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Sample records for gastrin-releasing peptide receptor-expressing

  1. Analysis of gastrin-releasing peptide gene and gastrin-releasing peptide receptor gene in patients with agoraphobia.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Katrin; Görgens, Heike; Bräuer, David; Einsle, Franziska; Noack, Barbara; von Kannen, Stephanie; Grossmann, Maria; Hoyer, Jürgen; Strobel, Alexander; Köllner, Volker; Weidner, Kerstin; Ziegler, Andreas; Hemmelmann, Claudia; Schackert, Hans K

    2014-10-01

    A gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (GRPR) knock-out mouse model provided evidence that the gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) and its neural circuitry operate as a negative feedback-loop regulating fear, suggesting a novel candidate mechanism contributing to individual differences in fear-conditioning and associated psychiatric disorders such as agoraphobia with/without panic disorder. Studies in humans, however, provided inconclusive evidence on the association of GRP and GRPR variations in agoraphobia with/without panic disorder. Based on these findings, we investigated whether GRP and GRPR variants are associated with agoraphobia. Mental disorders were assessed via the Munich-Composite International Diagnostic Interview (M-CIDI) in 95 patients with agoraphobia with/without panic disorder and 119 controls without any mental disorders. A complete sequence analysis of GRP and GRPR was performed in all participants. We found no association of 16 GRP and 7 GRPR variants with agoraphobia with/without panic disorder.

  2. Gastrin-releasing peptide stimulates glycoconjugate release from feline trachea

    SciTech Connect

    Lundgren, J.D.; Baraniuk, J.N.; Ostrowski, N.L.; Kaliner, M.A.; Shelhamer, J.H. )

    1990-02-01

    The effect of gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) on respiratory glycoconjugate (RGC) secretion was investigated in a feline tracheal organ culture model. RGC secretion was stimulated by GRP in a dose-dependent fashion at concentrations from 10(-8) to 10(-5) M (range 15-38% increase above control) with a peak effect within 0.5-1 h of incubation. GRP-(14-27), the receptor binding portion of GRP, and the related molecule, bombesin, also stimulated RGC secretion by approximately 20% above control. Acetyl-GRP-(20-27) stimulated RGC release by 10%, whereas GRP-(1-16) was inactive. Autoradiographic studies with 125I-GRP revealed that specific binding was restricted to the submucosal glands and the surface epithelium. A specific radioimmunoassay showed the content of GRP in feline trachea after extraction with ethanol-acetic acid to be 156 +/- 91 fmol/g wet wt. Indirect immunohistochemistry indicated that ganglion cells located just outside the cartilage contained GRP-immunoreactive materials. GRP is a novel mucus secretagogue that may participate in regulating airway mucosal gland secretion.

  3. [64Cu-NOTA-8-Aoc-BBN(7-14)NH2] targeting vector for positron-emission tomography imaging of gastrin-releasing peptide receptor-expressing tissues.

    PubMed

    Prasanphanich, Adam F; Nanda, Prasant K; Rold, Tammy L; Ma, Lixin; Lewis, Michael R; Garrison, Jered C; Hoffman, Timothy J; Sieckman, Gary L; Figueroa, Said D; Smith, Charles J

    2007-07-24

    Radiolabeled peptides hold promise as diagnostic/therapeutic targeting vectors for specific human cancers. We report the design and development of a targeting vector, [(64)Cu-NOTA-8-Aoc-BBN(7-14)NH(2)] (NOTA = 1,4,7-triazacyclononane-1,4,7-triacetic acid, 8-Aoc = 8-aminooctanoic acid, and BBN = bombesin), having very high selectivity and affinity for the gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (GRPr). GRPrs are expressed on a variety of human cancers, including breast, lung, pancreatic, and prostate, making this a viable approach toward site-directed localization or therapy of these human diseases. In this study, [NOTA-X-BBN(7-14)NH(2)] conjugates were synthesized, where X = a specific pharmacokinetic modifier. The IC(50) of [NOTA-8-Aoc-BBN(7-14)NH(2)] was determined by a competitive displacement cell-binding assay in PC-3 human prostate cancer cells using (125)I-[Tyr(4)]-BBN as the displacement ligand. An IC(50) of 3.1 +/- 0.5 nM was obtained, demonstrating high binding affinity of [NOTA-8-Aoc-BBN] for the GRPr. [(64)Cu-NOTA-X-BBN] conjugates were prepared by the reaction of (64)CuCl(2) with peptides in buffered aqueous solution. In vivo studies of [(64)Cu-NOTA-8-Aoc-BBN(7-14)NH(2)] in tumor-bearing PC-3 mouse models indicated very high affinity of conjugate for the GRPr. Uptake of conjugate in tumor was 3.58 +/- 0.70% injected dose (ID) per g at 1 h postintravenous injection (p.i.). Minimal accumulation of radioactivity in liver tissue (1.58 +/- 0.40% ID per g, 1 h p.i.) is indicative of rapid renal-urinary excretion and suggests very high in vivo kinetic stability of [(64)Cu-NOTA-8-Aoc-BBN(7-14)NH(2)] with little or no in vivo dissociation of (64)Cu(2+) from the NOTA chelator. Kidney accumulation at 1 h p.i. was 3.79 +/- 1.09% ID per g. Molecular imaging studies in GRPr-expressing tumor models produced high-contrast, high-quality micro-positron-emission tomography images.

  4. Lutetium-177-labeled gastrin releasing peptide receptor binding analogs: a novel approach to radionuclide therapy.

    PubMed

    Panigone, S; Nunn, A D

    2006-12-01

    Optimization of therapy for individual patients remains a goal of clinical practice. Radionuclide imaging can identify those patients who may benefit from subsequent targeted therapy by providing regional information on the distribution of the target. An ideal situation may be when the imaging and the therapeutic compounds are the same agent. Two antibodies ([ [90Y]ibritumomab, [131I]tositumomab) are now approved for the systemic radiotherapy of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. The main hurdle is to deliver higher absorbed doses to the more refractory solid tumors paying particular regard to the bone marrow toxicity. The low dose is thought to be a result of the large size of antibodies slowing delivery to the target. Peptides having high affinity to receptors expressed on cancer cells are a promising alternative. They are usually rapidly excreted from the body through renal and/or hepatobiliary excretion thus creating a prolonged accumulation of the radioactivity in the kidneys, which represents a recognized issue for systemic radiotherapy. The first radiopeptide developed was a somatostatin analogue, which led to a major breakthrough in the field. Beside the kidney issue, somatostatin use remains limited to few cancers that express receptors in sufficiently large quantities, mainly neuroendocrine tumors. The gastrin releasing peptide (GRP) receptor is an attractive target for development of new radiopeptides with diagnostic and therapeutic potential. This is based upon the functional expression of GRP receptors in several of the more prevalent cancers including prostate, breast, and small cell lung cancer. This review covers the efforts currently underway to develop new and clinically promising GRP-receptor specific molecules labeled with imageable and therapeutic radionuclides.

  5. GASTRIN-RELEASING PEPTIDE RECEPTOR IN BREAST CANCER MEDIATES CELLULAR MIGRATION AND INTERLEUKIN-8 EXPRESSION

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Celia; Ives, Kirk; Hellmich, Helen L.; Townsend, Courtney M.; Hellmich, Mark R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Breast cancers aberrantly express gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) hormone and its cognate receptor, gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (GRP-R). Experimental evidence suggests that bombesin (BBS), the pharmacological homologue of GRP, promotes breast cancer growth and progression. The contribution of GRP-R to other poor prognostic indicators in breast cancer, such as the expression of the EGF-R family of growth factors, and hormone insensitivity is unknown. Materials and Methods Two estrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast cancer cell lines were used. MDA-MB-231 overexpress both EGFR and GRPR, whereas SK-BR-3 cells express EGF-R but lack GRP-R. Cellular proliferation was assessed by Coulter counter. Chemotactic migration was performed using Transwell chambers and the migrated cells were quantified. Northern blot and real-time PCR were used to evaluate if pro-angiogenic factor interleukin-8 (IL-8) mRNA expression. Results In MDA-MB-231 cells, GRP-R and EGF-R synergize to regulate cell migration, IL-8 expression, but not cell proliferation. In SK-BR-3 cells, ectopic expression of GRP-R was sufficient to increase migration and IL-8 mRNA. Conclusions These data suggest relevant roles for GRP-R in ER-negative breast cancer progression. Future mechanistic studies to define the molecular role of GRP-R in breast cancer metastasis provide novel targets for the treatment of ER-negative breast cancers. PMID:19631337

  6. Fasting lowers gastrin-releasing peptide and FSH mRNA in the ovine anterior pituitary gland

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Estrogen receptor beta (ER-ß), LH, and FSH are important mediators of reproduction. FSH stimulates follicle recruitment and development. During anorexia, serum concentrations of FSH and LH decrease. Gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP), neuromedin B (NMB), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma...

  7. Fasting lowers gastrin-releasing peptide and Fsh mRNA in the ovine anterior pituitary gland

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Estrogen receptor beta (ER-ß), LH, and FSH are important mediators of reproduction. FSH stimulates follicle recruitment and development. During anorexia, serum concentrations of FSH and LH decrease. Gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP), neuromedin B (NMB), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma...

  8. Spinal cord interneurons expressing the gastrin releasing peptide receptor convey itch through VGLUT2-mediated signaling.

    PubMed

    Aresh, Bejan; Freitag, Fabio B; Perry, Sharn; Blümel, Edda; Lau, Joey; Franck, Marina C M; Lagerström, Malin C

    2017-02-01

    Itch is a sensation that promotes the desire to scratch, which can be evoked by mechanical and chemical stimuli. In the spinal cord, neurons expressing the gastrin releasing peptide receptor (GRPR) have been identified as specific mediators of itch. However, our understanding of the GRPR-population in the spinal cord, and thus how these neurons exercise their functions, is limited. For this purpose, we constructed a Cre line designed to target the GRPR population of neurons (Grpr-Cre). Our analysis revealed that Grpr-Cre cells in the spinal cord are predominantly excitatory interneurons that are found in the dorsal lamina, especially in lamina II-IV. Application of the specific agonist gastrin releasing peptide (GRP) induced spike responses in 43.3% of the patched Grpr-Cre neurons, where the majority of the cells displayed a tonic firing property. Additionally, our analysis showed that the Grpr-Cre population expresses Vglut2 mRNA and mice ablated of Vglut2 in Grpr-Cre cells (Vglut2-lox;Grpr-Cre mice) displayed less spontaneous itch, and attenuated responses to both histaminergic and non-histaminergic agents. We could also show that application of the itch-inducing peptide natriuretic polypeptide b (NPPB) induces calcium influx in a sub-population of Grpr-Cre neurons. To summarize, our data indicate that the Grpr-Cre spinal cord neural population is composed of interneurons that use VGLUT2-mediated signaling for transmitting chemical and spontaneous itch stimuli to the next, currently unknown, neurons in the labeled line of itch.This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivatives License 4.0 (CCBY-NC-ND), where it is permissible to download and share the work provided it is properly cited. The work cannot be changed in any way or used commercially without permission from the journal.

  9. Targeting prostate cancer cells with genetically engineered polypeptide-based micelles displaying gastrin-releasing peptide.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Garg, Sanjay; Eldi, Preethi; Zhou, Fiona Huan-Huan; Johnson, Ian R D; Brooks, Doug A; Lam, Frankie; Rychkov, Grigori; Hayball, John; Albrecht, Hugo

    2016-11-20

    In recent years G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) have emerged as crucial tumorigenic factors that drive aberrant cancer growth, metastasis and angiogenesis. Consequently, a number of GPCRs are strongly expressed in cancer derived cell lines and tissue samples. Therefore a rational anti-cancer strategy is the design of nano-medicines that specifically target GPCRs to bind and internalise cytotoxic drugs into cancer cells. Herein, we report the genetic engineering of a self-assembling nanoparticle based on elastin-like polypeptide (ELP), which has been fused with gastrin releasing peptide (GRP). These nanoparticles increased intracellular calcium concentrations when added to GRP receptor positive PC-3 prostate cancer cells, demonstrating specific receptor activation. Moreover, GRP-displaying fluorescent labelled nanoparticles showed specific cell-surface interaction with PC-3 prostate cancer cells and increased endocytic uptake. These nanoparticles therefore provide a targeted molecular carrier system for evaluating the delivery of cytotoxic drugs into cancer cells.

  10. Obese and lean Zucker rats respond similarly to intraperitoneal administration of gastrin-releasing peptides.

    PubMed

    Washington, Martha C; Park, Karen H; Sayegh, Ayman I

    2014-08-01

    The Zucker rat is an animal model used to study obesity and the control of food intake by various satiety peptides. The amphibian peptide bombesin (Bn) reduces cumulative food intake similarly in both obese and lean weanling Zucker rats. Here, we hypothesized that intraperitoneal (i.p) administration of gastrin-releasing peptides-10, -27 and -29 (GRP-10, GRP-27, GRP-29), which are the mammalian forms of Bn, would reduce first meal size (MS, 10% sucrose) and prolong the intermeal interval (IMI, time between first and second meals) similarly in obese and lean adult Zucker rats. To test this hypothesis, we administered GRP-10, GRP-27 and GRP-29 (0, 2.1, 4.1 and 10.3 nmol/kg) i.p. to obese and lean male Zucker rats (who were deprived of overnight food but not water) and then measured the first and second MS, IMI and satiety ratio (SR, IMI/MS). We found that in both obese and lean rats, all forms of GRP reduced the first MS, and in lean rats, they also decreased the second MS. Additionally, GRP-10 and GRP-29 prolonged the IMI in both obese and lean rats, but GRP-27 only prolonged it in lean rats. Finally, we found that all forms of GRP increased the SR in both obese and lean rats. In agreement with our hypothesis, we conclude that all forms of GRP reduce food intake in obese and lean adult Zucker rats similar to Bn in weanling rats.

  11. Gastrin-releasing peptide blockade as a broad-spectrum anti-inflammatory therapy for asthma

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Shutang; Potts, Erin N.; Cuttitta, Frank; Foster, W. Michael; Sunday, Mary E.

    2011-01-01

    Gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) is synthesized by pulmonary neuroendocrine cells in inflammatory lung diseases, such as bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). Many BPD infants develop asthma, a serious disorder of intermittent airway obstruction. Despite extensive research, early mechanisms of asthma remain controversial. The incidence of asthma is growing, now affecting >300 million people worldwide. To test the hypothesis that GRP mediates asthma, we used two murine models: ozone exposure for air pollution-induced airway hyperreactivity (AHR), and ovalbumin (OVA)-induced allergic airway disease. BALB/c mice were given small molecule GRP blocking agent 77427, or GRP blocking antibody 2A11, before exposure to ozone or OVA challenge. In both models, GRP blockade abrogated AHR and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) macrophages and granulocytes, and decreased BAL cytokines implicated in asthma, including those typically derived from Th1 (e.g., IL-2, TNFα), Th2 (e.g., IL-5, IL-13), Th17 (IL-17), macrophages (e.g., MCP-1, IL-1), and neutrophils (KC = IL-8). Dexamethasone generally had smaller effects on all parameters. Macrophages, T cells, and neutrophils express GRP receptor (GRPR). GRP blockade diminished serine phosphorylation of GRPR with ozone or OVA. Thus, GRP mediates AHR and airway inflammation in mice, suggesting that GRP blockade is promising as a broad-spectrum therapeutic approach to treat and/or prevent asthma in humans. PMID:21252304

  12. Oxygen, gastrin-releasing Peptide, and pediatric lung disease: life in the balance.

    PubMed

    Sunday, Mary E

    2014-01-01

    Excessive oxygen (O2) can cause tissue injury, scarring, aging, and even death. Our laboratory is studying O2-sensing pulmonary neuroendocrine cells (PNECs) and the PNEC-derived product gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP). Reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated from exposure to hyperoxia, ozone, or ionizing radiation (RT) can induce PNEC degranulation and GRP secretion. PNEC degranulation is also induced by hypoxia, and effects of hypoxia are mediated by free radicals. We have determined that excessive GRP leads to lung injury with acute and chronic inflammation, leading to pulmonary fibrosis (PF), triggered via ROS exposure or by directly treating mice with exogenous GRP. In animal models, GRP-blockade abrogates lung injury, inflammation, and fibrosis. The optimal time frame for GRP-blockade and the key target cell types remain to be determined. The concept of GRP as a mediator of ROS-induced tissue damage represents a paradigm shift about how O2 can cause injury, inflammation, and fibrosis. The host PNEC response in vivo may depend on individual ROS sensing mechanisms and subsequent GRP secretion. Ongoing scientific and clinical investigations promise to further clarify the molecular pathways and clinical relevance of GRP in the pathogenesis of diverse pediatric lung diseases.

  13. Gastrin Releasing Peptide Modulates Fast Delayed Rectifier Potassium Current in Per1-Expressing SCN Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Gamble, Karen L.; Kudo, Takashi; Colwell, Christopher S.; McMahon, Douglas G.

    2011-01-01

    The mammalian circadian clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) drives and maintains 24-h physiological rhythms, the phases of which are set by the local environmental light-dark cycle. Gastrin releasing peptide (GRP) communicates photic phase setting signals in the SCN by increasing neurophysiological activity of SCN neurons. Here, the ionic basis for persistent GRP-induced changes in neuronal activity was investigated in SCN slice cultures from Per1::GFP reporter mice during the early night. Recordings from Per1-fluorescent neurons in SCN slices several hours after GRP treatment revealed a significantly greater action potential frequency, a significant increase in voltage-activated outward current at depolarized potentials, and a significant increase in 4-aminopyridine (4-AP) sensitive fast delayed rectifier (fDR) potassium currents when compared to vehicle-treated slices. In addition, the persistent increase in spike rate following early night GRP application was blocked in SCN neurons from mice deficient in Kv3 channel proteins. Because fDR currents are regulated by the clock and are elevated in amplitude during the day, the present results support the model that GRP delays the phase of the clock during the early night by prolonging day-like membrane properties of SCN cells. Furthermore, these findings implicate fDR currents in the ionic basis for GRP-mediated entrainment of the primary mammalian circadian pacemaker. PMID:21454290

  14. Gastrin-releasing peptide contributes to the regulation of adult hippocampal neurogenesis and neuronal development.

    PubMed

    Walton, Noah M; de Koning, Anoek; Xie, Xiuyuan; Shin, Rick; Chen, Qian; Miyake, Shinichi; Tajinda, Katsunori; Gross, Adam K; Kogan, Jeffrey H; Heusner, Carrie L; Tamura, Kouichi; Matsumoto, Mitsuyuki

    2014-09-01

    In the postnatal hippocampus, newly generated neurons contribute to learning and memory. Disruptions in neurogenesis and neuronal development have been linked to cognitive impairment and are implicated in a broad variety of neurological and psychiatric disorders. To identify putative factors involved in this process, we examined hippocampal gene expression alterations in mice possessing a heterozygous knockout of the calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II alpha heterozygous knockout gene (CaMK2α-hKO), an established model of cognitive impairment that also displays altered neurogenesis and neuronal development. Using this approach, we identified gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) as the most dysregulated gene. In wild-type mice, GRP labels NeuN-positive neurons, the lone exception being GRP-positive, NeuN-negative cells in the subgranular zone, suggesting GRP expression may be relevant to neurogenesis and/or neuronal development. Using a model of in vitro hippocampal neurogenesis, we determined that GRP signaling is essential for the continued survival and development of newborn neurons, both of which are blocked by transient knockdown of GRP's cognate receptor (GRPR). Furthermore, GRP appears to negatively regulate neurogenesis-associated proliferation in neural stem cells both in vitro and in vivo. Intracerebroventricular infusion of GRP resulted in a decrease in immature neuronal markers, increased cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) phosphorylation, and decreased neurogenesis. Despite increased levels of GRP mRNA, CaMK2α-hKO mutant mice expressed reduced levels of GRP peptide. This lack of GRP may contribute to the elevated neurogenesis and impaired neuronal development, which are reversed following exogenous GRP infusion. Based on these findings, we hypothesize that GRP modulates neurogenesis and neuronal development and may contribute to hippocampus-associated cognitive impairment.

  15. Specializations of Gastrin Releasing Peptide Cells of the Mouse Suprachiasmatic Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Drouyer, Elise; LeSauter, Joseph; Hernandez, Amanda L.; Silver, Rae

    2010-01-01

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus regulates daily rhythms in physiology and behavior. It is constituted of a heterogeneous population of cells which together form the circuits underlying its master clock function. Numerous studies suggest the existence of two regions that have been termed core and shell. At a gross level, differences between these regions map to distinct functional differences, though the specific role(s) of various peptidergic cellular phenotypes remains unknown. In mouse, gastrin releasing peptide (GRP) cells lie in the core, are directly retinorecipient and lack detectable rhythmicity in clock gene expression, raising interest in their role in the SCN. Here, we provide evidence that calbindin expressing cells of perinatal mouse SCN express GRP, identified by a green fluorescent protein (GFP+), but lack detectable calbindin later in development. To explore the intra-SCN network in which GRP neurons participate, individual GFP+ cells were filled with tracer and their morphological characteristics, processes, and connections, as well as those of their non-GFP containing immediate neighbors, were compared. The results show that GFP+ neurons form a dense network of local circuits within the core, revealed by appositions on other GFP+ cells and by the presence of dye-coupled cells. Dendrites and axons of GFP+ cells make appositions on arginine vasopressin neurons, while non-GFP cells have a less extensive fiber network, largely confined to the region of GFP+ cells. The results point to specialized circuitry within the SCN, presumably supporting synchronization of neural activity and reciprocal communication between core and shell regions. PMID:20151358

  16. SILENCING GASTRIN-RELEASING PEPTIDE RECEPTOR SUPPRESSES KEY REGULATORS OF AEROBIC GLYCOLYSIS IN NEUROBLASTOMA CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Rellinger, Eric J.; Romain, Carmelle; Choi, SunPhil; Qiao, Jingbo; Chung, Dai H.

    2015-01-01

    Background Under normoxic conditions, cancer cells use aerobic glycolysis as opposed to glucose oxidation for energy production; this altered metabolism correlates with poor outcomes in neuroblastoma. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) and pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4 (PDK4) regulate aerobic glycolysis, while pyruvate dehydrogenase phosphatase 2 (PDP2) promotes glucose oxidation. Here, we sought to determine whether gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (GRP-R) signaling regulates glucose metabolism. Procedure Neuroblastoma cell lines, BE(2)-C and SK-N-AS, were used. PCR microararay for glucose metabolism was performed on GRP-R silenced cells. Target protein expression was validated using Western blotting and VEGF ELISA. Cobalt chloride (CoCl2) was used to induce chemical hypoxia. Efficacy of targeting PDK regulation in neuroblastoma was assessed using dichloroacetate (DCA) by conducting cell viability assays and Western blotting for apoptotic markers. Results Silencing GRP-R decreased HIF-1α expression and blocked VEGF expression and secretion in both normoxic and CoCl2 induced hypoxia. PCR array analysis identified that GRP-R silencing reduced PDK4 and increased PDP2 mRNA expression. These findings were validated by Western blotting. CoCl2 induced hypoxia increased VEGF secretion, HIF-1α, and PDK4 expression. PDK4 silencing decreased HIF-1α expression and VEGF expression and secretion. DCA treatment decreased BE(2)-C and SK-N-AS proliferation while promoting cell death. GRP-R silencing and DCA treatment synergistically halted BE(2)-C proliferation. Conclusions We report that GRP-R regulates glucose metabolism in neuroblastoma by modulating HIF-1α, PDK4 and PDP2. PDK4 regulates glucose metabolism, in part, via regulation of HIF-1α. Synergistic consequences of GRP-R inhibition and DCA treatment may suggest a novel therapeutic strategy for the treatment of aggressive neuroblastoma. PMID:25630799

  17. Gastrin releasing peptide-29 requires vagal and splanchnic neurons to evoke satiation and satiety.

    PubMed

    Wright, Susan A; Washington, Martha C; Garcia, Carlos; Sayegh, Ayman I

    2012-01-01

    We have shown that gastrin-releasing peptide-29 (GRP-29), the large molecular form of GRP in rats, reduces meal size (MS, intake of 10% sucrose solution) and prolongs the intermeal interval (IMI). In these studies, we first investigated possible pathways for these responses in rats undergoing total subdiaphragmatic vagotomy (VGX, removal of vagal afferent and efferent innervation of the gut), celiaco-mesenteric ganglionectomy (CMGX, removal of splanchnic afferent and efferent innervation of the gut) and combined VGX and CMGX. Second, we examined if the duodenum communicates the feeding signals (MS and IMI) of GRP-29 (0, 0.3, 1.0, 2.1, 4.1, 10.3 and 17.2 nmol/kg) with the feeding control areas of the hindbrain by performing duodenal myotomy (MYO), a procedure that severs some layers of the duodenal wall including the vagal, splanchnic and enteric neurons. We found that GRP-29 (2.1, 4.1, 10.3, 17.2 nmol/kg) reduced the size of the first meal (10% sucrose) and (1, 4.1, 10.3 nmol/kg) prolongs the first IMI but did not affect the subsequent meals or IMIs. In addition, CMGX and combined VGX/CMGX attenuated reduction of MS by GRP-29 and all surgeries attenuated the prolongation of the IMI. Therefore, reduction of MS and prolongation of IMI by GRP-29 require vagal and splanchnic nerves, and the duodenum is the major conduit that communicates prolongation of IMI by GRP-29 with the brain.

  18. Gastrin-releasing Peptide Receptor Imaging in Breast Cancer Using the Receptor Antagonist 68Ga-RM2 And PET

    PubMed Central

    Stoykow, Christian; Erbes, Thalia; Maecke, Helmut R; Bulla, Stefan; Bartholomä, Mark; Mayer, Sebastian; Drendel, Vanessa; Bronsert, Peter; Werner, Martin; Gitsch, Gerald; Weber, Wolfgang A; Stickeler, Elmar; Meyer, Philipp T

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (GRPR) is overexpressed in breast cancer. The present study evaluates GRPR imaging as a novel imaging modality in breast cancer by employing positron emission tomography (PET) and the GRPR antagonist 68Ga-RM2. Methods: Fifteen female patients with biopsy confirmed primary breast carcinoma (3 bilateral tumors; median clinical stage IIB) underwent 68Ga-RM2-PET/CT for pretreatment staging. In vivo tumor uptake of 68Ga-RM2 was correlated with estrogen (ER) and progesterone (PR) receptor expression, HER2/neu status and MIB-1 proliferation index in breast core biopsy specimens. Results: 13/18 tumors demonstrated strongly increased 68Ga-RM2 uptake compared to normal breast tissue (defined as PET-positive). All PET-positive primary tumors were ER- and PR-positive (13/13) in contrast to only 1/5 PET-negative tumors. Mean SUVMAX of ER-positive tumors was 10.6±6.0 compared to 2.3±1.0 in ER-negative tumors (p=0.016). In a multivariate analysis including ER, PR, HER2/neu and MIB-1, only ER expression predicted 68Ga-RM2 uptake (model: r2=0.55, p=0.025). Normal breast tissue showed inter- and intraindividually variable, moderate GRPR binding (SUVMAX 2.3±1.0), while physiological uptake of other organs was considerably less except pancreas. Of note, 68Ga-RM2-PET/CT detected internal mammary lymph nodes with high 68Ga-RM2 uptake (n=8), a contralateral axillary lymph node metastasis (verified by biopsy) and bone metastases (n=1; not detected by bone scan and CT). Conclusion: Our study demonstrates that 68Ga-RM2-PET/CT is a promising imaging method in ER-positive breast cancer. In vivo GRPR binding assessed by 68Ga-RM2-PET/CT correlated with ER expression in primary tumors of untreated patients. PMID:27446498

  19. Modulation of phagocytic function in murine peritoneal macrophages by bombesin, gastrin-releasing peptide and neuromedin C.

    PubMed Central

    De la Fuente, M; Del Rio, M; Ferrandez, M D; Hernanz, A

    1991-01-01

    Bombesin, as well as the two mammalian bombesin-like peptides gastrin-releasing peptide and neuromedin C, have been shown in this study to stimulate in vitro all steps of the phagocytic process in murine peritoneal macrophages: adherence to substrate, chemotaxis, ingestion of cells (Candida albicans) and inert particles (latex beads), and production of superoxide anion as measured by nitroblue tetrazolium reduction. A dose-response relationship was observed, with maximal stimulation of phagocytic process between 10(-12)M and 10(-9)M. Gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) and neuromedin C caused a higher activation of adherence, chemotaxis and ingestion of C. albicans than bombesin. The three neuropeptides induced in murine macrophages a significant, but transient, increase of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) levels at 60 seconds. On the contrary, these neuropeptides produced a rapid, transient and significant decrease of cAMP at 30 seconds. These results suggest that there are close relations between IP3 and cAMP messenger systems and the phagocytic process in murine peritoneal macrophages when these cells are incubated in the presence of bombesin, GRP or neuromedin C. PMID:1649124

  20. Critical evaluation of the expression of gastrin-releasing peptide in dorsal root ganglia and spinal cord

    PubMed Central

    Barry, Devin M; Li, Hui; Liu, Xian-Yu; Shen, Kai-Feng; Liu, Xue-Ting; Wu, Zhen-Yu; Munanairi, Admire; Chen, Xiao-Jun; Yin, Jun; Sun, Yan-Gang; Li, Yun-Qing

    2016-01-01

    There are substantial disagreements about the expression of gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) in sensory neurons and whether GRP antibody cross-reacts with substance P (SP). These concerns necessitate a critical revaluation of GRP expression using additional approaches. Here, we show that a widely used GRP antibody specifically recognizes GRP but not SP. In the spinal cord of mice lacking SP (Tac1 KO), the expression of not only GRP but also other peptides, notably neuropeptide Y (NPY), is significantly diminished. We detected Grp mRNA in dorsal root ganglias using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, in situ hybridization and RNA-seq. We demonstrated that Grp mRNA and protein are upregulated in dorsal root ganglias, but not in the spinal cord, of mice with chronic itch. Few GRP+ immunostaining signals were detected in spinal sections following dorsal rhizotomy and GRP+ cell bodies were not detected in dissociated dorsal horn neurons. Ultrastructural analysis further shows that substantially more GRPergic fibers form synaptic contacts with gastrin releasing peptide receptor-positive (GRPR+) neurons than SPergic fibers. Our comprehensive study demonstrates that a majority of GRPergic fibers are of primary afferent origin. A number of factors such as low copy number of Grp transcripts, small percentage of cells expressing Grp, and the use of an eGFP GENSAT transgenic as a surrogate for GRP protein have contributed to the controversy. Optimization of experimental procedures facilitates the specific detection of GRP expression in dorsal root ganglia neurons. PMID:27068287

  1. Postnatal development of the gastrin-releasing peptide system in the lumbosacral spinal cord controlling male reproductive function in rats.

    PubMed

    Katayama, Nao; Oti, Takumi; Takanami, Keiko; Sakamoto, Tatsuya; Sakamoto, Hirotaka

    2016-01-01

    A sexually dimorphic spinal gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) system in the lumbosacral spinal cord, which projects to the lower spinal centers, controls erection and ejaculation in rats. However, little is known about the postnatal development of this system. In this study, we therefore examined the postnatal development of the male-dominant spinal GRP system and its sexual differentiation in rats using immunohistochemistry. Our results show that male-dominant expression of GRP is prominent from the onset of puberty and that sexually dimorphism persists into adulthood. These results suggest that androgen surge during male puberty plays an important role in the development and maintenance of the male-specific GRP function in the rat spinal cord.

  2. Postnatal development of the gastrin-releasing peptide system in the lumbosacral spinal cord controlling male reproductive function in rats

    PubMed Central

    KATAYAMA, Nao; OTI, Takumi; TAKANAMI, Keiko; SAKAMOTO, Tatsuya; SAKAMOTO, Hirotaka

    2016-01-01

    A sexually dimorphic spinal gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) system in the lumbosacral spinal cord, which projects to the lower spinal centers, controls erection and ejaculation in rats. However, little is known about the postnatal development of this system. In this study, we therefore examined the postnatal development of the male-dominant spinal GRP system and its sexual differentiation in rats using immunohistochemistry. Our results show that male-dominant expression of GRP is prominent from the onset of puberty and that sexually dimorphism persists into adulthood. These results suggest that androgen surge during male puberty plays an important role in the development and maintenance of the male-specific GRP function in the rat spinal cord. PMID:26860455

  3. Characterization of gastrin-releasing peptide immunoreactivity in distinct storage particles in guinea pig myenteric and Torpedo electromotor neurones.

    PubMed

    Shaw, C; Whittaker, V P; Agoston, D V

    1990-01-01

    Using high resolution centrifugal density-gradient separation of cytoplasmic extracts of guinea pig myenteric plexus and Torpedo electric tissue, we have succeeded in isolating fractions of storage particles rich in gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP). In extracts of myenteric plexus and gradients derived therefrom, the 10-amino acid GRP peptide (GRP-10) was the sole form present; this was bimodally distributed in the gradients, one peak copurifying with Golgi membranes and apparently consisting of immature storage particles, the other with other synaptophysin-rich neuropeptide-containing particles. In extracts of electric organ, a tissue rich in cholinergic electromotor nerve terminals, and gradients derived therefrom, GRP-like immunoreactivity behaved in gel permeation and reversed phase high performance liquid chromatography like the 27-amino acid peptide (GRP-27). About half of the immunoreactivity sedimented in the centrifugal gradient to a region rich in particles containing vasoactive intestinal polypeptide-like immunoreactivity; the remainder was recovered in a very dense region of the gradient containing larger membrane fragments, including synaptosomes. The electromotor nerves and cell bodies also contained GRP-27-like immunoreactivity in relatively high concentration as did the Torpedo gut. It is concluded that this GRP-like peptide is packaged in dense storage particles in the electromotor neurones.

  4. Effects of intranasal and peripheral oxytocin or gastrin-releasing peptide administration on social interaction and corticosterone levels in rats.

    PubMed

    Kent, Pamela; Awadia, Alisha; Zhao, Leah; Ensan, Donna; Silva, Dinuka; Cayer, Christian; James, Jonathan S; Anisman, Hymie; Merali, Zul

    2016-02-01

    The intranasal route of drug administration has gained increased popularity as it is thought to allow large molecules, such as peptide hormones, more direct access to the brain, while limiting systemic exposure. Several studies have investigated the effects of intranasal oxytocin administration in humans as this peptide is associated with prosocial behavior. There are, however, few preclinical studies investigating the effects of intranasal oxytocin administration in rodents. Oxytocin modulates hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis functioning and it has been suggested that oxytocin's ability to increase sociability may occur through a reduction in stress reactivity. Another peptide that appears to influence both social behavior and HPA axis activity is gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP), but it is not known if these GRP-induced effects are related. With this in mind, in the present study, we assessed the effects of intranasal and intraperitoneal oxytocin and GRP administration on social interaction and release of corticosterone in rats. Intranasal and intraperitoneal administration of 20, but not 5 μg, of oxytocin significantly increased social interaction, whereas intranasal and peripheral administration of GRP (20 but not 5 μg) significantly decreased levels of social interaction. In addition, while intranasal oxytocin (20 μg) had no effect on blood corticosterone levels, a marked increase in blood corticosterone levels was observed following intraperitoneal oxytocin administration. With GRP, intranasal (20 μg) but not peripheral administration increased corticosterone levels. These findings provide further evidence that intranasal peptide delivery can induce behavioral alterations in rodents which is consistent with findings from human studies. In addition, the peptide-induced changes in social interaction were not linked to fluctuations in corticosterone levels.

  5. Paracrine effects of bombesin/gastrin-releasing peptide and other growth factors on pulmonary neuroendocrine cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Speirs, V; Bienkowski, E; Wong, V; Cutz, E

    1993-05-01

    Pulmonary neuroendocrine cells (PNEC) are numerous in the fetus where they have been implicated to have a role in fetal lung development. We assessed the effects of putative growth factors, gastrin releasing peptide (GRP), cholecystokinin (CCK), gastrin (GN), serotonin (5-HT), and epidermal growth factor (EGF), some of which are produced by PNEC, either alone or in combination, on cultured fetal rabbit PNEC from 20, 24, and 28 day fetuses. GRP increased the total protein of the cultures over a 7 day period in an age-dependent manner, with greatest effect in cultures from the 24 day fetus, no effect with the 28 day fetus, and an inhibitory effect on 20 day cultures. This was accompanied by an increase in PNEC, which could be blocked by treatment of the cultures with a monoclonal antibody to GRP (2A11). There was no increase in 3H-thymidine labeling of PNEC in GRP treated cultures but an increase in numbers of cells partially stained for 5-HT, suggesting the induction of a precursor cell. Other growth factors had neither an inhibitory nor a stimulatory effect either alone or in combination with GRP. Preliminary studies with 125I-GRP receptor localization suggests that the GRP receptor is mostly expressed on pulmonary fibroblasts, and less on epithelial cells, so that the role for GRP in fetal lung development, at least in the rabbit, is probably indirect, acting via a paracrine mechanism.

  6. The gastrin-releasing peptide analog bombesin preserves exocrine and endocrine pancreas morphology and function during parenteral nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Pierre, Joseph F.; Neuman, Joshua C.; Brill, Allison L.; Brar, Harpreet K.; Thompson, Mary F.; Cadena, Mark T.; Connors, Kelsey M.; Busch, Rebecca A.; Heneghan, Aaron F.; Cham, Candace M.; Jones, Elaina K.; Kibbe, Carly R.; Davis, Dawn B.; Groblewski, Guy E.; Kudsk, Kenneth A.

    2015-01-01

    Stimulation of digestive organs by enteric peptides is lost during total parental nutrition (PN). Here we examine the role of the enteric peptide bombesin (BBS) in stimulation of the exocrine and endocrine pancreas during PN. BBS protects against exocrine pancreas atrophy and dysfunction caused by PN. BBS also augments circulating insulin levels, suggesting an endocrine pancreas phenotype. While no significant changes in gross endocrine pancreas morphology were observed, pancreatic islets isolated from BBS-treated PN mice showed a significantly enhanced insulin secretion response to the glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) agonist exendin-4, correlating with enhanced GLP-1 receptor expression. BBS itself had no effect on islet function, as reflected in low expression of BBS receptors in islet samples. Intestinal BBS receptor expression was enhanced in PN with BBS, and circulating active GLP-1 levels were significantly enhanced in BBS-treated PN mice. We hypothesized that BBS preserved islet function indirectly, through the enteroendocrine cell-pancreas axis. We confirmed the ability of BBS to directly stimulate intestinal enteroid cells to express the GLP-1 precursor preproglucagon. In conclusion, BBS preserves the exocrine and endocrine pancreas functions during PN; however, the endocrine stimulation is likely indirect, through the enteroendocrine cell-pancreas axis. PMID:26185331

  7. The gastrin-releasing peptide analog bombesin preserves exocrine and endocrine pancreas morphology and function during parenteral nutrition.

    PubMed

    Pierre, Joseph F; Neuman, Joshua C; Brill, Allison L; Brar, Harpreet K; Thompson, Mary F; Cadena, Mark T; Connors, Kelsey M; Busch, Rebecca A; Heneghan, Aaron F; Cham, Candace M; Jones, Elaina K; Kibbe, Carly R; Davis, Dawn B; Groblewski, Guy E; Kudsk, Kenneth A; Kimple, Michelle E

    2015-09-15

    Stimulation of digestive organs by enteric peptides is lost during total parental nutrition (PN). Here we examine the role of the enteric peptide bombesin (BBS) in stimulation of the exocrine and endocrine pancreas during PN. BBS protects against exocrine pancreas atrophy and dysfunction caused by PN. BBS also augments circulating insulin levels, suggesting an endocrine pancreas phenotype. While no significant changes in gross endocrine pancreas morphology were observed, pancreatic islets isolated from BBS-treated PN mice showed a significantly enhanced insulin secretion response to the glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) agonist exendin-4, correlating with enhanced GLP-1 receptor expression. BBS itself had no effect on islet function, as reflected in low expression of BBS receptors in islet samples. Intestinal BBS receptor expression was enhanced in PN with BBS, and circulating active GLP-1 levels were significantly enhanced in BBS-treated PN mice. We hypothesized that BBS preserved islet function indirectly, through the enteroendocrine cell-pancreas axis. We confirmed the ability of BBS to directly stimulate intestinal enteroid cells to express the GLP-1 precursor preproglucagon. In conclusion, BBS preserves the exocrine and endocrine pancreas functions during PN; however, the endocrine stimulation is likely indirect, through the enteroendocrine cell-pancreas axis.

  8. Fetal organ growth in response to oesophageal infusion of amniotic fluid, colostrum, milk or gastrin-releasing peptide: a study in fetal sheep.

    PubMed

    Trahair, J F; Sangild, P T

    2000-01-01

    The hypothesis of the present study was that the infusion of the biological fluids to which the developing gut is normally exposed (i.e. amniotic fluid, colostrum, milk) and a single growth factor (gastrin-releasing peptide), which is found in high concentrations in fetal fluids and milk, could ameliorate the altered growth induced by the elimination of swallowed input secondary to ligation of the oesophagus. At 108-110 days of gestation the fetal oesophagus was ligated and a catheter inserted towards the stomach (32 fetuses). At 117-119 days of gestation saline (n = 5), amniotic fluid (n = 5), colostral whey (n = 5), milk whey (n = 5) or gastrin-releasing peptide (3.6 nmol day(-1), n = 6), was infused for 7 days (4 x 20 mL day(-1)), or no infusion was given (ligated group, n = 6). A further 15 fetuses were not ligated (normal group, n = 15). All fetuses had carotid artery and/or jugular vein catheters implanted. At 124-126 days of gestation the fetus was delivered and fetal body and organ weights recorded. Analysing the results by ANOVA, there were no effects of either ligation alone or infusion after ligation on fetal weight, crown-rump length, or weight relative to bodyweight of heart, adrenal, pancreas, large intestine and cecum. There were significant differences between the infusion groups for lungs, kidney, pancreas, total gut, abomasum, small intestine, spleen, chest and neck thymus, and mesenteric lymph nodes. Ligation alone significantly reduced small intestinal growth and increased kidney and spleen growth. Colostrum infusion enhanced growth of most organs. Gastrin-releasing peptide significantly increased growth of all the immune organs studied. It was concluded that at an age when premature delivery could be encountered, the fetal gut is capable of significant adaptive growth, to varying degrees, depending on the enteral diet. Growth effects in organs distant to the gut suggest that either gastrointestinal uptake and transport of growth factors or

  9. Early phosphorylation events following the treatment of Swiss 3T3 cells with bombesin and the mammalian bombesin-related peptide, gastrin-releasing peptide.

    PubMed Central

    Isacke, C M; Meisenhelder, J; Brown, K D; Gould, K L; Gould, S J; Hunter, T

    1986-01-01

    Bombesin and the related mammalian peptides, such as gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP), are potent mitogens for some fibroblast cell lines. Here we have examined the bombesin- and GRP-mediated changes in the phosphorylation of proteins in Swiss 3T3 cells and compared these to the events observed after platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), epidermal growth factor (EGF) and tumor promoter treatment. In agreement with previous reports, bombesin, GRP and PDGF, but not EGF, increased the activity of protein kinase C. This was assayed by an inhibition of [125I]EGF binding, stimulation in phosphorylation of pp60c-src on serine 12 and stimulation in phosphorylation of a group of 80 kd proteins. The different phosphorylated forms of the 80 kd proteins were examined by tryptic peptide mapping and shown to contain multiple phosphorylation sites. An investigation of the tyrosine phosphorylation events following mitogen treatment revealed a significant difference between PDGF and the bombesin peptides. PDGF treatment caused a marked increase in total cellular phosphotyrosine levels, and tyrosine phosphorylation both of known substrates and its own receptor. In contrast, bombesin and GRP treatments resulted in only a weak or undetectable increase in tyrosine phosphorylation of total cellular protein or known substrates. In this respect bombesin and GRP were more similar to EGF. The fact that the bombesin peptides do not induce a phosphorylation response identical with either PDGF or EGF suggests that there is not a single common signal pathway which is activated by all these mitogens. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. PMID:2431903

  10. Distinct functions of opioid-related peptides and gastrin-releasing peptide in regulating itch and pain in the spinal cord of primates

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Heeseung; Ko, Mei-Chuan

    2015-01-01

    How neuropeptides in the primate spinal cord regulate itch and pain is largely unknown. Here we elucidate the sensory functions of spinal opioid-related peptides and gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) in awake, behaving monkeys. Following intrathecal administration, β-endorphin (10–100 nmol) and GRP (1–10 nmol) dose-dependently elicit the same degree of robust itch scratching, which can be inhibited by mu-opioid peptide (MOP) receptor and GRP receptor (BB2) antagonists, respectively. Unlike β-endorphin, which produces itch and attenuates inflammatory pain, GRP only elicits itch without affecting pain. In contrast, enkephalins (100–1000 nmol) and nociceptin-orphanin FQ (3–30 nmol) only inhibit pain without eliciting itch. More intriguingly, dynorphin A(1–17) (10–100 nmol) dose-dependently attenuates both β-endorphin- and GRP-elicited robust scratching without affecting pain processing. The anti-itch effects of dynorphin A can be reversed by a kappa-opioid peptide (KOP) receptor antagonist nor-binaltorphimine. These nonhuman primate behavioral models with spinal delivery of ligands advance our understanding of distinct functions of neuropeptides for modulating itch and pain. In particular, we demonstrate causal links for itch-eliciting effects by β-endorphin-MOP receptor and GRP-BB2 receptor systems and itch-inhibiting effects by the dynorphin A-KOP receptor system. These studies will facilitate transforming discoveries of novel ligand-receptor systems into future therapies as antipruritics and/or analgesics in humans. PMID:26119696

  11. Intravenous infusion of gastrin-releasing peptide-27 and bombesin in rats reveals differential effects on meal size and intermeal interval length.

    PubMed

    Washington, Martha C; Salyer, Sarah; Aglan, Amnah H; Sayegh, Ayman I

    2014-01-01

    We have previously shown that the intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of gastrin-releasing peptide-27 (GRP-27) or bombesin (BN) (at 0.21, 0.41 and 1.03nmol/kg) reduces meal size (MS) and prolongs the intermeal interval (IMI). Here, we hypothesized that the intravenous (i.v.) administration of the same doses of GRP-27 and BN will be as effective as the i.p. administration in evoking these feeding responses. To test this hypothesis, we administered GRP-27 and BN i.v. and measured first MS (10% sucrose), IMI, satiety ratio (SR, IMI/MS) and second MS in overnight food-deprived but not water-deprived male Sprague Dawley rats. We found that (1) only GRP-27 reduced the first MS, (2) BN prolonged the IMI, (3) GRP-27 and BN increased the SR and (4) only BN reduced the size of the second meal. Contrary to our hypothesis, the i.v. administration of GRP-27 and BN affected the MS and IMI differently than did the i.p. administration. In conclusion, this pharmacological study suggests that the MS and IMI are regulated at different sites.

  12. Gastrin-releasing peptide receptor antagonist or N-acetylcysteine combined with omeprazol protect against mitochondrial complex II inhibition in a rat model of gastritis.

    PubMed

    Rezin, Gislaine T; Petronilho, Fabricia C; Araújo, João H; Gonçalves, Cinara L; Daufenbach, Juliana F; Cardoso, Mariane R; Roesler, Rafael; Schwartsmann, Gilberto; Dal-Pizzol, Felipe; Streck, Emilio L

    2011-03-01

    The pathophysiology of gastritis involves an imbalance between gastric acid attack and mucosal defence. In addition, the gastric mucosal injury results in adenosine triphosphate (ATP) depletion leading to mitochondrial dysfunction. Several studies have shown the association of mitochondrial disorders with gastrointestinal dysfunction. In the present study, we investigated the activity of mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes activity in the stomach of rats with gastritis induced by indomethacin (IDM) and treated with omeprazole (OM), N-acetylcysteine (NAC) and the gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (GRPR) antagonist RC-3095. Adult male Wistar rats were pre-treated for 7 days with OM, NAC, RC-3095, combination of OM plus RC-3095, OM plus NAC and water (control). The animals were then submitted to fasting for 24 hr; IDM was administered. The rats were killed 6 hr later, and the stomachs were used for evaluation of macroscopic damage and respiratory chain activity. Our results showed that complex I and IV activities were not affected by administration of IDM. On the other hand, complex II and III activities were inhibited. In addition, OM plus RC-3095 and OM plus NAC did not reverse complex II activity inhibition. However, the complex III activity inhibition was reversed only with the combined use of OM plus RC-3095 and OM plus NAC. Our results are in agreement with previous studies indicating mitochondrial dysfunction in the pathophysiology of gastrointestinal tract disease and we suggest that GRPR antagonism might be a novel therapeutic strategy in gastritis.

  13. Intravenous infusion of gastrin-releasing peptide-27 and bombesin in rats reveals differential effects on meal size and intermeal interval length

    PubMed Central

    Washington, Martha C.; Salyer, Sarah; Aglan, Amnah H.; Sayegh, Ayman I.

    2016-01-01

    We have previously shown that the intraperitoneal (i.p) administration of gastrin-releasing peptide-27 (GRP-27) or bombesin (BN) (at 0.21, 0.41 and 1.03 nmol/kg) reduces meal size (MS) and prolongs the intermeal interval (IMI). Here, we hypothesized that the intravenous (i.v) administration of the same doses of GRP-27 and BN will be as effective as the i.p administration in evoking these feeding responses. To test this hypothesis, we administered GRP-27 and BN i.v and measured first MS (10% sucrose), IMI, satiety ratio (SR, IMI/MS) and second MS in overnight food-deprived but not water-deprived male Sprague Dawley rats. We found that (1) only GRP-27 reduced the first MS, (2) BN prolonged the IMI, (3) GRP-27 and BN increased the SR and (4) only BN reduced the size of the second meal. Contrary to our hypothesis, the i.v administration of GRP-27 and BN affected the MS and IMI differently than did the i.p administration. In conclusion, this pharmacological study suggests that the MS and IMI are regulated at different sites. PMID:24291388

  14. Spinal neurons that contain gastrin-releasing peptide seldom express Fos or phosphorylate extracellular signal-regulated kinases in response to intradermal chloroquine

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez-Mecinas, Maria; Polgár, Erika; Todd, Andrew J

    2016-01-01

    Background Gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) is thought to play a role in the itch evoked by intradermal injection of chloroquine. Although some early studies suggested that GRP was expressed in pruriceptive primary afferents, it is now thought that GRP in the spinal cord is derived mainly from a population of excitatory interneurons in lamina II, and it has been suggested that these are involved in the itch pathway. To test this hypothesis, we used the transcription factor Fos and phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK) to look for evidence that interneurons expressing GRP were activated following intradermal injection of chloroquine into the calf, in mice that express enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) in these cells. Results Injection of chloroquine resulted in numerous Fos- or phospho-ERK (pERK) positive cells in the somatotopically appropriate part of the superficial dorsal horn. The proportion of all neurons in this region that showed Fos or pERK was 18% and 21%, respectively. However, among the GRP–EGFP, only 7% were Fos-positive and 3% were pERK-positive. As such, GRP–EGFP cells were significantly less likely than other neurons to express Fos or to phosphorylate ERK. Conclusions Both expression of Fos and phosphorylation of ERK can be used to identify dorsal horn neurons activated by chloroquine injection. However, these results do not support the hypothesis that interneurons expressing GRP are critical components in the itch pathway. PMID:27270268

  15. A role for glucocorticoid-signaling in depression-like behavior of gastrin-releasing peptide receptor knock-out mice.

    PubMed

    Monje, Francisco J; Kim, Eun-Jung; Cabatic, Maureen; Lubec, Gert; Herkner, Kurt R; Pollak, Daniela D

    2011-08-01

    Abstract Background. The gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (GRPR) is highly expressed in the limbic system, where it importantly regulates emotional functions and in the suprachiasmatic nucleus, where it is central for the photic resetting of the circadian clock. Mice lacking GRPR presented with deficient light-induced phase shift in activity as well altered emotional learning and amygdala function. The effect of GRPR deletion on depression-like behavior and its molecular signature in the amygdala, however, has not yet been evaluated. Methods. GRPR knock-out mice (GRPR-KO) were tested in the forced-swim test and the sucrose preference test for depression-like behavior. Gene expression in the basolateral nucleus of the amygdala was evaluated by micorarray analysis subsequent to laser-capture microdissection-assisted extraction of mRNA. The expression of selected genes was confirmed by RT-PCR. Results. GRPR-KO mice were found to present with increased depression-like behavior. Microarray analysis revealed down-regulation of several glucocorticoid-responsive genes in the basolateral amygdala. Acute administration of dexamethasone reversed the behavioral phenotype and alterations in gene expression. Discussion. We propose that deletion of GRPR leads to the induction of depression-like behavior which is paralleled by dysregulation of amygdala gene expression, potentially resulting from deficient light-induced corticosterone release in GRPR-KO.

  16. Comparative Anatomy of Gastrin-releasing Peptide Pathways in the Trigeminal Sensory System of Mouse and the Asian House Musk Shrew Suncus murinus

    PubMed Central

    Takanami, Keiko; Inoue, Kaihei; Mukai, Hiroki; Tamura, Kei; Jogahara, Takamichi; Oda, Sen-ichi; Kawata, Mitsuhiro; Sakamoto, Tatsuya; Sakamoto, Hirotaka

    2016-01-01

    Gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) has recently been identified as an itch-signaling molecule in the primary afferents and spinal cord of rodents. However, little information exists on the expression and localization of GRP in the trigeminal somatosensory system other than in rats. We examined the generality of the trigeminal GRP system in mammals using two distinct species, suncus as a model of specialized placental mammals known to have a well-developed trigeminal sensory system and mice as a representative small laboratory animal. We first analyzed the gross morphology of the trigeminal somatosensory system in suncus to provide a brainstem atlas on which to map GRP distribution. Immunohistochemical analyses showed that 8% of trigeminal ganglion neurons in suncus and 6% in mice expressed GRP. Expression was restricted to cells with smaller somata. The GRP-containing fibers were densely distributed in the superficial layers of the caudal part of the trigeminal spinal nucleus (Vc) but rare in the rostral parts, both in suncus and mice. Expression of GRP receptor mRNA and protein was also detected in the Vc of suncus. Taken together, these results suggest that the trigeminal GRP system mediating itch sensation is conserved in mammals. PMID:28127106

  17. Neuromedin B and gastrin releasing peptide excite arcuate nucleus neuropeptide Y neurons in a novel transgenic mouse expressing strong renilla GFP in NPY neurons

    PubMed Central

    van den Pol, Anthony N.; Yao, Yang; Fu, Li-Ying; Foo, Kylie; Huang, Hao; Coppari, Roberto; Lowell, Brad; Broberger, Christian

    2009-01-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is one of the most widespread neuropeptides in the brain. Transgenic mice were generated that expressed bright renilla GFP in most or all of the known NPY cells in the brain, which otherwise were not identifiable. GFP expression in NPY cells was confirmed with immunocytochemistry and single cell RT-PCR. NPY neurons in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus play an important role in energy homeostasis and endocrine control. Whole cell patch clamp recording was used to study identified arcuate NPY cells. Primary agents that regulate energy balance include melanocortin receptor agonists, AgRP, and cannabinoids; none of these substances substantially influenced electrical properties of NPY neurons. In striking contrast, neuropeptides of the bombesin family, including gastrin releasing peptide and neuromedin B which are found in axons in the arcuate nucleus and may also be released from the gut to signal the brain, showed strong direct excitatory actions at nanomolar levels on the NPY neurons, stronger than the actions of ghrelin and hypocretin/orexin. Bombesin-related peptides reduced input resistance and depolarized the membrane potential. The depolarization was attenuated by several factors: substitution of choline for sodium, extracellular Ni2+, inclusion of BAPTA in the pipette, KB-R7943 and SKF96365. Reduced extracellular calcium enhanced the current, which reversed around − 20 mV. Together, these data suggest two mechanisms, activation of non-selective cation channels and the sodium/calcium exchanger. Since both NPY and POMC neurons, which we also studied, are similarly directly excited by bombesin-like peptides, the peptides may function to initiate broad activation, rather than the cell-type selective activation or inhibition reported for many other compounds that modulate energy homeostasis. PMID:19357287

  18. In Vivo Stabilization of a Gastrin-Releasing Peptide Receptor Antagonist Enhances PET Imaging and Radionuclide Therapy of Prostate Cancer in Preclinical Studies.

    PubMed

    Chatalic, Kristell L S; Konijnenberg, Mark; Nonnekens, Julie; de Blois, Erik; Hoeben, Sander; de Ridder, Corrina; Brunel, Luc; Fehrentz, Jean-Alain; Martinez, Jean; van Gent, Dik C; Nock, Berthold A; Maina, Theodosia; van Weerden, Wytske M; de Jong, Marion

    2016-01-01

    A single tool for early detection, accurate staging, and personalized treatment of prostate cancer (PCa) would be a major breakthrough in the field of PCa. Gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (GRPR) targeting peptides are promising probes for a theranostic approach for PCa overexpressing GRPR. However, the successful application of small peptides in a theranostic approach is often hampered by their fast in vivo degradation by proteolytic enzymes, such as neutral endopeptidase (NEP). Here we show for the first time that co-injection of a NEP inhibitor (phosphoramidon (PA)) can lead to an impressive enhancement of diagnostic sensitivity and therapeutic efficacy of the theranostic (68)Ga-/(177)Lu-JMV4168 GRPR-antagonist. Co-injection of PA (300 µg) led to stabilization of (177)Lu-JMV4168 in murine peripheral blood. In PC-3 tumor-bearing mice, PA co-injection led to a two-fold increase in tumor uptake of (68)Ga-/(177)Lu-JMV4168, 1 h after injection. In positron emission tomography (PET) imaging with (68)Ga-JMV4168, PA co-injection substantially enhanced PC-3 tumor signal intensity. Radionuclide therapy with (177)Lu-JMV4168 resulted in significant regression of PC-3 tumor size. Radionuclide therapy efficacy was confirmed by production of DNA double strand breaks, decreased cell proliferation and increased apoptosis. Increased survival rates were observed in mice treated with (177)Lu-JMV4168 plus PA as compared to those without PA. This data shows that co-injection of the enzyme inhibitor PA greatly enhances the theranostic potential of GRPR-radioantagonists for future application in PCa patients.

  19. In Vivo Stabilization of a Gastrin-Releasing Peptide Receptor Antagonist Enhances PET Imaging and Radionuclide Therapy of Prostate Cancer in Preclinical Studies

    PubMed Central

    Chatalic, Kristell L.S.; Konijnenberg, Mark; Nonnekens, Julie; de Blois, Erik; Hoeben, Sander; de Ridder, Corrina; Brunel, Luc; Fehrentz, Jean-Alain; Martinez, Jean; van Gent, Dik C.; Nock, Berthold A.; Maina, Theodosia; van Weerden, Wytske M.; de Jong, Marion

    2016-01-01

    A single tool for early detection, accurate staging, and personalized treatment of prostate cancer (PCa) would be a major breakthrough in the field of PCa. Gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (GRPR) targeting peptides are promising probes for a theranostic approach for PCa overexpressing GRPR. However, the successful application of small peptides in a theranostic approach is often hampered by their fast in vivo degradation by proteolytic enzymes, such as neutral endopeptidase (NEP). Here we show for the first time that co-injection of a NEP inhibitor (phosphoramidon (PA)) can lead to an impressive enhancement of diagnostic sensitivity and therapeutic efficacy of the theranostic 68Ga-/177Lu-JMV4168 GRPR-antagonist. Co-injection of PA (300 µg) led to stabilization of 177Lu-JMV4168 in murine peripheral blood. In PC-3 tumor-bearing mice, PA co-injection led to a two-fold increase in tumor uptake of 68Ga-/177Lu-JMV4168, 1 h after injection. In positron emission tomography (PET) imaging with 68Ga-JMV4168, PA co-injection substantially enhanced PC-3 tumor signal intensity. Radionuclide therapy with 177Lu-JMV4168 resulted in significant regression of PC-3 tumor size. Radionuclide therapy efficacy was confirmed by production of DNA double strand breaks, decreased cell proliferation and increased apoptosis. Increased survival rates were observed in mice treated with 177Lu-JMV4168 plus PA as compared to those without PA. This data shows that co-injection of the enzyme inhibitor PA greatly enhances the theranostic potential of GRPR-radioantagonists for future application in PCa patients. PMID:26722377

  20. Prospects of Targeting the Gastrin Releasing Peptide Receptor and Somatostatin Receptor 2 for Nuclear Imaging and Therapy in Metastatic Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dalm, Simone U.; Schrijver, Willemijne A. M. E.; Sieuwerts, Anieta M.; Look, Maxime P.; Ziel - van der Made, Angelique C. J.; de Weerd, Vanja; Martens, John W.; van Diest, Paul J.; de Jong, Marion; van Deurzen, Carolien H. M.

    2017-01-01

    Background The gastrin releasing peptide receptor (GRPR) and the somatostatin receptor 2 (SSTR2) are overexpressed on primary breast cancer (BC), making them ideal candidates for receptor-mediated nuclear imaging and therapy. The aim of this study was to determine whether these receptors are also suitable targets for metastatic BC. Methods mRNA expression of human BC samples were studied by in vitro autoradiography and associated with radioligand binding. Next, GRPR and SSTR2 mRNA levels of 60 paired primary BCs and metastases from different sites were measured by quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. Receptor mRNA expression levels were associated with clinico-pathological factors and expression levels of primary tumors and corresponding metastases were compared. Results Binding of GRPR and SSTR radioligands to tumor tissue correlated significantly with receptor mRNA expression. High GRPR and SSTR2 mRNA levels were associated with estrogen receptor (ESR1)-positive tumors (p<0.001 for both receptors). There was no significant difference in GRPR mRNA expression of primary tumors versus paired metastases. Regarding SSTR2 mRNA expression, there was also no significant difference in the majority of cases, apart from liver and ovarian metastases which showed a significantly lower expression compared to the corresponding primary tumors (p = 0.02 and p = 0.03, respectively). Conclusion Targeting the GRPR and SSTR2 for nuclear imaging and/or treatment has the potential to improve BC care in primary as well as metastatic disease. PMID:28107508

  1. A rhesus monkey model to characterize the role of gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) in lung development. Evidence for stimulation of airway growth.

    PubMed Central

    Li, K; Nagalla, S R; Spindel, E R

    1994-01-01

    Gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) is developmentally expressed in human fetal lung and is a growth factor for normal and neoplastic lung but its role in normal lung development has yet to be clearly defined. In this study we have characterized the expression of GRP and its receptor in fetal rhesus monkey lung and determined the effects of bombesin on fetal lung development in vitro. By RNA blot analysis, GRP mRNA was first detectable in fetal monkey lung at 63 days gestation, reached highest levels at 80 days gestation, and then declined to near adult levels by 120 days gestation; a pattern closely paralleling GRP expression in human fetal lung. As in human lung, in situ hybridization localized GRP mRNA to neuroendocrine cells though during the canalicular phase of development (between 63-80 days gestation) GRP mRNA was present not only in classic pulmonary neuroendocrine cells, but also in cells of budding airways. Immunohistochemistry showed that bombesin-like immunoreactivity was present in neuroendocrine cells, but not in budding airways, suggesting that in budding airways either the GRP mRNA is not translated, is rapidly secreted, or a related, but different RNA is present. RNase protection analysis using a probe to the monkey GRP receptor demonstrated that the time course of receptor RNA expression closely paralleled the time course of GRP RNA expression. In situ hybridization showed that GRP receptors were primarily expressed in epithelial cells of the developing airways. Thus GRP would appear to be secreted from neuroendocrine cells to act on target cells in developing airways. This hypothesis was confirmed by organ culture of fetal monkey lung in the presence of bombesin and bombesin antagonists. Bombesin treatment at 1 and 10 nM significantly increased DNA synthesis in airway epithelial cells and significantly increased the number and size of airways in cultured fetal lung. In fact, culturing 60 d fetal lung for 5 d with 10 nM bombesin increased airway size

  2. In vitro and in vivo evaluation of Alexa Fluor 680-bombesin[7-14]NH2 peptide conjugate, a high-affinity fluorescent probe with high selectivity for the gastrin-releasing peptide receptor.

    PubMed

    Ma, Lixin; Yu, Ping; Veerendra, Bhadrasetty; Rold, Tammy L; Retzloff, Lauren; Prasanphanich, Adam; Sieckman, Gary; Hoffman, Timothy J; Volkert, Wynn A; Smith, Charles J

    2007-01-01

    Gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) receptors are overexpressed on several types of human cancer cells, including breast, prostate, small cell lung, and pancreatic cancers. Bombesin (BBN), a 14-amino acid peptide that is an analogue of human GRP, binds to GRP receptors with very high affinity and specificity. The aim of this study was to develop a new fluorescent probe based on BBN having high tumor uptake and optimal pharmacokinetics for specific targeting and optical imaging of human breast cancer tissue. In this study, solid-phase peptide synthesis was used to produce H(2)N-glycylglycylglycine-BBN[7-14]NH(2) peptide with the following general sequence: H(2)N-G-G-G-Q-W-A-V-G-H-L-M-(NH(2)). This conjugate was purified by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography and characterized by electrospray-ionization mass spectra. The fluorescent probe Alexa Fluor 680-G-G-G-BBN[7-14]NH(2) conjugate was prepared by reaction of Alexa Fluor 680 succinimidyl ester to H(2)N-G-G-G-BBN[7-14]NH(2) in dimethylformamide (DMF). In vitro competitive binding assays, using (125)I-Tyr(4)-BBN as the radiolabeling gold standard, demonstrated an inhibitory concentration 50% value of 7.7 +/- 1.4 nM in human T-47D breast cancer cells. Confocal fluorescence microscopy images of Alexa Fluor 680-G-G-G-BBN[7-14]NH(2) in human T-47D breast cancer cells indicated specific uptake, internalization, and receptor blocking of the fluorescent bioprobe in vitro. In vivo investigations in SCID mice bearing xenografted T-47D breast cancer lesions demonstrated the ability of this new conjugate to specifically target tumor tissue with high selectivity and affinity.

  3. Biological evaluation of (177)Lu-labeled DOTA-Ala(SO3H)-Aminooctanoyl-Gln-Trp-Ala-Val-N methyl Gly-His-Statine-Leu-NH2 for gastrin-releasing peptide receptor-positive prostate tumor targeting.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jae Cheong; Cho, Eun Ha; Kim, Jin Joo; Choi, Sang Mu; Lee, So young; Nam, Sung Soo; Park, Ul Jae; Park, Soo Hyun

    2015-02-01

    Bombesin binds with selectivity and high affinity to a Gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (GRPR), which is highly overexpressed in prostate cancer cells. The present study describes the in vitro and in vivo biological characteristics of DOTA-Ala(SO3H)-Aminooctanoyl-Gln-Trp-Ala-Val-N methyl Gly-His-Statine-Leu-NH2 (DOTA-sBBNA), an antagonist analogue of bombesin peptide for the targeting of GRPR. DOTA-sBBNA was synthesized and labeled with (177)Lu as previously published. A saturation assay on PC-3 human prostate cancer cells revealed that the Kd value of the radiolabeled peptide was 1.88 nM with a maximum binding capacity (Bmax) of 289.3 fmol/10(6) cells. The radio-peptide slowly internalized, and 24.4±0.5% of the total binding was internalized in 4hr. Biodistribution studies were conducted in healthy and PC-3 xenografted balb/c mice, which showed high uptake and retention of tumor-associated radioactivity in PC-3 xenografted mice. The tumor-to-blood ratio was 126.02±9.36 at 1.5hr p.i., and was increased to 216.33±61.58 at 24hr p.i., which means that the radiolabeled peptide was highly accumulated in a tumor and rapidly cleared from the blood pool. The GRPR is also over-expressed in Korean prostate cancer patients. These results suggest that this (177)Lu-labeled peptide has promising characteristics for application in nuclear medicine, namely for the diagnosis and treatment of GRPR over-expressing prostate tumors.

  4. A duodenal role in gastrin release

    PubMed Central

    Hayes, J. R.; Ardill, Joy; Kennedy, T. L.; Buchanan, K. D.

    1974-01-01

    Observations on the plasma gastrin response to feeding protein in patients with the dumping syndrome, patients with pyloric stenosis, and patients asymptomatic after gastric surgery suggested that the duodenum might be important in the mechanism of gastrin release. This duodenal role was confirmed by the finding that when the stimulus was placed directly in the duodenum peak gastrin levels occurred earlier than when the stimulus was placed directly in the stomach. PMID:4422726

  5. Identification of the sexually dimorphic gastrin-releasing peptide system in the lumbosacral spinal cord that controls male reproductive function in the mouse and Asian house musk shrew (Suncus murinus).

    PubMed

    Tamura, Kei; Kobayashi, Yasuhisa; Hirooka, Asuka; Takanami, Keiko; Oti, Takumi; Jogahara, Takamichi; Oda, Sen-Ichi; Sakamoto, Tatsuya; Sakamoto, Hirotaka

    2016-11-02

    Several regions of the brain and spinal cord control male reproductive function. We previously demonstrated that the gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) system, located in the lumbosacral spinal cord of rats, controls spinal centers to promote penile reflexes during male copulatory behavior. However, little information exists on the male-specific spinal GRP system in animals other than rats. The objective of this study was to examine the functional generality of the spinal GRP system in mammals using the Asian house musk shrew (Suncus murinus; suncus named as the laboratory strain), a specialized placental mammal model. Mice are also used for a representative model of small laboratory animals. We first isolated complementary DNA encoding GRP in suncus. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that suncus preproGRP was clustered to an independent branch. Reverse transcription-PCR showed that GRP and its receptor mRNAs were both expressed in the lumbar spinal cord of suncus and mice. Immunohistochemistry for GRP demonstrated that the sexually dimorphic GRP system and male-specific expression/distribution patterns of GRP in the lumbosacral spinal cord in suncus are similar to those of mice. In suncus, we further found that most GRP-expressing neurons in males also express androgen receptors, suggesting that this male-dominant system in suncus is also androgen-dependent. Taken together, these results indicate that the sexually dimorphic spinal GRP system exists not only in mice but also in suncus, suggesting that this system is a conserved property in mammals. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  6. Gastrin Receptor-Avid Peptide Conjugates

    DOEpatents

    Hoffman, Timothy J.; Volkert, Wynn A.; Li, Ning; Sieckman, Gary; Higginbotham, Chrys-Ann

    2005-07-26

    A compound for use as a therapeutic or diagnostic radiopharmaceutical includes a group capable of complexing a medically useful metal attached to a moiety which is capable of binding to a gastrin releasing peptide receptor. A method for treating a subject having a neoplastic disease includes administering to the subject an effective amount of a radiopharmaceutical having a metal chelated with a chelating group attached to a moiety capable of binding to a gastrin releasing peptide receptor expressed on tumor cells with subsequent internalization inside of the cell. A method of forming a therapeutic or diagnostic compound includes reacting a metal synthon with a chelating group covalently linked with a moiety capable of binding a gastrin releasing peptide receptor.

  7. Gastrin receptor-avid peptide conjugates

    DOEpatents

    Hoffman, Timothy J.; Volkert, Wynn A.; Li, Ning; Sieckman, Gary; Higginbotham, C. A.

    2001-01-01

    A compound for use as a therapeutic or diagnostic radiopharmaceutical includes a group capable of complexing a medically useful metal attached to a moiety which is capable of binding to a gastrin releasing peptide receptor. A method for treating a subject having a neoplastic disease includes administering to the subject an effective amount of a radiopharmaceutical having a metal chelated with a chelating group attached to a moiety capable of binding to a gastrin releasing peptide receptor expressed on tumor cells with subsequent internalization inside of the cell. A method of forming a therapeutic or diagnostic compound includes reacting a metal synthon with a chelating group covalently linked with a moiety capable of binding a gastrin releasing peptide receptor.

  8. Gastrin receptor-avid peptide conjugates

    DOEpatents

    Hoffman, Timothy J.; Volkert, Wynn A.; Li, Ning; Sieckman, Gary; Higginbotham, Chrys-Ann

    2006-12-12

    A compound for use as a therapeutic or diagnostic radiopharmaceutical includes a group capable of complexing a medically useful metal attached to a moiety which is capable of binding to a gastrin releasing peptide receptor. A method for treating a subject having a neoplastic disease includes administering to the subject an effective amount of a radiopharmaceutical having a metal chelated with a chelating group attached to a moiety capable of binding to a gastrin releasing peptide receptor expressed on tumor cells with subsequent internalization inside of the cell. A method of forming a therapeutic or diagnostic compound includes reacting a metal synthon with a chelating group covalently linked with a moiety capable of binding a gastrin releasing peptide receptor.

  9. Gastrin receptor-avid peptide conjugates

    DOEpatents

    Hoffman, Timothy J.; Volkert, Wynn A.; Sieckman, Gary; Smith, Charles J.; Gali, Hariprasad

    2006-06-13

    A compound for use as a therapeutic or diagnostic radiopharmaceutical includes a group capable of complexing a medically useful metal attached to a moiety which is capable of binding to a gastrin releasing peptide receptor. A method for treating a subject having a neoplastic disease includes administering to the subject an effective amount of a radiopharmaceutical having a metal chelated with a chelating group attached to a-moiety capable of binding to a gastrin releasing peptide receptor expressed on tumor cells with subsequent internalization inside of the cell. A method of forming a therapeutic or diagnostic compound includes reacting a metal synthon with a chelating group covalently linked with a moiety capable of binding a gastrin releasing peptide receptor.

  10. Effect of colectomy on cholecystokinin and gastrin release.

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, K; Wiener, I; Fried, G M; Lilja, P; Watson, L C; Thompson, J C

    1982-01-01

    Studies were conducted to determine the effect of resection of the colon on the release of cholecystokinin (CCK) and gastrin. A standard food stimulation test was performed in five dogs. Peripheral blood samples were collected for future measurement of CCK and gastrin by specific radioimmunoassay. Each dog underwent subtotal colectomy with side-to-end ileoproctostomy. The food stimulation test was repeated at approximately weekly intervals for eight weeks after colectomy. Basal plasma CCK levels of 139 +/- 21 pg/ml before colectomy did not change after colectomy. Total amount CCK released after food was increased significantly at both four (5.94 +/- 0.78 ng min/ml) and eight (13.00 +/- 2.72 ng min/ml) weeks after colectomy in comparison with that observed prior to colectomy (2.94 +/- 0.54 ng min/ml). Basal serum gastrin levels of 28 +/- 9 pg/ml did not change significantly after colectomy. Total amount of gastrin released after food was increased significantly at both two (8651 +/- 2294 pg min/ml) and three (6940 +/- 1426 pg min/ml) weeks after operation, but at none of the later weeks. The precolectomy output, used for comparison, was 5608 +/- 1346 pg min/ml. It was concluded that resection of the colon leads to an increase in release of CCK and gastrin after food stimulation. This finding provides further evidence that the colon contains a factor that inhibits the release of CCK and gastrin, and that the colon functions as an endocrine organ. PMID:7149821

  11. Isolation from beer and structural determination of a potent stimulant of gastrin release.

    PubMed

    Yokoo, Y; Kohda, H; Kusumoto, A; Naoki, H; Matsumoto, N; Amachi, T; Suwa, Y; Fukazawa, H; Ishida, H; Tsuji, K; Nukaya, H

    1999-01-01

    Beer was subjected to five successive chromatographic procedures to isolate the gastrin release-inducing activity, guided by bioassay of the fractions in anaesthetized Donryu rats. The procedures were: (1) hydrophobic interaction chromatography (aqueous effluent with an HP20 column); (2) weak cation-exchange chromatography (1 M acetic acid eluate with a CM Sephadex C-25 column); (3) gel filtration (methanol eluate with a Sephadex LH-20 column); (4) same as (2); (5) high-performance liquid chromatography (YMC-Pack ODS-AM with 7% acetonitrile-0.01 M HCl). The active component finally isolated had a specific activity approximately 10000 times higher than that of beer. It was identified by means of mass, 1H- and 13C-nuclear magnetic resonance spectral analyses as N-methyltyramine (NMT). The dose of NMT giving maximal gastrin-releasing activity was 25 microg/kg, and the 50% effective dose was approximately 10 microg/kg on oral administration to rats. NMT was isolated and identified as a gastrin release inducer in beer. Its concentration in beer is sufficient to account for most of the activity of beer.

  12. Synthesis and evaluation of bombesin derivatives on the basis of pan-bombesin peptides labeled with indium-111, lutetium-177, and yttrium-90 for targeting bombesin receptor-expressing tumors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hanwen; Chen, Jianhua; Waldherr, Christian; Hinni, Karin; Waser, Beatrice; Reubi, Jean Claude; Maecke, Helmut R

    2004-09-15

    Bombesin receptors are overexpressed on a variety of human tumors like prostate, breast, and lung cancer. The aim of this study was to develop radiolabeled (Indium-111, Lutetium-177, and Yttrium-90) bombesin analogues with affinity to the three bombesin receptor subtypes for targeted radiotherapy. The following structures were synthesized: diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid-gamma-aminobutyric acid-[D-Tyr6, beta-Ala11, Thi13, Nle14] bombesin (6-14) (BZH1) and 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-N,N',N",N"' -tetraacetic acid-gamma-aminobutyric acid-[D-Tyr6, beta-Ala11, Thi13, Nle14] bombesin (6-14) (BZH2). [111In]-BZH1 and in particular [90Y]-BZH2 were shown to have high affinity to all three human bombesin receptor subtypes with binding affinities in the nanomolar range. In human serum metabolic cleavage was found between beta-Ala11 and His12 with an approximate half-life of 2 hours. The metabolic breakdown was inhibited by EDTA and beta-Ala11-His12 (carnosine) indicating that carnosinase is the active enzyme. Both 111In-labeled peptides were shown to internalize into gastrin-releasing peptide-receptor-positive AR4-2J and PC-3 cells with similar high rates, which were independent of the radiometal. The biodistribution studies of [111In]-BZH1 and [111In]-BZH2 ([177Lu]-BZH2) in AR4-2J tumor-bearing rats showed specific and high uptake in gastrin-releasing peptide-receptor-positive organs and in the AR4-2J tumor. A fast clearance from blood and all of the nontarget organs except the kidneys was found. These radiopeptides were composed of the first pan-bombesin radioligands, which show great promise for the early diagnosis of tumors bearing not only gastrin-releasing peptide-receptors but also the other two bombesin receptor subtypes and may be of use in targeted radiotherapy of these tumors.

