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Sample records for gastrointestinal endoscopy asge

  1. Gastrointestinal endoscopy in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Savas, Nurten

    2014-11-07

    Gastrointestinal endoscopy has a major diagnostic and therapeutic role in most gastrointestinal disorders; however, limited information is available about clinical efficacy and safety in pregnant patients. The major risks of endoscopy during pregnancy include potential harm to the fetus because of hypoxia, premature labor, trauma and teratogenesis. In some cases, endoscopic procedures may be postponed until after delivery. When emergency or urgent indications are present, endoscopic procedures may be considered with some precautions. United States Food and Drug Administration category B drugs may be used in low doses. Endoscopic procedures during pregnancy may include upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy, sigmoidoscopy, colonoscopy, enteroscopy of the small bowel or video capsule endoscopy, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography and endoscopic ultrasonography. All gastrointestinal endoscopic procedures in pregnant patients should be performed in hospitals by expert endoscopists and an obstetrician should be informed about all endoscopic procedures. The endoscopy and flexible sigmoidoscopy may be safe for the fetus and pregnant patient, and may be performed during pregnancy when strong indications are present. Colonoscopy for pregnant patients may be considered for strong indications during the second trimester. Although therapeutic endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography may be considered during pregnancy, this procedure should be performed only for strong indications and attempts should be made to minimize radiation exposure.

  2. Gastrointestinal endoscopy in pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Savas, Nurten

    2014-01-01

    Gastrointestinal endoscopy has a major diagnostic and therapeutic role in most gastrointestinal disorders; however, limited information is available about clinical efficacy and safety in pregnant patients. The major risks of endoscopy during pregnancy include potential harm to the fetus because of hypoxia, premature labor, trauma and teratogenesis. In some cases, endoscopic procedures may be postponed until after delivery. When emergency or urgent indications are present, endoscopic procedures may be considered with some precautions. United States Food and Drug Administration category B drugs may be used in low doses. Endoscopic procedures during pregnancy may include upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy, sigmoidoscopy, colonoscopy, enteroscopy of the small bowel or video capsule endoscopy, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography and endoscopic ultrasonography. All gastrointestinal endoscopic procedures in pregnant patients should be performed in hospitals by expert endoscopists and an obstetrician should be informed about all endoscopic procedures. The endoscopy and flexible sigmoidoscopy may be safe for the fetus and pregnant patient, and may be performed during pregnancy when strong indications are present. Colonoscopy for pregnant patients may be considered for strong indications during the second trimester. Although therapeutic endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography may be considered during pregnancy, this procedure should be performed only for strong indications and attempts should be made to minimize radiation exposure. PMID:25386072

  3. ASGE Bariatric Endoscopy Task Force systematic review and meta-analysis assessing the ASGE PIVI thresholds for adopting endoscopic bariatric therapies.

    PubMed

    Abu Dayyeh, Barham K; Kumar, Nitin; Edmundowicz, Steven A; Jonnalagadda, Sreenivasa; Larsen, Michael; Sullivan, Shelby; Thompson, Christopher C; Banerjee, Subhas

    2015-09-01

    The increasing global burden of obesity and its associated comorbidities has created an urgent need for additional treatment options to fight this pandemic. Endoscopic bariatric therapies (EBTs) provide an effective and minimally invasive treatment approach to obesity that would increase treatment options beyond surgery, medications, and lifestyle measures. This systematic review and meta-analysis were performed by the American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ASGE) Bariatric Endoscopy Task Force comprising experts in the subject area and the ASGE Technology Committee Chair to specifically assess whether acceptable performance thresholds outlined by an ASGE Preservation and Incorporation of Valuable endoscopic Innovations (PIVI) document for clinical adoption of available EBTs have been met. After conducting a comprehensive search of several English-language databases, we performed direct meta-analyses by using random-effects models to assess whether the Orbera intragastric balloon (IGB) (Apollo Endosurgery, Austin, Tex) and the EndoBarrier duodenal-jejunal bypass sleeve (DJBS) (GI Dynamics, Lexington, Mass) have met the PIVI thresholds. The meta-analyses results indicate that the Orbera IGB meets the PIVI thresholds for both primary and nonprimary bridge obesity therapy. Based on a meta-analysis of 17 studies including 1683 patients, the percentage of excess weight loss (%EWL) with the Orbera IGB at 12 months was 25.44% (95% confidence interval [CI], 21.47%-29.41%) (random model) with a mean difference in %EWL over controls of 26.9% (95% CI, 15.66%-38.24%; P ≤ .01) in 3 randomized, controlled trials. Furthermore, the pooled percentage of total body weight loss (% TBWL) after Orbera IGB implantation was 12.3% (95% CI, 7.9%–16.73%), 13.16% (95% CI, 12.37%–13.95%), and 11.27% (95% CI, 8.17%–14.36%) at 3, 6, and 12 months after implantation, respectively, thus exceeding the PIVI threshold of 5% TBWL for nonprimary (bridge) obesity therapy. With the data

  4. Blood thinners and gastrointestinal endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Monjur

    2016-01-01

    As the number of diagnostic and therapeutic gastrointestinal endoscopies is increasing, and there is an increase in number of patients taking blood thinners, we are seeing more and more patients on blood thinners prior to endoscopic procedures. Gastrointestinal bleeding or thromboembolism can occur in this category of patients in the periendoscopic period. To better manage these patients, endoscopists should have a clear concept about the various blood thinners in the market. Patients’ risk of thromboembolism off anticoagulation, and the risk of bleeding from endoscopic procedures should be assessed prior to endoscopy. The endoscopic procedure should be done when it is safe to do it. PMID:27668068

  5. Advances in upper gastrointestinal endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Graham, David G.; Banks, Matthew R.

    2015-01-01

    The rapidly moving technological advances in gastrointestinal endoscopy have enhanced an endoscopist’s ability to diagnose and treat lesions within the gastrointestinal tract. The improvement in image quality created by the advent of high-definition and magnification endoscopy, alongside image enhancement, produces images of superb quality and detail that empower the endoscopist to identify important lesions that have previously been undetectable. Additionally, we are now seeing technologies emerge, such as optical coherence tomography and confocal laser endomicroscopy, that allow the endoscopist to visualize individual cells on a microscopic level and provide a real time, in vivo histological assessment. Within this article we discuss these technologies, as well as some of the results from their early use in clinical studies. PMID:26918137

  6. Gastrointestinal endoscopy: infection and disinfection.

    PubMed Central

    O'Connor, H J; Axon, A T

    1983-01-01

    The past decade has seen the development of an array of complex flexible fibreoptic instruments for gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy, and an increasing use of these for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. It has been recognised more recently that the use of contaminated endoscopic equipment can lead to serious and occasionally fatal infections. Infection with a wide variety of micro-organisms has been reported following oesophago-gastroduodenoscopy (OGD) and endoscopic retrograde cholangio-pancreatography (ERCP). PMID:6414894

  7. Complications in gastrointestinal endoscopy: a summary at the first international symposium in Hannover 2009.

    PubMed

    Meier, P N

    2011-10-01

    Following the recent success of the Second International Symposium on Complications in Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (17-18 June 2011, Hannover, Germany), it would be worth reminding ourselves of the key points and highlights of the first symposium held in Hannover in June 2009. The congress, which is endorsed by the American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ASGE) under the patronage of the European Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE), is designed to bring together endoscopists and support staff to present and discuss the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of complications associated with gastrointestinal endoscopy, including effective communication strategies and management in particular patient groups. This current report is a brief summary of topics discussed at the inaugural symposium in 2009.

  8. American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy

    MedlinePlus

    ... EDUCATION EndoFest Digestive Disease Week Online Learning Center STAR Certificate Programs Maintenance of Certification (MOC) Course Calendar ... 2-3, ASGE IT&T Lower GI EMR STAR Certificate Program February 11-12, 2017 MORE Latest ...

  9. Clinical Endoscopy as One of Leading Journals in Gastrointestinal Endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Kwang An; Choi, Il Ju; Ryu, Ji Kon; Kim, Eun Young

    2015-01-01

    Clinical Endoscopy (CE) is an official open access journal published bimonthly by the Korean Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (KSGE, http://www.gie.or.kr) and is listed on PMC, PubMed and SCOPUS. The KSGE was established on August 14, 1976, and the journal of the KSGE was published in Korean for the first time in November 1981. The journal was then titled the "Korean Journal of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy" and was published in Korean untill the July 2011 issue. The journal was published in English from the September 2011 issue under the official title of CE. In this review, the past and present of CE are discussed and future perspectives are introduced. In addition, the efforts to progress to a "first come, first served journal" in the field of gastrointestinal endoscopy and to be indexed in Science Citation Index will be described. PMID:26240805

  10. Ketamine Sedation in Gastrointestinal Endoscopy in Children

    PubMed Central

    Eskander, Ayman E.; Baroudy, Nevine R. El; Refay, Amira S. El

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Moderate sedation for gastrointestinal endoscopy has traditionally been provided by the endoscopist. Controversy has ensued over safe and efficient sedation practice as endoscopy has increased in numbers and complexity. AIM: To evaluate the safety of ketamine sedation given by non-anesthesiologist during gastrointestinal endoscopy in children. METHODS: A prospective study of 100 paediatric patients with gastrointestinal symptoms who were a candidate for upper or lower gastrointestinal endoscopy in paediatric endoscopy unit at Abo El-Reesh Paediatric Hospital, Cairo University. All children were > 2 years old and weighed > 6 kg. The analysis was performed in terms of sedation-related complications. RESULTS: A total 100 paediatric patients including 53 males and 47 females with mean age of 5.04 years were involved in the study. All children were medicated with ketamine with a mean dose of 3.77mg/kg. No complications occurred in 87% of cases. Desaturation occurred in 13% of the cases and was reversible by supplemental nasal oxygen. Desaturation was more frequent during Upper GI Endoscopy and with the intramuscular route (p value=0.049). No apnea, bradycardia, arrest or emergence reactions were recorded. CONCLUSION: Ketamine sedation found to be safe for paediatric gastrointestinal endoscopy in Egyptian children without co-morbidities. Transient Hypoxia (13%) may occur but easily reversed by nasal oxygen therapy. PMID:27703561

  11. Colon capsule endoscopy: European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) Guideline.

    PubMed

    Spada, C; Hassan, C; Galmiche, J P; Neuhaus, H; Dumonceau, J M; Adler, S; Epstein, O; Gay, G; Pennazio, M; Rex, D K; Benamouzig, R; de Franchis, R; Delvaux, M; Devière, J; Eliakim, R; Fraser, C; Hagenmuller, F; Herrerias, J M; Keuchel, M; Macrae, F; Munoz-Navas, M; Ponchon, T; Quintero, E; Riccioni, M E; Rondonotti, E; Marmo, R; Sung, J J; Tajiri, H; Toth, E; Triantafyllou, K; Van Gossum, A; Costamagna, G

    2012-05-01

    PillCam colon capsule endoscopy (CCE) is an innovative noninvasive, and painless ingestible capsule technique that allows exploration of the colon without the need for sedation and gas insufflation. Although it is already available in European and other countries, the clinical indications for CCE as well as the reporting and work-up of detected findings have not yet been standardized. The aim of this evidence-based and consensus-based guideline, commissioned by the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) is to furnish healthcare providers with a comprehensive framework for potential implementation of this technique in a clinical setting.

  12. Training the gastrointestinal endoscopy trainer.

    PubMed

    Waschke, Kevin A; Anderson, John; Macintosh, Donald; Valori, Roland M

    2016-06-01

    Endoscopy training has traditionally been accomplished by an informal process in the endoscopy unit that parallels apprenticeship training seen in other areas of professional education. Subsequent to an audit, a series of interventions were implemented in the English National Health Service to support both service delivery and to improve endoscopy training. The resulting training centers deliver a variety of hands-on endoscopy courses, established in parallel with the roll out of a colon cancer screening program that monitors and documents quality outcomes among endoscopists. The program developed a 'training the trainer' module that subsequently became known as the Training the Colonoscopy Trainer course (TCT). Several years after its implementation, colonoscopy quality outcomes in the UK have improved substantially. The core TCT program has spread to other countries with demonstration of a marked impact on endoscopy training and performance. The aim of this chapter is to describe the principles that underlie effective endoscopy training in this program using the TCT as an example. While the review focuses on the specific example of colonoscopy training, the approach is generic to the teaching of any technical skill; it has been successfully transferred to the teaching of laparoscopic surgery as well as other endoscopic techniques.

  13. Appropriateness of outpatient gastrointestinal endoscopy in a non-academic hospital

    PubMed Central

    Mangualde, João; Cremers, Marie I; Vieira, Ana M; Freire, Ricardo; Gamito, Élia; Lobato, Cristina; Alves, Ana L; Augusto, Fátima; Oliveira, Ana P

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To assess the appropriate use and the diagnostic yield of upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and colonoscopy in this subgroup of patients. METHODS: In total, 789 consecutive outpatients referred for gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy [381 for esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) and 408 for colonoscopy] were prospectively enrolled in the study. The American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ASGE) guidelines were used to assess the relationship between appropriateness and the presence of relevant endoscopic findings. RESULTS: The overall inappropriate rate was 13.3%. The indications for EGD and colonoscopy were, respectively, appropriate in 82.7% and 82.6% of the exams, uncertain in 5.8% and 2.4% and inappropriate in 11.5% and 15%. The diagnostic yield was significant higher for EGDs and colonoscopies judged appropriate and uncertain when compared with those considered inappropriate (EGD: 36.6% vs 36.4% vs 11.4%, P = 0.004; Colonoscopy: 24.3% vs 20.0% vs 3.3%, P = 0.001). Of the 25 malignant lesions detected, all but one was detected in exams judged appropriate or uncertain. CONCLUSION: This study shows a good adherence to ASGE guidelines by the referring physicians and a significant increase of the diagnostic yield in appropriate examinations, namely in detecting neoplastic lesions. It underscores the importance that the appropriateness of the indication assumes in assuring high-quality GI endoscopic procedures. PMID:22013500

  14. Leadership and team building in gastrointestinal endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Valori, Roland M; Johnston, Deborah J

    2016-06-01

    A modern endoscopy service delivers high volume procedures that can be daunting, embarrassing and uncomfortable for patients [1]. Endoscopy is hugely beneficial to patients but only if it is performed to high standards [2]. Some consequences of poor quality endoscopy include worse outcomes for cancer and gastrointestinal bleeding, unnecessary repeat procedures, needless damage to patients and even avoidable death [3]. New endoscopy technology and more rigorous decontamination procedures have made endoscopy more effective and safer, but they have placed additional demands on the service. Ever-scarcer resources require more efficient, higher turnover of patients, which can be at odds with a good patient experience, and with quality and safety. It is clear from the demands put upon it, that to deliver a modern endoscopy service requires effective leadership and team working [4]. This chapter explores what constitutes effective leadership and what makes great clinical teams. It makes the point that endoscopy services are not usually isolated, independent units, and as such are dependent for success on the organisations they sit within. It will explain how endoscopy services are affected by the wider policy and governance context. Finally, within the context of the collection of papers in this edition of Best Practice & Research: Clinical Gastroenterology, it explores the potentially conflicting relationship between training of endoscopists and service delivery. The effectiveness of leadership and teams is rarely the subject of classic experimental designs such as randomized controlled trials. Nevertheless there is a substantial literature on this subject within and particularly outside healthcare [5]. The authors draw on this wider, more diffuse literature and on their experience of delivering a Team Leadership Programme (TLP) to the leaders of 70 endoscopy teams during the period 2008-2012. (Team Leadership Programme Link-http://www.qsfh.co.uk/Page.aspx?PageId=Public).

  15. Virtual reality simulators for gastrointestinal endoscopy training

    PubMed Central

    Triantafyllou, Konstantinos; Lazaridis, Lazaros Dimitrios; Dimitriadis, George D

    2014-01-01

    The use of simulators as educational tools for medical procedures is spreading rapidly and many efforts have been made for their implementation in gastrointestinal endoscopy training. Endoscopy simulation training has been suggested for ascertaining patient safety while positively influencing the trainees’ learning curve. Virtual simulators are the most promising tool among all available types of simulators. These integrated modalities offer a human-like endoscopy experience by combining virtual images of the gastrointestinal tract and haptic realism with using a customized endoscope. From their first steps in the 1980s until today, research involving virtual endoscopic simulators can be divided in two categories: investigation of the impact of virtual simulator training in acquiring endoscopy skills and measuring competence. Emphasis should also be given to the financial impact of their implementation in endoscopy, including the cost of these state-of-the-art simulators and the potential economic benefits from their usage. Advances in technology will contribute to the upgrade of existing models and the development of new ones; while further research should be carried out to discover new fields of application. PMID:24527175

  16. Gastrointestinal endoscopy in the pregnant woman

    PubMed Central

    Friedel, David; Stavropoulos, Stavros; Iqbal, Shahzad; Cappell, Mitchell S

    2014-01-01

    About 20000 gastrointestinal endoscopies are performed annually in America in pregnant women. Gastrointestinal endoscopy during pregnancy raises the critical issue of fetal safety in addition to patient safety. Endoscopic medications may be potentially abortifacient or teratogenic. Generally, Food and Drug Administration category B or C drugs should be used for endoscopy. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) seems to be relatively safe for both mother and fetus based on two retrospective studies of 83 and 60 pregnant patients. The diagnostic yield is about 95% when EGD is performed for gastrointestinal bleeding. EGD indications during pregnancy include acute gastrointestinal bleeding, dysphagia > 1 wk, or endoscopic therapy. Therapeutic EGD is experimental due to scant data, but should be strongly considered for urgent indications such as active bleeding. One study of 48 sigmoidoscopies performed during pregnancy showed relatively favorable fetal outcomes, rare bad fetal outcomes, and bad outcomes linked to very sick mothers. Sigmoidoscopy should be strongly considered for strong indications, including significant acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding, chronic diarrhea, distal colonic stricture, suspected inflammatory bowel disease flare, and potential colonic malignancy. Data on colonoscopy during pregnancy are limited. One study of 20 pregnant patients showed rare poor fetal outcomes. Colonoscopy is generally experimental during pregnancy, but can be considered for strong indications: known colonic mass/stricture, active lower gastrointestinal bleeding, or colonoscopic therapy. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) entails fetal risks from fetal radiation exposure. ERCP risks to mother and fetus appear to be acceptable when performed for ERCP therapy, as demonstrated by analysis of nearly 350 cases during pregnancy. Justifiable indications include symptomatic or complicated choledocholithiasis, manifested by jaundice, cholangitis, gallstone

  17. Guidelines for Safety in the Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Unit

    PubMed Central

    Calderwood, Audrey H.; Chapman, Frank J.; Cohen, Jonathan; Cohen, Lawrence B.; Collins, James; Day, Lukejohn W.; Early, Dayna S.

    2014-01-01

    EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Historically, safety in the gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy unit has focused on infection control, particularly around the reprocessing of endoscopes. Two highly publicized outbreaks where the transmission of infectious agents were related to GI endoscopy have highlighted the need to address potential gaps along the endoscopy care continuum that could impact patient safety. PMID:24485393

  18. Inhaled sevoflurane for lower gastrointestinal endoscopy with possible propofol anaphylaxis

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Ling; Liu, Yun-Fei; Zhu, Tao

    2014-01-01

    Sedation with propofol is widely used for the outpatient examination. Although anaphylaxis to propofol is rare, there were some reports of anaphylaxis following propofol administration. We present a case of female patient under sedation for lower gastrointestinal endoscopy with possible propofol anaphylaxis. Then sevoflurane was successfully used for the examination and the following surgery. We discussed the possible feasibility of sevoflurane for the examination of lower gastrointestinal endoscopy. Propofol is widely used for the sedation of outpatient with lower gastrointestinal endoscopy. But it may cause some allergic reaction. Inhaled sevoflurane may provide a satisfactory and safe alternative for adult outpatients’ endoscopy. PMID:25419408

  19. European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy - Establishing the key unanswered research questions within gastrointestinal endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Rees, Colin J; Ngu, Wee Sing; Regula, Jaroslaw; Bisschops, Raf; Saftoiu, Adrian; Dekker, Evelien; Gralnek, Ian; Ciocirlan, Mihai; Dinis-Ribeiro, Mario; Jover, Rodrigo; Meisner, Søren; Spada, Cristiano; Hassan, Cesare; Valori, Roland; Hucl, Tomas; Le Moine, Olivier; Domagk, Dirk; Kaminski, Michal F; Bretthauer, Michael; Rutter, Matthew D; Aabakken, Lars; Ponchon, Thierry; Fockens, Paul; Siersema, Peter D

    2016-10-01

    Background and study aim: Gastrointestinal endoscopy is a rapidly evolving research field. The European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) plays a key role in shaping opinion and endoscopy activity throughout Europe and further afield. Establishing key unanswered questions within the field of endoscopy and prioritizing those that are important enables researchers and funders to appropriately allocate resources. Methods: Over 2 years, the ESGE Research Committee gathered information on research priorities and refined them through a modified Delphi approach. Consultations were held with the ESGE Governing Board and Quality Improvement Committee to identify important unanswered questions. Research workshops were held at the 21st United European Gastroenterology Week. Research questions were refined by the ESGE Research Committee and Governing Board, compiled into an online survey, and distributed to all ESGE members, who were invited to rank each question by priority. Results: The final questionnaire yielded 291 responses from over 60 countries. The three countries with the highest response rates were Spain, Italy, and United Kingdom. Most responders were from teaching hospitals (62 %) and were specialist endoscopists (51 %). Responses were analyzed with weighted rankings, resulting in prioritization of 26 key unanswered questions. The top ranked generic questions were: 1) How do we define the correct surveillance interval following endoscopic diagnosis? 2) How do we correctly utilize advanced endoscopic imaging? 3) What are the best markers of endoscopy quality? Conclusion: Following this comprehensive process, the ESGE has identified and ranked the key unanswered questions within the field of gastrointestinal endoscopy. Researchers, funders, and journals should prioritize studies that seek to answer these important questions.

  20. Reporting systems in gastrointestinal endoscopy: Requirements and standards facilitating quality improvement: European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy position statement.

    PubMed

    Bretthauer, Michael; Aabakken, Lars; Dekker, Evelien; Kaminski, Michal F; Rösch, Thomas; Hultcrantz, Rolf; Suchanek, Stepan; Jover, Rodrigo; Kuipers, Ernst J; Bisschops, Raf; Spada, Cristiano; Valori, Roland; Domagk, Dirk; Rees, Colin; Rutter, Matthew D

    2016-04-01

    To develop standards for high quality of gastrointestinal endoscopy, the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) has established the ESGE Quality Improvement Committee. A prerequisite for quality assurance and improvement for all gastrointestinal endoscopy procedures is state-of-the-art integrated digital reporting systems for standardized documentation of the procedures. The current paper describes the ESGE's viewpoints on requirements for high-quality endoscopy reporting systems. The following recommendations are issued: Endoscopy reporting systems must be electronic.Endoscopy reporting systems should be integrated into hospital patient record systems.Endoscopy reporting systems should include patient identifiers to facilitate data linkage to other data sources.Endoscopy reporting systems shall restrict the use of free text entry to a minimum, and be based mainly on structured data entry.Separate entry of data for quality or research purposes is discouraged. Automatic data transfer for quality and research purposes must be facilitated.Double entry of data by the endoscopist or associate personnel is discouraged. Available data from outside sources (administrative or medical) must be made available automatically.Endoscopy reporting systems shall enable the inclusion of information on histopathology of detected lesions; patient's satisfaction; adverse events; surveillance recommendations.Endoscopy reporting systems must facilitate easy data retrieval at any time in a universally compatible format.Endoscopy reporting systems must include data fields for key performance indicators as defined by quality improvement committees.Endoscopy reporting systems must facilitate changes in indicators and data entry fields as required by professional organizations.

  1. Requirements and standards facilitating quality improvement for reporting systems in gastrointestinal endoscopy: European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) Position Statement.

    PubMed

    Bretthauer, Michael; Aabakken, Lars; Dekker, Evelien; Kaminski, Michal F; Rösch, Thomas; Hultcrantz, Rolf; Suchanek, Stepan; Jover, Rodrigo; Kuipers, Ernst J; Bisschops, Raf; Spada, Cristiano; Valori, Roland; Domagk, Dirk; Rees, Colin; Rutter, Matthew D

    2016-03-01

    To develop standards for high quality in gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy, the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) has established the ESGE Quality Improvement Committee. A prerequisite for quality assurance and improvement for all GI endoscopy procedures is state-of-the-art integrated digital reporting systems for standardized documentation of the procedures. The current paper describes the ESGE's viewpoints on the requirements for high-quality endoscopy reporting systems in GI endoscopy. Recommendations 1 Endoscopy reporting systems must be electronic. 2 Endoscopy reporting systems should be integrated into hospitals' patient record systems. 3 Endoscopy reporting systems should include patient identifiers to facilitate data linkage to other data sources. 4 Endoscopy reporting systems shall restrict the use of free-text entry to a minimum, and be based mainly on structured data entry. 5 Separate entry of data for quality or research purposes is discouraged. Automatic data transfer for quality and research purposes must be facilitated. 6 Double entry of data by the endoscopist or associate personnel is discouraged. Available data from outside sources (administrative or medical) must be made available automatically. 7 Endoscopy reporting systems shall facilitate the inclusion of information on histopathology of detected lesions, patient satisfaction, adverse events, and surveillance recommendations. 8 Endoscopy reporting systems must facilitate easy data retrieval at any time in a universally compatible format. 9 Endoscopy reporting systems must include data fields for key performance indicators as defined by quality improvement committees. 10 Endoscopy reporting systems must facilitate changes in indicators and data entry fields as required by professional organizations.

  2. Optimizing early upper gastrointestinal cancer detection at endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Veitch, Andrew M; Uedo, Noriya; Yao, Kenshi; East, James E

    2015-11-01

    Survival rates for upper gastrointestinal cancers are poor and oesophageal cancer incidence is increasing. Upper gastrointestinal cancer is also often missed during examinations; a predicament that has not yet been sufficiently addressed. Improvements in the detection of premalignant lesions, early oesophageal and gastric cancers will enable organ-preserving endoscopic therapy, potentially reducing the number of advanced upper gastrointestinal cancers and resulting in improved prognosis. Japan is a world leader in high-quality diagnostic upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and the clinical routine in this country differs substantially from Western practice. In this Perspectives article, we review lessons learnt from Japanese gastroscopy technique, training and screening for risk stratification. We suggest a key performance indicator for upper gastrointestinal endoscopy with a minimum total procedure time of 8 min, and examine how quality assurance concepts in bowel cancer screening in the UK could be applied to upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and improve clinical practice.

  3. Sedation and Monitoring in the Pediatric Patient during Gastrointestinal Endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Chung, Hyun Kee; Lightdale, Jenifer R

    2016-07-01

    Sedation is a fundamental component of pediatric gastrointestinal procedures. The 2 main types of sedation for pediatric endoscopy remain general anesthesia and procedural sedation. Although anesthesiologist-administered sedation protocols are more common, there is no ideal regimen for endoscopy in children. This article discusses specific levels of sedation for endoscopy as well as various regimens that can be used to achieve each. Risks and considerations that may be specific to performing gastrointestinal procedures in children are reviewed. Finally, potential future directions for sedation and monitoring that may change the practice of pediatric gastroenterology and ultimately patient outcomes are examined.

  4. Reporting systems in gastrointestinal endoscopy: Requirements and standards facilitating quality improvement: European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy position statement

    PubMed Central

    Aabakken, Lars; Dekker, Evelien; Kaminski, Michal F; Rösch, Thomas; Hultcrantz, Rolf; Suchanek, Stepan; Jover, Rodrigo; Kuipers, Ernst J; Bisschops, Raf; Spada, Cristiano; Valori, Roland; Domagk, Dirk; Rees, Colin; Rutter, Matthew D

    2016-01-01

    To develop standards for high quality of gastrointestinal endoscopy, the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) has established the ESGE Quality Improvement Committee. A prerequisite for quality assurance and improvement for all gastrointestinal endoscopy procedures is state-of-the-art integrated digital reporting systems for standardized documentation of the procedures. The current paper describes the ESGE’s viewpoints on requirements for high-quality endoscopy reporting systems. The following recommendations are issued: Endoscopy reporting systems must be electronic.Endoscopy reporting systems should be integrated into hospital patient record systems.Endoscopy reporting systems should include patient identifiers to facilitate data linkage to other data sources.Endoscopy reporting systems shall restrict the use of free text entry to a minimum, and be based mainly on structured data entry.Separate entry of data for quality or research purposes is discouraged. Automatic data transfer for quality and research purposes must be facilitated.Double entry of data by the endoscopist or associate personnel is discouraged. Available data from outside sources (administrative or medical) must be made available automatically.Endoscopy reporting systems shall enable the inclusion of information on histopathology of detected lesions; patient’s satisfaction; adverse events; surveillance recommendations.Endoscopy reporting systems must facilitate easy data retrieval at any time in a universally compatible format.Endoscopy reporting systems must include data fields for key performance indicators as defined by quality improvement committees.Endoscopy reporting systems must facilitate changes in indicators and data entry fields as required by professional organizations. PMID:27087943

  5. Therapeutic upper gastrointestinal tract endoscopy in Paediatric Gastroenterology

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Imdadur; Patel, Praful; Boger, Philip; Rasheed, Shahnawaz; Thomson, Mike; Afzal, Nadeem Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Since the first report of use of endoscopy in children in the 1970s, there has seen an exponential growth in published experience and innovation in the field. In this review article we focus on modern age therapeutic endoscopy practice, explaining use of traditional as well as new and innovative techniques, for diagnosis and treatment of diseases in the paediatric upper gastrointestinal tract. PMID:25789087

  6. [Future perspective of gastrointestinal 'intelligent' endoscopy].

    PubMed

    Konishi, Kozo; Hashizume, Makoto

    2010-07-01

    Although the flexible endoscopy has been widely used in the medical field for many years, there is still great potential in improving the endoscopist's capability to perform therapeutic tasks. The application of flexible endoscopy tools for natural orifice translumenal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) is constrained due to limitations in dexterity, instrument insertion, navigation, visualization, and retraction. Miniature endolumenal robots can mitigate these constraints by providing a stable platform for visualization and dexterous manipulation. In this paper, we describe the high-functioned 'intelligent' endoscopic surgery system with navigation. This system has equipped with accurate master-slave manipulation micro arms which can be used in tandem with a conventional flexible endoscope. The system also has an integrated ultrasound probe and high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) applicator. With the continued development of the techniques and technology of intelligent endoscopy, innovative minimally invasive personalized therapy may realize.

  7. Quality assurance in gastrointestinal endoscopy: An Egyptian experience.

    PubMed

    Gado, Ahmed S; Ebeid, Basel A; Axon, Anthony T

    2016-12-01

    Over the last four decades, gastrointestinal endoscopy has become of paramount importance to diagnose, treat and prevent diseases of the digestive tract. Practice variation, however, is likely to have an important effect on the effectiveness of endoscopy and can impair the delivery of high-quality endoscopic procedures. There have been increasing demands to assess the quality of service and track and improve patient outcomes. Quality assurance has paved its way into professional guidelines for physicians. Developing a modern endoscopy unit demands the institution of a quality assurance programme, continuous training and monitoring of service delivery. This article describes our experience in implementing a quality assurance programme in endoscopy in a secondary care government hospital in Egypt. The implementation of quality assurance and improvement programme can lead to dramatic improvements in the quality of endoscopic care and patient outcomes. Quality assurance and continual improvement can be applied in developing countries.

  8. Upper gastrointestinal fiberoptic endoscopy in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Prolla, J C; Diehl, A S; Bemvenuti, G A; Loguercio, S V; Magalhães, D S; Silveira, T R

    1983-11-01

    Upper gastrointestinal fiberendoscopy in pediatric patients is done safely and under local anesthesia in most instances. This study of 47 children confirmed the value of fiberendoscopy in establishing the etiology of upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage and the presence of esophageal varices. It also contributed significantly to the management of patients with disphagia, pyrosis, epigastric pain, and ingestion of foreign bodies. No significant morbidity was caused.

  9. Sedation in gastrointestinal endoscopy: Current issues

    PubMed Central

    Triantafillidis, John K; Merikas, Emmanuel; Nikolakis, Dimitrios; Papalois, Apostolos E

    2013-01-01

    Diagnostic and therapeutic endoscopy can successfully be performed by applying moderate (conscious) sedation. Moderate sedation, using midazolam and an opioid, is the standard method of sedation, although propofol is increasingly being used in many countries because the satisfaction of endoscopists with propofol sedation is greater compared with their satisfaction with conventional sedation. Moreover, the use of propofol is currently preferred for the endoscopic sedation of patients with advanced liver disease due to its short biologic half-life and, consequently, its low risk of inducing hepatic encephalopathy. In the future, propofol could become the preferred sedation agent, especially for routine colonoscopy. Midazolam is the benzodiazepine of choice because of its shorter duration of action and better pharmacokinetic profile compared with diazepam. Among opioids, pethidine and fentanyl are the most popular. A number of other substances have been tested in several clinical trials with promising results. Among them, newer opioids, such as remifentanil, enable a faster recovery. The controversy regarding the administration of sedation by an endoscopist or an experienced nurse, as well as the optimal staffing of endoscopy units, continues to be a matter of discussion. Safe sedation in special clinical circumstances, such as in the cases of obese, pregnant, and elderly individuals, as well as patients with chronic lung, renal or liver disease, requires modification of the dose of the drugs used for sedation. In the great majority of patients, sedation under the supervision of a properly trained endoscopist remains the standard practice worldwide. In this review, an overview of the current knowledge concerning sedation during digestive endoscopy will be provided based on the data in the current literature. PMID:23382625

  10. General considerations and updates in pediatric gastrointestinal diagnostic endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Gastrointestinal and colonic endoscopic examinations have been performed in pediatric patients in Korea for 3 decades. Endoscopic procedures are complex and may be unsafe if special concerns are not considered. Many things have to be kept in mind before, during, and after the procedure. Gastrointestinal endoscopy is one of the most frequently performed procedure in children nowadays, Since the dimension size of the endoscopy was modified for pediatric patients 15 years ago, endoscopic procedures are almost performed routinely in pediatric gastrointestinal patients. The smaller size of the scope let the physicians approach the diagnostic and therapeutic endoscopic procedures. But this is an invasive procedure, so the procedure itself may provoke an emergence state. The procedure-related complications can more easily occur in pediatric patients. Sedation-related or procedure-related respiratory, cardiovascular complications are mostly important and critical in the care. The endoscopists are required to consider diverse aspects of the procedure - patient preparation, indications and contraindications, infection controls, sedation methods, sedative medicines and the side effects of each medicine, monitoring during and after the procedure, and complications related with the procedure and medicines - to perform the procedure successfully and safely. This article presents some important guidelines and recommendations for gastrointestinal endoscopy through literature review. PMID:21189965

  11. Computer vision and augmented reality in gastrointestinal endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Mahmud, Nadim; Cohen, Jonah; Tsourides, Kleovoulos; Berzin, Tyler M

    2015-08-01

    Augmented reality (AR) is an environment-enhancing technology, widely applied in the computer sciences, which has only recently begun to permeate the medical field. Gastrointestinal endoscopy-which relies on the integration of high-definition video data with pathologic correlates-requires endoscopists to assimilate and process a tremendous amount of data in real time. We believe that AR is well positioned to provide computer-guided assistance with a wide variety of endoscopic applications, beginning with polyp detection. In this article, we review the principles of AR, describe its potential integration into an endoscopy set-up, and envisage a series of novel uses. With close collaboration between physicians and computer scientists, AR promises to contribute significant improvements to the field of endoscopy.

  12. Paediatric Gastrointestinal Endoscopy: European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology Hepatology and Nutrition and European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Guidelines.

    PubMed

    Thomson, Mike; Tringali, Andrea; Dumonceau, Jean-Marc; Tavares, Marta; Tabbers, Merit M; Furlano, Raoul; Spaander, Manon; Hassan, Cesare; Tzvinikos, Christos; Ijsselstijn, Hanneke; Viala, Jérôme; Dall'Oglio, Luigi; Benninga, Marc; Orel, Rok; Vandenplas, Yvan; Keil, Radan; Romano, Claudio; Brownstone, Eva; Hlava, Štěpán; Gerner, Patrick; Dolak, Werner; Landi, Rosario; Huber, Wolf D; Everett, Simon; Vecsei, Andreas; Aabakken, Lars; Amil-Dias, Jorge; Zambelli, Alessandro

    2017-01-01

    This guideline refers to infants, children, and adolescents ages 0 to 18 years. The areas covered include indications for diagnostic and therapeutic esophagogastroduodenoscopy and ileocolonoscopy; endoscopy for foreign body ingestion; corrosive ingestion and stricture/stenosis endoscopic management; upper and lower gastrointestinal bleeding; endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography; and endoscopic ultrasonography. Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy and endoscopy specific to inflammatory bowel disease has been dealt with in other guidelines and are therefore not mentioned in this guideline. Training and ongoing skill maintenance are to be dealt with in an imminent sister publication to this.

  13. Autofluorescence endoscopy for detecting gastrointestinal cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiaodong; Xu, Zhi; Xie, Hongbo; Chen, Dongqing; Yu, Daoyin

    2002-04-01

    A cost-effective autofluorescence detecting system has been developed by our research group to diagnose and localize the early gastrointestinal cancer, which is occult to the traditional means of detection, for example, biopsy. At the early stage, we utilize autofluorescence spectrum detected by OMA (Optical Multichannel Analyzer) to discriminate cancerous tissue. Although this method can effectively distinguish tumors from normal tissues, it is not suitable to be applied in clinic use due to the high cost of the- most-often used OMA-autofluorescence detector. Then we designed a novel Double PMTs (Photomultiply Tube) system, which consists of two parallel-working A/Ds with lower frequency of acquisition, to replace the OMA system, and the results of clinic experiments prove that it can effectively determine gastrointestinal cancers.

  14. The role of endoscopy in pediatric gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Franke, Markus; Geiß, Andrea; Greiner, Peter; Wellner, Ulrich; Richter-Schrag, Hans-Jürgen; Bausch, Dirk; Fischer, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Gastrointestinal bleeding in children and adolescents accounts for up to 20 % of referrals to gastroenterologists. Detailed management guidelines exist for gastrointestinal bleeding in adults, but they do not encompass children and adolescents. The aim of this study was to assess gastrointestinal bleeding in pediatric patients and to determine an investigative management algorithm accounting for the specifics of children and adolescents. Patients and methods: Pediatric patients with gastrointestinal bleeding admitted to our endoscopy unit from 2001 to 2009 (n = 154) were identified. Retrospective statistical and neural network analysis was used to assess outcome and to determine an investigative management algorithm. Results: The source of bleeding could be identified in 81 % (n = 124/154). Gastrointestinal bleeding was predominantly lower gastrointestinal bleeding (66 %, n = 101); upper gastrointestinal bleeding was much less common (14 %, n = 21). Hematochezia was observed in 94 % of the patients with lower gastrointestinal bleeding (n = 95 of 101). Hematemesis (67 %, n = 14 of 21) and melena (48 %, n = 10 of 21) were associated with upper gastrointestinal bleeding. The sensitivity and specificity of a neural network to predict lower gastrointestinal bleeding were 98 % and 63.6 %, respectively and to predict upper gastrointestinal bleeding were 75 % and 96 % respectively. The sensitivity and specifity of hematochezia alone to predict lower gastrointestinal bleeding were 94.2 % and 85.7 %, respectively. The sensitivity and specificity for hematemesis and melena to predict upper gastrointestinal bleeding were 82.6 % and 94 %, respectively. We then developed an investigative management algorithm based on the presence of hematochezia and hematemesis or melena. Conclusions: Hematochezia should prompt colonoscopy and hematemesis or melena should prompt esophagogastroduodenoscopy. If no

  15. Self-expandable metal stents for obstructing colonic and extracolonic cancer: European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) Clinical Guideline.

    PubMed

    van Hooft, Jeanin E; van Halsema, Emo E; Vanbiervliet, Geoffroy; Beets-Tan, Regina G H; DeWitt, John M; Donnellan, Fergal; Dumonceau, Jean-Marc; Glynne-Jones, Robert G T; Hassan, Cesare; Jiménez-Perez, Javier; Meisner, Søren; Muthusamy, V Raman; Parker, Michael C; Regimbeau, Jean-Marc; Sabbagh, Charles; Sagar, Jayesh; Tanis, Pieter J; Vandervoort, Jo; Webster, George J; Manes, Gianpiero; Barthet, Marc A; Repici, Alessandro

    2014-11-01

    This Guideline is an official statement of the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE). This Guideline was also reviewed and endorsed by the Governing Board of the American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ASGE). The Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) system was adopted to define the strength of recommendations and the quality of evidence. Main recommendations The following recommendations should only be applied after a thorough diagnostic evaluation including a contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) scan. 1 Prophylactic colonic stent placement is not recommended. Colonic stenting should be reserved for patients with clinical symptoms and imaging evidence of malignant large-bowel obstruction, without signs of perforation (strong recommendation, low quality evidence). 2 Colonic self-expandable metal stent (SEMS) placement as a bridge to elective surgery is not recommended as a standard treatment of symptomatic left-sided malignant colonic obstruction (strong recommendation, high quality evidence). 3 For patients with potentially curable but obstructing left-sided colonic cancer, stent placement may be considered as an alternative to emergency surgery in those who have an increased risk of postoperative mortality, I. e. American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) Physical Status ≥ III and/or age > 70 years (weak recommendation, low quality evidence). 4 SEMS placement is recommended as the preferred treatment for palliation of malignant colonic obstruction (strong recommendation, high quality evidence), except in patients treated or considered for treatment with antiangiogenic drugs (e. g. bevacizumab) (strong recommendation, low quality evidence).

  16. Validation of a realistic simulator for veterinary gastrointestinal endoscopy training.

    PubMed

    Usón-Gargallo, Jesús; Usón-Casaús, Jesús M; Pérez-Merino, Eva M; Soria-Gálvez, Federico; Morcillo, Esther; Enciso, Silvia; Sánchez-Margallo, Francisco M

    2014-01-01

    This article reports on the face, content, and construct validity of a new realistic composite simulator (Simuldog) used to provide training in canine gastrointestinal flexible endoscopy. The basic endoscopic procedures performed on the simulator were esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD), gastric biopsy (GB), and gastric foreign body removal (FBR). Construct validity was assessed by comparing the performance of novices (final-year veterinary students and recent graduates without endoscopic experience, n=30) versus experienced subjects (doctors in veterinary medicine who had performed more than 50 clinical upper gastrointestinal endoscopic procedures as a surgeon, n=15). Tasks were scored based on completion time, and specific rating scales were developed to assess performance. Internal consistency and inter-rater agreement were assessed. Face and content validity were determined using a 5-point Likert-type scale questionnaire. The novices needed considerably more time than the experts to perform EGD, GB, and FBR, and their performance scores were significantly lower (p<.010). Inter-rater agreement and the internal validity of the rating scales were good. Face validity was excellent, and both groups agreed that the endoscopy scenarios were very realistic. The experts highly valued the usefulness of Simuldog for veterinary training and as a tool for assessing endoscopic skills. Simuldog is the first validated model specifically developed to be used as a training tool for endoscopy techniques in small animals.

  17. Live endoscopy events (LEEs): European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Position Statement - Update 2014.

    PubMed

    Dinis-Ribeiro, Mário; Hassan, Cesare; Meining, Alexander; Aabakken, Lars; Fockens, Paul

    2015-01-01

    The European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) is dedicated to improving the quality of gastrointestinal endoscopy through educational activities such as live endoscopy events (LEEs). The primary utility of LEEs is the educational value for the audience, and patients should not expect additional benefit from being treated during a LEE compared to a routine setting. Although there is no evidence that LEEs entail additional risks for patients, neither can possible unknown risks be excluded as the evidence available is limited. Therefore, necessary measures should be taken to assure patient safety. Patients must be adequately informed that the standard of care will be assured and that their identity will not be revealed. ESGE recommends that an endoscopist not belonging to the hosting unit is named as patient advocate. Clinical indications for the LEE procedures and the educational outputs must be clear and agreed between host and demonstrator teams. ESGE will ensure that in all ESGE-organized LEEs the indications, procedural descriptions, and adverse events will be registered, and that organizers requesting ESGE endorsement can demonstrate such a registry.

  18. Computer vision and augmented reality in gastrointestinal endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Mahmud, Nadim; Cohen, Jonah; Tsourides, Kleovoulos; Berzin, Tyler M.

    2015-01-01

    Augmented reality (AR) is an environment-enhancing technology, widely applied in the computer sciences, which has only recently begun to permeate the medical field. Gastrointestinal endoscopy—which relies on the integration of high-definition video data with pathologic correlates—requires endoscopists to assimilate and process a tremendous amount of data in real time. We believe that AR is well positioned to provide computer-guided assistance with a wide variety of endoscopic applications, beginning with polyp detection. In this article, we review the principles of AR, describe its potential integration into an endoscopy set-up, and envisage a series of novel uses. With close collaboration between physicians and computer scientists, AR promises to contribute significant improvements to the field of endoscopy. PMID:26133175

  19. Transmission of Infection by Flexible Gastrointestinal Endoscopy and Bronchoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Frans T. M.; van der Mei, Henny C.; Degener, John E.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Flexible endoscopy is a widely used diagnostic and therapeutic procedure. Contaminated endoscopes are the medical devices frequently associated with outbreaks of health care-associated infections. Accurate reprocessing of flexible endoscopes involves cleaning and high-level disinfection followed by rinsing and drying before storage. Most contemporary flexible endoscopes cannot be heat sterilized and are designed with multiple channels, which are difficult to clean and disinfect. The ability of bacteria to form biofilms on the inner channel surfaces can contribute to failure of the decontamination process. Implementation of microbiological surveillance of endoscope reprocessing is appropriate to detect early colonization and biofilm formation in the endoscope and to prevent contamination and infection in patients after endoscopic procedures. This review presents an overview of the infections and cross-contaminations related to flexible gastrointestinal endoscopy and bronchoscopy and illustrates the impact of biofilm on endoscope reprocessing and postendoscopic infection. PMID:23554415

  20. Use of water jet instruments in gastrointestinal endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Nakano, Toru; Sato, Chiaki; Sakurai, Tadashi; Kamei, Takashi; Nakagawa, Atsuhiro; Ohuchi, Noriaki

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, water jet instruments have been used in the field of gastrointestinal endoscopy, mainly in two clinical situations: Investigation and treatment under endoscopic view. Injecting water jet into the gastrointestinal lumen is helpful for maintaining a clear endoscopic view, washing away blood or mucous in the lumen or on the surface of the tip of the endoscope. This contributes to reducing time and discomfort of examination. Water jet technology is an alternative method for dissecting soft tissue; this method does not harm the small vessels or cause mechanical or thermal damage. However, its use in clinical settings has been limited to the transmucosal injection of water into the submucosal layer that elevates the mucosa to prepare for endoscopic mucosal resection or endoscopic submucosal dissection, instead of tissue dissection, which may occur because of the continuous water jet. A preclinical study has been conducted using a pulsed water jet system as an alternative method for submucosal dissection by reducing intraoperative water consumption and maintenance of dissection capability. This review introduces recent studies pertaining to using a water jet in gastrointestinal endoscopy and discusses future prospects. PMID:26862362

  1. Use of water jet instruments in gastrointestinal endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Toru; Sato, Chiaki; Sakurai, Tadashi; Kamei, Takashi; Nakagawa, Atsuhiro; Ohuchi, Noriaki

    2016-02-10

    In recent years, water jet instruments have been used in the field of gastrointestinal endoscopy, mainly in two clinical situations: Investigation and treatment under endoscopic view. Injecting water jet into the gastrointestinal lumen is helpful for maintaining a clear endoscopic view, washing away blood or mucous in the lumen or on the surface of the tip of the endoscope. This contributes to reducing time and discomfort of examination. Water jet technology is an alternative method for dissecting soft tissue; this method does not harm the small vessels or cause mechanical or thermal damage. However, its use in clinical settings has been limited to the transmucosal injection of water into the submucosal layer that elevates the mucosa to prepare for endoscopic mucosal resection or endoscopic submucosal dissection, instead of tissue dissection, which may occur because of the continuous water jet. A preclinical study has been conducted using a pulsed water jet system as an alternative method for submucosal dissection by reducing intraoperative water consumption and maintenance of dissection capability. This review introduces recent studies pertaining to using a water jet in gastrointestinal endoscopy and discusses future prospects.

  2. Adverse Event and Complication Management in Gastrointestinal Endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Richter, James M; Kelsey, Peter B; Campbell, Emily J

    2016-03-01

    Gastrointestinal endoscopy is a remarkably safe set of diagnostic and therapeutic techniques, and yet a small number of significant complications and adverse events are expected. Serious complications may have a material effect on the patient's health and well-being. They need to be anticipated and prevented if possible and managed effectively when identified. When complications occur they need to be discussed frankly with patients and their families. Informed consent, prevention, early detection, reporting, and systems improvement are critical aspects of effective complication management. Optimal complication management may improve patient satisfaction and outcome, as well as preserving the reputation and confidence of the endoscopist, and may minimize litigation.

  3. Introduction to Starting Upper Gastrointestinal Endoscopy: Proper Insertion, Complete Observation, and Appropriate Photographing

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Diagnostic upper gastrointestinal endoscopy is the most basic of endoscopy procedures and is the technique that trainee doctors first learn. Mastering the basics of endoscopy is very important because when this process is imprecise or performed incorrectly, it can severely affect a patient's health or life. Although there are several guidelines and studies that consider these basics, there are still no standard recommendations for endoscopy in Korea. In this review, basic points, including proper endoscope insertion, precise observation without blind spots, and appropriate photographing, for upper gastrointestinal endoscopy will be discussed. PMID:26240799

  4. The Application of Hemospray in Gastrointestinal Bleeding during Emergency Endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Albrecht, Heinz; Nägel, Andreas; Vitali, Francesco; Vetter, Marcel; Dauth, Christine; Neurath, Markus F.; Raithel, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Introduction. Gastrointestinal bleeding represents the main indication for emergency endoscopy (EE). Lately, several hemostatic powders have been released to facilitate EE. Methods. We evaluated all EE in which Hemospray was used as primary or salvage therapy, with regard to short- and long-term hemostasis and complications. Results. We conducted 677 EE in 474 patients (488 examinations in 344 patients were upper GI endoscopies). Hemospray was applied during 35 examinations in 27 patients (19 males), 33 during upper and 2 during lower endoscopy. It was used after previous treatment in 21 examinations (60%) and in 14 (40%) as salvage therapy. Short-term success was reached in 34 of 35 applications (97.1%), while long-term success occurred in 23 applications (65.7%). Similar long-term results were found after primary application (64,3%) or salvage therapy (66,7%). Rebleeding was found in malignant and extended ulcers. One major adverse event (2.8%) occurred with gastric perforation after Hemospray application. Discussion. Hemospray achieved short-term hemostasis in virtually all cases. The long-term effect is mainly determined by the type of bleeding source, but not whether it was applied as first line or salvage therapy. But, even in the failures, patients had benefit from hemodynamic stabilization and consecutive interventions in optimized conditions. PMID:28232848

  5. EVALUATION OF UPPER GASTROINTESTINAL ENDOSCOPY IN PATIENTS UNDERGOING BARIATRIC SURGERY

    PubMed Central

    ASSEF, Maurício Saab; MELO, Tiago Torres; ARAKI, Osvaldo; MARIONI, Fábio

    2015-01-01

    Background: Obesity has become epidemic, and is associated with greater morbidity and mortality. Treatment is multidisciplinary. Surgical treatment is a consistent resource in severe obesity. The indication of preoperative upper gastrointestinal endoscopy in asymptomatic patients is controversial; however, most studies recommend its implementation in all patients. Aim: To analyze endoscopic performance in patients who were in preoperative for bariatric surgery and compare them with control group. Method: A series of 35 obese patients in preoperative period for bariatric surgery compared with a control group of 30 patients submitted to upper endoscopy. There were analyzed clinical and endoscopic data. Results: The mean age of the group of patients was 43.54 years. Most individuals in the group of patients were female with median BMI of 47.26kg/m2and in control group 24.21 kg/m2. The majority of patients were asymptomatic. Upper endoscopy was altered in 81.25% of asymptomatic patients. Endoscopic findings in the patient group were 57.1% resulting from peptic ulcer disease and 34.3% associated with GERD. The analysis of endoscopic findings in patients showed no significant difference in relation of the control group. The prevalence of H. pylori infection was 60% in patients. Conclusion: It is recommended that the upper endoscopy should be made in all patients in the preoperative bariatric surgery period, although the degree of obesity is not related to a greater number of endoscopic findings. Obese patients do not have more endoscopic findings that non-obese individuals. PMID:26537272

  6. Pediatric gastrointestinal endoscopy: European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) and European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology Hepatology and Nutrition (ESPGHAN) Guideline Executive summary.

    PubMed

    Tringali, Andrea; Thomson, Mike; Dumonceau, Jean-Marc; Tavares, Marta; Tabbers, Merit M; Furlano, Raoul; Spaander, Manon; Hassan, Cesare; Tzvinikos, Christos; Ijsselstijn, Hanneke; Viala, Jérôme; Dall'Oglio, Luigi; Benninga, Marc; Orel, Rok; Vandenplas, Yvan; Keil, Radan; Romano, Claudio; Brownstone, Eva; Hlava, Štěpán; Gerner, Patrick; Dolak, Werner; Landi, Rosario; Huber, Wolf Dietrich; Everett, Simon; Vecsei, Andreas; Aabakken, Lars; Amil-Dias, Jorge; Zambelli, Alessandro

    2017-01-01

    This Executive summary of the Guideline on pediatric gastrointestinal endoscopy from the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) and the European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology Hepatology and Nutrition (ESPGHAN) refers to infants, children, and adolescents aged 0 - 18 years. The areas covered include: indications for diagnostic and therapeutic esophagogastroduodenoscopy and ileocolonoscopy; endoscopy for foreign body ingestion; endoscopic management of corrosive ingestion and stricture/stenosis; upper and lower gastrointestinal bleeding; endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, and endoscopic ultrasonography. Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy and endoscopy specific to inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have been dealt with in other Guidelines and are therefore not mentioned in this Guideline. Training and ongoing skill maintenance will be addressed in an imminent sister publication.

  7. Current practice in managing patients on anticoagulants and/or antiplatelet agents around the time of gastrointestinal endoscopy -- a nation-wide survey in Germany.

    PubMed

    Mosler, P; Mergener, K; Denzer, U; Kiesslich, R; Galle, P R; Kanzler, S

    2004-11-01

    Anticoagulants and antiplatelet agents are widely used in the prophylaxis and management of thromboembolic and cardiovascular diseases. Gastrointestinal bleeding is a well-known complication of these agents. Modification of anticoagulant and antiplatelet therapy is often required in patients undergoing surgical procedures and specific recommendations for the perioperative period have been issued. Fewer data exist with regard to the use of these agents around the time of endoscopic procedures. A survey of the American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ASGE), performed several years ago, showed a wide variation between endoscopists in the management of anticoagulants and antiplatelet agents in the periendoscopic period. Subsequently, guidelines have been proposed by the ASGE as well as the German Society for Gastroenterology (DGVS). The aim of this study was to investigate the current practices among German endoscopists regarding the use of these medications in patients undergoing endoscopic procedures and to assess their adherence to published guidelines. Our data demonstrate that, in spite of the dissemination of guidelines, there is still a wide variation in the periendoscopic management of patients who are at increased risk for bleeding due to anticoagulants, especially in patients taking antiplatelet agents.

  8. The effect of upper gastrointestinal system endoscopy process on serum oxidative stress levels.

    PubMed

    Turan, Mehmet Nuri; Aslan, Mehmet; Bolukbas, Filiz Fusun; Bolukbas, Cengiz; Selek, Sahbettin; Sabuncu, Tevfik

    2016-12-01

    Some authors have investigated the effects of oxidative stress in some process such as undergoing laparoscopic. However, the effect of upper gastrointestinal system endoscopy process on oxidative stress is unclear. We evaluated the short-term effect of upper gastrointestinal system endoscopy process on oxidative stress. Thirty patients who underwent endoscopy process and 20 healthy controls were enrolled in the prospective study. Serum total antioxidant capacity and total oxidant status measurements were measured before and after endoscopy process. The ratio percentage of total oxidant status to total antioxidant capacity was regarded as oxidative stress index. Before endoscopy process, serum total antioxidant capacity levels were higher, while serum total oxidant status levels and oxidative stress index values were lower in patients than controls, but this difference was not statistically significant (all, p > 0.05). After endoscopy process, serum total antioxidant capacity and total oxidant status levels were significantly higher in patients than before endoscopy process (both, p < 0.05). However, oxidative stress index values were slight higher in patients but this difference was not statistically significant (p > 0.05). We observed that serum TAC and TOS levels were increased in patients who underwent endoscopy process after endoscopy process. However, short-time upper gastrointestinal system endoscopy process did not cause an important change in the oxidative stress index. Further studies enrolling a larger number of patients are required to clarify the results obtained here.

  9. Air embolism complicating gastrointestinal endoscopy: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Donepudi, Suman; Chavalitdhamrong, Disaya; Pu, Liping; Draganov, Peter V

    2013-08-16

    Gastrointestinal endoscopy has become an important modality for the diagnosis and treatment of various gastrointestinal disorders. One of its major advantages is that it is minimally invasive and has an excellent safety record. Nevertheless, some complications do occur, and endoscopists are well aware and prepared to deal with the commonly recognized ones including bleeding, perforation, infection, and adverse effects from the sedative medications. Air embolism is a very rare endoscopic complication but possesses the potential to be severe and fatal. It can present with cardiopulmonary instability and neurologic symptoms. The diagnosis may be difficult because of its clinical presentation, which can overlap with sedation-related cardiopulmonary problems or neurologic symptoms possibly attributed to an ischemic or hemorrhagic central nervous system event. Increased awareness is essential for prompt recognition of the air embolism, which can allow potentially life-saving therapy to be provided. Therefore, we wanted to review the risk factors, the clinical presentation, and the therapy of an air embolism from the perspective of the practicing endoscopist.

  10. In-training gastrointestinal endoscopy competency assessment tools: Types of tools, validation and impact.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Catharine M

    2016-06-01

    The ability to perform endoscopy procedures safely, effectively and efficiently is a core element of gastroenterology practice. Training programs strive to ensure learners demonstrate sufficient competence to deliver high quality endoscopic care independently at completion of training. In-training assessments are an essential component of gastrointestinal endoscopy education, required to support training and optimize learner's capabilities. There are several approaches to in-training endoscopy assessment from direct observation of procedural skills to monitoring of surrogate measures of endoscopy skills such as procedural volume and quality metrics. This review outlines the current state of evidence as it pertains to in-training assessment of competency in performing gastrointestinal endoscopy as part of an overall endoscopy quality and skills training program.

  11. Diagnosis and management of nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage: European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) Guideline.

    PubMed

    Gralnek, Ian M; Dumonceau, Jean-Marc; Kuipers, Ernst J; Lanas, Angel; Sanders, David S; Kurien, Matthew; Rotondano, Gianluca; Hucl, Tomas; Dinis-Ribeiro, Mario; Marmo, Riccardo; Racz, Istvan; Arezzo, Alberto; Hoffmann, Ralf-Thorsten; Lesur, Gilles; de Franchis, Roberto; Aabakken, Lars; Veitch, Andrew; Radaelli, Franco; Salgueiro, Paulo; Cardoso, Ricardo; Maia, Luís; Zullo, Angelo; Cipolletta, Livio; Hassan, Cesare

    2015-10-01

    This Guideline is an official statement of the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE). It addresses the diagnosis and management of nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage (NVUGIH). Main Recommendations MR1. ESGE recommends immediate assessment of hemodynamic status in patients who present with acute upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage (UGIH), with prompt intravascular volume replacement initially using crystalloid fluids if hemodynamic instability exists (strong recommendation, moderate quality evidence). MR2. ESGE recommends a restrictive red blood cell transfusion strategy that aims for a target hemoglobin between 7 g/dL and 9 g/dL. A higher target hemoglobin should be considered in patients with significant co-morbidity (e. g., ischemic cardiovascular disease) (strong recommendation, moderate quality evidence). MR3. ESGE recommends the use of the Glasgow-Blatchford Score (GBS) for pre-endoscopy risk stratification. Outpatients determined to be at very low risk, based upon a GBS score of 0 - 1, do not require early endoscopy nor hospital admission. Discharged patients should be informed of the risk of recurrent bleeding and be advised to maintain contact with the discharging hospital (strong recommendation, moderate quality evidence). MR4. ESGE recommends initiating high dose intravenous proton pump inhibitors (PPI), intravenous bolus followed by continuous infusion (80 mg then 8 mg/hour), in patients presenting with acute UGIH awaiting upper endoscopy. However, PPI infusion should not delay the performance of early endoscopy (strong recommendation, high quality evidence). MR5. ESGE does not recommend the routine use of nasogastric or orogastric aspiration/lavage in patients presenting with acute UGIH (strong recommendation, moderate quality evidence). MR6. ESGE recommends intravenous erythromycin (single dose, 250 mg given 30 - 120 minutes prior to upper gastrointestinal [GI] endoscopy) in patients with clinically severe

  12. Gastrointestinal endoscopy in patients on anticoagulant therapy and antiplatelet agents

    PubMed Central

    Zullo, Angelo; Hassan, Cesare; Radaelli, Franco

    2017-01-01

    Periprocedural management of antithrombotics for gastrointestinal endoscopy is a common clinical issue, given the widespread use of these drugs for primary and secondary cardiovascular prevention. For diagnostic procedures, with or without biopsy, no adjustments in antithrombotics are usually needed. For operative procedures, balancing the risk of periprocedural hemorrhage with the continuation of antithrombotics against the chance of recurrent thromboembolic events with their discontinuation may be challenging. Oral anticoagulants need to be temporarily withheld, and consideration must be given to whether a periendoscopic “bridge” therapy, typically a low-molecular-weight heparin, should be used in order to minimize the risk of thromboembolic events. Although some emerging evidence has shown that patients receiving heparin bridging appear to be at increased risk of overall and major bleeding and at similar risk of thromboembolic events compared to controls, bridging therapy is still recommended for patients on vitamin K antagonists who are at high thrombotic risk. Conversely, bridging therapy is usually not needed for patients taking new oral agents, which are characterized by shorter half-lives, and a rapid offset and onset of action. Management of antiplatelet therapy requires special care in patients on secondary prevention, especially those with coronary stents. This review is intended to summarize the recommendations of updated International Guidelines designed to help the decision-making process in such an intricate field. PMID:28042233

  13. Acute Reversible Duodenitis Following Non-Therapeutic Upper Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. Is Duodenal Diverticulum a Predisposing Factor?

    PubMed Central

    Unal, Emre; Ayan, Elif Nurbegum; Yazgan, Sibel

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Diagnostic upper gastrointestinal (UGI) endoscopy has been regarded as a safe procedure. Case report We report of a 67-year-old woman who developed epigastric pain and dyspeptic complaints following an uneventful upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. The diagnosis of an acute reversible duodenitis was made on the basis of imaging studies. A duodenal diverticulum was also found on CT images, which raised the suspicion that duodenal diverticulum could be a predisposing factor for duodenitis. Conclusions Despite significant inflammation the patient demonstrated rapid clinical improvement with conservative treatment. Presence of a duodenal diverticulum may predispose to acute duodenitis following diagnostic UGI endoscopy. PMID:27994697

  14. Current and future role of magnetically assisted gastric capsule endoscopy in the upper gastrointestinal tract

    PubMed Central

    Ching, Hey-Long; Hale, Melissa Fay; McAlindon, Mark Edward

    2016-01-01

    Capsule endoscopy first captivated the medical world when it provided a means to visualize the small bowel, which was previously out of endoscopic reach. In the subsequent decade and a half we continue to learn of the true potential that capsule endoscopy has to offer. Of particular current interest is whether capsule endoscopy has any reliable investigative role in the upper gastrointestinal tract. Much research has already been dedicated to enhancing the diagnostic and indeed therapeutic properties of capsule endoscopy. Specific modifications to tackle the challenges of the gut have already been described in the current literature. In the upper gastrointestinal tract, the capacious anatomy of the stomach represents one of many challenges that capsule endoscopy must overcome. One solution to improving diagnostic yield is to utilize external magnetic steering of a magnetically receptive capsule endoscope. Notionally this would provide a navigation system to direct the capsule to different areas of the stomach and allow complete gastric mucosal examination. To date, several studies have presented promising data to support the feasibility of this endeavour. However the jury is still out as to whether this system will surpass conventional gastroscopy, which remains the gold standard diagnostic tool in the foregut. Nevertheless, a minimally invasive and patient-friendly alternative to gastroscopy remains irresistibly appealing, warranting further studies to test the potential of magnetically assisted capsule endoscopy. In this article the authors would like to share the current state of magnetically assisted capsule endoscopy and anticipate what is yet to come. PMID:27134661

  15. Highlights of the 48th Seminar of Korean Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Kwang An; Choi, Il Ju; Kim, Eun Young; Dong, Seok Ho

    2013-01-01

    This special May issue of Clinical Endoscopy discusses the tutorial contents dealing with either the diagnostic or therapeutic gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy that contain very fundamental and essential points in this filed. The seminar of Korean Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (KSGE) had positioned as one of prime educational seminars covering the very beginner to advanced experts of GI endoscopy. Besides of four rooms allocated for each lecture, two additional rooms were open for either live demonstration or hands-on course, covering totally 20 sessions including one special lecture. Among these prestigious lectures, 12 lectures were selected for the current review articles in this special issue of Clinical Endoscopy journal. Basic course for beginner to advanced tips to expert were all covered in this seminar. This introductory review prepared by four associated editors of Clinical Endoscopy contained core contents divided into four sessions-upper gut, lower gut, pancreaticobiliary, and specialized topic session part-to enhance understandings not covered by enlisted review articles in this issue. PMID:23767027

  16. Assessment the effect of midazolam sedation on hypoxia during upper gastrointestinal endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Fakheri, H T; Kiasari, A Z; Taghvaii, T; Hosseini, V; Mohammadpour, R A; Nasrollah, A; Kabirzadeh, A; Shahmohammadi, S

    2010-02-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of hypoxia related to midazolam sedation during upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. This single blind randomized placebo control clinical trial, carried out on 180 patients who referred to endoscopy clinic at Imam Khomeini Hospital for selective upper gastrointestinal endoscopy from April to July in 2008. Informed consents obtained from all participants. Patients under 18-years-old, obese, previous history of asthma, COPD and cigarette smoking were excluded. Arterial hemoglobin saturation controlled by finger probe pulse oximetry. After pharyngeal lidocaine spray, midazolam was administered intravenously in case group and patients in controlled group received placebo. Demographic characteristics and other variables were recorded in a questionnaire and data analyzed using SPSS software. Gastrointestinal disturbances and epigastric pain were major indications of endoscopies. The most common endoscopic diagnoses were deudonitis, esophagitis or gastroesophagial reflux. No patients had any serious episode of hypoxia and the incidence of mild hypoxia was not significant in both studied group (p = 0.823). There was no significant difference in arterial oxygen saturation recorded by the three endoscopists (p = 0.734). Our data showed that optimal dose of sedation had no hypoxia. So that, we recommend sedative endoscopy in patients without risk factors for hypoxia.

  17. Capsule Endoscopy in the Assessment of Obscure Gastrointestinal Bleeding: An Economic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Palimaka, S; Blackhouse, Gord; Goeree, Ron

    2015-01-01

    Background Small-bowel capsule endoscopy is a tool used to visualize the small bowel to identify the location of bleeds in obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (OGIB). Capsule endoscopy is currently funded in Ontario in cases where there has been a failure to identify a source of bleeding via conventional diagnostic procedures. In Ontario, capsule endoscopy is a diagnostic option for patients whose findings on esophagogastroduodenoscopy, colonoscopy, and push enteroscopy have been negative (i.e., the source of bleeding was not found). Objectives This economic analysis aims to estimate the budget impact of different rates of capsule endoscopy use as a complement to push enteroscopy procedures in patients aged 18 years and older. Data Sources Population-based administrative databases for Ontario were used to identify patients receiving push enteroscopy and small-bowel capsule endoscopy in the fiscal years 2008 to 2012. Review Methods A systematic literature search was performed to identify economic evaluations of capsule endoscopy for the investigation of OGIB. Studies were assessed for their methodological quality and their applicability to the Ontarian setting. An original budget impact analysis was performed using data from Ontarian administrative sources and published literature. The budget impact was estimated for different levels of use of capsule endoscopy as a complement to push enteroscopy due to the uncertain clinical utility of the capsule based on current clinical evidence. The analysis was conducted from the provincial public payer perspective. Results With varying rates of capsule endoscopy use, the budgetary impact spans from savings of $510,000,1 when no (0%) push enteroscopy procedures are complemented with capsule endoscopy, to $2,036,000, when all (100%) push enteroscopy procedures are complemented with capsule endoscopy. A scenario where 50% of push enteroscopy procedures are complemented with capsule endoscopy (expected use based on expert opinion

  18. Application of robotics in gastrointestinal endoscopy: A review

    PubMed Central

    Yeung, Baldwin Po Man; Chiu, Philip Wai Yan

    2016-01-01

    Multiple robotic flexible endoscope platforms have been developed based on cross specialty collaboration between engineers and medical doctors. However, significant number of these platforms have been developed for the natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery paradigm. Increasing amount of evidence suggest the focus of development should be placed on advanced endolumenal procedures such as endoscopic submucosal dissection instead. A thorough literature analysis was performed to assess the current status of robotic flexible endoscopic platforms designed for advanced endolumenal procedures. Current efforts are mainly focused on robotic locomotion and robotic instrument control. In the future, advances in actuation and servoing technology, optical analysis, augmented reality and wireless power transmission technology will no doubt further advance the field of robotic endoscopy. Globally, health systems have become increasingly budget conscious; widespread acceptance of robotic endoscopy will depend on careful design to ensure its delivery of a cost effective service. PMID:26855540

  19. Application of robotics in gastrointestinal endoscopy: A review.

    PubMed

    Yeung, Baldwin Po Man; Chiu, Philip Wai Yan

    2016-02-07

    Multiple robotic flexible endoscope platforms have been developed based on cross specialty collaboration between engineers and medical doctors. However, significant number of these platforms have been developed for the natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery paradigm. Increasing amount of evidence suggest the focus of development should be placed on advanced endolumenal procedures such as endoscopic submucosal dissection instead. A thorough literature analysis was performed to assess the current status of robotic flexible endoscopic platforms designed for advanced endolumenal procedures. Current efforts are mainly focused on robotic locomotion and robotic instrument control. In the future, advances in actuation and servoing technology, optical analysis, augmented reality and wireless power transmission technology will no doubt further advance the field of robotic endoscopy. Globally, health systems have become increasingly budget conscious; widespread acceptance of robotic endoscopy will depend on careful design to ensure its delivery of a cost effective service.

  20. A prospective study of patient safety incidents in gastrointestinal endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Matharoo, Manmeet; Haycock, Adam; Sevdalis, Nick; Thomas-Gibson, Siwan

    2017-01-01

    Background and study aims Medical error occurs frequently with significant morbidity and mortality. This study aime to assess the frequency and type of endoscopy patient safety incidents (PSIs). Patients and methods A prospective observational study of PSIs in routine diagnostic and therapeutic endoscopy was undertaken in a secondary and tertiary care center. Observations were undertaken within the endoscopy suite across pre-procedure, intra-procedure and post-procedure phases of care. Experienced (Consultant-level) and trainee endoscopists from medical, surgical, and nursing specialities were included. PSIs were defined as any safety issue that had the potential to or directly adversely affected patient care: PSIs included near misses, complications, adverse events and “never events”. PSIs were reviewed by an expert panel and categorized for severity and nature via expert consensus. Results One hundred and forty procedures (92 diagnostic, 48 therapeutic) over 37 lists (experienced operators n = 25, trainees n = 12) were analyzed. One hundred forty PSIs were identified (median 1 per procedure, range 0 – 7). Eighty-six PSIs (61 %) occurred in 48 therapeutic procedures. Zero PSIs were detected in 13 diagnostic procedures. 21 (15 %) PSIs were categorized as severe and 12 (9 %) had the potential to be “never events,” including patient misidentification and wrong procedure. Forty PSIs (28 %) were of intermediate severity and 78 (56 %) were minor. Oxygen monitoring PSIs occurred most frequently. Conclusion This is the first study documenting the range and frequency of PSIs in endoscopy. Although many errors are minor without immediate consequence, further work should identify whether prevention of such recurrent errors affects the incidence of severe errors, thus improving safety and quality. PMID:28191498

  1. The European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Quality Improvement Initiative: developing performance measures

    PubMed Central

    Senore, Carlo; Bisschops, Raf; Domagk, Dirk; Valori, Roland; Kaminski, Michal F.; Spada, Cristiano; Bretthauer, Michael; Bennett, Cathy; Bellisario, Cristina; Minozzi, Silvia; Hassan, Cesare; Rees, Colin; Dinis-Ribeiro, Mário; Hucl, Tomas; Ponchon, Thierry; Aabakken, Lars; Fockens, Paul

    2015-01-01

    The European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) and United European Gastroenterology (UEG) have a vision to create a thriving community of endoscopy services across Europe, collaborating with each other to provide high quality, safe, accurate, patient-centered and accessible endoscopic care. Whilst the boundaries of what can be achieved by advanced endoscopy are continually expanding, we believe that one of the most fundamental steps to achieving our goal is to raise the quality of everyday endoscopy. The development of robust, consensus- and evidence-based key performance measures is the first step in this vision. ESGE and UEG have identified quality of endoscopy as a major priority. This paper explains the rationale behind the ESGE Quality Improvement Initiative and describes the processes that were followed. We recommend that all units develop mechanisms for audit and feedback of endoscopist and service performance using the ESGE performance measures that will be published in future issues of this journal over the next year. We urge all endoscopists and endoscopy services to prioritize quality and to ensure that these performance measures are implemented and monitored at a local level, so that we can provide the highest possible care for our patients. PMID:26966520

  2. The European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Quality Improvement Initiative: developing performance measures.

