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Sample records for gastrin receptor-expressing tumours

  1. Circulating gastrin and ghrelin levels in patients with colorectal cancer: correlation with tumour stage, Helicobacter pylori infection and BMI.

    PubMed

    D'Onghia, V; Leoncini, R; Carli, R; Santoro, A; Giglioni, S; Sorbellini, F; Marzocca, G; Bernini, A; Campagna, S; Marinello, E; Vannoni, D

    2007-01-01

    Many studies have pointed out a possible role of gut peptides, including gastrin and ghrelin, in the pathogenesis and natural history of gastrointestinal malignancies, one of the most common death cause in the Western world. The objective of this work is to check gastrin and ghrelin serum levels in patients with colorectal cancer according to tumour's location, stage, Helicobacter pylori infection and BMI, in order to understand the two peptides' behaviour through the tumour's natural history and evaluate their assay's use in research and clinical practice. Twenty-nine subjects affected by colorectal cancer and 50 healthy controls were studied. Circulating gastrin and ghrelin levels and H. pylori serum antibodies were assessed by radioimmunologic assay and ELISA method. Gastrin and ghrelin serum levels were respectively slightly higher and significantly lower in colon cancer patients than in controls. Gastrin levels were higher in patients carrying left colon cancer and H. pylori infection while ghrelin levels were lower in both these groups. Both hormones' serum levels decreased from tumour earlier to later stages. Significant differences persisted in the correlation between BMI and ghrelin levels in controls but not in patients. Additional studies are necessary to ascertain the significance of gastrin and ghrelin opposite behaviour in colon cancer probably linked with interferences in endocrine pathways involving other gut peptides in this compromised condition. PMID:17258885

  2. Analysis of CC chemokine and chemokine receptor expression in solid ovarian tumours

    PubMed Central

    Scotton, C; Milliken, D; Wilson, J; Raju, S; Balkwill, F

    2001-01-01

    To understand the chemokine network in a tissue, both chemokine and chemokine receptor expression should be studied. Human epithelial ovarian tumours express a range of chemokines but little is known about the expression and localisation of chemokine receptors. With the aim of understanding chemokine action in this cancer, we investigated receptors for CC–chemokines and their ligands in 25 biopsies of human ovarian cancer. CC–chemokine receptor mRNA was generally absent from solid tumours, the exception being CCR1 which was detected in samples from 75% of patients. CCR1 mRNA localised to macrophages and lymphocytes and there was a correlation between numbers of CD8+ and CCR1 expressing cells (P = 0.031). mRNA for 6 CC-chemokines was expressed in a majority of tumour samples. In a monocytic cell line in vitro, we found that CCR1 mRNA expression was increased 5-fold by hypoxia. We suggest that the CC-chemokine network in ovarian cancer is controlled at the level of CC-chemokine receptors and this may account for the phenotypes of infiltrating cells found in these tumours. The leukocyte infiltrate may contribute to tumour growth and spread by providing growth survival factors and matrix metalloproteases. Thus, CCR1 may be a novel therapeutic target in ovarian cancer. http://www.bjcancer.com © 2001 Cancer Research Campaignhttp://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11556842

  3. Co-stimulation of gastrointestinal tumour cell growth by gastrin, transforming growth factor alpha and insulin like growth factor-I.

    PubMed Central

    Durrant, L. G.; Watson, S. A.; Hall, A.; Morris, D. L.

    1991-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptors and insulin like growth factor-I receptors were co-expressed on two gastric and three colorectal tumour cell lines. Previous studies have shown that gastrin receptors were also expressed at a low level or two of these cell lines. Both TGF alpha and IGF-I promoted cell growth in all of the cell lines tested. The cell doubling time of a colorectal cell line was reduced from 48 to 30-34 h. Furthermore the effects of the growth factors were additive. Each growth factor also increased the response of the cells to gastrin, but a combination of both growth factors and gastrin did not further increase growth. PMID:1846553

  4. Gastrin radioimmunoassay

    SciTech Connect

    McGuigan, J.E.; Wolfe, M.M.

    1982-02-01

    The radioimmunoassay for gastrin is based on competition by unlabeled antigen, i.e., gastrin in the form of synthetic human gastrin I heptadecapeptide (SHG) as standard and (or) gastrin unknown with radiolabeled gastrin (/sub 125/I-SHG), for specific binding sites on antibodies to gastrin, produced in experimental animals. The concentrations of antibody and radiolabeled antigen are kept constant, and standard calibration curves are established by including various concentrations of unlabeled gastrin in the incubation tubes. The antigen, gastrin, is added to concentrations in excess of antibody, to ensure competition between /sub 125/I-SHG and gastrin for the available antibody-binding sites. In this system of competitive inhibition, the proportion of antibody-bound /sub 125/I-SHG is inversely related to the quantity of unlabeled gastrin included in the incubation mixture. Unlabeled antigen (gastrin) available for binding by antibody is either the gastrin present in the standards included in the construction of calibration curves or gastrin present in the unknown samples to be measured. As with other radioimmunoassay techniques, radioimmunoassay of gastrin requires: (a) production of antibodies specific for gastrin, (b) availability of a pure form of the peptide for radiolabeling, (c) preparation of a radiolabeled form of gastrin, and (d) an effective method of separating antibody-bound peptide from free.

  5. PET imaging of epidermal growth factor receptor expression in tumours using 89Zr-labelled ZEGFR:2377 affibody molecules

    PubMed Central

    GAROUSI, JAVAD; ANDERSSON, KEN G.; MITRAN, BOGDAN; PICHL, MARIE-LOUISE; STÅHL, STEFAN; ORLOVA, ANNA; LÖFBLOM, JOHN; TOLMACHEV, VLADIMIR

    2016-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a transmembrane tyrosine kinase receptor, which is overexpressed in many types of cancer. The use of EGFR-targeting monoclonal antibodies and tyrosine-kinase inhibitors improves significantly survival of patients with colorectal, non-small cell lung cancer and head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Detection of EGFR overexpression provides important prognostic and predictive information influencing management of the patients. The use of radionuclide molecular imaging would enable non-invasive repeatable determination of EGFR expression in disseminated cancer. Moreover, positron emission tomography (PET) would provide superior sensitivity and quantitation accuracy in EGFR expression imaging. Affibody molecules are a new type of imaging probes, providing high contrast in molecular imaging. In the present study, an EGFR-binding affibody molecule (ZEGFR:2377) was site-specifically conjugated with a deferoxamine (DFO) chelator and labelled under mild conditions (room temperature and neutral pH) with a positron-emitting radionuclide 89Zr. The 89Zr-DFO-ZEGFR:2377 tracer demonstrated specific high affinity (160±60 pM) binding to EGFR-expressing A431 epidermoid carcinoma cell line. In mice bearing A431 xenografts, 89Zr-DFO-ZEGFR:2377 demonstrated specific uptake in tumours and EGFR-expressing tissues. The tracer provided tumour uptake of 2.6±0.5% ID/g and tumour-to-blood ratio of 3.7±0.6 at 24 h after injection. 89Zr-DFO-ZEGFR:2377 provides higher tumour-to-organ ratios than anti-EGFR antibody 89Zr-DFO-cetuximab at 48 h after injection. EGFR-expressing tumours were clearly visualized by microPET using 89Zr-DFO-ZEGFR:2377 at both 3 and 24 h after injection. In conclusion, 89Zr-DFO-ZEGFR:2377 is a potential probe for PET imaging of EGFR-expression in vivo. PMID:26847636

  6. PET imaging of epidermal growth factor receptor expression in tumours using 89Zr-labelled ZEGFR:2377 affibody molecules.

    PubMed

    Garousi, Javad; Andersson, Ken G; Mitran, Bogdan; Pichl, Marie-Louise; Ståhl, Stefan; Orlova, Anna; Löfblom, John; Tolmachev, Vladimir

    2016-04-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a transmembrane tyrosine kinase receptor, which is overexpressed in many types of cancer. The use of EGFR-targeting monoclonal antibodies and tyrosine-kinase inhibitors improves significantly survival of patients with colorectal, non-small cell lung cancer and head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Detection of EGFR overexpression provides important prognostic and predictive information influencing management of the patients. The use of radionuclide molecular imaging would enable non-invasive repeatable determination of EGFR expression in disseminated cancer. Moreover, positron emission tomography (PET) would provide superior sensitivity and quantitation accuracy in EGFR expression imaging. Affibody molecules are a new type of imaging probes, providing high contrast in molecular imaging. In the present study, an EGFR-binding affibody molecule (ZEGFR:2377) was site-specifically conjugated with a deferoxamine (DFO) chelator and labelled under mild conditions (room temperature and neutral pH) with a positron-emitting radionuclide (89)Zr. The (89)Zr-DFO-ZEGFR:2377 tracer demonstrated specific high affinity (160 ± 60 pM) binding to EGFR-expressing A431 epidermoid carcinoma cell line. In mice bearing A431 xenografts, (89)Zr-DFO-ZEGFR:2377 demonstrated specific uptake in tumours and EGFR-expressing tissues. The tracer provided tumour uptake of 2.6 ± 0.5% ID/g and tumour-to-blood ratio of 3.7 ± 0.6 at 24 h after injection. (89)Zr-DFO-ZEGFR:2377 provides higher tumour-to-organ ratios than anti-EGFR antibody (89)Zr-DFO-cetuximab at 48 h after injection. EGFR‑expressing tumours were clearly visualized by microPET using (89)Zr-DFO-ZEGFR:2377 at both 3 and 24 h after injection. In conclusion, 8(9)Zr-DFO-ZEGFR:2377 is a potential probe for PET imaging of EGFR-expression in vivo. PMID:26847636

  7. Androgen receptor expression in circulating tumour cells from castration-resistant prostate cancer patients treated with novel endocrine agents

    PubMed Central

    Crespo, M; van Dalum, G; Ferraldeschi, R; Zafeiriou, Z; Sideris, S; Lorente, D; Bianchini, D; Rodrigues, D N; Riisnaes, R; Miranda, S; Figueiredo, I; Flohr, P; Nowakowska, K; de Bono, J S; Terstappen, L W M M; Attard, G

    2015-01-01

    Background: Abiraterone and enzalutamide are novel endocrine treatments that abrogate androgen receptor (AR) signalling in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Here, we developed a circulating tumour cells (CTCs)-based assay to evaluate AR expression in real-time in CRPC and investigated nuclear AR expression in CTCs in patients treated with enzalutamide and abiraterone. Methods: CTCs were captured and characterised using the CellSearch system. An automated algorithm to identify CTCs and quantify AR expression was employed. The primary aim was to evaluate the association between CTC AR expression and prior treatment with abiraterone or enzalutamide. Results: AR expression in CTCs was evaluated in 94 samples from 48 metastatic CRPC patients. We observed large intra-patient heterogeneity of AR expression in CTCs. Prior exposure to abiraterone or enzalutamide was not associated with a change in CTCs AR expression (median intensity and distribution of AR-positive classes). In support of this, we also confirmed maintained nuclear AR expression in tissue samples collected after progression on abiraterone. AR staining also identified additional AR-positive CD45-negative circulating cells that were CK-negative/weak and therefore missed using standard protocols. The number of these events correlated with traditional CTCs and was associated with worse outcome on univariate analysis. Conclusions: We developed a non-invasive method to monitor AR nuclear expression in CTCs. Our studies confirm nuclear AR expression in CRPC patients progressing on novel endocrine treatments. Owing to the significant heterogeneity of AR expression in CTCs, studies in larger cohorts of patients are required to identify associations with outcome. PMID:25719830

  8. Gastrin receptor-avid peptide conjugates

    DOEpatents

    Hoffman, Timothy J.; Volkert, Wynn A.; Li, Ning; Sieckman, Gary; Higginbotham, Chrys-Ann

    2006-12-12

    A compound for use as a therapeutic or diagnostic radiopharmaceutical includes a group capable of complexing a medically useful metal attached to a moiety which is capable of binding to a gastrin releasing peptide receptor. A method for treating a subject having a neoplastic disease includes administering to the subject an effective amount of a radiopharmaceutical having a metal chelated with a chelating group attached to a moiety capable of binding to a gastrin releasing peptide receptor expressed on tumor cells with subsequent internalization inside of the cell. A method of forming a therapeutic or diagnostic compound includes reacting a metal synthon with a chelating group covalently linked with a moiety capable of binding a gastrin releasing peptide receptor.

  9. Gastrin Receptor-Avid Peptide Conjugates

    DOEpatents

    Hoffman, Timothy J.; Volkert, Wynn A.; Li, Ning; Sieckman, Gary; Higginbotham, Chrys-Ann

    2005-07-26

    A compound for use as a therapeutic or diagnostic radiopharmaceutical includes a group capable of complexing a medically useful metal attached to a moiety which is capable of binding to a gastrin releasing peptide receptor. A method for treating a subject having a neoplastic disease includes administering to the subject an effective amount of a radiopharmaceutical having a metal chelated with a chelating group attached to a moiety capable of binding to a gastrin releasing peptide receptor expressed on tumor cells with subsequent internalization inside of the cell. A method of forming a therapeutic or diagnostic compound includes reacting a metal synthon with a chelating group covalently linked with a moiety capable of binding a gastrin releasing peptide receptor.

  10. Gastrin receptor-avid peptide conjugates

    DOEpatents

    Hoffman, Timothy J.; Volkert, Wynn A.; Sieckman, Gary; Smith, Charles J.; Gali, Hariprasad

    2006-06-13

    A compound for use as a therapeutic or diagnostic radiopharmaceutical includes a group capable of complexing a medically useful metal attached to a moiety which is capable of binding to a gastrin releasing peptide receptor. A method for treating a subject having a neoplastic disease includes administering to the subject an effective amount of a radiopharmaceutical having a metal chelated with a chelating group attached to a-moiety capable of binding to a gastrin releasing peptide receptor expressed on tumor cells with subsequent internalization inside of the cell. A method of forming a therapeutic or diagnostic compound includes reacting a metal synthon with a chelating group covalently linked with a moiety capable of binding a gastrin releasing peptide receptor.

  11. Gastrin receptor-avid peptide conjugates

    DOEpatents

    Hoffman, Timothy J.; Volkert, Wynn A.; Li, Ning; Sieckman, Gary; Higginbotham, C. A.

    2001-01-01

    A compound for use as a therapeutic or diagnostic radiopharmaceutical includes a group capable of complexing a medically useful metal attached to a moiety which is capable of binding to a gastrin releasing peptide receptor. A method for treating a subject having a neoplastic disease includes administering to the subject an effective amount of a radiopharmaceutical having a metal chelated with a chelating group attached to a moiety capable of binding to a gastrin releasing peptide receptor expressed on tumor cells with subsequent internalization inside of the cell. A method of forming a therapeutic or diagnostic compound includes reacting a metal synthon with a chelating group covalently linked with a moiety capable of binding a gastrin releasing peptide receptor.

  12. Gastrin attenuates ischemia-reperfusion-induced intestinal injury in rats

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhihao; Luo, Yongli; Cheng, Yunjiu; Zou, Dezhi; Zeng, Aihong; Yang, Chunhua

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury is a devastating complication when the blood supply is reflowed in ischemic organs. Gastrin has critical function in regulating acid secretion, proliferation, and differentiation in the gastric mucosa. We aimed to determine whether gastrin has an effect on intestinal I/R damage. Intestinal I/R injury was induced by 60-min occlusion of the superior mesenteric artery followed by 60-min reperfusion, and the rats were induced to be hypergastrinemic by pretreated with omeprazole or directly injected with gastrin. Some hypergastrinemic rats were injected with cholecystokinin-2 (CCK-2) receptor antagonist prior to I/R operation. After the animal surgery, the intestine was collected for histological analysis. Isolated intestinal epithelial cells or crypts were harvested for RNA and protein analysis. CCK-2 receptor expression, intestinal mucosal damage, cell apoptosis, and apoptotic protein caspase-3 activity were measured. We found that high gastrin in serum significantly reduced intestinal hemorrhage, alleviated extensive epithelial disruption, decreased disintegration of lamina propria, downregulated myeloperoxidase activity, tumor necrosis factor-α, and caspase-3 activity, and lead to low mortality in response to I/R injury. On the contrary, CCK-2 receptor antagonist L365260 could markedly impair intestinal protection by gastrin on intestinal I/R. Severe edema of mucosal villi with severe intestinal crypt injury and numerous intestinal villi disintegrated were observed again in the hypergastrinemic rats with L365260. The survival in the hypergastrinemic rats after intestinal I/R injury was shortened by L365260. Finally, gastrin could remarkably upregulated intestinal CCK-2 receptor expression. Our data suggest that gastrin by omeprazole remarkably attenuated I/R induced intestinal injury by enhancing CCK-2 receptor expression and gastrin could be a potential mitigator for intestinal I/R damage in the clinical setting. PMID

  13. The novel desmopressin analogue [V4Q5]dDAVP inhibits angiogenesis, tumour growth and metastases in vasopressin type 2 receptor-expressing breast cancer models

    PubMed Central

    GARONA, JUAN; PIFANO, MARINA; ORLANDO, ULISES D.; PASTRIAN, MARIA B.; IANNUCCI, NANCY B.; ORTEGA, HUGO H.; PODESTA, ERNESTO J.; GOMEZ, DANIEL E.; RIPOLL, GISELLE V.; ALONSO, DANIEL F.

    2015-01-01

    Desmopressin (dDAVP) is a safe haemostatic agent with previously reported antitumour activity. It acts as a selective agonist for the V2 vasopressin membrane receptor (V2r) present on tumour cells and microvasculature. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the novel peptide derivative [V4Q5]dDAVP in V2r-expressing preclinical mouse models of breast cancer. We assessed antitumour effects of [V4Q5]dDAVP using human MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 breast carcinoma cells, as well as the highly metastatic mouse F3II cell line. Effect on in vitro cancer cell growth was evaluated by cell proliferation and clonogenic assays. Cell cycle distribution was analysed by flow cytometry. In order to study the effect of intravenously administered [V4Q5]dDAVP on tumour growth and angiogenesis, breast cancer xenografts were generated in athymic mice. F3II cells were injected into syngeneic mice to evaluate the effect of [V4Q5]dDAVP on spontaneous and experimental metastatic spread. In vitro cytostatic effects of [V4Q5]dDAVP against breast cancer cells were greater than those of dDAVP, and associated with V2r-activated signal transduction and partial cell cycle arrest. In MDA-MB-231 xenografts, [V4Q5]dDAVP (0.3 μg/kg, thrice a week) reduced tumour growth and angiogenesis. Treatment of F3II mammary tumour-bearing immunocompetent mice resulted in complete inhibition of metastatic progression. [V4Q5]dDAVP also displayed greater antimetastatic efficacy than dDAVP on experimental lung colonisation by F3II cells. The novel analogue was well tolerated in preliminary acute toxicology studies, at doses ≥300-fold above that required for anti-angiogenic/antimetastatic effects. Our data establish the preclinical activity of [V4Q5]dDAVP in aggressive breast cancer, providing the rationale for further clinical trials. PMID:25846632

  14. Gastrin blood test

    MedlinePlus

    ... doctor. Medicines that can increase gastrin measurements include antacids, H 2 -blocking agents (such as cimetidine), and ... Helicobacter pylori infection of the stomach Use of antacids or medicines to treat heartburn Zollinger-Ellison syndrome , ...

  15. The Zollinger-Ellison syndrome due to an infiltrating tumour of the stomach

    PubMed Central

    Royston, C. M. S.; Brew, D. St. J.; Garnham, J. R.; Stagg, B. H.; Polak, Julia

    1972-01-01

    This is the first case report of the Zollinger-Ellison syndrome due to an infiltrating tumour of the stomach. Plasma gastrin levels were high and gastrin was demonstrated in argyrophil tumour cells by an immunofluorescent technique. Evidence is presented that the tumour arose from the G cells. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6 PMID:4562021

  16. Kinin B1 and B2 receptor expression in osteoblasts and fibroblasts is enhanced by interleukin-1 and tumour necrosis factor-alpha. Effects dependent on activation of NF-kappaB and MAP kinases.

    PubMed

    Brechter, Anna Bernhold; Persson, Emma; Lundgren, Inger; Lerner, Ulf H

    2008-07-01

    Pro-inflammatory mediators formed by the kallikrein-kinin system can stimulate bone resorption and synergistically potentiate bone resorption induced by IL-1 and TNF-alpha. We have shown that the effect is associated with synergistically enhanced RANKL expression and enhanced prostaglandin biosynthesis, due to increased cyclooxygenase-2 expression. In the present study, the effects of osteotropic cytokines and different kinins on the expression of receptor subtypes for bradykinin (BK), des-Arg10-Lys-BK (DALBK), IL-1beta and TNF-alpha have been investigated. IL-1beta and TNF-alpha enhanced kinin B1 and B2 receptor binding in the human osteoblastic cell line MG-63 and the mRNA expression of B1 and B2 receptors in MG-63 cells, human gingival fibroblasts and intact mouse calvarial bones. Kinins did not affect mRNA expression of IL-1 or TNF receptors. EMSA showed that IL-1beta and TNF-alpha activated NF-kappaB and AP-1 in MG-63 cells. IL-1beta stimulated NF-kappaB via a non-canonical pathway (p52/p65) and TNF-alpha via the canonical pathway (p50/p65). Activation of AP-1 involved c-Jun in both IL-1beta and TNF-alpha stimulated cells, but c-Fos only in TNF-alpha stimulated cells. Phospho-ELISA and Western blots showed that IL-1beta activated JNK and p38, but not ERK 1/2 MAP kinase. Pharmacological inhibitors showed that NF-kappaB, p38 and JNK were important for IL-1beta induced stimulation of B1 receptors, and NF-kappaB and p38 for B2 receptors. p38 and JNK were important for TNF-alpha induced stimulation of B1 receptors, whereas NF-kappaB, p38 and JNK were involved in TNF-alpha induced expression of B2 receptors. These data show that IL-1beta and TNF-alpha upregulate B1 and B2 receptor expression by mechanisms involving activation of both NF-kappaB and MAP kinase pathways, but that signal transduction pathways are different for IL-1beta and TNF-alpha. The enhanced kinin receptor expression induced by the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1beta and TNF-alpha might be one

  17. Characterization of gastrin receptors on guinea pig pancreatic acini

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Dahong; Noguchi, Masato; Zhou, Zhichao; Villanueva, M.L.; Gardner, J.D.; Jensen, R.T. )

    1987-12-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated gastrin receptors in some pancreatic tumors and that gastrin is a potent stimulant of pancreatic Na{sup +}-H{sup +} exchange. In the present study the authors used {sup 125}I-labeled gastrin ({sup 125}I-gastrin) to characterize gastrin receptors on guinea pig pancreatic acini. Binding of {sup 125}I-gastrin was temperature dependent, saturable, and specific for gastrin-related peptides. Analysis demonstrated a single class of receptors with high affinity for gastrin and a binding capacity of 1 fmol/mg protein. Binding of {sup 125}I-gastrin was inhibited with the following relative potencies: cholecystokinin octapeptide (CCK-8) > gastrin-17-I = gastrin-34-I > pentagastrin > desulfated (des(SO{sub 3}))CCK-8 > CCK-4 and by the receptor antagonists CBZ-CCK-27-32-NH{sub 2} > proglumide analogue 10 > asperlicin > Bt{sub 2}-guanosine 3{prime},5{prime}-cyclic monophosphate. The present results demonstrate that guinea pig pancreatic acini possess gastrin receptors that have a high affinity for gastrin and are distinct from CCK receptors previously described. Only occupation of the CCK receptors results in enzyme secretion. Gastrin receptors on pancreatic acini resemble those described in parietal cells and gastric glands; however, their function is unknown.

  18. Effect of secretin on release of heterogeneous forms of gastrin.

    PubMed Central

    Straus, E; Greenstein, A J; Yalow, R S

    1975-01-01

    The effect of an intravenous injection of secretin on plasma gastrin concentration is shown to be dependent upon the relative concentration of the major forms of immunoreactive gastrin present in the plasma at the time of injection. Secretin suppressed gastrin secretion in the fasting state in patients in whose plasma heptadecapeptide and big gastrins predominated and did not suppress when big big gastrin comprised more than 90% of plasma gastrin immunoreactivity. The post-secretin decrease in plasma gastrin was due entirely to the disappearance of the smaller, more rapidly degraded forms. Food-stimulated gastrin response was suppressed by secretin for the initial 40 minutes after a test meal but was greater than usual from 40 to 120 minutes. PMID:1218824

  19. Gastrin in fetal and neonatal pigs.

    PubMed

    Xu, R J; Cranwell, P D

    1991-01-01

    1. The concentration and molecular profile of gastrin were examined in plasma and tissue extracts of fetal and neonatal pigs from 93 days gestation up to 12 weeks of age and also in the fetal gastric contents. 2. Gastrin was present in the gastrointestinal tract and plasma of fetal pigs at 93 days gestation. The concentration in both plasma and antral extracts increased progressively up to birth and continued to rise postnatally, reaching a peak at about 3 weeks of age in plasma and 6 weeks in the antrum. 3. In blood the major molecular form of gastrin was G34 (up to 80%), while in the antrum the major form was G17 (66-91%). The percentage of G34 in the antrum was highest in later gestation (21%), and reached adult proportion by 8 weeks of age (4%). 4. A considerable amount of gastrin, chiefly G17, was detected in the fetal gastric contents. Synthetic human G17 was stable in fetal gastric contents when incubated at 37 degrees C for 60 min, although, when incubated with gastric contents from a sow, it disappeared within 5 min. 5. It is suggested that the presence of gastrin in fetal gastric contents may be important in stimulation of fetal gut development.

  20. Mutual relationships between chromogranins A and B and gastrin in individual gastrin cells.

    PubMed Central

    Cetin, Y; Bargsten, G; Grube, D

    1992-01-01

    The chromogranins A and B (CgA and CgB, respectively), originally detected in the adrenal medulla, are present in various endocrine organs. Remarkably, their immunoreactivities vary among different endocrine cell types and also within a given endocrine cell population. With densitometric techniques at the cellular level, individual gastrin cells (n = 318) from guinea pig antral mucosa were studied to measure their content of immunoreactive CgA, CgB, and gastrin. The composition of these secretory proteins in individual gastrin cells varied considerably but with predictable components. Statistical evaluation of the data showed that immunoreactivities for gastrin and CgA correlated negatively in these cells; CgA and CgB immunoreactivities also correlated inversely. On the other hand, immunoreactivities for gastrin and CgB exhibited a high positive correlation. The mutual relationships between gastrin, CgA, and CgB suggest that under physiological conditions biosynthetic pathways of these secretory constituents are linked to each other in individual gastrin cells. Images PMID:1557398

  1. Gastrin receptors on isolated canine parietal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Soll, A.H.; Amirian, D.A.; Thomas, L.P.; Reedy, T.J.; Elashoff, J.D.

    1984-05-01

    The receptors in the fundic mucosa that mediate gastrin stimulation of acid secretion have been studied. Synthetic human gastrin-17-I (G17) with a leucine substitution in the 15th position ((Leu15)-G17) was iodinated by chloramine T; high saturable binding was found to enzyme-dispersed canine fundic mucosal cells. /sup 127/I-(Leu15)-G17, but not /sup 127/I-G17, retained binding potency and biological activity comparable with uniodinated G17. Fundic mucosal cells were separated by size by using an elutriator rotor, and specific /sup 125/I-(Leu-15)-G17 binding in the larger cell fractions was highly correlated with the distribution of parietal cells. There was, however, specific gastrin binding in the small cell fractions, not accounted for by parietal cells. Using sequential elutriation and stepwise density gradients, highly enriched parietal and chief cell fractions were prepared; /sup 125/I-(Leu15)-G17 binding correlated positively with the parietal cell (r . 0.98) and negatively with chief cell content (r . -0.96). In fractions enriched to 45-65% parietal cells, specific /sup 125/I-(Leu15)-G17 binding was rapid, reaching a steady state at 37 degrees C within 30 min. Dissociation was also rapid, with the rate similar after 100-fold dilution or dilution plus excess pentagastrin. At a tracer concentration from 10 to 30 pM, saturable binding was 7.8 +/- 0.8% per 10(6) cells (mean +/- SE) and binding in the presence of excess pentagastrin accounted for 11% of total binding. G17 and carboxyl terminal octapeptide of cholecystokinin (26-33) were equipotent in displacing tracer binding and in stimulating parietal cell function ((/sup 14/C)aminopyrine accumulation), whereas the tetrapeptide of gastrin (14-17) had a much lower potency. Proglumide inhibited gastrin binding and selectively inhibited gastrin stimulation of parietal cell function.

  2. Allelic deletion of the MEN1 gene in duodenal gastrin and somatostatin cell neoplasms and their precursor lesions

    PubMed Central

    Anlauf, M; Perren, A; Henopp, T; Rudolph, T; Garbrecht, N; Schmitt, A; Raffel, A; Gimm, O; Weihe, E; Knoefel, W T; Dralle, H; Heitz, Ph U; Komminoth, P; Klöppel, G

    2007-01-01

    Background Patients with a multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1)‐associated Zollinger–Ellison syndrome (ZES) show multifocal duodenal gastrinomas and precursor lesions. Aims To test these lesions for loss of heterozygosity (LOH) of the MEN1 gene locus on chromosome 11q13, and to investigate whether the MEN1‐related endocrine cell changes also involved somatostatin cells. Material and methods Tissue specimens from six patients with MEN1 and ZES were analysed by immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence. LOH analysis was performed by fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH), using probes containing the MEN1 gene locus and the centromere 11 (C11) region. For simultaneous analysis of hormones and allelic deletions, a combined FISH/immunofluorescence protocol was established. Results 28 of a total of 33 duodenal neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) were gastrin‐producing tumours; 13/28 (46.4%) revealed LOH on 11q13 and/or C11. Five of the NETs were somatostatin‐expressing tumours, two revealing LOH. Allelic loss was detected in tumours as small as 300 μm (gastrin) and 400 μm (somatostatin) in diameter. The gastrin‐producing tumours showed different deletion/retention patterns. Hyperplastic somatostatin cell lesions, similar to those of the gastrin cells, were present in all patients. The hyperplastic lesions of both cell lines consistently retained both 11q13 alleles. Conclusions Allelic deletion of the MEN1 gene may reflect a pivotal event in the development of multifocal gastrin and somatostatin cell neoplasms in the duodenum of patients with MEN1. The observation of distinct deletion patterns in small synchronous tumours supports the concept that each gastrin‐producing tumour in an individual MEN1 patient arises from an independent cell clone. PMID:17135306

  3. Comparative study of antral gastrin activity in some mammals.

    PubMed

    Amure, B O; Omole, A

    1971-04-01

    1. The amounts of crude gastrin extract and the gastrin activities of extracts from antral mucosa of several mammalian species have been determined.2. The yield of crude gastrin powder per gramme wet weight of antral mucosa was greater in goats and rabbits than in cat, dog, man or pig.3. Statistical differences do not appear to exist between the potencies of gastrin from the various species. The potencies of the powders were within the ranges 1.2-1.8 mug porcine gastrin II/mg with the exception of the extract from frozen dog antra (0.8 mug/mg).4. During prolonged freezing of animal antra and consequent thawing before extraction, significant losses in gastrin activity occurred in the dog.5. The amounts of gastrin activity per gramme wet weight of antral mucosa from herbivores (goat, rabbit and cattle) were greater than those from non-herbivores (cat, dog, man and pig).

  4. Androgen receptor expression in gastrointestinal stromal tumor.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Lisandro F; Bacchi, Carlos E

    2009-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the expression of estrogen, progesterone, and androgen receptors in a large series of gastrointestinal stromal tumors. Clinical and pathologic data were reviewed in 427 cases of gastrointestinal stromal tumor and the expression of such hormone receptors was investigated by immunohistochemistry using tissue microarray technique. All tumors were negative for estrogen receptor expression. Progesterone and androgen receptors expression was observed in 5.4% and 17.6% of tumors, respectively. We found the higher average age at diagnosis, the lower frequency of tumors located in the small intestine, and the higher frequency of extragastrointestinal tumors to be statistically significant in the group of tumors with androgen receptor expression in contrast to the group showing no androgen receptor expression. There was no statistic difference between such groups regarding sex, tumor size, mitotic count, cell morphology, and risk of aggressive behavior. Considering that the expression of androgen receptors in gastrointestinal stromal tumors is not negligible, further studies are encouraged to establish the role of androgen deprivation therapy for gastrointestinal stromal tumors.

  5. Serum gastrin in newborn, sucking and weaned pigs.

    PubMed

    Cranwell, P D; Hansky, J

    1980-07-01

    Serum gastrin concentrations during the first six weeks of life in pigs reared on sow's milk alone were compared with those in pigs given access to solid food at two weeks and weaned at three weeks of age. Gastrin levels were higher in both parturient sows and newborn unsuckled pigs than in dry sows. It appears that the newborn pig is capable of secreting its own gastrin. High levels of gastrin persisted throughout the experimental period, being particularly high in the first two weeks of life. In weaned pigs, feeding after a period of fasting evoked a greater postprandial gastrin response than that which occurred in unweaned pigs after sucking from the sow. The results suggest a possible role for gastrin in early gastric development.

  6. The half-life of exogenous gastrin in the circulation

    PubMed Central

    Blair, E. L.; Farra, Yvonne; Richardson, Diana D.; Steinbok, P.

    1970-01-01

    1. A method of gastrin bio-assay is described which can be used on as little as 30 ng synthetic human gastrin I at a minimum concentration of 2·5 ng/ml. 2. Pentagastrin or synthetic human gastrin I added to cat plasma can be stored on ice or at 4° C, for periods up to 27 hr without apparent loss of gastrin activity. 3. Between 1½ and 13 min after the rapid I.V. injection of pentagastrin in the anaesthetized cat and between 1½ and 15 min after the injection of synthetic human gastrin I, there is a rapid reduction of the gastrin concentration in the arterial plasma. The data relating log10 gastrin concentration in arterial plasma with time can be fitted by a single term. 4. Studies in vitro show that over the periods of time involved in the in vivo studies, both pentagastrin and synthetic human gastrin I are stable in cat plasma at 37° C in concentrations which occurred in the circulating plasma. 5. The half-life of pentagastrin in the circulating arterial plasma of the anaesthetized cat is 1·50 min (S.E. ± 0·08) and the half-life of synthetic human gastrin I is 2·65 min (S.E. ± 0·09). ImagesFig. 5 PMID:5500725

  7. Systemic Effects of Non-Endocrine Tumours

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, James D.; Rona, George

    1964-01-01

    Tumours of non-endocrine origin may exert deleterious effects by elaborating active principles which disturb body regulation. Systemic manifestations are fairly common with neoplasms of the lung, kidney, gastro-intestinal tract and thymus. The secretion of these tumours may have a known chemical structure (serotonin), may present hormone-like action (parathormone, antidiuretic hormone, insulinoid), or have well-defined biological properties (erythropoietin, gastrin-like principle). Tumours may stimulate endocrine glands by an unknown mechanism, producing disorders such as Cushing's syndrome, hypercalcemia, gynecomastia and hypoglycemia. Thymomas may be associated with autoimmune diseases. Tumours may extensively utilize or excrete some metabolite (glucose) or electrolyte (Na or K). Awareness of the systemic effects of various neoplasms may lead to an early diagnosis and proper treatment of these manifestations. PMID:14204555

  8. Autoantibody to the gastrin receptor in pernicious anemia

    SciTech Connect

    de Aizpurua, H.J.; Ungar, B.; Toh, B.H.

    1985-08-22

    The authors examined serum IgG fractions from 20 patients with pernicious anemia and 25 control subjects for their capacity to inhibit binding of (/sup 125/I)15-leu human gastrin-17 to parietal-cell-enriched gastric mucosal cells. IgG fractions from six patients reduced gastrin binding by 45.6 +/- 12.2 per cent, as compared with a reduction of 1.8 +/- 0.7 per cent by fractions from the 25 controls. The fractions from these six patients also reduced gastrin-stimulated (/sup 14/C)aminopyrine uptake by gastric cells (an index of gastric acid secretory activity in vitro) by 50.2 +/- 8.4 per cent (mean +/- S.D.), as compared with 9.2 +/- 4.1 per cent for the controls. IgG fractions from six other patients that did not reduce gastrin binding also inhibited gastrin-stimulated (/sup 14/C)aminopyrine uptake, by 48.1 +/- 9.1 per cent. These reductions in gastrin binding and aminopyrine uptake were abolished by absorption of the IgG fractions with suspensions of viable gastric mucosal cells but not by absorption with liver or kidney cells. The IgG fractions did not inhibit (/sup 3/H)histamine binding or histamine-stimulated (/sup 14/C)aminopyrine uptake. These results suggest that serum IgG from some patients with pernicious anemia contains autoantibodies to the gastrin receptor.

  9. Preclinical evaluation of new radioligand of cholecystokinin/gastrin receptors in endocrine tumors xenograft nude mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brillouet, S.; Caselles, O.; Dierickx, L. O.; Mestre, B.; Nalis, J.; Picard, C.; Favre, G.; Poirot, M.; Silvente-Poirot, S.; Courbon, F.

    2007-02-01

    The cholecystokinin(CCK)/gastrin 2 receptors (R-CCK2) are overexpressed in 90% of medullary thyroid cancers (MTC) and in 60% of small cell lung cancers but not or poorly in corresponding healthy tissues. They represent a relevant target for the diagnosis and internal targeted radiotherapy of these tumors. Although previous studies have demonstrated the feasibility of radiolabeled CCK/gastrin to target CCK-2 receptor-expressing tissues in animals and patients, some problems remained unsolved to identify an optimum candidate for in vivo targeting of R-CCK2-expressing tumors. By a rational approach and " in silico" drug design, we synthesized a new CCK-derivative with high affinity for the R-CCK2. The aim of this study was to achieve the radiolabeling of a new radioligand, to assess its efficacy using a published CCK radioligand ( 111In-DTPA-CCK8) as a control for the R-CCK2 targeting. This new CCK-derivative was radiolabeled with 111In. Nude mice, bearing the human MTC TT tumors and NIH-3T3 cell line expressing a tumorigenic mutant of the R-CCK2, were injected with this radiolabeled peptide. In vivo planar scintigraphies were acquired. Thereafter, biodistribution studies (%ID/g tissue) were done. The conditions of radiolabelling were optimized to obtain a radiochemical purity >90%. Scintigraphic images of xenograft mice showed significant tumor uptake with a target to nontarget ratio higher than two. These results were confirmed by the biodistribution studies which showed as expected a significant activity in the spleen, the liver and the kidneys. Therefore, this new radiolabeled compound is a promised new candidate for molecular imaging and internal radiotherapy for R-CCK2 tumor targeting.

  10. Serum gastrin in canine chronic lymphocytic-plasmacytic enteritis

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Abstract This study evaluates serum gastrin concentrations in dogs with chronic lymphocytic-plasmacytic enteritis, as well as its possible relationship with the severity of lesions present in the stomach. To achieve this aim, 5 dogs without gastrointestinal disease and 15 dogs with chronic lymphocytic-plasmacytic enteritis were included. Serum gastrin concentrations were significantly increased in dogs with chronic lymphocytic-plasmacytic enteritis compared with those in dogs without gastrointestinal disease. Also, there was a positive correlation between the severity of the gastric lesion and the serum gastrin concentration. Our findings indicate the possibility that gastrin plays a role in the etiology of an accompanying chronic antral gastritis in canine chronic lymphocytic-plasmacytic enteritis. PMID:16152719

  11. GROWTH OF HUMAN PANCREATIC CANCER IS INHIBITED BY DOWN-REGULATION OF GASTRIN GENE EXPRESSION

    PubMed Central

    Matters, Gail L.; Harms, John F.; McGovern, Christopher O.; Jayakumar, Calpurnia; Crepin, Keisha; Smith, Zachary P.; Nelson, Melissa C.; Stock, Heather; Fenn, Craig W.; Kaiser, James; Kester, Mark; Smith, Jill P.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives This study evaluated the effects of gastrin mRNA down-regulation on growth of human pancreatic cancer. Methods Gastrin expression was examined in human pancreatic cancer cell lines by RT-PCR and peptide expression was assessed by immunocytochemistry. Gastrin was down-regulated using either stable transfection of an antisense gastrin cDNA or one of three shRNA (short hairpin RNA) constructs. Tumor formation was evaluated following either subcutaneous or orthotopic injections into nude mice. The effect of nanoliposomes loaded with gastrin siRNA was tested in mice bearing pancreatic tumors. Results Stable transfection of gastrin antisense or shRNAs into BxPC-3 cells resulted in clones with >90% reduction in gastrin mRNA. Tumor growth rate and incidence of metastases in both wild type and transfected pancreatic cancer cells was directly proportional to the degrees of gastrin mRNA expression. Immunofluoresence analysis confirmed that gastrin peptide levels were decreased in antisense and shRNA tumors. Gastrin knockdown clones had lower Ki-67 and increased cleaved caspase-3 staining, consistent with known effects of gastrin on proliferation and apoptosis. Tumors in mice treated with gastrin siRNA were smaller than controls. Conclusions These results suggest that RNAi targeting of gastrin could serve as an effective treatment for pancreatic cancer. PMID:19465883

  12. Autoantibody against diiodinated tyrosine-gastrin in a patient with Graves' disease

    SciTech Connect

    Noguchi, M.; Adachi, H.; Aoki, E.; Iida, Y.; Kasagi, K.; Endo, K.; Konishi, J.; Torizuka, K.

    1987-01-01

    We describe autoantibodies against iodinated gastrin in a patient with Graves' disease. Values for serum gastrin differed in this case, depending on which of two different radioimmunoassay (RIA) kits was used. RIA with the dextran-coated charcoal method for separation of free tracer gastrin gave a value less than 9.5 pmol/L, whereas the value by a RIA kit by the double-antibody method was 318 pmol/L. The patient's serum contained a binding protein for /sup 125/I-labeled gastrin, as detected by Sephadex G-200 column chromatography. The IgG fraction was responsible for the ability of serum to bind /sup 125/I-labeled gastrin. Interestingly, of the two possible forms of iodinated gastrins, monoiodinated (MIT) and diiodinated (DIT) tyrosine-/sup 125/I-labeled gastrin, only the latter bound to patient's IgG. Furthermore, DIT-gastrin, but not gastrin or MIT-gastrin, inhibited the binding of DIT-/sup 125/I-labeled gastrin. The patient's serum evidently contains autoantibodies against DIT-gastrin that interfere with RIA of gastrin.

  13. Effect of regular and decaffeinated coffee on serum gastrin levels.

    PubMed

    Acquaviva, F; DeFrancesco, A; Andriulli, A; Piantino, P; Arrigoni, A; Massarenti, P; Balzola, F

    1986-04-01

    We evaluated the hypothesis that the noncaffeine gastric acid stimulant effect of coffee might be by way of serum gastrin release. After 10 healthy volunteers drank 50 ml of coffee solution corresponding to one cup of home-made regular coffee containing 10 g of sugar and 240 mg/100 ml of caffeine, serum total gastrin levels peaked at 10 min and returned to basal values within 30 min; the response was of little significance (1.24 times the median basal value). Drinking 100 ml of sugared water (as control) resulted in occasional random elevations of serum gastrin which were not statistically significant. Drinking 100 ml of regular or decaffeinated coffee resulted in a prompt and lasting elevation of total gastrin; mean integrated outputs after regular or decaffeinated coffee were, respectively, 2.3 and 1.7 times the values in the control test. Regular and decaffeinated coffees share a strong gastrin-releasing property. Neither distension, osmolarity, calcium, nor amino acid content of the coffee solution can account for this property, which should be ascribed to some other unidentified ingredient. This property is at least partially lost during the process of caffeine removal. PMID:3745848

  14. [Round table discussion. Ulcer - vagus - gastrin].

    PubMed

    1976-03-01

    1. Both gastrin and the vagus nerve play a part in the pathogenesis of the duodenal ulcer. Which of these two factors is of greater significance--this problem is still subject to discussion as is the question whether other factors such as duodenal neutralization are more important than hitherto assumed. 2. At this time no reliable and harmless drugs that speed up the healing of duodenal ulcers and prevent relapses are yet available. Candidates for this are H2 receptor blockers, prostaglandines and possibly substances resembling secretin. 3. Only some of the participants considered it necessary to do endoscopic and radiological follow-ups in duodenal ulcers. 4. Proximal gastric vagotomy for the treatment of duodenal ulcers is still undergoing clinical trials. At present this method should only be used by surgeons with a special interest in gastric surgery who also dispose of the technology and the staff for careful postoperative checks on these patients. The advantages of proximal gastric vagotomy consist in sparing truncation, low mortality and good functional results. 5. In gastric ulcers--contrary to duodenal ones--malignancy should always be suspected. If medical treatment does not lead to complete remission within a few months, surgery must be performed. 6. Many surgeons still prefer resection to vagotomy and excision in the management of gastric ulcers.

  15. The Effect of Gastrin on Basal- and Glucose-Stimulated Insulin Secretion in Man

    PubMed Central

    Rehfeld, Jens F.; Stadil, Flemming

    1973-01-01

    The effect of gastrin on basal- and glucose-stimulated insulin secretion was studied in 32 normal, young subjects. The concentration of gastrin and insulin in serum was measured radioimmunochemically. Maximal physiologic limit for the concentration of gastrin in serum was of the order of 160 pmol per liter as observed during a protein-rich meal. Oral ingestion of 50 g glucose produced a small gastrin response from 28±3 to 39±5 pmol per liter (mean ±SEM, P < 0.01). Intravenous injection or prolonged infusion of gastrin increased the concentration of insulin in peripheral venous blood to a maximum within 2 min followed by a decline to basal levels after a further 10 min. The minimum dose required to induce a significant insulin response (31.2 ng gastrin per kg) increased the gastrin level in serum above the physiologic range. Maximum effect was obtained with 500 ng gastrin per kg. When 15.6 ng (7.1 pmol) gastrin per kg body weight and 25 g glucose were injected simultaneously, the glucose-induced insulin response was potentiated (from 2.32±0.33 to 4.33±0.98 nmol per liter per 20 min, P < 0.02), even though gastrin concentrations only increased to 71.2±6.6 pmol per liter. No effect, however, was noted on glucose disposal. 15.6 ng gastrin per kg given i.v. 30 min before an i.v. glucose tolerance test was without significant effect on the insulin response. The results indicate that gastrin can stimulate a rapid and short-lived release of insulin. In physiologic concentrations gastrin potentiates the glucose-stimulated insulin secretion and is without effect on basal insulin secretion. A small release of gastrin during oral glucose ingestion may to a limited extent contribute to the nonglycemic insulin secretion. During protein ingestion, gastrin probably stimulates insulin secretion significantly. Images PMID:4703228

  16. High Affinity Binding of Indium and Ruthenium Ions by Gastrins.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Graham S; George, Graham N; Pushie, M Jake

    2015-01-01

    The peptide hormone gastrin binds two ferric ions with high affinity, and iron binding is essential for the biological activity of non-amidated forms of the hormone. Since gastrins act as growth factors in gastrointestinal cancers, and as peptides labelled with Ga and In isotopes are increasingly used for cancer diagnosis, the ability of gastrins to bind other metal ions was investigated systematically by absorption spectroscopy. The coordination structures of the complexes were characterized by extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy. Changes in the absorption of gastrin in the presence of increasing concentrations of Ga3+ were fitted by a 2 site model with dissociation constants (Kd) of 3.3 x 10-7 and 1.1 x 10-6 M. Although the absorption of gastrin did not change upon the addition of In3+ ions, the changes in absorbance on Fe3+ ion binding in the presence of indium ions were fitted by a 2 site model with Kd values for In3+ of 6.5 x 10-15 and 1.7 x 10-7 M. Similar results were obtained with Ru3+ ions, although the Kd values for Ru3+ of 2.6 x 10-13 and 1.2 x 10-5 M were slightly larger than observed for In3+. The structures determined by EXAFS all had metal:gastrin stoichiometries of 2:1 but, while the metal ions in the Fe, Ga and In complexes were bridged by a carboxylate and an oxygen with a metal-metal separation of 3.0-3.3 Å, the Ru complex clearly demonstrated a short range Ru-Ru separation, which was significantly shorter, at 2.4 Å, indicative of a metal-metal bond. We conclude that gastrin selectively binds two In3+ or Ru3+ ions, and that the affinity of the first site for In3+ or Ru3+ ions is higher than for ferric ions. Some of the metal ion-gastrin complexes may be useful for cancer diagnosis and therapy.

  17. High Affinity Binding of Indium and Ruthenium Ions by Gastrins

    PubMed Central

    Baldwin, Graham S.; George, Graham N.; Pushie, M. Jake

    2015-01-01

    The peptide hormone gastrin binds two ferric ions with high affinity, and iron binding is essential for the biological activity of non-amidated forms of the hormone. Since gastrins act as growth factors in gastrointestinal cancers, and as peptides labelled with Ga and In isotopes are increasingly used for cancer diagnosis, the ability of gastrins to bind other metal ions was investigated systematically by absorption spectroscopy. The coordination structures of the complexes were characterized by extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy. Changes in the absorption of gastrin in the presence of increasing concentrations of Ga3+ were fitted by a 2 site model with dissociation constants (Kd) of 3.3 x 10−7 and 1.1 x 10−6 M. Although the absorption of gastrin did not change upon the addition of In3+ ions, the changes in absorbance on Fe3+ ion binding in the presence of indium ions were fitted by a 2 site model with Kd values for In3+ of 6.5 x 10−15 and 1.7 x 10−7 M. Similar results were obtained with Ru3+ ions, although the Kd values for Ru3+ of 2.6 x 10−13 and 1.2 x 10−5 M were slightly larger than observed for In3+. The structures determined by EXAFS all had metal:gastrin stoichiometries of 2:1 but, while the metal ions in the Fe, Ga and In complexes were bridged by a carboxylate and an oxygen with a metal-metal separation of 3.0–3.3 Å, the Ru complex clearly demonstrated a short range Ru—Ru separation, which was significantly shorter, at 2.4 Å, indicative of a metal-metal bond. We conclude that gastrin selectively binds two In3+ or Ru3+ ions, and that the affinity of the first site for In3+ or Ru3+ ions is higher than for ferric ions. Some of the metal ion-gastrin complexes may be useful for cancer diagnosis and therapy. PMID:26457677

  18. Effects of differently composed feeds and physical stress on plasma gastrin concentration in horses.

    PubMed

    Sandin, A; Girma, K; Sjöholm, B; Lindholm, A; Nilsson, G

    1998-01-01

    Plasma gastrin concentrations were determined in 6 Standardbreds (4 geldings and 2 mares) after 3 different meals consisting of unlimited amounts of hay (8-9 kg per horse), a restricted amount of hay (0.6 kg/100 kg body-weight) and grain (0.2 kg/100 kg body-weight) in combination or of grain alone (0.2 kg/100 kg body-weight). In another series of experiments the possible role of gastrin as a stress hormone was investigated. Plasma gastrin and cortisol concentrations were determined during fasting and compared with concentrations during hay feeding. In addition, gastrin and cortisol concentrations were determined before, during and after 2 kinds of physical exercise on a treadmill. Meal stimulation significantly increased the plasma gastrin concentration, irrespective of the meal composition. An immediate and large increase in plasma gastrin concentration was found when voluminous meals were given, whereas a small meal evoked a later onset of gastrin release, suggesting that gastric distention plays an important role in inducing gastrin release during a meal. Meals consisting of grain seem to evoke a slower onset and then a more prolonged gastrin response than a hay meal, possibly due to different emptying rates of the stomach. Nervous excitation may play a minor role in the activation of gastrin release in horses. No experimental support was obtained for the idea that gastrin acts as a stress hormone in the horse.

  19. Imaging the inside of a tumour: a review of radionuclide imaging and theranostics targeting intracellular epitopes.

    PubMed

    Cornelissen, Bart

    2014-04-01

    Molecular imaging of tumour tissue focusses mainly on extracellular epitopes such as tumour angiogenesis or signal transduction receptors expressed on the cell membrane. However, most biological processes that define tumour phenotype occur within the cell. In this mini-review, an overview is given of the various techniques to interrogate intracellular events using molecular imaging with radiolabelled compounds. Additionally, similar targeting techniques can be employed for radionuclide therapy using Auger electron emitters, and recent advances in Auger electron therapy are discussed.

  20. 21 CFR 862.1325 - Gastrin test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Gastrin test system. 862.1325 Section 862.1325 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems §...

  1. 21 CFR 862.1325 - Gastrin test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Gastrin test system. 862.1325 Section 862.1325 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems §...

  2. Cognitive performance and peripheral endocannabinoid system receptor expression in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Ferretjans, Rodrigo; de Campos, Salvina Maria; Ribeiro-Santos, Rafael; Guimarães, Fernanda Carneiro; de Oliveira, Keliane; Cardoso, Ana Cecília Alves; Araújo, Marcio Sobreira; Teixeira-Carvalho, Andrea; Martins-Filho, Olindo Assis; Teixeira, Antonio L; Salgado, João V

    2014-07-01

    Schizophrenia is a chronic psychiatric syndrome characterized by generalized cognitive deficits that are associated with functional impairment. The endocannabinoid system (ECS) modulates neurotransmission and neuronal plasticity and is important for cognitive functioning. Evidence points to the involvement of this neuromodulatory system in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia and that alteration of the ECS on peripheral lymphocytes could reflect central changes. The objective of this study was to compare levels of peripheral endocannabinoid receptor expression in patients with schizophrenia and healthy subjects and find evidence of association between peripheral expression of those receptors and cognitive performance. Patients with stabilized schizophrenia (N=53) and controls (N=22) underwent clinical and cognitive evaluation, and assessment of cannabinoid receptor expression on the surface of peripheral immune cells (lymphocytes, natural killer cells and monocytes) by flow cytometry. Patients with schizophrenia had lower levels of cannabinoid receptor expression on total T lymphocytes, but after controlling for possible confounders this difference did not remain significant. In patients, increased cannabinoid receptor expression on lymphocytes and monocytes was significantly correlated with worst cognitive performance. These data provide additional evidence of the involvement of the ECS in the pathophysiology of cognitive deficits in schizophrenia.

  3. Neonatal tumours.

    PubMed

    Moore, S W

    2013-12-01

    Neonatal or perinatal tumours frequently relate to prenatal or developmental events and have a short exposure window which provides an opportunity to study tumours in a selective sensitive period of development. As a result, they display a number of host-specific features which include occasional spontaneous maturational changes with cells still responding to developmental influences. Neonatal tumours (NNT) are studied for a number of important reasons. Firstly, many of the benign tumours arising from soft tissue appear to result from disturbances in growth and development and some are associated with other congenital anomalies. Study of these aspects may open the door for investigation of genetic and epigenetic changes in genes controlling foetal development as well as environmental and drug effects during pregnancy. Secondly, the clinical behaviour of NNT differs from that of similar tumours occurring later in childhood. In addition, certain apparently malignant NNT can 'change course' in infancy leading to the maturation of apparently highly malignant tumours. Thirdly, NNT underline the genetic associations of most tumours but appear to differ in the effects of proto-oncogenes and other oncogenic factors. In this context, there are also connections between the foetal and neonatal period and some "adult" cancers. Fourthly, they appear to arise in a period in which minimal environmental interference has occurred, thus providing a unique potential window of opportunity to study the pathogenesis of tumour behaviour. This study will seek to review what is currently known in each of these areas of study as they apply to NNT. Further study of the provocative differences in tumour behaviour in neonates provides insights into the natural history of cancer in humans and promotes novel cancer therapies.

  4. Beer and wine but not whisky and pure ethanol do stimulate release of gastrin in humans.

    PubMed

    Singer, M V; Eysselein, V; Goebell, H

    1983-01-01

    In humans, the action of ethanol on gastrin release is still unclear and that of alcoholic beverages greatly unknown. We studied the effect of a drink of various concentrations of pure ethanol and several commonly ingested alcoholic beverages on plasma levels of immunoreactive gastrin in 6 healthy human volunteers and compared the results to a protein-rich meal. A drink of distilled water (250 ml) and of pure ethanol (250 ml or 125 ml in the case of 40% v/v ethanol) in concentrations (4, 10, 20 and 40% v/v) normally present in beer, wine, liquor and whisky did not stimulate plasma gastrin levels above basal. Of the alcoholic beverages given only whisky (125 ml) did not stimulate gastrin release. Beer, red and white wine (250 ml each) caused a rapid increase in plasma gastrin concentrations with a peak at 15-20 min, basal levels being reached 60 min after starting the drink. The 60-min integrated plasma gastrin response to beer, red and white wine was about 50% of the gastrin response to the protein-rich (steak) meal (883 +/- 297 pmol X min X 1(-1); mean +/- SE). A drink of 250 ml of white wine together with the meal did not cause a significantly higher integrated gastrin response than the protein meal with 250 ml of distilled water. We conclude that commonly ingested alcoholic beverages such as beer, red and white wine, but not whisky, are potent stimulants of gastrin release in humans. The ethanol content of these beverages cannot be responsible for the increase in plasma gastrin levels, since oral ingestion of pure ethanol in equivalent concentrations and amounts did not elicit a rise in plasma gastrin levels. Some unknown ingredients present in beer and wine are most likely responsible for the gastrin release by both alcoholic beverages.

  5. Species and tissue distribution of cholecystokinin/gastrin-like substances in some invertebrates.

    PubMed

    Larson, B A; Vigna, S R

    1983-06-01

    Twenty-six species of invertebrates representing eight phyla were surveyed for the presence of cholecystokinin/gastrin-like (CCK/gastrin-like) peptides by radioimmunoassay of various tissue extracts. This is the first report of the presence of CCK/gastrin-like peptides in representatives of the phylum Ectoprocta, the arthropodan classes Crustacea and Merostomata, and in the nervous systems of the gastropod mollusc Aplysia californica and the oligochaete annelid Lumbricus terrestris. It has been proposed that CCK/gastrin evolved in the invertebrates as a neural peptide and was subsequently exploited by the vertebrates as a regulatory peptide in both the nervous system and the gastrointestinal endocrine system. The present results indicate that some gastropod molluscs, a merostomatan arthropod, and an annelid have detectable CCK/gastrin in both nervous and gut tissue. However, extractable CCK/gastrin was found only in gut tissue and not in the central nervous system of a crustacean arthropod. The tissue origin of the extracted CCK/gastrin in Bugula (phylum Ectoprocta) was not determined. Final resolution of the question of the nervous versus gut endocrine cellular origin of CCK/gastrin in invertebrates awaits further investigation. CCK/gastrin-like peptides are widely distributed among the invertebrates, which thus provide a rich source of comparative material for study of these regulatory substances.

  6. Cionin, a protochordean hybrid of cholecystokinin and gastrin: biological activity in mammalian systems.

    PubMed

    Schjoldager, B; Park, J; Johnsen, A H; Yamada, T; Rehfeld, J F

    1991-06-01

    The protochordean octapeptide cionin is structurally a hybrid of mammalian cholecystokinin (CCK) and gastrin, and thus their possible common ancestor. To determine whether cionin behaves like CCK or gastrin, we examined its effect on canine fundic somatostatin cells and on porcine and bovine gallbladder muscles. Cionin released somatostatin with a potency (ED50 0.15 nM) and efficacy (14.8% of cell content) similar to that of CCK-8 (ED50 0.12 nM, efficacy 16.7%). The efficacies but not the potencies of CCK-8 and cionin differed from those of sulfated gastrin (0.12 nM, 9.7%), nonsulfated gastrin (0.20 nM, 9.4%), and nonsulfated CCK-8 (0.30 nM, 10.4%). CCK and gastrin stimulated contractions of porcine gallbladder muscle strips in a concentration-dependent manner with no differences in efficacy but with characteristic differences in potency. CCK-8 and cionin displayed similar potencies of ED50 2.0 and 2.6 nM; both were significantly different from the ED50 of 0.4 microM for sulfated gastrin and 2.3 microM for nonsulfated gastrin. CCK radioligand binding to membrane-enriched preparations of porcine and bovine gallbladder muscularis was specific and of high affinity. The equilibrium data revealed that binding of CCK and gastrin peptides best fit a single site. CCK-8 and cionin displayed similar affinities [Kd 0.5 nM (porcine), 0.5 nM (bovine, CCK) vs. Kd 0.8 and 0.9 nM (cionin), respectively]. These differed again significantly from Kd 0.6 and 1.5 microM (sulfated gastrin) and 0.7 and 0.2 microM (nonsulfated gastrin). The results show that cionin behaves like CCK rather than gastrin in mammals.

  7. A Speculative Role for Stromal Gastrin Signaling in Development and Dissemination of Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Matters, Gail L; Clawson, Gary A

    2013-01-01

    The peptide growth factor gastrin and its receptor, the G-protein coupled cholecystokinin receptor type B (CCKBR), play an integral role in the growth and progression of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Gastrin immunoreactivity is found in the fetal pancreas but its expression is not detected in normal pancreas after birth, except when it is re-expressed in malignant lesions. PMID:25346875

  8. Regulation of fibrinogen receptor expression on human platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Shattil, S.J.; Motulsky, H.J.; Insel, P.A.; Brass, L.F.

    1986-03-01

    Platelet aggregation requires the binding of fibrinogen to specific receptors on the plasma membrane glycoprotein IIb-IIIa complex. Although the IIb-IIIa complex is identifiable on the surface of resting platelets, the fibrinogen receptor is expressed only after platelet activation. The authors have developed a monoclonal anti-IIb-IIIa antibody (PAC-1) that binds only to stimulated platelets and only in the presence of Ca. In order to better understand the steps leading to platelet aggregation, the authors used radiolabeled PAC-1 and fibrinogen to examine the effect of the ..cap alpha../sub 2/-adrenergic agonist, epinephrine, on the expression and function of the fibrinogen receptor. The addition of epinephrine to unstirred platelets caused and immediate increase in PAC-1 and fibrinogen binding that was associated with platelet aggregation once the platelets were stirred. Even after prolonged incubation of the platelets with epinephrine, fibrinogen receptor expression could be reversed by adding EGTA, PGl/sub 2/, or the ..cap alpha../sub 2/-adrenergic antagonist, phentolamine. When unstirred platelets were exposed to epinephrine for more than 10 min, the extent of aggregation caused by subsequent stirring was decreased by 70%. Surprisingly, these desensitized platelets bound PAC-1 and fibrinogen normally, indicating that the loss of aggregation was not due to a decrease in fibrinogen receptor expression or function. These studies demonstrate that: (1) fibrinogen receptor expression is dependent on extracellular CA; (2) induction of the fibrinogen receptor by epinephrine requires the continued presence of the agonist; and (3) prolonged stimulation of the platelet by epinephrine can lead to a reduced aggregation response by a mechanism that does not involve a loss of either fibrinogen recepor expression or fibrinogen binding.

  9. The Relevance of Group II Glutamate Receptors Expression to Anxiety.

    PubMed

    Ravid, Jonathan D; Mostofsky, David I

    2016-01-01

    The interface of receptor-mediated regulation of cellular signaling and neurological outputs remains an active field of investigation. The metabotropic G protein-coupled glutamate receptors, and in particular, the group II cyclic adenosine mono-phosphate (cAMP)-lowering metabotropic glutamate receptors 2 and 3 (mGlu2/3 glutamate receptors), have gained interest as therapeutic targets in different forms of neurological disorders. This review explores mGlu2/3 glutamate receptors expression, pharmacological activation, and signaling links to anxiety, as assessed in animal models and in clinical trials. PMID:27650988

  10. An OmpA-Like Protein from Acinetobacter spp. Stimulates Gastrin and Interleukin-8 Promoters

    PubMed Central

    Ofori-Darko, Ernest; Zavros, Yana; Rieder, Gabriele; Tarlé, Susan A.; Van Antwerp, Mary; Merchant, Juanita L.

    2000-01-01

    Bacterial overgrowth in the stomach may occur under conditions of diminished or absent acid secretion. Under these conditions, secretion of the hormone gastrin is elevated. Alternatively, bacterial factors may directly stimulate gastrin. Consistent with this hypothesis, we found that mice colonized for 2 months with a mixed bacterial culture of opportunistic pathogens showed an increase in serum gastrin. To examine regulation of gene expression by bacterial proteins, stable transformants of AGS cells expressing gastrin or interleukin-8 (IL-8) promoters were cocultured with live organisms. Both whole-cell sonicates and a heat-stable fraction were also coincubated with the cells. A level of 108 organisms per ml stimulated both the gastrin and IL-8 promoters. Heat-stable proteins prepared from these bacterial sonicates stimulated the promoter significantly more than the live organism or unheated sonicates. A 38-kDa heat-stable protein stimulating the gastrin and IL-8 promoters was cloned and found to be an OmpA-related protein. Immunoblotting using antibody to the OmpA-like protein identified an Acinetobacter sp. as the bacterial species that expressed this protein and colonized the mouse stomach. Moreover, reintubation of mice with a pure culture of the Acinetobacter sp. caused gastritis. We conclude that bacterial colonization of the stomach may increase serum gastrin levels in part through the ability of the bacteria to produce OmpA-like proteins that directly stimulate gastrin and IL-8 gene expression. These results implicate OmpA-secreting bacteria in the activation of gastrin gene expression and raise the possibility that a variety of organisms may contribute to the increase in serum gastrin and subsequent epithelial cell proliferation in the hypochlorhydric stomach. PMID:10816525

  11. Gastrin stimulates MMP-1 expression in gastric epithelial cells: putative role in gastric epithelial cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, J. Dinesh; Steele, Islay; Moore, Andrew R.; Murugesan, Senthil V.; Rakonczay, Zoltan; Venglovecz, Viktoria; Pritchard, D. Mark; Dimaline, Rodney; Tiszlavicz, Laszlo; Varro, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    The pyloric antral hormone gastrin plays a role in remodeling of the gastric epithelium, but the specific targets of gastrin that mediate these effects are poorly understood. Glandular epithelial cells of the gastric corpus express matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1, which is a potential determinant of tissue remodeling; some of these cells express the CCK-2 receptor at which gastrin acts. We have now examined the hypothesis that gastrin stimulates expression of MMP-1 in the stomach. We determined MMP-1 transcript abundance in gastric mucosal biopsies from Helicobacter pylori negative human subjects with normal gastric mucosal histology, who had a range of serum gastrin concentrations due in part to treatment with proton pump inhibitors (PPI). The effects of gastrin were studied on gastric epithelial AGS-GR cells using Western blot and migration assays. In human subjects with increased serum gastrin due to PPI usage, MMP-1 transcript abundance was increased 2-fold; there was also increased MMP-7 transcript abundance but not MMP-3. In Western blots, gastrin increased proMMP-1 abundance, as well that of a minor band corresponding to active MMP-1, in the media of AGS-GR cells, and the response was mediated by protein kinase C and p42/44 MAP kinase. There was also increased MMP-1 enzyme activity. Gastrin-stimulated AGS-GR cell migration in both scratch wound and Boyden chamber assays was inhibited by MMP-1 immunoneutralization. We conclude that MMP-1 expression is a target of gastrin implicated in mucosal remodeling. PMID:25977510

  12. Distribution and ontogeny of gastrin- and serotonin-immunoreactive cells in the proventriculus of developing chick, Gallus gallus domestica

    PubMed Central

    Cinar, Kenan

    2009-01-01

    The ontogeny and distribution of gastrin- and serotonin-immunoreactive (IR) cell in the proventriculus of chicks (Gallus gallus domestica, n = 60) in different growth periods was examined immunohistochemically using antisera specific to gastrin and serotonin. Gastrin and serotonin-IR cells were detected in chick proventriculus. Gastrin-IR cells were first evident after 12 days of incubation in lamina epithelialis and compound glands, while serotonin-IR cells were observed only in compound glands at that same time. Gastrin-IR and serotonin-IR cells increased in frequency on incubation day 14 and 16, respectively. Towards the end of incubation, gastrin- and serotonin-IR cell numbers decreased. In adult chicken, both IR cells were present but not lower numbers. The observations demonstrate the presence of gastrin- and serotonin-IR cells in the proventriculus of developing chicks in temporally changing frequencies. PMID:19255518

  13. In vivo analysis of mouse gastrin gene regulation in enhanced GFP-BAC transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Takaishi, Shigeo; Shibata, Wataru; Tomita, Hiroyuki; Jin, Guangchun; Yang, Xiangdong; Ericksen, Russell; Dubeykovskaya, Zinaida; Asfaha, Samuel; Quante, Michael; Betz, Kelly S; Shulkes, Arthur; Wang, Timothy C

    2011-02-01

    Gastrin is secreted from a subset of neuroendocrine cells residing in the gastric antrum known as G cells, but low levels are also expressed in fetal pancreas and intestine and in many solid malignancies. Although past studies have suggested that antral gastrin is transcriptionally regulated by inflammation, gastric pH, somatostatin, and neoplastic transformation, the transcriptional regulation of gastrin has not previously been demonstrated in vivo. Here, we describe the creation of an enhanced green fluorescent protein reporter (mGAS-EGFP) mouse using a bacterial artificial chromosome that contains the entire mouse gastrin gene. Three founder lines expressed GFP signals in the gastric antrum and the transitional zone to the corpus. In addition, GFP(+) cells could be detected in the fetal pancreatic islets and small intestinal villi, but not in these organs of the adult mice. The administration of acid-suppressive reagents such as proton pump inhibitor omeprazole and gastrin/CCK-2 receptor antagonist YF476 significantly increased GFP signal intensity and GFP(+) cell numbers in the antrum, whereas these parameters were decreased by overnight fasting, octreotide (long-lasting somatostatin ortholog) infusion, and Helicobacter felis infection. GFP(+) cells were also detected in the anterior lobe of the pituitary gland and importantly in the colonic tumor cells induced by administration with azoxymethane and dextran sulfate sodium salt. This transgenic mouse provides a useful tool to study the regulation of mouse gastrin gene in vivo, thus contributing to our understanding of the mechanisms involved in transcriptional control of the gastrin gene.

  14. Reciprocal regulation of antral gastrin and somatostatin gene expression by omeprazole-induced achlorhydria.

    PubMed Central

    Brand, S J; Stone, D

    1988-01-01

    Gastric acid exerts a feedback inhibition on the secretion of gastrin from antral G cells. This study examines whether gastrin gene expression is also regulated by changes in gastric pH. Achlorhydria was induced in rats by the gastric H+/K+ ATPase inhibitor, omeprazole (100 mumol/kg). This resulted in fourfold increases in both serum gastrin (within 2 h) and gastrin mRNA levels (after 24 h). Antral somatostatin D cells probably act as chemoreceptors for gastric acid to mediate a paracrine inhibition on gastrin secretion from adjacent G cells. Omeprazole-induced achlorhydria reduced D-cell activity as shown by a threefold decrease in antral somatostatin mRNA levels that began after 24 h. Exogenous administration of the somatostatin analogue SMS 201-995 (10 micrograms/kg) prevented both the hypergastrinemia and the increase in gastrin mRNA levels caused by omeprazole-induced achlorhydria. Exogenous somatostatin, however, did not influence the decrease in antral somatostatin mRNA levels seen with achlorhydria. These data, therefore, support the hypothesis that antral D cells act as chemoreceptors for changes in gastric pH, and modulates somatostatin secretion and synthesis to mediate a paracrine inhibition on gastrin gene expression in adjacent G cells. Images PMID:2901431

  15. Luminal Nalpha-methyl histamine stimulates gastric acid secretion in duodenal ulcer patients via releasing gastrin.

    PubMed

    Konturek, P C; Konturek, S J; Sito, E; Kwiecien, N; Obtulowicz, W; Bielanski, W; Hahn, E G

    2001-01-26

    Nalpha-methyl histamine is an unusual histamine metabolite which is produced in the stomach infected by Helicobacter pylori and which was shown in animals to stimulate gastric acid secretion and to release gastrin in vitro isolated G-cells, but no information is available regarding its influence on gastric secretion and gastrin release in duodenal ulcer patients before and after H. pylori eradication. In this study, we compared the effects of intragastric administration of single or graded doses of Nalpha-methyl histamine on gastric acid secretion and plasma gastrin levels in 16 male duodenal ulcer patients (aging from 35 to 48 years and weighing 65-82 kg) before and after the eradication of H. pylori. Furthermore, the gastric luminal histamine and gastrin contents were determined before and after H. pylori eradication. In H. pylori-infected duodenal ulcer patients, the intragastric application of Nalpha-methyl histamine failed to affect gastric acid secretion or plasma gastrin levels. Following eradication of H. pylori, gastric luminal histamine and gastrin, and both basal gastric acid secretion and plasma gastrin levels, were significantly reduced. Nalpha-methyl histamine given intragastrically in graded doses to such H. pylori-eradicated duodenal ulcer patients was found to increase dose-dependently gastric acid output reaching at a dose of 5 mg, about 80% of histamine maximum induced by i.v. infusion of 25 microg/kg h of histamine dihydrochloride. We conclude that Nalpha-methyl histamine is a potent luminally active stimulant of gastrin release and gastric acid secretion in H. pylori-eradicated patients when luminal histamine is low but is not effective in H. pylori infected patients when luminal histamine is enhanced, possibly due to desensitization of gastrin (G-cells) and acid-producing (parietal) cells by Nalpha-methyl histamine produced excessively in H. pylori-infected stomach.

  16. Engineering Receptor Expression on Natural Killer Cells Through Trogocytosis.

    PubMed

    Somanchi, Anitha; Lee, Dean A; Somanchi, Srinivas S

    2016-01-01

    Trogocytosis is a rapid contact-dependent process by which lymphocytes acquire membrane patches from the target cells ('donor' cells) with which they interact and this phenomenon has been shown to occur in various immune cells. The surface molecules acquired through trogocytosis are functionally incorporated in the 'acceptor' cells transiently. We had previously demonstrated that trogocytosis can be utilized in place of gene transfer to engineer surface receptor expression on NK cells for adoptive immunotherapy applications. In this chapter, we describe detailed protocol for trogocytosis-co-culture of NK cell with the donor cell line, phenotypic assessment of receptor uptake and persistence, and assessment of NK cell function (migration) following receptor acquisition. PMID:27177672

  17. Control of TGF-beta receptor expression in bone.

    PubMed

    Centrella, M; Ji, C; McCarthy, T L

    1998-01-15

    Bone growth and remodeling are controlled by local and systemic growth factors. The first local bone growth factor purified to homogeneity was transforming growth factor type beta (TGF-beta). On skeletal cells, TGF-beta has multiple effects mediated through at least three distinct cell surface receptors. More recent evidence demonstrated hormone and growth factor dependent alterations in TGF-beta receptor expression on osteoblasts in vitro. Indeed, certain biological responses appear to depend on the proportional expression of the type I TGF-beta receptor. Studies defining the type I TGF-beta receptor gene promoter then revealed that it contained several binding sequences for a nuclear factor that varies in parallel with expression of the osteoblast phenotype. New observations linking these events appear to enhance our understanding of this pivotal growth factor during osteogenesis and systemic bone disease.

  18. Gastric calcifying fibrous tumour

    PubMed Central

    Attila, Tan; Chen, Dean; Gardiner, Geoffrey W; Ptak, Theadore W; Marcon, Norman E

    2006-01-01

    Intramucosal gastric tumours are most commonly found to be gastrointestinal stromal tumours or leiomyomas (smooth muscle tumours); however, a variety of other uncommon mesenchymal tumours can occur in the stomach wall. A rare benign calcifying fibrous tumour is reported and the endoscopic appearance, ultrasound findings and morphology are documented. A review of the literature found only two similar cases. PMID:16858502

  19. Implication of gastrin in cyclooxygenase-2 expression in Helicobacter pylori infected gastric ulceration.

    PubMed

    Konturek, S J; Konturek, P C; Plonka, A; Duda, A; Sito, E; Zuchowicz, M; Hahn, E G

    2001-08-01

    Gastroduodenal ulcerations have worldwide distribution and the infection with Helicobacter pylori (HP) has been implicated in pathogenesis of this disease. The HP infection is usually accompanied by hypergastrinemia and enhanced generation of prostaglandins (PG), both implicated in the pathogenesis of peptic ulcerations but no study has been undertaken to assess the relationship between the HP infection and coexpression of gastrin and cyclooxygenases (COX), the rate limiting enzymes in the PG production. Since HP infection, usually accompanying peptic ulcerations, results in increased release of gastrin, a potent gastric mitogen that might be capable to induce COX-2 and to generate PG, we decided 1) to compare the seroprevalence of HP and its cytotoxic protein, CagA, in gastric ulcer patients with those in age- and gender-matched controls; 2) to determine the gene expression of gastrin and its receptors (CCK(B)-R) at the margin of gastric ulcer and in the mucosa of antrum and corpus before and after successful eradication of HP, 3) to assess the plasma levels and gastric luminal contents of gastrin before and after HP eradication and 4) to examine the mRNA and enzyme protein expression of COX-1 and COX-2 as well as the PGE2 generation in ulcer margin tissue and gastric antral and fundic mucosa before and after the HP eradication. The trial material included 20 patients with gastric ulcer and 40 age- and gender-matched controls. Anti-HP and anti-CagA IgG seroprevalence was estimated by specific antisera using ELISA tests. Gene expressions of gastrin, CCK(B)-R, COX-1 and COX-2 were examined using RT-PCR with beta-actin as a reference and employing Western blotting for COX-2 expression, while gastrin and PGE2 were measured by RIA. All gastric ulcers were located at smaller curvature within the antral mucosal area. The seroprevalence of HP, especially that expressing CagA, was significantly higher in gastric ulcers (85%) than in controls (62.5%). Both gastrin and CCK

  20. Cyclic nucleotides of canine antral smooth muscle. Effects of acetylcholine, catecholamines and gastrin.

    PubMed

    Baur, S; Grant, B; Wooton, J

    1981-01-01

    1. The effects of acetylcholine, catecholamines and gastrin on the intracellular content of cyclic AMP and cyclic GMP in antral circular muscle have been determined. 2. Acetylcholine results in a significant but transient increase in intracellular cyclic GMP. 3. Isoproterenol and norepinephrine increase intracellular cyclic AMP. Based on half-maximal effective doses, isoproterenol is 2.7-times more effective than norepinephrine. The increase in intracellular cyclic AMP by both agents is inhibited by propranolol but not phentolamine, indicating that both agents act on the muscle cell by a beta-receptor-coupled mechanism. 4. Gastrin has no demonstrable effect on either cyclic AMP or cyclic GMP. This suggests that while gastrin and acetylcholine can produce a like myoelectric response in the muscle cell, the action of gastrin is mediated by a separate receptor, presumably on the muscle cell, and not by a release of acetylcholine.

  1. Imaging of testicular tumours.

    PubMed

    Owens, E J; Kabala, J; Goddard, P

    2004-01-01

    This article reviews the diagnosis, pathology and imaging of testicular tumours, predominantly germ cell tumours. It will discuss the imaging techniques used in their diagnosis, staging and surveillance.

  2. Genes involved in Drosophila glutamate receptor expression and localization

    PubMed Central

    Liebl, Faith LW; Featherstone, David E

    2005-01-01

    Background A clear picture of the mechanisms controlling glutamate receptor expression, localization, and stability remains elusive, possibly due to an incomplete understanding of the proteins involved. We screened transposon mutants generated by the ongoing Drosophila Gene Disruption Project in an effort to identify the different types of genes required for glutamate receptor cluster development. Results To enrich for non-silent insertions with severe disruptions in glutamate receptor clustering, we identified and focused on homozygous lethal mutants in a collection of 2185 BG and KG transposon mutants generated by the BDGP Gene Disruption Project. 202 lethal mutant lines were individually dissected to expose glutamatergic neuromuscular junctions, stained using antibodies that recognize neuronal membrane and the glutamate receptor subunit GluRIIA, and viewed using laser-scanning confocal microscopy. We identified 57 mutants with qualitative differences in GluRIIA expression and/or localization. 84% of mutants showed loss of receptors and/or clusters; 16% of mutants showed an increase in receptors. Insertion loci encode a variety of protein types, including cytoskeleton proteins and regulators, kinases, phosphatases, ubiquitin ligases, mucins, cell adhesion proteins, transporters, proteins controlling gene expression and protein translation, and proteins of unknown/novel function. Expression pattern analyses and complementation tests, however, suggest that any single mutant – even if a mutant gene is uniquely tagged – must be interpreted with caution until the mutation is validated genetically and phenotypically. Conclusion Our study identified 57 transposon mutants with qualitative differences in glutamate receptor expression and localization. Despite transposon tagging of every insertion locus, extensive validation is needed before one can have confidence in the role of any individual gene. Alternatively, one can focus on the types of genes identified, rather

  3. Abnormal gastric morphology and function in CCK-B/gastrin receptor-deficient mice.

    PubMed Central

    Rindi, G.; Langhans, N.; Rehfeld, J. F.; Beinborn, M.; Kopin, A. S.