  13. Calcitonin gene-related peptide receptor expression in alternatively activated monocytes/macrophages during irreversible pulpitis.

    PubMed

    Caviedes-Bucheli, Javier; Moreno, Gloria Cristina; López, María Paula; Bermeo-Noguera, Ana Milena; Pacheco-Rodríguez, Gloriana; Cuellar, Adriana; Muñoz, Hugo Roberto

    2008-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify the percentage and the mean fluorescence intensity of viable alternatively activated monocytes/macrophages (AAMø) CD163+ positive for calcitonin gene-related peptide receptor (CGRPr) within the total AAMø population in human dental pulp. Pulp tissue samples were collected from teeth with a clinical diagnosis of irreversible pulpitis (n = 13), pulps with induced inflammation (n = 13), and normal pulps (n = 13). All samples were labeled to identify positive cells for CGRPr and CD163 using a flow cytometry assay. Results demonstrated that a high percentage of total viable AAMø CD163+ expressed CGRPr on their membranes (72.12% in healthy pulp, 62.20% in irreversible pulpitis, and 58.01% in induced pulpitis). Significant differences were found between mean AAMø CD163+ fluorescence for CGRPr according to pulp condition, being greater in irreversible pulpitis. It can be concluded that AAMø CD163+ are expressed during normal and inflammatory processes, supporting the hypothesis that they could exercise an anti-inflammatory action that could be controlled by CGRP signaling after its binding.

  14. Physiological characterization of formyl peptide receptor expressing cells in the mouse vomeronasal organ

    PubMed Central

    Ackels, Tobias; von der Weid, Benoît; Rodriguez, Ivan; Spehr, Marc

    2014-01-01

    The mouse vomeronasal organ (VNO) is a chemosensory structure that detects both hetero- and conspecific social cues. Based on largely monogenic expression of either type 1 or 2 vomeronasal receptors (V1Rs/V2Rs) or members of the formyl peptide receptor (FPR) family, the vomeronasal sensory epithelium harbors at least three neuronal subpopulations. While various neurophysiological properties of both V1R- and V2R-expressing neurons have been described using genetically engineered mouse models, the basic biophysical characteristics of the more recently identified FPR-expressing vomeronasal neurons have not been studied. Here, we employ a transgenic mouse strain that coexpresses an enhanced variant of yellow fluorescent protein together with FPR-rs3 allowing to identify and analyze FPR-rs3-expressing neurons in acute VNO tissue slices. Single neuron electrophysiological recordings allow comparative characterization of the biophysical properties inherent to a prototypical member of the FPR-expressing subpopulation of VNO neurons. In this study, we provide an in-depth analysis of both passive and active membrane properties, including detailed characterization of several types of voltage-activated conductances and action potential discharge patterns, in fluorescently labeled vs. unmarked vomeronasal neurons. Our results reveal striking similarities in the basic (electro) physiological architecture of both transgene-expressing and non-expressing neurons, confirming the suitability of this genetically engineered mouse model for future studies addressing more specialized issues in vomeronasal FPR neurobiology. PMID:25484858

  15. Septal Glucagon-Like Peptide 1 Receptor Expression Determines Suppression of Cocaine-Induced Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Harasta, Anne E; Power, John M; von Jonquieres, Georg; Karl, Tim; Drucker, Daniel J; Housley, Gary D; Schneider, Miriam; Klugmann, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) and its receptor GLP-1R are a key component of the satiety signaling system, and long-acting GLP-1 analogs have been approved for the treatment of type-2 diabetes mellitus. Previous reports demonstrate that GLP-1 regulates glucose homeostasis alongside the rewarding effects of food. Both palatable food and illicit drugs activate brain reward circuitries, and pharmacological studies suggest that central nervous system GLP-1 signaling holds potential for the treatment of addiction. However, the role of endogenous GLP-1 in the attenuation of reward-oriented behavior, and the essential domains of the mesolimbic system mediating these beneficial effects, are largely unknown. We hypothesized that the central regions of highest Glp-1r gene activity are essential in mediating responses to drugs of abuse. Here, we show that Glp-1r-deficient (Glp-1r−/−) mice have greatly augmented cocaine-induced locomotor responses and enhanced conditional place preference compared with wild-type (Glp-1r+/+) controls. Employing mRNA in situ hybridization we located peak Glp-1r mRNA expression in GABAergic neurons of the dorsal lateral septum, an anatomical site with a crucial function in reward perception. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings of dorsal lateral septum neurons revealed that genetic Glp-1r ablation leads to increased excitability of these cells. Viral vector-mediated Glp-1r gene delivery to the dorsal lateral septum of Glp-1r−/− animals reduced cocaine-induced locomotion and conditional place preference to wild-type levels. This site-specific genetic complementation did not affect the anxiogenic phenotype observed in Glp-1r−/− controls. These data reveal a novel role of GLP-1R in dorsal lateral septum function driving behavioral responses to cocaine. PMID:25669605

  16. Glucagon-like-peptide-1 receptor expression in normal and diseased human thyroid and pancreas.

    PubMed

    Waser, Beatrice; Blank, Annika; Karamitopoulou, Eva; Perren, Aurel; Reubi, Jean C

    2015-03-01

    Glucagon-like-peptide-1 (GLP1) analogs may induce thyroid or pancreatic diseases in animals, raising questions about their use in diabetic patients. There is, however, controversy regarding expression of GLP1 receptors (GLP1R) in human normal and diseased thyroid and pancreas. Here, 221 human thyroid and pancreas samples were analyzed for GLP1R immunohistochemistry and compared with quantitative in vitro GLP1R autoradiography. Neither normal nor hyperplastic human thyroids containing parafollicular C cells express GLP1R with either method. Papillary thyroid cancer do not, and medullary thyroid carcinomas rarely express GLP1R. Insulin- and somatostatin-producing cells in the normal pancreas express a high density of GLP1R, whereas acinar cells express them in low amounts. Ductal epithelial cells do not express GLP1R. All benign insulinomas express high densities of GLP1R, whereas malignant insulinomas rarely express them. All ductal pancreatic carcinomas are GLP1R negative, whereas 6/20 PanIN 1/2 and 0/12 PanIN 3 express GLP1R. Therefore, normal thyroid, including normal and hyperplastic C cells, or papillary thyroid cancer are not targets for GLP1 analogs in humans. Conversely, all pancreatic insulin- and somatostatin-producing cells are physiological GLP1 targets, as well as most acini. As normal ductal epithelial cells or PanIN 3 or ductal pancreatic carcinomas do not express GLP1R, it seems unlikely that GLP1R is related to neoplastic transformation in pancreas. GLP1R-positive medullary thyroid carcinomas and all benign insulinomas are candidates for in vivo GLP1R targeting.

  17. Sex and estrogen receptor expression influence opioid peptide levels in the mouse hippocampal mossy fiber pathway.

    PubMed

    Van Kempen, Tracey A; Kahlid, Sana; Gonzalez, Andreina D; Spencer-Segal, Joanna L; Tsuda, Mumeko C; Ogawa, Sonoko; McEwen, Bruce S; Waters, Elizabeth M; Milner, Teresa A

    2013-09-27

    The opioid peptides, dynorphin (DYN) and enkephalin (L-ENK) are contained in the hippocampal mossy fiber pathway where they modulate synaptic plasticity. In rats, the levels of DYN and L-ENK immunoreactivity (-ir) are increased when estrogen levels are elevated (Torres-Reveron et al., 2008, 2009). Here, we used quantitative immunocytochemistry to examine whether opioid levels are similarly regulated in wildtype (WT) mice over the estrous cycle, and how these compared to males. Moreover, using estrogen receptor (ER) alpha and beta knock-out mice (AERKO and BERKO, respectively), the present study examined the role of ERs in rapid, membrane-initiated (6 h), or slower, nucleus-initiated (48 h) estradiol effects on mossy fiber opioid levels. Unlike rats, the levels of DYN and L-ENK-ir did not change over the estrous cycle. However, compared to males, females had higher levels of DYN-ir in CA3a and L-ENK-ir in CA3b. In WT and BERKO ovariectomized (OVX) mice, neither DYN- nor L-ENK-ir changed following 6 or 48 h estradiol benzoate (EB) administration. However, DYN-ir significantly increased 48 h after EB in the dentate gyrus (DG) and CA3b of AERKO mice only. These findings suggest that cyclic hormone levels regulate neither DYN nor L-ENK levels in the mouse mossy fiber pathway as they do in the rat. This may be due to species-specific differences in the mossy fiber pathway. However, in the mouse, DYN levels are regulated by exogenous EB in the absence of ERα possibly via an ERβ-mediated pathway requiring new gene transcription.

  18. Somatostatin receptor expression in small cell lung cancer as a prognostic marker and a target for peptide receptor radionuclide therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lapa, Constantin; Hänscheid, Heribert; Wild, Vanessa; Pelzer, Theo; Schirbel, Andreas; Werner, Rudolf A.; Droll, Sabine; Herrmann, Ken; Buck, Andreas K.; Lückerath, Katharina

    2016-01-01

    Despite initial responsiveness to both chemotherapy and radiotherapy, small cell lung cancer (SCLC) commonly relapses within months. Although neuroendocrine characteristics may be difficult to demonstrate in individual cases, a relevant expression of somatostatin receptors (SSTR) on the cell surface has been described. We aimed to evaluate the prognostic value of SSTR-expression in advanced SCLC. We further examined pre-requisites for successful peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT). 21 patients with extensive stage SCLC were enrolled. All patients underwent positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) with 68Ga-DOTATATE to select patients for SSTR-directed therapy. PET scans were visually and semi-quantitatively assessed and compared to SSTR2a and SSTR5 expression in biopsy samples. Peak standardized uptake values (SUVpeak) of tumors as well as tumor-to-liver ratios were correlated to progression-free (PFS) and overall survival (OS). In 4/21 patients all SCLC lesions were PET-positive. 6/21 subjects were rated “intermediate” with the majority of lesions positive, the remaining 11/21 patients were PET-negative. PET-positivity correlated well with histologic SSTR2a, but not with SSTR5 expression. Neither PET-positivity nor SUVpeak were predictors of PFS or OS. In 4 patients with intensive SSTR2a-receptor expression, PRRT was performed with one partial response and one stable disease, respectively. SSTR-expression as detected by 68Ga-DOTATATE-PET and/or histology is not predictive of PFS or OS in patients with advanced SCLC. However, in patients exhibiting sufficient tracer uptake, PRRT might be a treatment option given its low toxicity and the absence of effective alternatives. PMID:26936994

  19. Complex morphology of gastrin-releasing G-cells in the antral region of the mouse stomach.

    PubMed

    Frick, Claudia; Rettenberger, Amelie Therese; Lunz, Malena Luisa; Breer, Heinz

    2016-11-01

    Gastrin-releasing enteroendocrine cells (G-cells) are usually described as flask-shaped cells with a large base and a small apical pole, integrated in the epithelium lining the basal region of the antral invaginations in the stomach. By means of a transgenic mouse line in which the enhanced version of GFP is endogenously expressed under the control of a gastrin promoter, we have analyzed the spatial distribution and morphological features of G-cells. We found that G-cells were not only located at the basal region of the invagination but to a lesser extent also at the upper region. Visualization of the entire cellular morphology revealed that G-cells show complex morphologies. Basally located G-cells are roundish-shaped cells which project a prominent apical process towards the lumen and extend basal protrusions containing the hormone gastrin that were frequently found in close proximity to blood vessels and occasionally in the vicinity of nerve fibers. Inspection of G-cells in the upper region of antral invaginations disclosed a novel population of G-cells. These cells have a spindle-like contour and long apical and basal processes which extend vertically along the antral invagination, parallel to the lumen. This G-cell population seems to be in contact with a network of nerve fibers. While the functional role of these untypical G-cells is still elusive, the results of this study provide some useful indications to possible roles of these G-cells.

  20. A chronic high fat diet alters the homologous and heterologous control of appetite regulating peptide receptor expression.

    PubMed

    Kentish, Stephen J; Wittert, Gary A; Blackshaw, L Ashley; Page, Amanda J

    2013-08-01

    Leptin, ghrelin and neuropeptide W (NPW) modulate vagal afferent activity, which may underlie their appetite regulatory actions. High fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity induces changes in the plasma levels of these peptides and alters the expression of receptors on vagal afferents. We investigated homologous and heterologous receptor regulation by leptin, ghrelin and NPW. Mice were fed (12 weeks) a standard laboratory diet (SLD) or HFD. Nodose ganglia were cultured overnight in the presence or absence of each peptide. Leptin (LepR), ghrelin (GHS-R), NPW (GPR7) and cholecystokinin type-1 (CCK1R) receptor mRNA, and the plasma leptin, ghrelin and NPW levels were measured. SLD: leptin reduced LepR, GPR7, increased GHS-R and CCK1R mRNA; ghrelin increased LepR, GPR7, CCK1R, and decreased GHS-R. HFD: leptin decreased GHS-R and GPR7, ghrelin increased GHS-R and GPR7. NPW decreased all receptors except GPR7 which increased with HFD. Plasma leptin was higher and NPW lower in HFD. Thus, HFD-induced obesity disrupts inter-regulation of appetite regulatory receptors in vagal afferents.

  1. Glugacon-like peptide-2: broad receptor expression, limited therapeutic effect on intestinal inflammation and novel role in liver regeneration.

    PubMed

    El-Jamal, Noura; Erdual, Edmone; Neunlist, Michel; Koriche, Dine; Dubuquoy, Caroline; Maggiotto, Francois; Chevalier, Julien; Berrebi, Dominique; Dubuquoy, Laurent; Boulanger, Eric; Cortot, Antoine; Desreumaux, Pierre

    2014-08-01

    The glucagon-like peptide 2 (GLP-2) is an intestinotrophic hormone with growth promoting and anti-inflammatory actions. However, the full biological functions of GLP-2 and the localization of its receptor (GLP-2R) remain controversial. Among cell lines tested, the expression of GLP-2R transcript was detected in human colonic myofibroblasts (CCD-18Co) and in primary culture of rat enteric nervous system but not in intestinal epithelial cell lines, lymphocytes, monocytes, or endothelial cells. Surprisingly, GLP-2R was expressed in murine (GLUTag), but not human (NCI-H716) enteroendocrine cells. The screening of GLP-2R mRNA in mice organs revealed an increasing gradient of GLP-2R toward the distal gut. An unexpected expression was detected in the mesenteric fat, mesenteric lymph nodes, bladder, spleen, and liver, particularly in hepatocytes. In two mice models of trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)- and dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis, the colonic expression of GLP-2R mRNA was decreased by 60% compared with control mice. Also, GLP-2R mRNA was significantly downregulated in intestinal tissues of inflammatory bowel disease patients. Therapeutically, GLP-2 showed a weak restorative effect on intestinal inflammation during TNBS-induced colitis as assessed by macroscopic score and inflammatory markers. Finally, GLP-2 treatment accelerated mouse liver regeneration following partial hepatectomy as assessed by histological and molecular analyses. In conclusion, the limited therapeutic effect of GLP-2 on colonic inflammation dampens its utility in the management of severe inflammatory intestinal disorders. However, the role of GLP-2 in liver regeneration is a novelty that might introduce GLP-2 into the management of liver diseases and emphasizes on the importance of elucidating other extraintestinal functions of GLP-2.

  2. Oleic acid and glucose regulate glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor expression in a rat pancreatic ductal cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Leshuai W.; McMahon Tobin, Grainne A.; Rouse, Rodney L.

    2012-10-15

    The glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor (GLP1R) plays a critical role in glucose metabolism and has become an important target for a growing class of drugs designed to treat type 2 diabetes. In vitro studies were designed to investigate the effect of the GLP1R agonist, exenatide (Ex4), in “on-target” RIN-5mF (islet) cells as well as in “off-target” AR42J (acinar) and DSL-6A/C1 (ductal) cells in a diabetic environment. Ex4 increased islet cell proliferation but did not affect acinar cells or ductal cells at relevant concentrations. A high caloric, high fat diet is a risk factor for impaired glucose tolerance and type-2 diabetes. An in vitro Oleic acid (OA) model was used to investigate the effect of Ex4 in a high calorie, high fat environment. At 0.1 and 0.4 mM, OA mildly decreased the proliferation of all pancreatic cell types. Ex4 did not potentiate the inhibitory effect of OA on cell proliferation. Akt phosphorylation in response to Ex4 was diminished in OA-treated ductal cells. GLP1R protein detected by western blot was time and concentration dependently decreased after glucose stimulation in OA-treated ductal cells. In ductal cells, OA treatment altered the intracellular localization of GLP1R and its co-localization with early endosome and recycling endosomes. Chloroquine (lysosomal inhibitor), N-acetyl-L-cysteine (reactive oxygen species scavenger) and wortmannin (a phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase inhibitor), fully or partially, rescued GLP1R protein in OA-pretreated, glucose-stimulated ductal cells. The impact of altered regulation on phenotype/function is presently unknown. However, these data suggest that GLP1R regulation in ductal cells can be altered by a high fat, high calorie environment. -- Highlights: ► Exenatide did not inhibit islet, acinar or ductal cell proliferation. ► GLP1R protein decreased after glucose stimulation in oleic acid-treated ductal cells. ► Oleic acid treatment altered localization of GLP1R with early and recycling

  3. Coupling of inositol phospholipid hydrolysis to peptide hormone receptors expressed from adrenal and pituitary mRNA in Xenopus laevis oocytes

    SciTech Connect

    McIntosh, R.P.; Catt, K.J.

    1987-12-01

    The expression of several neurotransmitter and drug receptors from injected exogenous mRNA in Xenopus laevis oocytes has been demonstrated by electrophysiological measurements of ion channel activation. The expression of specific receptors for peptide hormones in such a translation system would facilitate studies on the structure and regulation of cell-surface receptors as well as their coupling to membrane transduction mechanisms. The expression of receptors for calcium-mobilizing hormones in Xenopus oocytes was sought by analysis of phospholipid turnover in hormone-stimulated oocytes. For this purpose, Xenopus oocytes were injected with mRNA extracted from bovine adrenal and pituitary glands and incubated with myo-(/sup 3/H)inositol to label plasma-membrane phosphatidylinositol phosphates. The expression of functionally active receptors for angiotensin II (AII) and thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) was demonstrated by the stimulation of (/sup 3/H)inositol phosphate production by AII and TRH in the mRNA-injected, (/sup 3/H)inositol-prelabeled oocytes. The ability of AII and TRH to act by way of newly synthesized receptors from mammalian endocrine tissues to stimulate phosphatidylinositol polyphosphate hydrolysis in Xenopus oocytes suggests a generalized and conserved mechanism of receptor coupling to the transduction mechanism responsible for activation of phospholipase C in the plasma membrane.

  4. Comparison of infarct-derived and control ovine cardiac myofibroblasts in culture: response to cytokines and natriuretic peptide receptor expression profiles.

    PubMed

    Jarvis, Martin D; Rademaker, Miriam T; Ellmers, Leigh J; Currie, Margaret J; McKenzie, Judith L; Palmer, Barry R; Frampton, Christopher M; Richards, A Mark; Cameron, Vicky A

    2006-10-01

    This study investigated whether gene expression profiles of myofibroblasts derived from infarcted myocardium differ from normal cardiac fibroblasts. We compared the expression of cytoskeletal proteins in cultured ovine cardiac fibroblasts derived from infarcted (ID) and noninfarcted ovine myocardium (NID) and the levels of expression of the natriuretic peptide receptors (NPR)-A and NPR-B in response to treatment with transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta1 and/or platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF). Transformation of cultured cardiac fibroblasts to myofibroblasts, as indicated by alpha-smooth muscle actin and vimentin expression, was independent of the presence of TGF-beta1, PDGF, or cell origin. ID fibroblasts had higher basal levels than NID fibroblasts of NPR-A (ID: 58.0 +/- 32.2 arbitrary density units, NID: undetectable), NPR-B (ID: 780 +/- 155, NID: 330 +/- 38 arbitrary density units) and collagen I (ID: 17.2 +/- 0.5, NID: 10.5 +/- 1.7 pg mRNA/mug total RNA, P < 0.05) but lower levels of alpha-SMa expression (ID: 50.2 +/- 7.9, NID: 76.9 +/- 3.2 fluorescence units, P < 0.05). NPR-A mRNA in ID fibroblasts showed a rapid fourfold increase in response to TGF-beta1 and/or PDGF at 4 and 2 h, respectively, followed by a profound decline; in NID cells, NPR-A mRNA was undetectable. In ID fibroblasts, cytokines reduced NPR-B mRNA below control levels; in NID fibroblasts, TGF-beta1 and PDGF elicited prompt increments in expression: a fourfold increase with TGF-beta1 at 8 h and a twofold increase with PDGF at 4 h (P < 0.05). In summary, transformation of cardiac fibroblasts to myofibroblasts in culture is independent of cytokine treatment. Moreover, whether the cultured cardiac fibroblasts are from infarct tissue is a major determinant of NPR expression levels and cytokine responses, even after four to five passages.

  5. Sensitivity and Specificity of Soluble Triggering Receptor Expressed on Myeloid Cells-1, Midregional Proatrial Natriuretic Peptide and Midregional Proadrenomedullin for Distinguishing Etiology and to Assess Severity in Community-Acquired Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Esposito, Susanna; Di Gangi, Maria; Cardinale, Fabio; Baraldi, Eugenio; Corsini, Ilaria; Da Dalt, Liviana; Tovo, Pier Angelo; Correra, Antonio; Villani, Alberto; Sacco, Oliviero; Tenero, Laura; Dones, Piera; Gambino, Monia; Zampiero, Alberto; Principi, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    Study Design This study aimed to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of soluble triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-1 (sTREM-1), midregional proatrial natriuretic peptide (MR-proANP) and midregional proadrenomedullin (MR-proADM) to distinguish bacterial from viral community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) and to identify severe cases in children hospitalized for radiologically confirmed CAP. Index test results were compared with those derived from routine diagnostic tests, i.e., white blood cell (WBC) counts, neutrophil percentages, and serum C-reactive protein (CRP) and procalcitonin (PCT) levels. Methods This prospective, multicenter study was carried out in the most important children’s hospitals (n = 11) in Italy and 433 otherwise healthy children hospitalized for radiologically confirmed CAP were enrolled. Among cases for whom etiology could be determined, CAP was ascribed to bacteria in 235 (54.3%) children and to one or more viruses in 111 (25.6%) children. A total of 312 (72.2%) children had severe disease. Results CRP and PCT had the best performances for both bacterial and viral CAP identification. The cut-off values with the highest combined sensitivity and specificity for the identification of bacterial and viral infections using CRP were ≥7.98 mg/L and ≤7.5 mg/L, respectively. When PCT was considered, the cut-off values with the highest combined sensitivity and specificity were ≥0.188 ng/mL for bacterial CAP and ≤0.07 ng/mL for viral CAP. For the identification of severe cases, the best results were obtained with evaluations of PCT and MR-proANP. However, in both cases, the biomarker cut-off with the highest combined sensitivity and specificity (≥0.093 ng/mL for PCT and ≥33.8 pmol/L for proANP) had a relatively good sensitivity (higher than 70%) but a limited specificity (of approximately 55%). Conclusions This study indicates that in children with CAP, sTREM-1, MR-proANP, and MR-proADM blood levels have poor abilities to differentiate

  6. The human vasoactive intestinal peptide/pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating peptide receptor 1 (VPAC1) promoter: characterization and role in receptor expression during enterocytic differentiation of the colon cancer cell line Caco-2Cl.20.

    PubMed Central

    Couvineau, A; Maoret, J J; Rouyer-Fessard, C; Carrero, I; Laburthe, M

    2000-01-01

    The basic organization of the human vasoactive intestinal peptide/pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating peptide receptor (VPAC) 1 promoter was investigated after cloning the 5'-flanking region (1.4 kb) of the VPAC1 gene from a human genomic library. Subsequent functional analysis of various deletions of the 5'-flanking sequence, subcloned upstream of a luciferase reporter gene, was carried out in HT-29 cells. The minimal promoter region identified encompasses the -205/+76 sequence and contains a crucial CCAAT box (-182/-178) and a GC-rich sequence. Moreover a region (-1348/-933) containing a silencer element was identified. We previously showed that the expression of the VPAC1 receptor binding site is strictly dependent upon the enterocytic differentiation of human colon cancer Caco-2 cells [Laburthe, Rousset, Rouyer-Fessard, Couvineau, Chantret, Chevalier and Zweibaum (1987) J. Biol. Chem. 262, 10180-10184]. In the present study we show that VPAC1 mRNA increases dramatically when Caco-2Cl.20 cells differentiate, as measured by RNase protection assays and reverse transcriptase-PCR. A single transcript species of 3 kb is detected in differentiated cells by Northern-blot analysis. Accumulation of VPAC1 receptor mRNA is due to a 5-fold increase of transcription rate (run-on assay) without a change in mRNA half-life (9 h). Stable transfections of various constructs in Caco-2Cl.20 cells and subsequent analysis of reporter gene expression, during the enterocytic differentiation process over 25 days of culture, further indicated that the -254/+76 5'-flanking sequence is endowed with the regulatory element(s) necessary for transcriptional regulation of VPAC1 during differentiation. Altogether, these observations provide the first characterization of the basic organization of the human VPAC1 gene promoter and unravel the crucial role of a short promoter sequence in the strict transcriptional control of VPAC1 expression during differentiation of human colon cancer Caco-2

  7. In Vitro Assessment of a Peptide Nucleic Acid (PNA) - Peptide Conjugate Labeled With an Auger-Emitting Radionuclide for Prostate Cell Killing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-02-01

    synthesis of a peptide nucleic acid (PNA) that has an Auger-emitter (1-125) incorporated. By design the PNA will bind with mRNA and DNA associated with...bind with cell surface gastrin -releasing peptide receptors and be internalized (3). Binding with mRNA and nuclear DNA specific to the insulin-like...route proposed to prepare 10 is shown in Figure 1 (compounds 1-10). This synthesis began with the preparation of the base-reactive intermediate 5

  8. Feasibility of imaging of epidermal growth factor receptor expression with ZEGFR:2377 affibody molecule labeled with 99mTc using a peptide-based cysteine-containing chelator

    PubMed Central

    Andersson, Ken G.; Oroujeni, Maryam; Garousi, Javad; Mitran, Bogdan; Ståhl, Stefan; Orlova, Anna; Löfblom, John; Tolmachev, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is overexpressed in a number of malignant tumors and is a molecular target for several specific anticancer antibodies and tyrosine kinase inhibitors. The overexpression of EGFR is a predictive biomarker for response to several therapy regimens. Radionuclide molecular imaging might enable detection of EGFR overexpression by a non-invasive procedure and could be used repeatedly. Affibody molecules are engineered scaffold proteins, which could be selected to have a high affinity and selectivity to predetermined targets. The anti-EGFR ZEGFR:2377 affibody molecule is a potential imaging probe for EGFR detection. The use of the generator-produced radionuclide 99mTc should facilitate clinical translation of an imaging probe due to its low price, availability and favorable dosimetry of the radionuclide. In the present study, we evaluated feasibility of ZEGFR:2377 labeling with 99mTc using a peptide-based cysteine-containing chelator expressed at the C-terminus of ZEGFR:2377. The label was stable in vitro under cysteine challenge. In addition, 99mTc-ZEGFR:2377 was capable of specific binding to EGFR-expressing cells with high affinity (274 pM). Studies in BALB/C nu/nu mice bearing A431 xenografts demonstrated that 99mTc-ZEGFR:2377 accumulates in tumors in an EGFR-specific manner. The tumor uptake values were 3.6±1 and 2.5±0.4% ID/g at 3 and 24 h after injection, respectively. The corresponding tumor-to-blood ratios were 1.8±0.4 and 8±3. The xenografts were clearly visualized at both time-points. This study demonstrated the potential of 99mTc-labeled ZEGFR:2377 for imaging of EGFR in vivo. PMID:27748899

  9. Capsaicin treatment differentially affects feeding suppression by bombesin-like peptides.

    PubMed

    Ladenheim, Ellen E; Knipp, Susan

    2007-05-16

    Peripheral administration of bombesin (BN) and the related mammalian peptides, gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) and neuromedin B (NMB), suppress food intake in rats. To examine whether all BN-like peptides utilize the same neural pathways to reduce feeding, rats were treated on postnatal day 2 with the injection vehicle or capsaicin, a neurotoxin that damages a subset of visceral afferent fibers. When rats reached adulthood, we compared the ability of a dose range of systemically administered BN, GRP18-27 and NMB to reduce intake of a 0.5 kcal/ml glucose solution in a short-term feeding test. Our results demonstrate that capsaicin treatment abolished or attenuated the suppression of glucose intake produced by BN and NMB but had no effect on the ability of GRP to reduce feeding. These results suggest that different neural substrates underlie the anorexic effects of peripherally administered BN-like peptides.

  10. Receptors for GRP/bombesin-like peptides in the rat forebrain

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, S.S.; Moody, T.W.

    1985-01-01

    Binding sites in the rat forebrain were characterized using ( SVI-Tyr4)bombesin as a receptor probe. Pharmacology experiments indicate that gastrin releasing peptide (GRP) and the GRP fragments GRP as well as Ac-GRP inhibited radiolabeled (Tyr4)bombesin binding with high affinity. Biochemistry experiments indicated that heat, N-ethyl maleimide or trypsin greatly reduced radiolabeled (Tyr4)bombesin binding. Also, autoradiographic studies indicated that highest grain densities were present in the stria terminalis, periventricular and suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus, dorsomedial and rhomboid thalamus, dentate gyrus, hippocampus and medial amygdaloid nucleus. The data suggest that CNS protein receptors, which are discretely distributed in the rat forebrain, may mediate the action of endogenous GRP/bombesin-like peptides.

  11. Hormone Receptor Expression in Human Fascial Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Fede, C.; Albertin, G.; Petrelli, L.; Sfriso, M.M.; Biz, C.; De Caro, R.

    2016-01-01

    Many epidemiologic, clinical, and experimental findings point to sex differences in myofascial pain in view of the fact that adult women tend to have more myofascial problems with respect to men. It is possible that one of the stimuli to sensitization of fascial nociceptors could come from hormonal factors such as estrogen and relaxin, that are involved in extracellular matrix and collagen remodeling and thus contribute to functions of myofascial tissue. Immunohistochemical and molecular investigations (real-time PCR analysis) of relaxin receptor 1 (RXFP1) and estrogen receptor-alpha (ERα) localization were carried out on samples of human fascia collected from 8 volunteers patients during orthopedic surgery (all females, between 42 and 70 yrs, divided into pre- and post-menopausal groups), and in fibroblasts isolated from deep fascia, to examine both protein and RNA expression levels. We can assume that the two sex hormone receptors analyzed are expressed in all the human fascial districts examined and in fascial fibroblasts culture cells, to a lesser degree in the post-menopausal with respect to the pre-menopausal women. Hormone receptor expression was concentrated in the fibroblasts, and RXFP1 was also evident in blood vessels and nerves. Our results are the first demonstrating that the fibroblasts located within different districts of the muscular fasciae express sex hormone receptors and can help to explain the link between hormonal factors and myofascial pain. It is known, in fact, that estrogen and relaxin play a key role in extracellular matrix remodeling by inhibiting fibrosis and inflammatory activities, both important factors affecting fascial stiffness and sensitization of fascial nociceptors. PMID:28076930

  12. Acute gastric pH changes alter intraluminal but not plasma peptide levels.

    PubMed

    Mueller, C R; Ure, T; O'Dorisio, T M; Barrie, R J; Woltering, E A

    1991-12-01

    Gastric acidity is influenced by systemic and local peptide effects. Previous work by others has shown that intraluminally secreted peptides may have a role in local control of gastric acidity; however, the response of these peptides to acute changes in gastric pH is unknown. To determine the effects of acute changes in pH on systemic and intraluminal peptide levels, 14 normal volunteers underwent placement of a nasogastric tube after an overnight fast. Blood and gastric fluid were analyzed on a control day, 2 hours after completion of 24 hours of aluminum-magnesium antacid therapy and after 24 hours of H2 blockade. Plasma and acid-alcohol-extracted gastric peptide levels were measured with specific radioimmunoassays. Specimens were subdivided into two groups: 28 gastric fluid specimens with a pH less than 4 and 10 specimens with a pH greater than 4. In the patients with a pH greater than 4, the luminal peptides, motilin, neurotensin, pancreatic polypeptide, somatostatin, substance P, and gastrin, were decreased by 50% to 90% and gastrin-releasing peptide was decreased by 36% compared with specimens with a pH less than 4. Conversely, intraluminal vasoactive intestinal polypeptide and calcitonin levels were elevated by 60% and 27%, respectively, in the samples with a pH greater than 4. Intraluminal peptide concentrations are responsive to changes in intragastric pH; however, this response was not seen in plasma peptide levels.

  13. Large-scale identification of endogenous secretory peptides using electron transfer dissociation mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Kazuki; Osaki, Tsukasa; Minamino, Naoto

    2013-03-01

    Mass spectrometry-based unbiased analysis of the full complement of secretory peptides is expected to facilitate the identification of unknown biologically active peptides. However, tandem MS sequencing of endogenous peptides in their native form has proven difficult because they show size heterogeneity and contain multiple internal basic residues, the characteristics not found in peptide fragments produced by in vitro digestion. Endogenous peptides remain largely unexplored by electron transfer dissociation (ETD), despite its widespread use in bottom-up proteomics. We used ETD, in comparison to collision induced dissociation (CID), to identify endogenous peptides derived from secretory granules of a human endocrine cell line. For mass accuracy, both MS and tandem MS were analyzed on an Orbitrap. CID and ETD, performed in different LC-MS runs, resulted in the identification of 795 and 569 unique peptides (ranging from 1000 to 15000 Da), respectively, with an overlap of 397. Peptides larger than 3000 Da accounted for 54% in CID and 46% in ETD identifications. Although numerically outperformed by CID, ETD provided more extensive fragmentation, leading to the identification of peptides that are not reached by CID. This advantage was demonstrated in identifying a new antimicrobial peptide from neurosecretory protein VGF (non-acronymic), VGF[554-577]-NH2, or in differentiating nearly isobaric peptides (mass difference less than 2 ppm) that arise from alternatively spliced exons of the gastrin-releasing peptide gene. CID and ETD complemented each other to add to our knowledge of the proteolytic processing sites of proteins implicated in the regulated secretory pathway. An advantage of the use of both fragmentation methods was also noted in localization of phosphorylation sites. These findings point to the utility of ETD mass spectrometry in the global study of endogenous peptides, or peptidomics.

  14. Large-scale Identification of Endogenous Secretory Peptides Using Electron Transfer Dissociation Mass Spectrometry*

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Kazuki; Osaki, Tsukasa; Minamino, Naoto

    2013-01-01

    Mass spectrometry-based unbiased analysis of the full complement of secretory peptides is expected to facilitate the identification of unknown biologically active peptides. However, tandem MS sequencing of endogenous peptides in their native form has proven difficult because they show size heterogeneity and contain multiple internal basic residues, the characteristics not found in peptide fragments produced by in vitro digestion. Endogenous peptides remain largely unexplored by electron transfer dissociation (ETD), despite its widespread use in bottom-up proteomics. We used ETD, in comparison to collision induced dissociation (CID), to identify endogenous peptides derived from secretory granules of a human endocrine cell line. For mass accuracy, both MS and tandem MS were analyzed on an Orbitrap. CID and ETD, performed in different LC-MS runs, resulted in the identification of 795 and 569 unique peptides (ranging from 1000 to 15000 Da), respectively, with an overlap of 397. Peptides larger than 3000 Da accounted for 54% in CID and 46% in ETD identifications. Although numerically outperformed by CID, ETD provided more extensive fragmentation, leading to the identification of peptides that are not reached by CID. This advantage was demonstrated in identifying a new antimicrobial peptide from neurosecretory protein VGF (non-acronymic), VGF[554–577]-NH2, or in differentiating nearly isobaric peptides (mass difference less than 2 ppm) that arise from alternatively spliced exons of the gastrin-releasing peptide gene. CID and ETD complemented each other to add to our knowledge of the proteolytic processing sites of proteins implicated in the regulated secretory pathway. An advantage of the use of both fragmentation methods was also noted in localization of phosphorylation sites. These findings point to the utility of ETD mass spectrometry in the global study of endogenous peptides, or peptidomics. PMID:23250050

  15. Functional Erythropoietin Receptors Expressed by Human Prostate Cancer Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-10-01

    carcinoma cell line (PC-3). Invest Urol, 1979. 17(1): p. 16-23. 11. Yoshimura, A., A.D. D’Andrea, and H.F. Lodish , Friend spleen focus-forming virus...receptor expression in human prostate cancer. Mod Pathol, 2004. 13. Socolovsky, M., A.E. Fallon, S. Wang, C. Brugnara, and H.F. Lodish , Fetal anemia and...Socolovsky, M., H. Nam, M.D. Fleming, V.H. Haase, C. Brugnara, and H.F. Lodish , Ineffective erythropoiesis in Stat5a(-/-)5b(-/-) mice due to decreased

  16. Myoinhibiting peptides are the ancestral ligands of the promiscuous Drosophila sex peptide receptor

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Male insects change behaviors of female partners by co-transferring accessory gland proteins (Acps) like sex peptide (SP), with their sperm. The Drosophila sex peptide receptor (SPR) is a G protein-coupled receptor expressed in the female’s nervous system and genital tract. While most Acps show a fa...

  17. Kaitocephalin Antagonism of Glutamate Receptors Expressed in Xenopus Oocytes

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Kaitocephalin is the first discovered natural toxin with protective properties against excitotoxic death of cultured neurons induced by N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) or α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA)/kainic acid (kainate, KA) receptors. Nevertheless, the effects of kaitocephalin on the function of these receptors were unknown. In this work, we report some pharmacological properties of synthetic (−)-kaitocephalin on rat brain glutamate receptors expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes and on the homomeric AMPA-type GluR3 and KA-type GluR6 receptors. Kaitocephalin was found to be a more potent antagonist of NMDA receptors (IC50 = 75 ± 9 nM) than of AMPA receptors from cerebral cortex (IC50 = 242 ± 37 nM) and from homomeric GluR3 subunits (IC50 = 502 ± 55 nM). Moreover, kaitocephalin is a weak antagonist of the KA-type receptor GluR6 (IC50 ∼ 100 μM) and of metabotropic (IC50 > 100 μM) glutamate receptors expressed by rat brain mRNA. PMID:20436943

  18. Imaging site-specific peptide-targeting in tumor tissues using spectral-domain optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Lixin; Zhang, Miao; Yu, Ping

    2011-03-01

    We report imaging studies on site-specific peptide-targeting in tumor tissues using newly developed optical peptide probes and spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). The system used two broadband superluminescent light emission diodes with different central wavelengths. An electro-optic modulation in the reference beam was used to get full-range deep imaging inside tumor tissues. The optical probes were based on Bombesin (BBN) that is a fourteen amino acid peptide. BBN has high binding affinity to gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) receptors overexpressed on several human cancer cell lines. Fluorescence BBN probes were developed by conjugating the last eight residues of BBN, -Q-W-A-V-G-H-L-M-(NH2), with Alexa Flour 680 or Alexa Fluor 750 dye molecules via amino acid linker -G-G-G. The SD-OCT imaging can identify normal tissue and tumor tissue through the difference in scattering coefficient, and trace the BBN conjugate probes through the absorption of the dye molecules using the twowavelength algorithm. We performed the specific uptake and receptor-blocking experiments of the optical BBN probes in severely compromised immunodeficient mouse model bearing human PC-3 prostate tumor xenografts. Tumor and muscle tissues were collected and used for SD-OCT imaging. The SD-OCT images showed fluorescence traces of the BBN probes in the peptide-targeted tumor tissues. Our results demonstrated that SD-OCT is a potential tool for preclinical and clinical early cancer detection.

  19. Motoneuron glutamatergic receptor expression following recovery from cervical spinal hemisection.

    PubMed

    Gransee, Heather M; Gonzalez Porras, Maria A; Zhan, Wen-Zhi; Sieck, Gary C; Mantilla, Carlos B

    2017-04-01

    Cervical spinal hemisection at C2 (SH) removes premotor drive to phrenic motoneurons located in segments C3-C5 in rats. Spontaneous recovery of ipsilateral diaphragm muscle activity is associated with increased phrenic motoneuron expression of glutamatergic N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors and decreased expression of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-proprionic acid (AMPA) receptors. Glutamatergic receptor expression is regulated by tropomyosin-related kinase receptor subtype B (TrkB) signaling in various neuronal systems, and increased TrkB receptor expression in phrenic motoneurons enhances recovery post-SH. Accordingly, we hypothesize that recovery of ipsilateral diaphragm muscle activity post-SH, whether spontaneous or enhanced by adenoassociated virus (AAV)-mediated upregulation of TrkB receptor expression, is associated with increased expression of glutamatergic NMDA receptors in phrenic motoneurons. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent diaphragm electromyography electrode implantation and SH surgery. Rats were injected intrapleurally with AAV expressing TrkB or GFP 3 weeks before SH. At 14 days post-SH, the proportion of animals displaying recovery of ipsilateral diaphragm activity increased in AAV-TrkB-treated (9/9) compared with untreated (3/5) or AAV-GFP-treated (4/10; P < 0.027) animals. Phrenic motoneuron NMDA NR1 subunit mRNA expression was approximately fourfold greater in AAV-TrkB- vs. AAV-GFP-treated SH animals (P < 0.004) and in animals displaying recovery vs. those not recovering (P < 0.005). Phrenic motoneuron AMPA glutamate receptor 2 (GluR2) subunit mRNA expression decreased after SH, and, albeit increased in animals displaying recovery vs. those not recovering, levels remained lower than control. We conclude that increased phrenic motoneuron expression of glutamatergic NMDA receptors is associated with spontaneous recovery after SH and enhanced recovery after AAV-TrkB treatment. J. Comp. Neurol. 525:1192-1205, 2017.

  20. GABAA receptor-expressing neurons promote consumption in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Samantha K.

    2017-01-01

    Feeding decisions are highly plastic and bidirectionally regulated by neurons that either promote or inhibit feeding. In Drosophila melanogaster, recent studies have identified four GABAergic interneurons that act as critical brakes to prevent incessant feeding. These GABAergic neurons may inhibit target neurons that drive consumption. Here, we tested this hypothesis by examining GABA receptors and neurons that promote consumption. We find that Resistance to dieldrin (RDL), a GABAA type receptor, is required for proper control of ingestion. Knockdown of Rdl in a subset of neurons causes overconsumption of tastants. Acute activation of these neurons is sufficient to drive consumption of appetitive substances and non-appetitive substances and acute silencing of these neurons decreases consumption. Taken together, these studies identify GABAA receptor-expressing neurons that promote Drosophila ingestive behavior and provide insight into feeding regulation. PMID:28362856

  1. Dcc haploinsufficiency regulates dopamine receptor expression across postnatal lifespan.

    PubMed

    Pokinko, Matthew; Grant, Alanna; Shahabi, Florence; Dumont, Yvan; Manitt, Colleen; Flores, Cecilia

    2017-03-27

    Adolescence is a period during which the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) undergoes significant remodeling. The netrin-1 receptor, deleted in colorectal cancer (DCC), controls the extent and organization of mPFC dopamine connectivity during adolescence and in turn directs mPFC functional and structural maturation. Dcc haploinsufficiency leads to increased mPFC dopamine input, which causes improved cognitive processing and resilience to behavioral effects of stimulant drugs of abuse. Here we examine the effects of Dcc haploinsufficiency on the dynamic expression of dopamine receptors in forebrain targets of C57BL6 mice. We conducted quantitative receptor autoradiography experiments with [(3)H]SCH-23390 or [(3)H]raclopride to characterize D1 and D2 receptor expression in mPFC and striatal regions in male Dcc haploinsufficient and wild-type mice. We generated autoradiograms at early adolescence (PND21±1), mid-adolescence (PND35±2), and adulthood (PND75±15). C57BL6 mice exhibit overexpression and pruning of D1, but not D2, receptors in striatal regions, and a lack of dopamine receptor pruning in the mPFC. We observed age- and region-specific differences in D1 and D2 receptor density between Dcc haploinsufficient and wild-type mice. Notably, neither group shows the typical pattern of mPFC dopamine receptor pruning in adolescence, but adult haploinsufficient mice show increased D2 receptor density in the mPFC. These results show that DCC receptors contribute to the dynamic refinement of D1 and D2 receptor expression in striatal regions across adolescence. The age-dependent expression of dopamine receptor in C57BL6 mice shows marked differences from previous characterizations in rats.

  2. Melanocortin MC₄ receptor expression sites and local function.

    PubMed

    Siljee-Wong, Jacqueline E

    2011-06-11

    The melanocortin MC(4) receptor plays an important role in energy metabolism, but also affects blood pressure, heart rate and erectile function. Localization of the receptors that fulfill these distinct roles is only partially known. Mapping of the melanocortin MC(4) receptor has been stymied by the absence of a functional antibody. Several groups have examined mRNA expression of the melanocortin MC(4) receptor in the rodent brain and transgenic approaches have also been utilized to visualize melanocortin MC(4) receptor expression sites within the brain. Ligand expression and binding studies have provided additional information on the areas of the brain where this elusive receptor is functionally expressed. Finally, microinjection of melanocortin MC(4) receptor ligands in specific nuclei has further served to elucidate the function of melanocortin MC(4) receptors in these nuclei. These combined approaches have helped link the anatomy and function of this receptor, such as the role of paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus melanocortin MC(4) receptor in the regulation of food intake. Intriguingly, however, numerous expression-sites have been identified that have not been linked to a specific receptor function such as those along the optic tract and olfactory tubercle. Further research is needed to clarify the function of the melanocortin MC(4) receptor at these sites.

  3. ECL-cell histamine mobilization in conscious rats: effects of locally applied regulatory peptides, candidate neurotransmitters and inflammatory mediators.

    PubMed

    Norlén, P; Bernsand, M; Konagaya, T; Håkanson, R

    2001-12-01

    1. The ECL cells control gastric acid secretion by mobilizing histamine in response to circulating gastrin. In addition, the ECL cells are thought to operate under nervous control and to be influenced by local inflammatory processes. 2. The purpose of the present study was to monitor histamine mobilization from ECL cells in conscious rats in response to locally applied regulatory peptides, candidate neurotransmitters and inflammatory mediators. 3. Microdialysis probes were implanted in the submucosa of the acid-producing part of the rat stomach. Three days later, the agents to be tested were administered via the microdialysis probe and their effects on basal (48 h fast) and stimulated (intravenous infusion of gastrin-17, 3 nmol kg(-1) h(-1)) mobilization of ECL-cell histamine was monitored by continuous measurement of histamine in the perfusate (radioimmunoassay). 4. Locally administered gastrin-17 and sulfated cholecystokinin-8 mobilized histamine as did pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating peptide-27, vasoactive intestinal peptide, peptide YY, met-enkephalin, endothelin and noradrenaline, adrenaline and isoprenaline. 5. While gastrin, sulfated-cholecystokinin-8, met-enkephalin and isoprenaline induced a sustained elevation of the submucosal histamine concentration, endothelin, peptide YY, pituitary adenylate cyclase activating peptide, vasoactive intestinal peptide, noradrenaline and adrenaline induced a transient elevation. 6. Calcitonin gene-related peptide, galanin, somatostatin and the prostanoid misoprostol inhibited gastrin-stimulated histamine mobilization. 7. The gut hormones neurotensin and secretin and the neuropeptides gastrin-releasing peptide, neuropeptide Y and substance P failed to affect ECL-cell histamine mobilization, while motilin and neuromedin U-25 had weak stimulatory effects. Also acetylcholine, carbachol, serotonin and the amino acid neurotransmitters aspartate, gamma-aminobutyric acid, glutamate and glycine were inactive or weakly

  4. Distribution of cellular HSV-1 receptor expression in human brain.

    PubMed

    Lathe, Richard; Haas, Juergen G

    2016-12-15

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) is a neurotropic virus linked to a range of acute and chronic neurological disorders affecting distinct regions of the brain. Unusually, HSV-1 entry into cells requires the interaction of viral proteins glycoprotein D (gD) and glycoprotein B (gB) with distinct cellular receptor proteins. Several different gD and gB receptors have been identified, including TNFRSF14/HVEM and PVRL1/nectin 1 as gD receptors and PILRA, MAG, and MYH9 as gB receptors. We investigated the expression of these receptor molecules in different areas of the adult and developing human brain using online transcriptome databases. Whereas all HSV-1 receptors showed distinct expression patterns in different brain areas, the Allan Brain Atlas (ABA) reported increased expression of both gD and gB receptors in the hippocampus. Specifically, for PVRL1, TNFRFS14, and MYH9, the differential z scores for hippocampal expression, a measure of relative levels of increased expression, rose to 2.9, 2.9, and 2.5, respectively, comparable to the z score for the archetypical hippocampus-enriched mineralocorticoid receptor (NR3C2, z = 3.1). These data were confirmed at the Human Brain Transcriptome (HBT) database, but HBT data indicate that MAG expression is also enriched in hippocampus. The HBT database allowed the developmental pattern of expression to be investigated; we report that all HSV1 receptors markedly increase in expression levels between gestation and the postnatal/adult periods. These results suggest that differential receptor expression levels of several HSV-1 gD and gB receptors in the adult hippocampus are likely to underlie the susceptibility of this brain region to HSV-1 infection.

  5. Regulation of bradykinin B2-receptor expression by oestrogen

    PubMed Central

    Madeddu, Paolo; Emanueli, Costanza; Varoni, Maria Vittoria; Demontis, Maria Piera; Anania, Vittorio; Gorioso, Nicola; Chao, Julie

    1997-01-01

    Tissue kallikrein is overexpressed in the kidney of female rats, this sexual dimorphism being associated with a greater effect of early blockade of bradykinin B2-receptors on female blood pressure phenotype. We evaluated the effect of ovariectomy and oestradiol benzoate (50 μg kg−1 every two days for two weeks) on the vasodepressor response to intra-arterial injection of bradykinin (150–900 ng kg−1) and on the expression of bradykinin B2-receptors.Ovariectomy reduced the magnitude of the vasodepressor response to bradykinin and unmasked a secondary vasopressor effect. Oestrogen replacement restored the vasodepressor response to bradykinin in ovariectomized rats.The vasodepressor responses to sodium nitroprusside (3–18 μg kg−1), acetylcholine (30–600 ng kg−1), desArg9-bradykinin (150–900 ng kg−1) or prostaglandin E2 (30–600 ng kg−1) were significantly reduced by ovariectomy. Oestrogen restored to normal the responses to desArg9-bradykinin, acetylcholine and prostaglandin E2, but not that to sodium nitroprusside.B2-receptor mRNA levels were decreased by ovariectomy in the aorta and kidney and they were restored to normal levels by oestrogen. Neither ovariectomy nor oestradiol affected receptor expression in the heart and uterus.These results indicate that oestrogen regulates B2-receptor gene expression and function. Since kinins exert a cardiovascular protective action, reduction in their vasodilator activity after menopause might contribute to the increased risk of pathological cardiovascular events. Conversely, the cardioprotective effects of oestrogen replacement might be, at least in part, mediated by activation of the kallikrein-kinin system. PMID:9283715

  6. Enhancement of the interleukin 2 receptor expression on T cells by multiple B-lymphotropic lymphokines.

    PubMed

    Noma, T; Mizuta, T; Rosén, A; Hirano, T; Kishimoto, T; Honjo, T

    1987-07-01

    Three new human lymphokines, interleukin-5, BSF-2 and BSF-MP6, were shown to be active in the enhancement of the IL-2 receptor expression on T cells, although they do not stimulate growth of the T cells.

  7. Flow cytometric monitoring of hormone receptor expression in human solid tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishan, Awtar

    2002-05-01

    Hormone receptor expression in human breast and prostate tumors is of diagnostic and therapeutic importance. With the availability of anti-estrogen, androgen and progesterone antibodies, immunohistochemistry has become a standard tool for determination of receptor expression in human tumor biopsies. However, this method is dependent on examination of a small number of cells under a microscope and the data obtained in most cases is not quantitative. As most of the commercially used anti-hormone antibodies have nuclear specificity, we have developed methods for isolation and antigen unmasking of nuclei from formalin fixed/paraffin embedded archival human tumors. After immunostaining with the antibodies and propidium iodide (for DNA content and cell cycle analysis), nuclei are analyzed by multiparametric laser flow cytometry for hormone receptor expression, DNA content, aneuploidy and cell cycle determination. These multiparametric methods are especially important for retrospective studies seeking to correlate hormone receptor expression with clinical response to anti-hormonal therapy of human breast and prostate tumors.

  8. The physiology of learning and memory: role of peptides and stress.

    PubMed

    Gülpinar, M A; Yegen, B C

    2004-12-01

    The neuropeptides, as well as their respective receptors, are widely distributed throughout the mammalian central nervous system. During learning and memory processes, besides structural synaptic remodeling, changes are observed at molecular and metabolic levels with the alterations in neurotransmitter and neuropeptide synthesis and release. While there is consensus that brain cholinergic neurotransmission plays a critical role in the processes related to learning and memory, it is also well known that these functions are influenced by a tremendous number of neuropeptides and non-peptide molecules. Arginine vasopressin (AVP), oxytocin, angiotensin II, insulin, growth factors, serotonin (5-HT), melanin concentrating hormone, histamine, bombesin and gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP), glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), cholecystokinin (CCK), dopamine, corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) have modulatory effects on learning and memory. Among these peptides CCK, 5-HT and CRF play strategic roles in the modulation of memory processes under stressful conditions. CRF is accepted as the main neuropeptide involved in both physical and emotional stress, with a protective role during stress, possibly through the activation of the hypothalamo-pitiuitary (HPA) axis. The peptide CCK has been proposed to facilitate memory processing and CCK-like immunoreactivity in the hypothalamus was observed upon stress exposure, suggesting that CCK may participate in the central control of stress response and stress-induced memory dysfunction. On the other hand, 5-HT appears to play a role in behaviors that involve a high cognitive demand and stress exposure activates serotonergic systems in a variety of brain regions. The physiological role and therapeutic efficacy of various neuropeptides and the impact of stress exposure in the acquisition and consolidation of memory will be reviewed thoroughly.

  9. Breast cancer photothermal therapy based on gold nanorods targeted by covalently-coupled bombesin peptide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heidari, Zahra; Salouti, Mojtaba; Sariri, Reyhaneh

    2015-05-01

    Photothermal therapy, a minimally invasive treatment method for killing cancers cells, has generated a great deal of interest. In an effort to improve treatment efficacy and reduce side effects, better targeting of photoabsorbers to tumors has become a new concept in the battle against cancer. In this study, a bombesin (BBN) analog that can bind to all gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) receptor subtypes was bound covalently with gold nanorods (GNRs) using Nanothinks acid as a link. The BBN analog was also coated with poly(ethylene glycol) to increase its stability and biocompatibility. The interactions were confirmed by ultraviolet-visible and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. A methylthiazol tetrazolium assay showed no cytotoxicity of the PEGylated GNR-BBN conjugate. The cell binding and internalization studies showed high specificity and uptake of the GNR-BBN-PEG conjugate toward breast cancer cells of the T47D cell line. The in vitro study revealed destruction of the T47D cells exposed to the new photothermal agent combined with continuous-wave near-infrared laser irradiation. The biodistribution study showed significant accumulation of the conjugate in the tumor tissue of mice with breast cancer. The in vivo photothermal therapy showed the complete disappearance of xenographted breast tumors in the mouse model.

  10. TM1-IR680 peptide for assessment of surgical margin and lymph node metastasis in murine orthotopic model of oral cancer

    PubMed Central

    Suganya S., Annie A.; Kochurani, K. J.; Nair, Madhumathy G.; Louis, Jiss Maria; Sankaran, Santhosh; Rajagopal, R.; Kumar, K. Santhosh; Abraham, Parvin; P. G., Balagopal; Sebastian, Paul; Somananthan, Thara; Maliekal, Tessy Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Treatment outcome after surgical removal in oral carcinoma is poor due to inadequate methodologies available for marking surgical margins. Even though some methodologies for intraoperative margin assessment are under clinical and preclinical trials for other solid tumours, a promising modality for oral cancer surgery is not developed. Fluorescent-based optical imaging using Near Infrared (NIR) dyes tagged to tumour specific target will be an optimal tool for this purpose. One such target, Gastrin Releasing Peptide Receptor (GRPR) was selected for the study, and its binding peptide, TM1-IR680, was tested for its efficacy for surgical margin prediction in murine orthotopic model of oral cancer, derived from primary samples. Here, for the first time in a preclinical analysis, we show that the size and margin of oral cancer can be predicted, as revealed by 3D-imaging. Interestingly, the peptide was sensitive enough to detect lymph nodes that harboured dispersed tumour cells before colonization, which was impossible to identify by conventional histopathology. We recommend the use of TM1-NIR dyes alone or in combination with other technologies to improve the clinical outcome of oral cancer surgery. PMID:27827443

  11. Glomerular Glucocorticoid Receptors Expression and Clinicopathological Types of Childhood Nephrotic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gamal, Yasser; Badawy, Ahlam; Swelam, Salwa; Tawfeek, Mostafa S K; Gad, Eman Fathalla

    2017-02-01

    Glucocorticoids are primary therapy of idiopathic nephrotic syndrome (INS). However, not all children respond to steroid therapy. We assessed glomerular glucocorticoid receptor expression in fifty-one children with INS and its relation to response to steroid therapy and to histopathological type. Clinical, laboratory and glomerular expression of glucocorticoid receptors were compared between groups with different steroid response. Glomerular glucocorticoid expression was slightly higher in controls than in minimal change early responders, which in turn was significantly higher than in minimal change late responders. There was significantly lower glomerular glucocorticoid receptor expression in steroid-resistance compared to early responders, late responders and controls. Glomerular glucocorticoid expression was significantly higher in all minimal change disease (MCD) compared to focal segmental glomerulosclerosis. In INS, response to glucocorticoid is dependent on glomerular expression of receptors and peripheral expression. Evaluation of glomerular glucocorticoid receptor expression at time of diagnosis of NS can predict response to steroid therapy.

  12. Fluoxetine alters mu opioid receptor expression in obese Zucker rat extrahypothalamic regions.

    PubMed

    Churruca, Itziar; Portillo, María P; Zumalabe, José María; Macarulla, María T; Sáenz Del Burgo, Laura; Zarate, Jon; Echevarría, Enrique

    2006-03-01

    The aim of this article was to describe the effects of chronic fluoxetine on mu opioid receptor expression in obese Zucker rat extrahypothalamic regions. Male obese Zucker (fa/fa) rats were administered with fluoxetine (10 mg/kg; i.p.) daily for two weeks. Brain regional immunostaining for mu opioid receptor was carried out. An increase in the numbers of neural cells immunostained for mu opioid receptor in caudatus-putamen, dentate gyrus, lateral septum, amygdala, and frontal, parietal, and piriform cortices was observed. Increased mu opioid receptor expression in the central amygdaloid nuclei suggests a decreased opioidergic tone at this level that could be involved in fluoxetine anorectic action.

  13. Gastrin: an acid-releasing, proliferative and immunomodulatory peptide?

    PubMed

    Calatayud, Sara; Alvarez, Angeles; Víctor, Víctor M

    2010-01-01

    Gastrin release is affected by gastric inflammatory conditions. Antral G cells respond to inflammatory mediators by increasing gastrin secretion. Accumulating experimental evidence suggests that gastrin exerts immunomodulatory and proinflammatory effects. Gastrin could be a contributing factor to these pathologies, which may constitute a new justification for pharmacological blockade of gastrin action.

  14. MicroRNA-181b regulates ALX/FPR2 receptor expression and proresolution signaling in human macrophages.

    PubMed

    Pierdomenico, Anna Maria; Recchiuti, Antonio; Simiele, Felice; Codagnone, Marilina; Mari, Veronica Cecilia; Davì, Giovanni; Romano, Mario

    2015-02-06

    Regulatory mechanisms of ALX/FPR2, the lipoxin A4 receptor, expression have considerable relevance in inflammation resolution. Because microRNAs (miRs) are emerging as key players in inflammation resolution, here we examined microRNA-mediated regulation of ALX/FPR2 (lipoxin A4 receptor/formyl peptide receptor 2) expression. By matching data from bioinformatic algorithms, we found 27 miRs predicted to bind the 3'-UTR of ALX/FPR2. Among these, we selected miR-181b because of its link with inflammation. Using a luciferase reporter system, we assessed miR-181b binding to ALX/FPR2 3'-UTR. Consistent with this, miR-181b overexpression in human macrophages significantly down-regulated ALX/FPR2 protein levels (-25%), whereas miR-181b knockdown gave a significant increase in ALX/FPR2 (+60%). miR-181b levels decreased during monocyte to macrophage differentiation (-50%), whereas ALX/FPR2 expression increased significantly (+60%). miR-181b overexpression blunted lipoxin A4 (0.1-10 nm)- and resolvin D1 (0.01-10 nm)-stimulated phagocytic activity of macrophages. These results unravel novel regulatory mechanisms of ALX/FPR2 expression and ligand-evoked macrophages proresolution responses mediated by miR-181b, thus uncovering novel components of the endogenous inflammation resolution circuits.

  15. Cortisol increases growth hormone-receptor expression in human osteoblast-like cells.

    PubMed

    Swolin-Eide, D; Nilsson, A; Ohlsson, C

    1998-01-01

    It is well known that high levels of glucocorticoids cause osteoporosis and that physiologic levels of growth hormone (GH) are required for normal bone remodeling. It has been suggested that glucocorticoids regulate GH-responses via the regulation of GH-receptor expression. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether cortisol plays a role in the regulation of GH-receptor expression in cultured human osteoblasts. The effect of serum starvation and cortisol on GH-receptor expression was tested in human osteoblast (hOB)-like cells. Serum starvation for 24 h resulted in an increase in GH-receptor mRNA levels (90 +/- 1% over control culture). Cortisol increased GH-receptor mRNA levels in a dose-dependent manner with a maximal effect at 10(-6)M. The stimulating effect of cortisol on GH-receptor mRNA levels was time-dependent, reaching a peak 12 h after the addition of cortisol (126 +/- 29% over control culture) and remaining up to 12 h later. The increase in GH-receptor mRNA levels was accompanied by an increase in 125I-GH binding which reached a maximum at 24 h (196 +/- 87% over control culture). In conclusion, glucocorticoids increase GH-receptor expression in hOB-like cells. Further studies are needed to clarify whether glucocorticoid-induced regulation of the GH-receptor is important in human bone physiology.

  16. Chemokine and lymph node homing receptor expression on pDC vary by graft source

    PubMed Central

    Hosoba, Sakura; Harris, Wayne AC; Lin, Kaifeng L; Waller, Edmund K

    2014-01-01

    A randomized clinical trial of BM vs. blood stem cell transplants from unrelated donors showed that more plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) in BM grafts was associated with better post-transplant survival. Here, we describe differences in homing-receptor expression on pDC to explain observed differences following BM vs. blood stem cell transplantation. PMID:25941585

  17. Memory consolidation and amnesia modify 5-HT6 receptors expression in rat brain: an autoradiographic study.

    PubMed

    Meneses, A; Manuel-Apolinar, L; Castillo, C; Castillo, E

    2007-03-12

    Traditionally, the search for memory circuits has been centered on examinations of amnesic and AD patients, cerebral lesions and, neuroimaging. A complementary alternative might be the use of autoradiography with radioligands. Indeed, ex vivo autoradiographic studies offer the advantage to detect functionally active receptors altered by pharmacological tools and memory formation. Hence, herein the 5-HT(6) receptor antagonist SB-399885 and the amnesic drugs scopolamine or dizocilpine were used to manipulate memory consolidation and 5-HT(6) receptors expression was determined by using [(3)H]-SB-258585. Thus, memory consolidation was impaired in scopolamine and dizocilpine treated groups relative to control vehicle but improved it in SB-399885-treated animals. SB-399885 improved memory consolidation seems to be associated with decreased 5-HT(6) receptors expression in 15 out 17 brain areas. Scopolamine or dizocilpine decreased 5-HT(6) receptors expression in nine different brain areas and increased it in CA3 hippocampus or other eight areas, respectively. In brain areas thought to be in charge of procedural memory such basal ganglia (i.e., nucleus accumbens, caudate putamen, and fundus striate) data showed that relative to control animals amnesic groups showed diminished (scopolamine) or augmented (dizocilpine) 5-HT(6) receptor expression. SB-399885 showing improved memory displayed an intermediate expression in these same brain regions. A similar intermediate expression occurs with regard to amygdala, septum, and some cortical areas in charge of explicit memory storage. However, relative to control group amnesic and SB-399885 rats in the hippocampus, region where explicit memory is formed, showed a complex 5-HT(6) receptors expression. In conclusion, these results indicate neural circuits underlying the effects of 5-HT(6) receptor antagonists in autoshaping task and offer some general clues about cognitive processes in general.

  18. Prenatal Oxycodone Exposure Alters CNS Endothelin Receptor Expression in Neonatal Rats.

    PubMed

    Devarapalli, M; Leonard, M; Briyal, S; Stefanov, G; Puppala, B L; Schweig, L; Gulati, A

    2016-05-01

    Prenatal opioid exposure such as oxycodone is linked to significant adverse effects on the developing brain. Endothelin (ET) and its receptors are involved in normal development of the central nervous system. Opioid tolerance and withdrawal are mediated through ET receptors. It is possible that adverse effect of oxycodone on the developing brain is mediated through ET receptors. We evaluated brain ETA and ETB receptor expression during postnatal development in rats with prenatal oxycodone exposure. Timed pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats received either oxycodone or placebo throughout gestation. After birth, male rat pups were sacrificed on postnatal day (PND) 1, 7, 14 or 28. Brain ETA and ETB receptor expression was determined by Western blot analysis. Oxycodone pups compared to placebo demonstrated congenital malformations of the face, mouth, and vertebrae at the time of birth [4/69 (5.7%) vs. 0/60 (0%); respectively] and intrauterine growth retardation [10/69 (15%) vs. 2/60 (3.3%); respectively]. On PND 28, oxycodone pups compared to placebo had lower body and kidney weight. ETA receptor expression in the oxycodone group was significantly higher compared to placebo on PND 1 (p=0.035), but was similar on PND 7, 14, or 28. ETB receptor expression decreased in oxycodone compared to placebo on PND 1 and 7 (p=0.001); and increased on PND 28 (p=0.002), but was similar on PND 14. Oxycodone-exposed rat pups had lower birth weight and postnatal weight gain and greater congenital malformations. ETB receptor expression is altered in the brain of oxycodone-treated rat pups indicating a possible delay in CNS development.

  19. Mutual enhancement of IL-2 and IL-7 on DNA vaccine immunogenicity mainly involves regulations on their receptor expression and receptor-expressing lymphocyte generation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yonghong; Liang, Shuang; Li, Xiujin; Wang, Liyue; Zhang, Jianlou; Xu, Jian; Huo, Shanshan; Cao, Xuebin; Zhong, Zhenyu; Zhong, Fei

    2015-07-09

    Our previous study showed that IL-2 and IL-7 could mutually enhance the immunogenicity of canine parvovirus VP2 DNA vaccine, although the underlying mechanism remained unknown. Here, we used the OVA gene as a DNA vaccine in a mouse model to test their enhancement on DNA vaccine immunogenicity and to explore the molecular mechanism. Results showed that both IL-2 and IL-7 genes significantly increased the immunogenicity of OVA DNA vaccine in mice. Co-administration of IL-2 and IL-7 genes with OVA DNA significantly increased OVA-specific antibody titers, T cell proliferation and IFN-γ production compared with IL-2 or IL-7 alone, confirming that IL-2 and IL-7 mutually enhanced DNA vaccine immunogenicity. Mechanistically, we have shown that IL-2 significantly stimulated generation of IL-7 receptor-expressing lymphocytes, and that IL-7 significantly induced IL-2 receptor expression. These results contribute to an explanation of the mechanism of the mutual effects of IL-2 and IL-7 on enhancing DNA vaccine immunogenicity and provided a basis for further investigation on their mutual effects on adjuvant activity and immune regulation.

  20. Hypothyroidism affects D2 receptor-mediated breathing without altering D2 receptor expression.

    PubMed

    Schlenker, Evelyn H; Del Rio, Rodrigo; Schultz, Harold D

    2014-03-01

    Bromocriptine depressed ventilation in air and D2 receptor expression in the nucleus tractus solitaries (NTS) in male hypothyroid hamsters. Here we postulated that in age-matched hypothyroid female hamsters, the pattern of D2 receptor modulation of breathing and D2 receptor expression would differ from those reported in hypothyroid males. In females hypothyroidism did not affect D2 receptor protein levels in the NTS, carotid bodies or striatum. Bromocriptine, but not carmoxirole (a peripheral D2 receptor agonist), increased oxygen consumption and body temperature in awake air-exposed hypothyroid female hamsters and stimulated their ventilation before and following exposure to hypoxia. Carmoxirole depressed frequency of breathing in euthyroid hamsters prior to, during and following hypoxia exposures and stimulated it in the hypothyroid hamsters following hypoxia. Although hypothyroidism did not affect expression of D2 receptors, it influenced central D2 modulation of breathing in a disparate manner relative to euthyroid hamsters.

  1. In Vitro Interleukin-1 and 2 Production and Interleukin 2 Receptor Expression in the Rhesus Monkey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitt, Didier A.; Sonnenfeld, Gerald; Husson, David; Tkaczuk, Jean; Andre, Eric; Schaffar, Laurance

    1996-01-01

    Anti-human monoclonal antibodies were used to detect and quantify interleukins-1 and 2 and interleukin-2 receptor expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from a rhesus monkey. Interleukin-1 production could be induced by phorbol esters (PMA) and was potentiated by phytohemagglutinin (PHA). Interleukin-2 secretion could also be induced by the combination of PHA and PMA, but only weakly with PHA alone. Interleukin-2 receptor expression was present in a subpopulation of unstimulated lymphocytes and could be enhanced by PHA or PMA. These data show once again that the rhesus monkey immune system is cross-reactive with the human one and that rhesus macaque could be a good model to study interleukin therapy.

  2. NRP-1 Receptor Expression Mismatch in Skin of Subjects with Experimental and Diabetic Small Fiber Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Van Acker, Nathalie; Ragé, Michael; Vermeirsch, Hilde; Schrijvers, Dorien; Nuydens, Rony; Byttebier, Geert; Timmers, Maarten; De Schepper, Stefanie; Streffer, Johannes; Andries, Luc; Plaghki, Léon; Cras, Patrick; Meert, Theo

    2016-01-01

    The in vivo cutaneous nerve regeneration model using capsaicin is applied extensively to study the regenerative mechanisms and therapeutic efficacy of disease modifying molecules for small fiber neuropathy (SFN). Since mismatches between functional and morphological nerve fiber recovery are described for this model, we aimed at determining the capability of the capsaicin model to truly mimic the morphological manifestations of SFN in diabetes. As nerve and blood vessel growth and regenerative capacities are defective in diabetes, we focused on studying the key regulator of these processes, the neuropilin-1 (NRP-1)/semaphorin pathway. This led us to the evaluation of NRP-1 receptor expression in epidermis and dermis of subjects presenting experimentally induced small fiber neuropathy, diabetic polyneuropathy and of diabetic subjects without clinical signs of small fiber neuropathy. The NRP-1 receptor was co-stained with CD31 vessel-marker using immunofluorescence and analyzed with Definiens® technology. This study indicates that capsaicin application results in significant loss of epidermal NRP-1 receptor expression, whereas diabetic subjects presenting small fiber neuropathy show full epidermal NRP-1 expression in contrast to the basal expression pattern seen in healthy controls. Capsaicin induced a decrease in dermal non-vascular NRP-1 receptor expression which did not appear in diabetic polyneuropathy. We can conclude that the capsaicin model does not mimic diabetic neuropathy related changes for cutaneous NRP-1 receptor expression. In addition, our data suggest that NRP-1 might play an important role in epidermal nerve fiber loss and/or defective regeneration and that NRP-1 receptor could change the epidermal environment to a nerve fiber repellant bed possibly through Sem3A in diabetes. PMID:27598321

  3. NRP-1 Receptor Expression Mismatch in Skin of Subjects with Experimental and Diabetic Small Fiber Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Van Acker, Nathalie; Ragé, Michael; Vermeirsch, Hilde; Schrijvers, Dorien; Nuydens, Rony; Byttebier, Geert; Timmers, Maarten; De Schepper, Stefanie; Streffer, Johannes; Andries, Luc; Plaghki, Léon; Cras, Patrick; Meert, Theo

    2016-01-01

    The in vivo cutaneous nerve regeneration model using capsaicin is applied extensively to study the regenerative mechanisms and therapeutic efficacy of disease modifying molecules for small fiber neuropathy (SFN). Since mismatches between functional and morphological nerve fiber recovery are described for this model, we aimed at determining the capability of the capsaicin model to truly mimic the morphological manifestations of SFN in diabetes. As nerve and blood vessel growth and regenerative capacities are defective in diabetes, we focused on studying the key regulator of these processes, the neuropilin-1 (NRP-1)/semaphorin pathway. This led us to the evaluation of NRP-1 receptor expression in epidermis and dermis of subjects presenting experimentally induced small fiber neuropathy, diabetic polyneuropathy and of diabetic subjects without clinical signs of small fiber neuropathy. The NRP-1 receptor was co-stained with CD31 vessel-marker using immunofluorescence and analyzed with Definiens® technology. This study indicates that capsaicin application results in significant loss of epidermal NRP-1 receptor expression, whereas diabetic subjects presenting small fiber neuropathy show full epidermal NRP-1 expression in contrast to the basal expression pattern seen in healthy controls. Capsaicin induced a decrease in dermal non-vascular NRP-1 receptor expression which did not appear in diabetic polyneuropathy. We can conclude that the capsaicin model does not mimic diabetic neuropathy related changes for cutaneous NRP-1 receptor expression. In addition, our data suggest that NRP-1 might play an important role in epidermal nerve fiber loss and/or defective regeneration and that NRP-1 receptor could change the epidermal environment to a nerve fiber repellant bed possibly through Sem3A in diabetes.

  4. Lutetium-177 Labeled Bombesin Peptides for Radionuclide Therapy.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Tamila Stott; Bandari, Rajendra P; Jiang, Zongrun; Smith, Charles J

    2016-01-01

    The rare-earth radionuclides that decay by beta particle (β-) emission are considered to be ideal in the context of targeted radiotherapy. The rare-earth isotopes exist primarily in the 3+ oxidation state and are considered to be hard metal centers, requiring multidentate, hard donor ligands such as the poly(aminocarboxylates) for in vivo kinetic inertness. 177Lu is a rare-earth radionuclide that is produced in moderate specific activity (740 GBq/mg) by direct neutron capture of enriched 176Lu via the 176Lu(n,γ)177Lu nuclear reaction. 177Lu has a half-life of 6.71 d, decays by beta emission (Ebmax = 0.497 MeV), and emits two imagable photons (113keV, 3% and 208kev, 11%). High specific activity, no-carrier-added 177Lu can also be prepared by an indirect neutron capture nuclear reaction on a 176Yb target. Herein, we report upon bombesin (BBN) peptides radiolabeled with 177Lu. The impetus driving many of the research studies that we have described in this review is that the high-affinity gastrin releasing peptide receptor (GRPR, BBN receptor subtype 2, BB2) has been identified in tissue biopsy samples and immortalized cell lines of many human cancers and is an ideal biomarker for targeting early-stage disease. Early on, the ability of GRPR agonists to be rapidly internalized coupled with a high incidence of GRPR expression on various neoplasias was a driving force for the design and development of new diagnostic and therapeutic agents targeting GRP receptor-positive tumors. Recent reports, however, show compelling evidence that radiopharmaceutical design and development based upon antagonist-type ligand frameworks clearly bears reexamination. Last of all, the ability to target multiple biomarkers simultaneously via a heterodimeric targeting ligand has also provided a new avenue to investigate the dual targeting capacity of bivalent radioligands for improved in vivo molecular imaging and treatment of specific human cancers. In this report, we describe recent advances

  5. Impact of chronic morphine on delta opioid receptor expressing neurons in the mouse hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Eric, Erbs; Lauren, Faget; Alice, Ceredig Rhian; Audrey, Matifas; Jean-Luc, Vonesch; L., Kieffer Brigitte; Dominique, Massotte

    2015-01-01

    Delta opioid receptors participate to the control of chronic pain and emotional responses. Recent data also identified their implication in spatial memory and drug-context associations pointing to a critical role of hippocampal delta receptors. To better appreciate the impact of repeated drug exposure on their modulatory activity, we used fluorescent knock-in mice that express a functional delta receptor fused at its carboxy-terminus with the green fluorescent protein in place of the native receptor. We then tested the impact of chronic morphine treatment on the density and distribution of delta receptor-expressing cells in the hippocampus. A decrease in delta receptor positive cell density was observed in the CA1, CA3 and dentate gyrus without alteration of the distribution across the different GABAergic populations that mainly express delta receptors. This effect partly persisted after four weeks of morphine abstinence. In addition, we observed increased delta opioid receptor expression at the cell surface compared to saline treated animals. In the hippocampus, chronic morphine administration thus induces delta opioid receptor cellular redistribution and durably decreases delta receptor-expressing cell density. Such modifications are likely to alter hippocampal physiology, and to contribute to long-term cognitive deficits. PMID:26480813

  6. Comparison of albumin receptors expressed on bovine and human group G streptococci.

    PubMed Central

    Raeder, R; Otten, R A; Boyle, M D

    1991-01-01

    The albumin receptor expressed by bovine group G streptococci was extracted and affinity purified. The protein was characterized for species reactivity, and monospecific antibodies were prepared to the purified receptor. The bovine group G albumin receptor was compared functionally, antigenically, and for DNA homology with the albumin-binding protein expressed by human group G streptococci. In agreement with previous reports, the albumin-binding activity of human strains was mediated by a unique domain of the type III immunoglobulin G-Fc-binding molecule, protein G. The albumin receptor expressed by bovine group G strains was found to lack any immunoglobulin G-binding potential but displayed a wider profile of species albumin reactivity than protein G. Both albumin receptors could inhibit the binding of the other to immobilized human serum albumin, and each displayed similar binding properties. Antigenic comparison of the two albumin receptors demonstrated a low level of cross-reactivity; however comparison at the DNA level, using an oligonucleotide probe specific for the albumin-binding region of protein G, demonstrated that the two albumin receptors expressed by human and bovine group G streptococcal strains do not display significant homology. Images PMID:1846128

  7. Impact of chronic morphine on delta opioid receptor-expressing neurons in the mouse hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Erbs, E; Faget, L; Ceredig, R A; Matifas, A; Vonesch, J-L; Kieffer, B L; Massotte, D

    2016-01-28

    Delta opioid (DOP) receptors participate to the control of chronic pain and emotional responses. Recent data also identified their implication in spatial memory and drug-context associations pointing to a critical role of hippocampal delta receptors. To better appreciate the impact of repeated drug exposure on their modulatory activity, we used fluorescent knock-in mice that express a functional delta receptor fused at its carboxy-terminus with the green fluorescent protein in place of the native receptor. We then tested the impact of chronic morphine treatment on the density and distribution of delta receptor-expressing cells in the hippocampus. A decrease in delta receptor-positive cell density was observed in the CA1, CA3 and dentate gyrus without alteration of the distribution across the different GABAergic populations that mainly express delta receptors. This effect partly persisted after four weeks of morphine abstinence. In addition, we observed increased DOP receptor expression at the cell surface compared to saline-treated animals. In the hippocampus, chronic morphine administration thus induces DOP receptor cellular redistribution and durably decreases delta receptor-expressing cell density. Such modifications are likely to alter hippocampal physiology, and to contribute to long-term cognitive deficits.