    PubMed

    Rutter, Matthew D; Senore, Carlo; Bisschops, Raf; Domagk, Dirk; Valori, Roland; Kaminski, Michal F; Spada, Cristiano; Bretthauer, Michael; Bennett, Cathy; Bellisario, Cristina; Minozzi, Silvia; Hassan, Cesare; Rees, Colin; Dinis-Ribeiro, Mário; Hucl, Tomas; Ponchon, Thierry; Aabakken, Lars; Fockens, Paul

    2016-01-01

    The European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) and United European Gastroenterology (UEG) have a vision to create a thriving community of endoscopy services across Europe, collaborating with each other to provide high quality, safe, accurate, patient-centered and accessible endoscopic care. Whilst the boundaries of what can be achieved by advanced endoscopy are continually expanding, we believe that one of the most fundamental steps to achieving our goal is to raise the quality of everyday endoscopy. The development of robust, consensus- and evidence-based key performance measures is the first step in this vision.ESGE and UEG have identified quality of endoscopy as a major priority. This paper explains the rationale behind the ESGE Quality Improvement Initiative and describes the processes that were followed. We recommend that all units develop mechanisms for audit and feedback of endoscopist and service performance using the ESGE performance measures that will be published in future issues of this journal over the next year. We urge all endoscopists and endoscopy services to prioritize quality and to ensure that these performance measures are implemented and monitored at a local level, so that we can provide the highest possible care for our patients.

  3. Endoscopy

    MedlinePlus

    ... eds. Campbell-Walsh Urology . 10th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2012:chap 8. Lentz GM. Endoscopy: hysteroscopy ... VL, eds. Comprehensive Gynecology . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Mosby; 2012:chap 10. Phillips BB. General principles ...

  4. A comparison of propofol and midazolam/meperidine sedation in upper gastrointestinal endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Gurbulak, Bunyamin; Gurbulak, Esin Kabul; Donmez, Turgut; Hut, Adnan; Yildirim, Dogan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction There is increasing interest in sedation for upper gastrointestinal endoscopy (UGE). Prospective randomized studies comparing sedation properties and complications of propofol and midazolam/meperidine in upper gastrointestinal endoscopy (UGE) are few. Aim To compare propofol and midazolam/meperidine sedation for UGE in terms of cardiopulmonary side effects, patient and endoscopist satisfaction and procedure-related times. Material and methods This was a prospective, randomized, double-blind study of propofol versus midazolam and meperidine in 100 patients scheduled for diagnostic upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. The patients were divided into propofol and midazolam/meperidine groups. Randomization was generated by a computer. Cardiopulmonary side effects (hypotension, bradycardia, hypoxemia), procedure-related times (endoscopy time, awake time, time to hospital discharge), and patient and endoscopist satisfaction were compared between groups. Results There was no significant difference between the groups with respect to the cost, endoscopy time, or demographic and clinical characteristics of the patients. Awake time and time to hospital discharge were significantly shorter in the propofol group (6.58 ±4.72 vs. 9.32 ±4.26 min, p = 0.030 and 27.60 ±7.88 vs. 32.00 ±10.54 min, p = 0.019). Hypotension incidence was significantly higher in the propofol group (12% vs. 0%, p = 0.027). The patient and endoscopist satisfaction was better with propofol. Conclusions Propofol may be preferred to midazolam/meperidine sedation, with a shorter awake and hospital discharge time and better patient and endoscopist satisfaction. However, hypotension risk should be considered with propofol, and careful evaluation is needed, particularly in cardiopulmonary disorders. PMID:27829941

  5. Endoscopy and antiplatelet agents. European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) Guideline.

    PubMed

    Boustière, C; Veitch, A; Vanbiervliet, G; Bulois, P; Deprez, P; Laquiere, A; Laugier, R; Lesur, G; Mosler, P; Nalet, B; Napoleon, B; Rembacken, B; Ajzenberg, N; Collet, J P; Baron, T; Dumonceau, J-M

    2011-05-01

    With the increasing use of antiplatelet agents (APA), their management during the periendoscopic period has become a more common and more difficult problem. The increase in use is due to the availability of new drugs and the widespread use of drug-eluting coronary stents. Acute coronary syndromes can occur when APA therapy is withheld for noncardiovascular interventions. Guidelines about APA management during the periendoscopic period are traditionally based on assessments of the procedure-related risk of bleeding and the risk of thrombosis if APA are stopped. New data allow better assessment of these risks, of the necessary duration of APA discontinuation before endoscopy, of the use of alternative procedures (mostly for endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography [ERCP]), and of endoscopic methods that can be used to prevent bleeding (following colonic polypectomy). This guideline makes graded, evidence-based, recommendations for the management of APA for all currently performed endoscopic procedures. A short summary and two tables are included for quick reference.

  6. Role of endoscopy in management of gastrointestinal complications of portal hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Luigiano, Carmelo; Iabichino, Giuseppe; Judica, Antonino; Virgilio, Clara; Peta, Valentina; Abenavoli, Ludovico

    2015-01-01

    The management of patients with gastrointestinal complications of portal hypertension is often complex and challenging. The endoscopy plays an important role in the management of these patients. The role of endoscopy is both diagnostic and interventional and in the last years the techniques have undergone a rapid expansion with the advent of different and novel endoscopic modalities, with consequent improvement of investigation and treatment of these patients. The choice of best therapeutic strategy depends on many factors: baseline disease, patient’s clinical performance and the timing when it is done if in emergency or a prophylactic approaches. In this review we evaluate the endoscopic management of patients with the gastrointestinal complications of portal hypertension. PMID:25610530

  7. [Management of new oral anticoagulants in gastrointestinal bleeding and endoscopy].

    PubMed

    del Molino, Fátima; Gonzalez, Isabel; Saperas, Esteve

    2015-10-01

    New oral direct anticoagulants agents are alternatives to warfarin for long-term anticoagulation in a growing number of patients that require long-term anticoagulation for atrial fibrillation, deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism. These new agents with predictable pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamics profiles offer a favorable global safety profile, but increased gastrointestinal bleeding compared to the vitamin K antagonists. Many gastroenterologists are unfamiliar and may be wary of these newer drugs, since Clinical experience is limited and no specific antidote is available to reverse their anticoagulant effect. In this article the risk of these new agents and, how to manage these agents in both the presence of acute gastrointestinal bleeding and in patients undergoing endoscopic procedures is reviewed.

  8. Review on sedation for gastrointestinal tract endoscopy in children by non-anesthesiologists

    PubMed Central

    Orel, Rok; Brecelj, Jernej; Dias, Jorge Amil; Romano, Claudio; Barros, Fernanda; Thomson, Mike; Vandenplas, Yvan

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To present evidence and formulate recommendations for sedation in pediatric gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy by non-anesthesiologists. METHODS: The databases MEDLINE, Cochrane and EMBASE were searched for the following keywords “endoscopy, GI”, “endoscopy, digestive system” AND “sedation”, “conscious sedation”, “moderate sedation”, “deep sedation” and “hypnotics and sedatives” for publications in English restricted to the pediatric age. We searched additional information published between January 2011 and January 2014. Searches for (upper) GI endoscopy sedation in pediatrics and sedation guidelines by non-anesthesiologists for the adult population were performed. RESULTS: From the available studies three sedation protocols are highlighted. Propofol, which seems to offer the best balance between efficacy and safety is rarely used by non-anesthesiologists mainly because of legal restrictions. Ketamine and a combination of a benzodiazepine and an opioid are more frequently used. Data regarding other sedatives, anesthetics and adjuvant medications used for pediatric GI endoscopy are also presented. CONCLUSION: General anesthesia by a multidisciplinary team led by an anesthesiologist is preferred. The creation of sedation teams led by non-anesthesiologists and a careful selection of anesthetic drugs may offer an alternative, but should be in line with national legislation and institutional regulations. PMID:26240691

  9. [Argon plasma coagulation (APC): a new mode in gastrointestinal endoscopy--first experience].

    PubMed

    Dajcman, D; Skalicky, M; Pernat, C; Pocajt, M

    2001-01-01

    Argon plasma coagulation (APC) is a new method of non-contact electrocoagulation in which current is applied to tissues by means of ionised argon gas (argon plasma). The development of special applicators has made this method applicable for gastrointestinal endoscopy. The primary indication for APC is the treatment of hemorrhage in the gastrointestinal tract. APC has been proven to be highly effective and easily used, with clear advantages over previously used methods. This article describes the introduction of APC in Slovenia and the first experiences with this method in the clinical department of internal medicine in Maribor.

  10. Glossopharyngeal Nerve Block versus Lidocaine Spray to Improve Tolerance in Upper Gastrointestinal Endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ortega Ramírez, Moisés; Linares Segovia, Benigno; García Cuevas, Marco Antonio; Sánchez Romero, Jorge Luis; Botello Buenrostro, Illich; Amador Licona, Norma; Guízar Mendoza, Juan Manuel; Guerrero Romero, Jesús Francisco; Vázquez Zárate, Víctor Manuel

    2013-01-01

    Aim of the Study. To compare the effect of glossopharyngeal nerve block with topical anesthesia on the tolerance of patients to upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. Methods. We performed a clinical trial in one hundred patients undergoing upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. Subjects were randomly assigned to one of the following two groups: (1) treatment with bilateral glossopharyngeal nerve block (GFNB) and intravenous midazolam or (2) treatment with topical anesthetic (TASS) and intravenous midazolam. We evaluated sedation, tolerance to the procedure, hemodynamic stability, and adverse symptoms. Results. We studied 46 men and 54 women, from 17 to 78 years of age. The procedure was reported without discomfort in 48 patients (88%) in the GFNB group and 32 (64%) in the TAAS group; 6 patients (12%) in GFNB group and 18 (36%) in TAAS group reported the procedure as little discomfort (χ2 = 3.95, P = 0.04). There was no difference in frequency of nausea (4% in both groups) and retching, 4% versus 8% for GFNB and TASS group, respectively (P = 0.55). Conclusions. The use of glossopharyngeal nerve block provides greater comfort and tolerance to the patient undergoing upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. It also reduces the need for sedation. PMID:23533386

  11. Glossopharyngeal Nerve Block versus Lidocaine Spray to Improve Tolerance in Upper Gastrointestinal Endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Ortega Ramírez, Moisés; Linares Segovia, Benigno; García Cuevas, Marco Antonio; Sánchez Romero, Jorge Luis; Botello Buenrostro, Illich; Amador Licona, Norma; Guízar Mendoza, Juan Manuel; Guerrero Romero, Jesús Francisco; Vázquez Zárate, Víctor Manuel

    2013-01-01

    Aim of the Study. To compare the effect of glossopharyngeal nerve block with topical anesthesia on the tolerance of patients to upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. Methods. We performed a clinical trial in one hundred patients undergoing upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. Subjects were randomly assigned to one of the following two groups: (1) treatment with bilateral glossopharyngeal nerve block (GFNB) and intravenous midazolam or (2) treatment with topical anesthetic (TASS) and intravenous midazolam. We evaluated sedation, tolerance to the procedure, hemodynamic stability, and adverse symptoms. Results. We studied 46 men and 54 women, from 17 to 78 years of age. The procedure was reported without discomfort in 48 patients (88%) in the GFNB group and 32 (64%) in the TAAS group; 6 patients (12%) in GFNB group and 18 (36%) in TAAS group reported the procedure as little discomfort (χ (2) = 3.95, P = 0.04). There was no difference in frequency of nausea (4% in both groups) and retching, 4% versus 8% for GFNB and TASS group, respectively (P = 0.55). Conclusions. The use of glossopharyngeal nerve block provides greater comfort and tolerance to the patient undergoing upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. It also reduces the need for sedation.

  12. Gastrointestinal involvement by mantle cell lymphoma observed by endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Li, De-Ming; Jiang, Yue-Ping

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) is a subtype of non-Hodgkin B-cell lymphoma, accounting for 6% of all non-Hodgkin lymphoma. The typical appearance of intestinal MCL is multiple lymphomatous polyposis, whereas presentation as protruding lesions is uncommon. We herein report the case of a 64-year-old male patient who was admitted to our hospital with epigastric pains. On endoscopy, submucosal neoplasma were identified in the gastric antrum, the duodenal bulb, and the rectum. On endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) (OLYMPUS EUS EU-ME2, Miniprobe sonography), the lesions were homogeneously hypoechoic and originated from the submucous layer or muscularis mucosa. Pathological examination of biopsied specimens from the lesions of the rectum revealed diffuse lymphomatous proliferation and dense infiltration by monomorphic and small cleaved cells with irregularly shaped nuclei. On immunohistochemistry, the cells were positive for cyclin D1, CD20, CD21, SOX-11, and Bcl-2, but negative for CD3 and CD10; these findings were compatible with a diagnosis of MCL. Conclusion: The EUS characteristics initially led to the suspicion of digestive neuroendocrine tumors, since MCL presenting as submucosal tumors on EUS is rarely reported. We herein present this case to suggest clinician to include MCL in the differential diagnosis of submucosal intestinal lesions, as early diagnosis and timely treatment may improve patient prognosis. PMID:28296749

  13. Small-bowel capsule endoscopy and device-assisted enteroscopy for diagnosis and treatment of small-bowel disorders: European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) Clinical Guideline.

    PubMed

    Pennazio, Marco; Spada, Cristiano; Eliakim, Rami; Keuchel, Martin; May, Andrea; Mulder, Chris J; Rondonotti, Emanuele; Adler, Samuel N; Albert, Joerg; Baltes, Peter; Barbaro, Federico; Cellier, Christophe; Charton, Jean Pierre; Delvaux, Michel; Despott, Edward J; Domagk, Dirk; Klein, Amir; McAlindon, Mark; Rosa, Bruno; Rowse, Georgina; Sanders, David S; Saurin, Jean Christophe; Sidhu, Reena; Dumonceau, Jean-Marc; Hassan, Cesare; Gralnek, Ian M

    2015-04-01

    This Guideline is an official statement of the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE). The Guideline was also reviewed and endorsed by the British Society of Gastroenterology (BSG). It addresses the roles of small-bowel capsule endoscopy and device-assisted enteroscopy for diagnosis and treatment of small-bowel disorders. Main recommendations 1 ESGE recommends small-bowel video capsule endoscopy as the first-line investigation in patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (strong recommendation, moderate quality evidence). 2 In patients with overt obscure gastrointestinal bleeding, ESGE recommends performing small-bowel capsule endoscopy as soon as possible after the bleeding episode, optimally within 14 days, in order to maximize the diagnostic yield (strong recommendation, moderate quality evidence). 3 ESGE does not recommend the routine performance of second-look endoscopy prior to small-bowel capsule endoscopy; however whether to perform second-look endoscopy before capsule endoscopy in patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding or iron-deficiency anaemia should be decided on a case-by-case basis (strong recommendation, low quality evidence). 4 In patients with positive findings at small-bowel capsule endoscopy, ESGE recommends device-assisted enteroscopy to confirm and possibly treat lesions identified by capsule endoscopy (strong recommendation, high quality evidence). 5 ESGE recommends ileocolonoscopy as the first endoscopic examination for investigating patients with suspected Crohn's disease (strong recommendation, high quality evidence). In patients with suspected Crohn's disease and negative ileocolonoscopy findings, ESGE recommends small-bowel capsule endoscopy as the initial diagnostic modality for investigating the small bowel, in the absence of obstructive symptoms or known stenosis (strong recommendation, moderate quality evidence).ESGE does not recommend routine small-bowel imaging or the use of the PillCam patency capsule

  14. Imaging considerations in fiber optic endoscopy system for the gastrointestinal endoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murukeshan, Vadakke M.; Sujatha, Narayanan Unni; Ong, Lin S.; Seah, Leong K.

    2003-10-01

    A theoretical model, which describes both the spatial distributions of photons in fluorescence endoscopic images for the detection of cancerous cells in the intra cavities of human body, specifically gastrointestinal path is presented in this paper. The design concept of the image probe, which was developed for collecting the low fluorescent emission using an excitation laser source and the imaging done through novel imaging lens scheme will be discussed with its advantages and limitations in comparison with the existing imaging schemes. Finally, a quantitative analysis done by varying the different parameters affecting the tissue fluorescence is discussed in this paper.

  15. ASGE: Find a Doctor

    MedlinePlus

    ... Drainage Stent Placement Stricture Dilation Upper Endoscopy (EGD) Quality & Safety GIQuIC Registry Infection Control Privileging & Credentialing Quality Indicators Education & Meetings Advanced Education & ...

  16. Computer-aided decision support systems for endoscopy in the gastrointestinal tract: a review.

    PubMed

    Liedlgruber, Michael; Uhl, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    Today, medical endoscopy is a widely used procedure to inspect the inner cavities of the human body. The advent of endoscopic imaging techniques-allowing the acquisition of images or videos-created the possibility for the development of the whole new branch of computer-aided decision support systems. Such systems aim at helping physicians to identify possibly malignant abnormalities more accurately. At the beginning of this paper, we give a brief introduction to the history of endoscopy, followed by introducing the main types of endoscopes which emerged so far (flexible endoscope, wireless capsule endoscope, and confocal laser endomicroscope). We then give a brief introduction to computer-aided decision support systems specifically targeted at endoscopy in the gastrointestinal tract. Then we present general facts and figures concerning computer-aided decision support systems and summarize work specifically targeted at computer-aided decision support in the gastrointestinal tract. This summary is followed by a discussion of some common issues concerning the approaches reviewed and suggestions of possible ways to resolve them.

  17. Recent clinical management of antithrombotic agents for gastrointestinal endoscopy after revision of guidelines in Japan.

    PubMed

    Ono, Satoshi; Fujishiro, Mitsuhiro; Ikeda, Yuichi; Komuro, Issei; Koike, Kazuhiko

    2015-09-01

    In 2012, the Japan Gastroenterological Endoscopy Society (JGES) revised guidelines for the management of gastrointestinal endoscopy for patients using antithrombotic agents. The conventional guidelines emphasized reducing the bleeding risk that accompanies gastrointestinal endoscopy, but the present guidelines prioritize reduction of thromboembolism risk during discontinuation of antithrombotic agents, which is consistent with Western guidelines. When the advantages outweigh the disadvantages, the guidelines permit endoscopic biopsy and high-bleeding-risk procedures without discontinuation of selected antithrombotic agents. These guidelines created a paradigm shift that has slowly, but surely, changed clinical daily practice in Japan. As a result, endoscopic biopsy without discontinuation of antithrombotic agents has been widely accepted, although solid evidence for its support is still lacking. Additionally, feasibility of high-bleeding-risk procedures without discontinuation of selected antithrombotic agents is also controversial because evidence newly acquired after publication of the present guidelines is low in evidence level. Consequently, clinical studies with a high evidence level, including randomized controlled studies, are mandatory to establish reliable upcoming guidelines. At the same time, under the present guidelines, the accomplishment of such studies in Japan is expected.

  18. International Digestive Endoscopy Network 2014: Turnpike to the Future

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun Young; Kwon, Kwang An; Choi, Il Ju; Ryu, Ji Kon

    2014-01-01

    Social networks are useful in the study of relationships between individuals or entire populations, and the ties through which any given social unit connects. Those represent the convergence of the various social contacts of that unit. Consequently, the term "social networking service" (SNS) became extremely familiar. Similar to familiar SNSs, International Digestive Endoscopy Network (IDEN) 2014 was based on an international network composed of an impressive 2-day scientific program dealing with a variety of topics for gastrointestinal (GI) diseases, which connects physicians and researchers from all over the world. The scientific programs included live endoscopic demonstrations and provided cutting-edge information and practice tips as well as the latest advances concerning upper GI, lower GI, and pancreatobiliary endoscopy. IDEN 2014 featured American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy-Korean Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ASGE-KSGE)-joint sessions prepared through cooperation between ASGE and KSGE. Furthermore, IDEN 2014 provided a special program for young scientists called the 'Asian Young Endoscopist Award Forum' to foster networks, with many young endoscopists from Asian countries taking an active interest and participation. PMID:25324994

  19. Malpractice claims in gastrointestinal endoscopy: analysis of an insurance industry data base.

    PubMed

    Gerstenberger, P D; Plumeri, P A

    1993-01-01

    We investigated 610 endoscopy-associated and 486 gastroenterology-associated malpractice claim files of the Physicians Insurers Association of America data-sharing project. We determined the relative malpractice claim risk for each of the major types of endoscopic procedures by comparing claim frequencies with Medicare performance frequencies. Relative malpractice risks were 1.0 for sigmoidoscopy, 1.2 for esophagogastroduodenoscopy, 1.6 for endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, and 1.7 for colonoscopy. "Improper performance" was alleged in 54% of claims and "diagnosis error" in 24% of claims. Of 121 claim files alleging a diagnostic error, 74 (61%) pertained to missed malignancies, of which 69% were colorectal. Of 147 claims alleging iatrogenic injury, 140 (95%) involved perforation or similar direct injury to the gastrointestinal tract. Problems with consent were alleged in 44% of 158 endoscopy-related claim files alleging additional associated issues.

  20. Obscure Overt Gastrointestinal Bleeding Secondary to Ventral Hernioplasty Mesh Small Bowel Perforation Visualized With Video Capsule Endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Mendez-Ishizaki, Yumi

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a 79-year-old female presenting with hematemesis and melena 9 years after ventral hernioplasty with mesh. After initial normal endoscopy and colonoscopy, video capsule endoscopy revealed a metallic wire mesh perforating the jejunum. Abdominal computed tomography did not identify a perforation although metallic mesh was visualized close to the small bowel. We present the first ventral hernia mesh perforation diagnosed via video capsule endoscopy. Such a finding emphasizes the importance of a complete diagnostic workup when approaching a patient with obscure overt gastrointestinal bleeding. PMID:28008400

  1. Applying LED in full-field optical coherence tomography for gastrointestinal endoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Bor-Wen; Wang, Yu-Yen; Juan, Yu-Shan; Hsu, Sheng-Jie

    2015-08-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has become an important medical imaging technology due to its non-invasiveness and high resolution. Full-field optical coherence tomography (FF-OCT) is a scanning scheme especially suitable for en face imaging as it employs a CMOS/CCD device for parallel pixels processing. FF-OCT can also be applied to high-speed endoscopic imaging. Applying cylindrical scanning and a right-angle prism, we successfully obtained a 360° tomography of the inner wall of an intestinal cavity through an FF-OCT system with an LED source. The 10-μm scale resolution enables the early detection of gastrointestinal lesions, which can increase detection rates for esophageal, stomach, or vaginal cancer. All devices used in this system can be integrated by MOEMS technology to contribute to the studies of gastrointestinal medicine and advanced endoscopy technology.

  2. How to improve patient satisfaction during midazolam sedation for gastrointestinal endoscopy?

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Eun Hyo; Hong, Kyoung Sup; Lee, Young; Seo, Ji Yeon; Choi, Ji Min; Chun, Jaeyoung; Kim, Sang Gyun; Kim, Joo Sung; Jung, Hyun Chae

    2017-01-01

    AIM To determine the procedure-related factors that affect sedation satisfaction and to make a suggestion to improve it. METHODS We prospectively enrolled a total of 456 patients who underwent outpatient endoscopy procedures with midazolam sedation between March 2014 and August 2014. All patients completed both pre- and post-endoscopy questionnaires about sedation expectations and satisfaction. RESULTS The study cohort included 167 (36.6%) patients who underwent esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD), 167 (36.6%) who underwent colonoscopy, and 122 (26.8%) who underwent a combined procedure (EGD and colonoscopy). Over 80% of all patients were satisfied with sedation using midazolam. In univariate and multivariate analyses, total procedure time in the EGD group, younger age (≤ 50 years), and longer colonoscopy withdrawal time in the colonoscopy group were related to decreased satisfaction with sedation. However, in active monitoring and intervention group, there was no decrease in grade of satisfaction despite longer procedure time due to more procedures during colonoscopy. Younger age (≤ 50 years), longer inter-procedure time gap, and colonoscopy withdrawal time were related to decreased satisfaction in the combined EGD and colonoscopy group. CONCLUSION Midazolam is still a safe and effective sedative for gastrointestinal endoscopy. Satisfaction with sedation depends on several factors including age (≤ 50 years) and procedure time duration. To improve patient satisfaction with sedation, active monitoring of sedation status by the endoscopist should be considered for patients who require long procedure time. PMID:28246484

  3. Advanced endoscopic imaging: European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) Technology Review.

    PubMed

    East, James E; Vleugels, Jasper L; Roelandt, Philip; Bhandari, Pradeep; Bisschops, Raf; Dekker, Evelien; Hassan, Cesare; Horgan, Gareth; Kiesslich, Ralf; Longcroft-Wheaton, Gaius; Wilson, Ana; Dumonceau, Jean-Marc

    2016-11-01

    Background and aim: This technical review is an official statement of the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE). It addresses the utilization of advanced endoscopic imaging in gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy. Methods: This technical review is based on a systematic literature search to evaluate the evidence supporting the use of advanced endoscopic imaging throughout the GI tract. Technologies considered include narrowed-spectrum endoscopy (narrow band imaging [NBI]; flexible spectral imaging color enhancement [FICE]; i-Scan digital contrast [I-SCAN]), autofluorescence imaging (AFI), and confocal laser endomicroscopy (CLE). The Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) system was adopted to define the strength of recommendation and the quality of evidence. Main recommendations:1. We suggest advanced endoscopic imaging technologies improve mucosal visualization and enhance fine structural and microvascular detail. Expert endoscopic diagnosis may be improved by advanced imaging, but as yet in community-based practice no technology has been shown consistently to be diagnostically superior to current practice with high definition white light. (Low quality evidence.) 2. We recommend the use of validated classification systems to support the use of optical diagnosis with advanced endoscopic imaging in the upper and lower GI tracts (strong recommendation, moderate quality evidence). 3. We suggest that training improves performance in the use of advanced endoscopic imaging techniques and that it is a prerequisite for use in clinical practice. A learning curve exists and training alone does not guarantee sustained high performances in clinical practice. (Weak recommendation, low quality evidence.) Conclusion: Advanced endoscopic imaging can improve mucosal visualization and endoscopic diagnosis; however it requires training and the use of validated classification systems.

  4. INTEGRATED OPTICAL TOOLS FOR MINIMALLY INVASIVE DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT AT GASTROINTESTINAL ENDOSCOPY

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Diaz, Eladio; Bigio, Irving J.; Singh, Satish K.

    2010-01-01

    Over the past two decades, the bulk of gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopic procedures has shifted away from diagnostic and therapeutic interventions for symptomatic disease toward cancer prevention in asymptomatic patients. This shift has resulted largely from a decrease in the incidence of peptic ulcer disease in the era of antisecretory medications coupled with emerging evidence for the efficacy of endoscopic detection and eradication of dysplasia, a histopathological biomarker widely accepted as a precursor to cancer. This shift has been accompanied by a drive toward minimally-invasive, in situ optical diagnostic technologies that help assess the mucosa for cellular changes that relate to dysplasia. Two competing but complementary approaches have been pursued. The first approach is based on broad-view targeting of “areas of interest” or “red flags.” These broad-view technologies include standard white light endoscopy (WLE), high-definition endoscopy (HD), and “electronic” chromoendoscopy (narrow-band-type imaging). The second approach is based on multiple small area or point-source (meso/micro) measurements, which can be either machine (spectroscopy) or human-interpreted (endomicroscopy, magnification endoscopy), much as histopatholgy slides are. In this paper we present our experience with the development and testing of a set of familiar but “smarter” standard tissue-sampling tools that can be routinely employed during screening/surveillance endoscopy. These tools have been designed to incorporate fiberoptic probes that can mediate spectroscopy or endomicroscopy. We demonstrate the value of such tools by assessing their preliminary performance from several ongoing clinical studies. Our results have shown promise for a new generation of integrated optical tools for a variety of screening/surveillance applications during GI endoscopy. Integrated devices should prove invaluable for dysplasia surveillance strategies that currently result in large

  5. Photoplethysmography respiratory rate monitoring in patients receiving procedural sedation and analgesia for upper gastrointestinal endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Touw, Hugo R W; Verheul, Milou H; Tuinman, Pieter R; Smit, Jeroen; Thöne, Deirdre; Schober, Patrick; Boer, Christa

    2016-05-28

    The value of capnography during procedural sedation and analgesia (PSA) for the detection of hypoxaemia during upper gastrointestinal (UGI) endoscopic procedures is limited. Photoplethysmography respiratory rate (RRp) monitoring may provide a useful alternative, but the level of agreement with capnography during PSA is unknown. We therefore investigated the level of agreement between the RRp and capnography-based RR (RRc) during PSA for UGI endoscopy. This study included patients undergoing PSA for UGI endoscopy procedures. Pulse oximetry (SpO2) and RRc were recorded in combination with Nellcor 2.0 (RRp) monitoring (Covidien, USA). Bland-Altman analysis was used to evaluate the level of agreement between RRc and RRp. Episodes of apnoea, defined as no detection of exhaled CO2 for minimal 36 s, and hypoxaemia, defined as an SpO2 < 92 %, were registered. A total of 1054 min of data from 26 patients were analysed. Bland-Altman analysis between the RRc and RRp revealed a bias of 2.25 ± 5.41 breath rate per minute (brpm), with limits of agreement from -8.35 to 12.84 brpm for an RR ≥ 4 brpm. A total of 67 apnoea events were detected. In 21 % of all apnoea events, the patient became hypoxaemic. Hypoxaemia occurred 42 times with a median length of 34 (19-141) s, and was preceded in 34 % of the cases by apnoea and in 64 % by an RRc ≥ 8 brpm. In 81 % of all apnoea events, photoplethysmography registered an RRp ≥ 4 brpm. We found a low level of agreement between capnography and the plethysmography respiratory rate during procedural sedation for UGI endoscopy. Moreover, respiratory rate derived from both the capnogram and photoplethysmogram showed a limited ability to provide warning signs for a hypoxaemic event during the sedation procedure.

  6. Differences in Managing Anticoagulants and Antiplatelets for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy between East and West

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sun-Young

    2009-01-01

    Decreasing the bleeding risk associated with gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopic procedures and minimizing the thromboembolic risk of withdrawing medications are very important for the patients taking anticoagulants and antiplatelets. Western guidelines on managing anticoagulation and antiplatelet medications in GI endoscopy suggest a polypectomy with aspirin medication or a biopsy with warfarin medication. However, Eastern endoscopists’ adherence to Western guidelines may be responsible for Easteners experiencing massive bleedings. During the cessation of drugs, it should be emphasized that Asians may be predisposed to different forms of embolism more likely to be of the cerebrovascular system, whereas Westerners more likely to be of the cardiovascular variety. To better understand the differences between the East and West, differences in drug metabolism should be considered that results in greater body weight-normalized plasma unbound clearance of drug in Easterners. Taken as a whole, different managements are required for GI endoscopy in patients on anticoagulation and/or antiplatelet medications based on differences in metabolism of drugs, risk of hemorrhage, and forms of thromboembolism. PMID:27956957

  7. A Systematic Review of Factors Associated With Utilization of Monitored Anesthesia Care for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Saleh, Ashraf; Rubenstein, Joel H.

    2016-01-01

    Utilization of monitored anesthesia care (MAC) for gastrointestinal endoscopy has increased markedly over the past decade, leading to significant additional health care expenditures. However, the extent to which certain patient-, provider-, and facility-level factors lead to MAC utilization is unclear. A systematic review of 13 studies evaluating influential factors associated with MAC utilization for colonoscopy and/or esophagogastroduodenoscopy was conducted. Multiple studies revealed significant increases in MAC utilization since the early 2000s, with substantial regional variation. The most influential patient-related factors associated with MAC utilization include female sex and diagnostic procedural indication. Other patient-related factors with weaker associations or conflicting evidence include older age, comorbidity, higher patient income, and white/non-Hispanic race. The impact of patient substance use and/or prescription medication use has been minimally studied. The strongest provider- and facility-level factors associated with MAC use are a surgeon endoscopist and nonhospital site of service. Other factors with weaker associations include facility endoscopy volume and endoscopist years of experience. Further qualitative and quantitative health services research is needed to better understand the root cause of the rising trend of MAC utilization and to develop policies for encouraging appropriate use of MAC. PMID:27493596

  8. Modeling the costs and benefits of capnography monitoring during procedural sedation for gastrointestinal endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Saunders, Rhodri; Erslon, Mary; Vargo, John

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: The addition of capnography to procedural sedation/analgesia (PSA) guidelines has been controversial due to limited evidence of clinical utility in moderate PSA and cost concerns. Patients and methods: A comprehensive model of PSA during gastrointestinal endoscopy was developed to capture adverse events (AEs), guideline interventions, outcomes, and costs. Randomized, controlled trials and large-scale studies were used to inform the model. The model compared outcomes using pulse oximetry alone with pulse oximetry plus capnography. Pulse oximetry was assumed at no cost, whereas capnography cost USD 4,000 per monitor. AE costs were obtained from literature review and Premier database analysis. The model population (n = 8,000) had mean characteristics of age 55.5 years, body mass index 26.2 kg/m2, and 45.3 % male. Results: The addition of capnography resulted in a 27.2 % and 18.0 % reduction in the proportion of patients experiencing an AE during deep and moderate PSA, respectively. Sensitivity analyses demonstrated significant reductions in apnea and desaturation with capnography. The median (95 % credible interval) number needed to treat to avoid any adverse event was 8 (2; 72) for deep and 6 (−59; 92) for moderate. Reduced AEs resulted in cost savings that accounted for the additional upfront purchase cost. Capnography was estimated to reduce the cost per procedure by USD 85 (deep) or USD 35 (moderate). Conclusions: Capnography is estimated to be cost-effective if not cost saving during PSA for gastrointestinal endoscopy. Savings were driven by improved patient safety, suggesting that capnography may have an important role in the safe provision of PSA. PMID:27004254

  9. Sex differences in dreaming during short propofol sedation for upper gastrointestinal endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Xu, Guanghong; Liu, Xuesheng; Sheng, Qiying; Yu, Fengqiong; Wang, Kai

    2013-10-02

    Previous reports suggest that sex differences may exist in dreaming under anesthesia, but their results were inconclusive. The current study explored sex differences in the incidence and content of dreams during short propofol sedation for upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and investigated whether sex differences or dream content affect patient satisfaction with sedation. A total of 200 patients (100 men and 100 women) undergoing upper gastrointestinal endoscopy participated in this study. Patients were interviewed with the modified Brice questionnaire about the incidence and the content of dreams, and satisfaction with sedation was assessed. The results showed that the incidence of dreaming was significantly higher in men (31%) than in women (17%) (P=0.02), but recovery time was similar. In men, 45% (14/31) of dreamers reported positive emotional content and only 6% (2/31) reported negative emotional content. In contrast, in women, 18% (3/17) reported positive and 29% (5/17) reported negative content (P=0.04). Men reported dreams that were more vivid, meaningful, familiar, and memorable (P<0.01). No significant sex differences were observed in the emotional intensity of dreams, and emotional content did not influence patients' satisfaction. In sum, sex differences existed in dreaming during short propofol sedation despite similar recovery time and matching in terms of age. Men reported dreaming more frequently and had a higher incidence of recall for their dream narratives. In particular, men reported significantly more positive emotional content, less negative emotional content, and more meaningful content. Dreamer satisfaction with sedation was not influenced by sex or dream content.

  10. Video capsule endoscopy in left ventricular assist device recipients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Amornsawadwattana, Surachai; Nassif, Michael; Raymer, David; LaRue, Shane; Chen, Chien-Huan

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To assess whether video capsule endoscopy (VCE) affects the outcomes of left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) recipients with gastrointestinal bleeding. METHODS: This is a retrospective study of LVAD recipients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (OGIB) who underwent VCE at a tertiary medical center between 2005 and 2013. All patients were admitted and monitored with telemetry and all VCE and subsequent endoscopic procedures were performed as inpatients. A VCE study was considered positive only when P2 lesions were found and was regarded as negative if P1 or P0 were identified. All patients were followed until heart transplant, death, or the end of the study. RESULTS: Between 2005 and 2013, 30 patients with LVAD underwent VCE. Completion rate of VCE was 93.3% and there was no capsule retention. No interference of VCE recording or the function of LVAD was found. VCE was positive in 40% of patients (n = 12). The most common finding was active small intestinal bleeding (50%) and small intestinal angiodysplasia (33.3%). There was no difference in the rate of recurrent bleeding between patients with positive and negative VCE study (50.0% vs 55.6%, P = 1.00) during an average of 11.6 ± 9.6 mo follow up. Among patients with positive VCE, the recurrent bleeding rate did not differ whether subsequent endoscopy was performed (50% vs 50%, P = 1.00). CONCLUSION: VCE can be safely performed in LVAD recipients with a diagnostic yield of 40%. VCE does not affect recurrent bleeding in LVAD patients regardless of findings. PMID:27182165

  11. Telemedicine for gastrointestinal endoscopy: The Endoscopic Club E-conference in the Asia Pacific Region

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Shiaw-Hooi; Rerknimitr, Rungsun; Kudo, Kuriko; Tomimatsu, Shunta; Ahmad, Mohamad Zahir; Aso, Akira; Seo, Dong Wan; Goh, Khean-Lee; Shimizu, Shuji

    2017-01-01

    Background and study aims An Endoscopic Club E-conference (ECE) was set up in May 2014 to cater to increased demand for gastrointestinal endoscopy-related teleconferences in the Asia-Pacific region which were traditionally organized by the medical working group (MWG) of Asia-Pacific Advanced Network. This study describes how the ECE meeting was run, examines the group dynamics, outlines feedback and analyzes factors affecting the enthusiasm of participants. It is hoped that the findings here can serve as guidance for future development of other teleconference groups. Methods The preparation, running of and feedback on the ECE teleconference were evaluated and described. The country’s economic situation, time zone differences, connectivity with a research and education network (REN) and engineering cooperation of each member were recorded and analyzed with regard to their association with participant enthusiasm, which was taken as participation in at least 50 % of the meetings since joining. Associations were calculated using 2-way table with chi-square test to generate odds ratio and P value. Results To date, ECE members have increased from 7 to 29 (increment of 314 %). Feedback received indicated a high level of satisfaction with program content, audiovisual transmission and ease of technical preparation. Upper gastrointestinal luminal endoscopy-related topics were the most favored program content. Those topics were presented mainly via case studies with a focus on management challenges. Time zone differences of more than 6 hours and poor engineering cooperation were independently associated with inactive participation (P values of 0.04 and 0.001 respectively). Conclusions Good program content and high-quality audiovisual transmission are keys to the success of an endoscopic medical teleconference. In our analysis, poor engineering cooperation and discordant time zones contributed to inactive participation while connectivity with REN and a country

  12. Removal of foreign bodies in the upper gastrointestinal tract in adults: European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) Clinical Guideline.

    PubMed

    Birk, Michael; Bauerfeind, Peter; Deprez, Pierre H; Häfner, Michael; Hartmann, Dirk; Hassan, Cesare; Hucl, Tomas; Lesur, Gilles; Aabakken, Lars; Meining, Alexander

    2016-05-01

    This Guideline is an official statement of the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE). It addresses the removal of foreign bodies in the upper gastrointestinal tract in adults. Recommendations Nonendoscopic measures 1 ESGE recommends diagnostic evaluation based on the patient's history and symptoms. ESGE recommends a physical examination focused on the patient's general condition and to assess signs of any complications (strong recommendation, low quality evidence). 2 ESGE does not recommend radiological evaluation for patients with nonbony food bolus impaction without complications. We recommend plain radiography to assess the presence, location, size, configuration, and number of ingested foreign bodies if ingestion of radiopaque objects is suspected or type of object is unknown (strong recommendation, low quality evidence). 3 ESGE recommends computed tomography (CT) scan in all patients with suspected perforation or other complication that may require surgery (strong recommendation, low quality evidence). 4 ESGE does not recommend barium swallow, because of the risk of aspiration and worsening of the endoscopic visualization (strong recommendation, low quality evidence). 5 ESGE recommends clinical observation without the need for endoscopic removal for management of asymptomatic patients with ingestion of blunt and small objects (except batteries and magnets). If feasible, outpatient management is appropriate (strong recommendation, low quality evidence). 6 ESGE recommends close observation in asymptomatic individuals who have concealed packets of drugs by swallowing ("body packing"). We recommend against endoscopic retrieval. We recommend surgical referral in cases of suspected packet rupture, failure of packets to progress, or intestinal obstruction (strong recommendation, low quality evidence). Endoscopic measures 7 ESGE recommends emergent (preferably within 2 hours, but at the latest within 6 hours) therapeutic esophagogastroduodenoscopy for

  13. Design of a video capsule endoscopy system with low-power ASIC for monitoring gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Liu, Gang; Yan, Guozheng; Zhu, Bingquan; Lu, Li

    2016-11-01

    In recent years, wireless capsule endoscopy (WCE) has been a state-of-the-art tool to examine disorders of the human gastrointestinal tract painlessly. However, system miniaturization, enhancement of the image-data transfer rate and power consumption reduction for the capsule are still key challenges. In this paper, a video capsule endoscopy system with a low-power controlling and processing application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) is designed and fabricated. In the design, these challenges are resolved by employing a microimage sensor, a novel radio frequency transmitter with an on-off keying modulation rate of 20 Mbps, and an ASIC structure that includes a clock management module, a power-efficient image compression module and a power management unit. An ASIC-based prototype capsule, which measures Φ11 mm × 25 mm, has been developed here. Test results show that the designed ASIC consumes much less power than most of the other WCE systems and that its total power consumption per frame is the least. The image compression module can realize high near-lossless compression rate (3.69) and high image quality (46.2 dB). The proposed system supports multi-spectral imaging, including white light imaging and autofluorescence imaging, at a maximum frame rate of 24 fps and with a resolution of 400 × 400. Tests and in vivo trials in pigs have proved the feasibility of the entire system, but further improvements in capsule control and compression performance inside the ASIC are needed in the future.

  14. Laparoscopic diverticulectomy with the aid of intraoperative gastrointestinal endoscopy to treat epiphrenic diverticulum

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Lei; Wu, Ji-xiang; Chen, Xiao-hong; Zhang, Yun-Feng; Ke, Ji

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Most researchers believe that the presence of large epiphrenic diverticulum (ED) with severe symptoms should lead to the consideration of surgical options. The choice of minimally invasive techniques and whether Heller myotomy with antireflux fundoplication should be employed after diverticulectomy became points of debate. The aim of this study was to describe how to perform laparoscopic transhiatal diverticulectomy (LTD) and oesophagomyotomy with the aid of intraoperative gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy and how to investigate whether the oesophagomyotomy should be performed routinely after LTD. PATIENTS AND METHODS: From 2008 to 2013, 11 patients with ED underwent LTD with the aid of intraoperative GI endoscopy at our department. Before surgery, 4 patients successfully underwent oesophageal manometry: Oesophageal dysfunction and an increase of the lower oesophageal sphincter pressure (LESP) were found in 2 patients. RESULTS: There were 2 cases of conversion to an open transthoracic procedure. Six patients underwent LTD, Heller myotomy and Dor fundoplication; and 3 patients underwent only LTD. The dysphagia and regurgitation 11 patients experienced before surgery improved significantly. Motor function studies showed that there was no oesophageal peristalsis in 5 patients during follow-up, while 6 patients showed seemingly normal oesophageal motility. The LESP of 6 patients undergoing LTD, myotomy and Dor fundoplication was 16.7 ± 10.2 mmHg, while the LESPs of 3 patients undergoing only LTD were 26 mmHg, 18 mmHg and 21 mmHg, respectively. In 4 cases experiencing LTD, myotomy and Dor fundoplication, the gastro-oesophageal reflux occurred during the sleep stage. CONCLUSIONS: LTD constitutes a safe and valid approach for ED patients with severe symptoms. As not all patients with large ED have oesophageal disorders, according to manometric and endoscopic results, surgeons can categorise and decide whether or not myotomy and antireflux surgery after LTD will

  15. Propofol versus Midazolam for Upper Gastrointestinal Endoscopy in Cirrhotic Patients: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Hsiao-Chien; Lin, Yu-Cih; Ko, Ching-Lung; Lou, Horng-Yuan; Chen, Ta-Liang; Tam, Ka-Wai; Chen, Chien-Yu

    2015-01-01

    Background Sedation during gastrointestinal endoscopy is often achieved using propofol or midazolam in general population. However, impaired protein synthesis, altered drug metabolism, and compromised hepatic blood flow in patients with liver cirrhosis might affect the pharmacokinetics of sedatives, placing cirrhotic patients undergoing endoscopy at a greater risk of adverse events. The objective of this study was to assess comparative efficacies and safety of propofol and midazolam in cirrhotic patients undergoing endoscopy. Methods Randomized, controlled trials comparing propofol with midazolam in cirrhotic patients undergoing gastrointestinal endoscopy were selected. We performed the meta-analysis, using a random-effect model, the Review Manager, Version 5.2, statistical software package (Cochrane Collaboration, Oxford, UK) according to the PRISMA guidelines. Results Five studies between 2003 and 2012, including 433 patients, were included. Propofol provided a shorter time to sedation (weight mean difference: -2.76 min, 95% confidence interval: -3.00 to -2.51) and a shorter recovery time (weight mean difference -6.17 min, 95% confidence interval: -6.81 to -5.54) than midazolam did. No intergroup difference in the incidence of hypotension, bradycardia, or hypoxemia was observed. Midazolam was associated with the deterioration of psychometric scores for a longer period than propofol. Conclusion This meta-analysis suggests that Propofol sedation for endoscopy provides more rapid sedation and recovery than midazolam does. The risk of sedation-related side effects for propofol does not differ significantly from that of midazolam. The efficacy of propofol in cirrhotic patients undergoing endoscopy is superior to those of midazolam. PMID:25646815

  16. Endoscopic management of Barrett's esophagus: European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) Position Statement.

    PubMed

    Weusten, Bas; Bisschops, Raf; Coron, Emanuel; Dinis-Ribeiro, Mário; Dumonceau, Jean-Marc; Esteban, José-Miguel; Hassan, Cesare; Pech, Oliver; Repici, Alessandro; Bergman, Jacques; di Pietro, Massimiliano

    2017-02-01

    Current practices for the management of Barrett's esophagus (BE) vary across Europe, as several national European guidelines exist. This Position Statement from the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) is an attempt to homogenize recommendations and, hence, patient management according to the best scientific evidence and other considerations (e.g. health policy). A Working Group developed consensus statements, using the existing national guidelines as a starting point and considering new evidence in the literature. The Position Statement wishes to contribute to a more cost-effective approach to the care of patients with BE by reducing the number of surveillance endoscopies for patients with a low risk of malignant progression and centralizing care in expert centers for those with high progression rates.Main statements MS1 The diagnosis of BE is made if the distal esophagus is lined with columnar epithelium with a minimum length of 1 cm (tongues or circular) containing specialized intestinal metaplasia at histopathological examination. MS2 The ESGE recommends varying surveillance intervals for different BE lengths. For patients with an irregular Z-line/columnar-lined esophagus of < 1 cm, no routine biopsies or endoscopic surveillance is advised. For BE ≥ 1 cm and < 3 cm, BE surveillance should be repeated every 5 years. For BE ≥ 3 cm and < 10 cm, the interval for endoscopic surveillance should be 3 years. Patients with BE with a maximum extent ≥ 10 cm should be referred to a BE expert center for surveillance endoscopies. Patients with limited life expectancy and advanced age should be discharged from endoscopic surveillance. MS3 The diagnosis of any degree of dysplasia (including "indefinite for dysplasia") in BE requires confirmation by an expert gastrointestinal pathologist. MS4 Patients with visible lesions in BE diagnosed as dysplasia or early cancer should be referred to a BE expert center. All visible

  17. Biliary stenting: indications, choice of stents and results: European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) clinical guideline.

    PubMed

    Dumonceau, J-M; Tringali, A; Blero, D; Devière, J; Laugiers, R; Heresbach, D; Costamagna, G

    2012-03-01

    This article is part of a combined publication that expresses the current view of the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy about endoscopic biliary stenting. The present Clinical Guideline describes short-term and long-term results of biliary stenting depending on indications and stent models; it makes recommendations on when, how, and with which stent to perform biliary drainage in most common clinical settings, including in patients with a potentially resectable malignant biliary obstruction and in those who require palliative drainage of common bile duct or hilar strictures. Treatment of benign conditions (strictures related to chronic pancreatitis, liver transplantation, or cholecystectomy, and leaks and failed biliary stone extraction) and management of complications (including stent revision) are also discussed. A two-page executive summary of evidence statements and recommendations is provided. A separate Technology Review describes the models of biliary stents available and the stenting techniques, including advanced techniques such as insertion of multiple plastic stents, drainage of hilar strictures, retrieval of migrated stents and combined stenting in malignant biliary and duodenal obstructions.The target readership for the Clinical Guideline mostly includes digestive endoscopists, gastroenterologists, oncologists, radiologists, internists, and surgeons while the Technology Review should be most useful to endoscopists who perform biliary drainage.

  18. ASGE Technology Committee systematic review and meta-analysis assessing the ASGE PIVI thresholds for adopting real-time endoscopic assessment of the histology of diminutive colorectal polyps.

    PubMed

    Abu Dayyeh, Barham K; Thosani, Nirav; Konda, Vani; Wallace, Michael B; Rex, Douglas K; Chauhan, Shailendra S; Hwang, Joo Ha; Komanduri, Sri; Manfredi, Michael; Maple, John T; Murad, Faris M; Siddiqui, Uzma D; Banerjee, Subhas

    2015-03-01

    In vivo real-time assessment of the histology of diminutive (≤5 mm) colorectal polyps detected at colonoscopy can be achieved by means of an "optical biopsy" by using currently available endoscopic technologies. This systematic review and meta-analysis was performed by the American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ASGE) Technology Committee to specifically assess whether acceptable performance thresholds outlined by an ASGE Preservation and Incorporation of Valuable endoscopic Innovations (PIVI) document for clinical adoption of these technologies have been met. We conducted direct meta-analyses calculating the pooled negative predictive value (NPV) for narrow-band imaging (NBI), i-SCAN, and Fujinon Intelligent Color Enhancement (FICE)-assisted optical biopsy for predicting adenomatous polyp histology of small/diminutive colorectal polyps. We also calculated the pooled percentage agreement with histopathology when assigning postpolypectomy surveillance intervals based on combining real-time optical biopsy of colorectal polyps 5 mm or smaller with histopathologic assessment of polyps larger than 5 mm. Random-effects meta-analysis models were used. Statistical heterogeneity was evaluated by means of I(2) statistics. Our meta-analyses indicate that optical biopsy with NBI, exceeds the NPV threshold for adenomatous polyp histology, supporting a "diagnose-and-leave" strategy for diminutive predicted nonneoplastic polyps in the rectosigmoid colon. The pooled NPV of NBI for adenomatous polyp histology by using the random-effects model was 91% (95% confidence interval [CI], 88-94). This finding was associated with a high degree of heterogeneity (I(2) = 89%). Subgroup analysis indicated that the pooled NPV was greater than 90% for academic medical centers (91.8%; 95% CI, 89-94), for experts (93%; 95% CI, 91-96), and when the optical biopsy assessment was made with high confidence (93%; 95% CI, 90-96). Our meta-analyses also indicate that the agreement in

  19. Risk of transmission of carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae and related “superbugs” during gastrointestinal endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Muscarella, Lawrence F

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the risk of transmission of carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) and their related superbugs during gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy. Reports of outbreaks linked to GI endoscopes contaminated with different types of infectious agents, including CRE and their related superbugs, were reviewed. Published during the past 30 years, both prior to and since CRE’s emergence, these reports were obtained by searching the peer-reviewed medical literature (via the United States National Library of Medicine’s “MEDLINE” database); the Food and Drug Administration’s Manufacturer and User Facility Device Experience database, or “MAUDE”; and the Internet (via Google’s search engine). This review focused on an outbreak of CRE in 2013 following the GI endoscopic procedure known as endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, or ERCP, performed at “Hospital X” located in the suburbs of Chicago (IL; United States). Part of the largest outbreak of CRE in United States history, the infection and colonization of 10 and 28 of this hospital’s patients, respectively, received considerable media attention and was also investigated by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), which published a report about this outbreak in Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR), in 2014. This report, along with the results of an independent inspection of Hospital X’s infection control practices following this CRE outbreak, were also reviewed. While this article focuses primarily on the prevention of transmissions of CRE and their related superbugs in the GI endoscopic setting, some of its discussion and recommendations may also apply to other healthcare settings, to other types of flexible endoscopes, and to other types of transmissible infectious agents. This review found that GI endoscopy is an important risk factor for the transmission of CRE and their related superbugs, having been recently associated with patient morbidity and mortality

  20. Risk of transmission of carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae and related "superbugs" during gastrointestinal endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Muscarella, Lawrence F

    2014-10-16

    To evaluate the risk of transmission of carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) and their related superbugs during gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy. Reports of outbreaks linked to GI endoscopes contaminated with different types of infectious agents, including CRE and their related superbugs, were reviewed. Published during the past 30 years, both prior to and since CRE's emergence, these reports were obtained by searching the peer-reviewed medical literature (via the United States National Library of Medicine's "MEDLINE" database); the Food and Drug Administration's Manufacturer and User Facility Device Experience database, or "MAUDE"; and the Internet (via Google's search engine). This review focused on an outbreak of CRE in 2013 following the GI endoscopic procedure known as endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, or ERCP, performed at "Hospital X" located in the suburbs of Chicago (IL; United States). Part of the largest outbreak of CRE in United States history, the infection and colonization of 10 and 28 of this hospital's patients, respectively, received considerable media attention and was also investigated by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), which published a report about this outbreak in Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR), in 2014. This report, along with the results of an independent inspection of Hospital X's infection control practices following this CRE outbreak, were also reviewed. While this article focuses primarily on the prevention of transmissions of CRE and their related superbugs in the GI endoscopic setting, some of its discussion and recommendations may also apply to other healthcare settings, to other types of flexible endoscopes, and to other types of transmissible infectious agents. This review found that GI endoscopy is an important risk factor for the transmission of CRE and their related superbugs, having been recently associated with patient morbidity and mortality following ERCP. The CDC

  1. Image Quality Analysis of Various Gastrointestinal Endoscopes: Why Image Quality Is a Prerequisite for Proper Diagnostic and Therapeutic Endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Weon Jin; An, Pyeong; Ko, Kwang Hyun; Hahm, Ki Baik; Hong, Sung Pyo

    2015-01-01

    Arising from human curiosity in terms of the desire to look within the human body, endoscopy has undergone significant advances in modern medicine. Direct visualization of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract by traditional endoscopy was first introduced over 50 years ago, after which fairly rapid advancement from rigid esophagogastric scopes to flexible scopes and high definition videoscopes has occurred. In an effort towards early detection of precancerous lesions in the GI tract, several high-technology imaging scopes have been developed, including narrow band imaging, autofocus imaging, magnified endoscopy, and confocal microendoscopy. However, these modern developments have resulted in fundamental imaging technology being skewed towards red-green-blue and this technology has obscured the advantages of other endoscope techniques. In this review article, we have described the importance of image quality analysis using a survey to consider the diversity of endoscope system selection in order to better achieve diagnostic and therapeutic goals. The ultimate aims can be achieved through the adoption of modern endoscopy systems that obtain high image quality. PMID:26473119

  2. 24th Seah Cheng Siang Lecture: Seeing better, doing better--evolution and application of gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Goh, Khean Lee

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy has evolved tremendously from the early days when candlelight was used to illuminate scopes to the extent that it has now become an integral part of the practice of modern gastroenterology. The first gastroscope was a rigid scope first introduced by Adolf Kussmaul in 1868. However this scope suffered from the 2 drawbacks of poor illumination and high risk of instrumental perforation. Rudolf Schindler improved on this by inventing the semiflexible gastroscope in 1932. But it was Basil Hirschowitz, using the principle of light conduction in fibreoptics, who allowed us to "see well" for the first time when he invented the flexible gastroscopy in 1958. With amazing speed and innovation, instrument companies, chiefly Japanese, had improved on the Hirschowitz gastroscope and invented a flexible colonoscope. Walter McCune introduced the technique of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) in 1968 which has now evolved into a sophisticated procedure. The advent of the digital age in the 1980s saw the invention of the videoendoscope. Videoendoscopes have allowed us to start seeing the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) "better" with high magnification and resolution and optical/digital enhancements. Fusing confocal and light microscopy with endoscopy has allowed us to perform an "optical biopsy" of the GI mucosa. Development of endoscopic ultrasonography has allowed us to see "beyond" the GIT lumen. Seeing better has allowed us to do better. Endoscopists have ventured into newer procedures such as the resection of mucosal and submucosal tumours and the field of therapeutic GI endoscopy sees no end in sight.

  3. European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE): recommendations (2009) on clinical use of video capsule endoscopy to investigate small-bowel, esophageal and colonic diseases.

    PubMed

    Ladas, S D; Triantafyllou, K; Spada, C; Riccioni, M E; Rey, J-F; Niv, Y; Delvaux, M; de Franchis, R; Costamagna, G

    2010-03-01

    These recommendations on video capsule endoscopy, an emerging technology with an impact on the practice of endoscopy, were developed by the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) Guidelines Committee. The first draft of each section was prepared by one or two members of the writing team, who were selected as experts on the content of that section on the basis of their published work. They used evidence-based methodology, performing MEDLINE and PubMed literature searches to identify relevant clinical studies. Abstracts from scientific meetings were included only if there was no published full paper on a particular topic. If there was disagreement, the first author of the Guideline made the final decision. Recommendations were graded according to the strength of the supporting evidence. The draft guideline was critically reviewed by all authors and submitted to the ESGE councillors for their critical review before approval of the final document. The ESGE Guidelines Committee acknowledges that this document is based on a critical review of the data available at the time of preparation and that further studies may be needed to clarify some aspects. Moreover, this Guideline may be revised as necessary to account for changes in technology, new data, or other aspects of clinical practice. This document should be regarded as supplying recommendations only to gastroenterologists in providing care to their patients. It is not a set of rules and should not be construed as establishing a legal standard of care, or as encouraging, advocating, requiring, or discouraging any particular treatment. These recommendations must be interpreted according to the clinician's knowledge, expertise, and clinical judgment in the management of individual patients and, if necessary, a course of action that varies from recommendations must be undertaken.

  4. Diagnosis and management of iatrogenic endoscopic perforations: European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) Position Statement.

    PubMed

    Paspatis, Gregorios A; Dumonceau, Jean-Marc; Barthet, Marc; Meisner, Søren; Repici, Alessandro; Saunders, Brian P; Vezakis, Antonios; Gonzalez, Jean Michel; Turino, Stine Ydegaard; Tsiamoulos, Zacharias P; Fockens, Paul; Hassan, Cesare

    2014-08-01

    This Position Paper is an official statement of the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE). It addresses the diagnosis and management of iatrogenic perforation occurring during diagnostic or therapeutic digestive endoscopic procedures. Main recommendations 1 ESGE recommends that each center implements a written policy regarding the management of iatrogenic perforation, including the definition of procedures that carry a high risk of this complication. This policy should be shared with the radiologists and surgeons at each center. 2 In the case of an endoscopically identified perforation, ESGE recommends that the endoscopist reports: its size and location with a picture; endoscopic treatment that might have been possible; whether carbon dioxide or air was used for insufflation; and the standard report information. 3 ESGE recommends that symptoms or signs suggestive of iatrogenic perforation after an endoscopic procedure should be carefully evaluated and documented, possibly with a computed tomography (CT) scan, in order to prevent any diagnostic delay. 4 ESGE recommends that endoscopic closure should be considered depending on the type of perforation, its size, and the endoscopist expertise available at the center. A switch to carbon dioxide insufflation, the diversion of luminal content, and decompression of tension pneumoperitoneum or tension pneumothorax should also be done. 5 After closure of an iatrogenic perforation using an endoscopic method, ESGE recommends that further management should be based on the estimated success of the endoscopic closure and on the general clinical condition of the patient. In the case of no or failed endoscopic closure of the iatrogenic perforation, and in patients whose clinical condition is deteriorating, hospitalization and surgical consultation are recommended.

  5. A Response Surface Model Exploration of Dosing Strategies in Gastrointestinal Endoscopies Using Midazolam and Opioids

    PubMed Central

    Liou, Jing-Yang; Ting, Chien-Kun; Hou, Ming-Chih; Tsou, Mei-Yung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Classical midazolam–opioid combination for gastrointestinal endoscopy sedation has been adopted for decades. Dosing regimens have been studied but most require fixed dosing intervals. We intend to use a sophisticated pharmacodynamic tool, response surface model (RSM), to simulate sedation using different regimens. RSM can predict patient's response during different phases of the examination and predict patient's wake-up time with precision and without the need for fixed dosing intervals. We believe it will aid physicians in guiding their dosing strategy and timing. The study is divided into 2 parts. The first part is the full Greco RSMs development for 3 distinct phases: esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD), colonoscopy, and intersession (the time lapse between procedures). Observer's Assessment of Alertness Score (OAA/S) is used to assess patient response. The second part simulates 6 regimens with different characteristics using the RSMs: midazolam only, balanced midazolam and opioids, high-dose opioids and midazolam, low-dose midazolam with high-dose opioids, high-dose midazolam and low-dose opioids, and finally midazolam with continuous opioid infusion. Loss of response at 95% probability for adequate anesthesia during examination and return of consciousness at 50% probability during intersession was selected for simulation purposes. The average age of the patient population is 49.3 years. Mean BMI is 21.9 ± 2.3 kg/m2. About 56.7% were females and none received prior abdominal surgery. The cecal intubation rate was 100%. Only 1 patient (3%) developed temporary hypoxemia, which was promptly managed with simple measures. The RSMs for each phase showed significant synergy between midazolam and alfentanil. The balanced midazolam and alfentanil combination provided adequate anesthesia and most rapid return of consciousness. The awakening time from the final drug bolus was 7.4 minutes during EGD and colonoscopy stimulation, and 9.1 minutes during EGD

  6. Clinical features of upper gastrointestinal serrated lesions: An endoscopy database analysis of 98746 patients

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Hai-Long; Dong, Wen-Xiao; Xu, Meng-Que; Zhang, Yu-Jie; Wang, Si-Nan; Piao, Mei-Yu; Cao, Xiao-Cang; Wang, Bang-Mao

    2016-01-01

    AIM To analyse the clinical features of patients with the serrated lesions in the upper gastrointestinal tract (UPGI) tract. METHODS Patients who underwent routine esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) at the Digestive Endoscopy Centre of General Hospital, Tianjin Medical University between January 2011 and December 2015 were consecutively recruited. Patients with UPGI serrated lesions were consecutively identified. The patients’ demographics and histopathology were recorded. The colorectal findings for patients who underwent colonoscopy simultaneously or within six months were also extracted from the colonoscopy database. In addition, we analysed differences in colorectal neoplasia detection between the study patients and randomly selected patients matched for age and gender who did not exhibit serrated lesions and who also underwent colonoscopy in the same period. RESULTS A total of 21 patients out of 98746 patients (0.02%) who underwent EGD were confirmed to have serrated lesions with predominantly crenated, sawtooth-like configurations. The mean age of the 21 patients was (55.3 ± 17.2) years, and 11 patients were male (52.4%). In terms of the locations of the serrated lesions, 17 were found in the stomach (including 3 in the cardia, 9 in the corpus and 5 in the antrum), 3 were found in the duodenum, and 1 was found in the esophagus. Serrated lesions were found in different mucosal lesions, with 14 lesions were detected in polyps (8 hyperplastic polyps and 6 serrated adenomas with low grade dysplasia), 3 detected in Ménétrier gastropathy, 3 detected in an area of inflammation or ulcer, and 1 detected in the intramucosal carcinoma of the duodenum. In addition, colonoscopy data were available for 18 patients, and a significantly higher colorectal adenoma detection rate was observed in the UPGI serrated lesions group than in the randomly selected age- and gender-matched group without serrated lesions who also underwent colonoscopy in the same period (38.9% vs 11

  7. Small bowel capsule endoscopy for the investigation of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding: When we should do it and what should we expect.

    PubMed

    Viazis, N; Anastasiou, J; Karamanolis, D G

    2016-01-01

    Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding is defined as bleeding of unknown origin that persists or recurs (i.e. recurrent or persistent iron deficiency anemia, fecal occult blood test positivity or visible bleeding) after a negative initial workout that necessarily includes gastroscopy and colonoscopy. In clinical practice, small bowel capsule endoscopy is recommended as a third stage examination in these patients, since it is a simple, safe, non-invasive and reliable test. To date there are three available small bowel capsule systems that have gained FDA approval and their diagnostic yield has shown to be superior to other diagnostic modalities for the investigation of the small bowel in patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding. The test should be performed as close to the bleeding episode as possible and the administration of a purgative bowel preparation before the administration of capsule endoscopy is recommended by the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE). Issues that still remain to be solved are the definition of bleeding lesions and what really represents a positive finding, as well as the question of whether the outcome of patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding is altered after the test, i.e. to better define subgroups of patients that will mostly benefit from capsule endoscopy. In the future small bowel capsule endoscopy might be able to get guided, while tissue samples might be available as well. (Acta gastro-enterol. belg., 2016, 79, 355-362).

  8. Gastrointestinal endoscopy in a low budget context: delegating EGD to non-physician clinicians in Malawi can be feasible and safe.

    PubMed

    Wilhelm, T J; Mothes, H; Chiwewe, D; Mwatibu, B; Kähler, G

    2012-02-01

    Gastrointestinal endoscopy is rarely performed in low-income countries in sub-Saharan Africa. One reason is the lack of available medical doctors and specialists in these countries. At Zomba Central Hospital in Malawi, clinical officers (non-physician clinicians with 4 years of formal training) were trained in upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. Prospectively recorded details of 1732 consecutive esophagogastroduodenoscopies (EGDs) performed between September 2001 and August 2010 were analyzed to evaluate whether upper gastrointestinal endoscopy can be performed safely and accurately by clinical officers. A total of 1059 (61.1%) EGDs were performed by clinical officers alone and 673 (38.9%) were carried out with a medical doctor present who performed or assisted in the procedure. Failure and complication rates were similar in both groups (P=0.105). Endoscopic diagnoses for frequent indications were generally evenly distributed across the two groups. The main difference was a higher proportion of normal findings and a lower proportion of esophagitis in the group with a doctor present, although this was significant only in patients who had presented with epigastric/abdominal pain (P<0.001). In conclusion, delegating upper gastrointestinal endoscopy to clinical officers can be feasible and safe in a setting with a shortage of medical doctors when adequate training and supervision are provided.

  9. Eosinophilic esophagitis: Update in diagnosis and management. Position paper by the Italian Society of Gastroenterology and Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (SIGE).

    PubMed

    de Bortoli, Nicola; Penagini, Roberto; Savarino, Edoardo; Marchi, Santino

    2017-03-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a chronic immune-mediated disease of the esophagus characterized by symptoms related to esophageal dysfunction, as well as significant esophageal eosinophilia. The entity exists worldwide but has been most extensively studied in Western countries. However, a wide range of symptoms has been noticed such as chest pain or gastro-esophageal reflux disease-like symptoms. Upper gastro-intestinal endoscopy and esophageal biopsies are crucial for the diagnosis. Endoscopy might be normal or reveal typical patterns such as rings, furrows, exudates, edema, and stricture. Two to four biopsies should be performed both in the distal and in the proximal esophagus, and 15 eosinophils per high power field within the esophageal epithelium are the minimal threshold to diagnose eosinophilic esophagitis. Allergy testing is recommended, although its impact to orient treatment remains to be demonstrated. Eosinophilic esophagitis treatment includes medical treatment, diet and endoscopic dilation. Proton pump inhibitors are the first-line therapy as up to 50% of patients respond well to proton pump inhibitors irrespective of objective evidence of GERD. Topical viscous corticosteroids or elimination diet are the treatment of choice in case of unresponsiveness to proton pump inhibitors.

  10. Clinical indications for computed tomographic colonography: European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) and European Society of Gastrointestinal and Abdominal Radiology (ESGAR) Guideline.

    PubMed

    Spada, Cristiano; Stoker, Jaap; Alarcon, Onofre; Barbaro, Federico; Bellini, Davide; Bretthauer, Michael; De Haan, Margriet C; Dumonceau, Jean-Marc; Ferlitsch, Monika; Halligan, Steve; Helbren, Emma; Hellstrom, Mikael; Kuipers, Ernst J; Lefere, Philippe; Mang, Thomas; Neri, Emanuele; Petruzziello, Lucio; Plumb, Andrew; Regge, Daniele; Taylor, Stuart A; Hassan, Cesare; Laghi, Andrea

    2014-10-01

    This is an official guideline of the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) and the European Society of Gastrointestinal and Abdominal Radiology (ESGAR). It addresses the clinical indications for the use of computed tomographic colonography (CTC). A targeted literature search was performed to evaluate the evidence supporting the use of CTC. The Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) system was adopted to define the strength of recommendations and the quality of evidence. Main recommendations 1 ESGE/ESGAR recommend computed tomographic colonography (CTC) as the radiological examination of choice for the diagnosis of colorectal neoplasia. ESGE/ESGAR do not recommend barium enema in this setting (strong recommendation, high quality evidence). 2 ESGE/ESGAR recommend CTC, preferably the same or next day, if colonoscopy is incomplete. Delay of CTC should be considered following endoscopic resection. In the case of obstructing colorectal cancer, preoperative contrast-enhanced CTC may also allow location or staging of malignant lesions (strong recommendation, moderate quality evidence). 3 When endoscopy is contraindicated or not possible, ESGE/ESGAR recommend CTC as an acceptable and equally sensitive alternative for patients with symptoms suggestive of colorectal cancer (strong recommendation, high quality evidence). 4 ESGE/ESGAR recommend referral for endoscopic polypectomy in patients with at least one polyp  ≥  6  mm in diameter detected at CTC. CTC surveillance may be clinically considered if patients do not undergo polypectomy (strong recommendation, moderate quality evidence). 5 ESGE/ESGAR do not recommend CTC as a primary test for population screening or in individuals with a positive first-degree family history of colorectal cancer (CRC). However, it may be proposed as a CRC screening test on an individual basis providing the screenee is adequately informed about test characteristics, benefits, and risks

  11. Volumetric photoacoustic endoscopy of upper gastrointestinal tract: ultrasonic transducer technology development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Joon-Mo; Favazza, Christopher; Chen, Ruimin; Maslov, Konstantin; Cai, Xin; Zhou, Qifa; Shung, K. Kirk; Wang, Lihong V.

    2011-03-01

    We have successfully implemented a focused ultrasonic transducer for photoacoustic endoscopy. The photoacoustic endoscopic probe's ultrasound transducer determines the lateral resolution of the system. By using a focused ultrasonic transducer, we significantly improved the endoscope's spatial resolution and signal-to-noise ratio. This paper describes the technical details of the ultrasonic transducer incorporated into the photoacoustic endoscopic probe and the experimental results from which the transducer's resolution is quantified and the image improvement is validated.

  12. Capturing and stitching images with a large viewing angle and low distortion properties for upper gastrointestinal endoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ya-Cheng; Chung, Chien-Kai; Lai, Jyun-Yi; Chang, Han-Chao; Hsu, Feng-Yi

    2013-06-01

    Upper gastrointestinal endoscopies are primarily performed to observe the pathologies of the esophagus, stomach, and duodenum. However, when an endoscope is pushed into the esophagus or stomach by the physician, the organs behave similar to a balloon being gradually inflated. Consequently, their shapes and depth-of-field of images change continually, preventing thorough examination of the inflammation or anabrosis position, which delays the curing period. In this study, a 2.9-mm image-capturing module and a convoluted mechanism was incorporated into the tube like a standard 10- mm upper gastrointestinal endoscope. The scale-invariant feature transform (SIFT) algorithm was adopted to implement disease feature extraction on a koala doll. Following feature extraction, the smoothly varying affine stitching (SVAS) method was employed to resolve stitching distortion problems. Subsequently, the real-time splice software developed in this study was embedded in an upper gastrointestinal endoscope to obtain a panoramic view of stomach inflammation in the captured images. The results showed that the 2.9-mm image-capturing module can provide approximately 50 verified images in one spin cycle, a viewing angle of 120° can be attained, and less than 10% distortion can be achieved in each image. Therefore, these methods can solve the problems encountered when using a standard 10-mm upper gastrointestinal endoscope with a single camera, such as image distortion, and partial inflammation displays. The results also showed that the SIFT algorithm provides the highest correct matching rate, and the SVAS method can be employed to resolve the parallax problems caused by stitching together images of different flat surfaces.

