Science.gov

Sample records for gastrointestinal endoscopic findings

  1. Endoscopic Findings of Upper Gastrointestinal Involvement in Primary Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Eun Jeong; Kim, Do Hoon; Chun, Joo Hyun; Ahn, Ji Yong; Choi, Kwi-Sook; Jung, Kee Wook; Lee, Jeong Hoon; Choi, Kee Don; Song, Ho June; Lee, Gin Hyug; Jung, Hwoon-Yong; Kim, Jin Ho; Song, In Hye; Kim, Yong-Gil

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Gastrointestinal involvement in vasculitis may result in life-threatening complications. However, its variable clinical presentations and endoscopic features, and the rarity of the disease, often result in delayed diagnosis. Methods Clinical characteristics, endoscopic features, and histopathological findings were reviewed from medical records. Results Of 6,477 patients with vasculitis, 148 were diagnosed as primary vasculitis with upper gastrointestinal involvement. Of these, 21 cases (14.2%) were classified as large-vessel vasculitis, 17 cases (11.5%) as medium-vessel vasculitis, and 110 cases (74.3%) as small-vessel vasculitis. According to the specific diagnosis, IgA vasculitis (Henoch-Schönlein purpura) was the most common diagnosis (56.8%), followed by Takayasu arteritis (14.1%), microscopic polyangiitis (10.1%), and polyarteritis nodosa (6.8%). Gastrointestinal symptoms were present in 113 subjects (76.4%), with abdominal pain (78.8%) the most common symptom. Erosion and ulcers were striking endoscopic features, and the second portion of the duodenum was the most frequently involved site. Biopsy specimens were obtained from 124 patients, and only eight (5.4%) presented histopathological signs of vasculitis. Conclusions Diagnosis of vasculitis involving the upper gastrointestinal tract is difficult. Because of the widespread use of endoscopy, combining clinical features with endoscopic findings may facilitate making appropriate diagnoses; however, the diagnostic yield of endoscopic biopsy is low. PMID:27226428

  2. Gangliocytic paraganglioma, a rare cause of upper gastrointestinal bleeding: Endoscopic ultrasound findings presented

    SciTech Connect

    Smithline, A.E.; Hawes, R.H.; Kopecky, K.K.; Cummings, O.W.; Kumar, S. )

    1993-01-01

    Gangliocytic paraganglioma (GP) is an uncommon benign neurogenic tumor of the digestive tract that is usually located in the descending duodenum. Patients with GP usually present with upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage, which reflects the tendency of the tumor to ulcerate the mucosa. The authors report a patient in whom the tumor was overlooked on routine radiologic examinations and initial endoscopy. It was discovered in the distal transverse duodenum at small bowel enteroscopy. The findings of endoscopic ultrasonography are correlated with radiographic and histologic examination. 10 refs.

  3. Endoscopic findings of gastrointestinal involvement in Chinese patients with Behcet’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Jun; Shen, Yan; Ji, Da-Nian; Zheng, Song-Bai; Guan, Jian-Long

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To report the incidence, clinical features and outcomes of gastrointestinal (GI) involvement in Behcet’s disease (BD). METHODS: A total of 168 consecutive patients with BD were screened and upper and lower GI endoscopies were performed in 148 patients. Four hundred age- and sex-matched controls were enrolled for comparison. RESULTS: Fifty-two (35.1%) patients had GI lesions. After a mean follow-up of 10 mo, ileocecal ulcers had been confirmed in 20 patients, including active ulcer(s) in 18 patients, but no ileocecal ulceration was found in controls. GI symptoms were present in 14 patients with active ulcer(s), while 4 patients with smaller ulcer were asymptomatic. Endoscopic features of ileocecal ulcer were: a single ulcer (50%), larger than 1 cm in diameter (72.2%), and round/oval or volcano-type in shape (83.3%). Compared with patients without GI involvement, less ocular lesions, lower levels of albumin, erythrocyte count and hemoglobin, and higher levels of C-reactive protein and erythrocyte sedimentation rate were confirmed in the intestinal BD group. Four patients had esophageal ulcers in the BD group but no case in controls. The other endoscopic findings were similar between the two groups. The prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection was similar in both groups. Most patients received an immunomodulator and responded well. CONCLUSION: GI lesions commonly occur in Chinese BD patients. The most frequently involved area is the ileocecal region. Esophageal ulcer might be a rare but unique lesion. PMID:25493032

  4. Rare gastrointestinal lymphomas: The endoscopic investigation

    PubMed Central

    Vetro, Calogero; Bonanno, Giacomo; Giulietti, Giorgio; Romano, Alessandra; Conticello, Concetta; Chiarenza, Annalisa; Spina, Paolo; Coppolino, Francesco; Cunsolo, Rosario; Raimondo, Francesco Di

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal lymphomas represent up to 10% of gastrointestinal malignancies and about one third of non-Hodgkin lymphomas. The most prominent histologies are mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. However, the gastrointestinal tract can be the site of rarer lymphoma subtypes as a primary or secondary localization. Due to their rarity and the multifaceted histology, an endoscopic classification has not been validated yet. This review aims to analyze the endoscopic presentation of rare gastrointestinal lymphomas from disease diagnosis to follow-up, according to the involved site and lymphoma subtype. Existing, new and emerging endoscopic technologies have been examined. In particular, we investigated the diagnostic, prognostic and follow-up endoscopic features of T-cell and natural killer lymphomas, lymphomatous polyposis and mantle cell lymphoma, follicular lymphoma, plasma cell related disease, gastrointestinal lymphomas in immunodeficiency and Hodgkin’s lymphoma of the gastrointestinal tract. Contrarily to more frequent gastrointestinal lymphomas, data about rare lymphomas are mostly extracted from case series and case reports. Due to the data paucity, a synergism between gastroenterologists and hematologists is required in order to better manage the disease. Indeed, clinical and prognostic features are different from nodal and extranodal or the bone marrow (in case of plasma cell disease) counterpart. Therefore, the approach should be based on the knowledge of the peculiar behavior and natural history of disease. PMID:26265987

  5. Endoscopic hemostasis techniques for upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage: A review

    PubMed Central

    Anjiki, Hajime; Kamisawa, Terumi; Sanaka, Masaki; Ishii, Taro; Kuyama, Yasushi

    2010-01-01

    Upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage (UGIH) is an urgent disease that is often encountered in daily medical practice. Endoscopic hemostasis is currently indispensable for the treatment of UGIH. Initially, when UGIH is suspected, a cause of UGIH is presumed from the medical interview and physical findings. After ample primary treatment, urgent endoscopy is performed. Many methods of endoscopic hemostasis are in wide use, including hemoclip, injection and thermo-coagulation methods. Although UGIH develops from a wide variety of diseases, such as esophageal varices and gastric and duodenal ulcer, hemostasis is almost always possible. Identification of the causative diseases, primary treatment and characteristic features of endoscopic hemostasis are needed to allow appropriate treatment. PMID:21160691

  6. Endoscopic findings in uninvestigated dyspepsia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background It is important to know the causes of dyspepsia to establish the therapeutic approach. Dyspepsia is a frequent syndrome in our country, where there are restrictions to endoscopy and high prevalence of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection. This study aimed to assess the endoscopic findings of the syndrome, in an outpatient screening clinic of a tertiary hospital in São Paulo. Methods Outpatients with uninvestigated dyspepsia, according to Rome III criteria, answered a dyspepsia questionnaire and underwent esophagogastroduodenoscopy. The Rapid Urease Test was applied to fragments of the antral mucosa and epidemiological data were collected from the studied population. Organic dyspepsia findings were analyzed with different variables to verify statistically significant associations. Results Three hundred and six patients were included and 282 were analyzed in the study. The mean age was 44 years and women comprised 65% of the sample. Forty-five percent of the patients reported alarm symptoms. Functional dyspepsia was found in 66% of the patients (20% with normal endoscopy results and 46% with gastritis), 18% had GERD and 13% had ulcers (duodenal in 9% and gastric in 4%). Four cases of gastric adenocarcinoma were identified (1.4%), one without alarm characteristics, 1 case of adenocarcinoma of the distal esophagus and 1 case of gastric lymphoma. The prevalence of H. pylori was 54% and infection, age and smoking status were associated with organic dyspepsia. The age of 48 years was indicative of alarm signs. Conclusions The endoscopic diagnosis of uninvestigated dyspepsia in our setting showed a predominance of functional disease, whereas cancer was an uncommon finding, despite the high prevalence of H. pylori. Organic dyspepsia was associated with infection, age and smoking status. PMID:24499444

  7. A Review of Current Disinfectants for Gastrointestinal Endoscopic Reprocessing

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sanghoon; Koo, Ja Seol; Park, Jeong Bae; Lim, Yun Jeong; Hong, Su Jin; Kim, Sang-Woo; Chun, Hoon Jai

    2013-01-01

    Gastrointestinal endoscopy is gaining popularity for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. However, concerns over endoscope-related nosocomial infections are increasing, together with interest by the general public in safe and efficient endoscopy. For this reason, reprocessing the gastrointestinal endoscope is an important step for effective performance of endoscopy. Disinfectants are essential to the endoscope reprocessing procedure. Before selecting an appropriate disinfectant, their characteristics, limitations and means of use must be fully understood. Herein, we review the characteristics of several currently available disinfectants, including their uses, potency, advantages, and disadvantages. Most disinfectants can be used to reprocess gastrointestinal endoscopes if the manufacturer's guidelines are followed. The selection and use of a suitable disinfectant depends on the individual circumstances of each endoscopy suite. PMID:23964330

  8. Endoscopic repair of post-surgical gastrointestinal complications.

    PubMed

    Manta, Raffaele; Magno, Luca; Conigliaro, Rita; Caruso, Angelo; Bertani, Helga; Manno, Mauro; Zullo, Angelo; Frazzoni, Marzio; Bassotti, Gabrio; Galloro, Giuseppe

    2013-11-01

    Complications following gastrointestinal surgery may require re-intervention, can lead to prolonged hospitalization, and significantly increase health costs. Some complications, such as anastomotic leakage, fistula, and stricture require a multidisciplinary approach. Therapeutic endoscopy may play a pivotal role in these conditions, allowing minimally invasive treatment. Different endoscopic approaches, including fibrin glue injection, endoclips, self-expanding stents, and endoscopic vacuum-assisted devices have been introduced for both anastomotic leakage and fistula treatment. Similarly endoscopic treatments, such as endoscopic dilation, incisional therapy, and self-expanding stents have been used for anastomotic strictures. All these techniques can be safely performed by skilled endoscopists, and may achieve a high technical success rate in both the upper and lower gastrointestinal tract. Here we will review the endoscopic management of post-surgical complications; these techniques should be considered as first-line approach in selected patients, allowing to avoid re-operation, reduce hospital stay, and decrease costs.

  9. Handling and Pathology Reporting of Gastrointestinal Endoscopic Mucosal Resection

    PubMed Central

    Geramizadeh, Bita; Owen, David A.

    2017-01-01

    Endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) is a non-invasive alternative to surgery that is now frequently used for resection of early lesions in both upper and lower parts of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. One of the main advantages of these techniques is providing tissue for histopathological examination. Pathological examination of endoscopically resected specimens of GI tract is a crucial component of these procedures and is useful for prediction of both the risk of metastasis and lymph node involvement. As the first step, it is very important for the pathologist to handle the EMR gross specimen in the correct way: it should be oriented, and then the margins should be labeled and inked accurately before fixation. In the second step, the EMR pathological report should include all the detailed information about the diagnosis, grading, depth of invasion (mucosa only or submucosal involvement), status of the margins, and the presence or absence of lymphovascular invasion. The current literature (PubMed and Google Scholar) was searched for the words "endoscopic mucosal resection" to find all relevant publications about this technique with emphasis on the pathologist responsibilities. PMID:28316760

  10. New devices and techniques for endoscopic closure of gastrointestinal perforations

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yue; Wu, Jian-Hua; Meng, Yan; Zhang, Qiang; Gong, Wei; Liu, Si-De

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal perforations, which need to be managed quickly, are associated with high morbidity and mortality. Treatments used to close these perforations range from surgery to endoscopic therapy. Nowadays, with the development of new devices and techniques, endoscopic therapy is becoming more popular. However, there are different indications and clinical efficacies between different methods, because of the diverse properties of endoscopic devices and techniques. Successful management also depends on other factors, such as the precise location of the perforation, its size and the length of time between the occurrence and diagnosis. In this study, we performed a comprehensive review of various devices and introduced the different techniques that are considered effective to treat gastrointestinal perforations. In addition, we focused on the different methods used to achieve successful closure, based on the literature and our clinical experiences. PMID:27672268

  11. Recent Update of Gastrointestinal Endoscope Reprocessing

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Kyong Hee

    2013-01-01

    As infection-related issues have become one of the most important concerns in endoscopy centers, proper reprocessing of endoscopes has attracted great interest. Compliance with established guidelines for reprocessing is critical to prevent pathogen transmission. However, hospital compliance with guidelines has not been satisfactory. To increase compliance, efforts have focused on developing new and more innovative disinfectants and an automated endoscope reprocessor. Reprocessing must be performed by appropriately trained personnel and regular monitoring of reprocessing is essential for quality assurance to improve compliance. PMID:23767038

  12. Master-slave robotic system for therapeutic gastrointestinal endoscopic procedures.

    PubMed

    Low, S C; Tang, S W; Thant, Z M; Phee, L; Ho, K Y; Chung, S C

    2006-01-01

    Flexible endoscopy is used to inspect and treat disorders of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract without the need for creating an artificial opening on the patient's body. Simple surgical procedures (like polypectomy and biopsy) can be performed by introducing a flexible tool via a working channel to reach the site of interest at the distal end. More technically demanding surgical procedures like hemostasis for arterial bleeding, or suturing to mend a perforation cannot be effectively achieved with flexible endoscopy. The proposed robotic system enables the endoscopist to perform technically demanding therapeutic procedures (currently possible only with open surgery) in conjunction with conventional flexible endoscopes. The robotic system consists of a master console and a slave. The latter is a cable driven flexible robotic manipulator that can be inserted into tool channel of existing endoscopes or attached in tandem to the endoscopes. Together with the real time endoscopic view, the endoscopist would be capable of performing more intricate and difficult surgical procedures.

  13. Endoscopic ultrasound-assisted gastrointestinal hemostasis: an evolving technique

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Deepanshu; Thosani, Nirav; Singhal, Shashideep

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding can range from grossly visible blood in stool or vomitus to microscopic bleed. However, any kind of bleeding can lead to potential life-threatening consequences. A small proportion of patients with gastrointestinal bleeding remain refractory to initial endoscopic hemostasis. While some are successfully managed by repeat endoscopic intervention, a few fail to respond or are not amenable to endoscopic hemostasis. As of now, the next level of intervention is passed on to either surgeons or interventional radiologists. There is new evidence suggesting the increased utility of endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) in diagnosis and treatment of culprit vascular lesions across the gut. In addition, EUS-assisted technique has also been used in the primary prevention of bleeding from gastroesophageal varices. In this review article, we have summarized case series and reports describing the use of EUS-assisted hemostasis. Indications, techniques, complications and success rates reported are discussed. While most of the authors describe their experience with primary and secondary treatment of gastric varices, treatment of other gastrointestinal lesions with EUS assisted hemostatic techniques is also discussed. PMID:27366229

  14. The Correlation of Endoscopic Findings and Clinical Features in Korean Patients with Scrub Typhus: A Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jun; Kim, Dong-Min; Yun, Na Ra; Kim, Young Dae; Park, Chan Guk; Kim, Man Woo

    2016-01-01

    Scrub typhus is an infectious disease caused by Orientia tsutsugamushi-induced systemic vasculitis, but the involvement of the gastrointestinal tract and the endoscopic findings associated with scrub typhus are not well understood. We performed a prospective study and recommend performing esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) for all possible scrub typhus patients, regardless of gastrointestinal symptoms. Gastrointestinal symptoms, endoscopic findings and clinical severity based on organ involvement and ICU admission were analyzed. Gastrointestinal symptoms occurred in up to 76.4% of scrub typhus patients. The major endoscopic findings were ulcers (43/127, 33.9%). Interestingly, 7.1% (9/127) of the patients presented with esophageal candidiasis. There was no correlation between the presence or absence of gastrointestinal symptoms and the endoscopic grade (P = 0.995). However, there was a positive correlation between the clinical severity and the endoscopic findings (P = 0.001). Sixty-three percent of the patients presented with erosion or ulcers on prospectively performed endoscopic evaluations, irrespective of gastrointestinal symptoms. Gastrointestinal symptoms did not reflect the need for endoscopy. Scrub typhus patients could have significant endoscopic abnormalities even in the absence of gastrointestinal symptoms. PMID:27195943

  15. Endoscopic Removal of 15 Gastrointestinal Foreign Bodies

    PubMed Central

    Savran, Bircan; Zeren, Sezgin; Coşgun, Süleyman; Adigüzel, Ünal; Öztürk, Ahmet

    2015-01-01

    Foreign body ingestion occurs commonly in children, elderly, mentally impaired or alcoholic, and psychiatric patients. We present a 15-year-old boy with mental retardation and uncontrolled psychiatric disorder admitted to the hospital with abdominal and chest pain. He was diagnosed with foreign body ingestion and 15 foreign objects, including a sharp knife, were successfully removed endoscopically by using an over-tube. PMID:26623255

  16. Advanced gastrointestinal endoscopic imaging for inflammatory bowel diseases

    PubMed Central

    Tontini, Gian Eugenio; Rath, Timo; Neumann, Helmut

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal luminal endoscopy is of paramount importance for diagnosis, monitoring and dysplasia surveillance in patients with both, Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis. Moreover, with the recent recognition that mucosal healing is directly linked to the clinical outcome of patients with inflammatory bowel disorders, a growing demand exists for the precise, timely and detailed endoscopic assessment of superficial mucosal layer. Further, the novel field of molecular imaging has tremendously expanded the clinical utility and applications of modern endoscopy, now encompassing not only diagnosis, surveillance, and treatment but also the prediction of individual therapeutic responses. Within this review, we describe how novel endoscopic approaches and advanced endoscopic imaging methods such as high definition and high magnification endoscopy, dye-based and dye-less chromoendoscopy, confocal laser endomicroscopy, endocytoscopy and molecular imaging now allow for the precise and ultrastructural assessment of mucosal inflammation and describe the potential of these techniques for dysplasia detection. PMID:26811662

  17. Compact endoscopic fluorescence detection system for gastrointestinal cancers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadeau, Valerie; Padgett, Miles J.; Hewett, Jacqueline; Sibbett, Wilson; Hamdan, Khaled; Mohammed, Sami; Tait, Iain; Cushieri, Alfred

    2001-04-01

    We describe a compact endoscopic imaging system for the detection of gastro-intestinal cancers. This system is designed to image ALA-induced PpIX fluorescence and allows the clinician to perform fluorescence endoscopy and white light endoscopy simultaneously. The system comprises a filtered mercury arclamp for illumination and fluorescence excitation, a dual camera system coupled to an endoscope for detection and a desktop PC for processing and display of images. The result is a real-time colour image onto which fluorescence information is superimposed. Preliminary in vivo results indicate an increased fluorescence level within cancers in comparison with normal tissue. In addition, the system allows point spectroscopy to be carried out by the insertion of an optical fibre probe down the biopsy channel of the endoscope.

  18. Frequently overlooked and rarely listened to: music therapy in gastrointestinal endoscopic procedures.

    PubMed

    Rudin, Dan

    2007-09-07

    To elucidate the role of music therapy in gastrointestinal endoscopic procedures following the conflicting outcomes reported in two recent studies. The findings of our recent meta-analysis that examined this matter were discussed in the context of later studies. Our meta-analysis illustrated the beneficial effects of music therapy on patient anxiety levels when used as a single measure of relaxation and analgesia. Beneficial effects were also shown on analgesia and sedation requirements and procedure duration times when used as an adjunct to pharmacotherapy. These findings are in agreement with those of both studies excluded from analysis and those that followed it. Music therapy is an effective tool for stress relief and analgesia in patients undergoing gastrointestinal endoscopic procedures.

  19. Upper gastrointestinal ectopic variceal bleeding treated with various endoscopic modalities

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sang Woo; Cho, Eunae; Jun, Chung Hwan; Choi, Sung Kyu; Kim, Hyun Soo; Park, Chang Hwan; Rew, Jong Sun; Cho, Sung Bum; Kim, Hee Joon; Han, Mingui; Cho, Kyu Man

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Ectopic variceal bleeding is a rare (2–5%) but fatal gastrointestinal bleed in patients with portal hypertension. Patients with ectopic variceal bleeding manifest melena, hematochezia, or hematemesis, which require urgent managements. Definitive therapeutic modalities of ectopic varices are not yet standardized because of low incidence. Various therapeutic modalities have been applied on the basis of the experiences of experts or availability of facilities, with varying results. Patient concerns: We have encountered eight cases of gastrointestinal ectopic variceal bleeding in five patients in the last five years. Diagnoses: All patients were diagnosed with liver cirrhosis presenting melena or hematemesis. Interventions: All patients were treated with various endoscopic modalities (endoscopic variceal obturation [EVO] with cyanoacrylate in five cases, endoscopic variceal band ligation (EVL) in two cases, hemoclipping in one case). Outcomes: Satisfactory hemostasis was achieved without radiologic interventions in all cases. EVO and EVL each caused one case of portal biliopathy, and EVL induced ulcer bleeding in one case. Lessons: EVO generally accomplished better results of variceal obturations than EVL or hemoclipping, without serious adverse events. EVO may be an effective modality for control of ectopic variceal bleeding without radiologic intervention or surgery. PMID:28072750

  20. High-level disinfection of gastrointestinal endoscope reprocessing.

    PubMed

    Chiu, King-Wah; Lu, Lung-Sheng; Chiou, Shue-Shian

    2015-02-20

    High level disinfection (HLD) of the gastrointestinal (GI) endoscope is not simply a slogan, but rather is a form of experimental monitoring-based medicine. By definition, GI endoscopy is a semicritical medical device. Hence, such medical devices require major quality assurance for disinfection. And because many of these items are temperature sensitive, low-temperature chemical methods, such as liquid chemical germicide, must be used rather than steam sterilization. In summarizing guidelines for infection prevention and control for GI endoscopy, there are three important steps that must be highlighted: manual washing, HLD with automated endoscope reprocessor, and drying. Strict adherence to current guidelines is required because compared to any other medical device, the GI endoscope is associated with more outbreaks linked to inadequate cleaning or disinfecting during HLD. Both experimental evaluation on the surveillance bacterial cultures and in-use clinical results have shown that, the monitoring of the stringent processes to prevent and control infection is an essential component of the broader strategy to ensure the delivery of safe endoscopy services, because endoscope reprocessing is a multistep procedure involving numerous factors that can interfere with its efficacy. Based on our years of experience in the surveillance of culture monitoring of endoscopic reprocessing, we aim in this study to carefully describe what details require attention in the GI endoscopy disinfection and to share our experience so that patients can be provided with high quality and safe medical practices. Quality management encompasses all aspects of pre- and post-procedural care including the efficiency of the endoscopy unit and reprocessing area, as well as the endoscopic procedure itself.

  1. [Incorporation of the flexible endoscope in gastrointestinal surgery].

    PubMed

    Noguera, José F; Cuadrado, Angel; Olea, José M; García, Juan C; Sanfeliu, Gaspar

    2012-11-01

    The flexible endoscope has not traditionally figured among the tools used by the surgeon. Intra-operative flexible endoscopy may be one of the techniques available in the operating room in the near future. On analysing the development of minimally invasive surgery and flexible endoscopy, it can be seen that they are converging and losing ground to gastrointestinal endoscopy on the one hand, and gaining it with the flexible endoscope, on the other. The technical development of «hybrid» NOTES has shown how some tools not usually available in theatre may be very useful. Flexible endoscopy is probably the technique to enter into the surgical area that offers improved performance. Surgeons need to work closely with the gastroenterologists, while they are trained in these techniques for future «hybrid» specialists.

  2. The Use of Channel-Purge Storage for Gastrointestinal Endoscopes Reduces Microbial Contamination.

    PubMed

    Saliou, Philippe; Cholet, Franck; Jézéquel, Julien; Robaszkiewicz, Michel; Le Bars, Hervé; Baron, Raoul

    2015-09-01

    Storage cabinets for heat-sensitive endoscopes (SCHEs) are designed to store gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopes in a clean, dry and well-ventilated cupboard to prevent microbiological proliferation. The use of SCHEs in a GI endoscopy unit has significally reduced the rate of contaminated endoscopes (13.0% vs 45.0%, P<.001).

  3. Gastrointestinal tract access for urological natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Miakicheva, Olga; Hamilton, Zachary; Beksac, Alp T; Berquist, Sean W; Hassan, Abd-elrahman; Holden, Marc; Derweesh, Ithaar H

    2016-01-01

    We conducted a literature review of natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES), focusing on urologic procedures with gastrointestinal tract access, to update on the development of this novel surgical approach. As part of the methods, a comprehensive electronic literature search for NOTES was conducted using PubMed and Cochrane Library from March 2002 to February 2016 for papers reporting urologic procedures performed utilizing gastrointestinal tract access. A total of 11 peer-reviewed studies examining utility of gastrointestinal access for NOTES urologic procedures were noted, with the first report in 2007. The procedures reported in the studies were total/radical nephrectomy, partial nephrectomy, adrenalectomy, and prostatectomy. The transgastric approach was identified in five studies examining total/radical nephrectomy (n = 2), partial nephrectomy (n = 1), partial cystectomy (n = 1), and adrenalectomy (n = 1). Six studies evaluated transrectal approach for NOTES, describing total/radical nephrectomy (n = 3), partial nephrectomy (n = 1), robotic nephrectomy with adrenalectomy (n = 1) and prostatectomy (n = 1). Feasibility was reported in all studies. Most studies were preclinical and acute, and limited by concerns regarding restricted instrumentation and infection risk. We concluded that gastrointestinal access for urologic NOTES demonstrates promise as described by outlined feasibility studies in preclinical models. Nonetheless, clinical application awaits further advancements in surgical technology and concerns regarding infectious potential. PMID:27909547

  4. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography in patients with surgically altered gastrointestinal anatomy.

    PubMed

    Amer, Syed; Horsley-Silva, Jennifer L; Menias, Christine O; Pannala, Rahul

    2015-10-01

    Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) in patients with surgically altered upper gastrointestinal anatomy, such as Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB), can be more challenging compared to those with a normal anatomy. Detailed assessment of cross-sectional imaging features by the radiologist, especially the pancreaticobiliary anatomy, strictures, and stones, is very helpful to the endoscopist in planning the procedure. In addition, any information on enteral anastomoses (for e.g., gastrojejunal strictures and afferent limb obstruction) is also very useful. The endoscopist should review the operative note to understand the exact anatomy prior to procedure. RYGB, which is performed for medically complicated obesity, is the most commonly encountered altered anatomy ERCP procedure. Other situations include patients who have had a pancreaticoduodenectomy or a hepaticojejunostomy. Balloon-assisted deep enteroscopy (single and double-balloon enteroscopy) or rotational endoscopy is often used to traverse the length of the intestine to reach the papilla. In addition, ERCP in these patients is further challenging due to the oblique orientation of the papilla relative to the forward viewing endoscope and the limited enteroscopy-length therapeutic accessories that are currently available. Overall, reported therapeutic success is approximately 70-75% with a complication rate of 3-4%. Alternative approaches include percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography, laparoscopy-assisted ERCP, or surgery. Given the complexity, ERCP in patients with surgically altered anatomy should be performed in close collaboration with body imagers, interventional radiology, and surgical services.

  5. Evaluation of motion compensation method for assessing the gastrointestinal motility using three dimensional endoscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimoto, Kayo; Yamada, Kenji; Watabe, Kenji; Fujinaga, Tetsuji; Kido, Michiko; Nagakura, Toshiaki; Takahashi, Hideya; Iijima, Hideki; Tsujii, Masahiko; Takehara, Tetsuo; Ohno, Yuko

    2016-03-01

    Functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGID) are the most common gastrointestinal disorders. The term "functional" is generally applied to disorders where there are no structural abnormalities. Gastrointestinal dysmotility is one of the several mechanisms that have been proposed for the pathogenesis of FGID and is usually examined by manometry, a pressure test. There have been no attempts to examine the gastrointestinal dysmotility by endoscopy. We have proposed an imaging system for the assessment of gastric motility using a three-dimensional endoscope. After we newly developed a threedimensional endoscope and constructed a wave simulated model, we established a method of extracting three-dimensional contraction waves derived from a three-dimensional profile of the wave simulated model obtained with the endoscope. In the study, the endoscope and the wave simulated model were fixed to the ground. However, in a clinical setting, it is hard for endoscopists to keep the endoscope still. Moreover, stomach moves under the influence of breathing. Thus, three-dimensional registration of the position between the endoscope and the gastric wall is necessary for the accurate assessment of gastrointestinal motility. In this paper, we propose a motion compensation method using three-dimensional scene flow. The scene flow of the feature point calculated by obtained images in a time series enables the three-dimensional registration of the position between the endoscope and the gastric wall. We confirmed the validity of a proposed method first by a known-movement object and then by a wave simulated model.

  6. Gastrointestinal tract volume measurement method using a compound eye type endoscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimoto, Kayo; Yamada, Kenji; Watabe, Kenji; Kido, Michiko; Nagakura, Toshiaki; Takahashi, Hideya; Nishida, Tsutomu; Iijima, Hideki; Tsujii, Masahiko; Takehara, Tetsuo; Ohno, Yuko

    2015-03-01

    We propose an intestine volume measurement method using a compound eye type endoscope. This method aims at assessment of the gastrointestinal function. Gastrointestinal diseases are mainly based on morphological abnormalities. However, gastrointestinal symptoms are sometimes apparent without visible abnormalities. Such diseases are called functional gastrointestinal disorder, for example, functional dyspepsia, and irritable bowel syndrome. One of the major factors for these diseases is abnormal gastrointestinal motility. For the diagnosis of the gastrointestinal tract, both aspects of organic and functional assessment is important. While endoscopic diagnosis is essential for assessment of organic abnormalities, three-dimensional information is required for assessment of the functional abnormalities. Thus, we proposed the three dimensional endoscope system using compound eye. In this study, we forces on the volume of gastrointestinal tract. The volume of the gastrointestinal tract is thought to related its function. In our system, we use a compound eye type endoscope system to obtain three-dimensional information of the tract. The volume can be calculated by integrating the slice data of the intestine tract shape using the obtained three-dimensional information. First, we evaluate the proposed method by known-shape tube. Then, we confirm that the proposed method can measure the tract volume using the tract simulated model. Our system can assess the wall of gastrointestinal tract directly in a three-dimensional manner. Our system can be used for examination of gastric morphological and functional abnormalities.

  7. Contrast-enhanced (endoscopic) ultrasound and endoscopic ultrasound elastography in gastrointestinal stromal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Ignee, Andre; Jenssen, Christian; Hocke, Michael; Dong, Yi; Wang, Wen-Ping; Cui, Xin-Wu; Woenckhaus, Matthias; Iordache, Sevastita; Saftoiu, Adrian; Schuessler, Gudrun; Dietrich, Christoph F.

    2017-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) represent the largest group of subepithelial tumors (SET) of the upper gastrointestinal (GI) tract. They may show malignant behavior, in contrast to other SET. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) is frequently used to characterize SET. With the introduction of contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) into EUS (CE-EUS), distinct enhancement patterns can be detected. In the presented study, the characteristic features of CE-EUS in GIST are analyzed and compared with those of other SET. Materials and Methods: Consecutive patients from four centers with SET of the upper and middle GI tract were included and received endoscopic or transcutaneous CEUS. The results were compared with EUS-guided tissue acquisition, forceps biopsy, or surgical resection. Results: Forty-two out of 62 (68%) patients had SET of the stomach, 17/62 (27%) of the small intestine, 2/62 (3%) of the esophagus, and 1/62 (2%) extraintestinal. Eighty-one percent underwent surgery. Leiomyoma was found in 5/62 (8%) and GIST in 57/62 patients (92%). Thirty-nine out of 57 (68%) patients had GIST lesions in the stomach, 17/57 (30%) had GIST of the small intestine, and 1/57 (2%) patients had extraintestinal GISTs. GIST size was 62.6 ± 42.1 (16–200) mm. Hyperenhancement had a sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and accuracy of 98%, 100%, 100%, 93%, and 98% for the diagnosis of GIST. Fifty out of 57 patients with GIST (88%) showed avascular areas in the center of the lesions. Conclusion: CE-EUS and CEUS show hyperenhancement and avascular areas in a high percentage of GIST but not in leiomyoma. Thus, GIST and leiomyoma can be discriminated accurately. PMID:28218202

  8. Evaluation of the three-dimensional endoscope system for assessing the gastrointestinal motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimoto, Kayo; Yamada, Kenji; Watabe, Kenji; Takeda, Maki; Nishimura, Takahiro; Kido, Michiko; Nagakura, Toshiaki; Takahashi, Hideya; Nishida, Tsutomu; Iijima, Hideki; Tsujii, Masahiko; Takehara, Tetsuo; Ohno, Yuko

    2014-02-01

    This paper described evaluation of the three-dimensional endoscope system for assessing the gastrointestinal motility. Gastrointestinal diseases are mainly based on the morphological or anatomical abnormity. However, sometimes the gastrointestinal symptoms are apparent without visible abnormalities. Such diseases are called functional gastrointestinal disorder, for example, functional dyspepsia, and irritable bowel syndrome. One of the major factors of these diseases is the gastrointestinal dysmotility. Assessment procedures for motor function are either invasive, or indirect. We thus propose a three-dimensional endoscope system for assessing the gastrointestinal motility. To assess the dynamic motility of the stomach, three-dimensional endoscopic imaging of stomach lining is performed. Propagating contraction waves are detected by subtracting estimated stomach geometry without contraction waves from one with contraction waves. After detecting constriction waves, their frequency, amplitude, and speed of propagation can be calculated. In this study, we evaluate the proposed system. First, we evaluate the developed three-dimensional endoscope system by a flat plane. This system can measure the geometry of the flat plane with an error of less than 10 percent of the distance between endoscope tip and the object. Then we confirm the validity of a prototype system by a wave simulated model. The detected wave is approximated by a Gaussian function. In the experiment, the amplitude and position of the wave can be measure with 1 mm accuracy. These results suggest that the proposed system can measure the speed and amplitude of contraction. In the future, we evaluate the proposed system in vivo experiments.

  9. Cooperative laparoscopic endoscopic and hybrid laparoscopic surgery for upper gastrointestinal tumors: Current status

    PubMed Central

    Ntourakis, Dimitrios; Mavrogenis, Georgios

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the cooperative laparoscopic and endoscopic techniques used for the resection of upper gastrointestinal tumors. METHODS: A systematic research of the literature was performed in PubMed for English and French language articles about laparoscopic and endoscopic cooperative, combined, hybrid and rendezvous techniques. Only original studies using these techniques for the resection of early gastric cancer, benign tumors and gastrointestinal stromal tumors of the stomach and the duodenum were included. By excluding case series of less than 10 patients, 25 studies were identified. The study design, number of cases, tumor pathology size and location, the operative technique name, the endoscopy team and surgical team role, operative time, type of closure of visceral wall defect, blood loss, complications and length of hospital stay of these studies were evaluated. Additionally all cooperative techniques found were classified and are presented in a systematic approach. RESULTS: The studies identified were case series and retrospective cohort studies. A total of 706 patients were operated on with a cooperative technique. The tumors resected were only gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) in 4 studies, GIST and various benign submucosal tumors in 22 studies, early gastric cancer (pT1a and pT1b) in 6 studies and early duodenal cancer in 1 study. There was important heterogeneity between the studies. The operative techniques identified were: laparoscopic assisted endoscopic resection, endoscopic assisted wedge resection, endoscopic assisted transgastric and intragastric surgery, laparoscopic endoscopic cooperative surgery (LECS), laparoscopic assisted endoscopic full thickness resection (LAEFR), clean non exposure technique and non-exposed endoscopic wall-inversion surgery (NEWS). Each technique is illustrated with the roles of the endoscopic and laparoscopic teams; the indications, characteristics and short term results are described. CONCLUSION: Along with

  10. Recent Update on Microbiological Monitoring of Gastrointestinal Endoscopes after High-Level Disinfection

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Suk Pyo

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopy-related infections are important contributors to nosocomial infections. Endoscope reprocessing according to standard guidelines ensures high-level disinfection and prevents endoscopy-related infections. Microbiological surveillance may help in monitoring the effectiveness of gastrointestinal endoscope disinfection. The process involves microbial cultures and non-culture methods such as bioburden assays, adenosine triphosphate (ATP) bioluminescence, and quantitative polymerase chain reactions (PCRs). Surveillance culturing to monitor endoscopes after reprocessing has been recommended by a majority of organizations. Bioburden assays, ATP bioluminescence, and quantitative PCRs provide rapid and reliable measures. Each institution will have to try to establish its own surveillance guidelines. PMID:26473118

  11. Review of Pure Endoscopic Full-Thickness Resection of the Upper Gastrointestinal Tract

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Hirohito; Kobara, Hideki; Nishiyama, Noriko; Fujihara, Shintaro; Masaki, Tsutomu

    2015-01-01

    Natural-orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) using flexible endoscopy has attracted attention as a minimally invasive surgical method that does not cause an operative wound on the body surface. However, minimizing the number of devices involved in endoscopic, compared to laparoscopic, surgeries has remained a challenge, causing endoscopic surgeries to gradually be phased out of use. If a flexible endoscopic full-thickness suturing device and a counter-traction device were developed to expand the surgical field for gastrointestinal-tract collapse, then endoscopic full-thickness resection using NOTES, which is seen as an extension of endoscopic submucosal dissection for full-thickness excision of tumors involving the gastrointestinal-tract wall, might become an extremely minimally invasive surgical method that could be used to resect only full-thickness lesions approached by the shortest distance via the mouth. It is expected that gastroenterological endoscopists will use this surgery if device development is advanced. This extremely minimally invasive surgery would have an immeasurable impact with regard to mitigating the burden on patients and reducing healthcare costs. Development of a new surgical method using a multipurpose flexible endoscope is therefore considered a socially urgent issue. PMID:26343069

  12. Upper non-variceal gastrointestinal bleeding - review the effectiveness of endoscopic hemostasis methods

    PubMed Central

    Szura, Mirosław; Pasternak, Artur

    2015-01-01

    Upper non-variceal gastrointestinal bleeding is a condition that requires immediate medical intervention and has a high associated mortality rate (exceeding 10%). The vast majority of upper gastrointestinal bleeding cases are due to peptic ulcers. Helicobacter pylori infection, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and aspirin are the main risk factors for peptic ulcer disease. Endoscopic therapy has generally been recommended as the first-line treatment for upper gastrointestinal bleeding as it has been shown to reduce recurrent bleeding, the need for surgery and mortality. Early endoscopy (within 24 h of hospital admission) has a greater impact than delayed endoscopy on the length of hospital stay and requirement for blood transfusion. This paper aims to review and compare the efficacy of the types of endoscopic hemostasis most commonly used to control non-variceal gastrointestinal bleeding by pooling data from the literature. PMID:26421105

  13. Telemedicine for gastrointestinal endoscopy: The Endoscopic Club E-conference in the Asia Pacific Region

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Shiaw-Hooi; Rerknimitr, Rungsun; Kudo, Kuriko; Tomimatsu, Shunta; Ahmad, Mohamad Zahir; Aso, Akira; Seo, Dong Wan; Goh, Khean-Lee; Shimizu, Shuji

    2017-01-01

    Background and study aims An Endoscopic Club E-conference (ECE) was set up in May 2014 to cater to increased demand for gastrointestinal endoscopy-related teleconferences in the Asia-Pacific region which were traditionally organized by the medical working group (MWG) of Asia-Pacific Advanced Network. This study describes how the ECE meeting was run, examines the group dynamics, outlines feedback and analyzes factors affecting the enthusiasm of participants. It is hoped that the findings here can serve as guidance for future development of other teleconference groups. Methods The preparation, running of and feedback on the ECE teleconference were evaluated and described. The country’s economic situation, time zone differences, connectivity with a research and education network (REN) and engineering cooperation of each member were recorded and analyzed with regard to their association with participant enthusiasm, which was taken as participation in at least 50 % of the meetings since joining. Associations were calculated using 2-way table with chi-square test to generate odds ratio and P value. Results To date, ECE members have increased from 7 to 29 (increment of 314 %). Feedback received indicated a high level of satisfaction with program content, audiovisual transmission and ease of technical preparation. Upper gastrointestinal luminal endoscopy-related topics were the most favored program content. Those topics were presented mainly via case studies with a focus on management challenges. Time zone differences of more than 6 hours and poor engineering cooperation were independently associated with inactive participation (P values of 0.04 and 0.001 respectively). Conclusions Good program content and high-quality audiovisual transmission are keys to the success of an endoscopic medical teleconference. In our analysis, poor engineering cooperation and discordant time zones contributed to inactive participation while connectivity with REN and a country

  14. Multidetector CT angiography for acute gastrointestinal bleeding: technique and findings.

    PubMed

    Artigas, José M; Martí, Milagros; Soto, Jorge A; Esteban, Helena; Pinilla, Inmaculada; Guillén, Eugenia

    2013-01-01

    Acute gastrointestinal bleeding is a common reason for emergency department admissions and an important cause of morbidity and mortality. Factors that complicate its clinical management include patient debility due to comorbidities; intermittence of hemorrhage; and multiple sites of simultaneous bleeding. Its management, therefore, must be multidisciplinary and include emergency physicians, gastroenterologists, and surgeons, as well as radiologists for diagnostic imaging and interventional therapy. Upper gastrointestinal tract bleeding is usually managed endoscopically, with radiologic intervention reserved as an alternative to be used if endoscopic therapy fails. Endoscopy is often less successful in the management of acute lower gastrointestinal tract bleeding, where colonoscopy may be more effective. The merits of performing bowel cleansing before colonoscopy in such cases might be offset by the resultant increase in response time and should be weighed carefully against the deficits in visualization and diagnostic accuracy that would result from performing colonoscopy without bowel preparation. In recent years, multidetector computed tomographic (CT) angiography has gained acceptance as a first-line option for the diagnosis and management of lower gastrointestinal tract bleeding. In selected cases of upper gastrointestinal tract bleeding, CT angiography also provides accurate information about the presence or absence of active bleeding, its source, and its cause. This information helps shorten the total diagnostic time and minimizes or eliminates the need for more expensive and more invasive procedures.

  15. A pilot study on using chlorine dioxide gas for disinfection of gastrointestinal endoscopes* #

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Ying; Hao, Li-mei; Ma, Shu-ren; Wu, Jin-hui; Wang, Tao; Lin, Song; Zhang, Zong-xing; Qi, Jian-cheng

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: This pilot study of employing chlorine dioxide (CD) gas to disinfect gastrointestinal endoscopes was conducted to meet the expectations of many endoscopy units in China for a high-efficiency and low-cost disinfectant. Methods: An experimental prototype with an active circulation mode was designed to use CD gas to disinfect gastrointestinal endoscopes. One type of testing device composed of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) tubes (2 m long, inner diameter 1 mm) and bacterial carrier containers was used to simulate the channel of the endoscope. PTFE bacterial carriers inoculated with Bacillus atrophaeus with or without organic burden were used to evaluate the sporicidal activity of CD gas. Factors including exposure dosage, relative humidity (RH), and flow rate (FR) influencing the disinfection effect of CD gas were investigated. Moreover, an autoptic disinfecting test on eight real gastrointestinal endoscopes after clinical use was performed using the experimental prototype. Results: RH, exposure dosage, organic burden, and the FR through the channel significantly (P<0.05) affected the disinfection efficacy of CD gas for a long and narrow lumen. The log reduction increased as FR decreased. Treatment with 4 mg/L CD gas for 30 min at 0.8 L/min FR and 75% RH, resulted in complete inactivation of spores. Furthermore, all eight endoscopes with a maximum colony-forming unit of 915 were completely disinfected. The cost was only 3 CNY (0.46 USD) for each endoscope. Conclusions: The methods and results reported in this study could provide a basis for further studies on using CD gas for the disinfection of endoscopes. PMID:27381729

  16. [OVESCO: a promising system for endoscopic closure of gastrointestinal tract perforations].

    PubMed

    Junquera, Félix; Martínez-Bauer, Eva; Miquel, Mireia; Fort, Miriam; Gallach, Marta; Brullet, Enric; Campo, Rafael

    2011-10-01

    Perforations of the gastrointestinal tract are a significant source of morbidity in clinical practice. Surgery has been the standard of care. However, endoscopic treatment with clips can be used when perforations are small. The development of natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) has substantially contributed to research in this field, such as the over the scope clip (OVESCO or OTSC). This system is one of the most promising technologies for closure of perforations of the gastrointestinal tract because of its efficacy, safety and rapidity. Other indications include severe gastrointestinal bleeding, fistulae, anastomotic leaks, and bariatric surgery anastomosis remodelling. This article describes the OVESCO system from its initial design to its introduction in clinical practice.

  17. Advanced endoscopic imaging: European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) Technology Review.

    PubMed

    East, James E; Vleugels, Jasper L; Roelandt, Philip; Bhandari, Pradeep; Bisschops, Raf; Dekker, Evelien; Hassan, Cesare; Horgan, Gareth; Kiesslich, Ralf; Longcroft-Wheaton, Gaius; Wilson, Ana; Dumonceau, Jean-Marc

    2016-11-01

    Background and aim: This technical review is an official statement of the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE). It addresses the utilization of advanced endoscopic imaging in gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy. Methods: This technical review is based on a systematic literature search to evaluate the evidence supporting the use of advanced endoscopic imaging throughout the GI tract. Technologies considered include narrowed-spectrum endoscopy (narrow band imaging [NBI]; flexible spectral imaging color enhancement [FICE]; i-Scan digital contrast [I-SCAN]), autofluorescence imaging (AFI), and confocal laser endomicroscopy (CLE). The Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) system was adopted to define the strength of recommendation and the quality of evidence. Main recommendations:1. We suggest advanced endoscopic imaging technologies improve mucosal visualization and enhance fine structural and microvascular detail. Expert endoscopic diagnosis may be improved by advanced imaging, but as yet in community-based practice no technology has been shown consistently to be diagnostically superior to current practice with high definition white light. (Low quality evidence.) 2. We recommend the use of validated classification systems to support the use of optical diagnosis with advanced endoscopic imaging in the upper and lower GI tracts (strong recommendation, moderate quality evidence). 3. We suggest that training improves performance in the use of advanced endoscopic imaging techniques and that it is a prerequisite for use in clinical practice. A learning curve exists and training alone does not guarantee sustained high performances in clinical practice. (Weak recommendation, low quality evidence.) Conclusion: Advanced endoscopic imaging can improve mucosal visualization and endoscopic diagnosis; however it requires training and the use of validated classification systems.

  18. Review of diagnostic and therapeutic endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography using several endoscopic methods in patients with surgically altered gastrointestinal anatomy

    PubMed Central

    Shimatani, Masaaki; Takaoka, Makoto; Tokuhara, Mitsuo; Miyoshi, Hideaki; Ikeura, Tsukasa; Okazaki, Kazuichi

    2015-01-01

    The endoscopic approach for biliary diseases in patients with surgically altered gastrointestinal anatomy (SAGA) had been generally deemed impractical. However, it was radically made feasible by the introduction of double balloon endoscopy (DBE) that was originally developed for diagnosis and treatments for small-bowel diseases. Followed by the subsequent development of single-balloon endoscopy (SBE) and spiral endoscopy (SE), interventions using several endoscopes for biliary disease in patients with SAGA widely gained an acceptance as a new modality. Many studies have been made on this new technique. Yet, some problems are to be solved. For instance, the mutual unavailability among devices due to different working lengths and channels, and unestablished standardization of procedural techniques can be raised. Additionally, in an attempt to standardize endoscopic procedures, it is important to evaluate biliary cannulating methods by case with existence of papilla or not. A full comprehension of the features of respective scope types is also required. However there are not many papers written as a review. In our manuscript, we would like to evaluate and make a review of the present status of diagnostic and therapeutic endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography applying DBE, SBE and SE for biliary diseases in patients with SAGA for establishment of these modalities as a new technology and further improvement of the scopes and devices. PMID:26078830

  19. Endoscopic Closure for Full-Thickness Gastrointestinal Defects: Available Applications and Emerging Innovations

    PubMed Central

    Takeshita, Nobuyoshi; Ho, Khek Yu

    2016-01-01

    Full-thickness gastrointestinal defects such as perforation, anastomotic leak, and fistula are severe conditions caused by various types of pathologies. They are more likely to require intensive care and a long hospital stay and have high rates of morbidity and mortality. After intentional full-thickness opening of hollow organs for natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery, safe and secure closure is urgently required. The currently available advanced endoscopic closing techniques have a major role in the treatment of full-thickness gastrointestinal defects. Appropriate usage of these techniques requires taking into account their advantages and limitations during practical application. We reviewed the available endoscopic modalities, including endoscopic clips, stents, vacuum-assisted closure, gap filling, and suturing devices, discussed their advantages and limitations when treating full-thickness gastrointestinal defects, and explored emerging innovations, including a novel endoluminal surgical platform for versatile suturing and a cell-laden scaffold for effective gap filling. Although these emerging technologies still require further pre-clinical and clinical trials to assess their feasibility and efficacy, the available modalities may be replaced and refined by these new techniques in the near future. PMID:27571898

  20. Endoscopic modalities for upper gastrointestinal leaks, fistulae and perforations

    PubMed Central

    Yee, Gary; Saxena, Payal

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background Endotherapy techniques are a recent addition to the suite of non‐surgical and minimally invasive strategies to manage patients with perforations, leaks and fistulae. The emergency nature of these conditions and the heterogeneity of pathologies encountered create difficulties when trying to select appropriate tools in these complex situations. The purpose of this article is to review experience at a tertiary academic centre, describe the various endoscopic tools available and the situations where they can be considered for use. Methods Single‐centre series and review of the published literature. Results Of 64 patients, 57 were successfully treated using endoscopic therapy, with surgery used only to provide drainage and suture fully covered metal stents in place to prevent migration. Discussion Selection of an appropriate endotherapy or stent for a patient with an oesophago‐gastric perforation or fistula requires an understanding of the anatomy and physiology underlying the patient's presentation and an understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of the available methods. Standard surgical principles of drainage, avoidance of distal obstruction and nutrition remain central to successful outcomes. A combination of surgical and endoscopic treatments may reduce the number of required treatments and can provide the ability to anchor fully covered stents to prevent them from migrating. PMID:26525773

  1. Hyaluronic acid solution injection for upper and lower gastrointestinal bleeding after failed conventional endoscopic therapy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin Wook; Kim, Hyung Hun

    2014-03-01

    Hyaluronic acid solution injection can be an additional endoscopic modality for controlling bleeding in difficult cases when other techniques have failed. We evaluated 12 cases in which we used hyaluronic acid solution injection for stopping bleeding. Immediately following hyaluronic acid solution injection, bleeding was controlled in 11 out of 12 cases. There was no clinical evidence of renewed bleeding in 11 cases during follow up.Hyaluronic acid solution injection can be a simple and efficient additional method for controlling upper and lower gastrointestinal bleeding after failed endoscopic therapy.

  2. Diagnosis and management of iatrogenic endoscopic perforations: European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) Position Statement.

    PubMed

    Paspatis, Gregorios A; Dumonceau, Jean-Marc; Barthet, Marc; Meisner, Søren; Repici, Alessandro; Saunders, Brian P; Vezakis, Antonios; Gonzalez, Jean Michel; Turino, Stine Ydegaard; Tsiamoulos, Zacharias P; Fockens, Paul; Hassan, Cesare

    2014-08-01

    This Position Paper is an official statement of the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE). It addresses the diagnosis and management of iatrogenic perforation occurring during diagnostic or therapeutic digestive endoscopic procedures. Main recommendations 1 ESGE recommends that each center implements a written policy regarding the management of iatrogenic perforation, including the definition of procedures that carry a high risk of this complication. This policy should be shared with the radiologists and surgeons at each center. 2 In the case of an endoscopically identified perforation, ESGE recommends that the endoscopist reports: its size and location with a picture; endoscopic treatment that might have been possible; whether carbon dioxide or air was used for insufflation; and the standard report information. 3 ESGE recommends that symptoms or signs suggestive of iatrogenic perforation after an endoscopic procedure should be carefully evaluated and documented, possibly with a computed tomography (CT) scan, in order to prevent any diagnostic delay. 4 ESGE recommends that endoscopic closure should be considered depending on the type of perforation, its size, and the endoscopist expertise available at the center. A switch to carbon dioxide insufflation, the diversion of luminal content, and decompression of tension pneumoperitoneum or tension pneumothorax should also be done. 5 After closure of an iatrogenic perforation using an endoscopic method, ESGE recommends that further management should be based on the estimated success of the endoscopic closure and on the general clinical condition of the patient. In the case of no or failed endoscopic closure of the iatrogenic perforation, and in patients whose clinical condition is deteriorating, hospitalization and surgical consultation are recommended.

  3. Colonoscopic findings and management of patients with outbreak typhoid fever presenting with lower gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Shaikhani, Mohammad A R; Husein, Hiwa A B; Karbuli, Taha A; Mohamed, Mohamed Abdulrahman

    2013-09-01

    Lower gastrointestinal bleeding (LGIB) along with intestinal perforation is a well-known complication of typhoid fever. Reports of colonoscopic appearance and intervention of typhoid perforation involve only few cases. This series reports the colonoscopic findings and the role of colonoscopic hemostatic interventions in controlling the bleeding ileocolonic lesions. During the typhoid fever outbreak in Sulaymaniyah City in Iraqi Kurdistan Region, we received 52 patients with LGIB manifesting as fresh bleeding per rectum or melena. We performed total colonoscopy with ileal intubation for all cases. The findings were recorded and endoscopic hemostatic intervention with adrenaline-saline injection and argon plasma coagulation was applied to actively bleeding lesion. These patients were young, 11-30 years of age, with female preponderance. Blood culture was positive in 50 %. Colonoscopic findings were mostly located in the ileocecal region, although other areas of the colon were involved in many cases. Twenty-four percent of the cases required endoscopic hemostatic intervention by adrenaline injection with argon plasma coagulation which was effective in all patients except one who died in spite of surgical intervention in addition of endoscopic hemostasis. Dual endoscopic hemostatic intervention can be a safe and effective management option for patients with LGIB due to typhoid fever.

  4. Wide-field endoscopic fluorescence imaging for gastrointestinal tumor detection with glucose analogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yun; Qu, Yawei; Bai, Jing; Liu, Haifeng

    2014-05-01

    The lack of functional information and targeted imaging in conventional white-light endoscopy leads to a high miss-rate of gastrointestinal tumor. The combination of near-infrared fluorescence imaging and endoscopy presents a promising approach. Here we introduce a new endoscopy method employing a home-made flexible wide-field epi-fluorescence endoscope, that can be inserted through the biopsy channel of a gastrointestinal endoscope, with the glucose analogue 2- DeoxyGlucosone as the near-infrared fluorescent probe. System characterization indicates a good sensitivity and linearity over a large field of view. Its capability of tumor identification and location is demonstrated with in-vivo imaging of xenografted tumor model.

  5. An endoscopic system for the early detection of cancers of the gastrointestinal tract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mckechnie, Tracy; Jahan, Ali; Tait, Iain; Cuschieri, Alfred; Sibbett, Wilson; Padgett, Miles

    1998-06-01

    We report a compact endoscopic imaging system suitable for the early detection of cancers throughout the gastrointestinal tract. The system incorporates a three-color camera to provide a conventional color image, a mercury lamp filtered between 360 and 450 nm to excite the photosensitizer, and an intensified camera to image the resulting fluorescence at 630 nm. Our results on over 30 resected specimens show a high optical contrast between the cancerous and healthy tissue.

  6. Endoscopic en bloc resection of an exophytic gastrointestinal stromal tumor with suction excavation technique.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyuk Soon; Chun, Hoon Jai; Kim, Kyoung-Oh; Kim, Eun Sun; Keum, Bora; Jeen, Yoon-Tae; Lee, Hong Sik; Kim, Chang Duck

    2016-06-21

    Here, we report the first successful endoscopic resection of an exophytic gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) using a novel perforation-free suction excavation technique. A 49-year-old woman presented for further management of a gastric subepithelial tumor on the lesser curvature of the lower body, originally detected via routine upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. Abdominal computed tomography and endoscopic ultrasound showed a 4-cm extraluminally protruding mass originating from the muscularis propria layer. The patient firmly refused surgical resection owing to potential cardiac problems, and informed consent was obtained for endoscopic removal. Careful dissection and suction of the tumor was repeated until successful extraction was achieved without serosal injury. We named this procedure the suction excavation technique. The tumor's dimensions were 3.5 cm × 2.8 cm × 2.5 cm. The tumor was positive for C-KIT and CD34 by immunohistochemical staining. The mitotic count was 6/50 high-power fields. The patient was followed for 5 years without tumor recurrence. This case demonstrated the use of endoscopic resection of an exophytic GIST using the suction excavation technique as a potential therapy without surgical resection.

  7. [Novel endoscopic techniques to image the upper gastrointestinal tract].

    PubMed

    Quénéhervé, Lucille; Neunlist, Michel; Bruley des Varannes, Stanislas; Tearney, Guillermo; Coron, Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    Novel endoscopic techniques for the analysis of the digestive wall have recently been developed to allow investigating digestive diseases beyond standard "white-light" macroscopic imaging of the mucosal surface. Among innovative techniques under clinical evaluation, confocal endomicroscopy and optical frequency domain imaging (OFDI) are the most promising. Indeed, these techniques allow performing in vivo microscopy with different levels in terms of depths and magnification, as well as functional assessment of structures. Some of these techniques, such as capsule-based OFDI, are also less invasive than traditional endoscopy and might help screening large groups of patients for specific disorders, for instance oesophageal precancerous diseases. In this review, we will focus on the results obtained with these techniques in precancerous, inflammatory and neuromuscular disorders.

  8. [Advantages of endoscopic stenting for malignant gastrointestinal obstructions].

    PubMed

    Meier, P N; Manns, M P

    2006-03-01

    Self-expanding stents play a major role in the interdisciplinary treatment of gastrointestinal obstructions in patients with local nonresectable tumors, advanced metastasis, and pronounced comorbidity. Reinstenting the passage and sealing esophagotracheal fistulae is very effective as palliative treatment for esophageal tumor complications. In hepatobiliary occlusions, the success rate against cholestasis is also high. Enteral and colorectal stents are gaining favor. Required are an experienced endoscopy team and adequate equipment. The rate of procedural complications is generally low, but rare and severe complications such as perforation must be considered. Further improvements in the materials and construction of stents can be expected.

  9. Upper gastrointestinal bleeding in cirrhosis: clinical and endoscopic correlations.

    PubMed Central

    Terés, J; Bordas, J M; Bru, C; Diaz, F; Bruguera, M; Rodes, J

    1976-01-01

    The clinical data of 180 episodes of upper gastrointestinal bleeding in 168 patients with cirrhosis of the liver are examined. The source of bleeding had been determined by early endoscopy in all cases. In men under the age of 50 years, and without symptoms of liver failure, bleeding was due to ruptured gastro-oesophageal varices in 84% of cases. Severe liver failure was associated with acute lesions of gastric mucosa in many cases. No presumptive diagnosis of the source of haemorrhage could be based on the examination of other clinical data (presence of ascites, mode of presentation and pattern of bleeding, history of ulcer disease, alcoholism, and previous medication. PMID:1083824

  10. Role of Endoscopic Ultrasonography in Guiding Treatment Plans for Upper Gastrointestinal Subepithelial Tumors.

    PubMed

    Moon, Jeong Seop

    2016-05-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) subepithelial tumors (SETs) are usually observed incidentally by endoscopy and have diverse prognoses, varying from benign to potentially malignant. When a GI SET is suspected, endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) is the most accurate diagnostic method to differentiate it from extraluminal compression. To determine the nature of GI SETs, EUS is also the most accurate diagnostic method, and reveals the precise sonographic nature of the lesion. There are some SETs with typical EUS findings of GI SETs, but most hypoechoic lesions are difficult to diagnose based on EUS images alone. EUS is also helpful to determine GI wall involvement in SETs and optimal treatment methods. For the diagnosis of GI SETs, obtaining a proper specimen is essential. EUS-guided cytology or biopsy methods such as fine-needle aspiration, Tru-Cut biopsy, and the newly introduced fine-needle biopsy (FNB) provide good results. To increase the diagnostic yield for GI SETs, cytology with immunocytochemical staining is used for cytological interpretation, resulting in good diagnostic yields. Recently, EUS-FNB using cheese slicer technology has been introduced, and has been reported to provide good diagnostic results for GI SETs.

  11. The diagnostic value of endoscopic ultrasonography and contrast-enhanced harmonic endoscopic ultrasonography in gastrointestinal stromal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yanchao; Qian, Linxue; Li, Peng; Zhang, Shutian

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the diagnostic value of endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) and contrast-enhanced harmonic (CEH) EUS in patients with gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs). Patients and Methods: About 19 patients with suspected GISTs underwent EUS and CEH-EUS before tumor resection. The malignant potential was assessed according to the modified Fletcher classification system. Patients were divided into lower (Group I) and higher (Group II) malignant potential group. The clinical characteristics and EUS/CEH-EUS features were compared between two groups. Results: The tumor size in Group II was significantly larger than that in Group I (14.6 ± 5.8 mm vs. 32.1 ± 8.4 mm, P < 0.05). Heterogeneous echogenicity was observed in 4 (4/8) cases in Group II and none in Group I (P < 0.05). Irregular intratumoral vessels were detected in 6 cases in Group II and none in Group I (P < 0.05). The sensitivity and specificity of irregular vessel detection for discriminating higher from lower malignant potential GISTs were 75% and 100%, respectively. The positive predictive value and negative predictive value of detection of irregular vessels to high malignant potential GISTs were 33% and 100%, respectively. Conclusion: Detection of irregular intratumoral vessels can predict higher malignant potential before tumor resection. The tumor size and echogenicity are assistant factors for malignant potential assessment. Endoscopic resection is an efficacious treatment with good security for appropriate patients. PMID:27080610

  12. Challenges of Endoscopic Management of Pancreaticobiliary Complications in Surgically Altered Gastrointestinal Anatomy

    PubMed Central

    Wai, Tin Moe; Kim, Eun Young

    2016-01-01

    Pancreaticobiliary complications following various surgical procedures, including liver transplantation, are not uncommon and are important causes of morbidity and mortality. Therapeutic endoscopy plays a substantial role in these patients and can help to avoid the need for reoperation. However, the endoscopic approach in patients with surgically altered gastrointestinal (GI) anatomy is technically challenging because of the difficulty in entering the enteral limb to reach the target orifice to manage pancreaticobiliary complications. Additional procedural complexity is due to the need of special devices and accessories to obtain successful cannulation and absence of an elevator in forward-viewing endoscopes, which is frequently used in this situation. Once bilioenteric anastomosis is reached, the technical success rates achieved in expert hands approach those of patients with intact GI anatomy. The success of endoscopic therapy in patients with surgically altered GI anatomy depends on multiple factors, including the expertise of the endoscopist, understanding of postoperative anatomic changes, and the availability of suitable scopes and accessories for endoscopic management. In this issue of Clinical Endoscopy, the focused review series deals with pancreatobiliary endoscopy in altered GI anatomy such as bilioenteric anastomosis and post-gastrectomy. PMID:27894188

  13. Endoscopic management of acute gastrointestinal bleeding in children: Time for a radical rethink.

    PubMed

    Thomson, Mike; Belsha, Dalia

    2016-02-01

    Currently we are no nearer than 10 or 20years ago providing a safe, adequate, and effective round-the-clock endoscopic services for acute life-threatening gastrointestinal bleeding in children. Preventable deaths are occurring still, and it is a tragedy. This is owing to a number of factors which require urgent attention. Skill-mix and the ability of available endoscopists in the UK are woeful. Manpower is spread too thinly and not concentrated in centers of excellence, which is necessary given the relative rarity of the presentation. Adult gastroenterologists are increasingly reticent regarding their help in increasingly litigious times. Recent work on identification of those children likely to require urgent endoscopic intervention has mirrored scoring systems that have been present in adult circles for many years and may allow appropriate and timely intervention. Recent technical developments such as that of Hemospray® may lower the threshold of competency in dealing with this problem endoscopically, thus allowing lives to be saved. Educational courses, mannequin and animal model training are important but so will be appropriate credentialing of individuals for this skill-set. Assessment of competency will become the norm and guidelines on a national level in each country mandatory if we are to move this problem from the "too difficult" to the "achieved". It is an urgent problem and is one of the last emergencies in pediatrics that is conducted poorly. This cannot and should not be allowed to continue unchallenged.

  14. Endoscopic findings in patients with Schatzki rings: Evidence for an association with eosinophilic esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Michaela; Eckardt, Alexander J; Fisseler-Eckhoff, Annette; Haas, Susanne; Gockel, Ines; Wehrmann, Till

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To investigate endoscopic findings in patients with Schatzki rings (SRs) with a focus on evidence for eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE). METHODS: We consecutively approached all adult patients scheduled for elective outpatient upper endoscopy for a variety of indications at the German Diagnostic Clinic, Wiesbaden, Germany between July 2007 and July 2010. All patients with endoscopically diagnosed SRs, defined as thin, symmetrical, mucosal structures located at the esophagogastric junction, were prospectively registered. Additional endoscopic findings, clinical information and histopathological findings with a focus on esophageal eosinophilia (≥ 20 eosinophils/high power field) were recorded. The criteria for active EoE were defined as: (1) eosinophilic tissue infiltration ≥ 20 eosinophils/hpf; (2) symptoms of esophageal dysfunction; and (3) exclusion of other causes of esophageal eosinophilia. Gastroesophageal reflux disease was excluded by proton pump inhibitor treatment prior to endoscopy. The presence of ≥ 20 eosinophils/hpf in esophageal biopsies in patients that did not fulfil the criteria of EoE was defined as esophageal hypereosinophilia. RESULTS: A SR was diagnosed in 171 (3.3%; 128 males, 43 females, mean age 66 ± 12.9 years) of the 5163 patients that underwent upper gastrointestinal-endoscopy. Twenty of the 116 patients (17%) from whom esophageal biopsies were obtained showed histological hypereosinophilia (≥ 20 eosinophils/hpf). Nine of these patients (8 males, 1 female, mean age 49 ± 10 years) did not fulfill all diagnostic criteria of EoE, whereas in 11 (9%) patients with ≥ 20 eosinophils/hpf, a definite diagnosis of EoE was made. Three of the 11 patients (27%) with definite EoE had no suspicious endoscopic features of EoE. In contrast, in the 25 patients in whom EoE was suspected by endoscopic features, EoE was only confirmed in 7 (28%) patients. Patients with EoE were younger (mean age 41.5 ± 6.5 vs 50.5 ± 11.5 years, P = 0.012), were

  15. Endoscopic submucosal dissection for silent gastric Dieulafoy lesions mimicking gastrointestinal stromal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xue; Cao, Hailong; Wang, Sinan; Wang, Dan; Xu, Mengque; Piao, Meiyu; Wang, Bangmao

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Dieulafoy lesion is a rare but serious cause of gastrointestinal hemorrhage. However, some cases can be occasionally found without bleeding during the endoscopic screening, and the management remains unclear. The aim of this article was to report the efficacy and safety of endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) for silent gastric Dieulafoy lesions, which presented as protrusion lesions mimicking gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs). Methods: Data from the patients with gastric protrusion lesions who underwent ESD from September 2008 to April 2016 in General Hospital, Tianjin Medical University, China were recorded. Seven cases with pathological diagnosis of Dieulafoy lesion without bleeding were enrolled for further analysis. Results: A total of 7 patients (2 males and 5 females) with mean age of 57.7 ± 4.15 years were pathologically diagnosed as Dieulafoy lesion. Four of the lesions were located in gastric antrum, 2 in the fundus, and 1 in the body of stomach, respectively. The mean sizes of the Dieulafoy lesions under white light endoscopy and endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) were 1.06 ± 0.28 and 0.84 ± 0.29 cm. The origins of these lesions were submucosa (6/7, 85.7%) and muscularis propria (1/7, 14.3%). Three of them appeared with mixed echo under EUS, 3 with hypoechogenicity, and 1 with hyperechogenicity. En bloc complete resection was achieved in all the lesions by ESD with average time of 76.00 ± 16.86 minutes, and no intraoperative bleeding happened. In addition, all patients were followed up for 1 to 53 months, and no recurrence or long-term complications was observed. Conclusion: Therefore, ESD can be an effective and safe treatment for silent gastric Dieulafoy lesions with clinical presentations of submucosal protrusion lesions mimicking GISTs. PMID:27603399

  16. Endoscopic management of Barrett's esophagus: European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) Position Statement.

    PubMed

    Weusten, Bas; Bisschops, Raf; Coron, Emanuel; Dinis-Ribeiro, Mário; Dumonceau, Jean-Marc; Esteban, José-Miguel; Hassan, Cesare; Pech, Oliver; Repici, Alessandro; Bergman, Jacques; di Pietro, Massimiliano

    2017-02-01

    Current practices for the management of Barrett's esophagus (BE) vary across Europe, as several national European guidelines exist. This Position Statement from the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) is an attempt to homogenize recommendations and, hence, patient management according to the best scientific evidence and other considerations (e.g. health policy). A Working Group developed consensus statements, using the existing national guidelines as a starting point and considering new evidence in the literature. The Position Statement wishes to contribute to a more cost-effective approach to the care of patients with BE by reducing the number of surveillance endoscopies for patients with a low risk of malignant progression and centralizing care in expert centers for those with high progression rates.Main statements MS1 The diagnosis of BE is made if the distal esophagus is lined with columnar epithelium with a minimum length of 1 cm (tongues or circular) containing specialized intestinal metaplasia at histopathological examination. MS2 The ESGE recommends varying surveillance intervals for different BE lengths. For patients with an irregular Z-line/columnar-lined esophagus of < 1 cm, no routine biopsies or endoscopic surveillance is advised. For BE ≥ 1 cm and < 3 cm, BE surveillance should be repeated every 5 years. For BE ≥ 3 cm and < 10 cm, the interval for endoscopic surveillance should be 3 years. Patients with BE with a maximum extent ≥ 10 cm should be referred to a BE expert center for surveillance endoscopies. Patients with limited life expectancy and advanced age should be discharged from endoscopic surveillance. MS3 The diagnosis of any degree of dysplasia (including "indefinite for dysplasia") in BE requires confirmation by an expert gastrointestinal pathologist. MS4 Patients with visible lesions in BE diagnosed as dysplasia or early cancer should be referred to a BE expert center. All visible

  17. Therapeutic Decision-Making in Endoscopically Unmanageable Nonvariceal Upper Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage

    SciTech Connect

    Defreyne, Luc; Schrijver, Ignace De; Decruyenaere, Johan; Maele, Georges Van; Ceelen, Wim; Looze, Danny De; Vanlangenhove, Peter

    2008-09-15

    The purpose of this study was to identify endoscopic and clinical parameters influencing the decision-making in salvage of endoscopically unmanageable, nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage (UGIH) and to report the outcome of selected therapy. We retrospectively retrieved all cases of surgery and arteriography for arrest of endoscopically unmanageable UGIH. Only patients with overt bleeding on endoscopy within the previous 24 h were included. Patients with preceding nonendoscopic hemostatic interventions, portal hypertension, malignancy, and transpapillar bleeding were excluded. Potential clinical and endoscopic predictors of allocation to either surgery or arteriography were tested using statistical models. Outcome and survival were regressed on the choice of rescue and clinical variables. Forty-six arteriographed and 51 operated patients met the inclusion criteria. Univariate analysis revealed a higher number of patients with a coagulation disorder in the catheterization group (41.4%, versus 20.4% in the laparotomy group; p = 0.044). With multivariate analysis, the identification of a bleeding peptic ulcer at endoscopy significantly steered decision-making toward surgical rescue (OR = 5.2; p = 0.021). Taking into account reinterventions, hemostasis was achieved in nearly 90% of cases in both groups. Overall therapy failure (no survivors), rebleeding within 3 days (OR = 3.7; p = 0.042), and corticosteroid use (OR = 5.2; p = 0.017) had a significant negative impact on survival. The odds of dying were not different for embolotherapy or surgery. In conclusion, decision-making was endoscopy-based, with bleeding peptic ulcer significantly directing the choice of rescue toward surgery. Unsuccessful hemostasis and corticosteroid use, but not the choice of rescue, negatively affected outcome.