  8. Cannabinoid CB(1) receptor expression and affinity in the rat hippocampus following bilateral vestibular deafferentation.

    PubMed

    Baek, Jean Ha; Zheng, Yiwen; Darlington, Cynthia L; Smith, Paul F

    2011-01-10

    Numerous studies have shown that bilateral vestibular deafferentation (BVD) results in spatial memory deficits and hippocampal dysfunction in rats and humans. Since cannabinoid CB(1) receptors are well known to regulate synaptic plasticity in the hippocampus, we investigated whether BVD resulted in changes in CB(1) receptor expression and affinity in the rat hippocampus at 1, 3 and 7 days post-surgery, using a combination of Western blotting and radioligand binding. Using Western blotting, we found that CB(1) receptor expression was significantly lower in BVD animals compared to sham controls only in the CA3 area across the 3 time points (P=0.03). CB(1) receptor expression decreased significantly over time for both the BVD and sham animals (P=0.000). The radioligand binding assays showed no significant change in the IC(50) of the CB(1) receptor for the cannabinoid CB(1)/CB(2) receptor agonist, WIN55,212-2. These results suggest that the CB(1) receptor down-regulates in the CA3 region of the hippocampus following BVD, but with no changes in the affinity of the CB(1) receptor for WIN55,212-2.

  9. CCR2 knockout exacerbates cerulein-induced chronic pancreatitis with hyperglycemia via decreased GLP-1 receptor expression and insulin secretion.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Yuji; Kanai, Takanori; Saeki, Keita; Takabe, Miho; Irie, Junichiro; Miyoshi, Jun; Mikami, Yohei; Teratani, Toshiaki; Suzuki, Takahiro; Miyata, Naoteru; Hisamatsu, Tadakazu; Nakamoto, Nobuhiro; Yamagishi, Yoshiyuki; Higuchi, Hajime; Ebinuma, Hirotoshi; Hozawa, Shigenari; Saito, Hidetsugu; Itoh, Hiroshi; Hibi, Toshifumi

    2013-04-15

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) promotes insulin release; however, the relationship between the GLP-1 signal and chronic pancreatitis is not well understood. Here we focus on chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2) and its receptor (CCR2) axis, which regulates various immune cells, including macrophages, to clarify the mechanism of GLP-1-mediated insulin secretion in chronic pancreatitis in mice. One and multiple series of repetitive cerulein administrations were used to induce acute and chronic cerulein pancreatitis, respectively. Acute cerulein-administered CCR2-knockout (KO) mice showed suppressed infiltration of CD11b(+)Gr-1(low) macrophages and pancreatic inflammation and significantly upregulated insulin secretion compared with paired wild-type (WT) mice. However, chronic cerulein-administered CCR2-KO mice showed significantly increased infiltration of CD11b(+)/Gr-1(-) and CD11b(+)/Gr-1(high) cells, but not CD11b(+)/Gr-1(low) cells, in pancreas with severe inflammation and significantly decreased insulin secretion compared with their WT counterparts. Furthermore, although serum GLP-1 levels in chronic cerulein-administered WT and CCR2-KO mice were comparably upregulated after cerulein administrations, GLP-1 receptor levels in pancreases of chronic cerulein-administered CCR2-KO mice were significantly lower than in paired WT mice. Nevertheless, a significantly higher hyperglycemia level in chronic cerulein-administered CCR2-KO mice was markedly restored by treatment with a GLP-1 analog to a level comparable to the paired WT mice. Collectively, the CCR2/CCL2 axis-mediated CD11b(+)-cell migration to the pancreas is critically involved in chronic pancreatitis-mediated hyperglycemia through the modulation of GLP-1 receptor expression and insulin secretion.

  10. Clinical Relevance of VPAC1 Receptor Expression in Early Arthritis: Association with IL-6 and Disease Activity

    PubMed Central

    Seoane, Iria V.; Ortiz, Ana M.; Piris, Lorena; Lamana, Amalia; Juarranz, Yasmina; García-Vicuña, Rosario; González-Álvaro, Isidoro; Gomariz, Rosa P.; Martínez, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    Background The vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) receptors VPAC1 and VPAC2 mediate anti-inflammatory and immunoregulatory responses in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Data on the expression of these receptors could complement clinical assessment in the management of RA. Our goal was to investigate the correlation between expression of both receptors and the 28-Joint Disease Activity Score (DAS28) in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from patients with early arthritis (EA). We also measured expression of IL-6 to evaluate the association between VIP receptors and systemic inflammation. Methods We analyzed 250 blood samples collected at any of the 5 scheduled follow-up visits from 125 patients enrolled in the Princesa Early Arthritis Register Longitudinal study. Samples from 22 healthy donors were also analyzed. Sociodemographic, clinical, and therapeutic data were systematically recorded. mRNA expression levels were determined using real-time PCR. Then, longitudinal multivariate analyses were performed. Results PBMCs from EA patients showed significantly higher expression of VPAC2 receptors at baseline compared to healthy donors (p<0.001). With time, however, VPAC2 expression tended to be significantly lower while VPAC1 receptor expression increased in correlation with a reduction in DAS28 index. Our results reveal that more severe inflammation, based on high levels of IL-6, is associated with lower expression of VPAC1 (p<0.001) and conversely with increased expression of VPAC2 (p<0.001). A major finding of this study is that expression of VPAC1 is lower in patients with increased disease activity (p = 0.001), thus making it possible to differentiate between patients with various degrees of clinical disease activity. Conclusion Patients with more severe inflammation and higher disease activity show lower levels of VPAC1 expression, which is associated with patient-reported impairment. Therefore, VPAC1 is a biological marker in EA. PMID:26881970

  11. Intrathecal NGF administration reduces reactive astrocytosis and changes neurotrophin receptors expression pattern in a rat model of neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Cirillo, Giovanni; Cavaliere, Carlo; Bianco, Maria Rosaria; De Simone, Antonietta; Colangelo, Anna Maria; Sellitti, Stefania; Alberghina, Lilia; Papa, Michele

    2010-01-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF), an essential peptide for sensory neurons, seems to have opposite effects when administered peripherally or directly to the central nervous system. We investigated the effects of 7-days intrathecal (i.t.) infusion of NGF on neuronal and glial spinal markers relevant to neuropathic behavior induced by chronic constriction injury (CCI) of the sciatic nerve. Allodynic and hyperalgesic behaviors were investigated by Von Frey and thermal Plantar tests, respectively. NGF-treated animals showed reduced allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia, compared to control animals. We evaluated on lumbar spinal cord the expression of microglial (ED-1), astrocytic (GFAP and S-100beta), and C- and Adelta-fibers (SubP, IB-4 and Cb) markers. I.t. NGF treatment reduced reactive astrocytosis and the density of SubP, IB4 and Cb positive fibers in the dorsal horn of injured animals. Morphometric parameters of proximal sciatic nerve stump fibers and cells in DRG were also analyzed in CCI rats: myelin thickness was reduced and DRG neurons and satellite cells appeared hypertrophic. I.t. NGF treatment showed a beneficial effect in reversing these molecular and morphological alterations. Finally, we analyzed by immunohistochemistry the expression pattern of neurotrophin receptors TrkA, pTrkA, TrkB and p75(NTR). Substantial alterations in neurotrophin receptors expression were observed in the spinal cord of CCI and NGF-treated animals. Our results indicate that i.t. NGF administration reverses the neuro-glial morphomolecular changes occurring in neuropathic animals paralleled by alterations in neurotrophin receptors ratio, and suggest that NGF is effective in restoring homeostatic conditions in the spinal cord and maintaining analgesia in neuropathic pain.

  12. Evaluation of 5-HT7 receptor expression in the placentae of normal and pre-eclamptic women.

    PubMed

    Irge, Emine; Halici, Zekai; Yilmaz, Mehmet; Cadirci, Elif; Karakus, Emre

    2016-01-01

    In this study, by examining 5-HT7 receptor expression in placentae from pre-eclamptic and normal pregnancies, we aimed to discover a new step of pathophysiological cascade for preeclampsia. Patients whose blood pressure over the 140/90 mmHg were included when study after 20 weeks of gestation. 5-HT7 receptor expression was investigated on the placentae obtained after birth by real time PCR (RT-PCR) analysis. Pre-natal-post-natal, systolic-diastolic blood pressure values, proteinuria and renal function indicators as BUN and creatinine levels of pre-eclamptic pregnant women were higher than the healthy group. Similarly, 5-HT7 receptor expression determined in healthy placentae increased 8-fold in pre-eclamptic women. This study, for the first time we showed 5-HT7 receptor expression in normal placenta and increased expression in pre-eclamptic placenta.

  13. Renal cell carcinoma alters endothelial receptor expression responsible for leukocyte adhesion.

    PubMed

    Juengel, Eva; Krueger, Geraldine; Rutz, Jochen; Nelson, Karen; Werner, Isabella; Relja, Borna; Seliger, Barbara; Fisslthaler, Beate; Fleming, Ingrid; Tsaur, Igor; Haferkamp, Axel; Blaheta, Roman A

    2016-04-12

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) escapes immune recognition. To elaborate the escape strategy the influence of RCC cells on endothelial receptor expression and endothelial leukocyte adhesion was evaluated. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) were co-cultured with the RCC cell line, Caki-1, with and without tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha. Intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), endothelial (E)-selectin, standard and variants (V) of CD44 were then analysed in HUVEC, using flow cytometry and Western blot analysis. To determine which components are responsible for HUVEC-Caki-1 interaction causing receptor alteration, Caki-1 membrane fragments versus cell culture supernatant were applied to HUVECS. Adhesion of peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) and polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) to endothelium was evaluated by co-culture adhesion assays. Relevance of endothelial receptor expression for adhesion to endothelium was determined by receptor blockage. Co-culture of RCC and HUVECs resulted in a significant increase in endothelial ICAM-1, VCAM-1, E-selectin, CD44 V3 and V7 expression. Previous stimulation of HUVECs with TNF-alpha and co-cultivation with Caki-1 resulted in further elevation of endothelial CD44 V3 and V7 expression, whereas ICAM-1, VCAM-1 and E-selectin expression were significantly diminished. Since Caki-1 membrane fragments also caused these alterations, but cell culture supernatant did not, cell-cell contact may be responsible for this process. Blocking ICAM-1, VCAM-1, E-selectin or CD44 with respective antibodies led to a significant decrease in PBL and PMN adhesion to endothelium. Thus, exposing HUVEC to Caki-1 results in significant alteration of endothelial receptor expression and subsequent endothelial attachment of PBL and PMN.

  14. Modifications of 5-HT4 receptor expression in rat brain during memory consolidation.

    PubMed

    Manuel-Apolinar, L; Rocha, L; Pascoe, D; Castillo, E; Castillo, C; Meneses, A

    2005-04-25

    Pharmacological evidence indicates a specific role of 5-HT(4) receptors on memory function. These receptors are members of G-protein-coupled 7-transmembrane domain receptor superfamily, are positively coupled to adenylyl cyclase, and are heterogeneously located in some structures important for memory, such as the hippocampus and cortical regions. To further clarify 5-HT(4) receptors' role in memory, the expression of these receptors in passive (P3) untrained and autoshaping (A3) trained (3 sessions) adult (3 months) and old (P9 or A9; 9 months) male rats was determined by autoradiography. Adult trained (A3) rats showed a better memory respect to old trained (A9). Using [(3)H] GR113808 as ligand (0.2 nM specific activity 81 Ci/mmol) for 5-HT(4) receptor expression, 29 brain areas were analyzed, 16 areas of A3 and 17 of A9 animals displayed significant changes. The medial mammillary nucleus of A3 group showed diminished 5-HT(4) receptor expression, and in other 15 brain areas of A3 or 10 of A9 animals, 5-HT(4) receptors were increased. Thus, for A3 rats, 5-HT(4) receptors were augmented in olfactory lobule, caudate putamen, fundus striatum, CA2, retrosplenial, frontal, temporal, occipital, and cingulate cortex. Also, 5-HT(4) receptors were increased in olfactory tubercule, hippocampal CA1, parietal, piriform, and cingulate cortex of A9. However, hippocampal CA2 and CA3 areas, and frontal, parietal, and temporal cortex of A9 rats, expressed less 5-HT(4) receptors. These findings suggest that serotonergic activity, via 5-HT(4) receptors in hippocampal, striatum, and cortical areas, mediates memory function and provides further evidence for a complex and regionally specific regulation over 5-HT receptor expression during memory formation.

  15. Characterization of dopamine D1 and D2 receptor-expressing neurons in the mouse hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Gangarossa, Giuseppe; Longueville, Sophie; De Bundel, Dimitri; Perroy, Julie; Hervé, Denis; Girault, Jean-Antoine; Valjent, Emmanuel

    2012-12-01

    The hippocampal formation is part of an anatomical system critically involved in learning and memory. Increasing evidence suggests that dopamine plays an important role in learning and memory as well as in several forms of synaptic plasticity. However, the precise identification of neuronal populations expressing D1 or D2 dopamine receptors within the hippocampus is still lacking. To clarify this issue, we used BAC transgenic mice expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) under the control of the promoter of dopamine D1 or D2 receptors. In Drd1a-EGFP mice, sparse GFP-expressing neurons were detected among glutamatergic projecting neurons of the granular layer of the dentate gyrus and GABAergic interneurons located in the hilus. A dense immunofluorescence was observed in the outer and medial part of the molecular layer of the dentate gyrus as well as in the inner part of the molecular layer of CA1 corresponding to the terminals of pyramidal neurons of the entorhinal cortex defining the perforant and the temporo-ammonic pathway respectively. Finally, scattered D1 receptor-expressing neurons were also identified as GABAergic interneurons in the CA3/CA1 fields of the hippocampus. In Drd2-EGFP transgenic mice, GFP was exclusively detected in the glutamatergic mossy cells located in the polymorphic layer of the dentate gyrus. This pattern was confirmed in Drd2-Cre mice crossed with NLS-LacZ-Tau(mGFP) :LoxP and RCE:LoxP reporter lines. Our results demonstrate that D1 and D2 receptor-expressing neurons are strictly segregated in the mouse hippocampus. By clarifying the identity of D1 and D2 receptor-expressing neurons in the hippocampus, this study establishes a basis for future investigations aiming at elucidating their roles in the hippocampal network.

  16. Dysregulated Chemokine Receptor Expression and Chemokine-Mediated Cell Trafficking in Pediatric Patients with ESRD

    PubMed Central

    Sherry, Barbara; Dai, Wei Wei; Lesser, Martin L.; Trachtman, Howard

    2008-01-01

    Background and objectives: Children and adolescents with ESRD on dialysis are susceptible to serious bacterial infections (SBI). Chemokines and chemokine receptors play a critical role in modulating macrophage and neutrophil function. This study examined the hypothesis that expression and/or function of these molecules is dysregulated in patients with ESRD, contributing to leukocyte dysfunction. Design setting, participants, & measurements: Pediatric patients, age 6 mo to 18 yr, with ESRD treated with either hemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis were enrolled in this prospective, nontherapeutic study. Blood was collected for plasma chemokine levels, chemokine receptor profiling by flow cytometry, and functional chemotaxis studies on neutrophils and mononuclear cells. Results: ESRD in children was associated with reduced expression of the chemokine receptors CXCR1 and chemokine (C-C motif) receptor 2 (CCR2) on circulating neutrophils and monocytes, respectively. When ESRD patients were divided into two subgroups, those who were infection-free and those who had three or more SBI in the preceding year, the differences in chemokine receptor expression were statistically significant compared with control subjects only in those with recurrent infection. In addition to the effects of ESRD on baseline chemokine receptor expression, the hemodialysis procedure itself acutely lowered neutrophil CXCR1 and monocyte CCR2 expression. Furthermore, neutrophil and monocyte responsiveness to chemokine-mediated trafficking signals was impaired in all ESRD patients studied. This abnormality was independent of the level of chemokine receptor expression on the leukocytes. Conclusions: The data presented in this study suggest that chemokine receptor dysregulation contributes to leukocyte dysfunction in patients with ESRD. This alteration is especially prominent in ESRD patients with recurrent infection. PMID:18235145

  17. Regulation of interferon receptor expression in human blood lymphocytes in vitro and during interferon therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Lau, A.S.; Hannigan, G.E.; Freedman, M.H.; Williams, B.R.

    1986-05-01

    Interferons (IFN) elicit antiviral and antineoplastic activities by binding to specific receptors on the cell surface. The binding characteristics of IFN to human lymphocytes were studied using IFN alpha 2 labeled with /sup 125/I to high specific activity. The specific binding curves generated were analyzed by the LIGAND program of Munson and Rodbard to determine receptor numbers. The number of receptors in peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) and tonsillar B-lymphocytes (TBL) from normal individuals were 505 +/- 293 (n = 10) and 393 +/- 147 (n = 3) respectively. When these cells were preincubated in vitro with unlabeled IFN alpha 2, the receptor number decreased to 82 +/- 45 and 61 +/- 16 respectively. Receptor binding activities recovered gradually over a period of 72 h when the cells were incubated in IFN-free medium. This recovery of receptors could be blocked by the addition of actinomycin D to the incubation medium. A similar decrease in receptor expression was observed in vivo in PBL from patients being treated daily with 5 X 10(6) units/m2 per d of IFN alpha 2 by subcutaneous injection, for acute lymphoblastic leukemia or papilloma virus infections. Receptor numbers in PBL in vivo were further reduced concurrent with the progression of IFN therapy. Thus, the reduction in IFN receptor expression observed in vitro can be demonstrated in vivo. These studies indicate that monitoring IFN receptor expression in vivo can provide information regarding the availability of IFN receptors at the cell surface for the mediation of IFN actions during the course of IFN therapy.

  18. The Triggering Receptor Expressed on Myeloid Cells 2: A Molecular Link of Neuroinflammation and Neurodegenerative Diseases*

    PubMed Central

    Walter, Jochen

    2016-01-01

    The triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells (TREM) 2 is a member of the immunoglobulin superfamily of receptors and mediates signaling in immune cells via engagement of its co-receptor DNAX-activating protein of 12 kDa (DAP12). Homozygous mutations in TREM2 or DAP12 cause Nasu-Hakola disease, which is characterized by bone abnormalities and dementia. Recently, a variant of TREM2 has also been associated with an increased risk for Alzheimer disease. The selective expression of TREM2 on immune cells and its association with different forms of dementia indicate a contribution of this receptor in common pathways of neurodegeneration. PMID:26694609

  19. Enhancement in gastric mucosal epidermal growth factor receptor expression by sulglycotide.

    PubMed

    Slomiany, B L; Piotrowski, J; Czajkowski, A; Murty, V L; Majka, J; Slomiany, A

    1994-05-01

    The effect of intragastric administration of sulglycotide, a cytoprotective sulfated glycopeptide, on the expression of gastric mucosal epidermal growth factor receptor was investigated. The experiments were conducted with groups of rats, one receiving twice daily for 5 consecutive days a dose of 200mg/kg sulglycotide, and the other only vehicle. Mucosal cell membranes were isolated from the stomachs at 16, 40 and 88h after the last dose, and used for EGF receptor assays. The binding assays revealed a marked increase in mucosal EGF receptor expression with sulglycotide. Compared to the controls, the sulglycotide-treated group showed a 4-fold increase in the EGF receptor expression at 16h after the last dose of sulglycotide, a 4.7-fold increase in the EGF receptor was observed by the 40h, and a 4.2-fold increase was still evident at 88h following the treatment. The results demonstrate that sulglycotide exhibits remarkable ability to enhance the gastric mucosal expression of EGF receptor.

  20. Enhancement in gastric mucosal EGF and PDGF receptor expression with ulcer healing by sulglycotide.

    PubMed

    Piotrowski, J; Majka, J; Sano, S; Nowak, P; Murty, V L; Slomiany, A; Slomiany, B L

    1995-07-01

    1. The effect of an antiulcer agent, sulglycotide, on mucosal expression of EGF and PDGF receptors with chronic ulcer healing was investigated. 2. Rats with experimentally-induced gastric ulcers were treated twice daily for 14 consecutive days, either with sulglycotide at 200 mg/kg or vehicle, and at different stages of treatment used for quantitation of gastric mucosal EGF and PDGF receptors. 3. The ulcer healing was accompanied by an increase in mucosal expression of both types of receptors. A 1.8-fold increase in EGF and 3.1-fold increase in PDGF receptors occurred by the 4th day following the development of ulcer and reached a maximum of 2.4-3.9-fold increase by the 10-14th day. 4. Treatment with sulglycotide caused accelerated ulcer healing accompanied by a significant enhancement in the receptors expression. A 2.3- and 3.6-fold increase in EGF and PDGF receptor expression occurred by the 4th day of sulglycotide treatment, reaching a 5.5- and 5.6-fold respective increase by the 10th day when the ulcer essentially healed. 5. The results attest to the ability of sulglycotide to stimulate the gastric mucosal proliferative activities associated with ulcer healing.

  1. Dopamine D2 receptor expression in the corticotroph cells of the human normal pituitary gland.

    PubMed

    Pivonello, Rosario; Waaijers, Marlijn; Kros, Johan M; Pivonello, Claudia; de Angelis, Cristina; Cozzolino, Alessia; Colao, Annamaria; Lamberts, Steven W J; Hofland, Leo J

    2016-10-13

    The dopamine D2 receptor is the main dopamine receptor expressed in the human normal pituitary gland. The aim of the current study was to evaluate dopamine D2 receptor expression in the corticotroph cell populations of the anterior lobe and pars intermedia, as well as posterior lobe of the human normal pituitary gland by immunohistochemistry. Human normal pituitary gland samples obtained from routine autopsies were used for the study. In all cases, histology together with immunostaining for adrenocorticotropic hormone, melanocyte-stimulating hormone, prolactin, and neurofilaments were performed and compared to the immunostaining for D2 receptor. D2 receptor was heterogeneously expressed in the majority of the cell populations of the anterior and posterior lobe as well as in the area localized between the anterior and posterior lobe, and arbitrary defined as "intermediate zone". This zone, characterized by the presence of nerve fibers included the residual pars intermedia represented by the colloid-filled cysts lined by the remnant melanotroph cells strongly expressing D2 receptors, and clusters of corticotroph cells, belonging to the anterior lobe but localized within the cysts and adjacent to the posterior lobe, variably expressing D2 receptors. D2 dopamine receptor is expressed in the majority of the cell populations of the human normal pituitary gland, and particularly, in the different corticotroph cell populations localized in the anterior lobe and the intermediate zone of the pituitary gland.

  2. Cationic modulation of rho 1-type gamma-aminobutyrate receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Calvo, D J; Vazquez, A E; Miledi, R

    1994-01-01

    A study was made of the effects of di- and trivalent cations on homomeric rho 1-type gamma-aminobutyrate (GABA rho 1) receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes after injection of mRNA coding for the GABA rho 1 subunit. GABA elicited large currents with a Kd approximately 1 microM. The properties of these GABA rho 1 receptors were similar to those of native bicuculline-resistant GABA receptors expressed by retinal mRNA. GABA rho 1 currents showed very little desensitization, were blocked by picrotoxin but not by bicuculline, and were not modulated by barbiturates, benzodiazepines, or beta-carbolines. Zn2+ reversibly decreased GABA rho 1 responses (IC50 = 22 microM). Other divalent cations were also tested and their rank order of potency was: Zn2+ approximately Ni2+ approximately Cu2+ >> Cd2+, whereas Ba2+, Co2+, Sr2+, Mn2+, Mg2+, and Ca2+ showed little or no effect. In contrast, La3+ reversibly potentiated the GABA currents mediated by homomeric GABA rho 1 receptors, with an EC50 = 135 microM and a maximal potentiation of about 100% (GABA, 1 microM; La3+, 1 mM). Other lanthanides showed similar effects (Lu3+ > Eu3+ > Tb3+ > Gd3+ > Er3% > Nd3+ > La3+ > Ce3+). Thus, GABA rho 1 receptors contain sites for cationic recognition, and in particular, Zn2+ may play a role during synaptic transmission in the retina. Images Fig. 3 PMID:7809110

  3. An MR Contrast Agent for Intra-Prostatic Imaging of Prostatic Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    nanoparticle MR contrast targeted to the gastrin releasing peptide receptor (GRP receptor) that will be used to image the intra-prostatic distribution of...develop a magnetic nanoparticle MR contrast targeted to the gastrin releasing peptide receptor (GRP receptor) that will be used to image the intra...the receptor in a convenient animal model, the normal mouse. The GRP receptor is expressed at high levels in the normal rodent pancreas. I. Synthesis

  4. MicroRNA-155 regulates monocyte chemokine and chemokine receptor expression in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Elmesmari, Aziza; Fraser, Alasdair R.; Wood, Claire; Gilchrist, Derek; Vaughan, Diane; Stewart, Lynn; McSharry, Charles; McInnes, Iain B.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To test the hypothesis that miR-155 regulates monocyte migratory potential via modulation of chemokine and chemokine receptor expression in RA, and thereby is associated with disease activity. Methods. The miR-155 copy-numbers in monocytes from peripheral blood (PB) of healthy (n = 22), RA (n = 24) and RA SF (n = 11) were assessed by real time-PCR using synthetic miR-155 as a quantitative standard. To evaluate the functional impact of miR-155, human monocytes were transfected with control or miR-155 mimic, and the effect on transcript levels, and production of chemokines was evaluated by Taqman low-density arrays and multiplex assays. A comparative study evaluated constitutive chemokine receptor expression in miR-155−/− and wild-type murine (CD115 + Ly6C + Ly6G−) monocytes. Results. Compared with healthy monocytes, the miR-155 copy-number was higher in RA, peripheral blood (PB) and SF monocytes (PB P < 0.01, and SF P < 0.0001). The miR-155 copy-number in RA PB monocytes was higher in ACPA-positive compared with ACPA-negative patients (P = 0.033) and correlated (95% CI) with DAS28 (ESR), R = 0.728 (0.460, 0.874), and with tender, R = 0.631 (0.306, 0.824) and swollen, R = 0.503 (0.125, 0.753) joint counts. Enforced-expression of miR-155 in RA monocytes stimulated the production of CCL3, CCL4, CCL5 and CCL8; upregulated CCR7 expression; and downregulated CCR2. Conversely, miR155−/− monocytes showed downregulated CCR7 and upregulated CCR2 expression. Conclusion. Given the observed correlations with disease activity, these data provide strong evidence that miR-155 can contribute to RA pathogenesis by regulating chemokine production and pro-inflammatory chemokine receptor expression, thereby promoting inflammatory cell recruitment and retention in the RA synovium. PMID:27411480

  5. Vitamin D3 restores altered cholinergic and insulin receptor expression in the cerebral cortex and muscarinic M3 receptor expression in pancreatic islets of streptozotocin induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Peeyush T; Antony, Sherin; Nandhu, Mohan S; Sadanandan, Jayanarayanan; Naijil, George; Paulose, Chiramadathikudiyil S

    2011-05-01

    Nutritional therapy is a challenging but necessary dimension in the management of diabetes and neurodegenerative changes associated with it. The study evaluates the effect of vitamin D(3) in preventing the altered function of cholinergic, insulin receptors and GLUT3 in the cerebral cortex of diabetic rats. Muscarinic M3 acetylcholine receptors in pancreas control insulin secretion. Vitamin D(3) treatment in M3 receptor regulation in the pancreatic islets was also studied. Radioreceptor binding assays and gene expression was done in the cerebral cortex of male Wistar rats. Immunocytochemistry of muscarinic M3 receptor was studied in the pancreatic islets using specific antibodies. Y-maze was used to evaluate the exploratory and spatial memory. Diabetes induced a decrease in muscarinic M1, insulin and vitamin D receptor expression and an increase in muscarinic M3, α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor, acetylcholine esterase and GLUT3 expression. Vitamin D(3) and insulin treatment reversed diabetes-induced alterations to near control. Diabetic rats showed a decreased Y-maze performance while vitamin D(3) supplementation improved the behavioural deficit. In conclusion, vitamin D(3) shows a potential therapeutic effect in normalizing diabetes-induced alterations in cholinergic, insulin and vitamin D receptor and maintains a normal glucose transport and utilisation in the cortex. In addition vitamin D(3) modulated muscarinic M3 receptors activity in pancreas and plays a pivotal role in controlling insulin secretion. Hence our findings proved, vitamin D(3) supplementation as a potential nutritional therapy in ameliorating diabetes mediated cortical dysfunctions and suggest an interaction between vitamin D(3) and muscarinic M3 receptors in regulating insulin secretion from pancreas.

  6. Genetic regulation of platelet receptor expression and function: application in clinical practice and drug development.

    PubMed

    Williams, Marlene S; Weiss, Ethan J; Sabatine, Marc S; Simon, Daniel I; Bahou, Wadie F; Becker, Lewis C; Parise, Leslie V; Dauerman, Harold L; French, Patricia A; Smyth, Susan S; Becker, Richard C

    2010-12-01

    Understanding genetic contributions to platelet function could have profound clinical ramifications for personalizing platelet-directed pharmacotherapy, by providing insight into the risks and possible benefits associated with specific genotypes. This article represents an integrated summary of presentations related to genetic regulation of platelet receptor expression and function given at the Fifth Annual Platelet Colloquium in January 2010. It is supplemented with additional highlights from the literature covering (1) approaches to determining and evidence for the associations of genetic variants with platelet hypo- and hyperresponsive phenotypes, (2) the ramifications of these polymorphisms with regard to clinical responses to antiplatelet therapies, and (3) the role of platelet function/genetic testing in guiding antiplatelet therapy.

  7. Distribution of delta opioid receptor expressing neurons in the mouse hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Eric, ERBS; Lauren, FAGET; Gregory, SCHERRER; Pascal, KESSLER; Didier, HENTSCH; Jean-Luc, VONESCH; Audrey, MATIFAS; Brigitte L., KIEFFER; Dominique, MASSOTTE

    2012-01-01

    Delta opioid receptors participate to the control of chronic pain and emotional responses. Recent data also identified their implication in spatial memory and drug-context associations pointing to a critical role of hippocampal delta receptors. We examined the distribution of delta receptor-expressing cells in the hippocampus using fluorescent knock-in mice that express a functional delta receptor fused at its carboxyterminus with the green fluorescent protein in place of the native receptor. Colocalization with markers for different neuronal populations was performed by immunohistochemical detection. Fine mapping in the dorsal hippocampus confirmed that delta opioid receptors are mainly present in GABAergic neurons. Indeed, they are mostly expressed in parvalbumin-immunopositive neurons both in the Ammon’s horn and dentate gyrus. These receptors, therefore, most likely participate to the dynamic regulation of hippocampal activity. PMID:22750239

  8. Cytokine receptor expression in human lymphoid tissue: analysis by fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Zola, H; Ridings, J; Weedon, H; Fusco, M; Byard, R W; Macardle, P J

    1995-08-01

    A highly-sensitive flourescence method, capable of detecting cytokine receptors present at low concentrations (around 100 molecules per cell) by flow cytometry, was adapted for use on tissue sections. This method was used to examine the expression of several cytokine receptors in lymphoid tissues. IL-2 receptors were distributed broadly, with higher concentrations in T cell areas. IL-1 receptor Type 1 was detected in T cell areas and in the follicular mantle, and was strongly expressed on vascular endothelium. IL-6 receptor was found at very low concentration, both within and outside germinal centres. The gp 130 molecule, which is involved in the functional receptor complex for IL-6 and several other cytokines, was present at higher concentrations, particularly in the germinal centre. Analysis of receptor expression in secondary lymphoid tissue provides evidence bearing on the physiological roles of cytokines, as these tissues contain cells at various stages of physiological activation located in well-defined functional zones.

  9. Distribution of delta opioid receptor-expressing neurons in the mouse hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Erbs, E; Faget, L; Scherrer, G; Kessler, P; Hentsch, D; Vonesch, J-L; Matifas, A; Kieffer, B L; Massotte, D

    2012-09-27

    Delta opioid receptors participate to the control of chronic pain and emotional responses. Recent data also identified their implication in spatial memory and drug-context associations pointing to a critical role of hippocampal delta receptors. We examined the distribution of delta receptor-expressing cells in the hippocampus using fluorescent knock-in mice that express a functional delta receptor fused at its carboxyterminus with the green fluorescent protein in place of the native receptor. Colocalization with markers for different neuronal populations was performed by immunohistochemical detection. Fine mapping in the dorsal hippocampus confirmed that delta opioid receptors are mainly present in GABAergic neurons. Indeed, they are mostly expressed in parvalbumin-immunopositive neurons both in the Ammon's horn and dentate gyrus. These receptors, therefore, most likely participate in the dynamic regulation of hippocampal activity.

  10. Association of Hormone Receptor Expression with Survival in Ovarian Endometrioid Carcinoma: Biological Validation and Clinical Implications

    PubMed Central

    Rambau, Peter; Kelemen, Linda E.; Steed, Helen; Quan, May Lynn; Ghatage, Prafull; Köbel, Martin

    2017-01-01

    This paper aims to validate whether hormone receptor expression is associated with longer survival among women diagnosed with ovarian endometrioid carcinoma (EC), and whether it identifies patients with stage IC/II tumors with excellent outcome that could be spared from toxic chemotherapy. Expression of estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) was assessed on 182 EC samples represented on tissue microarrays using the Alberta Ovarian Tumor Type (AOVT) cohort. Statistical analyses were performed to test for associations with ovarian cancer specific survival. ER or PR expression was present in 87.3% and 86.7% of cases, respectively, with co-expression present in 83.0%. Expression of each of the hormonal receptors was significantly higher in low-grade tumors and tumors with squamous differentiation. Expression of ER (Hazard Ratio (HR) = 0.18, 95% confidence interval 0.08–0.42, p = 0.0002) and of PR (HR = 0.22, 95% confidence interval 0.10–0.53, p = 0.0011) were significantly associated with longer ovarian cancer specific survival adjusted for age, grade, treatment center, stage, and residual disease. However, the five-year ovarian cancer specific survival among women with ER positive stage IC/II EC was 89.0% (standard error 3.3%) and for PR positive tumors 89.9% (standard error 3.2%), robustly below the 95% threshold where adjuvant therapy could be avoided. We validated the association of hormone receptor expression with ovarian cancer specific survival independent of standard predictors in an independent sample set of EC. The high ER/PR co-expression frequency and the survival difference support further testing of the efficacy of hormonal therapy in hormone receptor-positive ovarian EC. The clinical utility to identify a group of women diagnosed with EC at stage IC/II that could be spared from adjuvant therapy is limited. PMID:28264438

  11. Functional characteristics of enhanced Fc receptor expression of beta 2 integrin-deficient bovine mononuclear phagocytes.

    PubMed

    Nagahata, H; Higuchi, H; Goji, N; Noda, H; Kuwabara, M

    1996-01-01

    Fc receptor expression, cytoplasmic Ca2+ signaling, chemiluminescent (CL) response, and electron spin resonance (ESR) combined with spin trapping of blood mononuclear phagocytes from control heifers and a heifer with leukocyte adhesion deficiency (LAD) were evaluated to elucidate the relationships between complement receptor type 3 (CR3) and Fc receptor expression and their functional responses. The mean fluorescence intensity of fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-conjugated anti-bovine IgG bound to mononuclear phagocytes from the heifer with LAD was 1.8-fold higher than that of control heifers. The mean increments of cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentrations of mononuclear phagocytes from the heifer with LAD stimulated with OPZ, Agg-IgG, and PMA were 39.4 (P < 0.05), 118, and 71.6% compared with those of control heifers. A 1.27-fold increase in the CL response relative to control heifers was detected when mononuclear phagocytes from the heifer with LAD were stimulated with Agg-IgG. The OPZ-induced CL response of mononuclear phagocytes from the heifer with LAD was significantly (P < 0.05) decreased, whereas the PMA-induced CL response was similar to that of control heifers. The ESR spectrum of mononuclear phagocytes from the heifer with LAD was increased when stimulated with Agg-IgG, and was impaired when stimulated by OPZ compared with that of control heifers. The ESR spectrum of mononuclear phagocytes stimulated with PMA was similar in control heifers and the heifer with LAD. Fc receptors on mononuclear phagocytes from the heifer with LAD were enhanced, and their cytoplasmic Ca2+ signaling, CL response, and ESR-spin trapping when stimulated with Agg-IgG and OPZ appeared to be associated with enhanced Fc receptors.

  12. 5-HT7 receptor activation promotes an increase in TrkB receptor expression and phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Samarajeewa, Anshula; Goldemann, Lolita; Vasefi, Maryam S.; Ahmed, Nawaz; Gondora, Nyasha; Khanderia, Chandni; Mielke, John G.; Beazely, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    The serotonin (5-HT) type 7 receptor is expressed throughout the CNS including the cortex and hippocampus. We have previously demonstrated that the application of 5-HT7 receptor agonists to primary hippocampal neurons and SH-SY5Y cells increases platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) receptor expression and promotes neuroprotection against N-methyl-D-aspartate-(NMDA)-induced toxicity. The tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB) receptor is one of the receptors for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and is associated with neurodevelopmental and neuroprotective effects. Application of LP 12 to primary cerebral cortical cultures, SH-SY5Y cells, as well as the retinal ganglion cell line, RGC-5, increased both the expression of full length TrkB as well as its basal phosphorylation state at tyrosine 816. The increase in TrkB expression and phosphorylation was observed as early as 30 min after 5-HT7 receptor activation. In addition to full-length TrkB, kinase domain-deficient forms may be expressed and act as dominant-negative proteins toward the full length receptor. We have identified distinct patterns of TrkB isoform expression across our cell lines and cortical cultures. Although TrkB receptor expression is regulated by cyclic AMP and Gαs-coupled GPCRs in several systems, we demonstrate that, depending on the model system, pathways downstream of both Gαs and Gα12 are involved in the regulation of TrkB expression by 5-HT7 receptors. Given the number of psychiatric and degenerative diseases associated with TrkB/BDNF deficiency and the current interest in developing 5-HT7 receptor ligands as pharmaceuticals, identifying signaling relationships between these two receptors will aid in our understanding of the potential therapeutic effects of 5-HT7 receptor ligands. PMID:25426041

  13. 5-HT7 receptor activation promotes an increase in TrkB receptor expression and phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Samarajeewa, Anshula; Goldemann, Lolita; Vasefi, Maryam S; Ahmed, Nawaz; Gondora, Nyasha; Khanderia, Chandni; Mielke, John G; Beazely, Michael A

    2014-01-01

    The serotonin (5-HT) type 7 receptor is expressed throughout the CNS including the cortex and hippocampus. We have previously demonstrated that the application of 5-HT7 receptor agonists to primary hippocampal neurons and SH-SY5Y cells increases platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) receptor expression and promotes neuroprotection against N-methyl-D-aspartate-(NMDA)-induced toxicity. The tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB) receptor is one of the receptors for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and is associated with neurodevelopmental and neuroprotective effects. Application of LP 12 to primary cerebral cortical cultures, SH-SY5Y cells, as well as the retinal ganglion cell line, RGC-5, increased both the expression of full length TrkB as well as its basal phosphorylation state at tyrosine 816. The increase in TrkB expression and phosphorylation was observed as early as 30 min after 5-HT7 receptor activation. In addition to full-length TrkB, kinase domain-deficient forms may be expressed and act as dominant-negative proteins toward the full length receptor. We have identified distinct patterns of TrkB isoform expression across our cell lines and cortical cultures. Although TrkB receptor expression is regulated by cyclic AMP and Gαs-coupled GPCRs in several systems, we demonstrate that, depending on the model system, pathways downstream of both Gαs and Gα12 are involved in the regulation of TrkB expression by 5-HT7 receptors. Given the number of psychiatric and degenerative diseases associated with TrkB/BDNF deficiency and the current interest in developing 5-HT7 receptor ligands as pharmaceuticals, identifying signaling relationships between these two receptors will aid in our understanding of the potential therapeutic effects of 5-HT7 receptor ligands.

  14. Harnessing endogenous miR-181a to segregate transgenic antigen receptor expression in developing versus post-thymic T cells in murine hematopoietic chimeras.

    PubMed

    Papapetrou, Eirini P; Kovalovsky, Damian; Beloeil, Laurent; Sant'angelo, Derek; Sadelain, Michel

    2009-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, noncoding RNAs that regulate gene expression by targeting complementary sequences, referred to as miRNA recognition elements (MREs), typically located in the 3' untranslated region of mRNAs. miR-181a is highly expressed in developing thymocytes and markedly downregulated in post-thymic T cells. We investigated whether endogenous miR-181a can be harnessed to segregate expression of chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) and TCRs between developing and mature T cells. Lentiviral-encoded antigen receptors were tagged with a miR-181a-specific MRE and transduced into mouse BM cells that were used to generate hematopoietic chimeras. Expression of a CAR specific for human CD19 (hCD19) was selectively suppressed in late double-negative and double-positive thymocytes, coinciding with the peak in endogenous miR-181a expression. Receptor expression was fully restored in post-thymic resting and activated T cells, affording protection against a subsequent challenge with hCD19+ tumors. Hematopoietic mouse chimeras engrafted with a conalbumin-specific TCR prone to thymic clonal deletion acquired peptide-specific T cell responsiveness only when the vector-encoded TCR transcript was similarly engineered to be subject to regulation by miR-181a. These results demonstrate the potential of miRNA-regulated transgene expression in stem cell-based therapies, including cancer immunotherapy.

  15. ANALYSIS OF ANDROGEN- AND EGF-RECEPTOR EXPRESSION IN THE FETAL RAT PHALLUS AFTER EXPOSURE TO VINCLOZOLIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Analysis of Androgen- and EGF-Receptor Expression in the Fetal Rat Phallus After Exposure to Vinclozolin
    Cynthia Wolf1,2, Barbara Abbott1, Gerald A. LeBlanc2, and L. Earl Gray, Jr.1
    1USEPA, ORD, NHEERL, RTD, RTP, NC 27711, 2NCSU, Environmental and Molecular Toxicology, Ral...

  16. Androgen receptor expression in breast cancer in relation to molecular phenotype: results from the Nurses' Health Study.

    PubMed

    Collins, Laura C; Cole, Kimberly S; Marotti, Jonathan D; Hu, Rong; Schnitt, Stuart J; Tamimi, Rulla M

    2011-07-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that androgen receptor is expressed in many breast cancers, but its expression in relation to the various breast cancer subtypes as defined by molecular profiling has not been studied in detail. We constructed tissue microarrays from 3093 breast cancers that developed in women enrolled in the Nurses' Health Study. Tissue microarray sections were immunostained for estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), cytokeratin 5/6, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and androgen receptor (ER). Immunostain results were used to categorize each cancer as luminal A or B, HER2 and basal like. The relationships between androgen receptor expression and molecular subtype were analyzed. Overall, 77% of the invasive breast carcinomas were androgen receptor positive. Among 2171 invasive cancers, 64% were luminal A, 15% luminal B, 6% HER2 and 11% basal like. The frequency of androgen receptor expression varied significantly across the molecular phenotypes (P<0.0001). In particular, androgen receptor expression was commonly observed in luminal A (91%) and B (68%) cancers, but was less frequently seen in HER2 cancers (59%). Despite being defined by the absence of ER and PR expression and being considered hormonally unresponsive, 32% of basal-like cancers expressed androgen receptor. Among 246 cases of ductal carcinoma in situ, 86% were androgen receptor positive, but the frequency of androgen receptor expression differed significantly across the molecular phenotypes (P=0.001), and high nuclear grade lesions were less likely to be androgen receptor positive compared with lower-grade lesions. Androgen receptor expression is most commonly seen in luminal A and B invasive breast cancers. However, expression of androgen receptor is also seen in approximately one-third of basal-like cancers, providing further evidence that basal-like cancers represent a heterogeneous group. Our findings raise the

  17. Serotonin Receptors Expressed in Drosophila Mushroom Bodies Differentially Modulate Larval Locomotion

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Bryon; Goles, Nicolás I.; Varas, Rodrigo; Campusano, Jorge M.

    2014-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster has been successfully used as a simple model to study the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying behaviors, including the generation of motor programs. Thus, it has been shown that, as in vertebrates, CNS biogenic amines (BA) including serotonin (5HT) participate in motor control in Drosophila. Several evidence show that BA systems innervate an important association area in the insect brain previously associated to the planning and/or execution of motor programs, the Mushroom Bodies (MB). The main objective of this work is to evaluate the contribution of 5HT and its receptors expressed in MB to motor behavior in fly larva. Locomotion was evaluated using an automated tracking system, in Drosophila larvae (3rd-instar) exposed to drugs that affect the serotonergic neuronal transmission: alpha-methyl-L-dopa, MDMA and fluoxetine. In addition, animals expressing mutations in the 5HT biosynthetic enzymes or in any of the previously identified receptors for this amine (5HT1AR, 5HT1BR, 5HT2R and 5HT7R) were evaluated in their locomotion. Finally, RNAi directed to the Drosophila 5HT receptor transcripts were expressed in MB and the effect of this manipulation on motor behavior was assessed. Data obtained in the mutants and in animals exposed to the serotonergic drugs, suggest that 5HT systems are important regulators of motor programs in fly larvae. Studies carried out in animals pan-neuronally expressing the RNAi for each of the serotonergic receptors, support this idea and further suggest that CNS 5HT pathways play a role in motor control. Moreover, animals expressing an RNAi for 5HT1BR, 5HT2R and 5HT7R in MB show increased motor behavior, while no effect is observed when the RNAi for 5HT1AR is expressed in this region. Thus, our data suggest that CNS 5HT systems are involved in motor control, and that 5HT receptors expressed in MB differentially modulate motor programs in fly larvae. PMID:24586928

  18. Evidence of morphine like substance and μ-opioid receptor expression in Toxacara canis (Nematoda: Ascaridae)

    PubMed Central

    Golabi, Mostafa; Naem, Soraya; Imani, Mehdi; Dalirezh, Nowruz

    2016-01-01

    Toxocara canis (Nematoda: Ascaridae) is an intestinal nematode parasite of dogs, which can also cause disease in humans. Transmission to humans usually occurs because of direct contact with T. canis eggs present in soil contaminated with the feces of infected dogs. This nematode has extraordinary abilities to survive for many years in different tissues of vertebrates, and develop to maturity in the intestinal tract of its definitive host. Survival of parasitic nematodes within a host requires immune evasion using complicated pathways. Morphine-like substance, as well as opioids, which are known as down regulating agents, can modulate both innate and acquired immune responses, and let the parasite survives in their hosts. In the present study, we aimed to find evidences of morphine-like substance and µ-opiate receptor expression in T. canis, using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The results indicated that T. canis produced morphine-like substances at the level of 2.31± 0.26 ng g-1 wet weight, and expressed µ-opiate receptor as in expected size of 441 bp. According to our findings, it was concluded that T. canis, benefits using morphine-like substance to modulate host immunity. PMID:28144426

  19. Role of triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-1/3 in Klebsiella-derived pneumosepsis.

    PubMed

    Hommes, Tijmen J; Dessing, Mark C; Veer, Cornelis van 't; Florquin, Sandrine; Colonna, Marco; de Vos, Alex F; van der Poll, Tom

    2015-11-01

    Triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells (TREM)-1 and -2 can affect Toll-like receptor-mediated activation of immune cells. Klebsiella pneumoniae is a common cause of pneumonia-derived sepsis. Here we studied the role of TREM-1/3 and TREM-2 in the host response during Klebsiella pneumonia. Macrophages lacking either TREM-1/3 or TREM-2 were tested for their responsiveness toward K. pneumoniae and for their capacity to internalize this pathogen in vitro. TREM-1/3- and TREM-2-deficient mice were infected with K. pneumoniae via the airways, and their responses were compared with those in wild-type mice. TREM-1/3-deficient macrophages produced lower cytokine levels upon exposure to K. pneumoniae, whereas TREM-2-deficient macrophages released higher cytokine concentrations. TREM-2-deficient, but not TREM-1/3-deficient, macrophages showed a reduced capacity to phagocytose K. pneumoniae. TREM-1/3-deficient mice showed an impaired host defense during Klebsiella pneumonia, as reflected by worsened survival and increased bacterial growth and dissemination. In contrast, TREM-2 deficiency did not affect disease outcome. Although TREM-1/3 and TREM-2 influence macrophage responsiveness to K. pneumoniae in vitro, only TREM-1/3 contribute to the host response during Klebsiella pneumonia in vivo, serving a protective role.

  20. Positive and negative cues for modulating neurite dynamics and receptor expression.

    PubMed

    Wrobel, Melissa R; Sundararaghavan, Harini G

    2017-03-27

    Many current peripheral nerve repair strategies focus on delivering positive, growth promoting cues (e.g. extracellular matrix, ECM) while eliminating negative, growth inhibiting cues (e.g. chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans, CSPGs) at the injury site. We hypothesized that recapitulating the positive and negative cues of the peripheral nerve injury microenvironment would improve regeneration. First, we tested the effects of a characteristic CSPG, chondroitin sulfate A (CSA) on neurite dynamics of dissociated chick embryo dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons using time lapse video microscopy. DRG growth was recorded on different adhesive substrates, including a novel, porcine-derived spinal cord matrix (SCM). The SCM significantly increased frequency of neurite extension coordinated by a significant reduction in the neurites' time spent stalled. The SCM also mitigated inhibitory effects of CSA, producing longer neurites than the controls without CSA treatment. Next we aimed to elucidate receptors involved in mediating this behavior by testing the ability of CSA to upregulate cell-substrate binding receptors using flow cytometry. Our results showed a significant increase in syndecan-3 receptor expression in neurons treated with CSA. Furthermore, syndecans would most likely bind to the sulfated glycosaminoglycans measured in the SCM. Finally, we evaluated neurite growth on biomaterial scaffolds featuring CSA and SCM cues. Our results showed significantly increased neurite outgrowth on electrospun hyaluronic acid fibers with SCM and low levels of CSA. Higher incorporation of CSA maintained its inhibitory properties. Future work will evaluate coupling CSPGs with growth-permissive ECM to assess the combined effect on neurite outgrowth.

  1. Fighting experience alters brain androgen receptor expression dependent on testosterone status

    PubMed Central

    Li, Cheng-Yu; Earley, Ryan L.; Huang, Shu-Ping; Hsu, Yuying

    2014-01-01

    Contest decisions are influenced by the outcomes of recent fights (winner–loser effects). Steroid hormones and serotonin are closely associated with aggression and therefore probably also play important roles in mediating winner–loser effects. In mangrove rivulus fish, Kryptolebias marmoratus, individuals with higher testosterone (T), 11-ketotestosterone and cortisol levels are more capable of winning, but titres of these hormones do not directly mediate winner–loser effects. In this study, we investigated the effects of winning/losing experiences on brain expression levels of the receptor genes for androgen (AR), oestrogen α/β (ERα/β), glucocorticoid (GR) and serotonin (5-HT1AR). The effect of contest experience on AR gene expression depended on T levels: repeated losses decreased, whereas repeated wins increased AR gene expression in individuals with low T but not in individuals with medium or high T levels. These results lend strong support for AR being involved in mediating winner–loser effects, which, in previous studies, were more detectable in individuals with lower T. Furthermore, the expression levels of ERα/β, 5-HT1AR and GR genes were higher in individuals that initiated contests against larger opponents than in those that did not. Overall, contest experience, underlying endocrine state and hormone and serotonin receptor expression patterns interacted to modulate contest decisions jointly. PMID:25320171

  2. Chemotherapy-induced prospective memory impairment in breast cancer patients with different hormone receptor expression

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wen; Gan, Chen; Lv, Yue; Wang, Shanghu; Cheng, Huaidong

    2017-01-01

    Abstract This study aimed to investigate prospective memory impairment in patients with breast cancer with different expression of hormone receptors, including the estrogen receptor (ER) and the progesterone receptor (PR). A total of 120 patients with breast cancer who underwent chemotherapy following surgery were divided into 2 groups. The A group included 60 patients with ER−/PR− status, and the B group included 60 patients with ER+/PR+ status. After 6 cycles of postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy, all patients were administered neuropsychological and prospective memory tests, such as the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), verbal fluency test (VFT), and digit span test (DST), as well as examination of event-based prospective memory (EBPM) and time-based prospective memory (TBPM). As the neuropsychological background test results showed, there were no significant differences in MMSE, DST, and TBPM scores (∗:P > 0.05) between patients with breast cancer in the ER−/PR− and ER+/PR+ groups, while the VFT and EBPM scores were significantly greater in patients with breast cancer with ER+/PR+ status than in those with ER−/PR− status (∗∗: P < 0.01), indicating that patients with ER−/PR− status have significant impairment in EBPM, although not in TBPM. The results of the present study indicate that different hormone receptor expression in patients with breast cancer may be associated with heterogeneity of chemotherapy-induced prospective memory impairment. PMID:28353608

  3. Nicotine trapping causes the persistent desensitization of alpha4beta2 nicotinic receptors expressed in oocytes.

    PubMed

    Jia, Li; Flotildes, Karen; Li, Maureen; Cohen, Bruce N

    2003-02-01

    To determine whether prolonged nicotine exposure persistently inactivates rat alpha4beta2 nicotinic receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes, we measured the voltage-clamped alpha4beta2 response to acetylcholine (ACh) before and 24 h after, 1-h or 12-h incubations in 10 microm nicotine. A 12-h incubation in 10 microm nicotine depressed the alpha4beta2 ACh response for 24 h without affecting total or surface alpha4beta2 expression. To determine whether oocyte-mediated nicotine release caused this depression, we co-incubated an alpha4beta2-expressing oocyte with an un-injected one (pre-incubated in 10 microm nicotine for 12 h) for 24 h and measured the change in the alpha4beta2 ACh response. The response decreased by the same factor after the co-incubation as it did after a 12-h incubation in 10 microm nicotine and a 24-h incubation in nicotine-free media. Thus, oocyte-mediated nicotine release caused the persistent desensitization we observed after a 12-h incubation in 10 microm nicotine. Consistent with this result, measurements of [3H]nicotine release show that oocytes release enough nicotine into the wash media to desensitize alpha4beta2 receptors and that prolonged incubation in 300 microm ACh (which cannot readily cross the membrane or accumulate in acidic vesicles) did not persistently depress the alpha4beta2 response.

  4. NMDA Receptor Expression in the Thalamus of the Stargazer Model of Absence Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Barad, Z.; Grattan, D. R.; Leitch, B.

    2017-01-01

    In the stargazer mouse model of absence epilepsy, altered corticothalamic excitation of reticular thalamic nucleus (RTN) neurons has been suggested to contribute to abnormal synchronicity in the corticothalamic-thalamocortical circuit, leading to spike-wave discharges, the hallmark of absence seizures. AMPA receptor expression and function are decreased in stargazer RTN, due to a mutation of AMPAR auxiliary subunit stargazin. It is unresolved and debated, however, if decreased excitation of RTN is compatible with epileptogenesis. We tested the hypothesis that relative NMDAR expression may be increased in RTN and/or thalamic synapses in stargazers using Western blot on dissected thalamic nuclei and biochemically isolated synapses, as well as immunogold cytochemistry in RTN. Expression of main NMDAR subunits was variable in stargazer RTN and relay thalamus; however, mean expression values were not statistically significantly different compared to controls. Furthermore, no systematic changes in synaptic NMDAR levels could be detected in stargazer thalamus. In contrast, AMPAR subunits were markedly decreased in both nucleus-specific and synaptic preparations. Thus, defective AMPAR trafficking in stargazer thalamus does not appear to lead to a ubiquitous compensatory increase in total and synaptic NMDAR expression, suggesting that elevated NMDAR function is not mediated by changes in protein expression in stargazer mice. PMID:28220891

  5. Intranasally Administered Neuropeptide S (NPS) Exerts Anxiolytic Effects Following Internalization Into NPS Receptor-Expressing Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Ionescu, Irina A; Dine, Julien; Yen, Yi-Chun; Buell, Dominik R; Herrmann, Leonie; Holsboer, Florian; Eder, Matthias; Landgraf, Rainer; Schmidt, Ulrike

    2012-01-01

    Experiments in rodents revealed neuropeptide S (NPS) to constitute a potential novel treatment option for anxiety diseases such as panic and post-traumatic stress disorder. However, both its cerebral target sites and the molecular underpinnings of NPS-mediated effects still remain elusive. By administration of fluorophore-conjugated NPS, we pinpointed NPS target neurons in distinct regions throughout the entire brain. We demonstrated their functional relevance in the hippocampus. In the CA1 region, NPS modulates synaptic transmission and plasticity. NPS is taken up into NPS receptor-expressing neurons by internalization of the receptor–ligand complex as we confirmed by subsequent cell culture studies. Furthermore, we tracked internalization of intranasally applied NPS at the single-neuron level and additionally demonstrate that it is delivered into the mouse brain without losing its anxiolytic properties. Finally, we show that NPS differentially modulates the expression of proteins of the glutamatergic system involved inter alia in synaptic plasticity. These results not only enlighten the path of NPS in the brain, but also establish a non-invasive method for NPS administration in mice, thus strongly encouraging translation into a novel therapeutic approach for pathological anxiety in humans. PMID:22278093

  6. Activation of 5-HT7 receptors increases neuronal platelet-derived growth factor β receptor expression.

    PubMed

    Vasefi, Maryam S; Kruk, Jeff S; Liu, Hui; Heikkila, John J; Beazely, Michael A

    2012-03-09

    Several antipsychotics have a high affinity for 5-HT7 receptors yet despite intense interest in the 5-HT7 receptor as a potential drug target to treat psychosis, the function and signaling properties of 5-HT7 receptors in neurons remain largely uncharacterized. In primary mouse hippocampal and cortical neurons, as well as in the SH-SY5Y cell line, incubation with 5-HT, 5-carboxamidotryptamine (5-CT), or 5-HT7 receptor-selective agonists increases the expression of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)β receptors. The increased PDGFβ receptor expression is cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA)-dependent, suggesting that 5-HT7 receptors couple to Gα(s) in primary neurons. Interestingly, up-regulated PDGFβ receptors display an increased basal phosphorylation state at the phospholipase Cγ-activating tyrosine 1021. This novel linkage between the 5-HT7 receptor and the PDGF system may be an important GPCR-neurotrophic factor signaling pathway in neurons.

  7. Sex mediates dopamine and adrenergic receptor expression in adult rats exposed prenatally to cocaine

    PubMed Central

    Ferris, Mark J.; Mactutus, Charles F.; Silvers, Janelle M.; Hasselrot, Ulla; Strupp, Barbara J.; Booze, Rosemarie M.

    2010-01-01

    The extent of catecholaminergic receptor and respective behavioral alterations associated with prenatal cocaine exposure varies according to exogenous factors such as the amount, frequency, and route of maternal exposure, as well as endogenous factors such as specific brain regions under consideration and sex of the species. The goal of the current study was to use autoradiography to delineate possible moderators of dopaminergic and adrenergic receptor expression in adult rat offspring exposed to cocaine in utero. The current study demonstrated sex-dependent D1 receptor, α2, and noradrenergic transporter binding alterations in prelimbic, hippocampus, and anterior cingulate regions of adult rat brains exposed to cocaine during gestational days 8–21. Of further interest was the lack of alterations in the nucleus accumbens for nearly all receptors/transporters investigated, as well as the lack of alterations in D3 receptor binding in nearly all of the regions investigated (nucleus accumbens, prelimbic region, hippocampus, and cingulate gyrus). Thus, the current investigation demonstrated persistent receptor and transporter alterations that extend well into adulthood as a result of cocaine exposure in utero. Furthermore, the demonstration that sex played a mediating role in prenatal cocaine-induced, aberrant receptor/transporter expression is of primary importance for future studies that seek to control for sex in either design or analysis. PMID:17933484

  8. Sex-specific alterations in hippocampal cannabinoid 1 receptor expression following adolescent delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol treatment in the rat.

    PubMed

    Silva, Lindsay; Harte-Hargrove, Lauren; Izenwasser, Sari; Frank, Ashley; Wade, Dean; Dow-Edwards, Diana

    2015-08-18

    Marijuana use by adolescents has been on the rise since the early 1990s. With recent legalization and decriminalization acts passed, cannabinoid exposure in adolescents will undoubtedly increase. Human studies are limited in their ability to examine underlying changes in brain biochemistry making rodent models valuable. Studies in adult and adolescent animals show region and sex specific downregulation of the cannabinoid 1 (CB1) receptor following chronic cannabinoid treatment. However, although sex-dependent changes in behavior have been observed during the drug abstinence period following adolescent cannabinoid exposure, little is known about CB1 receptor expression during this critical time. In order to characterize CB1 receptor expression following chronic adolescent Δ-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) exposure, we used [(3)H] CP55,940 binding to assess CB1 receptor expression in the dentate gyrus and areas CA1, CA2, and CA3 of the hippocampus in both male and female adolescent rats at both 24h and 2 weeks post chronic THC treatment. Consistent with other reported findings, we found downregulation of the CB1 receptor in the hippocampal formation at 24h post treatment. While this downregulation persisted in both sexes following two weeks of abstinence in the CA2 region, in females, this downregulation also persisted in areas CA1 and CA3. Expression in the dentate gyrus returned to the normal range by two weeks. These data suggest that selective regions of the hippocampus show persistent reductions in CB1 receptor expression and that these reductions are more widespread in female compared to male adolescents.

  9. Sex-Specific Alterations in Hippocampal Cannabinoid 1 Receptor Expression Following Adolescent Delta-9-Tetrahydrocannabinol Treatment in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Lindsay; Harte-Hargrove, Lauren; Izenwasser, Sari; Frank, Ashley; Wade, Dean; Dow-Edwards, Diana

    2015-01-01

    Marijuana use by adolescents has been on the rise since the early 1990’s. With recent legalization and decriminalization acts passed, cannabinoid exposure in adolescents will undoubtedly increase. Human studies are limited in their ability to examine underlying changes in brain biochemistry making rodent models valuable. Studies in adult and adolescent animals show region and sex specific downregulation of the cannabinoid 1 (CB1) receptor following chronic cannabinoid treatment. However, although sex-dependent changes in behavior have been observed during the drug abstinence period following adolescent cannabinoid exposure, little is known about CB1 receptor expression during this critical time. In order to characterize CB1 receptor expression following chronic adolescent Δ-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) exposure, we used [3H]CP55,940 binding to assess CB1 receptor expression in the dentate gyrus and areas CA1, CA2, and CA3 of the hippocampus in both male and female adolescent rats at both 24 hours and 2 weeks post chronic THC treatment. Consistent with other reported findings, we found downregulation of the CB1 receptor in the hippocampal formation at 24 hours post treatment. While this downregulation persisted in both sexes following two weeks of abstinence in the CA2 region, in females, this downregulation also persisted in areas CA1 and CA3. Expression in the dentate gyrus returned to the normal range by two weeks. These data suggest that selective regions of the hippocampus show persistent reductions in CB1 receptor expression and that these reductions are more widespread in female compared to male adolescents. PMID:26118897

  10. The adaptor 3BP2 is required for KIT receptor expression and human mast cell survival

    PubMed Central

    Ainsua-Enrich, Erola; Serrano-Candelas, Eva; Álvarez-Errico, Damiana; Picado, César; Sayós, Joan; Rivera, Juan; Martín, Margarita

    2015-01-01

    3BP2 is a cytoplasmic adaptor protein that acts as a positive regulator in mast cell FcεRI-dependent signaling. The KIT receptor whose ligand is the stem cell factor (SCF) is necessary for mast cell development, proliferation and survival as well as for optimal IgE-dependent signal. Activating mutations in KIT have been associated with several diseases including mastocytosis. In the present work, we found that 3BP2 silencing impairs KIT signaling pathways, thus affecting PI3K and MAP kinase pathways in human mast cells from HMC-1, LAD2 (human mast cell lines) and CD34+-derived mast cells. Unexpectedly, silencing of 3BP2 reduces KIT expression in normal human mast cells as well as in HMC-1 cells where KIT is mutated, thus increasing cellular apoptosis and caspase 3/7 activity. 3BP2 silencing reduces KIT transcription expression levels. Interestingly, 3BP2 silencing decreased MITF expression, a transcription factor involved in KIT expression. Reconstitution of 3BP2 in knockdown cells leads to reversal of KIT expression as well as survival phenotype. Accordingly MITF reconstitution enhances KIT expression levels in 3BP2 silenced cells. Moreover, downregulation of KIT expression by miRNA221 overexpression or the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib also reduced 3BP2 and MITF expression. Furthermore, KIT tyrosine activity inhibition reduced 3BP2 and MITF expression, demonstrating again a tight and reciprocal relationship between these molecules. Taken together, our results show that 3BP2 regulates human mast cell survival and participates in KIT-mediated signal transduction by directly controlling KIT receptor expression, suggesting its potential as a therapeutic target in mast cell-mediated inflammatory diseases and deregulated KIT disorders. PMID:25810396

  11. Prolactinoma ErbB receptor expression and targeted therapy for aggressive tumors.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Odelia; Mamelak, Adam; Bannykh, Serguei; Carmichael, John; Bonert, Vivien; Lim, Stephen; Cook-Wiens, Galen; Ben-Shlomo, Anat

    2014-06-01

    As ErbB signaling is a determinant of prolactin synthesis, role of ErbB receptors was tested for prolactinoma outcomes and therapy. The objective of this study was to characterize ErbB receptor expression in prolactinomas and then perform a pilot study treating resistant prolactinomas with a targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI). Retrospective analysis of prolactinomas and pilot study for dopamine agonist resistant prolactinomas in tertiary referral center. We performed immunofluorescent staining of a tissue array of 29 resected prolactinoma tissues for EGFR, ErbB2, ErbB3, and ErbB4 correlated with clinical features. Two patients with aggressive resistant prolactinomas enrolled and completed trial. They received lapatinib 1,250 mg daily for 6 months with tumor and hormone assessments. Main outcome measures were positive tumor staining of respective ErbB receptors, therapeutic reduction of prolactin levels and tumor shrinkage. Treated PRL levels and tumor volumes were suppressed in both subjects treated with TKI. EGFR expression was positive in 82 % of adenomas, ErbB2 in 92 %, ErbB3 in 25 %, and ErbB4 in 71 %, with ErbB2 score > EGFR > ErbB4 > ErbB3. Higher ErbB3 expression was associated with optic chiasm compression (p = 0.03), suprasellar extension (p = 0.04), and carotid artery encasement (p = 0.01). Higher DA response rates were observed in tumors with higher ErbB3 expression. Prolactinoma expression of specific ErbB receptors is associated with tumor invasion, symptoms, and response to dopamine agonists. Targeting ErbB receptors may be effective therapy in patients with resistant prolactinomas.

  12. Ontogenetic development of cannabinoid receptor expression and signal transduction functionality in the human brain.

    PubMed

    Mato, Susana; Del Olmo, Elena; Pazos, Angel

    2003-05-01

    Previous evidence suggests that the endogenous cannabinoid system emerges relatively early during brain development in the rat. However, the pre- and postnatal pattern of appearance of CB1 cannabinoid receptors in humans has not been analysed in detail. Furthermore, there is a complete lack of information about the functional ability of these proteins to activate signal transduction mechanisms during human development. In the present study we have explored CB1 receptor expression throughout the different areas of the developing human brain by [3H]CP55 940 autoradiography. We have also assessed CB1 functional coupling to G proteins during brain development by agonist-stimulated [35S]GTPgammaS autoradiography in the same cases. Our results indicate a significant density of cannabinoid receptors at 19 weeks' gestation in the same areas that contain these receptors in the adult human brain. Autoradiographic levels of CB1 receptors in these structures seem to increase progressively from early prenatal stages to adulthood. Interestingly, high densities of cannabinoid receptors have also been detected during prenatal development in fibre-enriched areas that are practically devoid of them in the adult brain. In parallel with these data, we have found that brain cannabinoid receptors are functionally coupled to signal transduction mechanisms from early prenatal stages. This early pattern of expression of functionally active cannabinoid receptors, along with the transient and atypical localization of these proteins in white matter areas during the prenatal stages, suggest an specific role of the endocannabinoid system in the events related to human neural development.

  13. Characterization of a thyroid hormone receptor expressed in human kidney and other tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Nakai, A.; Seino, S.; Sakurai, A.; Szilak, I.; Bell, G.I.; DeGroot, L.J.

    1988-04-01

    A cDNA encoding a specific form of thyroid hormone receptor expressed in human liver, kidney, placenta, and brain was isolated from a human kidney library. Identical clones were found in human placenta and HepG2 cDNA libraries. The cDNA encodes a 490-amino acid protein. When expressed and translated in vitro, the protein products binds triiodothyronine with K/sub a/ of 2.3 /times/ 10/sup 9/ M/sup /minus/1/. This protein, designated human thyroid hormone receptor type ..cap alpha..2 (hTR..cap alpha..2), has the same domain structure as other members of the v-erbA-related superfamily of receptor genes. It is similar to thyroid hormone receptor type ..cap alpha.. described in chicken and rat and less similar to human thyroid hormone receptor type ..beta.. (formerly referred to as c-erbA..beta..) from placenta. However, it is distinguished from these receptors by an extension of the C-terminal hormone binding domain making it 80 amino acids longer than rat thyroid hormone receptor type ..cap alpha..1. Different sizes of mRNA found in liver and kidney suggest that there may be tissue-specific processing of the primary transcript of this gene. Identification of human thyroid hormone receptor type ..cap alpha..2 indicates that two or more forms of thyroid hormone receptor exist in human tissues and may explain the normal variation in thyroid hormone responsiveness of various organs and the selective tissue abnormalities found in the thyroid hormone resistance syndromes.

  14. Reduced retinoids and retinoid receptors' expression in pancreatic cancer: A link to patient survival.

    PubMed

    Bleul, Tim; Rühl, Ralph; Bulashevska, Svetlana; Karakhanova, Svetlana; Werner, Jens; Bazhin, Alexandr V

    2015-09-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) represents one of the deadliest cancers in the world. All-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) is the major physiologically active form of vitamin A, regulating expression of many genes. Disturbances of vitamin A metabolism are prevalent in some cancer cells. The main aim of this work was to investigate deeply the components of retinoid signaling in PDAC compared to in the normal pancreas and to prove the clinical importance of retinoid receptor expression. For the study, human tumor tissues obtained from PDAC patients and murine tumors from the orthotopic Panc02 model were used for the analysis of retinoids, using high performance liquid chromatography mass spectrometry and real-time RT-PCR gene expression analysis. Survival probabilities in univariate analysis were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method and the Cox proportional hazards model was used for the multivariate analysis. In this work, we showed for the first time that the ATRA and all-trans retinol concentration is reduced in PDAC tissue compared to their normal counterparts. The expression of RARα and β as well as RXRα and β are down-regulated in PDAC tissue. This reduced expression of retinoid receptors correlates with the expression of some markers of differentiation and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition as well as of cancer stem cell markers. Importantly, the expression of RARα and RXRβ is associated with better overall survival of PDAC patients. Thus, reduction of retinoids and their receptors is an important feature of PDAC and is associated with worse patient survival outcomes.

  15. Dopamine and Serotonin Modulate Human GABAρ1 Receptors Expressed in Xenopus laevis Oocytes

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    GABAρ1 receptors are highly expressed in bipolar neurons of the retina and to a lesser extent in several areas of the central nervous system (CNS), and dopamine and serotonin are also involved in the modulation of retinal neural transmission. Whether these biogenic amines have a direct effect on ionotropic GABA receptors was not known. Here, we report that GABAρ1 receptors, expressed in X. laevis oocytes, were negatively modulated by dopamine and serotonin and less so by octopamine and tyramine. Interestingly, these molecules did not have effects on GABAA receptors. 5-Carboxamido-tryptamine and apomorphine did not exert evident effects on any of the receptors. Schild plot analyses of the inhibitory actions of dopamine and serotonin on currents elicited by GABA showed slopes of 2.7 ± 0.3 and 6.1 ± 1.8, respectively, indicating a noncompetitive mechanism of inhibition. The inhibition of GABAρ1 currents was independent of the membrane potential and was insensitive to picrotoxin, a GABA receptor channel blocker and to the GABAρ-specific antagonist (1,2,5,6-tetrahydropyridine-4-yl)methyl phosphinic acid (TPMPA). Dopamine and serotonin changed the sensitivity of GABAρ1 receptors to the inhibitory actions of Zn2+. In contrast, La3+ potentiated the amplitude of the GABA currents generated during negative modulation by dopamine (EC50 146 μM) and serotonin (EC50 196 μM). The functional role of the direct modulation of GABAρ receptors by dopamine and serotonin remains to be elucidated; however, it may represent an important modulatory pathway in the retina, where GABAρ receptors are highly expressed and where these biogenic amines are abundant. PMID:22860179

  16. Application of photoshop-based image analysis to quantification of hormone receptor expression in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Lehr, H A; Mankoff, D A; Corwin, D; Santeusanio, G; Gown, A M

    1997-11-01

    The benefit of quantifying estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) expression in breast cancer is well established. However, in routine breast cancer diagnosis, receptor expression is often quantified in arbitrary scores with high inter- and intraobserver variability. In this study we tested the validity of an image analysis system employing inexpensive, commercially available computer software on a personal computer. In a series of 28 invasive ductal breast cancers, immunohistochemical determinations of ER and PR were performed, along with biochemical analyses on fresh tumor homogenates, by the dextran-coated charcoal technique (DCC) and by enzyme immunoassay (EIA). From each immunohistochemical slide, three representative tumor fields (x20 objective) were captured and digitized with a Macintosh personal computer. Using the tools of Photoshop software, optical density plots of tumor cell nuclei were generated and, after background subtraction, were used as an index of immunostaining intensity. This immunostaining index showed a strong semilogarithmic correlation with biochemical receptor assessments of ER (DCC, r = 0.70, p < 0.001; EIA, r = 0.76, p < 0.001) and even better of PR (DCC, r = 0.86; p < 0.01; EIA, r = 0.80, p < 0.001). A strong linear correlation of ER and PR quantification was also seen between DCC and EIA techniques (ER, r = 0.62, p < 0.001; PR, r = 0.92, p < 0.001). This study demonstrates that a simple, inexpensive, commercially available software program can be accurately applied to the quantification of immunohistochemical hormone receptor studies.

  17. Altered pattern of cannabinoid type 1 receptor expression in adipose tissue of dysmetabolic and overweight patients.

    PubMed

    Sarzani, Riccardo; Bordicchia, Marica; Marcucci, Pierfrancesco; Bedetta, Samuele; Santini, Silvia; Giovagnoli, Andrea; Scappini, Lorena; Minardi, Daniele; Muzzonigro, Giovanni; Dessì-Fulgheri, Paolo; Rappelli, Alessandro

    2009-03-01

    In overweight patients (OW), the increased peripheral activity of the endocannabinoid system in visceral adipose tissue (VAT) may be mediated by cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) receptor expression. We determined whether CB1 receptor splice variants and messenger RNA (mRNA) levels in perirenal and subcutaneous adipose tissues are associated with obesity and metabolic syndrome (MetS). Gene expression with multiple-primers real-time polymerase chain reaction (TaqMan; Applied Biosystem, Weiterstadt, Germany) was performed to study VAT and paired subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) mRNA from 36 consecutive patients undergoing nephrectomy. Cannabinoid type 1A and CB1E mRNAs variants with the longer version of exon 4 were expressed. The CB1 expression in perirenal VAT significantly correlated with body mass index (BMI). Paired subcutaneous/perirenal samples from normal-weight patients (BMI < 25 kg/m(2)) showed higher CB1 expression in SAT (P = .002), whereas in OW (BMI > or = 25 kg/m(2)), the higher CB1 expression was in VAT (P = .038). In unpaired samples, SAT of normal-weight patients had significantly higher CB1 mRNA levels compared with SAT of OW, whereas higher CB1 expression (P = .009) was found in VAT of OW (n = 25). Overweight patients with increased visceral CB1 expression had higher waist circumference (P < .01), insulin (P < .01), and homeostasis model assessment index (P < .01). In addition, patients with the MetS (n = 22) showed higher CB1 expression in perirenal adipose tissues (P = .007). Visceral adipose CB1 expression correlated with BMI. Overweight patients and those with MetS showed a CB1 expression pattern supporting a CB1-mediated overactivity of the endocannabinoid system in human VAT.

  18. α2-containing GABAA receptors expressed in hippocampal region CA3 control fast network oscillations.

