Science.gov

Sample records for gastritis helicobacter pylori

  1. Helicobacter heilmannii-associated Gastritis: Clinicopathologic Findings and Comparison with Helicobacter pylori-associated Gastritis

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Ji Eun; Chang, Sun Hee; Kim, Hanseong; Chi, Je G.; Kim, Kyung-Ah; Yang, Jeon Ho; Lee, June Sung; Moon, Young-Soo; Kim, Kyoung-Mee

    2007-01-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate the clinicopathologic features of Helicobacter heilmannii-associated gastritis and to compare H. heilmannii-associated gastritis with H. pylori-associated gastritis. We reviewed 5,985 consecutive gastric biopsy specimens. All cases of chronic gastritis with Helicobacter infection were evaluated with the Updated Sydney System, and the grades of all gastritis variables were compared between H. heilmannii-associated gastritis and H. pylori-associated gastritis groups. There were 10 cases of H. heilmannii-associated gastritis (0.17%) and 3,285 cases of H. pylori-associated gastritis (54.9%). The organisms were superficially located within the mucous layer without adhesion to epithelial cells. Interestingly, in one case many intracytoplasmic H. heilmannii organisms were observed in parietal cells with cell damage. A case of low-grade mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma concomitant with H. heilmannii infection was detected. Compared to H. pylori-associated gastritis, H. heilmannii-associated gastritis showed less severe neutrophilic activity (p<0.0001), mononuclear cell infiltration (p=0.0029), and endoscopic findings of chronic gastritis devoid of erosion or ulcer (p=0.0309). In conclusion, we present the detailed clinicopathologic findings of H. heilmannii-associated gastritis compared to H. pylori-associated gastritis. H. heilmannii-associated gastritis is uncommon and milder than H. pylori-associated gastritis, however it may be noteworthy with respect to the development of MALT lymphoma. PMID:17297253

  2. Lymphoid follicles in children with Helicobacter pylori-negative gastritis

    PubMed Central

    Broide, Efrat; Richter, Vered; Mendlovic, Sonia; Shalem, Tzippora; Eindor-Abarbanel, Adi; Moss, Steven F; Shirin, Haim

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The prevalence of Helicobacter pylori gastritis has been declining, whereas H. pylori-negative gastritis has become more common. We evaluated chronic gastritis in children with regard to H. pylori status and celiac disease (CD). Patients and methods Demographic, clinical, endoscopic, and histologic features of children who underwent elective esophagogastroduodenoscopy were reviewed retrospectively. Gastric biopsies from the antrum and corpus of the stomach were graded using the Updated Sydney System. H. pylori presence was defined by hematoxylin and eosin, Giemsa, or immunohistochemical staining and urease testing. Results A total of 184 children (61.9% female) met the study criteria with a mean age of 10 years. A total of 122 (66.3%) patients had chronic gastritis; 74 (60.7%) were H. pylori-negative. Children with H. pylori-negative gastritis were younger (p=0.003), were less likely to present with abdominal pain (p=0.02), and were mostly of non-Arabic origin (p=0.011). Nodular gastritis was found to be less prevalent in H. pylori-negative gastritis (6.8%) compared with H. pylori-positive gastritis (35.4%, p<0.001). The grade of mononuclear infiltrates and neutrophil density was more severe in the H. pylori-positive group (p<0.001). Pan-gastritis and lymphoid follicles were associated most commonly with H. pylori. Although less typical, lymphoid follicles were demonstrated in 51.3% of H. pylori-negative patients. The presence or absence of CD was not associated with histologic findings in H. pylori-negative gastritis. Conclusion Our findings suggest that lymphoid follicles are a feature of H. pylori-negative gastritis in children independent of their CD status. PMID:28860835

  3. Lymphoid follicles in children with Helicobacter pylori-negative gastritis.

    PubMed

    Broide, Efrat; Richter, Vered; Mendlovic, Sonia; Shalem, Tzippora; Eindor-Abarbanel, Adi; Moss, Steven F; Shirin, Haim

    2017-01-01

    The prevalence of Helicobacter pylori gastritis has been declining, whereas H. pylori-negative gastritis has become more common. We evaluated chronic gastritis in children with regard to H. pylori status and celiac disease (CD). Demographic, clinical, endoscopic, and histologic features of children who underwent elective esophagogastroduodenoscopy were reviewed retrospectively. Gastric biopsies from the antrum and corpus of the stomach were graded using the Updated Sydney System. H. pylori presence was defined by hematoxylin and eosin, Giemsa, or immunohistochemical staining and urease testing. A total of 184 children (61.9% female) met the study criteria with a mean age of 10 years. A total of 122 (66.3%) patients had chronic gastritis; 74 (60.7%) were H. pylori-negative. Children with H. pylori-negative gastritis were younger (p=0.003), were less likely to present with abdominal pain (p=0.02), and were mostly of non-Arabic origin (p=0.011). Nodular gastritis was found to be less prevalent in H. pylori-negative gastritis (6.8%) compared with H. pylori-positive gastritis (35.4%, p<0.001). The grade of mononuclear infiltrates and neutrophil density was more severe in the H. pylori-positive group (p<0.001). Pan-gastritis and lymphoid follicles were associated most commonly with H. pylori. Although less typical, lymphoid follicles were demonstrated in 51.3% of H. pylori-negative patients. The presence or absence of CD was not associated with histologic findings in H. pylori-negative gastritis. Our findings suggest that lymphoid follicles are a feature of H. pylori-negative gastritis in children independent of their CD status.

  4. Gastritis induced by Helicobacter pylori infection in experimental rats.

    PubMed

    Elseweidy, Mohamed M; Taha, Mona M; Younis, Nahla N; Ibrahim, Khadiga S; Hamouda, Hamdi A; Eldosouky, Mohamed A; Soliman, Hala

    2010-10-01

    Gastritis, an inflammation of gastric mucosa, may be due to many pathological factors and infection, such as with Helicobacter pylori. The use of experimental models of gastritis is important to evaluate the biochemical changes and study chemotherapeutic intervention. In a previous study we demonstrated an acute gastritis model induced by iodoacetamide. Our objective in this study was to evaluate a new gastritis model induced by H. pylori infection in experimental rats in terms of certain biomarkers in serum and mucosal tissues in addition to histopathological examination. Gastritis was induced in 20 albino Wistar rats by H. pylori isolated from antral biopsy taken from a 49-year-old male patient endoscopically diagnosed as having H. pylori infection. Another ten rats were used as controls. Serum gastrin, pepsinogen I activity, interleukin-6 (IL-6) and gastric mucosal myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity and prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) were measured. Immunostaining for inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), nitrotyrosine and DNA fragmentation were used to further evaluate H. pylori-induced gastritis. Serum gastrin, IL-6, mucosal MPO activity, and PGE(2) demonstrated significant increases joined with a decreased serum pepsinogen I activity (P < 0.001). Immunohistochemistry demonstrated positive reaction for iNOS, nitrotyrosine and DNA fragmentation. Helicobacter pylori-induced gastritis models demonstrated massive oxidative stress and pronounced injury in mucosal tissue. Since our model in rats reflected the clinical picture of H. pylori infection, it can be considered as a consistent model to study chemotherapeutic intervention for this type of gastritis.

  5. Helicobacter pylori-Negative Gastritis: Prevalence and Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Nordenstedt, Helena; Graham, David Y.; Kramer, Jennifer R.; Rugge, Massimo; Verstovsek, Gordana; Fitzgerald, Stephanie; Alsarraj, Abeer; Shaib, Yasser; Velez, Maria E.; Abraham, Neena; Anand, Bhupinderjit; Cole, Rhonda; El-Serag, Hashem B.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Recent studies using histology alone in select patients have suggested that Helicobacter pylori-negative gastritis may be common. The objective of this study was to investigate the prevalence of H. pylori among individuals with histologic gastritis. METHODS Subjects between 40 and 80 years underwent elective esophagogastroduodenoscopy at a VA Medical Center. Gastric biopsies were mapped from seven prespecified sites (two antrum, four corpus, and one cardia) and graded by two gastrointestinal pathologists, using the Updated Sydney System. H. pylori-negative required four criteria: negative triple staining at all seven gastric sites, negative H. pylori culture, negative IgG H. pylori serology, and no previous treatment for H. pylori. Data regarding tobacco smoking, alcohol drinking, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, and proton pump inhibitor (PPI) use were obtained by questionnaire. RESULTS Of the 491 individuals enrolled, 40.7% (200) had gastritis of at least grade 2 in at least one biopsy site or grade 1 in at least two sites. Forty-one (20.5%) had H. pylori-negative gastritis; most (30 or 73.2%) had chronic gastritis, five (12.2%) had active gastritis, and six (14.6%) had both. H. pylori-negative gastritis was approximately equally distributed in the antrum, corpus, and both antrum and corpus. Past and current PPI use was more frequent in H. pylori-negative vs. H. pylori-positive gastritis (68.2% and 53.8%; P = 0.06). CONCLUSIONS We used multiple methods to define non-H. pylori gastritis and found it in 21% of patients with histologic gastritis. While PPI use is a potential risk factor, the cause or implications of this entity are not known. PMID:23147524

  6. CONVENTIONAL VIDEOENDOSCOPY CAN IDENTIFY HELICOBACTER PYLORI GASTRITIS?

    PubMed Central

    GOMES, Alexandre; SKARE, Thelma Larocca; PRESTES, Manoel Alberto; COSTA, Maiza da Silva; Petisco, Roberta Dombroski; RAMOS, Gabriela Piovezani

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Studies with latest technologies such as endoscopy with magnification and chromoendoscopy showed that various endoscopic aspects are clearly related to infection by Helicobacter pylori (HP). The description of different patterns of erythema in gastric body under magnification of images revived interest in identifying these patterns by standard endoscopy. Aim: To validate the morphologic features of gastric mucosa related to H. pylori infection gastritis allowing predictability of their diagnosis as well as proper targeting biopsies. Methods: Prospective study of 339 consecutive patients with the standard videoendoscope image analysis were obtained, recorded and stored in a program database. These images were studied with respect to the presence or absence of H. pylori, diagnosed by rapid urease test and/or by histological analysis. Were studied: a) normal mucosa appearance; b) mucosal nodularity; c) diffuse nonspecific erythema or redness (with or without edema of folds and exudate) of antrum and body; d) mosaic pattern with focal area of hyperemia; e) erythema in streaks or bands (red streak); f) elevated (raised) erosion; g) flat erosions; h) fundic gland polyps. The main exclusion criteria were the use of drugs, HP pre-treatment and other entities that could affect results. Results: Applying the exclusion criteria, were included 170 of the 339 patients, of which 52 (30.58%) were positive for HP and 118 negative. On the positive findings, the most associated with infection were: nodularity in the antrum (26.92%); presence of raised erosion (15.38%) and mosaic mucosa in the body (21.15%). On the negative group the normal appearance of the mucosa was 66.94%; erythema in streaks or bands in 9.32%; flat erosions 11.86%; and fundic gland polyps 11.86%. Conclusion: Endoscopic findings are useful in the predictability of the result and in directing biopsies. The most representative form of HP related gastritis was the nodularity of the antral mucosa

  7. Lymphocytic gastritis and Helicobacter pylori infection in gastric lymphoma.

    PubMed Central

    Miettinen, A; Karttunen, T J; Alavaikko, M

    1995-01-01

    Lymphocytic gastritis and primary gastric lymphoma are rare conditions with unknown aetiology. It has recently been suggested that Helicobacter pylori has a role in the pathogenesis of both of them. The occurrence of lymphocytic gastritis and H pylori was studied in a series of patients with primary gastric lymphoma. The cases of primary gastric lymphomas (n = 35) diagnosed in years 1970-1993 were identified. The specimens of 22 cases contained gastric mucosa sufficiently so that the number of intra-epithelial lymphocytes, severity of gastritis, and occurrence of H pylori could be studied. Lymphocytic gastritis was detected in seven of 22 patients (32%), and in most cases both in antral and body mucosa. Atrophy of the body glands was significantly more severe in lymphocytic gastritis patients. H pylori was detected in 13 of all 22 patients (59%); two of seven lymphocytic gastritis patients (29%), and 11 of 15 (73%) of patients without lymphocytic gastritis were H pylori positive. Patients with gastric lymphoma have significantly increased prevalence of lymphocytic gastritis. Rarity of H pylori in these patients might be connected with atrophic changes in body mucosa. Further studies are needed to show the significance of lymphocytic gastritis as a precursor of gastric lymphoma. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:7489930

  8. CONVENTIONAL VIDEOENDOSCOPY CAN IDENTIFY HELICOBACTER PYLORI GASTRITIS?

    PubMed

    Gomes, Alexandre; Skare, Thelma Larocca; Prestes, Manoel Alberto; Costa, Maiza da Silva; Petisco, Roberta Dombroski; Ramos, Gabriela Piovezani

    2016-01-01

    Studies with latest technologies such as endoscopy with magnification and chromoendoscopy showed that various endoscopic aspects are clearly related to infection by Helicobacter pylori (HP). The description of different patterns of erythema in gastric body under magnification of images revived interest in identifying these patterns by standard endoscopy. To validate the morphologic features of gastric mucosa related to H. pylori infection gastritis allowing predictability of their diagnosis as well as proper targeting biopsies. Prospective study of 339 consecutive patients with the standard videoendoscope image analysis were obtained, recorded and stored in a program database. These images were studied with respect to the presence or absence of H. pylori, diagnosed by rapid urease test and/or by histological analysis. Were studied: a) normal mucosa appearance; b) mucosal nodularity; c) diffuse nonspecific erythema or redness (with or without edema of folds and exudate) of antrum and body; d) mosaic pattern with focal area of hyperemia; e) erythema in streaks or bands (red streak); f) elevated (raised) erosion; g) flat erosions; h) fundic gland polyps. The main exclusion criteria were the use of drugs, HP pre-treatment and other entities that could affect results. Applying the exclusion criteria, were included 170 of the 339 patients, of which 52 (30.58%) were positive for HP and 118 negative. On the positive findings, the most associated with infection were: nodularity in the antrum (26.92%); presence of raised erosion (15.38%) and mosaic mucosa in the body (21.15%). On the negative group the normal appearance of the mucosa was 66.94%; erythema in streaks or bands in 9.32%; flat erosions 11.86%; and fundic gland polyps 11.86%. Endoscopic findings are useful in the predictability of the result and in directing biopsies. The most representative form of HP related gastritis was the nodularity of the antral mucosa. The raised erosion and mucosa in mosaic in the body

  9. [Helicobacter pylori gastritis: assessment of OLGA and OLGIM staging systems].

    PubMed

    Ben Slama, Sana; Ben Ghachem, Dorra; Dhaoui, Amen; Jomni, Mohamed Taieb; Dougui, Mohamed Hédi; Bellil, Khadija

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) gastritis presents a risk of cancer related to atrophy and intestinal metaplasia. Two recent classifications OLGA (Operative Link on Gastritis Assessment) and OLGIM (Operative Link on Gastritic Intestinal Metaplasia assessment) have been proposed to identify high-risk forms (stages III and IV). The aim of this study is to evaluate the OLGA and OLGIM staging systems in H pylori gastritis. A descriptive study of 100 cases of chronic H pylori gastritis was performed. The revaluation of Sydney System parameters of atrophy and intestinal metaplasia, of gastric antrum and corpus, allowed identifying respectively the stages of OLGA and OLGIM systems. The progressive risk of our H pylori gastritis was 6% according to OLGA staging and 7% according to OLGIM staging. Significant correlation was revealed between age and OLGA staging. High-risk gastritis according to OLGIM staging was significantly associated with moderate to severe atrophy. High-risk forms according to OLGA staging were associated in 80% of the cases to intestinal metaplasia. OLGA and OLGIM systems showed a highly significant positive correlation between them with a mismatch at 5% for H pylori gastritis. The OLGA and OLGIM staging systems in addition to Sydney System, allow selection of high risk forms of chronic gastritis requiring accurate observation.

  10. Long-term sequelae of Helicobacter pylori gastritis.

    PubMed

    Kuipers, E J; Uyterlinde, A M; Peña, A S; Roosendaal, R; Pals, G; Nelis, G F; Festen, H P; Meuwissen, S G

    1995-06-17

    Chronic Helicobacter pylori gastritis has been put forward as a risk factor for development of gastric mucosal atrophy and gastric cancer. The purpose of our study was to investigate the long-term effects of H pylori gastritis on the gastric mucosa. We prospectively studied 49 subjects negative for H pylori and 58 positive subjects for a mean follow-up of 11.5 years (range 10-13 years). Serum samples were obtained at the initial and follow-up visits for determination of H pylori IgG antibodies. Gastroscopies with biopsy sampling were done in all patients at both visits. Biopsy specimens were used for assessment of H pylori infection and histology. Development of atrophic gastritis and intestinal metaplasia occurred in 2 (4%) uninfected and 16 (28%) infected subjects. Regression of atrophy was noted in 4 (7%) infected subjects. Development of atrophic gastritis and intestinal metaplasia was significantly associated with H pylori infection (p = 0.0014; odds ratio 9.0, 95% CI 1.9-41.3). The proportion of atrophic gastritis in the study population showed an annual increase of 1.15% (0.5-1.8%). We conclude that H pylori infection is a significant risk factor for development of atrophic gastritis and intestinal metaplasia. Our findings support strongly the causative role of this infection in gastric carcinogenesis.

  11. Endoscopic gastritis, serum pepsinogen assay, and Helicobacter pylori infection

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sun-Young

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic findings of the background gastric mucosa are important in the Helicobacter pylori-seroprevalent population. It is strongly correlated not only with the risk of gastric cancer, but also with the excretion ability of gastric mucosa cells. In noninfected subjects, common endoscopic findings are regular arrangement of collecting venules, chronic superficial gastritis, and erosive gastritis. In cases of active H. pylori infection, nodularity on the antrum, hemorrhagic spots on the fundus, and thickened gastric folds are common endoscopic findings. The secreting ability of the gastric mucosa cells is usually intact in both noninfected and actively infected stomachs, and the intragastric condition becomes hyperacidic upon inflammation. Increased serum pepsinogen II concentration correlates well with active H. pylori infection, and also indicates an increased risk of diffuse-type gastric cancer. In chronic inactive H. pylori infection, metaplastic gastritis and atrophic gastritis extending from the antrum (closed-type chronic atrophic gastritis) toward the corpus (open-type chronic atrophic gastritis) are common endoscopic findings. The intragastric environment is hypoacidic and the risk of intestinal-type gastric cancer is increased in such conditions. Furthermore, there is a decrease in serum pepsinogen I concentration when the secreting ability of the gastric mucosa cells is damaged. Serologic and endoscopic changes that occur upon H. pylori infection are important findings for estimating the secreting ability of the gastric mucosa cells, and could be applied for the secondary prevention of gastric cancer. PMID:27604795

  12. Endoscopic gastritis, serum pepsinogen assay, and Helicobacter pylori infection.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sun-Young

    2016-09-01

    Endoscopic findings of the background gastric mucosa are important in the Helicobacter pylori-seroprevalent population. It is strongly correlated not only with the risk of gastric cancer, but also with the excretion ability of gastric mucosa cells. In noninfected subjects, common endoscopic findings are regular arrangement of collecting venules, chronic superficial gastritis, and erosive gastritis. In cases of active H. pylori infection, nodularity on the antrum, hemorrhagic spots on the fundus, and thickened gastric folds are common endoscopic findings. The secreting ability of the gastric mucosa cells is usually intact in both noninfected and actively infected stomachs, and the intragastric condition becomes hyperacidic upon inflammation. Increased serum pepsinogen II concentration correlates well with active H. pylori infection, and also indicates an increased risk of diffuse-type gastric cancer. In chronic inactive H. pylori infection, metaplastic gastritis and atrophic gastritis extending from the antrum (closed-type chronic atrophic gastritis) toward the corpus (open-type chronic atrophic gastritis) are common endoscopic findings. The intragastric environment is hypoacidic and the risk of intestinal-type gastric cancer is increased in such conditions. Furthermore, there is a decrease in serum pepsinogen I concentration when the secreting ability of the gastric mucosa cells is damaged. Serologic and endoscopic changes that occur upon H. pylori infection are important findings for estimating the secreting ability of the gastric mucosa cells, and could be applied for the secondary prevention of gastric cancer.

  13. Helicobacter Pylori Gastritis, a Presequeale to Coronary Plaque

    PubMed Central

    Raut, Shrikant C.; Patil, Vinayak W.; Dalvi, Shubhangi M.; Bakhshi, Girish D.

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori are considered the most common human pathogen colonizing gastric mucosa. Gastritis with or without H. pylori infection is associated with increase in levels of homocysteine and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) but a more pronounced increase is noted in gastritis with H. pylori infection. Increasing level of homocysteine, due to decreased absorption of vitamin B12 and folic acid, together with increased CRP levels in gastritis with H. pylori infection may be the earliest event in the process of atherosclerosis and plaque formation. Retrospective study conducted at tertiary care hospital in Mumbai by Department of Biochemistry in association with Department of Surgery. Eighty patients who underwent gastroscopy in view of gastritis were subjected to rapid urease test for diagnosis of H. pylori infection. Vitamin B12, folic acid, homocysteine and hs-CRP were analyzed using chemiluminescence immuno assay. Student’s t-test, Pearson’s correlation and linear regression used for statistical analysis. Patients with H. pylori gastritis had significantly lower levels of vitamin B12 (271.6±101.3 vs 390.6±176.7 pg/mL; P=0.0005), as well as higher levels of homocysteine (17.4±7.4 vs 13.8±7.8 µmol/L; P=0.037) and hs-CRP (2.5±2.9 vs 1.2±1.1 mg/L; P=0.017), than in patients without H. pylori gastritis. However, folic acid showed (8.9±3.2 vs 10.0±3.6 ng/mL; P=0.171) no significant difference. Elevated homocysteine and hs-CRP in H. pylori gastritis may independently induce endothelial dysfunction, leading to cardiovascular pathology. PMID:25918633

  14. Helicobacter pylori-induced gastritis in experimentally infected conventional piglets.

    PubMed

    Poutahidis, T; Tsangaris, T; Kanakoudis, G; Vlemmas, I; Iliadis, N; Sofianou, D

    2001-11-01

    A conventional nonmutant animal that could be experimentally infected with Helicobacter pylori isolates would be a useful animal model for human H. pylori-associated gastritis. Gnotobiotic and barrier-born pigs are susceptible to H. pylori infection, but attempts to infect conventional pigs with this bacterium have been unsuccessful. In the present study, a litter of eight 20-day-old crossbreed piglets were purchased from a commercial farm. Six of them were orally challenged two to five times at different ages, between 29 and 49 days, with doses of H. pylori inoculum containing approximately 10(9) bacterial cells. Two animals served as controls. The inoculation program began 2 days postweaning when the piglets were 29 days of age. Prior to every inoculation, the piglets were fasted and pretreated with cimetidine, and prior to the first and second inoculation each piglet also was pretreated with dexamethasone. The challenged piglets were euthanasized between 36 and 76 days of age. H. pylori colonized all six inoculated piglets. The pathology of the experimentally induced gastritis was examined macroscopically and by light and electron microscopy. H. pylori induced a severe lymphocytic gastritis in the conventional piglets and reproduced the large majority of the pathologic features of the human disease. Therefore, the conventional piglet represents a promising new model for study of the various pathogenic mechanisms involved in the development of lesions of the human H. pylori-associated gastritis.

  15. Severe gastritis decreases success rate of Helicobacter pylori eradication.

    PubMed

    Kalkan, Ismail Hakki; Sapmaz, Ferdane; Güliter, Sefa; Atasoy, Pınar

    2016-05-01

    In several studies, different risk factors other than antibiotic resistance have been documented with Helicobacter pylori eradication failure. We aimed in this study to investigate the relationship of gastric density of H. pylori, the occurrence/degree of gastric atrophy, and intestinal metaplasia (IM) with success rate of H. pylori eradication. Two hundred consecutive treatment naive patients who received bismuth containing standart quadruple treatment due to H. pylori infection documented by histopathological examination of two antral or two corpal biopsies entered this retrospective study. The updated Sydney system was used to grade the activity of gastritis, density of H. pylori colonization, atrophy, and IM. Stages III and IV of operative link for gastritis assessment (OLGA) or the operative link on gastric intestinal metaplasia assessment (OLGIM) stages was considered as severe gastritis. H. pylori eradication was determined via stool H. pylori antigen test performed 4 weeks after the end of therapy. The presence of gastric atrophy and IM was significantly higher in patients with eradication failure (p = 0.001 and 0.01, respectively). Severe gastritis (OLGA III-IV and OLGIM III-IV) rates were higher in eradication failure group. A multiple linear regression analysis showed that OLGA and OLGIM stages were to be independent risk factors for eradication failure (p = 0.03 and 0.01, respectively). Our results suggested that histopathologically severe gastritis may cause H. pylori eradication failure. In addition, we found that H. pylori density was not a risk factor for treatment failure in patients who receive quadruple treatment.

  16. Helicobacter pylori-negative Russell body gastritis: Case report

    PubMed Central

    Gobbo, Alessandro Del; Elli, Luca; Braidotti, Paola; Nuovo, Franca Di; Bosari, Silvano; Romagnoli, Solange

    2011-01-01

    Russell body gastritis is an unusual form of chronic gastritis characterized by the permeation of lamina propria by numerous plasma cells with eosinophilic cytoplasmic inclusions. Very few cases have been reported in the literature; the majority of which have shown Helicobacter Pylori (H. pylori) infection, thus suggesting a correlation between plasma cell presence and antigenic stimulation by H. pylori. We present a case of Russell body gastritis in a 78-year-old woman who was undergoing esophagogastroduodenoscopy for epigastric pain. Gastric biopsy of the gastroesophageal junction showed the presence of cells with periodic acid-Schiff-positive hyaline pink bodies. Giemsa staining for H. pylori infection was negative, as well as immunohistochemical detection. The cells with eosinophilic inclusions stained positive for CD138, CD79a, and κ and lambda light chains, which confirmed plasma cell origin. In particular, κ and lambda light chains showed a polyclonal origin and the patient was negative for immunological dyscrasia. The histological observations were confirmed by ultrastructural examination. The cases reported in the literature associated with H. pylori infection have shown regression of plasma cells after eradication of H. pylori. Nothing is known about the progression of H. pylori-negative cases. The unusual morphological appearance of this type of chronic gastritis should not be misinterpreted during routine examination, and it should be distinguished from other common forms of chronic gastritis. It is mandatory to exclude neoplastic diseases such as gastric carcinoma, lymphoma and plasmocytoma by immunohistochemistry and electron microscopy, which can help with differential diagnosis. The long-term effects of plasma cells hyperactivation are still unknown, because cases of gastric tumor that originated in patients affected by Russell body gastritis have not been described in the literature. We are of the opinion that these patients should be scheduled

  17. Helicobacter pylori-negative Russell body gastritis: case report.

    PubMed

    Del Gobbo, Alessandro; Elli, Luca; Braidotti, Paola; Di Nuovo, Franca; Bosari, Silvano; Romagnoli, Solange

    2011-03-07

    Russell body gastritis is an unusual form of chronic gastritis characterized by the permeation of lamina propria by numerous plasma cells with eosinophilic cytoplasmic inclusions. Very few cases have been reported in the literature; the majority of which have shown Helicobacter Pylori (H. pylori) infection, thus suggesting a correlation between plasma cell presence and antigenic stimulation by H. pylori. We present a case of Russell body gastritis in a 78-year-old woman who was undergoing esophagogastroduodenoscopy for epigastric pain. Gastric biopsy of the gastroesophageal junction showed the presence of cells with periodic acid-Schiff-positive hyaline pink bodies. Giemsa staining for H. pylori infection was negative, as well as immunohistochemical detection. The cells with eosinophilic inclusions stained positive for CD138, CD79a, and κ and lambda light chains, which confirmed plasma cell origin. In particular, κ and lambda light chains showed a polyclonal origin and the patient was negative for immunological dyscrasia. The histological observations were confirmed by ultrastructural examination. The cases reported in the literature associated with H. pylori infection have shown regression of plasma cells after eradication of H. pylori. Nothing is known about the progression of H. pylori-negative cases. The unusual morphological appearance of this type of chronic gastritis should not be misinterpreted during routine examination, and it should be distinguished from other common forms of chronic gastritis. It is mandatory to exclude neoplastic diseases such as gastric carcinoma, lymphoma and plasmocytoma by immunohistochemistry and electron microscopy, which can help with differential diagnosis. The long-term effects of plasma cells hyperactivation are still unknown, because cases of gastric tumor that originated in patients affected by Russell body gastritis have not been described in the literature. We are of the opinion that these patients should be scheduled

  18. Helicobacter-negative gastritis: a distinct entity unrelated to Helicobacter pylori infection.

    PubMed

    Genta, R M; Sonnenberg, A

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter-negative gastritis is diagnosed when no organisms are detected in a gastric mucosa with typical features of Helicobacter gastritis (Hp-gastritis). If Helicobacter-negative gastritis consisted mostly of 'missed' Helicobacter infections, its prevalence should represent a constant percentage of these infections in a population, and their clinico-epidemiological features would overlap. To compare the epidemiologic patterns of Hp-positive and Hp-negative gastritis. From a pathology database, we extracted demographic, clinical and histopathological data from patients with gastric biopsies (1.2008-12.2013). We allocated patients to high (≥12%) and low (≤6%) H. pylori prevalence regions defined by ZIP code-based data. The prevalence of H. pylori-positive and -negative gastritis by sex, age and state were expressed as a per cent of the total study population stratified accordingly. Of 895 323 patients, 10.6% had Hp-gastritis and 1.5% Helicobacter-negative gastritis. Hp-gastritis, but not Helicobacter-negative gastritis, was more common in males than females (OR 1.17, 95% CI: 1.16-1.19). While Hp-gastritis was more prevalent in high than in low-prevalence areas (OR 3.65, 95% CI: 3.57-3.74), Helicobacter-negative gastritis was only minimally affected by the underlying H. pylori prevalence (1.7% vs. 1.5%). The age-specific prevalence of Hp-gastritis peaked in the 4th to 5th decades; Helicobacter-negative gastritis exhibited a low and relatively flat pattern. The geographic distribution of H. pylori-positive and -negative gastritis showed no significant correlation. Intestinal metaplasia was found in 13.0% of patients with Hp-gastritis and in 6.1% of those with Helicobacter-negative gastritis (OR 0.43, 95% CI: 0.40-0.47). These data suggest that Helicobacter-negative gastritis is, in the vast majority of cases, a nosologically and epidemiologically distinct entity that deserves further investigation. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Kyoto global consensus report on Helicobacter pylori gastritis

    PubMed Central

    Sugano, Kentaro; Tack, Jan; Kuipers, Ernst J; Graham, David Y; El-Omar, Emad M; Miura, Soichiro; Haruma, Ken; Asaka, Masahiro; Uemura, Naomi; Malfertheiner, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Objective To present results of the Kyoto Global Consensus Meeting, which was convened to develop global consensus on (1) classification of chronic gastritis and duodenitis, (2) clinical distinction of dyspepsia caused by Helicobacter pylori from functional dyspepsia, (3) appropriate diagnostic assessment of gastritis and (4) when, whom and how to treat H. pylori gastritis. Design Twenty-three clinical questions addressing the above-mentioned four domains were drafted for which expert panels were asked to formulate relevant statements. A Delphi method using an anonymous electronic system was adopted to develop the consensus, the level of which was predefined as ≥80%. Final modifications of clinical questions and consensus were achieved at the face-to-face meeting in Kyoto. Results All 24 statements for 22 clinical questions after extensive modifications and omission of one clinical question were achieved with a consensus level of >80%. To better organise classification of gastritis and duodenitis based on aetiology, a new classification of gastritis and duodenitis is recommended for the 11th international classification. A new category of H. pylori-associated dyspepsia together with a diagnostic algorithm was proposed. The adoption of grading systems for gastric cancer risk stratification, and modern image-enhancing endoscopy for the diagnosis of gastritis, were recommended. Treatment to eradicate H. pylori infection before preneoplastic changes develop, if feasible, was recommended to minimise the risk of more serious complications of the infection. Conclusions A global consensus for gastritis was developed for the first time, which will be the basis for an international classification system and for further research on the subject. PMID:26187502

  20. Kyoto global consensus report on Helicobacter pylori gastritis.

    PubMed

    Sugano, Kentaro; Tack, Jan; Kuipers, Ernst J; Graham, David Y; El-Omar, Emad M; Miura, Soichiro; Haruma, Ken; Asaka, Masahiro; Uemura, Naomi; Malfertheiner, Peter

    2015-09-01

    To present results of the Kyoto Global Consensus Meeting, which was convened to develop global consensus on (1) classification of chronic gastritis and duodenitis, (2) clinical distinction of dyspepsia caused by Helicobacter pylori from functional dyspepsia, (3) appropriate diagnostic assessment of gastritis and (4) when, whom and how to treat H. pylori gastritis. Twenty-three clinical questions addressing the above-mentioned four domains were drafted for which expert panels were asked to formulate relevant statements. A Delphi method using an anonymous electronic system was adopted to develop the consensus, the level of which was predefined as ≥80%. Final modifications of clinical questions and consensus were achieved at the face-to-face meeting in Kyoto. All 24 statements for 22 clinical questions after extensive modifications and omission of one clinical question were achieved with a consensus level of >80%. To better organise classification of gastritis and duodenitis based on aetiology, a new classification of gastritis and duodenitis is recommended for the 11th international classification. A new category of H. pylori-associated dyspepsia together with a diagnostic algorithm was proposed. The adoption of grading systems for gastric cancer risk stratification, and modern image-enhancing endoscopy for the diagnosis of gastritis, were recommended. Treatment to eradicate H. pylori infection before preneoplastic changes develop, if feasible, was recommended to minimise the risk of more serious complications of the infection. A global consensus for gastritis was developed for the first time, which will be the basis for an international classification system and for further research on the subject. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  1. Role of gastritis pattern on Helicobacter pylori eradication.

    PubMed

    Zullo, Angelo; Severi, Carola; Vannella, Lucy; Hassan, Cesare; Sbrozzi-Vanni, Andrea; Annibale, Bruno

    2012-12-01

    Helicobacter pylori eradication rate following standard triple therapy is decreasing. Identification of predictive factors of therapy success would be useful for H. pylori management in clinical practice. This study aimed to evaluate the role of different gastritis patterns on the efficacy of the currently suggested 14-day triple therapy regimen. One-hundred and seventeen, consecutive, non-ulcer dyspeptic patients, with H. pylori infection diagnosed at endoscopy, were enrolled. All patients received a 14-day, triple therapy with lansoprazole 30 mg, clarithromycin 500 mg and amoxicillin 1 g, all given twice daily. Bacterial eradication was assessed with (13)C-urea breath test 4-6 weeks after completion of therapy. H. pylori infection was cured in 70.1% at ITT analysis and 83.7% at PP analysis. The eradication rate tended to be lower in patients with corpus-predominant gastritis as compared to those with antral-predominant gastritis at both ITT (66.1 vs 74.5%) and PP (80.4 vs 87.2%) analyses. The multivariate analysis failed to identify factors associated with therapy success. However, 14-day triple therapy does not achieve acceptable H. pylori cure rate in Italy, and should be not recommended in clinical practice.

  2. Helicobacter pylori infection and chronic gastritis in gastric cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Sipponen, P.; Kosunen, T. U.; Valle, J.; Riihelä, M.; Seppälä, K.

    1992-01-01

    AIMS: To investigate the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori associated chronic gastritis in patients with gastric cancer. METHODS: Serum IgG antibodies for H pylori were determined in 54 consecutive patients with gastric carcinoma. The prevalence of H pylori in gastric mucosa was also examined histologically (modified Giemsa) in 32 patients from whom adequate biopsy specimens of the antrum and corpus were available. Thirty five patients with gastrointestinal tumours outside the stomach and 48 with non-gastrointestinal malignancies served as controls. RESULTS: Of the 54 patients, 38 (70%) had H pylori antibodies (IgG) in their serum (three additional patients had H pylori antibodies IgA, class specific but not IgG specific). This prevalence was significantly higher (p less than 0.05) than that (49%) in the 35 controls. No differences in prevalence of H pylori antibodies were found between gastric cancer cases of intestinal (IGCA) or diffuse (DGCA) type, both these types showing H pylori antibodies (IgG) in 71% of the patients. In the subgroup of 32 subjects, five patients had normal gastric mucosa and four showed corpus limited atrophy ("pernicious anaemia type" atrophy of type A). All of these nine patients had no evidence of current or previous H pylori infection in serum (no IgG antibodies) or in tissue sections (negative Giemsa staining). The remaining 23 patients had antral or pangastritis, and all had evidence of current or previous H pylori infection. CONCLUSIONS: H pylori associated chronic gastritis was the associated disease in 75% of the patients with gastric cancer occurring equally often in both IGCA and DGCA groups. About 25% of cases seem to have a normal stomach or severe corpus limited atrophy, neither of which showed evidence of concomitant H pylori infection. PMID:1577969

  3. Inverse Association Between Helicobacter pylori Gastritis and Microscopic Colitis.

    PubMed

    Sonnenberg, Amnon; Genta, Robert M

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease is known to be inversely associated with Helicobacter pylori infection of the upper gastrointestinal tract. We hypothesized that a similar inverse association also applied to microscopic colitis. The associations between microscopic colitis and presence of H. pylori-positive chronic active gastritis (CAG), H. pylori-negative CAG, intestinal metaplasia, or gastric atrophy were expressed as odds ratios with their 95% confidence intervals. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to adjust these associations for sex, age, percentage residents per ZIP code with white, black, Hispanic, or Asian ethnicity, percentage with college education, average housing values, annual income, and population size of individual ZIP codes. H. pylori-positive CAG was less common among patients with than without microscopic colitis (odds ratio = 0.61; 95% confidence interval, 0.52-0.70). Intestinal metaplasia also occurred less frequently among patients with than without microscopic colitis (0.75, 0.65-0.86). These inverse associations remained unaffected by adjustments for parameters of ethnicity and socioeconomic status. In contradistinction with H. pylori-positive CAG, H. pylori-negative CAG was more common in patients with than without microscopic colitis (1.54, 1.17-1.97). H. pylori infection and microscopic colitis are inversely associated. This observation is consistent with similar inverse associations found between H. pylori and inflammatory bowel disease. These relationships may provide clues about the yet unknown etiology of microscopic colitis.

  4. In French children, primary gastritis is more frequent than Helicobacter pylori gastritis.

    PubMed

    Kalach, N; Papadopoulos, S; Asmar, E; Spyckerelle, C; Gosset, P; Raymond, J; Dehecq, E; Decoster, A; Creusy, C; Dupont, C

    2009-09-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the histological characteristics according to the updated Sydney classification (intensity of gastritis, degree of activity, gastric atrophy, intestinal metaplasia, and Helicobacter pylori) in symptomatic children referred for upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. A 4-year retrospective descriptive study was carried out in 619 children (282 females and 337 males), median age 3.75 years (15 days to 17.3 years) referred for endoscopy. Six gastric biopsies were done (three antrum and three corpus) for histological analysis (n = 4), direct examination and H. pylori culture (n = 2). H. pylori status was considered positive if at least two out of three tests were positive and negative if all three tests were negative. The results showed that only 66 children (10.66%) were H. pylori positive. Histological antral and corpus gastritis was detected in, respectively, 53.95% and 59.12% of all cases, most of them of mild grade 1. Antral and corpus activity was grade 1 in 18.57% and 20.03% of cases. H. pylori-positive versus H. pylori-negative children did differ in terms of moderate and marked histological gastritis and grade 2 or 3 activities. One girl had moderate gastric atrophy and another one moderate intestinal metaplasia, both being H. pylori negative. The findings indicate that primary antrum and corpus gastritis is 5.3 and 6.9 times, respectively, more frequent than H. pylori gastritis in French children, with usually mild histological gastritis and activity. Gastric atrophy and intestinal metaplasia are rare.

  5. Probiotic BIFICO cocktail ameliorates Helicobacter pylori induced gastritis

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hong-Jing; Liu, Wei; Chang, Zhen; Shen, Hui; He, Li-Juan; Wang, Sha-Sha; Liu, Lu; Jiang, Yuan-Ying; Xu, Guo-Tong; An, Mao-Mao; Zhang, Jun-Dong

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To determine the protective effect of triple viable probiotics on gastritis induced by Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) and elucidate the possible mechanisms of protection. METHODS: Colonization of BIFICO strains in the mouse stomach was determined by counting colony-forming units per gram of stomach tissue. After treatment with or without BIFICO, inflammation and H. pylori colonization in the mouse stomach were analyzed by hematoxylin and eosin and Giemsa staining, respectively. Cytokine levels were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and Milliplex. The activation of nuclear factor (NF)-κB and MAPK signaling in human gastric epithelial cells was evaluated by Western blot analysis. Quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction was used to quantify TLR2, TLR4 and MyD88 mRNA expression in the mouse stomach. RESULTS: We demonstrated that BIFICO, which contains a mixture of Enterococcus faecalis, Bifidobacterium longum and Lactobacillus acidophilus, was tolerant to the mouse stomach environment and was able to survive both the 8-h and 3-d courses of administration. Although BIFICO treatment had no effect on the colonization of H. pylori in the mouse stomach, it ameliorated H. pylori-induced gastritis by significantly inhibiting the expression of cytokines and chemokines such as TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-10, IL-6, G-CSF and MIP-2 (P < 0.05). These results led us to hypothesize that BIFICO treatment would diminish the H. pylori-induced inflammatory response in gastric mucosal epithelial cells in vitro via the NF-κB and MAPK signaling pathways. Indeed, we observed a decrease in the expression of the NF-κB subunit p65 and in the phosphorylation of IκB-α, ERK and p38. Moreover, there was a significant decrease in the production of IL-8, TNF-α, G-CSF and GM-CSF (P < 0.05), and the increased expression of TLR2, TLR4 and MyD88 induced by H. pylori in the stomach was also significantly reduced following BIFICO treatment (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: Our

  6. Probiotic BIFICO cocktail ameliorates Helicobacter pylori induced gastritis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hong-Jing; Liu, Wei; Chang, Zhen; Shen, Hui; He, Li-Juan; Wang, Sha-Sha; Liu, Lu; Jiang, Yuan-Ying; Xu, Guo-Tong; An, Mao-Mao; Zhang, Jun-Dong

    2015-06-07

    To determine the protective effect of triple viable probiotics on gastritis induced by Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) and elucidate the possible mechanisms of protection. Colonization of BIFICO strains in the mouse stomach was determined by counting colony-forming units per gram of stomach tissue. After treatment with or without BIFICO, inflammation and H. pylori colonization in the mouse stomach were analyzed by hematoxylin and eosin and Giemsa staining, respectively. Cytokine levels were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and Milliplex. The activation of nuclear factor (NF)-κB and MAPK signaling in human gastric epithelial cells was evaluated by Western blot analysis. Quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction was used to quantify TLR2, TLR4 and MyD88 mRNA expression in the mouse stomach. We demonstrated that BIFICO, which contains a mixture of Enterococcus faecalis, Bifidobacterium longum and Lactobacillus acidophilus, was tolerant to the mouse stomach environment and was able to survive both the 8-h and 3-d courses of administration. Although BIFICO treatment had no effect on the colonization of H. pylori in the mouse stomach, it ameliorated H. pylori-induced gastritis by significantly inhibiting the expression of cytokines and chemokines such as TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-10, IL-6, G-CSF and MIP-2 (P < 0.05). These results led us to hypothesize that BIFICO treatment would diminish the H. pylori-induced inflammatory response in gastric mucosal epithelial cells in vitro via the NF-κB and MAPK signaling pathways. Indeed, we observed a decrease in the expression of the NF-κB subunit p65 and in the phosphorylation of IκB-α, ERK and p38. Moreover, there was a significant decrease in the production of IL-8, TNF-α, G-CSF and GM-CSF (P < 0.05), and the increased expression of TLR2, TLR4 and MyD88 induced by H. pylori in the stomach was also significantly reduced following BIFICO treatment (P < 0.05). Our results suggest that the probiotic

  7. Eradication of Helicobacter pylori in follicular and nonfollicular gastritis.

    PubMed

    Mehmet, Sokmen; Ozdal, Ersoy; Kamil, Ozdil; Beşir, Kesici; Huseyin, Demirsoy; Nihat, Akbayir; Cigdem, Ersoy Yazici; Nusret, Erdogan

    2009-01-01

    Effective eradication therapy of Helicobacter pylori (Hp) in non-follicular type gastritis is commonly demonstrated by many studies. In contrast, some other studies show that the eradication of Hp is low in follicular type gastritis. However, the subject concerning the comparison of the results of triple-drug Hp eradication treatment between follicular and nonfollicular type gastritis is still unclear because of the paucity of studies. The aim of this study was to compare the results of Hp eradication therapy between follicular and non-follicular type gastritis. Two age- and sex-matched groups, consisting of 21 patients with follicular type and 23 patients with nonfollicular type gastritis associated with Hp (histopathologically diagnosed after endoscopic procedure), were enrolled into our study. Triple-drug Hp eradication therapy [lansoprazole (L) 30 mg bid, amoxicillin (A) 1000 g bid and clarithromycin (C) 500 mg bid] was given to all patients in both groups for two weeks. Control for the eradication of Hp was performed by endoscopic biopsy (3 months after treatment) in the follicular group and by urea-breath test (1 month after treatment) in the nonfollicular group. Eradication of the follicles in follicular type gastritis was also observed in the control endoscopic biopsies. For the statistical analysis, SPSS 11 for Windows was used and paired-samples t-test was performed. p<0.05 was considered as significant. In total, 66 patients were enrolled into the study. All were histopathologically diagnosed as having Hp-associated gastritis (31 follicular and 35 nonfollicular) and started on triple-drug Hp eradication therapy. Only 44 of these patients (21 follicular gastritis and 23 nonfollicular gastritis) completed 2 weeks of treatment. The other 22 patients were not able to complete the treatment because of not taking the drugs properly or of the side-effects of the drugs. Patient compliance ratio to the treatment was 67.7%. The ratios for Hp eradication in

  8. Pediatric non-Helicobacter pylori atrophic gastritis: a case series.

    PubMed

    Pogoriler, Jennifer; Kamin, Daniel; Goldsmith, Jeffrey D

    2015-06-01

    Although autoimmune atrophic gastritis is classically a disease of elderly adults, recent studies have described the disease in younger adults, particularly in those with other autoimmune diseases and iron-deficiency anemia. Atrophic gastritis in pediatrics is a rare and possibly underdiagnosed entity that has been primarily reported as single-case reports. This retrospective study of atrophic gastritis not associated with Helicobacter pylori infection was performed to further expand the knowledge of clinical presentation, pathologic findings, and natural history of this disease in the pediatric population. Twelve patients with a histologic diagnosis of atrophic gastritis were identified, with an age range of 8 months to 18 years. Seven had other autoimmune diseases and/or immunodeficiency. Atrophy was confined to the oxyntic mucosa in 10 patients, with intramucosal inflammation in a diffuse or basal-predominant pattern. Active inflammation was present in 7 patients. Pseudopyloric, intestinal, or squamous/mucinous metaplasia was seen at initial biopsy or on follow-up in 8 patients, and enterochromaffin-like cell hyperplasia was seen in 5. One patient developed an adenocarcinoma during the follow-up period of 10 years. Two false-negative diagnoses were retrospectively identified. In the majority of cases, the possibility of atrophic gastritis was not raised by the submitting physician, and the endoscopic findings were not specific. Therefore, accurate diagnosis requires a high degree of suspicion on the part of the pathologist, and the diagnosis should be considered particularly in patients with a clinical history of other autoimmune diseases or iron-deficiency anemia.

  9. Oxyntic gastric atrophy in Helicobacter pylori gastritis is distinct from autoimmune gastritis.

    PubMed

    Venerito, Marino; Varbanova, Mariya; Röhl, Friedrich-Wilhelm; Reinhold, Dirk; Frauenschläger, Katrin; Jechorek, Doerthe; Weigt, Jochen; Link, Alexander; Malfertheiner, Peter

    2016-08-01

    To assess characteristics of oxyntic gastric atrophy (OGA) in autoimmune gastritis (AIG) compared with OGA as a consequence of Helicobacter pylori infection. Patients undergoing oesophagogastroduodenoscopy from July 2011 to October 2014 were prospectively included (N=452). Gastric biopsies were obtained for histology and H. pylori testing. Serum gastrin-17 (G17), pepsinogen (PG) I, PGII and antibodies against H. pylori and cytotoxin-associated gene A protein were determined in all patients. Antibodies against parietal cells and intrinsic factor were determined in patients with advanced (moderate to severe) OGA. Areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves (AUCs) were calculated for serum biomarkers and compared with histology. Overall, 34 patients (8.9%) had advanced OGA by histology (22 women, age 61±15 years). Current or past H. pylori infection and AIG were present in 14/34 and 22/34 patients, respectively. H. pylori-negative AIG patients (N=18) were more likely to have another autoimmune disease (OR 6.3; 95% CI 1.3 to 29.8), severe corpus atrophy (OR 10.1; 95% CI 1.9 to 54.1) and corpus intestinal metaplasia (OR 26.9; 95% CI 5.3 to 136.5) compared with H. pylori-positive patients with advanced OGA. Antrum atrophy was present in 39% of H. pylori-negative AIG patients. The diagnostic performance of G17, PG I and PGI/II was excellent for AIG patients (AUC=0.83, 0.95 and 0.97, respectively), but limited for H. pylori-positive patients with advanced OGA (AUC=0.62, 0.75 and 0.67, respectively). H. pylori-negative AIG has a distinct clinical, morphological and serological phenotype compared with advanced OGA in H. pylori gastritis. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  10. Caveolin-1 Protects B6129 Mice against Helicobacter pylori Gastritis

    PubMed Central

    Hitkova, Ivana; Yuan, Gang; Anderl, Florian; Gerhard, Markus; Kirchner, Thomas; Reu, Simone; Röcken, Christoph; Schäfer, Claus; Schmid, Roland M.; Vogelmann, Roger; Ebert, Matthias P. A.; Burgermeister, Elke

    2013-01-01

    Caveolin-1 (Cav1) is a scaffold protein and pathogen receptor in the mucosa of the gastrointestinal tract. Chronic infection of gastric epithelial cells by Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a major risk factor for human gastric cancer (GC) where Cav1 is frequently down-regulated. However, the function of Cav1 in H. pylori infection and pathogenesis of GC remained unknown. We show here that Cav1-deficient mice, infected for 11 months with the CagA-delivery deficient H. pylori strain SS1, developed more severe gastritis and tissue damage, including loss of parietal cells and foveolar hyperplasia, and displayed lower colonisation of the gastric mucosa than wild-type B6129 littermates. Cav1-null mice showed enhanced infiltration of macrophages and B-cells and secretion of chemokines (RANTES) but had reduced levels of CD25+ regulatory T-cells. Cav1-deficient human GC cells (AGS), infected with the CagA-delivery proficient H. pylori strain G27, were more sensitive to CagA-related cytoskeletal stress morphologies (“humming bird”) compared to AGS cells stably transfected with Cav1 (AGS/Cav1). Infection of AGS/Cav1 cells triggered the recruitment of p120 RhoGTPase-activating protein/deleted in liver cancer-1 (p120RhoGAP/DLC1) to Cav1 and counteracted CagA-induced cytoskeletal rearrangements. In human GC cell lines (MKN45, N87) and mouse stomach tissue, H. pylori down-regulated endogenous expression of Cav1 independently of CagA. Mechanistically, H. pylori activated sterol-responsive element-binding protein-1 (SREBP1) to repress transcription of the human Cav1 gene from sterol-responsive elements (SREs) in the proximal Cav1 promoter. These data suggested a protective role of Cav1 against H. pylori-induced inflammation and tissue damage. We propose that H. pylori exploits down-regulation of Cav1 to subvert the host's immune response and to promote signalling of its virulence factors in host cells. PMID:23592983

  11. Helicobacter pylori-related chronic gastritis as a risk factor for colonic neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Izumi; Kato, Jun; Tamai, Hideyuki; Iguchi, Mikitaka; Maekita, Takao; Yoshimura, Noriko; Ichinose, Masao

    2014-02-14

    To summarize the current views and insights on associations between Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori)-related chronic gastritis and colorectal neoplasm, we reviewed recent studies to clarify whether H. pylori infection/H. pylori-related chronic gastritis is associated with an elevated risk of colorectal neoplasm. Recent studies based on large databases with careful control for confounding variables have clearly demonstrated an increased risk of colorectal neoplasm associated with H. pylori infection. The correlation between H. pylori-related chronic atrophic gastritis (CAG) and colorectal neoplasm has only been examined in a limited number of studies. A recent large study using a national histopathological database, and our study based on the stage of H. pylori-related chronic gastritis as determined by serum levels of H. pylori antibody titer and pepsinogen, indicated that H. pylori-related CAG confers an increased risk of colorectal neoplasm, and more extensive atrophic gastritis will probably be associated with even higher risk of neoplasm. In addition, our study suggested that the activity of H. pylori-related chronic gastritis is correlated with colorectal neoplasm risk. H. pylori-related chronic gastritis could be involved in an increased risk of colorectal neoplasm that appears to be enhanced by the progression of gastric atrophy and the presence of active inflammation.

  12. Helicobacter pylori-related chronic gastritis as a risk factor for colonic neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Izumi; Kato, Jun; Tamai, Hideyuki; Iguchi, Mikitaka; Maekita, Takao; Yoshimura, Noriko; Ichinose, Masao

    2014-01-01

    To summarize the current views and insights on associations between Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori)-related chronic gastritis and colorectal neoplasm, we reviewed recent studies to clarify whether H. pylori infection/H. pylori-related chronic gastritis is associated with an elevated risk of colorectal neoplasm. Recent studies based on large databases with careful control for confounding variables have clearly demonstrated an increased risk of colorectal neoplasm associated with H. pylori infection. The correlation between H. pylori-related chronic atrophic gastritis (CAG) and colorectal neoplasm has only been examined in a limited number of studies. A recent large study using a national histopathological database, and our study based on the stage of H. pylori-related chronic gastritis as determined by serum levels of H. pylori antibody titer and pepsinogen, indicated that H. pylori-related CAG confers an increased risk of colorectal neoplasm, and more extensive atrophic gastritis will probably be associated with even higher risk of neoplasm. In addition, our study suggested that the activity of H. pylori-related chronic gastritis is correlated with colorectal neoplasm risk. H. pylori-related chronic gastritis could be involved in an increased risk of colorectal neoplasm that appears to be enhanced by the progression of gastric atrophy and the presence of active inflammation. PMID:24587623

  13. Kyoto global consensus report on Helicobacter pylori gastritis and its impact on Chinese clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qi; Lu, Hong

    2016-06-01

    The Kyoto global consensus report on Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) gastritis has had a great effect on the field of H. pylori studies worldwide. For the first time H. pylori gastritis was defined entirely as an infectious disease and H. pylori-associated dyspepsia as a new category of organic dyspepsia apart from functional dyspepsia, together with a proposed diagnostic algorithm. Accordingly, the report states that the eradication of H. pylori should be regarded as the first-line treatment for dyspepsia. Moreover, H. pylori eradication before the development of pre-neoplastic changes is recommended to reduce the risk of more serious complications of H. pylori gastritis. Despite the recommendations of this new global consensus, the task of transforming them into feasible and practical recommendations for individual countries will require them to become region-specific, which requires further discussion.

  14. Symptomatic infantile Helicobacter pylori gastritis infection in indigenous African infants: a case series.

    PubMed

    Malande, Oliver Ombeva

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori gastritis infection rate increases with age. Higher rates have however been reported among young people in the developing countries of the world. The infection however has rarely been reported in infants, especially in Africa. This case series describes three cases of Helicobacter pylori gastritis infection as diagnosed in three infants. The goal is to raise the suspicion index of medical practitioners about the possibility of this this infection among infants who present with suggestive symptoms. On three separate occasions in 2012 and 2013, three ill, indigenous, black African female infants aged 4, 6 and 7 months, were brought to hospital with symptoms ranging from fever, refusal to feed, diarrhoea, restlessness, vomiting and irritability. In each case, systemic examination findings were unremarkable. After several laboratory investigations, each infant was found to have Helicobacter pylori infection following positive blood antibody (using Tell Me Fast H. Pylori antibody serum and Plasma test manufactured by Biocan Diagnostics Canada) and fecal HpSA ImmunoCardSTAT antigen tests. Repeat stool antigen test was negative in each case after completion of the recommended triple therapy. Helicobacter pylori infection has been rarely reported among infants. This case series highlights the need for health care providers to have a high index of suspicion so that infants with suggestive symptoms, especially in settings with high Helicobacter pylori colonization prevalence can be evaluated for Helicobacter pylori gastritis infection.

  15. Prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection and atrophic gastritis in patients with dyspeptic symptoms in Myanmar.

    PubMed

    Myint, Thein; Shiota, Seiji; Vilaichone, Ratha-korn; Ni, New; Aye, Than Than; Matsuda, Miyuki; Tran, Trang Thi Huyen; Uchida, Tomohisa; Mahachai, Varocha; Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2015-01-14

    To survey the detailed analyses for Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection and gastric mucosal status in Myanmar. A total of 252 volunteers with dyspeptic symptoms (155 female and 97 male; mean age of 43.6 ± 14.2 years) was participated in Yangon and Mandalay. The status of H. pylori infection was determined based on 5 different tests including rapid urease test, culture, histology, immunohistochemistry and serology. Histological scores were evaluated according to the update Sydney system and the Operative Link for Gastritis Assessment system. Pepsinogen (PG) I and PG II were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. The overall prevalence of H. pylori infection was 48.0%. There was no relationship between age and infection rate. Even in young group (less than 29 years old), the H. pylori infection rate was relatively high (41.9%). The prevalence of H. pylori infection was significantly higher in Yangon than that of Mandalay. H. pylori infection was significantly associated with the presence of gastric mucosal atrophy. All 7 subjects with peptic ulcer were infected with H. pylori. Although H. pylori-positive subjects showed stronger gastritis than H. pylori-negative subjects, most cases had mild gastritis. We revealed the prevalence of H. pylori infection in patients with dyspeptic symptoms in Myanmar. The H. pylori infection was a risk factor for peptic ulcer and stronger gastritis.

  16. Prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection and atrophic gastritis in patients with dyspeptic symptoms in Myanmar

    PubMed Central

    Myint, Thein; Shiota, Seiji; Vilaichone, Ratha-korn; Ni, New; Aye, Than Than; Matsuda, Miyuki; Tran, Trang Thi Huyen; Uchida, Tomohisa; Mahachai, Varocha; Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To survey the detailed analyses for Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection and gastric mucosal status in Myanmar. METHODS: A total of 252 volunteers with dyspeptic symptoms (155 female and 97 male; mean age of 43.6 ± 14.2 years) was participated in Yangon and Mandalay. The status of H. pylori infection was determined based on 5 different tests including rapid urease test, culture, histology, immunohistochemistry and serology. Histological scores were evaluated according to the update Sydney system and the Operative Link for Gastritis Assessment system. Pepsinogen (PG) I and PG II were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. RESULTS: The overall prevalence of H. pylori infection was 48.0%. There was no relationship between age and infection rate. Even in young group (less than 29 years old), the H. pylori infection rate was relatively high (41.9%). The prevalence of H. pylori infection was significantly higher in Yangon than that of Mandalay. H. pylori infection was significantly associated with the presence of gastric mucosal atrophy. All 7 subjects with peptic ulcer were infected with H. pylori. Although H. pylori-positive subjects showed stronger gastritis than H. pylori-negative subjects, most cases had mild gastritis. CONCLUSION: We revealed the prevalence of H. pylori infection in patients with dyspeptic symptoms in Myanmar. The H. pylori infection was a risk factor for peptic ulcer and stronger gastritis. PMID:25605987

  17. Two Cases of Russell Body Gastritis Treated by Helicobacter pylori Eradication

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Jung Bin; Lee, Jin Sook; Yoon, Jong Min; Jang, Se Won; Kim, Min Jung; Lee, Su Jin; Kim, Tae Oh

    2012-01-01

    Russell body gastritis was first defined in 1998, but not many cases have been reported since then. The exact causes and process of this condition are unknown yet; however, considering the reported cases, it has been highly suggested to have correlation with Helicobacter pylori infection. Russell body gastritis has a non-specific clinical presentation of gastritis such as gastric mucosal edema in the macroscopic view. It can be mistaken as xanthoma, signet ring cell carcinoma, or a malignant lymphoma including mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma and plasmocytoma. Russell body gastritis features polyclonal immunoglobulin and is differentiated from Mott cancer, of which immune globulin has monoclonal aspect. Authors report here two cases of Russell body gastritis with examined endoscopic findings as well as a review of related literature on the association of all reported cases of Russell body gastritis with H. pylori infection. PMID:23251890

  18. N-acetylcysteine prevents the development of gastritis induced by Helicobacter pylori infection.

    PubMed

    Jang, Sungil; Bak, Eun-Jung; Cha, Jeong-Heon

    2017-05-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a human gastric pathogen, causing various gastric diseases ranging from gastritis to gastric adenocarcinoma. It has been reported that combining N-acetylcysteine (NAC) with conventional antibiotic therapy increases the success rate of H. pylori eradication. We evaluated the effect of NAC itself on the growth and colonization of H. pylori, and development of gastritis, using in vitro liquid culture system and in vivo animal models. H. pylori growth was evaluated in broth culture containing NAC. The H. pylori load and histopathological scores of stomachs were measured in Mongolian gerbils infected with H. pylori strain 7.13, and fed with NAC-containing diet. In liquid culture, NAC inhibited H. pylori growth in a concentration-dependent manner. In the animal model, 3-day administration of NAC after 1 week from infection reduced the H. pylori load; 6-week administration of NAC after 1 week from infection prevented the development of gastritis and reduced H. pylori colonization. However, no reduction in the bacterial load or degree of gastritis was observed with a 6-week administration of NAC following 6-week infection period. Our results indicate that NAC may exert a beneficial effect on reduction of bacterial colonization, and prevents the development of severe inflammation, in people with initial asymptomatic or mild H. pylori infection.

  19. Helicobacter pylori gastritis in a child with sickle cell anemia and recurrent abdominal pain.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, L; Mahoney, D H; Redel, C A

    1997-01-01

    Recurrent abdominal pain is a common complaint in children with sickle cell disease. Helicobacter pylori gastritis has recently been described in association with recurrent abdominal pain in children. A case report is given of a 16-year-old black male with hemoglobin SS disease presenting with recurrent abdominal pain and hematemesis. Endoscopic exam of the upper gastrointestinal tract revealed gastritis, and biopsy confirmed H. pylori infection. Serology studies demonstrated increased anti-H. pylori antibody titers. The young man responded well to treatment, with resolution of his symptoms. Helicobacter pylori infection is a new diagnostic consideration for children with recurrent abdominal pain and should be included in the differential diagnosis of children with sickle cell disease, especially when abdominal pain is recurrent and accompanied by vomiting. Larger case studies will be necessary to determine the true incidence of H. pylori in children with sickle cell disease and recurrent abdominal pain.

  20. Age dependent hypergastrinaemia in children with Helicobacter pylori gastritis--evidence of early acquisition of infection.

    PubMed Central

    McCallion, W A; Ardill, J E; Bamford, K B; Potts, S R; Boston, V E

    1995-01-01

    Acute Helicobacter pylori associated gastritis causes achlorhydria, a powerful stimulus to gastrin secretion. If H pylori infection is acquired primarily in early childhood, then the degree of hypergastrinaemia in seropositive children should be age dependent. Anti-Helicobacter antibodies and fasting gastrin concentrations were measured in 439 children aged 4 to 13 years attending hospital for routine day case surgery not connected with any gastrointestinal disorder. Thirty per cent were seropositive for H pylori. There was an inverse relationship between the fasting gastrin concentration and age; the mean fasting gastrin in children aged 4-5 years, 155 ng/l, was significantly higher than that seen in children aged 12-13 years, 90 ng/l. The more noticeable hypergastrinaemia seen in young children with H pylori associated gastritis may reflect achlorhydria associated with acute H pylori infection and suggests that this is primarily acquired in early childhood. PMID:7672676

  1. Lymphocytic gastritis is not associated with active Helicobacter pylori infection.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Jennifer A; Roberts, Cory A; Lager, Donna J; Putcha, Rajesh V; Jain, Rajeev; Lewin, Matthew

    2014-10-01

    Lymphocytic gastritis (LG), characterized by marked intra-epithelial lymphocytosis in the gastric mucosa, has been frequently associated with both celiac disease (CD) and H. pylori gastritis. The aim of this study was to review and correlate the morphology of LG with the presence of CD and H. pylori. Gastric biopsies diagnosed with LG from 1/1/2006 to 8/1/2013 at our institution and corresponding small bowel biopsies, when available, were reviewed for verification of the diagnosis and to assess for the presence of H. pylori and CD. Immunohistochemical (IHC) staining for H. pylori was performed on all gastric biopsies. Demographic, clinical, and laboratory data were obtained from the medical record. Fifty-four of the 56 cases that met inclusion criteria demonstrated significant intra-epithelial lymphocytosis as the predominant histologic abnormality; however, none were associated with H. pylori infection by IHC staining. Two cases that also showed a prominent intra-epithelial and lamina propria neutrophilic infiltrate were both positive for H. pylori and were excluded from further study. Of the 36 small bowel biopsies available, 19 (53%) showed changes in CD. LG is not a distinct clinicopathologic entity, but a morphologic pattern of gastric injury that can be secondary to a variety of underlying etiologies. When restricted to cases with lymphocytosis alone, LG is strongly associated with CD and not with active H. pylori infection. However, cases that also show significant neutrophilic infiltrate should be regarded as "active chronic gastritis" and are often associated with H. pylori infection. A morphologic diagnosis of LG should prompt clinical and serologic workup to exclude underlying CD. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Cell proliferation in Helicobacter pylori associated gastritis and the effect of eradication therapy.

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, D A; Mapstone, N P; Clarke, A M; Sobala, G M; Jackson, P; Morrison, L; Dixon, M F; Quirke, P; Axon, A T

    1995-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori causes chronic (type B) gastritis. The 'intestinal' form of gastric cancer arises against a background of chronic gastritis, and prospective epidemiological studies have shown that H pylori is a major risk factor for this. An increase in mucosal cell proliferation increases the likelihood of a neoplastic clone of epithelial cells emerging where there is chronic epithelial cell injury associated with H pylori gastritis. In vitro bromodeoxyuridine labelling of endoscopic antral biopsy specimens was used to measure mucosal cell proliferation in H pylori associated gastritis before and after therapy for H pylori triple infection. Cell proliferation was increased in H pylori associated gastritis patients compared with normal controls and patients with H pylori negative chronic gastritis (p = 0.0001; Tukey's Studentised range). There was no difference in antral epithelial cell proliferation between duodenal ulcer and non-ulcer subjects infected with H pylori (p = 0.62; Student's t test). Antral mucosal cell proliferation fell four weeks after completing triple therapy, irrespective of whether or not H pylori had been eradicated (p = 0.0001). At retesting six to 18 months later (mean = 12 months), however, those in whom H pylori had not been successfully eradicated showed increased mucosal proliferation compared with both H pylori negative subjects at a similar follow up interval and all cases (whether H pylori positive or negative) four weeks after completion of triple therapy (p = 0.024). These findings suggest that H pylori infection causes increased gastric cell proliferation and in this way may play a part in gastric carcinogenesis. PMID:7698690

  3. Chronic gastritis and Helicobacter pylori: a histopathological study of gastric mucosal biopsies.

    PubMed

    Yakoob, Mohammad Yawar; Hussainy, Akbar Shah

    2010-11-01

    The aim of this study was to observe the histological features of chronic gastritis and associated effects due to Helicobacter pylori infection in 176 randomly selected antral biopsy specimens of chronic gastritis cases. The specimens were reviewed for the presence or absence of H.pylori. The activity (neutrophilic infiltration) of gastritis and the presence or absence of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) were also noted. Chi-square test (Pearson value) was used to analyze categorical variables. H.pylori was detected in 110 (62.5%) cases of chronic gastritis. There was a significant association between H.pylori infection and activity of chronic gastritis (p=0.002). Lymphoid aggregates were significantly more frequently noted in H.pylori-positive patients (68.2%) vs. H.pylori negative group (47%), (p=0.005). It is concluded that H.pylori is significantly associated with active chronic gastritis and with formation of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT), which may develop into gastric lymphoma (MALT type).

  4. Differential proteomics of Helicobacter pylori associated with autoimmune atrophic gastritis.

    PubMed

    Repetto, Ombretta; Zanussi, Stefania; Casarotto, Mariateresa; Canzonieri, Vincenzo; De Paoli, Paolo; Cannizzaro, Renato; De Re, Valli

    2014-02-28

    Atrophic autoimmune gastritis (AAG) is a condition of chronic inflammation and atrophy of stomach mucosa, for which development can be partially triggered by the bacterial pathogen Helicobacter pylori (HP). HP can cause a variety of gastric diseases, such as duodenal ulcer (DU) or gastric cancer (GC). In this study, a comparative proteomic approach was used by two-dimensional fluorescence difference gel electrophoresis (DIGE) to identify differentially expressed proteins of HP strains isolated from patients with AAG, to identify markers of HP strain associated with AAG. Proteome profiles of HP isolated from GC or DU were used as a reference to compare proteomic levels. Proteomics analyses revealed 27 differentially expressed spots in AAG-associated HP in comparison with GC, whereas only 9 differential spots were found in AAG-associated HP profiles compared with DU. Proteins were identified after matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI)-TOF and peptide mass fingerprinting. Some AAG-HP differential proteins were common between DU- and GC-HP (peroxiredoxin, heat shock protein 70 [HSP70], adenosine 5'-triphosphate [ATP] synthase subunit α, flagellin A). Our results presented here may suggest that comparative proteomes of HP isolated from AAG and DU share more common protein expression than GC and provide subsets of putative AAG-specific upregulated or downregulated proteins that could be proposed as putative markers of AAG-associated HP. Other comparative studies by two-dimensional maps integrated with functional genomics of candidate proteins will undoubtedly contribute to better decipher the biology of AAG-associated HP strains.

  5. Nodular Gastritis and Pathologic Findings in Children and Young Adults with Helicobacter pylori Infection

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Hong; Noh, Tae-Woong; Baek, Seoung-Yon

    2007-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to investigate the pathologic characteristics of nodular gastritis in children and young adults infected with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori). Materials and Methods A total of 328 patients were enrolled in this study, and the diagnosis of H. pylori infection was done with gastroduodenal endoscopy concomitant with a CLO™ test and pathologic analysis of the biopsy specimens. Diagnoses of normal, superficial gastritis, nodular gastritis, and peptic ulcer disease were made from the gastroduodenal endoscopic findings. The density of H. pylori organisms in the gastric mucosa was rated as normal, mild, moderate, or marked. The pathologic findings of nodular gastritis were based on the histopathologic findings of inflammation, immune activity, glandular atrophy and intestinal metaplasia. Each of these findings was scored as either normal (0), mild (1), moderate (2), or marked (3) according to the updated Sydney system and using visual analog scales. The gastritis score was the sum of the four histopathologic scores. Results In this study, nodular gastritis (50.6%) was most common, and mild density (51.5%) H. pylori infection was also common upon microscopic examination. Intestinal metaplasia occurred in 9 patients (2.7%). Conclusion Logistic regression revealed a significant increase in the incidence of nodular gastritis with gastritis score (p = 0.008), but not an association with sex, age, or H. pylori density. Gastritis score was the only significant factor influencing the occurrence of nodular gastritis. Intestinal metaplasia, which was originally thought to be a pre-malignant lesion, occurred in 2.7% of the patients with H. pylori infection. PMID:17461522

  6. The prevalence of Helicobacter pylori gastritis in newly diagnosed children with inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Roka, Kleoniki; Roubani, Aikaterini; Stefanaki, Kalliopi; Panayotou, Ioanna; Roma, Eleftheria; Chouliaras, Giorgos

    2014-10-01

    Recent studies have shown that patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are less likely to be infected with Helicobacter pylori compared with non-IBD patients. We aimed to study the prevalence of H. pylori-positive and H. pylori-negative gastritis in newly diagnosed children with IBD in comparison to those with non-IBD in Greece. All children who underwent first esophagogastroduodenal endoscopy between 2002 and 2011 were retrospectively included. Four groups were studied: patients with Crohn's disease (CD), ulcerative colitis (UC), IBD unclassified (IBDU), and non-IBD individuals (non-IBD). Helicobacter pylori infection was defined by positive culture or by positive histology and CLO test. Those children with negative or not available culture and only one positive test (histology or CLO) were further evaluated by urea breath test, and the positives were also included in the infected group. We studied 159 patients with IBD (66 CD, 34 UC, and 59 IBDU) and 1209 patients in non-IBD individuals. Helicobacter pylori gastritis was less frequent in the IBD group (3.8% vs 13.2% in the control group, p < .001), whereas IBD patients were significantly older than non-IBD children (p < .001). Children with H. pylori-negative gastritis were 3.3 times more likely to belong in the IBD group compared with H. pylori-positive patients (p = .006). Occurrence of H. pylori gastritis is less frequent in children with IBD compared with controls. Our study confirms an inverse association between H. pylori and IBD. Future studies are needed to distinguish between a true protective role of H. pylori and a confounding effect due to previous antibiotic use in children with IBD. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Helicobacter pylori gastritis in HIV-infected patients: a review.