    1998-01-01

    Mice lacking the cholecystokinin (CCK)-B/gastrin receptor have been generated by targeted gene disruption. The roles of this receptor in controlling gastric acid secretion and gastric mucosal growth have been assessed. The analysis of homozygous mutant mice vs. wild type included measurement of basal gastric pH, plasma gastrin concentrations as well as quantification of gastric mucosal cell types by immunohistochemistry. Mutant mice exhibited a marked increase in basal gastric pH (from 3.2 to 5.2) and about a 10-fold elevation in circulating carboxyamidated gastrin compared with wild-type controls. Histologic analysis revealed a decrease in both parietal and enterochromaffin-like (ECL) cells, thus explaining the reduction in acid output. Consistent with the elevation in circulating gastrin, antral gastrin cells were increased in number while somatostatin cells were decreased. These data support the importance of the CCK-B/gastrin receptor in maintaining the normal cellular composition and function of the gastric mucosa. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:10461365

  4. Prostaglandin F receptor expression in intrauterine tissues of pregnant rats

    PubMed Central

    Kanca, Halit; Yar, Atiye Seda; Helvacioğlu, Fatma; Menevşe, Sevda; Çalgüner, Engin; Erdoğan, Deniz

    2014-01-01

    In this investigation, we studied the expression and localization of rat prostaglandin F (FP) receptor in uterine tissues of rats on gestational Days 10, 15, 18, 20, 21, 21.5 and postpartal Days 1 and 3 using Western blotting analysis, real-time PCR, and immunohistochemistry. A high level of immunoreactivity was observed on gestational Days 20, 21, and 21.5 with the most significant signals found on Day 20. FP receptor protein was expressed starting on gestational Day 15, and a fluctuating unsteady increase was observed until delivery. Uterine FP receptor mRNA levels were low between Days 10 and 18 of gestation (p < 0.05). The transcript level increased significantly on Day 20 and peaked on Day 21.5 just before labor (p < 0.05). There was a positive correlation between FP receptor mRNA expression and serum estradiol levels (rs = 0.78; p < 0.01) along with serum estradiol/progesterone ratios (rs = 0.79; p < 0.01). In summary, we observed an increase FP receptor expression in rat uterus with advancing gestation, a marked elevation of expression at term, and a concominant decrease during the postpartum period. These findings indicate a role for uterine FP receptors in the mediation of uterine contractility at term. PMID:24136214

  5. Repertoire of Chemokine Receptor Expression in the Female Genital Tract

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, Bruce K.; Landay, Alan; Andersson, Jan; Brown, Clark; Behbahani, Homira; Jiyamapa, Dan; Burki, Zareefa; Stanislawski, Donna; Czerniewski, Mary Ann; Garcia, Patricia

    1998-01-01

    Sexually transmitted diseases, genital ulcer disease, and progesterone therapy increase susceptibility to lentivirus transmission. Infection of cells by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is dependent on expression of specific chemokine receptors known to function as HIV co-receptors. Quantitative kinetic reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction was developed to determine the in vivo expression levels of CCR5, CXCR4, CCR3, CCR2b, and the cytomegalovirus-encoded US28 in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and cervical biopsies from 12 women with and without sexually transmitted diseases, genital ulcer disease, and progesterone-predominant conditions. Our data indicate that CCR5 is the major HIV co-receptor expressed in the female genital tract, and CXCR4 is the predominantly expressed HIV co-receptor in peripheral blood. CCR5 mRNA expression in the ectocervix was 10-fold greater than CXCR4, 20-fold greater than CCR2b, and 100-fold greater than CCR3. In peripheral blood, CXCR4 expression was 1.5-fold greater than CCR5, 10-fold greater than CCR2b, and 15-fold greater than CCR3. US28 was not expressed in cervical tissue despite expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from five individuals. CCR5 was significantly increased (p < 0.02) in biopsies from women with sexually transmitted diseases and others who were progesterone predominant. In vitro studies demonstrate that progesterone increases CCR5, CXCR4, and CCR3 expression and decreases CCR2b expression in lymphocytes and monocytes/macrophages. Characterization of chemokine receptors at the tissue level provides important information in identifying host determinants of HIV-1 transmission. PMID:9708808

  6. Gastrin and D1 dopamine receptor interact to induce natriuresis and diuresis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yue; Asico, Laureano D; Zheng, Shuo; Villar, Van Anthony M; He, Duofen; Zhou, Lin; Zeng, Chunyu; Jose, Pedro A

    2013-11-01

    Oral NaCl produces a greater natriuresis and diuresis than the intravenous infusion of the same amount of NaCl. Gastrin is the major gastrointestinal hormone taken up by renal proximal tubule (RPT) cells. We hypothesized that renal gastrin and dopamine receptors interact to synergistically increase sodium excretion, an impaired interaction of which may be involved in the pathogenesis of hypertension. In Wistar-Kyoto rats, infusion of gastrin induced natriuresis and diuresis, which was abrogated in the presence of a gastrin (cholecystokinin B receptor [CCKBR]; CI-988) or a D1-like receptor antagonist (SCH23390). Similarly, the natriuretic and diuretic effects of fenoldopam, a D1-like receptor agonist, were blocked by SCH23390, as well as by CI-988. However, the natriuretic effects of gastrin and fenoldopam were not observed in spontaneously hypertensive rats. The gastrin/D1-like receptor interaction was also confirmed in RPT cells. In RPT cells from Wistar-Kyoto but not spontaneously hypertensive rats, stimulation of either D1-like receptor or gastrin receptor inhibited Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase activity, an effect that was blocked in the presence of SCH23390 or CI-988. In RPT cells from Wistar-Kyoto and spontaneously hypertensive rats, CCKBR and D1 receptor coimmunoprecipitated, which was increased after stimulation of either D1 receptor or CCKBR in RPT cells from Wistar-Kyoto rats; stimulation of one receptor increased the RPT cell membrane expression of the other receptor, effects that were not observed in spontaneously hypertensive rats. These data suggest that there is a synergism between CCKBR and D1-like receptors to increase sodium excretion. An aberrant interaction between the renal CCK BR and D1-like receptors (eg, D1 receptor) may play a role in the pathogenesis of hypertension.

  7. Medical management of secretory syndromes related to gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumours.

    PubMed

    Dimitriadis, Georgios K; Weickert, Martin O; Randeva, Harpal S; Kaltsas, Gregory; Grossman, Ashley

    2016-09-01

    Although recent epidemiological evidence indicates that the prevalence of non-functioning gastroenteropancreatic (GEP) neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) is rising, a significant number of GEP-NETs still present with symptoms related to the secretion of biologically active substances leading to the development of distinct clinical syndromes. In the past, these syndromes were associated with substantial morbidity and mortality due to the lack of specific therapies; however, since the introduction of long-acting somatostatin analogues and medications such as proton pump inhibitors, their control has been greatly improved. As a result, nowadays, the main cause of morbidity and mortality in GEP-NETs is mostly directly related to tumour growth and the extent of metastatic disease. However, in some patients with functioning tumours and extensive disease, control of the secretory syndrome still remains problematic, necessitating the employment of several cytoreductive techniques, which may not always be sufficient. Recently, new agents directed against tumour growth, or exerting increased binding activity to receptors expressed in these tumours, or interfering with the synthetic pathway of some of the compounds secreted by these tumours, have been developed. Since there are no specific guidelines addressing the totality of the management of the secretory syndromes related to GEP-NETs, this review aims at critically analysing the medical management of previously recognised secretory syndromes; it also addresses areas of uncertainty, assesses the newer therapeutic developments and also addresses recently described but poorly characterised secretory syndromes related to GEP-NETs. PMID:27461388

  8. Tumour biology: Senescence in premalignant tumours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collado, Manuel; Gil, Jesús; Efeyan, Alejo; Guerra, Carmen; Schuhmacher, Alberto J.; Barradas, Marta; Benguría, Alberto; Zaballos, Angel; Flores, Juana M.; Barbacid, Mariano; Beach, David; Serrano, Manuel

    2005-08-01

    Oncogene-induced senescence is a cellular response that may be crucial for protection against cancer development, but its investigation has so far been restricted to cultured cells that have been manipulated to overexpress an oncogene. Here we analyse tumours initiated by an endogenous oncogene, ras, and show that senescent cells exist in premalignant tumours but not in malignant ones. Senescence is therefore a defining feature of premalignant tumours that could prove valuable in the diagnosis and prognosis of cancer.

  9. Flow cytometric monitoring of hormone receptor expression in human solid tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishan, Awtar

    2002-05-01

    Hormone receptor expression in human breast and prostate tumors is of diagnostic and therapeutic importance. With the availability of anti-estrogen, androgen and progesterone antibodies, immunohistochemistry has become a standard tool for determination of receptor expression in human tumor biopsies. However, this method is dependent on examination of a small number of cells under a microscope and the data obtained in most cases is not quantitative. As most of the commercially used anti-hormone antibodies have nuclear specificity, we have developed methods for isolation and antigen unmasking of nuclei from formalin fixed/paraffin embedded archival human tumors. After immunostaining with the antibodies and propidium iodide (for DNA content and cell cycle analysis), nuclei are analyzed by multiparametric laser flow cytometry for hormone receptor expression, DNA content, aneuploidy and cell cycle determination. These multiparametric methods are especially important for retrospective studies seeking to correlate hormone receptor expression with clinical response to anti-hormonal therapy of human breast and prostate tumors.

  10. Treatment of Gastrin-Secreting Tumor With Sustained-Release Octreotide Acetate in a Dog.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sangho; Hosoya, Kenji; Takagi, Satoshi; Okumura, Masahiro

    2015-01-01

    An 8 yr old, intact male Shiba Inu was presented with loose stool, polydipsia, hematuria, vomiting, and anorexia. On abdominal ultrasonography, numerous nodules were detected in the hepatic parenchyma distributed diffusely throughout all lobes. Excisional biopsy of one of the nodules was performed via exploratory laparotomy. A histopathological diagnosis of the lesion was carcinoid, and the tumor cells stained positive to chromogranin A and gastrin. The serum gastrin level of the dog was 45,613 pg/mL (reference range: 160-284). In addition to medical treatment with omeprazole(c) and famotidine(e), suppression of gastrin secretion was attempted with octreotide acetate. A test dose of octreotide acetate significantly decreased the serum gastrin level to approximately one third of the baseline in 2 hr and the effect lasted approximately for 6 hr. On day 21, treatment with sustained-release formulation of octreotide acetate(a) (5 mg intramuscular, q 4 wk) was initiated. The serum gastrin concentration gradually decreased over 32 days and then progressively increased in parallel with the progression of the hepatic nodules. The dog gradually developed recurrence of initial clinical signs, and was lost to follow-up on day 510.

  11. Gastrin-releasing peptide stimulates glycoconjugate release from feline trachea

    SciTech Connect

    Lundgren, J.D.; Baraniuk, J.N.; Ostrowski, N.L.; Kaliner, M.A.; Shelhamer, J.H. )

    1990-02-01

    The effect of gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) on respiratory glycoconjugate (RGC) secretion was investigated in a feline tracheal organ culture model. RGC secretion was stimulated by GRP in a dose-dependent fashion at concentrations from 10(-8) to 10(-5) M (range 15-38% increase above control) with a peak effect within 0.5-1 h of incubation. GRP-(14-27), the receptor binding portion of GRP, and the related molecule, bombesin, also stimulated RGC secretion by approximately 20% above control. Acetyl-GRP-(20-27) stimulated RGC release by 10%, whereas GRP-(1-16) was inactive. Autoradiographic studies with 125I-GRP revealed that specific binding was restricted to the submucosal glands and the surface epithelium. A specific radioimmunoassay showed the content of GRP in feline trachea after extraction with ethanol-acetic acid to be 156 +/- 91 fmol/g wet wt. Indirect immunohistochemistry indicated that ganglion cells located just outside the cartilage contained GRP-immunoreactive materials. GRP is a novel mucus secretagogue that may participate in regulating airway mucosal gland secretion.

  12. Chemokine receptor expression by inflammatory T cells in EAE.

    PubMed

    Mony, Jyothi Thyagabhavan; Khorooshi, Reza; Owens, Trevor

    2014-01-01

    Chemokines direct cellular infiltration to tissues, and their receptors and signaling pathways represent targets for therapy in diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS). The chemokine CCL20 is expressed in choroid plexus, a site of entry of T cells to the central nervous system (CNS). The CCL20 receptor CCR6 has been reported to be selectively expressed by CD4(+) T cells that produce the cytokine IL-17 (Th17 cells). Th17 cells and interferon-gamma (IFNγ)-producing Th1 cells are implicated in induction of MS and its animal model experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). We have assessed whether CCR6 identifies specific inflammatory T cell subsets in EAE. Our approach was to induce EAE, and then examine chemokine receptor expression by cytokine-producing T cells sorted from CNS at peak disease. About 7% of CNS-infiltrating CD4(+) T cells produced IFNγ in flow cytometric cytokine assays, whereas less than 1% produced IL-17. About 1% of CD4(+) T cells produced both cytokines. CCR6 was expressed by Th1, Th1+17 and by Th17 cells, but not by CD8(+) T cells. CD8(+) T cells expressed CXCR3, which was also expressed by CD4(+) T cells, with no correlation to cytokine profile. Messenger RNA for IFNγ, IL-17A, and the Th1 and Th17-associated transcription factors T-bet and RORγt was detected in both CCR6(+) and CXCR3(+) CD4(+) T cells. IFNγ, but not IL-17A mRNA expression was detected in CD8(+) T cells in CNS. CCR6 and CD4 were co-localized in spinal cord infiltrates by double immunofluorescence. Consistent with flow cytometry data some but not all CD4(+) T cells expressed CCR6 within infiltrates. CD4-negative CCR6(+) cells included macrophage/microglial cells. Thus we have for the first time directly studied CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells in the CNS of mice with peak EAE, and determined IFNγ and IL17 expression by cells expressing CCR6 and CXCR3. We show that neither CCR6 or CXCR3 align with CD4 T cell subsets, and Th1 or mixed Th1+17 predominate in EAE.

  13. Influence of type-I Interferon receptor expression level on the response to type-I Interferons in human pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Booy, Stephanie; van Eijck, Casper H J; Dogan, Fadime; van Koetsveld, Peter M; Hofland, Leo J

    2014-03-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a highly aggressive malignancy with limited treatment options. Type-I interferons (e.g. IFN-α/-β) have several anti-tumour activities. Over the past few years, clinical studies evaluating the effect of adjuvant IFN-α therapy in pancreatic cancer yielded equivocal results. Although IFN-α and -β act via the type-I IFN receptor, the role of the number of receptors present on tumour cells is still unknown. Therefore, this study associated, for the first time, in a large panel of pancreatic cancer cell lines the effects of IFN-α/-β with the expression of type-I IFN receptors. The anti-tumour effects of IFN-α or IFN-β on cell proliferation and apoptosis were evaluated in 11 human pancreatic cell lines. Type-I IFN receptor expression was determined on both the mRNA and protein level. After 7 days of incubation, IFN-α significantly reduced cell growth in eight cell lines by 5-67%. IFN-β inhibited cell growth statistically significant in all cell lines by 43-100%. After 3 days of treatment, IFN-β induced significantly more apoptosis than IFN-α. The cell lines variably expressed the type-I IFN receptor. The maximal inhibitory effect of IFN-α was positively correlated with the IFNAR-1 mRNA (P < 0.05, r = 0.63), IFNAR-2c mRNA (P < 0.05, r = 0.69) and protein expression (P < 0.05, r = 0.65). Human pancreatic cancer cell lines variably respond to IFN-α and -β. The expression level of the type-I IFN receptor is of predictive value for the direct anti-tumour effects of IFN-α treatment. More importantly, IFN-β induces anti-tumour effects already at much lower concentrations, is less dependent on interferon receptor expression and seems, therefore, more promising than IFN-α.

  14. Effects of whisky on plasma gastrin and cholecystokinin in young adult men.

    PubMed

    Manabe, T; Sawai, H; Okada, Y; Funahashi, H; Yamamoto, M; Sato, M; Hayakawa, T; Yamaki, K

    2003-01-01

    Whisky (1 g/kg, 21.5% alcohol) was administered orally to healthy young adult male volunteers, and changes in the plasma concentrations of alcohol, acetaldehyde, gastrin, cholecystokinin (CCK) and serum amylase were measured over time. Values for alcohol and acetaldehyde rapidly reached a peak at 30-45 min after alcohol intake, followed by a gradual decline. The plasma gastrin concentration showed a rapid elevation, while the plasma CCK concentration did not exhibit any significant changes in the early phase after alcohol intake. Elevation of CCK was observed after 75 min, however. These results show that intake of whisky stimulates the secretion of gastrin and is associated with a later increase in CCK.

  15. Checkpoint Blockade Cancer Immunotherapy Targets Tumour-Specific Mutant Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Gubin, Matthew M.; Zhang, Xiuli; Schuster, Heiko; Caron, Etienne; Ward, Jeffrey P.; Noguchi, Takuro; Ivanova, Yulia; Hundal, Jasreet; Arthur, Cora D.; Krebber, Willem-Jan; Mulder, Gwenn E.; Toebes, Mireille; Vesely, Matthew D.; Lam, Samuel S.K.; Korman, Alan J.; Allison, James P.; Freeman, Gordon J.; Sharpe, Arlene H.; Pearce, Erika L.; Schumacher, Ton N.; Aebersold, Ruedi; Rammensee, Hans-Georg; Melief, Cornelis J. M.; Mardis, Elaine R.; Gillanders, William E.; Artyomov, Maxim N.; Schreiber, Robert D.

    2014-01-01

    The immune system plays key roles in determining the fate of developing cancers by not only functioning as a tumour promoter facilitating cellular transformation, promoting tumour growth and sculpting tumour cell immunogenicity1–6, but also as an extrinsic tumour suppressor that either destroys developing tumours or restrains their expansion1,2,7. Yet clinically apparent cancers still arise in immunocompetent individuals in part as a consequence of cancer induced immunosuppression. In many individuals, immunosuppression is mediated by Cytotoxic T-Lymphocyte Associated Antigen-4 (CTLA-4) and Programmed Death-1 (PD-1), two immunomodulatory receptors expressed on T cells8,9. Monoclonal antibody (mAb) based therapies targeting CTLA-4 and/or PD-1 (checkpoint blockade) have yielded significant clinical benefits—including durable responses—to patients with different malignancies10–13. However, little is known about the identity of the tumour antigens that function as the targets of T cells activated by checkpoint blockade immunotherapy and whether these antigens can be used to generate vaccines that are highly tumour-specific. Herein, we use genomics and bioinformatics approaches to identify tumour-specific mutant proteins as a major class of T cell rejection antigens following αPD-1 and/or αCTLA-4 therapy of mice bearing progressively growing sarcomas and show that therapeutic synthetic long peptide (SLP) vaccines incorporating these mutant epitopes induce tumour rejection comparably to checkpoint blockade immunotherapy. Whereas, mutant tumour antigen-specific T cells are present in progressively growing tumours, they are reactivated following treatment with αPD-1- and/or αCTLA-4 and display some overlapping but mostly treatment-specific transcriptional profiles rendering them capable of mediating tumour rejection. These results reveal that tumour-specific mutant antigens (TSMA) are not only important targets of checkpoint blockade therapy but also can be

  16. Bronchial mucous gland tumours.

    PubMed

    Spencer, H

    1979-07-27

    Tumours arising in the bronchial mucous glands closely resemble tumours arising in the mixed salivary glands. Bronchial mucous gland tumours account for less than 0.5 per cent of all lung tumours. Twenty six tumours are reviewed and they have been divided into five types, (a) adenoidcystic carcinomas, (b) muco-epidermoid tumors, (c) mixed (pleomorphic) tumors, (d) cystadenomas and (f) oxyphilic adenoma. The clinical features, and postoperative course of the patients are reviewed. Adenocystic carcinomas, arising in the bronchus frequently involve the neighbouring trachea and spread mainly by direct infiltration. Most muco-epidermoid bronchial tumours were confined to young persons, and the only malignant muco-epidermoid tumour occurred in an elderly person. The prognosis in young persons is good provided the tumours are completely excised. The two mixed bronchial tumours resembled their salivary counterparts and one subsequently behaved as a carcinoma and metastasised. Bronchial cystadenomas all proved to be benign tumours but in two cases were associated with surface papillary proliferation. The only example of an oxyphil cell adenoma was discovered at post mortem examination. The histogenesis of the tumours is considered.

  17. Gastrin-releasing Peptide Receptor Imaging in Breast Cancer Using the Receptor Antagonist 68Ga-RM2 And PET

    PubMed Central

    Stoykow, Christian; Erbes, Thalia; Maecke, Helmut R; Bulla, Stefan; Bartholomä, Mark; Mayer, Sebastian; Drendel, Vanessa; Bronsert, Peter; Werner, Martin; Gitsch, Gerald; Weber, Wolfgang A; Stickeler, Elmar; Meyer, Philipp T

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (GRPR) is overexpressed in breast cancer. The present study evaluates GRPR imaging as a novel imaging modality in breast cancer by employing positron emission tomography (PET) and the GRPR antagonist 68Ga-RM2. Methods: Fifteen female patients with biopsy confirmed primary breast carcinoma (3 bilateral tumors; median clinical stage IIB) underwent 68Ga-RM2-PET/CT for pretreatment staging. In vivo tumor uptake of 68Ga-RM2 was correlated with estrogen (ER) and progesterone (PR) receptor expression, HER2/neu status and MIB-1 proliferation index in breast core biopsy specimens. Results: 13/18 tumors demonstrated strongly increased 68Ga-RM2 uptake compared to normal breast tissue (defined as PET-positive). All PET-positive primary tumors were ER- and PR-positive (13/13) in contrast to only 1/5 PET-negative tumors. Mean SUVMAX of ER-positive tumors was 10.6±6.0 compared to 2.3±1.0 in ER-negative tumors (p=0.016). In a multivariate analysis including ER, PR, HER2/neu and MIB-1, only ER expression predicted 68Ga-RM2 uptake (model: r2=0.55, p=0.025). Normal breast tissue showed inter- and intraindividually variable, moderate GRPR binding (SUVMAX 2.3±1.0), while physiological uptake of other organs was considerably less except pancreas. Of note, 68Ga-RM2-PET/CT detected internal mammary lymph nodes with high 68Ga-RM2 uptake (n=8), a contralateral axillary lymph node metastasis (verified by biopsy) and bone metastases (n=1; not detected by bone scan and CT). Conclusion: Our study demonstrates that 68Ga-RM2-PET/CT is a promising imaging method in ER-positive breast cancer. In vivo GRPR binding assessed by 68Ga-RM2-PET/CT correlated with ER expression in primary tumors of untreated patients. PMID:27446498

  18. Circulating tumour cells: insights into tumour heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Hayes, D F; Paoletti, C

    2013-08-01

    Tumour heterogeneity is a major barrier to cure breast cancer. It can exist between patients with different intrinsic subtypes of breast cancer or within an individual patient with breast cancer. In the latter case, heterogeneity has been observed between different metastatic sites, between metastatic sites and the original primary tumour, and even within a single tumour at either a metastatic or a primary site. Tumour heterogeneity is a function of two separate, although linked, processes. First, genetic instability is a hallmark of malignancy, and results in 'fixed' genetic changes that are almost certainly carried forward through progression of the cancer over time, with increasingly complex additional genetic changes in new metastases as they arise. The second type of heterogeneity is due to differential but 'plastic' expression of various genes important in the biology and response to various therapies. Together, these processes result in highly variable cancers with differential response, and resistance, to both targeted (e.g. endocrine or anti-human epithelial growth receptor type 2 (HER2) agents) and nontargeted therapies (e.g. chemotherapy). Ideally, tumour heterogeneity would be monitored over time, especially in relation to therapeutic strategies. However, biopsies of metastases require invasive and costly procedures, and biopsies of multiple metastases, or serially over time, are impractical. Circulating tumour cells (CTCs) represent a potential surrogate for tissue-based cancer and therefore might provide the opportunity to monitor serial changes in tumour biology. Recent advances have enabled accurate and reliable quantification and molecular characterization of CTCs with regard to a number of important biomarkers including oestrogen receptor alpha and HER2. Preliminary data have demonstrated that expression of these markers between CTCs in individual patients with metastatic breast cancer reflects the heterogeneity of the underlying tumours. Future

  19. Salt-Inducible Kinase 1 (SIK1) Is Induced by Gastrin and Inhibits Migration of Gastric Adenocarcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Selvik, Linn-Karina M.; Rao, Shalini; Steigedal, Tonje S.; Haltbakk, Ildri; Misund, Kristine; Bruland, Torunn; Prestvik, Wenche S.; Lægreid, Astrid; Thommesen, Liv

    2014-01-01

    Salt-inducible kinase 1 (SIK1/Snf1lk) belongs to the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) family of kinases, all of which play major roles in regulating metabolism and cell growth. Recent studies have shown that reduced levels of SIK1 are associated with poor outcome in cancers, and that this involves an invasive cellular phenotype with increased metastatic potential. However, the molecular mechanism(s) regulated by SIK1 in cancer cells is not well explored. The peptide hormone gastrin regulates cellular processes involved in oncogenesis, including proliferation, apoptosis, migration and invasion. The aim of this study was to examine the role of SIK1 in gastrin responsive adenocarcinoma cell lines AR42J, AGS-GR and MKN45. We show that gastrin, known to signal through the Gq/G11-coupled CCK2 receptor, induces SIK1 expression in adenocarcinoma cells, and that transcriptional activation of SIK1 is negatively regulated by the Inducible cAMP early repressor (ICER). We demonstrate that gastrin-mediated signalling induces phosphorylation of Liver Kinase 1B (LKB1) Ser-428 and SIK1 Thr-182. Ectopic expression of SIK1 increases gastrin-induced phosphorylation of histone deacetylase 4 (HDAC4) and enhances gastrin-induced transcription of c-fos and CRE-, SRE-, AP1- and NF-κB-driven luciferase reporter plasmids. We also show that gastrin induces phosphorylation and nuclear export of HDACs. Next we find that siRNA mediated knockdown of SIK1 increases migration of the gastric adenocarcinoma cell line AGS-GR. Evidence provided here demonstrates that SIK1 is regulated by gastrin and influences gastrin elicited signalling in gastric adenocarcinoma cells. The results from the present study are relevant for the understanding of molecular mechanisms involved in gastric adenocarcinomas. PMID:25384047

  20. Salt-inducible kinase 1 (SIK1) is induced by gastrin and inhibits migration of gastric adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Selvik, Linn-Karina M; Rao, Shalini; Steigedal, Tonje S; Haltbakk, Ildri; Misund, Kristine; Bruland, Torunn; Prestvik, Wenche S; Lægreid, Astrid; Thommesen, Liv

    2014-01-01

    Salt-inducible kinase 1 (SIK1/Snf1lk) belongs to the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) family of kinases, all of which play major roles in regulating metabolism and cell growth. Recent studies have shown that reduced levels of SIK1 are associated with poor outcome in cancers, and that this involves an invasive cellular phenotype with increased metastatic potential. However, the molecular mechanism(s) regulated by SIK1 in cancer cells is not well explored. The peptide hormone gastrin regulates cellular processes involved in oncogenesis, including proliferation, apoptosis, migration and invasion. The aim of this study was to examine the role of SIK1 in gastrin responsive adenocarcinoma cell lines AR42J, AGS-GR and MKN45. We show that gastrin, known to signal through the Gq/G11-coupled CCK2 receptor, induces SIK1 expression in adenocarcinoma cells, and that transcriptional activation of SIK1 is negatively regulated by the Inducible cAMP early repressor (ICER). We demonstrate that gastrin-mediated signalling induces phosphorylation of Liver Kinase 1B (LKB1) Ser-428 and SIK1 Thr-182. Ectopic expression of SIK1 increases gastrin-induced phosphorylation of histone deacetylase 4 (HDAC4) and enhances gastrin-induced transcription of c-fos and CRE-, SRE-, AP1- and NF-κB-driven luciferase reporter plasmids. We also show that gastrin induces phosphorylation and nuclear export of HDACs. Next we find that siRNA mediated knockdown of SIK1 increases migration of the gastric adenocarcinoma cell line AGS-GR. Evidence provided here demonstrates that SIK1 is regulated by gastrin and influences gastrin elicited signalling in gastric adenocarcinoma cells. The results from the present study are relevant for the understanding of molecular mechanisms involved in gastric adenocarcinomas. PMID:25384047

  1. Skeletal effects of a gastrin receptor antagonist in H+/K+ATPase beta subunit KO mice.

    PubMed

    Aasarød, Kristin M; Ramezanzadehkoldeh, Masoud; Shabestari, Maziar; Mosti, Mats P; Stunes, Astrid K; Reseland, Janne E; Beisvag, Vidar; Eriksen, Erik Fink; Sandvik, Arne K; Erben, Reinhold G; Schüler, Christiane; Boyce, Malcolm; Skallerud, Bjørn H; Syversen, Unni; Fossmark, Reidar

    2016-08-01

    Epidemiological studies suggest an increased fracture risk in patients taking proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) for long term. The underlying mechanism, however, has been disputed. By binding to the gastric proton pump, PPIs inhibit gastric acid secretion. We have previously shown that proton pump (H(+)/K(+)ATPase beta subunit) KO mice exhibit reduced bone mineral density (BMD) and inferior bone strength compared with WT mice. Patients using PPIs as well as these KO mice exhibit gastric hypoacidity, and subsequently increased serum concentrations of the hormone gastrin. In this study, we wanted to examine whether inhibition of the gastrin/CCK2 receptor influences bone quality in these mice. KO and WT mice were given either the gastrin/CCK2 receptor antagonist netazepide dissolved in polyethylene glycol (PEG) or only PEG for 1year. We found significantly lower bone mineral content and BMD, as well as inferior bone microarchitecture in KO mice compared with WT. Biomechanical properties by three-point bending test also proved inferior in KO mice. KO mice receiving netazepide exhibited significantly higher cortical thickness, cortical area fraction, trabecular thickness and trabecular BMD by micro-CT compared with the control group. Three-point bending test also showed higher Young's modulus of elasticity in the netazepide KO group compared with control mice. In conclusion, we observed that the gastrin receptor antagonist netazepide slightly improved bone quality in this mouse model, suggesting that hypergastrinemia may contribute to deteriorated bone quality during acid inhibition. PMID:27325243

  2. Changes in gastrin levels, food intake, and duodenal mucosal growth during lactation.

    PubMed

    Lichtenberger, L M; Trier, J S

    1979-07-01

    Gastrointestinal epithelial cell proliferation is stimulated during lactation in the rat. Serum gastrin levels and food intake are also increased during lactation. We investigated the role of gastrin and food intake as possible mediators of duodenal mucosal growth during the first 15 days of lactation. As the lactation period progressed, significant increases in the following crypt properties were noted: 1) crypt length; 2) cells/crypt; 3) labeling index; and 4) dimensions of the proliferative zone. Maternal serum gastrin levels rose abruptly by the first day of birth and remained elevated throughout lactation. The increases in crypt cell proliferation significantly correlated with food intake but not with serum gastrin levels during lactation. Mucosal mass and villus-crypt dimensions were also significantly increased above virgin levels in lactating antrectomized rats. These results suggest that the increase in duodenal growth during lactation most probably is not mediated by postpartum hypergastrinemia and that the increase in cell proliferation may be a direct response to an enhancement in food intake.

  3. Gastrin, gastric acid secretion, and gastric microflora in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Henriksson, K; Uvnäs-Moberg, K; Nord, C E; Johansson, C; Gullberg, R

    1986-01-01

    The relation between the basal and stimulated gastric acid secretion, plasma gastrin, and the gastric microflora was examined in 45 patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Sixteen patients (36%) had basal achlorhydria, and of these, 10 (22%) had achlorhydria or hypochlorhydria after stimulation with pentagastrin. The peak acid output and acidity showed inverse correlation with the disease duration but were not associated with age or with the degree of physical disability. Hypergastrinaemia was found in nine patients (20%), of whom 6 (13%) had significant titres of parietal cell antibody. The acidity of the peak acid output showed negative correlation with plasma gastrin. It was confirmed that the gastric secretory state is a determinant of plasma gastrin levels and in addition influences the growth of micro-organisms in the gastric lumen. The type of microflora in the non-acid stomach was similar to that found in the saliva. A subgroup of eight females was identified who showed low gastric acid secretion rates, positive bacterial cultures, and atlantoaxial subluxation. Gastrin- and insulin-like immunoreactivities were found in joint fluid. The concentrations reflected their plasma levels, suggesting that the peptides are not released at the inflammatory site, but rather that they reach synovial fluid from circulating blood. PMID:3524480

  4. Increased gastrin gene expression provides a physiological advantage to mice under hypoxic conditions.

    PubMed

    Laval, Marie; Baldwin, Graham S; Shulkes, Arthur; Marshall, Kathryn M

    2015-01-15

    Hypoxia, or a low concentration of O2, is encountered in humans undertaking activities such as mountain climbing and scuba diving and is important pathophysiologically as a limiting factor in tumor growth. Although data on the interplay between hypoxia and gastrins are limited, gastrin expression is upregulated by hypoxia in gastrointestinal cancer cell lines, and gastrins counterbalance hypoxia by stimulating angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo. The aim of this study was to determine if higher concentrations of the gastrin precursor progastrin are protective against hypoxia in vivo. hGAS mice, which overexpress progastrin in the liver, and mice of the corresponding wild-type FVB/N strain were exposed to normoxia or hypoxia. Iron status was assessed by measurement of serum iron parameters, real-time PCR for mRNAs encoding critical iron regulatory proteins, and Perls' stain and atomic absorption spectrometry for tissue iron concentrations. FVB/N mice lost weight at a faster rate and had higher sickness scores than hGAS mice exposed to hypoxia. Serum iron levels were lower in hGAS than FVB/N mice and decreased further when the animals were exposed to hypoxia. The concentration of iron in the liver was strikingly lower in hGAS than FVB/N mice. We conclude that increased circulating concentrations of progastrin provide a physiological advantage against systemic hypoxia in mice, possibly by increasing the availability of iron stores. This is the first report of an association between progastrin overexpression, hypoxia, and iron homeostasis.

  5. Tumour progression and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Arvelo, Francisco; Sojo, Felipe; Cotte, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    The two biological mechanisms that determine types of malignancy are infiltration and metastasis, for which tumour microenvironment plays a key role in developing and establishing the morphology, growth and invasiveness of a malignancy. The microenvironment is formed by complex tissue containing the extracellular matrix, tumour and non-tumour cells, a signalling network of cytokines, chemokines, growth factors, and proteases that control autocrine and paracrine communication among individual cells, facilitating tumour progression. During the development of the primary tumour, the tumour stroma and continuous genetic changes within the cells makes it possible for them to migrate, having to count on a pre-metastatic niche receptor that allows the tumour's survival and distant growth. These niches are induced by factors produced by the primary tumour; if it is eradicated, the active niches become responsible for activating the latent disseminated cells. Due to the importance of these mechanisms, the strategies that develop tumour cells during tumour progression and the way in which the microenvironment influences the formation of metastasis are reviewed. It also suggests that the metastatic niche can be an ideal target for new treatments that make controlling metastasis possible.

  6. Autocrine and paracrine regulation of lymphocyte CB2 receptor expression by TGF-beta.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Brian; Zu, Li X; Sharma, Sherven; Liu, Qian; Makriyannis, Alexandros; Tashkin, Donald P; Dubinett, Steven M

    2002-01-11

    The marijuana-derived cannabinoid Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) has been shown to be immunosuppressive. We report that THC induces the immunosuppressive cytokine TGF-beta by human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL). The ability of THC to stimulate TGF-beta production was blocked by the CB2 receptor specific antagonist SR144528 but not by the CB1 specific antagonist AM251. Furthermore, our data suggest that TGF-beta actively regulates lymphocyte CB2 receptor expression in an autocrine and paracrine manner. Whereas the addition of recombinant TGF-beta to PBL cultures downregulated CB2 receptor expression, anti-TGF-beta antibody treatment increased CB2 receptor expression. We conclude that one mechanism by which THC contributes to immune suppression is by stimulating an enhanced production of lymphocyte TGF-beta.

  7. Role of CCK/gastrin receptors in gastrointestinal/metabolic diseases and results of human studies using gastrin/CCK receptor agonists/antagonists in these diseases

    PubMed Central

    Berna, Marc J.; Jensen, Robert T.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, the estabished and possible roles of CCK1 and CCK2 receptors in gastrointestinal (GI) and metabolic diseases are reviewed and available results from human agonist/antagonist studies are discussed. While there is evidence for the involvement of CCK1R in numerous diseases including pancreatic disorders, motility disorders, tumor growth, regulation of satiety and a number of CCK-deficient states, the role of CCK1R in these conditions is not clearly defined. There are encouraging data from several clinical studies of CCK1R antagonists in some of these conditions, but their role as therapeutic agents remains unclear. The role of CCK2R in physiological (atrophic gastritis, pernicious anemia) and pathological (Zollinger-Ellison syndrome) hypergastrinemic states, its effects on the gastric mucosa (ECL cell hyperplasia, carcinoids, parietal cell mass) and its role in acid-peptic disorders are clearly defined. Furthermore, recent studies point to a possible role for CCK2R in a number of GI malignancies. Current data from human studies of CCK2R antagonists are presented and their potential role in the treatment of these conditions reviewed. Furthermore, the role of CCK2 receptors as targets for medical imaging is discussed. Even though cholecystokinin (CCK) and gastrin were among the first gastrointestinal hormones discovered [1,2], both their physiological roles as well as their roles in clinically relevant gastrointestinal diseases remain unclear and even controversial in many cases [3–6]. The structural characterization of CCK and gastrin [7,8], pharmacological identification [9–13] and cloning [14,15] of CCK and gastrin receptors (CCK1R, CCK2R), characterization of receptor location, peptide and receptor genes, development of receptor antagonists and receptor/agonist knockout animals [16–21] have led to important advancements in our understanding of the physiological and pathophysiological role of CCK and gastrin signaling [3]. Most of these topics

  8. Tumour progression and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Arvelo, Francisco; Sojo, Felipe; Cotte, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    The two biological mechanisms that determine types of malignancy are infiltration and metastasis, for which tumour microenvironment plays a key role in developing and establishing the morphology, growth and invasiveness of a malignancy. The microenvironment is formed by complex tissue containing the extracellular matrix, tumour and non-tumour cells, a signalling network of cytokines, chemokines, growth factors, and proteases that control autocrine and paracrine communication among individual cells, facilitating tumour progression. During the development of the primary tumour, the tumour stroma and continuous genetic changes within the cells makes it possible for them to migrate, having to count on a pre-metastatic niche receptor that allows the tumour’s survival and distant growth. These niches are induced by factors produced by the primary tumour; if it is eradicated, the active niches become responsible for activating the latent disseminated cells. Due to the importance of these mechanisms, the strategies that develop tumour cells during tumour progression and the way in which the microenvironment influences the formation of metastasis are reviewed. It also suggests that the metastatic niche can be an ideal target for new treatments that make controlling metastasis possible. PMID:26913068

  9. Increased plasma noradrenaline and serum gastrin in patients with duodenal ulcer.

    PubMed

    Brandsborg, O; Brandsborg, M; Løvgreen, N A; Christensen, N J

    1978-02-01

    Serum gastrin, serum insulin, plasma noradrenaline, plasma adrenaline, pulse rate and blood pressure were measured repeatedly during 24h in six patients with duodenal ulcer and in six control subjects. Mean serum gastrin concentration was 3-4 times higher in duodenal ulcer patients than in controls during both the day and at night. Serum insulin was the same in both groups of subjects. Overnight fasting and mean supine plasma noradrenaline as well as mean supine pulse rate were significantly higher in duodenal ulcer patients than in controls. Plasma adrenaline and arterial blood pressure were the same in patients and controls. These results suggest that sympathetic nervous activity is increased in patients with duodenal ulcer. The increased sympathetic nervous activity may mean that duodenal ulcer patients are subject to more stress than normal subjects or may be compensatory to increased vagal nervous activity presumed by some authors to be present in such patients.

  10. Increased gastrin gene expression provides a physiological advantage to mice under hypoxic conditions.

    PubMed

    Laval, Marie; Baldwin, Graham S; Shulkes, Arthur; Marshall, Kathryn M

    2015-01-15

    Hypoxia, or a low concentration of O2, is encountered in humans undertaking activities such as mountain climbing and scuba diving and is important pathophysiologically as a limiting factor in tumor growth. Although data on the interplay between hypoxia and gastrins are limited, gastrin expression is upregulated by hypoxia in gastrointestinal cancer cell lines, and gastrins counterbalance hypoxia by stimulating angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo. The aim of this study was to determine if higher concentrations of the gastrin precursor progastrin are protective against hypoxia in vivo. hGAS mice, which overexpress progastrin in the liver, and mice of the corresponding wild-type FVB/N strain were exposed to normoxia or hypoxia. Iron status was assessed by measurement of serum iron parameters, real-time PCR for mRNAs encoding critical iron regulatory proteins, and Perls' stain and atomic absorption spectrometry for tissue iron concentrations. FVB/N mice lost weight at a faster rate and had higher sickness scores than hGAS mice exposed to hypoxia. Serum iron levels were lower in hGAS than FVB/N mice and decreased further when the animals were exposed to hypoxia. The concentration of iron in the liver was strikingly lower in hGAS than FVB/N mice. We conclude that increased circulating concentrations of progastrin provide a physiological advantage against systemic hypoxia in mice, possibly by increasing the availability of iron stores. This is the first report of an association between progastrin overexpression, hypoxia, and iron homeostasis. PMID:25394662

  11. Uveal tumour resection

    PubMed Central

    Char, D.; Miller, T.; Crawford, J

    2001-01-01

    AIM—To review the ocular retention rates, visual results, and metastases in uveal tumours managed with eye wall resection techniques.
METHODS—This was a retrospective analysis of consecutive local uveal tumour resections performed by a single surgeon. All enucleation specimens were reviewed by one author. Both parametric and non-parametric analysis of data were performed.
RESULTS—138 eyes were scheduled for eye wall resection surgery. The mean age was 52 years (range 11-86 years). Tumours involved predominantly the iris in 14 cases, iris-ciliary body in 57, ciliary body alone in 18 patients, and in 49 cases the choroid was involved (ciliochoroidal, iris-ciliary body-choroid, or choroid). 125 eyes harboured melanomas; posterior tumours were more likely to have epithelioid cells (p<0.05). The mean follow up was 6 years. The mean clock hours in iris and iris-ciliary body tumours was 3.5. In tumours that involved the choroid the mean largest diameter was 12.9 mm and the mean thickness 8.5 mm. 105 of 138 (76%) eyes were retained. Histological assessment of surgical margins did not correlate evidence of tumour in enucleated eyes or metastatic disease. Surgical margins of more anterior tumours were more likely to be clear on histological evaluation (p<0.05). Approximately 53% of retained eyes had a final visual acuity of ⩾20/40; visual results were significantly better in more anteriorly located tumours (p<0.05). All retained iris tumour cases had ⩾20/40 final visual acuity. In tumours that involved the choroid nine of 31 retained eyes kept that level of visual acuity. Eight patients developed metastases; all metastatic events developed in patients with tumours that involved the choroid, and seven of eight were mixed cell melanomas.
CONCLUSIONS—76% of eyes were retained and 53% of these had a final visual acuity of ⩾20/40. Only 7% of uveal melanoma patients developed metastatic disease with a mean follow up of 6 years. Survival did not

  12. Lower esophageal sphincter pressure, acid secretion, and blood gastrin after coffee consumption.

    PubMed

    Van Deventer, G; Kamemoto, E; Kuznicki, J T; Heckert, D C; Schulte, M C

    1992-04-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that differences in the processing of raw coffee beans can account for some of the variability in gastric effects of coffee drinking. Coffees were selected to represent several ways that green coffee beans are treated, ie, processing variables. These included instant and ground coffee processing, decaffeination method (ethyl acetate or methylene chloride extraction), instant coffee processing temperature (112 degrees F or 300 degrees F), and steam treatment. Lower esophageal sphincter pressure, acid secretion, and blood gastrin was measured in eight human subjects after they consumed each of the different coffees. Consumption of coffee was followed by a sustained decrease in lower esophageal sphincter pressure (P less than 0.05) except for three of the four coffees treated with ethyl acetate regardless of whether or not they contained caffeine. Caffeinated ground coffee stimulated more acid secretion that did decaf ground coffees (P less than 0.05), but not more than a steam-treated caffeinated coffee. Instant coffees did not differ in acid-stimulating ability. Ground caffeinated coffee resulted in higher blood gastrin levels than other ground coffees (P less than 0.05). Freeze-dried instant coffee also tended toward higher gastrin stimulation. It is concluded that some of the observed variability in gastric response to coffee consumption can be traced to differences in how green coffee beans are processed.

  13. Association between serum pepsinogen A and C levels, serum gastrin concentrations and Helicobacter pylori antibodies.

    PubMed

    Kullich, W; Pöllmann, G; Czerwenka, C; Klein, G

    1999-01-01

    Pepsinogen A and C as well as gastrin were measured in the serum of 117 patients with rheumatic diseases. Moreover, the patients were divided up in groups by aids of a semiquantitative, rapid enzyme immunoassay for detection of Helicobacter pylori: 20 patients without H. pylori antibodies (AB) negative, 18 positive + (= weak AB-titre), 21 positive +2 (medium AB-titre), and 58 positive +3 (high AB-titre). The semiquantitative determinations of H. pylori-AB correlated with pepsinogen A, C and gastrin. Patients with H. pylori-AB positive +3 showed significantly higher values of pepsinogen C (p < or = 0.01) as well as pepsinogen A and gastrin (p < or = 0.05) than H. pylori-AB negative patients. Significantly increased levels of pepsinogen A (> 150 ng/ml) and C (> 25 ng/ml) were found to occur in 39% and 100% of patients with high H. pylori-AB titres. The measurement of serum pepsinogen C concentrations may provide additional diagnostic information of the extent of mucosal lesions in patients with positive H. pylori-AB titres treated with antirheumatic drugs. Our findings suggest that the semi-quantitative classification of positive AB-results can be useful in cases determining H. pylori infection and mucosal irritation if other investigations are not available.

  14. Gastrin promotes the metastasis of gastric carcinoma through the β-catenin/TCF-4 pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Kun; Yan, Yuan; Zhang, Xin; Zhang, Jun; Zhang, Lingxia; Han, Kun

    2016-09-01

    Gastric cancer is the most common epithelial malignancy and the second leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide; metastasis is a crucial factor in the progression of gastric cancer. The present study applied gastrin-17 amide (G-17) in SGC7901 cells. The results showed that G-17 promoted the cell cycle by accelerating the G0/G1 phase and by increasing the cell proliferation rate by binding to the gastrin receptor. The migratory and invasive abilities of the SGC7901 cells were increased by G-17. The expression levels of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-7, MMP-9 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) were enhanced by G-17 as well. Moreover, G-17 caused the overexpression of β-catenin and TCF-4. G-17 also caused a preferential cytoplasmic and nuclear localization of β-catenin with a high TOP-FLASH activity. Finally, axin reduced the migratory and invasive abilities of the SGC7901 cells, and inhibited the expression of β-catenin, TCF-4, MMP-7, MMP-9 and VEGF; these effects were counteracted by adding G-17. In summary, the present study confirmed the proliferation and metastasis-promoting role of G-17 via binding to the gastrin receptor, and the β-catenin/TCF-4 pathway was found to be essential for mediating G-17-induced metastasis in gastric cancer. These results may provide a novel gene target for the treatment of gastric cancer. PMID:27430592

  15. Expression, purification and characterization of recombinant toxins consisting of truncated gastrin 17 and pseudomonas exotoxin.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xiao-Li; Liu, Xi-Lin; Lu, Shi-Ying; Ren, Hong-Lin; Li, Yan-Song; Hu, Pan; Wang, Quan; Tong, Weihua; Yan, Dong-Ming; Zhou, Yu; Zhang, Song; Jin, Wen; Liu, Zeng-Shan

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer is a major cause of mortality and morbidity around world. However the effectiveness of the current approaches to the diagnosis and treatment of gastric cancer is limited. Recombinant targeted toxins may represent a novel direction of cancer therapy. In this study, we aimed to explore whether recombinant toxins fused with the truncated forms of G17 could target to kill cancer cells by recognizing CCK2R. Four recombinant Pseudomonas toxins PE38 fused with the forward or reverse truncated forms of G17 (G14 and G13) were successfully constructed, expressed, and purified. Their characteristics were further analyzed by SDS-PAGE, western blot and indirect immunofluorescence assay. The cytotoxicity assay demonstrated that only reversely fused recombinant toxins rG14PE38 and rG13PE38 exhibited certain toxicity on several cancer cell lines, and a competition assay indicated that the binding of the reverse gastrin-endotoxin to CCK2R (+) cells may be mediated by interaction between gastrin/gastrin-like and CCK2R.

  16. Lower esophageal sphincter pressure, acid secretion, and blood gastrin after coffee consumption.

    PubMed

    Van Deventer, G; Kamemoto, E; Kuznicki, J T; Heckert, D C; Schulte, M C

    1992-04-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that differences in the processing of raw coffee beans can account for some of the variability in gastric effects of coffee drinking. Coffees were selected to represent several ways that green coffee beans are treated, ie, processing variables. These included instant and ground coffee processing, decaffeination method (ethyl acetate or methylene chloride extraction), instant coffee processing temperature (112 degrees F or 300 degrees F), and steam treatment. Lower esophageal sphincter pressure, acid secretion, and blood gastrin was measured in eight human subjects after they consumed each of the different coffees. Consumption of coffee was followed by a sustained decrease in lower esophageal sphincter pressure (P less than 0.05) except for three of the four coffees treated with ethyl acetate regardless of whether or not they contained caffeine. Caffeinated ground coffee stimulated more acid secretion that did decaf ground coffees (P less than 0.05), but not more than a steam-treated caffeinated coffee. Instant coffees did not differ in acid-stimulating ability. Ground caffeinated coffee resulted in higher blood gastrin levels than other ground coffees (P less than 0.05). Freeze-dried instant coffee also tended toward higher gastrin stimulation. It is concluded that some of the observed variability in gastric response to coffee consumption can be traced to differences in how green coffee beans are processed. PMID:1551346

  17. In Vitro Interleukin-1 and 2 Production and Interleukin 2 Receptor Expression in the Rhesus Monkey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitt, Didier A.; Sonnenfeld, Gerald; Husson, David; Tkaczuk, Jean; Andre, Eric; Schaffar, Laurance

    1996-01-01

    Anti-human monoclonal antibodies were used to detect and quantify interleukins-1 and 2 and interleukin-2 receptor expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from a rhesus monkey. Interleukin-1 production could be induced by phorbol esters (PMA) and was potentiated by phytohemagglutinin (PHA). Interleukin-2 secretion could also be induced by the combination of PHA and PMA, but only weakly with PHA alone. Interleukin-2 receptor expression was present in a subpopulation of unstimulated lymphocytes and could be enhanced by PHA or PMA. These data show once again that the rhesus monkey immune system is cross-reactive with the human one and that rhesus macaque could be a good model to study interleukin therapy.

  18. NRP-1 Receptor Expression Mismatch in Skin of Subjects with Experimental and Diabetic Small Fiber Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Van Acker, Nathalie; Ragé, Michael; Vermeirsch, Hilde; Schrijvers, Dorien; Nuydens, Rony; Byttebier, Geert; Timmers, Maarten; De Schepper, Stefanie; Streffer, Johannes; Andries, Luc; Plaghki, Léon; Cras, Patrick; Meert, Theo

    2016-01-01

    The in vivo cutaneous nerve regeneration model using capsaicin is applied extensively to study the regenerative mechanisms and therapeutic efficacy of disease modifying molecules for small fiber neuropathy (SFN). Since mismatches between functional and morphological nerve fiber recovery are described for this model, we aimed at determining the capability of the capsaicin model to truly mimic the morphological manifestations of SFN in diabetes. As nerve and blood vessel growth and regenerative capacities are defective in diabetes, we focused on studying the key regulator of these processes, the neuropilin-1 (NRP-1)/semaphorin pathway. This led us to the evaluation of NRP-1 receptor expression in epidermis and dermis of subjects presenting experimentally induced small fiber neuropathy, diabetic polyneuropathy and of diabetic subjects without clinical signs of small fiber neuropathy. The NRP-1 receptor was co-stained with CD31 vessel-marker using immunofluorescence and analyzed with Definiens® technology. This study indicates that capsaicin application results in significant loss of epidermal NRP-1 receptor expression, whereas diabetic subjects presenting small fiber neuropathy show full epidermal NRP-1 expression in contrast to the basal expression pattern seen in healthy controls. Capsaicin induced a decrease in dermal non-vascular NRP-1 receptor expression which did not appear in diabetic polyneuropathy. We can conclude that the capsaicin model does not mimic diabetic neuropathy related changes for cutaneous NRP-1 receptor expression. In addition, our data suggest that NRP-1 might play an important role in epidermal nerve fiber loss and/or defective regeneration and that NRP-1 receptor could change the epidermal environment to a nerve fiber repellant bed possibly through Sem3A in diabetes. PMID:27598321

  19. NRP-1 Receptor Expression Mismatch in Skin of Subjects with Experimental and Diabetic Small Fiber Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Van Acker, Nathalie; Ragé, Michael; Vermeirsch, Hilde; Schrijvers, Dorien; Nuydens, Rony; Byttebier, Geert; Timmers, Maarten; De Schepper, Stefanie; Streffer, Johannes; Andries, Luc; Plaghki, Léon; Cras, Patrick; Meert, Theo

    2016-01-01

    The in vivo cutaneous nerve regeneration model using capsaicin is applied extensively to study the regenerative mechanisms and therapeutic efficacy of disease modifying molecules for small fiber neuropathy (SFN). Since mismatches between functional and morphological nerve fiber recovery are described for this model, we aimed at determining the capability of the capsaicin model to truly mimic the morphological manifestations of SFN in diabetes. As nerve and blood vessel growth and regenerative capacities are defective in diabetes, we focused on studying the key regulator of these processes, the neuropilin-1 (NRP-1)/semaphorin pathway. This led us to the evaluation of NRP-1 receptor expression in epidermis and dermis of subjects presenting experimentally induced small fiber neuropathy, diabetic polyneuropathy and of diabetic subjects without clinical signs of small fiber neuropathy. The NRP-1 receptor was co-stained with CD31 vessel-marker using immunofluorescence and analyzed with Definiens® technology. This study indicates that capsaicin application results in significant loss of epidermal NRP-1 receptor expression, whereas diabetic subjects presenting small fiber neuropathy show full epidermal NRP-1 expression in contrast to the basal expression pattern seen in healthy controls. Capsaicin induced a decrease in dermal non-vascular NRP-1 receptor expression which did not appear in diabetic polyneuropathy. We can conclude that the capsaicin model does not mimic diabetic neuropathy related changes for cutaneous NRP-1 receptor expression. In addition, our data suggest that NRP-1 might play an important role in epidermal nerve fiber loss and/or defective regeneration and that NRP-1 receptor could change the epidermal environment to a nerve fiber repellant bed possibly through Sem3A in diabetes. PMID:27598321

  20. NRP-1 Receptor Expression Mismatch in Skin of Subjects with Experimental and Diabetic Small Fiber Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Van Acker, Nathalie; Ragé, Michael; Vermeirsch, Hilde; Schrijvers, Dorien; Nuydens, Rony; Byttebier, Geert; Timmers, Maarten; De Schepper, Stefanie; Streffer, Johannes; Andries, Luc; Plaghki, Léon; Cras, Patrick; Meert, Theo

    2016-01-01

    The in vivo cutaneous nerve regeneration model using capsaicin is applied extensively to study the regenerative mechanisms and therapeutic efficacy of disease modifying molecules for small fiber neuropathy (SFN). Since mismatches between functional and morphological nerve fiber recovery are described for this model, we aimed at determining the capability of the capsaicin model to truly mimic the morphological manifestations of SFN in diabetes. As nerve and blood vessel growth and regenerative capacities are defective in diabetes, we focused on studying the key regulator of these processes, the neuropilin-1 (NRP-1)/semaphorin pathway. This led us to the evaluation of NRP-1 receptor expression in epidermis and dermis of subjects presenting experimentally induced small fiber neuropathy, diabetic polyneuropathy and of diabetic subjects without clinical signs of small fiber neuropathy. The NRP-1 receptor was co-stained with CD31 vessel-marker using immunofluorescence and analyzed with Definiens® technology. This study indicates that capsaicin application results in significant loss of epidermal NRP-1 receptor expression, whereas diabetic subjects presenting small fiber neuropathy show full epidermal NRP-1 expression in contrast to the basal expression pattern seen in healthy controls. Capsaicin induced a decrease in dermal non-vascular NRP-1 receptor expression which did not appear in diabetic polyneuropathy. We can conclude that the capsaicin model does not mimic diabetic neuropathy related changes for cutaneous NRP-1 receptor expression. In addition, our data suggest that NRP-1 might play an important role in epidermal nerve fiber loss and/or defective regeneration and that NRP-1 receptor could change the epidermal environment to a nerve fiber repellant bed possibly through Sem3A in diabetes.

  1. Effect of Hyperoxia on Retinoid Metabolism and Retinoid Receptor Expression in the Lungs of Newborn Mice

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hsing-Jin; Chiang, Bor-Luen

    2015-01-01

    Background Preterm newborns that receive oxygen therapy often develop bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), which is abnormal lung development characterized by impaired alveologenesis. Oxygen-mediated injury is thought to disrupt normal lung growth and development. However, the mechanism of hyperoxia-induced BPD has not been extensively investigated. We established a neonatal mouse model to investigate the effects of normobaric hyperoxia on retinoid metabolism and retinoid receptor expression. Methods Newborn mice were exposed to hyperoxic or normoxic conditions for 15 days. The concentration of retinol and retinyl palmitate in the lung was measured by HPLC to gauge retinoid metabolism. Retinoid receptor mRNA levels were assessed by real-time PCR. Proliferation and retinoid receptor expression in A549 cells were assessed in the presence and absence of exogenous vitamin A. Results Hyperoxia significantly reduced the body and lung weight of neonatal mice. Hyperoxia also downregulated expression of RARα, RARγ, and RXRγ in the lungs of neonatal mice. In vitro, hyperoxia inhibited proliferation and expression of retinoid receptors in A549 cells. Conclusion Hyperoxia disrupted retinoid receptor expression in neonatal mice. PMID:26509921

  2. Prognostic Value of Sex-Hormone Receptor Expression in Non-Muscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sung Woo; Lee, Sang Don; Chung, Moon Kee

    2014-01-01

    Purpose We investigated sex-hormone receptor expression as predicting factor of recurrence and progression in patients with non-muscle invasive bladder cancer. Materials and Methods We retrospectively evaluated tumor specimens from patients treated for transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder at our institution between January 2006 and January 2011. Performing immunohistochemistry using a monoclonal androgen receptor antibody and monoclonal estrogen receptor-beta antibody on paraffin-embedded tissue sections, we assessed the relationship of immunohistochemistry results and prognostic factors such as recurrence and progression. Results A total of 169 patients with bladder cancer were evaluated in this study. Sixty-threepatients had expressed androgen receptors and 52 patients had estrogen receptor beta. On univariable analysis, androgen receptor expression was significant lower in recurrence rates (p=0.001), and estrogen receptor beta expression was significant higher in progression rates (p=0.004). On multivariable analysis, significant association was found between androgen receptor expression and lower recurrence rates (hazard ratio=0.500; 95% confidence interval, 0.294 to 0.852; p=0.011), but estrogen receptor beta expression was not significantly associated with progression rates. Conclusion We concluded that the possibility of recurrence was low when the androgen receptor was expressed in the bladder cancer specimen and it could be the predicting factor of the stage, number of tumors, carcinoma in situ lesion and recurrence. PMID:25048477

  3. Comparison of albumin receptors expressed on bovine and human group G streptococci.

    PubMed Central

    Raeder, R; Otten, R A; Boyle, M D

    1991-01-01

    The albumin receptor expressed by bovine group G streptococci was extracted and affinity purified. The protein was characterized for species reactivity, and monospecific antibodies were prepared to the purified receptor. The bovine group G albumin receptor was compared functionally, antigenically, and for DNA homology with the albumin-binding protein expressed by human group G streptococci. In agreement with previous reports, the albumin-binding activity of human strains was mediated by a unique domain of the type III immunoglobulin G-Fc-binding molecule, protein G. The albumin receptor expressed by bovine group G strains was found to lack any immunoglobulin G-binding potential but displayed a wider profile of species albumin reactivity than protein G. Both albumin receptors could inhibit the binding of the other to immobilized human serum albumin, and each displayed similar binding properties. Antigenic comparison of the two albumin receptors demonstrated a low level of cross-reactivity; however comparison at the DNA level, using an oligonucleotide probe specific for the albumin-binding region of protein G, demonstrated that the two albumin receptors expressed by human and bovine group G streptococcal strains do not display significant homology. Images PMID:1846128

  4. BDNF and NT-3 Modulate Neurotransmitter Receptor Expressions on Developing Spiral Ganglion Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Wei; Salvi, Richard J.

    2009-01-01

    Cochlear spiral ganglion neurons (SGN) provide the only pathway for transmitting sound evoked activity from the hair cells to the central auditory system. Neurotrophic factor-3 (NT-3) and brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) released from hair cells and supporting cells exert a profound effect on SGN survival and neural firing patterns; however, it is unclear what the effects NT-3 and BDNF have on the type of neurotransmitter receptors expressed on SGN. To address this question, the whole-cell patch clamp recording technique was used to determine what effect NT-3 and BDNF had on the function and expression of glutamate, GABA and glycine receptors on postnatal SGN. Receptor currents induced by the agonist of each receptor were recorded from SGN cultured with or without BDNF or NT-3. NT-3 and BDNF exerted different effects. NT-3, and to a lesser extent BDNF, enhanced the expression of GABA receptors and had comparatively little effect on glutamate receptors. Absence of BDNF and NT-3 resulted in the emergence of glycine-induced currents; however, glycine receptor currents were absent from the short term cultured SGN. In contrast, NT-3 and BDNF suppressed glycine receptor expression on SGN. These results indicate that NT-3 and BDNF exert a profound effect on the types of neurotransmitter receptors expressed on postnatal SGN, results that may have important implications for neural development and plasticity. PMID:19778585

  5. Impact of chronic morphine on delta opioid receptor-expressing neurons in the mouse hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Erbs, E; Faget, L; Ceredig, R A; Matifas, A; Vonesch, J-L; Kieffer, B L; Massotte, D

    2016-01-28

    Delta opioid (DOP) receptors participate to the control of chronic pain and emotional responses. Recent data also identified their implication in spatial memory and drug-context associations pointing to a critical role of hippocampal delta receptors. To better appreciate the impact of repeated drug exposure on their modulatory activity, we used fluorescent knock-in mice that express a functional delta receptor fused at its carboxy-terminus with the green fluorescent protein in place of the native receptor. We then tested the impact of chronic morphine treatment on the density and distribution of delta receptor-expressing cells in the hippocampus. A decrease in delta receptor-positive cell density was observed in the CA1, CA3 and dentate gyrus without alteration of the distribution across the different GABAergic populations that mainly express delta receptors. This effect partly persisted after four weeks of morphine abstinence. In addition, we observed increased DOP receptor expression at the cell surface compared to saline-treated animals. In the hippocampus, chronic morphine administration thus induces DOP receptor cellular redistribution and durably decreases delta receptor-expressing cell density. Such modifications are likely to alter hippocampal physiology, and to contribute to long-term cognitive deficits.

  6. ZBP-89, a Krüppel-like zinc finger protein, inhibits epidermal growth factor induction of the gastrin promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Merchant, J L; Iyer, G R; Taylor, B R; Kitchen, J R; Mortensen, E R; Wang, Z; Flintoft, R J; Michel, J B; Bassel-Duby, R

    1996-01-01

    We have shown previously that a GC-rich element (GGGGCGGGGTGGGGGG) conferring epidermal growth factor (EGF) responsiveness to the human gastrin promoter binds Sp1 and additional undefined complexes. A rat GH4 cell line expression library was screened by using a multimer of the gastrin EGF response element, and three overlapping cDNA clones were identified. The full-length rat cDNA encoded an 89-kDa zinc finger protein (ZBP-89) that was 89% identical to a 49-kDa human factor, ht(beta), that binds a GTGGG/CACCC element in T-cell receptor promoters. The conservation of amino acids between the zinc fingers indicates that ZBP-89 is a member of the C2H2 zinc finger family subclass typified by the Drosophila Krüppel protein. ZBP-89 is ubiquitously expressed in normal adult tissues. It binds specifically to the gastrin EGF response element and inhibits EGF induction of the gastrin promoter. Collectively, these results demonstrate that ZBP-89 functions as a repressor of basal and inducible expression of the gastrin gene. PMID:8943318

  7. Well-Differentiated Grade 2, Type 3 Gastrointestinal Neuroendocrine Tumour with Bilateral Metastatic Ovarian Involvement: Report of an Unusual Case

    PubMed Central

    Manneh, Ray; Castellano, Daniel; Caso, Oscar; Loinaz, Carmelo; Jiménez, Jesús; Estenoz, Juana; Calatayud, Maria; Sepúlveda, Juan M.; García-Carbonero, Rocio

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of metastatic gastric neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) is challenging. In oligometastatic cases, surgical resection is recommended whenever possible. Somatostatin analogues have been used to decrease gastrin levels, and available evidence suggests that these drugs can also reduce recurrences. Here we present a highly unusual case involving a patient with a well-differentiated grade 2, type 3 gastric NET with exclusive metastatic bilateral ovarian involvement. To our knowledge, this is the first such case reported in the literature, as the cause of ovarian involvement is usually due to local invasion rather than metastasis. We believe this case is of interest not only due to the unusual presentation, but also because it makes us consider adjuvant treatment with somatostatin analogues in patients with low-grade tumours and a positive postoperative octreoscan. PMID:27239181

  8. Tumours of the thymus

    PubMed Central

    Sellors, T. Holmes; Thackray, A. C.; Thomson, A. D.

    1967-01-01

    Eighty-eight cases of thymoma are discussed with the object of trying to co-ordinate the histological and clinical features. The pathological specimens were in all cases obtained at operation. The pathology classification introduced by Thomson and Thackray in 1957 has been found to correspond adequately with the clinical pattern. The most common groups of tumours are basically epithelial and can be separated into five or six subdivisions, each of which has a separate pattern of behaviour. Lymphoid and teratomatous tumours also occur, but there were only two examples in this series. Clinically, separation of patients who suffered from myasthenia (38) and those who did not (50) affords the first main grouping. The majority of patients who had myasthenia gravis had tumours classified as epidermoid (19) and lymphoepithelial (14), the former with a more malignant appearance and behaviour than the latter. Removal of the tumour with or without radiation gave considerable and sometimes complete relief from myasthenic symptoms. Non-myasthenic thymoma (50) was usually discovered as a result of pressure signs or in the course of routine radiography. Spindle or oval celled tumours followed a benign pattern whereas undifferentiated thymoma was in every sense malignant, as also were teratomatous growths. Granulomatous or Hodgkin-like thymomas were of special interest and had an unpredictable course, some patients surviving many years after what was regarded as inadequate treatment. The place of radiotherapy as a pre- or post-operative agent complementary to surgery is discussed. Images PMID:6033387

  9. Salivary gland tumours.

    PubMed

    Speight, P M; Barrett, A W

    2002-09-01

    Salivary gland tumours are a relatively rare and morphologically diverse group of lesions. Although most clinicians and pathologists will have encountered the more common benign neoplasms, few have experience of the full range of salivary cancers, which are best managed in specialist centres. This review considers some current areas of difficulty and controversy in the diagnosis and management of these neoplasms. The classification of these lesions is complex, encompassing nearly 40 different entities, but precise classification and terminology is essential for an accurate diagnosis and for the allocation of tumours to prognostic groups. For many salivary tumours diagnosis is straightforward but the wide range of morphological diversity between and within tumour types means that a diagnosis may not be possible on small incisional biopsies and careful consideration of the clinical and pathological features together is essential. Although tumour grading is important and helpful, it is not an independent prognostic indicator and must be considered in the context of stage. Large malignancies tend to have a poor prognosis regardless of grade and even high-grade neoplasms may do well when they are small. A helpful guide to management of salivary cancers is the '4 cm rule'.

  10. [Studies on the clinical significance concerning the changes in serum pepsinogen-I and gastrin levels in aged patients with chronic gastritis].

    PubMed

    Hamada, Y; Kamiya, K; Koyama, M; Asaka, M; Matsushima, T; Myazaki, T; Kamiya, T

    1988-03-01

    Of 86 cases of aged patients with chronic gastritis treated with Trimebutine or Flutazolam, we evaluated the changes of serum pepsinogen-I and gastrin levels in their clinical courses from the points of the correlation with severity of chronic gastritis, aging phenomenon and the changes of symptom and endoscopic findings. In order to elucidate the multidimensional interrelation among these items, we used Hayashi's quantification theory II as a conventional analysis method. In aged patients, generally, although the serum gastrin levels were rather high compared with younger generation, the serum pepsinogen-I levels were consistently low throughout their clinical courses. There were some correlation between the levels of serum gastrin and the severity of chronic gastritis. When the drugs were effective on improving the condition of the disease, the level of gastrin revealed gradual decrease. These changes of gastrin were more typical in patients treated with Trimebutine. PMID:2898425

  11. Immunology of naturally transmissible tumours

    PubMed Central

    Siddle, Hannah V; Kaufman, Jim

    2015-01-01

    Naturally transmissible tumours can emerge when a tumour cell gains the ability to pass as an infectious allograft between individuals. The ability of these tumours to colonize a new host and to cross histocompatibility barriers contradicts our understanding of the vertebrate immune response to allografts. Two naturally occurring contagious cancers are currently active in the animal kingdom, canine transmissible venereal tumour (CTVT), which spreads among dogs, and devil facial tumour disease (DFTD), among Tasmanian devils. CTVT are generally not fatal as a tumour-specific host immune response controls or clears the tumours after transmission and a period of growth. In contrast, the growth of DFTD tumours is not controlled by the Tasmanian devil's immune system and the disease causes close to 100% mortality, severely impacting the devil population. To avoid the immune response of the host both DFTD and CTVT use a variety of immune escape strategies that have similarities to many single organism tumours, including MHC loss and the expression of immunosuppressive cytokines. However, both tumours appear to have a complex interaction with the immune system of their respective host, which has evolved over the relatively long life of these tumours. The Tasmanian devil is struggling to survive with the burden of this disease and it is only with an understanding of how DFTD passes between individuals that a vaccine might be developed. Further, an understanding of how these tumours achieve natural transmissibility should provide insights into general mechanisms of immune escape that emerge during tumour evolution. PMID:25187312

  12. Parallel evolution of tumour subclones mimics diversity between tumours.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Pierre; Birkbak, Nicolai Juul; Gerlinger, Marco; McGranahan, Nicholas; Burrell, Rebecca A; Rowan, Andrew J; Joshi, Tejal; Fisher, Rosalie; Larkin, James; Szallasi, Zoltan; Swanton, Charles

    2013-08-01

    Intratumour heterogeneity (ITH) may foster tumour adaptation and compromise the efficacy of personalized medicine approaches. The scale of heterogeneity within a tumour (intratumour heterogeneity) relative to genetic differences between tumours (intertumour heterogeneity) is unknown. To address this, we obtained 48 biopsies from eight stage III and IV clear cell renal cell carcinomas (ccRCCs) and used DNA copy-number analyses to compare biopsies from the same tumour with 440 single tumour biopsies from the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). Unsupervised hierarchical clustering of TCGA and multi-region ccRCC samples revealed segregation of samples from the same tumour into unrelated clusters; 25% of multi-region samples appeared more similar to unrelated samples than to any other sample originating from the same tumour. We found that the majority of recurrent DNA copy number driver aberrations in single biopsies were not present ubiquitously in late-stage ccRCCs and were likely to represent subclonal events acquired during tumour progression. Such heterogeneous subclonal genetic alterations within individual tumours may impair the identification of robust ccRCC molecular subtypes classified by distinct copy number alterations and clinical outcomes. The co-existence of distinct subclonal copy number events in different regions of individual tumours reflects the diversification of individual ccRCCs through multiple evolutionary routes and may contribute to tumour sampling bias and impact upon tumour progression and clinical outcome.

  13. Parallel evolution of tumour subclones mimics diversity between tumours.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Pierre; Birkbak, Nicolai Juul; Gerlinger, Marco; McGranahan, Nicholas; Burrell, Rebecca A; Rowan, Andrew J; Joshi, Tejal; Fisher, Rosalie; Larkin, James; Szallasi, Zoltan; Swanton, Charles

    2013-08-01

    Intratumour heterogeneity (ITH) may foster tumour adaptation and compromise the efficacy of personalized medicine approaches. The scale of heterogeneity within a tumour (intratumour heterogeneity) relative to genetic differences between tumours (intertumour heterogeneity) is unknown. To address this, we obtained 48 biopsies from eight stage III and IV clear cell renal cell carcinomas (ccRCCs) and used DNA copy-number analyses to compare biopsies from the same tumour with 440 single tumour biopsies from the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). Unsupervised hierarchical clustering of TCGA and multi-region ccRCC samples revealed segregation of samples from the same tumour into unrelated clusters; 25% of multi-region samples appeared more similar to unrelated samples than to any other sample originating from the same tumour. We found that the majority of recurrent DNA copy number driver aberrations in single biopsies were not present ubiquitously in late-stage ccRCCs and were likely to represent subclonal events acquired during tumour progression. Such heterogeneous subclonal genetic alterations within individual tumours may impair the identification of robust ccRCC molecular subtypes classified by distinct copy number alterations and clinical outcomes. The co-existence of distinct subclonal copy number events in different regions of individual tumours reflects the diversification of individual ccRCCs through multiple evolutionary routes and may contribute to tumour sampling bias and impact upon tumour progression and clinical outcome. PMID:23716380

  14. Prostate-specific antigen and hormone receptor expression in male and female breast carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Prostate carcinoma is among the most common solid tumors to secondarily involve the male breast. Prostate specific antigen (PSA) and prostate-specific acid phosphatase (PSAP) are expressed in benign and malignant prostatic tissue, and immunohistochemical staining for these markers is often used to confirm the prostatic origin of metastatic carcinoma. PSA expression has been reported in male and female breast carcinoma and in gynecomastia, raising concerns about the utility of PSA for differentiating prostate carcinoma metastasis to the male breast from primary breast carcinoma. This study examined the frequency of PSA, PSAP, and hormone receptor expression in male breast carcinoma (MBC), female breast carcinoma (FBC), and gynecomastia. Methods Immunohistochemical staining for PSA, PSAP, AR, ER, and PR was performed on tissue microarrays representing six cases of gynecomastia, thirty MBC, and fifty-six FBC. Results PSA was positive in two of fifty-six FBC (3.7%), focally positive in one of thirty MBC (3.3%), and negative in the five examined cases of gynecomastia. PSAP expression was absent in MBC, FBC, and gynecomastia. Hormone receptor expression was similar in males and females (AR 74.1% in MBC vs. 67.9% in FBC, p = 0.62; ER 85.2% vs. 68.5%, p = 0.18; and PR 51.9% vs. 48.2%, p = 0.82). Conclusions PSA and PSAP are useful markers to distinguish primary breast carcinoma from prostate carcinoma metastatic to the male breast. Although PSA expression appeared to correlate with hormone receptor expression, the incidence of PSA expression in our population was too low to draw significant conclusions about an association between PSA expression and hormone receptor status in breast lesions. PMID:20863373

  15. Regulation of interferon receptor expression in human blood lymphocytes in vitro and during interferon therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Lau, A.S.; Hannigan, G.E.; Freedman, M.H.; Williams, B.R.

    1986-05-01

    Interferons (IFN) elicit antiviral and antineoplastic activities by binding to specific receptors on the cell surface. The binding characteristics of IFN to human lymphocytes were studied using IFN alpha 2 labeled with /sup 125/I to high specific activity. The specific binding curves generated were analyzed by the LIGAND program of Munson and Rodbard to determine receptor numbers. The number of receptors in peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) and tonsillar B-lymphocytes (TBL) from normal individuals were 505 +/- 293 (n = 10) and 393 +/- 147 (n = 3) respectively. When these cells were preincubated in vitro with unlabeled IFN alpha 2, the receptor number decreased to 82 +/- 45 and 61 +/- 16 respectively. Receptor binding activities recovered gradually over a period of 72 h when the cells were incubated in IFN-free medium. This recovery of receptors could be blocked by the addition of actinomycin D to the incubation medium. A similar decrease in receptor expression was observed in vivo in PBL from patients being treated daily with 5 X 10(6) units/m2 per d of IFN alpha 2 by subcutaneous injection, for acute lymphoblastic leukemia or papilloma virus infections. Receptor numbers in PBL in vivo were further reduced concurrent with the progression of IFN therapy. Thus, the reduction in IFN receptor expression observed in vitro can be demonstrated in vivo. These studies indicate that monitoring IFN receptor expression in vivo can provide information regarding the availability of IFN receptors at the cell surface for the mediation of IFN actions during the course of IFN therapy.

  16. Primary retroperitoneal tumours and cysts.

    PubMed

    Bors, G; Polyák, L; Frang, D

    1986-01-01

    The authors give a summarizing report on retroperitoneal tumours and cysts. They review the origin and classification of tumours and cysts, their diagnostic and differential diagnostic possibilities as well as the therapeutic measures. Finally, their own 3 cases are reported.

  17. Targeting Diamond Nanoparticles into Folate-Receptor Expressing HeLa Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapina, V. A.; Vorobey, A. V.; Pavich, T. A.; Opitz, J.

    2013-07-01

    We have studied binding of synthesized folic acid-diamond nanoparticle conjugates to proliferatively active HeLa cells. In order to determine the binding of the complex to the cells, we used spectral luminescence methods and microscopy, which let us visualize localization of the conjugate in the cellular system in vitro. We show that the conjugate under study binds to folate-receptor expressing HeLa cells. We have established a determining role for the folate receptor in binding of the conjugate to the cells. Our studies suggest that is it possible to use the conjugate as a targeted nanoplatform for targeted delivery of diagnostic and therapeutic agents to tumor cells.

  18. Ultraviolet B irradiation increases endothelin-1 and endothelin receptor expression in cultured human keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Tsuboi, R; Sato, C; Oshita, Y; Hama, H; Sakurai, T; Goto, K; Ogawa, H

    1995-09-01

    The effect of ultraviolet B (UVB) irradiation on endothelin-1 (ET-1) and ET receptor expression was examined using cultured normal human keratinocytes. Keratinocytes secreted ET-1 in the medium at a level of 2.1 pg/day/10(5) cells. UVB irradiation up to 10 mJ/cm2 increased ET-1 secretion 3-fold, and potentiated expression of mRNA for ET-1. Both ETA and ETB receptor mRNAs were detected in keratinocytes, and their expression was up-regulated by 5 mJ/cm2 UVB irradiation.

  19. Tumour Cell Heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Gay, Laura; Baker, Ann-Marie; Graham, Trevor A.

    2016-01-01

    The population of cells that make up a cancer are manifestly heterogeneous at the genetic, epigenetic, and phenotypic levels. In this mini-review, we summarise the extent of intra-tumour heterogeneity (ITH) across human malignancies, review the mechanisms that are responsible for generating and maintaining ITH, and discuss the ramifications and opportunities that ITH presents for cancer prognostication and treatment. PMID:26973786

  20. Elastosis in malignant tumours.

    PubMed

    Isaacson, C; Greeff, H; Murray, J F; Posen, J; Schmaman, A

    1985-07-01

    Elastosis is common in infiltrating ductal and lobular carcinomas of the breast, occurring in approximately 90% of cases. It is also well described in some benign lesions of the breast and tumours of the salivary gland. Reports of venous elastosis in association with large-bowel carcinomas are rare. We describe elastosis in single cases of prostatic, gastric, bronchiolar-alveolar and cervical carcinoma.

  1. The spatial and temporal pattern of beta NGF receptor expression in the developing chick embryo.

    PubMed Central

    Raivich, G; Zimmermann, A; Sutter, A

    1985-01-01

    To gain insight into the developmental program of nerve growth factor (NGF) receptor expression, the binding of [125I] beta NGF to frozen chick sections was investigated autorradiographically between embryonic day 3 (E3) and post-hatching day 3. Strong NGF receptor expression was observed as early as E4, throughout embryonic development and in the post-hatching period at the classical NGF target sites: the paravertebral sensory and sympathetic ganglia, the paraaortal sympathetic ganglia as well as the cranial sensory ganglia with neurons of neural crest origin and their respective nerves. Only weak [125I] beta NGF binding was observed during a restricted time span in the parasympathetic ciliary ganglion. Clear differences were observed in the intensity and in the developmental time course of [125I] beta NGF binding to the dorsomedial and ventrolateral aspects of the dorsal root ganglia. NGF receptors were also found to be expressed on central axons of the dorsal root entry zone and the dorsal tract in the spinal cord. A transient expression of specific NGF binding sites of the same high affinity as measured at the classical NGF targets, was detected in the lateral motor column and in muscle at the time of motoneuron synapse formation and elimination. Images Fig. 1.,Fig. 2., Fig. 3 Fig. 4.,Fig. 5., Fig. 6. Fig. 7., Fig. 8. PMID:2988932

  2. Platelet receptor expression and shedding: glycoprotein Ib-IX-V and glycoprotein VI.

    PubMed

    Gardiner, Elizabeth E; Andrews, Robert K

    2014-04-01

    Quantity, quality, and lifespan are 3 important factors in the physiology, pathology, and transfusion of human blood platelets. The aim of this review is to discuss the proteolytic regulation of key platelet-specific receptors, glycoprotein(GP)Ib and GPVI, involved in the function of platelets in hemostasis and thrombosis, and nonimmune or immune thrombocytopenia. The scope of the review encompasses the basic science of platelet receptor shedding, practical aspects related to laboratory analysis of platelet receptor expression/shedding, and clinical implications of using the proteolytic fragments as platelet-specific biomarkers in vivo in terms of platelet function and clearance. These topics can be relevant to platelet transfusion regarding both changes in platelet receptor expression occurring ex vivo during platelet storage and/or clinical use of platelets for transfusion. In this regard, quantitative analysis of platelet receptor profiles on blood samples from individuals could ultimately enable stratification of bleeding risk, discrimination between causes of thrombocytopenia due to impaired production vs enhanced clearance, and monitoring of response to treatment prior to change in platelet count.