  13. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy in emergency setting for patients receiving oral anticoagulants – practice updates

    PubMed Central

    Oprita, R; Oprita, B; Diaconescu, B; Bratu, MR; Berceanu, D

    2017-01-01

    Anticoagulants are frequently used medications in diverse cardiovascular diseases. Their uses highly increase the risk of bleeding from upper and lower gastrointestinal sources, whether there is a classic vitamin K antagonist or a novel oral anticoagulant. Their interruption can promote procoagulation status with different thromboembolic accidents. Discontinuation of oral anticoagulants before the elective procedures is standardized but there are no guidelines for managing bleeding lesions of upper gastrointestinal tract concomitant with anticoagulation. Also, because some of the anticoagulants are new comers, there is no specific antidote, and so their anticoagulation effect cannot be antagonized fast in order to reduce the bleeding. Therefore, the endoscopic hemostasis must be definitive and efficient. This is a short review of the current management for the bleeding lesions of the upper gastrointestinal tract in patients taking oral anticoagulants. PMID:28255372

  14. Virtual gastrointestinal colonoscopy in combination with large bowel endoscopy: Clinical application

    PubMed Central

    He, Qing; Rao, Ting; Guan, Yong-Song

    2014-01-01

    Although colorectal cancer (CRC) has no longer been the leading cancer killer worldwide for years with the exponential development in computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging, and positron emission tomography/CT as well as virtual colonoscopy for early detection, the CRC related mortality is still high. The objective of CRC screening is to reduce the burden of CRC and thereby the morbidity and mortality rates of the disease. It is believed that this goal can be achieved by regularly screening the average-risk population, enabling the detection of cancer at early, curable stages, and polyps before they become cancerous. Large-scale screening with multimodality imaging approaches plays an important role in reaching that goal to detect polyps, Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis and CRC in early stage. This article reviews kinds of presentative imaging procedures for various screening options and updates detecting, staging and re-staging of CRC patients for determining the optimal therapeutic method and forecasting the risk of CRC recurrence and the overall prognosis. The combination use of virtual colonoscopy and conventional endoscopy, advantages and limitations of these modalities are also discussed. PMID:25320519

  15. Alfentanil versus ketamine combined with propofol for sedation during upper gastrointestinal system endoscopy in morbidly obese patients

    PubMed Central

    Kılıc, Ertugrul; Demiriz, Barıs; Isıkay, Nurgül; Yıldırım, Abdullah E.; Can, Selman; Basmacı, Cem

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To observe the effects of both propofol/alfentanil and propofol/ketamine on sedation during upper gastrointestinal system endoscopy in morbidly obese patients (UGSEMOP). Methods: In a prospective, double-blinded, randomized clinical study, 52 patients scheduled for UGSEMOP were assigned to either group A (n=26; 10 µg/kg intravenous [IV] alfentanil) or group K (n=26; 0.5 mg/kg IV ketamine). Each patient was administered 0.7 mg/kg propofol for induction. If it was needed, the patients were administered an additional dose of IV propofol. This study was performed in Sehitkamil State Hospital, Gaziantep, Turkey, between January 2014-2015. Total propofol consumption, time to achieve Modified Aldrete Scores (MAS) of 5 and 10 following the procedure, physician and patient satisfaction scores, and instances of side effects, such as bradycardia and hypotension were recorded. Results: Time to onset of sedation and duration of sedation were both significantly shorter in group A. Patients in group A also required less time to achieve an MAS of 5. Total propofol consumption was significantly lower in group A. Conclusion: Both propofol/alfentanil and propofol/ketamine combinations provided appropriate hypnosis and analgesia during UGSEMOP. However, propofol consumption was significantly higher using the propofol/ketamine combination. PMID:27761556

  16. Comprehensive management of full-thickness luminal defects: The next frontier of gastrointestinal endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Winder, Joshua S; Pauli, Eric M

    2015-07-10

    Full thickness gastrointestinal defects such as perforations, leaks, and fistulae are a relatively common result of many of the endoscopic and surgical procedures performed in modern health care. As the number of these procedures increases, so too will the number of resultant defects. Historically, these were all treated by open surgical means with the associated morbidity and mortality. With the recent advent of advanced endoscopic techniques, these defects can be treated definitively while avoiding an open surgical procedure. Here we explore the various techniques and tools that are currently available for the treatment of gastrointestinal defects including through the scope clips, endoscopic suturing devices, over the scope clips, sealants, endoluminal stents, endoscopic suction devices, and fistula plugs. As fistulae represent the most recalcitrant of defects, we focus this editorial on a multimodal approach of treatment. This includes optimization of nutrition, treatment of infection, ablation of tracts, removal of foreign bodies, and treatment of distal obstructions. We believe that by addressing all of these factors at the time of attempted closure, the patient is optimized and has the best chance at long-term closure. However, even with all of these factors addressed, failure does occur and in those cases, endoscopic therapies may still play a role in that they allow the patient to avoid a definitive surgical therapy for a time while nutrition is optimized, and infections are addressed.

  17. [The role of endoscopy in the therapy for perforations and leakages of the gastrointestinal tract].

    PubMed

    Feisthammel, J; Jonas, S; Mössner, J; Hoffmeister, A

    2013-06-01

    Perforations and leakages of hollow organs of the gastrointestinal tract can occur spontaneously among other causes. They can also develop as complications of an endoscopic intervention or after surgical construction of an anastomosis. For the patient, these situations usually are serious and life-threatening. Standard therapy has always been - and most of the time still is - major surgery. These procedures usually are technically difficult and their mortality and morbidity are not satisfactory due to, among others, the occurrence of local infections. Thus, various endoscopic techniques as therapy for perforations and leakages have been developed over the last years. These include above all the endoscopic placement of clip systems and stents and the relatively new vacuum drainage systems. In case of perforations and leakages of the bile duct and the rectum especially, these minimal invasive techniques are widely used, also increasingly in lesions of the esophagus. However, these new, endoscopic procedures suffer from a lack of evidence. This paper highlights the possibilities and limitations of endoscopic options in therapy for perforations and leakages of organs of the gastrointestinal tract.

  18. The Value of U/S to Determine Priority for Upper Gastrointestinal Endoscopy in Emergency Room.

    PubMed

    Abd Elrazek, Abd Elrazek; Mahfouz, Hamdy; Elazeem, Khaled Abd; Fakhry, Mohamed; Elrazek, Emad Abd; Foad, Mahmoud; Alboraie, Mohamed; Ragab, Aly; Baghdady, Shazly; Bilasy, Shymaa E; Salama, Khaled; Masseih, Ramy Abdel; Amer, Mohamed Omar; Hassaneen, Sayed; Bhagavathula, Akshaya Srikanth; Elnour, Asim Ahmed; Al Nuaimi, Saif K; Shehab, Abdulla

    2015-12-01

    In countries endemic for liver and GIT diseases, frequent emergency department (ED) patients contribute to a disproportionate number of visits consuming substantial amount of medical resources. One of the most frequent ED visits is patients who present with hypovolemic shock, abdominal pain, or confusion with or without signs of upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB). The use of conventional two-dimensional ultrasound (2D-U/S) may provide immediate and useful information on the presence of esophageal varices, gastrointestinal tumors, and other GIT abnormalities.The current study investigated the feasibility of using (2D-U/S) to predict the source of UGIB in ED and to determine patients' priority for UGE.Between February 2003 and March 2013, we retrospectively reviewed the profiles of 38,551 Egyptian patients, aged 2 to 75 years old, who presented with a history of GI/liver diseases and no alcohol consumption. We assessed the value of 2D-U/S technology in predicting the source of UGIB.Of 38,551 patients presenting to ED, 900 patients (2.3%), 534 male (59.3%) and 366 female (40.7%) developed UGIB. Analyzing results obtained from U/S examinations by data mining for emergent UGE were patients with liver cirrhosis (LC), splenomegaly, and ascites (42.6% incidence of UGIB), followed by LC and splenomegaly (14.6%), LC only (9.4%), and was only 0.5% who had no morbidity finding by 2D-U/S.Ultrasonographic instrumentation increases the feasibility of predictive emergency medicine. The area has recently not only gained a fresh impulse, but also a new set of complex problems that needs to be addressed in the emergency medicine setting according to each priority.

  19. Simple risk factors to predict urgent endoscopy in nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding pre-endoscopically

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jianzong; Hu, Duanming; Tang, Wen; Hu, Chuanyin; Lu, Qin; Li, Juan; Zhu, Jianhong; Xu, Liming; Sui, Zhenyu; Qian, Mingjie; Wang, Shaofeng; Yin, Guojian

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The goal of this study is to evaluate how to predict high-risk nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (NVUGIB) pre-endoscopically. A total of 569 NVUGIB patients between Match 2011 and January 2015 were retrospectively studied. The clinical characteristics and laboratory data were statistically analyzed. The severity of NVUGIB was based on high-risk NVUGIB (Forrest I–IIb), and low-risk NVUGIB (Forrest IIc and III). By logistic regression and receiver-operating characteristic curve, simple risk score systems were derived which predicted patients’ risks of potentially needing endoscopic intervention to control bleeding. Risk score systems combined of patients’ serum hemoglobin (Hb) ≤75 g/L, red hematemesis, red stool, shock, and blood urine nitrogen ≥8.5 mmol/L within 24 hours after admission were derived. As for each one of these clinical signs, the relatively high specificity was 97.9% for shock, 96.4% for red stool, 85.5% for red hematemesis, 76.7% for Hb ≤75 g/L, and the sensitivity was 50.8% for red hematemesis, 47.5% for Hb ≤75 g/L, 14.2% for red stool, and 10.9% for shock. When these 5 clinical signs were presented as a risk score system, the highest area of receiver-operating characteristic curve was 0.746, with sensitivity 0.675 and specificity 0.733, which discriminated well with high-risk NVUGIB. These simple risk factors identified patients with high-risk NVUGIB of needing treatment to manage their bleeding pre-endoscopically. Further validation in the clinic was required. PMID:27367977

  20. Efficacy and Safety of Low Dose Ketamine and Midazolam Combination for Diagnostic Upper Gastrointestinal Endoscopy in Children

    PubMed Central

    Cakir, Murat

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We aimed to analyze the effectiveness and safety of low-dose midazolam and ketamine combination for upper gastrointestinal endoscopy (UGIE) in children. Methods The study included the children (n=425, 10.78±3.81 years) who underwent UGIE for diagnostic purpose during 1 year period. All children were sedated with low dose midazolam (0.1 mg/kg) and ketamine (0.5 mg/kg) intravenously. Effectiveness of the sedation and complications during the procedure and recovery period were recorded. Results Endoscopic procedure was successfully completed in 414 patients (97.4%; 95% confidence interval, 95.8-98.9). Mean±standard deviation (SD) duration of procedure was 6.36±1.64 minutes (median, 6.0 minutes; range, 4-12 minutes). Minor complications occurred during the procedure in 39.2% of the patients. The most common complication was increased oral secretion (33.1%). No major complications were observed in any patient. Age and Ramsay sedation scores of patients with complications during the procedure were lower than the others (9.49±4.05 years vs. 11.61±3.43 years, p=0.002 and 2.10±1.46 vs. 4.37±1.16, p=0.001). Mean recovery time was 22 minutes (range, 10-90 minutes; mean±SD, 25±12.32 minutes). Minor complications developed during recovery in 60.1% of the patients. The most common complication was transient double vision (n=127, 30.7%). Emergence reaction was observed in 5 patients (1.2%). Conclusion The procedure was completed with high level of success without any major complication in our study. Combination of low-dose midazolam and ketamine is a suitable sedation protocol for pediatric endoscopists in UGIE. PMID:26473135

  1. [Endoscopy simulator for training in digestive endoscopy].

    PubMed

    Bures, Jan; Rejchrt, Stanislav; Tachecí, Ilja; Cyrany, Jirí; Fejfar, Tomás; Douda, Tomás; Kopácová, Marcela

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports on a computer-based simulator (GI Mentor II) used for initial training in digestive endoscopy. The highly sophisticated apparatus employs real endoscopes and virtual accessories. The training programme starts with a group of exercises, specially designed to enhance eye-hand coordination. Interactive computerised simulator contains modules for training in gastroscopy, colonoscopy, endoscopic retrograde cholangio-pancreatography and endoscopic control of gastrointestinal bleeding. Virtual library contains 88 authentic cases of diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. Computer-based endoscopy simulators enable trainees to learn and gain technical endoscopic skills before operating on patients. It has the potential to shorten the learning process to competency in digestive endoscopy.

  2. Fluorescence multi-scale endoscopy and its applications in the study and diagnosis of gastro-intestinal diseases: set-up design and software implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-García, Pablo Aurelio; Arranz, Alicia; Fresno, Manuel; Desco, Manuel; Mahmood, Umar; Vaquero, Juan José; Ripoll, Jorge

    2015-06-01

    Endoscopy is frequently used in the diagnosis of several gastro-intestinal pathologies as Crohn disease, ulcerative colitis or colorectal cancer. It has great potential as a non-invasive screening technique capable of detecting suspicious alterations in the intestinal mucosa, such as inflammatory processes. However, these early lesions usually cannot be detected with conventional endoscopes, due to lack of cellular detail and the absence of specific markers. Due to this lack of specificity, the development of new endoscopy technologies, which are able to show microscopic changes in the mucosa structure, are necessary. We here present a confocal endomicroscope, which in combination with a wide field fluorescence endoscope offers fast and specific macroscopic information through the use of activatable probes and a detailed analysis at cellular level of the possible altered tissue areas. This multi-modal and multi-scale imaging module, compatible with commercial endoscopes, combines near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) measurements (enabling specific imaging of markers of disease and prognosis) and confocal endomicroscopy making use of a fiber bundle, providing a cellular level resolution. The system will be used in animal models exhibiting gastro-intestinal diseases in order to analyze the use of potential diagnostic markers in colorectal cancer. In this work, we present in detail the set-up design and the software implementation in order to obtain simultaneous RGB/NIRF measurements and short confocal scanning times.

  3. Implications of small-bowel transit time in the detection rate of capsule endoscopy: A multivariable multicenter study of patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Girelli, Carlo Maria; Soncini, Marco; Rondonotti, Emanuele

    2017-01-01

    AIM To define the role of small-bowel transit time in the detection rate of significant small-bowel lesions. METHODS Small-bowel capsule endoscopy records, prospectively collected from 30 participating centers in the Lombardy Registry from October 2011 to December 2013, were included in the study if the clinical indication was obscure gastrointestinal bleeding and the capsule reached the cecum. Based on capsule findings, we created two groups: P2 (significant findings) and P0-1 (normal/negligible findings). Groups were compared for age, gender, small-bowel transit time, type of instrument, modality of capsule performance (outpatients vs inpatients), bowel cleanliness, and center volume. RESULTS We retrieved and scrutinized 1,433 out of 2,295 capsule endoscopy records (62.4%) fulfilling the inclusion criteria. Patients were 67 ± 15 years old, and 815 (57%) were males. In comparison with patients in the P0-1 group, those in the P2 group (n = 776, 54%) were older (P < 0.0001), had a longer small-bowel transit time (P = 0.0015), and were more frequently examined in low-volume centers (P < 0.001). Age and small-bowel transit time were correlated (P < 0.001), with age as the sole independent predictor on multivariable analysis. Findings of the P2 group were artero-venous malformations (54.5%), inflammatory (23.6%) and protruding (10.4%) lesions, and luminal blood (11.5%). CONCLUSION In this selected, prospectively collected cohort of small-bowel capsule endoscopy performed for obscure gastrointestinal bleeding, a longer small-bowel transit time was associated with a higher detection rate of significant lesions, along with age and a low center volume, with age serving as an independent predictor. PMID:28216977

  4. Detection of malignant lesions in vivo in the upper gastrointestinal tract using image-guided Raman endoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergholt, Mads Sylvest; Zheng, Wei; Lin, Kan; Ho, Khek Yu; Yeoh, Khay Guan; Teh, Ming; So, Jimmy Bok Yan; Huang, Zhiwei

    2012-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a vibrational analytic technique sensitive to the changes in biomolecular composition and conformations occurring in tissue. With our most recent development of near-infrared (NIR) Raman endoscopy integrated with diagnostic algorithms, in vivo real-time Raman diagnostics has been realized under multimodal wide-field imaging (i.e., white- light reflectance (WLR), narrow-band imaging (NBI), autofluorescence imaging (AFI)) modalities. A selection of 177 patients who previously underwent Raman endoscopy (n=2510 spectra) was used to render two robust models based on partial least squares - discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) for esophageal and gastric cancer diagnosis. The Raman endoscopy technique was validated prospectively on 4 new gastric and esophageal patients for in vivo tissue diagnosis. The Raman endoscopic technique could identify esophageal cancer in vivo with a sensitivity of 88.9% (8/9) and specificity of 100.0% (11/11) and gastric cancers with a sensitivity of 77.8% (14/18) and specificity of 100.0% (13/13). This study realizes for the first time the image-guided Raman endoscopy for real-time in vivo diagnosis of malignancies in the esophagus and gastric at the biomolecular level.

  5. Endoscopy in patients on antiplatelet or anticoagulant therapy, including direct oral anticoagulants: British Society of Gastroenterology (BSG) and European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) guidelines.

    PubMed

    Veitch, Andrew M; Vanbiervliet, Geoffroy; Gershlick, Anthony H; Boustiere, Christian; Baglin, Trevor P; Smith, Lesley-Ann; Radaelli, Franco; Knight, Evelyn; Gralnek, Ian M; Hassan, Cesare; Dumonceau, Jean-Marc

    2016-04-01

    The risk of endoscopy in patients on antithrombotics depends on the risks of procedural haemorrhage vs. thrombosis due to discontinuation of therapy. P2Y12 receptor antagonists (clopidogrel, prasugrel, ticagrelor): For low-risk endoscopic procedures we recommend continuing P2Y12 receptor antagonists as single or dual antiplatelet therapy (low quality evidence, strong recommendation);For high-risk endoscopic procedures in patients at low thrombotic risk, we recommend discontinuing P2Y12 receptor antagonists five days before the procedure (moderate quality evidence, strong recommendation). In patients on dual antiplatelet therapy, we suggest continuing aspirin (low quality evidence, weak recommendation).For high-risk endoscopic procedures in patients at high thrombotic risk, we recommend continuing aspirin and liaising with a cardiologist about the risk/benefit of discontinuation of P2Y12 receptor antagonists (high quality evidence, strong recommendation). Warfarin: The advice for warfarin is fundamentally unchanged from BSG 2008 guidance. Direct Oral Anticoagulants (DOAC): For low-risk endoscopic procedures we suggest omitting the morning dose of DOAC on the day of the procedure (very low quality evidence, weak recommendation). For high-risk endoscopic procedures, we recommend that the last dose of DOAC be taken ≥ 48 hours before the procedure (very low quality evidence, strong recommendation). For patients on dabigatran with CrCl (or estimated glomerular filtration rate, eGFR) of 30 - 50 mL/min we recommend that the last dose of DOAC be taken 72 hours before the procedure (very low quality evidence, strong recommendation). In any patient with rapidly deteriorating renal function a haematologist should be consulted (low quality evidence, strong recommendation).

  6. Endoscopy in patients on antiplatelet or anticoagulant therapy, including direct oral anticoagulants: British Society of Gastroenterology (BSG) and European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Veitch, Andrew M; Vanbiervliet, Geoffroy; Gershlick, Anthony H; Boustiere, Christian; Baglin, Trevor P; Smith, Lesley-Ann; Radaelli, Franco; Knight, Evelyn; Gralnek, Ian M; Hassan, Cesare; Dumonceau, Jean-Marc

    2016-01-01

    The risk of endoscopy in patients on antithrombotics depends on the risks of procedural haemorrhage versus thrombosis due to discontinuation of therapy. P2Y12 receptor antagonists (clopidogrel, prasugrel, ticagrelor) For low-risk endoscopic procedures we recommend continuing P2Y12 receptor antagonists as single or dual antiplatelet therapy (low quality evidence, strong recommendation); For high-risk endoscopic procedures in patients at low thrombotic risk, we recommend discontinuing P2Y12 receptor antagonists five days before the procedure (moderate quality evidence, strong recommendation). In patients on dual antiplatelet therapy, we suggest continuing aspirin (low quality evidence, weak recommendation). For high-risk endoscopic procedures in patients at high thrombotic risk, we recommend continuing aspirin and liaising with a cardiologist about the risk/benefit of discontinuation of P2Y12 receptor antagonists (high quality evidence, strong recommendation). Warfarin The advice for warfarin is fundamentally unchanged from British Society of Gastroenterology (BSG) 2008 guidance. Direct Oral Anticoagulants (DOAC) For low-risk endoscopic procedures we suggest omitting the morning dose of DOAC on the day of the procedure (very low quality evidence, weak recommendation); For high-risk endoscopic procedures, we recommend that the last dose of DOAC be taken ≥48 h before the procedure (very low quality evidence, strong recommendation). For patients on dabigatran with CrCl (or estimated glomerular filtration rate, eGFR) of 30–50 mL/min we recommend that the last dose of DOAC be taken 72 h before the procedure (very low quality evidence, strong recommendation). In any patient with rapidly deteriorating renal function a haematologist should be consulted (low quality evidence, strong recommendation). PMID:26873868

  7. Endoscopy: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    MedlinePlus

    ... Laparoscopy (Society of American Gastrointestinal Endoscopic Surgeons) Endoscopic Evaluation of Swallowing (Endoscopy) (American Speech-Language-Hearing Association) Endoscopic Sinus Surgery (American Rhinologic Society) ...

  8. CASS—CFEL-ASG software suite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foucar, Lutz; Barty, Anton; Coppola, Nicola; Hartmann, Robert; Holl, Peter; Hoppe, Uwe; Kassemeyer, Stephan; Kimmel, Nils; Küpper, Jochen; Scholz, Mirko; Techert, Simone; White, Thomas A.; Strüder, Lothar; Ullrich, Joachim

    2012-10-01

    The Max Planck Advanced Study Group (ASG) at the Center for Free Electron Laser Science (CFEL) has created the CFEL-ASG Software Suite CASS to view, process and analyse multi-parameter experimental data acquired at Free Electron Lasers (FELs) using the CFEL-ASG Multi Purpose (CAMP) instrument Strüder et al. (2010) [6]. The software is based on a modular design so that it can be adjusted to accommodate the needs of all the various experiments that are conducted with the CAMP instrument. In fact, this allows the use of the software in all experiments where multiple detectors are involved. One of the key aspects of CASS is that it can be used either 'on-line', using a live data stream from the free-electron laser facility's data acquisition system to guide the experiment, and 'off-line', on data acquired from a previous experiment which has been saved to file. Program summary Program title: CASS Catalogue identifier: AEMP_v1_0 Program summary URL: http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEMP_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GNU General Public Licence, version 3 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 167073 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 1065056 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C++. Computer: Intel x86-64. Operating system: GNU/Linux (for information about restrictions see outlook). RAM: >8 GB Classification: 2.3, 3, 15, 16.4. External routines: Qt-Framework[1], SOAP[2], (optional HDF5[3], VIGRA[4], ROOT[5], QWT[6]) Nature of problem: Analysis and visualisation of scientific data acquired at Free-Electron-Lasers Solution method: Generalise data access and storage so that a variety of small programming pieces can be linked to form a complex analysis chain. Unusual features: Complex analysis chains can be built without recompiling the program Additional comments: An updated extensive documentation of CASS is available

  9. [Double-blind study on the analgesic efficacy of tilidine (valoron) and pethidine (dolantin) in gastro-intestinal endoscopies and liver biopsies (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Tomatis, H P

    1977-02-01

    In a double-blind trial involving 99 patients, equi-analgesic doses of tilidine and pethidine (100 mg of each i.m.) were compared as to their effectiveness in laparoscopies, gastroscopies, esophagoscopies and liver needle biopsies. The two substances produced equally analgesic effects both during and after the various procedures, with the exception of the liver biopsies, in which tilidine was shown to be significantly more effective than pethidine. Whereas no sedation was noted in connection with tilidine medication, pethidine produced a marked, undesirable sleepiness in 12% of the cases observed. Due to the high analgesic efficacy and tolerance of tilidine found in both this and numerous other clinical trials and to its particular advantages over pethidine and other opiates (no respiratory depression, no effect on intestinal motility) tilidine can be recommended for premedication in gastrointestinal endoscopies and liver needle biopsies. Tilidine (Valoron) is not subject to the restrictions imposed by the West German narcotics laws.

  10. Present status of endoscopy, therapeutic endoscopy and the endoscopy training system in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Makmun, Dadang

    2014-04-01

    Recently, Indonesia was ranked as the fourth most populous country in the world. Based on 2012 data, 85000 general practitioners and 25000 specialists are in service around the country. Gastrointestinal (GI) disease remains the most common finding in daily practise, in both outpatient and inpatient settings, and ranks fifth in causing mortality in Indonesia. Management of patients with GI disease involves all health-care levels with the main portion in primary health care. Some are managed by specialists in secondary health care or are referred to tertiary health care. GI endoscopy is one of the main diagnostic and therapeutic modalities in the management of GI disease. Development of GI endoscopy in Indonesia started before World War II and, today, many GI endoscopy procedures are conducted in Indonesia, both diagnostic and therapeutic. Based on August 2013 data, there are 515 GI endoscopists in Indonesia. Most GI endoscopists are competent in carrying out basic endoscopy procedures, whereas only a few carry out advanced endoscopy procedures, including therapeutic endoscopy. Recently, the GI endoscopy training system in Indonesia consists of basic GI endoscopy training of 3-6 months held at 10 GI endoscopy training centers. GI endoscopy training is also eligible as part of a fellowship program of consultant gastroenterologists held at six accredited fellowship centers in Indonesia. Indonesian Society for Digestive Endoscopy in collaboration with GI endoscopy training centers in Indonesia and overseas has been working to increase quality and number of GI endoscopists, covering both basic and advanced GI endoscopy procedures.

  11. Combined endobronchial and esophageal endosonography for the diagnosis and staging of lung cancer: European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) Guideline, in cooperation with the European Respiratory Society (ERS) and the European Society of Thoracic Surgeons (ESTS).

    PubMed

    Vilmann, Peter; Frost Clementsen, Paul; Colella, Sara; Siemsen, Mette; De Leyn, Paul; Dumonceau, Jean-Marc; Herth, Felix J; Larghi, Alberto; Vazquez-Sequeiros, Enrique; Hassan, Cesare; Crombag, Laurence; Korevaar, Daniël A; Konge, Lars; Annema, Jouke T

    2015-07-01

    This is an official guideline of the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE), produced in cooperation with the European Respiratory Society (ERS) and the European Society of Thoracic Surgeons (ESTS). It addresses the benefit and burden associated with combined endobronchial and esophageal mediastinal nodal staging of lung cancer. The Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network (SIGN) approach was adopted to define the strength of recommendations and the quality of evidence.The article has been co-published with permission in Endoscopy and the European Respiratory Journal.

  12. Chromoendoscopy and magnifying endoscopy for Barrett's esophagus.

    PubMed

    Canto, Marcia Irene

    2005-07-01

    Chromoendoscopy and magnification endoscopy are 2 endoscopic techniques used to improve visualization and diagnosis of gastrointestinal mucosa. This article summarizes the principles behind magnification endoscopy, with and without chromoendoscopy, for the diagnosis of Barrett's esophagus, dysplasia, and adenocarcinoma. Furthermore, this article discusses the possible clinical use of magnification endoscopy and chromoendoscopy in evaluating patients with chronic gastroesophageal reflux disease and Barrett's esophagus.

  13. Quality Metrics in Endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Gurudu, Suryakanth R.

    2013-01-01

    Endoscopy has evolved in the past 4 decades to become an important tool in the diagnosis and management of many digestive diseases. Greater focus on endoscopic quality has highlighted the need to ensure competency among endoscopists. A joint task force of the American College of Gastroenterology and the American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy has proposed several quality metrics to establish competence and help define areas of continuous quality improvement. These metrics represent quality in endoscopy pertinent to pre-, intra-, and postprocedural periods. Quality in endoscopy is a dynamic and multidimensional process that requires continuous monitoring of several indicators and benchmarking with local and national standards. Institutions and practices should have a process in place for credentialing endoscopists and for the assessment of competence regarding individual endoscopic procedures. PMID:24711767

  14. [Does an information booklet on gastrointestinal endoscopy reduce anxiety for these examinations? Results of a randomized study with 379 patients].

    PubMed

    Lanius, M; Zimmermann, P; Heegewaldt, H; Hohn, M; Fischer, M; Rohde, H

    1990-12-01

    A randomized controlled trial was performed between June and December 1989 in 379 outpatients to evaluate whether a patient information booklet is able to reduce anxiety levels before gastroscopy or colonoscopy. Anxiety levels were measured by a Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) in all patients entering the office. Half of the patients received the information booklet about the endoscopic investigations and half did not. VAS was measured again directly before endoscopy in each patient. All patient groups were comparable. The median anxiety level of gastroscopy patients before and after reading the information booklet was 5.3 (2.5-10) and 4.9 (0.8-10), and for colonoscopy patients 6.0 (2.5-10) vs 5.0 (0.7-10). So not much difference concerning the anxiety level before and after reading the patient information booklet was found. Thus better than an information booklet, for every patient an individualized technique of the endoscopist may reduce patient anxiety before gastroscopy or colonoscopy.

  15. Evidence-Based Recommendations on Upper Gastrointestinal Tract Stenting: A Report from the Stent Study Group of the Korean Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Jee, Sam Ryong; Kim, Kyung Ho; Kim, Sang Gyun; Cho, Jun-Hyung

    2013-01-01

    Endoscopic stents have evolved dramatically over the past 20 years. With the introduction of uncovered self-expanding metal stents in the early 1990s, they are primarily used to palliate symptoms of malignant obstruction in patients with inoperable gastrointestinal (GI) cancer. At present, stents have emerged as an effective, safe, and less invasive alternative for the treatment of malignant GI obstruction. Clinical decisions about stent placement should be made based on the exact understanding of the patient's condition. These recommendations based on a critical review of the available data and expert consensus are made for the purpose of providing endoscopists with information about stent placement. These can be helpful for management of patients with inoperable cancer or various nonmalignant conditions in the upper GI tract. PMID:23964331

  16. Cleaning and disinfection of equipment for gastrointestinal flexible endoscopy: interim recommendations of a Working Party of the British Society of Gastroenterology.

    PubMed

    1988-08-01

    1. All patients undergoing gastrointestinal endoscopy must be considered 'at risk' for HIV and appropriate cleaning/disinfection measures taken for endoscopes and accessories. 2. Thorough manual cleaning with detergent, of the instrument and its channels is the most important part of the cleaning/disinfection procedure. Without this, blood, mucus and organic material will prevent adequate penetration of disinfectant for inactivation of bacteria and viruses. 3. Aldehyde preparations (2% activated glutaraldehyde and related products) are the recommended first line antibacterial and antiviral disinfectant. A four minute soak is recommended as sufficient for inactivation of vegetative bacteria and viruses (including HIV and HBV). 4. Quaternary ammonium detergents (8% Dettox for two minutes for bacterial disinfection), followed by exposure of the endoscope shaft and channels to ethyl alcohol (70% for four minutes for viral inactivation), is an acceptable second-line disinfectant routine where staff sensitisation prevents the use of an aldehyde disinfectant. 5. Accessories, including mouthguards and cleaning brushes, require similarly careful cleaning/disinfection, before and after each use. Disposable products (especially injection needles) may be used and appropriate items can be sterilised by autoclaving and kept in sterile packs. 6. Closed circuit endoscope washing machines have advantages in maintaining standards and avoiding staff sensitisation to disinfectants. Improved ventilation including exhaust extraction facilities may be required. 7. Endoscopy staff should receive HBV vaccination, wear gloves and appropriate protective garments, cover wounds or abrasions and avoid needlestick injuries (including spiked forceps, etc). 8. Known HIV-infected or AIDS patients are managed as immunosuppressed, and require protection from atypical mycobacteria/cryptosporidia etc, by one hour aldehyde disinfection of endoscopic equipment before and after the procedure. A dedicated

  17. Monitoring of stability of ASG-EUPOS network coordinates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figurski, M.; Szafranek, K.; Wrona, M.

    2009-04-01

    ASG-EUPOS (Active Geodetic Network - European Position Determination System) is the national system of precise satellite positioning in Poland, which increases a density of regional and global GNSS networks and is widely used by public administration, national institutions, entrepreneurs and citizens (especially surveyors). In near future ASG-EUPOS is to take role of main national network. Control of proper activity of stations and realization of ETRS'89 is a necessity. User of the system needs to be sure that observations quality and coordinates accuracy are high enough. Coordinates of IGS (International GNSS Service) and EPN (European Permanent Network) stations are precisely determined and any changes are monitored all the time. Observations are verified before they are archived in regional and global databases. The same applies to ASG-EUPOS. This paper concerns standardization of GNSS observations from different stations (uniform adjustment), examination of solutions correctness according to IGS and EPN standards and stability of solutions and sites activity

  18. Biophotonic endoscopy: a review of clinical research techniques for optical imaging and sensing of early gastrointestinal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Coda, Sergio; Siersema, Peter D.; Stamp, Gordon W. H.; Thillainayagam, Andrew V.

    2015-01-01

    Detection, characterization, and staging constitute the fundamental elements in the endoscopic diagnosis of gastrointestinal diseases, but histology still remains the diagnostic gold standard. New developments in endoscopic techniques may challenge histopathology in the near future. An ideal endoscopic technique should combine a wide-field, “red flag” screening technique with an optical contrast or microscopy method for characterization and staging, all simultaneously available during the procedure. In theory, biophotonic advances have the potential to unite these elements to allow in vivo “optical biopsy.” These techniques may ultimately offer the potential to increase the rates of detection of high risk lesions and the ability to target biopsies and resections, and so reduce the need for biopsy, costs, and uncertainty for patients. However, their utility and sensitivity in clinical practice must be evaluated against those of conventional histopathology. This review describes some of the most recent applications of biophotonics in endoscopic optical imaging and metrology, along with their fundamental principles and the clinical experience that has been acquired in their deployment as tools for the endoscopist. Particular emphasis has been placed on translational label-free optical techniques, such as fluorescence spectroscopy, fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM), two-photon and multi-photon microscopy, second harmonic generation (SHG) and third harmonic generation (THG) imaging, optical coherence tomography (OCT), diffuse reflectance, Raman spectroscopy, and molecular imaging. PMID:26528489

  19. Upper Endoscopy

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... Drainage Stent Placement Stricture Dilation Upper Endoscopy (EGD) Quality & Safety GIQuIC Registry Infection Control Privileging & Credentialing Quality Indicators Education & Meetings Advanced Education & ...

  20. Endo 2017: WEO's successful first World Congress of GI Endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Rey, Jean-François

    2017-03-24

    For more than 50 years, the World Endoscopy Organization (WEO) has promoted the study and advancement of digestive endoscopy around the globe. Our key efforts have been to promote education and training in digestive endoscopy, and to forge close links with the the WEO zones: Asian Pacific Society of Digestive Endoscopy (A-PSDE), European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE), and Inter-American Society of Digestive Endoscopy (SIED). With increased interaction and connectivity between different global regions, our goal to support the advancement of endoscopy in underserved areas of the world has been strengthened. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  1. Endoscopy and Endosurgery in Nonhuman Primates.

    PubMed

    Chai, Norin

    2015-09-01

    Endoscopy in nonhuman primates (NHPs) has resulted in improvements in research and clinical care for more than 4 decades. The indications and procedures are the same as in humans and the approach is similar to that in dogs, cats, and humans. Selected procedures are discussed including rhinoscopy, tracheobronchoscopy, upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, laparoscopy, and endoscopic salpingectomy. This short overview provides practitioners with pragmatic elements for safe and effective endoscopy in NHPs.

  2. American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Week ® GI Outlook (GO) Practice Management Conference Practice Management Quality & Safety STAR Certificate Programs Trifecta DDW Videos International ... Outlook 2017 (GO): The Practice Management Conference Practice Management Courses Quality & Safety ... Registry MACRA Resource Center Practice Accreditation ...

  3. Sketch of International Digestive Endoscopy Network 2012 Meeting: Overview

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    International Digestive Endoscopy Network (IDEN) is an international meeting covering scientific subjects of diverse topics about upper gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy, colonoscopy, endoscopic ultrasonography, and PB endoscopy. IDEN is organized by Korean Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy and the Korean Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Research Foundation, and took its first step in 2011 in Seoul, Korea. IDEN inaugurated a new era of diagnostic and therapeutic GI endoscopy. IDEN 2012 was designed to offer participants from all over the world with opportunities to share up-to-date knowledge about basic and clinical aspects of GI endoscopy and to engage in in-depth discussion with worldwide well-known experts. During the 2 days of meeting, there were 62 invited lectures, 28 case-based discussions, 20 video lectures, and 6 breakfast with the experts. There were a total of 598 participants registered from 12 countries, including Asian countries, Europe, and USA as well as Korea. PMID:22977804

  4. Management of precancerous conditions and lesions in the stomach (MAPS): guideline from the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE), European Helicobacter Study Group (EHSG), European Society of Pathology (ESP), and the Sociedade Portuguesa de Endoscopia Digestiva (SPED).

    PubMed

    Dinis-Ribeiro, M; Areia, M; de Vries, A C; Marcos-Pinto, R; Monteiro-Soares, M; O'Connor, A; Pereira, C; Pimentel-Nunes, P; Correia, R; Ensari, A; Dumonceau, J M; Machado, J C; Macedo, G; Malfertheiner, P; Matysiak-Budnik, T; Megraud, F; Miki, K; O'Morain, C; Peek, R M; Ponchon, T; Ristimaki, A; Rembacken, B; Carneiro, F; Kuipers, E J

    2012-01-01

    Atrophic gastritis, intestinal metaplasia, and epithelial dysplasia of the stomach are common and are associated with an increased risk for gastric cancer. In the absence of guidelines, there is wide disparity in the management of patients with these premalignant conditions. The European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE), the European Helicobacter Study Group (EHSG), the European Society of Pathology (ESP) and the Sociedade Portuguesa de Endoscopia Digestiva (SPED) have therefore combined efforts to develop evidence-based guidelines on the management of patients with precancerous conditions and lesions of the stomach (termed MAPS). A multidisciplinary group of 63 experts from 24 countries developed these recommendations by means of repeat online voting and a meeting in June 2011 in Porto, Portugal. The recommendations emphasize the increased cancer risk in patients with gastric atrophy and metaplasia, and the need for adequate staging in the case of high grade dysplasia, and they focus on treatment and surveillance indications and methods.

  5. Management of precancerous conditions and lesions in the stomach (MAPS): guideline from the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE), European Helicobacter Study Group (EHSG), European Society of Pathology (ESP), and the Sociedade Portuguesa de Endoscopia Digestiva (SPED).

    PubMed

    Dinis-Ribeiro, M; Areia, M; de Vries, A C; Marcos-Pinto, R; Monteiro-Soares, M; O'Connor, A; Pereira, C; Pimentel-Nunes, P; Correia, R; Ensari, A; Dumonceau, J M; Machado, J C; Macedo, G; Malfertheiner, P; Matysiak-Budnik, T; Megraud, F; Miki, K; O'Morain, C; Peek, R M; Ponchon, T; Ristimaki, A; Rembacken, B; Carneiro, F; Kuipers, E J

    2012-01-01

    Atrophic gastritis, intestinal metaplasia, and epithelial dysplasia of the stomach are common and are associated with an increased risk for gastric cancer. In the absence of guidelines, there is wide disparity in the management of patients with these premalignant conditions. The European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, the European Helicobacter Study Group, the European Society of Pathology, and the Sociedade Portuguesa de Endoscopia Digestiva have therefore combined efforts to develop evidence-based guidelines on the management of patients with precancerous conditions and lesions of the stomach. A multidisciplinary group of 63 experts from 24 countries developed these recommendations by means of repeat online voting and a meeting in June 2011 in Porto, Portugal. The recommendations emphasize the increased cancer risk in patients with gastric atrophy and metaplasia and the need for adequate staging in the case of high-grade dysplasia, and they focus on treatment and surveillance indications and methods.

  6. Therapeutic endoscopy in gastroenterology.

    PubMed

    Celiński, K; Cichoz-Lach, H

    2007-08-01

    The role of therapeutic endoscopy in current gastroenterology is very important. Therapuetic endoscopy is useful in treatment of gastrointestinal bleeding. Endoscopic control of gastrointestinal bleeding includes the following procedures of haemostasis techniques: photocoagulation, electrocoagulation, thermocoagulation and injection method. Owing to these procedures mortality has significantly decreased. Endoscopic hemostasis eliminates the risk of surgery, is less expensive and better tolerated by patients. Colonoscopic polypectomy is a widely used technique. By removal of polyps the incidence of colon cancer can be decreased. The "hot biopsy" forceps can be used to excise polyps of up to 6 mm. Larger polyps can be removed safely by snare electrocautery and retrieved for histologic study. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography has a therapeutic application designed to cut the sphincter of Oddi fibers of the distal common bile duct, what is indicated currently in choledocholithiasis and papillary stenosis with ascending cholangitis, acute gallstone pancreatitis. Endoscopic sphincterotomy in now an established procedure that is indicated in patients with common bile duct calculi. Endoscopic decompression of the biliary tree - dilatation benign structures of the biliary tree with baloon catheters and placement an internal endoprothesis allows the nonoperative decompression and significant palliation for patients with obstructing tumors.

  7. LC phase bias investigation of ASG-EUPOS stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araszkiewicz, Andrzej; Szafranek, Karolina

    2013-12-01

    Monitoring of permanent stations that make up the reference frame is an integral part of the geodesists work. Selection of reference stations is based on analysis of parameters characterizing them (hardware, coordinates' stability, mounting, location). In this paper, we took into account phase residual as an indicator of unmodelled signal. Phase residuals were computed based on ASG-EUPOS and EPN observation processing. The results show the connection between the method of mounting the antenna and the residuals. We have reviewed multipath effect at ASG-EUPOS stations, and chosen those which are characterized by the highest value of phase residual. The results show that LC phase residual is a good factor to characterize site's solutions' reliability. For majority of sites RMS values were less than 10 mm. Modulations associated with multipath effect were observed for few ASG-EUPOS sites only. Phase residuals are distributed specifically for sites, which antennas are mounted on pillars (more common for EPN sites). For majority of analysed sites phase residual distribution was similar for different days and did not depend directly on atmosphere condition. Monitorowanie permanentnych stacji GPS/GNSS, które tworzą układ współrzędnych stanowi integralną część pracy geodetów. Wybór takich stacji bazuje na analizie parametrów, które charakteryzują jej jakość (mi.in. sprzęt, stabilność współrzędnych, lokalizacja i montaż anteny). W przedstawionej pracy przeanalizowano jeden z nich - odchyłki obserwacji fazowych. Wartości tych różnic obliczono dla stacji EPN oraz ASG-EUPOS z rozwiązań dobowych. Dla większości z analizowanych stacji średnia kwadratowa otrzymanych odchyłek nie przekraczała 10 mm. Wartość ta oraz sam rozkład odchyłek nie zmieniał się znacząco przy różnych warunkach atmosfery. Na podstawie otrzymanych odchyłek fazowych przeanalizowano wpływ wielotorowości na tych stacjach. Modulacje wartości odchyłek na niskich k

  8. ASG2 is a farnesylated DWD protein that acts as ABA negative regulator in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Dutilleul, Christelle; Ribeiro, Iliana; Blanc, Nathalie; Nezames, Cynthia D; Deng, Xing Wang; Zglobicki, Piotr; Palacio Barrera, Ana María; Atehortùa, Lucia; Courtois, Martine; Labas, Valérie; Giglioli-Guivarc'h, Nathalie; Ducos, Eric

    2016-01-01

    The tagging-via-substrate approach designed for the capture of mammal prenylated proteins was adapted to Arabidopsis cell culture. In this way, proteins are in vivo tagged with an azide-modified farnesyl moiety and captured thanks to biotin alkyne Click-iT® chemistry with further streptavidin-affinity chromatography. Mass spectrometry analyses identified four small GTPases and ASG2 (ALTERED SEED GERMINATION 2), a protein previously associated to the seed germination gene network. ASG2 is a conserved protein in plants and displays a unique feature that associates WD40 domains and tetratricopeptide repeats. Additionally, we show that ASG2 has a C-terminal CaaX-box that is farnesylated in vitro. Protoplast transfections using CaaX prenyltransferase mutants show that farnesylation provokes ASG2 nucleus exclusion. Moreover, ASG2 interacts with DDB1 (DAMAGE DNA BINDING protein 1), and the subcellular localization of this complex depends on ASG2 farnesylation status. Finally, germination and root elongation experiments reveal that asg2 and the farnesyltransferase mutant era1 (ENHANCED RESPONSE TO ABSCISIC ACID (ABA) 1) behave in similar manners when exposed to ABA or salt stress. To our knowledge, ASG2 is the first farnesylated DWD (DDB1 binding WD40) protein related to ABA response in Arabidopsis that may be linked to era1 phenotypes.

  9. Capsule endoscopy

    MedlinePlus

    ... cameras, a light bulb, a battery, and a radio transmitter. It is about the size of a ... the way through the digestive (gastrointestinal) tract. The radio transmitter sends the photos to a recorder the ...

  10. Evidence from Multiple Species that Spider Silk Glue Component ASG2 is a Spidroin

    PubMed Central

    Collin, Matthew A.; Clarke, Thomas H.; Ayoub, Nadia A.; Hayashi, Cheryl Y.

    2016-01-01

    Spiders in the superfamily Araneoidea produce viscous glue from aggregate silk glands. Aggregate glue coats prey-capture threads and hampers the escape of prey from webs, thereby increasing the foraging success of spiders. cDNAs for Aggregate Spider Glue 1 (ASG1) and 2 (ASG2) have been previously described from the golden orb-weaver, Nephila clavipes, and Western black widow, Latrodectus hesperus. To further investigate aggregate glues, we assembled ASG1 and ASG2 from genomic target capture libraries constructed from three species of cob-web weavers and three species of orb-web weavers, all araneoids. We show that ASG1 is unlikely to be a glue, but rather is part of a widespread arthropod gene family, the peritrophic matrix proteins. For ASG2, we demonstrate its remarkable architectural and sequence similarities to spider silk fibroins, indicating that ASG2 is a member of the spidroin gene family. Thus, spidroins have diversified into glues in addition to task-specific, high performance fibers. PMID:26875681

  11. Screening for Human Immunodeficiency Virus, Hepatitis B Virus, Hepatitis C Virus, and Treponema pallidum by Blood Testing Using a Bio-Flash Technology-Based Algorithm before Gastrointestinal Endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Zhen, Chen; QuiuLi, Zhang; YuanQi, An; Casado, Verónica Vocero; Fan, Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Currently, conventional enzyme immunoassays which use manual gold immunoassays and colloidal tests (GICTs) are used as screening tools to detect Treponema pallidum (syphilis), hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV), human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), and HIV-2 in patients undergoing surgery. The present observational, cross-sectional study compared the sensitivity, specificity, and work flow characteristics of the conventional algorithm with manual GICTs with those of a newly proposed algorithm that uses the automated Bio-Flash technology as a screening tool in patients undergoing gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy. A total of 956 patients were examined for the presence of serological markers of infection with HIV-1/2, HCV, HBV, and T. pallidum. The proposed algorithm with the Bio-Flash technology was superior for the detection of all markers (100.0% sensitivity and specificity for detection of anti-HIV and anti-HCV antibodies, HBV surface antigen [HBsAg], and T. pallidum) compared with the conventional algorithm based on the manual method (80.0% sensitivity and 98.6% specificity for the detection of anti-HIV, 75.0% sensitivity for the detection of anti-HCV, 94.7% sensitivity for the detection of HBsAg, and 100% specificity for the detection of anti-HCV and HBsAg) in these patients. The automated Bio-Flash technology-based screening algorithm also reduced the operation time by 85.0% (205 min) per day, saving up to 24 h/week. In conclusion, the use of the newly proposed screening algorithm based on the automated Bio-Flash technology can provide an advantage over the use of conventional algorithms based on manual methods for screening for HIV, HBV, HCV, and syphilis before GI endoscopy. PMID:27707942

  12. Screening for Human Immunodeficiency Virus, Hepatitis B Virus, Hepatitis C Virus, and Treponema pallidum by Blood Testing Using a Bio-Flash Technology-Based Algorithm before Gastrointestinal Endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Jun, Zhou; Zhen, Chen; QuiuLi, Zhang; YuanQi, An; Casado, Verónica Vocero; Fan, Yuan

    2016-12-01

    Currently, conventional enzyme immunoassays which use manual gold immunoassays and colloidal tests (GICTs) are used as screening tools to detect Treponema pallidum (syphilis), hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV), human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), and HIV-2 in patients undergoing surgery. The present observational, cross-sectional study compared the sensitivity, specificity, and work flow characteristics of the conventional algorithm with manual GICTs with those of a newly proposed algorithm that uses the automated Bio-Flash technology as a screening tool in patients undergoing gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy. A total of 956 patients were examined for the presence of serological markers of infection with HIV-1/2, HCV, HBV, and T. pallidum The proposed algorithm with the Bio-Flash technology was superior for the detection of all markers (100.0% sensitivity and specificity for detection of anti-HIV and anti-HCV antibodies, HBV surface antigen [HBsAg], and T. pallidum) compared with the conventional algorithm based on the manual method (80.0% sensitivity and 98.6% specificity for the detection of anti-HIV, 75.0% sensitivity for the detection of anti-HCV, 94.7% sensitivity for the detection of HBsAg, and 100% specificity for the detection of anti-HCV and HBsAg) in these patients. The automated Bio-Flash technology-based screening algorithm also reduced the operation time by 85.0% (205 min) per day, saving up to 24 h/week. In conclusion, the use of the newly proposed screening algorithm based on the automated Bio-Flash technology can provide an advantage over the use of conventional algorithms based on manual methods for screening for HIV, HBV, HCV, and syphilis before GI endoscopy.

  13. Multiple angiodysplasia diagnosed by capsule endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Diamantini, Giulia; Procacciante, Fabio

    2017-01-01

    A 28-year-old Caucasian man was admitted in our unit for acute massive rectal bleeding. Past medical and family history was unremarkable. Hemoglobin was 7.6 g/dL. Blood transfusions were required. Computed tomography and gastrointestinal endoscopy were negative for active bleeding. When patient’s hemoglobin was normalized and stable, a video capsule endoscopy was performed. Video relieved the presence of multiple digiunal and ileal angiodysplastic lesions. A double endoscopic argon plasma coagulation procedure was planned on general anaesthesia. Upper and rectal operative approach were performed. Procedure was uneventful. After 2 years follow-up patient had no recurrence of gastrointestinal bleeding.

  14. Jaw Dislocation as an Unusual Complication of Upper Endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Dellon, Evan S.; Steele, David

    2016-01-01

    This case report presents an unusual complication of upper endoscopy, resulting in jaw dislocation. Temporomandibular joint dislocation is commonly reported in association with anesthesia and intubation, but it is not widely recognized as a complication of gastrointestinal endoscopy. This report also reviews the current literature regarding this complication and discusses the potential causes of dislocation, differential diagnoses for jaw pain following endoscopy, and recommendations for prevention. PMID:27403117

  15. Angiography and the gastrointestinal bleeder

    SciTech Connect

    Baum, S.

    1982-05-01

    The role of angiography in the diagnosis and treatment of gastrointestinal hemorrhage is discussed. Three categories of gastrointestinal bleeding are considered: upper gastrointestinal bleeding due to gastroesophageal varices, upper gastrointestinal bleeding of arterial or capillary origin, and lower gastrointestinal bleeding. The advantages and disadvantages of angiography are compared with those of radionuclide scanning and endoscopy or colonoscopy. It is anticipated that, as radionuclide scans are more widely employed, angiography will eventually be performed only in those patients with positive scans.

  16. Clinical analysis of moderate-to-deep-sedation by nonmedical sedation practitioners in 597 patients undergoing gastrointestinal endoscopy: a retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Vaessen, Hermanus; Bruens, Elisabeth; Knape, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aim: The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether moderate-to-deep sedation with propofol and alfentanil can be administered safely by nonmedical sedation practitioners, and the outcomes of this practice in the Netherlands. We retrospectively analyzed the occurrence of sedation-related complications in patients undergoing gastrointestinal endoscopic procedures. Patients and methods: In this study, 597 adult patients consecutively underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopic procedures. The health status of the patients was screened according to a standardized protocol, and the patients were sedated by trained nonmedical sedation practitioners. Their vital signs were continuously monitored and recorded. All patients received oxygen, and the depth of sedation was continuously assessed and recorded. Mild and severe complications were recorded and analyzed. Results: All patients recovered uneventfully, and no mortality occurred. Overall, of the 597 sedated patients, 85 had mild and 4 had severe complications. Hypoxemia and upper airway obstruction, which were easily managed by trained nonmedical sedation practitioners, were the most common events. Hypotension was rare. No signs or symptoms suggestive of aspiration were reported. Conclusion: Moderate-to-deep sedation has been and continues to be a risky medical procedure. Serious complications of propofol/opioid-based sedation, especially respiratory and cardiovascular adverse events, may occur. These complications need to be recognized rapidly and appropriately managed. Our study shows that well-trained nonmedical sedation practitioners can be entrusted to take responsibility for the safe administration of moderate-to-deep sedation. PMID:27227116

  17. [Gastrointestinal bleeding].

    PubMed

    Lanas, Ángel

    2015-09-01

    In the Digestive Disease Week in 2015 there have been some new contributions in the field of gastrointestinal bleeding that deserve to be highlighted. Treatment of celecoxib with a proton pump inhibitor is safer than treatment with nonselective NSAID and a proton pump inhibitor in high risk gastrointestinal and cardiovascular patients who mostly also take acetylsalicylic acid. Several studies confirm the need to restart the antiplatelet or anticoagulant therapy at an early stage after a gastrointestinal hemorrhage. The need for urgent endoscopy before 6-12 h after the onset of upper gastrointestinal bleeding episode may be beneficial in patients with hemodynamic instability and high risk for comorbidity. It is confirmed that in Western but not in Japanese populations, gastrointestinal bleeding episodes admitted to hospital during weekend days are associated with a worse prognosis associated with delays in the clinical management of the events. The strategy of a restrictive policy on blood transfusions during an upper GI bleeding event has been challenged. Several studies have shown the benefit of identifying the bleeding vessel in non varicose underlying gastric lesions by Doppler ultrasound which allows direct endoscopic therapy in the patient with upper GI bleeding. Finally, it has been reported that lower gastrointestinal bleeding diverticula band ligation or hemoclipping are both safe and have the same long-term outcomes.

  18. Effectiveness of nurse delivered endoscopy: findings from randomised multi-institution nurse endoscopy trial (MINuET)

    PubMed Central

    Russell, Ian; Durai, Dharmaraj; Cheung, Wai Yee; Farrin, Amanda; Bloor, Karen; Coulton, Simon; Richardson, Gerry

    2009-01-01

    Objective To compare the clinical effectiveness of doctors and nurses in undertaking upper and lower gastrointestinal endoscopy. Design Pragmatic trial with Zelen’s randomisation before consent to minimise distortion of existing practice. Setting 23 hospitals in the United Kingdom. In six hospitals, nurses undertook both upper and lower gastrointestinal endoscopy, yielding a total of 29 centres. Participants 67 doctors and 30 nurses. Of 4964 potentially eligible patients, we randomised 4128 (83%) and recruited 1888 (38%) from July 2002 to June 2003. Interventions Diagnostic upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and flexible sigmoidoscopy, undertaken with or without sedation, with the standard preparation, techniques, and protocols of participating hospitals. After referral for either procedure, patients were randomised between doctors and nurses. Main outcome measures Gastrointestinal symptom rating questionnaire (primary outcome), gastrointestinal endoscopy satisfaction questionnaire and state-trait anxiety inventory (all analysed by intention to treat); immediate and delayed complications; quality of examination and corresponding report; patients’ preferences for operator; and new diagnoses at one year (all analysed according to who carried out the procedure). Results There was no significant difference between groups in outcome at one day, one month, or one year after endoscopy, except that patients were more satisfied with nurses after one day. Nurses were also more thorough than doctors in examining the stomach and oesophagus. While quality of life scores were slightly better in patients the doctor group, this was not statistically significant. Conclusions Diagnostic endoscopy can be undertaken safely and effectively by nurses. Trial registration International standard RCT 82765705 PMID:19208714

  19. Capsule endoscopy: The road ahead

    PubMed Central

    Singeap, Ana-Maria; Stanciu, Carol; Trifan, Anca

    2016-01-01

    Since its introduction into clinical practice 15 years ago, capsule endoscopy (CE) has become the first-line investigation procedure in some small bowel pathologies, and more recently, dedicated esophageal and colon CE have expanded the fields of application to include the upper and lower gastrointestinal disorders. During this time, CE has become increasingly popular among gastroenterologists, with more than 2 million capsule examinations performed worldwide, and nearly 3000 PubMed-listed studies on its different aspects published. This huge interest in CE may be explained by its non-invasive nature, patient comfort, safety, and access to anatomical regions unattainable via conventional endoscopy. However, CE has several limitations which impede its wider clinical applications, including the lack of therapeutic capabilities, inability to obtain biopsies and control its locomotion. Several research groups are currently working to overcome these limitations, while novel devices able to control capsule movement, obtain high quality images, insufflate the gut lumen, perform chromoendoscopy, biopsy of suspect lesions, or even deliver targeted drugs directly to specific sites are under development. Overlooking current limitations, especially as some of them have already been successfully surmounted, and based on the tremendous progress in technology, it is expected that, by the end of next 15 years, CE able to perform both diagnostic and therapeutic procedures will remain the major form of digestive endoscopy. This review summarizes the literature that prognosticates about the future developments of CE. PMID:26755883

  20. Advances in Capsule Endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Scott, Ryan; Enns, Robert

    2015-09-01

    Wireless video capsule endoscopy (VCE) is a minimally invasive technology that has revolutionized the approach to small intestinal disease investigation and management. Designed primarily to provide diagnostic imaging of the small intestine, VCE is used predominantly for obscure gastrointestinal bleeding and suspected Crohn's disease; however, numerous other indications have been established, including the assessment of celiac disease, investigation of small bowel tumors, and surveillance of hereditary polyposis syndromes. Since the introduction of small bowel VCE in 2000, more than 1600 articles have been published describing the evolution of this technology. The main adverse outcome is capsule retention, which can potentially be avoided by careful patient selection or by using a patency capsule. Despite the numerous advances in the past 15 years, limitations such as incomplete VCE studies, missed lesions, and time-consuming reporting remain. The inability to control capsule movement for the application of targeted therapy or the acquisition of tissue for histologic analysis remains among the greatest challenges in the further development of capsule technology. This article outlines the recent technological and clinical advances in VCE and the future directions of research in this field.

  1. Advances in Capsule Endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Ryan

    2015-01-01

    Wireless video capsule endoscopy (VCE) is a minimally invasive technology that has revolutionized the approach to small intestinal disease investigation and management. Designed primarily to provide diagnostic imaging of the small intestine, VCE is used predominantly for obscure gastrointestinal bleeding and suspected Crohn’s disease; however, numerous other indications have been established, including the assessment of celiac disease, investigation of small bowel tumors, and surveillance of hereditary polyposis syndromes. Since the introduction of small bowel VCE in 2000, more than 1600 articles have been published describing the evolution of this technology. The main adverse outcome is capsule retention, which can potentially be avoided by careful patient selection or by using a patency capsule. Despite the numerous advances in the past 15 years, limitations such as incomplete VCE studies, missed lesions, and time-consuming reporting remain. The inability to control capsule movement for the application of targeted therapy or the acquisition of tissue for histologic analysis remains among the greatest challenges in the further development of capsule technology. This article outlines the recent technological and clinical advances in VCE and the future directions of research in this field. PMID:27482183

  2. UEG Week 2014 highlights: putting endoscopy into perspective.

    PubMed

    Papanikolaou, Ioannis S; Siersema, Peter D

    2015-02-01

    The 22nd United European Gastroenterology (EUG) Week took place in Vienna in October 2014. The meeting offered a great opportunity to all those interested in gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy to exchange clinical experiences, research trends, and scientific progress from all over the world. This report will highlight some of the most interesting topics of GI endoscopy that were presented over the 3 days, and will briefly comment on them in light of the latest bibliographic data.

  3. Sedation for Pediatric Endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    It is more difficult to achieve cooperation when conducting endoscopy in pediatric patients than adults. As a result, the sedation for a comfortable procedure is more important in pediatric patients. The sedation, however, often involves risks and side effects, and their prediction and prevention should be sought in advance. Physicians should familiarize themselves to the relevant guidelines in order to make appropriate decisions and actions regarding the preparation of the sedation, patient monitoring during endoscopy, patient recovery, and hospital discharge. Furthermore, they have to understand the characteristics of the pediatric patients and different types of endoscopy. The purpose of this article is to discuss the details of sedation in pediatric endoscopy. PMID:24749082

  4. Capsule endoscopy in patients refusing conventional endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Vázquez, Javier; Argüelles-Arias, Federico; García-Montes, Josefa Maria; Caunedo-Álvarez, Ángel; Pellicer-Bautista, Francisco Javier; Herrerías-Gutiérrez, Juan Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Capsule endoscopy is nowadays the diagnostic technique of choice in the study of small bowel pathologies, allowing the non-invasive study of the entire mucosa. This has led, together with new technical advances, to the creation of two new models (PillCam ESO and PillCam Colon) for the study of esophageal and colonic diseases. These two new capsules offer an interesting alternative to conventional endoscopy in the study of the upper and lower digestive tracts, because traditional endoscopy is often unpleasant and uncomfortable for the patient, can be painful, often requires moderate or deep sedation and is not without complications (hemorrhage, perforation, etc.). PillCam Colon is particularly important for its usefulness in the diagnosis of colonic polyps, and is a potentially useful tool in cases of incomplete colonoscopy or in colorectal cancer screening, even more when most patients are reluctant to undergo screening programs due to the said disadvantages of conventional colonoscopy. This article discusses the advantages of capsule endoscopy over conventional endoscopy, its current application possibilities and indications in routine clinical practice. In the various sections of the work, we assess the application of endoscopic capsule in different sections of the digestive tract (esophagus, stomach, and colon) and finally the potential role of panendoscopy with PillCam Colon. PMID:24966612

  5. Overview of technical solutions and assessment of clinical usefulness of capsule endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Koprowski, Robert

    2015-12-01

    The paper presents an overview of endoscopic capsules with particular emphasis on technical aspects. It indicates common problems in capsule endoscopy such as: (1) limited wireless communication (2) the use of capsule endoscopy in the case of partial patency of the gastrointestinal tract, (3) limited imaging area, (4) external capsule control limitations. It also presents the prospects of capsule endoscopy, the most recent technical solutions for biopsy and the mobility of the capsule in the gastrointestinal tract. The paper shows the possibilities of increasing clinical usefulness of capsule endoscopy resulting from technological limitations. Attention has also been paid to the current role of capsule endoscopy in screening tests and the limitations of its effectiveness. The paper includes the author's recommendations concerning the direction of further research and the possibility of enhancing the scope of capsule endoscopy.

  6. Endoscopy in Amphibians.

    PubMed

    Chai, Norin

    2015-09-01

    Despite advances in exotic animal endoscopy, descriptions involving amphibians are scarce. Amphibian endoscopy shares some similarities with reptiles, especially in lizards. Selected procedures are discussed, including stomatoscopy, gastroscopy, coelioscopy, and biopsy of coelomic organs and lesions. This short overview provides the practitioner with pragmatic advice on how to conduct safe and effective endoscopic examinations in amphibians.

  7. UEG week 2012 report: putting endoscopy into perspective.

    PubMed

    Papanikolaou, I S

    2013-01-01

    The 20th United European Gastroenterology Week (UEG week; 20 - 24 October 2012; Amsterdam, The Netherlands) offered, once again, the opportunity for delegates interested in gastrointestinal endoscopy to update their knowledge as colleagues from all over the world shared their experiences. Various interesting studies on endoscopic topics were presented, allowing participants to become better acquainted with recent advancements and research trends in gastrointestinal endoscopy. This report focuses on oral presentations and selected poster presentations and aims to review them in the light of recent literature.

  8. Diagnosis of Jejunal Metastases from Lung Cancer Using Capsule Endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Leduc, Charlotte; Prim, Nathalie; Mennecier, Bertrand; Delvaux, Michel; Gangi, Afshin; Quoix, Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal metastases from lung cancer are rare and usually asymptomatic. We report a case of small bowel metastases from primary lung cancer revealed by abdominal pain and severe recurrent anaemia. The diagnosis was obtained with capsule endoscopy. This non-invasive procedure thus represents a valuable method contributing to a rapid and detailed diagnosis while reducing underdiagnosis, and it should thus be considered for lung cancer patients complaining of abdominal symptoms, which may indeed be related to gastrointestinal metastases. PMID:27790115

  9. Diagnosis of Jejunal Metastases from Lung Cancer Using Capsule Endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Leduc, Charlotte; Prim, Nathalie; Mennecier, Bertrand; Delvaux, Michel; Gangi, Afshin; Quoix, Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal metastases from lung cancer are rare and usually asymptomatic. We report a case of small bowel metastases from primary lung cancer revealed by abdominal pain and severe recurrent anaemia. The diagnosis was obtained with capsule endoscopy. This non-invasive procedure thus represents a valuable method contributing to a rapid and detailed diagnosis while reducing underdiagnosis, and it should thus be considered for lung cancer patients complaining of abdominal symptoms, which may indeed be related to gastrointestinal metastases.

  10. Upper GI Endoscopy

    MedlinePlus

    ... or IV fluids during or after the procedure. Seek Care Right Away If you have any of the following symptoms after an upper GI endoscopy, seek medical care right away: chest pain problems breathing ...

  11. Sedation for Your Endoscopy

    MedlinePlus

    ... blood” such as Coumadin, Lovenox, Heparin, and Plavix yes | no Any type of medicine that is used for diabetes ( ... the past? yes | no Are you allergic to any medicines? yes | no If you had an endoscopy before, were ...

  12. Software Tools in Endoscopy - Nice to Have or Essential?

    PubMed Central

    Möschler, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    Background Documentation of findings and of the treatment implications resulting from them is one of the central tasks involved in medical work. The introduction of software tools for managing and providing technical support for this task is a logical development. Methods A literature search was conducted in September 2015 using PubMed and the search terms ‘gastrointestinal endoscopy AND electronic documentation’ and ‘software tools AND gastrointestinal endoscopy AND documentation’. Results The requirements in relation to documentation, patient information and sedation, dealing with histological findings, materials logistics, recording video documents, and hygiene documentation are discussed. Conclusion Software tools are essential for managing basic documentation requirements. However, for many aspects of the documentation required in a modern endoscopy department, there are various - and sometimes substantial - gaps in the programs currently available. More intensive discussions need to take place regarding existing gaps and requirements, both with the suppliers concerned and among colleagues and specialist societies. PMID:27588294

  13. Aldehyde disinfectants and health in endoscopy units. British Society of Gastroenterology Endoscopy Committee.

    PubMed

    Cowan, R E; Manning, A P; Ayliffe, G A; Axon, A T; Causton, J S; Cripps, N F; Hall, R; Hanson, P J; Harrison, J; Leicester, R J

    1993-11-01

    Summary of main recommendations(1) Glutaraldehyde, used in most endoscopy units in the United Kingdom for the disinfection of flexible gastrointestinal endoscopes, is a toxic substance being an irritant and a sensitiser; symptoms associated with glutaraldehyde exposure are common among staff working in endoscopy units.(2) The Control of Substances Hazardous to Health Regulations 1988 (COSHH) obliges the employer to make a systematic assessment of risk to staff of exposure to glutaraldehyde and institute measures to deal effectively with exposure.(3) At present glutaraldehyde remains the first line agent for the disinfection of flexible gastrointestinal endoscopes. Other agents are being developed; a standard means of assessment for flexible endoscope disinfectants should be devised.(4) Equipment and accessories that are heat stable should be sterilised by autoclaving; disposable accessories should be used wherever possible.(5) Flexible gastrointestinal endoscopes should be disinfected within automated washer/disinfectors; trays, bowls or buckets for this purpose are unacceptable.(6) Local exhaust ventilation must be used to control glutaraldehyde vapour. Extracted air may be discharged direct to the atmosphere or passed over special absorbent filters and recirculated. Such control measures must be regularly tested and records retained.(7) Endoscope cleaning and disinfection should be carried out in a room dedicated to the purpose, equipped with control measures to maintain the concentration of glutaraldehyde vapour at a level certainly below the current occupational exposure standard of 0.2 ppm and preferably below the commonly used working limit of 0.1 ppm. Sites other than the endoscopy unit where endoscopy is regularly performed, such as the radiology department, should have their own fully equipped cleaning and disinfection room.(8) COSHH limits the use of personal protective equipment to those situations where other measures cannot adequately control exposure

  14. Management of gastrointestinal hemorrhage.

    PubMed Central

    Hilsden, R. J.; Shaffer, E. A.

    1995-01-01

    Acute gastrointestinal hemorrhage is a common problem that requires prompt recognition and management to prevent serious morbidity and mortality. Management goals are stabilization of the patient with vigorous fluid resuscitation followed by investigation and definitive treatment of the bleeding source. Endoscopy is often the initial diagnostic test and allows therapeutic measures to be performed at the same time. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:8563510

  15. Prior esophagogastroduodenoscopy does not affect the cecal intubation time at bidirectional endoscopies

    PubMed Central

    Öner, Osman Zekai; Demirci, Rojbin Karakoyun; Gündüz, Umut Rıza; Aslaner, Arif; Koç, Ümit; Bülbüller, Nurullah

    2013-01-01

    Bidirectional endoscopy (BE) is often used to assess patients for the reason of anemia or to screen asymptomatic population for malignancy. Limited clinical data favors to perform first the upper gastrointestinal system endoscopy, but its effect to the duration of colonoscopy is yet to be determined. The aim of this retrospective study is to evaluate the effect of upper gastrointestinal system endoscopy on the time to achieve cecal intubation during colonoscopy in patients undergoing BE. Patients of four endoscopists at similar experience levels were retrospectively identified and categorized into the upper gastrointestinal system endoscopy before colonoscopy group (group 1) or the colonoscopy only group (group 2). The demographics, clinical data and the time to achieve cecal intubation for each patient were analyzed. The mean time to achieve cecal intubation in the first group that included 319 cases was 8.4 ± 0.93 minutes and the mean time in the second group that included 1672 cases was 8.56 ± 1.16 minutes. There was no statistically significant difference between the groups. There was also no significant difference between the Group 1 and Group 2 when compared according to which of the four endoscopists performed the procedures. Performing the upper gastrointestinal system endoscopy prior to colonoscopy did not affect the time to achieve cecal intubation. Considering that performing the upper gastrointestinal system endoscopy prior to the colonoscopy is more advantageous in terms of patient comfort and analgesic requirement, beginning to BE with it seems more favorable. PMID:23936601

  16. Complementary roles of interventional radiology and therapeutic endoscopy in gastroenterology

    PubMed Central

    Ray, David M; Srinivasan, Indu; Tang, Shou-Jiang; Vilmann, Andreas S; Vilmann, Peter; McCowan, Timothy C; Patel, Akash M

    2017-01-01

    Acute upper and lower gastrointestinal bleeding, enteral feeding, cecostomy tubes and luminal strictures are some of the common reasons for gastroenterology service. While surgery was initially considered the main treatment modality, the advent of both therapeutic endoscopy and interventional radiology have resulted in the paradigm shift in the management of these conditions. In this paper, we discuss the patient’s work up, indications, and complementary roles of endoscopic and angiographic management in the settings of gastrointestinal bleeding, enteral feeding, cecostomy tube placement and luminal strictures. These conditions often require multidisciplinary approaches involving a team of interventional radiologists, gastroenterologists and surgeons. Further, the authors also aim to describe how the fields of interventional radiology and gastrointestinal endoscopy are overlapping and complementary in the management of these complex conditions.

  17. Computed tomography as a definitive method for diagnosing gastrointestinal lipomas

    SciTech Connect

    Heiken. J.P.; Forde, K.A; Gold, R.P.

    1982-02-01

    Four cases of gastrointestinal lipoma that were demonstrated by computed tomography (CT) are presented. Until now, definitive diagnosis of gastrointestinal lipomas has required fiberoptic endoscopy, biopsy, or surgical excision. The results of this study indicate that CT may become a definitive diagnostic examination for lipomas of the gastrointestinal tract.

  18. Endoscopy as a diagnostic and therapeutic alternative technique of taeniasis.

    PubMed

    Canaval Zuleta, Héctor Julián; Company Campins, María M; Dolz Abadía, Carlos

    2016-06-01

    Despite a low incidence in developed countries, gastrointestinal taeniasis should be suspected in patients with abdominal pain, diarrhea, anemia, and/or malabsorption of unknown origin, even more so if they come from endemic regions or areas with poor hygienic and alimentary habits. Diagnosis is traditionally reached by identifying the parasite in stools, but more recently both serological and immunological approaches are also available. Based on a patient diagnosed by gastroscopy, a literature review was undertaken of patients diagnosed by endoscopy. We discuss endoscopy as diagnostic modality, and the effectiveness and safety that endoscopic treatment may provide in view of the potential risk for neurocysticercosis.