    PubMed

    Nevin, Daniel T; Morgan, Christopher J; Graham, David Y; Genta, Robert M

    2014-10-01

    The risk factors for acquiring Helicobacter pylori and Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infections are different: H. pylori is transmitted by gastro- or fecal-oral routes and is associated with low socioeconomic conditions, while HIV is transmitted through sexual intercourse, infected body fluids, and transplacentally. If the host responses to these infections were independent, the prevalence of H. pylori should be similar in HIV-infected and non-infected patients. Yet, several studies have detected a lower prevalence of H. pylori in patients with HIV infection, whereas other studies found either no differences or greater rates of H. pylori infection in HIV-positive subjects. To review studies that addressed the issue of these two simultaneous infections and attempt to determine whether reliable conclusions can be drawn from this corpus of often contrasting evidence. Electronic literature search for relevant publications, followed by manual search of additional citations from extracted articles. The initial search yielded 44 publications; after excluding case reports, reviews, narrowly focused articles, and duplicate reports, there remained 29 articles, which are the corpus of this review. With one exception, all studies reported higher rates of H. pylori infection in HIV-negative subjects. Five studies also examined the CD4 lymphocyte counts and found an inverse correlation between the degree of immunosuppression and the prevalence of active H. pylori infection. Current evidence suggests that it is likely that H. pylori needs a functional immune system to successfully and persistently colonize the human gastric mucosa. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Russell body gastritis: expanding the spectrum of Helicobacter pylori - related diseases?

    PubMed

    Pizzolitto, Stefano; Camilot, Debora; DeMaglio, Giovanna; Falconieri, Giovanni

    2007-01-01

    We report a new case of Helicobacter pylori gastritis showing plasma cell infiltrates with extensive formation of Russell bodies (Mott cells) within the lamina propria of the antral mucosa. The patient was a 60-year-old woman with a history of epigastric pain. Endoscopy revealed non-specific congestion of the mucosa. Microscopically, the intracytoplasmic inclusions were homogeneous, mainly round to oval, and pushed the nucleus toward the periphery. They were intensely PAS-positive and reacted to antibodies against polytypic light chains, CD79a, and anti-plasma cell antibody. Because of the accumulation of intracytoplasmic inclusions, Russell body gastritis is a potential source of diagnostic difficulties in endoscopic biopsy specimens that can be confused with immunocytic neoplasms, such as lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma or plasmocytoma, or signet-ring cell carcinoma. In the light of similar cases published previously, it seems as if the association between Russell body gastritis and Helicobacter pylori infection is not merely coincidental.

  9. Classification of histological severity of Helicobacter pylori-associated gastritis by confocal laser endomicroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Peng; Ji, Rui; Yu, Tao; Zuo, Xiu-Li; Zhou, Cheng-Jun; Li, Chang-Qing; Li, Zhen; Li, Yan-Qing

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To classify the histological severity of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection-associated gastritis by confocal laser endomicroscopy (CLE). METHODS: Patients with upper gastrointestinal symptoms or individuals who were screened for gastric cancer were enrolled in this study. Histological severity of H. pylori infection-associated gastritis was graded according to the established CLE criteria. Diagnostic value of CLE for histological gastritis was investigated and compared with that of white light endoscopy (WLE). Targeted biopsies from the sites observed by CLE were performed. RESULTS: A total of 118 consecutive patients with H. pylori infection-associated gastritis were enrolled in this study. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis showed that the sensitivity and specificity of CLE were 82.9% and 90.9% for the diagnosis of H. pylori infection, 94.6% and 97.4% for predicting gastric normal mucosa, 98.5% and 94.6% for predicting histological active inflammation, 92.9% and 95.2% for predicting glandular atrophy, 98.6% and 100% for diagnosing intestinal metaplasia, respectively. Post-CLE image analysis showed that goblet cells and absorptive cells were the two most common parameters on the CLE-diagnosed intestinal metaplasia (IM) images (P < 0.001). More histological lesions of the stomach could be found by CLE than by WLE (P < 0.001). CONCLUSION: CLE can accurately show the histological severity of H. pylori infection-associated gastritis. Mapping IM by CLE has a rather good diagnostic accuracy. PMID:21049554

  10. Prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection and histologic gastritis in asymptomatic persons.

    PubMed

    Dooley, C P; Cohen, H; Fitzgibbons, P L; Bauer, M; Appleman, M D; Perez-Perez, G I; Blaser, M J

    1989-12-07

    We estimated the prevalences of Helicobacter pylori (formerly called Campylobacter pylori) infection and histologic gastritis in 113 asymptomatic persons, using endoscopic biopsy of the gastric antrum and corpus. Unsuspected lesions, mainly mucosal erosions, were revealed at endoscopy in 16 subjects (14 percent). Gastritis was found in 42 subjects (37 percent), of whom 36 (32 percent of the total) were found to be infected with H. pylori on the basis of hematoxylin-eosin staining. H. pylori was not found in any of the 71 subjects with normal histologic features. Gastritis and H. pylori were noted in both the antrum and corpus in 75 percent of those infected (n = 27). The prevalence of H. pylori infection increased from 10 percent (2 of 20 subjects) in those between the ages of 18 and 29, to 47 percent (7 of 15) in those between the ages of 60 and 69, but the effect of age did not reach statistical significance. The prevalence of gastritis increased significantly with advancing age. Stepwise logistic regression analysis revealed that the relative risk for H. pylori infection associated with recent (within six months) antibiotic use was 5.8 (95 percent confidence interval, 1.5 to 22.1), whereas the relative risk was 6.5 (95 percent confidence interval, 1.4 to 29.2) for those who had never used bismuth compounds. We conclude that histologic gastritis and H. pylori infection commonly occur in the stomach of apparently normal persons and increase in prevalence with advancing age. All the subjects with H. pylori infection had gastritis, suggesting a possible etiologic role for the bacterium in the histologic lesion.

  11. Apigenin has anti-atrophic gastritis and anti-gastric cancer progression effects in Helicobacter pylori-infected Mongolian gerbils.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Chao-Hung; Weng, Bi-Chuang; Wu, Chun-Chieh; Yang, Sheau-Fang; Wu, Deng-Chang; Wang, Yuan-Chuen

    2014-02-12

    Apigenin, one of the most common flavonoids, is abundant in celery, parsley, chamomile, passionflower, and other vegetables and fruits. Celery is recognized as a medicinal vegetable in Oriental countries to traditionally treat inflammation, swelling, blood pressure, serum lipid, and toothache. In this study, we investigated apigenin treatment effects on Helicobacter pylori-induced atrophic gastritis and gastric cancer progression in Mongolian gerbils. Five to eight-week-old Mongolian gerbils were inoculated with Helicobacter pylori for four weeks without (atrophic gastritis group) or with N'-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitroso-guanidine (MNNG) (gastric cancer group) in drinking water, and were then rested for two weeks. During the 7th-32th (atrophic gastritis group) or the 7th-52th (gastric cancer group) weeks, they were given various doses (0-60 mg/kgbw/day) of apigenin. At the end of the 32th (atrophic gastritis group) or the 52th (atrophic gastritis group) week, all Mongolian gerbils were sacrificed using the CO2 asphyxia method. The histological changes of Helicobacter pylori colonization, neutrophil and monocyte infiltrations, and atrophic gastritis in both atrophic gastritis and gastric cancer Mongolian gerbils were examined using immunohistochemistry stain and Sydney System scoring. Apigenin treatments (30-60 mg/kgbw/day) effectively decreased atrophic gastritis (atrophic gastritis group) and dysplasia/gastric cancer (gastric cancer group) rates in Mongolian gerbils. Apigenin treatment (60 mg/kgbw/day) significantly decreased Helicobacter pylori colonization and Helicobacter pylori-induced histological changes of neutrophil and monocyte infiltrations and atrophic gastritis in both atrophic gastritis and gastric cancer Mongolian gerbils. Apigenin has the remarkable ability to inhibit Helicobacter pylori-induced atrophic gastritis and gastric cancer progression as well as possessing potent anti-gastric cancer activity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights

  12. Characterization of feline Helicobacter pylori strains and associated gastritis in a colony of domestic cats.

    PubMed Central

    Handt, L K; Fox, J G; Stalis, I H; Rufo, R; Lee, G; Linn, J; Li, X; Kleanthous, H

    1995-01-01

    Twenty-four young adult domestic cats from a commercial vendor were found to be infected with Helicobacter pylori. Histopathologic analyses, selected electron microscopy, and urease mapping were performed on mucosal samples collected from the cardias and fundi, bodies, and antra of these cats' stomachs. H. pylori organisms were abundant in all areas of the stomach on the basis of histologic evaluation and urease mapping. H. pylori infection was associated with a moderate to severe lymphofollicular gastritis in 21 of 24 cats (88%). The gastritis was most pronounced in the antral region and consisted mainly of multifocal lymphoplasmacytic follicular infiltrates in the deep mucosa. The severity of gastritis in the antrum corresponded to high numbers of H. pylori there on the basis of the use of the urease assay as an indicator of H. pylori colonization. Ten of 24 cats (42%) also had small to moderate numbers of eosinophils in the gastric mucosa. All 24 cats had gastric lymphoid follicles, with follicles being most prevalent in the antrum. Electron microscopy of gastric tissue revealed numerous H. pylori organisms, some of which were closely adhered to the mucosal epithelium. Human H. pylori gene-specific primers to ureA and ureB amplified products of similar sizes from H. pylori cat isolates. Digestion of the products with restriction enzymes resulted in fragments characteristic of the restriction fragment length polymorphism patterns of H. pylori isolates from humans.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7494015

  13. Are clinical features able to predict Helicobacter pylori gastritis patterns? Evidence from tertiary centers.

    PubMed

    Carabotti, Marilia; Lahner, Edith; Porowska, Barbara; Colacci, Enzo; Trentino, Paolo; Annibale, Bruno; Severi, Carola

    2014-12-01

    Outcome of Helicobacter pylori infection is different according to gastritis extension (i.e. antrum-restricted gastritis or pangastritis). The aim of this study is to evaluate whether different gastritis patterns are associated with specific gastrointestinal symptoms or clinical signs that could be suggestive of the topography of gastritis. 236 consecutive symptomatic outpatients were recruited in two tertiary centers. They filled in a validated and self-administered Rome III modular symptomatic questionnaire, and underwent gastroscopy with histological sampling. 154 patients with Helicobacter pylori infection were included. Clinical presentation did not differ between antrum-restricted gastritis and pangastritis, gastro-esophageal reflux disease being present in 48.2 and 54.1 % of patients and dyspepsia in 51.8 and 45.9 %, respectively. However, pangastritis statistically differed from antrum-restricted gastritis in that the presence of clinical signs (p < 0.0001) was observed in 33.7 % of the patients, consisting of iron deficiency (31.6 %), iron deficiency-anemia (20.4 %) and levothyroxine malabsorption (3.1 %). Symptoms are not helpful in suggesting gastritis pattern whereas their association with signs, accurately detected, is indicative for the presence of pangastritis.

  14. Myeloid HIF-1 is protective in Helicobacter pylori-mediated gastritis.

    PubMed

    Matak, Pavle; Heinis, Mylène; Mathieu, Jacques R R; Corriden, Ross; Cuvellier, Sylvain; Delga, Stéphanie; Mounier, Rémi; Rouquette, Alexandre; Raymond, Josette; Lamarque, Dominique; Emile, Jean-François; Nizet, Victor; Touati, Eliette; Peyssonnaux, Carole

    2015-04-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection triggers chronic inflammation of the gastric mucosa that may progress to gastric cancer. The hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) are the central mediators of cellular adaptation to low oxygen levels (hypoxia), but they have emerged recently as major transcriptional regulators of immunity and inflammation. No studies have investigated whether H. pylori affects HIF signaling in immune cells and a potential role for HIF in H. pylori-mediated gastritis. HIF-1 and HIF-2 expression was examined in human H. pylori-positive gastritis biopsies. Subsequent experiments were performed in naive and polarized bone marrow-derived macrophages from wild-type (WT) and myeloid HIF-1α-null mice (HIF-1(Δmyel)). WT and HIF-1(Δmyel) mice were inoculated with H. pylori by oral gavage and sacrificed 6 mo postinfection. HIF-1 was specifically expressed in macrophages of human H. pylori-positive gastritis biopsies. Macrophage HIF-1 strongly contributed to the induction of proinflammatory genes (IL-6, IL-1β) and inducible NO synthase in response to H. pylori. HIF-2 expression and markers of M2 macrophage differentiation were decreased in response to H. pylori. HIF-1(Δmyel) mice inoculated with H. pylori for 6 mo presented with a similar bacterial colonization than WT mice but, surprisingly, a global increase of inflammation, leading to a worsening of the gastritis, measured by an increased epithelial cell proliferation. In conclusion, myeloid HIF-1 is protective in H. pylori-mediated gastritis, pointing to the complex counterbalancing roles of innate immune and inflammatory phenotypes in driving this pathology.

  15. Effects of dietary calcium on Helicobacter pylori-induced gastritis in Mongolian gerbils.

    PubMed

    Iimuro, Masaki; Nakamura, Shiro; Arakawa, Tetsuo; Wakabayashi, Keiji; Mutoh, Michihiro

    2013-09-01

    Helicobacter pylori (Hp) infection causes gastritis and is considered a gastric cancer risk factor. We have previously reported that codfish meal markedly enhanced Hp-induced gastritis in Mongolian gerbils. In the present study, we sought the responsible components in codfish meal. Codfish were divided into three parts (meat, viscera and 'other parts', including bone), and administered to Hp-infected gerbils. Subsequently, cod bone, sardine bone and prawn shell were tested, along with major calcium components, hydroxyapatite and calcium carbonate, in bone and shell, respectively. 'Other parts' and cod bone enhanced Hp-induced gastritis, as was observed for whole codfish. Similarly, sardine bone and prawn shell, as well as 0.22-0.88% hydroxyapatite and calcium carbonate, enhanced gastritis. In contrast, administration of a higher dose of the calcium compounds exerted protective effects. Intake of calcium compounds may contribute to enhancement of Hp-induced gastritis.

  16. Resolution of protein-losing hypertrophic lymphocytic gastritis with therapeutic eradication of Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Groisman, G M; George, J; Berman, D; Harpaz, N

    1994-09-01

    Lymphocytic gastritis (LG) is a recently described histological entity characterized by increased lymphocytes in the superficial gastric epithelium and foveolae. It includes a subgroup of patients with giant gastric folds and, often, a protein-losing state, a condition termed hypertrophic lymphocytic gastritis (HLG). Despite close endoscopic and clinical similarities to classical Menetrier's disease, the histopathological features of these two diseases are sufficiently distinct that they are regarded as separate entities. The etiology and pathogenesis of HLG are unknown, and the possible etiological role of Helicobacter pylori in particular is controversial. For this reason we report the case of a 48-yr-old female with HLG, hypoproteinemia, and H. pylori infection whose disease resolved clinically, endoscopically, and pathologically with therapeutic eradication of the H. pylori. H. pylori infection may be a treatable cause of at least some cases of HLG and should therefore be carefully sought in any patient with this condition.

  17. Interleukin-17C in Human Helicobacter pylori Gastritis.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Shingo; Nagashima, Hiroyuki; Cruz, Modesto; Uchida, Tomohisa; Uotani, Takahiro; Jiménez Abreu, José A; Mahachai, Varocha; Vilaichone, Ratha-Korn; Ratanachu-Ek, Thawee; Tshering, Lotay; Graham, David Y; Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2017-10-01

    The interleukin-17 (IL-17) family of cytokines (IL-17A to IL-17F) is involved in many inflammatory diseases. Although IL-17A is recognized as being involved in the pathophysiology of Helicobacter pylori-associated diseases, the role of other IL-17 cytokine family members remains unclear. Microarray analysis of IL-17 family cytokines was performed in H. pylori-infected and uninfected gastric biopsy specimens. IL-17C mRNA was upregulated approximately 4.5-fold in H. pylori-infected gastric biopsy specimens. This was confirmed by quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR in infected and uninfected gastric mucosa obtained from Bhutan and from the Dominican Republic. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that IL-17C expression in H. pylori-infected gastric biopsy specimens was predominantly localized to epithelial and chromogranin A-positive endocrine cells. IL-17C mRNA levels were also significantly greater among cagA-positive than cagA-negative H. pylori infections (P = 0.012). In vitro studies confirmed an increase in IL-17C mRNA and protein levels in cells infected with cagA-positive infections compared to cells infected with either cagA-negative or cag pathogenicity island (PAI) mutant. Chemical inhibition of IκB kinase (IKK), mitogen-activated protein extracellular signal-regulated kinase (MEK), and Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) inhibited induction of IL-17C proteins in infected cells, whereas p38 inhibition had no effect on IL-17C protein secretion. In conclusion, H. pylori infection was associated with a significant increase in IL-17C expression in human gastric mucosa. The role of IL-17C in the pathogenesis of H. pylori-induced diseases remains to be determined. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  18. Complex T Cell Interactions Contribute to Helicobacter pylori Gastritis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Brian M.; Fontaine, Clinton A.; Poe, Sara A.

    2013-01-01

    Disease due to the gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori varies in severity from asymptomatic to peptic ulcer disease and cancer. Accumulating evidence suggests that one source of this variation is an abnormal host response. The goal of this study was to use a mouse model of H. pylori gastritis to investigate the roles of regulatory T cells (Treg) as well as proinflammatory T cells (Th1 and Th17) in gastritis, gastric T cell engraftment, and gastric cytokine production. Our results support published data indicating that severe gastritis in T cell recipient mice is due to failure of Treg engraftment, that Treg ameliorate gastritis, and that the proinflammatory response is attributable to interactions between several cell subsets and cytokines. We confirmed that gamma interferon (IFN-γ) is essential for induction of gastritis but showed that IFN-γ-producing CD4 T cells are not necessary. Interleukin 17A (IL-17A) also contributed to gastritis, but to a lesser extent than IFN-γ. Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and IL-17F were also elevated in association with disease. These results indicate that while H. pylori-specific CD4+ T cells and IFN-γ are both essential for induction of gastritis due to H. pylori, IFN-γ production by T cells is not essential. It is likely that other proinflammatory cytokines, such as IL-17F and TNF-α, shown to be elevated in this model, also contribute to the induction of disease. We suggest that gastritis due to H. pylori is associated with loss of immunoregulation and alteration of several cytokines and cell subsets and cannot be attributed to a single immune pathway. PMID:23264048

  19. Characterization of feline Helicobacter pylori strains and associated gastritis in a colony of domestic cats.

    PubMed

    Handt, L K; Fox, J G; Stalis, I H; Rufo, R; Lee, G; Linn, J; Li, X; Kleanthous, H

    1995-09-01

    Twenty-four young adult domestic cats from a commercial vendor were found to be infected with Helicobacter pylori. Histopathologic analyses, selected electron microscopy, and urease mapping were performed on mucosal samples collected from the cardias and fundi, bodies, and antra of these cats' stomachs. H. pylori organisms were abundant in all areas of the stomach on the basis of histologic evaluation and urease mapping. H. pylori infection was associated with a moderate to severe lymphofollicular gastritis in 21 of 24 cats (88%). The gastritis was most pronounced in the antral region and consisted mainly of multifocal lymphoplasmacytic follicular infiltrates in the deep mucosa. The severity of gastritis in the antrum corresponded to high numbers of H. pylori there on the basis of the use of the urease assay as an indicator of H. pylori colonization. Ten of 24 cats (42%) also had small to moderate numbers of eosinophils in the gastric mucosa. All 24 cats had gastric lymphoid follicles, with follicles being most prevalent in the antrum. Electron microscopy of gastric tissue revealed numerous H. pylori organisms, some of which were closely adhered to the mucosal epithelium. Human H. pylori gene-specific primers to ureA and ureB amplified products of similar sizes from H. pylori cat isolates. Digestion of the products with restriction enzymes resulted in fragments characteristic of the restriction fragment length polymorphism patterns of H. pylori isolates from humans. In the domestic cat, H. pylori infection is associated with a lymphofollicular gastritis, consisting of lymphocytic and plasmacytic infiltration into the lamina propria, and the organism appears to provide chronic antigenic stimulation resulting in the formation of gastric lymphoid follicles.

  20. Gene polymorphism of interleukin 1 and 8 in chronic gastritis patients infected with Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Epidemiological investigations have indicated that Helicobacter pylori induces inflammation in the gastric mucosa regulated by several interleukins. The genes IL1B and IL8 are suggested as key factors in determining the risk of gastritis. The aim of this paper was to evaluate the association of gene polymorphism of interleukin-1 and interleukin-8 with chronic gastrits in H. pylori infected patients. A total of 60 patients underwent endoscopic procedure. Biopsy samples were collected for urease test, histopathological and molecular exams. The DNA of theses samples was extracted for detection of H. pylori and analysis of the genes mentioned above. Patients with gastritis had a higher frequency of H. pylori-positive samples. Results H. pylori was detected in 30/60 patients (50%) by PCR. As for polymorphism of interleukin 8 (-251) gene we observed a statistical difference when analyzed TA (p = 0.039) and TT (p = 0.047) genotypes. In the IL1B31 there was a statistical difference in TT (p = 0.01) genotype and in the IL1B-511 there wasn’t any statistical difference. Conclusion Our results suggest a strong correlation between the presence of chronic gastritis and infection by H. pylori and that IL1B-31TT and IL8-251TT genotypes appear to act as protective factors against H. pylori infection while IL8-251TA genotype may comprise a risk factor for infection with this bacterium. PMID:24803922

  1. Critical pathogenic steps to high risk Helicobacter pylori gastritis and gastric carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Inchul

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) gastritis may progress to high risk gastropathy and cancer. However, the pathological progression has not been characterized in detail. H. pylori induce persistent inflammatory infiltration. Neutrophils are unique in that they directly infiltrate into foveolar epithelium aiming the proliferative zone specifically. Neutrophilic proliferative zone foveolitis is a critical pathogenic step in H. pylori gastritis inducing intensive epithelial damage. Epithelial cells carrying accumulated genomic damage and mutations show the Malgun (clear) cell change, characterized by large clear nucleus and prominent nucleolus. Malgun cells further undergo atypical changes, showing nuclear folding, coarse chromatin, and multiple nucleoli. The atypical Malgun cell (AMC) change is a novel premalignant condition in high risk gastropathy, which may progress and undergo malignant transformation directly. The pathobiological significance of AMC in gastric carcinogenesis is reviewed. A new diagnosis system of gastritis is proposed based on the critical pathologic steps classifying low and high risk gastritis for separate treatment modality. It is suggested that the regulation of H. pylori-induced neutrophilic foveolitis might be a future therapeutic goal replacing bactericidal antibiotics approach. PMID:24914362

  2. Critical pathogenic steps to high risk Helicobacter pylori gastritis and gastric carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Inchul

    2014-06-07

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) gastritis may progress to high risk gastropathy and cancer. However, the pathological progression has not been characterized in detail. H. pylori induce persistent inflammatory infiltration. Neutrophils are unique in that they directly infiltrate into foveolar epithelium aiming the proliferative zone specifically. Neutrophilic proliferative zone foveolitis is a critical pathogenic step in H. pylori gastritis inducing intensive epithelial damage. Epithelial cells carrying accumulated genomic damage and mutations show the Malgun (clear) cell change, characterized by large clear nucleus and prominent nucleolus. Malgun cells further undergo atypical changes, showing nuclear folding, coarse chromatin, and multiple nucleoli. The atypical Malgun cell (AMC) change is a novel premalignant condition in high risk gastropathy, which may progress and undergo malignant transformation directly. The pathobiological significance of AMC in gastric carcinogenesis is reviewed. A new diagnosis system of gastritis is proposed based on the critical pathologic steps classifying low and high risk gastritis for separate treatment modality. It is suggested that the regulation of H. pylori-induced neutrophilic foveolitis might be a future therapeutic goal replacing bactericidal antibiotics approach.

  3. Irregular Meal Timing Is Associated with Helicobacter pylori Infection and Gastritis.

    PubMed

    Lim, Su-Lin; Canavarro, Claudia; Zaw, Min-Htet; Zhu, Feng; Loke, Wai-Chiong; Chan, Yiong-Huak; Yeoh, Khay-Guan

    2013-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (HP) is associated with chronic gastritis and gastric cancer, and more than half of the world's population is chronically infected. The aim of this retrospective study was to investigate whether an irregular meal pattern is associated with increased risk of gastritis and HP infection. The study involved 323 subjects, divided into three groups as follows: subjects with HP infection and gastritis, subjects with gastritis, and a control group. Subjects were interviewed on eating habits and meal timing. Multivariate logistic regression was used to compare groups. Adjusted odds ratios (OR) were derived controlling for gender, age, stress, and probiotic consumption. Subjects who deviated from their regular meals by 2 hours or more had a significantly higher incidence of HP infection with gastritis (adjusted OR = 13.3; 95% CI 5.3-33.3; P < 0.001) and gastritis (adjusted OR = 6.1; 95% CI 2.5-15.0; P < 0.001). Subjects who deviated their meals by 2 hours or more, twice or more per week, had an adjusted OR of 6.3 and 3.5 of acquiring HP infection with gastritis (95% CI 2.6-15.2; P < 0.001) and gastritis (95% CI 1.5-8.5; P < 0.001), respectively. Frequent deviation in meal timing over a prolonged period appears associated with increased risk of developing HP infection and gastritis.

  4. Irregular Meal Timing Is Associated with Helicobacter pylori Infection and Gastritis

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Su-Lin; Canavarro, Claudia; Zaw, Min-Htet; Zhu, Feng; Loke, Wai-Chiong; Chan, Yiong-Huak; Yeoh, Khay-Guan

    2013-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (HP) is associated with chronic gastritis and gastric cancer, and more than half of the world's population is chronically infected. The aim of this retrospective study was to investigate whether an irregular meal pattern is associated with increased risk of gastritis and HP infection. The study involved 323 subjects, divided into three groups as follows: subjects with HP infection and gastritis, subjects with gastritis, and a control group. Subjects were interviewed on eating habits and meal timing. Multivariate logistic regression was used to compare groups. Adjusted odds ratios (OR) were derived controlling for gender, age, stress, and probiotic consumption. Subjects who deviated from their regular meals by 2 hours or more had a significantly higher incidence of HP infection with gastritis (adjusted OR = 13.3; 95% CI 5.3–33.3; P < 0.001) and gastritis (adjusted OR = 6.1; 95% CI 2.5–15.0; P < 0.001). Subjects who deviated their meals by 2 hours or more, twice or more per week, had an adjusted OR of 6.3 and 3.5 of acquiring HP infection with gastritis (95% CI 2.6–15.2; P < 0.001) and gastritis (95% CI 1.5–8.5; P < 0.001), respectively. Frequent deviation in meal timing over a prolonged period appears associated with increased risk of developing HP infection and gastritis. PMID:24967249

  5. Gastritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Infection of the stomach with a bacteria called Helicobacter pylori Less common causes are: Autoimmune disorders (such ... to treat chronic gastritis caused by infection with Helicobacter pylori bacteria.

  6. Basis of decreased risk of gastric cancer in severe atrophic gastritis with eradication of Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Tari, Akira; Kitadai, Yasuhiko; Sumii, Masaharu; Sasaki, Atsunori; Tani, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Sinji; Chayama, Kazuaki

    2007-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection induces chronic gastritis and lowers gastric juice ascorbic acid concentrations. We investigated how H. pylori eradication affected multiple variables that could prevent or delay development of new or occult gastric cancer in patients with early gastric cancer treated by endoscopic mucosal resection. Gastric juice pH, nitrite concentrations, and total vitamin C concentrations, serum concentrations of vitamin C and specific H. pylori antibody, and intensity of neutrophil infiltration in gastric mucosa were determined before and after successful H. pylori eradication. Successful eradication increased acid output and ascorbic acid secretion into gastric juice, accompanied by disappearance of polymorphonuclear infiltration from the surface epithelium and decreased gastric juice nitrite concentrations. Our data suggest that H. pylori eradication decreases the nitrosation rate as the ratio of vitamin C to nitrite increases. This decreases reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide, eliminating their damaging effect on DNA and reducing cell turnover.

  7. The number of Foxp3-positive regulatory T cells is increased in Helicobacter pylori gastritis and gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Jang, Tae Jung

    2010-01-15

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) colonization induces vigorous innate and specific immune responses; however, the infection is not removed, a state of chronic active gastritis persists for life if untreated. Recent studies have shown that CD4(+) CD25(+) Foxp3-positive regulatory T cells (Tregs) suppress the immune response to H. pylori. Persistent H. pylori-associated gastritis is closely associated with gastric carcinogenesis. We investigated the number of Tregs in the context of H. pylori colonization in chronic gastritis, examined the relationship between it and histopathological findings and compared it with that of gastric dysplasia and adenocarcinoma. This study was based on the analysis of gastric biopsy specimens from 126 cases of H. pylori-associated gastritis, 16 cases of H. pylori-negative gastritis, 17 cases of gastric dysplasia, and 25 cases of gastric adenocarcinoma. The number of Tregs was elevated in H. pylori-associated gastritis, where it was positively correlated with the grade of chronic inflammation and the number of lymphoid follicles. It was significantly elevated in adenocarcinomas compared to chronic gastritis and gastric dysplasia. In summary, the number of Tregs is increased in H. pylori-associated gastritis and gastric cancer.

  8. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Helicobacter pylori Diagnostic Methods in Patients with Atrophic Gastritis

    PubMed Central

    Shimbo, Takuro; Ohde, Sachiko; Fukui, Tsuguya

    2017-01-01

    Background. There are several diagnostic methods for Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection. A cost-effective analysis is needed to decide on the optimal diagnostic method. The aim of this study was to determine a cost-effective diagnostic method in patients with atrophic gastritis (AG). Methods. A decision-analysis model including seven diagnostic methods was constructed for patients with AG diagnosed by esophagogastroduodenoscopy. Expected values of cost and effectiveness were calculated for each test. Results. If the prevalence of H. pylori in the patients with AG is 85% and CAM-resistant H. pylori is 30%, histology, stool H. pylori antigen (SHPAg), bacterial culture (BC), and urine H. pylori antibody (UHPAb) were dominated by serum H. pylori IgG antibody (SHPAb), rapid urease test (RUT), and urea breath test (UBT). Among three undominated methods, the incremental cost-effective ratios (ICER) of RUT versus SHPAb and UBT versus RUT were $214 and $1914, respectively. If the prevalence of CAM-sensitive H. pylori was less than 55%, BC was not dominated, but its H. pylori eradication success rate was 0.86. Conclusions. RUT was the most cost-effective at the current prevalence of CAM-resistant H. pylori. BC could not be selected due to its poor effectiveness even if CAM-resistant H. pylori was more than 45%. PMID:28337217

  9. A pro-inflammatory role for Th22 cells in Helicobacter pylori-associated gastritis

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Yuan; Cheng, Ping; Liu, Xiao-fei; Peng, Liu-sheng; Li, Bo-sheng; Wang, Ting-ting; Chen, Na; Li, Wen-hua; Shi, Yun; Chen, Weisan; Pang, Ken C; Zeng, Ming; Mao, Xu-hu; Yang, Shi-ming; Guo, Hong; Guo, Gang; Liu, Tao; Zuo, Qian-fei; Yang, Hui-jie; Yang, Liu-yang; Mao, Fang-yuan; Lv, Yi-pin; Zou, Quan-ming

    2015-01-01

    Objective Helper T (Th) cell responses are critical for the pathogenesis of Helicobacter pylori-induced gastritis. Th22 cells represent a newly discovered Th cell subset, but their relevance to H. pylori-induced gastritis is unknown. Design Flow cytometry, real-time PCR and ELISA analyses were performed to examine cell, protein and transcript levels in gastric samples from patients and mice infected with H. pylori. Gastric tissues from interleukin (IL)-22-deficient and wild-type (control) mice were also examined. Tissue inflammation was determined for pro-inflammatory cell infiltration and pro-inflammatory protein production. Gastric epithelial cells and myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) were isolated, stimulated and/or cultured for Th22 cell function assays. Results Th22 cells accumulated in gastric mucosa of both patients and mice infected with H. pylori. Th22 cell polarisation was promoted via the production of IL-23 by dendritic cells (DC) during H. pylori infection, and resulted in increased inflammation within the gastric mucosa. This inflammation was characterised by the CXCR2-dependent influx of MDSCs, whose migration was induced via the IL-22-dependent production of CXCL2 by gastric epithelial cells. Under the influence of IL-22, MDSCs, in turn, produced pro-inflammatory proteins, such as S100A8 and S100A9, and suppressed Th1 cell responses, thereby contributing to the development of H. pylori-associated gastritis. Conclusions This study, therefore, identifies a novel regulatory network involving H. pylori, DCs, Th22 cells, gastric epithelial cells and MDSCs, which collectively exert a pro-inflammatory effect within the gastric microenvironment. Efforts to inhibit this Th22-dependent pathway may therefore prove a valuable strategy in the therapy of H. pylori-associated gastritis. PMID:25134787

  10. A pro-inflammatory role for Th22 cells in Helicobacter pylori-associated gastritis.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Yuan; Cheng, Ping; Liu, Xiao-fei; Peng, Liu-sheng; Li, Bo-sheng; Wang, Ting-ting; Chen, Na; Li, Wen-hua; Shi, Yun; Chen, Weisan; Pang, Ken C; Zeng, Ming; Mao, Xu-hu; Yang, Shi-ming; Guo, Hong; Guo, Gang; Liu, Tao; Zuo, Qian-fei; Yang, Hui-jie; Yang, Liu-yang; Mao, Fang-yuan; Lv, Yi-pin; Zou, Quan-ming

    2015-09-01

    Helper T (Th) cell responses are critical for the pathogenesis of Helicobacter pylori-induced gastritis. Th22 cells represent a newly discovered Th cell subset, but their relevance to H. pylori-induced gastritis is unknown. Flow cytometry, real-time PCR and ELISA analyses were performed to examine cell, protein and transcript levels in gastric samples from patients and mice infected with H. pylori. Gastric tissues from interleukin (IL)-22-deficient and wild-type (control) mice were also examined. Tissue inflammation was determined for pro-inflammatory cell infiltration and pro-inflammatory protein production. Gastric epithelial cells and myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) were isolated, stimulated and/or cultured for Th22 cell function assays. Th22 cells accumulated in gastric mucosa of both patients and mice infected with H. pylori. Th22 cell polarisation was promoted via the production of IL-23 by dendritic cells (DC) during H. pylori infection, and resulted in increased inflammation within the gastric mucosa. This inflammation was characterised by the CXCR2-dependent influx of MDSCs, whose migration was induced via the IL-22-dependent production of CXCL2 by gastric epithelial cells. Under the influence of IL-22, MDSCs, in turn, produced pro-inflammatory proteins, such as S100A8 and S100A9, and suppressed Th1 cell responses, thereby contributing to the development of H. pylori-associated gastritis. This study, therefore, identifies a novel regulatory network involving H. pylori, DCs, Th22 cells, gastric epithelial cells and MDSCs, which collectively exert a pro-inflammatory effect within the gastric microenvironment. Efforts to inhibit this Th22-dependent pathway may therefore prove a valuable strategy in the therapy of H. pylori-associated gastritis. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  11. Novel sonographic clues for diagnosis of antral gastritis and Helicobacter pylori infection: a clinical study.

    PubMed

    Cakmakci, Emin; Ucan, Berna; Colak, Bayram; Cinar, Hasibe Gokçe

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to find out whether transabdominal sonography may have a predictive role for detection of antral gastritis and Helicobacter pylori infection in the antrum. A total of 108 patients and 54 control participants were allocated into 3 groups: group 1, controls without any symptoms or findings of antral gastritis and H pylori infection; group 2, patients with symptoms and endoscopic findings consistent with gastritis in the absence of documented H pylori infection; and group 3, patients with symptoms and endoscopic findings consistent with gastritis and documented H pylori infection. These groups were compared in terms of demographics, antral wall thickness, mucosal layer (together with muscularis mucosa) thickness, and mucosal layer-to-antral wall thickness ratio. The groups had no statistically significant differences with respect to age, sex, body mass index, and smoking habits. However, it turned out that both antral walls and muscularis mucosa layers were thicker and the mucosal layer-to-antral wall thickness ratio was higher in groups 2 and 3 compared to group 1 (P > .001). In addition, group 3 had statistically significantly thicker antral walls and muscularis mucosa layers and a significantly increased mucosal layer-to-antral wall thickness ratio than group 2 (P < .001). Our results suggest that antral gastritis caused by H pylori infection is associated with characteristic features such as thickening of antral walls and mucosal layers on sonography. These novel clues may be useful in the diagnosis of gastritis, and unnecessary interventions and measures can be avoided in some cases. © 2014 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  12. Association between follicular gastritis and Helicobacter pylori in children seen at a public hospital in Peru.

    PubMed

    Mejia, C R; Vera, C A; Huiza-Espinoza, L

    2016-01-01

    For the last 15 years, infection from Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) has been recognized in gastritis pathogenesis, and is known to trigger an important inflammatory response in these patients. To determine the association between follicular gastritis and H. pylori infection in children seen at a public hospital in Peru. An analytic, cross-sectional study was conducted on all the children treated at the Hospital Nacional Docente Madre "Niño San Bartolomé" in Lima, Peru, within the time frame of 2011-2012. All the personal data from the patients' medical histories and endoscopic procedures were collected. The crude prevalence ratios (PR) were obtained and adjusted (aPR) with their 95% confidence intervals (95%CI), using generalized linear models with the binomial family and log link function. A total of 123 children met the study criteria. Forty-eight (39%) of the study sample were girls and the mean age of the children was 12 years. H. pylori was present in 44% of the sample and 9% presented with more than 100 bacteria per field (classified as +++). Thirty-five percent of the children had esophagitis due to concomitant reflux. The presence of H. pylori was associated with follicular gastritis (P<0.01; aPR: 2.3; 95% CI:1.49-3.49), adjusted by the children's age. Based on the data analyzed, it was concluded that the children with follicular gastritis had a greater likelihood of having H. pylori than those that did not present with gastritis. These results can be extrapolated to other similar populations and should be evaluated in each setting so that this does not become a public health problem within the next few years. Copyright © 2016 Asociación Mexicana de Gastroenterología. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  13. Complete Genome Sequence of Helicobacter pylori Strain 7C Isolated from a Mexican Patient with Chronic Gastritis

    PubMed Central

    Mucito-Varela, Eduardo; Castillo-Rojas, Gonzalo; Cevallos, Miguel A.; Lozano, Luis; Merino, Enrique; López-Leal, Gamaliel

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori-induced gastritis is a risk factor for developing gastric pathologies. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of a multidrug-resistant H. pylori strain isolated from a chronic gastritis patient in Mexico City, Mexico. Nonvirulent VacA and cag-pathogenicity island (PAI) genotypes were found, but the presence of a potential mobilizable plasmid carrying an IS605 element is of outstanding interest. PMID:26744372

  14. Inhibitory effect of Raphanobrassica on Helicobacter pylori-induced gastritis in Mongolian gerbils.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Takanori; Wei, Min; Toyoda, Takeshi; Yamano, Shoutaro; Wanibuchi, Hideki

    2014-08-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is well known to be associated with chronic gastritis and also development of gastric cancer. Raphanobrassica (RB) is an intergeneric hybrid of the genera Raphanus (radish) and Brassica (cabbages) containing appreciable amounts of glucoraphanin (GR) and glucoraphenin (GRe), which are actively hydrolyzed by the enzyme myrosinase to sulforaphane and sulforaphene, respectively. Both of these metabolites exert antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory activity. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effect of two freeze-dried products of RB (RB1 and RB2) on H. pylori-induced gastritis in Mongolian gerbils. Six-week-old male Mongolian gerbils were inoculated orally with H. pylori (ATCC 43504), and 2weeks later were fed diets containing no additives or diets supplemented with 2% RB1 (containing both GR and GRe) or 2% RB2 (containing GR only) for 10weeks. In the RB1, but not the RB2 group, mononuclear cell infiltration, mRNA expression of IL-6, and cell proliferation in the gastric mucosa were significantly suppressed. These results indicate that RB1 containing both GR and GRe exerted significant inhibitory effects on H. pylori-induced gastritis in Mongolian gerbils apparently mediated via suppression of IL-6 expression and chronic inflammation.

  15. Role of Activated Protein C in Helicobacter pylori-Associated Gastritis

    PubMed Central

    Oka, Satoko; Gabazza, Esteban Cesar; Taguchi, Yukiko; Yamaguchi, Michihiko; Nakashima, Shigehito; Suzuki, Koji; Adachi, Yukihiko; Imoto, Ichiro

    2000-01-01

    The protein C (PC) pathway has recently been suggested to play a role in the regulation of the inflammatory response. To further extend the anti-inflammatory effect of activated PC (APC) in vivo, particularly its biological relevance to human disease, the activity of APC in the mucosa of patients with Helicobacter pylori-associated gastritis and the effect of vacuolating cytotoxin (VacA), cytotoxin-associated antigen (CagA), and H. pylori lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on PC activation were evaluated. This study comprised 35 patients with chronic gastritis. There were 20 patients with and 15 without H. pylori infection. The levels of PC and APC-PC inhibitor (PCI) complex were measured by immunoassays. The level of PC was significantly decreased and the level of APC-PCI complex was significantly increased in biopsy specimens from gastric corpus and antrum in patients with H. pylori-associated gastritis as compared to H. pylori-negative subjects. The concentrations of VacA, CagA, and LPS were significantly correlated with those of the APC-PCI complex in biopsy mucosal specimens from the gastric corpus and antrum. H. pylori LPS, VacA, and CagA induced a dose-dependent activation of PC on the surface of monocytic cells. APC inhibited the secretion of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) induced by H. pylori LPS. Overall, these results suggest that H. pylori infection is associated with increased APC generation in the gastric mucosa. The inhibitory activity of APC on TNF-α secretion may serve to protect H. pylori-induced gastric mucosal damage. PMID:10768983

  16. Helicobacter pylori infection, gastritis, and the temperature of choice for hot drinks.

    PubMed

    Graham, D Y; Abou-Sleiman, J; el-Zimaity, H M; Badr, A; Graham, D P; Malaty, H M

    1996-09-01

    The role of the temperature of the diet as a potential etiological factor for gastritis or peptic ulcer disease has been postulated since the beginning of the century. Animal studies have demonstrated damage to gastric mucosa caused by hot water at 60 to 80 degrees C. In the pre-Helicobacter pylori era it was reported that the majority of ulcer patients preferred hot drinks. It also was reported that the temperature of choice for drinks increased with severity of histological grade of gastritis. We evaluated the association between the preferred temperature of hot drinks and the presence of H. pylori infection. We tested the temperature of choice for hot drinking liquids among 12 H. pylori-negative and 43 H. pylori-positive volunteers. We also compared the effect of H. pylori therapy on hot drink temperature preference and, in 32 individuals, whether there was a relation between temperature and the degree of gastric atrophy. There was no difference in the preferred temperature for hot drinks between those volunteers with and without H. pylori infection (63.4 degrees +/- 6 degrees C compared to 61.3 degrees +/- 7 degrees C, respectively) (mean +/- 1 SD, p = .3). There was no change in preferred temperature after successful therapy of the H. pylori infection compared to unsuccessful H. pylori therapy, nor was there a correlation between the preferred temperature and the presence, absence, or degree of gastric atrophy (r2 < 0.001). The temperature of preference for hot drinks was not influenced by H. pylori infection or by the presence of atrophic gastritis.

  17. [The low prevalence of Helicobacter pylori gastritis in newly diagnosed inflammatory bowel disease children and adolescent].

    PubMed

    Sładek, Małgorzata; Jedynak-Wasowicz, Urszula; Wedrychowicz, Andrzej; Kowalska-Duplaga, Kinga; Pieczarkowski, Stanisław; Fyderek, Krzysztof

    2007-01-01

    Data concerning prevalence rate of Helicobacter pylori gastritis in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients is conflicting. We had studied the prevalence of Hp gastritis in newly diagnosed inflammatory bowel disease children before any pharmacological treatment was introduced. Ninety four consecutive children with inflammatory bowel diseased were enrolled into study, mean age 12.9 +/- 3.75 years, including 50 with Crohn's Disease (CD) and 44 with ulcerative colitis (UC). One hundred and four patients (mean age 13.6 +/- 4.2 year) referred for diagnostic evaluation because of recurrent abdominal pain, matched for age, sex and socioeconomic status served as a control. The results revealed a highly statistically lower prevalence of Hp gastritis in children with IBD as compared with controls (9.6% vs. 38.4%, p < 0.0001). Significantly more often Hp gastritis occurred in CD than UC patients. There was no statistical difference in mean age of IBD onset between Hp gastritis positive and negative groups (14.3 +/- 3.75 vs. 13.6 +/- 4.3 yr) was found. Our results show that in newly diagnosed IBD children, Hp gastritis is not unusual, but the prevalence rate is significantly lower comparing to the control group. The low Hp gastritis rate is not related to medical treatment, since the patients were studied before any was introduced.

  18. Frequency of virulence factors in Helicobacter pylori-infected patients with gastritis.

    PubMed

    Salimzadeh, Loghman; Bagheri, Nader; Zamanzad, Behnam; Azadegan-Dehkordi, Fatemeh; Rahimian, Ghorbanali; Hashemzadeh-Chaleshtori, Morteza; Rafieian-Kopaei, Mahmoud; Sanei, Mohammad Hossein; Shirzad, Hedayatollah

    2015-03-01

    The outcome of Helicobacter pylori infection has been related to specific virulence-associated bacterial genotypes. The vacuolating cytotoxin (vacA), cagA gene, oipA and babA2 gene are important virulence factor involving gastric diseases. The objective of this study was to assess the relationship between virulence factors of H. pylori and histopathological findings. Gastroduodenoscopy was performed in 436 dyspeptic patients. Antrum biopsy was obtained for detection of H. pylori, virulence factors and for histopathological assessment. The polymerase chain reaction was used to detect virulence factors of H. pylori using specific primers. vacA genotypes in patients infected with H. pylori were associated with cagA, iceA1 and iceA2. In the patients with H. pylori infection there was a significant relationship between cagA positivity and neutrophil activity (P = 0.004) and chronic inflammation (P = 0.013) and with H. pylori density (P = 0.034). Neutrophil infiltration was found to be more severe in the s1 group than in the s2 group (P = 0.042). Also was a significant relationship between oipA positivity and neutrophil activity (P = 0.004) and with H. pylori density (P = 0.018). No significant relationships were observed between other vacA genotypes and histopathological parameters. H. pylori strains showing cagA, vacA s1 and oipA positivity are associated with more severe gastritis in some histological features but virulence factors of H. pylori do not appear to determine the overall pattern of gastritis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Antral atrophy, intestinal metaplasia, and preneoplastic markers in Mexican children with Helicobacter pylori-positive and Helicobacter pylori-negative gastritis.

    PubMed

    Villarreal-Calderon, Rodolfo; Luévano-González, Arturo; Aragón-Flores, Mariana; Zhu, Hongtu; Yuan, Ying; Xiang, Qun; Yan, Benjamin; Stoll, Kathryn Anne; Cross, Janet V; Iczkowski, Kenneth A; Mackinnon, Alexander Craig

    2014-06-01

    Chronic inflammation and infection are major risk factors for gastric carcinogenesis in adults. As chronic gastritis is common in Mexican children, diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori and other causes of gastritis are critical for the identification of children who would benefit from closer surveillance. Antral biopsies from 82 Mexican children (mean age, 8.3 ± 4.8 years) with chronic gastritis (36 H pylori+, 46 H pylori-) were examined for gastritis activity, atrophy, intestinal metaplasia (IM), and immunohistochemical expression of gastric carcinogenesis biomarkers caudal type homeobox 2 (CDX2), ephrin type-B receptor 4 (EphB4), matrix metalloproteinase 3 (MMP3), macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), p53, β-catenin, and E-cadherin. Atrophy was diagnosed in 7 (9%) of 82, and IM, in 5 (6%) of 82 by routine histology, whereas 6 additional children (7%) (3 H pylori+) exhibited aberrant CDX2 expression without IM. Significant positive correlations were seen between EphB4, MMP3, and MIF (P<.0001). Atrophy and follicular pathology were more frequent in H pylori+ biopsies (P<.0001), whereas IM and CDX2 expression showed no significant correlation with H pylori status. Antral biopsies demonstrating atrophy, IM, and/or aberrant CDX2 expression were seen in 21.95% (18/82) of the children, potentially identifying those who would benefit from closer surveillance and preventive dietary strategies. Biomarkers CDX2, EphB4, MMP3, and MIF may be useful in the workup of pediatric gastritis.

  20. Helicobacter pylori associated chronic gastritis, clinical syndromes, precancerous lesions, and pathogenesis of gastric cancer development

    PubMed Central

    Watari, Jiro; Chen, Nancy; Amenta, Peter S; Fukui, Hirokazu; Oshima, Tadayuki; Tomita, Toshihiko; Miwa, Hiroto; Lim, Kheng-Jim; Das, Kiron M

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is well known to be associated with the development of precancerous lesions such as chronic atrophic gastritis (AG), or gastric intestinal metaplasia (GIM), and cancer. Various molecular alterations are identified not only in gastric cancer (GC) but also in precancerous lesions. H. pylori treatment seems to improve AG and GIM, but still remains controversial. In contrast, many studies, including meta-analysis, show that H. pylori eradication reduces GC. Molecular markers detected by genetic and epigenetic alterations related to carcinogenesis reverse following H. pylori eradication. This indicates that these changes may be an important factor in the identification of high risk patients for cancer development. Patients who underwent endoscopic treatment of GC are at high risk for development of metachronous GC. A randomized controlled trial from Japan concluded that prophylactic eradication of H. pylori after endoscopic resection should be used to prevent the development of metachronous GC, but recent retrospective studies did not show the tendency. Patients with precancerous lesions (molecular alterations) that do not reverse after H. pylori treatment, represent the “point of no return” and may be at high risk for the development of GC. Therefore, earlier H. pylori eradication should be considered for preventing GC development prior to the appearance of precancerous lesions. PMID:24833876

  1. Helicobacter pylori associated chronic gastritis, clinical syndromes, precancerous lesions, and pathogenesis of gastric cancer development.

    PubMed

    Watari, Jiro; Chen, Nancy; Amenta, Peter S; Fukui, Hirokazu; Oshima, Tadayuki; Tomita, Toshihiko; Miwa, Hiroto; Lim, Kheng-Jim; Das, Kiron M

    2014-05-14

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is well known to be associated with the development of precancerous lesions such as chronic atrophic gastritis (AG), or gastric intestinal metaplasia (GIM), and cancer. Various molecular alterations are identified not only in gastric cancer (GC) but also in precancerous lesions. H. pylori treatment seems to improve AG and GIM, but still remains controversial. In contrast, many studies, including meta-analysis, show that H. pylori eradication reduces GC. Molecular markers detected by genetic and epigenetic alterations related to carcinogenesis reverse following H. pylori eradication. This indicates that these changes may be an important factor in the identification of high risk patients for cancer development. Patients who underwent endoscopic treatment of GC are at high risk for development of metachronous GC. A randomized controlled trial from Japan concluded that prophylactic eradication of H. pylori after endoscopic resection should be used to prevent the development of metachronous GC, but recent retrospective studies did not show the tendency. Patients with precancerous lesions (molecular alterations) that do not reverse after H. pylori treatment, represent the "point of no return" and may be at high risk for the development of GC. Therefore, earlier H. pylori eradication should be considered for preventing GC development prior to the appearance of precancerous lesions.

  2. An epizootic of lymphoplasmacytic gastritis attributed to Helicobacter pylori infection in cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis).

    PubMed

    Reindel, J F; Fitzgerald, A L; Breider, M A; Gough, A W; Yan, C; Mysore, J V; Dubois, A

    1999-01-01

    An epizootic of subclinical lymphoplasmacytic gastritis occurred in cynomolgus monkeys maintained at our research facility. Gastric pathology data and histologic sections of 63 adolescent monkeys (2.5-3.5 years old) sacrificed during the epizootic were reviewed. Localized to multifocal reddening of the gastric mucosa was noted grossly in 7 of 44 (16%) monkeys harboring Helicobacter pylori, but not in any of 19 monkeys in which these bacteria were not seen. Gastritis, characterized by accentuation of lymphoplasmacytic infiltrates in antral and to a lesser degree cardiac mucosa, occurred in 42 of 63 (67%) monkeys evaluated and in 42 of 44 (93%) monkeys in which H. pylori was observed microscopically. Two monkeys with H. pylori infection had infiltrate scores that overlapped with the upper limit of scores of H. pylori-negative animals. Coincident with accentuated infiltrates were gastric gland epithelial hyperplasia, reduction in mucin content of surface and gland epithelia, and comparatively minor infiltrates of neutrophils in superficial lamina propria and gastric glands. Antral mucosa thickness often exceeded 1.5 to 2 times normal. Antral mucosal erosions occurred in 7 of 44 (16%) monkeys with H. pylori. Argyrophilic bacteria morphologically consistent with H. pylori were present in antral and less commonly cardiac mucosal glands. Intensity of bacterial colonization correlated with lymphoplasmacytic infiltrates (r = 0.754) and hyperplasia (r = 0.700), although responses were quite variable. These bacteria were not detected in fundic mucosa except in instances where parietal cells were substantially depleted in glands coincident with localized increases in lamina propria inflammatory cell infiltrates. Helicobacter heilmannii-like organisms (HHLOs) were present in fundic glands of all 63 monkeys; colonization was often pronounced. Scores for fundic mucosal inflammation did not correlate with presence or intensity of colonization with HHLOs (r = 0.005). Rather, fundic

  3. The immunohistochemistry and toluidine blue roles for Helicobacter pylori detection in patients with gastritis.

    PubMed

    Tajalli, Raziye; Nobakht, Maliheh; Mohammadi-Barzelighi, Hajar; Agah, Shahram; Rastegar-Lari, Abdolaziz; Sadeghipour, Alireza

    2013-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori, which is associated with many upper gastrointestinal diseases, is found in half of the population of the world. Several special stains and immunohistochemistry stain for H. pylori are available. The need for and usefulness of immunohistochemical (IHC) technique has been debated for years. Toluidine blue is a simple stain for microbiological studies and is easily available in laboratories. Therefore, this study was conducted to compare hematoxylin and eosin (H&E), Giemsa and toluidine blue staining with immunehistochemistry for detection of H. pylori in patients with gastritis and also to correlate the results of these staining methods with pathological grading. We reviewed 54 consecutive gastric biopsy specimens stained by H&E and Giemsa as well as by toluidine blue and immunohistochemistry stains for H. pylori. H. pylori was positively identified by IHC in 43 (79.63%) patients, while positive samples were found in 18 (33.33%), 24 (44.44%) and 33 (61.11%) patients using H&E, Giemsa and toluidine blue staining methods. Our results showed that classical histological staining methods are not sensitive enough to identify low numbers or coccoid forms of organism, while toluidine blue and immunohistochemistry play an important role in detection of H. pylori infection. Toluidine blue has been proved to be much more reliable than H&E and Giemsa in detection of H. pylori. In addition, in post treatment biopsies and in biopsies with unexplained chronic active gastritis without histological evidence of H. pylori should have immunohistochemistry done to detect possible low density or coccoid form of organisms.

  4. Helicobacter pylori Infection with Atrophic Gastritis Is an Independent Risk Factor for Advanced Colonic Neoplasm

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ji Young; Park, Hye Won; Choi, Ji Young; Lee, Jong-Soo; Koo, Ja Eun; Chung, Eun Ju; Chang, Hye-Sook; Choe, Jaewon; Yang, Dong-Hoon; Myung, Seung-Jae; Jung, Hwoon-Yong; Yang, Suk-Kyun; Byeon, Jeong-Sik

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Helicobacter pylori is a major risk factor for atrophic gastritis (AG) and gastric cancer. The correlation between H. pylori, AG and colorectal neoplasm (CRN) has only been examined in a limited number of studies, and findings have been inconclusive. We aimed to investigate the association between H. pylori infection status, AG and advanced CRN. Methods This cross-sectional study investigated the relationship between the presence of serum anti-H. pylori IgG antibodies, AG, and advanced CRN in 6,351 consecutive asymptomatic subjects who underwent a screening colonoscopy. Results A total of 316 participants (5.0%) had advanced CRN. H. pylori seropositivity was 61.3%. In a univariate analysis, the presence of H. pylori infection was associated with advanced CRN (odds ratio [OR], 1.49; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.17 to 1.91; p=0.001). H. pylori infection was associated with an increased risk of advanced CRN after adjusting for clinically relevant confounders (OR, 1.34; 95% CI, 1.04 to 1.72; p=0.023). H. pylori-related AG was significantly associated with the risk of advanced CRN (OR, 1.40; 95% CI, 1.03 to 1.91; p=0.030), whereas H. pylori infection without AG was not. Conclusions H. pylori infection increased the risk of advanced CRN, especially when it was combined with AG. Strict colonoscopy screening and surveillance may be warranted in those with H. pylori-positive AG. PMID:27458180

  5. How host regulation of Helicobacter pylori-induced gastritis protects against peptic ulcer disease and gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Dhar, Poshmaal; Ng, Garrett Z; Sutton, Philip

    2016-09-01

    The bacterial pathogen Helicobacter pylori is the etiological agent of a range of gastrointestinal pathologies including peptic ulcer disease and the major killer, gastric adenocarcinoma. Infection with this bacterium induces a chronic inflammatory response in the gastric mucosa (gastritis). It is this gastritis that, over decades, eventually drives the development of H. pylori-associated disease in some individuals. The majority of studies investigating H. pylori pathogenesis have focused on factors that promote disease development in infected individuals. However, an estimated 85% of those infected with H. pylori remain completely asymptomatic, despite the presence of pathogenic bacteria that drive a chronic gastritis that lasts many decades. This indicates the presence of highly effective regulatory processes in the host that, in most cases, keeps a check on inflammation and protect against disease. In this minireview we discuss such known host factors and how they prevent the development of H. pylori-associated pathologies. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  6. The prevalence of lymphoid follicles in Helicobacter pylori associated gastritis in patients with ulcers and non-ulcer dyspepsia.

    PubMed Central

    Zaitoun, A M

    1995-01-01

    AIMS--To determine the prevalence of lymphoid follicles in Helicobacter pylori positive and negative gastritis in antral and body type gastric mucosa in patients with non-ulcer dyspepsia (NUD), duodenal ulcer, or gastric ulcer; to correlate follicle presence with patient age; to evaluate the correlation between the prevalence of lymphoid follicles and active and inactive gastritis and its severity; and to assess the positive predictive value of lymphoid follicle prevalence with respect to H pylori infection. METHODS--Gastric biopsy specimens, graded according to the Sydney system, from 337 patients were studied. RESULTS--Lymphoid follicles occurred more often in antral mucosa (78%) than in body type mucosa (41%) and were observed in 85% of patients with H pylori positive gastritis. There was no significant difference between NUD and gastric and duodenal ulcer disease with regard to the presence of lymphoid follicles. The positive predictive value of the presence of lymphoid follicles in H pylori infection was 96%. Lymphoid follicles were more commonly observed in patients aged between 10 and 29 years. Lymphoid follicles were more frequently found in pangastritis of all subtypes than in antral gastritis and also in active gastritis than in inactive gastritis. The presence of lymphoid follicles correlated strongly with the degree and severity of gastritis. CONCLUSION--Lymphoid follicles are a constant morphological feature of H pylori associated gastritis. Images PMID:7615851

  7. Upregulation of CCL20 and recruitment of CCR6+ gastric infiltrating lymphocytes in Helicobacter pylori gastritis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yi-Ying; Tsai, Hwei-Fang; Lin, We-Cheng; Hsu, Ping-I; Shun, Chia-Tung; Wu, Ming-Shiang; Hsu, Ping-Ning

    2007-09-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is associated with an inflammatory response in the gastric mucosa, leading to chronic gastritis, peptic ulcers, and gastric cancer. There is increased T-cell infiltration at the site of infection with H. pylori. CCR6, a specific beta-chemokine receptor for CCL20 (MIP-3alpha/LARC/exodus), has recently been reported to mediate lymphocyte homeostasis and immune responses in mucosal tissue, and it may play a role in chemokine-mediated lymphocyte trafficking during gastric inflammation. In this study, we investigated the role of CCR6 and its ligand, CCL20, in inducing an inflammatory response in the gastric mucosa during H. pylori infection. Gastric infiltrating T lymphocytes were isolated from endoscopic biopsy specimens of H. pylori gastritis patients and analyzed for the expression of the CCR6 chemokine receptor. Our results demonstrated that there was significantly increased CCR6 expression in CD3(+) T cells infiltrating the gastric mucosa, and the CCR6 ligand, the CCL20 chemokine, was selectively expressed in inflamed gastric tissues. The production of CCL20 was upregulated in response to H. pylori in gastric epithelial cells when there was stimulation by the proinflammatory cytokines interleukin-1beta and tumor necrosis factor alpha. Furthermore, recombinant CCL20 induced lymphocyte chemotaxis migration in fresh gastric T cells ex vivo, indicating that the gastric T cells could migrate toward inflammatory sites via CCR6/CCL20 interaction. Our results suggest that the interaction between CCL20 and CCR6 may play a role in chemokine-mediated lymphocyte trafficking during gastric inflammation in Helicobacter infection.

  8. Chronic idiophatic urticaria and Helicobacter pylori: a specific pattern of gastritis and urticaria remission after Helicobacter pylori eradication.

    PubMed

    Persechino, S; Annibale, B; Caperchi, C; Persechino, F; Narcisi, A; Tammaro, A; Milione, M; Corleto, V

    2012-01-01

    Chronic urticaria (CU) is defined as the occurrence of spontaneous wheals for a duration of more than 6 weeks and is the most frequent skin disease, with prevalence ranging between 15 and 25%, and is a seriously disabling condition, with social isolation and mood changes causing a significant degree of dysfunction and quality of life impairment to many patients. The main clinical features of CU are the repeated occurrence of transient eruptions of pruritic wheals or patchy erythema on the skin that last less than 24 hours and disappear without sequelae. CU is often defined as chronic idiopathic urticaria (CIU) because the causes of CU remain unknown in the great majority (70-95%) of patients. Drugs, food, viruses, alimentary conservative substances or inhalant substances often seem to be involved in determining CIU skin flare. Despite a general agreement that bacteria infections and parasitic infestations can be involved in the pathogenesis of CIU, proven evidence of these relationships is lacking. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori (Hp) infection, and the extension and severity of gastritis in a group of CIU patients compared to controls and to evaluate the effectiveness of eradication of Hp on the CIU symptomatology, and the role of Hp infection in pathogenesis of CIU.

  9. Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, B E; Cohen, H; Blaser, M J

    1997-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a gram-negative bacterium which causes chronic gastritis and plays important roles in peptic ulcer disease, gastric carcinoma, and gastric lymphoma. H. pylori has been found in the stomachs of humans in all parts of the world. In developing countries, 70 to 90% of the population carries H. pylori. In developed countries, the prevalence of infection is lower. There appears to be no substantial reservoir of H. pylori aside from the human stomach. Transmission can occur by iatrogenic, fecal-oral, and oral-oral routes. H. pylori is able to colonize and persist in a unique biological niche within the gastric lumen. All fresh isolates of H. pylori express significant urease activity, which appears essential to the survival and pathogenesis of the bacterium. A variety of tests to diagnose H. pylori infection are now available. Histological examination of gastric tissue, culture, rapid urease testing, DNA probes, and PCR analysis, when used to test gastric tissue, all require endoscopy. In contrast, breath tests, serology, gastric juice PCR, and urinary excretion of [15N]ammonia are noninvasive tests that do not require endoscopy. In this review, we highlight advances in the detection of the presence of the organism and methods of differentiating among types of H. pylori, and we provide a background for appropriate chemotherapy of the infection. PMID:9336670

  10. Time Trends in Helicobacter pylori Infection and Atrophic Gastritis Over 40 Years in Japan.

    PubMed

    Kamada, Tomoari; Haruma, Ken; Ito, Masanori; Inoue, Kazuhiko; Manabe, Noriaki; Matsumoto, Hiroshi; Kusunoki, Hiroaki; Hata, Jiro; Yoshihara, Masaharu; Sumii, Koji; Akiyama, Takashi; Tanaka, Shinji; Shiotani, Akiko; Graham, David Y

    2015-06-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection produces progressive mucosal damage that may eventually result in gastric cancer. We studied the changes that occurred in the presence and severity of atrophic gastritis and the prevalence of H. pylori infection that occurred coincident with improvements in economic and hygienic conditions in Japan since World War II. The prevalence of H. pylori infection and histologic grades of gastric damage were retrospectively evaluated using gastric biopsy specimens obtained over a 40-year period. Gastric atrophy and intestinal metaplasia were scored using the updated Sydney classification system. The prevalence of H. pylori and severity of atrophy were examined in 1381 patients including 289 patients examined in the 1970s (158 men; mean age, 44.9 years), 787 in the 1990s (430 men; 44.2 years), and 305 in the 2010s (163 men; 53.2 years). Overall, the prevalence of H. pylori infection decreased significantly from 74.7% (1970s) to 53% (1990s) and 35.1% (2010s) (p < .01). The prevalence of atrophy in the antrum and corpus was significantly lower in the 2010s (33, 19%, respectively) compared to those evaluated in either the 1970s (98, 82%) (p < .001) or 1990s (80, 67%) (p < .001). The severity of atrophy and intestinal metaplasia also declined remarkably among those with H. pylori infection. There has been a progressive and rapid decline in the prevalence of H. pylori infection as well a fall in the rate of progression of gastric atrophy among H. pylori-infected Japanese coincident with the westernization and improvements in economic and hygienic conditions in Japan since World War II. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Antibacterial and anti-atrophic effects of a highly soluble, acid stable UDCA formula in Helicobacter pylori-induced gastritis.

    PubMed

    Thao, Tran Dang Hien; Ryu, Ho-Cheol; Yoo, Seo-Hong; Rhee, Dong-Kwon

    2008-06-01

    Helicobacter pylori is one of the main causes of atrophic gastritis and gastric carcinogenesis. Gastritis can also occur in the absence of H. pylori as a result of bile reflux suggesting the eradication of H. pylori by bile acids. However, the bile salts are unable to eradicate H. pylori due to their low solubility and instability at acidic pH. This study examined the effect of a highly soluble and acid stable ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) formula on H. pylori-induced atrophic gastritis. The H. pylori infection decreased the body weight, mitochondrial membrane potential and ATP level in vivo. Surprisingly, H. pylori-induced expression of malate dehydrogenase (MDH), a key enzyme in the tricarboxylic acid cycle, at both the protein and mRNA levels. However, the UDCA formula repressed MDH expression and increased the membrane potential thereby increasing the ATP level and body weight in vivo. Moreover, UDCA scavenged the reactive oxygen species (ROS), increased the membrane potential, and inhibited apoptosis in AGS cells exposed to H(2)O(2) in vitro through the mitochondria-mediated pathway. Taken together, UDCA decreases the MDH and ROS levels, which can prevent apoptosis in H. pylori-induced gastritis.

  12. Relation of atrophic gastritis with Helicobacter pylori-CagA+ and interleukin-1 gene polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Sierra, Rafaela; Une, Clas; Ramírez, Vanessa; Alpízar-Alpízar, Warner; González, María I; Ramírez, José A; de Mascarel, Antoine; Cuenca, Patricia; Pérez-Pérez, Guillermo; Mégraud, Francis

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To determine the association of Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) CagA+ infection and pro-inflammatory polymorphisms of the genes interleukin (IL)-1RN and IL-1B with the risk of gastric atrophy and peptic ulcers in a dyspeptic population in Costa Rica, a country with high incidence and mortality of gastric cancer. METHODS: Seven biopsy specimens, a fasting blood sample and a questionnaire concerning nutritional and sociodemographic factors were obtained from 501 consecutive patients who had undergone endoscopy for dyspeptic symptoms. A histopathological diagnosis was made. Pepsinogen concentrations were analyzed by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Infection with H pylori CagA+ was determined by serology and polymerase chain reaction (PCR). IL-1B and IL-1RN polymorphisms genotyping was performed by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) and PCR respectively. RESULTS: In this dyspeptic population, 86% were H pylori positive and of these, 67.8% were positive for CagA. Atrophic antral gastritis (AAG) was associated with CagA+ status [odd ratio (OR) = 4.1; P < 0.000] and fruit consumption (OR = 0.3; P < 0.00). Atrophic body gastritis (ABG) was associated with pepsinogen PGI/PGII < 3.4 (OR = 4.9; P < 0.04) and alcohol consumption (OR = 7.3; P < 0.02). Duodenal ulcer was associated with CagA+ (OR = 2.9; P < 0.04) and smoking (OR = 2.4; P < 0.04). PGI < 60 μg/L as well as PGI/PGII < 3.4 were associated with CagA+. CONCLUSION: In a dyspeptic population in Costa Rica, H pylori CagA+ is not associated with ABG, but it is a risk factor for AAG. The pro-inflammatory cytokine polymorphisms IL-1B + 3945 and IL-1RN are not associated with the atrophic lesions of this dyspeptic population. PMID:19030199

  13. Russell Body Gastritis Treated With Helicobacter pylori Eradication Therapy: Magnifying Endoscopic Findings With Narrow Band Imaging Before and After Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Nishimura, Naoyuki; Mizuno, Motowo; Shimodate, Yuichi; Doi, Akira; Mouri, Hirokazu; Matsueda, Kazuhiro; Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Notohara, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    Russell body gastritis is considered a benign inflammatory disease. This is the first report that documented the disease’s natural history over a 15-month period and the response to eradication of Helicobacter pylori, with follow-up for another 15 months. In addition, Russell body gastritis was observed with magnifying endoscopy and narrow-band imaging. In the period of 30 months, we were able to record progression of the disease in the untreated state and its complete regression after clearance of H. pylori. PMID:27807558

  14. Draft Genome Sequence of a Helicobacter pylori Strain Isolated from a Patient with Diffuse Gastritis from a Region of High Cancer Risk in Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Bayona Rojas, Martin; Barragán Vidal, Carlos; Trujillo, Clara Esperanza; Bravo, María Mercedes

    2015-01-01

    The draft genome sequence of one Colombian Helicobacter pylori strain is presented. This strain was isolated from a patient with diffuse gastritis from Tibaná, Boyacá, a region with high gastric cancer risk. PMID:25858838

  15. Helicobacter Pylori Associated Gastritis Increases Risk of Colorectal Polyps: a Hospital Based-Cross-Sectional Study in Nakhon Ratchasima Province, Northeastern Thailand.

    PubMed

    Tongtawee, Taweesak; Kaewpitoon, Soraya; Kaewpitoon, Natthawut; Dechsukhum, Chavaboon; Leeanansaksiri, Wilairat; Loyd, Ryan A; Matrakool, Likit; Panpimanmas, Sukij

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal polyps are common in Thailand, particularly in the northeastern region. The present study aimed to determine any correlation between Helicobacter pylori-associated gastritis and colorectal polyps in the Thai population. A total of 303 patients undergoing esophagogastroduodenoscopy with colonoscopy for investigation of chronic abdominal pain participated in this study from November 2014 to October 2015. A diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori associated gastritis was made if the bacteria were seen on histopathological examination and a rapid urease test was positive. Colorectal polyps were confirmed by histological examination of colorectal biopsies. Patient demographic data were analyzed for correlations. The prevalence of colorectal polyps was 77 (25.4%), lesions being found more frequently in Helicobacter pylori infected patients than non-infected subjects [38.4% vs. 12.5%; Odds Ratio (OR) (95% CI): 2.26 (1.32 - 3.86), p < 0.01]. Patients with Helicobacter pylori - associated gastritis were at high risk of having adenomas featuring dysplasia [OR (95% CI): 1.15 (1.16 - 7.99); P = 0.02]. There was no varaition in location of polyps, age group, sex and gastric lesions with respect to Helicobacter pylori status. This study showed that Helicobacter pylori associated gastritis is associated with an increased risk of colorectal polyps, especially adenomas with dysplasia in the Thai population. Patients with Helicobacter pylori-associated gastritis may benefit from concurrent colonoscopy for diagnosis of colorectal polyps as a preventive and early treatment for colorectal cancer.

  16. Correlation between Gastric Mucosal Morphologic Patterns and Histopathological Severity of Helicobacter pylori Associated Gastritis Using Conventional Narrow Band Imaging Gastroscopy.

