5-b] pyridine (PhIP), a dietary carcinogen, in the CYP1A-humanized (hCYP1A) mice. Treatment of hCYP1A mice with PhIP (200mg/kg b.w., i.g.) induced high percentages of mouse prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (mPIN), mainly in the dorsolateral glands. Supplementation with a γ-T-rich mixture of tocopherols (γ-TmT, 0.3% in diet) significantly inhibited the development of mPIN lesions and reduced PhIP-induced elevation of 8-oxo-deoxyguanosine, COX-2, nitrotyrosine, Ki-67 and p-AKT, and the loss of PTEN and Nrf2. Further studies with purified δ-T, γ-T or α-T (0.2% in diet) showed that δ-T was more effective than γ-T or α-T in preventing mPIN formations and p-AKT elevation. These results indicate that γ-TmT and δ-T could be effective preventive agents of prostate cancer. PMID:26582657

  12. Asb6 upregulation by Areca nut extracts is associated with betel quid-induced oral carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hung, Kai-Feng; Lai, Kuo-Chu; Liu, Tsung-Yun; Liu, Chung-Ji; Lee, Te-Chang; Lo, Jeng-Fan

    2009-06-01

    Betel quit (BQ) chewing is a popular habit, especially in southern and southeastern Asia. Areca nut extracts (ANE), the major components of BQ, have been documented to induce reactive oxygen species, and consequently to cause genetic damage. ANE usage is tightly linked to oral cancer; however, the details of the molecular mechanism that results in carcinogenesis remain unclear. Previously, we successfully established HaCaT cells surviving from the long-term exposure of sublethal doses of ANE (Lai KC, Lee TC. Genetic damage in cultured human keratinocytes stressed by long-term exposure to areca nut extracts. Mutat Res 2006;599:66-75). Here, we identified the upregulation of Asb6, a coupling protein to the APS adapter protein, which is involved in insulin signaling for glucose transportation, of normal keratinocytes and oral cancer cells under ANE treatment. Immunohistochemical analyses of Asb6 on oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) tissues (n=57) demonstrated the positive correlation between Asb6 upregulation (cancerous tissues versus adjacent normal tissues) and clinicopathological features. We showed that the combination of ANE-enhanced Asb6 expression in vitro and Asb6 upregulation in OSCC patients leads to poor survival status. In conclusion, our results suggest that upregulated Asb6 could act as a prognostic marker for oral cancer.

  13. Mucosal adaptation to aspirin induced gastric damage in humans. Studies on blood flow, gastric mucosal growth, and neutrophil activation.

    PubMed Central

    Konturek, J W; Dembinski, A; Stoll, R; Domschke, W; Konturek, S J

    1994-01-01

    The gastropathy associated with the ingestion of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as aspirin is a common side effect of this class of drugs, but the precise mechanisms by which they cause mucosal damage have not been fully explained. During continued use of an injurious substance, such as aspirin, the extent of gastric mucosal damage decreases and this phenomenon is named gastric adaptation. To assess the extent of mucosal damage by aspirin and subsequent adaptation the effects of 14 days of continuous, oral administration of aspirin (2 g per day) to eight healthy male volunteers was studied. To estimate the rate of mucosal damage, gastroscopy was performed before (day 0) and at days 3, 7, 14 of aspirin treatment. Gastric microbleeding and gastric mucosal blood flow were measured using laser Doppler flowmeter and mucosal biopsy specimens were taken for the estimation of tissue DNA synthesis and RNA and DNA concentration. In addition, the activation of neutrophils in peripheral blood was assessed by measuring their ability to associate with platelets. Aspirin induced acute damage mainly in gastric corpus, reaching at day 3 about 3.5 on the endoscopic Lanza score but lessened to about 1.5 at day 14 pointing to the occurrence of gastric adaptation. Mucosal blood flow increased at day 3 by about 50% in the gastric corpus and by 88% in the antrum. The in vitro DNA synthesis and RNA concentration, an index of mucosal growth, were reduced at day 3 but then increased to reach about 150% of initial value at the end of aspirin treatment. It is concluded that the treatment with aspirin in humans induces gastric adaptation to this agent, which entails the increase in mucosal blood flow, the rise in neutrophil activation, and the enhancement in mucosal growth. PMID:7959223

  14. The effect of childbirth on carcinogenesis of DMBA-induced breast cancer in female SD rats.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ji-An; Chen, Jin-Jun; Ju, Ying-Chao; Wu, Jian-Hua; Geng, Cui-Zhi; Yang, Hui-Chai

    2011-11-01

    Many epidemiologic and clinical studies have indicated that the frequency of breast cancer was lower in parous women than in nulliparous women. Moreover, the incidence of breast cancer has been reported to be lower in women with early childbirth than in women with late childbirth. To verify the effect of childbirth and the age at first childbirth on carcinogenesis and progression of breast cancer, we induced breast cancer by 7,12-dimethylbenanthracene (DMBA) in 120 female Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats, and divided them into control or experimental (DMBA-treated) nulliparous, early childbirth, and late childbirth groups to observe the incidence, latency, and size of breast cancer. Argyrophilic nucleolar organizer regions (AgNOR) count and the expression of C-erbB-2, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), Ki-67, and minichromosome maintenance protein 2 (MCM2) in breast cancer tissues were detected by immunohistochemistry. The breast cancer incidences were 95.0%, 16.7%, and 58.8% in the experimental nulliparous, early childbirth, and late childbirth groups, respectively (all P < 0.05). Between any two of these groups, the latency was significantly different, but tumor size was similar. AgNOR count and the expression of C-erbB-2, PCNA, Ki-67, and MCM2 were significantly higher in the experimental nulliparous group than in the experimental early or late childbirth groups (P < 0.05), but no significant differences were observed between the latter two groups. Taken together, the results suggest that childbirth, especially early childbirth, can reduce the incidence and postpone the onset of DMBA-induced breast cancer.

  15. Chemopreventive effect of zingerone against colon carcinogenesis induced by 1,2-dimethylhydrazine in rats.

    PubMed

    Vinothkumar, Rajenderan; Vinothkumar, Rajamanickam; Sudha, Mani; Nalini, Namasivayam

    2014-09-01

    Zingerone [4-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)-2-butane], one of the active phenolic components isolated from Zingiber officinale, has antioxidant and anticarcinogenic properties. In our study, we have evaluated the effect of different doses of zingerone on lipid peroxidation (thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances, lipid hydroxyl radical and conjugated dienes), tissue enzymatic antioxidants (superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase), and nonenzymatic antioxidants (reduced glutathione, vitamin E, vitamin C), and also the formation of aberrant crypt foci (ACF) in male albino Wistar rats with colon cancer induced using 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH). The rats were divided into six groups. Group 1 served as a control group and received a modified pellet diet; the rats in group 2 received a modified pellet diet along with zingerone (40 mg/kg b.w., orally every day); groups 3-6 were administered DMH (20 mg/kg b.w., subcutaneously) once a week for the first 4 weeks; and groups 4-6 received zingerone at three different doses of 10, 20 and 40 mg/kg b.w., respectively, every day for 16 weeks. Increased tumour incidence and ACF formation were accompanied by a decrease in the tissue lipid peroxidation, enzymatic and nonenzymatic antioxidant activities observed in the colon of DMH-treated rats. Supplementation with zingerone in DMH-treated rats led to a significant decrease in the tumour incidence and ACF formation with simultaneous modulation in the level of tissue lipid peroxidation and antioxidant status. Thus, in conclusion, we can suggest that zingerone effectively inhibits DMH-induced colon carcinogenesis in male Wistar rats.

  16. Effect of spices on lipid metabolism in 1,2-dimethylhydrazine-induced rat colon carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Nalini, N; Manju, V; Menon, V P

    2006-01-01

    Colon cancer is the second most common cancer among men and women worldwide. We investigated the effect of red chilli (Capsicum annum L.), cumin (Cuminum cyminum L.), and black pepper (Piper nigrum L.) on colon cancer induced in rats by a colon-specific carcinogen, 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH). Colon cancer was induced by subcutaneous injection of DMH at a dosage of 20 mg/kg of body weight (15 doses, at 1-week intervals). The rats were continued with the standard pellet diet and supplemented red chilli [C. annum L., 0.015% (wt/wt) mixed with the diet], cumin seeds [C. cyminum L., 1.25% (wt/wt) mixed with the diet], and black pepper (P. nigrum L., 0.5% (wt/wt) mixed with the diet] throughout the experimental period. After the total experimental period of 32 weeks (including 2 weeks of acclimatization) the incidence and number of tumors in the colon were observed to be significantly higher in the rats administered DMH and/or red chillis, as compared with the cumin + DMH and black pepper + DMH groups. No tumors were observed in the control, cumin + DMH, or black pepper + DMH groups. The levels of fecal bile acids and neutral sterols in 24-hour fecal samples were significantly decreased in DMH + chilli-administered rats, while the excretion of fecal bile acids and neutral sterols was significantly increased in cumin + DMH- and black pepper + DMH-administered rats. In DMH-, chilli-, and chilli + DMH-administered rats the levels of cholesterol, cholesterol/phospholipid ratio, and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase activity were decreased in cumin + DMH- and black pepper + DMH-treated rats. The phospholipid levels were reduced in the DMH, chilli, and chilli + DMH groups as compared with the cumin + DMH and black pepper + DMH groups. Our results show that chilli supplementation promotes colon carcinogenesis, whereas cumin or black pepper suppresses colon carcinogensis in the presence of the procarcinogen DMH.

  17. DNA lesions, inducible DNA repair, and cell division: Three key factors in mutagenesis and carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Ames, B.N.; Shigenaga, M.K.; Gold, L.S.

    1993-12-01

    DNA lesions that escape repair have a certain probability of giving rise to mutations when the cell divides. Endogenous DNA damage is high: 10{sup 6} oxidative lesions are present per rat cell. An exogenous mutagen produces an increment in lesions over the background rate of endogenous lesions. The effectiveness of a particular lesion depends on whether it is excised by a DNA repair system and the probability that it gives rise to a mutation when the cell divides. When the cell divides, an unrepaired DNA lesion has a certain probability of giving rise to a mutation. Thus, an important factor in the mutagenic effect of an exogenous agent whether it is genotoxic or non-genotoxic, is the increment it causes over the background cell division rate (mitogenesis) in cells that appear to matter most in cancer, the stem cells, which are not on their way to being discarded. Increasing their cell division rate increases by high doses of chemicals. If both the rate of DNA lesions and cell division are increased, then there will be a multiplicative effect on mutagenesis (and carcinogenesis), for example, by high doses of a mutagen that also increases mitogenesis through cell killing. The defense system against reactive electrophilic mutagens, such as the glutathione transferases, are also almost all inducible and buffer cells against increments in active forms of chemicals that can cause DNA lesions. A variety of DNA repair defense systems, almost all inducible, buffer the cell against any increment in DNA lesions. Therefore, the effect of a particular chemical insult depends on the level of each defense, which in turn depends on the past history of exposure. Exogenous agents can influence the induction and effectiveness of these defenses. Defenses can be partially disabled by lack of particular micronutrients in the diet (e.g., antioxidants).

  18. Inhibitory effects of voluntary running wheel exercise on UVB-induced skin carcinogenesis in SKH-1 mice.

    PubMed

    Michna, Laura; Wagner, George C; Lou, You-Rong; Xie, Jian-Guo; Peng, Qing-Yun; Lin, Yong; Carlson, Kirsten; Shih, Weichung Joe; Conney, Allan H; Lu, Yao-Ping

    2006-10-01

    Earlier studies showed that oral administration of green tea or caffeine to SKH-1 mice inhibited ultraviolet B light (UVB)-induced skin carcinogenesis, decreased dermal fat thickness and increased locomotor activity. In the present study, the effects of voluntary running wheel exercise on thickness of dermal fat as well as on UVB-induced tumorigenesis in SKH-1 mice were studied in UVB-initiated high-risk and UVB-induced complete carcinogenesis models. In the high-risk model, animals were exposed to UVB (30 mJ/cm(2)) 3 times/week for 16 weeks. For 14 weeks subsequent to UVB exposure, half of the animals had access to running wheels in their cages whereas the other half did not. In the complete carcinogenesis model, animals were exposed to UVB (30 mJ/cm(2)) 2 times/week for 33 weeks. From the beginning, half of the animals had access to running wheels whereas the other half did not. At the conclusion of each study, body weights were not different between groups, although animals with running wheels consumed significantly more food and water than animals without running wheels. In addition, animals with running wheels had decreases in parametrial fat pad weight and thickness of the dermal fat layer. In both UVB-initiated high-risk and complete carcinogenesis models, voluntary running wheel exercise delayed the appearance of tumors, decreased the number of tumors per mouse and decreased tumor volume per mouse. Histopathology studies revealed that running wheel exercise decreased the number of non-malignant tumors (primarily keratoacanthomas) by 34% and total tumors per mouse by 32% in both models, and running wheel exercise decreased the formation of squamous cell carcinomas in the UVB-induced complete carcinogenesis model by 27%. In addition, the size of keratoacanthomas and squamous cell carcinomas were decreased substantially in both models. The effects described here indicate that voluntary running wheel exercise inhibits UVB-induced skin tumorigenesis and may also

  19. Prevention of azoxymethane/dextran sodium sulfate-induced mouse colon carcinogenesis by processed Aloe vera gel.

    PubMed

    Im, Sun-A; Kim, Ji-Wan; Kim, Hee-Suk; Park, Chan-Su; Shin, Eunju; Do, Seon-Gil; Park, Young In; Lee, Chong-Kil

    2016-11-01

    The preventive effect of a processed Aloe vera gel (PAG) on colon carcinogenesis was examined using an azoxymethane (AOM)-initiated and dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-promoted mouse colon carcinogenesis model. Oral administration of PAG (200, or 400mg/kg/day) significantly reduced the multiplicity of colonic adenomas and adenocarcinomas compared with the AOM/DSS only-treated mice. In the mice treated with 400mg/kg of PAG, adenoma and adenocarcinoma development was reduced to 80% and 60%, respectively, compared to 100% in the PAG-untreated AOM/DSS-treated mice. Western blot analysis using colon extracts showed that PAG reduced the activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), resulting in the inhibition of inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2 expression. PAG appeared to inhibit the NF-κB activation through the activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma. PAG also inhibited the expression and phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3, which is known to connect inflammation and cancer. In addition, PAG inhibited cell cycle progression-inducing cellular factors, such as extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2, cyclin-dependent kinase 4, and cyclin D1. On the other hand, PAG increased the expression of Caudal-related homeobox transcription factor 2, which is known to be a tumor suppressor in colorectal cancer. These findings show that PAG suppresses colitis-related colon carcinogenesis by inhibiting both chronic inflammation and cell cycle progression in the colon.

  20. Low susceptibility to N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea-induced transplacental carcinogenesis in Long-Evans Cinnamon (LEC) rats.

    PubMed

    Tsuchigauchi, Takeshi; Takahashi, Tetsuyuki; Ohnishi, Takamasa; Ogawa, Hirohisa; Bando, Yoshimi; Uehara, Hisanori; Takizawa, Tamotsu; Kaneda, Shinya; Nakai, Tokiko; Shiota, Hiroshi; Izumi, Keisuke

    2009-08-01

    The Long-Evans Cinnamon (LEC) rat, an animal model of Wilson's disease, is resistant to a variety of chemical carcinogenesis except liver and colon. In the present study, N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU)-induced transplacental carcinogenesis was examined in male and female LEC, Long-Evans Agouti (LEA), a sibling line of the LEC rat, and F344 rats (n=21). ENU was administered to pregnant rats as a single s.c. injection at a dose of 60 mg/kg body weight on the 17th day after conception. Cerebral/spinal gliomas and trigeminal/spinal nerve schwannomas developed in both LEA and F344 rats at 30 weeks of age, but no nervous system tumors developed in LEC rats, the difference being statistically significant. Lung adenomas also developed in LEA and F344 rats, but not in LEC rats. Semiquantitative RT-PCR demonstrated that metallothionein (MT)1a, MT2 and O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) mRNA levels in the liver of LEC rats were higher than those in F344 and LEA rats. In addition, Western blot analysis showed that MT (MT1 plus MT2) in the liver of LEC rats was also higher than that in other strains. Present results suggest that high levels of MT and/or MGMT contribute to the resistance to nitrosamine-induced carcinogenesis in LEC rats.

  1. Chemopreventive action of mace (Myristica fragrans, Houtt) on methylcholanthrene-induced carcinogenesis in the uterine cervix in mice.

    PubMed

    Hussain, S P; Rao, A R

    1991-03-01

    The present paper reports the chemopreventive action of mace (aril covering the testa of the seed of Myristica fragrans) on 3-methylcholanthrene (MCA)-induced carcinogenesis in the uterine cervix of virgin, young adult, Swiss albino mice. Placement of cotton-thread impregnated with beeswax containing MCA (approximately 600 micrograms) inside the canal of the uterine cervix results in the appearance of precancerous and cancerous lesions in the cervical epithelium. In this experiment using the cervical carcinogenesis model system, if mace was administered orally at the dose level of 10 mg/mouse per day for 7 days before and 90 days following carcinogen thread insertion, the cervical carcinoma incidence, as compared with that of the control (73.9%), was 21.4%. This decline in the incidence of carcinoma was highly significant (P less than 0.001). The incidence of precancerous lesions did not display any definite association with different treatments.

  2. Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee Considerations Regarding the Use of Virus-Induced Carcinogenesis and Oncolytic Viral Models.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Stephanie D; Hickman-Davis, Judy M; Bergdall, Valerie K

    2016-01-01

    The use of virus-induced carcinogenesis and oncologic experimental animal models is essential in understanding the mechanisms of cancer development to advance prevention, diagnosis, and treatment methods. The Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC) is responsible for both the complex philosophical and practical considerations associated with animal models of cancer. Animal models of cancer carry their own unique issues that require special consideration from the IACUC. Many of the considerations to be discussed apply to cancer models in general; specific issues related to viral carcinogenesis or oncolytic viruses will be specifically discussed as they arise. Responsible animal use integrates good science, humane care, and regulatory compliance. To meet those standards, the IACUC, in conjunction with the research investigator and attending veterinarian, must address a wide range of issues, including animal model selection, cancer model selection, humane end point considerations, experimental considerations, postapproval monitoring, reporting requirements, and animal management and personnel safety considerations.

  3. Experimental gastric ulcers induced by immobilization and electric shock of rats and their pharmacotherapy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zabrodin, O. N.

    1980-01-01

    The mechanism of development of experimental gastric ulcers, induced in rats by combined immobilization and electric shock, was analyzed pharmacologically with peripheral neurotropic agents. It is concluded that: (1) The most marked preventive effect in the development of the experimentally induced gastric ulcers was displayed by agents capable of blocking the ascending activation system of the reticular formation. (2) Sympathetic fibers, which disrupt the trophism of the gastric wall, form the efferent portion of the reflex arc. (3) Gastric secretion does not appear to be the primary cause of ulceration.

  4. Viral Carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Smith, A J; Smith, L A

    2016-01-01

    Cancer has been recognized for thousands of years. Egyptians believed that cancer occurred at the will of the gods. Hippocrates believed human disease resulted from an imbalance of the four humors: blood, phlegm, yellow bile, and black bile with cancer being caused by excess black bile. The lymph theory of cancer replaced the humoral theory and the blastema theory replaced the lymph theory. Rudolph Virchow was the first to recognize that cancer cells like all cells came from other cells and believed chronic irritation caused cancer. At the same time there was a belief that trauma caused cancer, though it never evolved after many experiments inducing trauma. The birth of virology occurred in 1892 when Dimitri Ivanofsky demonstrated that diseased tobacco plants remained infective after filtering their sap through a filter that trapped bacteria. Martinus Beijerinck would call the tiny infective agent a virus and both Dimitri Ivanofsky and Marinus Beijerinck would become the fathers of virology. Not to long thereafter, Payton Rous founded the field of tumor virology in 1911 with his discovery of a transmittable sarcoma of chickens by what would come to be called Rous sarcoma virus or RSV for short. The first identified human tumor virus was the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), named after Tony Epstein and Yvonne Barr who visualized the virus particles in Burkitt's lymphoma cells by electron microscopy in 1965. Since that time, many viruses have been associated with carcinogenesis including the most studied, human papilloma virus associated with cervical carcinoma, many other anogenital carcinomas, and oropharyngeal carcinoma. The World Health Organization currently estimates that approximately 22% of worldwide cancers are attributable to infectious etiologies, of which viral etiologies is estimated at 15-20%. The field of tumor virology/viral carcinogenesis has not only identified viruses as etiologic agents of human cancers, but has also given molecular insights to all human

  5. [Acute gastric lesions induced by drinking water, in rats].

    PubMed

    Laudano, O M

    1994-01-01

    The ability of certain beverages and drinking waters to induce acute gastric lesions was studied and the measurement of their pH was performed. 1) Saline; 2) tap water; 3) well-water; 4) well water plus puritabs; 5) saline plus 2 Cl drips; 6) saline plus 4 Cl drops; 7) saline plus 8 Cl drops; 8) boiled water after 30 min; 9) apartment deposit water; 10) WC bowl water; 11) ice water; 12) Paraná river water (Northern Rosario); 13) Paraná river water (Southern Rosario); 14) rain water (Rosario); 15) rain water) countryside); 16) carbonated mineral water; 17) non-carbonated mineral water; 18) soda; 19) flavored electrolytic water I; 20) flavored electrolytic water II; and 21) cola drink. We can conclude that: 1) a remarkable variance in saline and tap water pH is observed. 2) Rain water and Paraná river water were slightly acid, in contrast electrolytic carbonated beverages and cola drink were strongly acid (pH 2.5). 3) Saline, pH 6.68; saline plus 2 Cl drops; and non-carbonated mineral water were the only beverages that did not induce acute gastric lesions in rats.

  6. Aloe-emodin-induced apoptosis in human gastric carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sheng-Hsuan; Lin, Kai-Yuan; Chang, Chun-Chao; Fang, Chia-Lang; Lin, Chih-Ping

    2007-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the anticancer effect of aloe-emodin, an anthraquinone compound present in the leaves of Aloe vera, on two distinct human gastric carcinoma cell lines, AGS and NCI-N87. We demonstrate that aloe-emodin induced cell death in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Noteworthy is that the AGS cells were generally more sensitive than the NCI-N87 cells. Aloe-emodin caused the release of apoptosis-inducing factor and cytochrome c from mitochondria, followed by the activation of caspase-3, leading to nuclear shrinkage and apoptosis. In addition, exposure to aloe-emodin suppressed the casein kinase II activity in a time-dependent manner and was accompanied by a reduced phosphorylation of Bid, a downstream substrate of casein kinase II and a pro-apoptotic molecule. These preclinical studies suggest that aloe-emodin represents a suitable and novel chemotherapeutic drug candidate for the treatment of human gastric carcinoma.

  7. Enhanced levels of glutathione and protein glutathiolation in rat tongue epithelium during 4-NQO-induced carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhishan; Komninou, Despina; Kleinman, Wayne; Pinto, John T; Gilhooly, Elaine M; Calcagnotto, Ana; Richie, John P

    2007-04-01

    High glutathione (GSH) levels are commonly found in oral tumors and are thought to play an important role in tumorigenesis. While posttranslational binding of GSH to cellular proteins (protein glutathiolation) has recently been recognized as an important redox-sensitive regulatory mechanism, no data currently exist on this process during carcinogenesis. Our goal was to determine the effects of 4-nitroquinoline-N-oxide (4-NQO)-induced carcinogenesis on tongue levels of protein-bound and free GSH and related thiols in the rat. Male F-344 rats (6 weeks of age) were administered either 4-NQO (20 ppm) in drinking water or tap water alone (controls) for 8 weeks. Twenty-four weeks after cessation of 4-NQO, squamous cell carcinomas of the tongue were observed in all rats. The levels of both free and bound GSH in tumors, as well as in adjacent tissues, were 2- to 3-fold greater than in tongue epithelium from control rats (p < 0.05). Prior to tumor formation, at 8 weeks after cessation of 4-NQO, hyperplasia, dysplasia and carcinoma in situ were observed in 100%, 25% and 12.5% of 4-NQO-treated rats, respectively. At this early stage of carcinogenesis, levels of free and bound GSH were increased 50% compared with tongue tissues from control rats (p<0.05). Glutathione disulfide (GSSG) levels were also 2-fold greater in tongue tissues from 4-NQO treated vs. control rats (p<0.05). Altogether, these results suggest that protein glutathiolation, together with GSH and GSSG levels, are induced during oral carcinogenesis in the rat possibly as a result of enhanced levels of oxidative stress.

  8. Analysis of plasma metabolic biomarkers in the development of 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide-induced oral carcinogenesis in rats

    PubMed Central

    KONG, XIANGLI; YANG, XIAOQIN; ZHOU, JINGLIN; CHEN, SIXIU; LI, XIAOYU; JIAN, FAN; DENG, PENGCHI; LI, WEI

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify time-dependent changes in the expression of metabolic biomarkers during the various stages of oral carcinogenesis to provide an insight into the sequential mechanism of oral cancer development. An 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based metabolomics approach was used to analyze the blood plasma samples of Sprague-Dawley rats exhibiting various oral lesions induced by the administration of 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide (4NQO) in drinking water. The 1H NMR spectra were processed by principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least-squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) to determine the metabolic differences between the three developmental stages of oral mucosa cancer (health, oral leukoplakia [OLK] and oral squamous cell carcinoma [OSCC]). The variable importance in projection (VIP) score derived from the PLS-DA model was used to screen for important metabolites, whose significance was further verified through analysis of variance (ANOVA). Data from the present study indicated that 4NQO-induced rat oral carcinogenesis produced oral pre-neoplastic and neoplastic lesions and provided an effective model for analyzing sequential changes in the 1H NMR spectra of rat blood plasma. The 1H NMR-based metabolomics approach clearly differentiates between healthy, OLK and OSSC rats in the PCA and PLS-DA models. Furthermore, lactic acid, choline, glucose, proline, valine, isoleucine, aspartic acid and 2-hydroxybutyric acid demonstrated VIP>1 in the PLS-D model and P<0.05 with ANOVA. It was also identified that increases in lactic acid, choline and glucose, and decreases in proline, valine, isoleucine, aspartic acid and 2-hydroxybutyric acid may be relative to the characteristic mechanisms of oral carcinogenesis. Therefore, these plasma metabolites may serve as metabolic biomarkers in oral carcinogenesis and assist in the early diagnosis and preventive treatment of oral cancer. PMID:25435976

  9. Influence of extraneous supplementation of zinc on trace elemental profile leading to prevention of dimethylhydrazine-induced colon carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Chadha, Vijayta Dani; Garg, M L; Dhawan, D

    2010-10-01

    Trace elemental analyses of cancerous tissue is a less explored field of inquiry in cancer research. If the deficiency or excess of a particular trace element can be linked to the cancer, studies can be initiated to see its controlled administration to check the growth of cancer. The present study explored the prophylactic potential of zinc in experimental colon carcinogenesis and also its interaction with other trace metals, which gets altered during the development of colon cancer. Rats were segregated into four groups viz., normal control, dimethylhydrazine (DMH) treated, zinc treated, DMH+zinc treated. Initiation and induction of colon carcinogenesis was achieved through weekly subcutaneous injections of DMH (30 mg/Kg body weight) dissolved in 1 mM EDTA-normal saline (pH 6.5), for 8 and 16 weeks, respectively. Zinc was supplemented at a dose level of 227 mg/L in drinking water, for 8 and 16 weeks. The elemental analyses of colonic samples were carried out using Energy Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence technique (EDXRF). Zinc administration to DMH treated rats significantly decreased the tumor incidence, tumor multiplicity with simultaneous decrement in tumor size. EDXRF studies revealed that the concentrations of the elements zinc, chromium, manganese and copper were decreased, whereas the concentration levels of iron were found to be increased in the colon tissues following 8 and 16 weeks of DMH treatment. However, zinc supplementation to DMH-treated rats significantly improved the altered levels of elements when compared to DMH-treated animals indicating the chemopreventive role of zinc. In conclusion, DMH induced colon carcinogenesis is accompanied by altered trace element profile and zinc has a positive beneficial effect against chemically-induced colonic carcinogenesis.

  10. Aqueous suspension of anise “Pimpinella anisum” protects rats against chemically induced gastric ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Al Mofleh, Ibrahim A; Alhaider, Abdulqader A; Mossa, Jaber S; Al-Soohaibani, Mohammed O; Rafatullah, Syed

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To substantiate the claims of Unani and Arabian traditional medicine practitioners on the gastroprotective potential effect of a popular spice anise, “Pimpinella anisum L.” on experimentally-induced gastric ulceration and secretion in rats. METHODS: Acute gastric ulceration in rats was produced by various noxious chemicals including 80% ethanol, 0.2 mol/L NaOH, 25% NaCl and indomethacin. Anti-secretory studies were undertaken using pylorus-ligated Shay rat technique. Levels of gastric non-protein sulfhydryls (NP-SH) and wall mucus were estimated and gastric tissue was also examined histologically. Anise aqueous suspension was used in two doses (250 and 500 mg/kg body weight) in all experiments. RESULTS: Anise significantly inhibited gastric mu-cosal damage induced by necrotizing agents and indomethacin. The anti-ulcer effect was further confirmed histologically. In pylorus-ligated Shay rats, anise suspension significantly reduced the basal gastric acid secretion, acidity and completely inhibited the rumenal ulceration. On the other hand, the suspension significantly replenished ethanol-induced depleted levels of gastric mucosal NP-SH and gastric wall mucus concentration. CONCLUSION: Anise aqueous suspension possesses significant cytoprotective and anti-ulcer activities against experimentally-induced gastric lesions. The anti-ulcer effect of anise is possibly prostaglandin-mediated and/or through its anti-secretory and antioxidative properties. PMID:17373749

  11. The M2 macrophages induce autophagic vascular disorder and promote mouse sensitivity to urethane-related lung carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Li, G-G; Guo, Z-Z; Ma, X-F; Cao, N; Geng, S-N; Zheng, Y-Q; Meng, M-J; Lin, H-H; Han, G; Du, G-J

    2016-06-01

    Tumor vessels are known to be abnormal, with typically aberrant, leaky and disordered vessels. Here, we investigated whether polarized macrophage phenotypes are involved in tumor abnormal angiogenesis and what is its mechanism. We found that there was no difference in chemotaxis of polarized M1 and M2 macrophages to lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) cells and that either M1 or M2 macrophage-conditioned media had no effect on LLC cell proliferation. Unexpectedly, the M2 but not M1 macrophage-conditioned media promoted the proliferation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and simultaneously increased endothelial cell permeability in vitro and angiogenic index in the chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM). The treatment with M2 but not M1 macrophage-conditioned media increased autophagosomes as well as microtubule-associated protein light chain 3B (LC3-B) expression (a robust marker of autophagosomes) but decreased p62 protein expression (a selective autophagy substrate) in HUVECs, the treatment with chloroquine that blocked autophagy abrogated the abnormal angiogenic efficacy of M2 macrophage-conditioned media. These results were confirmed in urethane-induced lung carcinogenic progression. Urethane-induced lung carcinogenesis led to more M2 macrophage phenotype and increased abnormal angiogenesis concomitant with the upregulation of LC3-B and the downregulation of p62. Clodronate liposome-induced macrophage depletion, chloroquine-induced autophagic prevention or salvianolic acid B-induced vascular protection decreased abnormal angiogenesis and lung carcinogenesis. In addition, we found that the tendency of age-related M2 macrophage polarization also promoted vascular permeability and carcinogenesis in urethane carcinogenic progression. These findings indicate that the M2 macrophages induce autophagic vascular disorder to promote lung cancer progression, and the autophagy improvement represents an efficacious strategy for abnormal angiogenesis and cancer

  12. Effects of anti-ulcer agents on ethanol-induced gastric mucosal lesions in D-galactosamine-induced hepatitis rats.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Hiroyuki; Yomota, Eiji; Nogi, Koji; Onoda, Yuichi

    2002-01-01

    Patients with hepatic injury have an increased incidence of gastric ulcers and erosions. In this study, the effect of D-galactosamine(GalN)-induced hepatitis on ethanol-induced gastric mucosal lesions and the protective effect of anti-ulcer agents in rats were examined. Subcutaneous injection of GalN (1 g/kg) remarkably increased serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) activities suggesting induction of hepatic injury. Gastric mucosal lesions induced by ethanol were significantly aggravated in GalN-induced hepatitis rats. Orally administered ecabet (CAS 86408-72-2; 20-200 mg/kg) dose dependently inhibited ethanol-induced gastric mucosal lesions in GalN-induced hepatitis rats. Sucralfate (CAS 54182-58-0) tended to inhibit the gastric mucosal lesions at a dose of 200 mg/kg but teprenone (CAS 6809-52-5), cimetidine (CAS 51481-61-9) and rebamipide (CAS 90098-04-7) had little effect. All anti-ulcer agents had no effect on the serum ALT and AST activities increased by GalN pretreatment. These results indicate that the gastric mucosa of GalN-induced hepatitis rats is more susceptible to injury induced by luminal irritants such as ethanol. Ecabet potently inhibited gastric mucosal lesions suggesting its clinical utility for the gastric mucosal damage in patients with hepatic injury.

  13. Helicobacter pylori induces Snail expression through ROS-mediated activation of Erk and inactivation of GSK-3β in human gastric cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Ngo, Hoang-Kieu-Chi; Lee, Hee Geum; Piao, Juan-Yu; Zhong, Xiancai; Lee, Ha-Na; Han, Hyeong-Jun; Kim, Wonki; Kim, Do-Hee; Cha, Young-Nam; Na, Hye-Kyung; Surh, Young-Joon

    2016-12-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection has been known to be implicated in human gastric carcinogenesis. Snail, the zinc-finger transcription factor known as a key inducer of changes in the cell shape and morphogenetic movement, is aberrantly overexpressed and correlates with lymph node metastasis in gastric cancer. In the present study, we investigated whether H. pylori could induce Snail activation to provoke these changes. Using a cell scatter assay, we noticed that human gastric cancer AGS cells infected with H. pylori underwent morphological changes as well as disruption of cell-cell interaction, which was then reversed by silencing of Snail by use of small interfering RNA (siRNA). In addition, infection with H. pylori resulted in an increased intracellular level of Snail in gastric cancer cells, which was abrogated in the presence of U0126 and LY294002, inhibitors of MEK/Erk and PI3K/Akt pathways, respectively. Cycloheximide pulse-chase experiments coupled with immunocytochemical analysis revealed that the induction of Snail by H. pylori was regulated at multiple levels, including increased transcription of Snail mRNA, inhibition of protein degradation, and enhancement of nuclear translocation of Snail. Pre-treatment of AGS cells with N-acetylcysteine, a well-known reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenger, attenuated the H. pylori-induced activation of Erk, its binding to Snail promoter, inactivation of GSK-3β, and accumulation of Snail. Collectively, these findings suggest that the upregulation of Snail expression induced by H. pylori and transformation to a spindle-like shape as a consequence in gastric cancer cells are attributable to ROS-mediated activation of Erk and the inhibition of GSK-3β signaling. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Link between chronic inflammation and human papillomavirus-induced carcinogenesis (Review)

    PubMed Central

    FERNANDES, JOSÉ VERÍSSIMO; DE MEDEIROS FERNANDES, THALES ALLYRIO ARAÚJO; DE AZEVEDO, JENNER CHRYSTIAN VERÍSSIMO; COBUCCI, RICARDO NEY OLIVEIRA; DE CARVALHO, MARIA GORETTI FREIRE; ANDRADE, VANIA SOUSA; DE ARAÚJO, JOSÉLIO MARIA GALVÃO

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation is a defense strategy against invading agents and harmful molecules that is activated immediately following a stimulus, and involves the release of cytokines and chemokines, which activate the innate immune response. These mediators act together to increase blood flow and vascular permeability, facilitating recruitment of effector cells to the site of injury. Following resolution of the injury and removal of the stimulus, inflammation is disabled, but if the stimulus persists, inflammation becomes chronic and is strongly associated with cancer. This is likely to be due to the fact that the inflammation leads to a wound that does not heal, requiring a constant renewal of cells, which increases the risk of neoplastic transformation. Debris from phagocytosis, including the reactive species of oxygen and nitrogen that cause damage to DNA already damaged by the leukotrienes and prostaglandins, has an impact on inflammation and various carcinogenic routes. There is an association between chronic inflammation, persistent infection and cancer, where oncogenic action is mediated by autocrine and paracrine signals, causing changes in somatic cells under the influence of the microbial genome or of epigenetic factors. Among the infectious agents associated with cancer, certain genotypes of human papillomavirus (HPV) stand out. HPV is responsible for virtually all cases of cervical cancer and a lower proportion of cancers of the vagina, vulva, anus, penis and a number of extragenital cancers. In the present review, recent advances in the mechanisms involved in the inflammatory response are presented with their participation in the process of carcinogenesis, emphasizing the role of chronic inflammation in the development of HPV-induced cervical cancer. PMID:25663851

  15. Role of hormone imbalance in transplacental carcinogenesis induced in Syrian golden hamsters by sex hormones.

    PubMed

    Rustia, M

    1979-05-01

    Data are presented from studies on Syrian golden hamsters with the ENU precursors, EU, and NaNO2, given transplacentally and in adulthood, and with transplacentally administered DES. Hormone modification by gonadectomy of offspring prenatally exposed to ENU caused a significantly greater incidence and multiplicity of PNS neoplasms and other tumor types in orchidectomized males, compared with intact males, and in ovariectomized and intact females. That PNS tumors in gonadectomized males appeared within a significantly shorter latency period indicated that endogenously generated androgens inhibited neoplastic development. The endocrine imbalance also induced a higher incidence of neoplasia in other tissues and organs, e.g., skin melanomas, thyroid and adrenal cortex tumors, and notably gliomas in the CNS of ovariectomized female siblings. Exposure to single doses of ENU on days 12, 13, 14, and/or 15 caused PNS tumors predominantly in females and with an increased frequency in progeny treated during the final days of gestation. The spectrum of neoplasms was greater and their incidence significant in ENU-treated adult hamsters; the tumor types different from those of transplacentally treated animals (i.e., vascular, vaginal, and ovarian tumors and fore-stomach papillomas were seen). Determining factors in carcinogenesis at the time of carcinogen treatment possibly included stage of ontogenic development, degree of cell differentiation, hormone state of host, age, total dose, and duration of treatment. DES results indicated that the haster may be a useful model for reproducing lesions similar to those observed in children of mothers treated with this drug during pregnancy.

  16. Tobacco Smoke-Induced Immunologic Changes May Contribute to Oral Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Schierl, Michael; Patel, Daxesh; Ding, Wanhong; Kochhar, Amit; Adhami, Katayun; Zhou, Xi Kathy; Dannenberg, Andrew J.; Granstein, Richard D.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine if tobacco smoke (TS), a risk factor for cancers of the aerodigestive tract, may contribute to oral carcinogenesis, in part, by suppressing local immunity. Methods Mice were placed in plexiglass holders in which they breathed TS through the nose and mouth for 1 hour daily for 21 days. Control mice breathed room air in the same manner. One day after the last exposure, mice were immunized by application of oxazolone to each buccal mucosa. Control mice were mock-immunized by application of vehicle alone. Five days later, all mice were challenged on the ears with oxazolone and 24 hour ear swelling assessed as contact hypersensitivity (CHS). Results Mice exposed to TS had a significantly smaller CHS response compared to controls. When subsequently re-immunized on the glabrous skin, mice originally primed through TS-exposed mucosa could not be fully immunized, indicating induction of immunologic tolerance by exposure to hapten through TS-perturbed mucosa. Immunocompetent mice exposed to TS in this manner and challenged by submucosal placement of a syngeneic malignant tumor had significantly increased tumor growth over time compared to controls. No difference in growth rate was observed when the experiment was performed with NK cell-deficient, SCID mice. Additionally, exposure of epidermal Langerhans cells in vitro to an aqueous extract of TS impaired their ability to undergo maturation and to present antigen to responsive T cells. Conclusions Immunologic changes induced in the oral cavity by exposure to TS may play a role in the development of oral cancers. PMID:24322330

  17. Early diagnosis of colorectal cancer in rats with DMH induced carcinogenesis by means of urine autofluorescence analysis.

    PubMed

    Šteffeková, Zuzana; Birková, Anna; Bomba, Alojz; Mareková, Mária

    2014-01-01

    Cancer is one of the most highlighted topics of current research. Early detection of this disease allows more effective therapy, hence higher chance of cure. Application of fluorescence spectral techniques into oncological diagnostic is one of the potential alternatives. Chemically induced carcinogenesis in rats is widely used model for exploration of various aspects of colorectal cancer. This study shows value of discriminate analysis of urine fluorescent fingerprint between healthy control group of rats and those with dimethylhydrazine induced early lesions of colorectal cancer. Using fluorescence spectroscopy, significant difference (P < 0.05) between both of group was achieved.

  18. A Rat Model to Study the Effects of Diet-Induced Obesity on Radiation-Induced Mammary Carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Imaoka, Tatsuhiko; Nishimura, Mayumi; Daino, Kazuhiro; Morioka, Takamitsu; Nishimura, Yukiko; Uemura, Hiroji; Akimoto, Kenta; Furukawa, Yuki; Fukushi, Masahiro; Wakabayashi, Keiji; Mutoh, Michihiro; Shimada, Yoshiya

    2016-05-01

    A detailed understanding of the relationship between radiation-induced breast cancer and obesity is needed for appropriate risk management and to prevent the development of a secondary cancer in patients who have been treated with radiation. Our goal was to develop an animal model to study the relationship by combining two existing Sprague-Dawley rat models of radiation-induced mammary carcinogenesis and diet-induced obesity. Female rats were fed a high-fat diet for 4 weeks and categorized as obesity prone or obesity resistant based on their body weight at 7 weeks of age, at which time the rats were irradiated with 4 Gy. Control rats were fed a standard diet and irradiated at the same time and in the same manner. All rats were maintained on their initial diets and assessed for palpable mammary cancers once a week for the next 30 weeks. The obesity-prone rats were heavier than those in the other groups. The obesity-prone rats were also younger than the other animals at the first detection of mammary carcinomas and their carcinoma weights were greater. A tendency toward higher insulin and leptin blood levels were observed in the obesity-prone rats compared to the other two groups. Blood angiotensin II levels were elevated in the obesity-prone and obesity-resistant rats. Genes related to translation and oxidative phosphorylation were upregulated in the carcinomas of obesity-prone rats. Expression profiles from human breast cancers were used to validate this animal model. As angiotensin is potentially an important factor in obesity-related morbidities and breast cancer, a second set of rats was fed in a similar manner, irradiated and then treated with an angiotensin-receptor blocker, losartan and candesartan. Neither blocker altered mammary carcinogenesis; analyses of losartan-treated animals indicated that expression of renin in the renal cortex and of Agtr1a (angiotensin II receptor, type 1) in cancer tissue was significantly upregulated, suggesting the presence of

  19. RelA regulates CXCL1/CXCR2-dependent oncogene-induced senescence in murine Kras-driven pancreatic carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Lesina, Marina; Wörmann, Sonja Maria; Diakopoulos, Kalliope Nina; Korneeva, Olga; Wimmer, Margit; Sperveslage, Jan; Demir, Ihsan Ekin; Kehl, Timo; Saur, Dieter; Heikenwälder, Mathias; Steiner, Jörg Manfred; Wang, Timothy Cragin; Sansom, Owen J.; Schmid, Roland Michael

    2016-01-01

    Tumor suppression that is mediated by oncogene-induced senescence (OIS) is considered to function as a safeguard during development of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). However, the mechanisms that regulate OIS in PDAC are poorly understood. Here, we have determined that nuclear RelA reinforces OIS to inhibit carcinogenesis in the Kras mouse model of PDAC. Inactivation of RelA accelerated pancreatic lesion formation in Kras mice by abrogating the senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP) gene transcription signature. Using genetic and pharmacological tools, we determined that RelA activation promotes OIS via elevation of the SASP factor CXCL1 (also known as KC), which activates CXCR2, during pancreatic carcinogenesis. In Kras mice, pancreas-specific inactivation of CXCR2 prevented OIS and was correlated with increased tumor proliferation and decreased survival. Moreover, reductions in CXCR2 levels were associated with advanced neoplastic lesions in tissue from human pancreatic specimens. Genetically disabling OIS in Kras mice caused RelA to promote tumor proliferation, suggesting a dual role for RelA signaling in pancreatic carcinogenesis. Taken together, our data suggest a pivotal role for RelA in regulating OIS in preneoplastic lesions and implicate the RelA/CXCL1/CXCR2 axis as an essential mechanism of tumor surveillance in PDAC. PMID:27454298

  20. Efficacy of the potential chemopreventive agent, hesperetin (citrus flavanone), on 1,2-dimethylhydrazine induced colon carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Aranganathan, S; Nalini, N

    2009-10-01

    Our current study is an effort to identify a potent chemopreventive agent against colon cancer. Here we have investigated the efficacy of hesperetin on tissue lipid peroxidation, antioxidant defense system and colonic histoarchitecture in male Wistar rats in colon carcinogenesis. Rats in groups 3, 4, 5 and 6 were treated with DMH (20 mg kg body weight s.c.) once a week for 15 weeks. Group 1 rats received modified pellet diet and served as control; group 2 received modified pellet diet along with hesperetin (20mg/kg body weight, p.o., every day); and hesperetin was given to the rats as in-group 2 during the initiation, post-initiation and entire period stages of colon carcinogenesis. Lipid peroxidation was studied by measuring the formation of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), lipid hydroperoxides (LOOH) and conjugated dienes (CD), and superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPX), glutathione reductase (GR), reduced glutathione (GSH), in the liver and colonic tissues of DMH administered rats. (1) Decreased levels of lipid peroxidation in the colonic tissues; (2) decreased activities of antioxidant enzymes SOD, CAT, GPX, GR and GSH levels in the tissues on DMH treatment. Hesperetin supplementation during the initiation, post-initiation and entire period stages of carcinogenesis significantly reversed these activities. These results indicate that hesperetin may be a potential chemopreventive agent against DMH-induced colon cancer.

  1. erbB expression changes in ethanol and 7, 12- dimethylbenz (a) anthracene-induced oral carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Jacinto-Alemán, Luis F.; García-Carrancá, Alejandro; Leyba-Huerta, Elba R.; Zenteno-Galindo, Edgar; Jiménez-Farfán, María D.

    2013-01-01

    Objetive: The aim of this study was to determine erbB expression in normal mucosa, oral dysplasia, and invasive carcinomas developed in the hamster’s buccal pouch chemical carcinogenesis model. Study design: Fifty Syrian golden hamsters were equally divided in five groups (A-E); two controls and three experimental group exposed to alcohol, DMBA, or both for 14 weeks. Number of tumors per cheek, volume, histological condition, erbB expression were determined and results were analyzed by the Mann–Whitney U and Dunn’s test. Results: Control groups and those exposed to alcohol (A, B and C respectively) only presented clinical and histological normal mucosa; while those exposed to DMBA or DMBA plus alcohol (D and E groups) developed dysplasia and invasive carcinomas. erbB2, erbB3, and erbB4 increased their expression in alcohol-exposed mucosa, dysplasia, and invasive carcinomas. We observed a similar expression level for erbB2 in dysplasia and carcinomas; while, erbB3 and erbB4 were similar only in carcinomas. Conclusion: The DMBA and alcohol can be considered as carcinogen and promoter for oral carcinogenesis. The erbB expression is different according to their histological condition, suggesting differential participation of the erbB family in oral carcinogenesis induced by alcohol and DMBA. Key words:erbB, 7,12- dimethylbenz(a)anthracene, oral squamous cell carcinoma. PMID:23229248

  2. Fyn is a redox sensor involved in solar ultraviolet light-induced signal transduction in skin carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kim, J-E; Roh, E; Lee, M H; Yu, D H; Kim, D J; Lim, T-G; Jung, S K; Peng, C; Cho, Y-Y; Dickinson, S; Alberts, D; Bowden, G T; Einspahr, J; Stratton, S P; Curiel-Lewandrowski, C; Bode, A M; Lee, K W; Dong, Z

    2016-08-04

    Solar ultraviolet (UV) light is a major etiological factor in skin carcinogenesis, with solar UV-stimulated signal transduction inducing pathological changes and skin damage. The primary sensor of solar UV-induced cellular signaling has not been identified. We use an experimental system of solar simulated light (SSL) to mimic solar UV and we demonstrate that Fyn is a primary redox sensor involved in SSL-induced signal transduction. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated by SSL exposure directly oxidize Cys488 of Fyn, resulting in increased Fyn kinase activity. Fyn oxidation was increased in mouse skin after SSL exposure and Fyn-knockout mice formed larger and more tumors compared with Fyn wild-type mice when exposed to SSL for an extended period of time. Murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) lacking Fyn and cells in which Fyn expression was knocked down were resistant to SSL-induced apoptosis. Furthermore, cells expressing mutant Fyn (C448A) were resistant to SSL-induced apoptosis. These findings suggest that Fyn acts as a regulatory nexus between solar UV, ROS and signal transduction during skin carcinogenesis.

  3. AKT plays a crucial role in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    SASAKI, TAKAMITSU; YAMASHITA, YUICHI; KUNIYASU, HIROKI

    2015-01-01

    The AKT protein is involved in the phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase signaling pathway and is a vital regulator of survival, proliferation and differentiation in various types of cells. Helicobacter pylori infection induces epithelial cell proliferation and oxidative stress in chronic gastritis. These alterations lead to telomere shortening, resulting in the activation of telomerase. AKT, in particular, is activated by H. pylori-induced inflammation. AKT then promotes the expression of human telomerase reverse transcriptase, which encodes a catalytic subunit of telomerase, and induces telomerase activity, an essential component of the process of carcinogenesis. AKT activation is increased in gastric mucosa with carcinogenic properties and is associated with the low survival of patients with gastric cancer. The findings of the present study suggest that AKT is pivotal in gastric carcinogenesis and progression. PMID:26622541

  4. Copper and resveratrol attenuates serum catalase, glutathione peroxidase, and element values in rats with DMBA-induced mammary carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Skrajnowska, Dorota; Bobrowska-Korczak, Barbara; Tokarz, Andrzej; Bialek, Slawomir; Jezierska, Ewelina; Makowska, Justyna

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, a hypothesis was assessed whether or not the intoxication with copper and supplementation with copper plus resveratrol would result in changes in the activities of catalase and glutathione peroxidase and moreover if the characteristic changes would appear in concentrations of copper, iron, calcium, magnesium, and zinc in the serum of rats with chemically induced carcinogenesis. Female Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into study groups which, apart from the standard diet, were treated with copper (42.6 mg Cu/kg food as CuSO4·5H2O) or copper plus resveratrol (0.2 mg/kg body) via gavage for a period from 40 days until 20 weeks of age. In cancer groups, the rats were treated with a dose of 80 mg/body weight of 7,12-dimethyl-1,2-benz[a]anthracene (DMBA) given in rapeseed oil at 50 and 80 days of age to induce mammary carcinogenesis. The control groups included the rats kept in the same conditions and fed with the same diet as the animals from the study groups, but not DMBA-treated. The activity of catalase significantly decreased in groups of rats with mammary carcinogenesis that were supplemented with copper (p < 0.05) or copper plus resveratrol (p < 0.001) in comparison with the control groups that received the same diets. In cancer groups of nonsupplemented rats, the increase of glutathione peroxidase activity was observed. The process of carcinogenesis and the applied supplementation significantly altered the concentrations of trace elements in serum, in particular as concerns iron and copper. The mean serum iron levels in rats with breast cancer were significantly lower than those in the control groups (p < 0.001). The mean serum copper levels significantly decreased in the groups of rats with mammary carcinogenesis that were supplemented with copper or copper plus resveratrol in comparison with the control groups that received the same diets (p < 0.001). The characteristic changes in iron content and the zinc/copper and zinc/iron ratios in blood

  5. Participation of microbiota in the development of gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li-Li; Yu, Xin-Juan; Zhan, Shu-Hui; Jia, Sheng-Jiao; Tian, Zi-Bin; Dong, Quan-Jiang

    2014-05-07

    There are a large number of bacteria inhabiting the human body, which provide benefits for the health. Alterations of microbiota participate in the pathogenesis of diseases. The gastric microbiota consists of bacteria from seven to eleven phyla, predominantly Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, Actinobacteria and Fusobacteria. Intrusion by Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) does not remarkably interrupt the composition and structure of the gastric microbiota. Absence of bacterial commensal from the stomach delays the onset of H. pylori-induced gastric cancer, while presence of artificial microbiota accelerates the carcinogenesis. Altered gastric microbiota may increase the production of N-nitroso compounds, promoting the development of gastric cancer. Further investigation of the carcinogenic mechanisms of microbiota would benefit for the prevention and management of gastric cancer.

