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Sample records for gastrointestinal hemorrhage

  1. Upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage caused by superwarfarin poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Shu-Lei; Li, Peng; Ji, Ming; Zong, Ye; Zhang, Shu-Tian

    2010-01-01

    Superwarfarins are a class of rodenticides. Gastrointestinal hemorrhage is a fatal complication of superwarfarin poisoning, requiring immediate treatment. Here, we report a 55-year-old woman with tardive upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage caused by superwarfarin poisoning after endoscopic cold mucosal biopsy. PMID:20355251

  2. Treatment of Nonvariceal Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage by Transcatheter Embolization

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Muhammad; Ul Haq, Tanveer; Salam, Basit; Beg, Madiha; Azeemuddin, Muhammad

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate the sensitivity of mesenteric angiography, technical success of hemostasis, clinical success rate, and complications of transcatheter embolization for the treatment of acute nonvariceal gastrointestinal hemorrhage. Material and Methods. A retrospective review of 200 consecutive patients who underwent mesenteric arteriography for acute nonvariceal gastrointestinal hemorrhage between February 2004 and February 2011 was done. Results. Of 200 angiographic studies, 114 correctly revealed the bleeding site with mesenteric angiography. 47 (41%) patients had upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage and 67 (59%) patients had lower gastrointestinal hemorrhage. Out of these 114, in 112 patients (98%) technical success was achieved with immediate cessation of bleeding. 81 patients could be followed for one month. Clinical success was achieved in 72 out of these 81 patients (89%). Seven patients rebled. 2 patients developed bowel ischemia. Four patients underwent surgery for bowel ischemia or rebleeding. Conclusion. The use of therapeutic transcatheter embolization for treatment of acute gastrointestinal hemorrhage is highly successful and relatively safe with 98% technical success and 2.4% postembolization ischemia in our series. In 89% of cases it was definitive without any further intervention. PMID:23844289

  3. Ankaferd hemostat in the management of gastrointestinal hemorrhages

    PubMed Central

    Beyazit, Yavuz; Kekilli, Murat; Haznedaroglu, Ibrahim C; Kayacetin, Ertugrul; Basaranoglu, Metin

    2011-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding refers to any hemorrhage ascribed to the pathologies of the gastrointestinal tract, extending from the mouth to the anal canal. Despite the recent improvements in the endoscopic, hemostatic and adjuvant pharmacologic techniques, the reported mortality is still around 5%-10% for peptic ulcer bleeding and about 15%-20% for variceal hemorrhages. Although endoscopic management reduces the rates of re-bleeding, surgery, and mortality in active bleeding; early recurrence ratios still occur in around 20% of the cases even with effective initial hemostatic measures. In this quest for an alternative pro-hemostatic agent for the management of GI bleedings, Ankaferd blood stopper (ABS) offers a successful candidate, specifically for “difficult-to-manage” situations as evidenced by data presented in several studies. ABS is a standardized mixture of the plants Thymus vulgaris, Glycyrrhiza glabra, Vitis vinifera, Alpinia officinarum, and Urtica dioica. It is effective in both bleeding individuals with normal hemostatic parameters and in patients with deficient primary and/or secondary hemostasis. ABS also modulates the cellular apoptotic responses to hemorrhagic stress, as well as hemostatic hemodynamic activity. Through its effects on the endothelium, blood cells, angiogenesis, cellular proliferation, vascular dynamics, and wound healing, ABS is now becoming an effective alternative hemostatic medicine for gastrointestinal bleedings that are resistant to conventional anti-hemorrhagic measurements. The aim of this review is to outline current literature experience suggesting the place of ABS in the management of GI bleeding, and potential future controlled trials in this complicated field. PMID:22046083

  4. Outcome Following a Negative CT Angiogram for Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, Victoria Tse, Donald Dixon, Shaheen; Shrivastava, Vivek; Bratby, Mark Anthony, Suzie Patel, Rafiuddin Tapping, Charles Uberoi, Raman

    2015-04-15

    ObjectiveThis study was designed to evaluate the role of a negative computed tomography angiogram (CTA) in patients who present with gastrointestinal (GI) hemorrhage.MethodsA review of all patients who had CTAs for GI hemorrhage over an 8-year period from January 2005 to December 2012 was performed. Data for patient demographics, location of hemorrhage, hemodynamic stability, and details of angiograms and/or the embolization procedure were obtained from the CRIS/PACS database, interventional radiology database, secure electronic medical records, and patient’s clinical notes.ResultsA total of 180 patients had 202 CTAs during the 8-year period: 87 CTAs were performed for upper GI hemorrhage (18 positive for active bleeding, 69 negative) and 115 for lower GI hemorrhage (37 positive for active bleeding, 78 negative); 58.7 % (37/63) of patients with upper GI bleed and 77.4 % (48/62) of patients with lower GI bleed who had an initial negative CTA did not rebleed without the need for radiological or surgical intervention. This difference was statistically significant (p = 0.04). The relative risk of rebleeding, following a negative CTA, in lower GI bleeding versus upper GI bleeding patients is 0.55 (95 % confidence interval 0.32–0.95).ConclusionsPatients with upper GI bleed who had negative CTAs usually require further intervention to stop the bleeding. In contrast, most patients presenting with lower GI hemorrhage who had a negative first CTA were less likely to rebleed.

  5. Evaluation and management of massive lower gastrointestinal hemorrhage.

    PubMed Central

    Leitman, I M; Paull, D E; Shires, G T

    1989-01-01

    Sixty-eight patients with massive lower gastrointestinal (G.I.) hemorrhage underwent emergency arteriography. Patients were transfused an average of six units of packed red blood cells within 24 hours of admission. The bleeding source was localized arteriographically in 27 (40%), with a sensitivity of 65% among patients requiring emergency resection. However, twelve of the 41 patients with a negative arteriogram still required emergency intestinal resection for continued hemorrhage. Radionuclide bleeding scans had a sensitivity of 86%. The right colon was the most common site of bleeding (35%). Diverticulosis and arteriovenous malformation were the most common etiologies. Selective intra-arterial infusion of vasopressin and embolization were successful in 36% of cases in which they were employed and contributed to fatality in two patients. Twenty-three patients underwent segmental resection, whereas seven patients required subtotal colectomy for multiple bleeding sites or negative studies in the face continued hemorrhage. Intraoperative infusion of methylene blue via angiographic catheters allowed successful localization and resection of bleeding small bowel segments in three patients. Overall mortality was 21%. The mortality for patients without a malignancy, with a positive preoperative arteriogram, and emergency segmental resection was 13%. Images Fig. 1. PMID:2783842

  6. Upper Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage: Development of the Severity Score

    PubMed Central

    Chaikitamnuaychok, Rangson; Patumanond, Jayanton

    2012-01-01

    Background Emergency endoscopy for every patient with upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage is not possible in many medical centers. Simple guidelines to select patients for emergency endoscopy are lacking. The aim of the present report is to develop a simple scoring system to classify upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage (UGIH) severity based on patient clinical profiles at the emergency departments. Methods Retrospective data of patients with UGIH in a university affiliated hospital were analyzed. Patients were criterion-classified into 3 severity levels: mild, moderate and severe. Clinical and laboratory information were compared among the 3 groups. Significant parameters were selected as indicators of severity. Coefficients of significant multivariable parameters were transformed into item scores, which added up as individual severity scores. The scores were used to classify patients into 3 urgency levels: non-urgent, urgent and emergent groups. Score-classification and criterion-classification were compared. Results Significant parameters in the model were age ≥ 60 years, pulse rate ≥ 100/min, systolic blood pressure < 100 mmHg, hemoglobin < 10 g/dL, blood urea nitrogen ≥ 35 mg/dL, presence of cirrhosis and hepatic failure. The score ranged from 0 to 27, and classifying patients into 3 urgency groups: non-urgent (score < 4, n = 215, 21.2%), urgent (score 4 - 16, n = 677, 66.9%) and emergent (score > 16, n = 121, 11.9%). The score correctly classified 81.4% of the patients into their original (criterion-classified) severity groups. Under-estimation (7.5%) and over-estimation (11.1%) were clinically acceptable. Conclusions Our UGIH severity scoring system classified patients into 3 urgency groups: non-urgent, urgent and emergent, with clinically acceptable small number of under- and over-estimations. Its discriminative ability and precision should be validated before adopting into clinical practice.

  7. Pancreatic pseudocyst with hemorrhage into the gastrointestinal tract through the duct of Santorini.

    PubMed

    Brayko, C M; Kozarek, R A; Sanowski, R A; Chinichian, A

    1985-08-01

    Hemorrhage into a pancreatic pseudocyst frequently goes unrecognized. This catastrophic event can be heralded by intermittent bleeding, or may present as massive gastrointestinal hemorrhage. A high index of suspicion, proper diagnostic workup, and prompt surgical management afford the patient the best chance for survival. We report a patient with massive pseudocyst bleeding into the gastrointestinal tract via the duct of Santorini and discuss the current diagnostic and therapeutic approach.

  8. Upper Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage: Validation of the Severity Score

    PubMed Central

    Chaikitamnuaychok, Rangson; Patumanond, Jayanton

    2013-01-01

    Background A simple scoring system was developed earlier to classify patients presenting with upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage into mild, moderates and severe. To validate the derived simple UGIH severity scoring system to another set of data obtained from consecutive patients. Methods The score was developed earlier from data of patients with UGIH in 2009 - 2010. The same scoring system was assigned to another set of data from patients of the following year. Classification of patients into 3 urgency levels reflecting their severity was compared. Performance similarity of the score in the two sets of data was tested with a chi-squared test for homogeneity. The ability of the score to discriminate mild patients from moderate/severe, and to discriminate severe patients from mild/moderate was identified and compared with analysis of area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AuROC). Results Patients from the validation data were similar to those from the development data in overall aspects. The severity of UGIH and the score distribution in the two sets were similar. The score successfully classified patients in the validation data into 3 severity levels similar to the development data (P = 0.381, chi-squared for homogeneity), and similarly discriminated mild patients from moderate/severe patients (P = 0.360, AuROC analysis), and similarly discriminated severe patients from mild/moderate patients (P = 0.589, AuROC analysis) Conclusion The simple scoring scheme developed earlier to classify UGIH patients into 3 severity/urgency levels performed similarly in the validation data obtained from patients in the following year. Advantages of the scoring scheme should be tested when applied to patient care to assure clinical adoption into routine practice.

  9. Diagnosis and management of nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage: European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) Guideline.

    PubMed

    Gralnek, Ian M; Dumonceau, Jean-Marc; Kuipers, Ernst J; Lanas, Angel; Sanders, David S; Kurien, Matthew; Rotondano, Gianluca; Hucl, Tomas; Dinis-Ribeiro, Mario; Marmo, Riccardo; Racz, Istvan; Arezzo, Alberto; Hoffmann, Ralf-Thorsten; Lesur, Gilles; de Franchis, Roberto; Aabakken, Lars; Veitch, Andrew; Radaelli, Franco; Salgueiro, Paulo; Cardoso, Ricardo; Maia, Luís; Zullo, Angelo; Cipolletta, Livio; Hassan, Cesare

    2015-10-01

    This Guideline is an official statement of the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE). It addresses the diagnosis and management of nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage (NVUGIH). Main Recommendations MR1. ESGE recommends immediate assessment of hemodynamic status in patients who present with acute upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage (UGIH), with prompt intravascular volume replacement initially using crystalloid fluids if hemodynamic instability exists (strong recommendation, moderate quality evidence). MR2. ESGE recommends a restrictive red blood cell transfusion strategy that aims for a target hemoglobin between 7 g/dL and 9 g/dL. A higher target hemoglobin should be considered in patients with significant co-morbidity (e. g., ischemic cardiovascular disease) (strong recommendation, moderate quality evidence). MR3. ESGE recommends the use of the Glasgow-Blatchford Score (GBS) for pre-endoscopy risk stratification. Outpatients determined to be at very low risk, based upon a GBS score of 0 - 1, do not require early endoscopy nor hospital admission. Discharged patients should be informed of the risk of recurrent bleeding and be advised to maintain contact with the discharging hospital (strong recommendation, moderate quality evidence). MR4. ESGE recommends initiating high dose intravenous proton pump inhibitors (PPI), intravenous bolus followed by continuous infusion (80 mg then 8 mg/hour), in patients presenting with acute UGIH awaiting upper endoscopy. However, PPI infusion should not delay the performance of early endoscopy (strong recommendation, high quality evidence). MR5. ESGE does not recommend the routine use of nasogastric or orogastric aspiration/lavage in patients presenting with acute UGIH (strong recommendation, moderate quality evidence). MR6. ESGE recommends intravenous erythromycin (single dose, 250 mg given 30 - 120 minutes prior to upper gastrointestinal [GI] endoscopy) in patients with clinically severe

  10. Diagnosis and management of nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage: European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) Guideline.

    PubMed

    Gralnek, Ian M; Dumonceau, Jean-Marc; Kuipers, Ernst J; Lanas, Angel; Sanders, David S; Kurien, Matthew; Rotondano, Gianluca; Hucl, Tomas; Dinis-Ribeiro, Mario; Marmo, Riccardo; Racz, Istvan; Arezzo, Alberto; Hoffmann, Ralf-Thorsten; Lesur, Gilles; de Franchis, Roberto; Aabakken, Lars; Veitch, Andrew; Radaelli, Franco; Salgueiro, Paulo; Cardoso, Ricardo; Maia, Luís; Zullo, Angelo; Cipolletta, Livio; Hassan, Cesare

    2015-10-01

    This Guideline is an official statement of the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE). It addresses the diagnosis and management of nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage (NVUGIH). Main Recommendations MR1. ESGE recommends immediate assessment of hemodynamic status in patients who present with acute upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage (UGIH), with prompt intravascular volume replacement initially using crystalloid fluids if hemodynamic instability exists (strong recommendation, moderate quality evidence). MR2. ESGE recommends a restrictive red blood cell transfusion strategy that aims for a target hemoglobin between 7 g/dL and 9 g/dL. A higher target hemoglobin should be considered in patients with significant co-morbidity (e. g., ischemic cardiovascular disease) (strong recommendation, moderate quality evidence). MR3. ESGE recommends the use of the Glasgow-Blatchford Score (GBS) for pre-endoscopy risk stratification. Outpatients determined to be at very low risk, based upon a GBS score of 0 - 1, do not require early endoscopy nor hospital admission. Discharged patients should be informed of the risk of recurrent bleeding and be advised to maintain contact with the discharging hospital (strong recommendation, moderate quality evidence). MR4. ESGE recommends initiating high dose intravenous proton pump inhibitors (PPI), intravenous bolus followed by continuous infusion (80 mg then 8 mg/hour), in patients presenting with acute UGIH awaiting upper endoscopy. However, PPI infusion should not delay the performance of early endoscopy (strong recommendation, high quality evidence). MR5. ESGE does not recommend the routine use of nasogastric or orogastric aspiration/lavage in patients presenting with acute UGIH (strong recommendation, moderate quality evidence). MR6. ESGE recommends intravenous erythromycin (single dose, 250 mg given 30 - 120 minutes prior to upper gastrointestinal [GI] endoscopy) in patients with clinically severe

  11. Microcatheter Embolization of Lower Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage: An Old Idea Whose Time Has Come

    SciTech Connect

    Funaki, Brian

    2004-11-15

    Early attempts of using embolization for lower gastrointestinal hemorrhage were fraught with complications, most notably ischemic colitis or bowel infarction. Embolotherapy was eventually abandoned in favor of catheter-directed vasoconstriction (i.e., vasopressin infusion). This latter therapy is time and labor intensive. With the advent of microcatheter technology, superselective embolization emerged and is rapidly becoming the endovascular therapy of choice for patients with severe lower gastrointestinal hemorrhage refractory to medical management. Numerous studies on the subject have consistently reported high clinical success with low ischemic complications. This article will review the current status of co-axial microcatheter embolization with an emphasis on the technical aspects of the procedure.

  12. Abdominal varices mimicking an acute gastrointestinal hemorrhage during technetium-99m red blood cell scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Moreno, A.J.; Byrd, B.F.; Berger, D.E.; Turnbull, G.L.

    1985-04-01

    Abdominal varices consisting of a caput medusae and dilated mesenteric veins resulted in pooling of Tc-99m tagged red blood cells (RBC) within these dilated vessels in a 57-year-old man with severe Laennec's cirrhosis. The atypical radiotracer localization within the abdomen mimicked an acute gastrointestinal hemorrhage. Clinical suspicion and careful evaluation of scintigraphic gastrointestinal bleeding studies will avoid false-positive interpretations.

  13. Polyarteritis nodosa, presenting as life-threatening gastrointestinal hemorrhage in a liver transplant recipient.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Sheldon C; Olliff, Simon P; McCafferty, Ian; Wigmore, Stephen J; Mirza, Darius F

    2008-02-01

    This unique case reports the first recorded episode in the medical literature of vasculitis post-liver transplantation, presenting as life-threatening gastrointestinal hemorrhage. A 52-year-old Caucasian woman underwent orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) for autoimmune cirrhosis complicated by hepatoma and portal vein thrombosis. Late hepatic artery thrombosis led to a second liver graft. Following recovery from an episode of acute rejection, the patient presented with large volume hematemesis, melena, and hemochezia (passage of fresh blood from the rectum). Following upper and lower gastrointestinal endoscopy and surgery, angiography illustrated the presence of polyarteritis nodosa (PAN), which was successfully treated with high-dose steroid therapy. Gastrointestinal hemorrhage is an unusual presentation of vasculitis, especially PAN. The occurrence of this phenomenon post-OLT, in the presence of immunosuppression is previously unreported.

  14. Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage Due to Splenic Artery Aneurysm Pancreatic Duct Fistula in Chronic Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Blumgart, Leslie H.

    1993-01-01

    Gastrointestinal hemorrhage due to splenic artery aneurysm pancreatic duct fistula in chronic pancreatitis is rare. It is, however, important to diagnose this condition particularly in patients having chronic pancreatitis, since it may result in a life-threatening situation. The diagnosis is usually difficult to establish and it may take repeated admissions for intermittent gastrointestinal bleeding until the real source is recognized. Clinical attacks of epigastric pain followed by GI-bleeding 30–40 minutes later are characteristic. Occasionally these attacks are followed by transient jaundice. The present case report describes this rare complication and reviews the current literature. PMID:8268107

  15. Munchausen syndrome by proxy with massive proteinuria and gastrointestinal hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Ulinski, Tim; Lhopital, Caroline; Cloppet, Henri; Feït, Jean-Patrick; Bourlon, Isabelle; Morin, Denis; Cochat, Pierre

    2004-07-01

    A 5-year-old boy presented with acute abdominal pain. Massive proteinuria of 10 g/1.73 m(2) per day was detected on standard urinalysis. There was no peripheral edema. Serum concentrations of total proteins, lipids, and creatinine and immunological investigations were normal. Two kidney biopsies revealed no abnormalities. Several weeks later he was admitted for intestinal hemorrhage with significant anemia. Endoscopy of the esophagus, stomach, colon, and small bowel (via laparotomy) were normal. Electrophoresis of urine proteins revealed the unusual finding of an albumin fraction of 99.4%. During a routine check-up in the outpatient clinic fresh urine samples were obtained while the boy's mother was absent. These were all negative for protein. The mother, who was a nurse, finally confessed to adding human albumin to the urine samples.

  16. Confusing untypical intestinal Behcet’s disease: Skip ulcers with severe lower gastrointestinal hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhen-Kai; Shi, Hui; Wang, Shao-Dong; Liu, Jiong; Zhu, Wei-Ming; Yang, Miao-Fang; Liu, Chan; Lu, Heng; Wang, Fang-Yu

    2014-01-01

    Behcet’s disease (BD) is a rare and life-long disorder characterized by inflammation of blood vessels throughout the body. BD was originally described in 1937 as a syndrome involving oral and genital ulceration in addition to ocular inflammation. Intestinal BD refers to colonic ulcerative lesions documented by objective measures in patients with BD. Many studies have shown that over 40% of BD patients have gastrointestinal complaints. Symptoms include abdominal pain, diarrhea, nausea, anorexia and abdominal distension. Although gastrointestinal symptoms are common, the demonstration of gastrointestinal ulcers is rare. This so-called intestinal BD accounts for approximately 1% of cases. There is no specific test for BD, and the diagnosis is based on clinical criteria. The manifestations of intestinal BD are similar to those of other colitis conditions such as Crohn’s disease or intestinal tuberculosis, thus, it is challenging for gastroenterologists to accurately diagnose intestinal BD in patients with ileo-colonic ulcers. However, giant ulcers distributed in the esophagus and ileocecal junction with gastrointestinal hemorrhage are rare in intestinal BD. Here, we present a case of untypical intestinal BD. The patient had recurrent aphthous ulceration of the oral mucosa, and esophageal and ileo-colonic ulceration, but no typical extra-intestinal symptoms. During examination, the patient had massive acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding. The patient underwent ileostomy after an emergency right hemicolectomy and partial ileectomy, and was subsequently diagnosed with incomplete-type intestinal BD by pathology. The literature on the evaluation and management of this condition is reviewed. PMID:24527178

  17. [Gastrointestinal hemorrhage and diverticula of the jejunum--presentation of a case report and review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Greco, B; Wettstein, M; Hack, I; Meyer, A; Rosso, R

    1997-01-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding due to jejunal diverticulosis is an uncommon emergency condition that has been encountered recently in one patient. The case of this patient treated with an emergency laparotomy and a segmentary small bowel resection is here presented. The clinical significance, proper diagnostic evaluation, and treatment of the hemorrhagic complication of jejunal diverticular disease are reviewed.

  18. Rescue endoscopic bleeding control for nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage using clipping and detachable snaring.

    PubMed

    Lee, J H; Kim, B K; Seol, D C; Byun, S J; Park, K H; Sung, I K; Park, H S; Shim, C S

    2013-06-01

    Nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal (UGI) bleeding recurs after appropriate endoscopic therapy in 10 % - 15 % of cases. The mortality rate can be as high as 25 % when bleeding recurs, but there is no consensus about the best modality for endoscopic re-treatment. The aim of this study was to evaluate clipping and detachable snaring (CDS) for rescue endoscopic control of nonvariceal UGI hemorrhage. We report a case series of seven patients from a Korean tertiary center who underwent endoscopic hemostasis using the combined method of detachable snares with hemoclips. The success rate of endoscopic hemostasis with CDS was 86 %: six of the seven patients who had experienced primary endoscopic treatment failure or recurrent bleeding after endoscopic hemostasis were treated successfully. In conclusion, rescue endoscopic bleeding control by means of CDS is an option for controlling nonvariceal UGI bleeding when no other method of endoscopic treatment for recurrent bleeding and primary hemostatic failure is possible.

  19. Intra-abdominal mass associated with gastrointestinal hemorrhage: a new manifestation of bacillary angiomatosis.

    PubMed

    Koehler, J E; Cederberg, L

    1995-12-01

    Bacillary angiomatosis is a recently described vascular proliferative lesion that occurs most commonly in individuals infected with human immunodeficiency virus. Cutaneous lesions are the most frequently described manifestations of bacillary angiomatosis. However, as culture techniques and disease recognition have improved, additional manifestations have been identified in human immunodeficiency virus-infected individuals, including bacillary peliosis hepatis and isolated bacteremia. Two species of the genus Bartonella (formerly Rochalimaea), Bartonella henselae or Bartonella quintana, have been cultured from the cutaneous lesions of bacillary angiomatosis. A new manifestation of Bartonella infection is reported: an intra-abdominal mass presenting with massive gastrointestinal hemorrhage in a patient with human immunodeficiency virus infection. B. quintana was cultured from a percutaneous needle-biopsy specimen obtained from the highly vascularized intra-abdominal mass. The bacillary angiomatosis lesion resolved after 3 months of tetracycline treatment. Recognition of Bartonella infection is extremely important because it is readily treatable with antibiotic therapy.

  20. [The ways of prophylaxis of the gastro-intestinal hemorrhage recurrence].

    PubMed

    Liakhovs'kyĭ, V I; Liul'ka, O M; Kravtsiv, M I; Zaiets', S M

    2014-04-01

    Through three-years period 57 patients, suffering gastro-intestinal hemorrhage (GIH) of the ulcer genesis, were treated in the clinic. Among them were 37 (64.9%) men and 20 (35.1%) women. The patients have had (56.3 +/- 4.7) yrs old at average. The treatment programm for the patients have included a local arrest of GIH, medicinal therapy, directed on restoration of the circulating blood volume, gastric secretion inhibition, rising of the blood coagulation property. In cases of a middle and severe blood loss the blood preparations were transfused--the erythrocytic mass and freshly frozen plasm. Three patients were operated in the high period of GIH. The GIH recurrence was absent. In 7 - 8 days, if a persistent hemostasis was achieved, the patients were transferred to therapeutic department for the conservative therapy prolongation.

  1. Superselective arterial embolization of the superior mesenteric artery for the treatment of gastrointestinal hemorrhage following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Run-Zhe; Zhao, Gang; Jin, Nan; Chen, Bao-An; Ding, Jia-Hua

    2014-01-01

    Superselective arterial embolization is a common therapeutic procedure for cases of visceral hemorrhage. However, until now, it has not been applied in the treatment of gastrointestinal (GI) hemorrhage caused by acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. We describe a case presenting with persistent GI bleeding associated with acute GVHD successfully treated by superselective arterial embolization of the superior mesenteric artery with gelatin sponge after noneffective conventional management. This case will help guide hematologists to deal with a similar situation in the future. PMID:25419120

  2. Shock Index Correlates with Extravasation on Angiographs of Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage: A Logistics Regression Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Nakasone, Yutaka Ikeda, Osamu; Yamashita, Yasuyuki; Kudoh, Kouichi; Shigematsu, Yoshinori; Harada, Kazunori

    2007-09-15

    We applied multivariate analysis to the clinical findings in patients with acute gastrointestinal (GI) hemorrhage and compared the relationship between these findings and angiographic evidence of extravasation. Our study population consisted of 46 patients with acute GI bleeding. They were divided into two groups. In group 1 we retrospectively analyzed 41 angiograms obtained in 29 patients (age range, 25-91 years; average, 71 years). Their clinical findings including the shock index (SI), diastolic blood pressure, hemoglobin, platelet counts, and age, which were quantitatively analyzed. In group 2, consisting of 17 patients (age range, 21-78 years; average, 60 years), we prospectively applied statistical analysis by a logistics regression model to their clinical findings and then assessed 21 angiograms obtained in these patients to determine whether our model was useful for predicting the presence of angiographic evidence of extravasation. On 18 of 41 (43.9%) angiograms in group 1 there was evidence of extravasation; in 3 patients it was demonstrated only by selective angiography. Factors significantly associated with angiographic visualization of extravasation were the SI and patient age. For differentiation between cases with and cases without angiographic evidence of extravasation, the maximum cutoff point was between 0.51 and 0.0.53. Of the 21 angiograms obtained in group 2, 13 (61.9%) showed evidence of extravasation; in 1 patient it was demonstrated only on selective angiograms. We found that in 90% of the cases, the prospective application of our model correctly predicted the angiographically confirmed presence or absence of extravasation. We conclude that in patients with GI hemorrhage, angiographic visualization of extravasation is associated with the pre-embolization SI. Patients with a high SI value should undergo study to facilitate optimal treatment planning.

  3. Dieulafoy's lesion-like bleeding: an underrecognized cause of upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage in patients with advanced liver disease.

    PubMed

    Akhras, Jamil; Patel, Pragnesh; Tobi, Martin

    2007-03-01

    Dieulafoy's lesion is a gastrointestinal submucosal artery that ruptures into the lumen causing massive hemorrhage. Until recently, failure to diagnose and treat patients endoscopically may have necessitated blind gastrectomy. Because arteriolar spider nevi abound in patients with liver disease and bleeding from such lesions has been described in the upper gastrointestinal tract, we reviewed our experience to determine whether a diagnosis of advanced liver disease could facilitate recognition and treatment of this type of arterial bleeding. Endoscopy records from 1991 to 1996 for all cases of upper gastrointestinal bleeding at our institution were reviewed. Dieulafoy's lesion-like bleeding was defined as arterial-type bleeding with no evidence of mucosal ulceration or erosions. Advanced liver disease was defined as signs of portal hypertension and/or cirrhosis or infiltrative liver disease. Dieulafoy's lesion-like bleeding was the cause in 6 of 4569 cases (0.13%). Five patients with Dieulafoy's lesion-like gastrointestinal hemorrhage had advanced liver disease compared with 954 of 4569 of all patients endoscoped for gastrointestinal hemorrhage for the period evaluated (OR = 19.04; 95% CI 2.1-900.8; p < 0.002 by Fisher's exact test). Dieulafoy's lesion-like bleeding was treated successfully with epinephrine injection and endoscopic cauterization in 5 of 6 patients with 1 patient requiring surgery. No other clinical associations were evident. Dieulafoy's lesion-like bleeding occurs more commonly in patients with advanced liver disease and should be included as a potential cause for bleeding in advanced liver disease and aggressively sought.

  4. Management of non-variceal upper gastrointestinal tract hemorrhage: controversies and areas of uncertainty.

    PubMed

    Trawick, Eric P; Yachimski, Patrick S

    2012-03-21

    Upper gastrointestinal tract hemorrhage (UGIH) remains a common presentation requiring urgent evaluation and treatment. Accurate assessment, appropriate intervention and apt clinical skills are needed for proper management from time of presentation to discharge. The advent of pharmacologic acid suppression, endoscopic hemostatic techniques, and recognition of Helicobacter pylori as an etiologic agent in peptic ulcer disease (PUD) has revolutionized the treatment of UGIH. Despite this, acute UGIH still carries considerable rates of morbidity and mortality. This review aims to discuss current areas of uncertainty and controversy in the management of UGIH. Neoadjuvant proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy has become standard empiric treatment for UGIH given that PUD is the leading cause of non-variceal UGIH, and PPIs are extremely effective at promoting ulcer healing. However, neoadjuvant PPI administration has not been shown to affect hard clinical outcomes such as rebleeding or mortality. The optimal timing of upper endoscopy in UGIH is often debated. Upon completion of volume resuscitation and hemodynamic stabilization, upper endoscopy should be performed within 24 h in all patients with evidence of UGIH for both diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. With rising healthcare cost paramount in today's medical landscape, the ability to appropriately triage UGIH patients is of increasing value. Upper endoscopy in conjunction with the clinical scenario allows for accurate decision making concerning early discharge home in low-risk lesions or admission for further monitoring and treatment in higher-risk lesions. Concomitant pharmacotherapy with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and antiplatelet agents, such as clopidogrel, has a major impact on the etiology, severity, and potential treatment of UGIH. Long-term PPI use in patients taking chronic NSAIDs or clopidogrel is discussed thoroughly in this review. PMID:22468078

  5. Therapeutic Decision-Making in Endoscopically Unmanageable Nonvariceal Upper Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage

    SciTech Connect

    Defreyne, Luc; Schrijver, Ignace De; Decruyenaere, Johan; Maele, Georges Van; Ceelen, Wim; Looze, Danny De; Vanlangenhove, Peter

    2008-09-15

    The purpose of this study was to identify endoscopic and clinical parameters influencing the decision-making in salvage of endoscopically unmanageable, nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage (UGIH) and to report the outcome of selected therapy. We retrospectively retrieved all cases of surgery and arteriography for arrest of endoscopically unmanageable UGIH. Only patients with overt bleeding on endoscopy within the previous 24 h were included. Patients with preceding nonendoscopic hemostatic interventions, portal hypertension, malignancy, and transpapillar bleeding were excluded. Potential clinical and endoscopic predictors of allocation to either surgery or arteriography were tested using statistical models. Outcome and survival were regressed on the choice of rescue and clinical variables. Forty-six arteriographed and 51 operated patients met the inclusion criteria. Univariate analysis revealed a higher number of patients with a coagulation disorder in the catheterization group (41.4%, versus 20.4% in the laparotomy group; p = 0.044). With multivariate analysis, the identification of a bleeding peptic ulcer at endoscopy significantly steered decision-making toward surgical rescue (OR = 5.2; p = 0.021). Taking into account reinterventions, hemostasis was achieved in nearly 90% of cases in both groups. Overall therapy failure (no survivors), rebleeding within 3 days (OR = 3.7; p = 0.042), and corticosteroid use (OR = 5.2; p = 0.017) had a significant negative impact on survival. The odds of dying were not different for embolotherapy or surgery. In conclusion, decision-making was endoscopy-based, with bleeding peptic ulcer significantly directing the choice of rescue toward surgery. Unsuccessful hemostasis and corticosteroid use, but not the choice of rescue, negatively affected outcome.

  6. Diagnostic accuracy and implementation of computed tomography angiography for gastrointestinal hemorrhage according to clinical severity

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yoo Jin; Kim, Kyung Su; Suh, Gil Joon; Kwon, Woon Yong

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study compared the diagnostic accuracy of computed tomography (CT) angiography in patients with various severities of gastrointestinal hemorrhage (GIH). Methods We retrospectively enrolled adult patients (n=262) with GIH who had undergone CT angiography from January 2012 to December 2013. Age, sex, comorbidities, presenting symptoms, initial vital signs, laboratory results, transfusion volume, emergency department disposition, and hospital mortality were abstracted from patient records. CT angiography findings were reviewed and compared to reference standards consisting of endoscopy, conventional angiography, bleeding scan, capsule endoscopy, and surgery, either alone or in combination. Clinical severity was stratified according to the number of packed red blood cell units transfused during the first two days: the first quartile was categorized as mild severity, while the second and third quartiles were categorized as moderate severity. The fourth quartile was categorized as severe. Results Patients were categorized into the mild (n=75, 28.6%), moderate (n=139, 53.1%), and severe (n=48, 18.3%) groups. The mean number of transfused packed red blood cell units was 0, 3, and 9.6 in the mild, moderate, and severe groups, respectively. The overall sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of CT angiography were 73.8%, 94.0%, 97.3%, and 55.3%, respectively. The area under the receiver operating characteristics curve for the diagnostic performance of CT angiography was 0.780, 0.841, and 0.930 in the mild, moderate, and severe groups, respectively, which significantly differed among groups (P=0.006). Conclusion The diagnostic accuracy of CT angiography is better in patients with more severe GIH. PMID:27752620

  7. Transcatheter Arterial Embolization for Upper Gastrointestinal Nonvariceal Hemorrhage: Is Empiric Embolization Warranted?

    SciTech Connect

    Arrayeh, Elnasif; Fidelman, Nicholas Gordon, Roy L.; LaBerge, Jeanne M.; Kerlan, Robert K.; Klimov, Alexander; Bloom, Allan I.