  3. Altered sensitivity to excitotoxic cell death and glutamate receptor expression between two commonly studied mouse strains

    PubMed Central

    Finn, Rozzy; Kovács, Attila D.; Pearce, David A.

    2011-01-01

    Alterations in glutamatergic synapse function have been implicated in the pathogenesis of many different neurological disorders including ischemia, epilepsy, Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease, and Huntington’s disease. While studying glutamate receptor function in juvenile Batten disease on the C57BL/6J and 129S6/SvEv mouse backgrounds, we noticed differences unlikely to be due to mutation difference alone. We report here that primary cerebellar granule cell cultures from C57BL/6J mice are more sensitive to NMDA-mediated cell death. Moreover, sensitivity to AMPA-mediated excitotoxicity is more variable and is dependent upon the treatment conditions and age of the cultures. Glutamate receptor surface expression levels examined in vitro by in situ ELISA and in vivo by Western blot in surface cross-linked cerebellar samples indicated that these differences in sensitivity are likely due to strain-dependent differences in cell surface receptor expression levels. We propose that differences in glutamate receptor expression and in excitotoxic vulnerability should be taken into consideration in the context of characterizing disease models on the C57BL/6J and 129S6/SvEv mouse backgrounds. PMID:20544821

  4. PreBotzinger complex neurokinin-1 receptor-expressing neurons mediate opioid-induced respiratory depression.

    PubMed

    Montandon, Gaspard; Qin, Wuxuan; Liu, Hattie; Ren, Jun; Greer, John J; Horner, Richard L

    2011-01-26

    The analgesic properties of the opium poppy Papever somniferum were first mentioned by Hippocrates around 400 BC, and opioid analgesics remain the mainstay of pain management today. These drugs can cause the serious side-effect of respiratory depression that can be lethal with overdose, however the critical brain sites and neurochemical identity of the neurons mediating this depression are unknown. By locally manipulating neurotransmission in the adult rat, we identify the critical site of the medulla, the preBötzinger complex, that mediates opioid-induced respiratory depression in vivo. Here we show that opioids at the preBötzinger complex cause respiratory depression or fatal apnea, with anesthesia and deep-sleep being particularly vulnerable states for opioid-induced respiratory depression. Importantly, we establish that the preBötzinger complex is fully responsible for respiratory rate suppression following systemic administration of opioid analgesics. The site in the medulla most sensitive to opioids corresponds to a region expressing neurokinin-1 receptors, and we show in rhythmically active brainstem section in vitro that neurokinin-1 receptor-expressing preBötzinger complex neurons are selectively inhibited by opioids. In summary, neurokinin-1 receptor-expressing preBötzinger complex neurons constitute the critical site mediating opioid-induced respiratory rate depression, and the key therapeutic target for its prevention or reversal.

  5. The Triggering Receptor Expressed on Myeloid cells-1: A new player during acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Jérémie, Lemarié; Amir, Boufenzer; Marc, Derive; Sébastien, Gibot

    2015-10-01

    Following myocardial ischemia, an intense activation of the immune system occurs that leads to inflammatory cytokines and chemokines production and to the recruitment of neutrophils and mononuclear cells in the infarcted area. Although pro-inflammatory signals initiate the cellular events necessary for scar formation, excessive and prolonged inflammation promotes deleterious cardiac remodeling and dysfunction. The triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-1 (TREM-1) is a highly conserved immune-receptor expressed by neutrophils and monocytes that acts as an amplifier of the innate immune response. Blockade of TREM-1 activation protects from hyper-responsiveness and death during severe infections. Here we review the role of TREM-1 in orchestrating the inflammatory response that follows MI. TREM-1 deletion (Trem-1-/-) or modulation by the use of a short inhibitory peptide (LR12) dampens myocardial inflammation, limits leukocyte recruitment, and improves heart function and survival in mice or pigs. Moreover, the soluble form of TREM-1 (sTREM-1) is found in the plasma of patients suffering from an acute MI and its concentration is an independent predictor of death. This suggests that TREM-1 may constitute a new therapeutic target during acute MI. PMID:26318764

  6. GASTRIN-RELEASING PEPTIDE RECEPTOR IN BREAST CANCER MEDIATES CELLULAR MIGRATION AND INTERLEUKIN-8 EXPRESSION

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Celia; Ives, Kirk; Hellmich, Helen L.; Townsend, Courtney M.; Hellmich, Mark R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Breast cancers aberrantly express gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) hormone and its cognate receptor, gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (GRP-R). Experimental evidence suggests that bombesin (BBS), the pharmacological homologue of GRP, promotes breast cancer growth and progression. The contribution of GRP-R to other poor prognostic indicators in breast cancer, such as the expression of the EGF-R family of growth factors, and hormone insensitivity is unknown. Materials and Methods Two estrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast cancer cell lines were used. MDA-MB-231 overexpress both EGFR and GRPR, whereas SK-BR-3 cells express EGF-R but lack GRP-R. Cellular proliferation was assessed by Coulter counter. Chemotactic migration was performed using Transwell chambers and the migrated cells were quantified. Northern blot and real-time PCR were used to evaluate if pro-angiogenic factor interleukin-8 (IL-8) mRNA expression. Results In MDA-MB-231 cells, GRP-R and EGF-R synergize to regulate cell migration, IL-8 expression, but not cell proliferation. In SK-BR-3 cells, ectopic expression of GRP-R was sufficient to increase migration and IL-8 mRNA. Conclusions These data suggest relevant roles for GRP-R in ER-negative breast cancer progression. Future mechanistic studies to define the molecular role of GRP-R in breast cancer metastasis provide novel targets for the treatment of ER-negative breast cancers. PMID:19631337

  7. Anti-neuropilin 1 antibody Fab' fragment conjugated liposomal docetaxel for active targeting of tumours.

    PubMed

    Manjappa, Arehalli S; Goel, Peeyush N; Gude, Rajiv P; Ramachandra Murthy, Rayasa S

    2014-09-01

    Neuropilin-1, a transmembrane receptor entailed in wide range of human tumour cell lines and diverse neoplasms, mediates the effects of VEGF and Semaphorins during the processes of cellular proliferation, survival and migration. In view of this, we had developed and evaluated in vitro and in vivo efficacy of anti-neuropilin-1 immunoliposomes against neuropilin-1 receptor expressing tumours. The PEGylated liposomes loaded with docetaxel were prepared using thin film hydration method. Functionalised PEGylated liposomes were prepared using post-insertion technique. Anti-neuropilin-1 immunoliposomes were prepared by covalently conjugating Fab' fragments of neuropilin-1 antibody to functionalised PEGylated liposomes via thioether linkage. In vivo evaluation of Taxotere and liposomal formulations was performed using intradermal tumour model to demonstrate anti-angiogenic and tumour regression ability. The modified Fab' fragments and immunoliposomes were found to be immunoreactive against A549 cells. Further, docetaxel loaded PEGylated liposomes and PEGylated immunoliposomes demonstrated higher in vitro cytotoxicity than Taxotere formulation at the same drug concentration and exposure time. The live imaging showed distinctive cellular uptake of functional immunoliposomes. Further, significant decrease in micro-blood vessel density and tumour volumes was observed using bio-engineered liposomes. The results clearly highlight the need to seek neuropilin-1 as one of the prime targets in developing an anti-angiogenic therapy.

  8. CacyBP/SIP nuclear translocation induced by gastrin promotes gastric cancer cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Zhai, Hui-Hong; Meng, Juan; Wang, Jing-Bo; Liu, Zhen-Xiong; Li, Yuan-Fei; Feng, Shan-Shan

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the role of nuclear translocation of calcyclin binding protein, also called Siah-1 interacting protein (CacyBP/SIP), in gastric carcinogenesis. METHODS: The expression of CacyBP/SIP protein in gastric cancer cell lines was detected by Western blot. Immunofluorescence experiments were performed on gastric cancer cell lines that had been either unstimulated or stimulated with gastrin. To confirm the immunofluorescence findings, the relative abundance of CacyBP/SIP in nuclear and cytoplasmic compartments was assessed by Western blot. The effect of nuclear translocation of CacyBP/SIP on cell proliferation was examined using MTT assay. The colony formation assay was used to measure clonogenic cell survival. The effect of CacyBP/SIP nuclear translocation on cell cycle progression was investigated. Two CacyBP/SIP-specific siRNA vectors were designed and constructed to inhibit CacyBP/SIP expression in order to reduce the nuclear translocation of CacyBP/SIP, and the expression of CacyBP/SIP in stably transfected cells was determined by Western blot. The effect of inhibiting CacyBP/SIP nuclear translocation on cell proliferation was then assessed. RESULTS: CacyBP/SIP protein was present in most of gastric cancer cell lines. In unstimulated cells, CacyBP/SIP was distributed throughout the cytoplasm; while in stimulated cells, CacyBP/SIP was found mainly in the perinuclear region. CacyBP/SIP nuclear translocation generated a growth-stimulatory effect on cells. The number of colonies in the CacyBP/SIP nuclear translocation group was significantly higher than that in the control group. The percentage of stimulated cells in G1 phase was significantly lower than that of control cells (69.70% ± 0.46% and 65.80% ± 0.60%, control cells and gastrin-treated SGC7901 cells, P = 0.008; 72.99% ± 0.46% and 69.36% ± 0.51%, control cells and gastrin-treated MKN45 cells, P = 0.022). CacyBP/SIPsi1 effectively down-regulated the expression of CacyBP/SIP, and cells stably

  9. Gastrin/cholecystokinin-like immunoreactive peptides in the Dungeness crab, Cancer magister (Dana): immunochemical and biological characterization.

    PubMed

    Larson, B A; Vigna, S R

    1983-10-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to characterize a gastrin/cholecystokinin-like immunoreactant (G/CCK-LI) extractable from the crab, Cancer magister. G/CCK-LI was extracted best in boiling water and was found mainly in the stomach, hemolymph and carapace. A relatively large immunoreactive peptide in the stomach and apparently smaller forms in the hemolymph and carapace were separated by Sephadex G-50 fractionation. Anion-exchange chromatography further fractionated the stomach form into three major peaks. The crab material cross-reacted with three antisera specific for the common C-terminus of gastrin/CCK, but cross-reacted much less with three antisera directed against other portions of the gastrin molecule. Partially purified crab stomach G/CCK-LI inhibited the binding of labeled CCK to mouse brain G/CCK receptors but not to rat pancreatic CCK receptors. The crab peptide did not stimulate rat gastric acid or rat pancreatic amylase secretion. These results indicate that the crab peptides are structurally similar to, but distinguishable from, the bioactive C-terminal amino acid sequence common to gastrins and CCKs.

  10. Fasting lowers gastrin-releasing peptide and FSH mRNA in the ovine anterior pituitary gland

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Estrogen receptor beta (ER-ß), LH, and FSH are important mediators of reproduction. FSH stimulates follicle recruitment and development. During anorexia, serum concentrations of FSH and LH decrease. Gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP), neuromedin B (NMB), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma...

  11. Fasting lowers gastrin-releasing peptide and Fsh mRNA in the ovine anterior pituitary gland

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Estrogen receptor beta (ER-ß), LH, and FSH are important mediators of reproduction. FSH stimulates follicle recruitment and development. During anorexia, serum concentrations of FSH and LH decrease. Gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP), neuromedin B (NMB), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma...

  12. Laryngeal solitary fibrous tumour.

    PubMed

    Stomeo, Francesco; Padovani, Davide; Bozzo, Corrado; Pastore, Antonio

    2007-09-01

    Solitary fibrous tumours (SFT) are rare neoplasms, with an uncommon laryngeal involvement. Only five cases of laryngeal localization have been described in literature. The following is a case of a 75-year-old man with a supraglottic neoplasm of the larynx; after the biopsy immunohistochemical study demonstrated a strong positivity for vimentin, CD34 and Bcl-2. The neoplasm was consequently classified as a SFT. CO(2) laser surgery of the supraglottic larynx, with a wide excision of the neoplasm, was performed. Twenty-four months on, the patient is alive, well and free of disease. Surgical resection is the treatment of choice for laryngeal SFT, but tumour-free resection margins must be achieved to prevent the possibility of local recurrence. Endoscopic resection by means of the CO(2) laser must be accurately planned with MRI or CT imaging to confirm of this kind of surgery.

  13. GRPR-targeted Protein Contrast Agents for Molecular Imaging of Receptor Expression in Cancers by MRI

    PubMed Central

    Pu, Fan; Qiao, Jingjuan; Xue, Shenghui; Yang, Hua; Patel, Anvi; Wei, Lixia; Hekmatyar, Khan; Salarian, Mani; Grossniklaus, Hans E.; Liu, Zhi-Ren; Yang, Jenny J.

    2015-01-01

    Gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (GRPR) is differentially expressed on the surfaces of various diseased cells, including prostate and lung cancer. However, monitoring temporal and spatial expression of GRPR in vivo by clinical MRI is severely hampered by the lack of contrast agents with high relaxivity, targeting capability and tumor penetration. Here, we report the development of a GRPR-targeted MRI contrast agent by grafting the GRPR targeting moiety into a scaffold protein with a designed Gd3+ binding site (ProCA1.GRPR). In addition to its strong binding affinity for GRPR (Kd = 2.7 nM), ProCA1.GRPR has high relaxivity (r1 = 42.0 mM−1s−1 at 1.5 T and 25 °C) and strong Gd3+ selectivity over physiological metal ions. ProCA1.GRPR enables in vivo detection of GRPR expression and spatial distribution in both PC3 and H441 tumors in mice using MRI. ProCA1.GRPR is expected to have important preclinical and clinical implications for the early detection of cancer and for monitoring treatment effects. PMID:26577829

  14. Electrochemotherapy of Tumours

    PubMed Central

    Sersa, Gregor; Miklavcic, Damijan

    2008-01-01

    Electrochemotherapy is a combined use of certain chemotherapeutic drugs and electric pulses applied to the treated tumour nodule. Local application of electric pulses to the tumour increases drug delivery into cells, specifically at the site of electric pulse application. Drug uptake by delivery of electric pulses is increased for only those chemotherapeutic drugs whose transport through the plasma membrane is impeded. Among many drugs that have been tested so far, bleomycin and cisplatin found their way from preclinical testing to clinical use. Clinical data collected within a number of clinical studies indicate that approximately 80% of the treated cutaneous and subcutaneous tumour nodules of different malignancies are in an objective response, from these, approximately 70% in complete response after a single application of electrochemotherapy. Usually only one treatment is needed, however, electrochemotherapy can be repeated several times every few weeks with equal effectiveness each time. The treatment results in an effective eradication of the treated nodules, with a good cosmetic effect without tissue scarring. PMID:19229171

  15. MicroRNA-155 regulates monocyte chemokine and chemokine receptor expression in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Elmesmari, Aziza; Fraser, Alasdair R.; Wood, Claire; Gilchrist, Derek; Vaughan, Diane; Stewart, Lynn; McSharry, Charles; McInnes, Iain B.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To test the hypothesis that miR-155 regulates monocyte migratory potential via modulation of chemokine and chemokine receptor expression in RA, and thereby is associated with disease activity. Methods. The miR-155 copy-numbers in monocytes from peripheral blood (PB) of healthy (n = 22), RA (n = 24) and RA SF (n = 11) were assessed by real time-PCR using synthetic miR-155 as a quantitative standard. To evaluate the functional impact of miR-155, human monocytes were transfected with control or miR-155 mimic, and the effect on transcript levels, and production of chemokines was evaluated by Taqman low-density arrays and multiplex assays. A comparative study evaluated constitutive chemokine receptor expression in miR-155−/− and wild-type murine (CD115 + Ly6C + Ly6G−) monocytes. Results. Compared with healthy monocytes, the miR-155 copy-number was higher in RA, peripheral blood (PB) and SF monocytes (PB P < 0.01, and SF P < 0.0001). The miR-155 copy-number in RA PB monocytes was higher in ACPA-positive compared with ACPA-negative patients (P = 0.033) and correlated (95% CI) with DAS28 (ESR), R = 0.728 (0.460, 0.874), and with tender, R = 0.631 (0.306, 0.824) and swollen, R = 0.503 (0.125, 0.753) joint counts. Enforced-expression of miR-155 in RA monocytes stimulated the production of CCL3, CCL4, CCL5 and CCL8; upregulated CCR7 expression; and downregulated CCR2. Conversely, miR155−/− monocytes showed downregulated CCR7 and upregulated CCR2 expression. Conclusion. Given the observed correlations with disease activity, these data provide strong evidence that miR-155 can contribute to RA pathogenesis by regulating chemokine production and pro-inflammatory chemokine receptor expression, thereby promoting inflammatory cell recruitment and retention in the RA synovium. PMID:27411480

  16. Clinical features of gastroenteropancreatic tumours

    PubMed Central

    Czarnywojtek, Agata; Bączyk, Maciej; Ziemnicka, Katarzyna; Fischbach, Jakub; Wrotkowska, Elżbieta; Ruchała, Marek

    2015-01-01

    Gastroenteropancreatic (GEP) endocrine tumours (carcinoids and pancreatic islet cell tumours) are composed of multipotent neuroendocrine cells that exhibit a unique ability to produce, store, and secrete biologically active substances and cause distinct clinical syndromes. The classification of GEP tumours as functioning or non-functioning is based on the presence of symptoms that accompany these syndromes secondary to the secretion of hormones, neuropeptides and/or neurotransmitters (functioning tumours). Non-functioning tumours are considered to be neoplasms of neuroendocrine differentiation that are not associated with obvious symptoms attributed to the hypersecretion of metabolically active substances. However, a number of these tumours are either capable of producing low levels of such substances, which can be detected by immunohistochemistry but are insufficient to cause symptoms related to a clinical syndrome, or alternatively, they may secrete substances that are either metabolically inactive or inappropriately processed. In some cases, GEP tumours are not associated with the production of any hormone or neurotransmitter. Both functioning and non-functioning tumours can also produce symptoms due to mass effects compressing vital surrounding structures. Gastroenteropancreatic tumours are usually classified further according to the anatomic site of origin: foregut (including respiratory tract, thymus, stomach, duodenum, and pancreas), midgut (including small intestine, appendix, and right colon), and hindgut (including transverse colon, sigmoid, and rectum). Within these subgroups the biological and clinical characteristics of the tumours vary considerably, but this classification is still in use because a significant number of previous studies, mainly observational, have used it extensively. PMID:26516377

  17. Pepsinogen I and II, Gastrin and Cag A Serum Levels in Shiraz.

    PubMed

    Shamsdin, Seyedeh Azra; Saberifiroozi, Mehdi; Mehrabani, Davood; Heydari, Seyed Taghi

    2011-09-01

    BACKGROUND Despite the similar rate of HP infection, the rate of gastric cancer (GC) differs in different regions of the country. There are conflicting reports for using a panel of serologic tests such as pepsinogens I, II (PG I and PG II), and gastrin for population screening. We designed this study to assess healthy appearing adults in Shiraz, southern Iran in order to evaluate the correlation of these serological tests with demographics and lifestyle in a region with a low rate of gastric malignancy. METHODS In a population-based study, 846 out of 1978 subjects who were selected by cluster random sampling based on postal code division in Shiraz agreed to participate in the present study. A questionnaire that included age, gender, weight and height, lifestyle such as physical activity, smoking and the use of nonsteroidal anti inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) was completed. A blood sample was taken after overnight fasting for measurements of PG I, PG II and Cag A status by enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA). Gastrin level was measured by radioimmunoassay (RIA). RESULTS The study included 305 men and 541 women. Their mean age was 50.53+11.4 (range: 35-99 years). The level of PG I was significantly more in males than females (116.6±57.1 vs. 103.1±55.8, p < 0.001), lower in older age groups (p = 0.01), and rural compared with urban residents (110.3+55.7 vs. 100.2+58.1, p = 0.02). The serum level of PG II was less in obese subjects (p = 0.5). There was no significant correlation between PG I, PG II, smoking, NSAID use and activity. Gastrin level were not correlated with any of the demographic characteristics. The level of Cag A was significantly different between males and females (30.5±37 vs. 37.7±41.7, p < 0.001), more in older subjects (p = 0.007) and non smokers (p = 0.001). The serum levels of PG I and PG I/PG II ratio decreased significantly in subjects with positive Cag A serology (p < 0.05). The ratio of PG I/PG II was lower than 3 in 35 (4.1%) subjects

  18. Differential brain angiotensin-II type I receptor expression in hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Braga, Valdir A

    2011-09-01

    Blood-borne angiotensin-II (Ang-II) has profound effects in the brain. We tested the hypothesis that Ang-II-dependent hypertension involves differential Ang-II type I (AT(1)) receptors expression in the subfornical organ (SFO) and the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM). Male Wistar rats were implanted with 14-day osmotic minipump filled with Ang-II (150 ng/kg/min) or saline. AT(1) receptor mRNA levels were detected in the SFO and RVLM by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Ang-II caused hypertension (134 ± 10 mmHg vs. 98 ± 9 mmHg, n = 9, p < 0.05). RT-PCR revealed that Ang-II infusion induced increased AT(1) receptor mRNA levels in RVLM and decreased in SFO. Our data suggest that Ang-II-induced hypertension involves differential expression of brain AT(1) receptors. PMID:21897104

  19. Clinical review: Role of triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-1 during sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Gibot, Sébastien

    2005-01-01

    Triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells (TREM)-1 is a recently identified molecule that is involved in monocytic activation and in the inflammatory response. It belongs to a family related to the natural killer cell receptors and is expressed on neutrophils, mature monocytes and macrophages. The inflammatory response mediated by Toll-like receptor-2 and -4 stimulation is amplified by the engagement of TREM-1. The expression of membrane-bound TREM-1 is greatly increased on monocytes during sepsis. Moreover, infection induces the release of a soluble form of this receptor, which can be measured in biological fluid and may be useful as a diagnostic tool. Modulation of the TREM-1 signalling pathway by the use of small synthetic peptides confers interesting survival advantages during experimental septic shock in mice, even when this teatment is administered late after the onset of sepsis. PMID:16277737

  20. Normal Morphology and Hormone Receptor Expression in the Male California sea lion (Zalophus californianus) Genital Tract

    PubMed Central

    Colegrove, Kathleen M.; Gulland, Frances M. D.; Naydan, Diane K.; Lowenstine, Linda J.

    2010-01-01

    Histomorphology and estrogen α (ER α), and progesterone receptor (PR) expression were evaluated in free-ranging stranded male California sea lions (Zalophus californianus). Hormone receptor expression was evaluated using an immunohistochemical technique with monoclonal antibodies. Estrogen and progesterone receptors were identified in the efferent ductules, prostate gland, corpus cavernosa, corpus spongiosium, penile urethra, and in the epithelium and stroma of both the penis and prepuce. In the some tissues, ER α expression was more intense in the stroma, emphasizing the importance of the stroma in hormone – mediated growth and differentiation of reproductive organs. To our knowledge, this is the first study to localize ER α and PR to the epithelium of the glans penis. The results of this investigation add to the general knowledge of male California sea lion reproduction and suggest that estrogens could have a role in the function of the male reproductive tract. PMID:19768750

  1. Triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-1 as a new therapeutic target during inflammatory diseases

    PubMed Central

    Derive, Marc; Massin, Frédéric

    2010-01-01

    The Triggering Receptor Expressed on Myeloid cells (TREM)-1 is a recently identified molecule involved in monocytic activation and inflammatory response. It belongs to a family related to Natural Killer cell-receptors and is expressed on neutrophils, mature monocytes and macrophages. The engagement of TREM-1 synergizes with several Toll Like Receptors (TLR) and/or NOD Like Receptors (NLR) activation in amplifying the inflammatory response mediated by microbial components or danger signals. The implication of TREM-1 during experimental models of acute or chronic inflammatory conditions, as well as during cancer, begins to understand. Furthermore, the modulation of the TREM-1 signaling pathway by the use of small synthetic peptides derived from its extracellular moiety confers interesting survival advantages during experimental murine septic shock and protects from organ damage during other inflammatory diseases. This review summarizes the recent advances on TREM-1 biology and highlights the promises of its therapeutic modulation. PMID:21487478

  2. Genetic regulation of platelet receptor expression and function: application in clinical practice and drug development.

    PubMed

    Williams, Marlene S; Weiss, Ethan J; Sabatine, Marc S; Simon, Daniel I; Bahou, Wadie F; Becker, Lewis C; Parise, Leslie V; Dauerman, Harold L; French, Patricia A; Smyth, Susan S; Becker, Richard C

    2010-12-01

    Understanding genetic contributions to platelet function could have profound clinical ramifications for personalizing platelet-directed pharmacotherapy, by providing insight into the risks and possible benefits associated with specific genotypes. This article represents an integrated summary of presentations related to genetic regulation of platelet receptor expression and function given at the Fifth Annual Platelet Colloquium in January 2010. It is supplemented with additional highlights from the literature covering (1) approaches to determining and evidence for the associations of genetic variants with platelet hypo- and hyperresponsive phenotypes, (2) the ramifications of these polymorphisms with regard to clinical responses to antiplatelet therapies, and (3) the role of platelet function/genetic testing in guiding antiplatelet therapy.

  3. Maspin as a Tumour Suppressor in Salivary Gland Tumour

    PubMed Central

    Ashok, Nipun; Sheirawan, Mohammad Kinan; Altamimi, Mohammed Alsakran; Alenzi, Faris; Azzeghaiby, Saleh Nasser; Baroudi, Kusai; Nassani, Mohammad Zakaria

    2014-01-01

    Maspin is a protein that belongs to serin protease inhibitor (serpin) superfamily. The purpose of this study was to review the literature concerning the expression of maspin in salivary gland tumours. A literature search was done using MEDLINE, accessed via the National Library of Medicine PubMed interface. Statistical analysis was not done because only seven studies were available in literature, the collected data were different and the results could not be compared. Expression of maspin was down regulated in more aggressive salivary gland tumours. Maspin may function as a tumour suppressor in salivary gland tumours. PMID:25654053

  4. Neuropeptide substance P upregulates chemokine and chemokine receptor expression in primary mouse neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jia; Ramnath, Raina Devi; Bhatia, Madhav

    2007-08-01

    Neuropeptides play an important role in the active communication between the nervous and immune systems. Substance P (SP) is a prominent neuropeptide involved in neurogenic inflammation and has been reported to exert various proinflammatory actions on inflammatory leukocytes including neutrophils. The present study further investigated the modulatory effect of SP (1 muM) on chemokine production and chemokine receptor expression in primary mouse neutrophils. Our results showed that SP primed neutrophils for chemotactic responses not only to the CXC chemokine macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-2/CXCL2 but also to the CC chemokine MIP-1alpha/CCL3. The activating effect of SP on neutrophils was further evidenced by upregulation of the CD11b integrin, the activation marker of neutrophils. SP induced both the mRNA and protein expression of the chemokines MIP-1alpha/CCL3 and MIP-2/CXCL2 in neutrophils and upregulated the chemokine receptors CC chemokine receptor (CCR)-1 and CXC chemokine receptor (CXCR)-2. This stimulatory effect on chemokine and chemokine receptor expression in neutrophils was further found to be neurokinin-1 receptor (NK-1R) specific. Pretreatment with selective NK-1R antagonists inhibited SP-triggered activation of neutrophils and chemokine and chemokine receptor upregulation. Moreover, SP-induced chemokine upregulation was NF-kappaB dependent. SP time dependently induced NF-kappaB p65 binding activity, IkappaBalpha degradation, and NF-kappaB p65 nuclear translocation in neutrophils. Inhibition of NF-kappaB activation with its inhibitor Bay11-7082 (10 muM) abolished SP-induced NF-kappaB binding activity and upregulation of MIP-1alpha/CCL3 and MIP-2/CXCL2 in neutrophils. Together, these results suggest that SP exerts a direct stimulatory effect on the expression of chemokines and chemokine receptors in mouse neutrophils. The effect is NK-1R mediated, involving NF-kappaB activation.

  5. Biological effects of insulin and its analogs on cancer cells with different insulin family receptor expression.

    PubMed

    Sciacca, Laura; Cassarino, Maria Francesca; Genua, Marco; Vigneri, Paolo; Giovanna Pennisi, Maria; Malandrino, Pasqualino; Squatrito, Sebastiano; Pezzino, Vincenzo; Vigneri, Riccardo

    2014-11-01

    Hyperinsulinemia is a likely cause of the increased cancer incidence and mortality in diabetic patients, but its role is difficult to define in vivo. Previous in vitro studies testing the mitogenic potential of insulin and its analogs provided incomplete and sometimes contradictory results. To better evaluate cancer cell responsiveness to insulin, to its analogs and to IGF-I, we measured under identical experimental conditions cell proliferation, invasiveness, and foci formation in six cancer cell lines with different insulin receptor family expression levels. The cancer cells studied have a different expression of insulin receptor (IR), its isoforms (IR-A and IR-B), and of the IGF-I receptor. The data indicate that insulin stimulates proliferation in all cancer cell lines, invasiveness in some, and foci formation in none. Cancer cell responses to insulin (and IGF-I) are not related to receptor expression levels; moreover, hormone-stimulated proliferation and invasiveness are not correlated. IGF-I is a more potent stimulator than insulin in most but not all cancer cell lines. Insulin analogs including M1 and M2 Glargine metabolites stimulate cancer cells similar to insulin. However, exceptions occur for specific analogs in particular cancer cells. In conclusion, in vitro insulin is an effective growth factor for all cancer cells but the biological response to insulin cannot be predicted on the basis of receptor expression levels. In the clinical setting, these observations should be taken in account when deciding treatment for diabetic patients who are at risk of undiscovered cancer or survivors of oncological diseases.

  6. 5-HT7 receptor activation promotes an increase in TrkB receptor expression and phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Samarajeewa, Anshula; Goldemann, Lolita; Vasefi, Maryam S.; Ahmed, Nawaz; Gondora, Nyasha; Khanderia, Chandni; Mielke, John G.; Beazely, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    The serotonin (5-HT) type 7 receptor is expressed throughout the CNS including the cortex and hippocampus. We have previously demonstrated that the application of 5-HT7 receptor agonists to primary hippocampal neurons and SH-SY5Y cells increases platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) receptor expression and promotes neuroprotection against N-methyl-D-aspartate-(NMDA)-induced toxicity. The tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB) receptor is one of the receptors for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and is associated with neurodevelopmental and neuroprotective effects. Application of LP 12 to primary cerebral cortical cultures, SH-SY5Y cells, as well as the retinal ganglion cell line, RGC-5, increased both the expression of full length TrkB as well as its basal phosphorylation state at tyrosine 816. The increase in TrkB expression and phosphorylation was observed as early as 30 min after 5-HT7 receptor activation. In addition to full-length TrkB, kinase domain-deficient forms may be expressed and act as dominant-negative proteins toward the full length receptor. We have identified distinct patterns of TrkB isoform expression across our cell lines and cortical cultures. Although TrkB receptor expression is regulated by cyclic AMP and Gαs-coupled GPCRs in several systems, we demonstrate that, depending on the model system, pathways downstream of both Gαs and Gα12 are involved in the regulation of TrkB expression by 5-HT7 receptors. Given the number of psychiatric and degenerative diseases associated with TrkB/BDNF deficiency and the current interest in developing 5-HT7 receptor ligands as pharmaceuticals, identifying signaling relationships between these two receptors will aid in our understanding of the potential therapeutic effects of 5-HT7 receptor ligands. PMID:25426041

  7. Functional characteristics of enhanced Fc receptor expression of beta 2 integrin-deficient bovine mononuclear phagocytes.

    PubMed

    Nagahata, H; Higuchi, H; Goji, N; Noda, H; Kuwabara, M

    1996-01-01

    Fc receptor expression, cytoplasmic Ca2+ signaling, chemiluminescent (CL) response, and electron spin resonance (ESR) combined with spin trapping of blood mononuclear phagocytes from control heifers and a heifer with leukocyte adhesion deficiency (LAD) were evaluated to elucidate the relationships between complement receptor type 3 (CR3) and Fc receptor expression and their functional responses. The mean fluorescence intensity of fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-conjugated anti-bovine IgG bound to mononuclear phagocytes from the heifer with LAD was 1.8-fold higher than that of control heifers. The mean increments of cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentrations of mononuclear phagocytes from the heifer with LAD stimulated with OPZ, Agg-IgG, and PMA were 39.4 (P < 0.05), 118, and 71.6% compared with those of control heifers. A 1.27-fold increase in the CL response relative to control heifers was detected when mononuclear phagocytes from the heifer with LAD were stimulated with Agg-IgG. The OPZ-induced CL response of mononuclear phagocytes from the heifer with LAD was significantly (P < 0.05) decreased, whereas the PMA-induced CL response was similar to that of control heifers. The ESR spectrum of mononuclear phagocytes from the heifer with LAD was increased when stimulated with Agg-IgG, and was impaired when stimulated by OPZ compared with that of control heifers. The ESR spectrum of mononuclear phagocytes stimulated with PMA was similar in control heifers and the heifer with LAD. Fc receptors on mononuclear phagocytes from the heifer with LAD were enhanced, and their cytoplasmic Ca2+ signaling, CL response, and ESR-spin trapping when stimulated with Agg-IgG and OPZ appeared to be associated with enhanced Fc receptors. PMID:8805104

  8. Analysis of tumour cell composition in tumours composed of paired mixtures of mammary tumour cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, B. E.; Miller, F. R.; Wilburn, D. J.; Heppner, G. H.

    1987-01-01

    In order to quantitate the effects of tumour subpopulation interactions, we have devised a method to determine the subpopulation composition of tumours by using paired tumour cell lines able to grow in different selective media. Line 4T07 forms colonies in thioguanine but not in HAT and line 168 forms colonies in HAT but not in thioguanine. An independent technique of determining tumour cell content was used to validate this method: line 168 and 4T07 cells are distinguishable by flow cytometry after staining with propidium iodide for DNA content. Mixtures of cell suspensions prepared from each unmixed tumour, as well as from tumours arising from mixtures of these lines, were analysed by both the colony formation assay and by the DNA content assay. The colony formation assay yielded values in good agreement with the DNA content assay, but was considerably more sensitive in that it was able to quantitate minority subpopulations that constituted less than 10% of the tumour. Both methods revealed that in tumours arising from mixtures, the tumour cells were almost entirely line 4T07, even when the inoculum had contained a high proportion of 168 cells. Since line 168 cells are very tumorigenic per se, these results suggest that line 4T07 cells are capable of interfering with 168 proliferation in mixed tumours, either directly or through a host-mediated mechanism. PMID:3426919

  9. Gastrin releasing peptide is a selective mitogen for small cell lung carcinoma in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Weber, S; Zuckerman, J E; Bostwick, D G; Bensch, K G; Sikic, B I; Raffin, T A

    1985-01-01

    Human small cell lung carcinoma (SCLC) cells have been shown to contain significant levels of a bombesin-immunoreactive peptide. The 27-amino acid peptide, gastrin releasing peptide (GRP), has recently been shown to be responsible for the bombesin-like immunoreactivity found in SCLC cells. Among four lung cancer cell lines examined in vitro, GRP exhibited mitogenic activity for two SCLC subtypes, but not for a squamous carcinoma or adenocarcinoma lung cell line. The mitogenicity of the GRP molecule has been isolated to the carboxyterminal fragment, designated GRP 14-27, which is in part homologous to bombesin. The aminoterminal fragment, GRP 1-16, is no homologous to bombesin and exhibits no mitogenic activity. Thus, GRP may be an important growth regulating or autocrine factor in human SCLC. PMID:2981251

  10. Gastrin-releasing peptide, a mammalian analog of bombesin, is present in human neuroendocrine lung tumors.

    PubMed Central

    Bostwick, D. G.; Roth, K. A.; Evans, C. J.; Barchas, J. D.; Bensch, K. G.

    1984-01-01

    Several reports have indicated that the amphibian peptide bombesin is present in oat-cell carcinoma of the human lung. The recent observation that gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP), a 27-amino acid peptide isolated from porcine intestine, may be the mammalian analog of bombesin led the authors to look for this peptide in human pulmonary tumors. Examination of 36 human lung tumors (8 carcinoids, 8 oat-cell carcinomas, and 20 non-oat-cell carcinomas) by immunohistochemistry and radioimmunoassay demonstrated the presence of high, although variable, levels of GRP in neuroendocrine tumors, and not in other histologic types. These findings indicate that bombesin immunoreactivity in human lung tumors should be attributed to GRP or GRP-like molecules and that GRP may be a useful marker of neuroendocrine differentiation. Images Figure 1 PMID:6093543

  11. Gastrin-releasing peptide receptor signaling in the integration of stress and memory.

    PubMed

    Roesler, Rafael; Kent, Pamela; Luft, Tatiana; Schwartsmann, Gilberto; Merali, Zul

    2014-07-01

    Neuropeptides act as signaling molecules that regulate a range of aspects of brain function. Gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) is a 27-amino acid mammalian neuropeptide, homolog of the amphibian peptide bombesin. GRP acts by binding to the GRP receptor (GRPR, also called BB2), a member of the G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) superfamily. GRP produced by neurons in the central nervous system (CNS) plays a role in synaptic transmission by activating GRPRs located on postsynaptic membranes, influencing several aspects of brain function. Here we review the role of GRP/GRPR as a system mediating both stress responses and the formation and expression of memories for fearful events. GRPR signaling might integrate the processing of stress and fear with synaptic plasticity and memory, serving as an important component of the set of neurobiological systems underlying the enhancement of memory storage by aversive information.

  12. Action of omeprazole (a benzimidazole derivative) on secretory responses to sham feeding and pentagastrin and upon serum gastrin and pancreatic polypeptide in duodenal ulcer patients.

    PubMed Central

    Konturek, S J; Kweicień, N; Obtułowicz, W; Kopp, B; Oleksy, J

    1984-01-01

    The effects of omeprazole, a benzimidazole derivative, have been determined on the secretory responses to modified sham feeding and pentagastrin, and upon serum gastrin and pancreatic polypeptide concentrations in duodenal ulcer patients. Intragastric administration of omeprazole in doses of 2 and 6 mumol/kg produced, respectively, about 50% and 90% reduction in acid outputs in responses to modified sham feeding and pentagastrin without affecting serum gastrin and pancreatic polypeptide response to modified sham feeding. PMID:6418621

  13. LET-painting increases tumour control probability in hypoxic tumours.

    PubMed

    Bassler, Niels; Toftegaard, Jakob; Lühr, Armin; Sørensen, Brita Singers; Scifoni, Emanuele; Krämer, Michael; Jäkel, Oliver; Mortensen, Lise Saksø; Overgaard, Jens; Petersen, Jørgen B

    2014-01-01

    LET-painting was suggested as a method to overcome tumour hypoxia. In vitro experiments have demonstrated a well-established relationship between the oxygen enhancement ratio (OER) and linear energy transfer (LET), where OER approaches unity for high-LET values. However, high-LET radiation also increases the risk for side effects in normal tissue. LET-painting attempts to restrict high-LET radiation to compartments that are found to be hypoxic, while applying lower LET radiation to normoxic tissues. Methods. Carbon-12 and oxygen-16 ion treatment plans with four fields and with homogeneous dose in the target volume, are applied on an oropharyngeal cancer case with an identified hypoxic entity within the tumour. The target dose is optimised to achieve a tumour control probability (TCP) of 95% when assuming a fully normoxic tissue. Using the same primary particle energy fluence needed for this plan, TCP is recalculated for three cases assuming hypoxia: first, redistributing LET to match the hypoxic structure (LET-painting). Second, plans are recalculated for varying hypoxic tumour volume in order to investigate the threshold volume where TCP can be established. Finally, a slight dose boost (5-20%) is additionally allowed in the hypoxic subvolume to assess its impact on TCP. Results. LET-painting with carbon-12 ions can only achieve tumour control for hypoxic subvolumes smaller than 0.5 cm(3). Using oxygen-16 ions, tumour control can be achieved for tumours with hypoxic subvolumes of up to 1 or 2 cm(3). Tumour control can be achieved for tumours with even larger hypoxic subvolumes, if a slight dose boost is allowed in combination with LET-painting. Conclusion. Our findings clearly indicate that a substantial increase in tumour control can be achieved when applying the LET-painting concept using oxygen-16 ions on hypoxic tumours, ideally with a slight dose boost.

  14. VEGF targets the tumour cell.

    PubMed

    Goel, Hira Lal; Mercurio, Arthur M

    2013-12-01

    The function of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in cancer is not limited to angiogenesis and vascular permeability. VEGF-mediated signalling occurs in tumour cells, and this signalling contributes to key aspects of tumorigenesis, including the function of cancer stem cells and tumour initiation. In addition to VEGF receptor tyrosine kinases, the neuropilins are crucial for mediating the effects of VEGF on tumour cells, primarily because of their ability to regulate the function and the trafficking of growth factor receptors and integrins. This has important implications for our understanding of tumour biology and for the development of more effective therapeutic approaches.

  15. Brain Tumours Simulating Psychiatric Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hobbs, G. E.

    1963-01-01

    Brain tumours may present with symptoms indistinguishable from psychiatric disease. The impression of most psychiatrists is that individuals suffering from brain tumour rarely appear among their patients. A priori reasoning based on evidence from neurological, neurosurgical and pathological sources suggests the contrary. The present study is a frequency analysis of cases of previously undiagnosed brain tumours admitted to either an open psychoneurotic ward or a mental hospital over a period of 15 years. The results support the impression held by psychiatrists that brain tumours are uncommon among psychiatric patients. PMID:13954870

  16. Malignant testicular tumours

    PubMed Central

    Vecchio, Pierre Del; Tawil, Elie; Béland, Gilles

    1974-01-01

    A series of 71 patients with malignant testicular tumours treated primarily by orchiectomy and irradiation is reviewed with respect to pathological and clinical features and modes of treatment. The three-year crude survival rate in 36 patients with seminoma was 86% and in 24 patients with carcinoma it was 41.7%. There were no survivors among patients with choriocarcinoma. Our results are comparable with those of other series. A prospective study is proposed of the value of irradiation and subsequent limited lymph node dissection following orchiectomy in cases of carcinoma of the testis. PMID:4855670

  17. Two types of Zollinger-Ellison syndrome: immunofluorescent, cytochemical and ultrastructural studies of the antral and pancreatic gastrin cells in different clinical states

    PubMed Central

    Polak, Julia M.; Stagg, B.; Pearse, A. G. E.

    1972-01-01

    In this survey the antral, pancreatic and, where present, the neoplastic gastrin cells, were studied in eight cases of the Zollinger-Ellison syndrome. The antral G cells alone were studied in one case of Z-E syndrome, seven cases of simple duodenal ulcer, and five cases of pernicious anaemia. The Z-E cases were divided into two numerically equal groups. The first group had `short' histories, high serum gastrin levels, and profound antral G cell hyperplasia. The second group had `long' histories, relatively lower serum gastrin levels, normal antral G cells, and either pancreatic D cell hyperplasia or gastrinoma. Antral G cell hyperplasia, with maximal gastrin storage and normal serum gastrin levels, was found in the duodenal ulcer cases. Antral G cell hyperplasia with minimal storage and high serum gastrin levels was observed in the cases of pernicious anaemia. On the basis of our findings we propose that there exist at least two distinct types (or perhaps stages) of the Z-E syndrome. Suggestions for their pathogenesis are offered. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 7Fig. 8Fig. 9Fig. 10Fig. 11 PMID:4560738

  18. ANALYSIS OF ANDROGEN- AND EGF-RECEPTOR EXPRESSION IN THE FETAL RAT PHALLUS AFTER EXPOSURE TO VINCLOZOLIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Analysis of Androgen- and EGF-Receptor Expression in the Fetal Rat Phallus After Exposure to Vinclozolin
    Cynthia Wolf1,2, Barbara Abbott1, Gerald A. LeBlanc2, and L. Earl Gray, Jr.1
    1USEPA, ORD, NHEERL, RTD, RTP, NC 27711, 2NCSU, Environmental and Molecular Toxicology, Ral...

  19. [Serological tests of functional activity of the digestive system (gastrin, pepsinogen-I, trypsin), general IgE and serum cortisol levels in children with hepatitis A and B].

    PubMed

    Kalagina, L S; Pavlov, Ch S; Fomin, Iu A

    2013-01-01

    The mild form of hepatitis A and B with children is attended by a functional activity of pancreatic gland (tripsin), mucous coats of stomach and duodenum (gastrin) which permits to consider them as a factor of the risk of digestive organs combined pathology starting with the disease acuity. Differences in gastrin levels with children depending on hepatitis etiology were specified. Highest levels of gastrin were observed with persons suffering from hepatitis B.

  20. Adapting radiotherapy to hypoxic tumours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinen, Eirik; Søvik, Åste; Hristov, Dimitre; Bruland, Øyvind S.; Rune Olsen, Dag

    2006-10-01

    In the current work, the concepts of biologically adapted radiotherapy of hypoxic tumours in a framework encompassing functional tumour imaging, tumour control predictions, inverse treatment planning and intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) were presented. Dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCEMRI) of a spontaneous sarcoma in the nasal region of a dog was employed. The tracer concentration in the tumour was assumed related to the oxygen tension and compared to Eppendorf histograph measurements. Based on the pO2-related images derived from the MR analysis, the tumour was divided into four compartments by a segmentation procedure. DICOM structure sets for IMRT planning could be derived thereof. In order to display the possible advantages of non-uniform tumour doses, dose redistribution among the four tumour compartments was introduced. The dose redistribution was constrained by keeping the average dose to the tumour equal to a conventional target dose. The compartmental doses yielding optimum tumour control probability (TCP) were used as input in an inverse planning system, where the planning basis was the pO2-related tumour images from the MR analysis. Uniform (conventional) and non-uniform IMRT plans were scored both physically and biologically. The consequences of random and systematic errors in the compartmental images were evaluated. The normalized frequency distributions of the tracer concentration and the pO2 Eppendorf measurements were not significantly different. 28% of the tumour had, according to the MR analysis, pO2 values of less than 5 mm Hg. The optimum TCP following a non-uniform dose prescription was about four times higher than that following a uniform dose prescription. The non-uniform IMRT dose distribution resulting from the inverse planning gave a three times higher TCP than that of the uniform distribution. The TCP and the dose-based plan quality depended on IMRT parameters defined in the inverse planning procedure (fields

  1. Serotonin receptors expressed in Drosophila mushroom bodies differentially modulate larval locomotion.

    PubMed

    Silva, Bryon; Goles, Nicolás I; Varas, Rodrigo; Campusano, Jorge M

    2014-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster has been successfully used as a simple model to study the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying behaviors, including the generation of motor programs. Thus, it has been shown that, as in vertebrates, CNS biogenic amines (BA) including serotonin (5HT) participate in motor control in Drosophila. Several evidence show that BA systems innervate an important association area in the insect brain previously associated to the planning and/or execution of motor programs, the Mushroom Bodies (MB). The main objective of this work is to evaluate the contribution of 5HT and its receptors expressed in MB to motor behavior in fly larva. Locomotion was evaluated using an automated tracking system, in Drosophila larvae (3(rd)-instar) exposed to drugs that affect the serotonergic neuronal transmission: alpha-methyl-L-dopa, MDMA and fluoxetine. In addition, animals expressing mutations in the 5HT biosynthetic enzymes or in any of the previously identified receptors for this amine (5HT1AR, 5HT1BR, 5HT2R and 5HT7R) were evaluated in their locomotion. Finally, RNAi directed to the Drosophila 5HT receptor transcripts were expressed in MB and the effect of this manipulation on motor behavior was assessed. Data obtained in the mutants and in animals exposed to the serotonergic drugs, suggest that 5HT systems are important regulators of motor programs in fly larvae. Studies carried out in animals pan-neuronally expressing the RNAi for each of the serotonergic receptors, support this idea and further suggest that CNS 5HT pathways play a role in motor control. Moreover, animals expressing an RNAi for 5HT1BR, 5HT2R and 5HT7R in MB show increased motor behavior, while no effect is observed when the RNAi for 5HT1AR is expressed in this region. Thus, our data suggest that CNS 5HT systems are involved in motor control, and that 5HT receptors expressed in MB differentially modulate motor programs in fly larvae.

  2. Serotonin Receptors Expressed in Drosophila Mushroom Bodies Differentially Modulate Larval Locomotion

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Bryon; Goles, Nicolás I.; Varas, Rodrigo; Campusano, Jorge M.

    2014-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster has been successfully used as a simple model to study the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying behaviors, including the generation of motor programs. Thus, it has been shown that, as in vertebrates, CNS biogenic amines (BA) including serotonin (5HT) participate in motor control in Drosophila. Several evidence show that BA systems innervate an important association area in the insect brain previously associated to the planning and/or execution of motor programs, the Mushroom Bodies (MB). The main objective of this work is to evaluate the contribution of 5HT and its receptors expressed in MB to motor behavior in fly larva. Locomotion was evaluated using an automated tracking system, in Drosophila larvae (3rd-instar) exposed to drugs that affect the serotonergic neuronal transmission: alpha-methyl-L-dopa, MDMA and fluoxetine. In addition, animals expressing mutations in the 5HT biosynthetic enzymes or in any of the previously identified receptors for this amine (5HT1AR, 5HT1BR, 5HT2R and 5HT7R) were evaluated in their locomotion. Finally, RNAi directed to the Drosophila 5HT receptor transcripts were expressed in MB and the effect of this manipulation on motor behavior was assessed. Data obtained in the mutants and in animals exposed to the serotonergic drugs, suggest that 5HT systems are important regulators of motor programs in fly larvae. Studies carried out in animals pan-neuronally expressing the RNAi for each of the serotonergic receptors, support this idea and further suggest that CNS 5HT pathways play a role in motor control. Moreover, animals expressing an RNAi for 5HT1BR, 5HT2R and 5HT7R in MB show increased motor behavior, while no effect is observed when the RNAi for 5HT1AR is expressed in this region. Thus, our data suggest that CNS 5HT systems are involved in motor control, and that 5HT receptors expressed in MB differentially modulate motor programs in fly larvae. PMID:24586928

  3. Dural invasion by pituitary tumours.

    PubMed

    Shaffi, O M; Wrightson, P

    1975-04-23

    In 12 cases of pituitary tumour the dura mater of the sella turcica or diaphragma sellae in contact with the tumour was examined histologically. In nine cases tumour cells were found lying deep in the substance of the dura. Dura from the sella of seven subjects without pituitary disease, obtianed at autopsy, showed no inclusions of pituitary tissue. Four of the cases studied were known before death to suffer from an invasive pituitary adenoma. Of eight surviving cases operated upon in the last two years, five showed dural invasion by tumour. The present report suggests that the condition may be more frequent than expected and that with more study it may provide an index of prognosis. It also defines a requirement for the surgeon aiming to prevent recurrence of tumour after operation or to achieve a complete endocrine ablation.

  4. Heavy ion tumour therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholz, M.

    2000-03-01

    Ion beams represent a promising radiotherapy modality for the treatment of deep seated tumours. Compared to conventional photon beams, in particular beams of heavier ions like e.g. carbon show several advantages which are related to their different physical and radiobiological properties: The dose increases with penetration depth and shows a sharp distal fall off at the end of the particle range, i.e., the depth dose profile is inverted compared to photon beams. They exhibit an increased biological effectiveness in particular at the end of their range and thus in the target volume. The spatial distribution of stopping particles can be monitored by means of PET-techniques making use of the small amount of radioactive projectile fragments. Ion beams were first used for medical applications in 1954 in Berkeley. Since then, several treatment facilities for tumour therapy have been established worldwide, and approximately 25 000 patients have been treated with protons and 3000 patients with heavier ions successfully. As an example, the specific advantages of the heavy ion therapy facility at GSI Darmstadt established in cooperation with the Radiological Clinics and DKFZ Heidelberg and FZ Rossendorf will be described. In contrast to most existing facilities, it is based on an active beam delivery system, using magnetic deflection of a pencil beam (raster scan) and accelerator energy variation to adjust the penetration depth. Thus, an optimal conformation of the dose to the target volume is achieved. PET-measurements allow for a quasi on-line monitoring of the 3D distribution of stopping particles and in particular of the position of the distal edge of the dose distribution. Furthermore, in the treatment planning procedure the radiobiological properties of ion beams are taken into account in great detail. In December 1997, patient treatments started at GSI, and up to now 42 patients were treated with carbon ions alone or in a mixed carbon/photon beam regime.

  5. Intranasally Administered Neuropeptide S (NPS) Exerts Anxiolytic Effects Following Internalization Into NPS Receptor-Expressing Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Ionescu, Irina A; Dine, Julien; Yen, Yi-Chun; Buell, Dominik R; Herrmann, Leonie; Holsboer, Florian; Eder, Matthias; Landgraf, Rainer; Schmidt, Ulrike

    2012-01-01

    Experiments in rodents revealed neuropeptide S (NPS) to constitute a potential novel treatment option for anxiety diseases such as panic and post-traumatic stress disorder. However, both its cerebral target sites and the molecular underpinnings of NPS-mediated effects still remain elusive. By administration of fluorophore-conjugated NPS, we pinpointed NPS target neurons in distinct regions throughout the entire brain. We demonstrated their functional relevance in the hippocampus. In the CA1 region, NPS modulates synaptic transmission and plasticity. NPS is taken up into NPS receptor-expressing neurons by internalization of the receptor–ligand complex as we confirmed by subsequent cell culture studies. Furthermore, we tracked internalization of intranasally applied NPS at the single-neuron level and additionally demonstrate that it is delivered into the mouse brain without losing its anxiolytic properties. Finally, we show that NPS differentially modulates the expression of proteins of the glutamatergic system involved inter alia in synaptic plasticity. These results not only enlighten the path of NPS in the brain, but also establish a non-invasive method for NPS administration in mice, thus strongly encouraging translation into a novel therapeutic approach for pathological anxiety in humans. PMID:22278093

  6. Repeated Stress Causes Cognitive Impairment by Suppressing Glutamate Receptor Expression and Function in Prefrontal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Yuen, Eunice Y.; Wei, Jing; Liu, Wenhua; Zhong, Ping; Li, Xiangning; Yan, Zhen

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Chronic stress could trigger maladaptive changes associated with stress-related mental disorders, however, the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. In this study, we found that exposing juvenile male rats to repeated stress significantly impaired the temporal order recognition memory, a cognitive process controlled by prefrontal cortex (PFC). Concomitantly, significantly reduced AMPAR- and NMDAR-mediated synaptic transmission and glutamate receptor expression were found in PFC pyramidal neurons from repeatedly stressed animals. All these effects relied on activation of glucocorticoid receptors and the subsequent enhancement of ubiquitin/proteasome-mediated degradation of GluR1 and NR1 subunits, which was controlled by the E3 ubiquitin ligase Nedd4-1 and Fbx2, respectively. Inhibition of proteasomes or knockdown of Nedd4-1 and Fbx2 in PFC prevented the loss of glutamatergic responses and recognition memory in stressed animals. Our results suggest that repeated stress dampens PFC glutamatergic transmission by facilitating glutamate receptor turnover, which causes the detrimental effect on PFC-dependent cognitive processes. PMID:22405206

  7. A short review of twin pregnancy and how oxytocin receptor expression may differ in multiple pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Turton, Peter; Neilson, James P; Quenby, Siobhan; Burdyga, Theodor; Wray, Susan

    2009-05-01

    During a multiple pregnancy, the mother and her fetuses are exposed to a variety of risks during both pregnancy and labour. The most notable of these risks is that of pre-term labour and its associated sequelae. Whilst much research has been directed towards understanding the mechanisms of uterine contractility, very little research has focussed on how contractility in multiple pregnancy differs from contractility in the singleton pregnancy. The aim of this paper is to review the changing prevalence and risks of a twin pregnancy, as well as reviewing what is known about myometrium from multiple pregnancies. The paper ends by discussing how oxytocin receptor expression may differ in twin pregnancy, based on the evidence of animal models, as well as presenting our own evidence of how oxytocin affects myometrium from twin pregnancies. We highlight the lack of the basic information needed to characterize human myometrium in twin pregnancies. Of particular note is the lack of supporting data for the hypothesis that stretch is responsible for earlier activation of the uterus in multiple pregnancy. New hypotheses based on increased experimental work are called for. Such information may throw light on specific mechanisms leading to the increased incidence of pre-term delivery in twins.

  8. Fighting experience alters brain androgen receptor expression dependent on testosterone status

    PubMed Central

    Li, Cheng-Yu; Earley, Ryan L.; Huang, Shu-Ping; Hsu, Yuying

    2014-01-01

    Contest decisions are influenced by the outcomes of recent fights (winner–loser effects). Steroid hormones and serotonin are closely associated with aggression and therefore probably also play important roles in mediating winner–loser effects. In mangrove rivulus fish, Kryptolebias marmoratus, individuals with higher testosterone (T), 11-ketotestosterone and cortisol levels are more capable of winning, but titres of these hormones do not directly mediate winner–loser effects. In this study, we investigated the effects of winning/losing experiences on brain expression levels of the receptor genes for androgen (AR), oestrogen α/β (ERα/β), glucocorticoid (GR) and serotonin (5-HT1AR). The effect of contest experience on AR gene expression depended on T levels: repeated losses decreased, whereas repeated wins increased AR gene expression in individuals with low T but not in individuals with medium or high T levels. These results lend strong support for AR being involved in mediating winner–loser effects, which, in previous studies, were more detectable in individuals with lower T. Furthermore, the expression levels of ERα/β, 5-HT1AR and GR genes were higher in individuals that initiated contests against larger opponents than in those that did not. Overall, contest experience, underlying endocrine state and hormone and serotonin receptor expression patterns interacted to modulate contest decisions jointly. PMID:25320171

  9. The progesterone and estrogen modify the uterine prolactin and prolactin receptor expression of hyperprolactinemic mice.

    PubMed

    do Amaral, Vinícius Cestari; Carvalho, Kátia Candido; Maciel, Gustavo Arantes Rosa; Simoncini, Tommaso; da Silva, Priscilla Ludovico; Marcondes, Rodrigo Rodrigues; Soares, José Maria; Baracat, Edmund Chada

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of metoclopramide-induced hyperprolactinemia on the prolactin (PRL) and PRL receptor's expression in the uterus of mice. For this purpose, 49 Swiss mice were divided into the following groups: GrSS (non-ovariectomized mice given vehicle); GrMET (non-ovariectomized mice treated with metoclopramide); OvSS (ovariectomized mice given vehicle); OvMET (ovariectomized mice treated with metoclopramide); OvMET+17βE (ovariectomized mice treated with metoclopramide and 17β estradiol); OvMET+MP (ovariectomized mice treated with metoclopramide and micronized progesterone); OvMET+17βE+MP (ovariectomized mice treated with metoclopramide and a solution of 17β estradiol and micronized progesterone). Immunohistochemical analyzes were evaluated semi-quantitatively. Our results showed that GrMET, OvMET+MP, and OvMET+17βE+MP presented strong PRL expression. OvMET and OvMET+17βE presented mild reaction, while GrSS and OvSS presented weak reaction. Concerning PRL receptor, OvMET+MP and OvMET+17βE+MP showed strong reaction; GrMET, OvSS, and OvMET+17βE showed mild reaction; and GrSS and OvMET showed weak reaction. These findings suggest that progesterone alone or in combination with estrogen may increase the expression of uterine PRL and PRL receptor.

  10. Do G protein-coupled receptors expressed in human lingual epithelium interact with HPV11?

    PubMed

    Durzyński, Lukasz; Gaudin, Jean-Charles; Breuils, Laure; Szydłowski, Jaroslaw; Goździcka-Józefiak, Anna; Haertlé, Thomas

    2007-10-01

    Human papillomaviruses infect epithelia but little is known about the nature of cell surface receptors interacting with the viral particles. It has been proposed that glycosaminoglycans and integrins may be involved in the attachment process. In the present study, the putative interactions of virus-like particles of human papillomavirus type 11 (HPV11), which present a tropism for nasopharyngeal epithelia, with olfactory and taste receptors expressed in the human lingual epithelium were studied. The L1 protein of HPV11 was produced in insect cells. The presence of L1 virus-like particles was analyzed by ELISA using monoclonal antibodies specific for full-size particles and by electron microscopy. Using immunofluorescence, it was observed that virus-like particles interacted with taste buds from murine tongue, with the tagged human olfactory receptor hJCG5 expressed in HEK-293 but not with the tagged taste receptor hT2R4. This therefore suggests that hJCG5 may be involved in the adsorption process of HPV11 to lingual epithelium serving as a so-called "adsorption-adhesive molecule." PMID:17705193

  11. Role of triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-1/3 in Klebsiella-derived pneumosepsis.

    PubMed

    Hommes, Tijmen J; Dessing, Mark C; Veer, Cornelis van 't; Florquin, Sandrine; Colonna, Marco; de Vos, Alex F; van der Poll, Tom

    2015-11-01

    Triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells (TREM)-1 and -2 can affect Toll-like receptor-mediated activation of immune cells. Klebsiella pneumoniae is a common cause of pneumonia-derived sepsis. Here we studied the role of TREM-1/3 and TREM-2 in the host response during Klebsiella pneumonia. Macrophages lacking either TREM-1/3 or TREM-2 were tested for their responsiveness toward K. pneumoniae and for their capacity to internalize this pathogen in vitro. TREM-1/3- and TREM-2-deficient mice were infected with K. pneumoniae via the airways, and their responses were compared with those in wild-type mice. TREM-1/3-deficient macrophages produced lower cytokine levels upon exposure to K. pneumoniae, whereas TREM-2-deficient macrophages released higher cytokine concentrations. TREM-2-deficient, but not TREM-1/3-deficient, macrophages showed a reduced capacity to phagocytose K. pneumoniae. TREM-1/3-deficient mice showed an impaired host defense during Klebsiella pneumonia, as reflected by worsened survival and increased bacterial growth and dissemination. In contrast, TREM-2 deficiency did not affect disease outcome. Although TREM-1/3 and TREM-2 influence macrophage responsiveness to K. pneumoniae in vitro, only TREM-1/3 contribute to the host response during Klebsiella pneumonia in vivo, serving a protective role.

  12. Sex mediates dopamine and adrenergic receptor expression in adult rats exposed prenatally to cocaine

    PubMed Central

    Ferris, Mark J.; Mactutus, Charles F.; Silvers, Janelle M.; Hasselrot, Ulla; Strupp, Barbara J.; Booze, Rosemarie M.

    2010-01-01

    The extent of catecholaminergic receptor and respective behavioral alterations associated with prenatal cocaine exposure varies according to exogenous factors such as the amount, frequency, and route of maternal exposure, as well as endogenous factors such as specific brain regions under consideration and sex of the species. The goal of the current study was to use autoradiography to delineate possible moderators of dopaminergic and adrenergic receptor expression in adult rat offspring exposed to cocaine in utero. The current study demonstrated sex-dependent D1 receptor, α2, and noradrenergic transporter binding alterations in prelimbic, hippocampus, and anterior cingulate regions of adult rat brains exposed to cocaine during gestational days 8–21. Of further interest was the lack of alterations in the nucleus accumbens for nearly all receptors/transporters investigated, as well as the lack of alterations in D3 receptor binding in nearly all of the regions investigated (nucleus accumbens, prelimbic region, hippocampus, and cingulate gyrus). Thus, the current investigation demonstrated persistent receptor and transporter alterations that extend well into adulthood as a result of cocaine exposure in utero. Furthermore, the demonstration that sex played a mediating role in prenatal cocaine-induced, aberrant receptor/transporter expression is of primary importance for future studies that seek to control for sex in either design or analysis. PMID:17933484

  13. Relationship between tumour shrinkage and reduction in Ki67 expression after primary chemotherapy in human breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bottini, A; Berruti, A; Bersiga, A; Brizzi, M P; Bruzzi, P; Aguggini, S; Brunelli, A; Bolsi, G; Allevi, G; Generali, D; Betri, E; Bertoli, G; Alquati, P; Dogliotti, L

    2001-01-01

    The association between tumour shrinkage and reduction in kinetic cell activity after primary chemotherapy in human breast cancer is still a matter of investigation. 157 patients with T2-4, N0-1, M0 breast cancer received primary chemotherapy consisting of either the CMF regimen + tamoxifen (the first consecutive 76 cases) or the single agent epirubicin (the subsequent 81). Ki67, p53, bcl2, c-erbB2 and steroid hormone receptors were evaluated immunohistochemically in tumour specimens obtained before chemotherapy and at surgery. Tumour shrinkage of >50% occurred in 72.4% of patients. Ki67 expression significantly decreased after chemotherapy; the reduction correlated with tumour response in both univariate (P < 0.005) and multivariate analysis (P = 0.02). p53, bcl-2, steroid hormone receptor and c-erbB2 immunostaining were scarcely affected. Baseline bcl2 (P = 0.04) and c-erbB2 (P = 0.02) were directly and inversely associated with the reduction in Ki67 immunostaining, respectively. Baseline p53 expression (P < 0.01) was directly related with Ki67 expression at residual tumour, whereas oestrogen receptor expression (P < 0.001) was inversely related. Ki67 at residual tumour was a better predictor for relapse-free survival (RFS) than baseline Ki67. Clinical response (P < 0.03), but not reduction in Ki67, was a significant independent predictor for disease recurrence. Chemotherapy was found to induce tumour shrinkage and to reduce the number of cells in the cell cycle, but its effect on tumour biology/aggressiveness was minimal. Reduction in Ki67 immunostaining correlated with clinical response but failed to be related to RFS. Ki67 expression at surgery rather than at baseline appears to be a better predictor for disease relapse. © 2001 Cancer Research Campaign  http://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11710821

  14. Investigation of mechanism of fade of gastrin-stimulated gastric acid secretion in the cat.

    PubMed

    Hirst, B H

    1988-01-01

    and tachyphylaxis of gastrin-stimulated acid secretion are consistent with a common gastrin receptor inactivation or desensitization mechanism.

  15. Benign cardiac tumours, malignant arrhythmias

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Kimberley A; Wong, Kenny K; Tipple, Marion; Sanatani, Shubhayan

    2010-01-01

    Four cases of pediatric cardiac tumours (PCTs) associated with ventricular arrhythmias are reported. Sudden cardiac death attributable to the tumour occurred in two children. A third child received an implantable cardioverter defibrillator and the fourth had persistent ventricular arrhythmia despite medical therapy. Most PCTs are considered benign; however, the development of malignant arrhythmias may complicate the management of these tumours in some patients. The literature regarding the arrhythmogenic potential of PCTs and the use of implantable cardioverter defibrillators in these patients is reviewed. The series highlights the deficiency of prognostic information for this cohort. PMID:20151061

  16. Malignant tumours of the duodenum.

    PubMed

    Ryska, M; Hrabal, P

    2015-12-01

    No comprehensive knowledge of duodenal tumours exists in the current literature; individual types of malignant tumours may be described within malignancies of the small bowel, sets of case reports, or individual cases. Ampullary carcinomas are the exception and they are detailed in the current WHO histological classification of tumours of digestive system. Neither national nor international literature sources provide a comprehensive review of their therapy. The situation is similar when searching for surgical procedures. Resection procedures on the duodenum should thus be performed in specialized centres with sufficient experience with hepato-pancreato-biliary surgery. PMID:26767899

  17. Intra-tumoural microvessel density in human solid tumours

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, J; Byers, R; Jayson, G C

    2002-01-01

    Over the last decade assessment of angiogenesis has emerged as a potentially useful biological prognostic and predictive factor in human solid tumours. With the development of highly specific endothelial markers that can be assessed in histological archival specimens, several quantitative studies have been performed in various solid tumours. The majority of published studies have shown a positive correlation between intra-tumoural microvessel density, a measure of tumour angiogenesis, and prognosis in solid tumours. A minority of studies have not demonstrated an association and this may be attributed to significant differences in the methodologies employed for sample selection, immunostaining techniques, vessel counting and statistical analysis, although a number of biological differences may account for the discrepancy. In this review we evaluate the quantification of angiogenesis by immunohistochemistry, the relationship between tumour vascularity and metastasis, and the clinicopathological studies correlating intra-tumoral microvessel density with prognosis and response to anti-cancer therapy. In view of the extensive nature of this retrospective body of data, comparative studies are needed to identify the optimum technique and endothelial antigens (activated or pan-endothelial antigens) but subsequently prospective studies that allocate treatment on the basis of microvessel density are required. British Journal of Cancer (2002) 86, 1566–1577. DOI: 10.1038/sj/bjc/6600315 www.bjcancer.com © 2002 Cancer Research UK PMID:12085206

  18. Rewiring macrophages for anti-tumour immunity.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yunqin; Biswas, Subhra K

    2016-06-28

    Tumour-associated macrophages facilitate cancer progression, but whether they can be reprogrammed to elicit an anti-tumour response remains unclear. Deletion of the microRNA-processing enzyme Dicer is now shown to rewire macrophages to an anti-tumour mode, leading to an enhanced response to immunotherapy and inhibition of tumour progression. PMID:27350442

  19. Sex-Specific Alterations in Hippocampal Cannabinoid 1 Receptor Expression Following Adolescent Delta-9-Tetrahydrocannabinol Treatment in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Lindsay; Harte-Hargrove, Lauren; Izenwasser, Sari; Frank, Ashley; Wade, Dean; Dow-Edwards, Diana

    2015-01-01

    Marijuana use by adolescents has been on the rise since the early 1990’s. With recent legalization and decriminalization acts passed, cannabinoid exposure in adolescents will undoubtedly increase. Human studies are limited in their ability to examine underlying changes in brain biochemistry making rodent models valuable. Studies in adult and adolescent animals show region and sex specific downregulation of the cannabinoid 1 (CB1) receptor following chronic cannabinoid treatment. However, although sex-dependent changes in behavior have been observed during the drug abstinence period following adolescent cannabinoid exposure, little is known about CB1 receptor expression during this critical time. In order to characterize CB1 receptor expression following chronic adolescent Δ-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) exposure, we used [3H]CP55,940 binding to assess CB1 receptor expression in the dentate gyrus and areas CA1, CA2, and CA3 of the hippocampus in both male and female adolescent rats at both 24 hours and 2 weeks post chronic THC treatment. Consistent with other reported findings, we found downregulation of the CB1 receptor in the hippocampal formation at 24 hours post treatment. While this downregulation persisted in both sexes following two weeks of abstinence in the CA2 region, in females, this downregulation also persisted in areas CA1 and CA3. Expression in the dentate gyrus returned to the normal range by two weeks. These data suggest that selective regions of the hippocampus show persistent reductions in CB1 receptor expression and that these reductions are more widespread in female compared to male adolescents. PMID:26118897

  20. Leydig cell tumours in childhood.

    PubMed

    Mengel, W; Knorr, D

    1983-01-01

    Two cases of Leydig cell tumours in childhood are presented. In one case, delayed diagnosis and operation led to pubertas praecox vera whereas in the other case normal growth and development occurred after early diagnosis and operation. PMID:6878724

  1. A rare benign ovarian tumour.

    PubMed

    Palmeiro, Marta Morna; Cunha, Teresa Margarida; Loureiro, Ana Luisa; Esteves, Gonçalo

    2016-01-01

    Sclerosing stromal tumour (SST) of the ovary is an extremely rare and benign ovarian neoplasm, accounting for 6% of the sex cord stromal ovarian tumours subtype. Usually, it is found during the second and third decades of life. Patients commonly present with pelvic pain, a palpable pelvic mass or menstrual irregularity. We report a case of a 20-year-old woman reporting of mild pelvic pain, with normal laboratory data. On imaging examinations, a large right adnexal tumour was found, with features suggesting an ovarian sex cord tumour. The patient underwent right salpingo-oophorectomy, diagnosing a SST of the ovary. This paper also reviews the literature, and emphasises the typical pathological and imaging characteristics of these rare benign ovarian lesions, and their impact, in a conservative surgery. PMID:26933186

  2. Multicellular Streaming in Solid Tumours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kas, Josef

    As early as 400 BCE, the Roman medical encyclopaedist Celsus recognized that solid tumours are stiffer than surrounding tissue. However, cancer cell lines are softer, and softer cells facilitate invasion. This paradox raises several questions: Does softness emerge from adaptation to mechanical and chemical cues in the external microenvironment, or are soft cells already present inside a primary solid tumour? If the latter, how can a more rigid tissue contain more soft cells? Here we show that in primary tumour samples from patients with mammary and cervix carcinomas, cells do exhibit a broad distribution of rigidities, with a higher fraction of softer and more contractile cells compared to normal tissue. Mechanical modelling based on patient data reveals that, surprisingly, tumours with a significant fraction of very soft cells can still remain rigid. Moreover, in tissues with the observed distributions of cell stiffnesses, softer cells spontaneously self-organize into lines or streams, possibly facilitating cancer metastasis.

  3. Tumour of the juxtaoral organ.

    PubMed

    Bénateau, H; Rigau, V; Comoz, F; Benchemam, Y; Galateau, F; Compère, J F

    2003-02-01

    The juxtaoral organ is a normal and constant structure of the oral cavity. It consists of benign epithelial nests. We describe an intraoral tumour of the juxtaoral organ in a child. The tumour was not diagnosed after clinical and radiological examinations because it is extremely rare. A histological examination revealed a tumour of the juxtaoral organ, presumed to be neuroid hamartoma. This is only the second time that a tumour of the juxtaoral organ has been described in a child. We also describe the location, the embryology, the histology and the function of this organ. This is important because this structure can be confused with carcinomas of the oral cavity when examining frozen sections.

  4. Recombinant interleukin-16 selectively modulates surface receptor expression and cytokine release in macrophages and dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Hermann, E; Darcissac, E; Idziorek, T; Capron, A; Bahr, G M

    1999-01-01

    Interleukin-16 (IL-16), a natural ligand for the CD4 receptor, has been found to modulate T-lymphocyte function and to inhibit human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication. Antigen-presenting cells (APC), including macrophages and dendritic cells, are known to express functional surface CD4 molecules, to be susceptible to HIV-1 infection and to play a critical role in different immune processes. Therefore, we evaluated the ability of recombinant IL-16 (rIL-16) to regulate receptor expression and cytokine release in monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) and monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDDC). Recombinant IL-16 was found to up-regulate CD25 and CD80 but to down-regulate CD4 and CD86 surface expression in MDM cultures. However, no change could be observed on the level of CD4, CD80 and CD86 expression in IL-16-stimulated MDDC, although a significant up-regulation of CD25 and CD83 was consistently detected. Furthermore, the level of gene expression of the chemokine receptors CCR5 and CXCR4 was significantly reduced in rIL-16-treated MDM and costimulation with IL-2 did not modify the activity of the recombinant cytokine. The effects on chemokine receptor gene expression were less evident in MDDC and only a transient down-regulation of weak intensity could be detected following stimulation with rIL-16. Analysis of supernatants from rIL-16-stimulatedcultures revealed a different profile of released cytokines/chemokines among the two cell populations studied. These findings establish an important role for IL-16 in modulating the activity of APC and may have relevance regarding the protection of reservoir cells against HIV-1 infection. PMID:10447738

  5. Application of photoshop-based image analysis to quantification of hormone receptor expression in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Lehr, H A; Mankoff, D A; Corwin, D; Santeusanio, G; Gown, A M

    1997-11-01

    The benefit of quantifying estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) expression in breast cancer is well established. However, in routine breast cancer diagnosis, receptor expression is often quantified in arbitrary scores with high inter- and intraobserver variability. In this study we tested the validity of an image analysis system employing inexpensive, commercially available computer software on a personal computer. In a series of 28 invasive ductal breast cancers, immunohistochemical determinations of ER and PR were performed, along with biochemical analyses on fresh tumor homogenates, by the dextran-coated charcoal technique (DCC) and by enzyme immunoassay (EIA). From each immunohistochemical slide, three representative tumor fields (x20 objective) were captured and digitized with a Macintosh personal computer. Using the tools of Photoshop software, optical density plots of tumor cell nuclei were generated and, after background subtraction, were used as an index of immunostaining intensity. This immunostaining index showed a strong semilogarithmic correlation with biochemical receptor assessments of ER (DCC, r = 0.70, p < 0.001; EIA, r = 0.76, p < 0.001) and even better of PR (DCC, r = 0.86; p < 0.01; EIA, r = 0.80, p < 0.001). A strong linear correlation of ER and PR quantification was also seen between DCC and EIA techniques (ER, r = 0.62, p < 0.001; PR, r = 0.92, p < 0.001). This study demonstrates that a simple, inexpensive, commercially available software program can be accurately applied to the quantification of immunohistochemical hormone receptor studies.

  6. Prolactinoma ErbB receptor expression and targeted therapy for aggressive tumors.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Odelia; Mamelak, Adam; Bannykh, Serguei; Carmichael, John; Bonert, Vivien; Lim, Stephen; Cook-Wiens, Galen; Ben-Shlomo, Anat

    2014-06-01

    As ErbB signaling is a determinant of prolactin synthesis, role of ErbB receptors was tested for prolactinoma outcomes and therapy. The objective of this study was to characterize ErbB receptor expression in prolactinomas and then perform a pilot study treating resistant prolactinomas with a targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI). Retrospective analysis of prolactinomas and pilot study for dopamine agonist resistant prolactinomas in tertiary referral center. We performed immunofluorescent staining of a tissue array of 29 resected prolactinoma tissues for EGFR, ErbB2, ErbB3, and ErbB4 correlated with clinical features. Two patients with aggressive resistant prolactinomas enrolled and completed trial. They received lapatinib 1,250 mg daily for 6 months with tumor and hormone assessments. Main outcome measures were positive tumor staining of respective ErbB receptors, therapeutic reduction of prolactin levels and tumor shrinkage. Treated PRL levels and tumor volumes were suppressed in both subjects treated with TKI. EGFR expression was positive in 82 % of adenomas, ErbB2 in 92 %, ErbB3 in 25 %, and ErbB4 in 71 %, with ErbB2 score > EGFR > ErbB4 > ErbB3. Higher ErbB3 expression was associated with optic chiasm compression (p = 0.03), suprasellar extension (p = 0.04), and carotid artery encasement (p = 0.01). Higher DA response rates were observed in tumors with higher ErbB3 expression. Prolactinoma expression of specific ErbB receptors is associated with tumor invasion, symptoms, and response to dopamine agonists. Targeting ErbB receptors may be effective therapy in patients with resistant prolactinomas.