  6. Nicotine increases oxidative stress, activates NF-kappaB and GRP78, induces apoptosis and sensitizes cells to genotoxic/xenobiotic stresses by a multiple stress inducer, deoxycholate: relevance to colon carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Crowley-Weber, Cara L; Dvorakova, Katerina; Crowley, Cheray; Bernstein, Harris; Bernstein, Carol; Garewal, Harinder; Payne, Claire M

    2003-03-06

    Epidemiologic studies indicate that environmental (smoking) and dietary factors (high fat) contribute to carcinogenesis in many organ systems. The aim of our study was to test the hypothesis that nicotine, a component of cigarette smoke, and sodium deoxycholate (NaDOC), a cytotoxic bile salt that increases in concentration in the gastrointestinal tract after a high fat meal, induce similar cellular stresses and that nicotine may enhance some of the NaDOC-induced stresses. We found that nicotine, at 0.8 microM, the very low sub-micromolar level occurring in the tissues of smokers: (1). increases oxidative stress; (2). activates NF-kappaB, a redox-sensitive transcription factor; (3). activates the 78 kD glucose regulated protein promoter, an indication of endoplasmic reticulum stress; (4). induces apoptosis; (5). enhances the ability of NaDOC to activate the 153 kD growth arrest and DNA damage promoter, an indication of increased genotoxic stress; and (6). enhances the ability of NaDOC to activate the xenobiotic response element. Our findings have applicability to G.I. cancer, in general, since smoking is a risk factor in the development of esophageal, pancreatic, gastric and colon cancer, and these cancers are also promoted by bile acids.

  7. Oxidative DNA damage is a preliminary step during rat tongue carcinogenesis induced by 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Sandra Regina; Noguti, Juliana; Carvalho, Juliana Gonçalves; Oshima, Celina Tijuko Fujiyama; Ribeiro, Daniel Araki

    2011-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate oxidative DNA damage during 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide (4NQO)-induced rat tongue carcinogenesis. For this purpose, male Wistar rats were distributed into three groups of 10 animals each and treated with 50 ppm 4NQO solution through their drinking water for 4, 12, and 20 weeks. Ten animals were used as negative control. The alkaline Comet assay modified with lesion-specific enzymes was used to detect single and double strand breaks, labile sites (SBs), and oxidised purines and pyrimidines. Although no histopathological abnormalities were induced in the epithelium after 4 weeks of carcinogen exposure, oxidative DNA damage was detected in the 'normal' oral epithelium. In pre-neoplastic lesions and squamous cell carcinomas induced after 12 and 20 weeks following carcinogen exposure, respectively, oxidative DNA damage was also increased (P < 0.05) when compared to negative control. In conclusion, our results suggest that oxidative DNA damage is an early event during multistep carcinogenesis assay induced by 4NQO. This kind of approach should be considered to persons with high risk of oral cancer, such as in smokers or alcohol consumers.

  8. Docosahexaenoic acid, an omega-3 polyunsaturated acid protects against indomethacin-induced gastric injury.

    PubMed

    Pineda-Peña, Elizabeth Arlen; Jiménez-Andrade, Juan Miguel; Castañeda-Hernández, Gilberto; Chávez-Piña, Aracely Evangelina

    2012-12-15

    Previous studies have shown gastroprotective effect of fish oil in several experimental models. However, the mechanisms and active compounds underlying this effect are not fully understood. Fish oil has several components; among them, one of the most studied is docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), which is an omega-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid. The aim of this study was to examine the gastroprotective effect of DHA as a pure compound in a rat model of indomethacin-induced gastric injury as well as elucidate some of the mechanism(s) behind DHA's gastroprotective effect. Indomethacin was orally administered to induce an acute gastric injury (3, 10 and 30mg/kg). Omeprazol (a proton pump inhibitor, 30mg/kg, p.o.) and DHA (3, 10, 30mg/kg, p.o.) were gavaged 30 and 120min, respectively, before indomethacin insult (30mg/kg p.o.). Three hours after indomethacin administration, rats were sacrificed, gastric injury was evaluated by determining the total damaged area. A sample of gastric tissue was harvested and processed to quantify prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) and leukotriene B(4) (LTB(4)) levels by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Indomethacin produced gastric injury in dose-dependent manner. DHA protected against indomethacin-induced gastric damage, and this effect was comparable with omeprazol's gastroprotective effect. DHA did not reverse the indomethacin-induced reduction of PGE(2) gastric levels. In contrast, DHA partially prevented the indomethacin-induced increase in LTB(4) gastric levels. This is the first report demonstrating DHA's gastroprotective effect as a pure compound. Furthermore, the results reveal that the gastroprotective effect is mediated by a decrease in gastric LTB(4) levels in indomethacin-induced gastric damage.

  9. Role of zinc in modulating histo-architectural and biochemical alterations during dimethylhydrazine (DMH)-induced rat colon carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Malhotra, Anshoo; Chadha, Vijayta Dani; Nair, Praveen; Dhawan, Devinder K

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to gain insight into the putative anticancer effect of dietary zinc during 1,2 dimethylhydrazine (DMH)-induced colon carcinogenesis. The rats were segregated into four groups, namely, normal control, DMH-treated, zinc-treated, and (DMH + zinc)-treated. Colon carcinogenesis was induced through weekly subcutaneous injections of DMH (30 mg/kg body weight) for 12 weeks. Zinc in the form of zinc sulfate was supplemented to rats at a dose level of 227 mg/L in drinking water, ad libitum for the entire duration of the study. The effects of different treatments were studied on lipid peroxidation (LPO), reduced glutathione (GSH), and antioxidative enzymes, which included superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione S-transferase (GST), glutathione reductase (GR), as well as on the histoarchitecture of the colon. A total of 12 weeks of DMH treatment resulted in a significant increase in LPO. GSH levels and the activities of SOD, CAT, and GST were found to be significantly decreased following DMH treatment. A significant elevation in the activity of GR was observed following 12 weeks of DMH treatment. Histopathological studies showed well-differentiated signs of dysplasia, which included nuclei enlargement, epithelial thickening, and nuclear pleomorphism indicative of promotional phase of colon carcinogenesis in DMH-administered rats. Administration of zinc to DMH-treated rats decreased the levels of LPO and GSH significantly, but the activities of SOD and CAT were found to be significantly increased following zinc treatment. Zinc supplementation along with DMH treatment did not reveal any significant change in the activity of GR but significantly improved the activity of GST, which was depressed following DMH treatment. Also, zinc treatment in DMH-treated rats showed signs of great improvement, but structureless masses of the cells and hyperchromic nuclei were still visible occasionally. In conclusion, the results of this study

  10. Crosstalk between telomere maintenance and radiation effects: A key player in the process of radiation-induced carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Grace; Ricoul, Michelle; Hempel, William M.; Azzam, Edouard I.; Sabatier, Laure

    2014-01-01

    It is well established that ionizing radiation induces chromosomal damage, both following direct radiation exposure and via non-targeted (bystander) effects, activating DNA damage repair pathways, of which the proteins are closely linked to telomeric proteins and telomere maintenance. Long-term propagation of this radiation-induced chromosomal damage during cell proliferation results in chromosomal instability. Many studies have shown the link between radiation exposure and radiation-induced changes in oxidative stress and DNA damage repair in both targeted and non-targeted cells. However, the effect of these factors on telomeres, long established as guardians of the genome, still remains to be clarified. In this review, we will focus on what is known about how telomeres are affected by exposure to low- and high-LET ionizing radiation and during proliferation, and will discuss how telomeres may be a key player in the process of radiation-induced carcinogenesis. PMID:24486376

  11. Helicobacter pylori-induced gastric pathology: insights from in vivo and ex vivo models

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Jonathan M.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Gastric colonization with Helicobacter pylori induces diverse human pathological conditions, including superficial gastritis, peptic ulcer disease, mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma, and gastric adenocarcinoma and its precursors. The treatment of these conditions often relies on the eradication of H. pylori, an intervention that is increasingly difficult to achieve and that does not prevent disease progression in some contexts. There is, therefore, a pressing need to develop new experimental models of H. pylori-associated gastric pathology to support novel drug development in this field. Here, we review the current status of in vivo and ex vivo models of gastric H. pylori colonization, and of Helicobacter-induced gastric pathology, focusing on models of gastric pathology induced by H. pylori, Helicobacter felis and Helicobacter suis in rodents and large animals. We also discuss the more recent development of gastric organoid cultures from murine and human gastric tissue, as well as from human pluripotent stem cells, and the outcomes of H. pylori infection in these systems. PMID:28151409

  12. Antioxidant and antitumor efficacy of Luteolin, a dietary flavone on benzo(a)pyrene-induced experimental lung carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kasala, Eshvendar Reddy; Bodduluru, Lakshmi Narendra; Barua, Chandana C; Gogoi, Ranadeep

    2016-08-01

    The present study is designed to assess the antioxidant and antitumor potential of luteolin against benzo(a)pyrene [B(a)P]-induced lung carcinogenesis in Swiss albino mice. Here, we reported that oral administration of B(a)P (50mg/kg body weight) to mice resulted in raised lipid peroxides (LPO), lung specific tumor markers such as carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and neuron specific enolase (NSE) with concomitant decrease in the levels of both enzymatic antioxidants such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione reductase (GR), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and glutathione-s-transferase (GST), and non-enzymatic antioxidants such as reduced glutathione (GSH), vitamin E and vitamin C. Luteolin treatment (15mg/kg body weight, p.o) significantly counteracted all these alterations and maintained cellular normalcy. Moreover, assessment of protein expression levels by western blot analysis revealed that luteolin treatment effectively negates B(a)P-induced upregulated expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1) and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB). Furthermore, histopathology of lung tissue and immunohistochemistry of CYP1A1 were carried out to substantiate the anti- lung cancer effect of luteolin. Overall, these findings confirm the chemopreventive potential of luteolin against B(a)P induced lung carcinogenesis.

  13. Prevention of chemically induced two-stage skin carcinogenesis in mice by systemic effects of ultraviolet irradiation.

    PubMed

    Gensler, H L

    1988-05-01

    Systemic effects of UVB irradiation (280 to 320 nm) have been shown to enhance subsequent carcinogenesis induced by UV irradiation or by high doses of benzo[a]pyrene. In the present study, we asked whether the systemic effects of UVB irradiation would influence subsequent chemical tumorigenesis induced by the initiation-promotion protocol. A group of B6D2F1/J mice were irradiated dorsally with five 30-min treatments per week for 11.5 weeks. The irradiation source was a bank of six unfiltered Westinghouse FS40 sun lamps. One week later, irradiated and unirradiated mice were initiated ventrally with 100 micrograms of 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene. Four days later, ventral 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate treatments were begun. After 20 weeks of promotion, there were 75% fewer tumors per mouse in the irradiated mice than in unirradiated mice. Thus, systemic effects of UVB irradiation resulted in inhibition of chemical carcinogenesis induced with an initiation-promotion protocol.

  14. Role of endogenous gastric mucosal prostaglandins in the formation of acute gastric mucosal lesions induced by aspirin, ethanol, HCl and CH3COOH.

    PubMed

    Amioka, I; Arima, T; Nagashima, H

    1987-06-01

    The role of endogenous mucosal prostaglandins (PGs) in the production of acute gastric mucosal lesions (AGML) was examined in rats. Aspirin, ethanol or 0.6 N-HCl was given intragastrically and 20% acetic acid was injected into the gastric wall. Endogenous gastric mucosal PG (A + B), PGE and PGF were determined by radioimmunoassay. Their gastric contents were markedly reduced by aspirin administration (p less than 0.001). The level of gastric mucosal PGs still remained low (p less than 0.001) after the aspirin-induced AGML began to heal. Furthermore, rats with AGML induced by ethanol, HCl or acetic acid, showed no decrease in endogenous gastric mucosal PGs compared with the controls. These findings indicated that endogenous PGs are not necessary for either the induction or healing of experimental AGML.

  15. Morphological and Molecular Alterations in 1,2 Dimethylhydrazine and Azoxymethane Induced Colon Carcinogenesis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Perše, Martina; Cerar, Anton

    2011-01-01

    The dimethyhydrazine (DMH) or azoxymethane (AOM) model is a well-established, well-appreciated, and widely used model of experimental colon carcinogenesis. It has many morphological as well as molecular similarities to human sporadic colorectal cancer (CC), which are summarized and discussed in this paper. In addition, the paper combines present knowledge of morphological and molecular features in the multistep development of CC recognized in the DMH/AOM rat model. This understanding is necessary in order to accurately identify and interpret alterations that occur in the colonic mucosa when evaluating natural or pharmacological compounds in DMH/AOM rat colon carcinogenesis. The DMH/AOM model provides a wide range of options for investigating various initiating and environmental factors, the role of specific dietary and genetic factors, and therapeutic options in CC. The limitations of this model and suggested areas in which more research is required are also discussed. PMID:21253581

  16. Cytochrome P450 2E1 inhibition prevents hepatic carcinogenesis induced by diethylnitrosamine in alcohol-fed rats

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Qinyuan; Lian, Fuzhi; Chavez, Pollyanna R.G.; Chung, Jayong; Ling, Wenhua; Qin, Hua; Seitz, Helmut K.

    2012-01-01

    Chronic alcohol ingestion increases hepatic cytochrome P450 2E1 (CYP2E1), which is associated with hepatocarcinogenesis. We investigated whether treatment with chlormethiazole (CMZ), a CYP2E1 inhibitor, protects against alcohol-associated hepatic carcinogenesis in rats. Rats were fed either an ethanol liquid diet or a non-ethanol liquid diet, with or without CMZ for one and ten months. A single intraperitoneal injection of diethylnitrosamine (DEN, 20 mg/kg) was given to initiate hepatic carcinogenesis. CYP2E1 expression, inflammatory proteins, cell proliferation, protein-bound 4-HNE, etheno-DNA adducts, 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), retinoid concentrations, and hepatic carcinogenesis were examined. Ethanol feeding for 1 month with DEN resulted in significantly increased hepatic CYP2E1 levels and increased nuclear accumulation of NF-κB protein and TNF-α expression, which were associated with increased cyclin D1 expression and p-GST positive altered hepatic foci. All of these changes induced by ethanol feeding were significantly inhibited by the one month CMZ treatment. At 10-months of treatment, hepatocellular adenomas were detected in ethanol-fed rats only, but neither in control rats nor in animals receiving ethanol and CMZ. The 8-OHdG formation was found to be significantly increased in ethanol fed animals and normalized with CMZ treatment. In addition, alcohol-reduced hepatic retinol and retinoic acid concentrations were restored by CMZ treatment to normal levels in the rats at 10 months of treatment. These data demonstrate that the inhibition of ethanol-induced CYP2E1 as a key pathogenic factor can counteract the tumor-promoting action of ethanol by decreasing TNF-α expression, NF-κB activation, and oxidative DNA damage as well as restoring normal hepatic levels of retinoic acid in DEN-treated rats. PMID:23543859

  17. Protective effect of hydrogen sulfide against cold restraint stress-induced gastric mucosal injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Aboubakr, Esam M; Taye, Ashraf; El-Moselhy, Mohamed A; Hassan, Magdy K

    2013-12-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is an endogenous gaseous mediator plays a potential role in modulating gastric inflammatory responses. However, its putative protective role remains to be defined. The present study aimed to evaluate role of the exogenously released and endogenously synthesized H2S in cold restraint stress (CRS)-induced oxidative gastric damage in rats. Rats were restrained, and maintained at 4 °C for 3 h. The H2S donor, sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS) (60 μmol/kg) was injected intraperitoneally (i.p.) before CRS. Our results revealed that NaHS pretreatment significantly attenuated ulcer index, free and total acid output, and pepsin activity in gastric juice along with decreased gastric mucosal carbonyl content and reactive oxygen species production. This was accompanied by increased gastric juice pH and mucin concentration in addition to restoring the deficits in the gastric reduced glutathione, catalase as well as superoxide dismutase enzyme activities. NaHS pretreatment markedly reduced the serum level of tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α) and myeloperoxidase activity compared to CRS-non-treated. Moreover, NaHS preadministration significantly abrogated the inflammatory and the deleterious responses of gastric mucosa in CRS. The protective effects of H2S were confirmed by gastric histopathological examination. However, pretreatment with the H2S-synthesizing enzyme, cystathionine-gamma-lyase inhibitor, beta-cyano-L-alanine (50 mg/kg, i.p.) reversed the gastroprotection afforded by the endogenous H2S. Collectively, our results suggest that H2S can protect rat gastric mucosa against CRS-induced gastric ulceration possibly through mechanisms that involve anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory actions alongside enhancement of gastric mucosal barrier and reduction in acid secretory parameters.

  18. Effect of Spirogyra neglecta on the early stages of 1, 2-dimethylhydrazine-induced colon carcinogenesis in rats.

    PubMed

    Taya, Sirinya; Thumvijit, Tarika; Chewonarin, Teera; Punvittayagul, Charatda; Wongpoomchai, Rawiwan

    2016-12-06

    This study focused on the chemopreventive effects of Spirogyra neglecta extract (SNE) and dried S. neglecta mixed diet on the early stages of 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH)-induced colon carcinogenesis in rats. Male Wistar rats were injected with DMH to initiate aberrant crypt foci (ACF) formation. In the initiation stage, SNE significantly decreased the number of ACF in the colon of DMH-treated rats. Rats that received a low dose of SNE showed enhanced activity of several detoxifying and antioxidant enzymes. In the postinitiation stage, a low dose of SNE significantly decreased the number of ACF in the colon of DMH-treated rats. It significantly reduced the number of proliferating cell nuclear antigen-positive cells and increased the number of apoptotic cells in colonic crypts. S. neglecta thus inhibited the development of the early stages of DMH-induced colon carcinogenesis in rats by modulation of xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes and inhibition of cell proliferation as well as induction of apoptosis.

  19. Raman spectroscopic investigation of the chemopreventive response of naringenin and its nanoparticles in DMBA-induced oral carcinogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnakumar, N.; Sulfikkarali, N. K.; Manoharan, S.; Venkatachalam, P.

    2013-11-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a vibrational spectroscopic technique that can be used to optically probe the biomolecular changes associated with tumor progression. The aim of the present study is to investigate the biomolecular changes in chemopreventive response of prepared naringenin-loaded nanoparticles (NARNPs) relative to efficacy of free naringenin (NAR) during 7,12-dimethyl benz(a)anthracene (DMBA)-induced oral carcinogenesis by Fourier Transform Raman (FT-Raman) spectroscopy. Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) was developed in the buccal pouch of golden Syrian hamsters by painting with 0.5% DMBA in liquid paraffin three times a week for 14 weeks. Raman spectra differed significantly between the control and tumor tissues, with tumors showing higher percentage signals for nucleic acids, phenylalanine and tryptophan and a lower in the percentage of phospholipids. Moreover, oral administration of free NAR and NARNPs significantly increased phospholipids and decreased the levels of tryptophan, phenylalanine and nucleic acid contents. On a comparative basis, NARNPs was found to have a more potent antitumor effect than free NAR in completely preventing the formation of squamous cell carcinoma and in improving the biochemical status to a normal range in DMBA-induced oral carcinogenesis. The present study further suggest that Raman spectroscopy could be a valuable tool for rapid and sensitive detection of specific biomolecular changes in response to chemopreventive agents.

  20. Chemopreventive efficacy of green tea drinking against 1,2-dimethyl hydrazine-induced rat colon carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Sadik, Nermin A H

    2013-04-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the leading causes of tumour-related deaths. In the present study, the chemopreventive effect of green tea on 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH)-induced colon carcinogenesis was studied in male Wistar rats. The DMH group received subcutaneous injections of DMH (30 mg kg(-1) body weight) once a week for 30 weeks, the normal group received the vehicle of DMH, and the DMH + green tea group received DMH simultaneously with 1% green tea as their sole source of drinking fluid throughout the experimental period. In the DMH group treated with green tea, significant reductions in gene overexpressions of colonic nuclear factor κB (NF-κB), tumour necrosis factor α, inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase 2, and NF-κB immunostaining indicates the anti-inflammatory effect of green tea in attenuating colon cancer. Moreover, the anti-angiogenic and anti-invasiveness effects of green tea were revealed as reductions of both vascular endothelial growth factor and matrix metalloproteinase-7 mRNA expression levels. These effects were confirmed by the significant reduction of serum tumour necrosis factor α, C-reactive protein levels, inhibition of tumour incidence, and nearly normal survival rate and colonic architecture. It can be concluded that green tea exerts a potent chemopreventive effect on colon carcinogenesis possibly due to the inhibition of NF-κB.

  1. Resveratrol enhances cell-mediated immune response to DMBA through TLR4 and prevents DMBA induced cutaneous carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Yusuf, Nabiha; Nasti, Tahseen H; Meleth, Sreelatha; Elmets, Craig A

    2009-01-01

    Toll like receptors (TLRs) activate signals that are critically involved in innate immune responses and that contribute to the initiation of adaptive immune responses. Resveratrol (trans-3, 5,4-trihydroxystilbene), a polyphenol found in red grapes and in several other plant sources, is an effective chemopreventive agent in cutaneous chemical carcinogenesis. In this study, we investigated whether TLR4 was required for the chemopreventive action of resveratrol in DMBA skin carcinogenesis. For this purpose, mice with normal and deficient TLR4 function were compared when pretreated with resveratrol and then subjected to a DMBA-induced skin carcinogenesis protocol. There were fewer tumors/group (p<0.001) in resveratrol treated TLR4 competent C3H/HeN mice than in TLR4 deficient C3H/HeJ mice. In addition, the size of tumors in C3H/HeN mice was reduced in vivo and their survival in vitro was inhibited by resveratrol to a significantly greater extent than in C3H/HeJ mice. Resveratrol inhibited angiogenesis to a much greater extent in the TLR4 competent mice than in TLR4 deficient mice. IFN-γ and IL-12 levels were also increased in TLR4 competent mice compared to TLR4 deficient mice, and TLR4 competent C3H/HeN mice exhibited a greater increase in the cell-mediated immune response to DMBA. The results of this study indicate that TLR4 is an important mediator of resveratrol chemoprevention in DMBA skin tumorigenesis. PMID:19142898

  2. Effects of selenium on 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene-induced mammary carcinogenesis and DNA adduct formation

    SciTech Connect

    Ip, C.; Daniel, F.B.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of the present investigation was to determine the effects of dietary selenium deficiency or excess on 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA)-induced mammary neoplasia in rats and to delineate whether selenium-mediated modification of mammary carcinogenesis was associated with changes in carcinogen:DNA adduct formation and activities of liver microsomal enzymes that are involved in xenobiotic metabolism. Female Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into three groups from weaning and were maintained on one of three synthetic diets designated as follows: selenium deficient (less than 0.02 ppm); selenium adequate (0.2 ppm); or selenium excess (2.5 ppm). For the DMBA binding and DNA adduct studies, rats were given a dose of (/sup 3/H)DMBA p.o. after 1 month on their respective diets. Results from the liver and the mammary gland indicated that neither selenium deficiency nor excess had any significant effect on the binding levels, which were calculated on the basis of total radioactivity isolated with the purified DNA. Furthermore, it was found that dietary selenium intake did not seem to affect quantitatively or qualitatively the formation of DMBA:DNA adducts in the liver. Similarly, in a parallel group of rats that did not receive DMBA, the activities of aniline hydroxylase, aminopyrine N-demethylase, and cytochrome c reductase were not significantly altered by dietary selenium levels. Concurrent with the above experiments, the effect of dietary selenium intake on carcinogenesis was also monitored. Results of this experiment indicated that selenium deficiency enhanced mammary carcinogenesis only when this nutritional condition was maintained in the postinitiation phase. Likewise, an excess of selenium intake inhibited neoplastic development only when this regimen was continued after DMBA administration.

  3. Chemical carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Paula A; Colaço, Aura; Chaves, Raquel; Guedes-Pinto, Henrique; De-La-Cruz P, Luis F; Lopes, Carlos

    2007-12-01

    The use of chemical compounds benefits society in a number of ways. Pesticides, for instance, enable foodstuffs to be produced in sufficient quantities to satisfy the needs of millions of people, a condition that has led to an increase in levels of life expectancy. Yet, at times, these benefits are offset by certain disadvantages, notably the toxic side effects of the chemical compounds used. Exposure to these compounds can have varying effects, ranging from instant death to a gradual process of chemical carcinogenesis. There are three stages involved in chemical carcinogenesis. These are defined as initiation, promotion and progression. Each of these stages is characterised by morphological and biochemical modifications and result from genetic and/or epigenetic alterations. These genetic modifications include: mutations in genes that control cell proliferation, cell death and DNA repair--i.e. mutations in proto-oncogenes and tumour suppressing genes. The epigenetic factors, also considered as being non-genetic in character, can also contribute to carcinogenesis via epigenetic mechanisms which silence gene expression. The control of responses to carcinogenesis through the application of several chemical, biochemical and biological techniques facilitates the identification of those basic mechanisms involved in neoplasic development. Experimental assays with laboratory animals, epidemiological studies and quick tests enable the identification of carcinogenic compounds, the dissection of many aspects of carcinogenesis, and the establishment of effective strategies to prevent the cancer which results from exposure to chemicals.

  4. Topographic localization of gastric lesions and key role of plasma bicarbonate concentration in dogs with experimentally induced gastric dilatation.

    PubMed

    Pfeiffer, C J; Keith, J C; April, M

    1987-02-01

    The canine gastric response to acute dilatation, its correlation with selected systemic cardiovascular changes, and preliminary study of its modulation by membrane-stabilizing agents were studied in 21 Beagle dogs. Gastric mucosal damage and adverse cardiovascular sequelae were induced by inflation of an intragastric balloon to 60 mm of Hg in each anesthetized dog for 2.5 hours. At this time, dogs were given 1 of 4 treatments: control; lidocaine HCl, 2.2 mg bolus + 66 micrograms/min, IV; prednisolone succinate, 6.6 mg, IV; and zinc sulfate, 2.2 mg bolus + 66 micrograms/min, IV. After treatments were given, there was a 4-hour deflation period. Throughout the 6.5 hours, continuous measurements were made of stroke volume, arterial blood pressure, PaO2, PaCO2, and plasma HCO3- concentration. Gastric lesions, assessed by planimetric analysis of ulcer indices, were limited to the fundus and corpus and were significantly decreased by lidocaine administration. As seen by histopathologic examination, a sharply delineated transverse area bordering the corporeal-antral junction near the lesser curvature demonstrated minimal resistance to ulceration and showed mucus depletion. Plasma HCO3- concentration, base excess, and CO2 values were negatively correlated with development of gastric damage, indicating that plasma HCO3- concentration has a key role in mucosal resistance to ulcerogenesis.

  5. L-Theanine healed NSAID-induced gastric ulcer by modulating pro/antioxidant balance in gastric ulcer margin.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Sirshendu; Chatterjee, Ananya; Roy, Surmi; Bera, Biswajit; Bandyopadhyay, Sandip K

    2014-10-01

    L-Theanine is a unique non-protein-forming amino acid present in tea [Camellia sinensis (L.) O. Kuntze]. In the present work, we evaluated the healing effect of L-theanine on NSAID (indomethacin)-induced gastric ulcer. Histology of the stomach tissues revealed maximum ulceration on the third day after indomethacin administration (18 mg/kg, single dose p.o.) which was accompanied by increased lipid peroxidation; protein carbonylation; Th1 cytokine synthesis, and depletion of thiol, mucin, prostaglandin (PG) E, Th2 cytokine synthesis; and total antioxidant status in mice. L-Theanine healed gastric ulcer at a dose of 10 mg/kg b.w. but aggravated the ulcerated condition at a higher dose of 40 mg/kg b.w. At 10 mg/kg b.w., L-theanine significantly alleviated the adverse oxidative effect of indomethacin through enhanced synthesis of PGE2 by modulation of cyclo-oxygenase-1 and 2 [COX-1 and COX-2] expression, Th1/Th2 cytokine balance, and restoration of cellular antioxidant status at the gastric ulcer margin. The present study revealed for the first time the dose-dependent biphasic effect of a natural neuroprotective agent, L-theanine, on gastric ulcer disease.

  6. α-Terpineol Induces Gastric Retention of Liquids by Inhibiting Vagal Parasympathetic Pathways in Rats.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Moisés Tolentino Bento; Marques, Rosemarie Brandim; Batista-Lima, Francisco José; Soares, Marília Almeida; Dos Santos, Armênio Aguiar; Magalhães, Pedro Jorge Caldas; de Assis Oliveira, Francisco; de Castro Almeida, Fernanda Regina

    2016-10-01

    α-Terpineol is a monoterpene with smooth muscle relaxant properties. In this study, its effects on the gastric emptying rate of awake rats were evaluated with emphasis on the mode by which it induces gastrointestinal actions. Administered by gavage, α-terpineol (50 mg/kg) delayed gastric emptying of a liquid test meal at 10 min postprandial. Hexamethonium or guanethidine did not interfere with the retarding effect induced by α-terpineol, but atropine and L-N(G)-nitroarginine methyl ester abolished it. In vagotomized rats, α-terpineol did not delay gastric emptying. In isolated strips of gastric fundus, concentration-effect curves in response to carbamylcholine were higher in magnitude after treatment with the monoterpene. α-Terpineol (1 to 2000 µM) relaxed sustained contractions induced by carbamylcholine or a high K(+) concentration in a concentration-dependent manner. This relaxing effect was not affected by the presence of L-N(G)-nitroarginine methyl ester, 1 H-[1, 2, 4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one, tetraethylammonium, or atropine. Smooth muscle contractions induced by electrical field stimulation were inhibited by α-terpineol. In conclusion, α-terpineol induced gastric retention in awake rats through mechanisms that depended on intact vagal innervation to the stomach, which involved cholinergic/nitrergic signalling. Such a retarding effect induced by α-terpineol appears not to result from a direct action of the monoterpene on gastric smooth muscle cells.

  7. Effect of IL-1β and IL-1RN polymorphisms in carcinogenesis of the gastric mucosa in patients infected with Helicobacter pylori in Algeria

    PubMed Central

    Drici, Amine El-Mokhtar; Moulessehoul, Soraya; Tifrit, Abdelkarim; Diaf, Mustapha; Turki, Douidi Kara; Bachir, Meryem; Tou, Abdenacer

    2016-01-01

    Background Infection with Helicobacter pylori is considered a potential risk of developing gastric cancer in association with contributing host genetic factor. IL-1β and IL-1RN polymorphisms appear to maintain and promote Helicobacter pylori infection and to stimulate neoplastic growth of the gastric mucosa. Objective and methods In order to elucidate the effect of these polymorphisms in combination with gastric cancer in a population from northwestern Algeria, a case-control study was carried out on 79 patients infected with H. pylori with chronic atrophic gastritis and/or gastric carcinoma, and 32 subjects were recruited as case-control. IL-1β-31 bi-allelic and IL-1β-511 bi-allelic polymorphisms and IL-1RN penta-allelic were genotyped. Results IL-1β-31C was associated with an increased risk of developing gastric carcinoma (OR=4.614 [1.43−14.81], p=0.01). However, IL-1RN2 heterozygous allele type was significantly associated with chronic atrophic gastritis (OR=4.2 [1.23−3.61], p=0.022). IL-1β-511T was associated with an increased risk of development of chronic atrophic gastritis (OR=4.286 [1.54−11.89], p=0.005). Conclusion IL-1β and IL-1RN polymorphisms associated with H. pylori infection contribute to the development of chronic atrophic gastritis and gastric carcinomas in an Algerian population. The alleles IL-1β-31C and IL-1RN were associated with an increased risk of developing gastric carcinoma, and IL-1β-511T with an increased risk of developing chronic atrophic gastritis with no significant association of developing gastric carcinoma. PMID:27340011

  8. Polymer fraction of Aloe vera exhibits a protective activity on ethanol-induced gastric lesions.

    PubMed

    Park, Chul-Hong; Nam, Dong-Yoon; Son, Hyeong-U; Lee, Si-Rim; Lee, Hyun-Jin; Heo, Jin-Chul; Cha, Tae-Yang; Baek, Jin-Hong; Lee, Sang-Han

    2011-04-01

    For centuries, Aloe has been used as a herbal plant remedy against skin disorders, diabetes, and for its cardiac stimulatory activity. Here, we examined the gastroprotective effects of an Aloe vera polymer fraction (Avpf; molecular weight cut-off ≥50 kDa; 150 mg/kg body weight, p.o.) on an ethanol-induced gastric lesion mouse model. Mice pre-treated with Avpf had significantly fewer gastric lesions than their respective controls. To further examine the potential mechanism underlying this effect, we used reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction to examine nitric oxide synthase and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)mRNA expression on tissues from gastric lesions. Our results revealed that the mRNA expressions of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) were each reduced by ~50% in Avpf-treated mice vs. the controls, whereas, the mRNA expression levels of endothelial nitric oxide synthase remained unchanged. MMP-9, an index for gastric lesions, also alleviated the ethanol-treated gastric ulceration during Avpf treatment. These findings collectively suggest that Avpf significantly protects the gastric mucosa against ethanol-induced gastric damage, at least in part, by decreasing mRNA expression levels of not only iNOS and nNOS, but also MMP-9.

  9. Curcumin attenuates gastric cancer induced by N-methyl-N-nitrosourea and saturated sodium chloride in rats.

    PubMed

    Sintara, Kawiya; Thong-Ngam, Duangporn; Patumraj, Suthiluk; Klaikeaw, Naruemon

    2012-01-01

    To determine effects of curcumin on N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU) and saturated sodium chloride (s-NaCl)-induced gastric cancer in rats. Male Wistar rats were divided into 5 groups: control (CO), control supplemented with 200 mg/kg curcumin (CC), MNU + s-NaCl, MNU + s-NaCl supplemented with 200 mg/kg curcumin daily for the first 3 weeks (MNU + s-NaCl + C3W), and MNU + s-NaCl supplemented with curcumin for 20 weeks (MNU + s-NaCl + C20W). To induce stomach cancer, rats except for CO and CC were orally treated with 100 mg/kg MNU on day 0 and 14, and s-NaCl twice-a-week for the first 3 weeks. The experiment was finished and rats were sacrificed at the end of 20 weeks. Cancers were found in forestomachs of all rats in MNU + s-NaCl. The expressions of phosphorylated inhibitor kappaB alpha (phospho-IκBα), 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), and cyclin D1 significantly increased in MNU + s-NaCl compared with CO. Curcumin treatments for 3 and 20 weeks reduced the cancer incidence resulting in a decrease of phospho-IκBα expression in benign tumor-bearing rats compared with MNU + s-NaCl. Curcumin treatment for 20 weeks also decreased 8-OHdG expression in benign tumor-bearing rats compared with MNU + s-NaCl. Curcumin can attenuate cancer via a reduction of phospho-IκBα and 8-OHdG expressions, which may play a promising role in gastric carcinogenesis.

  10. Deletion of epidermal Rac1 inhibits HPV-8 induced skin papilloma formation and facilitates HPV-8- and UV-light induced skin carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Deshmukh, Jayesh; Pofahl, Ruth; Pfister, Herbert; Haase, Ingo

    2016-09-06

    Overexpression and increased activity of the small Rho GTPase Rac1 has been linked to squamous cell carcinoma of the epidermis and mucosa in humans. Targeted deletion of Rac1 or inhibition of Rac1 activity in epidermal keratinocytes reduced papilloma formation in a chemical skin carcinogenesis mouse model. However, a potential role of Rac1 in HPV- and UV-light induced skin carcinogenesis has not been investigated so far, solar UV radiation being an important carcinogen to the skin.To investigate this, we deleted Rac1 or modulated its activity in mice with transgenic expression of Human papilloma virus type-8 (HPV-8) in epidermal keratinocytes. Our data show that inhibition or deletion of Rac1 results in reduced papilloma formation upon UV-irradiation with a single dose, whereas constitutive activation of Rac1 strongly increases papilloma frequency in these mice. Surprisingly, we observed that, upon chronic UV-irradiation, the majority of mice with transgenic expression of HPV-8 and epidermis specific Rac1 deletion developed squamous cell carcinomas. Taken together, our data show that Rac1 exerts a dual role in skin carcinogenesis: its activation is, on one hand, required for HPV-8- and UV-light induced papilloma formation but, on the other, suppresses the development of squamous cell carcinomas.

  11. Deletion of epidermal Rac1 inhibits HPV-8 induced skin papilloma formation and facilitates HPV-8- and UV-light induced skin carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Deshmukh, Jayesh; Pofahl, Ruth; Pfister, Herbert; Haase, Ingo

    2016-01-01

    Overexpression and increased activity of the small Rho GTPase Rac1 has been linked to squamous cell carcinoma of the epidermis and mucosa in humans. Targeted deletion of Rac1 or inhibition of Rac1 activity in epidermal keratinocytes reduced papilloma formation in a chemical skin carcinogenesis mouse model. However, a potential role of Rac1 in HPV- and UV-light induced skin carcinogenesis has not been investigated so far, solar UV radiation being an important carcinogen to the skin. To investigate this, we deleted Rac1 or modulated its activity in mice with transgenic expression of Human papilloma virus type-8 (HPV-8) in epidermal keratinocytes. Our data show that inhibition or deletion of Rac1 results in reduced papilloma formation upon UV-irradiation with a single dose, whereas constitutive activation of Rac1 strongly increases papilloma frequency in these mice. Surprisingly, we observed that, upon chronic UV-irradiation, the majority of mice with transgenic expression of HPV-8 and epidermis specific Rac1 deletion developed squamous cell carcinomas. Taken together, our data show that Rac1 exerts a dual role in skin carcinogenesis: its activation is, on one hand, required for HPV-8- and UV-light induced papilloma formation but, on the other, suppresses the development of squamous cell carcinomas. PMID:27506937

  12. Chemical and Molecular Biological Aspects of Alkylhydrazine-Induced Carcinogenesis in Human Cells in vitro

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-09-01

    hydrazine and its simple alkyl derivatives in carcinogenesis has been reviewed ( 1 ). In several species of rodents 1,2- dimethylhydrazine 4 (I,2-DMH) has...Pharmacy I For the Period September 1 , 1980 - August 31, 1981 C:O AIR FORCE OFFICE OF SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH Research Directorate of Life Sciences mI Bolling...Air Force Base SWashington, D.C. 20332 Contract No. F49620-80-C-0086 "II September, 1981 m’ed for publi"e reeasoe; " 1 12 2•t9ibution unlimited. 1 ’. I Q

  13. Guarana (Paullinia cupana Mart.) offers protection against gastric lesions induced by ethanol and indomethacin in rats.

    PubMed

    Campos, A R; Barros, A I S; Santos, F A; Rao, V S N

    2003-12-01

    The effects of guarana (Paullinia cupana) extract were analyzed in rats on acute gastric lesions induced by ethanol and indomethacin and were compared to those produced by caffeine, a methylxanthine. Guarana (50 and 100 mg/kg p.o.) pretreated animals showed a significant reduction in the severity of gastric lesions induced by absolute ethanol in a manner similar to caffeine (20 and 30 mg/kg p.o.). Against indomethacin-induced gastric ulceration, guarana at a higher dose offered significant protection but caffeine was ineffective at the doses tested. In 4 h pylorus-ligated rats, both guarana and caffeine caused significant diminution in the gastric secretory volume as well as the total acidity. Gastrointestinal transit in mice was not significantly affected by either of these agents. These findings indicate that guarana has a gastroprotective property that needs further elucidation as regards to its mechanism.

  14. Effect of Manilkara hexandra (Roxb.) Dubard against experimentally-induced gastric ulcers.

    PubMed

    Shah, Mamta B; Goswami, S S; Santani, D D

    2004-10-01

    Effects of the flavonoid rich fraction of the stem bark of Manilkara hexandra (Roxb.) Dubard, have been studied on ethanol, ethanol-indomethacin and pylorus ligated gastric ulcers in experimental animals. Oral administration of the ethyl acetate extract (extract A3) inhibited the formation of gastric lesions induced by ethanol in a dose dependent manner. The protective effect of extract A3 against ethanol induced gastric lesions was not abolished by pretreatment with indomethacin (10 mg kg(-1)). Further, extract A3 inhibited increase in vascular permeability due to ethanol administration. Extent of lipid peroxidation was significantly reduced in animals treated with extract. Extract A3 also inhibited the formation of gastric ulcers induced by pylorus ligation, when administered both orally and intraperitoneally. Moreover, pretreatment with extract A3 increased mucus production and glycoprotein content, which was evident from the rise in mucin activity and TC: PR ratio.

  15. Oral Consumption of Bitter Gourd and Tomato Prevents Lipid Peroxidation in Liver Associated with DMBA Induced Skin Carcinogenesis in Mice.

    PubMed

    De, Sarmishtha; Chakraborty, Jamuna; Das, Sukta

    2000-01-01

    The protective role of two commonly consumed natural dietary items- bitter gourd and tomato against endogenous as well as 7,12- dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) induced lipid peroxidation in the livers of mice was investigated. The rationale for such an approach is that lipid peroxidation has been suggested to play a key role in human cancer development. There was a sharp rise in lipid peroxidation (measured as thiobarbituric acid reactive substances formation) during skin carcinogenesis induced by DMBA in mice. Aqueous extracts of bitter gourd and tomato juice were found to be very potent inhibitors of lipid peroxidation both in normal and DMBA treated mice. Our observations support the hypothesis that natural combinations of phytochemicals present in the fruit juices exert cancer-protective effects via a decrease in lipid peroxidation.

  16. Basic Mechanics of DNA Methylation and the Unique Landscape of the DNA Methylome in Metal-Induced Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Brocato, Jason; Costa, Max

    2013-01-01

    DNA methylation plays an intricate role in the regulation of gene expression and events that compromise the integrity of the methylome may potentially contribute to disease development. DNA methylation is a reversible and regulatory modification that elicits a cascade of events leading to chromatin condensation and gene silencing. In general, normal cells are characterized by gene-specific hypomethylation and global hypermethylation, while cancer cells portray a reverse profile to this norm. The unique methylome displayed in cancer cells is induced after exposure to carcinogenic metals such as nickel, arsenic, cadmium, and chromium (VI). These metals alter the DNA methylation profile by provoking both hyper- and hypomethylation events. The metal-stimulated deviations to the methylome are possible mechanisms for metal-induced carcinogenesis and may provide potential biomarkers for cancer detection. Development of therapies based on the cancer methylome requires further research including human studies that supply results with larger impact and higher human relevance. PMID:23844698

  17. Cholera toxin, a potent inducer of epidermal hyperplasia but with no tumor promoting activity in mouse skin carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Kuroki, T.; Chida, K.; Munakata, K.; Murakami, Y.

    1986-05-29

    Intracutaneous injection of cholera toxin into mice induced epidermal hyperplasia to a greater extent than 12-O-tetra-decanoylphorbol-13-acetate. It also induced adenylate cyclase and through weakly, ornithine decarboxylase of the epidermis. Cholera toxin, however, showed no tumor promoting activity in mouse skin carcinogenesis. In the single stage promotion, cholera toxin (50 ng) was injected once a week for 10 weeks into the skin of SENCAR mice initiated with 25 ..mu..g 7,12-dimethyl-benz(a)anthracene, but no tumors developed. In the two-stage promotion test, cholera toxin (10-100 ng) was injected for one or two weeks into the initiated skin and then mezerein (4 ..mu..g) was applied twice a week for 18 weeks, but the toxin did not increase incidence or numbers of papillomas.

  18. Local opioid-sensitive afferent sensory neurones in the modulation of gastric damage induced by Paf.

    PubMed Central

    Esplugues, J. V.; Whittle, B. J.; Moncada, S.

    1989-01-01

    1. The role of local sensory neurones in modulating the extent of gastric mucosal damage induced by close-arterial infusion of platelet-activating factor (Paf 50 ng kg-1 min-1 for 10 min) has been investigated in the anaesthetized rat. 2. Local intra-arterial infusion of the neurotoxin, tetrodotoxin (TTX), substantially augmented the mucosal damage induced by Paf, as assessed by both macroscopic and histological techniques. 3. In rats pretreated with capsaicin 2 weeks prior to study, to induce a functional ablation of primary afferent neurones, gastric damage induced by Paf was significantly augmented. 4. Administration of morphine (0.75-3 mg kg-1 i.v.) or its peripherally acting quaternary analogue, N-methyl morphine (15 mg kg-1 i.v.), also significantly enhanced the gastric damage induced by Paf. 5. The potentiation by morphine of Paf-induced gastric damage was inhibited by administration of the opioid antagonists, naloxone (1 mg kg-1 i.v.) or the peripherally acting N-methyl nalorphine (3 mg kg-1 i.v.). 6. Administration of TTX or morphine alone, or pretreatment with capsaicin did not induce any detectable mucosal damage, suggesting that interference with local sensory neuronal activity itself does not directly induce mucosal disruption. 7. These results indicate that peripheral opiate-sensitive afferent sensory neurones play a physiological defensive role in the mucosa, attenuating the extent of gastric damage induced by Paf. PMID:2758231

  19. Anti-inflammatory activity and gastric lesions induced by zinc-tenoxicam.

    PubMed

    Nascimento, Jorge Willian L; Santos, Luiz Henrique; Nothenberg, Michael S; Coelho, Márcio M; Oga, Seizi; Tagliati, Carlos A

    2003-06-01

    Oral administration of tenoxicam or zinc-tenoxicam complex inhibited to a similar extent carrageenin-induced paw oedema and granulomatous tissue formation in rats as well as the acetic acid induced writhing response in mice. Gastric lesions induced by oral administration of zinc-tenoxicam were reduced in number and severity when compared with those induced by tenoxicam or the co-administration of tenoxicam and zinc acetate. However, after intraperitoneal administration, both zinc-tenoxicam and tenoxicam plus zinc acetate induced a reduced number of gastric lesions as compared with tenoxicam.

  20. Effect of capsaicin and cimetidine on the healing of acetic acid induced gastric ulceration in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Kang, J Y; Teng, C H; Chen, F C

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Capsaicin protects the gastric mucosa against experimental injury while capsaicin desensitisation reduces the rate of gastric ulcer healing. The effect of exogenous capsaicin on gastric ulcer healing has not to date been reported. AIM/METHOD: To investigate the effect of capsaicin, cimetidine, and in combination, given intragastrically in the healing of acetic acid induced chronic gastric ulcer in the rat. Treatment started immediately after ulcer induction. RESULTS: At the end of one week, capsaicin, cimetidine, and in combination increased ulcer healing but the effect of combined treatment was less than that of capsaicin alone. In an in vivo gastric chamber preparation, capsaicin increased, while cimetidine decreased, gastric mucosal blood flow measured by laser Doppler flowmetry. A dose response effect in reduction of gastric mucosal blood flow could be demonstrated for cimetidine. The gastric hyperaemic effect of capsaicin was blunted by prior administration of cimetidine. In contrast, capsaicin had no effect on gastric acid secretion and its addition to cimetidine did not affect the acid suppressant effect of the latter. CONCLUSIONS: Capsaicin promotes the healing of acetic acid induced gastric ulcer, probably by its gastric hyperaemic effect. Although cimetidine also promotes ulcer healing due to its inhibitory effect on acid secretion it may have an antagonistic effect on the gastric ulcer healing effect of capsaicin by virtue of inhibition of gastric hyperaemia. PMID:8984019

  1. Genetic ablation of caspase-7 promotes solar-simulated light-induced mouse skin carcinogenesis: the involvement of keratin-17

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Mee-Hyun; Lim, Do Young; Kim, Myoung Ok; Lee, Sung-Young; Shin, Seung Ho; Kim, Jae Young; Kim, Sung-Hyun; Kim, Dong Joon; Jung, Sung Keun; Yao, Ke; Kundu, Joydeb Kumar; Lee, Hye Suk; Lee, Cheol-Jung; Dickinson, Sally E.; Alberts, David; Bowden, G.Timothy; Stratton, Steven; Curiel, Clara; Einspahr, Janine; Bode, Ann M.; Surh, Young-Joon; Dong, Zigang

    2015-01-01

    Solar ultraviolet irradiation is an environmental carcinogen that causes skin cancer. Caspase-7 is reportedly expressed at reduced levels in many cancers. The present study was designed to examine the role of caspase-7 in solar-simulated light (SSL)-induced skin cancer and to elucidate its underlying molecular mechanisms. Our study revealed that mice with genetic deficiency of caspase-7 are highly susceptible to SSL-induced skin carcinogenesis. Epidermal hyperplasia, tumor volume and the average number of tumors were significantly increased in caspase-7 knockout (KO) mice compared with SKH1 wild-type mice irradiated with SSL. The expression of cell proliferation markers, such as survivin and Ki-67, was elevated in SSL-irradiated skin of caspase-7 KO mice compared with those observed in SSL-exposed wild-type SKH1 mouse skin. Moreover, SSL-induced apoptosis was abolished in skin from caspase-7 KO mice. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, followed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time-of-flight analysis of skin tissue lysates from SSL-irradiated SKH1 wild-type and caspase-7 KO mice revealed an aberrant induction of keratin-17 in caspase-7 KO mice. Immunohistochemical analysis of skin tumors also showed an increase of keratin-17 expression in caspase-7 KO mice compared with SKH1 wild-type mice. The expression of keratin-17 was also elevated in SSL-irradiated caspase-7 KO keratinocytes as well as in human basal cell carcinomas. The in vitro caspase activity assay showed keratin-17 as a substrate of caspase-7, but not caspase-3. Overall, our study demonstrates that genetic loss of caspase-7 promotes SSL-induced skin carcinogenesis by blocking caspase-7-mediated cleavage of keratin-17. PMID:26271098

  2. Chemomodulatory Potential of Bartogenic Acid Against DMBA/Croton Oil Induced Two-Step Skin Carcinogenesis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Chandragouda R.; Sonara, Bhavin M.; Mahajan, Umesh B.; Patil, Kalpesh R.; Patil, Dipak D.; Jadhav, Ramchandra B.; Goyal, Sameer N.; Ojha, Shreesh

    2016-01-01

    Barringtonia racemosa fruits are believed to be useful in cancer treatment in Ayurveda, the Indian system of medicine. In present study, bartogenic acid (BA), a triterpenoid constituent of Barringtonia fruits was evaluated for its cytotoxicity property using the human skin carcinoma cell line (SCC-13) and human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). The chemopreventive efficacy of BA was evaluated against the DMBA/Croton oil-induced skin carcinogenesis in mice.BA was orally administered at the doses of 1, 2 or 4 mg/kg/day or applied topically every day for 12 weeks following DMBA application. The in vitro data from cell lines revealed that BA induces cytotoxicity against the SCC-13 cells (IC50=7.5 µM). It was found 4.05 times more selective to exert cytotoxicity against SCC-13 as compared to the PBMC (IC50=30.4 µM). The in vivo datacollected from mice model of DMBA/Croton oil-induced skin carcinogenesis revealed that BA administered orally or applied topically, both reduced the precancerous skin lesions andthe incidence of tumor bearing. The oral doses of BA (2 and 4 mg/kg) and topical treatment significantly reduced the incidence and number of skin papillomas. At these doses, BA also increased the activities of catalase and superoxide dismutase and induced an increase in glutathionecontent and inhibited lipid peroxidation in the skin. These findings reveal the chemopreventive efficacy of BA and also demonstrate that it contributes to the cytotoxic and antioxidative effects of Barringtonia racemosa fruits. The study also validates the traditional claims of Barringtonia fruits and provides a scientific basis of its chemopreventive property. PMID:27877231

  3. Aspirin-induced gastric mucosal damage: prevention by enteric-coating and relation to prostaglandin synthesis.

    PubMed

    Hawthorne, A B; Mahida, Y R; Cole, A T; Hawkey, C J

    1991-07-01

    1. Gastric damage induced by low-dose aspirin and the protective effect of enteric-coating was assessed in healthy volunteers in a double-blind placebo-controlled cross-over trial using Latin square design. Each was administered placebo, plain aspirin 300 mg daily, plain aspirin 600 mg four times daily, enteric-coated aspirin 300 mg daily, or enteric-coated aspirin 600 mg four times daily for 5 days. Gastric damage was assessed endoscopically, and gastric mucosal bleeding measured. 2. Aspirin 300 mg daily and 600 mg four times daily caused significant increases in gastric injury compared with placebo. Gastric mucosal bleeding was significantly more with the high dose, with a trend towards increased gastric erosions, compared with the low dose. 3. Enteric-coating of aspirin eliminated the injury caused by low dose aspirin and substantially reduced that caused by the higher dose. 4. All dosages and formulations caused similar inhibition of gastric mucosal prostaglandin E2 synthesis. 5. Serum thromboxane levels were suppressed equally with plain and enteric-coated aspirin. 6. In this short-term study in healthy volunteers, gastric toxicity from aspirin was largely topical, independent of inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis, and could be virtually eliminated by the use of an enteric-coated preparation.