  18. Endoscopic findings on alimentary lymphoma in 7 dogs.

    PubMed

    Miura, Teruhisa; Maruyama, Haruhiko; Sakai, Manabu; Takahashi, Tomoko; Koie, Hiroshi; Yamaya, Yoshiki; Shibuya, Hisashi; Sato, Tsuneo; Watari, Toshihiro; Tokuriki, Mikihiko; Hasegawa, Atsuhiko

    2004-05-01

    Alimentary lymphoma was evaluated endoscopically in 7 dogs and a histopathological examination was made to detect the origin of neoplastic lymphocytes in 5 dogs. A solitary mass in the rectum (1 case), irregular cobblestone appearance in the duodenum (4 cases) and a moderate irregular appearance resembling lymphocytic-plasmacytic enteritis (2 cases) were endoscopically detected. Endoscopic ultrasonography demonstrated increased thickness of the duodenal wall in 2 cases examined. Neoplastic lymphocytes of alimentary lymphoma proved to originate in T cells in all 5 cases examined by immunohistochemical analysis.

  19. Endoscopic management of patients with post-surgical leaks involving the gastrointestinal tract: A large case series

    PubMed Central

    Caruso, Angelo; Cellini, Carlo; Sica, Mariano; Zullo, Angelo; Mirante, Vincenzo Giorgio; Bertani, Helga; Frazzoni, Marzio; Mutignani, Massimiliano; Galloro, Giuseppe; Conigliaro, Rita

    2016-01-01

    Background Post-surgical anastomotic leaks often require a re-intervention, are associated with a definite morbidity and mortality, and with relevant costs. We described a large series of patients with different post-surgical leaks involving the gastrointestinal tract managed with endoscopy as initial approach. Methods This was a retrospective analysis of prospectively collected cases with anastomotic leaks managed with different endoscopic approaches (with surgical or radiological drainage when needed) in two endoscopic centres during 5 years. Interventions included: (1) over-the-scope clip (OTSC) positioning; (2) placement of a covered self-expanding metal stent (SEMS); (3) fibrin glue injection (Tissucol); and (4) endo-sponge application, according to both the endoscopic feature and patient’s status. Results A total of 76 patients underwent endoscopic treatment for a leak either in the upper (47 cases) or lower (29 cases) gastrointestinal tract, and the approach was successful in 39 (83%) and 22 (75.9%) patients, respectively, accounting for an overall 80.3% success rate. Leak closure was achieved in 84.9% and 78.3% of patients managed by using a single or a combination of endoscopic devices. Overall, leak closure failed in 15 (19.7%) patients, and the surgical approach was successful in all 14 patients who underwent re-intervention, whilst one patient died due to sepsis at 7 days. Conclusions Our data suggest that an endoscopic approach, with surgical or radiological drainage when needed, is successful and safe in the majority of patients with anastomotic gastrointestinal leaks. Therefore, an endoscopic treatment could be attempted before resorting to more invasive, costly and risky re-intervention.

  20. Simple risk factors to predict urgent endoscopy in nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding pre-endoscopically

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jianzong; Hu, Duanming; Tang, Wen; Hu, Chuanyin; Lu, Qin; Li, Juan; Zhu, Jianhong; Xu, Liming; Sui, Zhenyu; Qian, Mingjie; Wang, Shaofeng; Yin, Guojian

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The goal of this study is to evaluate how to predict high-risk nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (NVUGIB) pre-endoscopically. A total of 569 NVUGIB patients between Match 2011 and January 2015 were retrospectively studied. The clinical characteristics and laboratory data were statistically analyzed. The severity of NVUGIB was based on high-risk NVUGIB (Forrest I–IIb), and low-risk NVUGIB (Forrest IIc and III). By logistic regression and receiver-operating characteristic curve, simple risk score systems were derived which predicted patients’ risks of potentially needing endoscopic intervention to control bleeding. Risk score systems combined of patients’ serum hemoglobin (Hb) ≤75 g/L, red hematemesis, red stool, shock, and blood urine nitrogen ≥8.5 mmol/L within 24 hours after admission were derived. As for each one of these clinical signs, the relatively high specificity was 97.9% for shock, 96.4% for red stool, 85.5% for red hematemesis, 76.7% for Hb ≤75 g/L, and the sensitivity was 50.8% for red hematemesis, 47.5% for Hb ≤75 g/L, 14.2% for red stool, and 10.9% for shock. When these 5 clinical signs were presented as a risk score system, the highest area of receiver-operating characteristic curve was 0.746, with sensitivity 0.675 and specificity 0.733, which discriminated well with high-risk NVUGIB. These simple risk factors identified patients with high-risk NVUGIB of needing treatment to manage their bleeding pre-endoscopically. Further validation in the clinic was required. PMID:27367977

  1. Endoscopic Ultrasound of the Upper Gastrointestinal Tract and Mediastinum: Diagnosis and Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, Priyajit; Wittmann, Johannes; Pereira, Stephen P.

    2006-12-15

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) has developed significantly over the last two decades and has had a considerable impact on the imaging and staging of mass lesions within or in close proximity to the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. In conjunction with conventional imaging such as helical computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, the indications for EUS include (1) differentiating between benign and malignant lesions of the mediastinum and upper GI tract, (2) staging malignant tumors of the lung, esophagus, stomach, and pancreas prior to surgery or oncological treatment, (3) excluding common bile duct stones before laparoscopic cholecystectomy, thereby avoiding the need for endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) in some patients, and (4) assessing suspected lesions that are either equivocal or not seen on conventional imaging. In recent years, EUS has charted a course similar to that taken by ERCP, evolving from a purely diagnostic modality to one that is interventional and therapeutic. These indications include (5) obtaining a tissue diagnosis by EUS-guided fine-needle aspiration or trucut-type needle biopsy and (6) providing therapy such as coeliac plexus neurolysis and pancreatic pseudocyst drainage-in many cases, more accurately and safely than conventional techniques. Emerging investigational techniques include EUS-guided enteric anastomosis formation and fine-needle injection therapy for malignant disease.

  2. Performance and Clinical Role of Endoscopic Ultrasound Fine Needle Aspiration for Diagnosing Gastrointestinal Intramural Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Hea Jung; Park, Eun Young; Moon, Sung Jin; Lim, Chul Hyun; Kim, Jin Su; Park, Jae Myung; Lee, In Seok; Kim, Sang Woo; Choi, Myung-Gyu; Choi, Kyu Yong

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aims We evaluated the performance, clinical role, and diagnostic accuracy of endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) in gastrointestinal intramural lesions. Methods Procedural and pathologic data were reviewed from consecutive patients undergoing EUS-FNA for intramural lesions. Final diagnoses were determined by surgical histopathologic conformation and the diagnosis of malignancy, including clinical follow-up with repeat imaging. Results Forty-six patients (mean age, 47 years; 24 males) underwent EUS-FNA. Lesions were located in the stomach (n=31), esophagus (n=5), and duodenum (n=10). The median lesion size was 2 cm (range, 1 to 20.6). Final diagnoses were obtained in 22 patients (48%). EUS-FNA was diagnostic in 40 patients (87%). The diagnostic accuracy of cytology for differentiating between benign and malignant lesions was 82%; diagnostic error occurred in three patients (6%). The cytologic results influenced clinical judgment in 78% cases. The primary reasons for negative or no clinical impact were false-negative results, misdirected patient management, and inconclusive cytology. Conclusions EUS-FNA exhibited an 87% diagnostic yield for gastrointestinal intramural lesions; the accuracy of cytology for differentiating malignancy was 82%. The limitations of EUS-FNA were primarily because of nondiagnostic sampling (9%) and probable diagnostic error (6%); these factors may influence the clinical role of EUS-FNA. PMID:24340255

  3. Role of hemostatic powders in the endoscopic management of gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Bustamante-Balén, Marco; Plumé, Gema

    2014-01-01

    Acute gastrointestinal bleeding (AGIB) is a prevalent condition with significant influence on healthcare costs. Endoscopy is essential for the management of AGIB with a pivotal role in diagnosis, risk stratification and management. Recently, hemostatic powders have been added to our endoscopic armamentarium to treat gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. These substances are intended to control active bleeding by delivering a powdered product over the bleeding site that forms a solid matrix with a tamponade function. Local activation of platelet aggregation and coagulation cascade may be also boosted. There are currently three powders commercially available: hemostatic agent TC-325 (Hemospray®), EndoClot™ polysaccharide hemostatic system, and Ankaferd Bloodstopper®. Although the available evidence is based on short series of cases and there is no randomized controlled trial yet, these powders seem to be effective in controlling GI bleeding from a variety of origins with a very favorable side effects profile. They can be used either as a primary therapy or a second-line treatment, and they seem to be especially indicated in cases of cancer-related bleeding and lesions with difficult access. In this review, we will comment on the mechanism of action, efficacy, safety and technical challenges of the use of powders in several clinical scenarios and we will try to define the main current indications of use and propose new lines of research in this area. PMID:25133029

  4. Endoscopic ultrasonography: Transition towards the future of gastro-intestinal diseases

    PubMed Central

    De Lisi, Stefania; Giovannini, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) is a technique with an established role in the diagnosis and staging of gastro-intestinal tumors. In recent years, the spread of new devices dedicated to tissue sampling has improved the diagnostic accuracy of EUS fine-needle aspiration. The development of EUS-guided drainage of the bilio-pancreatic region and abdominal fluid collections has allowed EUS to evolve into an interventional tool that can replace more invasive procedures. Emerging techniques applying EUS in pancreatic cancer treatment and in celiac neurolysis have been described. Recently, confocal laser endomicroscopy has been applied to EUS as a promising technique for the in vivo histological diagnosis of gastro-intestinal, bilio-pancreatic and lymph node lesions. In this state-of-the-art review, we report the most recent data from the literature regarding EUS devices, interventional EUS, EUS-guided confocal laser endomicroscopy and EUS pancreatic cancer treatment, and we also provide an overview of their principles, clinical applications and limitations. PMID:26855537

  5. Endoscopic removal of foreign bodies from the upper gastrointestinal tract: 5-year experience

    PubMed Central

    Emara, Mohamed H; Darwiesh, Ehab M; Refaey, Mohamed M; Galal, Sherif M

    2014-01-01

    Background Foreign bodies (FBs) in the upper gastrointestinal tract are produced chiefly by accidental swallowing but rarely produce symptoms. Removal of FBs is not an infrequent challenge for upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. The aim of this study is to elicit our experience in a 5-year period in dealing with FBs in the upper gastrointestinal tract using upper endoscopy. Methods This retrospective study was conducted at Zagazig University Hospitals, Egypt, over a 5-year period. We reviewed all patients’ files with full notations on age, sex, type of FB and its anatomical location, treatments, and outcomes (complications, success rates, and mortalities). Patients with incomplete files and those with FBs not identified at the endoscopic examination were excluded. Results A total of 45 patients were identified. Their ages ranged from 6 months to 102 years. Slight male predominance was noticed (53.3%). The most frequent presentation was a history of FB ingestion without any associated manifestations (44.4%). Coins were the most commonly encountered FBs (14/45). Esophagus was the most common site of trapping (27/45). The overall success rate was 95.6% (43/45). Upper endoscopy successfully resolved the problem by either FB removal (41/43) or dislodgment of the impacted fleshy meat to the stomach (2/43). Two cases were referred for surgical removal. The rate of complications was 6.7%. Furthermore, no mortalities due to FB ingestion or removal had been reported throughout the study. Conclusion Our experience with FB removal emphasizes its importance and ease when performed by experienced hands, at well-equipped endoscopy units, and under conscious sedation in most cases, with high success rates and minor complications. PMID:25053889

  6. Clinical, endoscopic, and histologic features of eosinophilic inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract in pediatric liver transplant patients.

    PubMed

    Parashette, Kalyan Ray; Zeytinoglu, Meltem; Kernek, Kevin; Molleston, Jean P; Subbarao, Girish

    2013-12-01

    Immunosuppression during the post-transplantation period has led to dramatic outcome improvements in PLTR patients. There have been reports describing the development of food allergies and an increased predilection for development of EGI in PLTR. We aimed to identify the clinical, endoscopic and histologic features of EGI in PLTR patients. In this retrospective case series we analyzed medical record of all PLTR who underwent EGD and/or colonoscopy at our institution from 2000 to 2006. From 2000 to 2006, 32 PLTR patients underwent endoscopic evaluation. Seventeen (53%) of 32 patients were diagnosed with EGI. Endoscopic abnormalities were seen in the esophagus, stomach, and small intestine in 11 (65%), 11 (65%), and four (24%) patients, respectively. Eosinophilic inflammation was seen in the esophagus, stomach, and small intestine in 13 (76%), 10 (59%), and five (29%) patients, respectively. Nine of 17 patients underwent colonoscopy and endoscopic abnormalities were seen in four (44%) patients. Five patients (56%) had eosinophilic inflammation. In conclusion, we have characterized the clinical, endoscopic, and histologic features of EGI. Histologic and endoscopic examination reveals that, when present, EGI is often found at multiple segments along the gastrointestinal tract.

  7. Endoscopic full-thickness resection for gastrointestinal lesions using the over-the-scope clip system: a case series.

    PubMed

    Fähndrich, Martin; Sandmann, Marcel

    2015-01-01

    The over-the-scope clip (OTSC) system was developed for the closure of gastrointestinal defects but can also be used for endoscopic resection. This report describes the efficacy and safety of endoscopic full-thickness resection (eFTR) using the OTSC system. In this retrospective, observational, open-label case study, a total of 17 patients underwent eFTR using a dual clip and cap technique. The indications were: carcinoids, incompletely resected colon cancers involving the mucosa or submucosa, recurrent fibrosed adenoma of the colon, and submucosal lesions. The technical success was 94 % (16 /17). The complete resection (R0) rate was 100 %. There were no complications. In summary, the described minimally invasive method to perform eFTR of complex gastrointestinal lesions appears to be effective and safe.

  8. Ingested gastrointestinal foreign bodies: predisposing factors for complications in children having surgical or endoscopic removal.

    PubMed

    Tokar, Baran; Cevik, Alper A; Ilhan, Huseyin

    2007-02-01

    A retrospective study was performed to determine the predisposing factors associated with the complications of ingested gastrointestinal (GI) tract foreign bodies (FBs) in children who had surgical or endoscopic removal. The study was performed in 161 children who had endoscopic or surgical removal. The clinical data were evaluated in two groups. In groups I and II, respectively, 135 patients with no complications and 26 patients with complications were analyzed. The relative risk analysis was performed for the risk factors. The number of the patients with an accurate history and the radiopaque FBs was significantly higher in group I. Metal, especially sharp objects, and food plugs obstructing a diseased esophagus were the most common FBs found in group II. The majority of the FBs of both groups were entrapped in esophagus, the number of the FBs distal to esophagus was significantly higher and duration of lodgment was significantly longer in group II. Esophageal abrasion, laceration and bleeding, complete esophageal obstruction, caustic injury, severe esophageal stricture, laryngeal edema, recurrent aspiration pneumonia, loss of weight, intestinal perforation, constipation and intestinal obstruction were determined as complications. The relative risk was >1 for duration of lodgment more than 24 h, for sharp or pointed objects, button batteries, nonopaque objects, diseased esophagus and for the objects located below the upper third of esophagus. Type, radiopacity, location and duration of the ingested GI tract FB determine the outcome. A delayed diagnosis is the most significant factor increasing the risk of complications. Physician must maintain a high index of suspicion and a more extensive history; physical examination and radiodiagnostic investigation should be obtained in suspected cases.

  9. Comparison between air and carbon dioxide insufflation in the endoscopic submucosal excavation of gastrointestinal stromal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Wei-Bin; Wang, Zi-Hao; Qu, Chun-Ying; Zhang, Yi; Jiang, Han; Zhou, Min; Chen, Ying; Xu, Lei-Ming

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the safety and efficacy of CO2 insufflation compared with air insufflation in the endoscopic submucosal excavation (ESE) of gastrointestinal stromal tumors. METHODS: Sixty patients were randomized to undergo endoscopic submucosal excavation, with the CO2 group (n = 30) and the air group (n = 30) undergoing CO2 insufflation and air insufflation in the ESE, respectively. The end-tidal CO2 level (pETCO2) was observed at 4 time points: at the beginning of ESE, at total removal of the tumors, at completed wound management, and 10 min after ESE. Additionally, the patients’ experience of pain at 1, 3, 6 and 24 h after the examination was registered using a visual analog scale (VAS). RESULTS: Both the CO2 group and air group were similar in mean age, sex, body mass index (all P > 0.05). There were no significant differences in PetCO2 values before and after the procedure (P > 0.05). However, the pain scores after the ESE at different time points in the CO2 group decreased significantly compared with the air group (1 h: 21.2 ± 3.4 vs 61.5 ± 1.7; 3 h: 8.5 ± 0.7 vs 42.9 ± 1.3; 6 h: 4.4 ± 1.6 vs 27.6 ± 1.2; 24 h: 2.3 ± 0.4 vs 21.4 ± 0.7, P < 0.05). Meanwhile, the percentage of VAS scores of 0 in the CO2 group after 1, 3, 6 and 24 h was significantly higher than that in the air group (60.7 ± 1.4 vs 18.9 ± 1.5, 81.5 ± 2.3 vs 20.6 ± 1.2, 89.2 ± 0.7 vs 36.8 ± 0.9, 91.3 ± 0.8 vs 63.8 ± 1.3, respectively, P < 0.05). Moreover, the condition of the CO2 group was better than that of the air group with respect to anal exsufflation. CONCLUSION: Insufflation of CO2 in the ESE of gastrointestinal stromal tumors will not cause CO2 retention and it may significantly reduce the level of pain, thus it is safe and effective. PMID:23326136

  10. Endoscopic Management of Foreign Bodies in the Gastrointestinal Tract: A Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Andrade, Javier; Twersky, Yitzhak; Iqbal, Shahzad

    2016-01-01

    Foreign body ingestion is a common diagnosis that presents in emergency departments throughout the world. Distinct foreign bodies predispose to particular locations of impaction in the gastrointestinal tract, commonly meat boluses in the esophagus above a preexisting esophageal stricture or ring in adults and coins in children. Several other groups are at high risk of foreign body impaction, mentally handicapped individuals or those with psychiatric illness, abusers of drugs or alcohol, and the geriatric population. Patients with foreign body ingestion typically present with odynophagia, dysphagia, sensation of having an object stuck, chest pain, and nausea/vomiting. The majority of foreign bodies pass through the digestive system spontaneously without causing any harm, symptoms, or necessitating any further intervention. A well-documented clinical history and thorough physical exam is critical in making the diagnosis, if additional modalities are needed, a CT scan and diagnostic endoscopy are generally the preferred modalities. Various tools can be used to remove foreign bodies, and endoscopic treatment is safe and effective if performed by a skilled endoscopist. PMID:27807447

  11. A patient with odynophagia and unusual endoscopic findings.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Jessica; Potts, Jonathan; Chatu, Sukhdev; Chung-Faye, Guy

    2015-11-26

    The case describes a 50-year-old woman presenting with a severe painful dysphagia to solids, impacting on her nutritional intake. She had a history of pemphigus vulgaris maintained in remission with azathioprine, with no evidence of active oral or cutaneous disease at the time of presentation. Endoscopy and histology from the distal oesophagus revealed oesophageal involvement of pemphigus vulgaris. This is a relatively rare clinical form of the disease, with only 58 cases reported worldwide. Patients with pemphigus vulgaris are also prone to infective or steroid-induced gastritis, which present in the same way. Early endoscopic evaluation is therefore essential to distinguish between oesophageal involvement of pemphigus vulgaris and other pathologies, which warrant significant differences in management.

  12. Is photodynamic therapy a selective treatment? Analysis of local complications after endoscopic photodynamic therapy of early stage tumors of gastrointestinal, tracheobronchial, and urinary tracts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spinelli, Pasquale; Dal Fante, Marco; Mancini, Andrea

    1995-03-01

    Selectivity is the most emphasized advantage of photodynamic therapy (PDT). However, at drug and light doses used for clinical applications, response from normal tissue surrounding the tumor reduces the real selectivity of the drug-light system and increases the surface of the area responding to the treatment. It is now evident that light irradiation of a sensitized patient produces damage at a various degree not only in the tumor but also in non-neoplastic tissues included in the field of irradiation. We report our experience in endoscopic PDT of early stage tumors in tracheobronchial, gastrointestinal and urinary tracts, describing early and late local complications caused by the damage of normal tissues adjacent to the tumors and included in the field of light irradiation. Among 44 patients treated, local complications, attributable to a poor selectivity of the modality, occurred in 6 patients (14%). In particular, the rate of local complications was 9% in patients treated for esophageal tumors, 14% in patients with gastric tumors, 9% in patients with tracheobronchial tumors, and 67% in bladder cancer patients. Clinical pictures as well as endoscopic findings at various intervals from treatment showed that mucositis is a common event following endoscopic PDT. It causes exudation and significant tissue inflammatory response, whose consequences are different in the various organs treated. Photoradiation must be, as much as possible, limited to the malignant area.

  13. Endoscopic submucosal dissection for the treatment of neoplastic lesions in the gastrointestinal tract

    PubMed Central

    Białek, Andrzej; Wiechowska-Kozłowska, Anna; Pertkiewicz, Jan; Karpińska, Katarzyna; Marlicz, Wojciech; Milkiewicz, Piotr; Starzyńska, Teresa

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the indications, resection rate, and safety of endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) for neoplastic lesions in the gastrointestinal tract at a European referral center. METHODS: We carried out a retrospective analysis of the ESD procedures performed in our center for mucosal neoplastic and submucosal lesions of the gastrointestinal tract. The duration of the procedure, en bloc and complete (R0) resection rates, and complication rates were evaluated. Variables were reported as mean ± SD or simple proportions. Univariate analysis and comparisons of procedure times and resection rates were performed using Mann-Whitney U tests, or χ2 tests for dichotomous variables. RESULTS: Between 2007 and 2011, ESD was performed in a total of 103 patients (46.7% male, mean age 64.0 ± 12.7 years). The indications for the procedure were epithelial tumor (n = 54), submucosal tumor (n = 42), or other (n = 7). The total en bloc resection rate was 90.3% (93/103) and R0 resection rate 80.6% (83/103). The median speed of the procedure was 15.0 min/cm2. The complete resection rate was lower for submucosal tumors arising from the muscle layer (68%, 15/22, P < 0.05). Resection speed was quicker for submucosal tumors localized in the submucosal layer than for lesions arising from the muscularis propria layer (8.1 min/cm2 vs 17.9 min/cm2, P < 0.05). The R0 resection rate and speed were better in the last 24 mo (90.1%, 49/54 and 15.3 min/cm2) compared to the first 3 years of treatment (73.5%, 36/49, P < 0.05 and 22.0 min/cm2, P < 0.05). Complications occurred in 14.6% (n = 15) of patients, including perforation in 5.8% (n = 6), pneumoperitoneum in 3.9% (n = 4), delayed bleeding in 1.9% (n = 2), and other in 2.9% (n = 3). Only one patient with delayed perforation required surgical treatment. During the mean follow-up of 26 ± 15.3 mo, among patients with R0 resection, recurrence occurred in one patient (1.2%). CONCLUSION: ESD is an effective and safe method for resection of

  14. PillCam(TradeMark), a Noninvasive Endoscopic Device for the Measurement of Gastrointestinal Motility Changes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaksman, Zahman; Crady, Camille; Raju, G. S.; Putcha, Lakshmi

    2007-01-01

    Introduction: Bioavailability and effectiveness of drugs given by mouth are governed in part by gastrointestinal (GI) motility and function. Microgravity has been shown to decrease GI motility as indicated by a 3 fold increase in gastrointestinal transit time (GITT). The PillCam(TradeMark), an endoscopic camera embedded in a capsule, is a novel noninvasive and unobtrusive device that is used for the diagnosis of GI pathology. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the usefulness of PillCam(TradeMark) as an alternative to the Lactulose Breath Hydrogen Test (LBHT) for estimating GI motility. The sensitivity and applicability of this device for detection and estimation of the effect of promethazine, a deterrent, and caffeine, a prokinetic, on GI motility were also examined. Method: In this semi-randomized cross-over design study, six male and six female subjects were administered the following 4 treatments: PillCam(TradeMark) alone, PillCam(TradeMark)+Lactulose (10g), PillCam(TradeMark)+caffeine (200mg), and PillCam(TradeMark)+Promethazine (50mg). Results: GITT ranged between 1:24 and 7:52 hr:min. Lactulose did not alter GITT. A significant increase in GITT was noticed after administration of PMZ when compared to values from PillCam(TradeMark) treatment alone or PillCam(TradeMark)+Lactulose treatment. No difference in GITT after caffeine treatment was noticed. While there were no gender related differences in GITT after administration of PillCam(TradeMark) or with lactulose, a significant difference (p<.05) between genders was observed after promethazine administration with mean GITT higher in males (5:50 hr:min) than females (4:15 hr:min). Conclusion: The PillCam(TradeMark) capsule is applicable for the determination of GITT using time stamped GI images. It can be successfully used for the assessment of drug induced changes in GI motility and therefore, may be applicable for microgravity and analog environment studies on GI motility and function.

  15. Gastrointestinal pathology in the University Teaching Hospital, Lusaka, Zambia: review of endoscopic and pathology records.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Paul; Katema, Mwamba; Amadi, Beatrice; Zimba, Lameck; Aparicio, Sylvia; Mudenda, Victor; Baboo, K Sridutt; Zulu, Isaac

    2008-02-01

    There is a shortage of information on the epidemiology of digestive disease in developing countries. In the belief that such information will inform public health priorities and epidemiological comparisons between different geographical regions, we analysed 2132 diagnostic upper gastrointestinal endoscopy records from 1999 to 2005 in the University Teaching Hospital, Lusaka, Zambia. In order to clarify unexpected impressions about the age distribution of cancers, a retrospective analysis of pathology records was also undertaken. No abnormality was found in 31% of procedures, and in 42% of procedures in children. In patients with gastrointestinal haemorrhage, the common findings were oesophageal varices (26%), duodenal ulcer (17%) and gastric ulcer (12%). Gastrointestinal malignancy was found in 8.8% of all diagnostic procedures, in descending order of frequency: gastric adenocarcinoma, oesophageal squamous carcinoma, Kaposi's sarcoma, oesophageal adenocarcinoma. Data from endoscopy records and pathology records strongly suggest that the incidence in adults under the age of 45 years is higher than in the USA or UK, and pathology records suggest that this effect is particularly marked for colorectal carcinoma.

  16. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided forceps biopsy from upper gastrointestinal subepithelial lesions using a forward-viewing echoendoscope

    PubMed Central

    Matsuzaki, Ippei; Miyahara, Ryoji; Hirooka, Yoshiki; Funasaka, Kohei; Yamamura, Takeshi; Ohno, Eizaburo; Nakamura, Masanao; Kawashima, Hiroki; Watanabe, Osamu; Kobayashi, Makoto; Shimoyama, Yoshie; Nakamura, Shigeo; Goto, Hidemi

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Endoscopic tissue acquisition techniques using needle-knife and biopsy forceps allow abundant tissue acquisition from upper gastrointestinal subepithelial lesions; however, these techniques cannot capture real-time intratumor information. The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of endoscopic ultrasound-guided forceps biopsy (EUS-FB) from upper gastrointestinal subepithelial lesions using a forward-viewing echoendoscope. Patients and methods: This study was a prospective case series. After mucosal cuts, several specimens were taken using a hot biopsy forceps under real-time EUS visualization. The incision was closed using hemoclips. Diagnostic yield, rate of diagnosable samples obtained under EUS visualization, procedure time, and adverse events were assessed. Results: Ten patients (median lesion size 16 mm, range 15 – 44 mm) underwent EUS-FB. The overall rate of histological diagnosis by EUS-FB was 100 % (10/10). The rate of diagnosable samples among all cases was 97.6 % (41/42). The median procedure times for EUS-FB and complete closure were 28.5 and 4.5 minutes, respectively. No adverse events occurred. Conclusions: This newly developed EUS-FB is feasible and allowed forceps biopsy from upper gastrointestinal subepithelial lesions. Study registration: UMIN000015364 PMID:27556070

  17. Novel treatment options for perforations of the upper gastrointestinal tract: Endoscopic vacuum therapy and over-the-scope clips

    PubMed Central

    Mennigen, Rudolf; Senninger, Norbert; Laukoetter, Mike G

    2014-01-01

    Endoscopic management of leakages and perforations of the upper gastrointestinal tract has gained great importance as it avoids the morbidity and mortality of surgical intervention. In the past years, covered self-expanding metal stents were the mainstay of endoscopic therapy. However, two new techniques are now available that enlarge the possibilities of defect closure: endoscopic vacuum therapy (EVT), and over-the-scope clip (OTSC). EVT is performed by mounting a polyurethane sponge on a gastric tube and placing it into the leakage. Continuous suction is applied via the tube resulting in effective drainage of the cavity and the induction of wound healing, comparable to the application of vacuum therapy in cutaneous wounds. The system is changed every 3-5 d. The overall success rate of EVT in the literature ranges from 84% to 100%, with a mean of 90%; only few complications have been reported. OTSCs are loaded on a transparent cap which is mounted on the tip of a standard endoscope. By bringing the edges of the perforation into the cap, by suction or by dedicated devices, such as anchor or twin grasper, the OTSC can be placed to close the perforation. For acute endoscopy associated perforations, the mean success rate is 90% (range: 70%-100%). For other types of perforations (postoperative, other chronic leaks and fistulas) success rates are somewhat lower (68%, and 59%, respectively). Only few complications have been reported. Although first reports are promising, further studies are needed to define the exact role of EVT and OTSC in treatment algorithms of upper gastrointestinal perforations. PMID:24976714

  18. Novel treatment options for perforations of the upper gastrointestinal tract: endoscopic vacuum therapy and over-the-scope clips.

    PubMed

    Mennigen, Rudolf; Senninger, Norbert; Laukoetter, Mike G

    2014-06-28

    Endoscopic management of leakages and perforations of the upper gastrointestinal tract has gained great importance as it avoids the morbidity and mortality of surgical intervention. In the past years, covered self-expanding metal stents were the mainstay of endoscopic therapy. However, two new techniques are now available that enlarge the possibilities of defect closure: endoscopic vacuum therapy (EVT), and over-the-scope clip (OTSC). EVT is performed by mounting a polyurethane sponge on a gastric tube and placing it into the leakage. Continuous suction is applied via the tube resulting in effective drainage of the cavity and the induction of wound healing, comparable to the application of vacuum therapy in cutaneous wounds. The system is changed every 3-5 d. The overall success rate of EVT in the literature ranges from 84% to 100%, with a mean of 90%; only few complications have been reported. OTSCs are loaded on a transparent cap which is mounted on the tip of a standard endoscope. By bringing the edges of the perforation into the cap, by suction or by dedicated devices, such as anchor or twin grasper, the OTSC can be placed to close the perforation. For acute endoscopy associated perforations, the mean success rate is 90% (range: 70%-100%). For other types of perforations (postoperative, other chronic leaks and fistulas) success rates are somewhat lower (68%, and 59%, respectively). Only few complications have been reported. Although first reports are promising, further studies are needed to define the exact role of EVT and OTSC in treatment algorithms of upper gastrointestinal perforations.

  19. A novel imaging system of optical detection on cancers and tissues in gastrointestinal endoscope using high-color-rendering white and color tunable LEDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishikawa, Jun; Taguchi, Tsunemasa; Uchida, Yuji; Kurai, Satoshi; Yanai, Hideo; Kiyotoki, Shu; Okamoto, Takeshi; Higaki, Shingo; Sakaida, Isao

    2010-02-01

    The use of white or color tunable LEDs (light-emitting diodes), which can replace a large light source apparatus and light-guiding fiber bundle, enable the miniaturization of the whole endoscope system and remove constraints on the design of its shape. We have developed a novel white LED for a new experimental prototype LED-illuminated gastrointestinal endoscope having the color rendering in the clinically important red range at around 600 nm.­

  20. Two-sided sponge (TSS) treatment: Description of a novel device and technique for endoscopic vacuum treatment (EVT) in the upper gastrointestinal tract

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Andreas; Thimme, Robert; Hopt, Ulrich T.; Richter-Schrag, Hans-Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Endoscopic vacuum treatment (EVT) is increasingly used in the treatment of anastomotic leakages and perforations in the upper gastrointestinal tract. However, sponges often have to be mounted individually on a gastric tube and endoscopic introduction of the latter into an infected extraluminal cavity is challenging. In order to facilitate this procedure in some anatomical situations, we developed the prototype of a new sponge for EVT called a two-side sponge (TSS). PMID:27652297

  1. Identification of lesion images from gastrointestinal endoscope based on feature extraction of combinational methods with and without learning process.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ding-Yun; Gan, Tao; Rao, Ni-Ni; Xing, Yao-Wen; Zheng, Jie; Li, Sang; Luo, Cheng-Si; Zhou, Zhong-Jun; Wan, Yong-Li

    2016-08-01

    The gastrointestinal endoscopy in this study refers to conventional gastroscopy and wireless capsule endoscopy (WCE). Both of these techniques produce a large number of images in each diagnosis. The lesion detection done by hand from the images above is time consuming and inaccurate. This study designed a new computer-aided method to detect lesion images. We initially designed an algorithm named joint diagonalisation principal component analysis (JDPCA), in which there are no approximation, iteration or inverting procedures. Thus, JDPCA has a low computational complexity and is suitable for dimension reduction of the gastrointestinal endoscopic images. Then, a novel image feature extraction method was established through combining the algorithm of machine learning based on JDPCA and conventional feature extraction algorithm without learning. Finally, a new computer-aided method is proposed to identify the gastrointestinal endoscopic images containing lesions. The clinical data of gastroscopic images and WCE images containing the lesions of early upper digestive tract cancer and small intestinal bleeding, which consist of 1330 images from 291 patients totally, were used to confirm the validation of the proposed method. The experimental results shows that, for the detection of early oesophageal cancer images, early gastric cancer images and small intestinal bleeding images, the mean values of accuracy of the proposed method were 90.75%, 90.75% and 94.34%, with the standard deviations (SDs) of 0.0426, 0.0334 and 0.0235, respectively. The areas under the curves (AUCs) were 0.9471, 0.9532 and 0.9776, with the SDs of 0.0296, 0.0285 and 0.0172, respectively. Compared with the traditional related methods, our method showed a better performance. It may therefore provide worthwhile guidance for improving the efficiency and accuracy of gastrointestinal disease diagnosis and is a good prospect for clinical application.

  2. In-situ visualization and evaluation of neoplastic lesions of the human gastrointestinal tract using endoscopic optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rollins, Andrew M.; Westphal, Volker; Das, Ananya; Pfau, Patrick; Chak, Amitabh; Wong, Richard C. K.; Sivak, Michael J., Jr.; Izatt, Joseph A.

    2001-06-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a novel biomedical imaging technique that uses low-coherence optical interferometry to obtain micron-scale resolution cross- sectional images of tissue microstructure noninvasively. OCT fills a valuable niche in imaging of tissue structure, providing subsurface imaging with high spatial resolution (on the order of 10 micrometers) and penetration depths of 1 - 2 mm with no contact or matching medium needed between the probe and the tissue. An OCT system for gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy has been developed using a small-diameter rotary-scanning probe compatible with standard GI endoscopes and capable of imaging in real-time. To date more than 100 volunteers have been imaged during routine upper and lower endoscopic procedures. Results of imaging in normal organs have demonstrated visualization of morphological layers (epithelium, lamina propria, muscularis mucosa, submucosa, muscularis propria) and microscopic structures (glands, villi, crypts, vessels) in all endoscopically accessible GI organs. It has been observed in more than 30 patients that the EOCT appearance of Barrett's mucosa is clearly differentiable from normal gastric or esophageal mucosa. Furthermore, the EOCT appearance of dysplasia and neoplastic lesions, including adenocarcenoma in Barrett's and villous tumor in colon have been observed and are under investigation. Preliminary data indicate the potential of EOCT for routine clinical diagnostics in GI tissues, including early cancer detection and staging and detection of tumor margins.

  3. Endoscopic Management of Gastrointestinal Leaks and Bleeding with the Over-the-Scope Clip: A Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Goenka, Mahesh Kumar; Rai, Vijay Kumar; Goenka, Usha; Tiwary, Indrajit Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Background/Aims The over-the-scope clip (OTSC) is a device used for endoscopic closure of perforations, leaks and fistulas, and for endoscopic hemostasis. To evaluate the clinical effectiveness and safety of OTSC. Methods Between October 2013 and November 2015, 12 patients underwent OTSC placement by an experienced endoscopist. OTSC was used for the closure of gastrointestinal (GI) leaks and fistula in six patients, three of which were iatrogenic (esophageal, gastric, and duodenal) and three of which were inflammatory. In six patients, OTSC was used for hemostasis of non-variceal upper GI bleeding. Endoscopic tattooing using India ink was used to assist the accurate placement of the clip. Results All subjects except one with a colonic defect experienced immediate technical success as well as long-term clinical success, during a mean follow-up of 6 weeks. Only one clip was required to close each of the GI defects and to achieve hemostasis in all patients. There were no misfirings or complications of clips. The procedure was well tolerated, and patients were hospitalized for an average of 8 days (range, 3 to 10). Antiplatelet therapy was continued in patients with GI bleeding. Conclusions In our experience, OTSC was safe and effective for the closure of GI defect and to achieve hemostasis of non-variceal GI bleeding. PMID:27802375

  4. Embolization of Acute Nonvariceal Upper Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage Resistant to Endoscopic Treatment: Results and Predictors of Recurrent Bleeding

    SciTech Connect

    Loffroy, Romaric Rao, Pramod; Ota, Shinichi; Lin Mingde; Kwak, Byung-Kook; Geschwind, Jean-Francois

    2010-12-15

    Acute nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal (UGI) hemorrhage is a frequent complication associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The most common cause of UGI bleeding is peptic ulcer disease, but the differential diagnosis is diverse and includes tumors; ischemia; gastritis; arteriovenous malformations, such as Dieulafoy lesions; Mallory-Weiss tears; trauma; and iatrogenic causes. Aggressive treatment with early endoscopic hemostasis is essential for a favorable outcome. However, severe bleeding despite conservative medical treatment or endoscopic intervention occurs in 5-10% of patients, requiring surgery or transcatheter arterial embolization. Surgical intervention is usually an expeditious and gratifying endeavor, but it can be associated with high operative mortality rates. Endovascular management using superselective catheterization of the culprit vessel, < sandwich> occlusion, or blind embolization has emerged as an alternative to emergent operative intervention for high-risk patients and is now considered the first-line therapy for massive UGI bleeding refractory to endoscopic treatment. Indeed, many published studies have confirmed the feasibility of this approach and its high technical and clinical success rates, which range from 69 to 100% and from 63 to 97%, respectively, even if the choice of the best embolic agent among coils, cyanaocrylate glue, gelatin sponge, or calibrated particles remains a matter of debate. However, factors influencing clinical outcome, especially predictors of early rebleeding, are poorly understood, and few studies have addressed this issue. This review of the literature will attempt to define the role of embolotherapy for acute nonvariceal UGI hemorrhage that fails to respond to endoscopic hemostasis and to summarize data on factors predicting angiographic and embolization failure.

  5. Long-Term Outcome of Endoscopic Balloon Dilation in Obstructive Gastrointestinal Crohn's Disease: A Prospective Long-Term Study

    PubMed Central

    Ikeda, Keisuke; Tsuda, Sumio; Yao, Kenshi; Sou, Suketo; Satoh, Shigeru; Hatakeyama, Sadamune; Matake, Hiroaki; Sakurai, Toshihiro; Yao, Tsuneyoshi

    2000-01-01

    Background The short- and long-term results of balloon dilation therapy in Crohn's patients with non-anastomotic obstructive gastrointestinal lesions are investigated. Materials and methods Fifty-five patients with Crohn's disease who had obstructive gastrointestinal lesions were treated prospectively by endoscopic balloon dilation. Short-term results Eight of the initial dilations were unsuccessful giving no symptomatic relief (14.5%). Long-term results The subjects of the long-term prognosis were 40 cases followed up for more than 6 months (average 37 months) and their strictures were non-anastomotic in more than half (59%). Avoidance of surgery, was possible in 31 of 40 patients (78%). Surgery was avoided in 92%, 81% and 77% of patients after one, two, and three years, respectively (Kaplan–Meier's method). There was no difference in long-term outcome between anastomotic strictures and strictures in the absence of prior surgery. Conclusion Our results suggest that, (1) strictures in the absence of prior surgery might be treated in this way as well as anastomotic strictures; (2) if followed for a prolonged time period, more than 70% of patients, who have undergone balloon dilation for obstructive gastrointestinal Crohn's disease, may be able to avoid surgery. PMID:18493528

  6. Low Prevalence of Clinically Significant Endoscopic Findings in Outpatients with Dyspepsia

    PubMed Central

    Abdeljawad, Khaled; Wehbeh, Antonios

    2017-01-01

    Background. The value of endoscopy in dyspeptic patients is questionable. Aims. To examine the prevalence of significant endoscopic findings (SEFs) and the utility of alarm features and age in predicting SEFs in outpatients with dyspepsia. Methods. A retrospective analysis of outpatient adults who had endoscopy for dyspepsia. Demographic variables, alarm features, and endoscopic findings were recorded. We defined SEFs as peptic ulcer disease, erosive esophagitis, malignancy, stricture, or findings requiring specific therapy. Results. Of 650 patients included in the analysis, 51% had a normal endoscopy. The most common endoscopic abnormality was nonerosive gastritis (29.7%) followed by nonerosive duodenitis (7.2%) and LA-class A esophagitis (5.4%). Only 10.2% had a SEF. Five patients (0.8%) had malignancy. SEFs were more likely present in patients with alarm features (12.6% versus 5.4%, p = 0.004). Age ≥ 55 and presence of any alarm feature were associated with SEFs (aOR 1.8 and 2.3, resp.). Conclusion. Dyspeptic patients have low prevalence of SEF. The presence of any alarm feature and age ≥ 55 are associated with higher risk of SEF. Endoscopy in young patients with no alarm features has a low yield; these patients can be considered for nonendoscopic approach for diagnosis and management. PMID:28210269

  7. Innovations and techniques for balloon-enteroscope-assisted endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography in patients with altered gastrointestinal anatomy

    PubMed Central

    Yamauchi, Hiroshi; Kida, Mitsuhiro; Imaizumi, Hiroshi; Okuwaki, Kosuke; Miyazawa, Shiro; Iwai, Tomohisa; Koizumi, Wasaburo

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) remains challenging in patients who have undergone surgical reconstruction of the intestine. Recently, many studies have reported that balloon-enteroscope-assisted ERCP (BEA-ERCP) is a safe and effective procedure. However, further improvements in outcomes and the development of simplified procedures are required. Percutaneous treatment, Laparoscopy-assisted ERCP, endoscopic ultrasound-guided anterograde intervention, and open surgery are effective treatments. However, treatment should be noninvasive, effective, and safe. We believe that these procedures should be performed only in difficult-to-treat patients because of many potential complications. BEA-ERCP still requires high expertise-level techniques and is far from a routinely performed procedure. Various techniques have been proposed to facilitate scope insertion (insertion with percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (PTBD) rendezvous technique, Short type single-balloon enteroscopes with passive bending section, Intraluminal injection of indigo carmine, CO2 inflation guidance), cannulation (PTBD or percutaneous transgallbladder drainage rendezvous technique, Dilation using screw drill, Rendezvous technique combining DBE with a cholangioscope, endoscopic ultrasound-guided rendezvous technique), and treatment (overtube-assisted technique, Short type balloon enteroscopes) during BEA-ERCP. The use of these techniques may allow treatment to be performed by BEA-ERCP in many patients. A standard procedure for ERCP yet to be established for patients with a reconstructed intestine. At present, BEA-ERCP is considered the safest and most effective procedure and is therefore likely to be recommended as first-line treatment. In this article, we discuss the current status of BEA-ERCP in patients with surgically altered gastrointestinal anatomy. PMID:26074685

  8. Image Quality Analysis of Various Gastrointestinal Endoscopes: Why Image Quality Is a Prerequisite for Proper Diagnostic and Therapeutic Endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Weon Jin; An, Pyeong; Ko, Kwang Hyun; Hahm, Ki Baik; Hong, Sung Pyo

    2015-01-01

    Arising from human curiosity in terms of the desire to look within the human body, endoscopy has undergone significant advances in modern medicine. Direct visualization of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract by traditional endoscopy was first introduced over 50 years ago, after which fairly rapid advancement from rigid esophagogastric scopes to flexible scopes and high definition videoscopes has occurred. In an effort towards early detection of precancerous lesions in the GI tract, several high-technology imaging scopes have been developed, including narrow band imaging, autofocus imaging, magnified endoscopy, and confocal microendoscopy. However, these modern developments have resulted in fundamental imaging technology being skewed towards red-green-blue and this technology has obscured the advantages of other endoscope techniques. In this review article, we have described the importance of image quality analysis using a survey to consider the diversity of endoscope system selection in order to better achieve diagnostic and therapeutic goals. The ultimate aims can be achieved through the adoption of modern endoscopy systems that obtain high image quality. PMID:26473119

  9. A Bamboo Joint-Like Appearance is a Characteristic Finding in the Upper Gastrointestinal Tract of Crohn's Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Fujiya, Mikihiro; Sakatani, Aki; Dokoshi, Tatsuya; Tanaka, Kazuyuki; Ando, Katsuyoshi; Ueno, Nobuhiro; Gotoh, Takuma; Kashima, Shin; Tominaga, Motoya; Inaba, Yuhei; Ito, Takahiro; Moriichi, Kentaro; Tanabe, Hiroki; Ikuta, Katsuya; Ohtake, Takaaki; Yokota, Kinnichi; Watari, Jiro; Saitoh, Yusuke; Kohgo, Yutaka

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The clinical importance of Crohn's disease (CD)-specific lesions in the upper gastrointestinal tract (upper GIT) has not been sufficiently established. The aim of this case-control study is to investigate the characteristic findings of CD in the upper GIT. In 2740 patients who underwent gastroduodenoscopy at Asahikawa Medical University between April 2011 and December 2012, 81 CD patients, 81 gender- and age-matched non-IBD patients, and 66 ulcerative colitis (UC) patients were investigated in the present study. (1) The diagnostic ability and odds ratio of each endoscopic finding (a bamboo joint-like appearance in the cardia, erosions, and/or ulcers in the antrum, notched signs, and erosions and/or ulcers in the duodenum) were compared between the CD and non-IBD patients or UC patients. (2) The interobserver agreement of the diagnosis based on the endoscopic findings was evaluated by 3 experienced and 3 less-experienced endoscopists. The incidence of detecting a bamboo joint-like appearance, notched signs, and erosions and/or ulcers in the duodenum was significantly higher in the CD patients than in the non-IBD and UC patients. In addition, the diagnostic ability and odds ratio of a bamboo joint-like appearance for CD were higher than those for the other findings. Kendall's coefficients of concordance in the group of experienced and less-experienced endoscopists were relatively high for a bamboo joint-like appearance (0.748 and 0.692, respectively). A cardiac bamboo joint-like appearance is a useful finding for identifying high-risk groups of CD patients using only gastroduodenoscopy. PMID:26376393

  10. Incidental sinonasal findings identified during preoperative evaluation for endoscopic transsphenoidal approaches

    PubMed Central

    Laury, Adrienne M.; Oyesiku, Nelson M.; Hadjipanayis, Costas G.; DelGaudio, John M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The endoscopic transsphenoidal approach (eTSA) to lesions of the sellar region is typically performed jointly by neurosurgeons and otolaryngologists. Occasionally, the approach is significantly altered by sinonasal disease, anatomic variants, or previous surgery. However, there are no current guidelines that describe which physical or radiological findings should prompt a change in the plan of care. The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence of sinonasal pathology or anatomic variants noted endoscopically or by imaging that altered preoperative or intraoperative management. Methods: A retrospective review was performed of 355 consecutive patients who underwent combined neurosurgery–otolaryngology endoscopic sella approach from August 1, 2007 to April 1, 2011. Our practice in these patients involves preoperative otolaryngology clinical evaluation and MRI review. Intraoperative image guidance is not routinely used in uncomplicated eTSA. Results: The most common management alteration was the addition of image guidance based on anatomic variants on MRI, which occurred in 81 patients (35.0%). Eight patients (2.9%) were preoperatively treated with antibiotics and surgery was postponed secondary to acute or chronic purulent rhinosinusitis; two (0.7%) required functional endoscopic sinus surgery for medically refractory disease before eTSA. Five patients (1.8%) required anterior septoplasty intraoperatively for severe nasal septal deviation. Two patients (0.7%) had inverted papilloma and one patient had esthesioneuroblastoma identified preoperatively during rigid nasal endoscopy. Conclusion: This is one of the larger reviews of patients undergoing eTSA for sellar lesions and the only study that describes how intraoperative management may be altered by preoperative sinonasal evaluation. We found a significant incidence of sinonasal pathology and anatomic variants that altered routine operative planning; therefore, a thorough sinonasal evaluation

  11. An innovative ex-vivo porcine upper gastrointestinal model for submucosal tunnelling endoscopic resection (STER)

    PubMed Central

    Yeung, Baldwin; Chiu, Philip; Teoh, Anthony; Zheng, Linfu; Chan, Shannon; Lam, Kelvin; Tang, Raymond; Ng, Enders K. W.

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Submucosal tunnelling endoscopic resection (STER) is a novel endoscopic technique to remove submucosal tumour (SMT). We propose a novel, low cost simulator for training of techniques for STER. Patients and methods: The model consisted of an ex-planted porcine oesophagus, stomach and duodenum with marbles embedded surgically in the submucosal plane. Two expert endoscopists with experience in submucosal tunnelling and 5 board-certified endoscopists with no experience in submucosal tunnelling were recruited. Participants were asked to perform a diagnostic endoscopy and 2 STER procedures, 1 in the oesophagus and 1 in the stomach. They also answered a structured questionnaire. Factors including operative time, mucosal and muscular injury rate, injection volume and accuracy of endoscopic closure were assessed. Results: The median time for localization of all SMTs was 40.1 seconds for experts and 38.5 seconds for novices (P = 1.000). For esophageal STER, the length of mucosal incisions and tunnelling distances were comparable between the 2 groups. The median volume injected by the novice group was significantly lower than the experts (15 mL vs 42.5 mL (P = 0.05). The median tunnelling time per length was 25.9 seconds/mm for the experts and 40.8 seconds/mm for the novice group (P = 0.38). There was a higher rate of mucosal injury and muscular perforation in the novice group (8 vs 0; P = 0.05). For gastric STER, the length of mucosal incisions and tunnel distances were comparable between the 2 groups. The median tunnelling time per length for the experts was 23.3 seconds/mm and 34.6 seconds/mm for the novice group (P = 0.38). One mucosal injury was incurred by a novice. The rate of dissection in the stomach and the oesophagus was not statistically different (P = 0.620). All participants voted that the model provides a realistic simulation and recommended it for training. Conclusions: STER is an advanced endoscopic

  12. Endoscopic reflectance spectrophotometry and visible light spectroscopy in clinical gastrointestinal studies.

    PubMed

    Leung, Felix W

    2008-06-01

    The use of reflectance spectrophotometry (RS) for mucosal hemodynamic measurement relies on the recognition of changes in indexes of mucosal hemoglobin concentration and oxygen saturation. Endoscopic application in clinical studies has confirmed important observations demonstrated in animal experiments. The vasoconstriction induced by propranolol, vasopressin, glypressin, or somatostatin in the portal hypertensive gastric mucosa and the reduction of gastroduodenal mucosal perfusion by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) or smoking, mesenteric venoconstriction associated with systemic hypoxia, and acid-induced duodenal hyperemia are important examples. Prognostic predictions include the development of stress-induced gastric ulcerations in patients with significant reductions in gastric perfusion after thermal or head injury, or the demonstration of delayed gastric or duodenal ulcer healing when the hyperemia at the ulcer margin fails to materialize. In mechanical-ventilator-dependent patients with sepsis, a significantly reduced gastric mucosal RS measurement portends a grave prognosis (mortality >80%). Recent advances in technology resulted in the construction and validation of instruments for visible light spectroscopy. Measurements focused on tissue oxygen saturation demonstrated epinephrine and vessel-ligation-induced vasoconstriction, the absence of ischemia in radiation-induced rectal telangiectasias, and gut ischemia responsive to revascularization treatment. Endoscopic RS and visible light spectroscopy are suitable for assessing the role of blood flow in conditions with a lesser degree of ischemia and for testing the hypothesis that functional dyspepsia and dysmotility syndromes may be due to gut ischemia.

  13. Color calibration of swine gastrointestinal tract images acquired by radial imaging capsule endoscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ou-Yang, Mang; Jeng, Wei-De; Lai, Chien-Cheng; Wu, Hsien-Ming; Lin, Jyh-Hung

    2016-01-01

    The type of illumination systems and color filters used typically generate varying levels of color difference in capsule endoscopes, which influence medical diagnoses. In order to calibrate the color difference caused by the optical system, this study applied a radial imaging capsule endoscope (RICE) to photograph standard color charts, which were then employed to calculate the color gamut of RICE. Color gamut was also measured using a spectrometer in order to get a high-precision color information, and the results obtained using both methods were compared. Subsequently, color-correction methods, namely polynomial transform and conformal mapping, were used to improve the color difference. Before color calibration, the color difference value caused by the influences of optical systems in RICE was 21.45±1.09. Through the proposed polynomial transformation, the color difference could be reduced effectively to 1.53±0.07. Compared to another proposed conformal mapping, the color difference value was substantially reduced to 1.32±0.11, and the color difference is imperceptible for human eye because it is <1.5. Then, real-time color correction was achieved using this algorithm combined with a field-programmable gate array, and the results of the color correction can be viewed from real-time images.

  14. Endoscopic fluorescence of gastrointestinal neoplasia after sensitization with 5-aminolaevulinic acid (ALA) or Photofrin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messmann, Helmut; Mlkvy, Peter; Montan, Sune; Wang-Nordman, Ingrid; Nilsson, Annika M.; Svanberg, Katarina; Svanberg, Sune; MacRobert, Alexander J.; Bown, Stephen G.

    1995-03-01

    Fluorescence after photosensitization has the potential to identify lesions not visible on conventional endoscopy. We assessed 12 patients at high risk of or with established GI cancers (u ulcerative colitis, 1 colon polyp, 2 familial polyposis with duodenal polyps, 2 early oesophageal cancers). Fluorescence images (excitation 390 nm) were recorded with endoscopic equipment and additional spot measurements (optical multichannel analyzer). Patients were given 10 - 60 mg/kg ALA orally or 2 mg/kg Photofrin i.v. 60 mg/kg ALA gave high levels of PP IX (proto-porphyrin IX) in all areas, but 10 - 15 mg/kg resulted in selectivity in macroscopically inflamed colon. Photofrin gave oesophageal tumors selectivity at 4 and 48 hours. Photofrin patients subsequently had PDT. Photobleaching was documented in 3. We conclude that these techniques have potential as `optical biopsy tools' and for screening for early neoplastic changes.

  15. Chemical gastro-oesophagitis, upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage and gastroscopic findings following Dettol poisoning.

    PubMed

    Chan, T Y; Sung, J J; Critchley, J A

    1995-01-01

    1. Dettol liquid (chloroxylenol 4.8%, pine oil, isopropyl alcohol), a household disinfectant, has a corrosive action on the gastrointestinal mucosa when swallowed. The incidence of upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage and gastroscopic findings following Dettol poisoning was studied in 89 patients. 2. Five patients (5.6%) developed minor haematemesis, in the form of coffee-coloured or blood-stained vomitus. One patient had a gastroscopy performed on the day after admission, showing signs of chemical burns in the oesophagus and stomach. Gastroscopy was performed in one other patient on day 11 to rule out oesophageal stricture; the patient was normal. All patients completely recovered. 3. The data from this study suggest that upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage following Dettol poisoning tends to be mild and self-limiting. Gastroscopy, which may increase the risk of aspiration in patients with impaired consciousness, is not required unless other causes of gastrointestinal bleeding are suspected.

  16. Subject-friendly entire gastrointestinal screening with a single capsule endoscope by magnetic navigation and the Internet.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Hidetoshi; Katsuki, Shinichi

    2014-01-01

    Ever since capsule endoscopy (CE) was introduced into clinical practice, we gastroenterologists have been dreaming of using this less invasive modality to explore the entire gastrointestinal (GI) tract. To realize this dream, we have developed a magnetic navigation system which includes real-time internet streaming of endoscopic video and some useful gadgets (position detection by means of magnetic impedance (MI) sensors and a modified capsule that is "weightless" in water). The design of the weightless capsule made it possible with 0.5T (Tesla) extracorporeal magnets to control the capsule beyond 20cm. A pair of MI sensors on the body surface could detect subtle magnetic flux generated by an intra-capsular magnet in the GI tract by utilizing the space diversity effect which eliminated the interference of terrestrial magnetism. Subjects underwent CE, during which they were free from confinement in the hospital, except for 1 hour when the capsule was manipulated in the stomach and colon. This study had a completion rate of 97.5%. The high completion rate indicates that our system (single capsule endoscopy-SCE) with further improvements could become a viable modality for screening of the entire GI tract.

  17. Histopathological standards for the diagnosis of gastrointestinal inflammation in endoscopic biopsy samples from the dog and cat: a report from the World Small Animal Veterinary Association Gastrointestinal Standardization Group.

    PubMed

    Day, M J; Bilzer, T; Mansell, J; Wilcock, B; Hall, E J; Jergens, A; Minami, T; Willard, M; Washabau, R

    2008-01-01

    The characterization of inflammatory change in endoscopic biopsy samples of the gastrointestinal mucosa is an increasingly important component in the diagnosis and management of canine and feline gastrointestinal disease. Interpretation has hitherto been limited by the lack of standard criteria that define morphological and inflammatory features, and the absence of such standardization has made it difficult, if not impossible, to compare results of retrospective or prospective studies. The World Small Animal Veterinary Association (WSAVA) Gastrointestinal Standardization Group was established, in part, to develop endoscopic and microscopical standards in small animal gastroenterology. This monograph presents a standardized pictorial and textual template of the major histopathological changes that occur in inflammatory disease of the canine and feline gastric body, gastric antrum, duodenum and colon. Additionally, a series of standard histopathological reporting forms is proposed, to encourage evaluation of biopsy samples in a systematic fashion. The Standardization Group believes that the international acceptance of these standard templates will advance the study of gastrointestinal disease in individual small companion animals as well as investigations that compare populations of animals.

  18. CLINICAL APPLICATION OF L-MENTHOL IN THE UPPER GASTROINTESTINAL ENDOSCOPIC PROCEDURE

    PubMed Central

    KIKUCHI, HITOMI; HIKICHI, TAKUTO; TAKAGI, TADAYUKI; SUZUKI, REI; WATANABE, KO; NAKAMURA, JUN; SUGIMOTO, MITSURU; WARAGAI, YUICHI; KONNO, NAOKI; ASAMA, HIROYUKI; TAKASUMI, MIKA; WATANABE, HIROSHI; OBARA, KATSUTOSHI; OHIRA, HIROMASA

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Aim: Peppermint oil, which suppresses gastric peristalsis during esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD), is effective for determining the margin of a gastric tumor. This study was conducted to evaluate the utility of an L-menthol preparation for suppressing gastric peristalsis and for diagnosing gastric tumors. Methods: The study examined 124 patients who underwent EGD between January and April 2012. After 20 mL of 0.8% L-menthol was sprayed directly onto the mucosal surface of the gastric antrum, the degree of peristalsis suppression in the antrum was evaluated. The effectiveness of L-menthol for identifying new gastric tumors and determining tumor margins was also evaluated. Results: Gastric peristalsis was suppressed in 88.5% (69/78) of patients, with complete suppression of peristalsis achieved in 78.2%. L-menthol exerted a higher peristalsis-suppressive effect in patients with endoscopic gastric mucosal atrophy (93.3%, 56/60) than in patients without atrophy (72.2%, 13/18) (p = .014). L-menthol application caused the detection of new gastric tumors in 1.6% (2/124) of patients and clarification of the margin of three lesions (in 3 patients) identified as having an unclear margin before L-menthol application. Conclusion: These results suggest that L-menthol is effective for suppressing gastric peristalsis during EGD and suggest that it is useful for identifying gastric tumors and for determining tumor margins. PMID:26632191

  19. Various Upper Endoscopic Findings of Acute Esophageal Thermal Injury Induced by Diverse Food: A Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yu Mi; Kim, Ji Young; Song, Hyun Jung; Koo, Hoon Sup; Song, Kyung Ho; Kim, Yong Seok; Huh, Kyu Chan

    2014-01-01

    Esophageal thermal injury caused by food has been reported to occur mostly after drinking hot liquid food, and is known to produce alternating white and red linear mucosal bands. In addition, thermal injury caused by ingestion of hot solid foods is documented to be a cause of esophageal ulcers or pseudomembranes. From January 2006 to August 2012, five patients with suspected esophageal thermal injury underwent esophagogastroduodenoscopy with biopsy. A "candy-cane" appearance was observed in one case, pseudomembrane was observed in two cases, an esophageal ulcer was observed in one case, and a friable and edematous mucosa was noted in one case. We believe that the endoscopic findings of esophageal thermal injury depend on the following factors: causative materials, amount of food consumed, exposure period, and time to endoscopy after the incident. Therefore, physicians who encounter patients with suspected esophageal thermal injury should carefully take the patient's history considering these factors. PMID:25325006

  20. The Use of Standard Gastrointestinal Endoscopic Ultrasound to Assess Cardiac Anatomy.

    PubMed

    Sentissi, Kinza; Sawhney, Mandeep S; Pleskow, Douglas; Sepe, Paul; Mella, Jose M; Kwittken, Benjamin; Ketwaroo, Gyanprakash; Subramaniam, Balachundhar

    2016-09-01

    In this prospective observational study, conducted at an academic medical center, we evaluated the feasibility of performing a basic transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) examination using endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) technology to determine what cardiac structures could be assessed. This may be potentially beneficial during hemodynamic emergencies in the endoscopy suite resulting from hypovolemia, depressed ventricular function, aortic dissection, pericardial effusions, or aortic stenosis. Of the 20 patients enrolled, 18 underwent EUS with a linear echoendoscope for standard clinical indications followed by a cardiac assessment performed under the guidance of a TEE-certified cardiac anesthesiologist. Eight of the 20 standard views of cardiovascular structures per the 1999 American Society of Echocardiography/Society of Cardiovascular Anesthesiologists guidelines for TEE could be obtained using the linear echoendoscope. The following cardiac valvular structures were visualized: aortic valve (100%), mitral valve (100%), tricuspid valve (33%), and pulmonic valve (11%). Left ventricular and right ventricular systolic function could be assessed in 89% and 67% of patients, respectively. Other structures such as the ascending and descending aorta, pericardium, left atrial appendage, and interatrial septum were identified in 100% of patients. Doppler-dependent functions could not be assessed. Given that the EUS images were not directly compared with TEE in these patients, we cannot comment definitively on the quality of these assessments and further studies would need to be performed to make a formal comparison. Based on this study, EUS technology can consistently assess the mitral valve, aortic valve, aorta, pericardium, and left ventricular function. Given its limitations, EUS technology, although not a substitute for formal echocardiography, could be a helpful early diagnostic tool in an emergency setting.

  1. [Effect of eradication of Helicobacter pylori infection on endoscopic findings and symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux].

    PubMed

    Mesihović, Rusmir; Vucelić, Boris; Bratović, Ismet; Gribajcević, Mehmed; Selak, Ivan

    2002-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GORD) represents an illness which reflects a syndrome caused by returning of acid gastric, alkaline pancreatic and bowels content into the oesophagus, which is in the stomach, because of the protective mechanisms of oesophageal loss. The aim of this study was that this prospective study should explain the role of Helicobacter pylori infection in modification of GORD, respectively whether the Helicobacter pylori infection acts protectively or by deterioration of the disease. According to the settled rules, the inquiry was performed as well as the selection of 97 candidates to undergo research in this study. Helicobacter pylori infection has been proved by immunoassay in all pts in the beginning of this study. Endoscopy has been performed in all pts, the degree of gastroesophageal reflux disease by Sawary-Miller was done. The main group consisted of 50 candidates in whom the eradication of Helicobacter pylori infection was done with triple therapy, pantoprazol + amoxycilin + klaritromicin, which was proven by an immunoassay test. Two groups of pts were formed: the main one with eradicated Helicobacter infection, and a controlled one with a Helicobacter positive infection, which was subject to modification of life style. During 12 months, this study consisted of endoscopic evaluations and monthly evaluation of pts daily difficulties. The eradication of Helicobacter pylori infection acts on the improvement of gastroesophageal disease course by improvement of endoscopic findings by Sawary-Miller, and by decreasing daily acid symptoms. The eradication of Helicobacter pylori infection in gastroesophageal reflux disease does it act at the symptoms such as heartburn, weekly acid symptoms and chest pain.

  2. Anatomic findings in revision endoscopic sinus surgery: Case series and review of contributory factors

    PubMed Central

    Bewick, Jessica; Egro, Francesco M.; Masterson, Liam; Javer, Amin R.

    2016-01-01

    Background: It is recognized that patients who undergo endoscopic sinus surgery (ESS) do not always achieve control of their disease. The causes are multifactorial; variations in surgical practice have been identified as possible factors in refractory disease. Objective: To reflect on the frequent anatomic findings of patients with chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) who require revision ESS. Methods: A retrospective review of patients who required revision ESS at a tertiary institution over a 3-year period. Patients for whom maximal medical therapy failed for CRS underwent computed tomography of the paranasal sinuses and image-guided surgery. Surgical records of anatomic findings were reviewed and analyzed. Results: Over 3 years, a total of 75 patients underwent revision procedures, 28% of all ESS performed in the unit. The most frequent finding was a residual uncinate process in 64% of the patients (n = 48); other findings included a maxillary antrostomy not based on the natural ostium of the maxillary sinus in 47% (n = 35), an oversized antrostomy in 29% (n = 22), resected middle turbinates in 35% (n = 26), middle meatal stenosis in 15% (n = 11), synechiae in 29% (n = 22), and osteitic bone that required drilling in 13% (n = 10). Conclusion: Surgical technique can give rise to anatomic variations that may prevent adequate mucociliary clearance and medication delivery, which leads to failure in ESS in patients with CRS. This study demonstrated the surgical findings encountered in revision ESS that should be highlighted in the training of Ear, Nose and Throat surgeons to help prevent primary failure and reduce health care costs. PMID:28107148

  3. Spontaneous Crenosoma vulpis infection in 10 dogs: laboratory, radiographic and endoscopic findings.

    PubMed

    Unterer, S; Deplazes, P; Arnold, P; Flückiger, M; Reusch, C E; Glaus, T M

    2002-04-01

    Crenosoma (C.) vulpis infection was diagnosed in 10 dogs aged between 0.5 and 12 years (median 4 years) during a 4-year period. The predominant clinical sign in all dogs was coughing which lasted from 1 day to > 4 months. Hematological abnormalities included eosinophilia in 5/9 dogs, basophilia in 3/9 dogs, and mild monocytosis in 6/9 dogs. Thoracic radiographs (n = 9) were normal in 1 dog, showed a mild bronchial or interstitial pattern in 4 dogs, and moderate to marked changes (bronchial-interstitial to alveolar) in 4 dogs. Endoscopic findings (n = 9) varied from mild erythematous bronchitis (n = 3) to marked bronchitis with accumulation of large amounts of mucus (n = 2), irregular nodular mucosal surface (n = 2), accumulation of pus (n = 1), and bronchial hemorrhage (n = 1). Adult worms were observed in 2 dogs. Bronchial lavage cytology revealed inflammation with predominance of eosinophils in 7/10 dogs, eosinophils and neutrophils in 2/10 dogs, and neutrophils in 1/10 dogs. C. vulpis larvae were identified in the BAL of 5/10 dogs. Fecal examinations with the Baermann technique was the most sensitive method and positive in all 10 dogs. C. vulpis infection has to be considered in the differential diagnosis in dogs of all ages presenting with acute or chronic cough.

  4. Clinical Practice Guidelines for Endoscope Reprocessing

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Hyun Jin

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal endoscopy is effective and safe for the screening, diagnosis, and treatment of gastrointestinal disease. However, issues regarding endoscope-transmitted infections are emerging. Many countries have established and continuously revise guidelines for endoscope reprocessing in order to prevent infections. While there are common processes used in endoscope reprocessing, differences exist among these guidelines. It is important that the reprocessing of gastrointestinal endoscopes be carried out in accordance with the recommendations for each step of the process. PMID:26473117

  5. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided tissue sampling of small subepithelial tumors of the upper gastrointestinal tract with a 22-gauge core biopsy needle

    PubMed Central

    Schlag, Christoph; Menzel, Christoph; Götzberger, Manuela; Nennstiel, Simon; Klare, Peter; Wagenpfeil, Stefan; Schmid, Roland M.; Weirich, Gregor; von Delius, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    Background and study aims The optimal approach to small subepithelial tumors (SETs) of the upper gastrointestinal tract remains inconclusive. The aim of this study was to evaluate endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle biopsy (EUS-FNB) for less invasive tissue sampling of small SETs of the upper gastrointestinal tract. Patients and methods In this prospective observational study patients with small ( ≤ 3 cm) SETs of the upper gastrointestinal tract were eligible and underwent EUS-FNB with a 22-gauge core biopsy needle. The main outcome measure was the diagnostic yield. The number of obtained core biopsies was also assessed. Results Twenty patients were included. The mean SET size was 16 mm (range 10 – 27 mm). EUS-FNB was technically feasible in all cases and no complications were observed. The diagnostic yield was 75 %. Core biopsy specimens were obtained in only 25 % of cases. Conclusion EUS-FNB with a 22-gauge core biopsy needle of small SETs can achieve a definite diagnosis in the majority of cases. However, because core samples cannot regularly be obtained, EUS-FNB seems not to be convincingly superior to standard EUS-FNA in this setting PMID:28299351

  6. Gastrointestinal cancers in inflammatory bowel disease: An update with emphasis on imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Barral, Matthias; Dohan, Anthony; Allez, Matthieu; Boudiaf, Mourad; Camus, Marine; Laurent, Valérie; Hoeffel, Christine; Soyer, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are associated with an increased risk of gastrointestinal cancers depending on the specific type of IBD, the extent of the disease and its location. Patients with IBD and extensive colonic involvement are at increased risk of colorectal cancer whereas patients with Crohn disease have an increased risk for small-bowel and anal carcinoma. These cancers preferentially develop on sites of longstanding inflammation. In regards to colon cancer, several key pathogenic events are involved, including chromosomal instability, microsatellite instability and hypermethylation. The risk for colon cancer in IBD patients correlates with longer disease duration, presence of sclerosing cholangitis, pancolitis, family history of colorectal cancer, early onset of the disease and severity of bowel inflammation. Identification of increased colorectal cancer risk in individual IBD patients has led to formal surveillance guidelines. Conversely, although an increased risk for other types of cancer has been well identified, no specific formal screening recommendations exist. Consequently, the role of the radiologist is crucial to alert the referring gastroenterologist when a patient with IBD presents with unusual imaging findings at either computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. This review provides an update on demographics, molecular, clinical and histopathological features of gastrointestinal cancers in IBD patients including colorectal carcinoma, small bowel adenocarcinoma, neuroendocrine tumors and anal carcinoma, along with a special emphasis on the current role of CT and MR imaging.

  7. Endoscopic findings using narrow-band imaging to distinguish between basal cell hyperplasia and carcinoma of the pharynx.

    PubMed

    Yagishita, Atsushi; Fujii, Satoshi; Yano, Tomonori; Kaneko, Kazuhiro

    2014-07-01

    Narrow-band imaging (NBI) has been reported to be useful for detecting superficial-type esophageal or head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), and in the present study we have used NBI to detect non-carcinomatous lesions, such as basal cell hyperplasia (BCH) accompanied by microvascular irregularities; these non-carcinomatous lesions were pathologically discriminated from squamous cell carcinoma of the pharynx. The aim of the present study was to clarify the endoscopic characteristics of BCH that contribute to the discrimination of superficial-type head and neck SCC (HNSCC). We examined the key endoscopic findings capable of distinguishing BCH from SCC using 26 BCH and 37 superficial-type SCC of the pharynx that had been pathologically diagnosed at our institution between January 2008 and July 2012. The clinicopathological factors were also compared. The size of the BCH lesions was significantly smaller (P < 0.001), and their intervascular transparency was more clearly observed (P < 0.001). Intra-epithelial papillary capillary loop (IPCL) shapes were less variable and monotonous (P < 0.001), and the distribution of the IPCL was more regular with an interval comparable to that of SCC (P < 0.001), although no significant differences in the sharpness of the lesion border, dilatation of IPCL and tortuosity of the IPCL were seen between the BCH and SCC lesions. This study revealed that BCH was an independent entity in terms of not only pathological findings, but also endoscopic findings observed using NBI, such as the regular distribution of IPCL and the preserved intervascular transparency.