  7. Neural endocannabinoid CB1 receptor expression, social status, and behavior in male European starlings.

    PubMed

    DeVries, M Susan; Cordes, Melissa A; Rodriguez, Jonathan D; Stevenson, Sharon A; Riters, Lauren V

    2016-08-01

    Many species modify behavior in response to changes in resource availability or social status; however, the neural mechanisms underlying these modifications are not well understood. Prior work in male starlings demonstrates that status-appropriate changes in behavior involve brain regions that regulate social behavior and vocal production. Endocannabinoids are ubiquitously distributed neuromodulators that are proposed to play a role in adjusting behavior to match social status. As an initial step to provide insight into this hypothesis we observed flocks of male starlings in outdoor aviaries during the breeding season. We used quantitative real-time PCR to measure expression of endocannabinoid CB1 receptors in brain regions involved in social behavior and motivation (lateral septum [LS], ventral tegmental area [VTA], medial preoptic nucleus [POM]) and vocal behavior (Area X and robust nucleus of the arcopallium; RA). Males with nesting sites sang to females and displaced other males more than males without nesting sites. They also had higher levels of CB1 receptor expression in LS and RA. CB1 expression in LS correlated positively with agonistic behaviors. CB1 expression in RA correlated positively with singing behavior. CB1 in VTA also correlated positively with singing when only singing birds were considered. These correlations nicely map onto the well-established role of LS in agonistic behavior and the known role of RA in song production and VTA in motivation and song production. Studies are now needed to precisely characterize the role of CB1 receptors in these regions in the production of status-appropriate social behaviors. PMID:27206544

  8. Adipose tissue natriuretic peptide receptor expression is related to insulin sensitivity in obesity and diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Kovacova, Zuzana; Tharp, William G.; Liu, Dianxin; Wei, Wan; Xie, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Objective Cardiac natriuretic peptides (NPs) bind to two receptors (NPRA‐mediator of signaling; NPRC‐clearance receptor) whose ratio, NPRR (NPRA/NPRC), determines the NP bioactivity. This study investigated the relationship of NP receptor gene expression in adipose tissue and muscle with obesity and glucose intolerance. Prospectively, the study also assessed whether changes in NP receptor expression and thermogenic gene markers accompanied improvements of insulin sensitivity. Methods A cross‐sectional study of subjects with a wide range of BMI and glucose tolerance (n = 50) was conducted, as well as a randomized 12‐week trial of subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) treated with pioglitazone (n = 9) or placebo (n = 10). Results NPRR mRNA was significantly lower in adipose tissue of subjects with obesity when compared with lean subjects (P ≤ 0.001). NPRR decreased with progression from normal glucose tolerance to T2DM (P < 0.01) independently of obesity. Treatment of subjects with T2DM with pioglitazone increased NPRR in adipose tissue (P ≤ 0.01) in conjunction with improvements in insulin sensitivity and increases of the thermogenic markers PPARγ coactivator‐1α and uncoupling protein 1 (P ≤ 0.01). Conclusions Decreased adipose tissue NPRR was associated with obesity, glucose intolerance, and insulin resistance. This relationship was not observed for skeletal muscle NPRR. Pharmacological improvement of insulin sensitivity in subjects with T2DM was tied to improvement in NPRR and increased expression of genes involved in thermogenic processes. PMID:26887289

  9. A membrane-bound Fas decoy receptor expressed by human thymocytes.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, M; Keir, M; McCune, J M

    2000-03-17

    Human thymocytes at several stages of maturation express Fas, yet resist apoptosis induction through its ligation. A proximal step in apoptotic signaling through Fas is implicated in this resistance, as these cells undergo normal levels of apoptosis induction after exposure to tumor necrosis factor-alpha. We studied the Fas receptors expressed in human thymocytes to search for mechanisms of receptor-mediated inhibition of Fas signaling in these cells. We describe here a unique, membrane-bound form of Fas receptor that contained a complete extracellular domain of Fas but that lacked a death domain due to alternative splicing of exon 7. This Fas decoy receptor (FDR) was shown to have nearly wild-type ability to bind native human Fas ligand and was expressed predominantly at the plasma membrane. Unlike soluble forms of Fas receptor, FDR dominantly inhibited apoptosis induction by Fas ligand in transfected human embryonic kidney cells. Titration of FDR in Fas-expressing cells suggests that FDR may operate through the formation of mixed receptor complexes. FDR also dominantly inhibited Fas-induced apoptosis in Jurkat T cells. In mixing experiments with wild-type Fas, FDR was capable of inhibiting death signaling at molar ratios less than 0.5, and this relative level of FDR:wild type message was observed in at least some thymocytes tested. The data suggest that Fas signal pathways in primary human cells may be regulated by expression of a membrane-bound decoy receptor, analogous to the regulation of tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL)-induced apoptosis by decoy receptors.

  10. High Cell Surface Death Receptor Expression Determines Type I Versus Type II Signaling*

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Xue Wei; Peterson, Kevin L.; Dai, Haiming; Schneider, Paula; Lee, Sun-Hee; Zhang, Jin-San; Koenig, Alexander; Bronk, Steve; Billadeau, Daniel D.; Gores, Gregory J.; Kaufmann, Scott H.

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that there are two signaling pathways leading from ligation of the Fas receptor to induction of apoptosis. Type I signaling involves Fas ligand-induced recruitment of large amounts of FADD (FAS-associated death domain protein) and procaspase 8, leading to direct activation of caspase 3, whereas type II signaling involves Bid-mediated mitochondrial perturbation to amplify a more modest death receptor-initiated signal. The biochemical basis for this dichotomy has previously been unclear. Here we show that type I cells have a longer half-life for Fas message and express higher amounts of cell surface Fas, explaining the increased recruitment of FADD and subsequent signaling. Moreover, we demonstrate that cells with type II Fas signaling (Jurkat or HCT-15) can signal through a type I pathway upon forced receptor overexpression and that shRNA-mediated Fas down-regulation converts cells with type I signaling (A498) to type II signaling. Importantly, the same cells can exhibit type I signaling for Fas and type II signaling for TRAIL (TNF-α-related apoptosis-inducing ligand), indicating that the choice of signaling pathway is related to the specific receptor, not some other cellular feature. Additional experiments revealed that up-regulation of cell surface death receptor 5 levels by treatment with 7-ethyl-10-hydroxy-camptothecin converted TRAIL signaling in HCT116 cells from type II to type I. Collectively, these results suggest that the type I/type II dichotomy reflects differences in cell surface death receptor expression. PMID:21865165

  11. Triggering Receptor Expressed on Myeloid Cells (TREM)-2 Impairs Host Defense in Experimental Melioidosis

    PubMed Central

    Weehuizen, Tassili A. F.; Hommes, Tijmen J.; Lankelma, Jacqueline M.; de Jong, Hanna K.; Roelofs, Joris. J.T.H.; de Vos, Alex F.; Colonna, Marco; van der Poll, Tom; Wiersinga, W. Joost

    2016-01-01

    Background Triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells (TREM) -1 and TREM-2 are key regulators of the inflammatory response that are involved in the clearance of invading pathogens. Melioidosis, caused by the "Tier 1" biothreat agent Burkholderia pseudomallei, is a common form of community-acquired sepsis in Southeast-Asia. TREM-1 has been suggested as a biomarker for sepsis and melioidosis. We aimed to characterize the expression and function of TREM-1 and TREM-2 in melioidosis. Methodology/Principal Findings Wild-type, TREM-1/3 (Trem-1/3-/-) and TREM-2 (Trem-2-/-) deficient mice were intranasally infected with live B. pseudomallei and killed after 24, and/or 72 h for the harvesting of lungs, liver, spleen, and blood. Additionally, survival studies were performed. Cellular functions were further analyzed by stimulation and/or infection of isolated cells. TREM-1 and TREM-2 expression was increased both in the lung and liver of B. pseudomallei-infected mice. Strikingly, Trem-2-/-, but not Trem-1/3-/-, mice displayed a markedly improved host defense as reflected by a strong survival advantage together with decreased bacterial loads, less inflammation and reduced organ injury. Cellular responsiveness of TREM-2, but not TREM-1, deficient blood and bone-marrow derived macrophages (BMDM) was diminished upon exposure to B. pseudomallei. Phagocytosis and intracellular killing of B. pseudomallei by BMDM and alveolar macrophages were TREM-1 and TREM-2-independent. Conclusions/Significance We found that TREM-2, and to a lesser extent TREM-1, plays a remarkable detrimental role in the host defense against a clinically relevant Gram-negative pathogen in mice: TREM-2 deficiency restricts the inflammatory response, thereby decreasing organ damage and mortality. PMID:27253382

  12. Changes of epidermal mu-opiate receptor expression and nerve endings in chronic atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Bigliardi-Qi, M; Lipp, B; Sumanovski, L T; Buechner, S A; Bigliardi, P L

    2005-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that neuropeptides such as a substance P, neurotrophins or beta-endorphin, an endogenous agonist for mu-opioid receptor, are involved in the pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis in which mental stress and scratching deteriorate the disease. mu-Opioid receptor, a G-protein-coupled receptor, can be downregulated and internalized by agonists and other factors in vitro. In this study, we investigated the regulation of mu-opioid receptor and nerve endings in atopic dermatitis patients. Skin biopsies from atopic dermatitis patients revealed a significant downregulation of mu-opiate receptor expression in epidermis of atopic dermatitis. Permeabilization of the skin showed that the receptor in keratinocytes from atopic dermatitis is internalized. The mRNA expression pattern of the mu-opiate receptor is different in epidermis taken from patients with chronic atopic dermatitis compared to normal skin. In atopic dermatitis, the mRNA is concentrated in the subcorneal layers of the epidermis and in normal skin in the suprabasal layers. Staining of the nerve endings using protein gene product 9.5 shows a different pattern of epidermal nerve endings in normal skin compared to atopic dermatitis. In normal skin, the epidermal nerve endings are rather thick. However, in atopic dermatitis, the epidermal nerve endings are thin and run straight through the epidermis. Based on these observations and combining the 'intensity' and 'pattern' hypothesis, we propose a new theory especially for histamine-unrelated, peripheral induction of chronic pruritus. We suggest that 'itch' is elicited in the epidermal unmyelinated nerve C-fibers and 'pain' in the dermal unmyelinated nerve fibers. The downregulation of the opioid receptor in the epidermis contributes to the chronic itching. We call this new hypothesis the 'layer hypothesis'.

  13. Association of haemolytic uraemic syndrome with dysregulation of chemokine receptor expression in circulating monocytes.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Maria Victoria; Ruggieri, Matias; Panek, Analia Cecilia; Mejias, Maria Pilar; Fernandez-Brando, Romina Jimena; Abrey-Recalde, Maria Jimena; Exeni, Andrea; Barilari, Catalina; Exeni, Ramon; Palermo, Marina Sandra

    2015-08-01

    Haemolytic uraemic syndrome (HUS) is the major complication of Escherichia coli gastrointestinal infections that are Shiga toxin (Stx) producing. Monocytes contribute to HUS evolution by producing cytokines that sensitize endothelial cells to Stx action and migration to the injured kidney. As CC chemokine receptors (CCRs) are involved in monocyte recruitment to injured tissue, we analysed the contribution of these receptors to the pathogenesis of HUS. We analysed CCR1, CCR2 and CCR5 expression in peripheral monocytes from HUS patients during the acute period, with healthy children as controls. We observed an increased expression of CCRs per cell in monocytes from HUS patients, accompanied by an increase in the absolute number of monocytes CCR1+, CCR2+ and CCR5+. It is interesting that prospective analysis confirmed that CCR1 expression positively correlated with HUS severity. The evaluation of chemokine levels in plasma showed that regulated on activation of normal T-cell-expressed and -secreted (RANTES) protein was reduced in plasma from patients with severe HUS, and this decrease correlated with thrombocytopenia. Finally, the expression of the higher CCRs was accompanied by a loss of functionality which could be due to a mechanism for desensitization to compensate for altered receptor expression. The increase in CCR expression correlates with HUS severity, suggesting that the dysregulation of these receptors might contribute to an increased risk of renal damage. Activated monocytes could be recruited by chemokines and then receptors could be dysregulated. The dysregulation of CCRs and their ligands observed during the acute period suggests that a chemokine pathway would participate in HUS development.

  14. Macrophage polarization phenotype regulates adiponectin receptor expression and adiponectin anti-inflammatory response

    PubMed Central

    van Stijn, Caroline M. W.; Kim, Jason; Lusis, Aldons J.; Barish, Grant D.; Tangirala, Rajendra K.

    2015-01-01

    Adiponectin (APN), a pleiotropic adipokine that exerts anti-inflammatory, antidiabetic, and antiatherogenic effects through its receptors (AdipoRs), AdipoR1 and AdipoR2, is an important therapeutic target. Factors regulating AdipoR expression in monocyte/macrophages are poorly understood, and the significance of polarized macrophage activation in controlling AdipoR expression and the APN-mediated inflammatory response has not been investigated. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the macrophage polarization phenotype controls the AdipoR expression and APN-mediated inflammatory response. With the use of mouse bone marrow and peritoneal macrophages, we demonstrate that classical activation (M1) of macrophages suppressed (40–60% of control) AdipoR expression, whereas alternative activation (M2) preserved it. Remarkably, the macrophage polarization phenotypes produced contrasting inflammatory responses to APN (EC50 5 µg/ml). In M1 macrophages, APN induced proinflammatory cytokines, TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-12 (>10-fold of control) and AdipoR levels. In contrast, in M2 macrophages, APN induced the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 without altering AdipoR expression. Furthermore, M1 macrophages adapt to a cytokine environment by reversing AdipoR expression. APN induced AdipoR mRNA and protein expression by up-regulating liver X receptor-α (LXRα) in macrophages. These results provide the first evidence that macrophage polarization is a key determinant regulating AdipoR expression and differential APN-mediated macrophage inflammatory responses, which can profoundly influence their pathogenic role in inflammatory and metabolic disorders.—van Stijn, C. M. W., Kim, J., Lusis, A. J., Barish, G.D., Tangirala, R. K. Macrophage polarization phenotype regulates adiponectin receptor expression and adiponectin anti-inflammatory response. PMID:25392268

  15. Epstein-Barr virus receptor expression on human CD8+ (cytotoxic/suppressor) T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Sauvageau, G; Stocco, R; Kasparian, S; Menezes, J

    1990-02-01

    In 1977 we showed that cells of a human lymphocytic leukaemia-derived T line (Molt-4) have receptors for Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). More recently, EBV-positive human T cell lymphomas have been recognized and human T cell lines containing the EBV genome have been established in vitro. To understand better the interaction of EBV with T cells, we decided to determine first whether human peripheral blood T lymphocytes express receptors for EBV. Using flow cytometry we examined the binding of both lymphocyte-transforming (B95-8) and non-transforming (P3HR-1) strains of EBV to T lymphocyte subpopulations, using a double labelling technique with T cell-specific phycoerythrinated monoclonal antibodies (Leu 2a) and fluoresceinated viral preparation. Our results suggest that, in general, about 50% of the CD8+ (or suppressor/cytotoxic) T cell subpopulation from both EBV-seropositive and -seronegative individuals can bind EBV. EBV receptor expression on these T cells was about 10 and 51 times less than that on Molt-4 and Raji (an EBV receptor-positive B cell line) cells, respectively. The specificity of this binding was demonstrated by the inhibition of attachment of viral preparations preincubated with a monoclonal antibody directed against the viral ligand (gp240/350), and by preincubating these target T cells with unlabelled virus. We were unable to detect EBV-induced antigens in infected T cells, suggesting that, as in Molt-4 cells, virus internalization may not occur in fresh T cells and/or that the virus receptor may not be completely functional. We were also unable to detect C3d (or CR2) receptors on these T cells, or to inhibit virus attachment by treating the targets with an anti-CR2 monoclonal antibody (OKB7), suggesting that the EBV receptor on CD8+ peripheral blood lymphocytes is different from that on B cells. PMID:2155291

  16. Chicken TREM-B1, an Inhibitory Ig-Like Receptor Expressed on Chicken Thrombocytes.

    PubMed

    Turowski, Vanessa; Sperling, Beatrice; Hanczaruk, Matthias A; Göbel, Thomas W; Viertlboeck, Birgit C

    2016-01-01

    Triggering receptors expressed on myeloid cells (TREM) form a multigene family of immunoregulatory Ig-like receptors and play important roles in the regulation of innate and adaptive immunity. In chickens, three members of the TREM family have been identified on chromosome 26. One of them is TREM-B1 which possesses two V-set Ig-domains, an uncharged transmembrane region and a long cytoplasmic tail with one ITSM and two ITIMs indicating an inhibitory function. We generated specific monoclonal antibodies by immunizing a Balb/c mouse with a TREM-B1-FLAG transfected BWZ.36 cell line and tested the hybridoma supernatants on TREM-B1-FLAG transfected 2D8 cells. We obtained two different antibodies specific for TREM-B1, mab 7E8 (mouse IgG1) and mab 1E9 (mouse IgG2a) which were used for cell surface staining. Single and double staining of different tissues, including whole blood preparations, revealed expression on thrombocytes. Next we investigated the biochemical properties of TREM-B1 by using the specific mab 1E9 for immunoprecipitation of either lysates of surface biotinylated peripheral blood cells or stably transfected 2D8 cells. Staining with streptavidin coupled horse radish peroxidase revealed a glycosylated monomeric protein of about 50 kDa. Furthermore we used the stably transfected 2D8 cell line for analyzing the cytoplasmic tyrosine based signaling motifs. After pervanadate treatment, we detected phosphorylation of the tyrosine residues and subsequent recruitment of the tyrosine specific protein phosphatase SHP-2, indicating an inhibitory potential for TREM-B1. We also showed the inhibitory effect of TREM-B1 in chicken thrombocytes using a CD107 degranulation assay. Crosslinking of TREM-B1 on activated primary thrombocytes resulted in decreased CD107 surface expression of about 50-70%. PMID:26967520

  17. Reduced retinoids and retinoid receptors' expression in pancreatic cancer: A link to patient survival.

    PubMed

    Bleul, Tim; Rühl, Ralph; Bulashevska, Svetlana; Karakhanova, Svetlana; Werner, Jens; Bazhin, Alexandr V

    2015-09-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) represents one of the deadliest cancers in the world. All-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) is the major physiologically active form of vitamin A, regulating expression of many genes. Disturbances of vitamin A metabolism are prevalent in some cancer cells. The main aim of this work was to investigate deeply the components of retinoid signaling in PDAC compared to in the normal pancreas and to prove the clinical importance of retinoid receptor expression. For the study, human tumor tissues obtained from PDAC patients and murine tumors from the orthotopic Panc02 model were used for the analysis of retinoids, using high performance liquid chromatography mass spectrometry and real-time RT-PCR gene expression analysis. Survival probabilities in univariate analysis were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method and the Cox proportional hazards model was used for the multivariate analysis. In this work, we showed for the first time that the ATRA and all-trans retinol concentration is reduced in PDAC tissue compared to their normal counterparts. The expression of RARα and β as well as RXRα and β are down-regulated in PDAC tissue. This reduced expression of retinoid receptors correlates with the expression of some markers of differentiation and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition as well as of cancer stem cell markers. Importantly, the expression of RARα and RXRβ is associated with better overall survival of PDAC patients. Thus, reduction of retinoids and their receptors is an important feature of PDAC and is associated with worse patient survival outcomes.

  18. Characterization of a thyroid hormone receptor expressed in human kidney and other tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Nakai, A.; Seino, S.; Sakurai, A.; Szilak, I.; Bell, G.I.; DeGroot, L.J.

    1988-04-01

    A cDNA encoding a specific form of thyroid hormone receptor expressed in human liver, kidney, placenta, and brain was isolated from a human kidney library. Identical clones were found in human placenta and HepG2 cDNA libraries. The cDNA encodes a 490-amino acid protein. When expressed and translated in vitro, the protein products binds triiodothyronine with K/sub a/ of 2.3 /times/ 10/sup 9/ M/sup /minus/1/. This protein, designated human thyroid hormone receptor type ..cap alpha..2 (hTR..cap alpha..2), has the same domain structure as other members of the v-erbA-related superfamily of receptor genes. It is similar to thyroid hormone receptor type ..cap alpha.. described in chicken and rat and less similar to human thyroid hormone receptor type ..beta.. (formerly referred to as c-erbA..beta..) from placenta. However, it is distinguished from these receptors by an extension of the C-terminal hormone binding domain making it 80 amino acids longer than rat thyroid hormone receptor type ..cap alpha..1. Different sizes of mRNA found in liver and kidney suggest that there may be tissue-specific processing of the primary transcript of this gene. Identification of human thyroid hormone receptor type ..cap alpha..2 indicates that two or more forms of thyroid hormone receptor exist in human tissues and may explain the normal variation in thyroid hormone responsiveness of various organs and the selective tissue abnormalities found in the thyroid hormone resistance syndromes.

  19. Fasting and food-stimulated serum gastrin concentrations in relation to the antral G-cell population. A study in patients with peptic ulcer disease.

    PubMed

    Stave, R; Gedde-Dahl, D; Gjone, E

    1978-01-01

    The fasting serum concentration and the first-hour serum gastric response to a protein-rich meal were related to the antral G-cell population in 14 patients with peptic ulcer. They were divided into a uremic (n=5) and non-uremic group (n=9). Fasting serum gastrin correlated significantly with the total antral G-cell mass only in the non-uremic patients who showed a relatively narrow transitional body-antrum zone. Conversely, the integrated serum gastric response was inversely related to the size of this zone in both groups of patients. A presumptive endocrine G-cell mass was estimated by subtracting the G cells in the transitional zone from the total antral G-cell population. Total gastrin output correlated positively with this estimated mass in the non-uremic group and in the material as a whole. Also, the integrated gastrin response was positively correlated with the presumptive endocrine G-cell mass in the whole material. It was concluded that G cells in the transitional body-antrum zone, where also parietal cells are present, do not release gastrin into the circulation during meal stimulation like G cells in the remaining part of the pyloric antrum. On the basis of these results and our previous morphological observations (19), we propose that the G cells in the transitional zone are involved in a paracrine interrelationship with the surrounding parietal cells rather than contributing to the circulating pool of gastrin.

  20. Phosphorylated STAT3 and PD-1 regulate IL-17 production and IL-23 receptor expression in Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Bandaru, Anuradha; Devalraju, Kamakshi P; Paidipally, Padmaja; Dhiman, Rohan; Venkatasubramanian, Sambasivan; Barnes, Peter F; Vankayalapati, Ramakrishna; Valluri, Vijayalakshmi

    2014-07-01

    We studied the factors that regulate IL-23 receptor expression and IL-17 production in human tuberculosis infection. Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb)-stimulated CD4(+) T cells from tuberculosis patients secreted less IL-17 than did CD4(+) T cells from healthy tuberculin reactors (PPD(+) ). M. tb-cultured monocytes from tuberculosis patients and PPD(+) donors expressed equal amounts of IL-23p19 mRNA and protein, suggesting that reduced IL-23 production is not responsible for decreased IL-17 production by tuberculosis patients. Freshly isolated and M. tb-stimulated CD4(+) T cells from tuberculosis patients had reduced IL-23 receptor and phosphorylated STAT3 (pSTAT3) expression, compared with cells from PPD(+) donors. STAT3 siRNA reduced IL-23 receptor expression and IL-17 production by CD4(+) T cells from PPD(+) donors. Tuberculosis patients had increased numbers of PD-1(+) T cells compared with healthy PPD(+) individuals. Anti-PD-1 antibody enhanced pSTAT3 and IL-23R expression and IL-17 production by M. tb-cultured CD4(+) T cells of tuberculosis patients. Anti-tuberculosis therapy decreased PD-1 expression, increased IL-17 and IFN-γ production and pSTAT3 and IL-23R expression. These findings demonstrate that increased PD-1 expression and decreased pSTAT3 expression reduce IL-23 receptor expression and IL-17 production by CD4(+) T cells of tuberculosis patients. PMID:24643836

  1. Pituitary tumours: acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Chanson, Philippe; Salenave, Sylvie; Kamenicky, Peter; Cazabat, Laure; Young, Jacques

    2009-10-01

    Excessive production of the growth hormone (GH) is responsible for acromegaly. It is related to a pituitary GH-secreting adenoma in most cases. Prevalence is estimated 40-130 per million inhabitants. It is characterised by slowly progressive acquired somatic disfigurement (mainly involving the face and extremities) and systemic manifestations. The rheumatologic, cardiovascular, respiratory and metabolic consequences determine its prognosis. The diagnosis is confirmed by an increased serum GH concentration, unsuppressible by an oral glucose load and by detection of increased levels of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I). Treatment is aimed at correcting (or preventing) tumour compression by excising the disease-causing lesion, and at reducing GH and IGF-I levels to normal values. When surgery, the usual first-line treatment, fails to correct GH/IGF-I hypersecretion, medical treatment with somatostatin analogues and/or radiotherapy can be used. The GH-receptor antagonist (pegvisomant) is helpful in patients who are resistant to somatostatin analogues. Thanks to this multistep therapeutic strategy, adequate hormonal disease control is achieved in most cases, allowing a normal life expectancy. PMID:19945023

  2. Acid Secretion and Serum Gastrin Levels in the Zollinger-Ellison Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, R. Edward; Longmire, William P.; Passaro, Edward

    1972-01-01

    Thirteen cases of patients with the Zollinger-Ellison syndrome were reviewed. In two cases the diagnosis was made by incidental biopsy of small liver nodules at operation for peptic ulcer disease. Seven patients had gastric secretory tests which showed a basal acid output to maximum acid output ratio of more than 65 percent. Five patients had bao:mao ratios less than 50 percent. A 30-month interval between incidental discovery of tumor and clinically evident disease was observed in two patients. Recurrence of symptoms after excision of tumor was noted after a similar interval in another case. Serum gastrin levels, before total gastrectomy, were elevated in all cases. The lowest preoperative level in this series of patients was 550 picograms per ml (normal 100 to 150 picograms). They were diagnostic in two patients with normal gastric secretory studies. The levels fell to normal following total gastrectomy in six patients. Two patients still had elevated levels five years and 14 years after total gastrectomy. One was discovered to have a parathyroid adenoma with hypercalcemia. Total gastrectomy was curative in all the patients with the Zollinger-Ellison syndrome; lesser operations were not. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 3.Figure 4. PMID:5031740

  3. Targeting Gastrin-Releasing Peptide Suppresses Neuroblastoma Progression via Upregulation of PTEN Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Pritha; Qiao, Jingbo; Kim, Kwang Woon; Romain, Carmelle; Lee, Sora; Volny, Natasha; Mobley, Bret; Correa, Hernan; Chung, Dai H.

    2013-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated the role of gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) as an autocrine growth factor for neuroblastoma. Here, we report that GRP silencing regulates cell signaling involved in the invasion-metastasis cascade. Using a doxycycline inducible system, we demonstrate that GRP silencing decreased anchorage-independent growth, inhibited migration and neuroblastoma cell-mediated angiogenesis in vitro, and suppressed metastasis in vivo. Targeted inhibition of GRP decreased the mRNA levels of oncogenes responsible for neuroblastoma progression. We also identified PTEN/AKT signaling as a key mediator of the tumorigenic properties of GRP in neuroblastoma cells. Interestingly, PTEN overexpression decreased GRP-mediated migration and angiogenesis; a novel role for this, otherwise, understated tumor suppressor in neuroblastoma. Furthermore, activation of AKT (pAKT) positively correlated with neuroblastoma progression in an in vivo tumor-metastasis model. PTEN expression was slightly decreased in metastatic lesions. A similar phenomenon was observed in human neuroblastoma sections, where, early-stage localized tumors had a higher PTEN expression relative to pAKT; however, an inverse expression pattern was observed in liver lesions. Taken together, our results argue for a dual purpose of targeting GRP in neuroblastoma –1) decreasing expression of critical oncogenes involved in tumor progression, and 2) enhancing activation of tumor suppressor genes to treat aggressive, advanced-stage disease. PMID:24039782

  4. The Gastrin-Releasing Peptide Receptor (GRPR) in the Spinal Cord as a Novel Pharmacological Target

    PubMed Central

    Takanami, Keiko; Sakamoto, Hirotaka

    2014-01-01

    Gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) is a mammalian neuropeptide that acts through the G protein-coupled receptor, GRP receptor (GRPR). Increasing evidence indicates that GRPR-mediated signaling in the central nervous system plays an important role in many physiological processes in mammals. Additionally, we have recently reported that the GRP system within the lumbosacral spinal cord not only controls erection but also triggers ejaculation in male rats. This system of GRP neurons is sexually dimorphic, being prominent in male rats but vestigial or absent in females. It is suggested that the sexually dimorphic GRP/GRPR system in the lumbosacral spinal cord plays a critical role in the regulation of male sexual function. In parallel, it has been reported that the somatosensory GRP/GRPR system in the spinal cord contributes to the regulation of itch specific transmission independently of the pain transmission. Interestingly, these two distinct functions in the same spinal region are both regulated by the neuropeptide, GRP. In this report, we review findings on recently identified GRP/GRPR systems in the spinal cord. These GRP/GRPR systems in the spinal cord provide new insights into pharmacological treatments for psychogenic erectile dysfunction as well as for chronic pruritus. PMID:25426011

  5. Gastrin Releasing Peptide Modulates Fast Delayed Rectifier Potassium Current in Per1-Expressing SCN Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Gamble, Karen L.; Kudo, Takashi; Colwell, Christopher S.; McMahon, Douglas G.

    2011-01-01

    The mammalian circadian clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) drives and maintains 24-h physiological rhythms, the phases of which are set by the local environmental light-dark cycle. Gastrin releasing peptide (GRP) communicates photic phase setting signals in the SCN by increasing neurophysiological activity of SCN neurons. Here, the ionic basis for persistent GRP-induced changes in neuronal activity was investigated in SCN slice cultures from Per1::GFP reporter mice during the early night. Recordings from Per1-fluorescent neurons in SCN slices several hours after GRP treatment revealed a significantly greater action potential frequency, a significant increase in voltage-activated outward current at depolarized potentials, and a significant increase in 4-aminopyridine (4-AP) sensitive fast delayed rectifier (fDR) potassium currents when compared to vehicle-treated slices. In addition, the persistent increase in spike rate following early night GRP application was blocked in SCN neurons from mice deficient in Kv3 channel proteins. Because fDR currents are regulated by the clock and are elevated in amplitude during the day, the present results support the model that GRP delays the phase of the clock during the early night by prolonging day-like membrane properties of SCN cells. Furthermore, these findings implicate fDR currents in the ionic basis for GRP-mediated entrainment of the primary mammalian circadian pacemaker. PMID:21454290

  6. The Diagnostic Value of Gastrin-17 Detection in Atrophic Gastritis: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xu; Ling, Li; Li, Shanshan; Qin, Guiping; Cui, Wei; Li, Xiang; Ni, Hong

    2016-05-01

    A meta-analysis was performed to assess the diagnostic value of gastrin-17 (G-17) for the early detection of chronic atrophic gastritis (CAG).An extensive literature search was performed, with the aim of selecting publications that reported the accuracy of G-17 in predicting CAG, in the following databases: PubMed, Science Direct, Web of Science, Chinese Biological Medicine, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure, Wanfang, and VIP. To assess the diagnostic value of G-17, the following statistics were estimated and described: sensitivity, specificity, diagnostic odds ratios (DOR), summary receiver operating characteristic curves, area under the curve (AUC), and 95% confidence intervals (CIs).Thirteen studies that met the inclusion criteria were included in this meta-analysis, comprising 894 patients and 1950 controls. The pooled sensitivity and specificity of these studies were 0.48 (95% CI: 0.45-0.51) and 0.79 (95% CI: 0.77-0.81), respectively. The DOR was 5.93 (95% CI: 2.93-11.99), and the AUC was 0.82.G-17 may have potential diagnostic value because it has good specificity and a moderate DOR and AUC for CAG. However, more studies are needed to improve the sensitivity of this diagnostic tool in the future.

  7. Gastrin-releasing peptide blockade as a broad-spectrum anti-inflammatory therapy for asthma

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Shutang; Potts, Erin N.; Cuttitta, Frank; Foster, W. Michael; Sunday, Mary E.

    2011-01-01

    Gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) is synthesized by pulmonary neuroendocrine cells in inflammatory lung diseases, such as bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). Many BPD infants develop asthma, a serious disorder of intermittent airway obstruction. Despite extensive research, early mechanisms of asthma remain controversial. The incidence of asthma is growing, now affecting >300 million people worldwide. To test the hypothesis that GRP mediates asthma, we used two murine models: ozone exposure for air pollution-induced airway hyperreactivity (AHR), and ovalbumin (OVA)-induced allergic airway disease. BALB/c mice were given small molecule GRP blocking agent 77427, or GRP blocking antibody 2A11, before exposure to ozone or OVA challenge. In both models, GRP blockade abrogated AHR and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) macrophages and granulocytes, and decreased BAL cytokines implicated in asthma, including those typically derived from Th1 (e.g., IL-2, TNFα), Th2 (e.g., IL-5, IL-13), Th17 (IL-17), macrophages (e.g., MCP-1, IL-1), and neutrophils (KC = IL-8). Dexamethasone generally had smaller effects on all parameters. Macrophages, T cells, and neutrophils express GRP receptor (GRPR). GRP blockade diminished serine phosphorylation of GRPR with ozone or OVA. Thus, GRP mediates AHR and airway inflammation in mice, suggesting that GRP blockade is promising as a broad-spectrum therapeutic approach to treat and/or prevent asthma in humans. PMID:21252304

  8. Gastrin-releasing peptide expression and its effect on the calcification of developing mouse incisor.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong-Joon; Jin, Chengri; Kim, Eun-Jung; Lee, Jong-Min; Jung, Han-Sung

    2015-09-01

    Gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) is considered to be one of the cancer growth factors. This peptide's receptor (GRPR) is known as a G protein-coupled receptor, regulating intracellular calcium storage and releasing signals. This study is the first to investigate the function of GRP during mouse incisor development. We hypothesized that GRP is one of the factors that affects the regulation of calcification during tooth development. To verify the expression pattern of GRP, in situ hybridization was processed during incisor development. GRP was expressed at the late bell stage and hard tissue formation stage in the epithelial tissue. To identify the genuine function of GRP during incisor development, a gain-of-function analysis was performed. After GRP overexpression in culture, the phenotype of ameloblasts, odontoblasts and predentin was altered compared to control group. Moreover, enamel and dentin thickness was increased after renal capsule transplantation of GRP-overexpressed incisors. With these results, we suggest that GRP plays a significant role in the formation of enamel and dentin by regulating ameloblasts and predentin formation, respectively. Thus, GRP signaling is strongly related to calcium acquisition and secretion during mouse incisor development.

  9. Gastrin-releasing peptide receptor as a molecular target for psychiatric and neurological disorders.

    PubMed

    Roesler, R; Henriques, J A P; Schwartsmann, G

    2006-04-01

    The mammalian bombesin (BB)-like peptide gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) stimulates cell proliferation, displays a range of neuroendocrine activities, and acts as a growth factor in the pathogenesis of several types of human cancer. Several lines of evidence have indicated that GRP and its receptor (GRPR) might also be involved in the neurochemical alterations associated with psychiatric and neurological disorders. GRP and GRPR are distributed throughout the mammalian central nervous system (CNS). Altered levels of BB-like peptides have been found in the CNS of patients with schizophrenia and Parkinson's disease. Dysfunctions in GRPR-induced cellular calcium signaling have been reported in fibroblasts from patients with Alzheimer's disease. A translocation in the GRPR gene has been associated with autism. Pharmacological and genetic studies in rodents have shown that GRPRs in brain areas such as the dorsal hippocampus and amygdala are importantly involved in regulating synaptic plasticity and aspects of behavior that might be altered in disorders such as anxiety, schizophrenia, depression, autism and dementia. Behaviors modulated by the GRPR in rodents include grooming, food intake, stereotypy, social behavior, and emotionally-motivated learning and memory. Together, these findings support the view that the GRPR should be considered a therapeutic target for a subset of CNS diseases.

  10. Progress in developing cholecystokinin (CCK)/gastrin receptor ligands which have therapeutic potential

    PubMed Central

    Berna, Marc J.; Tapia, Jose A.; Sancho, Veronica; Jensen, Robert T.

    2007-01-01

    Summary Gastrin and CCK are two of the oldest hormones and within the last 15 years there has been an exponential increase in knowledge of their pharmacology, cell biology, receptors (CCK1R, CCK2R) and roles in physiology and pathological conditions. Despite these advances there is no approved disease indication for CCK receptor antagonists and only minor use of agonists. In this review the important factors determining this slow therapeutic development are reviewed. To assess this it is necessary to briefly review what is known about the roles of CCK receptors (CCK1R, CCK2R) in normal human physiology, their role in pathologic conditions, the selectivity of available potent CCKR agonists/antagonists as well as review their use in human conditions to date and the results. Despite extensive studies in animals and some in humans, recent studies suggest that monotherapy with CCK1R agonists will not be effective in obesity, nor CCK2R antagonists in panic disorders or CCK2R antagonists to inhibit growth of pancreatic cancer. Areas that require more study include the use of CCK2R agonists for imaging tumors and radiotherapy, CCK2R antagonists in hypergastrinemic states especially with long term PPI use and for potentiation of analgesia as well as use of CCK1R antagonists for a number of gastrointestinal disorders [motility disorders (irritable bowel syndrome, dyspepsia, constipation) and pancreatitis (acute, chronic)]. PMID:17997137

  11. Obese and lean Zucker rats respond similarly to intraperitoneal administration of gastrin-releasing peptides.

    PubMed

    Washington, Martha C; Park, Karen H; Sayegh, Ayman I

    2014-08-01

    The Zucker rat is an animal model used to study obesity and the control of food intake by various satiety peptides. The amphibian peptide bombesin (Bn) reduces cumulative food intake similarly in both obese and lean weanling Zucker rats. Here, we hypothesized that intraperitoneal (i.p) administration of gastrin-releasing peptides-10, -27 and -29 (GRP-10, GRP-27, GRP-29), which are the mammalian forms of Bn, would reduce first meal size (MS, 10% sucrose) and prolong the intermeal interval (IMI, time between first and second meals) similarly in obese and lean adult Zucker rats. To test this hypothesis, we administered GRP-10, GRP-27 and GRP-29 (0, 2.1, 4.1 and 10.3 nmol/kg) i.p. to obese and lean male Zucker rats (who were deprived of overnight food but not water) and then measured the first and second MS, IMI and satiety ratio (SR, IMI/MS). We found that in both obese and lean rats, all forms of GRP reduced the first MS, and in lean rats, they also decreased the second MS. Additionally, GRP-10 and GRP-29 prolonged the IMI in both obese and lean rats, but GRP-27 only prolonged it in lean rats. Finally, we found that all forms of GRP increased the SR in both obese and lean rats. In agreement with our hypothesis, we conclude that all forms of GRP reduce food intake in obese and lean adult Zucker rats similar to Bn in weanling rats.

  12. Imaging of skull base tumours.

    PubMed

    Thust, Stefanie Catherine; Yousry, Tarek

    2016-01-01

    The skull base is a highly complex and difficult to access anatomical region, which constitutes a relatively common site for neoplasms. Imaging plays a central role in establishing the differential diagnosis, to determine the anatomic tumour spread and for operative planning. All skull base imaging should be performed using thin-section multiplanar imaging, whereby CT and MRI can be considered complimentary. An interdisciplinary team approach is central to improve the outcome of these challenging tumours.

  13. Prognostic value of platelet derived growth factor α receptor expression in grade 2 astrocytomas and oligoastrocytomas

    PubMed Central

    Ribom, D; Andrae, J; Frielingsdorf, M; Hartman, M; Nister, M; Smits, A

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether the expression of platelet derived growth factor α receptor (PDGFRα) in low grade astrocytomas and oligoastrocytomas is associated with survival. Methods: Formalin fixed and paraffin embedded tumour samples of 40 consecutive patients with supratentorial diffuse astrocytomas and oligoastrocytomas of WHO grade 2, resected between 1986 and 1993, were used for immunohistochemical staining. The fraction of tumour cells expressing PDGFRα protein was quantified and entered into univariate and multivariate survival analyses. Changes in PDGFα expression over time were analysed in seven patients in whom reoperations had been performed. Results: Patients with a relatively high fraction of PDGFRα expressing cells had a more favourable outcome in both univariate (p = 0.04) and multivariate analyses (p = 0.02). Expression of PDGFRα was greater in oligoastrocytomas than in astrocytomas (p = 0.05). In four reoperated patients with histologically confirmed malignant transformation, there was a marked decrease in the number of cells expressing the receptor. Conclusions: There is an association between high PDGFRα expression and long survival time in patients with grade 2 astrocytomas and oligoastrocytomas. The findings suggest that expression of the receptor may be a useful prognostic marker in such patients. PMID:12023424

  14. Neuronal merlin influences ERBB2 receptor expression on Schwann cells through neuregulin 1 type III signalling

    PubMed Central

    Schulz, Alexander; Kyselyova, Anna; Baader, Stephan L.; Jung, Marie Juliane; Zoch, Ansgar; Mautner, Victor-Felix

    2014-01-01

    Axonal surface proteins encompass a group of heterogeneous molecules, which exert a variety of different functions in the highly interdependent relationship between axons and Schwann cells. We recently revealed that the tumour suppressor protein merlin, mutated in the hereditary tumour syndrome neurofibromatosis type 2, impacts significantly on axon structure maintenance in the peripheral nervous system. We now report on a role of neuronal merlin in the regulation of the axonal surface protein neuregulin 1 important for modulating Schwann cell differentiation and myelination. Specifically, neuregulin 1 type III expression is reduced in sciatic nerve tissue of neuron-specific knockout animals as well as in biopsies from seven patients with neurofibromatosis type 2. In vitro experiments performed on both the P19 neuronal cell line and primary dorsal root ganglion cells demonstrate the influence of merlin on neuregulin 1 type III expression. Moreover, expression of ERBB2, a Schwann cell receptor for neuregulin 1 ligands is increased in nerve tissue of both neuron-specific merlin knockout animals and patients with neurofibromatosis type 2, demonstrating for the first time that axonal merlin indirectly regulates Schwann cell behaviour. Collectively, we have identified that neuronally expressed merlin can influence Schwann cell activity in a cell-extrinsic manner. PMID:24309211

  15. MRI characteristics of midbrain tumours.

    PubMed

    Sun, B; Wang, C C; Wang, J

    1999-03-01

    We diagnosed 60 cases of midbrain tumours by MRI between 1993 to 1997. There were 39 males and 21 females, aged 2-64 years, mean 25.6 years. We found 38 patients with true intramedullary mid-brain tumours, 11 predominantly in the tectum, 20 in the tegmentum and 7 with a downward extension to the pons; there were 7 within the cerebral aqueduct. There were 22 patients with infiltrating midbrain tumours extending from adjacent structures, 11 cases each from the thalamus and pineal region. All patients received surgical treatment. Gross total resection was achieved in 42 cases, subtotal (> 75 %) resection in 18. Pathological diagnoses included 16 low-grade and 15 high-grade astrocytomas; 5 oligodendroastrocytomas; 2 ependymomas; 11 glioblastomas; and 11 pineal parenchymal or germ-cell tumours. Midbrain tumours are a heterogeneous group of neoplasms, with wide variation in clinical and MRI features, related to the site and type of tumour. MRI not only allows precise analysis of their growth pattern, but also can lead to a correct preoperative diagnosis in the majority of cases.

  16. Therapy-induced tumour secretomes promote resistance and tumour progression

    PubMed Central

    Obenauf, Anna C.; Zou, Yilong; Ji, Andrew L.; Vanharanta, Sakari; Shu, Weiping; Shi, Hubing; Kong, Xiangju; Bosenberg, Marcus C.; Wiesner, Thomas; Rosen, Neal; Lo, Roger S.; Massagué, Joan

    2015-01-01

    Drug resistance invariably limits the clinical efficacy of targeted therapy with kinase inhibitors against cancer1,2. Here we show that targeted therapy with BRAF, ALK, or EGFR kinase inhibitors induces a complex network of secreted signals in drug-stressed melanoma and lung adenocarcinoma cells. This therapy-induced secretome (TIS) stimulates the outgrowth, dissemination, and metastasis of drug-resistant cancer cell clones and supports the survival of drug-sensitive cancer cells, contributing to incomplete tumour regression. The vemurafenib reactive secretome in melanoma is driven by down-regulation of the transcription factor FRA1. In situ transcriptome analysis of drug-resistant melanoma cells responding to the regressing tumour microenvironment revealed hyperactivation of multiple signalling pathways, most prominently the AKT pathway. Dual inhibition of RAF and PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathways blunted the outgrowth of the drug-resistant cell population in BRAF mutant melanoma tumours, suggesting this combination therapy as a strategy against tumour relapse. Thus, therapeutic inhibition of oncogenic drivers induces vast secretome changes in drug-sensitive cancer cells, paradoxically establishing a tumour microenvironment that supports the expansion of drug-resistant clones, but is susceptible to combination therapy. PMID:25807485

  17. Multiple tumours in survival estimates.

    PubMed

    Rosso, Stefano; De Angelis, Roberta; Ciccolallo, Laura; Carrani, Eugenio; Soerjomataram, Isabelle; Grande, Enrico; Zigon, Giulia; Brenner, Hermann

    2009-04-01

    In international comparisons of cancer registry based survival it is common practice to restrict the analysis to first primary tumours and exclude multiple cancers. The probability of correctly detecting subsequent cancers depends on the registry's running time, which results in different proportions of excluded patients and may lead to biased comparisons. We evaluated the impact on the age-standardised relative survival estimates of also including multiple primary tumours. Data from 2,919,023 malignant cancers from 69 European cancer registries participating in the EUROCARE-4 collaborative study were used. A total of 183,683 multiple primary tumours were found, with an overall proportion of 6.3% over all the considered cancers, ranging from 0.4% (Naples, Italy) to 12.9% (Iceland). The proportion of multiple tumours varied greatly by type of tumour, being higher for those with high incidence and long survival (breast, prostate and colon-rectum). Five-year relative survival was lower when including patients with multiple cancers. For all cancers combined the average difference was -0.4 percentage points in women and -0.7 percentage points in men, and was greater for older registries. Inclusion of multiple tumours led to lower survival in 44 out of 45 cancer sites analysed, with the greatest differences found for larynx (-1.9%), oropharynx (-1.5%), and penis (-1.3%). Including multiple primary tumours in survival estimates for international comparison is advisable because it reduces the bias due to different observation periods, age, registration quality and completeness of registration. The general effect of inclusion is to reduce survival estimates by a variable amount depending on the proportion of multiple primaries and cancer site.

  18. A comparison of the effects of gastrin, somatostatin and dopamine receptor ligands on rat gastric enterochromaffin-like cell secretion and proliferation.

    PubMed

    Kidd, M; Modlin, I M; Black, J W; Boyce, M; Culler, M

    2007-10-01

    Gastrin regulates ECL cell histamine release and is a critical determinant of acid secretion. ECL cell secretion and proliferation is inhibited by gastrin antagonists and somatostatin but little is known about the role of dopamine agonists in this process. Since the ECL cell exhibits all three classes of receptor we evaluated and compared the effects of the gastrin receptor antagonist, (YF476), lanreotide (SST agonist) and novel dopaminergic agents (BIM53061 and BIM27A760) on ECL cell histamine secretion and proliferation. Highly enriched (>98%) ECL cell preparations prepared from rat gastric mucosa using a FACS approach were studied. Real-time PCR confirmed presence of the CCK2, SS2 and SS5 and D1 receptors on ECL cells. YF476 inhibited histamine secretion and proliferation with IC(50)s of 1.25 nM and 1.3 x 10(-11) M respectively, values 10-1000x more potent than L365,260. Lanreotide inhibited secretion and proliferation (2.2 nM, 1.9 x 10(-10) M) and increased YF476-inhibited proliferation a further 5-fold. The dopamine agonist, BIM53061, inhibited gastrin-mediated ECL cell secretion and proliferation (17 nM, 6 x 10(-10) M) as did the novel dopamine/somatostatin chimera BIM23A760 (22 nM, 4.9 x 10(-10) M). Our studies demonstrate that the gastrin receptor antagonist, YF476, is the most potent inhibitor of ECL cell histamine secretion and proliferation. Lanreotide, a dopamine agonist and a dopamine/somatostatin chimera inhibited ECL cell function but were 10-1000x less potent than YF476. Agents that selectively target the CCK2 receptor may provide alternative therapeutic strategies for gastrin-mediated gastrointestinal cell secretion and proliferation such as evident in the hypergastrinemic gastric carcinoids associated with low acid states.

  19. Estrogen and progesterone receptor expression in neuroendocrine and related neurons of the pubertal female monkey hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Goldsmith, P C; Boggan, J E; Thind, K K

    1997-05-01

    in the suprachiasmatic nucleus and lateral hypothalamic area lacked retrograde labeling. These results identify the principal sites and subsets of NEU and related neurons which express ER and PR in the mid-pubertal female monkey hypothalamus. They appear to correlate well with known populations of steroid-sensitive NEU neurons present in these areas in adults. The data also suggest that functional patterns of ER and PR expression arise upon reactivation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis at puberty. The degrees of receptor expression and of nuclear translocation most likely reflect peripubertal changes in the levels of gonadal steroids. Taken together, these results provide important insights into the mechanisms and development of neuroendocrine control during the pubertal period in primates.

  20. Protein malnutrition up-regulates growth hormone receptor expression in rat splenic B lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Mejía-Naranjo, Wilson; Sánchez-Gomez, Myriam

    2004-12-01

    The reciprocal interaction between the endocrine and immune systems has been the subject of active research during the last decade, and an important body of evidence has accumulated supporting the role of the GH/IGF axis in immune function. More recently, the GH/IGF axis has been postulated as playing an important role in the modulation of stress conditions, such as catabolic stages, aging-related disorders, immunodeficient aids patients and malnutrition. Whether these effects are exerted through endocrine, autocrine or paracrine mechanisms remains to be determined for different immune cell types and tissues. The aim of the current study was to define which specific subsets of lymphocytes are the primary targets for GH action. In addition, the regulatory role of stress induced by protein restriction was investigated with respect to the relative distribution of GH receptor positive lymphoid cells. Normal growing rats were fed isocaloric diets with variable protein content (0, 4, 8, 12 and 20%) for a period of 14 days. The lymphoid cells were then separated from spleen, lymph nodes and peripheral blood lymphocytes. Flow cytometry analysis measured the binding characteristics of Fluos-rrGH to lymphocytes together with specific PE-labelled mAbs defining CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and B lymphocytes. The pattern of expression of the GH receptor differed among the lymphoid tissues and cell subsets. Spleen was the most responsive organ to protein deprivation with highest GH receptor expression in B lymphocytes, followed by CD4+ T cells. As the protein intake was decreased from 20% to 0%, the percentage of GHR positive cells increased from 12% to 52% in splenic B lymphocytes and from 8% to 17% in CD4+ T cells. In contrast, only 10%-13% of lymphocytes in lymph nodes and 2%-4% in circulation, showed binding sites to GH associated with protein deprivation. In conclusion, the increase in GH receptors on lymphocytes under catabolic stress induced by protein malnutrition gives support

  1. Different characteristics of AMPA receptor agonists acting at AMPA receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes.

    PubMed

    Wahl, P; Madsen, U; Banke, T; Krogsgaard-Larsen, P; Schousboe, A

    1996-07-18

    A series of (RS)-2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolyl)propionic acid (AMPA) analogues were evaluated for activity at homo-oligomeric glutamate1-flop (Glu1-flop) receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes, using the two-electrode voltage clamp technique. (RS)-2-Amino-3-(3-carboxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolyl)propionic acid (ACPA) (EC50, 2.4 microM), a homologue of AMPA having a carboxyl group as the terminal acidic functionality, was five times more potent than AMPA (EC50, 12 microM) and 20 times more potent than kainate (EC50, 46 microM). (RS)-2-Amino-3(3-hydroxy-5-trifluoromethyl-4-isoxazolyl)propionic acid (Tri-F-AMPA), in which an electronegative trifluoromethyl group is substituted for the methyl group on the isoxazole ring in the AMPA structure, was three times more potent than AMPA, whereas (RS)-3-hydroxy-4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo[5,4-c]pyridine-5-carboxylic acid (5-HPCA), a bicyclic analogue of AMPA with highly restricted conformational flexibility was 10 times less potent than AMPA. The limiting slope of log-log plots of Glu1-flop receptor currents versus low agonist concentrations had a value of 1.7 for ACPA and kainate compared to 1.5 for Tri-F-AMPA and 1.3 for 5-HPCA and AMPA. The amplitude of responses evoked by near saturating concentrations of the agonists varied more than 7-fold. The sequence of efficacy was ACPA = kainate > Tri-F-AMPA > AMPA > 5-HPCA. Moreover, when saturating concentrations of Tri-F-AMPA and kainate were co-applied, the response was significantly greater than when each of the agonists was applied separately. The potency of the antagonist 2,3-dihydroxy-6-nitro-7-sulfamoylbenzo(f)quinoxaline (NBQX) (estimated KB, approximately 200 nM), to block currents mediated by Glu1-flop receptors was similar for all of the agonists tested in this study. These results indicate that relatively minor changes in the molecular structure of AMPA are associated with marked effects on potency and efficacy. In particular, it is suggested that the acidity of

  2. Silencing of ghrelin receptor expression inhibits endometrial cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Fung, Jenny N T; Jeffery, Penny L; Lee, John D; Seim, Inge; Roche, Deborah; Obermair, Andreas; Chopin, Lisa K; Chen, Chen

    2013-07-15

    Ghrelin is a 28-amino acid peptide hormone produced predominantly in the stomach but also in a range of normal cell types and tumors, where it has endocrine, paracrine, and autocrine roles. Previously, we have demonstrated that ghrelin has proliferative and antiapoptotic effects in endometrial cancer cell lines, suggesting a potential role in promoting tumor growth. In the present study, we investigated the effect of ghrelin receptor, GHSR, and gene silencing in vitro and in vivo and characterized ghrelin and GHSR1a protein expression in human endometrial tumors. GHSR gene silencing was achieved in the Ishikawa and KLE endometrial cancer cell lines, using a lentiviral short-hairpin RNA targeting GHSR. The effects of GHSR1a knockdown were further analyzed in vivo using the Ishikawa cell line in a NOD/SCID xenograft model. Cell proliferation was reduced in cultured GHSR1a knockdown Ishikawa and KLE cells compared with scrambled controls in the absence of exogenously applied ghrelin and in response to exogenous ghrelin (1,000 nM). The tumor volumes were reduced significantly in GHSR1a knockdown Ishikawa mouse xenograft tumors compared with scrambled control tumours. Using immunohistochemistry, we demonstrated that ghrelin and GHSR1a are expressed in benign and cancerous glands in human endometrial tissue specimens, although there was no correlation between the intensity of staining and cancer grade. These data indicate that downregulation of GHSR expression significantly inhibits endometrial cancer cell line and mouse xenograft tumour growth. This is the first preclinical evidence that downregulation of GHSR may be therapeutic in endometrial cancer.

  3. Comparison of cimetidine and ranitidine on 24-hour intragastric acidity and serum gastrin profile in patients with esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Mahachai, V; Walker, K; Thomson, A B; Zuk, L; Kirdeikis, P; Fisher, D; Brunet, K

    1985-04-01

    Twenty-four-hour intragastric pH and serum gastrin profiles were monitored in six male asymptomatic patients who previously were found to have esophagitis on endoscopy and biopsy. They received cimetidine 300 mg qid (C), ranitidine 150 mg bid (R), or placebo (P) for one week each, utilizing the Latin-square design. The mean BAO was 0.4 +/- 0.2 mmol/hr, and the pentagastrin-stimulated MAO was 21.2 +/- 3.2 mmol/hr. In the P-treated patients, the pH fluctuated between 1.8 and 3.5 and over 90% of the readings were less than pH 4. As compared to P, both C and R significantly suppressed H+ after breakfast, overnight, and over the 24-hr period. The mean pH after lunch was significantly higher in R than in P, but not in C. Over the 24-hr period, a higher percentage of the readings were above pH 4.0 in R as compared to C. During the night, 50% of the pH readings were above pH 4.0 in C and R, whereas in P 50% of the pH readings were less than pH 2.0. The integrated gastrin responses after each meal were similar in C and R and were greater than in P. The biphasic response of the ratio of H+ and gastrin (H+/G) following each meal was suppressed by both H2-receptor antagonists, with numerically lower values obtained in R than in C. This study suggests that ranitidine 150 mg bid is superior to cimetidine 300 mg qid in suppressing the 24-hr intragastric acidity.

  4. Tenascin in salivary gland tumours.

    PubMed

    Soini, Y; Pääkkö, P; Virtanen, I; Lehto, V P

    1992-01-01

    The distribution of tenascin immunoreactivity was analysed in salivary gland tissue and in various benign and malignant tumours of the salivary gland. In the non-neoplastic tissue, tenascin was seen in the areas of basement membranes of the ductal epithelium. No immunoreactivity could be observed in the serous or mucous glands. In pleomorphic adenomas, tenascin immunoreactivity could be seen in the stromal compartment. It was more pronounced in the dense stromal areas and chondroid elements than in the myxoid area. In Warthin's tumours, strong tenascin immunoreactivity could be observed in the basement membrane zone of the epithelial component. In the lymphatic component, faint reticular staining could be seen. In adenoid cystic carcinomas, acinic cell tumours and mucoepidermoid carcinomas, tenascin showed a linear stromal distribution. No intracytoplasmic immunoreactivity could be seen in any of the cases. The widespread tenascin positivity in salivary gland tumours suggests that tenascin may play a role in the induction and progression of salivary gland tumours, presumably by interfering with the normal parenchymal-mesenchymal interaction.

  5. Tuberculosis simulating brain tumour.

    PubMed

    Chaudhry, U R; Farooq, M; Rauf, F; Bhatti, S K

    2011-06-30

    The purpose of the study is to highlight the varied presentation of tuberculosis (TB) simulating a brain tumour. Headache and seizures are becoming frequent presenting complaints without any history of tuberculosis. The study comprises 1200 patients of both sexes with ages ranging from ten to sixty years. CT scan and MRI brain control with and without contrast medium were the investigations performed in these cases. In some patients Electroencephalography (EEG), cerebral angiography (DSA) and spectroscopy were also performed. The final diagnosis of tuberculosis was made on the basis of craniotomy, stereotactic and burr hole biopsies with histopathology in most of the cases. Forty per cent of the patients were followed up for eight months. They were put on anti-tuberculosis treatment with symptomatic and anti-epileptic drugs. The incidence was 544 and 757 per 100,000 in Africa and Indo Pakistan respectively. The male to female ratio was 1:1. Tuberculosis, especially with CNS involvement, is not only common in immunosuppressed patients in our setting, but TB has been and remains an important public health problem. TB may involve the CNS either as meningitis or as parenchymal granulomas or abscesses. Patients with brain TB usually present with fever, multiple cranial nerve involvement and occasional behavioural changes. CSF findings remain non specific in most cases. The most common sites are the cerebral hemisphere and basal ganglion in adults and the cerebellum in children. Tuberculosis has unique findings on brain CT and MRI. Cortical and subcortical locations are typical whereas the brain stem is a less common site. Tuberculosis lesions are usually solitary but multiple in 10% to 35% of cases. In spite of all these facts some cases of brain TB still need aggressive neurointervention to reach the final diagnosis of brain TB. Tuberculosis in the CNS may manifest in many different ways. So one should always include tuberculosis in the differential diagnosis in the

  6. Metastatic islet cell tumor with ACTH, gastrin, and glucagon secretion. Clinical and pathologic studies with multiple therapies.

    PubMed

    Lokich, J; Bothe, A; O'Hara, C; Federman, M

    1987-06-15

    A patient with metastatic islet cell carcinoma demonstrated multiple clinical syndromes simultaneously with secretion of ACTH, gastrin, glucagon, and serotonin. Hepatic arterial embolization resulted in an initial decrease in all secretory products, which was sustained for glucagon and serotonin. Recrudescence of the Cushings and Zollinger-Ellison syndrome was managed by surgical extirpation of the primary tumor and regional metastases as well as bilateral adrenalectomy. Electron microscopy and immunocytochemistry of the primary tumor and the metastatic lesions revealed the presence of multiple types of granules within single cells and, different patterns of secretory profiles in different tumor sites.

  7. Central ventilatory and cardiovascular actions of trout gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) in the unanesthetized trout

    PubMed Central

    Le Mével, Jean-Claude; Lancien, Frédéric; Mimassi, Nagi; Kermorgant, Marc; Conlon, J. Michael

    2013-01-01

    Summary Gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP), a neuropeptide initially isolated from porcine stomach, shares sequence similarity with bombesin. GRP and its receptors are present in the brains and peripheral tissues of several species of teleost fish, but little is known about the ventilatory and cardiovascular effects of this peptide in these vertebrates. The goal of this study was to compare the central and peripheral actions of picomolar doses of trout GRP on ventilatory and cardiovascular variables in the unanesthetized rainbow trout. Compared to vehicle, intracerebroventricular (ICV) injection of GRP (1–50 pmol) significantly elevated the ventilation rate (ƒV) and the ventilation amplitude (VAMP), and consequently the total ventilation (VTOT). The maximum hyperventilatory effect of GRP (VTOT: +225%), observed at a dose of 50 pmol, was mostly due to its stimulatory action on VAMP (+170%) rather than ƒV (+20%). In addition, ICV GRP (50 pmol) produced a significant increase in mean dorsal aortic blood pressure (PDA) (+35%) and in heart rate (ƒH) (+25%). Intra-arterial injections of GRP (5–100 pmol) were without sustained effect on the ventilatory variables but produced sporadic and transient increases in ventilatory movement at doses of 50 and 100 pmol. At these doses, GRP elevated PDA by +20% but only the 50 pmol dose significantly increased HR (+15%). In conclusion, our study suggests that endogenous GRP within the brain of the trout may act as a potent neurotransmitter and/or neuromodulator in the regulation of cardio-ventilatory functions. In the periphery, endogenous GRP may act as locally-acting and/or circulating neurohormone with an involvement in vasoregulatory mechanisms. PMID:24143283

  8. Gastrin-releasing peptide contributes to the regulation of adult hippocampal neurogenesis and neuronal development.

    PubMed

    Walton, Noah M; de Koning, Anoek; Xie, Xiuyuan; Shin, Rick; Chen, Qian; Miyake, Shinichi; Tajinda, Katsunori; Gross, Adam K; Kogan, Jeffrey H; Heusner, Carrie L; Tamura, Kouichi; Matsumoto, Mitsuyuki

    2014-09-01

    In the postnatal hippocampus, newly generated neurons contribute to learning and memory. Disruptions in neurogenesis and neuronal development have been linked to cognitive impairment and are implicated in a broad variety of neurological and psychiatric disorders. To identify putative factors involved in this process, we examined hippocampal gene expression alterations in mice possessing a heterozygous knockout of the calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II alpha heterozygous knockout gene (CaMK2α-hKO), an established model of cognitive impairment that also displays altered neurogenesis and neuronal development. Using this approach, we identified gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) as the most dysregulated gene. In wild-type mice, GRP labels NeuN-positive neurons, the lone exception being GRP-positive, NeuN-negative cells in the subgranular zone, suggesting GRP expression may be relevant to neurogenesis and/or neuronal development. Using a model of in vitro hippocampal neurogenesis, we determined that GRP signaling is essential for the continued survival and development of newborn neurons, both of which are blocked by transient knockdown of GRP's cognate receptor (GRPR). Furthermore, GRP appears to negatively regulate neurogenesis-associated proliferation in neural stem cells both in vitro and in vivo. Intracerebroventricular infusion of GRP resulted in a decrease in immature neuronal markers, increased cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) phosphorylation, and decreased neurogenesis. Despite increased levels of GRP mRNA, CaMK2α-hKO mutant mice expressed reduced levels of GRP peptide. This lack of GRP may contribute to the elevated neurogenesis and impaired neuronal development, which are reversed following exogenous GRP infusion. Based on these findings, we hypothesize that GRP modulates neurogenesis and neuronal development and may contribute to hippocampus-associated cognitive impairment.

  9. Posttranslational processing of endogenous and of baculovirus-expressed human gastrin-releasing peptide precursor.

    PubMed Central

    Lebacq-Verheyden, A M; Kasprzyk, P G; Raum, M G; Van Wyke Coelingh, K; Lebacq, J A; Battey, J F

    1988-01-01

    The 27-amino-acid gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP1-27) is a neuropeptide and growth factor that is synthesized by various neural and neuroendocrine cells. The major pro-GRP hormone (isoform I) contains both GRP1-27 and a novel C-terminal extension peptide termed pro-GRP31-125. In order to define potentially active neuropeptides that could be generated from this novel protein domain, we analyzed the posttranslational processing of endogenous human pro-GRP1-125 in a small-cell lung cancer cell line. Because such studies are much easier in an overexpression system, we investigated at the same time the posttranslational processing of baculovirus-expressed human pro-GRP1-125 in an insect ovary cell line. In the small-cell lung cancer cell line, GRP1-27 was cleaved as expected from the endogenous prohormone at a pair of basic amino acids (29 and 30) and alpha-amidated at its C-terminal methionine; however, a number of novel peptides were generated by additional cleavages in the pro-GRP31-125 domain. In the insect ovary cell line, GRP1-27 was cleaved from the expressed prohormone by a different mechanism, as were a number of other peptides that appeared to be similar in size to those produced by the human neuroendocrine tumor cell line. These data show for the first time that an insect ovary cell line that is widely used to overexpress proteins can process a human neuropeptide precursor. They also reveal the existence of novel pro-GRP-derived peptides that are candidates for biologically active ligands. Images PMID:3211139

  10. Gastrin releasing peptide-29 requires vagal and splanchnic neurons to evoke satiation and satiety.

    PubMed

    Wright, Susan A; Washington, Martha C; Garcia, Carlos; Sayegh, Ayman I

    2012-01-01

    We have shown that gastrin-releasing peptide-29 (GRP-29), the large molecular form of GRP in rats, reduces meal size (MS, intake of 10% sucrose solution) and prolongs the intermeal interval (IMI). In these studies, we first investigated possible pathways for these responses in rats undergoing total subdiaphragmatic vagotomy (VGX, removal of vagal afferent and efferent innervation of the gut), celiaco-mesenteric ganglionectomy (CMGX, removal of splanchnic afferent and efferent innervation of the gut) and combined VGX and CMGX. Second, we examined if the duodenum communicates the feeding signals (MS and IMI) of GRP-29 (0, 0.3, 1.0, 2.1, 4.1, 10.3 and 17.2 nmol/kg) with the feeding control areas of the hindbrain by performing duodenal myotomy (MYO), a procedure that severs some layers of the duodenal wall including the vagal, splanchnic and enteric neurons. We found that GRP-29 (2.1, 4.1, 10.3, 17.2 nmol/kg) reduced the size of the first meal (10% sucrose) and (1, 4.1, 10.3 nmol/kg) prolongs the first IMI but did not affect the subsequent meals or IMIs. In addition, CMGX and combined VGX/CMGX attenuated reduction of MS by GRP-29 and all surgeries attenuated the prolongation of the IMI. Therefore, reduction of MS and prolongation of IMI by GRP-29 require vagal and splanchnic nerves, and the duodenum is the major conduit that communicates prolongation of IMI by GRP-29 with the brain. PMID:22210008

  11. Roles of sphincter of Oddi motility and serum vasoactive intestinal peptide, gastrin and cholecystokinin octapeptide

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhen-Hai; Qin, Cheng-Kun; Wu, Shuo-Dong; Xu, Jian; Cui, Xian-Ping; Wang, Zhi-Yi; Xian, Guo-Zhe

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate roles of sphincter of Oddi (SO) motility played in pigment gallbladder stone formation in model of guinea pigs. METHODS: Thirty-four adult male Hartley guinea pigs were divided randomly into two groups: the control group and pigment stone group. The pigment stone group was divided into 4 subgroups with 6 guinea pigs each according to time of sacrifice, and were fed a pigment lithogenic diet and sacrificed after 3, 6, 9 and 12 wk. SO manometry and recording of myoelectric activity of the guinea pigs were obtained by multifunctional physiograph at each stage. Serum vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), gastrin and cholecystokinin octapeptide (CCK-8) were detected at each stage in the process of pigment gallbladder stone formation by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. RESULTS: The incidence of pigment gallstone formation was 0%, 0%, 16.7% and 66.7% in the 3-, 6-, 9- and 12-wk group, respectively. The frequency of myoelectric activity decreased in the 3-wk group. The amplitude of myoelectric activity had a tendency to decrease but not significantly. The frequency of the SO decreased significantly in the 9-wk group. The SO basal pressure and common bile duct pressure increased in the 12-wk group (25.19 ± 7.77 mmHg vs 40.56 ± 11.81 mmHg, 22.35 ± 7.60 mmHg vs 38.51 ± 11.57 mmHg, P < 0.05). Serum VIP was significantly elevated in the 6- and 12-wk groups and serum CCK-8 was decreased significantly in the 12-wk group. CONCLUSION: Pigment gallstone-causing diet may induce SO dysfunction. The tension of the SO increased. The disturbance in SO motility may play a role in pigment gallstone formation, and changes in serum VIP and CCK-8 may be important causes of SO dysfunction. PMID:24782626

  12. Pitfalls in colour photography of choroidal tumours

    PubMed Central

    Schalenbourg, A; Zografos, L

    2013-01-01

    Colour imaging of fundus tumours has been transformed by the development of digital and confocal scanning laser photography. These advances provide numerous benefits, such as panoramic images, increased contrast, non-contact wide-angle imaging, non-mydriatic photography, and simultaneous angiography. False tumour colour representation can, however, cause serious diagnostic errors. Large choroidal tumours can be totally invisible on angiography. Pseudogrowth can occur because of artefacts caused by different methods of fundus illumination, movement of reference blood vessels, and flattening of Bruch's membrane and sclera when tumour regression occurs. Awareness of these pitfalls should prevent the clinician from misdiagnosing tumours and wrongfully concluding that a tumour has grown. PMID:23238442

  13. Pitfalls in colour photography of choroidal tumours.

    PubMed

    Schalenbourg, A; Zografos, L

    2013-02-01

    Colour imaging of fundus tumours has been transformed by the development of digital and confocal scanning laser photography. These advances provide numerous benefits, such as panoramic images, increased contrast, non-contact wide-angle imaging, non-mydriatic photography, and simultaneous angiography. False tumour colour representation can, however, cause serious diagnostic errors. Large choroidal tumours can be totally invisible on angiography. Pseudogrowth can occur because of artefacts caused by different methods of fundus illumination, movement of reference blood vessels, and flattening of Bruch's membrane and sclera when tumour regression occurs. Awareness of these pitfalls should prevent the clinician from misdiagnosing tumours and wrongfully concluding that a tumour has grown.

  14. Tumour endothelial cells in high metastatic tumours promote metastasis via epigenetic dysregulation of biglycan

    PubMed Central

    Maishi, Nako; Ohba, Yusuke; Akiyama, Kosuke; Ohga, Noritaka; Hamada, Jun-ichi; Nagao-Kitamoto, Hiroko; Alam, Mohammad Towfik; Yamamoto, Kazuyuki; Kawamoto, Taisuke; Inoue, Nobuo; Taketomi, Akinobu; Shindoh, Masanobu; Hida, Yasuhiro; Hida, Kyoko

    2016-01-01

    Tumour blood vessels are gateways for distant metastasis. Recent studies have revealed that tumour endothelial cells (TECs) demonstrate distinct phenotypes from their normal counterparts. We have demonstrated that features of TECs are different depending on tumour malignancy, suggesting that TECs communicate with surrounding tumour cells. However, the contribution of TECs to metastasis has not been elucidated. Here, we show that TECs actively promote tumour metastasis through a bidirectional interaction between tumour cells and TECs. Co-implantation of TECs isolated from highly metastatic tumours accelerated lung metastases of low metastatic tumours. Biglycan, a small leucine-rich repeat proteoglycan secreted from TECs, activated tumour cell migration via nuclear factor-κB and extracellular signal–regulated kinase 1/2. Biglycan expression was upregulated by DNA demethylation in TECs. Collectively, our results demonstrate that TECs are altered in their microenvironment and, in turn, instigate tumour cells to metastasize, which is a novel mechanism for tumour metastasis. PMID:27295191

  15. Tailored nanoparticles for tumour therapy.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Pei-Shin; Drake, Philip; Cho, Hui-Ju; Kao, Chao-Hung; Lee, Kun-Feng; Kuo, Chien-Hung; Lin, Xi-Zhang; Lin, Yuh-Jiuan

    2012-06-01

    Gd doped iron-oxide nanoparticles were developed for use in tumour therapy via magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH). The effect of the Gd3+ dopant on the particle size and magnetic properties was investigated. The final particle composition varied from Gd0.01Fe2.99O4 to Gd0.04Fe2.96O4 as determined by Inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). TEM image analysis showed the average magnetic core diameters to be 12 nm and 33 nm for the lowest and highest Gd levels respectively. The specific power adsorption rate (SAR) determined with a field strength of 246 Oe and 52 kHz had a maximum of 38Wg(-1) [Fe] for the Gd0.03Fe2.97O4 sample. This value is about 4 times higher than the reported SAR values for Fe3O4. The potential for in vivo tumour therapy was investigated using a mouse model. The mouse models treated with Gd0.02Fe2.98O4 displayed much slower tumour growth after the first treatment cycle, the tumour had increased its mass by 25% after 7 days post treatment compared to a 79% mass increase over the same period for those models treated with standard iron-oxide or saline solution. After a second treatment cycle the mouse treated with Gd0.02Fe2.98O4 showed complete tumour regression with no tumour found for at least 5 days post treatment. PMID:22905580

  16. Circadian integration of sleep-wake and feeding requires NPY receptor-expressing neurons in the mediobasal hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Wiater, M F; Mukherjee, S; Li, A-J; Dinh, T T; Rooney, E M; Simasko, S M; Ritter, S

    2011-11-01

    Sleep and feeding rhythms are highly coordinated across the circadian cycle, but the brain sites responsible for this coordination are unknown. We examined the role of neuropeptide Y (NPY) receptor-expressing neurons in the mediobasal hypothalamus (MBH) in this process by injecting the targeted toxin, NPY-saporin (NPY-SAP), into the arcuate nucleus (Arc). NPY-SAP-lesioned rats were initially hyperphagic, became obese, exhibited sustained disruption of circadian feeding patterns, and had abnormal circadian distribution of sleep-wake patterns. Total amounts of rapid eye movement sleep (REMS) and non-REMS (NREMS) were not altered by NPY-SAP lesions, but a peak amount of REMS was permanently displaced to the dark period, and circadian variation in NREMS was eliminated. The phase reversal of REMS to the dark period by the lesion suggests that REMS timing is independently linked to the function of MBH NPY receptor-expressing neurons and is not dependent on NREMS pattern, which was altered but not phase reversed by the lesion. Sleep-wake patterns were altered in controls by restricting feeding to the light period, but were not altered in NPY-SAP rats by restricting feeding to either the light or dark period, indicating that disturbed sleep-wake patterns in lesioned rats were not secondary to changes in food intake. Sleep abnormalities persisted even after hyperphagia abated during the static phase of the lesion. Results suggest that the MBH is required for the essential task of integrating sleep-wake and feeding rhythms, a function that allows animals to accommodate changeable patterns of food availability. NPY receptor-expressing neurons are key components of this integrative function.

  17. Phyllodes tumour in pregnancy: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Way, Jeffrey C.; Culham, Beverley A.

    1998-01-01

    Phyllodes tumour (cystosarcoma phyllodes) is a rare breast tumour that grows rapidly and to a relatively large size, especially during pregnancy. These tumours may be classified as benign, borderline or malignant. They have a high incidence of local recurrence but little tendency to metastasize to distant organs. The question of whether the tumour is hormone dependent remains unresolved. This report describes the case of a patient who had a phyllodes tumour that first became apparent in her 31st week of pregnancy. After enucleation and subsequent wide excision she remained tumour free through a second pregnancy. Although the follow-up period is short, it appears that subsequent pregnancy is not necessarily associated with recurrent or new disease for patients who have had their initial tumour completely excised. The goal for the management of these tumours is complete surgical excision. PMID:9793511

  18. The treatment of sublingual gland tumours.

    PubMed

    Sun, G; Yang, X; Tang, E; Wen, J; Lu, M; Hu, Q

    2010-09-01

    This study assessed the clinical and histological features and therapeutic efficacy of 25 cases of sublingual gland tumours from 1998 to 2008. There were 17 female patients and 8 male, the ratio of females to males was 2.1:1. The mean age was 48.6 years. 4 cases were benign tumours (16%). 21 cases were malignant sublingual gland tumours (84%) and of these, 18 were adenoid cystic carcinoma (86%). Adenoid cystic carcinoma was mainly of the histological type, and the other histological classifications included mucoepidermoid carcinoma, pleomorphic adenoma, myoepithelioma, oncocytoma and polymorphous low-grade adenocarcinoma. Sublingual gland tumours are rare and most are malignant. For malignant sublingual gland tumours, early diagnosis and aggressive surgical treatment, especially for tumours with nerve involvement, is the key to improving prognosis. Free radial forearm flap or pectoralis major myocutaneous flap are appropriate methods for mouth floor reconstruction. For benign sublingual gland tumours, the resection of tumour and sublingual gland is the preferred treatment.

  19. Relative distribution of gastrin-, CCK-8-, NPY- and CGRP-immunoreactive cells in the digestive tract of dorado (Salminus brasiliensis).

    PubMed

    Pereira, R T; Costa, L S; Oliveira, I R C; Araújo, J C; Aerts, M; Vigliano, F A; Rosa, P V

    2015-04-01

    The endocrine cells (ECs) of the gastrointestinal mucosa form the largest endocrine system in the body, not only in terms of cell numbers but also in terms of the different produced substances. Data describing the association between the relative distributions of the peptide-specific ECs in relation to feeding habits can be useful tools that enable the creation of a general expected pattern of EC distribution. We aimed to investigate the distribution of ECs immunoreactive for the peptides gastrin (GAS), cholecystokinin (CCK-8), neuropeptide Y (NPY), and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) in different segments of the digestive tract of carnivorous fish dorado (Salminus brasiliensis) by using immunohistochemistry procedures. The distribution of endocrine cells immunoreactive for gastrin (GAS), cholecystokinin (CCK-8), neuropeptide Y (NPY), and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) in digestive tract of dorado S. brasiliensis was examined by immunohistochemistry. The results describe the association between the distribution of the peptide-specific endocrine cells and feeding habits in different carnivorous fish. The largest number of endocrine cells immunoreactive for GAS, CCK-8, and CGRP were found in the pyloric stomach region and the pyloric caeca. However, NPY-immunoreactive endocrine cells were markedly restricted to the midgut. The distribution pattern of endocrine cells identified in S. brasiliensis is similar to that found in other carnivorous fishes.

  20. Critical evaluation of the expression of gastrin-releasing peptide in dorsal root ganglia and spinal cord

    PubMed Central

    Barry, Devin M; Li, Hui; Liu, Xian-Yu; Shen, Kai-Feng; Liu, Xue-Ting; Wu, Zhen-Yu; Munanairi, Admire; Chen, Xiao-Jun; Yin, Jun; Sun, Yan-Gang; Li, Yun-Qing

    2016-01-01

    There are substantial disagreements about the expression of gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) in sensory neurons and whether GRP antibody cross-reacts with substance P (SP). These concerns necessitate a critical revaluation of GRP expression using additional approaches. Here, we show that a widely used GRP antibody specifically recognizes GRP but not SP. In the spinal cord of mice lacking SP (Tac1 KO), the expression of not only GRP but also other peptides, notably neuropeptide Y (NPY), is significantly diminished. We detected Grp mRNA in dorsal root ganglias using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, in situ hybridization and RNA-seq. We demonstrated that Grp mRNA and protein are upregulated in dorsal root ganglias, but not in the spinal cord, of mice with chronic itch. Few GRP+ immunostaining signals were detected in spinal sections following dorsal rhizotomy and GRP+ cell bodies were not detected in dissociated dorsal horn neurons. Ultrastructural analysis further shows that substantially more GRPergic fibers form synaptic contacts with gastrin releasing peptide receptor-positive (GRPR+) neurons than SPergic fibers. Our comprehensive study demonstrates that a majority of GRPergic fibers are of primary afferent origin. A number of factors such as low copy number of Grp transcripts, small percentage of cells expressing Grp, and the use of an eGFP GENSAT transgenic as a surrogate for GRP protein have contributed to the controversy. Optimization of experimental procedures facilitates the specific detection of GRP expression in dorsal root ganglia neurons. PMID:27068287

  1. Multiple cilia suppress tumour formation.

    PubMed

    Eberhart, Charles

    2016-04-01

    Primary cilia are cellular structures that have important functions in development and disease. The suppression of multiciliate differentiation of choroid plexus precursors, and maintenance of a single primary cilium by Notch1, is now shown to be involved in choroid plexus tumour formation. PMID:27027488

  2. Mixed tumour of the vagina.

    PubMed

    Fukunaga, M; Endo, Y; Ishikawa, E; Ushigome, S

    1996-05-01

    A 33-year-old Japanese woman presented with a polypoid 2.5 x 2.5 x 1.9 cm mass located in the posterior wall of the lower vagina. Microscopically, the tumour was composed of benign epithelial and stromal-type elements. Predominant epithelial elements were mucinous glands with squamous metaplasia and islands of mature squamous epithelium. The stromal-type cells showed reticular or short fascicular patterns with a transition to the epithelial elements. There was no dual epithelial-myoepithelial combination in the glands as seen in so-called mixed tumours (pleomorphic adenomas) of the salivary gland. Immunohistochemically, the epithelial elements were strongly positive for cytokeratin, PKK1 and epithelial membrane antigen, while the stromal-type cells co-expressed PKK1 and vimentin. Staining for S-100 protein, muscle actin, alpha-smooth muscle actin, desmin, and CD34 was uniformly negative in the tumour cells. The DNA pattern was diploid. The patient is alive and well without recurrence for 50 months after excision. These results indicate that an epithelial cell proliferation, probably of the remnant vestibular gland, plays a major role in the development of mixed tumours of the vagina.

  3. Tumour vasculature--a potential therapeutic target.

    PubMed Central

    Baillie, C. T.; Winslet, M. C.; Bradley, N. J.

    1995-01-01

    The tumour vasculature is vital for the establishment, growth and metastasis of solid tumours. Its physiological properties limit the effectiveness of conventional anti-cancer strategies. Therapeutic approaches directed at the tumour vasculature are reviewed, suggesting the potential of anti-angiogenesis and the targeting of vascular proliferation antigens as cancer treatments. PMID:7543770

  4. Toll-Like Receptor 4 Wild Type Homozygozity of Polymorphisms +896 and +1196 Is Associated with High Gastrin Serum Levels and Peptic Ulcer Risk

    PubMed Central

    Pohjanen, Vesa-Matti; Koivurova, Olli-Pekka; Huhta, Heikki; Helminen, Olli; Mäkinen, Johanna M.; Karhukorpi, Jari M.; Joensuu, Tapio; Koistinen, Pentti O.; Valtonen, Jarno M.; Niemelä, Seppo E.; Karttunen, Riitta A.; Karttunen, Tuomo J.