    PubMed

    Heistek, Tim S; Ruiperez-Alonso, Marta; Timmerman, A Jaap; Brussaard, Arjen B; Mansvelder, Huibert D

    2013-02-15

    GABA(A) receptors are critically involved in hippocampal oscillations. GABA(A) receptor α1 and α2 subunits are differentially expressed throughout the hippocampal circuitry and thereby may have distinct contributions to oscillations. It is unknown which GABA(A) receptor α subunit controls hippocampal oscillations and where these receptors are expressed. To address these questions we used transgenic mice expressing GABA(A) receptor α1 and/or α2 subunits with point mutations (H101R) that render these receptors insensitive to allosteric modulation at the benzodiazepine binding site, and tested how increased or decreased function of α subunits affects hippocampal oscillations. Positive allosteric modulation by zolpidem prolonged decay kinetics of hippocampal GABAergic synaptic transmission and reduced the frequency of cholinergically induced oscillations. Allosteric modulation of GABAergic receptors in CA3 altered oscillation frequency in CA1, while modulation of GABA receptors in CA1 did not affect oscillations. In mice having a point mutation (H101R) at the GABA(A) receptor α2 subunit, zolpidem effects on cholinergically induced oscillations were strongly reduced compared to wild-type animals, while zolpidem modulation was still present in mice with the H101R mutation at the α1 subunit. Furthermore, genetic knockout of α2 subunits strongly reduced oscillations, whereas knockout of α1 subunits had no effect. Allosteric modulation of GABAergic receptors was strongly reduced in unitary connections between fast spiking interneurons and pyramidal neurons in CA3 of α2H101R mice, but not of α1H101R mice, suggesting that fast spiking interneuron to pyramidal neuron synapses in CA3 contain α2 subunits. These findings suggest that α2-containing GABA(A) receptors expressed in the CA3 region provide the inhibition that controls hippocampal rhythm during cholinergically induced oscillations.

  19. Androgen receptor expression and morphology of forebrain and neuromuscular systems in male green anoles displaying individual differences in sexual behavior

    PubMed Central

    Neal, Jennifer K.; Wade, Juli

    2010-01-01

    Investigating individual differences in sexual performance in unmanipulated males is important for understanding natural relationships between behavior and morphology, and the mechanisms regulating them. Among male green anole lizards, some court and copulate frequently (studs) and others do not (duds). To evaluate potential factors underlying differences in the level of these behaviors, morphology and androgen receptor expression in neuromuscular courtship and copulatory structures, as well as in the preoptic area and amygdala, were compared in males displaying varying degrees of sexual function. This study revealed that individual differences in behavior among unmanipulated males, in particular the extension of a throat fan (dewlap) used during courtship, were positively correlated with the size of fibers in the associated muscle and with soma size in the amygdala. The physiological response to testosterone, as indicated by the height of cells in an androgen-sensitive portion of the kidney, was also correlated with male sexual behavior, and predicted it better than plasma androgen levels. Androgen receptor expression was not related to the display of courtship or copulation in any of the tissues examined. The present data indicate that higher levels of male courtship behavior result in (or are the result of) enhanced courtship muscle and amygdala morphology, and that androgen-sensitive tissue in studs may be more responsive to testosterone than duds. However, some mechanism(s) other than androgen receptor expression likely confer this difference in responsiveness. PMID:17531996

  20. Molecular biology of peptide pheromone production and reception in mice.

    PubMed

    Touhara, Kazushige

    2007-01-01

    Intraspecies communication via pheromones plays an important role in social and sexual behaviors, which are critical for survival and reproduction in many animal species. In mice, pheromonal signals are processed by the parallel action of two olfactory systems: the main olfactory system and the vomeronasal pathway. Pheromones are recognized by chemosensory receptors expressed in the main olfactory epithelium and by V1R- and V2R-type receptors expressed in the vomeronasal organ (VNO). Mice take advantage of the chemical properties of both types of pheromones (i.e., volatile/nonvolatile) to precisely control the spatial and temporal transmission of their individual signals. The recent discovery of the exocrine gland-secreting peptide (ESP) family, which appears to encode a VNO-specific ligand repertoire, should open a new avenue to understanding peptide pheromone-mediated communication via the vomeronasal pathway in mice. In this chapter, I will review the current knowledge on genetic and molecular aspects of peptide pheromones and their receptors, by focusing primarily on the mouse VNO system. It is also an intriguing aspect to discuss peptide pheromones in the context of the evolutionary importance of species-specific chemical communication.

  1. Gastrin response to candidate messengers in intact conscious rats monitored by antrum microdialysis.

    PubMed

    Ericsson, Peter; Håkanson, Rolf; Norlén, Per

    2010-08-09

    We monitored gastrin release in response to locally applied candidate messengers in intact conscious rats. Earlier studies have been performed on anaesthetized animals, isolated pieces of antrum, or purified preparations of gastrin cells. In this study we created an experimental situation to resemble physiological conditions, using reverse microdialysis to administer regulatory peptides and amines that might affect gastrin secretion. Microdialysis probes were implanted in the submucosa of the antrum of the rat stomach. Three days later, putative messenger compounds were administered via the probe. Their effects on basal (24 h fast) and omeprazole-stimulated (400 micromol/kg/day, 4 days peroral administration) gastrin release were monitored by continuous measurement (3 h) of gastrin in the perfusate (radioimmunoassay). Fasted rats (low microdialysate gastrin, 2.1+/-0.1 pmol l(-1)) were used to study stimulation of gastrin release. Omeprazole-treated rats (high microdialysate gastrin, 95.8+/-6.7 pmol l(-1)) were used to study suppression of gastrin release. The following agents raised the concentration of microdialysate gastrin (peak response): gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) (11-fold increase at a near-maximal dose), carbachol (5-fold increase), serotonin (2-fold increase) and isoprenaline (20-fold increase). Adrenaline and noradrenaline induced transient but powerful elevation (40- and 20-fold increase). Somatostatin, galanin and bradykinin (at near-maximal doses) suppressed omeprazole-stimulated gastrin release (50% decrease). Calcitonin gene-related peptide, ghrelin, gastric inhibitory peptide, motilin, neurotensin, neuromedin U-25, peptide YY and vasoactive intestinal peptide were without effect on gastrin release, as were aspartate, gamma-aminobutyric acid, glutamate, glycine, dopamine and histamine. The results support the view that G cells operate under neurocrine/paracrine control. They were stimulated by agents present in enteric neurons (GRP, galanin

  2. Altered coronary microvascular serotonin receptor expression after coronary artery bypass grafting utilizing cardiopulmonary bypass

    PubMed Central

    Robich, Michael P.; Araujo, Eugenio G.; Feng, Jun; Osipov, Robert M.; Clements, Richard T.; Bianchi, Cesario; Sellke, Frank W.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives Evaluate the role of serotonin receptors 1B and 2A, thromboxane synthase and receptor and phospholipases A2 and C in response to cardiopulmonary bypass in patients. Methods Atrial tissue was harvested from patients before and after cardiopulmonary bypass with cardioplegia (n=13). Coronary microvessels were assessed for vasoactive response to serotonin with and without inhibitors of 5-HT1B and 5-HT2A receceptors, phospholipase A2 and C. Expression of 5-HT1B and 5-HT2A mRNA was determined by RT-PCR. Expression of 5-HT1B, 5-HT2A, Thromboxane A2 receptor and synthase protein was determined by immunoblotting and immunohistochemistry. Results Exposure of microvessels to serotonin elicited a 7.3 ± 2% relaxation response pre-bypass, changing to a strong contraction response of -19.2 ± 2% after bypass (p<0.001). Addition of either a specific 5-HT1B antagonist or inhibitor of PLA2 resulted in a significant decrease in the contractile response to -8.6 ±1% (p<0.001) and 2.8 ± 3% (p= 0.001), respectively. 5-HT1B receptor mRNA expression increased 1.82 ± 0.34 fold after bypass (p=0.044), while 5-HT2A mRNA expression did not change. 5-HT1B receptor, but not 5-HT2A, protein expression increased after bypass by 1.35 ± 0.7 fold (p=0.0413). Neither thromboxane synthase nor thromboxane receptor expression changed after bypass. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated 5-HT1B receptor increased mainly in the arterial smooth muscle. There was no appreciable difference in arterial expression of either thromboxane synthase or receptor. Conclusion These data indicate that 5-HT-induced vascular dysfunction after cardiopulmonary bypass with cardioplegia may be mediated by increased expression of 5-HT1B receptor and subsequent PLA2 activation in myocardial coronary smooth muscle. Mini Abstract The expression of 5-HT1B receptor protein and mRNA were increased in the atrial myocardium after cardioplegia and cardiopulmonary bypass (CP-CPB). Serotonin elicited a strong contraction

  3. Characteristics of glycine receptors expressed by embryonic rat brain mRNAs

    PubMed Central

    García-Alcocer, Guadalupe; García-Colunga, Jesús; Martínez-Torres, Ataúlfo; Miledi, Ricardo

    2001-01-01

    A study was made of glycine (Gly) and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes injected with rat mRNAs isolated from the encephalon, midbrain, and brainstem of 18-day-old rat embryos. In oocytes injected with encephalon, midbrain, or brainstem mRNAs, the Gly-current amplitudes (membrane current elicited by Gly; 1 mM Gly) were respectively 115 ± 35, 346 ± 28, and 389 ± 22 nA, whereas the GABA-currents (1 mM GABA) were all ≤40 nA. Moreover, the Gly-currents desensitized faster in oocytes injected with encephalon or brainstem mRNAs. The EC50 for Gly was 611 ± 77 μM for encephalon, 661 ± 28 μM for midbrain, and 506 ± 18 μM for brainstem mRNA-injected oocytes, and the corresponding Hill coefficients were all ≈2. Strychnine inhibited all of the Gly-currents, with an IC50 of 56 ± 3 nM for encephalon, 97 ± 4 nM for midbrain, and 72 ± 4 nM for brainstem mRNAs. During repetitive Gly applications, the Gly-currents were potentiated by 1.6-fold for encephalon, 2.1-fold for midbrain, and 1.3-fold for brainstem RNA-injected oocytes. Raising the extracellular Ca2+ concentration significantly increased the Gly-currents in oocytes injected with midbrain and brainstem mRNAs. Reverse transcription–PCR studies showed differences in the Gly receptor (GlyR) α-subunits expressed, whereas the β-subunit was present in all three types of mRNA. These results indicate differential expression of GlyR mRNAs in the brain areas examined, and these mRNAs lead to the expression of GlyRs that have different properties. The modulation of GlyRs by Ca2+ could play important functions during brain development. PMID:11226317

  4. Circadian integration of sleep-wake and feeding requires NPY receptor-expressing neurons in the mediobasal hypothalamus

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, S.; Li, A.-J.; Dinh, T. T.; Rooney, E. M.; Simasko, S. M.; Ritter, S.

    2011-01-01

    Sleep and feeding rhythms are highly coordinated across the circadian cycle, but the brain sites responsible for this coordination are unknown. We examined the role of neuropeptide Y (NPY) receptor-expressing neurons in the mediobasal hypothalamus (MBH) in this process by injecting the targeted toxin, NPY-saporin (NPY-SAP), into the arcuate nucleus (Arc). NPY-SAP-lesioned rats were initially hyperphagic, became obese, exhibited sustained disruption of circadian feeding patterns, and had abnormal circadian distribution of sleep-wake patterns. Total amounts of rapid eye movement sleep (REMS) and non-REMS (NREMS) were not altered by NPY-SAP lesions, but a peak amount of REMS was permanently displaced to the dark period, and circadian variation in NREMS was eliminated. The phase reversal of REMS to the dark period by the lesion suggests that REMS timing is independently linked to the function of MBH NPY receptor-expressing neurons and is not dependent on NREMS pattern, which was altered but not phase reversed by the lesion. Sleep-wake patterns were altered in controls by restricting feeding to the light period, but were not altered in NPY-SAP rats by restricting feeding to either the light or dark period, indicating that disturbed sleep-wake patterns in lesioned rats were not secondary to changes in food intake. Sleep abnormalities persisted even after hyperphagia abated during the static phase of the lesion. Results suggest that the MBH is required for the essential task of integrating sleep-wake and feeding rhythms, a function that allows animals to accommodate changeable patterns of food availability. NPY receptor-expressing neurons are key components of this integrative function. PMID:21880863

  5. Circadian integration of sleep-wake and feeding requires NPY receptor-expressing neurons in the mediobasal hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Wiater, M F; Mukherjee, S; Li, A-J; Dinh, T T; Rooney, E M; Simasko, S M; Ritter, S

    2011-11-01

    Sleep and feeding rhythms are highly coordinated across the circadian cycle, but the brain sites responsible for this coordination are unknown. We examined the role of neuropeptide Y (NPY) receptor-expressing neurons in the mediobasal hypothalamus (MBH) in this process by injecting the targeted toxin, NPY-saporin (NPY-SAP), into the arcuate nucleus (Arc). NPY-SAP-lesioned rats were initially hyperphagic, became obese, exhibited sustained disruption of circadian feeding patterns, and had abnormal circadian distribution of sleep-wake patterns. Total amounts of rapid eye movement sleep (REMS) and non-REMS (NREMS) were not altered by NPY-SAP lesions, but a peak amount of REMS was permanently displaced to the dark period, and circadian variation in NREMS was eliminated. The phase reversal of REMS to the dark period by the lesion suggests that REMS timing is independently linked to the function of MBH NPY receptor-expressing neurons and is not dependent on NREMS pattern, which was altered but not phase reversed by the lesion. Sleep-wake patterns were altered in controls by restricting feeding to the light period, but were not altered in NPY-SAP rats by restricting feeding to either the light or dark period, indicating that disturbed sleep-wake patterns in lesioned rats were not secondary to changes in food intake. Sleep abnormalities persisted even after hyperphagia abated during the static phase of the lesion. Results suggest that the MBH is required for the essential task of integrating sleep-wake and feeding rhythms, a function that allows animals to accommodate changeable patterns of food availability. NPY receptor-expressing neurons are key components of this integrative function.

  6. Hypertonic saline up-regulates A3 adenosine receptors expression of activated neutrophils and increases acute lung injury after sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Yoshiaki; Chen, Yu; Pauzenberger, Reinhard; Mark, Hirsh I.; Junger, Wolfgang G.

    2008-01-01

    Objective Hypertonic saline resuscitation reduces tissue damage by inhibiting polymorphonuclear neutrophils. Hypertonic saline triggers polymorphonuclear neutrophils to release adenosine triphosphate that is converted to adenosine, inhibiting polymorphonuclear neutrophils through A2a adenosine receptors. polymorphonuclear neutrophils also express A3 adenosine receptors that enhance polymorphonuclear neutrophils functions. Here we investigated whether A3 receptors may diminish the efficacy of hypertonic saline in a mouse model of acute lung injury. Design Randomized animal study and laboratory investigation. Setting University research laboratory. Interventions The effect of A3 receptors on the efficacy of hypertonic saline resuscitation was assessed in A3 receptor knockout and wild-type mice. Animals were treated with hypertonic saline (7.5% NaCl, 4 mL/kg) before or after cecal ligation and puncture, and acute lung injury and mortality were determined. The effect of timing of hypertonic saline exposure on A3 receptor expression and degranulation was studied in vitro with isolated human polymorphonuclear neutrophils. Measurements and main results Treatment of human polymorphonuclear neutrophils with hypertonic saline before stimulation with formyl methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine inhibited A3 receptor expression and degranulation, whereas hypertonic saline-treatment after formyl methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine-stimulation augmented A3 receptor expression and degranulation. Acute lung injury in wild-type mice treated with hypertonic saline after cecal ligation and puncture was significantly greater than in wild-type mice pretreated with hypertonic saline. This aggravating effect of delayed hypertonic saline-treatment was absent in A3 receptor knockout mice. Similarly, mortality in wild-type mice with delayed hypertonic saline-treatment was significantly higher (88%) than in animals treated with hypertonic saline before cecal ligation and puncture (50%). Mortality in A3

  7. Genetic variation in MHC proteins is associated with T cell receptor expression biases

    PubMed Central

    Sharon, Eilon; Sibener, Leah V.; Battle, Alexis; Fraser, Hunter B.; Garcia, K. Christopher; Pritchard, Jonathan K.

    2016-01-01

    Within each individual, a highly diverse T cell receptor (TCR) repertoire interacts with peptides presented by major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules. Despite extensive research, it remains controversial whether germline-encoded TCR-MHC contacts promote TCR-MHC specificity and if so, whether there exist differences in TCR V-gene compatibilities with different MHC alleles. We applied eQTL mapping to test for associations between genetic variation and TCR V-gene usage in a large human cohort. We report strong trans associations between variation in the MHC locus and TCR V-gene usage. Fine mapping of the association signals reveals specific amino acids in MHC genes that bias V-gene usage, many of which contact or are spatially proximal to the TCR or peptide. Hence, these MHC variants, several of which are linked to autoimmune diseases, can directly affect TCR-MHC interaction. These results provide the first examples of trans-QTLs mediated by protein-protein interactions, and are consistent with intrinsic TCR-MHC specificity. PMID:27479906

  8. Prolactin receptor expression and breast cancer: relationships with tumor characteristics among pre- and post-menopausal women in a population-based case-control study from Poland.

    PubMed

    Faupel-Badger, Jessica M; Duggan, Maire A; Sherman, Mark E; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Yang, Xiaohong R; Lissowska, Jolanta; Brinton, Louise A; Peplonska, Beata; Vonderhaar, Barbara K; Figueroa, Jonine D

    2014-02-01

    Previous studies have found an association between elevated circulating prolactin levels and increased risk of breast cancer. Prolactin stimulates breast cancer cell proliferation, migration, and survival via binding to the cell-surface prolactin receptor. The association of prolactin receptor expression with breast tumorigenesis remains unclear as studies that have focused on this association have had limited sample size and/or information about tumor characteristics. Here, we examined the association of prolactin expression with tumor characteristics among 736 cases, from a large population-based case-control study of breast cancer conducted in Poland (2000-2003), with detailed risk factor and pathology data. Tumors were centrally reviewed and prepared as tissue microarrays for immunohistochemical analysis of prolactin receptor expression. Association of prolactin receptor expression across strata of tumor characteristics was evaluated using χ (2) analysis and logistic regression. Prolactin receptor expression did not vary by menopausal status; therefore, data from pre- and post-menopausal women were combined in the analyses. Approximately 83 % of breast cancers were categorized as strong prolactin receptor staining. Negative/low prolactin receptor expression was independently associated with poorly differentiated (p = 1.2 × 10(-08)) and larger tumors (p = 0.0005). These associations were independent of estrogen receptor expression. This is the largest study to date in which the association of prolactin receptor expression with tumor characteristics has been evaluated. These data provide new avenues from which to explore the associations of the prolactin/prolactin receptor signaling network with breast tumorigenesis.

  9. Peptide identification

    DOEpatents

    Jarman, Kristin H [Richland, WA; Cannon, William R [Richland, WA; Jarman, Kenneth D [Richland, WA; Heredia-Langner, Alejandro [Richland, WA

    2011-07-12

    Peptides are identified from a list of candidates using collision-induced dissociation tandem mass spectrometry data. A probabilistic model for the occurrence of spectral peaks corresponding to frequently observed partial peptide fragment ions is applied. As part of the identification procedure, a probability score is produced that indicates the likelihood of any given candidate being the correct match. The statistical significance of the score is known without necessarily having reference to the actual identity of the peptide. In one form of the invention, a genetic algorithm is applied to candidate peptides using an objective function that takes into account the number of shifted peaks appearing in the candidate spectrum relative to the test spectrum.

  10. Prenatal stress alters diazepam withdrawal syndrome and 5HT1A receptor expression in the raphe nuclei of adult rats.

    PubMed

    Lakehayli, S; Said, N; El Khachibi, M; El Ouahli, M; Nadifi, S; Hakkou, F; Tazi, A

    2016-08-25

    Early-life events have long-term effects on brain structures and cause behavioral alterations that persist into adulthood. The present experiments were designed to investigate the effects of prenatal stress on diazepam-induced withdrawal syndrome and serotonin-1A (5HT1A) receptor expression in the raphe nuclei of adult offspring. The results of the present study reveal that maternal exposure to chronic footshock stress increased the anxiety-like behavior in the prenatally stressed (PS) animals withdrawn from chronic diazepam (2.5mg/kg/day i.p for 1week). Moreover, prenatal stress induced a down-regulation of 5HT1A mRNA in the raphe nuclei of adult offspring. To our knowledge, this study is the first to demonstrate that maternal exposure to chronic footshock stress enhances diazepam withdrawal symptoms and alters 5HT1A receptor gene expression in the raphe nuclei of adult offspring. Thus, more studies are needed to clarify the mechanisms underlying the decrease of 5HT1A receptors expression in the raphe nuclei of PS rats.

  11. Cranial irradiation modulates hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activity and corticosteroid receptor expression in the hippocampus of juvenile rat.

    PubMed

    Velickovic, Natasa; Djordjevic, Ana; Drakulic, Dunja; Stanojevic, Ivana; Secerov, Bojana; Horvat, Anica

    2009-01-01

    Glucocorticoids, essential for normal hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activity, exert their action on the hippocampus through two types of corticosteroid receptors: the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) and the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR). Recent studies report that exposure of juvenile rats to cranial irradiation adversely affects HPA axis stability leading to its activation along with radiation- induced inflammation. This study was aimed to examine the acute effects of radiation on HPA axis activity and hippocampal corticosteroid receptor expression in 18-day-old rats. Since immobilization was part of irradiation procedure, both irradiated and sham-irradiated animals were exposed to this unavoidable stress. Our results demonstrate that the irradiated rats exhibited different pattern of corticosteroid receptor expression and hormone levels compared to respective controls. These differences included upregulation of GR protein in the hippocampus with a concomitant elevation of GR mRNA and an increase in circulating level of corticosterone. In addition, the expression of MR, both at the level of protein and gene expression, was not altered. Taken together, this study demonstrates that cranial irradiation in juvenile rats leads to enhanced HPA axis activity and increased relative GR/MR ratio in hippocampus. The present paper intends to show that neuroendocrine response of normal brain tissue to localized irradiation comprise both activation of HPA axis and altered corticosteroid receptor balance, probably as consequence of innate immune activation.

  12. Altered AMPA receptor expression plays an important role in inducing bidirectional synaptic plasticity during contextual fear memory reconsolidation.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Subhrajit; Kimble, Whitney; Buabeid, Manal; Bhattacharya, Dwipayan; Bloemer, Jenna; Alhowail, Ahmad; Reed, Miranda; Dhanasekaran, Muralikrishnan; Escobar, Martha; Suppiramaniam, Vishnu

    2017-03-01

    Retrieval of a memory appears to render it unstable until the memory is once again re-stabilized or reconsolidated. Although the occurrence and consequences of reconsolidation have received much attention in recent years, the specific mechanisms that underlie the process of reconsolidation have not been fully described. Here, we present the first electrophysiological model of the synaptic plasticity changes underlying the different stages of reconsolidation of a conditioned fear memory. In this model, retrieval of a fear memory results in immediate but transient alterations in synaptic plasticity, mediated by modified expression of the glutamate receptor subunits GluA1 and GluA2 in the hippocampus of rodents. Retrieval of a memory results in an immediate impairment in LTP, which is enhanced 6h following memory retrieval. Conversely, memory retrieval results in an immediate enhancement of LTD, which decreases with time. These changes in plasticity are accompanied by decreased expression of GluA2 receptor subunits. Recovery of LTP and LTD correlates with progressive overexpression of GluA2 receptor subunits. The contribution of the GluA2 receptor was confirmed by interfering with receptor expression at the postsynaptic sites. Blocking GluA2 endocytosis restored LTP and attenuated LTD during the initial portion of the reconsolidation period. These findings suggest that altered GluA2 receptor expression is one of the mechanisms that controls different forms of synaptic plasticity during reconsolidation.

  13. The role of Ly49E receptor expression on murine intraepithelial lymphocytes in intestinal cancer development and progression.

    PubMed

    Van Acker, Aline; Louagie, Els; Filtjens, Jessica; Taveirne, Sylvie; Van Ammel, Els; Kerre, Tessa; Elewaut, Dirk; Taghon, Tom; Vandekerckhove, Bart; Plum, Jean; Leclercq, Georges

    2016-11-01

    Ly49E is a member of the Ly49 family of NK receptors and is distinct from other members of this family on the basis of its structural properties, expression pattern and ligand recognition. Importantly, Ly49E receptor expression is high on small intestinal and colonic intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs). Intestinal IELs are regulators of the mucosal immune system and contribute to front-line defense at the mucosal barrier, including anti-tumor immune response. Whereas most Ly49 receptors have MHC class-I ligands, we showed that Ly49E is instead triggered by urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA). uPA has been extensively implicated in tumor development, where increased uPA expression correlates with poor prognosis. As such, we investigated the role of Ly49E receptor expression on intestinal IELs in the anti-tumor immune response. For this purpose, we compared Ly49E wild-type mice to Ly49E knockout mice in two established tumor models: Apc(Min/+)-mediated and azoxymethane-induced intestinal cancer. Our results indicate that Ly49E expression on IELs does not influence the development or progression of intestinal cancer.

  14. Formylated MHC Class Ib Binding Peptides Activate Both Human and Mouse Neutrophils Primarily through Formyl Peptide Receptor 1

    PubMed Central

    Winther, Malene; Holdfeldt, André; Gabl, Michael; Wang, Ji Ming; Forsman, Huamei; Dahlgren, Claes

    2016-01-01

    Two different immune recognition systems have evolved in parallel to recognize peptides starting with an N-formylated methionine, and recognition similarities/differences between these two systems have been investigated. A number of peptides earlier characterized in relation to the H2-M3 complex that presents N-formylated peptides to cytotoxic T cells, have been characterized in relation to the formyl peptide receptors expressed by phagocytic neutrophils in both men (FPRs) and mice (Fprs). FPR1/Fpr1 was identified as the preferred receptor for all fMet-containing peptides examined, but there was no direct correlation between H2-M3 binding and the neutrophil activation potencies. Similarly, there was no direct correlation between the activities induced by the different peptides in human and mouse neutrophils, respectively. The formyl group was important in both H2-M3 binding and FPR activation, but FPR2 was the preferred receptor for the non-formylated peptide. The structural requirements differed between the H2-M3 and FPR/Fpr recognition systems and these data suggest that the two recognition systems have different evolutionary traits. PMID:27907124

  15. Nociceptin/orphanin FQ receptor expression in clinical pain disorders and functional effects in cultured neurons.

    PubMed

    Anand, Praveen; Yiangou, Yiangos; Anand, Uma; Mukerji, Gaurav; Sinisi, Marco; Fox, Michael; McQuillan, Anthony; Quick, Tom; Korchev, Yuri E; Hein, Peter

    2016-09-01

    The nociceptin/orphanin FQ peptide receptor (NOP), activated by its endogenous peptide ligand nociceptin/orphanin FQ (N/OFQ), exerts several effects including modulation of pain signalling. We have examined, for the first time, the tissue distribution of the NOP receptor in clinical visceral and somatic pain disorders by immunohistochemistry and assessed functional effects of NOP and μ-opioid receptor activation in cultured human and rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. Quantification of NOP-positive nerve fibres within the bladder suburothelium revealed a remarkable several-fold increase in detrusor overactivity (P < 0.0001) and painful bladder syndrome patient specimens (P = 0.0014) compared with controls. In postmortem control human DRG, 75% to 80% of small/medium neurons (≤50 μm diameter) in the lumbar (somatic) and sacral (visceral) DRG were positive for NOP, and fewer large neurons; avulsion-injured cervical human DRG neurons showed similar numbers. NOP immunoreactivity was significantly decreased in injured peripheral nerves (P = 0.0004), and also in painful neuromas (P = 0.025). Calcium-imaging studies in cultured rat DRG neurons demonstrated dose-dependent inhibition of capsaicin responses in the presence of N/OFQ, with an IC50 of 8.6 pM. In cultured human DRG neurons, 32% inhibition of capsaicin responses was observed in the presence of 1 pM N/OFQ (P < 0.001). The maximum inhibition of capsaicin responses was greater with N/OFQ than μ-opioid receptor agonist DAMGO. Our findings highlight the potential of NOP agonists, particularly in urinary bladder overactivity and pain syndromes. The regulation of NOP expression in visceral and somatic sensory neurons by target-derived neurotrophic factors deserves further study, and the efficacy of NOP selective agonists in clinical trials.

  16. Involvement of gut microbiota in association between GLP-1/GLP-1 receptor expression and gastrointestinal motility.

    PubMed

    Yang, Mo; Fukui, Hirokazu; Eda, Hirotsugu; Xu, Xin; Kitayama, Yoshitaka; Hara, Ken; Kodani, Mio; Tomita, Toshihiko; Oshima, Tadayuki; Watari, Jiro; Miwa, Hiroto

    2017-04-01

    The microbiota in the gut is known to play a pivotal role in host physiology by interacting with the immune and neuroendocrine systems in gastrointestinal (GI) tissues. Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), a gut hormone, is involved in metabolism as well as GI motility. We examined how gut microbiota affects the link between GLP-1/GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) expression and motility of the GI tract. Germ-free (GF) mice (6 wk old) were orally administered a fecal bacterial suspension prepared from specific pathogen-free (SPF) mice, and then after fecal transplantation (FT) GI tissues were obtained from the GF mice at various time points. The expression of GLP-1 and its receptor was examined by immunohistochemistry, and gastrointestinal transit time (GITT) was measured by administration of carmine red solution. GLP-1 was expressed in endocrine cells in the colonic mucosa, and GLP-1R was expressed in myenteric neural cells throughout the GI wall. GLP-1R-positive cells throughout the GI wall were significantly fewer in GF mice with FT than in GF mice without gut microbiota reconstitution. GITT was significantly shorter in GF mice with FT than in control GF mice without FT and correlated with the number of GLP-1R-positive cells throughout the GI wall. GITT was significantly longer in GF control mice than in SPF mice. When those mice were treated with GLP-1 agonist extendin4, GITT was significantly longer in the GF mice. The gut microbiota may accelerate or at least modify GI motility while suppressing GLP-1R expression in myenteric neural cells throughout the GI tract.NEW & NOTEWORTHY The gut microbiota has been intensively studied, because it plays a pivotal role in various aspects of host physiology. On the other hand, glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) plays important roles in metabolism as well as gastrointestinal motility. In the present study, we have suggested that the gut microbiota accelerates gastrointestinal motility while suppressing the expression of GLP-1 receptor in

  17. MrgX2 is a high potency cortistatin receptor expressed in dorsal root ganglion.

    PubMed

    Robas, Nicola; Mead, Emma; Fidock, Mark

    2003-11-07

    MrgX2 is a recently identified orphan G-protein-coupled receptor whose ligand and physiological function were unknown. Here we describe cortistatin, a neuropeptide for which no specific receptor has been identified previously, as a high potency ligand at MrgX2. Cortistatin has several biological functions including roles in sleep regulation, locomotor activity, and cortical function. Using a "reverse pharmacology" approach, we have identified a number of additional cyclic peptide agonists for MrgX2, determined their rank order of potency, and demonstrated that this receptor has a pharmacological profile distinct from the other characterized members of the Mrg (Mas-related genes) family. In MrgX2-expressing cells, cortistatin-stimulated increases in intracellular Ca2+ but had no effect on basal or forskolin-stimulated cAMP levels, suggesting that this receptor is Gq-coupled. Immunohistochemical and quantitative PCR studies show MrgX2 to have a limited expression profile, both peripheral and within the central nervous system, with highest levels in dorsal root ganglion.

  18. Characterization of a single-chain T-cell receptor expressed in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Hoo, W F; Lacy, M J; Denzin, L K; Voss, E W; Hardman, K D; Kranz, D M

    1992-05-15

    Despite progress in defining the nature of major histocompatibility complex products that are recognized by the T-cell antigen receptor, the binding properties and structure of the receptor have not been solved. The primary problem has been the difficulty in obtaining sufficient quantities of active receptor. In this report we show that a single-chain T-cell receptor gene can be expressed in Escherichia coli. The protein consists of the variable (V) regions of the alpha and beta chains (V alpha and V beta) encoded by the cytotoxic T-lymphocyte clone 2C (a H-2b anti-H-2d alloreactive cell line) linked by a 25-amino acid flexible peptide. Solubilized extracts that contain the 27-kDa V alpha 3V beta 8 protein are positive in solid-phase immunoassays with the anti-V beta 8 antibody KJ16 and the anti-clonotypic antibody 1B2. Approximately 1% of the protein can be specifically purified on a 1B2-conjugated column. These results indicate that a fraction of the protein is able to fold into a native conformation and that single-chain proteins should be useful not only as immunogens for eliciting anti-T-cell receptor antibodies but in the study of T-cell receptor structure and function.

  19. Triggering receptor expressed in myeloid cells 2 (TREM2) trafficking in microglial cells: continuous shuttling to and from the plasma membrane regulated by cell stimulation.

    PubMed

    Prada, I; Ongania, G Naum; Buonsanti, C; Panina-Bordignon, P; Meldolesi, J

    2006-07-21

    Cell biology of triggering receptor expressed in myeloid cells 2, a receptor expressed in brain cells (microglia and possibly neurons and oligodendrocytes) which is responsible for a neurological and psychiatric genetic disease, polycystic lipomembranous osteodysplasia with sclerosing leukoencephalopathy otherwise called the Nasu-Hakola disease, is still largely unknown. Using immortalized mouse N9 microglial cells we demonstrate that triggering receptor expressed in myeloid cells 2 is mostly distributed intracellularly in two pools: a deposit in the Golgi complex and a population of exocytic vesicles, distinct from endosomes and lysosomes, which is continuously translocated to, and recycled from the cell surface. Results with ionomycin and gamma-interferon, showing rapid and slow increases, respectively, of triggering receptor expressed in myeloid cells 2 surface density, documented that the exocytosis of the receptor-rich vesicles is regulated. Pulse labeling in the cold of surface triggering receptor expressed in myeloid cells 2 with its antibody (or Fab fragment) followed by chase at 37 degrees C showed internalization, with recovery of the antibody in endosomes and lysosomes. However, part of the receptor/antibody complex, internalized for up to 30 min chase, was recycled to the cell surface within 2 min of ionomycin stimulation, together with a fraction of the total biotinylated surface protein chased in parallel. The internalized receptor appears therefore to get access to exocytic organelles distinct from lysosomes which may resemble the exocytic vesicles of resting cells. These results document that, in microglial cells, the surface density of the triggering receptor expressed in myeloid cells 2 and thus, presumably, the response to its activation, is continuously adapted and can be greatly increased, even at rapid rate, as a function of cell activation.

  20. Sex-related Differences in Gastrin Release and Parietal Cell Sensitivity to Gastrin in Healthy Human Beings

    PubMed Central

    Feldman, M.; Richardson, C. T.; Walsh, J. H.

    1983-01-01

    We compared serum gastrin concentrations and gastric acid secretion basally and in response to a mixed meal in age-matched women and men. Women had significantly higher basal serum gastrin concentrations (P < 0.01) and two- to threefold higher food-stimulated serum gastrin concentrations (P < 0.001) than men. Basal and food-stimulated serum gastrin concentrations in women did not fluctuate significantly during the menstrual cycle. Sex-related differences in food-stimulated serum gastrin concentrations were not due to differences in antral pH because pH after the meal in women and men had been kept constant at 5.0 by in vivo intragastric titration with sodium bicarbonate. Studies using an antibody that reacts only with potent gastrin heptadecapeptide species (G-17-I and II) indicated that women also had threefold higher serum G-17 concentrations after the meal than men (P < 0.005). Elevated serum G-17 concentrations after the meal in women were due to increased release of G-17 rather than slower clearance of G-17 from the circulation. Despite elevated serum gastrin concentrations in response to food, women secreted approximately the same amount of acid relative to their maximal secretory capacity as men. Furthermore, during exogenous G-17 infusion, which led to identical serum gastrin concentrations in women and men, the dose-response curve for acid secretion in women was shifted significantly to the right of the G-17 dose-response curve in men (P < 0.02). The dose of G-17 that stimulated half of peak acid secretion was two to three times higher in women than in men, reflecting significantly reduced sensitivity of parietal cells to gastrin in women (P < 0.05). Our studies suggest that, compared with men, women release greater amounts of gastrin but are at the same time less sensitive to stimulation of acid secretion by gastrin. PMID:6826731

  1. Inverse relationship between insulin receptor expression and progression in renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Makoto; Inoue, Takamitsu; Huang, Mingguo; Numakura, Kazuyuki; Tsuruta, Hiroshi; Saito, Mitsuru; Maeno, Atsushi; Nakamura, Eijiro; Narita, Shintaro; Tsuchiya, Norihiko; Habuchi, Tomonori

    2017-05-01

    We investigated the relationship among serum insulin level, insulin receptor (IR) expression in renal cell carcinoma (RCC), and outcomes in patients with RCC who underwent nephrectomy. We also explored the role of insulin signaling in RCC progression in a murine RCC allograft RENCA model using metformin to treat hyperinsulinemia induced by a high-carbohydrate diet. Clinically, the IR expression level in RCC tissue was significantly lower in patients with tumor stage pT2-4 and/or distant metastases. The IR expression level in RCC tissue was significantly lower in patients with preoperative serum C-peptide levels greater than or equal to the median than in patients with levels less than the median. High IR expression level was significantly associated with better disease-free and overall survival after nephrectomy. The IR expression level was significantly higher in murine subcutaneous flank tumors of the low-carbohydrate diet group and high-carbohydrate diet plus metformin group than of the high‑carbohydrate diet group. In vivo progression of murine tumors was not significantly enhanced by hyperinsulinemia induced by a high-carbohydrate diet and was significantly inhibited by metformin in both the low- and high‑carbohydrate diet groups. IR expression in RCC tissue was inversely associated with cancer progression in the clinical and murine experimental model studies. The clinical and murine allograft model study results suggested that hyperinsulinemia does not promote RCC progression. Decreased IR expression in high‑stage RCC tumors with poor prognosis may be the result of downregulation induced by the host's hyperinsulinemia.

  2. Proopiomelanocortin, glucocorticoid, and CRH receptor expression in human ACTH-secreting pituitary adenomas.

    PubMed

    Cassarino, Maria Francesca; Sesta, Antonella; Pagliardini, Luca; Losa, Marco; Lasio, Giovanni; Cavagnini, Francesco; Pecori Giraldi, Francesca

    2017-03-01

    ACTH-secreting pituitary tumors are by definition partially autonomous, i.e., secrete ACTH independent of physiological control. However, only few, small-sized studies on proopiomelanocortin (POMC) and its regulation by corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) or glucocorticoids are available. Objective of the present study was to report on constitutive and CRH- and dexamethasone-regulated POMC, CRH (CRH-R1), and glucocorticoid receptor (NR3C1) gene expression in a large series of human corticotrope adenomas. Fifty-three ACTH-secreting adenomas were incubated with 10 nM CRH or 10 nM dexamethasone for 24 h. POMC, CRH-R1, NR3C1, and its alpha and beta isoforms were quantified and medium ACTH measured. Constitutive POMC expression proved extremely variable, with macroadenomas exhibiting higher levels than microadenomas. POMC increased during CRH in most specimens; conversely, changes induced by dexamethasone were varied, ranging from decrease to paradoxical increase. No correlation between POMC and ACTH was detected in any experimental condition. CRH-R1 expression was not linked to the response to CRH while NR3C1 was expressed at greater levels in specimens who failed to inhibit during dexamethasone; glucocorticoid receptor α was the more abundant isoform and subject to down-regulation by dexamethasone. Our results demonstrate a considerable variability in POMC expression among tumors and no correlation between POMC and ACTH, suggesting that POMC peptide processing/transport plays a major role in modulating ACTH secretion. Further, CRH-R1 and NR3C1 expression were not linked to the expected ligand-induced outcome, indicating that receptor signaling rather than abundance determines corticotrope responses. Our findings pave the way to new avenues of research into Cushing's disease pathophysiology.

  3. Peripheral Sensitization Increases Opioid Receptor Expression and Activation by Crotalphine in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Zambelli, Vanessa Olzon; Fernandes, Ana Carolina de Oliveira; Gutierrez, Vanessa Pacciari; Ferreira, Julio Cesar Batista; Parada, Carlos Amilcar; Mochly-Rosen, Daria; Cury, Yara

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation enhances the peripheral analgesic efficacy of opioid drugs, but the mechanisms involved in this phenomenon have not been fully elucidated. Crotalphine (CRP), a peptide that was first isolated from South American rattlesnake C.d. terrificus venom, induces a potent and long-lasting anti-nociceptive effect that is mediated by the activation of peripheral opioid receptors. Because the high efficacy of CRP is only observed in the presence of inflammation, we aimed to elucidate the mechanisms involved in the CRP anti-nociceptive effect induced by inflammation. Using real-time RT-PCR, western blot analysis and ELISA assays, we demonstrate that the intraplantar injection of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) increases the mRNA and protein levels of the µ- and κ-opioid receptors in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and paw tissue of rats within 3 h of the injection. Using conformation state-sensitive antibodies that recognize activated opioid receptors, we show that PGE2, alone does not increase the activation of these opioid receptors but that in the presence of PGE2, the activation of specific opioid receptors by CRP and selective µ- and κ-opioid receptor agonists (positive controls) increases. Furthermore, PGE2 down-regulated the expression and activation of the δ-opioid receptor. CRP increased the level of activated mitogen-activated protein kinases in cultured DRG neurons, and this increase was dependent on the activation of protein kinase Cζ. This CRP effect was much more prominent when the cells were pretreated with PGE2. These results indicate that the expression and activation of peripheral opioid receptors by opioid-like drugs can be up- or down-regulated in the presence of an acute injury and that acute tissue injury enhances the efficacy of peripheral opioids. PMID:24594607

  4. SOCS3 deficiency in leptin receptor-expressing cells mitigates the development of pregnancy-induced metabolic changesa

    PubMed Central

    Zampieri, Thais T.; Ramos-Lobo, Angela M.; Furigo, Isadora C.; Pedroso, João A.B.; Buonfiglio, Daniella C.; Donato, Jose

    2014-01-01

    Objective During pregnancy, women normally increase their food intake and body fat mass, and exhibit insulin resistance. However, an increasing number of women are developing metabolic imbalances during pregnancy, including excessive gestational weight gain and gestational diabetes mellitus. Despite the negative health impacts of pregnancy-induced metabolic imbalances, their molecular causes remain unclear. Therefore, the present study investigated the molecular mechanisms responsible for orchestrating the metabolic changes observed during pregnancy. Methods Initially, we investigated the hypothalamic expression of key genes that could influence the energy balance and glucose homeostasis during pregnancy. Based on these results, we generated a conditional knockout mouse that lacks the suppressor of cytokine signaling-3 (SOCS3) only in leptin receptor-expressing cells and studied these animals during pregnancy. Results Among several genes involved in leptin resistance, only SOCS3 was increased in the hypothalamus of pregnant mice. Remarkably, SOCS3 deletion from leptin receptor-expressing cells prevented pregnancy-induced hyperphagia, body fat accumulation as well as leptin and insulin resistance without affecting the ability of the females to carry their gestation to term. Additionally, we found that SOCS3 conditional deletion protected females against long-term postpartum fat retention and streptozotocin-induced gestational diabetes. Conclusions Our study identified the increased hypothalamic expression of SOCS3 as a key mechanism responsible for triggering pregnancy-induced leptin resistance and metabolic adaptations. These findings not only help to explain a common phenomenon of the mammalian physiology, but it may also aid in the development of approaches to prevent and treat gestational metabolic imbalances. PMID:25737950

  5. Changes in Plasma β-NGF and Its Receptors Expression on Peripheral Blood Monocytes During Alzheimer's Disease Progression.

    PubMed

    Crispoltoni, Lucia; Stabile, Anna Maria; Pistilli, Alessandra; Venturelli, Massimo; Cerulli, Giuliano; Fonte, Cristina; Smania, Nicola; Schena, Federico; Rende, Mario

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD), the most common cause of dementia, is characterized by the deposition of extracellular amyloid-β (Aβ) plaques and intracellular neurofibrillary tangles, and by neuroinflammation. During the pathogenesis of AD, monocyte-macrophage lineage cells become increasingly ineffective in clearing Aβ deposits, less able to differentiate, and shift toward pro-inflammatory processes. Beta-nerve growth factor (β-NGF) and its receptors, TrKA and p75NTR, produce several biological responses, including cell apoptosis and survival, and inflammation. In the central nervous system, the involvement of these receptors in several critical hallmarks of AD is well known, but their role in circulating monocytes during the progression of dementia is unclear. We investigated the relationship between plasma β-NGF concentration and TrkA/p75NTR receptor expression in monocytes of patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), mild AD, and severe AD. We observed that plasma β-NGF concentration was increased with a higher expression of TrKA, but not of p75NTR, in monocytes from patients with MCI and mild AD, whereas β-NGF concentration and TrKA expression were decreased and p75NTR expression was increased, associated with caspase 3-mediated apoptosis, in patients with severe AD. In our study, we show evidence of variation in plasmatic β-NGF and monocytic TrkA/p75NTR receptor expression during the progression of dementia. These novel findings add evidence to support the hypothesis for the involvement of β-NGF and its receptors on monocytes during AD progression.

  6. Post-transcriptional regulation of dopamine D1 receptor expression in caudate-putamen of cocaine-sensitized mice.

    PubMed

    Tobón, Krishna E; Catuzzi, Jennifer E; Cote, Samantha R; Sonaike, Adenike; Kuzhikandathil, Eldo V

    2015-07-01

    The dopamine D1 receptor is centrally involved in mediating the effects of cocaine and is essential for cocaine-induced locomotor sensitization. Changes in D1 receptor expression have been reported in various models of cocaine addiction; however, the mechanisms that mediate these changes in D1 receptor expression are not well understood. Using preadolescent drd1a-EGFP mice and a binge cocaine treatment protocol we demonstrate that the D1 receptor is post-transcriptionally regulated in the caudate-putamen of cocaine-sensitized animal. While cocaine-sensitized mice express high levels of steady-state D1 receptor mRNA, the expression of D1 receptor protein is not elevated. We determined that the post-transcriptional regulation of D1 receptor mRNA is rapidly attenuated and D1 receptor protein levels increase within 30 min when the sensitized mice are challenged with cocaine. The rapid increase in D1 receptor protein levels requires de novo protein synthesis and correlates with the cocaine-induced hyperlocomotor activity in the cocaine-sensitized mice. The increase in D1 receptor protein levels in the caudate-putamen inversely correlated with the levels of microRNA 142-3p and 382, both of which regulate D1 receptor protein expression. The levels of these two microRNAs decreased significantly within 5 min of cocaine challenge in sensitized mice. The results provide novel insights into the previously unknown rapid kinetics of D1 receptor protein expression which occurs in a time scale that is comparable to the expression of immediate early genes. Furthermore, the results suggest a potential novel role for inherently labile microRNAs in regulating the rapid expression of D1 receptor protein in cocaine-sensitized animals.

  7. Puerarin ameliorates experimental alcoholic liver injury by inhibition of endotoxin gut leakage, Kupffer cell activation, and endotoxin receptors expression.

    PubMed

    Peng, Jing-Hua; Cui, Tuan; Huang, Fu; Chen, Liang; Zhao, Yu; Xu, Lin; Xu, Li-Li; Feng, Qin; Hu, Yi-Yang

    2013-03-01

    Puerarin, an isoflavone component extracted from Kudzu (Pueraria lobata), has been demonstrated to alleviate alcohol-related disorders. Our study examined whether puerarin ameliorates chronic alcoholic liver injury through inhibition of endotoxin gut leakage, the subsequent Kupffer cell activation, and endotoxin receptors expression. Rats were provided with the Liber-DeCarli liquid diet for 8 weeks. Puerarin (90 mg/kg or 180 mg/kg daily) was orally administered from the beginning of the third week until the end of the experiment. Chronic alcohol intake caused increased serum alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, hepatic gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase, and triglyceride levels as well as fatty liver and neutrophil infiltration in hepatic lobules as determined by biochemical and histologic assays. A significant increase of liver tumor necrosis factor α was detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. These pathologic effects correlated with increased endotoxin level in portal vein and upregulated protein expression of hepatic CD68, lipopolysaccharide-binding protein, CD14, Toll-like receptor 2, and Toll-like receptor 4. Meanwhile, the intestinal microvilli were observed to be sparse, shortened, and irregularity in distribution under the transmission electron microscope in conjunction with the downregulated intestinal zonula occludens-1 protein expression. These hepatic pathologic changes were significantly inhibited in puerarin-treated animals as were the endotoxin levels and hepatic CD68 and endotoxin receptors. Moreover, the pathologic changes in intestinal microvillus and the decreased intestinal zonula occludens-1 were also ameliorated with puerarin treatment. These results thus demonstrate that puerarin inhibition of endotoxin gut leakage, Kupffer cell activation, and endotoxin receptors expression is involved in the alleviation of chronic alcoholic liver injury in rats.

  8. Up-regulation of M1 muscarinic receptors expressed in CHOm1 cells by panaxynol via cAMP pathway.

    PubMed

    Hao, Wang; Xing-Jun, Wu; Yong-Yao, Cui; Liang, Zhu; Yang, Lu; Hong-Zhuan, Chen

    Loss of cholinergic neurons along with muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) in cerebral cortex and hippocampus is closely associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Recent drug development for AD treatment focuses heavily on identifying M(1) receptor agonists. However, mAChRs undergo down-regulation in response to agonist-induced sustained activation. Therefore, therapeutic effectiveness wanes during continuous use. Thus, another potentially effective approach, which overcomes this drawback is to develop compounds, which instead up-regulate M(1) receptor expression. In the present study, we took this alternative approach and contrasted in Chinese hamster ovary cells transfected with human m(1) subtype gene (CHOm(1) cells) changes of M(1) receptor expression levels caused by muscarinic agonists and upregulators of its expression. The muscarinic agonists carbachol and pilocarpine reduced M(1) receptor number in CHOm(1) cells by 29 and 46%, respectively, at 100muM, whereas panaxynol, a polyacetylene compound isolated from the lipophilic fraction of Panax notoginseng, concentration-dependently up-regulated the M(1) receptor number after pre-incubation with CHOm(1) cells for 48 h, reaching a plateau at 1 microM, and was accompanied by enhanced M(1) mRNA levels. Moreover, the protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor RP-adenosine-3',5'-cyclic mono-phosphoro-thioate triethylamine salt (RP-cAMPs) 5 microM completely prevented panaxynol-induced up-regulation of M(1) receptors. Panaxynol (1muM) caused a significant and consistent stimulation of cAMP accumulation (27% increase above basal at 40 min). These results suggest that in CHOm(1) cells panaxynol up-regulates M(1) receptor number through cAMP pathway-mediated stimulation of gene transcription.

  9. Nucleus Accumbens Dopamine D2-Receptor Expressing Neurons Control Behavioral Flexibility in a Place Discrimination Task in the IntelliCage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macpherson, Tom; Morita, Makiko; Wang, Yanyan; Sasaoka, Toshikuni; Sawa, Akira; Hikida, Takatoshi

    2016-01-01

    Considerable evidence has demonstrated a critical role for the nucleus accumbens (NAc) in the acquisition and flexibility of behavioral strategies. These processes are guided by the activity of two discrete neuron types, dopamine D1- or D2-receptor expressing medium spiny neurons (D1-/D2-MSNs). Here we used the IntelliCage, an automated…

  10. Antimicrobial Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Bahar, Ali Adem; Ren, Dacheng

    2013-01-01

    The rapid increase in drug-resistant infections has presented a serious challenge to antimicrobial therapies. The failure of the most potent antibiotics to kill “superbugs” emphasizes the urgent need to develop other control agents. Here we review the history and new development of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), a growing class of natural and synthetic peptides with a wide spectrum of targets including viruses, bacteria, fungi, and parasites. We summarize the major types of AMPs, their modes of action, and the common mechanisms of AMP resistance. In addition, we discuss the principles for designing effective AMPs and the potential of using AMPs to control biofilms (multicellular structures of bacteria embedded in extracellular matrixes) and persister cells (dormant phenotypic variants of bacterial cells that are highly tolerant to antibiotics). PMID:24287494

  11. Effect of chronic salt loading on adenosine metabolism and receptor expression in renal cortex and medulla in rats.

    PubMed

    Zou, A P; Wu, F; Li, P L; Cowley, A W

    1999-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that chronic salt loading increased renal interstitial adenosine concentrations and desensitized renal effects of adenosine, a phenomenon that could facilitate sodium excretion. However, the mechanisms responsible for the increased adenosine production and decreased adenosine response are poorly understood. This study examined the effects of the dietary high salt intake on adenosine metabolism and receptor expression in the renal cortex and medulla in Sprague Dawley rats. Fluorescent high-performance liquid chromatography analyses were performed to determine adenosine levels in snap-frozen kidney tissues. Comparing rats fed a normal (1% NaCl) versus high salt (4% NaCl) diet, renal adenosine concentrations in rats fed a high salt diet were significantly higher (cortex: 43+/-3 versus 85+/-4, P<0.05; medulla: 183+/-4 versus 302+/-8 nmol/g wet tissue, P<0.05). Increased adenosine concentrations were not associated with changes in the 5'-nucleotidase or adenosine deaminase activity, as determined by quantitative isoelectric focusing and gel electrophoresis. Western blot analyses showed that a high salt diet (4% NaCl for 3 weeks) downregulated A1 receptors (antinatriuretic type), did not alter A2A and A2B receptors (natriuretic type), and upregulated A3 receptors (function unknown) in both renal cortex and medulla. The data show that stimulation of adenosine production and downregulation of A1 receptors with salt loading may play an important role in adaptation in the kidney to promote sodium excretion.

  12. Dietary olive oil induces cannabinoid CB2 receptor expression in adipose tissue of ApcMin/+ transgenic mice

    PubMed Central

    Notarnicola, Maria; Tutino, Valeria; Tafaro, Angela; Bianco, Giusy; Guglielmi, Emilia; Caruso, Maria Gabriella

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cannabinoid- 2 (CB2) receptor is known for its anti-obesity effects silencing the activated immune cells that are key drivers of metabolic syndrome and inflammation. Nutritional interventions in experimental models of carcinogenesis have been demonstrated to modulate tissue inflammation state and proliferation. OBJECTIVE: Aim of this study was to test, in ApcMin/+ mice, whether a diet enriched with olive oil, omega- 3 and omega-6- PUFAs affects the adipose tissue inflammation status. METHODS: Four groups of animal were studied: ST group, receiving a standard diet; OO group, receiving the standard diet in which soybean oil (source of fats) was replaced with olive oil; OM-3 group, receiving the standard diet in which soybean oil was replaced with salmon oil; OM-6 group, receiving the standard diet in which soybean oil was replaced with oenothera oil. Gene and protein expression, in adipose tissue, were evaluated by RT-PCR and Western Blotting, respectively. Enzymatic activities were assayed by fluorescent and radiometric method, where appropriated. RESULTS: The diet enriched with olive oil significantly induced CB2 receptor expression and it was able to control inflammatory and proliferative activity of mice adipose tissue. CONCLUSIONS: The present findings open opportunities for developing novel nutritional strategies considering olive oil a key ingredient of a healthy dietary pattern. PMID:28035344

  13. Chemokine receptor expression by leukemic T cells of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma: clinical and histopathological correlations.

    PubMed

    Capriotti, Elisabetta; Vonderheid, Eric C; Thoburn, Christopher J; Bright, Emilie C; Hess, Allan D

    2007-12-01

    Chemokine receptors expressed by normal and neoplastic lymphocytes provide an important mechanism for cells to traffic into the skin and skin-associated lymph nodes. The goal of this study was to correlate chemokine receptor and CD62L expression by circulating neoplastic T cells with the clinical and pathological findings of the leukemic phase of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma, primarily Sézary syndrome (SS). Chemokine receptor mRNA transcripts were found in the majority of leukemic cells for CCR1, CCR4, CCR7, CCR10, CXCR3, and CD62L and in 20-50% of the samples for CXCR5. In patients with SS, relatively high expression levels of CCR7 and CCR10 by circulating neoplastic T cells correlated with epidermotropism, CXCR5 expression correlated with density of the dermal infiltrate, and CD62L correlated with extent of lymphadenopathy. Of note, CXCR5 expression and a dense dermal infiltrate correlated with a poor prognosis. The chemokine receptor profile supports the concept that neoplastic T cells are central memory T cells, and that CCR10 and CD62L play a fundamental role respectively in epidermotropism and lymphadenopathy that is observed in SS.

  14. TGF-β1 Upregulates the Expression of Triggering Receptor Expressed on Myeloid Cells 1 in Murine Lungs.

    PubMed

    Peng, Li; Zhou, Yong; Dong, Liang; Chen, Rui-Qi; Sun, Guo-Ying; Liu, Tian; Ran, Wen-Zhuo; Fang, Xiang; Jiang, Jian-Xin; Guan, Cha-Xiang

    2016-01-07

    Triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells 1 (TREM-1) increases the expression of TGF-β family genes, which are known as profibrogenic cytokines in the pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis. In this study, we determined whether TGF-β1 regulated the expression of TREM-1 in a mouse model of pulmonary fibrosis. The expression of TGF-β1 and TREM-1 was increased on day 7, 14, and 21 after single intratracheal injection of bleomycin (BLM). And there was positive correlation between the expression of TGF-β1 and TREM-1. TGF-β1 increased expression of TREM-1 mRNA and protein in a time- and dose-dependent manner in mouse macrophages. The expression of the activator protein 1 (AP-1) was increased in lung tissues from mouse after BLM injection and in mouse macrophages after TGF-β1 treatment, respectively. TGF-β1 significantly increased the relative activity of luciferase in the cells transfected with plasmid contenting wild type-promoter of TREM-1. But TGF-β1 had no effect on the activity of luciferase in the cells transfected with a mutant-TREM1 plasmid carrying mutations in the AP-1 promoter binding site. In conclusion, we found the expression of TREM-1 was increased in lung tissues from mice with pulmonary fibrosis. TGF-β1 increased the expression of TREM-1 in mouse macrophages partly via the transcription factor AP-1.

  15. Silencing Triggering Receptors Expressed on Myeloid Cells-1 Impaired the Inflammatory Response to Oxidized Low-Density Lipoprotein in Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Li, Houxuan; Hong, Feifei; Pan, Shengbo; Lei, Lang; Yan, Fuhua

    2016-02-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic progressive inflammatory disease characterized by the accumulation of lipid contents in arterial walls. Previous studies suggest participation of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) in lipid deposition and inflammatory response in vascular wall. The triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells 1 (TREM-1) is a cell surface receptor of the immunoglobulin superfamily, which amplifies signal transduction of TLR pathway and enhances immune response to microbial infections. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of the oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) on the expression of the TREM-1, as well as its engagement in proinflammatory cytokine production and foam cell formation in RAW264.7 mice macrophages. oxLDL enhanced TREM-1 and TLR-4, but not TLR-2 gene expression in macrophages; furthermore, silencing TREM-1 expression by short hairpin interfering RNA inhibited lipid phagocytosis and proinflammatory tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) as well as interleukin-6 (IL-6) production in macrophages; moreover, application of synthetic antagonist, LP-17 polypeptide, reduced IL-6 production upon oxLDL stimulation in vitro and in vivo. In conclusion, in macrophages, oxLDL enhanced expression of TREM-1, which amplifies the innate immune response of TLR pathway; activation of TREM-1 contributes to atherogenesis process by enhancing proinflammatory cytokine production and foam cell formation.

  16. Effects of a7nAChR agonist on the tissue estrogen receptor expression of castrated rats

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Feng; Gong, Fan; Lv, Jinhan; Gao, Jun; Ma, Jingzu

    2015-01-01

    Osteoporosis is one common disease in postmenopausal women due to depressed estrogen level. It has been known that inflammatory factors are involved in osteoporosis pathogenesis. One regulator of inflammatory cascade reaction, a7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (a7nAChR), therefore, may exert certain role in osteoporosis. This study thus investigated this question on an osteoporosis rat model after castration. Rats were firstly castrated to induce osteoporosis, and then received a7nAChR agonist (PNU-282987), diethylstilbestrol or saline via intraperitoneal injection. After 6 or 12 weeks, bone samples were collected for counting osteoblast number, bone density and estrogen receptor (ERα and ERβ) expression, in addition to the serum laboratory of inflammatory factors. Bone density, osteoclast number, ERα and ERβ expression level were significantly depressed in model group, and were remarkable potentiated in the drug treatment group (P<0.05). The levels of BGP and PTH in drug treatment group were decreased compared to diethylstilbestrol group, while E2 and IGF-1 showed up-regulation. Agonist of a7nAChR can up-regulate estrogen receptor expression and may prevent the occurrence and development of osteoporosis. PMID:26722551

  17. Thiocolchicoside inhibits the activity of various subtypes of recombinant GABA(A) receptors expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes.

    PubMed

    Mascia, Maria Paola; Bachis, Elisabetta; Obili, Nicola; Maciocco, Elisabetta; Cocco, Giovanni Antonio; Sechi, Gian Pietro; Biggio, Giovanni

    2007-03-08

    Thiocolchicoside is a myorelaxant drug with anti-inflammatory and analgesic properties as well as pronounced convulsant activity. To characterize the mechanisms of action of this drug at the molecular level, we examined its effects on the function of various recombinant neurotransmitter receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Electrophysiological recordings from recombinant human gamma-aminobutyric acid type A (GABA(A)) receptors consisting of alpha1beta1gamma2L, alpha1beta2gamma2L, or alpha2beta2gamma2L subunit combinations revealed that thiocolchicoside inhibited GABA-evoked Cl(-) currents with similar potencies (median inhibitory concentrations of 0.13 to 0.2 microM) and in a competitive manner. Consistent with previous observations, thiocolchicoside also inhibited the binding of GABA to rat cerebral cortical membranes. Thiocolchicoside inhibited the function of recombinant human strychnine-sensitive glycine receptors composed of the alpha1 subunit with a potency (median inhibitory concentration of 47 microM) lower than that apparent with recombinant GABA(A) receptors. It also inhibited the function of human nicotinic acetylcholine receptors composed of the alpha4 and beta2 subunits, but this effect was only partial and apparent at high concentrations. In contrast, thiocolchicoside had no effect on the function of 5-HT(3A) serotonin receptors. Our results thus provide molecular evidence that the epileptogenic activity of thiocolchicoside might be due to inhibition of the function of inhibitory receptors in the central nervous system, especially that of GABA(A) receptors.

  18. Selective C1 Lesioning Slightly Decreases Angiotensin II type I Receptor Expression in the Rat Rostral Ventrolateral Medulla (RVLM)

    PubMed Central

    Bourassa, Erick A.; Stedenfeld, Kristen A.; Sved, Alan F.; Speth, Robert C.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular homeostasis is regulated in large part by the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) in mammals. Projections from the RVLM to the intermediolateral column of the thoracolumbar spinal cord innervate preganglionic neurons of the sympathetic nervous system causing elevation of blood pressure and heart rate. A large proportion, but not all, of the neurons in the RVLM contain the enzymes necessary for the production of epinephrine and are identified as the C1 cell group. Angiotensin II (Ang II) activates the RVLM acting upon AT1 receptors. To assess the proportion of AT1 receptors that are located on C1 neurons in the rat RVLM this study employed an antibody to dopamine-beta-hydroxylase conjugated to saporin, to selectively destroy C1 neurons in the RVLM. Expression of tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactive neurons in the RVLM was reduced by 57 % in the toxin injected RVLM compared to the contralateral RVLM. In contrast, densitometric analysis of autoradiographic images of 125I-sarcosine1, isoleucine8 Ang II binding to AT1 receptors of the injected side RVLM revealed a small (10%) reduction in AT1 receptor expression compared to the contralateral RVLM. These results suggest that the majority of AT1 receptors in the rat RVLM are located on non-C1 neurons or glia. PMID:26138553

  19. HIV-related proteins prolong macrophage survival through induction of Triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-1

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Zhihong; Fan, Xian; Staitieh, Bashar; Bedi, Chetna; Spearman, Paul; Guidot, David M; Sadikot, Ruxana T

    2017-01-01

    Triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-1(TREM-1) is a member of the superimmunoglobulin receptor family. We have previously shown that TREM-1 prolongs survival of macrophages treated with lipoolysaccharide through Egr2-Bcl2 signaling. Recent studies suggest a role for TREM-1 in viral immunity. Human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV) targets the monocyte/macrophage lineage at varying stages of infection. Emerging data suggest that macrophages are key reservoirs for latent HIV even in individuals on antiretroviral therapy. Here, we investigated the potential role of TREM-1 in HIV latency in macrophages. Our data show that human macrophages infected with HIV show an increased expression of TREM-1. In parallel, direct exposure to the HIV-related proteins Tat or gp120 induces TREM-1 expression in macrophages and confers anti-apoptotic attributes.NF-κB p65 silencing identified that these proteins induce TREM-1 in p65-dependent manner. TREM-1 silencing in macrophages exposed to HIV-related proteins led to increased caspase 3 activation and reduced Bcl-2 expression, rendering them susceptible to apotosis. These novel data reveal that TREM-1 may play a critical role in establishing HIV reservoir in macrophages by inhibiting apoptosis. Therefore, targeting TREM-1 could be a novel therapeutic approach to enhance clearance of the HIV reservoir, at least within the macrophage pools. PMID:28181540

  20. Immune response genes receptors expression and polymorphisms in relation to multiple sclerosis susceptibility and response to INF-β therapy.

    PubMed

    Karam, Rehab A; Rezk, Noha A; Amer, Mona M; Fathy, Hala A

    2016-09-01

    Interferon (IFN)-β is one of the disease modifying drugs used in the treatment of multiple sclerosis. A predictive marker that indicates good or poor response to the treatment is highly desirable. We aimed to investigate the relation between the immune response genes receptors (IFNAR1, IFNAR2, and CCR5) expression and their polymorhic variants and multiple sclerosis (MS) susceptibility as well as the response to IFN-β therapy. The immune response genes receptors expression and genotyping were analyzed in 80 patients with MS, treated with IFN-β and in 110 healthy controls. There was a significant decrease of IFNAR1 and IFNAR2 mRNA expression and a significant increase of CCR5 mRNA expression in MS patients compared with the control group. Also, the level of IFNAR1, IFNAR2, and CCR5 mRNA expression was found to be significantly lower in the responders than nonresponders. Carriers of IFNAR1 18417 C/C genotype and C allele had an increased risk of developing MS. There was a significant relation between CCR5 Δ32 allele and IFN-β treatment response in MS patients. Our results highlighted the significance of IFNAR and CCR5 genes in multiple sclerosis risk and the response to IFN-β therapy. © 2016 IUBMB Life, 68(9):727-734, 2016.

  1. Patched targeting peptides for imaging and treatment of hedgehog positive breast tumors.

    PubMed

    Smith, Daniel; Kong, Fanlin; Yang, David; Larson, Richard; Sims-Mourtada, Jennifer; Woodward, Wendy A

    2014-01-01

    High tumor hedgehog expression is correlated with poor prognosis in invasive ductal carcinoma. Peptides which bind the patched receptor have recently been reported to have a growth inhibitory effect in tumors with activated hedgehog signaling. We sought to examine growth inhibition with these peptides in breast cancer cells and use these peptides as molecular imaging probes to follow changes in hedgehog expression after chemotherapy. Significant growth inhibition was observed in breast cancer cell lines treated with PTCH-blocking peptides. Significant in vitro uptake was observed with both FITC- and (99m)Tc-EC-peptide conjugates. In vivo imaging studies displayed greater accumulation of (99m)Tc-labeled peptides within tumors as compared to adjacent muscle tissue. Patched receptor expression increased after treatment and this correlated with an increase in tumor radiotracer uptake. These studies suggest that peptides which bind the sonic hedgehog docking site in patched receptor correlate with patched expression and can be used to image patched in vivo. Further, our data suggest that radiolabeled peptides may enable us to examine the activity of the hedgehog signaling pathway and to evaluate response to anti-cancer therapies.

  2. C-Peptide Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... vital for the body to use its main energy source, glucose . Since C-peptide and insulin are produced ... these cases, C-peptide measurement is a useful alternative to testing for insulin. C-peptide measurements can ...

  3. Early social isolation disrupts latent inhibition and increases dopamine D2 receptor expression in the medial prefrontal cortex and nucleus accumbens of adult rats.

    PubMed

    Han, Xiao; Li, Nanxin; Xue, Xiaofang; Shao, Feng; Wang, Weiwen

    2012-04-04

    Adolescence is a critical period for neurodevelopment. In the present study, we investigated the effects of peri-adolescent social isolation on latent inhibition (LI) and dopamine D2 receptor expression in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and nucleus accumbens (NAc) of young adult rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into adolescent isolation (ISO; isolated housing, 21-34 days of age) and social housing (SOC) groups. LI was tested at postnatal day 56. After behavioral testing, the number of dopamine D2 receptor-expressing cells was determined using immunohistochemistry. Adolescent social isolation impaired LI and increased the number of cells expressing the D2 receptor in the mPFC and NAc. The results suggest that adolescent social isolation produces profound effects on cognitive and dopaminergic function in adult rats, and could be used as an animal model of various neurodevelopmental disorders.

  4. Modulation of NMDA receptor expression in the rat spinal cord by peripheral nerve injury and adrenal medullary grafting.

    PubMed

    Hama, A T; Unnerstall, J R; Siegan, J B; Sagen, J

    1995-07-31

    Excessive activation of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors in the spinal cord consequent to peripheral injury has been implicated in the initiation of neuropathologic events leading to a state of chronic hyperexcitability and persistence of exaggerated sensory processing. In other CNS disease or injury states, NMDA-mediated neurotoxic damage is associated with a loss of NMDA receptors, and outcome may be improved by agents reducing NMDA activation. Previous findings in our laboratory have demonstrated that the transplantation of adrenal medullary tissue into the spinal subarachnoid space can alleviate sensory abnormalities and reduce the induction of a putative nitric oxide synthase consequent to peripheral nerve injury. In order to determine changes in NMDA receptor expression in the spinal cord following peripheral nerve injury and adrenal medullary grafting, NMDA receptor binding using a high-affinity competitive NMDA receptor antagonist, CGP-39653, and NMDAR1 subunit distribution using immunocytochemistry were investigated. Two weeks following peripheral nerve injury by loose ligation of the right sciatic nerve, either adrenal medullary or striated muscle (control) tissue pieces were implanted in the spinal subarachnoid space. Binding studies revealed a marked reduction in [3H]CGP-39653 binding at L4-L5 levels ipsilateral to peripheral nerve injury in control transplanted animals. In contrast, NMDA binding was normalized in adrenal medullary grafted animals. In addition, NMDAR1 immunoreactivity was reduced in both the dorsal horn neuropil and motor neurons of the ventral horn in animals with peripheral nerve injury, while levels in adrenal medullary grafted animals appeared similar to intact controls. These results suggest that adrenal medullary transplants reduce abnormal sensory processing resulting from peripheral injury by intervening in the spinal NMDA-excitotoxicity cascade.

  5. Anabolic steroid- and exercise-induced cardio-depressant cytokines and myocardial β1 receptor expression in CD1 mice.

    PubMed

    Fineschi, Vittorio; Di Paolo, Marco; Neri, Margherita; Bello, Stefania; D'Errico, Stefano; Dinucci, Dinuccio; Parente, Ruggero; Pomara, Cristoforo; Rabozzi, Roberto; Riezzo, Irene; Turillazzi, Emanuela

    2011-02-01

    Few animal model studies have been conducted in order to evaluate the impact of androgenic anabolic steroids (AAS) supraphysiological doses on the cardiovascular system and myocardial injury. Twenty-five male CD1 mice (8-10 weeks old; 35g initial body weight) were randomized into three AAS treated groups and two control groups. The AAS mice received intramuscular Nandrolone Decanoate (DECA-DURABOLIN), vehicled in arachidis oil, for 42 days, twice per week, with different dosages, studying plasma lipid analysis, cardiac histopathological features, cardiac β (1) adrenergic receptor expression, and the effects of the myocardial expression of inflammatory mediators (IL-1β, TNF-α) on the induction of cardiomyocytes apoptosis (HSP 70, TUNEL), using proteomic and immunohistochemical analysis. The mice had free movements in their animal rooms (two groups) or exercised by running on a motor-driven treadmill the others three groups. Recurring high dose AAS administration and physical training in mice produce significant increase in body weight and for total cholesterol. A moderate increase of the heart weight, cardiac hypertrophy and wide colliquative myocytolysis, were observed in high dose AAS administration and physical training group. The expression of HSP70 and inflammatory cytokine IL-1β, increased in the three AAS-treated groups. TNF- α showed a more extensive expression in the AAS-high dose group. A significant apoptotic process randomly sparse in the myocardium was described. Our data support the hypothesis that the combined effects of vigorous training, anabolic steroid abuse and stimulation of the sympathetic nervous system, may predispose to myocardial injury.

  6. Ingestion of Lactobacillus strain regulates emotional behavior and central GABA receptor expression in a mouse via the vagus nerve.

    PubMed

    Bravo, Javier A; Forsythe, Paul; Chew, Marianne V; Escaravage, Emily; Savignac, Hélène M; Dinan, Timothy G; Bienenstock, John; Cryan, John F

    2011-09-20

    There is increasing, but largely indirect, evidence pointing to an effect of commensal gut microbiota on the central nervous system (CNS). However, it is unknown whether lactic acid bacteria such as Lactobacillus rhamnosus could have a direct effect on neurotransmitter receptors in the CNS in normal, healthy animals. GABA is the main CNS inhibitory neurotransmitter and is significantly involved in regulating many physiological and psychological processes. Alterations in central GABA receptor expression are implicated in the pathogenesis of anxiety and depression, which are highly comorbid with functional bowel disorders. In this work, we show that chronic treatment with L. rhamnosus (JB-1) induced region-dependent alterations in GABA(B1b) mRNA in the brain with increases in cortical regions (cingulate and prelimbic) and concomitant reductions in expression in the hippocampus, amygdala, and locus coeruleus, in comparison with control-fed mice. In addition, L. rhamnosus (JB-1) reduced GABA(Aα2) mRNA expression in the prefrontal cortex and amygdala, but increased GABA(Aα2) in the hippocampus. Importantly, L. rhamnosus (JB-1) reduced stress-induced corticosterone and anxiety- and depression-related behavior. Moreover, the neurochemical and behavioral effects were not found in vagotomized mice, identifying the vagus as a major modulatory constitutive communication pathway between the bacteria exposed to the gut and the brain. Together, these findings highlight the important role of bacteria in the bidirectional communication of the gut-brain axis and suggest that certain organisms may prove to be useful therapeutic adjuncts in stress-related disorders such as anxiety and depression.

  7. Adolescent changes in dopamine D1 receptor expression in orbitofrontal cortex and piriform cortex accompany an associative learning deficit.

    PubMed

    Garske, Anna K; Lawyer, Chloe R; Peterson, Brittni M; Illig, Kurt R

    2013-01-01

    The orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) and piriform cortex are involved in encoding the predictive value of olfactory stimuli in rats, and neural responses to olfactory stimuli in these areas change as associations are learned. This experience-dependent plasticity mirrors task-related changes previously observed in mesocortical dopamine neurons, which have been implicated in learning the predictive value of cues. Although forms of associative learning can be found at all ages, cortical dopamine projections do not mature until after postnatal day 35 in the rat. We hypothesized that these changes in dopamine circuitry during the juvenile and adolescent periods would result in age-dependent differences in learning the predictive value of environmental cues. Using an odor-guided associative learning task, we found that adolescent rats learn the association between an odor and a palatable reward significantly more slowly than either juvenile or adult rats. Further, adolescent rats displayed greater distractibility during the task than either juvenile or adult rats. Using real-time quantitative PCR and immunohistochemical methods, we observed that the behavioral deficit in adolescence coincides with a significant increase in D1 dopamine receptor expression compared to juvenile rats in both the OFC and piriform cortex. Further, we found that both the slower learning and increased distractibility exhibited in adolescence could be alleviated by experience with the association task as a juvenile, or by an acute administration of a low dose of either the dopamine D1 receptor agonist SKF-38393 or the D2 receptor antagonist eticlopride. These results suggest that dopaminergic modulation of cortical function may be important for learning the predictive value of environmental stimuli, and that developmental changes in cortical dopaminergic circuitry may underlie age-related differences in associative learning.