  8. Outcome Measures of an Intracanal, Endoscopic Transforaminal Decompression Technique: Initial Findings from the MIS Prospective Registry

    PubMed Central

    Sclafani, Joseph A.; Raiszadeh, Kamshad; Laich, Dan; Shen, Jian; Bennett, Matthew; Blok, Robert; Liang, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    Background Minimally invasive transforaminal endoscopic procedures can achieve spinal decompression through either direct or indirect techniques. Subtle variations in trajectory of the surgical corridor can dictate access to the pathologic tissue. Two general strategies exist: the intradiscal “inside-out” technique and the extradiscal, intracanal (IC) technique. The IC technique utilizes a more lateral transforaminal approach than the intradiscal technique, which allows for a more direct decompression of the spinal canal. Objective This study is an assessment of IC patient outcome data obtained through analysis of a previously validated MIS Prospective Registry. Methods Post-hoc analysis was performed on the MIS Prospective Registry database containing 1032 patients. A subgroup of patients treated with the endoscopic IC technique was identified. Patient outcome measures after treatment of symptomatic disk herniation and neuroforaminal stenosis were evaluated. Results A total of 86 IC patients were analyzed. Overall, there was significant improvement in employment and walking tolerance as soon as 6 weeks post-op as well as significant one year VAS and ODI score improvement. Subanalysis of IC patients with two distinct primary diagnoses was performed. Group IC-1 (disc herniation) showed improvement in ODI and VAS back and leg outcomes at 1 year post-op. Group IC-2 (foraminal stenosis) showed VAS back and leg score improvement at one year post-op but did not demonstrate significant improvement in overall ODI outcome at any time point. The one year re-operation rate was 2% (1/40) for group IC-1 and 28% (5/18) for group IC-2. Conclusions The initial results of the MIS Registry IC subgroup show a significant clinical improvement when the technique is employed to treat patients with lumbar disc herniation. The treatment of foraminal stenosis can lead to improved short-term clinical outcome but is associated with a high re-operation rate at 1 year post-op. PMID

  9. Gastroduodenal Complications After Concurrent Chemoradiation Therapy in Patients With Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Endoscopic Findings and Risk Factors

    SciTech Connect

    Chon, Young Eun; Seong, Jinsil; Kim, Beom Kyung; Cha, Jihye; Kim, Seung Up; Park, Jun Yong; Ahn, Sang Hoon; Han, Kwang-Hyub; Chon, Chae Yoon; Shin, Sung Kwan; Kim, Do Young

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: Concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CCRT) is useful in advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), but little is known about radiation-induced gastroduodenal complications following therapy. To determine risk factors, we investigated the prevalence and patterns of gastroduodenal complications following CCRT using endoscopy. Methods and Materials: Enrolled in the study were 123 patients treated with CCRT for unresectable HCC between January 1998 and December 2005. Radiation-induced gastroduodenal complications were defined as radiation gastritis/duodenitis, radiation gastric/duodenal ulcer, or other gastroduodenal toxicity associated with radiation, based on Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE 3.0). Serious gastroduodenal complications were defined as events occurring within 12 months from completion of CCRT, those requiring prompt therapeutic intervention, or symptoms equivalent to Grade 3 or 4 radiation-related gastroduodenal toxicity, including nausea or vomiting, based on CTCAE 3.0. Results: A month after completion of CCRT, 65 (52.8%) patients displayed endoscopic evidence of radiation-induced gastroduodenal complications. Radiation gastric and duodenal ulcers were found in 32 (26.0%) and 20 (16.3%) patients, respectively; radiation gastritis and duodenitis were found in 50 (40.7%) and 42 (34.1%) patients, respectively. Radiation-related bleeding was observed in 13 patients (10.6%). Serious gastroduodenal complications occurred in 18 patients (14.6%) and were significantly more frequent in patients with liver cirrhosis than in those without cirrhosis (p = 0.043). There were no radiation-related deaths. Conclusions: Endoscopically detectable radiation-induced gastroduodenal complications were common in HCC following CCRT. Although serious complications were uncommon, the frequency was higher in patients with liver cirrhosis; thus, these patients should be closely monitored when receiving CCRT.

  10. Fabrication of a Micro-Fluid Gathering Tool for the Gastrointestinal Juice Sampling Function of a Versatile Capsular Endoscope

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Kyo-in; Lee, Sangmin; Cho, Dong-il Dan

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a micro-fluid gathering tool for a versatile capsular endoscope that employs a solid chemical propellant, azobisisobutyronitrile (AIBN). The proposed tool consists of a micro-heater, an AIBN matrix, a Venturi tube, a reservoir, an inlet, and an outlet. The micro-heater heats the AIBN matrix to be decomposed into by-products and nitrogen gas. This nitrogen gas generates negative pressure passing through the Venturi tube. The generated negative pressure inhales a target fluid from around the inlet into the reservoir. All the parts are designed to be embedded inside a cylindrical shape with a diameter of 17 mm and a height of 2.3 mm in order to integrate it into a versatile developmental capsular endoscope without any scaledown. Two sets of the proposed tools are fabricated and tested: one is made of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and the other is made of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA). In performance comparisons, the PDMS gathering tool can withstand a stronger pulling force, and the PMMA gathering tool requires a less negative pressure for inhaling the same target fluid. Due to the instant and full activation of the thin AIBN matrix, both types of gathering tool show analogous performance in the sample gathering evaluation. The gathered volume is approximately 1.57 μL using approximately 25.4 μL of AIBN compound. PMID:22163997

  11. State of the art in advanced endoscopic imaging for the detection and evaluation of dysplasia and early cancer of the gastrointestinal tract

    PubMed Central

    Coda, Sergio; Thillainayagam, Andrew V

    2014-01-01

    Ideally, endoscopists should be able to detect, characterize, and confirm the nature of a lesion at the bedside, minimizing uncertainties and targeting biopsies and resections only where necessary. However, under conventional white-light inspection – at present, the sole established technique available to most of humanity – premalignant conditions and early cancers can frequently escape detection. In recent years, a range of innovative techniques have entered the endoscopic arena due to their ability to enhance the contrast of diseased tissue regions beyond what is inherently possible with standard white-light endoscopy equipment. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of the state-of-the-art advanced endoscopic imaging techniques available for clinical use that are impacting the way precancerous and neoplastic lesions of the gastrointestinal tract are currently detected and characterized at endoscopy. The basic instrumentation and the physics behind each method, followed by the most influential clinical experience, are described. High-definition endoscopy, with or without optical magnification, has contributed to higher detection rates compared with white-light endoscopy alone and has now replaced ordinary equipment in daily practice. Contrast-enhancement techniques, whether dye-based or computed, have been combined with white-light endoscopy to further improve its accuracy, but histology is still required to clarify the diagnosis. Optical microscopy techniques such as confocal laser endomicroscopy and endocytoscopy enable in vivo histology during endoscopy; however, although of invaluable assistance for tissue characterization, they have not yet made transition between research and clinical use. It is still unknown which approach or combination of techniques offers the best potential. The optimal method will entail the ability to survey wide areas of tissue in concert with the ability to obtain the degree of detailed information provided by

  12. Gastrointestinal endoscopy in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Savas, Nurten

    2014-11-07

    Gastrointestinal endoscopy has a major diagnostic and therapeutic role in most gastrointestinal disorders; however, limited information is available about clinical efficacy and safety in pregnant patients. The major risks of endoscopy during pregnancy include potential harm to the fetus because of hypoxia, premature labor, trauma and teratogenesis. In some cases, endoscopic procedures may be postponed until after delivery. When emergency or urgent indications are present, endoscopic procedures may be considered with some precautions. United States Food and Drug Administration category B drugs may be used in low doses. Endoscopic procedures during pregnancy may include upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy, sigmoidoscopy, colonoscopy, enteroscopy of the small bowel or video capsule endoscopy, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography and endoscopic ultrasonography. All gastrointestinal endoscopic procedures in pregnant patients should be performed in hospitals by expert endoscopists and an obstetrician should be informed about all endoscopic procedures. The endoscopy and flexible sigmoidoscopy may be safe for the fetus and pregnant patient, and may be performed during pregnancy when strong indications are present. Colonoscopy for pregnant patients may be considered for strong indications during the second trimester. Although therapeutic endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography may be considered during pregnancy, this procedure should be performed only for strong indications and attempts should be made to minimize radiation exposure.

  13. Gastrointestinal endoscopy in pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Savas, Nurten

    2014-01-01

    Gastrointestinal endoscopy has a major diagnostic and therapeutic role in most gastrointestinal disorders; however, limited information is available about clinical efficacy and safety in pregnant patients. The major risks of endoscopy during pregnancy include potential harm to the fetus because of hypoxia, premature labor, trauma and teratogenesis. In some cases, endoscopic procedures may be postponed until after delivery. When emergency or urgent indications are present, endoscopic procedures may be considered with some precautions. United States Food and Drug Administration category B drugs may be used in low doses. Endoscopic procedures during pregnancy may include upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy, sigmoidoscopy, colonoscopy, enteroscopy of the small bowel or video capsule endoscopy, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography and endoscopic ultrasonography. All gastrointestinal endoscopic procedures in pregnant patients should be performed in hospitals by expert endoscopists and an obstetrician should be informed about all endoscopic procedures. The endoscopy and flexible sigmoidoscopy may be safe for the fetus and pregnant patient, and may be performed during pregnancy when strong indications are present. Colonoscopy for pregnant patients may be considered for strong indications during the second trimester. Although therapeutic endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography may be considered during pregnancy, this procedure should be performed only for strong indications and attempts should be made to minimize radiation exposure. PMID:25386072

  14. [Endoscopic surgery].

    PubMed

    Rushfeldt, Christian; Pham, Khanh Do-Cong; Aabakken, Lars

    2016-05-01

    Endoscopic surgery of the stomach/gastrointestinal tract was developed in the 1990s in Japan as a minimally invasive method of removing early-stage tumours, using a gastro-/coloscope instead of open or laparoscopic surgery. Its advantages are obvious, in that the patient is spared more major surgery, the hospital saves on resources as well as admission to a ward, and society is spared the costs of days of sickness absence. Endoscopic submucosal dissection is considered the most difficult technique, but it allows for the accurate dissection of large tumours. In 1999, Japanese surgeon Takuji Gotoda and his team were the first to perform these types of dissections of early cancers in the rectum using a diathermic needle and a flexible scope.

  15. Endoscopic submucosal tunnel dissection of upper gastrointestinal submucosal tumors: A comparative study of hook knife vs hybrid knife

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jie-Qiong; Tang, Xiao-Wei; Ren, Yu-Tang; Wei, Zheng-Jie; Huang, Si-Lin; Gao, Qiao-Ping; Zhang, Xiao-Feng; Yang, Jian-Feng; Gong, Wei; Jiang, Bo

    2017-01-01

    AIM To compare the efficacy and safety of a hook knife (HO) with a hybrid knife (HK) during endoscopic submucosal tunnel dissection (ESTD) procedure. METHODS Between August 2012 and December 2015, the ESTD procedure was performed for 83 upper GI submucosal lesions, which originated from the muscularis propria layer identified by upper endoscopy and endoscopic ultrasonography. Of these, 34 lesions were treated by a HO, whereas 49 lesions were treated by a HK. Data regarding age, gender, presenting symptoms, tumor location and size, procedure time, complications, en bloc resection rate and others were analyzed and compared between the two groups. RESULTS There were no significant differences in the age, gender, presenting symptoms and tumor location between the two groups. ESTD was successfully completed in all the patients, and no case was converted to laparoscopy. The mean procedure time was significantly shorter in the HK group than in the HO group (41.3 ± 20.3 min vs 57.2 ± 28.0 min, P = 0.004). The mean frequency of device exchange was 1.4 ± 0.6 in the HK group and significantly less than 3.3 ± 0.6 in the HO group (P < 0.001). The differences in tumor size and histopathological diagnoses were not significant between the two groups (P = 0.813, P = 0.363, respectively). Both groups had an equal en bloc resection rate and complete resection rate. Additionally, the complication rate was similar between the two groups (P = 0.901). During the follow-up, no recurrence occurred in either group. CONCLUSION We demonstrate for the first time that HO and HK do not differ in efficacy or safety, but HK reduces the frequency of device exchange and procedure time. PMID:28348490

  16. Diagnostic imaging and endoscopic finding in dogs and cats with gastric tumors: a review.

    PubMed

    Terragni, R; Vignoli, M; van Bree, H J; Gaschen, L; Saunders, J H

    2014-12-01

    Medical imaging is an essential part of the diagnostic workup of many gastrointestinal disorders. This paper reviews imaging and endoscopy of gastric tumors in dogs and cats and the techniques used. The appearance of the normal as well as the various aspects of gastric tumors are described for these different modalities. Plain radiography is widely available but has limited diagnostic value. Contrast radiography has higher sensitivity but is laborious and time-consuming. Ultrasonography (if an adequate acoustic window is available), endosonography and endoscopy are the most appropriate modalities for diagnosing gastric tumors. They are especially useful when obtaining samples for cytologic or histopathologic examination, because the imaging modalities do not always differentiate between inflammatory or infectious conditions and neoplastic disorders. Hydro-helical CT was found helpful for evaluating the location and local invasiveness of the lesion. Ultrasonography and endoscopy are useful modalities for taking adequate biopsies.

  17. Specific Radiological Findings of Traumatic Gastrointestinal Tract Injuries in Patients With Blunt Chest and Abdominal Trauma.

    PubMed

    Kokabi, Nima; Harmouche, Elie; Xing, Minzhi; Shuaib, Waqas; Mittal, Pardeep K; Wilson, Kenneth; Johnson, Jamlik-Omari; Nicolaou, Savvas; Khosa, Faisal

    2015-05-01

    Gastrointestinal hollow viscus injury after blunt chest and abdominal trauma is uncommon and complicates 0.6%-1.2% of all cases of trauma. Early recognition of such injuries significantly decreases morbidity and mortality. Since physical examination is not accurate in detecting such injuries, contrast-enhanced computed tomography has been the mainstay for diagnosis in many emergency departments. This pictorial essay aims to review the incidence, mechanisms, and signs of gastrointestinal hollow viscus injuries in the setting of blunt chest and abdominal trauma.

  18. The impact of endoscopic ultrasound findings on clinical decision making in Barrett's esophagus with high-grade dysplasia or early esophageal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Bulsiewicz, W J; Dellon, E S; Rogers, A J; Pasricha, S; Madanick, R D; Grimm, I S; Shaheen, N J

    2014-07-01

    The clinical utility of endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) for staging patients with Barrett's esophagus and high-grade dysplasia (HGD) or intramucosal carcinoma (IMC) prior to endoscopic therapy is unclear. We performed a retrospective analysis of patients with HGD or IMC referred to an American medical center for endoscopic treatment between 2004 and 2010. All patients had pretreatment staging by EUS. We examined the frequency that EUS findings consistent with advanced disease (tumor invasion into the submucosa, lymph node involvement, or regional metastasis) led to a change in management. The analysis was stratified by nodularity and pre-EUS histology. We identified one hundred thirty-five patients with HGD (n = 106, 79%) or IMC (n = 29, 21%) had staging by EUS (79 non-nodular, 56 nodular). Pathologic lymph nodes or metastases were not found by EUS. There were no endosonographic abnormalities noted in any patient with non-nodular mucosa (0/79). Abnormal EUS findings were present in 8/56 patients (14%) with nodular neoplasia (five IMC, three HGD). Endoscopic mucosal resection was performed in 44 patients with a nodule, with 13% (6/44) having invasive cancer. In nodular neoplasia, the EUS and endoscopic mucosal resection were abnormal in 24% (5/21) and 40% (6/15) of those with IMC and 9% (3/35) and 0% (0/29) of those with HGD, respectively. In this study we found that EUS did not alter management in patients with non-nodular HGD or IMC. Because the diagnostic utility of EUS in subjects with non-nodular Barrett's esophagus is low, the value of performing endoscopic mucosal resection in this setting is questionable. For patients with nodular neoplasia, resection of the nodule with histological examination had greater utility than staging by EUS.

  19. Duodenal Lipoma as a Rare Cause of Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding.

    PubMed

    Ouwerkerk, Helga M; Raber; Freling, G; Klaase, J M

    2010-12-01

    A 52-year-old female was referred because of melaena. After initital work-up, including gastroduodenoscopy, endosonography and CT scan, a duodenotomy was performed. Definite diagnosis was a duodenal lipoma based on histological findings. Lipomas of the gastrointestinal tract are rare. Only 4% occur in the duodenum. The peak incidence is around the 5th and 7th decade of life, with a slight female preponderance. Gastrointestinal lipomas are usually asymptomatic, but can present with mild to severe gastrointestinal bleeding, intussusceptions, abdominal pain, constipation and diarrhea. Clinical, endoscopical, surgical, and radiological features are described in this case of duodenal lipoma.

  20. Duodenal Lipoma as a Rare Cause of Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Ouwerkerk, Helga M.; Raber; Freling, G.; Klaase, J.M.

    2010-01-01

    A 52-year-old female was referred because of melaena. After initital work-up, including gastroduodenoscopy, endosonography and CT scan, a duodenotomy was performed. Definite diagnosis was a duodenal lipoma based on histological findings. Lipomas of the gastrointestinal tract are rare. Only 4% occur in the duodenum. The peak incidence is around the 5th and 7th decade of life, with a slight female preponderance. Gastrointestinal lipomas are usually asymptomatic, but can present with mild to severe gastrointestinal bleeding, intussusceptions, abdominal pain, constipation and diarrhea. Clinical, endoscopical, surgical, and radiological features are described in this case of duodenal lipoma. PMID:27942311

  1. [Gastrointestinal bleeding].

    PubMed

    Lanas, Ángel

    2015-09-01

    In the Digestive Disease Week in 2015 there have been some new contributions in the field of gastrointestinal bleeding that deserve to be highlighted. Treatment of celecoxib with a proton pump inhibitor is safer than treatment with nonselective NSAID and a proton pump inhibitor in high risk gastrointestinal and cardiovascular patients who mostly also take acetylsalicylic acid. Several studies confirm the need to restart the antiplatelet or anticoagulant therapy at an early stage after a gastrointestinal hemorrhage. The need for urgent endoscopy before 6-12 h after the onset of upper gastrointestinal bleeding episode may be beneficial in patients with hemodynamic instability and high risk for comorbidity. It is confirmed that in Western but not in Japanese populations, gastrointestinal bleeding episodes admitted to hospital during weekend days are associated with a worse prognosis associated with delays in the clinical management of the events. The strategy of a restrictive policy on blood transfusions during an upper GI bleeding event has been challenged. Several studies have shown the benefit of identifying the bleeding vessel in non varicose underlying gastric lesions by Doppler ultrasound which allows direct endoscopic therapy in the patient with upper GI bleeding. Finally, it has been reported that lower gastrointestinal bleeding diverticula band ligation or hemoclipping are both safe and have the same long-term outcomes.

  2. Idiopathic non-hypertrophic pyloric stenosis in an infant successfully treated via endoscopic approach

    PubMed Central

    Karnsakul, Wikrom; Cannon, Mary L; Gillespie, Stacey; Vaughan, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Non-peptic, non-hypertrophic pyloric stenosis has rarely been reported in pediatric literature. Endoscopic pyloric balloon dilation has been shown to be a safe procedure in treating gastric outlet obstruction in older children and adults. Partial gastric outlet obstruction (GOO) was diagnosed in an infant by history and confirmed by an upper gastrointestinal series (UGI). Abdominal ultrasonography and computed tomography scan excluded idiopathic hypertrophic pyloric stenosis, abdominal tumors, gastrointestinal and hepato-biliary-pancreatic anomalies. Endoscopic findings showed a pinhole-sized pylorus and did not indicate peptic ulcer disease, Helicobacter pylori infection, antral web, or evidence of allergic and inflammatory bowel diseases. Three sessions of a step-wise endoscopic pyloric balloon dilation were conducted under general anesthesia and a fluoroscopy at two week intervals using catheter balloons (Boston Scientific Microvasive®, MA, USA) of increasing diameters. Repeat UGI after the first session revealed normal gastrointestinal transit and no intestinal obstruction. The patient tolerated solid food without any gastrointestinal symptoms since the first session. The endoscope was able to be passed through the pylorus after the last session. Although the etiology of GOO in this infant is unclear (proposed mechanisms are herein discussed), endoscopic pyloric balloon dilation was a safe procedure for treating this young infant with non-peptic, non-hypertrophic pyloric stenosis and should be considered as an initial approach before pyloroplasty in such presentations. PMID:21191516

  3. Endoscopic full-thickness resection: Current status

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Arthur; Meier, Benjamin; Caca, Karel

    2015-01-01

    Conventional endoscopic resection techniques such as endoscopic mucosal resection or endoscopic submucosal dissection are powerful tools for treatment of gastrointestinal neoplasms. However, those techniques are restricted to superficial layers of the gastrointestinal wall. Endoscopic full-thickness resection (EFTR) is an evolving technique, which is just about to enter clinical routine. It is not only a powerful tool for diagnostic tissue acquisition but also has the potential to spare surgical therapy in selected patients. This review will give an overview about current EFTR techniques and devices. PMID:26309354

  4. Mast cells, disease and gastrointestinal cancer: A comprehensive review of recent findings

    PubMed Central

    Hodges, Kyle; Kennedy, Lindsey; Meng, Fanyin; Alpini, Gianfranco; Francis, Heather

    2012-01-01

    Paul Ehrlich, a German scientist, discovered what is known as the mast cell in the late 1800’s, which has proven to be an important player in the immune system of vertebrates. Mast cells are ubiquitous throughout the tissues of the human body and play numerous roles, both beneficial and destructive. We know they are important in our army of immunity warrior cells, which defend us against viruses, bacteria and parasitic invaders. They are also very well known for the havoc they wreak, causing uncomfortable symptoms due to their release of histamine and other mediators which cause the all too familiar itching, sneezing, urticaria and rhinorrhea of allergic responses. Mast cell activities are diverse and include painful inflammatory reactions in autoimmune conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis. In the gastrointestinal system, mast cells are implicated in diverse actions such as increased gastric acid secretion, polyp formation and uncomfortable conditions such as Irritable Bowel Syndrome. The role of immunology and mast cells in these areas is intriguing but less well understood than their role in allergic responses. Because mast cells have been implicated in both physiologic as well as pathogenic processes, they have been the subjects of avid study. Review of the current literature on mast cell biology reveals that there are many studies of their presence within the tumor microenvironment and evidence, which supports mast cell influence on tumor angiogenesis, tumor invasion, and immune suppression. The studies reviewed in this article concentrate largely on mast cells in human GI malignancies. This review also provides background information regarding mast cells, such as their origination, their location within the body, how they are activated and how they function as mediators. PMID:22943044

  5. Poor agreement between endoscopists and gastrointestinal pathologists for the interpretation of probe-based confocal laser endomicroscopy findings

    PubMed Central

    Peter, Shajan; Council, Leona; Bang, Ji Young; Neumann, Helmut; Mönkemüller, Klaus; Varadarajulu, Shyam; Wilcox, Charles Melbern

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To compare the interpretation of probe-based confocal laser endomicroscopy (pCLE) findings between endoscopists and gastrointestinal (GI)-pathologists. METHODS: All pCLE procedures were undertaken and the endoscopist rendered assessment. The same pCLE videos were then viewed offline by an expert GI pathologist. Histopathology was considered the gold standard for definitive diagnosis. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for diagnosis of dysplastic/ neoplastic GI lesions and interobserver agreement between endoscopists and experienced gastrointestinal pathologist for pCLE findings were analyzed. RESULTS: Of the 66 included patients, 40 (60.6%) had lesions in the esophagus, 7 (10.6%) in the stomach, 15 (22.7%) in the biliary tract, 3 (4.5%) in the ampulla and 1 (1.5%) in the colon. The overall sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for diagnosing dysplastic/neoplastic lesions using pCLE were higher for endoscopists than pathologist at 87.0% vs 69.6%, 80.0% vs 40.0% and 84.8% vs 60.6% (P = 0.0003), respectively. Area under the ROC curve (AUC) was greater for endoscopists than the pathologist (0.83 vs 0.55, P = 0.0001). Overall agreement between endoscopists and pathologist was moderate for all GI lesions (K = 0.43; 95%CI: 0.26-0.61), luminal lesions (K = 0.40; 95%CI: 0.20-0.60) and those of dysplastic/neoplastic pathology (K = 0.55; 95%CI: 0.37-0.72), the agreement was poor for benign (K = 0.13; 95%CI: -0.097-0.36) and pancreaticobiliary lesions (K = 0.19; 95%CI: -0.26-0.63). CONCLUSION: There is a wide discrepancy in the interpretation of pCLE findings between endoscopists and pathologist, particularly for benign and malignant pancreaticobiliary lesions. Further studies are needed to identify the cause of this poor agreement. PMID:25548499

  6. Endoscopic management of adenomatous ampullary lesions

    PubMed Central

    Espinel, Jesús; Pinedo, Eugenia; Ojeda, Vanesa; del Rio, Maria Guerra

    2015-01-01

    Lesions of the ampulla of Vater represent an uncommon group of gastrointestinal malignancies. The majority of lesions of the ampulla of Vater are either adenomas or adenocarcinomas. Ampullary lesions are often incidental findings. Accurate preoperative diagnosis and staging of ampullary tumors is imperative for predicting prognosis and determining the most appropriate therapeutic approach. Endoscopic ampullectomy is a safe and efficacious therapeutic procedure that can obviate the need for potentially major surgical intervention. This review will provide the framework for the diagnosis and management of ampullary lesions from the perspective of the practicing gastroenterologist. Strategies for safe and successful endoscopic ampullectomy with a focus on accurate preoperative diagnosis and staging, resection technique, and management of complications are presented. PMID:26413485

  7. Endoscopic therapy in early adenocarcinomas (Barrett's cancer) of the esophagus.

    PubMed

    Knabe, Mate; May, Andrea; Ell, Christian

    2015-07-01

    The incidence of early esophageal adenocarcinoma has been increasing significantly in recent decades. Prognosis depends greatly on the choice of treatment. Early cancers can be treated by endoscopic resection, whereas advanced carcinomas have to be sent for surgery. Esophageal resection is associated with high perioperative mortality (1-5%) even in specialized centers. Early diagnosis enables curative endoscopic treatment option. Patients with gastrointestinal symptoms and a familial risk for esophageal cancer should undergo upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. High-definition endoscopes have been developed with technical add-on that helps endoscopists to find fine irregularities in the esophageal mucosa, but interpreting the findings remains challenging. In this review we discussed novel and old diagnostic procedures and their values, as well as our own recommendations and those of the authors discussed for the diagnosis and treatment of early Barrett's carcinoma. Endoscopic resection is the therapy of choice in early esophageal adenocarcinoma. It is mandatory to perform a subsequent ablation of all residual Barrett's mucosa to avoid metachronous lesions.

  8. Compromised ventilation caused by tracheoesophageal fistula and gastrointestinal endoscope undergoing removal of disk battery on esophagus in pediatric patient -A case report-.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyung-Woo; Kim, Ji Yeon; Kim, Jung Won; Park, Jang Su; Choe, Won Joo; Kim, Kyung-Tae; Lee, Sangil

    2011-09-01

    Ingestion of disk batteries may have serious complications such as esophageal burn, perforation, and tracheoesophageal fistula, particularly when the battery is caught in the esophagus. Proper placement of the tracheal tube is critical when tracheoesophageal fistula was occurred from esophageal impaction the battery. Endoscopy of upper gastrointestinal tract in infants and children is an important and effective tool for the diagnosis and treatment of foreign body ingestion. But upper gastrointestinal endoscopy in infant and children has very high risk of tracheal compression and airway compromise. We present a case of ventilatory compromise during insertion of the upper gastrointestinal endoscopy in 16-month-old child with tracheoesophageal fistula secondary to disk battery ingestion.

  9. Representing flexible endoscope shapes with hermite splines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Elvis C. S.; Fowler, Sharyle A.; Hookey, Lawrence C.; Ellis, Randy E.

    2010-02-01

    Navigation of a flexible endoscope is a challenging surgical task: the shape of the end effector of the endoscope, interacting with surrounding tissues, determine the surgical path along which the endoscope is pushed. We present a navigational system that visualized the shape of the flexible endoscope tube to assist gastrointestinal surgeons in performing Natural Orifice Translumenal Endoscopic Surgery (NOTES). The system used an electromagnetic positional tracker, a catheter embedded with multiple electromagnetic sensors, and graphical user interface for visualization. Hermite splines were used to interpret the position and direction outputs of the endoscope sensors. We conducted NOTES experiments on live swine involving 6 gastrointestinal and 6 general surgeons. Participants who used the device first were 14.2% faster than when not using the device. Participants who used the device second were 33.6% faster than the first session. The trend suggests that spline-based visualization is a promising adjunct during NOTES procedures.

  10. First-line endoscopic treatment with over-the-scope clips significantly improves the primary failure and rebleeding rates in high-risk gastrointestinal bleeding: A single-center experience with 100 cases

    PubMed Central

    Richter-Schrag, Hans-Jürgen; Glatz, Torben; Walker, Christine; Fischer, Andreas; Thimme, Robert

    2016-01-01

    AIM To evaluate rebleeding, primary failure (PF) and mortality of patients in whom over-the-scope clips (OTSCs) were used as first-line and second-line endoscopic treatment (FLET, SLET) of upper and lower gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB, LGIB). METHODS A retrospective analysis of a prospectively collected database identified all patients with UGIB and LGIB in a tertiary endoscopic referral center of the University of Freiburg, Germany, from 04-2012 to 05-2016 (n = 93) who underwent FLET and SLET with OTSCs. The complete Rockall risk scores were calculated from patients with UGIB. The scores were categorized as < or ≥ 7 and were compared with the original Rockall data. Differences between FLET and SLET were calculated. Univariate and multivariate analysis were performed to evaluate the factors that influenced rebleeding after OTSC placement. RESULTS Primary hemostasis and clinical success of bleeding lesions (without rebleeding) was achieved in 88/100 (88%) and 78/100 (78%), respectively. PF was significantly lower when OTSCs were applied as FLET compared to SLET (4.9% vs 23%, P = 0.008). In multivariate analysis, patients who had OTSC placement as SLET had a significantly higher rebleeding risk compared to those who had FLET (OR 5.3; P = 0.008). Patients with Rockall risk scores ≥ 7 had a significantly higher in-hospital mortality compared to those with scores < 7 (35% vs 10%, P = 0.034). No significant differences were observed in patients with scores < or ≥ 7 in rebleeding and rebleeding-associated mortality. CONCLUSION Our data show for the first time that FLET with OTSC might be the best predictor to successfully prevent rebleeding of gastrointestinal bleeding compared to SLET. The type of treatment determines the success of primary hemostasis or primary failure. PMID:27895403

  11. Blood thinners and gastrointestinal endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Monjur

    2016-01-01

    As the number of diagnostic and therapeutic gastrointestinal endoscopies is increasing, and there is an increase in number of patients taking blood thinners, we are seeing more and more patients on blood thinners prior to endoscopic procedures. Gastrointestinal bleeding or thromboembolism can occur in this category of patients in the periendoscopic period. To better manage these patients, endoscopists should have a clear concept about the various blood thinners in the market. Patients’ risk of thromboembolism off anticoagulation, and the risk of bleeding from endoscopic procedures should be assessed prior to endoscopy. The endoscopic procedure should be done when it is safe to do it. PMID:27668068

  12. Cecal Leiomyoma: Can We Attempt Endoscopic Resection?

    PubMed Central

    Badipatla, Kanthi Rekha; Kamireddy, Chandana; Niazi, Masooma; Nayudu, Suresh Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal leiomyomas are smooth muscle tumors arising from the muscularis mucosae, muscularis propriae and possibly from smooth muscle of the vessel wall. Management depends on the size, location and the clinical scenario. Endoscopic snare cauterization with or without saline lift has been described in literature for tumors involving the left colon. To the best of our knowledge, endoscopic resection of right colon leiomyoma was never attempted in the past. We present a case of cecal leiomyoma which was resected endoscopically. PMID:28058080

  13. Effects of chronic ethanol consumption on rat upper gastrointestinal system: functional and histologic findings.

    PubMed

    Yazir, Yusufhan; Tugay, Melih; Utkan, Zafer; Utkan, Tijen

    2012-11-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine the effect of chronic alcohol consumption on reactivity of esophageal tunica muscularis mucosae (TMM) and lower esophageal sphincter (LES) smooth muscle. Six male rats in alcohol-fed group received ethanol (7.2% v/v) in a modified liquid diet for 4 weeks. Two control groups were used; six rats in the standard diet-fed group received rat chow and water for 4 weeks. Six rats in sucrose-fed group were given sucrose and received a liquid diet. The smooth muscle reactivity of TMM and LES strips from ethanol-fed and control animals was evaluated in organ chambers. Also histologic study was undertaken to show effects of chronic alcohol consumption. Maximum contractile responses of TMM to KCl and carbachol were decreased in the ethanol-fed group compared to the control groups. Relaxant responses to serotonin were decreased in the ethanol-fed group compared to the control groups. In TMM, isoproterenol- and papaverine-induced relaxant responses were similar in the ethanol-fed and control groups. In LES smooth muscle, relaxant responses to papaverine or isoproterenol were similar in the control groups and the ethanol-fed group. There was no change in agonist potency among the groups. The relaxation response elicited by nicotine and sodium nitroprusside (SNP) or contractile response elicited by carbachol and 80 mM KCl was decreased with maximum responses and pD(2) values, in the ethanol-fed group compared to that of the control groups in LES. Decreased nNOS immunoreactivity in myenteric plexus was found in alcohol-exposed group compared to control groups. Our findings suggest that chronic alcohol consumption impairs relaxant and contractile responses of both TMM and LES smooth muscle and it may contribute to gastroesophageal reflux commonly seen after alcohol binges.

  14. Hepatic applications of endoscopic ultrasound: Current status and future directions.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Indu; Tang, Shou-Jiang; Vilmann, Andreas S; Menachery, John; Vilmann, Peter

    2015-11-28

    The diagnosis and staging of various gastrointestinal malignancies have been made possible with the use of endoscopic ultrasound, which is a relatively safe procedure. The field of endoscopic ultrasound is fast expanding due to advancements in therapeutic endoscopic ultrasound. Though various studies have established its role in gastrointestinal malignancies and pancreatic conditions, its potential in the field of hepatic lesions still remains vastly untapped. In this paper the authors attempt to review important and landmark trials, case series and case studies involving hepatic applications of endoscopic ultrasound, thus not only providing an overview of utilization of endoscopic ultrasound in various liver conditions but also speculating its future role.

  15. Hepatic applications of endoscopic ultrasound: Current status and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Indu; Tang, Shou-Jiang; Vilmann, Andreas S; Menachery, John; Vilmann, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The diagnosis and staging of various gastrointestinal malignancies have been made possible with the use of endoscopic ultrasound, which is a relatively safe procedure. The field of endoscopic ultrasound is fast expanding due to advancements in therapeutic endoscopic ultrasound. Though various studies have established its role in gastrointestinal malignancies and pancreatic conditions, its potential in the field of hepatic lesions still remains vastly untapped. In this paper the authors attempt to review important and landmark trials, case series and case studies involving hepatic applications of endoscopic ultrasound, thus not only providing an overview of utilization of endoscopic ultrasound in various liver conditions but also speculating its future role. PMID:26640331

  16. Endoscopic ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007646.htm Endoscopic ultrasound To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Endoscopic ultrasound is a type of imaging test. It is ...

  17. Endoscopic Optical Coherence Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chao; Fujimoto, James G.; Tsai, Tsung-Han; Mashimo, Hiroshi

    New gastrointestinal (GI) cancers are expected to affect more than 290,200 new patients and will cause more than 144,570 deaths in the United States in 2013 [1]. When detected and treated early, the 5-year survival rate for colorectal cancer increases by a factor of 1.4 [1]. For esophageal cancer, the rate increases by a factor of 2 [1]. The majority of GI cancers begin as small lesions that are difficult to identify with conventional endoscopy. With resolutions approaching that of histopathology, optical coherence tomography (OCT) is well suited for detecting the changes in tissue microstructure associated with early GI cancers. Since the lesions are not endoscopically apparent, however, it is necessary to survey a relatively large area of the GI tract. Tissue motion is another limiting factor in the GI tract; therefore, in vivo imaging must be performed at extremely high speeds. OCT imaging can be performed using fiber optics and miniaturized lens systems, enabling endoscopic OCT inside the human body in conjunction with conventional video endoscopy. An OCT probe can be inserted through the working channel of a standard endoscope, thus enabling depth-resolved imaging of tissue microstructure in the GI tract with micron-scale resolution simultaneously with the endoscopic view (Fig. 68.1).

  18. Management of gastrointestinal haemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, S; Watts, D; Kinnear, M

    2002-01-01

    A variety of endoscopic haemostatic techniques have enabled major advances in the management of not only bleeding peptic ulcers and bleeding varices, but also in a variety of bleeding lesions in the small intestine and in the colon. Indeed, the development and widespread implementation of endoscopic haemostasis has been one of the most important developments in clinical gastroenterology in the past two decades. An increasingly ageing cohort of patients with multiple co-morbidity are being treated and therefore improving the outcome of gastrointestinal bleeding continues to pose major challenges. PMID:11796865

  19. Therapeutic endoscopic ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Venkatachalapathy, Suresh; Nayar, Manu K

    2017-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) is now firmly established as one of the essential tools for diagnosis in most gastrointestinal MDTs across the UK. However, the ability to provide therapy with EUS has resulted in a significant impact on the management of the patients. These include drainage of peripancreatic collections, EUS-guided endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatogram, EUS-guided coeliac plexus blocks, etc. The rapid development of this area in endoscopy is a combination of newer tools and increasing expertise by endosonographers to push the boundaries of intervention with EUS. However, the indications are limited and we are at the start of the learning curve for these high-risk procedures. These therapies should, therefore, be confined to centres with a robust multidisciplinary team, including interventional endoscopists, radiologists and surgeons. PMID:28261439

  20. Gastrointestinal endoscopy: infection and disinfection.

    PubMed Central

    O'Connor, H J; Axon, A T

    1983-01-01

    The past decade has seen the development of an array of complex flexible fibreoptic instruments for gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy, and an increasing use of these for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. It has been recognised more recently that the use of contaminated endoscopic equipment can lead to serious and occasionally fatal infections. Infection with a wide variety of micro-organisms has been reported following oesophago-gastroduodenoscopy (OGD) and endoscopic retrograde cholangio-pancreatography (ERCP). PMID:6414894

  1. Treatment of Gastrointestinal Bleeding in a Probable Case of Cerebroretinal Microangiopathy with Calcifications and Cysts

    PubMed Central

    Briggs, T.A.; Hubbard, M.; Hawkins, C.; Cole, T.; Livingston, J.H.; Crow, Y.J.; Pigott, A.

    2011-01-01

    Cerebroretinal microangiopathy with calcifications and cysts (CRMCC) is a highly pleiotropic disorder, particularly affecting the eye, brain, bone, and gut. The potential catastrophic sequelae of the associated gastrointestinal phenotype, variably characterised by both chronic bleeding and liver failure, is becoming increasingly apparent. Here we report a probable case of CRMCC with pre- and postnatal growth restriction, bilateral exudative retinopathy, a pathognomonic pattern of intracranial calcification, white matter disease, osteopenia with a tendency to fractures, and chronic gastrointestinal bleeding secondary to abnormal dilated vasculature. The gastrointestinal endoscopic findings were characteristic of gastric antral vascular ectasia (GAVE). Treatment with a combination of oral oestrogen and progesterone ameliorated the gastrointestinal blood loss such that monthly blood transfusions could be stopped. The benefit of this relatively benign therapy in managing the potentially life-limiting consequences of an abnormal gastrointestinal vasculature in CRMCC is of great interest. PMID:21373254

  2. Potential capacity of endoscopic screening for gastric cancer in Japan.

    PubMed

    Hamashima, Chisato; Goto, Rei

    2017-01-01

    In 2016, the Japanese government decided to introduce endoscopic screening for gastric cancer as a national program. To provide endoscopic screening nationwide, we estimated the proportion of increase in the number of endoscopic examinations with the introduction of endoscopic screening, based on a national survey. The total number of endoscopic examinations has increased, particularly in clinics. Based on the national survey, the total number of participants in gastric cancer screening was 3 784 967. If 30% of the participants are switched from radiographic screening to endoscopic screening, approximately 1 million additional endoscopic examinations are needed. In Japan, the participation rates in gastric cancer screening and the number of hospitals and clinics offering upper gastrointestinal endoscopy vary among the 47 prefectures. If the participation rates are high and the numbers of hospitals and clinics are small, the proportion of increase becomes larger. Based on the same assumption, 50% of big cities can provide endoscopic screening with a 5% increase in the total number of endoscopic examinations. However, 16.7% of the medical districts are available for endoscopic screening within a 5% increase in the total number of endoscopic examinations. Despite the Japanese government's decision to introduce endoscopic screening for gastric cancer nationwide, its immediate introduction remains difficult because of insufficient medical resources in rural areas. This implies that endoscopic screening will be initially introduced to big cities. To promote endoscopic screening for gastric cancer nationwide, the disparity of medical resources must first be resolved.

  3. EVALUATION OF UPPER GASTROINTESTINAL ENDOSCOPY IN PATIENTS UNDERGOING BARIATRIC SURGERY

    PubMed Central

    ASSEF, Maurício Saab; MELO, Tiago Torres; ARAKI, Osvaldo; MARIONI, Fábio

    2015-01-01

    Background: Obesity has become epidemic, and is associated with greater morbidity and mortality. Treatment is multidisciplinary. Surgical treatment is a consistent resource in severe obesity. The indication of preoperative upper gastrointestinal endoscopy in asymptomatic patients is controversial; however, most studies recommend its implementation in all patients. Aim: To analyze endoscopic performance in patients who were in preoperative for bariatric surgery and compare them with control group. Method: A series of 35 obese patients in preoperative period for bariatric surgery compared with a control group of 30 patients submitted to upper endoscopy. There were analyzed clinical and endoscopic data. Results: The mean age of the group of patients was 43.54 years. Most individuals in the group of patients were female with median BMI of 47.26kg/m2and in control group 24.21 kg/m2. The majority of patients were asymptomatic. Upper endoscopy was altered in 81.25% of asymptomatic patients. Endoscopic findings in the patient group were 57.1% resulting from peptic ulcer disease and 34.3% associated with GERD. The analysis of endoscopic findings in patients showed no significant difference in relation of the control group. The prevalence of H. pylori infection was 60% in patients. Conclusion: It is recommended that the upper endoscopy should be made in all patients in the preoperative bariatric surgery period, although the degree of obesity is not related to a greater number of endoscopic findings. Obese patients do not have more endoscopic findings that non-obese individuals. PMID:26537272

  4. [Gastrointestinal tract volvulus: diagnosis and correlation between plain-film X-ray and multidetector computed tomography findings].

    PubMed

    Ibáñez Sanz, L; Borruel Nacenta, S; Cano Alonso, R; Díez Martínez, P; Navallas Irujo, M

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal volvuli cause processes that manifest as acute abdomen. Volvuli are important not because they are common, but rather because their possible complications can be severe. All types of volvuli share a common pathophysiology, which consists of intestinal obstruction in a closed loop that results in ischemia. The clinical manifestations are nonspecific, so radiologists play a very important role in the early identification of the most common signs of torsion. These include the "bird's beak sign", the "whirlpool sign", and signs of potentially reversible or irreversible ischemia. The treatment of choice in most cases is surgery, either to correct the torsion and save the organ or to resect it if it is necrotic.

  5. A Case with Serrated Polyposis Syndrome Controlled by Multiple Applications of Endoscopic Mucosal Resection and Endoscopic Submucosal Dissection

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Daisuke; Matsumoto, Satohiro; Mashima, Hirosato

    2017-01-01

    Patient: Male, 66 Final Diagnosis: Serrated polyposis syndrome Symptoms: Positive fecal occult blood test Medication: — Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Gastroenterology and Hepatology Objective: Unusual setting of medical care Background: Serrated polyposis syndrome (SPS) is characterized by numerous hyperplastic polyps and sessile serrated adenoma/polyp (SSA/P) in the large intestine. SSA/P is known to transform into malignant lesions through the serrated pathway instead of the adenoma-carcinoma sequence. Early diagnosis with lower gastrointestinal endoscopy and early treatment are now considered to be essential. Case Report: We had an experience with a case of SPS to which endoscopic treatment was applied in multiple sessions. Endoscopic treatment was performed for 16 lesions in total, and the pathological findings were SSA/P for 15 and adenoma for the other lesion. We intend to continue performing endoscopic surveillance for any newly developing lesions. Conclusions: SPS has a potential for malignant transformation, and issues, such as long-term prognosis and optimal therapeutic strategies, await resolution. However, multiple endoscopic treatments are useful for cases with lesions that are controllable employing this modality. PMID:28341823

  6. Upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage caused by superwarfarin poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Shu-Lei; Li, Peng; Ji, Ming; Zong, Ye; Zhang, Shu-Tian

    2010-01-01

    Superwarfarins are a class of rodenticides. Gastrointestinal hemorrhage is a fatal complication of superwarfarin poisoning, requiring immediate treatment. Here, we report a 55-year-old woman with tardive upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage caused by superwarfarin poisoning after endoscopic cold mucosal biopsy. PMID:20355251

  7. Endoscopic laser therapy in gastroenterology.

    PubMed

    Pritikin, J; Weinman, D; Harmatz, A; Young, H

    1992-07-01

    Endoscopic laser therapy has become an important and widely used tool in gastroenterology. It has become important for outpatient palliative therapy for ablating obstructing gastrointestinal neoplasms. This method has often circumvented the need for major palliative surgical resections. Caution must be applied to laser therapy for potentially curable malignant neoplasms because, with vaporization of the target tissue, no tissue specimen is available to assure that local or invasive residual carcinoma is excluded. Therefore, in good surgical candidates, surgical resection of potentially curable cancers is always recommended. In the future, however, the combination of refined endoscopic ultrasonography and laser fluorescence techniques may lead to earlier detection, more precise localization, and even curative ablation of gastrointestinal malignancy.

  8. Endoscopic laser therapy in gastroenterology.

    PubMed Central

    Pritikin, J; Weinman, D; Harmatz, A; Young, H

    1992-01-01

    Endoscopic laser therapy has become an important and widely used tool in gastroenterology. It has become important for outpatient palliative therapy for ablating obstructing gastrointestinal neoplasms. This method has often circumvented the need for major palliative surgical resections. Caution must be applied to laser therapy for potentially curable malignant neoplasms because, with vaporization of the target tissue, no tissue specimen is available to assure that local or invasive residual carcinoma is excluded. Therefore, in good surgical candidates, surgical resection of potentially curable cancers is always recommended. In the future, however, the combination of refined endoscopic ultrasonography and laser fluorescence techniques may lead to earlier detection, more precise localization, and even curative ablation of gastrointestinal malignancy. Images PMID:1413743

  9. Catheter-based photoacoustic endoscope

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Joon-Mo; Li, Chiye; Chen, Ruimin; Zhou, Qifa; Shung, K. Kirk; Wang, Lihong V.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. We report a flexible shaft-based mechanical scanning photoacoustic endoscopy (PAE) system that can be potentially used for imaging the human gastrointestinal tract via the instrument channel of a clinical video endoscope. The development of such a catheter endoscope has been an important challenge to realize the technique’s benefits in clinical settings. We successfully implemented a prototype PAE system that has a 3.2-mm diameter and 2.5-m long catheter section. As the instrument’s flexible shaft and scanning tip are fully encapsulated in a plastic catheter, it easily fits within the 3.7-mm diameter instrument channel of a clinical video endoscope. Here, we demonstrate the intra-instrument channel workability and in vivo animal imaging capability of the PAE system. PMID:24887743

  10. Catheter-based photoacoustic endoscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Joon-Mo; Li, Chiye; Chen, Ruimin; Zhou, Qifa; Shung, K. Kirk; Wang, Lihong V.

    2014-06-01

    We report a flexible shaft-based mechanical scanning photoacoustic endoscopy (PAE) system that can be potentially used for imaging the human gastrointestinal tract via the instrument channel of a clinical video endoscope. The development of such a catheter endoscope has been an important challenge to realize the technique's benefits in clinical settings. We successfully implemented a prototype PAE system that has a 3.2-mm diameter and 2.5-m long catheter section. As the instrument's flexible shaft and scanning tip are fully encapsulated in a plastic catheter, it easily fits within the 3.7-mm diameter instrument channel of a clinical video endoscope. Here, we demonstrate the intra-instrument channel workability and in vivo animal imaging capability of the PAE system.

  11. Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy following previous abdominal surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Stellato, T A; Gauderer, M W; Ponsky, J L

    1984-01-01

    During a 36-month period, 89 patients have undergone percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy without mortality. Of these patients, 25 (13 infants and children, 12 adults) had prior abdominal procedures that increased their risk for the endoscopic procedure. With two exceptions, all gastrostomies were performed utilizing local anesthesia. There was one major complication, a gastrocolic fistula, which was successfully managed by repeating the endoscopic gastrostomy procedure at a location more cephalad in the stomach. Twenty-two of the gastrostomies were placed for feeding purposes and all of these patients were able to leave the hospital with alimentation accomplished via the tube. Three of the endoscopically placed gastrostomies were for gastrointestinal tract decompression. A total of 255 patient months have been accumulated in these patients with the endoscopically placed gastrostomy in situ. The technique can be safely performed in patients with prior abdominal surgery and in the majority of cases is the technique of choice for establishing a tube gastrostomy. PMID:6428334

  12. Endoscopic Management of Peptic Ulcer Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Joon Sung; Park, Sung Min

    2015-01-01

    Acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding is a common medical emergency around the world and the major cause is peptic ulcer bleeding. Endoscopic treatment is fundamental for the management of peptic ulcer bleeding. Despite recent advances in endoscopic treatment, mortality from peptic ulcer bleeding has still remained high. This is because the disease often occurs in elderly patients with frequent comorbidities and are taking ulcerogenic medications. Therefore, the management of peptic ulcer bleeding is still a challenge for clinicians. This article reviews the various endoscopic methods available for management of peptic ulcer bleeding and the techniques in using these methods. PMID:25844337

  13. Endoscopic management of peptic ulcer bleeding.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joon Sung; Park, Sung Min; Kim, Byung-Wook

    2015-03-01

    Acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding is a common medical emergency around the world and the major cause is peptic ulcer bleeding. Endoscopic treatment is fundamental for the management of peptic ulcer bleeding. Despite recent advances in endoscopic treatment, mortality from peptic ulcer bleeding has still remained high. This is because the disease often occurs in elderly patients with frequent comorbidities and are taking ulcerogenic medications. Therefore, the management of peptic ulcer bleeding is still a challenge for clinicians. This article reviews the various endoscopic methods available for management of peptic ulcer bleeding and the techniques in using these methods.

  14. Immediate detection of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography-related periampullary perforation: Fluoroscopy or endoscopy?

    PubMed Central

    Motomura, Yasuaki; Akahoshi, Kazuya; Gibo, Junya; Kanayama, Kenji; Fukuda, Shinichiro; Hamada, Shouhei; Otsuka, Yoshihiro; Kubokawa, Masaru; Kajiyama, Kiyoshi; Nakamura, Kazuhiko

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the causes and intraoperative detection of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP)-related perforations to support immediate or early diagnosis. METHODS: Consecutive patients who underwent ERCP procedures at our hospital between January 2008 and June 2013 were retrospectively enrolled in the study (n = 2674). All procedures had been carried out using digital fluoroscopic assistance with the patient under conscious sedation. For patients showing alterations in the gastrointestinal anatomy, a short-type double balloon enteroscope had been applied. Cases of perforation had been identified by the presence of air in or leakage of contrast medium into the retroperitoneal space, or upon endoscopic detection of an abdominal cavity related to the perforated lumen. For patients with ERCP-related perforations, the data on medical history, endoscopic findings, radiologic findings, diagnostic methods, management, and clinical outcomes were used for descriptive analysis. RESULTS: Of the 2674 ERCP procedures performed during the 71-mo study period, only six (0.22%) resulted in perforations (male/female, 2/4; median age: 84 years; age range: 57-97 years). The cases included an endoscope-related duodenal perforation, two periampullary perforations related to endoscopic sphincterotomy, two periampullary perforations related to endoscopic papillary balloon dilation, and a periampullary or bile duct perforation secondary to endoscopic instrument trauma. No cases of guidewire-related perforation occurred. The video endoscope system employed in all procedures was only able to immediately detect the endoscope-related perforation; the other five perforation cases were all detected by subsequent digital fluoroscope applied intraoperatively (at a median post-ERCP intervention time of 15 min). Three out of the six total perforation cases, including the single case of endoscope-related duodenal injury, were surgically treated; the remaining three cases were

  15. Gastrointestinal Stent Update

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The use of self-expanding metallic stents in the upper gastrointestinal tract, placed under radiologic imaging or endoscopic guidance, is the current treatment of choice for the palliation of malignant gastrointestinal outlet obstructions. Advances in metallic stent design and delivery systems have progressed to the stage where this treatment is now considered a minimally invasive therapy. Metallic stent placement will broaden further into the field of nonsurgical therapy for the gastrointestinal tract. To date, metallic stents placed in the esophagus, gastric outlet, colorectum, and bile ducts are not intended to be curative, but rather to provide a palliative treatment for obstructions. The evolution of metallic stent technology will render such procedures not only palliative but also therapeutic, by enabling local drug delivery, and the use of biodegradable materials will reduce procedure-related complications. PMID:21103290

  16. Gastrointestinal Pyogenic Granuloma (Lobular Capillary Hemangioma): An Underrecognized Entity Causing Iron Deficiency Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Kamal, Umar M.; Hammami, Muhammad B.; Taylor, Jason R.; Omran, M. Louay; Chen, Yongxin; Lai, Jin-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Pyogenic granuloma (PG), more accurately known as lobular capillary hemangioma, is a benign vascular tumor that usually occurs in the skin or oral mucosa. This lesion is rarely reported in the gastrointestinal tract but is known to bleed if not resected. We herein describe a case series with the clinical, endoscopic, and histologic findings of four cases of gastrointestinal PG at our institution. In addition, we provide a review of the literature and summation of all reported cases of PG specific to the gastrointestinal tract. Based on our experience, we suggest that the actual incidence of gastrointestinal PG may in fact be higher than reported because PG can be unrecognized or improperly diagnosed. It is important for the clinician to properly recognize this lesion as a source of anemia and its propensity to bleed during biopsy or resection. PMID:27403353

  17. Evaluation of two Iranian domestic ovine breeds for their pathological findings to gastrointestinal infection of Haemonchus contortus.

    PubMed

    Javanbakht, Javad; Hosseini, Ehsan; Mousavi, Shadi; Hassan, Mehdi Aghamohammad; Salehzadeh Kazeroni, Simin; Khaki, Fariba; Fattahi, Rooholla; Jani, Meysam; Alimohammadi, Samad

    2014-09-01

    The generally warm, moist environmental conditions in the Northwestern Iran are ideal for survival and growth of the egg and larval stages of Haemonchus contortus and other gastrointestinal nematodes (GIN) of sheep and goats.A total of 2,421 animals were slaughtered and examined from July 2010 to July 2011 in Urmia abattoir. In case of sheep, 225 out of 2,421 were positive and prevalence of H. contortus infestation was 9.3 %. Sex wise prevalence of H. contortus in sheep was 33.08 % (76/229) in male and 66.22 % (149/225) in female. The females indicated significantly (P < 0.05) higher prevalence (66.22 %) as compared to males (33.08 %). The highest prevalence was recorded in the spring (April) and the lowest was in summer (July), respectively. On microscopic examination, infiltration of mononuclear cells and eosinophils in gastric glands, periglandular hyperemia and hemorrhage, mucous gland hyperplasia, connective tissue proliferation and necrosis was observed. Also, in mixed abomasal infection with Haemonchus and Ostertagia species, mucosal hyperplasia and increased mucous glands and sometimes cystic glands were seen. Statistical analysis using SPSS software, and Chi-square test, demonstrated a non-significant difference between ages and abomasal PH values of infected and healthy sheep (P < 0.05). But the difference between sexes, seasons and abomasal lesions was significant (P > 0.05).

  18. Endoscopic calcaneoplasty.

    PubMed

    Jerosch, Joerg

    2015-03-01

    Opinions differ regarding the surgical treatment of posterior calcaneal exostosis. After failure of conservative treatment, open surgical bursectomy and resection of the calcaneal prominence is indicated by many investigators. Clinical studies have shown high rates of unsatisfactory results and complications. Endoscopic calcaneoplasty (ECP) is a minimally invasive surgical option that can avoid some of these obstacles. ECP is an effective procedure for the treatment of patients with posterior calcaneal exostosis. The endoscopic exposure is superior to the open technique and has less morbidity, less operating time, fewer complications, and the disorders can be better differentiated.

  19. Eosinophilic disorders of the gastro-intestinal tract: an update.

    PubMed

    Ridolo, Erminia; Melli, Valerie; De' Angelis, Gianluigi; Martignago, Irene

    2016-01-01

    Eosinophilic diseases of the gastrointestinal tract, including eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) and eosinophilic gastroenteritis (EGE), are rare chronic pathologies of the digestive system, with an immuno-mediated pathogenesis. Recent data suggest that, together with the "classic" IgE-response to allergens, also a delayed hypersensitivity mechanism could be involved in the development of eosinophilic disorders. EoE and EGE were studied only in the latest decades and as a consequence accurate data are not yet available, concerning not only pathogenesis, but also epidemiology, treatment and outcomes. The diagnosis of EoE is centered on endoscopic findings but the certainty is obtained by histological examination from biopsy samples, that has a sensitivity of 100% when based on five samples. The currently available treatments include topical corticosteroids, specific diets and endoscopic treatment. Concerning EGE, three subtypes (mucosal, muscular, and serosal) were identified. The diagnosis is based, as for EoE, on endoscopic and histological assessment, and the treatment includes pharmacological and dietetic approaches. Further studies are warranted in order to better define the etiology and pathogenesis of eosinophilic diseases of the gastrointestinal tract, and thus to develop more appropriate and specific therapies.

  20. Massive lower gastrointestinal bleeding associated with solitary rectal ulcer in a patient with Behçet's disease.

    PubMed

    Bes, C; Dağlı, Ü; Yılmaz, F; Soy, M

    2015-09-16

    Solitary rectal ulcer syndrome is a rare benign disorder that has a wide range of clinical presentations and variable endoscopic findings which makes it difficult to diagnose and treat. The clinical and endoscopic picture in this condition can also mimic malign ulceration, malignancy or Crohn's disease. Behçet's disease can affect the gastrointestinal tract. However to the best of our knowledge, no case with solitary rectal ulceration has been reported so far in literature. We herein present a patient diagnosed with Behçet's disease admitted to our clinic with rectal bleeding due to solitary rectal ulceration.

  1. FECAL CALPROTECTIN AND GASTROINTESTINAL (GI) PERMEABILITY CORRELATE WITH DISEASE ACTIVITY INDEX, AND HISTOLOGIC, ENDOSCOPIC, AND RADIOLOGIC FINDINGS IN CHILDREN WITH CROHN DISEASE (CD)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fecal calprotectin and permeability are noninvasive measures of GI inflammation and damage, respectively. However, there are scant data as to the possible association between the tests and CD disease activity in children. We hypothesized that levels of fecal calprotectin and permeability would corre...

  2. Ultrahigh-resolution endoscopic optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu; Herz, Paul R.; Hsiung, Pei-Lin; Aguirre, Aaron D.; Mashimo, Hiroshi; Desai, Saleem; Pedrosa, Macos; Koski, Amanda; Schmitt, Joseph M.; Fujimoto, James G.

    2005-01-01

    Early detection of gastrointestinal cancer is essential for the patient treatment and medical care. Endoscopically guided biopsy is currently the gold standard for the diagnosis of early esophageal cancer, but can suffer from high false negative rates due to sampling errors. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an emerging medical imaging technology which can generate high resolution, cross-sectional images of tissue in situ and in real time, without the removal of tissue specimen. Although endoscopic OCT has been used successfully to identify certain pathologies in the gastrointestinal tract, the resolution of current endoscopic OCT systems has been limited to 10 - 15 m for clinical procedures. In this study, in vivo imaging of the gastrointestinal tract is demonstrated at a three-fold higher resolution (< 5 m), using a portable, broadband, Cr4+:Forsterite laser as the optical light source. Images acquired from the esophagus, gastro-esophageal junction and colon on animal model display tissue microstructures and architectural details at high resolution, and the features observed in the OCT images are well-matched with histology. The clinical feasibility study is conducted through delivering OCT imaging catheter using standard endoscope. OCT images of normal esophagus, Barrett's esophagus, and esophageal cancers are demonstrated with distinct features. The ability of high resolution endoscopic OCT to image tissue morphology at an unprecedented resolution in vivo would facilitate the development of OCT as a potential imaging modality for early detection of neoplastic changes.

  3. Catheter-based photoacoustic endoscope for use in the instrument channel of a clinical video endoscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Joon-Mo; Li, Chiye; Chen, Ruimin; Zhou, Qifa; Shung, K. K.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2015-03-01

    We have successfully developed a fully-sheathed, flexible shaft-based, mechanical scanning photoacoustic endoscopy (PAE) system for imaging the human gastrointestinal tract via the instrument channel of a clinical video endoscope. The endoscopic system uses a single element ultrasonic transducer and flexible shaft-based proximal actuation mechanism, and it has a 2.5 m long and 3.2 mm diameter catheter section, which can be accommodated in the 3.7 mm diameter instrument channel of a clinical video endoscope. Here, we demonstrate the intra-instrument channel workability and in vivo imaging capability of the PAE system.

  4. [Patient Monitoring and Associated Devices during Endoscopic Sedation].

    PubMed

    Moon, Sung Hoon; Kim, Hyung Keun; Myung, Dae Seong; Yoon, Soon Man; Moon, Won

    2017-01-25

    Sedation is an essential component for gastrointestinal endoscopy. It allows patients to tolerate unpleasant endoscopic procedures by relieving anxiety, discomfort, or pain. It also reduces patient's risk of physical injury during endoscopic procedures, while providing the endoscopist with an adequate setting for a detailed examination. For the safety during endoscopic sedation, patient monitoring is crucial. Minimal monitoring requirements during endoscopic sedation are periodic assessment of blood pressure and application of continuous pulse oximetry. Continuous electrocardiography is recommended in selected patients with high risk for sedation or have cardiopulmonary diseases. Continuous supplemental oxygen is also recommended for endoscopic sedation. This study describes detailed monitoring and associated devices based on the current guidelines and recommendations from gastrointestinal society of America, Europe, and Korea.

  5. Management of early asymptomatic gastrointestinal stromal tumors of the stomach

    PubMed Central

    Scherübl, Hans; Faiss, Siegbert; Knoefel, Wolfram-Trudo; Wardelmann, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) are the most common mesenchymal tumors of the digestive tract. Approximately two thirds of clinically manifest tumors occur in the stomach, nearly one third in the small bowel, and the rest in the colorectal region with a few cases in the esophagus. GIST originate within the smooth muscle layer in the wall of the tubular gastrointestinal tract and grow mostly toward the serosa, far less often toward the mucosa. In the latter case, ulceration may develop and can cause gastrointestinal bleeding as the cardinal symptom. However, most GIST of the stomach are asymptomatic. They are increasingly detected incidentally as small intramural or submucosal tumors during endoscopy and particularly during endoscopic ultrasound. Epidemiological and molecular genetic findings suggest that early asymptomatic GIST of the stomach (< 1 cm) show self-limiting tumorigenesis. Thus, early (< 1 cm) asymptomatic gastric GIST (synonym: micro-GIST) are found in 20%-30% of the elderly. The mostly elderly people with early gastric GIST have an excellent GIST-specific prognosis. Patients with early GIST of the stomach can therefore be managed by endoscopic surveillance. PMID:25031785

  6. Recent traction methods for endoscopic submucosal dissection

    PubMed Central

    Tsuji, Kunihiro; Yoshida, Naohiro; Nakanishi, Hiroyoshi; Takemura, Kenichi; Yamada, Shinya; Doyama, Hisashi

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) is problematic with regard to en bloc and curable resection rates. Advancements in endoscopic techniques have enabled novel endoscopic approaches such as endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD), which has overcome some EMR problems, and has become the standard treatment for gastrointestinal tumors. However, ESD is technically difficult. Procedure time is longer and complications such as intraoperative perforation and bleeding occur more frequently than in EMR. Recently various traction methods have been introduced to facilitate ESD procedures, such as clip with line, external forceps, clip and snare, internal traction, double scope, and magnetic anchor. Each method must be used appropriately according to the anatomical characteristics. In this review we discuss recently proposed traction methods for ESD based on the characteristics of various anatomical sites. PMID:27468186

  7. [Advances on endoscopic treatment of intestinal fistulas].

    PubMed

    Wu, X W; Ren, J A; Li, J S

    2016-03-01

    Intestinal fistulas are severe complications after abdominal surgical procedures. The endoscopic therapy makes it possible to close fistulas without surgical interventions. When patients achieved stabilization and had no signs of systemic sepsis or inflammation, these therapies could be conducted, which included endoscopic vacuum therapy, fibrin glue sealing, stents, fistula plug, suture, and Over The Scope Clip (OTSC). Various techniques may be combined. Endoscopy vacuum therapy could be applied to control systemic inflammation and prevent continuing septic contamination by active drainage. Endoscopic stent is placed over fistulas and gastrointestinal continuity is recovered. The glue sealing is applied for enterocutaneous fistulas, and endoscopy suture has the best results seen in fistulas <1 cm in diameter. Insertion of the fistula plug is used to facilitate fistula healing. The OTSC is effective to treat leaks with large defects. Endoscopic treatment could avoid reoperation and could be regarded as the first-line treatment for specific patients.

  8. [Laser in gastroenterologic endoscopic therapy].

    PubMed

    Naveau, S; Chaput, J C

    1991-01-21

    Endoscopic gastrointestinal laser therapy was originally inspired by the haemostatic properties of the laser beam and was subsequently used to destroy tumours. In endoscopic gastroenterology, the most commonly used type of laser is the neodyme+-doped yttrium aluminium garnet (Nd:YAG) laser. Endoscopic Nd:YAG laser therapy of obstructive cancers of the oesophagus and cardia rapidly reduces dysphagia in 70 to 100% of the patients. In the treatment of colorectal cancers, the intestinal transit returns to normal in 57 to 83% of the cases, and rectal haemorrhages are controlled in 38 to 92% of the cases. However, sustained results can only be obtained by a maintenance treatment with at least one application every 4 weeks. The Nd:YAG laser makes it possible to destroy villose tumours in patients who cannot, or will not, be operated upon; the number of applications depends on the size of the tumour. Finally, the Nd:YAG laser seems to be able to control bleeding due to gastrointestinal angiodysplasia and to stabilize the course of Rendu-Osler-Weber disease.

  9. Findings

    MedlinePlus

    ... Issue All Issues Explore Findings by Topic Cell Biology Cellular Structures, Functions, Processes, Imaging, Stress Response Chemistry ... Glycobiology, Synthesis, Natural Products, Chemical Reactions Computers in Biology Bioinformatics, Modeling, Systems Biology, Data Visualization Diseases Cancer, ...

  10. Video-based measurements for wireless capsule endoscope tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spyrou, Evaggelos; Iakovidis, Dimitris K.

    2014-01-01

    The wireless capsule endoscope is a swallowable medical device equipped with a miniature camera enabling the visual examination of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. It wirelessly transmits thousands of images to an external video recording system, while its location and orientation are being tracked approximately by external sensor arrays. In this paper we investigate a video-based approach to tracking the capsule endoscope without requiring any external equipment. The proposed method involves extraction of speeded up robust features from video frames, registration of consecutive frames based on the random sample consensus algorithm, and estimation of the displacement and rotation of interest points within these frames. The results obtained by the application of this method on wireless capsule endoscopy videos indicate its effectiveness and improved performance over the state of the art. The findings of this research pave the way for a cost-effective localization and travel distance measurement of capsule endoscopes in the GI tract, which could contribute in the planning of more accurate surgical interventions.

  11. What if endoscopic hemostasis fails? Alternative treatment strategies: interventional radiology.

    PubMed

    Nanavati, Sujal M

    2014-12-01

    Since the 1960s, interventional radiology has played a role in the management of gastrointestinal bleeding. What began primarily as a diagnostic modality has evolved into much more of a therapeutic tool. And although the frequency of gastrointestinal bleeding has diminished thanks to management by pharmacologic and endoscopic methods, the need for additional invasive interventions still exists. Transcatheter angiography and intervention is a fundamental step in the algorithm for the treatment of gastrointestinal bleeding.

  12. Endoscopic ultrasound for chronic abdominal pain and gallbladder disease.

    PubMed

    Dill, B; Dill, J E; Berkhouse, L; Palmer, S T

    1999-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) is a major advance in gastrointestinal endoscopy. EUS, which is invaluable in the diagnosis and staging of gastrointestinal cancer, is now being used in the diagnosis of chronic upper abdominal pain. EUS combined with stimulated biliary drainage (EUS/SBD) aids in the diagnosis of choledocholithiasis, cholecystitis, microlithiasis, and various conditions of the upper gastrointestinal tract. This article describes the EUS/SBD procedure and nursing care. Two case histories illustrating potential benefits to patients are presented.

  13. Society of American Gastrointestinal and Endoscopic Surgeons

    MedlinePlus

    ... the available evidence supporting their safety and efficacy. Based on the level of evidence, recommendations may or may not be given for their use in clinical practice. VTE Prophylaxis for Laparoscopic Surgery Guidelines: An Update Since the publication of the ...

  14. Integrated biophotonics in endoscopic oncology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muguruma, Naoki; DaCosta, Ralph S.; Wilson, Brian C.; Marcon, Norman E.

    2009-02-01

    Gastrointestinal endoscopy has made great progress during last decade. Diagnostic accuracy can be enhanced by better training, improved dye-contrast techniques method, and the development of new image processing technologies. However, diagnosis using conventional endoscopy with white-light optical imaging is essentially limited by being based on morphological changes and/or visual attribution: hue, saturation and intensity, interpretation of which depends on the endoscopist's eye and brain. In microlesions in the gastrointestinal tract, we still rely ultimately on the histopathological diagnosis from biopsy specimens. Autofluorescence imaging system has been applied for lesions which have been difficult to morphologically recognize or are indistinct with conventional endoscope, and this approach has potential application for the diagnosis of dysplastic lesions and early cancers in the gastrointestinal tract, supplementing the information from white light endoscopy. This system has an advantage that it needs no administration of a photosensitive agent, making it suitable as a screening method for the early detection of neoplastic tissues. Narrow band imaging (NBI) is a novel endoscopic technique which can distinguish neoplastic and non-neoplastic lesions without chromoendoscopy. Magnifying endoscopy in combination with NBI has an obvious advantage, namely analysis of the epithelial pit pattern and the vascular network. This new technique allows a detailed visualization in early neoplastic lesions of esophagus, stomach and colon. However, problems remain; how to combine these technologies in an optimum diagnostic strategy, how to apply them into the algorithm for therapeutic decision-making, and how to standardize several classifications surrounding them. 'Molecular imaging' is a concept representing the most novel imaging methods in medicine, although the definition of the word is still controversial. In the field of gastrointestinal endoscopy, the future of

  15. Endoscopic Cyclophotocoagulation

    PubMed Central

    Seibold, Leonard K.; SooHoo, Jeffrey R.; Kahook, Malik Y.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, many new procedures and implants have been introduced as safer alternatives for the surgical treatment of glaucoma. The majority of these advances are implant-based with a goal of increased aqueous drainage to achieve lower intraocular pressure (IOP). In contrast, endoscopic cyclophotocoagulation (ECP) lowers IOP through aqueous suppression. Although ciliary body ablation is a well-established method of aqueous suppression, the novel endoscopic approach presents a significant evolution of this treatment with marked improvement in safety. The endoscope couples a light source, video imaging, and diode laser to achieve direct visualization of the ciliary processes during controlled laser application. The result is an efficient and safe procedure that can achieve a meaningful reduction in IOP and eliminate or reduce glaucoma medication use. From its initial use in refractory glaucoma, the indications for ECP have expanded broadly to include many forms of glaucoma across the spectrum of disease severity. The minimally-invasive nature of ECP allows for easy pairing with phacoemulsification in patients with coexisting cataract. In addition, the procedure avoids implant or device-related complications associated with newer surgical treatments. In this review, we illustrate the differences between ECP and traditional cyclophotocoagulation, then describe the instrumentation, patient selection, and technique for ECP. Finally, we summarize the available clinical evidence regarding the efficacy and safety of this procedure. PMID:25624669

  16. Endoscopic Ultrasonography in the Diagnosis of Gastric Subepithelial Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Eun Jeong; Kim, Do Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Subepithelial lesions occasionally found in the stomach of patients undergoing endoscopy may be either benign lesions or tumors with malignant potential. They may also appear due to extrinsic compression. Discrimination of gastric subepithelial lesions begins with meticulous endoscopic examination for size, shape, color, mobility, consistency, and appearance of the overlying mucosa. Accurate diagnosis can be achieved with endoscopic ultrasonography, which provides useful information on the exact size, layer-of-origin, and characteristic morphologic features to support a definitive diagnosis. Endoscopic ultrasonography also aids in the prediction of malignant potential, especially in gastrointestinal stromal tumors. Features of subepithelial lesions identified on endoscopic ultrasonography can be used to determine whether further diagnostic procedures such as endoscopic resection, fine needle aspiration, or core biopsy are required. Endoscopic ultrasonography is a valuable tool for diagnosis and clinical decision making during follow-up of gastric subepithelial lesions. PMID:27744661

  17. MR Enterography of Inflammatory Bowel Disease with Endoscopic Correlation.

    PubMed

    Kaushal, Pankaj; Somwaru, Alexander S; Charabaty, Aline; Levy, Angela D

    2017-01-01

    Crohn disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) are the two main forms of idiopathic inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). CD is a transmural chronic inflammatory disorder that can affect any part of the gastrointestinal tract in a discontinuous distribution. UC is a mucosal and submucosal chronic inflammatory disease that typically originates in the rectum and may extend proximally in a continuous manner. In treating patients with CD and UC, clinicians rely heavily on accurate diagnoses and disease staging. Magnetic resonance (MR) enterography used in conjunction with endoscopy and histopathologic analysis can help accurately diagnose and manage disease in the majority of patients. Endoscopy is more sensitive for detection of the early-manifesting mucosal abnormalities seen with IBD and enables histopathologic sampling. MR enterography yields more insightful information about the pathologic changes seen deep to the mucosal layer of the gastrointestinal tract wall and to those portions of the small bowel that are not accessible endoscopically. CD can be classified into active inflammatory, fistulizing and perforating, fibrostenotic, and reparative and regenerative phases of disease. Although CD has a progressive course, there is no stepwise progression between these disease phases, and various phases may exist at the same time. The endoscopic and MR enterographic features of UC can be broadly divided into two categories: acute phase and subacute-chronic phase. Understanding the endoscopic features of IBD and the pathologic processes that cause the MR enterographic findings of IBD can help improve the accuracy of disease characterization and thus optimize the medication and surgical therapies for these patients. (©)RSNA, 2016.