  4. Beyond gastric acid reduction: Proton pump inhibitors induce heme oxygenase-1 in gastric and endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, Jan C. . E-mail: beckeja@uni-muenster.de; Grosser, Nina; Waltke, Christian; Schulz, Stephanie; Erdmann, Kati; Domschke, Wolfram; Schroeder, Henning; Pohle, Thorsten

    2006-07-07

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) have been demonstrated to prevent gastric mucosal injury by mechanisms independent of acid inhibition. Here we demonstrate that both omeprazole and lansoprazole protect human gastric epithelial and endothelial cells against oxidative stress. This effect was abrogated in the presence of the heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) inhibitor ZnBG. Exposure to either PPI resulted in a strong induction of HO-1 expression on mRNA and protein level, and led to an increased activity of this enzyme. Expression of cyclooxygenase isoforms 1 and 2 remained unaffected, and COX-inhibitors did not antagonize HO-1 induction by PPIs. Our results suggest that the antioxidant defense protein HO-1 is a target of PPIs in both endothelial and gastric epithelial cells. HO-1 induction might account for the gastroprotective effects of PPIs independently of acid inhibition, especially in NSAID gastropathy. Moreover, our findings provide additional perspectives for a possible but yet unexplored use of PPIs in vasoprotection.

  5. Targeting hepatitis B virus and human papillomavirus induced carcinogenesis: novel patented therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Kanwar, Rupinder K; Singh, Neha; Gurudevan, Sneha; Kanwar, Jagat R

    2011-05-01

    Viral infections leading to carcinogenesis tops the risk factors list for the development of human cancer. The decades of research has provided ample scientific evidence that directly links 10-15% of the worldwide incidence of human cancers to the infections with seven human viruses. Moreover, the insights gained into the molecular pathogenetic and immune mechanisms of hepatitis B virus (HBV) and human papillomavirus (HPV) viral transmission to tumour progression, and the identification of their viral surface antigens as well as oncoproteins have provided the scientific community with opportunities to target these virus infections through the development of prophylactic vaccines and antiviral therapeutics. The preventive vaccination programmes targeting HBV and high risk HPV infections, linked to hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and cervical cancer respectively have been recently reported to alter age-old cancer patterns on an international scale. In this review, with an emphasis on HBV and HPV mediated carcinogenesis because of the similarities and differences in their global incidence patterns, viral transmission, mortality, molecular pathogenesis and prevention, we focus on the development of recently identified HBV and HPV targeting innovative strategies resulting in several patents and patent applications.

  6. Oral glutathione supplementation drastically reduces Helicobacter-induced gastric pathologies

    PubMed Central

    De Bruyne, Ellen; Ducatelle, Richard; Foss, Dennis; Sanchez, Margaret; Joosten, Myrthe; Zhang, Guangzhi; Smet, Annemieke; Pasmans, Frank; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Flahou, Bram

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter (H.) suis causes gastric pathologies in both pigs and humans. Very little is known on the metabolism of this bacterium and its impact on the host. In this study, we have revealed the importance of the glutamate-generating metabolism, as shown by a complete depletion of glutamine (Gln) in the medium during H. suis culture. Besides Gln, H. suis can also convert glutathione (GSH) to glutamate, and both reactions are catalyzed by the H. suis γ-glutamyltranspeptidase (GGT). Both for H. pylori and H. suis, it has been hypothesized that the degradation of Gln and GSH may lead to a deficiency for the host, possibly initiating or promoting several pathologies. Therefore the in vivo effect of oral supplementation with Gln and GSH was assessed. Oral supplementation with Gln was shown to temper H. suis induced gastritis and epithelial (hyper)proliferation in Mongolian gerbils. Astonishingly, supplementation of the feed with GSH, another GGT substrate, resulted in inflammation and epithelial proliferation levels returning to baseline levels of uninfected controls. This indicates that Gln and GSH supplementation may help reducing tissue damage caused by Helicobacter infection in both humans and pigs, highlighting their potential as a supportive therapy during and after Helicobacter eradication therapy. PMID:26833404

  7. Role of mucus in ischemia/reperfusion-induced gastric mucosal injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Mojzis, J; Hegedüsová, R; Mirossay, L

    2000-01-01

    Gastric mucus plays an important role in gastric mucosal protection. Apart from its "barrier" function, it has been demonstrated that mucus protects gastric epithelial cells against toxic oxygen metabolites derived from the xanthine/ xanthine oxidase system. In this study, we investigated the effect of malotilate and sucralfate (mucus production stimulators) and N-acetylcysteine (mucolytic agent) on ischemia/reperfusion-induced gastric mucosal injury. Gastric ischemia was induced by 30 min clamping of the coeliac artery followed by 30 min of reperfusion. The mucus content was determined by the Alcian blue method. Sucralfate (100 mg/kg), malotilate (100 mg/kg), and N-acetylcysteine (100 mg/kg) were given orally 30 min before surgery. Both sucralfate and malotilate increased the mucus production in control rats. On the other hand, N-acetyloysteine significantly decreased mucus content in control (sham) group. A significant decrease of mucus content was found in the control and the N-acetylcysteine pretreated group during the period of ischemia. On the other hand, sucralfate and malotilate prevented the decrease the content of mucus during ischemia. A similar result can be seen after ischemia/reperfusion. In the control group and N-acetylcysteine pretreated group a significant decrease of adherent mucus content was found. However, sucralfate and malotilate increased mucus production (sucralfate significantly). Sucralfate and malotilate also significantly protected the gastric mucosa against ischemia/reperfusion-induced injury. However, N-acetylcysteine significantly increased gastric mucosal injury after ischemia/reperfusion. These results suggest that gastric mucus may be involved in the protection of gastric mucosa after ischemia/reperfusion.

  8. Clonal xenobiotic resistance during pollution-induced toxic injury and hepatocellular carcinogenesis in liver of female flounder (Platichthys flesus (L.)).

    PubMed

    Koehler, Angela; Alpermann, Tilmann; Lauritzen, Bjarne; Van Noorden, Cornelis J F

    2004-01-01

    Juvenile and adult female flounder (Platichthys flesus (L.)) were caught either in the estuary of the most polluted European river, the Elbe, or as controls in a reference site to study pollution-induced xenobiotic resistance in their livers in relation to pathological alterations. In juvenile fish, livers displayed reversible and irreversible degenerative toxipathic lesion types but never showed (pre)neoplastic changes. Tumour frequencies up to 70% were found macroscopically in livers of adult female flounder which had progressed to adenomas and carcinomas in the most polluted site. Because male adult flounder show only up to 50% of livers containing early preneoplastic foci but never malignancies, we focussed our study on female individuals. (Pre)neoplastic changes ranged from early eosinophilic foci to basophilic foci, adenomas and hepatocellular carcinomas. Adenomas were generally eosinophilic whereas carcinomas were mainly basophilic. These phenotypical sequential changes strongly resemble those found in chemically-induced liver carcinogenesis in mammals. Characteristic mutations known from mammalian cancers have not been found so far in these flounder livers. Therefore, we investigated whether epigenetic events had induced a metabolic "resistant phenotype" of (pre)malignant cancer cells during hepatocellular carcinogenesis. With a quantitative immunohistochemical approach, we studied expression of P-glycoprotein (P-gp)-mediated multixenobiotic resistance (MXR), cytochrome P4501A1, glutathione-S-transferase-A which are key proteins in xenobiotic metabolism and elimination. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH) activity, the major source of the reducing power NADPH which is needed for biotransformation, oxyradical scavenging and biosynthesis, was detected as well. We observed upregulation of G6PDH activity already in early preneoplastic eosinophilic foci and subsequent further upregulation in basophilic foci and carcinomas. P-gp started to become

  9. Both base excision repair and O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase protect against methylation-induced colon carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wirtz, Stefan; Nagel, Georg; Eshkind, Leonid; Neurath, Markus F.; Samson, Leona D.; Kaina, Bernd

    2010-01-01

    Methylating agents are widely distributed environmental carcinogens. Moreover, they are being used in cancer chemotherapy. The primary target of methylating agents is DNA, and therefore, DNA repair is the first-line barrier in defense against their toxic and carcinogenic effects. Methylating agents induce in the DNA O6-methylguanine (O6MeG) and methylations of the ring nitrogens of purines. The lesions are repaired by O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (Mgmt) and by enzymes of the base excision repair (BER) pathway, respectively. Whereas O6MeG is well established as a pre-carcinogenic lesion, little is known about the carcinogenic potency of base N-alkylation products such as N3-methyladenine and N3-methylguanine. To determine their role in cancer formation and the role of BER in cancer protection, we checked the response of mice with a targeted gene disruption of Mgmt or N-alkylpurine-DNA glycosylase (Aag) or both Mgmt and Aag, to azoxymethane (AOM)-induced colon carcinogenesis, using non-invasive mini-colonoscopy. We demonstrate that both Mgmt- and Aag-null mice show a higher colon cancer frequency than the wild-type. With a single low dose of AOM (3 mg/kg) Aag-null mice showed an even stronger tumor response than Mgmt-null mice. The data provide evidence that both BER initiated by Aag and O6MeG reversal by Mgmt are required for protection against alkylation-induced colon carcinogenesis. Further, the data indicate that non-repaired N-methylpurines are not only pre-toxic but also pre-carcinogenic DNA lesions. PMID:20732909

  10. Evaluation of the chemopreventive response of naringenin-loaded nanoparticles in experimental oral carcinogenesis using laser-induced autofluorescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulfikkarali, N. K.; Krishnakumar, N.

    2013-04-01

    The aim of the present study is to investigate the chemopreventive effects of prepared naringenin-loaded nanoparticles (NARNPs) relative to the efficacy of free naringenin (NAR) in modifying the carcinogenic process and to study the changes in the endogenous fluorophores during DMBA-induced hamster buccal pouch (HBP) carcinogenesis by laser-induced autofluorescence (LIAF) spectroscopy. LIAF emission spectra from the hamster buccal mucosa of the control and experimental groups of animals were recorded in the 350-700 nm spectral range on a miniature fiber optic spectrometer from different anatomical sites of each group, with excitation at 404 nm from a diode laser. Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) was developed in the buccal pouch of golden Syrian hamsters by painting with 0.5% DMBA in liquid paraffin three times a week for 14 weeks. DMBA-painted animals revealed morphological changes, hyperplasia, dysplasia and well-differentiated squamous cell carcinoma. LIAF emission spectra showed significant difference between the control and tumor tissues. The tumor tissues are characterized by an increase in the emission of porphyrins and a decrease in the emission of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide hydrogenase (NADH) and flavin adenine nucleotide (FAD) when compared to the control tissues. Furthermore, oral administration of NAR and its nanoparticulates restored the status of endogenous fluorophores in the buccal mucosa of DMBA-painted animals. On a comparative basis, the treatment of nanoparticulate naringenin was found to be more effective than free naringenin in completely preventing the formation of squamous cell carcinoma and in improving the status of endogenous porphyrins to a normal range in DMBA-induced hamster buccal pouch carcinogenesis. The result of the present study further suggests that LIAF spectroscopy may be a very valuable tool for rapid and sensitive detection of endogenous fluorophore changes in response to chemopreventive agents.

  11. Role of mucus in gastric mucosal injury induced by local ischemia/reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Seno, K; Joh, T; Yokoyama, Y; Itoh, M

    1995-09-01

    The role of gastric mucus was evaluated in a rat model of gastric epithelial damage induced by local ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) stress. In this model, blood-to-lumen chromium 51-labeled ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (51Cr-EDTA) clearance served as an index of injury. Tetraprenyl acetone (TPA; 100 mg, 200 mg/kg IP) was used to stimulate mucus production. Administration of TPA increased both the hexosamine content in gastric tissue and the amount of alcian blue-periodic acid Schiff (AB-PAS) stained mucus in the mucosa in a dose-dependent manner. Increases in 51Cr-EDTA clearance induced by I/R were significantly attenuated by TPA in a dose-dependent manner. N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC; 0.6%, 0.8%) was perfused into the gastric lumen to assess the effect of reduction in mucus on the injury induced by I/R. Although mean values of hexosamine content were increased by perfusion with NAC, AB-PAS-stained mucus in the mucosa was significantly decreased in a dose-dependent manner. Perfusion of NAC did not change basal 51Cr-EDTA clearance but significantly exacerbated the increase in clearance induced by I/R in a dose-dependent manner. These results indicate that gastric mucus protects the gastric mucosa against I/R stress in vivo.

  12. Protective effect of tetrahydrocoptisine against ethanol-induced gastric ulcer in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Weifeng Huang, Huimin; Niu, Xiaofeng Fan, Ting; Mu, Qingli; Li, Huani

    2013-10-01

    Excessive alcohol consumption can lead to gastric ulcer and the present work was aimed to examine the protective effect of tetrahydrocoptisine (THC) in the model of ethanol-induced gastric ulcer in mice. Fasted mice treated with ethanol 75% (0.5 ml/100 g) were pre-treated with THC (10 or 20 mg/kg, ip), cimetidine (100 mg/kg, ip) or saline in different experimental sets for a period of 3 days, and animals were euthanized 4 h after ethanol ingestion. Gross and microscopic lesions, immunological and biochemical parameters were taken into consideration. The results showed that ethanol induced gastric damage, improving nitric oxide (NO) level, increased pro-inflammatory cytokine (TNF-α and IL-6) levels and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, as well as the expression of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) in the ethanol group. Pretreatment of THC at doses of 10 and 20 mg/kg bodyweight significantly attenuated the gastric lesions as compared to the ethanol group. These results suggest that the gastroprotective activity of THC is attributed to reducing NO production and adjusting the pro-inflammatory cytokine, inhibited neutrophil accumulation and NF-κB expression. - Highlights: • THC decreased ethanol-induced pro-inflammatory cytokine release. • THC inhibited the production of NO in serum and gastric tissue. • THC reduced NF-κB expression and MPO accumulation in ethanol-induced gastric tissue.

  13. Apigenin inhibits oxidative stress-induced macromolecular damage in N-nitrosodiethylamine (NDEA)-induced hepatocellular carcinogenesis in Wistar albino rats.

    PubMed

    Jeyabal, Prince Vijeya Singh; Syed, Mumtaz Banu; Venkataraman, Magesh; Sambandham, Jamuna Kumari; Sakthisekaran, Dhanapal

    2005-09-01

    Apigenin (4',5,7-trihydroxyflavone), a flavone subclass of flavonoid widely distributed in many herbs, fruits, and vegetables is a substantial component of the human diet and has been shown to possess a variety of biological activities including tumor growth inhibition and chemoprevention. Recent studies in several biological systems have shown that apigenin induces tumor growth inhibition, cell cycle arrest, and apoptosis. Free radical-induced degradation of polyunsaturated fatty acid results in electrophilic products and causes severe oxidative stress. Oxidative stress induced by free radicals, nonoxidizing species, electrophiles, and associated DNA damages have been frequently coupled with carcinogenesis. In the present study, the protective role of apigenin was examined against the oxidative stress caused by N-nitrosodiethylamine (NDEA) and phenobarbital (PB) in Wistar albino rats. Oxidative stress was measured in terms of lipid peroxidation (LPO) and protein carbonyl formation. Oxidative stress-induced DNA damage was measured by single cell gel electrophoresis (comet assay). Apigenin exhibited its antioxidant defense against NDEA-induced oxidative stress. We have observed minimal levels of LPO and DNA damage in apigenin-treated hepatoma bearing animals. Based on the results, we suggest that apigenin may be developed as a promising chemotherapeutic agent against the development of chemical carcinogenesis.

  14. Effects of gastric vagotomy on visceral cell proliferation induced by ventromedial hypothalamic lesions: role of vagal hyperactivity.

    PubMed

    Kintaka, Yuri; Osaka, Toshimasa; Suzuki, Yoko; Hashiguchi, Takeo; Niijima, Akira; Kageyama, Haruaki; Fumiko, Takenoya; Shioda, Seiji; Inoue, Shuji

    2009-07-01

    In rats, ventromedial hypothalamic (VMH) lesions induce cell proliferation in the visceral organs (stomach, small intestine, liver, and pancreas) due to hyperactivity of the vagus nerve. To investigate the effects of selective gastric vagotomy on VMH lesion-induced cell proliferation and secretion of gastric acid, we assessed the mitotic index (the number of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA)-immunopositive cells per 1,000 cells in the gastric mucosal cell layer) and measured the volume of secreted basal gastric acid. Furthermore, to explore whether or not ethanol-induced acute gastric mucosal lesions (AGML) lead to ulcer formation in VMH-lesioned rats, we assessed the ulcer index of both sham-operated and VMH-lesioned rats after administration of ethanol. VMH lesions resulted in an increased mitotic index and thickness of the gastric mucosal cell layer and gave rise to the hypersecretion of gastric acid. Selective gastric vagotomy restored these parameters to normal without affecting cell proliferation in other visceral organs. Ethanol-induced AGML caused ulcers in sham VMH-lesioned rats, whereas VMH-lesioned rats were less likely to exhibit such ulcers. These results suggest that VMH lesion-induced vagally mediated cell proliferation in the visceral organs is associated with hyperfunction in these organs, and VMH lesion-induced resistance to ethanol may be due to thickening of the gastric mucosal cell layer resulting from cell proliferation in the gastric mucosa-this in turn is due to hyperactivity of the vagus nerve.

  15. Modeling Murine Gastric Metaplasia Through Tamoxifen-Induced Acute Parietal Cell Loss

    PubMed Central

    Saenz, Jose B.; Burclaff, Joseph; Mills, Jason C.

    2016-01-01

    Parietal cell loss represents the initial step in the sequential progression toward gastric adenocarcinoma. In the setting of chronic inflammation, the expansion of the mucosal response to parietal cell loss characterizes a crucial transition en route to gastric dysplasia. Here, we detail methods for using the selective estrogen receptor modulator tamoxifen as a novel tool to rapidly and reversibly induce parietal cell loss in mice in order to study the mechanisms that underlie these pre-neoplastic events. PMID:27246044

  16. Use of dimethicone to reduce the fall in gastric potential difference induced by bile salts.

    PubMed

    Bergmann, J F; Simoneau, G; Chantelair, G; Caulin, C; Segrestaa, J M

    1989-01-01

    The gastric potential difference (PD) was measured in ten healthy volunteers after sodium taurocholate intake. This bile salt was given after treatment with dimethicone or placebo in a cross-over design study. With dimethicone the fall in PD was lower (16.1 vs. 24.8 mV,) and shorter (32.5 vs. 51.0 min) than with the placebo. Our result suggests that the silicone can prevent the formation of the gastric lesions induced by bile salts.

  17. Prophylactic effects of Clausena excavata Burum. f. leaf extract in ethanol-induced gastric ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Albaayit, Shaymaa Fadhel Abbas; Abba, Yusuf; Abdullah, Rasedee; Abdullah, Noorlidah

    2016-01-01

    Clausena excavata is a natural herb with both antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. It has been used for decades in folkloric practice for the amelioration of various ailments. In this study, the gastroprotective activity of methanolic extract of C. excavata leaves (MECE) was determined in the Sprague Dawley rat ethanol-induced gastric ulcer model. Rats were pretreated with a single dose of vehicle (5% Tween 20), 20 mg/mL omeprazole, 400 and 200 mg/mL of MECE dissolved in 5% Tween 20. Ulcer was induced with 5 mL/kg of ethanol and stomach tissue was obtained after 1 hour. Histological examination was done on hematoxylin and eosin, periodic acid-Schiff, and immunochemically stained gastric mucosal tissues. Prostaglandin E2, superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, and lipid peroxidation levels of the gastric tissue homogenates were also determined. Significantly (P<0.05) smaller ulcer areas, less intense edema, and fewer leukocytes’ infiltration were observed in MECE- and omeprazole-treated than in untreated gastric mucosa with ulcer. The gastric pH, mucus production, superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase contents increased, while the lipid peroxidation content decreased as a result of MECE treatment. Bcl-2-associated X protein was underexpressed, while heat shock protein 70 and transforming growth factor-beta protein were overexpressed in the ulcerated gastric mucosa tissues treated with omeprazole and MECE. Similarly, there was a reduction in the levels of tumor necrotic factor-alpha and interleukin-6, while the level of interleukin-10 was increased. This study showed that the gastroprotective effect of MECE is achieved through inhibition of gastric juice secretion and ulcer lesion development, stimulation of mucus secretion, elevation of gastric pH, reduction of reactive oxygen species production, inhibition of apoptosis in the gastric mucosa, and modulation of inflammatory cytokines. PMID:27366052

  18. [The modifying effect of long-term administration of ascorbic acid with drinking water on asbestos-induced pleural carcinogenesis in Wistar rats].

    PubMed

    Stadnikova, N M; Vasil'eva, L A; Shelepov, V P; Pylev, L N

    1996-01-01

    Ascorbic acid administered with drinking water, in a concentration of 2.5%, together with sucrose (1%) was found to significantly inhibit the development of mesothelial and pleural tumors induced in Wistar rats by asbestos treatment. Said agents, however, failed to influence spontaneous carcinogenesis.

  19. Enhanced UV-induced skin carcinogenesis in transgenic mice overexpressing proprotein convertases.

    PubMed

    Fu, Jian; Bassi, Daniel E; Zhang, Jirong; Li, Tianyu; Cai, Kathy Q; Testa, Courtney Lyons; Nicolas, Emmanuelle; Klein-Szanto, Andres J

    2013-02-01

    The proprotein convertases (PCs) furin and PACE4 process numerous substrates involved in tumor growth, invasion, and metastasis. We have previously shown that PCs increase the susceptibility to chemical skin carcinogenesis. Because of the human relevancy of UV radiation in the etiopathogenesis of human skin cancer, we investigated whether or not transgenic mice overexpressing either furin alone or both furin and PACE4 show increased susceptibility to UV carcinogenesis. After backcrossing our previously described furin and PACE4 transgenic lines, targeted to the epidermis, into a SKH-1 background, we exposed both single and double transgenic mice to UV radiation for 34 weeks. The results showed an increase in squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) multiplicity of approximately 70% in the single furin transgenic mouse line SF47 (P < .002) and a 30% increase in the other single transgenic line SF49 when compared to wild-type (WT) SKH-1 mice. Interestingly, there was also an increase in the percentage of high histologic grade SCCs in the transgenic lines compared to the WT mice, i.e., WT = 9%, SF47 = 15%, and SF49 = 26% (P < .02). Targeting both furin and PACE4 to the epidermis in double transgenic mice did not have an additive effect on tumor incidence/multiplicity but did enhance the tumor histopathologic grade, i.e., a significant increase in higher grade SCCs was seen in the bigenic mouse line SPF47 (P < .02). Thus, we observed an increased susceptibility to UV in single furin transgenic mice that was not substantially enhanced in the double furin/PACE4 transgenic mice.

  20. Chemo-immunotherapy induces tumor regression in a mouse model of spontaneous mammary carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Carpinelli, Giulia; Canese, Rossella; Cecchetti, Serena; Schiavoni, Giovanna; D'Urso, Maria Teresa; Belardelli, Filippo; Proietti, Enrico

    2016-01-01

    Tumor-specific immune tolerance represents an obstacle for the development of effective anti-tumor immune responses through cancer vaccines. We here evaluated the efficacy of chemo-immunotherapy in breaking tumor-specific immune tolerance in an almost incurable mouse model of spontaneous carcinogenesis. Transgenic HER-2/neu mice bearing large mammary tumors received the adoptive transfer of splenocytes and serum isolated from immune donors, with or without pre-conditioning with cyclophosphamide. Treatment efficacy was assessed by monitoring tumor growth by manual inspection and by magnetic resonance imaging. The same chemo-immunotherapy protocol was tested on tumor-free HER-2/neu mice, to evaluate the effects on tumor emergence. Our data show that chemo-immunotherapy hampered carcinogenesis and caused the regression of large mammary tumor lesions in tumor-bearing HER-2/neu mice. The complete eradication of a significant number of tumor lesions occurred only in mice receiving cyclophosphamide shortly before immunotherapy, and was associated with increased serum anti HER-2/p185 antibodies and tumor leukocyte infiltration. The same protocol significantly delayed the appearance of mammary tumors when administered to tumor-free HER-2/neu mice, indicating that this chemo-immunotherapy approach acted through the elicitation of an effective anti-tumor immune response. Overall, our data support the immune-modulatory role of chemotherapy in overcoming cancer immune tolerance when administered at lymphodepleting non-myeloablative doses shortly before transfer of antigen-specific immune cells and immunoglobulins. These findings open new perspectives on combining immune-modulatory chemotherapy and immunotherapy to overcome immune tolerance in cancer patients. PMID:27486759

  1. Comparative evaluation of antiproliferative, antiangiogenic and apoptosis inducing potential of black tea polyphenols in the hamster buccal pouch carcinogenesis model

    PubMed Central

    Letchoumy, Paramasivame Vidjaya; Mohan, Kurapathy Venkata Poorna Chandra; Prathiba, Duvuru; Hara, Yukihiko; Nagini, Siddavaram

    2007-01-01

    Background To evaluate the relative chemopreventive efficacy of two black tea polyphenols, Polyphenon-B [P-B] and BTF-35 on 7,12-dimethylbenz [a]anthracene (DMBA)-induced hamster buccal pouch (HBP) carcinogenesis. Methods Hamsters were divided into 6 groups. The right buccal pouches of animals in groups 1–3 were painted with 0.5% of DMBA three times a week for 14 weeks. While hamsters in group 1 received no further treatment, animals in groups 2 and 3 received diet containing 0.05% P-B and BTF-35 respectively, four weeks before DMBA painting that was continued until the end of the experiments. Animals in groups 4 and 5 were given P-B and BTF-35 alone respectively as in groups 2 and 3. Group 6 animals served as the untreated control. All the animals were sacrificed after 18 weeks. The expression of p21, cyclin D1, glutathione S-transferase pi (GST-P), nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), Bcl-2, Bax, cytochrome C, caspase-3, caspase-9, poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP), cytokeratins and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) was analysed by RT-PCR, immunohistochemical and Western blot analyses. Results DMBA treated animals developed buccal pouch carcinomas that displayed increased expression of p21, cyclin D1, GST-P, NF-κB, cytokeratins, VEGF and Bcl-2 with decreased expression of Bax, cytochrome C, caspase-3, caspase-9, and PARP. Dietary administration of both P-B and BTF-35 reduced the incidence of DMBA-induced HBP carcinomas by modulating markers of cell proliferation, cell survival, tumour infiltration, angiogenesis, and apoptosis. Conclusion The results of the present study provide a mechanistic basis for the chemopreventive potential of black tea polyphenols. The greater efficacy of BTF-35 in inhibiting HBP carcinogenesis and modulating multiple molecular targets may have a potential role in the prevention of oral cancer. PMID:18053169

  2. Membrane fluidity and surface changes during initiation of 1,2 dimethylhydrazine-induced colon carcinogenesis: protection by zinc.

    PubMed

    Chadha, Vijayta Dani; Dhawan, D K

    2009-01-01

    The present study evaluated the modulatory effects of zinc on colonic membrane fluidity and surface abnormalities following 1,2 dimethylhydrazine (DMH)-induced colon carcinogenesis. Rats were segregated into four groups: normal control, DMH treated, zinc treated, DMH + zinc treated. Colon carcinogenesis was initiated through weekly subcutaneous injections of DMH (30 mg/kg body weight) for 8 weeks. Zinc (in the form of zinc sulphate) was supplemented to rats at a dose level of 227 mg/L in drinking water, ad libitum, for the entire duration of the study. Brush border membranes (BBM) were isolated from the colon of rats and the fluidity parameters were assessed by steady-state fluorescence polarization technique using the membrane extrinsic fluorophore 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene (DPH). The translational diffusion was measured by using the excimer formation of pyrene incorporated in the membrane. The results demonstrated a significant increase in the polarization and anisotropy, accompanied by an increase in order parameter in the membrane preparations from the colon of DMH-injected rats. Further, studies with pyrene fluorophore indicated a marked decrease in membrane microviscosity following DMH treatment. However, the alterations in membrane fluorescence polarization and the fluidity parameters were completely restored following zinc treatment. Drastic alterations in colon surface were noticed after 8 weeks of DMH treatment. However, zinc treatment to DMH-treated rats greatly restored normalcy in the colonic surface. The study concludes that zinc has a strong membrane stabilizing effect and thus has a positive beneficial effect against chemically induced colonic preneoplastic progression in rats.

  3. Elimination of deleterious effects of DMBA-induced skin carcinogenesis in mice by Syzygium cumini seed extract.

    PubMed

    Parmar, Jyoti; Sharma, Priyanka; Verma, Preeti; Sharma, Priyanka; Goyal, Pradeep K

    2011-09-01

    The inhibition of tumor incidence by hydro-alcoholic extract of S.cumini seed was evaluated in mice on two stage process of skin carcinogenesis induced by single application of 7, 12-dimethyl benz(a)anthracene (100 µg/100µl of acetone), and 2 weeks later promoted by repeated application of croton oil (1% acetone/thrice in a week) till the end of the experiment (i.e. 16 weeks). Oral administration of extract at a dose of 250mg/kg b.wt./day at the peri-initiational stage (i.e. 7 days before and 7 days after DMBA application), promotional stage (i.e. from the time of croton oil application) and at both the stages (i.e. 7 days prior to DMBA application & continued till the end of experiment) to the mice, recorded a significant reduction in tumor incidence to 37.5, 50 & 25% respectively in comparison to the carcinogen treated control, where tumor incidence was found as 100%. Tumor yield and Tumor burden were also significantly reduced by SCE. Similarly, the cumulative number of papillomas after 16 weeks was 68 in the control group, which was reduced to 15, 21 & 8 in the animals treated with the SCE continuously at peri-, post- and peri- & post- initiation stage respectively. A significant impairment was noticed in the levels of reduced glutathione, superoxide dismutase, catalase & protein and enhancement in LPO in liver and skin of carcinogen treated control mice as compared with vehicle treated mice. All such parameters were returned to near normal value by administration of SCE to DMBA treated mice. These results suggest a possible chemopreventive property of S.cumini against DMBA induced skin carcinogenesis in mice.

  4. Taenia taeniaeformis larval product induces gastric mucosal hyperplasia in SCID mice.

    PubMed

    Lagapa, Jose Trinipil G; Oku, Yuzaburo; Nonaka, Nariaki; Kamiya, Masao

    2002-02-01

    The effects of intraperitoneal implantation of Taenia taeniaeformis larvae and inoculation of in vitro larval products on gastric mucosa of SCID mice were investigated in this study. Mice surgically implanted with T. taeniaeformis larvae developed slight and moderate gastric hyperplasia. When in vitro cultured T. taeniaeformis larval excretory-secretory (TtLES) products containing 1 mg of protein were injected daily into mice, they caused gastropathy after 5-7 days. Mice injected daily with 0.5 mg of TtLES products also showed slight gastric hyperplasia after day 14 and 28. The gastropathy was characterized by reduction of both parietal and zymogenic cell number and increased number of alcian blue-periodic acid Schiff (AB-PAS)-positive cells and by two-fold extension of proliferative zone of gastric units. Larval implantation demonstrated a more potent effect in inducing gastropathy than did in vitro larval culture products. Significant decrease in number of parietal cells with concomitant increase of proliferative zone and AB-PAS-positive cell number indicated their important roles in inducing the hyperplastic lesion. Similarities with other gastropathies indicated that there is a common fundamental regulatory mechanism involved, and that the host response may not be specific to parasites. Present study validated the induction of gastric mucosal hyperplasia by larval ES products of T. taeniaeformis. This proved the hypothesis of previous studies suggesting the role of larvae-derived products in inducing gastric mucosal hyperplasia in T. taeniaeformis-infected rats.

  5. Inhibition of autophagy promotes metastasis and glycolysis by inducing ROS in gastric cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Qin, Wenjie; Li, Chao; Zheng, Wen; Guo, Qingqu; Zhang, Yuefeng; Kang, Muxing; Zhang, Bo; Yang, Bin; Li, Baozhong; Yang, Haijun; Wu, Yulian

    2015-11-24

    Autophagy defect has been shown to be correlated with malignant phenotype and poor prognosis of human cancers, however, the detailed mechanisms remain obscure. In this study, we investigated the biological changes induced by autophagy inhibition in gastric cancer. We showed that inhibition of autophagy in gastric cancer cells promotes epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and metastasis, alters metabolic phenotype from mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation to aerobic glycolysis and converts cell phenotype toward malignant, which maybe further contribute to chemoresistance and poor prognosis of gastric cancer. We also identified that the EMT and metabolism alterations induced by autophagy inhibition were dependent on ROS-NF-κB-HIF-1α pathway. More importantly, scavenging of ROS by the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC) attenuated activation of NF-κB and HIF-1α in autophagy-deficient gastric cancer cells, and autophagy inhibition induced metastasis and glycolysis were also diminished by NAC in vivo. Taken together, our findings suggested that autophagy defect promotes metastasis and glycolysis of gastric cancer, and antioxidants could be used to improve disease outcome for gastric cancer patients with autophagy defect.

  6. EF24 induces ROS-mediated apoptosis via targeting thioredoxin reductase 1 in gastric cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Weiqian; Chen, Xi; Ying, Shilong; Feng, Zhiguo; Chen, Tongke; Ye, Qingqing; Wang, Zhe; Qiu, Chenyu; Yang, Shulin; Liang, Guang

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) is one of the leading causes of cancer mortality in the world, and finding novel agents for the treatment of advanced gastric cancer is of urgent need. Diphenyl difluoroketone (EF24), a molecule having structural similarity to curcumin, exhibits potent anti-tumor activities by arresting cell cycle and inducing apoptosis. Although EF24 demonstrates potent anticancer efficacy in numerous types of human cancer cells, the cellular targets of EF24 have not been fully defined. We report here that EF24 may interact with the thioredoxin reductase 1 (TrxR1), an important selenocysteine (Sec)-containing antioxidant enzyme, to induce reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated apoptosis in human gastric cancer cells. By inhibiting TrxR1 activity and increasing intracellular ROS levels, EF24 induces a lethal endoplasmic reticulum stress in human gastric cancer cells. Importantly, knockdown of TrxR1 sensitizes cells to EF24 treatment. In vivo, EF24 treatment markedly reduces the TrxR1 activity and tumor cell burden, and displays synergistic lethality with 5-FU against gastric cancer cells. Targeting TrxR1 with EF24 thus discloses a previously unrecognized mechanism underlying the biological activity of EF24, and reveals that TrxR1 is a good target for gastric cancer therapy. PMID:26919110

  7. Antibiotic drug tigecycline inhibited cell proliferation and induced autophagy in gastric cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Chunling; Yang, Liqun; Jiang, Xiaolan; Xu, Chuan; Wang, Mei; Wang, Qinrui; Zhou, Zhansong; Xiang, Zhonghuai; Cui, Hongjuan

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • Tigecycline inhibited cell growth and proliferation in human gastric cancer cells. • Tigecycline induced autophagy not apoptosis in human gastric cancer cells. • AMPK/mTOR/p70S6K pathway was activated after tigecycline treatment. • Tigecycline inhibited tumor growth in xenograft model of human gastric cancer cells. - Abstract: Tigecycline acts as a glycylcycline class bacteriostatic agent, and actively resists a series of bacteria, specifically drug fast bacteria. However, accumulating evidence showed that tetracycline and their derivatives such as doxycycline and minocycline have anti-cancer properties, which are out of their broader antimicrobial activity. We found that tigecycline dramatically inhibited gastric cancer cell proliferation and provided an evidence that tigecycline induced autophagy but not apoptosis in human gastric cancer cells. Further experiments demonstrated that AMPK pathway was activated accompanied with the suppression of its downstream targets including mTOR and p70S6K, and ultimately induced cell autophagy and inhibited cell growth. So our data suggested that tigecycline might act as a candidate agent for pre-clinical evaluation in treatment of patients suffering from gastric cancer.

  8. Nicotine and 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone induce cyclooxygenase-2 activity in human gastric cancer cells: Involvement of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) and {beta}-adrenergic receptor signaling pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Vivian Yvonne; Jin, H.C.; Ng, Enders K.O.; Yu Jun; Leung, W.K.; Cho, C.H.; Sung, J.J.Y.

    2008-12-01

    Induction of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) associates with cigarette smoke exposure in many malignancies. Nicotine and its derivative, 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK), are the two important components in cigarette smoke that contributes to cancer development. However, the molecular mechanism(s) by which nicotine or NNK promotes gastric carcinogenesis remains largely unknown. We found that nicotine and NNK significantly enhanced cell proliferation in AGS cells that expressed both alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor ({alpha}7 nAChR) and {beta}-adrenergic receptors. Treatment of cells with {alpha}-bungarotoxin ({alpha}-BTX, {alpha}7nAChR antagonist) or propranolol ({beta}-adrenergic receptor antagonist) blocked NNK-induced COX-2/PGE{sub 2} and cell proliferation, while nicotine-mediated cell growth and COX-2/PGE{sub 2} induction can only be suppressed by propranolol, but not {alpha}-BTX. Moreover, in contrast to the dependence of growth promoting effect of nicotine on Erk activation, inhibitor of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) repressed NNK-induced COX-2 upregulation and resulted in suppression of cell growth. In addition, nicotine and NNK mediated COX-2 induction via different receptors to modulate several G1/S transition regulatory proteins and promote gastric cancer cell growth. Selective COX-2 inhibitor (SC-236) caused G1 arrest and abrogated nicotine/NNK-induced cell proliferation. Aberrant expression of cyclin D1 and other G1 regulatory proteins are reversed by blockade of COX-2. These results pointed to the importance of adrenergic and nicotinic receptors in gastric tumor growth through MAPK/COX-2 activation, which may perhaps provide a chemoprevention strategy for cigarette smoke-related gastric carcinogenesis.

  9. KLF4 deletion alters gastric cell lineage and induces MUC2 expression

    PubMed Central

    Yu, T; Chen, X; Lin, T; Liu, J; Li, M; Zhang, W; Xu, X; Zhao, W; Liu, M; Napier, D L; Wang, C; Evers, B M; Liu, C

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the most common types of cancer in the world, particularly in underdeveloped countries. The mechanism of gastric cancer is less understood compared with other types of gastrointestinal (GI) cancers. Krüppel-like factor 4 (KLF4) is a zinc-finger transcription factor and is a potential tumor suppressor in GI cancers. In this study, we have generated two mouse models, Rosa-Cre;Klf4fl/fl and Lgr5-Cre;Klf4fl/fl. KLF4 was deleted by Rosa-Cre in the gastric epithelia cells or by Lgr5-Cre in the antral stem cells in the adult mice. KLF4 deletion resulted in increased proliferating cells and decreased pit mucous cells. Surprisingly, the intestinal goblet cell marker, MUC2, which is not expressed in normal gastric tissues, was strongly induced at the base of the KLF4-deleted antral glands. To understand the clinical relevance of these findings, we analyzed the expression of KLF4 and MUC2 in human gastric cancer. In a subset of human gastric cancer, the expression of KLF4 is negatively associated with MUC2 expression. In conclusion, KLF4 is essential for normal homeostasis of antral stem cells; loss of KLF4 and expression of MUC2 could be important markers for gastric cancer diagnosis. PMID:27277677

  10. Attenuation of stress-induced gastric lesions by lansoprazole, PD-136450 and ranitidine in rats.

    PubMed

    Chandranath, S I; Bastaki, S M A; D'Souza, A; Adem, A; Singh, J

    2011-03-01

    Combining restraint with cold temperature (4°C) consistently induces gastric ulceration in rats after 3.5 h. The cold restraint-stress (CRS) method provides a suitable model for acute ulcer investigations. This study compares the antiulcer activities of lansoprazole (a proton pump inhibitor), PD-136450 (CCK(2)/gastrin receptor antagonist) and ranitidine (histamine H(2) receptor antagonist) on CRS-induced gastric ulcers in rats. The results have shown that lansoprazole, which is a potent anti-secretory agent, provides complete protection in this model of ulcer formation. The use of indomethacin pretreatment to inhibit the prostaglandin (PG) synthesis and N(G)-nitro L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) pretreatment to inhibit nitric oxide synthase did not alter the lansoprazole-induced inhibition of ulcer index obtained in the untreated Wistar rats indicating that these two systems were not involved in the activation of lansoprazole. PD-136450, an effective anti-secretory agent against gastrin- but not dimaprit-induced stimulation, evoked a dose-dependent inhibition of CRS-induced gastric ulcers. The results show that both PG and nitric oxide pathways can influence the inhibitory effect of PD-136450 against CRS-induced gastric ulcer. The antiulcer activities of both lansoprazole and PD-136450 were compared to that of ranitidine. The results showed that ranitidine was more potent than lansoprazole and PD-136450 in inhibiting CRS-induced gastric ulcers and its effect was shown to be influenced by PG as well as nitric oxide synthase. The results of this study have demonstrated that although lansoprazole, PD-136450 and ranitidine were protective against CRS-induced gastric ulcers, the antiulcer activities of PD-136450 and ranitidine involved both PG and nitric oxide pathways, while lansoprazole acted independently of these two systems during CRS.

  11. Recent progress in carcinogenesis, progression and management of upper GI cancer: the 21st Hiroshima Cancer Seminar--the 5th Three Universities' Consortium International Symposium, 6 November 2011, International Conference Center Hiroshima.

    PubMed

    Yasui, Wataru; Ito, Hisao; Peek, Richard; Tahara, Eiichi

    2012-04-01

    The 21st Hiroshima Cancer Seminar focused on recent progress of carcinogenesis, progression and management of upper gastrointestinal cancers. β-Catenin and p120 mediate peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor δ-dependent proliferation induced by Helicobacter pylori in gastric epithelia. Helicobacter pylori CagA plays an important role in stomach carcinogenesis via altered signal transduction and cell polarity by interactions with several host proteins. Inflammation caused by H. pylori infection is responsible for inducing aberrant DNA methylation. The gastric gland mucin-specific αGlcNAc plays dual roles in preventing gastric cancer, inhibition of H. pylori infection and suppression of tumor-promoting inflammation. Information obtained from transcriptome dissection greatly contributes to understanding the molecular character of each mucin phenotype of gastric cancer. The standardized biomarkers will serve as good predictive and prognostic markers for gastric cancer. A microRNA expression profile may be useful for the diagnosis of gastric cancer. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells may provide an advantageous microenvironment for re-acquisition of stemness of gastric cancer cells. Recent progress in molecular biology research has enabled the clinical development of molecular targeting agents for gastric cancer, such as trastuzumab. The target molecule-based inhibition of the stromal reaction in the microenvironment may hold promise as an effective anti-tumor therapy. Since robotic surgery is feasible and safe, and provides adequate and precise lymph node dissection, it may be one of the good options for gastric cancer in the near future.

  12. Gastric mucosal damage induced by nonsalicylate nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs in rats is mediated systemically.

    PubMed

    Skeljo, M V; Giraud, A S; Yeomans, N D

    1993-11-01

    The gastric toxicities of an enteric-coated formulation and conventional indomethacin were compared in rats. Both formulations were equally damaging to the mucosa, suggesting that topical damage was not the major route of injury. The importance of systemically mediated damage was further determined by gastrotoxicity dose-response curves and pyloric ligation experiments in which indomethacin was administered either orally or parenterally, or into stomach or duodenum with the pylorus occluded. Gastric damage was significantly higher in those groups that had received the drug parenterally or intraduodenally. The extent of deeper mucosal damage, assessed histologically, was greater in parenterally dosed rats. In further experiments, oral and parenteral routes of administration of two other nonsalicylate NSAIDs, naproxen and sodium diclofenac, were found to be equally damaging to the mucosa. Our results show that indomethacin-induced gastric damage, unlike aspirin injury, is mediated mainly systemically. Enteric-coating may not be a useful strategy in reducing gastric injury by nonsalicylate, nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs.

  13. Effect of D-002 on gastric mucus composition in ethanol-induced ulcer.

    PubMed

    Carbajal, D; Molina, V; Noa, M; Valdés, S; Arruzazabala, M L; Aguilar, C; Más, R

    2000-10-01

    This study was designed to determine the effect of D-002, a natural product isolated and purified from beeswax (Apis mellifera), on gastric mucus composition on ethanol-induced ulcer in rats. The morphology of the lesions was analysed histologically, and morphometric analysis of gastric-gland content in total glycoprotein and sulphated macromolecules were done. Oral pretreatment with D-002 at 5 and 25 mgkg(-1)1 before oral administration of ethanol at 60%, produced a significant increase in the amount of gastric mucus and total protein. The histomorphometric evaluation of the gastric damage at the same doses showed a significant increase in neutral glycoproteins and sulfated macromolecules. It is concluded that enhancement of the quantity and quality of the mucus could partly explain the gastroprotective effect of D-002.

  14. Anticarcinogenic efficacy of phytic acid extracted from rice bran on azoxymethane-induced colon carcinogenesis in rats.

    PubMed

    Norazalina, S; Norhaizan, M E; Hairuszah, I; Norashareena, M S

    2010-05-01

    This study is carried out to determine the potential of phytic acid extracted from rice bran in the suppression of colon carcinogenesis induced by azoxymethane (AOM) in rats. Seventy-two male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into 6 groups with 12 rats in each group. The intended rats for cancer treatment received two intraperitoneal injections of AOM in saline (15mg/kg bodyweight) over a 2-week period. The treatments of phytic acid were given in two concentrations: 0.2% (w/v) and 0.5% (w/v) during the post-initiation phase of carcinogenesis phase via drinking water. The colons of the animals were analyzed for detection and quantification of aberrant crypt foci (ACF) after 8 weeks of treatment. The finding showed treatment with 0.2% (w/v) extract phytic acid (EPA) gave the greatest reduction in the formation of ACF. In addition, phytic acid significantly suppressed the number of ACF in the distal, middle and proximal colon as compared to AOM alone (p<0.05). For the histological classification of ACF, treatment with 0.5% (w/v) commercial phytic acid (CPA) had the highest percentage (71%) of non-dysplastic ACF followed by treatment with 0.2% (w/v) EPA (61%). Administration of phytic acid also reduced the incidence and multiplicity of total tumors even though there were no significant differences between groups. In conclusion, this study found the potential value of phytic acid extracted from rice bran in reducing colon cancer risk in rats.

  15. Suppressive effects of Moringa oleifera Lam pod against mouse colon carcinogenesis induced by azoxymethane and dextran sodium sulfate.

    PubMed

    Budda, Sirintip; Butryee, Chaniphun; Tuntipopipat, Siriporn; Rungsipipat, Anudep; Wangnaithum, Supradit; Lee, Jeong-Sang; Kupradinun, Piengchai

    2011-01-01

    Moringa oleifera Lam (horseradish tree; tender pod or fruits) is a major ingredient in Thai cuisine and has some medicinal properties. Previous studies have shown potentially antioxidant, antitumor promoter, anticlastogen and anticarcinogen activities both in vitro and in vivo. The present study was conducted to investigate chemopreventive effects on azoxymethane (AOM)-initiated and dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-promoted colon carcinogenesis in mice. Male ICR mice were divided into 8 groups: Group 1 served as a negative control; Group 2 received AOM/DSS as a positive control; Groups 3-5 were fed boiled freeze-dried M. oleifera (bMO) at 1.5%, 3.0% and 6.0%, respectively supplemented in basal diets for 5 weeks; Groups 6-8 were fed with bMO diets at the designed doses above for 2 weeks prior to AOM, during and 1 week after DSS administration. At the end of the study, colon samples were processed for histopathological examination. PCNA indices, and iNOS and COX-2 expression were assessed by immunohistochemistry. The results demonstrated the incidences and multiplicities of tumors in Groups 6-8 to be decreased when compared to Group 2 in a dose dependent manner, but this was significant only in Group 8. The PCNA index was also significantly decreased in Group 8 whereas iNOS and COX-2 protein expression were significantly decreased in Groups 7 and 8. The findings suggest that M. oleifera Lam pod exerts suppressive effects in a colitis-related colon carcinogenesis model induced by AOM/DSS and could serve as a chemopreventive agent.

  16. Native and bone marrow-derived cell mosaicism in gastric carcinoma in H. pylori-infected p27-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Songhua; Kim, Woojin; Pham, Tu T.; Rogers, Arlin B.; Houghton, Jean Marie; Moss, Steven F.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Chronic Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection promotes non-cardia gastric cancer. Some mouse models suggest that bone marrow derived cells (BMDC) contribute to Helicobacter-associated gastric carcinogenesis. We determined whether this increased susceptibility to Helicobacter-induced gastric carcinogenesis of p27-deficient mice is dependent upon their p27-null BMDC or their p27-null gastric epithelial cells. Design Female mice (recipients) were irradiated and transplanted with BMDC from male donors. Wild type (WT) mice in group 1 (control) received BMDC from male GFP-transgenic mice. Female WT and p27 KO mice were engrafted with male p27KO mice BMDC (Group 2) or GFP-transgenic WT BMDC (Group 3). Recipients were infected with H. pylori SS1 for one year. Results Mice lacking p27 in either the BM pool or gastric epithelium developed significantly more advanced gastric pathology, including high-grade dysplasia. Co-staining of donor BMDC in dysplastic gastric glands was confirmed by immunofluorescence. Gastric expression of IL-1 beta protein was reduced in groups 2 and 3 (p < 0.05 vs control) whereas expression of IFN-γ and chemokines MIP-1 beta, MIG, IP-10 and RANTES in group 2 were significantly higher than group 3. Conclusions Both bone marrow-derived and gastric epithelial cells contribute to the increased gastric cancer susceptibility of p27-deficient H. pylori-infected mice. PMID:27655701

  17. Endogenous histamine and promethazine-induced gastric ulcers in the guinea pig

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Djahanguiri, B.; Hemmati, M.

    1978-01-01

    Experiments performed with an inhibitor of diaminoxydase, aminoguanidine and an inhibitor of histidine decarboxylase, NSD 1055, showed that the frequency of gastric ulcers induced by promethazine was increased with the first inhibitor and decreased with the second. It is suggested that ulcers induced by promethazine in guinea pigs might be due to histamino-liberator effect of the antihistaminio compound.

  18. Inhibition of monoacylglycerol lipase attenuates nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug-induced gastric hemorrhages in mice.