    2012-12-15

    Purpose: To determine whether transcatheter arterial embolization performed in the setting of active gastric or duodenal nonvariceal hemorrhage is efficacious when the bleeding source cannot be identified angiographically. Methods: Records of 115 adult patients who underwent visceral angiography for endoscopically documented gastric (50 patients) or duodenal (65 patients) nonvariceal hemorrhage were retrospectively reviewed. Patients were subdivided into three groups according to whether angiographic evidence of arterial hemorrhage was present and whether embolization was performed (group 1 = no abnormality, no embolization; group 2 = no abnormality, embolization performed [empiric embolization]; and group 3 = abnormality present, embolization performed). Thirty-day rates and duration of primary hemostasis and survival were compared.ResultsFor patients with gastric sources of hemorrhage, the rate of primary hemostasis at 30 days after embolization was greater when embolization was performed in the setting of a documented angiographic abnormality than when empiric embolization was performed (67% vs. 42%). The rate of primary hemostasis at 30 days after angiography was greater for patients with duodenal bleeding who either underwent empiric embolization (60%) or embolization in the setting of angiographically documented arterial hemorrhage (58%) compared with patients who only underwent diagnostic angiogram (33%). Patients with duodenal hemorrhage who underwent embolization were less likely to require additional invasive procedures to control rebleeding (p = 0.006). Conclusion: Empiric arterial embolization may be advantageous in patients with a duodenal source of hemorrhage but not in patients with gastric hemorrhage.

  8. Clinical Risk Characteristics of Upper Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage Severity: A Multivariable Risk Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chaikitamnuaychok, Rangson; Patumanond, Jayanton

    2012-01-01

    Background Upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage (UGIH) is one of the common clinical manifestations encountered in most emergency departments. Patient characteristics indicating UGIH severity in developing countries may be different from those in developed countries. The present study was designed to explore clinical prognostic indicators for UGIH severity. Methods A retrospective cohort study was conducted in a university affiliated tertiary hospital in Kamphaeng Phet, Thailand. Medical folders of patients with UGIH were reviewed. Patients were grouped into 3 severity levels, based on criteria proposed by The American College of Surgeon. Pre-defined prognostic indicators were compared. The prognostic indicators for UGIH severity were analyzed by a multivariable continuation ratio ordinal logistic regression and presented with odds ratios. Results From 1,043 eligible medical folders, 984 (94.3%) complete folders were used in analysis. There were 241, 631 and 112 patients in the mild, moderate and severe UGIH groups. Six independent indicators of severe UGIH were, hemoglobin < 100 g/dL (OR = 13.82, 95% CI = 9.40 to 20.33, P < 0.001), systolic blood pressure < 100 mmHg (OR = 11.01, 95% CI = 7.41 to 16.36, P < 0.001), presence of hepatic failure (OR = 5.50, 95% CI = 1.14 to26.64, P = 0.037), presence of cirrhosis (OR = 2.03, 95% CI = 1.32 to 3.11, P = 0.001), blood urea nitrogen ≥ 35 mmol/L (OR = 1.73, 95% CI = 1.25 to 2.40, P = 0.001), and pulse rate ≥ 100 per minute (OR = 1.72, 95% CI = 1.21 to 2.45, P = 0.003). Conclusions Pulse rate ≥ 100 per minute, systolic blood pressure < 100 mmHg, hemoglobin < 10 g/dL, blood urea nitrogen ≥ 35 mmol/L, presence of cirrhosis and presence of hepatic failure are prognostic indicators for an increase in UGIH severity levels. They are potentially useful in UGIH risk stratification.

  9. Changes in rates of upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage after the introduction of cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors in British Columbia and Ontario

    PubMed Central

    Mamdani, Muhammad; Warren, Leanne; Kopp, Alex; Paterson, J. Michael; Laupacis, Andreas; Bassett, Ken; Anderson, Geoffrey M.

    2006-01-01

    Background Population rates of upper gastrointestinal (GI) hemorrhage have been observed to increase with the introduction and rapid uptake of selective cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitors. Changes in COX-2 inhibitor use and upper GI bleeding rates in regions with relatively restrictive drug policies (e.g., British Columbia) have not been compared with changes in regions with relatively less restrictive drug policies (e.g., Ontario). Methods We collected administrative data for about 1.4 million people aged 66 years and older in British Columbia and Ontario for the period January 1996 to November 2002. We examined temporal changes in the prevalence of NSAID use and admissions to hospital because of upper GI hemorrhage in both provinces using cross-sectional time series analysis. Results During the period studied, the prevalence of NSAID use in British Columbia's population of older people increased by 25% (from 8.7% to 10.9%; p < 0.01), as compared with a 51% increase in Ontario (from 10.9% to 16.5%; p < 0.01). Hospital admissions because of upper GI hemorrhage increased significantly in Ontario by about 16% on average, or about 2 admissions per 10 000 elderly people, above expected values (p < 0.01). A similar increase was not observed in British Columbia. Interpretation More restrictive drug coverage policies, although limiting access to drugs and their potential benefits, may protect the population from adverse drug effects. PMID:17146090

  10. [A modified monopolar electrocoagulation probe for endoscopic treatment of gastrointestinal hemorrhage].

    PubMed

    Reimold, W V

    1991-06-01

    A modified monopolar electrocoagulation probe for endoscopic treatment of gastrointestinal bleedings in special situations is described. The tip of the active electrode may be moved foreward or drawn back into a teflon catheter. Thereby, blood clots are removed from the tip of the probe. The device is easy to use, reliable in emergency endoscopies and can be employed with conventional high-frequency diathermy instruments. The probe is inexpensive. 49 patients with active gastrointestinal bleedings according to Forrest Ib were treated. In 40/49 patients permanent hemostasis could be achieved. In 4/49 patients recurrent bleedings were controlled after repeated electro-coagulation. 4/49 patients needed elective operation, one patient emergency operation. Complications by application of the described monopolar electrocoagulation probe did not occur. The area of necrosis according to electrocoagulation was small. PMID:1926958

  11. A Rare Cause of Massive Upper Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage in Immunocompromised Host

    PubMed Central

    Abdullah, Obai; Pele, Nicole A.; Fu, Yumei; Ashraf, Imran; Arif, Murtaza; Bechtold, Matthew L.; Grewal, Ajitinder; Hammad, Hazem T.

    2012-01-01

    Mucormycosis is an invasive and aggressive opportunistic fungal infection that usually presents with rhinocerebral or pulmonary involvement and rarely involves the gastrointestinal tract. The disease is acute with mortality rate up to 100%. A 68-year-old male was undergoing treatment at a local hospital for COPD exacerbation with IV steroids and antibiotics. Two weeks into his treatment he suddenly developed massive upper GI bleeding and hemodynamic instability that necessitated transfer to our tertiary care hospital for further treatment and management. An urgent upper endoscopy revealed multiple large and deep gastric and duodenal bulb ulcers with stigmata of recent bleeding. The ulcers were treated endoscopically. Biopsies showed fibrinopurulent debris with fungal organisms. Stains highlighted slightly irregular hyphae with rare septa and yeast suspicious for Candida. The patient was subsequently placed on fluconazole. Unfortunately, the patient’s general condition continued to worsen and he developed multiorgan failure and died. Autopsy revealed disseminated systemic mucormycosis. Most of the cases of gastrointestinal mucormycosis were reported from the tropics and few were reported in the United States. The disease occurs most frequently in immunocompromised individuals. The rare incidence of GI involvement, acute nature, severity and the problematic identification of the organisms on biopsies make antemortem diagnosis challenging. Treatment includes parenteral antifungals and debridement of the infected tissues. Gastroenterologists should be aware of this rare cause of gastrointestinal bleeding and understand the importance of communication with the reviewing pathologist so that appropriate, and often lifesaving, therapies can be administered in a timely manner.

  12. Embolization of Acute Nonvariceal Upper Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage Resistant to Endoscopic Treatment: Results and Predictors of Recurrent Bleeding

    SciTech Connect

    Loffroy, Romaric Rao, Pramod; Ota, Shinichi; Lin Mingde; Kwak, Byung-Kook; Geschwind, Jean-Francois

    2010-12-15

    Acute nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal (UGI) hemorrhage is a frequent complication associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The most common cause of UGI bleeding is peptic ulcer disease, but the differential diagnosis is diverse and includes tumors; ischemia; gastritis; arteriovenous malformations, such as Dieulafoy lesions; Mallory-Weiss tears; trauma; and iatrogenic causes. Aggressive treatment with early endoscopic hemostasis is essential for a favorable outcome. However, severe bleeding despite conservative medical treatment or endoscopic intervention occurs in 5-10% of patients, requiring surgery or transcatheter arterial embolization. Surgical intervention is usually an expeditious and gratifying endeavor, but it can be associated with high operative mortality rates. Endovascular management using superselective catheterization of the culprit vessel, < sandwich> occlusion, or blind embolization has emerged as an alternative to emergent operative intervention for high-risk patients and is now considered the first-line therapy for massive UGI bleeding refractory to endoscopic treatment. Indeed, many published studies have confirmed the feasibility of this approach and its high technical and clinical success rates, which range from 69 to 100% and from 63 to 97%, respectively, even if the choice of the best embolic agent among coils, cyanaocrylate glue, gelatin sponge, or calibrated particles remains a matter of debate. However, factors influencing clinical outcome, especially predictors of early rebleeding, are poorly understood, and few studies have addressed this issue. This review of the literature will attempt to define the role of embolotherapy for acute nonvariceal UGI hemorrhage that fails to respond to endoscopic hemostasis and to summarize data on factors predicting angiographic and embolization failure.

  13. Iliac Artery-Uretero-Colonic Fistula Presenting as Severe Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage and Hematuria: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Policha, Aleksandra; Baldwin, Melissa; Mussa, Firas; Rockman, Caron

    2015-11-01

    Arterioenteric fistulas represent an infrequent but potentially fatal cause of gastrointestinal hemorrhage. Patients often present in extremis from shock and sepsis. This mandates a rapid diagnosis so that prompt, potentially life-saving interventions can be performed. We report the case of a 35-year-old man who presented with hematuria and hematochezia secondary to an iliac artery-uretero-colonic fistula that developed years after open common iliac artery aneurysm repair. His condition rapidly progressed to hemorrhagic shock, and he underwent successful endovascular treatment with a covered stent graft as a bridge to definitive open surgery. Subsequently, graft explantation, extra-anatomic arterial bypass, bowel resection, and ureter ligation was undertaken. A summary of the literature on iliac artery-enteric fistulas follows. PMID:26303272

  14. Massive Lower Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage from the Surgical Anastomosis in Patients with Multiorgan Trauma: Treatment by Subselective Embolization with Polyvinyl Alcohol Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Bulakbasi, Nail; Kurtaran, Kemal; Ustuensoez, Bahri; Somuncu, Ibrahim

    1999-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of subselective arterial embolization with polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) particles with or without microcoil augmentation to control postoperative lower gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. Methods: Ten patients with clinical, scintigraphic, and angiographic evidence of postoperative lower GI bleeding were considered for subselective embolization. Subselective embolizations were performed through coaxial microcatheters with 355-500 {mu}m PVA particles with or without additional coil embolization. Results: Embolization was technically successful in 9 of 10 (90%) patients. In one patient, subselective embolization was not possible; consequently no embolization was performed. Clinical success was achieved after a single embolization in 6 of 10 (60%) patients and after a second embolization in an additional 3 of the 10 (30%) patients. While there was no rebleeding in patients with normal coagulation parameters, all three patients (100%) with coagulopathy rebled, two of them from another source. Although no acute ischemic effects developed, no long-term sequela such as ischemic stricture were specifically looked for. Seven patients developed abdominal discomfort and/or fever within 24-48 hr. Four of 10 patients died of complications other than hemorrhage or ischemia. Conclusion: Subselective PVA embolization with or without a microcoil embolization is an effective and safe means of managing postoperative lower GI hemorrhage in patients with multiorgan trauma.

  15. The Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Video Capsule Endoscopy Compared to Other Strategies to Manage Acute Upper Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage in the Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    Meltzer, Andrew C.; Ward, Michael J.; Gralnek, Ian M.; Pines, Jesse M.

    2014-01-01

    Study objective Acute upper gastrointestinal (GI) hemorrhage is a common presentation in hospital-based emergency departments (EDs). A novel diagnostic approach is to use video capsule endoscopy to directly visualize the upper GI tract and identify bleeding. Our objective was to evaluate and compare the relative costs and benefits of video capsule endoscopy compared to other strategies in low to moderate risk ED patients with acute upper GI hemorrhage. Methods We constructed a model using standard decision analysis software to examine the cost-effectiveness of four available strategies for a base-case patient who presents to the ED with either mild or moderate risk scenarios (by Glasgow-Blatchford Score) for requiring invasive hemostatic intervention (i.e., endoscopic, surgical, etc.) The four available diagnostic strategies were (1) direct imaging with video capsule endoscopy performed in the ED, (2) risk stratification using the Glasgow-Blatchford score, (3) nasogastric tube placement and, finally, (4) an admit-all strategy. Results In the low-risk scenario, video capsule endoscopy was preferred strategy (cost $5,691, 14.69 QALYs) and more cost effective than the remaining strategies including nasogastric tube strategy (cost $8,159, 14.69 QALYs), risk stratification strategy (cost $10,695, 14.69 QALYs) and admit-all strategy (cost $22,766, 14.68 QALYs). In the moderate risk scenario, video capsule endoscopy continued to be preferred strategy (cost $9,190, 14.56 QALYs) compared to nasogastric tube (cost $9,487, 14.58 QALYs, ICER $15,891) and more cost effective than admit-all strategy (cost, $22,584, 14.54 QALYs.) Conclusion Video capsule endoscopy may be cost-effective for low and moderate risk patients presenting to the ED with acute upper GI hemorrhage. PMID:24961149

  16. Comparison of microcoils and polyvinyl alcohol particles in selective microcatheter angioembolization of non variceal acute gastrointestinal hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Tanveer-Ul-Haq; Idris, Muhammad; Salam, Basit; Akhtar, Waseem; Jamil, Yasir

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To compare the efficacy of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) particles with microcoils in angiembolisation of non variceal acute gastrointestinal haemorrhage. Methods: This is a retrospective cross-sectional study of patients who underwent transcatheter angioembolization from January, 1995 to December, 2013 at Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi. Patients were divided into two groups on basis of use of either microcoils or PVA particles and compared in terms of technical success, clinical success, re-bleeding and ischemic complication rates. Chi (χ2) square and Fisher’s exact tests were applied and a P-value of less than 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: Fifty seven patients underwent angioembolization. Microcoil and PVA particles embolization was performed in 63% (36/57) and 35% (20/57) cases respectively. Technical success was achieved in all cases (100%). Clinical success rate was higher in microcoils group (92%) than PVA particles group (75%) with statistically significant P value (p=0.048). Ischemic complication was seen in one case (3%) in the microcoil group, while no such complications were seen in the PVA particles group. Conclusion: In angioembolization of non variceal acute gastrointestinal haemorrhage microcoils are better than Polyvinyl alcohol particles with higher clinical success and lower re-bleed rates. PMID:26430397

  17. Hemorrhagic adrenal cyst.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, M D

    1993-05-01

    Adrenal cysts are uncommon. They may be fatal if they hemorrhage and are not rapidly diagnosed. Most adrenal cysts are small and asymptomatic. When they are symptomatic, it is usually because the cyst has enlarged, causing flank discomfort, gastrointestinal complaints, and hemorrhage. Occasionally, a palpable mass may be found. It is thought that hemorrhage occurs secondary to trauma or some toxic or infectious process. The author describes a case in which a previously healthy man had a sudden hemorrhage within a benign adrenal cyst with infarction of the kidney. A discussion of adrenal cysts follows.

  18. Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia.

    PubMed

    Parambil, Joseph G

    2016-09-01

    Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is an underrecognized and underdiagnosed autosomal-dominant angiodysplasia that has an estimated prevalence of 1 in 5000 individuals, with variable clinical presentations even within family members with identical mutations. The most common manifestations are telangiectasias of the skin and nasal mucosa. However, HHT can often be complicated by the presence of arteriovenous malformations and telangiectasias in the lungs, brain, gastrointestinal tract, and liver that are often silent and can lead to life-threatening complications of stroke and hemorrhage. This article reviews HHT for the pulmonologist, who is not uncommonly the first practitioner to encounter these patients. PMID:27514597

  19. Hemorrhagic Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    A stroke is a medical emergency. There are two types - ischemic and hemorrhagic. Hemorrhagic stroke is the less common type. It happens when ... an artery wall that breaks open. Symptoms of stroke are Sudden numbness or weakness of the face, ...

  20. Obstetric hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Clark, Steven L

    2016-03-01

    Despite the availability of potent drugs, effective surgical techniques, and extensive blood banking facilities, post-partum hemorrhage remains a major cause of death in the United States. A hemorrhage bundle developed by the New York Safe Motherhood Initiative provides clear guidelines for reducing such deaths. This bundle focuses on risk assessment, preparation, diagnosis, and the provision of several management algorithms. Implementation of the protocols and approaches contained in this document, or their equivalent, on a systems basis and a consideration of several additional recommendations for individual care will reduce the likelihood of death from hemorrhage.

  1. Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    MedlinePlus

    ... can result from the rupture of an intracranial aneurysm — a weakened, dilated area of a blood vessel ... blood vessels in the brain even after the aneurysm that caused the hemorrhage is treated. Most of ...

  2. Dengue hemorrhagic fever

    MedlinePlus

    Hemorrhagic dengue; Dengue shock syndrome; Philippine hemorrhagic fever; Thai hemorrhagic fever; Singapore hemorrhagic fever ... and sweaty. These symptoms are followed by a shock -like state. Bleeding appears as tiny spots of ...

  3. Hemorrhagic acalculous cholecystitis: an unusual location of uremic bleeding.

    PubMed

    Lai, Yi-Chun; Tarng, Der-Cherng

    2009-09-01

    Hemorrhagic acalculous cholecystitis is a rare but potentially fatal disease. An increased bleeding tendency is present in both acute and chronic renal failure with impaired platelet function. We herein present a case of hemorrhagic acalculous cholecystitis in a hemodialysis patient who suffered from acute abdomen and upper gastrointestinal bleeding. The pathogenesis may have been associated with ischemia and reperfusion injury, eventually leading to necrosis of the gallbladder wall. Abdominal ultrasound can aid in diagnosis. Biliary colic, jaundice, and melena are the typical symptoms of hemorrhagic cholecystitis, particularly in a patient with unexplained gastrointestinal bleeding. PMID:19762317

  4. [Alveolar hemorrhage].

    PubMed

    Traclet, J; Lazor, R; Cordier, J-F; Cottin, V

    2013-04-01

    Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (DAH) is defined by the presence of red blood cells originating from the lung capillaries or venules within the alveoli. The diagnosis is established on clinical features, radiological pattern, and especially bronchoalveolar lavage. Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage may have many immune or non-immune causes. Immune causes of DAH include vasculitides, connective tissue diseases, especially systemic lupus erythematosus, and antiglomerular basement membrane antibody disease (Goodpasture's syndrome). Treatment is both supportive and causal, often based on high dose corticosteroids and immunosuppressive therapy (especially intravenous cyclophosphamide). Plasma exchanges are performed in antiglomerular basement membrane antibody disease and systemic lupus erythematosus, and are considered in systemic vasculitis. Non-immune causes of DAH mainly include heart diseases, coagulation disorders, infections, drug toxicities and idiopathic DAH. Treatment of non-immune DAH is that of its cause. Whatever the cause, DAH is an emergency requiring prompt assessment and early treatment.

  5. [Hemorrhagic enteropathy].

    PubMed

    Brobmann, G F; van Lessen, H; Springorum, H W; Thomas, C

    1976-10-21

    Intestinal infarction in the absence of organic vascular occlusion received increasing attention in recent years. The clinical picture is discussed based on results in 9 cases, an attempt to suggest a possible pathophysiological mechanism is made. Prophylactic digitalisation especially in the elderly patient in the absence of severe heart failure and in cases with already low mesenteric perfusion may lead to a further vasoconstriction and to hemorrhagic enteropathy. Therapeutic possibilities are discussed. PMID:1086816

  6. [Severe hemorrhagic gastritis of radiation origin].

    PubMed

    Flobert, C; Cellier, C; Landi, B; Berger, A; Durdux, C; Palazzo, L; Carnot, F; Cugnenc, P H; Barbier, J P

    1998-02-01

    Severe gastric complications due to radiotherapy are uncommon, in particular hemorrhagic gastritis. A high total dose and, above all, high daily fraction appear to be the main risk factors in gastric injuries. A case of hemorrhagic gastritis induced by radiotherapy requesting a total gastrectomy is reported. The patient was treated for a primary gastric non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Hemorrhagic gastritis occurred despite a low total dose (40 Gy) and 2 Gy daily fractions. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and repeated biopsies are usually insufficient to exclude a tumor recurrence. Endoscopic ultrasonography may argue for a recurrence or for radiation lesions. As the conservative treatment is usually ineffective, these gastrointestinal radiation injuries ought to be treated surgically. Besides it allows to ascertain the benign nature of radiation lesions. PMID:9762196

  7. Gastrointestinal Amyloidosis Presenting with Multiple Episodes of Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sang Hyeon Kang, Eun Ju; Park, Jee Won; Jo, Jung Hyun; Kim, Soo Jin; Cho, Jin Han; Kang, Myong Jin; Park, Byeong Ho

    2009-05-15

    Amyloidosis is characterized by the extracellular deposition of amyloid protein in various organs. Gastrointestinal involvement in amyloidosis is common, but a diagnosis of amyloidosis is often delayed. Severe gastrointestinal hemorrhage in amyloidosis is rare but can be fatal in some cases. We experienced a case of a 49-year-old man who presented with recurrent massive hematochezia. Although embolization was performed eight times for bleeding from different sites of the small intestine, hematochezia did not cease. We report the case, with a review of the literature.

  8. A case of spontaneous perirenal hemorrhage secondary to polyarteritis nodosa.

    PubMed

    Nguan, Christopher; Leone, Ercole

    2002-12-01

    A case report of a patient who develops a spontaneous perinephric hemorrhage secondary to polyarteritis nodosa (PAN) is described. The diagnosis of PAN was delayed in this patient somewhat due to a previously unrecognized relation to a recent perihepatic hemorrhage. Unenhanced CT findings in this case were nonspecific, but follow up angiography demonstrated characteristic subsegmental and interlobular renal artery aneurysms. Spontaneous perinephric hemorrhage is an uncommon complication of PAN however an elevated level of suspicion regarding the diagnosis of a systemic vasculitis should be considered in any case of spontaneous renal, hepatic, or gastrointestinal hemorrhage.

  9. [Cerebral hemorrhage].

    PubMed

    Nakase, Hiroyuki; Motoyama, Yasushi; Yamada, Shuichi

    2016-04-01

    Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) remains a serious condition for which early aggressive care is warranted. Japanese evidence-based stroke guidelines were published in 2015 to present the current and comprehensive recommendations for the diagnosis and treatment of stroke. In the spontaneous ICH, topics focused on prevention, management in the acute and chronic stage, complications, management of coagulopathy and blood pressure, prevention and control of secondary brain injury and intracranial pressure, the role of surgery, and other pathologies of ICH. The management of ICH in pregnancy and the puerperium was newly added. These guidelines provide a framework for goal-directed treatment of the patient with ICH. PMID:27333758

  10. Postpartum hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Su, Cindy W

    2012-03-01

    Postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) is a very common obstetric emergency with high morbidity and mortality rates worldwide. Understanding its etiology is fundamental to effectively managing PPH in an acute setting. Active management of the third stage of labor is also a key component in its prevention. Management strategies include conservative measures (medications, uterine tamponade, and arterial embolization) as well as surgical interventions (arterial ligations, compression sutures, and hysterectomy). Creating a standardized PPH protocol and running simulation-based drills with a multidisciplinary team may also help decrease maternal morbidity and improve perinatal outcomes, although further studies are needed. PMID:22309588

  11. Hemorrhagic complications of severe pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Stroud, W H; Cullom, J W; Anderson, M C

    1981-10-01

    Massive hemorrhage associated with pancreatitis is a rare but frequently lethal complication. Fifteen patients with this complication are presented. Bleeding occurred in four patients with necrotizing pancreatitis, in three patients with pancreatic abscesses, in seven patients with pseudocysts, and in one patient with chronic relapsing pancreatitis following longitudinal pancreaticojejunostomy. The initial presentation of hemorrhage was gastrointestinal in eight patients and retroperitoneal or intraperitoneal in seven. Abdominal pain with associated nausea and vomiting was present in all patients on admission. Duration of symptoms prior to hospitalization averaged 6 days. During hospitalization the 15 patients received a total of 512 units of blood for transfusions ranging from 8 to 177 units. Admission amylase values were of no benefit in assessing severity of the disease, but application of Ranson's criteria accurately predicted both severity and prognosis. The common denominator in all cases of bleeding appeared to be the presence of an overwhelming or continuing inflammatory process with necrosis and erosion of adjacent vascular and visceral structures. The overall mortality rate in the series was 53.3%. Those patients with hemorrhage associated with pseudocyst formation had the highest survival rates, whereas those with necrotizing pancreatitis and hemorrhage had an extremely poor response to aggressive medical and/or surgical management.

  12. Efficacy of Self-Expandable Metallic Stent Inserted for Refractory Hemorrhage of Duodenal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Orii, Takashi; Karasawa, Yukihiko; Kitahara, Hiroe; Yoshimura, Masaki; Okumura, Motohiro

    2016-01-01

    Because of advances in the technology of gastrointestinal endoscopy and improvements in the quality of stents, it has become routine to place a stent as palliative therapy for malignant gastrointestinal obstruction. On the other hand, stent placement for malignant gastrointestinal hemorrhage has scarcely been reported, although it may be performed for hemorrhage of the esophageal varicose vein. We recently experienced a patient with refractory hemorrhage from an unresectable duodenal cancer who underwent placement of a self-expandable metallic stent (SEMS) and thereafter had no recurrence of the hemorrhage. A 46-year-old man underwent laparotomy to radically resect a cancer in the third portion of the duodenum, which invaded widely to the superior mesenteric vein and its branches and was considered unresectable. After stomach-partitioning gastrojejunostomy was performed, chemotherapy was initiated according to the regimen of chemotherapy of far advanced gastric cancer. One year and 4 months after induction of chemotherapy, gastrointestinal hemorrhage occurred. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy revealed the hemorrhage oozing from the duodenal cancer, and endoscopic hemostasis, such as injection of hypertonic saline epinephrine and argon plasma coagulation, was unsuccessful. Twenty days after emergence of the hemorrhage, an endoscopic covered SEMS was placed with confirmation by fluoroscopy. Immediately after placement of the stent, the tarry stool stopped and the anemia ceased to progress. The recurrence of the hemorrhage has not been confirmed without migration of the stent. SEMS is an effective hemostatic procedure for malignant refractory hemorrhage. PMID:27403118

  13. Efficacy of Self-Expandable Metallic Stent Inserted for Refractory Hemorrhage of Duodenal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Orii, Takashi; Karasawa, Yukihiko; Kitahara, Hiroe; Yoshimura, Masaki; Okumura, Motohiro

    2016-01-01

    Because of advances in the technology of gastrointestinal endoscopy and improvements in the quality of stents, it has become routine to place a stent as palliative therapy for malignant gastrointestinal obstruction. On the other hand, stent placement for malignant gastrointestinal hemorrhage has scarcely been reported, although it may be performed for hemorrhage of the esophageal varicose vein. We recently experienced a patient with refractory hemorrhage from an unresectable duodenal cancer who underwent placement of a self-expandable metallic stent (SEMS) and thereafter had no recurrence of the hemorrhage. A 46-year-old man underwent laparotomy to radically resect a cancer in the third portion of the duodenum, which invaded widely to the superior mesenteric vein and its branches and was considered unresectable. After stomach-partitioning gastrojejunostomy was performed, chemotherapy was initiated according to the regimen of chemotherapy of far advanced gastric cancer. One year and 4 months after induction of chemotherapy, gastrointestinal hemorrhage occurred. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy revealed the hemorrhage oozing from the duodenal cancer, and endoscopic hemostasis, such as injection of hypertonic saline epinephrine and argon plasma coagulation, was unsuccessful. Twenty days after emergence of the hemorrhage, an endoscopic covered SEMS was placed with confirmation by fluoroscopy. Immediately after placement of the stent, the tarry stool stopped and the anemia ceased to progress. The recurrence of the hemorrhage has not been confirmed without migration of the stent. SEMS is an effective hemostatic procedure for malignant refractory hemorrhage. PMID:27403118

  14. Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia with Unusual Associations

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Dheeraj; Ramasamy, Chandramohan

    2015-01-01

    We describe a report of an elderly lady who was hospitalized with progressive worsening of breathlessness and fatigue of one month's duration. Clinical evaluation of the patient revealed hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia, interstitial lung disease, pulmonary hypertension without left heart failure, and bilateral gluteal calcinosis cutis. Initially, CREST (calcinosis, Raynaud's phenomenon, esophageal dysmotility, sclerodactyly, and telangiectasia) syndrome was considered in view of the telangiectasia and calcinosis cutis, but a strong autosomal inheritance pattern and endoscopies (nasal and upper gastrointestinal) favored a diagnosis of hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia with rare associations. PMID:26180702

  15. Gastrointestinal Infections.

    PubMed

    Alby, Kevin; Nachamkin, Irving

    2016-06-01

    Gastrointestinal infections in the immunocompromised host are caused by the common bacterial, viral, fungal, and parasitic agents that also cause infections in the immunocompetent host. Of special consideration is that immunocompromised patients may be at increased risk for infection or disease severity and by pathogens not seen in the competent host. This chapter reviews the various agents, risk factors, and diagnostic approaches to detect gastrointestinal infections in this patient population. PMID:27337464

  16. Methicillin Hemorrhagic Cystitis

    PubMed Central

    Bracis, R.; Sanders, C. V.; Gilbert, D. N.

    1977-01-01

    Interstitial nephritis is a recognized complication of methicillin therapy. Hemorrhagic cystitis due to methicillin has not been emphasized. Evidence of hemorrhagic cystitis developed in six patients receiving methicillin therapy and was confirmed by cystoscopy in three of them. PMID:907335

  17. Maternal mortality from hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Haeri, Sina; Dildy, Gary A

    2012-02-01

    Hemorrhage remains as one of the top 3 obstetrics related causes of maternal mortality, with most deaths occurring within 24-48 hours of delivery. Although hemorrhage related maternal mortality has declined globally, it continues to be a vexing problem. More specifically, the developing world continue to shoulder a disproportionate share of hemorrhage related deaths (99%) compared with industrialized nations (1%). Given the often preventable nature of death from hemorrhage, the cornerstone of effective mortality reduction involves risk factor identification, quick diagnosis, and timely management. In this monograph we will review the epidemiology, etiology, and preventative measures related to maternal mortality from hemorrhage.

  18. [Epidemiology of upper gastrointestinal bleeding in Gabon].

    PubMed

    Gaudong Mbethe, G L; Mounguengui, D; Ondounda, M; Magne, C; Bignoumbra, R; Ntsoumou, S; Moussavou Kombila, J-B; Nzenze, J R

    2014-01-01

    The department of internal medicine of the military hospital of Gabon managed 92 cases of upper gastrointestinal bleeding from April 2009 to November 2011. The frequency of these hemorrhages in the department was 8.2%; they occurred most often in adults aged 30-40 years and 50-60 years, and mainly men (74%). Erosive-ulcerative lesions (65.2%) were the leading causes of hemorrhage, followed by esophageal varices (15.2%). These results underline the importance of preventive measures for the control of this bleeding.

  19. Multiple Gastrointestinal Complications of Crack Cocaine Abuse

    PubMed Central

    Carlin, Neal; Nguyen, Nhat; DePasquale, Joseph R.

    2014-01-01

    Cocaine and its alkaloid free base “crack-cocaine” have long since been substances of abuse. Drug abuse of cocaine via oral, inhalation, intravenous, and intranasal intake has famously been associated with a number of medical complications. Intestinal ischemia and perforation remain the most common manifestations of cocaine associated gastrointestinal disease and have historically been associated with oral intake of cocaine. Here we find a rare case of two relatively uncommon gastrointestinal complications of hemorrhage and pancreatitis presenting within a single admission in a chronic crack cocaine abuser. PMID:24839446

  20. Retinal hemorrhages in newborn.

    PubMed

    Govind, A; Kumari, S; Lath, N K

    1989-02-01

    Two hundred and fifty eight newborn babies were studied for the presence of retinal hemorrhages between 1-3 days of birth. The overall incidence of retinal hemorrhages was found to be 18.9%. It was observed that the incidence of retinal hemorrhages was higher in unassisted vaginal deliveries than in assisted births. Also, a two fold higher incidence was noted in term infants as compared to preterm babies. No association was seen with birth asphyxia.

  1. Microwave hemorrhagic stroke detector

    DOEpatents

    Haddad, Waleed S.; Trebes, James E.

    2007-06-05

    The microwave hemorrhagic stroke detector includes a low power pulsed microwave transmitter with a broad-band antenna for producing a directional beam of microwaves, an index of refraction matching cap placed over the patients head, and an array of broad-band microwave receivers with collection antennae. The system of microwave transmitter and receivers are scanned around, and can also be positioned up and down the axis of the patients head. The microwave hemorrhagic stroke detector is a completely non-invasive device designed to detect and localize blood pooling and clots or to measure blood flow within the head or body. The device is based on low power pulsed microwave technology combined with specialized antennas and tomographic methods. The system can be used for rapid, non-invasive detection of blood pooling such as occurs with hemorrhagic stoke in human or animal patients as well as for the detection of hemorrhage within a patient's body.

  2. Microwave hemorrhagic stroke detector

    DOEpatents

    Haddad, Waleed S.; Trebes, James E.

    2002-01-01

    The microwave hemorrhagic stroke detector includes a low power pulsed microwave transmitter with a broad-band antenna for producing a directional beam of microwaves, an index of refraction matching cap placed over the patients head, and an array of broad-band microwave receivers with collection antennae. The system of microwave transmitter and receivers are scanned around, and can also be positioned up and down the axis of the patients head. The microwave hemorrhagic stroke detector is a completely non-invasive device designed to detect and localize blood pooling and clots or to measure blood flow within the head or body. The device is based on low power pulsed microwave technology combined with specialized antennas and tomographic methods. The system can be used for rapid, non-invasive detection of blood pooling such as occurs with hemorrhagic stroke in human or animal patients as well as for the detection of hemorrhage within a patient's body.