  19. Investigation on Reflection of Tectonic Pattern in ASG EUPOS Data in the Sudetes and Adjacent Areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szczerbowski, Zbigniew

    2016-12-01

    The GNSS data evaluated from on observation of ASG EUPOS stations in the Sudety Mts. and in adjacent areas is analyzed by the author in the scope of disturbances in daily solutions that can be induced by tectonics stress. The daily position changes derived from GNSS data demonstrate the long or short term trends, which are affected by offsets of different nature. Author presents an analysis based on frequency of parameter - displacement vector azimuth. The aim of the analysis is to show statistical significance of observed small values of temporal displacements, which values are not normally distributed. There are "outliers" of the normal distribution of displacement azimuths, which values show a certain reproducibility, which corresponds to orientations of tectonic lines. That suggests small, short time movements along boundaries of horsts and grabens - a crustal-extension structure of the area. However derived results (values of displacements) are less than a limitation error, temporal distributions of coordinates are not random as usually data errors. So in author's opinion the spatial-temporal evolution of horizontal displacements of ASG EUPOS stations in the Sudety Mts. and in adjacent areas are determined by expressions of underlying geological structures.

  20. Recent advances in photoacoustic endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Tae-Jong; Cho, Young-Seok

    2013-11-16

    Imaging based on photoacoustic effect relies on illuminating with short light pulses absorbed by tissue absorbers, resulting in thermoelastic expansion, giving rise to ultrasonic waves. The ultrasonic waves are then detected by detectors placed around the sample. Photoacoustic endoscopy (PAE) is one of four major implementations of photoacoustic tomography that have been developed recently. The prototype PAE was based on scanning mirror system that deflected both the light and the ultrasound. A recently developed mini-probe was further miniaturized, and enabled simultaneous photoacoustic and ultrasound imaging. This PAE-endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) system can offer high-resolution vasculature information in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract and display differences between optical and mechanical contrast compared with single-mode EUS. However, PAE for endoscopic GI imaging is still at the preclinical stage. In this commentary, we describe the technological improvements in PAE for possible clinical application in endoscopic GI imaging. In addition, we discuss the technical details of the ultrasonic transducer incorporated into the photoacoustic endoscopic probe.

  1. Contraindications for video capsule endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Bandorski, Dirk; Kurniawan, Niehls; Baltes, Peter; Hoeltgen, Reinhard; Hecker, Matthias; Stunder, Dominik; Keuchel, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Video capsule endoscopy (VCE) has been applied in the last 15 years in an increasing field of applications. Although many contraindications have been put into perspective, some precautions still have to be considered. Known stenosis of the gastrointestinal tract is a clear contraindication for VCE unless surgery is already scheduled or at least has been considered as an optional treatment modality. In patients with a higher incidence of stenosis, as in an established diagnosis of Crohn’s disease, clinical signs of obstruction, prior radiation or surgical small bowel resection, a preceding test with the self-dissolving patency capsule can override this contraindication. Endoscopic placement of the capsule should be considered in patients with swallowing disorders to avoid aspiration. Esophageal or gastric motility disorders may require endoscopic capsule transport or application of prokinetics if the real-time viewer proofs delayed transit. In pregnant women, VCE should be restricted to urgent cases where diagnosis cannot be postponed after delivery, as data on safety are missing. There is theoretical and clinical evidence that patients with implanted cardiac devices such as a pacemaker, cardioverters or left heart assist devices, can safely undergo VCE in spite of still existing contraindication by manufacturers. Children from the age of 2 years have safely undergone VCE. Although video capsules are not proven safe with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), first single cases of patients incidentally undergoing MRI with an incorporated capsule have been reported, showing susceptibility artifacts but no signs of clinical harm. PMID:28018097

  2. Endoscopy in screening for digestive cancer.

    PubMed

    Lambert, René

    2012-12-16

    The aim of this study is to describe the role of endoscopy in detection and treatment of neoplastic lesions of the digestive mucosa in asymptomatic persons. Esophageal squamous cell cancer occurs in relation to nutritional deficiency and alcohol or tobacco consumption. Esophageal adenocarcinoma develops in Barrett's esophagus, and stomach cancer in chronic gastric atrophy with Helicobacter pylori infection. Colorectal cancer is favoured by a high intake in calories, excess weight, low physical activity. In opportunistic or individual screening endoscopy is the primary detection procedure offered to an asymptomatic individual. In organized or mass screening proposed by National Health Authorities to a population, endoscopy is performed only in persons found positive to a filter selection test. The indications of primary upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and colonoscopy in opportunistic screening are increasingly developing over the world. Organized screening trials are proposed in some regions of China at high risk for esophageal cancer; the selection test is cytology of a balloon or sponge scrapping; they are proposed in Japan for stomach cancer with photofluorography as a selection test; and in Europe, America and Japan; for colorectal cancer with the fecal occult blood test as a selection test. Organized screening trials in a country require an evaluation: the benefit of the intervention assessed by its impact on incidence and on the 5 year survival for the concerned tumor site; in addition a number of bias interfering with the evaluation have to be controlled. Drawbacks of screening are in the morbidity of the diagnostic and treatment procedures and in overdetection of none clinically relevant lesions. The strategy of endoscopic screening applies to early cancer and to benign adenomatous precursors of adenocarcinoma. Diagnostic endoscopy is conducted in 2 steps: at first detection of an abnormal area through changes in relief, in color or in the course of

  3. Haptic device in endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Sadovnichy, Victor; Gabidullina, Rozaliya; Sokolov, Mikhail; Galatenko, Vladimir; Budanov, Vladimir; Nakashidze, Eldar

    2014-01-01

    Access to organs and tissues is limited during endoscopy. Information about mechanical properties of tissues received during an operation is a key factor for deciding the scale of surgery and further treatment strategy. A new device developed at Lomonosov Moscow State University determines the visco-elastic properties of tissues and presents them in a digital form as a visual image and a tactile sense for the surgeon. This data lets users define pathological change of tissues and if necessary change treatment policy.

  4. Innovative video capsule endoscopy for detection of ubiquitously elongated small intestinal villi in Cronkhite-Canada syndrome.

    PubMed

    Heinzow, Hauke Sebastian; Domschke, Wolfram; Meister, Tobias

    2014-03-01

    Cronkhite-Canada syndrome (CCS) is a rare non-familial disorder with multiple gastrointestinal polyps and ectodermal changes. Adenomatous and carcinomatous changes have been reported. Video capsule endoscopy is a useful non-invasive tool to reveal polypoid lesions of the gastrointestinal tract suspicious for malignancy. We report a case of a patient with CCS with excessively elongated intestinal villi resembling dense sea grass under water as well as multiple polyps of the intestinal mucosa revealed by video capsule endoscopy. This report presents for the first time small bowel video sequences of CCS qualifying video capsule endoscopy for screening purposes and early detection of malignancy.

  5. Hyperemesis gravidarum: a case of starvation and altered sensorium gestosis (ASG).

    PubMed

    Erick, Miriam

    2014-05-01

    Of the problems that complicate child-bearing, hyperemesis gravidarum (HG), or severe nausea and vomiting of pregnancy (NVP), is likely one of the most painful with unrelenting retching and vomiting that can lead to measurable injuries such as Mallory-Weiss Syndrome and esophageal rupture, and/or subtle maternal cognitive impairments related to starvation and dehydration. Recognized hallmarks of HG include dehydration, ketonuria, weight loss over 5%, and electrolyte abnormalities not attributable to other causes. Historically providers regarded the hyperemetic as a difficult to treat patient with potentially underlying psychological problems. Sick patients who experience pain and suffering present challenges to care, not excepting NVP. Ill patients can be demanding and agitated. Agitation can be one of the early signs of delirium or altered mental status (AMS). AMS can include previously diagnosed psychiatric conditions as well as new onset of Wernicke's encephalopathy, deliria, insomnia, hallucinations and autoscopy, resulting from various etiologies including and not limited to medications, pain including pain from hunger, vomiting and retching, constipation, dehydration, altered electrolytes, hypoglycemia, malnutrition and sleep deprivation. AMS may have a subtle waxing and waning trajectory, making the condition difficult to diagnosis in early stages. What have not been well elucidated in AMS are subjective images and/or experiences. Whether all AMS experiences are similar is unknown. We believe there may be a transient alteration of cognitive status or "altered sensorium gestosis" (ASG), attributed to the direct insults of hyperemesis gravidarum which will be discussed herein. How prevalent ASG might be is unknown and needs further investigation.

  6. Extra-articular hip endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Verhelst, L.; Guevara, V.; De Schepper, J.; Van Melkebeek, J.; Pattyn, C.; Audenaert, E. A.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this review is to evaluate the current available literature evidencing on peri-articular hip endoscopy (the third compartment). A comprehensive approach has been set on reports dealing with endoscopic surgery for recalcitrant trochanteric bursitis, snapping hip (or coxa-saltans; external and internal), gluteus medius and minimus tears and endoscopy (or arthroscopy) after total hip arthroplasty. This information can be used to trigger further research, innovation and education in extra-articular hip endoscopy. PMID:23610664

  7. The Past, Present, and Future of Image-Enhanced Endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Jae-Young

    2015-01-01

    Despite the remarkable progress recently made to enhance the resolution of white-light endoscopy, detection, and diagnosis of premalignant lesions, such as adenomas and subtle early-stage cancers, remains a great challenge. As for example, although chromoendoscopy, such as endoscopy using indigo carmine, is useful for the early diagnosis of subtle lesions, the technique presents various disadvantages ranging from the time required for spray application of the dye and suctioning of excess dye to the increased difficulty in identifying lesions in the presence of severe inflammation and obstruction of visual field due to the pooling of solution in depressed-type lesions. To overcome these diagnostic problems associated with chromoendoscopy, research has focused on the development of endoscopes based on new optical technologies. Several types of image-enhanced endoscopy methods have recently been presented. In particular, image-enhanced endoscopy has emerged as a new paradigm for the diagnosis of gastrointestinal disorders. Image-enhanced endoscopes provide high-contrast images of lesions by means of optical or electronic technologies, including the contrast enhancement of the mucosal surface and of blood vessels. Chromoendoscopy, narrow-band imaging, i-SCAN, and flexible spectral imaging color enhancement are representative examples of image-enhanced endoscopy discussed in this paper. PMID:26668791

  8. Small bowel capsule endoscopy in 2007: indications, risks and limitations.

    PubMed

    Rondonotti, Emanuele; Villa, Federica; Mulder, Chris J J; Jacobs, Maarten A J M; de Franchis, Roberto

    2007-12-14

    Capsule endoscopy has revoluzionized the study of the small bowel by providing a reliable method to evaluate, endoscopically, the entire small bowel. In the last six years several papers have been published exploring the possible role of this examination in different clinical conditions. At the present time capsule endoscopy is generally recommended as a third examination, after negative bidirectional endoscopy, in patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding. A growing body of evidence suggests also an important role for this examination in other clinical conditions such as Crohn's disease, celiac disease, small bowel polyposis syndromes or small bowel tumors. The main complication of this examination is the retention of the device at the site of a previously unknown small bowel stricture. However there are also some other open issues mainly due to technical limitations of this tool (which is not driven from remote control, is unable to take biopsies, to insufflate air, to suck fluids or debris and sometimes to correctly size and locate lesions). The recently developed double balloon enteroscope, owing to its capability to explore a large part of the small bowel and to take targeted biopsies, although being invasive and time consuming, can overcome some limitations of capsule endoscopy. At the present time, in the majority of clinical conditions (i.e. obscure GI bleeding), the winning strategy seems to be to couple these two techniques to explore the small bowel in a painless, safe and complete way (with capsule endoscopy) and to define and treat the lesions identified (with double balloon enteroscopy).

  9. Role of Clinical Endoscopy in Emphasizing Endoscope Disinfection

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Ji Kon; Kim, Eun Young; Kwon, Kwang An; Choi, Il Ju

    2015-01-01

    Based on the unexpected Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) outbreak in Korea, it was established that the virus can spread easily, MERS exposure in hospitals carries an extreme risk for infection as well as mortality, and the sharing of information was essential for infection control. Although the incidence of exogenous infections related to contaminated endoscopes is very low, the majority of published outbreaks have been caused by various shortcomings in reprocessing procedures, including insufficient training or awareness. Ever since the inauguration of "Clinical Endoscopy" as an English-language journal of the Korean Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy in 2011, it has published several articles on disinfection of the endoscope and its accessories. Many Science Citation Index journals have also emphasized high-level disinfection of the gastrointestinal endoscope. Many papers have been produced specifically, since the outbreak of carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae in 2013. The recent review papers concluded that quality control is the most important issue among all the aspects of procedural care, including the efficiency of the gastrointestinal endoscopy unit and reprocessing room. Thorough reprocessing of endoscopes using high-level disinfection and sterilization methods may be essential for reducing the risk of infection. PMID:26473114

  10. Making endoscopy mobile: a novel initiative for public healthcare.

    PubMed

    Talukdar, R; Reddy, D Nageshwar

    2012-02-01

    Public healthcare has progressed immensely in the past few decades. However, the rural masses in the developing and underdeveloped countries very often have limited access to the advanced healthcare technology. At the Asian Institute of Gastroenterology, Hyderabad, India, the Rural Health Care Project has been initiated in an attempt to provide cost-effective gastrointestinal care to the rural population. The Project was implemented by traveling to remote rural areas in a bus that had been converted into a mobile hospital and equipped with basic diagnostic facilities including a custom-made endoscopy unit. The mobile hospital and endoscopy unit is accompanied by a telemedicine vehicle that transmits all procedures and data to the main telemedicine center at the parent institute in Hyderabad. Our efforts have resulted in cost-effective management and robust data collection of several common gastrointestinal illnesses in remote rural areas of the Indian state of Andhra Pradesh. To date, 32756 endoscopic procedures have been carried out in a population of over 10 million people spanning 4837 villages. Overall, 72% of the population has had a positive finding on upper gastrointestinal endoscopy (primarily related to acid peptic diseases). Interestingly, <1% of the population have had colonic polyps on screening colonoscopy, whereas the prevalence of infective colitis has been high. This whole exercise has produced a high level of satisfaction among both beneficiaries and care-givers; it has also offered doctors in training the opportunity to encounter and manage common public health-related problems. This program is funded by philanthropic donations.

  11. A Review of Current Disinfectants for Gastrointestinal Endoscopic Reprocessing

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sanghoon; Koo, Ja Seol; Park, Jeong Bae; Lim, Yun Jeong; Hong, Su Jin; Kim, Sang-Woo; Chun, Hoon Jai

    2013-01-01

    Gastrointestinal endoscopy is gaining popularity for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. However, concerns over endoscope-related nosocomial infections are increasing, together with interest by the general public in safe and efficient endoscopy. For this reason, reprocessing the gastrointestinal endoscope is an important step for effective performance of endoscopy. Disinfectants are essential to the endoscope reprocessing procedure. Before selecting an appropriate disinfectant, their characteristics, limitations and means of use must be fully understood. Herein, we review the characteristics of several currently available disinfectants, including their uses, potency, advantages, and disadvantages. Most disinfectants can be used to reprocess gastrointestinal endoscopes if the manufacturer's guidelines are followed. The selection and use of a suitable disinfectant depends on the individual circumstances of each endoscopy suite. PMID:23964330

  12. Capsule endoscopy in neoplastic diseases.

    PubMed

    Pennazio, Marco; Rondonotti, Emanuele; de Franchis, Roberto

    2008-09-14

    Until recently, diagnosis and management of small-bowel tumors were delayed by the difficulty of access to the small bowel and the poor diagnostic capabilities of the available diagnostic techniques. An array of new methods has recently been developed, increasing the possibility of detecting these tumors at an earlier stage. Capsule endoscopy (CE) appears to be an ideal tool to recognize the presence of neoplastic lesions along this organ, since it is non-invasive and enables the entire small bowel to be visualized. High-quality images of the small-bowel mucosa may be captured and small and flat lesions recognized, without exposure to radiation. Recent studies on a large population of patients undergoing CE have reported small-bowel tumor frequency only slightly above that reported in previous surgical series (range, 1.6%-2.4%) and have also confirmed that the main clinical indication to CE in patients with small-bowel tumors is obscure gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. The majority of tumors identified by CE are malignant; many were unsuspected and not found by other methods. However, it remains difficult to identify pathology and tumor type based on the lesion's endoscopic appearance. Despite its limitations, CE provides crucial information leading in most cases to changes in subsequent patient management. Whether the use of CE in combination with other new diagnostic (MRI or multidetector CT enterography) and therapeutic (Push-and-pull enteroscopy) techniques will lead to earlier diagnosis and treatment of these neoplasms, ultimately resulting in a survival advantage and in cost savings, remains to be determined through carefully-designed studies.

  13. Paediatric endoscopy by adult gastroenterologists in Ile-Ife, Nigeria: A viable option to increase the access to paediatric endoscopy in low resource countries

    PubMed Central

    Alatise, Olusegun I.; Anyabolu, Henry Chineme; Sowande, Oludayo; Akinola, David

    2015-01-01

    Background: Paediatric endoscopy performed by adult gastroenterologists is a service delivery model that increases the access of children to endoscopy in countries where paediatric gastroenterologists with endoscopy skills are scarce. However, studies on the usefulness of this model in Nigeria and Sub-Saharan Africa are scarce. We aimed to evaluate the indications, procedures, diagnostic yield and safety of paediatric endoscopy performed by adult gastroenterologists in a Nigerian tertiary health facility. Materials and Methods: It was a retrospective study that evaluated the records of paediatric (≤18 years old) endoscopies carried out in the endoscopy suite of Obafemi Awolowo University Teaching Hospital Complex Ile-Ife, Nigeria from January 2007 to December 2014. Results: A total of 63 procedures were successfully completed in children of whom 4 were repeat procedures which were excluded. Thus, 59 endoscopies performed on children were analysed. Most (49; 83.1%) of these procedures on the children were diagnostic with oesophagogastroduodenoscopy being the commonest (43; 72.9%). Epigastric pain (22; 37.3%), haematemesis (17; 28.8%) and dysphagia (9; 15.3%) were the predominant indication for upper gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy while haematochezia (9; 15.3%) and rectal protrusion (2; 3.4%) were the indications for colonoscopy. Injection sclerotherapy (3; 5.1%) and variceal banding (2; 3.4%) were the therapeutic upper GI endoscopic procedures conducted while polypectomies were performed during colonoscopy in 5 children (8.5%). Abnormal endoscopy findings were observed in 53 out of the 59 children making the positive diagnostic yield to be 89.8%. No complication, either from the procedure or anaesthesia was observed. Conclusion: Paediatric endoscopy performed by adult gastroenterologists is useful, feasible and safe. It is being encouraged as a viable option to fill the gap created by dearth of skilled paediatric gastroenterologists. PMID:26712292

  14. Lasers in digestive endoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunetaud, Jean Marc; Maunoury, Vincent; Cochelard, Dominique

    1997-01-01

    Lasers were introduced in digestive endoscopy to stop active gastroduodenal hemorrhages. Their use spread progressively to the treatment of chronic hemorrhages from vascular malformations and sessile tumors. Laser face competition from other endoscopic techniques such as electrocoagulation, injection techniques, dilation, stents, and brachytherapy. Many series have reported the efficacy of lasers in digestive endoscopy used for their thermal or photochemical effects. However, they were gradually abandoned for the treatment of hemorrhages because of competition from nonlaser techniques. Lasers are still used for ablation of sessile tumors, but their true impact is difficult to evaluate. Modern methods of technology assessment did not allow gastroenterologists to clearly define the place of lasers among surgery, radio-chemotherapy, and other endoscopic techniques, and data on the daily use of lasers are not available. Therefore, the conclusion can only be subjective. The best current application of thermal lasers appears to be in the treatment of rectosigmoid villous adenomas in elderly patients. Small superficial rectal cancers may also become a good subject due to the impact of endoscopic ultrasonography. Early lesions with multifocal or diffuse disease such as early esophageal cancers could be the most promising subject of application for photodynamic therapy in the future.

  15. Quality Assurance in Endoscopy: Which Parameters?

    PubMed Central

    Denzer, Ulrike W.

    2016-01-01

    Background The verbalisation of quality standards and parameters by medical societies are relevant for qualitative improvement but may also be an instrument to demand more resources for health care or be a unique characteristic. Within the health care system 3 different quality levels can be defined: structure, process and result quality. Methods The current S2k guideline of the German Society for Gastroenterology (quality requirements for gastrointestinal endoscopy) AWMF registry no. 021-022 provides recommendations based on the available evidence for the structure quality (requirements for equipment, human resources) as well as for the process quality (patient preparation, conduct, documentation) and result quality (follow-up of specific endoscopic procedures). Results Based on these recommendations, measurable quality indicators/parameters for the endoscopy have been selected and formulated. General quality parameters for endoscopic examinations are given as well as quality parameters for specific procedures for the preparation, conduct, and follow-up of specific endoscopic interventions. Conclusion Only the regular review of processes and courses by means of defined measurement parameters builds up the basis for corrections based on facts. In addition, the implementation of recommended standards may be an instrument in demanding more resources from the health care system and, therefore, should be embedded as routine. PMID:27588295

  16. Comparative Analysis of Satellite Measurements Calculation Results Using the Postprocessing Services: Asg-Eupos (Poland), Apps (USA) and CSRS (Canada)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mika, Monika; Kudach, Jakub

    2014-06-01

    The publication has a cognitive research character. It presents a comparative analysis of free Internet services in Poland and abroad, used to adjust the data obtained using satellite measurement techniques. The main aim of this work is to describe and compare free tools for satellite data processing and to examine them for possible use in the surveying works in Poland. Among the many European and global services three of them dedicated to satellite measurements were selected: ASG-EUPOS (Poland), APPS (USA) and CSRS (Canada). The publication contains the results of calculations using these systems. Calculations were based on RINEX files obtained via postprocessing service (ASG-EUPOS network) POZGEO D for 12 reference stations in the South Poland. In order to examine differences in results between the ASG-EUPOS, APPS and CSRS the transformation points coordinate to a single coordinate system ETRF 2000 (in force in Poland) was made. Studies have shown the possibility of the calculation in Poland (in postprocessing mode) using the analyzed applications with global coverage.

  17. Endoscopy in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Carter, D; Lang, A; Eliakim, R

    2013-09-01

    Small bowel imaging and endoscopy in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) underwent a lot of change and advancement in the recent years. Modalities have shifted from gastroscopy, colonoscopy and small bowel follow through, to ileo-colonoscopy, computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance (MR), enteroscopy, wireless video capsule endoscopy and balloon assisted enteroscopy. Nowadays endoscopy has a major role in the diagnosis of IBD, assessing its extent, treating some of its complications (stricture, bleeding), assessing the success of various treatments (mucosal healing), and as a predictor of disease course. Wireless capsule endoscopy (WCE) is a relatively new "toy" allowing direct, patient friendly, visualization of the entire small bowel mucosa. It has gained a substantial role in the evaluation of patients with suspected Chron's Disease (CD) and indeterminate colitis. WCE has a high positive predictive value in patients with suspected CD, when one uses more than two of the International Conference on Capsule Endoscopy (ICCE) criteria, and not less important, a very high negative predictive value in patients with suspected CD. Its role in patients with known CD, assessing their disease activity and extent, its role in assessing postsurgical small bowel recurrence and its role in the evaluation of mucosal healing are still unclear. Balloon assisted enteroscopy has established its role as a complementary tool in cases where there is need of biopsies or treatment (dilatation of strictures). The present review will summarize the role of endoscopy in the diagnosis of IBD, in assessing its activity, its management, interventional endoscopy and cancer surveillance.

  18. Extra-Articular Endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Doral, Mahmut N; Huri, Gazi; Bohacek, Ivan; Turhan, Egemen; Bojanic, Ivan

    2016-03-01

    With the advent of endoscopy in the last 2 decades, a number of procedures, and modifications to them, have been developed and have advanced exponentially. The list of indications was extended over time because of several reasons: better understanding of the pathophysiology, better diagnostics, and advances in endoscopic technology. In this review article, we summarize the most frequently performed extra-articular endoscopic procedures on the extremities. As there are several methods, some have been described briefly, whereas others have been described in greater detail, such as suprascapular nerve entrapment syndrome and Achilles tendon disorders, as they present our area of interest and subspecialty domain. Recent advances in the treatment of versatile pathologic entities have been described, together with new methods, which currently lack sufficient clinical data but still represent promising techniques for the future.

  19. [Emergency treatment of corrosive gastrointestinal injuries].

    PubMed

    Oláh, T; Horváth, O; Zentai, G

    1992-05-03

    Authors discuss their experience of management for caustic gastrointestinal injury. Importance of urgent endoscopy in establishing the extend of injury is emphasized. In eight out of 12 surgical intervention an esophagogastrectomy were performed. According to their experience in case of serious caustic burn the only hope to save the patients life is the early radical operation.

  20. Can Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumors Be Found Early?

    MedlinePlus

    ... may also be found when parts of the gastrointestinal system are removed to treat other diseases. For example, a person with stomach pain or bleeding may have a test called an upper endoscopy to look for an ulcer. In this test, the doctor looks at the stomach ... Medical Review: February 26, 2015 ...

  1. Measuring Quality in Pediatric Endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Lightdale, Jenifer R

    2016-01-01

    Measuring quality in endoscopy includes the assessment of appropriateness of a procedure and the skill with which it is performed. High-quality pediatric endoscopy is safe and efficient, used effectively to make proper diagnoses, is useful for excluding other diagnoses, minimizes adverse events, and is accompanied by appropriate documentation from beginning through end of the procedure. There are no standard quality metrics for pediatric endoscopy, but proposed candidates are both process and outcomes oriented. Both are likely to be used in the near future to increase transparency about patient outcomes, as well as to influence payments for the procedure.

  2. Capsule endoscopy in portal hypertension.

    PubMed

    Rondonotti, Emanuele; Villa, Federica; Dell' Era, Alessandra; Tontini, Gian Eugenio; de Franchis, Roberto

    2010-05-01

    Since the introduction of small bowel capsule endoscopy, and more recently of esophageal capsule endoscopy, these diagnostic tools have become available for the evaluation of the consequences of portal hypertension in the esophagus, stomach, and small intestine. The main advantage of the esophageal and the small bowel capsule is the relatively less invasiveness that could potentially increase patients' adherence to endoscopic screening/surveillance programs. When esophageal capsule endoscopy was compared with traditional gastroscopy, it showed good sensitivity and specificity in recognizing the presence and the size of esophageal varices. However, the results are not consistent among studies, and more data are needed.

  3. The Prevalence of Barrett Esophagus Diagnosed in the Second Endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Suna, Nuretdin; Parlak, Erkan; Kuzu, Ufuk Baris; Yildiz, Hakan; Koksal, Aydin Seref; Oztas, Erkin; Sirtas, Zeliha; Yuksel, Mahmut; Aydinli, Onur; Bilge, Zulfikar; Taskiran, Ismail; Sasmaz, Nurgul

    2016-01-01

    Abstract At present, we do not know the exact prevalence of Barrett esophagus (BE) developing later in patients without BE in their first endoscopic screening. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of BE on the second endoscopic examination of patients who had no BE in their first endoscopic examination. The data of the patients older than 18 years who had undergone upper gastrointestinal system endoscopy more than once at the endoscopy unit of our clinic during the last 6 years were retrospectively analyzed. During the last 6 years, 44,936 patients had undergone at least one endoscopic examination. Among these patients, 2701 patients who had more than one endoscopic screening were included in the study. Of the patients, 1276 (47.3%) were females and 1425 (52.7%) were males, with an average age of 54.9 (18–94) years. BE was diagnosed in 18 (0.66%) of the patients who had no BE in the initial endoscopic examination. The patients with BE had reflux symptoms in their medical history and in both endoscopies, they revealed a higher prevalence of lower esophageal sphincter laxity, hiatal hernia, and reflux esophagitis when compared to patients without BE (P < 0.001). Our study showed that in patients receiving no diagnosis of BE on their first endoscopic examination performed for any reason, the prevalence of BE on their second endoscopy within 6 years was very low (0.66%). PMID:27057907

  4. Preoperative diagnosis of cavernous hemangioma presenting with melena using wireless capsule endoscopy of the small intestine

    PubMed Central

    Akazawa, Yu; Hiramatsu, Katsushi; Nosaka, Takuto; Saito, Yasushi; Ozaki, Yoshihiko; Takahashi, Kazuto; Naito, Tatsushi; Ofuji, Kazuya; Matsuda, Hidetaka; Ohtani, Masahiro; Nemoto, Tomoyuki; Suto, Hiroyuki; Yamaguchi, Akio; Imamura, Yoshiaki; Nakamoto, Yasunari

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Primary neoplasms of the small intestine are relatively rare in all age groups, accounting for about 5 % of all gastrointestinal tumors 1. Cavernous hemangiomas of the small intestine are also rare, can cause gastrointestinal bleeding, and are extremely difficult to diagnose preoperatively 2. We present a patient who presented with melena and iron deficiency anemia, for whom wireless capsule endoscopy and single-balloon enteroscopy facilitated the diagnosis of cavernous hemangioma. PMID:27004239

  5. Small bowel involvement documented by capsule endoscopy in Churg-Strauss syndrome.

    PubMed

    Beye, Birane; Lesur, Gilles; Claude, Pierre; Martzolf, Lionel; Kieffer, Pierre; Sondag, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Churg-Strauss syndrome is a small and medium vessel vasculitis and is also known as allergic granulomatous angiitis. Gastrointestinal involvement is common in patients with Churg-Strauss syndrome (20-50%). The most common symptoms are abdominal pain, diarrhoea and occasionally gastrointestinal bleeding and perforation. We present a case of Churg-Strauss syndrome with small bowel lesions documented by video capsule endoscopy.

  6. Small bowel involvement documented by capsule endoscopy in Churg-Strauss syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Beye, Birane; Lesur, Gilles; Claude, Pierre; Martzolf, Lionel; Kieffer, Pierre; Sondag, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Churg-Strauss syndrome is a small and medium vessel vasculitis and is also known as allergic granulomatous angiitis. Gastrointestinal involvement is common in patients with Churg-Strauss syndrome (20-50%). The most common symptoms are abdominal pain, diarrhoea and occasionally gastrointestinal bleeding and perforation. We present a case of Churg-Strauss syndrome with small bowel lesions documented by video capsule endoscopy. PMID:26664542

  7. Diagnosis of gastrointestinal bleeding: A practical guide for clinicians

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Bong Sik Matthew; Li, Bob T; Engel, Alexander; Samra, Jaswinder S; Clarke, Stephen; Norton, Ian D; Li, Angela E

    2014-01-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding is a common problem encountered in the emergency department and in the primary care setting. Acute or overt gastrointestinal bleeding is visible in the form of hematemesis, melena or hematochezia. Chronic or occult gastrointestinal bleeding is not apparent to the patient and usually presents as positive fecal occult blood or iron deficiency anemia. Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding is recurrent bleeding when the source remains unidentified after upper endoscopy and colonoscopic evaluation and is usually from the small intestine. Accurate clinical diagnosis is crucial and guides definitive investigations and interventions. This review summarizes the overall diagnostic approach to gastrointestinal bleeding and provides a practical guide for clinicians. PMID:25400991

  8. Detection of gastrointestinal bleeding by radionuclide scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, S.; Luna, E.; Kingsley, S.; Prince, M.; Herrera, N.

    1984-01-01

    Scanning with Technetium /sup 99m/ labeled autologous red blood cells was performed in 59 patients with clinical suspicion of acute and/or intermittent, chronic gastrointestinal bleeding. In 36 patients (61%), a definite site of bleeding could be demonstrated. A strong correlation with other modalities such as upper and lower gastrointestinal endoscopy, contrast angiography, and surgical exploration was found. Overall sensitivity of the procedure was 91%; specificity 100% and accuracy 93.3%. It is suggested that radionuclide scintigraphy provides a completely noninvasive, simple, and sensitive procedure which may be routinely used for the detection and localization of gastrointestinal bleeding.

  9. Gastric Metastases from Lung Adenocarcinoma Causing Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Abu Ghanimeh, Mouhanna; Albadarin, Sakher; Yousef, Osama

    2017-01-01

    Metastases to the stomach are rare. They are commonly asymptomatic, and the diagnosis is usually established during autopsy. We present a patient known to have stage IV lung adenocarcinoma who presented with melena and shock. Endoscopy revealed multiple gastric nodules, which were proved to be metastatic deposits from her lung cancer. The possibility of gastric metastases should be kept in mind in patients presenting with gastrointestinal bleeding. Endoscopy and biopsy remain the gold standard for diagnostic testing in such patients. PMID:28286791

  10. Modeling of the travelling ionospheric disturbances. Case study of ASG-EUPOS network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanimonskiy, Yevgen M.; Nykiel, Grzegorz; Figurski, Mariusz; Yampolski, Yuri M.

    2016-04-01

    Traveling ionospheric disturbances (TIDs) - this is quite established term for a relatively stable spatial structures, which are characterized by a certain distribution of the electron concentration and are moved as a whole, especially in the horizontal direction. In most cases TIDs are associated with atmospheric gravity waves (AGW) and are expected to be a quasi-plane wave. Effective modern method of studying TIDs is the sounding of ionosphere by GNSS signals received by the dense regional network. Method of the orthogonal projection of the ionosphere electronic content variations for the total electron content (TEC) mapping allows visualizing the ionospheric irregularities (Zanimonskiy et. al. 2016). Such maps can be used to detect TIDs, their modeling and determination of model parameters, such as: direction and speed of movement, spatial period and the height of the ionosphere layer, in which TIDs are localized. In this paper traveling ionospheric disturbances detected over Poland are presented for the day of St. Patrick (March 2015). Into the calculation process observational data from dense regional network deployed in Poland (ASG-EUPOS) were used. Estimated TIDs were characterized by relative frequent occurrence, up to several times a day, and were observed from a few tens of minutes to hour. The direction of detected TIDs movement in most cases was opposite to the horizontal wind calculated by Horizontal Wind Model 07 at the height of TID. Furthermore, the amplitudes of estimated TEC variations during the TID passage were proportional to the background TEC values and consequently to the higher level of the geomagnetic activity. The extremely high TEC variations and speed of TIDs were registered during the severe geomagnetic storm are discussed in this paper. Further works are carried out to the investigation of quantitative relation between the parameters of TIDs and horizontal winds, as well as to accumulation of statistics and characteristics of TIDs

  11. Operative endoscopy of the airway

    PubMed Central

    Walters, Dustin M.

    2016-01-01

    Airway endoscopy has long been an important and useful tool in the management of thoracic diseases. As thoracic specialists have gained experience with both flexible and rigid bronchoscopic techniques, the technology has continued to evolve so that bronchoscopy is currently the foundation for diagnosis and treatment of many thoracic ailments. Airway endoscopy plays a significant role in the biopsy of tumors within the airways, mediastinum, and lung parenchyma. Endoscopic methods have been developed to treat benign and malignant airway stenoses and tracheomalacia. And more recently, techniques have been conceived to treat end-stage emphysema and prolonged air leaks in select patients. This review describes the abundant uses of airway endoscopy, as well as technical considerations and limitations of the current technologies. PMID:26981263

  12. Management of iatrogenic colorectal perforation: From surgery to endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Shi-Lun; Chen, Tao; Yao, Li-Qing; Zhong, Yun-Shi

    2015-01-01

    Iatrogenic colon perforation is one the most pernicious complications for patients undergoing endoscopic screening or therapy. It is a serious but rare complication of colonoscopy. However, with the expansion of the indications for endoscopic therapies for gastrointestinal diseases, the frequency of colorectal perforation has increased. The management of iatrogenic colorectal perforation is still a challenge for many endoscopists. The methods for treating this complication vary, including conservative treatment, surgical treatment, laparoscopy and endoscopy. In this review, we highlight the etiology, recognition and treatment of colorectal iatrogenic perforation. Specifically, we shed light on the endoscopic management of this rare complication. PMID:26191347

  13. Endoscopy imaging intelligent contrast improvement.

    PubMed

    Sheraizin, S; Sheraizin, V

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we present a medical endoscopy video contrast improvement method that provides intelligent automatic adaptive contrast control. The method fundamentals are video data clustering and video data histogram modification. The video data clustering allows an effective use the low noise two channel contrast enhancement processing. The histogram analysis permitted to determine the video exposure type for simple and complicated contrast distribution. We determined the needed gamma value for automatic local area contrast improvement for the following exposure types: dark, normal, light, dark light, dark normal etc. The experimental results of medical endoscopy video processing allow defining the automatic gamma control range from 0.5 to 2.0.

  14. Efforts to increase image quality during endoscopy: The role of pronase

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Gwang Ha; Cho, Yu Kyung; Cha, Jae Myung; Lee, Sun-Young; Chung, Il-Kwun

    2016-01-01

    Clear visualization of the gastrointestinal mucosal surface is essential for thorough endoscopy. An unobstructed assessment can reduce the need for additional time-consuming manipulations such as frequent washing and suction, which tend to prolong total procedure time. However, mucus, foam, and bubbles often hinder clear visibility during endoscopy. Premedication with pronase, a compound of mixed proteolytic enzymes, has been studied in order to improve mucosal visibility during endoscopy. Although its effects differ according to the location in the stomach, premedication with pronase 10 to 20 min before endoscopy significantly improves mucosal visibility without affecting the accuracy of Helicobacter pylori identification. The effects of pronase as premedication also extend to chromoendoscopy, narrow-band imaging, magnifying endoscopy, and endoscopic ultrasonography. In addition, endoscopic flushing with pronase during endoscopy may improve the quantity and the quality of a biopsy to some degree. Although improved mucosal visibility does not necessarily improve clinical outcomes, premedication with pronase may be helpful for increasing the detection rate of early cancers. PMID:26981178

  15. A stubborn anemia caused by ectopic pancreas bleeding in the jejunum revealed by capsule endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qun-Ying; Yang, Xiao-Yun

    2015-01-01

    Ectopic pancreas is extremely rare in clinical setting. Meanwhile, a stubborn anemia without obvious dark bloody stool due to ectopic pancreas diagnosed by capsule endoscopy has not been reported. We reported a case of an ectopic pancreas inducing obscure gastrointestinal bleeding in a 70-year-old woman presenting as stubborn anemia, which was diagnosed by capsule endoscopy. The patient recovered well after resection the lesion. Diagnosis of ectopic pancreas is extremely difficult with conventional techniques. Endoscopists should pay more attention to the ectopic pancreas as a rare differential consideration for occult intestinal bleeding. PMID:26682148

  16. Visceral Vistas: Basil Hirschowitz and the Birth of Fiberoptic Endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Ian S; Howell, Joel D; Evans, H Hughes

    2016-08-02

    Fiberoptic endoscopy was developed at the University of Michigan in the 1950s by gastroenterology fellow Basil Hirschowitz and 2 physicists. Previous methods to visualize the gastrointestinal lumen used rigid instruments that relied on rudimentary optical systems. They were limited in reach and caused patients considerable discomfort. Fiberoptic technology dramatically changed endoscopic practice. The fiberoptic endoscope, or fiberscope, was a flexible instrument that allowed direct inspection of the gastrointestinal lumen. Although many practicing endoscopists initially resisted its adoption, the fiberscope ultimately held sway. Studying the period from the fiberscope's first introduction in the late 1950s to its more widespread acceptance in the late 1960s may help us understand how a new technology makes its way into routine clinical practice.

  17. Fluorescent Endoscopy of Tumors in Upper Part of Gastrointestinal Tract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisova, E.; Vladimirov, B.; Angelov, I.; Avramov, L.

    2007-04-01

    In the recent study delta-aminolevulinic acid/Protoporphyrin IX (5-ALA/PpIX) is used as fluorescent marker for dysplasia and tumor detection in esophagus and stomach. The 5-ALA is administered per os six hours before measurements at dose 20mg/kg weight. High-power light-emitting diode at 405 nm is used as an excitation source. Special opto-mechanical device is built for LED to use the light guide of standard video-endoscopic system (Olimpus Corp.). Through endoscopic instrumental channel a fiber is applied to return information about fluorescence to microspectrometer (USB4000, OceanOptics Inc.). Very good correlation between fluorescence signals and histology examination of the lesions investigated is achieved.

  18. Electropermanent magnetic anchoring for surgery and endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Tugwell, Josef; Brennan, Philip; O'Shea, Conor; O'Donoghue, Kilian; Power, Timothy; O'Shea, Michael; Griffiths, James; Cahill, Ronan; Cantillon-Murphy, Padraig

    2015-03-01

    The use of magnets for anchoring of instrumentation in minimally invasive surgery and endoscopy has become of increased interest in recent years. Permanent magnets have significant advantages over electromagnets for these applications; larger anchoring and retraction force for comparable size and volume without the need for any external power supply. However, permanent magnets represent a potential hazard in the operating field where inadvertent attraction to surgical instrumentation is often undesirable. The current work proposes an interesting hybrid approach which marries the high forces of permanent magnets with the control of electromagnetic technology including the ability to turn the magnet OFF when necessary. This is achieved through the use of an electropermanent magnet, which is designed for surgical retraction across the abdominal and gastric walls. Our electropermanent magnet, which is hand-held and does not require continuous power, is designed with a center lumen which may be used for trocar or needle insertion. The device in this application has been demonstrated successfully in the porcine model where coupling between an intraluminal ring magnet and our electropermanent magnet facilitated guided insertion of an 18 Fr Tuohy needle for guidewire placement. Subsequent investigations have demonstrated the ability to control the coupling distance of the system alleviating shortcomings with current methods of magnetic coupling due to variation in transabdominal wall thicknesses. With further refinement, the magnet may find application in the anchoring of endoscopic and surgical instrumentation for minimally invasive interventions in the gastrointestinal tract.

  19. 78 FR 24463 - In the Matter of the Review of the Designation of the Abu Sayyaf Group (ASG) (and Other Aliases...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-25

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF STATE In the Matter of the Review of the Designation of the Abu Sayyaf Group (ASG) (and Other Aliases) as a Foreign Terrorist Organization Pursuant to Section 219 of the Immigration and Nationality Act, as Amended Based upon a review of the Administrative...

  20. Application and Efficacy of Super-Magnifying Endoscopy for the Lower Intestinal Tract

    PubMed Central

    Hosoe, Naoki; Ogata, Haruhiko

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopy plays a significant role in the diagnosis, management, and surveillance of colorectal cancer (CRC) and inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs). Moreover, magnifying endoscopy and image-enhanced endoscopy has a crucial role in the clinical setting. Recently, a super-magnifying endoscope has been developed, and two devices, confocal laser endomicroscopy (CLE) and an endocytoscopy system (ECS), which allow in vivo microscopic inspection of the microstructural mucosal features of the gastrointestinal tract, are currently available. Studies on the use of ECS in CRC were reported by a Japanese group. Additionally, a few studies on the use of ECS in IBD have been reported. CLE has been shown to be reliable in assessing the activity of the disease in IBDs in both ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease. Various published studies evaluated the use of CLE during colonoscopy to distinguish colorectal polyp pathology and neoplasia. However, these studies are heterogeneous, and further evidence is necessary to confirm the efficacy of CLE. PMID:26855922

  1. Gastrointestinal complications postthoracotomy and postvagotomy.

    PubMed

    Kokoska, E R; Naunheim, K S

    1998-08-01

    Postthoracotomy gastrointestinal complications, although relatively uncommon, can be associated with significant morbidity and mortality. It is necessary to identify patients who are at high risk for gastrointestinal complications during the preoperative evaluation. Appropriate stress ulcer prophylaxis should be provided to high-risk patients, and enteral feeds should be initiated as early in the postoperative course as possible. Postoperative hypotension and massive blood transfusions can be avoided with early reexploration in the case of postoperative hemorrhage. Finally, unexplained abdominal pain must not be ignored; a high index of suspicion should be maintained, with early and liberal use of diagnostic tools such as standard radiography, CT, endoscopy, and angiography. Consultation should be requested from a surgeon experienced in abdominal catastrophes. Early laparotomy with aggressive operative management can be lifesaving therapy but must be not applied in a cavalier fashion, as many of these disorders can and should be managed conservatively.

  2. Drug-Induced Sleep Endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Charakorn, Natamon; Kezirian, Eric J

    2016-12-01

    Drug-induced sleep endoscopy (DISE) is an upper airway evaluation technique in which fiberoptic examination is performed under conditions of unconscious sedation. Unique information obtained from this 3-dimensional examination of the airway potentially provides additive benefits to other evaluation methods to guide treatment selection. This article presents recommendations regarding DISE technique and the VOTE Classification system for reporting DISE findings and reviews the evidence concerning DISE test characteristics and the association between DISE findings and treatment outcomes.

  3. Compromised ventilation caused by tracheoesophageal fistula and gastrointestinal endoscope undergoing removal of disk battery on esophagus in pediatric patient -A case report-.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyung-Woo; Kim, Ji Yeon; Kim, Jung Won; Park, Jang Su; Choe, Won Joo; Kim, Kyung-Tae; Lee, Sangil

    2011-09-01

    Ingestion of disk batteries may have serious complications such as esophageal burn, perforation, and tracheoesophageal fistula, particularly when the battery is caught in the esophagus. Proper placement of the tracheal tube is critical when tracheoesophageal fistula was occurred from esophageal impaction the battery. Endoscopy of upper gastrointestinal tract in infants and children is an important and effective tool for the diagnosis and treatment of foreign body ingestion. But upper gastrointestinal endoscopy in infant and children has very high risk of tracheal compression and airway compromise. We present a case of ventilatory compromise during insertion of the upper gastrointestinal endoscopy in 16-month-old child with tracheoesophageal fistula secondary to disk battery ingestion.

  4. [Incorporation of the flexible endoscope in gastrointestinal surgery].

    PubMed

    Noguera, José F; Cuadrado, Angel; Olea, José M; García, Juan C; Sanfeliu, Gaspar

    2012-11-01

    The flexible endoscope has not traditionally figured among the tools used by the surgeon. Intra-operative flexible endoscopy may be one of the techniques available in the operating room in the near future. On analysing the development of minimally invasive surgery and flexible endoscopy, it can be seen that they are converging and losing ground to gastrointestinal endoscopy on the one hand, and gaining it with the flexible endoscope, on the other. The technical development of «hybrid» NOTES has shown how some tools not usually available in theatre may be very useful. Flexible endoscopy is probably the technique to enter into the surgical area that offers improved performance. Surgeons need to work closely with the gastroenterologists, while they are trained in these techniques for future «hybrid» specialists.

  5. Ingestible wireless capsules for enhanced diagnostic inspection of gastrointestinal tract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasouli, Mahdi; Kencana, Andy Prima; Huynh, Van An; Ting, Eng Kiat; Lai, Joshua Chong Yue; Wong, Kai Juan; Tan, Su Lim; Phee, Soo Jay

    2011-03-01

    Wireless capsule endoscopy has become a common procedure for diagnostic inspection of gastrointestinal tract. This method offers a less-invasive alternative to traditional endoscopy by eliminating uncomfortable procedures of the traditional endoscopy. Moreover, it provides the opportunity for exploring inaccessible areas of the small intestine. Current capsule endoscopes, however, move by peristalsis and are not capable of detailed and on-demand inspection of desired locations. Here, we propose and develop two wireless endoscopes with maneuverable vision systems to enhance diagnosis of gastrointestinal disorders. The vision systems in these capsules are equipped with mechanical actuators to adjust the position of the camera. This may help to cover larger areas of the digestive tract and investigate desired locations. The preliminary experimental results showed that the developed platform could successfully communicate with the external control unit via human body and adjust the position of camera to limited degrees.

  6. Safety of Digestive Endoscopy following Acute Coronary Syndrome: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Dorreen, Alastair; Moosavi, Sarvee; Martel, Myriam; Barkun, Alan N.

    2016-01-01

    Background. The safety of endoscopy after an acute coronary syndrome (ACS) is poorly characterized. We thus performed a systematic review assessing the safety of endoscopy following ACS. Methods. Searches in EMBASE, Medline, and Web of Science identified articles for inclusion. Data abstraction was completed by two independent reviewers. Results. Fourteen retrospective studies yielded 1178 patients (mean 71.3 years, 59.0% male) having suffered an ACS before endoscopy. Patients underwent 1188 endoscopies primarily to investigate suspected gastrointestinal bleeding (81.2%). Overall, 810 EGDs (68.2%), 191 colonoscopies (16.1%), 100 sigmoidoscopies (8.4%), 64 PEGs (5.4%), and 22 ERCPs (1.9%) were performed 9.0 ± 5.2 days after ACS, showing principally ulcer disease (25.1%; 95% CI 22.2–28.3%) and normal findings (22.9%; 95% CI 20.1–26.0%). Overall, 108 peri- and postprocedural complications occurred (9.1%; 95% CI 7.6–10.9%), with hypotension (24.1%; 95% CI 17.0–32.9%), arrhythmias (8.1%; 95% CI 4.5–18.1%), and repeat ACS (6.5%; 95% CI 3.1–12.8%) as the most frequent. All-cause mortality was 8.1% (95% CI 6.3–10.4%), with 4 deaths attributed to endoscopy (<24 hours after ACS, 3.7% of all complications; 95% CI 1.5–9.1%). Conclusion. A significant proportion of possibly endoscopy-related negative outcomes occur following ACS. Further studies are required to better characterize indications, patient selection, and appropriate timing of endoscopy in this cohort. PMID:27446879

  7. Informative-frame filtering in endoscopy videos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Yong Hwan; Hwang, Sae; Oh, JungHwan; Lee, JeongKyu; Tavanapong, Wallapak; de Groen, Piet C.; Wong, Johnny

    2005-04-01

    Advances in video technology are being incorporated into today"s healthcare practice. For example, colonoscopy is an important screening tool for colorectal cancer. Colonoscopy allows for the inspection of the entire colon and provides the ability to perform a number of therapeutic operations during a single procedure. During a colonoscopic procedure, a tiny video camera at the tip of the endoscope generates a video signal of the internal mucosa of the colon. The video data are displayed on a monitor for real-time analysis by the endoscopist. Other endoscopic procedures include upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, enteroscopy, bronchoscopy, cystoscopy, and laparoscopy. However, a significant number of out-of-focus frames are included in this type of videos since current endoscopes are equipped with a single, wide-angle lens that cannot be focused. The out-of-focus frames do not hold any useful information. To reduce the burdens of the further processes such as computer-aided image processing or human expert"s examinations, these frames need to be removed. We call an out-of-focus frame as non-informative frame and an in-focus frame as informative frame. We propose a new technique to classify the video frames into two classes, informative and non-informative frames using a combination of Discrete Fourier Transform (DFT), Texture Analysis, and K-Means Clustering. The proposed technique can evaluate the frames without any reference image, and does not need any predefined threshold value. Our experimental studies indicate that it achieves over 96% of four different performance metrics (i.e. precision, sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy).

  8. Gastrointestinal manifestations.

    PubMed

    Tanowitz, H B; Simon, D; Weiss, L M; Noyer, C; Coyle, C; Wittner, M

    1996-11-01

    Gastrointestinal disease is a common problem in the setting of HIV-1 infection. As patients live longer and other opportunistic pathogens are suppressed, these problems are becoming even more important in the quality of life.

  9. Heparin as a pharmacologic intervention to induce positive scintiscan in occult gastrointestinal bleeding

    SciTech Connect

    Chaudhuri, T.K.; Brantly, M.

    1984-04-01

    The value of using heparin as a pharmacologic intervention to induce a positive scintiscan was studied in a patient with chronic occult gastrointestinal bleeding. When all standard diagnostic tests (upper and lower gastrointestinal series, upper and lower endoscopy, and conventional noninterventional Tc-99m RBC imaging) fail to detect and localize gastrointestinal bleeding in a patient who has definite clinical evidence (guaiac positive stool and dropping hemoglobin, hematocrit) of chronic occult gastrointestinal oozing, heparin may be used (with proper precaution) as a last resort to aid in the scintigraphic detection and localization of chronic occult gastrointestinal bleeding.

  10. Preliminary results on performance of new ultra-fast static positioning module - POZGEO-2 in areas outside the ASG-EUPOS network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paziewski, Jacek; Krukowska, Marta; Wielgosz, Paweł

    2014-06-01

    The presented preliminary research concerns the accuracy and reliability of new ultra-fast static positioning module - POZGEO-2 - in case of processing GPS data collected outside the ASG-EUPOS network. Such a case requires extrapolation of the network-derived atmospheric corrections which limits correction accuracy and, therefore, has adverse effect on the carrier phase ambiguity resolution. The presented processing tests are based on processing 5-minute long observing sessions and show that precise positioning can be supported up to 35 km from the ASG-EUPOS borders. This means that precise positioning with POZGEO-2 module can be assured for the most of the border areas of Poland. W pracy prezentowane są badania dotyczące dokładności i wiarygodności pozycji wyznaczanej z wykorzystaniem nowego modułu ultra-szybkiego pozycjonowania - POZGEO-2 opracowanego dla systemu ASG-EUPOS. Przedstawione testy obliczeniowe dotyczą szczególnego przypadku wyznaczania pozycji, gdy użytkownik znajduje się poza granicami sieci stacji referencyjnych. W takich warunkach wymagana jest ekstrapolacja sieciowych poprawek atmosferycznych. Wpływa to negatywnie na dokładność tych poprawek i może doprowadzić do sytuacji, w której wyznaczenie nieoznaczoności będzie niemożliwe. Prezentowane badania oparte są na pięciominutowych sesjach obserwacyjnych i pokazują, że poprawki mogą być ekstrapolowane dla obszarów położonych do około 35 km od granic sieci ASG-EUPOS. Oznacza to, że w praktyce precyzyjne pozycjonowanie ultra-szybkie z użyciem modułu POZGEO-2 może być zapewnione dla niemal całego obszaru Polski

  11. A review of drug delivery systems for capsule endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Munoz, Fredy; Alici, Gursel; Li, Weihua

    2014-05-01

    The development of a highly controllable drug delivery system (DDS) for capsule endoscopy has become an important field of research due to its promising applications in therapeutic treatment of diseases in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract and drug absorption studies. Several factors need to be considered to establish the minimum requirements for a functional DDS. Environmental factors of the GI tract and also pharmaceutical factors can help determine the requirements to be met by a DDS in an endoscopic capsule. In order to minimize the influence of such factors on the performance of an effective DDS, at least two mechanisms should be incorporated into a capsule endoscope: an anchoring mechanism to control the capsule position and a drug release mechanism to control variables such as the drug release rate, number of doses and amount of drug released. The implementation of such remotely actuated mechanisms is challenging due to several constraints, including the limited space available in a swallowable capsule endoscope and the delicate and complex environment within the GI tract. This paper presents a comprehensive overview of existing DDS. A comparison of such DDS for capsule endoscopy based on the minimum DDS requirements is presented and future work is also discussed.

  12. Diagnosis of Ascaris lumbricoides infection using capsule endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Eduardo Tomohissa; Takahashi, Wagner; Kuwashima, Daniel Yuiti; Langoni, Tiago Ribeiro; Costa-Genzini, Adriana

    2013-04-16

    Ascaris lumbricoides (A. lumbricoides) is the most common intestinal roundworm parasite, infecting approximately one quarter of the world's population. Infection can lead to various complications because it can spread along the gastrointestinal tract. Although A. lumbricoides infection is a serious healthcare issue in developing countries, it now also has a worldwide distribution as a result of increased immigration and travel. Intestinal obstruction is the most common complication of A. lumbricoides infection, potentially leading to even more serious consequences such as small bowel perforation and peritonitis. Diagnosis is based primarily on stool samples and the patient's history. Early diagnosis, aided in part by knowledge of the local prevalence, can result in early treatment, thereby preventing surgical complications associated with intestinal obstruction. Further, delay in diagnosis may have fatal consequences. Capsule endoscopy can serve as a crucial, non-invasive diagnostic tool for A. lumbricoides infection, especially when other diagnostic methods have failed to detect the parasite. We report a case of A. lumbricoides infection that resulted in intestinal obstruction at the level of the ileum. Both stool sample examination and open surgery failed to indicate the presence of A. lumbricoides, and the cause of the obstruction was only revealed by capsule endoscopy. The patient was treated with anthelmintics.

  13. Recent advancement of therapeutic endoscopy in the esophageal benign diseases

    PubMed Central

    Bechara, Robert; Inoue, Haruhiro

    2015-01-01

    Over the past 30 years, the field of endoscopy has witnessed several advances. With the advent of endoscopic mucosal resection, removal of large mucosal lesions have become possible. Thereafter, endoscopic submucosal resection was refined, permitting en bloc removal of large superficial neoplasms. Such techniques have facilitated the development of antireflux mucosectomy, a promising novel treatment for gastroesophageal reflux. The introduction and use of over the scope clips has allowed for endoscopic closure of defects in the gastrointestinal tract, which were traditionally treated with surgical intervention. With the development of per-oral endoscopic myotomy (POEM), the treatment of achalasia and spastic disorders of the esophagus have been revolutionized. From the submucosal tunnelling technique developed for POEM, Per oral endoscopic tumor resection of subepithelial tumors was made possible. Simultaneously, advances in biotechnology have expanded esophageal stenting capabilities with the introduction of fully covered metal and plastic stents, as well as biodegradable stents. Once deemed a primarily diagnostic tool, endoscopy has quickly transcended to a minimally invasive intervention and therapeutic tool. These techniques are reviewed with regards to their application to benign disease of the esophagus. PMID:25992187

  14. Wireless capsule endoscopy: from diagnostic devices to multipurpose robotic systems.

    PubMed

    Moglia, Andrea; Menciassi, Arianna; Schurr, Marc Oliver; Dario, Paolo

    2007-04-01

    In the recent past, the introduction of miniaturised image sensors with low power consumption, based on complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technology, has allowed the realisation of an ingestible wireless capsule for the visualisation of the small intestine mucosa. The device has received approval from Food and Drug Administration and has gained momentum since it has been more successful than traditional techniques in the diagnosis of small intestine disorders. In 2004 an esophagus specific capsule was launched, while a solution for colon is still under development. However, present solutions suffer from several limitations: they move passively by exploiting peristalsis, are not able to stop intentionally for a prolonged diagnosis, they receive power from an internal battery with short length, and their usage is restricted to one organ, either small bowel or esophagus. However the steady progresses in many branches of engineering, including microelectromechanical systems (MEMS), are envisaged to affect the performances of capsular endoscopy. The near future foreshadows capsules able to pass actively through the whole gastrointestinal tract, to retrieve views from all organs and to perform drug delivery and tissue sampling. In the long term, the advent of robotics could lead to autonomous medical platforms, equipped with the most advanced solutions in terms of MEMS for therapy and diagnosis of the digestive tract. In this review, we discuss the state of the art of wireless capsule endoscopy (WCE): after a description on the current status, we present the most promising solutions.

  15. Management of gastric subepithelial tumors: The role of endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Su Young; Kim, Kyoung Oh

    2016-01-01

    With the wide use of esophagogastroduodenoscopy, the incidence of gastric subepithelial tumor (SET) diagnosis has increased. While the management of large or symptomatic gastric SETs is obvious, treatment of small (≤ 3 cm) asymptomatic gastric SETs remains inconclusive. Moreover, the presence of gastrointestinal stromal tumors with malignant potential is of concern, and endoscopic treatment of gastric SETs remains a subject of debate. Recently, numerous studies have demonstrated the feasibility of endoscopic treatment of gastric SETs, and have proposed various endoscopic procedures including endoscopic submucosal dissection, endoscopic muscularis dissection, endoscopic enucleation, endoscopic submucosal tunnel dissection, endoscopic full-thickness resection, and a hybrid approach (the combination of endoscopy and laparoscopy). In this review article, we discuss current endoscopic treatments for gastric SETs as well as the advantages and limitations of this type of therapy. Finally, we predict the availability of newly developed endoscopic treatments for gastric SETs. PMID:27298713

  16. Transgastric endoscopy--a new fashion, a new excitement!

    PubMed

    Fritscher-Ravens, A

    2007-02-01

    Current flexible gastrointestinal endoscopy has been enriched by a new technique, transluminal endoscopic surgery, which has recently attracted an explosion of interest. To date, the established applications are few, but this review attempts to provide an overview of the present status of the procedures and of the development of the technical devices. The possible risks will be addressed as well as the potential benefits. Ethical issues and safeguards may need exploration. Above all, the principal developments in techniques for closure of incisions will be described here, including each of the methods and devices. Expansion in perspective as well as size is most important both in business and science, as it brings new dimensions to our lives and work. A steady state is a myth, in general, as it will be overtaken by new developments, that transform into new steady states which themselves will be superseded.

  17. Investigation of the excluded stomach after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass: the role of percutaneous endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Gill, Kanwar-Rs; McKinney, J-Mark; Stark, Mark-E; Bouras, Ernest-P

    2008-03-28

    Accessing the bypassed portion of the stomach via conventional endoscopy is difficult following Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery. However, endoscopic examination of the stomach and small bowel is possible through percutaneous access into the bypassed stomach (BS) with a combined radiologic and endoscopic technique. We present a case of obscure overt gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding where the source of bleeding was thought to be from the BS. After conventional endoscopic methods failed to examine the BS, percutaneous endoscopy (PE) was used as an alternative to surgical exploration.

  18. Surveillance of FAP: a prospective blinded comparison of capsule endoscopy and other GI imaging to detect small bowel polyps

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) is a hereditary disorder characterized by polyposis along the gastrointestinal tract. Information on adenoma status below the duodenum has previously been restricted due to its inaccessibility in vivo. Capsule Endoscopy (CE) may provide a useful adjunct in screening for polyposis in the small bowel in FAP patients. This study aims to evaluate the effectiveness of CE in the assessment of patients with FAP, compared to other imaging modalities for the detection of small bowel polyps. Method 20 consecutive patients with previously diagnosed FAP and duodenal polyps, presenting for routine surveillance of polyps at The Royal Melbourne Hospital were recruited. Each fasted patient initially underwent a magnetic resonance image (MRI) of the abdomen, and a barium small bowel follow-through study. Capsule Endoscopy was performed four weeks later on the fasted patient. An upper gastrointestinal side-viewing endoscopy was done one (1) to two (2) weeks after this. Endoscopists and investigators were blinded to results of other investigations and patient history. Results Within the stomach, upper gastrointestinal endoscopy found more polyps than other forms of imaging. SBFT and MRI generally performed poorly, identifying fewer polyps than both upper gastrointestinal and capsule endoscopy. CE was the only form of imaging that identified polyps in all segments of the small bowel as well as the only form of imaging able to provide multiple findings outside the stomach/duodenum. Conclusion CE provides important information on possible polyp development distal to the duodenum, which may lead to surgical intervention. The place of CE as an adjunct in surveillance of FAP for a specific subset needs consideration and confirmation in replication studies. Trial Registration Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12608000616370 PMID:20361877

  19. Arteriovenous malformation in chronic gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed Central

    Cavett, C M; Selby, J H; Hamilton, J L; Williamson, J W

    1977-01-01

    Arteriovenous malformations of the gastrointestinal tract are uncommon and treatment is problematic because routine barium contrast studies and endoscopy fail to demonstrate the lesion. Diagnosis is by selective mesenteric arteriography, demonstrating a characteristic vascular tuft and very early venous phase. Two cases of arteriovenous malformation are presented and 47 other reported cases are reviewed. Forty-five per cent were found in the cecum; 37, or 80%, involved the distal ileum, cecum ascending colon, or hepatic flexure. Seventy-five per cent of all patients fall into the 50--80 year age range. The literature reveals a recurring pattern of chronic gastrointestinal blood loss, anemia, and delay (even negative abdominal explorations) before the diagnosis is finally made. A more aggressive approach to chronic gastrointestinal bleeding is suggested through the use of selective mesenteric arteriography. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:299801

  20. Signet ring cell carcinoma of the jejunum: an uncommon finding within the reach of capsule endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Juanmartiñena, José Francisco; Montes, Marta; Fernández-Urién, Ignacio

    2017-02-01

    An 80 year-old female presented with ductal breast carcinoma (stage II) three years ago, complained of asthenia and iron-deficiency anemia. No diagnosis was obtained after conventional endoscopy and iron supplements were indicated. Ten months later visible digestive hemorrhage was presented. Upper and lower endoscopy was repeated but non-diagnosis was obtained. Thus, video capsule endoscopy was indicated identifying a stenotic lesion arising in the mucosa of distal jejunum. Histopathological examination revealed a poorly mucinous differentiated signet-ring cell adenocarcinoma with an intense peri-tumoral lymphoid (Crohn´s-like lymphoid reaction) and lympho-vascular infiltration with no nodal metastases (pT3N0;7ª edition TNM classification). Immunochemistry revealed negative stained for estrogen and progesterone receptors in contrast with prior breast cancer. Thus, metastatic origin was rule out. Primary small-bowel malignancies are extremely rare. They account for 2% of all gastrointestinal tract malignancies. Carcinoid tumor (40%), adenocarcinoma (33%), lymphoma (17%) and sarcoma (8%) are most common histological types. Symptomatic lesions are rare, but when present: gastrointestinal bleeding, abdominal pain and weight loss are most common digestive symptoms. Primary signet ring cell adenocarcinoma is a rarely histopathological variety of adenocarcinoma with poor prognosis, usually identified in esophageal or gastric locations (95%). They are less commonly detected in remaining gastrointestinal tract, and when present, metastatic origin must always rule out. Nowadays, diagnostic delayed is common and leads to detected small bowel neoplasms at late stages with poor treatment outcomes. Thus, capsule endoscopy may help to improve this situation as it may identify them at early stages.

  1. Breast ductal endoscopy: how many procedures qualify?

    PubMed Central

    Zagouri, Flora; Sergentanis, Theodoros N; Giannakopoulou, Georgia; Panopoulou, Effrosyni; Chrysikos, Dimosthenis; Bletsa, Garifallia; Flessas, John; Filippakis, George; Papalabros, Alexandros; Bramis, Kostas J; Zografos, George C

    2009-01-01

    Background Breast ductal endoscopy is a relatively new diagnostic method with ever growing importance in the work-up of patients with bloody nipple discharge. The ability to perform ductal endoscopy is very important and useful for breast fellows. Learning curve in breast ductal endoscopy remains a terra incognita, since no systematic studies have addressed this topic. The purpose of this study is to determine the point (number of procedures during training) beyond which ductal endoscopy is successfully performed. Findings Ten breast fellows received training in our Breast Unit. For the training process, an ex vivo model was adopted. Fellows were trained on 20 surgical specimens derived from modified radical mastectomy for breast cancer. The target of the education program was to acquire proficiency in performing ductoscopy. The achievement of four consecutively successful ductal endoscopies was determined as the point beyond which proficiency had been achieved. The number of procedures needed for the achievement of proficiency as defined above ranged between 9 and 17 procedures. The median value was 13 procedures; i.e. 50% of trainees had achieved proficiency at the 13th procedure or earlier. Conclusion These pilot findings point to approximately 13 procedures as a point beyond which ductal endoscopy is successfully performed; studies on a larger number of fellows are nevertheless needed. Further research, focusing on the learning curves of different training models of ductal endoscopy, seems desirable. PMID:19566939

  2. Wireless Capsule Endoscopy Detects Meckel's Diverticulum in a Child with Unexplained Intestinal Blood Loss.

    PubMed

    Xinias, I; Mavroudi, A; Fotoulaki, M; Tsikopoulos, G; Kalampakas, A; Imvrios, G

    2012-09-01

    Meckel's diverticulum (MD) is the most common congenital anomaly of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, affecting about 2% of the population. Most cases of Meckel's diverticula are asymptomatic. The diagnosis of symptomatic MD is often difficult to make. We report the case of an 8-year-old boy who presented with GI bleeding due to MD. The diagnostic difficulties after an initial negative endoscopic evaluation and the diagnostic value of the various endoscopic procedures are discussed. The patient had suffered from bright red stools for 20 h before hospital admission. GI scintigraphy with (99m)Tc-Na-pertechnetate was negative for heterotopic gastric tissue in the small bowel area. Colonoscopy performed in order to exclude Crohn's disease was also negative. He was placed on ranitidine at a dose of 6 mg/kg body weight twice daily. The patient remained asymptomatic over a period of 6 months before he was readmitted due to macroscopic rectal bleeding. Upper endoscopy and colonoscopy used to investigate the source of bleeding showed normal macroscopic findings. Radiolabeling of blood constituents with (99m)Tc on delayed imaging showed radionucleotide concentration in the ascending and transverse colon suggestive of a lesion in the ileocecal area. Further investigation with the use of wireless capsule endoscopy revealed a MD. Wireless capsule endoscopy may thus be indicated for patients with GI blood loss when other diagnostic methods, such as upper and lower endoscopy and colonoscopy, have failed to identify the source of bleeding.

  3. The Utility of Endoscopic Biopsies in Patients with Normal Upper Endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    McLean, Carolyn; Gregor, James; Yan, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims. Upper endoscopy is a valuable tool in the workup of gastrointestinal (GI) complaints. The purpose of this study is to determine cost and yield of taking biopsies in a normal upper GI tract. Methods. This is a retrospective study where all upper GI biopsies were identified between May 2012 and April 2013, at a tertiary care center. Clinical, procedural, and pathology reports were reviewed to identify patient demographics, procedure information, and pathology diagnosis. Results. Biopsies of the upper GI tract were taken in 1297 patients with normal upper endoscopies. In patients with normal upper endoscopy, 22% of esophageal, 44% of gastric, and 12% of duodenal biopsies were abnormal. The most frequent abnormality was reflux esophagitis in 16% of esophageal biopsies, chronic gastritis in 23% of gastric biopsies, and increased intraepithelial lymphocytes in 6% of duodenal biopsies. The additional cost for taking biopsies in a normal upper GI tract for a diagnosis of eosinophilic esophagitis was $2963 Canadian (CAD), H. pylori associated gastritis was $1404 CAD, and celiac disease was $3024 CAD. Conclusions. The yield of biopsy in normal upper endoscopy varied with location, but the additional expense can be costly and should be tailored to appropriate clinical situations. PMID:27478819

  4. Performance of static positioning for medium distances based on data from a virtual reference station and ASG-PL Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakula, M.

    The use of a network of reference stations instead of a single reference station allows the modelling of some systematic errors in a region and allows a user to increase the distance between the rover receiver and reference stations. In some countries, GPS reference stations exist and GPS observations are available for users in real-time mode and in post-processing. Observations from several GPS reference stations in a regional network enable modelling spatially-correlated errors and their modelling on an epoch-by-epoch and satellite-by-satellite basis. As a result, observations of a virtual reference station can be created at a rover's approximate position and its observations can be used in the precise baseline positioning of the rover. This paper presents the performance of the static positioning of a rover station, its quality and reliability for two different baselines. Single-baseline and network static solutions are presented and compared. Network solutions are based on data from a virtual reference station (VRS) obtained by the Wasoft/Virtuall software. In both cases, the same strategy of ambiguity resolution was used. These approaches have been tested with the use of 24-hour GPS data from the Polish Active Geodetic Network (ASG-PL). The data from three reference stations with medium-range separation were used in the process of generating VRS data. GPS data of the rover station were divided into 20, 10 and 5-min. sessions with a sampling interval of 5 sec. Practical calculations and analyses of horizontal and vertical accuracy of coordinates clearly show the improvement of static positioning in terms of time observation span and ambiguity reliability.

  5. Endoscopy - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/languages/endoscopy.html Other topics A-Z A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W XYZ List of All Topics All Endoscopy - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. French (français) Japanese (日本語) Korean (한국어) Russian (Русский) Somali ( ...

  6. Outcome of endoscopy-negative iron deficiency anemia in patients above 65: A longitudinal multicenter cohort.

    PubMed

    Clere-Jehl, Raphaël; Sauleau, Erik; Ciuca, Stefan; Schaeffer, Mickael; Lopes, Amanda; Goichot, Bernard; Vogel, Thomas; Kaltenbach, Georges; Bouvard, Eric; Pasquali, Jean-Louis; Sereni, Daniel; Andres, Emmanuel; Bourgarit, Anne

    2016-11-01

    After the age of 65 years, iron deficiency anemia (IDA) requires the elimination of digestive neoplasia and is explored with upper and lower gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy. However, such explorations are negative in 14% to 37% of patients. To further evaluate this issue, we evaluated the outcomes of patients aged over 65 years with endoscopy-negative IDA.We retrospectively analyzed the outcomes of in-patients over the age of 65 years with IDA (hemoglobin <12 g/dL and ferritin <70 μg/L) who had negative complete upper and lower GI endoscopies in 7 tertiary medical hospitals. Death, the persistence of anemia, further investigations, and the final diagnosis for IDA were analyzed after at least 12 months by calling the patients' general practitioners and using hospital records.Between 2004 and 2011, 69 patients (74% women) with a median age of 78 (interquartile range (IQR) 75-82) years and hemoglobin and ferritin levels of 8.4 (IQR 6.8-9.9) g/dL and 14 (IQR 8-27) μg/L, respectively, had endoscopy-negative IDA, and 73% of these patients received daily antithrombotics. After a follow-up of 41 ± 22 months, 23 (33%) of the patients were dead; 5 deaths were linked with the IDA, and 45 (65%) patients had persistent anemia, which was significantly associated with death (P = 0.007). Further investigations were performed in 45 patients; 64% of the second-look GI endoscopies led to significant changes in treatment compared with 25% for the capsule endoscopies. Conventional diagnoses of IDA were ultimately established for 19 (27%) patients and included 3 cancer patients. Among the 50 other patients, 40 (58%) had antithrombotics.In endoscopy-negative IDA over the age of 65 years, further investigations should be reserved for patients with persistent anemia, and second-look GI endoscopy should be favored. If the results of these investigations are negative, the role of antithrombotics should be considered.