  18. Endoscopic examination of the upper esophagus by withdrawal of endoscope over guide wire.

    PubMed

    Bhasin, Deepak K; Rana, Surinder S; Chandail, Vijant S; Nanda, Mohit; Nadkarni, Nikhil; Masoodi, Ibrahim; Sinha, Saroj K; Nagi, Birinder

    2006-01-01

    Upper gastrointestinal (UGI) endoscopy is an important diagnostic modality in evaluation of patients with upper gastrointestinal (GI) disorders. However, lesions located in the cricopharyngeal area and upper esophagus can be missed, as this area may not be well visualized during endoscopy. This study was conducted to study the utility of a new technique of endoscopic examination of the upper esophagus by withdrawal of endoscope over guide wire in diagnosing esophageal disorders. Patients with suspected upper esophageal disorders on history and radiological investigations were assessed using guide wire assisted endoscopic examination during withdrawal of the endoscope. In this technique, endoscope is inserted into the esophagus under vision and thereafter the whole of esophagus, stomach and proximal duodenum is examined. The endoscope is then withdrawn into the mid-esophagus, a guide wire is fed into the biopsy channel, and thereafter inserted into the esophagus. Once guide wire has been advanced into the esophagus, the endoscope is withdrawn gently over the guide wire into esophagus carefully examining for lesions in upper esophagus and cricopharyngeal area. Twenty cases of various abnormalities localized to the upper esophagus were studied. The final diagnosis in these patients was cervical esophageal web (10), post transhiatal esophagectomy leak (4), heterotopic gastric mucosa (3), posttraumatic esophageal perforation (2), and Zenker's diverticulum (1). Intact web was detected in 2 patients and in 8 patients fractured web was seen. Guide wire assisted examination of upper esophagus improved the ability to visualize and characterize these lesions and no complications were encountered as a result of this procedure. Endoscopic examination of the upper esophagus by withdrawal of endoscope over guide wire is safe and effective in diagnosing anatomical abnormalities of the upper esophagus that may be missed or poorly characterized during standard endoscopy.

  19. Analysis of the color rendition of flexible endoscopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Edward M.; Hegarty, Francis J.; McMahon, Barry P.; Boyle, Gerard

    2003-03-01

    Endoscopes are imaging devices routinely used for the diagnosis of disease within the human digestive tract. Light is transmitted into the body cavity via incoherent fibreoptic bundles and is controlled by a light feedback system. Fibreoptic endoscopes use coherent fibreoptic bundles to provide the clinician with an image. It is also possible to couple fibreoptic endoscopes to a clip-on video camera. Video endoscopes consist of a small CCD camera, which is inserted into gastrointestinal tract, and associated image processor to convert the signal to analogue RGB video signals. Images from both types of endoscope are displayed on standard video monitors. Diagnosis is dependent upon being able to determine changes in the structure and colour of tissues and biological fluids, and therefore is dependent upon the ability of the endoscope to reproduce the colour of these tissues and fluids with fidelity. This study investigates the colour reproduction of flexible optical and video endoscopes. Fibreoptic and video endoscopes alter image colour characteristics in different ways. The colour rendition of fibreoptic endoscopes was assessed by coupling them to a video camera and applying video colorimetric techniques. These techniques were then used on video endoscopes to assess how the colour rendition of video endoscopes compared with that of optical endoscopes. In both cases results were obtained at fixed illumination settings. Video endoscopes were then assessed with varying levels of illumination. Initial results show that at constant luminance endoscopy systems introduce non-linear shifts in colour. Techniques for examining how this colour shift varies with illumination intensity were developed and both methodology and results will be presented. We conclude that more rigorous quality assurance is required to reduce colour error and are developing calibration procedures applicable to medical endoscopes.

  20. Transmission of Infection by Flexible Gastrointestinal Endoscopy and Bronchoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Frans T. M.; van der Mei, Henny C.; Degener, John E.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Flexible endoscopy is a widely used diagnostic and therapeutic procedure. Contaminated endoscopes are the medical devices frequently associated with outbreaks of health care-associated infections. Accurate reprocessing of flexible endoscopes involves cleaning and high-level disinfection followed by rinsing and drying before storage. Most contemporary flexible endoscopes cannot be heat sterilized and are designed with multiple channels, which are difficult to clean and disinfect. The ability of bacteria to form biofilms on the inner channel surfaces can contribute to failure of the decontamination process. Implementation of microbiological surveillance of endoscope reprocessing is appropriate to detect early colonization and biofilm formation in the endoscope and to prevent contamination and infection in patients after endoscopic procedures. This review presents an overview of the infections and cross-contaminations related to flexible gastrointestinal endoscopy and bronchoscopy and illustrates the impact of biofilm on endoscope reprocessing and postendoscopic infection. PMID:23554415

  1. Management of a large mucosal defect after duodenal endoscopic resection

    PubMed Central

    Fujihara, Shintaro; Mori, Hirohito; Kobara, Hideki; Nishiyama, Noriko; Matsunaga, Tae; Ayaki, Maki; Yachida, Tatsuo; Masaki, Tsutomu

    2016-01-01

    Duodenal endoscopic resection is the most difficult type of endoscopic treatment in the gastrointestinal tract (GI) and is technically challenging because of anatomical specificities. In addition to these technical difficulties, this procedure is associated with a significantly higher rate of complication than endoscopic treatment in other parts of the GI tract. Postoperative delayed perforation and bleeding are hazardous complications, and emergency surgical intervention is sometimes required. Therefore, it is urgently necessary to establish a management protocol for preventing serious complications. For instance, the prophylactic closure of large mucosal defects after endoscopic resection may reduce the risk of hazardous complications. However, the size of mucosal defects after endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) is relatively large compared with the size after endoscopic mucosal resection, making it impossible to achieve complete closure using only conventional clips. The over-the-scope clip and polyglycolic acid sheets with fibrin gel make it possible to close large mucosal defects after duodenal ESD. In addition to the combination of laparoscopic surgery and endoscopic resection, endoscopic full-thickness resection holds therapeutic potential for difficult duodenal lesions and may overcome the disadvantages of endoscopic resection in the near future. This review aims to summarize the complications and closure techniques of large mucosal defects and to highlight some directions for management after duodenal endoscopic treatment. PMID:27547003

  2. An Unusual Cause of Acute Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding: Acute Esophageal Necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Tokala, Madhusudhan R.; Dhillon, Sonu; Pisoh, Watcoun-Nchinda; Walayat, Saqib; Vanar, Vishwas; Puli, Srinivas R.

    2016-01-01

    Acute esophageal necrosis (AEN), also called “black esophagus,” is a condition characterized by circumferential necrosis of the esophagus with universal distal involvement and variable proximal extension with clear demarcation at the gastroesophageal junction. It is an unusual cause of upper gastrointestinal bleeding and is recognized with distinct and striking mucosal findings on endoscopy. The patients are usually older and are critically ill with shared comorbidities, which include atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, chronic renal insufficiency, and malnutrition. Alcoholism and substance abuse could be seen in younger patients. Patients usually have systemic hypotension along with upper abdominal pain in the background of clinical presentation of hematemesis and melena. The endoscopic findings confirm the diagnosis and biopsy is not always necessary unless clinically indicated in atypical presentations. Herein we present two cases with distinct clinical presentation and discuss the endoscopic findings along with a review of the published literature on the management of AEN. PMID:27642529

  3. Endoscopic management of acute peptic ulcer bleeding.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yidan; Chen, Yen-I; Barkun, Alan

    2014-12-01

    This review discusses the indications, technical aspects, and comparative effectiveness of the endoscopic treatment of upper gastrointestinal bleeding caused by peptic ulcer. Pre-endoscopic considerations, such as the use of prokinetics and timing of endoscopy, are reviewed. In addition, this article examines aspects of postendoscopic care such as the effectiveness, dosing, and duration of postendoscopic proton-pump inhibitors, Helicobacter pylori testing, and benefits of treatment in terms of preventing rebleeding; and the use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, antiplatelet agents, and oral anticoagulants, including direct thrombin and Xa inhibitors, following acute peptic ulcer bleeding.

  4. Effects of flunixin and flunixin plus prednisone on the gastrointestinal tract of dogs.

    PubMed

    Dow, S W; Rosychuk, R A; McChesney, A E; Curtis, C R

    1990-07-01

    Flunixin meglumine has been reported to induce gastrointestinal lesions in dogs when administered at therapeutic dosages. We administered flunixin meglumine to dogs daily for 10 days to assess the effect of this drug on the gastrointestinal tract. We also evaluated the possibility of corticosteroid potentiation of gastrointestinal toxicosis by concurrent administration of prednisone to 1 group of dogs. Dogs were monitored for gastrointestinal toxicosis by means of serial endoscopic evaluation, measurement of fecal occult blood, PCV, and total solid concentration, and by physical examination. There were 3 treatment groups of 5 dogs each. Group-1 dogs were given 2.2 mg of flunixin meglumine/kg daily, in 2 divided doses IM; group-2 dogs were given 4.4 mg of flunixin meglumine/kg daily, in 2 divided doses IM; and group-3 dogs were given 2.2 mg of flunixin meglumine/kg daily, in 2 divided doses IM plus 1.1 mg of prednisone/kg/d orally, in 2 divided doses. A fourth group of 5 dogs served as a control group. Endoscopically visible gastric mucosal lesions developed in all treated dogs within 4 days of initiating treatment. Lesions first developed in the gastric pylorus and antrum and lesions at these sites were more severe than those observed elsewhere. Dogs treated with flunixin meglumine plus prednisone developed the earliest and most severe lesions; lesion scores in group-2 dogs were higher than those in group-1 dogs. All dogs treated had occult blood in their feces by day 5 and its presence appeared to correlate more closely with endoscopic findings than did physical examination findings or changes in values for PCV or total solids.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. Utility of esophageal gastroduodenoscopy at the time of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy in trauma patients

    PubMed Central

    Haan, James M; Bochicchio, Grant V; Scalea, Thomas M

    2007-01-01

    Background The utility of esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) performed at the time of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) is unclear. We examined whether EGD at time of PEG yielded clinically useful information important in patient care. We also reviewed the outcome and complication rates of EGD-PEG performed by trauma surgeons. Methods Retrospective review of all trauma patients undergoing EGD with PEG at a level I trauma center from 1/01–6/03. Results 210 patients underwent combined EGD with PEG by the trauma team. A total of 37% of patients had unsuspected upper gastrointestinal lesions seen on EGD. Of these, 35% had traumatic brain injury, 10% suffered multisystem injury, and 47% had spinal cord injury. These included 15 esophageal, 61 gastric, and six duodenal lesions, mucosal or hemorrhagic findings on EGD. This finding led to a change in therapy in 90% of patients; either resumption/continuation of H2 -blockers or conversion to proton-pump inhibitors. One patient suffered an upper gastrointestinal bleed while on H2-blocker. It was treated endoscopically. Complication rates were low. There were no iatrogenic visceral perforations seen. Three PEGs were inadvertently removed by the patient (1.5%); one was replaced with a Foley, one replaced endoscopically, and one patient underwent gastric repair and open jejunostomy tube. One PEG leak was repaired during exploration for unrelated hemorrhage. Six patients had significant site infections (3%); four treated with local drainage and antibiotics, one requiring operative debridement and later closure, and one with antibiotics alone. Conclusion EGD at the time of PEG may add clinically useful data in the management of trauma patients. Only one patient treated with acid suppression therapy for EGD diagnosed lesions suffered delayed gastrointestinal bleeding. Trauma surgeons can perform EGD and PEG with acceptable outcomes and complication rates. PMID:17615081

  6. Paediatric Gastrointestinal Endoscopy: European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology Hepatology and Nutrition and European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Guidelines.

    PubMed

    Thomson, Mike; Tringali, Andrea; Dumonceau, Jean-Marc; Tavares, Marta; Tabbers, Merit M; Furlano, Raoul; Spaander, Manon; Hassan, Cesare; Tzvinikos, Christos; Ijsselstijn, Hanneke; Viala, Jérôme; Dall'Oglio, Luigi; Benninga, Marc; Orel, Rok; Vandenplas, Yvan; Keil, Radan; Romano, Claudio; Brownstone, Eva; Hlava, Štěpán; Gerner, Patrick; Dolak, Werner; Landi, Rosario; Huber, Wolf D; Everett, Simon; Vecsei, Andreas; Aabakken, Lars; Amil-Dias, Jorge; Zambelli, Alessandro

    2017-01-01

    This guideline refers to infants, children, and adolescents ages 0 to 18 years. The areas covered include indications for diagnostic and therapeutic esophagogastroduodenoscopy and ileocolonoscopy; endoscopy for foreign body ingestion; corrosive ingestion and stricture/stenosis endoscopic management; upper and lower gastrointestinal bleeding; endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography; and endoscopic ultrasonography. Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy and endoscopy specific to inflammatory bowel disease has been dealt with in other guidelines and are therefore not mentioned in this guideline. Training and ongoing skill maintenance are to be dealt with in an imminent sister publication to this.

  7. Advances in gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Lanas, Ángel

    2016-09-01

    The main innovations of the latest meeting of the Gastroenterological Association (2016) concerning upper gastrointestinal bleeding from the clinician's perspective can be summarised as follows: a) The Glasgow-Blatchford scale has the best accuracy in predicting the need for surgical intervention and hospital mortality; b) Prognostic scales for non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding are also useful for lower gastrointestinal bleeding; c) Preliminary data suggest that treatment with hemospray does not seem to be superior to current standard treatment in controlling active peptic ulcer bleeding; d) Either famotidine or a proton pump inhibitor may be effective in preventing haemorrhagic recurrence in patients taking aspirin, but this finding needs to be confirmed in further studies; e) There was confirmation of the need to re-introduce antiplatelet therapy as early as possible in patients with antiplatelet-associated gastrointestinal bleeding in order to prevent cardiovascular mortality; f) Routine clinical practice suggests that gastrointestinal or cardiovascular complications with celecoxib or traditional NSAIDs are very low; g) Dabigatran is associated with an increased incidence of gastrointestinal bleeding compared with apixaban or warfarin. At least half of the episodes are located in the lower gastrointestinal tract; h) Implant devices for external ventricular circulatory support are associated with early gastrointestinal bleeding in up to one third of patients; the bleeding is often secondary to arteriovenous malformations.

  8. Therapeutic aspects of endoscopic ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodward, Timothy A.

    1999-06-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) is a technology that had been used primarily as a passive imaging modality. Recent advances have enabled us to move beyond the use of EUS solely as a staging tool to an interventional device. Current studies suggest that interventional applications of EUS will allow for minimally invasive assessment and therapies in a cost-effective manner. Endoscopic ultrasound with fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) has been demonstrated to be a technically feasible, relatively safe method of obtaining cytologic specimens. The clinical utility of EUS- FNA appears to be greatest in the diagnosis and staging of pancreatic cancer and in the nodal staging of gastrointestinal and pulmonary malignancies. In addition, EUS-FNA has demonstrated utility in the sampling pleural and ascitic fluid not generally appreciated or assessable to standard interventions. Interventional applications of EUS include EUS-guided pseudocyst drainage, EUS-guided injection of botulinum toxin in the treatment of achalasia, and EUS- guided celiac plexus neurolysis in the treatment of pancreatic cancer pain. Finally, EUS-guided fine-needle installation is being evaluated, in conjunction with recent bimolecular treatment modalities, as a delivery system in the treatment of certain gastrointestinal tumors.

  9. Risk Factors for Dieulafoy Lesions in the Upper Gastrointestinal Tract

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Hae Jin; Ju, Jong Seok; Kim, Ki Dae; Kim, Seok Won; Kang, Sung Hoon; Moon, Hee Seok; Sung, Jae Kyu; Jeong, Hyun Yong

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims The purpose of this study is to verify the risk factors associated with Dieulafoy lesion formation in the upper gastrointestinal tract. Methods A case-control study was performed by reviewing the electronic medical records of 42 patients who were admitted to a tertiary medical center in the Daejeon region for Dieulafoy lesions from September 2008 to October 2013, and the records of 132 patients who were admitted during the same period and who underwent endoscopic examination for reasons other than bleeding. We analyzed clinical and endoscopic findings retrospectively, and searched for risk factors associated with Dieulafoy lesion formation. Results All 42 patients diagnosed with Dieulafoy lesion had accompanying bleeding, and the location of the bleeding was proximal in 25 patients (59.5%), the middle portion in seven patients (16.7%), and distal in 10 patients (23.8%). Antiplatelet agents (p=0.022) and alcohol (p=0.001) use showed statistically significant differences between the two groups. The odds ratios (95% confidence intervals) of the two factors were 2.802 (1.263 to 6.217) and 3.938 (1.629 to 9.521), respectively. Conclusions This study showed that antiplatelet agents and alcohol consumption were risk factors associated with Dieulafoy lesion formation in the upper gastrointestinal tract. PMID:26064823

  10. Future directions of duodenal endoscopic submucosal dissection

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Satohiro; Miyatani, Hiroyuki; Yoshida, Yukio

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic therapies for lesions of the duodenum are technically more difficult than those for lesions of the other parts of the gastrointestinal tract due to the anatomical features of the duodenum, and the incidence rate of complications such as perforation and bleeding is also higher. These aforementioned trends were especially noticeable for the case of duodenal endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD). The indication for ESD of duodenal tumors should be determined by assessment of the histopathology, macroscopic morphology, and diameter of the tumors. The three types of candidate lesions for endoscopic therapy are adenoma, carcinoma, and neuroendocrine tumors. For applying endoscopic therapies to duodenal lesions, accurate preoperative histopathological diagnosis is necessary. The most important technical issue in duodenal ESD is the submucosal dissection process. In duodenal ESD, a short needle-type knife is suitable for the mucosal incision and submucosal dissection processes, and the Small-caliber-tip Transparent hood is an important tool. After endoscopic therapies, the wound should be closed by clipping in order to prevent complications such as secondary hemorrhage and delayed perforation. At present, the criteria for selection between ESD and EMR vary among institutions. The indications for ESD should be carefully considered. Duodenal ESD should have limitations, such as the need for its being performed by experts with abundant experience in performing the procedure. PMID:25901218

  11. Endoscopic ultrasonography for gastric submucosal lesions

    PubMed Central

    Papanikolaou, Ioannis S; Triantafyllou, Konstantinos; Kourikou, Anastasia; Rösch, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Gastric submucosal tumors (SMTs) are a rather frequent finding, occurring in about 0.36% of routine upper GI-endoscopies. EUS has emerged as a reliable investigative procedure for evaluation of these lesions. Diagnostic Endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) has the ability to differentiate intramural tumors from extraluminal compressions and can also show the layer of origin of gastric SMTs. Tumors can be further characterized by their layer of origin, echo pattern and margin. EUS-risk criteria of their malignant potential are presented, although the emergence of EUS-guided fne needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) has opened new indications for transmural tissue diagnosis and expanded the possibilities of EUS in SMTs of the stomach. Tissue diagnosis should address whether the SMT is a Gastrointestinal stromal tumour (GIST) or another tumor type and evaluate the malignant potential of a given GIST. However, there seems to be a lack of data on the optimal strategy in SMTs suspected to be GISTs with a negative EUS-FNA tissue diagnosis. The current management strategies, as well as open questions regarding their treatment are also presented. PMID:21772939

  12. In-Use Evaluation of Peracetic Acid for High-Level Disinfection of Endoscopes.

    PubMed

    Chenjiao, Wu; Hongyan, Zhang; Qing, Gu; Xiaoqi, Zhong; Liying, Gu; Ying, Fang

    2016-01-01

    Many high-level disinfectants have been used for disinfection of endoscopes such as 2% glutaraldehyde (GA), 0.55% ortho-phthalaldehyde (OPA), and peracetic acid (PAA). Both GA and OPA are widely used in disinfection of endoscopes and have been previously discussed, but there is little research on the practical use of PAA as an endoscope disinfectant. An experimental model of a flexible gastrointestinal endoscope being contaminated with 9 strains of microorganism was designed. After the cleaning and disinfecting procedure was completed, we evaluated the biocidal activity (850 ppm PAA, 2% GA, and 0.55% OPA) on our flexible gastrointestinal endoscope model. We also evaluated sterilization effectiveness of PAA on other bacteria, including some antibiotic-resistant bacteria (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus, and Clostridium difficile). The residual bacterial colony count number of the PAA-disinfected endoscope was significantly lower than that of the GA- and OPA-disinfected endoscopes. The biocidal effect and efficiency of the endoscope disinfection by PAA appeared to be better than either the GA- or OPA-disinfected endoscope. PAA has demonstrated a good sterilization effect on other bacterial species; of particular note are common antibiotic-resistant bacteria such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus, and Clostridium difficile. The results of this study demonstrate that PAA is a fast and effective high-level disinfectant for use in the reprocessing of flexible endoscopes.

  13. Application of new packing material in endoscopic nasal surgery

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Haiying; Han, Fei; Cui, Zhaoyang

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To show the efficacy and comfort of pneumatic bag packing after the endoscopic nasal surgery. Pneumatic bag packing may be recommendable in terms of comfort and efficacy after endoscopic nasal surgery. Significant findings: There were statistical significant differences between the pneumatic bag packing and the expansive sponge packing regarding subjective symptoms and objective findings after surgery. Conclusions: Pneumatic bag packing may be recommendable in terms of comfort and efficacy after endoscopic nasal surgery. PMID:25785173

  14. Orbital endoscopic surgery.

    PubMed

    Prabhakaran, Venkatesh C; Selva, Dinesh

    2008-01-01

    Minimally invasive "keyhole" surgery performed using endoscopic visualization is increasing in popularity and is being used by almost all surgical subspecialties. Within ophthalmology, however, endoscopic surgery is not commonly performed and there is little literature on the use of the endoscope in orbital surgery. Transorbital use of the endoscope can greatly aid in visualizing orbital roof lesions and minimizing the need for bone removal. The endoscope is also useful during decompression procedures and as a teaching aid to train orbital surgeons. In this article, we review the history of endoscopic orbital surgery and provide an overview of the technique and describe situations where the endoscope can act as a useful adjunct to orbital surgery.

  15. Rapid fecal calprotectin testing to assess for endoscopic disease activity in inflammatory bowel disease: A diagnostic cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Kwapisz, Lukasz; Mosli, Mahmoud; Chande, Nilesh; Yan, Brian; Beaton, Melanie; Micsko, Jessica; Mennill, Pauline W.; Barnett, William; Bax, Kevin; Ponich, Terry; Howard, John; Tirolese, Anthony; Lannigan, Robert; Gregor, James

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aim: With increasing numbers of patients diagnosed with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), it is important to identify noninvasive methods of detecting disease activity. The aim of this study is to examine the diagnostic accuracy of fecal rapid calprotectin (FC) testing in the detection of endoscopically active IBD. Patients and Methods: All consecutive patients presenting to outpatient clinics with lower gastrointestinal symptoms were prospectively recruited. Patients provided FC samples. Sensitivity (Sn), specificity (Sp), positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV) for FC were calculated. Receiver–operator characteristics (ROC) curve was used to identify the ideal FC cutoff that predicts endoscopic disease activity. Correlation between FC and endoscopic disease activity, disease location, and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels were measured. Results: One hundred and twenty-six patients, of whom 52% were females, were included in the final analysis with a mean age of 44.4 ± 16.7 years. Comparing FC to endoscopic findings, the following results were calculated: A cutoff point of 100 μg/g showed Sn = 83%, Sp = 67%, PPV = 65%, and NPV = 85%; and 200 μg/g showed Sn = 66%, Sp = 82%, PPV = 73%, and NPV = 77%. Based on ROC curve, the best FC cutoff point to predict endoscopic disease activity was 140 μg/g. Using this reference, FC levels strongly correlated with colorectal, ileocolonic, and ileal disease and predicted endoscopic activity. Conclusions: FC is an accurate test when used as an initial screening tool for patients suspected of having active IBD. Given its noninvasive nature, it may prove to reduce the need for colonoscopy and be an added tool in the management of IBD. PMID:26655130

  16. Clinical relevance of aberrant polypoid nodule scar after endoscopic submucosal dissection

    PubMed Central

    Arantes, Vitor; Uedo, Noriya; Pedrosa, Moises Salgado; Tomita, Yasuhiko

    2016-01-01

    AIM To describe a series of patients with aberrant polypoid nodule scar developed after gastric endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD), and to discuss its pathogenesis and clinical management. METHODS We reviewed retrospectively the endoscopic database of two academic institutions located in Brazil and Japan and searched for all patients that underwent ESD to manage gastric neoplasms from 2003 to 2015. The criteria for admission in the study were: (1) successful en bloc ESD procedure with R0 and curative resection confirmed histologically; (2) postoperative endoscopic examination with identification of a polypoid nodule scar (PNS) at ESD scar; (3) biopsies of the PNS with hyperplastic or regenerative tissue, reviewed by two independent experienced gastrointestinal pathologists, one from each Institution. Data were examined for patient demographics, Helicobacter pylori status, precise neoplastic lesion location in the stomach, tumor size, histopathological assessment of the ESD specimen, and postoperative information including medical management, endoscopic and histological findings, and clinical outcome. RESULTS A total of 14 patients (10 men/4 women) fulfilled the inclusion criteria and were enrolled in this study. One center contributed with 8 cases out of 60 patients (13.3%) from 2008 to 2015. The second center contributed with 6 cases (1.7%) out of 343 patients from 2003 to 2015. Postoperative endoscopic follow-up revealed similar findings in all patients: A protruded polypoid appearing nodule situated in the center of the ESD scar surrounded by convergence of folds. Biopsies samples were taken from PNS, and histological assessment revealed in all cases regenerative and hyperplastic tissue, without recurrent tumor or dysplasia. Primary neoplastic lesions were located in the antrum in 13 patients and in the angle in one patient. PNS did not develop in any patient after ESD undertaken for tumors located in the corpus, fundus or cardia. All patients have been

  17. Appropriateness of outpatient gastrointestinal endoscopy in a non-academic hospital

    PubMed Central

    Mangualde, João; Cremers, Marie I; Vieira, Ana M; Freire, Ricardo; Gamito, Élia; Lobato, Cristina; Alves, Ana L; Augusto, Fátima; Oliveira, Ana P

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To assess the appropriate use and the diagnostic yield of upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and colonoscopy in this subgroup of patients. METHODS: In total, 789 consecutive outpatients referred for gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy [381 for esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) and 408 for colonoscopy] were prospectively enrolled in the study. The American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ASGE) guidelines were used to assess the relationship between appropriateness and the presence of relevant endoscopic findings. RESULTS: The overall inappropriate rate was 13.3%. The indications for EGD and colonoscopy were, respectively, appropriate in 82.7% and 82.6% of the exams, uncertain in 5.8% and 2.4% and inappropriate in 11.5% and 15%. The diagnostic yield was significant higher for EGDs and colonoscopies judged appropriate and uncertain when compared with those considered inappropriate (EGD: 36.6% vs 36.4% vs 11.4%, P = 0.004; Colonoscopy: 24.3% vs 20.0% vs 3.3%, P = 0.001). Of the 25 malignant lesions detected, all but one was detected in exams judged appropriate or uncertain. CONCLUSION: This study shows a good adherence to ASGE guidelines by the referring physicians and a significant increase of the diagnostic yield in appropriate examinations, namely in detecting neoplastic lesions. It underscores the importance that the appropriateness of the indication assumes in assuring high-quality GI endoscopic procedures. PMID:22013500

  18. Endoscopic Resection Multicenter Registry

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-22

    Gastrointestinal Neoplasms; Gastrointestinal Disease; Gastric Cancer; Gastric Neoplasm; Gastric Polyp; Esophageal Neoplasms; Duodenal Neoplasms; Duodenal Polyp; Stomach Neoplasm; Stomach Polyp; Neoplasms; Colon Polyp; Colon Neoplasm

  19. Uncommon gastrointestinal bleeding during targeted therapy for advanced renal cell carcinoma: A report of four cases

    PubMed Central

    FUJIHARA, SHINTARO; MORI, HIROHITO; KOBARA, HIDEKI; NISHIYAMA, NORIKO; AYAKI, MAKI; OHATA, RYO; UEDA, NOBUFUMI; SUGIMOTO, MIKIO; KAKEHI, YOSHIYUKI; MASAKI, TSUTOMU

    2015-01-01

    Clinically available targeted agents to treat advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC) include sunitinib, sorafenib and temsirolimus. Sorafenib and sunitinib have been associated with bleeding in selected trials, but clinical and endoscopic characteristics of gastrointestinal bleeding are not well described. Herein, we report four cases of advanced RCC in which endoscopic hemostasis effectively resolved high-grade, life-threatening gastrointestinal bleeding that occurred during targeted therapy. Although stomatitis and mucositis have occurred during targeted therapies, life-threatening gastrointestinal bleeding is less common. In these four patients, the origins of gastrointestinal bleeding were identified, and complete endoscopic hemostasis was achieved. Endoscopies revealed variable characteristics including angiodysplasia, multiple gastric ulcers and oozing bleeding of the normal mucosa. Although the most effective diagnostic and treatment strategies are disputed, endoscopic examinations are best performed before starting targeted therapies. Additionally, these patients should be monitored even for rare life-threatening events. PMID:26722259

  20. Diagnostic procedures for submucosal tumors in the gastrointestinal tract

    PubMed Central

    Ponsaing, Laura Graves; Kiss, Katalin; Loft, Annika; Jensen, Lise Ingemann; Hansen, Mark Berner

    2007-01-01

    This review is part one of three, which will present an update on diagnostic procedures for gastrointestinal (GI) submucosal tumors (SMTs). Part two identifies the classification and part three the therapeutic methods regarding GI SMTs. Submucosal tumors are typically asymptomatic and therefore encountered incidentally. Advances in diagnostic tools for gastrointestinal submucosal tumors have emerged over the past decade. The aim of this paper is to provide the readers with guidelines for the use of diagnostic procedures, when a submucosal tumor is suspected. Literature searches were performed to find information on diagnostics for gastrointestinal submucosal tumors. Based on the searches, the optimal diagnostic procedures and specific features of the submucosal tumors could be outlined. Standard endoscppy, capsule endoscopy and push-and-pull enteroscopy (PPE) together with barium contrast X-ray do not alone provide sufficient information, when examining submucosal tumors. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS), computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and fluorodeoxyglucose-labeled positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) are recommended as supplementary tools. PMID:17659668

  1. Gastrointestinal manifestations.

    PubMed

    Tanowitz, H B; Simon, D; Weiss, L M; Noyer, C; Coyle, C; Wittner, M

    1996-11-01

    Gastrointestinal disease is a common problem in the setting of HIV-1 infection. As patients live longer and other opportunistic pathogens are suppressed, these problems are becoming even more important in the quality of life.

  2. Endoscopic ultrasound guided interventional procedures

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Vishal; Rana, Surinder S; Bhasin, Deepak K

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) has emerged as an important diagnostic and therapeutic modality in the field of gastrointestinal endoscopy. EUS provides access to many organs and lesions which are in proximity to the gastrointestinal tract and thus giving an opportunity to target them for therapeutic and diagnostic purposes. This modality also provides a real time opportunity to target the required area while avoiding adjacent vascular and other structures. Therapeutic EUS has found role in management of pancreatic fluid collections, biliary and pancreatic duct drainage in cases of failed endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, drainage of gallbladder, celiac plexus neurolysis/blockage, drainage of mediastinal and intra-abdominal abscesses and collections and in targeted cancer chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Infact, therapeutic EUS has emerged as the therapy of choice for management of pancreatic pseudocysts and recent innovations like fully covered removable metallic stents have improved results in patients with organised necrosis. Similarly, EUS guided drainage of biliary tract and pancreatic duct helps drainage of these systems in patients with failed cannulation, inaccessible papilla as with duodenal/gastric obstruction or surgically altered anatomy. EUS guided gall bladder drainage is a useful emergent procedure in patients with acute cholecystitis who are not fit for surgery. EUS guided celiac plexus neurolysis and blockage is more effective and less morbid vis-à-vis the percutaneous technique. The field of interventional EUS is rapidly advancing and many more interventions are being continuously added. This review focuses on the current status of evidence vis-à-vis the established indications of therapeutic EUS. PMID:26078831

  3. Endoscopic Removal of Ingested Dentures and Dental Instruments: A Retrospective Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Kazuya; Tominaga, Kentaro; Nishigaki, Yuki; Sato, Hiroki; Ikarashi, Satoshi; Hayashi, Kazunao; Yamamoto, Takashi; Honda, Yutaka; Hashimoto, Satoru; Kamimura, Kenya; Takeuchi, Manabu; Yokoyama, Junji; Sato, Yuichi; Kobayashi, Masaaki; Terai, Shuji

    2016-01-01

    Background. Dentures and dental instruments are frequently encountered ingested foreign bodies. The aim of the present study was to assess the safety and efficacy of endoscopically removing ingested dental objects. Methods. Twenty-nine consecutive patients with 29 dental objects who were treated at the Niigata University Medical and Dental Hospital from August 2009 to December 2015 were retrospectively reviewed. Characteristics of the patients and the ingested dental objects, the clinical features and findings of radiological imaging tests, and outcomes of endoscopic removal were analyzed. Results. Patients' mean age was 62.9 ± 21.0 years. The ingested dental objects included 23 dentures (13 crowns, 4 bridges, 4 partial dentures, and 2 other dentures) and 6 dental instruments. Twenty-seven upper gastrointestinal endoscopies and 2 colonoscopies were performed, and their success rates were 92.6% and 100%, respectively. There were 2 cases of removal failure; one case involved an impacted partial denture in the cervical esophagus, and this case required surgical removal. Conclusions. Endoscopic removal of ingested dentures and dental instruments is associated with a favorable success rate and acceptable complications. The immediate intervention and appropriate selection of devices are essential for managing ingested dental objects. PMID:27738426

  4. Measurement of motion detection of wireless capsule endoscope inside large intestine.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Mingda; Bao, Guanqun; Pahlavan, Kaveh

    2014-01-01

    Wireless Capsule Endoscope (WCE) provides a noninvasive way to inspect the entire Gastrointestinal (GI) tract, including large intestine, where intestinal diseases most likely occur. As a critical component of capsule endoscopic examination, physicians need to know the precise position of the endoscopic capsule in order to identify the position of detected intestinal diseases. Knowing how the capsule moves inside the large intestine would greatly complement the existing wireless localization systems by providing the motion information. Since the most recently released WCE can take up to 6 frames per second, it's possible to estimate the movement of the capsule by processing the successive image sequence. In this paper, a computer vision based approach without utilizing any external device is proposed to estimate the motion of WCE inside the large intestine. The proposed approach estimate the displacement and rotation of the capsule by calculating entropy and mutual information between frames using Fibonacci method. The obtained results of this approach show its stability and better performance over other existing approaches of motion measurements. Meanwhile, findings of this paper lay a foundation for motion pattern of WCEs inside the large intestine, which will benefit other medical applications.

  5. Optimal management of Barrett's esophagus: pharmacologic, endoscopic, and surgical interventions.

    PubMed

    Konda, Vani Ja; Dalal, Kunal

    2011-01-01

    Esophageal adenocarcinoma and its precursor, Barrett's esophagus, are rapidly rising in incidence. This review serves to highlight the role of pharmacologic, endoscopic, and surgical intervention in the management of Barrett's esophagus, which requires acid suppression and endoscopic assessment. Treatment with a proton pump inhibitor may decrease acid exposure and delay the progression to dysplasia. Patients who require aspirin for cardioprotection or other indications may also benefit in terms of a protective effect against the development of esophageal cancer. However, without other indications, aspirin is not indicated solely to prevent cancer. A careful endoscopic examination should include assessment of any visible lesions in a Barrett's segment. An expert gastrointestinal pathologist should confirm neoplasia in the setting of Barrett's esophagus. For those patients with high-grade dysplasia or intramucosal carcinoma, careful consideration of endoscopic therapy or surgical therapy must be given. All visible lesions in the setting of dysplasia should be targeted with focal endoscopic mucosal resection for both accurate histopathologic diagnosis and treatment. The remainder of the Barrett's epithelium should be eradicated to address all synchronous and metachronous lesions. This may be done by tissue acquiring or nontissue acquiring means. Radiofrequency ablation has a positive benefit-risk profile for flat Barrett's esophagus. At this time, endoscopic therapy is not indicated for nondysplastic Barrett's esophagus. Esophagectomy is still reserved for selected cases with evidence of lymph node metastasis, unsuccessful endoscopic therapy, or with high-risk features of high-grade dysplasia or intramucosal carcinoma.

  6. Gastrointestinal endoscopy in the pregnant woman

    PubMed Central

    Friedel, David; Stavropoulos, Stavros; Iqbal, Shahzad; Cappell, Mitchell S

    2014-01-01

    About 20000 gastrointestinal endoscopies are performed annually in America in pregnant women. Gastrointestinal endoscopy during pregnancy raises the critical issue of fetal safety in addition to patient safety. Endoscopic medications may be potentially abortifacient or teratogenic. Generally, Food and Drug Administration category B or C drugs should be used for endoscopy. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) seems to be relatively safe for both mother and fetus based on two retrospective studies of 83 and 60 pregnant patients. The diagnostic yield is about 95% when EGD is performed for gastrointestinal bleeding. EGD indications during pregnancy include acute gastrointestinal bleeding, dysphagia > 1 wk, or endoscopic therapy. Therapeutic EGD is experimental due to scant data, but should be strongly considered for urgent indications such as active bleeding. One study of 48 sigmoidoscopies performed during pregnancy showed relatively favorable fetal outcomes, rare bad fetal outcomes, and bad outcomes linked to very sick mothers. Sigmoidoscopy should be strongly considered for strong indications, including significant acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding, chronic diarrhea, distal colonic stricture, suspected inflammatory bowel disease flare, and potential colonic malignancy. Data on colonoscopy during pregnancy are limited. One study of 20 pregnant patients showed rare poor fetal outcomes. Colonoscopy is generally experimental during pregnancy, but can be considered for strong indications: known colonic mass/stricture, active lower gastrointestinal bleeding, or colonoscopic therapy. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) entails fetal risks from fetal radiation exposure. ERCP risks to mother and fetus appear to be acceptable when performed for ERCP therapy, as demonstrated by analysis of nearly 350 cases during pregnancy. Justifiable indications include symptomatic or complicated choledocholithiasis, manifested by jaundice, cholangitis, gallstone

  7. Pediatric gastrointestinal endoscopy: European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) and European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology Hepatology and Nutrition (ESPGHAN) Guideline Executive summary.

    PubMed

    Tringali, Andrea; Thomson, Mike; Dumonceau, Jean-Marc; Tavares, Marta; Tabbers, Merit M; Furlano, Raoul; Spaander, Manon; Hassan, Cesare; Tzvinikos, Christos; Ijsselstijn, Hanneke; Viala, Jérôme; Dall'Oglio, Luigi; Benninga, Marc; Orel, Rok; Vandenplas, Yvan; Keil, Radan; Romano, Claudio; Brownstone, Eva; Hlava, Štěpán; Gerner, Patrick; Dolak, Werner; Landi, Rosario; Huber, Wolf Dietrich; Everett, Simon; Vecsei, Andreas; Aabakken, Lars; Amil-Dias, Jorge; Zambelli, Alessandro

    2017-01-01

    This Executive summary of the Guideline on pediatric gastrointestinal endoscopy from the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) and the European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology Hepatology and Nutrition (ESPGHAN) refers to infants, children, and adolescents aged 0 - 18 years. The areas covered include: indications for diagnostic and therapeutic esophagogastroduodenoscopy and ileocolonoscopy; endoscopy for foreign body ingestion; endoscopic management of corrosive ingestion and stricture/stenosis; upper and lower gastrointestinal bleeding; endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, and endoscopic ultrasonography. Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy and endoscopy specific to inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have been dealt with in other Guidelines and are therefore not mentioned in this Guideline. Training and ongoing skill maintenance will be addressed in an imminent sister publication.

  8. Correction method of bending loss in the hollow optical fiber for endoscopic submucosal dissection using carbon dioxide laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusakari, Daisuke; Hazama, Hisanao; Awazu, Kunio

    2015-03-01

    Endoscopic submucosal dissection using carbon dioxide laser is a promising treatment of early digestive cancer because it can avoid the risk of perforation. Although a hollow optical fiber transmitting mid-infrared light has been used, it was observed that the irradiation effect was influenced by bending a gastrointestinal gastrointestinal endoscope due to the change in transmittance by the bending loss. Therefore, we quantitatively evaluated the change in the irradiation effect by bending the hollow optical fiber in the gastrointestinal endoscope and proposed a correction method to stabilize the irradiation effect. First, the relationship between the irradiated laser energy density and the incision depth for porcine stomach was measured by bending the head of the gastrointestinal endoscope. Next, the relationship between the bending angle of the head of the gastrointestinal endoscope and the temperature rise of the hollow optical fiber in the head of the gastrointestinal endoscope was measured during the laser irradiation. As a result, the laser energy density and the incision depth decreased as the bending angle increased, and linear correlation between the laser energy density and the incision depth was observed. It was found that the bending angle can be estimated by the ratio of the setting laser power to time derivative of the temporal profile of the temperature of the hollow optical fiber. In conclusion, it is suggested that the correction of the laser energy density and stabilization of the incision capability is possible by measuring the temporal profile of the temperature of the hollow optical fiber.

  9. Recent Trends in Endoscopic Bariatric Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hyuk Soon; Chun, Hoon Jai

    2017-01-01

    Obesity and its associated metabolic diseases including diabetes mellitus are severe medical problems that are increasing in prevalence worldwide and result in significant healthcare expenses. While behavioral and pharmacological treatment approaches are partly effective in the short term, their effects are not long-lasting. Although previous studies have described bariatric surgery as the most effective treatment for obesity, it is associated with morbidity, mortality, and economic burden. Endoluminal interventions performed entirely using gastrointestinal flexible endoscopy offer alternative approaches to the treatment of obesity that are safer and more cost-effective than current surgical approaches. The use of endoluminal techniques in the field of metabolic obesity disease has diverse promising applications including endoscopic gastroplasty, intragastric balloon, endoluminal malabsorptive bariatric procedures, and gastric electrical stimulation (GES) for the modulation of gastric emptying. This review discusses recent trends and roles in endoscopic bariatric therapies using the currently available endoluminal and transgastric technologies. PMID:28147471

  10. Endoscopic submucosal dissection for early esophageal cancer associated with achalasia.

    PubMed

    Ohkura, Yu; Iizuka, Toshiro; Kikuchi, Daisuke; Yamashita, Satoshi; Nakamura, Masanori; Matsui, Akira; Mitani, Toshifumi; Hoteya, Shu; Kaise, Mitsuru; Yahagi, Naohisa

    2013-01-01

    Esophageal achalasia is often associated with esophageal cancer. However, in many cases, esophageal cancer tends to be found in an advanced stage, with a poor prognosis. However, early-stage cancer was detected recently due to the advances in endoscopic instruments. In those cases, it is important to facilitate successful treatment by endoscopic submucosal dissection. We analyzed a total of six cases of esophageal cancer with achalasia in four patients treated with endoscopic submucosal dissection. Three features common to all six cases had a bearing on how endoscopic submucosal dissection was performed. First, esophageal dilatation and diminished peristalsis facilitated the performance of successful endoscopic submucosal dissection. Second, the esophageal wall was thickened, primarily with muscular tissue. Third, the submucosal layer contained abundant blood vessels that made it difficult to minimize bleeding during dissection. Those findings suggest that endoscopic submucosal dissection for early esophageal cancer associated with achalasia is a safe and potentially curative procedure. It is important, therefore, to detect esophageal cancer early.

  11. Role of Clinical Endoscopy in Emphasizing Endoscope Disinfection

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Ji Kon; Kim, Eun Young; Kwon, Kwang An; Choi, Il Ju

    2015-01-01

    Based on the unexpected Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) outbreak in Korea, it was established that the virus can spread easily, MERS exposure in hospitals carries an extreme risk for infection as well as mortality, and the sharing of information was essential for infection control. Although the incidence of exogenous infections related to contaminated endoscopes is very low, the majority of published outbreaks have been caused by various shortcomings in reprocessing procedures, including insufficient training or awareness. Ever since the inauguration of "Clinical Endoscopy" as an English-language journal of the Korean Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy in 2011, it has published several articles on disinfection of the endoscope and its accessories. Many Science Citation Index journals have also emphasized high-level disinfection of the gastrointestinal endoscope. Many papers have been produced specifically, since the outbreak of carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae in 2013. The recent review papers concluded that quality control is the most important issue among all the aspects of procedural care, including the efficiency of the gastrointestinal endoscopy unit and reprocessing room. Thorough reprocessing of endoscopes using high-level disinfection and sterilization methods may be essential for reducing the risk of infection. PMID:26473114

  12. [Preventive effect of postoperative disinfection of endoscope on bacterial adhesion to endoscope].

    PubMed

    Uwagawa, T; Okabe, N; Matsumoto, T; Kurihara, H; Miyamoto, S; Tujihara, Y; Takahashi, T; Sakurai, I; Matsumoto, F; Yamazaki, Y

    1999-10-01

    We took culture of throat swab from 77 subjects who were negative for infection of HBV, HCV, HIV and syphilis infection before and after endoscopy. Moreover, the existence of bacterium including Helicobacter pylori at overcoat of endoscopic instrument was investigated right after examination and after disinfection of endoscope. Povidoneiodine, 70% alcohol and 1% benzalkonium chloride was used as a disinfectant for endoscope, and it took less than 10 minutes to wash by hand to disinfection. alpha-haemolytic streptococci, Staphylococcus epidermids, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Enterococcus faecalis, Candida, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and MRSA were cultured in throat swab. The rate of adhesion of bacterium especially such as Candida, K. pneumoniae and S. epidermids to endoscope was considerably high. 23 of 77 subjects had H. pylori infection, and the adhesion of H. pylori to endoscope was found to be 65.2% of the subjects. On the contrast, no bacterium was detected from the endoscopic instrument after careful disinfection. These findings stress the importance of postoperative disinfection of the endoscope to prevent the chance to acquire bacterial infection.

  13. Optimizing early upper gastrointestinal cancer detection at endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Veitch, Andrew M; Uedo, Noriya; Yao, Kenshi; East, James E

    2015-11-01

    Survival rates for upper gastrointestinal cancers are poor and oesophageal cancer incidence is increasing. Upper gastrointestinal cancer is also often missed during examinations; a predicament that has not yet been sufficiently addressed. Improvements in the detection of premalignant lesions, early oesophageal and gastric cancers will enable organ-preserving endoscopic therapy, potentially reducing the number of advanced upper gastrointestinal cancers and resulting in improved prognosis. Japan is a world leader in high-quality diagnostic upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and the clinical routine in this country differs substantially from Western practice. In this Perspectives article, we review lessons learnt from Japanese gastroscopy technique, training and screening for risk stratification. We suggest a key performance indicator for upper gastrointestinal endoscopy with a minimum total procedure time of 8 min, and examine how quality assurance concepts in bowel cancer screening in the UK could be applied to upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and improve clinical practice.

  14. Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Therapies in Pancreatic Neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Dennis; DiMaio, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) has evolved from being primarily a diagnostic modality into an interventional endoscopic tool for the management of both benign and malignant gastrointestinal illnesses. EUS-guided therapy has garnered particular interest as a minimally invasive approach for the treatment of pancreatic cancer, a disease often complicated by its aggressive course and poor survival. The potential advantage of an EUS-guided approach revolves around real-time imaging for targeted therapy of a difficult to reach organ. In this review, we focus on EUS-guided therapies for pancreatic neoplasms. PMID:25802863

  15. [Endoscopic submucosal excavation (ESE) is a safe and useful technique for endoscopic removal of submucosal tumors of the stomach and the esophagus in selected cases].

    PubMed

    Reinehr, R

    2015-06-01

    Submucosal tumors of stomach and esophagus are often detected incidentally during endoscopy and further characterized by endoscopic ultrasonography. After risk estimation such submucosal tumors are either controlled by watchful waiting or surgically resected. Nevertheless, symptomatic submucosal tumors should be treated. Endoscopic submucosal excavation (ESE) and submucosal tunneling endoscopic resection (STER) may represent an alternative non-surgical therapeutic option. Two cases of complete endoscopic resection of symptomatic submucosal tumors are reported: a small gastrointestinal stroma tumor (GIST) of the antrum and a 12  cm long esophageal lipoma. For selected cases, ESE of symptomatic submucosal tumors of stomach and esophagus represents a useful alternative compared to surgical removal particularly if mass is located in antrum or corpus, sized < 20  mm and clearly defined by endoscopic ultrasonography.

  16. Nodular colitis: endoscopic image an unusual finding.

    PubMed

    Loza Vargas, L A; Núñez Rodríguez, Henar; Benito Sanz, Marina; Zamora Martínez, Tomás; Díez Redondo, Pilar; Pérez Miranda, Manuel

    2016-10-01

    An 82-year-old male with a history of high blood pressure, COPD, chronic myeloid leukemia, and stage-4 chronic renal failure. Admitted to hospital for lower-limb cellulitis and severe COPD exacerbation, he received antibiotic therapy and bronchodilators. During his hospital stay he developed severe anemia and had an hematochezia event with no diarrhea. A complete colonoscopy found small (4-7 mm) nacreous elevated lesions, circumferential in shape, in the cecum and ascending colon with some bleeding stigmata and submucosal bleeding suggestive of infectious colitis; stool culture was negative and Clostridium difficile toxins were positive. The condition was histologically confirmed.

  17. Advantages of laser application in endoscopic surgery.

    PubMed

    Hunter, J G

    1993-08-01

    This article discusses the various kinds of laser therapy used in endoscopic surgery and their respective indications. Following a brief introduction into the basics of laser-tissue-interaction it is shown how less expensive treatment modalities have narrowed the range of laser applications to very specific purposes. In upper gastrointestinal bleeding argon and KTP lasers are mainly used for treatment of pigmented gut lesions. In malignant disease the combined use of balloon dilatation and laser irradiation has proved efficient in restoring patency to the gastrointestinal tract. Argon and CO2 lasers are used by gynaecologists for ablation of endometrioma. In an assessment of future prospects it is concluded that the lasting value of the laser lies in its ability to selectively destroy pigmented pathologic tissues.

  18. Duodenal plexiform fibromyxoma as a cause of obscure upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Moris, Demetrios; Spanou, Evangelia; Sougioultzis, Stavros; Dimitrokallis, Nikolaos; Kalisperati, Polyxeni; Delladetsima, Ioanna; Felekouras, Evangelos

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: We are reporting the first-to our knowledge-case of duodenal Plexiform Fibromyxoma causing obscure upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Patient concerns: Plexiform fibromyxoma triggered recurrent upper gastrointestinal bleeding episodes in a 63-year-old man who remained undiagnosed, despite multiple hospitalizations, extensive diagnostic workups and surgical interventions (including gastrectomies), for almost 17 years. Diagnoses-Interventions: During hospitalization for the last bleeding episode, an upper gastrointestinal endoscopy revealed an intestinal hemorrhagic nodule. The lesion was deemed unresectable by endoscopic means. An abdominal computerized tomography disclosed no further lesions and surgery was decided. The lesion at operation was found near the edge of the duodenal stump and treated with pancreas-preserving duodenectomy (1st and 2nd portion). Outcomes: Postoperative recovery was mainly uneventful and a 20-month follow-up finds the patient in good health with no need for blood transfusions. Plexiform fibromyxomas stand for a rare and widely unknown mesenchymal entity. Despite the fact that they closely resemble other gastrointestinal tumors, they distinctly vary in clinical management as well as the histopathology. Clinical awareness and further research are compulsory to elucidate its clinical course and prognosis. PMID:28072751

  19. Use of water jet instruments in gastrointestinal endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Nakano, Toru; Sato, Chiaki; Sakurai, Tadashi; Kamei, Takashi; Nakagawa, Atsuhiro; Ohuchi, Noriaki

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, water jet instruments have been used in the field of gastrointestinal endoscopy, mainly in two clinical situations: Investigation and treatment under endoscopic view. Injecting water jet into the gastrointestinal lumen is helpful for maintaining a clear endoscopic view, washing away blood or mucous in the lumen or on the surface of the tip of the endoscope. This contributes to reducing time and discomfort of examination. Water jet technology is an alternative method for dissecting soft tissue; this method does not harm the small vessels or cause mechanical or thermal damage. However, its use in clinical settings has been limited to the transmucosal injection of water into the submucosal layer that elevates the mucosa to prepare for endoscopic mucosal resection or endoscopic submucosal dissection, instead of tissue dissection, which may occur because of the continuous water jet. A preclinical study has been conducted using a pulsed water jet system as an alternative method for submucosal dissection by reducing intraoperative water consumption and maintenance of dissection capability. This review introduces recent studies pertaining to using a water jet in gastrointestinal endoscopy and discusses future prospects. PMID:26862362

  20. Use of water jet instruments in gastrointestinal endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Toru; Sato, Chiaki; Sakurai, Tadashi; Kamei, Takashi; Nakagawa, Atsuhiro; Ohuchi, Noriaki

    2016-02-10

    In recent years, water jet instruments have been used in the field of gastrointestinal endoscopy, mainly in two clinical situations: Investigation and treatment under endoscopic view. Injecting water jet into the gastrointestinal lumen is helpful for maintaining a clear endoscopic view, washing away blood or mucous in the lumen or on the surface of the tip of the endoscope. This contributes to reducing time and discomfort of examination. Water jet technology is an alternative method for dissecting soft tissue; this method does not harm the small vessels or cause mechanical or thermal damage. However, its use in clinical settings has been limited to the transmucosal injection of water into the submucosal layer that elevates the mucosa to prepare for endoscopic mucosal resection or endoscopic submucosal dissection, instead of tissue dissection, which may occur because of the continuous water jet. A preclinical study has been conducted using a pulsed water jet system as an alternative method for submucosal dissection by reducing intraoperative water consumption and maintenance of dissection capability. This review introduces recent studies pertaining to using a water jet in gastrointestinal endoscopy and discusses future prospects.

  1. Infectious diseases of gastrointestinal tract in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Marsh, W W

    2000-06-01

    This article reviews the following gastrointestinal infections: esophagitis, gastritis, duodenitis including duodenal ulcers, and enteritis (gastroenteritis). The epidemiology, risk factors, microbiology and pathogenesis, diagnosis, treatment, morbidity/mortality, and prevention are discussed in relation to the most important pathogens. The symptoms and pathogenesis of esophagitis caused by Candida albicans and herpes simplex are contrasted with the symptoms of esophagitis caused by Helicobacter pylori and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). The incidence of gastritis and gastric and duodenal ulcers caused by H. pylori is discussed. The treatment regimens of H. pylori infection recommended by the CDC are presented. Endoscopic findings in esophagitis, gastritis, and duodenal ulcers are presented and discussed. The difference in symptoms caused by viral agents (Norwalk virus), bacterial agents (enterotoxigenic E. coli), and parasites (Giardia lamblia and Cryptosporidium parvum) are compared and contrasted. The symptoms of infections of the terminal small bowel caused by Salmonella and Campylobacter jejuni and the symptoms of pure colonic infection, dysentery, caused by Shigella and enteroinvasive E. coli and Entamoeba histolytica are discussed. The treatment regimens for enteritis are presented.

  2. Endoscopic Management of Esthesioneuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Roxbury, Christopher R; Ishii, Masaru; Gallia, Gary L; Reh, Douglas D

    2016-02-01

    Esthesioneuroblastoma is a rare malignant tumor of sinonasal origin. These tumors typically present with unilateral nasal obstruction and epistaxis, and diagnosis is confirmed on biopsy. Over the past 15 years, significant advances have been made in endoscopic technology and techniques that have made this tumor amenable to expanded endonasal resection. There is growing evidence supporting the feasibility of safe and effective resection of esthesioneuroblastoma via an expanded endonasal approach. This article outlines a technique for endoscopic resection of esthesioneuroblastoma and reviews the current literature on esthesioneuroblastoma with emphasis on outcomes after endoscopic resection of these malignant tumors.

  3. Guidelines for Safety in the Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Unit

    PubMed Central

    Calderwood, Audrey H.; Chapman, Frank J.; Cohen, Jonathan; Cohen, Lawrence B.; Collins, James; Day, Lukejohn W.; Early, Dayna S.

    2014-01-01

    EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Historically, safety in the gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy unit has focused on infection control, particularly around the reprocessing of endoscopes. Two highly publicized outbreaks where the transmission of infectious agents were related to GI endoscopy have highlighted the need to address potential gaps along the endoscopy care continuum that could impact patient safety. PMID:24485393

  4. General considerations and updates in pediatric gastrointestinal diagnostic endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Gastrointestinal and colonic endoscopic examinations have been performed in pediatric patients in Korea for 3 decades. Endoscopic procedures are complex and may be unsafe if special concerns are not considered. Many things have to be kept in mind before, during, and after the procedure. Gastrointestinal endoscopy is one of the most frequently performed procedure in children nowadays, Since the dimension size of the endoscopy was modified for pediatric patients 15 years ago, endoscopic procedures are almost performed routinely in pediatric gastrointestinal patients. The smaller size of the scope let the physicians approach the diagnostic and therapeutic endoscopic procedures. But this is an invasive procedure, so the procedure itself may provoke an emergence state. The procedure-related complications can more easily occur in pediatric patients. Sedation-related or procedure-related respiratory, cardiovascular complications are mostly important and critical in the care. The endoscopists are required to consider diverse aspects of the procedure - patient preparation, indications and contraindications, infection controls, sedation methods, sedative medicines and the side effects of each medicine, monitoring during and after the procedure, and complications related with the procedure and medicines - to perform the procedure successfully and safely. This article presents some important guidelines and recommendations for gastrointestinal endoscopy through literature review. PMID:21189965

  5. Metastatic renal cell carcinoma from a native kidney of a renal transplant patient diagnosed by endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Alastal, Yaseen; Hammad, Tariq A; Rafiq, Ehsan; Nawras, Mohamad; Alaradi, Osama

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) biopsy sampling of enlarged lymph nodes is increasingly used to diagnose metastatic tumors, especially of the gastrointestinal tract and the lungs. Herein, we describe the diagnosis of metastatic renal cell carcinoma from a native kidney of a 54 year-old male patient, who had a 5-years history of renal transplant, by EUS-FNA of mediastinal and celiac lymph nodes. Histological and immunohistochemical findings confirmed the origin of metastatic tumor. EUS-FNA with proper cytological evaluation can be useful in the diagnosis of metastatic renal cell carcinoma in renal transplant patients. PMID:28326261

  6. [Gastrointestinal bezoars].

    PubMed

    Espinoza González, Ricardo

    2016-08-01

    Gastrointestinal bezoars are a concretion of indigested material that can be found in the gastrointestinal tract of humans and some animals. This material forms an intraluminal mass, more commonly located in the stomach. During a large period of history animal bezoars were considered antidotes to poisons and diseases. We report a historical overview since bezoars stones were thought to have medicinal properties. This magic conception was introduced in South America by Spanish conquerors. In Chile, bezoars are commonly found in a camelid named guanaco (Lama guanicoe). People at Central Chile and the Patagonia believed that bezoar stones had magical properties and they were traded at very high prices. In Santiago, during the eighteenth century the Jesuit apothecary sold preparations of bezoar stones. The human bezoars may be formed by non-digestible material like cellulose (phytobezoar), hair (trichobezoar), conglomerations of medications or his vehicles (pharmacobezoar or medication bezoar), milk and mucus component (lactobezoar) or other varieties of substances. This condition may be asymptomatic or can produce abdominal pain, ulceration, gastrointestinal bleeding, gastric outlet obstruction, perforation and mechanical intestinal obstruction. We report their classification, diagnostic modalities and treatment.

  7. Endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy

    MedlinePlus

    Endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy (ETS) is surgery to treat sweating that is much heavier than normal. This condition ... hyperhidrosis . Usually the surgery is used to treat sweating in the palms or face. The sympathetic nerves ...

  8. Endoscopic cubital tunnel release.

    PubMed

    Cobb, Tyson K

    2010-10-01

    A minimally invasive endoscopic approach has been successfully applied to surgical treatment of cubital tunnel syndrome. This procedure allows for smaller incisions with faster recovery time. This article details relevant surgical anatomy, indications, contraindications, surgical technique, complications, and postoperative management.

  9. Reality named endoscopic ultrasound biliary drainage.

    PubMed

    Guedes, Hugo Gonçalo; Lopes, Roberto Iglesias; de Oliveira, Joel Fernandez; Artifon, Everson Luiz de Almeida

    2015-10-25

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) is used for diagnosis and evaluation of many diseases of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. In the past, it was used to guide a cholangiography, but nowadays it emerges as a powerful therapeutic tool in biliary drainage. The aims of this review are: outline the rationale for endoscopic ultrasound-guided biliary drainage (EGBD); detail the procedural technique; evaluate the clinical outcomes and limitations of the method; and provide recommendations for the practicing clinician. In cases of failed endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP), patients are usually referred for either percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (PTBD) or surgical bypass. Both these procedures have high rates of undesirable complications. EGBD is an attractive alternative to PTBD or surgery when ERCP fails. EGBD can be performed at two locations: transhepatic or extrahepatic, and the stent can be inserted in an antegrade or retrograde fashion. The drainage route can be transluminal, duodenal or transpapillary, which, again, can be antegrade or retrograde [rendezvous (EUS-RV)]. Complications of all techniques combined include pneumoperitoneum, bleeding, bile leak/peritonitis and cholangitis. We recommend EGBD when bile duct access is not possible because of failed cannulation, altered upper GI tract anatomy, gastric outlet obstruction, a distorted ampulla or a periampullary diverticulum, as a minimally invasive alternative to surgery or radiology.

  10. Autonomous Retroflexion of a Magnetic Flexible Endoscope.

    PubMed

    Slawinski, Piotr R; Taddese, Addisu Z; Musto, Kyle B; Obstein, Keith L; Valdastri, Pietro

    2017-07-01

    Retroflexion during colonoscopy is typically only practiced in the wider proximal and distal ends of the large intestine owing to the stiff nature of the colonoscope. This inability to examine the proximal side of the majority of colon folds contributes to today's suboptimal colorectal cancer detection rates. We have developed an algorithm for autonomous retroflexion of a flexible endoscope that is actuated magnetically from the tip. The magnetic wrench applied on the tip of the endoscope is optimized in real-time with data from pose detection to compute motions of the actuating magnet. This is the first example of a completely autonomous maneuver by a magnetic endoscope for exploration of the gastrointestinal tract. The proposed approach was validated in plastic tubes of various diameters with a success rate of 98.8% for separation distances up to 50 mm. Additionally, a set of trials was conducted in an excised porcine colon observing a success rate of 100% with a mean time of 19.7 s. In terms of clinical safety, the maximum stress that is applied on the colon wall with our methodology is an order of magnitude below what would damage tissue.

  11. Design of Endoscopic Capsule With Multiple Cameras.

    PubMed

    Gu, Yingke; Xie, Xiang; Li, Guolin; Sun, Tianjia; Wang, Dan; Yin, Zheng; Zhang, Pengfei; Wang, Zhihua

    2015-08-01

    In order to reduce the miss rate of the wireless capsule endoscopy, in this paper, we propose a new system of the endoscopic capsule with multiple cameras. A master-slave architecture, including an efficient bus architecture and a four level clock management architecture, is applied for the Multiple Cameras Endoscopic Capsule (MCEC). For covering more area of the gastrointestinal tract wall with low power, multiple cameras with a smart image capture strategy, including movement sensitive control and camera selection, are used in the MCEC. To reduce the data transfer bandwidth and power consumption to prolong the MCEC's working life, a low complexity image compressor with PSNR 40.7 dB and compression rate 86% is implemented. A chipset is designed and implemented for the MCEC and a six cameras endoscopic capsule prototype is implemented by using the chipset. With the smart image capture strategy, the coverage rate of the MCEC prototype can achieve 98% and its power consumption is only about 7.1 mW.

  12. Endoscopic ultrasonography: Challenges and opportunities in the developing world.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Furqaan

    2014-05-06

    Endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) has become a vital diagnostic modality for the evaluation of mediastinal lymphadenopathy, pancreatic cysts and masses, anorectal pathology, subepithelial gastrointestinal lesions, and for the staging of many gastrointestinal and pulmonary malignancies. Establishing a EUS program in a developing country presents many challenges. Doing so in Pakistan has led to the identification of the following challenges: initial investment, ongoing costs (particularly fine needle aspiration needle costs), awareness and cytopathology. Endoscopic ultrasonography has revolutionized aspects of the practice of gastroenterology and oncology in the West. This technique is becoming increasingly available in the developing world, where it poses unique challenges to its practice. These challenges include those relating to service initiation and maintenance costs, physician awareness, and on-site cytopathology access. If these issues are anticipated and addressed in ways appropriate to local circumstances, obstacles to the institution of EUS programs can be overcome.

  13. Successful endoscopic removal of a swallowed toothbrush: case report.

    PubMed

    Tonkic, Ante; Bogdanovic, Zoran; Grandić, Leo

    2011-04-06

    Most ingested foreign bodies will pass uneventfully through the gastrointestinal tract. Nevertheless, long and rigid foreign bodies are associated with an increased risk of gastrointestinal impaction, perforation and bleeding. Moreover, there has been no case of spontaneous passage of a toothbrush reported. Therefore, the prompt removal of such ingested foreign objects is recommended before complications develop. This case report describes a case of an 18-year-old woman who accidentally swallowed her toothbrush. The toothbrush was successfully removed via flexible endoscopy using a polypectomy snare. A swallowed toothbrush is a special clinical challenge. Early endoscopic retrieval of the toothbrush is critical for reducing morbidity and mortality. In cases when endoscopic removal fails, a laparoscopic surgical approach may be an alternative.

  14. Endoscopic band ligation: Beyond prevention and management of gastroesophageal varices

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Jeong-Seon; Cho, Young-Seok

    2013-01-01

    Endoscopic band ligation (EBL) is the preferred endoscopic technique for the endoscopic treatment of acute esophageal variceal bleeding. EBL has also been used to treat nonvariceal bleeding. Recently, Han et al demonstrated that EBL can be a feasible and safe alternate technique for the management of iatrogenic gastric perforation especially in cases in which closure with endoclips is difficult. EBL is technically simpler to perform than other methods and provides a good view of the lesions under direct pressure and suction from the transparent ligation cap. EBL can be used even if the diameter of the perforation is greater than 10 mm or if there is a severe tangential angle. In this commentary, we discuss the efficacy and safety of EBL for the closure of iatrogenic gastrointestinal perforation. We also discuss the advantages and disadvantages of EBL for the treatment of nonvariceal bleeding. PMID:23885137

  15. Endoscopic vacuum therapy for esophageal perforations and leakages

    PubMed Central

    Möschler, Oliver; Nies, Christoph; Mueller, Michael K.

    2015-01-01

    Background and study aims: Injuries to the esophageal wall, such as perforations and anastomotic leaks, are serious complications of surgical and endoscopic interventions. Since 2006, a new treatment has been introduced, in the form of endoscopically placed vacuum sponge therapy. Patients and methods: Between April 2012 and October 2014, 10 patients (5 men and 5 women) aged 57 to 94 years were treated at our institution using endoscopic vacuum therapy (EVT) in the upper gastrointestinal tract. Results: The defect in the esophageal wall was successfully closed in seven of the 10 patients (70 %). No severe complications occurred. Conclusions: EVT is a valuable tool for management of defects in the esophageal wall and should be considered as a treatment option for patients with this condition. PMID:26716111

  16. Elements Involved In Promoting Eosinophilic Gastrointestinal Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Anshi; Mishra, Akanksha; Venkateshaiah, Sathisha Upparahalli; Manohar, Murli; Mahadevappa, Chandrashekara Puthanapura; Mishra, Anil

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophilic gastrointestinal disorders (EGID) are food allergen-induced allergic gastrointestinal disorders, characterized by accumulation of highly induced eosinophils in different segments of gastrointestinal tract along with eosinophil microabssess and extracellular eosinophilic granules in the epithelial layer. EGID are both IgE- and cell-mediated group of diseases that include eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE), eosinophilic gastritis (EG), eosinophilic gastroenteritis (EGE) and eosinophilic colitis (EC). Despite the increased incidences and considerable progress made in understanding EGID pathogenesis. The mechanism is still not well understood. It has been shown that IL-4, IL-5, IL-13, IL-15, IL-18, eotaxin-1, eotaxin-2 and eotaxin-3 play a critical role in EGID pathogenesis. Currently, the only criterion for diagnosing EoE, EGE and EC are repetitive endoscopic and histopathological evaluation of biopsies along with other clinical characteristics/manifestations. Antigen elimination and corticosteroid therapies are the most effective therapies currently in practice for the treatment of EGID. The cytokines (anti-IL-5 and anti-IL-13) therapy trials were not very successful in case of EoE. Most recently, a clinical trial using anti-IL-13 reported only 60% reduced esophageal eosinophilia without achieving primary endpoint. This clinical finding is not surprising and is in accordance with our earlier report indicating that IL-13 is not critical in the initiation of EoE. Notably, EGID still has no reliable noninvasive diagnostic biomarkers. Hence, there is a great necessity to identify novel noninvasive diagnostic biomarkers that can easily diagnose EGID and provide an effective therapy. Now, the attention is required to target cell types like iNKT cells that produce eosinophil active cytokines and is found induced in the pathogenesis of both experimental and human EoE. iNKT cell neutralization is shown to protect allergen-induced EoE in experimental model. In this

  17. Endoscopic Closure of Duodenal Perforation with the Over-the-scope-clipping System

    PubMed Central

    Furukawa, Kazuhiro; Miyahara, Ryoji; Funasaka, Kohei; Yamamura, Takeshi; Ohno, Eizaburo; Nakamura, Masanao; Kawashima, Hiroki; Watanabe, Osamu; Hirooka, Yoshiki; Goto, Hidemi

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic treatment for superficial non-ampullary duodenal tumors is technically difficult and challenging due to the anatomical characteristics of the duodenum. It is frequently complicated by procedural accidents, such as perforation. Surgical repair has long been the standard treatment for acute iatrogenic gastrointestinal perforation. However, endoscopic closure has recently emerged as an attractive alternative. In the patient presented herein, the over-the-scope-clipping system (OTSC system) was found to be useful for closing a duodenal perforation that had occurred during endoscopic submucosal dissection. For endoscopists who perform endoscopic treatment of the duodenum, endoscopic closure with the OTSC system is considered to be a technique that is necessary to master. PMID:27803406

  18. Iatrogenic oesophageal perforation during placement of an endoscopic vacuum therapy device.

    PubMed

    Halliday, Edwin; Patel, Anant; Hindmarsh, Andrew; Sujendran, Vijay

    2016-07-28

    Endoscopic vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) is increasingly being used as a means of managing perforations or anastomotic leaks of the upper gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Published outcomes are favourable, with few mentions of complications or morbidity. We present a case in which the management of a gastric perforation with endoscopic vacuum therapy was complicated by cervical oesophageal perforation. The case highlights the risks of such endoscopic therapeutic procedures and is the first report in the literature to describe significant visceral injury during placement of a VAC device for upper GI perforation. Iatrogenic oesophageal perforation is an inherent risk to upper GI endoscopy and the risk increases in therapeutic endoscopic procedures. Complications may be reduced by management under a multidisciplinary team in a centre with specialist upper GI services. There is no doubt that the endoscopic VAC approach is becoming established practice, and training in its use must reflect its increasingly widespread adoption.