  3. Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia - HHT

    MedlinePlus

    ... Throughout Body Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia (HHT) is a genetic disorder that affects about one in 5,000 people and causes arterial blood to flow directly into the veins, creating weakened ballooned vessels that can rupture. Interventional radiologists ...

  4. Gastrointestinal system

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Leo K.; O’Grady, Gregory; Du, Peng; Egbuji, John U.; Windsor, John A.; Pullan, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    The functions of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract include digestion, absorption, excretion, and protection. In this review, we focus on the electrical activity of the stomach and small intestine, which underlies the motility of these organs, and where the most detailed systems descriptions and computational models have been based to date. Much of this discussion is also applicable to the rest of the GI tract. This review covers four major spatial scales: cell, tissue, organ, and torso, and discusses the methods of investigation and the challenges associated with each. We begin by describing the origin of the electrical activity in the interstitial cells of Cajal, and its spread to smooth muscle cells. The spread of electrical activity through the stomach and small intestine is then described, followed by the resultant electrical and magnetic activity that may be recorded on the body surface. A number of common and highly symptomatic GI conditions involve abnormal electrical and/or motor activity, which are often termed functional disorders. In the last section of this review we address approaches being used to characterize and diagnose abnormalities in the electrical activity and how these might be applied in the clinical setting. The understanding of electrophysiology and motility of the GI system remains a challenging field, and the review discusses how biophysically based mathematical models can help to bridge gaps in our current knowledge, through integration of otherwise separate concepts. PMID:20836011

  5. Ebola hemorrhagic Fever.

    PubMed

    Burnett, Mark W

    2014-01-01

    Ebola hemorrhagic fever is an often-fatal disease caused by a virus of the Filoviridae family, genus Ebolavirus. Initial signs and symptoms of the disease are nonspecific, often progressing on to a severe hemorrhagic illness. Special Operations Forces Medical Providers should be aware of this disease, which occurs in sporadic outbreaks throughout Africa. Treatment at the present time is mainly supportive. Special care should be taken to prevent contact with bodily fluids of those infected, which can transmit the virus to caregivers.

  6. Dengue hemorrhagic fever in infants.

    PubMed

    Hongsiriwon, Suchat

    2002-03-01

    A report of 19 cases of serologically-proven dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) in infants aged 3-12 months who were admitted to the Department of Pediatrics, Chon Buri Regional Hospital, Thailand, during 1995 to 1998. Subjects were 8 males and 11 females, with the peak age of 8 months. Four cases (21%) had DHF and other common co-infections ie pneumonia (2 cases), Staphylococcus aureus sepsis (1 case) and Haemophilus influenzae meningitis (1 case). The clinical manifestations of the 15 DHF cases were high fever (100%), coryza (93.3%), hepatomegaly (80%), drowsiness (53.3 %), and vomiting (46.7%); rash was observed in only 27%; one-fifth developed febrile convulsions. Sites of bleeding were the skin (petechiae) 58%, gastrointestinal system (melena) 16%, and mucous membrane (epistaxis) 5%; thrombocytopenia and increased hematocrit (> or =20%) were noted in 95% and 84% respectively. The majority of the patients (18 cases, 95%) had primary infection; only one (5%) had secondary infection. The clinical severity of the DHF was Grade I, II, and III (dengue shock syndrome) in 21%, 47% and 32% of cases respectively. After appropriate and effective management, all the infants recovered fully.

  7. Primary gastrointestinal lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Cooper, D L; Doria, R; Salloum, E

    1996-03-01

    Recent evidence suggests that a significant proportion of primary gastrointestinal lymphomas are driven by exogenous agents/antigens. In the stomach, Helicobacter pylori appears to be responsible for most cases of low-grade lymphomas (MALToma), whereas an infectious etiology is suspected in immunoproliferative small intestine disease (IPSID). Similarly, enteropathy-associated T-cell lymphomas appear to result from a disordered response to gluten, although this profile remains controversial. Accordingly, although traditional antineoplastic treatments, such as surgery and radiation, are still important for the treatment of primary GI lymphomas, antibiotics may be the first line of therapy for low-grade gastric MALToma, and they are often used alone or in combination with chemotherapy for IPSID. In patients with celiac sprue, a gluten-free diet appears to markedly reduce the risk for lymphoma. An important caveat for the treatment of gastric lymphomas is that only low-grade gastric MALTomas have consistently responded to antibiotics. Treatment of high-grade gastric lymphoma is evolving. Although surgery was once considered central to diagnosis, staging, and treatment of gastric lymphoma, most patients can now have a diagnosis established by endoscopic biopsy and are candidates for chemotherapy and adjuvant radiation. The risks of fatal hemorrhage and perforation have probably been vastly overestimated and appear to be equal or less than the mortality associated with surgery. In addition, the long-term effects of gastric resection on quality of life have been almost completely ignored. Systemic lymphomas involve the GI tract far more often than is clinically apparent. In most cases, treatment should not be affected.

  8. Spontaneous hemorrhage due to pseudocysts of the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Wu, T K; Zaman, S N; Gullick, H D; Powers, S R

    1977-09-01

    Spontaneous hemorrhage caused by erosion of major arteries by a pseudocyst of the pancreas is a rare condition. We have encountered three cases, one involving the abdominal aorta and two the superior pancreaticoduodenal artery. It is important to keep in mind that pseudocyst of the pancreas may cause massive gastrointestinal or intraabdominal bleeding. Operative treatment offers a better chance of survival than more conservative management.

  9. Dengue hemorrhagic fever in infancy at Petchabun Hospital, Thailand.

    PubMed

    Witayathawornwong, P

    2001-09-01

    Prospective study of dengue hemorrhagic fever in infancy at the Pediatric Department, Petchabun Hospital during May 1997 to April 1999 is reported. There were 31 patients (2.9%) from total DHF cases of 1,044. Ten patients from 31 (32.2%) were referred from district hospitals. Male to female ratio was 17:14 (1.2:1). Maximal, minimal and median ages were 11.5 months, 22 days and 8 months, respectively. All patients had signs, symptoms and laboratory results compatible with dengue hemorrhagic fever. Serologic response was primary dengue infection. Five patients (16.1%) had gastrointestinal hemorrhage, all of them needed blood transfusion. Crystalline solution was fluid of choice given to all patients. Three patients were complicated with febrile convulsions. All patients had rapid and uneventful recovery.

  10. Pontine infarcts and hemorrhages.

    PubMed

    Moncayo, Jorge

    2012-01-01

    Pontine infarcts are often part of a large ischemia involving the brainstem, although infarcts may be restricted to the pons. In both cases, infarcts in the pons are characterized by interesting clinical patterns resulting from a variety of cranial nerve dysfunctions, eye movement disorders and motor, sensory and cerebellar manifestations, either isolated or in combination. The anteromedial and anterolateral territories are the most commonly involved. Penetrating branch artery disease is the most common etiology. Ten percent of all intracerebral hemorrhages are located in the pons, and small hemorrhages in this brainstem structure may, in some instances, give rise to unusual clinical manifestations. PMID:22377887

  11. Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: An Update.

    PubMed

    Dority, Jeremy S; Oldham, Jeffrey S

    2016-09-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a debilitating, although uncommon, type of stroke with high morbidity, mortality, and economic impact. Modern 30-day mortality is as high as 40%, and about 50% of survivors have permanent disability. Care at high-volume centers with dedicated neurointensive care units is recommended. Euvolemia, not hypervolemia, should be targeted, and the aneurysm should be secured early. Neither statin therapy nor magnesium infusions should be initiated for delayed cerebral ischemia. Cerebral vasospasm is just one component of delayed cerebral edema. Hyponatremia is common in subarachnoid hemorrhage and is associated with longer length of stay, but not increased mortality. PMID:27521199

  12. Zinc and gastrointestinal disease

    PubMed Central

    Skrovanek, Sonja; DiGuilio, Katherine; Bailey, Robert; Huntington, William; Urbas, Ryan; Mayilvaganan, Barani; Mercogliano, Giancarlo; Mullin, James M

    2014-01-01

    This review is a current summary of the role that both zinc deficiency and zinc supplementation can play in the etiology and therapy of a wide range of gastrointestinal diseases. The recent literature describing zinc action on gastrointestinal epithelial tight junctions and epithelial barrier function is described. Zinc enhancement of gastrointestinal epithelial barrier function may figure prominently in its potential therapeutic action in several gastrointestinal diseases. PMID:25400994

  13. Gastrointestinal endoscopy in the cirrhotic patient.

    PubMed

    Horsley-Silva, Jennifer L; Vargas, Hugo E

    2015-07-01

    As advances in liver disease continue, including the increasing use of liver transplantation, the endoscopist needs to be familiar with the standards of care and potential complications in the management of the cirrhotic population. This includes both elective endoscopic procedures, such as screening colonoscopies and variceal banding, as well as the acutely bleeding cirrhotic patient. Peri-procedural management and standards of care for acute gastrointestinal hemorrhaging of cirrhotic patients will be emphasized. This article will focus on the plethora of data available to highlight the benefits of endoscopic intervention in the care of patients with liver disease and outline the areas of future emphasis. PMID:25967459

  14. Lower gastrointestinal bleeding in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Chait, Maxwell M

    2010-01-01

    Lower gastrointestinal bleeding (LGIB) is an important worldwide cause of morbidity and mortality in the elderly. The incidence of LGIB increases with age and corresponds to the increased incidence of specific gastrointestinal diseases that have worldwide regional variation, co-morbid diseases and polypharmacy. The evaluation and treatment of patients is adjusted to the rate and severity of hemorrhage and the clinical status of the patient and may be complicated by the presence of visual, auditory and cognitive impairment due to age and co-morbid disease. Bleeding may be chronic and mild or severe and life threatening, requiring endoscopic, radiologic or surgical intervention. Colonoscopy provides the best method for evaluation and treatment of patients with LGIB. There will be a successful outcome of LGIB in the majority of elderly patients with appropriate evaluation and management. PMID:21160742

  15. Prohemostatic interventions in obstetric hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Bonnet, Marie-Pierre; Basso, Olga

    2012-04-01

    Obstetric hemorrhage is a major cause of maternal morbidity and mortality. Pregnancy is associated with substantial hemostatic changes, resulting in a relatively hypercoagulable state. Acquired coagulopathy can, however, develop rapidly in severe obstetric hemorrhage. Therefore, prohemostatic treatments based on high fresh frozen plasma and red blood cell (FFP:RBC) ratio transfusion and procoagulant agents (fibrinogen concentrates, recombinant activated factor VII, and tranexamic acid) are crucial aspects of management. Often, evidence from trauma patients is applied to obstetric hemorrhage management, although distinct differences exist between the two situations. Therefore, until efficacy and safety are demonstrated in obstetric hemorrhage, clinicians should be cautious about wholesale adoption of high FFP:RBC ratio products. Applications of transfusion protocols, dedicated to massive obstetric hemorrhage and multidisciplinarily developed, currently remain the best available option. Similarly, while procoagulant agents appear promising in treatment of obstetric hemorrhage, caution is nonetheless warranted as long as clear evidence in the context of obstetric hemorrhage is lacking. PMID:22510859

  16. Delayed Consecutive Contralateral Thalamic Hemorrhage after Spontaneous Thalamic Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Han, Ji Hun; Choi, Hyuk Jai; Yang, Jin Seo; Kang, Suk Hyung; Cho, Yong Jun

    2016-01-01

    Simultaneous or subsequent bilateral thalamic hemorrhagic events have ranged from 12 to 19 in prior reports, with a time lag between bilateral thalamic hemorrhage of up to two days. Herein, we report the first case of delayed (17 days) consecutive contralateral thalamic hemorrhage after spontaneous first thalamic hemorrhage. A 65-year-old female initially presented with a drowsy mentality with a left-side motor weakness (grade II/III). Brain computed tomography (CT) demonstrated right side thalamic and intraventricular hemorrhage. She regained alertness with mild residual motor weakness (grade III/IV) under medical management. Seventeen days later, a sudden and generalized tonic-clonic seizure developed. Brain CT scans revealed a new contralateral thalamic hemorrhage coincident with microbleeds. Neurologic status remained unchanged, consisting of a stuporous mentality with quadriparesis of grade II/II. We report the first case of delayed consecutive contralateral thalamic hemorrhage up to 17 days after first thalamic hemorrhage. The case highlights the need for close monitoring of patients with thalamic hemorrhage who experience microbleeds on the contralateral side, due to the possibility of delayed hemorrhage.

  17. Hemorrhagic cerebrovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Romero, Javier M; Rosand, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Primary or nontraumatic spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) accounts for 10-15% of all strokes, and has a poor prognosis. ICH has a mortality rate of almost 50% when associated with intraventricular hemorrhage within the first month, and 80% rate of dependency at 6 months from onset. Neuroimaging is critical in identifying the underlying etiology and thus assisting in the important therapeutic decisions. There are several imaging modalities available in the workup of patients who present with ICH, including computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and digital subtraction angiography (DSA). A review of the current imaging approach, as well as a differential diagnosis of etiologies and imaging manifestations of primary versus secondary intraparenchymal hemorrhage, is presented. Active bleeding occurs in the first hours after symptom onset, with early neurologic deterioration. Identifying those patients who are more likely to have hematoma expansion is an active area of research, and there are many ongoing therapeutic trials targeting this specific patient population at risk. PMID:27432674

  18. Hypercoagulability in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia with epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Finsterer, Josef; Sehnal, Ernst

    2015-01-01

    Recent data indicate that in patients with hereditary hemorrhagic teleangiectasia (HHT), low iron levels due to inadequate replacement after hemorrhagic iron losses are associated with elevated factor-VIII plasma levels and consecutively increased risk of venous thrombo-embolism. Here, we report a patient with HHT, low iron levels, elevated factor-VIII, and recurrent venous thrombo-embolism. A 64-year-old multimorbid Serbian gipsy was diagnosed with HHT at age 62 years. He had a history of recurrent epistaxis, teleangiectasias on the lips, renal and pulmonary arterio-venous malformations, and a family history positive for HHT. He had experienced recurrent venous thrombosis (mesenteric vein thrombosis, portal venous thrombosis, deep venous thrombosis), insufficiently treated with phenprocoumon during 16 months and gastro-intestinal bleeding. Blood tests revealed sideropenia and elevated plasma levels of coagulation factor-VIII. His history was positive for diabetes, arterial hypertension, hyperlipidemia, smoking, cerebral abscess, recurrent ischemic stroke, recurrent ileus, peripheral arterial occluding disease, polyneuropathy, mild renal insufficiency, and epilepsy. Following recent findings, hypercoagulability was attributed to the sideropenia-induced elevation of coagulation factor-VIII. In conclusion, HHT may be associated with hypercoagulability due to elevated factor-VIII associated with low serum iron levels from recurrent bleeding. Iron substitution may prevent HHT patients from hypercoagulability. PMID:26167029

  19. Gastrointestinal complaints during exercise: prevalence, etiology, and nutritional recommendations.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Erick Prado; Burini, Roberto Carlos; Jeukendrup, Asker

    2014-05-01

    Gastrointestinal problems are common, especially in endurance athletes, and often impair performance or subsequent recovery. Generally, studies suggest that 30-50% of athletes experience such complaints. Most gastrointestinal symptoms during exercise are mild and of no risk to health, but hemorrhagic gastritis, hematochezia, and ischemic bowel can present serious medical challenges. Three main causes of gastrointestinal symptoms have been identified, and these are either physiological, mechanical, or nutritional in nature. During intense exercise, and especially when hypohydrated, mesenteric blood flow is reduced; this is believed to be one of the main contributors to the development of gastrointestinal symptoms. Reduced splanchnic perfusion could result in compromised gut permeability in athletes. However, although evidence exists that this might occur, this has not yet been definitively linked to the prevalence of gastrointestinal symptoms. Nutritional training and appropriate nutrition choices can reduce the risk of gastrointestinal discomfort during exercise by ensuring rapid gastric emptying and the absorption of water and nutrients, and by maintaining adequate perfusion of the splanchnic vasculature. A number of nutritional manipulations have been proposed to minimize gastrointestinal symptoms, including the use of multiple transportable carbohydrates, and potentially the use of nutrients that stimulate the production of nitric oxide in the intestine and thereby improve splanchnic perfusion. However, at this stage, evidence for beneficial effects of such interventions is lacking, and more research needs to be conducted to obtain a better understanding of the etiology of the problems and to improve the recommendations to athletes.

  20. Gastrointestinal Morbidity in Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Acosta, Andres; Camilleri, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is a complex disease that results from increased energy intake and decreased energy expenditure. The gastrointestinal system plays a key role in the pathogenesis of obesity and facilitates caloric imbalance. Changes in gastrointestinal hormones and the inhibition of mechanisms that curtail caloric intake result in weight gain. It is not clear if the gastrointestinal role in obesity is a cause or an effect of this disease. Obesity is often associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Obesity is also associated with gastrointestinal disorders, which are more frequent and present earlier than T2DM and CVD. Diseases such as gastro-esophageal reflux disease, cholelithiasis or non-alcoholic steatohepatitis are directly related to body weight and abdominal adiposity. Our objective is to assess the role of each gastrointestinal organ in obesity and the gastrointestinal morbidity resulting in those organs from effects of obesity. PMID:24602085

  1. Gastrointestinal disorders - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Digestive disease - resources; Resources - gastrointestinal disorders ... org American Liver Foundation -- www.liverfoundation.org National Digestive Diseases Information Clearinghouse -- digestive.niddk.nih.gov

  2. [Hemorrhagic stroke associated to neurocysticercosis].

    PubMed

    Tellez-Zenteno, J F; Negrete-Pulido, O; Cantú, C; Márquez, C; Vega-Boada, F; García Ramos, G

    2003-06-01

    A well-known complication of neurocysticercosis is cerebral arteritis, which is usually manifested by cerebral ischemia. Only anecdotal cases of hemorrhagic stroke associated to this parasitosis have been described. Previously there are only two reported cases of this association. One of these cases had an intracystic hemorrhage confirmed by autopsy without cerebrovascular risk factors. Autopsy revealed an inflammatory arteriopathy adjacent to the cyst intracystic hemorrhage. The second case had a subarachnoidal hemorrhage secondary to the rupture of an aneurysm in the right anteroinferior cerebellar artery. At surgery, the aneurysm was found to be surrounded by a thickened-leptomeninges, which histologically showed the presence of cysticercous with dense inflammation. Our first patient was a 32 year-old female developed a lenticulo-capsular hemorrhage around a cysticercotic lesion. The second patient was a 34 year-old male developed an intracystic hemorrhage. As cerebral angiography was normal in both patients, cerebral hemorrhages were considered to be related to cysticercotic arteritis of small penetrating vessels. We conclude that cysticercosis is associated with differenttypes of intracranial hemorrhage, as documented the present cases. In neurocysticercosis endemic areas, cysticercotic arteritis should be added to the list of causes of intracranial hemorrhage in young people. PMID:12768515

  3. Diffuse gastrointestinal bleeding and BK polyomavirus replication in a pediatric allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplant patient.

    PubMed

    Koskenvuo, M; Lautenschlager, I; Kardas, P; Auvinen, E; Mannonen, L; Huttunen, P; Taskinen, M; Vettenranta, K; Hirsch, H H

    2015-01-01

    Patients undergoing haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) are at high risk of severe gastrointestinal bleeding caused by infections, graft versus host disease, and disturbances in haemostasis. BK polyomavirus (BKPyV) is known to cause hemorrhagic cystitis, but there is also evidence of BKV shedding in stool and its association with gastrointestinal disease. We report putative association of BKPyV replication with high plasma viral loads in a pediatric HSCT patient developing hemorrhagic cystitis and severe gastrointestinal bleeding necessitating intensive care. The observation was based on chart review and analysis of BKPyV DNA loads in plasma and urine as well as retrospective BKPyV-specific IgM and IgG measurements in weekly samples until three months post-transplant. The gastrointestinal bleeding was observed after a >100-fold increase in the plasma BKPyV loads and the start of hemorrhagic cystitis. The BKPyV-specific antibody response indicated past infection prior to transplantation, but increasing IgG titers were seen following BKPyV replication. The gastrointestinal biopsies were taken at a late stage of the episode and were no longer informative of BK polyomavirus involvement. In conclusion, gastrointestinal complications with bleeding are a significant problem after allogeneic HSCT to which viral infections including BKPyV may contribute. PMID:25542476

  4. Dengue hemorrhagic fever.

    PubMed

    Rosen, L

    1996-01-01

    Dengue has been known for more than 200 years. The first dengue viruses were isolated about 50 years ago. Prior to the 1950's, dengue was considered a mild febrile disease, though rare hemorrhagic and fatal cases were known to occur. After that date, the first epidemics of dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) appeared in Southeast Asia, and DHF became the most important cause of childhood morbidity and mortality in the region. The emergence of DHF epidemics was first explained by mutations affecting dengue viruses, making them more virulent, but this hypothesis was not retained. Then, the "secondary infection" or "immune enhancement" theory was proposed to explain the increased virulence of dengue viruses when children had a secondary infection. This second hypothesis is still actually favoured. However, observations in Southeast Asia, some Pacific islands, and Americas do not agree with the "secondary infection" hypothesis, which consequently has been modified several times. Recent advances in molecular biology have led to the recognition that some viral strains are more virulent than others. Another hypothesis is the selection of more virulent dengue strains by the new vector Ae. aegypti, replacing the local vector Ae. albopictus, when urbanization and modern transportation increased in Southeast Asia after the last war. Comparisons between epidemics are very difficult, because of the distinction between DHF cases according to WHO criteria and dengue fever (DF) cases with hemorrhages. This distinction has no pathogenic or prognostic grounds, and makes the task of clinicians more difficult. The actual situation in countries facing dengue epidemics makes clear that this disease will continue to be a public health problem for some time to come.

  5. Spontaneous arterial hemorrhage as a complication of dengue

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Shoma Vinay; Jacob, Gijoe George; Raju, Nithin Abraham; Ancheri, Sneha Ann

    2016-01-01

    Bleeding complications of dengue hemorrhagic fever such as epistaxis, gum bleeding, gastrointestinal bleeding, hypermenorrhea, hematuria, and thrombocytopenia have been documented. A 49-year-old female presented with complaints of intermittent high-grade fever for the past 4 days, lower abdominal pain and altered sensorium for 1 day. Laboratory investigations revealed severe anemia, mild thrombocytopenia, hypofibrinogenemia, and positive dengue serology. Emergency ultrasound examination of the abdomen revealed a possible rapidly expanding hematoma from the inferior epigastric artery and suggested urgent computed tomography (CT) angiogram for confirmation of the same. CT angiogram was confirmatory, and patient underwent emergency embolization of the right inferior epigastric artery. We report the first case of inferior epigastric hemorrhage and rectus sheath hematoma as a consequence of dengue. PMID:27275081

  6. [Diagnosis of chronic hemorrhage in diseases of the small intestine].

    PubMed

    Romashov, F N; Savov, A M; Abashkin, Iu A; Tishchenkova, V S

    1996-01-01

    In a period of 10 years 38 patients received treatment in the clinic for iron deficiency anemia in whom the source of chronic blood loss was revealed in the small intestine. The radionuclide method for detecting concealed blood loss was most informative for the diagnosis (98%) of chronic intestinal hemorrhages, and was particularly important in cases with iron deficiency anemia of unclear genesis. Oral enterography was the most available method and sufficiently informative (32%) in the diagnosis of chronic hemorrhages from the small intestine. In 3-4 day, blood loss of more than 10 ml/24 h from the gastrointestinal tract verified by the radionuclide method but with the source of the bleeding not identified by instrumental methods, the indications for diagnostic laparotomy must be widened for careful examination of the small intestine.

  7. Gastrointestinal surgical emergencies following kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Bardaxoglou, E; Maddern, G; Ruso, L; Siriser, F; Campion, J P; Le Pogamp, P; Catheline, J M; Launois, B

    1993-05-01

    This study reports major gastrointestinal complications in a group of 416 patients following kidney transplantation. Three hundred and ninety-nine patients received a cadaveric kidney while the other 17 received a living related organ. The immunosuppressive regimen changed somewhat during the course of the study but included azathioprine, prednisolone, antilymphocyte globulin, and cyclosporin. Perforations occurred in the colon (n = 6), small bowel (n = 4), duodenum (n = 2), stomach (n = 1), and esophagus (n = 1). There were five cases of acute pancreatitis, four of upper gastrointestinal and two of lower intestinal hemorrhage, two of acute appendicitis, one of acute cholecystitis, one postoperative mesenteric infarction, and two small bowel obstructions. Fifty percent of the complications occurred while patients were being given high-dose immunosuppression to manage either the early postoperative period or episodes of acute rejection. Ten percent of the complications had an iatrogenic cause. Of the 31 patients affected, 10 (30%) died as a direct result of their gastrointestinal complication. This high mortality appears to be related to the effects of the immunosuppression and the associated response to sepsis. Reduction of these complications can be achieved by improved surgical management, preventive measures, prompt diagnosis, and a reduced immunosuppressive protocol.

  8. Swallowable fluorometric capsule for wireless triage of gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Nemiroski, A; Ryou, M; Thompson, C C; Westervelt, R M

    2015-12-01

    Real-time detection of gastrointestinal bleeding remains a major challenge because there does not yet exist a minimally invasive technology that can both i) monitor for blood from an active hemorrhage and ii) uniquely distinguish it from blood left over from an inactive hemorrhage. Such a device would be an important tool for clinical triage. One promising solution, which we have proposed previously, is to inject a fluorescent dye into the blood stream and to use it as a distinctive marker of active bleeding by monitoring leakage into the gastrointestinal tract with a wireless fluorometer. This paper reports, for the first time to our knowledge, the development of a swallowable, wireless capsule with a built-in fluorometer capable of detecting fluorescein in blood, and intended for monitoring gastrointestinal bleeding in the stomach. The embedded, compact fluorometer uses pinholes to define a microliter sensing volume and to eliminate bulky optical components. The proof-of-concept capsule integrates optics, low-noise analog sensing electronics, a microcontroller, battery, and low power Zigbee radio, all into a cylindrical package measuring 11 mm × 27 mm and weighing 10 g. Bench-top experiments demonstrate wireless fluorometry with a limit-of-detection of 20 nM aqueous fluorescein. This device represents a major step towards a technology that would enable simple, rapid detection of active gastrointestinal bleeding, a capability that would save precious time and resources and, ultimately, reduce complications in patients. PMID:26490455

  9. Epidemiology of hemorrhagic fever viruses.

    PubMed

    LeDuc, J W

    1989-01-01

    Twelve distinct viruses associated with hemorrhagic fever in humans are classified among four families: Arenaviridae, which includes Lassa, Junin, and Machupo viruses; Bunyaviridae, which includes Rift Valley fever, Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever, and Hantaan viruses; Filoviridae, which includes Marburg and Ebola viruses; and Flaviviridae, which includes yellow fever, dengue, Kyasanur Forest disease, and Omsk viruses. Most hemorrhagic fever viruses are zoonoses, with the possible exception of the four dengue viruses, which may continually circulate among humans. Hemorrhagic fever viruses are found in both temperate and tropical habitats and generally infect both sexes and all ages, although the age and sex of those infected are frequently influenced by the possibility of occupational exposure. Transmission to humans is frequently by bite of an infected tick or mosquito or via aerosol from infected rodent hosts. Aerosol and nosocomial transmission are especially important with Lassa, Junin, Machupo, Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever, Marburg, and Ebola viruses. Seasonality of hemorrhagic fever among humans is influenced for the most part by the dynamics of infected arthropod or vertebrate hosts. Mammals, especially rodents, appear to be important natural hosts for many hemorrhagic fever viruses. The transmission cycle for each hemorrhagic fever virus is distinct and is dependent upon the characteristics of the primary vector species and the possibility for its contact with humans.

  10. Neuroinflammation after intracerebral hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Mracsko, Eva; Veltkamp, Roland

    2014-01-01

    Spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is a particularly severe type of stroke for which no specific treatment has been established yet. Although preclinical models of ICH have substantial methodological limitations, important insight into the pathophysiology has been gained. Mounting evidence suggests an important contribution of inflammatory mechanisms to brain damage and potential repair. Neuroinflammation evoked by intracerebral blood involves the activation of resident microglia, the infiltration of systemic immune cells and the production of cytokines, chemokines, extracellular proteases and reactive oxygen species (ROS). Previous studies focused on innate immunity including microglia, monocytes and granulocytes. More recently, the role of adaptive immune cells has received increasing attention. Little is currently known about the interactions among different immune cell populations in the setting of ICH. Nevertheless, immunomodulatory strategies are already being explored in ICH. To improve the chances of translation from preclinical models to patients, a better characterization of the neuroinflammation in patients is desirable. PMID:25477782

  11. Is There a Role for Empiric Gastroduodenal Artery Embolization in the Management of Patients with Active Upper GI Hemorrhage?

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, Shaheen Chan, Victoria Shrivastava, Vivek Anthony, Susan Uberoi, Raman Bratby, Mark

    2013-08-01

    PurposeTo assess the relative efficacy of empiric gastroduodenal artery (GDA) embolization in reducing recurrent hemorrhage compared to image-guided targeted embolization.MethodsData were retrospectively collected for consecutive patients who had catheter angiography for major upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage from May 2008 to November 2010 (n = 40). The total number of cases were divided into two main groups according to angiographic findings: those that demonstrated a site of hemorrhage on catheter angiography (group 1, n = 13), and those where the site of hemorrhage was not identified on catheter angiography (group 2, n = 27). Group 2 was then further divided into patients who received empiric embolization (group 2a, n = 20) and those who had no embolization performed after angiography (group 2b, n = 7).ResultsThe technical and clinical success rates for embolization in groups 1 and 2a were, respectively, 100 vs. 95 %, and 85 vs. 80 %. There was no statistical significance in the recurrent hemorrhage rate, reintervention rate, or 30 day mortality between targeted and empiric embolization groups. There were no complications attributed to embolization within this study cohort.ConclusionCases of duodenal-related major upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage where no embolization is performed have poor outcome. Empiric embolization of the GDA in patients with major upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage refractory to endoscopic treatment appears to be a safe and effective treatment, with low reintervention rates and good clinical outcome comparable to patients where the site of hemorrhage is localized and embolized with computed tomographic angiography or catheter angiography and embolized.

  12. Dengue hemorrhagic fever in patients with thalassemia.

    PubMed

    Pongtanakul, Bunchoo; Narkbunnam, Nattee; Veerakul, Gavivann; Sanpakit, Kleebsabai; Viprakasit, Vip; Tanphaichitr, Voravarn Tanphaichitr; Suvatte, Vinai

    2005-11-01

    Dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) causing by dengue viral infection is endemic in Thailand and Southeast Asian countries where thalassemias are prevalent. Thalassemic patients are also at risk to acquire dengue viral infections and to develop DHF. However, they can have different clinical manifestations and complications as well as more severity than general population requiring special awareness for proper diagnosis and management. We reported 20 thalassemic patients (10 boys and 10 girls) with DHF admitted to Department of Pediatrics, Siriraj Hospital during 1977 to 2001. Their ages ranged from 2-16 years (average 9.5 years). These cases included 5 cases of Hb H disease, 5 cases of Hb H with Hb Constant Spring (CS), 9 cases of beta-thalassemia/Hb E disease and 1 case of beta-thalassemia major. Two cases were in Grade I, 10 cases in grade II, 7 cases in Grade III and one case in grade IV severity of DHF. Though there were evidences of plasma leakage, instead of hemoconcentration, eighteen patients (90 percent) had hematocrit dropped at the range of 11-66% of the initial level. Fifteen patients (75 percent) required at least one packed red cell transfusion. Nine patients (45 percent) had mild bleeding symptoms, one of them had upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage requiring platelet concentrate transfusion. Two patients (10 percent) had serious complications including one with infection-associated hemophagocytic syndrome (IAHS) requiring intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) and packed red cell transfusion and the other had generalized seizure due to hyponatremia and hypotension. No mortality was observed among this group of patients. Early recognition of the DHF in thalassemic patients and appropriate packed red cell transfusion in patients with anemic symptoms is warranted to reduce morbidity and mortality in these patients.

  13. Gastrointestinal motility and functional gastrointestinal diseases.

    PubMed

    Kusano, Motoyasu; Hosaka, Hiroko; Kawada, Akiyo; Kuribayashi, Shiko; Shimoyama, Yasuyuki; Zai, Hiroaki; Kawamura, Osamu; Yamada, Masanobu

    2014-01-01

    Digestive tract motility patterns are closely related to the pathophysiology of functional gastrointestinal diseases (FGID), and these patterns differ markedly between the interdigestive period and the postprandial period. The characteristic motility pattern in the interdigestive period is so-called interdigestive migrating contraction (IMC). IMCs have a housekeeping role in the intestinal tract, and could also be related to FGID. IMCs arising from the stomach are called gastrointestinal IMCs (GI-IMC), while IMCs arising from the duodenum without associated gastric contractions are called intestinal IMCs (I-IMC). It is thought that I-IMCs are abnormal in FGID. Transport of food residue to the duodenum via gastric emptying is one of the most important postprandial functions of the stomach. In patients with functional dyspepsia (FD), abnormal gastric emptying is a possible mechanism of gastric dysfunction. Accordingly, delayed gastric emptying has attracted attention, with prokinetic agents and herbal medicines often being administered in Japan to accelerate gastric emptying in patients who have anorexia associated with dyspepsia. Recently, we found that addition of monosodium L-glutamate (MSG) to a high-calorie liquid diet rich in casein promoted gastric emptying in healthy men. Therefore, another potential method of improving delayed gastric emptying could be activation of chemosensors that stimulate the autonomic nervous system of the gastrointestinal tract, suggesting a role for MSG in the management of delayed gastric emptying in patients with FD.

  14. Hemorrhagic complications in dermatologic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Bunick, Christopher G.; Aasi, Sumaira Z.

    2014-01-01

    The ability to recognize, manage, and, most importantly, prevent hemorrhagic complications is critical to performing dermatologic procedures that have safe and high quality outcomes. This article reviews the preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative factors and patient dynamics that are central to preventing such an adverse outcome. Specifically, the role that anticoagulants and antiplatelet agents, hypertension, and other medical conditions play in the development of postoperative hemorrhage are discussed. In addition, this article provides practical guidelines on managing bleeding during and after surgery. PMID:22515669

  15. Dengue and dengue hemorrhagic fever.

    PubMed

    Gubler, D J

    1998-07-01

    Dengue fever, a very old disease, has reemerged in the past 20 years with an expanded geographic distribution of both the viruses and the mosquito vectors, increased epidemic activity, the development of hyperendemicity (the cocirculation of multiple serotypes), and the emergence of dengue hemorrhagic fever in new geographic regions. In 1998 this mosquito-borne disease is the most important tropical infectious disease after malaria, with an estimated 100 million cases of dengue fever, 500,000 cases of dengue hemorrhagic fever, and 25,000 deaths annually. The reasons for this resurgence and emergence of dengue hemorrhagic fever in the waning years of the 20th century are complex and not fully understood, but demographic, societal, and public health infrastructure changes in the past 30 years have contributed greatly. This paper reviews the changing epidemiology of dengue and dengue hemorrhagic fever by geographic region, the natural history and transmission cycles, clinical diagnosis of both dengue fever and dengue hemorrhagic fever, serologic and virologic laboratory diagnoses, pathogenesis, surveillance, prevention, and control. A major challenge for public health officials in all tropical areas of the world is to develop and implement sustainable prevention and control programs that will reverse the trend of emergent dengue hemorrhagic fever.