  7. Outcome of endoscopy-negative iron deficiency anemia in patients above 65

    PubMed Central

    Clere-Jehl, Raphaël; Sauleau, Erik; Ciuca, Stefan; Schaeffer, Mickael; Lopes, Amanda; Goichot, Bernard; Vogel, Thomas; Kaltenbach, Georges; Bouvard, Eric; Pasquali, Jean-Louis; Sereni, Daniel; Andres, Emmanuel; Bourgarit, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Abstract After the age of 65 years, iron deficiency anemia (IDA) requires the elimination of digestive neoplasia and is explored with upper and lower gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy. However, such explorations are negative in 14% to 37% of patients. To further evaluate this issue, we evaluated the outcomes of patients aged over 65 years with endoscopy-negative IDA. We retrospectively analyzed the outcomes of in-patients over the age of 65 years with IDA (hemoglobin <12 g/dL and ferritin <70 μg/L) who had negative complete upper and lower GI endoscopies in 7 tertiary medical hospitals. Death, the persistence of anemia, further investigations, and the final diagnosis for IDA were analyzed after at least 12 months by calling the patients’ general practitioners and using hospital records. Between 2004 and 2011, 69 patients (74% women) with a median age of 78 (interquartile range (IQR) 75–82) years and hemoglobin and ferritin levels of 8.4 (IQR 6.8–9.9) g/dL and 14 (IQR 8–27) μg/L, respectively, had endoscopy-negative IDA, and 73% of these patients received daily antithrombotics. After a follow-up of 41 ± 22 months, 23 (33%) of the patients were dead; 5 deaths were linked with the IDA, and 45 (65%) patients had persistent anemia, which was significantly associated with death (P = 0.007). Further investigations were performed in 45 patients; 64% of the second-look GI endoscopies led to significant changes in treatment compared with 25% for the capsule endoscopies. Conventional diagnoses of IDA were ultimately established for 19 (27%) patients and included 3 cancer patients. Among the 50 other patients, 40 (58%) had antithrombotics. In endoscopy-negative IDA over the age of 65 years, further investigations should be reserved for patients with persistent anemia, and second-look GI endoscopy should be favored. If the results of these investigations are negative, the role of antithrombotics should be considered. PMID:27893668

  8. Emerging Issues and Future Developments in Capsule Endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Slawinski, Piotr R.; Obstein, Keith L.; Valdastri, Pietro

    2015-01-01

    Capsule endoscopy (CE) has transformed from a research venture into a widely used clinical tool and the primary means for diagnosing small bowel pathology. These orally administered capsules traverse passively through the gastrointestinal tract via peristalsis and are used in the esophagus, stomach, small bowel, and colon. The primary focus of CE research in recent years has been enabling active CE manipulation and extension of the technology to therapeutic functionality; thus, widening the scope of the procedure. This review outlines clinical standards of the technology as well as recent advances in CE research. Clinical capsule applications are discussed with respect to each portion of the gastrointestinal tract. Promising research efforts are presented with an emphasis on enabling active capsule locomotion. The presented studies suggest, in particular, that the most viable solution for active capsule manipulation is actuation of a capsule via exterior permanent magnet held by a robot. Developing capsule procedures adhering to current healthcare standards, such as enabling a tool channel or irrigation in a therapeutic device, is a vital phase in the adaptation of CE in the clinical setting. PMID:26028956

  9. Automatic Hookworm Detection in Wireless Capsule Endoscopy Images.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiao; Chen, Honghan; Gan, Tao; Chen, Junzhou; Ngo, Chong-Wah; Peng, Qiang

    2016-07-01

    Wireless capsule endoscopy (WCE) has become a widely used diagnostic technique to examine inflammatory bowel diseases and disorders. As one of the most common human helminths, hookworm is a kind of small tubular structure with grayish white or pinkish semi-transparent body, which is with a number of 600 million people infection around the world. Automatic hookworm detection is a challenging task due to poor quality of images, presence of extraneous matters, complex structure of gastrointestinal, and diverse appearances in terms of color and texture. This is the first few works to comprehensively explore the automatic hookworm detection for WCE images. To capture the properties of hookworms, the multi scale dual matched filter is first applied to detect the location of tubular structure. Piecewise parallel region detection method is then proposed to identify the potential regions having hookworm bodies. To discriminate the unique visual features for different components of gastrointestinal, the histogram of average intensity is proposed to represent their properties. In order to deal with the problem of imbalance data, Rusboost is deployed to classify WCE images. Experiments on a diverse and large scale dataset with 440 K WCE images demonstrate that the proposed approach achieves a promising performance and outperforms the state-of-the-art methods. Moreover, the high sensitivity in detecting hookworms indicates the potential of our approach for future clinical application.

  10. Current Status and Research into Overcoming Limitations of Capsule Endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kwack, Won Gun; Lim, Yun Jeong

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic investigation has a critical role in the diagnosis and treatment of gastrointestinal (GI) diseases. Since 2001, capsule endoscopy (CE) has been available for small-bowel exploration and is under continuous development. During the past decade, CE has achieved impressive improvements in areas such as miniaturization, resolution, and battery life. As a result, CE is currently a first-line tool for the investigation of the small bowel in obscure gastrointestinal bleeding and is a useful alternative to wired enteroscopy. Nevertheless, CE still has several limitations, such as incomplete examination and limited diagnostic and therapeutic capabilities. To resolve these problems, many groups have suggested several models (e.g., controlled CO2 insufflation system, magnetic navigation system, mobile robotic platform, tagging and biopsy equipment, and targeted drug-delivery system), which are in development. In the near future, new technological advances will improve the capabilities of CE and broaden its spectrum of applications not only for the small bowel but also for the colon, stomach, and esophagus. The purpose of this review is to introduce the current status of CE and to review the ongoing development of solutions to address its limitations. PMID:26855917

  11. Advanced gastrointestinal endoscopic imaging for inflammatory bowel diseases

    PubMed Central

    Tontini, Gian Eugenio; Rath, Timo; Neumann, Helmut

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal luminal endoscopy is of paramount importance for diagnosis, monitoring and dysplasia surveillance in patients with both, Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis. Moreover, with the recent recognition that mucosal healing is directly linked to the clinical outcome of patients with inflammatory bowel disorders, a growing demand exists for the precise, timely and detailed endoscopic assessment of superficial mucosal layer. Further, the novel field of molecular imaging has tremendously expanded the clinical utility and applications of modern endoscopy, now encompassing not only diagnosis, surveillance, and treatment but also the prediction of individual therapeutic responses. Within this review, we describe how novel endoscopic approaches and advanced endoscopic imaging methods such as high definition and high magnification endoscopy, dye-based and dye-less chromoendoscopy, confocal laser endomicroscopy, endocytoscopy and molecular imaging now allow for the precise and ultrastructural assessment of mucosal inflammation and describe the potential of these techniques for dysplasia detection. PMID:26811662

  12. Light-induced fluorescence endoscopy (LIFE) imaging system for early cancer detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Haishan; MacAulay, Calum E.; Lam, Stephen; Palcic, Branko

    1999-09-01

    This paper summarizes our experiences on the development of a Light Induced Fluorescence Endoscopy (LIFE) imaging system for early cancer detection in the respiratory and gastrointestinal tract. The system utilizes tissue autofluorescence to provide real time video imaging of the examined organ. No exogenous fluorescent tumor markers are needed. It is used by a physician in adjunct to conventional white-light endoscopy. Suspicious areas are identified in pseudo color to guide biopsy. A multi- center clinical trial has demonstrated that in the lung, the relative sensitivity of white-light imaging + LIFE imaging vs. white-light imaging alone was 6.3 for intraepithelial neoplastic lesion detection and 2.71 when invasive carcinomas were also included. The following issues will be discussed: (1) spectroscopy study design for imaging system development; (2) architecture of the imaging systems; (3) different imaging modalities (white-light imaging, dual channel fluorescence imaging, and combined fluorescence/reflectance imaging); and (4) clinical applications.

  13. A case of idiopathic gastroesophageal submucosal hematoma and its disappearance observed by endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Oe, Shinji; Watanabe, Tatsuyuki; Kume, Keiichiro; Shibata, Michihiko; Hiura, Masaaki; Yoshikawa, Ichiro; Harada, Masaru

    2014-06-01

    A 74-year-old man was hospitalized due to hematemesis. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy revealed a very large and dark red mass in the cardiac region of the stomach that extended from the upper esophagus. A biopsy specimen showed hemorrhagic tissue and no malignant cells. The tumor-like region ulcerated at 5 days after the administration of intravenous lansoprazole at a dose of 30 mg twice a day and resolved with scar formation at 2 months after a change to oral rabeprazole at a dose of 10 mg/day.We diagnosed the patient with gastroesophageal submucosal hematoma. Gastroesophageal submucosal hematoma is a rare complication. In this case, we could follow the process of its disappearance by endoscopy.

  14. [Enteric-coated aspirin does not reduce the risk of gastrointestinal side effects].

    PubMed

    Haastrup, Peter; Jarbøl, Dorte Ejg

    2014-04-28

    Enteric-coated aspirin has been developed in order to decrease the risk of gastrointestinal side effects. When reviewing the existing literature on the effects of the coating on the incidence of gastrointestinal side effects we find that enteric-coated aspirin causes significantly less minor gastrointestinal lesions compared to plain aspirin evaluated by endoscopy after short-term treatment, but there seems to be no effect of enteric-coating on the incidence of dyspepsia or gastrointestinal bleeding of clinical relevance. In conclusion enteric-coated aspirin is not superior to plain aspirin.

  15. Angiography in gastrointestinal bleeding in children

    SciTech Connect

    Meyerovitz, M.F.; Fellows, K.E.

    1984-10-01

    Twenty-seven children aged 1 day to 16 years studied arteriographically for acute or chronic gastrointestinal bleeding were reviewed. Children with known esophageal varices and portal hypertension were excluded. Final diagnoses were made in 25 patients by means of surgery, endoscopy, biopsy, laboratory data, and clinical follow-up. Of these 25 cases, arteriography gave a correct diagnosis in 64% and was falsely negative in 36%. The common causes of bleeding in this study were gastric and duodenal ulcers, gastritis, vascular malformations, and typhlitis. Transcatheter therapy was attempted in six acute bleeders, with success in three (50%).

  16. [Gastrointestinal bezoars].

    PubMed

    Espinoza González, Ricardo

    2016-08-01

    Gastrointestinal bezoars are a concretion of indigested material that can be found in the gastrointestinal tract of humans and some animals. This material forms an intraluminal mass, more commonly located in the stomach. During a large period of history animal bezoars were considered antidotes to poisons and diseases. We report a historical overview since bezoars stones were thought to have medicinal properties. This magic conception was introduced in South America by Spanish conquerors. In Chile, bezoars are commonly found in a camelid named guanaco (Lama guanicoe). People at Central Chile and the Patagonia believed that bezoar stones had magical properties and they were traded at very high prices. In Santiago, during the eighteenth century the Jesuit apothecary sold preparations of bezoar stones. The human bezoars may be formed by non-digestible material like cellulose (phytobezoar), hair (trichobezoar), conglomerations of medications or his vehicles (pharmacobezoar or medication bezoar), milk and mucus component (lactobezoar) or other varieties of substances. This condition may be asymptomatic or can produce abdominal pain, ulceration, gastrointestinal bleeding, gastric outlet obstruction, perforation and mechanical intestinal obstruction. We report their classification, diagnostic modalities and treatment.

  17. Guidelines for designing a digestive disease endoscopy unit: report of the World Endoscopy Organization.

    PubMed

    Mulder, Chris J J; Jacobs, Maarten A J M; Leicester, Roger J; Nageshwar Reddy, D; Shepherd, Libby E A; Axon, Anthony T; Waye, Jerome D

    2013-07-01

    A dedicated digestive disease endoscopy unit is structurally and functionally differentiating rapidly as a result of increasing diagnostic and therapeutic possibilities in the last 10-20 years. Publications with practical details are scarce, imposing a challenge in the construction of such a unit. The lack of authoritative information about endoscopy unit design means that architects produce their own design with or without consulting endoscopists working in such a unit. A working group of the World Endoscopy Organization discussed and outlined a practical approach fordesign and construction of a modern endoscopy unit. Designing the layout is extremely important, necessitating thoughtful planning to provide comfort to the endoscopy staff and patients, and efficient data archiving and transmission during endoscopic services.

  18. Intravenous midazolam sedation in pediatric diagnostic upper digestive endoscopy. A prospective study in a general hospital.

    PubMed

    Verhage, Jan; Mulder, Chris J J; Willekens, Frans L A

    2003-12-01

    The positive role of benzodiazepines (Midazolam) in conscious sedation in pediatric patients is widely known. However, problems concerning the role of sedation in diagnostic upper endoscopy are a matter for debate as little is known about dosage and timing. We prospectively evaluated the efficacy, safety and optimal intravenous sedation dosage of midazolam in 257 consecutive patients, aged 2 months to 18 years old, who underwent upper endoscopy of the gastrointestinal tract. The initial midazolam dosage was 0.2 mg/kg Bw (Body weight) i.v. for 1 minute and, if necessary, another 0.1 mg/kg Bw was administered 5 minutes later. If sedation was sufficient, the procedure would be started 4-5 minutes later; if not, another 0.1 - 0.2 mg/kg Bw would be administered. All procedures were performed by a pediatrician together with a gastroenterologist. No serious complications occurred in any of the procedures. Oxygen saturation (OS) was maintained at over 90%, if necessary with blowby oxygen. Flumazenil was administered to 7 children (OS < 90%). Endoscopy could not be completed in 1 child. All endoscopies were completed within 10 minutes. No unexpected hospital admissions were necessary. The mean midazolam dosage was 0.4 mg/kg Bw in patients up to 6 years, for the over 6 years-olds the mean dosage was decreased to 0,2 mg/kg Bw. Particular attention was paid to the importance of informing patients before the procedure. Endoscopic diagnostic procedures can be performed safely and effectively in children with intravenous sedation in a well equipped pediatric endoscopy unit.

  19. Upper non-variceal gastrointestinal bleeding - review the effectiveness of endoscopic hemostasis methods

    PubMed Central

    Szura, Mirosław; Pasternak, Artur

    2015-01-01

    Upper non-variceal gastrointestinal bleeding is a condition that requires immediate medical intervention and has a high associated mortality rate (exceeding 10%). The vast majority of upper gastrointestinal bleeding cases are due to peptic ulcers. Helicobacter pylori infection, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and aspirin are the main risk factors for peptic ulcer disease. Endoscopic therapy has generally been recommended as the first-line treatment for upper gastrointestinal bleeding as it has been shown to reduce recurrent bleeding, the need for surgery and mortality. Early endoscopy (within 24 h of hospital admission) has a greater impact than delayed endoscopy on the length of hospital stay and requirement for blood transfusion. This paper aims to review and compare the efficacy of the types of endoscopic hemostasis most commonly used to control non-variceal gastrointestinal bleeding by pooling data from the literature. PMID:26421105

  20. System for clinical photometric stereo endoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durr, Nicholas J.; González, Germán.; Lim, Daryl; Traverso, Giovanni; Nishioka, Norman S.; Vakoc, Benjamin J.; Parot, Vicente

    2014-02-01

    Photometric stereo endoscopy is a technique that captures information about the high-spatial-frequency topography of the field of view simultaneously with a conventional color image. Here we describe a system that will enable photometric stereo endoscopy to be clinically evaluated in the large intestine of human patients. The clinical photometric stereo endoscopy system consists of a commercial gastroscope, a commercial video processor, an image capturing and processing unit, custom synchronization electronics, white light LEDs, a set of four fibers with diffusing tips, and an alignment cap. The custom pieces that come into contact with the patient are composed of biocompatible materials that can be sterilized before use. The components can then be assembled in the endoscopy suite before use. The resulting endoscope has the same outer diameter as a conventional colonoscope (14 mm), plugs into a commercial video processor, captures topography and color images at 15 Hz, and displays the conventional color image to the gastroenterologist in real-time. We show that this system can capture a color and topographical video in a tubular colon phantom, demonstrating robustness to complex geometries and motion. The reported system is suitable for in vivo evaluation of photometric stereo endoscopy in the human large intestine.

  1. Initial Experience of Video Capsule Endoscopy After Intestinal Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Varkey, Jonas; Oltean, Mihai; Pischel, Andreas Bernd; Simrén, Magnus; Herlenius, Gustaf

    2016-01-01

    Background Intestinal transplantation is a procedure which inflicts immunological and infectious complications that affect the transplanted graft, posing both diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. Video capsule endoscopy (VCE) offers easy access to the entire small intestine and presents itself as an interesting option. However, at present, no studies evaluating the usefulness of video capsule endoscopies in this setting have been published. Our aim was to evaluate the usefulness of VCE in detecting complications that arise after intestinal transplantation. Methods We included 7 adult patients with either isolated intestine (n = 1) or multivisceral grafts (n = 6). These patients underwent 12 VCE between 2004 and 2015 at the Sahlgrenska University Hospital. The median age was 42 (21-67) years (4 women/3 men). VCE was used in clinical situations where the conventional diagnostic methods failed to provide answers to the clinical question. Results Indications for the procedure were: suspicion of rejection (n = 4 examinations), gastrointestinal dysmotility (n = 4 examinations), high stomal output (n = 2 examinations), suspicion of lymphoproliferative disease in the transplanted graft (n = 1 examination), and clinical surveillance (n = 1 examination). The median time after transplantation for performing an examination was 740 (26-3059) days. VCE was useful in 83% of the examinations and the results influenced the planned management. The overall agreement between VCE findings and biopsies was moderate (κ = 0.54, P = 0.05) but increased when comparing the presence of inflammation/rejection (κ = 0.79, P < 0.001). Conclusions VCE is a promising diagnostic method after intestinal transplantation. However, larger studies are needed to evaluate its potential risks and gains. PMID:27990484

  2. [Historical schedule of management of bleeding from the upper part of gastrointestinal tract].

    PubMed

    Wójtowicz, Jacek; Wojtuń, Stanisław; Gil, Jerzy

    2009-05-01

    Treatment of bleeding from the upper part of gastrointestinal tract were changed many times. First there were waiting (Hipocrates, Sydenham, Stahl), next transfusion of the blood were initiated (Denis, Blundell, Dieffenbach, Bierkowski, Dungren, Hirszfeld). Big (Rydygier) and small (Dragstedt) operations procedures were attempted. Discovery of endoscopy of gastrointestinal tract (Mikulicz) and initiation of elastic scopes (Hirschowitz) and exploration inhibitor of histamine receptors (H2) and proton pump inhibitors with recognition of role Helicobacter pylori in bleeding were permitted elaborate actual schemas of proceedings.

  3. Technetium sulfur colloid scintigraphy in the detection of lower gastrointestinal tract bleeding

    SciTech Connect

    Simpson, A.J.; Previti, F.W.

    1982-07-01

    /sup 99m/Tc sulfur colloid scintigraphy is a technique which can be used to localize sites of lower gastrointestinal hemorrhage. Two reports of patients illustrate its use clinically. This procedure is non-invasive, relatively inexpensive, easily performed and has a high degree of sensitivity. The technique may, in some instances, replace angiography or endoscopy as the initial procedure used to diagnose the site of lower gastrointestinal bleeding or, more likely, serve as a complementary diagnostic modality.

  4. Fluoroscopic studies of the upper gastrointestinal tract: techniques and indications.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Carpintero de la Vega, M; García Villar, C

    2017-01-25

    Fluoroscopic studies of the gastrointestinal tract are becoming increasing less common due to the introduction of other imaging techniques such as computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging and to the increased availability of endoscopy. Nevertheless, fluoroscopic studies of the gastrointestinal tract continue to appear in clinical guidelines and some of their indications are still valid. These studies are dynamic, operator-dependent examinations that require training to obtain the maximum diagnostic performance. This review aims to describe the technique and bring the indications for this imaging modality up to date.

  5. Gastrointestinal Kaposi sarcoma with appendiceal involvement.

    PubMed

    Egwuonwu, Steve; Gatto-Weis, Cara; Miranda, Roberto; Casas, Luis De Las

    2011-04-01

    Kaposi sarcoma is a vascular tumor manifesting as nodular lesions on skin, mucous membranes, or internal organs. This is a case of a 42-year-old human immunodeficiency virus- (HIV) positive bisexual male, not on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) since diagnosis four years ago. He presented with a three-day history of abdominal pains, fever, vomiting, and a one-week history of melena stools. Endoscopy revealed Kaposi sarcoma in the stomach and duodenum. Postendoscopy, he developed acute abdomen. Exploratory laparotomy revealed extensive Kaposi sarcoma of the gastrointestinal tract with appendiceal involvement. The patient underwent appendectomy and had an uneventful recovery. A review of the literature discusses appendiceal Kaposi sarcoma with appendicitis, a rare but critical manifestation of gastrointestinal Kaposi sarcoma.

  6. Wide-field endoscopic fluorescence imaging for gastrointestinal tumor detection with glucose analogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yun; Qu, Yawei; Bai, Jing; Liu, Haifeng

    2014-05-01

    The lack of functional information and targeted imaging in conventional white-light endoscopy leads to a high miss-rate of gastrointestinal tumor. The combination of near-infrared fluorescence imaging and endoscopy presents a promising approach. Here we introduce a new endoscopy method employing a home-made flexible wide-field epi-fluorescence endoscope, that can be inserted through the biopsy channel of a gastrointestinal endoscope, with the glucose analogue 2- DeoxyGlucosone as the near-infrared fluorescent probe. System characterization indicates a good sensitivity and linearity over a large field of view. Its capability of tumor identification and location is demonstrated with in-vivo imaging of xenografted tumor model.

  7. Peripheral facial nerve palsy after therapeutic endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun Jeong; Lee, Jun; Lee, Ji Woon; Lee, Jun Hyung; Park, Chol Jin; Kim, Young Dae; Lee, Hyun Jin

    2015-03-01

    Peripheral facial nerve palsy (FNP) is a mononeuropathy that affects the peripheral part of the facial nerve. Primary causes of peripheral FNP remain largely unknown, but detectable causes include systemic infections (viral and others), trauma, ischemia, tumor, and extrinsic compression. Peripheral FNP in relation to extrinsic compression has rarely been described in case reports. Here, we report a case of a 71-year-old man who was diagnosed with peripheral FNP following endoscopic submucosal dissection. This case is the first report of the development of peripheral FNP in a patient undergoing therapeutic endoscopy. We emphasize the fact that physicians should be attentive to the development of peripheral FNP following therapeutic endoscopy.

  8. The Use of Channel-Purge Storage for Gastrointestinal Endoscopes Reduces Microbial Contamination.

    PubMed

    Saliou, Philippe; Cholet, Franck; Jézéquel, Julien; Robaszkiewicz, Michel; Le Bars, Hervé; Baron, Raoul

    2015-09-01

    Storage cabinets for heat-sensitive endoscopes (SCHEs) are designed to store gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopes in a clean, dry and well-ventilated cupboard to prevent microbiological proliferation. The use of SCHEs in a GI endoscopy unit has significally reduced the rate of contaminated endoscopes (13.0% vs 45.0%, P<.001).

  9. Massive upper gastrointestinal bleeding originating from a fourth-stage duodenal diverticulum: a case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Rioux, Louis; Groseilliers, Sylvain Des; Fortin, Michel; Mutch, David O.

    1996-01-01

    Duodenal diverticulum is well-known pathologic entity. Most such diverticula are asymptomatic and located on the second stage of the duodenum. The diagnosis is most often established by endoscopy or upper gastrointestinal radiography. Hemorrhage has been described but is an infrequent complication. We report on a patient who presented with massive upper gastrointestinal bleeding, originating from a fourth-stage duodenal diverticulum. The diagnosis was made with a combination of arteriography and scanning with technetium 99-labelled red cells. Diverticulectomy was performed with a successful outcome. This report underlines the diagnostic limits of fiberoptic endoscopy for hemorrhagic lesions located past the third stage of the duodenum. PMID:8956821

  10. Virtual endoscopy in neurosurgery: a review.

    PubMed

    Neubauer, André; Wolfsberger, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Virtual endoscopy is the computerized creation of images depicting the inside of patient anatomy reconstructed in a virtual reality environment. It permits interactive, noninvasive, 3-dimensional visual inspection of anatomical cavities or vessels. This can aid in diagnostics, potentially replacing an actual endoscopic procedure, and help in the preparation of a surgical intervention by bridging the gap between plain 2-dimensional radiologic images and the 3-dimensional depiction of anatomy during actual endoscopy. If not only the endoscopic vision but also endoscopic handling, including realistic haptic feedback, is simulated, virtual endoscopy can be an effective training tool for novice surgeons. In neurosurgery, the main fields of the application of virtual endoscopy are third ventriculostomy, endonasal surgery, and the evaluation of pathologies in cerebral blood vessels. Progress in this very active field of research is achieved through cooperation between the technical and the medical communities. While the technology advances and new methods for modeling, reconstruction, and simulation are being developed, clinicians evaluate existing simulators, steer the development of new ones, and explore new fields of application. This review introduces some of the most interesting virtual reality systems for endoscopic neurosurgery developed in recent years and presents clinical studies conducted either on areas of application or specific systems. In addition, benefits and limitations of single products and simulated neuroendoscopy in general are pointed out.

  11. Three Year Old Male with Multiple Dieulafoy Lesions Treated with Epinephrine Injections via Therapeutic Endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Wilsey, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Dieulafoy lesions, vascular anomalies typically found along the gastrointestinal tract, have been viewed as rare and obscure causes of sudden intestinal bleeding, especially in pediatric patients. Since their discovery in the late 19th century, the reported incidence has increased. This is due to an increased awareness of, and knowledge about, their presentation and to advanced endoscopic diagnosis and therapy. Our patient was a three-year-old male, without a complex medical history. He presented to the emergency department with acute hematemesis with blood clots and acute anemia requiring blood transfusion. Endoscopy revealed four isolated Dieulafoy lesions along the lesser curvature of the stomach, which were treated with an epinephrine injection. The Dieulafoy lesion, although thought to be rare, should be considered when investigating an acute gastrointestinal bleed. These lesions have been successfully treated endoscopically. Appropriate anticipation and preparation for diagnosis and therapy can lead to optimal outcomes for the pediatric patient. PMID:28090473

  12. From Capsule Endoscopy to Balloon-Assisted Deep Enteroscopy: Exploring Small-Bowel Endoscopic Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Cooley, D. Matthew; Walker, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    In the past 15 years, the use of endoscopic evaluations in patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding has become more common. Indications for further endoscopic interventions include iron deficiency anemia, suspicion of Crohn’s disease or small-bowel tumors, assessment of celiac disease or of ulcers induced by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and screening for familial adenomatous polyposis. Often, capsule endoscopy is performed in concert with other endoscopic studies and can guide decisions regarding whether enteroscopy should be carried out in an anterograde or a retrograde approach. Retrograde endoscopy is beneficial in dealing with disease of the more distal small bowel. Multiple studies have examined the diagnostic yield of balloon-assisted deep enteroscopy and have estimated a diagnostic yield of 40% to 80%. Some of the studies have found that diagnostic yields are higher when capsule endoscopy is performed before balloon-assisted deep enteroscopy in a search for small-bowel bleeds. Each of these procedures has a role when performed alone; however, research suggests that they are especially effective as complementary techniques and together can provide better-directed therapy. Both procedures are relatively safe, with high diagnostic and therapeutic yields that allow evaluation of the small bowel. Because both interventions are relatively new to the world of gastroenterology, much research remains to be done regarding their overall efficacy, cost, and safety, as well as further indications for their use in the detection and treatment of diseases of the small bowel. PMID:27099585

  13. Thulium laser in interventional endoscopy: animal and human studies.

    PubMed

    Tontini, Gian E; Neumann, Helmut; Pastorelli, Luca; Spina, Luisa; Cavallaro, Flaminia; Soriani, Paola; Rimondi, Alessandro; Bruni, Barbara; Clemente, Claudio; Fagnani, Filippo; Lagoussis, Pavlos; Carmignani, Luca; Vecchi, Maurizio

    2017-01-20

    Background and study aims The thulium laser system (TLS) is an emerging surgical tool. The 2-μm wavelength provides a confined coagulation depth (0.2 - 0.4 mm) to reduce the potential for inadvertent injuries. For the first time ever, we assessed TLS feasibility for endoscopic hemostasis ex vivo in pigs. In addition, we performed the first in vivo hemostatic treatments in humans. Patients and methods Tissue damage induced by TLS using different settings and optical fibers was compared to that from argon plasma coagulation (APC) in established ex vivo animal models. Three consecutive patients with complex nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleedings were treated and followed up. Results No deep submucosal injury was observed in animal models. The TLS showed a progressive penetration depth with increased power outputs and tissue exposures but very limited vertical tissue injury (0.1 - 2.0 mm) and lateral spreading damage (0.1 - 0.3 mm and 0.2 - 0.7 mm using the 365-µm and 550-µm fibers, respectively). In vivo, endoscopic hemostasis with TLS was always successful without complications. Conclusions The TLS has proven to be very precise and easy to use. This novel technique appears to be a promising tool for advanced interventional endoscopy.

  14. Primary Aortodigestive Fistula: A Rare and Potentially Lethal Cause of Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Ditisheim, Saskia; Girardin, Marc; Dumonceau, Jean-Marc; Hadengue, Antoine; Frossard, Jean Louis

    2011-01-01

    Primary aortodigestive fistulas (PAFs) are a rare cause of gastrointestinal bleeding, with an incidence of 0.04-0.07% in autopsy series. The diagnosis of PAF is difficult and should be considered in patients with gastrointestinal hemorrhage of obscure origin. Because of its high mortality rate, clinical recognition of prodromal symptoms for early diagnosis is crucial for effective treatment. We report on the case of a 79-year-old patient with a PAF who was admitted for hematochezia and melena. The PAF was suspected during upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and confirmed by CT angiography. PMID:21960944

  15. Analysis of Non-Small Bowel Lesions Detected by Capsule Endoscopy in Patients with Potential Small Bowel Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Akin, Fatma Ebru; Yurekli, Oyku Tayfur; Demirezer Bolat, Aylin; Tahtacı, Mustafa; Koseoglu, Huseyin; Selvi, Eyup; Buyukasik, Naciye Semnur; Ersoy, Osman

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding cases in whom source cannot be identified after conventional upper and lower GI endoscopy are defined as potential small bowel bleeding. We aimed to search for lesions in the reach of conventional endoscopy in patients to whom video capsule endoscopy (VCE) had been applied for potential small bowel bleeding. 114 patients who had VCE evaluation for potential small bowel bleeding between January 2009 and August 2015 were retrospectively evaluated. Mean age of the patients was 55 ± 17 years. Female/male ratio is 39/75. In 58 patients (50.9%) bleeding lesion could be determined. Among these 58 patients 8 patients' lesions were in the reach of conventional endoscopes. Overall these 8 patients comprised 7% of patients in whom VCE was performed for potential small bowel bleeding. Among these 8 patients 5 had colonic lesions (4 angiodysplasia, 1 ulcerated polypoid cecal lesion), 2 had gastric lesions (1 GAVE, 1 anastomotic bleeding), and 1 patient had a bleeding lesion in the duodenal bulbus. Although capsule endoscopy is usually performed for potential small bowel bleeding gastroenterologists should always keep in mind that these patients may be suffering from bleeding from non-small bowel segments and should carefully review images captured from non-small bowel areas. PMID:27092029

  16. The Prevalence of Barrett Esophagus Diagnosed in the Second Endoscopy: A Retrospective, Observational Study at a Tertiary Center.

    PubMed

    Suna, Nuretdin; Parlak, Erkan; Kuzu, Ufuk Baris; Yildiz, Hakan; Koksal, Aydin Seref; Oztas, Erkin; Sirtas, Zeliha; Yuksel, Mahmut; Aydinli, Onur; Bilge, Zulfikar; Taskiran, Ismail; Sasmaz, Nurgul

    2016-04-01

    At present, we do not know the exact prevalence of Barrett esophagus (BE) developing later in patients without BE in their first endoscopic screening. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of BE on the second endoscopic examination of patients who had no BE in their first endoscopic examination.The data of the patients older than 18 years who had undergone upper gastrointestinal system endoscopy more than once at the endoscopy unit of our clinic during the last 6 years were retrospectively analyzed.During the last 6 years, 44,936 patients had undergone at least one endoscopic examination. Among these patients, 2701 patients who had more than one endoscopic screening were included in the study. Of the patients, 1276 (47.3%) were females and 1425 (52.7%) were males, with an average age of 54.9 (18-94) years. BE was diagnosed in 18 (0.66%) of the patients who had no BE in the initial endoscopic examination. The patients with BE had reflux symptoms in their medical history and in both endoscopies, they revealed a higher prevalence of lower esophageal sphincter laxity, hiatal hernia, and reflux esophagitis when compared to patients without BE (P < 0.001).Our study showed that in patients receiving no diagnosis of BE on their first endoscopic examination performed for any reason, the prevalence of BE on their second endoscopy within 6 years was very low (0.66%).

  17. Analyzing the Impact of Different Pcv Calibration Models on Height Determination Using Gps/Glonass Observations from Asg-Eupos Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawidowicz, Karol

    2014-12-01

    The integration of GPS with GLONASS is very important in satellite-based positioning because it can clearly improve reliability and availability. However, unlike GPS, GLONASS satellites transmit signals at different frequencies. This results in significant difficulties in modeling and ambiguity resolution for integrated GNSS positioning. There are also some difficulties related to the antenna Phase Center Variations (PCV) problem because, as is well known, the PCV is dependent on the received signal frequency dependent. Thus, processing simultaneous observations from different positioning systems, e.g. GPS and GLONASS, we can expect complications resulting from the different structure of signals and differences in satellite constellations. The ASG-EUPOS multifunctional system for precise satellite positioning is a part of the EUPOS project involving countries of Central and Eastern Europe. The number of its users is increasing rapidly. Currently 31 of 101 reference stations are equipped with GPS/GLONASS receivers and the number is still increasing. The aim of this paper is to study the height solution differences caused by using different PCV calibration models in integrated GPS/GLONASS observation processing. Studies were conducted based on the datasets from the ASG-EUPOS network. Since the study was intended to evaluate the impact on height determination from the users' point of view, a so-called "commercial" software was chosen for post-processing. The analysis was done in a baseline mode: 3 days of GNSS data collected with three different receivers and antennas were used. For the purposes of research the daily observations were divided into different sessions with a session length of one hour. The results show that switching between relative and absolute PCV models may cause an obvious effect on height determination. This issue is particularly important when mixed GPS/GLONASS observations are post-processed.

  18. Clinical multiphoton endoscopy with FLIM capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinigel, Martin; Breunig, Hans Georg; Fischer, Peter; Kellner-Höfer, Marcel; Bückle, Rainer; König, Karsten

    2013-02-01

    Multiphoton endoscopy can be applied for intra-corporeal imaging as well as to examine otherwise hard-to-access tissue areas like chronic wounds. Using high-NA (NA = 0.8) gradient-index (GRIN) lens-based endoscopes with a diameter of 1.4 mm and effective lengths of 7 mm and 20 mm, respectively, two-photon excitation of endogenous fluorophores and second-harmonic generation (SHG) is used for multimodal in vivo imaging of human skin. A further imaging modality is fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) which allows functional imaging to investigate the healing mechanism of chronic wounds and the corresponding cell metabolism. We performed first in vivo measurements using FLIM endoscopy with the medically-certified multiphoton tomograph MPTflex® in combination with a computer-controlled motorized scan head and a GRIN-lens endoscope.

  19. Revision Lapidus Arthrodesis by Bone Endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2016-08-01

    Revision arthrodesis is indicated in symptomatic nonunion of the first tarsometatarsal joint. Revision by first tarsometatarsal arthroscopy cannot deal with the dilated screw tract and associated bone cysts. Revision by bone endoscopy is indicated in symptomatic nonunion of the first tarsometatarsal joint, which is previously fixed by transarticular screw along with loosening of the screw and bone cyst formation. The screw tract makes up the portal tract, with the proximal and distal ends of the tract corresponding to the proximal and distal portals, respectively. In this technical note, we describe zonal debridement and bone grafting of the bone cysts, nonunion site, and the screw tract via the bone endoscopy. This can resolve all the co-pathologies of nonunion of the first tarsometatarsal fusion.

  20. Role of endoscopy in early oesophageal cancer.

    PubMed

    Mannath, Jayan; Ragunath, Krish

    2016-12-01

    Incidence of oesophageal adenocarcinoma has increased exponentially in the West over the past few decades. Following detection of advanced cancers, 5-year survival rates remain bleak, making identification of early neoplasia, which has a better outcome, important. Detection of subtle oesophageal lesions during endoscopy can be challenging, and advanced imaging techniques might improve their detection. High-definition endoscopy has become a standard in most endoscopy centres, and this technology probably provides better delineation of mucosal features than standard-definition endoscopy. Various image enhancement techniques are now available with the development of new electronics and software systems. Image enhancement with chromoendoscopy using dyes has been a cost-effective option for many years, yet these techniques have been replaced in some contexts by electronic chromoendoscopy, which can be used with the press of a button. However, Lugol's chromoendoscopy remains the gold standard to identify squamous dysplasia. Identification and characterization of subtle neoplastic lesions could help to target biopsies and perform endoscopic resection for better local staging and definitive therapy. In vivo histology with techniques such as confocal endomicroscopy could make endotherapy feasible within a shorter timescale than when relying on histology on tissue samples. Once early neoplasia is identified, treatments include endoscopic resection, endoscopic submucosal dissection or various ablative techniques. Endotherapy has the advantage of being a less invasive technique than oesophagectomy, and is associated with lower mortality and morbidity. Endoscopic ablation therapies have evolved over the past few years, with radiofrequency ablation showing the best results in terms of success rates and complications in Barrett dysplasia.

  1. Diagnostic Reasoning Model Validation in Digestive Endoscopy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Abstract: The development of a computer -assisted diagnostic system in digestive endoscopy implies to understand the reasoning process of endoscopists. The...that could be used in computer -assisted diagnostic, as referring data. Development of "intelligent" tools, which can retrieve referring images...of the computer -assisted diagnosis system performance was realized with indices, extracted from endoscopist talks. The system responses were compared

  2. Recent Update on Microbiological Monitoring of Gastrointestinal Endoscopes after High-Level Disinfection

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Suk Pyo

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopy-related infections are important contributors to nosocomial infections. Endoscope reprocessing according to standard guidelines ensures high-level disinfection and prevents endoscopy-related infections. Microbiological surveillance may help in monitoring the effectiveness of gastrointestinal endoscope disinfection. The process involves microbial cultures and non-culture methods such as bioburden assays, adenosine triphosphate (ATP) bioluminescence, and quantitative polymerase chain reactions (PCRs). Surveillance culturing to monitor endoscopes after reprocessing has been recommended by a majority of organizations. Bioburden assays, ATP bioluminescence, and quantitative PCRs provide rapid and reliable measures. Each institution will have to try to establish its own surveillance guidelines. PMID:26473118

  3. Endoscopy in Canada: Proceedings of the National Roundtable.

    PubMed

    Switzer, Noah; Dixon, Elijah; Tinmouth, Jill; Bradley, Nori; Vassiliou, Melina; Schwaitzberg, Steve; Gomes, Tony; Ellsmere, James; de Gara, Chris

    2015-01-01

    This 2014 roundtable discussion, hosted by the Canadian Association of General Surgeons, brought together general surgeons and gastroenterologists with expertise in endoscopy from across Canada to discuss the state of endoscopy in Canada. The focus of the roundtable was the evaluation of the competence of general surgeons at endoscopy, reviewing quality assurance parameters for high-quality endoscopy, measuring and assessing surgical resident preparedness for endoscopy practice, evaluating credentialing programs for the endosuite and predicting the future of endoscopic services in Canada. The roundtable noted several important observations. There exist inadequacies in both resident training and the assessment of competency in endoscopy. From these observations, several collaborative recommendations were then stated. These included the need for a formal and standardized system of both accreditation and training endoscopists.

  4. Learning curve for endoscopy training: Is it all about numbers?

    PubMed

    Forbes, Nauzer; Mohamed, Rachid; Raman, Maitreyi

    2016-06-01

    Endoscopy training is an important component of postgraduate gastroenterology and general surgery programs. Proficiency in endoscopy requires the development of several tangible and intangible skills. Much attention has traditionally been paid to establishing a threshold, or minimum procedural volume during the training period, which is necessary for a trainee to achieve competence in endoscopy by the conclusion of his or her program. However, despite several attempts to characterize this target, it has become clear in recent years that training programs need to consider other factors rather than relying on this measure as the sole marker of trainee competency. Here, we present a review of general concepts in endoscopy skills acquisition that affect the learning curve, the evolving definition of competency as it relates to procedural volume, the role of simulation in endoscopy training, and the concept of massed versus spaced delivery of endoscopy training.

  5. [Radiology and endoscopy in the diagnosis of colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Scerpella, E; Penny, E

    1990-01-01

    Over a 5-year period, 64 patients with a primary colorectal carcinoma were studied by means of radiographic or endoscopic diagnostic techniques. The overall accuracy rates of the barium contrast enema and endoscopy were 86% and 93%, respectively. A comparison of diagnostic accuracy between radiology and endoscopy yield a 75% correlation rate. Whenever possible, both radiology and digestive endoscopy should be carried out to assess the diagnosis of colorectal carcinoma.

  6. Activities for endoscopy information systems standardization in Japan.

    PubMed

    Yokoi, Hideto; Fujino, Masayuki A

    2006-01-01

    There are two activities for Japanese endoscopy information system. One is for a standard terminology (Minimal Standard Terminology: MST) for endoscopy reporting. Other is Integrating Healthcare Enterprise Japan (IHE-J) for an integration of hospital information system. In IHE-J activity, the members revealed specificities of an endoscopy workflow by making a comparison with a radiology workflow. The authors will propose a scheme for systematic standardization based on our experiences in the standardization activities.

  7. Master-slave robotic system for therapeutic gastrointestinal endoscopic procedures.

    PubMed

    Low, S C; Tang, S W; Thant, Z M; Phee, L; Ho, K Y; Chung, S C

    2006-01-01

    Flexible endoscopy is used to inspect and treat disorders of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract without the need for creating an artificial opening on the patient's body. Simple surgical procedures (like polypectomy and biopsy) can be performed by introducing a flexible tool via a working channel to reach the site of interest at the distal end. More technically demanding surgical procedures like hemostasis for arterial bleeding, or suturing to mend a perforation cannot be effectively achieved with flexible endoscopy. The proposed robotic system enables the endoscopist to perform technically demanding therapeutic procedures (currently possible only with open surgery) in conjunction with conventional flexible endoscopes. The robotic system consists of a master console and a slave. The latter is a cable driven flexible robotic manipulator that can be inserted into tool channel of existing endoscopes or attached in tandem to the endoscopes. Together with the real time endoscopic view, the endoscopist would be capable of performing more intricate and difficult surgical procedures.

  8. Compact endoscopic fluorescence detection system for gastrointestinal cancers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadeau, Valerie; Padgett, Miles J.; Hewett, Jacqueline; Sibbett, Wilson; Hamdan, Khaled; Mohammed, Sami; Tait, Iain; Cushieri, Alfred

    2001-04-01

    We describe a compact endoscopic imaging system for the detection of gastro-intestinal cancers. This system is designed to image ALA-induced PpIX fluorescence and allows the clinician to perform fluorescence endoscopy and white light endoscopy simultaneously. The system comprises a filtered mercury arclamp for illumination and fluorescence excitation, a dual camera system coupled to an endoscope for detection and a desktop PC for processing and display of images. The result is a real-time colour image onto which fluorescence information is superimposed. Preliminary in vivo results indicate an increased fluorescence level within cancers in comparison with normal tissue. In addition, the system allows point spectroscopy to be carried out by the insertion of an optical fibre probe down the biopsy channel of the endoscope.

  9. Stages of Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... carcinoid tumor is cancer that forms in the lining of the gastrointestinal tract. The gastrointestinal (GI) tract ... Rectum . Enlarge Gastrointestinal carcinoid tumors form in the lining of the gastrointestinal tract, most often in the ...

  10. Zinc and gastrointestinal disease

    PubMed Central

    Skrovanek, Sonja; DiGuilio, Katherine; Bailey, Robert; Huntington, William; Urbas, Ryan; Mayilvaganan, Barani; Mercogliano, Giancarlo; Mullin, James M

    2014-01-01

    This review is a current summary of the role that both zinc deficiency and zinc supplementation can play in the etiology and therapy of a wide range of gastrointestinal diseases. The recent literature describing zinc action on gastrointestinal epithelial tight junctions and epithelial barrier function is described. Zinc enhancement of gastrointestinal epithelial barrier function may figure prominently in its potential therapeutic action in several gastrointestinal diseases. PMID:25400994

  11. Endogenous and exogenous fluorescence of gastrointestinal tumors: initial clinical observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisova, Ekaterina; Plamenova, Lilia; Keremedchiev, Momchil; Vladimirov, Borislav; Avramov, Latchezar

    2013-03-01

    The limitations of standard endoscopy for detection and evaluation of cancerous changes in gastrointestinal tract (GIT) are significant challenge and initiate development of new diagnostic modalities. Therefore many spectral and optical techniques are applied recently into the clinical practice for obtaining qualitatively and quantitatively new data from gastrointestinal neoplasia with different level of clinical applicability and diagnostic success. One of the most promising approaches is fluorescence detection using naturally existing fluorescent molecules or added fluorescent markers. Deltaaminolevulinic acid / protoporphyrin IX is applied for exogenous fluorescent tumor detection in the upper part of gastrointestinal tract. The 5-ALA is administered per os six hours before measurements at dose 20mg/kg weight. Highpower light-emitting diode at 405 nm is used as a source and the excitation light is passed through the light-guide of standard video-endoscopic system to obtain 2-D visualization. Both kinds of spectra - autofluorescence signals and protoporphyrin IX signal are recorded and stored using a fiber-optic microspectrometer, as in endoscopy instrumental channel a fiber is applied to return information about fluorescence signals. In such way 1-D detection and 2-D visualization of the lesions' fluorescence are received. The results from in vivo detection show significant differentiation between normal and abnormal tissues in 1-D spectroscopic regime, but only moderate discrimination in 2-D imaging.

  12. Computed tomography angiography in patients with active gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Reis, Fatima Regina Silva; Cardia, Patricia Prando; D'Ippolito, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding represents a common medical emergency, with considerable morbidity and mortality rates, and a prompt diagnosis is essential for a better prognosis. In such a context, endoscopy is the main diagnostic tool; however, in cases where the gastrointestinal hemorrhage is massive, the exact bleeding site might go undetected. In addition, a trained professional is not always present to perform the procedure. In an emergency setting, optical colonoscopy presents limitations connected with the absence of bowel preparation, so most of the small bowel cannot be assessed. Scintigraphy cannot accurately demonstrate the anatomic location of the bleeding and is not available at emergency settings. The use of capsule endoscopy is inappropriate in the acute setting, particularly in the emergency department at night, and is a highly expensive method. Digital angiography, despite its high sensitivity, is invasive, presents catheterization-related risks, in addition to its low availability at emergency settings. On the other hand, computed tomography angiography is fast, widely available and minimally invasive, emerging as a promising method in the diagnostic algorithm of these patients, being capable of determining the location and cause of bleeding with high accuracy. Based on a critical literature review and on their own experience, the authors propose a computed tomography angiography protocol to assess the patient with gastrointestinal bleeding.

  13. Computed tomography angiography in patients with active gastrointestinal bleeding*

    PubMed Central

    Reis, Fatima Regina Silva; Cardia, Patricia Prando; D'Ippolito, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding represents a common medical emergency, with considerable morbidity and mortality rates, and a prompt diagnosis is essential for a better prognosis. In such a context, endoscopy is the main diagnostic tool; however, in cases where the gastrointestinal hemorrhage is massive, the exact bleeding site might go undetected. In addition, a trained professional is not always present to perform the procedure. In an emergency setting, optical colonoscopy presents limitations connected with the absence of bowel preparation, so most of the small bowel cannot be assessed. Scintigraphy cannot accurately demonstrate the anatomic location of the bleeding and is not available at emergency settings. The use of capsule endoscopy is inappropriate in the acute setting, particularly in the emergency department at night, and is a highly expensive method. Digital angiography, despite its high sensitivity, is invasive, presents catheterization-related risks, in addition to its low availability at emergency settings. On the other hand, computed tomography angiography is fast, widely available and minimally invasive, emerging as a promising method in the diagnostic algorithm of these patients, being capable of determining the location and cause of bleeding with high accuracy. Based on a critical literature review and on their own experience, the authors propose a computed tomography angiography protocol to assess the patient with gastrointestinal bleeding. PMID:26811556

  14. High-level disinfection of gastrointestinal endoscope reprocessing.

    PubMed

    Chiu, King-Wah; Lu, Lung-Sheng; Chiou, Shue-Shian

    2015-02-20

    High level disinfection (HLD) of the gastrointestinal (GI) endoscope is not simply a slogan, but rather is a form of experimental monitoring-based medicine. By definition, GI endoscopy is a semicritical medical device. Hence, such medical devices require major quality assurance for disinfection. And because many of these items are temperature sensitive, low-temperature chemical methods, such as liquid chemical germicide, must be used rather than steam sterilization. In summarizing guidelines for infection prevention and control for GI endoscopy, there are three important steps that must be highlighted: manual washing, HLD with automated endoscope reprocessor, and drying. Strict adherence to current guidelines is required because compared to any other medical device, the GI endoscope is associated with more outbreaks linked to inadequate cleaning or disinfecting during HLD. Both experimental evaluation on the surveillance bacterial cultures and in-use clinical results have shown that, the monitoring of the stringent processes to prevent and control infection is an essential component of the broader strategy to ensure the delivery of safe endoscopy services, because endoscope reprocessing is a multistep procedure involving numerous factors that can interfere with its efficacy. Based on our years of experience in the surveillance of culture monitoring of endoscopic reprocessing, we aim in this study to carefully describe what details require attention in the GI endoscopy disinfection and to share our experience so that patients can be provided with high quality and safe medical practices. Quality management encompasses all aspects of pre- and post-procedural care including the efficiency of the endoscopy unit and reprocessing area, as well as the endoscopic procedure itself.

  15. Optoacoustic endoscopy in curved scanning mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Hailong; Buehler, Andreas; Ntziachristos, Vasilis

    2016-03-01

    Optoacoustic technique has been shown to resolve anatomical, functional and molecular features at depths that go beyond the reach of epi-illumination optical microscopy offering new opportunities for endoscopic imaging. Herein, we interrogate the merits of optoacoustic endoscopy implemented by translating a sound detector in linear or curved geometries. The linear and curved detection geometries are achieved by employing an intravascular ultrasound transducer (IVUS) within a plastic guide shaped to a line or a curve. This concept could be used together with optical endoscopes to yield hybrid optical and optoacoustic imaging.

  16. Automatic blood detection in capsule endoscopy video

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novozámský, Adam; Flusser, Jan; Tachecí, Ilja; Sulík, Lukáš; Bureš, Jan; Krejcar, Ondřej

    2016-12-01

    We propose two automatic methods for detecting bleeding in wireless capsule endoscopy videos of the small intestine. The first one uses solely the color information, whereas the second one incorporates the assumptions about the blood spot shape and size. The original idea is namely the definition of a new color space that provides good separability of blood pixels and intestinal wall. Both methods can be applied either individually or their results can be fused together for the final decision. We evaluate their individual performance and various fusion rules on real data, manually annotated by an endoscopist.

  17. Shared governance in the endoscopy department.

    PubMed

    Metcalf, R; Tate, R

    1995-01-01

    Studies have indicated that active participation by employees improves job satisfaction and performance. There is a sense of pride and accountability that is demonstrated in the work environment when staff are involved in the decision-making process. Recent emergence of a relatively new philosophy for management that promotes employee ownership is shared governance. This type of leadership allows individuals who are at the center of the work place to participate in the decisions that actively reflect their needs. In this article, the authors describe the process of implementing shared governance in an Endoscopy Department. The effectiveness of shared governance is evidenced by the renewed enthusiasm and energy demonstrated by the staff.

  18. Electronic Endoscopy in Endoscopic Mucosal Resection (EMR) of Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Misaka, Ryouichi; Yamada, Michiru; Midorikawa, Shouko; Sanji, Tetuya; Shinohara, Satoshi; Morita, Shigefumi; Handa, Yutaka; Ohno, Hiroyuki; Saitou, Yasuhiko; Yosida, Hajime; Takase, Masahisa; Saitou, Toshihiko

    1995-01-01

    The role in which electronic endoscopy plays is important in EMR. It is useful in diagnosis and treatment of gastric cancer from a clinical viewpoint. EMR with use of electronic endoscopy allows better coordination between the operator and assistants, and thus improves the results further. PMID:18493367

  19. Evaluation of friction enhancement through soft polymer micro-patterns in active capsule endoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buselli, Elisa; Pensabene, Virginia; Castrataro, Piero; Valdastri, Pietro; Menciassi, Arianna; Dario, Paolo

    2010-10-01

    Capsule endoscopy is an emerging field in medical technology. Despite very promising innovations, some critical issues are yet to be addressed, such as the management and possible exploitation of the friction in the gastrointestinal environment in order to control capsule locomotion more actively. This paper presents the fabrication and testing of bio-inspired polymeric micro-patterns, which are arrays of cylindrical pillars fabricated via soft lithography. The aim of the work is to develop structures that enhance the grip between an artificial device and the intestinal tissue, without injuring the mucosa. In fact, the patterns are intended to be mounted on microfabricated legs of a capsule robot that is able to move actively in the gastrointestinal tract, thus improving the robot's traction ability. The effect of micro-patterned surfaces on the leg-slipping behaviour on colon walls was investigated by considering both different pillar dimensions and the influence of tissue morphology. Several in vitro tests on biological samples demonstrated that micro-patterns of pillars made from a soft polymer with an aspect ratio close to 1 enhanced friction by 41.7% with regard to flat surfaces. This work presents preliminary modelling of the friction and adhesion forces in the gastrointestinal environment and some design guidelines for endoscopic devices.

  20. Endoscopy training in Canadian general surgery residency programs

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, Nori L.; Bazzerelli, Amy; Lim, Jenny; Ying, Valerie Wu Chao; Steigerwald, Sarah; Strickland, Matt

    2015-01-01

    Summary Currently, general surgeons provide about 50% of endoscopy services across Canada and an even greater proportion outside large urban centres. It is essential that endoscopy remain a core component of general surgery practice and a core competency of general surgery residency training. The Canadian Association of General Surgeons Residents Committee supports the position that quality endoscopy training for all Canadian general surgery residents is in the best interest of the Canadian public. However, the means by which quality endoscopy training is achieved has not been defined at a national level. Endoscopy training in Canadian general surgery residency programs requires standardization across the country and improved measurement to ensure that competency and basic credentialing requirements are met. PMID:26011848

  1. Endoscopy training in Canadian general surgery residency programs.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Nori L; Bazzerelli, Amy; Lim, Jenny; Wu Chao Ying, Valerie; Steigerwald, Sarah; Strickland, Matt

    2015-06-01

    Currently, general surgeons provide about 50% of endoscopy services across Canada and an even greater proportion outside large urban centres. It is essential that endoscopy remain a core component of general surgery practice and a core competency of general surgery residency training. The Canadian Association of General Surgeons Residents Committee supports the position that quality endoscopy training for all Canadian general surgery residents is in the best interest of the Canadian public. However, the means by which quality endoscopy training is achieved has not been defined at a national level. Endoscopy training in Canadian general surgery residency programs requires standardization across the country and improved measurement to ensure that competency and basic credentialing requirements are met.

  2. Capsule endoscopy of the small bowel

    PubMed Central

    Ching, Hey-Long; Yung, Diana; Sidhu, Reena; Koulaouzidis, Anastasios

    2016-01-01

    Capsule endoscopy (CE) is a first line small bowel investigative modality which provides more sensitive mucosal imaging than comparators. It is a non-invasive, non-irradiating tool well tolerated by patients. The risk of retention of the capsule can be minimised by ensuring luminal patency using the Agile patency device. Research continues into how to minimise missed pathology and variability in the identification of pathology or interpretation of images. The consensus is that bowel preparation using laxatives improves visibility and diagnostic yield. Research includes the development of image recognition software, both to eliminate sequentially identical images to improve viewing speed and to select or enhance images likely to represent pathology. However, careful reading by experienced capsule endoscopists remains the benchmark. This should be performed at a speed comfortable to the viewer, probably at a maximum of 15 frames per second. Some prior experience of endoscopy appears to be helpful for novice capsule endoscopists and formal training on a hands-on training course seems to improve pathology recognition, for novices and for those with CE experience. PMID:27826572

  3. Laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy at endoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Jianan Y.; MacAulay, Calum E.; Lam, Stephen; Palcic, Branko

    1994-07-01

    A spectrofluorometry system has been developed for the collection of laser induced fluorescense spectra of tissue during endoscopy. In this system, a catheter with seven optical fibers was used to deliver the excitation light and collect the emitted fluorescence. The system enables one to switch from regular endoscopy into fluorescence measurement in 50 ms using a computerized shutter system. The fluorescence spectra can be recorded in 100 ms. This spectrofluorometry system has been used to obtain spectra from bronchial, larynx and nasopharyngeal tissues when employed with the appropriate endoscopes. The results demonstrate that laser induced fluorescence can be used to differentiate abnormal tissue from normal tissue. The illumination and fluorescence collection patterns of this system have been modeled using a Monte Carlo simulation. The Monte Carlo simulation data shows that the spectra recorded by our collection pattern is very close to the intrinsic spectra of tissue. The experimental results and the Monte Carlo simulation suggest that changes in fluorescence intensity are more robust for the detection of early cancers than the differences in spectral characteristics.

  4. Energy Engineering Analysis Program, 100th ASG, Grafenwoehr and Vilseck, Germany. Energy audit of dining facilities. Volume 2 - narrative. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1993-08-01

    This document contains the narrative description of the Energy Audit and Subsequent Energy/Cost Analyses performed by Gehrmann Consult, GMBH and Baker And Associates (hereinafter, the Engineers) under U.S. Army Engineer District, Europe (hereinafter, EDE) contract DACA-90-DA-0065. The study was performed on two dining facilities of the 100th ASG command, Building 101 at Grafenwolar, Germany and Building 603 at Vilseck, Germany. This project was conducted as part of the Department of the Army`s Energy Engineering Analysis Program (EEAP). The overall objective of this report is to identify and develop projects that can reduce the energy consumption of the aforementioned dining facilities. These projects are to be in compliance with the objectives of the Army Facilities Energy Plan (AFEP) and are to, in no way, decrease the readiness posture of the Army. This study has been prepared in compliance with the General Scope of Work (SOW) dated 8 May 1992 and revised 1 September 1992 and its accompanying detailed Scope of Work. The complete SOW is included in this report as Appendix A in Volume III. All of the ECO`s considered for this project are listed in Tab 3 of this Volume. All of the ECO`s recommended for implementation are listed in Tab 5 of this volume. The calculated Savings to Investment Ratios (SIRs) and the relative rankings of the ECO`s are also listed in Tab 4 of this volume.

  5. Endoscopic hemostasis techniques for upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage: A review

    PubMed Central

    Anjiki, Hajime; Kamisawa, Terumi; Sanaka, Masaki; Ishii, Taro; Kuyama, Yasushi

    2010-01-01

    Upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage (UGIH) is an urgent disease that is often encountered in daily medical practice. Endoscopic hemostasis is currently indispensable for the treatment of UGIH. Initially, when UGIH is suspected, a cause of UGIH is presumed from the medical interview and physical findings. After ample primary treatment, urgent endoscopy is performed. Many methods of endoscopic hemostasis are in wide use, including hemoclip, injection and thermo-coagulation methods. Although UGIH develops from a wide variety of diseases, such as esophageal varices and gastric and duodenal ulcer, hemostasis is almost always possible. Identification of the causative diseases, primary treatment and characteristic features of endoscopic hemostasis are needed to allow appropriate treatment. PMID:21160691

  6. [Advantages of endoscopic stenting for malignant gastrointestinal obstructions].

    PubMed

    Meier, P N; Manns, M P

    2006-03-01

    Self-expanding stents play a major role in the interdisciplinary treatment of gastrointestinal obstructions in patients with local nonresectable tumors, advanced metastasis, and pronounced comorbidity. Reinstenting the passage and sealing esophagotracheal fistulae is very effective as palliative treatment for esophageal tumor complications. In hepatobiliary occlusions, the success rate against cholestasis is also high. Enteral and colorectal stents are gaining favor. Required are an experienced endoscopy team and adequate equipment. The rate of procedural complications is generally low, but rare and severe complications such as perforation must be considered. Further improvements in the materials and construction of stents can be expected.

  7. Upper gastrointestinal bleeding in cirrhosis: clinical and endoscopic correlations.

    PubMed Central

    Terés, J; Bordas, J M; Bru, C; Diaz, F; Bruguera, M; Rodes, J

    1976-01-01

    The clinical data of 180 episodes of upper gastrointestinal bleeding in 168 patients with cirrhosis of the liver are examined. The source of bleeding had been determined by early endoscopy in all cases. In men under the age of 50 years, and without symptoms of liver failure, bleeding was due to ruptured gastro-oesophageal varices in 84% of cases. Severe liver failure was associated with acute lesions of gastric mucosa in many cases. No presumptive diagnosis of the source of haemorrhage could be based on the examination of other clinical data (presence of ascites, mode of presentation and pattern of bleeding, history of ulcer disease, alcoholism, and previous medication. PMID:1083824

  8. Eosinophilic esophagitis prevalence in an adult population undergoing upper endoscopy in southeastern Mexico.

    PubMed

    De la Cruz-Patiño, E; Ruíz Juárez, I; Meixueiro Daza, A; Grube Pagola, P; Roesch-Dietlen, F; Remes-Troche, J M

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) prevalence fluctuates according to the population studied and varies from 0.4% in an open population to 6.5% in subjects with esophageal symptoms. Even though this entity has been described in North American and European populations, it is still considered an 'unusual' condition in Latin America. The study aimed to determine EoE prevalence in patients undergoing elective endoscopy in a tertiary referral center in southeastern Mexico. Consecutive patients were evaluated that had been referred to the Medical and Biological Research Institute, Veracruz, Mexico, for upper endoscopy due to gastrointestinal symptoms. Demographic variables and symptoms were analyzed in all the cases. Eight mucosal biopsies of the esophagus (four proximal and four distal) were obtained and were reviewed by a blinded pathologist. Histological diagnosis was established when the mean eosinophil count at a large magnification was ≥15. A total of 235 subjects (137 women, 51.16 years) were evaluated, and EoE prevalence was 1.7% (4/235 95% confidence interval 0.2-3.6%). In all four cases, pH test were normal. Among patients with histological diagnosis of EoE, a greater number of patients with a past history of asthma (50% vs. 19.3%, P = 0.04) and a tendency for a greater frequency of dysphagia (50% vs. 25%, P = 0.10). There were no differences in the endoscopic findings (rings, grooves, plaques, or stricture) when compared with the patients presenting with erosive esophagitis. EoE prevalence among patients undergoing upper endoscopy from southeastern Mexico was 1.7%, which can be regarded as intermediate to low.

  9. Targeted detection of murine colonic dysplasia in vivo with flexible multispectral scanning fiber endoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Sharon J.; Lee, Cameron M.; Joshi, Bishnu P.; Gaustad, Adam; Seibel, Eric J.; Wang, Thomas D.

    2012-02-01

    Gastrointestinal cancers are heterogeneous and can overexpress several protein targets that can be imaged simultaneously on endoscopy using multiple molecular probes. We aim to demonstrate a multispectral scanning fiber endoscope for wide-field fluorescence detection of colonic dysplasia. Excitation at 440, 532, and 635 nm is delivered into a single spiral scanning fiber, and fluorescence is collected by a ring of light-collecting optical fibers placed around the instrument periphery. Specific-binding peptides are selected with phage display technology using the CPC;Apc mouse model of spontaneous colonic dysplasia. Validation of peptide specificity is performed on flow cytometry and in vivo endoscopy. The peptides KCCFPAQ, AKPGYLS, and LTTHYKL are selected and labeled with 7-diethylaminocoumarin-3-carboxylic acid (DEAC), 5-carboxytetramethylrhodamine (TAMRA), and CF633, respectively. Separate droplets of KCCFPAQ-DEAC, AKPGYLS-TAMRA, and LTTHYKL-CF633 are distinguished at concentrations of 100 and 1 μM. Separate application of the fluorescent-labeled peptides demonstrate specific binding to colonic adenomas. The average target/background ratios are 1.71+/-0.19 and 1.67+/-0.12 for KCCFPAQ-DEAC and AKPGYLS-TAMRA, respectively. Administration of these two peptides together results in distinct binding patterns in the blue and green channels. Specific binding of two or more peptides can be distinguished in vivo using a novel multispectral endoscope to localize colonic dysplasia on real-time wide-field imaging.

  10. Application of wireless power transmission systems in wireless capsule endoscopy: an overview.

    PubMed

    Basar, Md Rubel; Ahmad, Mohd Yazed; Cho, Jongman; Ibrahim, Fatimah

    2014-06-19

    Wireless capsule endoscopy (WCE) is a promising technology for direct diagnosis of the entire small bowel to detect lethal diseases, including cancer and obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (OGIB). To improve the quality of diagnosis, some vital specifications of WCE such as image resolution, frame rate and working time need to be improved. Additionally, future multi-functioning robotic capsule endoscopy (RCE) units may utilize advanced features such as active system control over capsule motion, drug delivery systems, semi-surgical tools and biopsy. However, the inclusion of the above advanced features demands additional power that make conventional power source methods impractical. In this regards, wireless power transmission (WPT) system has received attention among researchers to overcome this problem. Systematic reviews on techniques of using WPT for WCE are limited, especially when involving the recent technological advancements. This paper aims to fill that gap by providing a systematic review with emphasis on the aspects related to the amount of transmitted power, the power transmission efficiency, the system stability and patient safety. It is noted that, thus far the development of WPT system for this WCE application is still in initial stage and there is room for improvements, especially involving system efficiency, stability, and the patient safety aspects.

  11. Singular Value Decomposition Based Features for Automatic Tumor Detection in Wireless Capsule Endoscopy Images

    PubMed Central

    Karimian Khosroshahi, Ghader; Zolfy Lighvan, Mina

    2016-01-01

    Wireless capsule endoscopy (WCE) is a new noninvasive instrument which allows direct observation of the gastrointestinal tract to diagnose its relative diseases. Because of the large number of images obtained from the capsule endoscopy per patient, doctors need too much time to investigate all of them. So, it would be worthwhile to design a system for detecting diseases automatically. In this paper, a new method is presented for automatic detection of tumors in the WCE images. This method will utilize the advantages of the discrete wavelet transform (DWT) and singular value decomposition (SVD) algorithms to extract features from different color channels of the WCE images. Therefore, the extracted features are invariant to rotation and can describe multiresolution characteristics of the WCE images. In order to classify the WCE images, the support vector machine (SVM) method is applied to a data set which includes 400 normal and 400 tumor WCE images. The experimental results show proper performance of the proposed algorithm for detection and isolation of the tumor images which, in the best way, shows 94%, 93%, and 93.5% of sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy in the RGB color space, respectively. PMID:27478364

  12. Application of Wireless Power Transmission Systems in Wireless Capsule Endoscopy: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Basar, Md Rubel; Ahmad, Mohd Yazed; Cho, Jongman; Ibrahim, Fatimah

    2014-01-01

    Wireless capsule endoscopy (WCE) is a promising technology for direct diagnosis of the entire small bowel to detect lethal diseases, including cancer and obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (OGIB). To improve the quality of diagnosis, some vital specifications of WCE such as image resolution, frame rate and working time need to be improved. Additionally, future multi-functioning robotic capsule endoscopy (RCE) units may utilize advanced features such as active system control over capsule motion, drug delivery systems, semi-surgical tools and biopsy. However, the inclusion of the above advanced features demands additional power that make conventional power source methods impractical. In this regards, wireless power transmission (WPT) system has received attention among researchers to overcome this problem. Systematic reviews on techniques of using WPT for WCE are limited, especially when involving the recent technological advancements. This paper aims to fill that gap by providing a systematic review with emphasis on the aspects related to the amount of transmitted power, the power transmission efficiency, the system stability and patient safety. It is noted that, thus far the development of WPT system for this WCE application is still in initial stage and there is room for improvements, especially involving system efficiency, stability, and the patient safety aspects. PMID:24949645

  13. A Pilot Study of Ketamine versus Midazolam/Fentanyl Sedation in Children Undergoing GI Endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Lightdale, Jenifer R.; Mitchell, Paul D.; Fredette, Meghan E.; Mahoney, Lisa B.; Zgleszewski, Steven E.; Scharff, Lisa; Fox, Victor L.

    2011-01-01

    Background. Ketamine sedation has been found superior by physician report to traditional sedation regimens for pediatric endoscopy. Goal. To objectively compare sedation with ketamine versus midazolam/fentanyl for children undergoing gastrointestinal endoscopy. Study. Patients received one of two regimens and were independently monitored using a standardized rating scale. Results. There were 2 episodes of laryngospasm during ketamine sedation. Univariate analyses showed patients sedated with ketamine (n = 17) moved more (median 25% of procedure time versus 8%, P = .03) and required similar low levels of restraint (0.83% versus 0.25%, P = .4) as patients sedated with midazolam/fentanyl (n = 20). Age-adjusted analyses suggested that patients sedated with ketamine were comparably more quiet (P = .002). Conclusions. A pilot trial of ketamine at our institution was associated with episodes of laryngospasm. In addition, children sedated with ketamine moved and required restraint similarly to patients sedated with midazolam/fentanyl. Physician perceptions may be affected by the fact that children who received ketamine were less likely to vocalize distress. PMID:21760813

  14. A case of primary jejunal cancer diagnosed by preoperative small intestinal endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Nabeshima, Kazuhito; Machimura, Takao; Wasada, Mitsuru; Takayasu, Hiroyuki; Ogoshi, Kyoji; Makuuchi, Hiroyasu

    2008-04-20

    The patient was a 37-year-old female. She was brought to our hospital by ambulance with nausea and vomiting. Abdominal ultra sound and abdominal enhanced CT scan showed a tumor in left side of the abdominal aorta 6 cm in size, and it showed an expanded stomach and duodenum. Upper gastrointestinal series revealed an apple core sign in upper jejunum near the Treitz' ligament. Small intestinal endoscopy (XSIF-240 endoscope, Olympus Inc.) revealed stenosis related to an epithelially protruding lesion with an irregular surface in the jejunum on the anal side of the horizontal duodenal peduncle. Biopsy suggested a well-differentiated adenocarcinoma. Scintigraphy showed hot spot in left middle abdomen. Under a diagnosis of primary jejunum cancer, Partial resection of the jejunum and partial resection of the transverse colon was performed. Histopathologically, the tumor was well differentiated adenocarcinoma exposed serosal surface. Postoperatively, the stage was evaluated as III (T3, N1, M0). Preoperative diagnosis to use small intestinal endoscopy was effectiveness. We report a patient with primary jejunum cancer in whom a definitive diagnosis was made before surgery.

  15. Epiglottic Cyst Incidentally Discovered During Screening Endoscopy: A Case Report and Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung-Hwa; Kim, Kwang-Min; Kim, Kyu-Nam; Seo, Sang-Wook; Park, Young-Kyu; Cho, Sung-Min; Choi, Young-Ah; Lee, Jung-Un; Lee, Dong-Ryul

    2014-01-01

    From the endoscopists' point of view, although the main focus of upper gastrointestinal endoscopic examination is the esophagus, stomach, and duodenum (usually bulb and 2nd portion including ampulla of Vater), the portions of the upper airway may also be observed during insertion and withdrawal of the endoscope, such as pharynx and larynx. Thus, a variety of pathologic lesions of the upper airway can be encountered during upper endoscopy. Among these lesions, an epiglottic cyst is relatively uncommon. The cyst has no malignant potential and mostly remains asymptomatic in adults. However, if large enough, epiglottic cysts can compromise the airway and can be potentially life-threatening when an emergency endotracheal intubation is needed. Thus, patients may benefit from early detection and treatment of these relatively asymptomatic lesions. In this report, we present a case of epiglottic cyst in an asymptomatic adult incidentally found by family physician during screening endoscopy, which was successfully removed without complication, using a laryngoscopic carbon dioxide laser. PMID:24921035

  16. Small bowel capsule endoscopy: Where are we after almost 15 years of use?

    PubMed Central

    Van de Bruaene, Cedric; De Looze, Danny; Hindryckx, Pieter

    2015-01-01

    The development of capsule endoscopy (CE) in 2001 has given gastroenterologists the opportunity to investigate the small bowel in a non-invasive way. CE is most commonly performed for obscure gastrointestinal bleeding, but other indications include diagnosis or follow-up of Crohn’s disease, suspicion of a small bowel tumor, diagnosis and surveillance of hereditary polyposis syndromes, Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug-induced small bowel lesions and celiac disease. Almost fifteen years have passed since the release of the small bowel capsule. The purpose of this review is to offer the reader a brief but complete overview on small bowel CE anno 2014, including the technical and procedural aspects, the possible complications and the most important indications. We will end with some future perspectives of CE. PMID:25610531

  17. [Dilatation of anastomotic stricture by Nd:YAG laser beam under endoscopy].