  8. Attenuated Inflammatory Response in Triggering Receptor Expressed on Myeloid Cells 2 (TREM2) Knock-Out Mice following Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Brehm, Martin; Guenther, Madlen; Linnartz-Gerlach, Bettina; Neumann, Harald; Witte, Otto W.; Frahm, Christiane

    2013-01-01

    Background Triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-2 (TREM2) is a microglial surface receptor involved in phagocytosis. Clearance of apoptotic debris after stroke represents an important mechanism to re-attain tissue homeostasis and thereby ensure functional recovery. The role of TREM2 following stroke is currently unclear. Methods and Results As an experimental stroke model, the middle cerebral artery of mice was occluded for 30 minutes with a range of reperfusion times (duration of reperfusion: 6 h/12 h/24 h/2 d/7 d/28 d). Quantitative PCR (qPCR) revealed a greatly increased transcription of TREM2 after stroke. We subsequently analyzed the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, chemokines and their receptors in TREM2-knockout (TREM2-KO) mice via qPCR. Microglial activation (CD68, Iba1) and CD3-positive T-cell invasion were analyzed via qPCR and immunohistochemistry. Functional consequences of TREM2 knockout were assessed by infarct volumetry. The acute inflammatory response (12 h reperfusion) was very similar between TREM2-KO mice and their littermate controls. However, in the sub-acute phase (7 d reperfusion) following stroke, TREM2-KO mice showed a decreased transcription of pro-inflammatory cytokines TNFα, IL-1α and IL-1β, associated with a reduced microglial activity (CD68, Iba1). Furthermore, TREM2-KO mice showed a reduced transcription of chemokines CCL2 (MCP1), CCL3 (MIP1α) and the chemokine receptor CX3CR1, followed by a diminished invasion of CD3-positive T-cells. No effect on the lesion size was observed. Conclusions Although we initially expected an exaggerated pro-inflammatory response following ablation of TREM2, our data support a contradictory scenario that the sub-acute inflammatory reaction after stroke is attenuated in TREM2-KO mice. We therefore conclude that TREM2 appears to sustain a distinct inflammatory response after stroke. PMID:23301011

  9. Neuronal Hyperactivity Disturbs ATP Microgradients, Impairs Microglial Motility, and Reduces Phagocytic Receptor Expression Triggering Apoptosis/Microglial Phagocytosis Uncoupling

    PubMed Central

    Nadjar, Agnes; Layé, Sophie; Leyrolle, Quentin; Gómez-Nicola, Diego; Domercq, María; Pérez-Samartín, Alberto; Sánchez-Zafra, Víctor; Savage, Julie C.; Hui, Chin-Wai; Deudero, Juan J. P.; Brewster, Amy L.; Anderson, Anne E.; Zaldumbide, Laura; Galbarriatu, Lara; Marinas, Ainhoa; Vivanco, Maria dM.; Matute, Carlos; Maletic-Savatic, Mirjana

    2016-01-01

    Phagocytosis is essential to maintain tissue homeostasis in a large number of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases, but its role in the diseased brain is poorly explored. Recent findings suggest that in the adult hippocampal neurogenic niche, where the excess of newborn cells undergo apoptosis in physiological conditions, phagocytosis is efficiently executed by surveillant, ramified microglia. To test whether microglia are efficient phagocytes in the diseased brain as well, we confronted them with a series of apoptotic challenges and discovered a generalized response. When challenged with excitotoxicity in vitro (via the glutamate agonist NMDA) or inflammation in vivo (via systemic administration of bacterial lipopolysaccharides or by omega 3 fatty acid deficient diets), microglia resorted to different strategies to boost their phagocytic efficiency and compensate for the increased number of apoptotic cells, thus maintaining phagocytosis and apoptosis tightly coupled. Unexpectedly, this coupling was chronically lost in a mouse model of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) as well as in hippocampal tissue resected from individuals with MTLE, a major neurological disorder characterized by seizures, excitotoxicity, and inflammation. Importantly, the loss of phagocytosis/apoptosis coupling correlated with the expression of microglial proinflammatory, epileptogenic cytokines, suggesting its contribution to the pathophysiology of epilepsy. The phagocytic blockade resulted from reduced microglial surveillance and apoptotic cell recognition receptor expression and was not directly mediated by signaling through microglial glutamate receptors. Instead, it was related to the disruption of local ATP microgradients caused by the hyperactivity of the hippocampal network, at least in the acute phase of epilepsy. Finally, the uncoupling led to an accumulation of apoptotic newborn cells in the neurogenic niche that was due not to decreased survival but to delayed cell clearance

  10. Age dependent nitro-oxidative load and melatonin receptor expression in the spleen and immunity of goat Capra hircus.

    PubMed

    Singh, Amaresh Kumar; Haldar, Chandana

    2014-12-01

    The decline in the plasma level of melatonin has been associated with increased oxidative stress in the physiological system while aging. The increased levels of oxidants are known to augment the nitro-oxidative stress, which induces the apoptotic factors in lymphoid organs leading to age dependent immunosenescence. There are no reports to date that can suggest how the age dependent nitro-oxidative stress can influence the melatonin membrane MT1/MT2R expression and immune status of any small ruminant. In the present study, we noted the expression of melatonin receptors MT1R and MT2R and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) along with the apoptotic markers (viz. Bcl-2, Bax and Pro-caspase-3) in the spleen of young, middle-aged and old-aged Indian goat Capra hircus. The lymphocyte proliferation was also recorded along with the total nitrite and nitrate ion concentration (NOx) in the spleen and plasma. An age dependent decline in MT1R and MT2R expressions and lymphocyte proliferation with increased level of reactive nitrogen species (RNS) and iNOS expression was noted. An increased Bax/Bcl-2 ratio and a decreased Pro-caspase-3 expression were observed in the spleen of goat with an age dependent decline in the peripheral melatonin level. This decline in melatonin along with reduced melatonin receptor (MT1/MT2) expression and elevated RNS level in the spleen with aging might have an important role in the regulation of immune function of goats. Our observations suggest that the age-associated immunosenescence observed in goats can be a consequence of declining melatonin and its receptor expression and induction of apoptotic factors influenced by the increased RNS level that deteriorates the proper functioning of the spleen.

  11. Modulation of platelet-derived growth factor receptor expression in microvascular endothelial cells during in vitro angiogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Marx, M; Perlmutter, R A; Madri, J A

    1994-01-01

    Microvascular endothelial cells in vivo exhibit a plastic phenotype, forming a nonproliferative, differentiated capillary network, while retaining their ability to respond to injury by proliferation, migration and neovascularization. The presence of PDGF receptors and PDGF responsiveness in microvascular endothelial cells and the significance of PDGF isoforms in the control of endothelial cell growth and differentiation remain controversial. Since culture of microvascular endothelial cells in a three-dimensional (3D) system induced cell differentiation and angiogenesis and inhibited proliferation, the present study investigates the role of different extracellular matrix environments in inducing different microvascular endothelial cell phenotypes on microvascular endothelial cell PDGF receptor expression and PDGF responsiveness. In conventional two-dimensional (2D) culture, microvascular endothelial cells expressed both PDGF receptor alpha and beta chains. Suramin treatment demonstrated continuous downregulation of the alpha receptor surface expression. PDGF BB and, to a lesser extent, PDGF AB were mitogenic in 2D-culture, PDGF AA failed to induce any proliferative response despite inducing receptor autophosphorylation. During in vitro angiogenesis induced by 3D-culture, both PDGF receptors were rapidly downregulated. Assessment of cell proliferation showed quiescent cells and PDGF unresponsiveness. We conclude that the induction of a differentiated phenotype during in vitro angiogenesis (tube formation) driven in part by the spatial organization of the surrounding matrix is associated with a downregulation of PDGF receptors. Identification of the molecular cell-matrix interactions involved in this receptor regulation may allow for targeted manipulation of cell growth in vivo and lead to novel therapeutic applications for PDGF. Images PMID:7506710

  12. Impact of obesity on taste receptor expression in extra-oral tissues: emphasis on hypothalamus and brainstem

    PubMed Central

    Herrera Moro Chao, D.; Argmann, C.; Van Eijk, M.; Boot, R. G.; Ottenhoff, R.; Van Roomen, C.; Foppen, E.; Siljee, J. E.; Unmehopa, U. A.; Kalsbeek, A.; Aerts, J. M. F. G.

    2016-01-01

    Sweet perception promotes food intake, whereas that of bitterness is inhibitory. Surprisingly, the expression of sweet G protein-coupled taste receptor (GPCTR) subunits (T1R2 and T1R3) and bitter GPCTRs (T2R116, T2R118, T2R138 and T2R104), as well as the α-subunits of the associated signalling complex (αGustducin, Gα14 and αTransducin), in oral and extra-oral tissues from lean and obese mice, remains poorly characterized. We focused on the impact of obesity on taste receptor expression in brain areas involved in energy homeostasis, namely the hypothalamus and brainstem. We demonstrate that many of the GPCTRs and α-subunits are co-expressed in these tissues and that obesity decreases expression of T1R3, T2R116, Gα14, αTrans and TRPM5. In vitro high levels of glucose caused a prominent down-regulation of T1R2 and Gα14 expression in cultured hypothalamic neuronal cells, leptin caused a transient down-regulation of T1R2 and T1R3 expression. Intriguingly, expression differences were also observed in other extra-oral tissues of lean and obese mice, most strikingly in the duodenum where obesity reduced the expression of most bitter and sweet receptors. In conclusion, obesity influences components of sweet and bitter taste sensing in the duodenum as well as regions of the mouse brain involved in energy homeostasis, including hypothalamus and brainstem. PMID:27388805

  13. Adolescent social defeat alters N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor expression and impairs fear learning in adulthood.

    PubMed

    Novick, Andrew M; Mears, Mackenzie; Forster, Gina L; Lei, Yanlin; Tejani-Butt, Shanaz M; Watt, Michael J

    2016-05-01

    Repeated social defeat of adolescent male rats results in adult mesocortical dopamine hypofunction, impaired working memory, and increased contextual anxiety-like behavior. Given the role of glutamate in dopamine regulation, cognition, and fear and anxiety, we investigated potential changes to N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptors following adolescent social defeat. As both NMDA receptors and mesocortical dopamine are implicated in the expression and extinction of conditioned fear, a separate cohort of rats was challenged with a classical fear conditioning paradigm to investigate whether fear learning is altered by adolescent defeat. Quantitative autoradiography was used to measure 3H-MK-801 binding to NMDA receptors in regions of the medial prefrontal cortex, caudate putamen, nucleus accumbens, amygdala and hippocampus. Assessment of fear learning was achieved using an auditory fear conditioning paradigm, with freezing toward the auditory tone used as a measure of conditioned fear. Compared to controls, adolescent social defeat decreased adult NMDA receptor expression in the infralimbic region of the prefrontal cortex and central amygdala, while increasing expression in the CA3 region of the hippocampus. Previously defeated rats also displayed decreased conditioned freezing during the recall and first extinction periods, which may be related to the observed decreases and increases in NMDA receptors within the central amygdala and CA3, respectively. The alteration in NMDA receptors seen following adolescent social defeat suggests that dysfunction of glutamatergic systems, combined with mesocortical dopamine deficits, likely plays a role in the some of the long-term behavioral consequences of social stressors in adolescence seen in both preclinical and clinical studies.

  14. Estrogen and androgen receptor expression in surface epithelium and inclusion cyst in the ovary of premenopausal and postmenopausal women

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The importance of surface epithelium and epithelial inclusion cysts in the ovary arises from studies demonstrating that these structures are susceptible to epithelial ovarian cancer development. The expression of estrogen receptor alpha (ER alpha), androgen receptor (AR), in epithelial cells of the ovary from premenopausal and postmenopausal women is interesting because sexual steroid hormones are involved in cell growth and differentiation. Methods The presence of ER alpha, AR, and the orphan G protein-coupled receptor 30 (GPR30) was demonstrated by immunofluorescence in ovaries obtained from 79 pre and postmenopausal patients, undergoing histero-salpingo-oophorectomy for proliferative gynecological diseases. The proportion of patients that displayed positive reaction for estrogen and androgen receptors in epithelial cells of the ovary was evaluated according to menopausal status and associated pathology. Results The proportion of patients that displayed a positive receptor expression in the epithelial cells of the ovarian surface and cortical inclusion cysts shows that ER alpha is present in 20 of 79 patients (0.25), AR in 33 of 79 (0.42) and GPR30 in 38 of 55 (0.69). There are no differences in ER alpha, AR, and GPR30 expression between pre and postmenopausal patients and considering the associated pathology, proportions for ER alpha and GPR30 are similar. The patients with cervical cancer show a higher proportion of AR expression in epithelial cells of the ovary, which is statistically significant (P < 0.01) compared with patients with other proliferative diseases. Conclusions The presence of ER alpha, AR, and GPR30 in the surface epithelial ovarian cells and its derivatives are observed with a proportion that is specific for each receptor. The proportion of expression for these receptors in the epithelial cells of the ovary does not change after menopause. The proportion of ovaries with AR positive epithelial cells in patients with cervical

  15. Adolescent Changes in Dopamine D1 Receptor Expression in Orbitofrontal Cortex and Piriform Cortex Accompany an Associative Learning Deficit

    PubMed Central

    Garske, Anna K.; Lawyer, Chloe R.; Peterson, Brittni M.; Illig, Kurt R.

    2013-01-01

    The orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) and piriform cortex are involved in encoding the predictive value of olfactory stimuli in rats, and neural responses to olfactory stimuli in these areas change as associations are learned. This experience-dependent plasticity mirrors task-related changes previously observed in mesocortical dopamine neurons, which have been implicated in learning the predictive value of cues. Although forms of associative learning can be found at all ages, cortical dopamine projections do not mature until after postnatal day 35 in the rat. We hypothesized that these changes in dopamine circuitry during the juvenile and adolescent periods would result in age-dependent differences in learning the predictive value of environmental cues. Using an odor-guided associative learning task, we found that adolescent rats learn the association between an odor and a palatable reward significantly more slowly than either juvenile or adult rats. Further, adolescent rats displayed greater distractibility during the task than either juvenile or adult rats. Using real-time quantitative PCR and immunohistochemical methods, we observed that the behavioral deficit in adolescence coincides with a significant increase in D1 dopamine receptor expression compared to juvenile rats in both the OFC and piriform cortex. Further, we found that both the slower learning and increased distractibility exhibited in adolescence could be alleviated by experience with the association task as a juvenile, or by an acute administration of a low dose of either the dopamine D1 receptor agonist SKF-38393 or the D2 receptor antagonist eticlopride. These results suggest that dopaminergic modulation of cortical function may be important for learning the predictive value of environmental stimuli, and that developmental changes in cortical dopaminergic circuitry may underlie age-related differences in associative learning. PMID:23437091

  16. Acetylcholine induces GABA release onto rod bipolar cells through heteromeric nicotinic receptors expressed in A17 amacrine cells

    PubMed Central

    Elgueta, Claudio; Vielma, Alex H.; Palacios, Adrian G.; Schmachtenberg, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Acetylcholine (ACh) is a major retinal neurotransmitter that modulates visual processing through a large repertoire of cholinergic receptors expressed on different retinal cell types. ACh is released from starburst amacrine cells (SACs) under scotopic conditions, but its effects on cells of the rod pathway have not been investigated. Using whole-cell patch clamp recordings in slices of rat retina, we found that ACh application triggers GABA release onto rod bipolar (RB) cells. GABA was released from A17 amacrine cells and activated postsynaptic GABAA and GABAC receptors in RB cells. The sensitivity of ACh-induced currents to nicotinic ACh receptor (nAChR) antagonists (TMPH ~ mecamylamine > erysodine > DhβE > MLA) together with the differential potency of specific agonists to mimic ACh responses (cytisine >> RJR2403 ~ choline), suggest that A17 cells express heteromeric nAChRs containing the β4 subunit. Activation of nAChRs induced GABA release after Ca2+ accumulation in A17 cell dendrites and varicosities mediated by L-type voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) and intracellular Ca2+ stores. Inhibition of acetylcholinesterase depolarized A17 cells and increased spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents in RB cells, indicating that endogenous ACh enhances GABAergic inhibition of RB cells. Moreover, injection of neostigmine or cytisine reduced the b-wave of the scotopic flash electroretinogram (ERG), suggesting that cholinergic modulation of GABA release controls RB cell activity in vivo. These results describe a novel regulatory mechanism of RB cell inhibition and complement our understanding of the neuromodulatory control of retinal signal processing. PMID:25709566

  17. Cell surface profiling with peptide libraries yields ligand arrays that classify breast tumor subtypes.

    PubMed

    Dane, Karen Y; Gottstein, Claudia; Daugherty, Patrick S

    2009-05-01

    Cancer heterogeneity renders risk stratification and therapy decisions challenging. Thus, genomic and proteomic methodologies have been used in an effort to identify biomarkers that can differentiate tumor subtypes to improve therapeutic outcome. Here, we report a generally applicable strategy to generate tumor type-specific peptide ligand arrays. Peptides that specifically recognize breast tumor-derived cell lines (MDA-MB-231, MCF-7, and T47-D) were identified using cell-displayed peptide libraries carrying an intrinsic fluorescent marker allowing for sorting and characterization with quantitative flow cytometry. Tumor cell specificity was achieved by depleting libraries of ligands binding to normal mammary epithelial cells (HMEC and MCF-10A). Although integrin binding RGD motifs were favored by some cell lines, screening with RGD competitors yielded several novel consensus motifs exhibiting improved tumor specificity. The resultant peptide array contained multiple consensus motifs exhibiting strong similarity to breast tumor-associated proteins. Profiling a panel of breast cancer cell lines with the peptide array revealed receptor expression patterns distinctive for luminal or basal tumor subtypes. In addition, peptide displaying bacteria and peptide functionalized microparticles enabled fluorescent labeling of tumor cells and frozen tumor tissue sections. Our results indicate that cell surface profiling using highly specific breast tumor cell binding ligands may provide an efficient route for tumor subtype classification, biomarker identification, and for the development of targeted diagnostics and therapeutics.

  18. [SYNTHETIC PEPTIDE VACCINES].

    PubMed

    Sergeyev, O V; Barinsky, I F

    2016-01-01

    An update on the development and trials of synthetic peptide vaccines is reviewed. The review considers the successful examples of specific protection as a result of immunization with synthetic peptides using various protocols. The importance of conformation for the immunogenicity of the peptide is pointed out. An alternative strategy of the protection of the organism against the infection using synthetic peptides is suggested.

  19. Ca2+ channel inhibition by endomorphins via the cloned mu-opioid receptor expressed in NG108-15 cells.

    PubMed

    Mima, H; Morikawa, H; Fukuda, K; Kato, S; Shoda, T; Mori, K

    1997-12-11

    Endomorphin-1 and -2, recently isolated endogenous peptides specific for the mu-opioid receptor, inhibited Ca2+ channel currents with EC50 of 6 and 9 nM, respectively, in NG108-15 cells transformed to express the cloned rat mu-opioid receptor. On the other hand, they elicited no response in nontransfected NG108-15 cells. It is concluded that endomorphin-1 and -2 induce Ca2+ channel inhibition by selectively activating the mu-opioid receptor.

  20. Sex-specific effects of prenatal chronic mild stress on adult spatial learning capacity and regional glutamate receptor expression profiles.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Ma, Yuchao; Hu, Jingmin; Zhang, Xinxin; Cheng, Wenwen; Jiang, Han; Li, Min; Ren, Jintao; Zhang, Xiaosong; Liu, Mengxi; Sun, Anji; Wang, Qi; Li, Xiaobai

    2016-07-01

    Both animal experiments and clinical studies have demonstrated that prenatal stress can cause cognitive disorders in offspring. To explore the scope of these deficits and identify potential underlying mechanisms, we examined the spatial learning and memory performance and glutamate receptor (GluR) expression patterns of adult rats exposed to prenatal chronic mild stress (PCMS). Principal component analysis (PCA) was employed to reveal the interrelationships among spatial learning indices and GluR expression changes. Female PCMS-exposed offspring exhibited markedly impaired spatial learning and memory in the Morris water maze (MWM) task compared to control females, while PCMS-exposed males showed better initial spatial learning in the MWM compared to control males. PCMS also altered basal and post-MWM glutamate receptor expression patterns, but these effects differed markedly between sexes. Male PCMS-exposed offspring exhibited elevated basal expression of NR1, mGluR5, and mGluR2/3 in the prefrontal cortex (PFC), whereas females showed no basal expression changes. Following MWM training, PCMS-exposed males expressed higher NR1 in the PFC and mammillary body (MB), higher mGluR2/3 in PFC, and lower NR2B in the hippocampus (HIP), PFC, and MB compared to unstressed MWM-trained males. Female PCMS-exposed offspring showed strongly reduced NR1 in MB and NR2B in the HIP, PFC, and MB, and increased mGluR2/3 in PFC compared to unstressed MWM-trained females. This is the first report suggesting that NMDA subunits in the MB are involved in spatial learning. Additionally, PCA further suggests that the NR1-NR2B form is the most important for spatial memory formation. These results reveal long-term sex-specific effects of PCMS on spatial learning and memory performance in adulthood and implicate GluR expression changes within HIP, PFC, and MB as possible molecular mechanisms underlying cognitive dysfunction in offspring exposed to prenatal stress.

  1. NEURON SPECIFIC α-ADRENERGIC RECEPTOR EXPRESSION IN HUMAN CEREBELLUM: IMPLICATIONS FOR EMERGING CEREBELLAR ROLES IN NEUROLOGIC DISEASE

    PubMed Central

    SCHAMBRA, U. B.; MACKENSEN, G. B.; STAFFORD-SMITH, M.; HAINES, D. E.; SCHWINN, D. A.

    2008-01-01

    receptor subtypes in cerebellar neurons responding to sensory and autonomic input signals, and review species differences in cerebellar adrenergic receptor expression. PMID:16112482

  2. Recombinant nicotinic receptors, expressed in Xenopus oocytes, do not resemble native rat sympathetic ganglion receptors in single-channel behaviour.

    PubMed

    Sivilotti, L G; McNeil, D K; Lewis, T M; Nassar, M A; Schoepfer, R; Colquhoun, D

    1997-04-01

    1. In order to establish the subunit composition of neuronal nicotinic receptors in rat superior cervical ganglia (SCG), their single-channel properties were compared with those of recombinant receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes, using outside-out excised patch recording. 2. The mean main conductance of SCG channels from adult and 1-day-old rats was 34.8 and 36.6 pS, respectively. Less frequent openings to lower conductances occurred both as isolated bursts and as events connected to the main level by direct transitions. There was considerable interpatch variability in the values of the lower conductances. 3. Nicotinic receptors from oocytes expressing alpha3beta4 and alpha4beta4 subunits had chord conductances lower than that of SCG neurones (22 pS for alpha3beta4 and 29 pS for alpha4beta4). 4. Prolonged recording from both native and recombinant channels was precluded by 'run-down', i.e. channel activity could be elicited for only a few minutes after excision. Nevertheless, SCG channel openings were clearly seen to occur as short bursts (slowest component, 38 ms), whereas recombinant channels opened in very prolonged bursts of activity, the major component being the slowest (480 ms). 5. Addition of the alpha5 subunit to the alpha3beta4 pair produced channels with a higher conductance than those observed after injection of the pair alone (24.9 vs. 22 pS), suggesting incorporation of alpha5 into the channel. Addition of the beta2 subunit did not change alpha3beta4 single-channel properties. In one out of fourteen alpha3alpha5beta4 patches, both ganglion-like, high conductance, short burst openings and recombinant-type, low conductance, slow burst openings were observed. 6. Channels produced by expression in Xenopus oocytes of neuronal nicotinic subunits present in rat SCG as a rule differ from native ganglion receptors in single-channel conductance and gross kinetics. While it is possible that an essential nicotinic subunit remains to be cloned, it is perhaps

  3. Pharmacological and kinetic properties of alpha 4 beta 2 neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Charnet, P; Labarca, C; Cohen, B N; Davidson, N; Lester, H A; Pilar, G

    1992-01-01

    1. Co-injection of RNA synthesized from cloned neuronal acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) subunits (alpha 4 and beta 2) in Xenopus oocytes produced functional receptors. In macroscopic voltage-clamp experiments, the agonist-induced current exhibited a strong inward rectification. 2. Voltage jumps from +50 mV to more negative potentials produced relaxations of the agonist-induced current with a single exponential time course. The relaxation rate constant was only weakly voltage dependent. 3. At the single-channel level, three conductances were recorded of 12, 22 and 34 pS. Their burst durations were similar and varied only weakly with voltage (e-fold for 120 to 370 mV), consistent with the poorly voltage-dependent relaxation rate constants. However, the burst durations were less than 10 ms, or less than 1/5 the value expected from voltage-jump relaxations. 4. Hexamethonium (Hex, 0.5 to 8 microM) inhibited the agonist-induced current and produced voltage-jump relaxations characterized by a rapid conductance increase and a slower conductance decrease. Analysis of these relaxations suggested that the Hex-receptor interaction is open-channel blockade characterized by a forward binding rate of 1 x 10(7) M-1 s-1 and a dissociation rate constant of about 25 s-1. 5. For the relaxations produced by QX222, the slowest phase was a conductance increase, suggesting that the dissociation rate constant for QX222 is 10-30-fold greater than for Hex. 6. Hex but not QX222 produced an additional use-dependent blockade that was manifest during repetitive hyperpolarizing pulses. 7. With mouse muscle ACh receptors expressed in oocytes, the blockade by Hex did not depend strongly on voltage. Neither Hex nor QX222 produced appreciable use-dependent block on muscle ACh receptors. 8. Of the four conditions studied (neuronal and muscle receptors, Hex and QX222), only the blockade of the neuronal AChR by Hex is characterized by a residence time longer than the normal open time. 9. It is concluded

  4. Peripheral chemoreceptors: postnatal development and cytochemical findings in Sudden Infant Death Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Porzionato, Andrea; Macchi, Veronica; Parenti, Anna; Matturri, Luigi; De Caro, Raffaele

    2008-03-01

    The aim of the present study is to give a review of the postnatal development of peripheral chemoreceptors - carotid body, paraganglia, and pulmonary neuroendocrine cells (PNEC) - with implications in Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS). In the postnatal period, the hypoxic chemosensitivity of the carotid body gradually develops. Changes include proliferation of type I and II cells, increased numbers of dense core vesicles and K+ channels, and modifications of neurotransmitter/neuromodulator and receptor expression. Chromaffin paraganglia show increased expression of nitric oxide synthase and neuropeptides, and increased innervation. Innervation of PNEC develops fully only in the first postnatal period, after which their density falls. The neuropeptides produced by PNEC also changes, with increased expression of calcitonin gene-related peptide and neuropeptide YY and reduced expression of calcitonin and gastrin-releasing peptide. Most of the findings in the carotid body of SIDS victims, i.e., decrease in type I cells and dense cytoplasmic granules, and increase in progenitor cells, indicates immaturity of the carotid body, which may play a role in SIDS in the form of underlying biologic vulnerability. Aorticopulmonary paraganglia hyperplasia and increase of PNEC are also found in SIDS, and may be epiphenomena of alterations of the respiratory function with a pathogenetical role in SIDS. A comprehensive view of the pathogenesis of SIDS should also arise from the integration of peripheral chemoreceptors findings with neuro- and cardiopathologic ones.

  5. Effects of sex steroid hormones on neuromedin S and neuromedin U2 receptor expression following experimental traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Khaksari, Mohammad; Maghool, Fatemeh; Asadikaram, Gholamreza; Hajializadeh, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): Neuroprotective effects of female gonadal steroids are mediated through several pathways involving multiple peptides and receptors after traumatic brain injury (TBI). Two of these peptides are including the regulatory peptides neuromedin U (NMU) and neuromedin S (NMS), and their common receptor neuromedin U2 receptor (NMUR2). This study investigates the effects of physiological doses of estradiol and progesterone on brain edema, NMS and NMU as well as NMUR2 expression following TBI. Materials and Methods: Ovariectomized female rats were given high-and low-dose of female sex steroid hormones through implantation of capsules for a week before trauma. The brain NMUR2 expression, prepro-NMS expression, NMU content, and water content (brain edema) were evaluated 24 hr after TBI induced by Marmarou’s method. Results: Percentage of brain water content in high- and low-dose estradiol, and in high- and low- dose progesterone was less than vehicle (P<0.01). Results show high expression of prepro-NMS in high dose progesterone (TBI-HP) rats compared to the high dose estrogen (TBI-HE), as well as vehicle (P<0.01). NMU content in low-dose progesterone (TBI-LP) group was more than that of vehicle group (P<0.001). Furthermore a difference in NMU content observed between TBI-HP compared to TBI-HE, and vehicle (P<0.05). The NMUR2 mRNA expression revealed an upregulation in TBI-HP rats compared to the TBI-HE group (P<0.001). Conclusion: Findings indicate that progesterone attenuates brain edema and induces an increase in NMS and its receptor which may mediate the anti-edematous effect of progesterone after TBI. PMID:27872704

  6. A Model of Post-Infection Fatigue Is Associated with Increased TNF and 5-HT2A Receptor Expression in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Couch, Yvonne; Xie, Qin; Lundberg, Louise; Sharp, Trevor; Anthony, Daniel C.

    2015-01-01

    It is well documented that serotonin (5-HT) plays an important role in psychiatric illness. For example, myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME/CFS), which is often provoked by infection, is a disabling illness with an unknown aetiology and diagnosis is based on symptom-specific criteria. However, 5-HT2A receptor expression and peripheral cytokines are known to be upregulated in ME. We sought to examine the relationship between the 5-HT system and cytokine expression following systemic bacterial endotoxin challenge (LPS, 0.5mg/kg i.p.), at a time when the acute sickness behaviours have largely resolved. At 24 hours post-injection mice exhibit no overt changes in locomotor behaviour, but do show increased immobility in a forced swim test, as well as decreased sucrose preference and reduced marble burying activity, indicating a depressive-like state. While peripheral IDO activity was increased after LPS challenge, central activity levels remained stable and there was no change in total brain 5-HT levels or 5-HIAA/5-HT. However, within the brain, levels of TNF and 5-HT2A receptor mRNA within various regions increased significantly. This increase in receptor expression is reflected by an increase in the functional response of the 5-HT2A receptor to agonist, DOI. These data suggest that regulation of fatigue and depressive-like moods after episodes of systemic inflammation may be regulated by changes in 5-HT receptor expression, rather than by levels of enzyme activity or cytokine expression in the CNS. PMID:26147001

  7. Mammalian antimicrobial peptide influences control of cutaneous Leishmania infection

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Manjusha M.; Barbi, Joseph; McMaster, W. Robert; Gallo, Richard L.; Satoskar, Abhay R.; McGwire, Bradford S.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Cathelicidin-type antimicrobial peptides (CAMP) are important mediators of innate immunity against microbial pathogens acting through direct interaction with and disruption of microbial membranes and indirectly through modulation of host cell migration and activation. Using a mouse knock-out model in CAMP we studied the role of this host peptide in control of dissemination of cutaneous infection by the parasitic protozoan Leishmania. The presence of pronounced host inflammatory infiltration in lesions and lymph nodes of infected animals was CAMP-dependent. Lack of CAMP expression was associated with higher levels of IL-10 receptor expression in bone marrow, splenic and lymph node macrophages as well as higher anti-inflammatory IL-10 production by bone marrow macrophages and spleen cells but reduced production of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-12 and IFN-γ by lymph nodes. Unlike wild-type mice, local lesions were exacerbated and parasites were found largely disseminated in CAMP knockouts. Infection of CAMP knockouts with parasite mutants lacking the surface metalloprotease virulence determinant resulted in more robust disseminated infection than in control animals suggesting that CAMP activity is negatively regulated by parasite surface proteolytic activity. This correlated with the ability of the pro-tease to degrade CAMP in vitro and co-localization of CAMP with parasites within macrophages. Our results highlight the interplay of antimicrobial peptides and Leishmania that influence the host immune response and the outcome of infection. PMID:21501359

  8. Functional and pharmacological characterization of a VEGF mimetic peptide on reparative angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Finetti, Federica; Basile, Anna; Capasso, Domenica; Di Gaetano, Sonia; Di Stasi, Rossella; Pascale, Maria; Turco, Caterina Maria; Ziche, Marina; Morbidelli, Lucia; D'Andrea, Luca Domenico

    2012-08-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is the main regulator of physiological and pathological angiogenesis. Low molecular weight molecules able to stimulate angiogenesis have interesting medical application for example in regenerative medicine, but at present none has reached the clinic. We reported that a VEGF mimetic helical peptide, QK, designed on the VEGF helix sequence 17-25, is able to bind and activate the VEGF receptors, producing angiogenesis. In this study we evaluate the pharmacological properties of peptide QK with the aim to propose it as a VEGF-mimetic drug to be employed in reparative angiogenesis. We show that the peptide QK is able to recapitulate all the biological activities of VEGF in vivo and on endothelial cells. In experiments evaluating sprouting from aortic ring and vessel formation in an in vivo angiogenesis model, the peptide QK showed biological effects comparable with VEGF. At endothelial level, the peptide up-regulates VEGF receptor expression, activates intracellular pathways depending on VEGFR2, and consistently it induces endothelial cell proliferation, survival and migration. When added to angiogenic factors (VEGF and/or FGF-2), QK produces an improved biological action, which resulted in reduced apoptosis and accelerated in vitro wound healing. The VEGF-like activity of the short peptide QK, characterized by lower cost of production and easier handling compared to the native glycoprotein, suggests that it is an attractive candidate to be further developed for application in therapeutic angiogenesis.

  9. Evaluation of murine lymphocyte membrane potential, intracellular free calcium, and interleukin-2 receptor expression upon exposure to 1,1-dimethylhydrazine.

    PubMed

    Frazier, D E; Tarr, M J; Olsen, R G

    1992-06-01

    The effects of 1,1-dimethylhydrazine (UDMH) on several early events associated with lymphocyte activation were examined. The concentration of intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i) and membrane potential of murine lymphocytes were found to be altered upon exposure to UDMH; [Ca2+]i was increased in murine thymocytes, while splenocytes exhibited membrane hyperpolarization. In addition, interleukin-2 receptor expression induced by in-vitro concanavalin A stimulation of murine splenocytes at 24 and 48 h in the presence of UDMH was not affected. UDMH may interfere with the ability of these two distinct lymphocyte populations to regulate normal ionic fluctuations, thus contributing to altered immune responsiveness.

  10. Peptide Antimicrobial Agents

    PubMed Central

    Jenssen, Håvard; Hamill, Pamela; Hancock, Robert E. W.

    2006-01-01

    Antimicrobial host defense peptides are produced by all complex organisms as well as some microbes and have diverse and complex antimicrobial activities. Collectively these peptides demonstrate a broad range of antiviral and antibacterial activities and modes of action, and it is important to distinguish between direct microbicidal and indirect activities against such pathogens. The structural requirements of peptides for antiviral and antibacterial activities are evaluated in light of the diverse set of primary and secondary structures described for host defense peptides. Peptides with antifungal and antiparasitic activities are discussed in less detail, although the broad-spectrum activities of such peptides indicate that they are important host defense molecules. Knowledge regarding the relationship between peptide structure and function as well as their mechanism of action is being applied in the design of antimicrobial peptide variants as potential novel therapeutic agents. PMID:16847082

  11. Antimicrobial Peptides in 2014

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guangshun; Mishra, Biswajit; Lau, Kyle; Lushnikova, Tamara; Golla, Radha; Wang, Xiuqing

    2015-01-01

    This article highlights new members, novel mechanisms of action, new functions, and interesting applications of antimicrobial peptides reported in 2014. As of December 2014, over 100 new peptides were registered into the Antimicrobial Peptide Database, increasing the total number of entries to 2493. Unique antimicrobial peptides have been identified from marine bacteria, fungi, and plants. Environmental conditions clearly influence peptide activity or function. Human α-defensin HD-6 is only antimicrobial under reduced conditions. The pH-dependent oligomerization of human cathelicidin LL-37 is linked to double-stranded RNA delivery to endosomes, where the acidic pH triggers the dissociation of the peptide aggregate to release its cargo. Proline-rich peptides, previously known to bind to heat shock proteins, are shown to inhibit protein synthesis. A model antimicrobial peptide is demonstrated to have multiple hits on bacteria, including surface protein delocalization. While cell surface modification to decrease cationic peptide binding is a recognized resistance mechanism for pathogenic bacteria, it is also used as a survival strategy for commensal bacteria. The year 2014 also witnessed continued efforts in exploiting potential applications of antimicrobial peptides. We highlight 3D structure-based design of peptide antimicrobials and vaccines, surface coating, delivery systems, and microbial detection devices involving antimicrobial peptides. The 2014 results also support that combination therapy is preferred over monotherapy in treating biofilms. PMID:25806720

  12. PH dependent adhesive peptides

    SciTech Connect

    Tomich, John; Iwamoto, Takeo; Shen, Xinchun; Sun, Xiuzhi Susan

    2010-06-29

    A novel peptide adhesive motif is described that requires no receptor or cross-links to achieve maximal adhesive strength. Several peptides with different degrees of adhesive strength have been designed and synthesized using solid phase chemistries. All peptides contain a common hydrophobic core sequence flanked by positively or negatively charged amino acids sequences.

  13. Measuring HER2-Receptor Expression In Metastatic Breast Cancer Using [68Ga]ABY-025 Affibody PET/CT

    PubMed Central

    Sörensen, Jens; Velikyan, Irina; Sandberg, Dan; Wennborg, Anders; Feldwisch, Joachim; Tolmachev, Vladimir; Orlova, Anna; Sandström, Mattias; Lubberink, Mark; Olofsson, Helena; Carlsson, Jörgen; Lindman, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Positron Emission Tomography (PET) imaging of HER2 expression could potentially be used to select patients for HER2-targed therapy, predict response based on uptake and be used for monitoring. In this phase I/II study the HER2-binding Affibody molecule ABY-025 was labeled with 68Ga-gallium ([68Ga]ABY-025) for PET to study effect of peptide mass, test-retest variability and correlation of quantified uptake in tumors to histopathology. Experimental design: Sixteen women with known metastatic breast cancer and on-going treatment were included and underwent FDG PET/CT to identify viable metastases. After iv injection of 212±46 MBq [68Ga]ABY-025 whole-body PET was performed at 1, 2 and 4 h. In the first 10 patients (6 with HER2-positive and 4 with HER2-negative primary tumors), [68Ga]ABY-025 PET/CT with two different doses of injected peptide was performed one week apart. In the last six patients (5 HER2-positive and 1 HER2-negative primary tumors), repeated [68Ga]ABY-025 PET were performed one week apart as a test-retest of uptake in individual lesions. Biopsies from 16 metastases in 12 patients were collected for verification of HER2 expression by immunohistochemistry and in-situ hybridization. Results: Imaging 4h after injection with high peptide content discriminated HER2-positive metastases best (p<0.01). PET SUV correlated with biopsy HER2-scores (r=0.91, p<0.001). Uptake was five times higher in HER2-positive than in HER2-negative lesions with no overlap (p=0.005). The test-retest intra-class correlation was r=0.996. [68Ga]ABY-025 PET correctly identified conversion and mixed expression of HER2 and targeted treatment was changed in 3 of the 16 patients. Conclusion: [68Ga]ABY-025 PET accurately quantifies whole-body HER2-receptor status in metastatic breast cancer. PMID:26877784

  14. Downregulated hypothalamic 5-HT3 receptor expression and enhanced 5-HT3 receptor antagonist-mediated improvement in fatigue-like behaviour in cholestatic rats.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, H; Wang, H; le, T; Ho, W; Sharkey, K A; Swain, M G

    2008-03-01

    The serotonin neurotransmitter system, including the 5-HT(3) receptor, has been implicated in the genesis of fatigue in patients with liver disease. Therefore, we examined the possible role of 5-HT(3) receptors in cholestasis-associated fatigue. Rats were either bile duct resected (BDR) or sham resected and studied 10 days postsurgery. A significant decrease in hypothalamic 5-HT(3) receptor expression was detected by immunohistochemistry and Western blot in BDR vs sham rats, coupled with increased hypothalamic serotonin turnover identified by an elevated 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) to 5-HT ratio in BDR vs sham rats. To examine fatigue-like behaviour, an activity meter was used. BDR rats exhibited significantly lower locomotor activity than did sham animals. Subcutaneous injection of the 5-HT(3) receptor antagonist tropisetron (0.1 mg kg(-1)) resulted in significantly increased locomotor activity in BDR rats compared to the activity in saline-treated controls, but was without effect in sham rats. However, a 10-fold higher dose of tropisetron significantly increased locomotor activity in both BDR and sham rats compared to saline-injected controls. These findings indicate that cholestasis in the rat is associated with increased hypothalamic serotonin turnover, decreased hypothalamic 5-HT(3) receptor expression, and enhanced sensitivity to locomotor activation induced by 5-HT(3) receptor antagonism, thereby implicating the 5-HT(3) receptor system in cholestasis associated fatigue.

  15. Pesticide exposure during pregnancy, like nicotine, affects the brainstem α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor expression, increasing the risk of sudden unexplained perinatal death.

    PubMed

    Lavezzi, Anna Maria; Cappiello, Achille; Pusiol, Teresa; Corna, Melissa Felicita; Termopoli, Veronica; Matturri, Luigi

    2015-01-15

    This study indicates the impact of nicotine and pesticides (organochlorine and organophosphate insecticides used in agriculture) on neuronal α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor expression in brainstem regions receiving cholinergic projections in human perinatal life. An in-depth anatomopathological examination of the autonomic nervous system and immunohistochemistry to analyze the α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor expression in the brainstem from 44 fetuses and newborns were performed. In addition, the presence of selected agricultural pesticides in cerebral cortex samples of the victims was determined by specific analytical procedures. Hypodevelopment of brainstem structures checking the vital functions, frequently associated with α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor immunopositivity and smoke absorption in pregnancy, was observed in high percentages of victims of sudden unexpected perinatal death. In nearly 30% of cases however the mothers never smoked, but lived in rural areas. The search for pesticides highlighted in many of these cases traces of both organochlorine and organophosphate pesticides. We detain that exposition to pesticides in pregnancy produces homologous actions to those of nicotine on neuronal α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor, allowing to developmental alterations of brainstem vital centers in victims of sudden unexplained death.

  16. Seasonal changes in morphology and steroid receptor expression in the prostate of the brushtail possum (Trichosurus vulpecula): an animal model for the study of prostate growth?

    PubMed

    Martyn, Helen; Pugazhenthi, Kamali; Gould, Maree; Fink, Jo W; McLeod, Bernie; Nicholson, Helen D

    2011-01-01

    The prostate of the brushtail possum undergoes growth and regression during the year. The present study investigated the morphological changes and expression of androgen and oestrogen receptors during the breeding and non-breeding seasons. Prostate tissue was collected from adult possums at 2-monthly intervals. The periurethral and outer glandular areas were separated and the volume of stromal, epithelial and luminal tissues measured in each area. Immunohistochemistry was used to investigate cell proliferation with proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and to localise androgen receptor (AR) and oestrogen receptors α and β (ERα, ERβ). Seasonal changes in expression of the three receptors were investigated using quantitative PCR and western blot analysis. During the breeding season the volume of stromal tissue in the periurethral area and the luminal volume in the glandular area significantly increased. The change in periurethral volume was associated with increased PCNA-immunopositive cells. While the localisation of AR to the stromal and epithelial cells did not change, there was a significant increase in receptor expression before the main breeding season. ERα and ERβ expression and localisation did not alter during the year. Similarities in receptor expression and localisation suggest that the possum may be a suitable animal model for the study of human prostate growth.

  17. Muscle plasticity and β₂-adrenergic receptors: adaptive responses of β₂-adrenergic receptor expression to muscle hypertrophy and atrophy.

    PubMed

    Sato, Shogo; Shirato, Ken; Tachiyashiki, Kaoru; Imaizumi, Kazuhiko

    2011-01-01

    We discuss the functional roles of β₂-adrenergic receptors in skeletal muscle hypertrophy and atrophy as well as the adaptive responses of β₂-adrenergic receptor expression to anabolic and catabolic conditions. β₂-Adrenergic receptor stimulation using anabolic drugs increases muscle mass by promoting muscle protein synthesis and/or attenuating protein degradation. These effects are prevented by the downregulation of the receptor. Endurance training improves oxidative performance partly by increasing β₂-adrenergic receptor density in exercise-recruited slow-twitch muscles. However, excessive stimulation of β₂-adrenergic receptors negates their beneficial effects. Although the preventive effects of β₂-adrenergic receptor stimulation on atrophy induced by muscle disuse and catabolic hormones or drugs are observed, these catabolic conditions decrease β₂-adrenergic receptor expression in slow-twitch muscles. These findings present evidence against the use of β₂-adrenergic agonists in therapy for muscle wasting and weakness. Thus, β₂-adrenergic receptors in the skeletal muscles play an important physiological role in the regulation of protein and energy balance.

  18. A switchable stapled peptide.

    PubMed

    Kalistratova, Aleksandra; Legrand, Baptiste; Verdié, Pascal; Naydenova, Emilia; Amblard, Muriel; Martinez, Jean; Subra, Gilles

    2016-03-01

    The O-N acyl transfer reaction has gained significant popularity in peptide and medicinal chemistry. This reaction has been successfully applied to the synthesis of difficult sequence-containing peptides, cyclic peptides, epimerization-free fragment coupling and more recently, to switchable peptide polymers. Herein, we describe a related strategy to facilitate the synthesis and purification of a hydrophobic stapled peptide. The staple consists of a serine linked through an amide bond formed from its carboxylic acid function and the side chain amino group of diaminopropionic acid and through an ester bond formed from its amino group and the side chain carboxylic acid function of aspartic acid. The α-amino group of serine was protonated during purification. Interestingly, when the peptide was placed at physiological pH, the free amino group initiated the O-N shift reducing the staple length by one atom, leading to a more hydrophobic stapled peptide.

  19. Bioactive GLP-1 in gut, receptor expression in pancreas, and insulin response to GLP-1 in diabetes-prone rats.

    PubMed

    Valverde, Isabel; Wang, Gen-Sheng; Burghardt, Karolina; Kauri, Lisa M; Redondo, Araceli; Acitores, Alicia; Villanueva-Peñacarrillo, Maria L; Courtois, Philippe; Sener, Abdullah; Cancelas, Jesús; Malaisse, Willy J; Scott, Fraser W

    2004-02-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is the most insulinogenic of the glucagon-like peptides secreted mainly by L cells in the small and large intestine in response to the ingestion of nutrients. It binds to a specific GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) on beta-cells and can increase islet neogenesis and beta-cell mass. It is not clear whether the transmission of information from the gut to islet beta-cells by messengers such as GLP-1 is different in individuals who develop autoimmune diabetes. In the present study the expression of bioactive GLP-1 protein in the gut and its receptor in the pancreas was examined in diabetes-prone BioBreeding (BBdp) rats in the period before overt diabetes and in age-matched control, non-diabetes-prone BB (BBc) rats. An N-terminal directed antibody specific for the bioactive forms of GLP-1 (GLP-1(7-37) and GLP-1(7-36amide)) was used to mea-sure GLP-1 by radioimmunoassay in proximal, median, and distal gut. Pancreas GLP-1R area fraction, GLP-1R gene expression, and insulin content were analyzed, as were plasma GLP-1, glucose, and insulin. The concentration of GLP-1 protein in the jejunum and ileum of BBdp rats was lower than in BBc rats. Although these animals maintained normal blood glucose, there was impaired pancreatic endocrine function, characterized by low baseline insulin concentration in plasma and pancreas. GLP-1R mRNA expression was threefold less in islets isolated from BBdp rats, and GLP-1R+ islet area fraction in pancreas sections was decreased. When injected iv with GLP-1, BBdp rats displayed lower second-phase insulin response (and insulin/glucose ratios) compared with BBc rats. Thus, young BBdp rats displayed decreased concentrations of bioactive GLP-1 in jejunum and ileum, reduced GLP-1R in islets, and lower second-phase insulin response to iv GLP-1 than controls. The decrease in insulinogenic and islet beta-cell mass-promoting signal from GLP-1 in BBdp rats may contribute to impaired glucoregulation and ineffective maintenance of

  20. Kinin Peptides Enhance Inflammatory and Oxidative Responses Promoting Apoptosis in a Parkinson's Disease Cellular Model

    PubMed Central

    Kozik, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    Kinin peptides ubiquitously occur in nervous tissue and participate in inflammatory processes associated with distinct neurological disorders. These substances have also been demonstrated to promote the oxidative stress. On the other hand, the importance of oxidative stress and inflammation has been emphasized in disorders that involve the neurodegenerative processes such as Parkinson's disease (PD). A growing number of reports have demonstrated the increased expression of kinin receptors in neurodegenerative diseases. In this study, the effect of bradykinin and des-Arg10-kallidin, two representative kinin peptides, was analyzed with respect to inflammatory response and induction of oxidative stress in a PD cellular model, obtained after stimulation of differentiated SK-N-SH cells with a neurotoxin, 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium. Kinin peptides caused an increased cytokine release and enhanced production of reactive oxygen species and NO by cells. These changes were accompanied by a loss of cell viability and a greater activation of caspases involved in apoptosis progression. Moreover, the neurotoxin and kinin peptides altered the dopamine receptor 2 expression. Kinin receptor expression was also changed by the neurotoxin. These results suggest a mediatory role of kinin peptides in the development of neurodegeneration and may offer new possibilities for its regulation by using specific antagonists of kinin receptors. PMID:27721576

  1. Plant peptide hormone signalling.

    PubMed

    Motomitsu, Ayane; Sawa, Shinichiro; Ishida, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    The ligand-receptor-based cell-to-cell communication system is one of the most important molecular bases for the establishment of complex multicellular organisms. Plants have evolved highly complex intercellular communication systems. Historical studies have identified several molecules, designated phytohormones, that function in these processes. Recent advances in molecular biological analyses have identified phytohormone receptors and signalling mediators, and have led to the discovery of numerous peptide-based signalling molecules. Subsequent analyses have revealed the involvement in and contribution of these peptides to multiple aspects of the plant life cycle, including development and environmental responses, similar to the functions of canonical phytohormones. On the basis of this knowledge, the view that these peptide hormones are pivotal regulators in plants is becoming increasingly accepted. Peptide hormones are transcribed from the genome and translated into peptides. However, these peptides generally undergo further post-translational modifications to enable them to exert their function. Peptide hormones are expressed in and secreted from specific cells or tissues. Apoplastic peptides are perceived by specialized receptors that are located at the surface of target cells. Peptide hormone-receptor complexes activate intracellular signalling through downstream molecules, including kinases and transcription factors, which then trigger cellular events. In this chapter we provide a comprehensive summary of the biological functions of peptide hormones, focusing on how they mature and the ways in which they modulate plant functions.

  2. Melanocortin-3 receptors expressed in Nkx2.1(+ve) neurons are sufficient for controlling appetitive responses to hypocaloric conditioning

    PubMed Central

    Girardet, Clémence; Mavrikaki, Maria M.; Stevens, Joseph R.; Miller, Courtney A.; Marks, Daniel L.; Butler, Andrew A.

    2017-01-01

    Melanocortin-3 receptors (MC3R) have a contextual role in appetite control that is amplified with hypocaloric conditioning. C57BL/6J (B6) mice subjected to hypocaloric feeding schedules (HFS) exhibit compulsive behavioral responses involving food anticipatory activity (FAA) and caloric loading following food access. These homeostatic responses to calorie-poor environs are attenuated in B6 mice in which Mc3r transcription is suppressed by a lox-stop-lox sequence in the 5’UTR (Mc3rTB/TB). Here, we report that optimization of caloric loading in B6 mice subject to HFS, characterized by increased meal size and duration, is not observed in Mc3rTB/TB mice. Analysis of hypothalamic and neuroendocrine responses to HFS throughout the light-dark cycle suggests uncoupling of hypothalamic responses involving appetite-stimulating fasting-responsive hypothalamic neurons expressing agouti-related peptide (AgRP) and neuropeptide Y (Npy). Rescuing Mc3rs expression in Nkx2.1(+ve) neurons is sufficient to restore normal hypothalamic responses to negative energy balance. In addition, Mc3rs expressed in Nkx2.1(+ve) neurons are also sufficient to restore FAA and caloric loading of B6 mice subjected to HFS. In summary, MC3Rs expressed in Nkx2.1(+ve) neurons are sufficient to coordinate hypothalamic response and expression of compulsive behavioral responses involving meal anticipation and consumption of large meals during situations of prolonged negative energy balance. PMID:28294152

  3. The peptidergic control circuit for sighing

    PubMed Central

    Kam, Kaiwen; Pagliardini, Silvia; Krasnow, Mark A.; Feldman, Jack L.

    2016-01-01

    Sighs are long, deep breaths expressing sadness, relief, or exhaustion. Sighs also occur spontaneously every few minutes to reinflate alveoli, and sighing increases under hypoxia, stress, and certain psychiatric conditions. Here we use molecular, genetic, and pharmacologic approaches to identify a peptidergic sigh control circuit in murine brain. Small neural subpopulations in a key breathing control center (RTN/pFRG) express bombesin-like neuropeptide genes neuromedin B (Nmb) or gastrin releasing peptide (Grp). These project to the preBötzinger Complex (preBötC), the respiratory rhythm generator, which expresses NMB and GRP receptors in overlapping subsets of ~200 neurons. Introducing either neuropeptide into preBötC, or onto preBötC slices, induced sighing, whereas elimination or inhibition of either receptor reduced basal sighing and inhibition of both abolished it. Ablating receptor-expressing neurons eliminated basal and hypoxia-induced sighing, but left breathing otherwise intact initially. We propose these overlapping peptidergic pathways comprise the core of a sigh control circuit that integrates physiological and perhaps emotional input to transform normal breaths into sighs. PMID:26855425

  4. Effects of perinatal exposure to lead (Pb) on purine receptor expression in the brain and gliosis in rats tolerant to morphine analgesia.

    PubMed

    Baranowska-Bosiacka, Irena; Listos, Joanna; Gutowska, Izabela; Machoy-Mokrzyńska, Anna; Kolasa-Wołosiuk, Agnieszka; Tarnowski, Maciej; Puchałowicz, Kamila; Prokopowicz, Adam; Talarek, Sylwia; Listos, Piotr; Wąsik, Agnieszka; Chlubek, Dariusz

    2016-01-02

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the molecular effects of perinatal exposure to lead (Pb) on protein and mRNA expression of purine receptors: P2X4, P2X7, adenosine receptor A1; and astrocytes (GFAP mRNA expression) and on microglia activation (Iba1 mRNA expression) in several structures of the mesolimbic system (striatum, hippocampus, prefrontal cortex) in rats expressing tolerance to the antinociceptive effect of morphine. Rat mothers were orally treated with 0.1% lead acetate from conception, through gestation, and postnatally, as well as to offspring up to day (PND) 28; subsequently molecular studies were conducted on adult (PND 60) male rats. Morphine tolerance developed more strongly in rats perinatally exposed to Pb. The analysis revealed a significant up-regulation of protein and mRNA P2X4 receptor expression in the striatum and prefrontal cortex but not in the hippocampus; P2X7 protein and mRNA receptor expression in the striatum and hippocampus, but not in the prefrontal cortex; A1 protein receptor expression in all investigated structures and A1 mRNA expression in the striatum and hippocampus; Iba1 mRNA expression in the striatum and hippocampus; and GFAP mRNA expression in the striatum and prefrontal cortex. Immunohistochemical analysis has also revealed significant alterations. Strong expressions of P2X4, P2X7, A1 receptors, astrocytes and microglia activation were observed in the hippocampus in Pb and/or morphine treated rats. The higher expression of purine receptors and glial cell activation are important markers of neuroinflammatory processes. Therefore, we conclude that Pb-induced neuroinflammation may be responsible for the intensification of morphine tolerance in the Pb-treated rats. Additionally, the dysregulation of A1 adenosine receptors, mainly in the hippocampus, may also be involved in the intensification of morphine tolerance in Pb-treated rats. Our study demonstrates the significant participation of environmental factors in

  5. PILRα binds an unknown receptor expressed primarily on CD56bright and decidual-NK cells and activates NK cell functions.

    PubMed

    Ophir, Yael; Duev-Cohen, Alexandra; Yamin, Rachel; Tsukerman, Pini; Bauman, Yoav; Gamliel, Moriya; Mandelboim, Ofer

    2016-07-05

    Natural Killer (NK) cells are innate immune lymphocytes specializing in recognition and killing of tumors and pathogens, using an array of activating and inhibitory receptors. NK inhibition is mediated by a large repertoire of inhibitory receptors, whereas a limited number of activating NK cell receptors execute NK cell activation. The ligands recognized by the activating receptors are stress-induced, pathogen derived, tumor specific and even self ligands. However, the full spectrum of NK cell receptors and ligands that control NK cell activity remains uncharacterized. Here we demonstrate that Paired Ig-Like type 2 Receptor Alpha (PILRα), binds a distinct human NK cell sub-population present in the peripheral blood and also in the decidua. We further demonstrate that the interaction of NK cells with PILRα expressing targets lead to elevated IFNγ secretion and cytotoxicity. In conclusion, we present here a novel NK activating ligand which binds and activates an unknown NK receptor expressed on a unique NK cell subset.

  6. Toll-like Receptors, Triggering Receptor Expressed on Myeloid Cells Family Members and Receptor for Advanced Glycation End-products in Allergic Airway Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Sannette C.; Agrawal, Devendra K.

    2016-01-01

    Asthma is a chronic disorder of the airways characterized by cellular infiltration, airway hyper-responsive and airway inflammation. Innate immune cells are the first line of defense against endogenous and exogenous signals in the airways and as such possess a diverse array of pattern recognition receptors. Toll-like receptors are crucial sentinels which when activated, can either promote or ameliorate the inflammatory response in predisposed individuals. The recently discovered triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells family members are emerging mediators of inflammation. These receptors are believed to modulate inflammatory responses by collaborating with classic PRRs. Endogenous signals like HMGB-1, signaling through the receptor for advanced glycation end products, also promotes inflammation, however, its contribution to inflammation in the airways is not well known. Here, we discuss the role of each receptor in airway inflammation and highlight potential synergistic mechanisms, which contribute to disease pathogenesis in allergic asthma. PMID:26678062

  7. Increased levels of prolactin receptor expression correlate with the early onset of lupus symptoms and increased numbers of transitional-1 B cells after prolactin treatment

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Prolactin is secreted from the pituitary gland and other organs, as well as by cells such as lymphocytes. Prolactin has an immunostimulatory effect and is associated with autoimmune diseases that are characterised by abnormal B cell activation, such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Our aim was to determine if different splenic B cell subsets express the prolactin receptor and if the presence of prolactin influences these B cell subsets and correlates with development of lupus. Results Using real-time PCR and flow cytometry, we found that different subsets of immature (transitional) and mature (follicular, marginal zone) B cells express different levels of the prolactin receptor and are differentially affected by hyperprolactinaemia. We found that transitional B cells express the prolactin receptor at higher levels compared to mature B cells in C57BL/6 mice and the lupus-prone MRL/lpr and MRL mouse strains. Transitional-1 (T1) B cells showed a higher level of prolactin receptor expression in both MRL/lpr and MRL mice compared to C57BL/6 mice. Hyperprolactinaemia was induced using metoclopramide, which resulted in the development of early symptoms of SLE. We found that T1 B cells are the main targets of prolactin and that prolactin augments the absolute number of T1 B cells, which reflects the finding that this B cell subpopulation expresses the highest level of the prolactin receptor. Conclusions We found that all B cell subsets express the prolactin receptor but that transitional B cells showed the highest prolactin receptor expression levels. Hyperprolactinaemia in mice susceptible to lupus accelerated the disease and increased the absolute numbers of T1 and T3 B cells but not of mature B cells, suggesting a primary effect of prolactin on the early stages of B cell maturation in the spleen and a role of prolactin in B cell differentiation, contributing to SLE onset. PMID:22404893

  8. Exposure to Opiates in Female Adolescents Alters Mu Opiate Receptor Expression and Increases the Rewarding Effects of Morphine in Future Offspring

    PubMed Central

    Vassoler, Fair M.; Wright, Siobhan J.; Byrnes, Elizabeth M.

    2016-01-01

    Prescription opiate use and abuse has increased dramatically over the past two decades, including increased use in adolescent populations. Recently, it has been proposed that use during this critical period may affect future offspring even when use is discontinued prior to conception. Here, we utilize a rodent model to examine the effects of adolescent morphine exposure on the reward functioning of the offspring. Female Sprague Dawley rats were administered morphine for 10 days during early adolescence (post-natal day 30–39) using an escalating dosing regimen. Animals then remained drug free until adulthood at which point they were mated with naïve males. Adult offspring (F1 animals) were tested for their response to morphine-induced (0, 1, 2.5, 5, and 10 mg/kg, s.c.) conditioned place preference (CPP) and context-independent morphine-induced sensitization. Naïve littermates were used to examine mu opiate receptor expression in the nucleus accumbens and ventral tegmental area. Results indicate that F1 females whose mothers were exposed to morphine during adolescence (Mor-F1) demonstrate significantly enhanced CPP to the lowest doses of morphine compared with Sal-F1 females. There were no differences in context-independent sensitization between maternal treatment groups. Protein expression analysis showed significantly increased levels of accumbal mu opiate receptor in Mor-F1 offspring and decreased levels in the VTA. Taken together, these findings demonstrate a shift in the dose response curve with regard to the rewarding effects of morphine in Mor-F1 females which may in part be due to altered mu opiate receptor expression in the nucleus accumbens and VTA. PMID:26700246

  9. Exposure to opiates in female adolescents alters mu opiate receptor expression and increases the rewarding effects of morphine in future offspring.

    PubMed

    Vassoler, Fair M; Wright, Siobhan J; Byrnes, Elizabeth M

    2016-04-01

    Prescription opiate use and abuse has increased dramatically over the past two decades, including increased use in adolescent populations. Recently, it has been proposed that use during this critical period may affect future offspring even when use is discontinued prior to conception. Here, we utilize a rodent model to examine the effects of adolescent morphine exposure on the reward functioning of the offspring. Female Sprague Dawley rats were administered morphine for 10 days during early adolescence (post-natal day 30-39) using an escalating dosing regimen. Animals then remained drug free until adulthood at which point they were mated with naïve males. Adult offspring (F1 animals) were tested for their response to morphine-induced (0, 1, 2.5, 5, and 10 mg/kg, s.c.) conditioned place preference (CPP) and context-independent morphine-induced sensitization. Naïve littermates were used to examine mu opiate receptor expression in the nucleus accumbens and ventral tegmental area. Results indicate that F1 females whose mothers were exposed to morphine during adolescence (Mor-F1) demonstrate significantly enhanced CPP to the lowest doses of morphine compared with Sal-F1 females. There were no differences in context-independent sensitization between maternal treatment groups. Protein expression analysis showed significantly increased levels of accumbal mu opiate receptor in Mor-F1 offspring and decreased levels in the VTA. Taken together, these findings demonstrate a shift in the dose response curve with regard to the rewarding effects of morphine in Mor-F1 females which may in part be due to altered mu opiate receptor expression in the nucleus accumbens and VTA.

  10. Polycyclic peptide therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Baeriswyl, Vanessa; Heinis, Christian

    2013-03-01

    Owing to their excellent binding properties, high stability, and low off-target toxicity, polycyclic peptides are an attractive molecule format for the development of therapeutics. Currently, only a handful of polycyclic peptides are used in the clinic; examples include the antibiotic vancomycin, the anticancer drugs actinomycin D and romidepsin, and the analgesic agent ziconotide. All clinically used polycyclic peptide drugs are derived from natural sources, such as soil bacteria in the case of vancomycin, actinomycin D and romidepsin, or the venom of a fish-hunting coil snail in the case of ziconotide. Unfortunately, nature provides peptide macrocyclic ligands for only a small fraction of therapeutic targets. For the generation of ligands of targets of choice, researchers have inserted artificial binding sites into natural polycyclic peptide scaffolds, such as cystine knot proteins, using rational design or directed evolution approaches. More recently, large combinatorial libraries of genetically encoded bicyclic peptides have been generated de novo and screened by phage display. In this Minireview, the properties of existing polycyclic peptide drugs are discussed and related to their interesting molecular architectures. Furthermore, technologies that allow the development of unnatural polycyclic peptide ligands are discussed. Recent application of these technologies has generated promising results, suggesting that polycyclic peptide therapeutics could potentially be developed for a broad range of diseases.

  11. Antimicrobial Peptides in Reptiles

    PubMed Central

    van Hoek, Monique L.

    2014-01-01

    Reptiles are among the oldest known amniotes and are highly diverse in their morphology and ecological niches. These animals have an evolutionarily ancient innate-immune system that is of great interest to scientists trying to identify new and useful antimicrobial peptides. Significant work in the last decade in the fields of biochemistry, proteomics and genomics has begun to reveal the complexity of reptilian antimicrobial peptides. Here, the current knowledge about antimicrobial peptides in reptiles is reviewed, with specific examples in each of the four orders: Testudines (turtles and tortosises), Sphenodontia (tuataras), Squamata (snakes and lizards), and Crocodilia (crocodilans). Examples are presented of the major classes of antimicrobial peptides expressed by reptiles including defensins, cathelicidins, liver-expressed peptides (hepcidin and LEAP-2), lysozyme, crotamine, and others. Some of these peptides have been identified and tested for their antibacterial or antiviral activity; others are only predicted as possible genes from genomic sequencing. Bioinformatic analysis of the reptile genomes is presented, revealing many predicted candidate antimicrobial peptides genes across this diverse class. The study of how these ancient creatures use antimicrobial peptides within their innate immune systems may reveal new understandings of our mammalian innate immune system and may also provide new and powerful antimicrobial peptides as scaffolds for potential therapeutic development. PMID:24918867

  12. The natriuretic peptides.

    PubMed

    Baxter, Gary F

    2004-03-01

    The natriuretic peptides are a family of widely distributed, but evolutionarily conserved, polypeptide mediators that exert a range of actions throughout the body. In cardiovascular homeostasis, the endocrine roles of the cardiac-derived atrial and B-type natriuretic peptide (ANP and BNP) in regulating central fluid volume and blood pressure have been recognised for two decades. However, there is a growing realisation that natriuretic peptide actions go far beyond their volume regulating effects. These pleiotropic actions include local (autocrine/paracrine) regulatory actions of ANP and BNP within the heart, and of another natriuretic peptide, CNP, within the vessel wall. Effects on function and growth of the local tissue environment are likely to be of great importance, especially in disease states where tissue and circulating levels of ANP and BNP rise markedly. At present, the relevance of other natriuretic peptides (notably uroguanylin and DNP) to human physiology and pathology remain uncertain. Other articles in this issue of Basic Research in Cardiology review the molecular physiology of natriuretic peptide signalling, with a particular emphasis on the lessons from genetically targetted mice; the vascular activity of natriuretic peptides; the regulation and roles of natriuretic peptides in ischaemic myocardium; and the diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic roles of natriuretic peptides in heart failure.

  13. Calcitonin Peptide Family Members Are Differentially Regulated by LPS and Inhibit Functions of Rat Alveolar NR8383 Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Soultanova, Aichurek; Mikulski, Zbigniew; Pfeil, Uwe; Grau, Veronika; Kummer, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Members of the calcitonin peptide family—calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), adrenomedullin (AM), and adrenomedullin2/intermedin (IMD)–exert modulatory effects upon monocytes and macrophages of various extrapulmonary origins. Utilizing the rat alveolar macrophage (AMφ) cell line NR8383, we here set out to determine to which extent these three peptides and their receptors are differentially regulated in AMφ and what specific effects they have on AMφ key functions. LPS treatment differentially up-regulated expression of the peptides and receptors. Among the three peptides, IMD mRNA content was lowest both in primary rat AMφ and NR8383 cells, whereas IMD peptide dominated in basal and LPS-stimulated secretion from NR8383 cells. Fcγ receptor-mediated phagocytosis and TNF-α production were inhibited by AM, IMD, and CGRP, whereas pro-IL-1β mRNA was slightly down-regulated exclusively by CGRP. Neither of these peptides affected IL-6 or IL-10 production. None increased intracellular calcium concentration, but AM significantly inhibited store-operated calcium entry. In conclusion, the rat AMφ cell line NR8383 is both a source and a target of the calcitonin peptide family members AM, IMD, and CGRP. Despite sharing proteins of the receptor complexes, AM, IMD, and CGRP each showed a characteristic pattern of effects and regulation, suggesting that these closely related peptides are not just redundant members of one common signaling pathway but act in concert by addressing parallel signaling cascades. Since peptide and receptor expression are up-regulated by LPS, these signaling pathways might act as inhibitory feedback mechanisms in pulmonary bacterial infection. PMID:27737007

  14. Sweet taste receptor expression in ruminant intestine and its activation by artificial sweeteners to regulate glucose absorption.

    PubMed

    Moran, A W; Al-Rammahi, M; Zhang, C; Bravo, D; Calsamiglia, S; Shirazi-Beechey, S P

    2014-01-01

    Absorption of glucose from the lumen of the intestine into enterocytes is accomplished by sodium-glucose co-transporter 1 (SGLT1). In the majority of mammalian species, expression (this includes activity) of SGLT1 is upregulated in response to increased dietary monosaccharides. This regulatory pathway is initiated by sensing of luminal sugar by the gut-expressed sweet taste receptor. The objectives of our studies were to determine (1) if the ruminant intestine expresses the sweet taste receptor, which consists of two subunits [taste 1 receptor 2 (T1R2) and 3 (T1R3)], and other key signaling molecules required for SGLT1 upregulation in nonruminant intestines, and (2) whether T1R2-T1R3 sensing of artificial sweeteners induces release of glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) and enhances SGLT1 expression. We found that the small intestine of sheep and cattle express T1R2, T1R3, G-protein gustducin, and GLP-2 in enteroendocrine L-cells. Maintaining 110-d-old ruminating calves for 60d on a diet containing a starter concentrate and the artificial sweetener Sucram (consisting of saccharin and neohesperidin dihydrochalcone; Pancosma SA, Geneva, Switzerland) enhances (1) Na(+)-dependent d-glucose uptake by over 3-fold, (2) villus height and crypt depth by 1.4- and 1.2-fold, and (3) maltase- and alkaline phosphatase-specific activity by 1.5-fold compared to calves maintained on the same diet without Sucram. No statistically significant differences were observed for rates of intestinal glucose uptake, villus height, crypt depth, or enzyme activities between 50-d-old milk-fed calves and calves maintained on the same diet containing Sucram. When adult cows were kept on a diet containing 80:20 ryegrass hay-to-concentrate supplemented with Sucram, more than a 7-fold increase in SGLT1 protein abundance was noted. Collectively, the data indicate that inclusion of this artificial sweetener enhances SGLT1 expression and mucosal growth in ruminant animals. Exposure of ruminant sheep

  15. Peptide bioregulators inhibit apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Khavinson, V K; Kvetnoii, I M

    2000-12-01

    The effects of peptide bioregulators epithalon and vilon on the dynamics of irradiation-induced apoptotic death of spleen lymphocytes in rats indicate that these agents inhibit physiologically programmed cell death. The antiapoptotic effect of vilon was more pronounced, which corroborates the concept on tissue-specific effect of peptide bioregulators.

  16. Bacteriocin Inducer Peptides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Novel peptides produced by bacteriocin-producing bacteria stimulate the production of bacteriocins in vitro. The producer bacteria are cultured in the presence of a novel inducer bacteria and a peptide having a carboxy terminal sequence of VKGLT in order to achieve an increase in bacteriocin produc...

  17. Antimicrobial Peptides from Fish

    PubMed Central

    Masso-Silva, Jorge A.; Diamond, Gill

    2014-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are found widely distributed through Nature, and participate in the innate host defense of each species. Fish are a great source of these peptides, as they express all of the major classes of AMPs, including defensins, cathelicidins, hepcidins, histone-derived peptides, and a fish-specific class of the cecropin family, called piscidins. As with other species, the fish peptides exhibit broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity, killing both fish and human pathogens. They are also immunomodulatory, and their genes are highly responsive to microbes and innate immuno-stimulatory molecules. Recent research has demonstrated that some of the unique properties of fish peptides, including their ability to act even in very high salt concentrations, make them good potential targets for development as therapeutic antimicrobials. Further, the stimulation of their gene expression by exogenous factors could be useful in preventing pathogenic microbes in aquaculture. PMID:24594555

  18. Evolutionary origin of GnIH and NPFF in chordates: insights from novel amphioxus RFamide peptides.

    PubMed

    Osugi, Tomohiro; Okamura, Tomoki; Son, You Lee; Ohkubo, Makoto; Ubuka, Takayoshi; Henmi, Yasuhisa; Tsutsui, Kazuyoshi

    2014-01-01

    Gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH) is a newly identified hypothalamic neuropeptide that inhibits pituitary hormone secretion in vertebrates. GnIH has an LPXRFamide (X = L or Q) motif at the C-terminal in representative species of gnathostomes. On the other hand, neuropeptide FF (NPFF), a neuropeptide characterized as a pain-modulatory neuropeptide, in vertebrates has a PQRFamide motif similar to the C-terminal of GnIH, suggesting that GnIH and NPFF have diverged from a common ancestor. Because GnIH and NPFF belong to the RFamide peptide family in vertebrates, protochordate RFamide peptides may provide important insights into the evolutionary origin of GnIH and NPFF. In this study, we identified a novel gene encoding RFamide peptides and two genes of their putative receptors in the amphioxus Branchiostoma japonicum. Molecular phylogenetic analysis and synteny analysis indicated that these genes are closely related to the genes of GnIH and NPFF and their receptors of vertebrates. We further identified mature RFamide peptides and their receptors in protochordates. The identified amphioxus RFamide peptides inhibited forskolin induced cAMP signaling in the COS-7 cells with one of the identified amphioxus RFamide peptide receptors expressed. These results indicate that the identified protochordate RFamide peptide gene is a common ancestral form of GnIH and NPFF genes, suggesting that the origin of GnIH and NPFF may date back to the time of the emergence of early chordates. GnIH gene and NPFF gene may have diverged by whole-genome duplication in the course of vertebrate evolution.

  19. Cyclic Opioid Peptides.

    PubMed

    Remesic, Michael; Lee, Yeon Sun; Hruby, Victor J

    2016-01-01

    For decades the opioid receptors have been an attractive therapeutic target for the treatment of pain. Since the first discovery of enkephalin, approximately a dozen endogenous opioid peptides have been known to produce opioid activity and analgesia, but their therapeutics have been limited mainly due to low blood brain barrier penetration and poor resistance to proteolytic degradation. One versatile approach to overcome these drawbacks is the cyclization of linear peptides to cyclic peptides with constrained topographical structure. Compared to their linear parents, cyclic analogs exhibit better metabolic stability, lower offtarget toxicity, and improved bioavailability. Extensive structure-activity relationship studies have uncovered promising compounds for the treatment of pain as well as further elucidate structural elements required for selective opioid receptor activity. The benefits that come with employing cyclization can be further enhanced through the generation of polycyclic derivatives. Opioid ligands generally have a short peptide chain and thus the realm of polycyclic peptides has yet to be explored. In this review, a brief history of designing ligands for the opioid receptors, including classic linear and cyclic ligands, is discussed along with recent approaches and successes of cyclic peptide ligands for the receptors. Various scaffolds and approaches to improve bioavailability are elaborated and concluded with a discourse towards polycyclic peptides.

  20. Influence of type-I Interferon receptor expression level on the response to type-I Interferons in human pancreatic cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Booy, Stephanie; van Eijck, Casper H J; Dogan, Fadime; van Koetsveld, Peter M; Hofland, Leo J

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a highly aggressive malignancy with limited treatment options. Type-I interferons (e.g. IFN-α/-β) have several anti-tumour activities. Over the past few years, clinical studies evaluating the effect of adjuvant IFN-α therapy in pancreatic cancer yielded equivocal results. Although IFN-α and-β act via the type-I IFN receptor, the role of the number of receptors present on tumour cells is still unknown. Therefore, this study associated, for the first time, in a large panel of pancreatic cancer cell lines the effects of IFN-α/-β with the expression of type-I IFN receptors. The anti-tumour effects of IFN-α or IFN-β on cell proliferation and apoptosis were evaluated in 11 human pancreatic cell lines. Type-I IFN receptor expression was determined on both the mRNA and protein level. After 7 days of incubation, IFN-α significantly reduced cell growth in eight cell lines by 5–67%. IFN-β inhibited cell growth statistically significant in all cell lines by 43–100%. After 3 days of treatment, IFN-β induced significantly more apoptosis than IFN-α. The cell lines variably expressed the type-I IFN receptor. The maximal inhibitory effect of IFN-α was positively correlated with the IFNAR-1 mRNA (P < 0.05, r = 0.63), IFNAR-2c mRNA (P < 0.05, r = 0.69) and protein expression (P < 0.05, r = 0.65). Human pancreatic cancer cell lines variably respond to IFN-α and-β. The expression level of the type-I IFN receptor is of predictive value for the direct anti-tumour effects of IFN-α treatment. More importantly, IFN-β induces anti-tumour effects already at much lower concentrations, is less dependent on interferon receptor expression and seems, therefore, more promising than IFN-α. PMID:24460759

  1. Influence of type-I Interferon receptor expression level on the response to type-I Interferons in human pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Booy, Stephanie; van Eijck, Casper H J; Dogan, Fadime; van Koetsveld, Peter M; Hofland, Leo J

    2014-03-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a highly aggressive malignancy with limited treatment options. Type-I interferons (e.g. IFN-α/-β) have several anti-tumour activities. Over the past few years, clinical studies evaluating the effect of adjuvant IFN-α therapy in pancreatic cancer yielded equivocal results. Although IFN-α and -β act via the type-I IFN receptor, the role of the number of receptors present on tumour cells is still unknown. Therefore, this study associated, for the first time, in a large panel of pancreatic cancer cell lines the effects of IFN-α/-β with the expression of type-I IFN receptors. The anti-tumour effects of IFN-α or IFN-β on cell proliferation and apoptosis were evaluated in 11 human pancreatic cell lines. Type-I IFN receptor expression was determined on both the mRNA and protein level. After 7 days of incubation, IFN-α significantly reduced cell growth in eight cell lines by 5-67%. IFN-β inhibited cell growth statistically significant in all cell lines by 43-100%. After 3 days of treatment, IFN-β induced significantly more apoptosis than IFN-α. The cell lines variably expressed the type-I IFN receptor. The maximal inhibitory effect of IFN-α was positively correlated with the IFNAR-1 mRNA (P < 0.05, r = 0.63), IFNAR-2c mRNA (P < 0.05, r = 0.69) and protein expression (P < 0.05, r = 0.65). Human pancreatic cancer cell lines variably respond to IFN-α and -β. The expression level of the type-I IFN receptor is of predictive value for the direct anti-tumour effects of IFN-α treatment. More importantly, IFN-β induces anti-tumour effects already at much lower concentrations, is less dependent on interferon receptor expression and seems, therefore, more promising than IFN-α.

  2. Anti-antimicrobial Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Lloyd; Lamarre, Baptiste; Diu, Ting; Ravi, Jascindra; Judge, Peter J.; Temple, Adam; Carr, Matthew; Cerasoli, Eleonora; Su, Bo; Jenkinson, Howard F.; Martyna, Glenn; Crain, Jason; Watts, Anthony; Ryadnov, Maxim G.