    PubMed

    Tongtawee, Taweesak; Kaewpitoon, Soraya; Kaewpitoon, Natthawut; Dechsukhum, Chavaboon; Loyd, Ryan A; Matrakool, Likit

    2015-01-01

    Identifying specific gastric mucosal morphologic patterns useful for detecting Helicobacter pylori associated gastritis and correlation with histopathological severity. The endoscopists classified the C-NBI gastroscopic findings into 5 gastric mucosal morphologic patterns as follows: type 1: regular arrangement of collecting venules, type 2: cone-shaped gastric pits, type 3: rod-shaped gastric pits with prominent sulci, type 4: ground glass-like morphology, and type 5: dark brown patches with bluish margin and irregular border. Biopsies of all of the cases were then evaluated by 5 pathologists for definitive Helicobacter pylori diagnosis. Type 1 and type 2 patterns were statistically significant in predicting Helicobacter pylori negative status (58/60, P < 0.01). Type 3, type 4, and type 5 patterns were statistically significant in predicting Helicobacter pylori positive status (132/140, P < 0.01). Furthermore, the sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of type 3, 4, or 5 morphologies for predicting Helicobacter pylori positive were 94.28%, 96.66%, 98.50%, and 87.87%, respectively, correlated well with inflammation grading according to the Sydney classification (P < 0.01). Our study suggests that gastric mucosal morphologic patterns in the Helicobacter pylori infected gastric mucosa can be reliably identified using C-NBI gastroscopy with good correlation with inflammation grading.

  17. In vivo expression of Helicobacter pylori virulence genes in patients with gastritis, ulcer, and gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Avilés-Jiménez, Francisco; Reyes-Leon, Adriana; Nieto-Patlán, Erik; Hansen, Lori M; Burgueño, Juan; Ramos, Irma P; Camorlinga-Ponce, Margarita; Bermúdez, Hector; Blancas, Juan M; Cabrera, Lourdes; Ribas-Aparicio, Rosa María; Solnick, Jay V; Torres-López, Javier

    2012-02-01

    The best-studied Helicobacter pylori virulence factor associated with development of peptic ulcer disease or gastric cancer (GC) rather than asymptomatic nonatrophic gastritis (NAG) is the cag pathogenicity island (cagPAI), which encodes a type IV secretion system (T4SS) that injects the CagA oncoprotein into host epithelial cells. Here we used real-time reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) to measure the in vivo expression of genes on the cagPAI and of other virulence genes in patients with NAG, duodenal ulcer (DU), or GC. In vivo expression of H. pylori virulence genes was greater overall in gastric biopsy specimens of patients with GC than in those of patients with NAG or DU. However, since in vitro expression of cagA was not greater in H. pylori strains from patients with GC than in those from patients with NAG or DU, increased expression in GC in vivo is likely a result of environmental conditions in the gastric mucosa, though it may in turn cause more severe pathology. Increased expression of virulence genes in GC may represent a stress response to elevated pH or other environmental conditions in the stomach of patients with GC, which may be less hospitable to H. pylori colonization than the acidic environment in patients with NAG or DU.

  18. Association of CagPAI integrity with severeness of Helicobacter pylori infection in patients with gastritis.

    PubMed

    Ahmadzadeh, A; Ghalehnoei, H; Farzi, N; Yadegar, A; Alebouyeh, M; Aghdaei, H A; Molaei, M; Zali, M R; Pour Hossein Gholi, M A

    2015-12-01

    The Helicobacter pylori cag pathogenicity island (cagPAI) is involved in delivery of CagA effector protein and peptidoglycan into host cells and also in IL-8 induction in the human gastric tissue. Diversity of cagPAI may affect disease status and clinical outcome of the infected patients. Our study was aimed to investigate diversity of this island and its intactness in Iranian patients to investigate possible associations between cagPAI integrity and pathological changes of the infected tissue. Out of the 75 patients, H. pylori strains were obtained from 30 patients with severe active gastritis (SAG) (n=11), moderate chronic gastritis (CG) (n=14) and intestinal metaplasia/dysplasia (IM) (n=5). Intactness of the cagPAI was determined using 12 sets of primer pairs specific for functionally important loci of cagPAI by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The cagPAI positive strains were significantly observed in patients with SAG (52.4%) in comparison to those presenting CG (33.3%) and IM (14.3%). In addition, the presence of intact cagPAI was 87.5% in H. pylori strains isolated from patients with SAG, which was higher than those obtained from patients with CG (12.5%) or IM (0%). A significant increase in the frequency of cagα-cagY and cagW-cagT segments, as exterior proteins of the CagPAI, was illustrated in strains from SAG patients compared with those from patients with CG. Overall, these results strongly proposed an association between the severity of histopathological changes and intactness of cagPAI in the gastric tissue of patients infected with H. pylori. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Associations among Gastric Juice pH, Atrophic Gastritis, Intestinal Metaplasia and Helicobacter pylori Infection.

    PubMed

    Sung, Jihee; Kim, Nayoung; Lee, Jongchan; Hwang, Young-Jae; Kim, Hyoung Woo; Chung, Jung Wha; Kim, Jin-Wook; Lee, Dong Ho

    2017-09-19

    Gastric juice plays a crucial role in the physiology of the stomach. The aim of this study is to evaluate associations among the pH of gastric juice, atrophic gastritis (AG), intestinal metaplasia (IM), pepsinogen, and Helicobacter pylori infection. Gastric biopsies and juice were collected from 46 subjects who underwent endoscopies at Seoul National University Bundang Hospital between November 2011 and March 2013. H. pylori, AG and IM were evaluated, and pepsinogen I or II, I/II ratio and interleukin (IL)-1β levels were measured. The mean pH of gastric juice was higher in the H. pylori-positive group (n=17) than that in the H. pylori-negative group (n=29) (4.54 vs 2.46, p=0.002). When patients were divided into pH 〈3 (n=28) and pH ≥3 (n=18) groups, H. pylori was lower in the pH 〈3 group (21.4%) than in the pH ≥3 group (61.1%) (p=0.007). The pH ≥3 group demonstrated AG and IM more frequently than the pH 〈3 group in the body (p=0.047 and p=0.051, respectively) but not in the antrum. There were no differences in pepsinogen I or II, I/II ratio and IL-1β levels between the two groups. There is a relationship between chronic H. pylori infection and gastric juice pH ≥3, which may originate from AG and IM in the body.

  20. Serum IL-10, MMP-7, MMP-9 Levels in Helicobacter pylori Infection and Correlation with Degree of Gastritis

    PubMed Central

    Siregar, Gontar; Halim, Sahat; Sitepu, Ricky

    2016-01-01

    AIM: Helicobacter pylori causes gastric mucosal inflammation and immune reaction. However, the increase of IL-10, MMP-7, and MMP-7 levels in the serum is still controversial. The objective of this study was to investigate the serum levels of IL-10, MMP-7 & MMP-9 in gastritis patients with H. pylori infection. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A cross-sectional study was done on seventy gastritis patients that consecutive admitted to endoscopy units. The diagnosis of gastritis was made based on histopathology and diagnosis of H. pylori infection was based on rapid urease test. Serum samples were obtained to determine to circulate IL-10, MMP-7, and MMP-9 level. Univariate and bivariate analysis were done by SPSS version 22. RESULTS: Forthy percentages of the patients were infected with H. pylori. The IL-10 level was significantly higher in H. pylori-infected patients compared to non-infected patients. However, there were no differences between serum levels of MMP-7 and MMP-9 in infected and non-infected H. pylori patients. CONCLUSIONS: The immune response to H. pylori promotes systemic inflammation, which was reflected by the increased levels of serum IL-10. However, there were no significant differences in MMP-7 and MMP-9 serum levels between positive and negative infected H. pylori patients. PMID:27703556

  1. Changes in plasma ghrelin and leptin levels in patients with peptic ulcer and gastritis following eradication of Helicobacter pylori infection.

    PubMed

    Kasai, Chika; Sugimoto, Kazushi; Moritani, Isao; Tanaka, Junichiro; Oya, Yumi; Inoue, Hidekazu; Tameda, Masahiko; Shiraki, Katsuya; Ito, Masaaki; Takei, Yoshiyuki; Takase, Kojiro

    2016-10-04

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection and eradication therapy have been known to influence gastric ghrelin and leptin secretion, which may lead to weight gain. However, the exact relationship between plasma ghrelin/leptin levels and H. pylori infection has remained controversial. The aim of this study was to investigate plasma ghrelin and leptin levels in H. pylori-positive and -negative patients, to compare the two levels of the hormones before and after H. pylori eradication, and to examine the correlation between body mass index (BMI) and active ghrelin or leptin levels, as well as that between atrophic pattern and active ghrelin or leptin levels. Seventy-two H. pylori-positive patients who underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, 46 diagnosed as having peptic ulcer and 26 as atrophic gastritis, were enrolled. Control samples were obtained from 15 healthy H. pylori-negative volunteers. The extent of atrophic change of the gastric mucosa was assessed endoscopically. Body weight was measured and blood was collected before and 12 weeks after H. pylori eradication therapy. Blood samples were taken between 8 and 10 AM after an overnight fast. Plasma ghrelin levels were significantly lower in H. pylori-positive patients than in H. pylori-negative patients. In particular, plasma active ghrelin levels were significantly lower in patients with gastritis compared with patients with peptic ulcer. Plasma ghrelin levels decreased after H. pylori eradication in both peptic ulcer and gastritis patients, while plasma leptin levels increased only in peptic ulcer patients. Plasma leptin levels and BMI were positively correlated, and active ghrelin levels and atrophic pattern were weakly negatively correlated in peptic ulcer patients. H. pylori infection and eradication therapy may affect circulating ghrelin/leptin levels. This finding suggests a relationship between gastric mucosal injury induced by H. pylori infection and changes in plasma ghrelin and leptin levels.

  2. Food/nutrient intake and risk of atrophic gastritis among the Helicobacter pylori-infected population of northeastern Japan.

    PubMed

    Montani, Ai; Sasazuki, Shizuka; Inoue, Manami; Higuchi, Kazuhide; Arakawa, Tetsuo; Tsugane, Shoichiro

    2003-04-01

    Although Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori ) infection is considered a key risk factor for atrophic gastritis, along with other environmental factors, it is still unclear which factor is involved in the development of atrophic gastritis among H. pylori-infected subjects. In the present cross-sectional study, therefore, we analyzed various dietary factors in relation to the presence of atrophic gastritis among H. pylori-infected subjects who participated in a health check-up program in a town in northeastern Japan. One thousand and seventy-one subjects (362 males and 709 females) who provided both self-administered validated food frequency questionnaires and blood samples were the basis for the study, and all of them were serologically positive for H. pylori immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibody. Among them, 663 (223 males and 440 females) were diagnosed as having atrophic gastritis on the basis of serum pepsinogen levels. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were calculated based on tertile categories of subjects without atrophic gastritis, using logistic regression analysis. Among females, high consumptions of rice (OR = 1.6, 95% CI: 1.1-2.3), cod roe (OR = 1.5, 95% CI: 1.0-2.2) and cuttlefish (OR = 1.5, 95% CI: 1.0-2.3) were associated with a moderately increased risk of atrophic gastritis after adjustment for age (P for trend = 0.02 for these items). Among males, high consumptions of rice and miso soup showed a tendency toward an increased risk (P for trend = 0.12 and 0.13, respectively). Vegetables and fruits showed no association among either males or females. From these results, it is suggested that the dietary habits of consumers of traditional Japanese foods may play a role in the development of atrophic gastritis after H. pylori infection.

  3. Impact of Helicobacter pylori Immunoglobulin G Levels and Atrophic Gastritis Status on Risk of Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Takeoka, Atsushi; Tayama, Jun; Yamasaki, Hironori; Kobayashi, Masakazu; Ogawa, Sayaka; Saigo, Tatsuo; Hayashida, Masaki; Shirabe, Susumu

    2016-01-01

    Background Helicobacter pylori (HP) infection is implicated in gastric and extra-gastric diseases. While gastritis-related chronic inflammation represents a known trigger of metabolic disturbances, whether metabolic syndrome (MetS) is affected by gastritis status remains unclear. We aimed to clarify the effect of HP-related gastritis on the risk of MetS. Materials and Methods We retrospectively enrolled patients undergoing screening for MetS between 2014 and 2015. Investigations included HP-specific immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibody assays to detect HP infection, and serum pepsinogen assays to evaluate atrophic gastritis status. The risk of MetS was evaluated via multiple logistic regression analyses with two covariates: serum HP infection status (IgG levels) and atrophic gastritis status (two criteria were applied; pepsinogen I/II ratio < 3 or both pepsinogen I levels ≤ 70 μg/L and pepsinogen I/II ratio < 3). Results Of 1,044 participants, 247 (23.7%) were HP seropositive, and 62 (6.0%) had MetS. HP seronegative and seropositive patients had similar risks of MetS. On the other hand, AG (defined in terms of serum PG I/II <3) was significant risk of MetS (OR of 2.52 [95% CI 1.05–7.52]). After stratification according to HP IgG concentration, patients with low HP infection status had the lowest MetS risk (defined as an odds ratio [OR] adjusted for age, sex, smoking, drinking and physical activity status). Taking this result as a reference, patients with negative, moderate, and high HP infection status had ORs (with 95% confidence intervals [CI]) of 2.15 (1.06–4.16), 3.69 (1.12–16.7), and 4.05 (1.05–26.8). Conclusions HP-associated gastritis represents a risk factor for MetS. Research should determine why low and not negative HP infection status is associated with the lowest MetS risk. PMID:27851820

  4. Helicobacter pylori and gastritis: the role of extracellular matrix metalloproteases, their inhibitors, and the disintegrins and metalloproteases--a systematic literature review.

    PubMed

    Sampieri, Clara L

    2013-10-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is the etiologic agent of gastritis; it has been estimated that 50 % of the world's population could be infected by this bacteria. Gastritis may progress to chronic atrophic gastritis, a condition associated with the development of gastric cancer (GC). Several matrix metalloproteases (MMP) and tissue inhibitors of MMPs (TIMP) as well as disintegrins and metalloproteases (ADAM) have been reported as being involved in gastritis. Among other processes, these protein families participate in remodeling the extracellular matrix, cell signaling, immune response, angiogenesis, inflammation and epithelial mesenchymal transition. This systematic review analyzes the scientific evidence surrounding the relationship between members of the MMP, TIMP and ADAM families and infection by H. pylori in gastritis, considering both in vitro and in vivo studies. Given the potential clinical value of certain members of the MMP, TIMP and ADAM families as molecular markers in gastritis and the association of gastritis with GC, the need for further study is highlighted.

  5. Potential mechanism of corpus-predominant gastritis after PPI therapy in Helicobacter pylori-positive patients with GERD.

    PubMed

    Mukaisho, Ken-ichi; Hagiwara, Tadashi; Nakayama, Takahisa; Hattori, Takanori; Sugihara, Hiroyuki

    2014-09-14

    The long-term use of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) exacerbates corpus atrophic gastritis in patients with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection. To identify a potential mechanism for this change, we discuss interactions between pH, bile acids, and H. pylori. Duodenogastric reflux, which includes bile, occurs in healthy individuals, and bile reflux is increased in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Diluted human plasma and bile acids have been found to be significant chemoattractants and chemorepellents, respectively, for the bacillus H. pylori. Although only taurine conjugates, with a pKa of 1.8-1.9, are soluble in an acidic environment, glycine conjugates, with a pKa of 4.3-5.2, as well as taurine-conjugated bile acids are soluble in the presence of PPI therapy. Thus, the soluble bile acid concentrations in the gastric contents of patients with GERD after continuous PPI therapy are considerably higher than that in those with intact acid production. In the distal stomach, the high concentration of soluble bile acids is likely to act as a bactericide or chemorepellent for H. pylori. In contrast, the mucous layer in the proximal stomach has an optimal bile concentration that forms chemotactic gradients with plasma components required to direct H. pylori to the epithelial surface. H. pylori may then colonize in the stomach body rather than in the pyloric antrum, which may explain the occurrence of corpus-predominant gastritis after PPI therapy in H. pylori-positive patients with GERD.

  6. Role of Treg and TH17 cells of the gastric mucosa in children with Helicobacter pylori gastritis.

    PubMed

    Gil, Joo Hyun; Seo, Jeong Wan; Cho, Min-Sun; Ahn, Jung-Hyuck; Sung, Hye Youn

    2014-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the expression of FOXP3, interleukin (IL)-10, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1, IL-17A, and T helper 17 (TH17) cells/FOXP3+ regulatory T (Treg) cells balance in the gastric mucosa of children with Helicobacter pylori infection, in relation to the gastric histopathology. Antral mucosal biopsies were obtained from 20 children with H pylori(+) gastritis and 20 age- and sex-matched normal controls. Histopathology was assessed by the updated Sydney classification. Gene expression of FOXP3, IL-10, and TGF-β1 was analyzed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Immunohistochemical staining for FOXP3+ Treg and TH17 cells was performed. The gene expression levels of FOXP3, TGF-β1, and IL-10 messenger RNA (mRNA) and the number of FOXP3+ Treg were significantly higher in the H pylori(+) gastritis group than in the control group (P < 0.01). FOXP3 mRNA levels were correlated positively with TGF-β1 and IL-10 mRNA levels in the H pylori(+) gastritis group (P < 0.05). Furthermore, FOXP3 mRNA levels were correlated positively with the bacterial density, infiltration of polymorphonuclear cells, and mononuclear cells in the H pylori(+) gastritis group (P < 0.05). The number of TH17 cells was significantly higher in the H pylori(+) gastritis group than in the control group (P < 0.05). In addition, the number of TH17 cells was correlated negatively with the bacterial density and positively with the inflammatory scores of polymorphonuclear cells and mononuclear cells in the H pylori(+) gastritis group (P < 0.05). A negative correlation between the TH17 cells/FOXP3+ Treg ratio and the bacterial density was demonstrated in the H pylori(+) gastritis group (P < 0.05). This study suggested that a TH17/Treg balance toward a Treg-biased response favors the persistence of bacteria, causing chronic active gastritis.

  7. Interleukin-1 gene polymorphisms in chronic gastritis patients infected with Helicobacter pylori as risk factors of gastric cancer development.

    PubMed

    Hnatyszyn, Andrzej; Wielgus, Karolina; Kaczmarek-Rys, Marta; Skrzypczak-Zielinska, Marzena; Szalata, Marlena; Mikolajczyk-Stecyna, Joanna; Stanczyk, Jerzy; Dziuba, Ireneusz; Mikstacki, Adam; Slomski, Ryszard

    2013-12-01

    Epidemiological investigations indicated association of the Helicobacter pylori infections with the occurrence of inflammatory conditions of the gastric mucosa and development of chronic gastritis and intestinal type of gastric cancer. IL1A and IL1B genes have been proposed as key factors in determining risk of gastritis and malignant transformation. The aim of this paper was to evaluate association of interleukin-1 gene polymorphisms with chronic gastritis, atrophy, intestinal metaplasia, dysplasia and intestinal type of gastric cancer in H. pylori-infected patients. Patients subjected to analysis represent group of 144 consecutive cases that suffered from dyspepsia with coexisting infection of H. pylori and chronic gastritis, chronic atrophic gastritis, intestinal metaplasia, dysplasia or gastric cancer. Molecular studies involved analysis of -889C>T polymorphism of IL1A gene and +3954C>T polymorphism of IL1B gene. Statistical analysis of association of polymorphism -889C>T of gene IL1A with changes in gastric mucosa showed lack of significance, whereas +3954C>T polymorphism of IL1B gene showed significant association. Frequency of allele T of +3954C>T polymorphism of IL1B gene was higher in group of patients with chronic gastritis, atrophy, intestinal metaplasia, dysplasia or intestinal type of gastric cancer (32.1 %) as compared with population group (23 %), χ(2) = 4.61 and p = 0.03. This corresponds to odds ratio: 1.58, 95 % CI: 1.04-2.4. Our results indicate that +3954C>T polymorphism of IL1B gene increase susceptibility to inflammatory response of gastric mucosa H. pylori-infected patients and plays a significant role in the development of chronic gastritis, atrophy, intestinal metaplasia, dysplasia and the initiation of carcinogenesis.

  8. [THE ROLE OF HELICOBACTER PYLORI IN NORMOMICROBIOCENOSIS AND DYSBACTERIOSIS OF MUCOSAL MICROFLORA OF OESOPHAGOGASTRODUODENAL ZONE IN THE CASES OF PEPTIC ULCER, CHRONIC GASTRITIS AND OESOPHAGITIS].

    PubMed

    Chernin, V V; Chervinets, V M; Bazlov, S N

    2016-01-01

    Determine the qualitative and quantitative composition of the mucosal microflora of oesophagogastroduodenal zone to determine the location of Helicobocter pylori and its place in normomicrobiocenosis and dysbacteriosis in cases of peptic ulcer, chronic gastritis and oesophagitis. Clinical and microbiological studies were conducted in 30 healthy individuals-volunteers, 130 patients with peptic ulcer, 36--chronic gastritis and 24--chronic esophagitis. Helicobacter pylori in 33% of cases included in normomicrobiocenosis of mucosal microflora oesophagogastroduodenal zone, which consists of 12 genera of microorganisms and carries out all protection functions. The recurrence of peptic ulcer disease, exacerbation of chronic active gastritis and oesophagitis are accompanied by a dysbacteriosis of mucosal microflora with overgrowth of typical and atypical microorganisms for normal biotope with reduced occurrenceof Helicobocter pylori. Helicobacter pylori in the biocenosis of mucosal microflora of oesophagogastroduodenal zone is not an infection, has no independent significance in the development of peptic ulcer, chronic gastritis and esophagitis, does not require eradication.

  9. Braf, Kras and Helicobacter pylori epigenetic changes-associated chronic gastritis in Egyptian patients with and without gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Sabry, Dina; Ahmed, Rasha; Abdalla, Sayed; Fathy, Wael; Eldemery, Ahmed; Elamir, Azza

    2016-06-01

    We aimed to study MLH1 and MGMT methylation status in Helicobacter pylori-associated chronic gastritis in Egyptian patients with and without gastric cancer. 39 patients were included in our study. They were divided into 2 groups; patients without (group I) and with gastric adenocarcinoma (group II). Patients were subjected to clinical examination, abdominal ultrasound and upper endoscopy for gastric biopsy. Biopsies were subjected to urease test, histological examination, and DNA purification. H. pylori, Braf, Kras, MLH1 and MGMT methylation were assessed by quantitative PCR. DNA sequencing was performed to assess Braf and Kras genes mutation. qPCR of H. pylori was significantly higher in patients with adenocarcinoma (group II) than those without adenocarcinoma (group I); with a p < 0.001 as well as in patients with age above 50 years with a p value = 0.008. By applying logistic regression analysis it was reported that the H. pylori qPCR is a significant predictor to the adenocarcinoma with OR = 1.025 (95 % CI: 1. 002-1.048), with sensitivity of 90 % and specificity of 100 %. Adenocarcinoma patients had a significantly higher mean age and levels of H. Pylori, Braf, K-ras, methylated MGMT and methylated MLH1 than those of gastritis patients. DNA sequence analysis of Braf (codon 12) and Kras (codon 600) had genes mutation in gastric adenocarcinoma versus chronic gastritis. H. pylori may cause epigenetic changes predisposing the patients to cancer stomach. Estimation of H. pylori by qPCR can be a good predictor to adenocarcinoma. Braf and Kras genes mutation were reveled in gastritis and adenocarcinoma patients.

  10. Structural Characteristics of Gastric Cell Populations in Chronic Gastritis and Chronic Hepatitis under Conditions of Helicobacter pylori Persistence.

    PubMed

    Lapii, G A; Bakarev, M A; Nepomnyashchikh, G I; Kapustina, V I; Nepomnyashchikh, D L; Vinogradova, E V; Postnikova, O A

    2016-02-01

    Helicobacter pylori persistence in patients with chronic gastritis is associated with a complex of nonspecific structural reactions, the type of these reactions correlates with the severity of infection: catarrhal fibrotic changes in the gastric mucosa predominate in cases with manifest colonization, while the absence of H. pylori is associated with predominance of fibrotic process. Analysis of the incidence of some pathomorphological phenomena (degeneration, atrophy, metaplasia, and dysplasia of the surface epithelium) shows no relationship between the presence of H. pylori and colonization intensity. In all patients with chronic hepatitis, the gastric mucosa is involved in the pathological process; fibrosis (gastropathy) was the most common process. No appreciable correlations between the structural changes and hepatitis activity and the presence of H. pylori were detected.

  11. Chronic gastritis associated with Helicobacter pylori in Mexican children: histopathological patterns.

    PubMed

    Jaramillo-Rodríguez, Yolanda; Nares-Cisneros, Jesús; Martínez-Ordaz, Verónica Araceli; Velasco-Rodríguez, Víctor Manuel; Márquez, Francisco Carlos López; Manríquez-Covarrubias, Luis Enrique

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze the histopathological patterns of inflammation, distribution, severity, and degree of gastric mucosa of Helicobacter pylori (Hp)-infected children in Northern Mexico, as well as the correlation between colonization density and inflammation intensity. We carried out a cross-sectional study of gastric biopsies performed on children ranging from 2 to 17 years of age who underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy for diverse gastroduodenal disorders. This study includes only children who were found to be Hp carriers, with positive results for tests of Hp antigens in feces and in gastric biopsy studies. We studied 107 patients (age 8.2 ± 3.7 years). In 47.7% of patients, the density of Hp colonization was low; only 21.5% had a marked density. Mononuclear leukocyte infiltration showed a similar distribution. Thirty-seven percent of patients had follicular gastritis. An acute inflammatory response was absent in 65% and mild in 20.6% of patients. When inflammation was present, it was primarily located in the antrum (79%). There were no cases of intestinal metaplasia or atrophy. A link was found between Hp density and age, infiltration by mononuclear cells, the presence of follicular gastritis, and the level of neutrophil infiltration (P  =  0.001). Despite the high rates of Hp infection in the region, the histopathological findings in these children were mild and were limited primarily to the antral mucosa. These data indicate the need to study the behavior of this disease in children in diverse study populations to provide localized prevention and treatment strategies.

  12. Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Capsaicin and Piperine on Helicobacter pylori-Induced Chronic Gastritis in Mongolian Gerbils.

    PubMed

    Toyoda, Takeshi; Shi, Liang; Takasu, Shinji; Cho, Young-Man; Kiriyama, Yuka; Nishikawa, Akiyoshi; Ogawa, Kumiko; Tatematsu, Masae; Tsukamoto, Tetsuya

    2016-04-01

    Spices have been used for thousands of years, and recent studies suggest that certain spices confer beneficial effects on gastric disorders. The purpose of this study was to evaluate possible chemopreventive effects of spice-derived compounds on Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori)-induced gastritis. We examined the inhibitory effects of curcumin, capsaicin, and piperine on H. pylori in vitro by determining the colony-forming units and real-time RT-PCR in H. pylori stimulated AGS gastric cancer cells. For in vivo analysis, 6-week-old SPF male Mongolian gerbils were infected with H. pylori, fed diets containing 5000 ppm curcumin, 100 ppm capsaicin, or 100 ppm piperine, and sacrificed after 13 weeks. All three compounds inhibited in vitro proliferation of H. pylori, with curcumin being the most effective. Infiltration of neutrophils and mononuclear cells was suppressed by piperine both in the antrum and corpus of H. pylori-infected gerbils. Capsaicin also decreased neutrophils in the antrum and corpus and mononuclear cell infiltration and heterotopic proliferative glands in the corpus. mRNA expression of Tnf-α and formation of phospho-IκB-α in the antrum were reduced by both capsaicin and piperine. In addition, piperine suppressed expression of Il-1β, Ifn-γ, Il-6, and iNos, while H. pylori UreA and other virulence factors were not significantly attenuated by any compounds. These results suggest that capsaicin and piperine have anti-inflammatory effects on H. pylori-induced gastritis in gerbils independent of direct antibacterial effects and may thus have potential for use in the chemoprevention of H. pylori-associated gastric carcinogenesis. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. [The prevalence of intestinal parasites in children with Helicobacter pylori gastritis evaluated retrospectively].

    PubMed

    Uğraş, Meltem; Miman, Ozlem

    2013-01-01

    H. pylori infection is more frequent and is seen in younger ages in developing countries when compared to developed countries. Etiopathogenetic factors include living in crowded families, low educational level of mother, low income and infected drinking water. Intestinal parasites are more frequent in low socioeconomical populations. In this study, it was aimed to determine the prevalence of intestinal parasite in patients with H. pylori gastritis proven with endoscopic and histopathological study. Parasitology laboratory results of children who had undergone upper gastrointestinal system endoscopy (UGE) and were proved to have H. pylori gastritis were evaluated retrospectively. Stool samples were examined using native lugol and precipitation by formol ethyl acetate methods. A total of 138 children had undergone upper GIS endoscopy. Among those children, 97,1% had H. pylori positive gastritis. Of those H. pylori positive gastritis children, we obtained the stool test results of 105 children. Six children (5.71%) had Blastocystis hominis and 2 (1.91%) had Giardia intestinalis so a total of 8 patients had (7.61%) intestinal parasites. H. pylori and intestinal parasites are frequent among individuals living in low socioeconomical countries. The co-existence of hp and intestinal parasites, which have a negative effect on thriving and iron status in a growing child is a very important public health problem. National sanitation education and methods may help decrease the co-existence of these synergistic microorganisms.

  14. Helicobacter pylori infection, glandular atrophy and intestinal metaplasia in superficial gastritis, gastric erosion, erosive gastritis, gastric ulcer and early gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chuan; Yamada, Nobutaka; Wu, Yun-Lin; Wen, Min; Matsuhisa, Takeshi; Matsukura, Norio

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the histological features of gastric mucosa, including Helicobacter pylori infection in patients with early gastric cancer and endoscopically found superficial gastritis, gastric erosion, erosive gastritis, gastric ulcer. METHODS: The biopsy specimens were taken from the antrum, corpus and upper angulus of all the patients. Giemsa staining, improved toluidine-blue staining, and H pylori-specific antibody immune staining were performed as appropriate for the histological diagnosis of H pylori infection. Hematoxylin-eosin staining was used for the histological diagnosis of gastric mucosa inflammation, gastric glandular atrophy and intestinal metaplasia and scored into four grades according to the Updated Sydney System. RESULTS: The overall prevalence of H pylori infection in superficial gastritis was 28.7%, in erosive gastritis 57.7%, in gastric erosion 63.3%, in gastric ulcer 80.8%, in early gastric cancer 52.4%. There was significant difference (P<0.05), except for the difference between early gastric cancer and erosive gastritis. H pylori infection rate in antrum, corpus, angulus of patients with superficial gastritis was 25.9%, 26.2%, 25.2%, respectively; in patients with erosive gastritis 46.9%, 53.5%, 49.0%, respectively; in patients with gastric erosion 52.4%, 61.5%, 52.4%, respectively; in patients with gastric ulcer 52.4%, 61.5%, 52.4%, respectively; in patients with early gastric cancer 35.0%, 50.7%, 34.6%, respectively. No significant difference was found among the different site biopsies in superficial gastritis, but in the other diseases the detected rates were higher in corpus biopsy (P<0.05). The grades of mononuclear cell infiltration and polymorphonuclear cell infiltration, in early gastric cancer patients, were significantly higher than that in superficial gastritis patients, lower than that in gastric erosion and gastric ulcer patients (P<0.01); however, there was no significant difference compared with erosive gastritis. The

  15. Irregular arrangement of collecting venules (IRAC) provides a critical endoscopic insight in Helicobacter pylori-induced gastritis: A secondary publication.

    PubMed

    Katake, Yoshiki; Ichikawa, Kazuhito; Fujio, Chikau; Tomita, Shigeki; Imura, Johji; Fujimori, Takahiro

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the significance of an endoscopic atrophic border and irregular arrangement of collecting venules (IRAC) in the diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori)-induced gastritis. Upper gastrointestinal tract endoscopy was performed on 723 patients, who were screened them for H. pylori infection. Any patients who had undergone H. pylori eradication therapy were excluded from the study. The endoscopic atrophic border and IRAC in each patient were assessed. The H. pylori status was determined in the patients by combination of a serological test and/or histopathological examination. The H. pylori infection rates were 95.4% (455/477) in the group with an endoscopic atrophic border and 22.3% (55/246) in the group without an endoscopic atrophic border. In the diagnostic validity check, presence of an endoscopic atrophic border had a sensitivity of 89.2% and a specificity of 89.7%. Furthermore, the H. pylori infection rates were 95.5% (506/530) in the IRAC group and 2.1% (4/193) in the regular arrangement of collecting venules (RAC) group. In the diagnostic validity check, IRAC had a sensitivity of 99.2% and a specificity of 88.7%. In conclusion, the presence of an endoscopic atrophic border and IRAC are highly indicative of an H. pylori-infected gastric mucosa.

  16. [Helicobacter pylori: new answers to old questions].

    PubMed

    Urban, O

    1993-12-01

    Infection with Helicobacter pylori affects 20-40% of the adult population in advanced countries. A causal relationship between Helicobacter pylori and gastritis type B was proved. There is some indirect conclusive evidence of an aetiological association with peptic gastroduodenal ulceration. Attention is drawn to possible associations with gastric malignities. The author reviews aetiopathogenetic relations between Helicobacter pylori infection and these diseases.

  17. Identification of Helicobacter pylori and the evolution of an efficacious childhood vaccine to protect against gastritis and peptic ulcer disease.

    PubMed

    Blanchard, Thomas G; Czinn, Steven J

    2017-01-01

    Establishment of Helicobacter pylori infection as an etiologic agent of peptic ulcer disease and other gastric pathologies marked a revolution in gastroenterology which spurred an enormous interest in gastric physiology and immunology research. The association was soon also demonstrated in children as well. Application of antimicrobial therapies have proven remarkably efficacious in eradicating H. pylori and curing pediatric patients of duodenal ulcers as well as gastritis, negating a lifetime of ineffective therapy and life-threatening disease. Countries with high H. pylori prevalence and where H. pylori associated gastric cancer remains a primary cause of death due to cancer however would benefit from childhood vaccination. Studies in rodents and humans utilizing oral vaccination with bacterial exotoxin adjuvants demonstrated potential for limiting H. pylori colonization in the stomach. Almost 25 y of vaccine research recently culminated in a phase III clinical trial of over 4,000 children aged 6-15 y old to test an oral vaccine consisting of the H. pylori urease B subunit genetically fused to the E. coli heat labile toxin. Vaccination was demonstrated to have an efficacy of over 70%. Vaccination may now serve as an effective strategy to significantly reduce H. pylori associated disease in children throughout the world.

  18. The relationship between iron deficiency in patients with Helicobacter pylori-infected nodular gastritis and the serum prohepcidin level.

    PubMed

    Sato, Yuichi; Yoneyama, Osamu; Azumaya, Masaki; Takeuchi, Manabu; Sasaki, Syun-ya; Yokoyama, Junji; Shioji, Kazuhiko; Kawauchi, Yusuke; Hashimoto, Satoru; Nishigaki, Yuuki; Kobayashi, Masaaki; Sugimura, Kazuhito; Honma, Terasu; Narisawa, Rintaro; Aoyagi, Yutaka

    2015-02-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is recognized as a causative agent for unexplained iron-deficiency anemia (IDA). We evaluated many background factors influencing an iron-deficiency state in adult patients with various H. pylori-infected upper gastrointestinal tract diseases. Study 1: H. pylori-infected 121 patients (nodular gastritis (NG) (n = 19), duodenal ulcer (DU) (n = 30), or gastric ulcer (GU) (n = 47), or gastric hyperplastic polyp (GHP) (n = 25)) were enrolled. The RBC count and hemoglobin, iron, ferritin, pepsinogen (PG) I, PG II, gastrin, and anti-H. pylori antibody (Ab) levels in the serum were measured. Study 2: H. pylori-infected 105 patients (NG, n = 19; DU, n = 43; GU, n = 32; GHP, n = 11) and non-H. pylori-infected individuals (n = 35) were examined for the levels of prohepcidin, ferritin, and iron in the serum. In addition, we measured the data before and after the H. pylori eradication. In the patients with GHP and NG, hypoferritinemia was observed in comparison with the GU and DU patients. In the GHP patients, low levels of PG I, a decreased PG I/II ratio, and hypergastrinemia were observed. The levels of serum prohepcidin in the patients with H. pylori-associated disease were higher than those in the uninfected adults. In the patients with NG, the serum prohepcidin levels were higher than those in the other H. pylori-infected patient groups and decreased after the eradication. H. pylori-related iron-deficiency state might be associated with several factors, such as hypochlorhydria and hepcidin, in patients with GHP or NG. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Assessment of p21, p53 expression, and Ki-67 proliferative activities in the gastric mucosa of children with Helicobacter pylori gastritis.

    PubMed

    Saf, Coskun; Gulcan, Enver Mahir; Ozkan, Ferda; Cobanoglu Saf, Seyhan Perihan; Vitrinel, Ayca

    2015-02-01

    Helicobacter pylori that is generally acquired in childhood and infects the gastric mucosa is considered to be responsible for many pathobiological changes that are linked to the pathogenesis of gastric cancer. Although the majority of studies on the subject have been carried out in adults, there are a limited number of studies on children that reflect the early period of infection and may be of greater significance. We aimed to determine the role of H. pylori infection and/or gastritis in several histopathological changes, p53, p21, and cell proliferation-associated Ki-67 antigen expression in the gastric mucosa. We studied 60 patients with a mean age of 7.5 ± 4.5 years at referral. On the basis of endoscopic appearance and the evaluation of the gastric antral specimens, the patients were divided into three groups: patients without gastritis, patients with H. pylori-positive gastritis, and patients with H. pylori-negative gastritis. To determine the expression of p53, Ki-67, and p21 in gastric biopsy specimens, immunohistochemical stains were performed. The incidence of neutrophil activity, which was one of our histopathologic parameters, was significantly higher in the H. pylori-positive gastritis group than the other two groups. The presence of lymphoid aggregate was more frequent in H. pylori ± gastritis groups than the nongastritis group. p53 expression was found to be significantly higher in the H. pylori-positive gastritis group than the nongastritis group. Ki-67 and p21 expressions were significantly more frequent in the H. pylori-positive gastritis group than the other two groups. When we evaluated the density of H. pylori, as the density of bacteria increases, we found that the expressions of p53, p21, and Ki-67 increased significantly. Expression of the studied precancerous markers in significant amounts indicates the importance of childhood H. pylori infection in the constitution of gastric cancer in adulthood.

  20. Prevalence of Chronic Gastritis or Helicobacter pylori Infection in Adolescent Sleeve Gastrectomy Patients Does Not Correlate with Symptoms or Surgical Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Franklin, Ashanti L; Koeck, Emily S; Hamrick, Miller C; Qureshi, Faisal G; Nadler, Evan P

    2015-08-01

    In adults undergoing gastric bypass surgery, it is routine practice to perform pre-operative testing for Helicobacter pylori infection. Evidence suggests that infection impairs anastomotic healing and contributes to complications. There currently are no data for adolescents undergoing bariatric procedures. Despite few patients with pre-operative symptoms, we noted occasional patients with H. pylori detected after sleeve gastrectomy. We reviewed our experience with our adolescent sleeve gastrectomy cohort to determine the prevalence of H. pylori infection, its predictive factors, and association with outcomes. We hypothesized that H. pylori infection would be associated with pre-operative symptoms, but not surgical outcomes. All patients undergoing sleeve gastrectomy at our hospital were included. We conducted a chart review to determine pre- or post-operative symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease GERD or gastritis, operative complications, and long-term anti-reflux therapy after surgery. Pathology reports were reviewed for evidence of gastritis and H. pylori infection. 78 adolescents had laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy from January 2010 through July 2014. The prevalence of chronic gastritis was 44.9% (35/78) and 11.4% of those patients had H. pylori (4/35). Only one patient with H. pylori had pre-operative symptoms, and only 25.7% (9/35) of patients with pathology-proven gastritis had symptoms. One staple line leak occurred but this patient did not have H. pylori or gastritis. Mean patient follow-up was 10 (3-26) mos. There is a moderate prevalence of gastritis among adolescents undergoing sleeve gastrectomy, but only a small number of these patients had H. pylori infection. Neither the presence of chronic gastritis nor H. pylori infection correlated with symptoms or outcomes. Thus, in the absence of predictive symptomology or adverse outcome in those who are infected, we advocate for continued routine pathologic evaluation without the required need for pre

  1. Green Synthesis of Silver Nanoparticles: Structural Features and In Vivo and In Vitro Therapeutic Effects against Helicobacter pylori Induced Gastritis

    PubMed Central

    Hameed, Sadaf; Ali, Asghar; Anwar, Farooq; Shahid, Shaukat Ali; Shakir, Imran; Yaqoob, Aqdas; Hasan, Sara; Khan, Safyan Akram; Sajjad-ur-Rahman

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluates in vivo and in vitro anti-Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) efficacy of silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) prepared via a cost-effective green chemistry route wherein Peganum harmala L. seeds extract was used as a reducing and capping agent. The structural features, as elucidated by surface plasmon resonance spectrophotometry, transmission electron microscopy, and powder X-ray diffraction spectroscopy, revealed the Ag-NPs synthesized to be polydispersed in nature and spherical in shape with 5–40 nm size. A typical Ag-NPs suspension (S5), with size being 15 nm, when tested in vitro against forty-two local isolates and two reference strains, showed a considerable anti-H. pylori activity. In case of in vivo trial against H. pylori induced gastritis, after oral administration of 16 mg/kg body weight of S5 for seven days, a complete clearance was recorded in male albino rates. In comparative time-killing kinetics, S5 exhibited dose- and time-dependent anti-H. pylori activity that was almost similar to tetracycline and clarithromycin, less than amoxicillin, but higher than metronidazole. Furthermore, S5 was found to be an equally effective anti-H. pylori agent at low (≤4) and high pH with no drug resistance observed even up to 10 repeated exposures while a significant drug resistance was recorded for most of the standard drugs employed. The present results revealed the potential of the synthesized Ag-NPs as safer bactericidal agents for the treatment of H. pylori induced gastritis. PMID:25214825

  2. Effect of Helicobacter pylori infection and its eradication on cell proliferation, DNA status, and oncogene expression in patients with chronic gastritis

    PubMed Central

    Nardone, G; Staibano, S; Rocco, A; Mezza, E; D'Armiento, F; Insabato, L; Coppola, A; Salvatore, G; Lucariello, A; Figura, N; De Rosa, G; Budillon, G

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Helicobacter pylori, the main cause of chronic gastritis, is a class I gastric carcinogen. Chronic gastritis progresses to cancer through atrophy, metaplasia, and dysplasia. Precancerous phenotypic expression is generally associated with acquired genomic instability.
AIM—To evaluate the effect of H pylori infection and its eradication on gastric histology, cell proliferation, DNA status, and oncogene expression.
METHODS/SUBJECTS—Morphometric and immunohistochemical techniques were used to examine gastric mucosal biopsy specimens from eight controls, 10 patients with H pylori negative chronic gastritis, 53 with H pylori positive chronic gastritis, and 11 with gastric cancer.
RESULTS—All patients with chronic gastritis were in a hyperproliferative state related to mucosal inflammation, regardless of H pylori infection. Atrophy was present in three of 10 patients with H pylori negative chronic gastritis and in 26 of 53 with H pylori positive chronic gastritis, associated in 18 with intestinal metaplasia. DNA content was abnormal in only 11 patients with atrophy and H pylori infection; eight of these also had c-Myc expression, associated in six cases with p53 expression. Fifty three patients with H pylori positive chronic gastritis were monitored for 12 months after antibiotic treatment: three dropped out; infection was eradicated in 45, in whom cell proliferation decreased in parallel with the reduction in gastritis activity; atrophy previously detected in 21/45 disappeared in five, regressed from moderate to mild in nine, and remained unchanged in seven; complete metaplasia disappeared in 4/14, and markers of genomic instability disappeared where previously present. In the five patients in whom H pylori persisted, atrophy, metaplasia, dysplasia, and markers of genomic instability remained unchanged.
CONCLUSIONS—Chronic H pylori infection seems to be responsible for genomic instability in a subset of cases of H pylori positive

  3. HELICOBACTER PYLORI

    EPA Science Inventory

    Helicobacter pylori is a pathogenic bacteria which inhabits the human stomach and upper gastrointestinal tract. This encyclopedic entry summarizes the potential role of this organism as a waterborne pathogen. Information is provided on the physiology and morphology of this bacter...

  4. HELICOBACTER PYLORI

    EPA Science Inventory

    Helicobacter pylori is a pathogenic bacteria which inhabits the human stomach and upper gastrointestinal tract. This encyclopedic entry summarizes the potential role of this organism as a waterborne pathogen. Information is provided on the physiology and morphology of this bacter...

  5. Role of autoimmune gastritis, Helicobacter pylori and celiac disease in refractory or unexplained iron deficiency anemia.

    PubMed

    Hershko, Chaim; Hoffbrand, A Victor; Keret, Dan; Souroujon, Moshe; Maschler, Itzhak; Monselise, Yehudit; Lahad, Amnon

    2005-05-01

    Conventional endoscopic and radiographic methods fail to identify a probable source of gastrointestinal blood loss in about one third of males and post-menopausal females and in most women of reproductive age with iron deficiency anemia (IDA). Such patients, as well as subjects refractory to oral iron treatment, are often referred for hematologic evaluation. Patient clinic, screened for non-bleeding gastrointestinal conditions including celiac disease (antiendomysial antibodies), autoimmune atrophic gastritis (hypergastrinemia with strongly positive antiparietal cell antibodies) and H. pylori infection (IgG antibodies confirmed by urease breath test). The mean age of all subjects was 39+/-18 years, and 119 of 150 were females. We identified 8 new cases of adult celiac disease (5%). Forty IDA patients (27%) had autoimmune atrophic gastritis of whom 22 had low serum vitamin B12 levels. H. pylori infection was the only finding in 29 patients (19%), but was a common co-existing finding in 77 (51%) of the entire group. Refractoriness to oral iron treatment was found in 100% of patients with celiac disease, 71% with autoimmune atrophic gastritis, 68% with H. pylori infection, but only 11% of subjects with no detected underlying abnormality. H. pylori eradication in previously refractory IDA patients in combination with continued oral iron therapy resulted in a significant increase in hemoglobin from 9.4+/-1.5 (mean +/- 1SD) before, to 13.5+/-1.2 g/ dL (p<0.001 by paired t test) within 3 to 6 months. The recognition that autoimmune atrophic gastritis and H. pylori infection may have a significant role in the development of unexplained or refractory IDA in a high proportion of patients should have a strong impact on our daily practice of diagnosing and managing IDA.

  6. Vitamin C supplementation does not protect L-gulono-gamma-lactone oxidase-deficient mice from Helicobacter pylori-induced gastritis and gastric premalignancy

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In human studies, low vitamin C intake has been associated with more severe Helicobacter pylori gastritis and a higher incidence of gastric cancer. However, vitamin C supplementation has not been definitively shown to protect against gastric cancer. Using vitamin C-deficient B6.129P2-Gulo tm1Umc/mmc...

  7. Draft Genome Sequence of a Helicobacter pylori Strain Isolated from a Patient with Diffuse Gastritis from a Region of High Cancer Risk in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Escobar, Andrés J; Bayona Rojas, Martin; Barragán Vidal, Carlos; Trujillo, Clara Esperanza; Bravo, María Mercedes

    2015-04-09

    The draft genome sequence of one Colombian Helicobacter pylori strain is presented. This strain was isolated from a patient with diffuse gastritis from Tibaná, Boyacá, a region with high gastric cancer risk. Copyright © 2015 Gutiérrez-Escobar et al.

  8. Effects of sucralfate and sulglycotide treatment on active gastritis and Helicobacter pylori colonization of the gastric mucosa in non-ulcer dyspepsia patients.

    PubMed

    Barbara, L; Biasco, G; Capurso, L; Dobrilla, G; Lalli, A; Paganelli, G M; Pallone, F; Torsoli, A

    1990-09-01

    We conducted a double-blind randomized treatment study on patients affects by non-ulcer dyspepsia in whom multiple biopsy specimens showed active gastritis. Patients were given either 3 g/day of sucralfate (n = 39) or 600 mg/day of sulglycotide (n = 50) for 6 wk, a glycopeptide isolated from pig duodenum constituents. Endoscopy was carried out at baseline and at the end of treatment. We took biopsies from the gastric body (twice) and antrum (six times) at each endoscopy in order to determine grade and extent of gastritis and Helicobacter pylori colonization. Both treatments induced a marked regression of active gastritis (sucralfate group: p less than 0.05 and p less than 0.0001, respectively, in body and in antrum; sulglycotide group: p less than 0.01 and p less than 0.001, respectively). Conversely, Helicobacter pylori colonization remained unchanged at the end of the treatments. At baseline, a close relationship was found between grade of active inflammation in each biopsy and Helicobacter pylori density. After therapy, the association was lost in each treatment group. These results suggest that there can be a remission of active gastritis in patients with non-ulcer dyspepsia even without changes in Helicobacter pylori colonization. This result can be achieved by enhancing the protective properties of the gastric mucosa.

  9. Seroepidemiology of gastritis in Japanese and Dutch working populations: evidence for the development of atrophic gastritis that is not related to Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed Central

    Schlemper, R J; van der Werf, S D; Vandenbroucke, J P; Biemond, I; Lamers, C B

    1995-01-01

    Serological markers of gastritis, like pepsinogen A, pepsinogen C, gastrin, and Helicobacter pylori antibodies, can be used to explore the state of the gastric mucosa in populations with contrasting cancer risks. A decreasing pepsinogen A:C ratio and an increasing serum gastrin are known to reflect an increasing severity of atrophic corpus gastritis, which is a precursor of gastric cancer. In 723 subjects (without gastroduodenal surgery) from Japanese (n = 225) and Dutch (n = 498) working populations, which had a similar composition of age (mean 48 years), sex (male to female ratio 6:1), and type of occupation, fasting serum samples were analysed for IgG antibodies to H pylori, pepsinogen A, pepsinogen C, and gastrin in the same laboratory. H pylori infection was significantly more prevalent in the Japanese than in the Dutch (74.7% and 31.3%); as was a very low pepsinogen A, indicative of severe mucosal atrophy (4.4% and 1.6%). Among subjects with and without severe mucosal atrophy the H pylori seropositivity rate was similar. Between the Japanese and the Dutch there were significant differences in mean gastrin (31.8 and 13.4 pmol/l) and pepsinogen A:C ratio (1.7 and 2.9). These intercountry differences were as great for H pylori negative subjects (gastrin: 23.7 and 10.3 pmol/l, pepsinogen A:C ratio: 2.4 and 3.2) as for H pylori positive subjects (gastrin: 34.6 and 20.1 pmol/l, pepsinogen A:C ratio: 1.5 and 2.5). The intercountry difference in gastrin nearly disappeared after stratification into categories of pepsinogen A:C ratio. In conclusion, the intercountry differences in pepsinogen A:C ratio and gastrin reflect a higher prevalence of mild and severe mucosal atrophy of the corpus in the Japanese than in the Dutch, both among H pylori positive and negative subjects. Thus, these findings suggest that in the Japanese the development of atrophic gastritis is in part unrelated to H pylori. PMID:7557568

  10. The diagnostic value of endoscopic narrow band imaging in helicobacter pylori gastritis in children.

    PubMed

    Özgür, Taner; Özkan, Tanju Başarır; Erdemir, Gülin; Özakın, Cüneyt; Yerci, Ömer

    2015-03-01

    In this study we aimed to investigate the sensitivity and specificity of Narrow Band Imaging (NBI) in H. pylori gastritis and compare them with those of rapid urease test and urea breath test. A hundred sixty-five children who admitted to Uludag University Pediatric Gastroenterology Unit between October 2009-March 2011 with upper gastrointestinal symptoms were consecutively enrolled. During the endoscopy procedure gastric corporeal, antral and fundal images were obtained, afterwards the same areas were visualized with narrow band imaging and images were recorded again. The study included 68 (41.2%) boys and 97(58.8%) girls. The mean age of the patients were 11.88±4.55. Tissue culture positivity and/or histopathological staining for H. pylori was determined in 56 (33.9%) patients (Group 1) and the other patients (n:109, 43.6%) didn't have an evidence of H. pylori infection (Group 2). Narrow band images have supported H. pylori infection in 56.4%. The sensitivity of narrow band images for determining H. pylori infection was 92.86% (95% CI 82.7-98), specificity was 62.39% (95% CI 52.6-71.5). Our study is the first to show the role of NBI in diagnosing H. pylori infection in children, as well as determining the sensitivity and specificity of the technique. The specificity is low; however, we suggest that the specific mucosal view of H. pylori gastritis provided by NBI is useful for identifying the areas from which the biopsies should be taken. Moreover, by using this technique, treatment of H. pylori infection may be initiated immediately without performing rapid urease test and without waiting for histopathology report and tissue culture.

  11. Quantification of Helicobacter pylori infection in gastritis and ulcer disease using a simple and rapid carbon-14-urea breath test

    SciTech Connect

    Debongnie, J.C.; Pauwels, S.; Raat, A.; de Meeus, Y.; Haot, J.; Mainguet, P. )

    1991-06-01

    Gastric urease was studied isotopically in 230 patients with biopsy-proven normal mucosa or chronic gastritis, including 59 patients with ulcer disease. Carbon-14-urea was given in 25 ml of water without substrate carrier or nutrient-dense meal, and breath samples were collected over a 60-min period. The amount of 14CO2 excreted at 10 min was independent of the rate of gastric emptying and was not quantitatively influenced by the buccal urease activity. The 10-min 14CO2 values discriminated well between Helicobacter pylori positive and negative patients (94% sensitivity, 89% specificity) and correlated with the number of organisms assessed by histology. The test was a good predictor of chronic gastritis (95% sensitivity and 96% specificity), and a quantitative relationship was observed between 14CO2 values and the severity and activity of the gastritis. In H. pylori positive patients, breath 14CO2 was found to be similar in patients with and without ulcer disease, suggesting that the number of bacteria is not a determining factor for the onset of ulceration.

  12. Endoscopic features of lymphoid follicles in Helicobacter pylori-associated chronic gastritis.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Seishu; Imamura, Jun; Kimura, Kiminori; Saeki, Shunichi; Hishima, Tsunekazu

    2015-01-01

    Small, round, yellowish-white nodules (YWN) are frequently observed in Helicobacter pylori-associated gastritis. The aim of the present study was to investigate the clinical significance of these YWN. Participants comprised 211 patients with H. pylori-associated gastritis, ranging in age from 23 to 86 years. YWN were detected in 23% of participants, more frequently in women (33%) than in men (12%; P < 0.01). YWN were observed on the antral mucosa in 4.7% of cases, lesser curvature of the corpus mucosa in 20%, greater curvature of the corpus mucosa in 0.9%, and fundic mucosa in 12%. Most YWN located on the antral mucosa showed nodular type, and most YWN located on the corpus mucosa and fundic mucosa showed flat type. On magnifying endoscopy with narrow-band imaging, YWN appeared as round whitish lesions with radial or branching microvessels on the surface and hypovascular globe structures just beneath the surface of the mucosa. Targeted biopsies of YWN revealed lymphoid follicles with lymphocyte infiltration or intense inflammatory cell infiltration. The endoscopic finding of YWN could be observed at any site of the gastric mucosa in H. pylori-associated gastritis, and represented histological lymphoid follicles. © 2014 The Authors. Digestive Endoscopy © 2014 Japan Gastroenterological Endoscopy Society.

  13. Influence of Helicobacter pylori Colonization on Histological Grading of Chronic Gastritis in Korean Patients with Peptic Ulcer

    PubMed Central

    Park, Joongwon; Kim, Mi Kyung; Park, Sill Moo

    1995-01-01

    Objectives: We conducted an analysis of correlation between histological grading of chronic gastritis and the presence of H. pylori infection to investigate if H. pylori influences histological severity of chronic gastritis in Korean patients with peptic ulcers. Methods: Gastroscopic antral biopsy specimens and peripheral venous blood were taken from 80 patients with gastric or duodenal ulcers. H. pylori was identified microscopically in sections with Giemsa staining and quantitative grading of cultured H. pylori was reported on a scale 0 to 3. The histopathological features of biopsy specimens were reported according to the Sydney classification of chronic gastritis. Serum gastritis and pepsinogen concentrations were measured by radioimmunoassay. Results: H. pylori was identified in 62.5% (20 of 32 GU, 30 of 48 DU) of the study group. Gastric clonization rate of H. pylori did not increased with age. Forty of 50 biopsy specimens with H. pylori and also 23 of 30 biopsy specimens without H. pylori showed active chronic gastritis. There was no significant correlation overall between the presence of H. pylori and histological grading of chronic gastritis, including activity, and also no association was found between the quantitative grading of H. pylori and the histological grading of chronic gastritis. With and without H. pylori, a mean of serum gastritis concentration (79.4±43.0 pg/ml and 80.2±31.9 pg/ml) showed no significant difference, but a mean of serum pepsinogen concentration (87.7±41.6 ng/ml and 119±34.4 ng/ml) showed significant difference between the populations with and without H. pylori (p=0.001) Conclusions: The influence of H. pylori on histological grading of chronic gastritis in Korean is less than that in prior studies of Western countries, and further investigation of pathogenesis of H. pylori in chronic gastritis and peptic ulceration is necessary. PMID:7495770

  14. Analyzing the influence of gastric intestinal metaplasia on gastric ulcer healing in Helicobacter pylori-infected patients without atrophic gastritis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Li-Wei; Chang, Liang-Che; Hua, Chung-Ching; Hsieh, Bor-Jen; Chen, Shuo-Wei; Chien, Rong-Nan

    2017-01-03

    Gastric epithelial hyper-proliferation was reported in patients with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori)-infected gastric mucosa with intestinal metaplasia (IM) changes. In patients with gastric ulcer (GU) and IM, the GU may have a different healing rate in comparison to patients without IM. This study aimed to compare the difference in GU healing between H. pylori-infected patients with IM and those without IM. We retrospectively analyzed patients at the Keelung Chung Gung Memorial Hospital during the period from March 2005 to January 2011. The inclusion criteria were: 1) endoscopic findings of GU and biopsy histological examination plus rapid urease test indicating H. pylori infection; 2) gastric IM adjacent to a GU but with no atrophic gastritis changes; 3) patients receiving H. pylori eradication triple therapy and 8 weeks of maintenance therapy with a proton pump inhibitor; and 4) patients receiving follow-up endoscopy within the 3(rd) and the 4(th) months after treatment. In total, 327 patients with GU and H. pylori infection (136 with IM and 191 without IM) were included. Patients with IM had a higher GU healing rate than those without IM (91.9% vs. 84.3%, P = 0.040). Multivariate logistical regression analysis revealed that failure of H. pylori eradication (Odds = 4.013, 95% CI: 1.840-8.951, P < 0.001) and gastric IM (Odds = 0.369, 95% CI: 0.168-0.812, P = 0.013) were the predictors of non-healing GU following treatment. Patient with gastric IM change may have a higher GU healing rate than those without gastric IM. However, successful H. pylori eradication is a more important factor for GU healing than gastric IM.

  15. Helicobacter pylori vacA and cagA genotype diversity and interferon gamma expression in patients with chronic gastritis and patients with gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Carrillo, D N; Atrisco-Morales, J; Hernández-Pando, R; Reyes-Navarrete, S; Betancourt-Linares, R; Cruz-del Carmen, I; Illades Aguiar, B; Román-Román, A; Fernández-Tilapa, G

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is the main risk factor for the development of chronic gastritis, gastric ulcer, and gastric cancer. In H. pylori-infected individuals, the clinical result is dependent on various factors, among which are bacterial components, the immune response, and environmental influence. To compare IFN-γ expression with the H. pylori vacA and cagA genotypes in patients with chronic gastritis and patients with gastric cancer. Ninety-five patients diagnosed with chronic gastritis and 20 with gastric cancer were included in the study. Three gastric biopsies were taken; one was used for the molecular detection and genotyping of H. pylori; another was fixed in absolute alcohol and histologic sections were made for determining IFN-γ expression through immunohistochemistry. No differences were found in the cells that expressed IFN-γ between the patients with chronic gastritis (median percentage of positive cells: 82.6% in patients without H. pylori and 82% in infected persons) and those with gastric cancer (70.5% in H. pylori-negative patients and 78.5% in infected persons). IFN-γ expression was 69% in chronic gastritis patients infected with H. pylori vacAs2m2/cagA⁻ it was 86.5% in patients infected with H. pylori vacAs1m2/cagA⁻, 86.5% in vacAs1m1/cagA⁻, and 82% in vacAs1m1/cagA⁺. Similar data were found in the patients with gastric cancer. IFN-γ expression varied depending on the H. pylori vacA and cagA genotype, but not in accordance with the presence of chronic gastritis or gastric cancer.

  16. [Gastric cancer risk estimate in patients with chronic gastritis associated with Helicobacter pylori infection in a clinical setting].

    PubMed

    Arismendi-Morillo, G; Hernández, I; Mengual, E; Abreu, N; Molero, N; Fuenmayor, A; Romero, G; Lizarzábal, M

    2013-01-01

    Severity of chronic gastritis associated with Helicobacter pylori infection (CGAHpI) could play a role in evaluating the potential risk to develop gastric cancer. Our aim was to estimate the risk for gastric cancer in a clinical setting, according to histopathologic criteria, by applying the gastric cancer risk index (GCRI) METHODS: Histopathologic study of the gastric biopsies (corpus-antrum) from consecutive adult patients that underwent gastroesophageal duodenoscopy was carried out, and the GCRI was applied in patients presenting with CGAHpI. One hundred eleven patients (77% female) with a mean age of 38.6±13.1 years were included. Active Helicobacter pylori infection (aHpi) was diagnosed in 77 cases (69.40%). In 45% of the cases with aHpi, pangastritis (23%) or corpus-predominant gastritis (22%) was diagnosed. Nine cases were diagnosed with intestinal metaplasia (8%), 7 of which (77.70%) were in the aHpi group. Twenty one percent of the patients with aHpi had a GCRI of 2 (18.10%) or 3 (2.50%) points (high risk index), while 79.10% accumulated a GCRI of 0 or 1 points (low risk index). Of the patients with no aHpi, none of them had 3 points (p=0.001). Of the 18 patients that accumulated 2 or 3 points, 6 (33.30%) presented with intestinal metaplasia (all with pangastritis and corpus-predominant gastritis), of which 4 cases (66.60%) had aHpi. The estimated gastric cancer risk in patients with CGAHpI in the clinical setting studied was relatively low and 5% of the patients had a histopathologic phenotype associated with an elevated risk for developing gastric cancer. Copyright © 2012 Asociación Mexicana de Gastroenterología. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  17. Association of Helicobacter pylori infection with chronic atrophic gastritis: Meta-analyses according to type of disease definition.

    PubMed

    Weck, Melanie N; Brenner, Hermann

    2008-08-15

    Helicobacter pylori is a major risk factor for chronic atrophic gastritis (CAG). A large variety of definitions of CAG have been used in epidemiologic studies in the past. The aim of this work was to systematically review and summarize estimates of the association between H. pylori infection and CAG according to the various definitions of CAG. Articles on the association between H. pylori infection and CAG published until July 2007 were identified. Separate meta-analyses were carried out for studies defining CAG based on gastroscopy with biopsy, serum pepsinogen I (PG I) only, the pepsinogen I/pepsinogen II ratio (PG I/PG II ratio) only, or a combination of PG I and the PG I/PG II ratio. Numbers of identified studies and summary odds ratios (OR) (95% confidence intervals) were as follows: gastroscopy with biopsy: n = 34, OR = 6.4 (4.0-10.1); PG I only: n = 13, OR = 0.9 (0.7-1.2); PG I/PG II ratio: n = 8, OR = 7.2 (3.1-16.8); combination of PG I and the PG I/PG II ratio: n = 20, OR = 5.7 (4.4-7.5). Studies with CAG definitions based on gastroscopy with biopsy or the PG I/PG II ratio (alone or in combination with PG I) yield similarly strong associations of H. pylori with CAG. The association is missed entirely in studies where CAG is defined by PG I only.

  18. Clarithromycin resistance and prevalence of Helicobacter pylori virulent genotypes in patients from Southern México with chronic gastritis.

    PubMed

    Alarcón-Millán, Judit; Fernández-Tilapa, Gloria; Cortés-Malagón, Enoc Mariano; Castañón-Sánchez, Carlos Alberto; De Sampedro-Reyes, José; Cruz-Del Carmen, Iván; Betancourt-Linares, Reyes; Román-Román, Adolfo

    2016-10-01

    In developing countries, clarithromycin resistance and frequency of re-infection are factors that contribute to high prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection. The aim of this research was determine the prevalence of clarithromycin resistance and its relation with A2142G, A2142C and A2143G mutations in the domain V of the 23S rRNA gene of H. pylori isolates in patients from Southern Mexico with chronic gastritis. Another purpose of this work was to study the prevalence of virulent genotypes and distribution of resistant strains according to the vacA/cagA/babA2 H. pylori genotypes. One hundred forty-four patients with chronic gastritis were studied. Forty-five H. pylori strains were isolated and clarithromycin susceptibility was determined by the disk-diffusion method. The 82.2% of the strains had the combination of alleles vacA s1 m1 and the cagA gene was detected in 77.8% and 40% of the strains were babA2 positive. The vacA s1 m1 genotype was detected more frequently in cagA(+) strains, vacA s1m1/cagA(+)/babA2(-) genotype was more frequent than vacA s1m1/cagA(+)/babA2(+), 37.8% and 33.3%, respectively. Eight strains were clarithromycin resistant, in three of these, point mutations were identified, but only in one strain the A2143G mutation associated with clarithromycin resistance was found. Other point mutations (A1821G, G1826A, T1830C, A2089G, T1600C, C1601T, C1602T, T1610C, A1611C and T1633G) that have not been associated with clarithromycin resistance were identified. The highest proportion of resistant strains was vacA s1m1/cagA(+) (62.5%). In patients from southern Mexico with chronic gastritis, the prevalence of clarithromycin resistance is within internationally accepted range (17.8%) and allows continued use of triple therapy for H. pylori eradication. However, it is necessary to monitor the evolution of clarithromycin resistance in this area. The largest proportion of resistant H. pylori strains is not harboring the A2142G, A2142C and A2143G mutations

  19. Resveratrol Protects against Helicobacter pylori-Associated Gastritis by Combating Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaolin; Jiang, Anmin; Qi, Banghua; Ma, Zhongyou; Xiong, Youyi; Dou, Jinfeng; Wang, Jianfei

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori)-induced oxidative stress has been shown to play a very important role in the inflammation of the gastric mucosa and increases the risk of developing gastric cancer. Resveratrol has many biological functions and activities, including antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effect. The purpose of this study was to probe whether resveratrol inhibits H. pylori-induced gastric inflammation and to elucidate the underlying mechanisms of any effect in mice. A mouse model of H. pylori infection was established via oral inoculation with H. pylori. After one week, mice were administered resveratrol (100 mg/kg body weight/day) orally for six weeks. The mRNA and protein levels of iNOS and IL-8 were assessed using RT-PCR, Western blot and ELISA. The expression levels of IκBα and phosphorylated IκBα (which embodies the level and activation of NF-κB), Heme Oxygenase-1 (HO-1; a potent antioxidant enzyme) and nuclear factor-erythroid 2 related factor 2 (Nrf2) were determined using Western blot, and lipid peroxide (LPO) level and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity were examined using an MPO colorimetric activity assay, thiobarbituric acid reaction, and histological-grade using HE staining of the gastric mucosa. The results showed that resveratrol improved the histological infiltration score and decreased LPO level and MPO activity in the gastric mucosa. Resveratrol down-regulated the H. pylori-induced mRNA transcription and protein expression levels of IL-8 and iNOS, suppressed H. pylori-induced phosphorylation of IκBα, and increased the levels of HO-1 and Nrf2. In conclusion, resveratrol treatment exerted significant effects against oxidative stress and inflammation in H. pylori-infected mucosa through the suppression of IL-8, iNOS, and NF-κB, and moreover through the activation of the Nrf2/HO-1 pathway. PMID:26610474

  20. MiR-27a rs895819 is involved in increased atrophic gastritis risk, improved gastric cancer prognosis and negative interaction with Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Qian; Chen, Tie-jun; He, Cai-yun; Sun, Li-ping; Liu, Jing-wei; Yuan, Yuan

    2017-01-01

    MiR-27a rs895819 is a loop-stem structure single nucleotide polymorphism affecting mature miR-27a function. In this study, we performed a comprehensive analysis about the association of rs895819 with gastric cancer risk and prognosis, atrophic gastritis risk, as well as the interactions with environmental factors. A total of 939 gastric cancer patients, 1,067 atrophic gastritis patients and 1,166 healthy controls were screened by direct sequencing and MALDI-TOF-MS. The association of rs895819 with clinical pathological parameters and prognostic survival in 357 gastric cancer patients was also been analyzed. The rs895819 variant genotype increased the risk for atrophic gastritis (1.58-fold) and gastric cancer (1.24-fold). While in stratified analysis, the risk effect was demonstrated more significantly in the female, age >60y, Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) negative and non-drinker subgroups. Rs895819 and H. pylori showed an interaction effect for atrophic gastritis risk. In the survival analysis, the rs895819 AG heterozygosis was associated with better survival than the AA wild-type in the TNM stage I–II subgroup. In vitro study by overexpressing miR-27a, cells carrying polymorphic-type G allele expressed lower miR-27a than wild-type A allele. In conclusion, miR-27a rs895819 is implicated as a biomarker for gastric cancer and atrophic gastritis risk, and interacts with H. pylori in gastric carcinogenesis. PMID:28150722

  1. Characteristics of Helicobacter pylori-induced gastritis and the effect of H. pylori eradication in patients with chronic idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura.

    PubMed

    Ando, Takafumi; Tsuzuki, Tomoyuki; Mizuno, Tomokazu; Minami, Masaaki; Ina, Kenji; Kusugami, Kazuo; Takamatsu, Junki; Adachi, Kouichi; El-Omar, Emad; Ohta, Michio; Goto, Hidemi

    2004-10-01

    The association between Helicobacter pylori infection and idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) has been reported widely. We investigated the prevalence of H. pylori infection, its virulence profile and the effectiveness of its eradication in patients with ITP. Twenty patients with ITP, 20 with peptic ulcer (10 gastric ulcer (GU), 10 duodenal ulcer (DU)) and 20 with NUD were studied. The virulence profile of the strains was assessed by genotyping for cagA, vacA, iceA, and hpyIIIR/hrgA and by assaying for IL-8 and DNA fragmentation after incubation with AGS cells. Infected patients and two uninfected ITP patients received triple therapy and platelets were counted before and 1 month, 6 months, 1 year, and 2 years after eradication therapy. H. pylori infection was found in 17 ITP (85%), 20 ulcer (100%) and 13 NUD (65%) patients. Biopsies and strains were collected from five ITP, 20 ulcer and 13 NUD patients. The ITP patients had a pangastritis or corpus-predominant gastritis pattern. All H. pylori isolates, from ITP, ulcer and NUD patients, were cagA(+) and vacA s1/m1, and did not differ in levels of IL-8 induction or DNA fragmentation. Fifteen ITP (88%) and 17 ulcer (85%) patients had successful eradication of H. pylori. Ten of these 15 (67%) H. pylori-eradicated ITP patients had platelet recovery. There was no significant change in platelet count in the two ITP patients in whom eradication failed or in the two originally H. pylori-uninfected ITP patients, or in the treated ulcer patients. Age at onset of ITP was the main determinant of platelet recovery: 100% of patients diagnosed after the age of 60 recovered compared with only 22% of those diagnosed before 50. H. pylori-infected ITP patients have a corpus-predominant pattern of gastritis but the virulence profile of their strains does not differ from that of ulcer or NUD patients. Eradication of H. pylori infection is a good therapeutic option for some patients with chronic ITP, especially for those who

  2. Serum anti-Helicobacter pylori immunoglobulin G titer correlates with grade of histological gastritis, mucosal bacterial density, and levels of serum biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Tu, Huakang; Sun, Liping; Dong, Xiao; Gong, Yuehua; Xu, Qian; Jing, Jingjing; Yuan, Yuan

    2014-03-01

    OBJECTIVE. Clinical implications of serum anti-Helicobacter pylori immunoglobulin G (IgG) titer were unclear. This study investigated the associations of serum anti-H. pylori IgG titer with grade of histological gastritis, mucosal bacterial density and levels of serum biomarkers, including pepsinogen (PG) I, PGII, PGI/II ratio and gastrin-17. MATERIAL AND METHODS. Study participants were from a screening program in northern China. Serum anti-H. pylori IgG measurements were available for 5922 patients with superficial gastritis. Serum anti-H. pylori IgG titer and serum biomarkers were measured using ELISA, and gastric biopsies were evaluated using standardized criteria. RESULTS. In patients with mild, moderate or severe superficial gastritis, the mean serum anti-H. pylori IgG titers were 17.3, 33.4 and 54.4 EIU (p for trend < 0.0001), respectively. As mucosal H. pylori density score increased from 0 to 3, the mean serum anti-H. pylori IgG titers also increased from 24.7 to 44.8 EIU (p for trend < 0.0001). Serum anti-H. pylori IgG titer was associated positively with serum PGI, PGII and gastrin-17 concentrations and negatively with PGI/II ratio, and the association was the strongest for PGII. The mean PGII concentration of the patients in the highest quartile of IgG titer was twice the mean concentration of the patients in the lowest quartile (17.2 vs. 8.6 EIU, p < 0.0001). CONCLUSIONS. Our results suggest that serum anti-H. pylori IgG titer was associated positively with grade of histological gastritis, mucosal bacterial density and concentrations of serum PGI, PGII and gastrin-17, and negatively with PGI/II ratio.