  16. Simultaneous operation for cardiac disease and gastrointestinal malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Komokata, Teruo; Fukueda, Mikio; Kaieda, Mamoru; Ueno, Takayuki; Iguro, Yoshihumi; Imoto, Yutaka; Sakata, Ryuzo

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the safety of performing simultaneous cardiac surgery and a resection of a gastrointestinal malignancy. METHODS: Among 3664 elective cardiac operations performed in adults at Kagoshima University Hospital from January 1991 to October 2009, this study reviewed the clinical records of the patients who underwent concomitant cardiac surgery and a gastrointestinal resection. Such simultaneous surgeries were performed in 15 patients between January 1991 and October 2009. The cardiac diseases included 8 cases of coronary artery disease and 7 cases with valvular heart disease. Gastrointestinal malignancies included 11 gastric and 4 colon cancers. Immediate postoperative and long-term outcomes were evaluated. RESULTS: Postoperative complications occurred in 5 patients (33.3%), including strokes (n = 1), respiratory failure requiring re-intubation (n = 1), hemorrhage (n = 2), hyperbilirubinemia (n = 1) and aspiration pneumonia (n = 1). There was 1 hospital death caused by the development of adult respiratory distress syndrome after postoperative surgical bleeding followed aortic valve replacement plus gastrectomy. There was no cardiovascular event in the patients during the follow-up period. The cumulative survival rate for all patients was 69.2% at 5 years. CONCLUSION: Simultaneous procedures are acceptable for the patients who require surgery for both cardiac diseases and gastrointestinal malignancy. In particular, the combination of a standard cardiac operation, such as coronary artery bypass grafting or an isolated valve replacement and simple gastrointestinal resection, such as gastrectomy or colectomy can therefore be safely performed. PMID:25161762

  17. Diffuse Alveolar Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (DAH) is a life-threatening and medical emergency that can be caused by numerous disorders and presents with hemoptysis, anemia, and diffuse alveolar infiltrates. Early bronchoscopy with bronchoalveolar lavage is usually required to confirm the diagnosis and rule out infection. Most cases of DAH are caused by capillaritis associated with systemic autoimmune diseases such as anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis, anti-glomerular basement membrane disease, and systemic lupus erythematosus, but DAH may also result from coagulation disorders, drugs, inhaled toxins, or transplantation. The diagnosis of DAH relies on clinical suspicion combined with laboratory, radiologic, and pathologic findings. Early recognition is crucial, because prompt diagnosis and treatment is necessary for survival. Corticosteroids and immunosuppressive agents remain the gold standard. In patients with DAH, biopsy of involved sites can help to identify the cause and to direct therapy. This article aims to provide a general review of the causes and clinical presentation of DAH and to recommend a diagnostic approach and a management plan for the most common causes. PMID:23678356

  18. Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Park, Moo Suk

    2013-04-01

    Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (DAH) is a life-threatening and medical emergency that can be caused by numerous disorders and presents with hemoptysis, anemia, and diffuse alveolar infiltrates. Early bronchoscopy with bronchoalveolar lavage is usually required to confirm the diagnosis and rule out infection. Most cases of DAH are caused by capillaritis associated with systemic autoimmune diseases such as anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis, anti-glomerular basement membrane disease, and systemic lupus erythematosus, but DAH may also result from coagulation disorders, drugs, inhaled toxins, or transplantation. The diagnosis of DAH relies on clinical suspicion combined with laboratory, radiologic, and pathologic findings. Early recognition is crucial, because prompt diagnosis and treatment is necessary for survival. Corticosteroids and immunosuppressive agents remain the gold standard. In patients with DAH, biopsy of involved sites can help to identify the cause and to direct therapy. This article aims to provide a general review of the causes and clinical presentation of DAH and to recommend a diagnostic approach and a management plan for the most common causes.

  19. Pathogenesis of Bolivian Hemorrhagic Fever in Guinea Pigs.

    PubMed

    Bell, T M; Bunton, T E; Shaia, C I; Raymond, J W; Honnold, S P; Donnelly, G C; Shamblin, J D; Wilkinson, E R; Cashman, K A

    2016-01-01

    Machupo virus, the cause of Bolivian hemorrhagic fever, is a highly lethal viral hemorrhagic fever with no Food and Drug Administration-approved vaccines or therapeutics. This study evaluated the guinea pig as a model using the Machupo virus-Chicava strain administered via aerosol challenge. Guinea pigs (Cavia porcellus) were serially sampled to evaluate the temporal progression of infection, gross and histologic lesions, and sequential changes in serum chemistry and hematology. The incubation period was 5 to 12 days, and complete blood counts revealed leukopenia with lymphopenia and thrombocytopenia. Gross pathologic findings included congestion and hemorrhage of the gastrointestinal mucosa and serosa, noncollapsing lungs with fluid exudation, enlarged lymph nodes, and progressive pallor and friability of the liver. Histologic lesions consisted of foci of degeneration and cell death in the haired skin, liver, pancreas, adrenal glands, lymph nodes, tongue, esophagus, salivary glands, renal pelvis, small intestine, and large intestine. Lymphohistiocytic interstitial pneumonia was also present. Inflammation within the central nervous system, interpreted as nonsuppurative encephalitis, was histologically apparent approximately 16 days postexposure and was generally progressive. Macrophages in the tracheobronchial lymph node, on day 5 postexposure, were the first cells to demonstrate visible viral antigen. Viral antigen was detected throughout the lymphoid system by day 9 postexposure, followed by prominent spread within epithelial tissues and then brain. This study provides insight into the course of Machupo virus infection and supports the utility of guinea pigs as an additional animal model for vaccine and therapeutic development. PMID:26139838

  20. Pathogenesis of Bolivian Hemorrhagic Fever in Guinea Pigs.

    PubMed

    Bell, T M; Bunton, T E; Shaia, C I; Raymond, J W; Honnold, S P; Donnelly, G C; Shamblin, J D; Wilkinson, E R; Cashman, K A

    2016-01-01

    Machupo virus, the cause of Bolivian hemorrhagic fever, is a highly lethal viral hemorrhagic fever with no Food and Drug Administration-approved vaccines or therapeutics. This study evaluated the guinea pig as a model using the Machupo virus-Chicava strain administered via aerosol challenge. Guinea pigs (Cavia porcellus) were serially sampled to evaluate the temporal progression of infection, gross and histologic lesions, and sequential changes in serum chemistry and hematology. The incubation period was 5 to 12 days, and complete blood counts revealed leukopenia with lymphopenia and thrombocytopenia. Gross pathologic findings included congestion and hemorrhage of the gastrointestinal mucosa and serosa, noncollapsing lungs with fluid exudation, enlarged lymph nodes, and progressive pallor and friability of the liver. Histologic lesions consisted of foci of degeneration and cell death in the haired skin, liver, pancreas, adrenal glands, lymph nodes, tongue, esophagus, salivary glands, renal pelvis, small intestine, and large intestine. Lymphohistiocytic interstitial pneumonia was also present. Inflammation within the central nervous system, interpreted as nonsuppurative encephalitis, was histologically apparent approximately 16 days postexposure and was generally progressive. Macrophages in the tracheobronchial lymph node, on day 5 postexposure, were the first cells to demonstrate visible viral antigen. Viral antigen was detected throughout the lymphoid system by day 9 postexposure, followed by prominent spread within epithelial tissues and then brain. This study provides insight into the course of Machupo virus infection and supports the utility of guinea pigs as an additional animal model for vaccine and therapeutic development.

  1. Optimal management of hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Neetika; Khunger, Monica; Gupta, Arjun; Kumar, Nilay

    2014-01-01

    Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT), also known by the eponym Osler–Weber–Rendu syndrome, is a group of related disorders inherited in an autosomal dominant fashion and characterized by the development of arteriovenous malformations (AVM) in the skin, mucous membranes, and/or internal organs such as brain, lungs, and liver. Its prevalence is currently estimated at one in 5,000 to 8,000. Most cases are due to mutations in the endoglin (HHT1) or ACVRLK1 (HHT2) genes. Telangiectasias in nasal and gastrointestinal mucosa generally present with recurrent/chronic bleeding and iron deficiency anemia. Larger AVMs occur in lungs (~40%–60% of affected individuals), liver (~40%–70%), brain (~10%), and spine (~1%). Due to the devastating and potentially fatal complications of some of these lesions (for example, strokes and brain abscesses with pulmonary AVMs), presymptomatic screening and treatment are of utmost importance. However, due to the rarity of this condition, many providers lack an appreciation for the whole gamut of its manifestations and complications, age-dependent penetrance, and marked intrafamilial variation. As a result, HHT remains frequently underdiagnosed and many families do not receive the appropriate screening and treatments. This article provides an overview of the clinical features of HHT, discusses the clinical and genetic diagnostic strategies, and presents an up-to-date review of literature and detailed considerations regarding screening for visceral AVMs, preventive modalities, and treatment options. PMID:25342923

  2. Upper gastrointestinal bleeding in dengue fever.

    PubMed

    Tsai, C J; Kuo, C H; Chen, P C; Changcheng, C S

    1991-01-01

    Twenty-six virologically and serologically confirmed Dengue patients with signs of upper gastrointestinal tract bleeding (13.1%) were studied during the 1987 outbreak in southern Taiwan. Within a 1-yr period from 1987 to 1988 in Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, there were 198 patients with Dengue fever confirmed. Viral isolation and serological studies indicated that type I Dengue was the cause. There was no evidence of sequential secondary infection among them. The 26 patients were evaluated gastroduodenoscopically. Most of the Dengue patients who developed upper gastrointestinal bleeding had gastric ulcers or duodenal ulcers; superficial and hemorrhagic gastritis are the other relevant endoscopic findings. Thirteen patients (50%) had a past history of peptic ulcer symptoms, whereas the other 13 did not. Dengue infection is a precipitating factor in inducing peptic ulcer bleeding because of hemostatic derangements. Supportive therapy and blood transfusions alone were adequate treatment, except for one patient who required surgery due to massive bleeding of a duodenal ulcer. No mortality was observed in this study.

  3. Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a worldwide health burden with high fatality and permanent disability rates. The overall prognosis depends on the volume of the initial bleed, rebleeding, and degree of delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI). Cardiac manifestations and neurogenic pulmonary edema indicate the severity of SAH. The International Subarachnoid Aneurysm Trial (ISAT) reported a favorable neurological outcome with the endovascular coiling procedure compared with surgical clipping at the end of 1 year. The ISAT trial recruits were primarily neurologically good grade patients with smaller anterior circulation aneurysms, and therefore the results cannot be reliably extrapolated to larger aneurysms, posterior circulation aneurysms, patients presenting with complex aneurysm morphology, and poor neurological grades. The role of hypothermia is not proven to be neuroprotective according to a large randomized controlled trial, Intraoperative Hypothermia for Aneurysms Surgery Trial (IHAST II), which recruited patients with good neurological grades. Patients in this trial were subjected to slow cooling and inadequate cooling time and were rewarmed rapidly. This methodology would have reduced the beneficial effects of hypothermia. Adenosine is found to be beneficial for transient induced hypotension in 2 retrospective analyses, without increasing the risk for cardiac and neurological morbidity. The neurological benefit of pharmacological neuroprotection and neuromonitoring is not proven in patients undergoing clipping of aneurysms. DCI is an important cause of morbidity and mortality following SAH, and the pathophysiology is likely multifactorial and not yet understood. At present, oral nimodipine has an established role in the management of DCI, along with maintenance of euvolemia and induced hypertension. Following SAH, hypernatremia, although less common than hyponatremia, is a predictor of poor neurological outcome. PMID:25272066

  4. Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    D'Souza, Stanlies

    2015-07-01

    Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a worldwide health burden with high fatality and permanent disability rates. The overall prognosis depends on the volume of the initial bleed, rebleeding, and degree of delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI). Cardiac manifestations and neurogenic pulmonary edema indicate the severity of SAH. The International Subarachnoid Aneurysm Trial (ISAT) reported a favorable neurological outcome with the endovascular coiling procedure compared with surgical clipping at the end of 1 year. The ISAT trial recruits were primarily neurologically good grade patients with smaller anterior circulation aneurysms, and therefore the results cannot be reliably extrapolated to larger aneurysms, posterior circulation aneurysms, patients presenting with complex aneurysm morphology, and poor neurological grades. The role of hypothermia is not proven to be neuroprotective according to a large randomized controlled trial, Intraoperative Hypothermia for Aneurysms Surgery Trial (IHAST II), which recruited patients with good neurological grades. Patients in this trial were subjected to slow cooling and inadequate cooling time and were rewarmed rapidly. This methodology would have reduced the beneficial effects of hypothermia. Adenosine is found to be beneficial for transient induced hypotension in 2 retrospective analyses, without increasing the risk for cardiac and neurological morbidity. The neurological benefit of pharmacological neuroprotection and neuromonitoring is not proven in patients undergoing clipping of aneurysms. DCI is an important cause of morbidity and mortality following SAH, and the pathophysiology is likely multifactorial and not yet understood. At present, oral nimodipine has an established role in the management of DCI, along with maintenance of euvolemia and induced hypertension. Following SAH, hypernatremia, although less common than hyponatremia, is a predictor of poor neurological outcome.

  5. Heritable Gastrointestinal Cancer Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Stoffel, Elena M

    2016-09-01

    Although almost all gastrointestinal cancers develop from sporadic genomic events, approximately 5% arise from germline mutations in genes associated with cancer predisposition. The number of these genes continues to increase. Tumor phenotypes and family history provide the framework for identifying at-risk individuals. The diagnosis of a hereditary cancer syndrome has implications for management of patients and their families. Systematic approaches that integrate family history and molecular characterization of tumors and polyps facilitate identification of individuals with this genetic predisposition. This article summarizes diagnosis and management of hereditary cancer syndromes associated with gastrointestinal cancers. PMID:27546846

  6. What Are Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors?

    MedlinePlus

    ... the digestive system. The gastrointestinal system The gastrointestinal (GI) system (or digestive system) processes food for energy ... bloodstream. This is the longest section of the GI tract, measuring more than 20 feet. The small ...

  7. Pediatric functional gastrointestinal disorders

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Functional gastrointestinal disorders continue to be a prevalent set of conditions faced by the healthcare team and have a significant emotional and economic impact. In this review, the authors highlight some of the common functional disorders seen in pediatric patients (functional dyspepsia, irrita...

  8. Gastrointestinal Bleeding in Athletes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eichner, Edward R.

    1989-01-01

    Describes the scope and importance of gastrointestinal bleeding in runners and other athletes, discussing causes, sites, and implications of exercise-related bleeding. Practical tips to mitigate the problem, potentially more troublesome in women because of lower iron stores, are presented (e.g., gradual conditioning and avoidance of prerace…

  9. Gastrointestinal endoscopy in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Savas, Nurten

    2014-11-01

    Gastrointestinal endoscopy has a major diagnostic and therapeutic role in most gastrointestinal disorders; however, limited information is available about clinical efficacy and safety in pregnant patients. The major risks of endoscopy during pregnancy include potential harm to the fetus because of hypoxia, premature labor, trauma and teratogenesis. In some cases, endoscopic procedures may be postponed until after delivery. When emergency or urgent indications are present, endoscopic procedures may be considered with some precautions. United States Food and Drug Administration category B drugs may be used in low doses. Endoscopic procedures during pregnancy may include upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy, sigmoidoscopy, colonoscopy, enteroscopy of the small bowel or video capsule endoscopy, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography and endoscopic ultrasonography. All gastrointestinal endoscopic procedures in pregnant patients should be performed in hospitals by expert endoscopists and an obstetrician should be informed about all endoscopic procedures. The endoscopy and flexible sigmoidoscopy may be safe for the fetus and pregnant patient, and may be performed during pregnancy when strong indications are present. Colonoscopy for pregnant patients may be considered for strong indications during the second trimester. Although therapeutic endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography may be considered during pregnancy, this procedure should be performed only for strong indications and attempts should be made to minimize radiation exposure.

  10. [Gastrointestinal and hepatic diseases].

    PubMed

    Moctezuma-Velázquez, Carlos; Aguirre-Valadez, Jonathan

    2016-09-01

    Diet is considered an important triggering factor for gastrointestinal symptoms whose physiopathology includes not only measurable, inflammatory reactions, but also functional disorders, where no organic effects may be measured or demonstrated. Moreover, the prevalence of the perceived intolerance to certain foods ranges from 20-25% (within the general population) to 50-70% in diseases like irritable bowel syndrome. This intolerance has been observed particularly after the consumption of milk and dairy products, which are frequently considered as causative of gastrointestinal symptoms, thus limiting their ingestion. However, this behavior reduces the dietary sources of calcium and consequently may lead to malnutrition and bone decalcification, amongst other complications. The true dairy intolerance (intestinal lactase deficiency) explains most of the symptoms ensuing their consumption, but the frequency of such alteration on the different gastrointestinal diseases has not been determined. This review focuses on the most frequent gastrointestinal diseases and the existing evidence regarding the alterations and symptoms related to the consumption of milk or dairy products. PMID:27603892

  11. Apollo gastrointestinal analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichols, B. L.; Huang, C. T. L.

    1975-01-01

    Fecal bile acid patterns for the Apollo 17 flight were studied to determine the cause of diarrhea on the mission. The fecal sterol analysis gave no indication of an infectious diarrhea, or specific, or nonspecific etiology occurring during the entire flight. It is assumed that the gastrointestinal problems encountered are the consequences of altered physiology, perhaps secondary to physical or emotional stress of flight.

  12. Gastrointestinal endoscopy in pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Savas, Nurten

    2014-01-01

    Gastrointestinal endoscopy has a major diagnostic and therapeutic role in most gastrointestinal disorders; however, limited information is available about clinical efficacy and safety in pregnant patients. The major risks of endoscopy during pregnancy include potential harm to the fetus because of hypoxia, premature labor, trauma and teratogenesis. In some cases, endoscopic procedures may be postponed until after delivery. When emergency or urgent indications are present, endoscopic procedures may be considered with some precautions. United States Food and Drug Administration category B drugs may be used in low doses. Endoscopic procedures during pregnancy may include upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy, sigmoidoscopy, colonoscopy, enteroscopy of the small bowel or video capsule endoscopy, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography and endoscopic ultrasonography. All gastrointestinal endoscopic procedures in pregnant patients should be performed in hospitals by expert endoscopists and an obstetrician should be informed about all endoscopic procedures. The endoscopy and flexible sigmoidoscopy may be safe for the fetus and pregnant patient, and may be performed during pregnancy when strong indications are present. Colonoscopy for pregnant patients may be considered for strong indications during the second trimester. Although therapeutic endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography may be considered during pregnancy, this procedure should be performed only for strong indications and attempts should be made to minimize radiation exposure. PMID:25386072

  13. Intracerebral hemorrhage and cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Li; Reijmer, Yael D; Charidimou, Andreas; Cordonnier, Charlotte; Viswanathan, Anand

    2016-05-01

    Vascular cognitive impairment and vascular dementia are composed of cognitive deficits resulted from a range of vascular lesions and pathologies, including both ischemic and hemorrhagic. However the contribution of spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage presumed due to small vessel diseases on cognitive impairment is underestimated, in contrast to the numerous studies about the role of ischemic vascular disorders on cognition. In this review we summarize recent findings from clinical studies and appropriate basic science research to better elucidate the role and possible mechanisms of intracerebral hemorrhage in cognitive impairment and dementia. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Vascular Contributions to Cognitive Impairment and Dementia edited by M. Paul Murphy, Roderick A. Corriveau and Donna M. Wilcock.

  14. Massive extra-enteric gastrointestinal bleeding: angiographic diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Koehler, P R; Nelson, J A; Berenson, M M

    1976-04-01

    Two patients with massive gastrointestinal bleeding are reported. One bled from an aneurysm of a branch of the left hepatic artery, the blood reaching the bowel through communication with the biliary tree. The second had an aneurysm of a branch of the splenic artery which communicated with the pancreatic duct. This type of bleeding is intermittent and, consequently, actual extravasation of contrast media is not always seen. Therefore, if one sees an aneurysm of a visceral artery, even if it does not directly supply the enteric tract, one should consider the possibility that it is the origin of the hemorrhage. Pathogenesis, diagnostic modalities, and therapeutic implications are discussed. PMID:1083037

  15. Marked Hypofibrinogenemia and Gastrointestinal Bleeding After Copperhead (Agkistrodon contortrix) Envenomation.

    PubMed

    Kopec, Kathryn T; Yen, May; Bitner, Matthew; Evans, C Scott; Gerardo, Charles J

    2015-12-01

    Compared with other crotaline envenomations, copperhead envenomations have historically been reported as having less severe hematologic venom effects and rarely hemorrhage. We report a case of clinically significant gastrointestinal bleeding after a copperhead (Agkistrodon contortrix) envenomation. A 52-year-old woman with a history of systemic lupus erythematosus was bitten on her right medial ankle after which hypofibrinogenemia and hematochezia developed. The symptoms resolved after repeated administration of Crotalidae polyvalent immune Fab (ovine) antivenom. She was discharged without further complications 2 days later. Although copperhead envenomations are classically considered less severe than other crotaline envenomations, this case demonstrates the potential of the venom to produce clinically significant hematologic effects. PMID:26432425

  16. Haemochromatosis and gastrointestinal cancer.

    PubMed

    Lagergren, Katarina; Wahlin, Karl; Mattsson, Fredrik; Alderson, Derek; Lagergren, Jesper

    2016-10-15

    Iron overload in patients with haemochromatosis is a strong risk factor for liver cancer, but its influence on other gastrointestinal cancer risk is unclear. The aim was to assess the relative risk of luminal gastrointestinal cancer among patients diagnosed with haemochromatosis. This population-based, nationwide Swedish cohort study included patients with haemochromatosis in Sweden in 1965-2013. The incidence of gastrointestinal cancers was assessed through the Swedish Cancer Registry. The measure of relative risk was the standardised incidence ratio (SIR) with 95% confidence interval (CI), that is, the ratio of the observed number of gastrointestinal cancers in the haemochromatosis cohort divided by the expected number of such cancers, calculated from the entire corresponding background population of Sweden. Among 6,849 patients in the haemochromatosis cohort with up to 48 years of follow-up, the SIRs were 3-fold increased for oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma (SIR = 3.2, 95% CI 1.3-6.6; n = 7) and 40% increased for colon adenocarcinoma (SIR = 1.4, 95% CI 1.1-1.9; n = 54). No associations were found between haemochromatosis and the risk of adenocarcinoma of the oesophagus (SIR = 0.5, 95% CI 0.0-2.5; n = 1), stomach (SIR = 0.7, 95% CI 0.3-1.4; n = 8), small bowel (SIR = 1.2, 95% CI 0.0-6.7; n = 1) or rectum (SIR = 1.0, 95% CI 0.6-1.6; n = 21). These findings indicate that haemochromatosis increases the risk of oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma and colon adenocarcinoma, but might not influence the risk of other types of luminal gastrointestinal cancer. These findings should encourage further research examining the role of iron overload in cancer aetiology.

  17. Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever (CCHF)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Congo Hemorrhagic Fever (CCHF) [PDF - 2 pages] Virus Ecology Viral Hemorrhagic Fever (VHF) Information for Specific Groups ... Diagnosis Treatment Prevention Outbreak Distribution Map Resources Virus Ecology File Formats Help: How do I view different ...

  18. CT demonstration of bilateral adrenal hemorrhage

    SciTech Connect

    Ling, D.; Korobkin, M.; Silverman, P.M.; Dunnick, N.R.

    1983-08-01

    Bilateral adrenal hemorrhage with subsequent adrenal insufficiency is a recognized complication of anticoagulant therapy. Because the clinical manifestations are often nonspecific, the antemortem diagnosis of adrenal hemorrhage has been a difficult clinical problem. Computed tomography (CT) provides detailed images of the adrenal glands that are not possible with conventional imaging methods. The CT findings of bilateral adrenal hemorrhage in an anticoagulated patient are reported.

  19. Hemosuccus Pancreaticus: A Mysterious Cause of Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Mandaliya, Rohan; Krevsky, Benjamin; Sankineni, Abhinav; Walp, Kiley; Chen, Oliver

    2014-01-01

    Hemosuccus pancreaticus (bleeding from the pancreatic duct into the gastrointestinal tract via the ampulla of Vater) is a rare, potentially life-threatening and obscure cause of upper gastrointestinal bleeding. It is caused by rupture of the psuedoaneurysm of a peripancreatic vessel into pancreatic duct or pancreatic psuedocyst in the context of pancreatitis or pancreatic tumors. It can pose a significant diagnostic and therapeutic dilemma due to its anatomical location and that bleeding into the duodenum is intermittent and cannot be easily diagnosed by endoscopy. A 61-year-old female with HIV and alcoholism presented with 3 weeks of intermittent abdominal pain and melena. Examination revealed hypotension with pallor and mild epigastric tenderness. She was found to have severe anemia and a high serum lipase. It was decided to perform a contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) scan that demonstrated a hemorrhagic pancreatic pseudocyst with possible active bleeding into the cyst. An emergent angiogram showed a large pseudoaneurysm of the pancreaticoduodenal artery that was successfully embolized. Subsequent endoscopy showed blood near ampulla of Vater confirming the diagnosis of hemosuccus pancreaticus. Thus the bleeding pseudocyst was communicating with pancreatic duct. The patient had no further episodes of gastrointestinal bleeding. Hemosuccus pancreaticus should be considered in patients with intermittent crescendo-decrescendo abdominal pain, gastrointestinal bleeding and a high serum lipase. Contrast-enhanced CT scan can be an excellent initial diagnostic modality and can lead to prompt angiography for embolization of the bleeding pseudoaneurysm and can eliminate the need for surgery.

  20. The propionic acids. Gastrointestinal toxicity in various species.

    PubMed

    Elliott, G A; Purmalis, A; VanderMeer, D A; Denlinger, R H

    1988-01-01

    The propionic acids represent the largest chemical class of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents (NSAID). Several of them are widely used, both in the United States and internationally. This paper discusses observations made on fenoprofen, flurbiprofen, ibuprofen and naproxen. Of these compounds, three are racemates; the fourth, naproxen, is an enantiomer. As a group, the propionic acids, along with most members of the other classes of NSAID, produce gastrointestinal damage in most species. These lesions vary from erythema, hemorrhage and erosion to ulceration and peritonitis. As might be expected, the degree of gastrointestinal intolerance depends on many factors: the individual compound, the dose-level, the duration of the period of drug administration, and the pharmacokinetics and metabolism in a given species. For example, in our experience the rat is less tolerant of NSAID than is the monkey, and the dog is less tolerant than the rat. Gastrointestinal lesions have been seen following both parenteral and oral administration; these findings suggest that factors other than local irritation play a role in the development of lesions. Most NSAID inhibit prostaglandin cyclo-oxygenase activity, which results in a prostaglandin deficiency at the tissue level. The administration of relevant exogenous prostaglandins, such as 16,16-dimethyl PGE2, has been shown to inhibit the gastrointestinal toxicity accompanying the administration of several NSAID, including some of the propionic acids.

  1. Assessing preventability for obstetric hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Della Torre, Micaela; Kilpatrick, Sarah J; Hibbard, Judith U; Simonson, Louise; Scott, Shirley; Koch, Abby; Schy, Deborah; Geller, Stacie E

    2011-12-01

    We sought to determine preventability for cases of obstetric hemorrhage, identify preventable factors, and compare differences between levels of hospital. We retrospectively reviewed a 1-year cohort of severe and near-miss obstetric hemorrhage in an urban perinatal network. An expert panel, using a validated preventability model, reviewed all cases. Preventability and distribution of preventability factors were compared between levels of hospital care. Sixty-three severe and near-miss obstetric hemorrhage cases were identified from 11 hospitals; 54% were deemed potentially preventable. Overall preventability was not statistically different by level of hospital, and 88% were provider related. The only treatment-related preventability factors were significantly different between levels of hospital and significantly less common in level III hospitals (p < 0.01). The majority of obstetric hemorrhage was preventable. The most common potentially preventable factor was provider treatment error, and this was significantly more common in level II hospitals. New interventions should be focused on decreasing providers' treatment errors.

  2. Vital bleach of hemorrhagic discoloration.

    PubMed

    Wong, M; Schmidt, J C

    1991-05-01

    An unusual case is presented of a maxillary central incisor with hemorrhagic discoloration that was successfully treated with the thermocatalytic vital bleach technique. This case emphasizes the need for a thorough radiographic and clinical examination to include vitality tests when a patient presents with a discolored tooth.

  3. Assessing preventability for obstetric hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Della Torre, Micaela; Kilpatrick, Sarah J; Hibbard, Judith U; Simonson, Louise; Scott, Shirley; Koch, Abby; Schy, Deborah; Geller, Stacie E

    2011-12-01

    We sought to determine preventability for cases of obstetric hemorrhage, identify preventable factors, and compare differences between levels of hospital. We retrospectively reviewed a 1-year cohort of severe and near-miss obstetric hemorrhage in an urban perinatal network. An expert panel, using a validated preventability model, reviewed all cases. Preventability and distribution of preventability factors were compared between levels of hospital care. Sixty-three severe and near-miss obstetric hemorrhage cases were identified from 11 hospitals; 54% were deemed potentially preventable. Overall preventability was not statistically different by level of hospital, and 88% were provider related. The only treatment-related preventability factors were significantly different between levels of hospital and significantly less common in level III hospitals (p < 0.01). The majority of obstetric hemorrhage was preventable. The most common potentially preventable factor was provider treatment error, and this was significantly more common in level II hospitals. New interventions should be focused on decreasing providers' treatment errors. PMID:21698554

  4. Hemorrhagic onset of spinal angiolipoma.

    PubMed

    da Costa, Marcos Devanir Silva; Paz, Daniel de Araujo; Rodrigues, Thiago Pereira; Gandolfi, Ana Camila de Castro; Lamis, Fabricio Correa; Stavale, João Norberto; Suriano, Italo Capraro; Cetl, Luiz Daniel Marques Neves; Cavalheiro, Sergio

    2014-12-01

    Spinal angiolipomas are rare benign tumors that generally induce slow progressive cord compression. Here, the authors describe a case of sudden-onset palsy of the lower extremities caused by hemorrhagic spinal angiolipoma. An emergent laminectomy was performed to achieve total lesion removal. Follow-up examinations indicated neurological improvement and the absence of recurrence.

  5. Mosquito-borne hemorrhagic fevers.

    PubMed

    Lupi, Omar

    2011-01-01

    Arboviruses continue to be a significant source of disease, especially in regions where their insect hosts are endemic. This article highlights these diseases, with particular focus on dengue, yellow fever, and viral hemorrhagic fever. A general background is provided, as well information concerning diagnosis and treatment.

  6. Electrocardiograph abnormalities in intracerebral hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Satoru; Nagatani, Kimihiro; Otani, Naoki; Wada, Kojiro; Mori, Kentaro

    2015-12-01

    This study investigated the prevalence and type of electrocardiography (ECG) abnormalities, and their possible association with the clinical/radiological findings in 118 consecutive patients with non-traumatic, non-neoplastic intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). ECG frequently demonstrates abnormalities in patients with ischemic stroke and subarachnoid hemorrhage, but little is known of ECG changes in ICH patients. Clinical and radiological information was retrospectively reviewed. ECG recordings that were obtained within 24 hours of the initial hemorrhage were analyzed. Sixty-six patients (56%) had one or more ECG abnormalities. The most frequent was ST depression (24%), followed by left ventricular hypertrophy (20%), corrected QT interval (QTc) prolongation (19%), and T wave inversion (19%). The logistic regression analysis demonstrated the following: insular involvement was an independent predictive factor of ST depression (p<0.001; odds ratio OR 10.18; 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.84-36.57); insular involvement (p<0.001; OR 23.98; 95% CI 4.91-117.11) and presence of intraventricular hemorrhage (p<0.001; OR 8.72; 95% CI 2.69-28.29) were independent predictive factors of QTc prolongation; deep hematoma location (p<0.001; OR 19.12; 95% CI 3.82-95.81) and hematoma volume >30 ml (p=0.001; OR 6.58; 95% CI 2.11-20.46) were independent predictive factors of T wave inversion. We demonstrate associations between ECG abnormalities and detailed characteristics of ICH.

  7. [Zinc and gastrointestinal disorders].

    PubMed

    Higashimura, Yasuki; Takagi, Tomohisa; Naito, Yuji

    2016-07-01

    Zinc, an essential trace element, affects immune responses, skin metabolism, hormone composition, and some sensory function, so that the deficiency presents various symptoms such as immunodeficiency and taste obstacle. Further, the zinc deficiency also considers as a risk of various diseases. Recent reports demonstrated that -20% of the Japanese population was marginally zinc deficiency, and over 25% of the global population is at high risk of zinc deficiency. In gastrointestinal disorders, zinc plays an important role in the healing of mucosal and epithelial damage. In fact, polaprezinc, a chelate compound of zinc and L-carnosine, has been used for the treatment of gastric ulcer and gastritis. We describe here the therapeutic effect of zinc on gastrointestinal disorders. PMID:27455800

  8. [Microbiota and gastrointestinal diseases].