    PubMed

    Kinsey, Steven G; Nomura, Daniel K; O'Neal, Scott T; Long, Jonathan Z; Mahadevan, Anu; Cravatt, Benjamin F; Grider, John R; Lichtman, Aron H

    2011-09-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are commonly used analgesics, but can cause gastric and esophageal hemorrhages, erosion, and ulceration. The endogenous cannabinoid (endocannabinoid; eCB) system possesses several potential targets to reduce gastric inflammatory states, including cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB(1)), cannabinoid receptor type 2 (CB(2)), and enzymes that regulate the eCB ligands 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) and N-arachidonoyl ethanolamine (anandamide; AEA). In the presented study, we tested whether 4-nitrophenyl 4-(dibenzo[d][1,3]dioxol-5-yl(hydroxy)methyl)piperidine-1-carboxylate (JZL184), a selective inhibitor of the primary catabolic enzyme of 2-AG, monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL), would protect against NSAID-induced gastric damage. Food-deprived mice administered the nonselective cyclooxygenase inhibitor diclofenac sodium displayed gastric hemorrhages and increases in proinflammatory cytokines. JZL184, the proton pump inhibitor omeprazole (positive control), or the primary constituent of marijuana, Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), significantly prevented diclofenac-induced gastric hemorrhages. JZL184 also increased stomach levels of 2-AG, but had no effect on AEA, arachidonic acid, or the prostaglandins E(2) and D(2). MAGL inhibition fully blocked diclofenac-induced increases in gastric levels of proinflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor α, and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, as well as IL-10. Pharmacological inhibition or genetic deletion of CB(1) or CB(2) revealed that the gastroprotective effects of JZL184 and THC were mediated via CB(1). The antihemorrhagic effects of JZL184 persisted with repeated administration, indicating a lack of tolerance. These data indicate that increasing 2-AG protects against gastric damage induced by NSAIDs, and its primary catabolic enzyme MAGL offers a promising target for the development of analgesic therapeutics possessing gastroprotective properties.

  19. Contribution of gastrin to cysteamine-induced gastric acid secretion in rats.

    PubMed

    van de Brug, F J; Jansen, J B; Kuijpers, I J; Lamers, C B

    1993-01-01

    The role of circulating gastrin in cysteamine induced gastric acid secretion was examined in conscious male Wistar rats, provided with a portal vein catheter, a jugular vein catheter and a pyloric drainage tube. Intravenous infusion of 0.3 nmol/kg.30 min of gastrin 17-l resulted in serum gastrin concentrations of 1138 +/- 151 pg/ml and gastric acid secretion of 104 +/- 36 mumol H+/kg.30 min. This acid response was abolished by intravenous injection of 60 microliters of a gastrin-antiserum, indicating the efficacy of immunoneutralization with this antiserum in vivo. Intravenous bolus administration of 125 mg/kg of cysteamine induced increases in serum gastrin concentration (864 +/- 96 pg/ml) and gastric acid outputs (107 +/- 27 mumol H+/kg.30 min) not significantly different from the gastrin 17-l infusion experiments. Gastrin antiserum abolished cysteamine-induced gastric acid secretion, indicating that gastric acid secretion induced by 125 mg/kg of cysteamine is largely mediated by circulating gastrin in rats.

  20. Effects of nabumetone and dipyrone on experimentally induced gastric ulcers in rats.

    PubMed

    Yıldırım, Engin; Sağıroğlu, Oya; Kılıç, Fatma S; Erol, Kevser

    2013-04-01

    Nabumetone and dipyrone are non-acidic, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Both of them are known to have weak inhibitory effects of cyclooxygenases. Gastric side effects represent the most common adverse drug effects of the widely used nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. The gastric effects of these drugs may be comparable in experimental ulcer models. In the present study, the gastric ulcerogenic activity of nabumetone and dipyrone were investigated on stress- and diethyldithiocarbamate-induced experimental ulcer models by determining the ulcer index and gastric mucus secretion in rats. It was found that diethyldithiocarbamate increased both ulcer index and mucus secretion. Nabumetone inhibited dose-dependently the increase of diethyldithiocarbamate-induced mucus secretion. Dipyrone inhibited both stress- and diethyldithiocarbamate-induced ulcer index and mucus secretion. Nabumetone inhibited stress-induced ulcer index at 25-mg/kg dose but stimulated dose-dependently mucus secretion. These effects may be attributed to their non-acidic structures and weak inhibitory effects on gastric mucosal cyclooxygenases.

  1. Use of Transgenic and Mutant Animal Models in the Study of Heterocyclic Amine-induced Mutagenesis and Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Dashwood, Roderick H.

    2008-01-01

    Heterocyclic amines (HCAs) are potent mutagens generated during the cooking of meat and fish, and several of these compounds produce tumors in conventional experimental animals. During the past 5 years or so, HCAs have been tested in a number of novel in vivo murine models, including the following: lacZ, lacI, cII, c-myc/lacZ, rpsL, and gptΔ transgenics, XPA−/−, XPC−/−, Msh2+/−, Msh2−/− and p53+/− knock-outs, Apc mutant mice (ApcΔ716, Apc1638N, Apcmin), and A33ΔNβ-cat knock-in mice. Several of these models have provided insights into the mutation spectra induced in vivo by HCAs in target and non-target organs for tumorigenesis, as well as demonstrating enhanced susceptibility to HCA-induced tumors and preneoplastic lesions. This review describes several of the more recent reports in which novel animal models were used to examine HCA-induced mutagenesis and carcinogenesis in vivo, including a number of studies which assessed the inhibitory activities of chemopreventive agents such as 1,2-dithiole-3-thione, conjugated linoleic acids, tea, curcumin, chlorophyllin-chitosan, and sulindac. PMID:12542973

  2. Inhibitory effects of chlorophyllin on 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene-induced bacterial mutagenesis and mouse skin carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Chung, W Y; Lee, J M; Park, M Y; Yook, J I; Kim, J; Chung, A S; Surh, Y J; Park, K K

    1999-10-18

    Chlorophyllin (CHL), a water-soluble derivative of chlorophyll, has been used for the treatment of several abnormal human conditions without apparent toxicity. Recent studies have revealed that CHL has the excellent chemopreventive potential. In the present investigation, we have found the inhibitory activities of CHL against 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA)-induced mutagenesis in Salmonella typhimurium TA100 and also on DMBA-initiated and 12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-promoted mouse skin tumor formation. The incidence and the multiplicity of skin tumors were not significantly decreased in mice by a single topical application of CHL prior to the DMBA treatment, but there was a marked suppression of papillomagenesis in mice treated with CHL during the promotional stage. Furthermore, the formation of DMBA-induced papillomagenesis was reduced in all mice that had received CHL for 6 weeks following treatment with TPA for 6, 18 and 24 weeks. These results indicate that CHL can inhibit both tumor promotion and the progression of papillomagenesis in the two-stage mouse skin carcinogenesis induced by DMBA and TPA.

  3. Oral administration of the anti-proliferative substance taurolidine has no impact on dextran sulfate sodium induced colitis-associated carcinogenesis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Huss, Sebastian; Osseili, Hayssam; Daigeler, Adrien; Kersting, Sabine; Sülberg, Dominique; Mittelkötter, Ulrich; Herdegen, Thomas; Uhl, Waldemar; Müller, Annette M.

    2010-01-01

    Background: New chemopreventive strategies for ulcerative colitis (UC)-associated dysplasia and cancer have to be evaluated. Taurolidine (TRD) has anti-inflammatory, anti-proliferative and anti-neoplastic properties with almost absent toxicity. The aim of the study was to determine whether TRD decreases dysplasia in the well-characterized Dextran Sulfate Sodium – Azoxymethane (DSS-AOM) animal model for UC-associated carcinogenesis. Material and Methods: The DSS-AOM model of carcinogenesis was induced in female inbred C57BL/6 mice. Half of the mice were treated with TRD, the other served as control. After 100 days macroscopic, histological and immunhistochemical (β-Catenin, E-Cadherin, SOX9, Ki-67, Cyclin-D1) examination of the colon was performed. Results: Incidence, multiplicity, grading and growth pattern of adenomas did not differ significantly between TRD and control group. In all animals, inflammatory changes were absent. Immunhistochemistry revealed increased expression of Ki-67, β-catenin, SOX9 and Cyclin-D1 in adenomas compared to normal mucosa – without significant difference between TRD and control treatment. Conclusion: Oral administration of TRD has no impact on DSS-induced colitis-associated carcinogenesis. However, SOX9 and Cyclin-D1 representing key members of the Wnt pathway have not yet been described in the DSS-AOM model of carcinogenesis – underlining the importance of this oncogenic pathway in this setting. PMID:20442801

  4. Hydroxyproline, a Serum Biomarker Candidate for Gastric Ulcer in Rats: A Comparison Study of Metabolic Analysis of Gastric Ulcer Models Induced by Ethanol, Stress, and Aspirin

    PubMed Central

    Takeuchi, Kenichiro; Ohishi, Maki; Endo, Keiko; Suzumura, Kenichi; Naraoka, Hitoshi; Ohata, Takeji; Seki, Jiro; Miyamae, Yoichi; Honma, Masashi; Soga, Tomoyoshi

    2014-01-01

    Gastrointestinal symptoms are a common manifestation of adverse drug effects. Non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are widely prescribed drugs that induce the serious side effect of gastric mucosal ulceration. Biomarkers for these side effects have not been identified and ulcers are now only detectable by endoscopy. We previously identified five metabolites as biomarker candidates for NSAID-induced gastric ulcer using capillary electrophoresis–mass spectrometry (CE–MS)-based metabolomic analysis of serum and stomach from rats. Here, to clarify mechanism of changes and limitations of indications of biomarker candidates, we performed CE–MS-based metabolomic profiling in stomach and serum from rats with gastric ulcers induced by ethanol, stress, and aspirin. The results suggest that a decrease in hydroxyproline reflects the induction of gastric injury and may be useful in identifying gastric ulcer induced by multiple causes. While extrapolation to humans requires further study, hydroxyproline can be a new serum biomarker of gastric injury regardless of cause. PMID:25125970

  5. Polymeric black tea polyphenols inhibit 1,2-dimethylhydrazine induced colorectal carcinogenesis by inhibiting cell proliferation via Wnt/{beta}-catenin pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, Rachana; Ingle, Arvind; Maru, Girish B.

    2008-02-15

    Tea polyphenols like epigallocatechin gallate and theaflavins are established chemopreventive agents for colorectal carcinogenesis. However, studies on evaluating similar chemopreventive properties of thearubigins or polymeric black tea polyphenols (PBPs), the most abundant polyphenols in black tea, are limited. Hence, in the present study we aim to investigate chemopreventive effects along with probable mechanisms of action of PBP extract employing 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH)-induced colorectal carcinogenesis in Sprague-Dawley rats as experimental model. The present study suggests that PBPs, like other tea polyphenols, also inhibit DMH-induced colorectal tumorigenesis by decreasing tumor volume and multiplicity. This study also shows that although the pretreatment with PBP extract could induce detoxifying enzymes in hepatic and colorectal tissue, it did not show any additional chemopreventive effects when compared to treatments with PBP extract after initiation with DMH. Mechanistically, PBP extract may inhibit colorectal carcinogenesis by decreasing DMH-induced cell proliferation via Wnt/{beta}-catenin pathway. Treatments with PBP extract showed decreased levels of COX-2, c-MYC and cyclin D1 proteins which aid cell proliferation probably by regulating {beta}-catenin by maintaining expression of APC and decreasing inactivation of GSK3{beta}. DMH-induced activation of MAP kinases such as ERK and JNK was also found to be inhibited by treatments with PBP extract. In conclusion, the protective effects of PBP extract could be attributed to inhibition of DMH-induced cellular proliferation probably through {beta}-catenin regulation.

  6. Tachykinin inhibition of acid-induced gastric hyperaemia in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Heinemann, A.; Jocic, M.; Herzeg, G.; Holzer, P.

    1996-01-01

    1. Primary afferent neurones releasing the vasodilator, calcitonin gene-related peptide, mediate the gastric hyperaemic response to acid back-diffusion. The tachykinins neurokinin A (NKA) and substance P (SP) are located in the same neurones and are co-released with calcitonin gene-related peptide. In this study we investigated the effect and possible role of tachykinins in the acid-evoked gastric vasodilatation in urethane-anaesthetized rats. 2. Gastric acid back-diffusion, induced by perfusing the stomach with 15% ethanol in the presence of 0.05 M HCl, increased gastric mucosal blood flow by 60-90%, as determined by the hydrogen clearance technique. NKA and SP (0.14-3.78 nmol min-1 kg-1, infused intra-aortically) inhibited the gastric mucosal hyperaemic response to acid back-diffusion in a dose-dependent manner, an effect that was accompanied by aggravation of ethanol/acid-induced macroscopic haemorrhagic lesions. 3. The inhibitory effect of NKA (1.26 nmol min-1 kg-1) on the acid-induced gastric mucosal vasodilatation was prevented by the tachykinin NK2 receptor antagonists, MEN 10,627 (200 nmol kg-1) but left unaltered by the NK1 receptor antagonist, SR 140,333 (300 nmol kg-1) and the mast-cell stabilizer, ketotifen (4.6 mumol kg-1). 4. Under basal conditions, with 0.05 M HCl being perfused through the stomach, NKA (1.26 nmol min-1 kg-1) reduced gastric mucosal blood flow by about 25%, an effect that was abolished by SR 140,333 but not MEN 10,627 or ketotifen. 5. SR 140,333, MEN 10,627 or ketotifen had no significant effect on basal gastric mucosal blood flow nor did they modify the gastric mucosal hyperaemic reaction to acid back-diffusion. 6. The effect of NKA (1.26 nmol min-1 kg-1) in causing vasoconstriction and inhibiting the vasodilator response to acid back-diffusion was also seen when blood flow in the left gastric artery was measured with the ultrasonic transit time shift technique. 7. Arginine vasopressin (AVP, 0.1 nmol min-1 kg-1) induced gastric

  7. Protective Effects of Manassantin A against Ethanol-Induced Gastric Injury in Rats.

    PubMed

    Song, Ji-Won; Seo, Chang-Seob; Kim, Tae-In; Moon, Og-Sung; Won, Young-Suk; Son, Hwa-Young; Son, Jong-Keun; Kwon, Hyo-Jung

    2016-01-01

    Manassantin A, a neolignan isolated from Saururus chinensis, is a major phytochemical compound that has various biological activities, including anti-inflammatory, neuroleptic, and human acyl-CoA : cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) inhibitory activities. In this study, we investigated the protective effects of manassantin A against ethanol-induced acute gastric injury in rats. Gastric injury was induced by intragastric administration of 5 mL/kg body weight of absolute ethanol to each rat. The positive control group and the manassantin A group were given oral doses of omeprazole (20 mg/kg) or manassantin A (15 mg/kg), respectively, 1 h prior to the administration of absolute ethanol. Our examinations revealed that manassantin A pretreatment reduced ethanol-induced hemorrhage, hyperemia, and epithelial cell loss in the gastric mucosa. Manassantin A pretreatment also attenuated the increased lipid peroxidation associated with ethanol-induced acute gastric lesions, increased the mucosal glutathione (GSH) content, and enhanced the activities of antioxidant enzymes. The levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-6, and IL-1β were clearly decreased in the manassantin A-pretreated group. In addition, manassantin A pretreatment enhanced the levels of cyclooxygenase (COX)-1, COX-2, and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and reduced the inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) overproduction and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) phosphorylation. Collectively, these results indicate that manassantin A protects the gastric mucosa from ethanol-induced acute gastric injury, and suggest that these protective effects might be associated with COX/PGE2 stimulation, inhibition of iNOS production and NF-κB activation, and improvements in the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory status.

  8. Intervention of human breast cell carcinogenesis chronically induced by 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine

    PubMed Central

    Choudhary, Shambhunath; Sood, Shilpa; Donnell, Robert L.; Wang, Hwa-Chain R.

    2012-01-01

    More than 85% of breast cancers are sporadic and attributable to long-term exposure to environmental carcinogens, such as those in the diet, through a multistep disease process progressing from non-cancerous to premalignant and malignant stages. The chemical carcinogen 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP) is one of the most abundant heterocyclic amines found in high-temperature cooked meats and is recognized as a mammary carcinogen. However, the PhIP’s mechanism of action in breast cell carcinogenesis is not clear. Here, we demonstrated, for the first time, that cumulative exposures to PhIP at physiologically achievable, pico to nanomolar concentrations effectively induced progressive carcinogenesis of human breast epithelial MCF10A cells from a non-cancerous stage to premalignant and malignant stages in a dose- and exposure-dependent manner. Progressive carcinogenesis was measured by increasingly- acquired cancer-associated properties of reduced dependence on growth factors, anchorage-independent growth, acinar-conformational disruption, proliferation, migration, invasion, tumorigenicity with metastasis and increased stem-like cell populations. These biological changes were accompanied by biochemical and molecular changes, including upregulated H-Ras gene expression, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway activation, Nox-1 expression, reactive oxygen species (ROS) elevation, increased HIF-1α, Sp1, tumor necrosis factor-α, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2, MMP-9, aldehyde dehydrogenase activity and reduced E-cadherin. The Ras-ERK-Nox-ROS pathway played an important role in not only initiation but also maintenance of cellular carcinogenesis induced by PhIP. Using biological, biochemical and molecular changes as targeted endpoints, we identified that the green tea catechin components epicatechin-3-gallate and epigallocatechin-3-gallate, at non-cytotoxic doses, were capable of suppressing PhIP-induced cellular carcinogenesis and

  9. The effect of thalidomide on ethanol-induced gastric mucosal damage in mice: involvement of inflammatory cytokines and nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Amirshahrokhi, Keyvan; Khalili, Ali-Reza

    2015-01-05

    Excessive ethanol ingestion causes gastric mucosal damage through the inflammatory and oxidative processes. The present study was aimed to evaluate the protective effect of thalidomide on ethanol-induced gastric mucosal damage in mice. The animals were pretreated with vehicle or thalidomide (30 or 60 mg/kg, orally), and one hour later, the gastric mucosal injury was induced by oral administration of acidified ethanol. The animals were euthanized one hour after ethanol ingestion, and gastric tissues were collected to biochemical analyzes. The gastric mucosal lesions were assessed by macroscopic and histopathological examinations. The results showed that treatment of mice with thalidomide prior to the administration of ethanol dose-dependently reduced the gastric ulcer index. Thalidomide pretreatment significantly reduced the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines [tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6], malondialdehyde (MDA) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity. In addition, thalidomide significantly inhibited ethanol-induced nitric oxide (NO) overproduction in gastric tissue. Histological observations showed that ethanol-induced gastric mucosal damage was attenuated by thalidomide pretreatment. It seems that thalidomide as an anti-inflammatory agent may have a protective effect against alcohol-induced mucosal damage by inhibition of neutrophil infiltration and reducing the production of nitric oxide and inflammatory cytokines in gastric tissue.

  10. Gastric mucosal hyperplasia via upregulation of gastrin induced by persistent activation of gastric innate immunity in major histocompatibility complex class II deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Fukui, T; Nishio, A; Okazaki, K; Uza, N; Ueno, S; Kido, M; Inoue, S; Kitamura, H; Kiriya, K; Ohashi, S; Asada, M; Tamaki, H; Matsuura, M; Kawasaki, K; Suzuki, K; Uchida, K; Fukui, H; Nakase, H; Watanabe, N; Chiba, T

    2006-01-01

    Background and aim Major histocompatibility complex class II deficient (Aα0/0) mice have decreased CD4+ T cells, making them immunologically similar to patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Both patients with AIDS and Aα0/0 mice have hypertrophic gastric folds. To clarify the mechanism of gastric mucosal hyperplasia, we investigated the pathophysiology and the role of the innate immunity in the stomach of Aα0/0 mice. Methods Stomachs from 1–6 month old Aα0/0 mice, kept under specific pathogen free conditions, were examined at 1 month intervals histologically and immunohistochemically. Gene expression of proinflammatory cytokines, Toll‐like receptors (TLRs), cyclooxygenase (COX)‐2, and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity in the gastric mucosa was investigated. Serum gastrin levels and gastric acidity were measured. Bacterial culture of the stomach was performed. To clarify the roles of hypergastrinaemia in the gastric mucosa, a gastrin receptor antagonist (AG041R) was administered. Results Aα0/0 mice had a diffusely thick corpus mucosa with infiltration of CD11b+ granulocytes and macrophages. Anti‐Ki67 staining demonstrated expansion of the proliferating neck zone. Gene expression of interleukin 1β, interferon γ, TLR‐2, TLR‐4, and COX‐2 were upregulated, and MPO activity was increased. Only a small amount of non‐pathogenic bacteria was detected in the stomach. Serum gastrin levels and Reg‐Iα positive cells in the gastric mucosa increased, despite normal gastric acidity. After treatment with AG041R, gastric mucosal thickness was significantly reduced. Conclusion Persistent activation of innate immunity in the stomach induced gastric mucosal hyperplasia through upregulation of gastrin synthesis in Aα0/0 mice, suggesting a pathophysiology similar to the gastric changes in patients with AIDS. PMID:16322110

  11. Protective effect of Holothurian intestine against indomethacin induced gastric mucosal damage in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaoyu; Qiao, Xuejing; Zhang, Cuiping; Gao, Hua; Niu, Qinghui; Wu, Tong; Zhang, Qi; Tian, Zibin

    2017-02-01

    Our study aimed to investigate the protective effects of Holothurian intestines (HI) on NSAIDs-induced gastric mucosal damage and the possible mechanism. At first, 60 male Wistar rats were induced of gastric lesions with indomethacin (IDM, 30 mg kg-1). The rats were pretreated for 15 consecutive days with saline, sucralfate, or HI (0.4 g kg-1d-1, 0.8 g kg -1d-1 and 1.6 g kg-1d-1) prior to IDM treatment, followed by evaluations of macroscopic damage and microscopic features; and investigation of the levels of inflammatory cytokines, oxidative stress parameters, gastric mucosal prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and total hexosamine in tissues. The expression of COX-1 and COX-2 mRNA in the gastric tissue were determined by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Pathological gastric ulcer indexes, levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-17, TNF-α) and lipid peroxidation were significantly decreased in HI-treated groups, whereas the levels of protective factors (TGF-β, GSH, SOD activity and PGE2) were significantly elevated especially in the group with HI 1.6 g kg-1d-1 (P < 0.05). Furthermore, the expression of COX-2 mRNA decreased significantly in HI groups (P < 0.05). The study investigates that holothurian intestines may act as a kind of marine medicine which have protective effect on IDM-induced gastric ulcer, which could be a dietary preventive agent for the prevention of gastric damage.

  12. E-Cadherin and Gastric Cancer: Cause, Consequence, and Applications

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xin

    2014-01-01

    E-cadherin (epithelial-cadherin), encoded by the CDH1 gene, is a transmembrane glycoprotein playing a crucial role in maintaining cell-cell adhesion. E-cadherin has been reported to be a tumor suppressor and to be down regulated in gastric cancer. Besides genetic mutations in CDH1 gene to induce hereditary diffuse gastric cancer (HDGC), epigenetic factors such as DNA hypermethylation also contribute to the reduction of E-cadherin in gastric carcinogenesis. In addition, expression of E-cadherin could be mediated by infectious agents such as H. pylori (Helicobacter pylori). As E-cadherin is vitally involved in signaling pathways modulating cell proliferation, survival, invasion, and migration, dysregulation of E-cadherin leads to dysfunction of gastric epithelial cells and contributes to gastric cancer development. Moreover, changes in its expression could reflect pathological conditions of gastric mucosa, making its role in gastric cancer complicated. In this review, we summarize the functions of E-cadherin and the signaling pathways it regulates. We aim to provide comprehensive perspectives in the molecular mechanism of E-cadherin and its involvement in gastric cancer initiation and progression. We also focus on its applications for early diagnosis, prognosis, and therapy in gastric cancer in order to open new avenues in this field. PMID:25184143

  13. High susceptibility to azoxymethane-induced colorectal carcinogenesis in obese KK-Ay mice.

    PubMed

    Teraoka, Naoya; Mutoh, Michihiro; Takasu, Shinji; Ueno, Toshiya; Nakano, Katsuya; Takahashi, Mami; Imai, Toshio; Masuda, Shuichi; Sugimura, Takashi; Wakabayashi, Keiji

    2011-08-01

    Obesity is associated with colon carcinogenesis. However, not much information is available regarding the mechanisms of obesity-associated colorectal cancer, and there are only few useful animal models for investigating the underlying mechanism between obesity and colorectal cancer. KK-A(y) mice exhibit severe obesity. Amount of visceral fat assessed by micro-computed tomography was almost 15 times higher than that of same aged C57BL/6J mice. Treatment with azoxymethane (AOM; 200 μg/mouse injected once a week for 3 times) resulted in markedly increased colon aberrant crypt foci (ACF) development (≈70 ACF/mouse) in KK-A(y) mice compared with lean C57BL/6J mice (≈9 ACF/mouse). Moreover, administration of AOM at a dose of 200 μg/mouse once a week for 6 times developed colorectal adenocarcinomas within only 7 weeks after the last AOM injection. The incidence of adenocarcinoma was 88% in KK-A(y) mice and was markedly higher than the 4% observed in C57BL/6J mice. The number of tumors/mouse was 7.80 in KK-A(y) mice and also markedly higher than the 0.12 in the C57BL/6J case. Interestingly, adenocarcinomas were observed in most of the AOM-treated KK-A(y) mice along with remarkable tumor angiogenesis, and some showed submucosal invasion. These results indicate that the KK-A(y) mouse, featuring intact leptin and leptin receptor Ob-Rbl, could be a useful animal model to investigate obesity-associated cancer.

  14. Altered Gastric Emptying and Prevention of Radiation-Induced Vomiting in Dogs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-03-01

    nausea and vomiting is common10ily oh- of 10 dog$ pt’etrtolted wvith domperidone (p) < 0.01). served. These symptoms can occur after total body Gastric...Gastroenterol of radiotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting . Postgrad Med 1981;16(Suppl 67):33-6. 1979;55(Suppl 1):50-4. V.a, ...00_© 000 ’-- Altered gastric emptying and prevention of radiation-induced vomiting in dogs A. Dubois cc I J. P. Jacobus M. P. Grissom R.R. Eng J. J

  15. The hydrogen sulfide donor, Lawesson's reagent, prevents alendronate-induced gastric damage in rats

    PubMed Central

    Nicolau, L.A.D.; Silva, R.O.; Damasceno, S.R.B.; Carvalho, N.S.; Costa, N.R.D.; Aragão, K.S.; Barbosa, A.L.R.; Soares, P.M.G.; Souza, M.H.L.P.; Medeiros, J.V.R.

    2013-01-01

    Our objective was to investigate the protective effect of Lawesson's reagent, an H2S donor, against alendronate (ALD)-induced gastric damage in rats. Rats were pretreated with saline or Lawesson's reagent (3, 9, or 27 µmol/kg, po) once daily for 4 days. After 30 min, gastric damage was induced by ALD (30 mg/kg) administration by gavage. On the last day of treatment, the animals were killed 4 h after ALD administration. Gastric lesions were measured using a computer planimetry program, and gastric corpus pieces were assayed for malondialdehyde (MDA), glutathione (GSH), proinflammatory cytokines [tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin (IL)-1β], and myeloperoxidase (MPO). Other groups were pretreated with glibenclamide (5 mg/kg, ip) or with glibenclamide (5 mg/kg, ip)+diazoxide (3 mg/kg, ip). After 1 h, 27 µmol/kg Lawesson's reagent was administered. After 30 min, 30 mg/kg ALD was administered. ALD caused gastric damage (63.35±9.8 mm2); increased levels of TNF-α, IL-1β, and MDA (2311±302.3 pg/mL, 901.9±106.2 pg/mL, 121.1±4.3 nmol/g, respectively); increased MPO activity (26.1±3.8 U/mg); and reduced GSH levels (180.3±21.9 µg/g). ALD also increased cystathionine-γ-lyase immunoreactivity in the gastric mucosa. Pretreatment with Lawesson's reagent (27 µmol/kg) attenuated ALD-mediated gastric damage (15.77±5.3 mm2); reduced TNF-α, IL-1β, and MDA formation (1502±150.2 pg/mL, 632.3±43.4 pg/mL, 78.4±7.6 nmol/g, respectively); lowered MPO activity (11.7±2.8 U/mg); and increased the level of GSH in the gastric tissue (397.9±40.2 µg/g). Glibenclamide alone reversed the gastric protective effect of Lawesson's reagent. However, glibenclamide plus diazoxide did not alter the effects of Lawesson's reagent. Our results suggest that Lawesson's reagent plays a protective role against ALD-induced gastric damage through mechanisms that depend at least in part on activation of ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels. PMID:23969974

  16. Gastric Re-acidification with Betaine HCl in Healthy Volunteers with Rabeprazole-Induced Hypochlorhydria

    PubMed Central

    Yago, Marc Anthony R.; Frymoyer, Adam R.; Smelick, Gillian S.; Frassetto, Lynda A.; Budha, Nageshwar R.; Dresser, Mark J.; Ware, Joseph A.; Benet, Leslie Z.

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that increased gastric pH from the use of acid-reducing agents, such as proton-pump inhibitors or H2-receptor antagonists, can significantly impact the absorption of weakly basic drugs that exhibit pH-dependent solubility. Clinically practical strategies to mitigate this interaction have not been developed. This pilot study evaluated the extent and time course of gastric re-acidification after a solid oral dosage form of anhydrous betaine HCl in healthy volunteers with pharmacologically-induced hypochlorhydria. Six healthy volunteers with baseline normochlorhydria (fasting gastric pH < 4) were enrolled in this single period study. Hypochlorhydria was induced via 20 mg oral rabeprazole twice daily for four days. On the fifth day, an additional 20 mg dose of oral rabeprazole was given and gastric pH was monitored continuously using the Heidelberg pH capsule. After gastric pH > 4 was confirmed for 15 minutes, 1500 mg of betaine HCl was given orally with 90 mL of water and gastric pH was continuously monitored for 2 hours. Betaine HCl significantly lowered gastric pH by 4.5 (±0.5) units from 5.2 (±0.5) to 0.6 (±0.2) (P <0.001) during the 30 minute interval after administration. The onset of effect of betaine HCl was rapid, with a mean time to pH < 3 of 6.3 (±4.3) minutes. The re-acidification period was temporary with a gastric pH < 3 and < 4 lasting 73 (±33) and 77 (±30) minutes, respectively. Betaine HCl was well tolerated by all subjects. In healthy volunteers with pharmacologically-induced hypochlorhydria, betaine HCl was effective at temporarily lowering gastric pH. The rapid onset and relatively short duration of gastric pH reduction gives betaine HCl the potential to aid the absorption of orally administered weakly basic drugs that exhibit pH-dependent solubility when administered under hypochlorhydric conditions. PMID:23980906

  17. Gastric reacidification with betaine HCl in healthy volunteers with rabeprazole-induced hypochlorhydria.

    PubMed

    Yago, Marc R; Frymoyer, Adam R; Smelick, Gillian S; Frassetto, Lynda A; Budha, Nageshwar R; Dresser, Mark J; Ware, Joseph A; Benet, Leslie Z

    2013-11-04

    Previous studies have demonstrated that increased gastric pH from the use of acid-reducing agents, such as proton-pump inhibitors or H2-receptor antagonists, can significantly impact the absorption of weakly basic drugs that exhibit pH-dependent solubility. Clinically practical strategies to mitigate this interaction have not been developed. This pilot study evaluated the extent and time course of gastric reacidification after a solid oral dosage form of anhydrous betaine HCl in healthy volunteers with pharmacologically induced hypochlorhydria. Six healthy volunteers with baseline normochlorhydria (fasting gastric pH < 4) were enrolled in this single period study. Hypochlorhydria was induced via 20 mg oral rabeprazole twice daily for four days. On the fifth day, an additional 20 mg dose of oral rabeprazole was given and gastric pH was monitored continuously using the Heidelberg pH capsule. After gastric pH > 4 was confirmed for 15 min, 1500 mg of betaine HCl was given orally with 90 mL of water and gastric pH was continuously monitored for 2 h. Betaine HCl significantly lowered gastric pH by 4.5 (± 0.5) units from 5.2 (± 0.5) to 0.6 (± 0.2) (P < 0.001) during the 30 min interval after administration. The onset of effect of betaine HCl was rapid, with a mean time to pH < 3 of 6.3 (± 4.3) min. The reacidification period was temporary with a gastric pH < 3 and < 4 lasting 73 (± 33) and 77 (± 30) min, respectively. Betaine HCl was well tolerated by all subjects. In healthy volunteers with pharmacologically induced hypochlorhydria, betaine HCl was effective at temporarily lowering gastric pH. The rapid onset and relatively short duration of gastric pH reduction gives betaine HCl the potential to aid the absorption of orally administered weakly basic drugs that exhibit pH-dependent solubility when administered under hypochlorhydric conditions.

  18. Gastric injury induced by hemorrhage, local ischemia, and oxygen radical generation

    SciTech Connect

    Wadhwa, S.S.; Perry, M.A. )

    1987-08-01

    Gastric mucosal injury caused by local intra-arterial generation of oxygen-derived free radicals was compared with gastric injury caused by 30 min of hemorrhage-induced ischemia or local ischemia. The index of injury was the loss of {sup 51}Cr-labeled red cells across the gastric mucosa. Generation of oxygen radicals in the celiac artery caused a rapid increase in mucosal blood loss during the period of radical generation, and this loss was maintained after radical production ceased. Local ischemia produced similar mucosal injury; however, this occurred after reperfusion of the stomach and not during the ischemic episode. Hemorrhage-induced ischemia produced a threefold greater mucosal blood loss than local ischemia. The results of this study indicate that (1) oxygen radicals generated enzymatically in the blood supply to the stomach cause mucosal bleeding of similar magnitude to that observed after local ischemia and (2) that gastric ischemia induced by systemic hypotension produces more severe gastric injury than the same level of local hypotension.

  19. Altered gastric emptying and prevention of radiation-induced vomiting in dogs. [Cobalt 60 irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Dubois, A.; Jacobus, J.P.; Grissom, M.P.; Eng, R.R.; Conklin, J.J.

    1984-03-01

    The relation between radiation-induced vomiting and gastric emptying is unclear and the treatment of this condition is not established. We explored, therefore, (a) the effect of cobalt 60 irradiation on gastric emptying of solids and liquids and (b) the possibility of preventing radiation-induced vomiting with the dopamine antagonist, domperidone. Twenty dogs were studied on two separate days, blindly and in random order, after i.v. injection of either a placebo or 0.06 mg/kg domperidone. On a third day, they received 8 Gy (800 rads) whole body irradiation with cobalt 60 gamma-rays after either placebo (n . 10) or domperidone (n . 10). Before each study, each dog was fed chicken liver tagged in vivo with 99mTc-sulfur colloid (solid marker), and water containing 111In-diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (liquid marker). Dogs were placed in a Pavlov stand for the subsequent 3 h and radionuclide imaging was performed at 10-min intervals. Irradiation produced vomiting in 9 of 10 dogs given placebo but only in 1 of 10 dogs pretreated with domperidone (p less than 0.01). Gastric emptying of liquids and solids was significantly suppressed by irradiation (p less than 0.01) after both placebo and domperidone. These results demonstrate that radiation-induced vomiting is accompanied by suppression of gastric emptying. Furthermore, domperidone prevents vomiting produced by ionizing radiation but does not alter the accompanying delay of gastric emptying.

  20. Schlafen 4–expressing myeloid-derived suppressor cells are induced during murine gastric metaplasia

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Lin; Hayes, Michael M.; Photenhauer, Amanda; Eaton, Kathryn A.; Li, Qian; Ocadiz-Ruiz, Ramon; Merchant, Juanita L.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic Helicobacter pylori infection triggers neoplastic transformation of the gastric mucosa in a small subset of patients, but the risk factors that induce progression to gastric metaplasia have not been identified. Prior to cancer development, the oxyntic gastric glands atrophy and are replaced by metaplastic cells in response to chronic gastritis. Previously, we identified schlafen 4 (Slfn4) as a GLI1 target gene and myeloid differentiation factor that correlates with spasmolytic polypeptide-expressing metaplasia (SPEM) in mice. Here, we tested the hypothesis that migration of SLFN4-expressing cells from the bone marrow to peripheral organs predicts preneoplastic changes in the gastric microenvironment. Lineage tracing in Helicobacter-infected Slfn4 reporter mice revealed that SLFN4+ cells migrated to the stomach, where they exhibited myeloid-derived suppressor cell (MDSC) markers and acquired the ability to inhibit T cell proliferation. SLFN4+ MDSCs were not observed in infected GLI1-deficient mice. Overexpression of sonic hedgehog ligand (SHH) in infected WT mice accelerated the appearance of SLFN4+ MDSCs in the gastric corpus. Similarly, in the stomachs of H. pylori–infected patients, the human SLFN4 ortholog SLFN12L colocalized to cells that expressed MDSC surface markers CD15+CD33+HLA-DRlo. Together, these results indicate that SLFN4 marks a GLI1-dependent population of MDSCs that predict a shift in the gastric mucosa to a metaplastic phenotype. PMID:27427984

  1. Oxidative stress upregulates PDCD4 expression in patients with gastric cancer via miR-21.

    PubMed

    Tu, Honglei; Sun, Haibing; Lin, Yan; Ding, Jie; Nan, Kejun; Li, Zongfang; Shen, Qiang; Wei, Yongchang

    2014-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) plays a key role in carcinogenesis by aberrantly inducing signaling networks that initiatiate tumorigenesis and stimulate tumor progression. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) comprise a novel class of endogenous, small, noncoding RNAs that negatively regulate approximately 30% of the genes in a cell via degradation or translational inhibition of their target mRNAs. However, the effects of ROS on miRNAs expression and the role of miRNAs in ROS-mediated injury on carcinogenesis are uncertain. Using UV spectrophotometry and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), we examined tissues from human gastric cancers and tissues adjascent to gastric cancer and normal gastric tissues and found that total anti-oxidation competence (T-AOC), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) concentrations were lower in gastric cancer patients compared to the control subjects, while the concentrations of DNA oxidative damage product 8-oxo-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) was higher. To determine the potential role of miRNA in gastric carcinogenesis, real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (QPCR) analysis was performed. We found that human 8-oxoguanine DNA N-glycosylase 1 (hOGG1) mRNA and miR-21 expression were significantly upregulated in gastric cancer tissues than in the adjacent normal gastric tissues. Furthermore, the expression of programmed cell death 4 protein (PDCD4) in gastric cancer tissues was significantly lower than in adjacent normal gastric tissues. The expression of miR-21 and PDCD4 was highly correlated with the degree of differentiation, tumor staging, local lymphatic node metastasis and remote metastasis. Expression of miR-21 was negatively correlated with T-AOC, SOD and CAT, but positively correlated with 8-OHdG and hOGG1mRNA. In addition, the relative expression of PDCD4 was negatively correlated with miR-21. These results suggest that the defensive balance of oxidation and antioxidant system in patients with GC was impaired, resulting in

  2. Antibiotic drug tigecycline inhibited cell proliferation and induced autophagy in gastric cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Tang, Chunling; Yang, Liqun; Jiang, Xiaolan; Xu, Chuan; Wang, Mei; Wang, Qinrui; Zhou, Zhansong; Xiang, Zhonghuai; Cui, Hongjuan

    2014-03-28

    Tigecycline acts as a glycylcycline class bacteriostatic agent, and actively resists a series of bacteria, specifically drug fast bacteria. However, accumulating evidence showed that tetracycline and their derivatives such as doxycycline and minocycline have anti-cancer properties, which are out of their broader antimicrobial activity. We found that tigecycline dramatically inhibited gastric cancer cell proliferation and provided an evidence that tigecycline induced autophagy but not apoptosis in human gastric cancer cells. Further experiments demonstrated that AMPK pathway was activated accompanied with the suppression of its downstream targets including mTOR and p70S6K, and ultimately induced cell autophagy and inhibited cell growth. So our data suggested that tigecycline might act as a candidate agent for pre-clinical evaluation in treatment of patients suffering from gastric cancer.

  3. Anti-Inflammation Property of Syzygium cumini (L.) Skeels on Indomethacin-Induced Acute Gastric Ulceration

    PubMed Central

    Chanudom, Lanchakon; Tangpong, Jitbanjong

    2015-01-01

    Indomethacin, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAIDs), induced gastric damage and perforation through the excess generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Syzygium cumini (L.) Skeels is commonly used as a medicinal plant and is claimed to have antioxidant activities. The effects of Syzygium cumini (L.) Skeels aqueous extract (SCC) on antifree radical, anti-inflammation, and antiulcer of SCC on indomethacin induced acute gastric ulceration were determined in our study. Scavenging activity at 50% of SCC is higher than ascorbic acid in in vitro study. Mice treated with indomethacin revealed mucosal hemorrhagic lesion and inhibited mucus content. Pretreatment with SCC caused discernible decrease in indomethacin induced gastric lesion and lipid peroxide content. In addition, oxidized glutathione (GSSG), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), nitric oxide (NO) levels, and gastric wall mucus were restored on acute treated mice model. Indomethacin induced inflammation by activated inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) proinflammatory cytokines to release large amount of ROS/RNS which were ameliorated in mice pretreatment with SCC. SCC showed restoration of the imbalance of oxidative damage leading to amelioration of cyclooxygenase enzyme (COX). In conclusion, SCC acts as an antioxidant, anti-inflammation, and antiulcer against indomethacin. PMID:26633969

  4. Anti-Inflammation Property of Syzygium cumini (L.) Skeels on Indomethacin-Induced Acute Gastric Ulceration.

    PubMed

    Chanudom, Lanchakon; Tangpong, Jitbanjong

    2015-01-01

    Indomethacin, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAIDs), induced gastric damage and perforation through the excess generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Syzygium cumini (L.) Skeels is commonly used as a medicinal plant and is claimed to have antioxidant activities. The effects of Syzygium cumini (L.) Skeels aqueous extract (SCC) on antifree radical, anti-inflammation, and antiulcer of SCC on indomethacin induced acute gastric ulceration were determined in our study. Scavenging activity at 50% of SCC is higher than ascorbic acid in in vitro study. Mice treated with indomethacin revealed mucosal hemorrhagic lesion and inhibited mucus content. Pretreatment with SCC caused discernible decrease in indomethacin induced gastric lesion and lipid peroxide content. In addition, oxidized glutathione (GSSG), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), nitric oxide (NO) levels, and gastric wall mucus were restored on acute treated mice model. Indomethacin induced inflammation by activated inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) proinflammatory cytokines to release large amount of ROS/RNS which were ameliorated in mice pretreatment with SCC. SCC showed restoration of the imbalance of oxidative damage leading to amelioration of cyclooxygenase enzyme (COX). In conclusion, SCC acts as an antioxidant, anti-inflammation, and antiulcer against indomethacin.

  5. Eurycoma longifolia in Radix for the treatment of ethanol-induced gastric lesion in rats.

    PubMed

    Qodriyah, H M S; Asmadi, A Y

    2013-12-01

    The effect of treatment with Radix on ethanol-induced gastric lesions was investigated. The main ingredient of Radix is Eurycoma longifolia. Twenty-four rats of the Sprague-Dawley species were randomly divided into four groups. Three groups were given 0.5 mL 100% ethanol orally. Another group was used as a control and was given only distilled water orally (control). After 6 h all the rats were fed with normal diet. One group that was administered with ethanol was only given distilled water orally (no treatment). Another two groups that were administered with ethanol were treated with oral Radix 0.128 mg g(-1) b.wt. (Radix) and oral ranitidine 21.4 mg kg(-1) b.wt. (Ranitidine), respectively. After one week, all the rats were fasted overnight and sacrificed. The stomach was isolated and examined for the presence and severity of gastric lesions. Measurements for malondialdehyde content and gastric acid concentration were also done. It is found that the ulcer index was lower in the Radix and ranitidine group compared to the no treatment group whereas in the control group there was no lesion. There was no difference in ulcer index between the Radix and ranitidine group. The gastric MDA content was significantly higher in all the groups that were induced with ethanol compared to the control group but no difference between all the ethanol-induced groups. There was no difference in the gastric acid concentration in all groups. Hence it is concluded that Eurycoma longifolia in Radix is as effective as ranitidine in the treatment of ethanol-induced gastric lesions in rats.

  6. Protective effects of pogostone from Pogostemonis Herba against ethanol-induced gastric ulcer in rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, Haiming; Liao, Huijun; Liu, Yuhong; Zheng, Yifeng; Wu, Xiaoli; Su, Zuqing; Zhang, Xie; Lai, Zhengquan; Lai, Xiaoping; Lin, Zhi-Xiu; Su, Ziren

    2015-01-01

    We examined the protective effect of pogostone (PO), a chemical constituent isolated from Pogostemonis Herba, on the ethanol-induced gastric ulcer in rats. Administration of PO at doses of 10, 20 and 40 mg/kg body weight prior to ethanol ingestion effectively protected the stomach from ulceration. The gastric lesions were significantly ameliorated by all doses of PO as compared to the vehicle group. Pre-treatment with PO prevented the oxidative damage and the decrease of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) content. In addition, PO pretreatment markedly increased the mucosa levels of glutathione (GSH), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT), and decreased gastric malonaldehyde (MDA), relative to the vehicle group. In the mechanistic study, significant elevation of non-protein-sulfhydryl (NP-SH) was observed in the gastric mucosa pretreated by PO. Analysis of serum cytokines indicated that PO pretreatment obviously elevated the decrease of interleukin-10 (IL-10) level, while markedly mitigated the increment of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) secretions in ethanol-induced rats. Taken together, these results strongly indicate that PO could exert a gastro-protective effect against gastric ulceration, and the underlying mechanism might be associated with the stimulation of PGE2, improvement of antioxidant and anti-inflammatory status, as well as preservation of NP-SH.

  7. [Effect of dexamethasone on indomethacin-induced gastric erosion formation upon duration of the hormonal action].

    PubMed

    Podvigina, T T; Morozova, O Iu; Bagaeva, T R; Filaretova, L P

    2009-07-01

    The aim of the study was to verify a dependence of dexamethasone effect on the gastric erosion formation upon duration of the hormonal action. Gastric erosions were induced by indometha cin (35 mg/kg, sc) in male rats after 24-hour fasting. The rats were given a single injection of dexamethasone at a dose of 1 mg/kg and they underwent the ulcerogenic stimulus (indomethacin) at va rious time points after the hormonal injection (1, 6, 12, 18, 24 hours as well as 3, 5, 7 days). The control rats were given dexamethasone vehicle. In 4 hours after indomethacin injection gastric erosions, corticosterone and blood glucose levels, as well as body and thymus weights were examined. The results obtained demonstrate a dependence ofdexamethasone effect on the gastric erosion formation upon duration of its action: dexamethasone attenuated or aggravated indomethacin-induced gastric erosions depending on the time of its injection. Gastroprotective action of dexamethasone was observed in the case of its injection 1, 6, and 12 hours before indomethacin. The further increase in the time interval caused transformation of gastroprotective action of dexamethasone against ulcerogenic effect. The data obtained suggest that a disturbance of carbohydrate regulation accompanied with the signs of catabolic effects of the glucocorticoid may be responsible for the ulcerogenic action of dexamethasone.

  8. Antiulcerogenic activity of Scutia buxifolia on gastric ulcers induced by ethanol in rats

    PubMed Central

    Boligon, Aline Augusti; de Freitas, Robson Borba; de Brum, Thiele Faccim; Waczuk, Emily Pansera; Klimaczewski, Cláudia Vargas; de Ávila, Daiana Silva; Athayde, Margareth Linde; de Freitas Bauermann, Liliane

    2014-01-01

    Gastric ulcers affect many people around the world and their development is a result of the imbalance between aggressive and protective factors in the gastric mucosa. Scutia buxifolia, commonly known as coronilha, has attracted the interest of the scientific community due to its pharmacological properties and its potential therapeutic applications. In this study, the preventive effects of the crude extract of Scutia buxifolia (ceSb) against gastric ulcer induced by 70% ethanol were evaluated in male Wistar rats. In addition, the composition of ceSb was clarified by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). S. buxifolia extract (100, 200 and 400 mg/kg body weight) attenuated oxidative and histopathological features induced by ethanol. Moreover, all evaluated doses of ceSb caused significant (P<0.001 and P<0.0001) and dose-dependent increase in sulfhydryl groups (NPSH) levels, catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities. Furthermore, the administration of ceSb reversed the increase in lipid peroxidation produced by ethanol. The protective effect of the extract could be attributed to antioxidant compounds present in the ceSb, such as flavonoids and phenolic acids, which were quantified by HPLC. Thus, an antioxidant effect of the extract leads to a protection on gastric tissue. These results indicate that S. buxifolia could have a beneficial role against ethanol toxicity by preventing oxidative stress and gastric tissue injury. PMID:26579405

  9. Solcoseryl in prevention of stress-induced gastric lesions and healing of chronic ulcers.

    PubMed

    Konturek, S J; Drozdowicz, D; Pytko-Polonczyk, J; Brzozowski, T; Bielański, W

    1991-03-01

    Solcoseryl, a deproteinized extract of calf blood, protects the gastric mucosa against various topical irritants and enhances the healing of chronic gastric ulcerations but the mechanisms of these effects have been little studied. This study was designed to elucidate the active principle in Solcoseryl and to determine the role of prostaglandins (PG) and polyamines in the antiulcer properties of this agent. Using both, the radioimmunoassay and radioreceptor assay, EGF-like material was detected in Solcoseryl preparation. Solcoseryl given s.c. prevented the formation of stress-induced gastric lesions and this was accompanied by an increase in the generation of PGE2 in the gastric mucosa. Similar effects were obtained with EGF. Pretreatment with indomethacin, to suppress mucosal generation of prostaglandins (PG), greatly augmented stress-induced gastric ulcerations and antagonized the protection exerted by both Solcoseryl and EGF. Solcoseryl, like EGF, enhanced the healing of chronic gastro-duodenal ulcerations. This effect was abolished by the pretreatment with difluoromethylornithine, an inhibitor of ornithine decarboxylase, the key enzyme in the biosynthesis of polyamines. The healing effects of Solcoseryl and EGF was also reduced by prednisolone which decreased the angiogenesis in the granulation tissue in the ulcer area. These results indicate that Solcoseryl 1. contains EGF-like material, 2. displays the protective and ulcer healing effects similar to those of EGF and involving both PG and polyamines and 3. acts via similar mechanism as does EGF.

  10. The role of nitric oxide and sulphydryls in gastric mucosal protection induced by sodium cromoglycate in rats.

    PubMed

    Ali, A T

    1995-09-01

    The role of endogenous nitric oxide and sulphydryls in gastric protection afforded by sodium cromoglycate against ethanol-induced gastric lesions was studied in rats. Drugs were administered either intraperitoneally (i.p.) or subcutaneously (s.c.) 30, 45 or 60 min before oral administration of ethanol. Administration of cromoglycate before ethanol dose-dependently inhibited ethanol-induced gastric lesions. Pretreatment with NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), an inhibitor of nitric oxide biosynthesis, dose-dependently aggravated gastric lesions and reduced cromoglycate-induced gastric protection. The attenuating effect of L-NAME on gastric protection elicited by cromoglycate was reversible by pretreatment with L-arginine but not by D-arginine. On the other hand, ethanol-induced gastric lesions were found to be associated with a reduction of nonprotein sulphydryl content of glandular stomachs. Pretreatment with cromoglycate prevented non protein sulphydryl depletion and afforded protection. Pretreatment with N-ethylmaleimide, a sulphydryl blocker, caused dose-dependent enhancement of ethanol-induced gastric lesions and further depletion of non protein-sulphydryl. Treatment with N-ethylmaleimide before cromoglycate reduced the gastric protection that was associated with depletion of nonprotein sulphydryls. Furthermore, combined N-ethylmaleimide and L-NAME pretreatment caused a greater aggravation of ethanol-induced gastric lesions and significantly produced a higher reduction of the protective effects of cromoglycate. However, pretreatment with L-arginine only partially restored the protective effects of cromoglycate. These results suggest that the protective effects of cromoglycate may be dependent on the maintenance of a critical level of both endogenous nitric oxide and nonprotein sulphydryls in the gastric mucosa.