  19. Endoscopic facelift: two years' experience.

    PubMed

    Chajchir, A

    1997-01-01

    In the upcoming Twenty-first Century, we will find many surgical methods and devices that come to fulfill one of the main objectives of the aesthetic plastic surgery: to reduce scars, especially in facial surgery. Endoscopy is one of those methods. In my experience of the last two years, I have used this technique, sometimes combined with CO2 laser to partially remove glabellar muscles and the platysma fibers of the middle part of the neck. This work shows the results from 160 patients undergoing endoscopic forehead lift and neck contouring, using specially designed instruments. The results are highly significant and satisfactory.

  20. Gastric ulcer penetrating to liver diagnosed by endoscopic biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Kayacetin, Ertugrul; Kayacetin, Serra

    2004-01-01

    Liver penetration is a rare but serious complication of peptic ulcer disease. Usually the diagnosis is made by operation or autopsy. Clinical and laboratory data were no specific. A 64-year-old man was admitted with upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Hepatic penetration was diagnosed as the cause of bleeding. Endoscopy showed a large gastric ulcer with a pseudotumoral mass protruding from the ulcer bed. Definitive diagnosis was established by endoscopic biopsies of the ulcer base. PMID:15188520

  1. [Difficult endoscopic extraction: pneumomediastinum and bilateral pneumothorax after attempted endoscopic extraction of needle incarcerated in hiatal hernia].

    PubMed

    Scamporrino, A; Mongardini, M; Stagnitti, F; Corona, F; Costantini, A; Priore, F M; Tiberi, R; Iannetti, A; Occhigrossi, G

    2002-01-01

    From June 1987 to April 2000, 167 (74%) of 223 patients suspected of swallowing foreign bodies were treated. Hundred-sixty-three were successfully treated endoscopically. The surgery rate was 2.4%. There was failure to remove a tablespoon, a tooth-brush, a dental prostheses with metallic hook, a knitting-needle. The sharp and pointed foreign bodies were 35 (20.9%). Endoscopic removal of sharp and pointed foreign bodies in the upper gastrointestinal tract can be very difficult to manage. The Authors report iatrogenic perforation of esophagus-gastric-fundus in a patient with hiatus hernia who ingested a big knitting-needle in order to suicide. They think that it is absolutely necessary to use special endoscopic equipment during the taking out of foreign-body procedure, especially when pointed and sharp-edge shaped bodies are involved and when there is high risk of iatrogenic lesions.

  2. How to establish endoscopic submucosal dissection in Western countries

    PubMed Central

    Oyama, Tsuneo; Yahagi, Naohisa; Ponchon, Thierry; Kiesslich, Tobias; Berr, Frieder

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) has been invented in Japan to provide resection for cure of early cancer in the gastrointestinal tract. Professional level of ESD requires excellent staging of early neoplasias with image enhanced endoscopy (IEE) to make correct indications for ESD, and high skills in endoscopic electrosurgical dissection. In Japan, endodiagnostic and endosurgical excellence spread through personal tutoring of skilled endoscopists by the inventors and experts in IEE and ESD. To translocate this expertise to other continents must overcome two fundamental obstacles: (1) inadequate expectations as to the complexity of IEE and ESD; and (2) lack of suitable lesions and master-mentors for ESD trainees. Leading endoscopic mucosal resection-proficient endoscopists must pioneer themselves through the long learning curve to proficient ESD experts. Major referral centers for ESD must arise in Western countries on comparable professional level as in Japan. In the second stage, the upcoming Western experts must commit themselves to teach skilled endoscopists from other referral centers, in order to spread ESD in Western countries. Respect for patients with early gastrointestinal cancer asks for best efforts to learn endoscopic categorization of early neoplasias and skills for ESD based on sustained cooperation with the masters in Japan. The strategy is discussed here. PMID:26523097

  3. How to establish endoscopic submucosal dissection in Western countries.

    PubMed

    Oyama, Tsuneo; Yahagi, Naohisa; Ponchon, Thierry; Kiesslich, Tobias; Berr, Frieder

    2015-10-28

    Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) has been invented in Japan to provide resection for cure of early cancer in the gastrointestinal tract. Professional level of ESD requires excellent staging of early neoplasias with image enhanced endoscopy (IEE) to make correct indications for ESD, and high skills in endoscopic electrosurgical dissection. In Japan, endodiagnostic and endosurgical excellence spread through personal tutoring of skilled endoscopists by the inventors and experts in IEE and ESD. To translocate this expertise to other continents must overcome two fundamental obstacles: (1) inadequate expectations as to the complexity of IEE and ESD; and (2) lack of suitable lesions and master-mentors for ESD trainees. Leading endoscopic mucosal resection-proficient endoscopists must pioneer themselves through the long learning curve to proficient ESD experts. Major referral centers for ESD must arise in Western countries on comparable professional level as in Japan. In the second stage, the upcoming Western experts must commit themselves to teach skilled endoscopists from other referral centers, in order to spread ESD in Western countries. Respect for patients with early gastrointestinal cancer asks for best efforts to learn endoscopic categorization of early neoplasias and skills for ESD based on sustained cooperation with the masters in Japan. The strategy is discussed here.

  4. [Subepithelial tumors of the gastrointestinal tract].

    PubMed

    Stupnik, Silvio; Rafaelli, Claudio; González, Graciela Osorio; Pestalardo, María Luján; Quesada, Matías; Viúdez, Pedro

    2009-06-01

    The subepithelial lesions of the gastrointestinal tract are related to mesenchymal tumors and 80% of them are GIST (gastrointestinal stromal tumors). However, there are also other tumors, such as: leiomyomas, schwannomas, lipomas, glomus tumors, carcinoid tumors, aberrant pancreas and polyps or inflammatory tumors. Diagnosis of submucosal tumors is often performed during routine endoscopic examination, they are frequently located at the stomach and in most cases are clinically evidenced by their complications. Endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) is the elected method for their staging; but other imaging diagnosis methods include computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography scan (PET). The differential diagnosis is made by inmunohistochemical techniques, revealing in the GIST the expression of the antigen CD117, and prognostic factors are determined by size and mitotic index. Surgery is the recommended therapeutic, although in small lesions not exceeding 2 cm it has also been suggested the endoscopic resection guided by EUS and a watchful behaviour based on periodical controls in lesions with benignity criteria. The series here exhibited (2 GIST 1 lyposarcoma, 1 schwannoma and 1 inflammatory fibroid polyp) shows that all these tumors were symptomatic; have been diagnosed using endoscopy and recognized by means of histopathology and immunohistochemical analysis after surgery.

  5. Endoscopic Diagnosis and Differentiation of Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ji Min; Lee, Kang-Moon

    2016-01-01

    Patients with inflammatory bowel disease have significantly increased in recent decades in Korea. Intestinal tuberculosis (ITB) and intestinal Behcet’s disease (BD), which should be differentiated from Crohn’s disease (CD), are more frequent in Korea than in the West. Thus, the accurate diagnosis of these inflammatory diseases is problematic in Korea and clinicians should fully understand their clinical and endoscopic characteristics. Ulcerative colitis mostly presents with rectal inflammation and continuous lesions, while CD presents with discontinuous inflammatory lesions and frequently involves the ileocecal area. Involvement of fewer than four segments, a patulous ileocecal valve, transverse ulcers, and scars or pseudopolyps are more frequently seen in ITB than in CD. A few ulcers with discrete margins are a typical endoscopic finding of intestinal BD. However, the differential diagnosis is difficult in many clinical situations because typical endoscopic findings are not always observed. Therefore, clinicians should also consider symptoms and laboratory, pathological, and radiological findings, in addition to endoscopic findings. PMID:27484813

  6. Nosocomial infections from contaminated endoscopes: a flawed automated endoscope washer. An investigation using molecular epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Alvarado, C J; Stolz, S M; Maki, D G

    1991-09-16

    Approximately 1 year after purchase of one manufacturer's automated endoscope washing machine, we began to detect heavy contamination of upper gastrointestinal (UGI) endoscopes cultured after cleaning and disinfection in the washer. During the first 6 months of 1988, 77% of surveillance cultures (20-mL flush through the biopsy channel) were positive for gram-negative bacilli (median concentration, 10(5) cfu/mL), most frequently Pseudomonas aeruginosa serotype 10. During the first 19 months of use of the washer, nosocomial post-UGI endoscopy colonization or infections with P. aeruginosa increased 36%. Investigations show that endoscope contamination derives from a flaw in the design of the EW-10 washer: the detergent holding tank, inlet water hose, and air vents cannot be reliably disinfected and contain heavy biofilms that recontaminate the machine after it has been disinfected, as specified by the manufacturer, with glutaraldehyde. Only by rinsing machine-cleansed endoscopes with 70% alcohol followed by forced air drying has reliable disinfection been achieved. Since adaptation of terminal alcohol treatment and drying, post-UGI endoscopy colonization or infection by P. aeruginosa has declined threefold (p less than 0.001). Testing in other centers using the manufacturer's EW-10 or EW-20 washer has shown similar contamination. In three centers, including our own, postendoscopy infections by machine-associated type 10 P. aeruginosa have been confirmed by demonstrating concordance between isolates from contaminated machines or endoscopes and from infected patients by immunoblot of whole cell lysates and by pulsed-field electrophoresis of DraI endonuclease-digested genomic DNA. This problem reaffirms the vulnerability to microbial contamination of water-containing apparatus and equipment in patient care and points up the critical importance of engineering design to prevent contamination.

  7. Sparse aperture endoscope

    DOEpatents

    Fitch, Joseph P.

    1999-07-06

    An endoscope which reduces the volume needed by the imaging part thereof, maintains resolution of a wide diameter optical system, while increasing tool access, and allows stereographic or interferometric processing for depth and perspective information/visualization. Because the endoscope decreases the volume consumed by imaging optics such allows a larger fraction of the volume to be used for non-imaging tools, which allows smaller incisions in surgical and diagnostic medical applications thus produces less trauma to the patient or allows access to smaller volumes than is possible with larger instruments. The endoscope utilizes fiber optic light pipes in an outer layer for illumination, a multi-pupil imaging system in an inner annulus, and an access channel for other tools in the center. The endoscope is amenable to implementation as a flexible scope, and thus increases the utility thereof. Because the endoscope uses a multi-aperture pupil, it can also be utilized as an optical array, allowing stereographic and interferometric processing.

  8. Sparse aperture endoscope

    DOEpatents

    Fitch, J.P.

    1999-07-06

    An endoscope is disclosed which reduces the volume needed by the imaging part, maintains resolution of a wide diameter optical system, while increasing tool access, and allows stereographic or interferometric processing for depth and perspective information/visualization. Because the endoscope decreases the volume consumed by imaging optics such allows a larger fraction of the volume to be used for non-imaging tools, which allows smaller incisions in surgical and diagnostic medical applications thus produces less trauma to the patient or allows access to smaller volumes than is possible with larger instruments. The endoscope utilizes fiber optic light pipes in an outer layer for illumination, a multi-pupil imaging system in an inner annulus, and an access channel for other tools in the center. The endoscope is amenable to implementation as a flexible scope, and thus increases it's utility. Because the endoscope uses a multi-aperture pupil, it can also be utilized as an optical array, allowing stereographic and interferometric processing. 7 figs.

  9. Endoscopic resection of esthesioneuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Gallia, Gary L; Reh, Douglas D; Lane, Andrew P; Higgins, Thomas S; Koch, Wayne; Ishii, Masaru

    2012-11-01

    Esthesioneuroblastoma, or olfactory neuroblastoma, is an uncommon malignant tumor arising in the upper nasal cavity. Surgical approaches to this and other sinonasal malignancies involving the anterior skull base have traditionally involved craniofacial resections. Over the past 10 years to 15 years, there have been advances in endoscopic approaches to skull base pathologies, including malignant tumors. In this study, we review our experience with purely endoscopic approaches to esthesioneuroblastomas. Between January 2005 and February 2012, 11 patients (seven men and four women, average age 53.3 years) with esthesioneuroblastoma were treated endoscopically. Nine patients presented with newly diagnosed disease and two were treated for tumor recurrence. The modified Kadish staging was: A, two patients (18.2%); B, two patients (18.2%); C, five patients (45.5%); and D, two patients (18.2%). All patients had a complete resection with negative intraoperative margins. Three patients had 2-deoxy-2-((18)F)fluoro-d-glucose avid neck nodes on their preoperative positron emission tomography-CT scan. These patients underwent neck dissections; two had positive neck nodes. Perioperative complications included an intraoperative hypertensive urgency and pneumocephalus in two different patients. Mean follow-up was over 28 months and all patients were free of disease. This series adds to the growing experience of purely endoscopic surgical approaches in the treatment of skull base tumors including esthesioneuroblastoma. Longer follow-up on larger numbers of patients is required to clarify the utility of purely endoscopic approaches in the management of this malignant tumor.

  10. Endoscopic Endonasal Odontoidectomy.

    PubMed

    Zoli, Matteo; Mazzatenta, Diego; Valluzzi, Adelaide; Mascari, Carmelo; Pasquini, Ernesto; Frank, Giorgio

    2015-07-01

    Odontoidectomy is the treatment of choice for irreducible ventral cervical-medullary compression. The endonasal endoscopic approach is an innovative approach for odontoidectomy. The aim of this article is to identify in which conditions this approach is indicated, discussing variants of the technique for selected cases of craniovertebral malformation with platybasia. We believe that the technical difficulties of this approach are balanced by the advantages for patients. Some conditions related to the patient and to the anatomy of the craniovertebral junction may favor adoption of the endoscopic endonasal approach, which should be considered complementary and not alternative to standard approaches.

  11. Advances in balloon endoscopes.

    PubMed

    Araki, Akihiro; Tsuchiya, Kiichiro; Watanabe, Mamoru

    2014-06-01

    In September 2003, a double-balloon endoscope (DBE) composed of balloons attached to a scope and an overtube was released in Japan prior to becoming available in other parts of the world. The DBE was developed by Dr. Yamamoto (1), and 5 different types of scopes with different uses have already been marketed. In April 2007, a single-balloon small intestinal endoscope was released with a balloon attached only to the overtube as a subsequent model. This article presents a detailed account of the development of these scopes up to the present time.

  12. Patients with McCune-Albright syndrome have a broad spectrum of abnormalities in the gastrointestinal tract and pancreas.

    PubMed

    Wood, Laura D; Noë, Michaël; Hackeng, Wenzel; Brosens, Lodewijk A A; Bhaijee, Feriyl; Debeljak, Marija; Yu, Jun; Suenaga, Masaya; Singhi, Aatur D; Zaheer, Atif; Boyce, Alison; Robinson, Cemre; Eshleman, James R; Goggins, Michael G; Hruban, Ralph H; Collins, Michael T; Lennon, Anne Marie; Montgomery, Elizabeth A

    2017-02-10

    McCune-Albright Syndrome (MAS) is a rare sporadic syndrome caused by post-zygotic mutations in the GNAS oncogene, leading to constitutional mosaicism for these alterations. Somatic activating GNAS mutations also commonly occur in several gastrointestinal and pancreatic neoplasms, but the spectrum of abnormalities in these organs in patients with MAS has yet to be systematically described. We report comprehensive characterization of the upper gastrointestinal tract in seven patients with MAS and identify several different types of polyps, including gastric heterotopia/metaplasia (7/7), gastric hyperplastic polyps (5/7), fundic gland polyps (2/7), and a hamartomatous polyp (1/7). In addition, one patient had an unusual adenomatous lesion at the gastroesophageal junction with high-grade dysplasia. In the pancreas, all patients had endoscopic ultrasound findings suggestive of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN), but only two patients met the criteria for surgical intervention. Both of these patients had IPMNs at resection, one with low-grade dysplasia and one with high-grade dysplasia. GNAS mutations were identified in the majority of lesions analyzed, including both IPMNs and the adenomatous lesion from the gastroesophageal junction. These studies suggest that there is a broad spectrum of abnormalities in the gastrointestinal tract and pancreas in patients with MAS and that patients with MAS should be evaluated for gastrointestinal pathology, some of which may warrant clinical intervention due to advanced dysplasia.

  13. MULTIPHOTON IMAGING CAN BE USED FOR MICROSCOPIC EXAMINATION OF INTACT HUMAN GASTROINTESTINAL MUCOSA EX VIVO

    PubMed Central

    Rogart, Jason N.; Nagata, Jun; Loeser, Caroline S.; Roorda, Robert D.; Aslanian, Harry; Robert, Marie E.; Zipfel, Warren R.; Nathanson, Michael H.

    2008-01-01

    Background & Aims The ability to observe cellular and subcellular detail during routine endoscopy is a major goal in the development of new endoscopic imaging techniques. Multiphoton microscopy, which relies on nonlinear infared optical processes, has the potential to identify cellular details by excitation of endogenous fluorescent molecules. We examined the feasibility of using multiphoton microscopy to characterize mucosal histology in the human gastrointestinal tract. Methods A multiphoton microscope was used to determine the optimal excitation wavelength for examination of gastrointestinal mucosa. Fresh, unfixed, and unstained biopsy specimens obtained during routine endoscopy in human subjects were then examined by confocal microscopy and multiphoton microscopy. Multiphoton images also were compared to standard H&E images obtained from paired biopsy specimens. A prototype miniaturized multiphoton probe was used to examine intact rat colon. Results Peak multiphoton autofluorescence intensity was detected in mucosa excited at 735 nm. Multiphoton microscopic examination of unstained biopsy specimens revealed improved cellular detail relative to either unstained or stained specimens examined by confocal imaging. Resolution of structures such as epithelial nuclei, goblet cells, and interstitial fibers and cells was comparable to what was obtained using standard H&E histology. Similar findings were observed when using a prototype miniaturized multiphoton probe. Conclusions Multiphoton microscopy can be used to examine gastrointestinal mucosa at the cellular level, without the need for fluorescent dyes. The construction of a multiphoton endomicroscope could therefore provide a practical means of performing “virtual biopsies” during the course of routine endoscopy, with advantages over currently available endomicroscopy technologies. PMID:18065276

  14. Brunner's Gland Adenoma – A Rare Cause of Gastrointestinal Bleeding: Case Report and Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Sorleto, Michele; Timmer-Stranghöner, Annette; Wuttig, Helge; Engelhard, Oliver; Gartung, Carsten

    2017-01-01

    Brunner's gland adenoma is an extremely rare benign small bowel neoplasm, often discovered incidentally during upper gastrointestinal endoscopy or radiological diagnostics. In few cases, it tends to cause gastrointestinal hemorrhage or intestinal obstruction. We report here our experience with a 47-year-old woman with a Brunner's gland adenoma of more than 6 cm in size, located in the first part of the duodenum and causing gastrointestinal bleeding. Initially, we performed a partial endoscopic resection using endoloop and snare alternatively to prevent severe bleeding. A rest endoscopic polypectomy with the submucosal dissection technique was planned. However, on request of the patient, an elective surgical duodenotomy with submucosal resection of the remaining small duodenal tumor was performed. To better define the patient's characteristics and treatment options of such lesions, we performed a systematic review of the available literature in PubMed. Recently, an endoscopic removal is being increasingly practiced and is considered as a safe treatment modality of such lesions. PMID:28203131

  15. Gastrointestinal toxicity associated to radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Mario López; Martín, Margarita Martín; Padellano, Laura Cerezo; Palomo, Alicia Marín; Puebla, Yamile Ibáñez

    2010-08-01

    Radiation therapy in combination with other treatments, such as surgery and chemotherapy, increases locoregional control and survival in patients with thoracic, abdominal and pelvic malignancies. Nevertheless, significant clinical toxicity with combined treatments may be seen in these patients. With the advent of tridimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), dose-volume histograms (DVH) can be generated to assess the dose received by the organs at risk. The possible relationship between these parameters and clinical, anatomical and, more recently, genetic factors has to be considered. Treatment options include initial conservative medical therapies, endoscopic procedures, hyperbaric oxygen and surgery. Some pharmacological agents to prevent gastrointestinal toxicity are under investigation.

  16. An endoscope with integrated transparent bioelectronics and theranostic nanoparticles for colon cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyunjae; Lee, Youngsik; Song, Changyeong; Cho, Hye Rim; Ghaffari, Roozbeh; Choi, Tae Kyu; Kim, Kyung Hoon; Lee, Young Bum; Ling, Daishun; Lee, Hyuk; Yu, Su Jong; Choi, Seung Hong; Hyeon, Taeghwan; Kim, Dae-Hyeong

    2015-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract is a challenging anatomical target for diagnostic and therapeutic procedures for bleeding, polyps and cancerous growths. Advanced endoscopes that combine imaging and therapies within the gastrointestinal tract provide an advantage over stand-alone diagnostic or therapeutic devices. However, current multimodal endoscopes lack the spatial resolution necessary to detect and treat small cancers and other abnormalities. Here we present a multifunctional endoscope-based interventional system that integrates transparent bioelectronics with theranostic nanoparticles, which are photoactivated within highly localized space near tumours or benign growths. These advanced electronics and nanoparticles collectively enable optical fluorescence-based mapping, electrical impedance and pH sensing, contact/temperature monitoring, radio frequency ablation and localized photo/chemotherapy, as the basis of a closed-loop solution for colon cancer treatment. In vitro, ex vivo and in vivo experiments highlight the utility of this technology for accurate detection, delineation and rapid targeted therapy of colon cancer or precancerous lesions. PMID:26616435

  17. Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy in children: a single center experience

    PubMed Central

    Koca, Tuğba; Sivrice, Ayşe Çiğdem; Dereci, Selim; Duman, Levent; Akçam, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate the demographic data and complication rates in children who had undergone percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy in a three-year period in our Division of Pediatric Gastroenterology and to interrogate parental satisfaction. Material and Methods: The demographic data, complications and follow-up findings of the patients who had undergone percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy between March 2011 and March 2014 were examined retrospectively using medical files. Results: Forty seven percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy and percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy related procedures were performed in 34 children during a three-year period. The median age of the patients was 2.25 years (3 months-16 years, first and third quartiles=1.0–6.0) and the mean body weight was 13.07±8.6 kg (3 kg-47 kg). Before percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy procedure, the mean weight z score was −2.26±1.2 (−5–0) and the mean height z score was −2.25±0.96 (−3.85–0.98). The follow-up mean height and weight Z scores at the 12th month after the percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy procedure could be reached in 24 patients. A significant increase in the mean weight Z score from −2.41 to −1,07 (p=0.000) and in the mean height Z score from −2.29 to −1.99 (p=0.000) was found one year after percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy catheter was placed in these 24 patients. Patients with neurological and metabolic diseases constituted the majority (64.7% and 26.5% respectively). Peritoneal leakage of food was detected in one patient and local stoma infections were detected in three patients after the procedure. During the follow up period, “Buried bumper syndrome” was observed in one patient. Following percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy, the number of patients using anti-reflux medication increased from 16 (47.1%) to 18 (52.9%) (p=0.62). One patient with cerebral palsy who had aspiration pneumonia after percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy insertion

  18. Various applications of endoscopic scissors in difficult endoscopic interventions.

    PubMed

    Kee, Won-Ju; Park, Chang-Hwan; Chung, Kyoung-Myeun; Park, Seon-Young; Jun, Chung-Hwan; Ki, Ho-seok; Kim, Hyun-Soo; Choi, Sung-Kyu; Rew, Jong-Sun

    2014-05-01

    Endoscopic scissors offer a benefit over other devices by avoiding potential complications related to thermal and mechanical injury of surrounding structures. We describe our experience with endoscopic scissors in three difficult endoscopic interventions. A fishbone embedded in the esophageal wall penetrated very close to the pulsating aorta and the bronchus. The fishbone was cut in half by endoscopic scissors and removed without injury to adjacent organs. A gastric submucosal tumor with an insulated core that could not be resected by electrosurgical devices was cut using endoscopic scissors following endoloop placement. Extravascular coil migration after transcatheter arterial embolization resulted in a duodenal ulcer. The metallic coil on the duodenal ulcer was cut by endoscopic scissors without mechanical or thermal injury.

  19. Navigation system for flexible endoscopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hummel, Johann; Figl, Michael; Birkfellner, Wolfgang; Häfner, Michael; Kollmann, Christian; Bergmann, Helmar

    2003-05-01

    Endoscopic Ultrasound (EUS) features flexible endoscopes equipped with a radial or linear array scanhead allowing high resolution examination of organs adjacent to the upper gastrointestinal tract. An optical system based on fibre-glass or a CCD-chip allows additional orientation. However, 3-dimensional orientation and correct identification of the various anatomical structures may be difficult. It therefore seems desirable to merge real-time US images with high resolution CT or MR images acquired prior to EUS to simplify navigation during the intervention. The additional information provided by CT or MR images might facilitate diagnosis of tumors and, ultimately, guided puncture of suspicious lesions. We built a grid with 15 plastic spheres and measured their positions relatively to five fiducial markers placed on the top of the grid. For this measurement we used an optical tracking system (OTS) (Polaris, NDI, Can). Two sensors of an electromagnetic tracking system (EMTS) (Aurora, NDI, Can) were mounted on a flexible endoscope (Pentax GG 38 UX, USA) to enable a free hand ultrasound calibration. To determine the position of the plastic spheres in the emitter coordinate system of the EMTS we applied a point-to-point registration (Horn) using the coordinates of the fiducial markers in both coordinate systems (OTS and EMTS). For the transformation between EMTS to the CT space the Horn algorithm was adopted again using the fiducial markers. Visualization was enabled by the use of the AVW-4.0 library (Biomedical Imaging Resource, Mayo Clinic, Rochester/MN, USA). To evaluate the suitability of our new navigation system we measured the Fiducial Registration Error (FRE) of the diverse registrations and the Target Registration Error (TRE) for the complete transformation from the US space to the CT space. The FRE for the ultrasound calibration amounted to 4.3 mm +/- 4.2 mm, resulting from 10 calibration procedures. For the transformation from the OTS reference system to the

  20. Propofol use in endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography and endoscopic ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Cheriyan, Danny G; Byrne, Michael F

    2014-01-01

    Compared to standard endoscopy, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) and endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) are often lengthier and more complex, thus requiring higher doses of sedatives for patient comfort and compliance. The aim of this review is to provide the reader with information regarding the use, safety profile, and merits of propofol for sedation in advanced endoscopic procedures like ERCP and EUS, based on the current literature. PMID:24833847

  1. The use of optical imaging techniques in the gastrointestinal tract

    PubMed Central

    Beg, Sabina; Wilson, Ana; Ragunath, Krish

    2016-01-01

    With significant advances in the management of gastrointestinal disease there has been a move from diagnosing advanced pathology, to detecting early lesions that are potentially amenable to curative endoscopic treatment. This has required an improvement in diagnostics, with a focus on identifying and characterising subtle mucosal changes. There is great interest in the use of optical technologies to predict histology and enable the formulation of a real-time in vivo diagnosis, a so-called ‘optical biopsy’. The aim of this review is to explore the evidence for the use of the current commercially available imaging techniques in the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:27429735

  2. An endoscope for simultaneous macroscopic navigation and microscopic inspection of luminal sidewalls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leavesley, Silas; Sturgis, Jennifer; Robinson, J. Paul

    2008-02-01

    Endoscopic techniques are commonly used for esophageal and gastrointestinal screening. In this process, atypical regions are identified by gross visual and morphological changes. These regions are then biopsied for pathological confirmation prior to determining treatment. In an effort to increase the sensitivity of endoscopic screening, many groups have performed work in developing microscopic endoscopes capable of inspecting tissues on a cellular level. These microscopic endoscopes are generally implemented as either a stand-alone fiber or through the working channel of a traditional endoscope, and are oriented in a manner similar to traditional flexible endoscopes, imaging the region directly ahead of the endoscope with a wide-angle lens. However, this may not be the optimum configuration for microscopic inspection of luminal sidewalls. We present a novel optical configuration for an endoscope that can simultaneously function as a traditional forward-viewing macroscopic endoscope and as a sidewall-viewing microscopic endoscope. With the first prototype, we have realized a water-emersion microscopic that is capable of imaging tissues on a single-cell level. In addition, microscopic side-port configuration enables efficient mapping of the luminal wall. Utilizing simultaneous macroscopic and microscopic imaging, we are developing software for image registration and analysis that will enable localization of microscopic features within a macroscopic frame of reference. Through a combination of microscopic sidewall imaging and software for image analysis, we aim to provide the clinician with the equivalent of an in vivo biopsy, increasing screening effectiveness and decreasing discomfort and costs related to performing multiple biopsies of suspected regions.

  3. Ingestible wireless capsules for enhanced diagnostic inspection of gastrointestinal tract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasouli, Mahdi; Kencana, Andy Prima; Huynh, Van An; Ting, Eng Kiat; Lai, Joshua Chong Yue; Wong, Kai Juan; Tan, Su Lim; Phee, Soo Jay

    2011-03-01

    Wireless capsule endoscopy has become a common procedure for diagnostic inspection of gastrointestinal tract. This method offers a less-invasive alternative to traditional endoscopy by eliminating uncomfortable procedures of the traditional endoscopy. Moreover, it provides the opportunity for exploring inaccessible areas of the small intestine. Current capsule endoscopes, however, move by peristalsis and are not capable of detailed and on-demand inspection of desired locations. Here, we propose and develop two wireless endoscopes with maneuverable vision systems to enhance diagnosis of gastrointestinal disorders. The vision systems in these capsules are equipped with mechanical actuators to adjust the position of the camera. This may help to cover larger areas of the digestive tract and investigate desired locations. The preliminary experimental results showed that the developed platform could successfully communicate with the external control unit via human body and adjust the position of camera to limited degrees.

  4. Complications of endoscopic ultrasonography.

    PubMed

    Fabbri, C; Luigiano, C; Cennamo, V; Ferrara, F; Pellicano, R; Polifemo, A M; Tarantino, I; Barresi, L; Morace, C; Consolo, P; D'Imperio, N

    2011-06-01

    Since its development in the 1980s, endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) has undergone a great deal of technological modifications. EUS has become an important tool in the evaluation of patients with various clinical disorders and is increasingly being utilized in many centers. EUS has been evolving over the years; EUS-guided fine needle aspiration (FNA) for cytological and/or histological diagnosis has become standard practice and a wide array of interventional and therapeutic procedures are performed under EUS guidance for diseases which otherwise would have needed surgery, with its associated morbidities. EUS shares the risks and complications of other endoscopic procedures. This article addresses the specific adverse effects and risks associated with EUS, EUS-FNA and interventional EUS, namely perforation, bleeding, pancreatitis and infection. Measures to help minimizing these risks will also be discussed.

  5. Ingested metal in whooping cranes: an endoscopic technique for removal and implications for the release program

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olsen, G.H.; Wise, M.

    2001-01-01

    Since 1993 when the whooping crane (Grus americana) release program in Florida started, 21 whooping cranes at the USGS Patuxent Wildlife Research Center (Patuxent) have been diagnosed with gastrointestinal foreign bodies (primarily metal objects). A technique for safely removing these objects has been developed. The technique uses a flexible gastric endoscope to enter the proventriculus or ventriculus, and a snare or forceps passed down a channel of the endoscope to retrieve the foreign bodies. The technique is very successful with the whooping crane usually back to its pen the next day. The long-term survival of the whooping cranes from which gastrointestinal foreign bodies were removed was comparable to the survival of whooping cranes released with no history of gastrointestinal foreign bodies.

  6. Transanal Endoscopic Microsurgery

    PubMed Central

    Saclarides, Theodore John

    2015-01-01

    Transanal endoscopic microsurgery (TEM) was developed by Professor Gerhard Buess 30 years ago at the dawn of minimally invasive surgery. TEM utilizes a closed proctoscopic system whereby endoluminal surgery is accomplished with high-definition magnification, constant CO2 insufflation, and long-shafted instruments. The end result is a more precise excision and closure compared to conventional instrumentation. Virtually any benign lesion can be addressed with this technology; however, proper patient selection is paramount when using it for cancer. PMID:26491409

  7. Endoscopic Endonasal-Assisted Resection of Orbital Schwannoma.

    PubMed

    Sun, Michelle T; Wu, Wencan; Yan, Wentao; Tu, Yunhai; Selva, Dinesh

    2015-07-14

    Orbital schwannomas are rare and despite a variety of external surgical approaches previously utilized, removal of tumors located in the deep orbital apex remains challenging. The endoscopic endonasal approach has been used increasingly for various apical tumours, but few describe this technique for orbital schwannomas. The authors describe 2 cases of orbital schwannoma removed via an endoscopic endonasal assisted approach. The first patient was a 31-year-old Cantonese female who was found to have an 11 × 8 × 8 mm right orbital apical schwannoma which was removed using an endoscopic endonasal sphenoethmoidal approach. The second patient was a 78-year-old Caucasian male who had a 28 × 17 × 18 mm orbital schwannoma removed via a transcaruncular and endoscopic endonasal-assisted approach. These findings suggest that the use of an endonasal approach may facilitate the safe removal of selected medially located orbital schwannomas whose posterior margins involve the orbital apex.

  8. Peroral endoscopic myotomy.

    PubMed

    Kumbhari, Vivek; Khashab, Mouen A

    2015-05-16

    Peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) incorporates concepts of natural orifice translumenal endoscopic surgery and achieves endoscopic myotomy by utilizing a submucosal tunnel as an operating space. Although intended for the palliation of symptoms of achalasia, there is mounting data to suggest it is also efficacious in the management of spastic esophageal disorders. The technique requires an understanding of the pathophysiology of esophageal motility disorders as well as knowledge of surgical anatomy of the foregut. POEM achieves short term response in 82% to 100% of patients with minimal risk of adverse events. In addition, it appears to be effective and safe even at the extremes of age and regardless of prior therapy undertaken. Although infrequent, the ability of the endoscopist to manage an intraprocedural adverse event is critical as failure to do so could result in significant morbidity. The major late adverse event is gastroesophageal reflux which appears to occur in 20% to 46% of patients. Research is being conducted to clarify the optimal technique for POEM and a personalized approach by measuring intraprocedural esophagogastric junction distensibility appears promising. In addition to esophageal disorders, POEM is being studied in the management of gastroparesis (gastric pyloromyotomy) with initial reports demonstrating technical feasibility. Although POEM represents a paradigm shift the management of esophageal motility disorders, the results of prospective randomized controlled trials with long-term follow up are eagerly awaited.

  9. Peroral endoscopic myotomy

    PubMed Central

    Kumbhari, Vivek; Khashab, Mouen A

    2015-01-01

    Peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) incorporates concepts of natural orifice translumenal endoscopic surgery and achieves endoscopic myotomy by utilizing a submucosal tunnel as an operating space. Although intended for the palliation of symptoms of achalasia, there is mounting data to suggest it is also efficacious in the management of spastic esophageal disorders. The technique requires an understanding of the pathophysiology of esophageal motility disorders as well as knowledge of surgical anatomy of the foregut. POEM achieves short term response in 82% to 100% of patients with minimal risk of adverse events. In addition, it appears to be effective and safe even at the extremes of age and regardless of prior therapy undertaken. Although infrequent, the ability of the endoscopist to manage an intraprocedural adverse event is critical as failure to do so could result in significant morbidity. The major late adverse event is gastroesophageal reflux which appears to occur in 20% to 46% of patients. Research is being conducted to clarify the optimal technique for POEM and a personalized approach by measuring intraprocedural esophagogastric junction distensibility appears promising. In addition to esophageal disorders, POEM is being studied in the management of gastroparesis (gastric pyloromyotomy) with initial reports demonstrating technical feasibility. Although POEM represents a paradigm shift the management of esophageal motility disorders, the results of prospective randomized controlled trials with long-term follow up are eagerly awaited. PMID:25992188

  10. Endoscopic septoplasty: Tips and pearls.

    PubMed

    Pons, Y; Champagne, C; Genestier, L; Ballivet de Régloix, S

    2015-12-01

    This article is designed to provide a step-by-step description of our endoscopic septoplasty technique and discuss its difficulties and technical tips. Endoscopic septoplasty comprises 10 steps: diagnostic endoscopy, subperichondral infiltration, left mucosal incision, dissection of the left subperichondral flap, cartilage incision (0.5 centimetre posterior to the mucosal incision), dissection of the right subperichondral flap, anterior cartilage resection, perpendicular plate dissection, dissection and resection of the maxillary crest, endoscopic revision, mucosal suture and Silastic stents. A satisfactory postoperative result was observed at 3 months in 97% of cases in this series. The main contraindication to endoscopic septoplasty is anterior columellar deviation of the nasal septum requiring a conventional procedure.

  11. Endoscopic transmission of Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Tytgat, G N

    1995-01-01

    The contamination of endoscopes and biopsy forceps with Helicobacter pylori occurs readily after endoscopic examination of H. pylori-positive patients. Unequivocal proof of iatrogenic transmission of the organism has been provided. Estimates for transmission frequency approximate to 4 per 1000 endoscopies when the infection rate in the endoscoped population is about 60%. Iatrogenic transmission has also been shown to be the cause of the so-called 'acute mucosal lesion' syndrome in Japan. Traditional cleaning and alcohol rinsing is insufficient to eliminate endoscope/forceps contamination. Only meticulous adherence to disinfection recommendations guarantees H. pylori elimination.

  12. Hemostatic Powders in Gastrointestinal Bleeding: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yen-I; Barkun, Alan N

    2015-07-01

    Topical hemostatic agents and powders are an emerging modality in the endoscopic management of upper and lower gastrointestinal bleeding. This systematic review demonstrates the effectiveness and safety of these agents with special emphasis on TC-325 and Ankaferd Blood Stopper. The unique noncontact/nontraumatic application, ability to cover large areas of bleed, and ease of use make these hemostatic agents an attractive option in certain clinical situations, such as massive bleeding with poor visualization, salvage therapy, and diffuse bleeding from luminal malignancies.

  13. Validation of a realistic simulator for veterinary gastrointestinal endoscopy training.

    PubMed

    Usón-Gargallo, Jesús; Usón-Casaús, Jesús M; Pérez-Merino, Eva M; Soria-Gálvez, Federico; Morcillo, Esther; Enciso, Silvia; Sánchez-Margallo, Francisco M

    2014-01-01

    This article reports on the face, content, and construct validity of a new realistic composite simulator (Simuldog) used to provide training in canine gastrointestinal flexible endoscopy. The basic endoscopic procedures performed on the simulator were esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD), gastric biopsy (GB), and gastric foreign body removal (FBR). Construct validity was assessed by comparing the performance of novices (final-year veterinary students and recent graduates without endoscopic experience, n=30) versus experienced subjects (doctors in veterinary medicine who had performed more than 50 clinical upper gastrointestinal endoscopic procedures as a surgeon, n=15). Tasks were scored based on completion time, and specific rating scales were developed to assess performance. Internal consistency and inter-rater agreement were assessed. Face and content validity were determined using a 5-point Likert-type scale questionnaire. The novices needed considerably more time than the experts to perform EGD, GB, and FBR, and their performance scores were significantly lower (p<.010). Inter-rater agreement and the internal validity of the rating scales were good. Face validity was excellent, and both groups agreed that the endoscopy scenarios were very realistic. The experts highly valued the usefulness of Simuldog for veterinary training and as a tool for assessing endoscopic skills. Simuldog is the first validated model specifically developed to be used as a training tool for endoscopy techniques in small animals.

  14. Virtual reality simulators for gastrointestinal endoscopy training

    PubMed Central

    Triantafyllou, Konstantinos; Lazaridis, Lazaros Dimitrios; Dimitriadis, George D

    2014-01-01

    The use of simulators as educational tools for medical procedures is spreading rapidly and many efforts have been made for their implementation in gastrointestinal endoscopy training. Endoscopy simulation training has been suggested for ascertaining patient safety while positively influencing the trainees’ learning curve. Virtual simulators are the most promising tool among all available types of simulators. These integrated modalities offer a human-like endoscopy experience by combining virtual images of the gastrointestinal tract and haptic realism with using a customized endoscope. From their first steps in the 1980s until today, research involving virtual endoscopic simulators can be divided in two categories: investigation of the impact of virtual simulator training in acquiring endoscopy skills and measuring competence. Emphasis should also be given to the financial impact of their implementation in endoscopy, including the cost of these state-of-the-art simulators and the potential economic benefits from their usage. Advances in technology will contribute to the upgrade of existing models and the development of new ones; while further research should be carried out to discover new fields of application. PMID:24527175

  15. Endoscopic submucosal dissection--current success and future directions.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Hironori

    2012-09-01

    More than 10 years have passed since endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) was first developed in Japan. ESD enables en bloc complete resection of superficial gastrointestinal neoplasms regardless of the size and location of the lesions. With improvements in techniques and devices, excellent therapeutic results have been achieved despite the inherent technical difficulties of this procedure. ESD aiming for curative treatment can be performed for gastrointestinal neoplasms without risk of lymph node metastasis. Accurate histopathologic examination of the resected specimen is required to determine the risk of lymph node metastasis, for which en bloc resection is beneficial. Owing to the high success rate of en bloc complete resection and accurate histopathologic examination, tumour recurrence rates after ESD are reported to be very low in Japan. Excellent results of ESD in a large number of cases have also been reported from other Asian countries such as South Korea, Taiwan and China. Although scepticism exists among Western clinicians regarding the application of ESD, it is developing slowly and reports indicate promising results in some European countries. With further development of technologies, such as endoscopic robotics, ESD could become the worldwide treatment of choice for early gastrointestinal neoplasms.

  16. Gastric Contraction Imaging System Using a 3-D Endoscope.

    PubMed

    Yoshimoto, Kayo; Yamada, Kenji; Watabe, Kenji; Takeda, Maki; Nishimura, Takahiro; Kido, Michiko; Nagakura, Toshiaki; Takahashi, Hideya; Nishida, Tsutomu; Iijima, Hideki; Tsujii, Masahiko; Takehara, Tetsuo; Ohno, Yuko

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a gastric contraction imaging system for assessment of gastric motility using a 3-D endoscope. Gastrointestinal diseases are mainly based on morphological abnormalities. However, gastrointestinal symptoms are sometimes apparent without visible abnormalities. One of the major factors for these diseases is abnormal gastrointestinal motility. For assessment of gastric motility, a gastric motility imaging system is needed. To assess the dynamic motility of the stomach, the proposed system measures 3-D gastric contractions derived from a 3-D profile of the stomach wall obtained with a developed 3-D endoscope. After obtaining contraction waves, their frequency, amplitude, and speed of propagation can be calculated using a Gaussian function. The proposed system was evaluated for 3-D measurements of several objects with known geometries. The results showed that the surface profiles could be obtained with an error of [Formula: see text] of the distance between two different points on images. Subsequently, we evaluated the validity of a prototype system using a wave simulated model. In the experiment, the amplitude and position of waves could be measured with 1-mm accuracy. The present results suggest that the proposed system can measure the speed and amplitude of contractions. This system has low invasiveness and can assess the motility of the stomach wall directly in a 3-D manner. Our method can be used for examination of gastric morphological and functional abnormalities.

  17. Endoscopic gastritis, serum pepsinogen assay, and Helicobacter pylori infection

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sun-Young

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic findings of the background gastric mucosa are important in the Helicobacter pylori-seroprevalent population. It is strongly correlated not only with the risk of gastric cancer, but also with the excretion ability of gastric mucosa cells. In noninfected subjects, common endoscopic findings are regular arrangement of collecting venules, chronic superficial gastritis, and erosive gastritis. In cases of active H. pylori infection, nodularity on the antrum, hemorrhagic spots on the fundus, and thickened gastric folds are common endoscopic findings. The secreting ability of the gastric mucosa cells is usually intact in both noninfected and actively infected stomachs, and the intragastric condition becomes hyperacidic upon inflammation. Increased serum pepsinogen II concentration correlates well with active H. pylori infection, and also indicates an increased risk of diffuse-type gastric cancer. In chronic inactive H. pylori infection, metaplastic gastritis and atrophic gastritis extending from the antrum (closed-type chronic atrophic gastritis) toward the corpus (open-type chronic atrophic gastritis) are common endoscopic findings. The intragastric environment is hypoacidic and the risk of intestinal-type gastric cancer is increased in such conditions. Furthermore, there is a decrease in serum pepsinogen I concentration when the secreting ability of the gastric mucosa cells is damaged. Serologic and endoscopic changes that occur upon H. pylori infection are important findings for estimating the secreting ability of the gastric mucosa cells, and could be applied for the secondary prevention of gastric cancer. PMID:27604795

  18. Stages of Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... carcinoid tumor is cancer that forms in the lining of the gastrointestinal tract. The gastrointestinal (GI) tract ... Rectum . Enlarge Gastrointestinal carcinoid tumors form in the lining of the gastrointestinal tract, most often in the ...

  19. Zinc and gastrointestinal disease

    PubMed Central

    Skrovanek, Sonja; DiGuilio, Katherine; Bailey, Robert; Huntington, William; Urbas, Ryan; Mayilvaganan, Barani; Mercogliano, Giancarlo; Mullin, James M

    2014-01-01

    This review is a current summary of the role that both zinc deficiency and zinc supplementation can play in the etiology and therapy of a wide range of gastrointestinal diseases. The recent literature describing zinc action on gastrointestinal epithelial tight junctions and epithelial barrier function is described. Zinc enhancement of gastrointestinal epithelial barrier function may figure prominently in its potential therapeutic action in several gastrointestinal diseases. PMID:25400994

  20. Endoscopic ultrasound guided vascular access and therapy (with videos)

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Payal; Lakhtakia, Sundeep

    2015-01-01

    The continued need to develop minimally invasive alternatives to surgical and radiologic interventions has driven the development of endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided treatments. EUS has now stepped into the therapeutic arena. EUS provides the unique advantage of both real-time imaging and access to structures within and adjacent to the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Hence, EUS-guided therapeutic techniques continue to evolve in several directions enabling a variety of minimally invasive therapies for pancreatic and biliary pathologies. Furthermore, the close proximity of the GI tract to vascular structures in the mediastinum and abdomen permits EUS-guided vascular access and therapy. Studies have demonstrated several EUS-guided vascular interventions by using standard endoscopic accessories and available tools from the interventional radiology armamentarium. This article provides an overview of the literature including clinical and nonclinical studies for the management of nonvariceal and variceal GI bleeding, formation of intrahepatic portosystemic shunts (IPSS), and EUS-guided cardiac access and therapy. PMID:26374574

  1. On localizing a capsule endoscope using magnetic sensors.

    PubMed

    Moussakhani, Babak; Ramstad, Tor; Flåm, John T; Balasingham, Ilangko

    2012-01-01

    In this work, localizing a capsule endoscope within the gastrointestinal tract is addressed. It is assumed that the capsule is equipped with a magnet, and that a magnetic sensor network measures the flux from this magnet. We assume no prior knowledge on the source location, and that the measurements collected by the sensors are corrupted by thermal Gaussian noise only. Under these assumptions, we focus on determining the Cramer-Rao Lower Bound (CRLB) for the location of the endoscope. Thus, we are not studying specific estimators, but rather the theoretical performance of an optimal one. It is demonstrated that the CRLB is a function of the distance and angle between the sensor network and the magnet. By studying the CRLB with respect to different sensor array constellations, we are able to indicate favorable constellations.

  2. Endoscopic management of post-bariatric surgery complications

    PubMed Central

    Boules, Mena; Chang, Julietta; Haskins, Ivy N; Sharma, Gautam; Froylich, Dvir; El-Hayek, Kevin; Rodriguez, John; Kroh, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the technical constructs of bariatric surgery is important to the treating endoscopist to maximize effective endoluminal therapy. Post-operative complication rates vary widely based on the complication of interest, and have been reported to be as high as 68% following adjustable gastric banding. Similarly, there is a wide range of presenting symptoms for post-operative bariatric complications, including abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting, dysphagia, gastrointestinal hemorrhage, and weight regain, all of which may provoke an endoscopic assessment. Bleeding and anastomotic leak are considered to be early (< 30 d) complications, whereas strictures, marginal ulcers, band erosions, and weight loss failure or weight recidivism are typically considered late (> 30 d) complications. Treatment of complications in the immediate post-operative period may require unique considerations. Endoluminal therapies serve as adjuncts to surgical and radiographic procedures. This review aims to summarize the spectrum and efficacy of endoscopic management of post-operative bariatric complications. PMID:27668069

  3. Endoscopic management of post-bariatric surgery complications.

    PubMed

    Boules, Mena; Chang, Julietta; Haskins, Ivy N; Sharma, Gautam; Froylich, Dvir; El-Hayek, Kevin; Rodriguez, John; Kroh, Matthew

    2016-09-16

    Understanding the technical constructs of bariatric surgery is important to the treating endoscopist to maximize effective endoluminal therapy. Post-operative complication rates vary widely based on the complication of interest, and have been reported to be as high as 68% following adjustable gastric banding. Similarly, there is a wide range of presenting symptoms for post-operative bariatric complications, including abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting, dysphagia, gastrointestinal hemorrhage, and weight regain, all of which may provoke an endoscopic assessment. Bleeding and anastomotic leak are considered to be early (< 30 d) complications, whereas strictures, marginal ulcers, band erosions, and weight loss failure or weight recidivism are typically considered late (> 30 d) complications. Treatment of complications in the immediate post-operative period may require unique considerations. Endoluminal therapies serve as adjuncts to surgical and radiographic procedures. This review aims to summarize the spectrum and efficacy of endoscopic management of post-operative bariatric complications.

  4. Prolonged Radiant Exposure of the Middle Ear during Transcanal Endoscopic Ear Surgery.

    PubMed

    Shah, Parth V; Kozin, Elliott D; Remenschneider, Aaron K; Dedmon, Matthew M; Nakajima, Hideko Heidi; Cohen, Michael S; Lee, Daniel J

    2015-07-01

    Transcanal endoscopic ear surgery (EES) provides a high-resolution, wide-field view of the middle ear compared with the conventional operating microscope, reducing the need for a postauricular incision or mastoidectomy. Our group has shown in cadaveric human temporal bone studies that radiant energy from the endoscope tip can quickly elevate temperatures of the tympanic cavity. Elevated temperatures of the middle ear are associated with acute auditory brainstem response shifts in animal models. In EES, proposed methods to decrease middle ear temperature include frequent removal of the endoscope and the use of suction to rapidly dissipate heat; however, the routine application of such cooling techniques remains unknown. Herein, we aim to quantify the duration that the tympanic cavity is typically exposed to the endoscope during routine endoscopic middle ear surgery. We find that the tympanic cavity is exposed to the endoscope without a cooling mechanism for a prolonged period of time.

  5. Consensus of the Present and Prospects on Endoscopic Diagnosis and Treatment in East Asian Countries

    PubMed Central

    Kamiya, Takeshi; Joh, Takashi; Sollano, Jose D.; Zhu, Qi; Kachintorn, Udom; Aziz Rani, Abdul; Hahm, Ki-Baik; Takahashi, Shin'ichi; Kinoshita, Yoshikazu; Matsumoto, Takayuki; Naito, Yuji; Takeuchi, Koji; Arakawa, Tetsuo; Terano, Akira

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aim. New diagnostic or therapeutic methods in endoscopy have been used. Current clinical application of these procedures is not well known. The aim of this study is to investigate the present situation on endoscopic diagnosis and treatment of gastrointestinal disorders in East Asian countries. Method. A representative member from the International Gastrointestinal Consensus Symposium Committee provided a questionnaire to physicians in China, Indonesia, Japan, Korea, the Philippines, and Thailand. Results. In total, 514 physicians including gastroenterologists, surgeons, and general practitioners enrolled. The most frequently occurring disorder as the origin of upper gastrointestinal bleeding is gastric ulcer. Capsule endoscopy is selected as the first choice for the diagnosis of small intestine bleeding. The second choice was double-balloon endoscopy or angiography. For patients with gastric adenoma, the number of physicians who choose endoscopic mucosal resection is larger than those selecting endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) in China, Indonesia, the Philippines, and Thailand. ESD is chosen first in Japan and Korea. Conclusion. New instruments or techniques on endoscopy have not come into wide use yet, and there is diversity in the situation on it in Asian countries. We should unify the endoscopic diagnostic criteria or treated strategy in patients with GI disease. PMID:23093833

  6. Endoscopic Gastrocnemius Intramuscular Aponeurotic Recession

    PubMed Central

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2015-01-01

    Gastrocnemius aponeurotic recession is the surgical treatment for symptomatic gastrocnemius contracture. Endoscopic gastrocnemius recession procedures has been developed recently and reported to have fewer complications and better cosmetic outcomes. Classically, this is performed at the aponeurosis distal to the gastrocnemius muscle attachment. We describe an alternative endoscopic approach in which the intramuscular portion of the aponeurosis is released. PMID:26900563

  7. [Endoscopic treatments for Barrett oesophagus].

    PubMed

    Vienne, Ariane; Prat, Frédéric

    2011-05-01

    High grade dysplasia and superficial carcinomas (with no extension under muscularis mucosae) can be indications for endoscopic treatments of Barrett oesophagus. When an endoscopic treatment is considered, a gastroscopy with use of acetic acid and planimetry and the confirmation of high-grade dysplasia by a new examination after PPI treatment and a pathologic second confirmation is needed. For high-grade dysplasia in focalised and visible lesions, an endoscopic resection by EMR or ESD should be proposed: it allows a more accurate pathologic examination and can be an effective curative treatment. After endoscopic resection of visible high grade dysplasia lesions, a complete eradication of Barrett oesophagus may be proposed to prevent dysplasia recurrence. In case of extensive high-grade dysplasia or to eradicate Barrett oesophagus residual lesions, radiofrequency ablation is the preferred endoscopic technique. Photodynamic therapy may also be proposed for more invasive lesions or after other endoscopic techniques with mucosal scars. Surgical oesophagus resection is still recommended for diffuse high-grade dysplasia in young patients or in case of pathologic pejorative criteria in endoscopic resection specimen. In case of Low-grade dysplasia, either endoscopic surveillance should be performed every six or 12 months or radiofrequency ablation could be proposed in the yield of prospective studies.

  8. Endoscopic Gastrocnemius Intramuscular Aponeurotic Recession.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2015-10-01

    Gastrocnemius aponeurotic recession is the surgical treatment for symptomatic gastrocnemius contracture. Endoscopic gastrocnemius recession procedures has been developed recently and reported to have fewer complications and better cosmetic outcomes. Classically, this is performed at the aponeurosis distal to the gastrocnemius muscle attachment. We describe an alternative endoscopic approach in which the intramuscular portion of the aponeurosis is released.

  9. Hemostatic powder spray: a new method for managing gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Papafragkakis, Haris; Ofori, Emmanuel; Ona, Mel A.; Krishnaiah, Mahesh; Duddempudi, Sushil; Anand, Sury

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States. The management of gastrointestinal bleeding is often challenging, depending on its location and severity. To date, widely accepted hemostatic treatment options include injection of epinephrine and tissue adhesives such as cyanoacrylate, ablative therapy with contact modalities such as thermal coagulation with heater probe and bipolar hemostatic forceps, noncontact modalities such as photodynamic therapy and argon plasma coagulation, and mechanical hemostasis with band ligation, endoscopic hemoclips, and over-the-scope clips. These approaches, albeit effective in achieving hemostasis, are associated with a 5–10% rebleeding risk. New simple, effective, universal, and safe methods are needed to address some of the challenges posed by the current endoscopic hemostatic techniques. The use of a novel hemostatic powder spray appears to be effective and safe in controlling upper and lower gastrointestinal bleeding. Although initial reports of hemostatic powder spray as an innovative approach to manage gastrointestinal bleeding are promising, further studies are needed to support and confirm its efficacy and safety. The aim of this study was to evaluate the technical feasibility, clinical efficacy, and safety of hemostatic powder spray (Hemospray, Cook Medical, Winston-Salem, North Carolina, USA) as a new method for managing gastrointestinal bleeding. In this review article, we performed an extensive literature search summarizing case reports and case series of Hemospray for the management of gastrointestinal bleeding. Indications, features, technique, deployment, success rate, complications, and limitations are discussed. The combined technical and clinical success rate of Hemospray was 88.5% (207/234) among the human subjects and 81.8% (9/11) among the porcine models studied. Rebleeding occurred within 72 hours post-treatment in 38 patients (38/234; 16.2%) and in three porcine

  10. Successful endoscopic hemoclipping of an esophageal perforation.

    PubMed

    Sung, H Y; Kim, J I; Cheung, D Y; Cho, S H; Park, S-H; Han, J-Y; Kim, J K; Han, S W; Choi, K Y; Chung, I S

    2007-01-01

    We describe a case of esophageal perforation that resulted from a fishbone. A 71-year-old man had had a fishbone impacted in the lower esophagus for 2 days. At presentation, the bone was dislodged at endoscopy; one round opening in a deep ulceration was detected when the fishbone was removed. The perforation was closed by endoscopic hemoclipping, after the removal of the fishbone. A thoracic computed tomography revealed air around the esophagus, aorta and bronchus and the presence of a pleural effusion. These findings suggested mediastinal emphysema and mediastinitis due to the esophageal perforation after the removal of the fishbone. Esophagography revealed a focal esophageal defect and linear contrast leakage at the distal esophagus. The mediastinal emphysema and pleural effusion successfully resolved after the endoscopic hemoclip application and conservative management of the perforation.

  11. Linked color imaging application for improving the endoscopic diagnosis accuracy: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiaotian; Dong, Tenghui; Bi, Yiliang; Min, Min; Shen, Wei; Xu, Yang; Liu, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopy has been widely used in diagnosing gastrointestinal mucosal lesions. However, there are still lack of objective endoscopic criteria. Linked color imaging (LCI) is newly developed endoscopic technique which enhances color contrast. Thus, we investigated the clinical application of LCI and further analyzed pixel brightness for RGB color model. All the lesions were observed by white light endoscopy (WLE), LCI and blue laser imaging (BLI). Matlab software was used to calculate pixel brightness for red (R), green (G) and blue color (B). Of the endoscopic images for lesions, LCI had significantly higher R compared with BLI but higher G compared with WLE (all P < 0.05). R/(G + B) was significantly different among 3 techniques and qualified as a composite LCI marker. Our correlation analysis of endoscopic diagnosis with pathology revealed that LCI was quite consistent with pathological diagnosis (P = 0.000) and the color could predict certain kinds of lesions. ROC curve demonstrated at the cutoff of R/(G+B) = 0.646, the area under curve was 0.646, and the sensitivity and specificity was 0.514 and 0.773. Taken together, LCI could improve efficiency and accuracy of diagnosing gastrointestinal mucosal lesions and benefit target biopsy. R/(G + B) based on pixel brightness may be introduced as a objective criterion for evaluating endoscopic images. PMID:27641243

  12. Linked color imaging application for improving the endoscopic diagnosis accuracy: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaotian; Dong, Tenghui; Bi, Yiliang; Min, Min; Shen, Wei; Xu, Yang; Liu, Yan

    2016-09-19

    Endoscopy has been widely used in diagnosing gastrointestinal mucosal lesions. However, there are still lack of objective endoscopic criteria. Linked color imaging (LCI) is newly developed endoscopic technique which enhances color contrast. Thus, we investigated the clinical application of LCI and further analyzed pixel brightness for RGB color model. All the lesions were observed by white light endoscopy (WLE), LCI and blue laser imaging (BLI). Matlab software was used to calculate pixel brightness for red (R), green (G) and blue color (B). Of the endoscopic images for lesions, LCI had significantly higher R compared with BLI but higher G compared with WLE (all P < 0.05). R/(G + B) was significantly different among 3 techniques and qualified as a composite LCI marker. Our correlation analysis of endoscopic diagnosis with pathology revealed that LCI was quite consistent with pathological diagnosis (P = 0.000) and the color could predict certain kinds of lesions. ROC curve demonstrated at the cutoff of R/(G+B) = 0.646, the area under curve was 0.646, and the sensitivity and specificity was 0.514 and 0.773. Taken together, LCI could improve efficiency and accuracy of diagnosing gastrointestinal mucosal lesions and benefit target biopsy. R/(G + B) based on pixel brightness may be introduced as a objective criterion for evaluating endoscopic images.

  13. Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy: Indications, technique, complications and management

    PubMed Central

    Rahnemai-Azar, Ata A; Rahnemaiazar, Amir A; Naghshizadian, Rozhin; Kurtz, Amparo; Farkas, Daniel T

    2014-01-01

    Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) is the preferred route of feeding and nutritional support in patients with a functional gastrointestinal system who require long-term enteral nutrition. Besides its well-known advantages over parenteral nutrition, PEG offers superior access to the gastrointestinal system over surgical methods. Considering that nowadays PEG tube placement is one of the most common endoscopic procedures performed worldwide, knowing its indications and contraindications is of paramount importance in current medicine. PEG tubes are sometimes placed inappropriately in patients unable to tolerate adequate oral intake because of incorrect and unrealistic understanding of their indications and what they can accomplish. Broadly, the two main indications of PEG tube placement are enteral feeding and stomach decompression. On the other hand, distal enteral obstruction, severe uncorrectable coagulopathy and hemodynamic instability constitute the main absolute contraindications for PEG tube placement in hospitalized patients. Although generally considered to be a safe procedure, there is the potential for both minor and major complications. Awareness of these potential complications, as well as understanding routine aftercare of the catheter, can improve the quality of care for patients with a PEG tube. These complications can generally be classified into three major categories: endoscopic technical difficulties, PEG procedure-related complications and late complications associated with PEG tube use and wound care. In this review we describe a variety of minor and major tube-related complications as well as strategies for their management and avoidance. Different methods of percutaneous PEG tube placement into the stomach have been described in the literature with the “pull” technique being the most common method. In the last section of this review, the reader is presented with a brief discussion of these procedures, techniques and related issues

  14. Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy: indications, technique, complications and management.

    PubMed

    Rahnemai-Azar, Ata A; Rahnemaiazar, Amir A; Naghshizadian, Rozhin; Kurtz, Amparo; Farkas, Daniel T

    2014-06-28

    Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) is the preferred route of feeding and nutritional support in patients with a functional gastrointestinal system who require long-term enteral nutrition. Besides its well-known advantages over parenteral nutrition, PEG offers superior access to the gastrointestinal system over surgical methods. Considering that nowadays PEG tube placement is one of the most common endoscopic procedures performed worldwide, knowing its indications and contraindications is of paramount importance in current medicine. PEG tubes are sometimes placed inappropriately in patients unable to tolerate adequate oral intake because of incorrect and unrealistic understanding of their indications and what they can accomplish. Broadly, the two main indications of PEG tube placement are enteral feeding and stomach decompression. On the other hand, distal enteral obstruction, severe uncorrectable coagulopathy and hemodynamic instability constitute the main absolute contraindications for PEG tube placement in hospitalized patients. Although generally considered to be a safe procedure, there is the potential for both minor and major complications. Awareness of these potential complications, as well as understanding routine aftercare of the catheter, can improve the quality of care for patients with a PEG tube. These complications can generally be classified into three major categories: endoscopic technical difficulties, PEG procedure-related complications and late complications associated with PEG tube use and wound care. In this review we describe a variety of minor and major tube-related complications as well as strategies for their management and avoidance. Different methods of percutaneous PEG tube placement into the stomach have been described in the literature with the "pull" technique being the most common method. In the last section of this review, the reader is presented with a brief discussion of these procedures, techniques and related issues

  15. Upper airway tract and upper gastrointestinal tract involvement in patients with pemphigus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Su, Ozlem; Onsun, Nahide; Meric Teker, Aysenur; Cinkaya, Ayse; Yasemin Korkut, Arzu; Seremet, Sila; Davutoglu, Can; Demirkesen, Cuyan

    2010-01-01

    Pemphigus vulgaris (PV) is an autoimmune disease involving the skin and mucous membranes. The frequency of upper airway tract (UAT) and upper gastrointestinal tract (UGIT) involvement in PV is not clearly known. Our aim was to determine the incidence of UAT and UGIT involvement in patients with PV. Thirty-seven patients who were diagnosed with PV and treated between March 2008 and April 2009 at the Dermatology Department of the Vakif Gureba Teaching and Research Hospital were included. All patients were evaluated for UAT manifestations by endoscopic examination, and 22 of 37 patients were investigated for UGIT involvement by gastrointestinal endoscopy. Mucosal biopsies were obtained by UGIT endoscopy for direct immunofluorescence (DIF) examination, and a histopathological examination was conducted in patients with active UGIT mucosal lesions. Thirty-five of 37 patients (94.6%) had active pharyngeal, laryngeal, or nasal PV lesions on endoscopic evaluation. Oral symptoms (83.8%) and active oral PV lesions were the most frequent findings (100%). Pharyngeal lesions (64.9%) were the most commonly present lesions on UAT examination. The frequency for laryngeal and nasal lesions was 51.4% and 21.6%, respectively. Five of 22 patients (22.7%) presented with active laryngeal and esophageal lesions. Twenty-one of 22 (95.4%) patients had positive DIF results. We believe that UAT and UGIT endoscopies are useful and necessary diagnostic methods in patients with PV with or without UAT and UGIT symptoms. UAT and UGIT endoscopies should be performed as standard diagnostic procedures in all patients with PV.

  16. Emergency single-balloon enteroscopy in overt obscure gastrointestinal bleeding: Efficacy and safety

    PubMed Central

    Pinho, Rolando; Rodrigues, Adélia; Fernandes, Carlos; Ribeiro, Iolanda; Fraga, José; Carvalho, João

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to evaluate the impact of emergency single-balloon enteroscopy (SBE) on the diagnosis and treatment for active overt obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (OGIB). Methods SBE procedures for OGIB were retrospectively reviewed and sub-divided according to the bleeding types: active-overt and inactive-overt bleeding. The patient’s history, laboratory results, endoscopic findings and therapeutic interventions were registered. Emergency SBE was defined as an endoscopy that was performed for active-overt OGIB, within 24 hours of clinical presentation. Results Between January 2010 and February 2013, 53 SBEs were performed in 43 patients with overt OGIB. Seventeen emergency SBEs were performed in 15 patients with active overt-OGIB procedures (group A), which diagnosed the bleeding source in 14: angiodysplasia (n = 5), ulcers/erosions (n = 3), bleeding tumors (gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST), n = 3; neuroendocrine tumor, n = 1), and erosioned polyps (n = 2). Endoscopic treatment was performed in nine patients, with one or multiple hemostatic therapies: argon plasma coagulation (n = 5), epinephrine submucosal injection (n = 5), hemostatic clips (n = 3), and polypectomy (n = 2). Twenty-eight patients with inactive bleeding (group B) were submitted to 36 elective SBEs, which successfully diagnosed 18 cases. The diagnostic yield in group A (93.3%) was significantly higher than in group B (64.3%)—Fisher’s exact test, p = 0.038. Conclusion This study revealed an important role of emergency SBE in the diagnosis of bleeding etiology in active overt OGIB. PMID:25452844

  17. Endoscopic ultrasound in mediastinal tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Malay; Ecka, Ruth Shifa; Somasundaram, Aravindh; Shoukat, Abid; Kirnake, Vijendra

    2016-01-01

    Background: Tubercular lymphadenitis is the commonest extra pulmonary manifestation in cervical and mediastinal locations. Normal characteristics of lymph nodes (LN) have been described on ultrasonography as well as by Endoscopic Ultrasound. Many ultrasonic features have been described for evaluation of mediastinal lymph nodes. The inter and intraobserver agreement of the endosonographic features have not been uniformly established. Methods and Results: A total of 266 patients underwent endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration and 134 cases were diagnosed as mediastinal tuberculosis. The endoscopic ultrasound location and features of these lymph nodes are described. Conclusion: Our series demonstrates the utility of endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration as the investigation of choice for diagnosis of mediastinal tuberculosis and also describes various endoscopic ultrasound features of such nodes. PMID:27051097

  18. [Endoscopic vacuum-assisted closure].

    PubMed

    Wedemeyer, J; Lankisch, T

    2013-03-01

    Anastomotic leakage in the upper and lower intestinal tract is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Within the last 10 years endoscopic treatment options have been accepted as sufficient treatment option of these surgical complications. Endoscopic vacuum assisted closure (E-VAC) is a new innovative endoscopic therapeutic option in this field. E-VAC transfers the positive effects of vacuum assisted closure (VAC) on infected cutaneous wounds to infected cavities that can only be reached endoscopically. A sponge connected to a drainage tube is endoscopically placed in the leakage and a continuous vacuum is applied. Sponge and vacuum allow removal of infected fluids and promote granulation of the leakage. This results in clean wound grounds and finally allows wound closure. Meanwhile the method was also successfully used in the treatment of necrotic pancreatitis.

  19. Endoscopic Endonasal Transsphenoidal Approach

    PubMed Central

    Cappabianca, Paolo; Alfieri, Alessandra; Colao, Annamaria; Ferone, Diego; Lombardi, Gaetano; de Divitiis, Enrico

    1999-01-01

    The outcome of endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal surgery in 10 patients with pituitary adenomas was compared with that of traditional transnasal transsphenoidal approach (TTA) in 20 subjects. Among the 10 individuals subjected to “pure endoscopy,” 2 had a microadenoma, 1 an intrasellar macroadenoma, 4 had a macroadenoma with suprasellar expansion, 2 had a macroadenoma with supra-parasellar expansion, and 1 a residual tumor; 5 had acromegaly and 5 had a nonfunctioning adenoma (NFA). Among the patients subjected to TTA, 4 had a microadenoma, 2 had an intrasellar macroadenoma, 6 had a macroadenoma with suprasellar expansion, 4 had a macroadenoma with supra-parasellar expansion, and 4 had a residual tumor; 9 patients had acromegaly, 1 hyperprolactinemia, 1 Cushing's disease, and 9 a NFA. At the macroscopic evaluation, tumor removal was total (100%) after endoscopy in 9 patients and after TTA in 14 patients. Six months after surgery, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) confirmed the total tumor removal in 21 of 23 patients (91.3%). Circulating growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) significantly decreased 6 months after surgery in all 14 acromegalic patients: normalization of plasma IGF-I levels was obtained in 4 of 5 patients after the endoscopic procedure and in 4 of 9 patients after TTA. Before surgery, pituitary hormone deficiency was present in 14 out of 30 patients: pituitary function improved in 4 patients, remaining unchanged in the other 10 patients. Visual field defects were present before surgery in 4 patients, and improved in all. Early surgical results in the group of 10 patients who underwent endoscopic pituitary tumor removal were at least equivalent to those of standard TTA, with excellent postoperative course. Postsurgical hospital stay was significantly shorter (3.1 ± 0.4 vs. 6.2 ± 0.3 days, p < 0.001) after endoscopy as compared to TTA. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2 PMID:17171126

  20. Gastrointestinal endoscopy in a low budget context: delegating EGD to non-physician clinicians in Malawi can be feasible and safe.

    PubMed

    Wilhelm, T J; Mothes, H; Chiwewe, D; Mwatibu, B; Kähler, G

    2012-02-01

    Gastrointestinal endoscopy is rarely performed in low-income countries in sub-Saharan Africa. One reason is the lack of available medical doctors and specialists in these countries. At Zomba Central Hospital in Malawi, clinical officers (non-physician clinicians with 4 years of formal training) were trained in upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. Prospectively recorded details of 1732 consecutive esophagogastroduodenoscopies (EGDs) performed between September 2001 and August 2010 were analyzed to evaluate whether upper gastrointestinal endoscopy can be performed safely and accurately by clinical officers. A total of 1059 (61.1%) EGDs were performed by clinical officers alone and 673 (38.9%) were carried out with a medical doctor present who performed or assisted in the procedure. Failure and complication rates were similar in both groups (P=0.105). Endoscopic diagnoses for frequent indications were generally evenly distributed across the two groups. The main difference was a higher proportion of normal findings and a lower proportion of esophagitis in the group with a doctor present, although this was significant only in patients who had presented with epigastric/abdominal pain (P<0.001). In conclusion, delegating upper gastrointestinal endoscopy to clinical officers can be feasible and safe in a setting with a shortage of medical doctors when adequate training and supervision are provided.

  1. Endoscopic Intermetatarsal Ligament Decompression.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2015-12-01

    Morton neuroma is an entrapment of the intermetatarsal nerve by the deep intermetatarsal ligament. It is usually treated conservatively. Surgery is considered if there is recalcitrant pain that is resistant to conservative treatment. The surgical options include resection of the neuroma or decompression of the involved nerve. Decompression of the nerve by release of the intermetatarsal ligament can be performed by either an open or minimally invasive approach. We describe 2-portal endoscopic decompression of the intermetatarsal nerve. The ligament is released by a retrograde knife through the toe-web portal under arthroscopic guidance through the plantar portal.