    2015-01-01

    Toll-like receptor 4 is a part of the innate immune system and recognizes Helicobacter pylori lipopolysaccharide. The goal of this study was to analyze the role of Toll-like receptor 4 polymorphisms +896 (rs4986790) and +1196 (rs4986791) in the pathogenesis of Helicobacter pylori related gastroduodenal diseases in relation to gastric secretion and inflammation. Toll-like receptor 4 polymorphisms, serum gastrin-17 and pepsinogen I and II concentrations were determined, and gastroscopies with histopathological analyses were performed to 216 dyspeptic patients. As genotype controls, 179 controls and 61 gastric cancer patients were studied. In our study, the Toll-like receptor 4 +896 and +1196 polymorphisms were in total linkage disequilibrium. The homozygous wild types displayed higher gastrin-17 serum concentrations than the mutants (p = 0.001) and this effect was independent of Helicobacter pylori. The homozygous wild types also displayed an increased risk for peptic ulcers (OR: 4.390). Toll-like receptor 4 genotypes did not show any association with Helicobacter pylori positivity or the features of gastric inflammation. Toll-like receptor 4 expression was seen in gastrin and somatostatin expressing cells of antral mucosa by immunohistochemistry. Our results suggest a role for Toll-like receptor 4 in gastric acid regulation and that the Toll-like receptor 4 +896 and +1196 wild type homozygozity increases peptic ulcer risk via gastrin secretion. PMID:26161647

  5. TREM-2 Receptor Expression Increases with 25(OH)D Vitamin Serum Levels in Patients with Pulmonary Sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Bucova, Maria; Suchankova, Magda; Tibenska, Elena; Tedlova, Eva; Demian, Juraj; Majer, Ivan; Novosadova, Helena; Tedla, Miroslav

    2015-01-01

    TREM-1 and TREM-2 molecules are members of the TREM transmembrane glycoproteins. In our previous study we identified increased expressions of TREM-1 and TREM-2 receptors in pulmonary sarcoidosis (PS). Only a few studies concerning the association between vitamin D and TREM receptor expression can be found. The aim of our current study was to determine the association between the levels of an inactive form of 25(OH)D vitamin and TREM-1 and TREM-2 receptor expressions. We have detected low levels of 25(OH)D vitamin in 79% of PS patients. Only 21% of patients had normal serum level of 25(OH)D vitamin with values clustered within the low-normal range. The most striking findings were the increased TREM-2 expressions on myeloid cells surfaces in BALF of PS patients with normal 25(OH)D vitamin serum levels compared with those with its decreased levels. The total number of TREM-2 positive cells was 5.7 times higher and the percentage of TREM-2 positive cells was also significantly increased in BALF of PS patients with normal compared to PS patients with low 25(OH)D vitamin serum levels. A significant correlation between total TREM-2 expression and vitamin D levels has been detected too. However, we have not detected similar differences in TREM-1expression and 25(OH)D vitamin serum levels.

  6. TREM-2 Receptor Expression Increases with 25(OH)D Vitamin Serum Levels in Patients with Pulmonary Sarcoidosis

    PubMed Central

    Bucova, Maria; Suchankova, Magda; Tibenska, Elena; Tedlova, Eva; Demian, Juraj; Majer, Ivan; Novosadova, Helena; Tedla, Miroslav

    2015-01-01

    TREM-1 and TREM-2 molecules are members of the TREM transmembrane glycoproteins. In our previous study we identified increased expressions of TREM-1 and TREM-2 receptors in pulmonary sarcoidosis (PS). Only a few studies concerning the association between vitamin D and TREM receptor expression can be found. The aim of our current study was to determine the association between the levels of an inactive form of 25(OH)D vitamin and TREM-1 and TREM-2 receptor expressions. We have detected low levels of 25(OH)D vitamin in 79% of PS patients. Only 21% of patients had normal serum level of 25(OH)D vitamin with values clustered within the low-normal range. The most striking findings were the increased TREM-2 expressions on myeloid cells surfaces in BALF of PS patients with normal 25(OH)D vitamin serum levels compared with those with its decreased levels. The total number of TREM-2 positive cells was 5.7 times higher and the percentage of TREM-2 positive cells was also significantly increased in BALF of PS patients with normal compared to PS patients with low 25(OH)D vitamin serum levels. A significant correlation between total TREM-2 expression and vitamin D levels has been detected too. However, we have not detected similar differences in TREM-1expression and 25(OH)D vitamin serum levels. PMID:26166951

  7. TREM-2 Receptor Expression Increases with 25(OH)D Vitamin Serum Levels in Patients with Pulmonary Sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Bucova, Maria; Suchankova, Magda; Tibenska, Elena; Tedlova, Eva; Demian, Juraj; Majer, Ivan; Novosadova, Helena; Tedla, Miroslav

    2015-01-01

    TREM-1 and TREM-2 molecules are members of the TREM transmembrane glycoproteins. In our previous study we identified increased expressions of TREM-1 and TREM-2 receptors in pulmonary sarcoidosis (PS). Only a few studies concerning the association between vitamin D and TREM receptor expression can be found. The aim of our current study was to determine the association between the levels of an inactive form of 25(OH)D vitamin and TREM-1 and TREM-2 receptor expressions. We have detected low levels of 25(OH)D vitamin in 79% of PS patients. Only 21% of patients had normal serum level of 25(OH)D vitamin with values clustered within the low-normal range. The most striking findings were the increased TREM-2 expressions on myeloid cells surfaces in BALF of PS patients with normal 25(OH)D vitamin serum levels compared with those with its decreased levels. The total number of TREM-2 positive cells was 5.7 times higher and the percentage of TREM-2 positive cells was also significantly increased in BALF of PS patients with normal compared to PS patients with low 25(OH)D vitamin serum levels. A significant correlation between total TREM-2 expression and vitamin D levels has been detected too. However, we have not detected similar differences in TREM-1expression and 25(OH)D vitamin serum levels. PMID:26166951

  8. Cranial irradiation modulates hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activity and corticosteroid receptor expression in the hippocampus of juvenile rat.

    PubMed

    Velickovic, Natasa; Djordjevic, Ana; Drakulic, Dunja; Stanojevic, Ivana; Secerov, Bojana; Horvat, Anica

    2009-01-01

    Glucocorticoids, essential for normal hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activity, exert their action on the hippocampus through two types of corticosteroid receptors: the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) and the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR). Recent studies report that exposure of juvenile rats to cranial irradiation adversely affects HPA axis stability leading to its activation along with radiation- induced inflammation. This study was aimed to examine the acute effects of radiation on HPA axis activity and hippocampal corticosteroid receptor expression in 18-day-old rats. Since immobilization was part of irradiation procedure, both irradiated and sham-irradiated animals were exposed to this unavoidable stress. Our results demonstrate that the irradiated rats exhibited different pattern of corticosteroid receptor expression and hormone levels compared to respective controls. These differences included upregulation of GR protein in the hippocampus with a concomitant elevation of GR mRNA and an increase in circulating level of corticosterone. In addition, the expression of MR, both at the level of protein and gene expression, was not altered. Taken together, this study demonstrates that cranial irradiation in juvenile rats leads to enhanced HPA axis activity and increased relative GR/MR ratio in hippocampus. The present paper intends to show that neuroendocrine response of normal brain tissue to localized irradiation comprise both activation of HPA axis and altered corticosteroid receptor balance, probably as consequence of innate immune activation.

  9. Beta Cell Mass Restoration in Alloxan-Diabetic Mice Treated with EGF and Gastrin.

    PubMed

    Song, Imane; Patel, Oelfah; Himpe, Eddy; Muller, Christo J F; Bouwens, Luc

    2015-01-01

    One week of treatment with EGF and gastrin (EGF/G) was shown to restore normoglycemia and to induce islet regeneration in mice treated with the diabetogenic agent alloxan. The mechanisms underlying this regeneration are not fully understood. We performed genetic lineage tracing experiments to evaluate the contribution of beta cell neogenesis in this model. One day after alloxan administration, mice received EGF/G treatment for one week. The treatment could not prevent the initial alloxan-induced beta cell mass destruction, however it did reverse glycemia to control levels within one day, suggesting improved peripheral glucose uptake. In vitro experiments with C2C12 cell line showed that EGF could stimulate glucose uptake with an efficacy comparable to that of insulin. Subsequently, EGF/G treatment stimulated a 3-fold increase in beta cell mass, which was partially driven by neogenesis and beta cell proliferation as assessed by beta cell lineage tracing and BrdU-labeling experiments, respectively. Acinar cell lineage tracing failed to show an important contribution of acinar cells to the newly formed beta cells. No appearance of transitional cells co-expressing insulin and glucagon, a hallmark for alpha-to-beta cell conversion, was found, suggesting that alpha cells did not significantly contribute to the regeneration. An important fraction of the beta cells significantly lost insulin positivity after alloxan administration, which was restored to normal after one week of EGF/G treatment. Alloxan-only mice showed more pronounced beta cell neogenesis and proliferation, even though beta cell mass remained significantly depleted, suggesting ongoing beta cell death in that group. After one week, macrophage infiltration was significantly reduced in EGF/G-treated group compared to the alloxan-only group. Our results suggest that EGF/G-induced beta cell regeneration in alloxan-diabetic mice is driven by beta cell neogenesis, proliferation and recovery of insulin. The

  10. Mu opioid receptor expression is increased in inflammatory bowel diseases: implications for homeostatic intestinal inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Philippe, D; Chakass, D; Thuru, X; Zerbib, P; Tsicopoulos, A; Geboes, K; Bulois, P; Breisse, M; Vorng, H; Gay, J; Colombel, J‐F; Desreumaux, P; Chamaillard, M

    2006-01-01

    Background and aims Recent studies with μ opioid receptor (MOR) deficient mice support a physiological anti‐inflammatory effect of MOR at the colon interface. To better understand the potential pharmacological effect of certain opiates in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), we (1) evaluated the regulation in vivo and in vitro of human MOR expression by inflammation; and (2) tested the potential anti‐inflammatory function of a specific opiate (DALDA) in inflamed and resting human mucosa. Patients and methods Expression of MOR mRNA and protein was evaluated in healthy and inflamed small bowel and colonic tissues, isolated peripheral blood mononuclear cells and purified monocytes, and CD4+ and CD8+ T cells from healthy donors and IBD patients. The effect of cytokines and nuclear factor κB (NFκB) activation on MOR expression in lymphocyte T and monocytic human cell lines was assessed. Finally, DALDA induced anti‐inflammatory effect was investigated in mucosal explants from controls and IBD patients. Results MOR was expressed in ileal and colonic enteric neurones as well as in immunocytes such as myeloid cells and CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Overexpressed in active IBD mucosa, MOR was significantly enhanced by cytokines and repressed by NFκB inhibitor in myeloid and lymphocytic cell lines. Furthermore, ex vivo DALDA treatment dampened tumour necrosis factor α mRNA expression in the colon of active IBD patients. Conclusions Given the increased expression of MOR and the ex vivo beneficial effect of DALDA in active IBD, natural and/or synthetic opioid agonists could help to prevent overt pathological intestinal inflammation. PMID:16299031

  11. Androgen Receptor Expression in Early Triple-Negative Breast Cancer: Clinical Significance and Prognostic Associations

    PubMed Central

    Pistelli, Mirco; Caramanti, Miriam; Biscotti, Tommasina; Santinelli, Alfredo; Pagliacci, Alessandra; De Lisa, Mariagrazia; Ballatore, Zelmira; Ridolfi, Francesca; Maccaroni, Elena; Bracci, Raffaella; Berardi, Rossana; Battelli, Nicola; Cascinu, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    Background: Triple-negative breast cancers (TNBC) are characterized by aggressive tumour biology resulting in a poor prognosis. Androgen receptor (AR) is one of newly emerging biomarker in TNBC. In recent years, ARs have been demonstrated to play an important role in the genesis and in the development of breast cancer, although their prognostic role is still debated. In the present study, we explored the correlation of AR expression with clinical, pathological and molecular features and its impact on prognosis in early TNBC. Patients and Methods: ARs were considered positive in case of tumors with >10% nuclear-stained. Survival distribution was estimated by the Kaplan Meier method. The univariate and multivariate analyses were performed. The difference among variables were calculated by chi-square test. Results: 81 TNBC patients diagnosed between January 2006 and December 2011 were included in the analysis. Slides were stained immunohistochemically for estrogen and progesterone receptors, HER-2, Ki-67, ALDH1, e-cadherin and AR. Of the 81 TNBC samples, 18.8% showed positive immunostaining for AR, 23.5% and 44.4% of patients were negative for e-cadherin and ALDH1, respectively. Positive AR immunostaining was inversely correlated with a higher Ki-67 (p < 0.0001) and a lympho-vascular invasion (p = 0.01), but no other variables. Univariate survival analysis revealed that AR expression was not associated with disease-free survival (p = 0.72) or overall survival (p = 0.93). Conclusions: The expression of AR is associated with some biological features of TNBC, such as Ki-67 and lympho-vascular invasion; nevertheless the prognostic significance of AR was not documented in our analysis. However, since ARs are expressed in a significant number of TNBC, prospective studies in order to determine the biological mechanisms and their potential role as novel treatment target. PMID:24978437

  12. Somatostatin receptor expression and biological functions in endocrine pancreatic cells: review based on a doctoral thesis.

    PubMed

    Ludvigsen, Eva

    2007-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes is resulting from the selective destruction of insulin-producing betacells within the pancreatic islets. Somatostatin acts as an inhibitor of hormone secretion through specific receptors (sst1-5). All ssts were expressed in normal rat and mouse pancreatic islets, although the expression intensity and the co-expression pattern varied between ssts as well as between species. This may reflect a difference in response to somatostatin in islet cells of the two species. The Non-Obese Diabetic (NOD) mouse model is an experimental model of type 1 diabetes, with insulitis accompanied by spontaneous hyperglycaemia. Pancreatic specimens from NOD mice at different age and stage of disease were stained for ssts. The islet cells of diabetic NOD mice showed increased islet expression of sst2-5 compared to normoglycemic NOD mice. The increase in sst2-5 expression in the islets cells may suggest either a contributing factor in the process leading to diabetes, or a defense response against ongoing beta-cell destruction. Somatostatin analogues were tested on a human endocrine pancreatic tumour cell line and cultured pancreatic islets. Somatostatin analogues had an effect on cAMP accumulation, chromogranin A secretion and MAP kinase activity in the cell line. Treatment of rat pancreatic islets with somatostatin analogues with selective receptor affinity was not sufficient to induce an inhibition of insulin and glucagon secretion. However, a combination of selective analogues or non-selective analogues via costimulation of receptors can cause inhibition of hormone production. For insulin and glucagon, combinations of sst2 + sst5 and sst1 + sst2, respectively, showed a biological effect. In summary, knowledge of islet cell ssts expression and the effect of somatostatin analogues with high affinity to ssts may be valuable in the future attempts to influence beta-cell function in type 1 diabetes mellitus, since down-regulation of beta-cell function may promote survival of

  13. Piroxicam, indomethacin and aspirin action on a murine fibrosarcoma. Effects on tumour-associated and peritoneal macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Valdéz, J C; Perdigón, G

    1991-01-01

    Growth of a methylcholanthrene-induced fibrosarcoma in BALB/c mice was accompanied by an increase in the activation state of tumour-associated macrophages (TAM), as measured by their FcIgG receptor expression, phagocytic index and beta-glucuronidase levels. All of these parameters were markedly higher in TAM than in peritoneal macrophages (PM) derived from the same animal. On the other hand, PM from tumour-bearing mice showed lower activation parameters than PM from normal animals. We also studied the effect on tumour development of three inhibitors of prostaglandin synthesis: indomethacin, piroxicam and aspirin. Intraperitoneal administration of these drugs during 8 d was followed by the regression of palpable tumours. Indomethacin (90 mg/d) induced 45% regression, while with piroxicam (two 400 mg/d doses and six 200 mg/d doses) and aspirin (1 mg/d) 32% and 30% regressions, respectively, were observed. The growth rate of nonregressing tumours, which had reached different volumes by the end of the treatment, was delayed to a similar extent by the three anti-inflammatory non-steroidal drugs (NSAID). With respect to TAM, the treatment did not induce any significant change in their activation state, though both piroxicam and indomethacin increased slightly the TAM number. In contrast, NSAID administration was followed by a remarkable increase in the activation parameters of PM when compared with PM from tumour-bearing mice receiving no treatment. Indeed, these parameters were in some cases higher than those of PM from normal mice. The leukocytosis (60,000/microliters) with neutrophilia (80%) induced by tumour growth on peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL) was reversed by the treatment to values close to normal, in parallel with the reduction of tumour size. A drop in haematocrit was also noted which was most probably a consequence of tumour growth rather than of the treatment. This study reveals that the three NSAID tested have a remarkable antitumour activity, which

  14. Axospinous synaptic subtype-specific differences in structure, size, ionotropic receptor expression, and connectivity in apical dendritic regions of rat hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Nicholson, Daniel A.; Geinisman, Yuri

    2008-01-01

    The morphology of axospinous synapses and their parent spines varies widely. Additionally, many of these synapses are contacted by multiple synapse boutons (MSBs) and show substantial variability in receptor expression. The two major axospinous synaptic subtypes are perforated and nonperforated, but there are several subcategories within these two classes. The present study used serial section electron microscopy to determine whether perforated and nonperforated synaptic subtypes differed with regard to their distribution, size, receptor expression, and connectivity to MSBs in three apical dendritic regions of rat hippocampal area CA1: the proximal and distal thirds of stratum radiatum, and stratum lacunosum-moleculare. All synaptic subtypes were present throughout the apical dendritic regions, but there were several subclass-specific differences. First, segmented, completely partitioned synapses changed in number, proportion, and AMPA receptor expression with distance from the soma beyond that found within other perforated synaptic subtypes. Second, atypically large nonperforated synapses showed NMDA receptor immunoreactivity identical to perforated synapses, levels of AMPA receptor expression intermediate to nonperforated and perforated synapses, and perforated synapse-like changes in structure with distance from the soma. Finally, MSB connectivity was highest in proximal stratum radiatum, but only for those MSBs comprised of nonperforated synapses. The immunogold data suggest that most MSBs would not generate simultaneous depolarizations in multiple neurons or spines, however, because the vast majority of MSBs are comprised of two synapses with abnormally low levels of receptor expression, or involve one synapse with a high level of receptor expression and another with only a low level. PMID:19006199

  15. Tumours of Oddi: Diagnosis and Surgical Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Jeppsson, B.; El-Khoury, W.; Hannoun, L.; Frileux, P.; Huguet, C.; Malafosse, M.; Parc, R.

    1992-01-01

    A retrospective review of 56 patients operated upon for tumours of Oddi was performed in order to determine optimal diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. Common presenting symptoms were jaundice (86%) and anemia (21%). Mean size of the tumour was 2.3 cm. Five tumours were benign and 51 were malignant. According to the classification of Martin, five were grade I: 10 grade II; 18 grade III; and 18 grade IV. Forty-seven patients underwent resection of the tumour: three local excisions for small benign tumors, six ampullectomies (followed in three by a Whipples’ procedure for recurrence) and 41 Whipples’ procedures. The hospital mortality was 5.3%, minor complications appeared in 21%. The overall five years survival was 41%. It was 75% in grade I, 50% in grade II, 40% in grade III and 10% in grade IV. The patients who received ampullectomies were alive with a follow-up of one, two and three years. All patients operated upon for a benign tumour were alive except one who died of cardiac failure. Ultrasonography and duodenoscopy are the most useful tests for the diagnosis of tumours of Oddi. Prognosis depends on the degree of infiltration of the duodenal wall and the presence of positive lymph nodes. Whipples’ procedure is best but ampullectomy can be used in elderly or poor risk patients. Malignant tumours of the ampullary region are infrequent and reported to constitute betwee 0.02 and five percent of all cancers of the digestive tract. With wider application of endoscopic techniques, there has been an increasing interest in this group of tumours during recent years. In the literature tumours of Oddi are usually reported in the group of periampullary tumours, including tumours of the ampulla itself, duodenal wall surrounding the ampulla, the distal part of the common bile duct and head of the pancreas. We have wanted to distinguish specifically the tumours of the ampulla of Vater and have adopted the term tumour of Oddi introduced by Marchal and Hureau

  16. Postnatal development of the gastrin-releasing peptide system in the lumbosacral spinal cord controlling male reproductive function in rats

    PubMed Central

    KATAYAMA, Nao; OTI, Takumi; TAKANAMI, Keiko; SAKAMOTO, Tatsuya; SAKAMOTO, Hirotaka

    2016-01-01

    A sexually dimorphic spinal gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) system in the lumbosacral spinal cord, which projects to the lower spinal centers, controls erection and ejaculation in rats. However, little is known about the postnatal development of this system. In this study, we therefore examined the postnatal development of the male-dominant spinal GRP system and its sexual differentiation in rats using immunohistochemistry. Our results show that male-dominant expression of GRP is prominent from the onset of puberty and that sexually dimorphism persists into adulthood. These results suggest that androgen surge during male puberty plays an important role in the development and maintenance of the male-specific GRP function in the rat spinal cord. PMID:26860455

  17. The expression of leptin receptor in the ovary of the queen: leptin receptor expression in queen ovary.

    PubMed

    Albrizio, M; Roscino, M T; Trisolini, C; Binetti, F; Rizzo, A; Sciorsci, R L

    2013-10-01

    Leptin is a Ob gene product secreted mainly by adipose tissue. Several reports showed leptin production by other tissue including the ovary. The action of leptin is mediated upon binding to its receptor widely expressed in reproductive tissues in different species. In fact, there are growing evidences that leptin plays an important role in the modulation of reproductive functions. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate in the queen, the expression of leptin receptor during the functional ovarian cycle and pregnancy. We found that the ovaries of the queen express leptin receptor in all the examined phases. The highest leptin receptor expression was found in the luteal phase (pseudopregnancy, pregnancy) compared to other phases of the cycle (anestrus, proestrus, estrus). The variations in the expression of leptin receptor suggest a likely implication of leptin in the modulation of ovarian activity, in the examined species.

  18. Relationship between expression of gastrin, somatostatin, Fas/FasL and caspases in large intestinal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Jia-Ding; Wu, Pei; Yang, Ying-Lin; Wu, Jian; Huang, He

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To explore the correlation between the mRNAs and protein expression of gastrin (GAS), somatostatin (SS) and apoptosis index (AI), apoptosis regulation gene Fas/FasL and caspases in large intestinal carcinoma (LIC). METHODS: Expression of GAS and SS mRNAs were detected by nested RT-PCR in 79 cases of LIC. Cell apoptosis was detected by molecular biology in situ apoptosis detecting methods (TUNEL). Immunohistochemical staining for GAS, SS, Fas/FasL, caspase-3 and caspase-8 was performed according to the standard streptavidin-biotin-peroxidase (S-P) method. RESULTS: There was a significant positive correlation between mRNA and protein expression of GAS and SS (GASrs=0.99, P < 0.01; SSrs = 0.98, P < 0.01). There was significant difference in positive expression rates of GAS, SS mRNAs and protein among different histological differentiation, histological types and Dukes’ stage of LIC. The AI in GAS high and moderate expression groups was significantly lower than that in low expression groups (3.75 ± 2.38 vs 7.82 ± 2.38, P < 0.01; 5.51 ± 2.66 vs 7.82 ± 2.38, P < 0.01), and the AI in SS high and moderate expression groups was significantly higher than that in low expression groups (9.03 ± 1.76 vs 5.35 ± 3.00, P < 0.01; 7.44 ± 2.67 vs 5.35 ± 3.00, P < 0.01). There was a significant negative correlation between the integral ratio of GAS to SS and the AI (rs = -0.41, P < 0.01). The positive expression rate of FasL in GAS high and moderate expression groups was higher than that in low expression group (90.9% and 81.0% vs 53.2%, P < 0.05). The positive expression rates of Fas, caspase-8 and caspase-3 in SS high (90.0%, 90.0% and 100%) and moderate (80.0%, 70.0%, 75.0%) expression groups were higher than that in low expression group (53.1%, 42.9%, 49.0%) (90.0% and 80.0% vs 53.1%, P < 0.05; 90.0% and 70.0% vs 42.9%, P < 0.05; 100.0% and 75.0% vs 49.0%, P < 0.05). There was a significant positive correlation between the integral ratio of GAS to SS and the

  19. Fetal betamethasone exposure attenuates angiotensin-(1-7)-Mas receptor expression in the dorsal medulla of adult sheep.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Allyson C; Shaltout, Hossam A; Nautiyal, Manisha; Rose, James C; Chappell, Mark C; Diz, Debra I

    2013-06-01

    Glucocorticoids including betamethasone (BM) are routinely administered to women entering into early preterm labor to facilitate fetal lung development and decrease infant mortality; however, fetal steroid exposure may lead to deleterious long term consequences. In a sheep model of fetal programming, BM-exposed (BMX) offspring exhibit elevated mean arterial pressure (MAP) and decreased baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) for control of heart rate by 0.5-years of age associated with changes in the circulating and renal renin-angiotensin systems (RAS). In the brain solitary tract nucleus, angiotensin (Ang) II actions through the AT1 receptor oppose the beneficial actions of Ang-(1-7) at the Mas receptor for BRS regulation. Therefore, we examined Ang peptides, angiotensinogen (Aogen), and receptor expression in this brain region of exposed and control offspring of 0.5- and 1.8-years of age. Mas protein expression was significantly lower (>40%) in the dorsal medulla of BMX animals at both ages; however, AT1 receptor expression was not changed. BMX offspring exhibited a higher ratio of Ang II to Ang-(1-7) (2.30±0.36 versus 0.99±0.28; p<0.01) and Ang II to Ang I at 0.5-years. Although total Aogen was unchanged, Ang I-intact Aogen was lower in 0.5-year BMX animals (0.78±0.06 vs. 1.94±0.41; p<0.05) suggesting a greater degree of enzymatic processing of the precursor protein in exposed animals. We conclude that in utero BM exposure promotes an imbalance in the central RAS pathways of Ang II and Ang-(1-7) that may contribute to the elevated MAP and lower BRS in this model. PMID:23538211

  20. Post-transcriptional regulation of dopamine D1 receptor expression in caudate-putamen of cocaine-sensitized mice.

    PubMed

    Tobón, Krishna E; Catuzzi, Jennifer E; Cote, Samantha R; Sonaike, Adenike; Kuzhikandathil, Eldo V

    2015-07-01

    The dopamine D1 receptor is centrally involved in mediating the effects of cocaine and is essential for cocaine-induced locomotor sensitization. Changes in D1 receptor expression have been reported in various models of cocaine addiction; however, the mechanisms that mediate these changes in D1 receptor expression are not well understood. Using preadolescent drd1a-EGFP mice and a binge cocaine treatment protocol we demonstrate that the D1 receptor is post-transcriptionally regulated in the caudate-putamen of cocaine-sensitized animal. While cocaine-sensitized mice express high levels of steady-state D1 receptor mRNA, the expression of D1 receptor protein is not elevated. We determined that the post-transcriptional regulation of D1 receptor mRNA is rapidly attenuated and D1 receptor protein levels increase within 30 min when the sensitized mice are challenged with cocaine. The rapid increase in D1 receptor protein levels requires de novo protein synthesis and correlates with the cocaine-induced hyperlocomotor activity in the cocaine-sensitized mice. The increase in D1 receptor protein levels in the caudate-putamen inversely correlated with the levels of microRNA 142-3p and 382, both of which regulate D1 receptor protein expression. The levels of these two microRNAs decreased significantly within 5 min of cocaine challenge in sensitized mice. The results provide novel insights into the previously unknown rapid kinetics of D1 receptor protein expression which occurs in a time scale that is comparable to the expression of immediate early genes. Furthermore, the results suggest a potential novel role for inherently labile microRNAs in regulating the rapid expression of D1 receptor protein in cocaine-sensitized animals. PMID:25900179

  1. Post-transcriptional regulation of dopamine D1 receptor expression in caudate-putamen of cocaine-sensitized mice

    PubMed Central

    Tobón, Krishna E.; Catuzzi, Jennifer E.; Cote, Samantha R.; Sonaike, Adenike; Kuzhikandathil, Eldo V.

    2015-01-01

    The dopamine D1 receptor is centrally involved in mediating the effects of cocaine and is essential for cocaine-induced locomotor sensitization. Changes in D1 receptor expression has been reported in various models of cocaine addiction; however, the mechanisms that mediate these changes in D1 receptor expression are not well understood. Using preadolescent drd1a-EGFP mice and a binge cocaine treatment protocol we demonstrate that the D1 receptor is post-transcriptionally regulated in the caudate-putamen of cocaine-sensitized animal. While cocaine-sensitized mice express high levels of steady state D1 receptor mRNA, the expression of D1 receptor protein is not elevated. We determined that the post-transcriptional regulation of D1 receptor mRNA is rapidly attenuated and D1 receptor protein levels increase within thirty minutes when the sensitized mice are challenged with cocaine. The rapid increase in D1 receptor protein levels requires de novo protein synthesis and correlates with the cocaine-induced hyperlocomotor activity in the cocaine-sensitized mice. The increase in D1 receptor protein levels in the caudate-putamen inversely correlated to the levels of microRNA 142-3p and 382, both of which regulate D1 receptor protein expression. The levels of these two microRNAs decreased significantly within five minutes of cocaine challenge in sensitized mice. The results provide novel insights into the previously unknown rapid kinetics of D1 receptor protein expression which occurs in a time scale that is comparable to the expression of immediate early genes. Furthermore, the results suggests a potential novel role for inherently labile microRNAs in regulating the rapid expression of D1 receptor protein in cocaine-sensitized animals. PMID:25900179

  2. Transferrin receptor expression in rat liver: immunohistochemical and biochemical analysis of the effect of age and iron storage.

    PubMed

    Sciot, R; Verhoeven, G; Van Eyken, P; Cailleau, J; Desmet, V J

    1990-03-01

    Hepatic transferrin receptors were studied in normal male rats at 1 to 59 wk after weaning, using immunohistochemical and biochemical techniques. The number of transferrin receptors measured and the intensity of the staining in situ decreased rapidly during the first 10 wk of life and more slowly thereafter. Immunohistochemistry further demonstrated changes in the topographical and (sub)cellular localization of the transferrin receptor. In the young rat livers, staining was almost exclusively present on hepatocytes in acinar zone 2 + 3 in a honeycomb to sinusoidal pattern. With aging, a panacinar heterogeneous and mainly sinusoidal staining of hepatocytes was more frequent. Kupffer cell positivity was more obvious as compared with the young rat livers. The observed changes in transferrin receptor expression may partly be explained by age-dependent alterations in DNA synthesis and proliferative potential of the liver cells. A series of rats were iron loaded with carbonyl iron up to 39 wk and "unloaded" by administration of a normal diet during 20 wk. In these animals, serial histochemical studies showed predominantly parenchymal (7 to 14 wk), mixed parenchymal and reticuloendothelial (39 wk) and almost exclusive reticuloendothelial siderosis (59 wk). In the siderotic livers transferrin receptor numbers tended to be lower than in the controls with significant differences after 14 and 39 wk. Immunohistochemistry showed decreased parenchymal but increased reticuloendothelial transferrin receptor expression with iron load. After the period of unloading, parenchymal transferrin receptors were virtually absent despite the negligible siderosis of these cells. In contrast, siderotic reticuloendothelial cells were intensely positive. These findings support down-regulation of parenchymal transferrin receptor resulting from iron storage. However, the positivity of siderotic reticuloendothelial cells and the absence of re-emergence of parenchymal receptors in conditions of

  3. Puerarin ameliorates experimental alcoholic liver injury by inhibition of endotoxin gut leakage, Kupffer cell activation, and endotoxin receptors expression.

    PubMed

    Peng, Jing-Hua; Cui, Tuan; Huang, Fu; Chen, Liang; Zhao, Yu; Xu, Lin; Xu, Li-Li; Feng, Qin; Hu, Yi-Yang

    2013-03-01

    Puerarin, an isoflavone component extracted from Kudzu (Pueraria lobata), has been demonstrated to alleviate alcohol-related disorders. Our study examined whether puerarin ameliorates chronic alcoholic liver injury through inhibition of endotoxin gut leakage, the subsequent Kupffer cell activation, and endotoxin receptors expression. Rats were provided with the Liber-DeCarli liquid diet for 8 weeks. Puerarin (90 mg/kg or 180 mg/kg daily) was orally administered from the beginning of the third week until the end of the experiment. Chronic alcohol intake caused increased serum alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, hepatic gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase, and triglyceride levels as well as fatty liver and neutrophil infiltration in hepatic lobules as determined by biochemical and histologic assays. A significant increase of liver tumor necrosis factor α was detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. These pathologic effects correlated with increased endotoxin level in portal vein and upregulated protein expression of hepatic CD68, lipopolysaccharide-binding protein, CD14, Toll-like receptor 2, and Toll-like receptor 4. Meanwhile, the intestinal microvilli were observed to be sparse, shortened, and irregularity in distribution under the transmission electron microscope in conjunction with the downregulated intestinal zonula occludens-1 protein expression. These hepatic pathologic changes were significantly inhibited in puerarin-treated animals as were the endotoxin levels and hepatic CD68 and endotoxin receptors. Moreover, the pathologic changes in intestinal microvillus and the decreased intestinal zonula occludens-1 were also ameliorated with puerarin treatment. These results thus demonstrate that puerarin inhibition of endotoxin gut leakage, Kupffer cell activation, and endotoxin receptors expression is involved in the alleviation of chronic alcoholic liver injury in rats.

  4. Temporal relationships of F-actin bundle formation, collagen and fibronectin matrix assembly, and fibronectin receptor expression to wound contraction

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    Wound contraction can substantially reduce the amount of new tissue needed to reestablish organ integrity after tissue loss. Fibroblasts, rich in F-actin bundles, generate the force of wound contraction. Fibronectin-containing microfibrils link fibroblasts to each other and to collagen bundles and thereby provide transduction cables across the wound for contraction. The temporal relationships of F-actin bundle formation, collagen and fibronectin matrix assembly, and fibronectin receptor expression to wound contraction have not been determined. To establish these relationships, we used a cutaneous gaping wound model in outbred Yorkshire pigs. Granulation tissue filled approximately 80% of the wound space by day 5 after injury while wound contraction was first apparent at day 10. Neither actin bundles nor fibronectin receptors were observed in 5-d wound fibroblasts. Although fibronectin fibrils were assembled on the surfaces of 5-d fibroblasts, few fibrils coursed between cells. Day-7 fibroblasts stained strongly for nonmuscle- type F-actin bundles consistent with a contractile fibroblast phenotype. These cells expressed fibronectin receptors, were embedded in a fibronectin matrix that appeared to connect fibroblasts to the matrix and to each other, and were coaligned across the wound. Transmission EM confirmed the presence of microfilament bundles, cell- cell and cell-matrix linkages at day 7. Fibroblast coalignment, matrix interconnections, and actin bundles became more pronounced at days 10 and 14 coinciding with tissue contraction. These findings demonstrate that granulation tissue formation, F-actin bundle and fibronectin receptor expression in wound fibroblasts, and fibroblast-matrix linkage precede wound contraction. PMID:2136860

  5. Benign tumours of the bone: A review☆

    PubMed Central

    Hakim, David N.; Pelly, Theo; Kulendran, Myutan; Caris, Jochem A.

    2015-01-01

    Benign tumours of the bone are not cancerous and would not metastasise to other regions of the body. However, they can occur in any part of the skeleton, and can still be dangerous as they may grow and compress healthy bone tissue. There are several types of benign tumours that can be classified by the type of matrix that the tumour cells produce; such as bone, cartilage, fibrous tissue, fat or blood vessel. Overall, 8 different types can be distinguished: osteochondroma, osteoma, osteoid osteoma, osteoblastoma, giant cell tumour, aneurysmal bone cyst, fibrous dysplasia and enchondroma. The incidence of benign bone tumours varies depending on the type. However, they most commonly arise in people less than 30 years old, often triggered by the hormones that stimulate normal growth. The most common type is osteochondroma. This review discusses the different types of common benign tumours of the bone based on information accumulated from published literature. PMID:26579486

  6. Solitary fibrous tumour: a diagnostic dilemma.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Sharmila; Shet, Tanuja M; Chinoy, R F; Kane, S V

    2007-07-01

    Solitary fibrous tumour (SFT) is a rare spindle cell neoplasm arising at pleural and extrapleural sites. Five cases of SFT diagnosed at our institution over a five year period were reviewed. Haematoxylin and eosin stained histological sections, immuno-histochemical markers including CD34 and electron microscopy were the different methods used to study these tumours. Three histological features were consistently observed in all the tumours: the tumours were composed of short spindle cells separated by dense collagen bands and arranged in alternate hypocellular and hypercellular areas. CD34 positivity was seen in all the cases. SFT's have been reported to behave in an unpredictable fashion and hence prolonged follow up is essential. Histology, CD34 positivity and electron microscopy are useful tools in diagnosing SFT. While the pleural tumours can be diagnosed based on histology, this must be substantiated by ancillary techniques in case of extrapleural tumours.

  7. [Solitary fibrous tumours of the kidney].

    PubMed

    Gres, Pascal; Avances, Christophe; Ben Naoum, Kamel; Chapuis, Héliette; Costa, Pierre

    2004-02-01

    Solitary fibrous tumours (SFT) are mesenchymal tumours that usually arise from the pleura. Renal SFT are exceptional (9 cases reported in the literature). The authors report a new case discovered during assessment of HT and treated by radical right nephrectomy. The histological appearance is characteristic: a tumour with a fibrous centre, composed of a monomorphic proliferation of spindle cells, with positive CD 34, CD 99, and bcl 2 labelling. The prognosis after complete resection is generally favourable.

  8. Solitary fibrous tumour of the tongue.

    PubMed

    Piattelli, A; Fioroni, M; Rubini, C

    1998-09-01

    Solitary fibrous tumour (SFT) is a neoplasm most often localised in the pleura and peritoneum. The tumour is composed of spindled fibroblastic cells arranged in a haphazard way. Recently SFT has been described in many locations. Only one case of oral SFT has been described in the cheek: this is the second case of an oral SFT located in the tongue. The differential diagnosis must be made from many soft tissue tumours. SFTs stain strongly, in almost all cases, for CD34.

  9. [Adenomatoid tumour of the adrenal gland].

    PubMed

    Bandier, Philippe Claus; Hansen, Alastair; Thorelius, Lars

    2009-01-26

    An adenomatoid tumour in the right suprarenal gland was discovered during clinical cancer staging of a 73-year-old woman. Adenomatoid tumours in the suprarenal glands are rare and are most often found incidentally. A definitive diagnosis is made on the basis of histology since imaging methods are non-specific. Differential diagnoses comprise malignant vascular neoplasm or adenocarcinoma. Immunohistochemistry or electron microscopy allows uncomplicated distinction between these tumours. In general, it is recommended to obtain biopsies from suprarenal processes.

  10. Gastric stromal tumours: a practical approach.

    PubMed Central

    Mihssin, N.; Moorthy, K.; Sengupta, A.; Houghton, P. W.

    2000-01-01

    Recent findings on the pathological diversity of gastric stromal tumours and their unpredictable behaviour prompted us to review our series of 16 patients who had undergone surgery for these tumours from 1991 to 1998. There were 13 benign and 3 malignant lesions. The majority of patients presented with either upper gastrointestinal bleeding or anaemia alone (12 of 16). Endoscopy was an extremely useful diagnostic tool, revealing the lesion as an intraluminal protuberant tumour with or without ulcer in 10 cases and as an ulcer alone in 4 cases, and in 1 case features suggesting an extrinsic mass. All the patients in the series underwent surgery. We used staplers (AutosutureR TA 55) to excise the tumours in 7 cases, all of which on histological examination were benign with clear resection margins. Gastric resections were performed in 5 cases for either large tumours or those situated at the fundus or antrum and local excision of the remaining 4. The mean follow-up of these patients was 24 months. Two patients with malignant lesions died of irresectable recurrences, one 2 months and one 18 months after surgery. There have been no recurrences in the tumours diagnosed as benign on histology. Tumour size, position and the ability to apply the stapler leaving adequate margin below the tumour should be the determinants of extent and type of excision. Reliable determinants of behaviour are tumour size, grade and mitotic index. Images Figure 1 PMID:11103152

  11. Solitary fibrous tumour of the pleura.

    PubMed

    Sikri, V; Chawla, R

    2013-01-01

    Solitary fibrous tumour (SFT) of the pleura is a rare, usually benign primary tumour of the pleura. Spectrum of presentation can vary from an incidental finding on chest radiograph done for some other purpose, features of compression of surrounding structures to symptoms resulting from the tumour per se. We report a case of a female who presented with complaints of cough and chest pain in whom a diagnosis of SFT was confirmed on tru-cut biopsy and immunohistochemistry studies. The patient underwent thoracotomy and successful removal of the tumour.

  12. Oncogenic osteomalacia: strange tumours in strange places.

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, D.; Bar, R. S.; Weidner, N.; Wener, M.; Lee, F.

    1985-01-01

    Two patients presented with hypophosphataemic osteomalacia and were subsequently found to have small tumours unusual histopathology and location causing the osteomalacia. Each tumour was found after an intensive search for occult masses. Studies of vitamin D metabolism and renal tubular function before and after surgery yielded further insight into the pathophysiology of oncogenic osteomalacia. These cases demonstrate that microscopic quantities of tumour are capable of causing the syndrome and further illustrate the high index of suspicion often necessary to locate causative tumours in patients with hypophosphataemic osteomalacia. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:4022870

  13. Nucleus Accumbens Dopamine D2-Receptor Expressing Neurons Control Behavioral Flexibility in a Place Discrimination Task in the IntelliCage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macpherson, Tom; Morita, Makiko; Wang, Yanyan; Sasaoka, Toshikuni; Sawa, Akira; Hikida, Takatoshi

    2016-01-01

    Considerable evidence has demonstrated a critical role for the nucleus accumbens (NAc) in the acquisition and flexibility of behavioral strategies. These processes are guided by the activity of two discrete neuron types, dopamine D1- or D2-receptor expressing medium spiny neurons (D1-/D2-MSNs). Here we used the IntelliCage, an automated…

  14. [Pancreatic tumour in a child].

    PubMed

    Schouenborg Schultz, Thea; Thyssen Vestergaard, Esben

    2014-07-28

    Abdominal pain is a common symptom in children and recurrent abdominal pain (RAP) has a prevalence of 8.4% in childhood. In 90-95% of RAPs no organic disease is identified. Thus, it is important that the few of somatic origin are diagnosed. We describe a case concerning a 12-year-old girl, diagnosed with a solid pseudopapillary tumour of the pancreas. The symptoms were RAP and postprandial vomiting. The purpose of this article is to increase the knowledge of "alarm findings" indicating an organic disease in children with RAP. PMID:25292323

  15. Radiofrequency ablation of lung tumours

    PubMed Central

    Goh, PYT

    2006-01-01

    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a well-established local therapy for hepatic malignancies. It is rapidly emerging as an effective treatment modality for small lesions elsewhere in the body, in particular, the kidney and the lung. It is a relatively safe and minimally invasive treatment for small lung malignancies, both primary and secondary. In particular, it is the preferred form of treatment for non-surgical candidates. This paper describes the technique employed for radiofrequency ablation of lung tumours, as well as the protocol established, at the Mount Elizabeth Hospital, Singapore. PMID:21614247

  16. A review of bovine urothelial tumours and tumour-like lesions of the urinary bladder.

    PubMed

    Roperto, S; Borzacchiello, G; Brun, R; Leonardi, L; Maiolino, P; Martano, M; Paciello, O; Papparella, S; Restucci, B; Russo, V; Salvatore, G; Urraro, C; Roperto, F

    2010-01-01

    Four hundred bovine urothelial tumours and tumour-like lesions were classified in accordance with the 2004 World Health Organization (WHO) morphological classification for human urothelial tumours. The spectrum of neoplastic lesions of the urinary bladder of cattle is becoming wider and bovine urothelial tumours share striking morphological features with their human counterparts. A classification system based on the WHO scheme would also be appropriate for the classification of bovine bladder tumours. Bovine urothelial tumours are most often multiple. Four distinct growth patterns of bovine urothelial tumours and tumour-like lesions are recognized: flat, exophytic or papillary, endophytic and invasive. Carcinoma in situ (CIS) is the most common flat urothelial lesion, accounting for approximately 4% of urothelial tumours. CIS is detected adjacent to papillary and invasive tumours in 80-90% of cases. Approximately 3% of papillary lesions are papillomas and approximately 5% are 'papillary urothelial neoplasms of low malignant potential' (PUNLMP). Low-grade carcinoma is the most common urothelial tumour of cattle. High-grade carcinomas, and low and high-grade invasive tumours, are less commonly seen. Bovine papillomavirus (BPV) infection and ingestion of bracken fern both play a central role in carcinogenesis of these lesions.

  17. Chondrocyte IGF-1 receptor expression and responsiveness to IGF-1 stimulation in mouse articular cartilage during various phases of experimentally induced arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Verschure, P J; van Marle, J; Joosten, L A; van den Berg, W B

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To examine the distribution of insulin like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) receptors and the biological response to IGF-1 stimulation in articular cartilage of normal mouse knee joints and arthritic joints taken at various stages of experimentally induced arthritis. METHODS--In situ IGF-1 receptor expression and responsiveness to IGF-1 stimulation were examined in murine articular cartilage at different phases in two models of experimentally induced arthritis. IGF-1 receptor expression was visualised in joint sections with the use of anti-IGF-1 receptor antibodies and quantified by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Chondrocyte proteoglycan (PG) synthesis was measured by incorporation of 35S-sulphate. RESULTS--In control cartilage, the majority of IGF-1 receptors were found on chondrocytes localised in the middle and deeper zones of the cartilage, whereas receptor expression in surface zone chondrocytes was very low. During culture of normal articular cartilage, IGF-1 was able to maintain chondrocyte PG synthesis at the in vivo level. Concurrently with the development of arthritis, cartilage lost its capacity to react to IGF-1, but IGF-1 stimulation recovered when the inflammatory response waned. Shortly after induction of arthritis, IGF-1 receptor expression initially declined, but it had returned to normal levels by day 1 and remained increased thereafter. CONCLUSION--The distribution of IGF-1 receptor expression in the different zones of normal articular cartilage reflects IGF-1 stimulation and metabolic activity of chondrocytes in these layers. This correlation is disturbed in arthritic cartilage, suggesting inadequate or overruled signalling. Images PMID:7677441

  18. Transillumination imaging of intraocular tumours.

    PubMed

    Kjersem, Bård; Krohn, Jørgen

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this paper is to discuss a recently described modification of a standard photo slit lamp system for ocular transillumination, with special emphasis on the light transmission through the eye wall and the photographic technique. Transillumination photography was carried out with the Haag-Streit Photo-Slit Lamp BX 900 (Haag-Streit AG, Koeniz, Switzerland). After having released the background lighting optic fibre cable from its holder, the patient was positioned at the slit lamp, and the fibre tip was gently pressed against the sclera or the cornea of the patient's eye. During about 1/1000 of a second, the eye was illuminated by the flash and the scleral shadow of the tumour was exposed to the camera sensor. The images were of good diagnostic quality, making it easy to outline the tumours and to evaluate the involvement of intraocular structures. None of the examined patients experienced discomfort or negative side effects. The method is recommended in cases where photographic transillumination documentation of intraocular pathologies is considered important. PMID:23641762

  19. Effect of intraduodenal bile and Na- taurodeoxycholate on exocrine pancreatic secretion and on plasma levels of secretin, pancreatic polypeptide, and gastrin in man.

    PubMed

    Riepl, R L; Lehnert, P; Scharl, A; Hempen, I; Fiedler, F; Teufel, J; Burhol, P G

    1990-01-01

    The effect of intraduodenally administered cattle bile (CB) and Na-taurodeoxycholate (TDC) on basal pancreatic secretion and plasma levels of secretin, pancreatic polypeptide (PP), and gastrin were investigated on two separate days in 10 fasting volunteers. Doses of 2-6 g CB and 200-600 mg TDC were given intraduodenally at 65-min intervals. Volume, bicarbonate, lipase, trypsin, amylase, and bilirubin were measured in 10-min fractions of duodenal juice, and GI peptides determined by radioimmunoassay. CB and TDC enhanced significantly and dose-dependently volume, bicarbonate and enzyme secretion, and plasma secretin and PP levels. In contrast, plasma gastrin showed only a marginal increase. We conclude that the hydrokinetic effect of intraduodenal CB and TDC is at least partially mediated by secretin. Gastrin could be ruled out as a mediator of the ecbolic effect, whereas other GI peptides, primarily CCK, and/or neural mechanisms must be considered possible mediators. Both pathways may also play a role in the PP release observed.

  20. Effect of intraduodenal bile and Na- taurodeoxycholate on exocrine pancreatic secretion and on plasma levels of secretin, pancreatic polypeptide, and gastrin in man.

    PubMed

    Riepl, R L; Lehnert, P; Scharl, A; Hempen, I; Fiedler, F; Teufel, J; Burhol, P G

    1990-01-01

    The effect of intraduodenally administered cattle bile (CB) and Na-taurodeoxycholate (TDC) on basal pancreatic secretion and plasma levels of secretin, pancreatic polypeptide (PP), and gastrin were investigated on two separate days in 10 fasting volunteers. Doses of 2-6 g CB and 200-600 mg TDC were given intraduodenally at 65-min intervals. Volume, bicarbonate, lipase, trypsin, amylase, and bilirubin were measured in 10-min fractions of duodenal juice, and GI peptides determined by radioimmunoassay. CB and TDC enhanced significantly and dose-dependently volume, bicarbonate and enzyme secretion, and plasma secretin and PP levels. In contrast, plasma gastrin showed only a marginal increase. We conclude that the hydrokinetic effect of intraduodenal CB and TDC is at least partially mediated by secretin. Gastrin could be ruled out as a mediator of the ecbolic effect, whereas other GI peptides, primarily CCK, and/or neural mechanisms must be considered possible mediators. Both pathways may also play a role in the PP release observed. PMID:2305205

  1. Glucocorticoid-dependent induction of interleukin-6 receptor expression in human hepatocytes facilitates interleukin-6 stimulation of amino acid transport.

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, C P; Bode, B P; Takahashi, K; Tanabe, K K; Souba, W W

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The authors studied the effects of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) on glutamine and alanine transport in isolated human hepatocytes. They also evaluated the role of dexamethasone in modulating this response and its effects on the expression of the plasma membrane high-affinity IL-6 receptor. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Animal studies indicate that cytokines are important mediators of the increased hepatic amino acid uptake that occurs during cancer and sepsis, but studies in human tissues are lacking. The control of transport by cytokines and cytokine receptor expression in the liver may provide a mechanism by which hepatocytes can modulate amino acid availability during catabolic disease states. METHODS: Human hepatocytes were isolated from wedge biopsy specimens and plated in 24-well trays. Interleukin-6 and TNF-alpha, in combination with the synthetic glucocorticoid dexamethasone, were added to hepatocytes in culture, and the transport of radiolabeled glutamine and alanine was measured. Fluorescent-activated cell sorter (FACS) analysis was used to study the effects of dexamethasone on IL-6 receptor number in the well-differentiated human hepatoma HepG2. RESULTS: Both IL-6 and TNF-alpha exerted a small stimulatory effect on alanine and glutamine transport. Dexamethasone alone did not alter transport rates, but pretreatment of cells augmented the effects of both cytokines on carrier-mediated amino acid uptake. Dexamethasone pretreatment and a combination of IL-6 and TNF-alpha resulted in a greater than twofold increase in transport activity. Fluorescent-activated cell sorter analysis demonstrated that dexamethasone induced a threefold increase in the expression of high-affinity IL-6 receptors. CONCLUSIONS: Interleukin-6 and TNF-alpha work coordinately with glucocorticoids to stimulate amino acid uptake in human hepatocytes. Dexamethasone exerts a permissive effect on cytokine-mediated increases in transport by increasing IL

  2. In vivo electrical conductivity of hepatic tumours.

    PubMed

    Haemmerich, Dieter; Staelin, S T; Tsai, J Z; Tungjitkusolmun, S; Mahvi, D M; Webster, J G

    2003-05-01

    Knowledge of electrical tissue conductivity is necessary to determine deposition of electromagnetic energy and can further be used to diagnostically differentiate between normal and neoplastic tissue. We measured 17 rats with a total of 24 tumours of the K12/TRb rat colon cancer cell line. In each animal we measured in vivo hepatic tumour and normal tissue conductivity at seven frequencies from 10 Hz to 1 MHz, at different tumour stages between 6 and 12 weeks after induction. Conductivity of normal liver tissue was 1.26 +/- 0.15 mS cm(-1) at 10 Hz, and 4.61 +/- 0.42 mS cm(-1) at 1 MHz. Conductivity of tumour was 2.69 +/- 0.91 mS cm(-1) at 10 Hz, and 5.23 +/- 0.82 mS cm(-1) at 1 MHz. Conductivity was significantly different between normal and tumour tissue (p < 0.05). We determined the percentage of necrosis and fibrosis at the measurement site. We fitted the conductivity data to the Cole-Cole model. For the tumour data we determined Spearman's correlation coefficients between the Cole-Cole parameters and age, necrosis, fibrosis and tumour volume and found significant correlation between necrosis and the Cole-Cole parameters (p < 0.05). We conclude that necrosis within the tumour and the associated membrane breakdown is likely responsible for the observed change in conductivity.

  3. Cartilage-containing tumours of the lung

    PubMed Central

    Bateson, Eric M.

    1967-01-01

    An unusual case is reported of a woman aged 27 years who presented with four intrapulmonary cartilage-containing tumours which were resected from the left lung. The appearance of two new shadows in the chest several years later suggested that two of the resected tumours had recurred. Three of the four resected tumours consisted entirely of cartilage and bone and other connective tissues. The fourth tumour, although consisting almost entirely of cartilage and connective tissue, also contained epithelial tissue in the form of two small clefts, one in the periphery and the other in a connective tissue septum between the lobules of cartilage of the tumour. These tumours are regarded as a variation of the more typical cartilage-containing tumour of the lung which contains many spaces lined by respiratory epithelium and is regarded as a neoplasm arising in the connective tissue beneath the mucosa of a small bronchus with subsequent expansion into its lumen and enclosing spaces lined by the mucosal epithelium during its eccentric growth. The tumours consisting almost entirely of cartilage without spaces lined by epithelial cells are thought to expand into the adjacent lung tissue and not into the bronchial lumen. Therefore there is no inclusion of respiratory epithelium from the mucosa of the bronchus of origin. Images PMID:6033393

  4. FDG uptake, a surrogate of tumour hypoxia?

    PubMed Central

    Van de Wiele, Christophe

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Tumour hyperglycolysis is driven by activation of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) through tumour hypoxia. Accordingly, the degree of 2-fluro-2-deoxy-d-glucose (FDG) uptake by tumours might indirectly reflect the level of hypoxia, obviating the need for more specific radiopharmaceuticals for hypoxia imaging. Discussion In this paper, available data on the relationship between hypoxia and FDG uptake by tumour tissue in vitro and in vivo are reviewed. In pre-clinical in vitro studies, acute hypoxia was consistently shown to increase FDG uptake by normal and tumour cells within a couple of hours after onset with mobilisation or modification of glucose transporters optimising glucose uptake, followed by a delayed response with increased rates of transcription of GLUT mRNA. In pre-clinical imaging studies on chronic hypoxia that compared FDG uptake by tumours grown in rat or mice to uptake by FMISO, the pattern of normoxic and hypoxic regions within the human tumour xenografts, as imaged by FMISO, largely correlated with glucose metabolism although minor locoregional differences could not be excluded. In the clinical setting, data are limited and discordant. Conclusion Further evaluation of FDG uptake by various tumour types in relation to intrinsic and bioreductive markers of hypoxia and response to radiotherapy or hypoxia-dependent drugs is needed to fully assess its application as a marker of hypoxia in the clinical setting. PMID:18509637

  5. CT/MRI of neuroendocrine tumours

    PubMed Central

    Reznek, Rodney H

    2006-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) are often thought to be rare and rather recherché cancers which are of little concern to the general physician, surgeon or radiologist because of their rarity and esoteric nature. In fact, while relatively uncommon, the total group of gastro-entero-pancreatic (GEP) tumours incorporates the spectrum of all types of carcinoids, incuding bronchial carcinoids, and the whole gamut of islet-cell tumours. Some of these may present as functioning tumours, with a plethora of hormonal secretions and concomitant clinical syndromes, and GEPs in general have an incidence around 30 per million population per year. This means that in the whole European Union, for example, there will be in the region of 12000 new patients every year presenting with one or another manifestation of these tumours. Furthermore, the comparatively long survival of many of these patients, compared to more common adenocarcinomas or epithelial tumours, implies that the point prevalence is also not inconsiderable. However, it is undoubtedly true that these tumours can be difficult to identify, especially in their early stages, and it is then that radiological investigation becomes of paramount importance. Having taken into account all these considerations, most investigators would initiate investigation of a suspected or biochemically proven islet-cell tumour with cross-sectional imaging—either CT or MRI. This will clearly identify the larger lesions, allow assessment of the entire abdomen, and provide valuable information on the presence of hepatic metastates. PMID:17114072

  6. Küttner's tumour: a case report.

    PubMed

    Tagnon, B; Weynand, B; Reychler, H

    2008-01-01

    Küttner's tumour (chronic sclerosing sialadenitis) is a chronic inflammatory disease of the salivary glands. It is a totally benign lesion. However, because of its clinical features, the clinical diagnosis is often that of a salivary gland neoplasm. We present a case of unilateral Küttner's tumour in the left submandibular salivary gland and discuss clinical, imaging and histological features.

  7. Strain elastography features of epidermoid tumours in superficial soft tissue: differences from other benign soft-tissue tumours and malignant tumours

    PubMed Central

    Park, H J; Lee, S M; Kim, W T; Lee, S; Ahn, K S

    2015-01-01

    Objective: We evaluated ultrasonographic features of superficial epidermoid tumour with a focus on strain elastography (SE) features that will help in the differential diagnosis of epidermoid tumour from other benign and malignant soft-tissue tumours. Methods: We retrospectively evaluated ultrasonographic and SE data of 103 surgically confirmed superficial soft-tissue tumours and tumour-like lesions: 29 cases of epidermoid tumour, 46 cases of other benign tumours and 28 cases of malignant tumour. SE and B-mode imaging were performed at the same time. SE characteristics were assigned into four grades (1–4) according to their elasticity. Interobserver agreement for the four SE scores between the two radiologists was analysed using kappa statistics. We classified each SE finding as a hard lesion (SE Score 3–4) or soft lesion (SE Score 1–2) and compared these findings using the χ2 test to identify whether a significant difference in mass hardness existed among epidermoid tumour, other benign tumour and malignant tumour. Results: Overall interobserver agreement according to the four SE scores was moderate (κ = 0.540), and overall agreement for the hardness [soft (Score 1–2) or hard (Score 3–4)] was almost perfect (κ = 0.825). Malignant tumours showed higher SE scores (3–4, hard nature) than did epidermoid tumour or other benign soft-tissue tumours. There were no differences in SE score between epidermoid tumour and other benign tumours. Conclusion: Superficial epidermoid tumour exhibits a softer nature than does malignant tumour but does not have a different SE pattern from other benign tumours. Advances in knowledge: SE features of epidermoid tumour might be helpful in differentiating from other benign and malignant tumours. PMID:25827206

  8. Optimization of tumour control probability in hypoxic tumours by radiation dose redistribution: a modelling study.

    PubMed

    Søvik, Aste; Malinen, Eirik; Bruland, Øyvind S; Bentzen, Søren M; Olsen, Dag Rune

    2007-01-21

    Tumour hypoxia is a known cause of clinical resistance to radiation therapy. The purpose of this work was to model the effects on tumour control probability (TCP) of selectively boosting the dose to hypoxic regions in a tumour, while keeping the mean tumour dose constant. A tumour model with a continuous oxygen distribution, incorporating pO(2) histograms published for head and neck patients, was developed. Temporal and spatial variations in the oxygen distribution, non-uniform cell density and cell proliferation during treatment were included in the tumour modelling. Non-uniform dose prescriptions were made based on a segmentation of the tumours into four compartments. The main findings were: (1) Dose redistribution considerably improved TCP for all tumours. (2) The effect on TCP depended on the degree of reoxygenation during treatment, with a maximum relative increase in TCP for tumours with poor or no reoxygenation. (3) Acute hypoxia reduced TCP moderately, while underdosing chronic hypoxic cells gave large reductions in TCP. (4) Restricted dose redistribution still gave a substantial increase in TCP as compared to uniform dose boosts. In conclusion, redistributing dose according to tumour oxygenation status might increase TCP when the tumour response to radiotherapy is limited by chronic hypoxia. This could potentially improve treatment outcome in a subpopulation of patients who respond poorly to conventional radiotherapy. PMID:17202629

  9. p53 tumour suppressor gene expression in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumour cells.

    PubMed Central

    Bartz, C; Ziske, C; Wiedenmann, B; Moelling, K

    1996-01-01

    Neuroendocrine pancreatic tumours grow slower and metastasise later than ductal and acinar carcinomas. The expression of the p53 tumour suppressor gene in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumour cells is unknown. Pancreatic neuroendocrine cell lines (n = 5) and human tumour tissues (n = 19) were studied for changed p53 coding sequence, transcription, and translation. Proliferative activity of tumour cells was determined analysing Ki-67 expression. No mutation in the p53 nucleotide sequence of neuroendocrine tumour cell was found. However, an overexpression of p53 could be detected in neuroendocrine pancreatic tumour cell lines at a protein level. As no p53 mutations were seen, it is suggested that post-translational events can also lead to an overexpression of p53. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:8675094

  10. Characterization of twenty-five ovarian tumour cell lines that phenocopy primary tumours

    PubMed Central

    Ince, Tan A.; Sousa, Aurea D.; Jones, Michelle A.; Harrell, J. Chuck; Agoston, Elin S.; Krohn, Marit; Selfors, Laura M.; Liu, Wenbin; Chen, Ken; Yong, Mao; Buchwald, Peter; Wang, Bin; Hale, Katherine S.; Cohick, Evan; Sergent, Petra; Witt, Abigail; Kozhekbaeva, Zhanna; Gao, Sizhen; Agoston, Agoston T.; Merritt, Melissa A.; Foster, Rosemary; Rueda, Bo R.; Crum, Christopher P.; Brugge, Joan S.; Mills, Gordon B.

    2015-01-01

    Currently available human tumour cell line panels consist of a small number of lines in each lineage that generally fail to retain the phenotype of the original patient tumour. Here we develop a cell culture medium that enables us to routinely establish cell lines from diverse subtypes of human ovarian cancers with >95% efficiency. Importantly, the 25 new ovarian tumour cell lines described here retain the genomic landscape, histopathology and molecular features of the original tumours. Furthermore, the molecular profile and drug response of these cell lines correlate with distinct groups of primary tumours with different outcomes. Thus, tumour cell lines derived using this methodology represent a significantly improved platform to study human tumour pathophysiology and response to therapy. PMID:26080861

  11. Solitary fibrous tumour of the renal peripelvis.

    PubMed

    Fukunaga, M; Nikaido, T

    1997-05-01

    Solitary fibrous tumours (SFTs) are rare spindle cell neoplasms generally associated with the serosal surface, especially the pleura. This report describes two SFTs arising in the renal peripelvis, occurring in 33- and 36-year-old females. The lesions lacked the characteristic features of other recognized neoplasms that occur in the kidney. Immunohistochemically, the tumour cells were diffusely and strongly positive for vimentin and CD34, and some tumour cells expressed alpha-smooth muscle actin. Both tumours were diploid by flow cytometry. Both patients have had benign clinical courses with 7.5- and 1-year follow-up. The findings suggest that the SFTs may originate from peripelvic mesenchymal cells, a new location for SFT. SFT should be included in the differential diagnosis of spindle cell tumours arising in the renal pelvis and peripelvis.

  12. The gastrin-releasing peptide analog bombesin preserves exocrine and endocrine pancreas morphology and function during parenteral nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Pierre, Joseph F.; Neuman, Joshua C.; Brill, Allison L.; Brar, Harpreet K.; Thompson, Mary F.; Cadena, Mark T.; Connors, Kelsey M.; Busch, Rebecca A.; Heneghan, Aaron F.; Cham, Candace M.; Jones, Elaina K.; Kibbe, Carly R.; Davis, Dawn B.; Groblewski, Guy E.; Kudsk, Kenneth A.

    2015-01-01

    Stimulation of digestive organs by enteric peptides is lost during total parental nutrition (PN). Here we examine the role of the enteric peptide bombesin (BBS) in stimulation of the exocrine and endocrine pancreas during PN. BBS protects against exocrine pancreas atrophy and dysfunction caused by PN. BBS also augments circulating insulin levels, suggesting an endocrine pancreas phenotype. While no significant changes in gross endocrine pancreas morphology were observed, pancreatic islets isolated from BBS-treated PN mice showed a significantly enhanced insulin secretion response to the glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) agonist exendin-4, correlating with enhanced GLP-1 receptor expression. BBS itself had no effect on islet function, as reflected in low expression of BBS receptors in islet samples. Intestinal BBS receptor expression was enhanced in PN with BBS, and circulating active GLP-1 levels were significantly enhanced in BBS-treated PN mice. We hypothesized that BBS preserved islet function indirectly, through the enteroendocrine cell-pancreas axis. We confirmed the ability of BBS to directly stimulate intestinal enteroid cells to express the GLP-1 precursor preproglucagon. In conclusion, BBS preserves the exocrine and endocrine pancreas functions during PN; however, the endocrine stimulation is likely indirect, through the enteroendocrine cell-pancreas axis. PMID:26185331

  13. Chemokine receptor expression by leukemic T cells of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma: clinical and histopathological correlations.

    PubMed

    Capriotti, Elisabetta; Vonderheid, Eric C; Thoburn, Christopher J; Bright, Emilie C; Hess, Allan D

    2007-12-01

    Chemokine receptors expressed by normal and neoplastic lymphocytes provide an important mechanism for cells to traffic into the skin and skin-associated lymph nodes. The goal of this study was to correlate chemokine receptor and CD62L expression by circulating neoplastic T cells with the clinical and pathological findings of the leukemic phase of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma, primarily Sézary syndrome (SS). Chemokine receptor mRNA transcripts were found in the majority of leukemic cells for CCR1, CCR4, CCR7, CCR10, CXCR3, and CD62L and in 20-50% of the samples for CXCR5. In patients with SS, relatively high expression levels of CCR7 and CCR10 by circulating neoplastic T cells correlated with epidermotropism, CXCR5 expression correlated with density of the dermal infiltrate, and CD62L correlated with extent of lymphadenopathy. Of note, CXCR5 expression and a dense dermal infiltrate correlated with a poor prognosis. The chemokine receptor profile supports the concept that neoplastic T cells are central memory T cells, and that CCR10 and CD62L play a fundamental role respectively in epidermotropism and lymphadenopathy that is observed in SS.

  14. TGF-β1 Upregulates the Expression of Triggering Receptor Expressed on Myeloid Cells 1 in Murine Lungs

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Li; Zhou, Yong; Dong, Liang; Chen, Rui-Qi; Sun, Guo-Ying; Liu, Tian; Ran, Wen-Zhuo; Fang, Xiang; Jiang, Jian-Xin; Guan, Cha-Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells 1 (TREM-1) increases the expression of TGF-β family genes, which are known as profibrogenic cytokines in the pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis. In this study, we determined whether TGF-β1 regulated the expression of TREM-1 in a mouse model of pulmonary fibrosis. The expression of TGF-β1 and TREM-1 was increased on day 7, 14, and 21 after single intratracheal injection of bleomycin (BLM). And there was positive correlation between the expression of TGF-β1 and TREM-1. TGF-β1 increased expression of TREM-1 mRNA and protein in a time- and dose-dependent manner in mouse macrophages. The expression of the activator protein 1 (AP-1) was increased in lung tissues from mouse after BLM injection and in mouse macrophages after TGF-β1 treatment, respectively. TGF-β1 significantly increased the relative activity of luciferase in the cells transfected with plasmid contenting wild type-promoter of TREM-1. But TGF-β1 had no effect on the activity of luciferase in the cells transfected with a mutant-TREM1 plasmid carrying mutations in the AP-1 promoter binding site. In conclusion, we found the expression of TREM-1 was increased in lung tissues from mice with pulmonary fibrosis. TGF-β1 increased the expression of TREM-1 in mouse macrophages partly via the transcription factor AP-1. PMID:26738569

  15. Changes in hippocampal orexin 1 receptor expression involved in tooth pain-induced learning and memory impairment in rats.

    PubMed

    Raoof, Ramin; Esmaeili-Mahani, Saeed; Abbasnejad, Mehdi; Raoof, Maryam; Sheibani, Vahid; Kooshki, Razieh; Amirkhosravi, Ladan; Rafie, Foroozan

    2015-04-01

    Orexin 1 receptor signaling plays a significant role in pain as well as learning and memory processes. This study was conducted to assess the changes in orexin 1 receptor expression levels in hippocampus following learning and memory impairment induced by tooth inflammatory pulpal pain. Adult male Wistar rats received intradental injection of 100 µg capsaicin to induce pulpal pain. After recording the pain scores, spatial learning and memory were assessed using Morris Water Maze test. The hippocampal levels of orexin 1 receptor mRNA and protein were determined by semiquantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and immunoblotting respectively. The data showed that capsaicin-induced tooth inflammatory pulpal pain was correlated with learning and memory impairment. Intra-hippocampal injection of orexin A inhibited pain-induced learning and memory impairment. However, orexin 1 receptor antagonist, SB-334867, had no effect on learning and memory impairment. Moreover, capsaicin-induced pain significantly decreased hippocampal orexin 1 receptor mRNA and protein levels. Meanwhile, reversed changes took place in the ibuprofen-pretreated group (p < 0.05). It seems that decrease in orexin 1 receptor density and signaling could be involved in tooth pain-induced learning and memory impairment.

  16. [The relationship of virus load, receptor expression and tumor spectrum in layer chickens infected by ALV-J].

    PubMed

    Cai, Li-ming; Wang, Zhen-zhen; Wang, Yan-ming; Shen, Yan wei; Wei, Rong-rong; Cheng, Zi-qiang

    2013-09-01

    Abstract:Subgroup J avian leukosis virus (ALV-J) infect cells by binding to the chNHE1 receptor protein of the host and causes tumors. The tumor incidence of the ALV-J-infected chickens was observed by histo pathology, and virus was isolated on DF-1 cell line. The ALV-J load and mRNA of chNHElreceptor protein were detected by real time PCR. The relationship between ALV-J load, chNHE1 receptor expression levels and tumor spectrum was analyzed. The results showed that the tumors induced by ALV-J in laying hens and local lines of chicken were different. No significant relationship was observed between ALV-J load and tumor spectrum. ALV-J load was positively correlated with mRNA expression of chNHE1. The mRNA expression of chNHE1 increased when the tumors occurred. Our results suggest the chNHE1 protein is not only the receptor of ALV-J infected host but also play an important role in the process of tumor development. This study provides a scientific basis for further studying of oncogenic mechanism of ALV-J.

  17. Effects of a7nAChR agonist on the tissue estrogen receptor expression of castrated rats

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Feng; Gong, Fan; Lv, Jinhan; Gao, Jun; Ma, Jingzu

    2015-01-01

    Osteoporosis is one common disease in postmenopausal women due to depressed estrogen level. It has been known that inflammatory factors are involved in osteoporosis pathogenesis. One regulator of inflammatory cascade reaction, a7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (a7nAChR), therefore, may exert certain role in osteoporosis. This study thus investigated this question on an osteoporosis rat model after castration. Rats were firstly castrated to induce osteoporosis, and then received a7nAChR agonist (PNU-282987), diethylstilbestrol or saline via intraperitoneal injection. After 6 or 12 weeks, bone samples were collected for counting osteoblast number, bone density and estrogen receptor (ERα and ERβ) expression, in addition to the serum laboratory of inflammatory factors. Bone density, osteoclast number, ERα and ERβ expression level were significantly depressed in model group, and were remarkable potentiated in the drug treatment group (P<0.05). The levels of BGP and PTH in drug treatment group were decreased compared to diethylstilbestrol group, while E2 and IGF-1 showed up-regulation. Agonist of a7nAChR can up-regulate estrogen receptor expression and may prevent the occurrence and development of osteoporosis. PMID:26722551

  18. 67-Kilodalton laminin receptor expression correlates with worse prognostic indicators in non-small cell lung carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Fontanini, G; Vignati, S; Chiné, S; Lucchi, M; Mussi, A; Angeletti, C A; Ménard, S; Castronovo, V; Bevilacqua, G

    1997-02-01

    Tumor samples obtained from 72 patients resected for non-small cell lung cancer were stained immunohistochemically using an immunoperoxidase method and the MLuC5 monoclonal antibody specific for the 67-kDa laminin receptor. Sixty-one of 72 patients (84.7%) displayed a MLuC5-positive reaction, which was usually localized in both the inner surface of the plasmatic membranes and the cytoplasm of neoplastic cells. When we compared the laminin receptor expression with clinicopathological and biological parameters such as histotype, grading, T status, N status, ploidy, proliferative activity, vessel invasion, and p53 protein accumulation, the following results were observed: (a) the mean expression of the receptor was higher in the group of patients with metastatic nodal involvement than in those with uninvolved lymph nodes (P = 0.02); (b) a high Ki-67 score (>13% of positive cells) was observed in tumors with a higher mean value of laminin receptor (P = 0.004); (c) the tumors harboring neoplastic emboli in their vessels showed a higher laminin receptor immunoreactivity (P = 0.02); and (d) a borderline association was found between the high mean value of laminin receptor immunopositivity and p53 accumulation in neoplastic cell nuclei (P = 0.05). Our observations indicate that detection of high tissue levels of 67-kDa laminin receptor is associated with an invasive phenotype in non-small cell lung cancer and may provide further information in the biological characterization of this type of cancer.

  19. Neuroendocrine tumours - Medical therapy: Biological.

    PubMed

    Rinke, Anja; Krug, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Somatostatin analogues (SSA) are well established antisecretory drugs that have been used as first line treatment for symptomatic control in hormonally active neuroendocrine tumours (NET) for three decades. Both available depot formulations of SSA, long-acting repeatable (LAR) octreotide and lanreotide autogel, seem similarly effective and well tolerated, although comparative trials in NET have not been performed. The importance of SSA as antiproliferative treatment has been increasingly recognized during recent years. Two placebo-controlled trials demonstrated significant prolongation of progression free survival under SSA treatment. However, objective response as assessed by imaging is rare. Interferon-α (IFNα) also has antisecretory and antiproliferative efficacy in NET. Due to the less favourable toxicity profile it mainly has a role as add-on option in the refractory setting, especially in carcinoid syndrome patients. Further studies are needed to evaluate the antiproliferative efficacy of the multiligand SSA pasireotide and the role of pegylated IFNα. PMID:26971845

  20. Transsphenoidal surgery for pituitary tumours

    PubMed Central

    Massoud, A; Powell, M; Williams, R; Hindmarsh, P; Brook, C

    1997-01-01

    Accepted 29 January 1997
 OBJECTIVES—Transsphenoidal surgery (TSS) is the preferred method for the excision of pituitary microadenomas in adults. This study was carried out to establish the long term efficacy and safety of TSS in children.
STUDY DESIGN—A 14 year retrospective analysis was carried out on 23 children (16 boys and seven girls), all less than 18 years of age, who had undergone TSS at our centre.
RESULTS—Twenty nine transsphenoidal surgical procedures were carried out. The most common diagnosis was an adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) secreting adenoma (14 (61%) patients). The median length of follow up was 8.0 years (range 0.3-14.0 years). Eighteen (78%) patients were cured after the first procedure. No death was related to the operation. The most common postoperative complication was diabetes insipidus, which was transient in most patients. Other complications were headaches in two patients and cerebrospinal fluid leaks in two patients. De novo endocrine deficiencies after TSS in children were as follows: three (14%) patients developed panhypopituitarism, eight (73%) developed growth hormone insufficiency, three (14%) developed secondary hypothyroidism, and four (21%) developed gonadotrophin deficiency. Permanent ACTH deficiency occurred in five (24%) patients, though all patients received postoperative glucocorticoid treatment until dynamic pituitary tests were performed three months after TSS.
CONCLUSIONS—TSS in children is a safe and effective treatment for pituitary tumours, provided it is performed by surgeons with considerable experience and expertise. Surgical complications are minimal. Postoperative endocrine deficit is considerable, but is only permanent in a small proportion of patients.

 • Transsphenoidal surgery is a safe and effective treatment for pituitary tumours in children • Transsphenoidal surgery should be performed by surgeons with considerable experience and expertise • Surgical complications of

  1. Solitary fibrous tumour of the pancreas: a new member of the small group of mesenchymal pancreatic tumours.

    PubMed

    Lüttges, J; Mentzel, T; Hübner, G; Klöppel, G

    1999-07-01

    Solitary fibrous tumours usually occur in the pleura, but occasionally they appear in extraserosal soft tissues or parenchymatous organs, where their diagnosis often causes problems. This report describes a solitary fibrous tumour (SFT) of the pancreas in a 50-year-old woman treated by left-side pancreatectomy. The tumour showed immunocytochemical reactivity for CD34, CD99 and bcl-2. Because of its favourable prognosis, SFT must be clearly distinguished from leiomyosarcoma, the most frequent nonepithelial tumour of the pancreas. Other mesenchymal tumours that may occur in the pancreas include tumours of the peripheral nerve sheath, fibrous histiocytic tumours and rare vascular tumours.

  2. Functional polarization of tumour-associated macrophages by tumour-derived lactic acid.

    PubMed

    Colegio, Oscar R; Chu, Ngoc-Quynh; Szabo, Alison L; Chu, Thach; Rhebergen, Anne Marie; Jairam, Vikram; Cyrus, Nika; Brokowski, Carolyn E; Eisenbarth, Stephanie C; Phillips, Gillian M; Cline, Gary W; Phillips, Andrew J; Medzhitov, Ruslan

    2014-09-25

    Macrophages have an important role in the maintenance of tissue homeostasis. To perform this function, macrophages must have the capacity to monitor the functional states of their 'client cells': namely, the parenchymal cells in the various tissues in which macrophages reside. Tumours exhibit many features of abnormally developed organs, including tissue architecture and cellular composition. Similarly to macrophages in normal tissues and organs, macrophages in tumours (tumour-associated macrophages) perform some key homeostatic functions that allow tumour maintenance and growth. However, the signals involved in communication between tumours and macrophages are poorly defined. Here we show that lactic acid produced by tumour cells, as a by-product of aerobic or anaerobic glycolysis, has a critical function in signalling, through inducing the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor and the M2-like polarization of tumour-associated macrophages. Furthermore, we demonstrate that this effect of lactic acid is mediated by hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF1α). Finally, we show that the lactate-induced expression of arginase 1 by macrophages has an important role in tumour growth. Collectively, these findings identify a mechanism of communication between macrophages and their client cells, including tumour cells. This communication most probably evolved to promote homeostasis in normal tissues but can also be engaged in tumours to promote their growth.