    2013-01-01

    Antimicrobial or host defense peptides are innate immune regulators found in all multicellular organisms. Many of them fold into membrane-bound α-helices and function by causing cell wall disruption in microorganisms. Herein we probe the possibility and functional implications of antimicrobial antagonism mediated by complementary coiled-coil interactions between antimicrobial peptides and de novo designed antagonists: anti-antimicrobial peptides. Using sequences from native helical families such as cathelicidins, cecropins, and magainins we demonstrate that designed antagonists can co-fold with antimicrobial peptides into functionally inert helical oligomers. The properties and function of the resulting assemblies were studied in solution, membrane environments, and in bacterial culture by a combination of chiroptical and solid-state NMR spectroscopies, microscopy, bioassays, and molecular dynamics simulations. The findings offer a molecular rationale for anti-antimicrobial responses with potential implications for antimicrobial resistance. PMID:23737519

  3. Transforming growth factor beta is a potent inhibitor of interleukin 1 (IL-1) receptor expression: proposed mechanism of inhibition of IL-1 action

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    Transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) acts as a potent inhibitor of the growth and functions of lymphoid and hemopoietic progenitor cells. Cell proliferation depends not only on the presence of growth factors, but also on the development of specific receptor-signal transducing complexes. We therefore investigated whether the inhibitory actions of TGF-beta could be mediated by inhibition of growth factor receptors. TGF-beta inhibited the constitutive level of interleukin 1 receptor (IL-1R) expression on several murine lymphoid and myeloid progenitor cell lines, as well as IL-1R expression induced by interleukin 3 (IL-3) on normal murine and human bone marrow cells. Furthermore, treatment of bone marrow progenitor cells with TGF-beta concomitantly inhibited the ability of IL-1 to promote high proliferative potential (HPP) colony formation as well as blocked IL-1- induced IL-2 production by EL-4 6.1 cells. These findings provide the first evidence that the inhibitory action of TGF-beta on the growth and functional activities of hematopoietic and T cells is associated with a reduction in the cell surface receptor expression for IL-1. PMID:2143773

  4. Age-related behavioural phenotype and cellular characterisation of mice with progressive ablation of D1 dopamine receptor-expressing cells.

    PubMed

    Babovic, Daniela; Jiang, Luning; Gantois, Ilse; Lawrence, Andrew J; Ferreri, Vincenzo; Schütz, Günter; Waddington, John L; Drago, John

    2010-01-05

    In this study we characterize the behavioural and cellular phenotype of mutant (MUT) mice with progressive loss of D1 dopamine receptor (Drd1a)-expressing cells. Adult [14-19 weeks] MUT mice showed intact working memory in the spontaneous alternation test but evidenced anxiety-like behaviour in the elevated plus maze and the light-dark test. The ethogram of mature adult MUT [average age 22 weeks] was compared with that of young adult MUT mice [average age 12 weeks]. While MUT mice evidenced hyperactivity over initial exploration at both time points, the topography of hyperactivity shifted. Moreover, initial hyperactivity was sustained over habituation at 12 weeks, but not at 22 weeks. Thus, by 22 weeks MUT mice evidenced shifts in, and mitigation of, these early phenotypic effects. However, orofacial behaviours of chewing and sifting were reduced similarly at 12 and 22 weeks. These data support the hypothesis that aspects of the mutant phenotype change with time. Quantitative autoradiography at 20 weeks revealed loss of D1-like dopamine receptor binding in the entire basal ganglia, with upregulated D2-like binding. There appear to be topographically specific interactions between normal maturational processes and compensatory mechanisms evoked subsequent to targeted ablation of D1 dopamine receptor-expressing cells. Understanding the mechanistic bases of mitigation vs persistence of individual phenotypes in relation to neural adaptation consequent to cell loss may lead to novel therapeutic strategies for basal ganglia disorders.

  5. Background Parenchymal Enhancement and Fibroglandular Tissue Proportion on Breast MRI: Correlation with Hormone Receptor Expression and Molecular Subtypes of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Öztürk, Mesut; Polat, Ahmet Veysel; Süllü, Yurdanur; Tomak, Leman; Polat, Ayfer Kamalı

    2017-01-01

    Objective To assess the relationship between background parenchymal enhancement (BPE) and fibroglandular tissue (FGT) proportion on breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and hormone receptor expression and molecular subtypes in invasive breast cancer. Materials and Methods This retrospective study enrolled 75 breast cancer patients who underwent breast MRI before treatment. T1-weighted images were reviewed to determine the FGT proportion, and contrast-enhanced fat-suppressed T1-weighted images were reviewed to determine BPE. Estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), human epidermal growth factor 2-neu (HER2) status, and molecular subtypes of the tumors were compared with the BPE and FGT proportions. Results Women with high BPE tended to have increased rate of ER and PR positive tumors (p=0.018 and p=0.013). FGT proportion was associated with ER positivity (p=0.009), but no significant differences between FGT proportion and PR positivity were found (p=0.256). There was no significant difference between HER2 status and any of the imaging features (p=0.453 and p=0.922). For premenopausal women, both FGT proportion and BPE were associated with molecular subtypes (p=0.025 and p=0.042). FGT proportion was also associated with BPE (p<0.001). Conclusion In women with invasive breast cancer, both high FGT containing breasts and high BPE breasts tended to have ER positive tumors.

  6. Glucomannan- and glucomannan plus spirulina-enriched pork affect liver fatty acid profile, LDL receptor expression and antioxidant status in Zucker fa/fa rats fed atherogenic diets

    PubMed Central

    González-Torres, Laura; Matos, Cátia; Vázquez-Velasco, Miguel; Santos-López, Jorge A.; Sánchez-Martínez, Iria; García–Fernández, Camino; Bastida, Sara; Benedí, Juana; Sánchez-Muniz, Francisco J.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT We evaluated the effects of glucomannan or glucomannan plus spirulina-restructured pork (RP) on liver fatty acid profile, desaturase/elongase enzyme activities and oxidative status of Zucker fa/fa rats for seven weeks. Control (C), glucomannan (G) and glucomannan/spirulina (GS)-RP; HC (cholesterol-enriched control), HG and HGS (cholesterol-enriched glucomannan and glucomannan/spirulina-RP) experimental diets were tested. Increased metabolic syndrome markers were found in C, G and GS rats. Cholesterol feeding increased liver size, fat, and cholesterol and reduced antioxidant enzyme levels and expressions. Cholesterolemia was lower in HG and HGS than in HC. GS vs. G showed higher stearic but lower oleic levels. SFA and PUFA decreased while MUFA increased by cholesterol feeding. The arachidonic/linoleic and docosahexaenoic/alpha-linolenic ratios were lower in HC, HG, and HGS vs. C, G, and GS, respectively, suggesting a delta-6-elongase-desaturase system inhibition. Moreover, cholesterol feeding, mainly in HGS, decreased low-density-lipoprotein receptor expression and the delta-5-desaturase activity and increased the delta-9-desaturase activity. In conclusion, the liver production of highly unsaturated fatty acids was limited to decrease their oxidation in presence of hypercholesterolaemia. Glucomannan or glucomannan/spirulina-RP has added new attributes to their functional properties in meat, partially arresting the negative effects induced by high-fat-high-cholesterol feeding on the liver fatty acid and antioxidant statuses. PMID:28325998

  7. Leptin upregulates beta3-integrin expression and interleukin-1beta, upregulates leptin and leptin receptor expression in human endometrial epithelial cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, R R; Leavis, P

    2001-10-01

    Human endometrium and endometrial epithelial cells (EECs) either cultured alone or cocultured with human embryos express leptin and leptin receptor. This study compares the effect of leptin with that of interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) on the expression of beta3-EEC integrin, a marker of endometrial receptivity. Both cytokines increased the expression of beta3-EEC at concentrations in the range of 0.06-3 nM; however, leptin exhibited a significantly greater effect than IL-1beta. We also determined the regulatory effects of IL-1beta on leptin secretion and on the expression of leptin and leptin receptor at the protein level in both EEC and endometrial stromal cell (ESC) cultures. In EEC cultures, IL-1beta upregulated secretion of leptin and expression of both leptin and leptin receptors. No effect of IL-1beta was found in the ESC cultures. However, leptin exhibited marginal upregulation of leptin receptor. The upregulation of beta3-integrin and leptin/leptin receptor expression by IL-1beta in EEC cultures indicates that both cytokines may be implicated in embryonic-maternal cross-talk during the early phase of human implantation. Our present data also raise the possibility that leptin is an endometrial molecular effector of IL-1beta action on beta3-integrin upregulation. Thus, a new role for leptin in human reproduction as an autocrine/paracrine regulator of endometrial receptivity is proposed.

  8. Effect of Increased Cyclic AMP Concentration on Muscle Protein Synthesis and Beta-Adrenergic Receptor Expression in Chicken Skeletal Muscle Cells in Culture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, R. B.; Vaughn, J. R.; Bridge, K. Y.; Smith, C. K.

    1998-01-01

    Analogies of epinephrine are known to cause hypertrophy of skeletal muscle when fed to animals. These compounds presumably exert their physiological action through interaction with the P-adrenergic receptor. Since the intracellular signal generated by the Beta-adrenergic receptor is cyclic AMP (cAMP), experiments were initiated in cell culture to determine if artificial elevation of cAMP by treatment with forskolin would alter muscle protein metabolism and P-adrenergic receptor expression. Chicken skeletal muscle cells after 7 days in culture were treated with 0.2-30 micrometers forskolin for a total of three days. At the end of the treatment period, both the concentration of cAMP and the quantity of myosin heavy chain (MHC) were measured. Concentration of cAMP in forskolin-treated cells increased up to 10-fold in a dose dependent manner. In contrast, the quantity of MHC was increased approximately 50% above control cells at 0.2 micrometers forskolin, but exhibited a gradual decline at higher levels of forskolin so that the quantity of MHC in cells treated with 30 micrometers forskolin was not significantly different from controls. Curiously, the intracellular concentration of cAMP which elicited the maximum increase in the quantity of MHC was only 40% higher than cAMP concentration in control cells.

  9. "Warming yang and invigorating qi" acupuncture alters acetylcholine receptor expression in the neuromuscular junction of rats with experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hai-Peng; Pan, Hong; Wang, Hong-Feng

    2016-03-01

    Myasthenia gravis is an autoimmune disorder in which antibodies have been shown to form against the nicotinic acetylcholine nicotinic postsynaptic receptors located at the neuromuscular junction. "Warming yang and invigorating qi" acupuncture treatment has been shown to reduce serum inflammatory cytokine expression and increase transforming growth factor beta expression in rats with experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis. However, few studies have addressed the effects of this type of acupuncture on the acetylcholine receptors at the neuromuscular junction. Here, we used confocal laser scanning microscopy to examine the area and density of immunoreactivity for an antibody to the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor at the neuromuscular junction in the phrenic nerve of rats with experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis following "warming yang and invigorating qi" acupuncture therapy. Needles were inserted at acupressure points Shousanli (LI10), Zusanli (ST36), Pishu (BL20), and Shenshu (BL23) once daily for 7 consecutive days. The treatment was repeated after 1 day of rest. We found that area and the integrated optical density of the immunoreactivity for the acetylcholine receptor at the neuromuscular junction of the phrenic nerve was significantly increased following acupuncture treatment. This outcome of the acupuncture therapy was similar to that of the cholinesterase inhibitor pyridostigmine bromide. These findings suggest that "warming yang and invigorating qi" acupuncture treatment increases acetylcholine receptor expression at the neuromuscular junction in a rat model of autoimmune myasthenia gravis.

  10. The Proteasome Inhibitor Bortezomib Affects Chondrosarcoma Cells via the Mitochondria-Caspase Dependent Pathway and Enhances Death Receptor Expression and Autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Lohberger, Birgit; Steinecker-Frohnwieser, Bibiane; Stuendl, Nicole; Kaltenegger, Heike; Leithner, Andreas; Rinner, Beate

    2016-01-01

    High grade chondrosarcoma is characterized by its lack of response to conventional cytotoxic chemotherapy, the tendency to develop lung metastases, and low survival rates. Research within the field prioritizes the development and expansion of new treatment options for dealing with unresectable or metastatic diseases. Numerous clinical trials using the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib have shown specific efficacy as an active antitumor agent for treating a variety of solid tumors. However, as of yet the effect of bortezomib on chondrosarcoma has not been investigated. In our study, bortezomib decreased cell viability and proliferation in two different chondrosarcoma cell lines in a time- and dose dependent manner. FACS analysis, mRNA- and protein expression studies illustrated that induction of apoptosis developed through the intrinsic mitochondria-caspase dependent pathway. Furthermore, bortezomib treatment significantly increased expression of the death receptors TRAILR-1 and TRAILR-2 in chondrosarcoma cells. An increased expression of the autophagy markers Atg5/12, Beclin, and LC3BI-II supports the interpretation that bortezomib functions as a trigger for autophagy. Our results demonstrated for the first time that bortezomib reduced viability and proliferation of chondrosarcoma cells, induced apoptosis via the mitochondria-caspase dependent pathway and enhanced death receptor expression and autophagy. PMID:27978543

  11. Differential relationships between D1 and D2 dopamine receptor expression in the medial preoptic nucleus and sexually-motivated song in male European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris).

    PubMed

    DeVries, M S; Cordes, M A; Stevenson, S A; Riters, L V

    2015-08-20

    Converging data in songbirds support a central role for the medial preoptic nucleus (POM) in motivational aspects of vocal production. Recent data suggest that dopamine in the POM plays a complex modulatory role in the production of sexually-motivated song and that an optimal level of dopamine D1 receptor stimulation is required to facilitate singing behavior. To further explore this possibility, we used quantitative real-time PCR to examine relationships between mRNA expression of D1 as well as D2 receptors in the POM (and also the lateral septum and Area X) and sexually-motivated singing behavior in male European starlings. Results showed that both males with the highest and lowest D1 expression in the POM sang significantly less than males with intermediate levels of expression. Furthermore, singing behavior rose linearly in association with increasing levels of D1 expression in POM but dropped abruptly, such that individuals with D1 expression values higher than the mean sang very little. Analysis of birds with low and intermediate levels of D1 expression in POM revealed strong positive correlations between D1 expression and song but negative relationships between D2 receptor expression and song. These findings support prior work suggesting an optimal level of POM D1 receptor stimulation best facilitates sexually-motivated singing behavior. Results also suggest that D2 receptors may work in opposition to D1 receptors in POM to modify vocal production.

  12. Up-regulation of ryanodine receptor expression increases the calcium-induced calcium release and spontaneous calcium signals in cerebral arteries from hindlimb unloaded rats.

    PubMed

    Morel, Jean-Luc; Dabertrand, Fabrice; Porte, Yves; Prevot, Anne; Macrez, Nathalie

    2014-08-01

    Microgravity induces a redistribution of blood volume. Consequently, astronauts' body pressure is modified so that the upright blood pressure gradient is abolished, thereby inducing a modification in cerebral blood pressure. This effect is mimicked in the hindlimb unloaded rat model. After a duration of 8 days of unloading, Ca2+ signals activated by depolarization and inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate intracellular release were increased in cerebral arteries. In the presence of ryanodine and thapsigargin, the depolarization-induced Ca2+ signals remained increased in hindlimb suspended animals, indicating that Ca2+ influx and Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release mechanism were both increased. Spontaneous Ca2+ waves and localized Ca2+ events were also investigated. Increases in both amplitude and frequency of spontaneous Ca2+ waves were measured in hindlimb suspension conditions. After pharmacological segregation of Ca2+ sparks and Ca2+ sparklets, their kinetic parameters were characterized. Hindlimb suspension induced an increase in the frequencies of both Ca2+ localized events, suggesting an increase of excitability. Labeling with bodipy compounds suggested that voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels and ryanodine receptor expressions were increased. Finally, the expression of the ryanodine receptor subtype 1 (RyR1) was increased in hindlimb unloading conditions. Taken together, these results suggest that RyR1 expression and voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels activity are the focal points of the regulation of Ca2+ signals activated by vasoconstriction in rat cerebral arteries with an increase of the voltage-dependent Ca2+ influx.

  13. Nucleus accumbens dopamine D2-receptor expressing neurons control behavioral flexibility in a place discrimination task in the IntelliCage.

    PubMed

    Macpherson, Tom; Morita, Makiko; Wang, Yanyan; Sasaoka, Toshikuni; Sawa, Akira; Hikida, Takatoshi

    2016-07-01

    Considerable evidence has demonstrated a critical role for the nucleus accumbens (NAc) in the acquisition and flexibility of behavioral strategies. These processes are guided by the activity of two discrete neuron types, dopamine D1- or D2-receptor expressing medium spiny neurons (D1-/D2-MSNs). Here we used the IntelliCage, an automated group-housing experimental cage apparatus, in combination with a reversible neurotransmission blocking technique to examine the role of NAc D1- and D2-MSNs in the acquisition and reversal learning of a place discrimination task. We demonstrated that NAc D1- and D2-MSNs do not mediate the acquisition of the task, but that suppression of activity in D2-MSNs impairs reversal learning and increased perseverative errors. Additionally, global knockout of the dopamine D2L receptor isoform produced a similar behavioral phenotype to D2-MSN-blocked mice. These results suggest that D2L receptors and NAc D2-MSNs act to suppress the influence of previously correct behavioral strategies allowing transfer of behavioral control to new strategies.

  14. Clinical Association of a Soluble Triggering Receptor Expressed on Myeloid Cells-1 (sTREM-1) in Patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Bassyouni, Iman H; Fawzi, Samar; Gheita, Tamer A; Bassyouni, Rasha H; Nasr, Aml S; El Bakry, Samah A; Afifi, Naglaa

    2017-01-01

    A triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-1 (TREM-1) is a member of the immunoglobulin superfamily with an established role in innate and adaptive immune response. We aimed to determine the plasma concentrations and clinical association of sTREM-1 in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) patients. Plasma from 79 SLE patients and 35 normal healthy subjects were assayed for sTREM-1 and IL-6 levels using Enzyme Linked Immunosorbant Assay (ELISA). The clinical disease characteristics and serological data were prospectively assessed. Disease activity was scored using the SLE disease activity index. We detected significantly higher levels of sTREM-1 in plasma of SLE patients than the healthy control group. We also detected high sTREM-1 levels in subgroups of patients with neuropsychiatric manifestations (NPLE) and patients with the total high disease activity and NPLE activity. In addition, sTREM-l levels were significantly correlated with parameters of disease activity, i.e. SLEDAI score, IL-6, hypoalbuminemia. On the other hand, we did not find significant differences in sTREM-1 levels in relation to age, disease duration, medications, ESR, other organ system involvement, or the presence of anti-dsDNA. Our preliminary data indicated that sTREM-1 levels may be an additional useful marker of disease activity in SLE. It also highlights its importance in patients with NPLE. An additional prospective longitudinal study should be carried out to support these findings.

  15. Melanins from opioid peptides.

    PubMed

    Rosei, M A

    1996-12-01

    Opioid peptides and other Tyr-NH2-terminal peptides are substrates in vitro for mushroom and sepia tyrosine, giving rise to synthetic melanins retaining the peptide moiety (opiomelanins). The melanopeptides are characterized by a total solubility in hydrophylic solvents at neutral and basic pH. Opioid peptides (enkephalins, endorphins, and esorphins), if oxidized by tyrosinase in the presence of Dopa, are easily incorporated into Dopa-melanin, producing mixed-type pigments that can also be solubilized in hydrophylic solvents. Melanins derived from opioid peptides exhibit paramagnetism, as evidenced by an EPR spectrum identical to that of Dopa-melanin. However, the presence of the linked peptide chain is able to influence dramatically the electron transfer properties and the oxidizing behaviour of the melanopeptides, so that whereas Tyr-Gly-melanin appears to behave as Dopa-melanin, Enk-melanin does not exhibit any oxidizing activity. Opiomelanins are characterized by a peculiar UV-VIS spectrum; that is, by the presence of a distinct peak (330 nm) that disappears upon chemical treatment by acid hydrolysis. Opiomelanins are stable pigments at neutral and basic pH in the dark, whereas the addition of H2O2 leads to a 15% degradation. Under stimulated solar illumination, opiomelanins are more easily destroyed with respect to Dopa-melanin, with increasing degradation when exposed to increased hydrogen peroxide concentrations and more alkaline pH. Some speculations on the possible existence and role of opiomelanins have been outlined.

  16. Peptide Optical waveguides.

    PubMed

    Handelman, Amir; Apter, Boris; Shostak, Tamar; Rosenman, Gil

    2017-02-01

    Small-scale optical devices, designed and fabricated onto one dielectric substrate, create integrated optical chip like their microelectronic analogues. These photonic circuits, based on diverse physical phenomena such as light-matter interaction, propagation of electromagnetic waves in a thin dielectric material, nonlinear and electro-optical effects, allow transmission, distribution, modulation, and processing of optical signals in optical communication systems, chemical and biological sensors, and more. The key component of these optical circuits providing both optical processing and photonic interconnections is light waveguides. Optical confinement and transmitting of the optical waves inside the waveguide material are possible due to the higher refractive index of the waveguides in comparison with their surroundings. In this work, we propose a novel field of bionanophotonics based on a new concept of optical waveguiding in synthetic elongated peptide nanostructures composed of ordered peptide dipole biomolecules. New technology of controllable deposition of peptide optical waveguiding structures by nanofountain pen technique is developed. Experimental studies of refractive index, optical transparency, and linear and nonlinear waveguiding in out-of-plane and in-plane diphenylalanine peptide nanotubes have been conducted. Optical waveguiding phenomena in peptide structures are simulated by the finite difference time domain method. The advantages of this new class of bio-optical waveguides are high refractive index contrast, wide spectral range of optical transparency, large optical nonlinearity, and electro-optical effect, making them promising for new applications in integrated multifunctional photonic circuits. Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. A Novel Non-Peptidic Agonist of the Ghrelin Receptor with Orexigenic Activity In vivo

    PubMed Central

    Pastor-Cavada, Elena; Pardo, Leticia M.; Kandil, Dalia; Torres-Fuentes, Cristina; Clarke, Sarah L.; Shaban, Hamdy; McGlacken, Gerard P.; Schellekens, Harriet

    2016-01-01

    Loss of appetite in the medically ill and ageing populations is a major health problem and a significant symptom in cachexia syndromes, which is the loss of muscle and fat mass. Ghrelin is a gut-derived hormone which can stimulate appetite. Herein we describe a novel, simple, non-peptidic, 2-pyridone which acts as a selective agonist for the ghrelin receptor (GHS-R1a). The small 2-pyridone demonstrated clear agonistic activity in both transfected human cells and mouse hypothalamic cells with endogenous GHS-R1a receptor expression. In vivo tests with the hit compound showed significant increased food intake following peripheral administration, which highlights the potent orexigenic effect of this novel GHS-R1a receptor ligand. PMID:27819353

  18. In Vivo Tumor Angiogenesis Imaging Using Peptide-Based Near-Infrared Fluorescent Probes.

    PubMed

    Huang, Rui; Conti, Peter S; Chen, Kai

    2016-01-01

    Near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging is an emerging imaging technique for studying diseases at the molecular level. Optical imaging with a near-infrared emitting fluorophore for targeting tumor angiogenesis offers a noninvasive method for early tumor detection and efficient monitoring of tumor response to anti-angiogenesis therapy. CD13 receptor, a zinc-dependent membrane-bound ectopeptidase, plays important roles in regulating tumor angiogenesis and the growth of new blood vessels. In this chapter, we use CD13 receptor as an example to demonstrate how to construct CD13-specific NGR-containing peptides via bioorthogonal click chemistry for visualizing and quantifying the CD13 receptor expression in vivo by means of NIRF optical imaging.

  19. A Novel Non-Peptidic Agonist of the Ghrelin Receptor with Orexigenic Activity In vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastor-Cavada, Elena; Pardo, Leticia M.; Kandil, Dalia; Torres-Fuentes, Cristina; Clarke, Sarah L.; Shaban, Hamdy; McGlacken, Gerard P.; Schellekens, Harriet

    2016-11-01

    Loss of appetite in the medically ill and ageing populations is a major health problem and a significant symptom in cachexia syndromes, which is the loss of muscle and fat mass. Ghrelin is a gut-derived hormone which can stimulate appetite. Herein we describe a novel, simple, non-peptidic, 2-pyridone which acts as a selective agonist for the ghrelin receptor (GHS-R1a). The small 2-pyridone demonstrated clear agonistic activity in both transfected human cells and mouse hypothalamic cells with endogenous GHS-R1a receptor expression. In vivo tests with the hit compound showed significant increased food intake following peripheral administration, which highlights the potent orexigenic effect of this novel GHS-R1a receptor ligand.

  20. Expression and potential role of the peptide orexin-A in prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Valiante, Salvatore; Liguori, Giovanna; Tafuri, Simona; Pavone, Luigi Michele; Campese, Roberto; Monaco, Roberto; Iachetta, Giuseppina; Assisi, Loredana; Mirabella, Nicola; Forte, Maurizio; Costagliola, Anna; Vittoria, Alfredo

    2015-09-04

    The peptides orexin-A and orexin-B and their G protein-coupled OX1 and OX2 receptors are involved in multiple physiological processes in the central nervous system and peripheral organs. Altered expression or signaling dysregulation of orexins and their receptors have been associated with a wide range of human diseases including narcolepsy, obesity, drug addiction, and cancer. Although orexin-A, its precursor molecule prepro-orexin and OX1 receptor have been detected in the human normal and hyperplastic prostate tissues, their expression and function in the prostate cancer (PCa) remains to be addressed. Here, we demonstrate for the first time the immunohistochemical localization of orexin-A in human PCa specimens, and the expression of prepro-orexin and OX1 receptor at both protein and mRNA levels in these tissues. Orexin-A administration to the human androgen-dependent prostate carcinoma cells LNCaP up-regulates OX1 receptor expression resulting in a decrease of cell survival. Noteworthy, nanomolar concentrations of the peptide counteract the testosterone-induced nuclear translocation of the androgen receptor in the cells: the orexin-A action is prevented by the addition of the OX1 receptor antagonist SB-408124 to the test system. These findings indicate that orexin-A/OX1 receptor interaction interferes with the activity of the androgen receptor which regulates PCa onset and progression, thus suggesting that orexin-A and its receptor might represent novel therapeutic targets to challenge this aggressive cancer. - Highlights: • Orexin-A and OX1 receptor are present in human cancer prostate tissues. • Orexin-A up-regulates OX1 receptor expression in LNCaP cells. • Orexin-A inhibits testosterone-induced nuclear translocation of androgen receptor.

  1. Antimicrobial Peptides from Plants

    PubMed Central

    Tam, James P.; Wang, Shujing; Wong, Ka H.; Tan, Wei Liang

    2015-01-01

    Plant antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have evolved differently from AMPs from other life forms. They are generally rich in cysteine residues which form multiple disulfides. In turn, the disulfides cross-braced plant AMPs as cystine-rich peptides to confer them with extraordinary high chemical, thermal and proteolytic stability. The cystine-rich or commonly known as cysteine-rich peptides (CRPs) of plant AMPs are classified into families based on their sequence similarity, cysteine motifs that determine their distinctive disulfide bond patterns and tertiary structure fold. Cystine-rich plant AMP families include thionins, defensins, hevein-like peptides, knottin-type peptides (linear and cyclic), lipid transfer proteins, α-hairpinin and snakins family. In addition, there are AMPs which are rich in other amino acids. The ability of plant AMPs to organize into specific families with conserved structural folds that enable sequence variation of non-Cys residues encased in the same scaffold within a particular family to play multiple functions. Furthermore, the ability of plant AMPs to tolerate hypervariable sequences using a conserved scaffold provides diversity to recognize different targets by varying the sequence of the non-cysteine residues. These properties bode well for developing plant AMPs as potential therapeutics and for protection of crops through transgenic methods. This review provides an overview of the major families of plant AMPs, including their structures, functions, and putative mechanisms. PMID:26580629

  2. Cyclization in opioid peptides.

    PubMed

    Piekielna, Justyna; Perlikowska, Renata; Gach, Katarzyna; Janecka, Anna

    2013-06-01

    Endogenous opioid peptides have been studied extensively as potential therapeutics for the treatment of pain. The major problems of using natural opioid peptides as drug candidates are their poor receptor specificity, metabolic instability and inability to reach the brain after systemic administration. A lot of synthetic efforts have been made to opioid analogs with improved pharmacological properties. One important structural modification leading to such analogs is cyclization of linear sequences. Intramolecular cyclization has been shown to improve biological properties of various bioactive peptides. Cyclization reduces conformational freedom responsible for the simultaneous activation of two or more receptors, increases metabolic stability and lipophilicity which may result in a longer half-life and easier penetration across biological membranes. This review deals with various strategies that have been employed to synthesize cyclic analogs of opioid peptides. Discussed are such bridging bonds as amide and amine linkages, sulfur-containing bonds, including monosulfide, disulfide and dithioether bridges, bismethylene bonds, monosulfide bridges of lanthionine and, finally, carbonyl and guanidine linkages. Opioid affinities and activities of cyclic analogs are given and compared with linear opioid peptides. Analgesic activities of analogs evaluated in the in vivo pain tests are also discussed.

  3. Chronic social stress in pigs impairs intestinal barrier and nutrient transporter function, and alters neuro-immune mediator and receptor expression

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yihang; Song, Zehe; Kerr, Katelyn A.; Moeser, Adam J.

    2017-01-01

    Psychosocial stress is a major factor driving gastrointestinal (GI) pathophysiology and disease susceptibility in humans and animals. The mechanisms governing susceptibility to stress-induced GI disease remain poorly understood. In the present study, we investigated the influence of chronic social stress (CSS) in pigs, induced by 7 d of chronic mixing/crowding stress, on intestinal barrier and nutrient transport function, corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) signaling and immunological responses. Results from this study showed that CSS resulted in a significant impairment of ileal and colonic barrier function indicated by reduced transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) in the ileum and increased FD4 flux in the ileum (by 0.8 fold) and colon (by 0.7 fold). Ileal sodium glucose linked transporter 1 (SGLT-1) function, measured as glucose-induced changes in short-circuit current (Isc), was diminished (by 52%) in CSS pigs, associated with reduced body weight gain and feed efficiency. Although reductions in SGLT-1 function were observed in CSS pigs, mRNA expression for SGLT-1, villus heights were increased in CSS pigs. Corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) mRNA was upregulated (by 0.9 fold) in the ileum of CSS pigs but not in the colon. Urocortin 2 (Ucn2) mRNA was upregulated (by 1.5 fold) in the colon of CSS pigs, but not in the ileum. In CSS pigs, a downregulation of pro-inflammatory cytokines mRNA (IL1B, TNFA, IL8, and IL6) was observed in both ileum and colon, compared with controls. In contrast CSS induced a marked upregulation of mRNA for IL10 and mast cell chymase gene (CMA1) in the ileum and colon. Together, these data demonstrate that chronic stress in pigs results in significant alterations in intestinal barrier and nutrient transport function and neuro-immune mediator and receptor expression. PMID:28170426

  4. Prospective Evaluation of Procalcitonin, Soluble Triggering Receptor Expressed on Myeloid Cells-1 and C-Reactive Protein in Febrile Patients with Autoimmune Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chou-Han; Hsieh, Song-Chou; Keng, Li-Ta; Lee, Ho-Sheng; Chang, Hou-Tai; Liao, Wei-Yu; Ho, Chao-Chi; Yu, Chong-Jen

    2016-01-01

    Background Both procalcitonin (PCT) and soluble triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-1 (sTREM-1) have been investigated separately as indicators of infection in patients with autoimmune diseases. Our study simultaneously evaluated both PCT and sTREM-1 along with C-reactive protein (CRP) in febrile patients with autoimmune diseases. Methods Fifty-nine patients were enrolled in the study. The patients were categorized into the infection group (n = 24) or the disease flare group (n = 35). sTREM-1, PCT and CRP concentrations at fever onset were compared between the two groups of patients. Results sTREM-1 and CRP did not differ between the two groups. PCT [median (range), ng/ml] was higher in the infection group than in the disease flare group [0.53 (0.02–12.85) vs. 0.12 (0.02–19.23), p = 0.001]. The area under the receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) for diagnosis of infection was 0.75 for PCT (p = 0.001), 0.63 for CRP (p = 0.09) and 0.52 for sTREM-1 (p = 0.79). Using 0.2 ng/ml as the cutoff value for PCT, sensitivity was 0.75 and specificity was 0.77. Negative predictive values for PCT were 92%, 87% and 82% for a prevalence of infection of 20%, 30%, and 40%, respectively. Neither immunosuppressants nor biomodulators affected the level of the three biomarkers. However, in patients treated with corticosteroids, the levels of sTREM-1 and CRP were significantly decreased compared with the untreated patients. Conclusions Setting PCT at a lower cutoff value could provide useful information on excluding infection in febrile patients with autoimmune diseases. The possible effect of corticosteroids on the level of sTREM-1 as an infection marker deserves further study. PMID:27096761

  5. Diagnostic Performance of Soluble Triggering Receptor Expressed on Myeloid Cells-1 in Ventilator-Associated Pneumonia of Patients with Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yuetian; Liu, Chunyan

    2017-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the effect of soluble triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-1 (sTREM-1) in serum, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), endotracheal aspiration (ETA), and exhaled breath condensate (EBC) samples as early biomarkers for the diagnosis of ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) in patients with ischemic stroke. Methods. One hundred and thirty-two patients with clinically suspected VAP were enrolled in this study. Bronchoscopy was performed on the day of clinically suspected VAP. sTREM-1 levels in serum, BALF, ETA, and EBC were measured. VAP was diagnosed by quantitative cultures of BALF (≥104 cfu/mL). Results. VAP was confirmed in 76 (57.58%) cases. Patients with VAP showed significantly higher sTREM-1 in BALF [32.35 (IQR, 30.08–41.72) versus 18.92 (11.89–31.72)] pg/mL and in EBC [1.57 (IQR, 1.02–2.61) versus 0.41 (0.19–1.61)] pg/mL than patients without VAP. The area under the curve was 0.813 (p < 0.001). The optimum cut-off value for sTREM-1 in BALF was 23.61 pg/mL, yielding sensitivity and specificity of 85.5% and 73.1%. sTREM-1 in BALF had excellent correlation with that in EBC (R2 = 0.78, p < 0.05). Conclusions. sTREM-1 in EBC and BALF had good diagnostic performance in differentiating patients with and without VAP. PMID:28321261

  6. Pharmacology of GABAC receptors: responses to agonists and antagonists distinguish A- and B-subtypes of homomeric rho receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yi; Khalili, Parham; Ripps, Harris; Qian, Haohua

    2005-03-07

    GABA(C) receptors, expressed predominantly in vertebrate retina, are thought to be formed mainly by GABA rho subunits. Five GABA rho subunits have been cloned from white perch retina, four of which form functional homooligomeric receptors when expressed in Xenopus oocytes. These rho subtypes, classified as rho1A, rho1B, rho2A and rho2B receptors based on amino acid sequence alignment, exhibit distinct temporal and pharmacological properties. To examine further the pharmacological properties associated with the various rho receptor subtypes, we investigated the effects of a selective GABA(C) receptor antagonist, TPMPA, on the GABA-mediated activity of receptors formed in Xenopus oocytes by the four GABA rho subunits. In addition, we recorded the activation profiles of beta-alanine, taurine, and glycine, three amino acids that modulate neuronal activity in various parts of the CNS and are purported to be rho receptor agonists. TPMPA effectively inhibited GABA-elicited responses on A-type receptors, whereas B-type receptors exhibited a relatively low sensitivity to the drug. A-type and B-type receptors also displayed distinctly different reactions to agonists. Both taurine and glycine-activated the B-type receptors, whereas these agents had no detectable effect on A-type receptors. Similarly, beta-alanine evoked large responses from B-type receptors, but was far less effective on A-type receptors. These results indicate that, in addition to the characteristic response properties identified previously, there is a pattern of pharmacological reactions that further distinguishes the A- and B-subtypes of GABA rho receptor.

  7. Evolutionarily conserved organization of the dopaminergic system in lamprey: SNc/VTA afferent and efferent connectivity and D2 receptor expression.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Fernández, Juan; Stephenson-Jones, Marcus; Suryanarayana, Shreyas M; Robertson, Brita; Grillner, Sten

    2014-12-01

    The dopaminergic system influences motor behavior, signals reward and novelty, and is an essential component of the basal ganglia in all vertebrates including the lamprey, one of the phylogenetically oldest vertebrates. The intrinsic organization and function of the lamprey basal ganglia is highly conserved. For instance, the direct and indirect pathways are modulated through dopamine D1 and D2 receptors in lamprey and in mammals. The nucleus of the tuberculum posterior, a homologue of the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc)/ventral tegmental area (VTA) is present in lamprey, but only scarce data exist about its connectivity. Likewise, the D2 receptor is expressed in the striatum, but little is known about its localization in other brain areas. We used in situ hybridization and tracer injections, both in combination with tyrosine hydroxylase immunohistochemistry, to characterize the SNc/VTA efferent and afferent connectivity, and to relate its projection pattern with D2 receptor expression in particular. We show that most features of the dopaminergic system are highly conserved. As in mammals, the direct pallial (cortex in mammals) input and the basal ganglia connectivity with the SNc/VTA are present as part of the evaluation system, as well as input from the tectum as the evolutionary basis for salience/novelty detection. Moreover, the SNc/VTA receives sensory information from the olfactory bulbs, optic tectum, octavolateral area, and dorsal column nucleus, and it innervates, apart from the nigrostriatal pathway, several motor-related areas. This suggests that the dopaminergic system also contributes to the control of different motor centers at the brainstem level.

  8. Slit Binding via the Ig1 Domain Is Essential for Midline Repulsion by Drosophila Robo1 but Dispensable for Receptor Expression, Localization, and Regulation in Vivo.

    PubMed

    Brown, Haley E; Reichert, Marie C; Evans, Timothy A

    2015-09-10

    The midline repellant ligand Slit and its Roundabout (Robo) family receptors constitute the major midline repulsive pathway in bilaterians. Slit proteins produced at the midline of the central nervous system (CNS) signal through Robo receptors expressed on axons to prevent them from crossing the midline, and thus regulate connectivity between the two sides of the nervous system. Biochemical structure and interaction studies support a model in which Slit binding to the first immunoglobulin-like (Ig1) domain of Robo receptors activates a repulsive signaling pathway in axonal growth cones. Here, we examine the in vivo functional importance of the Ig1 domain of the Drosophila Robo1 receptor, which controls midline crossing of axons in response to Slit during development of the embryonic CNS. We show that deleting Ig1 from Robo1 disrupts Slit binding in cultured Drosophila cells, and that a Robo1 variant lacking Ig1 (Robo1(∆Ig1)) is unable to promote ectopic midline repulsion in gain-of-function studies in the Drosophila embryonic CNS. We show that the Ig1 domain is not required for proper expression, axonal localization, or Commissureless (Comm)-dependent regulation of Robo1 in vivo, and we use a genetic rescue assay to show that Robo1(∆Ig1) is unable to substitute for full-length Robo1 to properly regulate midline crossing of axons. These results establish a direct link between in vitro biochemical studies of Slit-Robo interactions and in vivo genetic studies of Slit-Robo signaling during midline axon guidance, and distinguish Slit-dependent from Slit-independent aspects of Robo1 expression, regulation, and activity during embryonic development.

  9. Sustained nicotine exposure differentially affects alpha 3 beta 2 and alpha 4 beta 2 neuronal nicotinic receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Y N; Amin, J; Weiss, D S; Wecker, L

    1996-02-01

    To determine whether prolonged exposure to nicotine differentially affects alpha 3 beta 2 versus alpha 4 beta 2 nicotinic receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes, oocytes were coinjected with subunit cRNAs, and peak responses to agonist, evoked by 0.7 or 7 microM nicotine for alpha 4 beta 2 and alpha 3 beta 2 receptors, respectively, were determined before and following incubation for up to 48 h with nanomolar concentrations of nicotine. Agonist responses of alpha 4 beta 2 receptors decreased in a concentration-dependent manner with IC50 values in the 10 nM range following incubation for 24 h and in the 1 nM range following incubation for 48 h. In contrast, responses of alpha 3 beta 2 receptors following incubation for 24-48 h with 1,000 nM nicotine decreased by only 50-60%, and total ablation of responses could not be achieved. Attenuation of responses occurred within the first 5 min of nicotine exposure and was a first-order process for both subtypes; half-lives for inactivation were 4.09 and 2.36 min for alpha 4 beta 2 and alpha 3 beta 2 receptors, respectively. Recovery was also first-order for both subtypes; half-lives for recovery were 21 and 7.5 h for alpha 4 beta 2 and alpha 3 beta 2 receptors, respectively. Thus, the responsiveness of both receptors decreased following sustained exposure to nicotine, but alpha 4 beta 2 receptors recovered much slower. Results may explain the differential effect of sustained nicotine exposure on nicotinic receptor-mediated neurotransmitter release.

  10. Angiotensin-(1-7) prevents systemic hypertension, attenuates oxidative stress and tubulointerstitial fibrosis, and normalizes renal angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 and Mas receptor expression in diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yixuan; Lo, Chao-Sheng; Padda, Ranjit; Abdo, Shaaban; Chenier, Isabelle; Filep, Janos G; Ingelfinger, Julie R; Zhang, Shao-Ling; Chan, John S D

    2015-05-01

    We investigated the relationship between Ang-(1-7) [angiotensin-(1-7)] action, sHTN (systolic hypertension), oxidative stress, kidney injury, ACE2 (angiotensin-converting enzyme-2) and MasR [Ang-(1-7) receptor] expression in Type 1 diabetic Akita mice. Ang-(1-7) was administered daily [500 μg/kg of BW (body weight) per day, subcutaneously] to male Akita mice from 14 weeks of age with or without co-administration of an antagonist of the MasR, A779 (10 mg/kg of BW per day). The animals were killed at 20 weeks of age. Age-matched WT (wild-type) mice served as controls. Ang-(1-7) administration prevented sHTN and attenuated kidney injury (reduced urinary albumin/creatinine ratio, glomerular hyperfiltration, renal hypertrophy and fibrosis, and tubular apoptosis) without affecting blood glucose levels in Akita mice. Ang-(1-7) also attenuated renal oxidative stress and the expression of oxidative stress-inducible proteins (NADPH oxidase 4, nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2, haem oxygenase 1), pro-hypertensive proteins (angiotensinogen, angiotensin-converting enzyme, sodium/hydrogen exchanger 3) and profibrotic proteins (transforming growth factor-β1 and collagen IV), and increased the expression of anti-hypertensive proteins (ACE2 and MasR) in Akita mouse kidneys. These effects were reversed by A779. Our data suggest that Ang-(1-7) plays a protective role in sHTN and RPTC (renal proximal tubular cell) injury in diabetes, at least in part, through decreasing renal oxidative stress-mediated signalling and normalizing ACE2 and MasR expression.

  11. Compromised NMDA/Glutamate Receptor Expression in Dopaminergic Neurons Impairs Instrumental Learning, But Not Pavlovian Goal Tracking or Sign Tracking(1,2,3).

    PubMed

    James, Alex S; Pennington, Zachary T; Tran, Phu; Jentsch, James David

    2015-01-01

    Two theories regarding the role for dopamine neurons in learning include the concepts that their activity serves as a (1) mechanism that confers incentive salience onto rewards and associated cues and/or (2) contingency teaching signal reflecting reward prediction error. While both theories are provocative, the causal role for dopamine cell activity in either mechanism remains controversial. In this study mice that either fully or partially lacked NMDARs in dopamine neurons exclusively, as well as appropriate controls, were evaluated for reward-related learning; this experimental design allowed for a test of the premise that NMDA/glutamate receptor (NMDAR)-mediated mechanisms in dopamine neurons, including NMDA-dependent regulation of phasic discharge activity of these cells, modulate either the instrumental learning processes or the likelihood of pavlovian cues to become highly motivating incentive stimuli that directly attract behavior. Loss of NMDARs in dopamine neurons did not significantly affect baseline dopamine utilization in the striatum, novelty evoked locomotor behavior, or consumption of a freely available, palatable food solution. On the other hand, animals lacking NMDARs in dopamine cells exhibited a selective reduction in reinforced lever responses that emerged over the course of instrumental learning. Loss of receptor expression did not, however, influence the likelihood of an animal acquiring a pavlovian conditional response associated with attribution of incentive salience to reward-paired cues (sign tracking). These data support the view that reductions in NMDAR signaling in dopamine neurons affect instrumental reward-related learning but do not lend support to hypotheses that suggest that the behavioral significance of this signaling includes incentive salience attribution.

  12. Chronic social stress in pigs impairs intestinal barrier and nutrient transporter function, and alters neuro-immune mediator and receptor expression.

    PubMed

    Li, Yihang; Song, Zehe; Kerr, Katelyn A; Moeser, Adam J

    2017-01-01

    Psychosocial stress is a major factor driving gastrointestinal (GI) pathophysiology and disease susceptibility in humans and animals. The mechanisms governing susceptibility to stress-induced GI disease remain poorly understood. In the present study, we investigated the influence of chronic social stress (CSS) in pigs, induced by 7 d of chronic mixing/crowding stress, on intestinal barrier and nutrient transport function, corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) signaling and immunological responses. Results from this study showed that CSS resulted in a significant impairment of ileal and colonic barrier function indicated by reduced transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) in the ileum and increased FD4 flux in the ileum (by 0.8 fold) and colon (by 0.7 fold). Ileal sodium glucose linked transporter 1 (SGLT-1) function, measured as glucose-induced changes in short-circuit current (Isc), was diminished (by 52%) in CSS pigs, associated with reduced body weight gain and feed efficiency. Although reductions in SGLT-1 function were observed in CSS pigs, mRNA expression for SGLT-1, villus heights were increased in CSS pigs. Corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) mRNA was upregulated (by 0.9 fold) in the ileum of CSS pigs but not in the colon. Urocortin 2 (Ucn2) mRNA was upregulated (by 1.5 fold) in the colon of CSS pigs, but not in the ileum. In CSS pigs, a downregulation of pro-inflammatory cytokines mRNA (IL1B, TNFA, IL8, and IL6) was observed in both ileum and colon, compared with controls. In contrast CSS induced a marked upregulation of mRNA for IL10 and mast cell chymase gene (CMA1) in the ileum and colon. Together, these data demonstrate that chronic stress in pigs results in significant alterations in intestinal barrier and nutrient transport function and neuro-immune mediator and receptor expression.

  13. The effects of paeoniflorin injection on soluble triggering receptor expressed on myeloid-1 (sTREM-1) levels in severe septic rats

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jie; Wang, Yi-Min; Ji, Ming-Suo; Liu, Fu-Shan

    2016-01-01

    Paeoniflorin (PAE) is the most abundant compound in Xuebijing injection widely used to treat sepsis. We aimed to investigate effect of PAE on expression of soluble triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-1 (sTREM-1) in a rat model of sepsis. Wistar rats were divided into Normal, Model, and PAE groups (n=20 each). Endotoxin was administrated at 5 mg/ml/kg in Model and PAE rats to establish rat sepsis model. 1 h after endotoxin administration, PAE was administrated at 4 ml/kg in PAE group once per day for 3 days. Routine blood tests and biochemical indexes were assessed, including aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and creatine kinase-MB (CK-MB). The plasma sTREM-1 level was measured using quantitative ELISA. At the end of experiment, the small intestine, liver, kidney and lung were subjected to pathological examinations. A rat model of sepsis-induced multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) was established successfully with endotoxin administration (5 mg/ml/kg), evidenced by histo-pathological examinations, routine blood tests and biochemical indexes: platelet count decreased and white blood cell count increased (p<0.05), CK-MB and AST increased (p<0.05). PAE treatment significantly reduced the plasma levels of AST, CK-MB, and sTREM-1, compared to Model group (p<0.05). Meanwhile, sepsis-induced damages in the liver, lung, stomach and intestinal mucosa were also markedly ameliorated by PAE treatment. PAE demonstrated a significantly protective effect in a rat model of sepsis by decreasing plasma sTREM-1 level, reducing inflammation, preventing MODS and protecting organ functions. PMID:27847433

  14. Cellular and species resistance to murine amphotropic, gibbon ape, and feline subgroup C leukemia viruses is strongly influenced by receptor expression levels and by receptor masking mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Tailor, C S; Nouri, A; Kabat, D

    2000-10-01

    Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells are resistant to infections by gibbon ape leukemia virus (GALV) and amphotropic murine leukemia virus (A-MLV) unless they are pretreated with tunicamycin, an inhibitor of N-linked glycosylation. These viruses use the related sodium-phosphate symporters Pit1 and Pit2, respectively, as receptors in nonhamster cells, and evidence has suggested that the corresponding transporters of CHO cells may be masked by tunicamycin-sensitive secreted inhibitors. Although the E36 line of Chinese hamster cells was reported to secrete the putative Pit2 inhibitor and to be sensitive to the inhibitory CHO factors, E36 cells are highly susceptible to both GALV and A-MLV in the absence of tunicamycin. Moreover, expression of E36 Pit2 in CHO cells conferred tunicamycin-independent susceptibilities to both viruses. Based on the latter results, it was suggested that E36 Pit2 must functionally differ from the endogenous Pit2 of CHO cells. To test these ideas, we analyzed the receptor properties of CHO Pit1 and Pit2 in CHO cells. Surprisingly, and counterintuitively, transfection of a CHO Pit2 expression vector into CHO cells conferred strong susceptibility to both GALV and A-MLV, and similar overexpression of CHO Pit1 conferred susceptibility to GALV. Thus, CHO Pit2 is a promiscuous functional receptor for both viruses, and CHO Pit1 is a functional receptor for GALV. Similarly, we found that the natural resistance of Mus dunni tail fibroblasts to subgroup C feline leukemia viruses (FeLV-C) was eliminated simply by overexpression of the endogenous FeLV-C receptor homologue. These results demonstrate a novel and simple method to unmask latent retroviral receptor activities that occur in some cells. Specifically, resistances to retroviruses that are caused by subthreshold levels of receptor expression or by stoichiometrically limited masking or interference mechanisms can be efficiently overcome simply by overexpressing the endogenous receptors in the same

  15. Cannabinoid CB1 receptor expression in relation to visceral adipose depots, endocannabinoid levels, microvascular damage, and the presence of the Cnr1 A3813G variant in humans.

    PubMed

    Bordicchia, Marica; Battistoni, Ilaria; Mancinelli, Lucia; Giannini, Elena; Refi, Giada; Minardi, Daniele; Muzzonigro, Giovanni; Mazzucchelli, Roberta; Montironi, Rodolfo; Piscitelli, Fabiana; Petrosino, Stefania; Dessì-Fulgheri, Paolo; Rappelli, Alessandro; Di Marzo, Vincenzo; Sarzani, Riccardo

    2010-05-01

    Dysregulation of the endocannabinoid system in the visceral adipose tissue (VAT) is associated with metabolic and cardiovascular complications of obesity. We studied perirenal VAT CB1 receptor expression in relation to anthropometry, VAT area and endocannabinoid levels, kidney microvascular damage (MVDa), and the presence of the CB1 gene A3813G variant, the frequency of which was also evaluated in a large population of obese-hypertensive (OH) patients with or without the metabolic syndrome (MetS). Perirenal VAT and kidney samples were obtained from 30 patients undergoing renal surgery. Total and perirenal VAT areas were determined by computed tomography. CB1 messenger RNA expression and endocannabinoid levels in perirenal VAT were determined by quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, respectively. The MVDa was evaluated in healthy portions of kidney cortex. The A3813G alleles were identified by genotyping in these patients and in 280 nondiabetic OH patients (age

  16. Compromised NMDA/Glutamate Receptor Expression in Dopaminergic Neurons Impairs Instrumental Learning, But Not Pavlovian Goal Tracking or Sign Tracking1,2,3

    PubMed Central

    James, Alex S.; Pennington, Zachary T.; Tran, Phu

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Two theories regarding the role for dopamine neurons in learning include the concepts that their activity serves as a (1) mechanism that confers incentive salience onto rewards and associated cues and/or (2) contingency teaching signal reflecting reward prediction error. While both theories are provocative, the causal role for dopamine cell activity in either mechanism remains controversial. In this study mice that either fully or partially lacked NMDARs in dopamine neurons exclusively, as well as appropriate controls, were evaluated for reward-related learning; this experimental design allowed for a test of the premise that NMDA/glutamate receptor (NMDAR)-mediated mechanisms in dopamine neurons, including NMDA-dependent regulation of phasic discharge activity of these cells, modulate either the instrumental learning processes or the likelihood of pavlovian cues to become highly motivating incentive stimuli that directly attract behavior. Loss of NMDARs in dopamine neurons did not significantly affect baseline dopamine utilization in the striatum, novelty evoked locomotor behavior, or consumption of a freely available, palatable food solution. On the other hand, animals lacking NMDARs in dopamine cells exhibited a selective reduction in reinforced lever responses that emerged over the course of instrumental learning. Loss of receptor expression did not, however, influence the likelihood of an animal acquiring a pavlovian conditional response associated with attribution of incentive salience to reward-paired cues (sign tracking). These data support the view that reductions in NMDAR signaling in dopamine neurons affect instrumental reward-related learning but do not lend support to hypotheses that suggest that the behavioral significance of this signaling includes incentive salience attribution. PMID:26464985

  17. Peptides in oral diseases.

    PubMed

    Lucchese, Alberta; Guida, Agostino; Petruzzi, Massimo; Capone, Giovanni; Laino, Luigi; Serpico, Rosario

    2012-01-01

    The oral cavity is home to numerous viruses and micro-organisms recognized as having a role in various oral diseases as well as in infections in other parts of the body. Indeed, in general a microbial infection underlies or is believed to underlie the ample spectrum of oral diseases, from tooth enamel decay to periodontal lesions, from candidiasis to virus-induced oral squamous cell carcinomas, and bullous autoimmune oral disorders. This clinico-pathological context stresses the need of targeted therapies to specifically kill infectious agents in a complex environment such as the oral cavity, and explains the current interest in exploring peptide-based therapeutic approaches in oral and dental research. Here, we review the therapeutic potential of antimicrobial peptides such as LL-37, beta defensins, adrenomedullin, histatins, and of various peptides modulating gene expression and immuno-biological interaction(s) in oral diseases.

  18. Molecular modeling of peptides.

    PubMed

    Kuczera, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    This article presents a review of the field of molecular modeling of peptides. The main focus is on atomistic modeling with molecular mechanics potentials. The description of peptide conformations and solvation through potentials is discussed. Several important computer simulation methods are briefly introduced, including molecular dynamics, accelerated sampling approaches such as replica-exchange and metadynamics, free energy simulations and kinetic network models like Milestoning. Examples of recent applications for predictions of structure, kinetics, and interactions of peptides with complex environments are described. The reliability of current simulation methods is analyzed by comparison of computational predictions obtained using different models with each other and with experimental data. A brief discussion of coarse-grained modeling and future directions is also presented.

  19. P2X7 Receptor Expression in Peripheral Blood Monocytes Is Correlated With Plasma C-Reactive Protein and Cytokine Levels in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: a Preliminary Report.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hong; Nie, Yijun; Xiong, Huangui; Liu, Shuangmei; Li, Guilin; Huang, An; Guo, Lili; Wang, Shouyu; Xue, Yun; Wu, Bing; Peng, Lichao; Song, Miaomiao; Li, Guodong; Liang, Shangdong

    2015-12-01

    Chronic inflammation plays a major role in development of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). C-reactive protein (CRP) and inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin 1β (IL-1β) are directly involved in the occurrence of insulin resistance. Increased extracellular ATP levels can amplify the inflammatory response in vivo via the P2X7 receptor. The present study aimed to assess the relationship between P2X7 receptor expression in human peripheral blood monocytes and plasma levels of TNF-α, IL-1β, and CRP in T2DM patients. The results showed the association of increased P2X7 receptor expression of monocytes with high serum CRP, TNF-α, and IL-1β levels. TNF-α and IL-1β levels were lowest in healthy subjects; in T2DM patients, these inflammatory markers were less abundant in individuals with normal CRP levels compared to those with high CRP contents. In contrast, IL-10 levels in T2DM patients with high CRP levels were dramatically decreased. P2X7 receptor expression in monocytes from T2DM patients with high CRP levels was significantly increased in comparison with healthy individuals and T2DM patients with normal CRP levels. These findings indicated that P2X7 receptor in peripheral blood monocytes may be involved in the pathological changes of T2DM, particularly affecting patients with high CRP levels.

  20. Generation of new peptide-Fc fusion proteins that mediate antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity against different types of cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Sioud, Mouldy; Westby, Phuong; Olsen, Julie Kristine E.; Mobergslien, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), a key effector function for the clinical effectiveness of monoclonal antibodies, is triggered by the engagement of the antibody Fc domain with the Fcγ receptors expressed by innate immune cells such as natural killer (NK) cells and macrophages. Here, we fused cancer cell-binding peptides to the Fc domain of human IgG1 to engineer novel peptide-Fc fusion proteins with ADCC activity. The designed fusion proteins were expressed in human embryonic kidney 293T cells, followed by purification and characterization by western blots. One of the engineered variants (WN-Fc), bound with high affinity to a wide range of solid tumor cell lines (e.g., colon, lung, prostate, skin, ovarian, and mammary tumors). Treatment of cancer cells with the engineered peptide-Fc fusions in the presence of effector NK cells potentially enhanced cytotoxicity, degranulation, and interferon-γ production by NK cells when compared to cells treated with the Fc control. The presence of competing peptides inhibited NK cell activation. Furthermore, a bispecific peptide-Fc fusion protein activated NK cells against HER-1- and/or HER-2-expressing cancer cells. Collectively, the engineered peptide-Fc fusions constitute a new promising strategy to recruit and activate NK cells against tumor cells, a primary goal of cancer immunotherapy. PMID:26605373

  1. Epitope peptides and immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Tanabe, Soichi

    2007-02-01

    Allergic diseases affect atopic individuals, who synthesize specific Immunoglobulins E (IgE) to environmental allergens, usually proteins or glycoproteins. These allergens include grass and tree pollens, indoor allergens such as house dust mites and animal dander, and various foods. Because allergen-specific IgE antibodies are the main effector molecules in the immune response to allergens, many studies have focused on the identification of IgE-binding epitopes (called B cell epitopes), specific and minimum regions of allergen molecules that binds to IgE. Our initial studies have provided evidence that only four to five amino acid residues are enough to comprise an epitope, since pentapeptide QQQPP in wheat glutenin is minimally required for IgE binding. Afterwards, various kinds of B cell epitope structures have been clarified. Such information contributes greatly not only to the elucidation of the etiology of allergy, but also to the development of strategies for the treatment and prevention of allergy. Allergen-specific T cells also play an important role in allergy and are obvious targets for intervention in the disease. Currently, the principle approach is to modify B cell epitopes to prevent IgE binding while preserving T cell epitopes to retain the capacity for immunotherapy. There is mounting evidence that the administration of peptide(s) containing immunodominant T cell epitopes from an allergen can induce T cell nonresponsiveness (immunotherapy). There have been clinical studies of peptide immunotherapy performed, the most promising being for bee venom sensitivity. Clinical trials of immunotherapy for cat allergen peptide have also received attention. An alternative strategy for the generation of an effective but hypoallergenic preparation for immunotherapy is to modify T cell epitope peptides by, for example, single amino acid substitution. In this article, I will present an overview of epitopes related to allergic disease, particularly stress on

  2. Related impurities in peptide medicines.

    PubMed

    D'Hondt, Matthias; Bracke, Nathalie; Taevernier, Lien; Gevaert, Bert; Verbeke, Frederick; Wynendaele, Evelien; De Spiegeleer, Bart

    2014-12-01

    Peptides are an increasingly important group of pharmaceuticals, positioned between classic small organic molecules and larger bio-molecules such as proteins. Currently, the peptide drug market is growing twice as fast as other drug markets, illustrating the increasing clinical as well as economical impact of this medicine group. Most peptides today are manufactured by solid-phase peptide synthesis (SPPS). This review will provide a structured overview of the most commonly observed peptide-related impurities in peptide medicines, encompassing the active pharmaceutical ingredients (API or drug substance) as well as the finished drug products. Not only is control of these peptide-related impurities and degradants critical for the already approved and clinically used peptide-drugs, these impurities also possess the capability of greatly influencing initial functionality studies during early drug discovery phases, possibly resulting in erroneous conclusions. The first group of peptide-related impurities is SPPS-related: deletion and insertion of amino acids are related to inefficient Fmoc-deprotection and excess use of amino acid reagents, respectively. Fmoc-deprotection can cause racemization of amino acid residues and thus diastereomeric impurities. Inefficient deprotection of amino acid side chains results into peptide-protection adducts. Furthermore, unprotected side chains can react with a variety of reagents used in the synthesis. Oxidation of amino acid side chains and dimeric-to-oligomeric impurities were also observed. Unwanted peptide counter ions such as trifluoroacetate, originating from the SPPS itself or from additional purification treatments, may also be present in the final peptide product. Contamination of the desired peptide product by other unrelated peptides was also seen, pointing out the lack of appropriate GMP. The second impurity group results from typical peptide degradation mechanisms such as β-elimination, diketopiperazine, pyroglutamate

  3. Peptide -- Silica Hybrid Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altunbas, Aysegul; Sharma, Nikhil; Nagarkar, Radhika; Schneider, Joel; Pochan, Darrin

    2010-03-01

    In this study, a bio-inspired route was used to fabricate scaffolds that display hierarchical organization of an inorganic layer around an organic self-assembled peptide fibril template. The 20 amino acid peptide used in this study intramolecular folds into a beta-hairpin conformation on addition of a desired solution stimulus. This intramolecular folding is followed by intermolecular self-assembly of the peptides into a three dimensional network of entangled fibrils rich in beta-sheet with a high density of lysine groups exposed on the fibril-surfaces. The lysine-rich surface chemistry was utilized to create a silica shell around the fibrils. The mineralization process of the fibrils results in a rigid, porous silica network that retains the microscale and nanoscale structure of the peptide fibril network. Structural characterization via Transmission Electron Microscopy, cryogenic-Scanning Electron Microscopy, mechanical characterization via oscillatory rheology, Small Angle X-ray and Neutron Scattering of the silicified hydrogels will be presented.

  4. Brain Peptides and Psychopharmacology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arehart-Treichel, Joan

    1976-01-01

    Proteins isolated from the brain and used as drugs can improve and apparently even transfer mental states and behavior. Much of the pioneering work and recent research with humans and animals is reviewed and crucial questions that are being posed about the psychologically active peptides are related. (BT)

  5. Peptide Nanofilament Engineering

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-31

    This laboratory studied four systems involving molecular self-assembly during this project period. Each system will open a new avenue of research in developing novel applications for use in biomedical engineering and materials science. These systems include self-assembling oligopeptides that form stable beta sheets in water, peptides that form inter- and

  6. Second extracellular loop of human glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) has a critical role in GLP-1 peptide binding and receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Koole, Cassandra; Wootten, Denise; Simms, John; Miller, Laurence J; Christopoulos, Arthur; Sexton, Patrick M

    2012-02-03

    The glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) is a therapeutically important family B G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) that is pleiotropically coupled to multiple signaling effectors and, with actions including regulation of insulin biosynthesis and secretion, is one of the key targets in the management of type II diabetes mellitus. However, there is limited understanding of the role of the receptor core in orthosteric ligand binding and biological activity. To assess involvement of the extracellular loop (ECL) 2 in ligand-receptor interactions and receptor activation, we performed alanine scanning mutagenesis of loop residues and assessed the impact on receptor expression and GLP-1(1-36)-NH(2) or GLP-1(7-36)-NH(2) binding and activation of three physiologically relevant signaling pathways as follows: cAMP formation, intracellular Ca(2+) (Ca(2+)(i)) mobilization, and phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (pERK1/2). Although antagonist peptide binding was unaltered, almost all mutations affected GLP-1 peptide agonist binding and/or coupling efficacy, indicating an important role in receptor activation. However, mutation of several residues displayed distinct pathway responses with respect to wild type receptor, including Arg-299 and Tyr-305, where mutation significantly enhanced both GLP-1(1-36)-NH(2)- and GLP-1(7-36)-NH(2)-mediated signaling bias for pERK1/2. In addition, mutation of Cys-296, Trp-297, Asn-300, Asn-302, and Leu-307 significantly increased GLP-1(7-36)-NH(2)-mediated signaling bias toward pERK1/2. Of all mutants studied, only mutation of Trp-306 to alanine abolished all biological activity. These data suggest a critical role of ECL2 of the GLP-1R in the activation transition(s) of the receptor and the importance of this region in the determination of both GLP-1 peptide- and pathway-specific effects.

  7. Bioinformatic identification of plant peptides.

    PubMed

    Lease, Kevin A; Walker, John C

    2010-01-01

    Plant peptides play a number of important roles in defence, development and many other aspects of plant physiology. Identifying additional peptide sequences provides the starting point to investigate their function using molecular, genetic or biochemical techniques. Due to their small size, identifying peptide sequences may not succeed using the default bioinformatic approaches that work well for average-sized proteins. There are two general scenarios related to bioinformatic identification of peptides to be discussed in this paper. In the first scenario, one already has the sequence of a plant peptide and is trying to find more plant peptides with some sequence similarity to the starting peptide. To do this, the Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST) is employed, with the parameters adjusted to be more favourable for identifying potential peptide matches. A second scenario involves trying to identify plant peptides without using sequence similarity searches to known plant peptides. In this approach, features such as protein size and the presence of a cleavable amino-terminal signal peptide are used to screen annotated proteins. A variation of this method can be used to screen for unannotated peptides from genomic sequences. Bioinformatic resources related to Arabidopsis thaliana will be used to illustrate these approaches.

  8. Biochemical functionalization of peptide nanotubes with phage displayed peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swaminathan, Swathi; Cui, Yue

    2016-09-01

    The development of a general approach for the biochemical functionalization of peptide nanotubes (PNTs) could open up existing opportunities in both fundamental studies as well as a variety of applications. PNTs are spontaneously assembled organic nanostructures made from peptides. Phage display has emerged as a powerful approach for identifying selective peptide binding motifs. Here, we demonstrate for the first time the biochemical functionalization of PNTs via peptides identified from a phage display peptide library. The phage-displayed peptides are shown to recognize PNTs. These advances further allow for the development of bifunctional peptides for the capture of bacteria and the self-assembly of silver particles onto PNTs. We anticipate that these results could provide significant opportunities for using PNTs in both fundamental studies and practical applications, including sensors and biosensors nanoelectronics, energy storage devices, drug delivery, and tissue engineering.

  9. The inhibitory effects of synthetic short peptides, mimicking MICA and targeting at NKG2D receptors, on function of NK cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bin; Wei, Haiming; Zheng, Xiaodong; Zhang, Jian; Sun, Rui; Tian, Zhigang

    2005-03-01

    NKG2D is an activating receptor expressed on most of human NK cells, one of whose ligands is MICA. Based on the crystal structure of NKG2D-MICA complex, we synthesized three short peptides (P1, P2 and P3), mimicking functional alpha1 and alpha2 domain of MICA. The inhibitory effects of three peptides on NK-92 cells, a human NK cell line against Hela cells were observed and the inhibitory percentage was 38% at maximum for P1+P2+P3 in concentration of 1nM. The same peptides had no effect on NK-92 cell against target cells lacking MICA (K562 cells line). The unrelated peptides as controls had no effect on the system. Two peptides (P2 and P3) were prolonged at one or both ends, and the longer forms of peptides exerted stronger inhibitory effects than their shorter forms. Each combination of two peptides exerted a stronger function than single peptide (P1, P2, P3), indicating that shedding of longer amino acid sequence of alpha1 domain or more domain sites of MICA are better than shorter sequence and fewer sites. P1+P2+P3 revealed the almost same inhibitory rate as the soluble MICA (sMICA). P1+P2+P3 were also able to alleviate the concanavalin A-induced murine autoimmune hepatitis in vivo, conforming the similarity of NKG2D between human and mice. The results demonstrate that MICA-mimicking peptides will be useful to search the specific functional sites for NKG2D-MICA interaction, but also promising in explaining NKG2D-related autoimmunity.

  10. A Peptide Filtering Relation Quantifies MHC Class I Peptide Optimization

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Leonard D.; Howarth, Mark; Cardelli, Luca; Emmott, Stephen; Elliott, Tim; Werner, Joern M.

    2011-01-01

    Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) class I molecules enable cytotoxic T lymphocytes to destroy virus-infected or cancerous cells, thereby preventing disease progression. MHC class I molecules provide a snapshot of the contents of a cell by binding to protein fragments arising from intracellular protein turnover and presenting these fragments at the cell surface. Competing fragments (peptides) are selected for cell-surface presentation on the basis of their ability to form a stable complex with MHC class I, by a process known as peptide optimization. A better understanding of the optimization process is important for our understanding of immunodominance, the predominance of some T lymphocyte specificities over others, which can determine the efficacy of an immune response, the danger of immune evasion, and the success of vaccination strategies. In this paper we present a dynamical systems model of peptide optimization by MHC class I. We incorporate the chaperone molecule tapasin, which has been shown to enhance peptide optimization to different extents for different MHC class I alleles. Using a combination of published and novel experimental data to parameterize the model, we arrive at a relation of peptide filtering, which quantifies peptide optimization as a function of peptide supply and peptide unbinding rates. From this relation, we find that tapasin enhances peptide unbinding to improve peptide optimization without significantly delaying the transit of MHC to the cell surface, and differences in peptide optimization across MHC class I alleles can be explained by allele-specific differences in peptide binding. Importantly, our filtering relation may be used to dynamically predict the cell surface abundance of any number of competing peptides by MHC class I alleles, providing a quantitative basis to investigate viral infection or disease at the cellular level. We exemplify this by simulating optimization of the distribution of peptides derived from Human

  11. Ginsenoside-Rg{sub 1} induces angiogenesis by the inverse regulation of MET tyrosine kinase receptor expression through miR-23a

    SciTech Connect

    Kwok, Hoi-Hin; Chan, Lai-Sheung; Poon, Po-Ying; Yue, Patrick Ying-Kit; Wong, Ricky Ngok-Shun

    2015-09-15

    Therapeutic angiogenesis has been implicated in ischemic diseases and wound healing. Ginsenoside-Rg{sub 1} (Rg{sub 1}), one of the most abundant active components of ginseng, has been demonstrated as an angiogenesis-stimulating compound in different models. There is increasing evidence implicating microRNAs (miRNAs), a group of non-coding RNAs, as important regulators of angiogenesis, but the role of microRNAs in Rg{sub 1}-induced angiogenesis has not been fully explored. In this report, we found that stimulating endothelial cells with Rg{sub 1} could reduce miR-23a expression. In silico experiments predicted hepatocyte growth factor receptor (MET), a well-established mediator of angiogenesis, as the target of miR-23a. Transfection of the miR-23a precursor or inhibitor oligonucleotides validated the inverse relationship of miR-23a and MET expression. Luciferase reporter assays further confirmed the interaction between miR-23a and the MET mRNA 3′-UTR. Intriguingly, ginsenoside-Rg{sub 1} was found to increase MET protein expression in a time-dependent manner. We further demonstrated that ginsenoside-Rg{sub 1}-induced angiogenic activities were indeed mediated through the down-regulation of miR-23a and subsequent up-regulation of MET protein expression, as confirmed by gain- and loss-of-function angiogenic experiments. In summary, our results demonstrated that ginsenoside-Rg{sub 1} could induce angiogenesis by the inverse regulation of MET tyrosine kinase receptor expression through miR-23a. This study has broadened our understanding of the non-genomic effects of ginsenoside-Rg{sub 1,} and provided molecular evidence that warrant further development of natural compound as novel angiogenesis-promoting therapy. - Highlights: • Therapeutic angiogenesis has been implicated in ischemic diseases and wound healing. • Ginsenoside-Rg{sub 1} (Rg{sub 1}) has been demonstrated as an angiogenesis-stimulating compound. • We found that Rg{sub 1} induces angiogenesis by

  12. Concepts for Biologically Active Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Kastin, Abba J.; Pan, Weihong

    2012-01-01

    Here we review a unique aspect of CNS research on biologically active peptides that started against a background of prevalent dogmas but ended by exerting considerable influence on the field. During the course of refuting some doctrines, we introduced several concepts that were unconventional and paradigm-shifting at the time. We showed that (1) hypothalamic peptides can act ‘up’ on the brain as well as ‘down’ on the pituitary, (2) peripheral peptides can affect the brain, (3) peptides can cross the blood-brain barrier, (4) the actions of peptides can persist longer than their half-lives in blood, (5) perinatal administration of peptides can exert actions persisting into adulthood, (6) a single peptide can have more than one action, (7) dose-response relationships of peptides need not be linear, (8) the brain produces antiopiate as well as opiate peptides, (9) there is a selective high affinity endogenous peptide ligand for the mu-opiate receptor, (10) a peptide’s name does not restrict its effects, and (11) astrocytes assume an active role in response to metabolic disturbance and hyperleptinemia. The evolving questions in our laboratories reflect the diligent effort of the neuropeptide community to identify the roles of peptides in the CNS. The next decade is expected to see greater progress in the following areas: (a) interactions of peptides with other molecules in the CNS; (b) peptide involvement in cell-cell interactions; and (c) peptides in neuropsychiatric, autoimmune, and neurodegenerative diseases. The development of peptidomics and gene silencing approaches will expedite the formation of many new concepts in a new era. PMID:20726835

  13. Peptide mass fingerprinting.

    PubMed

    Thiede, Bernd; Höhenwarter, Wolfgang; Krah, Alexander; Mattow, Jens; Schmid, Monika; Schmidt, Frank; Jungblut, Peter R

    2005-03-01

    Peptide mass fingerprinting by MALDI-MS and sequencing by tandem mass spectrometry have evolved into the major methods for identification of proteins following separation by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, SDS-PAGE or liquid chromatography. One main technological goal of proteome analyses beside high sensitivity and automation was the comprehensive analysis of proteins. Therefore, the protein species level with the essential information on co- and post-translational modifications must be achieved. The power of peptide mass fingerprinting for protein identification was described here, as exemplified by the identification of protein species with high molecular masses (spectrin alpha and beta), low molecular masses (elongation factor EF-TU fragments), splice variants (alpha A crystallin), aggregates with disulfide bridges (alkylhydroperoxide reductase), and phosphorylated proteins (heat shock protein 27). Helpful tools for these analyses were the use of the minimal protein identifier concept and the software program MS-Screener to remove mass peaks assignable to contaminants and neighbor spots.

  14. Identification of oligomerizing peptides.

    PubMed

    Dhiman, A; Rodgers, M E; Schleif, R

    2001-06-08

    The AraC DNA binding domain is inactive in a monomeric form but can activate transcription from the arabinose operon promoters upon its dimerization. We used this property to identify plasmids encoding peptide additions to the AraC DNA binding domain that could dimerize the domain. We generated a high diversity library of plasmids by inserting 90-base oligonucleotides of random sequence ahead of DNA coding for the AraC DNA binding domain in an expression vector, transforming, and selecting colonies containing functional oligomeric peptide-AraC DNA binding domain chimeric proteins by their growth on minimal arabinose medium. Six of seven Ara(+) candidates were partially characterized, and one was purified. Equilibrium analytical centrifugation experiments showed that it dimerizes with a dissociation constant of approximately 2 micrometer.

  15. Avian host defense peptides.

    PubMed

    Cuperus, Tryntsje; Coorens, Maarten; van Dijk, Albert; Haagsman, Henk P

    2013-11-01

    Host defense peptides (HDPs) are important effector molecules of the innate immune system of vertebrates. These antimicrobial peptides are also present in invertebrates, plants and fungi. HDPs display broad-spectrum antimicrobial activities and fulfill an important role in the first line of defense of many organisms. It is becoming increasingly clear that in the animal kingdom the functions of HDPs are not confined to direct antimicrobial actions. Research in mammals has indicated that HDPs have many immunomodulatory functions and are also involved in other physiological processes ranging from development to wound healing. During the past five years our knowledge about avian HDPs has increased considerably. This review addresses our current knowledge on the evolution, regulation and biological functions of HDPs of birds.

  16. Comparative mapping of the Grpr locus on the X chromosomes of man and mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Maslen, G.Ll.; Boyd, Y. )

    1993-07-01

    The gastrin-releasing peptide receptor has been previously cloned from both humans and mice. The authors have mapped the mouse gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (Grpr) locus using a polymorphic CA[sub n] repeat located in the 5[prime] untranslated region of the gene and a Mus spretus/Mus musculus interspecific backcross. The Grpr locus mapped between the Pdha-1 and Amg loci on the mouse X chromosome. Studies in man indicate that GRPR maps to the Xp21.2-p22.3 region of the human X chromosome and not to the Xp11-q11 interval as previously reported. The assignment of the GRPR locus to the distal Xp region is supported by the comparative map position in the mouse. 25 refs., 3 figs.

  17. Antimicrobial Peptides and Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Samantha; Pothoulakis, Charalabos; Koon, Hon Wai

    2013-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are important components of innate immunity. They are often expressed in response to colonic inflammation and infection. Over the last several years, the roles of several antimicrobial peptides have been explored. Gene expression of many AMPs (beta defensin HBD2-4 and cathelicidin) is induced in response to invasion of gut microbes into the mucosal barrier. Some AMPs are expressed in a constitutive manner (alpha defensin HD 5-6 and beta defensin HBD1), while others (defensin and bactericidal/permeability increasing protein BPI) are particularly associated with Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) due to altered defensin expression or development of autoantibodies against Bactericidal/permeability increasing protein (BPI). Various AMPs have different spectrum and strength of antimicrobial effects. Some may play important roles in modulating the colitis (cathelicidin) while others (lactoferrin, hepcidin) may represent biomarkers of disease activity. The use of AMPs for therapeutic purposes is still at an early stage of development. A few natural AMPs were shown to be able to modulate colitis when delivered intravenously or intracolonically (cathelicidin, elafin and SLPI) in mouse colitis models. New AMPs (synthetic or artificial non-human peptides) are being developed and may represent new therapeutic approaches against colitis. This review discusses the latest research developments in the AMP field with emphasis in innate immunity and pathophysiology of colitis. PMID:22950497

  18. Hormone Receptor Expression Analyses in Neoplastic and Non-Neoplastic Canine Mammary Tissue by a Bead Based Multiplex Branched DNA Assay: A Gene Expression Study in Fresh Frozen and Formalin-Fixed, Paraffin-Embedded Samples

    PubMed Central

    Mohr, Annika; Lüder Ripoli, Florenza; Hammer, Susanne Conradine; Willenbrock, Saskia; Hewicker-Trautwein, Marion; Kiełbowicz, Zdzisław; Murua Escobar, Hugo; Nolte, Ingo

    2016-01-01

    Immunohistochemistry (IHC) is currently considered the method of choice for steroid hormone receptor status evaluation in human breast cancer and, therefore, it is commonly utilized for assessing canine mammary tumors. In case of low hormone receptor expression, IHC is limited and thus is complemented by molecular analyses. In the present study, a multiplex bDNA assay was evaluated as a method for hormone receptor gene expression detection in canine mammary tissues. Estrogen receptor (ESR1), progesterone receptor (PGR), prolactin receptor (PRLR) and growth hormone receptor (GHR) gene expressions were evaluated in neoplastic and non-neoplastic canine mammary tissues. A set of 119 fresh frozen and 180 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) was comparatively analyzed and used for assay evaluation. Furthermore, a possible association between the hormone receptor expression in different histological subtypes of canine malignant mammary tumors and the castration status, breed and invasive growth of the tumor were analyzed. The multiplex bDNA assay proved to be more sensitive for fresh frozen specimens. Hormone receptor expression found was significantly decreased in malignant mammary tumors in comparison to non-neoplastic tissue and benign mammary tumors. Among the histological subtypes the lowest gene expression levels of ESR1, PGR and PRLR were found in solid, anaplastic and ductal carcinomas. In summary, the evaluation showed that the measurement of hormone receptors with the multiplex bDNA assay represents a practicable method for obtaining detailed quantitative information about gene expression in canine mammary tissue for future studies. Still, comparison with IHC or quantitative real-time PCR is needed for further validation of the present method. PMID:27649560

  19. [Hydrolysis of peptides by immobilized bacterial peptide hydrolases].