  2. Shape memory alloy-based biopsy device for active locomotive intestinal capsule endoscope.

    PubMed

    Le, Viet Ha; Hernando, Leon-Rodriguez; Lee, Cheong; Choi, Hyunchul; Jin, Zhen; Nguyen, Kim Tien; Go, Gwangjun; Ko, Seong-Young; Park, Jong-Oh; Park, Sukho

    2015-03-01

    Recently, capsule endoscopes have been used for diagnosis in digestive organs. However, because a capsule endoscope does not have a locomotive function, its use has been limited to small tubular digestive organs, such as small intestine and esophagus. To address this problem, researchers have begun studying an active locomotive intestine capsule endoscope as a medical instrument for the whole gastrointestinal tract. We have developed a capsule endoscope with a small permanent magnet that is actuated by an electromagnetic actuation system, allowing active and flexible movement in the patient's gut environment. In addition, researchers have noted the need for a biopsy function in capsule endoscope for the definitive diagnosis of digestive diseases. Therefore, this paper proposes a novel robotic biopsy device for active locomotive intestine capsule endoscope. The proposed biopsy device has a sharp blade connected with a shape memory alloy actuator. The biopsy device measuring 12 mm in diameter and 3 mm in length was integrated into our capsule endoscope prototype, where the device's sharp blade was activated and exposed by the shape memory alloy actuator. Then the electromagnetic actuation system generated a specific motion of the capsule endoscope to extract the tissue sample from the intestines. The final biopsy sample tissue had a volume of about 6 mm(3), which is a sufficient amount for a histological analysis. Consequently, we proposed the working principle of the biopsy device and conducted an in-vitro biopsy test to verify the feasibility of the biopsy device integrated into the capsule endoscope prototype using the electro-magnetic actuation system.

  3. Contrast harmonic endoscopic ultrasound: Instrumentation, echoprocessors, and echoendoscopes

    PubMed Central

    Iglesias-Garcia, Julio; Lariño-Noia, Jose; Domínguez-Muñoz, J. Enrique

    2017-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) has become as one the best diagnostic and therapeutic methods for the management of several intraintestinal and extraintestinal diseases, among them to highlight pancreaticobiliary indications, mediastinal evaluation, and the analysis of gastrointestinal lesions. Over the years, there has been an enormous evolution in the systems available to perform EUS. Newer processors and echoendoscopes are available nowadays, with the ability to perform new imaging analysis, such as elastography and contrast enhancement. In the present article, we will review which systems are available nowadays, focusing also in the technical advances associated. PMID:28218199

  4. A Therapeutic Wireless Capsule for Treatment of Gastrointestinal Haemorrhage by Balloon Tamponade Effect.

    PubMed

    Leung, Billy H K; Poon, Carmen C Y; Zhang, Ruikai; Zheng, Y L; Chan, C K W; Chiu, Philip W Y; Lau, James Y W; Sung, Joseph J Y

    2016-07-13

    Wireless capsule endoscope (WCE) is a revolutionary approach to diagnose small bowel pathologies. Currently available WCEs are mostly passive devices with image capturing function only, while on-going efforts have been placed on robotizing WCEs or to enhance them with therapeutic functions. In this paper, the authors present a novel inflatable WCE for haemostasis in the gastrointestinal tracts by balloon tamponade effect.

  5. Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube insertion via gastro-gastric fistula in a gastric bypass patient.

    PubMed

    Antanavicius, Gintaras; Leslie, Daniel; Torres-Villalobos, Gonzalo; Kellogg, Todd; Ikramuddin, Sayeed

    2010-07-01

    Enteral feedings are the preferred route of nutritional support for malnourished or critically ill patients. Recent progress in flexible endoscopic and interventional radiological techniques has allowed adaptation of numerous new procedures. Anatomic and functional rearrangement of the gastrointestinal tract often precludes traditional percutaneus endoscopic gastrostomy tube placement. Insertion of a gastroscope through the nose, via open pharynx, or neck fistula have been described, but there are no reports in the English literature describing introduction of the gastroscope through a dilated gastro-gastric fistula in a patient with previous open Roux en Y gastric bypass.

  6. [Gastrointestinal dysmotility in children].

    PubMed

    Fluge, G; Olafsdottir, E

    2001-03-20

    Motility disorders were previously impossible to penetrate, but new technics have made it possible to investigate these disorders. An overview of neurophysiological functions of the gastrointestinal tract is given, and various conditions representing primary and secondary motility disorders are discussed. Diagnostic procedures and treatment options are presented. The clinical picture of such disorders is demonstrated by two cases. A girl born in 1995, having megacystis microcolon hypoperistalsis syndrome was the first Norwegian individual to have an intestinal transplantation, which was performed in London, UK. A girl with hypoganglionosis is also reported. Since May 1998, manometry of the oesophagus was performed in 44 children, and pathological findings were demonstrated in 18 of these patients. The motoric activity of the stomach was investigated in 17 patients using two-dimensional ultrasound and electrogastrography pre- and post-prandially. Disturbed function was found in nine of these children. Anorectal manometry was performed in 147 individuals, and Hirschsprung's disease was diagnosed in four.

  7. Esophageal subepithelial lesion diagnosed as malignant gastrointestinal neuroectodermal tumor.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung Bum; Lee, Si Hyung; Gu, Mi Jin

    2015-05-14

    A 21-year-old male visited our hospital with a complaint of aggravating dysphagia and odynophagia for a few days. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy showed huge bulging mucosa with an intact surface causing luminal narrowing at 35 cm from the incisor teeth. Endoscopic ultrasonography showed an about 35 mm sized irregular margined in-homogenous hypoechoic lesion with an obscure layer of origin. Endoscopic ultrasonography fine needle aspiration revealed spindle cell proliferation without immunoreactivity for CD117, SMA, and cytokeratin. The patient underwent excision of the subepithelial lesion at the distal esophagus. On pathologic examination of the specimen, the tumor was composed of short fascicles of oval to spindle cells with eosinophilic and clear cytoplasm and vesicular nuclei. The tumor cells were positive for S-100 and SOX10 and negative for CD117, SMA, HMB-45, melan-A, cytokeratin, and CD99. The split-apart signal was detected in EWSR1 on FISH, suggesting a malignant gastrointestinal neuroectodermal tumor. At the time of writing, the patient is on radiation therapy at the operated site of esophagus and doing well, with no recurrence for three months. Malignant gastrointestinal neuroectodermal tumor is a rare gastrointestinal tumor with features of clear cell sarcoma, without melanocytic differentiation, and shows a poor prognosis. This is the first reported case of malignant gastrointestinal neuroectodermal tumor arising as subepithelial lesion in the esophagus.

  8. Endoscopic egomotion computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergen, Tobias; Ruthotto, Steffen; Rupp, Stephan; Winter, Christian; Münzenmayer, Christian

    2010-03-01

    Computer assistance in Minimally Invasive Surgery is a very active field of research. Many systems designed for Computer Assisted Surgery require information about the instruments' positions and orientations. Our main focus lies on tracking a laparoscopic ultrasound probe to generate 3D ultrasound volumes. State-of-the-art tracking methods such as optical or electromagnetic tracking systems measure pose with respect to a fixed extra-body coordinate system. This causes inaccuracies of the reconstructed ultrasound volume in the case of patient motion, e.g. due to respiration. We propose attaching an endoscopic camera to the ultrasound probe and calculating the camera motion from the video sequence with respect to the organ surface. We adapt algorithms developed for solving the relative pose problem to recreate the camera path during the ultrasound sweep over the organ. By this image-based motion estimation camera motion can only be determined up to an unknown scale factor, known as the depth-speed-ambiguity. We show, how this problem can be overcome in the given scenario, exploiting the fact, that the distance of the camera to the organ surface is fixed and known. Preprocessing steps are applied to compensate for endoscopic image quality deficiencies.

  9. Endoscopic simple prostatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Borkowski, Tomasz; Chłosta, Piotr; Dobruch, Jakub; Fiutowski, Marek; Jaskulski, Jarosław; Słojewski, Marcin; Szydełko, Tomasz; Szymański, Michał; Demkow, Tomasz

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Many options exist for the surgical treatment of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) due to benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), including transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP), laser surgery, and open adenomectomy. Recently, endoscopic techniques have been used in the treatment of BPH. Material and methods We reviewed clinical studies in PubMed describing minimally invasive endoscopic procedures for the treatment of BPH. Results Laparoscopic adenomectomy (LA) and robotic–assisted simple prostatectomy (RASP) were introduced in the early 2000s. These operative techniques have been standardized and reproducible, with some individual modifications. Studies analyzing the outcomes of LA and RASP have reported significant improvements in urinary flow and decreases in patient International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS). These minimally invasive approaches have resulted in a lower rate of complications, shorter hospital stays, smaller scars, faster recoveries, and an earlier return to work. Conclusions Minimally invasive techniques such as LA and RASP for the treatment BPH are safe, efficacious, and allow faster recovery. These procedures have a short learning curve and offer new options for the surgeon treating BPH. PMID:25667758

  10. Duplication cysts: Diagnosis, management, and the role of endoscopic ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Liu, Roy; Adler, Douglas G

    2014-07-01

    Gastrointestinal tract duplication cysts are rare congenital gastrointestinal malformation in young patients and adults. They consist of foregut duplication cysts, small bowel duplication cysts, and large bowel duplication cysts. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) has been widely used as a modality for the evaluation and diagnosis of duplication cysts. EUS is the diagnostic tool of choice to investigate duplication cysts since it can distinguish between solid and cystic lesions. The question of whether or not to perform EUS-fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) on a lesion suspected of being a duplication cyst is controversial as these lesions can become infected with significant consequences, although EUS-FNA is often required to obtain a definitive diagnosis and to rule out more ominous lesions. This manuscript will review the literature on duplication cysts throughout the body and will also focus on the role of EUS and FNA with regards to these lesions.

  11. Gallstone Ileus following Endoscopic Stone Extraction

    PubMed Central

    Wakui, Noritaka; Asai, Yasutsugu; Dan, Nobuhiro; Takeda, Yuki; Ueki, Nobuo; Otsuka, Takahumi; Oba, Nobuyuki; Nisinakagawa, Shuta; Kojima, Tatsuya

    2014-01-01

    An 85-year-old woman was an outpatient treated at Tokyo Rosai Hospital for cirrhosis caused by hepatitis B. She had previously been diagnosed as having common bile duct stones, for which she underwent endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). However, as stone removal was unsuccessful, a plastic stent was placed after endoscopic sphincterotomy. In October 2012, the stent was replaced endoscopically because she developed cholangitis due to stent occlusion. Seven days later, we performed ERCP to treat recurring cholangitis. During the procedure, the stone was successfully removed by a balloon catheter when cleaning the common bile duct. The next day, the patient developed abdominal pain, abdominal distension, and nausea and was diagnosed as having gallstone ileus based on abdominal computed tomography (CT) and abdominal ultrasonography findings of an incarcerated stone in the terminal ileum. Although colonoscopy was performed after inserting an ileus tube, no stone was visible. Subsequent CT imaging verified the disappearance of the incarcerated stone from the ileum, suggesting that the stone had been evacuated naturally via the transanal route. Although it is extremely rare for gallstone ileus to develop as a complication of ERCP, physicians should be aware of gallstone ileus and follow patients carefully, especially after removing huge stones. PMID:25328725

  12. Gastrointestinal complications of diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Babu; Babu, Shithu; Walker, Jessica; Walker, Adrian B; Pappachan, Joseph M

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus affects virtually every organ system in the body and the degree of organ involvement depends on the duration and severity of the disease, and other co-morbidities. Gastrointestinal (GI) involvement can present with esophageal dysmotility, gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD), gastroparesis, enteropathy, non alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and glycogenic hepatopathy. Severity of GERD is inversely related to glycemic control and management is with prokinetics and proton pump inhibitors. Diabetic gastroparesis manifests as early satiety, bloating, vomiting, abdominal pain and erratic glycemic control. Gastric emptying scintigraphy is considered the gold standard test for diagnosis. Management includes dietary modifications, maintaining euglycemia, prokinetics, endoscopic and surgical treatments. Diabetic enteropathy is also common and management involves glycemic control and symptomatic measures. NAFLD is considered a hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome and treatment is mainly lifestyle measures, with diabetes and dyslipidemia management when coexistent. Glycogenic hepatopathy is a manifestation of poorly controlled type 1 diabetes and is managed by prompt insulin treatment. Though GI complications of diabetes are relatively common, awareness about its manifestations and treatment options are low among physicians. Optimal management of GI complications is important for appropriate metabolic control of diabetes and improvement in quality of life of the patient. This review is an update on the GI complications of diabetes, their pathophysiology, diagnostic evaluation and management. PMID:23772273

  13. Laparoscopic approach in gastrointestinal emergencies

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez Rodriguez, Rosa M; Segura-Sampedro, Juan José; Flores-Cortés, Mercedes; López-Bernal, Francisco; Martín, Cristobalina; Diaz, Verónica Pino; Ciuro, Felipe Pareja; Ruiz, Javier Padillo

    2016-01-01

    This review focuses on the laparoscopic approach to gastrointestinal emergencies and its more recent indications. Laparoscopic surgery has a specific place in elective procedures, but that does not apply in emergency situations. In specific emergencies, there is a huge range of indications and different techniques to apply, and not all of them are equally settle. We consider that the most controversial points in minimally invasive procedures are indications in emergency situations due to technical difficulties. Some pathologies, such as oesophageal emergencies, obstruction due to colon cancer, abdominal hernias or incarcerated postsurgical hernias, are nearly always resolved by conventional surgery, that is, an open approach due to limited intraabdominal cavity space or due to the vulnerability of the bowel. These technical problems have been solved in many diseases, such as for perforated peptic ulcer or acute appendectomy for which a laparoscopic approach has become a well-known and globally supported procedure. On the other hand, endoscopic procedures have acquired further indications, relegating surgical solutions to a second place; this happens in cholangitis or pancreatic abscess drainage. This endoluminal approach avoids the need for laparoscopic development in these diseases. Nevertheless, new instruments and new technologies could extend the laparoscopic approach to a broader array of potentials procedures. There remains, however, a long way to go. PMID:26973409

  14. Haemorrhagic cholecystitis: an unusual cause of upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Hicks, Natalie

    2014-01-17

    Haemorrhagic cholecystitis is a rare cause of upper gastrointestinal bleeding and is a difficult diagnosis to make. This case report describes an orthopaedic patient, who developed deranged liver function tests and anaemia after a hemiarthroplasty of the hip. The patient had upper abdominal pain and black stools which clinically appeared to be melaena. An ultrasound scan of the abdomen was inconclusive, and therefore a CT was performed and the potential diagnosis of haemorrhagic cholecystitis was raised. An endoscopic evaluation of the upper gastrointestinal tract showed no evidence of other causes of upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Following an emergency laparotomy and cholecystectomy, she recovered well. This report aims to increase awareness about the uncommon condition of haemorrhagic cholecystitis, and to educate regarding clinical and radiological signs which lead to this diagnosis.

  15. Endoscopic management of esophageal varices.

    PubMed

    Poza Cordon, Joaquin; Froilan Torres, Consuelo; Burgos García, Aurora; Gea Rodriguez, Francisco; Suárez de Parga, Jose Manuel

    2012-07-16

    The rupture of gastric varices results in variceal hemorrhage, which is one the most lethal complications of cirrhosis. Endoscopic therapies for varices aim to reduce variceal wall tension by obliteration of the varix. The two principal methods available for esophageal varices are endoscopic sclerotherapy (EST) and band ligation (EBL). The advantages of EST are that it is cheap and easy to use, and the injection catheter fits through the working channel of a diagnostic gastroscope. Endoscopic variceal ligation obliterates varices by causing mechanical strangulation with rubber bands. The following review aims to describe the utility of EBL and EST in different situations, such as acute bleeding, primary and secondary prophylaxis.

  16. Complications of endoscopic intranasal ethmoidectomy.

    PubMed

    Stankiewicz, J A

    1987-11-01

    A consecutive series of 90 patients undergoing endoscopic intranasal ethmoidectomy was reviewed. There were 26 complications (29%) in 19 patients in this group. Eight complications (8%) including CSF leak, temporary blindness, and hemorrhage were considered major with the latter occurring most commonly. Synechiae were the most commonly occurring minor complications. Endoscopic nasal sinus surgery performed by inexperienced operators carries with it the same risks and complications as traditional intranasal sinus surgery. Any surgeon who does not routinely perform traditional intranasal ethmoidectomy should accrue endoscopic experience through appropriate didactic training and multiple cadaver dissections (akin to otologic training).

  17. Superficial leiomyomas of the gastrointestinal tract with interstitial cells of Cajal

    PubMed Central

    Janevska, Vesna; Qerimi, Adelina; Basheska, Neli; Stojkova, Elena; Janevski, Vlado; Jovanovic, Rubens; Zhivadinovik, Julija; Spasevska, Liljana

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Some authors suggest common origin of gastrointestinal stromal tumors from stem cells, which may show diverse differentiation. There are reports in which cells morphologically identical to the interstitial cells of Cajal are found in deep leiomyomas. The aim of this study was to demonstrate CD117 positive cells in superficial gastrointestinal (GI) leiomyomas and to find other cells that would suggest diverse differentiation in histologically typical leiomyoma. Materials and methods: We analyzed 8 cases of superficial leiomyomas and one deep leiomyoma, received in our institutions as endoscopically or surgically obtained material. The tumor sections were immunohistochemicaly stained with CD117, CD34, NF, S100, αSMA, desmin, caldesmon and mast cell antigen. Results: All leiomyomas showed diffuse positivity for αSMA, caldesmon and desmin. All of them had CD117 and CD34 positive cells morphologically identical to the interstitial cells of Cajal between smooth muscle fibers, 5 had S-100 and NF positive cells and 2 showed positivity for GFAP. The cells were found in different quantity; they were usually diffusely scattered through the tumors without predilection site, forming small groups in some areas. Conclusion: CD177, CD34, S-100 and NF positive cells are present in superficial leiomyomas and they may suggest common origin of GI stromal tumors. PMID:26884872

  18. Evaluation of technetium-99m DTPA for localization of site of acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    SciTech Connect

    Abdel-Dayem, H.M.; Mahajan, K.K.; Ericsson, S.; Nawaz, K.; Owunwanne, A.; Kouris, K.; Higazy, E.; Awdeh, M.

    1986-11-01

    Intravenous Tc-99m DTPA was evaluated in 34 patients with active upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Active bleeding was detected in 25 patients: nine in the stomach, 12 in the duodenum, and four from esophageal varices. No active bleeding was seen in nine patients (two gastric ulcers and seven duodenal ulcers). Results were correlated with endoscopic and/or surgical findings. All completely correlated except: 1) one case of esophageal varices in which there was disagreement on the site, 2) three cases of duodenal ulcers that were not bleeding on endoscopy but showed mild oozing on delayed images and 3) one case of gastric ulcer, in which no bleeding was detected in the Tc-99m DTPA study, but was found to be bleeding at surgery 24 hours later. The Tc-99m DTPA study is a reliable method for localization of upper gastrointestinal bleeding with an agreement ratio of 85%. This method also can be used safely for follow-up of patients with intermittent bleeding. It is less invasive than endoscopy, is easily repeatable, and has the same accuracy.

  19. Update on the Medical Management of Gastrointestinal Behçet's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Venerito, Vincenzo; Franceschini, Rossella; Lapadula, Giovanni; Galeazzi, Mauro; Frediani, Bruno; Iannone, Florenzo

    2017-01-01

    Behçet's disease (BD) is a multisystemic disorder of unknown etiology mainly defined by recurrent oral aphthosis, genital ulcers, and chronic relapsing bilateral uveitis, all of which represent the “stigmata” of disease. However, many other organs including the vascular, neurological, musculoskeletal, and gastrointestinal systems can be affected. The gastrointestinal involvement in Behçet's disease (GIBD), along with the neurological and vascular ones, represents the most feared clinical manifestation of BD and shares many symptoms with inflammatory bowel diseases, such as Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. Consequently, the differential diagnosis is often a daunting task, albeit the presence of typical endoscopic and pathologic findings may be a valuable aid to the exact diagnosis. To date, there are no standardized medical treatments for GIBD; therefore therapy should be tailored to the single patient and based on the severity of the clinical features and their complications. This work provides a digest of all current experience and evidence about pharmacological agents suggested by the medical literature as having a potential role for managing the dreadful features of GIBD. PMID:28210071

  20. Diagnosis and management of nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage: European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) Guideline.

    PubMed

    Gralnek, Ian M; Dumonceau, Jean-Marc; Kuipers, Ernst J; Lanas, Angel; Sanders, David S; Kurien, Matthew; Rotondano, Gianluca; Hucl, Tomas; Dinis-Ribeiro, Mario; Marmo, Riccardo; Racz, Istvan; Arezzo, Alberto; Hoffmann, Ralf-Thorsten; Lesur, Gilles; de Franchis, Roberto; Aabakken, Lars; Veitch, Andrew; Radaelli, Franco; Salgueiro, Paulo; Cardoso, Ricardo; Maia, Luís; Zullo, Angelo; Cipolletta, Livio; Hassan, Cesare

    2015-10-01

    injection therapy not be used as endoscopic monotherapy. If used, it should be combined with a second endoscopic hemostasis modality (strong recommendation, high quality evidence). MR12. ESGE recommends PPI therapy for patients who receive endoscopic hemostasis and for patients with adherent clot not receiving endoscopic hemostasis. PPI therapy should be high dose and administered as an intravenous bolus followed by continuous infusion (80 mg then 8 mg/hour) for 72 hours post endoscopy (strong recommendation, high quality evidence). MR13. ESGE does not recommend routine second-look endoscopy as part of the management of nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage (NVUGIH). However, in patients with clinical evidence of rebleeding following successful initial endoscopic hemostasis, ESGE recommends repeat upper endoscopy with hemostasis if indicated. In the case of failure of this second attempt at hemostasis, transcatheter angiographic embolization (TAE) or surgery should be considered (strong recommendation, high quality evidence). MR14. In patients with NVUGIH secondary to peptic ulcer, ESGE recommends investigating for the presence of Helicobacter pylori in the acute setting with initiation of appropriate antibiotic therapy when H. pylori is detected. Re-testing for H. pylori should be performed in those patients with a negative test in the acute setting. Documentation of successful H. pylori eradication is recommended (strong recommendation, high quality evidence). MR15. In patients receiving low dose aspirin for secondary cardiovascular prophylaxis who develop peptic ulcer bleeding, ESGE recommends aspirin be resumed immediately following index endoscopy if the risk of rebleeding is low (e. g., FIIc, FIII). In patients with high risk peptic ulcer (FIa, FIb, FIIa, FIIb), early reintroduction of aspirin by day 3 after index endoscopy is recommended, provided that adequate hemostasis has been established (strong recommendation, moderate quality evidence).

  1. Endoscopic Ultrasound Practice Survey in Latin America

    PubMed Central

    Drigo, Juliana Marques; Castillo, Cecilia; Wever, Wallia; Obaldía, José Ricardo Ruíz; Fillipi, Sheila; Ribeiro, Manoel C. S. A.; Rossini, Lucio G. B.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) has become an important imaging modality for the diagnosis, staging and treatment of gastrointestinal disorders. However, no official data exists regarding clinical EUS practice in Latin America (LA). This study assessed current EUS practice and training. Patients and Methods: A direct mail survey questionnaire was sent to 268 Capítulo Latino Americano de Ultrasonido Endoscópico members between August 2012 and January 2013. The questionnaire was sent out in English, Spanish and Portuguese languages and was available through the following site: http://www.cleus-encuesta.com. Responses were requested only from physicians who perform EUS. Results: A total of 70 LA physicians answered the questionnaire until January 2013. Most of the participants were under 42 years of age (53%) and 80% were men. Most participants (45.7%) perform EUS in Brazil, 53% work in a private hospital. The majority (70%) also perform endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. A total 42% had performed EUS for 2 years or less and 22.7% for 11 years or more. Only 10% performed more than 5000 EUS. The most common indication was an evaluation of pancreatic-biliary-ampullary lesions. Regarding training, 48.6% had more than 6 months of dedicated hands-on EUS and 37% think that at least 6 months of formal training is necessary to acquire competence. Furthermore, 64% think that more than 50 procedures for pancreatic-biliary lesions are necessary. Conclusion: This survey provides insight into the status of EUS in LA. EUS is performed mostly by young endoscopists in LA. Diagnostic upper EUS is the most common EUS procedure. Most endosonographers believe that formal training is necessary to acquire competence. PMID:24949398

  2. Foveated endoscopic lens

    PubMed Central

    Hagen, Nathan

    2012-01-01

    Abstract. We present a foveated miniature endoscopic lens implemented by amplifying the optical distortion of the lens. The resulting system provides a high-resolution region in the central field of view and low resolution in the outer fields, such that a standard imaging fiber bundle can provide both the high resolution needed to determine tissue health and the wide field of view needed to determine the location within the inspected organ. Our proof of concept device achieves 7∼8  μm resolution in the fovea and an overall field of view of 4.6 mm. Example images and videos show the foveated lens’ capabilities. PMID:22463022

  3. Endoscopic third ventriculostomy

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Yad Ram; Parihar, Vijay; Pande, Sonjjay; Namdev, Hemant; Agarwal, Moneet

    2012-01-01

    Endoscopic third ventriculostomy (ETV) is considered as a treatment of choice for obstructive hydrocephalus. It is indicated in hydrocephalus secondary to congenital aqueductal stenosis, posterior third ventricle tumor, cerebellar infarct, Dandy-Walker malformation, vein of Galen aneurism, syringomyelia with or without Chiari malformation type I, intraventricular hematoma, post infective, normal pressure hydrocephalus, myelomeningocele, multiloculated hydrocephalus, encephalocele, posterior fossa tumor and craniosynostosis. It is also indicated in block shunt or slit ventricle syndrome. Proper Pre-operative imaging for detailed assessment of the posterior communicating arteries distance from mid line, presence or absence of Liliequist membrane or other membranes, located in the prepontine cistern is useful. Measurement of lumbar elastance and resistance can predict patency of cranial subarachnoid space and complex hydrocephalus, which decides an ultimate outcome. Water jet dissection is an effective technique of ETV in thick floor. Ultrasonic contact probe can be useful in selected patients. Intra-operative ventriculo-stomography could help in confirming the adequacy of endoscopic procedure, thereby facilitating the need for shunt. Intraoperative observations of the patent aqueduct and prepontine cistern scarring are predictors of the risk of ETV failure. Such patients may be considered for shunt surgery. Magnetic resonance ventriculography and cine phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging are effective in assessing subarachnoid space and stoma patency after ETV. Proper case selection, post-operative care including monitoring of ICP and need for external ventricular drain, repeated lumbar puncture and CSF drainage, Ommaya reservoir in selected patients could help to increase success rate and reduce complications. Most of the complications develop in an early post-operative, but fatal complications can develop late which indicate an importance of long term follow

  4. Endoscopic surgery - exploring the modalities

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Daniel Jin Keat; Tan, Kok-Yang

    2015-01-01

    The adoption of endoscopic surgery continues to expand in clinical situations with the recent natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery technique enabling abdominal organ resection to be performed without necessitating any skin incision. In recent years, the development of numerous devices and platforms have allowed for such procedures to be carried out in a safer and more efficient manner, and in some ways to better simulate triangulation and surgical tasks (e.g., suturing and dissection). Furthermore, new novel techniques such as submucosal tunneling, endoscopic full-thickness resection and hybrid endo-laparoscopic approaches have further widened its use in more advanced diseases. Nevertheless, many of these new innovations are still at their pre-clinical stage. This review focuses on the various innovations in endoscopic surgery, with emphasis on devices and techniques that are currently in human use. PMID:26649156

  5. Digital image analysis of endoscopic ultrasonography is helpful in diagnosing gastric mesenchymal tumors

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) is a valuable imaging tool for evaluating subepithelial lesions in the stomach. However, there are few studies on differentiation between gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) and benign mesenchymal tumors, such as leiomyoma or schwannoma, with the use of EUS. In addition, there are limitations in the analysis of the characteristic features of such tumors due to poor interobserver agreement as a result of subjective interpretation of EUS images. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the role of digital image analysis in distinguishing the features of GISTs from those of benign mesenchymal tumors on EUS. Methods We enrolled 65 patients with histopathologically proven gastric GIST, leiomyoma or schwannoma on surgically resected specimens who underwent EUS examination at our endoscopic unit from January 2007 to September 2010. After standardization of the EUS images, brightness values including the mean (Tmean), indicative of echogenicity, and the standard deviation (TSD), indicative of heterogeneity, in the tumors were analyzed. Results The Tmean and TSD were significantly higher in GIST than in leiomyoma and schwannoma (p < 0.001). However, there was no significant difference in the Tmean or TSD between benign and malignant GISTs. The sensitivity and specificity were almost optimized for differentiating GIST from leiomyoma or schwannoma when the critical values of Tmean and TSD were 65 and 75, respectively. The presence of at least 1 of these 2 findings in a given tumor resulted in a sensitivity of 94%, specificity of 80%, positive predictive value of 94%, negative predictive value of 80%, and accuracy of 90.8% for predicting GIST. Conclusions Digital image analysis provides objective information on EUS images; thus, it can be useful in diagnosing gastric mesenchymal tumors. PMID:24400772

  6. Endoscopic Distal Tibiofibular Syndesmosis Arthrodesis.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2016-04-01

    Chronic distal tibiofibular syndesmosis disruption can be managed by endoscopic arthrodesis of the syndesmosis. This is performed through the proximal anterolateral and posterolateral portals. The scar tissue and bone block are resected to facilitate the subsequent reduction of the syndesmosis. The reduction of the syndesmosis can be guided either arthroscopically or endoscopically. The tibial and fibular surfaces of the tibiofibular overlap can be microfractured to facilitate subsequent fusion.

  7. [Endoscopic approaches to the orbit].

    PubMed

    Cebula, H; Lahlou, A; De Battista, J C; Debry, C; Froelich, S

    2010-01-01

    During the last decade, the use of endoscopic endonasal approaches to the pituitary has increased considerably. The endoscopic endonasal and transantral approaches offer a minimally invasive alternative to the classic transcranial or transconjunctival approaches to the medial aspect of the orbit. The medial wall of the orbit, the orbital apex, and the optic canal can be exposed through a middle meatal antrostomy, an anterior and posterior ethmoidectomy, and a sphenoidotomy. The inferomedial wall of the orbit can be also perfectly visualized through a sublabial antrostomy or an inferior meatal antrostomy. Several reports have described the use of an endoscopic approach for the resection or the biopsy of lesions located on the medial extraconal aspect of the orbit and orbital apex. However, the resection of intraconal lesions is still limited by inadequate instrumentation. Other indications for the endoscopic approach to the orbit are the decompression of the orbit for Graves' ophthalmopathy and traumatic optic neuropathy. However, the optimal management of traumatic optic neuropathy remains very controversial. Endoscopic endonasal decompression of the optic nerve in case of tumor compression could be a more valid indication in combination with radiation therapy. Finally, the endoscopic transantral treatment of blowout fracture of the floor of the orbit is an interesting option that avoids the eyelid or conjunctive incision of traditional approaches. The collaboration between the neurosurgeon and the ENT surgeon is mandatory and reduces the morbidity of the approach. Progress in instrumentation and optical devices will certainly make this approach promising for intraconal tumor of the orbit.

  8. Bleeding after endoscopic submucosal dissection: Risk factors and preventive methods

    PubMed Central

    Kataoka, Yosuke; Tsuji, Yosuke; Sakaguchi, Yoshiki; Minatsuki, Chihiro; Asada-Hirayama, Itsuko; Niimi, Keiko; Ono, Satoshi; Kodashima, Shinya; Yamamichi, Nobutake; Fujishiro, Mitsuhiro; Koike, Kazuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) has become widely accepted as a standard method of treatment for superficial gastrointestinal neoplasms because it enables en block resection even for large lesions or fibrotic lesions with minimal invasiveness, and decreases the local recurrence rate. Moreover, specimens resected in an en block fashion enable accurate histological assessment. Taking these factors into consideration, ESD seems to be more advantageous than conventional endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR), but the associated risks of perioperative adverse events are higher than in EMR. Bleeding after ESD is the most frequent among these adverse events. Although post-ESD bleeding can be controlled by endoscopic hemostasis in most cases, it may lead to serious conditions including hemorrhagic shock. Even with preventive methods including administration of acid secretion inhibitors and preventive hemostasis, post-ESD bleeding cannot be completely prevented. In addition high-risk cases for post-ESD bleeding, which include cases with the use of antithrombotic agents or which require large resection, are increasing. Although there have been many reports about associated risk factors and methods of preventing post-ESD bleeding, many issues remain unsolved. Therefore, in this review, we have overviewed risk factors and methods of preventing post-ESD bleeding from previous studies. Endoscopists should have sufficient knowledge of these risk factors and preventive methods when performing ESD. PMID:27468187

  9. Design of variable frequency endoscope ultrasonic digital imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ya-nan; Bai, Bao-ping; Chen, Xiao-dong; Zhao, Qiang; Deng, Hao-ran; Wang, Yi; Yu, Dao-yin

    2013-12-01

    This paper presented a real-time endoscope ultrasonic digital imaging system, which was based on FPGA and applied for gastrointestinal examination. Four modules, scan-line data processing module, coordinate transformation and interpolation algorithm module, cache reading and writing control module and transmitting and receiving control module were included in this FPGA based system. Through adopting different frequency ultrasound probes in a single insertion of endoscope, the system showed a high speed data processing mechanism capable of achieving images with various display effects. A high-precision modified coordinate calibration CORDIC (HMCC-CORDIC) algorithm was employed to realize coordinate transformation and interpolation simultaneously, while the precision and reliability of the algorithm could be greatly improved through utilizing the pipeline structure based on temporal logic. Also, system real-time control by computer could be achieved through operating under the condition of USB2.0 interface. The corresponding experimental validations proved the feasibility and the correctness of the proper data processing mechanism, the HMCC-CORDIC algorithm and the USB real-time control. Finally, the specific experimental sample, a tissue mimicking phantom, was imaged in real-time (25 frames per second) by an endoscope ultrasonic imaging system with image size 1024×1024. The requirements for clinical examination could be well satisfied with the imaging parameters discussed above.

  10. Magnetic control system targeted for capsule endoscopic operations in the stomach--design, fabrication, and in vitro and ex vivo evaluations.

    PubMed

    Lien, Gi-Shih; Liu, Chih-Wen; Jiang, Joe-Air; Chuang, Cheng-Long; Teng, Ming-Tsung

    2012-07-01

    This paper presents a novel solution of a hand-held external controller to a miniaturized capsule endoscope in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Traditional capsule endoscopes move passively by peristaltic wave generated in the GI tract and the gravity, which makes it impossible for endoscopists to manipulate the capsule endoscope to the diagnostic disease areas. In this study, the main objective is to present an endoscopic capsule and a magnetic field navigator (MFN) that allows endoscopists to remotely control the locomotion and viewing angle of an endoscopic capsule. The attractive merits of this study are that the maneuvering of the endoscopic capsule can be achieved by the external MFN with effectiveness, low cost, and operation safety, both from a theoretical and an experimental point of view. In order to study the magnetic interactions between the endoscopic capsule and the external MFN, a magnetic-analysis model is established for computer-based finite-element simulations. In addition, experiments are conducted to show the control effectiveness of the MFN to the endoscopic capsule. Finally, several prototype endoscopic capsules and a prototype MFN are fabricated, and their actual capabilities are experimentally assessed via in vitro and ex vivo tests using a stomach model and a resected porcine stomach, respectively. Both in vitro and ex vivo test results demonstrate great potential and practicability of achieving high-precision rotation and controllable movement of the capsule using the developed MFN.

  11. Endoscopic submucosal dissection of the pharyngeal region using anchored hemoclip with surgical thread: A novel method

    PubMed Central

    Minami, Hitomi; Tabuchi, Maiko; Matsushima, Kayoko; Akazawa, Yuko; Yamaguchi, Naoyuki; Ohnita, Ken; Takeshima, Fuminao; Nakao, Kazuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) of the pharyngeal region has not been well accepted, although ESD of the gastrointestinal tract is a standard procedure for treating early cancers. However, early detection and treatment of pharyngeal cancers is highly beneficial because surgical resection can be highly invasive and cause serious cosmetic deformities, swallowing disorders, dysgeusia, and speech defects. On the other hand, application of an anchored clip with surgical thread during ESD of the gastrointestinal tract has been reported to be beneficial. This pilot case series reveals the usefulness and clinical feasibility of applying a clip with thread in ESD of the pharyngeal region. PMID:27540568

  12. Giardia lamblia infection diagnosed by endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration.

    PubMed

    Carter, J Elliot; Nelson, John J; Eves, Matthew; Boudreaux, Carole

    2007-06-01

    The protozoan Giardia lamblia is a major cause of gastrointestinal disease worldwide. We report the case of a 59-yr-old male who presented to his primary care physician with complaints of abdominal pain and weight loss. Imaging studies revealed a liver mass and a pancreatic head mass. Biopsy of the liver mass proved to be benign, and endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration of the mass in the head of the pancreas showed no evidence of malignancy; however, numerous pear-shaped, binucleated, flagellated organisms morphologically consistent with trophozoites of Giardia lamblia were identified in the specimen. With the increasing use of endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration for sampling of gastrointestinal, hepatobiliary, and pancreatic lesions, cytopathologists examining such specimens will need to be familiar with the diagnostic characteristics of this protozoal parasite.

  13. [Clinico-endoscopic classification of acute anastomositis after resection of the stomach].

    PubMed

    Zhizhin, F S; Kapustin, B B

    2002-01-01

    The authors have analyzed the results of resection of the stomach in 106 patients with a complicated course of ulcer disease of the stomach and duodenum. Based on a complex investigation of regeneration of the gastrointestinal anastomoses formed by different methods and a comparison of the endoscopic picture with the clinical course of the early postoperative period the authors propose a clinico-endoscopic classification of acute postgastroresectional anastomosites. Comparison of the frequency and severity of the anastomosites has shown advantages of a one-raw seroserous musculo-submucous suture in the resectional surgery of the stomach when forming gastro-intestinal anastomoses. The classification of acute anastomosites allows the timely detection and correction of the operation complications.

  14. Endoscopic OCT for in-vivo imaging of precancer and cancer states of human mucosa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergeev, Alexander M.; Gelikonov, Valentin M.; Gelikonov, Grigory V.; Feldchtein, Felix I.; Kuranov, Roman V.; Gladkova, Natalia D.; Shakhova, Natalia M.; Kuznetzova, Irina N.; Snopova, Ludmila; Denisenko, Arkady; Almasov, Valentin

    1998-01-01

    First results of endoscopic applications of optical coherence tomography for in vivo studies of human mucosa in gastrointestinal and genital tracts are presented. A novel endoscopic OCT system has ben created that is based on the integration of a sampling arm of an all-optical-fiber interferometer into standard endoscopic devices using their biopsy channel to transmit low-coherence radiation to investigated tissue. We have studied mucous membranes of esophagus, stomach and uterine cervix as typical localization for carcinomatous processes. Images of tumor tissues versus healthy tissues have been recorded and analyzed. Violations of well-defined stratified healthy mucosa structure in cancerous tissue is distinctly seen by EOCT, thus making this technique promising for early diagnosis of tumors and precise guiding of excisional biopsy.

  15. Endoscopic microwave coagulation therapy of postoperative hemorrhage from a stapled anastomosis.

    PubMed

    Umano, Yasukazu; Horiuchi, Tetsuya; Inoue, Masaya; Shono, Yoshiharu; Oku, Yoshimasa; Tanishima, Hiroyuki; Tsuji, Takeshi; Tabuse, Katsuyoshi

    2005-01-01

    We experienced three cases of postoperative hemorrhage from a stapled gastrointestinal anastomosis, and established endoscopic microwave coagulation therapy (EMCT) with a cylinder-type electrode. We were able to treat postoperative hemorrhage over the entire circumference of stapled anastomosis successfully. Two patients had undergone a lower third thoracic esophagogastrectomy through a left thoraco-abdominal approach for gastric cancer in the cardia, while the other case had undergone Billroth I gastrectomy. They each had fresh bleeding from the stapled anastomosis after the operation. Emergency endoscopic examination was immediately performed. Endoscopy revealed bleeding on the suture line. We performed hemostasis endoscopically with microwave coagulation therapy safely. They were discharged from the hospital without complications such as leakage and stenosis. Since EMCT with the cylinder-type electrode can coagulate shallowly and widely, it is very effective for hemorrhage from a stapled anastomosis.

  16. [Natural orifice trans-luminal endoscopic surgery (notes)--a new era in general surgery].

    PubMed

    Elazary, Ram; Horgan, Santiago; Talamini, Mark A; Rivkind, Avraham I; Mintz, Yoav

    2008-10-01

    Four years ago, a new surgical technique was presented, the natural orifice trans-luminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES). This technique provides an incisionless operation. The surgical devices are inserted into the peritoneal cavity through the gastrointestinal or the urogenital tracts. Today, a cholecystectomy can be performed using an advanced endoscope inserted through the stomach or the vagina. The advantages of NOTES are: reduced post operative pain, no hernias, no surgical wounds infections and better cosmetic results. The disadvantages are: difficulties in achieving safe enterotomy closure or a leak proof anastomosis, it necessitates performing more operations compared to open or laparoscopic operations in order to obtain the skills for performing these operations, and difficulties of acquiring satisfactory endoscopic vision due to lack of advanced technology. Several NOTES operations have already been performed in humans. However, many other surgical procedures were tested in laboratory animals. Development and improvement of surgical devices may promote this surgical modality in the future.

  17. In vivo endoscopic OCT imaging of precancer and cancer states of human mucosa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergeev, Alexander M.; Gelikonov, V. M.; Gelikonov, G. V.; Feldchtein, Felix I.; Kuranov, R. V.; Gladkova, N. D.; Shakhova, N. M.; Snopova, L. B.; Shakhov, A. V.; Kuznetzova, I. A.; Denisenko, A. N.; Pochinko, V. V.; Chumakov, Yu P.; Streltzova, O. S.

    1997-12-01

    First results of endoscopic applications of optical coherence tomography for in vivo studies of human mucosa in respiratory, gastrointestinal, urinary and genital tracts are presented. A novel endoscopic OCT (EOCT) system has been created that is based on the integration of a sampling arm of an all-optical-fiber interferometer into standard endoscopic devices using their biopsy channel to transmit low-coherence radiation to investigated tissue. We have studied mucous membranes of esophagus, larynx, stomach, urinary bladder, uterine cervix and body as typical localization for carcinomatous processes. Images of tumor tissues versus healthy tissues have been recorded and analyzed. Violations of well-defined stratified healthy mucosa structure in cancered tissue are distinctly seen by EOCT, thus making this technique promising for early diagnosis of tumors and precise guiding of excisional biopsy.

  18. Endoscopic Septoplasty-Two Handed Technique with Endoscope Holder: A Novel Approach.

    PubMed

    Khan, Mubarak M; Parab, Sapna R

    2016-12-01

    The popularity of endoscopes has been expanding not only in diagnostics but also in therapeutics. The traditional septal surgery also has come under the purview of endoscopic surgery in the last few decades. Endoscopic septoplasty has definitely many advantages over the conventional procedure. But the only disadvantage of endoscopic surgery is that it is a single handed technique as the other hand is used for holding the endoscope which may compromise the overall surgical time as the hemostasis and suctioning of the surgical field off the blood cannot be done simultaneously, in addition to the surgeon fatigue associated with holding the endoscope in the left hand. Endoscope holder allows both hands of the surgeon to be free for surgical manipulation and also imitates more or less same actions of the left hand. To report the preliminary use of Khan's endoscope holder for endoscopic septoplasty. Prospective Non Randomized Clinical Study. Khan's Endoscope Holder, which was primarily designed for endoscopic ear surgery, has been used for two handed technique of endoscopic septoplasty. The design of the Endoscope holder is described in detail. A total of 49 endoholder assisted endoscopic septoplasties were operated from Nov 2014 to Jan 2015 in MIMER Medical College and Sushrut ENT Hospital, Talegaon D, Pune, India. Our Endoscope Holder is a good option for two handed technique in Endoscopic Septoplasty due to its advantages. The study reports the successful usage and applicability of the endo holder for endoscopic Septoplasty. Level of evidence IV.

  19. Primary gastrointestinal lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Ghimire, Prasanna; Wu, Guang-Yao; Zhu, Ling

    2011-01-01

    Gastrointestinal tract is the most common extranodal site involved by lymphoma with the majority being non-Hodgkin type. Although lymphoma can involve any part of the gastrointestinal tract, the most frequent sites in order of its occurrence are the stomach followed by small intestine and ileocecal region. Gastrointestinal tract lymphoma is usually secondary to the widespread nodal diseases and primary gastrointestinal tract lymphoma is relatively rare. Gastrointestinal lymphomas are usually not clinically specific and indistinguishable from other benign and malignant conditions. Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma is the most common pathological type of gastrointestinal lymphoma in essentially all sites of the gastrointestinal tract, although recently the frequency of other forms has also increased in certain regions of the world. Although some radiological features such as bulky lymph nodes and maintenance of fat plane are more suggestive of lymphoma, they are not specific, thus mandating histopathological analysis for its definitive diagnosis. There has been a tremendous leap in the diagnosis, staging and management of gastrointestinal lymphoma in the last two decades attributed to a better insight into its etiology and molecular aspect as well as the knowledge about its critical signaling pathways. PMID:21390139

  20. Obscure Gastrointestinal Bleeding Due to a Small Intestinal Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor in a Young Adult

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Mami; Yamamoto, Kentaroh; Taketomi, Hirotaka; Yamamoto, Fumio; Yamamoto, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    The source of most cases of gastrointestinal bleeding is the upper gastrointestinal tract. Since bleeding from the small intestine is very rare and difficult to diagnose, time is required to identify the source. Among small intestine bleeds, vascular abnormalities account for 70–80%, followed by small intestine tumors that account for 5–10%. The reported peak age of the onset of small intestinal tumors is about 50 years. Furthermore, rare small bowel tumors account for only 1–2% of all gastrointestinal tumors. We describe a 29-year-old man who presented with obscure anemia due to gastrointestinal bleeding and underwent laparotomy. Surgical findings revealed a well-circumscribed lesion measuring 45 × 40 mm in the jejunum that initially appeared similar to diverticulosis with an abscess. However, the postoperative pathological diagnosis was a gastrointestinal stromal tumor with extramural growth. PMID:27920659

  1. Pneumomediastinum after percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tube placement.

    PubMed

    Yount, Kenan W; Mallory, Melissa A; Turza, Kristin C; Griffiths, Eric R; Lau, Christine L; Sawyer, Robert G

    2014-02-01

    The incidence of esophageal perforation or confounding mechanisms of pneumomediastinum specifically introduced by the addition of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) tube insertion to esophagogastroduodenoscopy have not been described, and pneumomediastinum in the absence of esophageal perforation after PEG has not been reported. Typically, pneumomediastinum is an ominous finding, although benign causes exist. We present two cases of post-PEG pneumomediastinum not correlated with esophageal perforation on follow-up imaging. When pneumomediastinum is detected after PEG, appropriate studies should be undertaken to confirm its cause and to determine treatment plans. Further investigation may be warranted to ascertain the true incidence, causes, and clinical significance of post-PEG pneumomediastinum.

  2. Radiologic diagnosis of gastrointestinal perforation.

    PubMed

    Rubesin, Stephen E; Levine, Marc S

    2003-11-01

    Perforations of the gastrointestinal tract have many causes. Holes in the wall of gastrointestinal organs can be created by blunt or penetrating trauma, iatrogenic injury, inflammatory conditions that penetrate the serosa or adventitia, extrinsic neoplasms that invade the gastrointestinal tract, or primary neoplasms that penetrate outside the wall of gastrointestinal organs. This article provides a radiologic approach for investigating the wide variety of gastrointestinal perforations. General principles about contrast agents and studies are reviewed, and then perforations in specific gastrointestinal organs are discussed.

  3. Congenital duodenal web: successful management with endoscopic dilatation

    PubMed Central

    Poddar, Ujjal; Jain, Vikas; Yachha, Surender Kumar; Srivastava, Anshu

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Congenital duodenal web (CDW) is an uncommon cause of duodenal obstruction and endoscopic balloon dilatation has been reported in just eight pediatric cases to date. Here we are reporting three cases of CDW managed successfully with balloon dilatation. Cases and methods: In 2014 we diagnosed three cases of CDW on the basis of typical radiological and endoscopic findings. Endoscopic balloon dilatation was done under conscious sedation with a through-the-scope controlled radial expansion (CRE) balloon. Results: All three children presented late (median age 8 [range 2 – 9] years) with bilious vomiting, upper abdominal distension, and failure to thrive. One of them had associated Down syndrome and another had horseshoe kidney. In all cases, CDW was observed in the second part of the duodenum beyond the ampulla, causing partial duodenal obstruction. After repeated endoscopic dilatation (2 – 4 sessions), all three patients became asymptomatic. None of the patients experienced complications after balloon dilatation. Conclusions: Duodenal diaphragm should be suspected in patients with abdominal distension with bilious vomiting, even in relatively older children. Endoscopic balloon dilatation is a simple and effective method of treating this condition. PMID:27004237

  4. Jackhammer esophagus treated by a peroral endoscopic myotomy.

    PubMed

    Ko, Weon Jin; Lee, Byoung Moo; Park, Won Young; Kim, Jin Nyoung; Cho, Jun Hyung; Lee, Tae Hee; Hong, Su Jin; Cho, Joo Young

    2014-12-01

    A 49-year-old woman visited our hospital with dysphagia and chest pain. In another hospital, she was diagnosed as reflux esophagitis. Although she had taken proton pump inhibitor and prokinetics drugs for a long time, she was not relieved of any symptoms. On the basis of high resolution manometry and endoscopic ultrasonography findings, Jackhammer esophagus was diagnosed. In this patient, peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) was performed for long myotomy of thickened circular muscle. During the procedure, there were no significant complications and she was discharged uneventfully. Symptoms were completely improved during three months after POEM. Here, we report on a case of Jackhammer esophagus treated by POEM.

  5. Paraneoplastic thrombocytosis in gastrointestinal cancer.

    PubMed

    Baranyai, Zsolt; Jósa, Valéria; Tóth, Ambrus; Szilasi, Zsuzsanna; Tihanyi, Balazs; Zaránd, Attila; Harsanyi, Laszlo; Szállási, Zoltán

    2016-06-01

    It has been demonstrated recently in several solid tumors that thrombocytosis at diagnosis may correlate with tumor invasion, metastatic progression and worse outcome. Several details of the pathomechanism of the relationship of thrombocytosis and cancer have been elucidated; however, the complete process is not clearly understood. Several hypotheses have been proposed. Recently, it was suggested that in ovarian cancer elevated IL-6 production by the tumor may induce increased megakaryopoiesis via hepatic thrombopoietin production leading to thrombocytosis. The importance of the prognostic power of elevated platelet count is still debated in gastrointestinal cancer. The aims of this review were to evaluate the prognostic significance of thrombocytosis in gastrointestinal tumors, to see whether clinical practice confirmed the hypotheses and to reveal the causes of the inconsistent findings.

  6. European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy - Establishing the key unanswered research questions within gastrointestinal endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Rees, Colin J; Ngu, Wee Sing; Regula, Jaroslaw; Bisschops, Raf; Saftoiu, Adrian; Dekker, Evelien; Gralnek, Ian; Ciocirlan, Mihai; Dinis-Ribeiro, Mario; Jover, Rodrigo; Meisner, Søren; Spada, Cristiano; Hassan, Cesare; Valori, Roland; Hucl, Tomas; Le Moine, Olivier; Domagk, Dirk; Kaminski, Michal F; Bretthauer, Michael; Rutter, Matthew D; Aabakken, Lars; Ponchon, Thierry; Fockens, Paul; Siersema, Peter D

    2016-10-01

    Background and study aim: Gastrointestinal endoscopy is a rapidly evolving research field. The European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) plays a key role in shaping opinion and endoscopy activity throughout Europe and further afield. Establishing key unanswered questions within the field of endoscopy and prioritizing those that are important enables researchers and funders to appropriately allocate resources. Methods: Over 2 years, the ESGE Research Committee gathered information on research priorities and refined them through a modified Delphi approach. Consultations were held with the ESGE Governing Board and Quality Improvement Committee to identify important unanswered questions. Research workshops were held at the 21st United European Gastroenterology Week. Research questions were refined by the ESGE Research Committee and Governing Board, compiled into an online survey, and distributed to all ESGE members, who were invited to rank each question by priority. Results: The final questionnaire yielded 291 responses from over 60 countries. The three countries with the highest response rates were Spain, Italy, and United Kingdom. Most responders were from teaching hospitals (62 %) and were specialist endoscopists (51 %). Responses were analyzed with weighted rankings, resulting in prioritization of 26 key unanswered questions. The top ranked generic questions were: 1) How do we define the correct surveillance interval following endoscopic diagnosis? 2) How do we correctly utilize advanced endoscopic imaging? 3) What are the best markers of endoscopy quality? Conclusion: Following this comprehensive process, the ESGE has identified and ranked the key unanswered questions within the field of gastrointestinal endoscopy. Researchers, funders, and journals should prioritize studies that seek to answer these important questions.

  7. Endoscopic Therapy of Early Carcinoma of the Oesophagus

    PubMed Central

    Knabe, Mate; May, Andrea; Ell, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Oesophageal cancer is a comparatively rare disease in the Western world. Prognosis is highly dependent on the choice of treatment. Early stages can be treated by endoscopic resection, whereas surgery needs to be performed in the case of advanced carcinomas. Technical progress has enabled high-definition endoscopes and technical add-ons which help the endoscopist in finding fine irregularities in the oesophageal mucosa, though interpretation still remains challenging. Methods In this review, we discuss both novel and old diagnostic procedures and their value, as well as the current recommendations for the diagnosis and treatment of early oesophageal carcinomas. The database of PubMed and Medline was searched and analysed to provide all relevant literature for this review. Results and Conclusion Endoscopic resection is the therapy of choice in early oesophageal cancer. In case of adenocarcinoma it is mandatory to perform subsequent ablation of all residual Barrett's mucosa to avoid metachronous lesions. PMID:26989386

  8. Endoscopic Pubic Symphysectomy for Athletic Osteitis Pubis

    PubMed Central

    Matsuda, Dean K.; Sehgal, Bantoo; Matsuda, Nicole A.

    2015-01-01

    Osteitis pubis is a common form of athletic pubalgia associated with femoroacetabular impingement. Endoscopic pubic symphysectomy was developed as a less invasive option than open surgical curettage for recalcitrant osteitis pubis. This technical note demonstrates the use of the anterior and suprapubic portals in the supine lithotomy position for endoscopic burr resection of pubic symphyseal fibrocartilage and hyaline endplates. Key steps include use of the suprapubic portal for burr resection of the posteroinferior symphysis and preservation of the posterior and arcuate ligaments. Endoscopic pubic symphysectomy is a minimally invasive bone-conserving surgery that retains stability and may be useful in the treatment of recalcitrant osteitis pubis or osteoarthritis. It nicely complements arthroscopic surgery for femoroacetabular impingement and may find broader application in this group of co-affected athletes. PMID:26258039

  9. Endoscopic Pubic Symphysectomy for Athletic Osteitis Pubis.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Dean K; Sehgal, Bantoo; Matsuda, Nicole A

    2015-06-01

    Osteitis pubis is a common form of athletic pubalgia associated with femoroacetabular impingement. Endoscopic pubic symphysectomy was developed as a less invasive option than open surgical curettage for recalcitrant osteitis pubis. This technical note demonstrates the use of the anterior and suprapubic portals in the supine lithotomy position for endoscopic burr resection of pubic symphyseal fibrocartilage and hyaline endplates. Key steps include use of the suprapubic portal for burr resection of the posteroinferior symphysis and preservation of the posterior and arcuate ligaments. Endoscopic pubic symphysectomy is a minimally invasive bone-conserving surgery that retains stability and may be useful in the treatment of recalcitrant osteitis pubis or osteoarthritis. It nicely complements arthroscopic surgery for femoroacetabular impingement and may find broader application in this group of co-affected athletes.

  10. A carcinoid tumor of the ampulla of Vater treated by endoscopic snare papillectomy.

    PubMed

    Pyun, Dae-Keun; Moon, Gyoo; Han, Jimin; Kim, Myung-Hwan; Lee, Sang Soo; Seo, Dong-Wan; Lee, Sung-Koo

    2004-12-01

    Here, a case of a patient with incidental finding of a carcinoid tumor of the ampulla of Vater, who was treated with endoscopic snare papillectomy, is reported. A 62-year-old male was admitted to our hospital due to a carcinoid tumor of the ampulla of Vater, which was found during follow-up endoscopy after an endoscopic mucosal resection of early gastric cancer. No lymphadenopathy or visceral metastasis was found on an abdominal CT scan, In-111 octerotide scan and EUS. The ampulla was then en bloc removed by endoscopic snare papillectomy. The resected specimen revealed a 0.7 x 0.5 x 0.1 cm sized carcinoid tumor. All margins of resection were negative for tumor. After six months of follow-up, there was no evidence of recurrence and metastasis, either endoscopically or radiologically. To our knowledge, this case is the first report of an ampullary carcinoid tumor treated by endoscopic snare papillectomy in Korea.

  11. Huge biloma after endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography and endoscopic biliary sphincterotomy

    PubMed Central

    Alkhateeb, Harith M.; Aljanabi, Thaer J.; Al-azzawi, Khairallh H.; Alkarboly, Taha A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Biliary leak can occur as a complication of biliary surgery, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography manipulations and endoscopic biliary sphincterotomy. Consequently, bile may collect in the abdominal cavity, a condition called biloma. Rarely, it may reach a massive size. Case presentation A 72-year-old man presented with gastric upset with gradual abdominal distension reaching a large size due to intra-abdominal bile collection (biloma) after endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography plus endoscopic biliary sphincterotomy and stenting for post laparoscopic cholecystectomy common bile duct stricture. This huge biloma was treated by percutaneous insertion of a tube drain for a few days, evacuating the collection successfully without recurrence. Discussion This patient might sustain injury to the common bile duct either by the guide wire or stent, or the injury occurred at the angle between the common bile duct and duodenum during sphincterotomy of the ampulla. Although any of these rents may lead to a bile leak, causing a huge biloma, they could be successfully treated by percutaneous drainage. Conclusions (1) Following endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, a patient’s complaints should not be ignored. (2) A massive biloma can occur due to such procedures. (3) Conservative treatment with minimal invasive technique can prove to be effective. PMID:26402876

  12. Comprehensive management of full-thickness luminal defects: The next frontier of gastrointestinal endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Winder, Joshua S; Pauli, Eric M

    2015-07-10

    Full thickness gastrointestinal defects such as perforations, leaks, and fistulae are a relatively common result of many of the endoscopic and surgical procedures performed in modern health care. As the number of these procedures increases, so too will the number of resultant defects. Historically, these were all treated by open surgical means with the associated morbidity and mortality. With the recent advent of advanced endoscopic techniques, these defects can be treated definitively while avoiding an open surgical procedure. Here we explore the various techniques and tools that are currently available for the treatment of gastrointestinal defects including through the scope clips, endoscopic suturing devices, over the scope clips, sealants, endoluminal stents, endoscopic suction devices, and fistula plugs. As fistulae represent the most recalcitrant of defects, we focus this editorial on a multimodal approach of treatment. This includes optimization of nutrition, treatment of infection, ablation of tracts, removal of foreign bodies, and treatment of distal obstructions. We believe that by addressing all of these factors at the time of attempted closure, the patient is optimized and has the best chance at long-term closure. However, even with all of these factors addressed, failure does occur and in those cases, endoscopic therapies may still play a role in that they allow the patient to avoid a definitive surgical therapy for a time while nutrition is optimized, and infections are addressed.

  13. [The role of endoscopy in the therapy for perforations and leakages of the gastrointestinal tract].

    PubMed

    Feisthammel, J; Jonas, S; Mössner, J; Hoffmeister, A

    2013-06-01

    Perforations and leakages of hollow organs of the gastrointestinal tract can occur spontaneously among other causes. They can also develop as complications of an endoscopic intervention or after surgical construction of an anastomosis. For the patient, these situations usually are serious and life-threatening. Standard therapy has always been - and most of the time still is - major surgery. These procedures usually are technically difficult and their mortality and morbidity are not satisfactory due to, among others, the occurrence of local infections. Thus, various endoscopic techniques as therapy for perforations and leakages have been developed over the last years. These include above all the endoscopic placement of clip systems and stents and the relatively new vacuum drainage systems. In case of perforations and leakages of the bile duct and the rectum especially, these minimal invasive techniques are widely used, also increasingly in lesions of the esophagus. However, these new, endoscopic procedures suffer from a lack of evidence. This paper highlights the possibilities and limitations of endoscopic options in therapy for perforations and leakages of organs of the gastrointestinal tract.

  14. Postoperative ureteral obstruction after endoscopic treatment for vesicoureteral reflux

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Jae Min; Park, Chang Soo

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We undertook this study to evaluate the incidence, risk factors, management, and outcome of postoperative ureteral obstruction after endoscopic treatment for vesicoureteral reflux (VUR). Materials and Methods Ninety patients undergoing endoscopic treatment for VUR were retrospectively reviewed and classified into two groups according to ureteral obstruction: the nonobstruction group (83 cases, 122 ureters; mean age, 7.0±2.8 years) and the obstruction group (7 cases, 10 ureters; mean age, 6.2±8.1 years). We analyzed the following factors: age, sex, injection material, laterality, voiding dysfunction, constipation, renal scarring, preoperative and postoperative ultrasound findings, endoscopic findings, injection number, and injection volume. Additionally, we reviewed the clinical manifestations, natural course, management, and outcome of ureteral obstruction after endoscopic treatment. Results The incidence of ureteral obstruction after endoscopic treatment was 7.6% (10/132 ureters). The type of bulking agent used and injection volume tended to be associated with ureteral obstruction. However, no significant risk factors for obstruction were identified between the two groups. Three patients showed no symptoms or signs after the onset of ureteral obstruction. Most of the patients with ureteral obstruction experienced spontaneous resolution within 1 month with conservative therapy. Two patients required temporary ureteral stents to release the ureteral obstruction. Conclusions In our experience, the incidence of ureteral obstruction was slightly higher than in previous reports. Our study identified no predictive risk factors for developing ureteral obstruction after endoscopic treatment. Although most of the ureteral obstructions resolved spontaneously within 1 month, some cases required drainage to relieve symptoms or to prevent renal function deterioration. PMID:26175873

  15. Endoscopic hemostasis state of the art - Nonvariceal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Goelder, Stefan Karl; Brueckner, Juliane; Messmann, Helmut

    2016-01-01

    New endoscopic techniques for hemostasis in nonvariceal bleeding were introduced and known methods further improved. Hemospray and Endoclot are two new compounds for topical treatment of bleeding. Initial studies in this area have shown a good hemostatic effect, especially in active large scale oozing bleeding, e.g., tumor bleedings. For further evaluation larger prospective studies comparing the substanced with other methods of endoscopic hemostasis are needed. For localized active arterial bleeding primary injection therapy in the area of ​​bleeding as well as in the four adjacent quadrants offers a good method to reduce bleeding activity. The injection is technically easy to learn and practicable. After bleeding activity is reduced the bleeding source can be localized more clearly for clip application. Today many different through-the-scope (TTS) clips are available. The ability to close and reopen a clip can aid towards good positioning at the bleeding site. Even more important is the rotatability of a clip before application. Often multiple TTS clips are required for secure closure of a bleeding vessel. One model has the ability to use three clips in series without changing the applicator. Severe arterial bleeding from vessels larger than 2 mm is often unmanageable with these conventional methods. Here is the over-the-scope-clip system another newly available method. It is similar to the ligation of esophageal varices and involves aspiration of tissue into a transparent cap before closure of the clip. Thus a greater vascular occlusion pressure can be achieved and larger vessels can be treated endoscopically. Patients with severe arterial bleeding from the upper gastrointestinal tract have a very high rate of recurrence after initial endoscopic treatment. These patients should always be managed in an interdisciplinary team of interventional radiologist and surgeons. PMID:26962402

  16. Ankaferd hemostat in the management of gastrointestinal hemorrhages

    PubMed Central

    Beyazit, Yavuz; Kekilli, Murat; Haznedaroglu, Ibrahim C; Kayacetin, Ertugrul; Basaranoglu, Metin

    2011-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding refers to any hemorrhage ascribed to the pathologies of the gastrointestinal tract, extending from the mouth to the anal canal. Despite the recent improvements in the endoscopic, hemostatic and adjuvant pharmacologic techniques, the reported mortality is still around 5%-10% for peptic ulcer bleeding and about 15%-20% for variceal hemorrhages. Although endoscopic management reduces the rates of re-bleeding, surgery, and mortality in active bleeding; early recurrence ratios still occur in around 20% of the cases even with effective initial hemostatic measures. In this quest for an alternative pro-hemostatic agent for the management of GI bleedings, Ankaferd blood stopper (ABS) offers a successful candidate, specifically for “difficult-to-manage” situations as evidenced by data presented in several studies. ABS is a standardized mixture of the plants Thymus vulgaris, Glycyrrhiza glabra, Vitis vinifera, Alpinia officinarum, and Urtica dioica. It is effective in both bleeding individuals with normal hemostatic parameters and in patients with deficient primary and/or secondary hemostasis. ABS also modulates the cellular apoptotic responses to hemorrhagic stress, as well as hemostatic hemodynamic activity. Through its effects on the endothelium, blood cells, angiogenesis, cellular proliferation, vascular dynamics, and wound healing, ABS is now becoming an effective alternative hemostatic medicine for gastrointestinal bleedings that are resistant to conventional anti-hemorrhagic measurements. The aim of this review is to outline current literature experience suggesting the place of ABS in the management of GI bleeding, and potential future controlled trials in this complicated field. PMID:22046083

  17. Ameboma: an unusual cause of gastrointestinal bleeding during severe leptospirosis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Severe leptospirosis occurs mainly in a tropical environment and includes icterus, acute renal failure and hemorrhages. These bleedings, which are mainly a consequence of acute homeostatic disturbances, can also reveal simultaneous diseases. Coinfections with other tropical diseases have been previously reported during leptospirosis. To our knowledge, invasive amebiasis, which can induce gastrointestinal bleedings, has never been described in the course of severe leptospirosis. Case presentation In this report, we describe a case of a 60 year-old man living in Reunion Island (Indian Ocean, France) admitted to our intensive care unit for severe Leptospira interrogans serovar icterohaemorrhagiae infection with neurological, renal, liver and hematological involvement. Two lower gastrointestinal bleedings occurred 7 and 15 days after admission. The first episode was promoted by hemostatic disturbances while the second bleeding occurred during low-dose heparin therapy. Colonoscopy revealed a pseudo-tumoral inflammatory mass of the recto-sigmoid junction. Histological examination found trophozoites inside mucinous exudate suggestive of Entamoeba histolytica. Amoebic serology was strongly positive whereas careful detection of cysts or trophozoites on saline-wet mount was negative in three consecutive samples of stools. Amoxicillin followed by metronidazole therapy, combined with supportive care, led to an improvement in the clinical and biological patient’s condition and endoscopic appearances. Conclusion Clinicians should be aware that gastrointestinal bleeding during severe leptospirosis could not solely be the consequences of hemostatic disturbances. Careful endoscopic evaluation that may reveal curable coinfections should also be considered. PMID:24894109

  18. Effective treatment of gastrointestinal bleeding with thalidomide - Chances and limitations

    PubMed Central

    Bauditz, Juergen

    2016-01-01

    For more than 50 years bleeding from gastrointestinal angiodysplasias has been treated by hormonal therapy with estrogens and progesterons. After a randomized study finally demonstrated that hormones have no effect on bleeding events and transfusion requirements, therapy has switched to endoscopic coagulation. However, angiodysplasias tend to recur over months to years and endoscopy often has to be repeated for long time periods. Thalidomide, which caused severe deformities in newborn children in the 1960s, is now increasingly used after it was shown to suppress tumor necrosis factor alpha, inhibit angiogenesis and to be also effective for treatment of multiple myeloma. In 2011 thalidomide was proven to be highly effective for treatment of bleeding from gastrointestinal angiodysplasias in a randomized study. Further evidence by uncontrolled studies exists that thalidomide is also useful for treatment of bleeding in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia. In spite of this data, endoscopic therapy remains the treatment of choice in many hospitals, as thalidomide is still notorious for its teratogenicity. However, patients with gastrointestinal bleeding related to angiodysplasias are generally at an age in which women have no child-bearing potential. Teratogenicity is therefore no issue for these elderly patients. Other side-effects of thalidomide like neurotoxicity may limit treatment options but can be monitored safely. PMID:27003992

  19. Targeted Endoscopic Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Li, Meng; Wang, Thomas D

    2011-01-01

    Summary Endoscopy has undergone explosive technological growth in over recent years, and with the emergence of targeted imaging, its truly transformative power and impact in medicine lies just over the horizon. Today, our ability to see inside the digestive tract with medical endoscopy is headed toward exciting crossroads. The existing paradigm of making diagnostic decisions based on observing structural changes and identifying anatomical landmarks may soon be replaced by visualizing functional properties and imaging molecular expression. In this novel approach, the presence of intracellular and cell surface targets unique to disease are identified and used to predict the likelihood of mucosal transformation and response to therapy. This strategy can result in the development of new methods for early cancer detection, personalized therapy, and chemoprevention. This targeted approach will require further development of molecular probes and endoscopic instruments, and will need support from the FDA for streamlined regulatory oversight. Overall, this molecular imaging modality promises to significantly broaden the capabilities of the gastroenterologist by providing a new approach to visualize the mucosa of the digestive tract in a manner that has never been seen before. PMID:19423025

  20. MEMS-based endoscopic optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Huikai; Fedder, Gary K.; Pan, Yingtain

    2005-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an emerging imaging technique that can provide high-resolution cross-sectional images of biological tissues. OCT has been used to detect various cancers including those in gastrointestinal tracts, bladder, and respiratory pathways. For in vivo imaging in visceral organs, small size and fast speed are essential, which can be achieved by using MEMS (Microelectromechanical systems) technology. In this paper, design and experimental results of a miniature endoscopic OCT imaging probe based on unique single-crystal silicon (SCS) MEMS micromirrors are reported. Several generations of one-dimensional (1D) micromirrors with a size of 1 mm by 1 mm have been fabricated. The resonant frequencies and radii of curvature of the micromirrors are about 0.5 kHz and 0.25 m, respectively. The packaged MEMS-OCT probe is 5 mm in diameter. About 15-μm axial resolutions, 20-μm transverse resolutions and 5-frames/s image rates are obtained.

  1. Quality assurance in gastrointestinal endoscopy: An Egyptian experience.

    PubMed

    Gado, Ahmed S; Ebeid, Basel A; Axon, Anthony T

    2016-12-01

    Over the last four decades, gastrointestinal endoscopy has become of paramount importance to diagnose, treat and prevent diseases of the digestive tract. Practice variation, however, is likely to have an important effect on the effectiveness of endoscopy and can impair the delivery of high-quality endoscopic procedures. There have been increasing demands to assess the quality of service and track and improve patient outcomes. Quality assurance has paved its way into professional guidelines for physicians. Developing a modern endoscopy unit demands the institution of a quality assurance programme, continuous training and monitoring of service delivery. This article describes our experience in implementing a quality assurance programme in endoscopy in a secondary care government hospital in Egypt. The implementation of quality assurance and improvement programme can lead to dramatic improvements in the quality of endoscopic care and patient outcomes. Quality assurance and continual improvement can be applied in developing countries.

  2. Development of a new minipig model to study radiation-induced gastrointestinal syndrome and its application in clinical research.