    PubMed

    Polanco Allué, I

    2015-12-01

    The bacterial colonisation is established immediately after birth, through direct contact with maternal microbiota, and may be influenced during lactation. There is emerging evidence indicating that quantitative and qualitative changes on gut microbiota contribute to alterations in the mucosal activation of the immune system, leading to intra- or extra-intestinal diseases. A balance between pathogenic and beneficial microbiota throughout childhood and adolescence is important to gastrointestinal health, including protection against pathogens, inhibition of pathogens, nutrient processing (synthesis of vitamin K), stimulation of angiogenesis, and regulation of host fat storage. Probiotics can promote an intentional modulation of intestinal microbiota favouring the health of the host. A review is presented on the modulation of intestinal microbiota on prevention, and adjuvant treatment of some paediatric gastrointestinal diseases. PMID:26534880

  9. Gastrointestinal stromal tumor

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Changjun

    2012-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumor has received a lot of attention over the last 10 years due to its unique biologic behavior, clinicopathological features, molecular mechanisms, and treatment implications. GIST is the most common mesenchymal neoplasm in the gastrointestinal tract and has emerged from a poorly understood and treatment resistant neoplasm to a well-defined tumor entity since the discovery of particular molecular abnormalities, KIT and PDGFRA gene mutations. The understanding of GIST biology at the molecular level promised the development of novel treatment modalities. Diagnosis of GIST depends on the integrity of histology, immunohistochemistry and molecular analysis. The risk assessment of the tumor behavior relies heavily on pathological evaluation and significantly impacts clinical management. In this review, historic review, epidemiology, pathogenesis and genetics, diagnosis, role of molecular analysis, prognostic factor and treatment strategies have been discussed. PMID:22943011

  10. Cefoperazone Induced Gastrointestinal Bleeding.

    PubMed

    Katukuri, Goutham Reddy; Maddala, Raja Naga Mahesh; Ramamoorthi, Kusugodlu; Hande, Manjunatha

    2016-08-01

    Cefoperazone is a beta-lactam antibiotic which is frequently used in treating a variety of gram positive and gram negative infections. The chemical structure of cefoperazone contains a side chain of N-methylthiotetrazole which can inhibit vitamin K metabolism resulting in hypoprothombinemia. We report a case of cefoperazone induced coagulopathy manifesting as gastrointestinal bleeding. A Naranjo assessment score of 5 was obtained, indicating a probable relationship between the patient's coagulation function disorder and her use of the suspect drug. PMID:27656491

  11. Gastrointestinal food allergies.

    PubMed

    Heine, Ralf G

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal food allergies present during early childhood with a diverse range of symptoms. Cow's milk, soy and wheat are the three most common gastrointestinal food allergens. Several clinical syndromes have been described, including food protein-induced enteropathy, proctocolitis and enterocolitis. In contrast with immediate, IgE-mediated food allergies, the onset of gastrointestinal symptoms is delayed for at least 1-2 hours after ingestion in non-IgE-mediated allergic disorders. The pathophysiology of these non-IgE-mediated allergic disorders is poorly understood, and useful in vitro markers are lacking. The results of the skin prick test or measurement of the food-specific serum IgE level is generally negative, although low-positive results may occur. Diagnosis therefore relies on the recognition of a particular clinical phenotype as well as the demonstration of clear clinical improvement after food allergen elimination and the re-emergence of symptoms upon challenge. There is a significant clinical overlap between non-IgE-mediated food allergy and several common paediatric gastroenterological conditions, which may lead to diagnostic confusion. The treatment of gastrointestinal food allergies requires the strict elimination of offending food allergens until tolerance has developed. In breast-fed infants, a maternal elimination diet is often sufficient to control symptoms. In formula-fed infants, treatment usually involves the use an extensively hydrolysed or amino acid-based formula. Apart from the use of hypoallergenic formulae, the solid diets of these children also need to be kept free of specific food allergens, as clinically indicated. The nutritional progress of infants and young children should be carefully monitored, and they should undergo ongoing, regular food protein elimination reassessments by cautious food challenges to monitor for possible tolerance development.

  12. NSAIDS and gastrointestinal cancer.

    PubMed

    Piazuelo, Elena; Lanas, Angel

    2015-07-01

    A large body of evidence from epidemiological and preclinical studies have shown that nonsteroideal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have a chemopreventive effect on gastrointestinal cancers and, more specifically, in colorectal cancer. This review highlights recent advances in our understanding of the role of NSAIDs in colorectal cancer prevention and adjuvant treatment. Moreover, we have focused on randomized controlled studies assessing their efficacy to prevent adenoma recurrence and reduction of colorectal cancer incidence and mortality but also their gastrointestinal and cardiovascular side effects. Among NSAIDs, almost the unique agent with potential use as chemopreventive agent is aspirin at low dose since it has both no cardiovascular and low gastrointestinal risk. Furthermore, since aspirin has shown efficacy in secondary prevention of cardiovascular diseases, this drug carries a particular attractive intervention for selected populations. Nevertheless, before it can be prescribed, further studies are necessary to define some important questions, specially the most appropriate dose and time of aspirin use and the population who may benefit from it. PMID:26093284

  13. Endoscopic findings and management of dengue patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Yi-Chun; Wu, Keng-Liang; Kuo, Chung-Huang; Hu, Tsung-Hui; Chou, Yeh-Pin; Chuah, Seng-Kee; Kuo, Chung-Mou; Kee, Kwong-Ming; Changchien, Chi-Sin; Liu, Jien-Wei; Chiu, King-Wah

    2005-08-01

    There are 100 million cases of dengue infection, 500,000 cases of dengue hemorrhagic fever, and 25,000 deaths annually due to dengue worldwide. Gastrointestinal bleeding is the most common type of severe hemorrhage in dengue fever. However, there are no reports about the clinical applications of endoscopic therapy for upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGI) in dengue patients. From June 17, 2002 to January 30, 2003, 1,156 patients with confirmed dengue virus infection were treated at Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital in Taiwan. We analyzed those patients who had received endoscopic therapy for UGI. The characteristic endoscopic findings, therapeutic courses, and amount of blood component transfused were collected from their charts for statistical analysis. Among the 1,156 dengue patients, 97 (8.4%) had complications of UGI bleeding during hospitalization. The endoscopic findings included hemorrhagic (and/or erosive) gastritis in 67% of the patients, gastric ulcer in 57.7%, duodenal ulcer in 26.8%, and esophageal ulcer in 3.1%. Of the 73 patients with peptic ulcer, 42 (57.5%) met the endoscopic criteria (recent hemorrhage) for endoscopic hemostasis therapy. Peptic ulcer patients with recent hemorrhage required more transfusions with packed red blood cells (P = 0.002) and fresh frozen plasma (P = 0.05) than those without recent hemorrhage. Among these 42 patients with recent hemorrhage, endoscopic injection therapy was conducted in 15 patients (group A). The other 27 patients (group B) did not receive endoscopic therapy. After endoscopy, patients in group A required more transfusions with packed red blood cells (P = 0.03) and fresh frozen plasma (P = 0.014) than did patients in group B. There were no significant differences between groups A and B in duration of hospital stay and amounts of transfused platelet concentrate after endoscopy. Medical treatment with blood transfusion is the mainstay of management of UGI bleeding in dengue patients. Patients having

  14. Acute Hemorrhagic Edema of Infancy.

    PubMed

    Serra E Moura Garcia, C; Sokolova, A; Torre, M L; Amaro, C

    2016-01-01

    Acute Hemorrhagic Edema of Infancy is a small vessel leucocytoclastic vasculitis affecting young infants. It is characterized by large, target-like, macular to purpuric plaques predominantly affecting the face, ear lobes and extremities. Non-pitting edema of the distal extremities and low-grade fever may also be present. Extra-cutaneous involvement is very rare. Although the lesions have a dramatic onset in a twenty-four to forty-eight hour period, usually the child has a non-toxic appearance. In most cases there are no changes in laboratory parameters. The cutaneous biopsy reveals an inflammatory perivascular infiltrate. It is a benign and auto-limited disease, with complete resolution within two to three weeks leaving no sequelae in the majority of cases. No recurrences are described. We report a case of a 42-day old girl admitted at our hospital with Acute Hemorrhagic Edema of Infancy.

  15. Gastrointestinal Motility Disorders and Acupuncture

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Jieyun; Chen, Jiande D Z

    2010-01-01

    During the last decades, numerous studies have been performed to investigate the effects and mechanisms of acupuncture or electroacupuncture (EA) on gastrointestinal motility and patients with functional gastrointestinal diseases. A PubMed search was performed on this topic and all available studies published in English have been reviewed and evaluated. This review is organized based on the gastrointestinal organ (from the esophagus to the colon), components of gastrointestinal motility and the functional diseases related to specific motility disorders. It was found that the effects of acupuncture or EA on gastrointestinal motility were fairly consistent and the major acupuncture points used in these studies were ST36 and PC6. Gastric motility has been mostly studied, whereas much less information is available on the effect of EA on small and large intestinal motility or related disorders. A number of clinical studies have been published, investigating the therapeutic effects of EA on a number of functional gastrointestinal diseases, such as gastroesophageal reflux, functional dyspepsia and irritable bowel syndrome. However, the findings of these clinical studies were inconclusive. In summary, acupuncture or EA is able to alter gastrointestinal motility functions and improve gastrointestinal motility disorders. However, more studies are needed to establish the therapeutic roles of EA in treating functional gastrointestinal diseases. PMID:20363196

  16. Imaging of adrenal and renal hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Hammond, Nancy A; Lostumbo, Antonella; Adam, Sharon Z; Remer, Erick M; Nikolaidis, Paul; Yaghmai, Vahid; Berggruen, Senta M; Miller, Frank H

    2015-10-01

    Hemorrhage of the kidneys and adrenal glands has many etiologies. In the adrenal glands, trauma, anticoagulation, stress, sepsis, surgery, and neoplasms are common causes of hemorrhage. In the kidneys, reasons for hemorrhage include trauma, bleeding diathesis, vascular diseases, infection, infarction, hemorrhagic cyst rupture, the Antopol-Goldman lesion, and neoplasms. Angiomyolipoma and renal cell carcinoma are the neoplasms most commonly associated with hemorrhage in the kidneys and adrenal cortical carcinoma, metastases, and pheochromocytoma are associated with hemorrhage in the adrenal glands. Understanding the computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging features, and causes of hemorrhage in the kidneys and adrenal glands is critical. It is also important to keep in mind that mimickers of hemorrhage exist, including lymphoma in both the kidneys and adrenal glands, and melanoma metastases in the adrenal glands. Appropriate imaging follow-up of renal and adrenal hemorrhage should occur to exclude an underlying malignancy as the cause. If there is suspicion for malignancy that cannot be definitively diagnosed on imaging, surgery or biopsy may be warranted. Angiography may be indicated when there is a suspected underlying vascular disease. Unnecessary intervention, such as nephrectomy, may be avoided in patients with benign causes or no underlying disease. Appropriate management is dependent on accurate diagnosis of the cause of renal or adrenal hemorrhage and it is incumbent upon the radiologist to determine the etiology.

  17. Management of gastrointestinal haemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, S; Watts, D; Kinnear, M

    2002-01-01

    A variety of endoscopic haemostatic techniques have enabled major advances in the management of not only bleeding peptic ulcers and bleeding varices, but also in a variety of bleeding lesions in the small intestine and in the colon. Indeed, the development and widespread implementation of endoscopic haemostasis has been one of the most important developments in clinical gastroenterology in the past two decades. An increasingly ageing cohort of patients with multiple co-morbidity are being treated and therefore improving the outcome of gastrointestinal bleeding continues to pose major challenges. PMID:11796865

  18. Dabigatran-Associated Intracranial Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Szarlej, Dorota K.; Rincon, Fred

    2015-01-01

    Dabigatran etexilate is an oral direct thrombin inhibitor approved for prevention of stroke and systemic embolization in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation and for the treatment of venous thromboembolism. Although dabigatran has a favorable safety profile, predictable pharmacokinetics, fewer drug interactions than warfarin, and does not require monitoring, clinical data regarding dabigatran reversal are limited. In addition, currently available laboratory assays allow measurement of the presence, but not extent, of dabigatran-associated anticoagulation. Patient age, renal function, weight, concurrent drug therapy, adherence, and concomitant disease states can affect dabigatran’s efficacy and safety. Management of dabigatran-related intracranial hemorrhage must be approached on a case-by-case basis and include assessment of degree of anticoagulation, severity of hemorrhage, renal function, timing of last dabigatran dose, and risk of thromboembolic events. Initial management includes dabigatran discontinuation and general supportive measures. Oral activated charcoal should be administered in those who ingested dabigatran within 2 hours. Four-factor prothrombin complex concentrates (4PCCs), activated PCC, or recombinant activated factor VII use may be reasonable but is not evidence based. Reserve fresh frozen plasma for patients with dilutional coagulopathy. If readily available, hemodialysis should be considered, particularly in patients with advanced kidney injury or excessive risk of thromboembolic events. More clinical studies are needed to determine a standardized approach to treating dabigatran-associated intracranial hemorrhage. Institutional protocol development will facilitate safe, efficacious, and timely use of the limited management options. PMID:26425251

  19. [The epidemic of dengue and hemorrhagic dengue fever in the city of Rio de Janeiro, 2001/2002].

    PubMed

    Casali, Clarisse Guimarães; Pereira, Marcelo Ricardo Reis; Santos, Luciana Maria Jabor Garcia; Passos, Maíla Naves Pereira; Fortes, Bruno de Paula Menezes Drumond; Ortiz Valencia, Luis Iván; Alexandre, Aline de Jesus; Medronho, Roberto de Andrade

    2004-01-01

    The following study was intended to evaluate the occurrence of typical signs and symptoms in the cases of classic dengue and hemorrhagic dengue fever, during the 2001-2002 epidemic in the city of Rio de Janeiro. The authors reviewed 155,242 cases notified to the Information System of Notification Diseases, from January/2001 to June/2002: 81,327 cases were classified as classic dengue and 958 as hemorrhagic dengue fever, with a total of 60 deaths. Common symptoms, such as fever, headache, prostration, myalgia, nausea and retro-orbital pain, had a high incidence in both classic and hemorrhagic dengue fever. On the other hand, hemorrhagic signs and other signs of severe disease, such as shock, gastrointestinal bleeding, petechiae, epistaxis, abdominal pain and pleural effusion, were strongly associated to hemorrhagic dengue fever. Besides, the occurrence of death was 34.8 times higher in hemorrhagic dengue fever than in classic dengue (OR = 34.8; CI 19.7-61.3).

  20. Osteoporosis in Gastrointestinal Diseases.

    PubMed

    Krela-Kaźmierczak, Iwona; Szymczak, Aleksandra; Łykowska-Szuber, Liliana; Eder, Piotr; Linke, Krzysztof

    2016-01-01

    Secondary osteoporosis occurs as an isolated pathology or co-exists with types I and II osteoporosis. The gastroenterologist may come across osteoporosis or osteopenia in a patient with a gastrointestinal disease. This is often a young patient in whom investigations should be carried out and appropriate treatment initiated, aimed at preventing bone fractures and the formation of the best peak bone mass. Osteoporosis occurs in patients with the following conditions: Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, celiac disease, post gastrectomy patients, patients with short bowel syndrome, chronic hepatitis and cirrhosis, treated with steroids (steroid-induced osteoporosis) and patients using proton pump inhibitors chronically (state of achlorhydria). It is therefore necessary to approve a list of risk factors of secondary osteoporosis, the presence of which would be an indication for screening for osteoporosis, including a DXA study and the development of a separate algorithm for the therapeutic management of secondary osteoporosis accompanying gastrointestinal diseases, especially in premenopausal young women and young men, because there are currently no registered drugs with proven antifracture activity for this group of patients. PMID:26935513

  1. Subarachnoid hemorrhage and cerebral vasospasm - literature review.

    PubMed

    Ciurea, A V; Palade, C; Voinescu, D; Nica, D A

    2013-06-15

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage represents a serious disease with high mortality and morbidity. Two important areas are becoming the central research interest of subarachnoid hemorrhage: cerebral vasospasm and early brain injury. The authors have reviewed the major contributions in experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage documented in the medical literature in the past 5 years. Treatments interfering with nitric oxide - or endothelin-pathways continue to show antispasmotic effects in experimental models of subarachnoid hemorrhage. Inflammation and oxidative stress play a vital role in the pathophysiology of cerebral vasospasm. Apoptosis, a relevant cause of early brain injury after subarachnoid hemorrhage, also underline the etiology of cerebral vasospasm. Future research studies will continue to elucidate the pathophysiological pathways and treatment modalities targeting cerebral vasospasm and early brain injury, enabling an improvement in outcome for patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage. PMID:23904869

  2. Pulmonary hemorrhage resulting from bungee jumping.

    PubMed

    Manos, Daria; Hamer, Okka; Müller, Nestor L

    2007-11-01

    Pulmonary hemorrhage is a relatively common complication of blunt chest trauma. Occasionally, it may result from pulmonary barotrauma after scuba diving or from sports activities not associated with barotrauma such as long breath-hold diving. We report a case of symmetric diffuse upper lobe hemorrhage resulting from a bungee jump in a previously healthy man. Bungee jumping is an increasingly popular sport with relatively few reported injuries. To our knowledge pulmonary hemorrhage in this setting has not yet been described.

  3. Viral hemorrhagic fevers of South America.

    PubMed

    Tesh, Robert B

    2002-09-01

    This paper reviews the epidemiology and distinguishing features of three viral hemorrhagic fevers (dengue hemorrhagic fever, yellow fever and arenaviral hemorrhagic fever) that have emerged as important public health problems in South America. Although the etiology, natural history and control of the three diseases are different, their clinical manifestations and histopathology findings are similar and can be difficult to differentiate. Consequently, early recognition and correct diagnosis are essential for effective control measures to be initiated.

  4. Gastrointestinal Headache; a Narrative Review

    PubMed Central

    T Noghani, Majid; Rezaeizadeh, Hossein; Fazljoo, Sayed Mohammad Baqer; Keshavarz, Mansoor

    2016-01-01

    There are studies reporting primary headaches to be associated with gastrointestinal disorders, and some report resolution of headache following the treatment of the associated gastrointestinal disorder. Headache disorders are classified by The International Headache Society as primary or secondary; however, among the secondary headaches, those attributed to gastrointestinal disorders are not appreciated. Therefore, we aimed to review the literature to provide evidence for headaches, which originate from the gastrointestinal system. Gastrointestinal disorders that are reported to be associated with primary headaches include dyspepsia, gastro esophageal reflux disease (GERD), constipation, functional abdominal pain, inflammatory bowel syndrome (IBS), inflammatory bowel disorders (IBD), celiac disease, and helicobacter pylori (H. Pylori) infection. Some studies have demonstrated remission or improvement of headache following the treatment of the accompanying gastrointestinal disorders. Hypotheses explaining this association are considered to be central sensitization and parasympathetic referred pain, serotonin pathways, autonomic nervous system dysfunction, systemic vasculopathy, and food allergy. Traditional Persian physicians, namely Ebn-e-Sina (Avicenna) and Râzi (Rhazes) believed in a type of headache originating from disorders of the stomach and named it as an individual entity, the "Participatory Headache of Gastric Origin". We suggest providing a unique diagnostic entity for headaches coexisting with any gastrointestinal abnormality that are improved or cured along with the treatment of the gastrointestinal disorder. PMID:27800536

  5. Gastrointestinal stromal tumor presenting with prominent calcification

    PubMed Central

    Izawa, Naoki; Sawada, Takeshi; Abiko, Ryuichi; Kumon, Daisuke; Hirakawa, Mami; Kobayashi, Mika; Obinata, Nobuyuki; Nomoto, Masahito; Maehata, Tadateru; Yamauchi, Shun-ichi; Kouro, Takefumi; Tsuda, Takashi; Kitajima, Satoshi; Yasuda, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Keiichi; Tanaka, Ichiro; Hoshikawa, Masahiro; Takagi, Masayuki; Itoh, Fumio

    2012-01-01

    We present a rare case of a gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) in the stomach with prominent calcification at presentation. A 61-year-old woman visited our hospital because of epigastric discomfort. A spherical calcified lesion with a diameter of about 30 mm was incidentally shown in the left upper quadrant on an abdominal X-ray. Computed tomography demonstrated that the tumor was growing from the upper gastric body, with calcification in the peripheral ring area. A laparoscopic partial gastrectomy was performed, and the resected specimen revealed a well-circumscribed tumor with exophytic growth from the gastric muscularis propria. Microscopic examination revealed spindle-shaped tumor cells with calcification and hemorrhage. Additionally, positive immunoreactivity of the tumor to KIT and CD34 and a low mitotic index resulted in the diagnosis of very low risk GIST. There are a few case reports of heavily calcified GIST, although solitary or punctate calcification of primary GIST has been reported in several case series. Dystrophic calcification of necrotic or degenerative tissue is the supposed cause of primary calcified GISTs. In contrast, appearance of calcification after administration of imatinib mesylate, which may be one indicator of disease response, is possibly caused by a different mechanism. PMID:23112561

  6. Hemorrhagic cystitis: A challenge to the urologist

    PubMed Central

    Manikandan, R.; Kumar, Santosh; Dorairajan, Lalgudi N.

    2010-01-01

    Severe hemorrhagic cystitis often arises from anticancer chemotherapy or radiotherapy for pelvic malignancies. Infectious etiologies are less common causes except in immunocompromised hosts. These cases can be challenging problems for the urologist and a source of substantial morbidity and sometimes mortality for the patients. A variety of modalities of treatment have been described for the management of hemorrhagic cystitis but there is none that is uniformly effective. Some progress has been made in the understanding and management of viral hemorrhagic cystitis. This article reviews the common causes of severe hemorrhagic cystitis and the currently available management options. PMID:20877590

  7. Spontaneous Massive Adrenal Hemorrhage: A Management Dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Anshuman

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Adrenal hemorrhage (AH) is a rare but life-threatening condition. Small focal hemorrhage may present subclinically, but massive hemorrhage may lead to rapid cardiovascular collapse and ultimately death if not diagnosed appropriately and treated quickly. Most cases reported in the literature have been treated conservatively. In an event of increasing hemorrhage during conservative management, it may be tricky to intervene surgically because of the hematoma around the gland. Here we describe a case where we managed a large spontaneous AH by a combination of angioembolization and laparoscopic adrenalectomy.

  8. Spontaneous Massive Adrenal Hemorrhage: A Management Dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Anshuman

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Adrenal hemorrhage (AH) is a rare but life-threatening condition. Small focal hemorrhage may present subclinically, but massive hemorrhage may lead to rapid cardiovascular collapse and ultimately death if not diagnosed appropriately and treated quickly. Most cases reported in the literature have been treated conservatively. In an event of increasing hemorrhage during conservative management, it may be tricky to intervene surgically because of the hematoma around the gland. Here we describe a case where we managed a large spontaneous AH by a combination of angioembolization and laparoscopic adrenalectomy. PMID:27579389

  9. Hepatic hemorrhage in malignant rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, K; Ikeda, K; Saida, Y; Takenaka, R; Shibata, M; Takeuchi, T

    1996-12-01

    Intrahepatic hemorrhage is a serious and life-threatening complication in liver disease. We describe a patient who had two episodes of intrahepatic hemorrhage after having malignant rheumatoid arthritis for 8 yr. Abdominal CT scans revealed a large intrahepatic, subcapsular hematoma. Arteriography demonstrated irregularity, caliber change, and pseudoaneurysms of the right hepatic artery, suggesting vasculitis as a cause of the bleeding. The hemorrhage was first treated with transcatheter arterial embolization, which failed to exert long term control, but arterial infusion of a large dose of prednisolone when the hemorrhage appeared was successful in managing it.

  10. Effective treatment of gastrointestinal bleeding with thalidomide - Chances and limitations

    PubMed Central

    Bauditz, Juergen

    2016-01-01

    For more than 50 years bleeding from gastrointestinal angiodysplasias has been treated by hormonal therapy with estrogens and progesterons. After a randomized study finally demonstrated that hormones have no effect on bleeding events and transfusion requirements, therapy has switched to endoscopic coagulation. However, angiodysplasias tend to recur over months to years and endoscopy often has to be repeated for long time periods. Thalidomide, which caused severe deformities in newborn children in the 1960s, is now increasingly used after it was shown to suppress tumor necrosis factor alpha, inhibit angiogenesis and to be also effective for treatment of multiple myeloma. In 2011 thalidomide was proven to be highly effective for treatment of bleeding from gastrointestinal angiodysplasias in a randomized study. Further evidence by uncontrolled studies exists that thalidomide is also useful for treatment of bleeding in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia. In spite of this data, endoscopic therapy remains the treatment of choice in many hospitals, as thalidomide is still notorious for its teratogenicity. However, patients with gastrointestinal bleeding related to angiodysplasias are generally at an age in which women have no child-bearing potential. Teratogenicity is therefore no issue for these elderly patients. Other side-effects of thalidomide like neurotoxicity may limit treatment options but can be monitored safely. PMID:27003992

  11. Computed tomography angiography in patients with active gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Reis, Fatima Regina Silva; Cardia, Patricia Prando; D'Ippolito, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding represents a common medical emergency, with considerable morbidity and mortality rates, and a prompt diagnosis is essential for a better prognosis. In such a context, endoscopy is the main diagnostic tool; however, in cases where the gastrointestinal hemorrhage is massive, the exact bleeding site might go undetected. In addition, a trained professional is not always present to perform the procedure. In an emergency setting, optical colonoscopy presents limitations connected with the absence of bowel preparation, so most of the small bowel cannot be assessed. Scintigraphy cannot accurately demonstrate the anatomic location of the bleeding and is not available at emergency settings. The use of capsule endoscopy is inappropriate in the acute setting, particularly in the emergency department at night, and is a highly expensive method. Digital angiography, despite its high sensitivity, is invasive, presents catheterization-related risks, in addition to its low availability at emergency settings. On the other hand, computed tomography angiography is fast, widely available and minimally invasive, emerging as a promising method in the diagnostic algorithm of these patients, being capable of determining the location and cause of bleeding with high accuracy. Based on a critical literature review and on their own experience, the authors propose a computed tomography angiography protocol to assess the patient with gastrointestinal bleeding.

  12. [Obesity and gastrointestinal motility].

    PubMed

    Lee, Joon Seong

    2006-08-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) motility has a crucial role in the food consumption, digestion and absorption, and also controls the appetite and satiety. In obese patients, various alterations of GI motility have been investigated. The prevalence of GERD and esophageal motor disorders in obese patients are higher than those of general population. Gastric emptying of solid food is generally accelerated and fasting gastric volume especially in distal stomach is larger in obese patients without change in accommodation. Contractile activity of small intestine in fasting period is more prominent, but orocecal transit is delayed. Autonomic dysfunction is frequently demonstrated in obese patients. These findings correspond with increased appetite and delayed satiety in obese patients, but causes or results have not been confirmed. Therapeutic interventions of these altered GI motility have been developed using botulinum toxin, gastric electrical stimulation in obese patients. Novel agents targeted for GI hormone modulation (such as ghrelin and leptin) need to be developed in the near future. PMID:16929152

  13. Unsuspected invasive neonatal gastrointestinal mucormycosis: A clinicopathological study of six cases from a tertiary care hospital

    PubMed Central

    Patra, Sushma; Vij, Mukul; Chirla, Dinesh K.; Kumar, Narendar; Samal, Subash C.

    2012-01-01

    Aim: To analyse the clinicopathological features of neonatal mucormycosis Materials and Methods: Retrospective analysis of cases of neonatal gastrointestinal mucormycosis. Results: There were six neonates with male: female ratio of 1:1. Except one all were preterm babies. The clinical presentation was abdominal distension in the majority. All were clinically diagnosed as either NEC or toxic megacolon with perforation. Neonatal gastrointestinal mucormycosis was not suspected clinically in any. All the children were explored immediately. Biopsy revealed transmural hemorrhagic necrosis/infarction of the intestinal wall with fungal hyphae. Conclusions: The physicians should have a high index of suspicion for gastrointestinal tract mucormycosis in neonates with metabolic disturbances who present with abdominal distension and pneumoperitoneum. Early diagnosis and aggressive medical and surgical treatment may improve the outcome of neonates with this potentially lethal invasive disease. PMID:23243366

  14. Disorders of gastrointestinal hypomotility

    PubMed Central

    Bielefeldt, Klaus; Tuteja, Ashok; Nusrat, Salman

    2016-01-01

    Ingestion and digestion of food as well as expulsion of residual material from our gastrointestinal tract requires normal propulsive, i.e. motor, function. Hypomotility refers to inherited or acquired changes that come with decreased contractile forces or slower transit. It not only often causes symptoms but also may compromise nutritional status or lead to other complications. While severe forms, such as pseudo-obstruction or ileus, may have a tremendous functional impact, the less severe forms of hypomotility may well be more relevant, as they contribute to common disorders, such as functional dyspepsia, gastroparesis, chronic constipation, and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Clinical testing can identify changes in contractile activity, defined by lower amplitudes or abnormal patterns, and the related effects on transit. However, such biomarkers show a limited correlation with overall symptom severity as experienced by patients. Similarly, targeting hypomotility with pharmacological interventions often alters gut motor function but does not consistently improve symptoms. Novel diagnostic approaches may change this apparent paradox and enable us to obtain more comprehensive information by integrating data on electrical activity, mechanical forces, patterns, wall stiffness, and motions with information of the flow of luminal contents. New drugs with more selective effects or more specific delivery may improve benefits and limit adverse effects. Lastly, the complex regulation of gastrointestinal motility involves the brain-gut axis as a reciprocal pathway for afferent and efferent signaling. Considering the role of visceral input in emotion and the effects of emotion on visceral activity, understanding and managing hypomotility disorders requires an integrative approach based on the mind-body continuum or biopsychosocial model of diseases. PMID:27583135

  15. Disorders of gastrointestinal hypomotility.

    PubMed

    Bielefeldt, Klaus; Tuteja, Ashok; Nusrat, Salman

    2016-01-01

    Ingestion and digestion of food as well as expulsion of residual material from our gastrointestinal tract requires normal propulsive, i.e. motor, function. Hypomotility refers to inherited or acquired changes that come with decreased contractile forces or slower transit. It not only often causes symptoms but also may compromise nutritional status or lead to other complications. While severe forms, such as pseudo-obstruction or ileus, may have a tremendous functional impact, the less severe forms of hypomotility may well be more relevant, as they contribute to common disorders, such as functional dyspepsia, gastroparesis, chronic constipation, and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Clinical testing can identify changes in contractile activity, defined by lower amplitudes or abnormal patterns, and the related effects on transit. However, such biomarkers show a limited correlation with overall symptom severity as experienced by patients. Similarly, targeting hypomotility with pharmacological interventions often alters gut motor function but does not consistently improve symptoms. Novel diagnostic approaches may change this apparent paradox and enable us to obtain more comprehensive information by integrating data on electrical activity, mechanical forces, patterns, wall stiffness, and motions with information of the flow of luminal contents. New drugs with more selective effects or more specific delivery may improve benefits and limit adverse effects. Lastly, the complex regulation of gastrointestinal motility involves the brain-gut axis as a reciprocal pathway for afferent and efferent signaling. Considering the role of visceral input in emotion and the effects of emotion on visceral activity, understanding and managing hypomotility disorders requires an integrative approach based on the mind-body continuum or biopsychosocial model of diseases. PMID:27583135

  16. Propylthiouracil-induced alveolar hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Aydın, Bünyamin; Aksu, Oğuzhan; Kacemer, Hasret; Demirkan, Halil; Altuntaş, Atilla; Dirican, Nigar; Köroğlu, Banu Kale; Şahin, Mehmet

    2015-01-01

    Thionamide induced vasculitis is a multisystem disease. The patients may present with different clinical signs and findings due to organ involvement. These patients are almost always perinuclear antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (pANCA) or antimyeloperoxidase (MPO) positive. Clinical findings are not seen in all of the patients who are ANCA positive while using thionamide. Although symptoms usually resolve with drug discontinuation, some patients, however, require high-dose steroids, immunosuppressants, or plasmapheresis. We present here a case of alveolar hemorrhage induced by propilthiouracil (PTU) during treatment with PTU for Graves’ disease; patients completely recovered with corticosteroid, cyclophosphamide, and plasmapheresis.

  17. Adiposity and ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Kroll, Mary E.; Green, Jane; Beral, Valerie; Sudlow, Cathie L.M.; Brown, Anna; Kirichek, Oksana; Price, Alison; Yang, TienYu Owen

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To compare associations of body mass index (BMI) with ischemic stroke and hemorrhagic stroke risk, and to review the worldwide evidence. Methods: We recruited 1.3 million previously stroke-free UK women between 1996 and 2001 (mean age 57 years [SD 5]) and followed them by record linkage for hospital admissions and deaths. We used Cox regression to estimate adjusted relative risks for ischemic and hemorrhagic (intracerebral or subarachnoid hemorrhage) stroke in relation to BMI. We conducted a meta-analysis of published findings from prospective studies on these associations. Results: During an average follow-up of 11.7 years, there were 20,549 first strokes, of which 9,993 were specified as ischemic and 5,852 as hemorrhagic. Increased BMI was associated with an increased risk of ischemic stroke (relative risk 1.21 per 5 kg/m2 BMI, 95% confidence interval 1.18–1.23, p < 0.0001) but a decreased risk of hemorrhagic stroke (relative risk 0.89 per 5 kg/m2 BMI, 0.86–0.92, p < 0.0001). The BMI-associated trends for ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke were significantly different (heterogeneity: p < 0.0001) but were not significantly different for intracerebral hemorrhage (n = 2,790) and subarachnoid hemorrhage (n = 3,062) (heterogeneity: p = 0.5). Published data from prospective studies showed consistently greater BMI-associated relative risks for ischemic than hemorrhagic stroke with most evidence (prior to this study) coming from Asian populations. Conclusions: In UK women, higher BMI is associated with increased risk of ischemic stroke but decreased risk of hemorrhagic stroke. The totality of the available published evidence suggests that BMI-associated risks are greater for ischemic than for hemorrhagic stroke. PMID:27605176

  18. Delayed positive gastrointestinal bleeding studies with technetium-99m-red blood cells: Utility of a second injection

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobson, A.F. )

    1991-02-01

    Two patients studied with technetium-99m-labeled red blood cells (RBCs) for gastrointestinal bleeding had positive findings only on 24-hr delayed images, at which time the site of bleeding could not be ascertained. In each instance, when additional delayed images suggested that active bleeding was occurring, a second aliquot of RBCs was labeled and injected. Sites of active hemorrhage were identified following further imaging in both patients. When delayed GI bleeding images are positive, further views should be obtained to ascertain if the pattern of intraluminal activity changes. If renewed active hemorrhage is suspected, reinjection with a second dose of labeled RBCs may identify the bleeding site.

  19. [Endoscopic hemostasis using high-frequency hemostatic forceps for hemorrhagic gastric ulcer].