  3. Association of Malaysian Helicobacter pylori virulence polymorphisms with severity of gastritis and patients' ethnicity.

    PubMed

    Alfizah, Hanafiah; Ramelah, Mohamed; Rizal, Abdul M; Anwar, Abdullah S; Isa, Mohamed R

    2012-10-01

    Polymorphisms of Helicobacter pylori cagA and vacA genes do exist and may contribute to differences in H. pylori infection and gastroduodenal diseases among races in the Malaysian population. This study was conducted to characterize the polymorphisms in H. pylori cagA and vacA in Malaysian population. A total of 110 H. pylori isolates were genotyped by PCR and sequenced for cagA and PCR-RFLP for vacA. East Asian cagA was predominantly detected (64.5%), whereas vacA s1m1 and s1m2 alleles were detected in 60.9 and 37.3% of strains, respectively. A statistical association between cagA type with patients' ethnicity (p < .0001) and age group >50 years old (p = .027) was identified. vacA alleles showed significant association with age group >50 years old (p = .017) and increased neutrophil activity in gastric mucosa (p = .028 and p = .016 for moderate and marked activity, respectively). Further identification of vacA polymorphism revealed that 84% of strains from Malays and Indians showed one RFLP pattern (RFLP-1), whereas more than one RFLP patterns (RFLP-2, 3, 4, 5, 6, and 8) were predominantly observed in strains from Chinese (82%) (p < .0001). Increasing severity of gastric inflammation was observed in gastric mucosa infected with strains carrying RFLP-2, 3, 4, 5, and 6 (p = .037). About 86.6% of H. pylori strains with East Asian cagA were vacA RFLP-2, 3, 4, 5, 6, and 8, and 88% of Western cagA strains were vacA RFLP-1 (p < .0001). Chinese and Indians are susceptible to different virulence genotypes of H. pylori, whereas Malays showed a mixed virulence genotypes. Marked differences in the polymorphisms of cagA and vacA were observed among strains in Malaysian population. This provides a new insight into the pathogenicity of H. pylori in multiracial population. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  4. Development of gastric cancer in nonatrophic stomach with highly active inflammation identified by serum levels of pepsinogen and Helicobacter pylori antibody together with endoscopic rugal hyperplastic gastritis.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Mika; Kato, Jun; Inoue, Izumi; Yoshimura, Noriko; Yoshida, Takeichi; Mukoubayashi, Chizu; Deguchi, Hisanobu; Enomoto, Shotaro; Ueda, Kazuki; Maekita, Takao; Iguchi, Mikitaka; Tamai, Hideyuki; Utsunomiya, Hirotoshi; Yamamichi, Nobutake; Fujishiro, Mitsuhiro; Iwane, Masataka; Tekeshita, Tatsuya; Mohara, Osamu; Ushijima, Toshikazu; Ichinose, Masao

    2012-12-01

    This study aimed to elucidate groups at high risk of developing cancer among patients with serologically identified Helicobacter pylori infection and nonatrophic stomach. Annual endoscopy was performed for a mean of 5.4 years in 496 asymptomatic middle-aged men who were H. pylori antibody-positive and pepsinogen (PG) test-negative. Subjects were stratified according to the activity of H. pylori-associated gastritis measured by serum levels of PG and H. pylori antibody, and/or by endoscopic findings of rugal hyperplastic gastritis (RHG), and cancer development was investigated. During the study period, seven cases of cancer developed in the cohort (incidence rate, 261/100,000 person-years), with 85.7% developing in the group showing a PGI/II ratio ≤ 3.0, reflecting active inflammation-based high PGII levels. Cancer incidence was significantly higher in this group (750/100,000 person-years) than in groups with less active gastritis. Furthermore, cancer incidence for this group was significantly higher in the subgroup with high H. pylori antibody titers than in the low-titer subgroup. Meanwhile, endoscopic findings revealed that 11.7% of subjects showed RHG reflecting localized highly active inflammation, and cancer risk was significantly higher in patients with RHG than in patients without. Combining the two serum tests and endoscopic examination for RHG allowed identification of subjects with more active gastritis and higher cancer risk. No cancer development was observed in these high-risk subjects after H. pylori eradication. Subjects with highly active gastritis identified by the two serological tests and endoscopic RHG constitute a group at high risk of cancer development with H. pylori-infected nonatrophic stomach. Copyright © 2012 UICC.

  5. Helicobacter pylori Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... urease test (RUT) for H. pylori Formal name: Helicobacter pylori Related tests: Gastrin At a Glance Test ... else I should know? How is it used? Helicobacter pylori testing is used to diagnose an infection ...

  6. Helicobacter Pylori Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... Issues Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Helicobacter Pylori Infections Page Content Article Body Most people, ... always) caused by bacteria—specifically, an organism called Helicobacter pylori. H pylori infections occur at a low ...

  7. Virulence factors of Helicobacter pylori vacA increase markedly gastric mucosal TGF-β1 mRNA expression in gastritis patients.

    PubMed

    Rahimian, Ghorbanali; Sanei, Mohammad Hosein; Shirzad, Hedayatollah; Azadegan-Dehkordi, Fatemeh; Taghikhani, Afshin; Salimzadeh, Loghman; Hashemzadeh-Chaleshtori, Morteza; Rafieian-Kopaei, Mahmoud; Bagheri, Nader

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is the main cause of gastric inflammation. Regulatory T cells (Treg cells) suppress the activation and proliferation of antigen-specific T cells and mediate immunologic tolerance. TGF-β1 was shown to be secreted in a subset of Treg cells known as 'Th3 cells'. These cells have not been sufficiently studied in context to H. pylori-induced inflammation in human gastric mucosa. In this study we therefore, aimed to investigate the expression of TGF-β1 in the context of H. pylori colonization in chronic gastritis, to examine the relationship between it and histopathologic findings and to compare it with virulence factors. Total RNA was extracted from gastric biopsies of 48 H. pylori-infected patients and 38 H. pylori-negative patients with gastritis. Mucosal TGF-β1 mRNA expression in H. pylori-infected and uninfected gastric biopsies was determined by real-time PCR. Presence of vacA, cagA, iceA, babA2 and oipA virulence factors was evaluated using PCR. TGF-β1 mRNA expression was significantly increased in biopsies of H. pylori-infected patients compared to H. pylori-uninfected patients. There was association between virulence factors and TGF-β1 mRNA expression. TGF-β1 mRNA expression in mucosa was significantly higher in patients with vacA s1 and s1m1. TGF-β1 may play an important role in the inflammatory response and promote the chronic and persistent inflammatory changes in the gastric. This may ultimately influence the outcome of H. pylori-associated diseases that arise within the context of gastritis and vacA may suffice to induce expression of TGF-β1 mRNA. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Activation of IκB Kinase β and NF-κB Is Essential for Helicobacter pylori-Induced Chronic Gastritis in Mongolian Gerbils▿

    PubMed Central

    Yanai, Ayako; Maeda, Shin; Shibata, Wataru; Hikiba, Yohko; Sakamoto, Kei; Nakagawa, Hayato; Ohmae, Tomoya; Hirata, Yoshihiro; Ogura, Keiji; Muto, Susumu; Itai, Akiko; Omata, Masao

    2008-01-01

    The Mongolian gerbil model of Helicobacter pylori infection resembles human gastritis. In this study, we investigated the role of NF-κB activation in H. pylori-infected gerbils. Activated macrophages were significantly increased in H. pylori-infected gastric mucosa and were identified as being important cells with potent activation of NF-κB, which plays an important part in producing proinflammatory cytokines. Macrophage depletion by the administration of clodronate resulted in milder inflammation in gerbils infected with H. pylori. In macrophages, the inhibition of IκB kinase β (IKKβ), which is a critical kinase for NF-κB activation, resulted in lower proinflammatory cytokine expression caused by heat-killed H. pylori cells. Furthermore, treatment with IKKβ inhibitor resulted in milder inflammation in gerbils with H. pylori gastritis. Collectively, our data suggest that H. pylori-mediated gastric inflammation critically depends on the efficient recruitment and activation of macrophages, with sufficient NF-κB activation. PMID:18070894

  9. Association of IL1B -511C/-31T haplotype and Helicobacter pylori vacA genotypes with gastric ulcer and chronic gastritis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The association between proinflammatory cytokine gene polymorphisms and gastric diseases related to Helicobacter pylori varies by population and geographic area. Our objective was to determine if the IL-1B -511 T>C and -31 C>T polymorphisms and H. pylori vacA genotypes are associated with risk of chronic gastritis and gastric ulcer in a Mexican population. Methods We conducted endoscopic studies in 128 patients with symptoms of dyspepsia. We took two biopsies from the body, antrum, or ulcer edge from each patient, and classified our histopathological findings according to the Sydney System. H. pylori infection and vacA genotyping were accomplished via PCR from total DNA of the gastric biopsies. We confirmed the presence of anti-H. pylori serum IgG and IgM in 102 control subjects. In both case subjects and control subjects, the IL-1B -511 T>C polymorphism was genotyped by PCR-RFLPs and the IL-1B -31 C>T polymorphism was genotyped by pyrosequencing. Results Sixty-two point seven (62.7%) of the 102 control subjects were H. pylori-seropositive. Among the case subjects, 100 were diagnosed with chronic gastritis and 28 with gastric ulcer. We found that 77% of the patients with chronic gastritis and 85.7% of the patients with gastric ulcer were H. pylori-positive. The predominant H. pylori genotype was vacA s1m1 (58.4%) and the most frequent subtype was vacA s1. The -511 TC, (rs16944 -511 T>C) genotype and the -511C allele were associated with chronic gastritis (OR = 3.1, 95% CI = 1.4-6.8 and OR = 3.0, 95% CI = 1.4-6.0, respectively). The subjects carrying -31T (rs1143627 -31 C>T) were found to be at a higher risk of having chronic gastritis (OR = 2.8, 95% CI = 1.3-5.8). The IL-1B -511C/-31T haplotype was associated with chronic gastritis (OR = 2.1, 95% CI = 1.2-3.8) but not with gastric ulcer. Conclusions The H. pylori vacA genotypes identified herein were similar to those reported for other regions of Mexico. The vacA s1m1 genotype was not associated with

  10. Helicobacter pylori and precancerous conditions of the stomach: the frequency of infection in a cross-sectional study of 79 consecutive patients with chronic antral gastritis in Yaoundé, Cameroon.

    PubMed

    Ankouane, Firmin; Noah, Dominique Noah; Enyime, Félicien Ntoné; Ndjollé, Carole Menzy; Djapa, Roger Nsenga; Nonga, Bernadette Ngo; Njoya, Oudou; Ndam, Elie Claude Ndjitoyap

    2015-01-01

    The study aimed at determining the different types of precancerous conditions of the stomach and searches the frequency of Helicobacter pylori in these lesions in patients with chronic antral gastritis in Yaounde, Cameroon. Five gastric biopsies were performed during upper gastrointestinal endoscopy for pathology and fixed in formol 10% before being coated in paraffin. Both the modified Giemsa and Periodic acid of Shift - Alkaline blue stains were used for the histological diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection. Hematoxylyn and eosin stain was used to determine the activity of gastritis, atrophic gastritis and intestinal metaplasia in accordance to the Sydney's classification of gastritis. Data were analysed using both the Epi info 6.04 and Excel 2007 softwares. Means and their standard deviations, medians and their interquartiles (IQR) were calculated. Proportions were established for qualitative variables and chi square analysis done in this study with a p value set at 0.05. Seventy-nine patients with chronic antral gastritis were enrolled, of which 43 (54.4%) were male, median age: 43 years (range from 21 to 70 years). The rate of atrophic gastritis was 74.7% (59/79). The activity of atrophic gastritis was mild in 47.5% (28/59) of cases, moderate in 47.5% (28/59) and severe in 5% (5/59). Intestinal metaplasia and follicular gastritis were present in 6.3% (5/79), and 10.1% (8/79), respectively. Concerning Helicobacter pylori infection, 71.2% (42/59) of patients with atrophic gastritis tested positive against 28.8% (17/59) who tested negative (p=0.00003). Helicobacter pylori infection was related to the severity of gastric atrophy (p=0.0001). Among patients with intestinal metaplasia and follicular gastritis, the proportion of those who tested positive for Helicobacter pylori infection was 80% (4/5), and 75% (6/8), respectively. There were no significant differences in the occurrence of atrophic gastritis according to age groups (p=0.908). This study concludes

  11. Helicobacter pylori and precancerous conditions of the stomach: the frequency of infection in a cross-sectional study of 79 consecutive patients with chronic antral gastritis in Yaoundé, Cameroon

    PubMed Central

    Ankouane, Firmin; Noah, Dominique Noah; Enyime, Félicien Ntoné; Ndjollé, Carole Menzy; Djapa, Roger Nsenga; Nonga, Bernadette Ngo; Njoya, Oudou; Ndam, Elie Claude Ndjitoyap

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The study aimed at determining the different types of precancerous conditions of the stomach and searches the frequency of Helicobacter pylori in these lesions in patients with chronic antral gastritis in Yaounde, Cameroon. Methods Five gastric biopsies were performed during upper gastrointestinal endoscopy for pathology and fixed in formol 10% before being coated in paraffin. Both the modified Giemsa and Periodic acid of Shift – Alkaline blue stains were used for the histological diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection. Hematoxylyn and eosin stain was used to determine the activity of gastritis, atrophic gastritis and intestinal metaplasia in accordance to the Sydney's classification of gastritis. Data were analysed using both the Epi info 6.04 and Excel 2007 softwares. Means and their standard deviations, medians and their interquartiles (IQR) were calculated. Proportions were established for qualitative variables and chi square analysis done in this study with a p value set at 0.05. Results Seventy-nine patients with chronic antral gastritis were enrolled, of which 43 (54.4%) were male, median age: 43 years (range from 21 to 70 years). The rate of atrophic gastritis was 74.7% (59/79). The activity of atrophic gastritis was mild in 47.5% (28/59) of cases, moderate in 47.5% (28/59) and severe in 5% (5/59). Intestinal metaplasia and follicular gastritis were present in 6.3% (5/79), and 10.1% (8/79), respectively. Concerning Helicobacter pylori infection, 71.2% (42/59) of patients with atrophic gastritis tested positive against 28.8% (17/59) who tested negative (p = 0.00003). Helicobacter pylori infection was related to the severity of gastric atrophy (p = 0.0001). Among patients with intestinal metaplasia and follicular gastritis, the proportion of those who tested positive for Helicobacter pylori infection was 80% (4/5), and 75% (6/8), respectively. There were no significant differences in the occurrence of atrophic gastritis according to age

  12. Comparative analysis of upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, double-contrast upper gastrointestinal barium X-ray radiography, and the titer of serum anti-Helicobacter pylori IgG focusing on the diagnosis of atrophic gastritis.

    PubMed

    Yamamichi, Nobutake; Hirano, Chigaya; Takahashi, Yu; Minatsuki, Chihiro; Nakayama, Chiemi; Matsuda, Rie; Shimamoto, Takeshi; Takeuchi, Chihiro; Kodashima, Shinya; Ono, Satoshi; Tsuji, Yosuke; Fujishiro, Mitsuhiro; Wada, Ryoichi; Mitsushima, Toru; Koike, Kazuhiko

    2016-04-01

    Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy (UGI-ES) and double-contrast upper gastrointestinal barium X-ray radiography (UGI-XR) are two major image-based methods to diagnose atrophic gastritis, which is mostly induced by Helicobacter pylori infection. However, there have been few studies directly comparing them. Atrophic gastritis was evaluated using the data of 962 healthy subjects who underwent UGI-ES and UGI-XR within 1 year. Based on UGI-ES and UGI-XR, 602 subjects did not have atrophic gastritis and 254 subjects did have it. Considering UGI-ES-based atrophic gastritis as the standard, sensitivity and specificity of UGI-XR-based atrophic gastritis were 92.0 % (254/276) and 92.8 % (602/649), respectively. The seven-grade Kimura-Takemoto classification of UGI-ES-based atrophic gastritis showed a strong and significant association with the four-grade UGI-XR-based atrophic gastritis. Sensitivity and specificity of serum anti-Helicobacter pylori IgG to detect UGI-ES/UGI-XR-based atrophic gastritis were 89.4 % (227/254) and 99.8 % (601/602), indicating that atrophic gastritis can be overlooked according to serum anti-Helicobacter pylori IgG alone.

  13. Helicobacter pylori: Eradication or Preservation

    PubMed Central

    Scott, David R.

    2012-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infects about 50% of the world’s population and inevitably results in the development of gastritis. Of those infected, about 10% develop peptic ulcer disease and roughly 1% develop gastric cancer. Conversely, some take the view that H. pylori infection provides some protection against gastro-esophageal reflux disease and possibly asthma. This review aims to explore the case for and against eradication of the bacterium using a “test and treat” approach amongst the general population. PMID:22500191

  14. Composition and gene expression of the cag pathogenicity island in Helicobacter pylori strains isolated from gastric carcinoma and gastritis patients in Costa Rica.

    PubMed

    Occhialini, A; Marais, A; Urdaci, M; Sierra, R; Muñoz, N; Covacci, A; Mégraud, F

    2001-03-01

    The composition and in vitro expression of the cag pathogenicity island genes in a group of Helicobacter pylori strains obtained from patients suffering from chronic gastritis-associated dyspepsia (n = 26) or gastric carcinoma (n = 17) were analyzed. No significant difference in the distribution of the 10 studied regions was found between the cases and the controls. Nine strains did not harbor any of the selected regions: eight (30.8%) isolated from patients with gastritis only and one (5.9%) from a patient with gastric carcinoma. No association was found between the number of repeated sequences at the 3' end of the cagA gene or the presence of tyrosine phosphorylation motifs and the clinical origin of the strains. The virB10 homolog gene was the sole gene studied to be significantly expressed more often in cancer strains than in gastritis strains (P = 0.03).

  15. Composition and Gene Expression of the cag Pathogenicity Island in Helicobacter pylori Strains Isolated from Gastric Carcinoma and Gastritis Patients in Costa Rica

    PubMed Central

    Occhialini, Alessandra; Marais, Armelle; Urdaci, Maria; Sierra, Rafaela; Muñoz, Nubia; Covacci, Antonello; Mégraud, Francis

    2001-01-01

    The composition and in vitro expression of the cag pathogenicity island genes in a group of Helicobacter pylori strains obtained from patients suffering from chronic gastritis-associated dyspepsia (n = 26) or gastric carcinoma (n = 17) were analyzed. No significant difference in the distribution of the 10 studied regions was found between the cases and the controls. Nine strains did not harbor any of the selected regions: eight (30.8%) isolated from patients with gastritis only and one (5.9%) from a patient with gastric carcinoma. No association was found between the number of repeated sequences at the 3′ end of the cagA gene or the presence of tyrosine phosphorylation motifs and the clinical origin of the strains. The virB10 homolog gene was the sole gene studied to be significantly expressed more often in cancer strains than in gastritis strains (P = 0.03). PMID:11179371

  16. Helicobacter pylori and its involvement in gastritis and peptic ulcer formation.

    PubMed

    Konturek, S J; Konturek, P C; Konturek, J W; Plonka, M; Czesnikiewicz-Guzik, M; Brzozowski, T; Bielanski, W

    2006-09-01

    gastritis and peptic ulcer, which for the first time can be definitively cured by merely eradication of germ infecting stomach. This overview presents the mechanism of induction of gastritis and peptic ulcer by the H. pylori infection and describes accompanying changes in gastric acid and endocrine secretion as well as the effects of germ eradication on gastric secretory functions and gastroduodenal mucosal integrity.

  17. Additional corpus biopsy enhances the detection of Helicobacter pylori infection in a background of gastritis with atrophy

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The best sites for biopsy-based tests to evaluate H. pylori infection in gastritis with atrophy are not well known. This study aimed to evaluate the site and sensitivity of biopsy-based tests in terms of degree of gastritis with atrophy. Methods One hundred and sixty-four (164) uninvestigated dyspepsia patients were enrolled. Biopsy-based tests (i.e., culture, histology Giemsa stain and rapid urease test) and non-invasive tests (anti-H. pylori IgG) were performed. The gold standard of H. pylori infection was defined according to previous criteria. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive rate and negative predictive rate of biopsy-based tests at the gastric antrum and body were calculated in terms of degree of gastritis with atrophy. Results The prevalence rate of H. pylori infection in the 164 patients was 63.4%. Gastritis with atrophy was significantly higher at the antrum than at the body (76% vs. 31%; p<0.001). The sensitivity of biopsy-based test decreased when the degree of gastritis with atrophy increased regardless of biopsy site (for normal, mild, moderate, and severe gastritis with atrophy, the sensitivity of histology Giemsa stain was 100%, 100%, 88%, and 66%, respectively, and 100%, 97%, 91%, and 66%, respectively, for rapid urease test). In moderate to severe antrum or body gastritis with atrophy, additional corpus biopsy resulted in increased sensitivity to 16.67% compare to single antrum biopsy. Conclusions In moderate to severe gastritis with atrophy, biopsy-based test should include the corpus for avoiding false negative results. PMID:23272897

  18. Epstein Barr virus and Helicobacter pylori co-infection are positively associated with severe gastritis in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Cárdenas-Mondragón, María G; Carreón-Talavera, Ricardo; Camorlinga-Ponce, Margarita; Gomez-Delgado, Alejandro; Torres, Javier; Fuentes-Pananá, Ezequiel M

    2013-01-01

    H. pylori infection is acquired during childhood and causes a chronic inflammatory response in the gastric mucosa, which is considered the main risk factor to acquire gastric cancer (GC) later in life. More recently, infection by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) have also been associated with GC. The role of EBV in early inflammatory responses and its relationship with H. pylori infection remains poorly studied. Here, we assessed whether EBV infection in children correlated with the stage of gastritis and whether co-infection with H. pylori affected the severity of inflammation. 333 pediatric patients with chronic abdominal pain were studied. From them, gastric biopsies were taken and inflammation graded according to the Sydney system; peripheral blood was drawn and antibodies against EBV (IgG and IgM anti-VCA) and H. pylori (IgG anti-whole bacteria and anti-CagA) were measured in sera. We found that children infected only by EBV presented mild mononuclear (MN) and none polymorphonuclear (PMN) cell infiltration, while those infected by H. pylori presented moderate MN and mild PMN. In contrast, patients co-infected with both pathogens were significantly associated with severe gastritis. Importantly, co-infection of H. pylori CagA+/EBV+ had a stronger association with severe MN (PR 3.0) and PMN (PR 7.2) cells than cases with single H. pylori CagA+ infection. Co-infection with EBV and H. pylori in pediatric patients is associated with severe gastritis. Even single infections with H. pylori CagA+ strains are associated with mild to moderate infiltration arguing for a cooperative effect of H. pylori and EBV in the gastric mucosa and revealing a critical role for EBV previously un-appreciated. This study points out the need to study both pathogens to understand the mechanism behind severe damage of the gastric mucosa, which could identified children with increased risk to present more serious lesions later in life.

  19. Proteomic analysis reveals molecular biological details in varioliform gastritis without Helicobacter pylori infection

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lin; Hou, Yan-Hong; Wu, Kai; Zhai, Jun-Shan; Lin, Nan

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To investigate and elucidate the molecular mechanism underlying varioliform gastritis for early detection, prevention and intervention of gastric cancer. METHODS: A combination of two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry was used to detect the differentially expressed proteins between varioliform gastritis and matched normal mucosa. The selected proteins were confirmed by Western blotting and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) in additional samples and the function of some proteins in varioliform gastritis was analyzed by bio-method preliminarily. RESULTS: We identified 21 differentially expressed proteins in varioliform gastritis, and compared them with matched normal mucosa. Eleven proteins were upregulated and ten downregulated in varioliform gastritis when compared with the same proteins in individual-matched normal gastric mucosa. These proteins are related to metabolism, oxidation, cytoskeleton, apoptosis, signal transduction and other aspects of cells. Two novel proteins, thioredoxin domain-containing protein 5 (TXNDC5) upregulated in varioliform gastritis, and neuropolypeptide h3 [phosphatidylethanolamine-binding protein 1 (PEBP1)] downregulated in varioliform gastritis, were further investigated. Their expressions were validated by Western blotting and RT-PCR in 12 cases of varioliform gastritis which was matched with normal mucosa. The expression level of PEBP1 in varioliform gastritis was significantly lower (P < 0.05) while that of TXNDC5 was significantly higher than that in matched normal gastric mucosa (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: There are some changes of protein expression in varioliform gastritis. Downregulation of PEBP1 and upregulation of TXNDC5 are involved in the development of varioliform gastritis. PMID:20677338

  20. Ghrelin and Helicobacter pylori infection

    PubMed Central

    Osawa, Hiroyuki

    2008-01-01

    Ghrelin is primarily secreted from the stomach and has been implicated in the coordination of eating behavior and weight regulation. Ghrelin also plays an essential role in the mechanism of gastric mucosal defense. Thus, it is important to clarify which diseases primarily influence changes in plasma ghrelin concentrations. Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) infection is involved in the pathogenesis of gastritis, gastric and duodenal ulcer, gastric carcinoma, and mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma. H pylori eradication is related to body weight change. Compared, H pylori infected and negative subjects with normal body mass index, plasma ghrelin concentration, gastric ghrelin mRNA, and the number of ghrelin producing cells in gastric mucosa are significantly lower in H pylori infected subjects than in H pylori-negative controls. Plasma ghrelin concentration decreases with the progression of gastric atrophy. Impaired gastric ghrelin production in association with atrophic gastritis induced by H pylori infection accounts for the decrease in plasma ghrelin concentration. However, the ratio of plasma acylated ghrelin to total ghrelin levels is higher in patients with chronic atrophic gastritis than in healthy subjects. This may result from the compensatory increase in plasma active ghrelin concentration in response to gastric atrophy. After H pylori eradication, gastric preproghrelin mRNA expression is increased nearly 4-fold in most cases. However, changes in plasma ghrelin concentrations before and after H pylori cure are not associated with the gastric ghrelin production. Plasma ghrelin changes are inversely correlated with both body weight change and initial plasma ghrelin levels. PMID:19009647

  1. Ten-day bismuth-containing quadruple therapy is effective as first-line therapy for Helicobacter pylori-related chronic gastritis: a prospective randomized study in China.

    PubMed

    Wang, L; Lin, Z; Chen, S; Li, J; Chen, C; Huang, Z; Ye, B; Ding, J; Li, W; Wu, L; Jiang, Y; Meng, L; Du, Q; Si, J

    2017-06-01

    To investigate the effectiveness of 10-day bismuth-containing quadruple (B-quadruple) treatment as first-line therapy in patients with Helicobacter pylori-related chronic gastritis. A randomized controlled trial was conducted from October 2011 to December 2013 in Zhejiang, China, including patients with H. pylori-related chronic gastritis who were randomly provided either 10-day omeprazole-based triple therapy (OM-triple; omeprazole 20 mg twice daily, clarithromycin 500 mg twice daily and amoxicillin 1 g twice daily) or 10-day B-quadruple therapy (OM-triple + bismuth subcitrate 120 mg four times daily). H. pylori status, pathologic findings and dyspeptic symptoms were assessed at baseline and after 3 months. The primary outcome was H. pylori eradication rates by intention-to-treat (ITT) and per-protocol (PP) analyses. The secondary outcomes were the histologic and symptomatic benefits from H. pylori eradication. A total of 351 patients with H. pylori-related chronic gastritis were recruited. The eradication rates of the OM-triple and B-quadruple groups were 58.4% (108/185) and 86.1% (143/166) respectively according to ITT analysis (p <0.01). PP rates of H. pylori eradication were 63.2% (108/171) and 92.3% (143/155) respectively (p <0.01). According to the PP analysis, active and chronic inflammation in gastric mucosa was substantially improved in all treated patients (n=326). However, pathologic atrophic gastritis and intestinal metaplasia did not regress in both groups (n=326). The reduction of dyspeptic symptoms score was significantly higher in the B-quadruple group than in the OM-triple group (0.59±0.057 vs. 0.39±0.046) (p <0.01). Ten-day B-quadruple therapy is more effective than OM-triple therapy as first-line therapy for patients with H. pylori-induced chronic gastritis in China. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  2. Chronic gastritis in tigers associated with Helicobacter acinonyx.

    PubMed

    Schröder, H D; Ludwig, C; Jakob, W; Reischl, U; Stolte, M; Lehn, N

    1998-07-01

    Helicobacter pylori-like organisms (HPLOs) were isolated from the gastric mucosa of two Sumatran tigers and identified by polymerase chain reaction analysis as Helicobacter acinonyx. At histological examination, both tigers revealed a chronic gastritis associated with HPLOs as demonstrated by immunolabelling and electron microscopy. This is the first isolation of H. acinonyx from tigers, in which, as previously reported in cheetahs, it may be a cause of gastritis.

  3. Multiple in vivo passages enhance the ability of a clinical Helicobacter pylori isolate to colonize the stomach of Mongolian gerbils and to induce gastritis.

    PubMed

    Bleich, A; Köhn, I; Glage, S; Beil, W; Wagner, S; Mähler, M

    2005-04-01

    The Mongolian gerbil is an excellent animal model for Helicobacter pylori-induced gastritis in humans. In this study, initially low colonization rates of the H. pylori strains ATCC 43504, SS1, or HP87 inoculated into gerbils caused difficulties in establishing this model. In order to increase the colonization ability and pathogenicity, the clinical HP87 isolate was selected for adaptation to the gerbil stomach by multiple in vivo passages through gerbils. Development of gastritis was examined histologically at 4-52 weeks after infection. The proportion of gerbils which tested positive for H. pylori by culture at four weeks after inoculation gradually increased from 11.1% of gerbils inoculated with HP87 without prior in vivo passage (P0) to 100% of gerbils inoculated with HP87 with seven in vivo passages (P7). In addition, adaptation of HP87 resulted in more severe histopathological changes. Gerbils infected with adapted HP87 (P7) exhibited severe infiltration by monomorphonuclear and polymorphonuclear leukocytes in the mucosa, submucosa, and subserosa of the gastric antrum, as well as epithelial changes consisting of hyperplasia, erosion, and ulceration. Histopathological changes increased in severity from four to 52 weeks after infection. Adaptation of HP87 during its passages through gerbils could be due to genetic changes in bacterial colonization factors. Identification of these changes might be useful to understand the underlying mechanism of gastric adaptation and pathogenesis of H. pylori.

  4. Helicobacter pylori eradication therapy.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Hidekazu; Nishizawa, Toshihiro; Hibi, Toshifumi

    2010-04-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is the main cause of gastritis, gastroduodenal ulcers and gastric cancer. H. pylori eradication has been shown to have a prophylactic effect against gastric cancer. According to several international guidelines, the first-line therapy for treating H. pylori infection consists of a proton pump inhibitor (PPI) or ranitidine bismuth citrate, with any two antibiotics among amoxicillin, clarithromycin and metronidazole, given for 7-14 days. However, even with these recommended regimens, H. pylori eradication failure is still seen in more than 20% of patients. The failure rate for first-line therapy may be higher in actual clinical practice, owing to the indiscriminate use of antibiotics. The recommended second-line therapy is a quadruple regimen composed of tetracycline, metronidazole, a bismuth salt and a PPI. The combination of PPI-amoxicillin-levofloxacin is a good option as second-line therapy. In the case of failure of second-line therapy, the patients should be evaluated using a case-by-case approach. European guidelines recommend culture before the selection of a third-line treatment based on the microbial antibiotic sensitivity. H. pylori isolates after two eradication failures are often resistant to both metronidazole and clarithromycin. The alternative candidates for third-line therapy are quinolones, tetracycline, rifabutin and furazolidone; high-dose PPI/amoxicillin therapy might also be promising.

  5. vacA genotypes of Helicobacter pylori in the oral cavity and stomach of patients with chronic gastritis and gastric ulcer.

    PubMed

    Román-Román, Adolfo; Giono-Cerezo, Silvia; Camorlinga-Ponce, Margarita; Martínez-Carrillo, Dinorah Nashely; Loaiza-Loeza, Salome; Fernández-Tilapa, Gloria

    2013-03-01

    Helicobacter pylori adheres to various components of the human saliva. Therefore, the objective of this research was to simultaneously detect H. pylori in saliva and in gastric biopsy, and to determine the agreement between the vacA genotypes in both saliva and gastric biopsy. A total of 162 patients with chronic gastritis and 34 with gastric ulcer were studied, and saliva and biopsy samples were collected from each patient. H. pylori DNA was detected by conventional PCR and nested PCR was used for vacA genotyping. In 24% of the patients (47/196) H. pylori DNA was found in saliva and in biopsy; 52.5% (103/196) were saliva(negative)/biopsy(positive) and 6.6% (13/196) were saliva(positive)/biopsy(negative). In either or both H. pylori vacAs1m1 or s1m2 genotypes were detected in saliva in 41.5% of the patients with chronic gastritis. Forty-seven percent had >1 genotype, and the s1m1/s1m2 combination was found in 36% of them. H. pylori vacAs1m1 and s1m2 were also found in the saliva and biopsy of patients with gastric ulcer. The genotypes found in saliva and biopsy of the same patient had 51.1% agreement. In 27.6% of the 47 patients saliva(positive)/biopsy(positive) two genotypes were found in saliva, and one or both in the stomach. The s1m1/s1m2 genotypes, alone or together, are found simultaneously in saliva and gastric biopsy of the same patient. These results suggest that H. pylori reaches the oral cavity by various ways, and that saliva can be the transmitting and re-infecting vector. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  6. Helicobacter pylori in gastroduodenal diseases.

    PubMed

    Lawal, Oladejo O; Rotimi, Olorunda; Okeke, Iruka

    2007-01-01

    To determine the prevalence and disease association of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) in dyspeptic patients in southwest Nigeria. Obafemi Awolowo University Teaching Hospitals Complex, Ile-lfe, Nigeria. Consecutive dyspeptic patients for upper gastrointestinal endoscopy from January 1996 to March 1997 were investigated for H. pylori in gastric biopsy by histopathology and culture. Patients without gastroduodenal ulcerations or neoplastic lesions constituted the nonulcer dyspeptic (NUD) group. 138 (92 males, 46 females) patients aged 4.5-85 years [mean (7) = 45+/-SD 17.8 years] who had upper gastrointestinal endoscopy were analyzed for presence of H. pylori. Eighty-three had histopathology alone, while 55 others had both histology and culture. Endoscopic diagnosis included duodenal ulcer (DU) (n=35, 23%); gastric ulcer (n=4, 3%); gastric cancer (n=14, 9%); NUD, including gastritis (n=49, 32%); duodenitis (n=47, 31%); and normal (n=16, 11%). Overall, H. pylori was positive in 107 of 138 (77.5%) patients. There was a significant association of H. pylori with DU and NUD (p<0.000). Three-quarters of cases of normal endoscopy harbored H. pylori. The finding of 80% and 85% H. pylori in gastritis and duodenitis, respectively, was of interest. These findings suggest that DU and NUD were the main clinical expressions of H. pylori infection in southwest Nigerian dyspeptic patients similar to what is found in developed nations. Of note is the high incidence of H. pylori in endoscopically normal patients.

  7. [Helicobacter pylori -- 2014].

    PubMed

    Buzás, György Miklós

    2015-02-08

    The author reviews the main achievements in Helicobacter pylori research in the past 2 years. Of the more than 1000 microRNAs described thus far, sets of over- and underexpressed samples were identified that are associated with either gastric cancer or precancerous lesions, and some of them could be either markers or therapeutic targets in the near future. Meta-analyses involved 95 new publications: the association between infection and oesophageal, colorectal, pancreatic and liver carcinomas is supported by the increased odds ratios, but the results do not reach the strength seen in gastric carcinoma. Epstein-Barr virus is an emerging pathogen: 10% of gastric cancers are virus-associated; the prevalence of the virus in normal mucosa, chronic gastritis and peptic ulcer are currently being studied. Current Helicobacter pylori eradication regimens frequently achieve suboptimal results: a few optimisation methods are presented, although not all are supported by the meta-analyses. In 2013, the European Helicobacter Study Group proposed the development of a pan-European registry; data from 5792 patients registered so far indicated that many therapeutic regimens resulted in a low eradication rate. In 2013, the Healthy Stomach Initiative was started with the aim of supporting and disseminating research performed in the field of healthy and diseased stomachs.

  8. Helicobacter pylori

    MedlinePlus

    ... illnesses. H. pylori , which used to be called Campylobacter pylori , also can cause peptic ulcers (commonly known ... H. Pylori Antigen Food Safety for Your Family Campylobacter Infections Pyloric Stenosis Peptic Ulcers Digestive System Vomiting ...

  9. Helicobacter pylori

    MedlinePlus

    ... are a common cause of digestive illnesses, including gastritis (the irritation and inflammation of the stomach lining), ... cause symptoms, they're usually either symptoms of gastritis or peptic ulcer disease. In kids, symptoms of ...

  10. Teprenone, but not H2-receptor blocker or sucralfate, suppresses corpus Helicobacter pylori colonization and gastritis in humans: teprenone inhibition of H. pylori-induced interleukin-8 in MKN28 gastric epithelial cell lines.

    PubMed

    Miyake, Kazumasa; Tsukui, Taku; Shinji, Yoko; Shinoki, Kei; Hiratsuka, Tetsuro; Nishigaki, Hitoshi; Futagami, Seiji; Wada, Ken; Gudis, Katya; Iwakiri, Katsuhiko; Yamada, Nobutaka; Sakamoto, Choitsu

    2004-04-01

    The role of teprenone in Helicobacter pylori-associated gastritis has yet to be determined. To investigate the effect of teprenone on inflammatory cell infiltration, and on H. pylori colonization of the gastric mucosa in H. pylori-infected patients, we first compared the effect of teprenone with that of both histamine H2 receptor antagonists (H2-RA) and sucralfate on the histological scores of H. pylori gastritis. We then examined its in vitro effect on H. pylori-induced interleukin (IL)-8 production in MKN28 gastric epithelial cells. A total of 68 patients were divided into three groups, each group undergoing a 3-month treatment with either teprenone (150 mg/day), H2-RA (nizatidine, 300 mg/day), or sucralfate (3 g/day). All subjects underwent endoscopic examination of the stomach before and after treatment. IL-8 production in MKN28 gastric epithelial cells was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Following treatment, the teprenone group showed a significant decrease in both neutrophil infiltration and H. pylori density of the corpus (before vs. after: 2.49 +/- 0.22 vs. 2.15 +/- 0.23, p =.009; 2.36 +/- 0.25 vs. 2.00 +/- 0.24, p =.035, respectively), with no significant differences seen in either the sucralfate or H2-RA groups. Teprenone inhibited H. pylori-enhanced IL-8 production in MKN28 gastric epithelial cells in vitro, in a dose-dependent manner. Teprenone may modify corpus H. pylori-associated gastritis through its effect on neutrophil infiltration and H. pylori density, in part by its inhibition of IL-8 production in the gastric mucosa.

  11. Frequency of vacA, cagA and babA2 virulence markers in Helicobacter pylori strains isolated from Mexican patients with chronic gastritis

    PubMed Central

    Paniagua, Gloria Luz; Monroy, Eric; Rodríguez, Raymundo; Arroniz, Salvador; Rodríguez, Cristina; Cortés, José Luis; Camacho, Ausencio; Negrete, Erasmo; Vaca, Sergio

    2009-01-01

    Background Helicobacter pylori has been strongly associated with chronic gastritis, peptic and duodenal ulcers, and it is a risk factor for gastric cancer. Three major virulence factors of H. pylori have been described: the vacuolating toxin (VacA), the cytotoxin-associated gene product (CagA) and the adhesion protein BabA2. Since considerable geographic diversity in the prevalence of H. pylori virulence factors has been reported, the aim of this work was to establish the H. pylori and vacA, cagA and babA2 gene status in 238 adult patients, from a marginal urban area of Mexico, with chronic gastritis. Methods H. pylori was identified in cultures of gastric biopsies by nested PCR. vacA and cagA genes were detected by multiplex PCR, whereas babA2 gene was identified by conventional PCR. Results H. pylori-positive biopsies were 143 (60.1%). All H. pylori strains were vacA+; 39.2% were cagA+; 13.3% were cagA+ babA2+ and 8.4% were babA2+. Mexican strains examined possessed the vacA s1, m1 (43.4%), s1, m2 (24.5%), s2, m1 (20.3%) and s2, m2 (11.9%) genotypes. Conclusion These results show that the Mexican patients suffering chronic gastritis we have studied had a high incidence of infection by H. pylori. Forty four percent (63/143) of the H. pylori strains analyzed in this work may be considered as highly virulent since they possessed two or three of the virulence markers analyzed: vacA s1 cagA babA2 (9.8%, 14/143), vacA s1 babA2 (4.9%, 7/143), and vacA s1 cagA (29.4%, 42/143). However, a statistically significant correlation was not observed between vacAs1, cagA and babA2 virulence markers (χ2 test; P > 0.05). PMID:19405980

  12. Frequency of vacA, cagA and babA2 virulence markers in Helicobacter pylori strains isolated from Mexican patients with chronic gastritis.

    PubMed

    Paniagua, Gloria Luz; Monroy, Eric; Rodríguez, Raymundo; Arroniz, Salvador; Rodríguez, Cristina; Cortés, José Luis; Camacho, Ausencio; Negrete, Erasmo; Vaca, Sergio

    2009-04-30

    Helicobacter pylori has been strongly associated with chronic gastritis, peptic and duodenal ulcers, and it is a risk factor for gastric cancer. Three major virulence factors of H. pylori have been described: the vacuolating toxin (VacA), the cytotoxin-associated gene product (CagA) and the adhesion protein BabA2. Since considerable geographic diversity in the prevalence of H. pylori virulence factors has been reported, the aim of this work was to establish the H. pylori and vacA, cagA and babA2 gene status in 238 adult patients, from a marginal urban area of Mexico, with chronic gastritis. H. pylori was identified in cultures of gastric biopsies by nested PCR. vacA and cagA genes were detected by multiplex PCR, whereas babA2 gene was identified by conventional PCR. H. pylori-positive biopsies were 143 (60.1%). All H. pylori strains were vacA+; 39.2% were cagA+; 13.3% were cagA+ babA2+ and 8.4% were babA2+. Mexican strains examined possessed the vacA s1, m1 (43.4%), s1, m2 (24.5%), s2, m1 (20.3%) and s2, m2 (11.9%) genotypes. These results show that the Mexican patients suffering chronic gastritis we have studied had a high incidence of infection by H. pylori. Forty four percent (63/143) of the H. pylori strains analyzed in this work may be considered as highly virulent since they possessed two or three of the virulence markers analyzed: vacA s1 cagA babA2 (9.8%, 14/143), vacA s1 babA2 (4.9%, 7/143), and vacA s1 cagA (29.4%, 42/143). However, a statistically significant correlation was not observed between vacAs1, cagA and babA2 virulence markers (chi2 test; P > 0.05).

  13. The corpus-predominant gastritis index can be an early and reversible marker to identify the gastric cancer risk of Helicobacter pylori-infected nonulcer dyspepsia.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Hsiu-Chi; Tsai, Yu-Ching; Yang, Hsiao-Bai; Yeh, Yi-Chun; Chang, Wei-Lun; Kuo, Hsin-Yu; Lu, Cheng-Chan; Sheu, Bor-Shyang

    2017-08-01

    Corpus-predominant gastritis index (CGI) is an early histological marker to identify Helicobacter pylori-infected gastric cancer relatives at risk of cancer. This study validated whether CGI is more prevalent in H. pylori-infected nonulcer dyspepsia (NUD) subjects than in duodenal ulcer (DU) controls and whether it is reversible after H. pylori eradication or is correlated with noninvasive biomarkers. In this longitudinal cohort study, 573 H. pylori-infected subjects were enrolled, including 349 NUD and 224 DU. Gastric specimens were provided to assess CGI, spasmolyic polypeptide-expressing metaplasia (SPEM), and Operative Link on Gastric Intestinal Metaplasia assessment (OLGIM). Serum pepsinogen I and II levels were assessed using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. CGI subjected were followed up at least 1 year after H. pylori eradication. NUD subjects had higher prevalence rates of CGI (47.0% vs 29.9%, P<.001) and OLGIM stages III-IV (24.1% vs 15.2%, P=.01) than controls. CGI was highly prevalent in NUD subjects after the age of 40, which was 10 years earlier than atrophic gastritis and intestinal metaplasia. NUD subjects with CGI had higher risk of SPEM (OR 2.86, P<.001) and lower serum pepsinogen I/II ratios (P<.001) than those without CGI. Serum pepsinogen I/II ratios <9 could predict CGI modestly (AUROC 0.69, 95% CI: 0.63-0.74). CGI was regressed after eradication (P<.001). CGI was more prevalent in H. pylori-infected NUD subjects than in controls, was correlated with SPEM, and may serve as a marker earlier than OLGIM to indicate risk of gastric cancer. Moreover, CGI could be regressed after eradication. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Differences in Genome Content among Helicobacter pylori Isolates from Patients with Gastritis, Duodenal Ulcer, or Gastric Cancer Reveal Novel Disease-Associated Genes▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Romo-González, Carolina; Salama, Nina R.; Burgeño-Ferreira, Juan; Ponce-Castañeda, Veronica; Lazcano-Ponce, Eduardo; Camorlinga-Ponce, Margarita; Torres, Javier

    2009-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori establishes a chronic infection in the human stomach, causing gastritis, peptic ulcer, or gastric cancer, and more severe diseases are associated with virulence genes such as the cag pathogenicity island (PAI). The aim of this work was to study gene content differences among H. pylori strains isolated from patients with different gastroduodenal diseases in a Mexican-Mestizo patient population. H. pylori isolates from 10 patients with nonatrophic gastritis, 10 patients with duodenal ulcer, and 9 patients with gastric cancer were studied. Multiple isolates from the same patient were analyzed by randomly amplified polymorphic DNA analysis, and strains with unique patterns were tested using whole-genome microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH). We studied 42 isolates and found 1,319 genes present in all isolates, while 341 (20.5%) were variable genes. Among the variable genes, 127 (37%) were distributed within plasticity zones (PZs). The overall number of variable genes present in a given isolate was significantly lower for gastric cancer isolates. Thirty genes were significantly associated with nonatrophic gastritis, duodenal ulcer, or gastric cancer, 14 (46.6%) of which were within PZs and the cag PAI. Two genes (HP0674 and JHP0940) were absent in all gastric cancer isolates. Many of the disease-associated genes outside the PZs formed clusters, and some of these genes are regulated in response to acid or other environmental conditions. Validation of candidate genes identified by aCGH in a second patient cohort allowed the identification of novel H. pylori genes associated with gastric cancer or duodenal ulcer. These disease-associated genes may serve as biomarkers of the risk for severe gastroduodenal diseases. PMID:19237517

  15. Differences in genome content among Helicobacter pylori isolates from patients with gastritis, duodenal ulcer, or gastric cancer reveal novel disease-associated genes.

    PubMed

    Romo-González, Carolina; Salama, Nina R; Burgeño-Ferreira, Juan; Ponce-Castañeda, Veronica; Lazcano-Ponce, Eduardo; Camorlinga-Ponce, Margarita; Torres, Javier

    2009-05-01

    Helicobacter pylori establishes a chronic infection in the human stomach, causing gastritis, peptic ulcer, or gastric cancer, and more severe diseases are associated with virulence genes such as the cag pathogenicity island (PAI). The aim of this work was to study gene content differences among H. pylori strains isolated from patients with different gastroduodenal diseases in a Mexican-Mestizo patient population. H. pylori isolates from 10 patients with nonatrophic gastritis, 10 patients with duodenal ulcer, and 9 patients with gastric cancer were studied. Multiple isolates from the same patient were analyzed by randomly amplified polymorphic DNA analysis, and strains with unique patterns were tested using whole-genome microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH). We studied 42 isolates and found 1,319 genes present in all isolates, while 341 (20.5%) were variable genes. Among the variable genes, 127 (37%) were distributed within plasticity zones (PZs). The overall number of variable genes present in a given isolate was significantly lower for gastric cancer isolates. Thirty genes were significantly associated with nonatrophic gastritis, duodenal ulcer, or gastric cancer, 14 (46.6%) of which were within PZs and the cag PAI. Two genes (HP0674 and JHP0940) were absent in all gastric cancer isolates. Many of the disease-associated genes outside the PZs formed clusters, and some of these genes are regulated in response to acid or other environmental conditions. Validation of candidate genes identified by aCGH in a second patient cohort allowed the identification of novel H. pylori genes associated with gastric cancer or duodenal ulcer. These disease-associated genes may serve as biomarkers of the risk for severe gastroduodenal diseases.

  16. Evaluation of the Pattern of EPIYA Motifs in the Helicobacter pylori cagA Gene of Patients with Gastritis and Gastric Adenocarcinoma from the Brazilian Amazon Region.

    PubMed

    Vilar E Silva, Adenielson; Junior, Mario Ribeiro da Silva; Vinagre, Ruth Maria Dias Ferreira; Santos, Kemper Nunes; da Costa, Renata Aparecida Andrade; Fecury, Amanda Alves; Quaresma, Juarez Antônio Simões; Martins, Luisa Caricio

    2014-01-01

    The Helicobacter pylori is associated with the development of different diseases. The clinical outcome of infection may be associated with the cagA bacterial genotype. The aim of this study was to determine the EPIYA patterns of strains isolated from patients with gastritis and gastric adenocarcinoma and correlate these patterns with the histopathological features. Gastric biopsy samples were selected from 384 patients infected with H. pylori, including 194 with chronic gastritis and 190 with gastric adenocarcinoma. The presence of the cagA gene and the EPIYA motif was determined by PCR. The cagA gene was more prevalent in patients with gastric cancer and was associated with a higher degree of inflammation, neutrophil activity, and development of intestinal metaplasia. The number of EPIYA-C repeats showed a significant association with an increased risk of gastric carcinoma (OR = 3.79, 95% CI = 1.92-7.46, and P = 0.002). A larger number of EPIYA-C motifs were also associated with intestinal metaplasia. In the present study, infection with H. pylori strains harboring more than one EPIYA-C motif in the cagA gene was associated with the development of intestinal metaplasia and gastric adenocarcinoma but not with neutrophil activity or degree of inflammation.

  17. Evaluation of the Pattern of EPIYA Motifs in the Helicobacter pylori cagA Gene of Patients with Gastritis and Gastric Adenocarcinoma from the Brazilian Amazon Region

    PubMed Central

    Vilar e Silva, Adenielson; Junior, Mario Ribeiro da Silva; Vinagre, Ruth Maria Dias Ferreira; Santos, Kemper Nunes; da Costa, Renata Aparecida Andrade; Fecury, Amanda Alves; Quaresma, Juarez Antônio Simões; Martins, Luisa Caricio

    2014-01-01

    The Helicobacter pylori is associated with the development of different diseases. The clinical outcome of infection may be associated with the cagA bacterial genotype. The aim of this study was to determine the EPIYA patterns of strains isolated from patients with gastritis and gastric adenocarcinoma and correlate these patterns with the histopathological features. Gastric biopsy samples were selected from 384 patients infected with H. pylori, including 194 with chronic gastritis and 190 with gastric adenocarcinoma. The presence of the cagA gene and the EPIYA motif was determined by PCR. The cagA gene was more prevalent in patients with gastric cancer and was associated with a higher degree of inflammation, neutrophil activity, and development of intestinal metaplasia. The number of EPIYA-C repeats showed a significant association with an increased risk of gastric carcinoma (OR = 3.79, 95% CI = 1.92–7.46, and P = 0.002). A larger number of EPIYA-C motifs were also associated with intestinal metaplasia. In the present study, infection with H. pylori strains harboring more than one EPIYA-C motif in the cagA gene was associated with the development of intestinal metaplasia and gastric adenocarcinoma but not with neutrophil activity or degree of inflammation. PMID:26904732

  18. Diet and Helicobacter pylori infection

    PubMed Central

    Imiela, Jacek

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection has accompanied man for thousands of years. In some infected patients, a complex and dynamic pathogen-host reaction triggers pathogenic pathways resulting in development, inter alia, of atrophic gastritis, peptic ulcer disease (both gastric and duodenal), gastric adenocarcinoma, and MALT lymphoma. Large-scale eradication therapy is associated with a rapid increase in antibiotic resistance, gut flora composition disturbances, and increased risk of development, inter alia, of paediatric infectious diarrhoeas, atopic diseases, and oesophageal adenocarcinoma. Our diet contains many substances with potent antibacterial activity against H. pylori. Dietary interventions enable a decrease in H. pylori colonisation and result in a decrease in gastritis prevalence, thus potentially lowering the risk of gastric adenocarcinoma development. PMID:27713775

  19. Prevalence of the Helicobacter pylori babA2 gene and correlation with the degree of gastritis in infected Slovenian children.

    PubMed

    Homan, Matjaž; Šterbenc, Anja; Kocjan, Boštjan J; Luzar, Boštjan; Zidar, Nina; Orel, Rok; Poljak, Mario

    2014-10-01

    The aims of our study were to determine the prevalence of the babA2 gene within Helicobacter pylori strains circulating in the Slovenian pediatric population, to further clarify its significance in causing inflammation of gastric mucosa in children and to verify whether cagA, vacA, iceA and babA genes work independently or synergistically in causing gastritis. A total of 163 H. pylori isolates obtained from the same number of children were tested for the presence of cagA, vacA and iceA genes using previously established methods, while the babA2 gene was determined using novel polymerase chain reaction assay targeting a 139-bp fragment of the central region of babA2. The babA2 gene was detected in 47.9% of H. pylori samples. The presence of the babA2 gene was strongly associated with cagA, vacA s1 and vacA m1 genotype. The babA2 status correlated positively with bacterial density score, activity of inflammation and chronic inflammation of gastric mucosa. No significant correlation was found between the babA2 status and the presence of atrophy or intestinal metaplasia. In addition, the activity of gastric inflammation and density score were significantly associated with the coexpression of the cagA, vacA s1, vacA m1 and babA2 genes. The study, which included the largest number of pediatric H. pylori samples to date, confirmed that babA2 gene plays an important role in the pathogenesis of H. pylori gastritis in children. Furthermore, our results suggest that babA2, cagA and vacA s1 and m1 gene products may work synergistically in worsening the inflammation of gastric mucosa.

  20. Dietary Intervention of Artemisia and Green Tea Extracts to Rejuvenate Helicobacter pylori-Associated Chronic Atrophic Gastritis and to Prevent Tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Migyeong; Park, Jong-Min; Han, Young-Min; Kangwan, Napapan; Kwon, Sang-Oh; Kim, Bok-Nam; Kim, Won-Hee; Hahm, Ki-Baik

    2016-02-01

    As nonmicrobial dietary approach is capable of controlling Helicobacter pylori infection, we evaluated the efficacy of long-term dietary administration of Artemisia and/or green tea extracts on H. pylori-initiated, high-salt-promoted chronic atrophic gastritis and gastric tumorigenesis mouse model. Helicobacter pylori-infected and high-salt-diet-administered C57BL/6 mice were administered with Artemisia extracts (MP group) and/or green tea extracts (GT group) for 36 weeks in addition to the control group (ES group, gastroprotective drug, ecabet sodium 30 mg/kg, diet pellet). Gross and pathological gastric lesions were evaluated after 24 and 36 weeks, respectively, and their underlying molecular changes were measured in gastric homogenates. Detailed mechanisms were further evaluated in in vitro cell models. The erythematous and nodular changes and mucosal ulcerative and erosive lesions were noted in the control group at 24 weeks. MP, GT, MPGT, and ES groups all showed significantly ameliorated pathologic lesion compared to the control group (p < .05). After the 36 weeks, scattered nodular masses with some central ulcers and thin gastric surface were noted in the control stomach, whereas no tumorous lesion and milder atrophic changes were observed in all MP, GT, and MPGT groups except ES group (p < .05). On molecular analysis, increased expressions of COX-2, TNF-α, IL-6, lipid peroxide, and activated STAT3 relevant to H. pylori infection were significantly decreased with MPGT administration (p < .01), whereas HSP70 was significantly increased. PGDH expressions, core tumor suppressor involved in carcinogenesis, were significantly decreased with H. pylori infection (p < .05), but significantly increased in MPGT group (p < .05). Increased mucosal apoptotic index noted in the control group was significantly decreased with MP and/or GT along with significantly preserved gastric gastroprotective mediators (p < .01) such as mucins, HSP27, and HSP70. H. pylori-induced serum

  1. BH3-only protein Bim is associated with the degree of Helicobacter pylori-induced gastritis and is localized to the mitochondria of inflammatory cells in the gastric mucosa.

    PubMed

    Akazawa, Yuko; Matsuda, Katsuya; Isomoto, Hajime; Matsushima, Kayoko; Kido, Yoko; Urabe, Shigetoshi; Yamaghchi, Naoyuki; Ohnita, Ken; Takeshima, Fuminao; Kondo, Hisayoshi; Tsugawa, Hitoshi; Suzuki, Hidekazu; Moss, Joel; Nakao, Kazuhiko; Nakashima, Masahiro

    2015-09-01

    BH3-only protein, Bim, is a pro-apoptotic protein that mediates mitochondria-dependent cell death. However, the role of Bim in Helicobacter pylori-associated gastritis remains unclear. This study aimed to assess the cellular localization of Bim and its possible role in H. pylori-induced gastritis. The study was conducted on biopsy specimens obtained from 80 patients who underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy (H. pylori-negative: n=30, positive: n=50). Association between Bim mRNA expression and severity of gastritis was evaluated and the localization of Bim was examined by immunofluorescence. Bim mRNA expression was positively correlated with the degree of gastritis, as defined by the Sydney system. Immunohistochemical analysis confirmed increased Bim expression in H. pylori-infected gastric mucosa compared with uninfected mucosa in both humans and mice. Bim localized in myeloperoxidase- and CD138-positive cells of H. pylori-infected lamina propria and submucosa of the gastric tract, indicating that this protein is predominantly expressed in neutrophils and plasma cells. In contrast, Bim did not localize in CD20-, CD3-, or CD68-positive cells. Bim was expressed in the mitochondria, where it was partially co-localized with activated Bax and cleaved-PARP. In conclusion, Bim is expressed in neutrophils and plasma cells in H. pylori-associated gastritis, where it may participate in the termination of inflammatory response by causing mitochondria-mediated apoptosis in specific leucocytes.

  2. BH3-only protein Bim is associated with the degree of Helicobacter pylori-induced gastritis and is localized to the mitochondria of inflammatory cells in the gastric mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Akazawa, Yuko; Matsuda, Katsuya; Isomoto, Hajime; Matsushima, Kayoko; Kido, Yoko; Urabe, Shigetoshi; Yamaghchi, Naoyuki; Ohnita, Ken; Takeshima, Fuminao; Kondo, Hisayoshi; Tsugawa, Hitoshi; Suzuki, Hidekazu; Moss, Joel; Nakao, Kazuhiko; Nakashima, Masahiro

    2015-01-01

    BH3-only protein, Bim, is a pro-apoptotic protein that mediates mitochondria-dependent cell death. However, the role of Bim in Helicobacter pylori-associated gastritis remains unclear. This study aimed to assess the cellular localization of Bim and its possible role in H. pylori-induced gastritis. The study was conducted on biopsy specimens obtained from 80 patients who underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy (H. pylori-negative: n = 30, positive: n = 50). Association between Bim mRNA expression and severity of gastritis was evaluated and the localization of Bim was examined by immunofluorescence. Bim mRNA expression was positively correlated with the degree of gastritis, as defined by the Sydney system. Immunohistochemical analysis confirmed increased Bim expression in H. pylori-infected gastric mucosa compared with uninfected mucosa in both humans and mice. Bim localized in myeloperoxidase- and CD138-positive cells of H. pylori-infected lamina propria and submucosa of the gastric tract, indicating that this protein is predominantly expressed in neutrophils and plasma cells. In contrast, Bim did not localize in CD20-, CD3-, or CD68-positive cells. Bim was expressed in the mitochondria, where it partially co-localized with activated Bax and cleaved-PARP. In conclusion, Bim is expressed in neutrophils and plasma cells in H. pylori-associated gastritis, where it may participate in the termination of inflammatory response by causing mitochondria-mediated apoptosis in specific leucocytes. PMID:26197709

  3. Safety and efficacy of rabeprazole in combination with four antibiotic regimens for the eradication of Helicobacter pylori in patients with chronic gastritis with or without peptic ulceration.

    PubMed

    Stack, W A; Knifton, A; Thirlwell, D; Cockayne, A; Jenkins, D; Hawkey, C J; Atherton, J C

    1998-10-01

    Rabeprazole is a new fast acting proton pump inhibitor that has recently been proven to be effective in the treatment of peptic ulceration and reflux esophagitis. The aim of this study was to evaluate rabeprazole in combination with antibiotics for the eradication of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) in patients with chronic active gastritis with or without peptic ulcer disease. Seventy-five H. pylori-infected patients were randomized in a double-blind fashion to receive a 7-day treatment regimen consisting of: RAC, RAM, RCM, or RC (R=rabeprazole 20 mg b.d., A=amoxycillin 1 g b.d., C=clarithromycin 500 mg b.d., M=metronidazole 400 mg b.d.). Randomized patients were H. pylori-positive by gastric biopsy urease test, histology and 13C urea breath test (13C-UBT). H. pylori eradication was assessed by 13C-UBT, 4 and 8 wk after finishing treatment. Endoscopy with histology and culture for antibiotic sensitivity testing was performed pretreatment and if treatment failed. On an intention-to-treat analysis, treatment success was: RCM 100%, RAC 95%, RAM 90%, and RC 63%. The most common side effects were loose stools, headache, and taste disturbance, but there were no serious adverse events related to the study medication. The two patients failing RAM treatment had metronidazole-resistant strains before and after treatment. None of the pretreatment H. pylori isolates from six patients failing RC were clarithromycin resistant, but three of five successfully cultured posttreatment had developed clarithromycin resistance. Rabeprazole-based triple therapy with two antibiotics for 1 wk is safe and effective in eradicating H. pylori. Dual therapy with clarithromycin is less successful, and the majority of treatment failures develop clarithromycin resistance.

  4. [Jinghuaweikang gelatin pearls plus proton pump inhibitor-based triple regimen in the treatment of chronic atrophic gastritis with Helicobacter pylori infection: a multicenter, randomized, controlled clinical study].

    PubMed

    Wang, Ting-ting; Zhang, Yue-miao; Zhang, Xue-zhi; Cheng, Hong; Hu, Fu-lian; Han, Hai-xiao; Chen, Xiao-wei; Li, Jun-xiang; Lai, Yao-liang; Liu, Yong

    2013-11-26

    To observe the efficacy of Jinghuaweikang gelatin pearls plus proton pump inhibitor (PPI)-based triple regimen in the treatment of chronic atrophic gastritis (CAG) patients with Helicobacter pylori (H.pylori) infection. For this multicenter, randomized, controlled clinical study, 90 patients of endoscopically confirmed CAG with positive H.pylori ((13)C or (14)C-urea breath test (UBT) or rapid urease test) were enrolled. There were 46 males and 44 females with an age range of (54 ± 10) years. None of them had H.pylori eradication background. They were randomly divided into 2 groups, Group LACJ (n = 45) received lansoprazole 30 mg+amoxicillin 1000 mg+clarithromycin 500 mg + jinghuaweikang gelatin pearls 240 mg, twice daily, for 10 days (d1-10) plus another 14 days (d11-24) only with jinghuaweikang gelatin pearls 240 mg, twice daily. Group LACB (n = 45) had standard quadruple regimen treatment: lansoprazole 30 mg+amoxicillin 1000 mg+clarithromycin 500 mg+bismuth potassium citrate 220 mg, twice daily for 10 days (d1-10). The status of H.pylori was detected by (13)C-UBT at least 28 days after therapy. The eradication rates in Groups LACJ and LACB were as follows: per-protocol (PP): 70.5% (31/44) and 83.3% (35/42), intention-to-treat (ITT): 68.9% (31/45) and 77.8% (35/45) (both P > 0.05). The symptomatic improvements of bloating in upper abdomen, belching and epigastric pain after treatment in both groups. And those in Group LACJ was higher than those of Group LACB, but no statistical difference existed between two groups (all P > 0.05). The efficacy of LACJ for the treatment of CAG patients with H.pylori infection is similar to LACB. And the symptomatic improvement of patients is better than LACB.

  5. Down-regulated Th17 Responses Are Associated with Reduced Gastritis in Helicobacter pylori-infected Children

    PubMed Central

    Bimczok, Diane; Shaffer, Carrie L.; Cover, Timothy L.; Venegas, Alejandro; Salazar, Maria G.; Smythies, Lesley E.; Harris, Paul R.; Smith, Phillip D.

    2013-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori induces less gastric inflammation in children than adults. Here we investigated whether this reduced inflammation involves dysregulated Th17 responses. H. pylori-infected children and adults in Santiago, Chile had similar levels of H. pylori colonization, proportions of bacteria containing cagA and s1/s2 vacA markers of virulence and strain genotypes (predominantly hpEurope), but the children had significantly reduced levels of gastric inflammation and neutrophil infiltration. The reduced neutrophil accumulation in infected children was accompanied by significantly fewer gastric Th17 cells and significantly lower levels of IL-17-specific mRNA and protein compared to infected adults. The gastric mucosa of H. pylori-infected children also contained higher numbers of IL-10+ cells and increased levels of both IL-10 and Foxp3 mRNA compared to that of infected adults. Thus, reduced gastric inflammation, including diminished neutrophil accumulation, in H. pylori-infected children compared with infected adults is likely due to down-regulated gastric Th17/IL-17 responses as a consequence of enhanced mucosal regulatory T cell activity in the children. PMID:23299619

  6. Helicobacter Pylori Infections

    MedlinePlus

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a type of bacteria that causes infection in the stomach. It is found in about two-thirds of ... or stool to see if it contains H. pylori. The best treatment is a combination of antibiotics ...

  7. Study of the oipA genetic diversity and EPIYA motif patterns in cagA-positive Helicobacter pylori strains from Venezuelan patients with chronic gastritis.

    PubMed

    Torres, Keila; Valderrama, Elvis; Sayegh, Marjorie; Ramírez, José Luis; Chiurillo, Miguel Angel

    2014-11-01

    CagA and OipA are involved, among other virulence factors, in the ability of Helicobacter pylori to colonize the gastric mucosa and to modulate the host environment during the establishment of chronic infection. The number and type of EPIYA phosphorylation motifs and the presence and functional status of oipA have been involved in the induction of cellular transformations playing an important role in the development of H. pylori associated gastric diseases. This work determined the prevalence of the oipA virulence factor and EPIYA motif patterns in cagA-positive H. pylori gastric biopsies from chronic gastritis patients from the Central-Western region of Venezuela. DNA was extracted directly from gastric biopsies collected by upper endoscopy from 113 patients. The EPIYA motif genotyping and oipA gene functional status was determined by PCR and sequencing. Phylogenetic analysis with the 3' variable region of cagA sequences was performed. Only Western-type EPIYA variants were detected: ABC (68.14%), ABCC (29.20%) and ABCCC (2.66%). High prevalence of strains with the oipA gene (93.8%) and its functional status "ON" (83%) was observed. No significant association between EPIYA motif patterns or oipA functional status with the histological changes in the gastric mucosa was found. Our study demonstrated the absolute predominance of the Western-type cagA gene in a Venezuelan admixed population. This is the first report showing oipA status of H. pylori strains in Venezuela. Further studies with a larger number of samples and including other pathologies are necessary to continue evaluating the role of the H. pylori virulence factors in the prevalence of gastric diseases in our country. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Detection of serum antibodies to CagA and VacA and of serum neutralizing activity for vacuolating cytotoxin in patients with Helicobacter pylori-induced gastritis.

    PubMed Central

    Donati, M; Moreno, S; Storni, E; Tucci, A; Poli, L; Mazzoni, C; Varoli, O; Sambri, V; Farencena, A; Cevenini, R

    1997-01-01

    Thirty patients with dyspepsia, with histological diagnosis of gastritis, and with endoscopic diagnosis of peptic ulcer disease (PUD) (n = 13) or nonulcer dyspepsia (NUD) (n = 17) were admitted to the study. Helicobacter pylori vacuolating cytotoxin-producing strains (Tox+) were isolated from 14 (46.7%) patients, whereas non-cytotoxin-producing (Tox-) H. pylori strains were isolated from the remaining patients. Of 30 patients studied, 20 (66.7%) had serum cytotoxin neutralizing activity in vitro. Fourteen patients with Tox+ H. pylori strains showed serum cytotoxin neutralizing activity and serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgA antibodies reactive with both 87-kDa H. pylori vacuolating cytotoxin (VacA) and 128-kDa cytotoxin-associated gene product (CagA) by immunoblotting using native enriched preparations of VacA and CagA proteins from H. pylori culture supernatants as the antigens. A 94-kDa antigen cross-reacting with the 87-kDa VacA protein could be demonstrated in culture supernatant with immune sera from humans and animals. All patients (n = 10) lacking serum neutralizing activity were also negative for IgG or IgA against VacA antigen, whereas 6 of the 10 patients showed IgG serum antibody responses against CagA antigen. The prevalence of antibodies to VacA and CagA antigens was significantly (P < 0.001) higher in patients with gastritis (20 and 26 patients for VacA and CagA, respectively, of 30 patients) than in H. pylori culture-negative controls (0 of 27 for both VacA and CagA) and in randomly selected blood donors (17 and 21 for VacA and CagA, respectively, of 120 subjects). All patients with PUD had antibodies to CagA, whereas 13 of 17 (76.5%) patients with NUD had anti-CagA antibodies. Serum IgG antibodies to VacA were present in 9 (69.2%) patients with PUD of 13 patients and in 11 (64.7%) patients with NUD of 17 patients. Anti-CagA antibodies seemed to correlate better with PUD than anti-VacA antibodies. PMID:9220168

  9. Characteristics and Risk Factors of Helicobacter pylori Associated Gastritis: A Prospective Cross-Sectional Study in Northeast Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Tongtawee, Taweesak; Kaewpitoon, Soraya; Kaewpitoon, Natthawut; Dechsukhum, Chavaboon; Leeanansaksiri, Wilairat; Loyd, Ryan A.; Matrakool, Likit; Panpimanmas, Sukij

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aim. Risk factors for Helicobacter pylori infection are genetic susceptibility and poor living conditions. This study aimed to investigate the Mdm2 gene, clarithromycin resistance, and possible risk factors for Helicobacter pylori infection. Methods. Risk factors and clinical characteristics were analyzed, including patient demographic data, patient income, personal history, possible source of transmission, patient symptoms, endoscopic findings, patterns of clarithromycin resistance, and patterns of Mdm2 SNIP309. Results. Ingestion of pickled fish (OR = 11.27, 95% CI = 4.31–29.45, p < 0.0001), salt crab (OR = 8.83, 95% CI = 1.99–39.14, p < 0.001), and Papaya salad (OR = 8.73, 95% CI = 4.54–16.79, p < 0.01). The prevalence of clarithromycin resistance was 56% (wild type, A2143/2142A, is 23.8%; mutation, A2143/2142CG, is 35.7%; wild type + mutation is 40.5%). The genetic polymorphisms of Mdm2 SNIP309 were SNIP309 T/T homozygous in 78%, SNIP309 G/T heterozygous in 19%, and SNIP309 G/G homozygous in 3%. Conclusion. Pickled fish, salt crab, and Papaya salad are positive risk factors. There was high prevalence of clarithromycin resistance. The Mdm2 SNIP309 G/G homozygous genotype might be a risk factor for gastric cancer and the fact that it is infrequent in Thailand. PMID:27042174

  10. Helicobacter pylori infection in Finland.

    PubMed

    Rautelin, Hilpi; Kosunen, Timo U

    2004-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori causes chronic gastritis worldwide and it is the most important single factor in peptic ulcer disease. Up to half of H. pylori infected individuals develop atrophic gastritis over years and decades. H. pylori infection has also been classified as a class I carcinogen in human gastric cancer. Most infections are obtained in childhood, in Finland mainly before the age of 7 years but the exact transmission routes are not known. The infection shows an age-dependent pattern, the infection being rare among children but gradually becoming more prevalent among older age groups. As new infections are few in adults and the infection only rarely disappears without effective anti-microbial therapy, the occurrence of the infection in the old actually reflects the prevalence of the infection in their childhood. In developed countries, such as Finland, a rapid decline of H. pylori prevalence rate has been demonstrated. In order to speed up this natural decline of the infection, a unique population based 'screen and treat' project was started in Vammala, a semiurban south-western community in Finland. In this survey, young inhabitants were offered diagnosis and treatment for H. pylori.