  3. Paediatric extracranial germ-cell tumours.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, Furqan; Murray, Matthew J; Amatruda, James F; Coleman, Nicholas; Nicholson, James C; Hale, Juliet P; Pashankar, Farzana; Stoneham, Sara J; Poynter, Jenny N; Olson, Thomas A; Billmire, Deborah F; Stark, Daniel; Rodriguez-Galindo, Carlos; Frazier, A Lindsay

    2016-04-01

    Management of paediatric extracranial germ-cell tumours carries a unique set of challenges. Germ-cell tumours are a heterogeneous group of neoplasms that present across a wide age range and vary in site, histology, and clinical behaviour. Patients with germ-cell tumours are managed by a diverse array of specialists. Thus, staging, risk stratification, and treatment approaches for germ-cell tumours have evolved disparately along several trajectories. Paediatric germ-cell tumours differ from the adolescent and adult disease in many ways, leading to complexities in applying age-appropriate, evidence-based care. Suboptimal outcomes remain for several groups of patients, including adolescents, and patients with extragonadal tumours, high tumour markers at diagnosis, or platinum-resistant disease. Survivors have significant long-term toxicities. The challenge moving forward will be to translate new insights from molecular studies and collaborative clinical data into improved patient outcomes. Future trials will be characterised by improved risk-stratification systems, biomarkers for response and toxic effects, rational reduction of therapy for low-risk patients and novel approaches for poor-risk patients, and improved international collaboration across paediatric and adult cooperative research groups. PMID:27300675

  4. The Laser Treatment of Experimental Malignant Tumours

    PubMed Central

    McGuff, Paul E.; Deterling, Ralph A.; Gottlieb, Leonard S.; Fahimi, H. Dariush; Bushnell, David; Roeber, Fred

    1964-01-01

    Some of the results of experiments performed during the past two years to assess effects of laser energy on experimental malignant tumours are reviewed. Twenty types of malignant tumours (most in the cheek pouch and 11 of human origin) were treated in over 700 Syrian hamsters. Results of laser treatment of malignant melanomas and thyroidal carcinomas are presented. A human patient with malignant melanoma treated by laser energy is described. Investigation of thermal effect revealed that the laser-treated tumour remained warm for about one minute, while the cautery-treated tumour cooled to normal temperature in five seconds. Direct action of laser on superficial tumours is possible; deeper lesions must be exposed surgically. Laser energy has a selective effect on certain malignant tumours, resulting in their progressive regression and ultimate dissolution. All hamsters with implanted malignant melanomas and carcinomas of human origin, after completion of a course of laser treatment, showed no gross or histologic evidence of tumour up to the date of last observation. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2aFig. 2bFig. 2cFig. 2dFig. 2eFig. 2fFig. 3Fig. 4aFig. 4bFig. 4cFig. 4dFig. 4eFig. 4fFig. 4gFig. 6 PMID:14229757

  5. MRI appearances of borderline ovarian tumours.

    PubMed

    Bent, C L; Sahdev, A; Rockall, A G; Singh, N; Sohaib, S A; Reznek, R H

    2009-04-01

    This review was performed to describe the range of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appearances of borderline ovarian tumours. The MRI findings in 26 patients with 31 borderline ovarian tumours (mean age: 40.1 years, range: 14-85 years) were retrospectively reviewed. For each tumour, site, size, MRI characteristics, and enhancement following gadolinium administration were recorded. There were 20 serous and 11 mucinous borderline ovarian subtypes. Nine of 26 patients demonstrated bilateral disease on MRI; synchronous contralateral ovarian disease included three benign, five serous borderline, and one serous invasive tumour. A history of a metachronous mucinous borderline tumour was identified in one patient. MRI appearances were classified into four morphological categories: group 1 (6/31, 19%), unilocular cysts; group 2 (6/31, 19%), minimally septate cysts with papillary projections; group 3 (14/31, 45%), markedly septate lesions with plaque-like excrescences; and group 4 (5/31, 16%), predominantly solid with exophytic papillary projections, all of serous subtype. There was a significant difference in mean volume between serous (841.5 cm(3)) and mucinous (6358.2 cm(3)) subtypes (p=0.009). All tumours demonstrated at least one MRI feature suggestive of malignancy. The present review demonstrates the variable MRI appearances of borderline ovarian tumours along with imaging features suggestive of tumour subtype. In patients in whom the clinical features are suggestive of a borderline ovarian tumour (young age and normal or minimally elevated CA125), the ability to predict a borderline disease using morphological features observed on MRI would be extremely helpful in surgical planning, with the potential to offer fertility or ovary-preserving surgery. Future studies are required to further this aim.

  6. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Imaging of Prostate Cancer with a Gastrin Releasing Peptide Receptor Antagonist - from Mice to Men

    PubMed Central

    Wieser, Gesche; Mansi, Rosalba; Grosu, Anca L.; Schultze-Seemann, Wolfgang; Dumont-Walter, Rebecca A.; Meyer, Philipp T.; Maecke, Helmut R.; Reubi, Jean Claude; Weber, Wolfgang A.

    2014-01-01

    Ex vivo studies have shown that the gastrin releasing peptide receptor (GRPr) is overexpressed on almost all primary prostate cancers, making it a promising target for prostate cancer imaging and targeted radiotherapy. Methods: Biodistribution, dosimetry and tumor uptake of the GRPr antagonist 64Cu-CB-TE2A-AR06 [(64Cu-4,11-bis(carboxymethyl)-1,4,8,11-tetraazabicyclo(6.6.2)hexadecane)-PEG4-D-Phe-Gln-Trp-Ala-Val-Gly-His-Sta-LeuNH2] were studied by PET/CT in four patients with newly diagnosed prostate cancer (T1c-T2b, Gleason 6-7). Results: No adverse events were observed after injection of 64Cu-CB-TE2A-AR06. Three of four tumors were visualized with high contrast [tumor-to-prostate ratio > 4 at 4 hours (h) post injection (p.i.)], one small tumor (T1c, < 5% tumor on biopsy specimens) showed moderate contrast (tumor-to-prostate ratio at 4 h: 1.9). Radioactivity was cleared by the kidneys and only the pancreas demonstrated significant accumulation of radioactivity, which rapidly decreased over time. Conclusion: 64Cu-CB-TE2A-AR06 shows very favorable characteristics for imaging prostate cancer. Future studies evaluating 64Cu-CB-TE2A-AR06 PET/CT for prostate cancer detection, staging, active surveillance, and radiation treatment planning are necessary. PMID:24578724

  7. Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase regulation of gastrin-releasing peptide-induced cell cycle progression in neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Ishola, Titilope A; Kang, JungHee; Qiao, Jingbo; Evers, B Mark; Chung, Dai H

    2007-06-01

    Gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP), the mammalian equivalent of bombesin (BBS), is an autocrine growth factor for neuroblastoma; its receptor is up-regulated in undifferentiated neuroblastomas. Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) is a critical cell survival pathway; it is negatively regulated by the PTEN tumor suppressor gene. We have recently found that poorly differentiated neuroblastomas express decreased PTEN protein levels. Moreover, overexpression of the GRP receptor, a member of the G-protein coupled receptor family, down-regulates PTEN expression, resulting in increased neuroblastoma cell growth. Therefore, we sought to determine whether GRP or BBS activates PI3K in neuroblastoma cells (BE(2)-C, LAN-1, SK-N-SH). GRP or BBS treatment rapidly increased phosphorylation of Akt and GSK-3beta in neuroblastoma cells. Inhibition of GRP receptor, with antagonist GRP-H2756 or siRNA, attenuated BBS-induced phosphorylation of Akt. LY294002, a PI3K inhibitor, also abrogated BBS-stimulated phospho-Akt as well as its cell cycle targets. GRP increased G1/S phase progression in SK-N-SH cells. BBS-mediated BrdU incorporation was blocked by LY294002. Our findings identify PI3K as an important signaling pathway for GRP-mediated neuroblastoma cell growth. A novel therapy targeted at GRP/GRP receptor may prove to be an effective treatment option to inhibit PI3K in neuroblastomas.

  8. Primary Axillary Porocarcinoma: A Rare Cutaneous Tumour.

    PubMed

    Devi, Nalli R Sumitra; Valarmathi, K; Lilly, Mary; Satish, Selvi; Mishra, Nidhi

    2016-02-01

    Eccrine porocarcinoma, a rare cutaneous malignant tumour accounts for a fraction of sweat gland tumours. This tumour is found to originate from the intraepithelial parts of the sweat glands. It commonly involves the lower extremities in elderly patients and carries an aggressive behaviour. Cutaneous and visceral metastasis can occur and hence prompt treatment is mandatory. Surgical excision is the mainstay of treatment modality. We hereby present a case of eccrine porocarcinoma in a 50-year-old male in the right axillary region presenting as a verrucous lesion. PMID:27042472

  9. The combined epithelial odontogenic tumour in Malaysians.

    PubMed

    Siar, C H; Ng, K H

    1991-04-01

    The combined epithelial odontogenic tumour represents a hybrid lesion comprising primarily areas of adenomatoid odontogenic tumour intermixed with foci of calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumour. Five such cases retrieved from the files of the Division of Stomatology, Institute for Medical Research, Kuala Lumpur, and four others from the existing literature were analysed. A mean age of 18.8 years, a female preponderance (66.7%) with a male to female ratio of 1:2 and predilection for the mandible (55.6%) were observed. All cases were treated by conservative surgery and the lack of recurrence confirmed the innocuous nature of this lesion.

  10. The prophylaxis of nonindustrial urothelial tumours

    PubMed Central

    Mount, Balfour M.

    1973-01-01

    Present knowledge concerning carcinogenesis and the natural history of urothelial tumours precludes firm conclusions relative to nonindustrial prophylaxis. However, a number of measures are consistent with current data and may be instituted for those patients with a demonstrated propensity to urothelial tumours. Their acceptability is based on the lack of associated toxicity for the patient. These measures include the elimination of significant infection, cigarettes, artificial sweeteners, analgesic abuse and coffee, the administration of vitamins C and B6, and in selected cases, the use of thiotepa. It is emphasized that the merit of these steps in altering the natural history of urothelial tumours is uncertain. PMID:4197537

  11. Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumour of the gallbladder

    PubMed Central

    Behranwala, Kasim A; Straker, Peter; Wan, Andrew; Fisher, Cyril; Thompson, Jeremy N

    2005-01-01

    Background Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumour (IMT) is a benign, nonmetastasizing proliferation of myofibroblasts with a potential for local infiltration, recurrence and persistent local growth. Case report We report a case of a 51 year-old female, who had excision of a gallbladder tumour. Histopathology showed it to be IMT of the gallbladder. Conclusion The approach to these tumours should be primarily surgical resection to obtain a definitive diagnosis and relieve symptoms. IMT has a potential for local infiltration, recurrence and persistent local growth. PMID:15862123

  12. Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumour of the gallbladder.

    PubMed

    Behranwala, Kasim A; Straker, Peter; Wan, Andrew; Fisher, Cyril; Thompson, Jeremy N

    2005-04-29

    BACKGROUND: Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumour (IMT) is a benign, nonmetastasizing proliferation of myofibroblasts with a potential for local infiltration, recurrence and persistent local growth. CASE REPORT: We report a case of a 51 year-old female, who had excision of a gallbladder tumour. Histopathology showed it to be IMT of the gallbladder. CONCLUSION: The approach to these tumours should be primarily surgical resection to obtain a definitive diagnosis and relieve symptoms. IMT has a potential for local infiltration, recurrence and persistent local growth. PMID:15862123

  13. Warthin's tumour: a retrospective case series.

    PubMed

    Taylor, T R; Cozens, N J A; Robinson, I

    2009-11-01

    Warthin's tumour (benign cystadenolymphoma) is the second most common salivary gland tumour after pleomorphic salivary adenoma, and it is commonly encountered in routine head and neck ultrasonography. Tissue diagnosis can be achieved by fine-needle aspiration. Infarction and inflammatory response following fine-needle aspiration is previously described in excision specimens. We describe 7 cases of radiologically infarcting Warthin's tumours in situ in a retrospective analysis of 76 patients, and demonstrate an approximate incidence of at least 9% of infarction following fine-needle aspiration in lesions left in situ. We recommend the possibility of infarction and associated clinical symptoms being incorporated into pre-fine-needle aspiration patient counselling.

  14. Synchronous extra-parotid Warthin's tumour.

    PubMed

    Nishikawa, H; Kirkham, N; Hogbin, B M

    1989-08-01

    Warthin's tumour (also known as adenolymphoma or papillary cystadenoma lymphomatosum) is benign and accounts for 12 per cent of all neoplasms of the parotid gland. A case of extra-parotid Warthin's tumour occurring synchronously in a peri-parotid lymph node is described. This is not a metastatic phenomenon and occurs as a result of salivary gland inclusions of local lymph nodes during the embryological development of the parotid. Extra-parotid Warthin's tumour should be regarded as a benign incidental finding and the prognosis is excellent.

  15. A New Triggering Receptor Expressed on Myeloid Cells (TREM) Family Member, TLT-6, is Involved in Activation and Proliferation of Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Won, Kyung-Jong; Park, Sung-Won; Lee, Seunghoon; Kong, Il-Keun; Chae, Jung-Il; Kim, Bokyung; Lee, Eun-Jong

    2015-01-01

    The triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells (TREM) family, which is abundantly expressed in myeloid lineage cells, plays a pivotal role in innate and adaptive immune response. In this study, we aimed to identify a novel receptor expressed on hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) by using in silico bioinformatics and to characterize the identified receptor. We thus found the TREM-like transcript (TLT)-6, a new member of TREM family. TLT-6 has a single immunoglobulin domain in the extracellular region and a long cytoplasmic region containing 2 immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motif-like domains. TLT-6 transcript was expressed in HSCs, monocytes and macrophages. TLT-6 protein was up-regulated on the surface of bone marrow-derived and peritoneal macrophages by lipopolysaccharide stimulation. TLT-6 exerted anti-proliferative effects in macrophages. Our results demonstrate that TLT-6 may regulate the activation and proliferation of macrophages. PMID:26557807

  16. Exome sequencing identifies ATP4A gene as responsible of an atypical familial type I gastric neuroendocrine tumour.

    PubMed

    Calvete, Oriol; Reyes, Jose; Zuñiga, Sheila; Paumard-Hernández, Beatriz; Fernández, Victoria; Bujanda, Luís; Rodriguez-Pinilla, María S; Palacios, Jose; Heine-Suñer, Damian; Banka, Siddharth; Newman, William G; Cañamero, Marta; Pritchard, D Mark; Benítez, Javier

    2015-05-15

    Gastric neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) arise from enterochromaffin-like cells, which are located in oxyntic glands within the stomach. Type I tumours represent 70-80% of gastric NETs and are associated with hypergastrinaemia, chronic atrophic gastritis and achlorhydria. Gastrin is involved in the endocrine regulation of gastric acid production. Most type I gastric NETs are sporadic, have a good prognosis and their genetic basis are unknown. We performed an exome sequencing study in a family with consanguineous parents and 10 children, five of whom were affected by type I gastric NET. Atypical clinical traits included an earlier age of onset (around 30 years), aggressiveness (three had nodal infiltration requiring total gastrectomy and one an adenocarcinoma) and iron-deficiency rather than megaloblastic anaemia. We identified a homozygous missense mutation in the 14th exon of the ATP4A gene (c.2107C>T), which encodes the proton pump responsible for acid secretion by gastric parietal cells. The amino acid p.Arg703Cys is highly conserved across species and originates a change of one of the transmembrane domains that avoids the liberation of protons from cells to stomach. This is consistent with the achlorhydria that was observed in the affected individuals. No germline or somatic mutations in the ATP4A gene were found in sporadic gastric NET patients. Based on the results of this large family, it seems that this atypical form of gastric NET has an earlier age of onset, behaves more aggressively and has atypical clinical traits that differentiated from other studied cases. PMID:25678551

  17. Association of Serum Soluble Triggering Receptor Expressed on Myeloid Cells Levels in Malignant Febrile Neutropenic Patients with Bacteremia and Fungemia

    PubMed Central

    Arzanian, Mohammad-Taghi; Soltani, Babak; Fahimzad, Alireza; Shiva, Farideh; Shamshiri, Ahmad-Reza; Karimi, Abdollah

    2011-01-01

    Objective Infections are the major cause of morbidity and mortality in febrile neutropenic patients with malignancy. Rapid diagnostic tests are needed for prompt diagnosis and early treatment which is crucial for optimal management. We assessed the utility of soluble triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells (sTREM-1) in the diagnosis of bacteremia and fungemia in febrile neutropenic patients. Methods Sixty-five febrile neutropenic children with malignancy hospitalized in Mofid Children's Hospital during a period of one year from January 2007 were recruited for this cross sectional study (mean age 66.2± 37 months; 35 females and 30 males). Thirty patients (46.2%) had acute lymphoblastic leukemia, 2 (3.1%) acute myeloid leukemia, one (1.5%) lymphoma and 32 (49.2%) were under treatment for solid tumors. Simultaneous blood samples were collected for measurement of serum sTREM-1 levels and for blood cultures which were grown in BACTEC media. Gold standard for the presence of infection was a positive BACTEC culture as a more sensitive method compared to current blood culture techniques. Findings Blood cultures with BACTEC system were positive in 13(20%) patients (12 bacterial and one fungal culture). The mean serum sTREM-1 level in BACTEC positive patients was 948.2±592.9 pg/ml but in BACTEC negative cases it was 76.3±118.8 pg/ml (P<0.001). The optimal cut-off point of sTREM-1 for detecting patients with positive result of BACTEC was 525 pg/ml with sensitivity and specificity of 84.6% and 100%, respectively. Conclusion Our study revealed a significant association between serum sTREM-1 level and bacteremia and fungemia in febrile neutropenic patients suffering malignancy with acceptable sensitivity and specificity. PMID:23056805

  18. Estrogen and androgen receptor expression in surface epithelium and inclusion cyst in the ovary of premenopausal and postmenopausal women

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The importance of surface epithelium and epithelial inclusion cysts in the ovary arises from studies demonstrating that these structures are susceptible to epithelial ovarian cancer development. The expression of estrogen receptor alpha (ER alpha), androgen receptor (AR), in epithelial cells of the ovary from premenopausal and postmenopausal women is interesting because sexual steroid hormones are involved in cell growth and differentiation. Methods The presence of ER alpha, AR, and the orphan G protein-coupled receptor 30 (GPR30) was demonstrated by immunofluorescence in ovaries obtained from 79 pre and postmenopausal patients, undergoing histero-salpingo-oophorectomy for proliferative gynecological diseases. The proportion of patients that displayed positive reaction for estrogen and androgen receptors in epithelial cells of the ovary was evaluated according to menopausal status and associated pathology. Results The proportion of patients that displayed a positive receptor expression in the epithelial cells of the ovarian surface and cortical inclusion cysts shows that ER alpha is present in 20 of 79 patients (0.25), AR in 33 of 79 (0.42) and GPR30 in 38 of 55 (0.69). There are no differences in ER alpha, AR, and GPR30 expression between pre and postmenopausal patients and considering the associated pathology, proportions for ER alpha and GPR30 are similar. The patients with cervical cancer show a higher proportion of AR expression in epithelial cells of the ovary, which is statistically significant (P < 0.01) compared with patients with other proliferative diseases. Conclusions The presence of ER alpha, AR, and GPR30 in the surface epithelial ovarian cells and its derivatives are observed with a proportion that is specific for each receptor. The proportion of expression for these receptors in the epithelial cells of the ovary does not change after menopause. The proportion of ovaries with AR positive epithelial cells in patients with cervical

  19. Control of transferrin receptor expression via nitric oxide-mediated modulation of iron-regulatory protein 2.

    PubMed

    Kim, S; Ponka, P

    1999-11-12

    Cellular iron storage and uptake are coordinately regulated post-transcriptionally by cytoplasmic factors, iron-regulatory proteins 1 and 2 (IRP-1 and IRP-2). When iron in the intracellular transit pool is scarce, IRPs bind to iron-responsive elements (IREs) in the 5'-untranslated region of the ferritin mRNA and 3'-untranslated region of the transferrin receptor (TfR) mRNA. Such binding inhibits translation of ferritin mRNA and stabilizes the mRNA for TfR, whereas the opposite scenario develops when iron in the transit pool is plentiful. However, we (Richardson, D. R., Neumannova, V., Nagy, E., and Ponka, P. (1995) Blood 86, 3211-3219) and others reported that the binding of IRPs to IREs can also be modulated by nitric oxide (NO). In this study, we showed that a short exposure of RAW 264.7 cells (a murine macrophage cell line) to the NO(+) donor, sodium nitroprusside (SNP), caused a significant decrease in IRP-2 binding to the IREs followed by IRP-2 degradation and that these changes occurred without affecting IRP-1 binding. The SNP-mediated degradation of IRP-2 in RAW 264.7 cells could be prevented by MG-132 or lactacystin, known inhibitors of proteasome-dependent protein degradation. A SNP-mediated decrease in IRP-2 binding and levels was associated with a dramatic decrease in TfR mRNA levels and an increase in ferritin synthesis. Importantly, the proteasome inhibitor MG-132 prevented the SNP-mediated decrease in TfR mRNA levels. These observations suggest that IRP-2 can play an important role in controlling transferrin receptor expression.

  20. Modulation of GABA receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes by 13-L-hydroxylinoleic acid and food additives.

    PubMed

    Aoshima, H; Tenpaku, Y

    1997-12-01

    To study the effects of 13-L-hydroxylinoleic acid (LOH) and food additives on gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptors, ionotropic GABA receptors were expressed in Xenopus oocytes by injecting mRNAs prepared from rat whole brain. LOH, which was prepared by reduction of 13-L-hydroperoxylinoleic acid (LOOH), inhibited the response of GABA receptors in the presence of high concentrations of GABA. LOH also inhibited nicotinic acetylcholine, glycine, and kainate receptors, while it had little effect on NMDA receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes. However, LOH potentiated the response of GABA receptors as well as LOOH in the presence of low concentrations of GABA, possibly increasing the affinity of GABA for the receptors, while linoleic acid did not. Since some modification of the compounds seemed to change their effects on GABA receptors, the responses of GABA receptors elicited by 10 microM GABA were measured in the presence of compounds with various kinds of functional groups or the structural isomers of pentanol. Potentiation of GABA receptors depended strongly on the species of functional groups and also depended on the structure of the isomers. Then effects of various kinds of food additives on GABA receptors were also examined; perfumes such as alcohols or esters potentiated the responses strongly, while hexylamine, nicotinamide, or caffeine inhibited the responses, mainly in a competitive manner, and vanillin inhibited the responses noncompetitively. These results suggest the possibility that production of LOOH and LOH, or intake of much of some food additives, modulates the neural transmission in the brain, especially through ionotropic GABA receptors and changes the frame of the human mind, as alcohol or tobacco does.

  1. Neuronal Hyperactivity Disturbs ATP Microgradients, Impairs Microglial Motility, and Reduces Phagocytic Receptor Expression Triggering Apoptosis/Microglial Phagocytosis Uncoupling

    PubMed Central

    Nadjar, Agnes; Layé, Sophie; Leyrolle, Quentin; Gómez-Nicola, Diego; Domercq, María; Pérez-Samartín, Alberto; Sánchez-Zafra, Víctor; Savage, Julie C.; Hui, Chin-Wai; Deudero, Juan J. P.; Brewster, Amy L.; Anderson, Anne E.; Zaldumbide, Laura; Galbarriatu, Lara; Marinas, Ainhoa; Vivanco, Maria dM.; Matute, Carlos; Maletic-Savatic, Mirjana

    2016-01-01

    Phagocytosis is essential to maintain tissue homeostasis in a large number of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases, but its role in the diseased brain is poorly explored. Recent findings suggest that in the adult hippocampal neurogenic niche, where the excess of newborn cells undergo apoptosis in physiological conditions, phagocytosis is efficiently executed by surveillant, ramified microglia. To test whether microglia are efficient phagocytes in the diseased brain as well, we confronted them with a series of apoptotic challenges and discovered a generalized response. When challenged with excitotoxicity in vitro (via the glutamate agonist NMDA) or inflammation in vivo (via systemic administration of bacterial lipopolysaccharides or by omega 3 fatty acid deficient diets), microglia resorted to different strategies to boost their phagocytic efficiency and compensate for the increased number of apoptotic cells, thus maintaining phagocytosis and apoptosis tightly coupled. Unexpectedly, this coupling was chronically lost in a mouse model of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) as well as in hippocampal tissue resected from individuals with MTLE, a major neurological disorder characterized by seizures, excitotoxicity, and inflammation. Importantly, the loss of phagocytosis/apoptosis coupling correlated with the expression of microglial proinflammatory, epileptogenic cytokines, suggesting its contribution to the pathophysiology of epilepsy. The phagocytic blockade resulted from reduced microglial surveillance and apoptotic cell recognition receptor expression and was not directly mediated by signaling through microglial glutamate receptors. Instead, it was related to the disruption of local ATP microgradients caused by the hyperactivity of the hippocampal network, at least in the acute phase of epilepsy. Finally, the uncoupling led to an accumulation of apoptotic newborn cells in the neurogenic niche that was due not to decreased survival but to delayed cell clearance

  2. Adolescent social defeat alters N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor expression and impairs fear learning in adulthood.

    PubMed

    Novick, Andrew M; Mears, Mackenzie; Forster, Gina L; Lei, Yanlin; Tejani-Butt, Shanaz M; Watt, Michael J

    2016-05-01

    Repeated social defeat of adolescent male rats results in adult mesocortical dopamine hypofunction, impaired working memory, and increased contextual anxiety-like behavior. Given the role of glutamate in dopamine regulation, cognition, and fear and anxiety, we investigated potential changes to N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptors following adolescent social defeat. As both NMDA receptors and mesocortical dopamine are implicated in the expression and extinction of conditioned fear, a separate cohort of rats was challenged with a classical fear conditioning paradigm to investigate whether fear learning is altered by adolescent defeat. Quantitative autoradiography was used to measure 3H-MK-801 binding to NMDA receptors in regions of the medial prefrontal cortex, caudate putamen, nucleus accumbens, amygdala and hippocampus. Assessment of fear learning was achieved using an auditory fear conditioning paradigm, with freezing toward the auditory tone used as a measure of conditioned fear. Compared to controls, adolescent social defeat decreased adult NMDA receptor expression in the infralimbic region of the prefrontal cortex and central amygdala, while increasing expression in the CA3 region of the hippocampus. Previously defeated rats also displayed decreased conditioned freezing during the recall and first extinction periods, which may be related to the observed decreases and increases in NMDA receptors within the central amygdala and CA3, respectively. The alteration in NMDA receptors seen following adolescent social defeat suggests that dysfunction of glutamatergic systems, combined with mesocortical dopamine deficits, likely plays a role in the some of the long-term behavioral consequences of social stressors in adolescence seen in both preclinical and clinical studies. PMID:26876136

  3. High fat diet and body weight have different effects on cannabinoid CB1 receptor expression in rat nodose ganglia

    PubMed Central

    Cluny, N.L.; Baraboi, E.D.; Mackie, K; Burdyga, G.; Richard, D.; Dockray, G.J.; Sharkey, K.A.

    2013-01-01

    Energy balance is regulated, in part, by orexigenic signaling pathways of the vagus nerve. Fasting-induced modifications in the expression of orexigenic signaling systems have been observed in vagal afferents of lean animals. Altered basal cannabinoid (CB)1 receptor expression in the nodose ganglia in obesity has been reported. Whether altered body weight or a high fat diet modifies independent or additive changes in CB1 expression is unknown. We investigated the expression of CB1 and orexin 1 receptor (OX-1R) in nodose ganglia of rats fed ad libitum or food deprived (24h), maintained on low or high fat diets (HFD), with differing body weights. Male Wistar rats were fed chow or HFD (diet-induced obese: DIO or diet-resistant: DR) or were body weight matched to the DR group but fed chow (wmDR). CB1 and OX-1R immunoreactivity were investigated and CB1 mRNA density was determined using in situ hybridization. CB1 immunoreactivity was measured in fasted rats after sulfated cholecystokinin octapeptide (CCK8s) administration. In chow rats, fasting did not modify the level of CB1 mRNA. More CB1 immunoreactive cells were measured in fed DIO, DR and wmDR rats than chow rats; levels increased after fasting in chow and wmDR rats but not in DIO or DR rats. In HFD fasted rats CCK8s did not reduce CB1 immunoreactivity. OX-1R immunoreactivity was modified by fasting only in DR rats. These data suggest that body weight contributes to the proportion of neurons expressing CB1 immunoreactivity in the nodose ganglion, while HFD blunts fasting-induced increases, and CCK-induced suppression of, CB1-immunoreactivity. PMID:24145047

  4. Motor and behavioral phenotype in conditional mutants with targeted ablation of cortical D1 dopamine receptor-expressing cells.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Luning; O'Leary, Claire; Kim, Hyun Ah; Parish, Clare L; Massalas, Jim; Waddington, John L; Ehrlich, Michelle E; Schütz, Günter; Gantois, Ilse; Lawrence, Andrew J; Drago, John

    2015-04-01

    D1-dopamine receptors (Drd1a) are highly expressed in the deep layers of the cerebral cortex and the striatum. A number of human diseases such as Huntington disease and schizophrenia are known to have cortical pathology involving dopamine receptor expressing neurons. To illuminate their functional role, we exploited a Cre/Lox molecular paradigm to generate Emx-1(tox) MUT mice, a transgenic line in which cortical Drd1a-expressing pyramidal neurons were selectively ablated. Emx-1(tox) MUT mice displayed prominent forelimb dystonia, hyperkinesia, ataxia on rotarod testing, heightened anxiety-like behavior, and age-dependent abnormalities in a test of social interaction. The latter occurred in the context of normal working memory on testing in the Y-maze and for novel object recognition. Some motor and behavioral abnormalities in Emx-1(tox) MUT mice overlapped with those in CamKIIα(tox) MUT transgenic mice, a line in which both striatal and cortical Drd1a-expressing cells were ablated. Although Emx-1(tox) MUT mice had normal striatal anatomy, both Emx-1(tox) MUT and CamKIIα(tox) MUT mice displayed selective neuronal loss in cortical layers V and VI. This study shows that loss of cortical Drd1a-expressing cells is sufficient to produce deficits in multiple motor and behavioral domains, independent of striatal mechanisms. Primary cortical changes in the D1 dopamine receptor compartment are therefore likely to model a number of core clinical features in disorders such as Huntington disease and schizophrenia. PMID:25684539

  5. Intrathecal NGF administration reduces reactive astrocytosis and changes neurotrophin receptors expression pattern in a rat model of neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Cirillo, Giovanni; Cavaliere, Carlo; Bianco, Maria Rosaria; De Simone, Antonietta; Colangelo, Anna Maria; Sellitti, Stefania; Alberghina, Lilia; Papa, Michele

    2010-01-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF), an essential peptide for sensory neurons, seems to have opposite effects when administered peripherally or directly to the central nervous system. We investigated the effects of 7-days intrathecal (i.t.) infusion of NGF on neuronal and glial spinal markers relevant to neuropathic behavior induced by chronic constriction injury (CCI) of the sciatic nerve. Allodynic and hyperalgesic behaviors were investigated by Von Frey and thermal Plantar tests, respectively. NGF-treated animals showed reduced allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia, compared to control animals. We evaluated on lumbar spinal cord the expression of microglial (ED-1), astrocytic (GFAP and S-100beta), and C- and Adelta-fibers (SubP, IB-4 and Cb) markers. I.t. NGF treatment reduced reactive astrocytosis and the density of SubP, IB4 and Cb positive fibers in the dorsal horn of injured animals. Morphometric parameters of proximal sciatic nerve stump fibers and cells in DRG were also analyzed in CCI rats: myelin thickness was reduced and DRG neurons and satellite cells appeared hypertrophic. I.t. NGF treatment showed a beneficial effect in reversing these molecular and morphological alterations. Finally, we analyzed by immunohistochemistry the expression pattern of neurotrophin receptors TrkA, pTrkA, TrkB and p75(NTR). Substantial alterations in neurotrophin receptors expression were observed in the spinal cord of CCI and NGF-treated animals. Our results indicate that i.t. NGF administration reverses the neuro-glial morphomolecular changes occurring in neuropathic animals paralleled by alterations in neurotrophin receptors ratio, and suggest that NGF is effective in restoring homeostatic conditions in the spinal cord and maintaining analgesia in neuropathic pain.

  6. Progesterone receptor expression declines in the guinea pig uterus during functional progesterone withdrawal and in response to prostaglandins.

    PubMed

    Welsh, Toni N; Hirst, Jonathan J; Palliser, Hannah; Zakar, Tamas

    2014-01-01

    Progesterone withdrawal is essential for parturition, but the mechanism of this pivotal hormonal change is unclear in women and other mammals that give birth without a pre-labor drop in maternal progesterone levels. One possibility suggested by uterine tissue analyses and cell culture models is that progesterone receptor levels change at term decreasing the progesterone responsiveness of the myometrium, which causes progesterone withdrawal at the functional level and results in estrogen dominance enhancing uterine contractility. In this investigation we have explored whether receptor mediated functional progesterone withdrawal occurs during late pregnancy and labor in vivo. We have also determined whether prostaglandins that induce labor cause functional progesterone withdrawal by altering myometrial progesterone receptor expression. Pregnant guinea pigs were used, since this animal loses progesterone responsiveness at term and gives birth in the presence of high maternal progesterone level similarly to primates. We found that progesterone receptor mRNA and protein A and B expression decreased in the guinea pig uterus during the last third of gestation and in labor. Prostaglandin administration reduced while prostaglandin synthesis inhibitor treatment increased progesterone receptor A protein abundance. Estrogen receptor-1 protein levels remained unchanged during late gestation, in labor and after prostaglandin or prostaglandin synthesis inhibitor administration. Steroid receptor levels were higher in the non-pregnant than in the pregnant uterine horns. We conclude that the decreasing expression of both progesterone receptors A and B is a physiological mechanism of functional progesterone withdrawal in the guinea pig during late pregnancy and in labor. Further, prostaglandins administered exogenously or produced endogenously stimulate labor in part by suppressing uterine progesterone receptor A expression, which may cause functional progesterone withdrawal, promote

  7. Motor and behavioral phenotype in conditional mutants with targeted ablation of cortical D1 dopamine receptor-expressing cells.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Luning; O'Leary, Claire; Kim, Hyun Ah; Parish, Clare L; Massalas, Jim; Waddington, John L; Ehrlich, Michelle E; Schütz, Günter; Gantois, Ilse; Lawrence, Andrew J; Drago, John

    2015-04-01

    D1-dopamine receptors (Drd1a) are highly expressed in the deep layers of the cerebral cortex and the striatum. A number of human diseases such as Huntington disease and schizophrenia are known to have cortical pathology involving dopamine receptor expressing neurons. To illuminate their functional role, we exploited a Cre/Lox molecular paradigm to generate Emx-1(tox) MUT mice, a transgenic line in which cortical Drd1a-expressing pyramidal neurons were selectively ablated. Emx-1(tox) MUT mice displayed prominent forelimb dystonia, hyperkinesia, ataxia on rotarod testing, heightened anxiety-like behavior, and age-dependent abnormalities in a test of social interaction. The latter occurred in the context of normal working memory on testing in the Y-maze and for novel object recognition. Some motor and behavioral abnormalities in Emx-1(tox) MUT mice overlapped with those in CamKIIα(tox) MUT transgenic mice, a line in which both striatal and cortical Drd1a-expressing cells were ablated. Although Emx-1(tox) MUT mice had normal striatal anatomy, both Emx-1(tox) MUT and CamKIIα(tox) MUT mice displayed selective neuronal loss in cortical layers V and VI. This study shows that loss of cortical Drd1a-expressing cells is sufficient to produce deficits in multiple motor and behavioral domains, independent of striatal mechanisms. Primary cortical changes in the D1 dopamine receptor compartment are therefore likely to model a number of core clinical features in disorders such as Huntington disease and schizophrenia.

  8. Impact of obesity on taste receptor expression in extra-oral tissues: emphasis on hypothalamus and brainstem

    PubMed Central

    Herrera Moro Chao, D.; Argmann, C.; Van Eijk, M.; Boot, R. G.; Ottenhoff, R.; Van Roomen, C.; Foppen, E.; Siljee, J. E.; Unmehopa, U. A.; Kalsbeek, A.; Aerts, J. M. F. G.

    2016-01-01

    Sweet perception promotes food intake, whereas that of bitterness is inhibitory. Surprisingly, the expression of sweet G protein-coupled taste receptor (GPCTR) subunits (T1R2 and T1R3) and bitter GPCTRs (T2R116, T2R118, T2R138 and T2R104), as well as the α-subunits of the associated signalling complex (αGustducin, Gα14 and αTransducin), in oral and extra-oral tissues from lean and obese mice, remains poorly characterized. We focused on the impact of obesity on taste receptor expression in brain areas involved in energy homeostasis, namely the hypothalamus and brainstem. We demonstrate that many of the GPCTRs and α-subunits are co-expressed in these tissues and that obesity decreases expression of T1R3, T2R116, Gα14, αTrans and TRPM5. In vitro high levels of glucose caused a prominent down-regulation of T1R2 and Gα14 expression in cultured hypothalamic neuronal cells, leptin caused a transient down-regulation of T1R2 and T1R3 expression. Intriguingly, expression differences were also observed in other extra-oral tissues of lean and obese mice, most strikingly in the duodenum where obesity reduced the expression of most bitter and sweet receptors. In conclusion, obesity influences components of sweet and bitter taste sensing in the duodenum as well as regions of the mouse brain involved in energy homeostasis, including hypothalamus and brainstem. PMID:27388805

  9. Clinical Relevance of VPAC1 Receptor Expression in Early Arthritis: Association with IL-6 and Disease Activity

    PubMed Central

    Seoane, Iria V.; Ortiz, Ana M.; Piris, Lorena; Lamana, Amalia; Juarranz, Yasmina; García-Vicuña, Rosario; González-Álvaro, Isidoro; Gomariz, Rosa P.; Martínez, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    Background The vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) receptors VPAC1 and VPAC2 mediate anti-inflammatory and immunoregulatory responses in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Data on the expression of these receptors could complement clinical assessment in the management of RA. Our goal was to investigate the correlation between expression of both receptors and the 28-Joint Disease Activity Score (DAS28) in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from patients with early arthritis (EA). We also measured expression of IL-6 to evaluate the association between VIP receptors and systemic inflammation. Methods We analyzed 250 blood samples collected at any of the 5 scheduled follow-up visits from 125 patients enrolled in the Princesa Early Arthritis Register Longitudinal study. Samples from 22 healthy donors were also analyzed. Sociodemographic, clinical, and therapeutic data were systematically recorded. mRNA expression levels were determined using real-time PCR. Then, longitudinal multivariate analyses were performed. Results PBMCs from EA patients showed significantly higher expression of VPAC2 receptors at baseline compared to healthy donors (p<0.001). With time, however, VPAC2 expression tended to be significantly lower while VPAC1 receptor expression increased in correlation with a reduction in DAS28 index. Our results reveal that more severe inflammation, based on high levels of IL-6, is associated with lower expression of VPAC1 (p<0.001) and conversely with increased expression of VPAC2 (p<0.001). A major finding of this study is that expression of VPAC1 is lower in patients with increased disease activity (p = 0.001), thus making it possible to differentiate between patients with various degrees of clinical disease activity. Conclusion Patients with more severe inflammation and higher disease activity show lower levels of VPAC1 expression, which is associated with patient-reported impairment. Therefore, VPAC1 is a biological marker in EA. PMID:26881970

  10. Impact of obesity on taste receptor expression in extra-oral tissues: emphasis on hypothalamus and brainstem.

    PubMed

    Herrera Moro Chao, D; Argmann, C; Van Eijk, M; Boot, R G; Ottenhoff, R; Van Roomen, C; Foppen, E; Siljee, J E; Unmehopa, U A; Kalsbeek, A; Aerts, J M F G

    2016-01-01

    Sweet perception promotes food intake, whereas that of bitterness is inhibitory. Surprisingly, the expression of sweet G protein-coupled taste receptor (GPCTR) subunits (T1R2 and T1R3) and bitter GPCTRs (T2R116, T2R118, T2R138 and T2R104), as well as the α-subunits of the associated signalling complex (αGustducin, Gα14 and αTransducin), in oral and extra-oral tissues from lean and obese mice, remains poorly characterized. We focused on the impact of obesity on taste receptor expression in brain areas involved in energy homeostasis, namely the hypothalamus and brainstem. We demonstrate that many of the GPCTRs and α-subunits are co-expressed in these tissues and that obesity decreases expression of T1R3, T2R116, Gα14, αTrans and TRPM5. In vitro high levels of glucose caused a prominent down-regulation of T1R2 and Gα14 expression in cultured hypothalamic neuronal cells, leptin caused a transient down-regulation of T1R2 and T1R3 expression. Intriguingly, expression differences were also observed in other extra-oral tissues of lean and obese mice, most strikingly in the duodenum where obesity reduced the expression of most bitter and sweet receptors. In conclusion, obesity influences components of sweet and bitter taste sensing in the duodenum as well as regions of the mouse brain involved in energy homeostasis, including hypothalamus and brainstem. PMID:27388805

  11. Somatostatin receptor expression in small cell lung cancer as a prognostic marker and a target for peptide receptor radionuclide therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lapa, Constantin; Hänscheid, Heribert; Wild, Vanessa; Pelzer, Theo; Schirbel, Andreas; Werner, Rudolf A.; Droll, Sabine; Herrmann, Ken; Buck, Andreas K.; Lückerath, Katharina

    2016-01-01

    Despite initial responsiveness to both chemotherapy and radiotherapy, small cell lung cancer (SCLC) commonly relapses within months. Although neuroendocrine characteristics may be difficult to demonstrate in individual cases, a relevant expression of somatostatin receptors (SSTR) on the cell surface has been described. We aimed to evaluate the prognostic value of SSTR-expression in advanced SCLC. We further examined pre-requisites for successful peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT). 21 patients with extensive stage SCLC were enrolled. All patients underwent positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) with 68Ga-DOTATATE to select patients for SSTR-directed therapy. PET scans were visually and semi-quantitatively assessed and compared to SSTR2a and SSTR5 expression in biopsy samples. Peak standardized uptake values (SUVpeak) of tumors as well as tumor-to-liver ratios were correlated to progression-free (PFS) and overall survival (OS). In 4/21 patients all SCLC lesions were PET-positive. 6/21 subjects were rated “intermediate” with the majority of lesions positive, the remaining 11/21 patients were PET-negative. PET-positivity correlated well with histologic SSTR2a, but not with SSTR5 expression. Neither PET-positivity nor SUVpeak were predictors of PFS or OS. In 4 patients with intensive SSTR2a-receptor expression, PRRT was performed with one partial response and one stable disease, respectively. SSTR-expression as detected by 68Ga-DOTATATE-PET and/or histology is not predictive of PFS or OS in patients with advanced SCLC. However, in patients exhibiting sufficient tracer uptake, PRRT might be a treatment option given its low toxicity and the absence of effective alternatives. PMID:26936994

  12. Acetylcholine induces GABA release onto rod bipolar cells through heteromeric nicotinic receptors expressed in A17 amacrine cells

    PubMed Central

    Elgueta, Claudio; Vielma, Alex H.; Palacios, Adrian G.; Schmachtenberg, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Acetylcholine (ACh) is a major retinal neurotransmitter that modulates visual processing through a large repertoire of cholinergic receptors expressed on different retinal cell types. ACh is released from starburst amacrine cells (SACs) under scotopic conditions, but its effects on cells of the rod pathway have not been investigated. Using whole-cell patch clamp recordings in slices of rat retina, we found that ACh application triggers GABA release onto rod bipolar (RB) cells. GABA was released from A17 amacrine cells and activated postsynaptic GABAA and GABAC receptors in RB cells. The sensitivity of ACh-induced currents to nicotinic ACh receptor (nAChR) antagonists (TMPH ~ mecamylamine > erysodine > DhβE > MLA) together with the differential potency of specific agonists to mimic ACh responses (cytisine >> RJR2403 ~ choline), suggest that A17 cells express heteromeric nAChRs containing the β4 subunit. Activation of nAChRs induced GABA release after Ca2+ accumulation in A17 cell dendrites and varicosities mediated by L-type voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) and intracellular Ca2+ stores. Inhibition of acetylcholinesterase depolarized A17 cells and increased spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents in RB cells, indicating that endogenous ACh enhances GABAergic inhibition of RB cells. Moreover, injection of neostigmine or cytisine reduced the b-wave of the scotopic flash electroretinogram (ERG), suggesting that cholinergic modulation of GABA release controls RB cell activity in vivo. These results describe a novel regulatory mechanism of RB cell inhibition and complement our understanding of the neuromodulatory control of retinal signal processing. PMID:25709566

  13. Effect of exercise on hyperactivity, impulsivity and dopamine D2 receptor expression in the substantia nigra and striatum of spontaneous hypertensive rats

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Han Sam; Baek, Dae Jung; Baek, Seung Soo

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a heritable, chronic, neurobehavioral disorder that is characterized by hyperactivity, inattention, and impulsivity. It is commonly believed that the symptoms of ADHD are closely associated with hypo-function of the dopamine system. Dopamine D2 receptor activation decreases the excitability of dopamine neurons, as well as the release of dopamine. Physical exercise is known to improve structural and functional impairments in neuropsychiatric disorders. We investigated the therapeutic effect of exercise on ADHD. [Methods] Open field task and elevated-plus maze task were used in the evaluation of hyperactivity and impulsivity, respectively. Dopamine D2 receptor expression in the substantia nigra and striatum were evaluated by western blotting. [Results] The present results indicated that ADHD rats showed hyperactivity and impulsivity. Dopamine D2 receptor expression in the substantia nigra and striatum were increased in ADHD rats. Exercise alleviated hyperactivity and impulsivity in ADHD rats. Furthermore, dopamine D2 receptor expression in ADHD rats was also decreased by exercise. [Conclusion] We thus showed that exercise effectively alleviates ADHD-induced symptoms through enhancing dopamine D2 expression in the brain. PMID:25671205

  14. Regional tumour glutamine supply affects chromatin and cell identity.

    PubMed

    Højfeldt, Jonas W; Helin, Kristian

    2016-09-28

    Limited perfusion of solid tumours produces a nutrient-deprived tumour core microenvironment. Low glutamine levels in the tumour core are now shown to lead to reduced levels of α-ketoglutarate and decreased histone demethylase activity, thereby promoting a less differentiated and more therapy-resistant state of the tumour cells.

  15. Regional tumour glutamine supply affects chromatin and cell identity.

    PubMed

    Højfeldt, Jonas W; Helin, Kristian

    2016-09-28

    Limited perfusion of solid tumours produces a nutrient-deprived tumour core microenvironment. Low glutamine levels in the tumour core are now shown to lead to reduced levels of α-ketoglutarate and decreased histone demethylase activity, thereby promoting a less differentiated and more therapy-resistant state of the tumour cells. PMID:27684506

  16. Adenomatoid odontogenic tumour in a 20-year-old woman

    PubMed Central

    Virupakshappa, Deepti; Rajashekhara, Bhari Sharanesha; Manjunatha, Bhari Sharanesha; Das, Nagarajappa

    2014-01-01

    Adenomatoid odontogenic tumour is a relatively rare and distinct odontogenic tumour that is exclusively odontogenic epithelium in origin. It comprises 3% of all odontogenic tumours. This report describes the surgical therapy, clinical course and morphological characteristics of an adenomatoid odontogenic tumour that developed in the left maxilla of a 20-year-old patient. PMID:24810436

  17. Ovarian tumours in pregnancy: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Pakhee; Kehoe, Sean

    2011-04-01

    Ovarian tumours in pregnancy are a diagnostic and management challenge that is increasingly being faced by the clinician. While most masses are benign and resolve spontaneously, there are others that persist and indicate the need for surgical management. Ultrasound not only detects asymptomatic masses but also helps to guide their management based on presence or absence of features suspicious of malignancy. The role of tumour markers in pregnancy is limited due to their non-specific nature. Most masses treated in pregnancy are benign (most commonly dermoids), and most malignancies are either of low malignant potential or germ cell tumours, usually early stage disease. Surgical management is indicated for symptomatic masses or those with increasing size or complexity indicating possible malignancy. Both laparoscopy and laparotomy have similar results with regard to obstetric outcome. Conservative management is preferred in the remainder. MRI may help in better characterization of doubtful masses. National tumour registries can help to establish guidelines.

  18. A rare solitary fibrous tumour of kidney.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Tilak Bahadur; Nepal, Umesh

    2013-01-01

    A solitary fibrous tumour is an unusual spindle cell neoplasm. It frequently arises from the serosal surface of pleural cavity but has recently been described in diverse extrapleural sites. Urogenital localization is rare and only 36 cases of solitary fibrous tumours of the kidney have been described on published report. We report a case of a large solitary fibrous tumour clinically and radiologically thought to be renal cell carcinoma arising in the kidney of a 30 year old female. The radical nephrectomy was performed. The tumour was a well- circumscribed, solid mass attached to the renal pelvis without necrosis and haemorrhage. Histopathologically, a spindle cell neoplasia with alternating hypo and hypercellular areas, storiform, fascicular and hemangipericytoma like growth pattern and less cellular dense collagen deposits were observed. Immunohistochemical studies revealed reactivity for CD34, CD99 and Bcl-2 protein. PMID:24362666

  19. Tumour marker detection in oesophageal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Mealy, K; Feely, J; Reid, I; McSweeney, J; Walsh, T; Hennessy, T P

    1996-10-01

    Levels of the tumour markers CEA, CA 19-9, CA 125 and SCC were measured in 58 patients presenting with oesophageal carcinoma and compared with levels in patients with benign oesophageal disease and levels in normal volunteers. CEA and CA 19-9 were significantly increased in the patients with oesophageal cancer, however, individual sensitivity for CEA, CA 19-9, CA 125 and SCC was only 28, 34, 10, and 32%, respectively. The combined sensitivity of all markers was 64% and specificity was 80%. There was no difference in combined tumour marker sensitivity between squamous or adenocarcinomas of the oesophagus. No consistent change in marker levels occurred with treatment, and tumour marker levels could not be significantly correlated with stage of disease or short-term survival. These results indicate that tumour marker sensitivity is too low for oesophageal cancer screening and has poor prognostic significance in those undergoing treatment.

  20. Dentigerous Cyst Associated with Adenomatoid Odontogenic Tumour

    PubMed Central

    Majumdar, Sumit; Uppala, Divya; Talasila, Sunil; Babu, Mahesh

    2015-01-01

    Adenomatoid odontogenic tumour (AOT), a tumour composed of odontogenic epithelium, is an uncommon tumour of odontogenic origin that accounts for only 2.2- 7.1% of all odontogenic tumours. Very few cases of AOT associated with Dentigerous cyst (DC) have been reported till date, most cases are in females and have a striking tendency to occur in the anterior maxilla. The present case is that of a 14-year-old female who revealed a large radiolucent lesion associated with the crown of an unerupted canine located in the left maxillary anterior region. The microscopic examination revealed the presence of AOT in the fibrous capsule of a DC. In this paper, we describe the importance of grossing, sectioning and complete examination of the slide to diagnose such hybrid lesions. PMID:26155575

  1. Mesenchymal phosphaturic tumour: early detection of recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Allevi, Fabiana; Rabbiosi, Dimitri; Mandalà, Marco; Colletti, Giacomo

    2014-01-01

    The case of a recurrent phosphaturic mesenchymal tumour of the maxillary sinus 10 years after the first surgical excision is reported. The neoplasm first presented with paraneoplastic osteomalacia causing a pathological femur fracture. A right maxillary sinus tumour was identified and treated thereafter. The patient had no local symptoms and serum electrolytes returned to normal after surgical removal of the tumour. However, 10 years later, the patient's urine Ca and P levels increased and an octreoscan detected a new tumour in the right maxillary sinus. Early diagnosis prevented the effects of the paraneoplastic activity of the neoplasm. This case emphasises the importance of specific, close follow-up, because the neoplasm rarely produces local signs indicating its position. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of a late relapse presenting without relevant symptoms (local pain or swelling or pathological fractures). PMID:24827649

  2. Suppression of tumour growth by orally administered osteopontin is accompanied by alterations in tumour blood vessels

    PubMed Central

    Rittling, S R; Wejse, P L; Yagiz, K; Warot, G A; Hui, T

    2014-01-01

    Background: The integrin-binding protein osteopontin is strongly associated with tumour development, yet is an abundant dietary component as a constituent of human and bovine milk. Therefore, we tested the effect of orally administered osteopontin (o-OPN) on the development of subcutaneous tumours in mice. Methods: Bovine milk osteopontin was administered in drinking water to tumour-bearing immune-competent mice. Tumour growth, proliferation, necrosis, apoptosis and blood vessel size and number were measured. Expression of the α9 integrin was determined. Results: o-OPN suppressed tumour growth, increased the extent of necrosis, and induced formation of abnormally large blood vessels. Anti-OPN reactivity detected in the plasma of OPN-null mice fed OPN suggested that tumour-blocking peptides were absorbed during digestion, but the o-OPN effect was likely distinct from that of an RGD peptide. Expression of the α9 integrin was detected on both tumour cells and blood vessels. Potential active peptides from the α9 binding site of OPN were identified by mass spectrometry following in vitro digestion, and injection of these peptides suppressed tumour growth. Conclusions: These results suggest that peptides derived from o-OPN are absorbed and interfere with tumour growth and normal vessel development. o-OPN-derived peptides that target the α9 integrin are likely involved. PMID:24473400

  3. Unusual mass in the parapharyngeal space: a Warthin's tumour.

    PubMed

    Shaw, C-K Leslie; Sood, Sanjai; Bradley, Patrick J; Krishnan, Suren

    2006-03-01

    Parapharyngeal space (PPS) tumours are uncommon and can be a diagnostic challenge as the presenting symptoms are often vague and non-specific. Most of the PPS tumours are salivary tumours (pleomorphic adenoma being the most frequent diagnosis), and are thought to originate from minor salivary glands or the deep lobe of the parotid gland. Warthin's tumour, another benign salivary tumour involving the PPS has been rarely reported. A case of bilateral, metachronous Warthin's tumour involving the PPS is reported here. PPS Warthin's tumour is a very rare condition that if undiagnosed may result in considerable morbidity.

  4. Pineal anlage tumour - a rare entity with divergent histology.

    PubMed

    Ahuja, Arvind; Sharma, Mehar Chand; Suri, Vaishali; Sarkar, Chitra; Sharma, B S; Garg, Ajay

    2011-06-01

    Pineal anlage tumour is a rare tumour of the pineal gland that is not listed in the 2007 World Health Organization classification of tumours of the central nervous system. Pineal anlage has been defined as a primary pineal tumour with both neuroepithelial and ectomesenchymal differentiation but without endodermal differentiation. We report a pineal anlage tumour in a 4-month-old boy, the youngest patient reported with this rare tumour, with a brief review of the literature. Clinicians and neuropathologists should be aware of this entity as it is likely to be misdiagnosed as a teratoma or a melanocytic tumour of the central nervous system.

  5. Cervical intra-/extramedullary solitary fibrous tumour.

    PubMed

    Ogungbo, B; Prakash, S; Kulkarni, G; Bradey, N; Marks, S M; Scoones, D

    2005-06-01

    A 53-year-old man presented with a 9-month history of symptoms of right-sided weakness, tingling and hypersentivity to clothes on both sides of the body. MRI revealed a large intraspinal intradural tumour at the level of C3-C4 in the cervical cord. The final histology was a solitary fibrous tumour (SFT) of the cervical spinal cord. The radiological diagnosis, surgical management and histology are reviewed.

  6. Consensus on biomarkers for neuroendocrine tumour disease

    PubMed Central

    Oberg, Kjell; Modlin, Irvin M; De Herder, Wouter; Pavel, Marianne; Klimstra, David; Frilling, Andrea; Metz, David C; Heaney, Anthony; Kwekkeboom, Dik; Strosberg, Jonathan; Meyer, Timothy; Moss, Steven F; Washington, Kay; Wolin, Edward; Liu, Eric; Goldenring, James

    2016-01-01

    Management of neuroendocrine neoplasia represents a clinical challenge because of its late presentation, lack of treatment options, and limitations in present imaging modalities and biomarkers to guide management. Monoanalyte biomarkers have poor sensitivity, specificity, and predictive ability. A National Cancer Institute summit, held in 2007, on neuroendocrine tumours noted biomarker limitations to be a crucial unmet need in the management of neuroendocrine tumours. A multinational consensus meeting of multidisciplinary experts in neuroendocrine tumours assessed the use of current biomarkers and defined the perquisites for novel biomarkers via the Delphi method. Consensus (at >75%) was achieved for 88 (82%) of 107 assessment questions. The panel concluded that circulating multianalyte biomarkers provide the highest sensitivity and specificity necessary for minimum disease detection and that this type of biomarker had sufficient information to predict treatment effectiveness and prognosis. The panel also concluded that no monoanalyte biomarker of neuroendocrine tumours has yet fulfilled these criteria and there is insufficient information to support the clinical use of miRNA or circulating tumour cells as useful prognostic markers for this disease. The panel considered that trials measuring multianalytes (eg, neuroendocrine gene transcripts) should also identify how such information can optimise the management of patients with neuroendocrine tumours. PMID:26370353

  7. Brain tumour-associated status epilepticus.

    PubMed

    Goonawardena, Janindu; Marshman, Laurence A G; Drummond, Katharine J

    2015-01-01

    We have reviewed the scant literature on status epilepticus in patients with brain tumours. Patients with brain tumour-associated epilepsy (TAE) appear less likely to develop status epilepticus (TASE) than patients with epilepsy in the general population (EGP) are to develop status epilepticus (SEGP). TASE is associated with lesions in similar locations as TAE; in particular, the frontal lobes. However, in contrast to TAE, where seizures commence early in the course of the disease or at presentation, TASE is more likely to occur later in the disease course and herald tumour progression. In marked contrast to TAE, where epilepsy risk is inversely proportional to Word Health Organization tumour grade, TASE risk appears to be directly proportional to tumour grade (high grade gliomas appear singularly predisposed). Whilst anti-epileptic drug (AED) resistance is more common in TAE than EGP (with resistance directly proportional to tumour grade and frontal location), TASE appears paradoxically more responsive to simple AED regimes than either TAE or SEGP. Although some results suggest that mortality may be higher with TASE than with SEGP, it is likely that (as with SEGP) the major determinant of mortality is the underlying disease process. Because all such data have been derived from retrospective studies, because TASE and SEGP are less common than TAE and EGP, and because TASE and SEGP classification has often been inconsistent, findings can only be considered preliminary: multi-centre, prospective studies are required. Whilst preliminary, our review suggests that TASE has a distinct clinical profile compared to TAE and SEGP.

  8. Solitary fibrous tumour of the chest wall.

    PubMed

    Mohtarrudin, N; Nor Hanipah, Z; Mohd Dusa, N

    2016-04-01

    Extrapleural solitary fibrous tumours (SFTs) are rare tumours characterized by patternless spindle cells with haemangiopericytoma-like vascular spaces. Previously the tumours have been classified as haemangiopericytoma, an entity that is now considered obsolete. We report a case of extrapleural SFT arising in the soft tissue of the chest wall. The patient was a 31-year-old Malay lady presenting with a mobile swelling of the right chest wall for more than five years. During excision the tumour was noted to be well-circumscribed and yellowish in colour, giving an impression of lipoma. Microscopically, the tumour had patternless architecture, characterized by hypocellular and hypercellular areas. It was composed of uniform, spindle-shaped cells displaying oval nuclei, inconspicuous nucleoli, pale cytoplasm and indistinct cell borders. The mitotic count was 2 per 10 HPF. Branching, medium-sized thin-walled blood vessels in a haemangiopericytomatous growth pattern, some with hyalinised wall were identified. The neoplastic cells were immunoreactive to CD99 and CD34 and were non-immunoreactive to Desmin, Smooth Muscle Actin, S100 protein and EMA. We elucidate the challenges in diagnosing this tumour in this unusual location.

  9. Solitary fibrous tumour of the chest wall.

    PubMed

    Mohtarrudin, N; Nor Hanipah, Z; Mohd Dusa, N

    2016-04-01

    Extrapleural solitary fibrous tumours (SFTs) are rare tumours characterized by patternless spindle cells with haemangiopericytoma-like vascular spaces. Previously the tumours have been classified as haemangiopericytoma, an entity that is now considered obsolete. We report a case of extrapleural SFT arising in the soft tissue of the chest wall. The patient was a 31-year-old Malay lady presenting with a mobile swelling of the right chest wall for more than five years. During excision the tumour was noted to be well-circumscribed and yellowish in colour, giving an impression of lipoma. Microscopically, the tumour had patternless architecture, characterized by hypocellular and hypercellular areas. It was composed of uniform, spindle-shaped cells displaying oval nuclei, inconspicuous nucleoli, pale cytoplasm and indistinct cell borders. The mitotic count was 2 per 10 HPF. Branching, medium-sized thin-walled blood vessels in a haemangiopericytomatous growth pattern, some with hyalinised wall were identified. The neoplastic cells were immunoreactive to CD99 and CD34 and were non-immunoreactive to Desmin, Smooth Muscle Actin, S100 protein and EMA. We elucidate the challenges in diagnosing this tumour in this unusual location. PMID:27126667

  10. Smooth muscle tumours of the alimentary tract.

    PubMed Central

    Diamond, T.; Danton, M. H.; Parks, T. G.

    1990-01-01

    Neoplasms arising from smooth muscle of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract are uncommon, comprising only 1% of gastrointestinal tumours. A total of 51 cases of smooth muscle tumour of the GI tract were analysed; 44 leiomyomas and 7 leiomyosarcomas. Lesions occurred in all areas from the oesophagus to the rectum, the stomach being the commonest site. Thirty-six patients had clinical features referable to the tumour. The tumour was detected during investigation or management of an unrelated disease process in 15 patients. The clinical presentation varied depending on tumour location, but abdominal pain and GI bleeding were the commonest presenting symptoms. The lesion was demonstrated preoperatively, mainly by endoscopy and barium studies, in 27 patients. Surgical excision was the treatment of choice, where possible. There was no recurrence in the leiomyoma group but four patients died in the leiomyosarcoma group. Although rare, smooth muscle tumours should be considered in situations where clinical presentation and investigations are not suggestive of any common GI disorder. The preoperative assessment and diagnosis is difficult because of the variability in clinical features and their inaccessibility to routine GI investigation. It is recommended that, where possible, the lesion, whether symptomatic or discovered incidentally, should be excised completely to achieve a cure and prevent future complications. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:2221768

  11. Myeloid cells in tumour-immune interactions.

    PubMed

    Kareva, Irina; Berezovskaya, Faina; Castillo-Chavez, Carlos

    2010-07-01

    Despite highly developed specific immune responses, tumour cells often manage to escape recognition by the immune system, continuing to grow uncontrollably. Experimental work suggests that mature myeloid cells may be central to the activation of the specific immune response. Recognition and subsequent control of tumour growth by the cells of the specific immune response depend on the balance between immature (ImC) and mature (MmC) myeloid cells in the body. However, tumour cells produce cytokines that inhibit ImC maturation, altering the balance between ImC and MmC. Hence, the focus of this manuscript is on the study of the potential role of this inhibiting mechanism on tumour growth dynamics. A conceptual predator-prey type model that incorporates the dynamics and interactions of tumour cells, CD8(+) T cells, ImC and MmC is proposed in order to address the role of this mechanism. The prey (tumour) has a defence mechanism (blocking the maturation of ImC) that prevents the predator (immune system) from recognizing it. The model, a four-dimensional nonlinear system of ordinary differential equations, is reduced to a two-dimensional system using time-scale arguments that are tied to the maturation rate of ImC. Analysis shows that the model is capable of supporting biologically reasonable patterns of behaviour depending on the initial conditions. A range of parameters, where healing without external influences can occur, is identified both qualitatively and quantitatively.

  12. Estrogen, progesterone, and HER2/neu receptor discordance between primary and metastatic breast tumours-a review.

    PubMed

    Yeung, C; Hilton, J; Clemons, M; Mazzarello, S; Hutton, B; Haggar, F; Addison, C L; Kuchuk, I; Zhu, X; Gelmon, K; Arnaout, A

    2016-09-01

    Discordance in estrogen (ER), progesterone (PR), and HER2/neu status between primary breast tumours and metastatic disease is well recognized. In this review, we highlight how receptor discordance between primary tumours and paired metastasis can help elucidate the mechanism of metastasis but can also effect patient management and the design of future trials. Discordance rates and ranges were available from 47 studies (3384 matched primary and metastatic pairs) reporting ER, PR, and HER2/neu expression for both primary and metastatic sites. Median discordance rates for ER, PR, and HER2/neu were 14 % (range 0-67 %, IQR 9-25 %), 21 % (range 0-62 %, IQR 15-41 %), and 10 % (range 0-44 %, IQR 4-17 %), respectively. Loss of receptor expression was more common (9.17 %) than gain (4.51 %). Discordance rates varied amongst site of metastasis with ER discordance being highest in bone metastases suggesting that discordance is a true biological phenomenon. Discordance rates vary for both the biomarker and the metastatic site. Loss of expression is more common than gain. This can affect patient management as it can lead to a reduction in both the efficacy and availability of potential therapeutic agents. Future studies are recommended to explore both the mechanisms of discordance as well as its impact on patient outcome and management.

  13. Effect of a gastrin-releasing peptide receptor antagonist and a proton pump inhibitor association in an animal model of gastritis.

    PubMed

    Petronilho, Fabricia; Araújo, João H; Steckert, Amanda V; Rezin, Gislaine T; Ferreira, Gabriela K; Roesler, Rafael; Schwartsmann, Gilberto; Dal-Pizzol, Felipe; Streck, Emilio L

    2009-08-01

    It has been proposed that reactive oxygen species play a causative role of gastric mucosal damage induced by increased gastric secretion. Gastrin-releasing peptide is a typical neuropeptide that stimulates acid secretion by release of gastrin. In the present work we have investigated the mechanism of indomethacin (IDM)-induced gastric ulcer caused by ROS and determined the effects of a selective gastrin-releasing peptide receptor antagonist, RC-3095, alone and in association with omeprazole (OM) and compared it with an established antioxidant compound N-acetyl cysteine (NAC). Adult male Wistar rats were pre-treated for 7 days with OM, RC-3095, NAC, both drugs and water (control). The animals were then submitted to fasting for 24h; IDM was administered. Rats were killed 6h after that and the stomachs were used for evaluation of macroscopic damage and oxidative stress parameters. Our results showed that IDM increased mitochondrial superoxide production; OM and RC-3095 alone did not prevent such effect, but the combination of these drugs was effective. TBARS assay revealed that IDM-induced lipid peroxidation in gastric tissue and that OM and RC-3095, alone or in combination, prevented this effect with superior action that NAC. Finally, we verified that IDM increased protein carbonyl content and that this effect was prevented RC-3095, alone or in combination with OM, being similar to standard antioxidant. The present results support the view that, besides the inhibition of acid secretion, the protective effects exerted by OM and RC-3095 against IDM-induced gastric damage can be ascribed to a reduction of gastric oxidative injury.

  14. Tumour nuclear oestrogen receptor beta 1 correlates inversely with parathyroid tumour weight

    PubMed Central

    Haglund, Felix; Rosin, Gustaf; Nilsson, Inga-Lena; Juhlin, C Christofer; Pernow, Ylva; Norenstedt, Sophie; Dinets, Andrii; Larsson, Catharina; Hartman, Johan; Höög, Anders

    2015-01-01

    Primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) is a common endocrinopathy, frequently caused by a parathyroid adenoma, rarely by a parathyroid carcinoma that lacks effective oncological treatment. As the majority of cases are present in postmenopausal women, oestrogen signalling has been implicated in the tumourigenesis. Oestrogen receptor beta 1 (ERB1) and ERB2 have been recently identified in parathyroid adenomas, the former inducing genes coupled to tumour apoptosis. We applied immunohistochemistry and slide digitalisation to quantify nuclear ERB1 and ERB2 in 172 parathyroid adenomas, atypical adenomas and carcinomas, and ten normal parathyroid glands. All the normal parathyroid glands expressed ERB1 and ERB2. The majority of tumours expressed ERB1 (70.6%) at varying intensities, and ERB2 (96.5%) at strong intensities. Parathyroid carcinomas expressed ERB1 in three out of six cases and ERB2 in five out of six cases. The intensity of tumour nuclear ERB1 staining significantly correlated inversely with tumour weight (P=0.011), and patients whose tumours were classified as ERB1-negative had significantly greater tumour weight as well as higher serum calcium (P=0.002) and parathyroid hormone levels (P=0.003). Additionally, tumour nuclear ERB1 was not expressed differentially with respect to sex or age of the patient. Levels of tumour nuclear ERB2 did not correlate with clinical characteristics. In conclusion, decreased ERB1 immunoreactivity is associated with increased tumour weight in parathyroid adenomas. Given the previously reported correlation with tumour-suppressive signalling, selective oestrogen receptor modulation (SERMs) may play a role in the treatment of parathyroid carcinomas. Future studies of SERMs and oestrogen treatment in PHPT should consider tumour weight as a potential factor in pharmacological responsiveness. PMID:25648860

  15. Tumour nuclear oestrogen receptor beta 1 correlates inversely with parathyroid tumour weight.

    PubMed

    Haglund, Felix; Rosin, Gustaf; Nilsson, Inga-Lena; Juhlin, C Christofer; Pernow, Ylva; Norenstedt, Sophie; Dinets, Andrii; Larsson, Catharina; Hartman, Johan; Höög, Anders

    2015-03-01

    Primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) is a common endocrinopathy, frequently caused by a parathyroid adenoma, rarely by a parathyroid carcinoma that lacks effective oncological treatment. As the majority of cases are present in postmenopausal women, oestrogen signalling has been implicated in the tumourigenesis. Oestrogen receptor beta 1 (ERB1) and ERB2 have been recently identified in parathyroid adenomas, the former inducing genes coupled to tumour apoptosis. We applied immunohistochemistry and slide digitalisation to quantify nuclear ERB1 and ERB2 in 172 parathyroid adenomas, atypical adenomas and carcinomas, and ten normal parathyroid glands. All the normal parathyroid glands expressed ERB1 and ERB2. The majority of tumours expressed ERB1 (70.6%) at varying intensities, and ERB2 (96.5%) at strong intensities. Parathyroid carcinomas expressed ERB1 in three out of six cases and ERB2 in five out of six cases. The intensity of tumour nuclear ERB1 staining significantly correlated inversely with tumour weight (P=0.011), and patients whose tumours were classified as ERB1-negative had significantly greater tumour weight as well as higher serum calcium (P=0.002) and parathyroid hormone levels (P=0.003). Additionally, tumour nuclear ERB1 was not expressed differentially with respect to sex or age of the patient. Levels of tumour nuclear ERB2 did not correlate with clinical characteristics. In conclusion, decreased ERB1 immunoreactivity is associated with increased tumour weight in parathyroid adenomas. Given the previously reported correlation with tumour-suppressive signalling, selective oestrogen receptor modulation (SERMs) may play a role in the treatment of parathyroid carcinomas. Future studies of SERMs and oestrogen treatment in PHPT should consider tumour weight as a potential factor in pharmacological responsiveness. PMID:25648860

  16. Comparative analysis of mineralocorticoid receptor expression among vocal learners (Bengalese finch and budgerigar) and non-vocal learners (quail and ring dove) has implications for the evolution of avian vocal learning.

    PubMed

    Matsunaga, Eiji; Suzuki, Kenta; Kobayashi, Tetsuya; Okanoya, Kazuo

    2011-12-01

    Mineralocorticoid receptor is the receptor for corticosteroids such as corticosterone or aldosterone. Previously, we found that mineralocorticoid receptor was highly expressed in song nuclei of a songbird, Bengalese finch (Lonchura striata var. domestica). Here, to examine the relationship between mineralocorticoid receptor expression and avian vocal learning, we analyzed mineralocorticoid receptor expression in the developing brain of another vocal learner, budgerigar (Melopsittacus undulatus) and non-vocal learners, quail (Coturnix japonica) and ring dove (Streptopelia capicola). Mineralocorticoid receptor showed vocal control area-related expressions in budgerigars as Bengalese finches, whereas no such mineralocorticoid receptor expressions were seen in the telencephalon of non-vocal learners. Thus, these results suggest the possibility that mineralocorticoid receptor plays a role in vocal development of parrots as songbirds and that the acquisition of mineralocorticoid receptor expression is involved in the evolution of avian vocal learning. PMID:22010640

  17. Comparative analysis of mineralocorticoid receptor expression among vocal learners (Bengalese finch and budgerigar) and non-vocal learners (quail and ring dove) has implications for the evolution of avian vocal learning.

    PubMed

    Matsunaga, Eiji; Suzuki, Kenta; Kobayashi, Tetsuya; Okanoya, Kazuo

    2011-12-01

    Mineralocorticoid receptor is the receptor for corticosteroids such as corticosterone or aldosterone. Previously, we found that mineralocorticoid receptor was highly expressed in song nuclei of a songbird, Bengalese finch (Lonchura striata var. domestica). Here, to examine the relationship between mineralocorticoid receptor expression and avian vocal learning, we analyzed mineralocorticoid receptor expression in the developing brain of another vocal learner, budgerigar (Melopsittacus undulatus) and non-vocal learners, quail (Coturnix japonica) and ring dove (Streptopelia capicola). Mineralocorticoid receptor showed vocal control area-related expressions in budgerigars as Bengalese finches, whereas no such mineralocorticoid receptor expressions were seen in the telencephalon of non-vocal learners. Thus, these results suggest the possibility that mineralocorticoid receptor plays a role in vocal development of parrots as songbirds and that the acquisition of mineralocorticoid receptor expression is involved in the evolution of avian vocal learning.

  18. The treatment of cranial germ cell tumours.

    PubMed

    Brandes, A A; Pasetto, L M; Monfardini, S

    2000-08-01

    Germ cell tumours of the central nervous system (CNS) include many subtypes whose response to treatment varies, even though the symptoms and radiological appearances are similar. Five-year survival rates are 96% for germinomas, 100% for mature teratomas, 67% for immature teratomas and 69% for immature teratomas mixed with germinomas; for beta-HCG secreting germinomas the rate is only 38%. Patients with choriocarcinoma, embryonal carcinoma, or yolk sac tumour have the lowest survival rates; patients with germinoma or mature teratoma have longer survival rates. Although a wider resection is associated with a higher rate of survival for patients with non-germinomatous germ cell (NGGC) tumours, to date an aggressive surgical approach has been advocated only for pineal region tumours, but not for hypothalamic/neurohypophyseal tumours. Beside the delayed injury induced by radiotherapy, the late injury induced by chemotherapy is becoming increasingly evident. Cisplatin is considered an indispensable drug, but it may cause renal damage, ototoxicity, peripheral neuropathy and sterility, while etoposide is associated with an excess frequency of second neoplasms. Taking into account all of the published literature, the following therapeutic options are suggested: in pure germinoma tumours (GT) radiotherapy alone will usually ensure adequate control of the disease, and the long-term sequelae may be limited by reducing the dose delivered, as was proposed for germ cell testicular tumours, to 30 Gy to limited fields plus 25-30 Gy to the spinal axis if there is disseminated disease. In cases of recurrence, which should be uncommon, patients may be rescued with both radiotherapy and chemotherapy. In NGGC tumours, the prognosis is more unfavourable and there is often dissemination to the spine at diagnosis; however, the tumour's high chemosensitivity suggests neoadjuvant treatment chemotherapy with cisplatin and etoposide for three cycles followed by consolidation radiotherapy with

  19. Gastrin-releasing peptide signaling plays a limited and subtle role in amygdala physiology and aversive memory.

    PubMed

    Chaperon, Frederique; Fendt, Markus; Kelly, Peter H; Lingenhoehl, Kurt; Mosbacher, Johannes; Olpe, Hans-Rudolf; Schmid, Peter; Sturchler, Christine; McAllister, Kevin H; van der Putten, P Herman; Gee, Christine E

    2012-01-01

    Links between synaptic plasticity in the lateral amygdala (LA) and Pavlovian fear learning are well established. Neuropeptides including gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) can modulate LA function. GRP increases inhibition in the LA and mice lacking the GRP receptor (GRPR KO) show more pronounced and persistent fear after single-trial associative learning. Here, we confirmed these initial findings and examined whether they extrapolate to more aspects of amygdala physiology and to other forms of aversive associative learning. GRP application in brain slices from wildtype but not GRPR KO mice increased spontaneous inhibitory activity in LA pyramidal neurons. In amygdala slices from GRPR KO mice, GRP did not increase inhibitory activity. In comparison to wildtype, short- but not long-term plasticity was increased in the cortico-lateral amygdala (LA) pathway of GRPR KO amygdala slices, whereas no changes were detected in the thalamo-LA pathway. In addition, GRPR KO mice showed enhanced fear evoked by single-trial conditioning and reduced spontaneous firing of neurons in the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA). Altogether, these results are consistent with a potentially important modulatory role of GRP/GRPR signaling in the amygdala. However, administration of GRP or the GRPR antagonist (D-Phe(6), Leu-NHEt(13), des-Met(14))-Bombesin (6-14) did not affect amygdala LTP in brain slices, nor did they affect the expression of conditioned fear following intra-amygdala administration. GRPR KO mice also failed to show differences in fear expression and extinction after multiple-trial fear conditioning, and there were no differences in conditioned taste aversion or gustatory neophobia. Collectively, our data indicate that GRP/GRPR signaling modulates amygdala physiology in a paradigm-specific fashion that likely is insufficient to generate therapeutic effects across amygdala-dependent disorders.

  20. Effects of intranasal and peripheral oxytocin or gastrin-releasing peptide administration on social interaction and corticosterone levels in rats.

    PubMed

    Kent, Pamela; Awadia, Alisha; Zhao, Leah; Ensan, Donna; Silva, Dinuka; Cayer, Christian; James, Jonathan S; Anisman, Hymie; Merali, Zul

    2016-02-01

    The intranasal route of drug administration has gained increased popularity as it is thought to allow large molecules, such as peptide hormones, more direct access to the brain, while limiting systemic exposure. Several studies have investigated the effects of intranasal oxytocin administration in humans as this peptide is associated with prosocial behavior. There are, however, few preclinical studies investigating the effects of intranasal oxytocin administration in rodents. Oxytocin modulates hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis functioning and it has been suggested that oxytocin's ability to increase sociability may occur through a reduction in stress reactivity. Another peptide that appears to influence both social behavior and HPA axis activity is gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP), but it is not known if these GRP-induced effects are related. With this in mind, in the present study, we assessed the effects of intranasal and intraperitoneal oxytocin and GRP administration on social interaction and release of corticosterone in rats. Intranasal and intraperitoneal administration of 20, but not 5 μg, of oxytocin significantly increased social interaction, whereas intranasal and peripheral administration of GRP (20 but not 5 μg) significantly decreased levels of social interaction. In addition, while intranasal oxytocin (20 μg) had no effect on blood corticosterone levels, a marked increase in blood corticosterone levels was observed following intraperitoneal oxytocin administration. With GRP, intranasal (20 μg) but not peripheral administration increased corticosterone levels. These findings provide further evidence that intranasal peptide delivery can induce behavioral alterations in rodents which is consistent with findings from human studies. In addition, the peptide-induced changes in social interaction were not linked to fluctuations in corticosterone levels.

  1. Shrinkage of experimental benign prostatic hyperplasia and reduction of prostatic cell volume by a gastrin-releasing peptide antagonist

    PubMed Central

    Rick, Ferenc G.; Abi-Chaker, Andrew; Szalontay, Luca; Perez, Roberto; Jaszberenyi, Miklos; Jayakumar, Arumugam R.; Shamaladevi, Nagarajarao; Szepeshazi, Karoly; Vidaurre, Irving; Halmos, Gabor; Krishan, Awtar; Block, Norman L.; Schally, Andrew V.

    2013-01-01

    Gastrin releasing-peptide (GRP) is a potent growth factor in many malignancies. Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is a progressive age-related proliferation of glandular and stromal tissues; various growth factors and inflammatory processes are involved in its pathogenesis. We have demonstrated that potent antagonists of GRP inhibit growth of experimental human tumors including prostate cancer, but their effect on models of BPH has not been studied. Here, we evaluated the effects of GRP antagonist RC-3940-II on viability and cell volume of BPH-1 human prostate epithelial cells and WPMY-1 prostate stromal cells in vitro, and in testosterone-induced BPH in Wistar rats in vivo. RC-3940-II inhibited the proliferation of BPH-1 and WPMY-1 cells in a dose-dependent manner and reduced prostatic cell volume in vitro. Shrinkage of prostates was observed after 6 wk of treatment with RC-3940-II: a 15.9% decline with 25 μg/d; and a 18.4% reduction with 50 μg/d (P < 0.05 for all). Significant reduction in levels of proliferating cell nuclear antigen, NF-κβ/p50, cyclooxygenase-2, and androgen receptor was also seen. Analysis of transcript levels of genes related to growth, inflammatory processes, and signal transduction showed significant changes in the expression of more than 90 genes (P < 0.05). In conclusion, GRP antagonists reduce volume of human prostatic cells and lower prostate weight in experimental BPH through direct inhibitory effects on prostatic GRP receptors. GRP antagonists should be considered for further development as therapy for BPH. PMID:23359692

  2. Hypothalamic gastrin-releasing peptide receptor mediates an antidepressant-like effect in a mouse model of stress.

    PubMed

    Yao, Lihua; Chen, Jianxin; Chen, Hexiang; Xiang, Dan; Yang, Can; Xiao, Ling; Liu, Wanhong; Wang, Huiling; Wang, Gaohua; Zhu, Fan; Liu, Zhongchun

    2016-01-01

    Evidence has shown that gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (GRPR) is involved in responses to stress and anxiety. The primary role of GRPR is to stimulate corticotrophin-releasing hormone (CRH) or adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) secretion. Thus, the mechanisms of GRPR signaling should be elucidated to discover novel therapeutic targets for treating depression. This study aimed to investigate GRPR alterations in the C57 mouse hypothalamus after the animals were subjected to stress and fluoxetine treatments. Specifically, we subjected the mice to isolation and chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS) for three weeks to establish an experimental model of depression. These mice were subsequently treated with fluoxetine for three weeks. Then, we performed the sucrose preference test and the open field test and measured food intake and body weight to explore the effects of stress and fluoxetine on activity and anhedonia. After fluoxetine treatment, we also assessed changes in the levels of GRPR expression in the hypothalamus using immunohistochemistry, western blotting, and real-time quantitative PCR (RT-PCR). We found that stressed mice showed significant reductions in locomotion, food intake/body weight, and sucrose preference; these reduced parameters indicated a state of anhedonia. Marked increases in mRNA and protein expression of GRPR in the hypothalamus of CUMS-exposed mice were also observed, although treatment with fluoxetine reversed these stress-induced changes. Our results also demonstrated the feasibility and effectiveness of the C57 mouse model of depression established by CUMS and isolation. After fluoxetine treatment was administered, the animals' depression symptoms were alleviated, and these behavioral alterations were accompanied by specific changes in mRNA and protein expression of GRPR in the hypothalamus. These results suggest that GRPR may be implicated in depression; therefore, new therapeutic targets of depression focused on GRPR signaling

  3. Gastrin-Releasing Peptide Signaling Plays a Limited and Subtle Role in Amygdala Physiology and Aversive Memory

    PubMed Central

    Chaperon, Frederique; Fendt, Markus; Kelly, Peter H.; Lingenhoehl, Kurt; Mosbacher, Johannes; Olpe, Hans-Rudolf; Schmid, Peter; Sturchler, Christine; McAllister, Kevin H.; van der Putten, P. Herman; Gee, Christine E.