    PubMed

    Enomoto, Shotaro; Yahagi, Naohisa; Fujishiro, Mitsuhiro; Iguchi, Mikitaka; Ichinose, Masao

    2004-03-01

    Gastric ulcer is a major responsible lesion for upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Several methods for endoscopic hemostasis are widely used throughout Japan to treat the ulcerative lesion. High-frequency hemostatic forceps is one of the endoscopic coagulation devices developed solely for hemostasis. Unlike biopsy forceps, it has narrow opening angle, a small cup and a dull edge to make pinpoint holding of the target lesion possible. We applied high-frequency hemostatic forceps for eleven cases of hemorrhagic gastric ulcer with exposed vessels. All of the cases were treated by endoscopic hemostasis with the device. Initial hemostasis obtained in all of the cases(100%), and no rebleeding was observed. Additional treatment, however, was necessary in four cases(36%). No serious complication, like perforation, was observed. We concluded that endoscopic hemostasis using high-frequency hemostatic forceps for hemorrhagic gastric ulcer is safe and effective method.

  20. Rebleeding after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Starke, R M; Connolly, E S

    2011-09-01

    Rebleeding after initial aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) can have substantial impact on overall patient outcome. While older studies have suggested rebleeding occurs in about 4% of patients during the first day after initial aneurysmal bleed, these studies may have failed to capture very early rebleeds and, consequently, underestimated the impact of rebleeding. An electronic literature search was performed to identify English-language articles published or available for review from February 1975 through October 2010. A total of 43 articles (40 original research and 3 review articles) focused on rebleeding after initial aneurysmal SAH in humans were selected for review. Although most studies supported an incidence of rebleeding ≤4%, studies investigating ultra-early rebleeding reported bleeding within the first 24 h following aneurysmal SAH in as many as 9-17% of patients, with most cases occurring within 6 h of initial hemorrhage. Overall, studies investigating antifibrinolytic therapy to reduce rebleeding have failed to clearly demonstrate overall therapeutic benefit. Short-course antifibrinolytic therapy may have a role prior to initial aneurysm repair, although insufficient data are currently available. PMID:21761274

  1. Subchorionic hemorrhage treatment with dydrogesterone.

    PubMed

    Pelinescu-Onciul, Dimitrie

    2007-10-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the efficacy of progestogenic therapy for the prevention of spontaneous abortions in patients with subchorionic hemorrhage. One hundred pregnant women with bleeding and ultrasonographic evidence of subchorionic hematoma were treated with oral dydrogesterone 40 mg/day. Only cases in which the embryo was viable were included. The follow-up included ultrasonography and intravaginal examination. Of the 100 pregnancies, 93 had a favorable evolution with maintenance of pregnancy. The abortion rate was therefore 7%. This compares with an abortion rate of 18.7% obtained in a previous study in women with subchorionic hematoma treated with micronized progesterone. The abortion rate was therefore reduced by up to 37% with dydrogesterone, as most cases had large-volume hematomas at the first visit and thus a poor prognosis. In conclusion, the marked immunomodulatory effect of dydrogesterone in maintaining a T helper-2 cytokine balance means that it is a good choice for preventing abortion in women suffering from subchorionic hemorrhage. PMID:17943544

  2. Epizootic hemorrhagic disease in a yak

    PubMed Central

    Raabis, Sarah M.; Byers, Stacey R.; Han, Sushan; Callan, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    Epizootic hemorrhagic disease virus (EHDV) infection was diagnosed in a 3-year-old yak. The yak had signs of intermittent tremors, dysphagia, oral ulcerative lesions, hemorrhagic enteritis, tachypnea, and thrombocytopenia. Postmortem diagnostics confirmed EHDV (serotype 2) using reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Gross and histopathological results were consistent with EHDV reported in other species. PMID:24688138

  3. Postpartum hemorrhage: use of hemostatic combat gauze.

    PubMed

    Schmid, Bernd C; Rezniczek, Günther A; Rolf, Norbert; Maul, Holger

    2012-01-01

    Cheap and simple interventions that are intended to minimize postpartum hemorrhage are of major public health concern. We report a case of postpartum hemorrhage in which conservative interventions had failed. The use of a chitosan-covered gauze that originally was developed for combat trauma allowed us to achieve hemostasis, and a seemingly inevitable hysterectomy was avoided. PMID:22011588

  4. Surgical Outcomes of Hemorrhagic Metastatic Brain Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Heon; Jung, Eugene; Gwak, Ho Shin; Shin, Sang Hoon

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Hemorrhagic metastatic brain tumors are not rare, but little is known about the surgical outcome following treatment. We conducted this study to determine the result of the surgical outcome of hemorrhagic metastatic brain tumors. Materials and Methods From July 2001 to December 2008, 21 patients underwent surgery for hemorrhagic metastatic brain tumors at our institution. 15 patients had lung cancer, 3 had hepatocellular carcinoma, and the rest had rectal cancer, renal cell carcinoma, and sarcoma. 20 patients had macroscopic hemorrhage in the tumors, and one patient had intracerebral hemorrhage surrounding the tumor. A retrospective clinical review was conducted focusing on the patterns of presenting symptoms and signs, as well as local recurrence following surgery. Results Among 21 hemorrhagic brain metastases, local recurrence developed in two patients. The 12 month progression free survival rate was 86.1%. Mean time to progression was 20.8 months and median survival time after surgery was 11.7 months. Conclusion The results of our study showed that hemorrhagic metastatic brain tumors rarely recurred after surgery. Surgery should be considered as a good treatment option for hemorrhagic brain metastasis, especially in cases with increased intracranial pressure or severe neurologic deficits. PMID:21811426

  5. Spontaneous Retroperitoneal Hemorrhage from Adrenal Artery Aneurysm

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez Valverde, F.M. Balsalobre, M.; Torregrosa, N.; Molto, M.; Gomez Ramos, M.J.; Vazquez Rojas, J.L.

    2007-04-15

    Spontaneous adrenal hemorrhage is a very rare but serious disorder of the adrenal gland that can require emergent treatment. We report on a 42-year-old man who underwent selective angiography for diagnosis and treatment of retroperitoneal hemorrhage from small adrenal artery aneurysm. This case gives further details about the value of transluminal artery embolization in the management of visceral aneurysm rupture.

  6. First outbreak of dengue hemorrhagic fever, Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Mahbubur; Rahman, Khalilur; Siddque, A K; Shoma, Shereen; Kamal, A H M; Ali, K S; Nisaluk, Ananda; Breiman, Robert F

    2002-07-01

    During the first countrywide outbreak of dengue hemorrhagic fever in Bangladesh, we conducted surveillance for dengue at a hospital in Dhaka. Of 176 patients, primarily adults, found positive for dengue, 60.2% had dengue fever, 39.2% dengue hemorrhagic fever, and 0.6% dengue shock syndrome. The Dengue virus 3 serotype was detected in eight patients.

  7. Postadenoidectomy hemorrhage: how we do it?

    PubMed Central

    Demirbilek, Nevzat; Evren, Cenk; Altun, Uzay

    2015-01-01

    Aims: Conventionally, adenoidectomy has been performed using blind curettage. Postoperative hemorrhage is the most common complication of surgery. There is no specific management algorithm in the literature. In this study, we described an endoscopic approach in the management of postadenoidectomy hemorrhage. Material and methods: Between 1995 and 2014, 7946 patients undergoing adenoidectomy under general anesthesia in our clinic were retrospectively analyzed. All patients had a rest adenoid tissue located in the choanae. Endoscopic excision of the tissue was performed without using a post-nasal pack. Results: All patients (100%) had a rest adenoid tissue located in the choanae. Hemorrhage was completely discontinued with endoscopic excision of the hemorrhagic tissue. Conclusion: Based on our study findings, we conclude that an endoscopic approach should be applied in all postoperative patients with hemorrhage who are unresponsive to conservative treatment modalities. PMID:25932238

  8. Sleep Dysfunction and Gastrointestinal Diseases.

    PubMed

    Khanijow, Vikesh; Prakash, Pia; Emsellem, Helene A; Borum, Marie L; Doman, David B

    2015-12-01

    Sleep deprivation and impaired sleep quality have been associated with poor health outcomes. Many patients experience sleep disturbances, which can increase the risk of medical conditions such as hypertension, obesity, stroke, and heart disease as well as increase overall mortality. Recent studies have suggested that there is a strong association between sleep disturbances and gastrointestinal diseases. Proinflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor, interleukin-1, and interleukin-6, have been associated with sleep dysfunction. Alterations in these cytokines have been seen in certain gastrointestinal diseases, such as gastroesophageal reflux disease, inflammatory bowel disease, liver disorders, and colorectal cancer. It is important for gastroenterologists to be aware of the relationship between sleep disorders and gastrointestinal illnesses to ensure good care for patients. This article reviews the current research on the interplay between sleep disorders, immune function, and gastrointestinal diseases. PMID:27134599

  9. Gastrointestinal Motility Disorders in Children

    PubMed Central

    Ambartsumyan, Lusine

    2014-01-01

    The most common and challenging gastrointestinal motility disorders in children include gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), esophageal achalasia, gastroparesis, chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction, and constipation. GERD is the most common gastrointestinal motility disorder affecting children and is diagnosed clinically and treated primarily with acid secretion blockade. Esophageal achalasia, a less common disorder in the pediatric patient population, is characterized by dysphagia and treated with pneumatic balloon dilation and/or esophagomyotomy. Gastroparesis and chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction are poorly characterized in children and are associated with significant morbidity. Constipation is among the most common complaints in children and is associated with significant morbidity as well as poor quality of life. Data on epidemiology and outcomes, clinical trials, and evaluation of new diagnostic techniques are needed to better diagnose and treat gastrointestinal motility disorders in children. We present a review of the conditions and challenges related to these common gastrointestinal motility disorders in children. PMID:24799835

  10. Sleep Dysfunction and Gastrointestinal Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Khanijow, Vikesh; Prakash, Pia; Emsellem, Helene A.; Borum, Marie L.

    2015-01-01

    Sleep deprivation and impaired sleep quality have been associated with poor health outcomes. Many patients experience sleep disturbances, which can increase the risk of medical conditions such as hypertension, obesity, stroke, and heart disease as well as increase overall mortality. Recent studies have suggested that there is a strong association between sleep disturbances and gastrointestinal diseases. Proinflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor, interleukin-1, and interleukin-6, have been associated with sleep dysfunction. Alterations in these cytokines have been seen in certain gastrointestinal diseases, such as gastroesophageal reflux disease, inflammatory bowel disease, liver disorders, and colorectal cancer. It is important for gastroenterologists to be aware of the relationship between sleep disorders and gastrointestinal illnesses to ensure good care for patients. This article reviews the current research on the interplay between sleep disorders, immune function, and gastrointestinal diseases. PMID:27134599

  11. The chicken gastrointestinal microbiome.

    PubMed

    Oakley, Brian B; Lillehoj, Hyun S; Kogut, Michael H; Kim, Woo K; Maurer, John J; Pedroso, Adriana; Lee, Margie D; Collett, Stephen R; Johnson, Timothy J; Cox, Nelson A

    2014-11-01

    The domestic chicken is a common model organism for human biological research and of course also forms the basis of a global protein industry. Recent methodological advances have spurred the recognition of microbiomes as complex communities with important influences on the health and disease status of the host. In this minireview, we provide an overview of the current state of knowledge of the chicken gastrointestinal microbiome focusing on spatial and temporal variability, the presence and importance of human pathogens, the influence of the microbiota on the immune system, and the importance of the microbiome for poultry nutrition. Review and meta-analysis of public data showed cecal communities dominated by Firmicutes and Bacteroides at the phylum level, while at finer levels of taxonomic resolution, a phylogenetically diverse assemblage of microorganisms appears to have similar metabolic functions that provide important benefits to the host as inferred from metagenomic data. This observation of functional redundancy may have important implications for management of the microbiome. We foresee advances in strategies to improve gut health in commercial operations through management of the intestinal microbiota as an alternative to in-feed subtherapeutic antibiotics, improvements in pre- and probiotics, improved management of polymicrobial poultry diseases, and better control of human pathogens via colonization reduction or competitive exclusion strategies. PMID:25263745

  12. The Gastrointestinal Microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Engen, Phillip A.; Green, Stefan J.; Voigt, Robin M.; Forsyth, Christopher B.; Keshavarzian, Ali

    2015-01-01

    The excessive use of alcohol is a global problem causing many adverse pathological health effects and a significant financial health care burden. This review addresses the effect of alcohol consumption on the microbiota in the gastrointestinal tract (GIT). Although data are limited in humans, studies highlight the importance of changes in the intestinal microbiota in alcohol-related disorders. Alcohol-induced changes in the GIT microbiota composition and metabolic function may contribute to the well-established link between alcohol-induced oxidative stress, intestinal hyperpermeability to luminal bacterial products, and the subsequent development of alcoholic liver disease (ALD), as well as other diseases. In addition, clinical and preclinical data suggest that alcohol-related disorders are associated with quantitative and qualitative dysbiotic changes in the intestinal microbiota and may be associated with increased GIT inflammation, intestinal hyperpermeability resulting in endotoxemia, systemic inflammation, and tissue damage/organ pathologies including ALD. Thus, gut-directed interventions, such as probiotic and synbiotic modulation of the intestinal microbiota, should be considered and evaluated for prevention and treatment of alcohol-associated pathologies. PMID:26695747

  13. Thalidomide in gastrointestinal disorders.

    PubMed

    Bousvaros, A; Mueller, B

    2001-01-01

    Thalidomide was originally marketed as a sedative, but was removed from the market in 1961 after it was associated with an epidemic of severe birth defects. Subsequently, it has been shown to have therapeutic efficacy in a number of the gastrointestinal tract conditions characterised by immune dysregulation. The exact mechanism of the immunosuppressive effects of thalidomide is unknown; proposed mechanisms include inhibition of tumour necrosis factor alpha release and inhibition of angiogenesis. In chronic graft versus host disease, use of high dose thalidomide (1200 mg/day) may bring about a response in 20% of patients with refractory disease. Thalidomide 200 mg/day helps eradicate ulcers in 50% of patients with HIV-associated oral aphthous ulceration. In Behçet's disease, thalidomide 100 to 300 mg/day can decrease the number of mucocutaneous ulcers, although full remission occurs in less than 20% of patients. In Crohn's disease, thalidomide 50 to 300 mg/day may decrease the severity of mucosal disease and prompt closure of fistulae. Patients to be placed on thalidomide therapy must practice either abstinence or strict birth control; women must undergo regular pregnancy testing and utilise 2 forms of contraception. Other adverse effects include sedation (present in nearly all patients), symptomatic neuropathy (present in approximately 20%), and skin rashes. Given the potential toxicity, thalidomide use should generally be limited to clinical protocols with institutional review board oversight.

  14. [Functional gastrointestinal disorders].

    PubMed

    Vogt, W

    2007-11-21

    Functional gastrointestinal disorders particularly dyspepsia an irritable bowel syndrome are frequent problems for the general practitioner and also for the specialist. Both are diseases and not only a kind of discomfort. The high frequency of dispepsia and irritable bowel syndrome induces very high direct and indirect charges. Both diseases depend on a number of factors or causes, for whom the evidence is not good. But there are good experimental data for the visceral hypersensitivity as one of the main factors. Gastroscopy is the most important examination in the diagnosis of dyspepsia. Endoscopy has to be done in all patients with alarm symptoms an in all patients older than 45 years. The therapy of dyspepsia is an empirical one. The eradication of Helicobacter pylori is a therapeutical option, but only 8% of the patients will have benefit for a long time. Other therapeutical options are the use of proton-pump inhibitors, prokinetics or phytotherapeutics. The therapy of the irritable bowel syndrome depends on the subtype of the disease (diarrhea, constipation, abdominal pain, bloating). First of all a good doctor-patient relationship is mandatory. Furthermore the use of dietary fibre, antidiarrhoeics, laxatives and muscle relaxants may be beneficial. And phytotherapeutics can be an additional therapeutic approach.

  15. Feline gastrointestinal microbiota.

    PubMed

    Minamoto, Yasushi; Hooda, Seema; Swanson, Kelly S; Suchodolski, Jan S

    2012-06-01

    The close relationship between gastrointestinal (GI) microbiota and its host has an impact on the health status of an animal that reaches beyond the GI tract. A balanced microbiome stimulates the immune system, aids in the competitive exclusion of transient pathogens and provides nutritional benefits to the host. With recent rapid advances in high-throughput sequencing technology, molecular approaches have become the routinely used tools for ecological studies of the feline microbiome, and have revealed a highly diverse and complex intestinal ecosystem in the feline GI tract. The major bacterial groups are similar to those found in other mammals, with Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, Actinobacteria and Proteobacteria constituting more than 99% of intestinal microbiota. Several nutritional studies have demonstrated that the feline microbiota can be modulated by the amount of soluble fibers (i.e., prebiotics) and macronutrients (i.e., protein content) in the diet. Initial clinical studies have suggested the presence of a dysbiosis in feline inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Recently, metagenomic approaches have attempted to characterize the microbial gene pool. However, more studies are needed to describe the phylogenetic and functional changes in the intestinal microbiome in disease states and in response to environmental and dietary modulations. This paper reviews recent studies cataloging the microbial phylotypes in the GI tract of cats.

  16. The chicken gastrointestinal microbiome.

    PubMed

    Oakley, Brian B; Lillehoj, Hyun S; Kogut, Michael H; Kim, Woo K; Maurer, John J; Pedroso, Adriana; Lee, Margie D; Collett, Stephen R; Johnson, Timothy J; Cox, Nelson A

    2014-11-01

    The domestic chicken is a common model organism for human biological research and of course also forms the basis of a global protein industry. Recent methodological advances have spurred the recognition of microbiomes as complex communities with important influences on the health and disease status of the host. In this minireview, we provide an overview of the current state of knowledge of the chicken gastrointestinal microbiome focusing on spatial and temporal variability, the presence and importance of human pathogens, the influence of the microbiota on the immune system, and the importance of the microbiome for poultry nutrition. Review and meta-analysis of public data showed cecal communities dominated by Firmicutes and Bacteroides at the phylum level, while at finer levels of taxonomic resolution, a phylogenetically diverse assemblage of microorganisms appears to have similar metabolic functions that provide important benefits to the host as inferred from metagenomic data. This observation of functional redundancy may have important implications for management of the microbiome. We foresee advances in strategies to improve gut health in commercial operations through management of the intestinal microbiota as an alternative to in-feed subtherapeutic antibiotics, improvements in pre- and probiotics, improved management of polymicrobial poultry diseases, and better control of human pathogens via colonization reduction or competitive exclusion strategies.

  17. Imaging of Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia

    SciTech Connect

    Carette, Marie-France Nedelcu, Cosmina; Tassart, Marc; Grange, Jean-Didier; Wislez, Marie; Khalil, Antoine

    2009-07-15

    This pictorial review is based on our experience of the follow-up of 120 patients at our multidisciplinary center for hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT). Rendu-Osler-Weber disease or HHT is a multiorgan autosomal dominant disorder with high penetrance, characterized by epistaxis, mucocutaneous telangiectasis, and visceral arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). The research on gene mutations is fundamental and family screening by clinical examination, chest X-ray, research of pulmonary shunting, and abdominal color Doppler sonography is absolutely necessary. The angioarchitecture of pulmonary AVMs can be studied by unenhanced multidetector computed tomography; however, all other explorations of liver, digestive bowels, or brain require administration of contrast media. Magnetic resonance angiography is helpful for central nervous system screening, in particular for the spinal cord, but also for pulmonary, hepatic, and pelvic AVMs. Knowledge of the multiorgan involvement of HHT, mechanism of complications, and radiologic findings is fundamental for the correct management of these patients.

  18. [Non-traumatic vitreous hemorrhage].

    PubMed

    Conart, J-B; Berrod, J-P

    2016-02-01

    Spontaneous vitreous hemorrhage is a serious disease whose incidence is 7 per 100,000 people per year. Posterior vitreous detachment with or without retinal tear, diabetic retinopathy, vascular proliferation after retinal vein occlusion, age-related macular degeneration and Terson's syndrome are the most common causes. Repeated ultrasonography may ignore a retinal tear or detachment and delay vitrectomy that is the only treatment for serious forms. The occurrence of retinal tear or detachment is a surgical emergency as well as rubeosis or diabetic tractional retinal detachment involving the macula. Intravitreal injection of antiangiogenic agents are helpful in clearing the vitreous cavity, facilitating laser photocoagulation and reducing the risks of bleeding during preretinal neovascular membranes dissection. PMID:26826742

  19. [Management of major postpartum hemorrhage].

    PubMed

    Nebout, Sophie; Merbai, Nadia; Faitot, Valentina; Keita, Hawa

    2014-02-01

    Postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) is defined by loss of greater than 500 mL of blood following vaginal delivery or 1,000 mL of blood following cesarean section, in the first 24 hours postpartum. Its incidence is up to 5% and the severe forms represent 1% of births. PPH is the first cause of obstetrical maternal mortality in France and 90% of these deaths are considered as preventable. Its management is multidisciplinary (obstetricians, anesthetists, midwives, biologists and interventional radiologists), based on treatment protocols where time is a major prognosis factor. In case of failure of the initial measures (oxytocin, manual placenta removal, uterus and birth canal examination), the management of severe forms includes active resuscitation (intravenous fluids, blood transfusion, vasoactive drugs), haemostatic interventions (sulprostone, tamponnade and haemostatic suture, surgical procedures and arterial embolization) and the correction of any potential coagulopathy (administration of blood products and haemostatic agents). PMID:24373716

  20. Congenital hemorrhagic disorders in Jordan.

    PubMed

    Awidi, A S

    1984-07-29

    The results of a three year prospective study of inherited bleeding syndromes in Jordan is presented. There were 112 patients from 64 families. Of these there were 42 patients with hemophilia A, 23 with Glanzmann's thrombasthenia, 22 with von Willebrand's disease, 11 with Christmas disease, 6 with hypofibrinogenemia, 3 with afibrinogenemia, 2 with factor XIII deficiency, 2 with storage pool disease and 1 with factor XI deficiency. The pattern of inherited bleeding syndromes in Jordan is different from that seen in Europe and U.S.A. in that Glanzmann's thrombasthenia is very common. High proportion of hemophiliacs were severe. Arthropathy was common. A significant number of bleeders had fatal hemorrhage. In a high proportion of patients, no family history of bleeding was found.

  1. Enteral alimentation and gastrointestinal bleeding in mechanically ventilated patients.

    PubMed

    Pingleton, S K; Hadzima, S K

    1983-01-01

    The incidence of upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding in mechanically ventilated ICU patients receiving enteral alimentation was reviewed and compared to bleeding occurring in ventilated patients receiving prophylactic antacids or cimetidine. Of 250 patients admitted to our ICU during a 1-yr time period, 43 ventilated patients were studied. Patients in each group were comparable with respect to age, respiratory diagnosis, number of GI hemorrhage risk factors, and number of ventilator, ICU, and hospital days. Twenty-one patients had evidence of GI bleeding. Fourteen of 20 patients receiving antacids and 7 of 9 patients receiving cimetidine had evidence of GI bleeding. No bleeding occurred in 14 patients receiving enteral alimentation. Complications of enteral alimentation were few and none required discontinuation of enteral alimentation. Our preliminary data suggest the role of enteral alimentation in critically ill patients may include not only protection against malnutrition but also protection against GI bleeding.

  2. Imaging and intervention in the gastrointestinal tract in children.

    PubMed

    Kaye, Robin D; Towbin, R B

    2002-09-01

    Vascular and interventional techniques have become an integral component of modern pediatric healthcare. Minimally invasive procedures of the gastrointestinal tract now comprise a large part of any active pediatric interventional practice. Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography offers a reliable, non-invasive means to evaluate patients with possible pancreatic or biliary pathology. This article reviews treatment of esophageal strictures and placement of gastronomy and gastrojejunostomy tubes and discusses new developments. Placement of percutaneous cecostomy tubes is a relatively new procedure that creatively uses the techniques developed for placement of percutaneous gastronomy tubes. This procedure offers significant benefits and lasting positive lifestyle changes for patients suffering from fecal incontinence. Liver biopsy in high-risk patients can be performed safely using measures designed to significantly decrease the risk of post-biopsy hemorrhage, such as track embolization or the transjugular approach.

  3. Surveillance for gastrointestinal malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Tiwari, Ashish K; Laird-Fick, Heather S; Wali, Ramesh K; Roy, Hemant K

    2012-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) malignancies are notorious for frequently progressing to advanced stages even in the absence of serious symptoms, thus leading to delayed diagnoses and dismal prognoses. Secondary prevention of GI malignancies through early detection and treatment of cancer-precursor/premalignant lesions, therefore, is recognized as an effective cancer prevention strategy. In order to efficiently detect these lesions, systemic application of screening tests (surveillance) is needed. However, most of the currently used non-invasive screening tests for GI malignancies (for example, serum markers such as alpha-fetoprotein for hepatocellular carcinoma, and fecal occult blood test, for colon cancer) are only modestly effective necessitating the use of highly invasive endoscopy-based procedures, such as esophagogastroduodenoscopy and colonoscopy for screening purposes. Even for hepatocellular carcinoma where non-invasive imaging (ultrasonography) has become a standard screening tool, the need for repeated liver biopsies of suspicious liver nodules for histopathological confirmation can’t be avoided. The invasive nature and high-cost associated with these screening tools hinders implementation of GI cancer screening programs. Moreover, only a small fraction of general population is truly predisposed to developing GI malignancies, and indeed needs surveillance. To spare the average-risk individuals from superfluous invasive procedures and achieve an economically viable model of cancer prevention, it’s important to identify cohorts in general population that are at substantially high risk of developing GI malignancies (risk-stratification), and select suitable screening tests for surveillance in these cohorts. We herein provide a brief overview of such high-risk cohorts for different GI malignancies, and the screening strategies that have commonly been employed for surveillance purpose in them. PMID:22969223

  4. Remote cerebellar hemorrhage following supratentorial cerebrovascular surgery.

    PubMed

    Smith, Ross; Kebriaei, Meysam; Gard, Andrew; Thorell, William; Surdell, Daniel

    2014-04-01

    Three patients with remote cerebellar hemorrhage following supratentorial cerebrovascular surgery are presented. Remote cerebellar hemorrhage is a rare surgical complication that is most often associated with aneurysm clipping or temporal lobectomies. Bleeding occurs on the superior cerebellar cortex and is believed to be venous in origin. The precise pathogenesis of remote cerebellar hemorrhage has yet to be fully elucidated but is generally considered to be a consequence of intraoperative cerebrospinal fluid loss causing caudal displacement of the cerebellum with resultant stretching of the supracerebellar veins. This case series will hopefully shed further light on the incidence, presentation, workup, and treatment of this particular complication of supratentorial surgery. PMID:24238635

  5. Heterotopic gastrointestinal mucosa and pancreatic tissue in a retroperitoneal tumor.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Naoki; Hakamada, Kenichi; Narumi, Shunji; Totsuka, Eishi; Aoki, Kazunori; Kamata, Yoshimasa; Sasaki, Mutsuo

    2006-01-01

    We believe that this is the first report of a retroperitoneal tumor consisting of heterotopic gastrointestinal mucosa and pancreatic tissue. The patient was a 19-year-old woman with the chief complaint being occasional back pain. Abdominal computerized tomography demonstrated a 3.1 x 2.5 x 3.2-cm low-density solid and cystic lesion adjoining the left renal vein between the aorta and inferior vena cava. Angiography revealed that the inferior vena cava was displaced by the hypovascular tumor. The retroperitoneal lesion was diagnosed preoperatively as a benign tumor such as a neurogenic neoplasm or lymphangioma. At laparotomy, a cystic tumor was found, which existed behind the inferior vena cava and renal vessels, and contained reddish-brown fluid, suggesting hemorrhage in the past. The cut surface of the tumor showed a unilocular cyst with partially hypertrophic wall. Histopathological examination revealed a cystic tumor lined with heterotopic gastric and duodenal mucosa, with pancreatic tissue in the muscularis propria. In addition, evidence of bleeding from the gastric mucosa was observed in the cystic tumor. External secretion from these tissues could have triggered the hemorrhage and expanded the tumor, possibly resulting in the back pain.

  6. Primary Gastrointestinal Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yinting; Chen, Yanzhu; Chen, Shaojie; Wu, Lili; Xu, Lishu; Lian, Guoda; Yang, Kege; Li, Yaqing; Zeng, Linjuan; Huang, Kaihong

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Primary gastrointestinal lymphoma (PGIL) is a rare malignant tumor without standard diagnosis and treatment methods. This study is aimed to systematically analyze its clinical characteristics and draw out an appropriate flow chart of diagnosis and treatment process for PGIL in China. This study retrospectively analyzed the clinicopathological characteristics, diagnostic approaches, prognostic factors, and therapeutic modalities in 415 cases of PGIL in Chinese province of Guangdong. A systematic review was conducted in 118 studies containing 5075 patients to further identify clinical manifestations and mortalities of therapeutic modalities. The most common clinical presentations were abdominal pain and bloody stools. Endoscopic biopsy was an important diagnostic means, and usually more than once to make a definite diagnosis. Retrospective multicenter clinical study showed that younger onset age (<60 years), female, one region involved, one lesion, early stage, International Prognostic Index (IPI ≤1), normal lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), normal albumin, and nonemergency operation were significant prognostic factors for B-cell lymphoma; non-B symptom, tumor restricted to gastric or ileocecal region, one lesion, performance status (PS ≤1), normal LDH, and nonsurgery alone were significant prognostic factors for T-cell lymphoma. Site of origin and IPI were independent prognostic factors for B-cell lymphoma; PS was the independent prognostic factor for T-cell lymphoma. And T-cell lymphoma had worse overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) than B-cell lymphoma. Among different therapeutic modalities, chemotherapy alone or combined with surgery showed better OS and PFS than surgery alone for diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) of stage I/II E and T-cell lymphoma. For DLBCL of stage III E/IV and mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma, OS and PFS did not differ among different therapeutic groups. In meta-analysis, surgery plus chemotherapy

  7. Spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage and glucose management.

    PubMed

    Schmutzhard, Erich; Rabinstein, Alejandro A

    2011-09-01

    Although metabolic abnormalities have been linked with poor outcome after subarachnoid hemorrhage, there are limited data addressing the impact of glycemic control or benefits of glucose management after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. A systematic literature search was conducted of English-language articles describing original research on glycemic control in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage. Case reports and case series were excluded. A total of 22 publications were selected for this review. Among the 17 studies investigating glucose as an outcome predictor, glucose levels during hospitalization were more likely to predict outcome than admission glucose. In general, hyperglycemia was linked to worse outcome. While insulin therapy in subarachnoid hemorrhage patients was shown to effectively control plasma glucose levels, plasma glucose control was not necessarily reflective of cerebral glucose such that very tight glucose control may lead to neuroglycopenia. Furthermore, tight glycemic control was associated with an increased risk for hypoglycemia which was linked to worse outcome. PMID:21850563

  8. Delayed Intracerebral Hemorrhage Secondary to Ventriculoperitoneal Shunt

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Li; Chen, Yi-Li; Yang, Shu-Xu; Wang, Yi-Rong

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt is a routine procedure for cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) diversion, and is associated with many complications. A delayed hemorrhage after the VP shunt surgery, however, is quite rare. In this study, we report a case involving late-onset hemorrhage. The 67-year-old male patient with a history of head trauma and brain surgery underwent a VP shunt placement for hydrocephalus. The surgery course was uneventful and no bleeding was revealed in the first computed tomographic (CT) scan after the procedure. However, a massive intraparenchymal and intraventricular hemorrhage occurred 8 h following adjustment of the valve system on the 8th day after surgery. Erosion of the vasculature by catheter cannulation and a sudden reduction of CSF pressure after downregulation of the valve could be one of the possible causes of the intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). PMID:26632700

  9. Splenic Involvement in Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Kota; Kato, Shunsuke; Nagano, Hiroto; Ohtsukasa, Shunro; Kawachi, Yasuyuki

    2016-01-01

    A 33-year-old man who presented with prolonged epigastric pain was referred to our hospital. He had experienced recurrent epistaxis and had a family history of hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging revealed splenomegaly and a 9 cm hypervascular mass in his spleen. Computed tomography also showed a pulmonary arteriovenous malformation and heterogeneous enhancement of the liver parenchyma, suggesting the presence of arteriosystemic shunts and telangiectases. Based on these findings, the patient was definitely diagnosed with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia according to Curaçao criteria. He underwent splenectomy, and his symptoms disappeared after surgery. Pathological examination of the resected specimen revealed that the hypervascular lesion of the spleen was not a tumor but was composed of abnormal vessels associated with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia. Symptomatic splenic involvement may be a rare manifestation of hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia but can be revealed by imaging modalities. PMID:27807449

  10. [Subretinal hemorrhage. Natural course and staging].

    PubMed

    Bopp, S

    2012-07-01

    Subretinal hemorrhages are a complication of various diseases which arise from the choroidal or retinal circulation. Most commonly the underlying pathology is a choroidal neovascular membrane (CNV) especially in patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Less common ocular diseases are those with non-AMD-related CNV and retinal arterial macroaneurysms (RAM). Case studies have demonstrated a poor prognosis, however, a significant portion have favorable outcomes. Therefore, therapeutic decision-making is difficult. As a major difficulty in comparing different treatment modalities for submacular hemorrhages is the lack of a standardized definition of the extent of the hemorrhage. A classification for AMD-related subretinal hemorrhages including size, thickness and intraretinal location is suggested.