  11. Tumor promoter induces sister chromatid exchanges: relevance to mechanisms of carcinogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Kinsella, A R; Radman, M

    1978-01-01

    12-O-Tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA), a powerful tumor promoter, is shown to induce sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs), whereas the nonpromoting derivative 4-O-methyl-TPA does not. Inhibitors of tumor promotion--antipain, leupeptin, and fluocinolone acetonide--inhibit formation of such TPA-induced SCEs. TPA is a unique agent in its induction of SCEs in the absence of DNA damage, chromosome aberrations, mutagenesis, or significant toxicity. Because TPA is known to induce several gene functions, we speculate that it might also induce enzymes involved in genetic recombination. Thus, the irreversible step in tumor promotion might be the result of an aberrant mitotic segregation event leading to the expression of carcinogen/mutagen-induced recessive genetic or epigenetic chromosomal changes. Images PMID:282631

  12. Genomic instability in non-neoplastic oral mucosa cells can predict risk during 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide-induced rat tongue carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Daniel Araki; Fávero Salvadori, Daisy Maria; da Silva, Renata Nunes; Ribeiro Darros, Bruno; Alencar Marques, Mariangela Esther

    2004-10-01

    4-Nitroquinoline 1-oxide (4NQO)-induced rat tongue carcinogenesis is a useful model for studying oral squamous cell carcinoma. The aim of this study was to investigate the level of DNA damage induced by 4NQO in oral mucosa cells by the single cell gel (comet) assay. Male Wistar rats were distributed into three groups of 10 animals each and treated with 50 ppm 4NQO solution by drinking water for 4, 12 or 20 weeks. Ten animals were used as negative control. Statistically significant increase of DNA damage was observed in non-neoplastic oral cells at four weeks of 4NQO administration when compared with control (P < 0.05). The level of DNA damage was directly associated with the severity of histological changes. The results suggest that histologically normal tissue is able to harbor genetically unstable cells contributing to the initiation of oral carcinogenesis. Genomic instability appears to be associated with the risk and progression of oral cancer.

  13. Prickly pear cactus (Opuntia ficus indica var. saboten) protects against stress-induced acute gastric lesions in rats.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seung Hyun; Jeon, Byung Ju; Kim, Dae Hyun; Kim, Tae Il; Lee, Hee Kyoung; Han, Dae Seob; Lee, Jong-Hwan; Kim, Tae Bum; Kim, Jung Wha; Sung, Sang Hyun

    2012-11-01

    The protective activity of prickly pear cactus (Opuntia ficus indica var. saboten) fruit juice and its main constituent, betanin, were evaluated against stress-induced acute gastric lesions in rats. After 6 h of water immersion restraint stress (WIRS), gastric mucosal lesions with bleeding were induced in Sprague-Dawley rats. Pretreatment of a lyophilized powder containing O. ficus indica var. saboten fruit juice and maltodextrin (OFSM) and betanin significantly reduced stress lesions (800-1600 mg/kg). Both OFSM and betanin effectively prevented the decrease in gastric mucus content as detected by alcian blue staining. In addition, OFSM significantly suppressed WIRS-induced increases in the level of gastric mucosal tumor necrosis factor-α and myeloperoxidase (MPO). Betanin alone was only effective in decreasing MPO. These results revealed the protective activity of OFSM against stress-induced acute gastric lesions and that betanin may contribute to OFSM's gastric protective activity, at least in part. When OFSM and betanin were taken together, OFSM exerted gastroprotective activity against stress-induced gastric lesions by maintaining gastric mucus, which might be related to the attenuation of MPO-mediated damage and proinflammatory cytokine production.

  14. Prickly Pear Cactus (Opuntia ficus indica var. saboten) Protects Against Stress-Induced Acute Gastric Lesions in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seung Hyun; Jeon, Byung Ju; Kim, Dae Hyun; Kim, Tae Il; Lee, Hee Kyoung; Han, Dae Seob; Lee, Jong-Hwan; Kim, Tae Bum; Kim, Jung Wha

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The protective activity of prickly pear cactus (Opuntia ficus indica var. saboten) fruit juice and its main constituent, betanin, were evaluated against stress-induced acute gastric lesions in rats. After 6 h of water immersion restraint stress (WIRS), gastric mucosal lesions with bleeding were induced in Sprague–Dawley rats. Pretreatment of a lyophilized powder containing O. ficus indica var. saboten fruit juice and maltodextrin (OFSM) and betanin significantly reduced stress lesions (800–1600 mg/kg). Both OFSM and betanin effectively prevented the decrease in gastric mucus content as detected by alcian blue staining. In addition, OFSM significantly suppressed WIRS-induced increases in the level of gastric mucosal tumor necrosis factor-α and myeloperoxidase (MPO). Betanin alone was only effective in decreasing MPO. These results revealed the protective activity of OFSM against stress-induced acute gastric lesions and that betanin may contribute to OFSM's gastric protective activity, at least in part. When OFSM and betanin were taken together, OFSM exerted gastroprotective activity against stress-induced gastric lesions by maintaining gastric mucus, which might be related to the attenuation of MPO-mediated damage and proinflammatory cytokine production. PMID:23062184

  15. Dietary Chemoprevention of PhIP Induced Carcinogenesis in Male Fischer 344 Rats with Tomato and Broccoli

    PubMed Central

    Canene-Adams, Kirstie; Sfanos, Karen S.; Liang, Chung-Tiang; Yegnasubramanian, Srinivasan; Nelson, William G.; Brayton, Cory; De Marzo, Angelo M.

    2013-01-01

    The heterocyclic amine, 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-B]pyridine (PhIP), found in meats cooked at high temperatures, has been implicated in epidemiological and rodent studies for causing breast, prostate, and colorectal cancers. A previous animal study using a xenograft model has shown that whole tomato and broccoli, when eaten in combination, exhibit a marked effect on tumor reduction compared to when eaten alone. Our aim was to determine if PhIP-induced carcinogenesis can be prevented by dietary consumption of whole tomato + broccoli powders. Male Fischer 344 rats (n = 45) were randomized into the following treatment groups: control (AIN93G diet), PhIP (200 ppm in AIN93G diet for the first 20 weeks of the study), or tomato + broccoli + PhIP (mixed in AIN93G diet at 10% each and fed with PhIP for 20 weeks, and then without PhIP for 32 weeks). Study animals were monitored for 52 weeks and were euthanized as necessary based on a set of criteria for health status and tumor burden. Although there appeared to be some hepatic and intestinal toxicity due to the combination of PhIP and tomato + broccoli, these rodents had improved survival and reduced incidence and/or severity of PhIP-induced neoplastic lesions compared to the PhIP-alone treated group. Rats eating tomato + broccoli exhibited a marked decrease in the number and size of cribiform prostatic intraepitheilial neoplasia/carcinoma in situ (cribiform PIN/CIS) lesions and in the incidence of invasive intestinal adenocarcinomas and skin carcinomas. Although the apparent toxic effects of combined PhIP and tomato + broccoli need additional study, the results of this study support the hypothesis that a diet rich in tomato and broccoli can reduce or prevent dietary carcinogen-induced cancers. PMID:24312188

  16. SKHIN/Sprd, a new genetically defined inbred hairless mouse strain for UV-induced skin carcinogenesis studies

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Carlos; Parker-Thornburg, Jan; Mikulec, Carol; Kusewitt, Donna F.; Fischer, Susan M.; DiGiovanni, John; Conti, Claudio J.; Benavides, Fernando

    2013-01-01

    Strains of mice vary in their susceptibility to ultra-violet (UV) radiation-induced skin tumors. Some strains of hairless mice (homozygous for the spontaneous Hrhr mutation) are particularly susceptible to these tumors. The skin tumors that develop in hairless mice resemble, both at the morphologic and molecular levels, UV-induced squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) and their precursors in human. The most commonly employed hairless mice belong to the SKH1 stock. However, these mice are outbred and their genetic background is not characterized, which makes them a poor model for genetic studies. We have developed a new inbred strain from outbred SKH1 mice that we named SKHIN/Sprd (now at generation F31). In order to characterize the genetic background of this new strain, we genotyped a cohort of mice at F30 with 92 microsatellites and 140 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) evenly distributed throughout the mouse genome. We also exposed SKHIN/Sprd mice to chronic UV irradiation and showed that they are as susceptible to UV-induced skin carcinogenesis as outbred SKH1 mice. In addition, we proved that, albeit with low efficiency, inbred SKHIN/Sprd mice are suitable for transgenic production by classical pronuclear microinjection. This new inbred strain will be useful for the development of transgenic and congenic strains on a hairless inbred background as well as the establishment of syngeneic tumor cell lines. These new tools can potentially help elucidate a number of features of the cutaneous response to UV irradiation in humans, including the effect of genetic background and modifier genes. PMID:22379968

  17. Effects of Moquiniastrum polymorphum ssp floccosum ethnolic extract on colorectal carcinogenesis induced by 1,2-dimethylhydrazine.

    PubMed

    Limeiras, S M A; Oliveira, B C; Pessatto, L R; Pesarini, J R; Kassuya, C A L; Monreal, A C D; Cantero, W B; Antoniolli-Silva, R; Antoniolli-Silva, A C M B; Stefanello, M E A; Oliveira, R J

    2017-03-16

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of Moquiniastrum polymorphum ssp floccosum ethanolic extract (MPEE) on 1,2 dimethylhydrazine (DMH)-induced colorectal carcinogenesis in mice. Forty-two male Swiss mice (Mus musculus) were subdivided into six groups (N = 7/group): negative control, DMH, MPEE, pre-treatment, simultaneous, and post-treatment. Results showed that MPEE has antigenotoxic potential on the tested protocols pre- and silmultaneous treatment, and the percent damage reductions (%DRs) were 81.88 and 93.12%, respectively. The micronucleus test demonstrated that MPEE has great antimutagenic activity, with %DRs higher than 77.09 in the associated groups. The aberrant crypt focus assay demonstrated anticarcinogenic potential of MPEE as the associated groups showed %DRs that ranged from 62.13 to 95.14%. The study shows that MPEE is nontoxic and has chemopreventive and anticarcinogenic activity, thus it may prove to be a promising medicinal plant in view of its demonstrated properties.

  18. Cyclooxygenase as a target in chemoprevention by probiotics during 1,2-dimethylhydrazine induced colon carcinogenesis in rats.

    PubMed

    Walia, Sohini; Kamal, Rozy; Kanwar, Sarbjit Singh; Dhawan, Davinder Kumar

    2015-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to assess the effects of potential probiotics in regulating the activity of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) along with other morphological and histological analysis during 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH) induced colon carcinogenesis in rats. The rats were divided into 6 groups viz., normal control, Lactobacillus plantarum (AdF10) treated, Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) treated, DMH treated, AdF10 + DMH treated and LGG + DMH treated. Probiotics were supplemented to rats at dose levels of 2 × 10(10) cells per day for 6 days in a week. All the treatments were continued for a period of 16 wk. DMH treatment resulted in a statistically significant increase in the levels of total sialic acid (TSA). However, on supplementation with probiotics, a significant reduction in TSA was observed. DMH treatment brought about a significant increase in the expression of COX-2. But, supplementation of probiotics brought down the protein expression to moderate level. Further, supplementation with probiotics was also able to reduce tumor incidence, tumor multiplicity and average tumor size. Therefore, treatment with probiotics has the potential of providing protection against colon cancer by suppressing the COX-2 expression as one of the protective mechanisms.

  19. Anticarcinogenic Effect of Corn Tortilla Against 1,2-Dimethylhydrazine (DMH)-Induced Colon Carcinogenesis in Sprague-Dawley Rats.

    PubMed

    Reynoso-Camacho, Rosalía; Guerrero-Villanueva, Guadalupe; Figueroa, Juan de Dios; Gallegos-Corona, Marco A; Mendoza, Sandra; Loarca-Piña, Guadalupe; Ramos-Gomez, Minerva

    2015-06-01

    Mexico has the highest per capita consumption of corn in the world, which is consumed mainly as tortilla. However, only a few in vivo studies have demonstrated the anticarcinogenic potential of some maize components against colon cancer, but not as a whole food product. Therefore, our objective was to evaluate the protective effect of corn tortillas against the development of colon cancer. First, blue, red, yellow and white corn grains were lime-cooked and processed to elaborate tortillas. Then, tortillas were administered into the diet (27% w/w) to male Sprague-Dawley rats induced with the colon carcinogen 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH). Our results indicated that consumption of tortillas, particularly from white and blue corns, significantly decreased adenocarcinoma incidence (up to 77.5%) and mean number compared to DMH-treated animals. In addition, an inhibition of β-glucuronidase activity, and induction of detoxifying enzymes in liver and colon, as well as a decrease in the expression of the two most important proliferative proteins (K-ras and β-catenin) involved in colon carcinogenesis, were also observed. These results highlight some of the molecular mechanisms related to the chemopreventive effect of tortillas, thus indicating that corn products retain their biological properties even after nixtamalization and tortilla processing.

  20. Hypothalamic Astrocytes Respond to Gastric Mucosal Damage Induced by Restraint Water-Immersion Stress in Rat

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Haiji; Li, Ruisheng; Xu, Shiguo; Liu, Zhen; Ma, Xiaoli

    2016-01-01

    Restraint water-immersion stress (RWIS), a compound stress model, includes both psychological and physical stimulation. Studies have shown that neurons in the hypothalamus are involved in RWIS, but the role of astrocytes and the interactions between astrocytes and neurons in RWIS are not clear. Here, we tested our hypothesis that hypothalamus astrocytes are involved in RWIS and interact with neurons to regulate gastric mucosal damage induced by RWIS. The expression of Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and c-Fos in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) and supraoptic nucleus (SON) significantly increased following the RWIS. GFAP and c-Fos expression are similar in the temporal pattern, peaked at 1 h after the RWIS, then reduced gradually, and reached a maximal level again at 5 h which show “double-peak” characteristics. Intracerebroventricular administration of astroglial toxin L-a-aminoadipate (L-AA) and c-Fos antisense oligodeoxy nucleotides (ASO) both decreased RWIS-induced gastric mucosal damage. Results of immunohistochemistry assay revealed that both L-AA and ASO decreased the activation of astrocytes and neurons in the hypothalamus by RWIS. These results showed that hypothalamus neuron-astrocyte “network” involved in gastric mucosal damage induced by RWIS. This study may offer theoretical basis for some novel therapeutic strategies for RWIS-induced gastric ulcers. PMID:27847472

  1. Ay allele promotes azoxymethane-induced colorectal carcinogenesis by macrophage migration in hyperlipidemic/diabetic KK mice.

    PubMed

    Ito, Kumiko; Ishigamori, Rikako; Mutoh, Michihiro; Ohta, Toshihiro; Imai, Toshio; Takahashi, Mami

    2013-07-01

    The incidence of colorectal cancer has been increasing and is associated with obesity and diabetes. We have found that type 2 diabetes model KK-Ay/TaJcl (KK-Ay) mice develop tumors within a short period after treatment with azoxymethane (AOM). However, factors that contribute to the promotion of carcinogenesis have not been clarified. Therefore, we looked at the genetic background of KK-Ay, including two genetic characteristics of KK/TaJcl (KK) mice and C57BL/6J-Ham-Ay/+ (Ay) mice, compared with other non-obese and non-diabetic mouse strains C57BL/6J and ICR, and induced colorectal premalignant lesions, aberrant crypt foci (ACF), and tumors using AOM (150 μg/mouse/week for 4 weeks and 200 μg/mouse/week for 6 weeks, respectively). The mice with a diabetes feature, KK-Ay and KK, developed significantly more ACF, 67 and 61 per mouse, respectively, whereas ICR, Ay, and C57BL/6J mice developed 42, 24, and 18 ACF/mouse, respectively, at 17 weeks of age. Serum insulin and triglyceride levels in KK-Ay and KK mice were quite high compared with other non-diabetic mouse strains. Interestingly, KK-Ay mice developed more colorectal tumors (2.7 ± 2.3 tumor/mouse) than KK mice (1.2 ± 1.1 tumor/mouse) at 25 weeks of age, in spite of similar diabetic conditions. The colon cancers that developed in both KK-Ay and KK mice showed similar activation of β-catenin signaling. However, mRNA levels of inflammatory factors related to the activation of macrophages were significantly higher in colorectal cancer of KK-Ay mice than in KK. These data indicate that factors such as insulin resistance and dyslipidemia observed in obese and diabetic patients could be involved in susceptibility to colorectal carcinogenesis. In addition, increase of tumor-associated macrophages may play important roles in the stages of promotion of colorectal cancer.

  2. Modulatory effect of troxerutin on biotransforming enzymes and preneoplasic lesions induced by 1,2-dimethylhydrazine in rat colon carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Vinothkumar, Rajamanickam; Vinoth Kumar, Rajenderan; Sudha, Mani; Viswanathan, Periyaswamy; Balasubramanian, Thangavel; Nalini, Namasivayam

    2014-02-01

    Colon cancer is the third most global oncologic problem faced by medical fraternity. Troxerutin, a flavonoid present in tea, coffee, cereal grains, and a variety of fruits and vegetables, exhibits various pharmacological and biological activities. This study was carried out to investigate the effect of troxerutin on xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes, colonic bacterial enzymes and the development of aberrant crypt foci (ACF) during 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH) induced experimental rat colon carcinogenesis. Male albino Wistar rats were randomly divided into six groups. Group 1 served as control. Group 2 received troxerutin (50 mg/kg b.w., p.o. every day) for 16 weeks. Groups 3-6 received subcutaneous injections of DMH (20 mg/kg b.w.) once a week, for the first four weeks. In addition, groups 4-6 received different doses of troxerutin (12.5, 25, 50 mg/kg b.w., p.o. every day respectively) along with DMH injections. Our results reveal that DMH treated rats exhibited elevated activities of phase I enzymes such as cytochrome P450, cytochrome b5, cytochrome P4502E1, NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase and NADH-cytochrome b5 reductase and reduced activities of phase II enzymes such as glutathione-S-transferase (GST), DT-diaphorase (DTD) and uridine diphospho glucuronyl transferase (UDPGT) in the liver and colonic mucosa of control and experimental rats. Furthermore, the activities of fecal and colonic mucosal bacterial enzymes, such as β-glucronidase, β-glucosidase, β-galactosidase and mucinase were found to be significantly higher in DMH alone treated rats than those of the control rats. On supplementation with troxerutin to DMH treated rats, the alterations in the activities of the biotransforming enzymes, bacterial enzymes and the pathological changes were significantly reversed, the effect being more pronounced when troxerutin was supplemented at the dose of 25 mg/kg b.w. Thus troxerutin could be considered as a good chemopreventive agent against the formation of

  3. Gastroprotective effect of andrographolide sodium bisulfite against indomethacin-induced gastric ulceration in rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu-Hong; Zhang, Zhen-Biao; Zheng, Yi-Feng; Chen, Hai-Ming; Yu, Xiu-Ting; Chen, Xiao-Ying; Zhang, Xie; Xie, Jian-Hui; Su, Zu-Qing; Feng, Xue-Xuan; Zeng, Hui-Fang; Su, Zi-Ren

    2015-06-01

    Andrographolide sodium bisulfite (ASB), a water-soluble sulfonate of andrographolide has been shown to possess anti-inflammatory, antipyretic and analgesic activities. However, there is no report on the gastroprotective effect of ASB against indomethacin-induced gastric ulcer. Here we investigated the possible anti-ulcerogenic potential of ASB and the underlying mechanism against indomethacin-induced gastric ulcer in rats. The ulcer area, histopathological assessment, contents of gastric mucosal glutathione (GSH), catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), malonaldehyde (MDA) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) were examined. In addition, cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) mRNA expression and immunohistochemical evaluation of HSP70, Bcl-2 and Bax proteins were also investigated. Results indicated that ASB pre-treatment significantly reduced the ulcer areas induced by indomethacin compared with the vehicle group. The gastric levels of GSH, CAT and SOD were markedly increased by ASB while the level of MDA was decreased. In addition, ASB pretreatment significantly promoted the gastric PGE2 levels and up-regulated the COX-1 and COX-2 mRNA expression in comparison with the vehicle group. Immunohistochemistry analysis showed obvious up-regulation of HSP70 and Bcl-2 protein expression while suppression of Bax protein in the gastric tissue of ASB-pretreated group. Taken together, these findings indicated that the gastroprotective effect of ASB might be associated with the improvement of antioxidative status, activation of COX-mediated PGE2 synthesis, down-regulation of Bax proteins and up-regulation of Bcl-2 and HSP70 proteins. ASB might have the potential for further development as a promising alternative for antiulcer treatment.

  4. Tumor-associated macrophages induce capillary morphogenesis of lymphatic endothelial cells derived from human gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Tauchi, Yukie; Tanaka, Hiroaki; Kumamoto, Kanako; Tokumoto, Mao; Sakimura, Chie; Sakurai, Katsunobu; Kimura, Kenjiro; Toyokawa, Takahiro; Amano, Ryosuke; Kubo, Naoshi; Muguruma, Kazuya; Yashiro, Masakazu; Maeda, Kiyoshi; Ohira, Masaichi; Hirakawa, Kosei

    2016-08-01

    Tumor lymphangiogenesis is a major prognostic indicator of gastric cancer. Tumor-induced inflammation has been shown to attract tumor-associated macrophages that affect lymphangiogenesis. However, detailed mechanisms of macrophage-induced lymphangiogenesis have not been elucidated. Here, we evaluated the interaction between tumor-associated macrophages and lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs) derived from lymph nodes (LNs) of human gastric cancer. Lymphatic endothelial cells were directly or indirectly cocultured with macrophages from healthy human blood, with or without the supernatant of the gastric cancer cell line, OCUM-12. We analyzed the effect of cancer pretreated macrophages and of macrophages from metastatic LNs of gastric cancer on LECs. We observed morphological changes of LECs in coculture and assessed the gene expression of possible lymphangiogenic molecules of macrophages and LECs after contact coculture, and of cancer pretreated macrophages, by quantitative RT-PCR. Specimens of metastatic LN of gastric cancer were immunofluorescently stained. We found that tubulogenesis of LECs was observed only in the contact coculture model. OCUM-12 cells promoted macrophage-induced tubulogenesis of LECs. Relative gene expression of MMP and adhesion molecules was significantly upregulated in both capillary-forming LECs and cocultured macrophages. Cancer pretreated macrophages upregulated lymphangiogenic factors including inflammatory cytokines, MMPs, adhesion molecules, and vascular endothelial growth factor-C. Blocking of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and macrophage activation suppressed tubulogenesis of LECs. Immunohistochemistry showed macrophages localized around lymphatic vessels. Our results suggested that interaction between LECs and macrophages may be an important initial step of tumor lymphangiogenesis developing LN metastasis. Understanding of its mechanisms could be useful for future therapeutics of gastric cancer.

  5. Genistein regulates tumor microenvironment and exhibits anticancer effect in dimethyl hydrazine-induced experimental colon carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Sekar, Vasudevan; Anandasadagopan, Suresh Kumar; Ganapasam, Sudhandiran

    2016-11-12

    Colon cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer mortality, worldwide. Cancer stem cells are attractive targets for therapeutic interventions since their abnormal growth may trigger tumor initiation, progression, and recurrence. Colon cancer in rats were induced with 1, 2-dimethyl hydrazine (DMH) and treated with genistein, an isoflavone rich in the soy food products, which also possesses various biological activities. Genistein treatment regulates enzymatic and non-enzymatic anti-oxidants in the DMH-induced colonic tissue microenvironment. Alcian blue staining in colonic tissue reveals that mucin secretion was found to be depleted in DMH-induced group of animals. The alterations were normalized in the genistein-treated groups. Also, the mast cell population and collagen deposition were reduced as compared to induced group. Genistein treatment reduces the prognostic marker Argyrophilic nuclear organizer region (AgNOR) and proliferating cell nucleolar antigen (PCNA) in DMH-induced group of rats. DMH administration induces oxidative stress, whereas genistein activates nuclear factor-erythroid 2 related factor 2 (Nrf-2) and its downstream target hemoxygenase-1 (HO-1). Colonic stem cell marker protein CD133, CD44, and β-catenin expressions were found to be increased in DMH-induced group of animals as compared to control group of rats. Genistein treatment suppressed the expression of these stem cell markers suggesting rapid dysfunctional activation and proliferation of colonic stem cell-induced by DMH. The results of this study indicate that genistein administration in rats restored the colonic niche that was damaged by DMH and inhibits colon cancer progression. © 2016 BioFactors, 42(6):623-637, 2016.

  6. Curcumin Blocks Naproxen-Induced Gastric Antral Ulcerations through Inhibition of Lipid Peroxidation and Activation of Enzymatic Scavengers in Rats.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeong-Hwan; Jin, Soojung; Kwon, Hyun Ju; Kim, Byung Woo

    2016-08-28

    Curcumin is a polyphenol derived from the plant Curcuma longa, which is used for the treatment of diseases associated with oxidative stress and inflammation. The present study was undertaken to determine the protective effect of curcumin against naproxen-induced gastric antral ulcerations in rats. Different doses (10, 50, and 100 mg/kg) of curcumin or vehicle (curcumin, 0 mg/kg) were pretreated for 3 days by oral gavage, and then gastric mucosal lesions were caused by 80 mg/kg naproxen applied for 3 days. Curcumin significantly inhibited the naproxen-induced gastric antral ulcer area and lipid peroxidation in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, curcumin markedly increased activities of radical scavenging enzymes, such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase, and glutathione peroxidase in a dose-dependent manner. Specifically, 100 mg/kg curcumin completely protected the gastric mucosa against the loss in the enzyme, resulting in a drastic increase of activities of radical scavenging enzymes up to more than the level of untreated normal rats. Histological examination obviously showed that curcumin prevents naproxen-induced gastric antral ulceration as a result of direct protection of the gastric mucosa. These results suggest that curcumin blocks naproxen-induced gastric antral ulcerations through prevention of lipid peroxidation and activation of radical scavenging enzymes, and it may offer a potential remedy of gastric antral ulcerations.

  7. TFF1 inhibits proliferation and induces apoptosis of gastric cancer cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ge, Yanli; Zhang, Junjie; Cao, Jianchun; Wu, Qiong; Sun, Longe; Guo, Likun; Wang, Zhirong

    2012-05-01

    Trefoil Factor Family (TFF) plays an essential role in the intestinal epithelial restitution, but the relationship between TFF1 and gastric cancer (GC) is still unclear. The present study aimed to determine the role of TFF1 in repairing gastric mucosa and in the pathogenesis of GC. The TFF1 expression in different gastric mucosas was measured with immunohistochemistry. Then, siRNA targeting TFF1 or plasmids expressing TFF1 gene were transfected into BGC823 cells, SGC7901 cells and GES-1 cells. The cell proliferation was detected with MTT assay and apoptosis and cell cycle measured by flow cytometry. From normal gastric mucosa to mucosa with dysplasia and to gastric cancer, the TFF1 expression had a decreasing trend. Down-regulation of TFF1 expression significantly reduced the apoptosis of three cell lines and markedly facilitated their proliferation but had no significant effect on cell cycle. Over-expression of TFF1 could promote apoptosis of three cell lines and inhibit proliferation but had no pronounced effect on cell cycle. TFF1 can inhibit proliferation and induce apoptosis of GC cells in vitro.

  8. Immunization with gastric H+/K(+)-ATPase induces a reversible autoimmune gastritis.

    PubMed Central

    Scarff, K J; Pettitt, J M; Van Driel, I R; Gleeson, P A; Toh, B H

    1997-01-01

    The gastric H+/K(+)-ATPase has been implicated as a major autoantigen in pernicious anaemia in humans and in thymectomy-induced autoimmune gastritis in mice. Here we have shown that autoimmune gastritis can be generated by direct immunization of non-thymectomized BALB/c mice with mouse gastric H+/K(+)-ATPase in complete Freund's adjuvant. The gastritis was characterized by infiltration of the gastric submucosa and mucosa with macrophages, CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, and B cells and by circulating autoantibodies to the H+/K(+)-ATPase. The mononuclear infiltrate within the gastric mucosa was accompanied by loss of parietal and zymogenic cells and accumulation of small immature epithelial cells. Splenocytes from gastritic mice adoptively transferred gastritis to naive recipients. Cessation of immunization resulted in decrease in autoantibody titre and regeneration of parietal and zymogenic cells. The results directly confirm that the gastric H+/K(+)-ATPase is the causative autoantigen in the genesis of autoimmune gastritis. Recovery of the lesion following cessation of immunization suggests that homeostatic mechanisms can reverse a destructive autoimmune process. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:9370929

  9. Gastroprotective effects of several H2RAs on ibuprofen-induced gastric ulcer in rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Sun, Dan; He, Jinfeng; Yang, Chengli; Hu, Tingting; Zhang, Lijing; Cao, Hua; Tong, Ai-Ping; Song, Xiangrong; Xie, Yongmei; He, Gu; Guo, Gang; Luo, Youfu; Cheng, Ping; Zheng, Yu

    2016-03-15

    Ibuprofen is the first line of treatment for osteoarthritis and arthritis. The main side effects of ibuprofen especially in long-term treatment include gastric ulcer, duodenal ulcer and indigestion etc. Therefore, screening drugs with effective gastric protective effects and low toxicity for combination therapy with ibuprofen is necessary. The mechanism of gastric damage induced by ibuprofen is still unclear, however, cell damage caused by reactive oxygen species (ROS) is considered as the main reason. Preliminary screening of literature with the criteria of low toxicity led to four histamine-2 receptor antagonists (H2RAs): nizatidine, famotidine, lafutidine, and roxatidine acetate, which were selected for further investigation. These drugs were evaluated systemically by examining the gastric ulcer index, lipid peroxidation (LPO), membrane permeability, toxicity to main organs, and the influence on the activity of antioxidant enzymes, and myeloperoxidase (MPO). Nizatidine was found to be the best gastric protective agent. It exhibited excellent protective effect by increasing antioxidant enzyme activity, decreasing MPO activity, reducing LPO, and membrane permeability. Combination treatment with nizatidine and ibuprofen did not show any significant toxicity. Nizatidine was considered as a good option for combination therapy with ibuprofen especially for diseases that require long-term treatment such as arthritis and osteoarthritis.

  10. Gastric cancer: basic aspects.

    PubMed

    Resende, Carlos; Thiel, Alexandra; Machado, José C; Ristimäki, Ari

    2011-09-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) is a world health burden, ranging as the second cause of cancer death worldwide. Etiologically, GC arises not only from the combined effects of environmental factors and susceptible genetic variants but also from the accumulation of genetic and epigenetic alterations. In the last years, molecular oncobiology studies brought to light a number of genes that are implicated in gastric carcinogenesis. This review is intended to focus on the recently described basic aspects that play key roles in the process of gastric carcinogenesis. Genetic variants of the genes IL-10, IL-17, MUC1, MUC6, DNMT3B, SMAD4, and SERPINE1 have been reported to modify the risk of developing GC. Several genes have been newly associated with gastric carcinogenesis, both through oncogenic activation (GSK3β, CD133, DSC2, P-Cadherin, CDH17, CD168, CD44, metalloproteinases MMP7 and MMP11, and a subset of miRNAs) and through tumor suppressor gene inactivation mechanisms (TFF1, PDX1, BCL2L10, XRCC, psiTPTE-HERV, HAI-2, GRIK2, and RUNX3). It also addressed the role of the inflammatory mediator cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in the process of gastric carcinogenesis and its importance as a potential molecular target for therapy.

  11. Lippia graveolens photochemopreventive effect against UVB radiation-induced skin carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    García-Bores, A M; Espinosa-González, A M; Reyna-Campos, A; Cruz-Toscano, S; Benítez-Flores, J C; Hernández-Delgado, C T; Flores-Maya, S; Urzúa-Meza, M; Peñalosa-Castro, I; Céspedes-Acuña, C L; Avila-Acevedo, J G

    2017-02-01

    Lippia graveolens HBK (Mexican oregano) is a species that is regularly used as a condiment in Mexican cuisine. In traditional medicine, it is used for the treatment of respiratory and digestive illnesses, headaches, rheumatism and inflammation-related disorders. The main chemical components reported in this species include the following: terpenoids, iridoids and flavonoids. The aim of this study was to determine the potential photochemopreventive effect of the methanolic extract of Lippia graveolens (MELG) against ultraviolet B (UVB)-induced skin cancer in SKH-1 mice. The phenolic content, radical scavenger activity, penetration and genotoxicity of the MELG were also evaluated. The MELG exhibited scavenging activity against 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl, superoxide and hydroxyl radicals, and it did not exhibit genotoxic activity in the micronucleus test. In addition, the MELG absorbed UVB (280nm) electromagnetic radiation. The main components detected in the plant extract were naringenin and galangin, and pinocembrin was also isolated and identified through spectroscopic analysis. The MELG demonstrated a photoprotective effect against UVB-induced cell death in Escherichia coli. In chronic challenge experiments, the MELG protected against UVB-induced skin cancer in SKH-1 mice. The MELG penetrated the skin of mice. Topical administration of the MELG protected against chronic UVB-induced damage in mouse SKH-1 skin. Our results suggest that the MELG has photochemopreventive activity and may potentially prevent photo-tumorigenesis.

  12. Bromelain nanoparticles protect against 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene induced skin carcinogenesis in mouse model.

    PubMed

    Bhatnagar, Priyanka; Pant, Aditya B; Shukla, Yogeshwer; Chaudhari, Bhushan; Kumar, Pradeep; Gupta, Kailash C

    2015-04-01

    Conventional cancer chemotherapy leads to severe side effects, which limits its use. Nanoparticles (NPs) based delivery systems offer an effective alternative. Several evidences highlight the importance of Bromelain (BL), a proteolytic enzyme, as an anti-tumor agent which however has been limited due to the requirement of high doses at the tumor site. Therefore, we illustrate the development of BL loaded poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) NPs that show enhanced anti-tumor effects compared to free BL. The formulated NPs with a mean particle size of 130.4 ± 8.81 nm exhibited sustained release of BL. Subsequent investigation revealed enhanced anti-tumor ability of NPs in 2-stage skin tumorigenesis mice model. Reduction in average number of tumors (∼ 2.3 folds), delay in tumorigenesis (∼ 2 weeks), percent tumorigenesis (∼ 4 folds), and percent mortality rate as well as a reduction in the average tumor volume (∼ 2.5 folds) in mice as compared to free BL were observed. The NPs were found to be superior in exerting chemopreventive effects over chemotherapeutic effects at 10 fold reduced dose than free BL, validated by the enhanced ability of NPs (∼ 1.8 folds) to protect the DNA from induced damage. The effects were also supported by histopathological evaluations. NPs were also capable of modulating the expression of pro-apoptotic (P53, Bax) and anti-apoptotic (Bcl2) proteins. Therefore, our findings demonstrate that developed NPs formulation could be used to improve the efficacy of chemotherapy by exerting chemo-preventive effects against induced carcinogenesis at lower dosages.

  13. Ultrastructural changes in rat colon following 1,2-dimethylhydrazine-induced colon carcinogenesis: protection by zinc.

    PubMed

    Chadha, Vijayta Dani; Dhawan, D K

    2010-01-01

    The present study evaluated the modulatory effects of zinc on 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH)-induced ultrastructural changes in rat colon as well as on [(3)H]thymidine uptake and [(14)C]D-glucose metabolism. The rats were segregated into four groups: normal control, DMH treated, zinc treated, DMH + zinc treated. Initiation and induction of colon carcinogenesis was achieved through weekly subcutaneous injections of DMH (30 mg/kg body weight) for 8 and 16 weeks, respectively. Zinc was supplemented to rats at a dose level of 227 mg/L in drinking water, ad libitum for two different time durations of 8 and 16 weeks. The study revealed a significant decrease in zinc concentration in serum and colon following DMH treatment to rats, which upon zinc supplementation were recovered to near normal levels. A significant increase in in vitro [(3)H]thymidine uptake was observed following 16 weeks of DMH treatment. Further, a significant increase in the [(14)C]glucose turnover was observed following 8 and 16 weeks of DMH treatment. Simultaneous supplementation of zinc to DMH-treated rats for 16 weeks significantly decreased the uptake of [(3)H]thymidine and [(4)C]glucose when compared to DMH alone-treated rats. Changes in the ultrastructural architecture of colonic cells were evident following both treatment schedules of DMH; however, the changes were more distinguishable following 16 weeks of DMH treatment. The most obvious changes were seen in nuclear shape and disruption of cellular integrity, which upon zinc supplementation was appreciably improved. In conclusion, the study suggests positive beneficial effect of zinc against chemically induced colonic preneoplastic progression in rats.

  14. Successful treatment with a combination of endoscopic injection and irrigation with coca cola for gastric bezoar-induced gastric outlet obstruction.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chen-Sheng; Tung, Chun-Fang; Peng, Yen-Chun; Chow, Wei-Keung; Chang, Chi-Sen; Hu, Wei-Hsiung

    2008-01-01

    We report a case of gastric bezoar-induced gastric outlet obstruction that was successfully treated with a combination of endoscopic injection and irrigation with Coca Cola. A 73-year-old diabetic woman had a history of perforated peptic ulcer and had received pyloroplasty more than 20 years previously. She had been ingesting Pho Pu Zi (Cordia dichotoma Forst. f.) as an appetizer for 1 month. She presented with epigastric pain, nausea, and vomiting. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, performed at a local hospital, showed 2 gastric bezoars in the stomach, and 1 of them impacted at the pylorus. She was referred to our emergency department for removal of the gastric bezoars that were suspected to be causing gastric outlet obstruction. All attempts at endoscopic removal using a polypectomy snare, biopsy forceps and Dormia basket failed. We then injected Coca Cola directly into the bezoar mass, followed by irrigation with Coca Cola. Follow-up endoscopy was performed the next day, which revealed that the gastric bezoars had dissolved spontaneously.

  15. Radiation carcinogenesis: radioprotectors and photosensitizers

    SciTech Connect

    Fry, R.J.M.

    1982-01-01

    This paper outlines 1) some of the salient features of radiation carcinogenesis that are pertinent to the questions of how the carcinogenic effects might be influenced, 2) the effects of radioprotectors on ionizing radiation-induced cancer, and 3) the effect of photosensitizers on UVR-induced skin cancer.

  16. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, nabumetone, prevents indometacin-induced gastric damage via inhibition of neutrophil functions.

    PubMed

    Ishiwata, Yoshiro; Okamoto, Masayuki; Yokochi, Shoji; Hashimoto, Hiroyuki; Nakamura, Takashi; Miyachi, Atsushi; Naito, Yuji; Yoshikawa, Toshikazu

    2003-02-01

    Nabumetone is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID). It works as a prodrug and is extensively metabolized to an active metabolite, 6-methoxy-2-naphthylacetic acid (6MNA). It is well known that neutrophil infiltration and activation are critical in the pathogenesis of NSAID-induced gastric injury, and nabumetone shows less incidence of gastrointestinal irritancy. We examined the effects of nabumetone on neutrophil activation and on indometacin-induced gastric damage. In the indometacin-induced gastric mucosal injury, rats were treated with indometacin and then nabumetone or 6MNA was orally administered. Nabumetone prevented gastric damage accompanied by the reduction of neutrophil infiltration into gastric mucosa, but such an effect was not observed with 6MNA. Nabumetone reduced the formyl methionyl leucyl phenylalanine (fMLP)-induced respiratory burst of human neutrophils to 30% of the control level in-vitro, but 6MNA did not. In addition, nabumetone prevented the fMLP-induced migration of neutrophils. Nabumetone did not inhibit O2- generation in the xanthine-xanthine oxidase system. These results suggest that nabumetone prevents gastric damage induced by the active metabolite, 6MNA, via the suppression of neutrophil activation in gastric mucosa.

  17. Dietary modifiers of carcinogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Kohlmeier, L; Simonsen, N; Mottus, K

    1995-01-01

    Dietary components express a wide range of activities that can affect carcinogenesis. Naturally occurring substances in foods have been shown in laboratory experiments to serve as dietary antimutagens, either as bioantimutagens or as desmutagens. Dietary desmutagens may function as chemical inactivaters, enzymatic inducers, scavengers, or antioxidants. Dietary components may also act later in the carcinogenic process as tumor growth suppressors. Examples of dietary factors acting in each of these stages of carcinogenesis are presented, and potential anticarcinogens such as the carotenoids, tocopherols, phenolic compounds, glucosinolates, metal-binding proteins, phytoestrogens, and conjugated linoleic acid are discussed. Individual foods typically contain multiple potential anticarcinogens. Many of these substances can influence carcinogenesis through more than one mechanism. Some substances exhibit both anticarcinogenic and carcinogenic activity in vitro, depending on conditions. Epidemiologic research indicates that high fruit and vegetable consumption is associated with lower cancer risk. Little research has focused on the effects of single substances or single foods in man. Realization of the potential of foodborne substances to reduce the human burden of cancer will only be achieved with better measurement of dietary exposures and funding of multidisciplinary research in this area commensurate with its importance. PMID:8741780

  18. Chemopreventive effect of a mixture of Chinese Herbs (antitumor B) on chemically induced oral carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yian; Yao, Ruisheng; Gao, Song; Wen, Weidong; Du, Yinqiu; Szabo, Eva; Hu, Ming; Lubet, Ronald A; You, Ming

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we evaluated chemopreventive efficacy of Antitumor B, a Chinese herbal mixture of six plants (Sophora tonkinensis, Polygonum bistorta, Prunella vulgaris, Sonchus arvensis L., Dictamnus dasycarpus, and Dioscorea bulbifera) on the development of 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide (4NQO) induced oral squamous cell carcinomas in A/J mice. Antitumor B, delivered through diet, inhibited 4NQO-induced oral cancer development by 59.19%. The reduction of cell proliferation appears to be associated with efficacy of Antitumor B against 4NQO-induced oral cancer in A/J mice. The expression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and phosphorylated EGFR (Tyr1173) were down-regulated by Antitumor B. Tissue distribution of Antitumor B was determined using obacunone, matrine, and maackiain as marker chemicals. We found significant amounts of obacunone, matrine, and maackiain in the blood after 1-wk treatment. The concentrations of these three compounds did not increase further at 18  wk, suggesting that plasma concentrations had reached a steady-state level at 1  wk. There was no significant body weight loss and there was no other obvious sign of toxicity in Antitumor B-treated mice. These results suggest that Antitumor B is a promising agent for human oral cancer chemoprevention.

  19. Recent advances in sunlight-induced carcinogenesis using the Xiphophorus melanoma model✰

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez, André A.; Paniker, Lakshmi; Garcia, Rachel; Mitchell, David L.

    2011-01-01

    Unlike breast and prostate cancers, the nature and sequence of critical genetic and epigenetic events involved in the initiation and progression of melanoma is not well understood. A contributing factor to this dilemma, especially given our current understanding of the importance of UV light in melanoma etiology, is the lack of quality UV-inducible melanoma animal models. In this study we elaborate on the capability of UV light to induce cutaneous malignant melanomas (CMM) in Xiphophorus fishes, which were previously found to develop melanomas after acute neonatal UVB irradiation. In two separate tumorigenesis experiments, we exposed adult Xiphophorus hybrids to either acute UVB irradiations (5 consecutive daily treatments) or chronic solar irradiations (continuous UVA/UVB treatment for 9 months). Acute adult UVB irradiation resulted in the significant induction of melanomas, and moreover, this induction rate is equivalent to that of animals exposed to acute neonatal UVB irradiation. This study represents the first evidence that acute adult UVB irradiation, in the absence of any early life exposures, induces CMM. Similar to the findings conducted on other divergent melanoma models, including HGF/SF transgenic mice and Monodelphis domestica, prolonged chronic solar UV was not a factor in melanomagenesis. PMID:21457786

  20. Chemopreventive Effects of Azadirachta indica on Cancer Marker Indices and Ultrastructural Changes During 1,2-Dimethylhydrazine-Induced Colon Carcinogenesis in Rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ning; Sun, Bo; Wu, Peiwei; Wei, Xi

    2015-09-01

    The present study elucidated the prospective of Azadirachta indica supplementation, if any, in affording chemoprevention by modulating the altered cancer markers and ultrastructural changes in DMH-induced colorectal carcinogenesis in rats. The rats were segregated into four groups viz., normal control, DMH treated, A. indica treated, and DMH+AI treated. Initiation and induction of colon carcinogenesis were achieved through weekly subcutaneous injections of DMH (30 mg/kg body weight) for both 10 and 20 weeks. A. indica extract was supplemented to rats at a dose rate of 100 mg/kg body weight of animals thrice a week on alternative days, ad libitum for two different time durations of 10 and 20 weeks. The study observed a significant increase in the number of aberrant crypt foci in colons of DMH-treated rats at both the time intervals which were decreased significantly upon AI supplementation. Also, a significant increase was seen in the enzyme activity of alkaline phosphatase, which, however, was moderated upon AI administration to DMH-treated rats. Changes in the ultrastructural architecture of colonic cells were apparent following both the treatment schedules of DMH; however, the changes were prominent following 20 weeks of DMH treatment. The most obvious changes were seen in the form of altered nuclear shape and disruption of cellular integrity, which were appreciably improved upon AI supplementation. In conclusion, the study shows the chemopreventive abilities of AI against DMH-induced colorectal carcinogenesis in rats.

  1. Long-term treatment with Sitagliptin, a dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor, reduces colon carcinogenesis and reactive oxygen species in 1,2-dimethylhydrazine-induced rats.

    PubMed

    Femia, Angelo Pietro; Raimondi, Laura; Maglieri, Giulia; Lodovici, Maura; Mannucci, Edoardo; Caderni, Giovanna

    2013-11-15

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and insulin resistance (IR) increase colon cancer risk. Antidiabetic drugs stabilizing incretin hormones, such as inhibitors of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 activity (DPP4i), may affect colon carcinogenesis; however, the data remain controversial. Therefore, the authors studied whether long-term administration of the DPP4i Sitagliptin (SITA) affects 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH)-induced colon carcinogenesis. Male F344 rats fed a high-fat (HF) diet promoting colon carcinogenesis and IR, were induced with DMH (100 mg/kg × 2 times). One week later, the animals were allocated to two groups: one continuing with HF diet (controls; n = 8) and one receiving SITA (n = 8) mixed in the diet (260 ppm). Body weight, food consumption and glycemia were not affected by SITA. Fifteen weeks after DMH, the number of the precancerous lesions mucin-depleted foci (MDF) was significantly lower in rats treated with SITA [MDF/colon: 9.5 ± 0.9 and 6.4 ± 0.9 in controls (n = 8) and SITA groups (n = 8), respectively; means ± SE, p < 0.05]. Reactive oxygen species in the blood were also significantly lower in the SITA group [6.75 ± 0.69 and 5.63 ± 0.75 (H2 O2 in mM) in controls (n = 5) and SITA (n = 6), respectively; means ± SE, p < 0.05]. Rats treated with SITA had a lower DPP4 activity in the intestine but not in the plasma. Intestine growth morphometric parameters and colon proliferation, as proliferating cell nuclear antigen expression, were not affected by SITA. In conclusion, the results suggest a protective effect of DPP4i against colon carcinogenesis that could be exploited in chemoprevention trials.

  2. Mitigation of indomethacin-induced gastric mucosal lesions by a potent specific type V phosphodiesterase inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Karakaya, Kemal; Hanci, Volkan; Bektas, Sibel; Can, Murat; Ucan, Hamdi B; Emre, Ali Ugur; Tascılar, Oge; Turan, Isıl Ozkocak; Comert, Mustafa; Irkorucu, Oktay; Cakmak, Guldeniz Karadeniz

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the gastroprotective effect of vardenafil against indomethacin-induced gastric damage. METHODS: Forty-eight female Wistar albino rats were randomly divided into 6 groups. Group 1 received saline only. Group 2 (indomethacin) received indomethacin. Rats in group 3 and 4 were pretreated with different doses of famotidine. Group 5 and 6 were pretreated with different doses of vardenafil. Rats in groups 3 to 6 received 25 mg/kg indomethacin 30 min after pretreatment. The animals were sacrificed 6 h later and their stomachs were opened. Gastric lesions were counted and measured. The stomach of each animal was divided in two parts for histopathological examinations and nitric oxide (NO) and malondialdehyde (MDA) assays, respectively. RESULTS: There were no gastric mucosal lesion in the saline group but all rats in the indomethacin group had gastric mucosal ulcerations (ulcer count; 6.25 ± 3.49, and mean ulcer area; 21.00 ± 12.35). Ulcer counts were diminished with famotidine 5 mg/kg (4.12 ± 2.47, P > 0.05), 20 mg/kg (2.37 ± 4.43, P < 0.05), vardenafil 2 mg/kg (4.37 ± 3.06), and vardenafil 10 mgkg (1.25 ± 1.38, P < 0.05) compared to the indomethacin group. Gastric mucosal lesion areas were diminished with famotidine 5 mg/kg (8.62 ± 2.97, P < 0.001) , famotidine 20 mg/kg (0.94 ± 2.06, P < 0.001), vardenafil 2 mg/kg (6.62 ± 5.87, P < 0.001), and vardenafil 10 mg/kg (0.75 ± 0.88, P < 0.001) compared to the indomethacin group. MDA levels were significantly higher in indomethacin group (28.48 ± 14.51), compared to the famotidine 5 mg/kg (6,21 ± 1.88, P < 0.05), famotidine 20 mg/kg (5.88 ± 1.60. P < 0.05), vardenafil 2 mg/kg (15.87 ± 3.93, P < 0.05), and vardenafil 10 mg/kg (10.97 ± 4.50, P < 0.05). NO concentration in gastric tissues of the famotidine groups were significantly increased (P < 0.05), but the NO increases in the vardenafil groups were not statistically significant. Histopathology revealed diminished gastric damage for

  3. Lactobacillus fermentum Suo Attenuates HCl/Ethanol Induced Gastric Injury in Mice through Its Antioxidant Effects

    PubMed Central

    Suo, Huayi; Zhao, Xin; Qian, Yu; Sun, Peng; Zhu, Kai; Li, Jian; Sun, Baozhong

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the inhibitory effects of Lactobacillus fermentum Suo (LF-Suo) on HCl/ethanol induced gastric injury in ICR (Institute for Cancer Research) mice and explain the mechanism of these effects through the molecular biology activities of LF-Suo. The studied mice were divided into four groups: healthy, injured, LF-Suo-L and LF-Suo-H group. After the LF-Suo intragastric administration, the gastric injury area was reduced compared to the injured group. The serum MOT (motilin), SP (substance P), ET (endothelin) levels of LF-Suo treated mice were lower, and SS (somatostatin), VIP (vasoactive intestinal peptide) levels were higher than the injured group mice. The cytokine IL-6 (interleukin 6), IL-12 (interleukin 12), TNF-α (tumor necrosis factor-α) and IFN-γ (interferon-γ) serum levels were decreased after the LF-Suo treatment. The gastric tissues SOD (superoxide dismutase), GSH-Px (glutathione peroxidase), NO (nitric oxide) and activities of LF-Suo treated mice were increased and MDA (malondialdehyde) activity was decreased compared to the injured group mice. By the RT-PCR assay, LF-Suo raised the occludin, EGF (epidermal growth factor), EGFR (epidermal growth factor receptor), VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor), Fit-1 (fms-like tyrosine kinase-1), IκB-α (inhibitor kappaB-α), nNOS (neuronal nitric oxide synthase), eNOS (endothelial nitric oxide synthase), Mn-SOD, Cu/Zn-SOD, CAT (catalase) mRNA or protein expressions and reduced the COX-2, NF-κB (nuclear factor kappaB), and iNOS (inducible nitric oxide synthase) expressions in gastric tissues compared to the gastric injured group mice. A high concentration (1.0 × 109 CFU/kg b.w.) of LF-Suo treatment showed stronger anti-gastric injury effects compared to a low concentration of (0.5 × 109 CFU/kg b.w.) of LF-Suo treatment. LF-Suo also showed strong survival in pH 3.0 man-made gastric juice and hydrophobic properties. These results indicate that LF-Suo has potential use

  4. Inhibitory effects of Indigofera aspalathoides on 20-methylcholanthrene-induced chemical carcinogenesis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, S. Selva; Karrunakaran, C. M.; Rao, M. R. K.; Balasubramanian, M. P.