    2012-01-01

    Links between synaptic plasticity in the lateral amygdala (LA) and Pavlovian fear learning are well established. Neuropeptides including gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) can modulate LA function. GRP increases inhibition in the LA and mice lacking the GRP receptor (GRPR KO) show more pronounced and persistent fear after single-trial associative learning. Here, we confirmed these initial findings and examined whether they extrapolate to more aspects of amygdala physiology and to other forms of aversive associative learning. GRP application in brain slices from wildtype but not GRPR KO mice increased spontaneous inhibitory activity in LA pyramidal neurons. In amygdala slices from GRPR KO mice, GRP did not increase inhibitory activity. In comparison to wildtype, short- but not long-term plasticity was increased in the cortico-lateral amygdala (LA) pathway of GRPR KO amygdala slices, whereas no changes were detected in the thalamo-LA pathway. In addition, GRPR KO mice showed enhanced fear evoked by single-trial conditioning and reduced spontaneous firing of neurons in the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA). Altogether, these results are consistent with a potentially important modulatory role of GRP/GRPR signaling in the amygdala. However, administration of GRP or the GRPR antagonist (D-Phe6, Leu-NHEt13, des-Met14)-Bombesin (6–14) did not affect amygdala LTP in brain slices, nor did they affect the expression of conditioned fear following intra-amygdala administration. GRPR KO mice also failed to show differences in fear expression and extinction after multiple-trial fear conditioning, and there were no differences in conditioned taste aversion or gustatory neophobia. Collectively, our data indicate that GRP/GRPR signaling modulates amygdala physiology in a paradigm-specific fashion that likely is insufficient to generate therapeutic effects across amygdala-dependent disorders. PMID:22509372

  4. Hypothalamic gastrin-releasing peptide receptor mediates an antidepressant-like effect in a mouse model of stress

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Lihua; Chen, Jianxin; Chen, Hexiang; Xiang, Dan; Yang, Can; Xiao, Ling; Liu, Wanhong; Wang, Huiling; Wang, Gaohua; Zhu, Fan; Liu, Zhongchun

    2016-01-01

    Evidence has shown that gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (GRPR) is involved in responses to stress and anxiety. The primary role of GRPR is to stimulate corticotrophin-releasing hormone (CRH) or adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) secretion. Thus, the mechanisms of GRPR signaling should be elucidated to discover novel therapeutic targets for treating depression. This study aimed to investigate GRPR alterations in the C57 mouse hypothalamus after the animals were subjected to stress and fluoxetine treatments. Specifically, we subjected the mice to isolation and chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS) for three weeks to establish an experimental model of depression. These mice were subsequently treated with fluoxetine for three weeks. Then, we performed the sucrose preference test and the open field test and measured food intake and body weight to explore the effects of stress and fluoxetine on activity and anhedonia. After fluoxetine treatment, we also assessed changes in the levels of GRPR expression in the hypothalamus using immunohistochemistry, western blotting, and real-time quantitative PCR (RT-PCR). We found that stressed mice showed significant reductions in locomotion, food intake/body weight, and sucrose preference; these reduced parameters indicated a state of anhedonia. Marked increases in mRNA and protein expression of GRPR in the hypothalamus of CUMS-exposed mice were also observed, although treatment with fluoxetine reversed these stress-induced changes. Our results also demonstrated the feasibility and effectiveness of the C57 mouse model of depression established by CUMS and isolation. After fluoxetine treatment was administered, the animals’ depression symptoms were alleviated, and these behavioral alterations were accompanied by specific changes in mRNA and protein expression of GRPR in the hypothalamus. These results suggest that GRPR may be implicated in depression; therefore, new therapeutic targets of depression focused on GRPR signaling

  5. Sex-specific effects of prenatal chronic mild stress on adult spatial learning capacity and regional glutamate receptor expression profiles.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Ma, Yuchao; Hu, Jingmin; Zhang, Xinxin; Cheng, Wenwen; Jiang, Han; Li, Min; Ren, Jintao; Zhang, Xiaosong; Liu, Mengxi; Sun, Anji; Wang, Qi; Li, Xiaobai

    2016-07-01

    Both animal experiments and clinical studies have demonstrated that prenatal stress can cause cognitive disorders in offspring. To explore the scope of these deficits and identify potential underlying mechanisms, we examined the spatial learning and memory performance and glutamate receptor (GluR) expression patterns of adult rats exposed to prenatal chronic mild stress (PCMS). Principal component analysis (PCA) was employed to reveal the interrelationships among spatial learning indices and GluR expression changes. Female PCMS-exposed offspring exhibited markedly impaired spatial learning and memory in the Morris water maze (MWM) task compared to control females, while PCMS-exposed males showed better initial spatial learning in the MWM compared to control males. PCMS also altered basal and post-MWM glutamate receptor expression patterns, but these effects differed markedly between sexes. Male PCMS-exposed offspring exhibited elevated basal expression of NR1, mGluR5, and mGluR2/3 in the prefrontal cortex (PFC), whereas females showed no basal expression changes. Following MWM training, PCMS-exposed males expressed higher NR1 in the PFC and mammillary body (MB), higher mGluR2/3 in PFC, and lower NR2B in the hippocampus (HIP), PFC, and MB compared to unstressed MWM-trained males. Female PCMS-exposed offspring showed strongly reduced NR1 in MB and NR2B in the HIP, PFC, and MB, and increased mGluR2/3 in PFC compared to unstressed MWM-trained females. This is the first report suggesting that NMDA subunits in the MB are involved in spatial learning. Additionally, PCA further suggests that the NR1-NR2B form is the most important for spatial memory formation. These results reveal long-term sex-specific effects of PCMS on spatial learning and memory performance in adulthood and implicate GluR expression changes within HIP, PFC, and MB as possible molecular mechanisms underlying cognitive dysfunction in offspring exposed to prenatal stress.

  6. Tumour-induced neoneurogenesis and perineural tumour growth: a mathematical approach

    PubMed Central

    Lolas, Georgios; Bianchi, Arianna; Syrigos, Konstantinos N.

    2016-01-01

    It is well-known that tumours induce the formation of a lymphatic and a blood vasculature around themselves. A similar but far less studied process occurs in relation to the nervous system and is referred to as neoneurogenesis. The relationship between tumour progression and the nervous system is still poorly understood and is likely to involve a multitude of factors. It is therefore relevant to study tumour-nerve interactions through mathematical modelling: this may reveal the most significant factors of the plethora of interacting elements regulating neoneurogenesis. The present work is a first attempt to model the neurobiological aspect of cancer development through a system of differential equations. The model confirms the experimental observations that a tumour is able to promote nerve formation/elongation around itself, and that high levels of nerve growth factor and axon guidance molecules are recorded in the presence of a tumour. Our results also reflect the observation that high stress levels (represented by higher norepinephrine release by sympathetic nerves) contribute to tumour development and spread, indicating a mutually beneficial relationship between tumour cells and neurons. The model predictions suggest novel therapeutic strategies, aimed at blocking the stress effects on tumour growth and dissemination. PMID:26861829

  7. Tumour-induced neoneurogenesis and perineural tumour growth: a mathematical approach.

    PubMed

    Lolas, Georgios; Bianchi, Arianna; Syrigos, Konstantinos N

    2016-01-01

    It is well-known that tumours induce the formation of a lymphatic and a blood vasculature around themselves. A similar but far less studied process occurs in relation to the nervous system and is referred to as neoneurogenesis. The relationship between tumour progression and the nervous system is still poorly understood and is likely to involve a multitude of factors. It is therefore relevant to study tumour-nerve interactions through mathematical modelling: this may reveal the most significant factors of the plethora of interacting elements regulating neoneurogenesis. The present work is a first attempt to model the neurobiological aspect of cancer development through a system of differential equations. The model confirms the experimental observations that a tumour is able to promote nerve formation/elongation around itself, and that high levels of nerve growth factor and axon guidance molecules are recorded in the presence of a tumour. Our results also reflect the observation that high stress levels (represented by higher norepinephrine release by sympathetic nerves) contribute to tumour development and spread, indicating a mutually beneficial relationship between tumour cells and neurons. The model predictions suggest novel therapeutic strategies, aimed at blocking the stress effects on tumour growth and dissemination. PMID:26861829

  8. Tumour-induced neoneurogenesis and perineural tumour growth: a mathematical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lolas, Georgios; Bianchi, Arianna; Syrigos, Konstantinos N.

    2016-02-01

    It is well-known that tumours induce the formation of a lymphatic and a blood vasculature around themselves. A similar but far less studied process occurs in relation to the nervous system and is referred to as neoneurogenesis. The relationship between tumour progression and the nervous system is still poorly understood and is likely to involve a multitude of factors. It is therefore relevant to study tumour-nerve interactions through mathematical modelling: this may reveal the most significant factors of the plethora of interacting elements regulating neoneurogenesis. The present work is a first attempt to model the neurobiological aspect of cancer development through a system of differential equations. The model confirms the experimental observations that a tumour is able to promote nerve formation/elongation around itself, and that high levels of nerve growth factor and axon guidance molecules are recorded in the presence of a tumour. Our results also reflect the observation that high stress levels (represented by higher norepinephrine release by sympathetic nerves) contribute to tumour development and spread, indicating a mutually beneficial relationship between tumour cells and neurons. The model predictions suggest novel therapeutic strategies, aimed at blocking the stress effects on tumour growth and dissemination.

  9. MicroRNA Regulation of Brain Tumour Initiating Cells in Central Nervous System Tumours

    PubMed Central

    Vijayakumar, Thusyanth; Bakhshinyan, David; Venugopal, Chitra; Singh, Sheila K.

    2015-01-01

    CNS tumours occur in both pediatric and adult patients and many of these tumours are associated with poor clinical outcome. Due to a paradigm shift in thinking for the last several years, these tumours are now considered to originate from a small population of stem-like cells within the bulk tumour tissue. These cells, termed as brain tumour initiating cells (BTICs), are perceived to be regulated by microRNAs at the posttranscriptional/translational levels. Proliferation, stemness, differentiation, invasion, angiogenesis, metastasis, apoptosis, and cell cycle constitute some of the significant processes modulated by microRNAs in cancer initiation and progression. Characterization and functional studies on oncogenic or tumour suppressive microRNAs are made possible because of developments in sequencing and microarray techniques. In the current review, we bring recent knowledge of the role of microRNAs in BTIC formation and therapy. Special attention is paid to two highly aggressive and well-characterized brain tumours: gliomas and medulloblastoma. As microRNA seems to be altered in the pathogenesis of many human diseases, “microRNA therapy” may now have potential to improve outcomes for brain tumour patients. In this rapidly evolving field, further understanding of miRNA biology and its contribution towards cancer can be mined for new therapeutic tools. PMID:26064134

  10. Vascular tumours in infants. Part I: benign vascular tumours other than infantile haemangioma.

    PubMed

    Hoeger, P H; Colmenero, I

    2014-09-01

    Vascular anomalies can be subdivided into vascular tumours and vascular malformations (VMs). While most VMs are present at birth and do not exhibit significant postnatal growth, vascular tumours are characterized by their dynamics of growth and (sometimes) spontaneous regression. This review focuses on benign vascular tumours other than infantile haemangiomas (IHs), namely pyogenic granuloma, eruptive pseudoangiomatosis, glomangioma, rapidly involuting and noninvoluting congenital haemangioma, verrucous haemangioma and spindle cell haemangioma. While some of them bear clinical resemblance to IH, they can be separated by age of appearance, growth characteristics and/or negative staining for glucose transporter 1. Separation of these tumours from IH is necessary because their outcome and therapeutic options are different. Semimalignant and malignant vascular tumours will be addressed in a separate review.

  11. Synchronous gastric inflammatory myofibroblastic tumour with gastrointestinal stromal tumour of the stomach and hepatic syringious haemangioma

    PubMed Central

    Papadopoulou, D; Chatziralli, IP; Papadopoulos, V; Filitantzi, C; Demertzidis, C

    2012-01-01

    Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumour of the stomach is a very rare lesion. A case of a gastric inflammatory myofibroblastic tumour associated with gastrointestinal stromal tumour of the stomach and hepatic syringious haemangioma is described. We report an 80-year-old male who had an exophytic mass in the area of the pylorus and the duodenum, where hepatic cysts were found in the magnetic resonance (MRI) scan on examination of hypochromic microcytic anaemia, and prolapsus and torsion of the bulb of the stomach found during gastroscopy. During surgical excision of the exophytic mass, a gastrointestinal stromal tumour from the gastric fundus and a syringious haemangioma from the superior hepatic surface were resected. All tumours were treated successfully by surgical excision. The patient had an uneventful recovery. Neither recurrence nor metastasis was found after a 12-month follow-up. To our knowledge, this is the first time that such an association is reported in the literature. PMID:24960722

  12. Desmoplastic nested spindle cell tumours and nested stromal epithelial tumours of the liver.

    PubMed

    Misra, Sunayana; Bihari, Chhagan

    2016-04-01

    Desmoplastic nested spindle cell tumour of liver (DNSTL), nested stromal-epithelial tumour (NSET) and calcifying nested stromal-epithelial tumour (CNSET) are recently described entities with similar morphology, immunohistochemistry and molecular genetics. These are rare entities with only three large case series described till date. These tumours commonly present in the paediatric age group. NSETs, in addition have been described to be associated with ectopic adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) production and Cushingoid features. It is important to discuss this rare group of tumours with a low malignant potential as the most common radiological differential diagnosis is hepatoblastoma, which has a relatively poorer prognosis. Thus, a pathologist needs to keep this entity in mind, so as to offer a correct histological diagnosis.

  13. Tumour-specific CD4 T cells eradicate melanoma via indirect recognition of tumour-derived antigen.

    PubMed

    Shklovskaya, Elena; Terry, Alexandra M; Guy, Thomas V; Buckley, Adrian; Bolton, Holly A; Zhu, Erhua; Holst, Jeff; Fazekas de St. Groth, Barbara

    2016-07-01

    The importance of CD4 T cells in tumour immunity has been increasingly recognised, with recent reports describing robust CD4 T cell-dependent tumour control in mice whose immune-regulatory mechanisms have been disturbed by irradiation, chemotherapy, immunomodulatory therapy and/or constitutive immunodeficiency. Tumour control in such models has been attributed in large part to direct Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) class II-dependent CD4 T cell killing of tumour cells. To test whether CD4 T cells can eradicate tumours without directly killing tumour cells, we developed an animal model in which tumour-derived antigen could be presented to T-cell receptor (TCR)-transgenic CD4 T cells by host but not tumour MHC class II molecules. In I-E(+) mice bearing I-E(null) tumours, naive I-E-restricted CD4 T cells proliferated locally in tumour-draining lymph nodes after recognising tumour-derived antigen on migratory dendritic cells. In lymphopaenic but not immunosufficient hosts, CD4 T cells differentiated into polarised T helper type 1 (Th1) cells expressing interferon gamma (IFNγ), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) and interleukin (IL)-2 but little IL-17, and cleared established tumours. Tumour clearance was enhanced by higher TCR affinity for tumour antigen-MHC class II and was critically dependent on IFNγ, as demonstrated by early tumour escape in animals treated with an IFNγ blocking antibody. Thus, CD4 T cells and IFNγ can control tumour growth without direct T-cell killing of tumour cells, and without requiring additional adaptive immune cells such as CD8 T cells and B cells. Our results support a role for effective CD4 T cell-dependent tumour immunity against MHC class II-negative tumours. PMID:26837456

  14. Glutathione S-transferase isoenzymes in human tumours and tumour derived cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, A. D.; Forrester, L. M.; Hayes, J. D.; Wareing, C. J.; Carmichael, J.; Harris, A. L.; Mooghen, M.; Wolf, C. R.

    1989-01-01

    An increasing body of evidence indicates that glutathione S-transferases play a role in the intrinsic and acquired resistance of tumours to anticancer drugs. In view of the wide use of tumour cell lines to understand the factors which confer either sensitivity or resistance to chemotherapeutic agents we have determined glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity and isozyme composition in nine human cell lines. These data have been compared with the values obtained in solid tumours. In most cases overall GST activity was higher in the tumours than in the cell lines. This was most pronounced for the breast tumour samples relative to MCF7 cell line. The pi class GST subunit was present at similar concentration in the cell lines and the tumours, and in most cases was the most abundant subunit present. The alpha and mu class GST were expressed in most of the cell lines but at much lower concentration than the pi class subunit. Also considerable variability particularly in the expression of the mu subunits was observed. This was also the case for the expression of these subunits in the solid tumour samples. The levels of these GSTs (when expressed) in the solid tumours was invariably higher than that observed in the cell lines. There are therefore several similarities but also some significant differences in GST expression in solid tumours and cell lines. Whether the differences are because expression is lost during the generation of the cell lines or whether it reflects the individuality of human tumours remains to be clearly established. Images Figure 2 Figure 4 PMID:2789940

  15. Targeting ALCAM in the cryo-treated tumour microenvironment successfully induces systemic anti-tumour immunity.

    PubMed

    Kudo-Saito, Chie; Fuwa, Takafumi; Kawakami, Yutaka

    2016-07-01

    Cryoablative treatment has been widely used for treating cancer. However, the therapeutic efficacies are still controversial. The molecular mechanisms of the cryo-induced immune responses, particularly underlying the ineffectiveness, remain to be fully elucidated. In this study, we identified a new molecular mechanism involved in the cryo failure. We used cryo-ineffective metastatic tumour models that murine melanoma B16-F10 cells were subcutaneously and intravenously implanted into C57BL/6 mice. When the subcutaneous tumours were treated cryoablation on day 7 after tumour implantation, cells expressing activated leucocyte cell adhesion molecule (ALCAM/CD166) were significantly expanded not only locally in the treated tumours but also systemically in spleen and bone marrow of the mice. The cryo-induced ALCAM(+) cells including CD45(-) mesenchymal stem/stromal cells, CD11b(+)Gr1(+) myeloid-derived suppressor cells, and CD4(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells significantly suppressed interferon γ production and cytotoxicity of tumour-specific CD8(+) T cells via ALCAM expressed in these cells. This suggests that systemic expansion of the ALCAM(+) cells negatively switches host-immune directivity to the tumour-supportive mode. Intratumoural injection with anti-ALCAM blocking monoclonal antibody (mAb) following the cryo treatment systemically induced tumour-specific CD8(+) T cells with higher cytotoxic activities, resulting in suppression of tumour growth and metastasis in the cryo-resistant tumour models. These suggest that expansion of ALCAM(+) cells is a determinant of limiting the cryo efficacy. Further combination with an immune checkpoint inhibitor anti-CTLA4 mAb optimized the anti-tumour efficacy of the dual-combination therapy. Targeting ALCAM may be a promising strategy for overcoming the cryo ineffectiveness leading to the better practical use of cryoablation in clinical treatment of cancer.

  16. Improving tumour heterogeneity MRI assessment with histograms

    PubMed Central

    Just, N

    2014-01-01

    By definition, tumours are heterogeneous. They are defined by marked differences in cells, microenvironmental factors (oxygenation levels, pH, VEGF, VPF and TGF-α) metabolism, vasculature, structure and function that in turn translate into heterogeneous drug delivery and therapeutic outcome. Ways to estimate quantitatively tumour heterogeneity can improve drug discovery, treatment planning and therapeutic responses. It is therefore of paramount importance to have reliable and reproducible biomarkers of cancerous lesions' heterogeneity. During the past decade, the number of studies using histogram approaches increased drastically with various magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques (DCE-MRI, DWI, SWI etc.) although information on tumour heterogeneity remains poorly exploited. This fact can be attributed to a poor knowledge of the available metrics and of their specific meaning as well as to the lack of literature references to standardised histogram methods with which surrogate markers of heterogeneity can be compared. This review highlights the current knowledge and critical advances needed to investigate and quantify tumour heterogeneity. The key role of imaging techniques and in particular the key role of MRI for an accurate investigation of tumour heterogeneity is reviewed with a particular emphasis on histogram approaches and derived methods. PMID:25268373

  17. Mast cells, angiogenesis, and tumour growth.

    PubMed

    Ribatti, Domenico; Crivellato, Enrico

    2012-01-01

    Accumulation of mast cells (MCs) in tumours was described by Ehrlich in his doctoral thesis. Since this early account, ample evidence has been provided highlighting participation of MCs to the inflammatory reaction that occurs in many clinical and experimental tumour settings. MCs are bone marrow-derived tissue-homing leukocytes that are endowed with a panoply of releasable mediators and surface receptors. These cells actively take part to innate and acquired immune reactions as well as to a series of fundamental functions such as angiogenesis, tissue repair, and tissue remodelling. The involvement of MCs in tumour development is debated. Although some evidence suggests that MCs can promote tumourigenesis and tumour progression, there are some clinical sets as well as experimental tumour models in which MCs seem to have functions that favour the host. One of the major issues linking MCs to cancer is the ability of these cells to release potent pro-angiogenic factors. This review will focus on the most recent acquisitions about this intriguing field of research. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Mast cells in inflammation.

  18. Targeting the tumour microenvironment in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Jean M; Coleman, Robert L; Sood, Anil K

    2016-03-01

    The study of cancer initiation, growth, and metastasis has traditionally been focused on cancer cells, and the view that they proliferate due to uncontrolled growth signalling owing to genetic derangements. However, uncontrolled growth in tumours cannot be explained solely by aberrations in cancer cells themselves. To fully understand the biological behaviour of tumours, it is essential to understand the microenvironment in which cancer cells exist, and how they manipulate the surrounding stroma to promote the malignant phenotype. Ovarian cancer is the leading cause of death from gynaecologic cancer worldwide. The majority of patients will have objective responses to standard tumour debulking surgery and platinum-taxane doublet chemotherapy, but most will experience disease recurrence and chemotherapy resistance. As such, a great deal of effort has been put forth to develop therapies that target the tumour microenvironment in ovarian cancer. Herein, we review the key components of the tumour microenvironment as they pertain to this disease, outline targeting opportunities and supporting evidence thus far, and discuss resistance to therapy.

  19. Giant malignant phyllodes tumour of breast.

    PubMed

    Krishnamoorthy, Ramakrishnan; Savasere, Thejas; Prabhuswamy, Vinod Kumar; Babu, Rajashekhara; Shivaswamy, Sadashivaiah

    2014-01-01

    The term phyllodes tumour includes lesions ranging from completely benign tumours to malignant sarcomas. Clinically phyllodes tumours are smooth, rounded, and usually painless multinodular lesions indistinguishable from fibroadenomas. Percentage of phyllodes tumour classified as malignant ranges from 23% to 50%. We report a case of second largest phyllodes tumour in a 35-year-old lady who presented with swelling of right breast since 6 months, initially small in size, that progressed gradually to present size. Examination revealed mass in the right breast measuring 36×32 cms with lobulated firm surface and weighing 10 kgs. Fine needle aspiration cytology was reported as borderline phyllodes; however core biopsy examination showed biphasic neoplasm with malignant stromal component. Simple mastectomy was done and specimen was sent for histopathological examination which confirmed the core biopsy report. Postoperatively the patient received chemotherapy and radiotherapy. The patient is on follow-up for a year and has not shown any evidence of metastasis or recurrence. PMID:25548696

  20. Neuroendoscopic management of pineal region tumours.

    PubMed

    Ferrer, E; Santamarta, D; Garcia-Fructuoso, G; Caral, L; Rumià, J

    1997-01-01

    The management of pineal tumours remains controversial. During 1994 we treated four consecutive adults (16-44 yrs) harbouring a pineal tumour with a neuroendoscopic procedure. All of them presented with hydrocephalus. Pre-operative workup included cranial computerized tomography (CT), craniospinal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and serum levels of biological tumour markers. The endoscopic procedure consisted of a third ventriculostomy followed by biopsy with a flexible, steerable neuroendoscope. Histological diagnosis was achieved in three patients who no longer required a shunt device. Recorded complications were: bleeding during ventriculostomy that prevented us from obtaining a good sample for biopsy, short-term memory loss that cleared over a two-week period, and transient increase of pre-operative hemiparesis. Complications and morbidity are emphasized so as to be avoided with further technical experience. Neuroendoscopy affords a minimally invasive way of reaching three objectives by one-step surgery in the management of pineal region lesions: 1) CSF sample for analysis of tumour markers. 2) Treatment of hydrocephalus by third ventriculostomy. 3) Several biopsy specimens can be obtained identifying tumours which will require further open surgery or adjuvant radiation and/or chemotherapy. PMID:9059706

  1. Epidemiological study of salivary gland tumours.

    PubMed

    Frade Gonzalez, C; Lozano Ramirez, A; Garcia Caballero, T; Labella Caballero, T

    1999-01-01

    Tumours located in the salivary glands form the most heterogeneous group in all human oncological pathology. They show various epidemiological, clinical and evolutionary characteristics which separate them from other neoplasms of the head and neck. In this paper, we have carried out a study on their epidemiological aspects, collecting 80 cases diagnosed in the ENT Service of the University Hospital Complex of Santiago over 17 years. The incidence was 1.22 cases per 100,000 inhabitants per year. The frequency was higher in males (58.75%) and in the 7th decade of age. A predominance was noticed in females under 40 years of age and in males over this age, but the differences were not statistically significant. The most frequent site was the parotid gland, and we could not find any case in the sublingual gland. In 52.5% of cases the tumour was benign, pleomorphic adenoma being the most prevalent. Among malignant tumours, the epidermoid carcinoma stood out in our series. The prevalence of benign tumours in females and of malignant tumours in males was clear, with significant differences. We compare our results with the data published in the literature.

  2. Pedunculated solitary fibrous tumours arising from the pleura.

    PubMed

    Poyraz, A; Kilic, D; Hatipoglu, A; Bakirci, T; Bilezikci, B

    2006-09-01

    Solitary fibrous tumour (SFT) is one of the rare tumours which arise from visceral pleura. Klemperer and Rabin first described SFT as a distinct clinical entity among primary pleural tumoUrs in 1931. Approximately 820 cases have been reported in literature to date. The management of patients with SFT is complete resection of the tumour and follow up of the patient to detect any possible late recurrence. In the present paper, we report two cases of pedunculated solitary fibrous tumours of the pleura that appeared as a wandering chest nodule to which surgical resection undertaken at our hospital. The aim is to summarise our experience in the management of solitary fibrous tumour.

  3. Salivary gland tumours in Zimbabwe: report of 282 cases.

    PubMed

    Chidzonga, M M; Lopez Perez, V M; Portilla-Alvarez, A L

    1995-08-01

    Tumours of the salivary glands are relatively uncommon. In a review of 282 black patients seen at Harare Central Hospital, Zimbabwe, the relative incidence of various tumour types and the age and sex distribution were similar to those reported in other series. There were more tumours of the minor salivary glands than in reported Western series. There were more tumours of the minor salivary glands than in reported Western series. Pain and rapid growth were significant in distinguishing malignant from benign tumours. Malignant tumours were more common in elderly than in young patients.

  4. [Parotid tumours. Only 31% of mixed tumours. In one hundred and seventy-five parotidectomies (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Massoud, E; Tarabay, F

    1982-06-10

    This article reports on an analytical study into the etiological aspects of 175 parotidectomies carried out in the Lebanon. In comparing our results with the classical data, we reached a certain number of interesting conclusions. Our study confirms classical breakdown of parotid tumours with 80% benign and 20% malignant. We also confirm the rise in the incidence of malignancy in line with age, and its classical predominance in male patients. Classically, the benign tumours can be divided into 80% mixed tumours, 8% warthin, and 6 to 7% other rare tumours. Our data concerning this breakdown of benign tumours is very different. We found 31% of mixed tumours, which is in line with the figure given by A. Palva. We can therefore conclude that mixed tumours are not the most common form of benign parotid tumours and that the so-called rare tumours account for 69% benign tumours. They include hemangiomas, tubercles, salivary cysts, chronic parotidits and Warthin's tumours. Another difference between the conclusions of our study and classical data concern warthin tumours, which account fort 18% of cases as compared to only 6% in the classical data. We can therefore conclude that the so-called "rare benign tumours of the parotid" show a far higher incidence in our country than the classical 6%, and in fact come far closer to 50% of all cases of benign tumours.

  5. Antisense-mediated reduction in insulin-like growth factor-I receptor expression suppresses the malignant phenotype of a human alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma.

    PubMed Central

    Shapiro, D N; Jones, B G; Shapiro, L H; Dias, P; Houghton, P J

    1994-01-01

    The expression of the insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) and their receptors has been linked to cellular proliferation and tumorigenicity in a number of model systems. Since rhabdomyosarcoma cells express IGF-I receptors, an autocrine or paracrine loop involving this receptor and its ligands could be responsible in part for the growth characteristics of this tumor. To assess directly the role of the IGF-I receptor in rhabdomyosarcoma cell growth and tumorigenicity, a human alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma cell line with high IGF-I receptor expression was transfected with an amplifiable IGF-I receptor antisense expression vector. Four unique, transfected clones were analyzed and found to have reduced IGF-I receptor expression relative to the parental line. Integration of the antisense sequence was demonstrated by Southern blot analysis, and expression of antisense message in these clones was shown by S1 nuclease protection assay. Reduced IGF-I receptor surface expression in the transfectants was shown by decreased immunofluorescence with an IGF-I receptor monoclonal antibody and by decreased IGF-I binding as measured by Scatchard analysis. These clones had markedly reduced growth rates in vitro, impaired colony formation in soft agar, and failed to form tumors in immunodeficient mice when compared with vector-transfected clones. These results demonstrate that reduction of IGF-I receptor expression can inhibit both the in vitro and in vivo growth of a human rhabdomyosarcoma cell line and suggest a role for the IGF-I receptor in mediating neoplastic growth in this mesenchymally derived tumor. Images PMID:8083365

  6. A Model of Post-Infection Fatigue Is Associated with Increased TNF and 5-HT2A Receptor Expression in Mice.

    PubMed

    Couch, Yvonne; Xie, Qin; Lundberg, Louise; Sharp, Trevor; Anthony, Daniel C

    2015-01-01

    It is well documented that serotonin (5-HT) plays an important role in psychiatric illness. For example, myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME/CFS), which is often provoked by infection, is a disabling illness with an unknown aetiology and diagnosis is based on symptom-specific criteria. However, 5-HT2A receptor expression and peripheral cytokines are known to be upregulated in ME. We sought to examine the relationship between the 5-HT system and cytokine expression following systemic bacterial endotoxin challenge (LPS, 0.5 mg/kg i.p.), at a time when the acute sickness behaviours have largely resolved. At 24 hours post-injection mice exhibit no overt changes in locomotor behaviour, but do show increased immobility in a forced swim test, as well as decreased sucrose preference and reduced marble burying activity, indicating a depressive-like state. While peripheral IDO activity was increased after LPS challenge, central activity levels remained stable and there was no change in total brain 5-HT levels or 5-HIAA/5-HT. However, within the brain, levels of TNF and 5-HT2A receptor mRNA within various regions increased significantly. This increase in receptor expression is reflected by an increase in the functional response of the 5-HT2A receptor to agonist, DOI. These data suggest that regulation of fatigue and depressive-like moods after episodes of systemic inflammation may be regulated by changes in 5-HT receptor expression, rather than by levels of enzyme activity or cytokine expression in the CNS. PMID:26147001

  7. Effects of long-term restricted feeding on plasma leptin, hepatic leptin expression and leptin receptor expression in juvenile Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.).

    PubMed

    Trombley, Susanne; Maugars, Gersende; Kling, Peter; Björnsson, Björn Thrandur; Schmitz, Monika

    2012-01-01

    Leptin is a pleiotropic hormone and plays a key role in body weight regulation, energy homeostasis and lipid store utilization in mammals. In this study, we investigated the effect of feed-restriction on leptin genes (lepa1 and lepa2), leptin receptor (lepr) gene expression and plasma leptin levels in juvenile Atlantic salmon parr. Feed restriction was performed from late April to mid-June, in order to gain insight into the role of the leptin system in energy balance regulation and adiposity in juvenile salmon. A significant increase in lepa1 expression as well as higher levels of plasma leptin was found in feed-restricted fish in June compared to fully fed controls, while lepa2 gene expression decreased in both groups during the treatment period. Lepa2 was, however significantly higher in the feed-restricted group in June. Leptin receptor expression was up regulated during the period of enhanced growth and lipid deposition in the fully fed control, indicating a seasonal effect on the receptor expression in the brain. Both lepa1 and lepa2 genes very mainly expressed in the liver in juvenile salmon, while lepr was expressed in the brain but showed also considerable expression in various peripheral tissues. The study provides evidence that the leptin system is sensitive to the metabolic status of the fish as both season and restricted feeding affect lepa1 and lepa2 gene expression in the liver and brain leptin receptor expression, however, for lepa1 expression and leptin plasma level in an opposite way as that observed in the mammalian system.

  8. Regulation of transferrin receptor expression and ferritin content in human mononuclear phagocytes. Coordinate upregulation by iron transferrin and downregulation by interferon gamma.

    PubMed Central

    Byrd, T F; Horwitz, M A

    1993-01-01

    We have investigated the regulation of key human iron binding proteins in mononuclear phagocytes by IFN gamma and iron transferrin. In a previous study, we demonstrated that IFN gamma downregulates the expression on human monocytes of transferrin receptors, the major source of iron for the cell. In the present study, we show that IFN gamma also downregulates the intracellular concentration of ferritin, the major iron storage protein in the cell. By radioimmunoassay, the mean ferritin content of nonactivated monocytes was 361 +/- 107 fg/monocyte (mean +/- SEM) whereas the mean ferritin content of IFN gamma-activated monocytes was 64 +/- 13 fg/monocyte, an 82% reduction with activation (P < 0.01, t test). Consistent with its downregulating effect on these iron proteins, IFN gamma treatment also results in decreased iron incorporation. IFN gamma-activated monocytes incorporated 33% less iron from 59Fe-transferrin than nonactivated monocytes (P < 0.05, t test). Gel filtration chromatography revealed that incorporated iron is located primarily in ferritin in both nonactivated and IFN gamma-activated monocytes. Ferritin in IFN gamma-activated monocytes is saturated with approximately three times as much 59Fe as ferritin in nonactivated monocytes. We have also explored the effect of iron transferrin on transferrin receptor expression and intracellular ferritin content in human monocytes. We have found that iron transferrin markedly upregulates both transferrin receptor expression and intracellular ferritin content in both nonactivated (2.3- and 1.3-fold, respectively) and IFN gamma-activated (3.4- and 2.9-fold, respectively) monocytes. This study demonstrates that transferrin receptor expression and intracellular ferritin content in human monocytes is unidirectionally and coordinately upregulated by iron transferrin and unidirectionally and coordinately downregulated by IFN gamma. PMID:8450071

  9. A Model of Post-Infection Fatigue Is Associated with Increased TNF and 5-HT2A Receptor Expression in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Couch, Yvonne; Xie, Qin; Lundberg, Louise; Sharp, Trevor; Anthony, Daniel C.

    2015-01-01

    It is well documented that serotonin (5-HT) plays an important role in psychiatric illness. For example, myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME/CFS), which is often provoked by infection, is a disabling illness with an unknown aetiology and diagnosis is based on symptom-specific criteria. However, 5-HT2A receptor expression and peripheral cytokines are known to be upregulated in ME. We sought to examine the relationship between the 5-HT system and cytokine expression following systemic bacterial endotoxin challenge (LPS, 0.5mg/kg i.p.), at a time when the acute sickness behaviours have largely resolved. At 24 hours post-injection mice exhibit no overt changes in locomotor behaviour, but do show increased immobility in a forced swim test, as well as decreased sucrose preference and reduced marble burying activity, indicating a depressive-like state. While peripheral IDO activity was increased after LPS challenge, central activity levels remained stable and there was no change in total brain 5-HT levels or 5-HIAA/5-HT. However, within the brain, levels of TNF and 5-HT2A receptor mRNA within various regions increased significantly. This increase in receptor expression is reflected by an increase in the functional response of the 5-HT2A receptor to agonist, DOI. These data suggest that regulation of fatigue and depressive-like moods after episodes of systemic inflammation may be regulated by changes in 5-HT receptor expression, rather than by levels of enzyme activity or cytokine expression in the CNS. PMID:26147001

  10. Unusual presentation of a scrotal tumour

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Debashis; Parr, Nijel J

    2014-01-01

    A 59-year-old man had a wide excision of the right-sided scrotal cancer in the neck of the scrotum. On dissection it became apparent that the tumour had developed a blood supply from the right spermatic cord. Histology revealed G2T2 squamous cell carcinoma. A biopsy from an abnormal skin area from the opposite groin reported chronic folliculitis. He underwent an ultrasound scanning of the groin and fine-needle aspiration, which did not show any suspicious features. Follow-up CT of the abdomen and pelvis after 6 weeks did not show any evidence of intra-abdominal lymphadenopathy. Another CT has been arranged within the next 3 months to confirm that the spread of the tumour does not follow the pattern of a testicular tumour. PMID:24879734

  11. Insulin receptor activation in solitary fibrous tumours.

    PubMed

    Li, Y; Chang, Q; Rubin, B P; Fletcher, C D M; Morgan, T W; Mentzer, S J; Sugarbaker, D J; Fletcher, J A; Xiao, S

    2007-04-01

    Solitary fibrous tumours (SFTs) are known to overexpress insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF-2). The down-stream oncogenic pathways of IGF-2, however, are not clear. Here we report uniform activation of the insulin receptor (IR) pathway in SFTs, which are mesenchymal tumours frequently associated with hypoglycaemia. Whereas the IR and its downstream signalling pathways were constitutively activated in SFTs, insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF-1R) was not expressed in these tumours. We also find that SFT cells secrete IGF-2 and proliferate in serum-free medium, consistent with an IGF-2/IR autocrine loop. The aetiological relevance of IGF-2 is supported by expression of IR-A, the IR isoform with high affinity for IGF-2, in all SFTs. Our studies suggest that IR activation plays an oncogenic role in SFTs.

  12. Surgery for locally aggressive bone tumours.

    PubMed

    Devitt, A; O'Sullivan, T; Kavanagh, M; Hurson, B J

    1996-01-01

    Treatment of 16 patients with aggressive benign bone tumours and one patient with a low grade malignancy with a combined regimen of cryosurgery, phenolization and acrylic cementation is reported. Patients were aged between 9 and 51 years and were treated by this method between the years 1986 and 1993. Minimal follow up was 13 months. The commonest histological diagnosis was giant cell tumour (7), followed by aneurysmal bone cyst (6), chondromyxoidfibroma (3) and low grade chondrosarcoma (1). Patients were assessed for functional outcome and local recurrence. On average 86 per cent of premorbid function was restored at follow up and there was one local recurrence (6.29 per cent). We conclude that this is a satisfactory method of gaining local control of these tumours. PMID:8990655

  13. Unusual presentation of a scrotal tumour.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Debashis; Parr, Nijel J

    2014-05-30

    A 59-year-old man had a wide excision of the right-sided scrotal cancer in the neck of the scrotum. On dissection it became apparent that the tumour had developed a blood supply from the right spermatic cord. Histology revealed G2T2 squamous cell carcinoma. A biopsy from an abnormal skin area from the opposite groin reported chronic folliculitis. He underwent an ultrasound scanning of the groin and fine-needle aspiration, which did not show any suspicious features. Follow-up CT of the abdomen and pelvis after 6 weeks did not show any evidence of intra-abdominal lymphadenopathy. Another CT has been arranged within the next 3 months to confirm that the spread of the tumour does not follow the pattern of a testicular tumour.

  14. Tumours of the foot and ankle.

    PubMed

    Khan, Zeeshan; Hussain, Shakir; Carter, Simon R

    2015-09-01

    Sarcomas are rare tumours and particularly rarer in the foot and ankle region. The complex anatomy of the foot and ankle makes it unique and hence poses a challenge to the surgeon for limb salvage surgery. Other lesions found in the foot and ankle region are benign bone and soft tissue tumours, metastasis and infection. The purpose of this article is to discuss the relevance of the complex anatomy of the foot and ankle in relation to tumours, clinical features, their general management principles and further discussion about some of the more common bone and soft tissue lesions. Discussion of every single bone and soft tissue lesion in the foot and ankle region is beyond the scope of this article.

  15. Tumour Angiogenesis and Angiogenic Inhibitors: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Lalita; Puri, Naveen; Satpute, Pranali; Sharma, Vandana

    2015-01-01

    Angiogenesis is a complex process depending on the coordination of many regulators and there by activating angiogenic switch. Recent advances in understanding of angiogenic mechanism have lead to the development of several anti-angiogenic and anti-metastatic agents that use the strategy of regulation of angiogenic switch. Antiangiogenic therapy is a form of treatment not cure for cancer and represents a highly effective strategy for destroying tumour because vascular supply is the fundamental requirement for growth of tumour. Because of the quiescent nature of normal adult vasculature, angiogenic inhibitors are expected to confer a degree of specificity when compared to nonspecific modalities of chemo and radiotherapy, so it has the advantage of less toxicities, does not induce drug resistance and deliver a relatively non toxic, long term treatment of tumour. PMID:26266204

  16. Brain tumour-associated status epilepticus.

    PubMed

    Goonawardena, Janindu; Marshman, Laurence A G; Drummond, Katharine J

    2015-01-01

    We have reviewed the scant literature on status epilepticus in patients with brain tumours. Patients with brain tumour-associated epilepsy (TAE) appear less likely to develop status epilepticus (TASE) than patients with epilepsy in the general population (EGP) are to develop status epilepticus (SEGP). TASE is associated with lesions in similar locations as TAE; in particular, the frontal lobes. However, in contrast to TAE, where seizures commence early in the course of the disease or at presentation, TASE is more likely to occur later in the disease course and herald tumour progression. In marked contrast to TAE, where epilepsy risk is inversely proportional to Word Health Organization tumour grade, TASE risk appears to be directly proportional to tumour grade (high grade gliomas appear singularly predisposed). Whilst anti-epileptic drug (AED) resistance is more common in TAE than EGP (with resistance directly proportional to tumour grade and frontal location), TASE appears paradoxically more responsive to simple AED regimes than either TAE or SEGP. Although some results suggest that mortality may be higher with TASE than with SEGP, it is likely that (as with SEGP) the major determinant of mortality is the underlying disease process. Because all such data have been derived from retrospective studies, because TASE and SEGP are less common than TAE and EGP, and because TASE and SEGP classification has often been inconsistent, findings can only be considered preliminary: multi-centre, prospective studies are required. Whilst preliminary, our review suggests that TASE has a distinct clinical profile compared to TAE and SEGP. PMID:25150762

  17. Incidence, histopathologic analysis and distribution of tumours of the hand

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of this large collective and meticulous study of primary bone tumours and tumourous lesions of the hand was to enhance the knowledge about findings of traumatological radiographs and improve differential diagnosis. Methods This retrospective study reviewed data collected from 1976 until 2006 in our Bone Tumour Registry. The following data was documented: age, sex, radiological investigations, tumour location, histopathological features including type and dignity of the tumour, and diagnosis. Results The retrospective analysis yielded 631 patients with a mean age of 35.9 ± 19.2 years. The majority of primary hand tumours were found in the phalanges (69.7%) followed by 24.7% in metacarpals and 5.6% in the carpals. Only 10.6% of all cases were malignant. The major lesion type was cartilage derived at 69.1%, followed by bone cysts 11.3% and osteogenic tumours 8.7%. The dominant tissue type found in phalanges and metacarpals was of cartilage origin. Osteogenic tumours were predominant in carpal bones. Enchondroma was the most commonly detected tumour in the hand (47.1%). Conclusions All primary skeletal tumours can be found in the hand and are most often of cartilage origin followed by bone cysts and osteogenic tumours. This study furthermore raises awareness about uncommon or rare tumours and helps clinicians to establish proper differential diagnosis, as the majority of detected tumours of the hand are asymptomatic and accidental findings on radiographs. PMID:24885007

  18. Sertoliform cystadenoma: a rare benign tumour of the rete testis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Sertoliform cystadenoma of the rete testis represents an uncommon benign tumour. They appear in patients from 26 to 62 years of age. We describe a case of a 66-year-old man with a tumour in the area of the epididymal head. The tumour markers were not increased. Under the assumption of a malignant testicular tumour an inguinal orchiectomy was performed. The cut surface of this tumour was of grey/white color and showed small cysts. The tumour consisted of two compartments. The epithelial like tumour cells showed a sertoliform growth pattern and cystic dilatations. In between the tumour cells repeatedly actin expressing sclerotic areas could be recognized as the second tumour component. Proliferative activity was not increased. Immunohistochemically the tumour cells were positiv for inhibin, S-100, and CD 99. Alpha feto protein (AFP), human chorionic gonadotropin (ß-HCG) and placental alkaline phosphatase (PLAP) as well as synaptophysin, epithelial membrane antigene (EMA), and BCL-2 were not expressed. As far as we know this is the sixth reported case of this tumour. Because of the benign nature of this tumour the correct diagnosis is important for the intra- and postoperative management. Here we present a case of this rare tumour and discuss potential differential diagnosis. Virtual Slides The virtual slide(s) for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/1956026143857335 PMID:23406299

  19. Neurons containing gastrin-releasing peptide and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide are involved in the reception of the photic signal in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the Syrian hamster: an immunocytochemical ultrastructural study.

    PubMed

    Aïoun, J; Chambille, I; Peytevin, J; Martinet, L

    1998-02-01

    In mammals, the suprachiasmatic nuclei are involved in the generation of biological rhythms and are synchronized by light input coming from the retina. The targets of retinal afferents and the involvement of neurons containing gastrin-releasing and vasoactive intestinal peptides in photic reception were investigated in the suprachiasmatic nuclei of the Syrian hamster by using light- and electron-microscopic immunocytochemistry. Cholera toxin was used to trace retinal fibers and Fos immunoreactivity to visualize cellular response to light stimulation. Ultrastructural observations were made in the intermediate third of the nuclei, the area of highest overlap for the immunoreactivities investigated. Gastrin-releasing peptide and vasoactive intestinal peptide cell bodies were localized in the ventral part of the nuclei; their dense immunoreactive fiber network often displayed synaptic contacts. Both neuropeptides were colocalized in elongated cells observed near the optic chiasm. Following a light pulse in the middle of the subjective night, Fos protein was expressed in most gastrin-releasing peptide perikarya and in some vasoactive intestinal peptide cells. Retinal terminals mostly occurred in the midline zone between the suprachiasmatic nuclei. Symmetrical or asymmetrical retinal synapses were observed on gastrin-releasing peptide-immunoreactive dendrites and somata, but never on vasoactive intestinal peptide neurons. These results are discussed in relation to the photic entrainment of the circadian clock.

  20. Treatment of primary brain tumours in adults.

    PubMed

    McNamara, Shanne

    This article considers the complexities of caring for patients with primary brain tumours. The incidence, classification and clinical signs and symptoms are outlined. Adult patients experience disabling effects as a result of a brain tumour, which is often accompanied by high morbidity and mortality rates. The various treatment options available are summarised. However, for many patients, there are limited curative treatment options and the main focus is palliative care. The nurse's contribution to care and support of these patients and their families is discussed, with the aim of improving their quality of life.

  1. Stochastic Gompertz model of tumour cell growth.

    PubMed

    Lo, C F

    2007-09-21

    In this communication, based upon the deterministic Gompertz law of cell growth, a stochastic model in tumour growth is proposed. This model takes account of both cell fission and mortality too. The corresponding density function of the size of the tumour cells obeys a functional Fokker--Planck equation which can be solved analytically. It is found that the density function exhibits an interesting "multi-peak" structure generated by cell fission as time evolves. Within this framework the action of therapy is also examined by simply incorporating a therapy term into the deterministic cell growth term.

  2. Metastatic colonization by circulating tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Massagué, Joan; Obenauf, Anna C

    2016-01-21

    Metastasis is the main cause of death in people with cancer. To colonize distant organs, circulating tumour cells must overcome many obstacles through mechanisms that we are only now starting to understand. These include infiltrating distant tissue, evading immune defences, adapting to supportive niches, surviving as latent tumour-initiating seeds and eventually breaking out to replace the host tissue. They make metastasis a highly inefficient process. However, once metastases have been established, current treatments frequently fail to provide durable responses. An improved understanding of the mechanistic determinants of such colonization is needed to better prevent and treat metastatic cancer.

  3. Coordinated regulation of myeloid cells by tumours.

    PubMed

    Gabrilovich, Dmitry I; Ostrand-Rosenberg, Suzanne; Bronte, Vincenzo

    2012-03-22

    Myeloid cells are the most abundant nucleated haematopoietic cells in the human body and are a collection of distinct cell populations with many diverse functions. The three groups of terminally differentiated myeloid cells - macrophages, dendritic cells and granulocytes - are essential for the normal function of both the innate and adaptive immune systems. Mounting evidence indicates that the tumour microenvironment alters myeloid cells and can convert them into potent immunosuppressive cells. Here, we consider myeloid cells as an intricately connected, complex, single system and we focus on how tumours manipulate the myeloid system to evade the host immune response.

  4. A Large Extragnathic Keratocystic Odontogenic Tumour

    PubMed Central

    Bavle, Radhika M.; Muniswamappa, Sudhakara; Narasimhamurthy, Srinath

    2015-01-01

    Odontogenic keratocysts (OKCs) are developmental cysts which occur typically in the jawbones. They present more commonly in the posterior mandible of young adults than the maxilla. OKCs have been reclassified under odontogenic tumours in 2005 by the WHO and have since been termed as keratocystic odontogenic tumours (KCOTs). Here we report a case of a recurrent buccal lesion in a 62-year-old man which was provisionally diagnosed as a space infection (buccal abscess) but surprisingly turned out to be a soft tissue KCOT in an unusual location on histopathologic examination. PMID:26770859

  5. Epidermal growth factor, oestrogen and progesterone receptor expression in primary ovarian cancer: correlation with clinical outcome and response to chemotherapy.

    PubMed Central

    Scambia, G.; Benedetti-Panici, P.; Ferrandina, G.; Distefano, M.; Salerno, G.; Romanini, M. E.; Fagotti, A.; Mancuso, S.

    1995-01-01

    The expression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), oestrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) was assayed by a radioreceptor method in 117 primary ovarian cancers. EGFR was not significantly related to any of the clinicopathological parameters examined. In patients with stage II-IV disease who underwent second-look surgery after primary chemotherapy, a significant correlation between high EGFR levels and poor response to chemotherapy was demonstrated (P = 0.031). Moreover, post-operative residual tumour showed an independent role in predicting chemotherapy response (P = 0.0007) and EGFR status showed a borderline significance (P = 0.052) in the multivariate analysis. No correlation between steroid hormone receptors and clinicopathological parameters was observed. Whereas a significant relationship was shown between EGFR positivity and a shorter overall survival (OS) (P = 0.0022) and progression-free survival (PFS) (P = 0.0033), patient survival was not related to steroid hormone receptor status. Among the parameters tested only stage, ascites and EGFR status retained an independent prognostic value in the multivariate analysis. PMID:7640219

  6. Increased killer immunoglobulin-like receptor expression and functional defects in natural killer cells in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Al Omar, Suliman Y; Marshall, Ernie; Middleton, Derek; Christmas, Stephen E

    2011-05-01

    Frequencies of natural killer (NK) cells from patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) or small cell lung cancer (SCLC) did not differ from healthy controls. A higher proportion of NK cells from NSCLC patients expressed the killer immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) CD158b than in controls (P = 0.0004), in the presence or absence of its ligand, HLA-C1. A similar result was obtained for CD158e in the presence of its ligand HLA-Bw4 in NSCLC patients (P = 0.003); this was entirely attributable to the Bw4I group of alleles in the presence of which a fivefold higher percentage of CD158e(+) NK cells was found in NSCLC patients than controls. Proportions of CD158b(+) NK cells declined with advancing disease in NSCLC patients. Expression of NKp46, CD25 and perforin A, and production of interferon-γ following stimulation with interleukin-12 and interleukin-18, were all significantly lower in NK cells from NSCLC patients than in controls. Both NK cell cytotoxicity and granzyme B expression were also reduced in lung cancer patients. Increased inhibitory KIR expression would decrease NK cell cytotoxic function against tumour cells retaining class I HLA expression. Furthermore, the reduced ability to produce interferon-γ would restrict the ability of NK cells to stimulate T-cell responses in patients with lung cancer.

  7. Ovarian hilus-cell tumour: a case report.

    PubMed

    Georgiev, T N; Valkov, I M; Dokumov, S I

    1980-01-01

    A case of hilus-cell tumour of the ovary, associated with polycystic ovarian disease is reported. The authors discuss the data from hormonal investigations, the morphological picture and the genesis of the tumour.

  8. Intraoperative intravital microscopy permits the study of human tumour vessels

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Daniel T.; Muhitch, Jason B.; Kim, Minhyung; Doyen, Kurt C.; Bogner, Paul N.; Evans, Sharon S.; Skitzki, Joseph J.

    2016-01-01

    Tumour vessels have been studied extensively as they are critical sites for drug delivery, anti-angiogenic therapies and immunotherapy. As a preclinical tool, intravital microscopy (IVM) allows for in vivo real-time direct observation of vessels at the cellular level. However, to date there are no reports of intravital high-resolution imaging of human tumours in the clinical setting. Here we report the feasibility of IVM examinations of human malignant disease with an emphasis on tumour vasculature as the major site of tumour-host interactions. Consistent with preclinical observations, we show that patient tumour vessels are disorganized, tortuous and ∼50% do not support blood flow. Human tumour vessel diameters are larger than predicted from immunohistochemistry or preclinical IVM, and thereby have lower wall shear stress, which influences delivery of drugs and cellular immunotherapies. Thus, real-time clinical imaging of living human tumours is feasible and allows for detection of characteristics within the tumour microenvironment. PMID:26883450

  9. Brain tumour cells interconnect to a functional and resistant network.

    PubMed

    Osswald, Matthias; Jung, Erik; Sahm, Felix; Solecki, Gergely; Venkataramani, Varun; Blaes, Jonas; Weil, Sophie; Horstmann, Heinz; Wiestler, Benedikt; Syed, Mustafa; Huang, Lulu; Ratliff, Miriam; Karimian Jazi, Kianush; Kurz, Felix T; Schmenger, Torsten; Lemke, Dieter; Gömmel, Miriam; Pauli, Martin; Liao, Yunxiang; Häring, Peter; Pusch, Stefan; Herl, Verena; Steinhäuser, Christian; Krunic, Damir; Jarahian, Mostafa; Miletic, Hrvoje; Berghoff, Anna S; Griesbeck, Oliver; Kalamakis, Georgios; Garaschuk, Olga; Preusser, Matthias; Weiss, Samuel; Liu, Haikun; Heiland, Sabine; Platten, Michael; Huber, Peter E; Kuner, Thomas; von Deimling, Andreas; Wick, Wolfgang; Winkler, Frank

    2015-12-01

    Astrocytic brain tumours, including glioblastomas, are incurable neoplasms characterized by diffusely infiltrative growth. Here we show that many tumour cells in astrocytomas extend ultra-long membrane protrusions, and use these distinct tumour microtubes as routes for brain invasion, proliferation, and to interconnect over long distances. The resulting network allows multicellular communication through microtube-associated gap junctions. When damage to the network occurred, tumour microtubes were used for repair. Moreover, the microtube-connected astrocytoma cells, but not those remaining unconnected throughout tumour progression, were protected from cell death inflicted by radiotherapy. The neuronal growth-associated protein 43 was important for microtube formation and function, and drove microtube-dependent tumour cell invasion, proliferation, interconnection, and radioresistance. Oligodendroglial brain tumours were deficient in this mechanism. In summary, astrocytomas can develop functional multicellular network structures. Disconnection of astrocytoma cells by targeting their tumour microtubes emerges as a new principle to reduce the treatment resistance of this disease.

  10. Cutaneous location of atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumour.

    PubMed

    Bellon, Nathalia; Fraitag, Sylvie; Miquel, Catherine; Salomon, Laurent J; Bourdeaut, Franck; Bodemer, Christine; Roujeau, Thomas; Zerah, Michel; Hadj-Rabia, Smail

    2014-07-01

    Atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumour is a rare and highly malignant tumour of the posterior fossae nervous system that occurs in children especially in the first few years of life. Cutaneous location is not previously reported. A newborn boy was referred for both aqueductal stenosis detected antenatally and skin tags mimicking hamartoma. The cerebral tumour increased in size during a few months leading to both skin and cerebral biopsies. Integrase Interactor-1 (INI-1) immunostaining and tumoural and leukocytes INI-1 gene sequencing confirmed the atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumour nature of the cerebral tumour. INI-1 immunostaining in skin biopsy confirmed the dermal location of rhabdoid tumour. Thus, unusual cutaneous lesions may be part of atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumour. The loss of Integrase INI-1 on immunohistochemical staining is characteristic.

  11. Intraoperative intravital microscopy permits the study of human tumour vessels.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Daniel T; Muhitch, Jason B; Kim, Minhyung; Doyen, Kurt C; Bogner, Paul N; Evans, Sharon S; Skitzki, Joseph J

    2016-02-17

    Tumour vessels have been studied extensively as they are critical sites for drug delivery, anti-angiogenic therapies and immunotherapy. As a preclinical tool, intravital microscopy (IVM) allows for in vivo real-time direct observation of vessels at the cellular level. However, to date there are no reports of intravital high-resolution imaging of human tumours in the clinical setting. Here we report the feasibility of IVM examinations of human malignant disease with an emphasis on tumour vasculature as the major site of tumour-host interactions. Consistent with preclinical observations, we show that patient tumour vessels are disorganized, tortuous and ∼50% do not support blood flow. Human tumour vessel diameters are larger than predicted from immunohistochemistry or preclinical IVM, and thereby have lower wall shear stress, which influences delivery of drugs and cellular immunotherapies. Thus, real-time clinical imaging of living human tumours is feasible and allows for detection of characteristics within the tumour microenvironment.

  12. Benign metastatic mixed tumours or unrecognized salivary carcinomas?

    PubMed

    el-Naggar, A; Batsakis, J G; Kessler, S

    1988-09-01

    'Benign metastasizing mixed tumours' are enigmatic lesions of the parotid gland. The authors, through the illustrations of a case and review of the literature, conclude that the tumours are unrecognized and currently unclassified malignancies.

  13. Induction of haem oxygenase-1 by nitric oxide and ischaemia in experimental solid tumours and implications for tumour growth

    PubMed Central

    Doi, K; Akaike, T; Fujii, S; Tanaka, S; Ikebe, N; Beppu, T; Shibahara, S; Ogawa, M; Maeda, H

    1999-01-01

    Induction of haem oxygenase-1 (HO-1) as well as nitric oxide (NO) biosynthesis during tumour growth was investigated in an experimental solid tumour model (AH136B hepatoma) in rats. An immunohistochemical study showed that the inducible isoform of NO synthase (iNOS) was localized in monocyte-derived macrophages, which infiltrated interstitial spaces of solid tumour, but not in the tumour cells. Excessive production of NO in the tumour tissue was unequivocally verified by electron spin resonance spectroscopy. Tumour growth was moderately suppressed by treatment with either Nω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) or S-methylisothiourea sulphate (SMT). In contrast, HO-1 was found only in tumour cells, not in macrophages, by in situ hybridization for HO-1 mRNA. HO-1 expression in AH136B cells in culture was strongly enhanced by an NO (NO+) donor S-nitroso-N-acetyl penicillamine. HO-1 mRNA expression in the solid tumour in vivo decreased significantly after treatment with low doses of NOS inhibitors such as L-NAME and SMT (6–20 mg kg−1). However, the level of HO-1 mRNA in the solid tumour treated with higher doses of NOS inhibitor was similar to that of the solid tumour without NOS inhibitor treatment. Strong induction of HO-1 was also observed in solid tumours after occlusion or embolization of the tumour-feeding artery, indicating that ischaemic stress which may involve oxidative stress triggers HO-1 induction in the solid tumour. Lastly, it is of great importance that an HO inhibitor, zinc protoporphyrin IX injected intra-arterially to the solid tumour suppressed the tumour growth to a great extent. In conclusion, HO-1 expression in the solid tumour may confer resistance of tumour cells to hypoxic stress as well as to NO-mediated cytotoxicity. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10471043

  14. Trophoblastic cell lines generated from tumour necrosis factor receptor-deficient mice reveal specific functions for the two tumour necrosis factor receptors.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, C A; Pace, J L; Banerjee, S; Phillips, T A; Hunt, J S

    1999-01-01

    In mice and humans, expression of the tumour necrosis factor receptor-1 (TNF-R1) gene in placental trophoblast cells is constitutive whereas expression of the TNF-R2 gene is developmentally programmed. In order to study the individual functions of TNF-R1 and -R2 in this lineage, cell lines were generated from placental explants of homozygous matings of gestation day 10 outbred mice (Swiss-Webster), TNF-R1-deficient (TNF-R1-/-) and TNF-R2-/- transgenic mice as well as the background strain for the TNF-R2-/- mice (WT, C57BL/6x129). All of the cells exhibited trophoblast markers; they contained cytokeratin intermediate filaments, expressed alkaline phosphatase activity and displayed transferrin receptors, but were negative for vimentin filaments and the macrophage marker, F4/80. Analysis of DNA by polymerase chain reaction demonstrated the expected TNF-R genotype in each line. In experiments testing the effects of recombinant mouse TNF-alpha (rmTNF-alpha) on viability and proliferation of the cell lines, rmTNF-alpha modestly but dose-dependently inhibited the growth of WT and TNF-R2-/- cells while having no effect on TNF-R1-/- cells. Actinomycin D-treated WT and, to a lesser extent, TNF-R2-/- cells, were more sensitive to growth inhibition than untreated cells whereas TNF-R1-/- cell responses remained unchanged. These data indicated that rmTNF-alpha inhibits growth of trophoblastic cells through TNF-R1 and that newly synthesized protein(s) provide partial protection against toxicity. In contrast to the receptor species-specific effects on cell growth exerted by rmTNF-alpha, both TNF-R mediated inhibition of alkaline phosphatase activity. Collectively, the observations support the postulate that receptor expression is the key factor which determines the nature and extent of TNF-alpha effects on trophoblast cell growth and function.

  15. Effect of orally administered 15(R)-15-methyl prostaglandin E2 and/or an anticholinergic drug on meal-induced gastric acid secretion and serum gastrin level in patients with duodenal ulcers.

    PubMed

    Konturek, S J; Swierczek, J S; Kwiecien, N; Obtułowicz, W; Sito, E; Oleksy, J

    1979-01-01

    The purpose of the present series of tests was to measure and compare the effects of ingestion of gelatin capsules containing 15(R)-15-methyl PGE2 (PG) and/or an anticholinergic drug (methscopolamine bromide, Pamine) on meal-induced gastric acid secretion and serum gastrin level. Eleven duodenal ulcer patients were stimulated by a 5% peptone meal. Acid secretion was determined by the intragastric titration technique, and serum gastrin was measured by radioimmunoassay. The tests were randomized and double-blind. PG alone given 30 min before a test meal at a dose of 50 micrograms or 100 micrograms produced no side effects and inhibited meal-stimulated acid secretion by about 43% and 55%, respectively. Gastric acid inhibition after a single dose of PG was most pronounced in the first hour of a test meal and was accompanied by almost complete suppression of the meal-induced serum gastrin level. Pamine alone in a dose of 2.5 mg reduced gastric acid response to a meal by about 29% but caused a further rise of postprandial serum gastrin level over control values. The combination of PG, 50 micrograms, and Pamine, 2.5 mg, did not result in significantly greater acid inhibition (about 48%) than when either compound was given alone. When the higher dose of PG (100 micrograms) was given together with Pamine (2.5 mg), the degree of inhibition produced by PG alone was not changed. It is concluded that PG given orally in capsules is a potent inhibitor of gastric acid and serum gastrin response to a meal and that this effect may be of potential value in the treatment of peptic ulcer disease.

  16. Pesticide exposure during pregnancy, like nicotine, affects the brainstem α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor expression, increasing the risk of sudden unexplained perinatal death.

    PubMed

    Lavezzi, Anna Maria; Cappiello, Achille; Pusiol, Teresa; Corna, Melissa Felicita; Termopoli, Veronica; Matturri, Luigi

    2015-01-15

    This study indicates the impact of nicotine and pesticides (organochlorine and organophosphate insecticides used in agriculture) on neuronal α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor expression in brainstem regions receiving cholinergic projections in human perinatal life. An in-depth anatomopathological examination of the autonomic nervous system and immunohistochemistry to analyze the α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor expression in the brainstem from 44 fetuses and newborns were performed. In addition, the presence of selected agricultural pesticides in cerebral cortex samples of the victims was determined by specific analytical procedures. Hypodevelopment of brainstem structures checking the vital functions, frequently associated with α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor immunopositivity and smoke absorption in pregnancy, was observed in high percentages of victims of sudden unexpected perinatal death. In nearly 30% of cases however the mothers never smoked, but lived in rural areas. The search for pesticides highlighted in many of these cases traces of both organochlorine and organophosphate pesticides. We detain that exposition to pesticides in pregnancy produces homologous actions to those of nicotine on neuronal α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor, allowing to developmental alterations of brainstem vital centers in victims of sudden unexplained death.

  17. Büschke-Lowenstein tumour in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Garozzo, G; Nuciforo, G; Rocchi, C M; Bonanno, N M; Sampugnaro, E G; Piccione, S; Di Stefano, A; Acquaviva, G; Barberi, A L; Panella, M

    2003-11-10

    During pregnancy a localised human papillomavirus (HPV) lesion may, in rare cases, develop into a Büschke-Lowenstein tumour. The choice of treatment is crucial as standard systemic treatment is teratogenic. We performed laser CO2 microsurgery because it has a low incidence of complications. PMID:14557019

  18. Molecular mechanisms for tumour resistance to chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Pan, Shu-Ting; Li, Zhi-Ling; He, Zhi-Xu; Qiu, Jia-Xuan; Zhou, Shu-Feng

    2016-08-01

    Chemotherapy is one of the prevailing methods used to treat malignant tumours, but the outcome and prognosis of tumour patients are not optimistic. Cancer cells gradually generate resistance to almost all chemotherapeutic drugs via a variety of distinct mechanisms and pathways. Chemotherapeutic resistance, either intrinsic or acquired, is caused and sustained by reduced drug accumulation and increased drug export, alterations in drug targets and signalling transduction molecules, increased repair of drug-induced DNA damage, and evasion of apoptosis. In order to better understand the mechanisms of chemoresistance, this review highlights our current knowledge of the role of altered drug metabolism and transport and deregulation of apoptosis and autophagy in the development of tumour chemoresistance. Reduced intracellular activation of prodrugs (e.g. thiotepa and tegafur) or enhanced drug inactivation by Phase I and II enzymes contributes to the development of chemoresistance. Both primary and acquired resistance can be caused by alterations in the transport of anticancer drugs which is mediated by a variety of drug transporters such as P-glycoprotein (P-gp), multidrug resistance associated proteins, and breast cancer resistance protein. Presently there is a line of evidence indicating that deregulation of programmed cell death including apoptosis and autophagy is also an important mechanism for tumour resistance to anticancer drugs. Reversal of chemoresistance is likely via pharmacological and biological approaches. Further studies are warranted to grasp the full picture of how each type of cancer cells develop resistance to anticancer drugs and to identify novel strategies to overcome it.

  19. Solitary fibrous tumour of the vagus nerve.

    PubMed

    Scholsem, Martin; Scholtes, Felix

    2012-04-01

    We describe the complete removal of a foramen magnum solitary fibrous tumour in a 36-year-old woman. It originated on a caudal vagus nerve rootlet, classically described as the 'cranial' accessory nerve root. This ninth case of immunohistologically confirmed cranial or spinal nerve SFT is the first of the vagus nerve.

  20. Karyotypic abnormalities in tumours of the pancreas.

    PubMed Central

    Bardi, G.; Johansson, B.; Pandis, N.; Mandahl, N.; Bak-Jensen, E.; Andrén-Sandberg, A.; Mitelman, F.; Heim, S.

    1993-01-01

    Short-term cultures from 20 pancreatic tumours, three endocrine and 17 exocrine, were cytogenetically analysed. All three endocrine tumours had a normal chromosome complement. Clonal chromosome aberrations were detected in 13 of the 17 exocrine tumours: simple karyotypic changes were found in five carcinomas and numerous numerical and/or structural changes in eight. When the present findings and those previously reported by our group were viewed in conjunction, the most common numerical imbalances among the 22 karyotypically abnormal pancreatic carcinomas thus available for evaluation turned out to be, in order of falling frequency, -18, -Y, +20, +7, +11 and -12. Imbalances brought about by structural changes most frequently affected chromosomes 1 (losses in 1p but especially gains of 1q), 8 (in particular 8q gains but also 8p losses), and 17 (mostly 17q gain but also loss of 17p). Chromosomal bands 1p32, 1q10, 6q21, 7p22, 8p21, 8q11, 14p11, 15q10-11, and 17q11 were the most common breakpoint sites affected by the structural rearrangements. Abnormal karyotypes were detected more frequently in poorly differentiated and anaplastic carcinomas than in moderately and well differentiated tumours. Images Figure 1 PMID:8494707

  1. Malignant peripheral nerve sheet tumour of cervix.

    PubMed

    Akhavan, Ali; Moghimi, Mansour; Karimi-Zarchi, Mojgan; Navabii, Hossein

    2012-05-30

    Sarcomas account for less than 1% of malignancies of the uterine cervix. Among them, rhabdomyosarcomas are the ones most frequently reported. Malignant peripheral nerve sheet tumour (MPNST) is very rare. In this paper we present a 53-year-old woman with MPNST of the uterine cervix.

  2. Analysis of nanoparticle delivery to tumours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhelm, Stefan; Tavares, Anthony J.; Dai, Qin; Ohta, Seiichi; Audet, Julie; Dvorak, Harold F.; Chan, Warren C. W.

    2016-05-01

    Targeting nanoparticles to malignant tissues for improved diagnosis and therapy is a popular concept. However, after surveying the literature from the past 10 years, only 0.7% (median) of the administered nanoparticle dose is found to be delivered to a solid tumour. This has negative consequences on the translation of nanotechnology for human use with respect to manufacturing, cost, toxicity, and imaging and therapeutic efficacy. In this article, we conduct a multivariate analysis on the compiled data to reveal the contributions of nanoparticle physicochemical parameters, tumour models and cancer types on the low delivery efficiency. We explore the potential causes of the poor delivery efficiency from the perspectives of tumour biology (intercellular versus transcellular transport, enhanced permeability and retention effect, and physicochemical-dependent nanoparticle transport through the tumour stroma) as well as competing organs (mononuclear phagocytic and renal systems) and present a 30-year research strategy to overcome this fundamental limitation. Solving the nanoparticle delivery problem will accelerate the clinical translation of nanomedicine.

  3. Molecular mechanisms for tumour resistance to chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Pan, Shu-Ting; Li, Zhi-Ling; He, Zhi-Xu; Qiu, Jia-Xuan; Zhou, Shu-Feng

    2016-08-01

    Chemotherapy is one of the prevailing methods used to treat malignant tumours, but the outcome and prognosis of tumour patients are not optimistic. Cancer cells gradually generate resistance to almost all chemotherapeutic drugs via a variety of distinct mechanisms and pathways. Chemotherapeutic resistance, either intrinsic or acquired, is caused and sustained by reduced drug accumulation and increased drug export, alterations in drug targets and signalling transduction molecules, increased repair of drug-induced DNA damage, and evasion of apoptosis. In order to better understand the mechanisms of chemoresistance, this review highlights our current knowledge of the role of altered drug metabolism and transport and deregulation of apoptosis and autophagy in the development of tumour chemoresistance. Reduced intracellular activation of prodrugs (e.g. thiotepa and tegafur) or enhanced drug inactivation by Phase I and II enzymes contributes to the development of chemoresistance. Both primary and acquired resistance can be caused by alterations in the transport of anticancer drugs which is mediated by a variety of drug transporters such as P-glycoprotein (P-gp), multidrug resistance associated proteins, and breast cancer resistance protein. Presently there is a line of evidence indicating that deregulation of programmed cell death including apoptosis and autophagy is also an important mechanism for tumour resistance to anticancer drugs. Reversal of chemoresistance is likely via pharmacological and biological approaches. Further studies are warranted to grasp the full picture of how each type of cancer cells develop resistance to anticancer drugs and to identify novel strategies to overcome it. PMID:27097837

  4. A mucoepidermoid tumour of the tongue.

    PubMed

    Hume, W J; Lowry, J C

    1985-10-01

    A case of mucoepidermoid tumour arising in minor salivary glands of the tongue and assessed histologically to be of high-grade malignancy is described. The diagnostic difficulties involved in distinguishing the neoplasm from a squamous cell carcinoma are considered. From published figures it would appear that salivary gland neoplasms in the tongue are much more likely to be malignant than benign.

  5. Predictive and prognostic value of metabolic tumour volume and total lesion glycolysis in solid tumours.

    PubMed

    Van de Wiele, Christophe; Kruse, Vibeke; Smeets, Peter; Sathekge, Mike; Maes, Alex

    2013-01-01

    Data available in patients suffering from squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck, lung carcinoma, oesophageal carcinoma and gynaecological malignancies suggest that metabolic tumour volume and to a lesser extent total lesion glycolysis have the potential to become valuable in the imaging of human solid tumours as prognostic biomarkers for short- to intermediate-term survival outcomes, adding value to clinical staging, for assessment of response to treatment with neoadjuvant and concurrent chemotherapy, and for treatment optimization; for example, based on early treatment response assessment using changes in metabolic tumour volume over time, it might be possible to select patients who require a more aggressive treatment to improve their outcome. Prospective studies enrolling consecutive patients, adopting standardized protocols for FDG PET acquisition and processing, adjusting for potential confounders in the analysis (tumour size and origin) and determining the optimal methodology for determination of these novel markers are mandatory.

  6. Malignant mixed tumour. A salivary gland tumour showing both carcinomatous and sarcomatous features.

    PubMed

    Hellquist, H; Michaels, L

    1986-01-01

    Two malignant mixed tumours, in which both carcinomatous and sarcomatous features were present, are described. They arose in the palate in patients who had undergone surgery and irradiation for a pleomorphic adenoma at the same site 30 and 36 years previously. The histological differential diagnoses of recurrent benign pleomorphic adenoma, pleomorphic adenoma resembling mesenchymal tumour, and carcinoma in (ex) pleomorphic adenoma are discussed. On the basis of their positive reaction for keratin with specific monoclonal antibodies it is suggested that the myoepithelial cells are of epithelial origin. Immunohistochemical studies together with the histological appearance of the neoplasms indicate that the carcinomatous as well as the sarcomatous elements were derived from modified myoepithelial tumour cells. Irradiation may have been responsible for inducing a true malignant mixed tumour as distinct from the more common malignancy which may arise in pleomorphic adenoma, this being a simple carcinoma.

  7. Neuropsychological Differences between Survivors of Supratentorial and Infratentorial Brain Tumours

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patel, S. K.; Mullins, W. A.; O'Neil, S. H.; Wilson, K.

    2011-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study is to evaluate the relationship between brain tumour location and core areas of cognitive and behavioural functioning for paediatric brain tumour survivors. The extant literature both supports and refutes an association between paediatric brain tumour location and neurocognitive outcomes. We examined…

  8. The mechanical microenvironment in cancer: How physics affects tumours.

    PubMed

    Nagelkerke, Anika; Bussink, Johan; Rowan, Alan E; Span, Paul N

    2015-12-01

    The tumour microenvironment contributes greatly to the response of tumour cells. It consists of chemical gradients, for example of oxygen and nutrients. However, a physical environment is also present. Apart from chemical input, cells also receive physical signals. Tumours display unique mechanical properties: they are a lot stiffer than normal tissue. This may be either a cause or a consequence of cancer, but literature suggests it has a major impact on tumour cells as will be described in this review. The mechanical microenvironment may cause malignant transformation, possibly through activation of oncogenic pathways and inhibition of tumour suppressor genes. In addition, the mechanical microenvironment may promote tumour progression by influencing processes such as epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, enhancing cell survival through autophagy, but also affects sensitivity of tumour cells to therapeutics. Furthermore, multiple intracellular signalling pathways prove sensitive to the mechanical properties of the microenvironment. It appears the increased stiffness is unlikely to be caused by increased stiffness of the tumour cells themselves. However, there are indications that tumours display a higher cell density, making them more rigid. In addition, increased matrix deposition in the tumour, as well as increased interstitial fluid pressure may account for the increased stiffness of tumours. Overall, tumour mechanics are significantly different from normal tissue. Therefore, this feature should be further explored for use in cancer prevention, detection and treatment.

  9. Extracellular matrix glycoproteins and diffusion barriers in human astrocytic tumours.

    PubMed

    Zámecník, J; Vargová, L; Homola, A; Kodet, R; Syková, E

    2004-08-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) and changes in the size and geometry of the extracellular space (ECS) in tumour tissue are thought to be of critical importance in influencing the migratory abilities of tumour cells as well as the delivery of therapeutic agents into the tumour. In 21 astrocytic neoplasms, the ECM composition was investigated in situ by the immunohistochemical detection of ECM glycoproteins (tenascin, laminin, vitronectin, fibronectin, collagen types I-VI). To explain the changes in ECS size and to detect barriers to diffusion in the tumour tissue, the ECM composition, the cellularity, the density of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)-positive tumour cell processes and the proliferative activity of the tumours were compared with the size and geometry of the ECS. The ECS volume fraction and the complex of hindrances to diffusion in the ECS (i.e. the tortuosity) were revealed by the real-time iontophoretic tetramethylammonium method. Increased proliferative activity of the tumours correlated with increased ECS volume fraction and tortuosity. The tortuosity of the tumour tissue was not significantly influenced by tumour cell density. Higher tortuosity was found in low-grade astrocytomas associated with the presence of a dense net of GFAP-positive fibrillary processes of the tumour cells. The increase in tortuosity in high-grade tumours correlated with an increased accumulation of ECM molecules, particularly of tenascin. We conclude that the increased malignancy of astrocytic tumours correlates with increases in both ECS volume and ECM deposition.

  10. Cerebrospinal fluid-derived circulating tumour DNA better represents the genomic alterations of brain tumours than plasma.

    PubMed

    De Mattos-Arruda, Leticia; Mayor, Regina; Ng, Charlotte K Y; Weigelt, Britta; Martínez-Ricarte, Francisco; Torrejon, Davis; Oliveira, Mafalda; Arias, Alexandra; Raventos, Carolina; Tang, Jiabin; Guerini-Rocco, Elena; Martínez-Sáez, Elena; Lois, Sergio; Marín, Oscar; de la Cruz, Xavier; Piscuoglio, Salvatore; Towers, Russel; Vivancos, Ana; Peg, Vicente; Ramon y Cajal, Santiago; Carles, Joan; Rodon, Jordi; González-Cao, María; Tabernero, Josep; Felip, Enriqueta; Sahuquillo, Joan; Berger, Michael F; Cortes, Javier; Reis-Filho, Jorge S; Seoane, Joan

    2015-11-10

    Cell-free circulating tumour DNA (ctDNA) in plasma has been shown to be informative of the genomic alterations present in tumours and has been used to monitor tumour progression and response to treatments. However, patients with brain tumours do not present with or present with low amounts of ctDNA in plasma precluding the genomic characterization of brain cancer through plasma ctDNA. Here we show that ctDNA derived from central nervous system tumours is more abundantly present in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) than in plasma. Massively parallel sequencing of CSF ctDNA more comprehensively characterizes the genomic alterations of brain tumours than plasma, allowing the identification of actionable brain tumour somatic mutations. We show that CSF ctDNA levels longitudinally fluctuate in time and follow the changes in brain tumour burden providing biomarkers to monitor brain malignancies. Moreover, CSF ctDNA is shown to facilitate and complement the diagnosis of leptomeningeal carcinomatosis.

  11. Menin: A Tumor Suppressor That Mediates Postsynaptic Receptor Expression and Synaptogenesis between Central Neurons of Lymnaea stagnalis

    PubMed Central

    Flynn, Nichole; Getz, Angela; Visser, Frank; Janes, Tara A.; Syed, Naweed I.