  11. Epizootic hemorrhagic disease in yaks (Bos grunniens).

    PubMed

    Van Campen, Hana; Davis, Charlie; Flinchum, John D; Bishop, Jeanette V; Schiebel, Anita; Duncan, Colleen; Spraker, Terry

    2013-05-01

    An epizootic of hemorrhagic disease associated with Epizootic hemorrhagic disease virus serotype 2 (EHDV-2) infections in yaks from 5 herds occurred in Colorado between August 21 and October 3, 2012. Affected yaks presented with fever, lethargy, anorexia, dyspnea, and swollen conjunctivae. Ulcerated dental pads, mucoid sanguineous nasal discharge, petechial hemorrhages in multiple organs, pulmonary edema, and serosanguinous fluid in the thorax, abdomen, and pericardial sac were observed at necropsy. Blood and tissue samples from 8 yaks with similar clinical signs and necropsy findings were positive for EHDV-2 by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and 5 yaks were seropositive for EHDV. Tests for malignant catarrhal fever (Ovine herpesvirus 2), Bovine viral diarrhea virus, Bovine herpesvirus 1, Foot-and-mouth disease virus, and Vesicular stomatitis virus were negative. The findings indicate that yaks are susceptible to infection with EHDV-2 and exhibit the clinical signs, and gross and histologic lesions of hemorrhagic disease observed in other ruminant species. PMID:23572453

  12. Peribulbar anesthesia causing bilateral orbital hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Garft, Kyla; Burt, Peter; Burt, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of bilateral orbital hemorrhage as a complication of peribulbar anesthesia in a 78 year old man. Initially, unilateral orbital hemorrhage occurred but quickly spread to the contralateral side. Neuroophthalmological assessment revealed a proptosed tense globe with normal retinovascular findings. Visual acuity was adversely affected and this was conservatively managed with no lasting ophthalmic sequela. This patient’s case was reported as it illustrates an unusual complication of bilateral spread of orbital hemorrhage secondary to peribulbar anesthesia. It highlights how early ophthalmic assessment can ensure a good visual outcome in the setting of appropriate ophthalmic monitoring. The mechanisms of orbital hemorrhage spread and appropriate management options are discussed. PMID:27013899

  13. Predicting Hemorrhagic Transformation of Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Marsh, Elisabeth B.; Llinas, Rafael H.; Schneider, Andrea L.C.; Hillis, Argye E.; Lawrence, Erin; Dziedzic, Peter; Gottesman, Rebecca F.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Hemorrhagic transformation (HT) increases the morbidity and mortality of ischemic stroke. Anticoagulation is often indicated in patients with atrial fibrillation, low ejection fraction, or mechanical valves who are hospitalized with acute stroke, but increases the risk of HT. Risk quantification would be useful. Prior studies have investigated risk of systemic hemorrhage in anticoagulated patients, but none looked specifically at HT. In our previously published work, age, infarct volume, and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) significantly predicted HT. We created the hemorrhage risk stratification (HeRS) score based on regression coefficients in multivariable modeling and now determine its validity in a prospectively followed inpatient cohort. A total of 241 consecutive patients presenting to 2 academic stroke centers with acute ischemic stroke and an indication for anticoagulation over a 2.75-year period were included. Neuroimaging was evaluated for infarct volume and HT. Hemorrhages were classified as symptomatic versus asymptomatic, and by severity. HeRS scores were calculated for each patient and compared to actual hemorrhage status using receiver operating curve analysis. Area under the curve (AUC) comparing predicted odds of hemorrhage (HeRS score) to actual hemorrhage status was 0.701. Serum glucose (P < 0.001), white blood cell count (P < 0.001), and warfarin use prior to admission (P = 0.002) were also associated with HT in the validation cohort. With these variables, AUC improved to 0.854. Anticoagulation did not significantly increase HT; but with higher intensity anticoagulation, hemorrhages were more likely to be symptomatic and more severe. The HeRS score is a valid predictor of HT in patients with ischemic stroke and indication for anticoagulation. PMID:26765425

  14. Pulmonary hemorrhage resulting from roller coaster.

    PubMed

    Yin, Ming; Tian, Qing; Shen, Hong

    2011-03-01

    Roller coasters are probably one of the more popular rides at amusement parks around the world, and there are few reported injuries. We report a case of symmetric diffuse upper lobe hemorrhage resulting from roller coaster in a previously healthy woman. The clinical course, management, and etiology of her case are discussed; and the literature is reviewed. To our knowledge, pulmonary hemorrhage in this setting has not yet been described. PMID:20825914

  15. Hemorrhagic sarcoid pleural effusion: A rare entity

    PubMed Central

    Jha, Onkar; Nair, Vidya; Talwar, Deepak

    2016-01-01

    Involvement of pleura by sarcoidosis remains a rare manifestation and varies from pleural effusion, pneumothorax, pleural thickening, hydropneumothorax, trapped lung, hemothorax, or chylothorax. Sarcoid pleural effusions presenting as hemorrhagic effusions are even more rare. We report a case of active pulmonary sarcoidosis presenting as hemorrhagic pleural effusion requiring tissue diagnosis to rule out malignancy. The rarity of the presentation prompted us to report this case. PMID:27625449

  16. Hemorrhagic sarcoid pleural effusion: A rare entity

    PubMed Central

    Jha, Onkar; Nair, Vidya; Talwar, Deepak

    2016-01-01

    Involvement of pleura by sarcoidosis remains a rare manifestation and varies from pleural effusion, pneumothorax, pleural thickening, hydropneumothorax, trapped lung, hemothorax, or chylothorax. Sarcoid pleural effusions presenting as hemorrhagic effusions are even more rare. We report a case of active pulmonary sarcoidosis presenting as hemorrhagic pleural effusion requiring tissue diagnosis to rule out malignancy. The rarity of the presentation prompted us to report this case.

  17. Argentine hemorrhagic fever: a primate model.

    PubMed

    Weissenbacher, M C; Calello, M A; Colillas, O J; Rondinone, S N; Frigerio, M J

    1979-01-01

    Experimental Junin virus infection of a New World primate, Callithrix jacchus, was evaluated. The virus produced anorexia, loss of weight, thrombocytopenia, leukopenia, and hemorrhagic and neurological symptoms and terminated in death. Virus was recovered from urine, blood samples and all tissues taken at autopsy. These preliminary observations show that several aspects of the experimental disease in C. jacchus are quite similar to severe natural Argentine hemorrhagic fever of man.

  18. Hemorrhagic sarcoid pleural effusion: A rare entity.

    PubMed

    Jha, Onkar; Nair, Vidya; Talwar, Deepak

    2016-01-01

    Involvement of pleura by sarcoidosis remains a rare manifestation and varies from pleural effusion, pneumothorax, pleural thickening, hydropneumothorax, trapped lung, hemothorax, or chylothorax. Sarcoid pleural effusions presenting as hemorrhagic effusions are even more rare. We report a case of active pulmonary sarcoidosis presenting as hemorrhagic pleural effusion requiring tissue diagnosis to rule out malignancy. The rarity of the presentation prompted us to report this case. PMID:27625449

  19. Occult hemorrhage in children with severe ITP.

    PubMed

    Flores, Adolfo; Buchanan, George R

    2016-03-01

    Little is known about the frequency and significance of clinically unapparent or occult hemorrhage in ITP. Therefore, we prospectively explored the sites and frequency of occult bleeding in children with severe ITP at diagnosis or upon symptomatic relapse in a prospective, single-institution cohort study of patients ≤ 18 years of age and a platelet count ≤ 10,000/mm(3) . Data collected included bleeding severity assessment, urinalysis, fecal occult blood testing, and non-contrast brain MRI. Stool and urine samples were tested within 7 days of diagnosis or symptomatic relapse. Three months after diagnosis or relapse a noncontrast brain MRI evaluated hemosiderin deposits resulting from prior localized hemorrhage. Fifty-two ITP patients were enrolled with a mean platelet count of 4,000/mm(3) . A significant occurrence of occult hemorrhage was identified in the urine (27%) compared with clinically overt hematuria (0.91%, P < 0.0005). CNS microbleeding in the superficial cortex of the left frontal lobe was identified in one child with occult bleeding in the urinary tract. There was no relationship between occult hemorrhage and bleeding manifestations on physical examination. Occult hemorrhage was not a harbinger of subsequent bleeding. Our findings suggest that occult hemorrhage occurs with greater frequency than overt bleeding in children with severe ITP. CNS microbleeding is a potential risk in this patient population. Assessment of brain microbleeds and microscopic hematuria in this patient population require additional study.

  20. Congenital hepatic cyst with intracystic hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Qingqiang; Zhang, Minfeng; Yang, Cheng; Cai, Wenchang; Zhao, Qian; Shen, Weifeng; Yang, Jiamei

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Fast-growing congenital hepatic cysts with intracystic hemorrhage are rare in clinical practice. Additionally, the clinical manifestations of and laboratory and imaging findings for this condition are often nonspecific and are particularly difficult to differentiate from those of hepatobiliary cystadenoma and cystadenocarcinoma, thus posing great challenges for diagnosis and treatment. The 2 case reports presented here aim to analyze the diagnosis and treatment of 2 rare cases of congenital hepatic cysts with intracystic hemorrhage in the Chinese Han population to provide an important reference for the clinical diagnosis and treatment of this condition. Diagnoses: These 2 case reports present 2 rare cases of congenital hepatic cysts with intracystic hemorrhage. Case 1 involved a 31-year-old patient with a very large, fast-growing hepatic cyst with intracystic hemorrhage and elevated carbohydrate antigen 199. Case 2 involved a patient with intense, paroxysmal right upper abdominal pain; computed tomography suggested a hepatic cyst with intracystic hemorrhage and possibly hepatobiliary cystadenoma. Outcomes: Both patients underwent liver resection. Postoperative follow-up showed that for both patients, the symptoms improved, the laboratory findings returned to normal levels, and the surgical outcomes were satisfactory. Conclusion: Liver resection is an ideal treatment for patients with congenital hepatic cysts with intracystic hemorrhage, and especially those with fast-growing, symptomatic hepatic cysts or hepatic cysts that are difficult to differentiate from hepatobiliary cystadenoma and cystadenocarcinoma. PMID:27759646

  1. Impaired Fracture Healing after Hemorrhagic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Kobbe, Philipp; Pfeifer, Roman; Campbell, Graeme C.; Tohidnezhad, Mersedeh; Bergmann, Christian; Kadyrov, Mamed; Fischer, Horst; Glüer, Christian C.; Pape, Hans-Christoph; Pufe, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Impaired fracture healing can occur in severely injured patients with hemorrhagic shock due to decreased soft tissue perfusion after trauma. We investigated the effects of fracture healing in a standardized pressure controlled hemorrhagic shock model in mice, to test the hypothesis that bleeding is relevant in the bone healing response. Male C57/BL6 mice were subjected to a closed femoral shaft fracture stabilized by intramedullary nailing. One group was additionally subjected to pressure controlled hemorrhagic shock (HS, mean arterial pressure (MAP) of 35 mmHg for 90 minutes). Serum cytokines (IL-6, KC, MCP-1, and TNF-α) were analyzed 6 hours after shock. Fracture healing was assessed 21 days after fracture. Hemorrhagic shock is associated with a significant increase in serum inflammatory cytokines in the early phase. Histologic analysis demonstrated a significantly decreased number of osteoclasts, a decrease in bone quality, and more cartilage islands after hemorrhagic shock. μCT analysis showed a trend towards decreased bone tissue mineral density in the HS group. Mechanical testing revealed no difference in tensile failure. Our results suggest a delay in fracture healing after hemorrhagic shock. This may be due to significantly diminished osteoclast recruitment. The exact mechanisms should be studied further, particularly during earlier stages of fracture healing. PMID:26106256

  2. Preprocedural considerations in gastrointestinal endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Gorospe, Emmanuel C; Oxentenko, Amy S

    2013-09-01

    The current practice of open-access endoscopy allows primary care and other non-gastroenterology physicians to directly refer patients for routine gastrointestinal endoscopic procedures. Open-access endoscopy is considered to be more cost-effective and time efficient than the traditional practice of referring patients for preprocedural consultation with a gastrointestinal endoscopist. Several studies have evaluated the performance of endoscopic procedures in an open-access environment and the utility of structured referral mechanisms to ensure safe and appropriately indicated procedures. This review focuses on 4 common preprocedural issues in gastrointestinal endoscopy encountered by primary care physicians: management of anticoagulation and antiplatelet therapy, indication for prophylactic antibiotic drug therapy, need for anesthesia-assisted sedation, and management of poor bowel preparation. We summarize the current guidelines that address these 4 common preprocedural issues to facilitate safe and clinically appropriate procedures in open-access endoscopy.

  3. Hemodynamic management of subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Treggiari, Miriam M

    2011-09-01

    Hemodynamic augmentation therapy is considered standard treatment to help prevent and treat vasospasm and delayed cerebral ischemia. Standard triple-H therapy combines volume expansion (hypervolemia), blood pressure augmentation (hypertension), and hemodilution. An electronic literature search was conducted of English-language papers published between 2000 and October 2010 that focused on hemodynamic augmentation therapies in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage. Among the eligible reports identified, 11 addressed volume expansion, 10 blood pressure management, 4 inotropic therapy, and 12 hemodynamic augmentation in patients with unsecured aneurysms. While hypovolemia should be avoided, hypervolemia did not appear to confer additional benefits over normovolemic therapy, with an excess of side effects occurring in patients treated with hypervolemic targets. Overall, hypertension was associated with higher cerebral blood flow, regardless of volume status (normo- or hypervolemia), with neurological symptom reversal seen in two-thirds of treated patients. Limited data were available for evaluating inotropic agents or hemodynamic augmentation in patients with additional unsecured aneurysms. In the context of sparse data, no incremental risk of aneurysmal rupture has been reported with the induction of hemodynamic augmentation. PMID:21786046

  4. Hemorrhagic Aspects of Gaucher Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rosenbaum, Hanna

    2014-01-01

    Gaucher disease (GD) is an inherited lysosomal disorder, originating from deficient activity of the lysosomal enzyme glucocerebrosidase (GCase). Normally, GCase hydrolyzes glucocerebroside (GC) to glucose and ceramide; however, impaired activity of this enzyme leads to the accumulation of GC in macrophages, termed “Gaucher cells.” Gaucher disease is associated with hepatosplenomegaly, cytopenias, skeletal complications and in some forms involves the central nervous system. Coagulation abnormalities are common among GD patients due to impaired production and chronic consumption of coagulation factors. Bleeding phenomena are variable (as are other symptoms of GD) and include mucosal and surgical hemorrhages. Four main etiological factors account for the hemostatic defect in GD: thrombocytopenia, abnormal platelet function, reduced production of coagulation factors, and activation of fibrinolysis. Thrombocytopenia relates not only to hypersplenism and decreased megakaryopoiesis by the infiltrated bone marrow but also to immune thrombocytopenia. Autoimmunity, especially the induction of platelet antibody production, might cause persistent thrombocytopenia. Enzyme replacement therapy reverses only part of the impaired coagulation system in Gaucher disease. Other therapeutic and supportive measures should be considered to prevent and/or treat bleeding in GD. Gaucher patients should be evaluated routinely for coagulation abnormalities especially prior to surgery and dental and obstetric procedures. PMID:25386355

  5. Dengue and dengue hemorrhagic fever.

    PubMed

    Hayes, E B; Gubler, D J

    1992-04-01

    Hundreds of thousands of dengue cases are reported worldwide each year. Given the difficulty in obtaining full reporting, the actual number of human infections is probably much higher than the number reported. Dengue is usually a nonspecific febrile illness that resolves with supportive therapy but the clinical spectrum ranges from asymptomatic infection through severe hemorrhage and sudden fatal shock. The pathophysiology of the severe forms of dengue may be related to sequential infection with different serotypes, variations in virus virulence, interaction of the virus with environmental and host factors or a combination of these factors. Control of dengue at the present time is dependent on control of the principal vector mosquito, A. aegypti. Efforts to achieve such control are now focusing on community education and action towards eliminating this mosquito's breeding sites near human dwellings. Vaccine development continues, but at present the only way to avoid dengue in an area where it is endemic or epidemic is to use repellents and mosquito barriers. The movement of people to and from tropical areas makes dengue an important differential diagnosis in any patient with an acute illness and history of recent travel to tropical areas. Because of continued infestation of the southeastern United States with A. aegypti, indigenous transmission in the continental United States remains a public health concern.

  6. Nutritional support and gastrointestinal disease.

    PubMed

    Hennessy, K

    1989-06-01

    The use of nutritional support in patients with acute gastrointestinal disease requires a thorough knowledge of the pathophysiology and nutritional alterations that are caused by the disease process. Although nutritional therapy of a patient with gastrointestinal disease is not curative of the underlying disease, it does provide essential support to the patient, which improves response to, and eventual recovery from, illness. Special considerations need to be made to avoid complicating the patient's condition by inappropriate use of nutritional support solutions, which can lead to abnormal liver function. PMID:2498848

  7. Blood thinners and gastrointestinal endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Monjur

    2016-01-01

    As the number of diagnostic and therapeutic gastrointestinal endoscopies is increasing, and there is an increase in number of patients taking blood thinners, we are seeing more and more patients on blood thinners prior to endoscopic procedures. Gastrointestinal bleeding or thromboembolism can occur in this category of patients in the periendoscopic period. To better manage these patients, endoscopists should have a clear concept about the various blood thinners in the market. Patients’ risk of thromboembolism off anticoagulation, and the risk of bleeding from endoscopic procedures should be assessed prior to endoscopy. The endoscopic procedure should be done when it is safe to do it. PMID:27668068

  8. Blood thinners and gastrointestinal endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Monjur

    2016-01-01

    As the number of diagnostic and therapeutic gastrointestinal endoscopies is increasing, and there is an increase in number of patients taking blood thinners, we are seeing more and more patients on blood thinners prior to endoscopic procedures. Gastrointestinal bleeding or thromboembolism can occur in this category of patients in the periendoscopic period. To better manage these patients, endoscopists should have a clear concept about the various blood thinners in the market. Patients’ risk of thromboembolism off anticoagulation, and the risk of bleeding from endoscopic procedures should be assessed prior to endoscopy. The endoscopic procedure should be done when it is safe to do it.

  9. Blood thinners and gastrointestinal endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Monjur

    2016-09-16

    As the number of diagnostic and therapeutic gastrointestinal endoscopies is increasing, and there is an increase in number of patients taking blood thinners, we are seeing more and more patients on blood thinners prior to endoscopic procedures. Gastrointestinal bleeding or thromboembolism can occur in this category of patients in the periendoscopic period. To better manage these patients, endoscopists should have a clear concept about the various blood thinners in the market. Patients' risk of thromboembolism off anticoagulation, and the risk of bleeding from endoscopic procedures should be assessed prior to endoscopy. The endoscopic procedure should be done when it is safe to do it. PMID:27668068

  10. Evaluation of Dabigatran- and Warfarin-Associated Hemorrhagic Events Using the FDA-Adverse Event Reporting System Database Stratified by Age.

    PubMed

    Abe, Junko; Umetsu, Ryogo; Kato, Yamato; Ueda, Natsumi; Nakayama, Yoko; Suzuki, Yukiya; Suzuki, Toshiyuki; Nagasawa, Hideko; Kinosada, Yasutomi; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Dabigatran and warfarin are oral anticoagulant drugs widely used for the prevention of stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation. The objective of this study was to evaluate the interaction between aging and dabigatran- and warfarin-induced gastrointestinal (GI) and nervous system hemorrhage using data available in the FDA Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS) database. We analyzed reports of hemorrhagic events in the GI and nervous system recorded in the FAERS database between 2004 and 2014 using an adjusted reporting odds ratio (ROR). We demonstrated that dabigatran-associated GI hemorrhage was significantly increased in patients over the age of 80 years. The RORs of dabigatran increased with increasing age, although aging had little effect on warfarin-associated GI hemorrhage. The ROR for anticoagulant-associated nervous system hemorrhage was not significantly affected by aging, as compared to GI hemorrhage. Our results indicate that the excretion of dabigatran may be affected by aging, as compared to warfarin, likely due to renal function decline. Our results emphasize the need for physicians to closely monitor GI bleeding in aging patients, because it is closely related to renal function deterioration.

  11. Prevention of acrylonitrile-induced gastrointestinal bleeding by sulfhydryl compounds, atropine and cimetidine

    SciTech Connect

    Ghanayem, B.I.; Ahmed, A.E.

    1986-07-01

    We have recently demonstrated that acrylonitrile (VCN) causes acute gastric hemorrhage and mucosal erosions. The current studies were undertaken to investigate the effects of the sulfhydryl-containing compounds, cysteine and cysteamine, the cholinergic blocking agent atropine and the histamine H2 receptor antagonist, cimetidine on the VCN-induced gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding in rats. Our data shows that pretreatment with L-cysteine, cysteamine, atropine or cimetidine has significantly protected rats against the VCN-induced GI bleeding. A possible mechanism of the VCN-induced GI bleeding may involve the interaction of VCN with critical sulfhydryl groups that, in turn, causes alteration of acetylcholine muscarinic receptors to lead to gastric hemorrhagic lesions and bleeding.

  12. [HORMONALLY-GENETICALLY DEPENDENT THERAPY, USING VITAMIN K IN PATIENTS, SUFFERING THE ULCER HEMORRHAGE].

    PubMed

    Duzhyi, I D; Kharchenko, S V

    2016-04-01

    Pathophysiological mechanisms of the vitamin K impact, including those in the gut with ulcerative affection, are studied still insufficiently. Investigations of pharmacogenomics of the vitamin K gives a new approach to therapy in patients, suffering gastro-intestinal hemorrhage. Possibilities of titration of the vitamin K3 (menadione) doses, depending on level of estrogenemia and genetic constitution, concerning genes-candidates ESR1 (rs2234693) and VKORC1 (rs9923231), were studied. There were examined 36 patients, who were treated for the ulcer hemorrhage. The blood serum concentration of estradiol was investigated in accordance to method of solid phase enzyme immunoassay, the genotyping procedure was performed in accordance to indices of polymerase chain reaction with analysis of the restrictional fragments length. The initial daily dose of menadione have constituted 20 mg. After a genotype determination made (first-second day after admittance to hospital) in patients with normoestrogenemia in genotypes CC/GG, CC/GA, CT/GG, CT/GA a vitaminotherapy was prolonged in daily dose of 20 mg, and in a conditionally-pathological variant of genotype the dose of vitamin K was enhanced up to 30 mg. Determination of hormones and the patients' genetic constitution makes possible to apply a personified approach for the vitamin K3 application in the ulcerative hemorrhage. PMID:27434945

  13. [HORMONALLY-GENETICALLY DEPENDENT THERAPY, USING VITAMIN K IN PATIENTS, SUFFERING THE ULCER HEMORRHAGE].

    PubMed

    Duzhyi, I D; Kharchenko, S V

    2016-04-01

    Pathophysiological mechanisms of the vitamin K impact, including those in the gut with ulcerative affection, are studied still insufficiently. Investigations of pharmacogenomics of the vitamin K gives a new approach to therapy in patients, suffering gastro-intestinal hemorrhage. Possibilities of titration of the vitamin K3 (menadione) doses, depending on level of estrogenemia and genetic constitution, concerning genes-candidates ESR1 (rs2234693) and VKORC1 (rs9923231), were studied. There were examined 36 patients, who were treated for the ulcer hemorrhage. The blood serum concentration of estradiol was investigated in accordance to method of solid phase enzyme immunoassay, the genotyping procedure was performed in accordance to indices of polymerase chain reaction with analysis of the restrictional fragments length. The initial daily dose of menadione have constituted 20 mg. After a genotype determination made (first-second day after admittance to hospital) in patients with normoestrogenemia in genotypes CC/GG, CC/GA, CT/GG, CT/GA a vitaminotherapy was prolonged in daily dose of 20 mg, and in a conditionally-pathological variant of genotype the dose of vitamin K was enhanced up to 30 mg. Determination of hormones and the patients' genetic constitution makes possible to apply a personified approach for the vitamin K3 application in the ulcerative hemorrhage.

  14. Recovery from Choriocarcinoma Syndrome Associated with a Metastatic Extragonadal Germ Cell Tumor Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Komori, Koji; Takahari, Daisuke; Kimura, Kenya; Kinoshita, Takashi; Ito, Seiji; Abe, Tetsuya; Senda, Yoshiki; Misawa, Kazunari; Ito, Yuichi; Uemura, Norihisa; Natsume, Seiji; Kawakami, Jiro; Iwata, Yoshinori; Tsutsuyama, Masayuki; Shigeyoshi, Itaru; Akazawa, Tomoyuki; Hayashi, Daisuke; Ouchi, Akira; Shimizu, Yasuhiro

    2016-01-01

    A germ cell tumor is the most common form of malignancy in early male life, and can be classified as either seminomatous or nonseminomatous. Choriocarcinoma, comprised of nonseminomatous germ cells, is the most aggressive type of germ cell tumor and characteristically metastasizes to the retroperitoneal lymph nodes and less frequently to the lungs, liver, bone or brain [Shibuya et al., 2009;48: 551–554]. A 56-year-old man was admitted to another hospital complaining of abdominal distension. Symptoms included anorexia, vomiting, and diarrhea. The patient was diagnosed with an extragonadal germ cell tumor and referred to our hospital to receive chemotherapy. The day after admission, the patient's abdominal distension gradually worsened. An emergency operation revealed venous hemorrhage from the surface of a metastatic extragonadal germ cell tumor between the ligament of Treitz and the inferior mesenteric vein in a horizontal position. Hemostatic treatment was performed with 4-0 proline thread attached to a medicated cotton sponge, rather than using a simple proline thread, and the closure area was manually compressed. Chemotherapy was initiated on postoperative day 10. A metastatic extragonadal germ cell tumor that causes massive hemorrhage and gastrointestinal hemorrhage is very rare, and represents a life-threatening emergency. If the patient's condition carries a substantial risk of bleeding to death, it may be worthwhile to attempt abdominal operations. PMID:27403124

  15. Recovery from Choriocarcinoma Syndrome Associated with a Metastatic Extragonadal Germ Cell Tumor Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Komori, Koji; Takahari, Daisuke; Kimura, Kenya; Kinoshita, Takashi; Ito, Seiji; Abe, Tetsuya; Senda, Yoshiki; Misawa, Kazunari; Ito, Yuichi; Uemura, Norihisa; Natsume, Seiji; Kawakami, Jiro; Iwata, Yoshinori; Tsutsuyama, Masayuki; Shigeyoshi, Itaru; Akazawa, Tomoyuki; Hayashi, Daisuke; Ouchi, Akira; Shimizu, Yasuhiro

    2016-01-01

    A germ cell tumor is the most common form of malignancy in early male life, and can be classified as either seminomatous or nonseminomatous. Choriocarcinoma, comprised of nonseminomatous germ cells, is the most aggressive type of germ cell tumor and characteristically metastasizes to the retroperitoneal lymph nodes and less frequently to the lungs, liver, bone or brain [Shibuya et al., 2009;48: 551-554]. A 56-year-old man was admitted to another hospital complaining of abdominal distension. Symptoms included anorexia, vomiting, and diarrhea. The patient was diagnosed with an extragonadal germ cell tumor and referred to our hospital to receive chemotherapy. The day after admission, the patient's abdominal distension gradually worsened. An emergency operation revealed venous hemorrhage from the surface of a metastatic extragonadal germ cell tumor between the ligament of Treitz and the inferior mesenteric vein in a horizontal position. Hemostatic treatment was performed with 4-0 proline thread attached to a medicated cotton sponge, rather than using a simple proline thread, and the closure area was manually compressed. Chemotherapy was initiated on postoperative day 10. A metastatic extragonadal germ cell tumor that causes massive hemorrhage and gastrointestinal hemorrhage is very rare, and represents a life-threatening emergency. If the patient's condition carries a substantial risk of bleeding to death, it may be worthwhile to attempt abdominal operations. PMID:27403124

  16. Increase in colonic diverticular hemorrhage and confounding factors

    PubMed Central

    Kinjo, Ken; Matsui, Toshiyuki; Hisabe, Takashi; Ishihara, Hiroshi; Maki, Shinichiro; Chuman, Kenta; Koga, Akihiro; Ohtsu, Kensei; Takatsu, Noritaka; Hirai, Fumihito; Yao, Kenshi; Washio, Masakazu

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To classify changes over time in causes of lower gastrointestinal bleeding (LGIB) and to identify factors associated with changes in the incidence and characteristics of diverticular hemorrhage (DH). METHODS: A total of 1803 patients underwent colonoscopy for overt LGIB at our hospital from 1995 to 2013. Patients were divided into an early group (EG, 1995-2006, n = 828) and a late group (LG, 2007-2013, n = 975), and specific diseases were compared between groups. In addition, antithrombotic drug (ATD) use and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) use were compared between patients with and without DH. RESULTS: Older patients (≥ 70 years old) and those with colonic DH were more frequent in LG than in EG (P < 0.01). Patients using ATDs as well as NSAIDs, male sex, obesity (body mass index ≥ 25 kg/m2), smoking, alcohol drinking, and arteriosclerotic diseases were more frequent in patients with DH than in those without. CONCLUSION: Incidence of colonic DH seems to increase with aging of the population, and factors involved include use of ATDs and NSAIDs, male sex, obesity, smoking, alcohol drinking, and arteriosclerotic disease. These factors are of value in handling DH patients. PMID:27602246

  17. Retinoids, race and the pathogenesis of dengue hemorrhagic fever.

    PubMed

    Mawson, Anthony R

    2013-12-01

    Dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) is the most significant mosquito-borne viral disease worldwide in terms of illness, mortality and economic cost, but the pathogenesis of DHF is not well understood and there is no specific treatment or vaccine. Based on evidence of liver involvement, it is proposed that dengue virus and retinoids interact to cause cholestatic liver damage, resulting in the spillage of stored retinoids into the circulation and in an endogenous form of hypervitaminosisis A manifested by the signs and symptoms of the disease, including: fever, severe joint and bone pain, capillary leakage, thrombocytopenia, headache, and gastrointestinal symptoms. While retinoids in low concentration are essential for numerous biological functions, they are prooxidant, cytotoxic, mutagenic and teratogenic in higher concentration, especially when unbound to protein, and an endogenous form of vitamin A intoxication is recognized in cholestasis. The model tentatively explains the observations that 1) repeat infections are more severe than initial dengue virus infections; 2) the incidence of denue has increased dramatically worldwide in recent decades; 3) DHF is less prevalent in people of African ancestry than those of other racial backgrounds; and 4) infants are protected from dengue. The retinoid toxicity hypothesis of DHF predicts the co-existence of low serum concentrations of retinol coupled with high concentrations of retinoic acid and an increased percentage of retinyl esters to total vitamin A. Subject to such tests, it may be possible to treat DHF effectively using drugs that target the metabolism and expression of retinoids.

  18. Increase in colonic diverticular hemorrhage and confounding factors

    PubMed Central

    Kinjo, Ken; Matsui, Toshiyuki; Hisabe, Takashi; Ishihara, Hiroshi; Maki, Shinichiro; Chuman, Kenta; Koga, Akihiro; Ohtsu, Kensei; Takatsu, Noritaka; Hirai, Fumihito; Yao, Kenshi; Washio, Masakazu

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To classify changes over time in causes of lower gastrointestinal bleeding (LGIB) and to identify factors associated with changes in the incidence and characteristics of diverticular hemorrhage (DH). METHODS: A total of 1803 patients underwent colonoscopy for overt LGIB at our hospital from 1995 to 2013. Patients were divided into an early group (EG, 1995-2006, n = 828) and a late group (LG, 2007-2013, n = 975), and specific diseases were compared between groups. In addition, antithrombotic drug (ATD) use and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) use were compared between patients with and without DH. RESULTS: Older patients (≥ 70 years old) and those with colonic DH were more frequent in LG than in EG (P < 0.01). Patients using ATDs as well as NSAIDs, male sex, obesity (body mass index ≥ 25 kg/m2), smoking, alcohol drinking, and arteriosclerotic diseases were more frequent in patients with DH than in those without. CONCLUSION: Incidence of colonic DH seems to increase with aging of the population, and factors involved include use of ATDs and NSAIDs, male sex, obesity, smoking, alcohol drinking, and arteriosclerotic disease. These factors are of value in handling DH patients.

  19. Supernova hemorrhage: obliterative hemorrhage of brain arteriovenous malformations following γ knife radiosurgery.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Matthew D; Hetts, Steven W; Young, William L; Halbach, Van V; Dowd, Christopher F; Higashida, Randall T; English, Joey D

    2012-09-01

    Hemorrhage represents the most feared complication of cerebral arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) in both untreated patients and those treated with gamma knife radiosurgery. Radiosurgery does not immediately lead to obliteration of the malformation, which often does not occur until years following treatment. Post-obliteration hemorrhage is rare, occurring months to years after radiosurgery, and has been associated with residual or recurrent AVM despite prior apparent nidus elimination. Three cases are reported of delayed intracranial hemorrhage in patients with cerebral AVMs treated with radiosurgery in which no residual AVM was found on catheter angiography at the time of delayed post-treatment hemorrhage. That the pathophysiology of these hemorrhages involves progressive venous outflow occlusion is speculated and the possible mechanistic link to subsequent vascular rupture is discussed.

  20. A Case of Sudden Deafness with Intralabyrinthine Hemorrhage Intralabyrinthine Hemorrhage and Sudden Deafness.

    PubMed

    Park, Jeong Jin; Jeong, Se Won; Lee, Jae Wook; Han, Su-Jin

    2015-12-01

    Sudden hearing deterioration may occur in our population, but it is difficult to explain the exact pathophysiology and the cause. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL) is usually useful to evaluate neural lesions such as acoustic schwannoma and hemorrhage in labyrinth. Recently some cases of SSNHL caused by intralabyrintine hemorrhage were reported by the advance of MRI. In the case of intralabyrintine hemorrhage, MRI showed a hyperintense signal in the labyrinth on the pre-contrast and contrast enhanced T1-weighted image and relatively weak intensity on T2-weighted image. The prognosis SSNHL by intralabyrintine hemorrhage is generally known to be poor. We report a case of sudden deafness with intralabyrintine hemorrhage who has a history of anticoagulant administration, with a review of literature.

  1. Pulmonary hemorrhage syndrome associated with an autochthonous case of dengue hemorrhagic fever.

    PubMed

    Setlik, Robert F; Ouellette, Daniel; Morgan, Julia; McAllister, C Kenneth; Dorsey, David; Agan, Brian K; Horvath, Lynn; Zimmerman, Michelle K; Purcell, Bret

    2004-07-01

    Dengue fever is a major public health problem worldwide. Dengue hemorrhagic fever, a much rarer form of the disease, occurs when a person previously infected with dengue is re-infected with a different viral serotype. In recent years the infection rates of dengue and both clinical syndromes have increased along the United States-Mexico border. We present the case of a 61-year-old Laotian female who presented with a 1-week history of fever, altered mental status, oral ulceration, and rash. The patient developed diffuse pulmonary hemorrhage and anemia requiring multiple transfusions. She eventually sustained multi-organ system failure and expired. Both the titer data and serologies were consistent with the diagnosis of dengue hemorrhagic fever. We hypothesize that this syndrome was the result of re-infection occurring within the United States. This case is also unusual in that it is the second reported in the literature of pulmonary hemorrhages associated with dengue hemorrhagic fever.

  2. Gastrointestinal epithelial neoplasia: Vienna revisited.

    PubMed

    Dixon, M F

    2002-07-01

    International consensus meetings in Padova and Vienna have attempted to rationalise the grading and classification of gastrointestinal epithelial neoplasia (GEN). With its minor adjustments, the Vienna classification of GEN seeks to be more closely in tune with patient management and it is hoped that it is not seen as fiddling around with terms but as a genuine contribution to patient care.

  3. [Motility and functional gastrointestinal disorders].