    2011-01-01

    Background: The anticancer and antioxidant effects of the aqueous extract of Indigofera aspalathoides on 20-methylcholanthrene (20-MCA) induced fibrosarcoma were investigated in male albino rats. Materials and Methods: The rats were divided into four different groups, each group consisting of six animals. Group I animals were served as normal control, Group II animals were fibrosarcoma-bearing animals after the incubation period, Group III animals were fibrosarcoma-bearing animals, treated with aqueous extract of I. aspalathoides intraperitoneally at a dose of 250 mg/kg b.w. for 30 days and Group IV animals were administered with the aqueous extract of I. aspalathoides alone, at a dose of 250 mg/kg b.w. for 30 days, served as drug control animals. After the experimental period, all the rats were weighed and killed by cervical decapitation. The serum was separated from the blood for analysis. The weights of the liver and the kidneys were noted. The fibrosarcoma was proved by pathological examinations. The liver and kidney tissues were excised and then homogenized in an ice-cold buffer. These tissues were used for biochemical analysis. Results: The activities of antioxidant enzymes, e.g. catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and superoxide dismutase (SOD), in blood serum, liver, and kidney of control and experimental animals, respectively, have been reported. Conclusion: The present observations suggested that the aqueous extract of I. aspalathoides treatment enhanced the recovery from 20-MCA-induced fibrosarcoma due to its antioxidants and antineoplastic properties. PMID:21297921

  5. Systemic modulation by ultraviolet irradiation of cutaneous N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine-induced carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Gensler, H L

    1992-01-10

    Ultraviolet irradiation can systemically enhance subsequent skin cancer induction by benzo[a]pyrene, methylcholanthrene, or UV radiation. The present study was designed to determine whether UVB irradiation influences host susceptibility to the alkylating agent N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG). Female C3H/HeJ mice were exposed dorsally to UVB radiation from banks of 6 Westinghouse FS40 sun lamps. The mice received a total UV dose of approximately 8.1 x 10(5) J m-2 over a 15-week period. After termination of UVB treatments, ventral tumors were induced by 4 applications of 30 mumol of MNNG at 8-day intervals. At 20 weeks after the first MNNG treatment, UVB-irradiated mice had 7-fold more MNNG-induced, ventral tumors than did the unirradiated control mice (P = 0.026, Wilcoxon rank sum test). Ventral application of MNNG after cessation of dorsal UVB exposure, but before UV tumor appearance, did not influence photocarcinogenesis. These results demonstrate that UV irradiation can systemically decrease host resistance to tumor induction by the methylating agent, MNNG.

  6. Inhibitory effects of DA-9601 on ethanol-induced gastrohemorrhagic lesions and gastric xanthine oxidase activity in rats.

    PubMed

    Huh, Keun; Kwon, Tae Hyup; Shin, Uk Sup; Kim, Won Bae; Ahn, Byoung Ok; Oh, Tae Young; Kim, Jung-Ae

    2003-10-01

    The exposure of gastric mucosa to ethanol produces pathological changes such as inflammatory process, hemorrhagic erosions, even acute ulcers. The gastric mucosal lesions accompanied by a significant decrease of gastric blood flow and increase of reactive oxygen species (ROS) implicate a role of xanthine oxidase in ethanol-induced gastric hemorrhagic erosions. DA-9601, a novel antipeptic formulation of extracts of Artemisia asiatica Nakai, was studied for its inhibitory effect on gastric xanthine oxidase activity and type conversion of the enzyme that has a profound role in free radical generation. Intubation of absolute ethanol (4 g/kg) significantly induced gastrohemorrhagic lesions and lipid peroxidation in the rat stomach. Oral administration of DA-9601 at 40 mg/kg body weight significantly reduced ethanol-induced gastric mucosal hemorrhagic lesions and lipid peroxidation, which was proportional to the inhibitory effect of DA-9601 on alcohol-induced xanthine oxidase-type conversion and enzyme activity. The results suggest that alcohol-induced gastric mucosal damage may be, in part, due to the increased activity of xanthine oxidase and type conversion rate of the enzyme and that the preventive effect of DA-9601 on gastrohemorrhagic lesions would result from its inhibitory action against xanthine oxidase and oxidative stress in alcohol-treated rats.

  7. Gastric cancer: Animal studies on the risk of hypoacidity and hypergastrinemia

    PubMed Central

    Fossmark, Reidar; Qvigstad, Gunnar; Waldum, Helge L

    2008-01-01

    Gastric hypoacidity and hypergastrinaemia are seen in several conditions associated with an increased risk of gastric malignancy. Hypoacidity and hypergastrinaemia are closely related and their long-term effects are difficult to study separately in patients. Studies using animal models can provide valuable information about risk factors and mechanisms in gastric cancer development as the models allow a high degree of intervention when introducing or eliminating factors possibly affecting carcinogenesis. In this report, we briefly review findings from relevant animal studies on this topic. Animal models of gastric hypoacidity and hypergastrinaemia provide evidence hypergastrinaemia is a common causative factor in many otherwise diverse settings. In all species where sufficient hypoacidity and hypergastrinaemia have been induced, a proportion of the animals develop malignant lesions in the gastric oxyntic mucosa. PMID:18350594

  8. Curcumin inhibits B[a]PDE-induced procarcinogenic signals in lung cancer cells, and curbs B[a]P-induced mutagenesis and lung carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Puliyappadamba, Vineshkumar T; Thulasidasan, Arun Kumar T; Vijayakurup, Vinod; Antony, Jayesh; Bava, Smitha V; Anwar, Shabna; Sundaram, Sankar; Anto, Ruby John

    2015-01-01

    Benzo[a]pyrene is a procarcinogen present in environment and cigarette smoke, which could be bio-transformed in vivo to B[a]PDE, a potent carcinogen known to form DNA adducts and induce mutations. We observed that curcumin, a known chemopreventive, could significantly inhibit the survival of lung cancer cells exposed to B[a]PDE. It also downregulates B[a]PDE-induced nuclear translocation of NF-κB as assessed by Electrophoretic Mobility Shift Assay (EMSA) and NF-κB-dependent reporter gene assay. Ames assay demonstrated its ability to revert the mutagenic property of benzo[a]pyrene. These observations prompted us to evaluate the efficacy of curcumin in preventing B[a]P-induced lung carcinogenesis in vivo and to explore the molecular mechanism associated with it. The average number of tumor nodules present in the lungs of the Swiss albino mice, which received benzo[a]pyrene, was significantly high compared to that received curcumin as 2% diet along with B[a]P. Curcumin treatment significantly reverted histopathological deviations in the lung tissues due to benzo[a]pyrene ingestion. Moreover, curcumin diet reduced benzo[a]pyrene-induced activation of NF-κB and MAPK signaling and Cox-2 transcription in lung tissues of mice. Taken together, this study illustrates multifaceted efficacy of curcumin in preventing lung cancer.

  9. Interferon-inducer polyriboinosinic-polyribocytidylic acid: a potent anti-gastric ulcer agent and inhibitor of the gastric proton pump in rats.

    PubMed

    Nath, C; Rastogi, L; Dikshit, M; Patnaik, G K; Saxena, R C; Gupta, M B

    1998-01-01

    1. Polyriboinosinic-polyribocytidylic acid (Poly I:Poly C), an interferon inducer was studied for its effect on gastric ulceration in rats. Polyriboinosinic-polyribocytidylic acid (1, 2 and 4 mg/kg, i.m.) showed a dose-dependent inhibition of gastric ulcers induced by aspirin, cold restraint stress and pylorus ligation (Shay's model). Protective dose (PD50) +/- SEM values of Poly I:Poly C on these models of ulcers were 1.9 +/- 0.2, 2.3 +/- 0.4 and 2.8 +/- 0.4 (mg/kg, i.m.) respectively. 2. Polyriboinosinic-polyribocytidylic acid (10-60 micrograms) produced dose-dependent inhibition of gastric proton pump (H+/K(+)-ATPase) activity in the gastric parietal microsomal fraction. The concentration of Poly I:Poly C causing a 50% inhibition (IC50) +/- SEM was found to be 17.6 +/- 1.2 micrograms. 3. Polyriboinosinic-polyribocytidylic acid caused a significant decrease in free and total acid and pepsin and an increase in mucin content in Shay (pylorus-ligated) rat. 4. Polyriboinosinic-polyribocytidylic acid did not exert a significant influence on isolated tissue preparations for anti-cholinergic (acetylcholine-induced contraction of guinea-pig ileum) and H2-anti-histaminic (histamine-induced contraction of rat uterus and guinea-pig auricle) activities. 5. Thus, the present study indicates that Poly I:Poly C may possess anti-gastric ulcer activity as a result of inhibition of the gastric proton pump.

  10. Fisetin inhibits cellular proliferation and induces mitochondria-dependent apoptosis in human gastric cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Sabarwal, Akash; Agarwal, Rajesh; Singh, Rana P

    2017-02-01

    The anticancer effects of fisetin, a dietary agent, are largely unknown against human gastric cancer. Herein, we investigated the mechanisms of fisetin-induced inhibition of growth and survival of human gastric carcinoma AGS and SNU-1 cells. Fisetin (25-100 μM) caused significant decrease in the levels of G1 phase cyclins and CDKs, and increased the levels of p53 and its S15 phosphorylation in gastric cancer cells. We also observed that growth suppression and death of non-neoplastic human intestinal FHs74int cells were minimally affected by fisetin. Fisetin strongly increased apoptotic cells and showed mitochondrial membrane depolarization in gastric cancer cells. DNA damage was observed as early as 3 h after fisetin treatment which was accompanied with gamma-H2A.X(S139) phosphorylation and cleavage of PARP. Fisetin-induced apoptosis was observed to be independent of p53. DCFDA and MitoSOX analyses showed an increase in mitochondrial ROS generation in time- and dose-dependent fashion. It also increased cellular nitrite and superoxide generation. Pre-treatment with N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) inhibited ROS generation and also caused protection from fisetin-induced DNA damage. The formation of comets were observed in only fisetin treated cells which was blocked by NAC pre-treatment. Further investigation of the source of ROS, using mitochondrial respiratory chain (MRC) complex inhibitors, suggested that fisetin caused ROS generation specifically through complex I. Collectively, these results for the first time demonstrated that fisetin possesses anticancer potential through ROS production most likely via MRC complex I leading to apoptosis in human gastric carcinoma cells. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Preventive effect of hydrotalcite on gastric mucosal injury in rats induced by taurocholate

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Bao-Ping; Sun, Jun; Li, Mu-Qi; Luo, He-Sheng; Yu, Jie-Ping

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To study the preventive effect of hydrotalcite on gastric mucosal injury in rat induced by taurocholate, and to investigate the relationship between the protective mechanism of hydrotalcite and the expression of trefoil factor family 2 (TFF2) mRNA and c-fos protein. METHODS: Forty five male Wistar rats were randomly divided into hydrotalcite group, ranitidine group and control group. Gastric mucosal injury was induced by introgastric acidified taurocholate. OD value of TFF2 mRNA expression in gastric mucous cells was determined by hybridization and computer image analysis system. OD value of c-fos protein expression in gastric mucous cells was measured by immunohistochemistry and computer image analysis system. RESULTS: The gross mucosal injury index in hydrotalcite group was significantly lower than that in ranitidine group and control group (8.60 ± 2.20 vs 16.32 ± 4.27, 29.53 ± 5.39; P < 0.05, P < 0.01). The expression level of TFF2 mRNA in hydrotalcite group was markedly higher than that in ranitidine group and control group (0.56 ± 0.09 vs 0.30 ± 0.05, 0.28 ± 0.03, P < 0.05). The OD value of c-fos protein in hydrotalcite group was higher than that in ranitidine group and control group (0.52 ± 0.07 vs 0.31 ± 0.04, 0.32 ± 0.05, P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: Hydrotalcite can protect gastric mucosal injury in rats induced by taurocholate, which may be related to the increased expression of TFF2 and c-fos protein. PMID:12854134

  12. Leptin activates STAT and ERK2 pathways and induces gastric cancer cell proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Pai, Rama . E-mail: rpai@uci.edu; Lin Cal; Tran, Teresa; Tarnawski, Andrzej . E-mail: atarnawski@yahoo.com

    2005-06-17

    Although leptin is known to induce proliferative response in gastric cancer cells, the mechanism(s) underlying this action remains poorly understood. Here, we provide evidence that leptin-induced gastric cancer cell proliferation involves activation of STAT and ERK2 signaling pathways. Leptin-induced STAT3 phosphorylation is independent of ERK2 activation. Leptin increases SHP2 phosphorylation and enhances binding of Grb2 to SHP2. Inhibition of SHP2 expression with siRNA but not SHP2 phosphatase activity abolished leptin-induced ERK2 activation. While JAK inhibition with AG490 significantly reduced leptin-induced ERK2, STAT3 phosphorylation, and cell proliferation, SHP2 inhibition only partially reduced cancer cell proliferation. Immunostaining of gastric cancer tissues displayed local overexpression of leptin and its receptor indicating that leptin might be produced and act locally in a paracrine or autocrine manner. These findings indicate that leptin promotes cancer growth by activating multiple signaling pathways and therefore blocking its action at the receptor level could be a rational therapeutic strategy.

  13. Light/Dark Shifting Promotes Alcohol-Induced Colon Carcinogenesis: Possible Role of Intestinal Inflammatory Milieu and Microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Bishehsari, Faraz; Saadalla, Abdulrahman; Khazaie, Khashayarsha; Engen, Phillip A.; Voigt, Robin M.; Shetuni, Brandon B.; Forsyth, Christopher; Shaikh, Maliha; Vitaterna, Martha Hotz; Turek, Fred; Keshavarzian, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Background: Colorectal cancer (CRC) is associated with the modern lifestyle. Chronic alcohol consumption—a frequent habit of majority of modern societies—increases the risk of CRC. Our group showed that chronic alcohol consumption increases polyposis in a mouse mode of CRC. Here we assess the effect of circadian disruption—another modern life style habit—in promoting alcohol-associated CRC. Method: TS4Cre × adenomatous polyposis coli (APC)lox468 mice underwent (a) an alcohol-containing diet while maintained on a normal 12 h light:12 h dark cycle; or (b) an alcohol-containing diet in conjunction with circadian disruption by once-weekly 12 h phase reversals of the light:dark (LD) cycle. Mice were sacrificed after eight weeks of full alcohol and/or LD shift to collect intestine samples. Tumor number, size, and histologic grades were compared between animal groups. Mast cell protease 2 (MCP2) and 6 (MCP6) histology score were analyzed and compared. Stool collected at baseline and after four weeks of experimental manipulations was used for microbiota analysis. Results: The combination of alcohol and LD shifting accelerated intestinal polyposis, with a significant increase in polyp size, and caused advanced neoplasia. Consistent with a pathogenic role of stromal tryptase-positive mast cells in colon carcinogenesis, the ratio of mMCP6 (stromal)/mMCP2 (intraepithelial) mast cells increased upon LD shifting. Baseline microbiota was similar between groups, and experimental manipulations resulted in a significant difference in the microbiota composition between groups. Conclusions: Circadian disruption by Light:dark shifting exacerbates alcohol-induced polyposis and CRC. Effect of circadian disruption could, at least partly, be mediated by promoting a pro-tumorigenic inflammatory milieu via changes in microbiota. PMID:27918452

  14. [Chemopreventive effects of 5-fluorouracil and lactoferrin on goldfish intestinal carcinogenesis induced by 1,2-dimethylhydrazine].

    PubMed

    Takase, Kiyomi; Kakuta, Izuru

    2011-01-01

    The present study was carried out to examine the chemopreventive effects of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and lactoferrin (LF) on goldfish intestinal carcinogenesis induced by 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH). DMH was given to fish by intraperitoneal injection in a dosage of 15 mg/kg body weight once a week for 6 weeks. Eight weeks after the initial DMH injection, fish were randomly divided into 2 groups, control and LF-treated groups. Control fish fed a commercial diet. LF- treated fish fed a commercial diet with bovine lactoferrin (oral administration at 200 mg/kg body weight/day). Ten weeks after the initial DMH injection, each was divided into 2 groups, saline- and 5-FU- treated groups. Physiological saline for freshwater fish (0.75% NaCl solution) in the saline-treated fish and 5-FU dissolved in 0.75% NaCl solution in the 5-FU-treated (75 mg/kg body weight) fish were injected intramuscularly three times every other day, respectively. The mean number of precancer cell foci (PCF) per intestine was 2.7 in DMH treated fish. PCF showed broader distribution in the entire intestine derived from DMH-treated fish. LF-only-treatment has no effect on the number of PCF. Mean number of PCF in 5-FU-only-treated fish decreased in comparison with that of the saline-treated control group, though no statistically significant reduction in PCF was found. But if 5-FU treatment was added to LF pretreatment, a statistically significant reduction in the number of PCF was observed. Pretreatment with LF for 2 weeks also reduced the deleterious side effects of 5-FU.

  15. Human bronchial epithelial BEAS-2B cells, an appropriate in vitro model to study heavy metals induced carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Park, Youn-Hee; Kim, Donghern; Dai, Jin; Zhang, Zhuo

    2015-09-15

    Occupational and environmental exposure to arsenic (III) and chromium VI (Cr(VI)) have been confirmed to cause lung cancer. Mechanisms of these metals carcinogenesis are still under investigation. Selection of cell lines to be used is essential for the studies. Human bronchial epithelial BEAS-2B cells are the cells to be utilized by most of scientists. However, due to p53 missense mutation (CCG→TCG) at codon 47 and the codon 72 polymorphism (CGC→CCC) in BEAS-2B cells, its usage has frequently been questioned. The present study has examined activity and expression of 53 and its downstream target protein p21 upon acute or chronic exposure of BEAS-2B cells to arsenic and Cr(VI). The results show that short-term exposure of BEAS-2B cells to arsenic or Cr(VI) was able to activate both p53 and p21. Chronic exposure of BEAS-2B cells to these two metals caused malignant cell transformation and tumorigenesis. In arsenic-transformed BEAS-2B cells reductions in p53 promoter activity, mRNA expression, and phosphorylation of p53 at Ser392 were observed, while the total p53 protein level remained the same compared to those in passage-matched parent ones. p21 promoter activity and expression were decreased in arsenic-transformed cells. Cr(VI)-transformed cells exhibit elevated p53 promoter activity, mRNA expression, and phosphorylation at Ser15, but reduced phosphorylation at Ser392 and total p53 protein level compared to passage-matched parent ones. p21 promoter activity and expression were elevated in Cr(VI)-transformed cells. These results demonstrate that p53 is able to respond to exposure of arsenic or Cr(VI), suggesting that BEAS-2B cells are an appropriate in vitro model to investigate arsenic or Cr(VI) induced lung cancer.

  16. Identification of specific mRNA signatures as fingerprints for carcinogenesis in mice induced by genotoxic and nongenotoxic hepatocarcinogens.

    PubMed

    Kossler, Nadine; Matheis, Katja A; Ostenfeldt, Nina; Bach Toft, Dorthe; Dhalluin, Stéphane; Deschl, Ulrich; Kalkuhl, Arno

    2015-02-01

    Long-term rodent carcinogenicity studies for evaluation of chemicals and pharmaceuticals concerning their carcinogenic potential to humans are currently receiving critical revision. Additional data from mechanistic studies can support cancer risk assessment by clarifying the underlying mode of action. In the course of the IMI MARCAR project, a European consortium of EFPIA partners and academics, which aims to identify biomarkers for nongenotoxic carcinogenesis, a toxicogenomic mouse liver database was generated. CD-1 mice were orally treated for 3 and 14 days with 3 known genotoxic hepatocarcinogens: C.I. Direct Black 38, Dimethylnitrosamine and 4,4'-Methylenedianiline; 3 nongenotoxic hepatocarcinogens: 1,4-Dichlorobenzene, Phenobarbital sodium and Piperonyl butoxide; 4 nonhepatocarcinogens: Cefuroxime sodium, Nifedipine, Prazosin hydrochloride and Propranolol hydrochloride; and 3 compounds that show ambiguous results in genotoxicity testing: Cyproterone acetate, Thioacetamide and Wy-14643. By liver mRNA expression analysis using individual animal data, we identified 64 specific biomarker candidates for genotoxic carcinogens and 69 for nongenotoxic carcinogens for male mice at day 15. The majority of genotoxic carcinogen biomarker candidates possess functions in DNA damage response (eg, apoptosis, cell cycle progression, DNA repair). Most of the identified nongenotoxic carcinogen biomarker candidates are involved in regulation of cell cycle progression and apoptosis. The derived biomarker lists were characterized with respect to their dependency on study duration and gender and were successfully used to characterize carcinogens with ambiguous genotoxicity test results, such as Wy-14643. The identified biomarker candidates improve the mechanistic understanding of drug-induced effects on the mouse liver that result in hepatocellular adenomas and/or carcinomas in 2-year mouse carcinogenicity studies.

  17. Noninflammatory upregulation of nerve growth factor underlies gastric hypersensitivity induced by neonatal colon inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qingjie; Winston, John H.

    2015-01-01

    Gastric hypersensitivity is one of the key contributors to the postprandial symptoms of epigastric pain/discomfort, satiety, and fullness in functional dyspepsia patients. Epidemiological studies found that adverse early-life experiences are risk factors for the development of gastric hypersensitivity. Preclinical studies found that neonatal colon inflammation elevates plasma norepinephrine (NE), which upregulates expression of nerve growth factor (NGF) in the muscularis externa of the gastric fundus. Our goal was to investigate the cellular mechanisms by which NE upregulates the expression of NGF in gastric hypersensitive (GHS) rats, which were subjected previously to neonatal colon inflammation. Neonatal colon inflammation upregulated NGF protein, but not mRNA, in the gastric fundus of GHS rats. Western blotting showed upregulation of p110γ of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase (PI3K), phosphoinositide-dependent kinase-1 (PDK1), pAKT(Ser473), and phosphorylated 4E-binding protein (p4E-BP1)(Thr70), suggesting AKT activation and enhanced NGF protein translation. AKT inhibitor MK-2206 blocked the upregulation of NGF in the fundus of GHS rats. Matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9), the major NGF-degrading protease, was suppressed, indicating that NGF degradation was impeded. Incubation of fundus muscularis externa with NE upregulated NGF by modulating the protein translation and degradation pathways. Yohimbine, an α2-adrenergic receptor antagonist, upregulated plasma NE and NGF expression by activating the protein translation and degradation pathways in naive rats. In contrast, a cocktail of adrenergic receptor antagonists suppressed the upregulation of NGF by blocking the activation of the protein translation and degradation pathways. Our findings provide evidence that the elevation of plasma NE induces NGF expression in the gastric fundus. PMID:26608656

  18. A Biochemical Study on the Gastroprotective Effect of Andrographolide in Rats Induced with Gastric Ulcer

    PubMed Central

    Saranya, P.; Geetha, A.; Selvamathy, S. M. K. Narmadha

    2011-01-01

    The major objective of the study was to evaluate the gastroprotective property of andrographolide, a chief component of the leaves of Andrographis paniculata in terms of the ulcer preventive effect in rats. An acute toxicity test was conducted with different concentrations of andrographolide to determine the LD50 value. The dose responsive study was conducted in rats pretreated with andrographolide (1, 3 and 5 mg/kg) for a period of 30 days, prior to ulcer induction by administering ethanol, aspirin or by pyloric ligation. The ulcer protective efficacy was tested by determining the ulcer score, pH, pepsin, titrable acidity, gastric mucin, lipid peroxides, reduced glutathione, and enzymatic antioxidants superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase in gastric tissue. The activities of H+-K+ ATPase and myeloperoxidase were also determined in gastric tissue. The LD50 value was found to be 48 mg/kg b. wt and the effective dose was found to be 3 mg/kg. We have observed a significant reduction in the ulcer score in rats pretreated with 3 mg of andrographolide/kg body weight. A favourable increase in the pH and decrease in titrable acidity were observed in the gastric fluid of rats pretreated with the test drug. The gastric tissue H+-K+ ATPase and myeloperoxidase activities were elevated in ulcer-induced animals. The elevation in the enzyme activity was significantly minimized in the andrographolide received animals. The antioxidants and mucin levels were significantly maintained in the gastric tissue of drug-pretreated animals. Andrographolide did not produce any toxic effects in normal rats. This study reveals that the ulcer preventive efficacy of andrographolide may probably due to its antioxidant, cytoprotective and antiacid secretory effects. PMID:22923868

  19. Mesenchymal and stem-like cell properties targeted in suppression of chronically-induced breast cell carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Rathore, Kusum; Wang, Hwa-Chain Robert

    2013-01-01

    Stem-like cells and the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) program are postulated to play important roles in various stages of cancer development, but their roles in breast cell carcinogenesis and intervention remain to be clarified. We investigated stem-like cell- and EMT-associated properties and markers in breast epithelial cells chronically exposed to low-dose 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone and benzo[a]pyrene in the presence and absence of the preventive agents green tea catechins and grape seed extract. Our results indicate that stem-like cell- and EMT-associated properties and markers should be seriously considered as new cancer-associated indicators for detecting breast cell carcinogenesis and as endpoints for intervention of carcinogenesis. PMID:23352646

  20. Changes in gastric microbiota induced by Helicobacter pylori infection and preventive effects of Lactobacillus plantarum ZDY 2013 against such infection.

    PubMed

    Pan, Mingfang; Wan, Cuixiang; Xie, Qiong; Huang, Renhui; Tao, Xueying; Shah, Nagendra P; Wei, Hua

    2016-02-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a gram-negative pathogen linked to gastric ulcers and stomach cancer. Gastric microbiota might play an essential role in the pathogenesis of these stomach diseases. In this study, we investigated the preventive effect of a probiotic candidate Lactobacillus plantarum ZDY 2013 as a protective agent against the gastric mucosal inflammation and alteration of gastric microbiota induced by H. pylori infection in a mouse model. Prior to infection, mice were pretreated with or without 400 µL of L. plantarum ZDY 2013 at a concentration of 10(9) cfu/mL per mouse. At 6 wk postinfection, gastric mucosal immune response and alteration in gastric microbiota mice were examined by quantitative real-time PCR and high-throughput 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing, respectively. The results showed that L. plantarum ZDY 2013 pretreatment prevented increase in inflammatory cytokines (e.g., IL-1β and IFN-γ) and inflammatory cell infiltration in gastric lamina propria induced by H. pylori infection. Weighted UniFrac principal coordinate analysis showed that L. plantarum ZDY 2013 pretreatment prevented the alteration in gastric microbiota post-H. pylori infection. Linear discriminant analysis coupled with effect size identified 22 bacterial taxa (e.g., Pasteurellaceae, Erysipelotrichaceae, Halomonadaceae, Helicobacteraceae, and Spirochaetaceae) that overgrew in the gastric microbiota of H. pylori-infected mice, and most of them belonged to the Proteobacteria phylum. Lactobacillus plantarum ZDY 2013 pretreatment prevented this alteration; only 6 taxa (e.g., Lachnospiraceae, Ruminococcaceae, and Clostridiaceae), mainly from the taxa of Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes, were dominant in the gastric microbiota of the L. plantarum ZDY 2013 pretreated mice. Administration of L. plantarum ZDY 2013 for 3 wk led to increase in several bacterial taxa (e.g., Rikenella, Staphylococcus, Bifidobacterium), although a nonsignificant alteration was found in the gastric microbiota

  1. Dynamic changes in the gene expression profile during rat oral carcinogenesis induced by 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide

    PubMed Central

    GE, SHUYUN; ZHANG, JI; DU, YANZHI; HU, BIN; ZHOU, ZENGTONG; LOU, JIANING

    2016-01-01

    The typical progression of oral cancer is from hyperplastic epithelial lesions through dysplasia to invasive carcinoma. It is important to investigate malignant oral cancer progression and development in order to determine useful approaches of prevention of dysplastic lesions. The present study aimed to gain insights into the underlying molecular mechanism of oral carcinogenesis by establishing a rat model of oral carcinogenesis using 4-nitroquino-line 1-oxide. Subsequently, transcription profile analysis using an integrating microarray was performed. The dynamic gene expression changes of the six stages of rat oral carcinogenesis (normal, mild epithelial dysplasia, moderate dysplasia, severe dysplasia, carcinoma in situ and oral squamous cell carcinomas) were analyzed using component plane presentations (CPP)-self-organizing map (SOM). Six genes were verified by quantitative polymerase chain reaction, immunohistochemistry and succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) activity assay kit. Numerous differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified during rat oral carcinogenesis. CPP-SOM determined that these DEGs were primarily enriched during cell cycle, apoptosis, inflammatory response and tricarboxylic acid cycle, indicating the coordinated regulation of molecular networks. In addition, the expression of specific DEGs, such as janus kinase 3, cyclin-dependent kinase A-1, B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukaemia/lymphoma 2-like 2, nuclear factor-κB, tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily member 1A, cyclin D1 and SDH were identified to have high concordance with the results from microarray data. The current study demonstrated that oral carcinogenesis is a multi-step and multi-gene process, with a distinct pattern alteration along a continuum of malignant transformation. In addition, this comprehensive investigation provided a theoretical basis for the understanding of the molecular alterations associated with oral carcinogenesis. PMID:26860129

  2. Activation of ras oncogene in aflatoxin-induced rat liver carcinogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, S; Webber, C; Marshall, C J; Knowles, M A; Proctor, A; Barrass, N C; Neal, G E

    1988-01-01

    The presence of activated transforming genes was investigated in four primary aflatoxin-induced rat liver tumors in male Fischer rats, in two cell lines generated from such tumors, in an epithelial liver-derived nontransformed cell line, and in the latter cell line after transformation by aflatoxin B1 in vitro. When DNA extracted from these sources was transfected into NIH 3T3 cells, negative results were obtained from focus assays. Cotransfection of these DNA samples with a gene for resistance to G418, followed by selection for resistance to that antibiotic, and tumorigenicity testing in nude mice demonstrated DNA-mediated transfer of the neoplastic phenotype in all cases except for DNA from the nontransformed cell line. DNA extracted from these primary nude mouse tumors used in a secondary round of transfection with NIH 3T3 cells gave positive results in focus assays, which were conserved through succeeding rounds of transfection. By use of appropriate radiolabeled probes, activated ras oncogenes were detected in all samples. N-ras activation was detected in three of the primary rat liver tumors and both hepatoma cell lines. Ki-ras activation was detected in one primary rat liver tumor, and Ha-ras activation was detected in the cell line transformed in vitro with activated aflatoxin B1. The activated Ki-ras oncogene was further characterized by use of synthetic oligonucleotide probes and was shown to contain a G----A transition at the second nucleotide in codon 12. Images PMID:3287372

  3. The effects of aqueous extract of Aloe vera leaves on the gastric acid secretion and brain and intestinal water content following acetic acid- induced gastric ulcer in male rats

    PubMed Central

    Keshavarzi, Zakieh; Rezapour, Taha Mohammad; Vatanchian, Mehran; Zare Hesari, Mohammad; Nabizade Haghighi, Hadi; Izanlu, Mostafa; Sabaghian, Maryam; Shahveisi, Kaveh

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Gut–brain axis (GBA) is very important in creation and modulation of gastrointestinal problems. Aloe vera gel has gastroprotective properties. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of aqueous extract of Aloe vera leaves on the gastric acid secretion and brain and intestinal water content following acetic acid gastric ulcer induction. Materials and Methods: Gastric ulcer was induced by injection of 20% acetic acid into the subserosal layer in male rats. Rats were randomly assigned into three groups: intact group, gastric ulcer group and Aloe vera group (treatment with Aloe vera following gastric ulcer induction). The acid levels and brain and intestinal water content of each sample were measured eight days after the gastric ulcer induction. Results: Gastric acid levels were significantly decreased in Aloe vera group when compared with gastric ulcer group (p<0.05). However, there were no differences in acid output between gastric ulcer and Aloe vera groups with intact group. After Aloe vera administration, the amount of brain water content had no difference with intact and gastric ulcer groups (p<0.05). The duodenal water content in Aloe vera group was significantly reduced compared with intact group (p<0.05) but gastric ulcer group had no significant difference with intact and Aloe vera group. Conclusions: The administration of Aloe vera has an inhibitory effect on the gastric acid output. PMID:25050311

  4. Tocotrienol Attenuates Stress-Induced Gastric Lesions via Activation of Prostaglandin and Upregulation of COX-1 mRNA

    PubMed Central

    Kamisah, Yusof; Chua, Kien Hui; Qodriyah, Hj Mohd Saad

    2013-01-01

    The present study aims to distinguish the effect of tocotrienol on an important gastric protective factor, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), in stress-induced gastric injury. Twenty-eight Wistar rats were divided into four groups of seven rats each. Two control groups were fed commercial rat diet, and two treatment groups were fed the same diet but with additional dose of omeprazole (20 mg/kg) or tocotrienol (60 mg/kg). After 28 days, rats from one control group and both treated groups were subjected to water-immersion restraint stress for 3.5 hours once. The rats were then sacrificed, their stomach isolated and gastric juice collected, lesions examined, and gastric PGE2 content and cyclooxygenase (COX) mRNA expression were determined. Both the regimes significantly attenuated the total lesion area in the stomach compared to the control. Gastric acidity, which was increased in stress, was significantly reduced in rats supplemented with omeprazole and tocotrienol. The PGE2 content was also significantly higher in the rats given tocotrienol supplementation compared to the control followed by an increase in COX-1 mRNA expression. We conclude that tocotrienol supplementation protected rat gastric mucosa against stress-induced lesions possibly by reducing gastric acidity and preserving gastric PGE2 by increasing COX-1 mRNA. PMID:23970937

  5. Effect of proton pump inhibitors on the secretion of bicarbonates and pepsinogen induced by chemical stimulation of the gastric mucosa.

    PubMed

    Zolotarev, V A; Khropycheva, R P

    2013-02-01

    Proton pump inhibitors were shown to affect the sensitivity of the gastric mucosa to chemical agents. This effect is associated with inhibition of proton back-diffusion and increase in the permeability of the gastric epithelium. We studied the effect of omeprazole on gastric secretion of bicarbonates and pepsinogen induced by irritation of the gastric mucosa in narcotized rats with a hypertonic solution of high acidity (500 mM NaCl, pH 2.0). Irritation of the gastric mucosa increased the basal secretion of bicarbonates and potentiated the secretion of HCO3(-)and pepsinogen induced by electrostimulation of the vagus nerve. Omeprazole stimulated the prostaglandin-induced increase in the basal secretion of HCO3(-)and pepsinogen. By contrast, bicarbonate production in response to vagal stimulation was suppressed in the presence of omeprazole. Our results indicate that proton pump blockade has a modulatory effect on gastric secretion of bicarbonates and pepsinogen induced by chemical stimulation of the gastric mucosa.

  6. Immunomodulatory Effect of Mangiferin in Experimental Animals with Benzo(a)Pyrene-induced Lung Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Rajendran, Peramaiyan; Jayakumar, Thangavel; Nishigaki, Ikuo; Ekambaram, Ganapathy; Nishigaki, Yutaka; Vetriselvi, Jayabal; Sakthisekaran, Dhanapal

    2013-01-01

    The immunomodulatory activity of mangiferin was studied in various groups of animals. For this study, adult Swiss albino male mice were treated with benzo(a)pyrene, abbreviated as B(a)P, at 50 mg/kg body weight orally twice a week for 4 weeks; and mangiferin was also given orally (pre- and post-initiation of carcinoma) at 100 mg/kg body weight. Immunocompetence and immune complexes as measured by phagocyte index, avidity index, and soluble immune complex (SIC) levels (p<0.001), as well as NBT reduction, were decreased in the B(a)P-treated animals;whereas increased levels of immunocompetence were noted in the mangiferin-treated animals given B(a)P (p<0.001, p<0.05). The levels of immunoglobulins such as IgG and IgM were decreased considerably (p<0.001) in the B(a)P-treated animals compared with their levels in the control animals; whereas the IgA level was increased (p<0.001). In the mangiferin-treated experimental animals given B(a)P, the levels of IgG and IgM were significantly (p<0.001, p<0.05) increased whereas the IgA level was decreased compared with those for the B(a)P-treated mice. Oxidative changes in lymphocytes, neutrophils, and macrophages were also measured. The enhanced lipid peroxidation and decreased catalase and superoxide dismutase activities found in the lymphocytes, polymorphonuclear cells (PMN), and macrophages from B(a)P-treated mice were significantly reduced and increased, respectively, by the mangiferin treatment. This study confirms the immunomodulatory effect of mangiferin and shows an immunoprotective role arbitrated through a reduction in the reactive intermediate-induced oxidative stress in lymphocytes, neutrophils, and macrophages. PMID:23847456

  7. Macrophage Infiltration and Alternative Activation during Wound Healing Promote MEK1-Induced Skin Carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Weber, Christine; Telerman, Stephanie B; Reimer, Andreas S; Sequeira, Ines; Liakath-Ali, Kifayathullah; Arwert, Esther N; Watt, Fiona M

    2016-02-15

    Macrophages are essential for the progression and maintenance of many cancers, but their role during the earliest stages of tumor formation is unclear. To test this, we used a previously described transgenic mouse model of wound-induced skin tumorigenesis, in which expression of constitutively active MEK1 in differentiating epidermal cells results in chronic inflammation (InvEE mice). Upon wounding, the number of epidermal and dermal monocytes and macrophages increased in wild-type and InvEE skin, but the increase was greater, more rapid, and more sustained in InvEE skin. Macrophage ablation reduced tumor incidence. Furthermore, bioluminescent imaging in live mice to monitor macrophage flux at wound sites revealed that macrophage accumulation was predictive of tumor formation; wounds with the greatest number of macrophages at day 5 went on to develop tumors. Gene expression profiling of flow-sorted monocytes, macrophages, and T cells from InvEE and wild-type skin showed that as wound healing progressed, InvEE macrophages altered their phenotype. Throughout wound healing and after wound closure, InvEE macrophages demonstrated sustained upregulation of several markers implicated in alternative macrophage activation including arginase-1 (ARG1) and mannose receptor (CD206). Notably, inhibition of ARG1 activity significantly reduced tumor formation and epidermal proliferation in vivo, whereas addition of L-arginase to cultured keratinocytes stimulated proliferation. We conclude that macrophages play a key role in early, inflammation-mediated skin tumorigenesis, with mechanistic evidence suggesting that ARG1 secretion drives tumor development by stimulating epidermal cell proliferation. These findings highlight the importance of cancer immunotherapies aiming to polarize tumor-associated macrophages toward an antitumor phenotype.

  8. Coordinate up-regulation of hypoxia inducible factor (HIF)-1alpha and HIF-1 target genes during multi-stage epidermal carcinogenesis and wound healing.

    PubMed

    Elson, D A; Ryan, H E; Snow, J W; Johnson, R; Arbeit, J M

    2000-11-01

    Both carcinogenesis and wound healing proceed through stages of proliferation and tissue remodeling. Here, using either a model of multistage epidermal carcinogenesis in K14-HPV16 transgenic mice or creation of full-thickness back wounds in nontransgenic mice, we determined patterns of expression of hypoxia inducible factor (HIF)-1alpha, and three targets of the heterodimeric transcription factor HIF-1, glucose transporter (GLUT)-1, phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK)-1, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in skin. Neither HIF-1alpha, GLUT-1, PGK-1, nor VEGF mRNA was detectable in unwounded nontransgenic skin. In epidermal carcinogenesis, HIF-1alpha, GLUT-1, PGK-1, and VEGF mRNAs were just detectable in early-stage hyperplasia, markedly increased in high-grade epidermal chest dysplasias, and further increased in invasive squamous carcinomas. In neoplastic skin, HIF-1alpha, GLUT-1, and PGK-1 mRNAs localized in the basal and immediate suprabasal epidermal layers, whereas VEGF mRNA was predominantly expressed in the more superior spinous and granular epidermal layers. Immediately after wounding, HIF-1alpha, GLUT-1, and PGK-1 mRNAs were detectable in basal keratinocytes at the wound edge. Expression of all three genes increased to maximum levels in reepithelializing basal keratinocytes and then diminished to near undetectable levels after wound epithelialization. Although VEGF mRNA similarly increased and decreased during wound healing, its expression pattern was more punctate; the most intense hybridization signals were detected in the upper spinous and granular layers of reepithelializing keratinocytes and in dermal cells morphologically similar to macrophages. These data suggest stage-specific and spatio-temporal control of HIF-1alpha and HIF-1 target gene expression in both multistage epithelial carcinogenesis and wound healing.

  9. Remodeling of the residual gastric mucosa after roux-en-y gastric bypass or vertical sleeve gastrectomy in diet-induced obese rats.

    PubMed

    Arapis, Konstantinos; Cavin, Jean Baptiste; Gillard, Laura; Cluzeaud, Françoise; Lettéron, Philippe; Ducroc, Robert; Le Beyec, Johanne; Hourseau, Muriel; Couvelard, Anne; Marmuse, Jean-Pierre; Le Gall, Maude; Bado, André

    2015-01-01

    Whereas the remodeling of intestinal mucosa after bariatric surgeries has been the matter of numerous studies to our knowledge, very few reported on the remodeling of the residual gastric mucosa. In this study, we analyzed remodeling of gastric mucosa after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) and vertical sleeve gastrectomy (VSG) in rats. Diet-induced obese rats were subjected to RYGB, VSG or sham surgical procedures. All animals were assessed for food intake, body-weight, fasting blood, metabolites and hormones profiling, as well as insulin and glucose tolerance tests before and up to 5 weeks post-surgery. Remodeling of gastric tissues was analyzed by routine histology and immunohistochemistry studies, and qRT-PCR analyses of ghrelin and gastrin mRNA levels. In obese rats with impaired glucose tolerance, VSG and RYGB caused substantial weight loss and rats greatly improved their oral glucose tolerance. The remaining gastric mucosa after VSG and gastric pouch (GP) after RYGB revealed a hyperplasia of the mucous neck cells that displayed a strong immunoreactivity for parietal cell H+/K+-ATPase. Ghrelin mRNA levels were reduced by 2-fold in remaining fundic mucosa after VSG and 10-fold in GP after RYGB. In the antrum, gastrin mRNA levels were reduced after VSG in line with the reduced number of gastrin positive cells. This study reports novel and important observations dealing with the remaining gastric mucosa after RYGB and VSG. The data demonstrate, for the first time, a hyperplasia of the mucous neck cells, a transit cell population of the stomach bearing differentiating capacities into zymogenic and peptic cells.

  10. Protective effects of acetaminophen on ibuprofen-induced gastric mucosal damage in rats with associated suppression of matrix metalloproteinase.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Eriko; Monoi, Noriyuki; Mikoshiba, Shigeo; Hirayama, Yutaka; Serizawa, Tetsushi; Adachi, Kiyo; Koide, Misao; Ohdera, Motoyasu; Murakoshi, Michiaki; Kato, Hisanori

    2014-04-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are known to cause gastric mucosal damage as a side effect. Acetaminophen, widely used as an analgesic and antipyretic drug, has gastroprotective effects against gastric lesions induced by absolute ethanol and certain NSAIDs. However, the mechanisms that underlie the gastroprotective effects of acetaminophen have not yet been clarified. In the present study, we examined the role and protective mechanism of acetaminophen on ibuprofen-induced gastric damage in rats. Ibuprofen and acetaminophen were administered orally, and the gastric mucosa was macroscopically examined 4 hours later. Acetaminophen decreased ibuprofen-induced gastric damage in a dose-dependent manner. To investigate the mechanisms involved, transcriptome analyses of the ibuprofen-damaged gastric mucosa were performed in the presence and absence of acetaminophen. Ingenuity pathway analysis (IPA) software revealed that acetaminophen suppressed the pathways related to cellular assembly and inflammation, whereas they were highly activated by ibuprofen. On the basis of gene classifications from the IPA Knowledge Base, we identified the following five genes that were related to gastric damage and showed significant changes in gene expression: interleukin-1β (IL-1β), chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2), matrix metalloproteinase-10 (MMP-10), MMP-13, and FBJ osteosarcoma oncogene (FOS). Expression of these salient genes was confirmed using real-time polymerase chain reaction. The expression of MMP-13 was the most reactive to the treatments, showing strong induction by ibuprofen and suppression by acetaminophen. Moreover, MMP-13 inhibitors decreased ibuprofen-induced gastric damage. In conclusion, these results suggest that acetaminophen decreases ibuprofen-induced gastric mucosal damage and that the suppression of MMP-13 may play an important role in the gastroprotective effects of acetaminophen.

  11. Cadmium induces carcinogenesis in BEAS-2B cells through ROS-dependent activation of PI3K/AKT/GSK-3β/β-catenin signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Son, Young-Ok; Wang, Lei; Poyil, Pratheeshkumar; Budhraja, Amit; Hitron, J. Andrew; Zhang, Zhuo; Lee, Jeong-Chae; Shi, Xianglin

    2012-10-15

    Cadmium has been widely used in industry and is known to be carcinogenic to humans. Although it is widely accepted that chronic exposure to cadmium increases the incidence of cancer, the mechanisms underlying cadmium-induced carcinogenesis are unclear. The main aim of this study was to investigate the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cadmium-induced carcinogenesis and the signal transduction pathways involved. Chronic exposure of human bronchial epithelial BEAS-2B cells to cadmium induced cell transformation, as evidenced by anchorage-independent growth in soft agar and clonogenic assays. Chronic cadmium treatment also increased the potential of these cells to invade and migrate. Injection of cadmium-stimulated cells into nude mice resulted in the formation of tumors. In contrast, the cadmium-mediated increases in colony formation, cell invasion and migration were prevented by transfection with catalase, superoxide dismutase-1 (SOD1), or SOD2. In particular, chronic cadmium exposure led to activation of signaling cascades involving PI3K, AKT, GSK-3β, and β-catenin and transfection with each of the above antioxidant enzymes markedly inhibited cadmium-mediated activation of these signaling proteins. Inhibitors specific for AKT or β-catenin almost completely suppressed the cadmium-mediated increase in total and active β-catenin proteins and colony formation. Moreover, there was a marked induction of AKT, GSK-3β, β-catenin, and carcinogenic markers in tumor tissues formed in mice after injection with cadmium-stimulated cells. Collectively, our findings suggest a direct involvement of ROS in cadmium-induced carcinogenesis and implicate a role of AKT/GSK-3β/β-catenin signaling in this process. -- Highlights: ► Chronic exposure to cadmium induces carcinogenic properties in BEAS-2B cells. ► ROS involved in cadmium-induced tumorigenicity of BEAS-2B cells. ► Cadmium activates ROS-dependent AKT/GSK-3β/β-catenin-mediated signaling. ► ROS

  12. Nrf2-dependent suppression of azoxymethane/dextran sulfate sodium-induced colon carcinogenesis by the cinnamon-derived dietary factor cinnamaldehyde

    PubMed Central

    Long, Min; Tao, Shasha; de la Vega, Montserrat Rojo; Jiang, Tao; Wen, Qing; Park, Sophia L.; Zhang, Donna D.; Wondrak, Georg T.

    2015-01-01

    The progressive nature of colorectal cancer (CRC) and poor prognosis associated with the metastatic phase of the disease create an urgent need for the development of more efficacious strategies targeting colorectal carcinogenesis. Cumulative evidence suggests that the redox-sensitive transcription factor Nrf2 (nuclear factor-E2-related factor 2), a master regulator of the cellular antioxidant defence, represents a promising molecular target for CRC chemoprevention. Recently, we have identified cinnamon, the ground bark of Cinnamomum aromaticum (cassia cinnamon) and Cinnamomum verum (Ceylon cinnamon), as a rich dietary source of the Nrf2 inducer cinnamaldehyde (CA) eliciting the Nrf2-regulated antioxidant response in human epithelial colon cells, conferring cytoprotection against electrophilic and genotoxic insult. Here, we have explored the molecular mechanism underlying CA-induced Nrf2 activation in colorectal epithelial cells and have examined the chemopreventive potential of CA in a murine CRC model comparing Nrf2+/+ and Nrf2−/− mice. In HCT116 cells, CA caused a Keap1-C151-dependent increase in Nrf2 protein half-life via blockage of ubiquitination with upregulation of cytoprotective Nrf2 target genes and elevation of cellular glutathione. After optimizing colorectal Nrf2 activation and target gene expression by dietary CA-supplementation regimens, we demonstrated that CA suppresses AOM/DSS-induced inflammatory colon carcinogenesis with modulation of molecular markers of colorectal carcinogenesis. Dietary suppression of CRC using CA supplementation was achieved in Nrf2+/+ but not in Nrf2−/− mice confirming the Nrf2-dependence of CA-induced chemopreventive effects. Taken together, our data suggest feasibility of CRC suppression by dietary CA, an FDA-approved food additive derived from the third most consumed spice in the world. PMID:25712056

  13. Inhibitory effect of vitamin D-binding protein-derived macrophage activating factor on DMBA-induced hamster cheek pouch carcinogenesis and its derived carcinoma cell line

    PubMed Central

    TOYOHARA, YUKIYO; HASHITANI, SUSUMU; KISHIMOTO, HIROMITSU; NOGUCHI, KAZUMA; YAMAMOTO, NOBUTO; URADE, MASAHIRO

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the inhibitory effect of vitamin D-binding protein-derived macrophage-activating factor (GcMAF) on carcinogenesis and tumor growth, using a 9,10-dimethyl-1,2-benzanthracene (DMBA)-induced hamster cheek pouch carcinogenesis model, as well as the cytocidal effect of activated macrophages against HCPC-1, a cell line established from DMBA-induced cheek pouch carcinoma. DMBA application induced squamous cell carcinoma in all 15 hamsters of the control group at approximately 10 weeks, and all 15 hamsters died of tumor burden within 20 weeks. By contrast, 2 out of the 14 hamsters with GcMAF administration did not develop tumors and the remaining 12 hamsters showed a significant delay of tumor development for approximately 3.5 weeks. The growth of tumors formed was significantly suppressed and none of the hamsters died within the 20 weeks during which they were observed. When GcMAF administration was stopped at the 13th week of the experiment in 4 out of the 14 hamsters in the GcMAF-treated group, tumor growth was promoted, but none of the mice died within the 20-week period. On the other hand, when GcMAF administration was commenced after the 13th week in 5 out of the 15 hamsters in the control group, tumor growth was slightly suppressed and all 15 hamsters died of tumor burden. However, the mean survival time was significantly extended. GcMAF treatment activated peritoneal macrophages in vitro and in vivo, and these activated macrophages exhibited a marked cytocidal effect on HCPC-1 cells. Furthermore, the cytocidal effect of activated macrophages was enhanced by the addition of tumor-bearing hamster serum. These findings indicated that GcMAF possesses an inhibitory effect on tumor development and growth in a DMBA-induced hamster cheek pouch carcinogenesis model. PMID:22848250

  14. Inhibitory effect of vitamin D-binding protein-derived macrophage activating factor on DMBA-induced hamster cheek pouch carcinogenesis and its derived carcinoma cell line.

    PubMed

    Toyohara, Yukiyo; Hashitani, Susumu; Kishimoto, Hiromitsu; Noguchi, Kazuma; Yamamoto, Nobuto; Urade, Masahiro

    2011-07-01

    This study investigated the inhibitory effect of vitamin D-binding protein-derived macrophage-activating factor (GcMAF) on carcinogenesis and tumor growth, using a 9,10-dimethyl-1,2-benzanthracene (DMBA)-induced hamster cheek pouch carcinogenesis model, as well as the cytocidal effect of activated macrophages against HCPC-1, a cell line established from DMBA-induced cheek pouch carcinoma. DMBA application induced squamous cell carcinoma in all 15 hamsters of the control group at approximately 10 weeks, and all 15 hamsters died of tumor burden within 20 weeks. By contrast, 2 out of the 14 hamsters with GcMAF administration did not develop tumors and the remaining 12 hamsters showed a significant delay of tumor development for approximately 3.5 weeks. The growth of tumors formed was significantly suppressed and none of the hamsters died within the 20 weeks during which they were observed. When GcMAF administration was stopped at the 13th week of the experiment in 4 out of the 14 hamsters in the GcMAF-treated group, tumor growth was promoted, but none of the mice died within the 20-week period. On the other hand, when GcMAF administration was commenced after the 13th week in 5 out of the 15 hamsters in the control group, tumor growth was slightly suppressed and all 15 hamsters died of tumor burden. However, the mean survival time was significantly extended. GcMAF treatment activated peritoneal macrophages in vitro and in vivo, and these activated macrophages exhibited a marked cytocidal effect on HCPC-1 cells. Furthermore, the cytocidal effect of activated macrophages was enhanced by the addition of tumor-bearing hamster serum. These findings indicated that GcMAF possesses an inhibitory effect on tumor development and growth in a DMBA-induced hamster cheek pouch carcinogenesis model.