    PubMed

    Nekliudov, A D; Deniakina, E K

    2004-01-01

    The feasibility of hydrolysis of a mixture of peptides with an enzyme from the bacterium Xanthomonas rubrilineans, displaying a peptidase activity and immobilized on aluminum oxide, was studied. Kinetic schemes and equations allowing for approaching quantitative description of peptide hydrolysis in complex mixtures containing free amino acids and peptides were obtained. It was demonstrated that as a result of hydrolysis, the content of free amino acids in hydrolysates decreased 2.5- to 3-fold and the molecular weight of the constituent peptides, 2-fold.

  20. Development of a Tetrathioether (S4) Bifunctional Chelate System for Rh-105

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-01

    bombesin (BBN) targeting vector. Bombesin targets gastrin releasing peptide (GRP) receptors, which have been shown to be over-expressed on the surface of...prostate cancer cells. Here we report the successful synthesis and characterization of a bombesin agonist coupled tetrathioether (S4) bifunctional...1: Synthesis of bombesin (7-14) coupled tetrathioether bifunctional chelate 1a: Synthesize dicarboxylic acid functionalized ligand 3,3,3-S4-(COOH)2

  1. Macrocyclization of Unprotected Peptide Isocyanates.

    PubMed

    Vinogradov, Alexander A; Choo, Zi-Ning; Totaro, Kyle A; Pentelute, Bradley L

    2016-03-18

    A chemistry for the facile two-component macrocyclization of unprotected peptide isocyanates is described. Starting from peptides containing two glutamic acid γ-hydrazide residues, isocyanates can be readily accessed and cyclized with hydrazides of dicarboxylic acids. The choice of a nucleophilic linker allows for the facile modulation of biochemical properties of a macrocyclic peptide. Four cyclic NYAD-1 analogues were synthesized using the described method and displayed a range of biological activities.

  2. Biodiscovery of Aluminum Binding Peptides

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-01

    display scaffold hosted by a phage (virus), bacteria, or yeast cell. This allows the selfsustaining peptide libraries to be rapidly screened for high...scaffold hosted by a phage (virus), bacteria, or yeast cell. This allows the self- sustaining peptide libraries to be rapidly screened for high...removal. An eCPX peptide display library was grown and induced as described in the paragraph above. After rinsing samples briefly in PBS, the aluminum

  3. Recent improvements in the use of synthetic peptides for a selective photodynamic therapy.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Raphaël; Tirand, Loraine; Frochot, Céline; Vanderesse, Régis; Thomas, Noémie; Gravier, Julien; Guillemin, François; Barberi-Heyob, Muriel

    2006-09-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a relatively new cytotoxic treatment, predominantly used in anti-cancer approaches, that depends on the retention of photosensitizers in tumor and their activation after light exposure. Photosensitizers are photoactive compounds such as porphyrins and chlorins that upon photoactivation, effect strongly localized oxidative damage within the target cells. The ability to confine activation of the photosensitizer by restricting illumination to the tumor allows for a certain degree of selectivity. Nevertheless, the targeted delivery of photosensitizers to defined cells is a major problem in PDT of cancer, and one area of importance is photosensitizer targeting. Alterations or increased levels in receptor expression of specific cellular type occur in the diseased tissues. Therefore, photosensitizers can be covalently attached to molecules such as peptides, leading to a receptor-mediated targeting strategy. These active-targeting approaches may be particularly useful for anti-vascular PDT. Moreover, it has been shown that the photocytotoxicity of photodynamic drugs could be enhanced by delivering high amounts of a photosensitizer into subcellular organelles such as the nucleus where nucleic acids represent target molecules sensitive to photodamage. The recent progresses in the use of active-targeting strategy with synthetic peptides and the interest of using an active-targeting strategy in PDT, which could allow efficient cellular internalization of photosensitizers, are described in this review.

  4. Expression and potential role of the peptide orexin-A in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Valiante, Salvatore; Liguori, Giovanna; Tafuri, Simona; Pavone, Luigi Michele; Campese, Roberto; Monaco, Roberto; Iachetta, Giuseppina; Assisi, Loredana; Mirabella, Nicola; Forte, Maurizio; Costagliola, Anna; Vittoria, Alfredo

    2015-09-04

    The peptides orexin-A and orexin-B and their G protein-coupled OX1 and OX2 receptors are involved in multiple physiological processes in the central nervous system and peripheral organs. Altered expression or signaling dysregulation of orexins and their receptors have been associated with a wide range of human diseases including narcolepsy, obesity, drug addiction, and cancer. Although orexin-A, its precursor molecule prepro-orexin and OX1 receptor have been detected in the human normal and hyperplastic prostate tissues, their expression and function in the prostate cancer (PCa) remains to be addressed. Here, we demonstrate for the first time the immunohistochemical localization of orexin-A in human PCa specimens, and the expression of prepro-orexin and OX1 receptor at both protein and mRNA levels in these tissues. Orexin-A administration to the human androgen-dependent prostate carcinoma cells LNCaP up-regulates OX1 receptor expression resulting in a decrease of cell survival. Noteworthy, nanomolar concentrations of the peptide counteract the testosterone-induced nuclear translocation of the androgen receptor in the cells: the orexin-A action is prevented by the addition of the OX1 receptor antagonist SB-408124 to the test system. These findings indicate that orexin-A/OX1 receptor interaction interferes with the activity of the androgen receptor which regulates PCa onset and progression, thus suggesting that orexin-A and its receptor might represent novel therapeutic targets to challenge this aggressive cancer.

  5. Improving Peptide Applications Using Nanotechnology.

    PubMed

    Narayanaswamy, Radhika; Wang, Tao; Torchilin, Vladimir P

    2016-01-01

    Peptides are being successfully used in various fields including therapy and drug delivery. With advancement in nanotechnology and targeted delivery carrier systems, suitable modification of peptides has enabled achievement of many desirable goals over-riding some of the major disadvantages associated with the delivery of peptides in vivo. Conjugation or physical encapsulation of peptides to various nanocarriers, such as liposomes, micelles and solid-lipid nanoparticles, has improved their in vivo performance multi-fold. The amenability of peptides to modification in chemistry and functionalization with suitable nanocarriers are very relevant aspects in their use and have led to the use of 'smart' nanoparticles with suitable linker chemistries that favor peptide targeting or release at the desired sites, minimizing off-target effects. This review focuses on how nanotechnology has been used to improve the number of peptide applications. The paper also focuses on the chemistry behind peptide conjugation to nanocarriers, the commonly employed linker chemistries and the several improvements that have already been achieved in the areas of peptide use with the help of nanotechnology.

  6. Biodiscovery of aluminum binding peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Bryn L.; Sarkes, Deborah A.; Finch, Amethist S.; Hurley, Margaret M.; Stratis-Cullum, Dimitra

    2013-05-01

    Cell surface peptide display systems are large and diverse libraries of peptides (7-15 amino acids) which are presented by a display scaffold hosted by a phage (virus), bacteria, or yeast cell. This allows the selfsustaining peptide libraries to be rapidly screened for high affinity binders to a given target of interest, and those binders quickly identified. Peptide display systems have traditionally been utilized in conjunction with organic-based targets, such as protein toxins or carbon nanotubes. However, this technology has been expanded for use with inorganic targets, such as metals, for biofabrication, hybrid material assembly and corrosion prevention. While most current peptide display systems employ viruses to host the display scaffold, we have recently shown that a bacterial host, Escherichia coli, displaying peptides in the ubiquitous, membrane protein scaffold eCPX can also provide specific peptide binders to an organic target. We have, for the first time, extended the use of this bacterial peptide display system for the biodiscovery of aluminum binding 15mer peptides. We will present the process of biopanning with macroscopic inorganic targets, binder enrichment, and binder isolation and discovery.

  7. Peptides that influence membrane topology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Gerard C. L.

    2014-03-01

    We examine the mechanism of a range of polypeptides that influence membrane topology, including antimicrobial peptides, cell penetrating peptides, viral fusion peptides, and apoptosis proteins, and show how a combination of geometry, coordination chemistry, and soft matter physics can be used to approach a unified understanding. We will also show how such peptides can impact biomedical problems such as auto-immune diseases (psoriasis, lupus), infectious diseases (viral and bacterial infections), and mitochondrial pathologies (under-regulated apoptosis leads to neurodegenerative diseases whereas over-regulated apoptosis leads to cancer.)

  8. Antitumor Peptides from Marine Organisms

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Lan-Hong; Wang, Yue-Jun; Sheng, Jun; Wang, Fang; Zheng, Yuan; Lin, Xiu-Kun; Sun, Mi

    2011-01-01

    The biodiversity of the marine environment and the associated chemical diversity constitute a practically unlimited resource of new antitumor agents in the field of the development of marine bioactive substances. In this review, the progress on studies of antitumor peptides from marine sources is provided. The biological properties and mechanisms of action of different marine peptides are described; information about their molecular diversity is also presented. Novel peptides that induce apoptosis signal pathway, affect the tubulin-microtubule equilibrium and inhibit angiogenesis are presented in association with their pharmacological properties. It is intended to provide useful information for further research in the fields of marine antitumor peptides. PMID:22072999

  9. The PeptideAtlas Project.

    PubMed

    Deutsch, Eric W

    2010-01-01

    PeptideAtlas is a multi-species compendium of peptides observed with tandem mass spectrometry methods. Raw mass spectrometer output files are collected from the community and reprocessed through a uniform analysis and validation pipeline that continues to advance. The results are loaded into a database and the information derived from the raw data is returned to the community via several web-based data exploration tools. The PeptideAtlas resource is useful for experiment planning, improving genome annotation, and other data mining projects. PeptideAtlas has become especially useful for planning targeted proteomics experiments.

  10. Antitumor peptides from marine organisms.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Lan-Hong; Wang, Yue-Jun; Sheng, Jun; Wang, Fang; Zheng, Yuan; Lin, Xiu-Kun; Sun, Mi

    2011-01-01

    The biodiversity of the marine environment and the associated chemical diversity constitute a practically unlimited resource of new antitumor agents in the field of the development of marine bioactive substances. In this review, the progress on studies of antitumor peptides from marine sources is provided. The biological properties and mechanisms of action of different marine peptides are described; information about their molecular diversity is also presented. Novel peptides that induce apoptosis signal pathway, affect the tubulin-microtubule equilibrium and inhibit angiogenesis are presented in association with their pharmacological properties. It is intended to provide useful information for further research in the fields of marine antitumor peptides.

  11. Peptides and food intake.

    PubMed

    Sobrino Crespo, Carmen; Perianes Cachero, Aránzazu; Puebla Jiménez, Lilian; Barrios, Vicente; Arilla Ferreiro, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms for controlling food intake involve mainly an interplay between gut, brain, and adipose tissue (AT), among the major organs. Parasympathetic, sympathetic, and other systems are required for communication between the brain satiety center, gut, and AT. These neuronal circuits include a variety of peptides and hormones, being ghrelin the only orexigenic molecule known, whereas the plethora of other factors are inhibitors of appetite, suggesting its physiological relevance in the regulation of food intake and energy homeostasis. Nutrients generated by food digestion have been proposed to activate G-protein-coupled receptors on the luminal side of enteroendocrine cells, e.g., the L-cells. This stimulates the release of gut hormones into the circulation such as glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), oxyntomodulin, pancreatic polypeptides, peptide tyrosine tyrosine, and cholecystokinin, which inhibit appetite. Ghrelin is a peptide secreted from the stomach and, in contrast to other gut hormones, plasma levels decrease after a meal and potently stimulate food intake. Other circulating factors such as insulin and leptin relay information regarding long-term energy stores. Both hormones circulate at proportional levels to body fat content, enter the CNS proportionally to their plasma levels, and reduce food intake. Circulating hormones can influence the activity of the arcuate nucleus (ARC) neurons of the hypothalamus, after passing across the median eminence. Circulating factors such as gut hormones may also influence the nucleus of the tractus solitarius (NTS) through the adjacent circumventricular organ. On the other hand, gastrointestinal vagal afferents converge in the NTS of the brainstem. Neural projections from the NTS, in turn, carry signals to the hypothalamus. The ARC acts as an integrative center, with two major subpopulations of neurons influencing appetite, one of them coexpressing neuropeptide Y and agouti-related protein (AgRP) that increases food

  12. Peptide Amyloid Surface Display

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Homomeric self-assembly of peptides into amyloid fibers is a feature of many diseases. A central role has been suggested for the lateral fiber surface affecting gains of toxic function. To investigate this, a protein scaffold that presents a discrete, parallel β-sheet surface for amyloid subdomains up to eight residues in length has been designed. Scaffolds that present the fiber surface of islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP) were prepared. The designs show sequence-specific surface effects apparent in that they gain the capacity to attenuate rates of IAPP self-assembly in solution and affect IAPP-induced toxicity in insulin-secreting cells. PMID:25541905

  13. Plant antimicrobial peptides.

    PubMed

    Nawrot, Robert; Barylski, Jakub; Nowicki, Grzegorz; Broniarczyk, Justyna; Buchwald, Waldemar; Goździcka-Józefiak, Anna

    2014-05-01

    Plant antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are a component of barrier defense system of plants. They have been isolated from roots, seeds, flowers, stems, and leaves of a wide variety of species and have activities towards phytopathogens, as well as against bacteria pathogenic to humans. Thus, plant AMPs are considered as promising antibiotic compounds with important biotechnological applications. Plant AMPs are grouped into several families and share general features such as positive charge, the presence of disulfide bonds (which stabilize the structure), and the mechanism of action targeting outer membrane structures.

  14. Peptides and Food Intake

    PubMed Central

    Sobrino Crespo, Carmen; Perianes Cachero, Aránzazu; Puebla Jiménez, Lilian; Barrios, Vicente; Arilla Ferreiro, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms for controlling food intake involve mainly an interplay between gut, brain, and adipose tissue (AT), among the major organs. Parasympathetic, sympathetic, and other systems are required for communication between the brain satiety center, gut, and AT. These neuronal circuits include a variety of peptides and hormones, being ghrelin the only orexigenic molecule known, whereas the plethora of other factors are inhibitors of appetite, suggesting its physiological relevance in the regulation of food intake and energy homeostasis. Nutrients generated by food digestion have been proposed to activate G-protein-coupled receptors on the luminal side of enteroendocrine cells, e.g., the L-cells. This stimulates the release of gut hormones into the circulation such as glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), oxyntomodulin, pancreatic polypeptides, peptide tyrosine tyrosine, and cholecystokinin, which inhibit appetite. Ghrelin is a peptide secreted from the stomach and, in contrast to other gut hormones, plasma levels decrease after a meal and potently stimulate food intake. Other circulating factors such as insulin and leptin relay information regarding long-term energy stores. Both hormones circulate at proportional levels to body fat content, enter the CNS proportionally to their plasma levels, and reduce food intake. Circulating hormones can influence the activity of the arcuate nucleus (ARC) neurons of the hypothalamus, after passing across the median eminence. Circulating factors such as gut hormones may also influence the nucleus of the tractus solitarius (NTS) through the adjacent circumventricular organ. On the other hand, gastrointestinal vagal afferents converge in the NTS of the brainstem. Neural projections from the NTS, in turn, carry signals to the hypothalamus. The ARC acts as an integrative center, with two major subpopulations of neurons influencing appetite, one of them coexpressing neuropeptide Y and agouti-related protein (AgRP) that increases food

  15. Recognition of Bacterial Signal Peptides by Mammalian Formyl Peptide Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Bufe, Bernd; Schumann, Timo; Kappl, Reinhard; Bogeski, Ivan; Kummerow, Carsten; Podgórska, Marta; Smola, Sigrun; Hoth, Markus; Zufall, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Formyl peptide receptors (FPRs) are G-protein-coupled receptors that function as chemoattractant receptors in innate immune responses. Here we perform systematic structure-function analyses of FPRs from six mammalian species using structurally diverse FPR peptide agonists and identify a common set of conserved agonist properties with typical features of pathogen-associated molecular patterns. Guided by these results, we discover that bacterial signal peptides, normally used to translocate proteins across cytoplasmic membranes, are a vast family of natural FPR agonists. N-terminally formylated signal peptide fragments with variable sequence and length activate human and mouse FPR1 and FPR2 at low nanomolar concentrations, thus establishing FPR1 and FPR2 as sensitive and broad signal peptide receptors. The vomeronasal receptor mFpr-rs1 and its sequence orthologue hFPR3 also react to signal peptides but are much more narrowly tuned in signal peptide recognition. Furthermore, all signal peptides examined here function as potent activators of the innate immune system. They elicit robust, FPR-dependent calcium mobilization in human and mouse leukocytes and trigger a range of classical innate defense mechanisms, such as the production of reactive oxygen species, metalloprotease release, and chemotaxis. Thus, bacterial signal peptides constitute a novel class of immune activators that are likely to contribute to mammalian immune defense against bacteria. This evolutionarily conserved detection mechanism combines structural promiscuity with high specificity and enables discrimination between bacterial and eukaryotic signal sequences. With at least 175,542 predicted sequences, bacterial signal peptides represent the largest and structurally most heterogeneous class of G-protein-coupled receptor agonists currently known for the innate immune system. PMID:25605714

  16. Clinical uses of gut peptides.

    PubMed Central

    Geoghegan, J; Pappas, T N

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The authors review clinical applications of gut-derived peptides as diagnostic and therapeutic agents. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: An increasing number of gut peptides have been evaluated for clinical use. Earlier uses as diagnostic agents have been complemented more recently by increasing application of gut peptides as therapeutic agents. METHOD: The authors conducted a literature review. RESULTS: Current experience with clinical use of gut peptides is described. Initial clinical applications focused on using secretomotor effects of gut peptides in diagnostic tests, many of which have now fallen into disuse. More recently, attention has been directed toward harnessing these secretomotor effects for therapeutic use in a variety of disorders, and also using the trophic effects of gut peptides to modulate gut mucosal growth in benign and malignant disease. Gut peptides have been evaluated in a variety of other clinical situations including use as adjuncts to imaging techniques, and modification of behaviors such as feeding and panic disorder. CONCLUSIONS: Gut peptides have been used successfully in an increasing variety of clinical conditions. Further refinements in analogue and antagonist design are likely to lead to even more selective agents that may have important clinical applications. Further studies are needed to identity and evaluate these new agents. PMID:9065291

  17. Urinary Peptides in Rett Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solaas, K. M.; Skjeldal, O.; Gardner, M. L. G.; Kase, B. F.; Reichelt, K. L.

    2002-01-01

    A study found a significantly higher level of peptides in the urine of 53 girls with Rett syndrome compared with controls. The elevation was similar to that in 35 girls with infantile autism. Levels of peptides were lower in girls with classic Rett syndrome than those with congenital Rett syndrome. (Contains references.) (Author/CR)

  18. Bioactive peptides derived from food.

    PubMed

    Rutherfurd-Markwick, Kay J; Moughan, Paul J

    2005-01-01

    As interest in the ability of functional foods to impact on human health has grown over the past decade, so has the volume of knowledge detailing the beneficial roles of food-derived bioactive peptides. Bioactive peptides from both plant and animal proteins have been discovered, with to date, by far the most being isolated from milk-based products. A wide range of activities has been described, including antimicrobial and antifungal properties, blood pressure-lowering effects, cholesterol-lowering ability, antithrombotic effects, enhancement of mineral absorption, immunomodulatory effects, and localized effects on the gut. Although there is still considerable research to be performed in the area of food-derived bioactive peptides, it is clear that the generation of bioactive peptides from dietary proteins during the normal digestive process is of importance. Therefore, it will become necessary when determining dietary protein quality to consider the potential effects of latent bioactive peptides that are released during digestion of the protein.

  19. Microscopic characterization of peptide nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Mammadov, Rashad; Tekinay, Ayse B; Dana, Aykutlu; Guler, Mustafa O

    2012-02-01

    Peptide-based nanomaterials have been utilized for various applications from regenerative medicine to electronics since they provide several advantages including easy synthesis methods, numerous routes for functionalization and biomimicry of secondary structures of proteins which leads to design of self-assembling peptide molecules to form nanostructures. Microscopic characterization at nanoscale is critical to understand processes directing peptide molecules to self-assemble and identify structure-function relationship of the nanostructures. Here, fundamental studies in microscopic characterization of peptide nanostructures are discussed to provide insights in widely used microscopy tools. In this review, we will encompass characterization studies of peptide nanostructures with modern microscopes, such as TEM, SEM, AFM, and advanced optical microscopy techniques. We will also mention specimen preparation methods and describe interpretation of the images.

  20. Endogenous expression and in vitro study of CRF-related peptides and CRF receptors in the rat gastric antrum.

    PubMed

    Porcher, Christophe; Peinnequin, André; Pellissier, Sonia; Meregnani, Julien; Sinniger, Valérie; Canini, Frédéric; Bonaz, Bruno

    2006-06-01

    In vivo studies suggest that corticotrophin-releasing factor (CRF) and CRF-like peptides, urocortin 1 (UCN 1) and UCN 2, inhibit gastric emptying and stimulate colonic motility through CRF2 and CRF1 receptors, respectively. We evaluated expression and functions of CRF, UCN 1, UCN 2 and CRF1 and CRF2 receptors in the rat gastric antrum. Tissues were processed for immunohistochemistry and real-time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). In vitro studies were performed to test the functional significance of CRF, UCN 1 and UCN 2. Some experiments were realized in the presence of specific CRF1 or CRF2 receptors antagonists. CRF1 and CRF2 receptors-like immunoreactivity (CRF1 and CRF2 receptors-LI) was localized in fibers and neurons of the myenteric ganglia. CRF1 and CRF2 receptors-LI was also found in nerve fibers distributed in the muscle layers. CRF- and UCN 1-LI was observed in neuronal cell bodies of the myenteric ganglia and in numerous nerve fibers running parallel to smooth muscle cells. Quantitative RT-PCR demonstrated UCN 2, CRF1 and CRF2 receptors expressions in both muscle layers and mucosa of the gastric antrum. Functional studies showed that CRF, UCN 1 and UCN 2 decreased antral phasic contractions. CRF(1) receptor antagonist (CP-154,526) did not block CRF-like peptides-induced inhibition of antral motility. In contrast, a CRF2 receptor antagonist (Astressin2-B) blocked the effects of CRF-like peptides on the antral muscle contractions. These results demonstrate (1) the presence of CRF, UCN and CRF1 and CRF2 receptors in the rat gastric antrum; (2) that, in vitro, CRF-like peptides inhibit phasic contractions of the antrum through CRF2 receptor. These results strongly suggest that CRF-like peptides play a major role in the regulatory mechanisms that underlie the neural control of gastric motility through CRF2 receptor.

  1. Asymmetric Peptide Nanoribbons.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhilin; Tantakitti, Faifan; Palmer, Liam C; Stupp, Samuel I

    2016-11-09

    Asymmetry in chemical structure or shape at molecular, nanoscale, or microscopic levels is essential to a vast number of functionalities in both natural and artificial systems. Bottom-up approaches to create asymmetric supramolecular nanostructures are considered promising but this strategy suffers from the potentially dynamic nature of noncovalent interactions. We report here on supramolecular self-assembly of asymmetric peptide amphiphiles consisting of two different molecularly linked domains. We found that strong noncovalent interactions and a high degree of internal order among the asymmetric amphiphiles lead to nanoribbons with asymmetric faces due to the preferential self-association of the two domains. The capture of gold nanoparticles on only one face of the nanoribbons demonstrates symmetry breaking in these supramolecular structures.

  2. Antimicrobial peptides: therapeutic potentials.

    PubMed

    Kang, Su-Jin; Park, Sung Jean; Mishig-Ochir, Tsogbadrakh; Lee, Bong-Jin

    2014-12-01

    The increasing appearance of multidrug-resistant pathogens has created an urgent need for suitable alternatives to current antibiotics. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), which act as defensive weapons against microbes, have received great attention because of broad-spectrum activities, unique action mechanisms and rare antibiotic-resistant variants. Despite desirable characteristics, they have shown limitations in pharmaceutical development due to toxicity, stability and manufacturing costs. Because of these drawbacks, only a few AMPs have been tested in Phase III clinical trials and no AMPs have been approved by the US FDA yet. However, these obstacles could be overcome by well-known methods such as changing physicochemical characteristics and introducing nonnatural amino acids, acetylation or amidation, as well as modern techniques like molecular targeted AMPs, liposomal formulations and drug delivery systems. Thus, the current challenge in this field is to develop therapeutic AMPs at a reasonable cost as well as to overcome the limitations.

  3. Peptide-formation on cysteine-containing peptide scaffolds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, B. C.; Orgel, L. E.

    1999-01-01

    Monomeric cysteine residues attached to cysteine-containing peptides by disulfide bonds can be activated by carbonyldiimidazole. If two monomeric cysteine residues, attached to a 'scaffold' peptide Gly-Cys-Glyn-Cys-Glu10, (n = 0, 1, 2, 3) are activated, they react to form the dipeptide Cys-Cys. in 25-65% yield. Similarly, the activation of a cysteine residue attached to the 'scaffold' peptide Gly-Cys-Gly-Glu10 in the presence of Arg5 leads to the formation of Cys-Arg5 in 50% yield. The significance of these results for prebiotic chemistry is discussed.

  4. Epimerization in peptide thioester condensation.

    PubMed

    Teruya, Kenta; Tanaka, Takeyuki; Kawakami, Toru; Akaji, Kenichi; Aimoto, Saburo

    2012-11-01

    Peptide segment couplings are now widely utilized in protein chemical synthesis. One of the key structures for the strategy is the peptide thioester. Peptide thioester condensation, in which a C-terminal peptide thioester is selectively activated by silver ions then condensed with an amino component, is a powerful tool. But the amino acid adjacent to the thioester is at risk of epimerization. During the preparation of peptide thioesters by the Boc solid-phase method, no substantial epimerization of the C-terminal amino acid was detected. Epimerization was, however, observed during a thioester-thiol exchange reaction and segment condensation in DMSO in the presence of a base. In contrast, thioester-thiol exchange reactions in aqueous solutions gave no epimerization. The epimerization during segment condensation was significantly suppressed with a less polar solvent that is applicable to segments in thioester peptide condensation. These results were applied to a longer peptide thioester condensation. The epimer content of the coupling product of 89 residues was reduced from 27% to 6% in a condensation between segments of 45 and 44 residues for the thioester and the amino component, respectively.

  5. Interleukin-6 and interleukin-6 receptor expression, localization, and involvement in pain-sensing neuron activation in a mouse intervertebral disc injury model.

    PubMed

    Sainoh, Takeshi; Orita, Sumihisa; Miyagi, Masayuki; Sakuma, Yoshihiro; Yamauchi, Kazuyo; Suzuki, Miyako; Kubota, Go; Oikawa, Yasuhiro; Inage, Kazuhide; Sato, Jun; Fujimoto, Kazuki; Shiga, Yasuhiro; Inoue, Gen; Aoki, Yasuchika; Takahashi, Kazuhisa; Ohtori, Seiji

    2015-10-01

    The pathological mechanism of intractable low back pain is unclear. However, intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration is a primary cause of low back pain, and pain-related mediators, such as interleukin-6 (IL-6), have been correlated with discogenic pain. The objective of this study is to elucidate the mechanism of local IL-6 and IL-6 receptor (IL-6R) expression after IVD injury as well as determine the involvement of IL-6/IL-6 signaling in discogenic pain. To do this, quantitative and immunohistological analyses in a mouse model of IVD injury were performed. Firstly, we measured the local expression levels of IL-6 and IL-6R in IVDs by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Secondly, we immunohistochemically confirmed their localization in injured IVDs. Lastly, we evaluated the effects of intradiscal injection of an IL-6 inhibitor by evaluating pain-related protein, calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), expression in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons that innervate IVDs. Injured IVDs showed increased production of IL-6 and IL-6R. IL-6 and IL-6R expression in the injured IVD were predominantly localized in the annulus fibrosus and endplate, and intradiscal injection of the IL-6 inhibitor suppressed CGRP expression in the DRG neurons. These results show that IL-6 and IL-6R expression levels are responsive to IVD injury and that inhibition of IL-6/IL-6R signaling may be a promising analgesic treatment for degenerative disc diseases.

  6. Blocking triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-1 attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury via inhibiting NLRP3 inflammasome activation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tian; Zhou, Yong; Li, Ping; Duan, Jia-Xi; Liu, Yong-Ping; Sun, Guo-Ying; Wan, Li; Dong, Liang; Fang, Xiang; Jiang, Jian-Xin; Guan, Cha-Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is associated with high mortality and uncontrolled inflammation plays a critical role in ALI. TREM-1 is an amplifier of inflammatory response, and is involved in the pathogenesis of many infectious diseases. NLRP3 inflammasome is a member of NLRs family that contributes to ALI. However, the effect of TREM-1 on NLRP3 inflammasome and ALI is still unknown. This study aimed to determine the effect of TREM-1 modulation on LPS-induced ALI and activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome. We showed that LR12, a TREM-1 antagonist peptide, significantly improved survival of mice after lethal doses of LPS. LR12 also attenuated inflammation and lung tissue damage by reducing histopathologic changes, infiltration of the macrophage and neutrophil into the lung, and production of the pro-inflammatory cytokine, and oxidative stress. LR12 decreased expression of the NLRP3, pro-caspase-1 and pro-IL-1β, and inhibited priming of the NLRP3 inflammasome by inhibiting NF-κB. LR12 also reduced the expression of NLRP3 and caspase-1 p10 protein, and secretion of the IL-1β, inhibited activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome by decreasing ROS. For the first time, these data show that TREM-1 aggravates inflammation in ALI by activating NLRP3 inflammasome, and blocking TREM-1 may be a potential therapeutic approach for ALI. PMID:28004759

  7. A human apolipoprotein E mimetic peptide reduces atherosclerosis in aged apolipoprotein E null mice

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yanyong; Liu, Hongmei; Liu, Mengting; Li, Feifei; Liu, Liangchen; Du, Fen; Fan, Daping; Yu, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Apolipoprotein E (apoE) is well known as an antiatherogenic protein via regulating lipid metabolism and inflammation. We previously reported that a human apoE mimetic peptide, EpK, reduced atherosclerosis in apoE null (apoE-/-) mice through reducing inflammation without affecting plasma lipid levels. Here, we construct another human apoE mimetic peptide, named hEp, and investigate whether expression of hEp can reduce atherosclerotic lesion development in aged female apoE-/- mice with pre-existing lesions. We found that chemically synthesized hEp significantly decreased cholesterol accumulation induced by oxidized low density lipoprotein and the expression of inflammatory cytokines TNFα and IL-6 induced by lipopolysaccharide in macrophages. In an in vivo study, Lv-hEp-GFP lentiviruses were intravenously injected into 9 month-old apoE-/- mice. Mice were then fed a chow diet for 18 weeks. Results showed that in comparison to the Lv-GFP lentivirus injection (Lv-GFP) group, Lv-hEp-GFP lentivirus injection achieved hepatic hEp expression and secretion in apoE-/- mice. It was observed that hEp expression significantly reduced plasma VLDL and LDL cholesterol levels and decreased aortic atherosclerotic lesions. This was accompanied by an increase of LDL receptor expression and a reduction of TNFα and IL-6 mRNA levels in the liver. Moreover, expression of hEp increased plasma paraoxonase-1 activity and decreased plasma myeloperoxidase activity and serum amyloid A levels. Our study provides evidence that hEp may be developed as a promising therapeutic apoE mimetic peptide for atherosclerosis-related cardiovascular diseases through its induction of plasma VLDL/LDL cholesterol clearance as well as its anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory activities. PMID:27648138

  8. Multidimensional peptide separations in proteomics.

    PubMed

    Link, Andrew J

    2002-12-01

    Multidimensional peptide separation will play an increasingly important role in the drive to identify and quantitate the proteome. By increasing the peak and load capacity, multidimensional approaches increase the number and dynamic range of peptides that can be analyzed in a complex biological organism. Separation methods using different physical properties of peptides have been combined with varying degrees of success. The ultimate goal is a rapid separation strategy that can be coupled with analytical methods, such as mass spectrometry, to provide comprehensive monitoring of the changing concentration, interactions, and structures of proteins in the proteome.

  9. Early peptidic enzymes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brack, André; Barbier, Bernard

    Oligopeptides supposed to be essential to primitive living cells could not be obtained by a prebiotic organic chemistry working mainly at random. Selection pathways were required. Experimental evidence is given for selective condensation of amino-acids in water as well as for selective resistance to degradation. Polycationic polypeptides containing lysyl (or arginyl) and hydrophobic residues strongly accelerate the hydrolysis of oligoribonucleotides. A ionic complex is first formed and the polypeptides are particularly active when they adopt a stable conformation, β-sheet or α-helix, in the complex. Well-defined short peptides were synthesized in order to determine the critical chain-length required for chemical activity. In a contemporary cell, proteins represent about 40 % of the dry weight. They fulfil a structural role and they are particularly helpful as chemical catalysts (enzymes). They can be represented as long chains made of twenty different building blocks, the amino-acids NH2-CHR-COOH, which differ by the side-chain R. Proteins are remarkable in the sense that they use amino-acids having only one carbon atom between the -NH2 and -COOH functions. The central carbon atom has always the same spatial asymmetry (chirality) and always bears a hydrogen atom. When the side-chain R is a hydrocarbon, it is branched. When R contains a chemical function, the side functions do not participate to the peptide bond construction. The protein chain results from the condensation of amino-acids, i.e. water molecules are removed between molecules in a medium which is mainly aqueous (the cell contains 75 % of water). The protein chains adopt rigid asymmetric conformations (α-helices, β-sheet structures) which are essential for the protein functions. Proteins, even the smallest ones, are too sophisticated entities to be considered as the products of an organic chemistry working at random, without any chemical selection. The chemist has therefore to understand, with simple

  10. Synthetic Peptides as Protein Mimics

    PubMed Central

    Groß, Andrea; Hashimoto, Chie; Sticht, Heinrich; Eichler, Jutta

    2016-01-01

    The design and generation of molecules capable of mimicking the binding and/or functional sites of proteins represents a promising strategy for the exploration and modulation of protein function through controlled interference with the underlying molecular interactions. Synthetic peptides have proven an excellent type of molecule for the mimicry of protein sites because such peptides can be generated as exact copies of protein fragments, as well as in diverse chemical modifications, which includes the incorporation of a large range of non-proteinogenic amino acids as well as the modification of the peptide backbone. Apart from extending the chemical and structural diversity presented by peptides, such modifications also increase the proteolytic stability of the molecules, enhancing their utility for biological applications. This article reviews recent advances by this and other laboratories in the use of synthetic protein mimics to modulate protein function, as well as to provide building blocks for synthetic biology. PMID:26835447

  11. Marine Peptides: Bioactivities and Applications

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Randy Chi Fai; Ng, Tzi Bun; Wong, Jack Ho

    2015-01-01

    Peptides are important bioactive natural products which are present in many marine species. These marine peptides have high potential nutraceutical and medicinal values because of their broad spectra of bioactivities. Their antimicrobial, antiviral, antitumor, antioxidative, cardioprotective (antihypertensive, antiatherosclerotic and anticoagulant), immunomodulatory, analgesic, anxiolytic anti-diabetic, appetite suppressing and neuroprotective activities have attracted the attention of the pharmaceutical industry, which attempts to design them for use in the treatment or prevention of various diseases. Some marine peptides or their derivatives have high commercial values and had reached the pharmaceutical and nutraceutical markets. A large number of them are already in different phases of the clinical and preclinical pipeline. This review highlights the recent research in marine peptides and the trends and prospects for the future, with special emphasis on nutraceutical and pharmaceutical development into marketed products. PMID:26132844

  12. Antimicrobial peptides: properties and applicability.

    PubMed

    van 't Hof, W; Veerman, E C; Helmerhorst, E J; Amerongen, A V

    2001-04-01

    All organisms need protection against microorganisms, e. g. bacteria, viruses and fungi. For many years, attention has been focused on adaptive immunity as the main antimicrobial defense system. However, the adaptive immune system, with its network of humoral and cellular responses is only found in higher animals, while innate immunity is encountered in all living creatures. The turning point in the appreciation of the innate immunity was the discovery of antimicrobial peptides in the early eighties. In general these peptides act by disrupting the structural integrity of the microbial membranes. It has become clear that membrane-active peptides and proteins play a crucial role in both the innate and the adaptive immune system as antimicrobial agents. This review is focused on the functional and structural features of the naturally occurring antimicrobial peptides, and discusses their potential as therapeutics.

  13. Moonlighting Peptides with Emerging Function

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez Plaza, Jonathan G.; Villalón Rojas, Amanda; Herrera, Sur; Garza-Ramos, Georgina; Torres Larios, Alfredo; Amero, Carlos; Zarraga Granados, Gabriela; Gutiérrez Aguilar, Manuel; Lara Ortiz, María Teresa; Polanco Gonzalez, Carlos; Uribe Carvajal, Salvador; Coria, Roberto; Peña Díaz, Antonio; Bredesen, Dale E.; Castro-Obregon, Susana; del Rio, Gabriel

    2012-01-01

    Hunter-killer peptides combine two activities in a single polypeptide that work in an independent fashion like many other multi-functional, multi-domain proteins. We hypothesize that emergent functions may result from the combination of two or more activities in a single protein domain and that could be a mechanism selected in nature to form moonlighting proteins. We designed moonlighting peptides using the two mechanisms proposed to be involved in the evolution of such molecules (i.e., to mutate non-functional residues and the use of natively unfolded peptides). We observed that our moonlighting peptides exhibited two activities that together rendered a new function that induces cell death in yeast. Thus, we propose that moonlighting in proteins promotes emergent properties providing a further level of complexity in living organisms so far unappreciated. PMID:22808104

  14. Borinic acid catalysed peptide synthesis.

    PubMed

    El Dine, Tharwat Mohy; Rouden, Jacques; Blanchet, Jérôme

    2015-11-18

    The catalytic synthesis of peptides is a major challenge in the modern organic chemistry hindered by the well-established use of stoichiometric coupling reagents. Herein, we describe for the first time that borinic acid is able to catalyse this reaction under mild conditions with an improved activity compared to our recently developed thiophene-based boronic acid. This catalyst is particularly efficient for peptide bond synthesis affording dipeptides in good yields without detectable racemization.

  15. Biodegradable Peptide-Silica Nanodonuts.

    PubMed

    Maggini, Laura; Travaglini, Leana; Cabrera, Ingrid; Castro-Hartmann, Pablo; De Cola, Luisa

    2016-03-07

    We report hybrid organosilica toroidal particles containing a short peptide sequence as the organic component of the hybrid systems. Once internalised in cancer cells, the presence of the peptide allows for interaction with peptidase enzymes, which attack the nanocarrier effectively triggering its structural breakdown. Moreover, these biodegradable nanovectors are characterised by high cellular uptake and exocytosis, showing great potential as biodegradable drug carriers. To demonstrate this feature, doxorubicin was employed and its delivery in HeLa cells investigated.

  16. Peptides and proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Bachovchin, W.W.; Unkefer, C.J.

    1994-12-01

    Advances in magnetic resonance and vibrational spectroscopy make it possible to derive detailed structural information about biomolecular structures in solution. These techniques are critically dependent on the availability of labeled compounds. For example, NMR techniques used today to derive peptide and protein structures require uniformity {sup 13}C-and {sup 15}N-labeled samples that are derived biosynthetically from (U-6-{sup 13}C) glucose. These experiments are possible now because, during the 1970s, the National Stable Isotope Resource developed algal methods for producing (U-6-{sup 13}C) glucose. If NMR techniques are to be used to study larger proteins, we will need sophisticated labelling patterns in amino acids that employ a combination of {sup 2}H, {sup 13}C, and {sup 15}N labeling. The availability of these specifically labeled amino acids requires a renewed investment in new methods for chemical synthesis of labeled amino acids. The development of new magnetic resonance or vibrational techniques to elucidate biomolecular structure will be seriously impeded if we do not see rapid progress in labeling technology. Investment in labeling chemistry is as important as investment in the development of advanced spectroscopic tools.

  17. Randomized Multicenter Trial of the Effects of Melanoma-Associated Helper Peptides and Cyclophosphamide on the Immunogenicity of a Multipeptide Melanoma Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Slingluff, Craig L.; Petroni, Gina R.; Chianese-Bullock, Kimberly A.; Smolkin, Mark E.; Ross, Merrick I.; Haas, Naomi B.; von Mehren, Margaret; Grosh, William W.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose This multicenter randomized trial was designed to test whether melanoma-associated helper peptides augment CD8+ T-cell responses to a melanoma vaccine and whether cyclophosphamide (CY) pretreatment augments CD4+ or CD8+ T-cell responses to that vaccine. Patients and Methods In all, 167 eligible patients with resected stage IIB to IV melanoma were randomly assigned to four vaccination study arms. Patients were vaccinated with 12 class I major histocompatibility complex–restricted melanoma peptides (12MP) to stimulate CD8+ T cells and were randomly assigned to receive a tetanus helper peptide or a mixture of six melanoma-associated helper peptides (6MHP) to stimulate CD4+ T cells. Before vaccination, patients were also randomly assigned to receive CY pretreatment or not. T-cell responses were assessed by an ex vivo interferon gamma ELISpot assay. Clinical outcomes and toxicities were recorded. Results Vaccination with 12MP plus tetanus induced CD8+ T-cell responses in 78% of patients and CD4+ T-cell responses to tetanus peptide in 93% of patients. Vaccination with 12MP plus 6MHP induced CD8+ responses in 19% of patients and CD4+ responses to 6MHP in 48% of patients. CY had no significant effect on T-cell responses. Overall 3-year survival was 79% (95% CI, 71% to 86%), with no significant differences (at this point) by study arm. Conclusion Melanoma-associated helper peptides paradoxically decreased CD8+ T-cell responses to a melanoma vaccine (P < .001), and CY pretreatment had no immunologic or clinical effect. Prior work showed immunologic and clinical activity of 6MHP alone. Possible explanations for negative effects on CD8 responses include modulation of homing receptor expression or induction of antigen-specific regulatory T cells. PMID:21690475

  18. Substance P receptor expression by inhibitory interneurons of the rat hippocampus: enhanced detection using improved immunocytochemical methods for the preservation and colocalization of GABA and other neuronal markers.

    PubMed

    Sloviter, R S; Ali-Akbarian, L; Horvath, K D; Menkens, K A

    2001-02-12

    Two unresolved issues regarding the identification and characterization of hippocampal interneurons were addressed in this study. One issue was the longstanding inability to detect gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in the somata of several hippocampal interneuron subpopulations, which has prevented the unequivocal identification of all hippocampal interneurons as GABA neurons. The second issue was related to the identification of the hippocampal interneurons that constitutively express substance P (neurokinin-1) receptors (SPRs). The recent development of neurotoxins that specifically target SPR-expressing cells suggests that it may be possible to destroy hippocampal inhibitory interneurons selectively for experimental purposes. Although SPRs are apparently expressed in the hippocampus only by interneurons, colocalization studies have found that most interneurons of several subtypes and hippocampal subregions appear SPR-negative. Thus, the identities and locations of the inhibitory interneurons that are potential targets of an SPR-directed neurotoxin remain in doubt. Using newly developed methods designed to copreserve and colocalize GABA and polypeptide immunoreactivities with increased sensitivity, the authors report that virtually all hippocampal interneuron somata that are immunoreactive for parvalbumin (PV), calbindin, calretinin, somatostatin (SS), neuropeptide Y, cholecystokinin, and vasoactive intestinal peptide exhibited clearly detectable, somal, GABA-like immunoreactivity (LI). Hippocampal SPR-LI was detected only on the somata and dendrites of GABA-immunopositive interneurons. All glutamate receptor subunit 2-immunoreactive principal cells, including dentate granule cells, hilar mossy cells, and hippocampal pyramidal cells, were devoid of detectable SPR-LI, even after prolonged electrical stimulation of the perforant pathway that induced the expression of other neuronal proteins in principal cells. Thus, hippocampal interneurons of all subtypes and

  19. The novel desmopressin analogue [V4Q5]dDAVP inhibits angiogenesis, tumour growth and metastases in vasopressin type 2 receptor-expressing breast cancer models

    PubMed Central

    GARONA, JUAN; PIFANO, MARINA; ORLANDO, ULISES D.; PASTRIAN, MARIA B.; IANNUCCI, NANCY B.; ORTEGA, HUGO H.; PODESTA, ERNESTO J.; GOMEZ, DANIEL E.; RIPOLL, GISELLE V.; ALONSO, DANIEL F.

    2015-01-01

    Desmopressin (dDAVP) is a safe haemostatic agent with previously reported antitumour activity. It acts as a selective agonist for the V2 vasopressin membrane receptor (V2r) present on tumour cells and microvasculature. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the novel peptide derivative [V4Q5]dDAVP in V2r-expressing preclinical mouse models of breast cancer. We assessed antitumour effects of [V4Q5]dDAVP using human MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 breast carcinoma cells, as well as the highly metastatic mouse F3II cell line. Effect on in vitro cancer cell growth was evaluated by cell proliferation and clonogenic assays. Cell cycle distribution was analysed by flow cytometry. In order to study the effect of intravenously administered [V4Q5]dDAVP on tumour growth and angiogenesis, breast cancer xenografts were generated in athymic mice. F3II cells were injected into syngeneic mice to evaluate the effect of [V4Q5]dDAVP on spontaneous and experimental metastatic spread. In vitro cytostatic effects of [V4Q5]dDAVP against breast cancer cells were greater than those of dDAVP, and associated with V2r-activated signal transduction and partial cell cycle arrest. In MDA-MB-231 xenografts, [V4Q5]dDAVP (0.3 μg/kg, thrice a week) reduced tumour growth and angiogenesis. Treatment of F3II mammary tumour-bearing immunocompetent mice resulted in complete inhibition of metastatic progression. [V4Q5]dDAVP also displayed greater antimetastatic efficacy than dDAVP on experimental lung colonisation by F3II cells. The novel analogue was well tolerated in preliminary acute toxicology studies, at doses ≥300-fold above that required for anti-angiogenic/antimetastatic effects. Our data establish the preclinical activity of [V4Q5]dDAVP in aggressive breast cancer, providing the rationale for further clinical trials. PMID:25846632

  20. Leukocyte opioid receptors mediate analgesia via Ca(2+)-regulated release of opioid peptides.

    PubMed

    Celik, Melih Ö; Labuz, Dominika; Henning, Karen; Busch-Dienstfertig, Melanie; Gaveriaux-Ruff, Claire; Kieffer, Brigitte L; Zimmer, Andreas; Machelska, Halina

    2016-10-01

    Opioids are the most powerful analgesics. As pain is driven by sensory transmission and opioid receptors couple to inhibitory G proteins, according to the classical concept, opioids alleviate pain by activating receptors on neurons and blocking the release of excitatory mediators (e.g., substance P). Here we show that analgesia can be mediated by opioid receptors in immune cells. We propose that activation of leukocyte opioid receptors leads to the secretion of opioid peptides Met-enkephalin, β-endorphin and dynorphin A (1-17), which subsequently act at local neuronal receptors, to relieve pain. In a mouse model of neuropathic pain induced by a chronic constriction injury of the sciatic nerve, exogenous agonists of δ-, μ- and κ-opioid receptors injected at the damaged nerve infiltrated by opioid peptide- and receptor-expressing leukocytes, produced analgesia, as assessed with von Frey filaments. The analgesia was attenuated by pharmacological or genetic inactivation of opioid peptides, and by leukocyte depletion. This decrease in analgesia was restored by the transfer of wild-type, but not opioid receptor-lacking leukocytes. Ex vivo, exogenous opioids triggered secretion of opioid peptides from wild-type immune cells isolated from damaged nerves, which was diminished by blockade of Gαi/o or Gβγ (but not Gαs) proteins, by chelator of intracellular (but not extracellular) Ca(2+), by blockers of phospholipase C (PLC) and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) receptors, and was partially attenuated by protein kinase C inhibitor. Similarly, the leukocyte depletion-induced decrease in exogenous opioid analgesia was re-established by transfer of immune cells ex vivo pretreated with extracellular Ca(2+) chelator, but was unaltered by leukocytes pretreated with intracellular Ca(2+) chelator or blockers of Gαi/o and Gβγ proteins. Thus, both ex vivo opioid peptide release and in vivo analgesia were mediated by leukocyte opioid receptors coupled to the G

  1. Expression of neuropeptide hormone receptors in human adrenal tumors and cell lines: antiproliferative effects of peptide analogues.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, C G; Brown, J W; Schally, A V; Erler, A; Gebauer, L; Treszl, A; Young, L; Fishman, L M; Engel, J B; Willenberg, H S; Petersenn, S; Eisenhofer, G; Ehrhart-Bornstein, M; Bornstein, S R

    2009-09-15

    Peptide analogues targeting various neuropeptide receptors have been used effectively in cancer therapy. A hallmark of adrenocortical tumor formation is the aberrant expression of peptide receptors relating to uncontrolled cell proliferation and hormone overproduction. Our microarray results have also demonstrated a differential expression of neuropeptide hormone receptors in tumor subtypes of human pheochromocytoma. In light of these findings, we performed a comprehensive analysis of relevant receptors in both human adrenomedullary and adrenocortical tumors and tested the antiproliferative effects of peptide analogues targeting these receptors. Specifically, we examined the receptor expression of somatostatin-type-2 receptor, growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) receptor or GHRH receptor splice variant-1 (SV-1) and luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) receptor at the mRNA and protein levels in normal human adrenal tissues, adrenocortical and adrenomedullary tumors, and cell lines. Cytotoxic derivatives of somatostatin AN-238 and, to a lesser extent, AN-162, reduced cell numbers of uninduced and NGF-induced adrenomedullary pheochromocytoma cells and adrenocortical cancer cells. Both the splice variant of GHRH receptor SV-1 and the LHRH receptor were also expressed in adrenocortical cancer cell lines but not in the pheochromocytoma cell line. The GHRH receptor antagonist MZ-4-71 and LHRH antagonist Cetrorelix both significantly reduced cell growth in the adrenocortical cancer cell line. In conclusion, the expression of receptors for somatostatin, GHRH, and LHRH in the normal human adrenal and in adrenal tumors, combined with the growth-inhibitory effects of the antitumor peptide analogues, may make possible improved treatment approaches to adrenal tumors.

  2. Cyclic peptide therapeutics: past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Zorzi, Alessandro; Deyle, Kaycie; Heinis, Christian

    2017-02-26

    Cyclic peptides combine several favorable properties such as good binding affinity, target selectivity and low toxicity that make them an attractive modality for the development of therapeutics. Over 40 cyclic peptide drugs are currently in clinical use and around one new cyclic peptide drug enters the market every year on average. The vast majority of clinically approved cyclic peptides are derived from natural products, such as antimicrobials or human peptide hormones. New powerful techniques based on rational design and in vitro evolution have enabled the de novo development of cyclic peptide ligands to targets for which nature does not offer solutions. A look at the cyclic peptides currently under clinical evaluation shows that several have been developed using such techniques. This new source for cyclic peptide ligands introduces a freshness to the field, and it is likely that de novo developed cyclic peptides will be in clinical use in the near future.

  3. Exploration of the Medicinal Peptide Space.

    PubMed

    Gevaert, Bert; Stalmans, Sofie; Wynendaele, Evelien; Taevernier, Lien; Bracke, Nathalie; D'Hondt, Matthias; De Spiegeleer, Bart

    2016-01-01

    The chemical properties of peptide medicines, known as the 'medicinal peptide space' is considered a multi-dimensional subset of the global peptide space, where each dimension represents a chemical descriptor. These descriptors can be linked to biofunctional, medicinal properties to varying degrees. Knowledge of this space can increase the efficiency of the peptide-drug discovery and development process, as well as advance our understanding and classification of peptide medicines. For 245 peptide drugs, already available on the market or in clinical development, multivariate dataexploration was performed using peptide relevant physicochemical descriptors, their specific peptidedrug target and their clinical use. Our retrospective analysis indicates that clusters in the medicinal peptide space are located in a relatively narrow range of the physicochemical space: dense and empty regions were found, which can be explored for the discovery of novel peptide drugs.

  4. Twilight reloaded: the peptide experience

    PubMed Central

    Weichenberger, Christian X.; Pozharski, Edwin; Rupp, Bernhard

    2017-01-01

    The de facto commoditization of biomolecular crystallography as a result of almost disruptive instrumentation automation and continuing improvement of software allows any sensibly trained structural biologist to conduct crystallo­graphic studies of biomolecules with reasonably valid outcomes: that is, models based on properly interpreted electron density. Robust validation has led to major mistakes in the protein part of structure models becoming rare, but some depositions of protein–peptide complex structure models, which generally carry significant interest to the scientific community, still contain erroneous models of the bound peptide ligand. Here, the protein small-molecule ligand validation tool Twilight is updated to include peptide ligands. (i) The primary technical reasons and potential human factors leading to problems in ligand structure models are presented; (ii) a new method used to score peptide-ligand models is presented; (iii) a few instructive and specific examples, including an electron-density-based analysis of peptide-ligand structures that do not contain any ligands, are discussed in detail; (iv) means to avoid such mistakes and the implications for database integrity are discussed and (v) some suggestions as to how journal editors could help to expunge errors from the Protein Data Bank are provided. PMID:28291756

  5. Peptide Vaccine: Progress and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Li, Weidang; Joshi, Medha D.; Singhania, Smita; Ramsey, Kyle H.; Murthy, Ashlesh K.

    2014-01-01

    Conventional vaccine strategies have been highly efficacious for several decades in reducing mortality and morbidity due to infectious diseases. The bane of conventional vaccines, such as those that include whole organisms or large proteins, appear to be the inclusion of unnecessary antigenic load that, not only contributes little to the protective immune response, but complicates the situation by inducing allergenic and/or reactogenic responses. Peptide vaccines are an attractive alternative strategy that relies on usage of short peptide fragments to engineer the induction of highly targeted immune responses, consequently avoiding allergenic and/or reactogenic sequences. Conversely, peptide vaccines used in isolation are often weakly immunogenic and require particulate carriers for delivery and adjuvanting. In this article, we discuss the specific advantages and considerations in targeted induction of immune responses by peptide vaccines and progresses in the development of such vaccines against various diseases. Additionally, we also discuss the development of particulate carrier strategies and the inherent challenges with regard to safety when combining such technologies with peptide vaccines. PMID:26344743

  6. Antimicrobial Peptides Under Clinical Trials.

    PubMed

    Greber, Katarzyna E; Dawgul, Małgorzata

    2017-01-01

    Today microbial drug resistance has become a serious problem not only within inpatient setting but also within outpatient setting. Repeated intake and unnecessary usage of antibiotics as well as the transfer of resistance genes are the most important factors that make the microorganisms resistant to conventional antibiotics. A large number of antimicrobials successfully used for prophylaxis and therapeutic purposes have now become ineffective [1, 2]. Therefore, new molecules are being studied to be used in the treatment of various diseases. Some of these molecules are structural compounds based on a combination of peptides, for example, naturally occurring endogenous peptide antibiotics and their synthetic analogues or molecules designed de novo using QSAR (quantitative structureproperty relationships)-based methods [3]. Trying to exploit numerous advantages of antimicrobial peptides such as high potency and selectivity, broad range of targets, potentially low toxicity and low accumulation in tissues, pharmaceutical industry aims to develop them as commercially available drugs and appropriate clinical trials are being conducted [4]. In this paper we define clinical trials steps and describe current status of several antimicrobial peptides under clinical development as well as briefly depict peptide drug formulation.

  7. Natriuretic peptide metabolism, clearance and degradation.

    PubMed

    Potter, Lincoln R

    2011-06-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide, B-type natriuretic peptide and C-type natriuretic peptide constitute a family of three structurally related, but genetically distinct, signaling molecules that regulate the cardiovascular, skeletal, nervous, reproductive and other systems by activating transmembrane guanylyl cyclases and elevating intracellular cGMP concentrations. This review broadly discusses the general characteristics of natriuretic peptides and their cognate signaling receptors, and then specifically discusses the tissue-specific metabolism of natriuretic peptides and their degradation by neprilysin, insulin-degrading enzyme, and natriuretic peptide receptor-C.

  8. Dietary bioactive peptides: Human studies.

    PubMed

    Bouglé, Dominique; Bouhallab, Saïd

    2017-01-22

    Current opinion strongly links nutrition and health. Among nutrients, proteins, and peptides which are encrypted in their sequences and released during digestion could play a key role in improving health. These peptides have been claimed to be active on a wide spectrum of biological functions or diseases, including blood pressure and metabolic risk factors (coagulation, obesity, lipoprotein metabolism, and peroxidation), gut and neurological functions, immunity, cancer, dental health, and mineral metabolism. A majority of studies involved dairy peptides, but the properties of vegetal, animal, and sea products were also assessed. However, these allegations are mainly based on in vitro and experimental studies which are seldom confirmed in humans. This review focused on molecules which were tested in humans, and on the mechanisms explaining discrepancies between experimental and human studies.

  9. Antiviral active peptide from oyster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Mingyong; Cui, Wenxuan; Zhao, Yuanhui; Liu, Zunying; Dong, Shiyuan; Guo, Yao

    2008-08-01

    An active peptide against herpes virus was isolated from the enzymic hydrolysate of oyster ( Crassostrea gigas) and purified with the definite direction hydrolysis technique in the order of alcalase and bromelin. The hydrolysate was fractioned into four ranges of molecular weight (>10 kDa, 10 5 kDa, 5 1 kDa and <1 kDa) using ultrafiltration membranes and dialysis. The fraction of 10 5 kDa was purified using consecutive chromatographic methods including DEAE Sephadex A-25 column, Sephadex G-25 column, and high performance liquid chromatogram (HPLC) by activity-guided isolation. The antiviral effect of the obtained peptide on herpetic virus was investigated in Vero cells by observing cytopathic effect (CPE). The result shows that the peptide has high inhibitory activity on herpetic virus.

  10. Antimicrobial Peptides from Marine Proteobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Desriac, Florie; Jégou, Camille; Balnois, Eric; Brillet, Benjamin; Le Chevalier, Patrick; Fleury, Yannick

    2013-01-01

    After years of inadequate use and the emergence of multidrug resistant (MDR) strains, the efficiency of “classical” antibiotics has decreased significantly. New drugs to fight MDR strains are urgently needed. Bacteria hold much promise as a source of unusual bioactive metabolites. However, the potential of marine bacteria, except for Actinomycetes and Cyanobacteria, has been largely underexplored. In the past two decades, the structures of several antimicrobial compounds have been elucidated in marine Proteobacteria. Of these compounds, polyketides (PKs), synthesised by condensation of malonyl-coenzyme A and/or acetyl-coenzyme A, and non-ribosomal peptides (NRPs), obtained through the linkage of (unusual) amino acids, have recently generated particular interest. NRPs are good examples of naturally modified peptides. Here, we review and compile the data on the antimicrobial peptides isolated from marine Proteobacteria, especially NRPs. PMID:24084784

  11. Membrane Perturbation Induced by Interfacially Adsorbed Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Zemel, Assaf; Ben-Shaul, Avinoam; May, Sylvio

    2004-01-01

    The structural and energetic characteristics of the interaction between interfacially adsorbed (partially inserted) α-helical, amphipathic peptides and the lipid bilayer substrate are studied using a molecular level theory of lipid chain packing in membranes. The peptides are modeled as “amphipathic cylinders” characterized by a well-defined polar angle. Assuming two-dimensional nematic order of the adsorbed peptides, the membrane perturbation free energy is evaluated using a cell-like model; the peptide axes are parallel to the membrane plane. The elastic and interfacial contributions to the perturbation free energy of the “peptide-dressed” membrane are evaluated as a function of: the peptide penetration depth into the bilayer's hydrophobic core, the membrane thickness, the polar angle, and the lipid/peptide ratio. The structural properties calculated include the shape and extent of the distorted (stretched and bent) lipid chains surrounding the adsorbed peptide, and their orientational (C-H) bond order parameter profiles. The changes in bond order parameters attendant upon peptide adsorption are in good agreement with magnetic resonance measurements. Also consistent with experiment, our model predicts that peptide adsorption results in membrane thinning. Our calculations reveal pronounced, membrane-mediated, attractive interactions between the adsorbed peptides, suggesting a possible mechanism for lateral aggregation of membrane-bound peptides. As a special case of interest, we have also investigated completely hydrophobic peptides, for which we find a strong energetic preference for the transmembrane (inserted) orientation over the horizontal (adsorbed) orientation. PMID:15189858

  12. Novel Formulations for Antimicrobial Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Carmona-Ribeiro, Ana Maria; Carrasco, Letícia Dias de Melo

    2014-01-01

    Peptides in general hold much promise as a major ingredient in novel supramolecular assemblies. They may become essential in vaccine design, antimicrobial chemotherapy, cancer immunotherapy, food preservation, organs transplants, design of novel materials for dentistry, formulations against diabetes and other important strategical applications. This review discusses how novel formulations may improve the therapeutic index of antimicrobial peptides by protecting their activity and improving their bioavailability. The diversity of novel formulations using lipids, liposomes, nanoparticles, polymers, micelles, etc., within the limits of nanotechnology may also provide novel applications going beyond antimicrobial chemotherapy. PMID:25302615

  13. Novel formulations for antimicrobial peptides.

    PubMed

    Carmona-Ribeiro, Ana Maria; de Melo Carrasco, Letícia Dias

    2014-10-09

    Peptides in general hold much promise as a major ingredient in novel supramolecular assemblies. They may become essential in vaccine design, antimicrobial chemotherapy, cancer immunotherapy, food preservation, organs transplants, design of novel materials for dentistry, formulations against diabetes and other important strategical applications. This review discusses how novel formulations may improve the therapeutic index of antimicrobial peptides by protecting their activity and improving their bioavailability. The diversity of novel formulations using lipids, liposomes, nanoparticles, polymers, micelles, etc., within the limits of nanotechnology may also provide novel applications going beyond antimicrobial chemotherapy.

  14. Peptides and the new endocrinology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwyzer, Robert

    1982-01-01

    The discovery of regulatory peptides common to the nervous and the endocrine systems (brain, gut, and skin) has brought about a revolution in our concepts of endocrinology and neurology. We are beginning to understand some of the complex interrelationships between soma and psyche that might, someday, be important for an integrated treatment of diseases. Examples of the actions of certain peptides in the periphery and in the central nervous system are given, and their biosynthesis and molecular anatomy as carriers for information are discussed.

  15. Potentiation of Peptide Receptor Radionuclide Therapy by the PARP Inhibitor Olaparib

    PubMed Central

    Nonnekens, Julie; van Kranenburg, Melissa; Beerens, Cecile E.M.T.; Suker, Mustafa; Doukas, Michael; van Eijck, Casper H.J.; de Jong, Marion; van Gent, Dik C.

    2016-01-01

    Metastases expressing tumor-specific receptors can be targeted and treated by binding of radiolabeled peptides (peptide receptor radionuclide therapy or PRRT). For example, patients with metastasized somatostatin receptor-positive neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) can be treated with radiolabeled somatostatin analogues, resulting in strongly increased progression-free survival and quality of life. There is nevertheless still room for improvement, as very few patients can be cured at this stage of disease. We aimed to specifically sensitize replicating tumor cells without further damage to healthy tissues. Thereto we investigated the DNA damaging effects of PRRT with the purpose to enhance these effects through modulation of the DNA damage response. Although PRRT induces DNA double strand breaks (DSBs), a larger fraction of the induced lesions are single strand breaks (expected to be similar to those induced by external beam radiotherapy) that require poly-[ADP-ribose]-polymerase 1 (PARP-1) activity for repair. If these breaks cannot be repaired, they will cause replication fork arrest and DSB formation during replication. Therefore, we used the PARP-1 inhibitor Olaparib to increase the number of cytotoxic DSBs. Here we show that this new combination strategy synergistically sensitized somatostatin receptor expressing cells to PRRT. We observed increased cell death and reduced cellular proliferation compared to the PRRT alone. The enhanced cell death was caused by increased numbers of DSBs that are repaired with remarkably slow kinetics, leading to genome instability. Furthermore, we validated the increased DSB induction after PARP inhibitor addition in the clinically relevant model of living human NET slices. We expect that this combined regimen can thus augment current PRRT outcomes. PMID:27570553

  16. Peptide Antibodies: Past, Present, and Future.

    PubMed

    Houen, Gunnar

    2015-01-01

    Peptide antibodies recognize epitopes with amino acid residues adjacent in sequence ("linear" epitopes). Such antibodies can be made to virtually any sequence and have been immensely important in all areas of molecular biology and diagnostics due to their versatility and to the rapid growth in protein sequence information. Today, peptide antibodies can be routinely and rapidly made to large numbers of peptides, including peptides with posttranslationally modified residues, and are used for immunoblotting, immunocytochemistry, immunohistochemistry, and immunoassays. In the future, peptide antibodies will continue to be immensely important for molecular biology, TCR- and MHC-like peptide antibodies may be produced routinely, peptide antibodies with predetermined conformational specificities may be designed, and peptide-based vaccines may become part of vaccination programs.

  17. Computational approach for designing tumor homing peptides

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Arun; Kapoor, Pallavi; Gautam, Ankur; Chaudhary, Kumardeep; Kumar, Rahul; Chauhan, Jagat Singh; Tyagi, Atul; Raghava, Gajendra P. S.

    2013-01-01

    Tumor homing peptides are small peptides that home specifically to tumor and tumor associated microenvironment i.e. tumor vasculature, after systemic delivery. Keeping in mind the huge therapeutic importance of these peptides, we have made an attempt to analyze and predict tumor homing peptides. It was observed that certain types of residues are preferred in tumor homing peptides. Therefore, we developed support vector machine based models for predicting tumor homing peptides using amino acid composition and binary profiles of peptides. Amino acid composition, dipeptide composition and binary profile-based models achieved a maximum accuracy of 86.56%, 82.03%, and 84.19% respectively. These methods have been implemented in a user-friendly web server, TumorHPD. We anticipate that this method will be helpful to design novel tumor homing peptides. TumorHPD web server is freely accessible at http://crdd.osdd.net/raghava/tumorhpd/. PMID:23558316

  18. Membrane disruption mechanism of antimicrobial peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ka Yee

    2012-04-01

    Largely distributed among living organisms, antimicrobial peptides are a class of small (<100 residues) host defense peptides that induce selective membrane lytic activity against microbial pathogens. The permeabilizing behavior of these diverse peptides has been commonly attributed to the formation of pores, and such pore formation has been categorized as barrel-stave, toroidal, or carpet-like. With the continuing discovery of new peptide species, many are uncharacterized and the exact mechanism is unknown. Through the use of atomic force microscopy, the disruption of supported lipid bilayer patches by protegrin-1 is concentration-dependent. The intercalation of antimicrobial peptide into the bilayer results in structures beyond that of pore formation, but with the formation of worm-like micelles at high peptide concentration. Our results suggest that antimicrobial peptide acts to lower the interfacial energy of the bilayer in a way similar to detergents. Antimicrobial peptides with structural differences, magainin-1 and aurein 1.1, exhibit a mechanistic commonality.

  19. Stapled peptide induces cancer cell death.

    PubMed

    Whelan, Jo

    2004-11-01

    Hydrocarbon stapling could enable peptides from the key domains of natural proteins to be used therapeutically. Using the technique on a peptide involved in apoptosis, researchers have succeeded in destroying cancer cells in a mouse model of leukaemia.

  20. Investigating Endogenous Peptides and Peptidases using Peptidomics

    PubMed Central

    Tinoco, Arthur D.; Saghatelian, Alan

    2012-01-01

    Rather than simply being protein degradation products, peptides have proven to be important bioactive molecules. Bioactive peptides act as hormones, neurotransmitters and antimicrobial agents in vivo. The dysregulation of bioactive peptide signaling is also known to be involved in disease, and targeting peptide hormone pathways has been successful strategy in the development of novel therapeutics. The importance of bioactive peptides in biology has spurred research to elucidate the function and regulation of these molecules. Classical methods for peptide analysis have relied on targeted immunoassays, but certain scientific questions necessitated a broader and more detailed view of the peptidome–all the peptides in a cell, tissue or organism. In this review we discuss how peptidomics has emerged to fill this need through the application of advanced liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) methods that provide unique insights into peptide activity and regulation. PMID:21786763

  1. Identification of tissue-specific targeting peptide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Eunkyoung; Lee, Nam Kyung; Kang, Sang-Kee; Choi, Seung-Hoon; Kim, Daejin; Park, Kisoo; Choi, Kihang; Choi, Yun-Jaie; Jung, Dong Hyun

    2012-11-01

    Using phage display technique, we identified tissue-targeting peptide sets that recognize specific tissues (bone-marrow dendritic cell, kidney, liver, lung, spleen and visceral adipose tissue). In order to rapidly evaluate tissue-specific targeting peptides, we performed machine learning studies for predicting the tissue-specific targeting activity of peptides on the basis of peptide sequence information using four machine learning models and isolated the groups of peptides capable of mediating selective targeting to specific tissues. As a representative liver-specific targeting sequence, the peptide "DKNLQLH" was selected by the sequence similarity analysis. This peptide has a high degree of homology with protein ligands which can interact with corresponding membrane counterparts. We anticipate that our models will be applicable to the prediction of tissue-specific targeting peptides which can recognize the endothelial markers of target tissues.

  2. Boosting production yield of biomedical peptides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manatt, S. L.

    1978-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technique is employed to monitor synthesis of biomedical peptides. Application of NMR technique may improve production yields of insulin, ACTH, and growth hormones, as well as other synthesized biomedical peptides.

  3. Streptavidin-binding peptides and uses thereof

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szostak, Jack W. (Inventor); Wilson, David S. (Inventor); Keefe, Anthony D. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    The invention provides peptides with high affinity for streptavidin. These peptides may be expressed as part of fusion proteins to facilitate the detection, quantitation, and purification of proteins of interest.

  4. Streptavidin-binding peptides and uses thereof

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szostak, Jack W. (Inventor); Wilson, David S. (Inventor); Keefe, Anthony D. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    The invention provides peptides with high affinity for streptavidin. These peptides may be expressed as part of fusion proteins to facilitate the detection, quantitation, and purification of proteins of interest.

  5. Carbohydrates in peptide and protein design.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Knud J; Brask, Jesper

    2005-01-01

    Monosaccharides and amino acids are fundamental building blocks in the assembly of nature's polymers. They have different structural aspects and, to a significant extent, different functional groups. Oligomerization gives rise to oligosaccharides and peptides, respectively. While carbohydrates and peptides can be found conjoined in nature, e.g., in glycopeptides, the aim of this review is the radical redesign of peptide structures using carbohydrates, particularly monosaccharides and cyclic oligosaccharides, to produce novel peptides, peptidomimetics, and abiotic proteins. These hybrid molecules, chimeras, have properties arising largely from the combination of structural characteristics of carbohydrates with the functional group diversity of peptides. This field includes de novo designed synthetic glycopeptides, sugar (carbohydrate) amino acids, carbohydrate scaffolds for nonpeptidal peptidomimetics of cyclic peptides, cyclodextrin functionalized peptides, and carboproteins, i.e., carbohydrate-based proteinmimetics. These successful applications demonstrate the general utility of carbohydrates in peptide and protein architecture.

  6. Digesting New Elements in Peptide Transport.

    PubMed

    Lyons, Joseph A; Nissen, Poul

    2015-10-06

    In this issue of Structure, Beale et al. (2015) define structurally and functionally a large extracellular domain unique to mammalian peptide transporters and its implications for the transport of basic di- and tri-peptides (Beale et al., 2015).

  7. The evolution of peptide hormones.

    PubMed

    Niall, H D

    1982-01-01

    Despite limitations in our present knowledge it is already possible to discern the main features of peptide hormone evolution, since the same mechanisms (and indeed the same hormone molecules) function in many different ways. This underlying unity of organization has its basis in the tendency of biochemical networks, once established, to survive and diversify. The most surprising recent findings in endocrinology have been the discovery of vertebrate peptide hormones in multiple sites within the same organism, and the reports, persuasive but requiring confirmation, of vertebrate hormones in primitive unicellular organisms (20, 20a). Perhaps the major challenge for the future is to define the roles and interactions of the many peptide hormones identified in brain (18). The most primitive bacteria and the human brain, though an enormous evolutionary distance apart, may have more in common than we have recognized until now. As Axelrod & Hamilton have pointed out in a recent provocative article, "The Evolution of Cooperation" (1), bacteria, though lacking a brain, are capable of adaptive behavior that can be analysed in terms of game theory. It is clear that we can learn a great deal about the whole evolutionary process from a study of the versatile and durable peptide hormones molecules.

  8. Acyclic peptide inhibitors of amylases.

    PubMed

    Pohl, Nicola

    2005-12-01

    In this issue of Chemistry and Biology, a library screening approach reveals a linear octapeptide inhibitor of alpha-amylases reached by de novo design . The selected molecule shares characteristics with naturally occurring protein inhibitors -- a result that suggests general rules for the design of peptide-based amylase inhibitors may be achievable.

  9. Bi- or multifunctional peptide drugs

    PubMed Central

    Schiller, Peter W.

    2009-01-01

    Strategies for the design of bi- or multifunctional drugs are reviewed. A distinction is made between bifunctional drugs interacting in a monovalent fashion with two targets and ligands containing two distinct pharmacophores binding in a bivalent mode to the two binding sites in a receptor heterodimer. Arguments are presented to indicate that some of the so-called “bivalent” ligands reported in the literature are unlikely to simultaneously interact with two binding sites. Aspects related to the development of bi- or multifunctional drugs are illustrated with examples from the field of opioid analgesics. The drug-like properties of the tetrapeptide Dmt1[DALDA] with triple action as a μ opioid agonist, norepinephrine uptake inhibitor and releaser of endogenous opioid peptides to produce potent spinal analgesia are reviewed. Rationales for the development of opioid peptides with mixed agonist/antagonist profiles as analgesics with reduced side effects are presented. Progress in the development of mixed μ opioid agonist/δ opioid antagonists with low propensity to produce tolerance and physical dependence is reviewed. Efforts to develop bifunctional peptides containing a μ opioid agonist and a cholecystokinin antagonist or an NK1 receptor antagonist as analgesics expected to produce less tolerance and dependence are also reviewed. A strategy to improve the drug-like properties of bifunctional opioid peptide analgesics is presented. PMID:19285088

  10. Free-living nematode peptides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    All nematodes employ a wide array of peptide messengers to control nearly all aspects of the life cycle, including hatching, locomotion, feeding, defense, mating, reproduction, and other behavioral and metabolic events. There are molecular and biological similarities, as well as significant differen...

  11. Toxins and antimicrobial peptides: interactions with membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlamadinger, Diana E.; Gable, Jonathan E.; Kim, Judy E.

    2009-08-01

    The innate immunity to pathogenic invasion of organisms in the plant and animal kingdoms relies upon cationic antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) as the first line of defense. In addition to these natural peptide antibiotics, similar cationic peptides, such as the bee venom toxin melittin, act as nonspecific toxins. Molecular details of AMP and peptide toxin action are not known, but the universal function of these peptides to disrupt cell membranes of pathogenic bacteria (AMPs) or a diverse set of eukaryotes and prokaryotes (melittin) is widely accepted. Here, we have utilized spectroscopic techniques to elucidate peptide-membrane interactions of alpha-helical human and mouse AMPs of the cathelicidin family as well as the peptide toxin melittin. The activity of these natural peptides and their engineered analogs was studied on eukaryotic and prokaryotic membrane mimics consisting of <200-nm bilayer vesicles composed of anionic and neutral lipids as well as cholesterol. Vesicle disruption, or peptide potency, was monitored with a sensitive fluorescence leakage assay. Detailed molecular information on peptidemembrane interactions and peptide structure was further gained through vibrational spectroscopy combined with circular dichroism. Finally, steady-state fluorescence experiments yielded insight into the local environment of native or engineered tryptophan residues in melittin and human cathelicidin embedded in bilayer vesicles. Collectively, our results provide clues to the functional structures of the engineered and toxic peptides and may impact the design of synthetic antibiotic peptides that can be used against the growing number of antibiotic-resistant pathogens.

  12. Identification of multifunctional peptides from human milk.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Santi M; Bharti, Rashmi; Porto, William F; Gauri, Samiran S; Mandal, Mahitosh; Franco, Octavio L; Ghosh, Ananta K

    2014-06-01

    Pharmaceutical industries have renewed interest in screening multifunctional bioactive peptides as a marketable product in health care applications. In this context, several animal and plant peptides with potential bioactivity have been reported. Milk proteins and peptides have received much attention as a source of health-enhancing components to be incorporated into nutraceuticals and functional foods. By using this source, 24 peptides have been fractionated and purified from human milk using RP-HPLC. Multifunctional roles including antimicrobial, antioxidant and growth stimulating activity have been evaluated in all 24 fractions. Nevertheless, only four fractions show multiple combined activities among them. Using a proteomic approach, two of these four peptides have been identified as lactoferrin derived peptide and kappa casein short chain peptide. Lactoferrin derived peptide (f8) is arginine-rich and kappa casein derived (f12) peptide is proline-rich. Both peptides (f8 and f12) showed antimicrobial activities against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Fraction 8 (f8) exhibits growth stimulating activity in 3T3 cell line and f12 shows higher free radical scavenging activity in comparison to other fractions. Finally, both peptides were in silico evaluated and some insights into their mechanism of action were provided. Thus, results indicate that these identified peptides have multiple biological activities which are valuable for the quick development of the neonate and may be considered as potential biotechnological products for nutraceutical industry.