  11. Effectiveness of Citrus Fruits on Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    It is known that Helicobacter pylori infection is associated with chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer, and gastric carcinoma. Due to the increased side effects of the treatment regimens and the development of antimicrobial resistance, a number of natural compounds have been tested as potential alternatives. In this review, we will examine the current knowledge on the effect of Citrus fruits and their derivatives against H. pylori, highlighting the remaining outstanding questions on the development of novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:28408943

  12. Helicobacter pylori infection: old and new.

    PubMed

    Diaconu, S; Predescu, A; Moldoveanu, A; Pop, C S; Fierbințeanu-Braticevici, C

    2017-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a spiral-shaped bacterium that grows in the digestive tract and may be present in more than half of the world's population. The clinical features of Helicobacter pylori range from asymptomatic gastritis to gastrointestinal malignancy. Mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma is a low-grade B-cell marginal zone lymphoma and Helicobacter pylori has been detected in more than 75% of the patients with MALT lymphoma. Many tests for the detection of Helicobacter pylori are available, including antibody tests, urea breath tests, stool antigen tests and endoscopic biopsies. The eradication of Helicobacter pylori usually prevents the return of ulcers and ulcer complications even after appropriate medications such as PPIs are stopped. The eradication of Helicobacter pylori is important in the treatment of the rare condition of the stomach known as MALT lymphoma. The treatment of Helicobacter pylori to prevent stomach cancer is controversial. Confirmation of eradication is recommended in associated ulcers, persistent dyspepsia despite a test-and-treat approach, MALT lymphoma, and previous treatment for early-stage gastric cancer. The urea breath test and stool antigen test can be used to confirm the eradication and should be performed at least 4 weeks after the completion of therapy. Several diseases have been reported to be associated with Helicobacter pylori infection, including hematologic diseases, such as ITP, idiopathic iron deficiency anemia and vitamin B12 deficiency. There is a positive trend in the association between Helicobacter pylori infection and neurodegenerative disorders and new data showed a reduced risk of death due to stroke and lung cancer but an increased risk of preeclampsia in infected women, which requires further investigations.

  13. Helicobacter pylori infection: old and new

    PubMed Central

    Diaconu, S; Predescu, A; Moldoveanu, A; Pop, CS; Fierbințeanu-Braticevici, C

    2017-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a spiral-shaped bacterium that grows in the digestive tract and may be present in more than half of the world’s population. The clinical features of Helicobacter pylori range from asymptomatic gastritis to gastrointestinal malignancy. Mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma is a low-grade B-cell marginal zone lymphoma and Helicobacter pylori has been detected in more than 75% of the patients with MALT lymphoma. Many tests for the detection of Helicobacter pylori are available, including antibody tests, urea breath tests, stool antigen tests and endoscopic biopsies. The eradication of Helicobacter pylori usually prevents the return of ulcers and ulcer complications even after appropriate medications such as PPIs are stopped. The eradication of Helicobacter pylori is important in the treatment of the rare condition of the stomach known as MALT lymphoma. The treatment of Helicobacter pylori to prevent stomach cancer is controversial. Confirmation of eradication is recommended in associated ulcers, persistent dyspepsia despite a test-and-treat approach, MALT lymphoma, and previous treatment for early-stage gastric cancer. The urea breath test and stool antigen test can be used to confirm the eradication and should be performed at least 4 weeks after the completion of therapy. Several diseases have been reported to be associated with Helicobacter pylori infection, including hematologic diseases, such as ITP, idiopathic iron deficiency anemia and vitamin B12 deficiency. There is a positive trend in the association between Helicobacter pylori infection and neurodegenerative disorders and new data showed a reduced risk of death due to stroke and lung cancer but an increased risk of preeclampsia in infected women, which requires further investigations. PMID:28616085

  14. [Helicobacter pylori and Arteriosclerosis].

    PubMed

    Matsui, Teruaki

    2011-03-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection-related diseases are known to include gastritis, gastric and duodenal ulcer, gastric cancer, gastric MALT lymphoma, idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, iron-deficient anemia, urticaria, reflux esophagitis, and some lifestyle-related diseases. It is indicated that homocysteine involved with arteriosclerosis induces lifestyle-related diseases. Homocysteine is decomposed to methionine and cysteine (useful substances) in the liver, through the involvement of vitamin B₁₂ (VB₁₂) and folic acid. However, deficiency of VB₁₂ and folic acid induces an increase in unmetabolized homocysteine stimulating active oxygen and promoting arteriosclerosis. VB₁₂ and folic acid are activated by the intrinsic factors of gastric parietal cells and gastric acid. The question of whether homocysteine, as a trigger of arteriosclerosis, was influenced by H. pylori infection was investigated. H. pylori infection induces atrophy of the gastric mucosa, and the function of parietal cells decreases with the atrophy to inactivate its intrinsic factor. The inactivation of the intrinsic factor causes a deficiency of VB₁₂ and folic acid to increase homocysteine's chances of triggering arteriosclerosis. The significance and usefulness of H. pylori eradication therapy was evaluated for its ability to prevent arteriosclerosis that induces lifestyle-related diseases. Persons with positive and negative results of H. pylori infection were divided into a group of those aged 65 years or more (early and late elderly) and a group of those under 65 years of age, and assessed for gastric juice. For twenty-five persons from each group who underwent gastrointestinal endoscopy, the degree of atrophy of the gastric mucosa was observed. Blood homocysteine was measured as a novel index of arteriosclerosis, as well as VB₁₂ and folic acid that affect the metabolism of homocysteine, and then activated by gastric acid and intrinsic factors. Their

  15. Helicobacter pylori in gastric carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Hyo Jun; Lee, Dong Soo

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer still is a major concern as the third most common cancer worldwide, despite declining rates of incidence in many Western countries. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is the major cause of gastric carcinogenesis, and its infection insults gastric mucosa leading to the occurrence of atrophic gastritis which progress to intestinal metaplasia, dysplasia, early gastric cancer, and advanced gastric cancer consequently. This review focuses on multiple factors including microbial virulence factors, host genetic factors, and environmental factors, which can heighten the chance of occurrence of gastric adenocarcinoma due to H. pylori infection. Bacterial virulence factors are key components in controlling the immune response associated with the induction of carcinogenesis, and cagA and vacA are the most well-known pathogenic factors. Host genetic polymorphisms contribute to regulating the inflammatory response to H. pylori and will become increasingly important with advancing techniques. Environmental factors such as high salt and smoking may also play a role in gastric carcinogenesis. It is important to understand the virulence factors, host genetic factors, and environmental factors interacting in the multistep process of gastric carcinogenesis. To conclude, prevention via H. pylori eradication and controlling environmental factors such as diet, smoking, and alcohol is an important strategy to avoid H. pylori-associated gastric carcinogenesis. PMID:26690981

  16. Helicobacter pylori and autoimmune diseases

    PubMed Central

    Hasni, S; Ippolito, A; Illei, GG

    2013-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a widely prevalent microbe, with between 50 and 80% of the population infected worldwide. Clinically, infection with H. pylori is commonly associated with peptic ulcer disease, but many of those infected remain asymptomatic. H. pylori has evolved a number of means to affect the host immune response and has been implicated in many diseases mitigated by immune dysregulation, such as immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP), atrophic gastritis, and mucosa associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma. Autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, and Sjogren’s syndrome, are the result of a dysregulated host immune system which targets otherwise healthy tissues. The exact etiology of autoimmune diseases is unclear, but it has long been suggested that exposure to certain environmental agents, such as viral and bacterial infection or chemical exposures, in genetically susceptible individuals may be the catalyst for the initiation of autoimmune processes. Because of its prevalence and ability to affect human immune function, many researchers have hypothesized that H. pylori might contribute to the development of autoimmune diseases. In this article, we review the available literature regarding the role of chronic H. pylori infection in various autoimmune disease states. PMID:21902767

  17. Pathogenic diversity of Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Mégraud, F

    1997-04-01

    Helicobacter pylori has been shown to possess a very heterogeneous genoma despite its common phenotypic properties. Some characteristics relevant to pathogenesis have also been found to be heterogeneous. This is the case for adherence properties and the amount of urease produced, but it was not possible to relate these properties to disease entities. A vacuolating cytotoxin which alters epithelial cells has been found in about 60% of strains isolated from patients with ulcers versus 30% from those with gastritis only. The cagA gene can be used as a marker to detect the cag pathogenicity island. This DNA fragment seems to induce an increased inflammation in the gastric tissue via release of interleukin 8 by the epithelial cells. The association of this marker is strongly linked with ulcers compared with gastritis only (80% vs 55%, respectively). A number of other properties may be heterogeneous, but the low number of strains studied does not allow conclusions to be drawn.

  18. [Celiac disease associated with Helicobacter pylori infection].

    PubMed

    Cârdei, E; Moraru, D; Trandafir, Laura; Bozomitu, Laura; Mihăilă, Doina

    2003-01-01

    Celiac disease, also known as gluten-sensitive enteropathy, is an autoimmune enteropathy caused by the ingestion of gluten-containing grains in susceptible subjects. The authors present a 3 years and 5 months old girl diagnosed with celiac disease at 1 year and 5 months old. Initially, the evolution after gluten-free diet was favorable. After 2 years the child presented abdominal pain and anorexia. The IgA antigliadin antibodies had normal values. The gastric biopsy found Helicobacter pylori gastritis. After treatment for Helicobacter pylori eradication the symptoms disappeared.

  19. Helicobacter pylori infection in children.

    PubMed

    Kalach, Nicolas; Bontems, Patrick; Raymond, Josette

    2017-09-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection in children differs from that in adults, from the point of view of epidemiology, host response, clinical features, related diseases, and diagnosis, as well as treatment strategies. The prevalence of H. pylori infection, in both children and adults, is decreasing in the Western World as well as in some developing countries, which contrasts with the increase in childhood asthma and allergic diseases. Recurrent abdominal pain is not specific during H. pylori infection in children. The role of H. pylori infection and failure to thrive, children's growth, type I diabetes mellitus (T1DM) and celiac disease remains controversial. The main initial diagnosis is based on upper digestive endoscopy with biopsy-based methods. Nodular gastritis may be a pathognomonic endoscopic finding of childhood H. pylori infection. The infection eradication control is based on validated noninvasive tests. The main cause of treatment failure of H. pylori infection is its clarithromycin resistance. We recommend standard antibiotic susceptibility testing of H. pylori in pediatric patients prior to the initiation of eradication therapy. H. pylori treatment in children should be based on an evaluation of the rate of eradication in the local population, a systematic use of a treatment adapted to the susceptibility profile and a treatment compliance greater than 90%. The last meta-analysis in children did not show an advantage for sequential therapy when compared to a 14-day triple therapy. Finally, the high rate of antibiotic resistance responsible for therapy failure in recent years justifies the necessity of a novel vaccine to prevent H. pylori infection in children. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Effects of sulglycotide on inflammation and epithelial cell turnover in active Helicobacter pylori+ chronic gastritis. A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Bazuro, G E; Dezi, A; Pallotta, L; Masci, P; Teodori, L; Trinca, M L; Koch, M; Capurso, L

    1996-01-01

    The effects of Sulglycotide were evaluated in a pilot study of active H. pylori+ atrophic gastritis. Ten informed patients (mean age 51 +/- 13 years) entered a double-blind study. Five received Sulglycotide 400 mg three times a day for one year, the other 5, placebo. At 0, 30, 90, 270, and 360 days of treatment, patients underwent endoscopic examinations with multiple biopsies. Morphometric studies (number of inflammatory cells and percent gland volume), morphologic studies (according to the Sydney system), and flow cytofluorimetry were performed in all cases. Compared to findings in the placebo group, patients treated with Sulglycotide showed a reduced number of inflammatory cells and an increase in gland volume 120 days after treatment. While the difference was not statistically significant, the trend was confirmed by the morphologic patterns. Flow cytofluorimetry revealed an increase in the percentage of cells in the G2 phase (full maturation) and a parallel drop in the S phase (premitotic synthesis) in the Sulglycotide group only in the first three months. These data would appear to indicate an acceleration of gastric epithelial cell maturation and a decrease in the inflammatory infiltrate under the effect of Sulglycotide.

  1. K‐ras mutations and cell kinetics in Helicobacter pylori associated gastric intestinal metaplasia: a comparison before and after eradication in patients with chronic gastritis and gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Watari, J; Tanaka, A; Tanabe, H; Sato, R; Moriichi, K; Zaky, A; Okamoto, K; Maemoto, A; Fujiya, M; Ashida, T; Das, K M; Kohgo, Y

    2007-01-01

    Background Helicobacter pylori related gastric intestinal metaplasia (IM) is considered to be a precancerous lesion. Aims To identify the effects of H pylori eradication on K‐ras mutations, cell kinetics in IM and histological changes in patients with and without gastric cancers in a one‐year prospective study. Methods Patients included group A (n = 39), chronic gastritis, and group B (n = 53), intestinal‐type early gastric cancer patients who had all undergone endoscopic mucosal resection (n = 25) or surgical resection (n = 28). K‐ras codon 12 mutations in IM were examined, followed by DNA sequencing analysis. Proliferating and apoptotic cells were detected with anti‐Ki‐67 antibody and using the TUNEL method, respectively. Results The incidence of K‐ras mutations in the cancer was only 3.8%. The mutant K‐ras in IM was observed more frequently in group A (46.2%) than in group B patients (1.9%) (p<0.005). After eradication, the K‐ras mutations significantly declined to 12.8% in group A (p<0.005). The mutation pattern of K‐ras codon 12 before eradication was that GGT was mainly changed to AGT (50%) in group A. AGT transformation was not affected by treatment. Apoptosis in IM showed an increase after H pylori eradication in both groups (p<0.05 in group A) although no histological improvement in IM was observed. The monocyte score was significantly higher in group A than in group B (p<0.05); the score improved significantly after eradication. Conclusions K‐ras mutations in IM do not always play a role in gastric carcinogenesis but cell kinetics, especially apoptosis, in IM may contribute to it. There are early events in K‐ras mutations which are influenced by H pylori infection; some mutations may also be selected by eradication. These unstable K‐ras mutations in IM may be related to lymphocyte infiltration caused by H pylori infection. PMID:16997920

  2. Epidemiology of Helicobacter pylori infection.

    PubMed

    Leja, Mārcis; Axon, Anthony; Brenner, Hermann

    2016-09-01

    This review of recent publications related to the epidemiology of Helicobacter pylori highlights the origin of the infection, its changing prevalence, transmission, and outcome. A number of studies have addressed the ancestor roots of the bacteria, and the first genomewide analysis of bacterial strains suggests that its coexistence with humans is more ancient than previously thought. As opposed to the generally declining prevalence of H. pylori (including China and Japan), in Sweden, the prevalence of atrophic gastritis in the young population has risen. The prevalence of the infection remains high in the indigenous populations of the Arctic regions, and reinfection rates are high. A high prevalence is permanently found in the Siberian regions of Russia as well. Several studies, some of which used multiplex serology, addressed prevalence of and risks associated with various H. pylori serotypes, thereby enabling more precise risk assessment. Transmission of H. pylori was discussed, specifically fecal-oral transmission and the use of well-water and other unpurified water. Finally, the long-term course of H. pylori infection was considered, with an estimated 89% of noncardia gastric cancer cases being attributable to the infection.

  3. Gastric and enterohepatic non-Helicobacter pylori Helicobacters.

    PubMed

    Flahou, Bram; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Smet, Annemieke; Yonezawa, Hideo; Osaki, Takako; Kamiya, Shigeru

    2013-09-01

    A substantial number of reports published in the last year have contributed to a better understanding of both human and animal infection with non-Helicobacter pylori Helicobacter species (NHPH). Gastric infection of humans with Helicobacter suis and Helicobacter felis as well as unidentified NHPH has been described to cause a chronic gastritis and a variety of clinical symptoms, whereas enterohepatic NHPH, including Helicobacter cinaedi, Helicobacter bilis, and Helicobacter canis, have been reported to be associated with human diseases such as bacteremia, cellulitis, cutaneous diseases, and fever of unknown origin in immunocompromised hosts. In various animal species, including dogs and laboratory mice, high rates of infection with NHPH were described. For gastric NHPH, mainly H. suis and H. felis infection was studied, revealing that differences in the immune response evoked in the host do exist when compared to Helicobacter pylori. Pathogenic mechanisms of infection with Helicobacter pullorum, H. bilis, and Helicobacter hepaticus were investigated, as well as immune responses involved in H. bilis-, Helicobacter typhlonius-, and H. hepaticus-induced intestinal inflammation. Complete genome sequences of Helicobacter heilmannii strain ASB1 and a H. cinaedi strain isolated in a case of human bacteremia were published, as well as comparative genomics of a human-derived Helicobacter bizzozeronii strain and proteome or secretome analyses for H. hepaticus and Helicobacter trogontum, respectively. Molecular analysis has revealed a function for type VI secretion systems of H. hepaticus and H. pullorum, the Helicobacter mustelae iron urease, and several other functional components of NHPH. In each section of this chapter, new findings on gastric NHPH will first be discussed, followed by those on enterohepatic Helicobacter species.

  4. Fuentes de variabilidad en el diagnóstico de gastritis atrófica multifocal asociada con la infección por Helicobacter pylori1

    PubMed Central

    Bravo, Luis Eduardo; Bravo, Juan Carlos; Realpe, José Luis; Zarama, Guillermo; Piazuelo, MarÍa Blanca; Correa, Pelayo

    2014-01-01

    RESUMEN Introducción El mapeo de las diferentes regiones del estómago y el número de fragmentos de mucosa gástrica disponibles para evaluación histopatológica son fuentes importantes de variación en el momento de clasificar y hacer la gradación de la gastritis crónica. Objetivos Estimar la sensibilidad del número de fragmentos de mucosa gástrica necesarios para establecer los diagnósticos de gastritis atrófica con metaplasia intestinal (MI), displasia y estado de infección por Helicobacter pylori. Además evaluar la variabilidad intra-observador en la clasificación de estas lesiones precursoras del cáncer gástrico. Materiales y métodos En una cohorte de 6 años de seguimiento se evaluaron 1,958 procedimientos de endoscopia realizados por dos gastroenterólogos. En cada procedimiento y de cada participante se obtuvieron 5 biopsias de mucosa gástrica que representaban antro, incisura angularis y cuerpo. Un único patólogo hizo la interpretación histológica de las 5 biopsias y proporcionó un diagnóstico definitivo global que se utilizó como patrón de referencia. Cada fragmento de mucosa gástrica examinado condujo a un diagnóstico individual para cada biopsia que se comparó con el patrón de referencia. La variabilidad intra-observador se evaluó en 127 personas que corresponden a una muestra aleatoria de 20% del total de endoscopias hechas a los 72 meses de seguimiento. Resultados La sensibilidad del diagnóstico de MI y displasia gástrica aumentó de manera significativa con el número de fragmentos de mucosa gástrica evaluados El sitio anatómico de mayor sensibilidad para el diagnóstico de MI y displasia fue la incisura angularis. Para descubrir H. pylori se logró alta sensibilidad con el estudio de un solo fragmento de mucosa gástrica (95.9%) y fue independiente del sitio de obtención de la biopsia. El acuerdo intra-observador para el diagnóstico de gastritis crónica fue 86.1% con valor kappa de 0.79 IC 95% (0.76-0.85). Las

  5. High frequency of helicobacter negative gastritis in patients with Crohn's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Halme, L; Kärkkäinen, P; Rautelin, H; Kosunen, T U; Sipponen, P

    1996-01-01

    The frequency of gastric Crohn's disease has been considered low. This study was undertaken to determine the prevalence of chronic gastritis and Helicobacter pylori infection in patients with Crohn's disease. Oesophagogastroduodenoscopy was performed on 62 consecutive patients suffering from ileocolonic Crohn's disease. Biopsy specimens from the antrum and corpus were processed for both histological and bacteriological examinations. H pylori antibodies of IgG and IgA classes were measured in serum samples by enzyme immunoassay. Six patients (9.7%) were infected with H pylori, as shown by histology, and in five of them the infection was also verified by serology. Twenty one patients (32%) had chronic H pylori negative gastritis (negative by both histology and serology) and one of them also had atrophy in the antrum and corpus. Granulomas were found in four patients. The characteristic appearance of H pylori negative gastritis was focal and mostly mild inflammation resembling the inflammatory changes seen in the gut in Crohn's disease. Patients with H pylori negative chronic gastritis had a significantly more active disease in their gut than those with normal gastric mucosa (p < 0.01). It is concluded that H pylori positive gastritis is rare, while H pylori negative gastritis is relatively common in patients with Crohn's disease. H pylori negative 'Crohn's gastritis' seems to be associated with active Crohn's disease. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:8675090

  6. Helicobacter-negative gastritis: polymerase chain reaction for Helicobacter DNA is a valuable tool to elucidate the diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Kiss, S; Zsikla, V; Frank, A; Willi, N; Cathomas, G

    2016-04-01

    Helicobacter-negative gastritis has been increasingly reported. Molecular techniques as the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) may detect bacterial DNA in histologically negative gastritis. To evaluate of Helicobacter PCR in gastric biopsies for the daily diagnostics of Helicobacter-negative gastritis. Over a 5-year period, routine biopsies with chronic gastritis reminiscent of Helicobacter infection, but negative by histology, were tested by using a H. pylori specific PCR. Subsequently, PCR-negative samples were re-evaluated using PCR for other Helicobacter species. Of the 9184 gastric biopsies, 339 (3.7%) with histological-negative gastritis and adequate material were forwarded to PCR analysis for H. pylori and 146 (43.1%) revealed a positive result. In 193 H. pylori DNA-negative biopsies, re-analysis using PCR primers for other Helicobacter species, revealed further 23 (11.9%) positive biopsies, including 4 (2.1%) biopsies with H. heilmannii sensu lato. PCR-positive biopsies showed a higher overall inflammatory score, more lymphoid follicles/aggregates and neutrophils (P < 0.05). No Helicobacter DNA was found in control biopsies of 48 patients with neither primer set (P < 0.0001). In 274 patients with an endoscopic description, detection of H. pylori DNA was associated with ulcers and erosions (P < 0.01). Over all, in 339 histologically-negative gastric biopsies, Helicobacter DNA was detected in 169 (49.9%) samples with at least one primer set. Molecular testing offers a sensitive and specific diagnosis to a selected group of patients, in whom adequate searches for bacteria by conventional histology have resulted in the unsatisfactory diagnosis of H. pylori-negative gastritis. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Autoantibodies to gastric mucosa in Helicobacter pylori infection.

    PubMed

    Negrini, R; Savio, A; Appelmelk, B J

    1997-07-01

    Although Helicobacter pylori is recognized as the main cause of chronic gastritis and its associated diseases, very little is known about the pathogenetic mechanisms leading to intestinal metaplasia and atrophic gastritis. We reviewed the data regarding the possible pathogenetic role played by the anti-H. pylori immune responses in the genesis of atrophic gastritis and intestinal metaplasia. Although only type A (corpus-restricted atrophic gastritis), often associated to pernicious anemia, is considered autoimmune in nature, abundant evidence supports the presence of cellular and humoral autoimmune responses also in patients with H. pylori infection. In a mechanism known as antigenic mimicry, highly conserved immunogenic molecules expressed by infectious pathogens may act as a trigger for the induction of humoral and cellular immune responses that cross-react with host cellular antigens. Numerous studies support the view that H. pylori is very effective in inducing antigenic mimicry, and antibodies against H. pylori have been found to cross-react with both antral mucosal cells (the membrane of the secretory canalicular structures of the parietal cells) and gastrin-producing cells. Such autoantibodies were detected both in human infections and in experimental work in rodents. The detection of antibodies that cross-react with H. pylori and various components of the gastric mucosa provides strong support to the view that immune responses against H. pylori not only participate in the pathogenetic mechanisms leading to atrophy in the progressive atrophic gastritis associated with Helicobacter infection but also in the corpus-restricted autoimmune gastritis.

  8. Helicobacter spp. other than H. pylori.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Mirko; Hänninen, Marja-Liisa

    2012-09-01

    Significant advances have been made over the last 12 months in the understanding of the biology of non-H. pylori Helicobacter species (NHPH). Several studies have investigated the association between NHPH and human disease, including Crohn's disease, lithiasis, liver disease, coronary disease, gastritis, and pyoderma gangrenosum-like ulcers. Novel Helicobacter taxa were identified in new vertebrate hosts, and new methodologies in the fields of identification of Helicobacter spp. and evaluation of antibiotic resistance were described. The genome of the first human-derived gastric NHPH strain (Helicobacter bizzozeronii CIII-1) was sequenced, and several studies elucidated functions of different genes in NHPH. A number of important investigations regarding pathogenesis and immunopathobiology of NHPH infections have been published including the description of a new urease in Helicobacter mustelae. Finally, the effects of the gut microbiota and probiotics on NHPH infections were investigated. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  9. Immune Homeostasis of Human Gastric Mucosa in Helicobacter pylori Infection.

    PubMed

    Reva, I V; Yamamoto, T; Vershinina, S S; Reva, G V

    2015-05-01

    We present the results of electron microscopic, microbiological, immunohistochemical, and molecular genetic studies of gastric biopsy specimens taken for diagnostic purposes according by clinical indications during examination of patients with gastrointestinal pathology. Immune homeostasis of the gastric mucosa against the background of infection with various pathogen strains of Helicobacter pylori was studied in patients of different age groups with peptic ulcer, gastritis, metaplasia, and cancer. Some peculiarities of Helicobacter pylori contamination in the gastric mucosa were demonstrated. Immune homeostasis of the gastric mucosa in different pathologies was analyzed depending on the Helicobacter pylori genotype.

  10. Helicobacter pylori and early gastric cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Craanen, M E; Blok, P; Dekker, W; Tytgat, G N

    1994-01-01

    The relation between Helicobacter pylori, intestinal metaplasia, and early gastric cancer was studied by examining gastrectomy specimens from 31 intestinal type and 22 diffuse type carcinomas. A total of 298 patients with antral gastritis were used as controls. Atrophic changes and intestinal metaplasia were significantly more common in intestinal type early gastric cancer compared with diffuse type early gastric cancer (p < 0.05 and p < 0.001, respectively). H pylori was found in 61.3% of intestinal type early gastric cancer and in 54.5% of diffuse type early gastric cancer (NS). The age adjusted prevalence of intestinal metaplasia in the patients with antral gastritis was higher in H pylori positive patients in all age groups studied. Comparing gastritis patients with patients with intestinal type early gastric cancer showed the age adjusted prevalence of intestinal metaplasia to be significantly higher in the patients with early gastric cancer in all age groups studied. In conclusion, H pylori is associated with both types of early gastric carcinoma. Intestinal metaplasia formation seems to be a multifactorial process in which H pylori may play a part. These findings suggest that gastric cancer may be included in the spectrum of H pylori associated diseases, although many questions about causality remain to be answered. PMID:7959189

  11. Helicobacter pylori eradication for preventing gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Lu, Bin; Li, Meng

    2014-05-21

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is a major risk factor for gastric cancer (GC) development, which is one of the most challenging malignant diseases worldwide with limited treatments. In the multistep pathogenesis of GC, H. pylori infection slowly induces chronic active gastritis, which progresses through the premalignant stages of atrophic gastritis, intestinal metaplasia, and dysplasia, and then finally to GC. Although eradication of H. pylori is a reasonable approach for the prevention of GC, there have been some contradictory reports, with only some long-term follow-up data showing efficacy of this approach. The inconsistencies are likely due to the insufficient number of participants, relatively short follow-up periods, poor quality of study designs, and the degree and extent of preneoplastic changes at the time of H. pylori eradication. This review analyzes recent high-quality studies to resolve the discrepancies regarding the eradication of H. pylori for GC prevention. The relationship between H. pylori eradication and GC/precancerous lesions/metachronous GC is examined, and the cost-effectiveness of this strategy in the prevention of GC is assessed. Although it is assumed that eradication of H. pylori has the potential to prevent GC, the feasibility and appropriate timing of this strategy for cancer prevention remain to be determined. As a result, additional well-designed trials with longer follow-up periods are needed to clarify this issue.

  12. Helicobacter pylori eradication for preventing gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Bin; Li, Meng

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is a major risk factor for gastric cancer (GC) development, which is one of the most challenging malignant diseases worldwide with limited treatments. In the multistep pathogenesis of GC, H. pylori infection slowly induces chronic active gastritis, which progresses through the premalignant stages of atrophic gastritis, intestinal metaplasia, and dysplasia, and then finally to GC. Although eradication of H. pylori is a reasonable approach for the prevention of GC, there have been some contradictory reports, with only some long-term follow-up data showing efficacy of this approach. The inconsistencies are likely due to the insufficient number of participants, relatively short follow-up periods, poor quality of study designs, and the degree and extent of preneoplastic changes at the time of H. pylori eradication. This review analyzes recent high-quality studies to resolve the discrepancies regarding the eradication of H. pylori for GC prevention. The relationship between H. pylori eradication and GC/precancerous lesions/metachronous GC is examined, and the cost-effectiveness of this strategy in the prevention of GC is assessed. Although it is assumed that eradication of H. pylori has the potential to prevent GC, the feasibility and appropriate timing of this strategy for cancer prevention remain to be determined. As a result, additional well-designed trials with longer follow-up periods are needed to clarify this issue. PMID:24914325

  13. Helicobacter pylori vaccine: from past to future.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Kanishtha; Agarwal, Shvetank

    2008-02-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is highly prevalent worldwide and is an important cause of gastritis, peptic ulcer disease, gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma (MALToma), and gastric adenocarcinoma. Infection is usually acquired during childhood and tends to persist unless treated. Because eradication requires treatment with multidrug regimens, prevention of initial infection by a suitable vaccine is attractive. Although immunization with H pylori protein subunits has been encouraging in animals, similar vaccine trials in humans have shown adjuvant-related adverse effects and only moderate effectiveness. Newer immunization approaches (use of DNA, live vectors, bacterial ghosts, and microspheres) are being developed. Several questions about when and whom to vaccinate will need to be appropriately answered, and a cost-effective vaccine production and delivery strategy will have to be useful for developing countries. For this review, we searched MEDLINE using the Medical Subject Heading (MeSH) terms Helicobacter pylori and vaccines for articles in English from 1990 to 2007.

  14. Pathogenesis of Helicobacter pylori Infection

    PubMed Central

    Kusters, Johannes G.; van Vliet, Arnoud H. M.; Kuipers, Ernst J.

    2006-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is the first formally recognized bacterial carcinogen and is one of the most successful human pathogens, as over half of the world's population is colonized with this gram-negative bacterium. Unless treated, colonization usually persists lifelong. H. pylori infection represents a key factor in the etiology of various gastrointestinal diseases, ranging from chronic active gastritis without clinical symptoms to peptic ulceration, gastric adenocarcinoma, and gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma. Disease outcome is the result of the complex interplay between the host and the bacterium. Host immune gene polymorphisms and gastric acid secretion largely determine the bacterium's ability to colonize a specific gastric niche. Bacterial virulence factors such as the cytotoxin-associated gene pathogenicity island-encoded protein CagA and the vacuolating cytotoxin VacA aid in this colonization of the gastric mucosa and subsequently seem to modulate the host's immune system. This review focuses on the microbiological, clinical, immunological, and biochemical aspects of the pathogenesis of H. pylori. PMID:16847081

  15. Diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori-related chronic gastritis, gastric adenoma and early gastric cancer by magnifying endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Soma, Nei

    2016-10-01

    Evaluating the prevalence and severity of gastritis by endoscopy is useful for estimating the risk of gastric cancer (GC). Moreover, understanding the endoscopic appearances of gastritis is important for diagnosing GC due to the fact that superficial mucosal lesions mimicing gastritis (gastritis-like lesions) are quite difficult to be detected even with optimum preparation and the best technique, and in such cases tissue biopsy is often not very accurate for the diagnosis of gastric epithelial neoplasia. Magnifying endoscopy is a highly accurate technique for the detection of early gastric cancer (EGC). Recent reports have described that various novel endoscopic markers which, visualized by magnifying endoscopy with image-enhanced system (ME-IEE), can predict specific histopathological findings. Using ME-IEE with vessels and surface classification system (VSCS) may represent an excellent diagnostic performance with high confidence and good reproducibility to the endoscopists if performed under consistent conditions, including observation under maximal magnification. The aim of this review was to discuss how to identify high-risk groups for GC by endoscopy, and how to detect effectively signs of suspicious lesions by conventional white light imaging (C-WLI) or chromoendoscopy (CE). Furthermore, to characterize suspicious lesions using ME-IEE using the criteria and classification of EGC based upon VSCS. © 2016 Chinese Medical Association Shanghai Branch, Chinese Society of Gastroenterology, Renji Hospital Affiliated to Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  16. Helicobacter pylori infection, chronic corpus atrophic gastritis and pancreatic cancer risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort: A nested case-control study.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jiaqi; Zagai, Ulrika; Hallmans, Göran; Nyrén, Olof; Engstrand, Lars; Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael; Duell, Eric J; Overvad, Kim; Katzke, Verena A; Kaaks, Rudolf; Jenab, Mazda; Park, Jin Young; Murillo, Raul; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Lagiou, Pagona; Bamia, Christina; Bradbury, Kathryn E; Riboli, Elio; Aune, Dagfinn; Tsilidis, Konstantinos K; Capellá, Gabriel; Agudo, Antonio; Krogh, Vittorio; Palli, Domenico; Panico, Salvatore; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Tjønneland, Anne; Olsen, Anja; Martínez, Begoña; Redondo-Sanchez, Daniel; Chirlaque, Maria-Dolores; Hm Peeters, Petra; Regnér, Sara; Lindkvist, Björn; Naccarati, Alessio; Ardanaz, Eva; Larrañaga, Nerea; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Rebours, Vinciane; Barré, Amélie; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B As; Ye, Weimin

    2017-04-15

    The association between H. pylori infection and pancreatic cancer risk remains controversial. We conducted a nested case-control study with 448 pancreatic cancer cases and their individually matched control subjects, based on the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort, to determine whether there was an altered pancreatic cancer risk associated with H. pylori infection and chronic corpus atrophic gastritis. Conditional logistic regression models were applied to calculate odds ratios (ORs) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs), adjusted for matching factors and other potential confounders. Our results showed that pancreatic cancer risk was neither associated with H. pylori seropositivity (OR = 0.96; 95% CI: 0.70, 1.31) nor CagA seropositivity (OR = 1.07; 95% CI: 0.77, 1.48). We also did not find any excess risk among individuals seropositive for H. pylori but seronegative for CagA, compared with the group seronegative for both antibodies (OR = 0.94; 95% CI: 0.63, 1.38). However, we found that chronic corpus atrophic gastritis was non-significantly associated with an increased pancreatic cancer risk (OR = 1.35; 95% CI: 0.77, 2.37), and although based on small numbers, the excess risk was particularly marked among individuals seronegative for both H. pylori and CagA (OR = 5.66; 95% CI: 1.59, 20.19, p value for interaction < 0.01). Our findings provided evidence supporting the null association between H. pylori infection and pancreatic cancer risk in western European populations. However, the suggested association between chronic corpus atrophic gastritis and pancreatic cancer risk warrants independent verification in future studies, and, if confirmed, further studies on the underlying mechanisms.

  17. Thailand Consensus on Helicobacter pylori Treatment 2015.

    PubMed

    Mahachai, Varocha; Vilaichone, Ratha-Korn; Pittayanon, Rapat; Rojborwonwitaya, Jarin; Leelakusolvong, Somchai; Kositchaiwat, Chomsri; Mairiang, Pisaln; Praisontarangkul, Ong-Ard; Ovartlarnporn, Buncha; Sottisuporn, Jaksin; Pisespongsa, Pises; Maneerattanaporn, Monthira; Sony, Ravin; Sirinthornpunya, Siam; Chaiyamahapurk, Orawan; Wiwattanachang, Olarn; Sansak, Inchaya; Harnsomboon, Piyathida; Chitapanarux, Taned; Chuenrattanakul, Surapon

    2016-01-01

    Management of Helicobacter pylori infection is an important aspect of many upper gastrointestinal tract diseases, such as chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer disease, gastric cancer and mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma. The Thailand Consensus on H. pylori treatment 2015 consisted of 22 national experts who took active roles, discussed all important clinical information and investigated clinical aspects in four workshops, focuising on: (1) Diagnosis (2) Treatment (3) Follow-up after eradication and (4) H. pylori infection and special conditions. Experts were invited to participate on the basis of their expertise and contribution to H. pylori works and/or consensus methodology. The results of each workshop were taken to a final consensus vote by all experts. Recommendations were developed from the best evidence and availability to guide clinicians in management of this specific infection associated with variety of clinical outcomes.

  18. Natural history of Helicobacter pylori infection.

    PubMed

    Correa, P; Piazuelo, M B

    2008-07-01

    This report describes the modalities of chronic gastritis induced by Helicobacter pylori infection in different populations. The full gamut of lesions representing the precancerous cascade is very prevalent in populations of low socioeconomic background experiencing very high gastric cancer risk, as seen in the Latin American Andes Mountains. In populations of high socioeconomic standards and high cancer risk, such as Japan and Korea, the precancerous cascade predominates and "early" cancers are also diagnosed frequently. Some reports describe frequent corpus atrophy, not prominent in the former group. The so-called African enigma is seen in populations of low socioeconomic standards, usually living at low altitudes, with high prevalence of infection but low frequency of cancer and precancerous lesions. In populations in transition from high to low cancer risk, duodenal ulcer and antral non-atrophic gastritis are frequently seen. In affluent societies at low risk of cancer, such as Western Europe, Australia and North America, mild non-atrophic gastritis associated with low virulence Helicobacter pylori genotypes predominate. The varied phenotypes of gastritis may reflect secular changes in the ecology of our species.

  19. [Kyoto global consensus report for treatment of Helicobacter pylori and its implications for China].

    PubMed

    Xie, Chuan; Lyu, Nonghua

    2016-01-01

    Kyoto global consensus report on Helicobacter pylori gastritis (Gut, July 2015) is another important international consensus since the European Maastricht Ⅳ consensus was published. Kyoto consensus will improve the etiology-based classification, the diagnostic assessment of gastritis, and the treatment of H. pylori-associated dyspepsia and H. pylori gastritis. However, because of high rate of H. pylori infection and antibiotic resistance as well as limited health resources in China, we need to develop our own strategies of H. pylori infection control with the reference of the Kyoto global consensus.

  20. Helicobacter pylori research: historical insights and future directions.

    PubMed

    Fock, Kwong Ming; Graham, David Y; Malfertheiner, Peter

    2013-08-01

    Helicobacter pylori leads to chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer disease and gastric cancer. With increasing issues of antibiotic resistance and changing epidemiology of this pathogen, new approaches are needed for effective management. In 1984, Dr Barry Marshall and Dr Robin Warren reported the association of Helicobacter pylori with peptic ulcers in The Lancet--a discovery that earned them the Nobel prize in Physiology or Medicine in 2005--but what progress have we made since then? Here, we have invited three international experts to give their insights into the advances in H. pylori research over the past 30 years and where research should be focused in the future.

  1. Helicobacter pylori research: historical insights and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Fock, Kwong Ming; Graham, David Y.; Malfertheiner, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori leads to chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer disease and gastric cancer. With increasing issues of antibiotic resistance and changing epidemiology of this pathogen, new approaches are needed for effective management. In 1984, Dr Barry Marshall and Dr Robin Warren reported the association of Helicobacter pylori with peptic ulcers in The Lancet—a discovery that earned them the Nobel prize in Physiology or Medicine in 2005—but what progress have we made since then? Here, we have invited three international experts to give their insights into the advances in H. pylori research over the past 30 years and where research should be focused in the future. PMID:23752823

  2. Molecular Basis of Pathogenicity in Helicobacter pylori Clinical Isolates ▿

    PubMed Central

    Ramis, Ivy Bastos; Fonseca, Tesiê Leopoldo; Moraes, Ernani Pinho de; Fernandes, Márcia Silveira; Mendoza-Sassi, Raul; Rodrigues, Obirajara; Juliano, Carlos Renan Varela; Scaini, Carlos James; Almeida da Silva, Pedro Eduardo

    2010-01-01

    This study identified pathogenicity genes in 40 Helicobacter pylori clinical isolates. The cagA, vacA, and iceA genes were detected in 65%, 97.5%, and 97.5% of the isolates, respectively. The cagA, iceA1, and vacAs1a/m1 genes were related to erosive gastritis, whereas the vacAs2/m2 and iceA2 genes were associated with enanthematous gastritis. PMID:20686086

  3. Helicobacter spp. other than Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Goldman, Cinthia G; Mitchell, Hazel M

    2010-09-01

    Over the last 12 months, new insights into the association of non-Helicobacter pylori Helicobacters with a range of human diseases in children and adults, including hepatobiliary disease, Crohn's disease, sepsis, and gastric disease were published. Studies investigating the presence of non-H. pylori Helicobacters in domestic animals reinforce previous findings that cats and dogs harbor gastric Helicobacter species and thus may be an important source of these organisms in humans. The confounding effect of enterohepatic Helicobacters on the outcome of biomedical research was investigated in several studies and led to recommendations that animals should be screened prior to performing experiments. A number of important and novel investigations regarding pathogenic mechanisms and immune responses to enterohepatic Helicobacters were conducted. Genomic advances in non-H. pylori Helicobacters included description of the complete genome of Helicobacter canadensis, delineation of two Helicobacter bilis genomospecies, and identification of a novel cis-regulatory RNA. New insights concerning growth conditions, biochemical characterization, and the effect of certain dietary compounds on Helicobacter spp. have also been reported. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  4. Are Mucosa CD4+/CD8+ T-Cells Expressions Correlated with the Endoscopic Appearance of Chronic Gastritis Related with Helicobacter pylori Infection?

    PubMed

    Ratnasari, Neneng; Bayupurnama, Putut; Maduseno, Sutanto; Indrarti, Fahmi; Triwikatmani, Catharina; Harijadi, Achmad; Nurdjanah, Siti

    2016-06-01

    Local inflammatory processes in the gastric mucosa are followed by extensive immune cell infiltration, resulting in chronic active gastritis characterized by a marked infiltration of T(h)1 cytokine-producing CD4+ and CD8+T-cells Objective. To investigate the correlation between CD4+/CD8+ T-cells in gastric mucosa with endoscopic appearance in chronic gastritis with or without H.pylori infection. Prospective, cross sectional study is performed in a chronic dyspepsia population in July-November 2009 at Dr. Sardjito General Hospital Yogyakarta, Indonesia. The update Sydney system was used to analyze the gastroscopy appearance. Biopsy specimens were stained with HE-stain and IHC-stain. Data were analyzed by t-test, Mann-Whitney and Spearman correlation test. Number of 88 consecutive subjects are enrolled the study (50% male; 50% female), age 46±15 years; 25% H.pylori positive. The expression of CD4+ and CD8+ were higher in H.pylori negative subjects, but only the CD4+ was significant (P=0.011). A significant correlation was found between CD4+ and CD8+ in both subjects (r(Hp+)=0.62 and r(Hp-)=0.68; P<0.05). The expression of CD4+ and CD8+ in H.pylori positive showed a significant correlation with gastric lesions (r(CD4+)=-0.60; r(CD8+)=-0.42 ; P<0.05), only erosion showed a significant difference in both subjects. A positive correlation was found between CD4+ and CD8+ infiltration in both subjects with or without H.pylori infection, and a negative correlation was only found between gastric lesion with CD4+ and CD8+ infiltration in H.pylori subject.

  5. Helicobacter pylori and non-malignant diseases.

    PubMed

    Furuta, Takahisa; Delchier, Jean-Charles

    2009-09-01

    It is well known that Helicobacter pylori infection is associated with many nonmalignant disorders such as gastritis, peptic ulcer, gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), gastric polyp, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID)/aspirin-induced gastric injury, and functional dyspepsia. In 2008, interesting articles on the association of H. pylori infection with these disorders were presented, some of which intended to reveal the mechanisms of inter-individual differences in response to H. pylori infection, and have demonstrated that genetic differences in host and bacterial factors as well as environmental factors account for these differences. A decline in the occurrence of peptic ulcer related to H. pylori was confirmed. An inverse relationship between H. pylori infection and GERD was also confirmed but the impact of gastric atrophy on the prevention of GERD remained debatable. For NSAID-induced gastric injury, eradication of H. pylori infection has been recommended. During this year, eradication of H. pylori infection was recommended for patients treated with antiplatelet therapy as well as aspirin and NSAID. It was also reported that for patients with functional dyspepsia, eradication of H. pylori offers a modest but significant benefit.

  6. Comparison of Helicobacter spp. in Cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus) with and without Gastritis

    PubMed Central

    Terio, K. A.; Munson, L.; Marker, L.; Aldridge, B. M.; Solnick, J. V.

    2005-01-01

    Chronic gastritis causes significant morbidity and mortality in captive cheetahs but is rare in wild cheetahs despite colonization by abundant spiral bacteria. This research aimed to identify the Helicobacter species that were associated with gastritis in captive cheetahs but are apparently commensal in wild cheetahs. Helicobacter species were characterized by PCR amplification and sequencing of the 16S rRNA, urease, and cagA genes and by transmission electron microscopy of frozen or formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded gastric samples from 33 cheetahs infected with Helicobacter organisms (10 wild without gastritis and 23 captive with gastritis). Samples were screened for mixed infections by denaturant gel gradient electrophoresis of the 16S rRNA gene and by transmission electron microscopy. There was no association between Helicobacter infection and the presence or severity of gastritis. Eight cheetahs had 16S rRNA sequences that were most similar (98 to 99%) to H. pylori. Twenty-five cheetahs had sequences that were most similar (97 to 99%) to “H. heilmannii” or H. felis. No cheetahs had mixed infections. The ultrastructural morphology of all bacteria was most consistent with “H. heilmannii,” even when 16S rRNA sequences were H. pylori-like. The urease gene from H. pylori-like bacteria could not be amplified with primers for either “H. heilmannii” or H. pylori urease, suggesting that this bacteria is neither H. pylori nor “H. heilmannii.” The cagA gene was not identified in any case. These findings question a direct role for Helicobacter infection in the pathogenesis of gastritis and support the premise that host factors account for the differences in disease between captive and wild cheetah populations. PMID:15634976

  7. Comparison of Helicobacter spp. in Cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus) with and without gastritis.

    PubMed

    Terio, K A; Munson, L; Marker, L; Aldridge, B M; Solnick, J V

    2005-01-01

    Chronic gastritis causes significant morbidity and mortality in captive cheetahs but is rare in wild cheetahs despite colonization by abundant spiral bacteria. This research aimed to identify the Helicobacter species that were associated with gastritis in captive cheetahs but are apparently commensal in wild cheetahs. Helicobacter species were characterized by PCR amplification and sequencing of the 16S rRNA, urease, and cagA genes and by transmission electron microscopy of frozen or formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded gastric samples from 33 cheetahs infected with Helicobacter organisms (10 wild without gastritis and 23 captive with gastritis). Samples were screened for mixed infections by denaturant gel gradient electrophoresis of the 16S rRNA gene and by transmission electron microscopy. There was no association between Helicobacter infection and the presence or severity of gastritis. Eight cheetahs had 16S rRNA sequences that were most similar (98 to 99%) to H. pylori. Twenty-five cheetahs had sequences that were most similar (97 to 99%) to "H. heilmannii" or H. felis. No cheetahs had mixed infections. The ultrastructural morphology of all bacteria was most consistent with "H. heilmannii," even when 16S rRNA sequences were H. pylori-like. The urease gene from H. pylori-like bacteria could not be amplified with primers for either "H. heilmannii" or H. pylori urease, suggesting that this bacteria is neither H. pylori nor "H. heilmannii." The cagA gene was not identified in any case. These findings question a direct role for Helicobacter infection in the pathogenesis of gastritis and support the premise that host factors account for the differences in disease between captive and wild cheetah populations.

  8. Impact of Helicobacter Pylori on Mucus Rheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celli, Jonathan; Keates, Sarah; Kelly, Ciaran; Turner, Bradley; Bansil, Rama; Erramilli, Shyamsunder

    2006-03-01

    It is well known that the viscoelastic properties of gastric mucin are crucial to the protection of the lining of the stomach against its own acidic secretions and other agents. Helicobacter Pylori, a rod shaped, gram-negative bacteria that dwells in the mucus layer of approximately 50% of the world's population is a class I carcinogen and is associated with gastric ulcers and severe gastritis. The structural damage to the mucus layer caused by H. Pylori is an important aspect of infection with this bacteria. We are examining the impact of H. Pylori on mucin and mucus rheology quantitatively using a combination of dynamic light scattering and multiple particle tracking experiments. Video microscopy data will also be presented on the motility of this bacteria in mucin at different pH and in other viscoelastic gels.

  9. Helicobacter pylori: gastric cancer and beyond

    PubMed Central

    Polk, D. Brent; Peek, Richard M.

    2010-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is the dominant species of the human gastric microbiome, and colonization causes a persistent inflammatory response. H. pylori-induced gastritis is the strongest singular risk factor for cancers of the stomach; however, only a small proportion of infected individuals develop malignancy. Carcinogenic risk is modified by strain-specific bacterial components, host responses and/or specific host–microbe interactions. Delineation of bacterial and host mediators that augment gastric cancer risk has profound ramifications for both physicians and biomedical researchers as such findings will not only focus the prevention approaches that target H. pylori-infected human populations at increased risk for stomach cancer but will also provide mechanistic insights into inflammatory carcinomas that develop beyond the gastric niche. PMID:20495574

  10. Helicobacter pylori: gastric cancer and beyond.

    PubMed

    Polk, D Brent; Peek, Richard M

    2010-06-01

    Helicobacter pylori is the dominant species of the human gastric microbiome, and colonization causes a persistent inflammatory response. H. pylori-induced gastritis is the strongest singular risk factor for cancers of the stomach; however, only a small proportion of infected individuals develop malignancy. Carcinogenic risk is modified by strain-specific bacterial components, host responses and/or specific host-microbe interactions. Delineation of bacterial and host mediators that augment gastric cancer risk has profound ramifications for both physicians and biomedical researchers as such findings will not only focus the prevention approaches that target H. pylori-infected human populations at increased risk for stomach cancer but will also provide mechanistic insights into inflammatory carcinomas that develop beyond the gastric niche.

  11. Virulence Factors of Helicobacter pylori: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Roesler, Bruna M.; Rabelo-Gonçalves, Elizabeth M.A.; Zeitune, José M.R.

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a spiral-shaped Gram-negative bacterium that colonizes the human stomach and can establish a long-term infection of the gastric mucosa, a condition that affects the relative risk of developing various clinical disorders of the upper gastrointestinal tract, such as chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer disease, mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma, and gastric adenocarcinoma. H. pylori presents a high-level of genetic diversity, which can be an important factor in its adaptation to the host stomach and also for the clinical outcome of infection. There are important H. pylori virulence factors that, along with host characteristics and the external environment, have been associated with the different occurrences of diseases. This review is aimed to analyzing and summarizing the main of them and possible associations with the clinical outcome. PMID:24833944

  12. Hematologic manifestations of Helicobacter pylori infection

    PubMed Central

    Campuzano-Maya, Germán

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is the most common infection in humans, with a marked disparity between developed and developing countries. Although H. pylori infections are asymptomatic in most infected individuals, they are intimately related to malignant gastric conditions such as gastric cancer and gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma and to benign diseases such as gastritis and duodenal and gastric peptic ulcers. Since it was learned that bacteria could colonize the gastric mucosa, there have been reports in the medical literature of over 50 extragastric manifestations involving a variety medical areas of specialization. These areas include cardiology, dermatology, endocrinology, gynecology and obstetrics, hematology, pneumology, odontology, ophthalmology, otorhinolaryngology and pediatrics, and they encompass conditions with a range of clear evidence between the H. pylori infection and development of the disease. This literature review covers extragastric manifestations of H. pylori infection in the hematology field. It focuses on conditions that are included in international consensus and management guides for H. pylori infection, specifically iron deficiency, vitamin B12 (cobalamin) deficiency, immune thrombocytopenia, and MALT lymphoma. In addition, there is discussion of other conditions that are not included in international consensus and management guides on H. pylori, including auto-immune neutropenia, antiphospholipid syndrome, plasma cell dyscrasias, and other hematologic diseases. PMID:25278680

  13. Simple animal model of Helicobacter pylori infection.

    PubMed

    Werawatganon, Duangporn

    2014-06-07

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) has become accepted as a human pathogen for the development of gastritis and gastroduodenal ulcer. To develop a simple rat model of chronic H. pylori infection, male Sprague-Dawley rats were pretreated with streptomycin suspended in tap water (5 mg/mL) for 3 d. The rats were inoculated by gavage at 1 mL/rat with H. pylori suspension (5 × 10(8)-5 × 10(10) CFU/mL) twice daily at an interval of 4 h for three consecutive days. Two weeks after inoculation, rats were sacrificed and the stomachs were removed. Antral biopsies were performed for urease test and the stomachs were taken for histopathology. Successful H. pylori inoculation was defined as a positive urease test and histopathology. We reported a 69.8%-83.0% success rate for H. pylori infection using the urease test, and hematoxylin and eosin staining confirmed the results. Histopathological analysis detected bacteria along the mucous lining of the surface epithelium and crypt lumen and demonstrated mild to moderate gastric inflammation in successfully inoculated rats. We developed a simple rat model of chronic H. pylori infection for research into gastric microcirculatory changes and therapy with plant products.

  14. Helicobacter pylori as an oncogenic pathogen, revisited.

    PubMed

    Miftahussurur, Muhammad; Yamaoka, Yoshio; Graham, David Y

    2017-03-21

    Gastric cancer is an inflammation-associated malignancy aetiologically related to infection with the bacterium, Helicobacter pylori, which is considered a necessary but insufficient cause. Unless treated, H. pylori causes life-long acute and chronic gastric inflammation resulting in progressive gastric mucosal damage that may result in gastric cancer. The rate of progression from superficial gastritis, to an atrophic metaplastic mucosa, and ultimately to cancer relates to the virulence of the infecting H. pylori as well as host and environmental factors. H. pylori virulence is a reflection of its propensity to cause severe gastric inflammation. Both mucosal inflammation and H. pylori can cause host genomic instability, including dysregulation of DNA mismatch repair, stimulation of expression of activation-induced cytidine deaminase, abnormal DNA methylation and dysregulation of  micro RNAs, which may result in an accumulation of mutations and loss of normal regulation of cell growth. The difference in cancer risk between the most and least virulent H. pylori strain is only approximately 2-fold. Overall, none of the putative virulence factors identified to date have proved to be disease-specific. The presence, severity, extent and duration of inflammation appear to be the most important factors and current evidence suggests that any host, environmental or bacterial factor that reliably enhances the inflammatory response to the H. pylori infection increases the risk of gastric cancer.

  15. Metalloregulation of Helicobacter pylori physiology and pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Haley, Kathryn P.; Gaddy, Jennifer A.

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a Gram-negative spiral-shaped bacterium that colonizes over half of the world's population. Chronic H. pylori infection is associated with increased risk for numerous disease outcomes including gastritis, dysplasia, neoplasia, B-cell lymphoma of mucosal-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT lymphoma), and invasive adenocarcinoma. The complex interactions that occur between pathogen and host are dynamic and exquisitely regulated, and the relationship between H. pylori and its human host are no exception. To successfully colonize, and subsequently persist, within the human stomach H. pylori must temporally regulate numerous genes to ensure localization to the gastric lumen and coordinated expression of virulence factors to subvert the host's innate and adaptive immune response. H. pylori achieves this precise gene regulation by sensing subtle environmental changes including host-mediated alterations in nutrient availability and responding with dramatic global changes in gene expression. Recent studies revealed that the presence or absence of numerous metal ions encountered in the lumen of the stomach, or within host tissues, including nickel, iron, copper and zinc, can influence regulatory networks to alter gene expression in H. pylori. These expression changes modulate the deployment of bacterial virulence factors that can ultimately influence disease outcome. In this review we will discuss the environmental stimuli that are detected by H. pylori as well as the trans regulatory elements, specifically the transcription regulators and transcription factors, that allow for these significant transcriptional shifts. PMID:26388855

  16. Accelerated Progression of Gastritis to Dysplasia in the Pyloric Antrum of TFF2−/− C57BL6 × Sv129 Helicobacter pylori-Infected Mice

    PubMed Central

    Fox, James G.; Rogers, Arlin B.; Whary, Mark T.; Ge, Zhongming; Ohtani, Masa; Jones, Evelyn Kurt; Wang, Timothy C.

    2007-01-01

    Trefoil factor family 2 (TFF2) is up-regulated in Helicobacter spp.-infected gastric tissues of both humans and mice. To ascertain the biological effects of TFF2 in vivo, TFF2−/− C57BL/6 × Sv129 and wild-type (WT) C57BL/6 × Sv129 mice were orally infected with Helicobacter pylori SS1. Mice were evaluated for gastric H. pylori colonization, pathology, and cytokine profiles at 6 and 19 months post inoculation (pi). At 6 months pi, there was a significant difference (P < 0.05) for epithelial criteria (mucosal defects, atrophy, hyperplasia, pseudopyloric metaplasia, and dysplasia) in the corpus of TFF2−/− versus WT mice. At 19 months pi, a similar statistical difference in epithelial parameters was noted in the antrum of TFF2−/− versus WT mice (P < 0.01). All of the TFF2−/− H. pylori-infected mice had high-grade antral dysplasia, including gastric intraepithelial neoplasia, which was statistically significant (P < 0.05) compared with the infected WT mice. Levels of interferon-γ were markedly elevated in the gastric mucosa of infected TFF2−/− mice at both 6 and 19 months pi. TFF2 provided a cytoprotective and/or anti-inflammatory effect against the progression of premalignant lesions of the gastric corpus at 6 months pi and in the pyloric antrum in H. pylori-infected mice at 19 months pi. These data support a protective role for TFF2 in part by modulating levels of gastric interferon-γ in the development of H. pylori-associated premalignancy of the distal stomach. PMID:17982128

  17. Identification of Helicobacter pylori in skin biopsy of prurigo pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Missall, Tricia A; Pruden, Samuel; Nelson, Christine; Fohn, Laurel; Vidal, Claudia I; Hurley, M Yadira

    2012-06-01

    A 23-year-old Chinese man presented with a 3-year history of a pruritic eruption. On examination, pink urticarial papules associated with hyperpigmented reticulated patches were noted on his neck, back, and upper chest. Histopathology revealed vacuolar interface dermatitis and numerous gram-negative rods within a dilated hair follicle. The organisms were reactive with anti-Helicobacter pylori immunohistochemisty. The histologic findings and clinical presentation support the diagnosis of prurigo pigmentosa. Additional testing demonstrated a positive urease breath test and serum H. pylori IgG antibodies. The patient was referred to gastroenterology and treated with appropriate antibiotics. After treatment, esophagogastroduodenoscopy revealed chronic gastritis without evidence of H. pylori infection and his skin showed reticulated hyperpigmented patches without evidence of active inflammatory papules. Although previous reports have associated prurigo pigmentosa to H. Pylori gastritis, this is the first report of H. pylori organisms identified in a skin biopsy of prurigo pigmentosa.

  18. Prevention of Gastric Cancer: Eradication of Helicobacter pylori and Beyond

    PubMed Central

    Tsukamoto, Tetsuya; Nakagawa, Mitsuru; Kiriyama, Yuka; Toyoda, Takeshi; Cao, Xueyuan

    2017-01-01

    Although its prevalence is declining, gastric cancer remains a significant public health issue. The bacterium Helicobacter pylori is known to colonize the human stomach and induce chronic atrophic gastritis, intestinal metaplasia, and gastric cancer. Results using a Mongolian gerbil model revealed that H. pylori infection increased the incidence of carcinogen-induced adenocarcinoma, whereas curative treatment of H. pylori significantly lowered cancer incidence. Furthermore, some epidemiological studies have shown that eradication of H. pylori reduces the development of metachronous cancer in humans. However, other reports have warned that human cases of atrophic metaplastic gastritis are already at risk for gastric cancer development, even after eradication of these bacteria. In this article, we discuss the effectiveness of H. pylori eradication and the morphological changes that occur in gastric dysplasia/cancer lesions. We further assess the control of gastric cancer using various chemopreventive agents. PMID:28771198

  19. Rare Gastric Lesions Associated with Helicobacter pylori Infection: A Histopathological Review.

    PubMed

    Joo, Mee

    2017-07-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is associated with chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer disease, gastric adenocarcinoma, and mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma. However, some rare gastric lesions exhibiting distinctive histological features may also be associated with H. pylori infection, including lymphocytic gastritis, granulomatous gastritis, Russell body gastritis, or crystal-storing histiocytosis. Although diverse factors can contribute to their development, there is convincing evidence that H. pylori infection may play a pathogenic role. These findings are mainly based on studies in patients with these lesions who exhibited clinical and histological improvements after H. pylori eradication therapy. Thus, H. pylori eradication therapy might be indicated in patients with no other underlying disease, particularly in countries with a high prevalence of H. pylori infection. This review describes the characteristic histological features of these rare lesions and evaluates the evidence regarding a causative role for H. pylori infection in their pathogenesis.

  20. Helicobacter pylori infection in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Shiota, Seiji; Murakawi, Kazunari; Suzuki, Rumiko; Fujioka, Toshio; Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2013-01-01

    The prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection is gradually decreasing in Japan. On the main island of Japan, nearly all H. pylori isolates possess cagA and vacA with strong virulence. However, less virulent H. pylori strains are frequently found in Okinawa where cases of gastric cancer are the lowest in Japan. Eradication therapy for peptic ulcer, idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma and early gastric cancer after endoscopic resection has been approved by the Japanese national health insurance system. However, the Japanese Society for Helicobacter Research recently stated that all ‘H. pylori infection’ was considered as the indication for eradication irrespective of the background diseases. To eliminate H. pylori in Japan, the Japanese health insurance system should approve the eradication of all H. pylori infections. PMID:23265147

  1. Helicobacter pylori infection in Japan.

    PubMed

    Shiota, Seiji; Murakawi, Kazunari; Suzuki, Rumiko; Fujioka, Toshio; Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2013-01-01

    The prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection is gradually decreasing in Japan. On the main island of Japan, nearly all H. pylori isolates possess cagA and vacA with strong virulence. However, less virulent H. pylori strains are frequently found in Okinawa where cases of gastric cancer are the lowest in Japan. Eradication therapy for peptic ulcer, idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma and early gastric cancer after endoscopic resection has been approved by the Japanese national health insurance system. However, the Japanese Society for Helicobacter Research recently stated that all 'H. pylori infection' was considered as the indication for eradication irrespective of the background diseases. To eliminate H. pylori in Japan, the Japanese health insurance system should approve the eradication of all H. pylori infections.

  2. Effect of dietary anti-Helicobacter pylori-urease immunoglobulin Y on Helicobacter pylori infection.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, H; Nomura, S; Masaoka, T; Goshima, H; Kamata, N; Kodama, Y; Ishii, H; Kitajima, M; Nomoto, K; Hibi, T

    2004-07-01

    Recently, chicken egg yolk was recognized as an inexpensive antibody source, and the therapeutic usefulness of egg yolk immunoglobulin Y (IgY) in oral passive immunization has been investigated. Although multiple antibiotic treatments eradicate most Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infections, therapy fails in 10-15% of cases due to the development of drug resistance. Consequently, it is important that new, more broadly based therapies for the treatment of H. pylori infection should be identified. The present study evaluated the effect, on H. pylori infection, of IgY prepared from egg yolk of hens immunized with H. pylori urease (anti-HpU IgY). Seventeen asymptomatic volunteers diagnosed as H. pylori-positive by the 13C-urea breath test (UBT) were orally administered anti-HpU IgY for 4 weeks. Four weeks later, UBT values were significantly decreased although no case showed H. pylori eradication. An H. pylori-positive 53-year-old female gastritis patient administered anti-HpU IgY plus lansoprazole for 8 weeks showed a decrease in serum pepsinogen (PG) I and UBT values as well as an increase in the PG I/II ratio. In conclusion, anti-HpU IgY may mitigate H. pylori-associated gastritis and partially attenuate gastric urease activity. Furthermore, anti-HpU IgY combined with antacids appears to ameliorate gastric inflammation. These encouraging results may represent a novel approach to the management of H. pylori-associated gastroduodenal disease.

  3. Helicobacter pylori infection has no impact on manometric and pH-metric findings in adolescents and young adults with gastroesophageal reflux and antral gastritis: eradication results to no significant clinical improvement.

    PubMed

    Xinias, Ioannis; Maris, Theophanis; Mavroudi, Antigoni; Panteliadis, Christos; Vandenplas, Yvan

    2013-02-05

    The relationship between Helicobacter pylori (Hp) gastritis and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) remains controversial. The aim was to investigate the association between Hp infection and gastroesophageal reflux (GER) and the impact of Hp eradication on esophageal acid exposure and motility in adolescents and young adults with Hp gastritis and GERD. Sixty-four patients with symptoms suggestive for GERD, of which 40 Hp-positive (group A) and 24 Hp-negative (group B), underwent endoscopy-biopsy, esophageal manometry and 24-hour pH-metry. All group A patients received eradication treatment and were re-evaluated six months later again with 24-hour pH-metry, esophageal manometry, endoscopy-biopsy and clinical assessment. At inclusion, there were no significant differences between the two groups regarding sex, age, grade of endoscopic esophagitis, manometric and pH-metry findings. All Hp-positive patients had an antral predominant gastritis. Eradication of Hp was successful in all patients, and gastritis and esophagitis were healed in all patients. The mean lower esophageal sphincter pressure (LESP) increased significantly from 11.25 mmHg before to 11.71 mmHg after eradication (P<0.05). A significant decrease in reflux index was observed (mean RI 6.02% before versus 4.96% after eradication (P<0.05). However clinical symptoms of GER improved not significantly after 6 months follow up. Conclusively, in children and young adults with GER symptoms and GERD, the presence or absence of Hp has no impact on manometric and pH-metric findings. Eradication of Hp infection results in increase in LESP with a consequent decrease in esophageal acid exposure but not significant clinical improvement.

  4. Non-human reservoirs of Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Fox, J G

    1995-01-01

    Early attempts to identify non-human reservoirs for Helicobacter pylori were largely unrewarding. The one exception being old-world macaques, which were found to be colonized with H. pylori; however, it is doubtful whether this species provides an important reservoir for human infection. The possibility of other animal reservoirs and zoonotic transmission of H. pylori has been discussed, but until recently has not received serious study. Enthusiasm to initiate extensive studies in this area were further dampened by the inability to experimentally infect several different species of mammals with the organism. Reports using whole-cell enzyme-linked immunoabsorbent assay (ELISA) sonicate to monitor infection serologically, have cited a high incidence of H. pylori infection in abattoir workers. These results have been criticized because of potential antigenic cross-reactivity in workers' sera due to the constant exposure of these personnel to other gastrointestinal flora of animals. The large spiral gastric Helicobacter-like organisms (GHLOs) commonly noted in dogs and cats are associated with approximately 0.08-1% of gastritis in humans. These GHLOs often infect patients who own pets, suggesting a zoonotic link. Thus, the recent isolation of H. pylori from the inflamed gastric mucosa of commercially reared cats, and the ability to experimentally infect cats with H. pylori, raises the possibility of zoonotic H. pylori transmission from infected animals who have close human contact. Water and raw vegetables have been linked with H. pylori transmission in a few epidemiologically-based studies in developing populations. The recent isolation of H. pylori from the faeces of adults and children implicates a faecal-oral transmission pathway and supports the theory that both food and water (via faecal contamination) could be a source of H. pylori. Providing conclusive evidence that H. pylori has the ability to exist in the environment as a viable, non-culturable coccoid form

  5. Helicobacter pylori in gastroduodenal diseases: rapid identification by endoscopic brush cytology.

    PubMed

    De Francesco, F; Nicòtina, P A; Picciotto, M; Martines, F; Ferlazzo, G; d'Aquino, A

    1993-08-01

    Previous reports showed Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) in type B gastritis-affected stomachs. This study was carried out to compare H. pylori staining effectiveness on biopsy to brush cytology. Tissue and brush parallel samples of gastric mucosa with abnormal or normal appearances were examined: 57.6% H. pylori-positive pieces from the antrum and 19.2% from the body were found, versus 65.3% and 25% H. pylori-positive brush smears, respectively. H. pylori resembling organisms were mainly related to chronic and acute antral inflammations and were often associated with higher amounts of round-shaped cocco-bacteria. In addition, H. pylori direct stain on brushing is proposed as the most rapid and reliable method for the routine diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection, in both ulcer or nonulcer gastritis.

  6. Significance of dormant forms of Helicobacter pylori in ulcerogenesis.

    PubMed

    Reshetnyak, Vasiliy Ivanovich; Reshetnyak, Tatiana Magomedalievna

    2017-07-21

    Nearly half of the global population are carriers of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori), a Gram-negative bacterium that persists in the healthy human stomach. H. pylori can be a pathogen and causes development of peptic ulcer disease in a certain state of the macroorganism. It is well established that H. pylori infection is the main cause of chronic gastritis and peptic ulcer disease (PUD). Decontamination of the gastric mucosa with various antibiotics leads to H. pylori elimination and longer remission in this disease. However, the reasons for repeated detection of H. pylori in recurrent PUD after its successful eradication remain unclear. The reason for the redetection of H. pylori in recurrent PUD can be either reinfection or ineffective anti-Helicobacter therapy. The administration of antibacterial drugs can lead not only to the emergence of resistant strains of microorganisms, but also contribute to the conversion of H. pylori into the resting (dormant) state. The dormant forms of H. pylori have been shown to play a potential role in the development of relapses of PUD. The paper discusses morphological H. pylori forms, such as S-shaped, C-shaped, U-shaped, and coccoid ones. The authors proposes the classification of H. pylori according to its morphological forms and viability.

  7. Significance of dormant forms of Helicobacter pylori in ulcerogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Reshetnyak, Vasiliy Ivanovich; Reshetnyak, Tatiana Magomedalievna

    2017-01-01

    Nearly half of the global population are carriers of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori), a Gram-negative bacterium that persists in the healthy human stomach. H. pylori can be a pathogen and causes development of peptic ulcer disease in a certain state of the macroorganism. It is well established that H. pylori infection is the main cause of chronic gastritis and peptic ulcer disease (PUD). Decontamination of the gastric mucosa with various antibiotics leads to H. pylori elimination and longer remission in this disease. However, the reasons for repeated detection of H. pylori in recurrent PUD after its successful eradication remain unclear. The reason for the redetection of H. pylori in recurrent PUD can be either reinfection or ineffective anti-Helicobacter therapy. The administration of antibacterial drugs can lead not only to the emergence of resistant strains of microorganisms, but also contribute to the conversion of H. pylori into the resting (dormant) state. The dormant forms of H. pylori have been shown to play a potential role in the development of relapses of PUD. The paper discusses morphological H. pylori forms, such as S-shaped, C-shaped, U-shaped, and coccoid ones. The authors proposes the classification of H. pylori according to its morphological forms and viability. PMID:28785141

  8. Diagnostic accuracy of nodular gastritis for H. pylori infection

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Flores, Juan L; Fernandez-Rivero, Justo A; Marroquín-Fabian, Erika; Téllez-Ávila, Félix I; Sánchez-Jiménez, Beatriz A; Juárez-Hernández, Eva; Uribe, Misael; Chávez-Tapia, Norberto C

    2017-01-01

    Background The term nodular is not included in the Sydney classification and there is no widely accepted histopathological definition. It has been proposed that the presence of antral nodularity could predict Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection. The aim of this study was to determine the diagnostic accuracy of nodular gastritis (NG) for H. pylori infection after a rigorous standardization process, and to describe the associated histopathological characteristics. Materials and methods Endoscopic images of patients submitted to endoscopy with biopsy sampling were included. Endoscopic images were distributed among six endoscopists. The analysis was performed sequentially in three rounds: the first round assessed the interobserver variability, the second evaluated the intraobserver variability, and the third calculated the interobserver variability after training. A correlation analysis between endoscopic and histopathological findings was performed. Results A total of 917 studies were included. In the first analysis of interobserver variability, a poor kappa value (0.078) was obtained. The second evaluation yielded good intraobserver variability, with kappa values of 0.62–0.86. The evaluation of interobserver variability after training revealed an improvement in the kappa value of 0.42. A correlation was found between endoscopic images and histopathological reports. Conclusion There was a strong correlation between NG and H. pylori, but only after rigorous evaluation. The use of the term NG requires extensive standardization before it can be used clinically. PMID:28031716

  9. Helicobacter pylori Infection in Pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Roma, Eleftheria; Miele, Erasmo

    2015-09-01

    This review includes the main pediatric studies published from April 2014 to March 2015. The host response of Treg cells with increases in FOXP3 and TGF-β1 combined with a reduction in IFN-γ by Teff cells may contribute to Helicobacter pylori susceptibility in children. Genotypic variability in H. pylori strains influences the clinical manifestation of the infection. Helicobacter pylori infection is associated with variables indicative of a crowded environment and poor living conditions, while breast-feeding has a protective effect. Intrafamilial infection, especially from mother to children and from sibling to sibling, is the dominant transmission route. Studies showed conflicting results regarding the association between H. pylori infection and iron deficiency anemia. One study suggests that H. pylori eradication plays a role in the management of chronic immune thrombocytopenic purpura in H. pylori-infected children and adolescents. The prevalence of H. pylori was higher in chronic urticaria patients than in controls and, following H. pylori eradication, urticarial symptoms disappeared. An inverse relationship between H. pylori infection and allergic disease was reported. Antibiotic resistance and insufficient compliance to treatment limit the efficacy of eradication therapy. Sequential therapy had no advantage over standard triple therapy. In countries where H. pylori infection is prevalent, studies focusing on virulence factors and antibiotic susceptibility may provide anticipation of the prognosis and may be helpful to reduce morbidity and mortality.