  15. Chemopreventive efficacy of hesperidin against chemically induced nephrotoxicity and renal carcinogenesis via amelioration of oxidative stress and modulation of multiple molecular pathways.

    PubMed

    Siddiqi, Aisha; Hasan, Syed Kazim; Nafees, Sana; Rashid, Summya; Saidullah, Bano; Sultana, Sarwat

    2015-12-01

    In the present study, chemopreventive efficacy of hesperidin was evaluated against ferric nitrilotriacetate (Fe-NTA) induced renal oxidative stress and carcinogenesis in wistar rats. Nephrotoxicity was induced by single intraperitoneal injection of Fe-NTA (9 mg Fe/kg b.wt). Renal cancer was initiated by the administration of N-nitrosodiethylamine (DEN 200mg/kg b.wt ip) and promoted by Fe-NTA (9 mg Fe/kg b.wt ip) twice weekly for 16 weeks. Efficacy of hesperidin against Fe-NTA-induced nephrotoxicity was assessed in terms of biochemical estimation of antioxidant enzyme activities viz. reduced renal GSH, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase, glutathione-S-transferase, catalase, superoxide dismutase and renal toxicity markers (BUN, Creatinine, KIM-1). Administration of Fe-NTA significantly depleted antioxidant renal armory, enhanced renal lipid peroxidation as well as the levels of BUN, creatinine and KIM-1. However, simultaneous pretreatment of hesperidin restored their levels in a dose dependent manner. Expression of apoptotic markers caspase-3, caspase-9, bax, bcl-2 and proliferative marker PCNA along with inflammatory markers (NFκB, iNOS, TNF-α) were also analysed to assess the chemopreventive potential of hesperidin in two-stage renal carcinogenesis model. Hesperidin was found to induce caspase-3, caspase-9, bax expression and downregulate bcl-2, NFκB, iNOS, TNF-α, PCNA expression. Histopathological findings further revealed hesperidin's chemopreventive efficacy by restoring the renal morphology. Our results provide a powerful evidence suggesting hesperidin to be a potent chemopreventive agent against renal carcinogenesis possibly by virtue of its antioxidant properties and by modulation of multiple molecular pathways.

  16. Nrf2-dependent suppression of azoxymethane/dextran sulfate sodium-induced colon carcinogenesis by the cinnamon-derived dietary factor cinnamaldehyde.

    PubMed

    Long, Min; Tao, Shasha; Rojo de la Vega, Montserrat; Jiang, Tao; Wen, Qing; Park, Sophia L; Zhang, Donna D; Wondrak, Georg T

    2015-05-01

    The progressive nature of colorectal cancer and poor prognosis associated with the metastatic phase of the disease create an urgent need for the development of more efficacious strategies targeting colorectal carcinogenesis. Cumulative evidence suggests that the redox-sensitive transcription factor Nrf2 (nuclear factor-E2-related factor 2), a master regulator of the cellular antioxidant defence, represents a promising molecular target for colorectal cancer chemoprevention. Recently, we have identified cinnamon, the ground bark of Cinnamomum aromaticum (cassia cinnamon) and Cinnamomum verum (Ceylon cinnamon), as a rich dietary source of the Nrf2 inducer cinnamaldehyde (CA) eliciting the Nrf2-regulated antioxidant response in human epithelial colon cells, conferring cytoprotection against electrophilic and genotoxic insult. Here, we have explored the molecular mechanism underlying CA-induced Nrf2 activation in colorectal epithelial cells and have examined the chemopreventive potential of CA in a murine colorectal cancer model comparing Nrf2(+/+) with Nrf2(-/-) mice. In HCT116 cells, CA caused a Keap1-C151-dependent increase in Nrf2 protein half-life via blockage of ubiquitination with upregulation of cytoprotective Nrf2 target genes and elevation of cellular glutathione. After optimizing colorectal Nrf2 activation and target gene expression by dietary CA-supplementation regimens, we demonstrated that CA suppresses AOM/DSS-induced inflammatory colon carcinogenesis with modulation of molecular markers of colorectal carcinogenesis. Dietary suppression of colorectal cancer using CA supplementation was achieved in Nrf2(+/+) but not in Nrf2(-/-) mice confirming the Nrf2 dependence of CA-induced chemopreventive effects. Taken together, our data suggest feasibility of colorectal cancer suppression by dietary CA, an FDA-approved food additive derived from the third most consumed spice in the world.

  17. Lack of correlation between fecal blood loss and drug-induced gastric mucosal lesions

    SciTech Connect

    Hedenbro, J.L.; Wetterberg, P.; Vallgren, S.; Bergqvist, L.

    1988-05-01

    Increased fecal blood loss was produced in healthy volunteers by the administration of two nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID), naproxen or fenflumizole. Basal as well as drug-induced gastrointestinal blood loss was measured using /sup 51/Cr erythrocyte labeling. Median rise in daily fecal blood loss was 432%. All subjects were endoscoped at the initiation and at the completion of the study. Endoscopic findings were assessed quantitatively by two observers in two different ways. All subjects but three had gastric mucosal lesions at follow-up endoscopy. There was a good correlation between the endoscopic assessments but no statistical correlation between the endoscopic assessment and the increase in fecal blood loss. The data suggest that factors other than gastric mucosal lesions have to be taken into account when investigating NSAID-induced gastrointestinal bleeding.

  18. Cytochrome P450 2E1 inhibition prevents hepatic carcinogenesis induced by diethylnitrosamine in alcohol-fed rats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chronic alcohol ingestion increases hepatic cytochrome P450 2E1 (CYP2E1), which is associated with hepatocarcinogenesis. We investigated whether treatment with chlormethiazole (CMZ), a CYP2E1 inhibitor, protects against alcohol-associated hepatic carcinogenesis in rats. Rats were fed either an ethan...

  19. Gastroprotective Effect of Oxalis corniculata (Whole Plant) on Experimentally Induced Gastric Ulceration in Wistar Rats

    PubMed Central

    Sakat, S. S.; Tupe, Preeti; Juvekar, Archana

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the antiulcer activity of methanol extract of Oxalis corniculata (whole plant) using pylorus ligation and indomethacin-induced gastric ulceration in Wistar rats. The extract was preliminary evaluated for acute oral toxicity test using Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development guidelines 423. Further, it was studied for antiulcer potential at the dose levels of 125, 250 and 500 mg/kg. Ranitidine was used as a standard drug (100 mg/kg). Acid secretory parameters like gastric volume, pH, total acidity and free acidity were measured in pylorus ligation model, whereas numbers of ulcers, ulcers score and ulcer index was measured in pylorus ligated and indomethacin treated rats. Pretreatment of test extract significantly (p<0.05) decreased the gastric volume, total acidity, free acidity and increase in the pH of the gastric fluid in pylorus-ligated rats. It also showed significant (p<0.05) decrease in number of ulcers, ulcers score and ulcer index in pylorus ligated and indomethacin treated rats. Results of the study suggest that, the methanol extract of Oxalis corniculata possesses significant antisecretory and antiulcer effects and justify the traditional usage of this herb to treat peptic ulcers. PMID:23204622

  20. Curcumin inhibits gastric inflammation induced by Helicobacter pylori infection in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Santos, António M; Lopes, Teresa; Oleastro, Mónica; Gato, Inês Vale; Floch, Pauline; Benejat, Lucie; Chaves, Paula; Pereira, Teresa; Seixas, Elsa; Machado, Jorge; Guerreiro, António S

    2015-01-06

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection triggers a sequence of gastric alterations starting with an inflammation of the gastric mucosa that, in some cases, evolves to gastric cancer. Efficient vaccination has not been achieved, thus it is essential to find alternative therapies, particularly in the nutritional field. The current study evaluated whether curcumin could attenuate inflammation of the gastric mucosa due to H. pylori infection. Twenty-eight C57BL/6 mice, were inoculated with the H. pylori SS1 strain; ten non-infected mice were used as controls. H. pylori infection in live mice was followed-up using a modified 13C-Urea Breath Test (13C-UBT) and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Histologically confirmed, gastritis was observed in 42% of infected non-treated mice at both 6 and 18 weeks post-infection. These mice showed an up-regulation of the expression of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, as well as of toll-like receptors (TLRs) and MyD88, at both time points. Treatment with curcumin decreased the expression of all these mediators. No inflammation was observed by histology in this group. Curcumin treatment exerted a significant anti-inflammatory effect in H. pylori-infected mucosa, pointing to the promising role of a nutritional approach in the prevention of H. pylori induced deleterious inflammation while the eradication or prevention of colonization by effective vaccine is not available.

  1. Curcumin Inhibits Gastric Inflammation Induced by Helicobacter Pylori Infection in a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Santos, António M.; Lopes, Teresa; Oleastro, Mónica; Gato, Inês Vale; Floch, Pauline; Benejat, Lucie; Chaves, Paula; Pereira, Teresa; Seixas, Elsa; Machado, Jorge; Guerreiro, António S.

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection triggers a sequence of gastric alterations starting with an inflammation of the gastric mucosa that, in some cases, evolves to gastric cancer. Efficient vaccination has not been achieved, thus it is essential to find alternative therapies, particularly in the nutritional field. The current study evaluated whether curcumin could attenuate inflammation of the gastric mucosa due to H. pylori infection. Twenty-eight C57BL/6 mice, were inoculated with the H. pylori SS1 strain; ten non-infected mice were used as controls. H. pylori infection in live mice was followed-up using a modified 13C-Urea Breath Test (13C-UBT) and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Histologically confirmed, gastritis was observed in 42% of infected non-treated mice at both 6 and 18 weeks post-infection. These mice showed an up-regulation of the expression of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, as well as of toll-like receptors (TLRs) and MyD88, at both time points. Treatment with curcumin decreased the expression of all these mediators. No inflammation was observed by histology in this group. Curcumin treatment exerted a significant anti-inflammatory effect in H. pylori-infected mucosa, pointing to the promising role of a nutritional approach in the prevention of H. pylori induced deleterious inflammation while the eradication or prevention of colonization by effective vaccine is not available. PMID:25569625

  2. Acrylonitrile-induced gastric toxicity in rats: The role of xanthine oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Al-Abbasi, Fahad A.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background Acrylonitrile (ACN) is an extensively produced aliphatic nitrile. The gastrointestinal tract is an important target organ for ACN toxicity. The objective of the present study was to investigate the role of xanthine oxidase (XO) in ACN-induced gastric toxicity in rats. Material/Methods We assessed the effect of ACN on oxidative stress parameters as xanthine oxidase (XO) and total xanthine dehydrogenase (XD)/ XO activity, superoxide anion (O2·−) production, reduced glutathione (GSH) levels and lipid peroxidation in gastric tissues. Results A single oral dose of ACN (25 mg/kg) caused a significant enhancement in XO activity. ACN also caused a significant depletion of GSH levels, enhanced O2·− production and increased lipid peroxidation in the time-course experiment. In the dose-response experiment, ACN accelerated the conversion of XD to XO, with a significant depletion of gastric GSH in a dose-related manner. A strong negative correlation existed between the levels of GSH and the percentage enhancement in XO activity (r =−0.997). (O2·−) production and malondialdehyde (MDA) formation were significantly elevated in a dose-related manner. Pretreatment with allopurinol (50 mg/kg) significantly protected against ACN-induced rise in XO activity, depletion of GSH, and elevated production of (O2·−). However, pretreatment with diethyl maleate (DEM; 100 mg/kg) significantly aggravated the ACN-induced GSH depletion and rise in XO activity. Furthermore, DEM significantly enhanced (O2·−) and MDA production. Conclusions The present study indicates that enhancement of XO activity could be implicated in ACN-induced gastric damage in rats. PMID:22648241

  3. Cryptolepine, isolated from Sida acuta, sensitizes human gastric adenocarcinoma cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Firoj; Toume, Kazufumi; Ohtsuki, Takashi; Rahman, Mahmudur; Sadhu, Samir Kumar; Ishibashi, Masami

    2011-01-01

    Bioassay guided separation of Sida acuta whole plants led to the isolation of an alkaloid, cryptolepine (1), along with two kaempferol glycosides (2-3). Compound 1 showed strong activity in overcoming TRAIL-resistance in human gastric adenocarcinoma (AGS) cells at 1.25, 2.5 and 5 μm. Combined treatment of 1 and TRAIL sensitized AGS cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis at the aforementioned concentrations.

  4. Protective action of ethanolic extract of Rosmarinus officinalis L. in gastric ulcer prevention induced by ethanol in rats.

    PubMed

    Amaral, Guilherme Pires; de Carvalho, Nelson Rodrigues; Barcelos, Rômulo Pillon; Dobrachinski, Fernando; Portella, Rafael de Lima; da Silva, Michele Hinerasky; Lugokenski, Thiago Henrique; Dias, Glaecir Roseni Mundstock; da Luz, Sônia Cristina Almeida; Boligon, Aline Augusti; Athayde, Margareth Linde; Villetti, Marcos Antonio; Antunes Soares, Félix Alexandre; Fachinetto, Roselei

    2013-05-01

    The pathology of a gastric ulcer is complex and multifactorial. Gastric ulcers affect many people around the world and its development is a result of the imbalance between aggressive and protective factors in the gastric mucosa. In this study, we evaluated the ethanolic extract of Rosmarinus officinalis L. (eeRo); this plant, more commonly known as rosemary, has attracted the interest of the scientific community due to its numerous pharmacological properties and their potential therapeutic applications. Here, we tested the preventive effects of eeRo against gastric ulcer induced by 70% ethanol in male Wistar rats. In addition, we aimed to clarify the mechanism involved in the preventive action of the eeRo in gastric ulcers. Based on the analysis of markers of oxidative damage and enzymatic antioxidant defense systems, the measurement of nitrite and nitrate levels and the assessment of the inflammatory response, the eeRo exhibited significant antioxidant, vasodilator and antiinflammatory properties.

  5. Protective Effect of Repeatedly Preadministered Brazilian Propolis Ethanol Extract against Stress-Induced Gastric Mucosal Lesions in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Tadashi; Ohta, Yoshiji; Ikeno, Kumiko; Ohashi, Koji; Ikeno, Takeyuki

    2014-01-01

    The present study was conducted to clarify the protective effect of Brazilian propolis ethanol extract (BPEE) against stress-induced gastric mucosal lesions in rats. The protective effect of BPEE against gastric mucosal lesions in male Wistar rats exposed to water-immersion restraint stress (WIRS) for 6 h was compared between its repeated preadministration (50 mg/kg/day, 7 days) and its single preadministration (50 mg/kg). The repeated BPEE preadministration attenuated WIRS-induced gastric mucosal lesions and gastric mucosal oxidative stress more largely than the single BPEE preadministration. In addition, the repeated BPEE preadministration attenuated neutrophil infiltration in the gastric mucosa of rats exposed to WIRS. The protective effect of the repeated preadministration of BPEE against WIRS-induced gastric mucosal lesions was similar to that of a single preadministration of vitamin E (250 mg/kg) in terms of the extent and manner of protection. From these findings, it is concluded that BPEE preadministered in a repeated manner protects against gastric mucosal lesions in rats exposed to WIRS more effectively than BPEE preadministered in a single manner possibly through its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory actions. PMID:24639881

  6. Indomethacin inactivates gastric peroxidase to induce reactive-oxygen-mediated gastric mucosal injury and curcumin protects it by preventing peroxidase inactivation and scavenging reactive oxygen.

    PubMed

    Chattopadhyay, Ishita; Bandyopadhyay, Uday; Biswas, Kaushik; Maity, Pallab; Banerjee, Ranajit K

    2006-04-15

    We have investigated the mechanism of indomethacin-induced gastric ulcer caused by reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the gastroprotective effect of curcumin thereon. Curcumin dose-dependently blocks indomethacin-induced gastric lesions, showing 82% protection at 25 mg/kg. Indomethacin-induced oxidative damage by ROS as shown by increased lipid peroxidation and thiol depletion is almost completely blocked by curcumin. Indomethacin causes nearly fivefold increase in hydroxyl radical (()OH) and significant inactivation of gastric mucosal peroxidase to elevate endogenous H(2)O(2) and H(2)O(2)-derived ()OH, which is prevented by curcumin. In vitro studies indicate that indomethacin inactivates peroxidase irreversibly only in presence of H(2)O(2) by acting as a suicidal substrate. 5,5-Dimethyl-pyrroline-N-oxide (DMPO) protects the peroxidase, indicating involvement of indomethacin radical in the inactivation. Indomethacin radical was also detected in the peroxidase-indomethacin-H(2)O(2) system as DMPO adduct (a(N) = 15 G, a(beta)(H) = 16 G) by electron spin resonance spectroscopy. Curcumin protects the peroxidase in a concentration-dependent manner and consumes H(2)O(2) for its oxidation as a suitable substrate of the peroxidase, thereby blocking indomethacin oxidation. Curcumin can also scavenge ()OH in vitro. We suggest that curcumin protects gastric damage by efficient removal of H(2)O(2) and H(2)O(2) -derived ()OH by preventing peroxidase inactivation by indomethacin.

  7. Reactive oxygen species mediate Cr(VI)-induced carcinogenesis through PI3K/AKT-dependent activation of GSK-3β/β-catenin signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Son, Young-Ok; Pratheeshkumar, Poyil; Wang, Lei; Wang, Xin; Fan, Jia; Kim, Dong-Hern; Lee, Ju-Yeon; Zhang, Zhuo; Lee, Jeong-Chae; Shi, Xianglin

    2013-09-01

    Cr(VI) compounds are known human carcinogens that primarily target the lungs. Cr(VI) produces reactive oxygen species (ROS), but the exact effects of ROS on the signaling molecules involved in Cr(VI)-induced carcinogenesis have not been extensively studied. Chronic exposure of human bronchial epithelial cells to Cr(VI) at nanomolar concentrations (10–100 nM) for 3 months not only induced cell transformation, but also increased the potential of these cells to invade and migrate. Injection of Cr(VI)-stimulated cells into nude mice resulted in the formation of tumors. Chronic exposure to Cr(VI) increased levels of intracellular ROS and antiapoptotic proteins. Transfection with catalase or superoxide dismutase (SOD) prevented Cr(VI)-mediated increases in colony formation, cell invasion, migration, and xenograft tumors. While chronic Cr(VI) exposure led to activation of signaling cascades involving PI3K/AKT/GSK-3β/β-catenin and PI3K/AKT/mTOR, transfection with catalase or SOD markedly inhibited Cr(VI)-mediated activation of these signaling proteins. Inhibitors specific for AKT or β-catenin almost completely suppressed the Cr(VI)-mediated increase in total and active β-catenin proteins and colony formation. In particular, Cr(VI) suppressed autophagy of epithelial cells under nutrition deprivation. Furthermore, there was a marked induction of AKT, GSK-3β, β-catenin, mTOR, and carcinogenic markers in tumor tissues formed in mice after injection with Cr(VI)-stimulated cells. Collectively, our findings suggest that ROS is a key mediator of Cr(VI)-induced carcinogenesis through the activation of PI3K/AKT-dependent GSK-3β/β-catenin signaling and the promotion of cell survival mechanisms via the inhibition of apoptosis and autophagy. - Highlights: • Chronic exposure to Cr(VI) induces carcinogenic properties in BEAS-2B cells. • ROS play an important role in Cr(VI)-induced tumorigenicity of BEAS-2B cells. • PI3K/AKT/GSK-3β/β-catenin signaling involved in Cr

  8. Downregulation of glutathione S-transferase M1 protein in N-butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl)nitrosamine-induced mouse bladder carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Chuang, Jing-Jing; Dai, Yuan-Chang; Lin, Yung-Lun; Chen, Yang-Yi; Lin, Wei-Han; Chan, Hong-Lin; Liu, Yi-Wen

    2014-09-15

    Bladder cancer is highly recurrent following specific transurethral resection and intravesical chemotherapy, which has prompted continuing efforts to develop novel therapeutic agents and early-stage diagnostic tools. Specific changes in protein expression can provide a diagnostic marker. In our present study, we investigated changes in protein expression during urothelial carcinogenesis. The carcinogen BBN was used to induce mouse bladder tumor formation. Mouse bladder mucosa proteins were collected and analyzed by 2D electrophoresis from 6 to 20 weeks after commencing continuous BBN treatment. By histological examination, the connective layer of the submucosa showed gradual thickening and the number of submucosal capillaries gradually increased after BBN treatment. At 12-weeks after the start of BBN treatment, the urothelia became moderately dysplastic and tumors arose after 20-weeks of treatment. These induced bladder lesions included carcinoma in situ and connective tissue invasive cancer. In protein 2D analysis, the sequentially downregulated proteins from 6 to 20 weeks included GSTM1, L-lactate dehydrogenase B chain, keratin 8, keratin 18 and major urinary proteins 2 and 11/8. In contrast, the sequentially upregulated proteins identified were GSTO1, keratin 15 and myosin light polypeptide 6. Western blotting confirmed that GSTM1 and NQO-1 were decreased, while GSTO1 and Sp1 were increased, after BBN treatment. In human bladder cancer cells, 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine increased the GSTM1 mRNA and protein expression. These data suggest that the downregulation of GSTM1 in the urothelia is a biomarker of bladder carcinogenesis and that this may be mediated by DNA CpG methylation. - Highlights: • GSTM1 and NQO-1 proteins decreased in the mouse bladder mucosa after BBN treatment. • BBN induced GSTO1 and Sp1 protein expression in the mouse bladder mucosa. • 5-Aza-2′-deoxycytidine increased GSTM1 mRNA and protein in human bladder cancer cell. • GSTM1

  9. Curcumin ameliorates the tumor-enhancing effects of a high-protein diet in an azoxymethane-induced mouse model of colon carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Byun, So-Young; Kim, Dan-Bi; Kim, Eunjung

    2015-08-01

    An increasing number of reports suggest that a high-protein diet (HPD) is associated with an increased risk for colorectal cancer (CRC). One of the proposed mechanisms is that an HPD increases the delivery of protein to the colon and generates various toxic metabolites that contribute to colon carcinogenesis. Curcumin was shown to exert significant preventive properties against CRC. We therefore hypothesized that curcumin can reverse the tumor-enhancing effects of an HPD. This study examined the effects of curcumin on the development of azoxymethane (AOM)-induced colorectal tumors in HPD-fed mice. A total of 30 female Balb/c mice were randomly divided into 3 groups: those fed a normal diet (20% casein), those fed an HPD (HPD; 50% casein), and those fed an HPD supplemented with curcumin (HPDC; 0.02% curcumin). The mice were subjected to an AOM-dextran sodium sulfate colon carcinogenesis protocol. Mice in the HPDC group exhibited a significant (40%) reduction in colorectal tumor multiplicity when compared with those in the HPD group. The expression of colonic inflammatory proteins (cyclooxygenase-2 and inducible nitric oxide synthase), the levels of plasma inflammatory markers (nitric oxide and tumor necrosis factor-α), fecal ammonia, short- and branched-chain fatty acid levels, and the rate of colonocyte proliferation were significantly lower in the HPDC than the HPD group. In conclusion, curcumin inhibited the development of colorectal tumors in an AOM-induced mouse model of colon carcinogenesis by attenuating colonic inflammation, proliferation, and toxic metabolite production. Curcumin might be useful in the chemoprevention of CRC in individuals consuming an HPD.

  10. Gastric histamine content and ulcer formation in rats with ethanol-induced injury. Effects of cinnarizine and flunarizine.

    PubMed

    Lozeva, V; Marazova, K; Belcheva, A

    1994-06-01

    The effects of the calcium antagonists cinnarizine and flunarizine on gastric histamine content and ulcer formation in rats with ethanol-induced injury were studied. Gastric ulcers were inflicted by oral application of 50% or 100% ethanol solution. Cinnarizine (20 mg/kg), flunarizine (10 mg/kg) and cimetidine (100 mg/kg) were administered orally 1 h before ethanol. Histamine was assayed fluorometrically. No effect of the tested drugs on 50% ethanol-induced gastric damage was observed. Cinnarizine and flunarizine inhibited 100% ethanol-induced lesion formation by 71% (p < 0.01) and 20% (p > 0.05), respectively. The inhibition exerted by cimetidine was 54% (p < 0.05). Gastric histamine content was not affected by 50% ethanol, while 100% ethanol decreased it two-fold. None of the tested drugs induced significant changes in gastric histamine levels. No correlation was obtained between the ulceroprotective effect of the used calcium antagonists and the gastric histamine content in ethanol-induced injury.

  11. Somatic pain sensitivity during formation and healing of acetic acid-induced gastric ulcers in conscious rats.

    PubMed

    Yarushkina, Natalya; Bogdanov, Anatoly; Filaretova, Ludmila

    2006-06-30

    A classical feature of visceral pain is its referring to somatic locations. Gastric ulcer is a source of visceral pain. In the present study we investigated whether gastric ulcers may trigger the changes in somatic nociception. For this aim somatic pain sensitivity was estimated under conditions of gastric ulcer development and healing. Gastric ulcers were induced by luminal application of 60% acetic acid under surgical conditions. Control rats were subjected to the same surgical procedure, but with the application of saline instead of the acid. Somatic pain sensitivity (tail flick latency), plasma corticosterone level, adrenal and thymus weight were investigated under conditions of the formation and the healing of gastric ulcers. The application of the acid resulted in the formation of kissing gastric ulcers, the increase of somatic pain sensitivity (the decrease of tail flick latency) as well as the appearance of typical signs of chronic stress: long-lasting increase of plasma corticosterone level, adrenal gland hypertrophy and thymus gland involution. Natural healing of gastric ulcers was accompanied by restoration of pain sensitivity as well as attenuation of the signs of chronic stress. Delay of ulcer healing by the daily indomethacin administration (2 mg/kg, s.c.) prevented the restoration of somatic pain sensitivity. The results suggest that chronic gastric ulcers may trigger somatic hypersensitivity.

  12. Mechanisms of cadmium carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph, Pius

    2009-08-01

    Cadmium (Cd), a heavy metal of considerable occupational and environmental concern, has been classified as a human carcinogen by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). The carcinogenic potential of Cd as well as the mechanisms underlying carcinogenesis following exposure to Cd has been studied using in vitro cell culture and in vivo animal models. Exposure of cells to Cd results in their transformation. Administration of Cd in animals results in tumors of multiple organs/tissues. Also, a causal relationship has been noticed between exposure to Cd and the incidence of lung cancer in human. It has been demonstrated that Cd induces cancer by multiple mechanisms and the most important among them are aberrant gene expression, inhibition of DNA damage repair, induction of oxidative stress, and inhibition of apoptosis. The available evidence indicates that, perhaps, oxidative stress plays a central role in Cd carcinogenesis because of its involvement in Cd-induced aberrant gene expression, inhibition of DNA damage repair, and apoptosis.

  13. Evidence for a significant role of gastrin in cysteamine-induced hypersecretion of gastric acid.

    PubMed

    Shiratori, K; Shimizu, K; Ikeda, M; Watanabe, S; Hayashi, N

    1997-01-01

    Cysteamine has been known to stimulate gastric acid secretion and to induce duodenal ulcers in rats. We investigated the role of gastrin in cysteamine-induced acid hypersecretion in the perfused rat stomach. Intravenous infusion of cysteamine (75 mg/kg/h) resulted in a significant increase in acid secretion, which was accompanied by a marked increase in the plasma gastrin concentration. The cysteamine-induced increase in gastric acid secretion was completely blocked by i.v. injection of anti-gastrin rabbit serum (500 microliters). In addition, i.v. infusion of a CCK-B/gastrin receptor antagonist (L-365,260) (1 mg/kg/h) also suppressed the cysteamine-induced increase in acid secretion. Atropine significantly, but only partially, inhibited the increase. The elevated plasma gastrin levels induced by cysteamine were unaffected by atropine and L-365,260. In conclusion, cysteamine-induced acid hypersecretion is mediated mainly by cysteamine-induced gastrin release and partially by cholinergic factors. Furthermore, gastrin release caused by cysteamine appears to be independent of cholinergic tone.

  14. Dietary Composition Influences Incidence of Helicobacter pylori-Induced Iron Deficiency Anemia and Gastric Ulceration.

    PubMed

    Beckett, Amber C; Piazuelo, M Blanca; Noto, Jennifer M; Peek, Richard M; Washington, M Kay; Algood, Holly M Scott; Cover, Timothy L

    2016-12-01

    Epidemiologic studies have provided conflicting data regarding an association between Helicobacter pylori infection and iron deficiency anemia (IDA) in humans. Here, a Mongolian gerbil model was used to investigate a potential role of H. pylori infection, as well as a possible role of diet, in H. pylori-associated IDA. Mongolian gerbils (either H. pylori infected or uninfected) received a normal diet or one of three diets associated with increased H. pylori virulence: high-salt, low-iron, or a combination of a high-salt and low-iron diet. In an analysis of all infected animals compared to uninfected animals (independent of diet), H. pylori-infected gerbils had significantly lower hemoglobin values than their uninfected counterparts at 16 weeks postinfection (P < 0.0001). The mean corpuscular volume (MCV) and serum ferritin values were significantly lower in H. pylori-infected gerbils than in uninfected gerbils, consistent with IDA. Leukocytosis and thrombocytosis were also detected in infected gerbils, indicating the presence of a systemic inflammatory response. In comparison to uninfected gerbils, H. pylori-infected gerbils had a higher gastric pH, a higher incidence of gastric ulcers, and a higher incidence of fecal occult blood loss. Anemia was associated with the presence of gastric ulceration but not gastric cancer. Infected gerbils consuming diets with a high salt content developed gastric ulcers significantly more frequently than gerbils consuming a normal-salt diet, and the lowest hemoglobin levels were in infected gerbils consuming a high-salt/low-iron diet. These data indicate that H. pylori infection can cause IDA and that the composition of the diet influences the incidence and severity of H. pylori-induced IDA.

  15. Human bronchial epithelial BEAS-2B cells, an appropriate in vitro model to study heavy metals induced carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Youn-hee; Kim, Donghern; Dai, Jin; Zhang, Zhuo

    2015-09-15

    Occupational and environmental exposure to arsenic (III) and chromium VI (Cr(VI)) have been confirmed to cause lung cancer. Mechanisms of these metals carcinogenesis are still under investigation. Selection of cell lines to be used is essential for the studies. Human bronchial epithelial BEAS-2B cells are the cells to be utilized by most of scientists. However, due to p53 missense mutation (CCG → TCG) at codon 47 and the codon 72 polymorphism (CGC → CCC) in BEAS-2B cells, its usage has frequently been questioned. The present study has examined activity and expression of 53 and its downstream target protein p21 upon acute or chronic exposure of BEAS-2B cells to arsenic and Cr(VI). The results show that short-term exposure of BEAS-2B cells to arsenic or Cr(VI) was able to activate both p53 and p21. Chronic exposure of BEAS-2B cells to these two metals caused malignant cell transformation and tumorigenesis. In arsenic-transformed BEAS-2B cells reductions in p53 promoter activity, mRNA expression, and phosphorylation of p53 at Ser392 were observed, while the total p53 protein level remained the same compared to those in passage-matched parent ones. p21 promoter activity and expression were decreased in arsenic-transformed cells. Cr(VI)-transformed cells exhibit elevated p53 promoter activity, mRNA expression, and phosphorylation at Ser15, but reduced phosphorylation at Ser392 and total p53 protein level compared to passage-matched parent ones. p21 promoter activity and expression were elevated in Cr(VI)-transformed cells. These results demonstrate that p53 is able to respond to exposure of arsenic or Cr(VI), suggesting that BEAS-2B cells are an appropriate in vitro model to investigate arsenic or Cr(VI) induced lung cancer. - Highlights: • Short-term exposure of BEAS-2B cells to arsenic or Cr(VI) activates p53 and p21. • Chronic exposure of BEAS-2B cells to arsenic or Cr(VI) causes cell transformation and tumorigenesis. • Arsenic-transformed cells exhibit

  16. [Suppressor activity of bone marrow and spleen cells in C57Bl/6 mice during carcinogenesis induced by 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene].

    PubMed

    Kusmartsev, S A; Ogreba, V I

    1989-01-01

    The nonspecific suppressor activity of bone marrow cells (BMC) and spleen cells (SC) of C57B1/6 mice was studied at 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene-induced carcinogenesis. It is established that in the latent period of the tumour development and with its appearance the suppressor activity of BMC decreases, while SC-increases. The activity of the BMC suppressor factor which is determined by the inhibition of proliferation of mastocytoma P-815 cells in vitro did not change significantly.

  17. Gastroprotective Effects of PMK-S005 against Ethanol-Induced Acute Gastric Damage in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yoon Jeong; Kim, Nayoung; Lee, Ju Yup; Nam, Ryoung Hee; Seo, Ji Hyung; Lee, Seonmin; Kim, Hee Jin; Choi, Yoon Jin; Lee, Hye Seung; Lee, Dong Ho

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims This study aimed to examine the gastroprotective effects of PMK-S005, which is a synthetic S-allyl-l-cysteine (SAC; a sulfur-containing amino acid), against acute ethanol-induced gastric damage in rats. Methods Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into six groups, including a nonethanol group, groups treated with absolute ethanol 1 hour after pretreatment with various doses of PMK-S005 (1, 5, and 10 mg/kg) or rebamipide (50 mg/kg), and an absolute ethanol-only group. Ethanol-induced gross ulcer and mucus levels were measured. Myeloperoxidase, tumor necrosis factor α, interleukin 1β, PGE2, LTB4, cPLA2, COX-1, and COX-2 levels were estimated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay or Western blot analysis. Furthermore, the protein expression levels of antioxidant enzymes, including heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), NAD(P)H:quinine oxidoreductase 1 (NQO-1), GCLC, and GCLM, were assessed. Results PMK-S005 significantly attenuated the ethanol-induced gastric damage; it reduced mucosal inflammatory cytokine production and increased mucus levels. The expression levels of cPLA2, COX-1, and COX-2 were decreased by PMK-S005. PMK-S005 did not affect PGE2 synthesis, but LTB4 production was significantly suppressed. In addition, long-term administration of PMK-S005 significantly increased the expression of HO-1, NQO-1, GCLC, and GCLM. Conclusions These results strongly suggest that PMK-S005 prevents gastric mucosal damage and that these gastroprotective activities are due to anti-inflammatory effects and enhancement of the gastric defense system, including antioxidant enzymes. PMID:26347516

  18. Petroselinum Crispum is Effective in Reducing Stress-Induced Gastric Oxidative Damage

    PubMed Central

    Akıncı, Ayşin; Eşrefoğlu, Mukaddes; Taşlıdere, Elif; Ateş, Burhan

    2017-01-01

    Background: Oxidative stress has been shown to play a principal role in the pathogenesis of stress-induced gastric injury. Parsley (Petroselinum crispum) contains many antioxidants such as flavanoids, carotenoids and ascorbic acid. Aims: In this study, the histopathological and biochemical results of nutrition with a parsley-rich diet in terms of eliminating stress-induced oxidative gastric injury were evaluated. Study Design: Animal experimentation Methods: Forty male Wistar albino rats were divided into five groups: control, stress, stress + standard diet, stress + parsley-added diet and stress + lansoprazole (LPZ) groups. Subjects were exposed to 72 hours of fasting and later immobilized and exposed to the cold at +4 degrees for 8 hours to create a severe stress condition. Samples from the animals’ stomachs were arranged for microscopic and biochemical examinations. Results: Gastric mucosal injury was obvious in rats exposed to stress. The histopathologic damage score of the stress group (7.00±0.57) was higher than that of the control group (1.50±0.22) (p<0.05). Significant differences in histopathologic damage score were found between the stress and stress + parsley-added diet groups (p<0.05), the stress and stress + standard diet groups (p<0.05), and the stress and stress + LPZ groups (p<0.05). The mean tissue malondialdehyde levels of the stress + parsley-added group and the stress + LPZ group were lower than that of the stress group (p<0.05). Parsley supported the cellular antioxidant system by increasing the mean tissue glutathione level (53.31±9.50) and superoxide dismutase (15.18±1.05) and catalase (16.68±2.29) activities. Conclusion: Oral administration of parsley is effective in reducing stress-induced gastric injury by supporting the cellular antioxidant defence system. PMID:28251024

  19. The long non-coding RNA H19-derived miR-675 modulates human gastric cancer cell proliferation by targeting tumor suppressor RUNX1

    SciTech Connect

    Zhuang, Ming; Gao, Wen; Xu, Jing; Wang, Ping; Shu, Yongqian

    2014-06-06

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • H19 regulates gastric cancer cell proliferation phenotype via miR-675. • MiR-675 modulates cell proliferation of gastric cancer cells by targeting tumor suppressor RUNX1. • The H19/miR-675/RUNX1 axis plays an important role in the tumorigenesis of gastric cancer. - Abstract: The lncRNA H19 has been recently shown to be upregulated and play important roles in gastric cancer tumorigenesis. However, the precise molecular mechanism of H19 and its mature product miR-675 in the carcinogenesis of gastric cancer remains unclear. In this study, we found that miR-675 was positively expressed with H19 and was a pivotal mediator in H19-induced gastric cancer cell growth promotion. Subsequently, the tumor suppressor Runt Domain Transcription Factor1 (RUNX1) was confirmed to be a direct target of miR-675 using a luciferase reporter assay and Western blotting analyses. A series of rescue assays indicated that RUNX1 mediated H19/miR-67-induced gastric cancer cell phenotypic changes. Moreover, the inverse relationship between the expression of RUNX1 and H19/miR-675 was also revealed in gastric cancer tissues and gastric cancer cell lines. Taken together, our study demonstrated that the novel pathway H19/miR-675/RUNX1 regulates gastric cancer development and may serve as a potential target for gastric cancer therapy.

  20. Autophagy Protects from Raddeanin A-Induced Apoptosis in SGC-7901 Human Gastric Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shen-lin; Fang, Liang-hua; Zhou, Jin-yong; Wu, Jian; Xi, Song-yang; Chen, Yan; Zhang, Ying-ying; Xu, Song

    2016-01-01

    Raddeanin A (RA) is an extractive from Anemone raddeana Regel, a traditional Chinese medicine. The aim of this study is to assess the efficacy of RA against human gastric cancer (GC) cells (SGC-7901) and explore its mechanism. MTT assay showed that RA inhibition of proliferation of SGC-7901 cells increased in a dose-dependent manner. Flow cytometry analysis and Hoechst 33258 staining showed that RA induced apoptosis on SGC-7901 cells. Meanwhile, it induced autophagy. Western blotting analysis showed that the RA induces apoptosis and autophagy by activating p38 MAPK pathway and inhibiting mTOR pathway. Further studies showed that autophagy inhibition could protect from RA-induced apoptosis in SGC-7901 cells. In conclusion, RA can induce SGC-7901 cell apoptosis and autophagy by activating p38 MAPK pathway. And autophagy can protect SGC-7901 cells from apoptosis induced by RA. PMID:27974905

  1. Neurotensin induces hyperplasia of the pancreas and growth of the gastric antrum in rats.

    PubMed

    Feurle, G E; Müller, B; Rix, E

    1987-01-01

    We investigated whether chronic subcutaneous infusion of neurotensin during 14 days would affect pancreatic and gastric growth of rats. In another experiment, neurotensin (836 pmol/kg) was injected intraperitoneally three times a day for three days in 12 rats. Thereafter, pancreatic DNA and in vitro incorporation of 3H-thymidine into pancreatic DNA was determined. Long term infusion of 282 pmol/kg neurotensin induced an increase of pancreatic weight, DNA, and pancreatic polypeptide, whereas pancreatic protein, RNA, amylase and lipase contents were not increased. In relation to DNA, even these parameters were significantly depressed. Insulin remained unchanged. Neurotensin, therefore, caused hyperplasia of the pancreas. Intraperitoneal injection of neurotensin induced an increase of pancreatic DNA content and stimulated 3H-thymidine incorporation into DNA, whereas caerulein only augmented 3H-thymidine incorporation. Moreover, long term neurotensin infusion led to a rise in protein concentration and an increase in the thickness of the gastric antrum; antral DNA concentration was insignificantly stimulated. Neurotensin, therefore, can act as a trophic factor on pancreas and gastric antrum of the rat.

  2. [Somatic pain sensitivity under indometacin induced gastric and small intestinal injury in rats].

    PubMed

    Iarushkina, N I; Bagaeva, T R; Filaretova, L P

    2014-01-01

    The aim was to study the effect of indometacin (IM) induced gastrointestinal injury on somatic pain sensitivity in awake rats. IM was administered at the ulcerogenic dose (35 mg/kg, s. c.) to fasted (24 h) and fed rats. Somatic pain sensitivity was evaluated using a tail flick test. Latency time was measured under conditions of the formation of gastric erosion (1 - 4 h after IM injection) as well as small intestinal injury (24, 48 and 72 h after IM injection). IM administration caused the gastric erosion formation only in fasted rats (4 h after the administration) and the small intestinal injury in both fasted and fed rats (24, 48, 72 h after the administration). Indomethacin-caused gastric and small intestinal injury resulted in an increase in tail flick latency. We did not observe any changes in tail flick latency in IM-treated rats without significant gastrointestinal injury. The gastrointestinal injury was accompanied by signs of chronic stress: long-lasting increase in corticosterone blood level, adrenal hypertrophy, thymus involution, and loss of body weight. Thus, the IM-induced gastrointestinal injury formation resulted in somatic pain inhibition in awake rats.

  3. Abnormal Savda Munziq, an Herbal Preparation of Traditional Uighur Medicine, May Prevent 1,2-dimethylhydrazine-Induced Rat Colon Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Yusup, Abdiryim; Upur, Halmurat; Umar, Anwar; Berke, Benedicte; Yimit, Dilxat; Lapham, Jaya Conser; Moore, Nicholas; Cassand, Pierrette

    2011-01-01

    The study tried to assess the chemoprotective effect of abnormal Savda Munziq (ASMq) on 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH)-induced rat colon carcinogenesis. Male F344 rats were randomized into eight groups: Group 1 was served as control, no DMH injection was given and treated daily with normal saline. Rats in Groups 2–8 were given a single intraperitoneal injection of DMH (20 mg/kg body weight) at the beginning of the study. Group 2 was served as negative control, administered with normal saline until the end of the experiment after the single DMH injection. Groups 3–5 were served as pretreatment group, administered with ASMq ethanol extract at 400, 800 and 1600 mg/kg body weight, respectively, until the 45th day, continued by normal saline administration for another 45 days. Groups 6–8 were served as the treatment group, administered with normal saline for the first 45 days from the day of DMH injection, ASMq ethanol extract at three different doses to be administered until the end of the second 45th day. All rats were sacrificed at 91st day and the colons were analyzed for aberrant crypt foci (ACF) formation and crypt multiplicity. Results showed that ASMq ethanol extract reduced the number of ACF, AC and crypt multiplicity significantly (P < .05). It suggested that ASMq ethanol extract had chemoprotective effects on DMH-induced colon carcinogenesis, by suppressing the development of preneoplastic lesions, and probably exerted protection against the initiation and promotion steps of colon carcinogenesis. PMID:19561161

  4. Selenium as a modulator of membrane stability parameters and surface changes during the initiation phase of 1,2-dimethylhydrazine induced colorectal carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ghadi, Fereshteh Ezzati; Malhotra, Anshoo; Ghara, Abdollah Ramzani; Dhawan, D K

    2012-10-01

    The present study evaluated the modulatory potential of selenium on colonic surface abnormalities and membrane fluidity changes following 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH) induced colon carcinogenesis. Rats were segregated into four groups viz., normal control, DMH treated, selenium treated, and DMH + selenium treated. Initiation of molecular events leading to colon carcinogenesis was started following weekly subcutaneous injections of DMH (30 mg/Kg body weight) for 10 weeks. Selenium in the form of sodium selenite was supplemented to rats at a dose level of 1 PPM in drinking water, ad libitum for the entire duration of the study. Brush border membranes were isolated from the colon of rats and the viscosity as well as fluidity parameters were assessed using the membrane extrinsic fluorophore pyrene. DMH treatment resulted in a significant increase in lipid peroxidation. Reduced glutathione levels (GSH) and the activities of glutathione reductase (GR), glutathione transferase (GST), superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) were found to be significantly decreased following DMH treatment. On the other hand, supplementation with selenium to DMH treated rats resulted in a significant decrease in the levels of lipid peroxidation but caused a significant increase in the levels of GSH as well in the activities of GR, GST, SOD, CAT, and GPx. The results further, demonstrated a marked decrease in membrane microviscosity following DMH treatment. On the other hand, a significant increase was observed in the excimer/monomer ratio and fluidity parameter of DMH treated rats when compared to normal control rats. However, the alterations in membrane microviscosity and the fluidity parameters were significantly restored following selenium treatment. Further, histological as well as colon surface alterations were also observed following DMH treatment, which however were greatly prevented upon selenium co-administration. The study, therefore, concludes

  5. Effect of antiperoxidative drugs on gastric damage induced by ethanol in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Mizui, T.; Sato, H.; Hirose, F.; Doteuchi, M.

    1987-08-10

    Lesion formation due to oral administration of absolute ethanol could be prevented by parenteral pretreatment with antiperoxidative drugs such as butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT), quercetin and quinacrine. Also effective were allopurinol and oxypurinol, inhibitors of xanthine oxidase, but not superoxide dismutase (SOD) and hydroxyl radical scavengers, such as sodium benzoate and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). BHT, quercetin, quinacrine and sulfhydryl compounds such as reduced glutathione and cysteamine which offer gastroprotection in vivo against ethanol inhibited lipid peroxidation induced in vitro by ferrous ion in porcine gastric mucosal homogenate, but SOD, sodium benzoate, DMSO, allopurinol and oxypurinol did not. These results suggest the possibility that an active species, probably derived from free iron mobilized by the xanthine oxidase system, other than oxygen radicals such as hydroxyl formation in the gastric mucosa after absolute ethanol administration. 38 references, 1 figure, 4 tables.

  6. Attenuating effect of bromocriptine on cysteamine anticarcinogenesis of stomach cancers induced by N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine

    SciTech Connect

    Tatsuta, M.; Iishi, H.; Baba, M.; Ichii, M.; Nakaizumi, A.; Uehara, H.; Taniguchi, H. )

    1990-09-01

    The effect of bromocriptine on inhibition by cysteamine of gastric carcinogenesis induced by N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine was investigated in inbred Wistar rats. After 25 weeks of p.o. treatment with N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine, rats were given injections every other day: cysteamine (50 mg/kg body weight); cysteamine (50 mg/kg body weight) plus bromocriptine (0.5 or 0.25 mg/kg body weight); or bromocriptine (0.5 or 0.25 mg/kg body weight). In week 52, the group treated with cysteamine showed a significantly decreased incidence of gastric cancers. Concomitant treatment with bromocriptine at 0.5 but not at 0.25 mg/kg body weight significantly attenuated the inhibitory effect of cysteamine on gastric carcinogenesis. Administration of bromocriptine alone at either dosage had no influence on gastric carcinogenesis. The labeling index of the antral mucosa was significantly reduced in rats treated with cysteamine and significantly higher in those treated concomitantly with bromocriptine at 0.5 mg/kg body weight than in those treated with cysteamine alone. These findings indicate that cysteamine suppressed gastric carcinogenesis and that bromocriptine at high dosage attenuated this inhibition. These findings also suggest that dopamine is involved in the mechanism of inhibition of gastric carcinogenesis by cysteamine.

  7. Distinct response of the hepatic transcriptome to Aflatoxin B1 induced hepatocellular carcinogenesis and resistance in rats

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Jiejun; He, Jiangtu; Lin, Jing; Sun, Xin; Sun, Fenyong; Ou, Chao; Jiang, Cizhong

    2016-01-01

    Aflatoxin is a natural potent carcinogen and a major cause of liver cancer. However, the molecular mechanisms of hepatocellular carcinogenesis remain largely unexplored. In this study, we profiled global gene expression in liver tissues of rats that developed hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) from aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) administration and those that were AFB1-resistant, as well as rats without AFB1 exposure as a control. AFB1 exposure resulted in extensive perturbation in gene expression with different functions in HCC and AFB1 resistance (AR) samples. The differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in HCC sample were enriched for cell proliferation, cell adhesion and vasculature development that largely contribute to carcinogenesis. Anti-apoptosis genes were up-regulated in HCC sample whereas apoptosis-induction genes were up-regulated in AR sample. AFB1 exposure also caused extensive alteration in expression level of lncRNAs. Among all the 4511 annotated lncRNAs, half of them were highly expressed only in HCC sample and up-regulated a group of protein-coding genes with cancer-related functions: apoptosis regulation, DNA repair, and cell cycle. Intriguingly, these genes were down-regulated by lncRNAs highly expressed in AR sample. Collectively, apoptosis is the critical biological process for carcinogenesis in response to AFB1 exposure through changes in expression level of both protein-coding and lncRNA genes. PMID:27545718

  8. Regulation of biokinetics of (65)Zn by curcumin and zinc in experimentally induced colon carcinogenesis in rats.

    PubMed

    Jain, Kinnri; Dhawan, Devinder K

    2014-10-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the role of curcumin and zinc on the biokinetics and biodistribution of (65)Zn during colon carcinogenesis. Male wistar rats were divided into five groups, namely normal control, 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH) treated, DMH + curcumin treated, DMH + zinc treated, and DMH + curcumin + zinc treated. Weekly subcutaneous injections of DMH (30 mg/kg body weight) for 16 weeks initiated colon carcinogenesis. Curcumin (100 mg/kg body weight orally) and ZnSO4 (227 mg/L in drinking water) were supplemented for 16 weeks. This study revealed a significant depression in the fast (Tb1) and slow component (Tb2) of biological half-life of (65)Zn in the whole body of DMH-treated rats, whereas liver showed a significant elevation in these components. Further, DMH treatment showed a significant increase in the uptake values of (65)Zn in colon, small intestine, and kidneys. Subcellular distribution depicted a significant increase in (65)Zn uptake values in mitochondrial, microsomal, and postmicrosomal fractions of colon. However, curcumin and zinc supplementation when given separately or in combination reversed the trends and restored the uptake values close to normal range. Our study concludes that curcumin and zinc supplementation during colon carcinogenesis shall prove to be efficacious in regulating the altered zinc metabolism.

  9. Strawberry phytochemicals inhibit azoxymethane/dextran sodium sulfate-induced colorectal carcinogenesis in Crj: CD-1 mice.

    PubMed

    Shi, Ni; Clinton, Steven K; Liu, Zhihua; Wang, Yongquan; Riedl, Kenneth M; Schwartz, Steven J; Zhang, Xiaoli; Pan, Zui; Chen, Tong

    2015-03-10

    Human and experimental colon carcinogenesis are enhanced by a pro-inflammatory microenvironment. Pharmacologically driven chemopreventive agents and dietary variables are hypothesized to have future roles in the prevention of colon cancer by targeting these processes. The current study was designed to determine the ability of dietary lyophilized strawberries to inhibit inflammation-promoted colon carcinogenesis in a preclinical animal model. Mice were given a single i.p. injection of azoxymethane (10 mg kg-1 body weight). One week after injection, mice were administered 2% (w/v) dextran sodium sulfate in drinking water for seven days and then an experimental diet containing chemically characterized lyophilized strawberries for the duration of the bioassay. Mice fed control diet, or experimental diet containing 2.5%, 5.0% or 10.0% strawberries displayed tumor incidence of 100%, 64%, 75% and 44%, respectively (p < 0.05). The mechanistic studies demonstrate that strawberries reduced expression of proinflammatory mediators, suppressed nitrosative stress and decreased phosphorylation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, Akt, extracellular signal-regulated kinase and nuclear factor kappa B. In conclusion, strawberries target proinflammatory mediators and oncogenic signaling for the preventive efficacies against colon carcinogenesis in mice. This works supports future development of fully characterized and precisely controlled functional foods for testing in human clinical trials for this disease.