    PubMed

    Shim, Sehwan; Jang, Won-Suk; Lee, Sun-Joo; Jin, Sungho; Kim, Jin; Lee, Seung-Sook; Bang, Ho Yoon; Jeon, Byung Suk; Park, Sunhoo

    2014-04-01

    Because of insufficient clinical data regarding acute radiation damage after single high-dose radiation exposure, acute radiation-induced gastrointestinal (GI) syndrome remains difficult to treat. The goal of this study was to establish an appropriate and efficient minipig model to study high-dose radiation-induced GI syndrome after radiation exposure. For endoscopic access to the ileum, ileocutaneous anastomosis was performed 3 weeks before irradiation in six male Göttingen minipigs. Minipigs were locally irradiated at the abdominal area using a gamma source as follows: 1,000 cGy (n = 3) and 1,500 cGy (n = 3). Endoscopic evaluation for the terminal ileum was periodically performed via the ileocutaneous anastomosis tract. Pieces of tissue were serially taken for histological examination. The irradiated intestine presented characteristic morphological changes over time. The most obvious changes in the ileum were mucosal atrophy and telangiectasia from day 1 to day 17 after abdominal irradiation. Microscopic findings were characterized as architectural disorganization, loss of villi and chronic active inflammation. Increase in cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression was closely correlated with severity of tissue damage and inflammation. Particularly, the plasma citrulline level (PCL), a potential marker for radiation-induced intestinal damage, was significantly decreased the day after irradiation and recovered when irradiated mucosa was normalized. Our results also showed that PCL changes were positively correlated with microscopic changes and the endoscopic score in radiation-induced mucosal damage. In conclusion, the ileocutaneous anastomosis model using the minipig mimics human GI syndrome and allows the study of sequential changes in the ileum, the main target tissue of abdominal irradiation. In addition, PCL could be a simple biomarker for radiation-induced intestinal damage.

  3. Management of Patients with Acute Lower Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Strate, Lisa L.; Gralnek, Ian M.

    2016-01-01

    This guideline provides recommendations for the management of patients with acute overt lower gastrointestinal hemorrhage. Hemodynamic status should be initially assessed with intravascular volume resuscitation started as needed. Risk stratification based upon clinical parameters should be performed to help distinguish patients at high and low-risk of adverse outcomes. Hematochezia associated with hemodynamic instability may be indicative of an upper GI bleeding source and thus warrants an upper endoscopy. In the majority of patients, colonoscopy should be the initial diagnostic procedure and should be performed within 24 hours of patient presentation after adequate colon preparation. Endoscopic hemostasis therapy should be provided to patients with high risk endoscopic stigmata of bleeding including active bleeding, non-bleeding visible vessel, or adherent clot. The endoscopic hemostasis modality used (mechanical, thermal, injection or combination) is most often guided by the etiology of bleeding, access to the bleeding site, and endoscopist experience with the various hemostasis modalities. Repeat colonoscopy, with endoscopic hemostasis performed if indicated, should be considered for patients with evidence of recurrent bleeding. Radiographic interventions (tagged red blood cell scintigraphy, CT angiography, angiography) should be considered in high-risk patients with ongoing bleeding who do not respond adequately to resuscitation, and who are unlikely to tolerate bowel preparation and colonoscopy. Strategies to prevent recurrent bleeding should be considered. NSAID use should be avoided in patients with a history of acute lower GI bleeding particularly if secondary to diverticulosis or angioectasia. In patients with established cardiovascular disease who require aspirin (secondary prophylaxis), aspirin should not be discontinued. The exact timing depends on the severity of bleeding, perceived adequacy of hemostasis and the risk of a thromboembolic event. Surgery

  4. Endoscopic and retrograde cholangiographic appearance of hepaticojejunostomy strictures: A practical classification

    PubMed Central

    Mönkemüller, Klaus; Jovanovic, Ivan

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To study the endoscopic and radiological characteristics of patients with hepaticojejunostomy (HJ) and propose a practical HJ stricture classification. METHODS: In a retrospective observational study, a balloon-assisted enteroscopy (BAE)-endoscopic retrograde cholangiography was performed 44 times in 32 patients with surgically-altered gastrointestinal (GI) anatomy. BAE-endoscopic retrograde cholangio pancreatography (ERCP) was performed 23 times in 18 patients with HJ. The HJ was carefully studied with the endoscope and using cholangiography. RESULTS: The authors observed that the hepaticojejunostomies have characteristics that may allow these to be classified based on endoscopic and cholangiographic appearances: the HJ orifice aspect may appear as small (type A) or large (type B) and the stricture may be short (type 1), long (type 2) and type 3, intrahepatic biliary strictures not associated with anastomotic stenosis. In total, 7 patients had type A1, 4 patients A2, one patient had B1, one patient had B (large orifice without stenosis) and one patient had type B3. CONCLUSION: This practical classification allows for an accurate initial assessment of the HJ, thus potentially allowing for adequate therapeutic planning, as the shape, length and complexity of the HJ and biliary tree choice may mandate the type of diagnostic and therapeutic accessories to be used. Of additional importance, a standardized classification may allow for better comparison of studies of patients undergoing BAE-ERCP in the setting of altered upper GI anatomy. PMID:22110837

  5. Geometric estimation of intestinal contraction for motion tracking of video capsule endoscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mi, Liang; Bao, Guanqun; Pahlavan, Kaveh

    2014-03-01

    Wireless video capsule endoscope (VCE) provides a noninvasive method to examine the entire gastrointestinal (GI) tract, especially small intestine, where other endoscopic instruments can barely reach. VCE is able to continuously provide clear pictures in short fixed intervals, and as such researchers have attempted to use image processing methods to track the video capsule in order to locate the abnormalities inside the GI tract. To correctly estimate the speed of the motion of the endoscope capsule, the radius of the intestinal track must be known a priori. Physiological factors such as intestinal contraction, however, dynamically change the radius of the small intestine, which could bring large errors in speed estimation. In this paper, we are aiming to estimate the radius of the contracted intestinal track. First a geometric model is presented for estimating the radius of small intestine based on the black hole on endoscopic images. To validate our proposed model, a 3-dimentional virtual testbed that emulates the intestinal contraction is then introduced in details. After measuring the size of the black holes on the test images, we used our model to esimate the radius of the contracted intestinal track. Comparision between analytical results and the emulation model parameters has verified that our proposed method could preciously estimate the radius of the contracted small intestine based on endoscopic images.

  6. Total extraperitoneal endoscopic hernioplasty (TEP).

    PubMed

    Kuthe, A; Mainik, F; Flade-Kuthe, R

    2014-04-01

    One can no longer think about modern hernia surgery without mentioning endoscopic techniques. But due to their high technical demands the learning curve is comparatively long. And by technical mistakes and their consequences (pain, recurrence, complications) the benefits of the endoscopic techniques can easily be turned to drawbacks. The following text explains the steps of the total extraperitoneal endoscopic hernioplasty (TEP) technique in detail pointing out alternatives and risks. From preparation, indication and positioning, from trocar placement to extraperitoneal dissection and mesh placement, the principles of TEP are elucidated in respect of local anatomy and possible complications. The text as well as the accompanying video in the Mediathek are based on the authors' 20 years of experience in the TEP technique. Both of them may help in safe TEP application to minimise the complication rate as well as recurrences. Then patients can benefit from the advantages of this technique.

  7. Endoscopic Management of Bladder Diverticula

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Khanh N.; Jeldres, Claudio; Hefty, Thomas; Corman, John M.

    2016-01-01

    A 50-year-old man with benign prostatic hyperplasia and urinary retention had a very large diverticulum on the posterior wall of the bladder. The patient was managed with transurethral resection of the prostate and endoscopic fulguration of the bladder diverticulum mucosa using the Orandi technique. There was near-complete resolution of the bladder diverticulum following endoscopic management, obviating the need for bladder diverticulectomy. The patient now empties his bladder, with a postvoid residual < 50 mL and the absence of urinary tract infection after 6-month follow-up. We report the successful treatment of a large bladder diverticulum with endoscopic fulguration to near-complete resolution. This minimally invasive technique is a useful alternative in patients unfit for a more extensive surgical approach. PMID:27601971

  8. Motion magnification for endoscopic surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLeod, A. Jonathan; Baxter, John S. H.; de Ribaupierre, Sandrine; Peters, Terry M.

    2014-03-01

    Endoscopic and laparoscopic surgeries are used for many minimally invasive procedures but limit the visual and haptic feedback available to the surgeon. This can make vessel sparing procedures particularly challenging to perform. Previous approaches have focused on hardware intensive intraoperative imaging or augmented reality systems that are difficult to integrate into the operating room. This paper presents a simple approach in which motion is visually enhanced in the endoscopic video to reveal pulsating arteries. This is accomplished by amplifying subtle, periodic changes in intensity coinciding with the patient's pulse. This method is then applied to two procedures to illustrate its potential. The first, endoscopic third ventriculostomy, is a neurosurgical procedure where the floor of the third ventricle must be fenestrated without injury to the basilar artery. The second, nerve-sparing robotic prostatectomy, involves removing the prostate while limiting damage to the neurovascular bundles. In both procedures, motion magnification can enhance subtle pulsation in these structures to aid in identifying and avoiding them.

  9. Recent development in multifunctional endoscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gono, Kazuhiro

    2008-02-01

    We have developed the novel video endoscope imaging techniques; Narrow band imaging (NBI), Auto-Fluorescence Imaging (AFI), Infra-Red Imaging (IRI) and Endo-Cytoscopy System (ECS). The purpose of these imaging techniques is to emphasize the important tissue features associated with early stage of lesions. We have already launched the new medical endoscope system including NBI, AFI and IRI (EVIS LUCERA SPECTRUM, OLYMPUS MEDICAL SYSTEMS Co., Ltd., Fig.1). Moreover ECS, which has enough magnification to observe cell nuclei on a superficial mucosa under methylene blue dye staining, is the endoscopic instrument with ultra-high optical zoom. In this paper we demonstrate the concepts and the medical efficacy of each technology.

  10. Osteoporosis and Gastrointestinal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Weinerman, Stuart

    2010-01-01

    Gastrointestinal disease is often overlooked or simply forgotten as a cause of osteoporosis. Yet, the consequences of osteoporotic fractures can be devastating. Although the bulk of the published experience regarding osteoporosis is derived from the postmenopausal population, this review will focus on gastrointestinal disorders implicated in osteoporosis, with an emphasis on inflammatory bowel disease and celiac disease. The unique aspects of gastrointestinal diseases associated with osteoporosis include early onset of disease (and, therefore, prolonged exposure to risk factors for developing osteoporosis, particularly with inflammatory bowel disease and celiac disease), malabsorption, and maldigestion of nutrients necessary for bone health and maintenance (eg, calcium, vitamin D), as well as the impact of glucocorticoids. These factors, when added to smoking, a sedentary lifestyle, hypogonadism, and a family history of osteoporosis, accumulate into an imposing package of predictors for osteoporotic fracture. This paper will review the identification and treatment strategies for patients with gastrointestinal disorders and osteoporosis. PMID:20978554

  11. Patient and staff exposure to glutaraldehyde from KeyMed Auto-Disinfector endoscope washing machine.

    PubMed

    Lynch, D A; Parnell, P; Porter, C; Axon, A T

    1994-05-01

    Activated glutaraldehyde (2%) is the recommended agent for disinfection of endoscopic equipment. Exposure to the disinfectant is associated with side-effects and guidelines have been set to avoid these complications. Endoscope washing machines are used to provide automated high level disinfection of endoscopes as well as reduce exposure to the irritant aldehyde. We report a design fault in an endoscope washing machine which results in patients and staff being exposed to activated glutaraldehyde. The Auto-Disinfector (KeyMed) comprises a washing chamber supplied by three separate reservoirs (detergent, disinfectant, and rinse water) via a common channel. After the first cycle endoscopes are processed using previously used detergent and rinse water. Rinse water glutaraldehyde concentrations were measured in four machines during routine endoscopy lists on at least two occasions and showed a progressive rise in glutaraldehyde concentration up to 0.1% after two to six cycles. This results in staff being exposed to glutaraldehyde present on the processed instrument and the disinfectant being pumped from the internal channels of the endoscope into direct contact with the gastrointestinal mucosa during endoscopy at concentrations of 200-1000 ppm. The present atmospheric limit for glutaraldehyde is 0.2 ppm. Skin and mucosal irritation occur at concentrations of 0.3 ppm and severe synovitis in experimental animals at 100 pm. Tongue swelling and bloody diarrhoea with characteristic mucosal histological changes have been reported in patients exposed to activated glutaraldehyde on inadequately rinsed equipment. To reduce this problem the rinse water should be changed after every cycle and the endoscope should be dried thoroughly before use.

  12. Vasculitis and gastrointestinal involvement.

    PubMed

    Casella, G; Bronzino, B; Cutrino, L; Montani, N; Somma, A; Baldini, V

    2006-06-01

    The incidence of gastrointestinal involvement is relatively observed in patients with vasculitis processes. Vasculitis can be primary (necrotising or hypersensitivity) or secondary to another primary disease. Gastrointestinal involvement is present in up to 50% of the various forms of systemic vasculitis. Primary or secondary vasculitic process, according to the classification in necrotizing and hypersensitivity vasculitis, are described in this paper. A review of the literature on the the subject is also presented.

  13. Endoscopic brow lifts uber alles.

    PubMed

    Patel, Bhupendra C K

    2006-12-01

    Innumerable approaches to the ptotic brow and forehead have been described in the past. Over the last twenty-five years, we have used all these techniques in cosmetic and reconstructive patients. We have used the endoscopic brow lift technique since 1995. While no one technique is applicable to all patients, the endoscopic brow lift, with appropriate modifications for individual patients, can be used effectively for most patients with brow ptosis. We present the nuances of this technique and show several different fixation methods we have found useful.

  14. Endoscopic surgery of pituitary tumors.

    PubMed

    Dhepnorrarat, Rataphol Chris; Ang, Beng Ti; Sethi, Dharambir Singh

    2011-08-01

    Endoscopic pituitary surgery has been gaining wide acceptance as the first-line treatment of most functional pituitary adenomas. This technique has many advantages over traditional procedures, and growing evidence supports its use for endocrine control of functioning tumors. This article reviews data on the different modalities of treatment of functioning pituitary adenomas and compares the results. Endoscopic pituitary surgery controls tumor growth and endocrinopathy as well as or better than other treatment modalities. Complication rates are low and patient recovery is fast. Furthermore, surgery provides a means of achieving prompt decompression of neurologic structures and endocrine remission.

  15. Training for advanced endoscopic procedures.

    PubMed

    Feurer, Matthew E; Draganov, Peter V

    2016-06-01

    Advanced endoscopy has evolved from diagnostic ERCP to an ever-increasing array of therapeutic procedures including EUS with FNA, ablative therapies, deep enteroscopy, luminal stenting, endoscopic suturing and endoscopic mucosal resection among others. As these procedures have become increasingly more complex, the risk of potential complications has also risen. Training in advanced endoscopy involves more than obtaining a minimum number of therapeutic procedures. The means of assessing a trainee's competence level and ability to practice independently continues to be a matter of debate. The use of quality indicators to measure performance levels may be beneficial as more advanced techniques and procedures become available.

  16. Endoscopic Ganglionectomy of the Elbow.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2015-12-01

    Resection of the ganglion of the elbow is indicated if the size or location of the cyst impairs function or causes significant pain. Arthroscopic decompression or endoscopic resection of the cyst is the minimally invasive surgical option. It has the potential advantage of better cosmetic results and less soft-tissue dissection. Endoscopic resection is indicated if the cyst is not communicating with the joint or the communication is not identifiable arthroscopically or if there is a long and narrow communication placing the cyst away from the elbow joint. Preoperative magnetic resonance imaging is essential for surgical planning.

  17. Asbestos and Gastrointestinal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Robert W.; Foliart, Donna E.; Wong, Otto

    1985-01-01

    Exposure to asbestos is among several factors cited as possible causes of esophageal, gastric and colorectal cancer. More than 45 published studies have presented mortality data on asbestos-exposed workers. For each cohort, we listed the observed and expected rates of deaths from types of gastrointestinal cancer based on the latest published follow-up. Summary standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) were then derived. Finally, we calculated summary SMRs for total gastrointestinal tract cancer for three occupational groups: asbestos factory workers, insulators/shipyard workers and asbestos miners. Statistically significant elevations in summary SMRs were found for esophageal, stomach and total gastrointestinal tract cancer in all asbestos-exposed workers. Esophageal cancer summary SMRs remained significantly elevated when data were reanalyzed to include only those cohorts with death certificate diagnoses for cause of observed deaths. However, summary SMRs were not statistically significant for stomach and total gastrointestinal tract cancer after reanalysis. Summary SMRs by occupational group showed a significant elevation for total gastrointestinal cancer in insulators/shipyard workers. The elevation was not significant after reanalysis. Based on the results after reanalysis, the elevations in summary SMRs for stomach and total gastrointestinal tract cancer are of a magnitude that could result from diagnostic and investigator error. We conclude that more studies are required before stomach and colorectal cancers are documented as asbestos-related diseases. PMID:4036114

  18. Endoscopic and non-endoscopic approaches for the management of radiation-induced rectal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Weiner, Joseph Paul; Wong, Andrew Thomas; Schwartz, David; Martinez, Manuel; Aytaman, Ayse; Schreiber, David

    2016-01-01

    Pelvic radiation is a commonly utilized treatment for malignancy of the genitourinary and lower gastrointestinal tract. Radiation proctitis and the resultant clinical picture varies from asymptomatic to potentially life threatening. Similarly, treatment options also vary greatly, from medical therapy to surgical intervention. Commonly utilized medical therapy includes sucralfate enemas, antibiotics, 5-aminosalicylic acid derivatives, probiotics, antioxidants, short-chain fatty acids, formalin instillation and fractionated hyperbaric oxygen. More invasive treatments include endoscopic-based, focally ablative interventions such as dilation, heater and bipolar cautery, neodymium/yttrium aluminum garnet argon laser, radiofrequency ablation or argon plasma coagulation. Despite its relatively common frequency, there is a dearth of existing literature reporting head-to-head comparisons of the various treatment options via a randomized controlled approach. The purpose of our review was to present the reader a consolidation of the existing evidence-based literature with the goal of highlighting the comparative effectiveness and risks of the various treatment approaches. Finally, we outline a pragmatic approach to the treatment of radiation proctitis. In light of the lack of randomized data, our goal is to pursue as least invasive an approach as possible, with escalation of care tailored to the severity of the patient’s symptoms. For those cases that are clinically asymptomatic or only mildly symptomatic, observation or medical management can be considered. Once a patient fails such management or symptoms become more severe, invasive procedures such as endoscopically based focal ablation or surgical intervention can be considered. Although not all recommendations are supported by level I evidence, reported case series and single-institutional studies in the literature suggest that successful treatment with cessation of symptoms can be obtained in the majority of cases

  19. Monitoring of endoscope reprocessing with an adenosine triphosphate (ATP) bioluminescence method

    PubMed Central

    Parohl, Nina; Stiefenhöfer, Doris; Heiligtag, Sabine; Reuter, Henning; Dopadlik, Dana; Mosel, Frank; Gerken, Guido; Dechêne, Alexander; Heintschel von Heinegg, Evelyn; Jochum, Christoph; Buer, Jan; Popp, Walter

    2017-01-01

    Background: The arising challenges over endoscope reprocessing quality proposes to look for possibilities to measure and control the process of endoscope reprocessing. Aim: The goal of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of monitoring endoscope reprocessing with an adenosine triphosphate (ATP) based bioluminescence system. Methods: 60 samples of eight gastroscopes have been assessed from routine clinical use in a major university hospital in Germany. Endoscopes have been assessed with an ATP system and microbial cultures at different timepoints during the reprocessing. Findings: After the bedside flush the mean ATP level in relative light units (RLU) was 19,437 RLU, after the manual cleaning 667 RLU and after the automated endoscope reprocessor (AER) 227 RLU. After the manual cleaning the mean total viable count (TVC) per endoscope was 15.3 CFU/10 ml, and after the AER 5.7 CFU/10 ml. Our results show that there are reprocessing cycles which are not able to clean a patient used endoscope. Conclusion: Our data suggest that monitoring of flexible endoscope with ATP can identify a number of different influence factors, like the endoscope condition and the endoscopic procedure, or especially the quality of the bedside flush and manual cleaning before the AER. More process control is one option to identify and improve influence factors to finally increase the overall reprocessing quality, best of all by different methods. ATP measurement seems to be a valid technique that allows an immediate repeat of the manual cleaning if the ATP results after manual cleaning exceed the established cutoff of 200 RLU.

  20. Three infants with rotavirus gastroenteritis complicated by severe gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Kawamura, Yoshiki; Miura, Hiroki; Mori, Yuji; Sugata, Ken; Nakajima, Yoichi; Yamamoto, Yasuto; Morooka, Masashi; Tsuge, Ikuya; Yoshikawa, Akiko; Taniguchi, Koki; Yoshikawa, Tetsushi

    2016-01-01

    Rotavirus gastroenteritis causes substantial morbidity and mortality worldwide in children. We report three infants with rotavirus gastroenteritis complicated by various severity of gastrointestinal bleeding. Two patients (cases 1 and 2) recovered completely without any specific treatments. One patient (case 3) died despite extensive treatments including a red blood cell transfusion and endoscopic hemostatic therapy. Rotavirus genotypes G1P[8] and G9P[8] were detected in cases 2 and 3, respectively. Rotavirus antigenemia levels were not high at the onset of melena, suggesting that systemic rotaviral infection does not play an important role in causing melena.

  1. Bevacizumab and gastrointestinal bleeding in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia

    PubMed Central

    Ou, George; Galorport, Cherry; Enns, Robert

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of severe, refractory gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding in a patient with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) whose massive transfusion dependence was lifted shortly after treatment with bevacizumab, an anti-vascular endothelial growth factor. The patient’s bleeding had been refractory to repeated endoscopic interventions, tranexamic acid, and tamoxifen. However, following treatment with bevacizumab at 5 mg/kg every other week, nearly 300 units of packed red blood cell transfusions were avoided in one year’s time. Despite its relatively high cost, bevacizumab may have a more active role in the management of severe GI bleeding in HHT if such remarkable response can be consistently demonstrated. PMID:28070235

  2. Angiography and the gastrointestinal bleeder

    SciTech Connect

    Baum, S.

    1982-05-01

    The role of angiography in the diagnosis and treatment of gastrointestinal hemorrhage is discussed. Three categories of gastrointestinal bleeding are considered: upper gastrointestinal bleeding due to gastroesophageal varices, upper gastrointestinal bleeding of arterial or capillary origin, and lower gastrointestinal bleeding. The advantages and disadvantages of angiography are compared with those of radionuclide scanning and endoscopy or colonoscopy. It is anticipated that, as radionuclide scans are more widely employed, angiography will eventually be performed only in those patients with positive scans.

  3. Colonic endoscopic full-thickness resection (EFTR) with the over-the-scope device (FTRD): a short case series.

    PubMed

    Marín-Gabriel, José Carlos; Díaz-Tasende, José; Rodríguez-Muñoz, Sarbelio; Del Pozo-García, Andrés J; Ibarrola-Andrés, Carolina

    2017-03-01

    The endoscopic treatment of early gastrointestinal neoplasms usually involves the resection of the superficial layers, mucosa and submucosa, of the wall. However, in some circumstances, a full-thickness resection may be necessary. Endoscopic full-thickness resection (EFTR) may be an adequate approach in challenging lesions such as adenomas or early cancers with severe submucosal fibrosis or small sub-epithelial lesions in the lower GI tract. Furthermore, this novel technique has the potential to spare surgical therapy in a subset of cases. In this paper, we describe our results with the full-thickness resection device (FTRD) in three different situations.

  4. Endoscope Reprocessing: Update on Controversial Issues

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hyun Ho

    2015-01-01

    Several issues concerning endoscope reprocessing remain unresolved based on currently available data. Thus, further studies are required to confirm standard practices including safe endoscope shelf life, proper frequency of replacement of some accessories including water bottles and connecting tubes, and microbiological surveillance testing of endoscopes after reprocessing. The efficacy and cost-effectiveness of newer technology that allows automated cleaning and disinfection is one such controversial issue. In addition, there are no guidelines on whether delayed reprocessing and extended soaking may harm endoscope integrity or increase the bioburden on the external or internal device surfaces. In this review, we discuss the unresolved and controversial issues regarding endoscope reprocessing. PMID:26473115

  5. Cutaneous manifestation of gastrointestinal disease

    PubMed Central

    Kerstetter, Justin

    2016-01-01

    The gastrointestinal (GI) and cutaneous systems are closely linked in origin. Skin manifestations are frequently seen as a part of different GI syndromes. Gastroenterologists play an important role in recognizing the symptoms, patient workup and arriving at appropriate diagnoses, often in consultation with dermatologists. This review discusses the diseases with both cutaneous and intestinal involvement. Hereditary polyposis GI cancers, hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancers (CRCs), hamartomatous disorders, and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are reviewed with emphasis on the genetic basis, diagnostic, histologic findings, screening modalities, and therapeutic options. PMID:27034812

  6. Roles and regulation of gastrointestinal eosinophils in immunity and disease.

    PubMed

    Jung, YunJae; Rothenberg, Marc E

    2014-08-01

    Eosinophils have historically been considered to be destructive end-stage effector cells that have a role in parasitic infections and allergic reactions by the release of their granule-derived cytotoxic proteins. However, an increasing number of experimental observations indicate that eosinophils also are multifunctional leukocytes involved in diverse inflammatory and physiologic immune responses. Under homeostatic conditions, eosinophils are particularly abundant in the lamina propria of the gastrointestinal tract, where their involvement in various biological processes within the gastrointestinal tract has been posited. In this review, we summarize the molecular steps involved in eosinophil development and describe eosinophil trafficking to the gastrointestinal tract. We synthesize the current findings on the phenotypic and functional properties of gastrointestinal eosinophils and the accumulating evidence that they have a contributory role in gastrointestinal disorders, with a focus on primary eosinophilic gastrointestinal disorders. Finally, we discuss the potential role of eosinophils as modulators of the intestinal immune system.

  7. Klebsiella pneumoniae in Gastrointestinal Tract and Pyogenic Liver Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yi-Tsung; Lin, Jung-Chung; Chen, Te-Li; Yeh, Kuo-Ming; Chang, Feng-Yee; Chuang, Han-Chuan; Wu, Hau-Shin; Tseng, Chih-Peng; Siu, L. Kristopher

    2012-01-01

    To determine the role of gastrointestinal carriage in Klebsiella pneumoniae liver abscess, we studied 43 patients. Bacterial isolates from liver and fecal samples from 10 patients with this condition and 7 healthy carriers showed identical serotypes and genotypes with the same virulence. This finding indicated that gastrointestinal carriage is a predisposing factor for liver abscess. PMID:22840473

  8. Stereo Imaging Miniature Endoscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bae, Youngsam; Manohara, Harish; White, Victor; Shcheglov, Kirill V.; Shahinian, Hrayr

    2011-01-01

    Stereo imaging requires two different perspectives of the same object and, traditionally, a pair of side-by-side cameras would be used but are not feasible for something as tiny as a less than 4-mm-diameter endoscope that could be used for minimally invasive surgeries or geoexploration through tiny fissures or bores. The proposed solution here is to employ a single lens, and a pair of conjugated, multiple-bandpass filters (CMBFs) to separate stereo images. When a CMBF is placed in front of each of the stereo channels, only one wavelength of the visible spectrum that falls within the passbands of the CMBF is transmitted through at a time when illuminated. Because the passbands are conjugated, only one of the two channels will see a particular wavelength. These time-multiplexed images are then mixed and reconstructed to display as stereo images. The basic principle of stereo imaging involves an object that is illuminated at specific wavelengths, and a range of illumination wavelengths is time multiplexed. The light reflected from the object selectively passes through one of the two CMBFs integrated with two pupils separated by a baseline distance, and is focused onto the imaging plane through an objective lens. The passband range of CMBFs and the illumination wavelengths are synchronized such that each of the CMBFs allows transmission of only the alternate illumination wavelength bands. And the transmission bandwidths of CMBFs are complementary to each other, so that when one transmits, the other one blocks. This can be clearly understood if the wavelength bands are divided broadly into red, green, and blue, then the illumination wavelengths contain two bands in red (R1, R2), two bands in green (G1, G2), and two bands in blue (B1, B2). Therefore, when the objective is illuminated by R1, the reflected light enters through only the left-CMBF as the R1 band corresponds to the transmission window of the left CMBF at the left pupil. This is blocked by the right CMBF. The

  9. [Management of new oral anticoagulants in gastrointestinal bleeding and endoscopy].

    PubMed

    del Molino, Fátima; Gonzalez, Isabel; Saperas, Esteve

    2015-10-01

    New oral direct anticoagulants agents are alternatives to warfarin for long-term anticoagulation in a growing number of patients that require long-term anticoagulation for atrial fibrillation, deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism. These new agents with predictable pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamics profiles offer a favorable global safety profile, but increased gastrointestinal bleeding compared to the vitamin K antagonists. Many gastroenterologists are unfamiliar and may be wary of these newer drugs, since Clinical experience is limited and no specific antidote is available to reverse their anticoagulant effect. In this article the risk of these new agents and, how to manage these agents in both the presence of acute gastrointestinal bleeding and in patients undergoing endoscopic procedures is reviewed.

  10. Endoscopic evaluation of neurological dysphagic patients.

    PubMed

    Coscarelli, S; Verrecchia, L; Coscarelli, A

    2007-12-01

    Dysphagia is a frequent finding in neurological patients and is a symptom related to the severity of the clinical picture. The swallowing impairments, in these patients, increase the risk of aspiration pneumonia, that leads to death, in at least 6% of patients, within the first year. Therefore, evaluation of the swallowing status is essential in patients with dysphagia and videofluoroscopic study of swallowing (VFSS) is the method of choice. It cannot be performed in all patients on account of the complexity of the procedure and since they must be brought to the Radiology Unit. In the 1980, a new bedside method was introduced, namely: fiber-optic endoscopic study of swallow (FESS) which is easy, low-cost, well-tolerated and repeatable. We use this bedside technique to assess swallowing function in patients with dysphagia admitted to acute care units, neurological and internal medicine units. The evaluation aims to indicate the safer nutritional method (oral intake, feeding tube or percutaneous gastrostomy) and, consequently, reducing the risk of aspiration pneumonia during hospitalization. We found that more than 50% of the dysphagic patients present cerebrovascular injuries and in 2% of the population, the first diagnostic hypothesis of Myasthenia Gravis can be made with the FESS technique. In 60%, we indicate a change in nutritional method: in 20% we indicate percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG). With these indications, none of those patients had aspiration pneumonia. Our protocol for the bedside fiberoptic study of neurological patients with dysphagia has demonstrated its efectiveness by eliminating the incidence of aspiration pneumonia.

  11. Cannabinoids and the gastrointestinal tract

    PubMed Central

    PERTWEE, R

    2001-01-01

    The enteric nervous system of several species, including the mouse, rat, guinea pig and humans, contains cannabinoid CB1 receptors that depress gastrointestinal motility, mainly by inhibiting ongoing contractile transmitter release. Signs of this depressant effect are, in the whole organism, delayed gastric emptying and inhibition of the transit of non-absorbable markers through the small intestine and, in isolated strips of ileal tissue, inhibition of evoked acetylcholine release, peristalsis, and cholinergic and non-adrenergic non-cholinergic (NANC) contractions of longitudinal or circular smooth muscle. These are contractions evoked electrically or by agents that are thought to stimulate contractile transmitter release either in tissue taken from morphine pretreated animals (naloxone) or in unpretreated tissue (γ-aminobutyric acid and 5-hydroxytryptamine). The inhibitory effects of cannabinoid receptor agonists on gastric emptying and intestinal transit are mediated to some extent by CB1 receptors in the brain as well as by enteric CB1 receptors. Gastric acid secretion is also inhibited in response to CB1 receptor activation, although the detailed underlying mechanism has yet to be elucidated. Cannabinoid receptor agonists delay gastric emptying in humans as well as in rodents and probably also inhibit human gastric acid secretion. Cannabinoid pretreatment induces tolerance to the inhibitory effects of cannabinoid receptor agonists on gastrointestinal motility. Findings that the CB1 selective antagonist/inverse agonist SR141716A produces in vivo and in vitro signs of increased motility of rodent small intestine probably reflect the presence in the enteric nervous system of a population of CB1 receptors that are precoupled to their effector mechanisms. SR141716A has been reported not to behave in this manner in the myenteric plexus-longitudinal muscle preparation (MPLM) of human ileum unless this has first been rendered cannabinoid tolerant. Nor has it been

  12. Experimental telemanipulation in endoscopic surgery.

    PubMed

    Schurr, M O; Breitwieser, H; Melzer, A; Kunert, W; Schmitt, M; Voges, U; Buess, G

    1996-06-01

    Today's rigid endoscopic instruments limit the intracorporeal mobility of the surgical tool and are a severe impediment for the further spread of endoscopic techniques in operative medicine. Since 1992 flexible, steerable instruments with additional links for pivoting and rotating the tip have been developed and experimentally evaluated. The latest versions of this series of instruments are equipped with electromotors for better handling. The next aim in this development is a fully mobile telemanipulator with six motion axes dedicated to use in endoscopic surgery. Its first tests are planned for 1995. For successful operation of an electric telemanipulator, the man-machine interface (MMI) is of cardinal importance. For the definition of surgical requirements for the MMI, a conventional master-slave manipulator designed for technical application was modified for use in guiding a laparoscopic instrument. Master and slave sites of the system were 1.3 km apart and linked by means of a fiber-optic cable. Using this modified telepresence system, remote laparoscopic cholecystectomy was feasible in a phantom model. In a standardized test series using a test parcours, different parameters of the control system were modified, and their influence on the execution time of the parcours tasks was recorded. Well-suited parameter configurations were found and allowed experimental verification and completion of the important aspects of our concepts for development of an endoscopic manipulator MMI.

  13. Endoscopic excision of cheek lipomas.

    PubMed

    Pyon, Jai-Kyong; Park, Bum-Jin; Mun, Goo-Hyun; Cha, Myung-Kyu; Lim, So-Young; Bang, Sa-Ik; Oh, Kap-Sung

    2008-10-01

    Although the removal of forehead and brow benign tumors using an endoscopic technique has proven to be valuable, the efficacy of an endoscopic excision for cheek masses is unclear. A retrospective review was performed on 8 patients with a lipoma (7) and a foreign body granuloma (1) located at the cheek region. There were 7 men and 1 woman with a mean age of 34.8 years (range, 22-54 years). All the excisional procedures were performed with an endoscope through 2 small incisions, one on the hair-bearing sideburns and the other behind the earlobe. The masses varied from 0.7 x 0.7 cm to 4.0 x 3.0 cm in size. There were no intraoperative or postoperative complications, and no recurrence was detected after a 5- to 61-month follow-up. An endoscopically assisted excision of cheek lipomas is an effective procedure and might be a good alternative to the more conventional procedures.

  14. Endoscopic thyroidectomy: the transoral approach

    PubMed Central

    Hellinger, Achim; Kaminski, Cornelia; Benhidjeb, Tahar

    2016-01-01

    Transoral endoscopic thyroid surgery seems to be the logical consequence in the evolution of thyroid surgery. Animal and cadaver studies have shown that different endoscopic techniques can be performed in a safe and successful way. Presently, the minimally invasive aspect and cosmetic advantage seem to be the most important factor for the patients. However, even if these procedures are feasible in patients, the transoral access must still be considered as experimental. In this study then we aim at comparing the available literature on transoral thyroid surgery with our own experience in this field. The access itself needs to be further refined, and even more suitable and better adapted instruments need to be developed so that optimal and safe results that meet all requirements on endocrine surgery can be achieved and all requirements for endocrine surgery are met. The transoral thyroidectomy should only be performed in highly specialized centres for endocrine and endoscopic surgery. As an alternative, a combination with endoscopic non-transoral techniques—so called hybrid techniques—might be useful for our patients. PMID:27294042

  15. Endoscopic Resection of Asymptomatic, Colonic, Polypoid Arteriovenous Malformations: Two Case Reports and a Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Han-Hee; Kwon, Hyuk-Min; Gil, Sanghyun; Kim, Young-Shin; Cho, Minjung; Seo, Kyung-Jin; Chae, Hiun-Suk; Cho, Young-Seok

    2017-01-01

    A colonic arteriovenous malformation (AVM) is a significant vascular lesion of the gastrointestinal tract and a common cause of lower gastrointestinal bleeding. AVMs are usually identified endoscopically as bright red, flat lesions. AVMs with a polypoid appearance are extremely rare in the large intestine. We present two cases of colonic polypoid AVM, which were detected incidentally during screening colonoscopy. Both the patients had no history of gastrointestinal bleeding such as melena or hematochezia. Colonoscopy revealed pedunculated polyps overlaid by hyperemic mucosa in the ascending colon and proximal sigmoid colon. Microscopic examination showed aberrant vessels with thickened, hypertrophic walls in the mucosa and the submucosa, and arteries were directly connected to veins without capillary beds. These features were compatible with a diagnosis of AVM with a polypoid appearance. No immediate or delayed bleeding was noted after polypectomy. PMID:28139503

  16. Management by the intensivist of gastrointestinal bleeding in adults and children

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Intensivists are regularly confronted with the question of gastrointestinal bleeding. To date, the latest international recommendations regarding prevention and treatment for gastrointestinal bleeding lack a specific approach to the critically ill patients. We present recommendations for management by the intensivist of gastrointestinal bleeding in adults and children, developed with the GRADE system by an experts group of the French-Language Society of Intensive Care (Société de Réanimation de Langue Française (SRLF), with the participation of the French Language Group of Paediatric Intensive Care and Emergencies (GFRUP), the French Society of Emergency Medicine (SFMU), the French Society of Gastroenterology (SNFGE), and the French Society of Digestive Endoscopy (SFED). The recommendations cover five fields of application: management of gastrointestinal bleeding before endoscopic diagnosis, treatment of upper gastrointestinal bleeding unrelated to portal hypertension, treatment of upper gastrointestinal bleeding related to portal hypertension, management of presumed lower gastrointestinal bleeding, and prevention of upper gastrointestinal bleeding in intensive care. PMID:23140348

  17. Endoscopic Hemostasis is Rarely Used for Hematochezia: A Population-Based Study from the Clinical Outcomes Research Initiative National Endoscopic Database

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Osnat Ron-Tal; Gralnek, Ian M.; Eisen, Glenn M.; Williams, J. Luke; Holub, Jennifer L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Data on use of endoscopic hemostasis performed during colonoscopy for hematochezia are primarily derived from expert opinion and case series from tertiary care settings. Objective To characterize patients with hematochezia who underwent in-patient colonoscopy and compare those who received endoscopic hemostasis with those who did not receive endoscopic hemostasis. Design Retrospective analysis Setting Clinical Outcomes Research Initiative (CORI) National Endoscopic Database 2002 – 2008 Patients Adults with hematochezia Interventions None Main Outcome Measurements Demographics, co-morbidity, practice setting, adverse events, and colonoscopy procedural characteristics and findings. Results We identified 3,151 persons who underwent in-patient colonoscopy for hematochezia. Endoscopic hemostasis was performed in 144 patients (4.6%). Of those who received endoscopic hemostasis, the majority were male (60.3%), White (83.3%), older (mean age 70.9 ± 12.3 years), had a low risk ASA Score (53.9%), and underwent colonoscopy in a community setting (67.4%). The hemostasis-receiving cohort was significantly more likely to be White (83.3% vs. 71.0%, p=0.02), have more co-morbidities (ASA Score III and IV 46.2% vs. 36.0%, p=0.04), and have the cecum reached (95.8% vs. 87.7%, p=0.003). Those receiving hemostasis were significantly more likely to have an endoscopic diagnosis of AVM’s (32.6% vs. 2.6%) p=0.0001or solitary ulcer (8.3% vs. 2.1%), p<0.0001. Limitations Retrospective database analysis. Conclusions Less than five percent of persons presenting with hematochezia and undergoing inpatient colonoscopy received endoscopic hemostasis. These findings differ from published tertiary care setting data. These data provide new insights on in-patient colonoscopy performed primarily in a community practice setting for patients with hematochezia. PMID:24184172

  18. Irregular arrangement of collecting venules (IRAC) provides a critical endoscopic insight in Helicobacter pylori-induced gastritis: A secondary publication.

    PubMed

    Katake, Yoshiki; Ichikawa, Kazuhito; Fujio, Chikau; Tomita, Shigeki; Imura, Johji; Fujimori, Takahiro

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the significance of an endoscopic atrophic border and irregular arrangement of collecting venules (IRAC) in the diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori)-induced gastritis. Upper gastrointestinal tract endoscopy was performed on 723 patients, who were screened them for H. pylori infection. Any patients who had undergone H. pylori eradication therapy were excluded from the study. The endoscopic atrophic border and IRAC in each patient were assessed. The H. pylori status was determined in the patients by combination of a serological test and/or histopathological examination. The H. pylori infection rates were 95.4% (455/477) in the group with an endoscopic atrophic border and 22.3% (55/246) in the group without an endoscopic atrophic border. In the diagnostic validity check, presence of an endoscopic atrophic border had a sensitivity of 89.2% and a specificity of 89.7%. Furthermore, the H. pylori infection rates were 95.5% (506/530) in the IRAC group and 2.1% (4/193) in the regular arrangement of collecting venules (RAC) group. In the diagnostic validity check, IRAC had a sensitivity of 99.2% and a specificity of 88.7%. In conclusion, the presence of an endoscopic atrophic border and IRAC are highly indicative of an H. pylori-infected gastric mucosa.

  19. Duodenal Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue Lymphomas: Two Cases and the Evaluation of Endoscopic Ultrasonography

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Su Jin; Choi, Choel Woong; Ha, Jong Kun; Hong, Young Mi; Park, Jin Hyun; Park, Soo Bum; Kang, Dae Hwan

    2013-01-01

    Mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma mainly arises in the stomach, with fewer than 30% arising in the small intestine. We describe here two cases of primary duodenal mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma which were evaluated by endoscopic ultrasonography. A 52-year-old man underwent endoscopy due to abdominal pain, which demonstrated a depressed lesion on duodenal bulb. Endoscopic ultrasonographic finding was hypoechoic lesion invading the submucosa. The other case was a previously healthy 51-year-old man. Endoscopy showed a whitish granular lesion on duodenum third portion. Endoscopic ultrasonography image was similar to the first case, whereas abdominal computed tomography revealed enlargement of multiple lymph nodes. The first case was treated with eradication of Helicobacter pylori, after which the mucosal change and endoscopic ultrasound finding were normalized in 7 months. The second case was treated with cyclophosphamide, vincristine, prednisolone, and rituximab every 3 weeks. After 6 courses of chemotherapy, the patient achieved complete remission. PMID:24143321

  20. Video capsule endoscopy in left ventricular assist device recipients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Amornsawadwattana, Surachai; Nassif, Michael; Raymer, David; LaRue, Shane; Chen, Chien-Huan

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To assess whether video capsule endoscopy (VCE) affects the outcomes of left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) recipients with gastrointestinal bleeding. METHODS: This is a retrospective study of LVAD recipients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (OGIB) who underwent VCE at a tertiary medical center between 2005 and 2013. All patients were admitted and monitored with telemetry and all VCE and subsequent endoscopic procedures were performed as inpatients. A VCE study was considered positive only when P2 lesions were found and was regarded as negative if P1 or P0 were identified. All patients were followed until heart transplant, death, or the end of the study. RESULTS: Between 2005 and 2013, 30 patients with LVAD underwent VCE. Completion rate of VCE was 93.3% and there was no capsule retention. No interference of VCE recording or the function of LVAD was found. VCE was positive in 40% of patients (n = 12). The most common finding was active small intestinal bleeding (50%) and small intestinal angiodysplasia (33.3%). There was no difference in the rate of recurrent bleeding between patients with positive and negative VCE study (50.0% vs 55.6%, P = 1.00) during an average of 11.6 ± 9.6 mo follow up. Among patients with positive VCE, the recurrent bleeding rate did not differ whether subsequent endoscopy was performed (50% vs 50%, P = 1.00). CONCLUSION: VCE can be safely performed in LVAD recipients with a diagnostic yield of 40%. VCE does not affect recurrent bleeding in LVAD patients regardless of findings. PMID:27182165

  1. Asbestos and gastrointestinal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, R.W.; Foliart, D.E.; Wong, O.

    1985-07-01

    Exposure to asbestos is among several factors cited as possible causes of esophageal, gastric and colorectal cancer. More than 45 published studies have presented mortality data on asbestos-exposed workers. For each cohort, the authors listed the observed and expected rates of deaths from types of gastrointestinal cancer based on the latest published follow-up. Summary standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) were then derived. Finally, summary SMRs were calculated for total gastrointestinal tract cancer for three occupational groups: asbestos factory workers, insulators/shipyard workers and asbestos miners. Statistically significant elevations in summary SMRs were found for esophageal, stomach and total gastrointestinal tract cancer in all asbestos-exposed workers. Esophageal cancer summary SMR remained significantly elevated when data were reanalyzed to include only those cohorts with death certificate diagnoses for cause of observed deaths. However, summary SMRs were not statistically significant for stomach and total gastrointestinal tract cancer after reanalysis. Summary SMRs by occupational group showed a significant elevation for total gastrointestinal cancer in insulators/shipyard workers. The elevation was not significant after reanalysis. 59 references, 5 tables.

  2. 21 CFR 876.1500 - Endoscope and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... for endoscopes, nonpowered anoscopes, binolcular attachments for endoscopes, pocket battery boxes... surgical instruments. This section does not apply to endoscopes that have specialized uses in other medical... endoscope, smoke removal tube, rechargeable battery box, pocket battery box, bite block for endoscope,...

  3. 21 CFR 876.1500 - Endoscope and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... for endoscopes, nonpowered anoscopes, binolcular attachments for endoscopes, pocket battery boxes... surgical instruments. This section does not apply to endoscopes that have specialized uses in other medical... endoscope, smoke removal tube, rechargeable battery box, pocket battery box, bite block for endoscope,...

  4. Effectiveness of Endoscopic Surgery for Comatose Patients with Large Supratentorial Intracerebral Hemorrhages

    PubMed Central

    YAMASHIRO, Shigeo; HITOSHI, Yasuyuki; YOSHIDA, Akimasa; KURATSU, Jun-ichi

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of endoscopic surgery for life-threatening large brain hemorrhage, we reviewed our empirical cases of comatose patients with large supratentorial intracerebral hemorrhage. Among 35 patients with putaminal or subcortical hemorrhage that was evacuated endoscopically, 14 cases (40%) presented both findings of neurological grade IV for severity and hematoma volume exceeding 70 mL in the recent 3 years (endoscope group), whereas 8 cases with the same conditions were treated by conventional craniotomy for the preceding 3-year period (craniotomy group). Between these two groups, mean age was higher and duration of surgery was shorter in the endoscope group, but no significant differences in hematoma size or evacuation rate were recognized. In the 10 cases that presented with signs of cerebral herniation (neurological grade IVb) and required emergent decompression, the preparation time for surgery tended to be shorter in the endoscope group, although the difference was not significant. Additional ventricular drainage was performed in 7 cases and showed a supplemental effect of reducing intracranial pressure (ICP). Consequently, all patients in the endoscope group were rescued without decompressive large craniectomy, even with symptoms of cerebral herniation. In conclusion, endoscopic surgery has the potential to offer an effective therapeutic option for comatose patients with large supratentorial intracerebral hemorrhages, matching conventional craniotomy for emergent treatment in terms of mortality and management of ICP. PMID:26369719

  5. Usefulness of Endoscopic Indices in Determination of Disease Activity in Patients with Crohn's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kucharski, Marcin; Karczewski, Jacek; Mańkowska-Wierzbicka, Dorota; Karmelita-Katulska, Katarzyna; Kaczmarek, Elżbieta; Iwanik, Katarzyna; Rzymski, Piotr; Grzymisławski, Marian; Linke, Krzysztof; Dobrowolska, Agnieszka

    2016-01-01

    Background. Assessment of endoscopic activity of Crohn's disease (CD) is of growing importance both in clinical practice and in clinical trials. The study aimed to assess which of the endoscopic indices used for evaluation of mucosal changes correlates with the currently used clinical indices for determination of disease activity and with the results of histopathological examination. Study. A group of 71 patients with CD and 52 individuals without a diagnosis of GI tract disease as a control group were investigated, considering clinical and histological severity of the disease and the severity of inflammatory changes in the bowel. Evaluation was conducted with the use of clinical, endoscopic, and histopathological indices. Endoscopic indices were then correlated with different clinical and histopathological indices with the aim of finding the strongest correlations. Results and Conclusions. Correlation between the clinical disease activity and the severity of endoscopic lesions in CD was shown in this study to be poor. The results also indicate that the optimal endoscopic index used in the diagnostic stage and in the assessment of treatment effects in CD is Simple Endoscopic Score for Crohn's Disease (SES-CD). PMID:26997952

  6. Infection by Mycobacterium avium intracellulare in AIDS: endoscopic duodenal appearance mimicking Whipple's disease.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Iglesias, J L; Yañez, J; Durana, J; Arnal, F

    1988-09-01

    We report the case of a 24-year-old woman who presented with diarrhea, weight loss and abdominal lymph node enlargement. A diagnosis of infection by Mycobacterium avium intracellulare with a clinical picture similar to Whipple's disease was established. The endoscopic study of the duodenum revealed multiple yellow nodules that became confluent in the second portion, entirely replacing the normal mucosa. These endoscopic findings have not been described previously in intestinal infection by Mycobacterium avium intracellulare.

  7. Gastrointestinal Symptoms from Left-Ventricular Assist Device External Compression of the Gastric Lumen

    PubMed Central

    Suarez, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    A 74-year-old man with a left-ventricular assist device (LVAD) as destination therapy for end-stage ischemic cardiomyopathy presented with acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Other symptoms included chronic early satiety, intermittent nausea, and non-specific abdominal discomfort since LVAD implantation 3 years ago. An actively bleeding duodenal arteriovenous malformation was successfully treated with endoscopic coagulation. There was also evidence of moderate external compression of the anterior gastric wall from the LVAD pump with luminal narrowing in the antrum. While bleeding may be the most commonly encountered gastrointestinal manifestation in LVAD patients, other potential complications, including luminal compression by the device, should be recognized. PMID:28008413

  8. Introduction to Starting Upper Gastrointestinal Endoscopy: Proper Insertion, Complete Observation, and Appropriate Photographing

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Diagnostic upper gastrointestinal endoscopy is the most basic of endoscopy procedures and is the technique that trainee doctors first learn. Mastering the basics of endoscopy is very important because when this process is imprecise or performed incorrectly, it can severely affect a patient's health or life. Although there are several guidelines and studies that consider these basics, there are still no standard recommendations for endoscopy in Korea. In this review, basic points, including proper endoscope insertion, precise observation without blind spots, and appropriate photographing, for upper gastrointestinal endoscopy will be discussed. PMID:26240799

  9. Role of endoscopy in management of gastrointestinal complications of portal hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Luigiano, Carmelo; Iabichino, Giuseppe; Judica, Antonino; Virgilio, Clara; Peta, Valentina; Abenavoli, Ludovico

    2015-01-01

    The management of patients with gastrointestinal complications of portal hypertension is often complex and challenging. The endoscopy plays an important role in the management of these patients. The role of endoscopy is both diagnostic and interventional and in the last years the techniques have undergone a rapid expansion with the advent of different and novel endoscopic modalities, with consequent improvement of investigation and treatment of these patients. The choice of best therapeutic strategy depends on many factors: baseline disease, patient’s clinical performance and the timing when it is done if in emergency or a prophylactic approaches. In this review we evaluate the endoscopic management of patients with the gastrointestinal complications of portal hypertension. PMID:25610530

  10. Management of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography-related perforations

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Byung Seup; Kim, In-Gyu; Ryu, Byoung Yoon; Kim, Jong Hyeok; Yoo, Kyo Sang; Baik, Gwang Ho; Kim, Jin Bong

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study is to analyze the treatment strategies of patients with endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP)-related perforations. This is a retrospective study. Methods We experienced 13 perforations associated with ERCP. We reviewed the medical recordsand classified ERCP-related perforations according to mechanism of injury in terms of perforating device. Injury by endoscopic tip or insertion tube was classified as type I, injury by cannulation catheter or sphincterotomy knife as type II, and injury by guidewire as type III. Results Of four type I injuries, one case was managed by conservative management after primary closure with a hemoclip during ERCP. The other three patients underwent surgical treatments such as primary closure orpancreatico-duodenectomy. Of five type II injuries, two patients underwent conservative management and the other three cases were managed by surgical treatment such as duodenojejunostomy, duodenal diverticulization and pancreatico-duodenectomy. Of four type III injuries, three patients were managed conservatively and the remaining patient was managed by T-tube choledochostomy. Conclusion Type I injuries require immediate surgical management after EPCP or immediate endoscopic closure during ERCP whenever possible. Type II injuries require surgical or conservative treatment according to intra- and retro-peritoneal dirty fluid collection findings following radiologic evaluation. Type III injuries almost always improve after conservative treatment with endoscopic nasobilliary drainage. PMID:22066121

  11. Gastrointestinal imaging in pediatrics, 2nd ed

    SciTech Connect

    Franken, E.A. Jr.; Smith, W.L.

    1982-01-01

    Gastrointestinal imaging in pediatrics is very different from its predecessor, gastrointestinal radiology in pediatrics, which was written eight years ago. The second edition is organized by anatomic area with supplemental chapters on special procedures (i.e., angiography, nuclear medicine, computerized axial tomography and ultrasonography). This volume contains 635 pages in contrast to the first edition which consisted of 323 pages. The arrangement of this volume is by anatomic area and not be clinical problem, therefore, the reader should have some background in pediatric radiology in order to find answers to specific questions.

  12. A portable wireless power transmission system for video capsule endoscopes.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yu; Yan, Guozheng; Zhu, Bingquan; Liu, Gang

    2015-01-01

    Wireless power transmission (WPT) technology can solve the energy shortage problem of the video capsule endoscope (VCE) powered by button batteries, but the fixed platform limited its clinical application. This paper presents a portable WPT system for VCE. Besides portability, power transfer efficiency and stability are considered as the main indexes of optimization design of the system, which consists of the transmitting coil structure, portable control box, operating frequency, magnetic core and winding of receiving coil. Upon the above principles, the correlation parameters are measured, compared and chosen. Finally, through experiments on the platform, the methods are tested and evaluated. In the gastrointestinal tract of small pig, the VCE is supplied with sufficient energy by the WPT system, and the energy conversion efficiency is 2.8%. The video obtained is clear with a resolution of 320×240 and a frame rate of 30 frames per second. The experiments verify the feasibility of design scheme, and further improvement direction is discussed.

  13. Endoscopic ultrasound in the diagnosis and treatment of pancreatic disease

    PubMed Central

    Teshima, Christopher W; Sandha, Gurpal S

    2014-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) is an important part of modern gastrointestinal endoscopy and now has an integral role in the diagnostic evaluation of pancreatic diseases. Furthermore, as EUS technology has advanced, it has increasingly become a therapeutic procedure, and the prospect of multiple applications of interventional EUS for the pancreas is truly on the near horizon. However, this review focuses on the established diagnostic and therapeutic roles of EUS that are used in current clinical practice. In particular, the diagnostic evaluation of acute pancreatitis, chronic pancreatitis, cystic pancreatic lesions and solid masses of the pancreas are discussed. The newer enhanced imaging modalities of elastography and contrast enhancement are evaluated in this context. The main therapeutic aspects of pancreatic EUS are then considered, namely celiac plexus block and celiac plexus neurolysis for pain control in chronic pancreatitis and pancreas cancer, and EUS-guided drainage of pancreatic fluid collections. PMID:25110426

  14. Endoscopic ultrasound-fine needle injection for oncological therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, Jeremy; Khalid, Amaara; Cosgrove, Natalie; Soomro, Ayesha; Mazhar, Syed Mohsin; Siddiqui, Ali A

    2015-01-01

    The minimal invasiveness and precision of endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) has lead to both its widespread use as a diagnostic and staging modality for gastrointestinal and pancreaticobiliary malignancies, and to its expanding role as a therapeutic modality. EUS-guided celiac plexus neurolysis is now a well-accepted modality for palliation of pain in patients with pancreatic cancer. EUS-guided ablation, brachytherapy, fiducial marker placement, and antitumor agent injection have been described as methods of performing minimally invasive oncological therapy. EUS-fine needle injection may be performed as adjunctive, alternative, or palliative treatment. This review summarizes the studies to date that have described these methods. A literature search using the PubMed/MEDLINE databases was performed. While most published studies to date are limited with disappointing outcomes, the concept of a role of EUS in oncological therapy seems promising. PMID:26691224

  15. Acute gastric volvulus associated with wandering spleen in an adult treated laparoscopically after endoscopic reduction: a case report.

    PubMed

    Omata, Jiro; Utsunomiya, Katsuyuki; Kajiwara, Yoshiki; Takahata, Risa; Miyasaka, Nobuo; Sugasawa, Hidekazu; Sakamoto, Naoko; Yamagishi, Yoji; Fukumura, Makiko; Kitagawa, Daiki; Konno, Mitsuhiko; Okusa, Yasushi; Murayama, Michinori

    2016-12-01

    A 43-year-old female was referred to our hospital for sudden onset of abdominal pain, fullness, and vomiting. Physical examination revealed abdominal distension with mild epigastric tenderness. Abdominal radiography showed massive gastric distension and plain computed tomography (CT) a markedly enlarged stomach filled with gas and fluid. A large volume of gastric contents was suctioned out via a nasogastric (NG) tube. Contrast-enhanced CT showed a grossly distended stomach with displacement of the antrum above the gastroesophageal junction, and the spleen was dislocated inferiorly. Upper gastrointestinal (GI) series showed the greater curvature to be elevated and the gastric fundus to be lower than normal. Acute mesenteroaxial gastric volvulus was diagnosed. GI endoscopy showed a distortion of the gastric anatomy with difficulty intubating the pylorus. Various endoscopic maneuvers were required to reposition the stomach, and the symptoms showed immediate and complete solution. GI fluoroscopy was performed 3 days later. Initially, most of the contrast medium accumulated in the fundus, which was drawn prominently downward, and then began flowing into the duodenum with anteflexion. Elective laparoscopic surgery was performed 1 month later. The stomach was in its normal position, but the fundus was folded posteroinferiorly. The spleen attached to the fundus was normal in size but extremely mobile. We diagnosed a wandering spleen based on the operative findings. Gastropexy was performed for the treatment of gastric volvulus and wandering spleen. The patient remained asymptomatic, and there was no evidence of recurrence during a follow-up period of 24 months. This report describes a rare adult case of acute gastric volvulus associated with wandering spleen. Because delay in treatment can result in lethal complications, it is critical to provide a prompt and correct diagnosis and surgical intervention. We advocate laparoscopic surgery after endoscopic reduction because

  16. Management of Antiplatelet Agents and Anticoagulants in Patients with Gastrointestinal Bleeding.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Neena S

    2015-07-01

    Antithrombotic drugs (anticoagulants, aspirin, and other antiplatelet agents) are used to treat cardiovascular disease and to prevent secondary thromboembolic events. These drugs are independently associated with an increased risk of gastrointestinal bleeding (GIB), and, when prescribed in combination, further increase the risk of adverse bleeding events. Clinical evidence to inform the choice of endoscopic hemostatic procedure, safe temporary drug cessation, and use of reversal agents is reviewed to optimize management following clinically significant GIB.

  17. Bone metastasis from early gastric cancer following non-curative endoscopic submucosal dissection

    PubMed Central

    Kawabata, Hiroyuki; Oda, Ichiro; Suzuki, Haruhisa; Nonaka, Satoru; Yoshinaga, Shigetaka; Katai, Hitoshi; Taniguchi, Hirokazu; Kushima, Ryoji; Saito, Yutaka

    2013-01-01

    A 67-year-old male underwent endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) to treat early gastric cancer (EGC) in 2001. The lesion (50 mm × 25 mm diameter) was histologically diagnosed as poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma, with an ulcer finding. Although the tumor was confined to the mucosa with no evidence of lymphovascular involvement, the ESD was regarded as a non-curative resection due to the histological type, tumor size, and existence of an ulcer finding (as indicated by the 2010 Japanese gastric cancer treatment guidelines, ver. 3). Despite strong recommendation for subsequent gastrectomy, the patient refused surgery. An alternative follow-up routine was designed, which included five years of biannual clinical examinations to detect and measure serum tumor markers and perform visual assessment of recurrence by endoscopy and computed tomography scan after which the examinations were performed annually. The patient’s condition remained stable for eight years, until a complaint of back pain in 2010 prompted further clinical investigation. Bone scintigraphy indicated increased uptake. Histological examination of biopsy specimens taken from the lumbar spine revealed adenocarcinoma resembling the carcinoma cells from the EGC that had been treated previously by ESD, and which was consistent with immunohistochemical findings of gastrointestinal tract cancer. Thus, the diagnosis of bone metastasis from EGC was made. The reported rates of EGC recurrence in surgically resected cases range 1.4%-3.4%, but among these bone metastasis is very rare. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of bone metastasis from EGC following a non-curative ESD and occurring after an eight-year disease-free interval. PMID:23946610

  18. Computer-aided decision support systems for endoscopy in the gastrointestinal tract: a review.

    PubMed

    Liedlgruber, Michael; Uhl, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    Today, medical endoscopy is a widely used procedure to inspect the inner cavities of the human body. The advent of endoscopic imaging techniques-allowing the acquisition of images or videos-created the possibility for the development of the whole new branch of computer-aided decision support systems. Such systems aim at helping physicians to identify possibly malignant abnormalities more accurately. At the beginning of this paper, we give a brief introduction to the history of endoscopy, followed by introducing the main types of endoscopes which emerged so far (flexible endoscope, wireless capsule endoscope, and confocal laser endomicroscope). We then give a brief introduction to computer-aided decision support systems specifically targeted at endoscopy in the gastrointestinal tract. Then we present general facts and figures concerning computer-aided decision support systems and summarize work specifically targeted at computer-aided decision support in the gastrointestinal tract. This summary is followed by a discussion of some common issues concerning the approaches reviewed and suggestions of possible ways to resolve them.

  19. An ultra-low-power image compressor for capsule endoscope

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Meng-Chun; Dung, Lan-Rong; Weng, Ping-Kuo

    2006-01-01

    Background Gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy has been popularly applied for the diagnosis of diseases of the alimentary canal including Crohn's Disease, Celiac disease and other malabsorption disorders, benign and malignant tumors of the small intestine, vascular disorders and medication related small bowel injury. The wireless capsule endoscope has been successfully utilized to diagnose diseases of the small intestine and alleviate the discomfort and pain of patients. However, the resolution of demosaicked image is still low, and some interesting spots may be unintentionally omitted. Especially, the images will be severely distorted when physicians zoom images in for detailed diagnosis. Increasing resolution may cause significant power consumption in RF transmitter; hence, image compression is necessary for saving the power dissipation of RF transmitter. To overcome this drawback, we have been developing a new capsule endoscope, called GICam. Methods We developed an ultra-low-power image compression processor for capsule endoscope or swallowable imaging capsules. In applications of capsule endoscopy, it is imperative to consider battery life/performance trade-offs. Applying state-of-the-art video compression techniques may significantly reduce the image bit rate by their high compression ratio, but they all require intensive computation and consume much battery power. There are many fast compression algorithms for reducing computation load; however, they may result in distortion of the original image, which is not good for use in the medical care. Thus, this paper will first simplify traditional video compression algorithms and propose a scalable compression architecture. Conclusion As the result, the developed video compressor only costs 31 K gates at 2 frames per second, consumes 14.92 mW, and reduces the video size by 75% at least. PMID:16504138

  20. A novel microactuator for microbiopsy in capsular endoscopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sunkil; Koo, Kyo-in; Bang, Seoung Min; Youp Park, Jeong; Song, Si Young; 'Dan'Cho, Dongil

    2008-02-01

    This paper presents a LiGA (a German acronym for lithographie, galvanoformung, abformung) process based microactuator to be used for microbiopsy in capsular endoscopes. This microactuator is designed to be integrated into a capsular endoscope and to extract tissue samples inside the small gastrointestine which a conventional endoscope cannot reach. The proposed microactuator was fabricated as a cylindrical shape of diameter 10 mm and length 1.8 mm. This actuator consists of three parts: a microbiopsy part with a microspike, an actuating part with a torsion spring and a triggering part with a shape memory alloy (SMA) heating wire and polymer string. In order to extract sample tissue, a microspike in the developed actuator moves forward and backward using the slider-crank mechanism. For low power consumption triggering, a polymer-melting scheme was applied. The SMA heating wire consumed approximately 1.5 V × 160 mA × 1 second (66.67 µWH) for triggering. The precise components of the microactuator were fabricated using the LiGA process in order to overcome the limitations in accuracy of conventional precision machining. The developed microactuator was evaluated by extracting tissue samples from the small intestine of a pig ex vivo, and examining the tissue with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining protocol. The experimental tests demonstrated that the developed microactuator with microspike successfully extracted tissue samples from the pig's small intestines. This paper is an extended version of an oral paper presented at Transducers 2007: 14th International Conference on Solid State Sensors and Actuators, Lyon, France, 10-14 June, 2007.

  1. Endoscopic probe optics for spectrally encoded confocal microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kang, Dongkyun; Carruth, Robert W; Kim, Minkyu; Schlachter, Simon C; Shishkov, Milen; Woods, Kevin; Tabatabaei, Nima; Wu, Tao; Tearney, Guillermo J

    2013-01-01

    Spectrally encoded confocal microscopy (SECM) is a form of reflectance confocal microscopy that can achieve high imaging speeds using relatively simple probe optics. Previously, the feasibility of conducting large-area SECM imaging of the esophagus in bench top setups has been demonstrated. Challenges remain, however, in translating SECM into a clinically-useable device; the tissue imaging performance should be improved, and the probe size needs to be significantly reduced so that it can fit into luminal organs of interest. In this paper, we report the development of new SECM endoscopic probe optics that addresses these challenges. A custom water-immersion aspheric singlet (NA = 0.5) was developed and used as the objective lens. The water-immersion condition was used to reduce the spherical aberrations and specular reflection from the tissue surface, which enables cellular imaging of the tissue deep below the surface. A custom collimation lens and a small-size grating were used along with the custom aspheric singlet to reduce the probe size. A dual-clad fiber was used to provide both the single- and multi- mode detection modes. The SECM probe optics was made to be 5.85 mm in diameter and 30 mm in length, which is small enough for safe and comfortable endoscopic imaging of the gastrointestinal tract. The lateral resolution was 1.8 and 2.3 µm for the single- and multi- mode detection modes, respectively, and the axial resolution 11 and 17 µm. SECM images of the swine esophageal tissue demonstrated the capability of this device to enable the visualization of characteristic cellular structural features, including basal cell nuclei and papillae, down to the imaging depth of 260 µm. These results suggest that the new SECM endoscopic probe optics will be useful for imaging large areas of the esophagus at the cellular scale in vivo.

  2. Endoscopic probe optics for spectrally encoded confocal microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kang, DongKyun; Carruth, Robert W.; Kim, Minkyu; Schlachter, Simon C.; Shishkov, Milen; Woods, Kevin; Tabatabaei, Nima; Wu, Tao; Tearney, Guillermo J.

    2013-01-01

    Spectrally encoded confocal microscopy (SECM) is a form of reflectance confocal microscopy that can achieve high imaging speeds using relatively simple probe optics. Previously, the feasibility of conducting large-area SECM imaging of the esophagus in bench top setups has been demonstrated. Challenges remain, however, in translating SECM into a clinically-useable device; the tissue imaging performance should be improved, and the probe size needs to be significantly reduced so that it can fit into luminal organs of interest. In this paper, we report the development of new SECM endoscopic probe optics that addresses these challenges. A custom water-immersion aspheric singlet (NA = 0.5) was developed and used as the objective lens. The water-immersion condition was used to reduce the spherical aberrations and specular reflection from the tissue surface, which enables cellular imaging of the tissue deep below the surface. A custom collimation lens and a small-size grating were used along with the custom aspheric singlet to reduce the probe size. A dual-clad fiber was used to provide both the single- and multi- mode detection modes. The SECM probe optics was made to be 5.85 mm in diameter and 30 mm in length, which is small enough for safe and comfortable endoscopic imaging of the gastrointestinal tract. The lateral resolution was 1.8 and 2.3 µm for the single- and multi- mode detection modes, respectively, and the axial resolution 11 and 17 µm. SECM images of the swine esophageal tissue demonstrated the capability of this device to enable the visualization of characteristic cellular structural features, including basal cell nuclei and papillae, down to the imaging depth of 260 µm. These results suggest that the new SECM endoscopic probe optics will be useful for imaging large areas of the esophagus at the cellular scale in vivo. PMID:24156054

  3. Combined use of clips and nylon snare ("tulip-bundle") as a rescue endoscopic bleeding control in a mallory-weiss syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ivekovic, Hrvoje; Radulovic, Bojana; Jankovic, Suzana; Markos, Pave; Rustemovic, Nadan

    2014-01-01

    Mallory-Weiss syndrome (MWS) accounts for 6-14% of all cases of upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Prognosis of patients with MWS is generally good, with a benign course and rare recurrence of bleeding. However, no strict recommendations exist in regard to the mode of action after a failure of primary endoscopic hemostasis. We report a case of an 83-year-old male with MWS and rebleeding after the initial endoscopic treatment with epinephrine and clips. The final endoscopic control of bleeding was achieved by a combined application of clips and a nylon snare in a "tulip-bundle" fashion. The patient had an uneventful postprocedural clinical course and was discharged from the hospital five days later. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case report showing the "tulip-bundle" technique as a rescue endoscopic bleeding control in the esophagus.

  4. Polymer optical fibre sensors for endoscopic optoacoustic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broadway, Christian; Gallego, Daniel; Woyessa, Getinet; Pospori, Andreas; Bang, Ole; Webb, David J.; Carpintero, Guillermo; Lamela, Horacio

    2015-07-01

    Opto-acoustic imaging (OAI) shows particular promise for in-vivo biomedical diagnostics. Its applications include cardiovascular, gastrointestinal and urogenital systems imaging. Opto-acoustic endoscopy (OAE) allows the imaging of body parts through cavities permitting entry. The critical parameter is the physical size of the device, allowing compatibility with current technology, while governing flexibility of the distal end of the endoscope based on the needs of the sensor. Polymer optical fibre (POF) presents a novel approach for endoscopic applications and has been positively discussed and compared in existing publications. A great advantage can be obtained for endoscopy due to a small size and array potential to provide discrete imaging speed improvements. Optical fibre exhibits numerous advantages over conventional piezo-electric transducers, such as immunity from electromagnetic interference and a higher resolution at small sizes. Furthermore, micro structured polymer optical fibres offer over 12 times the sensitivity of silica fibre. We present a polymer fibre Bragg grating ultrasound detector with a core diameter of 125 microns. We discuss the ultrasonic signals received and draw conclusions on the opportunities and challenges of applying this technology in biomedical applications.

  5. Miniature Wireless BioSensor for Remote Endoscopic Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemiroski, Alex; Brown, Keith; Issadore, David; Westervelt, Robert; Thompson, Chris; Obstein, Keith; Laine, Michael

    2009-03-01

    We have built a miniature wireless biosensor with fluorescence detection capability that explores the miniaturization limit for a self-powered sensor device assembled from the latest off-the-shelf technology. The device is intended as a remote medical sensor to be inserted endoscopically and remainin a patient's gastrointestinal tract for a period of weeks, recording and transmitting data as necessary. A sensing network may be formed by using multiple such devices within the patient, routing information to an external receiver that communicates through existing mobilephone networks to relay data remotely. By using a monolithic IC chip with integrated processor, memory, and 2.4 GHz radio,combined with a photonic sensor and miniature battery, we have developed a fully functional computing device in a form factorcompliantwith insertion through the narrowest endoscopic channels (less than 3mm x 3mm x 20mm). We envision similar devices with various types of sensors to be used in many different areas of the human body.

  6. Ultrahigh speed en face OCT capsule for endoscopic imaging

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Kaicheng; Traverso, Giovanni; Lee, Hsiang-Chieh; Ahsen, Osman Oguz; Wang, Zhao; Potsaid, Benjamin; Giacomelli, Michael; Jayaraman, Vijaysekhar; Barman, Ross; Cable, Alex; Mashimo, Hiroshi; Langer, Robert; Fujimoto, James G.