    PubMed

    Lu, Z C; Chen, L G; Zhang, Y Y

    1994-11-01

    Anastomotic stricture has become a common complication following surgical treatment of upper gastrointestinal cancers. A technique was devised to alleviate the stricture with Nd. YAG laser beam under endoscopy. The laser beam was applied at 3-4 different points near the anastomotic stoma. The thermal effect of the beam would cut the scar tissues in and underneath the mucosa, leading to dilatation of the stoma. A total of 48 patients with cancer of the esophagus (n = 21), gastric cardia (n = 20), body of stomach (n = 6) and gastric stump (n = 1) with postoperative anastomotic stricture was so treated. According to the degree of dilatation, the result of treatment upon longterm follow-up was good (the anastomotic stoma was enlarged more than 6 mm) in 41 (85.4%), fair (the stoma enlarged 4-5 mm) in 5 (10.4%) and poor in the remaining 2. Due precautions should be made to avoid bleeding and perforation.

  18. Respiratory and gastrointestinal complications of caustic ingestion in children

    PubMed Central

    Turner, A; Robinson, P

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: To determine circumstances surrounding the ingestion of caustic substances, the incidence of respiratory and gastrointestinal symptoms at presentation, and the degree of investigation and active treatment during hospitalisation. Long term respiratory and gastrointestinal sequelae were also studied. Design: Retrospective case note study covering a 10 year period. Setting: Tertiary children's hospital. Patients: Children and adolescents presenting following caustic ingestions to the Royal Children's Hospital, Melbourne. Main outcome measures: Requirement for interventional oesophagoscopy/bronchoscopy, respiratory support or admission to intensive care, and long term gastrointestinal or respiratory sequelae noted. Results: Thirty two cases of caustic ingestion were identified in 31 patients (median age 2.6 years; 78% boys). The average time in hospital was 2 days. Two patients (6%) required intensive care nursing, and both required intubation with mechanical ventilation (average 33 hours). Thirty patients (97%) underwent diagnostic oesophagoscopy, and two underwent laryngoscopy or bronchoscopy for visualisation of the upper airway. No patient had long term respiratory consequences. Two patients (6%) sustained significant oesophageal injuries requiring interventional oesophagoscopy. Conclusions: Caustic ingestion is overrepresented in boys. Most ingestions involve household cleaning products. Symptoms on admission do not usually require intensive care admission. Gastrointestinal symptoms predominate at presentation, however, these are usually mild. Respiratory symptoms are uncommon and respiratory involvement requiring intervention is rare, although the presence of respiratory symptoms should be viewed as potentially serious. Long term sequelae of caustic ingestion are rare and in this series only affected the gastrointestinal tract. The indications for diagnostic endoscopy need further evaluation. PMID:15843706

  19. Multidetector CT angiography for acute gastrointestinal bleeding: technique and findings.

    PubMed

    Artigas, José M; Martí, Milagros; Soto, Jorge A; Esteban, Helena; Pinilla, Inmaculada; Guillén, Eugenia

    2013-01-01

    Acute gastrointestinal bleeding is a common reason for emergency department admissions and an important cause of morbidity and mortality. Factors that complicate its clinical management include patient debility due to comorbidities; intermittence of hemorrhage; and multiple sites of simultaneous bleeding. Its management, therefore, must be multidisciplinary and include emergency physicians, gastroenterologists, and surgeons, as well as radiologists for diagnostic imaging and interventional therapy. Upper gastrointestinal tract bleeding is usually managed endoscopically, with radiologic intervention reserved as an alternative to be used if endoscopic therapy fails. Endoscopy is often less successful in the management of acute lower gastrointestinal tract bleeding, where colonoscopy may be more effective. The merits of performing bowel cleansing before colonoscopy in such cases might be offset by the resultant increase in response time and should be weighed carefully against the deficits in visualization and diagnostic accuracy that would result from performing colonoscopy without bowel preparation. In recent years, multidetector computed tomographic (CT) angiography has gained acceptance as a first-line option for the diagnosis and management of lower gastrointestinal tract bleeding. In selected cases of upper gastrointestinal tract bleeding, CT angiography also provides accurate information about the presence or absence of active bleeding, its source, and its cause. This information helps shorten the total diagnostic time and minimizes or eliminates the need for more expensive and more invasive procedures.

  20. Scintigraphic diagnosis of gastrointestinal bleeding with /sup 99/. mu. Tc-labeled blood-pool agents

    SciTech Connect

    Miskowiak, J.; Nielsen, S.; Munck, O.

    1981-11-01

    Abdominal scintigraphy with /sup 99/..mu..Tc-labeled albumin or red blood cells was used in 68 patients to localize gastrointestinal bleeding or confirm that it had stopped. Acute, active bleeding was identified in 33 patients; characteristic patterns of bleeding from the stomach, biliary passages, small intestine, and colon are shown. Sensitivity was 0.86 (95% confidence limits, 0.57-0.98) and specificity was 1.0 (95% confidence limits, 0.82-1.0) in 33 patients who had scintigraphy and endoscopy performed in succession. Abdominal scintigraphy appears to be a valuable supplement to conventional diagnostic methods. In upper gastrointestinal bleeding, scintigraphy should be considered when endoscopy fails. In lower intestinal bleeding, scintigraphy should be the method of choice.

  1. Scintigraphic diagnosis of gastrointestinal bleeding with /sup 99/mTc-labeled blood-pool agents

    SciTech Connect

    Miskowiak, J.; Nielsen, S.L.; Munck, O.

    1981-01-01

    Abdominal scintigraphy with /sup 99/mTc-labeled albumin or red blood cells was used in 68 patients to localize gastrointestinal bleeding or confirm that it had stopped. Acute, active bleeding was identified in 33 patients; characteristic patterns of bleeding from the stomach, biliary passages, small intestine, and colon are shown. Sensitivity was 0.86 (95% confidence limits, 0.57-0.98) and specificity was 1.0 (95% confidence limits, 0.82-1.0) in 33 patients who had scintigraphy and endoscopy performed in succession. Abdominal scintigraphy appears to be a valuable supplement to conventional diagnostic methods. In upper gastrointestinal bleeding, scintigraphy should be considered when endoscopy fails. In lower intestinal bleeding, scintigraphy should be the method of choice.

  2. Does magnetically assisted capsule endoscopy improve small bowel capsule endoscopy completion rate? A randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Hale, Melissa F.; Drew, Kaye; Sidhu, Reena; McAlindon, Mark E.

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Delayed gastric emptying is a significant factor in incomplete small bowel capsule examinations. Gastric transit could be hastened by external magnetic control of the capsule. We studied the feasibility of this approach to improve capsule endoscopy completion rates. Patients and methods: Prospective, single-center, randomized controlled trial involving 122 patients attending for small bowel capsule endoscopy using MiroCam Navi. Patients were randomized to either the control group (mobilisation for 30 minutes after capsule ingestion, followed by intramuscular metoclopramide 10 mg if the capsule failed to enter the small bowel) or the intervention group (1000 mL of water prior to capsule ingestion, followed by positional change and magnetic steering). Outcome measures were capsule endoscopy completion rate, gastric clarity and distention, relationship of body habitus to capsule endoscopy completion rate (CECR), and patient comfort scores. Results: 122 patients were recruited (61 each to the control and intervention groups: mean age 49 years [range 21 – 85], 61 females). There was no significant difference in CECR between the two groups (P = 0.39). Time to first pyloric image was significantly shorter in the intervention group (P = 0.03) but there was no difference in gastric transit times (P = 0.12), suggesting that magnetic control hastens capsular transit to the gastric antrum but does not influence duodenal passage. Gastric clarity and distention were significantly better in the intervention group (P < 0.0001 and P < 0.0001 respectively). Conclusions: Magnetic steering of a small bowel capsule is unable to overcome pyloric contractions to enhance gastric emptying and improve capsule endoscope completion rate. Excellent mucosal visualisation within the gastric cavity suggests this technique could be harnessed for capsule examination of the stomach. PMID:26878053

  3. Validation of the Global Rating Scale for endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Williams, T; Ross, A; Stirling, C; Palmer, K; Phull, P S

    2013-02-01

    The Global Rating Scale for endoscopy is a web-based tool that can be used to assess and improve the quality of an endoscopy service. It was developed by asking endoscopy health professionals what they would want from the service for themselves or their relatives if they were undergoing an endoscopic procedure. To date, the Global Rating Scale has not been validated by patients themselves. We used focus groups in order to access the views and opinions of patients who had recently had experience of endoscopy services. Six focus groups were undertaken in five different Health Board areas across Scotland; in total 26 people participated. The results indicated that from the patients' perspective the 12 items of the GRS covered all areas of the endoscopy experience. There were no specific concerns identified that were not already covered within the Global Rating Scale. We conclude that the Global Rating Scale does address quality issues that matter to patients undergoing endoscopy, and validates the use of the GRS as a quality assessment tool for endoscopy services.

  4. GUIDELINE FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF BILE DUCT CANCERS BY THE BRAZILIAN GASTROINTESTINAL TUMOR GROUP.

    PubMed

    Riechelmann, Rachel; Coutinho, Anelisa K; Weschenfelder, Rui F; Andrade DE Paulo, Gustavo; Fernandes, Gustavo Dos Santos; Gifoni, Markus; Oliveira, Maria de Lourdes; Gansl, Rene; Gil, Roberto; Luersen, Gustavo; Lucas, Lucio; Reisner, Marcio; Vieira, Fernando Meton; Machado, Marcel Autran; Murad, Andre; Osvaldt, Alessandro; Brandão, Miguel; Carvalho, Elisangela; Souza, Tulio; Pfiffer, Tulio; Prolla, Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    The Brazilian Gastrointestinal Tumor Group developed guidelines for the surgical and clinical management of patients with billiary cancers. The multidisciplinary panel was composed of experts in the field of radiology, medical oncology, surgical oncology, radiotherapy, endoscopy and pathology. The panel utilized the most recent literature to develop a series of evidence-based recommendations on different treatment and diagnostic strategies for cholangiocarcinomas and gallbladder cancers.

  5. In-vivo multispectral video endoscopy towards in-vivo hyperspectral video endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Hohmann, Martin; Kanawade, R; Klämpfl, F; Douplik, A; Mudter, J; Neurath, M F; Albrecht, H

    2016-07-12

    For in-vivo diagnostics of cancer and pre-cancer in the stomach, there is no endoscopic procedure offering both high sensitivity and high specificity. Our data suggest that multispectral or hyperspectral imaging may be helpful to solve this problem. It is successfully applied to the detection and analysis of easily reachable carcinomas, ex-vivo samples of hollow organ mucosal carcinomas and also histological samples. An endoscopy system which allows flexible multispectral videoendoscopy for in-vivo diagnostics has so far been unavailable. To overcome this problem, we modified a standard Olympus endoscopy system to conduct in-vivo multispectral imaging of the upper GI tract. The pilot study is performed on 14 patients with adeno carcinomas in the stomach. For analysis, Support Vector Machine with linear and Gaussian Kernel, AdaBoost, RobustBoost and Random-Forest-walk are used and compared for the data classification with a leave-one-out strategy. The margin of the carcinoma for the training of the classifier is drawn by expert-labeling. The cancer findings are cross-checked by biopsies. We expect that the present study will help to improve the further development of hyperspectral endoscopy and to overcome some of the problems to be faced in this process.

  6. Multilevel wireless capsule endoscopy video segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Sae; Celebi, M. Emre

    2010-03-01

    Wireless Capsule Endoscopy (WCE) is a relatively new technology (FDA approved in 2002) allowing doctors to view most of the small intestine. WCE transmits more than 50,000 video frames per examination and the visual inspection of the resulting video is a highly time-consuming task even for the experienced gastroenterologist. Typically, a medical clinician spends one or two hours to analyze a WCE video. To reduce the assessment time, it is critical to develop a technique to automatically discriminate digestive organs and shots each of which consists of the same or similar shots. In this paper a multi-level WCE video segmentation methodology is presented to reduce the examination time.

  7. Optimal Bowel Preparation for Video Capsule Endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Song, Hyun Joo; Moon, Jeong Seop; Shim, Ki-Nam

    2016-01-01

    During video capsule endoscopy (VCE), several factors, such as air bubbles, food material in the small bowel, and delayed gastric and small bowel transit time, influence diagnostic yield, small bowel visualization quality, and cecal completion rate. Therefore, bowel preparation before VCE is as essential as bowel preparation before colonoscopy. To date, there have been many comparative studies, consensus, and guidelines regarding different kinds of bowel cleansing agents in bowel preparation for small bowel VCE. Presently, polyethylene glycol- (PEG-) based regimens are given primary recommendation. Sodium picosulphate-based regimens are secondarily recommended, as their cleansing efficacy is less than that of PEG-based regimens. Sodium phosphate as well as complementary simethicone and prokinetics use are considered. In this paper, we reviewed previous studies regarding bowel preparation for small bowel VCE and suggested optimal bowel preparation of VCE. PMID:26880894

  8. Endoscopic repair of post-surgical gastrointestinal complications.

    PubMed

    Manta, Raffaele; Magno, Luca; Conigliaro, Rita; Caruso, Angelo; Bertani, Helga; Manno, Mauro; Zullo, Angelo; Frazzoni, Marzio; Bassotti, Gabrio; Galloro, Giuseppe

    2013-11-01

    Complications following gastrointestinal surgery may require re-intervention, can lead to prolonged hospitalization, and significantly increase health costs. Some complications, such as anastomotic leakage, fistula, and stricture require a multidisciplinary approach. Therapeutic endoscopy may play a pivotal role in these conditions, allowing minimally invasive treatment. Different endoscopic approaches, including fibrin glue injection, endoclips, self-expanding stents, and endoscopic vacuum-assisted devices have been introduced for both anastomotic leakage and fistula treatment. Similarly endoscopic treatments, such as endoscopic dilation, incisional therapy, and self-expanding stents have been used for anastomotic strictures. All these techniques can be safely performed by skilled endoscopists, and may achieve a high technical success rate in both the upper and lower gastrointestinal tract. Here we will review the endoscopic management of post-surgical complications; these techniques should be considered as first-line approach in selected patients, allowing to avoid re-operation, reduce hospital stay, and decrease costs.

  9. [Subepithelial tumors of the gastrointestinal tract].

    PubMed

    Stupnik, Silvio; Rafaelli, Claudio; González, Graciela Osorio; Pestalardo, María Luján; Quesada, Matías; Viúdez, Pedro

    2009-06-01

    The subepithelial lesions of the gastrointestinal tract are related to mesenchymal tumors and 80% of them are GIST (gastrointestinal stromal tumors). However, there are also other tumors, such as: leiomyomas, schwannomas, lipomas, glomus tumors, carcinoid tumors, aberrant pancreas and polyps or inflammatory tumors. Diagnosis of submucosal tumors is often performed during routine endoscopic examination, they are frequently located at the stomach and in most cases are clinically evidenced by their complications. Endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) is the elected method for their staging; but other imaging diagnosis methods include computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography scan (PET). The differential diagnosis is made by inmunohistochemical techniques, revealing in the GIST the expression of the antigen CD117, and prognostic factors are determined by size and mitotic index. Surgery is the recommended therapeutic, although in small lesions not exceeding 2 cm it has also been suggested the endoscopic resection guided by EUS and a watchful behaviour based on periodical controls in lesions with benignity criteria. The series here exhibited (2 GIST 1 lyposarcoma, 1 schwannoma and 1 inflammatory fibroid polyp) shows that all these tumors were symptomatic; have been diagnosed using endoscopy and recognized by means of histopathology and immunohistochemical analysis after surgery.

  10. Video capsule endoscopy in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Paul D

    2016-01-01

    Video capsule endoscopy (VCE) has evolved to become an important tool for the non-invasive examination of the small bowel, which hitherto had been relatively inaccessible to direct visualisation. VCE has been shown to play a role in monitoring the activity of small bowel Crohn’s disease and can be used to assess the response to anti-inflammatory treatment in Crohn’s disease. For those patients with Crohn’s disease who have undergone an intestinal resection, VCE has been assessed as a tool to detect post-operative recurrence. VCE may also aid in the reclassification of patients with a diagnosis of Inflammatory Bowel Disease Unclassified to Crohn’s disease. The evolution of colon capsule endoscopy (CCE) has expanded the application of this technology further. The use of CCE to assess the activity of ulcerative colitis has been described. This advance in capsule technology has also fuelled interest in its potential role as a minimally invasive tool to assess the whole of GI tract opening the possibility of its use for the panenteric assessment of Crohn’s disease. VCE is a safe procedure. However, the risk of a retained capsule is higher in patients with suspected or confirmed Crohn’s disease compared with patients having VCE examination for other indications. A retained video capsule is rare after successful passage of a patency capsule which may be utilised to pre-screen patients undergoing VCE. This paper describes the use of VCE in the assessment of inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:27499830

  11. Miniature Grating for Spectrally-Encoded Endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Dongkyun; Martinez, Ramses V.; Whitesides, George M.

    2013-01-01

    Spectrally-encoded endoscopy (SEE) is an ultraminiature endoscopy technology that acquires high-definition images of internal organs through a sub-mm endoscopic probe. In SEE, a grating at the tip of the imaging optics diffracts the broadband light into multiple beams, where each beam with a distinctive wavelength is illuminated on a unique transverse location of the tissue. By encoding one transverse coordinate with the wavelength, SEE can image a line of the tissue at a time without using any beam scanning devices. This feature of the SEE technology allows the SEE probe to be miniaturized to sub-mm dimensions. While previous studies have shown that SEE has the potential to be utilized for various clinical imaging applications, the translation of SEE for medicine has been hampered by challenges in fabricating the miniature grating inherent to SEE probes. This paper describes a new fabrication method for SEE probes. The new method uses a soft lithographic approach to pattern a high-aspect-ratio grating at the tip of the miniature imaging optics. Using this technique, we have constructed a 500-μm-diameter SEE probe. The miniature grating at the tip of the probe had a measured diffraction efficiency of 75%. The new SEE probe was used to image a human finger and formalin fixed mouse embryos, demonstrating the capability of this device to visualize key anatomic features of tissues with high image contrast. In addition to providing high quality imaging SEE optics, the soft lithography method allows cost-effective and reliable fabrication of these miniature endoscopes, which will facilitate the clinical translation of SEE technology. PMID:23503940

  12. The Value of Endoscopy in a Wildlife Raptor Service.

    PubMed

    Desmarchelier, Marion R; Ferrell, Shannon T

    2015-09-01

    Although endoscopy is part of the basic standard of care in most avian practices, many wildlife rehabilitation centers do not have access to the equipment or do not use it on a regular basis. Endoscopic equipment is easily available at a lower cost on the used market or can be acquired through donations from local human hospitals. Several medical conditions encountered in wild raptors have an improved prognosis if they are diagnosed or treated early with the aid of endoscopy. In many cases, endoscopy provides a noninvasive alternative to exploratory surgery, saving cost and time and decreasing postoperative pain.

  13. Uncommon gastrointestinal bleeding during targeted therapy for advanced renal cell carcinoma: A report of four cases

    PubMed Central

    FUJIHARA, SHINTARO; MORI, HIROHITO; KOBARA, HIDEKI; NISHIYAMA, NORIKO; AYAKI, MAKI; OHATA, RYO; UEDA, NOBUFUMI; SUGIMOTO, MIKIO; KAKEHI, YOSHIYUKI; MASAKI, TSUTOMU

    2015-01-01

    Clinically available targeted agents to treat advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC) include sunitinib, sorafenib and temsirolimus. Sorafenib and sunitinib have been associated with bleeding in selected trials, but clinical and endoscopic characteristics of gastrointestinal bleeding are not well described. Herein, we report four cases of advanced RCC in which endoscopic hemostasis effectively resolved high-grade, life-threatening gastrointestinal bleeding that occurred during targeted therapy. Although stomatitis and mucositis have occurred during targeted therapies, life-threatening gastrointestinal bleeding is less common. In these four patients, the origins of gastrointestinal bleeding were identified, and complete endoscopic hemostasis was achieved. Endoscopies revealed variable characteristics including angiodysplasia, multiple gastric ulcers and oozing bleeding of the normal mucosa. Although the most effective diagnostic and treatment strategies are disputed, endoscopic examinations are best performed before starting targeted therapies. Additionally, these patients should be monitored even for rare life-threatening events. PMID:26722259

  14. MULTIPHOTON IMAGING CAN BE USED FOR MICROSCOPIC EXAMINATION OF INTACT HUMAN GASTROINTESTINAL MUCOSA EX VIVO

    PubMed Central

    Rogart, Jason N.; Nagata, Jun; Loeser, Caroline S.; Roorda, Robert D.; Aslanian, Harry; Robert, Marie E.; Zipfel, Warren R.; Nathanson, Michael H.

    2008-01-01

    Background & Aims The ability to observe cellular and subcellular detail during routine endoscopy is a major goal in the development of new endoscopic imaging techniques. Multiphoton microscopy, which relies on nonlinear infared optical processes, has the potential to identify cellular details by excitation of endogenous fluorescent molecules. We examined the feasibility of using multiphoton microscopy to characterize mucosal histology in the human gastrointestinal tract. Methods A multiphoton microscope was used to determine the optimal excitation wavelength for examination of gastrointestinal mucosa. Fresh, unfixed, and unstained biopsy specimens obtained during routine endoscopy in human subjects were then examined by confocal microscopy and multiphoton microscopy. Multiphoton images also were compared to standard H&E images obtained from paired biopsy specimens. A prototype miniaturized multiphoton probe was used to examine intact rat colon. Results Peak multiphoton autofluorescence intensity was detected in mucosa excited at 735 nm. Multiphoton microscopic examination of unstained biopsy specimens revealed improved cellular detail relative to either unstained or stained specimens examined by confocal imaging. Resolution of structures such as epithelial nuclei, goblet cells, and interstitial fibers and cells was comparable to what was obtained using standard H&E histology. Similar findings were observed when using a prototype miniaturized multiphoton probe. Conclusions Multiphoton microscopy can be used to examine gastrointestinal mucosa at the cellular level, without the need for fluorescent dyes. The construction of a multiphoton endomicroscope could therefore provide a practical means of performing “virtual biopsies” during the course of routine endoscopy, with advantages over currently available endomicroscopy technologies. PMID:18065276

  15. Management by the intensivist of gastrointestinal bleeding in adults and children

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Intensivists are regularly confronted with the question of gastrointestinal bleeding. To date, the latest international recommendations regarding prevention and treatment for gastrointestinal bleeding lack a specific approach to the critically ill patients. We present recommendations for management by the intensivist of gastrointestinal bleeding in adults and children, developed with the GRADE system by an experts group of the French-Language Society of Intensive Care (Société de Réanimation de Langue Française (SRLF), with the participation of the French Language Group of Paediatric Intensive Care and Emergencies (GFRUP), the French Society of Emergency Medicine (SFMU), the French Society of Gastroenterology (SNFGE), and the French Society of Digestive Endoscopy (SFED). The recommendations cover five fields of application: management of gastrointestinal bleeding before endoscopic diagnosis, treatment of upper gastrointestinal bleeding unrelated to portal hypertension, treatment of upper gastrointestinal bleeding related to portal hypertension, management of presumed lower gastrointestinal bleeding, and prevention of upper gastrointestinal bleeding in intensive care. PMID:23140348

  16. Primary gastrointestinal lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Ghimire, Prasanna; Wu, Guang-Yao; Zhu, Ling

    2011-01-01

    Gastrointestinal tract is the most common extranodal site involved by lymphoma with the majority being non-Hodgkin type. Although lymphoma can involve any part of the gastrointestinal tract, the most frequent sites in order of its occurrence are the stomach followed by small intestine and ileocecal region. Gastrointestinal tract lymphoma is usually secondary to the widespread nodal diseases and primary gastrointestinal tract lymphoma is relatively rare. Gastrointestinal lymphomas are usually not clinically specific and indistinguishable from other benign and malignant conditions. Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma is the most common pathological type of gastrointestinal lymphoma in essentially all sites of the gastrointestinal tract, although recently the frequency of other forms has also increased in certain regions of the world. Although some radiological features such as bulky lymph nodes and maintenance of fat plane are more suggestive of lymphoma, they are not specific, thus mandating histopathological analysis for its definitive diagnosis. There has been a tremendous leap in the diagnosis, staging and management of gastrointestinal lymphoma in the last two decades attributed to a better insight into its etiology and molecular aspect as well as the knowledge about its critical signaling pathways. PMID:21390139

  17. Advances in gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Lanas, Ángel

    2016-09-01

    The main innovations of the latest meeting of the Gastroenterological Association (2016) concerning upper gastrointestinal bleeding from the clinician's perspective can be summarised as follows: a) The Glasgow-Blatchford scale has the best accuracy in predicting the need for surgical intervention and hospital mortality; b) Prognostic scales for non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding are also useful for lower gastrointestinal bleeding; c) Preliminary data suggest that treatment with hemospray does not seem to be superior to current standard treatment in controlling active peptic ulcer bleeding; d) Either famotidine or a proton pump inhibitor may be effective in preventing haemorrhagic recurrence in patients taking aspirin, but this finding needs to be confirmed in further studies; e) There was confirmation of the need to re-introduce antiplatelet therapy as early as possible in patients with antiplatelet-associated gastrointestinal bleeding in order to prevent cardiovascular mortality; f) Routine clinical practice suggests that gastrointestinal or cardiovascular complications with celecoxib or traditional NSAIDs are very low; g) Dabigatran is associated with an increased incidence of gastrointestinal bleeding compared with apixaban or warfarin. At least half of the episodes are located in the lower gastrointestinal tract; h) Implant devices for external ventricular circulatory support are associated with early gastrointestinal bleeding in up to one third of patients; the bleeding is often secondary to arteriovenous malformations.

  18. Management of anticoagulation in patients with acute gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Radaelli, Franco; Dentali, Francesco; Repici, Alessandro; Amato, Arnaldo; Paggi, Silvia; Rondonotti, Emanuele; Dumonceau, Jean Marc

    2015-08-01

    Acute gastrointestinal bleeding represents the most common adverse event associated with the use of oral anticoagulant therapy. Due to increasing prescription of anticoagulants worldwide, gastroenterologists are more and more called to deal with bleeding patients taking these medications. Their management is challenging because several issues have to be taken into account, such as the severity of bleeding, the intensity of anticoagulation, the patient's thrombotic risk and endoscopy findings. The recent introduction into the marketplace of new direct oral anticoagulants, for whom specific reversal agents are still lacking, further contributes to make the decision-making process even more demanding. Available evidence on this topic is limited and practice guidelines by gastroenterology societies only marginally address key issues for clinicians, including when and how to reverse coagulopathy, the optimal timing of endoscopy and when and how to resume anticoagulation thereafter. The present paper reviews the evidence in the literature and provides practical algorithms to support clinicians in the management of patients on anticoagulants who present with acute gastrointestinal bleeding.

  19. Radiologic diagnosis of gastrointestinal perforation.

    PubMed

    Rubesin, Stephen E; Levine, Marc S

    2003-11-01

    Perforations of the gastrointestinal tract have many causes. Holes in the wall of gastrointestinal organs can be created by blunt or penetrating trauma, iatrogenic injury, inflammatory conditions that penetrate the serosa or adventitia, extrinsic neoplasms that invade the gastrointestinal tract, or primary neoplasms that penetrate outside the wall of gastrointestinal organs. This article provides a radiologic approach for investigating the wide variety of gastrointestinal perforations. General principles about contrast agents and studies are reviewed, and then perforations in specific gastrointestinal organs are discussed.

  20. Effect of longer battery life on small bowel capsule endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ou, George; Shahidi, Neal; Galorport, Cherry; Takach, Oliver; Lee, Terry; Enns, Robert

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To determine if longer battery life improves capsule endoscopy (CE) completion rates. METHODS: A retrospective study was performed at a tertiary, university-affiliated hospital in Vancouver, Canada. Patients who underwent CE with either PillCam™ SB2 or SB2U between 01/2010 and 12/2013 were considered for inclusion. SB2 and SB2U share identical physical dimensions but differ in their battery lives (8 h vs 12 h). Exclusion criteria included history of gastric or small bowel surgery, endoscopic placement of CE, interrupted view of major landmarks due to technical difficulty or significant amount of debris, and repeat CE using same system. Basic demographics, comorbidities, medications, baseline bowel habits, and previous surgeries were reviewed. Timing of major landmarks in CE were recorded, and used to calculate gastric transit time, small bowel transit time, and total recording time. A complete CE study was defined as visualization of cecum. Transit times and completion rates were compared. RESULTS: Four hundred and eight patients, including 208 (51.0%) males, were included for analysis. The mean age was 55.5 ± 19.3 years. The most common indication for CE was gastrointestinal bleeding (n = 254, 62.3%), followed by inflammatory bowel disease (n = 86, 21.1%). There was no difference in gastric transit times (group difference 0.90, 95%CI: 0.72-1.13, P = 0.352) and small bowel transit times (group difference 1.07, 95%CI: 0.95-1.19, P = 0.261) between SB2U and SB2, but total recording time was about 14% longer in the SB2U group (95%CI: 10%-18%, P < 0.001) and there was a corresponding trend toward higher completion rate (88.2% vs 93.2%, OR = 1.78, 95%CI 0.88-3.63, P = 0.111). There was no statistically significant difference in the rates of positive findings (OR = 0.98, 95%CI: 0.64-1.51, P = 0.918). CONCLUSION: Extending the operating time of CE may be a simple method to improve completion rate although it does not affect the rate of positive findings. PMID

  1. Contact endoscopy for identifying the parathyroid glands during thyroidectomy.

    PubMed

    Guimarães, A V; Brandão, L G; Dedivitis, R A

    2010-02-01

    Aim of this study was to analyse contact endoscopy as an auxiliary method for identifying parathyroid glands during thyroid surgery and to identify other variables that may interfere with this correlation. Overall, 125 patients underwent thyroid surgery between January 2004 and February 2006. The variables analysed were: the total duration of surgery; time taken to locate and identify parathyroid glands; improvement in identifying these; numbers of parathyroid glands located by the surgeon and confirmed by contact endoscopy; histopathological diagnosis; presence of thyroiditis; thyroid weight; number of parathyroid glands left in thyroid specimens; and number of parathyroid gland autotransplantations. A total of 331 parathyroid glands were observed by the surgeon. However, 282 glands were identified by contact endoscopy. Nine parathyroid glands (7.2%) were observed together with thyroid specimens (Kappa = 0.534). The longer the total duration of surgery (p = 0.03) and time taken to locate and identify (p = 0.00) the parathyroid glands by contact endoscopy, the lower the observed agreement. The second year of performing contact endoscopy led to better agreement between the results (p = 0.02). In conclusion, contact endoscopy is an efficient auxiliary method for identifying parathyroid glands during thyroid surgery. During the period studied, association between total duration of surgery and time taken to locate and identify parathyroid glands was statistically significant.

  2. Application and limitations of endoscopy in anthropological and archaeological research.

    PubMed

    Beckett, Ronald G

    2015-06-01

    The use of endoscopy in anthropological and archaeological research was been well documented in the literature. This article explores the varied settings in which endoscopy is beneficial in gathering visual data for interpretation related to cultural remains and artifacts. Endoscopic data may be used to assist in the pursuit of answering such bioanthropological questions as sex, age at death, presence of paleopathologies, dental conditions, and cultural practices. Endoscopy is often used to guide and document biopsy procedures as well as the retrieval of artifacts from within poorly accessible locations such as body cavities, coffins, or tombs. In addition, endoscopic data is used to examine such archaeological features as tomb structure and design. A contrast between the medical and anthropological approach is described. Endoscopic research is enhanced when applied in conjunction with additional varied imaging modalities. While invasive, endoscopy is a nondestructive methodological approach. As with all methods, endoscopy has application and interpretational limitations, which can be described as limitations resulting from instrumentation, and those arising from personnel less familiar with the various approaches to endoscopy in both field and laboratory settings.

  3. National Endoscopy Quality Improvement Program Remains Suboptimal in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Jae Myung; Moon, Jeong Seop; Chung, Il-Kwun; Kim, Jin-Oh; Im, Jong Pil; Cho, Yu Kyung; Kim, Hyun Gun; Lee, Sang Kil; Lee, Hang Lak; Jang, Jae Young; Kim, Eun Sun; Jung, Yunho; Moon, Chang Mo; Kim, Yeol; Park, Bo Young

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims We evaluated the characteristics of the National Cancer Screening Program (NCSP) and opinions regarding the National Endoscopy Quality Improvement Program (NEQIP). Methods We surveyed physicians performing esophagogastroduodenoscopy and/or colonoscopy screenings as part of the NCSP via e-mail between July and August in 2015. The 32-item survey instrument included endoscopic capacity, sedation, and reprocessing of endoscopes as well as opinions regarding the NEQIP. Results A total of 507 respondents were analyzed after the exclusion of 40 incomplete answers. Under the current capacity of the NCSP, the typical waiting time for screening endoscopy was less than 4 weeks in more than 90% of endoscopy units. Performance of endoscopy reprocessing was suboptimal, with 28% of respondents using unapproved disinfectants or not knowing the main ingredient of their disinfectants and 15% to 17% of respondents not following reprocessing protocols. Agreement with the NEQIP was optimal, because only 5.7% of respondents did not agree with NEQIP; however, familiarity with the NEQIP was suboptimal, because only 37.3% of respondents were familiar with the NEQIP criteria. Conclusions The NEQ-IP remains suboptimal in Korea. Given the suboptimal performance of endoscopy reprocessing and low familiarity with the NEQIP, improved quality in endoscopy reprocessing and better understanding of the NEQIP should be emphasized in Korea. PMID:27282270

  4. Interventional Endoscopy Database for Pancreatico-biliary, Gastrointestinal and Esophageal Disorders

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-16

    Ampullary Cancer; Duodenal Cancer; Bile Duct Cancer; Bile Duct Disorders; Gallstones; Obstructive Jaundice; Pancreatic Disorders (Noncancerous); Colorectal Cancer; Esophageal Cancer; Barrett's Esophagus; Gastric Malignancies; Pancreatic Cancer; Pediatric Gastroenterology; Cholangiocarcinoma; Pancreatic Pseudocysts; Acute and Chronic Pancreatitis; Recurrent Pancreatitis; Cholangitis; Bile Leak; Biliary Strictures; Pancreatic Divisum; Biliary and Pancreatic Stones; Choledocholithiasis

  5. Endoscopic Findings of Upper Gastrointestinal Involvement in Primary Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Eun Jeong; Kim, Do Hoon; Chun, Joo Hyun; Ahn, Ji Yong; Choi, Kwi-Sook; Jung, Kee Wook; Lee, Jeong Hoon; Choi, Kee Don; Song, Ho June; Lee, Gin Hyug; Jung, Hwoon-Yong; Kim, Jin Ho; Song, In Hye; Kim, Yong-Gil

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Gastrointestinal involvement in vasculitis may result in life-threatening complications. However, its variable clinical presentations and endoscopic features, and the rarity of the disease, often result in delayed diagnosis. Methods Clinical characteristics, endoscopic features, and histopathological findings were reviewed from medical records. Results Of 6,477 patients with vasculitis, 148 were diagnosed as primary vasculitis with upper gastrointestinal involvement. Of these, 21 cases (14.2%) were classified as large-vessel vasculitis, 17 cases (11.5%) as medium-vessel vasculitis, and 110 cases (74.3%) as small-vessel vasculitis. According to the specific diagnosis, IgA vasculitis (Henoch-Schönlein purpura) was the most common diagnosis (56.8%), followed by Takayasu arteritis (14.1%), microscopic polyangiitis (10.1%), and polyarteritis nodosa (6.8%). Gastrointestinal symptoms were present in 113 subjects (76.4%), with abdominal pain (78.8%) the most common symptom. Erosion and ulcers were striking endoscopic features, and the second portion of the duodenum was the most frequently involved site. Biopsy specimens were obtained from 124 patients, and only eight (5.4%) presented histopathological signs of vasculitis. Conclusions Diagnosis of vasculitis involving the upper gastrointestinal tract is difficult. Because of the widespread use of endoscopy, combining clinical features with endoscopic findings may facilitate making appropriate diagnoses; however, the diagnostic yield of endoscopic biopsy is low. PMID:27226428

  6. Vibration measurements by pulsed digital holographic endoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schedin, Staffan; Pedrini, Giancarlo; Perez-Lopez, Carlos; Mendoza Santoyo, Fernando

    2005-02-01

    Digital holographic interferometry in combination with a flexible fiber endoscope allows high precision measurements of deformations on hidden objects surfaces, inside cavities and objects with small access apertures. A digital holographic endoscopy system is described with a frequency-doubled, twin oscillator Q-switched pulsed Nd:YAG laser as light source. A sequence of digital hologram pairs are recorded with a maximum repetition rate of 260 ms. Each digital hologram is captured at separate video frames of a CCD-camera. The time separation between the laser pulses from each cavity can be set in the range from 50 to 500 μs. The digital holograms are transferred to a PC via a frame grabber and evaluated quantitatively by the Fourier transform method. The resulting phase fringe pattern has the information needed to evaluate quantitatively the amount of the deformation. Experimental results of vibration measurements of hidden mechanical and biological object surfaces are presented. The quality of the results obtained by mechanical object surfaces is usually higher than for biological surfaces. This can be explained easily by the fact that a biological surface is much more complex than a mechanical surface in the sense that some parts of the surface may reflect the light well whereas other parts may absorb the light. Also, biological surfaces are translucent, which means that part of the light may enter inside the sample where it may be absorbed or reflected.

  7. Endoscopic removal of foreign bodies from the upper gastrointestinal tract: 5-year experience

    PubMed Central

    Emara, Mohamed H; Darwiesh, Ehab M; Refaey, Mohamed M; Galal, Sherif M

    2014-01-01

    Background Foreign bodies (FBs) in the upper gastrointestinal tract are produced chiefly by accidental swallowing but rarely produce symptoms. Removal of FBs is not an infrequent challenge for upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. The aim of this study is to elicit our experience in a 5-year period in dealing with FBs in the upper gastrointestinal tract using upper endoscopy. Methods This retrospective study was conducted at Zagazig University Hospitals, Egypt, over a 5-year period. We reviewed all patients’ files with full notations on age, sex, type of FB and its anatomical location, treatments, and outcomes (complications, success rates, and mortalities). Patients with incomplete files and those with FBs not identified at the endoscopic examination were excluded. Results A total of 45 patients were identified. Their ages ranged from 6 months to 102 years. Slight male predominance was noticed (53.3%). The most frequent presentation was a history of FB ingestion without any associated manifestations (44.4%). Coins were the most commonly encountered FBs (14/45). Esophagus was the most common site of trapping (27/45). The overall success rate was 95.6% (43/45). Upper endoscopy successfully resolved the problem by either FB removal (41/43) or dislodgment of the impacted fleshy meat to the stomach (2/43). Two cases were referred for surgical removal. The rate of complications was 6.7%. Furthermore, no mortalities due to FB ingestion or removal had been reported throughout the study. Conclusion Our experience with FB removal emphasizes its importance and ease when performed by experienced hands, at well-equipped endoscopy units, and under conscious sedation in most cases, with high success rates and minor complications. PMID:25053889

  8. Creation of a therapeutic digestive endoscopy suite in Senegal: renovation, training and university certification. Results of a Belgian-Senegalese inter-university project.

    PubMed

    Le Moine, O; Diouf, M L; Mbengue, M; Mbaye, P S; Diop, P M; Balme, F; Brihay, J; Le Moine-Pauwels, A; Le Moine, M; Moreira-Diop, T

    2012-02-01

    Therapeutic digestive endoscopy did not exist in sub-Saharan Africa before 2005. However, the prevalence of digestive diseases that could potentially benefit from basic endoscopic treatment is very high in this region. Portal hypertension with variceal bleeding and severe dysphagia associated with benign or malignant upper gastrointestinal tract diseases are prominent in these countries. The aim of the Project described in this report was to create a digestive endoscopy facility in Dakar (Senegal, West Africa), that would also provide local training in therapeutic endoscopy to doctors and nurses and facilitate regional autonomy with the opening of a University Certification in Gastroenterology. It took about 10 years to achieve these targets - 5 years to prepare realistic aims that took into account local needs, available local resources, and funding, and 4 years for the Project itself (2005-2009). At the present time, Senegalese colleagues and nurses are autonomous for basic therapeutic procedures in the upper and lower gastrointestinal tract. Two years after the end of funding, the rate of therapeutic activity has increased from 0% in 2005 to 12 % of digestive endoscopic activity in 2011. Key points of success were preparation, confidence of medical personnel, university involvement, shared funding, local multidisciplinary training, and facilitation of autonomy. Belgian healthcare workers were present on-site in Dakar for a total of about 6 months over the 4-year Project period, with an annual budget of less than € 80000. The Project has enabled an efficient North-South collaboration with a minimal budget, which has changed the healthcare provision of digestive endoscopy in Senegal, and has also provided autonomy, and facilitated the development of South-South cooperation.

  9. Osteoporosis and Gastrointestinal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Weinerman, Stuart

    2010-01-01

    Gastrointestinal disease is often overlooked or simply forgotten as a cause of osteoporosis. Yet, the consequences of osteoporotic fractures can be devastating. Although the bulk of the published experience regarding osteoporosis is derived from the postmenopausal population, this review will focus on gastrointestinal disorders implicated in osteoporosis, with an emphasis on inflammatory bowel disease and celiac disease. The unique aspects of gastrointestinal diseases associated with osteoporosis include early onset of disease (and, therefore, prolonged exposure to risk factors for developing osteoporosis, particularly with inflammatory bowel disease and celiac disease), malabsorption, and maldigestion of nutrients necessary for bone health and maintenance (eg, calcium, vitamin D), as well as the impact of glucocorticoids. These factors, when added to smoking, a sedentary lifestyle, hypogonadism, and a family history of osteoporosis, accumulate into an imposing package of predictors for osteoporotic fracture. This paper will review the identification and treatment strategies for patients with gastrointestinal disorders and osteoporosis. PMID:20978554

  10. A typical presentation of a rare cause of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Reuter, Stefan; Bettenworth, Dominik; Mees, Sören Torge; Neumann, Jörg; Beyna, Torsten; Domschke, Wolfram; Wessling, Johannes; Ullerich, Hansjörg

    2011-01-01

    A 52-year-old white woman had suffered from intermittent gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding for one year. Upper GI endoscopy, colonoscopy and peroral double-balloon enteroscopy (DBE) did not detect any bleeding source, suggesting obscure GI bleeding. However, in videocapsule endoscopy a jejunal ulceration without bleeding signs was suspected and this was endoscopically confirmed by another peroral DBE. After transfusion of packed red blood cells, the patient was discharged from our hospital in good general condition. Two weeks later she was readmitted because of another episode of acute bleeding. Multi-detector row computed tomography with 3D reconstruction was performed revealing a jejunal tumor causing lower gastrointestinal bleeding. The patient underwent exploratory laparotomy with partial jejunal resection and end-to-end jejunostomy for reconstruction. Histological examination of the specimen confirmed the diagnosis of a low risk gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST). Nine days after surgery the patient was discharged in good health. No signs of gastrointestinal rebleeding occurred in a follow-up of eight months. We herein describe the complex presentation and course of this patient with GIST and also review the current approach to treatment. PMID:21403816

  11. Vasculitis and gastrointestinal involvement.

    PubMed

    Casella, G; Bronzino, B; Cutrino, L; Montani, N; Somma, A; Baldini, V

    2006-06-01

    The incidence of gastrointestinal involvement is relatively observed in patients with vasculitis processes. Vasculitis can be primary (necrotising or hypersensitivity) or secondary to another primary disease. Gastrointestinal involvement is present in up to 50% of the various forms of systemic vasculitis. Primary or secondary vasculitic process, according to the classification in necrotizing and hypersensitivity vasculitis, are described in this paper. A review of the literature on the the subject is also presented.

  12. Time Series Analysis of the Effectiveness and Safety of Capsule Endoscopy between the Premarketing and Postmarketing Settings: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Iijima, Kazuo; Umezu, Mitsuo; Iwasaki, Kiyotaka

    2016-01-01

    Background Clinical studies for assessing the effectiveness and safety in a premarketing setting are conducted under time and cost constraints. In recent years, postmarketing data analysis has been given more attention. However, to our knowledge, no studies have compared the effectiveness and the safety between the pre- and postmarketing settings. In this study, we aimed to investigate the importance of the postmarketing data analysis using clinical data. Methods and Findings Studies on capsule endoscopy with rich clinical data in both pre- and postmarketing settings were selected for the analysis. For effectiveness, clinical studies published before October 10, 2015 comparing capsule endoscopy and conventional flexible endoscopy measuring the detection ratio of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding were selected (premarketing: 4 studies and postmarketing: 8 studies) from PubMed (MEDLINE), Cochrane Library, EMBASE and Web of Science. Among the 12 studies, 5 were blinded and 7 were non-blinded. A time series meta-analysis was conducted. Effectiveness (odds ratio) decreased in the postmarketing setting (premarketing: 5.19 [95% confidence interval: 3.07–8.76] vs. postmarketing: 1.48 [0.81–2.69]). The change in odds ratio was caused by the increase in the detection ratio with flexible endoscopy as the control group. The efficacy of capsule endoscopy did not change between pre- and postmarketing settings. Heterogeneity (I2) increased in the postmarketing setting because of one study. For safety, in terms of endoscope retention in the body, data from the approval summary and adverse event reports were analyzed. The incidence of retention decreased in the postmarketing setting (premarketing: 0.75% vs postmarketing: 0.095%). The introduction of the new patency capsule for checking the patency of the digestive tract might contribute to the decrease. Conclusions Effectiveness and safety could change in the postmarketing setting. Therefore, time series meta-analyses could be

  13. Asbestos and Gastrointestinal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Robert W.; Foliart, Donna E.; Wong, Otto

    1985-01-01

    Exposure to asbestos is among several factors cited as possible causes of esophageal, gastric and colorectal cancer. More than 45 published studies have presented mortality data on asbestos-exposed workers. For each cohort, we listed the observed and expected rates of deaths from types of gastrointestinal cancer based on the latest published follow-up. Summary standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) were then derived. Finally, we calculated summary SMRs for total gastrointestinal tract cancer for three occupational groups: asbestos factory workers, insulators/shipyard workers and asbestos miners. Statistically significant elevations in summary SMRs were found for esophageal, stomach and total gastrointestinal tract cancer in all asbestos-exposed workers. Esophageal cancer summary SMRs remained significantly elevated when data were reanalyzed to include only those cohorts with death certificate diagnoses for cause of observed deaths. However, summary SMRs were not statistically significant for stomach and total gastrointestinal tract cancer after reanalysis. Summary SMRs by occupational group showed a significant elevation for total gastrointestinal cancer in insulators/shipyard workers. The elevation was not significant after reanalysis. Based on the results after reanalysis, the elevations in summary SMRs for stomach and total gastrointestinal tract cancer are of a magnitude that could result from diagnostic and investigator error. We conclude that more studies are required before stomach and colorectal cancers are documented as asbestos-related diseases. PMID:4036114

  14. Hygiene: The Looming Achilles Heel in Endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Michael; Beilenhoff, Ulrike

    2016-01-01

    Background Since the late 1970s there have been sporadic reports of nosocomial infections linked to endoscopic procedures. Infections by multidrug-resistant organisms (MDRO) have an increasing impact on healthcare systems worldwide. Since 2010 outbreaks involving MDRO have been reported as a result of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) from the USA, France, Germany and the Netherlands. Methods This article evaluates the recent outbreaks and developments and demonstrates a structural approach to how to prevent future infections. Current national and international guidelines were used as a basis for discussions. Results In some cases insufficient cleaning or drying supported the outbreak. In the majority of cases, outbreaks occurred despite the apparently appropriate reprocessing protocols being in use. Microlesions were identified on a number of endoscopes, which supported the growth of bacteria and represented a vehicle for the transmission of infectious material. National official bodies responded with warnings. Manufacturers informed their customers accordingly. Separate, purpose-designed reprocessing rooms and a sufficient number of competent staff provide the structural quality for a safe reprocessing. The process quality includes a thorough cleaning of all endoscope channels and crucial instrument components, followed by an automated and validated reprocessing procedure. Strict adherence to manufacturers' recommendations is essential. The outcome quality should be evaluated by regular audits, validation of reprocessing procedures and microbiological surveillance. If outbreaks occur, a close co-operation with official bodies and manufacturers is essential. Conclusion Health care professionals and manufacturers should be aware of their responsibility to ensure patient safety. A structural approach is key in prevention of endoscopy-associated infections. PMID:27588292

  15. Indications of capsule endoscopy in Crohn´s disease.

    PubMed

    Luján-Sanchis, Marisol; Sanchis-Artero, Laura; Suárez-Callol, Patricia; Medina-Chuliá, Enrique

    2014-01-01

    Capsule endoscopy currently plays a relevant role for Crohn´s disease. This manuscript will discuss the current indications and practical uses of capsule endoscopy in this disease. It is a non-invasive technique that represents a significant advance in the endoscopic diagnosis of small bowel conditions. These circumstances, together with its diagnostic yield and excellent tolerability, make it considerably acceptable by both patients and physicians. This paper discusses the current evidence on the specific circumstances where capsule endoscopy may be indicated for three specific scenarios: Suspected Crohn´s disease, indeterminate colitis, and established Crohn´s disease, where it plays an extensive role. Furthermore, the impact and implications of capsule endoscopy results for follow-up are reviewed. These recommendations must be interpreted and applied in the setting of the integral, individual management of these patients. Understanding its appropriate use in daily clinical practice and an analysis of results may define endoscopic scoring systems to assess activity and mucosal healing in this condition. The present role of capsule endoscopy for Crohn´s disease is subject to ongoing review, and appropriate usage uncovers novel applications likely to result in relevant changes for the future management of these patients.

  16. On-the-fly detection of images with gastritis aspects in magnetically guided capsule endoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mewes, P. W.; Neumann, D.; Juloski, A. L.; Angelopoulou, E.; Hornegger, J.

    2011-03-01

    Capsule Endoscopy (CE) was introduced in 2000 and has since become an established diagnostic procedure for the small bowel, colon and esophagus. For the CE examination the patient swallows the capsule, which then travels through the gastrointestinal tract under the influence of the peristaltic movements. CE is not indicated for stomach examination, as the capsule movements can not be controlled from the outside and the entire surface of the stomach can not be reliably covered. Magnetically-guided capsule endoscopy (MGCE) was introduced in 2010. For the MGCE procedure the stomach is filled with water and the capsule is navigated from the outside using an external magnetic field. During the examination the operator can control the motion of the capsule in order to obtain a sufficient number of stomach-surface images with diagnostic value. The quality of the examination depends on the skill of the operator and his ability to detect aspects of interest in real time. We present a novel computer-assisted diagnostic-procedure (CADP) algorithm for indicating gastritis pathologies in the stomach during the examination. Our algorithm is based on pre-processing methods and feature vectors that are suitably chosen for the challenges of the MGCE imaging (suspended particles, bubbles, lighting). An image is classified using an ada-boost trained classifier. For the classifier training, a number of possible features were investigated. Statistical evaluation was conducted to identify relevant features with discriminative potential. The proposed algorithm was tested on 12 video sequences stemming from 6 volunteers. A mean detection rate of 91.17% was achieved during leave-one out cross-validation.

  17. Acute Upper Gastro-Intestinal Bleeding in Morocco: What Have Changed?

    PubMed Central

    Timraz, A.; Khannoussi, W.; Ajana, F. Z.; Essamri, W.; Benelbarhdadi, I.; Afifi, R.; Benazzouz, M.; Essaid, A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective. In the present study, we aimed to investigate epidemiological, clinical, and etiological characteristics of acute upper gastro-intestinal bleeding. Materials and Methods. This retrospective study was conducted between January 2003 and December 2008. It concerned all cases of acute upper gastroduodenal bleeding benefited from an urgent gastro-intestinal endoscopy in our department in Morocco. Characteristics of patients were evaluated in terms of age, gender, medical history, presenting symptoms, results of rectal and clinical examinations, and endoscopy findings. Results. 1389 cases were registered. As 66% of the patients were male, 34% were female. Mean age was 49. 12% of patients had a history of previous hemorrhage, and 26% had a history of NSAID and aspirin use. Endoscopy was performed in 96%. The gastroduodenal ulcer was the main etiology in 38%, followed by gastritis and duodenitis in 32.5%. Conclusion. AUGIB is still a frequent pathology, threatening patients' life. NSAID and aspirin are still the major risk factors. Their impact due to peptic ulcer remains stable in our country. PMID:21991509

  18. Confocal laser endomicroscopy and immunoendoscopy for real-time assessment of vascularization in gastrointestinal malignancies.

    PubMed

    Gheonea, Dan Ionuţ; Cârţână, Tatiana; Ciurea, Tudorel; Popescu, Carmen; Bădărău, Anca; Săftoiu, Adrian

    2011-01-07

    Gastrointestinal cancers represent a major cause of morbidity and mortality, with incomplete response to chemotherapy in the advanced stages and poor prognosis. Angiogenesis plays a crucial part in tumor growth and metastasis, with most gastrointestinal cancers depending strictly on the development of a new and devoted capillary network. Confocal laser endomicroscopy is a new technology which allows in vivo microscopic analysis of the gastrointestinal mucosa and its microvascularization during ongoing endoscopy by using topically or systemically administered contrast agents. Targeting markers of angiogenesis in association with confocal laser endomicroscopic examination (immunoendoscopy), as a future challenge, will add functional analysis to the morphological aspect of the neoplastic process. This review describes previous experience in endomicroscopic examination of the upper and lower digestive tract with emphasis on vascularization, resulting in a broad spectrum of potential clinical applications, and also preclinical research that could be translated to human studies.

  19. Brunner's Gland Adenoma – A Rare Cause of Gastrointestinal Bleeding: Case Report and Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Sorleto, Michele; Timmer-Stranghöner, Annette; Wuttig, Helge; Engelhard, Oliver; Gartung, Carsten

    2017-01-01

    Brunner's gland adenoma is an extremely rare benign small bowel neoplasm, often discovered incidentally during upper gastrointestinal endoscopy or radiological diagnostics. In few cases, it tends to cause gastrointestinal hemorrhage or intestinal obstruction. We report here our experience with a 47-year-old woman with a Brunner's gland adenoma of more than 6 cm in size, located in the first part of the duodenum and causing gastrointestinal bleeding. Initially, we performed a partial endoscopic resection using endoloop and snare alternatively to prevent severe bleeding. A rest endoscopic polypectomy with the submucosal dissection technique was planned. However, on request of the patient, an elective surgical duodenotomy with submucosal resection of the remaining small duodenal tumor was performed. To better define the patient's characteristics and treatment options of such lesions, we performed a systematic review of the available literature in PubMed. Recently, an endoscopic removal is being increasingly practiced and is considered as a safe treatment modality of such lesions. PMID:28203131

  20. Evaluation of a multimedia information system for endoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enning, C. John W.; Siersema, Peter D.; van Blankenstein, Mark; van Boven, Gert-Jan; van Gennip, Elisabeth M.

    1996-05-01

    In a cooperation between the University Hospital Rotterdam (AZR) and HISCOM, HIS supplier, a multimedia information system for endoscopy (ENSIS) has been developed in a project funded by the Dutch Ministry of Health Care. An integral part of this project was an evaluation of costs and effects of this system. The system has been implemented on the gastroenterology department and the internal medicine ward in the AZR. The results indicate that the anatomical knowledge of requesting physicians improved with the system. Both the response time and availability of endoscopy images improved greatly. Because of the use of off-the-shelve technology (possible because of the relatively small resolution requirements of endoscopy images) ENSIS can be implemented at relatively low costs.

  1. Endoscopy in neutropenic and/or thrombocytopenic patients

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Michelle C; Tadros, Micheal; Vaziri, Haleh

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the safety of endoscopic procedures in neutropenic and/or thrombocytopenic cancer patients. METHODS: We performed a literature search for English language studies in which patients with neutropenia and/or thrombocytopenia underwent endoscopy. Studies were included if endoscopic procedures were used as part of the evaluation of neutropenic and/or thrombocytopenic patients, yielding 13 studies. Two studies in which endoscopy was not a primary evaluation tool were excluded. Eleven relevant studies were identified by two independent reviewers on PubMed, Scopus, and Ovid databases. RESULTS: Most of the studies had high diagnostic yield with relatively low complication rates. Therapeutic endoscopic interventions were performed in more than half the studies, including high-risk procedures, such as sclerotherapy. Platelet transfusion was given if counts were less than 50000/mm3 in four studies and less than 10000/mm3 in one study. Other thrombocytopenic precautions included withholding of biopsy if platelet count was less than 30000/mm3 in one study and less than 20000/mm3 in another study. Two of the ten studies which examined thrombocytopenic patient populations reported bleeding complications related to endoscopy, none of which caused major morbidity or mortality. All febrile neutropenic patients received prophylactic broad-spectrum antibiotics in the studies reviewed. Regarding afebrile neutropenic patients, prophylactic antibiotics were given if absolute neutrophil count was less than 1000/mm3 in one study, if the patient was undergoing colonoscopy and had a high inflammatory condition without clear definition of significance in another study, and if the patient was in an aplastic phase in a third study. Endoscopy was also withheld in one study for severe pancytopenia. CONCLUSION: Endoscopy can be safely performed in patients with thrombocytopenia/neutropenia. Prophylactic platelet transfusion and/or antibiotic administration prior to endoscopy may be

  2. Asbestos and gastrointestinal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, R.W.; Foliart, D.E.; Wong, O.

    1985-07-01

    Exposure to asbestos is among several factors cited as possible causes of esophageal, gastric and colorectal cancer. More than 45 published studies have presented mortality data on asbestos-exposed workers. For each cohort, the authors listed the observed and expected rates of deaths from types of gastrointestinal cancer based on the latest published follow-up. Summary standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) were then derived. Finally, summary SMRs were calculated for total gastrointestinal tract cancer for three occupational groups: asbestos factory workers, insulators/shipyard workers and asbestos miners. Statistically significant elevations in summary SMRs were found for esophageal, stomach and total gastrointestinal tract cancer in all asbestos-exposed workers. Esophageal cancer summary SMR remained significantly elevated when data were reanalyzed to include only those cohorts with death certificate diagnoses for cause of observed deaths. However, summary SMRs were not statistically significant for stomach and total gastrointestinal tract cancer after reanalysis. Summary SMRs by occupational group showed a significant elevation for total gastrointestinal cancer in insulators/shipyard workers. The elevation was not significant after reanalysis. 59 references, 5 tables.

  3. Gastrointestinal Stent Update

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The use of self-expanding metallic stents in the upper gastrointestinal tract, placed under radiologic imaging or endoscopic guidance, is the current treatment of choice for the palliation of malignant gastrointestinal outlet obstructions. Advances in metallic stent design and delivery systems have progressed to the stage where this treatment is now considered a minimally invasive therapy. Metallic stent placement will broaden further into the field of nonsurgical therapy for the gastrointestinal tract. To date, metallic stents placed in the esophagus, gastric outlet, colorectum, and bile ducts are not intended to be curative, but rather to provide a palliative treatment for obstructions. The evolution of metallic stent technology will render such procedures not only palliative but also therapeutic, by enabling local drug delivery, and the use of biodegradable materials will reduce procedure-related complications. PMID:21103290

  4. Pediatric Gastrointestinal Sarcoidosis: Successful Treatment with Infliximab

    PubMed Central

    Alawdah, Laila; Nahari, Ahmad; Alshahrani, Dayel; Fagih, Musa; Ghazi, Shahid; Al-Hussaini, Abdulrahman

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal sarcoidosis is a rare disease with very limited data in children. Here we report the first pediatric case of successful treatment with infliximab. The first case was an 8-year-old Saudi girl who presented with fever, weight loss, and abdominal pain that was followed in a few months with hematemesis and development of hepatosplenomegaly. The second case was a 9-year-old Sudanese boy who manifested with vomiting, epigastric pain, and weight loss. On upper endoscopy, both cases demonstrated severe erosive nodular gastric mucosa. Gastric and esophageal biopsies had shown noncaseating granulomatous inflammation. The first case had histopathological evidence of granulomatous hepatitis, and both cases demonstrated lung nodularity on computed tomography chest. The boy had elevated angiotensin-converting enzyme level. Given the multisystem involvement with significant chest findings, tissue findings of granulomatous disease, and negative workup for other causes of granulomatous inflammation, both cases were diagnosed with active disseminated sarcoidosis, and treated with corticosteroids. The girl continued to be symptom-free for 4 years after tapering steroid therapy. The boy had relapses off steroids and the disease was brought into remission for 5 years off steroid therapy by infliximab. Pediatric GI sarcoidosis is a rare disease that exhibits heterogeneity in natural course. The chronic relapsing progressive form of the disease might benefit from infliximab therapy. PMID:27748327

  5. Management of early asymptomatic gastrointestinal stromal tumors of the stomach

    PubMed Central

    Scherübl, Hans; Faiss, Siegbert; Knoefel, Wolfram-Trudo; Wardelmann, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) are the most common mesenchymal tumors of the digestive tract. Approximately two thirds of clinically manifest tumors occur in the stomach, nearly one third in the small bowel, and the rest in the colorectal region with a few cases in the esophagus. GIST originate within the smooth muscle layer in the wall of the tubular gastrointestinal tract and grow mostly toward the serosa, far less often toward the mucosa. In the latter case, ulceration may develop and can cause gastrointestinal bleeding as the cardinal symptom. However, most GIST of the stomach are asymptomatic. They are increasingly detected incidentally as small intramural or submucosal tumors during endoscopy and particularly during endoscopic ultrasound. Epidemiological and molecular genetic findings suggest that early asymptomatic GIST of the stomach (< 1 cm) show self-limiting tumorigenesis. Thus, early (< 1 cm) asymptomatic gastric GIST (synonym: micro-GIST) are found in 20%-30% of the elderly. The mostly elderly people with early gastric GIST have an excellent GIST-specific prognosis. Patients with early GIST of the stomach can therefore be managed by endoscopic surveillance. PMID:25031785

  6. Diagnostic procedures for submucosal tumors in the gastrointestinal tract

    PubMed Central

    Ponsaing, Laura Graves; Kiss, Katalin; Loft, Annika; Jensen, Lise Ingemann; Hansen, Mark Berner

    2007-01-01

    This review is part one of three, which will present an update on diagnostic procedures for gastrointestinal (GI) submucosal tumors (SMTs). Part two identifies the classification and part three the therapeutic methods regarding GI SMTs. Submucosal tumors are typically asymptomatic and therefore encountered incidentally. Advances in diagnostic tools for gastrointestinal submucosal tumors have emerged over the past decade. The aim of this paper is to provide the readers with guidelines for the use of diagnostic procedures, when a submucosal tumor is suspected. Literature searches were performed to find information on diagnostics for gastrointestinal submucosal tumors. Based on the searches, the optimal diagnostic procedures and specific features of the submucosal tumors could be outlined. Standard endoscppy, capsule endoscopy and push-and-pull enteroscopy (PPE) together with barium contrast X-ray do not alone provide sufficient information, when examining submucosal tumors. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS), computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and fluorodeoxyglucose-labeled positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) are recommended as supplementary tools. PMID:17659668

  7. Effective treatment of gastrointestinal bleeding with thalidomide - Chances and limitations

    PubMed Central

    Bauditz, Juergen

    2016-01-01

    For more than 50 years bleeding from gastrointestinal angiodysplasias has been treated by hormonal therapy with estrogens and progesterons. After a randomized study finally demonstrated that hormones have no effect on bleeding events and transfusion requirements, therapy has switched to endoscopic coagulation. However, angiodysplasias tend to recur over months to years and endoscopy often has to be repeated for long time periods. Thalidomide, which caused severe deformities in newborn children in the 1960s, is now increasingly used after it was shown to suppress tumor necrosis factor alpha, inhibit angiogenesis and to be also effective for treatment of multiple myeloma. In 2011 thalidomide was proven to be highly effective for treatment of bleeding from gastrointestinal angiodysplasias in a randomized study. Further evidence by uncontrolled studies exists that thalidomide is also useful for treatment of bleeding in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia. In spite of this data, endoscopic therapy remains the treatment of choice in many hospitals, as thalidomide is still notorious for its teratogenicity. However, patients with gastrointestinal bleeding related to angiodysplasias are generally at an age in which women have no child-bearing potential. Teratogenicity is therefore no issue for these elderly patients. Other side-effects of thalidomide like neurotoxicity may limit treatment options but can be monitored safely. PMID:27003992

  8. Ectopic Pancreas Imitating Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor (GIST) In The Stomach.

    PubMed

    Zińczuk, Justyna; Bandurski, Roman; Pryczynicz, Anna; Konarzewska-Duchnowska, Emilia; Kemona, Andrzej; Kędra, Bogusław

    2015-05-01

    Ectopic pancreas is a rare congenital disorder defined as pancreatic tissue lacking vascular or anatomic communication with the normal body of the pancreas. Most cases of ectopic pancreas are asymptomatic, but it may become clinically evident depending on the size, location and the pathological changes similar to those observed in case of the normal pancreas. It is often an incidental finding and can be located at different sites in the gastrointestinal tract. The most common locations are: the stomach, duodenum or the proximal part of small intestine. The risk of malignancy, bleeding and occlusion are the most serious complications. Despite the development in diagnostics, it still remains a challenge for the clinician to differentiate it from neoplasm. In this report, we described a case of 28-years old woman who presented recurrent epigastric pain. The upper gastrointestinal endoscopy revealed gastrointestinal stromal tumor on the border of the body and antrum of the back wall of great curvature of the stomach. The histopathological examination after surgery showed heterotopic pancreatic tissue. Ectopic pancreas should be considered in the differential diagnosis of gastric mass lesions.

  9. The significance and work-up of minor gastrointestinal bleeding in hospitalized nursing home patients.

    PubMed Central

    Suatengco, R.; Posner, G. L.; Marsh, F.

    1995-01-01

    Twenty-seven consecutive admissions from nursing homes who underwent a gastrointestinal (GI) consult for coffee ground vomitus or occult GI bleeding to evaluate the outcome were reviewed retrospectively to determine whether a GI work-up was or would have been useful. There were 15 deaths, all associated with severe infection or respiratory failure. Endoscopy, barium studies, and a history of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug use or peptic ulcer disease did not affect the management or outcome. No patient developed major GI bleeding. When nursing home patients present with coffee ground vomitus or newly found occult blood in the stool, efforts should be made to identify and vigorously treat any acute underlying infection or respiratory failure. Endoscopy is not helpful in this clinical situation. Both the primary care physician and the GI consultant should be aware of these associations and should focus on the underlying etiology. PMID:7473849

  10. Bleeding detection in wireless capsule endoscopy images based on color invariants and spatial pyramids using support vector machines.

    PubMed

    Lv, Guolan; Yan, Guozheng; Wang, Zhiwu

    2011-01-01

    Wireless capsule endoscopy (WCE) is a revolutionary imaging technique that enables detailed inspection of the interior of the whole gastrointestinal tract in a non-invasive way. However, viewing WCE videos is a very time-consuming, and labor intensive task for physicians. In this paper, we propose an automatic method for bleeding detection in WCE images. A novel series of descriptors which combine color and spatial information is designed in a way that local and global features are also incorporated together. And a kernel based classification method using histogram intersection or chi-square is deployed to verify the performance of the proposed descriptors. Experiments demonstrate that the proposed kernel based scheme is very effective in detecting bleeding patterns of WCE images.

  11. Duodenum identification mechanism for capsule endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Woo, Sang Hyo; Mohy-Ud-Din, Zia; Cho, Jin Ho

    2011-04-01

    The aim of this study is to implement a duodenum identification mechanism for capsule endoscopes because commercially available capsule endoscopes sometimes present a false negative diagnosis of the duodenum. One reason for the false negative diagnosis is that the duodenum is the fastest moving part within the gastrointestinal tract and the current frame rate of the capsule is not fast enough. When the capsule can automatically identify that it is in the duodenum, the frame rate of the capsule can be temporarily increased to reduce the possibility of a false negative diagnosis. This study proposes a mechanism to identify the duodenum using capacitive proximity sensors that can distinguish the surrounding tissue and transmit data using RF communication. The implemented capsule (D11 mm × L22 mm) was smaller than the commercially available capsule endoscopes, and power consumption was as low as 0.642 mW. Preexperiments were conducted to select an appropriate electrode width in order to increase the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and in vitro experiments were conducted to verify whether the implemented capsule could identify the duodenum within 3 s. The experiment showed that the identification rate of duodenum was 93% when the velocity of the capsule was less than 1 cm/s.

  12. Perioperative endoscopy of the whole small bowel in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Lescut, D; Vanco, D; Bonnière, P; Lecomte-Houcke, M; Quandalle, P; Wurtz, A; Colombel, J F; Delmotte, J S; Paris, J C; Cortot, A

    1993-01-01

    The aim of this study was to search for small bowel lesions by means of a perioperative endoscopy in 20 patients operated on for Crohn's disease. Seven women and 13 men (mean age 29 years) had a total retrograde exploration to the angle of Treitz during an ileocolectomy (16 of 20 patients) or a colonic or ileal resection (four of 20 patients). Endoscopic exploration was completed, through an enterotomy, from the surgical area to the angle of Treitz. Periendoscopic biopsy samples were taken on macroscopic lesions and every 20 cm systematically. In 13 of 20 cases, various lesions scattered over the whole small intestine were found. These were aphthoid ulcerations (10 patients), superficial ulcerations (seven patients), mucosal oedema (three patients), non-ulcerative stenosis (three patients), erythema (two patients), pseudopolyps (two patients), deep ulcerations (two patients), and ulcerative stenosis (one patient). In seven patients none of the lesions detected at perioperative endoscopy had been recognised by preoperative evaluation or surgical inspection of the serosal surface. A typical granuloma was found at biopsy of lesions identified by endoscopy in three cases and at biopsy of an apparently healthy area in one case. Thus 65% of patients operated on for Crohn's disease had lesions of the small intestine detected by endoscopy, which were unrecognised before surgery in more than half of the cases. PMID:8504965

  13. A Quantitative Analysis of Published Skull Base Endoscopy Literature.

    PubMed

    Hardesty, Douglas A; Ponce, Francisco A; Little, Andrew S; Nakaji, Peter

    2016-02-01

    Objectives Skull base endoscopy allows for minimal access approaches to the sinonasal contents and cranial base. Advances in endoscopic technique and applications have been published rapidly in recent decades. Setting We utilized an Internet-based scholarly database (Web of Science, Thomson Reuters) to query broad-based phrases regarding skull base endoscopy literature. Participants All skull base endoscopy publications. Main Outcome Measures Standard bibliometrics outcomes. Results We identified 4,082 relevant skull base endoscopy English-language articles published between 1973 and 2014. The 50 top-cited publications (n = 51, due to articles with equal citation counts) ranged in citation count from 397 to 88. Most of the articles were clinical case series or technique descriptions. Most (96% [49/51])were published in journals specific to either neurosurgery or otolaryngology. Conclusions A relatively small number of institutions and individuals have published a large amount of the literature. Most of the publications consisted of case series and technical advances, with a lack of randomized trials.

  14. A Quantitative Analysis of Published Skull Base Endoscopy Literature

    PubMed Central

    Hardesty, Douglas A.; Ponce, Francisco A.; Little, Andrew S.; Nakaji, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Skull base endoscopy allows for minimal access approaches to the sinonasal contents and cranial base. Advances in endoscopic technique and applications have been published rapidly in recent decades. Setting We utilized an Internet-based scholarly database (Web of Science, Thomson Reuters) to query broad-based phrases regarding skull base endoscopy literature. Participants All skull base endoscopy publications. Main Outcome Measures Standard bibliometrics outcomes. Results We identified 4,082 relevant skull base endoscopy English-language articles published between 1973 and 2014. The 50 top-cited publications (n = 51, due to articles with equal citation counts) ranged in citation count from 397 to 88. Most of the articles were clinical case series or technique descriptions. Most (96% [49/51])were published in journals specific to either neurosurgery or otolaryngology. Conclusions A relatively small number of institutions and individuals have published a large amount of the literature. Most of the publications consisted of case series and technical advances, with a lack of randomized trials. PMID:26949585

  15. [Endoscopic examination including magnifying endoscopy for diagnosis of GERD].

    PubMed

    Kato, Mototsugu; Ono, Shoko; Nakagawa, Manabu; Shimizu, Yuichi; Asaka, Masahiro

    2007-05-01

    Symptoms of heartburn and regurgitation are the most important for diagnosis of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in the clinical field. Endoscopic examination is also widely used modality for Los Angeles classification of GERD according to endoscopic severity of esophageal mucosal breaks. However, about half of GERD patients reveal no abnormality under conventional endoscopy. These endoscopic negative GERD is called as non-erosive reflux disease (NERD). There is the possibility to underestimate a minute mucosal change of GERD by conventional endoscopy that has the limitation of visual ability. Magnifying endoscopic examination is able to get clear visualization of intrapapillary capillary loops(IPCL), which are usually shown as dot-like structures in esophageal mucosa by a conventional endoscopy. The changing of IPCLs is associated with inflammation and neoplasia of esophagus. Minute change of IPCLs such as a dilation and elongation with regular intervals were reported to be suggestive of inflammatory change in esophagus. Magnifying endoscopic observation of IPCLs is useful for diagnosis of NERD which cannot be visualized by conventional endoscopy.