  10. Helicobacter pylori-associated idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura: a narrative review.

    PubMed

    Franchini, Massimo; Vescovi, Pier Paolo; Garofano, Massimo; Veneri, Dino

    2012-07-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Helicobacter pylori has a well-demonstrated role in several gastroduodenal diseases, including peptic ulcer disease, chronic active gastritis, mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma, and gastric adenocarcinoma. In addition, more recently, several studies have focused on the possible causal role of H. pylori in various extragastric disorders, such as cardiovascular, respiratory, neurological, skin, and autoimmune conditions. The current status of the research on the pathogenesis, clinical and therapeutic aspects of H. pylori-associated idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura in adults and children will be addressed in this narrative review.

  11. Immune evasion strategies used by Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Lina, Taslima T; Alzahrani, Shatha; Gonzalez, Jazmin; Pinchuk, Irina V; Beswick, Ellen J; Reyes, Victor E

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is perhaps the most ubiquitous and successful human pathogen, since it colonizes the stomach of more than half of humankind. Infection with this bacterium is commonly acquired during childhood. Once infected, people carry the bacteria for decades or even for life, if not treated. Persistent infection with this pathogen causes gastritis, peptic ulcer disease and is also strongly associated with the development of gastric cancer. Despite induction of innate and adaptive immune responses in the infected individual, the host is unable to clear the bacteria. One widely accepted hallmark of H. pylori is that it successfully and stealthily evades host defense mechanisms. Though the gastric mucosa is well protected against infection, H. pylori is able to reside under the mucus, attach to gastric epithelial cells and cause persistent infection by evading immune responses mediated by host. In this review, we discuss how H. pylori avoids innate and acquired immune response elements, uses gastric epithelial cells as mediators to manipulate host T cell responses and uses virulence factors to avoid adaptive immune responses by T cells to establish a persistent infection. We also discuss in this review how the genetic diversity of this pathogen helps for its survival. PMID:25278676

  12. Immune evasion strategies used by Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Lina, Taslima T; Alzahrani, Shatha; Gonzalez, Jazmin; Pinchuk, Irina V; Beswick, Ellen J; Reyes, Victor E

    2014-09-28

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is perhaps the most ubiquitous and successful human pathogen, since it colonizes the stomach of more than half of humankind. Infection with this bacterium is commonly acquired during childhood. Once infected, people carry the bacteria for decades or even for life, if not treated. Persistent infection with this pathogen causes gastritis, peptic ulcer disease and is also strongly associated with the development of gastric cancer. Despite induction of innate and adaptive immune responses in the infected individual, the host is unable to clear the bacteria. One widely accepted hallmark of H. pylori is that it successfully and stealthily evades host defense mechanisms. Though the gastric mucosa is well protected against infection, H. pylori is able to reside under the mucus, attach to gastric epithelial cells and cause persistent infection by evading immune responses mediated by host. In this review, we discuss how H. pylori avoids innate and acquired immune response elements, uses gastric epithelial cells as mediators to manipulate host T cell responses and uses virulence factors to avoid adaptive immune responses by T cells to establish a persistent infection. We also discuss in this review how the genetic diversity of this pathogen helps for its survival.

  13. Helicobacter pylori and Helicobacter heilmannii in untreated Bulgarian children over a period of 10 years.

    PubMed

    Boyanova, Lyudmila; Lazarova, Elena; Jelev, Christo; Gergova, Galina; Mitov, Ivan

    2007-08-01

    The aims of the study were to evaluate the incidence of Helicobacter pylori and Helicobacter heilmannii in untreated Bulgarian children from 1996 to 2006, to analyse the performance of diagnostic tests, and to look at H. pylori density in specimens by culture. Antral specimens from children with chronic gastritis (n=513), peptic ulcers (n=54) and other diseases (n=91) were evaluated by direct Gram staining (DGS), in-house rapid urease test (RUT) and culture. The living environment and semi-quantitative H. pylori density were assessed in 188 and 328 children, respectively. H. pylori infection was found in children with ulcers (77.8 %), chronic gastritis (64.5 %) and other diseases (36.3 %). Half (51.4 %) of patients aged 1-5 years and 77.4 % of those aged 16-17 years were H. pylori-positive. Of all children, 328 (49.8 %) showed positive DGS, 184 (28 %) had a positive RUT, and 386 (58.7 %) were culture-positive. Unlike gastric mucus specimens, frozen biopsy specimens provided reliable diagnosis. H. heilmannii was observed in two (0.3 %) children. High H. pylori density (growth into all quadrants of plates) was found in 18 % of 328 children evaluated, involving 31 % of ulcer and 16.7 % of non-ulcer patients. H. pylori infection was more common in rural children with chronic gastritis (91.3 %) than in the remainder (66.7 %). In conclusion, H. pylori infection was common in symptomatic Bulgarian children. The infection prevalence was >77 % in patients aged 16-17 years, in children with a duodenal ulcer, and in rural patients. H. heilmannii infection was uncommon. The performance of the bacterial culture was good. The impact of H. pylori density on the clinical expression and eradication of the infection requires further evaluation. The results highlight the need for routine H. pylori diagnosis in rural children with chronic gastritis.

  14. Helicobacter pylori infection and skin disorders.

    PubMed

    Kutlubay, Zekayi; Zara, Tuba; Engin, Burhan; Serdaroğlu, Server; Tüzün, Yalçin; Yilmaz, Erkan; Eren, Bülent

    2014-08-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a Gram-negative bacterium that has been linked to peptic ulcer disease, gastric lymphoma, and gastric carcinoma. Apart from its well-demonstrated role in gastroduodenal diseases, some authors have suggested a potential role of Helicobacter pylori infection in several extra-intestinal pathologies including haematological, cardiovascular, neurological, metabolic, autoimmune, and dermatological diseases. Some studies suggest an association between Helicobacter pylori infection and skin diseases such as chronic idiopathic urticaria and rosacea. There have also been few case reports documenting association between Helicobacter pylori and psoriasis vulgaris, Behçet's disease, alopecia areata, Henoch-Schönlein purpura, and Sweet's syndrome. However, more systematic studies are required to clarify the proposed association between Helicobacter pylori and skin diseases; most of the studies do not show relevant relationships of these diseases with Helicobacter pylori infections. This review discusses skin diseases that are believed to be associated with Helicobacter pylori.

  15. Characterization of Helicobacter pylori urease mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Segal, E D; Shon, J; Tompkins, L S

    1992-01-01

    The association between Helicobacter pylori, gastritis, and peptic ulcer is well established, and the association of infection with gastric cancer has been noted in several developing countries. However, the pathogenic mechanism(s) leading to disease states has not been elucidated. The H. pylori urease is thought to be a determinant of pathogenicity, since the enzyme is produced by all H. pylori clinical isolates. Evidence indicates that some H. pylori strains are more cytotoxic than others, with a correlation between the activity of the urease and the presence of a vacuolating cytotoxin having been made. However, the number of cytotoxins remains unknown at this time. The relationship between the urease and cytotoxicity has previously been examined with chemical inhibitors. To examine the role of the urease and its relationship to cytotoxicity, urease-deficient mutants were produced following ethyl methanesulfonate mutagenesis of H. pylori 87A300. Two mutants (the ure1 and ure5 mutants) which were entirely deficient in urease activity (Ure-) were selected. Characterization of the isolates at the protein level showed that the urease subunits lacked the ability to complex and form the active urease enzyme. The ure1 mutant was shown to be sensitive to the effects of low pH in vitro and exhibited no cytotoxicity to eucaryotic cells, whereas the parental strain (Ure+) produced a cytotoxic effect in the presence of urea. Interaction between the H. pylori Ure+ and Ure- strains and Caco-2 cells appeared to be similar in that both bacterial types elicited pedestal formation and actin condensation. These results indicate that the H. pylori urease may have many functions, among them (i) protecting H. pylori against the acidic environment of the stomach, (ii) acting as a cytotoxin, with human gastric cells especially susceptible to its activity, and (iii) disrupting cell tight junctions in such a manner that the cells remain viable but an ionic flow between the cells occurs

  16. Impact of health insurance coverage for Helicobacter pylori gastritis on the trends in eradication therapy in Japan: retrospective observational study and simulation study based on real-world data.

    PubMed

    Hiroi, Shinzo; Sugano, Kentaro; Tanaka, Shiro; Kawakami, Koji

    2017-07-31

    To explore the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection in Japan and the trends of its eradication therapy before and after the changes of the insurance coverage policy, first started in 2000, and expanded to cover H. pylori-positive gastritis in 2013. The impacts that the changes brought were estimated. In this retrospective observational study and simulation study based on health insurance claims data, product sales data and relevant studies, individuals who received triple therapy (amoxicillin, clarithromycin, proton-pump inhibitors or potassium-competitive acid blockers) were defined as the first-time patients for H. pylori eradication in two Japanese health insurance claims databases (from approximately 1.6 million and 10.5 million individuals). Each sales data of eradication packages and examination kits were used to estimate the number of H. pylori-eradicated individuals nationwide. The prevalence of H. pylori infection, including the future rate, was predicted using previous studies and the estimated population trend by a national institute. Cases completed prior to the policy change on insurance coverage were simulated to estimate what would have happened had there been no change in the policy. The numbers of patients first received eradication therapy were 81 119 and 170 993 from two databases. The nationwide estimated number of patients successfully eradicated was approximately 650 000 per year between 2001 and 2012, whereas it rapidly rose to 1 380-000 per year in 2013. The estimated prevalence of infection in 2050 is 5%, this rate was estimated to be 28% and 22% if the policy changes had not occurred in 2000 and 2013, respectively. The impact of policy changes for H. pylori eradication therapy on the prevalence of infection was shown. The results suggest that insurance coverage expansion may also reduce the prevalence in other countries with a high prevalence of H. pylori infection if the reinfection is low. © Article author(s) (or their employer

  17. Helicobacter pylori infection: New pathogenetic and clinical aspects

    PubMed Central

    Hagymási, Krisztina; Tulassay, Zsolt

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infects more than half of the world’s human population, but only 1% to 3% of infected people consequently develop gastric adenocarcinomas. The clinical outcome of the infection is determined by host genetic predisposition, bacterial virulence factors, and environmental factors. The association between H. pylori infection and chronic active gastritis, peptic ulcer disease, gastric cell carcinoma, and B cell mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma has been well established. With the exception of unexplained iron deficiency anemia and idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, H. pylori infection has no proven role in extraintestinal diseases. On the other hand, there is data showing that H. pylori infection could be beneficial for some human diseases. The unpredictability of the long-term consequences of H. pylori infection and the economic challenge in eradicating it is why identification of high-risk individuals is crucial. PMID:24914360

  18. Free recombination within Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Suerbaum, Sebastian; Smith, John Maynard; Bapumia, Khairun; Morelli, Giovanna; Smith, Noel H.; Kunstmann, Erdmute; Dyrek, Isabelle; Achtman, Mark

    1998-01-01

    Sequences of three gene fragments (flaA, flaB, and vacA) from Helicobacter pylori strains isolated from patients in Germany, Canada, and South Africa were analyzed for diversity and for linkage equilibrium by using the Homoplasy Test and compatibility matrices. Horizontal genetic exchange in H. pylori is so frequent that different loci and polymorphisms within each locus are all at linkage equilibrium. These results indicate that H. pylori is panmictic. Comparisons with sequences from Escherichia coli, Neisseria meningitidis, and Drosophila melanogaster showed that recombination in H. pylori was much more frequent than in other species. In contrast, when multiple family members infected with H. pylori were investigated, some strains were indistinguishable at all three loci. Thus, H. pylori is clonal over short time periods after natural transmission. PMID:9770535

  19. Prevalence of Helicobacter pylori in Gastric Hyperplastic Polyps.

    PubMed

    Horvath, Bela; Pai, Rish K

    2016-12-01

    Hyperplastic polyps of the stomach are routinely encountered during upper endoscopy and often arise in the setting of abnormal surrounding mucosa, particularly Helicobacter pylori, autoimmune gastritis, and reactive gastropathy. Not infrequently gastroenterologists fail to biopsy the surrounding mucosa, thus determining the underlying etiology of the gastric hyperplastic polyp can be difficult. Recently, the Rodger C. Haggitt Gastrointestinal Pathology Society published guidelines on the use of special stains. The society guidelines indicate that H pylori are not usually present in hyperplastic polyps and special stains in this setting may have limited utility. We analyzed the histologic features of 32 gastric hyperplastic polyps in which the nonpolypoid mucosa demonstrated H pylori gastritis. A consecutive series of 50 hyperplastic polyps in which no surrounding mucosa was sampled was also analyzed. When H pylori are identified in biopsies of the nonpolypoid mucosa, it is also commonly present within the polyp tissue (22/32, 69%). The majority of H pylori organisms were identified on routine hematoxylin and eosin stain (16/22, 72%). In contrast, H pylori were only seen in 2/50 consecutive hyperplastic polyps in which the surrounding mucosa was not sampled. Compared with the hyperplastic polyps that lack the organisms, H pylori associated hyperplastic polyps more commonly had dense lymphoplasmacytic inflammation (P = .0001) and neutrophils within gastric epithelium (P = .036). Polyp location, number, size, and presence of intestinal metaplasia was not associated with H pylori These results provide empirical data to guide evaluation of hyperplastic polyps for H pylori.

  20. Helicobacter pylori infection following partial gastrectomy for gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sanghoon; Chun, Hoon Jai

    2014-01-01

    Gastric remnants are an inevitable consequence of partial gastrectomy following resection for gastric cancer. The presence of gastric stumps is itself a risk factor for redevelopment of gastric cancer. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is also a well-known characteristic of gastric carcinogenesis. H. pylori colonization in the remnant stomach therefore draws special interest from clinicians in terms of stomach cancer development and pathogenesis; however, the H. pylori-infected gastric remnant is quite different from the intact organ in several aspects and researchers have expressed conflicting opinions with respect to its role in pathogenesis. For instance, H. pylori infection of the gastric stump produced controversial results in several recent studies. The prevalence of H. pylori infection in the gastric stump has varied among recent reports. Gastritis developing in the remnant stomach presents with a unique pattern of inflammation that is different from the pattern seen in ordinary gastritis of the intact organ. Bile refluxate also has a significant influence on the colonization of the stomach stump, with several studies reporting mixed results as well. In contrast, the elimination of H. pylori from the gastric stump has shown a dramatic impact on eradication rate. H. pylori elimination is recognized to be important for cancer prevention and considerable agreement of opinion is seen among researchers. To overcome the current discrepancies in the literature regarding the role of H. pylori in the gastric stump, further research is required. PMID:24659869

  1. Chronic Gastritis and its Association with H. Pylori Infection.

    PubMed

    Fatema, J; Khan, A H; Uddin, M J; Rahman, M H; Saha, M; Safwath, S A; Alam, M J; Mamun, M A

    2015-10-01

    This cross sectional study was designed to see association of chronic gastritis including its type with H. pylori infection. Consecutive patients undergoing endoscopic examination having histopathological evidence of chronic gastritis were enrolled in the study and was done in Sylhet MAG Osmani Medical College from July 2011 to June 2012. Biopsies were taken from antrum, body and fundus in all patients. Histopathological examinations were done using H-E stain and for detection of H. pylori, rapid urease test, anti-H.pylori antibody test and histopathological test with modified Giemsa stain were done. Patients having results positive in at least two methods were considered infected by H. pylori. Total 80 dyspeptic patients having chronic gastritis were evaluated. Out of them 67(83.8%) had H. pylori infection and 13(16.2%) were H. pylori negative. Among all patients 57(71.2%) had pangastritis and 23(28.8%) had antral gastritis with female and male predominance respectively. H. pylori infection was present in 49(86.0%) cases of pangastritis and 18(78.3%) cases of antral gastritis. H. pylori infection was a little higher among males (34, 50.7%) females (33, 49.3%). H. pylori infection is the predominant cause of chronic gastritis and pangastritis is the major type.

  2. Recurrence of chronic urticaria caused by reinfection by Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Bruscky, Dayanne Mota V; Bruscky, Dayanne Melo V; da Rocha, Luiz Alexandre R; Costa, Aldo José F

    2013-06-01

    To describe a case of chronic urticaria in a female adolescent associated with Helicobacter pylori infection, confirmed in two different occasions, with improvement of urticaria after the antibacterial treatment. A 13-year-old female patient sought medical care with chronic urticaria and epigastric pain unresponsive to medical treatment. Laboratorial tests for further investigation were normal except for the upper gastrointestinal endoscopy with biopsy showing moderate chronic active gastritis associated with Helicobacter pylori. After specific and appropriate treatment, the patient had remission of the symptoms. A new upper gastrointestinal endoscopy to control the treatment after nine months was normal. After five years, the patient returned with recurrence of urticaria and epigastric pain. She was taking antihistamines, without any improvement. It was again submitted to screening protocol for chronic urticaria with normal results. She was submitted to upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, which showed positive urease test. The patient started a new treatment for Helicobacter pylori with disappearance of chronic urticaria and epigastric pain within seven days. The reported case suggests a causal relationship between the positive diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori and the occurrence of chronic urticaria, showing the remission of symptoms after the institution of effective therapy for this agent. Chronic urticaria is a disease of complex etiology, and although controversial, there is growing evidence of Helicobacter pylori involvement with extraintestinal diseases, including chronic urticaria.

  3. Helicobacter pylori detected in pharyngeal and laryngeal pathologies in patients with proven gastric colonization.

    PubMed

    Fellmann, Jonas; Weisert, Jan U; Soltermann, Alex; Morand, Grégoire; Morra, Laura; Moch, Holger; Huber, Gerhard F; Probst, Rudolf

    2014-11-01

    Helicobacter pylori is known to cause gastric cancer. Presence and carcinogenicity in the upper aerodigestive system is doubtful. This study examined the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori and related factors in biopsies from the upper aerodigestive tract (UADT) in patients with gastric colonization by Helicobacter pylori. In a case series study, 26 patients with histopathologically confirmed gastric colonization were identified. A polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was performed on matched formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded tissues of the stomach and the oral cavity, pharynx, or larynx. Helicobacter pylori was found in 38% of the samples from the oral cavity, pharynx, and larynx. An association with malignancies in these regions or possible risk factors, such as age, smoking, or alcohol, was not found. The upper aerodigestive system seems to be an additional reservoir in a significant percentage of patients presenting with Helicobacter pylori gastritis. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. [Eradication of Helicobacter pylori in patients with recurrent abdominal pain using a triple drug treatment].

    PubMed

    Ramírez Mayans, J; Zamora Dávila, E; Cervantes Bustamante, R; Mata Rivera, N; Oyervides García, C I; Cuevas Schacht, F; Sosa de Martínez, M C

    1996-01-01

    Different antibiotics, antagonist H2 and others have been used for elimination and/or eradication of Helicobacter pylori. Evaluate elimination of Helicobacter pylori with amoxicillin, bismuth subsalicylate and ranitidine; and the improvement of recurrent abdominal pain. 20 children with recurrent abdominal pain associated to gastritis and histologic identification of Helicobacter pylori were studied under a period of 18 months (January 1992 to June 1993), at Instituto Nacional de Pediatría, México, D.F. All children were treated simultaneously with: Amoxicillin, 15 days, plus ranitidine and bismuth subsalicylate for one month. Helicobacter pylori was eliminated in 14 of 20 children studied. All these children had an important improvement of recurrent abdominal pain. Elimination of Helicobacter pylori and clinical improvement was present in 14 of 20 children studied (70%).

  5. Helicobacter pylori infection in older people

    PubMed Central

    Pilotto, Alberto; Franceschi, Marilisa

    2014-01-01

    Since the discovery of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection as the major cause of gastroduodenal disorders three decades ago, H. pylori has been the focus of active research and debate in the scientific community. Its linkage to several diseases, such as peptic ulcer disease, gastritis and gastric malignancy is incontestable. In particular, it has been noticed that, as the aged population is increasing worldwide, older people are at increased risk of developing several gastroduodenal diseases and related complications. At the same time, gastric cancer is definitely more frequent in elderly than in adult and young people. In addition, it has been showed that peptic ulcer and related complications occur much more commonly in aged individuals than in young people, resulting in a significantly higher mortality. Although this infection plays a crucial role in gastrointestinal disorders affecting all age groups and in particular older people, only a few studies have been published regarding the latter. This article presents an overview of the epidemiology, diagnosis, clinical manifestations and therapy of H. pylori infection in elderly people. PMID:24914358

  6. Endoscopic transmission of Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Tytgat, G N

    1995-01-01

    The contamination of endoscopes and biopsy forceps with Helicobacter pylori occurs readily after endoscopic examination of H. pylori-positive patients. Unequivocal proof of iatrogenic transmission of the organism has been provided. Estimates for transmission frequency approximate to 4 per 1000 endoscopies when the infection rate in the endoscoped population is about 60%. Iatrogenic transmission has also been shown to be the cause of the so-called 'acute mucosal lesion' syndrome in Japan. Traditional cleaning and alcohol rinsing is insufficient to eliminate endoscope/forceps contamination. Only meticulous adherence to disinfection recommendations guarantees H. pylori elimination.

  7. Virulence genes of Helicobacter pylori in the Dominican Republic

    PubMed Central

    Shiota, Seiji; Cruz, Modesto; Abreu, José A. Jiménez; Mitsui, Takahiro; Terao, Hideo; Disla, Mildre; Iwatani, Shun; Nagashima, Hiroyuki; Matsuda, Miyuki; Uchida, Tomohisa; Tronilo, Lourdes; Rodríguez, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    Although the incidence of gastric cancer in the Dominican Republic is not high, the disease remains a significant health problem. We first conducted a detailed analysis of Helicobacter pylori status in the Dominican Republic. In total, 158 patients (103 females and 55 males; mean age 47.1±16.2 years) were recruited. The status of H. pylori infection was determined based on four tests: rapid urease test, culture test, histological test and immunohistochemistry. The status of cagA and vacA genotypes in H. pylori was examined using PCR and gene sequencing. The overall prevalence of H. pylori infection was 58.9 %. No relationship was found between the H. pylori infection rate and the age range of 17–91 years. Even in the youngest group (patients aged <29 years), the H. pylori infection rate was 62.5 %. Peptic ulcer was found in 23 patients and gastric cancer was found in one patient. The H. pylori infection rate in patients with peptic ulcer was significantly higher than that in patients with gastritis (82.6 versus 54.5 %, P<0.01). The cagA-positive/vacA s1m1 genotype was the most prevalent (43/64, 67.2 %). Compared with H. pylori-negative patients, H. pylori-positive patients showed more severe gastritis. Furthermore, the presence of cagA was related to the presence of more severe gastritis. All CagA-positive strains had Western-type CagA. In conclusion, we found that H. pylori infection is a risk factor for peptic ulcer in the Dominican Republic. Patients with cagA-positive H. pylori could be at higher risk for severe inflammation and atrophy. PMID:24965801

  8. Virulence genes of Helicobacter pylori in the Dominican Republic.

    PubMed

    Shiota, Seiji; Cruz, Modesto; Abreu, José A Jiménez; Mitsui, Takahiro; Terao, Hideo; Disla, Mildre; Iwatani, Shun; Nagashima, Hiroyuki; Matsuda, Miyuki; Uchida, Tomohisa; Tronilo, Lourdes; Rodríguez, Eduardo; Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2014-09-01

    Although the incidence of gastric cancer in the Dominican Republic is not high, the disease remains a significant health problem. We first conducted a detailed analysis of Helicobacter pylori status in the Dominican Republic. In total, 158 patients (103 females and 55 males; mean age 47.1±16.2 years) were recruited. The status of H. pylori infection was determined based on four tests: rapid urease test, culture test, histological test and immunohistochemistry. The status of cagA and vacA genotypes in H. pylori was examined using PCR and gene sequencing. The overall prevalence of H. pylori infection was 58.9 %. No relationship was found between the H. pylori infection rate and the age range of 17-91 years. Even in the youngest group (patients aged <29 years), the H. pylori infection rate was 62.5 %. Peptic ulcer was found in 23 patients and gastric cancer was found in one patient. The H. pylori infection rate in patients with peptic ulcer was significantly higher than that in patients with gastritis (82.6 versus 54.5 %, P<0.01). The cagA-positive/vacA s1m1 genotype was the most prevalent (43/64, 67.2 %). Compared with H. pylori-negative patients, H. pylori-positive patients showed more severe gastritis. Furthermore, the presence of cagA was related to the presence of more severe gastritis. All CagA-positive strains had Western-type CagA. In conclusion, we found that H. pylori infection is a risk factor for peptic ulcer in the Dominican Republic. Patients with cagA-positive H. pylori could be at higher risk for severe inflammation and atrophy. © 2014 The Authors.

  9. Immunology and vaccines and nanovaccines for Helicobacter pylori infection.

    PubMed

    Milani, Morteza; Sharifi, Yaeghob; Rahmati-Yamchi, Mohammad; Somi, Mohammad H; Akbarzadeh, Abolfazl

    2015-06-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is very common worldwide and is an important cause of gastritis, peptic ulcer disease, gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma, and gastric adenocarcinoma. Since the eradication requires treatment with multidrug regimens, prevention of primary infection by a suitable vaccine is attractive. Developing vaccines on the spot when and where an infection is breaking out might be possible, thanks to engineered nanoparticles. In this review, the nature of the host immune response to H. pylori infection is considered. We explain recent candidate vaccines and prophylactic or therapeutic immunization strategies for use against H. pylori. We also describe identification of different types of immune responses that may be related to protection against H. pylori infection. Thus, it seems that there is still a strong need to clarify the main protective immune response against H. pylori.

  10. Local Immune Response in Helicobacter pylori Infection

    PubMed Central

    Kivrak Salim, Derya; Sahin, Mehmet; Köksoy, Sadi; Adanir, Haydar; Süleymanlar, Inci

    2016-01-01

    Abstract There have been few studies concerning the cytokine profiles in gastric mucosa of Helicobacter pylori–infected patients with normal mucosa, chronic gastritis, and gastric carcinoma (GAC). In the present study, we aimed to elucidate the genomic expression levels and immune pathological roles of cytokines—interferon (IFN)-γ, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-4, IL-6, IL-10, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β, IL-17A, IL-32—in H pylori–infected patients with normal gastric mucosa (NGM; control), chronic active gastritis (CAG), and GAC. Genomic expression levels of these cytokines were assayed by real-time PCR analysis in gastric biopsy specimens obtained from 93 patients. We found that the genomic expression levels of IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-6, IL-10, IL-17A mRNA were increased in the CAG group and those of TNF-α, IL-6, IL-10, IL-17A, TGF-β mRNA were increased in the GAC group with reference to H pylori–infected NGM group. This study is on the interest of cytokine profiles in gastric mucosa among individuals with normal, gastritis, or GAC. Our findings suggest that the immune response of gastric mucosa to infection of H pylori differs from patient to patient. For individual therapy, levels of genomic expression of IL-6 or other cytokines may be tracked in patients. PMID:27196487

  11. Strategy for the treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection.

    PubMed

    Shiota, Seiji; Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2014-01-01

    The eradication of Helicobacter pylori not only heals peptic ulcers but also prevents their recurrence and reduces the risk of development of gastric cancer and other H. pylori-associated disorders. H. pylori eradication heals gastritis and may prevent the spread of infection, reducing the future costs required for the treatment of subsequent H. pylori-associated diseases. There are various guidelines for the management of H. pylori infection worldwide, such as the guidelines of the American College of Gastroenterology, Maastricht IV, the Second Asia-Pacific Consensus Conference, and Japan. The Japanese health insurance system approved H. pylori eradication therapy for H. pylori-related chronic gastritis in 2013. Triple therapy regimens comprising 1 proton pump inhibitor and 2 antimicrobial agents such as amoxicillin, clarithromycin, metronidazole, levofloxacin, or tetracycline have been widely used to eradicate this bacterium. The rate of successful eradication has declined owing to the increased rate of drug resistance stemming from the wide usage of antibiotics. This issue is of particular relevance with regard to clarithromycin. In worldwide, clarithromycin-based triple therapy should be abandoned, as it is no longer effective. Quadruple therapy and sequential therapy are reasonable alternatives for initial therapy. First-line treatment should be recommended on the basis of an understanding of the local prevalence of H. pylori antimicrobial resistance.

  12. Toxicosis in Helicobacter Pylori infection - a hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    BELASCU, MIHAI

    2013-01-01

    Background and aim We present a new clinical entity in relation to the Helicobacter pylori infection characterized by complex and varied clinical extra-digestive manifestations. Clinical findings such as asthenia, adynamia, sleep disorders, hair and nails modifications, digestive symptoms and heart rhythm disorders describe the clinical aspect of toxicosis associated with Helicobacter pylori infection. Methods The clinical presentation and therapy of patients with Helicobacter pylori infection were analyzed. Results Combined drug therapy: antibiotics + proton pump inhibitors + colloidal bismuth compound determinate remission of the symptoms in the first 3 to 5 days. The characteristic of the relation between Helicobacter pylori and the mucus-epithelial cell complex, the properties of the bacterial cell components, and the inflammatory and immunological response targeting other organs describe the immuno-pathological outbreak of Helicobacter pylori. Conclusion We support the term of toxicosis associated with Helicobacter pylori infection in selected cases. PMID:26527950

  13. Medicinal plant activity on Helicobacter pylori related diseases

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuan-Chuen

    2014-01-01

    More than 50% of the world population is infected with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori). The bacterium highly links to peptic ulcer diseases and duodenal ulcer, which was classified as a group I carcinogen in 1994 by the WHO. The pathogenesis of H. pylori is contributed by its virulence factors including urease, flagella, vacuolating cytotoxin A (VacA), cytotoxin-associated gene antigen (Cag A), and others. Of those virulence factors, VacA and CagA play the key roles. Infection with H. pylori vacA-positive strains can lead to vacuolation and apoptosis, whereas infection with cagA-positive strains might result in severe gastric inflammation and gastric cancer. Numerous medicinal plants have been reported for their anti-H. pylori activity, and the relevant active compounds including polyphenols, flavonoids, quinones, coumarins, terpenoids, and alkaloids have been studied. The anti-H. pylori action mechanisms, including inhibition of enzymatic (urease, DNA gyrase, dihydrofolate reductase, N-acetyltransferase, and myeloperoxidase) and adhesive activities, high redox potential, and hydrophilic/hydrophobic natures of compounds, have also been discussed in detail. H. pylori-induced gastric inflammation may progress to superficial gastritis, atrophic gastritis, and finally gastric cancer. Many natural products have anti-H. pylori-induced inflammation activity and the relevant mechanisms include suppression of nuclear factor-κB and mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway activation and inhibition of oxidative stress. Anti-H. pylori induced gastric inflammatory effects of plant products, including quercetin, apigenin, carotenoids-rich algae, tea product, garlic extract, apple peel polyphenol, and finger-root extract, have been documented. In conclusion, many medicinal plant products possess anti-H. pylori activity as well as an anti-H. pylori-induced gastric inflammatory effect. Those plant products have showed great potential as pharmaceutical candidates for H. pylori

  14. [Helicobacter pylori antibiotic sensitivity by microdilution].

    PubMed

    Rivas, F; Rivera, P; Hernández, F; Hevia, F; Guillén, F; Tamayo, G

    2000-01-01

    The gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori has been recognized as the major aetiologic agent of chronic gastritis and peptic ulcers and also a risk factor for gastric cancer; eradication of H pylori prevents peptic ulcer recurrence and may also decrease the prevalence of gastric cancer in high risk populations around the world. Currently the only accepted indication for treatment is ulcer disease and maltosa, infected with Helicobacter pilory. However treatment is difficult and easily develops resistance. The elaboration of an antibiotic profile is recommended after a treatment failure. There is a lack of information in developing countries so the aim of this work was to determine the antibiotic profile of 51 strains isolated from patients gastric biopsies attended at Hospital San Juan de Dios in Costa Rica, using egg yolk broth and finding a resistance of 63.0% to metronidazole with a breakpoint of 8.0 microg/ml and 20.0% resistance to tetracycline (MIC1.0 microg/ml), 6.0% to clarithromicyn with a MIC of 0.125 microg/ml. There was no resistance to amoxicilin (MIC 0.015 microg/ml). The microdilution technique is very laborious, but highly reproducible with results accordingly to previous work, and we recommended it for the designing of therapeutical scheme.

  15. Halitosis and helicobacter pylori infection

    PubMed Central

    Dou, Wenhuan; Li, Juan; Xu, Liming; Zhu, Jianhong; Hu, Kewei; Sui, Zhenyu; Wang, Jianzong; Xu, Lingling; Wang, Shaofeng; Yin, Guojian

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Halitosis is used to describe any disagreeable odor of expired air regardless of its origin. Numerous trials published have investigated the relation between Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) infection and halitosis, and even some regimes of H pylori eradication have been prescribed to those patients with halitosis in the clinic. We conducted a meta-analysis to define the correlation between H pylori infection and halitosis. Objectives: To evaluate whether there is a real correlation between H pylori infection and halitosis, and whether H pylori eradication therapy will help relieve halitosis. Methods: We searched several electronic databases (The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE, PubMed, Web of Science, and Wanfangdata) up to December 2015. Studies published in English and Chinese were considered in this review. After a final set of studies was identified, the list of references reported in the included reports was reviewed to identify additional studies. Screening of titles and abstracts, data extraction and quality assessment was undertaken independently and in duplicate. All analyses were done using Review Manager 5.2 software. Results: A total of 115 articles were identified, 21 of which met the inclusion criteria and presented data that could be used in the analysis. The results showed that the OR of H pylori infection in the stomach between halitosis-positive patients and halitosis-negative patients was 4.03 (95% CI: 1.41–11.50; P = 0.009). The OR of halitosis between H pylori-positive patients and H pylori-negative patients was 2.85 (95% CI: 1.40–5.83; P = 0.004); The RR of halitosis after successful H pylori eradication in those H pylori-infected halitosis-positive patients was 0.17 (95% CI: 0.08–0.39; P <0.0001), compared with those patients without successful H pylori eradication. And the RR of halitosis before successful H pylori eradication therapy was 4.78 (95% CI: 1.45–15.80; P = 0.01), compared with after successful H

  16. Inactivation of Helicobacter pylori by Chloramination

    EPA Science Inventory

    Three strains of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) were studied to determine their resistance to chloramination. H. pylori is an organism listed on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (USEPA) Contaminant Control List (CCL). H. pylori was exposed to 2ppm of pre-formed monoc...

  17. Inactivation of Helicobacter pylori by Chloramination

    EPA Science Inventory

    Three strains of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) were studied to determine their resistance to chloramination. H. pylori is an organism listed on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (USEPA) Contaminant Control List (CCL). H. pylori was exposed to 2ppm of pre-formed monoc...

  18. Helicobacter pylori and Nonmalignant Diseases.

    PubMed

    Potamitis, Georgios S; Axon, Anthony T R

    2015-09-01

    Helicobacter pylori is responsible for most peptic ulcers, plays a role in functional dyspepsia and is thought by some to influence the course of gastroesophageal reflux disease. This article addresses recent studies that have been published in connection with these diseases. H. pylori-associated peptic ulcer is declining in prevalence but the incidence of perforation and bleeding remains high especially in the elderly. All H. pylori associated peptic ulcers should be treated by eradication of the infection. Dyspepsia is a common disorder that affects up to 25% of the population. About 8% of cases that are infected with H. pylori will respond to treatment of the infection. The association between H. pylori and gastroesophageal reflux disease continues to be debated, a number of studies have shown that there is a negative association between H. pylori infection and Gastroesophageal reflux disease but treatment of H. pylori has not been shown to induce reflux or to affect the response to medication. Gastric atrophy is known to extend when acid suppression is used in infected patients implying that H. pylori treatment should be used in infected patients who are to undergo long-term Proton Pump Inhibitor therapy.

  19. Epidemiology of Helicobacter pylori infection.

    PubMed

    Eusebi, Leonardo H; Zagari, Rocco M; Bazzoli, Franco

    2014-09-01

    Medline and PubMed databases were searched on epidemiology of Helicobacter pylori for the period of April 2013-March 2014. Several studies have shown that the prevalence of H. pylori is still high in most countries. In north European and North American populations, about one-third of adults are still infected, whereas in south and east Europe, South America, and Asia, the prevalence of H. pylori is often higher than 50%. H. pylori remains highly prevalent in immigrants coming from countries with high prevalence of H. pylori. However, the lower prevalence of infection in the younger generations suggests a further decline of H. pylori prevalence in the coming decades. Low socioeconomic conditions in childhood are confirmed to be the most important risk factors for H. pylori infection. Although the way the infection is transmitted is still unclear, interpersonal transmission appears to be the main route. Finally, H. pylori recurrence after successful eradication can still occur, but seems to be an infrequent event.

  20. [Detection of Helicobacter pylori in the saliva of patients with recurrent aphthous stomatitis].

    PubMed

    Richter, J; Grimmová, M; Stiborová, I; Král, V; Jílek, D

    2003-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori participates significantly on the pathogeny of chronic gastritis, duodenal and gastric ulcer, carcinoma and lymphoma of the stomach. There are some more diseases requiring attention--for example cardiovascular, dermatologic, and autoimmune. Helicobacter pylori was detected in saliva and faeces of 28 persons by the Premier platinum HpSA diagnostic set. Levels of IgA and IgG antibodies were determined by EIA and Western Blott methods. Parameters of salivary immunity were investigated as well. Levels of IgG, SIgA, IgM, lysozyme and albumin were determined. Recommended therapy of Helicobacter infection led to an evident clinical improvement and descent of the documented Helicobacter pylori antigen. Helicobacter pylori infection can probably participate in some cases of relapsing aphtous stomatitis.

  1. Role of dupA in virulence of Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Talebi Bezmin Abadi, Amin; Perez-Perez, Guillermo

    2016-12-14

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a gastric human pathogen associated with acute and chronic gastritis, 70% of all gastric ulcers, 85% of all duodenal ulcers, and both forms of stomach cancer, mucosal-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma and adenocarcinoma. Recently, attention has focused on possible relationship between presence of certain virulence factor and H. pylori-associated diseases. Some contradictory data between this bacterium and related disorders has been observed since not all the colonized individuals develop to severe disease. The reported diseases plausibility related to H. pylori specific virulence factors became an interesting story about this organism. Although a number of putative virulence factors have been identified including cytotoxin-associated gene a (cagA) and vacA, there are conflicting data about their actual participation as specific risk factor for H. pylori-related diseases. Duodenal ulcer promoting gene a (dupA) is a virulence factor of H. pylori that is highly associated with duodenal ulcer development and reduced risk of gastric cancer. The prevalence of dupA in H. pylori strains isolated from western countries is relatively higher than in H. pylori strains from Asian countries. Current confusing epidemiological reports will continue unless future sophisticated and molecular studies provide data on functional and complete dupA cluster in H. pylori infected individuals. This paper elucidates available knowledge concerning role of dupA in virulence of H. pylori after a decade of its discovery.

  2. Role of dupA in virulence of Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Talebi Bezmin Abadi, Amin; Perez-Perez, Guillermo

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a gastric human pathogen associated with acute and chronic gastritis, 70% of all gastric ulcers, 85% of all duodenal ulcers, and both forms of stomach cancer, mucosal-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma and adenocarcinoma. Recently, attention has focused on possible relationship between presence of certain virulence factor and H. pylori-associated diseases. Some contradictory data between this bacterium and related disorders has been observed since not all the colonized individuals develop to severe disease. The reported diseases plausibility related to H. pylori specific virulence factors became an interesting story about this organism. Although a number of putative virulence factors have been identified including cytotoxin-associated gene a (cagA) and vacA, there are conflicting data about their actual participation as specific risk factor for H. pylori-related diseases. Duodenal ulcer promoting gene a (dupA) is a virulence factor of H. pylori that is highly associated with duodenal ulcer development and reduced risk of gastric cancer. The prevalence of dupA in H. pylori strains isolated from western countries is relatively higher than in H. pylori strains from Asian countries. Current confusing epidemiological reports will continue unless future sophisticated and molecular studies provide data on functional and complete dupA cluster in H. pylori infected individuals. This paper elucidates available knowledge concerning role of dupA in virulence of H. pylori after a decade of its discovery. PMID:28028359

  3. Gastric atrophy and Helicobacter pylori infection in children.

    PubMed

    Boukthir, S; Mrad, S Mazigh; Kalach, N; Sammoud, A

    2009-01-01

    To assess the prevalence of gastric atrophy (GA) in Tunisia (a high prevalence region for Helicobacter pylori), and describe its histological, clinical and endoscopic features in children. 345 children, 151 male and 194 female, mean age 8.6 +/- 3.7 years, underwent upper gastrointestinal (UGI) endoscopy with gastric biopsies for recurrent abdominal pain (n=232, 67.2%), vomiting (n=72, 20%) associated with or without upper gastrointestinal bleeding (n=59, 17.1%) and miscellaneous causes (n=53, 15.4 %). Biopsies performed both in the gastric antrum (n=2) and corpus (n=2) were analysed for histological assessment according to the updated Sydney classification system and bacterial culture. A positive result was recorded where histology and/or culture were positive, confirming the presence of H. pylori infection (H. pylori +ve). A negative result was recorded when both tests were concomitantly negative (H. pylori -ve). 9.3% (32/345) of the total population, and 14.5% (32/221) of chronic gastritis patients exhibited GA, M/F: 16/16, mean age (SD) 9.4 (3.4) years. Amongst the 32 children with GA, 30 (93.7%) were H. pylori +ve and 2 (6.3%) were H. pylori -ve. GA was localised in the antrum (n=26, 81.2%), the fundus (n=2, 6.3%) and was also seen in both (n=4, 12.5%). GA was categorised as mild, grade 1 (n=18, 56.3%); moderate, grade 2 (n=13, 46.6%); and severe, grade 3 (n=1, 3.1%). GA was associated with mild active gastritis in 18 cases (56.3%). The prevalence of moderate or severe antral GA was detected in 9/26 (34.6%) of H. pylori +ve vs. any of H. pylori -ve (p=0.4), whereas GA in the corpus was detected in 1/2 (50%) vs. none, respectively. None exhibited intestinal metaplasia. There were no clinical features specific to this pathology. UGI endoscopy in GA patients showed nodular gastritis (n=17, 53.1%), congestive gastritis (n=9, 28.1%), and normal tissue (n=6, 18.8%). GA was significantly associated with H. pylori infection (p<0.0001) and nodular gastritis (p<0

  4. A Comparative Study of Clinicopathological Features between Chronic Cholecystitis Patients with and without Helicobacter pylori Infection in Gallbladder Mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jian-dong; Zhang, Yong; Gong, Wei; Quan, Zhi-wei

    2013-01-01

    Background Helicobacter pylori has been isolated from 10%–20% of human chronic cholecystitis specimens but the characteristics of “Helicobacter pylori positive cholecystitis” remains unclear. This study aims to compare the clinicopathological features between chronic cholecystitis patients with and without Helicobacter pylori infection in gallbladder mucosa. Methods Three hundred and twenty-six chronic cholecystitis patients were divided into two groups according to whether Helicobacter pylori could be detected by culture, staining or PCR for Helicobacter 16s rRNA gene in gallbladder mucosa. Positive samples were sequenced for Helicobacter pylori-specific identification. Clinical parameters as well as pathological characteristics including some premalignant lesions and the expression levels of iNOS and ROS in gallbladder were compared between the two groups. Results Helicobacter pylori infection in gallbladder mucosa was detected in 20.55% of cholecystitis patients. These patients had a higher prevalence of acid regurgitation symptoms (p = 0.001), more histories of chronic gastritis (p = 0.005), gastric ulcer (p = 0.042), duodenal ulcer (p = 0.026) and higher presence of Helicobacter pylori in the stomach as compared to patients without Helicobacter pylori infection in the gallbladder mucosa. Helicobacter pylori 16s rRNA in gallbladder and gastric-duodenal mucosa from the same individual patient had identical sequences. Also, higher incidences of adenomyomatosis (p = 0.012), metaplasia (p = 0.022) and higher enhanced expressions of iNOS and ROS were detected in Helicobacter pylori infected gallbladder mucosa (p<0.05). Conclusions Helicobacter pylori infection in gallbladder mucosa is strongly associated with Helicobacter pylori existed in stomach. Helicobacter pylori is also correlated with gallbladder premalignant lesions including metaplasia and adenomyomatosis. The potential mechanism might be related with higher ROS/RNS production

  5. Pharmacoeconomic comparison of Helicobacter pylori eradication regimens.

    PubMed

    Sancar, Mesut; Izzettin, Fikret Vehbi; Apikoglu-Rabus, Sule; Besisik, Fatih; Tozun, Nurdan; Dulger, Gul

    2006-08-01

    Helicobacter pylori is the most important etiologic agent for development of peptic ulcer, chronic gastritis and gastric carcinomas. It is now well established that H. pylori eradication treatment is more cost-effective than acid suppressing therapies alone for the treatment of peptic ulcer disease. However, the comparative cost-effectiveness of various H. pylori eradication regimens is still not clear. This study was designed to make a pharmacoeconomic comparison of different H. pylori eradication regimens in patients with peptic ulcer disease or chronic gastritis, using real-world cost and effectiveness data. Istanbul University Hospital and Marmara University Hospital. A total of 75 patients diagnosed as H. pylori (+) by endoscopy were randomized to receive one of the seven H. pylori treatment protocols. These protocols were as follows: (LAC) = 'lansoprazole 30 mg bid + amoxicillin 1 g bid + clarithromycin 500 mg bid' for 7 days and (OCM) = 'omeprazole 20 mg bid + clarithromycin 250 mg bid + metronidazole 500 mg bid'; (OAM) = 'omeprazole 40 mg qd + amoxicillin 500 mg tid + metronidazole 500 mg tid'; (MARB) = 'metronidazole 250 mg tid + amoxicillin 500 mg qid + ranitidine 300 mg hs + bismuth 300 mg qid'; (OAC) = omeprazole 20 mg bid + amoxicillin 1 g bid + clarithromycin 500 mg bid'; (OCA) = omeprazole 40 mg bid + clarithromycin 500 mg bid + amoxicillin 1 g bid'; (OAB) = 'omeprazole 20 mg bid + amoxicillin 500 mg tid + bismuth 300 mg qid' each for 14 days. Only direct costs were included in the analysis. Effectiveness was measured in terms of "successful eradication". The cost-effectiveness ratios of the regimens were calculated using these effectiveness and cost data. The perspective of the study was assumed as the Government's perspective. Cost-effectiveness ratios of eradication regimens. MARB and OCA regimens were found to be more cost-effective than the other treatment regimens. The eradication rates and cost-effectiveness ratios calculated for these

  6. Helicobacter pylori and nonmalignant diseases.

    PubMed

    Ierardi, Enzo; Goni, Elisabetta; Losurdo, Giuseppe; Di Mario, Francesco

    2014-09-01

    Peptic ulcer bleeding and recurrence rate are strongly linked to Helicobacter pylori infection even if nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) play a relevant role in this setting. Further studies confirm that H. pylori eradication lowers the risk of recurrent peptic ulcer bleeding. Therefore, a test-and-treat strategy appears to be mandatory for patients with a history of ulcer bleeding and NSAIDs and/or aspirin use. Concerning gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), evidence clearly shows that H. pylori status has no effect on symptoms and treatment. Therefore, H. pylori treatment is not contraindicated in patients with GERD. The exact role of H. pylori in functional dyspepsia (FD) remains controversial. Novel possible mechanisms by which H. pylori may elicit dyspeptic symptoms include alterations of gastric motility, as well as endocrine and acid-secretory abnormalities. Hunger sensations, acid secretion, and gastrointestinal motility are regulated by ghrelin, particularly produced by the gastric enteroendocrine cell compartment. The improvement of symptoms correlates with enhanced plasma ghrelin levels. Apart from the need for more trials on this topic, these findings may give insight into the underlying pathophysiology of FD symptoms. Recent reports suggest that the presence of bacterial DNA in the oral cavity may be relevant to its transmission. A potential protective role of H. pylori on inflammatory bowel diseases needs to be better elucidated.

  7. The Clinical Evidence Linking Helicobacter pylori to Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Moss, Steven F

    2017-03-01

    Gastric cancer has long been recognized to be accompanied and preceded by chronic gastritis, lasting decades. Arguably, the most important development in our understanding of gastric cancer pathogenesis over the past 50 years has been the realization that, for most cases of gastric cancer, Helicobacter pylori is the cause of the underlying gastritis. Gastritis can promote gastric carcinogenesis, typically via the Correa cascade of atrophic gastritis, intestinal metaplasia, and dysplasia. Nested case-control studies have shown that H pylori infection increases the risk of gastric cancer significantly, both of the intestinal and diffuse subtypes, and that H pylori is responsible for approximately 90% of the world's burden of noncardia gastric cancer. Based largely on randomized studies in high gastric cancer prevalence regions in East Asia, it appears that primary and tertiary intervention to eradicate H pylori can halve the risk of gastric cancer. Some public health authorities now are starting screening and treatment programs to reduce the burden of gastric cancer in these high-risk areas. However, there is currently much less enthusiasm for initiating similar attempts in the United States. This is partially because gastric cancer is a relatively less frequent cause of cancer in the United States, and in addition there are concerns about theoretical downsides of H pylori eradication, principally because of the consistent inverse relationship noted between H pylori and esophageal adenocarcinoma. Nevertheless, establishing a link between chronic H pylori infection and gastric cancer has led to novel insights into cancer biology, the gastrointestinal microbiome, and on individual and population-based gastric cancer prevention strategies.

  8. Non-invasive detection and successful treatment of a Helicobacter pylori infection in a captive rhesus macaque.

    PubMed

    Semrau, Antje; Gerold, Susanne; Frick, Julia-Stefanie; Iglauer, Franz

    2017-04-01

    Gastritis is a commonly diagnosed condition in non-human primates used in biomedical research. As in humans, Helicobacter pylori infection may cause gastritis. The following report presents a method of non-invasive detection and a successful treatment protocol for this common pathogen.

  9. The role of the gastrointestinal microbiome in Helicobacter pylori pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Sheh, Alexander; Fox, James G

    2013-01-01

    The discovery of Helicobacter pylori overturned the conventional dogma that the stomach was a sterile organ and that pH values < 4 were capable of sterilizing the stomach. H. pylori are an etiological agent associated with gastritis, hypochlorhydria, duodenal ulcers, and gastric cancer. It is now appreciated that the human stomach supports a bacterial community with possibly 100s of bacterial species that influence stomach homeostasis. Other bacteria colonizing the stomach may also influence H. pylori-associated gastric pathogenesis by creating reactive oxygen and nitrogen species and modulating inflammatory responses. In this review, we summarize the available literature concerning the gastric microbiota in humans, mice, and Mongolian gerbils. We also discuss the gastric perturbations, many involving H. pylori, that facilitate the colonization by bacteria from other compartments of the gastrointestinal tract, and identify risk factors known to affect gastric homeostasis that contribute to changes in the microbiota. PMID:23962822

  10. The role of the gastrointestinal microbiome in Helicobacter pylori pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Sheh, Alexander; Fox, James G

    2013-01-01

    The discovery of Helicobacter pylori overturned the conventional dogma that the stomach was a sterile organ and that pH values<4 were capable of sterilizing the stomach. H. pylori are an etiological agent associated with gastritis, hypochlorhydria, duodenal ulcers, and gastric cancer. It is now appreciated that the human stomach supports a bacterial community with possibly 100s of bacterial species that influence stomach homeostasis. Other bacteria colonizing the stomach may also influence H. pylori-associated gastric pathogenesis by creating reactive oxygen and nitrogen species and modulating inflammatory responses. In this review, we summarize the available literature concerning the gastric microbiota in humans, mice, and Mongolian gerbils. We also discuss the gastric perturbations, many involving H. pylori, that facilitate the colonization by bacteria from other compartments of the gastrointestinal tract, and identify risk factors known to affect gastric homeostasis that contribute to changes in the microbiota.

  11. The Role of PPARγ in Helicobacter pylori Infection and Gastric Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jong-Min; Kim, Sung Soo; Cho, Young-Seok

    2012-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) is a nuclear receptor that is important in many physiological and pathological processes, such as lipid metabolism, insulin sensitivity, inflammation, cell proliferation, and carcinogenesis. Several studies have shown that PPARγ plays an important role in gastric mucosal injury due to Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori). As H. pylori infection is the main etiologic factor in chronic gastritis and gastric cancer, understanding of the potential roles of PPARγ in H. pylori infection may lead to the development of a therapeutic target. In this paper, the authors discuss the current knowledge on the role of PPARγ in H. pylori infection and its related gastric carcinogenesis. PMID:22936949

  12. Helicobacter pylori in lacrimal secretions.

    PubMed

    Batioglu-Karaaltin, Aysegul; Saatci, Ozlem; Akpinar, Meltem; Celik, Melih Ozgür; Develioglu, Omer; Yigit, Ozgur; Külekçi, Mehmet; Akarsubaşı, Alper Tunga

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of Helicobacter pylori in human lacrimal and nasal secretions. Eighty patients with complaints of dyspepsia who had undergone endoscopies and gastric antrum biopsies were included in the study. A total of five specimens, including 2 lacrimal secretion samples, 2 nasal mucosal swab samples, and 1 gastric antrum biopsy, were collected from each patient and investigated with polymerase chain reaction (PCR) methods consisting of the urease enzyme coding gene GlmM (UreC) and the H pylori-specific 16S rRNA coding gene. The Reflux Symptom Index and ophthalmologic complaints of the patients were recorded. The detected positivity rates of the H pylori 16S rRNA coding gene in gastric biopsies and nasal mucous and lacrimal secretions were 55, 11.2, and 20%, respectively. The patients were grouped as gastric-antrum-biopsy-negative (Group I [n = 36]) and -positive (Group II [n = 44). In Group II, H pylori positivity in the lacrimal and nasal mucous secretions was 36.3 and 18%, respectively. A comparison between the groups in terms of H pylori presence in nasal mucous and lacrimal secretions yielded statistically significant differences (p = 0.0001, p = 0.003). The simultaneous presence of H pylori in nasal mucous and lacrimal secretions was 13.6% in Group II. H pylori positivity in nasal mucous and lacrimal secretions had a positive moderate correlation (r = 0.40; p = 0.0003). The present study is the first report on the presence of H pylori in lacrimal secretions through nested PCR, which suggested the presence of a number of mechanisms for H pylori transmission to lacrimal secretions.

  13. Helicobacter pylori infection and expression of DNA mismatch repair proteins

    PubMed Central

    Mirzaee, Vahid; Molaei, Mahsa; Shalmani, Hamid Mohaghegh; Zali, Mohammad Reza

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To determine the expression of DNA (MMR) proteins, including hMLH1 and hMSH2, in gastric epithelial cells in the patients with or without Helicobacter pylori (H pylori)-infected gastritis. METHODS: Fifty H pylori-positive patients and 50 H pylori-negative patients were enrolled in the study. During endoscopy of patients with non-ulcer dyspepsia, two antral and two corpus biopsies were taken for histological examination (Giemsa stain) and for immunohistochemical staining of hMLH1 and hMSH2. RESULTS: The percentage of epithelial cell nuclei that demonstrated positivity for hMLH1 staining was 84.14 ± 7.32% in H pylori-negative patients, while it was 73.34 ± 10.10% in H pylori-positive patients (P < 0.0001). No significant difference was seen between the two groups regarding the percentage of epithelial cell nuclei that demonstrated positivity for hMSH2 staining (81.16 ± 8.32% in H pylori-negative versus 78.24 ± 8.71% in H pylori-positive patients; P = 0.09). CONCLUSION: This study indicates that H pylori might promote development of gastric carcinoma at least in part through its ability to affect the DNA MMR system. PMID:19034977

  14. Pathogenesis of Helicobacter pylori infection

    PubMed Central

    Sgouras, Dionyssios N.; Trang, Tran Thi Huyen; Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2015-01-01

    Three decades have passed since Warren and Marshall described the successful isolation and culture of Helicobacter pylori, the Gram-negative bacterium that colonizes the stomach of half the human population worldwide. Although it is documented that H. pylori infection is implicated in a range of disorders of the upper gastrointestinal tract, as well as associated organs, many aspects relating to host colonization, successful persistence and the pathophysiological mechanisms of this bacteria still remain controversial and are constantly being explored. Unceasing efforts to decipher the pathophysiology of H. pylori infection have illuminated the crucially important contribution of multifarious bacterial factors for H. pylori pathogenesis, in particular the cag pathogenicity island (PAI), the effector protein CagA and the vacuolating cytotoxin VacA. In addition, recent studies have provided insight into the importance of the gastrointestinal microbiota on the cumulative pathophysiology associated with H. pylori infections. This review focuses on the key findings of publications related to the pathogenesis of H. pylori infection published during the last year, with an emphasis on factors affecting colonization efficiency, cag PAI, CagA, VacA and gastrointestinal microbiota. PMID:26372819

  15. Pathogenesis of Helicobacter pylori Infection.

    PubMed

    Sgouras, Dionyssios N; Trang, Tran Thi Huyen; Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2015-09-01

    Three decades have passed since Warren and Marshall described the successful isolation and culture of Helicobacter pylori, the Gram-negative bacterium that colonizes the stomach of half the human population worldwide. Although it is documented that H. pylori infection is implicated in a range of disorders of the upper gastrointestinal tract, as well as associated organs, many aspects relating to host colonization, successful persistence, and the pathophysiological mechanisms of this bacteria still remain controversial and are constantly being explored. Unceasing efforts to decipher the pathophysiology of H. pylori infection have illuminated the crucially important contribution of multifarious bacterial factors for H. pylori pathogenesis, in particular the cag pathogenicity island (PAI), the effector protein CagA, and the vacuolating cytotoxin VacA. In addition, recent studies have provided insight into the importance of the gastrointestinal microbiota on the cumulative pathophysiology associated with H. pylori infection. This review focuses on the key findings of publications related to the pathogenesis of H. pylori infection published during the last year, with an emphasis on factors affecting colonization efficiency, cagPAI, CagA, VacA, and gastrointestinal microbiota. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Laryngopharyngeal reflux and Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Yılmaz, Taner; Bajin, Münir Demir; Günaydın, Rıza Önder; Özer, Serdar; Sözen, Tevfik

    2014-01-01

    Laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR) occurs when gastric contents pass the upper esophageal sphincter, causing symptoms such as hoarseness, sore throat, coughing, excess throat mucus, and globus. The pattern of reflux is different in LPR and gastroesophageal reflux. LPR usually occurs during the daytime in the upright position whereas gastroesophageal reflux disease more often occurs in the supine position at night-time or during sleep. Ambulatory 24-h double pH-probe monitoring is the gold standard diagnostic tool for LPR. Acid suppression with proton pump inhibitor on a long-term basis is the mainstay of treatment. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is found in many sites including laryngeal mucosa and interarytenoid region. In this paper, we aim to present the relationship between LPR and H. pylori and review the current literature. PMID:25083069

  17. Helicobacter pylori and autoimmune disease: Cause or bystander

    PubMed Central

    Smyk, Daniel S; Koutsoumpas, Andreas L; Mytilinaiou, Maria G; Rigopoulou, Eirini I; Sakkas, Lazaros I; Bogdanos, Dimitrios P

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is the main cause of chronic gastritis and a major risk factor for gastric cancer. This pathogen has also been considered a potential trigger of gastric autoimmunity, and in particular of autoimmune gastritis. However, a considerable number of reports have attempted to link H. pylori infection with the development of extra-gastrointestinal autoimmune disorders, affecting organs not immediately relevant to the stomach. This review discusses the current evidence in support or against the role of H. pylori as a potential trigger of autoimmune rheumatic and skin diseases, as well as organ specific autoimmune diseases. We discuss epidemiological, serological, immunological and experimental evidence associating this pathogen with autoimmune diseases. Although over one hundred autoimmune diseases have been investigated in relation to H. pylori, we discuss a select number of papers with a larger literature base, and include Sjögrens syndrome, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, vasculitides, autoimmune skin conditions, idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, autoimmune thyroid disease, multiple sclerosis, neuromyelitis optica and autoimmune liver diseases. Specific mention is given to those studies reporting an association of anti-H. pylori antibodies with the presence of autoimmune disease-specific clinical parameters, as well as those failing to find such associations. We also provide helpful hints for future research. PMID:24574735

  18. Transmission of Helicobacter pylori: a role for food?

    PubMed Central

    van Duynhoven, Y. T.; de Jonge, R.

    2001-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori colonizes and grows in human gastric epithelial tissue and mucus. Its presence is associated with gastritis and there is substantial evidence that it causes peptic and duodenal ulcers and chronic gastritis. Since 1994, H. pylori has been classified as carcinogenic to humans. In industrialized countries, as many as 50% of adults are infected with the pathogen, while in the developing world, prevalence values of about 90% have been reported. As little is known about the mode of transmission, a literature search was carried out to determine whether food acts a reservoir or vehicle in the transmission of H. pylori. Although growth of the pathogen should be possible in the gastrointestinal tract of all warm-blooded animals, the human stomach is its only known reservoir. Under conditions where growth is not possible, H. pylori can enter a viable, but nonculturable state. H. pylori has been detected in such states in water, but not in food. Person-to-person contact is thought to be the most likely mode of transmission, and there is no direct evidence that food is involved in the transmission of H. pylori. PMID:11417041

  19. Serum pepsinogen I and II concentrations and IgG antibody to Helicobacter pylori in dyspeptic patients.

    PubMed Central

    Biasco, G; Paganelli, G M; Vaira, D; Holton, J; Di Febo, G; Brillanti, S; Miglioli, M; Barbara, L; Samloff, I M

    1993-01-01

    AIMS--To investigate the association between histologically confirmed gastritis, carriage of Helicobacter pylori and pepsinogen (PG) I and PG II concentrations. METHODS--Prospective study of 81 dyspeptic patients undergoing upper gastrointestinal endoscopy was made. The extent of gastric mucosal inflammation and the presence of H pylori was determined, and serology to evaluate PG I and II concentrations and IgG titres to H pylori was carried out. RESULTS--The presence of H pylori was strongly correlated with high IgG antibody titres to H pylori and gastritis. Patients who were H pylori positive had significantly higher PG I and PG II concentrations and a significantly lower PG I:PG II ratio than patients who were negative for H pylori. In 13 patients with duodenal ulcer and H pylori positive gastritis serum PG I concentrations were significantly higher than in H pylori positive patients without duodenal ulcer. Significant correlations were found between the age of patients and serum PG II, the PG I:PG II ratio, IgG antibodies to H pylori, the severity of body gastritis and H pylori infection, and between the degree of gastritis in the body of the stomach and the PG II concentration. CONCLUSIONS--Serum PG I and II concentrations, together with a fall in the PG I:PG II ratio, could be used as predictors of H pylori infection as well as serum IgG antibody response to H pylori. PMID:8227432

  20. The eradication treatments of Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Wermeille, J; Zelger, G; Cunningham, M

    1998-02-01

    The eradication of Helicobacter pylori is at present widely recognized as the adequate therapeutic approach for gastric and duodenal ulcers in infected patients. In those with dyspepsia but no ulcer as well as in those with type B chronic gastritis, eradication remains controversial. It is difficult to have a clear opinion on the advantages and disadvantages of the numerous existing therapies. Therefore, a systematic review of published treatments has been made by the authors. Ideally, the eradication treatment of H. pylori should have the following advantages: 1. eradication superior to 90%, 2. simplicity, 3. short duration, 4. safety, 5. low cost, 6. reproducibility of results. Dual therapies (2 antibiotics or a proton pump inhibitor in combination with an antibiotic) rarely allow an eradication greater than 90% and the results have poor reproducibility. Consequently, they do not represent an ideal anti-H. pylori treatment. Triple therapies come closer to the requirements for an ideal treatment, with eradication rates generally close to 90%, varying little between studies and the countries in which they were performed. The triple therapy bismuth-imidazole-tetracycline (or amoxicillin) still represents for many authors the standard reference therapy. It has the advantage of low cost, high efficacy and widespread use. It is the therapy that has been the most studied. However, the increasing emergence of strains resistant to imidazoles, the complexity of the treatment (10 to 12 tablets per day), the numerous adverse effects and the lack of availability of bismuth salts in certain countries has led to the elaboration of therapeutic schemes combining an antisecretory drug with 2 antibiotics. Among these, the combination PPI-clarithromycine-imidazole during 7 days represents the most studied triple therapy of short duration for some authors, it already represents a new standard. However, the efficacy of this therapy seems dependent on the sensitivity of the bacteria to

  1. Bacteriology of Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Owen, R J

    1995-09-01

    The discovery and first isolation of H. pylori in pure culture from gastric biopsies in 1982 provided the basis for a completely new area of microbiology. Since then, H. pylori has been an intensively pursued topic world-wide, and extensive data have been acquired on all aspects of its basic microbiology, both at the conventional phenotypic level and at the molecular level. H. pylori is a remarkable microorganism because of its ability to readily colonize a major proportion of human population worldwide and to persist successfully for long periods (probably decades) in a hostile environment. At the same time it interacts with the host immune system in such a way as to permit long-term survival. Blaser (1993) proposed a model in which both host and parasite adapt to down regulate inflammatory phenomena to promote survival. Urease production by H. pylori (an important factor in that process) is one of its most distinct features with a key role in its success as an infective agent. Another less obvious yet highly significant feature of H. pylori is the ability to achieve a high degree of interstrain diversity in genomic DNA nucleotide sequences, while maintaining overall genetic homology and phenotypic homogeneity amongst strains. The selective advantage this diversity provides the bacterium is not understood. A key objective of future microbiological studies should be to understand the population genetic structure of H. pylori. Most species of bacteria are clonal in natural population structure, yet all genomic data suggest the contrary is true for H. pylori. Furthermore, it is not clear if all strains of H. pylori are equally pathogenic, and that some subsets may possess additional pathogenicity factors that are responsible for the development of different disease pathologies. A phylogenetic framework of the genetic relationships of the clones within H. pylori would enable an examination of the total genetic diversity, with respect to ethnic or geographical

  2. Antibiotic resistance in Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Alba, Claudio; Blanco, Ana; Alarcón, Teresa

    2017-10-01

    Treatment of Helicobacter pylori is difficult nowadays because of its high resistance. The prevalence and mechanism of resistance, the different methods to detect it and the clinical implication of resistance were addressed in several research papers last year. Clarithromycin-resistant H. pylori has been recognized by the WHO as 'high priority', for which new antibiotics are needed. Moreover, the Maastricht consensus recommended, in areas with high resistance, that susceptibility tests should be performed, at least after a treatment failure. Metronidazole and clarithromycin resistance rates are alarming although they vary among populations. Tetracycline and amoxicillin-resistance are very low in most countries. H. pylori resistance can be detected by phenotypic or by molecular methods. Different break points may be used when performing an antimicrobial susceptibility test, so comparing resistance among different populations is challenging. Genomic techniques open new possibilities in the diagnosis of H. pylori, and the detection of H. pylori and its antimicrobial resistance in faeces is an interesting approach. Eradication rates are dependent on the susceptibility of the strain to metronidazole and clarithromycin, being lower in patients infected with a resistant strain.

  3. What constitutes an Arabian Helicobacter pylori? Lessons from comparative genomics.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Narender; Albert, M John; Al Abkal, Hanan; Siddique, Iqbal; Ahmed, Niyaz

    2017-02-01

    Helicobacter pylori, the human gastric pathogen, causes a variety of gastric diseases ranging from mild gastritis to gastric cancer. While the studies on H. pylori are dominated by those based on either East Asian or Western strains, information regarding H. pylori strains prevalent in the Middle East remains scarce. Therefore, we carried out whole-genome sequencing and comparative analysis of three H. pylori strains isolated from three native Arab, Kuwaiti patients. H. pylori strains were sequenced using Illumina platform. The sequence reads were filtered and draft genomes were assembled and annotated. Various pathogenicity-associated regions and phages present within the genomes were identified. Phylogenetic analysis was carried out to determine the genetic relatedness of Kuwaiti strains to various lineages of H. pylori. The core genome content and virulence-related genes were analyzed to assess the pathogenic potential. The three genomes clustered along with HpEurope strains in the phylogenetic tree comprising various H. pylori lineages. A total of 1187 genes spread among various functional classes were identified in the core genome analysis. The three genomes possessed a complete cagPAI and also retained most of the known outer membrane proteins as well as virulence-related genes. The cagA gene in all three strains consisted of an AB-C type EPIYA motif. The comparative genomic analysis of Kuwaiti H. pylori strains revealed a European ancestry and a high pathogenic potential. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. The significance of virulence factors in Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    SHIOTA, Seiji; SUZUKI, Rumiko; YAMAOKA, Yoshio

    2013-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is linked to various gastroduodenal diseases; however, only a small fraction of these patients develop associated diseases. Despite the high prevalence of H. pylori infection in Africa and South Asia, the incidence of gastric cancer in these areas is much lower than those in other countries. The incidence of gastric cancer tends to decrease from north to south in East Asia. Such geographic differences in the pathology can be explained, at least in part, by the presence of different types of H. pylori virulence factors in addition to the host and environmental factors. Virulence factors of H. pylori, such as cagA, vacA, dupA, iceA, oipA and babA, have been demonstrated to be predictors of severe clinical outcomes. Interestingly, meta-analysis showed that CagA seropositivity was associated with gastric cancer compared with gastritis even in East Asian countries where almost of the strains possessing cagA. Meta-analysis also confirmed the significance of vacA, dupA and iceA. However, there remains the possibility that additional important pathogenic genes can be existed because H. pylori consists of approximately 1 600 genes. Despite advances in our understanding of the development of H. pylori-related diseases, further work is required to clarify the roles of H. pylori virulence factors. PMID:23452293

  5. [On the rating of Helicobacter pylori in drinking water].

    PubMed

    Fedichkina, T P; Solenova, L G; Zykova, I E

    2014-01-01

    There are considered the issues related to the possibility to rate of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) content in drinking water. There is described the mechanism of of biofilm formation. The description refers to the biofilm formation mechanism in water supply systems and the existence of H. pylori in those systems. The objective premises of the definition of H. pylori as a potential limiting factor for assessing the quality of drinking water have been validated as follows: H. pylori is an etiologic factor associated to the development of chronic antral gastritis, gastric ulcer and duodenal ulcer, and gastric cancer either, in the Russian population the rate of infection with H. pylori falls within range of 56 - 90%, water supply pathway now can be considered as a source of infection of the population with H. pylori, the existence of WHO regulatory documents considering H. pylori as a candidate for standardization of the quality of the drinking water quite common occurrence of biocorrosion, the reduction of sanitary water network reliability, that creates the possibility of concentrating H. pylori in some areas of the water system and its delivery to the consumer of drinking water, and causes the necessity of the prevention of H. pylori-associated gastric pathology of the population. A comprehensive and harmonized approach to H. pylori is required to consider it as a candidate to its rating in drinking water. Bearing in mind the large economic losses due to, on the one hand, the prevalence of disease caused by H. pylori, and, on the other hand, the biocorrosion of water supply system, the problem is both relevant in terms of communal hygiene and economy.

  6. [Elimination of Helicobacter pylori in patients with recurrent abdominal pain with simultaneous administration of ranitidine, bismuth subsalicylate and clarithromycin].