  10. Salt-inducible kinase 1 (SIK1) is induced by gastrin and inhibits migration of gastric adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Selvik, Linn-Karina M; Rao, Shalini; Steigedal, Tonje S; Haltbakk, Ildri; Misund, Kristine; Bruland, Torunn; Prestvik, Wenche S; Lægreid, Astrid; Thommesen, Liv

    2014-01-01

    Salt-inducible kinase 1 (SIK1/Snf1lk) belongs to the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) family of kinases, all of which play major roles in regulating metabolism and cell growth. Recent studies have shown that reduced levels of SIK1 are associated with poor outcome in cancers, and that this involves an invasive cellular phenotype with increased metastatic potential. However, the molecular mechanism(s) regulated by SIK1 in cancer cells is not well explored. The peptide hormone gastrin regulates cellular processes involved in oncogenesis, including proliferation, apoptosis, migration and invasion. The aim of this study was to examine the role of SIK1 in gastrin responsive adenocarcinoma cell lines AR42J, AGS-GR and MKN45. We show that gastrin, known to signal through the Gq/G11-coupled CCK2 receptor, induces SIK1 expression in adenocarcinoma cells, and that transcriptional activation of SIK1 is negatively regulated by the Inducible cAMP early repressor (ICER). We demonstrate that gastrin-mediated signalling induces phosphorylation of Liver Kinase 1B (LKB1) Ser-428 and SIK1 Thr-182. Ectopic expression of SIK1 increases gastrin-induced phosphorylation of histone deacetylase 4 (HDAC4) and enhances gastrin-induced transcription of c-fos and CRE-, SRE-, AP1- and NF-κB-driven luciferase reporter plasmids. We also show that gastrin induces phosphorylation and nuclear export of HDACs. Next we find that siRNA mediated knockdown of SIK1 increases migration of the gastric adenocarcinoma cell line AGS-GR. Evidence provided here demonstrates that SIK1 is regulated by gastrin and influences gastrin elicited signalling in gastric adenocarcinoma cells. The results from the present study are relevant for the understanding of molecular mechanisms involved in gastric adenocarcinomas.

  11. Early or late antibiotic intervention prevents Helicobacter pylori-induced gastric cancer in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Songhua; Lee, Dong Soo; Morrissey, Rhiannon; Aponte-Pieras, Jose R; Rogers, Arlin B; Moss, Steven F

    2014-12-01

    H. pylori infection causes gastritis, peptic ulcers and gastric cancer. Eradicating H. pylori prevents ulcers, but to what extent this prevents cancer remains unknown, especially if given after intestinal metaplasia has developed. H. pylori infected wild-type (WT) mice do not develop cancer, but mice lacking the tumor suppressor p27 do so, thus providing an experimental model of H. pylori-induced cancer. We infected p27-deficient mice with H. pylori strain SS1 at 6-8 weeks of age. Persistently H. pylori-infected WT C57BL/6 mice served as controls. Mice in the eradication arms received antimicrobial therapy (omeprazole, metronidazole and clarithromycin) either "early" (at 15 weeks post infection, WPI) or "late" at 45 WPI. At 70 WPI, mice were euthanized for H. pylori determination, histopathology and cytokine/chemokine expression. Persistently infected mice developed premalignant lesions including high-grade dysplasia, whereas those given antibiotics did not. Histologic activity scores in the eradication groups were similar to each other, and were significantly decreased compared with controls for inflammation, epithelial defects, hyperplasia, metaplasia, atrophy and dysplasia. IP-10 and MIG levels in groups that received antibiotics were significantly lower than controls. There were no significant differences in expression of IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-1β, RANTES, MCP-1, MIP-1α or MIP-1β among the three groups. Thus, H. pylori eradication given either early or late after infection significantly attenuated gastric inflammation, gastric atrophy, hyperplasia, and dysplasia in the p27-deficient mice model of H. pylori-induced gastric cancer, irrespective of the timing of antibiotic administration. This was associated with reduced expression of IP-10 and MIG.

  12. ATOH1 Can Regulate the Tumorigenicity of Gastric Cancer Cells by Inducing the Differentiation of Cancer Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Han, Myoung-Eun; Baek, Su-Jin; Kim, Seon-Young; Kang, Chi-Dug; Oh, Sae-Ock

    2015-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) have been shown to mediate tumorigenicity, chemo-resistance, radio-resistance and metastasis, which suggest they be considered therapeutic targets. Because their differentiated daughter cells are no longer tumorigenic, to induce the differentiation of CSCs can be one of strategies which can eradicate CSCs. Here we show that ATOH1 can induce the differentiation of gastric cancer stem cells (GCSCs). Real time PCR and western blot analysis showed that ATOH1 was induced during the differentiation of GCSCs. Furthermore, the lentivirus-induced overexpression of ATOH1 in GCSCs and in gastric cancer cell lines significantly induced differentiation, reduced proliferation and sphere formation, and reduced in vivo tumor formation in the subcutaneous injection and liver metastasis xenograft models. These results suggest ATOH1 be considered for the development of a differentiation therapy for gastric cancer. PMID:25950549

  13. Sterigmatocystin-induced checkpoint adaptation depends on Chk1 in immortalized human gastric epithelial cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xiujuan; Wang, Juan; Xing, Lingxiao; Shen, Haitao; Lian, Weiguang; Yi, Li; Zhang, Donghui; Yang, Haiyan; Liu, Jianghui; Zhang, Xianghong

    2017-01-01

    Sterigmatocystin (ST) is a common contaminant detected in food and animal feed that has been recognized as a possible human carcinogen. Our previous studies demonstrate that ST causes DNA damage and subsequently triggers cell cycle arrest in G2 and apoptosis in immortalized human gastric epithelial cells (GES-1). Recently, studies have shown that in certain contexts, cells with DNA damage may escape checkpoint arrest and enter mitosis without repairing the damage. The term for this process is "checkpoint adaptation," and it increases the risk of unstable genome propagation, which may contribute to carcinogenesis. Thus, we aimed to investigate whether checkpoint adaptation occurs in GES-1 cells treated with ST and explored the underlying molecular mechanisms that contribute to this phenotype. In this study, we found that ST treatment for 24 h in GES-1 cells led to an initial G2 arrest; however, a fraction of GES-1 cells became large and rounded, and the number of p-H3-positive cells increased sharply after ST treatment for 48 h. Moreover, collection of the large and rounded cells by mechanical shake-off revealed that the majority of these large cells were found in the mitotic phase of the cell cycle. Importantly, we found that these rounded cells entered mitosis despite damaged DNA and that a small subset of this cell population survived and continued to propagate. These results suggest that ST induces an initial G2 arrest that is subsequently followed by G2 phase checkpoint adaptation, which may potentially promote genomic instability and result in tumorigenesis. Furthermore, we showed that activation of Chk1 contributes to the G2 arrest in GES-1 cells that are treated with ST for 24 h and that prolonged treatment of cells with ST for 48 h led to a decrease in the total protein and phosphorylation levels of Chk1 in mitotic cells, indicating that checkpoint adaptation may be driven by inactivation of Chk1. Knockdown studies confirmed that cells entered mitosis

  14. A potential role for Helicobacter pylori heat shock protein 60 in gastric tumorigenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Chen-Si; He, Pei-Juin; Tsai, Nu-Man; Li, Chi-Han; Yang, Shang-Chih; Hsu, Wei-Tung; Wu, Ming-Shiang; Wu, Chang-Jer; Cheng, Tain-Lu; Liao, Kuang-Wen

    2010-02-05

    Helicobacter pylori has been found to promote the malignant process leading to gastric cancer. Heat shock protein 60 of H. pylori (HpHSP60) was previously been identified as a potent immunogene. This study investigates the role of HpHSP60 in gastric cancer carcinogenesis. The effect of HpHSP60 on cell proliferation, anti-death activity, angiogenesis and cell migration were explored. The results showed that HpHSP60 enhanced migration by gastric cancer cells and promoted tube formation by umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs); however, HpHSP60 did not increase cell proliferation nor was this protein able to rescue gastric cancer cells from death. Moreover, the results also indicated HpHSP60 had different effects on AGS gastric cancer cells or THP-1 monocytic cells in terms of their expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, which are known to be important to cancer development. We propose that HpHSP60 may trigger the initiation of carcinogenesis by inducing pro-inflammatory cytokine release and by promoting angiogenesis and metastasis. Thus, this extracellular pathogen-derived HSP60 is potentially a vigorous virulence factor that can act as a carcinogen during gastric tumorigenesis.

  15. The gastroprotective effects of hydroalcoholic extract of Monolluma quadrangula against ethanol-induced gastric mucosal injuries in Sprague Dawley rats

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Ibrahim Abdel Aziz; Abdulla, Mahmood Ameen; Hajrezaie, Maryam; Bader, Ammar; Shahzad, Naiyer; Al-Ghamdi, Saeed S; Gushash, Ahmad S; Hasanpourghadi, Mohadeseh

    2016-01-01

    Monolluma quadrangula (Forssk.) Plowes is used in Saudi traditional medicines to treat gastric ulcers. The hydroalcoholic extract of M. quadrangula (MHAE) was used in an in vivo model to investigate its gastroprotective effects against ethanol-induced acute gastric lesions in rats. Five groups of Sprague Dawley rats were used. The first group was treated with 10% Tween 20 as a control. The other four groups included rats treated with absolute ethanol (5 mL/kg) to induce an ulcer, rats treated with 20 mg/kg omeprazole as a reference drug, and rats treated with 150 or 300 mg/kg MHAE. One hour later, the rats were administered absolute ethanol (5 mL/kg) orally. Animals fed with MHAE exhibited a significantly increased pH, gastric wall mucus, and flattening of the gastric mucosa, as well as a decreased area of gastric mucosal damage. Histology confirmed the results; extensive destruction of the gastric mucosa was observed in the ulcer control group, and the lesions penetrated deep into the gastric mucosa with leukocyte infiltration of the submucosal layer and edema. However, gastric protection was observed in the rats pre-fed with plant extracts. Periodic acid–Schiff staining of the gastric wall revealed a remarkably intensive uptake of magenta color in the experimental rats pretreated with MHAE compared to the ulcer control group. Immunohistochemistry staining revealed an upregulation of the Hsp70 protein and a downregulation of the Bax protein in rats pretreated with MHAE compared with the control rats. Gastric homogenate showed significantly increased catalase and superoxide dismutase, and the level of malondialdehyde (MDA) was reduced in the rats pretreated with MHAE compared to the control group. In conclusion, MHAE exhibited a gastroprotective effect against ethanol-induced gastric mucosal injury in rats. The mechanism of this gastroprotection included an increase in pH and gastric wall mucus, an increase in endogenous enzymes, and a decrease in the level of

  16. Aloe vera attenuated gastric injury on indomethacin-induced gastropathy in rats

    PubMed Central

    Werawatganon, Duangporn; Rakananurak, Narisorn; Sallapant, Sasipim; Prueksapanich, Piyapan; Somanawat, Kanjana; Klaikeaw, Naruemon; Rerknimitr, Rungsun

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the protective effects of Aloe vera on gastric injury in rats with indomethacin (IMN)-induced gastropathy. METHODS: Male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into three groups. Group 1 (control, n = 6) was given distilled water (DW) orally. Group 2 (IMN, n = 6) was given oral IMN (150 mg/kg) dissolved in 5% sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3-) at time 0 and 4 h. Group 3 (Aloe vera-treated, n = 6) was given oral Aloe vera (150 mg/kg) dissolved in DW and IMN at time 0 and 4 h. Eight hours later, the stomach was removed to determine gastric malondialdehyde (MDA), the number of interleukin (IL)-18 positive stained cells (%) by immunohistochemistry, and for histopathological examination. Then, the serum was collected to determine tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant (CINC)-1 by sandwich enzyme linked immunosorbent assay method. RESULTS: In the IMN group, serum TNF-α, CINC-1 and gastric MDA were significantly increased when compared to the control group (27.78 ± 1.52 pg/mL vs 85.07 ± 49.11 pg/mL, P = 0.009; 104.55 ± 45.80 pg/mL vs 1054.70 ± 20.38 pg/mL, and 1.74 ± 0.21 nmol/mg vs 9.36 ± 1.07 nmol/mg protein, P = 0.000, respectively). The mean level of TNF-α, CINC-1 and gastric MDA in the Aloe vera-treated group were improved as compared with the IMN group (85.07 ± 49.11 pg/mL vs 35.19 ± 1.61 pg/mL, P = 0.021; 1054.70 ± 20.38 pg/mL vs 813.56 ± 239.04 pg/mL, P = 0.025; and 9.36 ± 1.07 nmol/mg vs 2.67 ± 0.64 nmol/mg protein, P = 0.000, respectively). The number of IL-18 positive stained cells (%) in the gastric epithelial cells of the IMN group was significantly higher than the control group (5.01% ± 3.73% vs 30.67% ± 2.03%, P = 0.000, respectively). In contrast, Aloe vera treatment decreased the number of IL-18 positive stained cells (%) significantly when compared with the IMN group (30.67% ± 2.03% vs 13.21% ± 1.10%, P = 0.000, respectively). Most rats in the IMN group developed moderate to severe

  17. Advances in Understanding How Heavy Metal Pollution Triggers Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Wenzhen; Yang, Ning; Li, Xiangkai

    2016-01-01

    With the development of industrialization and urbanization, heavy metals contamination has become a major environmental problem. Numerous investigations have revealed an association between heavy metal exposure and the incidence and mortality of gastric cancer. The mechanisms of heavy metals (lead, cadmium, mercury, chromium, and arsenic) contamination leading to gastric cancer are concluded in this review. There are four main potential mechanisms: (1) Heavy metals disrupt the gastric mucosal barrier by decreasing mucosal thickness, mucus content, and basal acid output, thereby affecting the function of E-cadherin and inducing reactive oxygen species (ROS) damage. (2) Heavy metals directly or indirectly induce ROS generation and cause gastric mucosal and DNA lesions, which subsequently alter gene regulation, signal transduction, and cell growth, ultimately leading to carcinogenesis. Exposure to heavy metals also enhances gastric cancer cell invasion and metastasis. (3) Heavy metals inhibit DNA damage repair or cause inefficient lesion repair. (4) Heavy metals may induce other gene abnormalities. In addition, heavy metals can induce the expression of proinflammatory chemokine interleukin-8 (IL-8) and microRNAs, which promotes tumorigenesis. The present review is an effort to underline the human health problem caused by heavy metal with recent development in order to garner a broader perspective.

  18. Advances in Understanding How Heavy Metal Pollution Triggers Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Wenzhen; Yang, Ning

    2016-01-01

    With the development of industrialization and urbanization, heavy metals contamination has become a major environmental problem. Numerous investigations have revealed an association between heavy metal exposure and the incidence and mortality of gastric cancer. The mechanisms of heavy metals (lead, cadmium, mercury, chromium, and arsenic) contamination leading to gastric cancer are concluded in this review. There are four main potential mechanisms: (1) Heavy metals disrupt the gastric mucosal barrier by decreasing mucosal thickness, mucus content, and basal acid output, thereby affecting the function of E-cadherin and inducing reactive oxygen species (ROS) damage. (2) Heavy metals directly or indirectly induce ROS generation and cause gastric mucosal and DNA lesions, which subsequently alter gene regulation, signal transduction, and cell growth, ultimately leading to carcinogenesis. Exposure to heavy metals also enhances gastric cancer cell invasion and metastasis. (3) Heavy metals inhibit DNA damage repair or cause inefficient lesion repair. (4) Heavy metals may induce other gene abnormalities. In addition, heavy metals can induce the expression of proinflammatory chemokine interleukin-8 (IL-8) and microRNAs, which promotes tumorigenesis. The present review is an effort to underline the human health problem caused by heavy metal with recent development in order to garner a broader perspective. PMID:27803929

  19. 7-O-Geranylquercetin induces apoptosis in gastric cancer cells via ROS-MAPK mediated mitochondrial signaling pathway activation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yanyan; Jiang, Yameng; Shi, Lei; Du, Linying; Xu, Xiaodong; Wang, Enxia; Sun, Yong; Guo, Xin; Zou, Boyang; Wang, Huaxin; Wang, Changyuan; Sun, Lidan; Zhen, Yuhong

    2017-03-01

    7-O-Geranylquercetin (GQ) is a novel O-alkylated derivate of quercetin. In this study, we evaluated its apoptosis induction effects in human gastric cancer cell lines SGC-7901 and MGC-803 and explored the potential molecular mechanisms. The results demonstrated that GQ lowered viability of SGC-7901 and MGC-803 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner without apparent cytotoxicity to human gastric epithelial cell line GES-1. GQ could induce apoptosis in SGC-7901 and MGC-803cells, and arrest the gastric cancer cells at G2/M phase. Mechanism study showed that GQ triggered generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), then activated p38 and JNK signaling pathways, subsequently led to mitochondrial impairment by regulating the expression of Bcl-2, Bcl-xl and Bax, and finally promoted the release of cytochrome c and the activation of caspases to induce apoptosis. In addition, Z-VAD-FMK (caspase inhibitor) could reverse GQ-induced apoptosis. SB203580 (p38 inhibitor) and SP600125 (JNK inhibitor) could rescue GQ-induced cell death and attenuate mitochondrial signal pathway activation. Furthermore, NAC (ROS inhibitor) could rescue GQ-induced cell death, reduce ROS generation, decrease the phosphorylation of p38 and JNK, and then attenuate the activation of mitochondrial signal pathway. Taken together, GQ induces caspase-dependent apoptosis in gastric cancer cells through activating ROS-MAPK mediated mitochondrial signal pathway. This study highlights the potential use of GQ as a gastric cancer therapeutic agent.

  20. Ellagic acid prevents rat colon carcinogenesis induced by 1, 2 dimethyl hydrazine through inhibition of AKT-phosphoinositide-3 kinase pathway.

    PubMed

    Umesalma, Syed; Sudhandiran, Ganapasam

    2011-06-25

    Colon cancer is the third most malignant neoplasm in the world and chemoprevention through dietary intervention is an emerging option to reduce its mortality. Ellagic acid (EA) a major component of berries possesses attractive biological deeds. This study is aimed to investigate the effect of ellagic acid in fostering apoptosis in 1,2-dimethyl hydrazine (DMH) mediated experimental colon carcinogenesis model. Wistar male rats were segregated into four groups: group I-control rats, group II-rats received ellagic acid (60 mg/kg body weight p.o. every day), rats in group III-induced with DMH (20 mg/kg body weight, s.c.) for 15 weeks, DMH-induced group IV rats were initiated with ellagic acid treatment. The present study is designed to explore the significance of phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt molecular pathway as well as ellagic acid's chemopreventive effect in colon cancer. DMH-induced rats exhibited elevated expressions of PI3K and Akt as confirmed by immunofluorescence, immunoblot and confocal microscopic analysis. Mechanistically, ellagic acid was found to prevent PI3K/Akt activation that in turn, results in modulation of its downstream Bcl-2 family proteins. Bax expression and caspase-3 activation was noted after ellagic acid supplementation leading to elevation of cytochrome c (cyt c) levels and finally cell death. These observations were supported by the DNA fragmentation results, which showed the occurrence of apoptosis. This study reveals the involvement of PI3K-Akt signaling through which ellagic acid induces apoptosis and subsequently suppresses colon cancer during DMH-induced rat colon carcinogenesis. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate that ellagic acid begets apoptosis in DMH-induced colon carcinoma.

  1. (+)-2-(1-Hydroxyl-4-oxocyclohexyl) ethyl caffeate suppresses solar UV-induced skin carcinogenesis by targeting PI3-K, ERK1/2 and p38

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Do Young; Lee, Mee-Hyun; Shin, Seung Ho; Chen, Hanyoung; Ryu, Joohyun; Shan, Lei; Li, Honglin; Bode, Ann M.; Zhang, Wei-Dong; Dong, Zigang

    2014-01-01

    For decades, skin cancer incidence has increased, mainly due to oncogenic signaling pathways activated by solar ultraviolet (UV) irradiation (i.e., sun exposure). Solar UV induces multiple signaling pathways that are critical in the development of skin cancer, and therefore the development of compounds capable of targeting multiple molecules for chemoprevention of skin carcinogenesis is urgently needed. Herein, we examined the chemopreventive effects and the molecular mechanism of HOEC, [(+)-2-(1-hydroxyl-4-oxocyclohexyl) ethyl caffeate], isolated from Incarvillea mairei var. grandiflora (Wehrhahn) Grierson. HOEC strongly inhibited neoplastic transformation of JB6 C14l cells without toxicity. PI3-K, ERK1/2 and p38 kinase activities were suppressed by direct binding with HOEC in vitro. Our in silico docking data showed that HOEC binds at the ATP-binding site of each kinase. The inhibition of solar UV-induced PI3-K, ERK1/2 and p38 kinase activities resulted in suppression of their downstream signaling pathways and AP-1 and NF-κB transactivation in JB6 cells. Furthermore, topical application of HOEC reduced skin cancer incidence and tumor volume in SKH-1 hairless mice chronically exposed to solar UV. In summary, our results show that HOEC exerts inhibitory effects on multiple kinase targets and their downstream pathways activated by solar UV in vitro and in vivo. These findings suggest that HOEC is as a potent chemopreventive compound against skin carcinogenesis caused by solar UV exposure. PMID:24845061

  2. Chemopreventive efficacy of Phyllanthus emblica L. (amla) fruit extract on 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene induced oral carcinogenesis--a dose-response study.

    PubMed

    Krishnaveni, Mani; Mirunalini, Sankaran

    2012-11-01

    Phyllanthus emblica L. (Euphorbiaceae), a novel natural fruit has long been used as a home remedy by the medical practitioners. In this report, we investigated the chemopreventive effect of P. emblica fruit methanolic extract (PFMet) on oxidant-antioxidant status in hamster buccal pouch carcinogenesis. Buccal pouch carcinoma was induced in hamsters by painting with DMBA (0.5% in mineral oil) on the left buccal pouch three times a week for 14 weeks. By means of HPLC analysis, ascorbic acid (24.13%), gallic acid (10.45%), ellagic acid (1.74%) and quercetin (0.009%) were identified and quantified in the PFMet. The results showed that depleted activities of SOD, CAT and TBARS level and significant elevation were observed in the levels of GSH, vitamin E and activity of GPx in DMBA group of buccal pouch. The level of TBARS was significantly enhanced and the activities of enzymatic (SOD, CAT and GPx) and non-enzymatic (vitamin E, vitamin C and GSH) antioxidants were diminished significantly in plasma of tumor bearing animals. The effects were dose dependent and the above noted parameters were renovated to near normal after supplementation with different doses of PFMet (50, 100 and 200 mg/kg BW). The data obtained in this study clearly indicate that PFMet at a dose of 200mg/kg BW possesses optimum chemopreventive effect against DMBA-induced buccal pouch carcinogenesis.

  3. Shikonin induces mitochondria-mediated apoptosis and enhances chemotherapeutic sensitivity of gastric cancer through reactive oxygen species

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Wenquan; Cai, Aizhen; Chen, Guozhu; Xi, Hongqing; Wu, Xiaosong; Cui, Jianxin; Zhang, Kecheng; Zhao, Xudong; Yu, Jiyun; Wei, Bo; Chen, Lin

    2016-01-01

    The prognosis of gastric cancer remains poor due to clinical drug resistance. Novel drugs are urgently needed. Shikonin (SHK), a natural naphthoquinone, has been reported to trigger cell death and overcome drug resistance in anti-tumour therapy. In this study, we investigated the effectiveness and molecular mechanisms of SHK in treatment with gastric cancer. In vitro, SHK suppresses proliferation and triggers cell death of gastric cancer cells but leads minor damage to gastric epithelial cells. SHK induces the generation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), depolarizes the mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and ultimately triggers mitochondria-mediated apoptosis. We confirmed that SHK induces apoptosis of gastric cancer cells not only in a caspase-dependent manner which releases Cytochrome C and triggers the caspase cascade, but also in a caspase-independent manner which mediates the nuclear translocation of apoptosis-inducing factor and Endonuclease G. Furthermore, we demonstrated that SHK enhanced the chemotherapeutic sensitivity of 5-fluorouracil and oxaliplatin in vitro and in vivo. Taken together, our data show that SHK may be a novel therapeutic agent in the clinical treatment of gastric cancer. PMID:27905569

  4. The DNA methyltransferase inhibitor zebularine induces mitochondria-mediated apoptosis in gastric cancer cells in vitro and in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Wei; Zhou, Wei; Yu, Hong-gang; Luo, He-Sheng; Shen, Lei

    2013-01-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Zebularine inhibited cell growth of gastric cancer in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chromatin condensation and nuclear fragmentation were induced. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Zebularine promoted apoptosis via mitochondrial pathways. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tumorigenicity was inhibited by zebularine. -- Abstract: DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) inhibitor zebularine has been reported to potentiate the anti-tumor effect by reactivating the expression of tumor suppressor genes and apoptosis-related genes in various malignant cells. However, the apoptotic signaling pathway in gastric cancer cells induced by zebularine is not well understood. In the study, the effects of zebularine on the growth and apoptosis of gastric cancer cells were investigated by MTT assay, Hoechst assay, Western blot analysis, flow cytometric analysis of annexin V-FITC/PI staining, and TUNEL assay. Zebularine was an effective inhibitor of human gastric cancer cells proliferation in vitro and in vivo. The effects were dose dependent. A zebularine concentration of 50 {mu}M accounted for the inhibition of cell proliferation of 67% at 48 h. The treatment with zebularine upregulated Bax, and decreased Bcl-2 protein. Caspase-3 was activated, suggesting that the apoptosis is mediated by mitochondrial pathways. Moreover, zebularine injection successfully inhibited the tumor growth via apoptosis induction which was demonstrated by TUNEL assay in xenograft tumor mouse model. These results demonstrated that zebularine induced apoptosis in gastric cancer cells via mitochondrial pathways, and zebularine might become a therapeutic approach for the treatment of gastric cancer.

  5. A novel water-soluble vitamin E derivative protects against aspirin-induced gastric mucosal injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Isozaki, Yutaka; Yoshida, Norimasa; Ichikawa, Hiroshi; Kuroda, Masaaki; Kokura, Satoshi; Naito, Yuji; Okanoue, Takeshi; Yoshikawa, Toshikazu

    2005-12-01

    Oxygen radical-mediated lipid peroxidation and neutrophil activation may be involved in the development of gastric mucosal injury induced by non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Vitamin E is one of the lipid-soluble antioxidants and is generally considered to protect against lipid peroxidation of the cell membrane and to scavenge singlet oxygen and superoxide anion radicals. Our object was to investigate the antioxidative effects of water-soluble vitamin E derivative, 2-(alpha-D-glucopyranosyl)methyl-2,5,7,8-tetra-methylchroman-6-ol (TMG), on aspirin-induced gastric mucosal injury in rats. Gastric injury was induced by intragastric administration of aspirin and 0.15 N HCl in male Sprague-Dawley rats. TMG dissolved in physiological saline was injected intraperitoneally 0.5 h before the aspirin administration. The intragastric administration of acidified aspirin induced hyperemia and hemorragic erosions in rat stomach. The increase in total area of gastric erosions was reduced by pretreatment with TMG in a dose-dependent manner. The increases of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBA-RS) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity 3 h after aspirin administration were significantly inhibited by pretreatment with TMG. The gastric concentration of cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractants-1 (CINC-1) increased after aspirin administration, and the increase was also inhibited by pretreatment with TMG. These results suggest that TMG is effective for the treatment of aspirin-induced gastric injury. This anti-inflammatory effect of TMG seems to be related to impairment of lipid peroxidation, neutrophil function and cytokine production in gastric mucosa.

  6. GASTRIN, INFLAMMATION, AND CARCINOGENESIS

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Celia; Hellmich, Mark R.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review Chronic infection of the gastric mucosa with Helicobacter pylori has long been recognized as a significant risk factor for gastric cancer, and indeed, this model represents the prototypical inflammation-associated cancer. In this review, we present the latest clinical and experimental evidence showing that gastrin peptides and their receptors (the cholecystokinin [CCK2] receptors) potentiate the progression of gastric cancer and other gastrointestinal malignancies in the presence of inflammation. Recent Findings We highlight the feed-forward mechanisms by which gastrin and CCK2 receptor expression are upregulated during inflammation and in GI cancers, summarize gastrin’s pro-inflammatory role by inducing the production cyclooxgenase-2 (COX-2) and interleukin-8 (IL-8), and relate evidence suggesting that gastrin and their receptors modulate the function of immune cells and fibroblasts following cellular stress, injury, repair, as well as during cancer progression. Summary We discuss trends for future studies directed toward the elucidation of gastrin peptides’ role in regulating inter-cellular molecular signaling mechanisms between local and circulating immune cells, fibroblasts, epithelial cells, and other cell-types in the microenvironments of inflammation-related cancers. Elucidation of the molecular and cellular pathways that relate inflammation with cancer may provide additional opportunities to develop complementary therapies that target the inflammatory microenvironment of the cancer. PMID:19907321

  7. The potentiation of taurocholate-induced rat gastric erosions following parenteral administration of cyclo-oxygenase inhibitors.

    PubMed Central

    Whittle, B. J.

    1983-01-01

    Subcutaneous administration of anti-inflammatory doses of aspirin, indomethacin, naproxen and flurbiprofen inhibited prostacyclin formation ex vivo in the luminally-perfused gastric mucosa of anaesthetized rats. These doses of anti-inflammatory compounds potentiated the formation of gastric mucosal erosions following 3 h luminal perfusion of the topical irritant, acidified sodium taurocholate (2 mM in 100 mM HCl). The increase in luminal acid-loss during gastric perfusion of acidified taurocholate was not significantly enhanced by these anti-inflammatory agents. A correlation was found between the increase in gastric erosion formation and the inhibition of mucosal prostacyclin formation ex vivo by intravenous injection of aspirin or ketoprofen during acid-taurocholate perfusion. BW755C, which failed to inhibit mucosal prostacyclin formation ex vivo, did not significantly augment acid-taurocholate induced gastric damage. The present findings support the potentiating interactions between topical irritation and inhibition of gastric cyclo-oxygenase in the genesis of the gastric lesions. PMID:6416343

  8. Preventive Effects of Tocotrienol on Stress-Induced Gastric Mucosal Lesions and Its Relation to Oxidative and Inflammatory Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Nur Azlina, Mohd Fahami; Ibrahim, Ibrahim Abdel Aziz

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the possible gastroprotective effect of tocotrienol against water-immersion restraint stress (WIRS) induced gastric ulcers in rats by measuring its effect on gastric mucosal nitric oxide (NO), oxidative stress, and inflammatory biomarkers. Twenty-eight male Wistar rats were randomly assigned to four groups of seven rats. The two control groups were administered vitamin-free palm oil (vehicle) and the two treatment groups were given omeprazole (20 mg/kg) or tocotrienol (60 mg/kg) orally. After 28 days, rats from one control group and both treated groups were subjected to WIRS for 3.5 hours once. Malondialdehyde (MDA), NO content, and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity were assayed in gastric tissue homogenates. Gastric tissue SOD, iNOS, TNF-α and IL1-β expression were measured. WIRS increased the gastric MDA, NO, and pro-inflammatory cytokines levels significantly when compared to the non-stressed control group. Administration of tocotrienol and omeprazole displayed significant protection against gastric ulcers induced by exposure to WIRS by correction of both ulcer score and MDA content. Tissue content of TNF-α and SOD activity were markedly reduced by the treatment with tocotrienol but not omeprazole. Tocotrienol significantly corrected nitrite to near normal levels and attenuated iNOS gene expression, which was upregulated in this ulcer model. In conclusion, oral supplementation with tocotrienol provides a gastroprotective effect in WIRS-induced ulcers. Gastroprotection is mediated through 1) free radical scavenging activity, 2) the increase in gastric mucosal antioxidant enzyme activity, 3) normalisation of gastric mucosal NO through reduction of iNOS expression, and 4) attenuation of inflammatory cytokines. In comparison to omeprazole, it exerts similar effectiveness but has a more diverse mechanism of protection, particularly through its effect on NO, SOD activity, and TNF-α. PMID:26465592

  9. Strawberry Polyphenols Attenuate Ethanol-Induced Gastric Lesions in Rats by Activation of Antioxidant Enzymes and Attenuation of MDA Increase

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez-Suarez, José M.; Dekanski, Dragana; Ristić, Slavica; Radonjić, Nevena V.; Petronijević, Nataša D.; Giampieri, Francesca; Astolfi, Paola; González-Paramás, Ana M.; Santos-Buelga, Celestino; Tulipani, Sara; Quiles, José L.; Mezzetti, Bruno; Battino, Maurizio

    2011-01-01

    Background and Aim Free radicals are implicated in the aetiology of gastrointestinal disorders such as gastric ulcer, colorectal cancer and inflammatory bowel disease. Strawberries are common and important fruit due to their high content of essential nutrient and beneficial phytochemicals which seem to have relevant biological activity on human health. In the present study we investigated the antioxidant and protective effects of three strawberry extracts against ethanol-induced gastric mucosa damage in an experimental in vivo model and to test whether strawberry extracts affect antioxidant enzyme activities in gastric mucosa. Methods/Principal Findings Strawberry extracts were obtained from Adria, Sveva and Alba cultivars. Total antioxidant capacity and radical scavenging capacity were performed by TEAC, ORAC and electron paramagnetic resonance assays. Identification and quantification of anthocyanins was carried out by HPLC-DAD-MS analyses. Different groups of animals received 40 mg/day/kg body weight of strawberry crude extracts for 10 days. Gastric damage was induced by ethanol. The ulcer index was calculated together with the determination of catalase and SOD activities and MDA contents. Strawberry extracts are rich in anthocyanins and present important antioxidant capacity. Ethanol caused severe gastric damage and strawberry consumption protected against its deleterious role. Antioxidant enzyme activities increased significantly after strawberry extract intake and a concomitantly decrease in gastric lipid peroxidation was found. A significant correlation between total anthocyanin content and percent of inhibition of ulcer index was also found. Conclusions Strawberry extracts prevented exogenous ethanol-induced damage to rats' gastric mucosa. These effects seem to be associated with the antioxidant activity and phenolic content in the extract as well as with the capacity of promoting the action of antioxidant enzymes. A diet rich in strawberries might exert a

  10. Risk assessment of mouse gastric tissue cancer induced by dichlorvos and dimethoate

    PubMed Central

    WANG, QING-LU; ZHANG, YU-JUN; ZHOU, CAI-XIA; ZHANG, JIE; DOU, YE; LI, QIAO-QIAO

    2013-01-01

    Cancer hazards from pesticide residues in food have been much discussed in the past decade. In this study, we showed that dichlorvos and dimethoate affect hemoglobin content and hematocrit value, but had no effect on red blood cell counts and total plasma protein in mice. A 40-mg/kg/day dose of dichlorvos upregulated the expression of p16, Bcl-2 and c-myc genes in mouse gastric tissue. By contrast, expression of the p16, Bcl-2 and c-myc genes induced by low doses (5, 10 and 20 mg/kg/day) of dichlorvos demonstrated no change in the control check group (CK; 200 μl sterile saline perfused group; 0 mg/kg/day). Different doses of dimethoate all upregulated the expression of p16, Bcl-2 and c-myc genes in mouse gastric tissue. The results further demonstrated that mouse gastric tissue, exposed in the long-term to low doses of dichlorvos and dimethoate, has the potential to become cancerous. PMID:23599799

  11. Risk assessment of mouse gastric tissue cancer induced by dichlorvos and dimethoate.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qing-Lu; Zhang, Yu-Jun; Zhou, Cai-Xia; Zhang, Jie; Dou, Ye; Li, Qiao-Qiao

    2013-04-01

    Cancer hazards from pesticide residues in food have been much discussed in the past decade. In this study, we showed that dichlorvos and dimethoate affect hemoglobin content and hematocrit value, but had no effect on red blood cell counts and total plasma protein in mice. A 40-mg/kg/day dose of dichlorvos upregulated the expression of p16, Bcl-2 and c-myc genes in mouse gastric tissue. By contrast, expression of the p16, Bcl-2 and c-myc genes induced by low doses (5, 10 and 20 mg/kg/day) of dichlorvos demonstrated no change in the control check group (CK; 200 μl sterile saline perfused group; 0 mg/kg/day). Different doses of dimethoate all upregulated the expression of p16, Bcl-2 and c-myc genes in mouse gastric tissue. The results further demonstrated that mouse gastric tissue, exposed in the long-term to low doses of dichlorvos and dimethoate, has the potential to become cancerous.

  12. Effects of eating on vection-induced motion sickness, cardiac vagal tone, and gastric myoelectric activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uijtdehaage, S. H.; Stern, R. M.; Koch, K. L.

    1992-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of food ingestion on motion sickness severity and its physiological mechanisms. Forty-six fasted subjects were assigned either to a meal group or to a no-meal group. Electrogastrographic (EGG) indices (normal 3 cpm activity and abnormal 4-9 cpm tachyarrhythmia) and respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) were measured before and after a meal and during a subsequent exposure to a rotating drum in which illusory self-motion was induced. The results indicated that food intake enhanced cardiac parasympathetic tone (RSA) and increased gastric 3 cpm activity. Postprandial effects on motion sickness severity remain equivocal due to group differences in RSA baseline levels. During drum rotation, dysrhythmic activity of the stomach (tachyarrhythmia) and vagal withdrawal were observed. Furthermore, high levels of vagal tone prior to drum rotation predicted a low incidence of motion sickness symptoms, and were associated positively with gastric 3 cpm activity and negatively with tachyarrhythmia. These data suggest that enhanced levels of parasympathetic activity can alleviate motion sickness symptoms by suppressing, in part, its dysrhythmic gastric underpinnings.

  13. The antiulcer effect of Cibotium barometz leaves in rats with experimentally induced acute gastric ulcer

    PubMed Central

    AL-Wajeeh, Nahla Saeed; Hajrezaie, Maryam; Al-Henhena, Nawal; Kamran, Sareh; Bagheri, Elham; Zahedifard, Maryam; Saremi, Kamelia; Noor, Suzita Mohd; Ali, Hapipah Mohd; Abdulla, Mahmood Ameen

    2017-01-01

    Cibotium barometz is a pharmaceutical plant customarily used in traditional medicine in Malaysia for the treatment of different diseases, such as gastric ulcer. The gastroprotective effect of C. barometz leaves against ethanol-induced gastric hemorrhagic abrasions in Sprague Dawley rats has been evaluated in terms of medicinal properties. Seven groups of rats (normal control and ulcerated control groups, omeprazole 20 mg/kg, 62.5, 125, 250, and 500 mg/kg of C. barometz correspondingly) were used in antiulcer experiment and pretreated with 10% Tween 20. After 1 hour, the normal group was orally administered 10% Tween 20, whereas absolute alcohol was fed orally to ulcerated control, omeprazole, and experimental groups. Gastric’s homogenate were assessed for endogenous enzymes activities. Stomachs were examined macroscopically and histologically. Grossly, the data demonstrated a significant decrease in the ulcer area of rats pretreated with plant extract in a dose-dependent manner with respect to the ulcerated group. Homogenates of the gastric tissue exhibited significantly increased endogenous enzymes activities in rats pretreated with C. barometz extract associated with the ulcerated control group. Histology of rats pretreated with C. barometz extract group using hematoxylin and eosin staining exhibited a moderate-to-mild disruption of the surface epithelium with reduction in submucosal edema and leucocyte infiltration in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, it showed heat shock protein70 protein up-expression and BCL2-associated X protein downexpression. These outcomes might be attributed to the gastroprotective and antioxidative effects of the plant.

  14. Protective effect of Cupressus sempervirens extract against indomethacin-induced gastric ulcer in rats

    PubMed Central

    Gad, Islam B.; Nasiry, Zayenab K.

    2015-01-01

    Cupressus sempervirens (C. sempervirens) belongs to the family Cupressaceae. It is widspread in Northern Africa, Greece, Turkey, North America, Cyprus and Syria. Cupressuflavone is the major ingredient of the plant leave extract. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the antiulcerogenic activity of the extract of C. sempervirens leaves in gastric ulcer tissues induced by indomethacin. The results of the present study revealed that indomethacin significantly decreased glutathione S-transferase (GST), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), catalase (CAT), reduced glutathione (GSH), glutathione reductase (GR) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) levels, while it increased significantly lipid peroxidation (MDA), nitric oxide (NO) and protein carbonyl (PC) levels in gastric tissue. Furthermore, indomethacin decreased p53 expression, while it increased bcl-2 expression in gastric tissue. Pretreatment with 5%, 10% & 20% of the LD50 of C. sempervirens and cupressuflavone of indomethacin-treated rats restored all the above parameters to approach normal values. C. sempervirens at the highest dose was more effective than the two lower doses. C. sempervirens proved more potent than cupressuflavone. In conclusion, C. sempervirens exerted antiulcerogenic activity and the effect was dose-dependent and related to the cupressuflavone ingredient of the plant leave extract. PMID:27486357

  15. Helicobacter pylori CagA induced interleukin-8 secretion in gastric epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Fazeli, Zeinab; Alebouyeh, Masoud; Rezaei Tavirani, Mostafa; Azimirad, Masoumeh; Yadegar, Abbas

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Since, contradictory data have been reported about the effect of diverse variants of H. pylori virulence factors on IL-8 induction, we aimed to analyze the effect of this diversity on levels of IL-8 secretion in AGS cell line. Background: Helicobacter pylori colonizes the human stomach and induces the activation of inflammatory cytokines, including interleukin (IL)-8, in the gastric mucosa. This induction promotes neutrophil and monocyte recruitment that causes gastric tissue damage. Methods: To determine whether different strains of H. pylori and their CagA variants have possible roles on IL-8 induction, polarized AGS cell line was infected with CagA+ H. pylori strains carrying different EPIYA motifs (ABCCC and ABC) and CagA- strain for 24 hours. Difference in stimulation of IL-8 was measured by ELISA. Results: IL-8 secretion was elevated in the treated cells with CagA encoding strains compared with the negative one. Furthermore, a noticeably increased level of IL-8 induction was measured by the CagA-EPIYA type ABCCC encoding strain in compare to that carried EPIYA type ABC Conclusion: Results of this study provide new evidence about different effects of H. pylori strains and possible roles of their CagA variants on IL-8 induction. It seems that not only carriage of cagA and its expression, but also diversity in EPIYA motif be involved in IL-8 induction in the gastric epithelial cells. PMID:28224027

  16. Aberrant Cytokeratin Expression During Arsenic-induced Acquired Malignant Phenotype in Human HaCaT Keratinocytes Consistent with Epidermal Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yang; Pi, Jingbo; Wang, Xueqian; Tokar, Erik J.; Liu, Jie; Waalkes, Michael P.

    2009-01-01

    Inorganic arsenic is a known human skin carcinogen. Chronic arsenic exposure results in various human skin lesions, including hyperkeratosis and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), both characterized by distorted cytokeratin (CK) production. Prior work shows the human skin keratinocyte HaCaT cell line, when exposed chronically for >25 weeks to a low level of inorganic arsenite (100 nM) results in cells able to produce aggressive SCC upon inoculation into nude mice. In the present study, CK expression analysis was performed in arsenic-exposed HaCaT cells during the progressive acquisition of this malignant phenotype (0 to 20 weeks) to further validate this model as relevant to epidermal carcinogenesis induced by arsenic in humans. Indeed, we observed clear evidence of acquired cancer phenotype by 20 weeks of arsenite exposure including the formation of giant cells, a >4-fold increase in colony formation in soft agar and a ∼2.5-fold increase in matrix metalloproteinase-9 secretion, an enzyme often secreted by cancer cells to help invade through the local extra-cellular matrix. During this acquired malignant phenotype, various CK genes showed markedly altered expression at the transcript and protein levels in a time-dependent manner. For example, CK1, a marker of hyperkeratosis, increased up to 34-fold during arsenic-induced transformation, while CK13, a marker for dermal cancer progression, increased up to 45-fold. The stem cell marker, CK15, increased up to 7-fold, particularly during the later stages of arsenic exposure, indicating a potential emergence of cancer stem-like cells with arsenic-induced acquired malignant phenotype. The expression of involucrin and loricrin, markers for keratinocyte differentiation, increased up to 9-fold. Thus, during arsenic-induced acquired cancer phenotype in human keratinocytes, dramatic and dynamic alterations in CK expression occur which are consistent with the process of epidermal carcinogenesis helping validate this as an

  17. Aberrant cytokeratin expression during arsenic-induced acquired malignant phenotype in human HaCaT keratinocytes consistent with epidermal carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yang; Pi, Jingbo; Wang, Xueqian; Tokar, Erik J; Liu, Jie; Waalkes, Michael P

    2009-08-03

    Inorganic arsenic is a known human skin carcinogen. Chronic arsenic exposure results in various human skin lesions, including hyperkeratosis and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), both characterized by distorted cytokeratin (CK) production. Prior work shows the human skin keratinocyte HaCaT cell line, when exposed chronically for >25 weeks to a low level of inorganic arsenite (100nM) results in cells able to produce aggressive SCC upon inoculation into nude mice. In the present study, CK expression analysis was performed in arsenic-exposed HaCaT cells during the progressive acquisition of this malignant phenotype (0-20 weeks) to further validate this model as relevant to epidermal carcinogenesis induced by arsenic in humans. Indeed, we observed clear evidence of acquired cancer phenotype by 20 weeks of arsenite exposure including the formation of giant cells, a >4-fold increase in colony formation in soft agar and a approximately 2.5-fold increase in matrix metalloproteinase-9 secretion, an enzyme often secreted by cancer cells to help invade through the local extra-cellular matrix. During this acquired malignant phenotype, various CK genes showed markedly altered expression at the transcript and protein levels in a time-dependent manner. For example, CK1, a marker of hyperkeratosis, increased up to 34-fold during arsenic-induced transformation, while CK13, a marker for dermal cancer progression, increased up to 45-fold. The stem cell marker, CK15, increased up to 7-fold, particularly during the later stages of arsenic exposure, indicating a potential emergence of cancer stem-like cells with arsenic-induced acquired malignant phenotype. The expression of involucrin and loricrin, markers for keratinocyte differentiation, increased up to 9-fold. Thus, during arsenic-induced acquired cancer phenotype in human keratinocytes, dramatic and dynamic alterations in CK expression occur which are consistent with the process of epidermal carcinogenesis helping validate this as an

  18. Betulin induces reactive oxygen species-dependent apoptosis in human gastric cancer SGC7901 cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; Liu, Xiaokang; Jiang, Dan; Lin, Yingjia; Wang, Yushi; Li, Qing; Liu, Linlin; Jin, Ying-Hua

    2016-09-01

    Betulin, an abundant natural compound, significantly inhibited the cell viability of advanced human gastric cancer SGC7901 cells. Mechanism study demonstrated that betulin induced apoptosis through mitochondrial Bax and Bak accumulation-mediated intrinsic apoptosis pathway. Downregulation of the anti-apoptosis proteins Bcl-2 and XIAP was involved during betulin-induced cell apoptosis. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) was generated in cells after betulin treatment in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Addition of antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) significantly attenuated betulin-induced ROS generation as well as Bcl-2 and XIAP downregulation. The mitochondrial accumulation of Bax and Bak, as well as caspase activity, was also remarkably inhibited by NAC treatment, indicating that ROS are important signaling intermediates that lead to betulin-induced apoptosis by modulating multiple apoptosis-regulating proteins in SGC7901 cells.

  19. Neural Mechanisms and Delayed Gastric Emptying of Liquid Induced Through Acute Myocardial Infarction in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Nunez, Wilson Ranu Ramirez; Ozaki, Michiko Regina; Vinagre, Adriana Mendes; Collares, Edgard Ferro; de Almeida, Eros Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Background In pathological situations, such as acute myocardial infarction, disorders of motility of the proximal gut can trigger symptoms like nausea and vomiting. Acute myocardial infarction delays gastric emptying (GE) of liquid in rats. Objective Investigate the involvement of the vagus nerve, α 1-adrenoceptors, central nervous system GABAB receptors and also participation of paraventricular nucleus (PVN) of the hypothalamus in GE and gastric compliance (GC) in infarcted rats. Methods Wistar rats, N = 8-15 in each group, were divided as INF group and sham (SH) group and subdivided. The infarction was performed through ligation of the left anterior descending coronary artery. GC was estimated with pressure-volume curves. Vagotomy was performed by sectioning the dorsal and ventral branches. To verify the action of GABAB receptors, baclofen was injected via icv (intracerebroventricular). Intravenous prazosin was used to produce chemical sympathectomy. The lesion in the PVN of the hypothalamus was performed using a 1mA/10s electrical current and GE was determined by measuring the percentage of gastric retention (% GR) of a saline meal. Results No significant differences were observed regarding GC between groups; vagotomy significantly reduced % GR in INF group; icv treatment with baclofen significantly reduced %GR. GABAB receptors were not conclusively involved in delaying GE; intravenous treatment with prazosin significantly reduced GR% in INF group. PVN lesion abolished the effect of myocardial infarction on GE. Conclusion Gastric emptying of liquids induced through acute myocardial infarction in rats showed the involvement of the vagus nerve, alpha1- adrenergic receptors and PVN. PMID:25494017

  20. Neuronal correlates of gastric pain induced by fundus distension: a 3T-fMRI study.

    PubMed

    Lu, C-L; Wu, Y-T; Yeh, T-C; Chen, L-F; Chang, F-Y; Lee, S-D; Ho, L-T; Hsieh, J-C

    2004-10-01

    Visceral hypersensitivity in gastric fundus is a possible pathogenesis for functional dyspepsia. The cortical representation of gastric fundus is still unclear. Growing evidence shows that the insula, but not the primary or secondary somatosensory region (SI or SII), may be the cortical target for visceral pain. Animal studies have also demonstrated that amygdala plays an important role in processing visceral pain. We used fMRI to study central projection of stomach pain from fundus balloon distension. We also tested the hypothesis that there will be neither S1 nor S2 activation, but amygdala activation with the fundus distension. A 3T-fMRI was performed on 10 healthy subjects during baseline, fullness (12.7 +/- 0.6 mmHg) and moderate gastric pain (17.0 +/- 0.8 mmHg). fMRI signal was modelled by convolving the predetermined psychophysical response. Statistical comparisons were performed between conditions on a group level. Gastric pain activated a wide range of cortical and subcortical structures, including thalamus and insula, anterior and posterior cingulate cortices, basal ganglia, caudate nuclei, amygdala, brain stem, cerebellum and prefrontal cortex (P < 0.001). A subset of these neuronal substrates was engaged in the central processing of fullness sensation. SI and SII were not activated during the fundus stimulation. In conclusion, the constellation of neuronal structures activated by fundus distension overlaps the pain matrices induced musculocutaneous pain, with the exception of the absence of SI or SII activation. This may account for the vague nature of visceral sensation/pain. Our data also confirms that the insula and amygdala may act as the central role in visceral sensation/pain, as well as in the proposed sensory-limbic model of learning and memory of pain.

  1. Contractile profile of esophageal and gastric fundus strips in experimental doxorubicin-induced esophageal atresia.

    PubMed

    Capeto, F A; Lima, F J B; Okoba, W; Ramos, F L; Messias, T F A; Rigonatto, G A; Sbragia, L; Magalhães, P J C; Melo-Filho, A A

    2015-05-01

    Esophageal atresia (EA) is characterized by esophageal and gastric motility changes secondary to developmental and postsurgical damage. This study evaluated the in vitro contractile profile of the distal esophagus and gastric fundus in an experimental model of EA induced by doxorubicin (DOXO). Wistar pregnant rats received DOXO 2.2 mg/kg on the 8th and 9th gestational days. On day 21