  16. Single Cavernous Hemangioma of the Small Bowel Diagnosed by Using Capsule Endoscopy in a Child with Chronic Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Soo Jin; Hwang, Geol; Kang, Hyun Sik; Song, Hyun Joo; Chang, Weon Young; Maeng, Young Hee

    2015-01-01

    Cavernous hemangiomas of the gastrointestinal tract are extremely rare. In particular, the diagnosis of small bowel hemangiomas is very difficult in children. A 13-year-old boy presented at the outpatient clinic with dizziness and fatigue. The patient was previously diagnosed with iron-deficiency anemia at 3 years of age and had been treated with iron supplements continuously and pure red cell transfusion intermittently. Laboratory tests indicated that the patient currently had iron-deficiency anemia. There was no evidence of gross bleeding, such as hematemesis or bloody stool. Laboratory findings indicated no bleeding tendency. Gastroduodenoscopy and colonoscopy results were negative. To obtain a definitive diagnosis, the patient underwent capsule endoscopy. A purplish stalked mass was found in the jejunum, and the mass was excised successfully. We report of a 13-year-old boy who presented with severe and recurrent iron-deficiency anemia caused by a cavernous hemangioma in the small bowel without symptoms of gastrointestinal bleeding. PMID:26240811

  17. Upper airway tract and upper gastrointestinal tract involvement in patients with pemphigus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Su, Ozlem; Onsun, Nahide; Meric Teker, Aysenur; Cinkaya, Ayse; Yasemin Korkut, Arzu; Seremet, Sila; Davutoglu, Can; Demirkesen, Cuyan

    2010-01-01

    Pemphigus vulgaris (PV) is an autoimmune disease involving the skin and mucous membranes. The frequency of upper airway tract (UAT) and upper gastrointestinal tract (UGIT) involvement in PV is not clearly known. Our aim was to determine the incidence of UAT and UGIT involvement in patients with PV. Thirty-seven patients who were diagnosed with PV and treated between March 2008 and April 2009 at the Dermatology Department of the Vakif Gureba Teaching and Research Hospital were included. All patients were evaluated for UAT manifestations by endoscopic examination, and 22 of 37 patients were investigated for UGIT involvement by gastrointestinal endoscopy. Mucosal biopsies were obtained by UGIT endoscopy for direct immunofluorescence (DIF) examination, and a histopathological examination was conducted in patients with active UGIT mucosal lesions. Thirty-five of 37 patients (94.6%) had active pharyngeal, laryngeal, or nasal PV lesions on endoscopic evaluation. Oral symptoms (83.8%) and active oral PV lesions were the most frequent findings (100%). Pharyngeal lesions (64.9%) were the most commonly present lesions on UAT examination. The frequency for laryngeal and nasal lesions was 51.4% and 21.6%, respectively. Five of 22 patients (22.7%) presented with active laryngeal and esophageal lesions. Twenty-one of 22 (95.4%) patients had positive DIF results. We believe that UAT and UGIT endoscopies are useful and necessary diagnostic methods in patients with PV with or without UAT and UGIT symptoms. UAT and UGIT endoscopies should be performed as standard diagnostic procedures in all patients with PV.

  18. Treatment Option Overview (Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumors)

    MedlinePlus

    ... carcinoid tumor is cancer that forms in the lining of the gastrointestinal tract. The gastrointestinal (GI) tract ... Rectum . Enlarge Gastrointestinal carcinoid tumors form in the lining of the gastrointestinal tract, most often in the ...

  19. Treatment Options for Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... carcinoid tumor is cancer that forms in the lining of the gastrointestinal tract. The gastrointestinal (GI) tract ... Rectum . Enlarge Gastrointestinal carcinoid tumors form in the lining of the gastrointestinal tract, most often in the ...

  20. General Information about Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... carcinoid tumor is cancer that forms in the lining of the gastrointestinal tract. The gastrointestinal (GI) tract ... Rectum . Enlarge Gastrointestinal carcinoid tumors form in the lining of the gastrointestinal tract, most often in the ...

  1. Apollo gastrointestinal analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichols, B. L.; Huang, C. T. L.

    1975-01-01

    Fecal bile acid patterns for the Apollo 17 flight were studied to determine the cause of diarrhea on the mission. The fecal sterol analysis gave no indication of an infectious diarrhea, or specific, or nonspecific etiology occurring during the entire flight. It is assumed that the gastrointestinal problems encountered are the consequences of altered physiology, perhaps secondary to physical or emotional stress of flight.

  2. Pediatric functional gastrointestinal disorders

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Functional gastrointestinal disorders continue to be a prevalent set of conditions faced by the healthcare team and have a significant emotional and economic impact. In this review, the authors highlight some of the common functional disorders seen in pediatric patients (functional dyspepsia, irrita...

  3. Gastrointestinal Bleeding in Athletes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eichner, Edward R.

    1989-01-01

    Describes the scope and importance of gastrointestinal bleeding in runners and other athletes, discussing causes, sites, and implications of exercise-related bleeding. Practical tips to mitigate the problem, potentially more troublesome in women because of lower iron stores, are presented (e.g., gradual conditioning and avoidance of prerace…

  4. Upper gastrointestinal bleeding: gallstone-induced auto-sphincterotomy

    PubMed Central

    Kalipershad, Sujala; Chung, Kin Tong; Jehangir, Ernest

    2012-01-01

    A 67-year-old gentleman with no significant medical history of note presented with sudden onset of epigastric pain, coffee ground vomiting and passing black tarry stool. A series of investigations including blood tests, ultrasound scan, CT abdomen and pelvis with contrast and endoscopy failed to reveal any site of active bleeding. The mystery remained and the patient continued to have upper gastrointestinal bleeding. A second CT abdomen and pelvis with contrast was carried out and showed evidence of contrast extravasation into the duodenum (figure 3). An exploratory laparotomy showed no obvious site of haemorrhage and a loop jejunostomy was performed. The diagnosis of gallstone-induced auto-sphincterotomy was only made, using gastroscope via jejunostomy, when a big gallstone was found in the third part of the duodenum and the papilla was ruptured (figure 5). PMID:22914239

  5. Gastrointestinal pathology in the University Teaching Hospital, Lusaka, Zambia: review of endoscopic and pathology records.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Paul; Katema, Mwamba; Amadi, Beatrice; Zimba, Lameck; Aparicio, Sylvia; Mudenda, Victor; Baboo, K Sridutt; Zulu, Isaac

    2008-02-01

    There is a shortage of information on the epidemiology of digestive disease in developing countries. In the belief that such information will inform public health priorities and epidemiological comparisons between different geographical regions, we analysed 2132 diagnostic upper gastrointestinal endoscopy records from 1999 to 2005 in the University Teaching Hospital, Lusaka, Zambia. In order to clarify unexpected impressions about the age distribution of cancers, a retrospective analysis of pathology records was also undertaken. No abnormality was found in 31% of procedures, and in 42% of procedures in children. In patients with gastrointestinal haemorrhage, the common findings were oesophageal varices (26%), duodenal ulcer (17%) and gastric ulcer (12%). Gastrointestinal malignancy was found in 8.8% of all diagnostic procedures, in descending order of frequency: gastric adenocarcinoma, oesophageal squamous carcinoma, Kaposi's sarcoma, oesophageal adenocarcinoma. Data from endoscopy records and pathology records strongly suggest that the incidence in adults under the age of 45 years is higher than in the USA or UK, and pathology records suggest that this effect is particularly marked for colorectal carcinoma.

  6. What is the impact of capsule endoscopy in the long term period?

    PubMed Central

    Ormeci, Asli; Akyuz, Filiz; Baran, Bulent; Gokturk, Suut; Ormeci, Tugrul; Pinarbasi, Binnur; Soyer, Ozlem Mutluay; Evirgen, Sami; Akyuz, Umit; Karaca, Cetin; Demir, Kadir; Kaymakoglu, Sabahattin; Besisik, Fatih

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To assess the clinical impact of capsule endoscopy (CE) in the long-term follow-up period in patients with obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (OGIB). METHODS: One hundred and forty-one patients who applied CE for OGIB between 2009 and 2012 were retrospectively analyzed, and this cohort was then questioned prospectively. Demographic data of the patients were determined via the presence of comorbid diseases, use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs anticoagulant-antiaggregant agents, previous diagnostic tests for bleeding episodes, CE findings, laboratory tests and outcomes. RESULTS: CE was performed on 141 patients because of OGIB. The capsule was retained in the upper gastrointestinal (GI) system in two of the patients, thus video monitoring was not achieved. There were 139 patients [62% male, median age: 72 years (range: 13-93 years) and a median follow-up duration: 32 mo (range: 6-82 mo)]. The overall diagnostic yield of CE was 84.9%. Rebleeding was determined in 40.3% (56/139) of the patients. The rebleeding rates of patients with positive and negative capsule results at the end of the follow-up were 46.6% (55/118) and 4.8% (1/21), respectively. In the multivariate analysis, usage of NSAIDs, anticoagulant-antiaggregant therapies (OR = 5.8; 95%CI: 1.86-18.27) and vascular ectasia (OR = 6.02; 95%CI: 2.568-14.146) in CE were detected as independent predictors of rebleeding. In the univariate analysis, advanced age, comorbidity, and overt bleeding were detected as predictors of rebleeding. CONCLUSION: CE is a reliable method in the diagnosis of obscure GI bleeding. Negative CE correlated with a significantly lower rebleeding risk in the long-term follow-up period. PMID:27076873

  7. Simultaneous functional photoacoustic and ultrasonic endoscopy of internal organs in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Joon-Mo; Favazza, Christopher; Chen, Ruimin; Yao, Junjie; Cai, Xin; Maslov, Konstantin; Zhou, Qifa; Shung, K. Kirk; Wang, Lihong V.

    2013-01-01

    Presently, clinicians routinely apply ultrasound endoscopy in a variety of interventional procedures which provide treatment solutions for diseased organs. Ultrasound endoscopy not only produces high resolution images, it is also safe for clinical use and broadly applicable. However, for soft tissue imaging, its mechanical wave-based image contrast fundamentally limits its ability to provide physiologically-specific functional information. By contrast, photoacoustic endoscopy possesses a unique combination of functional optical contrast and high spatial resolution at clinically-relevant depths, ideal for soft tissue imaging. With these attributes, photoacoustic endoscopy can overcome the current limitations of ultrasound endoscopy. Moreover, the benefits of photoacoustic imaging do not come at the expense of existing ultrasound functions; photoacoustic endoscopy systems are inherently compatible with ultrasound imaging, enabling multi-modality imaging with complementary contrast. Here, we present simultaneous photoacoustic and ultrasonic dual-mode endoscopy and demonstrate its ability to image internal organs in vivo, illustrating its potential clinical application. PMID:22797808

  8. Video summarization based tele-endoscopy: a service to efficiently manage visual data generated during wireless capsule endoscopy procedure.

    PubMed

    Mehmood, Irfan; Sajjad, Muhammad; Baik, Sung Wook

    2014-09-01

    Wireless capsule endoscopy (WCE) has great advantages over traditional endoscopy because it is portable and easy to use. More importantly, WCE combined with mobile computing ensures rapid transmission of diagnostic data to hospitals and enables off-site senior gastroenterologists to offer timely decision making support. However, during this WCE process, video data are produced in huge amounts, but only a limited amount of data is actually useful for diagnosis. The sharing and analysis of this video data becomes a challenging task due the constraints such as limited memory, energy, and communication capability. In order to facilitate efficient WCE data collection and browsing tasks, we present a video summarization-based tele-endoscopy service that estimates the semantically relevant video frames from the perspective of gastroenterologists. For this purpose, image moments, curvature, and multi-scale contrast are computed and are fused to obtain the saliency map of each frame. This saliency map is used to select keyframes. The proposed tele-endoscopy service selects keyframes based on their relevance to the disease diagnosis. This ensures the sending of diagnostically relevant frames to the gastroenterologist instead of sending all the data, thus saving transmission costs and bandwidth. The proposed framework also saves storage costs as well as the precious time of doctors in browsing patient's information. The qualitative and quantitative results are encouraging and show that the proposed service provides video keyframes to the gastroenterologists without discarding important information.

  9. Fibre-Optic Endoscopy In Clinical Practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jourdan, Martin H.

    1985-08-01

    Man's curiosity has led him to seek methods of investigating the inner workings of the human body, but it is only recently that it has become possible to properly visualise the inner cavities of the human frame. Physiologists such as William Beaumont have occasionally had the opportunity to see the function of the gastrointestinal tract, in this case the gastric fistula of Alexis St Martin who was injured following an accidental firearm explosion. Rigid instruments, down which lights are shone, can be used to visualise the respiratory passages, the gullet, the rectum, and the bladder, and in the past artists were employed to record what was seen. Such instruments are still in use, although light from a powerful source is now conducted down the instrument using a fibreoptic bundle. The first semi-flexible instrument which could be inserted into the stomach and used to visualise its walls was developed by Schindler and Wolf in Germany in 1932. The optics consisted of a series of convex-lenses, transmitting an image back to the eye, but again the view obtained was limited and since its optics were side viewing, the gullet could not be viewed. The advent of fibre-optics revolutionised the situation, and the first fibrescope conducting the image up a fibreoptic bundle was a side-viewing instrument, developed by Hirschowitz, Curtiss, Peters and Pollard by 1958, and used for viewing the stomach. Since those pioneering days, the development of fibrescopes for viewing every potential cavity in the human body has proceeded in leaps and bounds.

  10. Feasibility of full-spectrum endoscopy: Korea’s first full-spectrum endoscopy colonoscopic trial

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jeong-Yeop; Cho, Youn Hee; Kim, Mi A; Kim, Jeong-Ae; Lee, Chun Tek; Lee, Moon Sung

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the full-spectrum endoscopy (FUSE) colonoscopy system as the first report on the utility thereof in a Korean population. METHODS: We explored the efficacy of the FUSE colonoscopy in a retrospective, single-center feasibility study performed between February 1 and July 20, 2015. A total of 262 subjects (age range: 22-80) underwent the FUSE colonoscopy for colorectal cancer screening, polyp surveillance, or diagnostic evaluation. The cecal intubation success rate, the polyp detection rate (PDR), the adenoma detection rate (ADR), and the diverticulum detection rate (DDR), were calculated. Also, the success rates of therapeutic interventions were evaluated with biopsy confirmation. RESULTS: All patients completed the study and the success rates of cecal and terminal ileal intubation were 100% with the FUSE colonoscope; we found 313 polyps in 142 patients and 173 adenomas in 95. The overall PDR, ADR and DDR were 54.2%, 36.3%, and 25.2%, respectively, and were higher in males, and increased with age. The endoscopists and nurses involved considered that the full-spectrum colonoscope improved navigation and orientation within the colon. No colonoscopy was aborted because of colonoscope malfunction. CONCLUSION: The FUSE colonoscopy yielded a higher PDR, ADR, DDR than did traditional colonoscopy, without therapeutic failure or complications, showing feasible, effective, and safe in this first Korean trial. PMID:26937150

  11. Safety and Efficacy of Small Bowel Examination by Capsule Endoscopy for Patients before Liver Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Tetsuya, Yasunaka; Yoshiyasu, Kono; Kou, Miura; Toshihiro, Inokuchi; Yoshiro, Kawahara; Yuzo, Umeda; Takahito, Yagi; Hiroyuki, Okada

    2017-01-01

    Background and Aims. Gastrointestinal surveillance is a requirement prior to liver transplantation (LT), but small intestine examination is not generally undertaken. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of capsule endoscopy (CE) for patients with end-stage liver disease. Methods. 31 patients who needed LT were enrolled, and 139 patients who underwent CE over the same period of time acted as controls. Results. Frequency of successful achievement of evaluation of the full length of the small bowel, the mean gastric transit time, and the mean small bowel transit time were not significantly different between the two groups. Abnormalities in the small bowel were found in 26 patients. Comparative analysis revealed that history of EV rupture, history of EV treatment, red color sign of EV, and presence of PHG or HCC were significantly associated with patients with >2 two such findings (high score group). Conclusions. Small bowel examination by CE in patients before liver transplantation could be performed safely and is justified by the high rate of abnormal lesions detected particularly in patients with history of EV therapy or bleeding, red color sign, and presence of PHG or HCC. This study was registered in the UMIN Clinical Trial Registry (UMIN 000008672). PMID:28168199

  12. A clinically viable capsule endoscopy video analysis platform for automatic bleeding detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Steven; Jiao, Heng; Xie, Jean; Mui, Peter; Leighton, Jonathan A.; Pasha, Shabana; Rentz, Lauri; Abedi, Mahmood

    2013-02-01

    In this paper, we present a novel and clinically valuable software platform for automatic bleeding detection on gastrointestinal (GI) tract from Capsule Endoscopy (CE) videos. Typical CE videos for GI tract run about 8 hours and are manually reviewed by physicians to locate diseases such as bleedings and polyps. As a result, the process is time consuming and is prone to disease miss-finding. While researchers have made efforts to automate this process, however, no clinically acceptable software is available on the marketplace today. Working with our collaborators, we have developed a clinically viable software platform called GISentinel for fully automated GI tract bleeding detection and classification. Major functional modules of the SW include: the innovative graph based NCut segmentation algorithm, the unique feature selection and validation method (e.g. illumination invariant features, color independent features, and symmetrical texture features), and the cascade SVM classification for handling various GI tract scenes (e.g. normal tissue, food particles, bubbles, fluid, and specular reflection). Initial evaluation results on the SW have shown zero bleeding instance miss-finding rate and 4.03% false alarm rate. This work is part of our innovative 2D/3D based GI tract disease detection software platform. While the overall SW framework is designed for intelligent finding and classification of major GI tract diseases such as bleeding, ulcer, and polyp from the CE videos, this paper will focus on the automatic bleeding detection functional module.

  13. Comparison of Capsule Endoscopy Findings to Subsequent Double Balloon Enteroscopy: A Dual Center Experience

    PubMed Central

    Kalra, Amandeep S.; Walker, Andrew J.; Benson, Mark E.; Soni, Anurag; Guda, Nalini M.; Misha, Mehak; Gopal, Deepak V.

    2015-01-01

    Background. There has been a growing use of both capsule endoscopy (CE) and double balloon enteroscopy (DBE) to diagnose and treat patients with obscure gastrointestinal blood loss and suspected small bowel pathology. Aim. To compare and correlate sequential CE and DBE findings in a large series of patients at two tertiary level hospitals in Wisconsin. Methods. An IRB approved retrospective study of patients who underwent sequential CE and DBE, at two separate tertiary care academic centers from May 2007 to December 2011, was performed. Results. 116 patients were included in the study. The mean age ± SD was 66.6 ± 13.2 years. There were 56% males and 43.9% females. Measure of agreement between prior capsule and DBE findings was performed using kappa statistics, which gave kappa value of 0.396 with P < 0.001. Also contingency coefficient was calculated and was found to be 0.732 (P < 0.001). Conclusions. Our study showed good overall agreement between DBE and CE. Findings of angioectasia had maximum agreement of 69%. PMID:26420979

  14. Semantic and topological classification of images in magnetically guided capsule endoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mewes, P. W.; Rennert, P.; Juloski, A. L.; Lalande, A.; Angelopoulou, E.; Kuth, R.; Hornegger, J.

    2012-03-01

    Magnetically-guided capsule endoscopy (MGCE) is a nascent technology with the goal to allow the steering of a capsule endoscope inside a water filled stomach through an external magnetic field. We developed a classification cascade for MGCE images with groups images in semantic and topological categories. Results can be used in a post-procedure review or as a starting point for algorithms classifying pathologies. The first semantic classification step discards over-/under-exposed images as well as images with a large amount of debris. The second topological classification step groups images with respect to their position in the upper gastrointestinal tract (mouth, esophagus, stomach, duodenum). In the third stage two parallel classifications steps distinguish topologically different regions inside the stomach (cardia, fundus, pylorus, antrum, peristaltic view). For image classification, global image features and local texture features were applied and their performance was evaluated. We show that the third classification step can be improved by a bubble and debris segmentation because it limits feature extraction to discriminative areas only. We also investigated the impact of segmenting intestinal folds on the identification of different semantic camera positions. The results of classifications with a support-vector-machine show the significance of color histogram features for the classification of corrupted images (97%). Features extracted from intestinal fold segmentation lead only to a minor improvement (3%) in discriminating different camera positions.

  15. A video wireless capsule endoscopy system powered wirelessly: design, analysis and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Guobing; Xin, Wenhui; Yan, Guozheng; Chen, Jiaoliao

    2011-06-01

    Wireless capsule endoscopy (WCE), as a relatively new technology, has brought about a revolution in the diagnosis of gastrointestinal (GI) tract diseases. However, the existing WCE systems are not widely applied in clinic because of the low frame rate and low image resolution. A video WCE system based on a wireless power supply is developed in this paper. This WCE system consists of a video capsule endoscope (CE), a wireless power transmission device, a receiving box and an image processing station. Powered wirelessly, the video CE has the abilities of imaging the GI tract and transmitting the images wirelessly at a frame rate of 30 frames per second (f/s). A mathematical prototype was built to analyze the power transmission system, and some experiments were performed to test the capability of energy transferring. The results showed that the wireless electric power supply system had the ability to transfer more than 136 mW power, which was enough for the working of a video CE. In in vitro experiments, the video CE produced clear images of the small intestine of a pig with the resolution of 320 × 240, and transmitted NTSC format video outside the body. Because of the wireless power supply, the video WCE system with high frame rate and high resolution becomes feasible, and provides a novel solution for the diagnosis of the GI tract in clinic.

  16. GISentinel: a software platform for automatic ulcer detection on capsule endoscopy videos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Steven; Jiao, Heng; Meng, Fan; Leighton, Jonathon A.; Shabana, Pasha; Rentz, Lauri

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, we present a novel and clinically valuable software platform for automatic ulcer detection on gastrointestinal (GI) tract from Capsule Endoscopy (CE) videos. Typical CE videos take about 8 hours. They have to be reviewed manually by physicians to detect and locate diseases such as ulcers and bleedings. The process is time consuming. Moreover, because of the long-time manual review, it is easy to lead to miss-finding. Working with our collaborators, we were focusing on developing a software platform called GISentinel, which can fully automated GI tract ulcer detection and classification. This software includes 3 parts: the frequency based Log-Gabor filter regions of interest (ROI) extraction, the unique feature selection and validation method (e.g. illumination invariant feature, color independent features, and symmetrical texture features), and the cascade SVM classification for handling "ulcer vs. non-ulcer" cases. After the experiments, this SW gave descent results. In frame-wise, the ulcer detection rate is 69.65% (319/458). In instance-wise, the ulcer detection rate is 82.35%(28/34).The false alarm rate is 16.43% (34/207). This work is a part of our innovative 2D/3D based GI tract disease detection software platform. The final goal of this SW is to find and classification of major GI tract diseases intelligently, such as bleeding, ulcer, and polyp from the CE videos. This paper will mainly describe the automatic ulcer detection functional module.

  17. Investigation of Small Bowel Abnormalities in HIV-Infected Patients Using Capsule Endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Sakai, Eiji; Higurashi, Takuma; Ohkubo, Hidenori; Hosono, Kuhihiro; Ueda, Atsuhisa

    2017-01-01

    HIV infection is reportedly associated with an increased permeability of the intestinal epithelium and can cause HIV enteropathy, which occurs independently of opportunistic infections. However, the characteristics of small bowel abnormalities attributable to HIV infection are rarely investigated. In the present study, we assessed the intestinal mucosal changes found in HIV-infected patients and compared them with the mucosa of healthy control subjects using capsule endoscopy (CE). Three of the 27 HIV-infected patients harbored gastrointestinal opportunistic infections and were thus excluded from subsequent analyses. The endoscopic findings of CE in HIV-infected patients were significantly higher than those in control subjects (55% versus 10%, P = 0.002); however, most lesions, such as red spots or tiny erosions, were unlikely to cause abdominal symptoms. After validating the efficacy of CE for the diagnosis of villous atrophy, we found that the prevalence of villous atrophy was 54% (13/24) among HIV-infected patients. Interestingly, villous atrophy persisted in patients receiving long-term antiretroviral therapy, though most of them exhibited reconstituted peripheral blood CD4+ T cells. Although we could not draw any conclusions regarding the development of small bowel abnormalities in HIV-infected patients, our results may provide some insight regarding the pathogenesis of HIV enteropathy.

  18. Emerging role of fecal microbiota therapy in the treatment of gastrointestinal and extra-gastrointestinal diseases.

    PubMed

    Konturek, P C; Haziri, D; Brzozowski, T; Hess, T; Heyman, S; Kwiecien, S; Konturek, S J; Koziel, J

    2015-08-01

    In the recent decade our understanding of the role of the human gut microbiome has been revolutionized by advances in development of molecular methods. Approximately, up to 100 trillion (10(14)) microorganisms per human body colonize the intestinal tract making an additional acquired organ that provides many vital functions to the host. A healthy gut microbiome can be defined by the presence of the various classes of microbes that enhance metabolism, resistance to infection and inflammation, prevention against cancer and autoimmunity and that positively influence so called braingut axis. Diet represents one of the most important driving forces that besides environmental and genetic factors, can define and influence the microbial composition of the gut. Aging process due to different changes in gut physiology (i.e. gastric hypochlorhydria, motility disorders, use of drugs, degenerative changes in enteric nervous system) has a profound effect on the composition, diversity and functional features of gut microbiota. A perturbed aged gut microbiome has been associated with the increasing number of gastrointestinal (e.g. Clostridium difficile infection - CDI) and non-gastrointestinal diseases (metabolic syndrome, diabetes mellitus, fatty liver disease, atherosclerosis etc.). Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) is a highly effective method in the treatment of refractory CDI. FMT is the term used when stool is taken from a healthy individual and instilled during endoscopy (colonoscopy or enteroscopy) into a gut of the sick person to cure certain disease. FMT represents an effective therapy in patient with recurrent CDI and the effectiveness of FMT in the prevention of CDI recurrence had reached approx. 90%. There is also an increasing evidence that the manipulation of gut microbiota by FMT represents a promising therapeutic method in patients with inflammatory bowel disease and irritable bowel syndrome. There is also an increased interest in the role of FMT for the

  19. Gastrointestinal parasite infestation.

    PubMed

    Abd El Bagi, Mohamed E; Sammak, Bassam M; Mohamed, Abdulrahman E; Al Karawi, Mohamed A; Al Shahed, Mona; Al Thagafi, Mohamed A

    2004-03-01

    Twenty-five percent of the world's population could be suffering parasitic infestation. Highest prevalence is in underdeveloped agricultural and rural areas in the tropical and subtropical regions. In some areas incidence may reach 90% of the population. In contrast, some major economic projects intended to promote local development have, paradoxically, caused parasitic proliferation, e.g. bilharziasis in Egypt and Sudan and Chagas disease in Brazil. The commonest cosmopolitan gastrointestinal parasite is Entamoeba histolytica. Some intestinal parasite are endemic in temperate climates, e.g. Entrobius vermicularis. The AIDS epidemic has increased the prevalence and severity of parasitic disease, particularly Strongyloides stercolaris. Tropical parasites are seen in Western people who travel to tropical countries. Radiology has acquired a major role in diagnosis and management of gastrointestinal parasite infestations and their complications.

  20. [Microbiota and gastrointestinal diseases].

    PubMed

    Polanco Allué, I

    2015-12-01

    The bacterial colonisation is established immediately after birth, through direct contact with maternal microbiota, and may be influenced during lactation. There is emerging evidence indicating that quantitative and qualitative changes on gut microbiota contribute to alterations in the mucosal activation of the immune system, leading to intra- or extra-intestinal diseases. A balance between pathogenic and beneficial microbiota throughout childhood and adolescence is important to gastrointestinal health, including protection against pathogens, inhibition of pathogens, nutrient processing (synthesis of vitamin K), stimulation of angiogenesis, and regulation of host fat storage. Probiotics can promote an intentional modulation of intestinal microbiota favouring the health of the host. A review is presented on the modulation of intestinal microbiota on prevention, and adjuvant treatment of some paediatric gastrointestinal diseases.

  1. Isolated Splenic Vein Thrombosis: 8-Year-Old Boy with Massive Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding and Hypersplenism.

    PubMed

    Kiani, Mohammad Ali; Forouzan, Arash; Masoumi, Kambiz; Mazdaee, Behnaz; Bahadoram, Mohammad; Kianifar, Hamid Reza; Ravari, Hassan

    2015-01-01

    We present an 8-year-old boy who was referred to our center with the complaint of upper gastrointestinal bleeding and was diagnosed with hypersplenism and progressive esophageal varices. Performing a computerized tomography (CT) scan, we discovered a suspicious finding in the venography phase in favor of thrombosis in the splenic vein. Once complementary examinations were done and due to recurrent bleeding and band ligation failure, the patient underwent splenectomy. And during the one-year follow-up obvious improvement of the esophageal varices was observed in endoscopy.

  2. Gangliocytic paraganglioma, a rare cause of upper gastrointestinal bleeding: Endoscopic ultrasound findings presented

    SciTech Connect

    Smithline, A.E.; Hawes, R.H.; Kopecky, K.K.; Cummings, O.W.; Kumar, S. )

    1993-01-01

    Gangliocytic paraganglioma (GP) is an uncommon benign neurogenic tumor of the digestive tract that is usually located in the descending duodenum. Patients with GP usually present with upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage, which reflects the tendency of the tumor to ulcerate the mucosa. The authors report a patient in whom the tumor was overlooked on routine radiologic examinations and initial endoscopy. It was discovered in the distal transverse duodenum at small bowel enteroscopy. The findings of endoscopic ultrasonography are correlated with radiographic and histologic examination. 10 refs.

  3. Splenic Pseudoaneursym as the Cause of Recurrent Gastrointestinal Bleeding in a Woman With Diffuse Scleroderma.

    PubMed

    Hartman, Joshua; Protano, Marion-Anna; Jaffin, Barry

    2015-01-01

    A 67-year-old woman with a 15-year history of intestinal scleroderma presented with recurrent melena. Upper endoscopies revealed a healing, non-bleeding, large gastric ulcer. After the third bleed, angiography demonstrated bleeding from a splenic artery pseudoaneurysm adjacent to the gastric ulcer. Scleroderma patients are at risk of bleeding from esophagitis or gastric arteriovenous malformations, while splenic artery pseudoaneurysms are primarily attributed to pancreatitis and trauma. This is the first reported case of gastrointestinal bleeding from a splenic artery pseudoaneurysm in a patient with intestinal scleroderma and a large gastric ulcer.

  4. Gastrointestinal food allergies.

    PubMed

    Heine, Ralf G

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal food allergies present during early childhood with a diverse range of symptoms. Cow's milk, soy and wheat are the three most common gastrointestinal food allergens. Several clinical syndromes have been described, including food protein-induced enteropathy, proctocolitis and enterocolitis. In contrast with immediate, IgE-mediated food allergies, the onset of gastrointestinal symptoms is delayed for at least 1-2 hours after ingestion in non-IgE-mediated allergic disorders. The pathophysiology of these non-IgE-mediated allergic disorders is poorly understood, and useful in vitro markers are lacking. The results of the skin prick test or measurement of the food-specific serum IgE level is generally negative, although low-positive results may occur. Diagnosis therefore relies on the recognition of a particular clinical phenotype as well as the demonstration of clear clinical improvement after food allergen elimination and the re-emergence of symptoms upon challenge. There is a significant clinical overlap between non-IgE-mediated food allergy and several common paediatric gastroenterological conditions, which may lead to diagnostic confusion. The treatment of gastrointestinal food allergies requires the strict elimination of offending food allergens until tolerance has developed. In breast-fed infants, a maternal elimination diet is often sufficient to control symptoms. In formula-fed infants, treatment usually involves the use an extensively hydrolysed or amino acid-based formula. Apart from the use of hypoallergenic formulae, the solid diets of these children also need to be kept free of specific food allergens, as clinically indicated. The nutritional progress of infants and young children should be carefully monitored, and they should undergo ongoing, regular food protein elimination reassessments by cautious food challenges to monitor for possible tolerance development.

  5. Esophageal capsule endoscopy is not the optimal technique to determine the need for primary prophylaxis in patients with cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Krok, Karen L.; Wagennar, Rebecca Rankin; Kantsevoy, Sergey V.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Capsule endoscopy has been suggested as a potential alternative to endoscopy for detection of esophagogastric varices and severe portal hypertensive gastropathy (PHG). The aim of the study was to determine whether PillCam esophageal capsule endoscopy could replace endoscopy for screening purposes. Material and methods Sixty-two patients with cirrhosis with no previous variceal bleeding had PillCam capsule endoscopy and video endoscopy performed on the same day. Sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values (PPV, NPV) of capsule endoscopy were compared to endoscopy for the presence and severity of esophageal and gastric varices, PHG and the need for primary prophylaxis. Patients’ preference was assessed by a questionnaire. Results Four (6%) patients were unable to swallow the capsule. Sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV of capsule endoscopy for detecting any esophageal varices (92%, 50%, 92%, 50%), large varices (55%, 91%, 75%, 80%), variceal red signs (58%, 87%, 69%, 80%), PHG (95%, 50%, 95%, 50%), and the need for primary prophylaxis (91%, 57%, 78%, 80%) were not optimal, with only moderate agreement (κ) between capsule and upper GI endoscopy. Had only a capsule endoscopy been performed, 12 (21.4%) patients would have received inappropriate treatment. Capsule endoscopy also failed to detect (0/13) gastric varices. The majority of patients ranked capsule endoscopy as more convenient (69%) and their preferred (61%) method. Conclusions Despite the preference expressed by patients for capsule endoscopy, we believe that upper GI endoscopy should remain the preferred screening method for primary prophylaxis. PMID:27186182

  6. Endoscopy in inflammatory bowel disease when and why

    PubMed Central

    Rameshshanker, Rajaratnam; Arebi, Naila

    2012-01-01

    Endoscopy plays an important role in the diagnosis and management of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). It is useful to exclude other aetiologies, differentiate between ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn’s disease (CD), and define the extent and activity of inflammation. Ileocolonoscopy is used for monitoring of the disease, which in turn helps to optimize the management. It plays a key role in the surveillance of UC for dysplasia or neoplasia and assessment of post operative CD. Capsule endoscopy and double balloon enteroscopy are increasingly used in patients with CD. Therapeutic applications relate to stricture dilatation and dysplasia resection. The endoscopist’s role is vital in the overall management of IBD. PMID:22720120

  7. Volumetric sub-surface imaging using spectrally encoded endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Yelin, D; Bouma, B E; Tearney, G J

    2008-02-04

    Endoscopic imaging below tissue surfaces and through turbid media may provide improved diagnostic capabilities and visibility in surgical settings. Spectrally encoded endoscopy (SEE) is a recently developed method that utilizes a single optical fiber, miniature optics and a diffractive grating for high-speed imaging through small diameter, flexible endoscopic probes. SEE has also been shown to provide three-dimensional topological imaging capabilities. In this paper, we have configured SEE to additionally image beneath tissue surfaces, by increasing the system's sensitivity and acquiring the complex spectral density for each spectrally resolved point on the sample. In order to demonstrate the capability of SEE to obtain subsurface information, we have utilized the system to image a resolution target through intralipid solution, and conduct volumetric imaging of a mouse embryo and excised human middle-ear ossicles. Our results demonstrate that real-time subsurface imaging is possible with this miniature endoscopy technique.

  8. Evaluation of motion compensation method for assessing the gastrointestinal motility using three dimensional endoscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimoto, Kayo; Yamada, Kenji; Watabe, Kenji; Fujinaga, Tetsuji; Kido, Michiko; Nagakura, Toshiaki; Takahashi, Hideya; Iijima, Hideki; Tsujii, Masahiko; Takehara, Tetsuo; Ohno, Yuko

    2016-03-01

    Functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGID) are the most common gastrointestinal disorders. The term "functional" is generally applied to disorders where there are no structural abnormalities. Gastrointestinal dysmotility is one of the several mechanisms that have been proposed for the pathogenesis of FGID and is usually examined by manometry, a pressure test. There have been no attempts to examine the gastrointestinal dysmotility by endoscopy. We have proposed an imaging system for the assessment of gastric motility using a three-dimensional endoscope. After we newly developed a threedimensional endoscope and constructed a wave simulated model, we established a method of extracting three-dimensional contraction waves derived from a three-dimensional profile of the wave simulated model obtained with the endoscope. In the study, the endoscope and the wave simulated model were fixed to the ground. However, in a clinical setting, it is hard for endoscopists to keep the endoscope still. Moreover, stomach moves under the influence of breathing. Thus, three-dimensional registration of the position between the endoscope and the gastric wall is necessary for the accurate assessment of gastrointestinal motility. In this paper, we propose a motion compensation method using three-dimensional scene flow. The scene flow of the feature point calculated by obtained images in a time series enables the three-dimensional registration of the position between the endoscope and the gastric wall. We confirmed the validity of a proposed method first by a known-movement object and then by a wave simulated model.

  9. Airway observations during upper endoscopy predicting obstructive sleep apnea

    PubMed Central

    Harvin, Glenn; Ali, Eslam; Raina, Amit; Leland, William; Abid, Sabeen; Vahora, Zahid; Movahed, Hossein; Kachru, Sumyra; Tee, Rick

    2016-01-01

    Background This pilot study examined airway characteristics during upper endoscopy to determine who is at high risk for obstructive sleep apnea. Methods Patients undergoing routine upper endoscopy were divided into 2 groups according to the Berlin Questionnaire (high and low risk for sleep disordered breathing). Patients underwent routine upper endoscopy using propofol sedation. The airway was then evaluated for no, partial, or complete collapse at the levels of the palate/uvula/tonsils, the tongue base, the hypopharynx, and the larynx. They were given a score of 0 for no collapse, 1 for partial collapse, and 2 for complete collapse. The score for each of these levels was added to give a total score or severity index. The larynx was also evaluated for lateral pharyngeal collapse (minimal, up to 50%, >50%, or 100%). Results We found that patients with a partial obstruction at the level of the palate/uvula/tonsils, tongue base, hypopharynx, or larynx, or complete obstruction at any level more often had a positive Berlin questionnaire. Patients with a positive Berlin questionnaire were more often of increased weight (mean 197 vs 175 lbs, P=0.19), increased body mass index (31.2 vs 27.42 kg/m2, P=0.11), increased neck circumference (36.7 vs 34.7 cm, P=0.23), and had a higher total airway score (2.61 vs 1.67, P=0.09). Conclusions The results of our pilot study represent preliminary data regarding the use of upper endoscopy as a potential tool to evaluate patients for obstructive sleep apnea. PMID:27708514

  10. Hyperspectral Imaging Using Flexible Endoscopy for Laryngeal Cancer Detection.

    PubMed

    Regeling, Bianca; Thies, Boris; Gerstner, Andreas O H; Westermann, Stephan; Müller, Nina A; Bendix, Jörg; Laffers, Wiebke

    2016-08-13

    Hyperspectral imaging (HSI) is increasingly gaining acceptance in the medical field. Up until now, HSI has been used in conjunction with rigid endoscopy to detect cancer in vivo. The logical next step is to pair HSI with flexible endoscopy, since it improves access to hard-to-reach areas. While the flexible endoscope's fiber optic cables provide the advantage of flexibility, they also introduce an interfering honeycomb-like pattern onto images. Due to the substantial impact this pattern has on locating cancerous tissue, it must be removed before the HS data can be further processed. Thereby, the loss of information is to minimize avoiding the suppression of small-area variations of pixel values. We have developed a system that uses flexible endoscopy to record HS cubes of the larynx and designed a special filtering technique to remove the honeycomb-like pattern with minimal loss of information. We have confirmed its feasibility by comparing it to conventional filtering techniques using an objective metric and by applying unsupervised and supervised classifications to raw and pre-processed HS cubes. Compared to conventional techniques, our method successfully removes the honeycomb-like pattern and considerably improves classification performance, while preserving image details.

  11. Fibre-optic nonlinear optical microscopy and endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Fu, L; Gu, M

    2007-06-01

    Nonlinear optical microscopy has been an indispensable laboratory tool of high-resolution imaging in thick tissue and live animals. Rapid developments of fibre-optic components in terms of growing functionality and decreasing size provide enormous opportunities for innovations in nonlinear optical microscopy. Fibre-based nonlinear optical endoscopy is the sole instrumentation to permit the cellular imaging within hollow tissue tracts or solid organs that are inaccessible to a conventional optical microscope. This article reviews the current development of fibre-optic nonlinear optical microscopy and endoscopy, which includes crucial technologies for miniaturized nonlinear optical microscopy and their embodiments of endoscopic systems. A particular attention is given to several classes of photonic crystal fibres that have been applied to nonlinear optical microscopy due to their unique properties for ultrashort pulse delivery and signal collection. Furthermore, fibre-optic nonlinear optical imaging systems can be classified into portable microscopes suitable for imaging behaving animals, rigid endoscopes that allow for deep tissue imaging with minimally invasive manners, and flexible endoscopes enabling imaging of internal organs. Fibre-optic nonlinear optical endoscopy is coming of age and a paradigm shift leading to optical microscope tools for early cancer detection and minimally invasive surgery.

  12. Combined optical resolution photoacoustic and fluorescence micro-endoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Peng; Shi, Wei; Hajireza, Parsin; Zemp, Roger J.

    2012-02-01

    We present a new micro-endoscopy system combining real-time C-scan optical-resolution photoacoustic micro-endoscopy (OR-PAME), and a high-resolution fluorescence micro-endoscopy system for visualizing fluorescently labeled cellular components and optically absorbing microvasculature simultaneously. With a diode-pumped 532-nm fiber laser, the OR-PAM sub-system is capable of imaging with a resolution of ~ 7μm. The fluorescence sub-system consists of a diode laser with 445 nm-centered emissions as the light source, an objective lens and a CCD camera. Proflavine, a FDA approved drug for human use, is used as the fluorescent contrast agent by topical application. The fluorescence system does not require any mechanical scanning. The scanning laser and the diode laser light source share the same light path within an optical fiber bundle containing 30,000 individual single mode fibers. The absorption of Proflavine at 532 nm is low, which mitigates absorption bleaching of the contrast agent by the photoacoustic excitation source. We demonstrate imaging in live murine models. The system is able to provide cellular morphology with cellular resolution co-registered with the structural and functional information given by OR-PAM. Therefore, the system has the potential to serve as a virtual biopsy technique, helping researchers and clinicians visualize angiogenesis, effects of anti-cancer drugs on both cells and the microcirculation, as well as aid in the study of other diseases.

  13. Hyperspectral Imaging Using Flexible Endoscopy for Laryngeal Cancer Detection

    PubMed Central

    Regeling, Bianca; Thies, Boris; Gerstner, Andreas O. H.; Westermann, Stephan; Müller, Nina A.; Bendix, Jörg; Laffers, Wiebke

    2016-01-01

    Hyperspectral imaging (HSI) is increasingly gaining acceptance in the medical field. Up until now, HSI has been used in conjunction with rigid endoscopy to detect cancer in vivo. The logical next step is to pair HSI with flexible endoscopy, since it improves access to hard-to-reach areas. While the flexible endoscope’s fiber optic cables provide the advantage of flexibility, they also introduce an interfering honeycomb-like pattern onto images. Due to the substantial impact this pattern has on locating cancerous tissue, it must be removed before the HS data can be further processed. Thereby, the loss of information is to minimize avoiding the suppression of small-area variations of pixel values. We have developed a system that uses flexible endoscopy to record HS cubes of the larynx and designed a special filtering technique to remove the honeycomb-like pattern with minimal loss of information. We have confirmed its feasibility by comparing it to conventional filtering techniques using an objective metric and by applying unsupervised and supervised classifications to raw and pre-processed HS cubes. Compared to conventional techniques, our method successfully removes the honeycomb-like pattern and considerably improves classification performance, while preserving image details. PMID:27529255

  14. Plague Masquerading as Gastrointestinal Illness

    PubMed Central

    Hull, Harry F.; Montes, Jean M.; Mann, Jonathan M.

    1986-01-01

    In clinical descriptions of human plague, fever and tender lymphadenitis are emphasized and gastrointestinal manifestations are rarely mentioned. A review of 71 human plague cases showed that gastrointestinal symptoms occurred commonly (57%). Vomiting (39%) was the most frequent symptom, with nausea (34%), diarrhea (28%) and abdominal pain (17%) occurring less often. Physicians treating patients who reside in or have recently visited plague-endemic areas should include plague in the differential diagnosis in the presence of gastrointestinal symptoms and fever. PMID:3788132

  15. Bringing Top-End Endoscopy to Regional Australia: Hurdles and Benefits

    PubMed Central

    Van Den Bogaerde, J.; Sorrentino, D.

    2012-01-01

    This paper focuses on recent experience in setting up an endoscopy unit in a large regional hospital. The mix of endoscopy in three smaller hospitals, draining into the large hospital endoscopy unit, has enabled the authors to comment on practical and achievable steps towards creating best practice endoscopy in the regional setting. The challenges of using what is available from an infrastructural equipment and personnel setting are discussed. In a fast moving field such as endoscopy, new techniques have an important role to play, and some are indeed cost effective and have been shown to improve patient care. Some of the new techniques and technologies are easily applicable to smaller endoscopy units and can be easily integrated into the practice of working endoscopists. Cost effectiveness and patient care should always be the final arbiter of what is essential, as opposed to what is nice to have. Close cooperation between referral and peripheral centers should also guide these decisions. PMID:22991487

  16. Hereditary gastrointestinal cancer syndromes.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Henry T; Lynch, Jane F; Shaw, Trudy G

    2011-07-01

    The rapid growth of molecular genetics and its attendant germline mutation discoveries has enabled identification of persons who are at an inordinately high cancer risk and, therefore, ideal candidates for prevention. However, one must fully appreciate the extensive genotypic and phenotypic heterogeneity that exists in hereditary cancer. Once the causative germline mutation has been identified in a patient, high-risk members of the family can be similarly tested and identified and provided highly targeted surveillance and management opportunities. DNA testing can change the individual's presumed risk status and affect decision making by patients and their physicians regarding surveillance and management. Our purpose is to describe familial/hereditary cancers of the gastrointestinal tract, including familial Barrett's esophagus, hereditary diffuse gastric cancer, gastrointestinal stromal tumors, familial adenomatous polyposis and desmoid tumors, Lynch syndrome, small bowel cancer, and familial pancreatic cancer. We use our discussion of Lynch syndrome as a model for diagnostic and clinical translation strategies for all hereditary gastrointestinal tract cancers, which clearly can then be extended to cancer of all anatomic sites. Highly pertinent questions from the patient's perspective include the following: What kind of counseling will be provided to a patient with a Lynch syndrome mutation, and should that counseling be mandatory? Does the proband have the responsibility to inform relatives about the familial mutation, even if the relatives do not want to know whether they carry it? Is the patient is responsible for notifying family members that a parent or sibling has Lynch syndrome? Can notification be forced and, if so, under what circumstances? These questions point out the need for criteria regarding which family members to inform and how to inform them.

  17. Gastrointestinal Manifestations of Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis has historically been considered a pulmonary disease, but with the increasing life expectancy of these patients, gastrointestinal manifestations are becoming more important. Furthermore, nutritional status is closely linked to pulmonary function and, thus, overall mortality. This article discusses gastrointestinal manifestations (which involve nutritional, pancreatic, hepatobiliary, and, in particular, gastrointestinal tract issues) of cystic fibrosis as well as management of the disease. In addition, the article discusses studies that have been critical to our understanding of gastrointestinal manifestations of cystic fibrosis. PMID:27330503

  18. Detection of gastrointestinal bleeding with /sup 99m/Tc-labeled red blood cells

    SciTech Connect

    Winzelberg, G.G.; McKusick, K.A.; Froelich, J.W.; Callahan, R.J.; Strauss, H.W.

    1982-04-01

    Using a modified in vivo /sup 99m/Tc red cell labeling technique, gastrointestinal bleeding scintigraphy was performed in 100 patients with GI bleeding. Sixty-two patients with melena or bright red blood per rectum had positive scintiscans. In comparison to results of angiography, endoscopy, surgery and contrast radiography, radionuclide scintigraphy correctly located the site of bleeding in 83% of patients. The procedures could be performed over a 24 hr period which increased the sensitivity of the test since 85% of the scintiscans were positive at one hr or greater after the onset of imaging. The procedure was more sensitive than angiography in detecting sources of GI bleeding. We conclude that GI bleeding scintigraphy /sup 99m/Tc-red cells in an accurate and effective method to detect upper and lower GI bleeding in patients with acute intermittent gastrointestinal bleeding.

  19. Approach to a child with upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Singhi, Sunit; Jain, Puneet; Jayashree, M; Lal, Sadhna

    2013-04-01

    Upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) is a potentially life threatening medical emergency requiring an appropriate diagnostic and therapeutic approach. Therefore, the primary focus in a child with UGIB is resuscitation and stabilization followed by a diagnostic evaluation. The differential diagnosis of UGIB in children is determined by age and severity of bleed. In infants and toddlers mucosal bleed (gastritis and stress ulcers) is a common cause. In children above 2 y variceal bleeding due to Extra-Hepatic Portal Venous Obstruction (EHPVO) is the commonest cause of significant UGIB in developing countries as against peptic ulcer in the developed countries. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy is the most accurate and useful diagnostic tool to evaluate UGIB in children. Parenteral vitamin K (infants, 1-2 mg/dose; children, 5-10 mg) and parenteral Proton Pump Inhibitors (PPI's), should be administered empirically in case of a major UGIB. Octreotide infusion is useful in control of significant UGIB due to variceal hemorrhage. A temporarily placed, Sengstaken-Blakemore tube can be life saving if pharmacologic/ endoscopic methods fail to control variceal bleeding. Therapy in patients having mucosal bleed is directed at neutralization and/or prevention of gastric acid release; High dose Proton Pump Inhibitors (PPIs, Pantoprazole) are more efficacious than H2 receptor antagonists for this purpose.

  20. Management of gastrointestinal haemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, S; Watts, D; Kinnear, M

    2002-01-01

    A variety of endoscopic haemostatic techniques have enabled major advances in the management of not only bleeding peptic ulcers and bleeding varices, but also in a variety of bleeding lesions in the small intestine and in the colon. Indeed, the development and widespread implementation of endoscopic haemostasis has been one of the most important developments in clinical gastroenterology in the past two decades. An increasingly ageing cohort of patients with multiple co-morbidity are being treated and therefore improving the outcome of gastrointestinal bleeding continues to pose major challenges. PMID:11796865

  1. Challenges of Endoscopic Management of Pancreaticobiliary Complications in Surgically Altered Gastrointestinal Anatomy

    PubMed Central

    Wai, Tin Moe; Kim, Eun Young

    2016-01-01

    Pancreaticobiliary complications following various surgical procedures, including liver transplantation, are not uncommon and are important causes of morbidity and mortality. Therapeutic endoscopy plays a substantial role in these patients and can help to avoid the need for reoperation. However, the endoscopic approach in patients with surgically altered gastrointestinal (GI) anatomy is technically challenging because of the difficulty in entering the enteral limb to reach the target orifice to manage pancreaticobiliary complications. Additional procedural complexity is due to the need of special devices and accessories to obtain successful cannulation and absence of an elevator in forward-viewing endoscopes, which is frequently used in this situation. Once bilioenteric anastomosis is reached, the technical success rates achieved in expert hands approach those of patients with intact GI anatomy. The success of endoscopic therapy in patients with surgically altered GI anatomy depends on multiple factors, including the expertise of the endoscopist, understanding of postoperative anatomic changes, and the availability of suitable scopes and accessories for endoscopic management. In this issue of Clinical Endoscopy, the focused review series deals with pancreatobiliary endoscopy in altered GI anatomy such as bilioenteric anastomosis and post-gastrectomy. PMID:27894188

  2. From POEM to POET: Applications and perspectives for submucosal tunnel endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Philip W Y; Inoue, Haruhiro; Rösch, Thomas

    2016-12-01

    Recent advances in submucosal endoscopy have unlocked a new horizon for potential development in diagnostic and therapeutic endoscopy. Increasing evidence has demonstrated that peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) is not only clinically feasible and safe, but also has excellent results in symptomatic relief of achalasia. The success of submucosal endoscopy in performance of tumor resection has confirmed the potential of this new area in diagnostic and therapeutic endoscopy. This article reviews the current applications and evidence, from POEM to peroral endoscopic tunnel resection (POET), while exploring the possible future clinical applications in this field.

  3. Gastrointestinal Headache; a Narrative Review

    PubMed Central

    T Noghani, Majid; Rezaeizadeh, Hossein; Fazljoo, Sayed Mohammad Baqer; Keshavarz, Mansoor

    2016-01-01

    There are studies reporting primary headaches to be associated with gastrointestinal disorders, and some report resolution of headache following the treatment of the associated gastrointestinal disorder. Headache disorders are classified by The International Headache Society as primary or secondary; however, among the secondary headaches, those attributed to gastrointestinal disorders are not appreciated. Therefore, we aimed to review the literature to provide evidence for headaches, which originate from the gastrointestinal system. Gastrointestinal disorders that are reported to be associated with primary headaches include dyspepsia, gastro esophageal reflux disease (GERD), constipation, functional abdominal pain, inflammatory bowel syndrome (IBS), inflammatory bowel disorders (IBD), celiac disease, and helicobacter pylori (H. Pylori) infection. Some studies have demonstrated remission or improvement of headache following the treatment of the accompanying gastrointestinal disorders. Hypotheses explaining this association are considered to be central sensitization and parasympathetic referred pain, serotonin pathways, autonomic nervous system dysfunction, systemic vasculopathy, and food allergy. Traditional Persian physicians, namely Ebn-e-Sina (Avicenna) and Râzi (Rhazes) believed in a type of headache originating from disorders of the stomach and named it as an individual entity, the "Participatory Headache of Gastric Origin". We suggest providing a unique diagnostic entity for headaches coexisting with any gastrointestinal abnormality that are improved or cured along with the treatment of the gastrointestinal disorder. PMID:27800536

  4. Gastrointestinal Headache; a Narrative Review.

    PubMed

    T Noghani, Majid; Rezaeizadeh, Hossein; Fazljoo, Sayed Mohammad Baqer; Keshavarz, Mansoor

    2016-11-01

    There are studies reporting primary headaches to be associated with gastrointestinal disorders, and some report resolution of headache following the treatment of the associated gastrointestinal disorder. Headache disorders are classified by The International Headache Society as primary or secondary; however, among the secondary headaches, those attributed to gastrointestinal disorders are not appreciated. Therefore, we aimed to review the literature to provide evidence for headaches, which originate from the gastrointestinal system. Gastrointestinal disorders that are reported to be associated with primary headaches include dyspepsia, gastro esophageal reflux disease (GERD), constipation, functional abdominal pain, inflammatory bowel syndrome (IBS), inflammatory bowel disorders (IBD), celiac disease, and helicobacter pylori (H. Pylori) infection. Some studies have demonstrated remission or improvement of headache following the treatment of the accompanying gastrointestinal disorders. Hypotheses explaining this association are considered to be central sensitization and parasympathetic referred pain, serotonin pathways, autonomic nervous system dysfunction, systemic vasculopathy, and food allergy. Traditional Persian physicians, namely Ebn-e-Sina (Avicenna) and Râzi (Rhazes) believed in a type of headache originating from disorders of the stomach and named it as an individual entity, the "Participatory Headache of Gastric Origin". We suggest providing a unique diagnostic entity for headaches coexisting with any gastrointestinal abnormality that are improved or cured along with the treatment of the gastrointestinal disorder.

  5. Evaluation of technetium-99m DTPA for localization of site of acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    SciTech Connect

    Abdel-Dayem, H.M.; Mahajan, K.K.; Ericsson, S.; Nawaz, K.; Owunwanne, A.; Kouris, K.; Higazy, E.; Awdeh, M.

    1986-11-01

    Intravenous Tc-99m DTPA was evaluated in 34 patients with active upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Active bleeding was detected in 25 patients: nine in the stomach, 12 in the duodenum, and four from esophageal varices. No active bleeding was seen in nine patients (two gastric ulcers and seven duodenal ulcers). Results were correlated with endoscopic and/or surgical findings. All completely correlated except: 1) one case of esophageal varices in which there was disagreement on the site, 2) three cases of duodenal ulcers that were not bleeding on endoscopy but showed mild oozing on delayed images and 3) one case of gastric ulcer, in which no bleeding was detected in the Tc-99m DTPA study, but was found to be bleeding at surgery 24 hours later. The Tc-99m DTPA study is a reliable method for localization of upper gastrointestinal bleeding with an agreement ratio of 85%. This method also can be used safely for follow-up of patients with intermittent bleeding. It is less invasive than endoscopy, is easily repeatable, and has the same accuracy.

  6. Massive lower gastrointestinal bleeding due to 'Dieulafoy's vascular malformation' of the jejunum: case report.

    PubMed Central

    Goins, W. A.; Chatman, D. M.; Kaviani, M. J.

    1995-01-01

    Dieulafoy reported three cases of massive gastric hemorrhage due to a dilated submucosal artery in 1898, and since then, more than 100 cases of this gastric vascular malformation have been reported in the literature. These same pathologic lesions are even a rarer occurrence in the small bowel. This article reports a 38-year-old hypotensive male who presented to the hospital after an acute onset of massive lower gastrointestinal hemorrhage; superior mesenteric angiography demonstrated an actively bleeding lesion in a proximal jejunal branch. Intraoperative small bowel endoscopy via an enterotomy demonstrated a 4 mm bleeding submucosal lesion 30 cm distal to the ligament of Treitz. A literature review revealed six other cases of Dieulafoy's vascular malformation that occurred in the small bowel, with the lesions located in the proximal jejunum between 15 cm and 45 cm distal to the ligament of Treitz. The cause of these lesions is unknown. This case demonstrates the importance of preoperative angiography and intraoperative endoscopy when massive lower gastrointestinal hemorrhage is suspected to be from a small bowel source. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:7473854

  7. Mortality associated with gastrointestinal bleeding in children: A retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Attard, Thomas M; Miller, Mikaela; Pant, Chaitanya; Kumar, Ashwath; Thomson, Mike

    2017-01-01

    AIM To determine the clinical characteristics of children with gastrointestinal bleeding (GIB) who died during the course of their admission. METHODS We interrogated the Pediatric Hospital Information System database, including International Classification of Diseases, Current Procedural Terminology and Clinical Transaction Classification coding from 47 pediatric tertiary centers extracting the population of patients (1-21 years of age) admitted (inpatient or observation) with acute, upper or indeterminate GIB (1/2007-9/2015). Descriptive statistics, unadjusted univariate and adjusted multivariate analysis of the associations between patient characteristics and treatment course with mortality was performed with mortality as primary and endoscopy a secondary outcome of interest. All analyses were performed using the R statistical package, v.3.2.3. RESULTS The population with GIB was 19528; 54.6% were male, overall mortality was 2.07%; (0.37% in patients with the principal diagnosis of GIB). When considering only the mortalities in which GIB was the principal diagnosis, 48% (12 of 25 principal diagnosis GIB mortalities) died within the first 3 d of admission, whereas 19.8% of secondary diagnosis GIB patients died with 3 d of admission. Patients who died were more likely to have received octreotide (19.8% c.f. 4.04%) but tended to have not received proton pump inhibitor therapy in the first 48 h, and far less likely to have undergone endoscopy during their admission (OR = 0.489, P < 0.0001). Chronic liver disease associated with a greater likelihood of endoscopy. Mortalities were significantly more likely to have multiple complex chronic conditions. CONCLUSION GIB associated mortality in children is highest within 7 d of admission. Multiple comorbidities are a risk factor whereas early endoscopy during the admission is protective. PMID:28321162

  8. Adherence to guidelines: A national audit of the management of acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding. The REASON registry

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yidan; Barkun, Alan N; Martel, Myriam

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To assess process of care in nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (NVUGIB) using a national cohort, and to identify predictors of adherence to ‘best practice’ standards. METHODS: Consecutive charts of patients hospitalized for acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding across 21 Canadian hospitals were reviewed. Data regarding initial presentation, endoscopic management and outcomes were collected. Results were compared with ‘best practice’ using established guidelines on NVUGIB. Adherence was quantified and independent predictors were evaluated using multivariable analysis. RESULTS: Overall, 2020 patients (89.4% NVUGIB, variceal in 10.6%) were included (mean [± SD] age 66.3±16.4 years; 38.4% female). Endoscopy was performed in 1612 patients: 1533 with NVUGIB had endoscopic lesions (63.1% ulcers; high-risk stigmata in 47.8%). Early endoscopy was performed in 65.6% and an assistant was present in 83.5%. Only 64.5% of patients with high-risk stigmata received endoscopic hemostasis; 9.8% of patients exhibiting low-risk stigmata also did. Intravenous proton pump inhibitor was administered after endoscopic hemostasis in 95.7%. Rebleeding and mortality rates were 10.5% and 9.4%, respectively. Multivariable analysis revealed that low American Society of Anesthesiologists score patients had fewer assistants present during endoscopy (OR 0.63 [95% CI 0.48 to 0.83), a hemoglobin level <70 g/L predicted inappropriate high-dose intravenous proton pump inhibitor use in patients with low-risk stigmata, and endoscopies performed during regular hours were associated with longer delays from presentation (OR 0.33 [95% CI 0.24 to 0.47]). CONCLUSION: There was variability between the process of care and ‘best practice’ in NVUGIB. Certain patient and situational characteristics may influence guideline adherence. Dissemination initiatives must identify and focus on such considerations to improve quality of care. PMID:25314356

  9. Portable disposable ultrathin endoscopy tested through percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy

    PubMed Central

    Baeg, Myong Ki; Lim, Chul-Hyun; Kim, Jin Su; Cho, Yu Kyung; Park, Jae Myung; Lee, Bo-In; Lee, In-Seok; Choi, Myung-Gyu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: A portable disposable ultrathin endoscope (DUE) with high visual quality and maneuverability would reduce the need for expensive facilities and emergency endoscopy could be available anywhere. It would increase patient satisfaction, prevent unnecessary sedation, and reduce infection. Our aim was to evaluate the usefulness of portable DUE in performing percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG). Methods: We prospectively enrolled patients who underwent PEG under DUE guidance and compared them with historical controls who underwent PEG under conventional ultrathin endoscopy (CUE) guidance. The primary outcomes were successful stomach visualization and PEG tube insertion. Results: Twenty-five patients (19 male) were enrolled and compared with 25 gender and indication-matched controls. The most common indications for PEG were aspiration due to stroke or brain injury, dementia, and head and neck cancer. Entrance into the stomach was achieved in 92.0% (23/25) and 96% (24/25) in the DUE and CUE groups, and PEG was performed in 91.3% (21/23) and 95.8% (23/24), respectively. The mean insertion time for the DUE and CUE groups were 22.7 ± 9.3 minutes and 17.1 ± 5.7 minutes (P = 0.044). The 3 cases of failure to reach the stomach in both groups were caused by esophageal blockage. The 3 cases of failed PEG tube insertion were caused by poor visualization of the insertion site. Bleeding and pneumoperitoneum occurred in 1 and 2 patients in the DUE group. One case of fever was noted in the CUE group. All adverse events were conservatively managed. Conclusions: Our study shows that portable DUE in facilities without endoscopy equipment may be clinically feasible. PMID:27902596

  10. Hemostatic effect of topical hemocoagulase spray in digestive endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tao; Wang, Dan-Na; Liu, Wen-Tian; Zheng, Zhong-Qing; Chen, Xin; Fang, Wei-Li; Li, Shu; Liang, Li; Wang, Bang-Mao

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the hemostatic effect of topical hemocoagulase spray in digestive endoscopy. METHODS: Eighty-nine patients who developed oozing bleeding during endoscopic treatment from September 2014 to October 2014 at Center for Digestive Endoscopy, Tianjin Medical University General Hospital were randomly divided into either a study group (n = 39) or a control group (n = 50). The study group was given topical hemocoagulase spray intraoperatively, while the control group was given traditional 8% norepinephrine spray. Hemostatic efficacy was compared between the two groups. Bleeding site, wound cleanliness and perforation were recorded, and the rates of perforation and late bleeding were compared. RESULTS: Successful hemostasis was achieved in 39 (100%) patients of the study group and in 47 (94.0%) patients of the control group, and there was no significant difference in the rate of successful hemostasis between the two groups. Compared with the control group, after topical hemocoagulase spray in the study group, the surgical field was clearer, the bleeding site was more easily identified, and the wound was cleaner. There was no significant difference in the rate of perforation between the study and control groups (16.7% vs 35.0%, P = 0.477), but the rates of late bleeding (0% vs 15.8%, P = 0.048) and overall complications (P = 0.032) were significantly lower in the study group. CONCLUSION: Topical hemocoagulase spray has a definite hemostatic effect for oozing bleeding in digestive endoscopy, and this method is convenient, safe, and reliable. It is expected to become a new method for endoscopic hemostasis. PMID:27433096

  11. Alternative Agents to Prevent Fogging in Head and Neck Endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Piromchai, Patorn; Kasemsiri, Pornthep; Thanaviratananich, Sanguansak

    2011-01-01

    Background: The essential factor for diagnosis and treatment of diseases in head and neck endoscopy is the visibility of the image. An anti-fogging agent can reduce this problem by minimizing surface tension to prevent the condensation of water in the form of small droplets on a surface. There is no report on the use of hibiscrub® or baby shampoo to reduce fogging in the literature. The objective of this study was to compare the efficacy between commercial anti-fogging agent, hibiscrub® and baby shampoo to reduce fogging for the use in head and neck endoscopy. Methods: The study was conducted at the Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Faculty of Medicine, Khon Kaen University in August 2010. Commercial anti-fogging agent, baby shampoo and hibiscrub® were applied on rigid endoscope lens before putting them into a mist generator. The images were taken at baseline, 15 seconds, 30 seconds and 1 minute. The images’ identifiers were removed before they were sent to two evaluators. A visual analogue scale (VAS) was used to rate the image quality from 0 to 10. Results: The difference in mean VAS score between anti-fogging agent, baby shampoo and hibiscrub® versus no agent were 5.46, 4.45 and 2.1 respectively. The commercial anti-fogging agent and baby shampoo had most protective benefit and performed significantly better than no agent (P = 0.05). Conclusions: Baby shampoo is an effective agent to prevent fogging during head and neck endoscopy and compares favourably with commercial anti-fogging agent. PMID:24179399

  12. Hereditary gastrointestinal cancer.

    PubMed

    Hata, Keisuke; Yamamoto, Yoko; Kiyomatsu, Tomomichi; Tanaka, Toshiaki; Kazama, Shinsuke; Nozawa, Hiroaki; Kawai, Kazushige; Tanaka, Junichiro; Nishikawa, Takeshi; Otani, Kensuke; Yasuda, Koji; Kishikawa, Junko; Nagai, Yuzo; Anzai, Hiroyuki; Shinagawa, Takahide; Arakawa, Keiichi; Yamaguchi, Hironori; Ishihara, Soichiro; Sunami, Eiji; Kitayama, Joji; Watanabe, Toshiaki

    2016-10-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) cancer, including gastric and colorectal cancer, is a major cause of death worldwide. A substantial proportion of patients with GI cancer have a familial history, and several causative genes have been identified. Gene carriers with these hereditary GI syndromes often harbor several kinds of cancer at an early age, and genetic testing and specific surveillance may save their lives through early detection. Gastroenterologists and GI surgeons should be familiar with these syndromes, even though they are not always associated with a high penetrance of GI cancer. In this review, we provide an overview and discuss the diagnosis, genetic testing, and management of four major hereditary GI cancers: familial adenomatous polyposis, Lynch syndrome, hereditary diffuse gastric cancer, and Li-Fraumeni syndrome.

  13. Dysbiosis in gastrointestinal disorders.

    PubMed

    Chang, Christopher; Lin, Henry

    2016-02-01

    The recent development of advanced sequencing techniques has revealed the complexity and diverse functions of the gut microbiota. Furthermore, alterations in the composition or balance of the intestinal microbiota, or dysbiosis, are associated with many gastrointestinal diseases. The looming question is whether dysbiosis is a cause or effect of these diseases. In this review, we will evaluate the contribution of intestinal microbiota in obesity, fatty liver, inflammatory bowel disease, and irritable bowel syndrome. Promising results from microbiota or metabolite transfer experiments in animals suggest the microbiota may be sufficient to reproduce disease features in the appropriate host in certain disorders. Less compelling causal associations may reflect complex, multi-factorial disease pathogenesis, in which dysbiosis is a necessary condition. Understanding the contributions of the microbiota in GI diseases should offer novel insight into disease pathophysiology and deliver new treatment strategies such as therapeutic manipulation of the microbiota.

  14. [Gastrointestinal dysmotility in children].

    PubMed

    Fluge, G; Olafsdottir, E

    2001-03-20

    Motility disorders were previously impossible to penetrate, but new technics have made it possible to investigate these disorders. An overview of neurophysiological functions of the gastrointestinal tract is given, and various conditions representing primary and secondary motility disorders are discussed. Diagnostic procedures and treatment options are presented. The clinical picture of such disorders is demonstrated by two cases. A girl born in 1995, having megacystis microcolon hypoperistalsis syndrome was the first Norwegian individual to have an intestinal transplantation, which was performed in London, UK. A girl with hypoganglionosis is also reported. Since May 1998, manometry of the oesophagus was performed in 44 children, and pathological findings were demonstrated in 18 of these patients. The motoric activity of the stomach was investigated in 17 patients using two-dimensional ultrasound and electrogastrography pre- and post-prandially. Disturbed function was found in nine of these children. Anorectal manometry was performed in 147 individuals, and Hirschsprung's disease was diagnosed in four.

  15. Gastrointestinal infections in children.

    PubMed

    Mönkemüller, K E; Wilcox, C M

    2001-01-01

    Gastrointestinal infections in children are a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Children living in developing countries are particularly susceptible to infectious diarrhea because of poor standards of hygiene and sanitation. Although the magnitude of diarrheal illnesses in developed countries is less, costly hospital admissions are still frequent. The causal agent of infectious diarrhea is most frequently related to age, geographical location, lifestyle habits, use of antibiotics, associated medical conditions, social circumstances, and degree of immune competence. In this article we present some of the most important articles published in the field during the last year. The role of Helicobacter pylori in the pathogenesis of gastritis and peptic ulcer disease has been shown in adults and children. Information about the natural history of H. pylori, symptomatology, and diagnostic therapeutic approaches for children are being generated constantly; we discuss some of the most relevant information in this review.

  16. Brush cytology: an adjunct to diagnostic upper GI endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Patwari, A K; Anand, V K; Malhotra, V; Balani, B; Gangil, A; Jain, A; Kapoor, G

    2001-06-01

    Endoscopic brush cytology (EBC) was performed in antral and duodenal brushings of children subjected to upper GI endoscopy for the detection of H. pylori (Hp) and trophozoites of Giardia lamblia (Glt) in addition to routine endoscopic grasp biopsy (EGB). It was hospital based prospective study. EBC was performed in children subjected to upper GI endoscopy with a sheathed cytology brush. Mucosal brushings were collected from antrum, body of the stomach and second or third part of duodenum by gently rubbing the surface of the brush with the mucosal wall in all the directions, brush withdrawn and brushings performed on a glass slide. The smears were placed in 95% ethyl alcohol and later examined for Glt and Hp using Giemsa and Hematoxylin & Eosin stain. EGB was taken from antrum, body of the stomach and duodenum from sites other than those used for brushings. One hundred and seventy children between 1-13 years (median age = 5 years) were subjected to upper GI endoscopy for malabsorption (n = 94), recurrent abdominal pain (n = 49), failure to thrive (n = 16) and recurrent vomiting/regurgitation (n = 11) and EBC was performed in addition to routine EGB. Thirty five children (20.4%) were colonized by Hp, 14 (8.2%) were detected to have Glt and in 6 cases (3.5%) both Hp as well as Glt were detected. Out of 41 cases colonized by Hp, 24 cases (58.5%) were detected by EGB and 27 cases (65.8%) were detected by EBC. Out of 20 children in whom Glt were detected from their duodenum, the detection was by EBG in 12 cases (60%) and by EBC in as many as 19 cases (95%). Comparison of EGB and EBC suggested that detection rates with EBC were higher than EGB. Detection by EBC was significantly higher for Glt than Hp. There were no complications attributed to EBC and procedure time for endoscopy was not significantly prolonged. On the contrary, detection of Hp and particularly Glt in higher proportion of cases with the help of EBC was helpful in their appropriate management. Our results

  17. Disorders of gastrointestinal hypomotility

    PubMed Central

    Bielefeldt, Klaus; Tuteja, Ashok; Nusrat, Salman

    2016-01-01

    Ingestion and digestion of food as well as expulsion of residual material from our gastrointestinal tract requires normal propulsive, i.e. motor, function. Hypomotility refers to inherited or acquired changes that come with decreased contractile forces or slower transit. It not only often causes symptoms but also may compromise nutritional status or lead to other complications. While severe forms, such as pseudo-obstruction or ileus, may have a tremendous functional impact, the less severe forms of hypomotility may well be more relevant, as they contribute to common disorders, such as functional dyspepsia, gastroparesis, chronic constipation, and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Clinical testing can identify changes in contractile activity, defined by lower amplitudes or abnormal patterns, and the related effects on transit. However, such biomarkers show a limited correlation with overall symptom severity as experienced by patients. Similarly, targeting hypomotility with pharmacological interventions often alters gut motor function but does not consistently improve symptoms. Novel diagnostic approaches may change this apparent paradox and enable us to obtain more comprehensive information by integrating data on electrical activity, mechanical forces, patterns, wall stiffness, and motions with information of the flow of luminal contents. New drugs with more selective effects or more specific delivery may improve benefits and limit adverse effects. Lastly, the complex regulation of gastrointestinal motility involves the brain-gut axis as a reciprocal pathway for afferent and efferent signaling. Considering the role of visceral input in emotion and the effects of emotion on visceral activity, understanding and managing hypomotility disorders requires an integrative approach based on the mind-body continuum or biopsychosocial model of diseases. PMID:27583135

  18. Effectiveness of systematic alphanumeric coded endoscopy for diagnosis of gastric intraepithelial neoplasia in a low socioeconomic population

    PubMed Central

    Machaca Quea, Nancy Roxana; Emura, Fabian; Barreda Bolaños, Fernando; Salvador Arias, Yuliana; Arévalo Suárez, Fernando Antonio; Piscoya Rivera, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: In the Western world, gastric cancer (GC) usually presents at an advanced stage, carrying a high mortality rate. Studies have reported that 14 % to 26 % of GCs are missed at endoscopy up to 3 years before diagnosis. Systematic Alphanumeric Coded Endoscopy (SACE) has been proposed to improve quality of esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) by facilitating a complete examination of the upper gastrointestinal tract. This prospective cross-sectional study was designed to determine the frequency of gastric intraepithelial neoplasia (GIN) by using the SACE approach in cohort of patients from low socioeconomic level. It also used non-targeted biopsies to evaluate the frequency of premalignant conditions. Patients and methods: A total of 601 consecutive asymptomatic or dyspeptic patients were enrolled between January 2013 and November 2014 at the Huacho regional hospital in Peru. The SACE method proposed by Emura et al, which divides the stomach into 5 regions and 21 areas, was routinely used for diagnosis. Biopsy samples were obtained from any endoscopically detected focal lesion. To evaluate gastric premalignant conditions, 4 non-targeted biopsies were taken. Results: A total of 573 patients were analyzed. The mean age was 57 years, and the female:male ratio was 1.9 : 1. In all cases, complete photo-documentation of the 21 gastric areas was achieved. The overall rate of detection of GIN was 2.8 %. Low-grade displasia, high-grade dysplasia, and adenocarcinoma were found in 13 (2.3 %), 2 (0.3 %), and 1 (0.2 %) of the patients, respectively. The prevalence of at least 1 premalignant condition was 31 %, and helicobacter pylori infection was found in 57 % of patients. Conclusions: Using the SACE approach and with proper training, we have reported herein a high frequency of GIN in patients from a low socioeconomic status. Gastric cancer detection can be improved in a Western endoscopy setting when SACE, as a screening method, is

  19. Microultrasound characterisation of ex vivo porcine tissue for ultrasound capsule endoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lay, H. S.; Cox, B. F.; Sunoqrot, M.; Démoré, C. E. M.; Näthke, I.; Gomez, T.; Cochran, S.