    PubMed

    Ramirez Mayans, J A; Zamora Davila, E; Cervantes Bustamante, R; Mata Rivera, N; Oyervides Garcia, I; Cuevas, S; Zarate Mondragón, F E

    1996-01-01

    Elimination of Helicobacter pylori with Chlaritromicin, Bismuth subsalicylate and Ranitidine; and improvement of recurrent abdominal pain. ANTECEDENT: Different antibiotics, antagonist H2 and others has been used for elimination and, or eradication of Helicobacter pylori. 22 children with recurrent abdominal pain associated to gastritis and histologic identification of Helicobacter pylori were studied under a period of 18 months (january 1992 to june 1993), at Instituto Nacional de Pediatría, México, D:F: All children were treated simultaneously with: Chlaritromicin, 15 days, Plus ranitidine and bismuth subsalicylate for one month. Helicobacter pylori was eliminate in 14 of 22 children studied. All these children had an important improvement of recurrent abdominal pain. Elimination of Helicobacter pylori and clinical improvement was present in 14 of 22 children studied (63.7%).

  7. Non-pharmacological treatment of Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Shmuely, Haim; Domniz, Noam; Yahav, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    Many food and plant extracts have shown in vitro anti-Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) activity, but are less effective in vivo. The anti-H. pylori effects of these extracts are mainly permeabilitization of the membrane, anti-adhesion, inhibition of bacterial enzymes and bacterial grown. We, herein, review treatment effects of cranberry, garlic, curcumin, ginger and pistacia gum against H. pylori in both in vitro, animal studies and in vivo studies. PMID:27158532

  8. Consequences of Helicobacter pylori infection in children

    PubMed Central

    Pacifico, Lucia; Anania, Caterina; Osborn, John F; Ferraro, Flavia; Chiesa, Claudio

    2010-01-01

    Although evidence is emerging that the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is declining in all age groups, the understanding of its disease spectrum continues to evolve. If untreated, H. pylori infection is lifelong. Although H. pylori typically colonizes the human stomach for many decades without adverse consequences, children infected with H. pylori can manifest gastrointestinal diseases. Controversy persists regarding testing (and treating) for H. pylori infection in children with recurrent abdominal pain, chronic idiopathic thrombocytopenia, and poor growth. There is evidence of the role of H. pylori in childhood iron deficiency anemia, but the results are not conclusive. The possibility of an inverse relationship between H. pylori and gastroesophageal reflux disease, as well as childhood asthma, remains a controversial question. A better understanding of the H. pylori disease spectrum in childhood should lead to clearer recommendations about testing for and treating H. pylori infection in children who are more likely to develop clinical sequelae. PMID:21049552

  9. Pathogenesis of Helicobacter pylori infection.

    PubMed

    Camilo, Vania; Sugiyama, Toshiro; Touati, Eliette

    2017-09-01

    Helicobacter pylori is responsible for the most commonly found infection in the world's population. It is the major risk factor for gastric cancer development. Numerous studies published over the last year provide new insights into the strategies employed by H. pylori to adapt to the extreme acidic conditions of the gastric environment, to establish persistent infection and to deregulate host functions, leading to gastric pathogenesis and cancer. In this review, we report recent data on the mechanisms involved in chemotaxis, on the essential role of nickel in acid resistance and gastric colonization, on the importance of adhesins and Hop proteins and on the role of CagPAI-components and CagA. Among the host functions, a special focus has been made on the escape from immune response, the ability of bacteria to induce genetic instability and modulate telomeres, the mechanism of autophagy and the deregulation of micro RNAs. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection.

    PubMed

    Dzierzanowska-Fangrat, Katarzyna; Lehours, Philippe; Mégraud, Francis; Dzierzanowska, Danuta

    2006-10-01

    A growing interest in non-invasive tests for the detection of Helicobacter pylori has been observed recently, reflecting a large number of studies published this year. New tests have been validated, and the old ones have been used in different clinical situations or for different purposes. Stool antigen tests have been extensively evaluated in pre- and post-treatment settings both in adults and children, and the urea breath test has been studied as a predictor of bacterial load, severity of gastric inflammation, and response to eradication treatment. Several studies have also explored the usefulness of some serologic markers as indicators of the gastric mucosa status. With regard to invasive tests, molecular methods are being used more and more, but the breakthrough this year was the direct in vivo observation of H. pylori during endoscopy.

  11. Antimicrobial Nanotherapeutics Against Helicobacter pylori Infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thamphiwatana, Soracha

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection with its vast prevalence is responsible for various gastric diseases including gastritis, peptic ulcers, and gastric malignancy. While effective, current treatment regimens are challenged by a fast-declining eradication rate due to the increasing emergence of H. pylori strains resistant to existing antibiotics. Therefore, there is an urgent need to develop novel antibacterial strategies against H. pylori. The first area of this research, we developed a liposomal nanoformulation of linolenic acid (LipoLLA) and evaluated its bactericidal activity against resistant strains of H. pylori. We found that LipoLLA was effective in killing both spiral and dormant forms of the bacteria via disrupting bacterial membranes. LipoLLA eradicated all strains of the bacteria regardless of their antibiotic resistance status. Furthermore, the bacteria did not develop drug resistance toward LipoLLA. Our findings suggest that LipoLLA is a promising antibacterial nanotherapeutic to treat antibiotic-resistant H. pylori infection. The next step, we investigated the in vivo therapeutic potential of LipoLLA for the treatment of H. pylori infection. In vivo tests further confirmed that LipoLLA was able to kill H. pylori and reduce bacterial load in the mouse stomach. LipoLLA treatment was also shown to reduce the levels of proinflammatory cytokines including interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta), IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor alpha, which were otherwise elevated due to the H. pylori infection. Finally, toxicity test demonstrated excellent biocompatibility of LipoLLA to normal mouse stomach. Collectively, results from this work indicate that LipoLLA is a promising, new, effective, and safe therapeutic agent for the treatment of H. pylori infection. The second area is stimuli-responsive liposomes development. By adsorbing small chitosan-modified gold nanoparticles (AuChi) onto the outer surface of liposomes, we show that at gastric pH the liposomes have

  12. Helicobacter pylori Adhesion to Carbohydrates

    PubMed Central

    Aspholm, Marina; Kalia, Awdhesh; Ruhl, Stefan; Schedin, Staffan; Arnqvist, Anna; Lindén, Sara; Sjöström, Rolf; Gerhard, Markus; Semino-Mora, Cristina; Dubois, Andre; Unemo, Magnus; Danielsson, Dan; Teneberg, Susann; Lee, Woo-Kon; Berg, Douglas E.; Borén, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Adherence of bacterial pathogens to host tissues contributes to colonization and virulence and typically involves specific interactions between bacterial proteins called adhesins and cognate oligosaccharide (glycan) or protein motifs in the host that are used as receptors. A given pathogen may have multiple adhesins, each specific for a different set of receptors and, potentially, with different roles in infection and disease. This chapter provides strategies for identifying and analyzing host glycan receptors and the bacterial adhesins that exploit them as receptors, with particular reference to adherence of the gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori. PMID:17132512

  13. Helicobacter pylori: Friend or foe?

    PubMed Central

    Malnick, Stephen David Howard; Melzer, Ehud; Attali, Malka; Duek, Gabriel; Yahav, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a Gram-negative spiral bacterium that is present in nearly half the world’s population. It is the major cause of peptic ulcer disease and a recognized cause of gastric carcinoma. In addition, it is linked to non-ulcer dyspepsia, vitamin B12 deficiency, iron-deficient anemia and immune thrombocytopenic purpura. These conditions are indications for testing and treatment according to current guidelines. An additional indication according to the guidelines is “anyone with a fear of gastric cancer” which results in nearly every infected person being eligible for eradication treatment. There may be beneficial effects of H. pylori in humans, including protection from gastroesophageal reflux disease and esophageal adenocarcinoma. In addition, universal treatment will be extremely expensive (more than $32 billion in the United States), may expose the patients to adverse effects such as anaphylaxis and Clostridium difficile infection, as well as contributing to antibiotic resistance. There may also be an as yet uncertain effect on the fecal microbiome. There is a need for robust clinical data to assist in decision-making regarding treatment of H. pylori infection. PMID:25083071

  14. Helicobacter pylori: friend or foe?

    PubMed

    Malnick, Stephen David Howard; Melzer, Ehud; Attali, Malka; Duek, Gabriel; Yahav, Jacob

    2014-07-21

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a Gram-negative spiral bacterium that is present in nearly half the world's population. It is the major cause of peptic ulcer disease and a recognized cause of gastric carcinoma. In addition, it is linked to non-ulcer dyspepsia, vitamin B12 deficiency, iron-deficient anemia and immune thrombocytopenic purpura. These conditions are indications for testing and treatment according to current guidelines. An additional indication according to the guidelines is "anyone with a fear of gastric cancer" which results in nearly every infected person being eligible for eradication treatment. There may be beneficial effects of H. pylori in humans, including protection from gastroesophageal reflux disease and esophageal adenocarcinoma. In addition, universal treatment will be extremely expensive (more than $32 billion in the United States), may expose the patients to adverse effects such as anaphylaxis and Clostridium difficile infection, as well as contributing to antibiotic resistance. There may also be an as yet uncertain effect on the fecal microbiome. There is a need for robust clinical data to assist in decision-making regarding treatment of H. pylori infection.

  15. Helicobacter pylori infection in pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Iwańczak, Barbara; Francavailla, Ruggiero

    2014-09-01

    This review concerns important pediatric studies published from April 2013 to March 2014. New data on pathogenesis have demonstrated that Th1 type cytokine secretion at the gastric level is less intense in children compared with adults. They have also shown that the most significant risk factor for Helicobacter pylori infection is the parents' origin and frequency of childcare in settings with a high prevalence of infection. A new hypothesis on the positive relationship between childhood H. pylori infection and the risk of gastric cancer in adults has been suggested which calls for an implementation of preventive programs to reduce the burden of childhood H. pylori infection in endemic areas. Several studies have investigated the role of H. pylori infection in iron-deficiency anemia, and results support the role of the bacterium in this condition. Antibiotic resistance is an area of intense research with data confirming an increase in antibiotic resistance, and the effect of CYP2C19 genetic polymorphism on proton-pump inhibitor metabolism should be further investigated as cure rates are lower in extensive metabolizers. Studies confirmed that probiotic supplementation may have beneficial effects on eradication and therapy-related side effects, particularly diarrhea in children. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Development of a Mouse Model of Helicobacter pylori Infection that Mimics Human Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchetti, Marta; Arico, Beatrice; Burroni, Daniela; Figura, Natale; Rappuoli, Rino; Ghiara, Paolo

    1995-03-01

    The human pathogen Helicobacter pylori is associated with gastritis, peptic ulcer disease, and gastric cancer. The pathogenesis of H. pylori infection in vivo was studied by adapting fresh clinical isolates of bacteria to colonize the stomachs of mice. A gastric pathology resembling human disease was observed in infections with cytotoxin-producing strains but not with noncytotoxic strains. Oral immunization with purified H. pylori antigens protected mice from bacterial infection. This mouse model will allow the development of therapeutic agents and vaccines against H. pylori infection in humans.

  17. Eradicating Helicobacter pylori and symptoms of non-ulcer dyspepsia.

    PubMed Central

    Patchett, S; Beattie, S; Leen, E; Keane, C; O'Morain, C

    1991-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To examine the effect of eradication of Helicobacter pylori on symptoms of non-ulcer dyspepsia. DESIGN--Four week prospective study. SETTING--One hospital outpatient and endoscopy department. PATIENTS--90 adults with persistent symptoms typical of non-ulcer dyspepsia but no clinical or endoscopic evidence of other peptic, biliary, pancreatic, or malignant disease; all had histological and microbiological evidence of infection with H pylori. 83 patients completed the treatment regimen. INTERVENTION--Colloidal bismuth subcitrate 120 mg four times a day for four weeks (27 patients); metronidazole 400 mg and amoxycillin 500 mg each three times a day for one week (27); and bismuth subcitrate 120 mg four times a day for four weeks, metronidazole 400 mg three times a day for one week, plus amoxycillin 500 mg three times a day for the first week (29). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Change in symptom scores determined with questionnaire; histological evidence of gastritis and microbiological evidence of presence of H pylori in biopsy specimens. RESULTS--Overall, H pylori was eradicated in 41 (49%) patients. Although gastritis scores improved significantly in only patients in whom H pylori had been eradicated (from 1.56 to 0.61, p less than 0.01 v from 1.83 to 1.07, p = 0.52) mean symptom scores after treatment were similar in patients in whom H pylori had or had not been eradicated (3.0 v 2.3, NS). Similarly the mean symptom score improved whether or not gastritis improved (2.8 v 3.1 respectively, p = 0.72). The observations were similar for treatment groups analysed individually. CONCLUSION--Antral infection with the organism does not seem to have an important aetiological role in non-ulcer dyspepsia short term. PMID:1747644

  18. Role of Helicobacter pylori infection in pathogenesis of gastric carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Rong-Guang; Duan, Guang-Cai; Fan, Qing-Tang; Chen, Shuai-Yin

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) is one of the most common carcinoma and the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection causes a series of precancerous lesions like gastritis, atrophy, intestinal metaplasia and dysplasia, and is the strongest known risk factor for GC, as supported by epidemiological, preclinical and clinical studies. However, the mechanism of H. pylori developing gastric carcinoma has not been well defined. Among infected individuals, approximately 10% develop severe gastric lesions such as peptic ulcer disease, 1%-3% progresses to GC. The outcomes of H. pylori infection are determined by bacterial virulence, genetic polymorphism of hosts as well as environmental factors. It is important to gain further understanding of the pathogenesis of H. pylori infection for developing more effective treatments for this common but deadly malignancy. The recent findings on the bacterial virulence factors, effects of H. pylori on epithelial cells, genetic polymorphism of both the bacterium and its host, and the environmental factors for GC are discussed with focus on the role of H. pylori in gastric carcinogenesis in this review. PMID:26909232

  19. Role of Helicobacter pylori infection on nutrition and metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Franceschi, Francesco; Annalisa, Tortora; Teresa, Di Rienzo; Giovanna, D’Angelo; Ianiro, Gianluca; Franco, Scaldaferri; Viviana, Gerardi; Valentina, Tesori; Riccardo, Lopetuso Loris; Antonio, Gasbarrini

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a gram-negative pathogen that is widespread all over the world, infecting more than 50% of the world’s population. It is etiologically associated with non-atrophic and atrophic gastritis, peptic ulcer and shows a deep association with primary gastric B-cell lymphoma and gastric adenocarcinoma. Recently, the medical research focused on the modification of the gastric environment induced by H. pylori infection, possibly affecting the absorption of nutrients and drugs as well as the production of hormones strongly implicated in the regulation of appetite and growth. Interestingly, the absorption of iron and vitamin B12 is impaired by H. pylori infection, while infected subjects have lower basal and fasting serum levels of ghrelin and higher concentration of leptin compared to controls. Since leptin is an anorexigenic hormone, and ghrelin stimulates powerfully the release of growth hormone in humans, H. pylori infection may finally induce growth retardation if acquired very early in the childhood and in malnourished children. This review is focused on the nutritional effects of H. pylori infection, such as the reduced bioavailability or the malabsorbption of essential nutrients, and of gastrointestinal hormones, as well as on the relationship between H. pylori and the metabolic syndrome. PMID:25278679

  20. Helicobacter pylori and Antibiotic Resistance, A Continuing and Intractable Problem.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yue; Zhang, Meng; Lu, Bin; Dai, Jinfeng

    2016-10-01

    Helicobacter pylori, a human pathogen with a high global prevalence, is the causative pathogen for multiple gastrointestinal diseases, especially chronic gastritis, peptic ulcers, gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma, and gastric malignancies. Antibiotic therapies remain the mainstay for H. pylori eradication; however, this strategy is hampered by the emergence and spread of H. pylori antibiotic resistance. Exploring the mechanistic basis of this resistance is becoming one of the major research questions in contemporary biomedical research, as such knowledge could be exploited to devise novel rational avenues for counteracting the existing resistance and devising strategies to avoid the development of a novel anti-H. pylori medication. Encouragingly, important progress in this field has been made recently. Here, we attempt to review the current state and progress with respect to the molecular mechanism of antibiotic resistance for H. pylori. A picture is emerging in which mutations of various genes in H. pylori, resulting in decreased membrane permeability, altered oxidation-reduction potential, and a more efficient efflux pump system. The increased knowledge on these mechanisms produces hope that antibiotic resistance in H. pylori can ultimately be countered. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Fluoroquinolone-based protocols for eradication of Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Rispo, Antonio; Capone, Pietro; Castiglione, Fabiana; Pasquale, Luigi; Rea, Matilde; Caporaso, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a widespread pathogen infecting about 40% of people living in urban areas and over 90% of people living in the developing regions of the world. H. pylori is well-documented as the main factor in the pathogenesis of peptic ulcer disease, chronic gastritis, and gastric malignancies such as cancer and mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue-lymphoma; hence, its eradication is strongly recommended. The Maastricht IV consensus, which focused on the management of H. pylori infection, set important new strategies in terms of treatment approaches, particularly with regards to first- and second-line treatment protocols and led to improved knowledge and understanding of H. pylori resistance to antibiotics. In recent years, various fluoroquinolone-based protocols, mainly including levofloxacin, have been proposed and effectively tested at all therapeutic lines for H. pylori eradication. The aim of the present paper is to review the scientific literature focused on the use of fluoroquinolones in eradicating H. pylori. PMID:25083067

  2. Structure, function and localization of Helicobacter pylori urease.

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, B. E.; Phadnis, S. H.

    1998-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is the causative agent of most cases of gastritis. Once acquired, H. pylori establishes chronic persistent infection; it is this long-term infection that, is a subset of patients, leads to gastric or duodenal ulcer, gastric cancer or gastric MALT lymphoma. All fresh isolates of H. pylori express significant urease activity, which is essential to survival and pathogenesis of the bacterium. A significant fraction of urease is associated with the surface of H. pylori both in vivo and in vitro. Surface-associated urease is essential for H. pylori to resist exposure to acid in the presence of urea. The mechanism whereby urease becomes associated with the surface of H. pylori is unique. This process, which we term "altruistic autolysis," involves release of urease (and other cytoplasmic proteins) by genetically programmed autolysis with subsequent adsorption of the released urease onto the surface of neighboring intact bacteria. To our knowledge, this is the first evidence of essential communal behavior in pathogenic bacteria; such behavior is crucial to understanding the pathogenesis of H. pylori. PMID:10378351

  3. From inflammation to gastric cancer: Role of Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiao-Ying; Zhang, Pei-Ying; Aboul-Soud, Mourad A.M.

    2017-01-01

    Gastric cancer is a multifactorial disease and a leading cause of mortality and the risk factors for this include environmental factors and factors that influence host-pathogen interaction and complex interplay between these factors. Gastric adenocarcinomas are of two types, namely intestinal and diffuse type, and Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection has been suspected of being causally linked to the initiation of chronic active gastritis, which leads to adenocarcinoma of the intestinal type. Even though most individuals with H. pylori infection do not show any clinical symptoms, long-term infection leads to inflammation of gastric epithelium and approximately 10% of infected patients develop peptic ulcers and 1–3% of patients develop gastric adenocarcinoma. Among the several mechanisms involved in tumorigenesis, CagA and peptidoglycan of H. pylori, which enter the infected gastric epithelial cells play an important role by triggering oncogenic pathways. Inflammation induced by H. pylori in gastric epithelium, which involves the cyclooxygenase-2/prostaglandin E2 pathway and IL-1β, is also an important factor that triggers chronic active gastritis and adenocarcinoma. H. pylori infection induced oxidative stress and dysregulated E-cadherin/β-catenin/p120 interactions and function also play a critical role in tumorigenesis. Environmental and dietary factors, in particular salt intake, are known to modify the pathogenesis induced by H. pylori. Gastric cancer induced by H. pylori appears to involve several mechanisms, making this mode of tumorigenesis a highly complicated process. Nevertheless, there are many events in this tumorigenesis that remain to be clarified and investigated. PMID:28356927

  4. Host pathogen interactions in Helicobacter pylori related gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Chmiela, Magdalena; Karwowska, Zuzanna; Gonciarz, Weronika; Allushi, Bujana; Stączek, Paweł

    2017-03-07

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori), discovered in 1982, is a microaerophilic, spiral-shaped gram-negative bacterium that is able to colonize the human stomach. Nearly half of the world's population is infected by this pathogen. Its ability to induce gastritis, peptic ulcers, gastric cancer and mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma has been confirmed. The susceptibility of an individual to these clinical outcomes is multifactorial and depends on H. pylori virulence, environmental factors, the genetic susceptibility of the host and the reactivity of the host immune system. Despite the host immune response, H. pylori infection can be difficult to eradicate. H. pylori is categorized as a group I carcinogen since this bacterium is responsible for the highest rate of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Early detection of cancer can be lifesaving. The 5-year survival rate for gastric cancer patients diagnosed in the early stages is nearly 90%. Gastric cancer is asymptomatic in the early stages but always progresses over time and begins to cause symptoms when untreated. In 97% of stomach cancer cases, cancer cells metastasize to other organs. H. pylori infection is responsible for nearly 60% of the intestinal-type gastric cancer cases but also influences the development of diffuse gastric cancer. The host genetic susceptibility depends on polymorphisms of genes involved in H. pylori-related inflammation and the cytokine response of gastric epithelial and immune cells. H. pylori strains differ in their ability to induce a deleterious inflammatory response. H. pylori-driven cytokines accelerate the inflammatory response and promote malignancy. Chronic H. pylori infection induces genetic instability in gastric epithelial cells and affects the DNA damage repair systems. Therefore, H. pylori infection should always be considered a pro-cancerous factor.

  5. Host pathogen interactions in Helicobacter pylori related gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chmiela, Magdalena; Karwowska, Zuzanna; Gonciarz, Weronika; Allushi, Bujana; Stączek, Paweł

    2017-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori), discovered in 1982, is a microaerophilic, spiral-shaped gram-negative bacterium that is able to colonize the human stomach. Nearly half of the world's population is infected by this pathogen. Its ability to induce gastritis, peptic ulcers, gastric cancer and mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma has been confirmed. The susceptibility of an individual to these clinical outcomes is multifactorial and depends on H. pylori virulence, environmental factors, the genetic susceptibility of the host and the reactivity of the host immune system. Despite the host immune response, H. pylori infection can be difficult to eradicate. H. pylori is categorized as a group I carcinogen since this bacterium is responsible for the highest rate of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Early detection of cancer can be lifesaving. The 5-year survival rate for gastric cancer patients diagnosed in the early stages is nearly 90%. Gastric cancer is asymptomatic in the early stages but always progresses over time and begins to cause symptoms when untreated. In 97% of stomach cancer cases, cancer cells metastasize to other organs. H. pylori infection is responsible for nearly 60% of the intestinal-type gastric cancer cases but also influences the development of diffuse gastric cancer. The host genetic susceptibility depends on polymorphisms of genes involved in H. pylori-related inflammation and the cytokine response of gastric epithelial and immune cells. H. pylori strains differ in their ability to induce a deleterious inflammatory response. H. pylori-driven cytokines accelerate the inflammatory response and promote malignancy. Chronic H. pylori infection induces genetic instability in gastric epithelial cells and affects the DNA damage repair systems. Therefore, H. pylori infection should always be considered a pro-cancerous factor. PMID:28321154

  6. Serum and gastric fluid levels of cytokines and nitrates in gastric diseases infected with Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Mehmet, N; Refik, M; Harputluoglu, M; Ersoy, Y; Aydin, N Engin; Yildirim, B

    2004-04-01

    This case control study presents data on the concentrations of nitrite and nitrate and a variety of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta), interleukin-2R (IL-2R), interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin-8 (IL-8) and tumor necrosis factor TNF-alpha in gastric fluid and serum. Patients with gastritis, gastric ulcer and gastric cancer are studied and grouped according to infection by Helicobacter pylori. The 208 patients who underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopic examination were classified as follows; H. pylori-positive gastritis (n = 32), H. pylori-negative gastritis (n = 32), H. pylori-positive ulcers (n = 34), H. pylori-negative ulcers (n = 34), 43 patients with H. pylori-positive gastric cancer in addition to 33 H. pylori-negative healthy control individuals. Gastric fluids and blood samples were taken concomitantly. Cytokines and nitrite and nitrate determinations were attempted as soon as possible after collection of the samples. Nitrite and nitrate levels of serum and gastric fluids of H. pylori-positive gastritis and ulcers were higher than H. pylori-negative gastritis and ulcers. The concentrations of total nitrite and nitrate and cytokines (TNF-alpha, IL-2R, IL-6, and IL-8) in gastric fluids and sera of H. pylori-positive gastric cancer patients were higher than H. pylori-negative control groups. IL-1 beta level was significantly elevated in gastric fluid of infected cancer patients but not in serum. Taken together, the results suggest that an increase in cytokine-NO combination in gastric mucosa previously reported by many studies is not restricted to local infected gastric tissue but also detected in gastric fluid and sera of H. pylori-positive subjects and may have an important role in the pathogenesis and development of common gastric diseases.

  7. [Helicobacter pylori-related diseases].

    PubMed

    Gisbert, Javier P

    2013-10-01

    This article summarizes the main conclusions drawn from the presentations on Helicobacter pylori at Digestive Disease Week 2013. Knowledge of this infection among the general population continues to be extremely limited. H. pylori is the main cause of "aging" of the human stomach. In developed countries, the prevalence of H. pylori infection has decreased but continues to be considerable. In most countries, clarithromycin and metronidazole resistance rates are markedly high. H. pylori eradication improves the symptoms of functional dyspepsia, but only in a minority of patients. The frequency of idiopathic peptic ulcers seems to be rising and their prognosis is worse. Most patients with gastric cancer have, or have had, prior H. pylori infection. The risk of developing preneoplastic lesions depends on the type (strain) of the microorganism. To prevent the development of gastric cancer, eradication therapy should be administered early (before the development of intestinal metaplasia). Among H. pylori-infected patients, those who receive long-term treatment with proton pump inhibitors more frequently develop preneoplastic lesions. In patients who undergo endoscopic resection of early gastric cancer, H. pylori eradication reduces the incidence of metachronous tumors. Eradication therapy induces regression of MALT lymphoma in most patients and tumoral recurrence in the long term is exceptional; eradication is a reasonable option even when H. pylori infection has not been identified in patients with MALT lymphoma. Several diagnostic innovations were presented, such as some polymerase chain reaction techniques for use in gastric biopsy specimens or gastric juice. The efficacy of triple standard therapy is clearly inadequate. The superiority of "sequential" therapy over standard triple therapy has not been definitively established. "Concomitant" therapy is more effective and is simpler than "sequential" therapy. After failure of standard triple therapy, second

  8. Preventive effects of Cladosiphon fucoidan against Helicobacter pylori infection in Mongolian gerbils.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Hideyuki; Iimuro, Masaki; Uchiya, Naoaki; Kawamori, Toshihiko; Nagaoka, Masato; Ueyama, Sadao; Hashimoto, Shusuke; Yokokura, Teruo; Sugimura, Takashi; Wakabayashi, Keiji

    2003-02-01

    Recently, the acquisition by Helicobacter pylori of resistance to antibiotics has become a serious problem. Therefore, nonantibiotic substances are required to diminish H. pylori-induced gastric lesions. In the present study, the effects of Cladosiphon fucoidan were examined in terms of H. pylori attachment to porcine gastric mucin in vitro and Helicobacter pylori-induced gastritis in vivo. The inhibitory effect of Cladosiphon fucoidan and other polysaccharides on H. pylori attachment to porcine gastric mucin was assayed in vitro with mucin-coated microtiter plates. The effect of Cladosiphon fucoidan on H. pylori-induced gastritis was examined in vivo using Mongolian gerbils. H. pylori-inoculated gerbils were given fucoidan in drinking water. Six weeks after H. pylori-inoculation, gerbils were sacrificed for macroscopic and microscopic examination of gastric lesions and counting of viable H. pylori in the gastric mucosa. Cladosiphon fucoidan inhibited the H. pylori attachment to porcine gastric mucin at pH 2.0 and 4.0. Two other sulfated polysaccharides, Fucus fucoidan and dextran sulfate sodium, also inhibited the attachment but only at pH 2.0. Inhibitory effects of these three sulfated polysaccharides were not observed at pH 7.2 and nonsulfated polysaccharides, such as mannan and dextran, exerted no influence at any pH. In the in vivo experiment, the H. pylori-induced gastritis and the prevalence of H. pylori infected animals were markedly reduced by fucoidan in a dose-dependent manner, at doses of 0.05 and 0.5% in the drinking water. Cladosiphon fucoidan may deserve particular attention as a safe agent that can prevent H. pylori infection and reduce the risk of associated gastric cancer.

  9. Does acid suppression by antacids and H2 receptor antagonists increase the incidence of atrophic gastritis in patients with or without H. pylori gastritis?

    PubMed

    Carter, M; Katz, D L; Haque, S; DeLuca, V A

    1999-09-01

    Currently there is controversial evidence that suggests that the accepted incidence of atrophic gastritis of 1.2 to 3.3% in patients with Helicobacter pylori gastritis may be increased by the long-term suppression of acid by a proton pump inhibitor (omeprazole). The purpose of this study is to show whether lesser forms of acid suppression by antacids or H2 receptor antagonists may have an influence on the development of atrophic gastritis. The authors recently reported a study in which a cohort of 36 patients with symptoms of dyspepsia were followed clinically for a period of 7 to 19 years. In that report all subjects underwent upper endoscopy with two biopsy specimens each from the antrum and fundus, on at least two occasions, 7 to 19 years apart. A diagnosis of atrophic gastritis was based on the interpretation of these biopsies by two gastrointestinal pathologists. The presence of H. pylori colonization was determined by tissue sampling and by a campylobacter-like organisms test of the antrum. Of the 36 patients in the authors' previous report, 33 had adequate baseline and follow-up data on medications consumed throughout the period of the study. In their current report they now present the findings of a retrospective review in which they correlate the presence of atrophic gastritis with the sole use of antacids and H2 receptor antagonists throughout the period of the study. In the cohort of 33 patients evaluated from the previous report, the authors found that atrophic gastritis had developed in all 28 patients positive for H. pylori, and in none of the 5 patients negative for H. pylori (p < 0.0001). A retrospective analysis of this previously studied cohort of 33 patients revealed that the use of antacids and H2 receptor antagonists did not predict the development of atrophic gastritis in either H. pylori-negative or -positive subjects. In a retrospective analysis of a cohort of 33 patients followed for an average of 11.7 years, atrophic gastritis developed in

  10. Prevalence and treatment of Helicobacter pylori in patients with blepharitis.

    PubMed

    Saccà, Sergio Claudio; Pascotto, Antonio; Venturino, Gian Maria; Prigione, Guido; Mastromarino, Antonio; Baldi, Franco; Bilardi, Claudio; Savarino, Vincenzo; Brusati, Carlo; Rebora, Alfredo

    2006-02-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a major pathogen etiologically associated with gastritis, peptic ulcer disease, gastric cancer, and primary gastric lymphoma. This study was conducted to investigate a possible association between Helicobacter pylori infection and blepharitis. Two hundred fifty consecutive patients with symptomatic blepharitis and 250 control subjects without blepharitis symptoms were evaluated. After exclusions, the blepharitis group consisted of 186 patients with blepharitis and a control group of 215 patients. Blepharitis was diagnosed on the basis of findings in ophthalmic and dermatologic examinations. All patients underwent a 13C-urea breath test (UBT) to detect H. pylori infection, and impression cytology was performed before and after eradication therapy. The follow-up period was 4 months +/- 28 days. The blepharitis group showed an H. pylori infection prevalence of approximately 76.3% (UBT-positive group with blepharitis: n = 142 patients), compared with 42.3% of the control group (UBT-positive group with blepharitis [although asymptomatic]: n = 66 patients; UBT-positive group without blepharitis: n = 25 patients). Furthermore, we observed blepharitis in 30.6% (n = 66 patients) of UBT-positive control subjects and 13.4% (n = 29 patients) of UBT-negative control subjects. Impression cytology revealed that blepharitis was more severe in UBT-positive patients than in negative ones, and a clinical improvement in blepharitis was noted in approximately 50% of patients after H. pylori eradication. Even though possible sources of error in defining the association of two highly prevalent conditions must be considered, the data seem to validate an association between H. pylori infection and blepharitis, but may not be indicative of a causal association. Eradication of H. pylori improved ocular cytology results. It is possible that chronic blepharitis is an extradigestive manifestation of H. pylori infection.

  11. Roadmap to eliminate gastric cancer with Helicobacter pylori eradication and consecutive surveillance in Japan.

    PubMed

    Asaka, Masahiro; Kato, Mototsugu; Sakamoto, Naoya

    2014-01-01

    In Japan, the annual number of deaths from gastric cancer is approximately 50,000 and there has been no change over the last 50 years. So far, all efforts have been directed toward improving the detection of early gastric cancer by barium X-ray and endoscopy, since early cancer has a good prognosis, resulting in Japan having the best diagnostic capability for early gastric cancer worldwide. The 5-year survival rate of gastric cancer patients exceeds 60 % in Japan and is much higher than that in Europe and the US (20 %) because of this superior diagnosis of early gastric cancer. In February 2013, national health insurance coverage for Helicobacter pylori eradication therapy to treat H. pylori-associated chronic gastritis became available in Japan. H. pylori-associated gastritis leads to development of gastric and duodenal ulcers and gastric polyps. Therefore, providing treatment for gastritis is likely to substantially decrease the prevalence of both gastric and duodenal ulcers and polyps. Because treatment for H. pylori-associated gastritis, which leads to atrophic gastritis and gastric cancer, is now covered by health insurance in Japan, a strategy to eliminate gastric cancer-related deaths by taking advantage of this innovation was planned. According to this strategy, patients with gastritis will be investigated for H. pylori infection and those who are positive will receive eradication therapy followed by periodic surveillance. If this strategy is implemented, deaths from gastric cancer in Japan will decrease dramatically after 10-20 years.

  12. Unusual Helicobacter pylori in gastric resection specimens: an old friend with a new look.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Nidhi; Snyder, Patricia; Owens, Scott R

    2011-06-01

    Immunohistochemical staining is useful in the diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori-induced gastritis. The authors encountered gastric resection specimens with an unusual pattern of reactivity on H pylori immunostains where the typical morphology of the organism was not recognizable, but the characteristic chronic gastritis associated with infection was present. The authors sought to explore this phenomenon by retrospectively reviewing and immunostaining 28 gastric resection specimens for H pylori. Six cases with large clumps of immunohistochemically positive but morphologically unrecognizable material were identified on light microscopy, corresponding on electron microscopy to clusters of predominantly coccoid H pylori, some located intracellularly. Such organisms were not identifiable without immunohistochemistry, and the phenomenon was not encountered in gastric biopsies. The authors conclude that this staining pattern reflects true H pylori infection that is not diagnosable without immunohistochemistry. Based on its occurrence only in resections, it may be the result of hypoxic or other stress induced when the mucosa is not promptly fixed.

  13. Helicobacter pylori and food products: a public health problem.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Anavella Gaitan

    2004-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a major human pathogen causing gastritis and chronic superficial infection (CSG). It colonizes the stomach of more than 50% of humans and causes disease. This microorganism is associated with the gastric antral epithelium in patients with active chronic gastritis, peptic (gastric) or duodenal ulcers, and gastric adenocarcinoma H. pylori is present in feces, sewage, and water but is killed by routine chlorination. Therefore, in developing countries, consumption of sewage-contaminated drinking water and vegetables may pose a risk; properly cooking foods and chlorinating water reduces the risk of transmitting H. pylori to humans. In South America the consumption of raw vegetables fertilized with human feces has been found to be a risk factor for infection, and consumption of water from a municipal supply has been suggested as a risk factor for children. Epidemiological studies have found that H. pylori organisms colonize the stomach and duodenum of humans and many animal species and family clusters; it is believed to be orally transmitted person to person. This transmission is the major, if not exclusive, source of infection.H. pylori has been detected in the mouth from dental plaque. Recent observations in persons infected with H. pylori caused to vomit or have diarrhea showed that an actively unwell person with these symptoms could spread H. pylori in the immediate vicinity by aerosol, splashing of vomitus, infected vomitus, and infected diarrhea. In summary, H. pylori is usually spread by the fecal-oral route but possibly also by the oral-oral route and the spread of contaminated secretions. Thus, in developing countries, individuals catch H. pylori at a very young age from other persons (children) in their environment. In developed countries, H. pylori is more difficult to acquire and is usually transmitted from one family member to another, possibly by the fecal-oral route, or by the oral-oral route, e.g., kissing, vomitus. On occasion

  14. Helicobacter pylori colonisation and eczema

    PubMed Central

    Herbarth, Olf; Bauer, Mario; Fritz, Gisela J; Herbarth, Petra; Rolle‐Kampczyk, Ulrike; Krumbiegel, Peter; Richter, Matthias; Richter, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    The hygiene hypothesis postulates that the increase in atopic diseases may in part be due to diminished exposure to microorganisms. But it is unknown which type of infection does render protection. An epidemiological study was conducted in Leipzig, Germany, and its rural county, involving 3347 school starters. Two types of infection were considered: (1) gastrointestinal colonisation (Helicobacter pylori detection using in vivo [13C] urea breath test) and (2) respiratory infections (physician‐diagnosed lower (bronchitis) and upper (common cold) respiratory infections). H pylori colonisation was selected because it is very common and plays an important role in gastrointestinal disorders. Atopic eczema was selected as the (allergic) target variable because of its high frequency in the age of the study participants. The results, adjusted for relevant confounders, showed a significant inverse association between H pylori infection and eczema (adjusted odds ratio (aOR) = 0.31, p = 0.006) in children not predisposed to atopy. In contrast, bronchitis increased the risk of eczema (aOR = 1.98, p<0.001). Bacterial digestive tract colonisation (infection) seems to protect against eczema in comparison with the effect of respiratory tract infections. The hygiene hypothesis may be better explained when gastrointestinal and respiratory infections are subtly differentiated. PMID:17568058

  15. [Helicobacter pylori-associated diseases].

    PubMed

    Gisbert, Javier P

    2015-09-01

    This article summarizes the main conclusions of the studies presented at Digestive Disease Week this year (2015) related to Helicobacter pylori infection. Despite the undeniable widespread reduction in the prevalence of H. pylori infection, developing countries continue to have substantial infection rates. The prevalence of clarithromycin, metronidazole and quinolone resistance is markedly higher in most countries and continues to rise. Although H. pylori eradication reduces the incidence of gastric adenocarcinoma, it does not completely prevent its development; the presence of precancerous lesions--intestinal atrophy and metaplasia--is associated with a higher risk of developing this neoplasm, despite H. pylori eradication. The use of molecular diagnostic methods (polymerase chain reaction) in faecal samples could allow non-invasive evaluation of the antibiotic susceptibility of H. pylori. The effectiveness of standard triple therapy is clearly insufficient and continues to decrease. The effectiveness of sequential therapy in recent studies is lower than initially described and consequently this treatment cannot be recommended in clinical practice. Concomitant therapy is more effective and simpler than sequential therapy. In penicillin-allergic patients, quadruple therapy with bismuth is the treatment of choice in our environment. After the failure of standard triple therapy, second-line therapy with levofloxacin is effective and, moreover, is simpler and better tolerated than quadruple therapy with bismuth. Quadruple therapy with a proton pump inhibitor, bismuth, levofloxacin and amoxicillin is an effective (≥ 90% eradication), simple and safe second-line therapy if triple or quadruple therapy without bismuth (sequential or concomitant) fails to eradicate the infection. The new-generation quinolones, such as moxifloxacin or sitafloxacin, could be useful in second- or third-line rescue eradication therapy. Even after the failure of 3 eradication treatments, a

  16. Current European concepts in the management of Helicobacter pylori infection. The Maastricht Consensus Report. European Helicobacter Pylori Study Group.

    PubMed Central

    1997-01-01

    There is considerable confusion over the management of Helicobacter pylori infection, particularly among primary care physicians, and numerous European countries lack national guidelines in this rapidly growing area of medicine. The European Helicobacter Pylori Study Group therefore organised a meeting in Maastricht of H pylori experts, primary care physicians and representatives of National Societies of Gastroenterology from Europe to establish consensus guidelines on the management of H pylori at the primary care and specialist levels, and to consider general health care issues associated with the infection. As in previous guidelines, eradication therapy was recommended in all H pylori positive patients with peptic ulcer disease. Additionally, at the primary care level in dyspeptic patients < 45 years old and with no alarm symptoms, diagnosis is recommended by non-invasive means (13C urea breath test, serology) and if H pylori positive the patient should be treated. Moreover, at the specialist level the indications for eradication of H pylori were also broadened to include H pylori positive patients with functional dyspepsia in whom no other possible causes of symptoms are identified by the specialist (after a full investigation including endoscopy, ultrasound and other necessary investigations), patients with low grade gastric mucosa associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma (managed in specialised centres) and those with gastritis with severe macro- or microscopic abnormalities. There was consensus that treatment regimens should be simple, well tolerated and achieve an eradication rate of over 80% on an intention to treat basis. It was strongly recommended, therefore, that eradication treatment should be with proton pump inhibitor based triple therapy for seven days, using a proton pump inhibitor and two of the following: clarithromycin, a nitroimidazole (metronidazole or tinidazole) and amoxycillin. PMID:9274464

  17. Role of Helicobacter pylori in gastric cancer: Updates

    PubMed Central

    Khatoon, Jahanarah; Rai, Ravi Prakash; Prasad, Kashi Nath

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is highly prevalent in human, affecting nearly half of the world’s population; however, infection remains asymptomatic in majority of population. During its co-existence with humans, H. pylori has evolved various strategies to maintain a mild gastritis and limit the immune response of host. On the other side, presence of H. pylori is also associated with increased risk for the development of various gastric pathologies including gastric cancer (GC). A complex combination of host genetics, environmental agents, and bacterial virulence factors are considered to determine the susceptibility as well as the severity of outcome in a subset of individuals. GC is one of the most common cancers and considered as the third most common cause of cancer related death worldwide. Many studies had proved H. pylori as an important risk factor in the development of non-cardia GC. Although both H. pylori infection and GC are showing decreasing trends in the developed world, they still remain a major threat to human population in the developing countries. The current review attempts to highlight recent progress in the field of research on H. pylori induced GC and aims to provide brief insight into H. pylori pathogenesis, the role of major virulence factors of H. pylori that modulates the host environment and transform the normal gastric epithelium to neoplastic one. This review also emphasizes on the mechanistic understanding of how colonization and various virulence attributes of H. pylori as well as the host innate and adaptive immune responses modulate the diverse signaling pathways that leads to different disease outcomes including GC. PMID:26909129

  18. Epidemiological study on food intake and Helicobacter pylori infection.

    PubMed

    Toyonaga, A; Okamatsu, H; Sasaki, K; Kimura, H; Saito, T; Shimizu, S; Fukuizumi, K; Tsuruta, O; Tanikawa, K; Sata, M

    2000-01-01

    We conducted an epidemiological study to investigate the relation of food intake to Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection in an area endemic for H. pylori. In this study, 365 subjects, 104 men and 261 women, were randomly selected from 7,389 adult (over age 20) inhabitants of town A, Japan. The prevalence of immunoglobulin G (IgG) class antibody to H. pylori (anti-H. pylori) was 83.7% and the prevalence of anti-H. pylori increased with age significantly (P < 0.05). Subjects with anamnesis of gastritis, gastroduodenal ulcer and gastric cancer tended to have a higher anti-H. pylori positive ratio (93.5%) than those without (81.0%). But there was no relationship between anti-H. pylori prevalence and sex, blood type, smoking or drinking habits. Daily intake of foods by food groups, nutrients and the concentrations of serum ingredients were compared between 37 anti-H. pylori-positive and 40 negative subjects selected from 365 inhabitants by matching up according to sex and age. The daily intake of cereals, potatoes and starches, and milks tended to be higher in positive than negative subjects, while the daily intake of algae and tea appeared to be a little higher in negative than in positive subjects. The daily zinc intake of antibody-positive subjects was significantly higher (P < 0.05) than in antibody negative subjects. On the other hand, the daily iron intake in negative subjects was significantly higher (P < 0.05) than in positive subjects. The serum concentrations of copper, zinc, and vitamin E tended to be higher in positive than negative subjects. But there were no significant differences in serum ingredients concentrations between antibody negative and positive subjects. Our findings suggest that iron and zinc intakes may effect on H. pylori infection.

  19. Strategies used by helicobacter pylori to establish persistent infection

    PubMed Central

    Abadi, Amin Talebi Bezmin

    2017-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a Gram-negative and motile bacterium that colonizes the hostile microniche of the human stomach, then persists for the host’s entire life, if not effectively treated. Clinically, H. pylori plays a causative role in the development of a wide spectrum of diseases including chronic active gastritis, peptic ulceration, gastric adenocarcinoma, and gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma. Due to the global distribution of H. pylori, it is no exaggeration to conclude that smart strategies are contributing to adaptation of the bacterium to its permanent host. Thirty-four years after the discovery of this bacterium, there are still many unanswered questions. For example, which strategies help the bacterium to survive in this inhospitable microniche? This question is slightly easier to answer if we presume the same clinical concept for both persistent infection and disease. Understanding the mechanisms governing H. pylori persistence will improve identification of the increased risk of diseases such as gastric cancer in patients infected with this bacterium. A well-defined and long-term equilibrium between the human host and H. pylori allows bacterial persistence in the gastric microniche; although this coexistence leads to a high risk of severe diseases such as gastric cancer. To escape the bactericidal activity of stomach acid, H. pylori secretes large amounts of surface-associated and cytosolic urease. The potential to avoid acidic conditions and immune evasion are discussed in order to explain the persistence of H. pylori colonization in the gastric mucosa, and data on bacterial genetic diversity are included. Information on the mechanisms related to H. pylori persistence can also provide the direction for future research concerning effective therapy and management of gastroduodenal disorders. The topics presented in the current review are important for elucidating the strategies used by H. pylori to help the bacterium

  20. Helicobacter pylori and gastric cancer: a state of the art review.

    PubMed

    Ishaq, Sauid; Nunn, Lois

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the third most common cause of cancer-related death in the world. It is now well- established that Helicobacter pylori infection predispose individuals toward gastric adenocarcinoma later in life. It has since been classified as a class I carcinogen by the World Health Organization. Research suggests that the oncogenic effects of Helicobacter pylori can occur through a variety of mechanisms, including the indirect inflammatory effects of Helicobacter pylori on the gastric mucosa and the direct epigenetic effects of Helicobacter pylori on individual cells. Whilst infected with Helicobacter pylori, a combination of environmental and host-dependent factors determines the likelihood of developing gastric cancer. Controversy remains regarding the effects of eradication of Helicobacter pylori on the prevention of further progression of gastric lesions and the possibility for regression of atrophic gastritis. The aim of this review is to synthesis different elements that contribute to the step-wise progression of normal gastric mucosa to gastric adenocarcinoma. This review helps clinicians to better identify those infected individuals who are at high risk of developing gastric cancer and implement the necessary investigations and treatment.

  1. Helicobacter pylori bab genes during chronic colonization

    PubMed Central

    Matteo, Mario J; Armitano, Rita I; Romeo, Mariela; Wonaga, Andres; Olmos, Martín; Catalano, Mariana

    2011-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori BabA adhesin metastability could yield variants with potential for periodic activation and deactivation of their mediated adherence. babA/B or babB/A chimeras could play an important role in translational regulation. We investigated the frequency of different bab gene profiles in paired isolates from antrum and corpus recovered from patients with chronic gastritis. Isolates from 174 biopsies from 34 patients were included, and bab genes at the three common chromosomal loci were investigated. Inter-micro-niche variation was found in 1/4 patients, counting duplicate copies of babA or babB, babB/A or babA/B chimeras, opposite location of babA and babB or babC and babB, and absence of babB ATG translational codon. Truncated BabA was identified in 2/34 patients without inter-micro-niche variation. Isolates from 12/34 patients harbored babA/B or babB/A chimeras -either in one, several or all micro-niches indicating that chimera formation is a common mechanism to control BabA expression. To note, babA gene was absent in 11/34 patients, and in this population, babA/B chimeras which lack expression predominated over babB/A, able to exhibit Leb binding phenotype. PMID:21915366

  2. Methods for Detecting the Environmental Coccoid Form of Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Mazaheri Assadi, Mahnaz; Chamanrokh, Parastoo; Whitehouse, Chris A.; Huq, Anwar

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is recognized as the most common pathogen to cause gastritis, peptic and duodenal ulcers, and gastric cancer. The organisms are found in two forms: (1) spiral-shaped bacillus and (2) coccoid. H. pylori coccoid form, generally found in the environment, is the transformed form of the normal spiral-shaped bacillus after exposed to water or adverse environmental conditions such as exposure to sub-inhibitory concentrations of antimicrobial agents. The putative infectious capability and the viability of H. pylori under environmental conditions are controversial. This disagreement is partially due to the fact of lack in detecting the coccoid form of H. pylori in the environment. Accurate and effective detection methods of H. pylori will lead to rapid treatment and disinfection, and less human health damages and reduction in health care costs. In this review, we provide a brief introduction to H. pylori environmental coccoid forms, their transmission, and detection methods. We further discuss the use of these detection methods including their accuracy and efficiency. PMID:26075197

  3. Healing of protein losing hypertrophic gastropathy by eradication of Helicobacter pylori--is Helicobacter pylori a pathogenic factor in Ménétrier's disease?

    PubMed Central

    Bayerdörffer, E; Ritter, M M; Hatz, R; Brooks, W; Ruckdeschel, G; Stolte, M

    1994-01-01

    Hypertrophic gastropathy--that is, Ménétrier's disease--was found, in a retrospective analysis, to be associated with Helicobacter pylori in more than 90% of patients. It is proposed that hypertrophic gastropathy represents a special form of H pylori gastritis in these patients. A case is described of a 28 year old woman with Ménétrier's disease associated with proved protein loss from the stomach. Treatment with cimetidine for more than three years had little benefit when colonisation by H pylori was detected. Density of H pylori colonisation and activity of gastritis, which was also present in the first biopsy specimens taken five years ago, were more pronounced in the body than in the antrum, which is in agreement with the characteristics of H pylori gastritis found in other cases with Ménétrier's disease. A 14 day antibacterial treatment course with 750 mg amoxicillin three times a day combined with 40 mg omeprazole three times a day was started in April 1991. This resulted in eradication of H pylori and the return to normal of giant folds and the mucosal histology. Serum protein concentrations returned to normal within six weeks and remained normal at two endoscopies during a two year follow up. This case report suggests that a subgroup of the patients with Ménétrier's disease may be healed by the eradication of H pylori. PMID:8200570

  4. The Possible Role of Helicobacter pylori Infection in Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Dan-Dan; He, Cong; Ai, Hong-Hui; Huang, Ying; Lu, Nong-Hua

    2017-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) which colonizes the stomach can cause a wide array of gastric disorders, including chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer, and gastric cancer. Recently, accumulating evidence has implicated H. pylori infection in extragastrointestinal diseases such as cardiovascular diseases, neurological disorders, and metabolic diseases. At the same time, many scholars have noted the relationship between H. pylori infection and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Despite the positive association between H. pylori and NAFLD reported in some researches, there are opposite perspectives denying their relationship. Due to high prevalence, unclear etiology and difficult treatment of NAFLD, confirming the pathogenicity of H. pylori infection in NAFLD will undoubtedly provide insights for novel treatment strategies for NAFLD. This paper will review the relationship between H. pylori infection and NAFLD and the possible pathogenic mechanisms.

  5. An association between Helicobacter pylori and upper respiratory tract disease: Fact or fiction?

    PubMed Central

    Kariya, Shin; Okano, Mitsuhiro; Nishizaki, Kazunori

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a major cause of chronic gastritis and gastric ulcers and considerable evidence supports the notion that infection with this bacterium is also associated with gastric malignancy in addition to various other conditions including pulmonary, vascular and autoimmune disorders. Gastric juice infected with H. pylori might play an important role in upper respiratory tract infection. Although direct and/or indirect mechanisms might be involved in the association between H. pylori and upper respiratory tract diseases, the etiological role of H. pylori in upper respiratory tract disorders has not yet been fully elucidated. Although various studies over the past two decades have suggested a relationship between H. pylori and upper respiratory tract diseases, the findings are inconsistent. The present overview describes the outcomes of recent investigations into the impact of H. pylori on upper respiratory tract and adjacent lesions. PMID:24587622

  6. [Diagnosis and treatment guidelines for Helicobacter pylori infection in Korea].

    PubMed

    Kim, Nayoung; Kim, Jae J; Choe, Yon Ho; Kim, Hyun Soo; Kim, Jin Il; Chung, In-Sik

    2009-11-01

    Eleven years has passed since the guideline of the Korean College of Helicobacter and Upper Gastrointestinal Research group for H. pylori infection was produced in 1998. During this period the research for H. pylori has much progressed that H. pylori is now regarded as the major cause of gastric cancer. The seroprevalence of H. pylori in Korea was found to be decreased especially below the age of 40s and in the area of Seoul-Gyeonggi province, and annual reinfection rate of H. pylori has decreased up to 2.94%. In the aspect of diagnostic tests of H. pylori the biopsy is recommended in the body instead of antrum in the subjects with atrophic gastritis and/or intestinal metaplasia for the modified Giemsa staining or Warthin Starry silver staining. The urea breath test is the test of choice to confirm eradication when follow-up endoscopy is not necessary. Definite indication for H. pylori eradication is early gastric cancer in addition to the previous indications of peptic ulcer including scar and Marginal zone B cell lymphoma (MALT type). Treatment is also recommended for the relatives of gastric cancer patient, unexplained iron deficiency anemia, and chronic idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura. One or two week treatment of proton pump inhibitor (PPI) based triple therapy consisting of one PPI and two antibiotics, clarithromycin and amoxicillin, is recommended as the first line treatment regimen. In the case of treatment failure, one or two weeks of quadruple therapy (PPI+metronidazole+tetracycline+bismuth) is recommended. Herein, Korean College of Helicobacter and Upper Gastrointestinal Research proposes a diagnostic and treatment guideline based on currently available evidence.

  7. Helicobacter pylori may induce bile reflux: link between H pylori and bile induced injury to gastric epithelium.

    PubMed Central

    Ladas, S D; Katsogridakis, J; Malamou, H; Giannopoulou, H; Kesse-Elia, M; Raptis, S A

    1996-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori and duodenogastric reflux are both recognised as playing aetiological roles in chronic gastritis. This study investigated whether H pylori colonisation of the antral mucosa and duodenogastric reflux are independent phenomena or have a causal relationship. Thirty eight patients (15 men, 23 women) aged (mean (SD)) 48 (17) years participated. Each patient underwent gastroscopy. Antral biopsy specimens were taken to investigate H pylori colonisation. In addition BrIDA-99mTc/111In-DTPA scintigraphy was used to quantify duodenogastric reflux. H pylori positive patients who were found to have duodenogastric reflux were treated with amoxycillin (1 g/d) and metronidazole (1.5 g/d) for seven days and four tablets of bismuth subcitrate daily for four weeks. Follow up antral biopsies and scintigraphy were repeated at six months. Duodenogastric reflux could not be found in 18 patients, including eight (44%) who were H pylori positive. Ten of the 11 patients who had duodenogastric reflux (reflux % 11.6 (9.2)), however, were H pylori positive (chi 2 = 6.26, p = 0.01). These 10 patients were given eradication treatment. At six months, in six patients who became H pylori negative, duodenogastric reflux was significantly reduced from a pretreatment value of 14.3% to 3.3% (two tail, paired t = 2.57, p = 0.016). These data suggest that H pylori may induced duodenogastric reflux which may be important in the pathogenesis of H pylori gastritis or carcinogenesis, or both. PMID:8566844

  8. Lack of commensal flora in H. pylori-infected INS-GAS mice reduces gastritis and delays intraepithelial neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Lofgren, Jennifer L.; Whary, Mark T.; Ge, Zhongming; Muthupalani, Sureshkumar; Taylor, Nancy S.; Mobley, Melissa; Potter, Amanda; Varro, Andrea; Eibach, Daniel; Suerbaum, Sebastian; Wang, Timothy C.; Fox, James G.

    2010-01-01

    Background & Aims Transgenic, insulin–gastrin (INS–GAS) mice have high circulating levels of gastrin. On a FVB/N background, these mice develop spontaneous atrophic gastritis and gastrointestinal intraepithelial neoplasia (GIN) with 80% prevalence 6 months after Helicobacter pylori infection. GIN is associated with gastric atrophy and achlorhydria, predisposing mice to non-helicobacter microbiota overgrowth. We determined if germ-free INS–GAS mice spontaneously develop GIN and if H. pylori accelerates GIN in gnotobiotic INS–GAS mice. Methods We compared gastric lesions and levels of mRNA, serum inflammatory mediators, antibodies, and gastrin among germ-free and H. pylori-monoinfected INS-GAS mice. Microbiota composition of specific pathogen-free (SPF) INS-GAS mice was quantified by pyro-sequencing. Results Germ-free INS-GAS mice had mild hypergastrinemia but did not develop significant gastric lesions until they were 9 months old; they did not develop GIN through 13 months. H. pylori monoassociation caused progressive gastritis, epithelial defects, oxyntic gland atrophy, marked foveolar hyperplasia and dysplasia, and strong serum and tissue proinflammatory immune responses (particularly in male mice) between 5 and 11 months post infection (P<0.05, compared with germ-free controls). Only 2 of 26 female, whereas 8 of 18 male, H. pylori-infected INS-GAS mice developed low- to high-grade GIN by 11 months post infection. Stomachs of H. pylori-infected SPF male mice had significant reductions in Bacteroidetes and significant increases in Firmicutes. Conclusions Gastric lesions take 13 months longer to develop in germ-free INS–GAS mice than male SPF INS-GAS mice. H. pylori-monoassociation accelerated gastritis and GIN but caused less-severe gastric lesions and delayed onset of GIN compared to H. pylori-infected INS-GAS mice with complex gastric microbiota. Changes of gastric microbiota composition might promote GIN in the achlorhydric stomachs of SPF mice. PMID

  9. Prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection in patients with peptic disease.

    PubMed

    Sirinthornpunya, Siam

    2012-03-01

    Helicobacter pylori is one of the most common human infections worldwide. It has been established as etiology of chronic gastritis and peptic ulcer disease, gastric adenocarcinoma and mucosal associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma (MALT). During this decade, there have been some reports showing a decline in global prevalence of H. pylori infection and peptic diseases including in many Asian countries. To study the H. pylori infection in patients with peptic diseases, association with other factors and comparison to previous data. Retrospective observational study of endoscopic reports for upper gastrointestinal tract diseases in patients with peptic diseases from October 2009 to September 2010 at the Endoscopic Unit, Department of Medicine, Rajavithi Hospital. Patients were examined for the presence of H. pylori infection by rapid urease test (RUT) or histology staining. Five hundred and seventy patients with a mean age of 55.0 +/- 16.02 years with peptic diseases were studies. Endoscopic findings showed 106 GU patients (18.6%), 29 DU patients (5.1%), 3 combined GU and DU patients (0.5%) and 432 NUD patients (75.8%). The prevalence of H. pylori infection were 64% (365 of 570 patients). Prevalence of H. pylori infection were 61.3% of NUD cases, 68.9% of GU cases, 82.8% in DU cases and 100% in combined GU and DU cases. Comparison with previous data (Anantapunpong S. Rajavithi Med J 1999; 10: 17-26), the prevalence of H. pylori infection overall and in DU are not changed but in NUD and GU are increased. The prevalence of H. pylori infection is still high in peptic diseases. The patients with age more than 50 years have more GU, less NUD than the younger groups. In comparison with a previous study, the prevalence of H. pylori infection in overall and in DU are not changed but in NUD and GU are increased.

  10. Helicobacter pylori associated Asian enigma: Does diet deserve distinction?

    PubMed Central

    Zaidi, Syed Faisal

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is one of the most widespread infections in humans worldwide that chronically infects up to 50% of the world’s population. The infection is involved in the pathogenesis of chronic active gastritis, peptic ulcer, mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma and gastric cancer, therefore, it has been classified as class I definite carcinogen by the World Health Organization. Despite the established etiological role of H. pylori, its actual distribution and association with related diseases is controversial and there is a large intercountry variation especially among Asian countries. H. pylori infection is more frequent in developing countries like India, Pakistan, and Bangladesh as compared to developed Asian countries like Japan, China and South Korea. However, the frequency of gastric cancer is comparatively lower in India, Pakistan, and Bangladesh with that of Japan, China and South Korea. Such phenomenon of clinical diversity, defined as enigma, is judged by genetic variability of the infecting H. pylori strains, differences in the host genetic background in various ethnic groups, and environmental factors such as dietary habits. Most of the studies have so far focused on the bacterial factor while environmental issues, including dietary components, were not given due attention as one of the factors related with H. pylori associated gastric carcinogenesis. The dietary factor has been suggested to play an important role in H. pylori related carcinogenesis, and in this respect several studies have corroborated the intake of various dietary components as modulatory factors for gastric cancer risk. In this review, such studies, from in vitro experiments to clinical trials, are being focused in detail with respect to enigma associated with H. pylori. It may be conceivably concluded from the available evidence that dietary factor can be a game changer in the scenario of Asian enigma, particularly in high risk population infected with

  11. Helicobacter pylori associated Asian enigma: Does diet deserve distinction?

    PubMed

    Zaidi, Syed Faisal

    2016-04-15

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is one of the most widespread infections in humans worldwide that chronically infects up to 50% of the world's population. The infection is involved in the pathogenesis of chronic active gastritis, peptic ulcer, mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma and gastric cancer, therefore, it has been classified as class I definite carcinogen by the World Health Organization. Despite the established etiological role of H. pylori, its actual distribution and association with related diseases is controversial and there is a large intercountry variation especially among Asian countries. H. pylori infection is more frequent in developing countries like India, Pakistan, and Bangladesh as compared to developed Asian countries like Japan, China and South Korea. However, the frequency of gastric cancer is comparatively lower in India, Pakistan, and Bangladesh with that of Japan, China and South Korea. Such phenomenon of clinical diversity, defined as enigma, is judged by genetic variability of the infecting H. pylori strains, differences in the host genetic background in various ethnic groups, and environmental factors such as dietary habits. Most of the studies have so far focused on the bacterial factor while environmental issues, including dietary components, were not given due attention as one of the factors related with H. pylori associated gastric carcinogenesis. The dietary factor has been suggested to play an important role in H. pylori related carcinogenesis, and in this respect several studies have corroborated the intake of various dietary components as modulatory factors for gastric cancer risk. In this review, such studies, from in vitro experiments to clinical trials, are being focused in detail with respect to enigma associated with H. pylori. It may be conceivably concluded from the available evidence that dietary factor can be a game changer in the scenario of Asian enigma, particularly in high risk population infected with

  12. Genetic Manipulation of a Naturally Competent Bacterium, Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Noto, Jennifer M.; Peek, Richard M.

    2013-01-01

    Genetic manipulation of Helicobacter pylori facilitates characterization and functional analysis of individual H. pylori genes. This chapter discusses the methods involved in H. pylori chromosomal DNA isolation, mutagenesis of individual genes, and natural transformation. PMID:23015491

  13. Novel and Effective Therapeutic Regimens for Helicobacter pylori in an Era of Increasing Antibiotic Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yi; Zhu, Yin; Lu, Nong-Hua

    2017-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a common gastrointestinal bacterial strain closely associated with the incidence of chronic gastritis, peptic ulcers, gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma, and gastric cancer. A current research and clinical challenge is the increased rate of antibiotic resistance in H. pylori, which has led to a decreased H. pylori eradication rate. In this article, we review recent H. pylori infection and reinfection rates and H. pylori resistance to antibiotics, and we discuss the pertinent treatments. A PubMed literature search was performed using the following keywords: Helicobacter pylori, infection, reinfection, antibiotic resistance, bismuth, proton pump inhibitors, vonoprazan, susceptibility, quintuple therapy, dual therapy, and probiotic. The prevalence of H. pylori has remained high in some areas despite the decreasing trend of H. pylori prevalence observed over time. Additionally, the H. pylori reinfection rate has varied in different countries due to socioeconomic and hygienic conditions. Helicobacter pylori monoresistance to clarithromycin, metronidazole or levofloxacin was common in most countries. However, the prevalence of amoxicillin and tetracycline resistance has remained low. Because H. pylori infection and reinfection present serious challenges and because H. pylori resistance to clarithromycin, metronidazole or levofloxacin remains high in most countries, the selection of an efficient regimen to eradicate H. pylori is critical. Currently, bismuth-containing quadruple therapies still achieve high eradication rates. Moreover, susceptibility-based therapies are alternatives because they may avoid the use of unnecessary antibiotics. Novel regimens, e.g., vonoprazan-containing triple therapies, quintuple therapies, high-dose dual therapies, and standard triple therapies with probiotics, require further studies concerning their efficiency and safety for treating H. pylori. PMID:28529929

  14. Emerging Role of Probiotics in the Management of Helicobacter pylori Infection: Histopathologic Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Emara, Mohamed H; Elhawari, Soha A; Yousef, Salem; Radwan, Mohamed I; Abdel-Aziz, Hesham R

    2016-02-01

    There is growing evidence from preclinical and clinical studies that emphasizes the efficacy of probiotics in the management of Helicobacter (H) pylori infection; it increased the eradication rate, improved patient clinical manifestations and lowered treatment associated side effects. In this review we documented the potential ability of probiotics to ameliorate H. pylori induced histological features. We searched the available literature for full length articles focusing the role of probiotics on H. pylori induced gastritis from histologic perspectives. Probiotics lowered H. pylori density at the luminal side of epithelium, improved histological inflammatory and activity scores both in the gastric corpus and antrum. This effect persists for long period of time after discontinuation of probiotic supplementation and this is probably through an immune mechanism. The current evidence support the promising role of probiotics in improving H. pylori induced histopathological features both in gastric antrum and corpus and for long periods of time. Because increased density of H. pylori on the gastric mucosa is linked to more severe gastritis and increased incidence of peptic ulcers, we can infer that a reduction of the density might help to decrease the risk of developing pathologies, probably the progression toward atrophic gastritis and gastric adenocarcinoma. These effects together with improving the H. pylori eradication rates and amelioration of treatment related side effects might open the door for probiotics to be added to H. pylori eradication regimens. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Comparative Genomics of H. pylori and Non-Pylori Helicobacter Species to Identify New Regions Associated with Its Pathogenicity and Adaptability

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Qun-Feng; Li, Song-Bo; Wang, Ju-Ping; Chen, Yu-Li

    2016-01-01

    The genus Helicobacter is a group of Gram-negative, helical-shaped pathogens consisting of at least 36 bacterial species. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori), infecting more than 50% of the human population, is considered as the major cause of gastritis, peptic ulcer, and gastric cancer. However, the genetic underpinnings of H. pylori that are responsible for its large scale epidemic and gastrointestinal environment adaption within human beings remain unclear. Core-pan genome analysis was performed among 75 representative H. pylori and 24 non-pylori Helicobacter genomes. There were 1173 conserved protein families of H. pylori and 673 of all 99 Helicobacter genus strains. We found 79 genome unique regions, a total of 202,359bp, shared by at least 80% of the H. pylori but lacked in non-pylori Helicobacter species. The operons, genes, and sRNAs within the H. pylori unique regions were considered as potential ones associated with its pathogenicity and adaptability, and the relativity among them has been partially confirmed by functional annotation analysis. However, functions of at least 54 genes and 10 sRNAs were still unclear. Our analysis of protein-protein interaction showed that 30 genes within them may have the cooperation relationship. PMID:28078297

  16. Does Helicobacter pylori exhibit corkscrew motion while swimming?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constantino, Maira; Hardcastle, Joseph; Bansil, Rama

    2015-03-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a spiral shaped bacterium associated with ulcers, gastric cancer, gastritis among other diseases. In order to colonize the harsh acidic environment of the stomach H. pylori has to go across the viscoelastic mucus layer of the stomach. Many studies have been conducted on the swimming of H. pylori in viscous media however none have taken into account the influence of cell-body shape on the trajectory. We present an experimental study of the effects of body shape in the swimming trajectory of H. pylori in viscous media by a quantitative analysis of the bacterium rotation and translation in gels using phase contrast microscopy and particle tracking techniques. Preliminary microscopic tracking measurements show very well defined helical trajectories in the spiral-shaped wild type H. pylori. These helical trajectories are not seen in rod-shaped mutants which sometimes display whirling motion about one end acting as a hinge. We will present an analysis of the different trajectories for bacteria swimming in media with different viscoelastic parameters. Supported by the National Science Foundation PHY PoLS.

  17. [Animal models for the study of Helicobacter pylori infection].

    PubMed

    Miszczyk, Eliza; Walencka, Maria; Mikołajczyk-Chmiela, Magdalena

    2014-05-15

    The Gram-negative bacillus Helicobacter pylori is widely recognized as a major etiologic agent responsible for chronic active gastritis, peptic ulcers, the development of gastric cancer and mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT lymphoma). Still, little is known about the natural history of H. pylori infection, since patients usually after many years of not suffering from symptoms of the infection are simply asymptomatic. Since the research investigators carried out on human models has many limitations, there is an urgent need for the development of an animal model optimal and suitable for the monitoring of H. pylori infections. This review summarizes the recent findings on the suitability of animal models used in H. pylori research. Several animal models are useful for the assessment of pathological, microbiological and immunological consequences of infection, which makes it possible to monitor the natural history of H. pylori infection. Preclinical investigations on animal models are an essential stage of research which enrich the knowledge on treatment and prevention strategies.

  18. PCR Detection of Helicobacter pylori in Clinical Samples

    PubMed Central

    Rimbara, Emiko; Sasatsu, Masanori; Graham, David Y.

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is an important pathogen whose primary niche is the human stomach. H. pylori is etio-logically associated with gastric inflammation (gastritis), peptic ulcer disease, and gastric cancer. Both noninvasive (e.g., urea breath and stool antigen tests) and invasive (gastric biopsy for histology, culture, or PCR) tests are used for diagnosis. PCR detection of H. pylori has been reported using a variety of clinical samples including gastric biopsy, gastric juice, saliva, dental plaque, and stools as well as environmental samples. Whenever possibly, noninvasive tests are preferred over invasive tests. H. pylori are excreted in the stool. Culture from stool is variable whereas stool antigen testing is widely used. Stool consists of a complicated mixture of commensal bacteria and chemicals and often includes inhibitors of PCR. Nevertheless, simple extraction methods are available to efficiently extract DNA from human stools and nested-PCR targeting the 23S rRNA gene have proven to be highly sensitive for the detection of H. pylori. Detection of clarithromycin susceptibility/resistance is important clinically and the mutation of the 23S rRNA gene responsible for resistance can also be detected using stool. This described method can be modified for other clinical samples such as gastric juice or biopsy material. PMID:23104297

  19. Contemporary Diagnostic Strategies for the Detection of Helicobacter pylori Infection

    PubMed Central

    Elfant, Adam B.; Howden, Colin W.; Stollman, Neil

    2012-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is highly prevalent, affecting approximately half of the world’s population. While the majority of infected individuals are asymptomatic, H. pylori infection is associated with certain diseases, including peptic ulcers (either duodenal or gastric), gastritis, and 2 malignancies—gastric cancer and gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma. Many of the epidemiologic associations between these diseases and H. pylori infection have been further validated by treatment studies, which show that effective eradication therapy correlates with a decreased risk of disease. A variety of testing strategies are used to detect H. pylori infection. Serologic techniques are widely available and inexpensive, but they are no longer preferred as they have low sensitivities and specificities, and they may show a positive result for a long period following effective therapy. The remaining testing methods are divided into 2 categories: invasive tests (which require endoscopy) and noninvasive tests. Noninvasive test methods such as the urea breath test and stool antigen test have gained popularity due to their high sensitivities and specificities. Further, both of these methods may be used to confirm the absence of infection following eradication therapy. Due to the increasing incidence of treatment failure (caused in part by antibiotic resistance), post-treatment testing is recommended to confirm H. pylori eradication. PMID:24847180

  20. Drug therapy for Helicobacter pylori infection: problems and pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Glupczynski, Y; Burette, A

    1990-12-01

    Antibacterial chemotherapy against Helicobacter pylori is currently being assessed by open or randomized controlled clinical studies for its efficacy in eradicating this bacterium from the stomach of patients with gastritis or gastroduodenal ulcer. Whereas there is presently no "optimal" agent and treatment scheme, the combination of some antibiotics (metronidazole, tinidazole, amoxicillin) with bismuth salts proves definitely superior in vivo to either of these agents administered alone. Several reasons have been proposed, to explain the clinical failure after treatment: insufficient concentration of active drugs in gastric mucus, instability of some agents at an acidic pH, inappropriate formulation of drug, insufficient duration of treatment, and variable compliance of patients. Recently, it has appeared from several clinical trials that H. pylori may rapidly acquire resistance to some antibiotics, and that this event might also account for clinical failure. A critical review of the literature on H. pylori treatment indicates that association of bismuth and antibiotics or of antibiotics alone both may efficiently reduce the risk of emergence of resistance and improve the therapeutic outcome. Guidelines of treatment are suggested in order to avoid the future misuse of antibiotics that would increase selection of antibiotic-resistant H. pylori and negatively affect the ecology of the gastric microflora. Likewise, an accurate definition of a subset of patients with H. pylori who really will require treatment needs to be rapidly established.