    2014-01-01

    Neurotrophic factors (NTFs) support neuronal survival, differentiation, and even synaptic plasticity both during development and throughout the life of an organism. However, their precise roles in central synapse formation remain unknown. Previously, we demonstrated that excitatory synapse formation in Lymnaea stagnalis requires a source of extrinsic NTFs and receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) activation. Here we show that NTFs such as Lymnaea epidermal growth factor (L-EGF) act through RTKs to trigger a specific subset of intracellular signalling events in the postsynaptic neuron, which lead to the activation of the tumor suppressor menin, encoded by Lymnaea MEN1 (L-MEN1) and the expression of excitatory nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). We provide direct evidence that the activation of the MAPK/ERK cascade is required for the expression of nAChRs, and subsequent synapse formation between pairs of neurons in vitro. Furthermore, we show that L-menin activation is sufficient for the expression of postsynaptic excitatory nAChRs and subsequent synapse formation in media devoid of NTFs. By extending our findings in situ, we reveal the necessity of EGFRs in mediating synapse formation between a single transplanted neuron and its intact presynaptic partner. Moreover, deficits in excitatory synapse formation following EGFR knock-down can be rescued by injecting synthetic L-MEN1 mRNA in the intact central nervous system. Taken together, this study provides the first direct evidence that NTFs functioning via RTKs activate the MEN1 gene, which appears sufficient to regulate synapse formation between central neurons. Our study also offers a novel developmental role for menin beyond tumour suppression in adult humans. PMID:25347295

  12. Orbital tumours and tumour-like lesions: exploring the armamentarium of multiparametric imaging.

    PubMed

    Purohit, Bela S; Vargas, Maria Isabel; Ailianou, Angeliki; Merlini, Laura; Poletti, Pierre-Alexandre; Platon, Alexandra; Delattre, Bénédicte M; Rager, Olivier; Burkhardt, Karim; Becker, Minerva

    2016-02-01

    Although the orbit is a small anatomical space, the wide range of structures present within it are often the site of origin of various tumours and tumour-like conditions, both in adults and children. Cross-sectional imaging is mandatory for the detection, characterization, and mapping of these lesions. This review focuses on multiparametric imaging of orbital tumours. Each tumour is reviewed in relation to its clinical presentation, compartmental location, imaging characteristics, and its histological features. We herein describe orbital tumours as lesions of the globe (retinoblastoma, uveal melanoma), optic nerve sheath complex (meningioma, optic nerve glioma), conal-intraconal compartment (hemangioma), extraconal compartment (dermoid/epidermoid, lacrimal gland tumours, lymphoma, rhabdomysarcoma), and bone and sinus compartment (fibrous dysplasia). Lesions without any typical compartmental localization and those with multi-compartment involvement (veno-lymphatic malformation, plexiform neurofibroma, idiopathic orbital pseudotumour, IgG4 related disease, metastases) are also reviewed. We discuss the role of advanced imaging techniques, such as MR diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), diffusion tensor imaging, fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography CT (FDG-PET CT), and positron emission tomography MRI (MRI PET) as problem-solving tools in the evaluation of those orbital masses that present with non-specific morphologic imaging findings. Main messages/Teaching points • A compartment-based approach is essential for the diagnosis of orbital tumours. • CT and MRI play a key role in the work-up of orbital tumours. • DWI, PET CT, and MRI PET are complementary tools to solve diagnostic dilemmas. • Awareness of salient imaging pearls and diagnostic pitfalls avoids interpretation errors.

  13. Orbital tumours and tumour-like lesions: exploring the armamentarium of multiparametric imaging.

    PubMed

    Purohit, Bela S; Vargas, Maria Isabel; Ailianou, Angeliki; Merlini, Laura; Poletti, Pierre-Alexandre; Platon, Alexandra; Delattre, Bénédicte M; Rager, Olivier; Burkhardt, Karim; Becker, Minerva

    2016-02-01

    Although the orbit is a small anatomical space, the wide range of structures present within it are often the site of origin of various tumours and tumour-like conditions, both in adults and children. Cross-sectional imaging is mandatory for the detection, characterization, and mapping of these lesions. This review focuses on multiparametric imaging of orbital tumours. Each tumour is reviewed in relation to its clinical presentation, compartmental location, imaging characteristics, and its histological features. We herein describe orbital tumours as lesions of the globe (retinoblastoma, uveal melanoma), optic nerve sheath complex (meningioma, optic nerve glioma), conal-intraconal compartment (hemangioma), extraconal compartment (dermoid/epidermoid, lacrimal gland tumours, lymphoma, rhabdomysarcoma), and bone and sinus compartment (fibrous dysplasia). Lesions without any typical compartmental localization and those with multi-compartment involvement (veno-lymphatic malformation, plexiform neurofibroma, idiopathic orbital pseudotumour, IgG4 related disease, metastases) are also reviewed. We discuss the role of advanced imaging techniques, such as MR diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), diffusion tensor imaging, fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography CT (FDG-PET CT), and positron emission tomography MRI (MRI PET) as problem-solving tools in the evaluation of those orbital masses that present with non-specific morphologic imaging findings. Main messages/Teaching points • A compartment-based approach is essential for the diagnosis of orbital tumours. • CT and MRI play a key role in the work-up of orbital tumours. • DWI, PET CT, and MRI PET are complementary tools to solve diagnostic dilemmas. • Awareness of salient imaging pearls and diagnostic pitfalls avoids interpretation errors. PMID:26518678

  14. Haematogenous tumour growth in the inferior vena cava in a patient with a nonseminomatous testicular tumour.

    PubMed

    Ham, S J; Schraffordt Koops, H; Sleijfer, D T; Freling, N M; Molenaar, W M

    1991-08-01

    The case history is reported of a patient with an invasion of the inferior vena cava by metastases of a non-seminomatous testicular tumour. He was treated with combination chemotherapy, followed by laparotomy and resection of residual tumour tissue. Fourteen months after this operation he is in good health. For every retroperitoneal lymph node dissection it is necessary to be on the look-out for invasion of the vena cava, because of the risk of a sudden pulmonary embolism.

  15. Fractionated Radiotherapy with 3 x 8 Gy Induces Systemic Anti-Tumour Responses and Abscopal Tumour Inhibition without Modulating the Humoral Anti-Tumour Response

    PubMed Central

    Habets, Thomas H. P. M.; Oth, Tammy; Houben, Ans W.; Huijskens, Mirelle J. A. J.; Senden-Gijsbers, Birgit L. M. G.; Schnijderberg, Melanie C. A.; Brans, Boudewijn; Dubois, Ludwig J.; Lambin, Philippe; De Saint-Hubert, Marijke; Germeraad, Wilfred T. V.; Tilanus, Marcel G. J.; Mottaghy, Felix M.

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that fractionated radiotherapy (RT) can result in distant non-irradiated (abscopal) tumour regression. Although preclinical studies indicate the importance of T cells in this infrequent phenomenon, these studies do not preclude that other immune mechanisms exhibit an addition role in the abscopal effect. We therefore addressed the question whether in addition to T cell mediated responses also humoral anti-tumour responses are modulated after fractionated RT and whether systemic dendritic cell (DC) stimulation can enhance tumour-specific antibody production. We selected the 67NR mammary carcinoma model since this tumour showed spontaneous antibody production in all tumour-bearing mice. Fractionated RT to the primary tumour was associated with a survival benefit and a delayed growth of a non-irradiated (contralateral) secondary tumour. Notably, fractionated RT did not affect anti-tumour antibody titers and the composition of the immunoglobulin (Ig) isotypes. Likewise, we demonstrated that treatment of tumour-bearing Balb/C mice with DC stimulating growth factor Flt3-L did neither modulate the magnitude nor the composition of the humoral immune response. Finally, we evaluated the immune infiltrate and Ig isotype content of the tumour tissue using flow cytometry and found no differences between treatment groups that were indicative for local antibody production. In conclusion, we demonstrate that the 67NR mammary carcinoma in Balb/C mice is associated with a pre-existing antibody response. And, we show that in tumour-bearing Balb/C mice with abscopal tumour regression such pre-existing antibody responses are not altered upon fractionated RT and/or DC stimulation with Flt3-L. Our research indicates that evaluating the humoral immune response in the setting of abscopal tumour regression is not invariably associated with therapeutic effects. PMID:27427766

  16. [Phyllodes tumour of the seminal vesicle - case report of a rare tumour entity].

    PubMed

    Rau, D; Alt, W; Kälble, T

    2010-11-01

    Neoplasms of the seminal vesicles are rare. Here we report on a patient with a low-grade phyllodes tumour of the seminal vesicle. The patient was admitted to our hospital with a tumour in the excavatio rectovesicalis diagnosed by CT scan. He had no symptoms. For further diagnosis we took transrectal ultrasound-guided biopsies, the histopathological examination showed no malignant features. One month later a follow-up CT scan demonstrated a significant enlargement of the tumour. Therefore we decided to perform a surgical exploration. During surgery we found a partially necrotic mass involving the prostate, the urinary bladder and the rectum. Both radical cystoprostatectomy with ileal conduit and anterior resection of the rectum with colostomy were necessary. Histologically the specimen showed a low-grade phyllodes tumour of the left seminal vesicle. One year after surgery the follow-up was completely normal without any residual or recurrent tumour. Frequency, histology, diagnostic investigations, therapy and prognosis of this rare tumour entity are discussed with respect to the actual literature.

  17. The interaction of general anaesthetics with recombinant GABAA and glycine receptors expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes: a comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Pistis, Marco; Belelli, Delia; Peters, John A; Lambert, Jeremy J

    1997-01-01

    The effects of five structurally dissimilar general anaesthetics were examined in voltage-clamp recordings of agonist-evoked currents mediated by recombinant γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)A receptors composed of human α1β1 and γ2L subunits expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes. A quantitative comparison of the effects of these agents was made upon recombinant glycine receptors expressed as a homo-oligomer of human α1 subunits, or as a hetero-oligomer of human α1 and rat β subunits. Complementary RNA-injected oocytes expressing GABAA receptors responded to bath applied GABA with an EC50 of 158±34 μM. Oocytes expressing α1 and α1β glycine receptors subsequent to cDNA injection displayed EC50 values of 76±2 μM and 66±2 μM, respectively, in response to bath applied glycine. Picrotoxin antagonized responses mediated by homo-oligomeric α1 glycine receptors with an IC50 of 4.2±0.8 μM. Hetero-oligomeric α1β glycine receptors were at least 100-fold less sensitive to blockade by picrotoxin. With the appropriate agonist EC10, propofol enhanced GABA and glycine-evoked currents to approximately the maximal response produced by a saturating concentration of either agonist (i.e. Imax). The calculated EC50 values were 2.3±0.2 μM, 16±3 μM and 27±2 μM, for GABAA α1β1γ2L, glycine α1 and α1β receptors, respectively. At relatively high concentrations, propofol was observed to activate directly both GABAA and glycine receptors. Pentobarbitone potentiated GABA-evoked currents to 117±8.5% of Imax with an EC50 of 65±3 μM. The barbiturate also produced a substantial enhancement of the glycine-evoked currents, Imax and EC50 values being 71±2% and 845±66 μM and 51±10% and 757±30 μM for homomeric α1 and heteromeric α1β glycine receptors respectively. At high concentrations, pentobarbitone directly activated GABAA, but not glycine, receptors. The potentiation by propofol or pentobarbitone of currents mediated by α1 homo

  18. Tumours and tumour-like lesions of the hip in the paediatric age: a review of the Rizzoli experience.

    PubMed

    Ruggieri, P; Angelini, A; Montalti, M; Pala, E; Calabrò, T; Ussia, G; Abati, C N; Mercuri, M

    2009-01-01

    Bone tumours and tumour-like lesions of the hip in children are rare. Signs and symptoms of these tumours are generally nonspecific. Delay of diagnosis is not uncommon. A high index of suspicion in young patients presenting with persistent pain and without history of trauma, that is unresolved with conservative therapy should prompt further investigation, including radiographs or computed tomography scan of the pelvis. In the experience of the Istituto Rizzoli, in patients less than 14 years (mean 9 years, ranged from 6 months to 14 years), 752 tumours and tumours-like lesions occurred in the pelvis or proximal femur, involving the hip. Tumour-like lesions accounted for 322 cases (simple bone cyst in 255, eosinophilic granuloma in 43, aneurismal bone cyst in 34), benign tumours for 340 cases (osteoid osteoma in 229, fibrous dysplasia in 63, exostosis in 48) and malignant tumours for 80 cases (Ewing's sarcoma in 53 and osteosarcoma in 27). The epidemiology, pathology, clinical presentation, and radiograph findings are discussed for each of these tumours.Treatment of these tumours differs from observation or minimally invasive treatment for most pseudotumoural lesions, intralesional excision or termoablation for benign bone tumours and wide resection for malignant bone tumours. In this latter group, chemotherapy is required and often administered pre- and postoperatively.

  19. Cancer Cell Death-Inducing Radiotherapy: Impact on Local Tumour Control, Tumour Cell Proliferation and Induction of Systemic Anti-tumour Immunity.

    PubMed

    Frey, Benjamin; Derer, Anja; Scheithauer, Heike; Wunderlich, Roland; Fietkau, Rainer; Gaipl, Udo S

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy (RT) predominantly is aimed to induce DNA damage in tumour cells that results in reduction of their clonogenicity and finally in tumour cell death. Adaptation of RT with higher single doses has become necessary and led to a more detailed view on what kind of tumour cell death is induced and which immunological consequences result from it. RT is capable of rendering tumour cells immunogenic by modifying the tumour cell phenotype and the microenvironment. Danger signals are released as well as the senescence-associated secretory phenotype. This results in maturation of dendritic cells and priming of cytotoxic T cells as well as in activation of natural killer cells. However, RT on the other hand can also result in immune suppressive events including apoptosis induction and foster tumour cell proliferation. That's why RT is nowadays increasingly combined with selected immunotherapies. PMID:27558821

  20. Skull base tumours Part II. Central skull base tumours and intrinsic tumours of the bony skull base.

    PubMed

    Borges, Alexandra

    2008-06-01

    With the advances of cross-sectional imaging radiologists gained an increasing responsibility in the management of patients with skull base pathology. As this anatomic area is hidden to clinical exam, surgeons and radiation oncologists have to rely on imaging studies to plan the most adequate treatment. To fulfil these endeavour radiologists need to be knowledgeable about skull base anatomy, about the main treatment options available, their indications and contra-indications and needs to be aware of the wide gamut of pathologies seen in this anatomic region. This article will provide a radiologists' friendly approach to the central skull base and will review the most common central skull base tumours and tumours intrinsic to the bony skull base.

  1. IL-8/IL-8 receptor expression in psoriasis and the response to systemic tacrolimus (FK506) therapy.

    PubMed Central

    Lemster, B H; Carroll, P B; Rilo, H R; Johnson, N; Nikaein, A; Thomson, A W

    1995-01-01

    Recently, the keratinocyte IL-8/IL-8 receptor (IL-8R) pathway has been implicated in the pathogenesis of psoriasis, and there is evidence that the potent macrolide immune suppressant tacrolimus (formerly FK506) can inhibit this pathway in vitro. In this study, determination of the expression of cytokine mRNAs in lesional skin of patients with active disease by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction revealed transcripts for IL-1 beta, tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), IL-6, IL-8, IL-8R, IL-10, interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), IL-2R and transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta), but not IL-2 or IL-4. IL-8 was the only cytokine expressed in affected skin of all patients but not in clinically normal skin of healthy subjects. In seven CD4+ T cell clones propagated from the lesional skin of an untreated psoriasis patient, IL-8 was expressed by the skin-derived T lymphocytes and not by feeder cells (irradiated autologous blood lymphocytes); IL-1 beta, IL-2, IL-6 and IL-10 were also expressed by some or all of the T cell clones. IL-8 mRNA was not detected in the skin of any patient after the start of systemic tacrolimus therapy; IL-1 beta, IL-6 and IFN-gamma transcripts were also reduced. By 12 weeks, the mean psoriasis area and severity index (PASI) had decreased from 18.8 to 3.8, a reduction of 80%. In the same post-treatment biopsies, however, message for IL-8R persisted. Estimation of circulating IL-8 levels by enzyme immunoassay showed that all patients with detectable IL-8 before treatment had decreased levels in response to treatment with tacrolimus; reductions in PASI scores were accompanied by decreases in IL-8 levels, that varied both in rate and extent. Partial relapse, which in a minority of patients followed the initial period of remission, and was precipitated by drug dose reduction, was accompanied by an increase in circulating IL-8. These findings add credence to the view that the IL-8/IL-8R autocrine/paracrine pathway may be important in the

  2. Oral and maxillofacial tumours in children: a review.

    PubMed

    Sato, M; Tanaka, N; Sato, T; Amagasa, T

    1997-04-01

    This retrospective review presents our experience of oral and maxillofacial tumours in children. The subjects were 250 children under the age of 15 years (out of a total of 2747 patients with oral and maxillofacial tumours), who were treated after histopathological confirmation of their diagnoses during the 28 years 1965-92. Diagnosis, incidence, and age at presentation were the main outcome measures and the results showed that 232 patients (93%) had benign tumours and 18 (7%) were malignant. The most common benign tumour was haemangioma (n = 69) and the most common malignant tumour sarcoma (n = 14). The most common odontogenic tumour was odontoma (n = 47) and non-odontogenic tumour ossifying fibroma (n = 5). The most common site of soft tissue tumours was the tongue (n = 65) and of bony tumours the mandible (n = 62). About a third of the tumours developed in patients between the ages of 6 and 11 years. Most of the angiomas developed in patients less than 6 years old, and most of the ameloblastomas in those over 12 years of age. Children accounted for 55% of patients with lymphangoma, 41% of those with odontoma, and 22% of those with haemangioma. It is concluded that most of these lesions were probably developmental malformations rather than neoplasms, and that the definition of oral and maxillofacial tumours in children should be reconsidered.

  3. Incidence and prevalence of salivary gland tumours in Valparaiso, Chile

    PubMed Central

    Araya, Juan; Martinez, René; Niklander, Sven; Marshall, Maureen

    2015-01-01

    Background To determine the incidence and prevalence of salivary gland tumours in the province of Valparaíso, Chile. Material and Methods Retrospective review of salivary gland tumours diagnosed between the years 2000 and 2011 from four local pathology services. Information on demographics and histopathology were retrieved from the medical records. Results The study sample consisted of 279 salivary gland tumours. Prevalence and incidence rates per 100.000 persons were 15.4 and 2.51, respectively. Most of the neoplasms corresponded to benign tumours (70.3%). The most affected gland was the parotid gland. Pleomorphic adenoma was the most common benign tumour (53.8%) and mucoepidermoid carcinoma was the most common malignant tumour (7.2%). Conclusions Salivary gland tumours are uncommon neoplasms that usually arise in the parotid gland. Pleomorphic adenoma and mucoepidermoid carcinoma were the most common benign and malignant tumours reported in this series. Key words:Salivary gland tumours, benign tumours, malignant tumours, salivary glands neoplasms, cancer, neoplasia. PMID:26034925

  4. Isolated, disseminated and circulating tumour cells in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Schilling, David; Todenhöfer, Tilman; Hennenlotter, Jörg; Schwentner, Christian; Fehm, Tanja; Stenzl, Arnulf

    2012-08-01

    The loss of single cells from a tumour cell cluster marks an early event in the metastatic process of cancer progression. Although the metastatic cascade in prostate cancer is yet to be fully understood, monitoring circulating tumour cells (CTCs) and quantifying the load of tumour cell dissemination is currently being implemented into routine clinical practice for diagnosing minimal residual disease (MRD), estimating prognosis and monitoring treatment success. Current methods for enrichment of CTCs or disseminated tumour cells (DTCs) and detection of MRD rely on the expression of specific marker genes or proteins that might be altered during the process of tumour cell dissemination, therefore disrupting tumour cell detection. The tumour origin and malignant potential for metastasis of marker-positive cells is not yet clear. Some studies have demonstrated the potential of CTCs or DTCs as prognostic or predictive markers, leading to the increasing implementation of CTC measurement as an end point in clinical trials.

  5. Giant Mediastinal Germ Cell Tumour: An Enigma of Surgical Consideration

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Nurayub Mohd; Azizan, Nornazirah; Zakaria, Andee Dzulkarnaen; Rahman, Mohd Ramzisham Abdul

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of 16-year-old male, who was referred from private centre for dyspnoea, fatigue, and orthopnea. The chest radiograph revealed complete opacification of left chest which was confirmed by computed tomography as a large left mediastinal mass measuring 14 × 15 × 18 cm. The diagnostic needle core biopsy revealed mixed germ cell tumour with possible combination of embryonal carcinoma, yolk sac, and teratoma. After 4 cycles of neoadjuvant BEP regime, there was initial response of tumour markers but not tumour bulk. Instead of classic median sternotomy or clamshell incision, posterolateral approach with piecemeal manner was chosen. Histology confirmed mixed germ cell tumour with residual teratomatous component without yolk sac or embryonal carcinoma component. Weighing 3.5 kg, it is one of the largest mediastinal germ cell tumours ever reported. We describe this rare and gigantic intrathoracic tumour and discuss the spectrum of surgical approach and treatment of this exceptional tumour. PMID:27807495

  6. Expression and mutations of p53 in salivary gland tumours.

    PubMed

    Kärjä, V J; Syrjänen, K J; Kurvinen, A K; Syrjänen, S M

    1997-05-01

    A series of 219 salivary gland tumours (103 carcinomas and 116 benign tumours) were analysed for p53 protein expression using immunohistochemistry, and for mutations in p53 gene using non-radioactive single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP). p53 expression was present in 36% (42/116) of the benign tumours and in 54% (56/103) of the carcinomas. The highest prevalence of p53 expression was found in adenoid cystic carcinomas (69%), followed by mucoepidermoid carcinomas (67%). Of the benign tumours, pleomorphic adenomas showed the highest prevalence of p53 positivity (41%). In malignant tumours, expression of p53 bore no correlation to local recurrence, metastatic disease or survival of the patients. Exons 5 through 9 were analysed and four mutations were found in 20 cases of p53-immunopositive tumours and two in 20 p53-negative tumours. Each of the exons 5, 6 and 8/9 had two mutations, whereas no mutations were detected in exon 7.

  7. Effects of perinatal exposure to lead (Pb) on purine receptor expression in the brain and gliosis in rats tolerant to morphine analgesia.

    PubMed

    Baranowska-Bosiacka, Irena; Listos, Joanna; Gutowska, Izabela; Machoy-Mokrzyńska, Anna; Kolasa-Wołosiuk, Agnieszka; Tarnowski, Maciej; Puchałowicz, Kamila; Prokopowicz, Adam; Talarek, Sylwia; Listos, Piotr; Wąsik, Agnieszka; Chlubek, Dariusz

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the molecular effects of perinatal exposure to lead (Pb) on protein and mRNA expression of purine receptors: P2X4, P2X7, adenosine receptor A1; and astrocytes (GFAP mRNA expression) and on microglia activation (Iba1 mRNA expression) in several structures of the mesolimbic system (striatum, hippocampus, prefrontal cortex) in rats expressing tolerance to the antinociceptive effect of morphine. Rat mothers were orally treated with 0.1% lead acetate from conception, through gestation, and postnatally, as well as to offspring up to day (PND) 28; subsequently molecular studies were conducted on adult (PND 60) male rats. Morphine tolerance developed more strongly in rats perinatally exposed to Pb. The analysis revealed a significant up-regulation of protein and mRNA P2X4 receptor expression in the striatum and prefrontal cortex but not in the hippocampus; P2X7 protein and mRNA receptor expression in the striatum and hippocampus, but not in the prefrontal cortex; A1 protein receptor expression in all investigated structures and A1 mRNA expression in the striatum and hippocampus; Iba1 mRNA expression in the striatum and hippocampus; and GFAP mRNA expression in the striatum and prefrontal cortex. Immunohistochemical analysis has also revealed significant alterations. Strong expressions of P2X4, P2X7, A1 receptors, astrocytes and microglia activation were observed in the hippocampus in Pb and/or morphine treated rats. The higher expression of purine receptors and glial cell activation are important markers of neuroinflammatory processes. Therefore, we conclude that Pb-induced neuroinflammation may be responsible for the intensification of morphine tolerance in the Pb-treated rats. Additionally, the dysregulation of A1 adenosine receptors, mainly in the hippocampus, may also be involved in the intensification of morphine tolerance in Pb-treated rats. Our study demonstrates the significant participation of environmental factors in

  8. The protein kinase IKKepsilon contributes to tumour growth and tumour pain in a melanoma model.

    PubMed

    Möser, Christine V; Meissner, Markus; Laarmann, Kathrin; Olbrich, Katrin; King-Himmelreich, Tanya S; Wolters, Miriam C; Geisslinger, Gerd; Niederberger, Ellen

    2016-03-01

    Inhibitor-kappaB kinase epsilon (IKKε) constitutes a non-canonical I-κB kinase, which amongst others modulates NF-κB activity. IKKε and NF-κB have both been described for their role in cell proliferation and their dysregulation has been associated with tumourigenesis and metastasis in multiple cancer types. Accordingly, overexpression and constitutive activation of NF-κB have also been shown in melanoma, however, the role of IKKε in this cancer type has not been investigated so far. Thus, we determined IKKε expression in malignant melanoma cells and we were able to show a significant overexpression of IKKε in tumour cells in comparison to melanocytes. Inhibition of IKKε either by shRNA or the pharmacological inhibitor amlexanox resulted in reduced cell proliferation associated with a cell cycle block in the G1-phase. Functional analysis indicated that NF-κB, Akt1 and MAPK pathways might be involved in the IKKε-mediated effects. In vivo, we applied a mouse melanoma skin cancer model to assess tumour growth and melanoma-associated pain in IKKε knockout mice as well as C57BL/6 mice after inoculation with IKKε-negative cells. In IKKε knockout mice, tumour growth was not altered as compared to IKKε wild type mice. However, melanoma associated pain was strongly suppressed accompanied by a reduced mRNA expression of a number of pain-relevant genes. In contrast, after inoculation of IKKε-depleted tumour cells, the development of melanoma was almost completely prevented. In conclusion, our data suggest that IKKε in the tumour plays an essential role in tumour initiation and progression while IKKε expression in tumour surrounding tissues contributes to melanoma-associated pain.

  9. LKB1, the multitasking tumour suppressor kinase.

    PubMed

    Marignani, P A

    2005-01-01

    Mutations in the lkb1 gene are found in Peutz-Jeghers syndrome (PJS), with loss of heterozygosity or somatic mutations at the lkb1 locus, suggesting the gene product, the serine/threonine kinase LKB1, may function as a tumour suppressor. Patients with PJS are at a greater risk of developing cancers of epithelial tissue origin. It is widely accepted that the presence of hamartomatous polyps in PJS does not in itself lead to the development of malignancy. The signalling mechanisms that lead to these PJS related malignancies are not well understood. However, it is evident from the recent literature that LKB1 is a multitasking kinase, with unlimited potential in orchestrating cell activity. Thus far, LKB1 has been found to play a role in chromatin remodelling, cell cycle arrest, Wnt signalling, cell polarity, and energy metabolism, all of which may require the tumour suppressor function of this kinase and/or its catalytic activity.

  10. Caspase-2 as a tumour suppressor

    PubMed Central

    Puccini, J; Dorstyn, L; Kumar, S

    2013-01-01

    Ever since its discovery 20 years ago, caspase-2 has been enigmatic and its function somewhat controversial. Although many in vitro studies suggested that caspase-2 was important for apoptosis, demonstrating an in vivo cell death role for this caspase has been more problematic, with caspase-2-deficient mice showing limited, tissue-specific cell death defects. Recent results from different laboratories suggest that at least one of its physiological roles in animals is to protect against cellular stress and transformation. As such, loss of caspase-2 augments tumorigenesis in some mouse models of cancer, assigning a tumour suppressor function to this enigmatic caspase. This review focuses on this seemingly non-apoptotic function of caspase-2 as a tumour suppressor and reconciles some of the recent findings in the field. PMID:23811850

  11. Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy of neuroendocrine tumours.

    PubMed

    Brabander, Tessa; Teunissen, Jaap J M; Van Eijck, Casper H J; Franssen, Gaston J H; Feelders, Richard A; de Herder, Wouter W; Kwekkeboom, Dik J

    2016-01-01

    In the past decades, the number of neuroendocrine tumours that are detected is increasing. A relative new and promising therapy for patients with metastasised or inoperable disease is peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT). This therapy involves an infusion of somatostatin analogues linked to radionuclides like Yttrium-90 or Lutetium-177. Objective response rates are reported in 15-35%. Response rates may vary between type of tumour and radionuclide. Besides the objective response rate, overall survival and progression free survival increase significantly. Also, the quality of life improves as well. Serious side-affects are rare. PRRT is usually well tolerated, also in patients with extensive metastasised disease. Recent studies combined PRRT with other types of therapies. Unfortunately no randomised trials comparing these strategies are available. In the future, more research is needed to evaluate the best therapy combinations or sequence of therapies. PMID:26971847

  12. Coexistent dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumour and pilocytic astrocytoma

    PubMed Central

    Nasit, Jitendra G.; Shah, Payal; Zalawadia, Himanshu

    2016-01-01

    Dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumour (DNET) is an uncommon mixed glioneuronal tumour. DNET is classified as Grade I neoplasm in revised World Health Organization classification of tumors of the nervous system. DNET is commonly seen in the temporal lobe of children and young adults with features of pharmacoresistant complex partial seizures. Tumors arising in association with DNETs are rare. Only two cases of pilocytic astrocytoma (PA) arising in DNETs are reported. Surgical excision is the only successful management with favourable prognosis. The development of recurrence and malignancy after subtotal or even after complete excision challenges the premise of stability and highlights the importance of close clinical follow up. Here, a case of DNET with area of PA is described which helps in understanding the pathogenesis and biological behavior of DNET.

  13. Coexistent dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumour and pilocytic astrocytoma

    PubMed Central

    Nasit, Jitendra G.; Shah, Payal; Zalawadia, Himanshu

    2016-01-01

    Dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumour (DNET) is an uncommon mixed glioneuronal tumour. DNET is classified as Grade I neoplasm in revised World Health Organization classification of tumors of the nervous system. DNET is commonly seen in the temporal lobe of children and young adults with features of pharmacoresistant complex partial seizures. Tumors arising in association with DNETs are rare. Only two cases of pilocytic astrocytoma (PA) arising in DNETs are reported. Surgical excision is the only successful management with favourable prognosis. The development of recurrence and malignancy after subtotal or even after complete excision challenges the premise of stability and highlights the importance of close clinical follow up. Here, a case of DNET with area of PA is described which helps in understanding the pathogenesis and biological behavior of DNET. PMID:27695565

  14. Novel 1,4-diarylpiperidine-4-methylureas as anti-hyperlipidemic agents: dual effectors on acyl-CoA:cholesterol O-acyltransferase and low-density lipoprotein receptor expression.

    PubMed

    Asano, Shigehiro; Ban, Hitoshi; Kino, Kouichi; Ioriya, Katsuhisa; Muraoka, Masami

    2009-02-15

    A family of 1,4-diarylpiperidine-4-methylureas were designed and synthesized as novel dual effectors on ACAT and LDL receptor expression. We examined SAR of the synthesized compounds focusing on substitution at the three aromatic parts of the starting compound 1 and succeeded in identifying essential substituents for inhibition of ACAT and up-regulation of hepatic LDL receptor expression. Especially, we found that compound 12f, which can easily be prepared, has biological properties comparable to those of SMP-797, a promising ACAT inhibitor. In addition, the in vitro effects of 12f on lipid metabolism were substantially superior to those of a known ACAT inhibitor, Avasimibe. PMID:19167888

  15. [Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumours of the bladder].

    PubMed

    Dakir, Mohamed; Taha, Abdellatif; Attar, Hicham; Sarf, Ismail; Aboutaib, Rachid; Moussaoui, Ali; Meziane, Fathi

    2004-12-01

    The inflammatory myofibroblastic tumour of the bladder is a rare benign affection that interests mainly young adults. Its etiopathogeny remains unknown, but its tumoral origin was evocated recently by Griffin (1999), incriminating a chromosomic abnormality involving the ALK gene. We will discuss the etiopathogenic, anatopathological and therapeutical aspects of this lesion for which the diagnosis is histological and the treatment remains conservative with a good prognosis.

  16. Genetics of neuroendocrine and carcinoid tumours.

    PubMed

    Leotlela, P D; Jauch, A; Holtgreve-Grez, H; Thakker, R V

    2003-12-01

    Neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) originate in tissues that contain cells derived from the embryonic neural crest, neuroectoderm and endoderm. Thus, NETs occur at many sites in the body, although the majority occur within the gastro-entero-pancreatic axis and can be subdivided into those of foregut, midgut and hindgut origin. Amongst these, only those of midgut origin are generally argentaffin positive and secrete serotonin, and hence only these should be referred to as carcinoid tumours. NETs may occur as part of complex familial endocrine cancer syndromes, such as multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1), although the majority occur as non-familial (i.e. sporadic) isolated tumours. Molecular genetic studies have revealed that the development of NETs may involve different genes, each of which may be associated with several different abnormalities that include point mutations, gene deletions, DNA methylation, chromosomal losses and chromosomal gains. Indeed, the foregut, midgut and hindgut NETs develop via different molecular pathways. For example, foregut NETs have frequent deletions and mutations of the MEN1 gene, whereas midgut NETs have losses of chromosome 18, 11q and 16q and hindgut NETs express transforming growth factor-alpha and the epidermal growth factor receptor. Furthermore, in lung NETs, a loss of chromosome 3p is the most frequent change and p53 mutations and chromosomal loss of 5q21 are associated with more aggressive tumours and poor survival. In addition, methylation frequencies of retinoic acid receptor-beta, E-cadherin and RAS-associated domain family genes increase with the severity of lung NETs. Thus the development and progression of NETs is associated with specific genetic abnormalities that indicate the likely involvement of different molecular pathways.

  17. A benign maxillary tumour with malignant features.

    PubMed

    Ricalde, Rosario R; Lim, Aimee Caroline E; Lopa, Ramon Antonio B; Carnate, Jose M

    2010-06-01

    Non-specific biopsy results such as chronic inflammation, hemorrhage, necrosis can be frustrating to the clinician. This is especially true if the patient presents with clinical features suggestive of an aggressive tumour. This is a review of the clinical features, diagnostic dilemmas and surgical management of a benign maxillary mass with malignant features - a disease called hematoma-like mass of the maxillary sinus (HLMMS). Our experience with five cases will also be cited. PMID:20502750

  18. Malignant testicular tumour incidence and mortality trends

    PubMed Central

    Wojtyła-Buciora, Paulina; Więckowska, Barbara; Krzywinska-Wiewiorowska, Małgorzata; Gromadecka-Sutkiewicz, Małgorzata

    2016-01-01

    Aim of the study In Poland testicular tumours are the most frequent cancer among men aged 20–44 years. Testicular tumour incidence since the 1980s and 1990s has been diversified geographically, with an increased risk of mortality in Wielkopolska Province, which was highlighted at the turn of the 1980s and 1990s. The aim of the study was the comparative analysis of the tendencies in incidence and death rates due to malignant testicular tumours observed among men in Poland and in Wielkopolska Province. Material and methods Data from the National Cancer Registry were used for calculations. The incidence/mortality rates among men due to malignant testicular cancer as well as the tendencies in incidence/death ratio observed in Poland and Wielkopolska were established based on regression equation. The analysis was deepened by adopting the multiple linear regression model. A p-value < 0.05 was arbitrarily adopted as the criterion of statistical significance, and for multiple comparisons it was modified according to the Bonferroni adjustment to a value of p < 0.0028. Calculations were performed with the use of PQStat v1.4.8 package. Results The incidence of malignant testicular neoplasms observed among men in Poland and in Wielkopolska Province indicated a significant rising tendency. The multiple linear regression model confirmed that the year variable is a strong incidence forecast factor only within the territory of Poland. A corresponding analysis of mortality rates among men in Poland and in Wielkopolska Province did not show any statistically significant correlations. Conclusions Late diagnosis of Polish patients calls for undertaking appropriate educational activities that would facilitate earlier reporting of the patients, thus increasing their chances for recovery. Introducing preventive examinations in the regions of increased risk of testicular tumour may allow earlier diagnosis. PMID:27095941

  19. ABCB1 in children's brain tumours.

    PubMed

    Coyle, Beth; Kessler, Maya; Sabnis, Durgagauri H; Kerr, Ian D

    2015-10-01

    Tumours of the central nervous system are the most common solid tumour, accounting for a quarter of the 1500 cases of childhood cancer diagnosed each year in the U.K. They are the most common cause of cancer-related death in children. Treatment consists of surgery followed by adjuvant chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy. Survival rates have generally increased, but many survivors suffer from radiotherapy-related neurocognitive and endocrine side effects as well as an increased risk of secondary cancer. Adjuvant chemotherapy is normally given in combination to circumvent chemoresistance, but several studies have demonstrated it to be ineffective in the absence of radiotherapy. The identification of children with drug-resistant disease at the outset could allow stratification of those that are potentially curable by chemotherapy alone. Ultimately, however, what is required is a means to overcome this drug resistance and restore the effectiveness of chemotherapy. Medulloblastomas and ependymomas account for over 30% of paediatric brain tumours. Advances in neurosurgery, adjuvant radiotherapy and chemotherapy have led to improvements in 5-year overall survival rates. There remain, however, significant numbers of medulloblastoma patients that have intrinsically drug-resistant tumours and/or present with disseminated disease. Local relapse in ependymoma is also common and has an extremely poor prognosis with only 25% of children surviving first relapse. Each of these is consistent with the acquisition of drug and radiotherapy resistance. Since the majority of chemotherapy drugs currently used to treat these patients are transport substrates for ATP-binding cassette sub-family B member 1 (ABCB1) we will address the hypothesis that ABCB1 expression underlies this drug resistance. PMID:26517917

  20. Papillary tumours of the minor salivary glands.

    PubMed

    Whittaker, J S; Turner, E P

    1976-09-01

    The clinical and histological features of oncocytic adenomatous hyperplasia, papillary adenoma, and papillary adenocarcinoma of the oral cavity are described, and the literature is reviewed. Histological features which may be of value in distinguishing between benign and malignant variants are described, and in view of the slow growth rate of most of these tumours, the importance of long-term follow-up is stressed.

  1. Verification of genes differentially expressed in neuroblastoma tumours: a study of potential tumour suppressor genes

    PubMed Central

    Thorell, Kaisa; Bergman, Annika; Carén, Helena; Nilsson, Staffan; Kogner, Per; Martinsson, Tommy; Abel, Frida

    2009-01-01

    Background One of the most striking features of the childhood malignancy neuroblastoma (NB) is its clinical heterogeneity. Although there is a great need for better clinical and biological markers to distinguish between tumours with different severity and to improve treatment, no clear-cut prognostic factors have been found. Also, no major NB tumour suppressor genes have been identified. Methods In this study we performed expression analysis by quantitative real-time PCR (QPCR) on primary NB tumours divided into two groups, of favourable and unfavourable outcome respectively. Candidate genes were selected on basis of lower expression in unfavourable tumour types compared to favourables in our microarray expression analysis. Selected genes were studied in two steps: (1) using TaqMan Low Density Arrays (TLDA) targeting 89 genes on a set of 12 NB tumour samples, and (2) 12 genes were selected from the TLDA analysis for verification using individual TaqMan assays in a new set of 13 NB tumour samples. Results By TLDA analysis, 81 out of 87 genes were found to be significantly differentially expressed between groups, of which 14 have previously been reported as having an altered gene expression in NB. In the second verification round, seven out of 12 transcripts showed significantly lower expression in unfavourable NB tumours, ATBF1, CACNA2D3, CNTNAP2, FUSIP1, GNB1, SLC35E2, and TFAP2B. The gene that showed the highest fold change in the TLDA analysis, POU4F2, was investigated for epigenetic changes (CpG methylation) and mutations in order to explore the cause of the differential expression. Moreover, the fragile site gene CNTNAP2 that showed the largest fold change in verification group 2 was investigated for structural aberrations by copy number analysis. However, the analyses of POU4F2 and CNTNAP2 showed no genetic alterations that could explain a lower expression in unfavourable NB tumours. Conclusion Through two steps of verification, seven transcripts were found to

  2. [Guideline 'Leptomeningeal metastases of solid tumours'].

    PubMed

    Boogerd, W; du Bois, W F J; Teepen, J L J M; Rosenbrand, C J G M

    2007-01-13

    In view of recent progressive insight in the diagnosis and treatment of leptomeningeal metastases of solid tumours, a new guideline has been designed on the initiative of the Dutch Association of NeuroOncology and the Netherlands Society of Neurology, with methodological support from the Dutch Institute for Healthcare Improvement (CBO). - There are no neurological symptoms or signs, nor MRI characteristics that are unique to leptomeningeal metastasis. However, clinical suspicion of leptomeningeal metastasis in a patient known to have cancer, in combination with specific MRI characteristics is sufficient to make the diagnosis. If MRI or CT results are negative or inconclusive cerebrospinal-fluid assessment should be conducted. - Management of care of patients with leptomeningeal metastasis without brain metastases can be based on a series of categories that have been developed using prognostic factors such as Karnofsky performance status, serious encephalopathy or neurological dysfunction, systemic disease, sensitivity of the tumour for chemotherapy or hormonal treatment - In the context of meaningful palliation, systemic treatment, if necessary in combination with radiotherapy to clinically relevant sites, is preferable to intrathecal chemotherapy. - Intrathecal chemotherapy combined with local radiotherapy is recommended if effective systemic treatment is not available, and if the tumour is potentially sensitive to methotrexate, cytarabine or thiotepa. The combination of intrathecal methotrexate and whole-brain radiotherapy should be avoided.

  3. [Epidemiology and risk factors of testicular tumours].

    PubMed

    Kozłowski, Piotr; Starosławska, Elżbieta; Szumiło, Justyna; Jankiewicz, Małgorzata; Kozłowska, Magdalena; Burdan, Franciszek

    2016-04-01

    Testicular tumours are rare neoplasms, which most commonly affects men aged 25 to 35 years. Among young adult males it is the most common cause of testicular swelling. In recent decades, the number of cases of testicular tumours has greatly increased. The most significant predisposing factors are cryptorchidism and some endocrine disorders, especially increased levels of gonadotropins and female sex hormones. Testicular trauma, inguinal hernia, extreme values of body mass index (BMI), high-calorie diet rich in dairy products as well as high social status are also regarded as risk factors. Furthermore, some chromosomal abnormalities like increased number of chromosomes 7, 8. 12, 21 and X, loss of chromosomes 4, 5, 11, 13, 18, or Y, mutation in the gene Xq27; as well as multiplied copy of the gene i(12p) are associated with tumor development. It has been proven that high testosterone levels and regular physical activity may prevent testicular tumours. Since one of the first sign the lesion is often a lump or swelling of the testis and the appearance of abnormal structure in the scrotum routine testicular self-examination seems to be important in early detection. In all suspected cases an immediate ultrasound examination of both testicles is highly recommended. It is also advised to conduct a computerized tomography (CT) and a positron emission tomography (PET) scan for staging of the tumor to select the best mode of treatment. PMID:27137819

  4. Cell metabolism, tumour diagnosis and multispectral FLIM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rück, A.; Hauser, C.; Lorenz, S.; Mosch, S.; Rotte, S.; Kessler, M.; Kalinina, S.

    2013-02-01

    Fluorescence guided diagnosis of tumour tissue is in many cases insufficient, because false positive results are interfering with the outcome. Discrimination between tumour and inflammation could be therefore difficult. Improvement of fluorescence diagnosis through observation of cell metabolism could be the solution, which needs a detailed understanding of the origin of autofluorescence. However, a complex combination of fluorophores give rise to the emission signal. Also in PDD (photodynamic diagnosis) different photosensitizer metabolites contribute to the fluorescence signal. Therefore, the fluorescence decay in many cases does not show a simple monoexponential profile. In those cases a considerable improvement could be achieved when time-resolved and spectral-resolved techniques are simultaneously incorporated. The discussion will focus on the detection of NADH, FAD and 5-ALA induced porphyrins. With respect to NADH and FAD the discrimination between protein bound and free coenzyme was investigated with multispectral FLIM in normal oral keratinocytes and squamous carcinoma cells from different origin. The redox ratio, which can be correlated with the fluorescence lifetimes of NADH and FAD changed depending on the state of the cells. Most of the investigations were done in monolayer cell cultures. However, in order to get information from a more realistic in vivo situation additionally the chorioallantoismembrane (CAM) of fertilized eggs was used where tumour cells or biopsies were allowed to grow. The results of theses measurements will be discussed as well.

  5. Tumour exosome integrins determine organotropic metastasis.

    PubMed

    Hoshino, Ayuko; Costa-Silva, Bruno; Shen, Tang-Long; Rodrigues, Goncalo; Hashimoto, Ayako; Tesic Mark, Milica; Molina, Henrik; Kohsaka, Shinji; Di Giannatale, Angela; Ceder, Sophia; Singh, Swarnima; Williams, Caitlin; Soplop, Nadine; Uryu, Kunihiro; Pharmer, Lindsay; King, Tari; Bojmar, Linda; Davies, Alexander E; Ararso, Yonathan; Zhang, Tuo; Zhang, Haiying; Hernandez, Jonathan; Weiss, Joshua M; Dumont-Cole, Vanessa D; Kramer, Kimberly; Wexler, Leonard H; Narendran, Aru; Schwartz, Gary K; Healey, John H; Sandstrom, Per; Labori, Knut Jørgen; Kure, Elin H; Grandgenett, Paul M; Hollingsworth, Michael A; de Sousa, Maria; Kaur, Sukhwinder; Jain, Maneesh; Mallya, Kavita; Batra, Surinder K; Jarnagin, William R; Brady, Mary S; Fodstad, Oystein; Muller, Volkmar; Pantel, Klaus; Minn, Andy J; Bissell, Mina J; Garcia, Benjamin A; Kang, Yibin; Rajasekhar, Vinagolu K; Ghajar, Cyrus M; Matei, Irina; Peinado, Hector; Bromberg, Jacqueline; Lyden, David

    2015-11-19

    Ever since Stephen Paget's 1889 hypothesis, metastatic organotropism has remained one of cancer's greatest mysteries. Here we demonstrate that exosomes from mouse and human lung-, liver- and brain-tropic tumour cells fuse preferentially with resident cells at their predicted destination, namely lung fibroblasts and epithelial cells, liver Kupffer cells and brain endothelial cells. We show that tumour-derived exosomes uptaken by organ-specific cells prepare the pre-metastatic niche. Treatment with exosomes from lung-tropic models redirected the metastasis of bone-tropic tumour cells. Exosome proteomics revealed distinct integrin expression patterns, in which the exosomal integrins α6β4 and α6β1 were associated with lung metastasis, while exosomal integrin αvβ5 was linked to liver metastasis. Targeting the integrins α6β4 and αvβ5 decreased exosome uptake, as well as lung and liver metastasis, respectively. We demonstrate that exosome integrin uptake by resident cells activates Src phosphorylation and pro-inflammatory S100 gene expression. Finally, our clinical data indicate that exosomal integrins could be used to predict organ-specific metastasis.

  6. Genomic landscape of paediatric adrenocortical tumours.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Emilia M; Chen, Xiang; Easton, John; Finkelstein, David; Liu, Zhifa; Pounds, Stanley; Rodriguez-Galindo, Carlos; Lund, Troy C; Mardis, Elaine R; Wilson, Richard K; Boggs, Kristy; Yergeau, Donald; Cheng, Jinjun; Mulder, Heather L; Manne, Jayanthi; Jenkins, Jesse; Mastellaro, Maria J; Figueiredo, Bonald C; Dyer, Michael A; Pappo, Alberto; Zhang, Jinghui; Downing, James R; Ribeiro, Raul C; Zambetti, Gerard P

    2015-01-01

    Paediatric adrenocortical carcinoma is a rare malignancy with poor prognosis. Here we analyse 37 adrenocortical tumours (ACTs) by whole-genome, whole-exome and/or transcriptome sequencing. Most cases (91%) show loss of heterozygosity (LOH) of chromosome 11p, with uniform selection against the maternal chromosome. IGF2 on chromosome 11p is overexpressed in 100% of the tumours. TP53 mutations and chromosome 17 LOH with selection against wild-type TP53 are observed in 28 ACTs (76%). Chromosomes 11p and 17 undergo copy-neutral LOH early during tumorigenesis, suggesting tumour-driver events. Additional genetic alterations include recurrent somatic mutations in ATRX and CTNNB1 and integration of human herpesvirus-6 in chromosome 11p. A dismal outcome is predicted by concomitant TP53 and ATRX mutations and associated genomic abnormalities, including massive structural variations and frequent background mutations. Collectively, these findings demonstrate the nature, timing and potential prognostic significance of key genetic alterations in paediatric ACT and outline a hypothetical model of paediatric adrenocortical tumorigenesis. PMID:25743702

  7. Imatinib treatment for gastrointestinal stromal tumour (GIST).

    PubMed

    Lopes, Lisandro F; Bacchi, Carlos E

    2010-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumour (GIST) is the most common mesenchymal neoplasm of the gastrointestinal tract. GISTs are believed to originate from intersticial cells of Cajal (the pacemaker cells of the gastrointestinal tract) or related stem cells, and are characterized by KIT or platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha (PDGFRA) activating mutations. The use of imatinib has revolutionized the management of GIST and altered its natural history, substantially improving survival time and delaying disease progression in many patients. The success of imatinib in controlling advanced GIST led to interest in the neoadjuvant and adjuvant use of the drug. The neoadjuvant (preoperative) use of imatinib is recommended to facilitate resection and avoid mutilating surgery by decreasing tumour size, and adjuvant therapy is indicated for patients at high risk of recurrence. The molecular characterization (genotyping) of GISTs has become an essential part of the routine management of the disease as KIT and PDGFRA mutation status predicts the likelihood of achieving response to imatinib. However, the vast majority of patients who initially responded to imatinib will develop tumour progression (secondary resistance). Secondary resistance is often related to secondary KIT or PDGFRA mutations that interfere with drug binding. Multiple novel tyrosine kinase inhibitors may be potentially useful for the treatment of imatinib-resistant GISTs as they interfere with KIT and PDGFRA receptors or with the downstream-signalling proteins.

  8. Familial syndromes associated with neuroendocrine tumours

    PubMed Central

    Komarowska, Hanna; Czarnywojtek, Agata; Waligórska-Stachura, Joanna; Bączyk, Maciej; Ziemnicka, Katarzyna; Fischbach, Jakub; Wrotkowska, Elżbieta; Ruchała, Marek

    2015-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumours may be associated with familial syndromes. At least eight inherited syndromes predisposing to endocrine neoplasia have been identified. Two of these are considered to be major factors predisposing to benign and malignant endocrine tumours, designated multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 and type 2 (MEN1 and MEN2). Five other autosomal dominant diseases show more heterogeneous clinical patterns, such as the Carney complex, hyperparathyroidism-jaw tumour syndrome, Von Hippel-Lindau syndrome (VHL), neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) and tuberous sclerosis. The molecular and cellular interactions underlying the development of most endocrine cells and related organs represent one of the more complex pathways not yet to be deciphered. Almost all endocrine cells are derived from the endoderm and neuroectoderm. It is suggested that within the first few weeks of human development there are complex interactions between, firstly, the major genes involved in the initiation of progenitor-cell differentiation, secondly, factors secreted by the surrounding mesenchyme, and thirdly, a series of genes controlling cell differentiation, proliferation and migration. Together these represent a formula for the harmonious development of endocrine glands and tissue. PMID:26557756

  9. Tumour exosome integrins determine organotropic metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Hoshino, Ayuko; Costa-Silva, Bruno; Shen, Tang-Long; Rodrigues, Goncalo; Hashimoto, Ayako; Mark, Milica Tesic; Molina, Henrik; Kohsaka, Shinji; Di Giannatale, Angela; Ceder, Sophia; Singh, Swarnima; Williams, Caitlin; Soplop, Nadine; Uryu, Kunihiro; Pharmer, Lindsay; King, Tari; Bojmar, Linda; Davies, Alexander E.; Ararso, Yonathan; Zhang, Tuo; Zhang, Haiying; Hernandez, Jonathan; Weiss, Joshua M.; Dumont-Cole, Vanessa D.; Kramer, Kimberly; Wexler, Leonard H.; Narendran, Aru; Schwartz, Gary K.; Healey, John H.; Sandstrom, Per; Labori, Knut Jørgen; Kure, Elin H.; Grandgenett, Paul M.; Hollingsworth, Michael A.; de Sousa, Maria; Kaur, Sukhwinder; Jain, Maneesh; Mallya, Kavita; Batra, Surinder K.; Jarnagin, William R.; Brady, Mary S.; Fodstad, Oystein; Muller, Volkmar; Pantel, Klaus; Minn, Andy J.; Bissell, Mina J.; Garcia, Benjamin A.; Kang, Yibin; Rajasekhar, Vinagolu K.; Ghajar, Cyrus M.; Matei, Irina; Peinado, Hector; Bromberg, Jacqueline; Lyden, David

    2015-01-01

    Ever since Stephen Paget’s 1889 hypothesis, metastatic organotropism has remained one of cancer’s greatest mysteries. Here we demonstrate that exosomes from mouse and human lung-, liver- and brain-tropic tumour cells fuse preferentially with resident cells at their predicted destination, namely lung fibroblasts and epithelial cells, liver Kupffer cells and brain endothelial cells. We show that tumour-derived exosomes uptaken by organ-specific cells prepare the pre-metastatic niche. Treatment with exosomes from lung-tropic models redirected the metastasis of bone-tropic tumour cells. Exosome proteomics revealed distinct integrin expression patterns, in which the exosomal integrins α6β4 and α6β1 were associated with lung metastasis, while exosomal integrin αvβ5 was linked to liver metastasis. Targeting the integrins α6β4 and αvβ5 decreased exosome uptake, as well as lung and liver metastasis, respectively. We demonstrate that exosome integrin uptake by resident cells activates Src phosphorylation and pro-inflammatory S100 gene expression. Finally, our clinical data indicate that exosomal integrins could be used to predict organ-specific metastasis. PMID:26524530

  10. The natural history of disappearing bone tumours and tumour-like conditions.

    PubMed

    Yanagawa, T; Watanabe, H; Shinozaki, T; Ahmed, A R; Shirakura, K; Takagishi, K

    2001-11-01

    We describe 27 cases of bone tumours or tumour-like lesions where there was spontaneous regression. The follow-up period was 2.8-16.7 years (average, 7.0 years). Fourteen of these cases were no longer visible on plain radiographs. Histological diagnosis included exostosis, eosinophilic granuloma, fibrous dysplasia, fibrous cortical defect, non-ossifying fibroma, osteoid osteoma and bone island. Most cases began to reduce in adolescence or earlier, although sclerotic type lesions showed their regression in older patients. All lesions thought to be eosinophilic granuloma began to regress after periods of less than 3 months, while the duration of the other lesions showed wide variation (1-74 months). As resolution of the lesions took between 2 and 79 months (mean, 25.0 +/- 20.3 months) we consider that the most likely mechanism was recovery of normal skeletal growth control. In exostosis with fracture, alteration of vascular supply may contribute to growth arrest, but not to subsequent remodelling stage. In inflammatory-related lesions such as eosinophilic granuloma, cessation of inflammation may be the mechanism of growth arrest, whilst temporary inflammation may stimulate osteogenic cells engaged in remodeling. In the sclerotic type, growth arrest is a less probable mechanism. Necrosis within the tumour and/or local changes in hormonal control, plus remodelling of the sclerotic area takes longer. Knowledge of the potential for spontaneous resolution may help in management of these tumour and tumour-like lesions of bone.

  11. Induction of IL-25 secretion from tumour-associated fibroblasts suppresses mammary tumour metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Shu-Yi; Jian, Feng-Yin; Chen, Yung-Hsiang; Chien, Shih-Chang; Hsieh, Mao-Chih; Hsiao, Pei-Wen; Lee, Wen-Hwa; Yang, Ning-Sun

    2016-01-01

    Tumour-associated fibroblasts (TAFs), as a functionally supportive microenvironment, play an essential role in tumour progression. Here we investigate the role of IL-25, an endogenous anticancer factor secreted from TAFs, in suppression of mouse 4T1 mammary tumour metastasis. We show that a synthetic dihydrobenzofuran lignan (Q2-3), the dimerization product of plant caffeic acid methyl ester, suppresses 4T1 metastasis by increasing fibroblastic IL-25 activity. The secretion of IL-25 from treated human or mouse fibroblasts is enhanced in vitro, and this activity confers a strong suppressive effect on growth activity of test carcinoma cells. Subsequent in vivo experiments showed that the anti-metastatic effects of Q2-3 on 4T1 and human MDA-MD-231 tumour cells are additive when employed in combination with the clinically used drug, docetaxel. Altogether, our findings reveal that the release of IL-25 from TAFs may serve as a check point for control of mammary tumour metastasis and that phytochemical Q2-3 can efficiently promote such anticancer activities. PMID:27089063

  12. Exposure to opiates in female adolescents alters mu opiate receptor expression and increases the rewarding effects of morphine in future offspring.

    PubMed

    Vassoler, Fair M; Wright, Siobhan J; Byrnes, Elizabeth M

    2016-04-01

    Prescription opiate use and abuse has increased dramatically over the past two decades, including increased use in adolescent populations. Recently, it has been proposed that use during this critical period may affect future offspring even when use is discontinued prior to conception. Here, we utilize a rodent model to examine the effects of adolescent morphine exposure on the reward functioning of the offspring. Female Sprague Dawley rats were administered morphine for 10 days during early adolescence (post-natal day 30-39) using an escalating dosing regimen. Animals then remained drug free until adulthood at which point they were mated with naïve males. Adult offspring (F1 animals) were tested for their response to morphine-induced (0, 1, 2.5, 5, and 10 mg/kg, s.c.) conditioned place preference (CPP) and context-independent morphine-induced sensitization. Naïve littermates were used to examine mu opiate receptor expression in the nucleus accumbens and ventral tegmental area. Results indicate that F1 females whose mothers were exposed to morphine during adolescence (Mor-F1) demonstrate significantly enhanced CPP to the lowest doses of morphine compared with Sal-F1 females. There were no differences in context-independent sensitization between maternal treatment groups. Protein expression analysis showed significantly increased levels of accumbal mu opiate receptor in Mor-F1 offspring and decreased levels in the VTA. Taken together, these findings demonstrate a shift in the dose response curve with regard to the rewarding effects of morphine in Mor-F1 females which may in part be due to altered mu opiate receptor expression in the nucleus accumbens and VTA. PMID:26700246

  13. Increased levels of prolactin receptor expression correlate with the early onset of lupus symptoms and increased numbers of transitional-1 B cells after prolactin treatment

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Prolactin is secreted from the pituitary gland and other organs, as well as by cells such as lymphocytes. Prolactin has an immunostimulatory effect and is associated with autoimmune diseases that are characterised by abnormal B cell activation, such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Our aim was to determine if different splenic B cell subsets express the prolactin receptor and if the presence of prolactin influences these B cell subsets and correlates with development of lupus. Results Using real-time PCR and flow cytometry, we found that different subsets of immature (transitional) and mature (follicular, marginal zone) B cells express different levels of the prolactin receptor and are differentially affected by hyperprolactinaemia. We found that transitional B cells express the prolactin receptor at higher levels compared to mature B cells in C57BL/6 mice and the lupus-prone MRL/lpr and MRL mouse strains. Transitional-1 (T1) B cells showed a higher level of prolactin receptor expression in both MRL/lpr and MRL mice compared to C57BL/6 mice. Hyperprolactinaemia was induced using metoclopramide, which resulted in the development of early symptoms of SLE. We found that T1 B cells are the main targets of prolactin and that prolactin augments the absolute number of T1 B cells, which reflects the finding that this B cell subpopulation expresses the highest level of the prolactin receptor. Conclusions We found that all B cell subsets express the prolactin receptor but that transitional B cells showed the highest prolactin receptor expression levels. Hyperprolactinaemia in mice susceptible to lupus accelerated the disease and increased the absolute numbers of T1 and T3 B cells but not of mature B cells, suggesting a primary effect of prolactin on the early stages of B cell maturation in the spleen and a role of prolactin in B cell differentiation, contributing to SLE onset. PMID:22404893

  14. BMP2/BMPR1A is linked to tumour progression in dedifferentiated liposarcomas

    PubMed Central

    O’Neill, Hannah L.; Cassidy, Amy P.; Harris, Olivia B.

    2016-01-01

    Bone Morphogenic Protein 2 (BMP2) is a multipurpose cytokine, important in the development of bone and cartilage, and with a role in tumour initiation and progression. BMP2 signal transduction is dependent on two distinct classes of serine/threonine kinase known as the type I and type II receptors. Although the type I receptors (BMPR1A and BMPR1B) are largely thought to have overlapping functions, we find tissue and cellular compartment specific patterns of expression, suggesting potential for distinct BMP2 signalling outcomes dependent on tissue type. Herein, we utilise large publicly available datasets from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and Protein Atlas to define a novel role for BMP2 in the progression of dedifferentiated liposarcomas. Using disease free survival as our primary endpoint, we find that BMP2 confers poor prognosis only within the context of high BMPR1A expression. Through further annotation of the TCGA sarcoma dataset, we localise this effect to dedifferentiated liposarcomas but find overall BMP2/BMP receptor expression is equal across subsets. Finally, through gene set enrichment analysis we link the BMP2/BMPR1A axis to increased transcriptional activity of the matrisome and general extracellular matrix remodelling. Our study highlights the importance of continued research into the tumorigenic properties of BMP2 and the potential disadvantages of recombinant human BMP2 (rhBMP2) use in orthopaedic surgery. For the first time, we identify high BMP2 expression within the context of high BMPR1A expression as a biomarker of disease relapse in dedifferentiated liposarcomas. PMID:27114889

  15. Steroid hormone receptor in pleural solitary fibrous tumours and CD34+ progenitor stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Bongiovanni, Massimo; Viberti, Laura; Pecchioni, Carla; Papotti, Mauro; Thonhofer, Renè; Hans Popper, Helmut; Sapino, Anna

    2002-10-01

    Solitary fibrous tumours (SFT), originally described in the pleura, were subsequently recognized in numerous extrapleural sites. This suggests that a common stem cell, present in various organs and tissues, may be at the origin of SFT and that specific factors may be involved in the proliferation of such cells. Recently it has been described that steroid hormone receptors, progesterone receptors in particular, are expressed by extrapleural SFT. In addition, progesterone may participate as growth factor in many CD34(+) stromal neoplasms, which express low levels of the hormone receptors. The present study analysed the expression of androgen (AR), oestrogen (ER) and progesterone (PR) receptors in a series of 32 pleural SFT, 10 mesotheliomas and in reactive tissue of chronic pleuritis. ER and AR were never expressed by SFT or by chronic pleuritis, whereas PR were demonstrated in 2/16 "large" (>8 cm) and in 6/16 "small" (< or =8 cm) pleural SFT (all expressing CD34, bcl-2 and CD99). PR(+) SFT had a significantly higher proliferative activity (p = 0.04) (Ki-67 mean value 6.5%) and lower p27(kip1) (mean value 51.5%) expression than the PR(-) cases (Ki-67 mean value 3.81% and p27(kip1) mean value 57.86%). One of the cases expressing a high level of PR (80%) recurred 1 year after first surgery and the recurrence was PR(+) as well, but with a lower percentage of nuclear receptor expression (12%). In addition, in chronically inflamed subserosal tissue, a subpopulation of CD34(+) endothelial and interstitial dendritic cells was identified, which also expressed PR. These findings suggest that the CD34(+) submesothelial interstitial dendritic cells, activated during reactive processes, may be the stem cells that give rise to SFT, and that progesterone might participate in the growth of SFT through modulation of its specific receptors.

  16. Local tumour hyperthermia as immunotherapy for metastatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Toraya-Brown, Seiko; Fiering, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Local tumour hyperthermia for cancer treatment is currently used either for ablation purposes as an alternative to surgery or less frequently, in combination with chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy to enhance the effects of those traditional therapies. As it has become apparent that activating the immune system is crucial to successfully treat metastatic cancer, the potential of boosting anti-tumour immunity by heating tumours has become a growing area of cancer research. After reviewing the history of hyperthermia therapy for cancer and introducing methods for inducing local hyperthermia, this review describes different mechanisms by which heating tumours can elicit anti-tumour immune responses, including tumour cell damage, tumour surface molecule changes, heat shock proteins, exosomes, direct effects on immune cells, and changes in the tumour vasculature. We then go over in vivo studies that provide promising results showing that local hyperthermia therapy indeed activates various systemic anti-tumour immune responses that slow growth of untreated tumours. Finally, future research questions that will help bring the use of local hyperthermia as systemic immunotherapy closer to clinical application are discussed. PMID:25430985

  17. Activation of blood coagulation in cancer: implications for tumour progression.

    PubMed

    Lima, Luize G; Monteiro, Robson Q

    2013-09-04

    Several studies have suggested a role for blood coagulation proteins in tumour progression. Herein, we discuss (1) the activation of the blood clotting cascade in the tumour microenvironment and its impact on primary tumour growth; (2) the intravascular activation of blood coagulation and its impact on tumour metastasis and cancer-associated thrombosis; and (3) antitumour therapies that target blood-coagulation-associated proteins. Expression levels of the clotting initiator protein TF (tissue factor) have been correlated with tumour cell aggressiveness. Simultaneous TF expression and PS (phosphatidylserine) exposure by tumour cells promote the extravascular activation of blood coagulation. The generation of blood coagulation enzymes in the tumour microenvironment may trigger the activation of PARs (protease-activated receptors). In particular, PAR1 and PAR2 have been associated with many aspects of tumour biology. The procoagulant activity of circulating tumour cells favours metastasis, whereas the release of TF-bearing MVs (microvesicles) into the circulation has been correlated with cancer-associated thrombosis. Given the role of coagulation proteins in tumour progression, it has been proposed that they could be targets for the development of new antitumour therapies.

  18. Activation of blood coagulation in cancer: implications for tumour progression

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Luize G.; Monteiro, Robson Q.

    2013-01-01

    Several studies have suggested a role for blood coagulation proteins in tumour progression. Herein, we discuss (1) the activation of the blood clotting cascade in the tumour microenvironment and its impact on primary tumour growth; (2) the intravascular activation of blood coagulation and its impact on tumour metastasis and cancer-associated thrombosis; and (3) antitumour therapies that target blood-coagulation-associated proteins. Expression levels of the clotting initiator protein TF (tissue factor) have been correlated with tumour cell aggressiveness. Simultaneous TF expression and PS (phosphatidylserine) exposure by tumour cells promote the extravascular activation of blood coagulation. The generation of blood coagulation enzymes in the tumour microenvironment may trigger the activation of PARs (protease-activated receptors). In particular, PAR1 and PAR2 have been associated with many aspects of tumour biology. The procoagulant activity of circulating tumour cells favours metastasis, whereas the release of TF-bearing MVs (microvesicles) into the circulation has been correlated with cancer-associated thrombosis. Given the role of coagulation proteins in tumour progression, it has been proposed that they could be targets for the development of new antitumour therapies. PMID:23889169

  19. Nanoparticle-blood interactions: the implications on solid tumour targeting.

    PubMed

    Lazarovits, James; Chen, Yih Yang; Sykes, Edward A; Chan, Warren C W

    2015-02-18

    Nanoparticles are suitable platforms for cancer targeting and diagnostic applications. Typically, less than 10% of all systemically administered nanoparticles accumulate in the tumour. Here we explore the interactions of blood components with nanoparticles and describe how these interactions influence solid tumour targeting. In the blood, serum proteins adsorb onto nanoparticles to form a protein corona in a manner dependent on nanoparticle physicochemical properties. These serum proteins can block nanoparticle tumour targeting ligands from binding to tumour cell receptors. Additionally, serum proteins can also encourage nanoparticle uptake by macrophages, which decreases nanoparticle availability in the blood and limits tumour accumulation. The formation of this protein corona will also increase the nanoparticle hydrodynamic size or induce aggregation, which makes nanoparticles too large to enter into the tumour through pores of the leaky vessels, and prevents their deep penetration into tumours for cell targeting. Recent studies have focused on developing new chemical strategies to reduce or eliminate serum protein adsorption, and rescue the targeting potential of nanoparticles to tumour cells. An in-depth and complete understanding of nanoparticle-blood interactions is key to designing nanoparticles with optimal physicochemical properties with high tumour accumulation. The purpose of this review article is to describe how the protein corona alters the targeting of nanoparticles to solid tumours and explains current solutions to solve this problem.

  20. Flow cytometric DNA ploidy in salivary gland tumours.

    PubMed

    Driemel, Oliver; Maier, Heinz; Kraft, Klaus; Haase, Stephan; Hemmer, Joerg

    2005-01-01

    This study on 279 tumours of the salivary glands was conducted to analyse whether the assessment of DNA ploidy by flow cytometry may assist histopathology in discriminating benign from malignant types of tumours. The group of benign tumours included 164 pleomorphic adenomas, 51 Warthin's tumours, 7 basal cell adenomas, 2 lipomas as well as 5 other different tumours. All of the 229 benign tumours were diploid. The malignant tumours consisted of 18 adenoid cystic adenomas, 10 mucoepidermoid carcinomas, 5 acinic cell carcinomas, 5 carcinoma in pleomorphic adenoma as well as of 12 other malignancies belonging to 7 different tumour entities. Twelve of 50 malignant salivary gland tumours were aneuploid. There was no significant relationship between the DNA ploidy status and histopathological grading, lymph node metastasis and local recurrence development, respectively. In three cases which initially were taken for pleomorphic adenomas by routine histological examination, aneuploid cell populations exposed by DNA flow cytometric analysis gave rise to a closer inspection of the suspect lesions. Examination of consecutive slides actually revealed small assemblies of carcinoma cells that required a final diagnosis as non-invasive carcinoma in pleomorphic adenoma. The most obvious value of DNA flow cytometry in salivary gland tumours is thus its contribution to assist histopathology in identifying potentially malignant lesions.

  1. Tumour cells engineered to secrete interleukin-15 augment anti-tumour immune responses in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Hazama, S; Noma, T; Wang, F; Iizuka, N; Ogura, Y; Yoshimura, K; Inoguchi, E; Hakozaki, M; Hirose, K; Suzuki, T; Oka, M

    1999-01-01

    We examined the effect of interleukin-15 (IL-15) gene transfer into tumour cells on the host's anti-tumour response. In BALB/c mice IL-15 producing Meth-A cells (Meth-A/IL-15) underwent complete rejection, in a response characterized by massive infiltration of CD4+ T-cells and neutrophils. In contrast, Meth-A cells transfected with vector alone (Meth-A/Neo) grew rapidly. Moreover, rechallenged parental cells also were rejected in association with CD8+ T-cell infiltration. However, in nude mice there was no drastic difference between Meth-A/IL-15 and Meth-A/Neo cells. These results demonstrate that IL-15-secreting tumour cells can stimulate local and systemic T-cell-dependent immunity and therefore may have a potential role in cancer therapy. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10424745

  2. Somatic CRISPR/Cas9-mediated tumour suppressor disruption enables versatile brain tumour modelling.

    PubMed

    Zuckermann, Marc; Hovestadt, Volker; Knobbe-Thomsen, Christiane B; Zapatka, Marc; Northcott, Paul A; Schramm, Kathrin; Belic, Jelena; Jones, David T W; Tschida, Barbara; Moriarity, Branden; Largaespada, David; Roussel, Martine F; Korshunov, Andrey; Reifenberger, Guido; Pfister, Stefan M; Lichter, Peter; Kawauchi, Daisuke; Gronych, Jan

    2015-06-11

    In vivo functional investigation of oncogenes using somatic gene transfer has been successfully exploited to validate their role in tumorigenesis. For tumour suppressor genes this has proven more challenging due to technical aspects. To provide a flexible and effective method for investigating somatic loss-of-function alterations and their influence on tumorigenesis, we have established CRISPR/Cas9-mediated somatic gene disruption, allowing for in vivo targeting of TSGs. Here we demonstrate the utility of this approach by deleting single (Ptch1) or multiple genes (Trp53, Pten, Nf1) in the mouse brain, resulting in the development of medulloblastoma and glioblastoma, respectively. Using whole-genome sequencing (WGS) we characterized the medulloblastoma-driving Ptch1 deletions in detail and show that no off-targets were detected in these tumours. This method provides a fast and convenient system for validating the emerging wealth of novel candidate tumour suppressor genes and the generation of faithful animal models of human cancer.

  3. Adenomatoid odontogenic tumour: tumour or a cyst, a histopathological support for the controversy.

    PubMed

    Gadewar, Dilip R; Srikant, N

    2010-04-01

    Adenomatoid odontogenic tumour (AOT) is a well-established odontogenic tumour with various clinicopathological variants. AOT quite frequently mimics an odontogenic cyst commonly a dentigerous cyst. Histologically a cystic component of AOT has been described in the literature. In the present paper we review the literature for the AOTs arising in an odontogenic cyst and add to the literature a case of cystic AOT. The present review is aimed to provide an insight to the varied demographic profile, clinical behavior and prognosis of cystic variant of AOT.

  4. Lysyl oxidase-like-2 promotes tumour angiogenesis and is a potential therapeutic target in angiogenic tumours.

    PubMed

    Zaffryar-Eilot, Shelly; Marshall, Derek; Voloshin, Tali; Bar-Zion, Avinoam; Spangler, Rhyannon; Kessler, Ofra; Ghermazien, Haben; Brekhman, Vera; Suss-Toby, Edith; Adam, Dan; Shaked, Yuval; Smith, Victoria; Neufeld, Gera

    2013-10-01

    Lysyl oxidase-like 2 (LOXL2), a secreted enzyme that catalyzes the cross-linking of collagen, plays an essential role in developmental angiogenesis. We found that administration of the LOXL2-neutralizing antibody AB0023 inhibited bFGF-induced angiogenesis in Matrigel plug assays and suppressed recruitment of angiogenesis promoting bone marrow cells. Small hairpin RNA-mediated inhibition of LOXL2 expression or inhibition of LOXL2 using AB0023 reduced the migration and network-forming ability of endothelial cells, suggesting that the inhibition of angiogenesis results from a direct effect on endothelial cells. To examine the effects of AB0023 on tumour angiogenesis, AB0023 was administered to mice bearing tumours derived from SKOV-3 ovarian carcinoma or Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) cells. AB0023 treatment significantly reduced the microvascular density in these tumours but did not inhibit tumour growth. However, treatment of mice bearing SKOV-3-derived tumours with AB0023 also promoted increased coverage of tumour vessels with pericytes and reduced tumour hypoxia, providing evidence that anti-LOXL2 therapy results in the normalization of tumour blood vessels. In agreement with these data, treatment of mice bearing LLC-derived tumours with AB0023 improved the perfusion of the tumour-associated vessels as determined by ultrasonography. Improved perfusion and normalization of tumour vessels after treatment with anti-angiogenic agents were previously found to improve the delivery of chemotherapeutic agents into tumours and to result in an enhancement of chemotherapeutic efficiency. Indeed, treatment with AB0023 significantly enhanced the anti-tumourigenic effects of taxol. Our results suggest that inhibition of LOXL2 may prove beneficial for the treatment of angiogenic tumours.

  5. Tumour-induced osteomalacia: An emergent paraneoplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Guillermo; Varsavsky, Mariela

    2016-04-01

    Endocrine paraneoplastic syndromes are distant manifestations of some tumours. An uncommon but increasingly reported form is tumour-induced osteomalacia, a hypophosphatemic disorder associated to fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF-23) secretion by tumours. The main biochemical manifestations of this disorder include hypophosphatemia, inappropriately low or normal tubular reabsorption of phosphate, low serum calcitriol levels, increased serum alkaline phosphatase levels, and elevated or normal serum FGF-23 levels. These tumours, usually small, benign, slow growing and difficult to discover, are mainly localized in soft tissues of the limbs. Histologically, phosphaturic mesenchymal tumours of the mixed connective tissue type are most common. Various imaging techniques have been suggested with variable results. Treatment of choice is total surgical resection of the tumour. Medical treatment includes oral phosphorus and calcitriol supplements, octreotide, cinacalcet, and monoclonal antibodies.

  6. Synchronous abdominal and thoracic solitary fibrous tumour: a case report.

    PubMed

    Maassarani, F; Leroy, C; Dekeuleneer, R

    2010-01-01

    Solitary fibrous tumours (SFT), described for the first time by Klemperer and Rabin in 1931, are uncommon mesenchymal tumours that have been known to mainly affect the pleura and mediastinum. More recently, solitary fibrous tumours affecting other anatomical sites are being increasingly reported. Clinically, these tumours are asymptomatic and are discovered incidentally. Diagnosis is established at pathology by positive staining for CD34. Their prognosis depends on complete surgical resection and lack of histological signs of malignancy. We report here the case of a 63-year-old woman with double localisation of malignant solitary fibrous tumour who underwent complete removal of her lesions. To the best of our knowledge, this observation is the first description of a primary solitary fibrous tumour totally asymptomatic but already metastatic.

  7. Endobronchial Carcinoid Tumour with Extensive Ossification: An Unusual Case Presentation.

    PubMed

    Osmond, Allison; Filter, Emily; Joseph, Mariamma; Inculet, Richard; Kwan, Keith; McCormack, David

    2016-01-01

    Carcinoid tumour is a well-known primary endobronchial lung neoplasm. Although calcifications may be seen in up to 30% of pulmonary carcinoid tumours, near complete ossification of these tumours is an unusual finding. Such lesions can prove diagnostically challenging at the time of intraoperative frozen section as the latter technique requires thin sectioning of the lesion for microscopic assessment. We present an unusual case of endobronchial carcinoid tumour with extensive ossification in a 45-year-old male. Preliminary intraoperative diagnosis was achieved through the alternative use of cytology scrape smears. The final diagnosis was confirmed after decalcification of the tumour. The prognostic implications of heavily ossified carcinoid tumours remain elusive. Long-term clinical follow-up of these patients is recommended. PMID:27610135

  8. Proliferating tricholemmal tumour: clinicopathological aspects of a case.

    PubMed

    Khoja, A A; Yan, B; Lee, S J; Cheong, E C; Tan, K B

    2011-12-01

    We report the case of a 49-year-old man who presented with an enlarging mass over his occipital scalp. The clinical impression was either a squamous cell carcinoma or an unusual adnexal tumour. A wide excision was performed with skin grafting. Gross examination revealed a large exophytic tumour mass measuring 10 cm. Histopathological examination showed a circumscribed, well-differentiated squamoproliferative lesion with a lobulated architecture. Clear cell features, pilar-type keratinisation, microcalcifications and the presence of mucinous degeneration were noted. A diagnosis of proliferating tricholemmal tumour was made. This entity incorporates a spectrum of lesions, ranging from the mostly benign proliferating tricholemmal cyst to tumours having more atypical cellular and invasive features, the latter features correlating with an increased capacity for aggressive behaviour. Management-wise, such tumours require complete excision with follow-up. As the tumours are often large in size at presentation, reconstruction is required. PMID:22159947

  9. Endobronchial Carcinoid Tumour with Extensive Ossification: An Unusual Case Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Filter, Emily; Joseph, Mariamma; Inculet, Richard; Kwan, Keith; McCormack, David

    2016-01-01

    Carcinoid tumour is a well-known primary endobronchial lung neoplasm. Although calcifications may be seen in up to 30% of pulmonary carcinoid tumours, near complete ossification of these tumours is an unusual finding. Such lesions can prove diagnostically challenging at the time of intraoperative frozen section as the latter technique requires thin sectioning of the lesion for microscopic assessment. We present an unusual case of endobronchial carcinoid tumour with extensive ossification in a 45-year-old male. Preliminary intraoperative diagnosis was achieved through the alternative use of cytology scrape smears. The final diagnosis was confirmed after decalcification of the tumour. The prognostic implications of heavily ossified carcinoid tumours remain elusive. Long-term clinical follow-up of these patients is recommended.

  10. Endobronchial Carcinoid Tumour with Extensive Ossification: An Unusual Case Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Filter, Emily; Joseph, Mariamma; Inculet, Richard; Kwan, Keith; McCormack, David

    2016-01-01

    Carcinoid tumour is a well-known primary endobronchial lung neoplasm. Although calcifications may be seen in up to 30% of pulmonary carcinoid tumours, near complete ossification of these tumours is an unusual finding. Such lesions can prove diagnostically challenging at the time of intraoperative frozen section as the latter technique requires thin sectioning of the lesion for microscopic assessment. We present an unusual case of endobronchial carcinoid tumour with extensive ossification in a 45-year-old male. Preliminary intraoperative diagnosis was achieved through the alternative use of cytology scrape smears. The final diagnosis was confirmed after decalcification of the tumour. The prognostic implications of heavily ossified carcinoid tumours remain elusive. Long-term clinical follow-up of these patients is recommended. PMID:27610135

  11. Kinase fusions are frequent in Spitz tumours and spitzoid melanomas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiesner, Thomas; He, Jie; Yelensky, Roman; Esteve-Puig, Rosaura; Botton, Thomas; Yeh, Iwei; Lipson, Doron; Otto, Geoff; Brennan, Kristina; Murali, Rajmohan; Garrido, Maria; Miller, Vincent A.; Ross, Jeffrey S.; Berger, Michael F.; Sparatta, Alyssa; Palmedo, Gabriele; Cerroni, Lorenzo; Busam, Klaus J.; Kutzner, Heinz; Cronin, Maureen T.; Stephens, Philip J.; Bastian, Boris C.

    2014-01-01

    Spitzoid neoplasms are a group of melanocytic tumours with distinctive histopathological features. They include benign tumours (Spitz naevi), malignant tumours (spitzoid melanomas) and tumours with borderline histopathological features and uncertain clinical outcome (atypical Spitz tumours). Their genetic underpinnings are poorly understood, and alterations in common melanoma-associated oncogenes