    2017-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) disease development and progression is often characterised by cellular and tissue architectural changes within the mucosa and sub-mucosa layers. Current clinical capsule endoscopy and other approaches are heavily reliant on optical techniques which cannot detect disease progression below the surface layer of the tissue. To enhance the ability of clinicians to detect cellular changes earlier and more confidently, both quantitative and qualitative microultrasound (μUS) techniques are investigated in healthy ex vivo porcine GI tissue. This work is based on the use of single-element, focussed μUS transducers made with micromoulded piezocomposite operating at around 48 MHz. To explore the possibility that μUS can detect Crohn’s disease and other inflammatory bowel diseases, ex vivo porcine small bowel tissue samples were cannulised and perfused with phosphate-buffered saline followed by various dilutions of polystyrene microspheres. Comparison with fluorescent imaging showed that the microspheres had infiltrated the microvasculature of the samples and that μUS was able to successfully detect this as a mimic of inflammation. Samples without microspheres were analysed using quantitative ultrasound to assess mechanical properties. Attenuation coefficients of 1.78 ± 0.66 dB/mm and 1.92 ± 0.77 dB/mm were obtained from reference samples which were surgically separated from the muscle layer. Six intact samples were segmented using a software algorithm and the acoustic impedance, Z, for varying tissue thicknesses, and backscattering coefficient, BSC, were calculated using the reference attenuation values and tabulated.

  20. Capsule endoscopy compared with conventional colonoscopy for detection of colorectal neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Sieg, Andreas

    2011-05-16

    Colon capsule endoscopy (CCE) may be a means to overcome the low adherence to colorectal cancer screening. The device is an ingestible capsule with a video camera at both ends that can take photographs as it progresses through the gastrointestinal tract. PillCam colon (PCC1) may be used for structural evaluation of the large bowel following an adequate cleaning procedure. PCC1 measures 11 mm × 31 mm and has dual cameras that enable the device to acquire video images from both ends with a wide coverage area, automatic light control and a frame rate of four frames per second. The system includes a sensor array and data recorder connected to the patient during the procedure. The recorded data are downloaded to the Given Imaging Rapid workstation for review of the colon video. The second generation of PillCam Colon (PCC2) is similar to PCC1 and incorporates new developments. The angle of view has been increased to 172 degrees. It has an adaptive frame rate, alternating from 35 frames per second while in motion to 4 images when virtually stationary. The new RAPID(®) software now includes a simple graphic interface tool for polyp size estimation. The procedure of bowel cleansing until capsule ingestion is similar to that used for traditional colonoscopy. However it is more rigorous as the bowel cleanliness for capsule colonoscopy has to be excellent or at least good to result in an adequate sensitivity of the method. Briefly, it consists of 3.5-4 L of split dose polyethylene glycol. Oral NaP boosters are administered after 1-2 h if the capsule has entered the small bowel. Sodium phosphate (NaP) seems to be a necessary adjunct to the regimen because the total transit time is doubled without NaP. The cleansing level was considered to be good to excellent in 72%-88% in studies with PCC1. The sensitivity for significant polyps (> 6 mm or more than 3 polyps >3 mm) ranged from 63%-88% with specificities between 64%-94%. PCC2 showed an improved sensitivity of 89% and a

  1. Zn concentration in plasma and gastric fluid in patients with upper gastrointestinal disease

    SciTech Connect

    Kadakia, S.C.; Wong, R.H.K.; Maydonovitch, C.; Johnson, L.F.; Nelson, N.; Henkin, R.I.

    1986-03-05

    Very few data are available about Zn in gastrointestinal fluids in humans. To obtain data in one such fluid Zn was measured in plasma and gastric fluid, obtained by direct visual aspiration through an endoscope placed into the gastric fundus, in 36 subjects with normal gastrointestinal mucosa (N) and in 36 patients with the following upper gastrointestinal pathology confirmed by endoscopy: 13 with esophagitis (E), 9 with gastritis (G) and 14 with duodenal ulcer disease (DU). Plasma and gastric fluid Zn were estimated by flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Mean plasma Zn was significantly lower than normal in patients with E (N, 87 +/- 2 ..mu..g/dl, M +/- SEM; E, 75 +/- 4, p < 0.01) but plasma values were similar to normal in the other patient groups (G, 89 +/- 4; DU, 87 +/- 2). Mean gastric fluid zinc in G was significantly higher than in normal subjects (G, 664 +/- 159 ..mu..g/L; N, 360 +/- 43, p < 0.02) but not significantly different from normal in patients with DU or E (DU, 402 +/- 76; E, 307 +/- 55). Mean gastric fluid Zn in women with DU was approximately 45% higher than in men with DU, although it was 17% lower in normal women than in normal men. Compared to other normal tissues gastric fluid Zn is about 1/3 that in serum and about 3 times that in saliva. These results indicate that Zn in plasma and gastric fluid is altered in some upper gastrointestinal diseases.

  2. Superior Mesenteric Vein Occlusion Causing Severe Gastrointestinal Haemorrhage in Two Paediatric Cases

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Anna L.; Jones, Matthew; Healey, Andrew; Auth, Marcus K. H.

    2012-01-01

    Reports about superior mesenteric vein thrombosis in childhood are very rare and have not been associated with gastrointestinal bleeding. We describe two cases of severe bleeding from the upper and lower gastrointestinal tract in children who had undergone complex abdominal surgery at considerable time before. The first child had a tracheoesophageal fistula, corrected by division, gastrostomy insertion, and repair of duodenal rupture. The child presented with severe bleeding from the gastrostomy site and was diagnosed with a thrombosis of the proximal superior mesenteric vein. The second child had a gastroschisis and duodenal atresia, and required duodenoplasty, gastrostomy insertion, hemicolectomy, and adhesiolysis. The child presented with intermittent severe lower gastrointestinal bleeding, resulting from collateral vessels at location of the surgical connections. He was diagnosed with a thrombosis of the superior mesenteric vein. In both children, the extensive previous surgery and anastomosis were considered the cause of the mesenteric thrombosis. CT angiography confirmed the diagnosis in both cases, in addition to characteristic findings on endoscopy. Paediatricians should suspect this condition in children with severe gastrointestinal bleeding, particularly in children with previous, complex abdominal surgery. PMID:23198238

  3. Duodenal plexiform fibromyxoma as a cause of obscure upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Moris, Demetrios; Spanou, Evangelia; Sougioultzis, Stavros; Dimitrokallis, Nikolaos; Kalisperati, Polyxeni; Delladetsima, Ioanna; Felekouras, Evangelos

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: We are reporting the first-to our knowledge-case of duodenal Plexiform Fibromyxoma causing obscure upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Patient concerns: Plexiform fibromyxoma triggered recurrent upper gastrointestinal bleeding episodes in a 63-year-old man who remained undiagnosed, despite multiple hospitalizations, extensive diagnostic workups and surgical interventions (including gastrectomies), for almost 17 years. Diagnoses-Interventions: During hospitalization for the last bleeding episode, an upper gastrointestinal endoscopy revealed an intestinal hemorrhagic nodule. The lesion was deemed unresectable by endoscopic means. An abdominal computerized tomography disclosed no further lesions and surgery was decided. The lesion at operation was found near the edge of the duodenal stump and treated with pancreas-preserving duodenectomy (1st and 2nd portion). Outcomes: Postoperative recovery was mainly uneventful and a 20-month follow-up finds the patient in good health with no need for blood transfusions. Plexiform fibromyxomas stand for a rare and widely unknown mesenchymal entity. Despite the fact that they closely resemble other gastrointestinal tumors, they distinctly vary in clinical management as well as the histopathology. Clinical awareness and further research are compulsory to elucidate its clinical course and prognosis. PMID:28072751

  4. A Patient Flow Analysis: Identification of Process Inefficiencies and Workflow Metrics at an Ambulatory Endoscopy Unit

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Rowena; Paterson, William G.; Craig, Nancy; Hookey, Lawrence

    2016-01-01

    Background. The increasing demand for endoscopic procedures coincides with the paradigm shift in health care delivery that emphasizes efficient use of existing resources. However, there is limited literature on the range of endoscopy unit efficiencies. Methods. A time and motion analysis of patient flow through the Hotel-Dieu Hospital (Kingston, Ontario) endoscopy unit was followed by qualitative interviews. Procedures were directly observed in three segments: individual endoscopy room use, preprocedure/recovery room, and overall endoscopy unit utilization. Results. Data were collected for 137 procedures in the endoscopy room, 139 procedures in the preprocedure room, and 143 procedures for overall room utilization. The mean duration spent in the endoscopy room was 31.47 min for an esophagogastroduodenoscopy, 52.93 min for a colonoscopy, 30.47 min for a flexible sigmoidoscopy, and 66.88 min for a double procedure. The procedure itself accounted for 8.11 min, 34.24 min, 9.02 min, and 39.13 min for the above procedures, respectively. The focused interviews identified the scheduling template as a major area of operational inefficiency. Conclusions. Despite reasonable procedure times for all except colonoscopies, the endoscopy room durations exceed the allocated times, reflecting the impact of non-procedure-related factors and the need for a revised scheduling template. Endoscopy units have unique operational characteristics and identification of process inefficiencies can lead to targeted quality improvement initiatives. PMID:27446830

  5. [Magnification endoscopy diagnosis of Barrett's esophagus with methylene blue and acetic acid].

    PubMed

    Yagi, Kazuyoshi; Nakamura, Atsuo; Sekine, Atsuo

    2005-08-01

    Intestinal metaplasia of Barrett's esophagus is pre-cancerous lesion and it is important to diagnose intestinal metaplasia by endoscopic examination. Predefined 4 quadrant sampling technique is popular in western countries. However, chromoendoscopy or magnification endoscopy have been tried to diagnose intestinal metaplasia. We have carried out magnification endoscopy with methylene blue and magnification endoscopy with acetic acid. In magnification endoscopy with methylene blue, intestinal metaplasia showed blue-staining area with tubulaous or cavernous pattern. In magnification endoscopy with acetic acid, all of epithelium of Barrett's esophagus changed to whitening surface and it was easy to observe the structure of each epithelium. Intestinal metaplasia showed tubulaous or villous, although fundic type showed pits of small round and cardiac type showed oval pattern with central-slit pits.

  6. Training non-physicians to do endoscopy: Feasibility, effectiveness and cost-effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Ruco, A; Walsh, C M; Cooper, M A; Rabeneck, L

    2016-06-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common cancers in women and men worldwide. Training non-physicians including nurses, nurse practitioners, and physician assistants to perform endoscopy can provide the opportunity to expand access to CRC screening as demand for endoscopic procedures continues to grow. A formal program, incorporating didactic instruction and hands-on practice in addition to oversight, is required to train non-physicians to perform endoscopy as safely and effectively as physicians. Additionally, the context in which the non-physician endoscopy program is organized will dictate key program characteristics including remuneration, participant recruitment and professional and legal considerations. This review explores the evidence in support of non-physician based endoscopy, potential challenges in implementing non-physician endoscopy and requirements for a high-quality program to support training and implementation.

  7. What Are the Key Statistics about Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumors?

    MedlinePlus

    ... About Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumors What Are the Key Statistics About Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumors? Although the exact number ... a Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor? What Are the Key Statistics About Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumors? What’s New in Gastrointestinal ...

  8. Flexor Digitorum Accessorius Longus: Importance of Posterior Ankle Endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Batista, Jorge Pablo; del Vecchio, Jorge Javier; Golanó, Pau; Vega, Jordi

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopy for the posterior region of the ankle through two portals is becoming more widespread for the treatment of a large number of conditions which used to be treated with open surgery years ago. The tendon of the flexor hallucis longus (FHL) travels along an osteofibrous tunnel between the posterolateral and posteromedial tubercles of the talus. Chronic inflammation of this tendon may lead to painful stenosing tenosynovitis. The aim of this report is to describe two cases depicting an accessory tendon which is an anatomical variation of the flexor hallucis longus in patients with posterior friction syndrome due to posterior ankle impingement and associated with a posteromedial osteochondral lesion of the talus. The anatomical variation (FDAL) described was a finding during an endoscopy of the posterior region of the ankle, and we have spared it by sectioning the superior flexor retinaculum only. The accessory flexor digitorum longus is an anatomical variation and should be taken into account when performing an arthroscopy of the posterior region of the ankle. We recommend this treatment on this type of injury although we admit this does not make a definite conclusion. PMID:26060592

  9. Pulmonary aspiration of gastric contents during routine endoscopy

    SciTech Connect

    La France, N.D.; Cole, P.; Wolfe, E.; Giardello, F.; Wagner, H.N.

    1985-05-01

    Radioactive tracer studies are a sensitive means to detect occult pulmonary aspiration of gastric contents. A complication of diagnostic endoscopy is aspiration of contents even in fasted patients. The authors have studied 21 hospitalized patients who underwent elective endoscopy (END) for suspected UGI pathology. Fifteen minutes before END, and prior to pharygeal anesthesia, 1 mCi Tc-99m-sulfur colloid, added to the usual 30cc of simethicone routinely administered before END, was given orally. END was performed as usual and 2 hours later anterior 100,000 count images of the chest were obtained. All the studies were interpreted without history or clinical information. Fever developed within 24 hours (and septic shock in 1) in both patients with positive studies while no fever occurred in the remaining patients with negative studies (rho<.001). The authors conclude that oral radionuclide pulmonary aspiration studies may; detect aspiration not recognized by the endoscopist, reveal evidence of aspiration that preceeds adverse clinical signs and symptoms, and be influenced by systemic pre-END drugs known to affect GI secretions and motility.

  10. Bowel preparation regimens for colon capsule endoscopy: a review

    PubMed Central

    Nigar, Sofia; Paleti, Vani; Lane, Devin; Duddempudi, Sushil

    2014-01-01

    Colon capsule endoscopy (CCE) is being actively evaluated as an emerging complementary or alternative procedure for evaluation of the colon. The yield of CCE is significantly dependent on the quality of bowel preparation. In addition to achieving a stool-free colon the bowel preparation protocols need to decrease bubble effect and aid propulsion of the capsule. An extensive English literature search was done using PubMed with search terms of colon capsule endoscopy, PillCam and bowel preparation. Full-length articles which met the criteria were included for review. A total of 12 studies including 1149 patients were reviewed. There was significant variability in the type of bowel preparation regimens. Large-volume (3–4 liters) polyethylene glycol (PEG) was the most widely used laxative. Lower volumes of PEG showed comparable results but larger studies are needed to determine efficacy. Sodium phosphate was used as an effective booster in most studies. Magnesium citrate and ascorbic acid are emerging as promising boosters to replace sodium phosphate when it is contraindicated. The potential benefit of prokinetics needs further evaluation. Over the past decade there has been significant improvement in the bowel preparation regimens for CCE. Further experience and studies are likely to standardize the bowel preparation regimens before CCE is adopted into routine clinical practice. PMID:24790642

  11. Absolute length measurement using manually decided stereo correspondence for endoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, M.; Koishi, T.; Nakaguchi, T.; Tsumura, N.; Miyake, Y.

    2009-02-01

    In recent years, various kinds of endoscope have been developed and widely used to endoscopic biopsy, endoscopic operation and endoscopy. The size of the inflammatory part is important to determine a method of medical treatment. However, it is not easy to measure absolute size of inflammatory part such as ulcer, cancer and polyp from the endoscopic image. Therefore, it is required measuring the size of those part in endoscopy. In this paper, we propose a new method to measure the absolute length in a straight line between arbitrary two points based on the photogrammetry using endoscope with magnetic tracking sensor which gives camera position and angle. In this method, the stereo-corresponding points between two endoscopic images are determined by the endoscopist without any apparatus of projection and calculation to find the stereo correspondences, then the absolute length can be calculated on the basis of the photogrammetry. The evaluation experiment using a checkerboard showed that the errors of the measurements are less than 2% of the target length when the baseline is sufficiently-long.

  12. Contrast limiting factors of optical fiber bundles for flexible endoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega-Quijano, N.; Arce-Diego, J. L.; Fanjul-Vélez, F.

    2008-11-01

    Medical endoscopy constitutes a basic device for the development of minimally invasive procedures for a wide range of medical applications, involving diagnosis, treatment and surgery, as well as biopsy sampling. Its minimally invasive nature results in no surgery, or only small incisions, which involves a minimal hospitalization time. The medical relevance of endoscopes relies on the fact that they are one of the most effective means of early stages of cancer diagnosis, with the subsequent improvement in the patient's quality of life. Flexible endoscopy by means of coherent optical fiber bundles shows both flexibility and a high active area. However, the parallel arrangement of the fibers within the bundle produces interference phenomena between them, which results in optical crosstalk. As a consequence, there is a power exchange between contiguous fibers, producing a worsening in the contrast of the image. In this work, this quality limiting factor is deeply studied. We quantitatively analyze crosstalk, performing several studies that show the limitations imposed to the endoscopic system. Finally, we propose some solutions by an analytical method to accurately determine the appropriate optical fibers for each particular design. The method is also applied to endoscopic OCT.

  13. Autistic disorder and gastrointestinal disease.

    PubMed

    Horvath, Karoly; Perman, Jay A

    2002-10-01

    Autistic disorder is a pervasive developmental disorder manifested in the first 3 years of life by dysfunction in social interaction and communication. Many efforts have been made to explore the biologic basis of this disorder, but the etiology remains unknown. Recent publications describing upper gastrointestinal abnormalities and ileocolitis have focused attention on gastrointestinal function and morphology in these children. High prevalence of histologic abnormalities in the esophagus, stomach, small intestine and colon, and dysfunction of liver conjugation capacity and intestinal permeability were reported. Three surveys conducted in the United States described high prevalence of gastrointestinal symptoms in children with autistic disorder. Treatment of the digestive problems may have positive effects on their behavior.

  14. State of the art in advanced endoscopic imaging for the detection and evaluation of dysplasia and early cancer of the gastrointestinal tract

    PubMed Central

    Coda, Sergio; Thillainayagam, Andrew V

    2014-01-01

    Ideally, endoscopists should be able to detect, characterize, and confirm the nature of a lesion at the bedside, minimizing uncertainties and targeting biopsies and resections only where necessary. However, under conventional white-light inspection – at present, the sole established technique available to most of humanity – premalignant conditions and early cancers can frequently escape detection. In recent years, a range of innovative techniques have entered the endoscopic arena due to their ability to enhance the contrast of diseased tissue regions beyond what is inherently possible with standard white-light endoscopy equipment. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of the state-of-the-art advanced endoscopic imaging techniques available for clinical use that are impacting the way precancerous and neoplastic lesions of the gastrointestinal tract are currently detected and characterized at endoscopy. The basic instrumentation and the physics behind each method, followed by the most influential clinical experience, are described. High-definition endoscopy, with or without optical magnification, has contributed to higher detection rates compared with white-light endoscopy alone and has now replaced ordinary equipment in daily practice. Contrast-enhancement techniques, whether dye-based or computed, have been combined with white-light endoscopy to further improve its accuracy, but histology is still required to clarify the diagnosis. Optical microscopy techniques such as confocal laser endomicroscopy and endocytoscopy enable in vivo histology during endoscopy; however, although of invaluable assistance for tissue characterization, they have not yet made transition between research and clinical use. It is still unknown which approach or combination of techniques offers the best potential. The optimal method will entail the ability to survey wide areas of tissue in concert with the ability to obtain the degree of detailed information provided by

  15. Hedgehog signaling and gastrointestinal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Saqui-Salces, Milena; Merchant, Juanita L.

    2017-01-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) signaling is critical for embryonic development and in differentiation, proliferation, and maintenance of multiple adult tissues. De-regulation of the Hh pathway is associated with birth defects and cancer. In the gastrointestinal tract, Hh ligands Sonic (Shh) and Indian (Ihh), as well as the receptor Patched (Ptch1), and transcription factors of Glioblastoma family (Gli) are all expressed during development. In the adult, Shh expression is restricted to the stomach and colon, while Ihh expression occurs throughout the luminal gastrointestinal tract, its expression being highest in the proximal duodenum. Several studies have demonstrated a requirement for Hh signaling during gastrointestinal tract development. However to date, the specific role of the Hh pathway in the adult stomach and intestine is not completely understood. The current review will place into context the implications of recent published data related to the biochemistry and cell biology of Hh signaling on the luminal gastrointestinal tract during development, normal physiology and subsequently carcinogenesis. PMID:20307590

  16. Epigenetic mechanisms and gastrointestinal development

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This review considers the hypothesis that nutrition during infancy affects developmental epigenetics in the gut, causing metabolic imprinting of gastrointestinal (GI) structure and function. Fundamentals of epigenetic gene regulation are reviewed, with an emphasis on the epigenetic mechanism of DNA ...

  17. Role of small bowel capsule endoscopy in the diagnosis and management of iron deficiency anemia in elderly: a comprehensive review of the current literature.

    PubMed

    Muhammad, Adnan; Vidyarthi, Gitanjali; Brady, Patrick

    2014-07-14

    Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) is common and often under recognized problem in the elderly. It may be the result of multiple factors including a bleeding lesion in the gastrointestinal tract. Twenty percent of elderly patients with IDA have a negative upper and lower endoscopy and two-thirds of these have a lesion in the small bowel (SB). Capsule endoscopy (CE) provides direct visualization of entire SB mucosa, which was not possible before. It is superior to push enteroscopy, enteroclysis and barium radiography for diagnosing clinically significant SB pathology resulting in IDA. Angioectasia is one of the commonest lesions seen on the CE in elderly with IDA. The diagnostic yield of CE for IDA progressively increases with advancing age, and is highest among patients over 85 years of age. Balloon assisted enteroscopy is used to treat the lesions seen on CE. CE has some limitations mainly lack of therapeutic capability, inability to provide precise location of the lesion and false positive results. Overall CE is a very safe and effective procedure for the evaluation of IDA in elderly.

  18. Confocal laser endomicroscopy and narrow-band imaging-aided endoscopy for in vivo imaging of colitis and colon cancer in mice.

    PubMed

    Waldner, Maximilian J; Wirtz, Stefan; Neufert, Clemens; Becker, Christoph; Neurath, Markus F

    2011-09-01

    New endoscopic techniques such as narrow-band imaging (NBI) and confocal laser endomicroscopy (CLE) have improved the in vivo diagnosis of human gastrointestinal diseases in the colon. Whereas NBI may facilitate the identification of neoplastic lesions, CLE permits real-time histology of the inflamed or neoplastic colonic mucosa through the use of fluorescent dyes. These techniques have been recently adopted for use during ongoing endoscopy in mice. This protocol, which can be completed in 2 h, provides a detailed description of NBI and CLE in the mouse colon. In contrast to other techniques, this approach does not require laparotomy, and it allows direct CLE analysis of lesions identified by NBI. Mice exposed to models of colitis or colorectal cancer are anesthetized and examined with a miniaturized NBI endoscope, which provides an increased contrast of the vasculature. Upon identification of suspicious areas by NBI and the administration of fluorescent dyes, a confocal laser probe can be directed to the area of interest through the endoscope and confocal images can be obtained. Through the use of various fluorescent dyes, different aspects of the mucosa can be assessed. In addition, fluorescence-labeled antibodies can be used for molecular imaging of mice in vivo. Mouse NBI endoscopy and CLE represent reliable and fast high-quality techniques for the endoscopic characterization and molecular imaging of the mucosa in colitis and colon cancer.

  19. The Gastrointestinal Microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Engen, Phillip A.; Green, Stefan J.; Voigt, Robin M.; Forsyth, Christopher B.; Keshavarzian, Ali

    2015-01-01

    The excessive use of alcohol is a global problem causing many adverse pathological health effects and a significant financial health care burden. This review addresses the effect of alcohol consumption on the microbiota in the gastrointestinal tract (GIT). Although data are limited in humans, studies highlight the importance of changes in the intestinal microbiota in alcohol-related disorders. Alcohol-induced changes in the GIT microbiota composition and metabolic function may contribute to the well-established link between alcohol-induced oxidative stress, intestinal hyperpermeability to luminal bacterial products, and the subsequent development of alcoholic liver disease (ALD), as well as other diseases. In addition, clinical and preclinical data suggest that alcohol-related disorders are associated with quantitative and qualitative dysbiotic changes in the intestinal microbiota and may be associated with increased GIT inflammation, intestinal hyperpermeability resulting in endotoxemia, systemic inflammation, and tissue damage/organ pathologies including ALD. Thus, gut-directed interventions, such as probiotic and synbiotic modulation of the intestinal microbiota, should be considered and evaluated for prevention and treatment of alcohol-associated pathologies. PMID:26695747

  20. CDC Group EO-4 and Candida tropicalis Peritonitis in a Patient on Peritoneal Dialysis after Upper Endoscopy, Colonoscopy and Coil Embolization of the Gastroduodenal Artery.

    PubMed

    Gayen, Shameek; Ziemba, Yonah; Jaiswal, Shikha; Frank, Adam; Brahmbhatt, Yasmin

    2016-01-01

    Peritoneal dialysis (PD) is an excellent form of renal replacement therapy for many patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Over 10,000 patients receive PD in the United States [United States Renal Data System: 2015 USRDS Annual Data Report: Epidemiology of Kidney Disease in the United States, 2015]. PD has superior outcomes compared to hemodialysis in the first 2 years of ESRD [Sinnakirouchenan and Holley: Adv Chronic Kidney Dis 2011;18: 428-432]. However, peritonitis is a known complication and may result in significant morbidity and necessitate transition to hemodialysis, which increases medical costs [Holley and Piraino: Semin Dial 1990;3: 245-248]. We report the first case of a PD patient who underwent endoscopy, colonoscopy and CT angiogram with coil embolization for gastrointestinal bleeding without antibiotic prophylaxis and subsequently developed CDC group EO-4 organism and fungal peritonitis.

  1. CDC Group EO-4 and Candida tropicalis Peritonitis in a Patient on Peritoneal Dialysis after Upper Endoscopy, Colonoscopy and Coil Embolization of the Gastroduodenal Artery

    PubMed Central

    Gayen, Shameek; Ziemba, Yonah; Jaiswal, Shikha; Frank, Adam; Brahmbhatt, Yasmin

    2016-01-01

    Peritoneal dialysis (PD) is an excellent form of renal replacement therapy for many patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Over 10,000 patients receive PD in the United States [United States Renal Data System: 2015 USRDS Annual Data Report: Epidemiology of Kidney Disease in the United States, 2015]. PD has superior outcomes compared to hemodialysis in the first 2 years of ESRD [Sinnakirouchenan and Holley: Adv Chronic Kidney Dis 2011;18: 428-432]. However, peritonitis is a known complication and may result in significant morbidity and necessitate transition to hemodialysis, which increases medical costs [Holley and Piraino: Semin Dial 1990;3: 245-248]. We report the first case of a PD patient who underwent endoscopy, colonoscopy and CT angiogram with coil embolization for gastrointestinal bleeding without antibiotic prophylaxis and subsequently developed CDC group EO-4 organism and fungal peritonitis. PMID:28100993

  2. Gastrointestinal mucormycosis in immunocompromised hosts.

    PubMed

    Dioverti, M Veronica; Cawcutt, Kelly A; Abidi, Maheen; Sohail, M Rizwan; Walker, Randall C; Osmon, Douglas R

    2015-12-01

    Invasive mucormycosis is a rare fungal infection in immunocompromised hosts, but it carries a high mortality rate. Primary gastrointestinal disease is the least frequent form of presentation. Early diagnosis and treatment are critical in the management; however, symptoms are typically non-specific in gastrointestinal disease, leading to delayed therapy. To describe the clinical presentation, diagnosis, treatment and outcomes of gastrointestinal mucormycosis in immunocompromised hosts, we reviewed all cases of primary gastrointestinal mucormycosis in immunocompromised hosts reported in English literature as well as in our Institution from January 1st 1991 to December 31st 2013 for a total of 31 patients. About 52% of patients underwent solid organ transplant (SOT), while the rest had an underlying haematologic malignancy. Abdominal pain was the most common presenting symptom, followed by gastrointestinal bleeding and fever. Gastric disease was more common in SOT, whereas those with haematologic malignancy presented with intestinal disease (P = 0.002). Although gastrointestinal mucormycosis remains an uncommon condition in immunocompromised hosts, it carries significant morbidity and mortality, particularly in cases with intestinal involvement. A high index of suspicion is of utmost importance to institute early and appropriate therapy and improve outcomes.

  3. Lipomas of the gastrointestinal system.

    PubMed

    Dolai, Matilda; Andrejić, Bojana; Ivanov, Dejan

    2012-01-01

    Lipomas are rare benign tumors in the gastrointestinal system. Within the gastrointestinal system, 65% of the lipomas are located in the colon (sigmoid part of the colon or rectum) and rarely in the stomach and esophagus. The paper presents two gastrointestinal lipomas. First is the case of lipoma of the sigmoid colon and the other one is gastric lipoma. In both cases the material was sent for histopathological analysis due to suspicion of malignancy of the lesions. In both cases, the histopathologic analysis showed tumor made of mature adipocytes, localized in the submucosa both of the stomach and intestine. Hypercellularity and/or atypia of the cell was found in neither case. Lipomas are shown because of its atypical localization and clinically suspicious malignancy in the stomach and sigmoid colon. These cases show that the applied methods of preoperative diagnosis of tumors in the gastrointestinal system are not sufficient to determine the origin and biological behavior of tumors. Histopathological diagnosis provides a correct insight into the nature of tumors and determine the course of treatment. This paper presents a rare localization of lipomas in the gastrointestinal system. The preoperative diagnosis of lesions in the gastrointestinal system may not be sufficient to determine the origin and biological behavior of the lesions, hence the histopathological diagnosis gives an accurate insight into the nature of the change, preventing the possibility of further aggressive therapy.

  4. Capsule endoscopy in patients with cardiac pacemakers, implantable cardioverter defibrillators and left heart assist devices

    PubMed Central

    Bandorski, Dirk; Höltgen, Reinhard; Stunder, Dominik; Keuchel, Martin

    2014-01-01

    According to the recommendations of the US Food and Drug Administration and manufacturers, capsule endoscopy should not be used in patients carrying implanted cardiac devices. For this review we considered studies indexed (until 30.06.2013) in Medline [keywords: capsule endoscopy, small bowel endoscopy, cardiac pacemaker, implantable cardioverter defibrillator, interference, left heart assist device], technical information from Given Imaging and one own publication (not listed in Medline). Several in vitro and in vivo studies included patients with implanted cardiac devices who underwent capsule endoscopy. No clinically relevant interference was noticed. Initial reports on interference with a simulating device were not reproduced. Furthermore technical data of PillCam (Given Imaging) demonstrate that the maximum transmission power is below the permitted limits for cardiac devices. Hence, impairment of cardiac pacemaker, defibrillator or left ventricular heart assist device function by capsule endoscopy is not expected. However, wireless telemetry can cause dysfunction of capsule endoscopy recording. Application of capsule endoscopy is feasible and safe in patients with implanted cardiac devices such as pacemakers, cardioverter defibrillators, and left heart assist devices. Development of new technologies warrants future re-evaluation. PMID:24714370

  5. Primary gastrointestinal lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Aledavood, Amir; Nasiri, Mohammad Reza Ghavam; Memar, Bahram; Shahidsales, Soodabeh; Raziee, Hamid Reza; Ghafarzadegan, Kamran; Mohtashami, Samira

    2012-01-01

    Background: Extranodal lymphoma may arise anywhere outside lymph nodes mostly in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract as non-Hodgkin's disease. We reviewed the clinicopathological features and treatment results of patients with primary GI lymphoma. Materials and Methods: A total number of 30 cases with primary GI lymphoma were included in this study. Patients referred to the Radiation Oncology Department of Omid Hospital (Mashhad, Iran) during a 5-year period (2006-11). Clinical, paraclinical, and radiological data was collected from medical records of the patients. Results: Out of the 30 patients with primary GI lymphoma in the study, 12 were female (40%) and 18 were male (60%) (male to female ratio: 3/2). B symptoms were present in 27 patients (90%). Antidiuretic hormone (LDH) levels were elevated in 9 patients (32.1%). The most common primary site was stomach in 14 cases (46.7%). Other common sites included small intestine and colon each in 8 patients (26.7%). All patients had histopathologically proven non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. The most common histologic subtype was diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBL) in 16 patients (53.3%). In addition, 28 patients (93.3%) received chemotherapy with cyclophosphamide, vincristine, doxorubicin, prednisolone (CHOP regimen). The median course of chemotherapy was 6 cources. Moreover, 8 patients (26.7%) received radiotherapy with cobalt 60. The median follow-up time was 26 months. The overall 5-year survival rate was 53% and the median survival time was 60 months. Conclusion: Primary GI lymphoma is commonly seen in stomach and small intestine and mostly is DLBCL or mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma. PMID:23626617

  6. Gastrointestinal Physiology and Function.

    PubMed

    Greenwood-Van Meerveld, Beverley; Johnson, Anthony C; Grundy, David

    2017-02-08

    The gastrointestinal (GI) system is responsible for the digestion and absorption of ingested food and liquids. Due to the complexity of the GI tract and the substantial volume of material that could be covered under the scope of GI physiology, this chapter briefly reviews the overall function of the GI tract, and discusses the major factors affecting GI physiology and function, including the intestinal microbiota, chronic stress, inflammation, and aging with a focus on the neural regulation of the GI tract and an emphasis on basic brain-gut interactions that serve to modulate the GI tract. GI diseases refer to diseases of the esophagus, stomach, small intestine, colon, and rectum. The major symptoms of common GI disorders include recurrent abdominal pain and bloating, heartburn, indigestion/dyspepsia, nausea and vomiting, diarrhea, and constipation. GI disorders rank among the most prevalent disorders, with the most common including esophageal and swallowing disorders, gastric and peptic ulcer disease, gastroparesis or delayed gastric emptying, irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Many GI disorders are difficult to diagnose and their symptoms are not effectively managed. Thus, basic research is required to drive the development of novel therapeutics which are urgently needed. One approach is to enhance our understanding of gut physiology and pathophysiology especially as it relates to gut-brain communications since they have clinical relevance to a number of GI complaints and represent a therapeutic target for the treatment of conditions including inflammatory diseases of the GI tract such as IBD and functional gut disorders such as IBS.

  7. Childhood functional gastrointestinal disorders

    PubMed Central

    Rasquin-Weber, A; Hyman, P; Cucchiara, S; Fleisher, D; Hyams, J; Milla, P; Staiano, A

    1999-01-01

    This is the first attempt at defining criteria for functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs) in infancy, childhood, and adolescence. The decision-making process was as for adults and consisted of arriving at consensus, based on clinical experience. This paper is intended to be a quick reference. The classification system selected differs from the one used in the adult population in that it is organized according to main complaints instead of being organ-targeted. Because the child is still developing, some disorders such as toddler's diarrhea (or functional diarrhea) are linked to certain physiologic stages; others may result from behavioral responses to sphincter function acquisition such as fecal retention; others will only be recognizable after the child is cognitively mature enough to report the symptoms (e.g., dyspepsia). Infant regurgitation, rumination, and cyclic vomiting constitute the vomiting disorders. Abdominal pain disorders are classified as: functional dyspepsia, irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), functional abdominal pain, abdominal migraine, and aerophagia. Disorders of defecation include: infant dyschezia, functional constipation, functional fecal retention, and functional non-retentive fecal soiling. Some disorders, such as IBS and dyspepsia and functional abdominal pain, are exact replications of the adult criteria because there are enough data to confirm that they represent specific and similar disorders in pediatrics. Other disorders not included in the pediatric classification, such as functional biliary disorders, do occur in children; however, existing data are insufficient to warrant including them at the present time. For these disorders, it is suggested that, for the time being, clinicians refer to the criteria established for the adult population.


Keywords: infant vomiting; cyclic vomiting syndrome; functional dyspepsia in children; irritable bowel syndrome in children; functional abdominal pain in children; functional

  8. Dexmedetomidine-ketamine sedation during upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and biopsy in a patient with Duchenne muscular dystrophy and egg allergy

    PubMed Central

    Raman, Vidya; Yacob, Desale; Tobias, Joseph D

    2012-01-01

    Sedation during invasive procedures provides appropriate humanitarian care as well as facilitating the completion of procedure. Although generally safe and effective, adverse effects may occur especially in patients with co-morbid diseases. In many cases, given its rapid onset and offset, propofol is chosen to provide sedation during various invasive procedures. We present a nine-year-old, 45 kg child with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) who presented for esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD). Given the egg allergy, which was a relative contraindication to the use of propofol, and the potential risk of malignant hyperthermia due to DMD, a combination of dexmedetomidine and ketamine was used for procedural sedation. Dexmedetomidine was administered as a loading dose of 1 μg/kg along with a single bolus dose of ketamine (1 mg/kg). This was followed by a dexmedetomidine infusion at 0.5 μg/kg/hour. The patient tolerated the procedure well and was discharged to home. Previous reports regarding the use of dexmedetomidine and ketamine for procedural sedation are reviewed and the potential efficacy of this combination is discussed. PMID:22624101

  9. Role of virtual reality simulation in endoscopy training.

    PubMed

    Harpham-Lockyer, Louis; Laskaratos, Faidon-Marios; Berlingieri, Pasquale; Epstein, Owen

    2015-12-10

    Recent advancements in virtual reality graphics and models have allowed virtual reality simulators to be incorporated into a variety of endoscopic training programmes. Use of virtual reality simulators in training programmes is thought to improve skill acquisition amongst trainees which is reflected in improved patient comfort and safety. Several studies have already been carried out to ascertain the impact that usage of virtual reality simulators may have upon trainee learning curves and how this may translate to patient comfort. This article reviews the available literature in this area of medical education which is particularly relevant to all parties involved in endoscopy training and curriculum development. Assessment of the available evidence for an optimal exposure time with virtual reality simulators and the long-term benefits of their use are also discussed.

  10. PillCam colon capsule endoscopy (PCCE) in colonic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Diseases affecting the colon are common worldwide and can cause a major health problem. Colorectal cancer (CRC) as well as Inflammatory bowel diseases represent a major cause of morbidity and mortality in western countries. PillCam colon capsule endoscopy (PCCE) is a novel and promising technology that can be useful for the screening and monitoring of colonic diseases. In the recent years many articles examined the use of various versions of PCCE—the 1st and 2nd generation versus various other endoscopic or radiologic modalities both for detection of colonic polyps or cancer and in both ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn’s disease. The aim of the current review is to provide up to date information regarding the use and usefulness of this method in these disease. PMID:27668227

  11. Portable wireless power transmission system for video capsule endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhiwei, Jia; Guozheng, Yan; Bingquan, Zhu

    2014-10-01

    Wireless power transmission is considered a practical way of overcoming the power shortage of wireless capsule endoscopy (VCE). However, most patients cannot tolerate the long hours of lying in a fixed transmitting coil during diagnosis. To develop a portable wireless power transmission system for VCE, a compact transmitting coil and a portable inverter circuit driven by rechargeable batteries are proposed. The couple coils, optimized considering the stability and safety conditions, are 28 turns of transmitting coil and six strands of receiving coil. The driven circuit is designed according to the portable principle. Experiments show that the integrated system could continuously supply power to a dual-head VCE for more than 8 h at a frame rate of 30 frames per second with resolution of 320 × 240. The portable VCE exhibits potential for clinical applications, but requires further improvement and tests.

  12. About human taeniasis and Taenia saginata diagnosis by endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Galán Puchades, María Teresa

    2016-10-01

    La carta al editor se refiere al artículo de Canaval-Zuleta et al. aceptado para publicación, titulado "Endoscopy as an alternative diagnostic and therapeutic technique for Taenia saginata". El trabajo presenta una serie de incorrecciones que deben ser aclaradas, o al menos parte de ellas en solo 300 palabras. La información sobre las vias de infeccion en taeniasis, así como la patogenia y técnicas de diagnóstico, no se ajustan a la realidad. Asimismo, ya está publicado que el diagnóstico por endoscopia es una técnica muy sensible pero nada específica, pues no permite distinguir entre las 3 especies humanas del género Taenia.

  13. A wide-angle camera module for disposable endoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shim, Dongha; Yeon, Jesun; Yi, Jason; Park, Jongwon; Park, Soo Nam; Lee, Nanhee

    2016-08-01

    A wide-angle miniaturized camera module for disposable endoscope is demonstrated in this paper. A lens module with 150° angle of view (AOV) is designed and manufactured. All plastic injection-molded lenses and a commercial CMOS image sensor are employed to reduce the manufacturing cost. The image sensor and LED illumination unit are assembled with a lens module. The camera module does not include a camera processor to further reduce its size and cost. The size of the camera module is 5.5 × 5.5 × 22.3 mm3. The diagonal field of view (FOV) of the camera module is measured to be 110°. A prototype of a disposable endoscope is implemented to perform a pre-clinical animal testing. The esophagus of an adult beagle dog is observed. These results demonstrate the feasibility of a cost-effective and high-performance camera module for disposable endoscopy.

  14. Current role of capsule endoscopy in Crohn’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Luján-Sanchis, Marisol; Sanchis-Artero, Laura; Larrey-Ruiz, Laura; Peño-Muñoz, Laura; Núñez-Martínez, Paola; Castillo-López, Génesis; González-González, Lara; Clemente, Carlos Boix; Albert Antequera, Cecilia; Durá-Ayet, Ana; Sempere-Garcia-Argüelles, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Capsule endoscopy (CE) currently plays an important role in Crohn’s disease (CD). It is a noninvasive technique that has led to a breakthrough in the endoscopic diagnosis of diseases of the small intestine. Its superior diagnostic performance and excellent safety profile lead to its considerable acceptance on the part of the patient. This paper reviews current indications of CE in three stages of clinical practice: Suspected CD, unclassified colitis and its extensive role in diagnosed CD. The diagnostic and therapeutic impact of the results of CE on the monitoring of this disease is also reviewed. Knowledge of its applications, the interpretation of its results in an appropriate context and the existence of a validated endoscopic activity index could change the way in which these patients are managed. The definition of mucosal healing and postoperative recurrence by means of endoscopic scoring systems will endow CE with new applications in the management of CD in the near future. PMID:27668067

  15. Principles of infection prevention and reprocessing in ENT endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Axel; Kohnen, Wolfgang; Israel, Susanne; Ryll, Sylvia; Hübner, Nils-Olaf; Luckhaupt, Horst; Hosemann, Werner

    2015-01-01

    This article gives an overview on the principles of reprocessing of rigid and flexible endoscopes used in ENT units including structural and spatial requirements based on general and ENT-specific risks of infection associated with diagnostic and therapeutic endoscopy. The underlying legal principles as well as recommendations from scientific societies will be exemplified in order to give a practical guidance to the otorhinolaryngologist. Preliminary results of a small nation-wide survey on infection control standards based on data of 29 ENT practices in Germany reveal current deficits of varying degree concerning infection control management including reprocessing of endoscopes. The presented review aims to give support to the establishment of a structured infection control management program including the evaluation of results by means of a prospective surveillance. PMID:26770284

  16. Non-Helicobacter pylori, non-NSAIDs peptic ulcers: a descriptive study on patients referred to Taleghani hospital with upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Rajabalinia, Hasan; Ghobakhlou, Mehdi; Nikpour, Shahriar; Dabiri, Reza; Bahriny, Rasoul; Sherafat, Somayeh Jahani; Moghaddam, Pardis Ketabi

    2012-01-01

    Aim The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the number and proportion of various causes of upper gastrointestinal bleeding and actual numbers of non-NSAID, non-Helicobacter pylori (H.pylori) peptic ulcers seen in endoscopy of these patients. Background The number and the proportion of patients with non- H.pylori, non-NSAIDs peptic ulcer disease leading to upper gastrointestinal bleeding is believed to be increasing after eradication therapy for H.pylori. Patients and methods Medical records of patients referred to the emergency room of Taleghani hospital from 2010 with a clinical diagnosis of upper gastrointestinal bleeding (hematemesis, coffee ground vomiting and melena) were included in this study. Patients with hematochezia with evidence of a source of bleeding from upper gastrointestinal tract in endoscopy were also included in this study. Results In this study, peptic ulcer disease (all kinds of ulcers) was seen in 61 patients which were about 44.85% of abnormalities seen on endoscopy of patients. Among these 61 ulcers, 44 were duodenal ulcer, 22 gastric ulcer (5 patients had the both duodenal and gastric ulcers). Multiple biopsies were taken and be sent to laboratory for Rapid Urease Test and pathological examination. About 65.53% of patients had ulcers associated with H.pylori, 9.83% had peptic ulcer disease associated with NSAIDs and 11.47% of patients had ulcers associated with both H.pylori and consumption of NSAIDs. 13.11% of patients had non-NSAIDs non- H.pylori peptic ulcer disease. Conclusion The results of this study supports the results of other studies that suggest the incidence of H.pylori infection related with duodenal ulcer is common, and that non-H pylori and non-NSAIDs duodenal ulcer is also common. PMID:24834225

  17. Capsule endoscopy for the diagnosis and follow up of Crohn’s disease: a comprehensive review of current status

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Michael Dam; Brodersen, Jacob Broder; Kjeldsen, Jens

    2017-01-01

    Capsule endoscopy (CE) has revolutionized the diagnosis and monitoring of small bowel Crohn’s disease (CD). The procedure is patient friendly and noninvasive, and compared to cross-sectional imaging, CE allows a direct and detailed evaluation of the entire small bowel mucosa with a high sensitivity for the earliest lesions of CD. Today, CE is the leading modality for visualizing the small bowel in suspected CD, and validated activity indices are available for the follow up of patients with established CD. CE of the entire gastrointestinal tract (panenteric CE) was recently introduced as a new diagnostic approach in patients examined for CD, and preliminary results are promising. There are important limitations, involving mainly capsule retention. Furthermore, a diagnostic criterion for CD has never been validated, and lesions detected by CE are not specific for CD. Hence, concern has been raised about a low specificity compared to other diagnostic modalities. Important questions about the optimal bowel preparation, selection of patients for CE and the optimal reading protocol remain to be clarified. The aim of this review is to evaluate the performance of CE for diagnosing CD and assess disease activity in known CD; to compare the diagnostic accuracy of CE to that of cross-sectional imaging; to discuss limitations; and to define the place of CE in the diagnostic algorithm in suspected or known CD. PMID:28243037

  18. Is laparoscopic resection the appropriate management of a jejunal gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST)? Report of a case.

    PubMed

    Pitiakoudis, Michail; Zezos, Petros; Courcoutsakis, Nikos; Papanas, Nikolaos; Giatromanolaki, Alexandra; Sivridis, Efthimios; Kouklakis, Georgios; Simopoulos, Constantinos

    2010-10-01

    A 51-year-old female patient presented with iron deficiency anemia. Upper and lower gastrointestinal endoscopy were unremarkable. Computed tomography enteroclysis showed an ovoid 3×4-cm jejunal tumor with intraluminal protrusion and exophytic growth pattern, without lymphadenopathy or metastatic disease. Laparoscopic resection of the tumor was successfully carried out. Histologically, a mesenchymal tumor composed of spindle cells with an interlacing bundle pattern and high-mitotic activity greater than 10 mitoses/50 high-power fields were observed. The immunohistochemistry showed that the tumor was KIT (CD117)-, vimentin-, smooth muscle actin-, and S-100-positive, whereas it was CD34-negative. These findings were consistent with the features of a gastrointestinal stromal tumor. The patient had an uneventful postoperative course, and after 10 months of follow-up, she is well without any evidence of tumor recurrence.

  19. A Case of an Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding Due to a Ruptured Dissection of a Right Aortic Arch

    SciTech Connect

    Born, Christine; Forster, Andreas; Rock, Clemens; Pfeifer, Klaus-Juergen; Rieger, Johannes; Reiser, Maximilian

    2003-09-15

    We report a case of severe upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage with a rare underlying cause. The patient was unconscious when he was admitted to the hospital. No chest radiogram was performed. Routine diagnostic measures, including endoscopy, failed to reveal the origin of the bleeding, which was believed to originate from the esophagus secondary to a peptic ulcer or varices. Exploratory laparotomy added no further information, but contrast-enhanced multislice computed tomography (MSCT) of the chest showed dextroposition of the widened aortic arch with a ruptured type-B dissection and a consecutive aorto-esophageal fistula (AEF). The patient died on the day of admission. Noninvasive MSCT angiography gives rapid diagnostic information on patients with occult upper gastrointestinal bleeding and should be considered before more invasive conventional angiography or surgery.

  20. Ankaferd Blood Stopper for controlling gastrointestinal bleeding due to distinct benign lesions refractory to conventional antihemorrhagic measures

    PubMed Central

    Kurt, Mevlut; Onal, Ibrahim Koral; Akdogan, Meral; Kekilli, Murat; Arhan, Mehmet; Sayilir, Abdurrahim; Oztas, Erkin; Haznedaroglu, Ibrahim Celalettin

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the hemostatic efficacy of the Ankaferd Blood Stopper (ABS, Ankaferd Health Products Ltd, Turkey) hemostatic agent for controlling gastrointestinal bleeding associated with various benign lesions refractory to conventional antihemorrhagic measures. METHODS: The records of all patients who underwent upper and lower endoscopy procedures at the Turkiye Yuksek Ihtisas Teaching and Research Hospital (Ankara, Turkey) between April 2008 and June 2009 were reviewed. Patients in whom ABS was used as a primary or adjuvant hemostatic agent were included in the study. Rates of bleeding control and postprocedural complications were documented. RESULTS: Hemostasis with no immediate complications was achieved in all patients within seconds of endoscopic application of ABS. CONCLUSIONS: ABS may have a role as a primary treatment or as an adjuvant to conventional modalities used to control gastrointestinal bleeding. Prospective controlled studies are needed to help establish its efficacy and, perhaps, offer a comparison with conventional hemostatic interventions. PMID:20559581

  1. Gastrointestinal Bleeding as a Complication of Serial Transverse Enteroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Jeremy G.; Stamm, Danielle A.; Modi, Biren P.; Duggan, Christopher; Jaksic, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Serial transverse enteroplasty (STEP) lengthens and tapers bowel in patients with intestinal failure and has a generally low complication profile. Evaluation and treatment of serious gastrointestinal bleeding (GIB) in three STEP patients is described. Methods Records of patients participating in an interdisciplinary intestinal rehabilitation program were reviewed to identify those who underwent STEP and had GIB necessitating red blood cell transfusion. Results Of 296 patients, 23 underwent STEP and 3 (13%) had subsequent GIB requiring transfusion. Underlying diagnoses were multiple atresias/intrauterine volvulus, gastroschisis, and gastroschisis with volvulus. STEP was performed at ages ranging from 3–5 months, using 3–8 stapler firings with an increase in mean bowel length from 23 to 45 cm. GIB was noted at 10–33 months post-op and resulted in 2–7 transfusions per patient over a period of 3–16 months. Gastrointestinal endoscopic evaluation demonstrated ulcers adjacent to the staple lines in two patients. Both had improvement of GIB with enteral antibiotics, sulfasalazine, topical enteral steroids and, ultimately, a period of bowel rest. The third patient had histological evidence of eosinophilic enteritis and was treated sequentially with antibiotics, sulfasalazine, enteral steroids, and an elemental diet. In all three, hemoglobin levels improved despite persistent occult bleeding. Conclusions Significant GIB is a potential late complication of STEP. Endoscopy identified the underlying source of GIB in all three patients. A combination of enteral antibiotics, anti-inflammatory medications, and bowel rest was effective in the treatment of post-STEP GIB, without the need for additional bowel resection. PMID:24851761

  2. Management of Patients with Acute Lower Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Strate, Lisa L.; Gralnek, Ian M.

    2016-01-01

    This guideline provides recommendations for the management of patients with acute overt lower gastrointestinal hemorrhage. Hemodynamic status should be initially assessed with intravascular volume resuscitation started as needed. Risk stratification based upon clinical parameters should be performed to help distinguish patients at high and low-risk of adverse outcomes. Hematochezia associated with hemodynamic instability may be indicative of an upper GI bleeding source and thus warrants an upper endoscopy. In the majority of patients, colonoscopy should be the initial diagnostic procedure and should be performed within 24 hours of patient presentation after adequate colon preparation. Endoscopic hemostasis therapy should be provided to patients with high risk endoscopic stigmata of bleeding including active bleeding, non-bleeding visible vessel, or adherent clot. The endoscopic hemostasis modality used (mechanical, thermal, injection or combination) is most often guided by the etiology of bleeding, access to the bleeding site, and endoscopist experience with the various hemostasis modalities. Repeat colonoscopy, with endoscopic hemostasis performed if indicated, should be considered for patients with evidence of recurrent bleeding. Radiographic interventions (tagged red blood cell scintigraphy, CT angiography, angiography) should be considered in high-risk patients with ongoing bleeding who do not respond adequately to resuscitation, and who are unlikely to tolerate bowel preparation and colonoscopy. Strategies to prevent recurrent bleeding should be considered. NSAID use should be avoided in patients with a history of acute lower GI bleeding particularly if secondary to diverticulosis or angioectasia. In patients with established cardiovascular disease who require aspirin (secondary prophylaxis), aspirin should not be discontinued. The exact timing depends on the severity of bleeding, perceived adequacy of hemostasis and the risk of a thromboembolic event. Surgery

  3. Review of diagnostic and therapeutic endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography using several endoscopic methods in patients with surgically altered gastrointestinal anatomy

    PubMed Central

    Shimatani, Masaaki; Takaoka, Makoto; Tokuhara, Mitsuo; Miyoshi, Hideaki; Ikeura, Tsukasa; Okazaki, Kazuichi

    2015-01-01

    The endoscopic approach for biliary diseases in patients with surgically altered gastrointestinal anatomy (SAGA) had been generally deemed impractical. However, it was radically made feasible by the introduction of double balloon endoscopy (DBE) that was originally developed for diagnosis and treatments for small-bowel diseases. Followed by the subsequent development of single-balloon endoscopy (SBE) and spiral endoscopy (SE), interventions using several endoscopes for biliary disease in patients with SAGA widely gained an acceptance as a new modality. Many studies have been made on this new technique. Yet, some problems are to be solved. For instance, the mutual unavailability among devices due to different working lengths and channels, and unestablished standardization of procedural techniques can be raised. Additionally, in an attempt to standardize endoscopic procedures, it is important to evaluate biliary cannulating methods by case with existence of papilla or not. A full comprehension of the features of respective scope types is also required. However there are not many papers written as a review. In our manuscript, we would like to evaluate and make a review of the present status of diagnostic and therapeutic endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography applying DBE, SBE and SE for biliary diseases in patients with SAGA for establishment of these modalities as a new technology and further improvement of the scopes and devices. PMID:26078830

  4. Gastrointestinal Amyloidosis Presenting with Multiple Episodes of Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sang Hyeon Kang, Eun Ju; Park, Jee Won; Jo, Jung Hyun; Kim, Soo Jin; Cho, Jin Han; Kang, Myong Jin; Park, Byeong Ho

    2009-05-15

    Amyloidosis is characterized by the extracellular deposition of amyloid protein in various organs. Gastrointestinal involvement in amyloidosis is common, but a diagnosis of amyloidosis is often delayed. Severe gastrointestinal hemorrhage in amyloidosis is rare but can be fatal in some cases. We experienced a case of a 49-year-old man who presented with recurrent massive hematochezia. Although embolization was performed eight times for bleeding from different sites of the small intestine, hematochezia did not cease. We report the case, with a review of the literature.

  5. Identification of lesion images from gastrointestinal endoscope based on feature extraction of combinational methods with and without learning process.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ding-Yun; Gan, Tao; Rao, Ni-Ni; Xing, Yao-Wen; Zheng, Jie; Li, Sang; Luo, Cheng-Si; Zhou, Zhong-Jun; Wan, Yong-Li

    2016-08-01

    The gastrointestinal endoscopy in this study refers to conventional gastroscopy and wireless capsule endoscopy (WCE). Both of these techniques produce a large number of images in each diagnosis. The lesion detection done by hand from the images above is time consuming and inaccurate. This study designed a new computer-aided method to detect lesion images. We initially designed an algorithm named joint diagonalisation principal component analysis (JDPCA), in which there are no approximation, iteration or inverting procedures. Thus, JDPCA has a low computational complexity and is suitable for dimension reduction of the gastrointestinal endoscopic images. Then, a novel image feature extraction method was established through combining the algorithm of machine learning based on JDPCA and conventional feature extraction algorithm without learning. Finally, a new computer-aided method is proposed to identify the gastrointestinal endoscopic images containing lesions. The clinical data of gastroscopic images and WCE images containing the lesions of early upper digestive tract cancer and small intestinal bleeding, which consist of 1330 images from 291 patients totally, were used to confirm the validation of the proposed method. The experimental results shows that, for the detection of early oesophageal cancer images, early gastric cancer images and small intestinal bleeding images, the mean values of accuracy of the proposed method were 90.75%, 90.75% and 94.34%, with the standard deviations (SDs) of 0.0426, 0.0334 and 0.0235, respectively. The areas under the curves (AUCs) were 0.9471, 0.9532 and 0.9776, with the SDs of 0.0296, 0.0285 and 0.0172, respectively. Compared with the traditional related methods, our method showed a better performance. It may therefore provide worthwhile guidance for improving the efficiency and accuracy of gastrointestinal disease diagnosis and is a good prospect for clinical application.

  6. Gastrointestinal Symptoms of Marathon Runners

    PubMed Central

    Keeffe, Emmet B.; Lowe, Daniel K.; Goss, J. Richard; Wayne, Robert

    1984-01-01

    A survey of 707 participants in the 13th Annual Trail's End Marathon in Seaside, Oregon, showed a high incidence of gastrointestinal disturbances, predominantly of the lower tract, associated with long-distance running. The urge to defecate, both during and immediately after running, occurred in over a third of runners. Bowel movements (35%) and diarrhea (19%) were relatively common after running, and runners occasionally interrupted hard runs or races for bowel movements (18%) or diarrhea (10%). Lower gastrointestinal disturbances were more frequent in women than in men and in younger than in older runners. Awareness of the frequency and nature of gastrointestinal symptoms documented by this survey will assist physicians in evaluating abdominal complaints in runners. PMID:6506684

  7. Gastrointestinal symptoms of marathon runners.

    PubMed

    Keeffe, E B; Lowe, D K; Goss, J R; Wayne, R

    1984-10-01

    A survey of 707 participants in the 13th Annual Trail's End Marathon in Seaside, Oregon, showed a high incidence of gastrointestinal disturbances, predominantly of the lower tract, associated with long-distance running. The urge to defecate, both during and immediately after running, occurred in over a third of runners. Bowel movements (35%) and diarrhea (19%) were relatively common after running, and runners occasionally interrupted hard runs or races for bowel movements (18%) or diarrhea (10%). Lower gastrointestinal disturbances were more frequent in women than in men and in younger than in older runners. Awareness of the frequency and nature of gastrointestinal symptoms documented by this survey will assist physicians in evaluating abdominal complaints in runners.

  8. Glycomic Approaches for the Discovery of Targets in Gastrointestinal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mereiter, Stefan; Balmaña, Meritxell; Gomes, Joana; Magalhães, Ana; Reis, Celso A.

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) cancer is the most common group of malignancies and many of its types are among the most deadly. Various glycoconjugates have been used in clinical practice as serum biomarker for several GI tumors, however, with limited diagnose application. Despite the good accessibility by endoscopy of many GI organs, the lack of reliable serum biomarkers often leads to late diagnosis of malignancy and consequently low 5-year survival rates. Recent advances in analytical techniques have provided novel glycoproteomic and glycomic data and generated functional information and putative biomarker targets in oncology. Glycosylation alterations have been demonstrated in a series of glycoconjugates (glycoproteins, proteoglycans, and glycosphingolipids) that are involved in cancer cell adhesion, signaling, invasion, and metastasis formation. In this review, we present an overview on the major glycosylation alterations in GI cancer and the current serological biomarkers used in the clinical oncology setting. We further describe recent glycomic studies in GI cancer, namely gastric, colorectal, and pancreatic cancer. Moreover, we discuss the role of glycosylation as a modulator of the function of several key players in cancer cell biology. Finally, we address several state-of-the-art techniques currently applied in this field, such as glycomic and glycoproteomic analyses, the application of glycoengineered cell line models, microarray and proximity ligation assay, and imaging mass spectrometry, and provide an outlook to future perspectives and clinical applications. PMID:27014630

  9. Diagnosis and therapy of non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Biecker, Erwin

    2015-01-01

    Non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) is defined as bleeding proximal to the ligament of Treitz in the absence of oesophageal, gastric or duodenal varices. The clinical presentation varies according to the intensity of bleeding from occult bleeding to melena or haematemesis and haemorrhagic shock. Causes of UGIB are peptic ulcers, Mallory-Weiss lesions, erosive gastritis, reflux oesophagitis, Dieulafoy lesions or angiodysplasia. After admission to the hospital a structured approach to the patient with acute UGIB that includes haemodynamic resuscitation and stabilization as well as pre-endoscopic risk stratification has to be done. Endoscopy offers not only the localisation of the bleeding site but also a variety of therapeutic measures like injection therapy, thermocoagulation or endoclips. Endoscopic therapy is facilitated by acid suppression with proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy. These drugs are highly effective but the best route of application (oral vs intravenous) and the adequate dosage are still subjects of discussion. Patients with ulcer disease are tested for Helicobacter pylori and eradication therapy should be given if it is present. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs have to be discontinued if possible. If discontinuation is not possible, cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors in combination with PPI have the lowest bleeding risk but the incidence of cardiovascular events is increased. PMID:26558151

  10. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography in patients with surgically altered gastrointestinal anatomy.

    PubMed

    Amer, Syed; Horsley-Silva, Jennifer L; Menias, Christine O; Pannala, Rahul

    2015-10-01

    Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) in patients with surgically altered upper gastrointestinal anatomy, such as Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB), can be more challenging compared to those with a normal anatomy. Detailed assessment of cross-sectional imaging features by the radiologist, especially the pancreaticobiliary anatomy, strictures, and stones, is very helpful to the endoscopist in planning the procedure. In addition, any information on enteral anastomoses (for e.g., gastrojejunal strictures and afferent limb obstruction) is also very useful. The endoscopist should review the operative note to understand the exact anatomy prior to procedure. RYGB, which is performed for medically complicated obesity, is the most commonly encountered altered anatomy ERCP procedure. Other situations include patients who have had a pancreaticoduodenectomy or a hepaticojejunostomy. Balloon-assisted deep enteroscopy (single and double-balloon enteroscopy) or rotational endoscopy is often used to traverse the length of the intestine to reach the papilla. In addition, ERCP in these patients is further challenging due to the oblique orientation of the papilla relative to the forward viewing endoscope and the limited enteroscopy-length therapeutic accessories that are currently available. Overall, reported therapeutic success is approximately 70-75% with a complication rate of 3-4%. Alternative approaches include percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography, laparoscopy-assisted ERCP, or surgery. Given the complexity, ERCP in patients with surgically altered anatomy should be performed in close collaboration with body imagers, interventional radiology, and surgical services.

  11. Nabumetone induces less gastrointestinal mucosal changes than diclofenac retard.

    PubMed

    Becvár, R; Urbanová, Z; Vlasáková, V; Vítová, J; Rybár, I; Maldyk, H; Filipowicz-Sosnowska, A; Bernacka, K; Mackiewicz, S; Gömör, B; Rojkovich, B; Siro, B; Bereczki, J; Toth, K; Sukenik, S; Green, L; Ehrenfeld, M; Pavelka, K

    1999-01-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the efficacy and the effects on the mucosa of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) of nabumetone and diclofenac retard in patients with osteoarthritis (OA). An open, multicentre, randomised, comparative, endoscopy-blind parallel group study included 201 patients with nabumetone and 193 patients with diclofenac retard suffering from moderate to severe OA of the knee or hip joint. Twelve clinical efficacy variables were assessed and a portion of the population underwent gastroduodenoscopy. All patients exhibited significant improvement in pain severity and pain relief (p < 0.001 and p < 0.0001, respectively) but there were no differences between the groups for all the efficacy variables. Eleven per cent of patients on nabumetone and 19% on diclofenac experienced GIT side-effects. Sixty-nine patients with nabumetone and 61 with diclofenac underwent gastroduodenoscopy. The differences in the mucosal grade for the oesophagus, stomach and duodenum at baseline were not significant. In the oesophagus there were significantly less changes after treatment with nabumetone (p = 0.007) than with diclofenac; there were similar findings in the stomach (p < 0.001) but the difference in the duodenum was not significant. This study indicates that nabumetone and diclofenac retard have similar efficacy in the treatment of OA, but nabumetone has significantly fewer GIT side-effects.

  12. Evidence based review of the impact of image enhanced endoscopy in the diagnosis of gastric disorders

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Ikram; Ang, Tiing Leong

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the third most common cause of cancer-related death. Advanced stages of gastric cancers generally have grim prognosis. But, good prognosis can be achieved if such cancers are detected, diagnosed and resected at early stages. However, early gastric cancers and its precursors often produce only subtle mucosal changes and therefore quite commonly remain elusive at the conventional examination with white light endoscopy. Image-enhanced endoscopy makes mucosal lesions more conspicuous and can therefore potentially yield earlier and more accurate diagnoses. Recent years have seen growing work of research in support of various types of image enhanced endoscopy (IEE) techniques (e.g., dye-chromoendoscopy; magnification endoscopy; narrow-band imaging; flexible spectral imaging color enhancement; and I-SCAN) for a variety of gastric pathologies. In this review, we will examine the evidence for the utilization of various IEE techniques in the diagnosis of gastric disorders. PMID:28042388

  13. [Portal cavernoma in children revealed by gastrointestinal haemorrhage: about a case].

    PubMed

    Basse, Idrissa; Guèye, Ndéye Rama Diagne; Diop, Dina Cyrienne Obambi; Diawara, Ndiémé Ndiaye; Ba, Aïssatou; Seck, Ndiogou; Thiongane, Aliou; Ba, Abou; Ndongo, Aliou Abdoulaye; Fall, Amadou Lamine; Boiro, Djibril; Thiam, Lamine; Mbengue, Marie

    2016-01-01

    Portal cavernoma is a venous vascular anomaly characterized by the formation of a network of veins whose caliber is increased and carrying portal blood. It is due to a thrombotic and always chronic occlusion of the extra-hepatic portal venous system. This is one of the most common causes of portal hypertension in children. Its severity is mainly associated with an high risk of gastrointestinal haemorrhage. Very few cases have been described mainly in African literature. We report the case of a 4-year old boy admitted with very abundant haematemesis, melena and dizziness associated with anemic syndrome on examination. Laboratory tests showed severe microcytic hypochromic anemia with normal renal and hepatic function. Gastrointestinal endoscopy showed esophageal varices (grade III) with red signs. Abdominal ultrasound showed portal vein formation resulting in the classic "spiderweb", in favor of a cavernoma. Abdominal CT scan confirmed portal cavernoma associated with portal hypertensive syndrome and vascular anomaly like an ectopic splenic vein anastomosis with the trunk formed by the gonadal vein and the inferior mesenteric vein. Therapeutic approach was based on blood transfusion and beta-blocker treatment. Portal cavernoma can be a major complication of vascular malformations often unknown. In case of gastrointestinal haemorrhage in children, diagnosis should be suspected. Its management requires early treatment and should be adapted to the patient's condition in order to prevent a fatal evolution.

  14. Development of enterohepatic fistula after embolization in ileal gastrointestinal stromal tumor: a case report.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yun Ho; Koo, Ja Seol; Jung, Chang Ho; Chung, Sang Yoon; Lee, Jae Joong; Kim, Seung Young; Hyun, Jong Jin; Jung, Sung Woo; Choung, Rok Seon; Lee, Sang Woo; Choi, Jai Hyun

    2013-11-21

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) is a rare mesenchymal tumor of the gastrointestinal tract that has been associated with the formation of fistulas to adjacent organs in few case reports. However, GIST with enterohepatic fistula has not been reported. Here we report the case of an enterohepatic fistula that occurred after embolization of a liver mass originating in the distal ileum. An 87-year-old woman was hospitalized for melena. On initial conventional endoscopy, a bleeding focus in the gastrointestinal tract was not found. Because of massive hematochezia, enteroscopy was performed through the anus. A protruding, ulcerative mass was found in the distal ileum that was suspected to be the source of the bleeding; a biopsy sample was taken. Electrocoagulation was not successful in controlling the bleeding; therefore, embolization was performed. After embolization, the patient developed a high fever and severe abdominal tenderness with rebound tenderness. Follow-up abdominopelvic computed tomography revealed an enterohepatic fistula between the liver and distal ileum. The fistula was treated surgically by segmental resection of the distal ileum and unlooping of the liver mass.

  15. Effective treatment of gastrointestinal bleeding with thalidomide--Chances and limitations.

    PubMed

    Bauditz, Juergen

    2016-03-21

    For more than 50 years bleeding from gastrointestinal angiodysplasias has been treated by hormonal therapy with estrogens and progesterons. After a randomized study finally demonstrated that hormones have no effect on bleeding events and transfusion requirements, therapy has switched to endoscopic coagulation. However, angiodysplasias tend to recur over months to years and endoscopy often has to be repeated for long time periods. Thalidomide, which caused severe deformities in newborn children in the 1960s, is now increasingly used after it was shown to suppress tumor necrosis factor alpha, inhibit angiogenesis and to be also effective for treatment of multiple myeloma. In 2011 thalidomide was proven to be highly effective for treatment of bleeding from gastrointestinal angiodysplasias in a randomized study. Further evidence by uncontrolled studies exists that thalidomide is also useful for treatment of bleeding in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia. In spite of this data, endoscopic therapy remains the treatment of choice in many hospitals, as thalidomide is still notorious for its teratogenicity. However, patients with gastrointestinal bleeding related to angiodysplasias are generally at an age in which women have no child-bearing potential. Teratogenicity is therefore no issue for these elderly patients. Other side-effects of thalidomide like neurotoxicity may limit treatment options but can be monitored safely.

  16. Virtual endoscopy in odontogenic sinus disease. Study technique and main pathological findings.

    PubMed

    Fanucci, Ezio; Leporace, Mario; Di Costanzo, Giuseppe; Mannino, Michela; Simonetti, Giovanni

    2004-09-01

    The use of CT scans in dental pathology is an established technique. The potential applications of Dentascan are further enhanced by the use of virtual navigation software, resulting in endoscopy-like imaging of the maxillary sinus, thus optimising both the diagnostic and therapeutic approach to sinus pathology of dental origin. The aim of this paper is to illustrate the technical-methodological aspects of maxillary sinus virtual endoscopy with Dentascan software and to document the most important and frequent diseases.

  17. Place of upper endoscopy before and after bariatric surgery: A multicenter experience with 3219 patients

    PubMed Central

    Abd Ellatif, Mohamed E; Alfalah, Haitham; Asker, Walid A; El Nakeeb, Ayman E; Magdy, Alaa; Thabet, Waleed; Ghaith, Mohamed A; Abdallah, Emad; Shahin, Rania; Shoma, Asharf; Dawoud, Ibraheim E; Abbas, Ashraf; Salama, Asaad F; Ali Gamal, Maged

    2016-01-01

    or more) were found in 805 (25%) patients (19% group A vs 6% group B, P = 0.001). Seven patients had critical events during conscious sedation due to severe hypoxemia (< 60%). Rate of stricture in our study