  1. Antimicrobial activity of Northwestern Mexican plants against Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Robles-Zepeda, Ramón E; Velázquez-Contreras, Carlos A; Garibay-Escobar, Adriana; Gálvez-Ruiz, Juan C; Ruiz-Bustos, Eduardo

    2011-10-01

    Helicobacter pylori is the major etiologic agent of such gastric disorders as chronic active gastritis and gastric carcinoma. Over the past few years, the appearance of antibiotic-resistant bacteria has led to the development of better treatments, such as the use of natural products. This study evaluated the anti-H. pylori activity of 17 Mexican plants used mainly in the northwestern part of Mexico (Sonora) for the empirical treatment of gastrointestinal disorders. The anti-H. pylori activity of methanolic extracts of the plants was determined by using the broth microdilution method. The 50% minimum inhibitory concentrations ranged from less than 200 to 400 μg/mL for Castella tortuosa, Amphipterygium adstringens, Ibervillea sonorae, Pscalium decompositum, Krameria erecta, Selaginella lepidophylla, Pimpinella anisum, Marrubium vulgare, Ambrosia confertiflora, and Couterea latiflora and were greater than 800 μg/mL for Byophyllum pinnatum, Tecoma stans linnaeus, Kohleria deppena, Jatropha cuneata, Chenopodium ambrosoides, and Taxodium macronatum. Only Equisetum gigantum showed no activity against H. pylori. This study suggests the important role that these plants may have in the treatment of gastrointestinal disorders caused by H. pylori. The findings set the groundwork for further characterization and elucidation of the active compounds responsible for such activity.

  2. Helicobacter pylori does not use spermidine synthase to produce spermidine.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huawei; Au, Shannon Wing Ngor

    2017-08-26

    Helicobacter pylori is the primary pathogen associated to gastritis and gastric cancer. Growth of H. pylori depends on the availability of spermidine in vivo. Interestingly, the genome of H. pylori contains an incomplete set of genes for the classical pathway of spermidine biosynthesis. It is thus not clear whether some other genes remained in the pathway would have any functions in spermidine biosynthesis. Here, we study spermidine synthase, which is responsible for the final catalytic process in the classical route. Protein sequence alignment reveals that H. pylori SpeE (HpSpeE) lacks key residues for substrate binding. By using isothermal titration calorimetry, we show that purified recombinant HpSpeE does not interact with the putative substrates putrescine and decarboxylated S-adenosylmethionine, and the product spermidine. High performance liquid chromatography analysis further demonstrates that HpSpeE has no detectable in vitro enzymatic activity. Additionally, intracellular spermidine level in speE-null mutant strain is comparable to that in the wild type strain. Collectively, our results suggest that HpSpeE is functionally distinct from spermidine production. H. pylori may instead employ the alternative pathway for spermidine synthesis which is dominantly exploited by other human gut microbes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Comparison of endoscopic based diagnosis with Helicobacter urease test for Helicobacter pylori infection.

    PubMed

    Adu-Aryee, N A; Aabakken, L; Dedey, F; Nsaful, J; Kudzi, W

    2016-08-30

    Helicobacter pylori is an important risk factor for gastritis, peptic ulcers and gastric cancer. The prevalence in developed countries is lower than 40 % but higher than 80 % in some developing countries. It is 75 % in Ghana. The Helicobacter urease test (HUT) is performed at endoscopy and gives an accurate diagnosis. The HUT is not routinely done at our facility and presumption of H. pylori is made based on endoscopic findings and H. pylori eradication prescribed, as the incidence in the general population is presumed high. Is this endoscopic diagnosis sufficient for diagnosing and treating H. pylori? We aimed to assess the feasibility of an endoscopic based H. pylori diagnosis and its accuracy using a HUT as the gold standard in consecutive patients. Seventy-six consecutive adult patients with dyspepsia were assessed by upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. A clinical diagnosis of H. pylori or not was made. Biopsy samples were collected for HUT. H. pylori was diagnosed if HUT was positive. The results were then compared. Median age of patients was 45.0 years. H. pylori prevalence detected by HUT was 51.3 % (95 % CI 40.0-63.0). Sensitivity of endoscopic diagnosis of H. pylori was 71.8 % (95 % CI 55.1-85.0) and specificity was 37.8 % (95 % CI 22.5-55.2). There was no association between clinical findings (73.7 %) and HUT (26.3 %) (OR = 0.80; [95 % CI 0.24-2.64], p = 0.682). There was also no association between endoscopic diagnosis (71.8 %) and HUT (28.2 %), (OR = 1.55; 95 % CI 0.59-4.06, p = 0.373). Helicobacter pylori infection was not as high as that published in earlier reports. The endoscopic diagnosis alone is not sufficient to make a diagnosis of H. pylori.

  4. No evidence of a role for mitochondrial complex I in Helicobacter pylori pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ng, Garrett Z; Ke, Bi-Xia; Laskowski, Adrienne; Thorburn, David R; Sutton, Philip

    2017-06-01

    Complex I is the first enzyme complex in the mitochondrial respiratory chain, responsible for generating a large fraction of energy during oxidative phosphorylation. Recently, it has been identified that complex I deficiency can result in increased inflammation due to the generation of reactive oxygen species by innate immune cells. As a reduction in complex I activity has been demonstrated in human stomachs with atrophic gastritis, we investigated whether complex I deficiency could influence Helicobacter pylori pathogenesis. Ndufs6(gt/gt) mice have a partial complex I deficiency. Complex I activity was quantified in the stomachs and immune cells of Ndufs6(gt/gt) mice by spectrophotometric assays. Ndufs6(gt/gt) mice were infected with H. pylori and bacterial colonization assessed by colony-forming assay, gastritis assessed histologically, and H. pylori -specific humoral response quantified by ELISA. The immune cells and stomachs of Ndufs6(gt/gt) mice were found to have significantly decreased complex I activity, validating the model for assessing the effects of complex I deficiency in H. pylori infection. However, there was no observable effect of complex I deficiency on either H. pylori colonization, the resulting gastritis, or the humoral response. Although complex I activity is described to suppress innate immune responses and is decreased during atrophic gastritis in humans, our data suggest it does not affect H. pylori pathogenesis. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Histology of the mucosa of gastric antrum and body before and after eradication of Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Resende, L M; Queiroz, D M; Barbosa, A J; Mendes, E N; Rocha, G A; Coelho, L G; Passos, M C; Castro, L P; Oliveira, C A; Lima Júnior, G F

    1993-12-01

    1. Helicobacter pylori status and the histology of the antral and oxyntic mucosa were evaluated in 25 patients with duodenal ulcer treated with a triple schedule of furazolidone, metronidazole and amoxicillin, and in 16 patients treated only with cimetidine. 2. Before treatment, H. pylori was detected in all patients. One month after treatment with the antimicrobial agents, H. pylori was not found in 18 (72.0%) of 25 patients treated with the triple schedule. In the patients treated with cimetidine (N = 16) the H. pylori tests continued to be positive after treatment. 3. Inflammatory activity and intensity of gastritis were significantly reduced in patients treated with the antimicrobial agents but not in cimetidine-treated patients. Three patients who had negative cultures and improvement of gastritis 1 month after treatment became H. pylori positive again within 2 months, with concomitant reappearance of gastritis. 4. This study provides additional evidence that histological gastritis observed in H. pylori-positive patients with duodenal ulcer is due to the presence of the microorganism.

  6. In vitro anti-Helicobacter pylori action of 30 Chinese herbal medicines used to treat ulcer diseases.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; Xu, Chen; Zhang, Qiang; Liu, Jun Yan; Tan, Ren Xiang

    2005-04-26

    Infection by Helicobacter pylori has been ascertained to be an important etiologic impetus leading usually to chronic active gastritis and gastric ulcer with growing incidences worldwide. Utilizing as the test pathogen a standard and five clinic strains of Helicobacter pylori, the antibacterial action was assessed in vitro with ethanol extracts of 30 Chinese herbal medicines which have been frequently prescribed since ancient times for treating gastritis-like disorders. Among the 30 tested materials, the ethanol extracts of Abrus cantoniensis (Fabaceae), Saussurea lappa (Asteraceae) and Eugenia caryophyllata (Myrtaceae) were strongly inhibitory to all test strains (MICs: approximately 40 microg/ml), and Hippophae rhamnoides (Elaeagnaceae), Fritillaria thunbergii (Liliaceae), Magnolia officinalis and Schisandra chinensis (Magnoliaceae), Corydalis yanhusuo (Papaveraceae), Citrus reticulata (Rutaceae), Bupleurum chinense and Ligusticum chuanxiong (Apiaceae) substantially active with MICs close to 60.0 microg/ml. As to antibacterial actions of the aqueous extracts of the same drugs, those derived from Cassia obtusifolia (Fabaceae), Fritillaria thunbergii and Eugenia caryophyllata were remarkably inhibitory against all the six Helicobacter pylori strains (MICs: approximately 60 microg/ml). The work compared almost quantitatively the magnitude of the anti-Helicobacter pylori actions of the 30 most prescribed gastritis-treating Chinese herbal drugs, and located as well some source plants where potent anti-Helicobacter pylori phytochemicals could be characterized.

  7. Dynamic Changes in Helicobacter pylori Status Following Gastric Cancer Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Kichul; Kim, Nayoung; Kim, Jaeyeon; Lee, Jung Won; Lee, Hye Seung; Lee, Jong-Chan; Yoon, Hyuk; Shin, Cheol Min; Park, Young Soo; Ahn, Sang-Hoon; Park, Do Joong; Kim, Hyung Ho; Lee, Yoon Jin; Lee, Kyoung-Ho; Kim, Young-Hoon; Lee, Dong Ho

    2017-01-01

    Background/Aims Helicobacter pylori eradication is recommended in patients with early gastric cancer. However, the possibility of spontaneous regression raises a question for clinicians about the need for “retesting” postoperative H. pylori status. Methods Patients who underwent curative gastrectomy at Seoul National University Bundang Hospital and had a positive H. pylori status without eradication therapy at the time of gastric cancer diagnosis were prospectively enrolled in this study. H. pylori status and atrophic gastritis (AG) and intestinal metaplasia (IM) histologic status were assessed pre- and postoperatively. Results One hundred forty patients (mean age, 59.0 years; 60.7% male) underwent subtotal gastrectomy with B-I (65.0%), B-II (27.1%), Roux-en-Y (4.3%), jejunal interposition (0.7%), or proximal gastrectomy (4.3%). Preoperative presence of AG (62.9%) and IM (72.9%) was confirmed. The mean period between surgery and the last endoscopic follow-up was 38.0±25.6 months. Of the 140 patients, 80 (57.1%) were found to be persistently positive for H. pylori, and 60 (42.9%) showed spontaneous negative conversion at least once during follow-up. Of these 60 patients, eight (13.3%) showed more complex postoperative dynamic changes between negative and positive results. The spontaneous negative conversion group showed a trend of having more postoperative IM compared to the persistent H. pylori group. Conclusions A high percentage of spontaneous regression and complex dynamic changes in H. pylori status were observed after partial gastrectomy, especially in individuals with postoperative histological IM. It is better to consider postoperative eradication therapy after retesting for H. pylori. PMID:27840366

  8. Autophagy in Helicobacter pylori Infection and Related Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Castaño-Rodríguez, Natalia; Kaakoush, Nadeem O; Goh, Khean-Lee; Fock, Kwong Ming; Mitchell, Hazel M

    2015-10-01

    Autophagy, a degradation pathway in which cytoplasmic content is engulfed and degraded by lysosomal hydrolases, plays a pivotal role in infection and inflammation. Given that defects in autophagy lead to increased susceptibility to infection, we investigated the role of autophagy in Helicobacter pylori-related gastric cancer (GC). Gene expression of 84 molecules was examined through quantitative real-time PCR in gastric epithelial cells (AGS) and macrophages (THP-1) upon exposure to H. pylori GC026 (GC) and 26695 (gastritis). Further, ATG16L1 rs2241880, IRGM rs13361189, and IRGM rs4958847, polymorphisms that have been investigated in relation to H. pylori infection or GC in Caucasians, were detected by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry in 304 ethnic Chinese (86 noncardia GC cases/218 functional dyspepsia controls). Gene expression analyses showed twenty-eight molecules involved in vesicle nucleation, elongation, and maturation to be significantly down-regulated in H. pylori GC026-challenged AGS cells. Further, core autophagy proteins and autophagy regulators were differentially expressed in H. pylori-challenged THP-1-derived macrophages. Analyses of the selected polymorphisms showed that ATG16L1 rs2241880 increased the risk of GC (OR: 2.38, 95% CI: 1.34-4.24) and H. pylori infection (OR: 1.49, 95% CI: 1.02-2.16) while IRGM rs4958847 decreased GC risk (OR: 0.26, 95% CI: 0.09-0.74) in ethnic Chinese, these effect sizes being especially strong in H. pylori-infected individuals (ATG16L1 rs2241880 and IRGM rs13361189). Our findings indicate that highly virulent H. pylori strains markedly modulate autophagy in the host cell. Further, for the first time, autophagy polymorphisms were associated with GC in Chinese, a high GC-risk population. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Role of food in environmental transmission of Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Zamani, Mohammad; Vahedi, Amin; Maghdouri, Zahra; Shokri-Shirvani, Javad

    2017-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H.pylori) is a gram-negative bacterium that has infected more than half of the world's population. This pathogen colonizes the human gastric mucosa and is usually acquired during childhood. It is an important cause of peptic ulcers, chronic gastritis and stomach cancer. Among the risk factors for acquisition of H. pylori infection, poor socioeconomic status, poor sanitization and hygiene practices, and contaminated food and water, are the most significant ones. The main route of H. pylori transmission is still unknown. Studies show that H.pylori bacteria can spread directly from one person to the other, or indirectly from an infected person to the environment. Person to person transmission is divided into fecal-oral, gastric-oral, oral-oral, sexual routes. Presently, interpersonal pathways are more acceptable than environmental exposure routes. Literatures indicate the presence and survival of H. pylori in food samples, such as milk, vegetables and meat, and suggest these foods may play an important role in the environmental transmission of this pathogen. In addition, other studies report the presence of H. pylori in the gastric tissue of some animals (e.g. sheep and cow) and therefore, it is likely they participate in the food chain transmission as reservoirs besides human. Although there are findings which indicate the probable role of food products in the environmental transmission of H. pylori, there is still not enough direct evidence to confirm this and more studies are needed. However, attention to food contamination sources (unhygienic water) and controlling them may prevent transmission of pathogens associated with health.

  10. The presence of Helicobacter pylori in oral cavities of patients with leukoplakia and oral lichen planus.

    PubMed

    Kazanowska-Dygdała, Magdalena; Duś, Irena; Radwan-Oczko, Małgorzata

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is one of the most common bacterial infections in men. This gastrointestinal pathogen is closely related to gastritis, peptic ulcers, and the increased risk of gastric cancer. Numerous studies have indicated oral cavities as possible Helicobacter pylori reservoirs. Helicobacter pylori has been detected both in supragingival and subgingival plaques, and also in saliva. In addition, the relationship between lesions of oral mucosa and the presence of H. pylori has been evaluated and described in some studies. The aim of this study was to assess the presence of Helicobacter pylori DNA in the oral cavity of patients with oral leukoplakia and oral lichen planus. The study included 54 patients with oral leukoplakia, 72 with oral lichen planus lesions, and 40 healthy controls. The presence of Helicobacter pylori in oral cavity samples was analyzed using a single-step Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) method. All patients underwent a periodontal examination and the following clinical parameters were collected: pocket depth, bleeding, and plaque indexes. The periodontal status was assessed using the Offenbacher classification. In most patients, pathological lesions were in typical sites on the buccal mucosa (leukoplakia in 88%, and oral lichen planus in 93% of patients). The DNA of the Helicobacter pylori was present in 20% of patients with leukoplakia and 23% of patients with lichen planus. We did not find the DNA of H. pylori in healthy controls. The periodontal status described by periodontal indices was worse in the investigated group than in the control group. These findings suggest that the H. pylori presence in oral cavities may be related with leukoplakia and lichen planus oral lesions.

  11. The presence of Helicobacter pylori in oral cavities of patients with leukoplakia and oral lichen planus

    PubMed Central

    Kazanowska-Dygdała, Magdalena; Duś, Irena; Radwan-Oczko, Małgorzata

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective Helicobacter pylori infection is one of the most common bacterial infections in men. This gastrointestinal pathogen is closely related to gastritis, peptic ulcers, and the increased risk of gastric cancer. Numerous studies have indicated oral cavities as possible Helicobacter pylori reservoirs. Helicobacter pylori has been detected both in supragingival and subgingival plaques, and also in saliva. In addition, the relationship between lesions of oral mucosa and the presence of H. pylori has been evaluated and described in some studies. The aim of this study was to assess the presence of Helicobacter pylori DNA in the oral cavity of patients with oral leukoplakia and oral lichen planus. Material and Methods The study included 54 patients with oral leukoplakia, 72 with oral lichen planus lesions, and 40 healthy controls. The presence of Helicobacter pylori in oral cavity samples was analyzed using a single-step Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) method. All patients underwent a periodontal examination and the following clinical parameters were collected: pocket depth, bleeding, and plaque indexes. The periodontal status was assessed using the Offenbacher classification. Results In most patients, pathological lesions were in typical sites on the buccal mucosa (leukoplakia in 88%, and oral lichen planus in 93% of patients). The DNA of the Helicobacter pylori was present in 20% of patients with leukoplakia and 23% of patients with lichen planus. We did not find the DNA of H. pylori in healthy controls. The periodontal status described by periodontal indices was worse in the investigated group than in the control group. Conclusion These findings suggest that the H. pylori presence in oral cavities may be related with leukoplakia and lichen planus oral lesions. PMID:27008253

  12. Helicobacter pylori-related diseases.

    PubMed

    Gisbert, Javier P

    2016-09-01

    This article describes the main conclusions drawn from the presentations on Helicobacter pylori infection in Digestive Diseases Week, 2016. Despite the undeniable widespread reduction in the prevalence of this infection, infection rates continue to be high in developing countries. The prevalence of clarithromycin, metronidazole and quinolone resistance is markedly high in most countries and continues to rise. The management of H. pylori infection in patients with peptic ulcers still leaves much to be desired. Although H. pylori eradication reduces the incidence of gastric adenocarcinoma, it does not completely avoid its appearance. The new rapid stool antigen tests show promising results. The efficacy of standard triple therapy is clearly inadequate and continues to decline, and cannot therefore be recommended. Vonoprazan, when associated with 2 antibiotics, is more effective than traditional proton pump inhibitors, especially in clarithromycin-resistant patients. Non-bismuth quadruple (concomitant) therapy achieves eradication rates of around 90% and has a good safety profile. Concomitant therapy is more effective and simpler than sequential therapy. Although some probiotics can increase the efficacy and tolerability of triple therapy, the utility of its association with quadruple concomitant therapy has not been established. If a first treatment with clarithromycin fails, both bismuth-containing quadruple therapy and levofloxacin-containing triple therapy achieve good-but still suboptimal-results. The combination of bismuth and levofloxacin in the same regimen increases the efficacy of rescue therapy. The management of H. pylori infection by European gastroenterologists is widely heterogeneous and the eradication rates achieved by them are generally unacceptable. In Spain, the highest first-line eradication rate is obtained with quadruple concomitant therapy in 14-day regimens and with double doses of proton pump inhibitors; in second-line therapy, the use of

  13. Helicobacter pylori vacA genotype is a predominant determinant of immune response to Helicobacter pylori CagA.

    PubMed

    Link, Alexander; Langner, Cosima; Schirrmeister, Wiebke; Habendorf, Wiebke; Weigt, Jochen; Venerito, Marino; Tammer, Ina; Schlüter, Dirk; Schlaermann, Philipp; Meyer, Thomas F; Wex, Thomas; Malfertheiner, Peter

    2017-07-14

    To evaluate the frequency of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) CagA antibodies in H. pylori infected subjects and to identify potential histopathological and bacterial factors related to H. pylori CagA-immune response. Systematic data to H. pylori isolates, blood samples, gastric biopsies for histological and molecular analyses were available from 99 prospectively recruited subjects. Serological profile (anti-H. pylori, anti-CagA) was correlated with H. pylori isolates (cagA, EPIYA, vacA s/m genotype), histology (Sydney classification) and mucosal interleukin-8 (IL-8) mRNA and protein expression. Selected H. pylori strains were assessed for H. pylori CagA protein expression and IL-8 induction in co-cultivation model with AGS cells. Thirty point three percent of microbiologically confirmed H. pylori infected patients were seropositive for CagA. Majority of H. pylori isolates were cagA gene positive (93.9%) with following vacA polymorphisms: 42.4% vacA s1m1, 23.2% s1m2 and 34.3% s2m2. Anti-CagA-IgG seropositivity was strongly associated with atrophic gastritis, increased mucosal inflammation according to the Sydney score, IL-8 and cagA mRNA expression. VacA s and m polymorphisms were the major determinants for positive (vacA s1m1) or negative (vacA s2m2) anti-CagA serological immune response, which also correlated with the in vitro inflammatory potential in AGS cells. In vitro co-cultivation of representative H. pylori strains with AGS cells confirmed functional CagA translocation, which showed only partial correlation with CagA seropositivity in patients, supporting vacA as major co-determinant of the immune response. Serological immune response to H. pylori cagA+ strain in H. pylori infected patients is strongly associated with vacA polymorphism, suggesting the crucial role of bacterial factors in immune and clinical phenotype of the infection.

  14. History of Helicobacter pylori, duodenal ulcer, gastric ulcer and gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Graham, David Y

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection underlies gastric ulcer disease, gastric cancer and duodenal ulcer disease. The disease expression reflects the pattern and extent of gastritis/gastric atrophy (i.e., duodenal ulcer with non-atrophic and gastric ulcer and gastric cancer with atrophic gastritis). Gastric and duodenal ulcers and gastric cancer have been known for thousands of years. Ulcers are generally non-fatal and until the 20th century were difficult to diagnose. However, the presence and pattern of gastritis in past civilizations can be deduced based on the diseases present. It has been suggested that gastric ulcer and duodenal ulcer both arose or became more frequent in Europe in the 19th century. Here, we show that gastric cancer and gastric ulcer were present throughout the 17th to 19th centuries consistent with atrophic gastritis being the predominant pattern, as it proved to be when it could be examined directly in the late 19th century. The environment before the 20th century favored acquisition of H. pylori infection and atrophic gastritis (e.g., poor sanitation and standards of living, seasonal diets poor in fresh fruits and vegetables, especially in winter, vitamin deficiencies, and frequent febrile infections in childhood). The latter part of the 19th century saw improvements in standards of living, sanitation, and diets with a corresponding decrease in rate of development of atrophic gastritis allowing duodenal ulcers to become more prominent. In the early 20th century physician’s believed they could diagnose ulcers clinically and that the diagnosis required hospitalization for “surgical disease” or for “Sippy” diets. We show that while H. pylori remained common and virulent in Europe and the United States, environmental changes resulted in changes of the pattern of gastritis producing a change in the manifestations of H. pylori infections and subsequently to a rapid decline in transmission and a rapid decline in all H. pylori

  15. History of Helicobacter pylori, duodenal ulcer, gastric ulcer and gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Graham, David Y

    2014-05-14

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection underlies gastric ulcer disease, gastric cancer and duodenal ulcer disease. The disease expression reflects the pattern and extent of gastritis/gastric atrophy (i.e., duodenal ulcer with non-atrophic and gastric ulcer and gastric cancer with atrophic gastritis). Gastric and duodenal ulcers and gastric cancer have been known for thousands of years. Ulcers are generally non-fatal and until the 20th century were difficult to diagnose. However, the presence and pattern of gastritis in past civilizations can be deduced based on the diseases present. It has been suggested that gastric ulcer and duodenal ulcer both arose or became more frequent in Europe in the 19th century. Here, we show that gastric cancer and gastric ulcer were present throughout the 17th to 19th centuries consistent with atrophic gastritis being the predominant pattern, as it proved to be when it could be examined directly in the late 19th century. The environment before the 20th century favored acquisition of H. pylori infection and atrophic gastritis (e.g., poor sanitation and standards of living, seasonal diets poor in fresh fruits and vegetables, especially in winter, vitamin deficiencies, and frequent febrile infections in childhood). The latter part of the 19th century saw improvements in standards of living, sanitation, and diets with a corresponding decrease in rate of development of atrophic gastritis allowing duodenal ulcers to become more prominent. In the early 20th century physician's believed they could diagnose ulcers clinically and that the diagnosis required hospitalization for "surgical disease" or for "Sippy" diets. We show that while H. pylori remained common and virulent in Europe and the United States, environmental changes resulted in changes of the pattern of gastritis producing a change in the manifestations of H. pylori infections and subsequently to a rapid decline in transmission and a rapid decline in all H. pylori-related diseases.

  16. Transforming growth factor-β: an important mediator in Helicobacter pylori-associated pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Nianshuang; Xie, Chuan; Lu, Nong-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H.pylori) is a Gram-negative, microaerophilic, helical bacillus that specifically colonizes the gastric mucosa. The interaction of virulence factors, host genetic factors, and environmental factors contributes to the pathogenesis of H. pylori-associated conditions, such as atrophic gastritis and intestinal metaplasia. Infection with H. pylori has recently been recognized as the strongest risk factor for gastric cancer. As a pleiotropic cytokine, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β regulates various biological processes, including cell cycle, proliferation, apoptosis, and metastasis. Recent studies have shed new light on the involvement of TGF-β signaling in the pathogenesis of H. pylori infection. This review focuses on the potential etiological roles of TGF-β in H. pylori-mediated gastric pathogenesis. PMID:26583078

  17. Helicobacter pylori genetic diversity and gastro-duodenal diseases in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Gunaletchumy, Selva Perumal; Seevasant, Indran; Tan, Mun Hua; Croft, Laurence J; Mitchell, Hazel M; Goh, Khean Lee; Loke, Mun Fai; Vadivelu, Jamuna

    2014-12-11

    Helicobacter pylori infection results in diverse clinical conditions ranging from chronic gastritis and ulceration to gastric adenocarcinoma. Among the multiethnic population of Malaysia, Indians consistently have a higher H. pylori prevalence as compared with Chinese and Malays. Despite the high prevalence of H. pylori, Indians have a relatively low incidence of peptic ulcer disease and gastric cancer. In contrast, gastric cancer and peptic ulcer disease incidence is high in Chinese. H. pylori strains from Chinese strains predominantly belong to the hspEAsia subpopulation while Indian/Malay strains mainly belong to the hspIndia subpopulation. By comparing the genome of 27 Asian strains from different subpopulations, we identified six genes associated with risk of H. pylori-induced peptic ulcer disease and gastric cancer. This study serves as an important foundation for future studies aiming to understand the role of bacterial factors in H. pylori-induced gastro-duodenal diseases.

  18. Helicobacter pylori Genetic Diversity and Gastro-duodenal Diseases in Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Gunaletchumy, Selva Perumal; Seevasant, Indran; Tan, Mun Hua; Croft, Laurence J.; Mitchell, Hazel M.; Goh, Khean Lee; Loke, Mun Fai; Vadivelu, Jamuna

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection results in diverse clinical conditions ranging from chronic gastritis and ulceration to gastric adenocarcinoma. Among the multiethnic population of Malaysia, Indians consistently have a higher H. pylori prevalence as compared with Chinese and Malays. Despite the high prevalence of H. pylori, Indians have a relatively low incidence of peptic ulcer disease and gastric cancer. In contrast, gastric cancer and peptic ulcer disease incidence is high in Chinese. H. pylori strains from Chinese strains predominantly belong to the hspEAsia subpopulation while Indian/Malay strains mainly belong to the hspIndia subpopulation. By comparing the genome of 27 Asian strains from different subpopulations, we identified six genes associated with risk of H. pylori-induced peptic ulcer disease and gastric cancer. This study serves as an important foundation for future studies aiming to understand the role of bacterial factors in H. pylori-induced gastro-duodenal diseases. PMID:25503415

  19. Gene polymorphisms of pathogenic Helicobacter pylori in patients with different types of gastrointestinal diseases

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu-Li; Mo, Xiao-Qiang; Huang, Gan-Rong; Huang, Yan-Qiang; Xiao, Juan; Zhao, Li-Juan; Wei, Hong-Yu; Liang, Qian

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a kind of chronic infectious pathogen which can cause chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer, gastric cancer and other diseases. The genetic structure of the pathogenic genes of H. pylori varies largely, which contributes to the differences in virulence among various strains, and in clinical symptoms. Virulence genes of H. pylori can be categorized into three main classes: those related to adhesion and colonization, those related to gastric mucosal injury, and others. This review focuses on the relationship between genetic polymorphisms of the three classes of virulence genes of H. pylori and diseases. Most of the genetic polymorphisms of the main virulence factors of H. pylori are summarized in this paper. PMID:27956795

  20. Prevalence of Coinfection with Gastric Non-Helicobacter pylori Helicobacter (NHPH) Species in Helicobacter pylori-infected Patients Suffering from Gastric Disease in Beijing, China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jie; He, Lihua; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Gong, Yanan; Flahou, Bram; Cao, Qizhi; Zhang, Jianzhong

    2015-08-01

    The Helicobacter heilmannii sensu lato (H. heilmannii s.l.) group consists of long, spiral-shaped bacteria naturally colonizing the stomach of animals. Moreover, bacteria belonging to this group have been observed in 0.2-6% of human gastric biopsy specimens, and associations have been made with the development of chronic gastritis, peptic ulceration, and gastric MALT lymphoma in humans. To gain insight into the prevalence of H. heilmannii s.l. infections in patients suffering from gastric disease in China, H. heilmannii s.l. species-specific PCRs were performed on DNA extracts from rapid urease test (RUT)-positive gastric biopsies from 1517 patients followed by nucleotide sequencing. At the same time, Helicobacter pylori cultivation and specific PCR was performed to assess H. pylori infection in these patients. In total, H. heilmannii s.l. infection was detected in 11.87% (178/1499) of H. pylori-positive patients. The prevalence of H. suis, H. felis, H. bizzozeronii, H. heilmannii sensu stricto (s.s.), and H. salomonis in the patients was 6.94%, 2.20%, 0.13%, 0.07%, and 2.54%, respectively. Results revealed that all patients with H. heilmannii s.l. infection were co-infected with H. pylori, and some patients were co-infected with more than two different Helicobacter species. Helicobacter heilmannii s.l. infections are fairly common in Chinese patients. This should be kept in mind when diagnosing the cause of gastric pathologies in patients. Helicobacter suis was shown to be by far the most prevalent H. heilmannii s.l.species. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Helicobacter pylori invades the gastric mucosa and translocates to the gastric lymph nodes.

    PubMed

    Ito, Takashi; Kobayashi, Daisuke; Uchida, Keisuke; Takemura, Tamiko; Nagaoka, Sakae; Kobayashi, Intetsu; Yokoyama, Tetsuji; Ishige, Ikuo; Ishige, Yuki; Ishida, Noriko; Furukawa, Asuka; Muraoka, Hiroe; Ikeda, Satoshi; Sekine, Masaki; Ando, Noboru; Suzuki, Yoshimi; Yamada, Tetsuo; Suzuki, Takashige; Eishi, Yoshinobu

    2008-06-01

    Helicobacter pylori has been considered to be non-invasive and to rarely infiltrate the gastric mucosa, even though there is an active Th1 immune response in the lamina propria of the H. pylori-infected stomach. To elucidate whether H. pylori invades the lamina propria and translocates to the gastric lymph nodes, we examined H. pylori in formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded tissue sections of stomach and gastric lymph nodes obtained from 51 cancer patients using real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry (IHC) with a novel anti-H. pylori monoclonal antibody that recognizes lipopolysaccharides. Fresh gastric lymph nodes were used to culture for H. pylori. In 46 patients with H. pylori in the stomach, the bacterium was found in the lymph nodes from 21 patients by culture, 37 patients by PCR, and 29 patients by IHC. H. pylori captured by macrophages was found in the lamina propria of 39 patients. In the lymph nodes, the bacterium was found in many macrophages and a few interdigitating dendritic cells at the paracortical areas. H. pylori was also found in the intracellular canaliculi of parietal cells in 21 patients, but intracytoplasmic invasion into gastric epithelial cells was not identified. When compared to the commercially available anti-H. pylori antibodies, the novel antibody showed the highest sensitivity to detect H. pylori-positive macrophages, whereas no difference was found for H. pylori in the mucous layer. The H. pylori-positive macrophages in the lamina propria correlated with chronic gastritis as well as translocation of such cells to the lymph nodes. These results suggest that H. pylori-induced gastric epithelial damage allows the bacteria to invade the lamina propria and translocate to the gastric lymph nodes, which may chronically stimulate the immune system. The bacteria captured by macrophages, whether remaining alive or not, may contribute to the induction and development of H. pylori-induced chronic gastritis.

  2. Recurrent aphthous stomatitis and Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Carolina-Cavaliéri; Gomez, Ricardo-Santiago; Zina, Lívia-Guimarães

    2016-01-01

    Background Recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS) is a recurrent painful ulcerative disorder that commonly affects the oral mucosa. Local and systemic factors such as trauma, food sensitivity, nutritional deficiencies, systemic conditions, immunological disorders and genetic polymorphisms are associated with the development of the disease. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a gram-negative, microaerophile bacteria, that colonizes the gastric mucosa and it was previously suggested to be involved in RAS development. In the present paper we reviewed all previous studies that investigated the association between RAS and H. pylori. Material and Methods A search in Pubmed (MEDLINE) databases was made of articles published up until July 2015 using the following keywords: Helicobacter Pylori or H. pylori and RAS or Recurrent aphthous stomatitis. Results Fifteen experimental studies that addressed the relationship between infection with H. pylori and the presence of RAS and three reviews, including a systematic review and a meta-analysis were included in this review. The studies reviewed used different methods to assess this relationship, including PCR, nested PCR, culture, ELISA and urea breath test. A large variation in the number of patients included in each study, as well as inclusion criteria and laboratorial methods was observed. H. pylori can be detected in the oral mucosa or ulcerated lesion of some patients with RAS. The quality of the all studies included in this review was assessed using levels of evidence based on the University of Oxford’s Center for Evidence Based Medicine Criteria. Conclusions Although the eradication of the infection may affect the clinical course of the oral lesions by undetermined mechanisms, RAS ulcers are not associated with the presence of the bacteria in the oral cavity and there is no evidence that H. pylori infection drives RAS development. Key words:Campylobacter, elisa, h. pylori, Helicobacter Pylori, RAS, recurrent aphthous

  3. Helicobacter Pylori Bacteremia: An Unusual Finding

    PubMed Central

    De Luca, Concetta; Mancin, Annalisa; Calabrò, Maria; Daleno, Cristina; Ferrario, Antonella; Renzulli, Raffaella; Scuderi, Cristina; Casari, Erminia

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of Helicobacter pylori transient bacteremia in a woman with ulcerated antral gastric cancer. The patient was hospitalized for laparoscopy and subtotal gastrectomy. After surgery she developed fever (39°C) and was empirically treated with levofloxacin. Blood cultures, collected and sent immediately to Laboratory, were positive for a spiral Gram-negative bacterium. This isolate was identified as H. pylori and the specific susceptibility test was performed. One day after the fever was decreased but antibiotic treatment with levofloxacin was continued and it was maintained until discharge. In summary, H. pylori transient bacteremia may occur as a rare complication after stomach surgery. Further studies are necessary to elucidate the potential role of Helicobacter pylori presence in blood.

  4. Prostate stem cell antigen gene TT genotype and development of intestinal metaplasia in Helicobacter pylori infection

    PubMed Central

    Uotani, Takahiro; Sugimoto, Mitsushige; Ichikawa, Hitomi; Tanaka, Shingo; Nagashima, Hiroyuki; Uchida, Tomohisa; Graham, David Y.; Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2016-01-01

    Aim Gastric cancer is etiologically related to interactions between Helicobacter pylori infection, environmental, and host factors. Gastric carcinoma is associated with a cascade of increasing atrophic gastric mucosal damage. Prostate stem cell antigen polymorphisms have been associated with an increased risk of gastric cancer. Here, we examined the interaction between prostate stem cell antigen polymorphisms and H. pylori in the progression of H. pylori gastritis. Methods Prostate stem cell antigen polymorphisms (TT, TC and CC) among H. pylori infected and uninfected Bhutanese were compared with the severity of H. pylori gastritis (neutrophils, monocytes, atrophy scores, H. pylori density, and the presence and extent of intestinal metaplasia) using the updated Sydney system. Results Biopsies from 339 patients were included. The proportion of biopsies with intestinal metaplasia was also significantly (P<0.05) greater among those with the TT genotype than with either the CT or CC genotype. Despite no significant differences in inflammation or H. pylori density scores, the scores for the premalignant condition, intestinal metaplasia in both the gastric corpus and antrum, among H. pylori infected with the TT genotype was significantly (P <0.05) greater than C allele carriers. Conclusions Prostate stem cell antigen TT genotype was associated with more than a 3-fold increase in the prevalence and extent of gastric mucosal intestinal metaplasia compared to C allele carriers among H. pylori infected Bhutanese. PMID:26706772

  5. Helicobacter pylori infection in Indian children.

    PubMed

    Patwari, A K

    1999-01-01

    Current epidemiological scenario of Hp in India does not very clearly predict the natural history of this infection in children as they grow old. Positive serology does not seem to be of much clinical significance. Colonization by Hp in the stomach or duodenum per se does not predict a potential ulcer disease in all the cases. Most case control studies from India do not suggest any significant relationship of Helicobacter pylori (Hp) infection and recurrent abdominal pain. A significant relationship has been observed between Hp infection and antral gastritis and duodenitis. Hp related gastric or duodenal ulcers are infrequently reported in children probably because children between 12-18 years of age are not included in most of these studies. Scarce information is available regarding the relationship of Hp infection with failure to thrive, persistent diarrhea, disabled and neurodevelopmentally retarded children and the implications of acquiring infection in infancy. There is an urgent need to have guidelines for management of children with variable spectrum of gastroduodenal disease who are detected to have Hp colonization without any evidence of mucosal inflammation. Since a large number of children fall in this group, treating all of them in the absence of knowing their PCR amplified DNA sequence in Hp genome is impractical and may not be necessary. The ones detected to have evidence of mucosal inflammation attributed to Hp infection may need to be treated since it is not justified to leave these children untreated even after making a definite diagnosis. Secondly, eradication therapy may provide them the much desired symptomatic relief which is the patient's primary concern. For older children with peptic ulcer disease, using adult model for clinical significance and therapeutic options is justified. However, at present, there are no definite guidelines regarding the combinations and duration of antibacterial therapy for children in our setting due to lack of

  6. Involvement of the CD95 (APO-1/Fas) receptor and ligand system in Helicobacter pylori-induced gastric epithelial apoptosis.

    PubMed Central

    Rudi, J; Kuck, D; Strand, S; von Herbay, A; Mariani, S M; Krammer, P H; Galle, P R; Stremmel, W

    1998-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is associated with chronic gastritis, peptic ulceration, and gastric carcinoma. The potential role of CD95-mediated apoptosis was investigated in a panel of gastric biopsies obtained from patients with H. pylori-associated chronic gastritis (n = 29) and with noninfected normal mucosa (n = 10). Immunohistochemistry revealed increased CD95 receptor expression in epithelial and lamina propria cells in chronic gastritis. By in situ hybridization, CD95 ligand mRNA was absent or low in normal mucosa but expressed at high levels in lamina propria lymphocytes and, unexpectedly, in epithelial cells in chronic gastritis. Apoptotic cells were rare in normal mucosa but were observed regularly in chronic gastritis in close proximity to CD95 ligand mRNA expression throughout the epithelial and lamina propria cells. In a functional analysis gastric epithelial cell lines were incubated with supernatants of H. pylori. Treatment with the cytotoxic isolate H. pylori 60190 but not with the noncytotoxic isolate Tx30a upregulated CD95 in up to 50% of gastric epithelial cells and induced apoptosis in these cells. H. pylori-induced apoptosis was partially prevented by blocking CD95, demonstrating the functional role of the CD95 system. These findings suggest that H. pylori-associated chronic gastritis involves apoptosis of gastric epithelial cells by activation of the CD95 receptor and ligand system. PMID:9788963

  7. Overview of the phytomedicine approaches against Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Vale, Filipa F; Oleastro, Mónica

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) successfully colonizes the human stomach of the majority of the human population. This infection always causes chronic gastritis, but may evolve to serious outcomes, such as peptic ulcer, gastric carcinoma or mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma. H. pylori first line therapy recommended by the Maastricht-4 Consensus Report comprises the use of two antibiotics and a proton-pomp inhibitor, but in some regions failure associated with this treatment is already undesirable high. Indeed, treatment failure is one of the major problems associated with H. pylori infection and is mainly associated with bacterial antibiotic resistance. In order to counteract this situation, some effort has been allocated during the last years in the investigation of therapeutic alternatives beyond antibiotics. These include vaccines, probiotics, photodynamic inactivation and phage therapy, which are briefly revisited in this review. A particular focus on phytomedicine, also described as herbal therapy and botanical therapy, which consists in the use of plant extracts for medicinal purposes, is specifically addressed, namely considering its history, category of performed studies, tested compounds, active principle and mode of action. The herbs already experienced are highly diverse and usually selected from products with a long history of employment against diseases associated with H. pylori infection from each country own folk medicine. The studies demonstrated that many phytomedicine products have an anti-H. pylori activity and gastroprotective action. Although the mechanism of action is far from being completely understood, current knowledge correlates the beneficial action of herbs with inhibition of essential H. pylori enzymes, modulation of the host immune system and with attenuation of inflammation. PMID:24914319

  8. Mucosal polymerase chain reaction for diagnosing Helicobacter pylori infection in patients with bleeding peptic ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Hwai-Jeng; Lo, Wen-Ching; Perng, Chin-Lin; Tseng, Guan-Ying; Li, Anna Fen-Yau; Ou, Yueh-Hsing

    2005-01-01

    AIM: Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) has been linked to chronic gastritis, peptic ulcers, gastric cancer and MALT-lymphoma. Conventional invasive tests are less sensitive than non-invasive tests in diagnosing H pylori infection in patients with bleeding peptic ulcers. Polymerase chain reaction is a sensitive and accurate method for diagnosing H pylori infection. The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic role of mucosal polymerase chain reaction for H pylori infection in patients with bleeding peptic ulcers. METHODS: In patients with bleeding, non-bleeding peptic ulcers and chronic gastritis, we checked rapid urease test, histology, bacterial culture and mucosal polymerase chain reaction for detecting H pylori infection. Positive H pylori infection was defined as positive culture or both a positive histology and a positive rapid urease test. For mucosal polymerase chain reaction of H pylori, we checked vacA (s1a, s1b, s1c, s2, m1, m1T, m2), iceA1, iceA2 and cag A. RESULTS: Between October 2000 and April 2002, 88 patients with bleeding peptic ulcers (males/females: 60/28, gastric ulcers/duodenal ulcers: 55/33), 81 patients with non-bleeding peptic ulcers (males/females: 54/27, gastric ulcers/duodenal ulcers: 45/36) and 37 patients with chronic gastritis (males/females: 24/13) were enrolled in this study. In patients with bleeding peptic ulcers, non-bleeding peptic ulcers and chronic gastritis, 45 patients (51%), 71 patients (88%) and 20 patients (54%) respectively were found to have positive H pylori infection (P<0.001). In patients with bleeding peptic ulcers, non-bleeding peptic ulcers and chronic gastritis, polymerase chain reaction for H pylori infection was positive in 54 patients (61%), 70 patients (86%) and 20 patients (54%) respectively (P<0.001). The sensitivity, positive predictive value and diagnostic accuracy of mucosal polymerase reaction for H pylori infection were significantly lower in patients with bleeding peptic ulcers (84%, 79% and 81

  9. Helicobacter pylori-induced gastric pathology: insights from in vivo and ex vivo models

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Jonathan M.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Gastric colonization with Helicobacter pylori induces diverse human pathological conditions, including superficial gastritis, peptic ulcer disease, mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma, and gastric adenocarcinoma and its precursors. The treatment of these conditions often relies on the eradication of H. pylori, an intervention that is increasingly difficult to achieve and that does not prevent disease progression in some contexts. There is, therefore, a pressing need to develop new experimental models of H. pylori-associated gastric pathology to support novel drug development in this field. Here, we review the current status of in vivo and ex vivo models of gastric H. pylori colonization, and of Helicobacter-induced gastric pathology, focusing on models of gastric pathology induced by H. pylori, Helicobacter felis and Helicobacter suis in rodents and large animals. We also discuss the more recent development of gastric organoid cultures from murine and human gastric tissue, as well as from human pluripotent stem cells, and the outcomes of H. pylori infection in these systems. PMID:28151409

  10. Effect of Rebamipide, a Novel Antiulcer Agent, on Helicobacter pylori Adhesion to Gastric Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Shunji; Sugiyama, Toshiro; Amano, Ken-Ichi; Isogai, Hiroshi; Isogai, Emiko; Aihara, Miki; Kikuchi, Mikio; Asaka, Masahiro; Yokota, Kenji; Oguma, Keiji; Fujii, Nobuhiro; Hirai, Yoshikazu

    1998-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a major etiological agent in gastroduodenal disorders. The adhesion of H. pylori to human gastric epithelial cells is the initial step of H. pylori infection. Inhibition of H. pylori adhesion is thus a therapeutic target in the prevention of H. pylori infection. Experiments were performed to evaluate the effect of rebamipide, a novel antiulcer agent, on H. pylori adhesion to gastric epithelial cells. MKN-28 and MKN-45 cells, derived from human gastric carcinomas, were used as target cells. Ten H. pylori strains isolated from patients with chronic gastritis and gastric ulcer were used in the study. We evaluated the effect of rebamipide on H. pylori adhesion to MKN-28 and MKN-45 cells quantitatively using our previously established enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The adhesion of H. pylori to MKN-28 and MKN-45 cells was significantly inhibited by pretreatment of these cells with 100 μg of rebamipide per ml. However, the adhesion was not affected by the pretreatment of H. pylori with rebamipide. On the other hand, the viabilities of H. pylori, MKN-28 cells, and MKN-45 cells were not affected by rebamipide. Our studies suggest that rebamipide inhibits the adhesion of H. pylori to gastric epithelial cells. PMID:9687380

  11. Antimicrobial activity of curcumin against Helicobacter pylori isolates from India and during infections in mice.

    PubMed

    De, Ronita; Kundu, Parag; Swarnakar, Snehasikta; Ramamurthy, T; Chowdhury, Abhijit; Nair, G Balakrish; Mukhopadhyay, Asish K

    2009-04-01

    Treatment failure is a major cause of concern for the Helicobacter pylori-related gastroduodenal diseases like gastritis, peptic ulcer, and gastric cancer. Curcumin, diferuloylmethane from turmeric, has recently been shown to arrest H. pylori growth. The antibacterial activity of curcumin against 65 clinical isolates of H. pylori in vitro and during protection against H. pylori infection in vivo was examined. The MIC of curcumin ranges from 5 microg/ml to 50 microg/ml, showing its effectiveness in inhibiting H. pylori growth in vitro irrespective of the genetic makeup of the strains. The nucleotide sequences of the aroE genes, encoding shikimate dehydrogenase, against which curcumin seems to act as a noncompetitive inhibitor, from H. pylori strains presenting differential curcumin MICs showed that curcumin-mediated growth inhibition of Indian H. pylori strains may not be always dependent on the shikimate pathway. The antimicrobial effect of curcumin in H. pylori-infected C57BL/6 mice and its efficacy in reducing the gastric damage due to infection were examined histologically. Curcumin showed immense therapeutic potential against H. pylori infection as it was highly effective in eradication of H. pylori from infected mice as well as in restoration of H. pylori-induced gastric damage. This study provides novel insights into the therapeutic effect of curcumin against H. pylori infection, suggesting its potential as an alternative therapy, and opens the way for further studies on identification of novel antimicrobial targets of curcumin.

  12. Antimicrobial Activity of Curcumin against Helicobacter pylori Isolates from India and during Infections in Mice▿

    PubMed Central

    De, Ronita; Kundu, Parag; Swarnakar, Snehasikta; Ramamurthy, T.; Chowdhury, Abhijit; Nair, G. Balakrish; Mukhopadhyay, Asish K.

    2009-01-01

    Treatment failure is a major cause of concern for the Helicobacter pylori-related gastroduodenal diseases like gastritis, peptic ulcer, and gastric cancer. Curcumin, diferuloylmethane from turmeric, has recently been shown to arrest H. pylori growth. The antibacterial activity of curcumin against 65 clinical isolates of H. pylori in vitro and during protection against H. pylori infection in vivo was examined. The MIC of curcumin ranges from 5 μg/ml to 50 μg/ml, showing its effectiveness in inhibiting H. pylori growth in vitro irrespective of the genetic makeup of the strains. The nucleotide sequences of the aroE genes, encoding shikimate dehydrogenase, against which curcumin seems to act as a noncompetitive inhibitor, from H. pylori strains presenting differential curcumin MICs showed that curcumin-mediated growth inhibition of Indian H. pylori strains may not be always dependent on the shikimate pathway. The antimicrobial effect of curcumin in H. pylori-infected C57BL/6 mice and its efficacy in reducing the gastric damage due to infection were examined histologically. Curcumin showed immense therapeutic potential against H. pylori infection as it was highly effective in eradication of H. pylori from infected mice as well as in restoration of H. pylori-induced gastric damage. This study provides novel insights into the therapeutic effect of curcumin against H. pylori infection, suggesting its potential as an alternative therapy, and opens the way for further studies on identification of novel antimicrobial targets of curcumin. PMID:19204190

  13. Helicobacter pylori-induced inflammation and epigenetic changes during gastric carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Valenzuela, Manuel A; Canales, Jimena; Corvalán, Alejandro H; Quest, Andrew F G

    2015-12-07

    The sequence of events associated with the development of gastric cancer has been described as "the gastric precancerous cascade". This cascade is a dynamic process that includes lesions, such as atrophic gastritis, intestinal metaplasia and dysplasia. According to this model, Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection targets the normal gastric mucosa causing non-atrophic gastritis, an initiating lesion that can be cured by clearing H. pylori with antibiotics or that may then linger in the case of chronic infection and progress to atrophic gastritis. The presence of virulence factors in the infecting H. pylori drives the carcinogenesis process. Independent epidemiological and animal studies have confirmed the sequential progression of these precancerous lesions. Particularly long-term follow-up studies estimated a risk of 0.1% for atrophic gastritis/intestinal metaplasia and 6% in case of dysplasia for the long-term development of gastric cancer. With this in mind, a better understanding of the genetic and epigenetic changes associated with progression of the cascade is critical in determining the risk of gastric cancer associated with H. pylori infection. In this review, we will summarize some of the most relevant mechanisms and focus predominantly but not exclusively on the discussion of gene promoter methylation and miRNAs in this context.

  14. Helicobacter pylori-induced inflammation and epigenetic changes during gastric carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Valenzuela, Manuel A; Canales, Jimena; Corvalán, Alejandro H; Quest, Andrew FG

    2015-01-01

    The sequence of events associated with the development of gastric cancer has been described as “the gastric precancerous cascade”. This cascade is a dynamic process that includes lesions, such as atrophic gastritis, intestinal metaplasia and dysplasia. According to this model, Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection targets the normal gastric mucosa causing non-atrophic gastritis, an initiating lesion that can be cured by clearing H. pylori with antibiotics or that may then linger in the case of chronic infection and progress to atrophic gastritis. The presence of virulence factors in the infecting H. pylori drives the carcinogenesis process. Independent epidemiological and animal studies have confirmed the sequential progression of these precancerous lesions. Particularly long-term follow-up studies estimated a risk of 0.1% for atrophic gastritis/intestinal metaplasia and 6% in case of dysplasia for the long-term development of gastric cancer. With this in mind, a better understanding of the genetic and epigenetic changes associated with progression of the cascade is critical in determining the risk of gastric cancer associated with H. pylori infection. In this review, we will summarize some of the most relevant mechanisms and focus predominantly but not exclusively on the discussion of gene promoter methylation and miRNAs in this context. PMID:26668499

  15. Helicobacter pylori eradication therapy: A review of current trends.

    PubMed

    Olokoba, A B; Obateru, O A; Bojuwoye, M O

    2013-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori has been implicated in the formation of chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer disease, mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma and gastric cancer. Eradication of H. Pylori has been recommended as treatment and prevention for these complications. This review is based on a search of Medline, the Cochrane Database of Systemic Reviews, and citation lists of relevant publications. Subject heading and key words used include H. Pylori, current treatment and emerging therapy. Only articles in English were included. There has been a substantial decline in the H. pylori eradication rates over the years, despite the use of proton pump inhibitor and bismuth salts for triple and quadruple therapies respectively. The reasons for eradication failure are diverse, among them, antibiotic resistance is an important factor in the treatment failure. Primary resistance to clarithromycin or metronidazole significantly affects the efficacy of eradication therapy. This has led to the introduction of second line, third line "rescue," and sequential therapies for resistant cases. Subsequently, new antibiotic combinations with proton-pump inhibitors and bismuth salts are being studied in the last decade, to find out the antibiotics that are capable of increasing the eradication rates. Some of these antibiotics include Levofloxacin, Doxycycline, Rifaximin, Rifampicin, Furazolidone based therapies. Studies are ongoing to determine the efficacy of Lactoferrin based therapy.

  16. Gastroretentive drug delivery systems for the treatment of Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Shan; Lv, Yan; Zhang, Jian-Bin; Wang, Bing; Lv, Guo-Jun; Ma, Xiao-Jun

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is one of the most common pathogenic bacterial infections and is found in the stomachs of approximately half of the world’s population. It is the primary known cause of gastritis, gastroduodenal ulcer disease and gastric cancer. However, combined drug therapy as the general treatment in the clinic, the rise of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, adverse reactions and poor patient compliance are major obstacles to the eradication of H. pylori. Oral site-specific drug delivery systems that could increase the longevity of the treatment agent at the target site might improve the therapeutic effect and avoid side effects. Gastroretentive drug delivery systems potentially prolong the gastric retention time and controlled/sustained release of a drug, thereby increasing the concentration of the drug at the application site, potentially improving its bioavailability and reducing the necessary dosage. Recommended gastroretentive drug delivery systems for enhancing local drug delivery include floating systems, bioadhesive systems and expandable systems. In this review, we summarize the important physiological parameters of the gastrointestinal tract that affect the gastric residence time. We then focus on various aspects useful in the development of gastroretentive drug delivery systems, including current trends and the progress of novel forms, especially with respect to their application for the treatment of H. pylori infections. PMID:25071326

  17. Gastroretentive drug delivery systems for the treatment of Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shan; Lv, Yan; Zhang, Jian-Bin; Wang, Bing; Lv, Guo-Jun; Ma, Xiao-Jun

    2014-07-28

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is one of the most common pathogenic bacterial infections and is found in the stomachs of approximately half of the world's population. It is the primary known cause of gastritis, gastroduodenal ulcer disease and gastric cancer. However, combined drug therapy as the general treatment in the clinic, the rise of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, adverse reactions and poor patient compliance are major obstacles to the eradication of H. pylori. Oral site-specific drug delivery systems that could increase the longevity of the treatment agent at the target site might improve the therapeutic effect and avoid side effects. Gastroretentive drug delivery systems potentially prolong the gastric retention time and controlled/sustained release of a drug, thereby increasing the concentration of the drug at the application site, potentially improving its bioavailability and reducing the necessary dosage. Recommended gastroretentive drug delivery systems for enhancing local drug delivery include floating systems, bioadhesive systems and expandable systems. In this review, we summarize the important physiological parameters of the gastrointestinal tract that affect the gastric residence time. We then focus on various aspects useful in the development of gastroretentive drug delivery systems, including current trends and the progress of novel forms, especially with respect to their application for the treatment of H. pylori infections.

  18. Alternative therapies for Helicobacter pylori: probiotics and phytomedicine.

    PubMed

    Vítor, Jorge M B; Vale, Filipa F

    2011-11-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a common human pathogen infecting about 30% of children and 60% of adults worldwide and is responsible for diseases such as gastritis, peptic ulcer and gastric cancer. Treatment against H. pylori is based on the use of antibiotics, but therapy failure can be higher than 20% and is essentially due to an increase in the prevalence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, which has led to the search for alternative therapies. In this review, we discuss alternative therapies for H. pylori, mainly phytotherapy and probiotics. Probiotics are live organisms or produced substances that are orally administrated, usually in addition to conventional antibiotic therapy. They may modulate the human microbiota and promote health, prevent antibiotic side effects, stimulate the immune response and directly compete with pathogenic bacteria. Phytomedicine consists of the use of plant extracts as medicines or health-promoting agents, but in most cases the molecular mode of action of the active ingredients of these herbal extracts is unknown. Possible mechanisms include inhibition of H. pylori urease enzyme, disruption of bacterial cell membrane, and modulation of the host immune system. Other alternative therapies are also reviewed.

  19. Detection of Helicobacter spp. in the saliva of dogs with gastritis.

    PubMed

    Jankowski, M; Spużak, J; Kubiak, K; Glińska-Suchocka, K; Biernat, M

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the species and determine the prevalence of gastric Helicobacter in the saliva of dogs with gastritis. The study was carried out on 30 dogs of different breeds, genders and ages, which were diagnosed with gastritis. The nested-PCR method was used to detect Helicobacter spp. in saliva. Helicobacter bacteria were found in the saliva samples of 23 (76.6%) dogs. Helicobacter heilmannii was the most commonly detected species of gastric Helicobacter spp. in canine saliva, and was found in 22 (73.3%) cases. The results indicate that gastric Helicobacter spp. occurs relatively frequently in dogs with gastritis. Moreover, the saliva of dogs with gastritis may be a source of Helicobacter spp. infection for humans and other animals. However, further studies are needed to confirm this finding as the PCR method does not distinguish active from inactive infections.

  20. Burkitt's lymphoma associated with Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Shannon, C; Vickers, C; Field, A; Ward, R

    2000-01-01

    The association between Helicobacter pylori infection and low grade mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma is now widely accepted. In this report, we describe the concurrent development of Burkitt's lymphoma in the stomach of a 53-year-old male with perforated duodenal ulcer and positive H. pylori serology. The temporal relationship between these two events raises the possibility of a causal link between H. pylori infection and this lymphoproliferative disease. In describing this rare case of gastric Burkitt's lymphoma, we consider the evidence that supports this possibility.

  1. Helicobacter pylori infection, serum pepsinogens, and pediatric abdominal pain: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Kassem, Eias; Naamna, Medhat; Mawassy, Kadri; Beer-Davidson, Gany; Muhsen, Khitam

    2017-08-01

    The significance of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection in pediatric abdominal pain remains poorly recognized. We examined associations of H. pylori infection and serum pepsinogens (PGs), as non-invasive markers of gastritis, with pediatric abdominal pain. A case-control study was conducted among 99 children aged 5-17 years admitted to one hospital for abdominal pain (cases) without an apparent organic reason. Using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, sera were tested and compared with 179 controls for anti-H. pylori immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies and PGI and PGII levels. Multivariable analysis was performed to adjust for potential confounders. H. pylori IgG sero-positivity was 34.3 and 36.3% in cases and controls, respectively, P = 0.7. H. pylori-infected children had higher median PGI and PGII levels and a lower PGI/PGII ratio than uninfected children. Cases infected with H. pylori had a higher median PGII level (P < 0.001) and lower PGI/PGII ratio (P = 0.036) than controls infected with H. pylori. The percentage of cases with PGII ≥7.5 μg/L, as indication for antral inflammation, was higher than in controls: 58.6 versus 44.7%, P = 0.027. Children with PGII levels ≥7.5 μg/L had increased risk for abdominal pain: adjusted prevalence ratio 1.73 [95% confidence intervals 1.02, 2.93], P = 0.039. Children with increased serum PGII levels, as an indication of gastritis, are more likely to have abdominal pain. Serum PGs can be a useful non-invasive marker for gastritis, in evaluating children with severe abdominal pain with no apparent organic reason. What is Known: • The significance of Helicobacter pylori infection in pediatric abdominal pain remains debated. • Serum pepsinogens (PGs), non-invasive markers of gastric inflammation, were rarely utilized in assessing the association between H. pylori in pediatric abdominal pain of unknown origin. What is New: • High serum PGII level, as an indication of gastritis, rather than H. pylori

  2. Helicobacter pylori, Cancer, and the Gastric Microbiota.

    PubMed

    Wroblewski, Lydia E; Peek, Richard M

    Gastric adenocarcinoma is one of the leading causes of cancer-related death worldwide and Helicobacter pylori infection is the strongest known risk factor for this disease. Although the stomach was once thought to be a sterile environment, it is now known to house many bacterial species leading to a complex interplay between H. pylori and other residents of the gastric microbiota. In addition to the role of H. pylori virulence factors, host genetic polymorphisms, and diet, it is now becoming clear that components of the gastrointestinal microbiota may also influence H. pylori-induced pathogenesis. In this chapter, we discuss emerging data regarding the gastric microbiota in humans and animal models and alterations that occur to the composition of the gastric microbiota in the presence of H. pylori infection that may augment the risk of developing gastric cancer.

  3. [Prospective study of 420 biopsies realised in patients with duodenal ulcer with positive Helicobacter pylori].

    PubMed

    Khayat, Olfa; Kilani, Afef; Chedly-Debbiche, Achraf; Zeddini, Abdelfattah; Gargouri, Dalila; Kharrat, Jamel; Souissi, Adnene; Ghorbel, Abdel Jabbar; Ben Ayed, Mohamed; Ben Khelifa, Habib

    2006-06-01

    It's a prospective study leaded between September 1997 and july 1999 (23 months ) in 75 patients with duodenal ulcer and positif for Helicobacter pylori. All patients had a first endoscopy with antral, fundic and duodenal biopsies, followed one month later by a second control fibroscopy with biopsies of the same sites. A total of 420 biopsies was realised. Chronic gastritis was evaluated according to sydney system. Patients was divided by randomisation in 4 groups. Every group was received a different therapeutic association. The results was conform to liberation concering activity 80%, intestinal metaplasia 12%. inflammation 100%. Atrophy was observed in 56% of cases, this percentage is variable in literature; chronic gastritis was predominant in antre relatively to fundus (p<0.005). After treatment, a significative fall of Helicobacter pylori and activity and atrophy was established, contrarity to intestinal metaplasia and chronic inflammation witch are persisted. The prevalence of follicular gastritis was 57%. The better rate of ulcer cicatrisation and Helicobacter pylori eradication was respectively of 79% and 66% in group 1 treated by omeprazol, amoxcillin, metronidazol by comparison with the others 3 groups (p<0.005).

  4. Bacteriology and taxonomy of Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Windsor, H M; O'Rourke, J

    2000-09-01

    As the scientific community approaches the twentieth anniversary of the first isolation of H. pylori, it appears that despite the wealth of articles published in journals throughout the world every month, there are still many unanswered questions about the microbiology of this bacterium and others in the genus Helicobacter.

  5. Helicobacter pylori infection and peptic ulcer in eastern Turkish children: is it more common than known?

    PubMed

    Uğraş, Meltem; Pehlivanoğlu, Ender

    2011-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is mainly acquired in childhood and is frequent in developing countries. The infection is associated with chronic gastritis in all infected children, but peptic ulcer disease develops in a small number of them. In our country, H. pylori infection and associated peptic ulcer disease are common. In eastern Turkey, we found peptic ulcer disease in 13.2% of children who underwent endoscopic examination. Peptic ulcers were mostly gastric ulcers and H. pylori-positive in the studied population, and most of the children were admitted due to abdominal pain. As there are no well-established criteria leading directly to diagnosis, pediatricians should include H. pylori infection and peptic ulcer disease in the differential diagnosis list when evaluating children with abdominal pain, failure to thrive and upper gastrointestinal system bleeding.

  6. Helicobacter pylori infection in intestinal- and diffuse-type gastric adenocarcinomas.

    PubMed

    Parsonnet, J; Vandersteen, D; Goates, J; Sibley, R K; Pritikin, J; Chang, Y

    1991-05-01

    Gastric cancer can be divided into two histologic types: intestinal and diffuse. To determine whether Helicobacter pylori, a bacterium linked with gastritis, was associated with either cancer type, we reviewed histologic sections from stomachs of patients who had undergone gastrectomy for gastric cancer. Of 37 of the sections with evidence of intestinal-type cancer, 33 (89.2%) contained H pylori in noncancerous tissue compared with 7 (31.8%) of 22 of the sections with evidence of diffuse-type cancer (odds ratio = 17.7; P less than .001). This association remained strong when controlled for age, sex, site, and number of sections reviewed. The prevalence of H pylori in intestinal-type gastric cancer far exceeded the prevalence of H pylori in diffuse disease and that described in the normal US population. This finding suggests that H pylori may be a cofactor in development of intestinal-type gastric cancer.

  7. Adhesion and Invasion of Gastric Mucosa Epithelial Cells by Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ying; Wang, Qi-long; Cheng, Dan-dan; Xu, Wen-ting; Lu, Nong-hua

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is the main pathogenic bacterium involved in chronic gastritis and peptic ulcer and a class 1 carcinogen in gastric cancer. Current research focuses on the pathogenicity of H. pylori and the mechanism by which it colonizes the gastric mucosa. An increasing number of in vivo and in vitro studies demonstrate that H. pylori can invade and proliferate in epithelial cells, suggesting that this process might play an important role in disease induction, immune escape and chronic infection. Therefore, to explore the process and mechanism of adhesion and invasion of gastric mucosa epithelial cells by H. pylori is particularly important. This review examines the relevant studies and describes evidence regarding the adhesion to and invasion of gastric mucosa epithelial cells by H. pylori. PMID:27921009

  8. Immune responses to Helicobacter pylori infection.

    PubMed

    Moyat, Mati; Velin, Dominique

    2014-05-21

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is one of the most common infections in human beings worldwide. H. pylori express lipopolysaccharides and flagellin that do not activate efficiently Toll-like receptors and express dedicated effectors, such as γ-glutamyl transpeptidase, vacuolating cytotoxin (vacA), arginase, that actively induce tolerogenic signals. In this perspective, H. pylori can be considered as a commensal bacteria belonging to the stomach microbiota. However, when present in the stomach, H. pylori reduce the overall diversity of the gastric microbiota and promote gastric inflammation by inducing Nod1-dependent pro-inflammatory program and by activating neutrophils through the production of a neutrophil activating protein. The maintenance of a chronic inflammation in the gastric mucosa and the direct action of virulence factors (vacA and cytotoxin-associated gene A) confer pro-carcinogenic activities to H. pylori. Hence, H. pylori cannot be considered as symbiotic bacteria but rather as part of the pathobiont. The development of a H. pylori vaccine will bring health benefits for individuals infected with antibiotic resistant H. pylori strains and population of underdeveloped countries.

  9. Relation between periodontitis and helicobacter pylori infection

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Pei; Zhou, Weiying

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The correlation between periodontitis and Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection in the mouth was analyzed. Method: 70 elderly patients with periodontitis treated at our hospital from January 2013 to December 2014 were recruited. Dental plaques and gargle were collected for H. pylori detection using PCR technique. Periodontal health status of the patients was recorded. 70 control cases with healthy periodontium were also included. The symptoms of H. pylori infection in the mouth were compared between the two groups, and the results were analyzed statistically. Results: The positive rate of urease C gene of H. pylori in the periodontitis group was 71.4%; the positive rate of cagA gene was 35.7%. The positive rate of urease C gene of H. pylori in the control group was 34.3% and that of cagA gene was 12.9%. The two groups did not show significant differences in these two indicators (P<0.05). The positive detection rate of urease C gene of H. pylori in subgingival plaques was higher than that in supragingival plaques, and the difference was of statistical significance (P<0.05). The positive detection rate of H. pylori in patients with moderate and severe periodontitis was obviously higher than that of patients with mild periodontitis (P<0.05). Conclusion: Periodontal health status of elderly people with periodontitis correlated with H. pylori infection in the stomach. PMID:26629215

  10. Helicobacter pylori infection in Omani children.

    PubMed

    Al-Sinani, Siham; Sharef, Sharef W; Al-Naamani, Khalid; Al-Sharji, Hyatt

    2014-08-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is the most common chronic bacterial infection in humans. Its prevalence in Omani adults and children is not known. To report histology-based H. pylori infection prevalence in Omani children. A retrospective study of biopsy proven H. pylori infection in children over a 3 year period in a single center. Age, gender, indication for endoscopy, history of recurrent abdominal pain, and anemia were compared between H. pylori-positive and negative children. Of 143 patients who underwent endoscopy, gastric biopsies were available on 112. The overall prevalence of biopsy proven H. pylori infection was 25%. The prevalence in children with recurrent abdominal pain was 30% compared to 22% in children who underwent endoscopy for other indications (p = .382). The prevalence increased from 7% in children aged <5 years, to 33% in those aged between 5 and 10 years (p = .010). There was no significant difference in the prevalence between the 5-10 years age group (33%) and older age group (29%) (p = .814). There was no significant difference in gender or anemia between the two groups. This study represents the first reported study on the prevalence of biopsy proven H. pylori infection in Omani children. H. pylori infection prevalence is 25%, is lower than regional and many Arab countries. The prevalence appears to increase till age of 5 years. There was no significant association between H. pylori and recurrent abdominal pain, gender, or anemia. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Immune responses to Helicobacter pylori infection

    PubMed Central

    Moyat, Mati; Velin, Dominique

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is one of the most common infections in human beings worldwide. H. pylori express lipopolysaccharides and flagellin that do not activate efficiently Toll-like receptors and express dedicated effectors, such as γ-glutamyl transpeptidase, vacuolating cytotoxin (vacA), arginase, that actively induce tolerogenic signals. In this perspective, H. pylori can be considered as a commensal bacteria belonging to the stomach microbiota. However, when present in the stomach, H. pylori reduce the overall diversity of the gastric microbiota and promote gastric inflammation by inducing Nod1-dependent pro-inflammatory program and by activating neutrophils through the production of a neutrophil activating protein. The maintenance of a chronic inflammation in the gastric mucosa and the direct action of virulence factors (vacA and cytotoxin-associated gene A) confer pro-carcinogenic activities to H. pylori. Hence, H. pylori cannot be considered as symbiotic bacteria but rather as part of the pathobiont. The development of a H. pylori vaccine will bring health benefits for individuals infected with antibiotic resistant H. pylori strains and population of underdeveloped countries. PMID:24914318

  12. Helicobacter pylori Induction of the Gastrin Promoter Through GC-Rich DNA Elements

    PubMed Central

    Tucker, Tamara P.; Gray, Brian M.; Eaton, Kathyrn A.; Merchant, Juanita L.

    2012-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori(H. pylori) infection has been linked to the development of chronic gastritis, duodenal ulcer disease, and gastric cancer. H. pylori- infected patients and animal models develop hypergastrinemia, chronic gastritis, and gastric atrophy. Since gastrin is an important regulator of gastric acid secretion and cell growth, H. pylori regulation of this hormone has been implicated in its pathogenesis. We investigated the effect of H. pylori infection on gastrin gene expression in mice and the effect of human isolates of the bacteria on gastrin transcription in a cell line. In addition to an increase in gastrin mRNA in H. pylori-infected mice, we found that the bacteria induced the endogenous human gastrin gene through MAP kinase-dependent signaling but not NFκB-dependent signaling. Moreover, activation of gastrin through MAPK signaling did not require CagA or VacA virulence factors. In transfection studies, we demonstrated that H. pylori-induction of the gastrin promoter thorough a GC-rich motif was mediated by inducible binding of Sp1 and Sp3 transcription factors. In conclusion, co-culturing live H. pylori bacteria with human cells is sufficient to induce gastrin gene expression. PMID:21083750

  13. JMJD2B is required for Helicobacter pylori-induced gastric carcinogenesis via regulating COX-2 expression

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jinjin; Sun, Yundong; Ma, Fang; Liu, Zhifang; Yu, Han; Jia, Jihui; Li, Wenjuan

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is the strongest risk factor for the initiation and progression of gastric cancer. However, the mechanism of H. pylori-induced pathogenesis remains unclear. In this study, we investigate the role of H. pylori infection in JMJD2B upregulation and the mechanism underlying gastric carcinogenesis. We find that JMJD2B can be induced by H. pylori infection via β-catenin pathway. β-catenin directly binds to JMJD2B promoter and stimulates JMJD2B expression following H. pylori infection. Increased JMJD2B, together with NF-κB, binds to COX-2 promoter to enhance its transcription by demethylating H3K9me3 locally. JMJD2B and COX-2 expression is upregulated in H. pylori infected mice in vivo. Furthermore, JMJD2B and COX-2 expression is gradually increased in human gastric tissues from gas