  13. Metabolism of Peptides by Rumen Microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    Wright, D. E.

    1967-01-01

    Rumen microorganisms utilize tryptic peptides from Chlorella protein, forming carbon dioxide, volatile fatty acids, and bacterial protein. Peptide carbon is more efficiently converted into bacterial protein than is amino acid carbon. A progressive degradation of the peptides was demonstrated by use of columns of Sephadex G-25. PMID:6035045

  14. Characterization of the neuropeptide Y system in the frog Silurana tropicalis (Pipidae): three peptides and six receptor subtypes.

    PubMed

    Sundström, G; Xu, B; Larsson, T A; Heldin, J; Bergqvist, C A; Fredriksson, R; Conlon, J M; Lundell, I; Denver, R J; Larhammar, D

    2012-07-01

    Neuropeptide Y and its related peptides PYY and PP (pancreatic polypeptide) are involved in feeding behavior, regulation of the pituitary and the gastrointestinal tract, and numerous other functions. The peptides act on a family of G-protein coupled receptors with 4-7 members in jawed vertebrates. We describe here the NPY system of the Western clawed frog Silurana (Xenopus) tropicalis. Three peptides, NPY, PYY and PP, were identified together with six receptors, namely subtypes Y1, Y2, Y4, Y5, Y7 and Y8. Thus, this frog has all but one of the ancestral seven gnathostome NPY-family receptors, in contrast to mammals which have lost 2-3 of the receptors. Expression levels of mRNA for the peptide and receptor genes were analyzed in a panel of 19 frog tissues using reverse transcriptase quantitative PCR. The peptide mRNAs had broad distribution with highest expression in skin, blood and small intestine. NPY mRNA was present in the three brain regions investigated, but PYY and PP mRNAs were not detectable in any of these. All receptor mRNAs had similar expression profiles with high expression in skin, blood, muscle and heart. Three of the receptors, Y5, Y7 and Y8, could be functionally expressed in HEK-293 cells and characterized with binding studies using the three frog peptides. PYY had the highest affinity for all three receptors (K(i) 0.042-0.34 nM). Also NPY and PP bound to the Y8 receptor with high affinity (0.14 and 0.50 nM). The low affinity of NPY for the Y5 receptor (100-fold lower than PYY) differs from mammals and chicken. This may suggest a less important role of NPY on Y5 in appetite stimulation in the frog compared with amniotes. In conclusion, our characterization of the NPY system in S. tropicalis with its six receptors demonstrates not only greater complexity than in mammals but also some interesting differences in ligand-receptor preferences.

  15. Neuromodulatory propensity of Bacopa monniera against scopolamine-induced cytotoxicity in PC12 cells via down-regulation of AChE and up-regulation of BDNF and muscarnic-1 receptor expression.

    PubMed

    Pandareesh, M D; Anand, T

    2013-10-01

    Scopolamine is a competitive antagonist of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors, and thus classified as an anti-muscarinic and anti-cholinergic drug. PC12 cell lines possess muscarinic receptors and mimic the neuronal cells. These cells were treated with different concentrations of scopolamine for 24 h and were protected from the cellular damage by pretreatment with Bacopa monniera extract (BME). In current study, we have explored the molecular mechanism of neuromodulatory and antioxidant propensity of (BME) to attenuate scopolamine-induced cytotoxicity using PC12 cells. Our results elucidate that pretreatment of PC12 cells with BME ameliorates the mitochondrial and plasma membrane damage induced by 3 μg/ml scopolamine to 54.83 and 30.30 % as evidenced by MTT and lactate dehydrogenase assays respectively. BME (100 μg/ml) ameliorated scopolamine effect by down-regulating acetylcholine esterase and up-regulating brain-derived neurotropic factor and muscarinic muscarinic-1 receptor expression. BME pretreated cells also showed significant protection against scopolamine-induced toxicity by restoring the levels of antioxidant enzymes and lipid peroxidation. This result indicates that the scopolamine-induced cytotoxicity and neuromodulatory changes were restored with the pretreatment of BME.

  16. Stress-induced differences in primary and secondary resistance against bacterial sepsis corresponds with diverse corticotropin releasing hormone receptor expression by pulmonary CD11c+ MHC II+ and CD11c− MHC II+ APCs

    PubMed Central

    Gonzales, Xavier F.; Desmutkh, Aniket; Pulse, Mark; Johnson, Khaisha; Jones, Harlan P.

    2009-01-01

    Stress responses have been associated with altered immunity and depending upon the type of stressor, can have diverse effects on disease outcomes. As the first line of defense against potential pathogens, alterations in cellular immune responses along the respiratory tract can have a significant impact on the manifestation of local and systemic disease. Utilizing a murine model of respiratory pneumonia, the current study investigated the effects of restraint stress on the induction of primary and secondary immunity along the respiratory tract, influencing host susceptibility. Female CD-1 mice were subjected to three hours of restraint stress over a period of four days followed by primary and secondary Streptococcus pneumoniae infection via intranasal route. Stress exposure led to increased retention of bacterial carriage in the lungs, enhanced polymorphonuclear cells and a preferential decrease in pulmonary CD11c+ MHC II+ cells resulting in delayed lethality during primary infection but significant impairment of acquired immune protection after secondary infection. We also provide evidence to support a role for lung-associated corticotrophin releasing hormone regulation through peripheral CRH and diverse CRH receptor expression by MHC II+ antigen presenting cells (APCs). We conclude that repeated restraint stress has distinct influences on immune cell populations that appear to be important in the generation of innate and adaptive immune responses along the respiratory tract with the potential to influence local and systemic protection against disease pathogenesis. PMID:18166336

  17. Mutation of Tyr697, a GRB2-binding site, and Tyr721, a PI 3-kinase binding site, abrogates signal transduction by the murine CSF-1 receptor expressed in Rat-2 fibroblasts.

    PubMed Central

    van der Geer, P; Hunter, T

    1993-01-01

    The receptor for the myeloid cell growth factor colony stimulating factor 1 (CSF-1) is a protein tyrosine kinase that is closely related to the PDGF receptor. Ligand binding results in kinase activation and autophosphorylation. Three autophosphorylation sites, Tyr697, Tyr706 and Tyr721, have been mapped to the kinase insert domain. Deletion of the entire kinase insert domain completely abrogates signal transduction by the CSF-1 receptor expressed in Rat-2 fibroblasts. To investigate the function of individual phosphorylation sites present in the CSF-1 receptor kinase insert domain, a number of phosphorylation site mutants were expressed in Rat-2 fibroblasts. Mutation of either Tyr697 or Tyr721 compromised signal transduction by the CSF-1 receptor. A mutant receptor, in which both Tyr697 and Tyr721 were replaced by phenylalanine, has lost all ability to induce changes in morphology or to increase cell growth rate in response to CSF-1. Tyr721 has been identified recently as the binding site for PI 3-kinase. Here we report that GRB2 associates with the CSF-1 receptor upon ligand binding. The phosphorylation on tyrosine of SHC and several other GRB2-associated proteins increased upon stimulation with CSF-1. Tyr697 was identified as a binding site for GRB2. We suggest that PI 3-kinase, GRB2 and some of the GRB2-associated proteins could play an important role in signal transduction by the CSF-1 receptor. Images PMID:8262059

  18. Peptide array-based characterization and design of ZnO-high affinity peptides.

    PubMed

    Okochi, Mina; Sugita, Tomoya; Furusawa, Seiji; Umetsu, Mitsuo; Adschiri, Tadafumi; Honda, Hiroyuki

    2010-08-15

    Peptides with both an affinity for ZnO and the ability to generate ZnO nanoparticles have attracted attention for the self-assembly and templating of nanoscale building blocks under ambient conditions with compositional uniformity. In this study, we have analyzed the specific binding sites of the ZnO-binding peptide, EAHVMHKVAPRP, which was identified using a phage display peptide library. The peptide binding assay against ZnO nanoparticles was performed using peptides synthesized on a cellulose membrane using the spot method. Using randomized rotation of amino acids in the ZnO-binding peptide, 125 spot-synthesized peptides were assayed. The peptide binding activity against ZnO nanoparticles varied greatly. This indicates that ZnO binding does not depend on total hydrophobicity or other physical parameters of these peptides, but rather that ZnO recognizes the specific amino acid alignment of these peptides. In addition, several peptides were found to show higher binding ability compared with that of the original peptides. Identification of important binding sites in the EAHVMHKVAPRP peptide was investigated by shortened, stepwise sequence from both termini. Interestingly, two ZnO-binding sites were found as 6-mer peptides: HVMHKV and HKVAPR. The peptides identified by amino acid substitution of HKVAPR were found to show high affinity and specificity for ZnO nanoparticles.

  19. Future directions for peptide therapeutics development.

    PubMed

    Kaspar, Allan A; Reichert, Janice M

    2013-09-01

    The notable expansion of peptide therapeutics development in the late 1990s and the 2000s led to an unprecedented number of marketing approvals in 2012 and has provided a robust pipeline that should deliver numerous approvals during the remainder of the 2010s. To document the current status of the pipeline, we collected data for peptide therapeutics in clinical studies and regulatory review, as well as those recently approved. In this Foundation review, we provide an overview of the pipeline, including therapeutic area and molecular targets, with a focus on glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor agonists. Areas for potential expansion, for example constrained peptides and peptide-drug conjugates, are profiled.

  20. Peptides and Peptidomimetics for Antimicrobial Drug Design

    PubMed Central

    Mojsoska, Biljana; Jenssen, Håvard

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to introduce and highlight a few classes of traditional antimicrobial peptides with a focus on structure-activity relationship studies. After first dissecting the important physiochemical properties that influence the antimicrobial and toxic properties of antimicrobial peptides, the contributions of individual amino acids with respect to the peptides antibacterial properties are presented. A brief discussion of the mechanisms of action of different antimicrobials as well as the development of bacterial resistance towards antimicrobial peptides follows. Finally, current efforts on novel design strategies and peptidomimetics are introduced to illustrate the importance of antimicrobial peptide research in the development of future antibiotics. PMID:26184232

  1. Fabrication of Odor Sensor Using Peptide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hotokebuchi, Yuta; Hayashi, Kenshi; Toko, Kiyoshi; Chen, Ronggang; Ikezaki, Hidekazu

    We report fabrication of an odor sensor using peptides. Peptides were designed to acquire the specific reception for a target odor molecule. Au surface of the sensor electrode was coated by the designed peptide using the method of self assembled monolayers (SAMs). Functionalized Au surfaces by the peptides were confirmed by ellipsometry and cyclic voltammetry. The odorants of vanillin, phenethyl alcohol and hexanol were discriminated by QCM sensor with the peptide surface. Moreover, we verified specific interaction between amino acid (Trp) and vanillin by fluorescence assay.

  2. Isoelectric focusing of proteins and peptides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egen, N.

    1979-01-01

    Egg-white solution was chosen as the reference solution in order to assess the effects of operational parameters (voltage, flow rate, ampholine pH range and concentration, and protein concentration) of the RIEF apparatus on protein resolution. Topics of discussion include: (1) comparison of RIEF apparatus to conventional IEF techniques (column and PAG) with respect to resolution and throughput; (2) peptide and protein separation (AHF, Thymosin - Fraction 5, vasoactive peptide, L-asparaginase and ACP); and (3) detection of peptides - dansyl derivatives of amino acids and peptides, post-focusing fluorescent labeling of amino acids, peptides and proteins, and ampholine extraction from focused gels.

  3. The First Salamander Defensin Antimicrobial Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Ke; Rong, Mingqiang; Lai, Ren

    2013-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides have been widely identified from amphibian skins except salamanders. A novel antimicrobial peptide (CFBD) was isolated and characterized from skin secretions of the salamander, Cynops fudingensis. The cDNA encoding CFBD precursor was cloned from the skin cDNA library of C. fudingensis. The precursor was composed of three domains: signal peptide of 17 residues, mature peptide of 41 residues and intervening propeptide of 3 residues. There are six cysteines in the sequence of mature CFBD peptide, which possibly form three disulfide-bridges. CFBD showed antimicrobial activities against Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, Candida albicans and Escherichia coli. This peptide could be classified into family of β-defensin based on its seqeuence similarity with β-defensins from other vertebrates. Evolution analysis indicated that CFBD was close to fish β-defensin. As far as we know, CFBD is the first β-defensin antimicrobial peptide from salamanders. PMID:24386139

  4. Biology of the CAPA peptides in insects.

    PubMed

    Predel, R; Wegener, C

    2006-11-01

    CAPA peptides have been isolated from a broad range of insect species as well as an arachnid, and can be grouped into the periviscerokinin and pyrokinin peptide families. In insects, CAPA peptides are the characteristic and most abundant neuropeptides in the abdominal neurohemal system. In many species, CAPA peptides exert potent myotropic effects on different muscles such as the heart. In others, including blood-sucking insects able to transmit serious diseases, CAPA peptides have strong diuretic or anti-diuretic effects and thus are potentially of medical importance. CAPA peptides undergo cell-type-specific sorting and packaging, and are the first insect neuropeptides shown to be differentially processed. In this review, we discuss the current knowledge on the structure, distribution, receptors and physiological actions of the CAPA peptides.

  5. The first salamander defensin antimicrobial peptide.

    PubMed

    Meng, Ping; Yang, Shilong; Shen, Chuanbin; Jiang, Ke; Rong, Mingqiang; Lai, Ren

    2013-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides have been widely identified from amphibian skins except salamanders. A novel antimicrobial peptide (CFBD) was isolated and characterized from skin secretions of the salamander, Cynops fudingensis. The cDNA encoding CFBD precursor was cloned from the skin cDNA library of C. fudingensis. The precursor was composed of three domains: signal peptide of 17 residues, mature peptide of 41 residues and intervening propeptide of 3 residues. There are six cysteines in the sequence of mature CFBD peptide, which possibly form three disulfide-bridges. CFBD showed antimicrobial activities against Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, Candida albicans and Escherichia coli. This peptide could be classified into family of β-defensin based on its sequence similarity with β-defensins from other vertebrates. Evolution analysis indicated that CFBD was close to fish β-defensin. As far as we know, CFBD is the first β-defensin antimicrobial peptide from salamanders.

  6. Therapeutic uses of gastrointestinal peptides.

    PubMed

    Redfern, J S; O'Dorisio, T M

    1993-12-01

    The GI tract is one of nature's great pharmacies. Most, if not all, biologically active peptides can be found there, and it is quite likely that others remain to be discovered. Our ability to exploit this resource has expanded considerably over the past two decades. Advances in analytical techniques have allowed investigators to rapidly isolate and purify new compounds from tissue extracts. Sequencing and de novo synthesis of newly discovered peptides are now routine, and the structural modifications required to alter activity and tailor a compound to a particular use are easily made. A number of gastrointestinal peptides or their analogues for use in clinical studies are available from commercial sources (see Table 7). Somatostatin is the first gut peptide to successfully complete development and yield a pharmaceutical compound with a broad range of action. Several of the peptides discussed in this article have similar potential. TRH stands out as a candidate because of its effectiveness in the treatment of experimental spinal cord injury and a variety of shock states. Such a broad range of action in critical fields may justify the intensive development required to yield potent, long-acting, and highly specific analogues. Similarly, the antimetastatic and immunostimulant properties of the enkephalins offer promise for new therapies in the treatment of AIDS, ARC, and cancer. Studies with amylin may lead to new and more precise regimens of blood sugar control in insulin-dependent diabetics and could in turn, prevent some of the worst long-term effects of the disease. The development of effective intranasal forms of GHRH could spare children with GH-GHRH deficiency the distress of repeated injections and help to prevent excessive GH blood levels. Secretin, glucagon, or CGRP might be used one day in cardiovascular emergencies, and VIP or its analogues could prove effective in the treatment of asthma. Although preliminary results with many of these peptides are

  7. RFamide peptides in agnathans and basal chordates.

    PubMed

    Osugi, Tomohiro; Son, You Lee; Ubuka, Takayoshi; Satake, Honoo; Tsutsui, Kazuyoshi

    2016-02-01

    Since a peptide with a C-terminal Arg-Phe-NH2 (RFamide peptide) was first identified in the ganglia of the venus clam in 1977, RFamide peptides have been found in the nervous system of both invertebrates and vertebrates. In vertebrates, the RFamide peptide family includes gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH), neuropeptide FF (NPFF), prolactin-releasing peptide (PrRP), pyroglutamylated RFamide peptide/26RFamide peptide (QRFP/26RFa), and kisspeptins (kiss1 and kiss2). They are involved in important functions such as the release of hormones, regulation of sexual or social behavior, pain transmission, reproduction, and feeding. In contrast to tetrapods and jawed fish, the information available on RFamide peptides in agnathans and basal chordates is limited, thus preventing further insights into the evolution of RFamide peptides in vertebrates. In this review, we focus on the previous research and recent advances in the studies on RFamide peptides in agnathans and basal chordates. In agnathans, the genes encoding GnIH, NPFF, and PrRP precursors and the mature peptides have been identified in lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) and hagfish (Paramyxine atami). Putative kiss1 and kiss2 genes have also been found in the genome database of lamprey. In basal chordates, namely, in amphioxus (Branchiostoma japonicum), a common ancestral form of GnIH and NPFF genes and their mature peptides, as well as the ortholog of the QRFP gene have been identified. The studies revealed that the number of orthologs of vertebrate RFamide peptides present in agnathans and basal chordates is greater than expected, suggesting that the vertebrate RFamide peptides might have emerged and expanded at an early stage of chordate evolution.

  8. Anionic phospholipids modulate peptide insertion into membranes.

    PubMed

    Liu, L P; Deber, C M

    1997-05-06

    While the insertion of a hydrophobic peptide or membrane protein segment into the bilayer can be spontaneous and driven mainly by the hydrophobic effect, anionic lipids, which comprise ca. 20% of biological membranes, provide a source of electrostatic attractions for binding of proteins/peptides into membranes. To unravel the interplay of hydrophobicity and electrostatics in the binding of peptides into membranes, we designed peptides de novo which possess the typical sequence Lys-Lys-Ala-Ala-Ala-X-Ala-Ala-Ala-Ala-Ala-X-Ala-Ala-Trp-Ala-Ala-X-Ala-Al a-Ala-Lys-Lys-Lys-Lys-amide, where X residues correspond to "guest" residues which encompass a range of hydrophobicity (Leu, Ile, Gly, and Ser). Circular dichroism spectra demonstrated that peptides were partially (40-90%) random in aqueous buffer but were promoted to form 100% alpha-helical structures by anionic lipid micelles. In neutral lipid micelles, only the relatively hydrophobic peptides (X = L and I) spontaneously adopted the alpha-helical conformation, but when 25% of negatively charged lipids were mixed in to mimic the content of anionic lipids in biomembranes, the less hydrophobic (X = S and G) peptides then formed alpha-helical conformations. Consistent with these findings, fluorescence quenching by the aqueous-phase quencher iodide indicated that in anionic (dimyristoylphosphatidylglycerol) vesicles, the peptide Trp residue was buried in the lipid vesicle hydrophobic core, while in neutral (dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine) vesicles, only hydrophobic (X = L and I) peptides were shielded from the aqueous solution. Trp emission spectra of peptides in the presence of phospholipids doxyl-labeled at the 5-, 7-, 10-, 12-, and 16-fatty acid positions implied not only a transbilayer orientation for inserted peptides but also that mixed peptide populations (transbilayer + surface-associated) may arise. Overall results suggest that for hydrophobic peptides with segmental threshold hydrophobicity below that which

  9. Encapsulation of bioactive whey peptides in soy lecithin-derived nanoliposomes: Influence of peptide molecular weight.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Aishwarya; McClements, David Julian; Udenigwe, Chibuike C

    2016-12-15

    Encapsulation of peptides can be used to enhance their stability, delivery and bioavailability. This study focused on the effect of the molecular weight range of whey peptides on their encapsulation within soy lecithin-derived nanoliposomes. Peptide molecular weight did not have a major impact on encapsulation efficiency or liposome size. However, it influenced peptide distribution amongst the surface, core, and bilayer regions of the liposomes, as determined by electrical charge (ζ-potential) and FTIR analysis. The liposome ζ-potential depended on peptide molecular weight, suggesting that the peptide charged groups were in different locations relative to the liposome surfaces. FTIR analysis indicated that the least hydrophobic peptide fractions interacted more strongly with choline on the liposome surfaces. The results suggested that the peptides were unequally distributed within the liposomes, even at the same encapsulation efficiency. These findings are important for designing delivery systems for commercial production of encapsulated peptides with improved functional attributes.

  10. Taylor Dispersion Analysis as a promising tool for assessment of peptide-peptide interactions.

    PubMed

    Høgstedt, Ulrich B; Schwach, Grégoire; van de Weert, Marco; Østergaard, Jesper

    2016-10-10

    Protein-protein and peptide-peptide (self-)interactions are of key importance in understanding the physiochemical behavior of proteins and peptides in solution. However, due to the small size of peptide molecules, characterization of these interactions is more challenging than for proteins. In this work, we show that protein-protein and peptide-peptide interactions can advantageously be investigated by measurement of the diffusion coefficient using Taylor Dispersion Analysis. Through comparison to Dynamic Light Scattering it was shown that Taylor Dispersion Analysis is well suited for the characterization of protein-protein interactions of solutions of α-lactalbumin and human serum albumin. The peptide-peptide interactions of three selected peptides were then investigated in a concentration range spanning from 0.5mg/ml up to 80mg/ml using Taylor Dispersion Analysis. The peptide-peptide interactions determination indicated that multibody interactions significantly affect the PPIs at concentration levels above 25mg/ml for the two charged peptides. Relative viscosity measurements, performed using the capillary based setup applied for Taylor Dispersion Analysis, showed that the viscosity of the peptide solutions increased with concentration. Our results indicate that a viscosity difference between run buffer and sample in Taylor Dispersion Analysis may result in overestimation of the measured diffusion coefficient. Thus, Taylor Dispersion Analysis provides a practical, but as yet primarily qualitative, approach to assessment of the colloidal stability of both peptide and protein formulations.

  11. Peptides and methods against diabetes

    DOEpatents

    Albertini, Richard J.; Falta, Michael T.

    2000-01-01

    This invention relates to methods of preventing or reducing the severity of diabetes. In one embodiment, the method involves administering to the individual a peptide having substantially the sequence of a on-conserved region sequence of a T cell receptor present on the surface of T cells mediating diabetes or a fragment thereof, wherein the peptide or fragment is capable of causing an effect on the immune system to regulate the T cells. In particular, the T cell receptor has the V.beta. regional V.beta.6 or V.beta.14. In another embodiment, the method involves gene therapy. The invention also relates to methods of diagnosing diabetes by determining the presence of diabetes predominant T cell receptors.

  12. Antimicrobial Peptides in Human Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Lukas; van Meegern, Anne; Doemming, Sabine; Schuerholz, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    Nearly 100 years ago, antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) were identified as an important part of innate immunity. They exist in species from bacteria to mammals and can be isolated in body fluids and on surfaces constitutively or induced by inflammation. Defensins have anti-bacterial effects against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria as well as anti-viral and anti-yeast effects. Human neutrophil peptides (HNP) 1–3 and human beta-defensins (HBDs) 1–3 are some of the most important defensins in humans. Recent studies have demonstrated higher levels of HNP 1–3 and HBD-2 in sepsis. The bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein (BPI) attenuates local inflammatory response and decreases systemic toxicity of endotoxins. Moreover, BPI might reflect the severity of organ dysfunction in sepsis. Elevated plasma lactoferrin is detected in patients with organ failure. HNP 1–3, lactoferrin, BPI, and heparin-binding protein are increased in sepsis. Human lactoferrin peptide 1–11 (hLF 1–11) possesses antimicrobial activity and modulates inflammation. The recombinant form of lactoferrin [talactoferrin alpha (TLF)] has been shown to decrease mortality in critically ill patients. A phase II/III study with TLF in sepsis did not confirm this result. The growing number of multiresistant bacteria is an ongoing problem in sepsis therapy. Furthermore, antibiotics are known to promote the liberation of pro-inflammatory cell components and thus augment the severity of sepsis. Compared to antibiotics, AMPs kill bacteria but also neutralize pathogenic factors such as lipopolysaccharide. The obstacle to applying naturally occurring AMPs is their high nephro- and neurotoxicity. Therefore, the challenge is to develop peptides to treat septic patients effectively without causing harm. This overview focuses on natural and synthetic AMPs in human and experimental sepsis and their potential to provide significant improvements in the treatment of critically ill with severe infections

  13. Antihypertensive Peptides from Milk Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Jäkälä, Pauliina; Vapaatalo, Heikki

    2010-01-01

    Dietary proteins possess a wide range of nutritional and functional properties. They are used as a source of energy and amino acids, which are needed for growth and development. Many dietary proteins, especially milk proteins, contain physiologically active peptides encrypted in the protein sequence. These peptides may be released during gastrointestinal digestion or food processing and once liberated, cause different physiological functions. Milk-derived bioactive peptides are shown to have antihypertensive, antimicrobial, immunomodulatory, antioxidative and mineral-binding properties. During the fermentation of milk with certain lactobacilli, two interesting tripeptides Ile-Pro-Pro and Val-Pro-Pro are released from casein to the final product. These lactotripeptides have attenuated the development of hypertension in several animal models and lowered blood pressure in clinical studies. They inhibit ACE in vitro at micromolar concentrations, protect endothelial function in vitro and reduce arterial stiffness in humans. Thus, milk as a traditional food product can after certain processing serve as a functional food and carry specific health-promoting effects, providing an option to control blood pressure. PMID:27713251

  14. Recent Advances in Peptide Immunomodulators.

    PubMed

    Zerfas, Breanna L; Gao, Jianmin

    2015-01-01

    With the continued rise in antibiotic-resistant bacteria, there is an immense need for the development of new therapeutic agents. Host-defense peptides (HDPs) offer a unique alternative to many of the current approved antibiotics. By targeting the host rather than the pathogen, HDPs offer several benefits over traditional small molecule drug treatments, such as a slower propensity towards resistance, broad-spectrum activity and lower risk of patients developing sepsis. However, natural peptide structures have many disadvantages as well, including susceptibility to proteolytic degradation, significant costs of synthesis and host toxicity. For this reason, much work has been done to examine peptidomimetic structures, in the hopes of finding a structure with all of the desired qualities of an antibiotic drug. Recently, this research has included synthetic constructs that mimic the behavior of HDPs but have no structural similarity to peptides. This review article focuses on the progression of this field of research, beginning with an analysis of a few prominent examples of natural HDPs and moving on to describe how the information learned by studying them have led to the current design platforms.

  15. Stability of peptide drugs in the colon.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jie; Yadav, Vipul; Smart, Alice L; Tajiri, Shinichiro; Basit, Abdul W

    2015-10-12

    This study was the first to investigate the colonic stability of 17 peptide molecules (insulin, calcitonin, glucagon, secretin, somatostatin, desmopressin, oxytocin, Arg-vasopressin, octreotide, ciclosporin, leuprolide, nafarelin, buserelin, histrelin, [D-Ser(4)]-gonadorelin, deslorelin, and goserelin) in a model of the large intestine using mixed human faecal bacteria. Of these, the larger peptides - insulin, calcitonin, somatostatin, glucagon and secretin - were metabolized rapidly, with complete degradation observed within 5 min. In contrast, a number of the smaller peptides - Arg-vasopressin, desmopressin, oxytocin, gonadorelin, goserelin, buserelin, leuprolide, nafarelin and deslorelin - degraded more slowly, while octreotide, histrelin and ciclosporin were seen to be more stable as compared to the other small peptides under the same conditions. Peptide degradation rate was directly correlated to peptide lipophilicity (logP); those peptides with a higher logP were more stable in the colonic model (R(2)=0.94). In the absence of human faecal bacteria, all peptides were stable. This study highlights the impact of the colonic environment - in particular, the gut microbiota - on the metabolism of peptide drugs, and identifies potential peptide candidates for drug delivery to the colon.

  16. Structure-function relationships of antimicrobial peptides.

    PubMed

    Hwang, P M; Vogel, H J

    1998-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides are ubiquitously produced throughout nature. Many of these relatively short peptides (6-50 residues) are lethal towards bacteria and fungi, yet they display minimal toxicity towards mammalian cells. All of the peptides are highly cationic and hydrophobic. It is widely believed that they act through nonspecific binding to biological membranes, even though the exact nature of these interactions is presently unclear. High-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) has contributed greatly to knowledge in this field, providing insight about peptide structure in aqueous solution, in organic cosolvents, and in micellar systems. Solid-state NMR can provide additional information about peptide-membrane binding. Here we review our current knowledge about the structure of antimicrobial peptides. We also discuss studies pertaining to the mechanism of action. Despite the different three-dimensional structural motifs of the various classes, they all have similar amphiphilic surfaces that are well-suited for membrane binding. Many antimicrobial peptides bind in a membrane-parallel orientation, interacting only with one face of the bilayer. This may be sufficient for antimicrobial action. At higher concentrations, peptides and phospholipids translocate to form multimeric transmembrane channels that seem to contribute to the peptide's hemolytic activity. An understanding of the key features of the secondary and tertiary structures of the antimicrobial peptides and their effects on bactericidal and hemolytic activity can aid the rational design of improved analogs for clinical use.

  17. Bioprospecting open reading frames for peptide effectors.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Ling; Scott, Charles

    2014-01-01

    Recent successes in the development of small-molecule antagonists of protein-protein interactions designed based on co-crystal structures of peptides bound to their biological targets confirm that short peptides derived from interacting proteins can be high-value ligands for pharmacologic validation of targets and for identification of druggable sites. Evolved sequence space is likely to be enriched for interacting peptides, but identifying minimal peptide effectors within genomic sequence can be labor intensive. Here we describe the use of incremental truncation to diversify genetic material on the scale of open reading frames into comprehensive libraries of constituent peptides. The approach is capable of generating peptides derived from both continuous and discontinuous sequence elements, and is compatible with the expression of free linear or backbone cyclic peptides, with peptides tethered to amino- or carboxyl-terminal fusion partners or with the expression of peptides displayed within protein scaffolds (peptide aptamers). Incremental truncation affords a valuable source of molecular diversity to interrogate the druggable genome or evaluate the therapeutic potential of candidate genes.

  18. Predicting protein-peptide interactions from scratch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Chengfei; Xu, Xianjin; Zou, Xiaoqin; Zou lab Team

    Protein-peptide interactions play an important role in many cellular processes. The ability to predict protein-peptide complex structures is valuable for mechanistic investigation and therapeutic development. Due to the high flexibility of peptides and lack of templates for homologous modeling, predicting protein-peptide complex structures is extremely challenging. Recently, we have developed a novel docking framework for protein-peptide structure prediction. Specifically, given the sequence of a peptide and a 3D structure of the protein, initial conformations of the peptide are built through protein threading. Then, the peptide is globally and flexibly docked onto the protein using a novel iterative approach. Finally, the sampled modes are scored and ranked by a statistical potential-based energy scoring function that was derived for protein-peptide interactions from statistical mechanics principles. Our docking methodology has been tested on the Peptidb database and compared with other protein-peptide docking methods. Systematic analysis shows significantly improved results compared to the performances of the existing methods. Our method is computationally efficient and suitable for large-scale applications. Nsf CAREER Award 0953839 (XZ) NIH R01GM109980 (XZ).

  19. Human Antimicrobial Peptides and Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guangshun

    2014-01-01

    As the key components of innate immunity, human host defense antimicrobial peptides and proteins (AMPs) play a critical role in warding off invading microbial pathogens. In addition, AMPs can possess other biological functions such as apoptosis, wound healing, and immune modulation. This article provides an overview on the identification, activity, 3D structure, and mechanism of action of human AMPs selected from the antimicrobial peptide database. Over 100 such peptides have been identified from a variety of tissues and epithelial surfaces, including skin, eyes, ears, mouths, gut, immune, nervous and urinary systems. These peptides vary from 10 to 150 amino acids with a net charge between −3 and +20 and a hydrophobic content below 60%. The sequence diversity enables human AMPs to adopt various 3D structures and to attack pathogens by different mechanisms. While α-defensin HD-6 can self-assemble on the bacterial surface into nanonets to entangle bacteria, both HNP-1 and β-defensin hBD-3 are able to block cell wall biosynthesis by binding to lipid II. Lysozyme is well-characterized to cleave bacterial cell wall polysaccharides but can also kill bacteria by a non-catalytic mechanism. The two hydrophobic domains in the long amphipathic α-helix of human cathelicidin LL-37 lays the basis for binding and disrupting the curved anionic bacterial membrane surfaces by forming pores or via the carpet model. Furthermore, dermcidin may serve as ion channel by forming a long helix-bundle structure. In addition, the C-type lectin RegIIIα can initially recognize bacterial peptidoglycans followed by pore formation in the membrane. Finally, histatin 5 and GAPDH(2-32) can enter microbial cells to exert their effects. It appears that granulysin enters cells and kills intracellular pathogens with the aid of pore-forming perforin. This arsenal of human defense proteins not only keeps us healthy but also inspires the development of a new generation of personalized medicine to

  20. SOCS3 expression within leptin receptor-expressing cells regulates food intake and leptin sensitivity but does not affect weight gain in pregnant mice consuming a high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Zampieri, Thais Tessari; da Silva, Tiago Eugênio Oliveira; de Paula Romeu, Deborah; Torrão, Andréa da Silva; Donato, Jose

    2016-04-01

    Pregnancy induces transitory metabolic changes including increases in food intake and body fat deposition, as well as leptin and insulin resistance. Recent findings have suggested that increased hypothalamic expression of suppressor of cytokine signaling-3 (SOCS3) is a key mechanism responsible for triggering those metabolic adaptations. Because obesity is a risk factor for gestational metabolic imbalances, we aimed to study the role of SOCS3 during pregnancy in obese mice. Female mice carrying a deletion of SOCS3 in leptin receptor-expressing cells (SOCS3 KO mice) were exposed to a chronic high-fat diet (HFD), and we then studied their energy balance and glucose homeostasis during pregnancy. SOCS3 deletion did not prevent diet-induced obesity or changes in body weight and adiposity observed during pregnancy. However, the typical increase in food intake during mid- and late-pregnancy was blunted in SOCS3 KO females. We also observed a slight improvement in glucose homeostasis and increased leptin sensitivity in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus in pregnant SOCS3 KO mice on HFD. Despite this, SOCS3 KO mice had an increased number of uterine reabsorptions and fewer fetuses compared to the controls. Compared to control animals, a reduction in proopiomelanocortin and an increase in oxytocin mRNA levels were observed in the hypothalamus of pregnant SOCS3 KO mice. In contrast to previous studies using lean animals, conditional SOCS3 ablation did not prevent major gestational metabolic changes in diet-induced obese mice. Our findings contribute to the understanding of the role of SOCS3 in mediating pregnancy-induced metabolic adaptations.

  1. Maternal exposure to secondhand cigarette smoke primes the lung for induction of phosphodiesterase-4D5 isozyme and exacerbated Th2 responses: rolipram attenuates the airway hyperreactivity and muscarinic receptor expression but not lung inflammation and atopy.

    PubMed

    Singh, Shashi P; Mishra, Neerad C; Rir-Sima-Ah, Jules; Campen, Mathew; Kurup, Viswanath; Razani-Boroujerdi, Seddigheh; Sopori, Mohan L

    2009-08-01

    Airway hyperreactivity (AHR), lung inflammation, and atopy are clinical signs of allergic asthma. Gestational exposure to cigarette smoke (CS) markedly increases the risk for childhood allergic asthma. Muscarinic receptors regulate airway smooth muscle tone, and asthmatics exhibit increased AHR to muscarinic agonists. We have previously reported that in a murine model of bronchopulmonary aspergillosis, maternal exposure to mainstream CS increases AHR after acute intratracheal administration of Aspergillus fumigatus extract. However, the mechanism by which gestational CS induces allergic asthma is unclear. We now show for the first time that, compared with controls, mice exposed prenatally to secondhand CS exhibit increased lung inflammation (predominant infiltration by eosinophils and polymorphs), atopy, and airway resistance, and produce proinflammatory cytokines (IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, and IL-13, but not IL-2 or IFN-gamma). These changes, which occur only after an allergen (A. fumigatus extract) treatment, are correlated with marked up-regulated lung expression of M1, M2, and M3 muscarinic receptors and phosphodiesterase (PDE)4D5 isozyme. Interestingly, the PDE4-selective inhibitor rolipram attenuates the increase in AHR, muscarinic receptors, and PDE4D5, but fails to down-regulate lung inflammation, Th2 cytokines, or serum IgE levels. Thus, the fetus is extraordinarily sensitive to CS, inducing allergic asthma after postnatal exposure to allergens. Although the increased AHR might reflect increased PDE4D5 and muscarinic receptor expression, the mechanisms underlying atopy and lung inflammation are unrelated to the PDE4 activity. Thus, PDE4 inhibitors might ease AHR, but are unlikely to attenuate lung inflammation and atopy associated with childhood allergic asthma.

  2. Repeated administration of phytocannabinoid Δ(9)-THC or synthetic cannabinoids JWH-018 and JWH-073 induces tolerance to hypothermia but not locomotor suppression in mice, and reduces CB1 receptor expression and function in a brain region-specific manner.

    PubMed

    Tai, S; Hyatt, W S; Gu, C; Franks, L N; Vasiljevik, T; Brents, L K; Prather, P L; Fantegrossi, W E

    2015-12-01

    These studies probed the relationship between intrinsic efficacy and tolerance/cross-tolerance between ∆(9)-THC and synthetic cannabinoid drugs of abuse (SCBs) by examining in vivo effects and cellular changes concomitant with their repeated administration in mice. Dose-effect relationships for hypothermic effects were determined in order to confirm that SCBs JWH-018 and JWH-073 are higher efficacy agonists than ∆(9)-THC in mice. Separate groups of mice were treated with saline, sub-maximal hypothermic doses of JWH-018 or JWH-073 (3.0mg/kg or 10.0mg/kg, respectively) or a maximally hypothermic dose of 30.0mg/kg ∆(9)-THC once per day for 5 consecutive days while core temperature and locomotor activity were monitored via biotelemetry. Repeated administration of all drugs resulted in tolerance to hypothermic effects, but not locomotor effects, and this tolerance was still evident 14 days after the last drug administration. Further studies treated mice with 30.0mg/kg ∆(9)-THC once per day for 4 days, then tested with SCBs on day 5. Mice with a ∆(9)-THC history were cross-tolerant to both SCBs, and this cross-tolerance also persisted 14 days after testing. Select brain regions from chronically treated mice were examined for changes in CB1 receptor expression and function. Expression and function of hypothalamic CB1Rs were reduced in mice receiving chronic drugs, but cortical CB1R expression and function were not altered. Collectively, these data demonstrate that repeated ∆(9)-THC, JWH-018 and JWH-073 can induce long-lasting tolerance to some in vivo effects, which is likely mediated by region-specific downregulation and desensitization of CB1Rs.

  3. Myometrial oxytocin receptor expression and intracellular pathways.

    PubMed

    Yulia, A; Johnson, M R

    2014-06-01

    Oxytocin (OT) signalling plays a fundamental role in the mechanisms of parturition. OT is one of the most frequently used drugs in obstetrics, promoting uterine contractions for labor induction and augmentation and to prevent postpartum hemorrhage (PPH). Expression of the oxytocin receptor (OTR) in the human myometrium is tightly regulated during pregnancy and its levels have been shown to peak upon labour onset and to fall sharply in advanced labour and the postpartum period, when the uterus become refractive to OT. However, uterine sensitivity to OT varies between pregnant women, probably reflecting differences in their myometrial OTR expression. Control of OTR expression is mediated by a combination of steroid hormone stimulation, stretch, and inflammation. This review summarises current knowledge regarding the complex regulation of myometrial OTR expression and its associated intracellular signaling pathways.

  4. Male genital leiomyomas showing androgen receptor expression.

    PubMed

    Suárez-Peñaranda, José Manuel; Vieites, Begoña; Evgenyeva, Elena; Vázquez-Veiga, Hugo; Forteza, Jeronimo

    2007-12-01

    Genital leiomyoma in men include those superficial leiomyomas arising in the scrotum and the areola. They are unusual neoplasms: few cases have been reported in the literature and they usually escape clinical diagnosis. Three cases of male genital leiomyomas are reported: two in the scrotum and one in the areola. They were all conservatively excised and the behaviour was completely benign in all cases. Histopathological examination showed the typical findings of superficial leiomyomas, with some minor differences between cases arising in the scrotum and those from the areola. Immunohistochemical findings not only confirmed the smooth muscle nature of all cases but also showed unequivocal immunostaining for androgen receptors in the leiomyomas from the scrotum. Immunostaining for androgen receptors in scrotal leiomyomas is, as far as we are aware, a previously unknown characteristic of male genital leiomyomas. This finding supports the role of steroid hormones in the growth of genital leiomyomas, similar to leiomyomas found in other locations.

  5. Tyrosine Kinase Receptor Expression in Canine Liposarcoma.

    PubMed

    Avallone, G; Pellegrino, V; Roccabianca, P; Lepri, E; Crippa, L; Beha, G; De Tolla, L; Sarli, G

    2017-03-01

    The expression of tyrosine kinase receptors is attracting major interest in human and veterinary oncological pathology because of their role as targets for adjuvant therapies. Little is known about tyrosine kinase receptor (TKR) expression in canine liposarcoma (LP), a soft tissue sarcoma. The aim of this study was to evaluate the immunohistochemical expression of the TKRs fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) and platelet-derived growth factor receptor-β (PDGFRβ); their ligands, fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2) and platelet-derived growth factor B (PDGFB); and c-kit in canine LP. Immunohistochemical labeling was categorized as high or low expression and compared with the mitotic count and MIB-1-based proliferation index. Fifty canine LPs were examined, classified, and graded. Fourteen cases were classified as well differentiated, 7 as myxoid, 25 as pleomorphic, and 4 as dedifferentiated. Seventeen cases were grade 1, 26 were grade 2, and 7 were grade 3. A high expression of FGF2, FGFR1, PDGFB, and PDGFRβ was identified in 62% (31/50), 68% (34/50), 81.6% (40/49), and 70.8% (34/48) of the cases, respectively. c-kit was expressed in 12.5% (6/48) of the cases. Mitotic count negatively correlated with FGF2 ( R = -0.41; P < .01), being lower in cases with high FGF2 expression, and positively correlated with PDGFRβ ( R = 0.33; P < .01), being higher in cases with high PDGFRβ expression. No other statistically significant correlations were identified. These results suggest that the PDGFRβ-mediated pathway may have a role in the progression of canine LP and may thus represent a promising target for adjuvant cancer therapies.

  6. Anti-angiogenic peptides for cancer therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Rosca, Elena V.; Koskimaki, Jacob E.; Rivera, Corban G.; Pandey, Niranjan B.; Tamiz, Amir P.; Popel, Aleksander S.

    2011-01-01

    Peptides have emerged as important therapeutics that are being rigorously tested in angiogenesis-dependent diseases due to their low toxicity and high specificity. Since the discovery of endogenous proteins and protein fragments that inhibit microvessel formation (thrombospondin, endostatin) several peptides have shown promise in pre-clinical and clinical studies for cancer. Peptides have been derived from thrombospondin, collagens, chemokines, coagulation cascade proteins, growth factors, and other classes of proteins and target different receptors. Here we survey recent developments for anti-angiogenic peptides with length not exceeding 50 amino acid residues that have shown activity in pre-clinical models of cancer or have been tested in clinical trials; some of the peptides have been modified and optimized, e.g., through L-to-D and non-natural amino acid substitutions. We highlight technological advances in peptide discovery and optimization including computational and bioinformatics tools and novel experimental techniques. PMID:21470139

  7. Formulation strategies to improve oral peptide delivery.

    PubMed

    Maher, Sam; Ryan, Ben; Duffy, Aoife; Brayden, David J

    2014-05-01

    Delivery of peptides by the oral route greatly appeals due to commercial, patient convenience and scientific arguments. While there are over 60 injectable peptides marketed worldwide, and many more in development, most delivery strategies do not yet adequately overcome the barriers to oral delivery. Peptides are sensitive to chemical and enzymatic degradation in the intestine, and are poorly permeable across the intestinal epithelium due to sub-optimal physicochemical properties. A successful oral peptide delivery technology should protect potent peptides from presystemic degradation and improve epithelial permeation to achieve a target oral bioavailability with acceptable intra-subject variability. This review provides a comprehensive up-to-date overview of the current status of oral peptide delivery with an emphasis on patented formulations that are yielding promising clinical data.

  8. Ribosomally encoded cyclic peptide toxins from mushrooms.

    PubMed

    Walton, Jonathan D; Luo, Hong; Hallen-Adams, Heather

    2012-01-01

    The cyclic peptide toxins of poisonous Amanita mushrooms are chemically unique among known natural products. Furthermore, they differ from other fungal cyclic peptides in being synthesized on ribosomes instead of by nonribosomal peptide synthetases. Because of their novel structures and biogenic origins, elucidation of the biosynthetic pathway of the Amanita cyclic peptides presents both challenges and opportunities. In particular, a full understanding of the pathway should lead to the ability to direct synthesis of a large number of novel cyclic peptides based on the Amanita toxin scaffold by genetic engineering of the encoding genes. Here, we highlight some of the principal methods for working with the Amanita cyclic peptides and the known steps in their biosynthesis.

  9. Cryptic Peptides from Collagen: A Critical Review.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Pradipta; Shanthi, C

    2016-01-01

    Collagen, a predominant structural protein in extracellular matrix (ECM), is now considered to have probable roles in many biological activities and hence, in different forms have found application as nutraceutical or pharmaceutical therapy option. Many of the biological properties are believed to be due to small hidden peptide residues in the collagen molecules, which come into play after the biodegradation or biosorption of the parent molecule. These peptide regions are called cryptic peptides or by some, as cryptides. The proteolytic hydrolysis of the ECM protein releases the cryptic peptides with many novel biological activities not exhibited directly by the parental protein which include angiogenic, antimicrobial, mitogenic and chemotactic properties. The research for understanding the role of these cryptic peptide regions and making use of them in medical field is very active. Such an understanding could lead to the development of peptide supplements for many biomedical applications. The prolific research in this area is reviewed in this paper.

  10. Peptide YY receptors in the brain

    SciTech Connect

    Inui, A.; Oya, M.; Okita, M.; Inoue, T.; Sakatani, N.; Morioka, H.; Shii, K.; Yokono, K.; Mizuno, N.; Baba, S.

    1988-01-15

    Radiolabelled ligand binding studies demonstrated that specific receptors for peptide YY are present in the porcine as well as the canine brains. Peptide YY was bound to brain tissue membranes via high-affinity (dissociation constant, 1.39 X 10(-10)M) and low-affinity (dissociation constant, 3.72 X 10(-8)M) components. The binding sites showed a high specificity for peptide YY and neuropeptide Y, but not for pancreatic polypeptide or structurally unrelated peptides. The specific activity of peptide YY binding was highest in the hippocampus, followed by the pituitary gland, the hypothalamus, and the amygdala of the porcine brain, this pattern being similarly observed in the canine brain. The results suggest that peptide YY and neuropeptide Y may regulate the function of these regions of the brain through interaction with a common receptor site.

  11. Toward structure prediction of cyclic peptides.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hongtao; Lin, Yu-Shan

    2015-02-14

    Cyclic peptides are a promising class of molecules that can be used to target specific protein-protein interactions. A computational method to accurately predict their structures would substantially advance the development of cyclic peptides as modulators of protein-protein interactions. Here, we develop a computational method that integrates bias-exchange metadynamics simulations, a Boltzmann reweighting scheme, dihedral principal component analysis and a modified density peak-based cluster analysis to provide a converged structural description for cyclic peptides. Using this method, we evaluate the performance of a number of popular protein force fields on a model cyclic peptide. All the tested force fields seem to over-stabilize the α-helix and PPII/β regions in the Ramachandran plot, commonly populated by linear peptides and proteins. Our findings suggest that re-parameterization of a force field that well describes the full Ramachandran plot is necessary to accurately model cyclic peptides.

  12. Synthesis of peptide .alpha.-thioesters

    DOEpatents

    Camarero, Julio A.; Mitchell, Alexander R.; De Yoreo, James J.

    2008-08-19

    Disclosed herein is a new method for the solid phase peptide synthesis (SPPS) of C-terminal peptide .alpha. thioesters using Fmoc/t-Bu chemistry. This method is based on the use of an aryl hydrazine linker, which is totally stable to conditions required for Fmoc-SPPS. When the peptide synthesis has been completed, activation of the linker is achieved by mild oxidation. The oxidation step converts the acyl-hydrazine group into a highly reactive acyl-diazene intermediate which reacts with an .alpha.-amino acid alkylthioester (H-AA-SR) to yield the corresponding peptide .alpha.-thioester in good yield. A variety of peptide thioesters, cyclic peptides and a fully functional Src homology 3 (SH3) protein domain have been successfully prepared.

  13. Anti-angiogenic peptides for cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Rosca, Elena V; Koskimaki, Jacob E; Rivera, Corban G; Pandey, Niranjan B; Tamiz, Amir P; Popel, Aleksander S

    2011-08-01

    Peptides have emerged as important therapeutics that are being rigorously tested in angiogenesis-dependent diseases due to their low toxicity and high specificity. Since the discovery of endogenous proteins and protein fragments that inhibit microvessel formation (thrombospondin, endostatin) several peptides have shown promise in pre-clinical and clinical studies for cancer. Peptides have been derived from thrombospondin, collagens, chemokines, coagulation cascade proteins, growth factors, and other classes of proteins and target different receptors. Here we survey recent developments for anti-angiogenic peptides with length not exceeding 50 amino acid residues that have shown activity in pre-clinical models of cancer or have been tested in clinical trials; some of the peptides have been modified and optimized, e.g., through L-to-D and non-natural amino acid substitutions. We highlight technological advances in peptide discovery and optimization including computational and bioinformatics tools and novel experimental techniques.

  14. Use of Galerina marginata genes and proteins for peptide production

    DOEpatents

    Hallen-Adams, Heather E.; Scott-Craig, John S.; Walton, Jonathan D.; Luo, Hong

    2017-03-21

    The present invention relates to compositions and methods comprising genes and peptides associated with cyclic peptides and cyclic peptide production in mushrooms. In particular, the present invention relates to using genes and proteins from Galerina species encoding peptides specifically relating to amatoxins in addition to proteins involved with processing cyclic peptide toxins. In a preferred embodiment, the present invention also relates to methods for making small peptides and small cyclic peptides including peptides similar to amanitin. Further, the present inventions relate to providing kits for making small peptides.

  15. Use of Galerina marginata genes and proteins for peptide production

    DOEpatents

    Hallen-Adams, Heather E.; Scott-Craig, John S.; Walton, Jonathan D.; Luo, Hong

    2016-03-01

    The present invention relates to compositions and methods comprising genes and peptides associated with cyclic peptides and cyclic peptide production in mushrooms. In particular, the present invention relates to using genes and proteins from Galerina species encoding peptides specifically relating to amatoxins in addition to proteins involved with processing cyclic peptide toxins. In a preferred embodiment, the present invention also relates to methods for making small peptides and small cyclic peptides including peptides similar to amanitin. Further, the present inventions relate to providing kits for making small peptides.

  16. Analysis of peptide uptake and location of root hair-promoting peptide accumulation in plant roots.

    PubMed

    Matsumiya, Yoshiki; Taniguchi, Rikiya; Kubo, Motoki

    2012-03-01

    Peptide uptake by plant roots from degraded soybean-meal products was analyzed in Brassica rapa and Solanum lycopersicum. B. rapa absorbed about 40% of the initial water volume, whereas peptide concentration was decreased by 75% after 24 h. Analysis by reversed-phase HPLC showed that number of peptides was absorbed by the roots during soaking in degraded soybean-meal products for 24 h. Carboxyfluorescein-labeled root hair-promoting peptide was synthesized, and its localization, movement, and accumulation in roots were investigated. The peptide appeared to be absorbed by root hairs and then moved to trichoblasts. Furthermore, the peptide was moved from trichoblasts to atrichoblasts after 24 h. The peptide was accumulated in epidermal cells, suggesting that the peptide may have a function in both trichoblasts and atrichoblasts.

  17. Current scenario of peptide-based drugs: the key roles of cationic antitumor and antiviral peptides

    PubMed Central

    Mulder, Kelly C. L.; Lima, Loiane A.; Miranda, Vivian J.; Dias, Simoni C.; Franco, Octávio L.

    2013-01-01

    Cationic antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) and host defense peptides (HDPs) show vast potential as peptide-based drugs. Great effort has been made in order to exploit their mechanisms of action, aiming to identify their targets as well as to enhance their activity and bioavailability. In this review, we will focus on both naturally occurring and designed antiviral and antitumor cationic peptides, including those here called promiscuous, in which multiple targets are associated with a single peptide structure. Emphasis will be given to their biochemical features, selectivity against extra targets, and molecular mechanisms. Peptides which possess antitumor activity against different cancer cell lines will be discussed, as well as peptides which inhibit virus replication, focusing on their applications for human health, animal health and agriculture, and their potential as new therapeutic drugs. Moreover, the current scenario for production and the use of nanotechnology as delivery tool for both classes of cationic peptides, as well as the perspectives on improving them is considered. PMID:24198814

  18. GAMPMS: Genetic algorithm managed peptide mutant screening.

    PubMed

    Long, Thomas; McDougal, Owen M; Andersen, Tim

    2015-06-30

    The prominence of endogenous peptide ligands targeted to receptors makes peptides with the desired binding activity good molecular scaffolds for drug development. Minor modifications to a peptide's primary sequence can significantly alter its binding properties with a receptor, and screening collections of peptide mutants is a useful technique for probing the receptor-ligand binding domain. Unfortunately, the combinatorial growth of such collections can limit the number of mutations which can be explored using structure-based molecular docking techniques. Genetic algorithm managed peptide mutant screening (GAMPMS) uses a genetic algorithm to conduct a heuristic search of the peptide's mutation space for peptides with optimal binding activity, significantly reducing the computational requirements of the virtual screening. The GAMPMS procedure was implemented and used to explore the binding domain of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) α3β2-isoform with a library of 64,000 α-conotoxin (α-CTx) MII peptide mutants. To assess GAMPMS's performance, it was compared with a virtual screening procedure that used AutoDock to predict the binding affinity of each of the α-CTx MII peptide mutants with the α3β2-nAChR. The GAMPMS implementation performed AutoDock simulations for as few as 1140 of the 64,000 α-CTx MII peptide mutants and could consistently identify a set of 10 peptides with an aggregated binding energy that was at least 98% of the aggregated binding energy of the 10 top peptides from the exhaustive AutoDock screening.

  19. Insect inducible antimicrobial peptides and their applications.

    PubMed

    Ezzati-Tabrizi, Reyhaneh; Farrokhi, Naser; Talaei-Hassanloui, Reza; Alavi, Seyed Mehdi; Hosseininaveh, Vahid

    2013-12-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are found as important components of the innate immune system (host defense) of all invertebrates. These peptides can be constitutively expressed or induced in response to microbial infections. Indeed, they vary in their amino acid sequences, potency and antimicrobial activity spectra. The smaller AMPs act greatly by disrupting the structure or function of microbial cell membranes. Here, the insect innate immune system with emphasis on inducible antimicrobial peptide properties against microbial invaders has been discussed.

  20. Attenuation of monocyte chemotaxis--a novel anti-inflammatory mechanism of action for the cardio-protective hormone B-type natriuretic peptide.

    PubMed

    Glezeva, Nadezhda; Collier, Patrick; Voon, Victor; Ledwidge, Mark; McDonald, Kenneth; Watson, Chris; Baugh, John

    2013-08-01

    B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) is a prognostic and diagnostic marker for heart failure (HF). An anti-inflammatory, cardio-protective role for BNP was proposed. In cardiovascular diseases including pressure overload-induced HF, perivascular inflammation and cardiac fibrosis are, in part, mediated by monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)1-driven monocyte migration. We aimed to determine the role of BNP in monocyte motility to MCP1. A functional BNP receptor, natriuretic peptide receptor-A (NPRA) was identified in human monocytes. BNP treatment inhibited MCP1-induced THP1 (monocytic leukemia cells) and primary monocyte chemotaxis (70 and 50 %, respectively). BNP did not interfere with MCP1 receptor expression or with calcium. BNP inhibited activation of the cytoskeletal protein RhoA in MCP1-stimulated THP1 (70 %). Finally, BNP failed to inhibit MCP1-directed motility of monocytes from patients with hypertension (n = 10) and HF (n = 6) suggesting attenuation of this anti-inflammatory mechanism in chronic heart disease. We provide novel evidence for a direct role of BNP/NPRA in opposing human monocyte migration and support a role for BNP as a cardio-protective hormone up-regulated as part of an adaptive compensatory response to combat excess inflammation.

  1. Turning peptides in comb silicone polymers.

    PubMed

    Jebors, Said; Pinese, Coline; Nottelet, Benjamin; Parra, Karine; Amblard, Muriel; Mehdi, Ahmad; Martinez, Jean; Subra, Gilles

    2015-03-01

    We have recently reported on a new class of silicone-peptide' biopolymers obtained by polymerization of di-functionalized chlorodimethylsilyl hybrid peptides. Herein, we describe a related strategy based on dichloromethylsilane-derived peptides, which yield novel polymers with a polysiloxane backbone, comparable with a silicone-bearing pendent peptide chains. Interestingly, polymerization is chemoselective toward amino acids side-chains and proceeds in a single step in very mild conditions (neutral pH, water, and room temperature). As potential application, a cationic sequence was polymerized and used for antibacterial coating.

  2. Synthesis of stabilized alpha-helical peptides.

    PubMed

    Bernal, Federico; Katz, Samuel G

    2014-01-01

    Stabilized alpha-helical (SAH) peptides are valuable laboratory tools to explore important protein-protein interactions. Whereas most peptides lose their secondary structure when isolated from the host protein, stapled peptides incorporate an all-hydrocarbon "staple" that reinforces their natural alpha-helical structure. Thus, stapled peptides retain their functional ability to bind their native protein targets and serve multiple experimental uses. First, they are useful for structural studies such as NMR or crystal structures that map and better define binding sites. Second, they can be used to identify small molecules that specifically target that interaction site. Third, stapled peptides can be used to test the importance of specific amino acid residues or posttranslational modifications to the binding. Fourth, they can serve as structurally competent bait to identify novel binding partners to specific alpha-helical motifs. In addition to markedly improved alpha-helicity, stapled peptides also display resistance to protease cleavage and enhanced cell permeability. Most importantly, they are useful for intracellular experiments that explore the functional consequences of blocking particular protein interactions. Because of their remarkable stability, stapled peptides can be applied to whole-animal, in vivo studies. Here we describe a protocol for the synthesis of a peptide that incorporates an all-hydrocarbon "staple" employing a ring-closing olefin metathesis reaction. With proper optimization, stapled peptides can be a fundamental, accurate laboratory tool in the modern chemical biologist's armory.

  3. A regularized method for peptide quantification.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chao; Yang, Can; Yu, Weichuan

    2010-05-07

    Peptide abundance estimation is generally the first step in protein quantification. In peptide abundance estimation, peptide overlapping and peak intensity variation are two challenges. The main objective of this paper is to estimate peptide abundance by taking advantage of peptide isotopic distribution and smoothness of peptide elution profile. Our method proposes to solve the peptide overlapping problem and provides a way to control the variance of estimation. We compare our method with a commonly used method on simulated data sets and two real data sets of standard protein mixtures. The results show that our method achieves more accurate estimation of peptide abundance on different samples. In our method, there is a variance-related parameter. Considering the well-known trade-off between the variance and the bias of estimation, we should not only focus on reducing the variance in real applications. A suggestion about parameter selection is given based on the discussion of variance and bias. Matlab source codes and detailed experimental results are available at http://bioinformatics.ust.hk/PeptideQuant/peptidequant.htm.

  4. (Lipo)polysaccharide interactions of antimicrobial peptides.

    PubMed

    Schmidtchen, Artur; Malmsten, Martin

    2015-07-01

    Due to rapidly increasing resistance development against conventional antibiotics, as well as problems associated with diseases either triggered or deteriorated by infection, antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory peptides have attracted considerable interest during the last few years. While there is an emerging understanding of the direct antimicrobial function of such peptides through bacterial membrane destabilization, the mechanisms of their anti-inflammatory function are less clear. We here summarize some recent results obtained from our own research on anti-inflammatory peptides, with focus on peptide-(lipo)polysaccharide interactions.

  5. Second harmonic generation from tyrosine containing peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasir, M. N.; Bergmann, E.; Benichou, E.; Russier-Antoine, I.; Lascoux, N.; Jonin, Ch.; Besson, F.; Brevet, P. F.

    2013-10-01

    The Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) response from Tyrosine-containing peptides at the air-water interface is presented. First, the quadratic hyperpolarizability of the aromatic amino acid Tyrosine obtained by Hyper Rayleigh Scattering is reported, demonstrating its potentiality as an endogenous molecular probe for SHG studies. Then, the single Tyrosine antimicrobial peptide Mycosubtilin is monitored at the air-water interface and compared to another peptide, Surfactin, lacking a Tyrosine residue. Adsorption kinetics and polarization analysis of the SHG intensity for the peptide monolayers clearly demonstrate that the SHG response from Mycosubtilin arises from Tyrosine. Besides, it confirms that indeed Tyrosine can be targeted as an endogenous molecular probe.

  6. Antimicrobial peptides: clinical relevance and therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Pinheiro da Silva, Fabiano; Machado, Marcel Cerqueira César

    2012-08-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are molecules that provide protection against environmental pathogens, acting against a large number of microorganisms, including bacteria, fungi, yeast, virus and others. Two major groups of antimicrobial peptides are found in humans: cathelicidins and defensins. Recently, several studies have furnished information that besides their role in infection diseases, antimicrobial peptides play a role in diseases as diverse as inflammatory disorders, autoimmunity and cancer. Here, we discuss the role of antimicrobial peptides and vitamin D have in such complex diseases and propose their use should be more explored in the diagnosis and treatment of such conditions.

  7. Application of capillary isotachophoresis in peptide analysis.

    PubMed

    Kasicka, V; Prusík, Z

    1991-09-13

    This paper gives a broad and detailed review of the applications of one of the modern high-performance electromigration separation techniques--capillary isotachophoresis (ITP)--in peptide analysis. Examples are presented of the utilization of capillary ITP for peptide analysis in the fields of chemistry, general and clinical biochemistry, biology, biotechnology, pharmacy and the food industry. The complete composition of all the electrolyte systems used for peptide ITP analyses in both cationic and anionic techniques is given in tabular form. According to the purpose of analysis the applications are divided into several sections: model studies, determination of physico-chemical characteristics, purity control of both intermediate and final peptide preparations, including the determination of low-molecular-mass ionogenic admixtures, and the analysis of peptides in biological fluids and tissue extracts. In addition to the main applications the theoretical and methodological aspects of peptide ITP analysis are discussed. The basic electromigration properties of peptides (their polyampholyte character, effective and absolute mobilities, acid-base equilibria) are explained and the selection of parameters for peptide ITP analysis is described in detail. The advantages and disadvantages of ITP compared with other electrophoretic and chromatographic methods used for peptide analysis are discussed.

  8. Metal-triggered collagen peptide disk formation.

    PubMed

    Przybyla, David E; Chmielewski, Jean

    2010-06-16

    A collagen peptide was designed for metal-triggered, hierarchical assembly through a radial growth mechanism. To achieve radial assembly, H-(byp)(2) containing Pro-Hyp-Gly repeating sequences and two staggered bipyridine ligands within the peptide was synthesized. Triple helix formation resulted in the placement of six bipyridine ligands along the triple helix, and the addition of metal ions resulted in the formation of nanometer-sized collagen peptide disks. These structures were found to disassemble upon the addition of EDTA, demonstrating that radial assembly of collagen peptide triple helices could be realized with the addition of metal ions.

  9. Endomorphins and related opioid peptides.

    PubMed

    Okada, Yoshio; Tsuda, Yuko; Bryant, Sharon D; Lazarus, Lawrence H

    2002-01-01

    Opioid peptides and their G-protein-coupled receptors (delta, kappa, mu) are located in the central nervous system and peripheral tissues. The opioid system has been studied to determine the intrinsic mechanism of modulation of pain and to develop uniquely effective pain-control substances with minimal abuse potential and side effects. Two types of endogenous opioid peptides exist, one containing Try-Gly-Gly-Phe as the message domain (enkephalins, endorphins, dynorphins) and the other containing the Tyr-Pro-Phe/Trp sequence (endomorphins-1 and -2). Endomorphin-1 (Tyr-Pro-Trp-Phe-NH2), which has high mu receptor affinity (Ki = 0.36 nM) and remarkable selectivity (4000- and 15,000-fold preference over the delta and kappa receptors, respectively), was isolated from bovine and human brain. In addition, endomorphin-2 (Tyr-Pro-Phe-Phe-NH2), isolated from the same sources, exhibited high mu receptor affinity (Ki = 0.69 nM) and very high selectivity (13,000- and 7500-fold preference relative to delta and kappa receptors, respectively). Both opioids bind to mu-opioid receptors, thereby activating G-proteins, resulting in regulation of gastrointestinal motility, manifestation of antinociception, and effects on the vascular systems and memory. To develop novel analgesics with less addictive properties, evaluation of the structure-activity relationships of the endomorphins led to the design of more potent and stable analgesics. Opioidmimetics and opioid peptides containing the amino acid sequence of the message domain of endomorphins, Tyr-Pro-Phe/Trp, could exhibit unique binding activity and lead to the development of new therapeutic drugs for controlling pain.

  10. Multicanonical simulations of some peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arkın, H.; Yaşar, F.; Çelik, T.; Berg, B. A.; Meirovitch, H.

    2002-08-01

    A brief discussion of the multicanonical simulation method is given and the results of our simulations of the peptides Leu-enkephalin and deltorphin (in vacuum) are presented. For Leu-enkephalin the determination of the a priori unknown multicanonical weight factors by a recursion is demonstrated, a comparison to the canonical simulations at fixed temperature is done and the effectiveness of the multicanonical simulation method is discussed. Ramachandran plots are shown for deltorphin and interpreted in favor of a funnel kind of picture.

  11. Receptors for the Neuropeptides, Myoinhibitory Peptide and SIFamide, in Control of the Salivary Glands of the Blacklegged Tick Ixodes scapularis

    PubMed Central

    Šimo, Ladislav; Koči, Juraj; Park, Yoonseong

    2013-01-01

    Tick salivary glands are important organs that enable the hematophagous feeding of the tick. We previously described the innervation of the salivary gland acini types II and III by a pair of protocerebral salivary gland neurons that produce both myoinhibitory peptide (MIP) and SIFamide (Šimo et al., 2009b). In this study we identified authentic receptors expressed in the salivary glands for these neuropeptides. Homology-based searches for these receptors in the Ixodes scapularis genome sequence were followed by gene cloning and functional expression of the receptors. Both receptors were activated by low nanomolar concentrations of their respective ligands. The temporal expression patterns of the two ligands and their respective receptors suggest that the SIFamide signaling system pre-exists in unfed salivary glands, while the MIP system is activated upon initiation of feeding. Immunoreactivity for the SIFamide receptor in the salivary gland was detected in acini types II and III, surrounding the acinar valve and extending to the basal region of the acinar lumen. The location of the SIFamide receptor in the salivary glands suggests three potential target cell types and their probable functions: myoepithelial cells that may function in the contraction of the acini and/or the control of the valve; large, basally located dopaminergic granular cells for regulation of paracrine dopamine; and neck cells that may be involved in the control of the acinar duct and its valve. PMID:23357681

  12. Characterization of bicuculline/baclofen-insensitive (rho-like) gamma-aminobutyric acid receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes. II. Pharmacology of gamma-aminobutyric acidA and gamma-aminobutyric acidB receptor agonists and antagonists.

    PubMed

    Woodward, R M; Polenzani, L; Miledi, R

    1993-04-01

    Poly(A)+ RNA from mammalian retina expresses bicuculline/baclofen-insensitive gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptors in Xenopus oocytes with properties similar to those of homooligomeric GABA rho 1 receptors. The pharmacological profile of these rho-like receptors was extended by measuring sensitivities to various GABAA and GABAB receptor ligands. For direct comparison the same compounds were also assayed with GABAA receptors expressed by rat brain RNA. The potency sequence for heterocyclic GABA analogues at the GABA rho-like receptors was GABA (1.3) > muscimol (2.3) > isoguvacine (100) (approximate EC50 in parentheses; all EC50 and Kb values given in microM). Both muscimol and isoguvacine were partial agonists at the rho-like receptors. 4,5,6,7-Tetrahydroisoxazolo[5,4-c]pyridin-3-ol (Kb congruent to 32), piperidine-4-sulfonic acid (Kb congruent to 85), and isonipecotic acid (Kb congruent to 1000) acted primarily as competitive antagonists, showing little or no activity as agonists. The sulfonic acid GABA analogue 3-aminopropanesulfonic acid was also a competitive antagonist (Kb congruent to 20). Conformationally restricted GABA analogues trans- and cis-4-aminocrotonic acid (TACA and CACA) were agonists at the rho-like receptors. TACA (EC50 congruent to 0.6) had twice the potency of GABA and was 125 times more potent than CACA (EC50 congruent to 75). Z-3-(Amidinothio)propenoic acid, an isothiouronium analogue of GABA, had little activity as an agonist but instead acted as a competitive antagonist (Kb congruent to 20). At concentrations of > 100 microM, bicuculline did have some weak competitive inhibitory effects on the GABA rho-like receptors (Kb congruent to 6000), but it was at least 5000 times more potent at GABAA receptors. Strychnine (Kb congruent to 70) and SR-95531 (Kb congruent to 35) also were competitive inhibitors of the rho-like receptors but were, respectively, 20 and 240 times more potent at GABAA receptors. The GABAB receptor ligands baclofen

  13. Peptides and the blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Banks, William A

    2015-10-01

    The demonstration that peptides and regulatory proteins can cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is one of the major contributions of Dr. Abba J. Kastin. He was the first to propose that peptides could cross the BBB, the first to show that an endogenous peptide did so, and the first to describe a saturable transport system at the BBB for peptides. His work shows that in crossing the BBB, peptides and regulatory proteins act as informational molecules, informing the brain of peripheral events. Brain-to-blood passage helps to control levels of peptides with the brain and can deliver information in the brain-to-blood direction. He showed that the transporters for peptides and proteins are not static, but respond to developmental and physiological changes and are affected by disease states. As such, the BBB is adaptive to the needs of the CNS, but when that adaption goes awry, the BBB can be a cause of disease. The mechanisms by which peptides and proteins cross the BBB offer opportunities for drug delivery of these substances or their analogs to the brain in the treatment of diseases of the central nervous system.

  14. C-peptide and diabetic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Brunskill, N J

    2017-01-01

    Kidney disease is a serious development in diabetes mellitus and poses an increasing clinical problem. Despite increasing incidence and prevalence of diabetic kidney disease, there have been no new therapies for this condition in the last 20 years. Mounting evidence supports a biological role for C-peptide, and findings from multiple studies now suggest that C-peptide may beneficially affect the disturbed metabolic and pathophysiological pathways leading to the development of diabetic nephropathy. Studies of C-peptide in animal models and in humans with type 1 diabetes all suggest a renoprotective effect for this peptide. In diabetic rodents, C-peptide reduces glomerular hyperfiltration and albuminuria. Cohort studies of diabetic patients with combined islet and kidney transplants suggest that maintained C-peptide secretion is protective of renal graft function. Further, in short-term studies of patients with type 1 diabetes, administration of C-peptide is also associated with a lowered hyperfiltration rate and reduced microalbuminuria. Thus, the available information suggests that type 1 diabetes should be regarded as a dual hormone deficiency disease and that clinical trials of C-peptide in diabetic nephropathy are both justified and urgently required.

  15. A femtomolar-acting neuroprotective peptide.

    PubMed Central

    Brenneman, D E; Gozes, I

    1996-01-01

    A novel 14-amino acid peptide, with stress-protein-like sequences, exhibiting neuroprotection at unprecedented concentrations, is revealed. This peptide prevented neuronal cell death associated with the envelope protein (GP 120) from HIV, with excitotoxicity (N-methyl d-aspartate), with the beta amyloid peptide (putative cytotoxin in Alzheimer's disease), and with tetrodotoxin (electrical blockade). The peptide was designed to contain a sequence derived from a new neuroprotective protein secreted by astroglial cells in the presence of vasoactive intestinal peptide. The neurotrophic protein was isolated by sequential chromatographic methods combining ion exchange, size separation, and hydrophobic interaction. The protein (mol mass, 14 kD and pI, 8.3 +/- 0.25) was named activity-dependent neurotrophic factor, as it protected neurons from death associated with electrical blockade. Peptide sequencing led to the synthesis of the novel 14-amino acid peptide that was homologous, but not identical, to an intracellular stress protein, heat shock protein 60. Neutralizing antiserum to heat shock protein 60 produced neuronal cell death that could be prevented by cotreatment with the novel protein, suggesting the existence of extracellular stress-like proteins with neuroprotective properties. These studies identify a potent neuroprotective glial protein and an active peptide that provide a basis for developing treatments of currently intractable neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:8636410

  16. Structure and Design of Multipotent Peptide Microbicides

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-08-01

    Project goal. ~$e goal of this project is to design novel peptide antibiotics using a naturally occurring family of peptides, known as defensins, as...coupling of taurine , glycinamide, and arginine amide. " 3. Solution Structures. in collaborative studies performed with Arthur Pardi, we have

  17. Experimental validation of peptide immunohistochemistry controls.

    PubMed

    Bogen, Steven A; Vani, Kodela; McGraw, Brian; Federico, Vin; Habib, Iqbal; Zeheb, Ron; Luther, Ed; Tristram, Colin; Sompuram, Seshi R

    2009-05-01

    Peptide immunohistochemistry (IHC) controls are a new quality control format for verifying proper IHC assay performance, offering advantages in high throughput automated manufacture and standardization. We previously demonstrated that formalin-fixed peptide epitopes, covalently attached to glass microscope slides, behaved (immunochemically) in a similar fashion to the native protein in tissue sections. To convert this promising idea into a practical clinical laboratory quality control tool, we tested the hypothesis that the quality assurance information provided by peptide IHC controls accurately reflects IHC staining performance among a diverse group of clinical laboratories. To test the hypothesis, we first designed and built an instrument for reproducibly printing the controls on microscope slides and a simple software program to measure the color intensity of stained controls. Automated printing of peptide spots was reproducible, with coefficients of variation of 4% to 8%. Moreover, the peptide controls were stable at peptide controls to their ability in properly staining a 3+ HER-2 formalin-fixed tissue section mounted on the same slide (r=0.87). Therefore, peptide IHC controls accurately reflect the analytical component of an IHC stain, including antigen retrieval. Besides its use in proficiency survey testing, we also demonstrate the feasibility of applying peptide IHC controls for verifying intralaboratory IHC staining consistency, using Levy-Jennings charting.

  18. Constrained Peptides as Miniature Protein Structures

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Hang

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses the recent developments of protein engineering using both covalent and noncovalent bonds to constrain peptides, forcing them into designed protein secondary structures. These constrained peptides subsequently can be used as peptidomimetics for biological functions such as regulations of protein-protein interactions. PMID:25969758

  19. Hydrophobic peptide auxotrophy in Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed Central

    Brãnes, L V; Somers, J M; Kay, W W

    1981-01-01

    The growth of a pleiotropic membrane mutant of Salmonella typhimurium with modified lipopolysaccharide composition was found to be strictly dependent on the peptone component of complex media. Nutritional Shiftdown into minimal media allowed growth for three to four generations. Of 20 commercial peptones, only enzymatic digests supported growth to varying degrees. Neither trace cations, amino acids, vitamins, carbohydrates, lipids, glutathione, polyamines, carbodimides, nor synthetic peptides stimulated growth; however, cells still metabolized carbohydrates, and amino acid transport systems were shown to be functional. A tryptic digest of casein was fractionated into four electrophoretically different peptide fractions of 1,000 to 1,200 molecular weight which supported growth to varying degrees. The best of these was further fractionated to two highly hydrophopic peptides. N-terminal modifications eliminated biological activity. Fluorescein-conjugated goat antibody to rabbit immunoglobulin G was used as a probe to detect antipeptide antibody-peptide complexes on membrane preparations. Cells grown on peptone distributed the peptide into both inner and outer membranes. The peptide could be removed with chaotropic agents, and cells had to be pregrown in peptone-containing media to bind the hydrophobic peptide. The gene (hyp) responsible for peptide auxotrophy was mapped at 44 to 45 units by conjugation. Images PMID:7024254

  20. B-Type allatostatins and sex peptides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In many species, mating induces a number of behavioral changes in the female. For Drosophila melanogaster, the sex peptide (SP) has been identified as the main molecular factor behind these responses. Recently, the sex peptide receptor (SPR), a GPCR activated by SP has also been characterized as res...

  1. Peptide Mass Fingerprinting of Egg White Proteins

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alty, Lisa T.; LaRiviere, Frederick J.

    2016-01-01

    Use of advanced mass spectrometry techniques in the undergraduate setting has burgeoned in the past decade. However, relatively few undergraduate experiments examine the proteomics tools of protein digestion, peptide accurate mass determination, and database searching, also known as peptide mass fingerprinting. In this experiment, biochemistry…

  2. Biologically active peptides: prospects for drug development.

    PubMed

    Hughes, J

    1980-08-11

    Biologically active peptides aree typified by their unbiquity of distribution, their high receptor affinity and an almost infinite diversity of structure. For these reasons, considerable effort is now being expended to elucidate the possible role of peptides in brain function. This effort has been stimulated by the discovery of a number of new endogenous peptides, such as the enkephalins, endorphins, vasoactive intestinal peptide and neurotensin. At present, there is no clearly defined role for these peptides, although they may form an important basis for the chemical coding of various brain functions, including pain, mood and memory. At present, the potential for drug development of peptide agonists remains in fairly circumscribed areas such as analgesia, pituitary hormone control, and gastrointestinal motor and secretory control.