    2015-01-01

    Depth resolved and en face OCT visualization in vivo may have important clinical applications in endoscopy. We demonstrate a high speed, two-dimensional (2D) distal scanning capsule with a micromotor for fast rotary scanning and a pneumatic actuator for precision longitudinal scanning. Longitudinal position measurement and image registration were performed by optical tracking of the pneumatic scanner. The 2D scanning device enables high resolution imaging over a small field of view and is suitable for OCT as well as other scanning microscopies. Large field of view imaging for screening or surveillance applications can also be achieved by proximally pulling back or advancing the capsule while scanning the distal high-speed micromotor. Circumferential en face OCT was demonstrated in living swine at 250 Hz frame rate and 1 MHz A-scan rate using a MEMS tunable VCSEL light source at 1300 nm. Cross-sectional and en face OCT views of the upper and lower gastrointestinal tract were generated with precision distal pneumatic longitudinal actuation as well as proximal manual longitudinal actuation. These devices could enable clinical studies either as an adjunct to endoscopy, attached to an endoscope, or as a swallowed tethered capsule for non-endoscopic imaging without sedation. The combination of ultrahigh speed imaging and distal scanning capsule technology could enable both screening and surveillance applications. PMID:25909001

  7. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided interventions in special situations

    PubMed Central

    Prachayakul, Varayu; Aswakul, Pitulak

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) was introduced in 1982 and has since become a popular advanced procedure for diagnosis and therapeutic intervention. Initially, EUS was most commonly used for the diagnosis of pancreatobiliary diseases and tissue acquisition. EUS was first used for guided cholangiography in 1996, followed by EUS-guided biliary drainage in 2001. Advancements in equipment and endoscopic accessories have led to an expansion of EUS-guided procedures, which now include EUS-guided drainage of intra-abdominal abscesses or collections, intra-vascular treatment of refractory variceal and nonvariceal bleeding, transmural pancreatic drainage, common bile duct stone clearance, enteral feeding tube placement and entero-enteric anastomosis. Patients with surgically altered upper gastrointestinal anatomies have greatly benefited from EUS also. This systematic review describes and discusses EUS procedures performed in uncommon diseases and conditions, as well as applications on more vulnerable patients such as young children and pregnant women. In these cases, routine approaches do not always apply, and thus may require the use of innovative and unconventional techniques. Increased knowledge of such special applications will help increase the success rates of these procedures and provide a foundation for additional advances and utilizations of the technique. PMID:26839650

  8. Endoscopic submucosal dissection for superficial Barrett’s esophageal cancer in the Japanese state and perspective

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Sachiko; Hanaoka, Noboru; Takeuchi, Yoji; Higashino, Koji; Uedo, Noriya; Iishi, Hiroyasu

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of Barrett’s esophageal cancer is one of the most rapidly increasing among all cancers in the West, and it is also expected to increase in Japan. The optimal treatment for early Barrett’s esophageal cancer remains controversial. En bloc esophagectomy with regional lymph node dissection has been considered the standard therapy. Endoscopic therapies are currently being evaluated as alternatives to esophagectomy because they can provide the least postoperative morbidity and the best quality of life. Endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) and endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) allow for removal of visible lesions and histopathologic review of resected tissue, which help in diagnostic staging of the disease. EMR is limited with respect to resection size, and large lesions must be resected in several fragments. Piecemeal resection of lesions is associated with high local recurrence rates, probably because of minor remnants of neoplastic tissue being left in situ. ESD provides larger specimens than does EMR in patients with early Barrett’s neoplasia. This in turn allows for more precise histological analysis and higher en bloc and curative resection rates, potentially reducing the incidence of recurrence. Detailed endoscopic examination to determine the invasion depth and spread of Barrett’s esophageal cancer is essential before ESD. The initial inspection is usually conducted with white-light imaging followed by narrow-band imaging. The ESD procedure is similar to that for lesions in other parts of the gastrointestinal tract. However, the narrow space of the esophagogastric junction and contraction of the lower esophageal sphincter sometimes disturb the visual field and endoscopic control. Skilled endoscope handling, sometimes including retroflexion, is required during ESD for Barrett’s esophageal cancer. Previous reports have shown that ESD achieves en bloc resection in >80% of lesions. Although promising short-term results are reported, a long

  9. Broadband rotary joint for high speed ultrahigh resolution endoscopic OCT imaging (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alemohammad, Milad; Yuan, Wu; Mavadia-Shukla, Jessica; Liang, Wenxuan; Yu, Xiaoyun; Yu, Shaoyong; Li, Xingde

    2016-03-01

    Endoscopic OCT is a promising technology enabling noninvasive in vivo imaging of internal organs, such as the gastrointestinal tract and airways. The past few years have witnessed continued efforts to achieve ultrahigh resolution and speed. It is well-known that the axial resolution in OCT imaging has a quadratic dependence on the central wavelength. While conventional OCT endoscopes operate in 1300 nm wavelength, the second-generation endoscopes are designed for operation around 800 nm where turn-key, broadband sources are becoming readily available. Traditionally 1300 nm OCT endoscopes are scanned at the proximal end, and a broadband fiber-optic rotary joint as a key component in scanning endoscopic OCT is commercially available. Bandwidths in commercial 800 nm rotary joints are unfortunately compromised due to severe chromatic aberration, which limits the resolution afforded by the broadband light source. In the past we remedied this limitation by using a home-made capillary-tube-based rotary joint where the maximum reliable speed is ~10 revolutions/second. In this submission we report our second-generation, home-built high-speed and broadband rotary joint for 800 nm wavelength, which uses achromatic doublets in order achieve broadband achromatic operation. The measured one-way throughput of the rotary joint is >67 % while the fluctuation of the double-pass coupling efficiency during 360° rotation is less than +/-5 % at a speed of 70 revolutions/second. We demonstrate the operation of this rotary joint in conjunction with our ultrahigh-resolution (2.4 µm in air) diffractive catheter by three-dimensional full-circumferential endoscopic imaging of guinea pig esophagus at 70 frames per second in vivo.

  10. 5-ALA/PpIX fluorescence detection of gastrointestinal neoplasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisova, Ekaterina G.; Vladimirov, Borislav; Terziev, Ivan; Ivanova, Radina; Avramov, Latchezar

    2009-07-01

    In the recent study delta-ALA/PpIX is used as fluorescent marker for dysplasia and tumor detection in esophagus, stomach and colon. ALA is administered per os six to eight (depending on the lesion location) hours before measurements at dose 20mg/kg weight. High-power light-emitting diode at 405 nm is used as an excitation source. Special opto-mechanical device is built for the LED to use the light guide of standard video-endoscopic system. Through endoscopic instrumental channel a fiber is applied to return information about fluorescence to microspectrometer. The fluorescence detected from tumor sites has very complex spectral origins. It consists of autofluorescence, fluorescence from exogenous fluorophores and re-absorption from the chromophores accumulated in the tissue investigated. Spectral features observed during endoscopic investigations could be distinct as the next regions: 450-630 nm region, where tissue autofluorescence is observed; 630-710 nm region, where fluorescence of PpIX is clearly pronounced; 530-580 nm region, where minima in the autofluorescence signal are observed, related to re-absorption of oxy-hemoglobin in this spectral area. Endogenous and exogenous fluorescence spectra are used to develop simple but effective algorithm, based on dimensionless ratio of the signals at 560 and 635 nm, for differentiation of normal/abnormal gastrointestinal tissues. Very good correlation between fluorescence signals and histology examination of the lesions investigated is achieved.

  11. Transmission of Salmonella enteritidis after endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography because of inadequate endoscope decontamination.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Paul; Smith, Andrew; Anderson, Margaret; Stewart, Jackie; Hamilton, Kate; McNamee, Sandra; Curran, Evonne T

    2017-04-01

    We report a historic nosocomial outbreak of Salmonella enteritidis affecting 4 inpatients who underwent endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. The cause was attributed to inadequate decontamination of an on-loan endoscope used over a weekend. This report highlights the risks of using on-loan endoscopes, particularly regarding their commissioning and adherence to disinfection protocols. In an era of increasing antibiotic resistance, transmission of Enterobacteriaceae by endoscopes remains a significant concern.

  12. [Indication and effectiveness of endoscopic percutaneous gastrostomy as a route of parenteral alimentation for the home care patient].

    PubMed

    Ueda, T; Hida, S; Higasa, K; Shinomiya, S; Matsumoto, T; Fukuoka, K; Yamanaka, E; Ozaki, S; Takayama, E

    2000-12-01

    We are managing 8 home care patients who have a gastrostomy made using an endoscopic percutaneous technique as a route of parenteral alimentation. Based on our experience, the preconditions for an endoscopic percutaneous gastrostomy as a route of parenteral alimentation are 1. normal gastrointestinal function, 2. difficulty in swallowing, 3. possibility that the caregiver can manage the gastrostomy. When we performed an endoscopic percutaneous gastrostomy as a route of parenteral alimentation for 8 home care patients, we obtained the several advantages mentioned below. 1. Swallowing pneumonia was prevented. 2. Adequate amount of alimental liquid could be infused. 3. Patient could take a bath or shower with the gastrostomy, and good QOL was realized. 4. The home care patient with the gastrostomy could have a satisfactorily long life.

  13. Treatment Option Overview (Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumors)

    MedlinePlus

    ... carcinoid tumor is cancer that forms in the lining of the gastrointestinal tract. The gastrointestinal (GI) tract ... Rectum . Enlarge Gastrointestinal carcinoid tumors form in the lining of the gastrointestinal tract, most often in the ...

  14. Treatment Options for Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... carcinoid tumor is cancer that forms in the lining of the gastrointestinal tract. The gastrointestinal (GI) tract ... Rectum . Enlarge Gastrointestinal carcinoid tumors form in the lining of the gastrointestinal tract, most often in the ...

  15. General Information about Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... carcinoid tumor is cancer that forms in the lining of the gastrointestinal tract. The gastrointestinal (GI) tract ... Rectum . Enlarge Gastrointestinal carcinoid tumors form in the lining of the gastrointestinal tract, most often in the ...

  16. Apollo gastrointestinal analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichols, B. L.; Huang, C. T. L.

    1975-01-01

    Fecal bile acid patterns for the Apollo 17 flight were studied to determine the cause of diarrhea on the mission. The fecal sterol analysis gave no indication of an infectious diarrhea, or specific, or nonspecific etiology occurring during the entire flight. It is assumed that the gastrointestinal problems encountered are the consequences of altered physiology, perhaps secondary to physical or emotional stress of flight.

  17. Pediatric functional gastrointestinal disorders

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Functional gastrointestinal disorders continue to be a prevalent set of conditions faced by the healthcare team and have a significant emotional and economic impact. In this review, the authors highlight some of the common functional disorders seen in pediatric patients (functional dyspepsia, irrita...

  18. Gastrointestinal Bleeding in Athletes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eichner, Edward R.

    1989-01-01

    Describes the scope and importance of gastrointestinal bleeding in runners and other athletes, discussing causes, sites, and implications of exercise-related bleeding. Practical tips to mitigate the problem, potentially more troublesome in women because of lower iron stores, are presented (e.g., gradual conditioning and avoidance of prerace…

  19. Endoscopic septoplasty: technique and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Durr, Dory G

    2003-02-01

    Recent literature has already embraced the topic of endoscopic septoplasty, with several published articles on the subject. This approach provides a direct-targeted route to the anatomic deformity, improved visualization, and magnification of the surgical field. It allows improved evaluation of the posterior nasal septal deformities, identification of the degree of mucosal involvement of the posterior ends of the inferior turbinates, and concomitant assessment of the middle meatus. It permits objective documentation of the cause of nasal obstruction with possible use in outcome assessment. It is also an effective teaching method and a motivating approach for the nursing team. We present our experience in a series of 47 patients performed during a 1 1/2-year period and discuss the surgical technique and patients' outcomes. We systematically used the endoscope for all septal and turbinate surgery. We evaluated outcomes using a telephone survey along with a validated disease-specific health status measure and a global rating questionnaire.

  20. Endoscopic-Assisted Craniosynostosis Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Honeycutt, Johnnie Harrel

    2014-01-01

    Over the last decade, endoscopy has been increasingly utilized in craniosynostosis surgery. In 2006, the author added endoscopy followed by helmet therapy to the treatment of young craniosynostosis patients. Since then, 73 children have been successfully treated utilizing endoscopic techniques with a transfusion rate of 23%. Most children are discharged on the first postoperative day; helmet therapy begins one week later. A helmet is worn for 4 to 6 months with one helmet replacement. Complications were limited to three reoperations to address suboptimal results, and one reoperation for a persisting skull defect. One sagittal sinus injury was addressed successfully, with resolution of a small intrasinus thrombus and no adverse brain sequelae. Although not applicable to every craniosynostosis patient, properly applied endoscopic-assisted craniosynostosis surgery is safe and effective, adding another option to the treatment armamentarium for craniosynostosis. PMID:25210508

  1. Endoscopic Palliation of Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Coté, Gregory A.; Sherman, Stuart

    2012-01-01

    Endoscopy has an increasingly important role in the palliation of patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. Endoscopic biliary drainage is still requested in the majority of patients who present with obstructive jaundice, and the increased use of self-expandable metallic stents has reduced the incidence of premature stent occlusion. First-line use of metallic stents is expected to be utilized more frequently as neoadjuvant protocols are improved. The efficacy of endoscopy for palliating gastroduodenal obstruction has advanced with the development of through-the-scope, self-expandable gastroduodenal stents. There have been advances in pain management, with endoscopic ultrasound-guided celiac plexus neurolysis reducing opiate requirements and pain for patients with unresectable malignancy. Future applications of endoscopy in pancreatic cancer may include fine needle injection of chemotherapeutic and other agents into the lesion itself. This review will summarize the evidence of endoscopy in the management of patients with pancreatic cancer. PMID:23187846

  2. Barrett Esophagus: When to Endoscope

    PubMed Central

    Butt, Joshua

    2014-01-01

    Increasing interest in identifying an effective strategy for decreasing the burden of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) has been fuelled by the rising EAC rates worldwide, the morbidity associated with esophagectomy, and the development of endoscopic methods for curing early-stage EAC. In the face of this enthusiasm, however, we should be cautious about continuing our current evidence-free approach to screening and one with unclear benefits and unclear costs to the community. The literature is increasingly recognizing that the value of traditional endoscopy for screening and surveillance of Barrett esophagus may be more limited than initially believed. A better understanding of the risk factors for Barrett esophagus and progression to dysplasia and a more individualized risk calculation will be useful in defining populations to consider for Barrett screening. The development of novel, nonendoscopic screening techniques and of less expensive endoscopic techniques holds promise for a cost-effective screening and surveillance method to curtail the increasing rates of EAC. PMID:24570882

  3. Endoscopic subsurface imaging in tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Demos, S G; Staggs, M; Radousky, H B

    2001-02-12

    The objective of this work is to develop endoscopic subsurface optical imaging technology that will be able to image different tissue components located underneath the surface of the tissue at an imaging depth of up to 1 centimeter. This effort is based on the utilization of existing technology and components developed for medical endoscopes with the incorporation of the appropriate modifications to implement the spectral and polarization difference imaging technique. This subsurface imaging technique employs polarization and spectral light discrimination in combination with image processing to remove a large portion of the image information from the outer layers of the tissue which leads to enhancement of the contrast and image quality of subsurface tissue structures.

  4. Where next for the endoscope?

    PubMed

    Natalin, Ricardo A; Landman, Jaime

    2009-11-01

    The concept of examining the body's interior and its organs dates back to ancient times. The roots of modern endoscopy lie in early nineteenth century Europe, and the intervening centuries have seen a steady evolution of devices and techniques. Nowadays, a wide variety of urinary tract disorders are successfully managed in a minimally invasive manner thanks to the endoscope and related technologies. Distal-sensor, 'digital', endoscopes have the potential to revolutionize the field, and change the way in which we use and think about endoscopy. Virtual endoscopy, capsule endoscopy, and a range of other techniques derived from physics and molecular biology all promise great improvements in visualization of the urinary tract and other urologic structures. Ultimately, the continued improvement of these minimally invasive technologies will enhance the quality of care that we can offer our patients.

  5. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided biliary drainage versus percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage after failed endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Baniya, Ramkaji; Upadhaya, Sunil; Madala, Seetharamprasad; Subedi, Subash Chandra; Shaik Mohammed, Tabrez; Bachuwa, Ghassan

    2017-01-01

    The failure rate of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography for biliary cannulation is approximately 6%–7% in cases of obstructive jaundice. Percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (PTBD) is the procedure of choice in such cases. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided biliary drainage (EGBD) is a novel technique that allows biliary drainage by echoendoscopy and fluoroscopy using a stent from the biliary tree to the gastrointestinal tract. Information in PubMed, Scopus, clinicaltrials.gov and Cochrane review were analyzed to obtain studies comparing EGBD and PTBD. Six studies fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Technical (odds ratio (OR): 0.34; confidence interval (CI) 0.10–1.14; p=0.05) and clinical (OR: 1.48; CI 0.46–4.79; p=0.51) success rates were not statistically significant between the EGBD and PTBD groups. Mild adverse events were nonsignificantly different (OR: 0.36; CI 0.10–1.24; p=0.11) but not the moderate-to-severe adverse events (OR: 0.16; CI 0.08–0.32; p≤0.00001) and total adverse events (OR: 0.34; CI 0.20–0.59; p≤0.0001). EGBD is equally effective but safer than PTBD.

  6. Portable electronic endoscopic imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Lihui; Wang, Liqiang; Ye, Bin; Duan, Huilong

    2010-11-01

    The paper presents a low-power, inexpensive and portable endoscopic imaging system. A 1.3 million pixels CMOS sensor is considered as an image capture. The sensor and the lens system are designed to minify the cannula diameter of the endoscope and therefore minimize the incision size for insertion. LVDS is used for image data transmission between the sensor and CPU to realize a long distance, high speed and low noise system. An ARM 920T based microcontroller is employed as the control core for the image transmission module, display module and other modules. The camera interface and LCD controller are integrated in the microcontroller and both have a dedicated DMA supports to transmit image data though AHB to or from frame buffer located in system memory without CPU intervention. The image is displayed on an 8 inch LCD screen with 800 × 600 resolution and 16 bits of color depth. With the maximum capture and display rate of 15 fps, this system can provide a clear image enough for laparoscopy or industrial application. And with integrated camera, light source and video display function, it can also be used as a portable, miniature and inexpensive endoscope.

  7. Endoscopic treatment of esophageal achalasia.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Dario; Maione, Francesco; D'Alessandro, Alessandra; Sarnelli, Giovanni; De Palma, Giovanni D

    2016-01-25

    Achalasia is a motility disorder of the esophagus characterized by dysphagia, regurgitation of undigested food, chest pain, weight loss and respiratory symptoms. The most common form of achalasia is the idiopathic one. Diagnosis largely relies upon endoscopy, barium swallow study, and high resolution esophageal manometry (HRM). Barium swallow and manometry after treatment are also good predictors of success of treatment as it is the residue symptomatology. Short term improvement in the symptomatology of achalasia can be achieved with medical therapy with calcium channel blockers or endoscopic botulin toxin injection. Even though few patients can be cured with only one treatment and repeat procedure might be needed, long term relief from dysphagia can be obtained in about 90% of cases with either surgical interventions such as laparoscopic Heller myotomy or with endoscopic techniques such pneumatic dilatation or, more recently, with per-oral endoscopic myotomy. Age, sex, and manometric type by HRM are also predictors of responsiveness to treatment. Older patients, females and type II achalasia are better after treatment compared to younger patients, males and type III achalasia. Self-expandable metallic stents are an alternative in patients non responding to conventional therapies.

  8. Primary endoscopic management of the frontal sinus.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, F A; Javer, A R

    2001-02-01

    Surgical treatment of the frontal sinus continues to be an area of much interest and controversy. The complex anatomy and confined space of this region require the endoscopic surgeon to be knowledgeable and delicate to obtain a positive result. Proper instrumentation is crucial and continues to evolve over time. Postoperative endoscopic care is integral to the success of endoscopic frontal sinusotomy and the availability of proper office equipment to perform this care is critical. In most instances, the intranasal endoscopic approach can be accomplished successfully without the need for an external procedure.

  9. Determination of the adequate dosage of rebamipide, a gastric mucoprotective drug, to prevent low-dose aspirin-induced gastrointestinal mucosal injury

    PubMed Central

    Ota, Kazuhiro; Takeuchi, Toshihisa; Nouda, Sadaharu; Ozaki, Haruhiko; Kawaguchi, Shinpei; Takahashi, Yoshiaki; Harada, Satoshi; Edogawa, Shoko; Kojima, Yuichi; Kuramoto, Takanori; Higuchi, Kazuhide

    2016-01-01

    Small intestinal mucosal injury caused by low-dose aspirin is a common cause of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding. We aimed to investigate the protective effects and optimal dose of rebamipide for low-dose aspirin-induced gastrointestinal mucosal injury. In this prospective randomized trial, 45 healthy volunteers (aged 20–65 years) were included and divided into three groups. The groups received enteric-coated aspirin 100 mg (low-dose aspirin) plus omeprazole 10 mg (Group A: proton pump inhibitor group), low-dose aspirin plus rebamipide 300 mg (Group B: standard-dose group), or low-dose aspirin plus rebamipide 900 mg (Group C: high-dose group). Esophagogastroduodenoscopy and video capsule endoscopy were performed, and the fecal occult blood reaction and fecal calprotectin levels were measured before and two weeks after drug administration. Although the fecal calprotectin levels increased significantly in Group A, they did not increase in Groups B and C. The esophagogastroduodenoscopic and video capsule endoscopic findings and the fecal occult blood test findings did not differ significantly among the three groups. In conclusion, standard-dose rebamipide is sufficient for preventing mucosal injury of the small intestine induced by low-dose aspirin, indicating that high-dose rebamipide is not necessary. PMID:27895392

  10. Intramural hematomas of the gastrointestinal system: a 5-year single center experience

    PubMed Central

    Kones, Osman; Gonenc, Murat; Karabulut, Mehmet; Akarsu, Cevher; Gok, Ilhan; Bozkurt, M. Abdussamet; Ilhan, Mehmet; Alıs, Halil

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Although spontaneous intramural hematomas of the gastrointestinal tract are very rare, they may be observed with the use of oral anticoagulant, though less frequently in cases of hematological malignancy and other bleeding disorders. Cases diagnosed as spontaneous intramural hematoma have been assessed in our clinic. Methods The cases, which were diagnosed as spontaneous intramural hematoma in the gastrointestinal tract (SIHGT) following anamnesis, physical examination, biochemical, radiological and endoscopic findings from July 2008 to July 2012, have been assessed retrospectively. Results Seven out of 13 cases were women and the mean age was 65.1 years (34 to 82 years). The most frequent complaint on admission was abdominal pain. The most frequent location of SIHGT was the ileum (n = 8). Oral anticoagulant use was the most common cause of etiology (n = 12). In 10 cases, International normalized ratio values were higher than treatment range (2 to 3, where mechanical valve replacement was 2.5 to 3.5) and mean value was 7.6 (1.70 to 23.13). While 12 cases were discharged without problems with medical treatment, one case with acute myeloid leukemia died in the intensive care unit following cerebrovascular attack. Conclusion Spontaneus bleeding and hematomas that may arise in connection with bleeding diathesis may be fatal in cases with long-term oral anticoagulant treatment and insufficient follow-up. In management of these cases, it may be necessary to arrange conservative follow up and/or initialize low molecular weight heparin, and administer vitamin K as well as replace blood products and coagulation factors when indicated. PMID:23908961

  11. Ghrelin and gastrointestinal stromal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Chang-Zhen; Liu, Dong; Kang, Wei-Ming; Yu, Jian-Chun; Ma, Zhi-Qiang; Ye, Xin; Li, Kang

    2017-01-01

    Ghrelin, as a kind of multifunctional protein polypeptide, is mainly produced in the fundus of the stomach and can promote occurrence and development of many tumors, including gastrointestinal tumors, which has been proved by the relevant researches. Most gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs, about 80%), as the most common mesenchymal tumor, also develop in the fundus. Scientific research has confirmed that ghrelin, its receptors and mRNA respectively can be found in GISTs, which demonstrated the existence of a ghrelin autocrine/paracrine loop in GIST tissues. However, no reports to date have specified the mechanism whether ghrelin can promote the occurrence and development of GISTs. Studies of pulmonary artery endothelial cells in a low-oxygen environment and cardiac muscle cells in an ischemic environment have shown that ghrelin can activate the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/AKT/mammalian target of rapamycin (PI3K/AKT/mTOR) signaling pathway. Moreover, some studies of GISTs have confirmed that activation of the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway can indeed promote the growth and progression of GISTs. Whether ghrelin is involved in the development or progression of GISTs through certain pathways remains unknown. Can we find a new target for the treatment of GISTs? This review explores and summaries the relationship among ghrelin, the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway and the development of GISTs. PMID:28348480

  12. Ghrelin and gastrointestinal stromal tumors.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Chang-Zhen; Liu, Dong; Kang, Wei-Ming; Yu, Jian-Chun; Ma, Zhi-Qiang; Ye, Xin; Li, Kang

    2017-03-14

    Ghrelin, as a kind of multifunctional protein polypeptide, is mainly produced in the fundus of the stomach and can promote occurrence and development of many tumors, including gastrointestinal tumors, which has been proved by the relevant researches. Most gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs, about 80%), as the most common mesenchymal tumor, also develop in the fundus. Scientific research has confirmed that ghrelin, its receptors and mRNA respectively can be found in GISTs, which demonstrated the existence of a ghrelin autocrine/paracrine loop in GIST tissues. However, no reports to date have specified the mechanism whether ghrelin can promote the occurrence and development of GISTs. Studies of pulmonary artery endothelial cells in a low-oxygen environment and cardiac muscle cells in an ischemic environment have shown that ghrelin can activate the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/AKT/mammalian target of rapamycin (PI3K/AKT/mTOR) signaling pathway. Moreover, some studies of GISTs have confirmed that activation of the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway can indeed promote the growth and progression of GISTs. Whether ghrelin is involved in the development or progression of GISTs through certain pathways remains unknown. Can we find a new target for the treatment of GISTs? This review explores and summaries the relationship among ghrelin, the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway and the development of GISTs.

  13. From the surface to the single cell: Novel endoscopic approaches in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Rath, Timo; Tontini, Gian Eugenio; Neurath, Markus F; Neumann, Helmut

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) comprise the two major entities Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis and endoscopic imaging of the gastrointestinal tract has always been an integral and central part in the management of IBD patients. Within the recent years, mucosal healing emerged as a key treatment goal in IBD that substantially decides about the clinical outcome of IBD patients, thereby demanding for a precise, timely and detailed endoscopic assessment of the mucosal inflammation associated with IBD. Further, molecular imaging has tremendously expanded the clinical utility and applications of modern endoscopy, now encompassing not only diagnosis, surveillance, and treatment but also the prediction of individual therapy response. Within this review we describe novel endoscopic approaches and advanced endoscopic imaging methods for the diagnosis, treatment and surveillance of IBD patients. We begin by providing an overview over novel and advanced imaging techniques such as magnification endoscopy and dye-based and dye-less chromoendoscopy, endomicroscopy and endocytoscopy. We then describe how these techniques can be utilized for the precise and ultrastructural assessment of mucosal inflammation and dysplasia development associated with IBD and outline how they have enabled the endoscopist to gain insight onto the cellular level in real-time. Finally, we provide an outlook on how molecular imaging has rapidly evolved in the recent past and can be used to make individual predictions about the therapeutic response towards biological treatment. PMID:26523101

  14. Have we Comprehensively Evaluated the Effectiveness of Endoscopic Screening for Gastric Cancer?

    PubMed

    Hamashima, Chisato

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopy has been increasingly used in clinical practice and as a standardized examination procedure for gastrointestinal diseases. However, only a few studies on endoscopic screening for evaluating mortality reduction from gastric cancer have been carried out. Even if a high detection rate is obtained in clinical practice, such a rate cannot be directly accepted as evidence providing the effectiveness of cancer screening. Endoscopic screening for gastric cancer is not an exception of possibility to detect overdiagnosis. If detection rate is used for the evaluation of the effectiveness of cancer screening, the possibility of overestimating the effectiveness of cancer screening cannot be ruled out. To avoid the effect of overdiagnosis and confirm the effectiveness of endoscopic screening, mortality reduction from gastric cancer must be carefully evaluated by conducting reliable studies. The burden of gastric cancer remains real and this cannot be ignored in Eastern Asian countries. To determine the best available method for gastric cancer screening, evaluation of its effectiveness is a must. Endoscopic screening for gastric cancer has shown promising results, and thus deserves further comprehensive evaluation to reliably confirm its effectiveness and how its optimal use can be strategically promoted.

  15. Development of a catadioptric endoscope objective with forward and side views

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Roy Chih Chung; Deen, M. Jamal; Armstrong, David; Fang, Qiyin

    2011-06-01

    Autofluorescence endoscopy is a promising functional imaging technique to improve screening of pre-cancerous or early cancer lesions in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Tissue autofluorescence signal is weak compared to white light reflectance imaging. Conventional forward-viewing endoscopes are inefficient in the collection of light from objects of interest along on the GI luminal wall. A key component of a complete autofluorescence endoscope is the light collection module. In this paper, we report the design, optimization, prototype development, and testing of an endoscope objective that is capable of acquiring simultaneous forward and radial views. The radial-view optical design was optimized for a balance between image quality and light collection. Modulation transfer function (MTF), entrance pupil radius, manufacturability, and field-of-view were parameters used in the lens optimization. In comparison with the typical forward-viewing endoscopes, our nonsequential ray trace simulations suggest the proposed radial-view design is more practical in the light collection. To validate the proposed simulation methods, a 3:1 scaled-up prototype was fabricated. Contrast measurements were taken with the prototype, and then compared with the simulated MTF.

  16. Endoscopic vacuum-assisted closure system (E-VAC): case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Borejsza-Wysocki, Maciej; Bobkiewicz, Adam; Malinger, Stanisław; Świrkowicz, Józef; Hermann, Jacek; Drews, Michał; Banasiewicz, Tomasz

    2015-01-01

    Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) has become a standard in the treatment of chronic and difficult healing wounds. Negative pressure wound therapy is applied to the wound via a special vacuum-sealed sponge. Nowadays, the endoscopic vacuum-assisted wound closure system (E-VAC) has been proven to be an important alternative in patients with upper and lower intestinal leakage not responding to standard endoscopic and/or surgical treatment procedures. Endoscopic vacuum-assisted wound closure system provides perfect wound drainage and closure of various kinds of defect and promotes tissue granulation. Our experience has shown that E-VAC may significantly improve the morbidity and mortality rate. Moreover, E-VAC may be useful in a multidisciplinary approach – from upper gastrointestinal to rectal surgery complications. On the other hand, major limitations of the E-VAC system are the necessity of repeated endoscopic interventions and constant presence of well-trained staff. Further, large-cohort studies need to be performed to establish the applicability and effectiveness of E-VAC before routine widespread use can be recommended. PMID:26240633

  17. Endoscopic vacuum-assisted closure system (E-VAC): case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Borejsza-Wysocki, Maciej; Szmyt, Krzysztof; Bobkiewicz, Adam; Malinger, Stanisław; Świrkowicz, Józef; Hermann, Jacek; Drews, Michał; Banasiewicz, Tomasz

    2015-07-01

    Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) has become a standard in the treatment of chronic and difficult healing wounds. Negative pressure wound therapy is applied to the wound via a special vacuum-sealed sponge. Nowadays, the endoscopic vacuum-assisted wound closure system (E-VAC) has been proven to be an important alternative in patients with upper and lower intestinal leakage not responding to standard endoscopic and/or surgical treatment procedures. Endoscopic vacuum-assisted wound closure system provides perfect wound drainage and closure of various kinds of defect and promotes tissue granulation. Our experience has shown that E-VAC may significantly improve the morbidity and mortality rate. Moreover, E-VAC may be useful in a multidisciplinary approach - from upper gastrointestinal to rectal surgery complications. On the other hand, major limitations of the E-VAC system are the necessity of repeated endoscopic interventions and constant presence of well-trained staff. Further, large-cohort studies need to be performed to establish the applicability and effectiveness of E-VAC before routine widespread use can be recommended.

  18. Endoscopic closure instead of surgery to close an ileal pouch fistula with the over-the-scope clip system

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Yao; Gong, Jian-Feng; Zhu, Wei-Ming

    2017-01-01

    An ileal pouch fistula is an uncommon complication after an ileal pouch anal anastomosis. Most patients who suffer from an ileal pouch fistula will need surgical intervention. However, the surgery can be invasive and has a high risk compared to endoscopic treatment. The over-the-scope clip (OTSC) system was initially developed for hemostasis and leakage closure in the gastrointestinal tract during flexible endoscopy. There have been many successes in using this approach to apply perforations to the upper gastrointestinal tract. However, this approach has not been used for ileal pouch fistulas until currently. In this report, we describe one patient who suffered a leak from the tip of the “J” pouch and was successfully treated with endoscopic closure via the OTSC system. A 26-year-old male patient had an intestinal fistula at the tip of the “J” pouch after an ileal pouch anal anastomosis procedure. He received endoscopic treatment via OTSC under intravenous anesthesia, and the leak was closed successfully. Endoscopic closure of a pouch fistula could be a simpler alternative to surgery and could help avoid surgery-related complications. PMID:28250903

  19. Endoscopic decompression for intraforaminal and extraforaminal nerve root compression

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to evaluate the outcome of endoscopic decompression surgery for intraforaminal and extraforaminal nerve root compression in the lumbar spine. Methods The records from seventeen consecutive patients treated with endoscopic posterior decompression without fusion for intaforaminal and extraforaminal nerve root compression in the lumbar spine (7 males and 10 females, mean age: 67.9 ± 10.7 years) were retrospectively reviewed. The surgical procedures consisted of lateral or translaminal decompression with or without discectomy. The following items were investigated: 1) the preoperative clinical findings; 2) the radiologic findings including MRI and computed tomography-discography; and 3) the surgical outcome as evaluated using the Japanese Orthopaedic Association scale for lower back pain (JOA score). Results All patients had neurological findings compatible with a radiculopathy, such as muscle weakness and sensory disturbance. MRI demonstrated the obliteration of the normal increased signal intensity fat in the intervertebral foramen. Ten patients out of 14 who underwent computed tomography-discography exhibited disc protrusion or herniation. Selective nerve root block was effective in all patients. During surgery, 12 patients were found to have a protruded disc or herniation that compressed the nerve root. Sixteen patients reported pain relief immediately after surgery. Conclusions Intraforaminal and extraforaminal nerve root compression is a rare but distinct pathological condition causing severe radiculopathy. Endoscopic decompression surgery is considered to be an appropriate and less invasive surgical option. PMID:21439083

  20. Gastric antral webs in adults: A case series characterizing their clinical presentation and management in the modern endoscopic era

    PubMed Central

    Morales, Shannon J; Nigam, Neha; Chalhoub, Walid M; Abdelaziz, Dalia I; Lewis, James H; Benjamin, Stanley B

    2017-01-01

    AIM To investigate the current management of gastric antral webs (GAWs) among adults and identify optimal endoscopic and/or surgical management for these patients. METHODS We reviewed our endoscopy database seeking to identify patients in whom a GAW was visualized among 24640 esophagogastroduodenoscopies (EGD) over a seven-year period (2006-2013) at a single tertiary care center. The diagnosis of GAW was suspected during EGD if aperture size of the antrum did not vary with peristalsis or if a “double bulb” sign was present on upper gastrointestinal series. Confirmation of the diagnosis was made by demonstrating a normal pylorus distal to the GAW. RESULTS We identified 34 patients who met our inclusion criteria (incidence 0.14%). Of these, five patients presented with gastric outlet obstruction (GOO), four of whom underwent repeated sequential balloon dilations and/or needle-knife incisions with steroid injection for alleviation of GOO. The other 29 patients were incidentally found to have a non-obstructing GAW. Age at diagnosis ranged from 30-87 years. Non-obstructing GAWs are mostly incidental findings. The most frequently observed symptom prompting endoscopic work-up was refractory gastroesophageal reflux (n = 24, 70.6%) followed by abdominal pain (n = 11, 33.4%), nausea and vomiting (n = 9, 26.5%), dysphagia (n = 6, 17.6%), unexplained weight loss, (n = 4, 11.8%), early satiety (n = 4, 11.8%), and melena of unclear etiology (n = 3, 8.82%). Four of five GOO patients were treated with balloon dilation (n = 4), four-quadrant needle-knife incision (n = 3), and triamcinolone injection (n = 2). Three of these patients required repeat intervention. One patient had a significant complication of perforation after needle-knife incision. CONCLUSION Endoscopic intervention for GAW using balloon dilation or needle-knife incision is generally safe and effective in relieving symptoms, however repeat treatment may be needed and a risk of perforation exists with thermal

  1. Novel Therapeutic Strategies in the Management of Non-Variceal Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Garber, Ari; Jang, Sunguk

    2016-01-01

    Non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding, the most common etiology of which is peptic ulcer disease, remains a persistent challenge despite a reduction in both its incidence and mortality. Both pharmacologic and endoscopic techniques have been developed to achieve hemostasis, with varying degrees of success. Among the pharmacologic therapies, proton pump inhibitors remain the mainstay of treatment, as they reduce the risk of rebleeding and requirement for recurrent endoscopic evaluation. Tranexamic acid, a derivative of the amino acid lysine, is an antifibrinolytic agent whose role requires further investigation before application. Endoscopically delivered pharmacotherapy, including Hemospray (Cook Medical), EndoClot (EndoClot Plus Inc.), and Ankaferd Blood Stopper (Ankaferd Health Products), in addition to standard epinephrine, show promise in this regard, although their mechanisms of action require further investigation. Non-pharmacologic endoscopic techniques use one of the following two methods to achieve hemostasis: ablation or mechanical tamponade, which may involve using endoscopic clips, cautery, argon plasma coagulation, over-the-scope clipping devices, radiofrequency ablation, and cryotherapy. This review aimed to highlight these novel and fundamental hemostatic strategies and the research supporting their efficacy. PMID:27744662

  2. Technological review on endoscopic submucosal dissection: available equipment, recent developments and emerging techniques.

    PubMed

    Mavrogenis, Georgios; Hochberger, Juergen; Deprez, Pierre; Shafazand, Morteza; Coumaros, Dimitri; Yamamoto, Katsumi

    2017-04-01

    Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) is widely practiced in Japan and the Eastern World and is rapidly expanding in western countries for the management of early malignancies of the upper and lower gastrointestinal tube. In addition, novel therapeutic applications deriving from ESD have emerged including the treatment of achalasia, of submucosal tumors, of diverticula, of strictures and of reflux disease. An ESD procedure necessitates not only skills and specific training, but also familiarization with a vast spectrum of devices (endoscopes, high-frequency generators and their settings, endoknives, hoods, irrigation devices) and techniques (such as countertraction, artificial ulcer closure), that render the procedure faster, more efficient and safer. This technological article gives an overview on current and novel equipment for an ESD and associated techniques.

  3. Risk of transmission of carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae and related "superbugs" during gastrointestinal endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Muscarella, Lawrence F

    2014-10-16

    To evaluate the risk of transmission of carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) and their related superbugs during gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy. Reports of outbreaks linked to GI endoscopes contaminated with different types of infectious agents, including CRE and their related superbugs, were reviewed. Published during the past 30 years, both prior to and since CRE's emergence, these reports were obtained by searching the peer-reviewed medical literature (via the United States National Library of Medicine's "MEDLINE" database); the Food and Drug Administration's Manufacturer and User Facility Device Experience database, or "MAUDE"; and the Internet (via Google's search engine). This review focused on an outbreak of CRE in 2013 following the GI endoscopic procedure known as endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, or ERCP, performed at "Hospital X" located in the suburbs of Chicago (IL; United States). Part of the largest outbreak of CRE in United States history, the infection and colonization of 10 and 28 of this hospital's patients, respectively, received considerable media attention and was also investigated by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), which published a report about this outbreak in Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR), in 2014. This report, along with the results of an independent inspection of Hospital X's infection control practices following this CRE outbreak, were also reviewed. While this article focuses primarily on the prevention of transmissions of CRE and their related superbugs in the GI endoscopic setting, some of its discussion and recommendations may also apply to other healthcare settings, to other types of flexible endoscopes, and to other types of transmissible infectious agents. This review found that GI endoscopy is an important risk factor for the transmission of CRE and their related superbugs, having been recently associated with patient morbidity and mortality following ERCP. The CDC

  4. Psychophysiological Associations with Gastrointestinal Symptomatology in Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Bradley J; Marler, Sarah; Altstein, Lily L; Lee, Evon Batey; Akers, Jill; Sohl, Kristin; McLaughlin, Aaron; Hartnett, Kaitlyn; Kille, Briana; Mazurek, Micah; Macklin, Eric A; McDonnell, Erin; Barstow, Mariah; Bauman, Margaret L; Margolis, Kara Gross; Veenstra-VanderWeele, Jeremy; Beversdorf, David Q

    2017-02-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is often accompanied by gastrointestinal disturbances, which also may impact behavior. Alterations in autonomic nervous system functioning are also frequently observed in ASD. The relationship between these findings in ASD is not known. We examined the relationship between gastrointestinal symptomatology, examining upper and lower gastrointestinal tract symptomatology separately, and autonomic nervous system functioning, as assessed by heart rate variability and skin conductance level, in a sample of 120 individuals with ASD. Relationships with co-occurring medical and psychiatric symptoms were also examined. While the number of participants with significant upper gastrointestinal tract problems was small in this sample, 42.5% of participants met criteria for functional constipation, a disorder of the lower gastrointestinal tract. Heart rate variability, a measure of parasympathetic modulation of cardiac activity, was found to be positively associated with lower gastrointestinal tract symptomatology at baseline. This relationship was particularly strong for participants with co-occurring diagnoses of anxiety disorder and for those with a history of regressive ASD or loss of previously acquired skills. These findings suggest that autonomic function and gastrointestinal problems are intertwined in children with ASD; although it is not possible to assess causality in this data set. Future work should examine the impact of treatment of gastrointestinal problems on autonomic function and anxiety, as well as the impact of anxiety treatment on gastrointestinal problems. Clinicians should be aware that gastrointestinal problems, anxiety, and autonomic dysfunction may cluster in children with ASD and should be addressed in a multidisciplinary treatment plan. Autism Res 2017, 10: 276-288. © 2016 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Endoscopic evaluation of neurological dysphagic patients

    PubMed Central

    Coscarelli, S; Verrecchia, L; Coscarelli, A

    2007-01-01

    Summary Dysphagia is a frequent finding in neurological patients and is a symptom related to the severity of the clinical picture. The swallowing impairments, in these patients, increase the risk of aspiration pneumonia, that leads to death, in at least 6% of patients, within the first year. Therefore, evaluation of the swallowing status is essential in patients with dysphagia and videofluoroscopic study of swallowing (VFSS) is the method of choice. It cannot be performed in all patients on account of the complexity of the procedure and since they must be brought to the Radiology Unit. In the 1980, a new bedside method was introduced, namely: fiber-optic endoscopic study of swallow (FESS) which is easy, low-cost, well-tolerated and repeatable. We use this bedside technique to assess swallowing function in patients with dysphagia admitted to acute care units, neurological and internal medicine units. The evaluation aims to indicate the safer nutritional method (oral intake, feeding tube or percutaneous gastrostomy) and, consequently, reducing the risk of aspiration pneumonia during hospitalization. We found that more than 50% of the dysphagic patients present cerebrovascular injuries and in 2% of the population, the first diagnostic hypothesis of Myasthenia Gravis can be made with the FESS technique. In 60%, we indicate a change in nutritional method: in 20% we indicate percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG). With these indications, none of those patients had aspiration pneumonia. Our protocol for the bedside fiberoptic study of neurological patients with dysphagia has demonstrated its efectiveness by eliminating the incidence of aspiration pneumonia. PMID:18320832

  6. Gastrointestinal parasite infestation.

    PubMed

    Abd El Bagi, Mohamed E; Sammak, Bassam M; Mohamed, Abdulrahman E; Al Karawi, Mohamed A; Al Shahed, Mona; Al Thagafi, Mohamed A

    2004-03-01

    Twenty-five percent of the world's population could be suffering parasitic infestation. Highest prevalence is in underdeveloped agricultural and rural areas in the tropical and subtropical regions. In some areas incidence may reach 90% of the population. In contrast, some major economic projects intended to promote local development have, paradoxically, caused parasitic proliferation, e.g. bilharziasis in Egypt and Sudan and Chagas disease in Brazil. The commonest cosmopolitan gastrointestinal parasite is Entamoeba histolytica. Some intestinal parasite are endemic in temperate climates, e.g. Entrobius vermicularis. The AIDS epidemic has increased the prevalence and severity of parasitic disease, particularly Strongyloides stercolaris. Tropical parasites are seen in Western people who travel to tropical countries. Radiology has acquired a major role in diagnosis and management of gastrointestinal parasite infestations and their complications.

  7. [Microbiota and gastrointestinal diseases].

    PubMed

    Polanco Allué, I

    2015-12-01

    The bacterial colonisation is established immediately after birth, through direct contact with maternal microbiota, and may be influenced during lactation. There is emerging evidence indicating that quantitative and qualitative changes on gut microbiota contribute to alterations in the mucosal activation of the immune system, leading to intra- or extra-intestinal diseases. A balance between pathogenic and beneficial microbiota throughout childhood and adolescence is important to gastrointestinal health, including protection against pathogens, inhibition of pathogens, nutrient processing (synthesis of vitamin K), stimulation of angiogenesis, and regulation of host fat storage. Probiotics can promote an intentional modulation of intestinal microbiota favouring the health of the host. A review is presented on the modulation of intestinal microbiota on prevention, and adjuvant treatment of some paediatric gastrointestinal diseases.

  8. Gastrointestinal food allergies.

    PubMed

    Heine, Ralf G

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal food allergies present during early childhood with a diverse range of symptoms. Cow's milk, soy and wheat are the three most common gastrointestinal food allergens. Several clinical syndromes have been described, including food protein-induced enteropathy, proctocolitis and enterocolitis. In contrast with immediate, IgE-mediated food allergies, the onset of gastrointestinal symptoms is delayed for at least 1-2 hours after ingestion in non-IgE-mediated allergic disorders. The pathophysiology of these non-IgE-mediated allergic disorders is poorly understood, and useful in vitro markers are lacking. The results of the skin prick test or measurement of the food-specific serum IgE level is generally negative, although low-positive results may occur. Diagnosis therefore relies on the recognition of a particular clinical phenotype as well as the demonstration of clear clinical improvement after food allergen elimination and the re-emergence of symptoms upon challenge. There is a significant clinical overlap between non-IgE-mediated food allergy and several common paediatric gastroenterological conditions, which may lead to diagnostic confusion. The treatment of gastrointestinal food allergies requires the strict elimination of offending food allergens until tolerance has developed. In breast-fed infants, a maternal elimination diet is often sufficient to control symptoms. In formula-fed infants, treatment usually involves the use an extensively hydrolysed or amino acid-based formula. Apart from the use of hypoallergenic formulae, the solid diets of these children also need to be kept free of specific food allergens, as clinically indicated. The nutritional progress of infants and young children should be carefully monitored, and they should undergo ongoing, regular food protein elimination reassessments by cautious food challenges to monitor for possible tolerance development.

  9. Management of gastrointestinal hemorrhage.

    PubMed Central

    Hilsden, R. J.; Shaffer, E. A.

    1995-01-01

    Acute gastrointestinal hemorrhage is a common problem that requires prompt recognition and management to prevent serious morbidity and mortality. Management goals are stabilization of the patient with vigorous fluid resuscitation followed by investigation and definitive treatment of the bleeding source. Endoscopy is often the initial diagnostic test and allows therapeutic measures to be performed at the same time. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:8563510

  10. Radiological Features of Gastrointestinal Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Lo Re, Giuseppe; Federica, Vernuccio; Midiri, Federico; Picone, Dario; La Tona, Giuseppe; Galia, Massimo; Lo Casto, Antonio; Lagalla, Roberto; Midiri, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal lymphomas represent 5–20% of extranodal lymphomas and mainly occur in the stomach and small intestine. Clinical findings are not specific, thus often determining a delay in the diagnosis. Imaging features at conventional and cross-sectional imaging must be known by the radiologist since he/she plays a pivotal role in the diagnosis and disease assessment, thus assisting in the choice of the optimal treatment to patients. This review focuses on the wide variety of imaging presentation of esophageal, gastric, and small and large bowel lymphoma presenting their main imaging appearances at conventional and cross-sectional imaging, mainly focusing on computed tomography and magnetic resonance, helping in the choice of the best imaging technique for the disease characterization and assessment and the recognition of potential complications. PMID:26819598

  11. Is endoscopic ultrasonography essential for endoscopic resection of small rectal neuroendocrine tumors?

    PubMed Central

    Park, Su Bum; Kim, Dong Jun; Kim, Hyung Wook; Choi, Cheol Woong; Kang, Dae Hwan; Kim, Su Jin; Nam, Hyeong Seok

    2017-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the importance of endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) for small (≤ 10 mm) rectal neuroendocrine tumor (NET) treatment. METHODS Patients in whom rectal NETs were diagnosed by endoscopic resection (ER) at the Pusan National University Yangsan Hospital between 2008 and 2014 were included in this study. A total of 120 small rectal NETs in 118 patients were included in this study. Histologic features and clinical outcomes were analyzed, and the findings of endoscopy, EUS and histology were compared. RESULTS The size measured by endoscopy was not significantly different from that measured by EUS and histology (r = 0.914 and r = 0.727 respectively). Accuracy for the depth of invasion was 92.5% with EUS. No patients showed invasion of the muscularis propria or metastasis to the regional lymph nodes. All rectal NETs were classified as grade 1 and demonstrated an L-cell phenotype. Mean follow-up duration was 407.54 ± 374.16 d. No patients had local or distant metastasis during the follow-up periods. CONCLUSION EUS is not essential for ER in the patient with small rectal NETs because of the prominent morphology and benign behavior. PMID:28373770

  12. Endoscopic-assisted infraorbital nerve release

    PubMed Central

    Sosin, Michael; De La Cruz, Carla; Christy, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Endoscopic-assisted techniques in plastic and craniofacial surgeries are limited. We present a patient with infraorbital nerve entrapment following traumatic facial injury that failed conservative management. Compression of the nerve was treated with an endoscopic-assisted nerve release of the surrounding soft tissue with a circumferential foraminal osteotomy. PMID:27252952

  13. Biological ablation of sentinel lymph node metastasis in submucosally invaded early gastrointestinal cancer.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Satoru; Kishimoto, Hiroyuki; Tazawa, Hiroshi; Hashimoto, Yuuri; Kuroda, Shinji; Nishizaki, Masahiko; Nagasaka, Takeshi; Shirakawa, Yasuhiro; Kagawa, Shunsuke; Urata, Yasuo; Hoffman, Robert M; Fujiwara, Toshiyoshi

    2015-03-01

    Currently, early gastrointestinal cancers are treated endoscopically, as long as there are no lymph node metastases. However, once a gastrointestinal cancer invades the submucosal layer, the lymph node metastatic rate rises to higher than 10%. Therefore, surgery is still the gold standard to remove regional lymph nodes containing possible metastases. Here, to avoid prophylactic surgery, we propose a less-invasive biological ablation of lymph node metastasis in submucosally invaded gastrointestinal cancer patients. We have established an orthotopic early rectal cancer xenograft model with spontaneous lymph node metastasis by implantation of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-labeled human colon cancer cells into the submucosal layer of the murine rectum. A solution containing telomerase-specific oncolytic adenovirus was injected into the peritumoral submucosal space, followed by excision of the primary rectal tumors mimicking the endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) technique. Seven days after treatment, GFP signals had completely disappeared indicating that sentinel lymph node metastasis was selectively eradicated. Moreover, biologically treated mice were confirmed to be relapse-free even 4 weeks after treatment. These results indicate that virus-mediated biological ablation selectively targets lymph node metastasis and provides a potential alternative to surgery for submucosal invasive gastrointestinal cancer patients.

  14. Endoscopic transnasal resection of ameloblastoma with intracranial extension.

    PubMed

    Woodroffe, Royce W; Abel, Taylor J; Fletcher, Aaron; Grossbach, Andrew; Van Daele, Douglas J; O'Brien, Erin; Greenlee, Jeremy D W

    2014-05-01

    Ameloblastoma is a rare odontogenic tumor with characteristics of epithelial tissue that produces enamel for the developing tooth. This lesion is generally considered benign, but has malignant forms that invade locally and metastasize. We present a 60-year-old man with maxillary ameloblastoma that after multiple recurrences developed intracranial extension with dural involvement of the middle cranial fossa and was treated by endoscopic transnasal resection followed by radiation therapy. Our technique and intraoperative findings are described with a review of the literature on intracranial ameloblastoma. This patient represents a unique account of endoscopic transnasal resection being utilized in the treatment of intracranial extension of ameloblastoma and demonstrates potential for application in similar cases.

  15. The Combination Therapy of Dissolution Using Carbonated Liquid and Endoscopic Procedure for Bezoars: Pragmatical and Clinical Review

    PubMed Central

    Ogawa, Kohei; Mizuno, Ken-ichi; Shinagawa, Yoko; Kobayashi, Yuji; Abe, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Yukari; Takahashi, Shunsaku; Hayashi, Kazunao; Yokoyama, Junji; Takeuchi, Manabu; Yamagiwa, Satoshi; Sato, Yuichi; Terai, Shuji

    2016-01-01

    Bezoars are relatively rare foreign bodies of gastrointestinal tract and often cause ileus and ulcerative lesions in the stomach and subsequent bleeding and perforation due to their size and stiffness. Therefore, the removal of bezoars is essential and recent development of devices, the endoscopic removal procedure, is often applied. However, due to their stiffness, simple endoscopic removal failed in not a few cases, and surgical removal has also been used. Recently, the efficacy of a combination therapy of endoscopic procedure and dissolution using carbonated liquid has been reported. To develop the safe and effective removal procedure, we carefully reviewed a total of 55 reported cases in this study including our 3 additional cases, successfully treated with dissolution with endoscopic fragmentation. In summary, the data showed the efficiency in the combination therapy, treating the larger size of bezoar and reducing the length of hospital stay. To the best of our knowledge, this is the largest pragmatical and clinical review for the combination therapy of dissolution and endoscopic treatment for bezoars. This review should help physicians to manage bezoars more efficiently. PMID:27642293

  16. Endoscopic management of biliary hydatid disease

    PubMed Central

    Akkiz, Hikmet; Akinoglu, Alper; Çolakoglu, Salih; Demiryürek, Haluk; Yagmur, Özgür

    1996-01-01

    Objective To determine the effect of endoscopic sphincterotomy in the management of biliary hydatid disease. Design A case study between January 1992 and December 1994. Setting A university-affiliated hospital in Adana, Turkey. Patients Five patients with biliary hydatid disease, in which the cyst had ruptured into the biliary tree. The follow-up ranged from 3 to 12 months. Intervention Endoscopic sphincterotomy. Main Outcome Measures Morbidity, mortality and recurrence of the disease. Results All patients underwent successful endoscopic sphincterotomy, including removal of daughter cysts. During the follow-up period, ultrasonography and laboratory investigations showed complete cure in all patients. There were no complications due to endoscopic sphincterotomy. Conclusion Endoscopic sphincterotomy is the treatment of choice for the management of hydatid cysts that have ruptured into the biliary tract causing obstructive jaundice. PMID:8697318

  17. Endoscopic management of esophagogastric varices in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Ichikawa, Tatsuki; Taura, Naota; Miuma, Satoshi; Isomoto, Hajime; Nakao, Kazuhiko

    2014-01-01

    Esophagogastric varices are the most common complication in patients with portal hypertension, and endoscopy plays an important role in their diagnosis and in the prevention of acute bleeding from these structures. Recently, new modalities such as endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) and narrow-band imaging have been introduced for the diagnosis of esophagogastric varices. In Japan, endoscopic therapy has become the first choice for the treatment of acutely bleeding esophageal or gastric varices. The two principal methods used to treat esophageal varices are endoscopic injection sclerotherapy (EIS) and endoscopic variceal ligation (EVL). Recently, combinations of EIS plus EVL and EVL plus argon plasma coagulation were reported to be more effective than EVL or EIS alone. Additionally, endoscopic cyanoacrylate injection is superior to EIS and EVL for the treatment of acutely bleeding gastric varices. PMID:25333017

  18. Immunohistochemistry staining for mismatch repair proteins: the endoscopic biopsy material provides useful and coherent results.

    PubMed

    Vilkin, Alex; Leibovici-Weissman, Ya'ara; Halpern, Marisa; Morgenstern, Sara; Brazovski, Eli; Gingold-Belfer, Rachel; Wasserberg, Nir; Brenner, Baruch; Niv, Yaron; Sneh-Arbib, Orly; Levi, Zohar

    2015-11-01

    Immunohistochemistry (IHC) testing for mismatch repair proteins (MMRP) in patients with colorectal cancer can be performed on endoscopic biopsy material or the surgical resection material. Data are continuing to accumulate regarding the deleterious effect of neoadjuvant chemoradiation on MMRP expression. However, despite continuing rise in the use of endoscopic biopsies for IHC, most pathology departments still use mainly the surgical materials for IHC testing. In this study we compared the quality of stains among 96 colon cancer subjects with paired endoscopic and surgical material available for MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, and PMS2 stains (96 × 4, yielding 384 paired stains). Each slide received both a quantitative score (immunoreactivity [0-3] × percent positivity [0-4]) and a qualitative score (absent; weak and focal; strong). The quantitative scores of all MMRP were significantly higher among the endoscopic material (P<.001 for all). In 358 pairs (93.2%), both the endoscopic and operative material stained either strong (322, 83.9%) or absent (36, 9.4%). In 26 pairs (6.8%), the endoscopic material stained strong, whereas the operative material stained focal and weak. No endoscopic biopsy materials stained focal and weak. Our findings indicate that the biopsy material may provide more coherent results. Although these results may indicate that biopsy material provides coherent and useful results, it is yet to be determined if the demonstrated differences pose a real clinical problem in interpreting final results of IHC staining of such kind. Hence, we suggest that when available, the endoscopic material rather than the operative one should serve as the primary substrate for IHC staining.

  19. Endoscopic Sciatic Neurolysis.

    PubMed

    Knudsen, Joshua S; McConkey, Mark O; Brick, Matthew J

    2015-08-01

    Despite remaining a controversial diagnosis, piriformis syndrome continues to affect patients' quality of life with pain, sitting discomfort, and exercise intolerance. Open sciatic neurolysis has been noted by the senior author to often only bring temporary relief of the symptoms, with the recurrence presumably due to postoperative scar tissue. Minimally invasive techniques used to decompress the nerve have met with mixed results. This article describes a step-by-step surgical technique designed to maximize patient safety, as well as surgeon orientation, and achieve a thorough neurolysis. Preoperative findings suggestive of piriformis syndrome are described and include retro-trochanteric pain, sciatica-like leg pain, and paresthesias, as well as a positive response to computed tomography-guided injection of dilute ropivacaine hydrochloride and 40 mg of triamcinolone. The operation is performed with the patient in the lateral decubitus position through 2 portals 6 to 8 cm apart, allowing for good triangulation. Dissection is undertaken with a combination of radiofrequency and a laparoscopic peanut, with the assistance of a vascular sling to control the sciatic nerve. Encouraging results have been achieved, and with increasing interest in this procedure, a step-by-step technical description with an accompanying video may prove useful for other experienced hip arthroscopists. Pearls and pitfalls are discussed.

  20. Endoscopic Sciatic Neurolysis

    PubMed Central

    Knudsen, Joshua S.; McConkey, Mark O.; Brick, Matthew J.

    2015-01-01

    Despite remaining a controversial diagnosis, piriformis syndrome continues to affect patients' quality of life with pain, sitting discomfort, and exercise intolerance. Open sciatic neurolysis has been noted by the senior author to often only bring temporary relief of the symptoms, with the recurrence presumably due to postoperative scar tissue. Minimally invasive techniques used to decompress the nerve have met with mixed results. This article describes a step-by-step surgical technique designed to maximize patient safety, as well as surgeon orientation, and achieve a thorough neurolysis. Preoperative findings suggestive of piriformis syndrome are described and include retro-trochanteric pain, sciatica-like leg pain, and paresthesias, as well as a positive response to computed tomography–guided injection of dilute ropivacaine hydrochloride and 40 mg of triamcinolone. The operation is performed with the patient in the lateral decubitus position through 2 portals 6 to 8 cm apart, allowing for good triangulation. Dissection is undertaken with a combination of radiofrequency and a laparoscopic peanut, with the assistance of a vascular sling to control the sciatic nerve. Encouraging results have been achieved, and with increasing interest in this procedure, a step-by-step technical description with an accompanying video may prove useful for other experienced hip arthroscopists. Pearls and pitfalls are discussed. PMID:26759776

  1. Endoscopic palliation of tracheobronchial malignancies.

    PubMed Central

    Hetzel, M R; Smith, S G

    1991-01-01

    The prognosis for tracheobronchial tumours remains poor. Most patients can be offered only palliation. When the main symptom is breathlessness or refractory haemoptysis from a large airway tumour endoscopic treatment may be very effective. Over the last decade most attention has focused on the neodymium YAG laser. This often produces dramatic effects but has some important limitations. In the last few years better techniques for stenting and intrabronchial radiotherapy (brachytherapy) have also been developed. This article discusses the range of techniques now available and aims to help clinicians decide which patients may benefit from referral to centres providing these techniques. Images PMID:1712516

  2. Outcomes in Endoscopic Ear Surgery.

    PubMed

    Kiringoda, Ruwan; Kozin, Elliott D; Lee, Daniel J

    2016-10-01

    Endoscopic ear surgery (EES) provides several advantages compared with traditional binocular microscopy, including a wide-field view, improved resolution with high magnification, and visual access to hidden corridors of the middle ear. Although binocular microscopic-assisted surgical techniques remain the gold standard for most otologists, EES is slowly emerging as a viable alternative for performing otologic surgery at several centers in the United States and abroad. In this review, we evaluate the current body of literature regarding EES outcomes, summarize our EES outcomes at the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, and compare these results with data for microscopic-assisted otologic surgery.

  3. Transnasal ethmoidectomy under endoscopical control.

    PubMed

    Wigand, M E

    1981-03-01

    Endonasal sinus surgery aims at the preservation of a lining mucosa in the reventilated and redrained cavities. It can, therefore, be confined to the removal of narrowing bone at the "isthmus" of the ducts or windows. Transnasal ethmoidectomy for diffuse polyposis consists of the removal of the ethmoidal cell septa, including the middle turbinate, and a broad fenestration of both the sphenoid sinus and the frontal infundibulum. A consequent postoperative care provided, transnasal ethmoidectomy offers excellent clinical results. A new suction-irrigation endoscope and refined instruments contribute to improved surgical exposure and to the avoidance of complications.

  4. Diagnosis of follicular lymphoma of the gastrointestinal tract: A better initial diagnostic workup

    PubMed Central

    Iwamuro, Masaya; Kondo, Eisei; Takata, Katsuyoshi; Yoshino, Tadashi; Okada, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Due to an increasing incidence and more frequent recognition by endoscopists, gastrointestinal follicular lymphoma has been established as a variant of follicular lymphoma. However, due to its rarity, there are no established guidelines on the optimal diagnostic strategy for patients with primary gastrointestinal follicular lymphoma or secondary gastrointestinal involvement of systemic follicular lymphoma. This review offers an overview and pitfalls to avoid during the initial diagnostic workup of this disease entity. Previously reported case reports, case series, and retrospective studies are reviewed and focus on the disease’s endoscopic and histological features, the roles of computed tomography and positron emission tomography scanning, the clinical utility of the soluble interleukin-2 receptor, and the possible pathogenesis. PMID:26819532

  5. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy in emergency setting for patients receiving oral anticoagulants – practice updates

    PubMed Central

    Oprita, R; Oprita, B; Diaconescu, B; Bratu, MR; Berceanu, D

    2017-01-01

    Anticoagulants are frequently used medications in diverse cardiovascular diseases. Their uses highly increase the risk of bleeding from upper and lower gastrointestinal sources, whether there is a classic vitamin K antagonist or a novel oral anticoagulant. Their interruption can promote procoagulation status with different thromboembolic accidents. Discontinuation of oral anticoagulants before the elective procedures is standardized but there are no guidelines for managing bleeding lesions of upper gastrointestinal tract concomitant with anticoagulation. Also, because some of the anticoagulants are new comers, there is no specific antidote, and so their anticoagulation effect cannot be antagonized fast in order to reduce the bleeding. Therefore, the endoscopic hemostasis must be definitive and efficient. This is a short review of the current management for the bleeding lesions of the upper gastrointestinal tract in patients taking oral anticoagulants. PMID:28255372

  6. Hemostasis Achieved Endoscopically for Diverticular Bleeding from the Horizontal Portion of the Duodenum

    PubMed Central

    Matuso, Yasumasa; Yasuda, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Midori; Ishigooka, Shinya; Ozawa, Shun-ichiro; Yamashita, Masaki; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Itoh, Fumio

    2015-01-01

    Diverticulum of the horizontal portion of the duodenum is a rare cause of upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. Since it is difficult to access the horizontal portion of the duodenum by standard upper GI endoscopy, only a very few cases of endoscopic hemostasis have been reported. Herein, we report a case of diverticular bleeding from the horizontal portion of the duodenum for which hemostasis was achieved using a small-caliber colonoscope, which has an insertion part designed with a passive-bending function/high-force transmission and a transparent tip hood. PMID:26692767

  7. Endoscopic diagnosis and treatment of neuroendocrine tumors of the digestive system

    PubMed Central

    Telesca, Donato Alessandro; Ruggiero, Simona; Russo, Teresa; Amato, Maurizio; Bianco, Tommaso; Amato, Bruno; Formisano, Cesare; Avellino, Manuela; Napolitano, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The authors evaluated the role of endoscopic techniques in the diagnosis and in the potential treatment of neuroendocrine tumors (NET) localized in the gastro-entero-pancreatic system, on the basis of their experience and of the international literature. NET are rare tumors that arise from neuroendocrine cells of the gastrointestinal tract and pancreas. It is a possibility that both the digestive endoscopy and EUS play an important role in the diagnosis, staging and surveillance of this disease. In some cases, especially in the early stages, surgical endoscopy allows the treatment of such tumors. PMID:28352822

  8. Expanding Functionality of Commercial Optical Coherence Tomography Systems by Integrating a Custom Endoscope

    PubMed Central

    Welge, Weston A.; Barton, Jennifer K.

    2015-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a useful imaging modality for detecting and monitoring diseases of the gastrointestinal tract and other tubular structures. The non-destructiveness of OCT enables time-serial studies in animal models. While turnkey commercial research OCT systems are plenty, researchers often require custom imaging probes. We describe the integration of a custom endoscope with a commercial swept-source OCT system and generalize this description to any imaging probe and OCT system. A numerical dispersion compensation method is also described. Example images demonstrate that OCT can visualize the mouse colon crypt structure and detect adenoma in vivo. PMID:26418811

  9. Design of rigid GRIN-endoscope with sapphire window and improved image quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fluder, Grzegorz; Voznesenskaya, Anna; Bakholdin, Alexey

    2015-05-01

    The possibilities of using gradient index (GRIN) lenses as the objective and relay lens in rigid endoscopic systems working in visible spectrum are investigated. The final aim of the project is to obtain a system providing diffraction limited image quality, which could be used for examining the gastrointestinal tract. This paper describes steps of the design of the system with working distance equal to 125 mm and angular field of view 25°. The diameter of the GRIN lenses is equal to 2,2 mm. Influence of the gradient of refractive index on the image quality is shown. Current results are analysed and future steps are described.

  10. Hydrogen Sulfide Signaling in the Gastrointestinal Tract

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: The current literature regarding the effects of the gaseous signal molecule hydrogen sulfide (H2S) in the gastrointestinal system is reviewed. Bacterial, host and pharmaceutical-derived H2S are all considered and presented according to the physiological or pathophysiological effects of the gaseous signal molecule. These subjects include the toxicology of intestinal H2S with emphasis on bacterial-derived H2S, especially from sulfate-reducing bacteria, the role of endogenous and exogenous H2S in intestinal inflammation, and the roles of H2S in gastrointestinal motility, secretion and nociception. Recent Advances: While its pro- and anti-inflammatory, smooth muscle relaxant, prosecretory, and pro- and antinociceptive actions continue to remain the major effects of H2S in this system; recent findings have expanded the potential molecular targets for H2S in the gastrointestinal tract. Critical Issues: Numerous discrepancies remain in the literature, and definitive molecular targets in this system have not been supported by the use of competitive antagonism. Future Directions: Future work will hopefully resolve discrepancies in the literature and identify molecular targets and mechanisms of action for H2S. It is clear from the current literature that the long-appreciated relationship between H2S and the gastrointestinal tract continues to be strong as we endeavor to unravel its mysteries. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 818–830. PMID:23582008

  11. Endogenous and exogenous fluorescence of gastrointestinal tumors: initial clinical observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisova, Ekaterina; Plamenova, Lilia; Keremedchiev, Momchil; Vladimirov, Borislav; Avramov, Latchezar

    2013-03-01

    The limitations of standard endoscopy for detection and evaluation of cancerous changes in gastrointestinal tract (GIT) are significant challenge and initiate development of new diagnostic modalities. Therefore many spectral and optical techniques are applied recently into the clinical practice for obtaining qualitatively and quantitatively new data from gastrointestinal neoplasia with different level of clinical applicability and diagnostic success. One of the most promising approaches is fluorescence detection using naturally existing fluorescent molecules or added fluorescent markers. Deltaaminolevulinic acid / protoporphyrin IX is applied for exogenous fluorescent tumor detection in the upper part of gastrointestinal tract. The 5-ALA is administered per os six hours before measurements at dose 20mg/kg weight. Highpower light-emitting diode at 405 nm is used as a source and the excitation light is passed through the light-guide of standard video-endoscopic system to obtain 2-D visualization. Both kinds of spectra - autofluorescence signals and protoporphyrin IX signal are recorded and stored using a fiber-optic microspectrometer, as in endoscopy instrumental channel a fiber is applied to return information about fluorescence signals. In such way 1-D detection and 2-D visualization of the lesions' fluorescence are received. The results from in vivo detection show significant differentiation between normal and abnormal tissues in 1-D spectroscopic regime, but only moderate discrimination in 2-D imaging.

  12. Worker safety and glutaraldehyde in the gastrointestinal lab environment.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Nancy L; Patton, Carol M

    2006-01-01

    Glutaraldehyde is considered a high-level surgical disinfectant commonly used in the United States in gastrointestinal lab environments. Glutaraldehyde requires proper ventilation when used as glutaraldehyde vapors are known irritants to the skin, eyes, nose, and lungs without proper ventilation in the work environment. Vapor concentration is the unit of measurement for the environmental presence of glutaraldehyde. Safe levels of glutaraldehyde vapor concentrations are a significant issue in the work environment. The American Conference of Governmental Hygienists has established and reported safe and allowable limits for vapor concentration of glutaraldehyde. Unfortunately, uncontrolled glutaraldehyde exposure in selected work environments is contributing to occupational asthma. Environmental exposure to glutaraldehyde has been linked to respiratory sensitization of the workers exposed and suggests the need for safe work environments anywhere glutaraldehyde is in use. Gastrointestinal labs use high-level disinfectants like glutaraldehyde to safely and thoroughly disinfect endoscopic instruments and accessories; however, there are worker-safety considerations relevant to glutaraldehyde use. The purpose of this article is to identify and describe clinical issues and challenges associated with worker safety and proper ventilation of glutaraldehyde in a gastrointestinal environment. A multidisciplinary problem-solving approach for use in identification and intervention for glutaraldehyde exposure and safety recommendations related to glutaraldehyde use as a high-level disinfectant in one gastroenterology lab environment will be highlighted.

  13. Risk of transmission of carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae and related “superbugs” during gastrointestinal endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Muscarella, Lawrence F

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the risk of transmission of carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) and their related superbugs during gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy. Reports of outbreaks linked to GI endoscopes contaminated with different types of infectious agents, including CRE and their related superbugs, were reviewed. Published during the past 30 years, both prior to and since CRE’s emergence, these reports were obtained by searching the peer-reviewed medical literature (via the United States National Library of Medicine’s “MEDLINE” database); the Food and Drug Administration’s Manufacturer and User Facility Device Experience database, or “MAUDE”; and the Internet (via Google’s search engine). This review focused on an outbreak of CRE in 2013 following the GI endoscopic procedure known as endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, or ERCP, performed at “Hospital X” located in the suburbs of Chicago (IL; United States). Part of the largest outbreak of CRE in United States history, the infection and colonization of 10 and 28 of this hospital’s patients, respectively, received considerable media attention and was also investigated by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), which published a report about this outbreak in Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR), in 2014. This report, along with the results of an independent inspection of Hospital X’s infection control practices following this CRE outbreak, were also reviewed. While this article focuses primarily on the prevention of transmissions of CRE and their related superbugs in the GI endoscopic setting, some of its discussion and recommendations may also apply to other healthcare settings, to other types of flexible endoscopes, and to other types of transmissible infectious agents. This review found that GI endoscopy is an important risk factor for the transmission of CRE and their related superbugs, having been recently associated with patient morbidity and mortality

  14. Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Drainage of Intra-Abdominal Abscess after Gastric Perforation in a Patient Receiving Ramucirumab and Paclitaxel for Advanced Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Mandai, Koichiro; Shirakawa, Atsushi; Uno, Koji; Yasuda, Kenjiro

    2017-01-01

    Gastrointestinal perforation is a serious adverse event that occurs in approximately 1% of patients receiving ramucirumab and paclitaxel. A 67-year-old man with unresectable advanced gastric cancer was admitted to our hospital and treated with ramucirumab and paclitaxel. Gastric perforation occurred during the second cycle of chemotherapy. Although the patient's condition improved without surgery, an abscess developed in t