    PubMed

    Mearin, Fermín; Rey, Enrique; Balboa, Agustín

    2014-09-01

    This article discusses the studies on functional and motor gastrointestinal disorders presented at the 2014 Digestive Diseases Week conference that are of greatest interest to us. New data have been provided on the clinical importance of functional gastrointestinal disorders, with recent prevalence data for irritable bowel syndrome and fecal incontinence. We know more about the pathophysiological mechanisms of the various functional disorders, especially irritable bowel syndrome, which has had the largest number of studies. Thus, we have gained new data on microinflammation, genetics, microbiota, psychological aspects, etc. Symptoms such as abdominal distension have gained interest in the scientific community, both in terms of patients with irritable bowel syndrome and those with constipation. From the diagnostic point of view, the search continues for a biomarker for functional gastrointestinal disorders, especially for irritable bowel syndrome. In the therapeutic area, the importance of diet for these patients (FODMAP, fructans, etc.) is once again confirmed, and data is provided that backs the efficacy of already marketed drugs such as linaclotide, which rule out the use of other drugs such as mesalazine for patients with irritable bowel syndrome. This year, new forms of drug administration have been presented, including metoclopramide nasal sprays and granisetron transdermal patches for patients with gastroparesis. Lastly, a curiosity that caught our attention was the use of a vibrating capsule to stimulate gastrointestinal transit in patients with constipation.

  4. Gastrointestinal disease and its management.

    PubMed

    Jergens, A E

    1997-11-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) diseases involving the alimentary tract and hepatobiliary system are common in geriatric dogs and cats. Inflammatory disorders predominate, but motility disturbances and degenerative lesions may also cause GI signs in affected animals. Treatment is directed at correction of the underlying cause and often requires tissue biopsy. The prognosis is good in many diseases with appropriate drug nutritional, and/or surgical therapy.

  5. Intraparenchymal hemorrhage after heroin use.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Neha; Bhalla, Mary Colleen; Frey, Jennifer A; Southern, Alison

    2015-08-01

    Heroin-associated stroke is a rare complication of use. Various proposed mechanisms of heroin-associated ischemic stroke have been proposed, including the following: cardioembolism in the setting of infective endocarditis, hypoxic ischemic brain injury in the setting of hypoxemia and hypotension, and infective arteritis or vasculitis from drug adulterants. A previously healthy 28-year-old woman presented to the emergency department with altered mental status and normal vitals after she was found wandering outside her apartment. During ambulance transport, she endorsed heroin use. The patient was alert but could not recall her name, place, or time. She intermittently responded "I don't know" to questioning and could not perform simple commands. No motor or sensory deficits were apparent other than sluggish pinpoint pupils. There were no signs of trauma other than antecubital track marks. Her laboratory results were unremarkable. Reevaluation at 2 hours after presentation showed persistent confusion and disorientation. A computed tomographic scan of the head was obtained, which showed a large 5.1 × 5-cm intraparenchymal hemorrhage in the left frontal lobe, vasogenic edema, and a 5-mm midline shift. A workup for cardioembolic, vasculitis, and other etiologies for stroke did not reveal an underlying cause. The patient remained confused with significant memory loss throughout her hospital stay and was eventually discharged to a long-term care facility. Drug abuse should be considered a risk factor for stoke in young adults. In patients with persistent neurologic deficits, physicians must be vigilant and order appropriate workup while managing drug overdose.

  6. Hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lee, H W; van der Groen, G

    1989-01-01

    Hantaviruses, the causative agents of HFRS, have become more widely recognized. Epidemiologic evidence indicates that these pathogens are distributed worldwide. People who come into close contact with infected rodents in urban, rural and laboratory environments are at particular risk. Transmission to man occurs mainly via the respiratory tract. The epidemiology of the hantaviruses is intimately linked to the ecology of their principal vertebrate hosts. Four distinct viruses are now recognized within the hantavirus genus and that number is likely to increase to six very soon; however, further investigations are necessary. Much more work is still needed before we fully understand the wide spectrum of clinical signs and symptoms of HFRS as well as the pathogenicity of the different viruses in the hantavirus genus of the Bunyaviridae family. HFRS is difficult to diagnose on clinical grounds alone and serological evidence is often needed. A fourfold rise in IgG antibody titer in a 1-week interval, and the presence of the IgM type of antibodies against hantaviruses are good evidence for an acute hantavirus infection. Physicians should be alert for HFRS each time they deal with patients with acute febrile flu-like illness, renal failure of unknown origin and sometimes hepatic dysfunction. Especially the mild form of HFRS is difficult to diagnose. Acute onset, headache, fever, increased serum creatinine, proteinuria and polyuria are signs and symptoms compatible with a mild form of HFRS. Differential diagnosis should be considered for the following diseases in the endemic areas of HFRS: acute renal failure, hemorrhagic scarlet fever, acute abdomen, leptospirosis, scrub typhus, murine typhus, spotted fevers, non-A, non-B hepatitis, Colorado tick fever, septicemia, dengue, heartstroke and DIC. Treatment of HFRS is mainly supportive. Recently, however, treatment of HFRS patients with ribavirin in China and Korea, within 7 days after onset of fever, resulted in a reduced

  7. Topical application of ankaferd hemostat in a patient with gastroduodenal amyloidosis complicated with gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Beyazit, Yavuz; Onder, Fatih Oguz; Torun, Serkan; Tas, Adnan; Purnak, Tugrul; Tenlik, Ilyas; Turhan, Nesrin

    2013-10-01

    Amyloidosis rarely manifests itself as gastrointestinal hemorrhage, especially in the absence of systemic involvement. Despite urgent endoscopic and/or pharmacological therapy, bleeding due to gastric amyloidosis usually recurs after a short period and has considerable morbidity and mortality rates, even in patients undergoing gastrointestinal surgery. For this reason, there is a need for a therapeutic armamentarium for such cases that is effective, easily applicable and has minimal side effects. In this respect, ankaferd blood stopper (ABS) offers a well tolerated and effective alternative approach for these patients. Herein we would like to report a 77-year-old man who had massive bleeding from a gastric ulcer complicating primary gastroduodenal amyloidosis, in whom topical ABS was successfully applied. PMID:23751610

  8. Overview of ultrasound-induced lung hemorrhage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, William D.; Simpson, Douglas G.; Frizzell, Leon A.; Oelze, Michael L.; Zachary, James F.

    2003-10-01

    It is well documented that ultrasound-induced lung hemorrhage can occur in mice, rats, rabbits, pigs, and monkeys. Our own experimental studies have focused on mice, rats, and pigs as animal models. The characteristics of the lesions produced in mice, rats and pigs were similar to those described in studies by our research group and others, suggesting a common pathogenesis for the initiation and propagation of the lesions at the macroscopic and microscopic levels. Five experimental in vivo studies have been conducted to evaluate whether cavitation is responsible for ultrasound-induced lung hemorrhage. The studies evaluated the dependencies of hydrostatic pressure, frequency, pulse polarity, contrast agents and lung inflation, and the results of each study appeared inconsistent with the hypothesis that the mechanism for the production of a lung hemorrhage was inertial cavitation. Other dependencies evaluated included beam width, pulse repetition frequency, pulse duration, exposure duration, and animal species and age. The thresholds for producing ultrasound-induced lung hemorrhage, in general, were less than the FDA's regulatory limit of a Mechanical Index (MI) of 1.9. Further, the MI does not appear to provide a risk-based index for lung hemorrhage. [Work supported by NIH Grant No. R01EB02641.

  9. Intravesical silver nitrate for refractory hemorrhagic cystitis

    PubMed Central

    Montgomery, Brian D.; Boorjian, Stephen A.; Ziegelmann, Matthew J.; Joyce, Daniel D.; Linder, Brian J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Hemorrhagic cystitis is a challenging clinical entity with limited evidence available to guide treatment. The use of intravesical silver nitrate has been reported, though supporting literature is sparse. Here, we sought to assess outcomes of patients treated with intravesical silver nitrate for refractory hemorrhagic cystitis. Material and methods We identified nine patients with refractory hemorrhagic cystitis treated at our institution with intravesical silver nitrate between 2000–2015. All patients had failed previous continuous bladder irrigation with normal saline and clot evacuation. Treatment success was defined as requiring no additional therapy beyond normal saline irrigation after silver nitrate instillation prior to hospital discharge. Results Median patient age was 80 years (IQR 73, 82). Radiation was the most common etiology for hemorrhagic cystitis 89% (8/9). Two patients underwent high dose (0.1%–0.4%) silver nitrate under anesthesia, while the remaining seven were treated with doses from 0.01% to 0.1% via continuous bladder irrigation for a median of 3 days (range 2–4). All nine patients (100%) had persistent hematuria despite intravesical silver nitrate therapy, requiring additional interventions and red blood cell transfusion during the hospitalization. There were no identified complications related to intravesical silver nitrate instillation. Conclusion Although well tolerated, we found that intravesical silver nitrate was ineffective for bleeding control, suggesting a limited role for this agent in the management of patients with hemorrhagic cystitis.

  10. Intravesical silver nitrate for refractory hemorrhagic cystitis

    PubMed Central

    Montgomery, Brian D.; Boorjian, Stephen A.; Ziegelmann, Matthew J.; Joyce, Daniel D.; Linder, Brian J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Hemorrhagic cystitis is a challenging clinical entity with limited evidence available to guide treatment. The use of intravesical silver nitrate has been reported, though supporting literature is sparse. Here, we sought to assess outcomes of patients treated with intravesical silver nitrate for refractory hemorrhagic cystitis. Material and methods We identified nine patients with refractory hemorrhagic cystitis treated at our institution with intravesical silver nitrate between 2000–2015. All patients had failed previous continuous bladder irrigation with normal saline and clot evacuation. Treatment success was defined as requiring no additional therapy beyond normal saline irrigation after silver nitrate instillation prior to hospital discharge. Results Median patient age was 80 years (IQR 73, 82). Radiation was the most common etiology for hemorrhagic cystitis 89% (8/9). Two patients underwent high dose (0.1%–0.4%) silver nitrate under anesthesia, while the remaining seven were treated with doses from 0.01% to 0.1% via continuous bladder irrigation for a median of 3 days (range 2–4). All nine patients (100%) had persistent hematuria despite intravesical silver nitrate therapy, requiring additional interventions and red blood cell transfusion during the hospitalization. There were no identified complications related to intravesical silver nitrate instillation. Conclusion Although well tolerated, we found that intravesical silver nitrate was ineffective for bleeding control, suggesting a limited role for this agent in the management of patients with hemorrhagic cystitis. PMID:27635296

  11. Global aphasia due to left thalamic hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Ozeren, Ali; Koc, Filiz; Demirkiran, Meltem; Sönmezler, Abdurrahman; Kibar, Mustafa

    2006-12-01

    Global aphasia is an acquired language disorder characterized by severe impairments in all modalities of language. The specific sites of injury commonly include Wernike's and Broca's areas and result from large strokes--particularly those involving the internal carotid or middle cerebral arteries. Rarely, deep subcortical lesions may cause global aphasia. We present three cases with global aphasia due to a more rare cause: left thalamic hemorrhage. Their common feature was the large size of the hemorrhage and its extension to the third ventricule. HMPAO-SPECT in one of the cases revealed ipsilateral subcortical, frontotemporal cortical and right frontal cortical hypoperfusion. Left thalamic hemorrhage should be considered in the differential diagnosis of global aphasia. PMID:17114855

  12. Traumatic intraventricular hemorrhage with a good prognosis.

    PubMed

    Is, Merih; Gezen, Ferruh; Akgul, Mehmet; Dosoglu, Murat

    2011-01-01

    We report a 10-year-old girl with an isolated traumatic intraventricular hemorrhage following a traffic accident, who had a good prognosis. Her neurological examination upon arrival was normal and she had no complaint other than headache and vomiting. Computed tomography on admission showed a hemorrhage in the lateral and fourth ventricles. She had a Glasgow Coma Score of 15, and she was thus given only antiepileptic drugs for prophylaxis and followed. Computed tomography that was repeated 5 days after admission showed no blood and all ventricles were of normal size. There was no vascular pathology on magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance angiography. The patient remains well 5 months after her accident. Intraventricular hemorrhage does not always have a poor prognosis.

  13. Renin responses to hemorrhage in conscious rats

    SciTech Connect

    Roarty, T.P.; Chadwick. K.J.; Raff, H.

    1986-03-01

    The authors investigated the role of beta adrenergic inhibition on the renin response to graded hemorrhage (hem) in conscious rats. Chronic femoral arterial (for measurement of mean arterial pressure - MAP) and venous (for drug infusion) catheters were implanted at least 5 days before experimentation. Hem was administered in < 2 min. 10 rats (CTL) were exposed to a total of 21 episodes of hemorrhage. 13 rats (B-block) were given 1 mg/kg propranolol hydrochloride iv 20 min prior to hem (24 episodes total). Plasma renin activity (PRA) was measured by radioimmunoassay. Pre-hem PRA levels were measured in the first 1 ml of hem blood. Hem resulted in hem volume-dependent decreases in blood pressure and increase-response to hemorrhage.

  14. Renin responses to hemorrhage to conscious rats

    SciTech Connect

    Roarty, T.P.; Chadwick, K.J.; Raff, H.

    1986-03-01

    The authors investigated the role of beta adrenergic inhibition on the renin response to graded hemorrhage (hem) in conscious rats. Chronic femoral arterial (for measurement of mean arterial pressure - MAP) and venous (for drug infusion) catheters were implanted at least 5 days before experimentation. Hem was administered in < 2 min. 10 rats (CTL) were exposed to a total of 21 episodes of hemorrhage. 13 rats (B-block) were given 1 mg/kg propranolol hydrochloride iv 20 min prior to hem (24 episodes total). Plasma renin activity (PRA) was measured by radioimmunoassay. Pre-hem PRA levels were measured in the first 1 ml of hem blood. Hem resulted in hem volume-dependent decreases in blood pressure and increases in PRA. B-block did not significantly alter the mean renin response to hemorrhage.

  15. Primary Medullary Hemorrhage Associated with Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Hyung-Min; Park, Jong-Moo; Lee, Jee-Young

    2005-01-01

    Spontaneous primary medullary hemorrhage is a rare event. A 64-year-old man was admitted for sudden-onset vertigo and vomiting. His clinical features were similar to those of lateral medullary syndrome. The patient had no anticoagulant therapy, vascular malformation, or a caudal extension of a pontine hemorrhage. The patient had multiple hypertensive changes, including retinopathy, left ventricular hypertrophy on electrocardiography, multiple cerebral microbleeds, and small-vessel changes on MRI. T2*-weighted gradient echo MRI performed 3 months prior to admission and contrast-enhanced MRI showed no evidence of vascular malformation. We concluded that the patient had uncontrolled hypertension that may have lead to primary medullary hemorrhage. PMID:20396466

  16. Effect of cimetidine on marathon-associated gastrointestinal symptoms and bleeding.

    PubMed

    Moses, F M; Baska, R S; Peura, D A; Deuster, P A

    1991-10-01

    Occult gastrointestinal bleeding occurs in 8-30% of marathon runners. We hypothesized that cimetidine would decrease bleeding by reducing acid-mediated injury and conducted a blinded, placebo-controlled prospective trial to determine the impact of cimetidine on gastrointestinal symptoms and bleeding during a marathon. Thirty participants in the 1989 Marine Corps or New York City marathons completed pre- and postrace: (1) a questionnaire evaluating demographic, medication usage, training history, and gastrointestinal symptoms; (2) three consecutive stool Hemoccult (HO) cards; and (3) a stool Hemoquant (HQ). Fourteen runners (CR) took 800 mg of cimetidine by mouth 2 hr before the start and 16 runners (PR) took placebo. Three subjects were HO+ prerace and were not analyzed. Three subjects failed to take drug as directed and were analyzed as PR. Five of 14 PR and two of 13 CR were HO+ postrace (P greater than 0.05). Prerace HQ values (PR: 1.49 +/- 0.6 and CR: 0.60 +/- 0.1 mg hemoglobin/g stool) were not significantly different from postrace HQ values (PR: 0.73 +/- 0.2 and CR: 0.86 +/- 0.2 mg Hgb/g stool). Despite postrace HO+ conversion, no individual postrace HQ became abnormal. The frequency of gastrointestinal symptoms was similar for CR and PR, as well as HO- and HO+ individuals. Cimetidine did not significantly affect occult gastrointestinal bleeding as measured by HO or HQ results. This suggests that marathon-associated gastrointestinal symptoms and bleeding may be due to lesions other than acid-mediated disease or hemorrhagic gastritis.

  17. Recovery from Intracranial Hemorrhage Due to Leptospirosis

    PubMed Central

    Babamahmoodi, Farhang; Babamhmoodi, Abdolreza

    2011-01-01

    Intracranial hemorrhage is a rare and fatal presentation of leptospirosis. In this paper we present the case of a 51-year-old male farmer who lives in northern Iran. He came to our hospital with a severe headache. A paraclinical evaluation showed clear signs of thrombocytopenia, and a brain MRI revealed left temporoparietal hemorrhage. Our preliminary diagnosis was Leptospirosis, and after 26 days of hospital care the patient was discharged in good condition. This paper will educationally help physicians in better diagnosis and treatment of leptospirosis. PMID:22013452

  18. Quality control in gastrointestinal surgery.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Barba, Ector Jaime; Arenas-Moya, Diego; Vázquez-Guerrero, Arturo

    2011-01-01

    We analyzed the Mexican legal framework, identifying the vectors that characterize quality and control in gastrointestinal surgery. Quality is contemplated in the health protection rights determined according to the Mexican Constitution, established in the general health law and included as a specific goal in the actual National Development Plan and Health Sector Plan. Quality control implies planning, verification and application of corrective measures. Mexico has implemented several quality strategies such as certification of hospitals and regulatory agreements by the General Salubrity Council, creation of the National Health Quality Committee, generation of Clinical Practice Guidelines and the Certification of Medical Specialties, among others. Quality control in gastrointestinal surgery must begin at the time of medical education and continue during professional activities of surgeons, encouraging multidisciplinary teamwork, knowledge, abilities, attitudes, values and skills that promote homogeneous, safe and quality health services for the Mexican population. PMID:22169378

  19. Advances in upper gastrointestinal endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Graham, David G.; Banks, Matthew R.

    2015-01-01

    The rapidly moving technological advances in gastrointestinal endoscopy have enhanced an endoscopist’s ability to diagnose and treat lesions within the gastrointestinal tract. The improvement in image quality created by the advent of high-definition and magnification endoscopy, alongside image enhancement, produces images of superb quality and detail that empower the endoscopist to identify important lesions that have previously been undetectable. Additionally, we are now seeing technologies emerge, such as optical coherence tomography and confocal laser endomicroscopy, that allow the endoscopist to visualize individual cells on a microscopic level and provide a real time, in vivo histological assessment. Within this article we discuss these technologies, as well as some of the results from their early use in clinical studies. PMID:26918137

  20. Paraneoplastic thrombocytosis in gastrointestinal cancer.

    PubMed

    Baranyai, Zsolt; Jósa, Valéria; Tóth, Ambrus; Szilasi, Zsuzsanna; Tihanyi, Balazs; Zaránd, Attila; Harsanyi, Laszlo; Szállási, Zoltán

    2016-06-01

    It has been demonstrated recently in several solid tumors that thrombocytosis at diagnosis may correlate with tumor invasion, metastatic progression and worse outcome. Several details of the pathomechanism of the relationship of thrombocytosis and cancer have been elucidated; however, the complete process is not clearly understood. Several hypotheses have been proposed. Recently, it was suggested that in ovarian cancer elevated IL-6 production by the tumor may induce increased megakaryopoiesis via hepatic thrombopoietin production leading to thrombocytosis. The importance of the prognostic power of elevated platelet count is still debated in gastrointestinal cancer. The aims of this review were to evaluate the prognostic significance of thrombocytosis in gastrointestinal tumors, to see whether clinical practice confirmed the hypotheses and to reveal the causes of the inconsistent findings. PMID:27136385

  1. Gastrointestinal manifestations of food allergies.

    PubMed

    Wolfe, Jaime Liou; Aceves, Seema S

    2011-04-01

    The rates of eosinophilic gastrointestinal disorders appear to be increasing. The most common of these is eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) which is a clinicopathologic condition consisting of characteristic symptoms and endoscopic features accompanied by a pan-esophageal, acid resistant epithelial eosinophilia of greater than equal to 15 per high power field. Typical symptoms include dysphagia and abdominal pain. Typical endoscopic features include pallor, plaques, furrows, concentric rings. Complications include food impactions and strictures. EoE resolution with food elimination diets provides evidence that EoE is a food-antigen driven process. In vitro and microarray studies have identified specific immunologic factors underlying EoE pathogenesis. Other gastrointestinal manifestations of food intolerances/allergy include food protein induced enterocolitis syndrome.

  2. Gastrointestinal malignancy and the microbiome.

    PubMed

    Abreu, Maria T; Peek, Richard M

    2014-05-01

    Microbial species participate in the genesis of a substantial number of malignancies-in conservative estimates, at least 15% of all cancer cases are attributable to infectious agents. Little is known about the contribution of the gastrointestinal microbiome to the development of malignancies. Resident microbes can promote carcinogenesis by inducing inflammation, increasing cell proliferation, altering stem cell dynamics, and producing metabolites such as butyrate, which affect DNA integrity and immune regulation. Studies in human beings and rodent models of cancer have identified effector species and relationships among members of the microbial community in the stomach and colon that increase the risk for malignancy. Strategies to manipulate the microbiome, or the immune response to such bacteria, could be developed to prevent or treat certain gastrointestinal cancers. PMID:24406471

  3. Paraneoplastic thrombocytosis in gastrointestinal cancer.

    PubMed

    Baranyai, Zsolt; Jósa, Valéria; Tóth, Ambrus; Szilasi, Zsuzsanna; Tihanyi, Balazs; Zaránd, Attila; Harsanyi, Laszlo; Szállási, Zoltán

    2016-06-01

    It has been demonstrated recently in several solid tumors that thrombocytosis at diagnosis may correlate with tumor invasion, metastatic progression and worse outcome. Several details of the pathomechanism of the relationship of thrombocytosis and cancer have been elucidated; however, the complete process is not clearly understood. Several hypotheses have been proposed. Recently, it was suggested that in ovarian cancer elevated IL-6 production by the tumor may induce increased megakaryopoiesis via hepatic thrombopoietin production leading to thrombocytosis. The importance of the prognostic power of elevated platelet count is still debated in gastrointestinal cancer. The aims of this review were to evaluate the prognostic significance of thrombocytosis in gastrointestinal tumors, to see whether clinical practice confirmed the hypotheses and to reveal the causes of the inconsistent findings.

  4. Lanthanum-Induced Gastrointestinal Histiocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Araya, Hiwot; Longacre, Teri A.; Pasricha, Pankaj J.

    2015-01-01

    A patient with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) on hemodialysis presented with fever, anorexia, and nausea shortly after starting oral lanthanum carbonate for phosphate control. Gastric and duodenal biopsies demonstrated diffuse histiocytosis with intracellular aggregates of basophilic foreign material. Transmission electron microscopy, an underutilized diagnostic test, revealed the nature of the aggregates as heavy metal particles, consistent with lanthanum. Symptoms and histiocytosis improved after discontinuation of lanthanum. Lanthanum may be an underdiagnosed cause of gastrointestinal histiocytosis. PMID:26157959

  5. Gastrointestinal endoscopy: infection and disinfection.

    PubMed Central

    O'Connor, H J; Axon, A T

    1983-01-01

    The past decade has seen the development of an array of complex flexible fibreoptic instruments for gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy, and an increasing use of these for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. It has been recognised more recently that the use of contaminated endoscopic equipment can lead to serious and occasionally fatal infections. Infection with a wide variety of micro-organisms has been reported following oesophago-gastroduodenoscopy (OGD) and endoscopic retrograde cholangio-pancreatography (ERCP). PMID:6414894

  6. Diet and upper gastrointestinal malignancies.

    PubMed

    Abnet, Christian C; Corley, Douglas A; Freedman, Neal D; Kamangar, Farin

    2015-05-01

    Diet is believed to modulate cancer risk and this relationship has been widely studied in the gastrointestinal tract. Observational epidemiologic studies have provided most of the evidence about the effects of diet on cancer risk because clinical trials to determine nutritional exposures are often impossible, impractical, or unaffordable. Although a few foods or nutrients are thought to protect against specific types of cancer, it seems clear that the strength and even direction of dietary associations (increasing or decreasing risk) is organ-site- and even histology-specific, along the gastrointestinal tract. Although some hypotheses are supported by a substantial body of observational data (drinking hot maté [an infusion of the herb Ilex Paraguarensis] contributes to esophageal cancer), there are not much data to support others. We discuss some highly touted hypotheses and draw interim conclusions about what is known and what could be done to improve the level of evidence. The complex nature of diet and its associations can be productively investigated with disease-specific studies. However, public health recommendations for normal-risk individuals regarding diet and gastrointestinal cancer should probably emphasize the importance of eating for overall health rather than eating specific foods to reduce risk for specific cancers. PMID:25680671

  7. Classification of eosinophilic gastrointestinal diseases.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Susanna

    2008-01-01

    Diagnosis of eosinophilic gastrointestinal diseases is based on morphological evaluation with regard to localization and density of eosinophil infiltration of the mucosa and/or deeper parts of the oesophagus, stomach, and bowel in biopsy or resection specimens. As with eosinophils in any tissue, in the majority of diseases they are probably a sequel of acute inflammation and do not indicate any specific disease. Eosinophil morphology includes intact cells with bilobated nuclei and eosinophil granules in the cytoplasm and extracellular tissue following activation/degranulation. There is no fixed number of eosinophils that can be used as a cut-off criterion to define disease. Associated histopathological features observed in eosinophilic gastrointestinal disease depend on the site of manifestation and primary disease. Eosinophils are typically increased in allergy-associated colitis in adults and allergic proctocolitis in infants, eosinophilic gastroenteritis and eosinophilic oesophagitis. Their presence can also suggest a drug-induced eosinophilia or the presence of a parasitic infection. In general, eosinophils are increased in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). They are seen in reflux oesophagitis, coeliac disease, and microscopic and infectious colitis. Eosinophils may be a feature of polyarteriitis nodosa and Churg-Strauss syndrome, and can accompany connective-tissue disease as well as malignant lymphomas and adenocarcinomas of gastrointestinal mucosa. PMID:18492564

  8. Diet and Upper Gastrointestinal Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Abnet, Christian C.; Corley, Douglas A.; Freedman, Neal D.; Kamangar, Farin

    2015-01-01

    Diet is believed to modulate cancer risk and this relationship has been widely studied in the gastrointestinal tract. Observational epidemiologic studies have provided most of the evidence for the effects of diet on cancer risk, because clinical trials to determine nutritional exposures are often impossible, impractical, or unaffordable. Although a few foods or nutrients are thought to protect against specific types of cancer, it seems clear that the strength and even direction of dietary associations (increasing or decreasing risk) is organ site- and even histology-specific, along the gastrointestinal tract. Although some hypotheses are supported by a substantial body of observational data (drinking hot maté contributes to esophageal cancer), there is not much data to support others. We discuss some highly touted hypotheses and draw interim conclusions about what is known, and what could be done to improve the level of evidence. The complex nature of diet and its associations can be productively investigated with disease-specific studies. However, public health recommendations for normal-risk individuals regarding diet and gastrointestinal cancer should probably emphasize the importance of eating for overall health, rather than eating specific foods to reduce risk for specific cancers. PMID:25680671

  9. Surgery for Patients With Spontaneous Deep Supratentorial Intracerebral Hemorrhage: A Retrospective Case-Control Study Using Propensity Score Matching.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jun; Li, Hao; Zhao, He-Xiang; Guo, Rui; Lin, Sen; Dong, Wei; Ma, Lu; Fang, Yuan; Tian, Meng; Liu, Ming; You, Chao

    2016-03-01

    Spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (sICH) is one of the most dangerous cerebrovascular diseases, especially when in deep brain. The treatment of spontaneous deep supratentorial intracerebral hemorrhage is still controversial. We conducted a retrospective case-control study using propensity score matching to compare the efficacy of surgery and conservative treatment for patients with deep surpatentorial hemorrhage. We observed the outcomes of consecutive patients with spontaneous deep supratentorial hemorrhage retrospectively from December 2008 to July 2013. Clinical outcomes of surgery and conservative treatments were compared in patients with deep sICH using propensity score matching method. The primary outcome was neurological function status at 6 months post ictus. The second outcomes included mortality at 30 days and 6 months, and the incidence of complications. Subgroup analyses of 6-month outcome were conducted. Sixty-three (22.66%) of the 278 patients who received surgery had a favorable neurological function status at 6 months, whereas in the conservative group, 66 of 278 (23.74%) had the same result (P = 0.763). The 30-day mortality in the surgical group was 19.06%, whereas 30.58% in the conservative group (P = 0.002). There was significant difference in the mortality at 6 months after ictus as well (23.38% vs 36.33%, P = 0.001). The subgroup analyses showed significantly better outcomes for the surgical group when hematoma was >40 mL (13.33% vs 0%, P = 0.005) or complicated with intraventricular hemorrhage (16.67% vs 7.27%, P = 0.034). For complications, the risk of pulmonary infection, gastrointestinal hemorrhage, urinary infection, pulmonary embolus, and need for tracheostomy/long term ventilation in the surgical group was higher than the conservative group (31.29% vs 15.47%, P < 0.001; 6.83% vs 3.96%, P = 0.133; 2.88% vs 1.80%, P = 0.400; 1.80% vs 1.08%, P = 0.476; 32.73% vs 23.38%, P = 0.014). Surgery could

  10. Surgery for Patients With Spontaneous Deep Supratentorial Intracerebral Hemorrhage: A Retrospective Case-Control Study Using Propensity Score Matching.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jun; Li, Hao; Zhao, He-Xiang; Guo, Rui; Lin, Sen; Dong, Wei; Ma, Lu; Fang, Yuan; Tian, Meng; Liu, Ming; You, Chao

    2016-03-01

    Spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (sICH) is one of the most dangerous cerebrovascular diseases, especially when in deep brain. The treatment of spontaneous deep supratentorial intracerebral hemorrhage is still controversial. We conducted a retrospective case-control study using propensity score matching to compare the efficacy of surgery and conservative treatment for patients with deep surpatentorial hemorrhage. We observed the outcomes of consecutive patients with spontaneous deep supratentorial hemorrhage retrospectively from December 2008 to July 2013. Clinical outcomes of surgery and conservative treatments were compared in patients with deep sICH using propensity score matching method. The primary outcome was neurological function status at 6 months post ictus. The second outcomes included mortality at 30 days and 6 months, and the incidence of complications. Subgroup analyses of 6-month outcome were conducted. Sixty-three (22.66%) of the 278 patients who received surgery had a favorable neurological function status at 6 months, whereas in the conservative group, 66 of 278 (23.74%) had the same result (P = 0.763). The 30-day mortality in the surgical group was 19.06%, whereas 30.58% in the conservative group (P = 0.002). There was significant difference in the mortality at 6 months after ictus as well (23.38% vs 36.33%, P = 0.001). The subgroup analyses showed significantly better outcomes for the surgical group when hematoma was >40 mL (13.33% vs 0%, P = 0.005) or complicated with intraventricular hemorrhage (16.67% vs 7.27%, P = 0.034). For complications, the risk of pulmonary infection, gastrointestinal hemorrhage, urinary infection, pulmonary embolus, and need for tracheostomy/long term ventilation in the surgical group was higher than the conservative group (31.29% vs 15.47%, P < 0.001; 6.83% vs 3.96%, P = 0.133; 2.88% vs 1.80%, P = 0.400; 1.80% vs 1.08%, P = 0.476; 32.73% vs 23.38%, P = 0.014). Surgery could

  11. Epizootic hemorrhagic disease in Alberta, Canada.

    PubMed

    Pybus, Margo J; Ravi, Madhu; Pollock, Colleen

    2014-07-01

    Epizootic hemorrhagic disease (EHD) virus serotype 2 was identified by reverse-transcription (RT)-PCR in a white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) found dead in southern Alberta in September 2013. Field observations indicate at least 50 deer, primarily white-tailed deer, and three pronghorn antelope (Antilocapra americana) died during a suspected localized EHD outbreak. PMID:24807363

  12. Severe perinephric hemorrhage after shockwave lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Antoniou, N K; Karanastasis, D; Stenos, J L

    1995-06-01

    We report a case of a 69-year-old man who, after a second session of shockwave lithotripsy for multiple stones in the right kidney, showed symptoms of severe hemorrhage and flank pain unresponsive to analgesics, with the gradual development of extensive and serious perinephric hematoma. The bleeding necessitated nephrectomy. Unrecognized chronic pyelonephritis may have been a predisposing factor.

  13. Uterine artery embolization for primary postpartum hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae-Hee; Lee, Hae-Hyeog; Kim, Jun-Mo; Ryu, Ae-Li; Chung, Soo-Ho; Seok Lee, Woo

    2013-01-01

    Background: Postpartum hemorrhage is the leading cause of severe maternal morbidity and death. A prompt management of uterine artery embolization (UAE) is important for a good outcome. UAE is generally accepted to be a safe and reliable procedure. Objective: To estimate critical patient characteristics influencing the success of UAE for the treatment of emergent primary postpartum hemorrhage. Materials and Methods: This was a cross sectional study that reviewed 121 patients who were diagnosed primary postpartum hemorrhage between February 2002 and December 2009 at a tertiary treatment center among 4,022 deliveries. We evaluated patient clinical characteristics associated with a successful surgical outcome of UAE. Results: The success rate for UAE was 96%. For two cases, UAE complication was associated with fever (>38.5oC). Five patients had problems that required admission to the intensive care unit (ICU). Conclusion: To increase the surgical success rate and lower the number of ICU admissions, the decision to treat primary postpartum hemorrhage using UAE should be based on individual patient clinical findings under the direction of obstetrics staff and an interventional radiologist. PMID:24639786

  14. How I treat patients with massive hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Pär I; Stensballe, Jakob; Oliveri, Roberto; Wade, Charles E; Ostrowski, Sisse R; Holcomb, John B

    2014-11-13

    Massive hemorrhage is associated with coagulopathy and high mortality. The transfusion guidelines up to 2006 recommended that resuscitation of massive hemorrhage should occur in successive steps using crystalloids, colloids, and red blood cells (RBCs) in the early phase and plasma and platelets in the late phase. With the introduction of the cell-based model of hemostasis in the mid-1990s, our understanding of the hemostatic process and of coagulopathy has improved. This has contributed to a change in resuscitation strategy and transfusion therapy of massive hemorrhage along with an acceptance of the adequacy of whole blood hemostatic tests to monitor these patients. Thus, in 2005, a strategy aiming at avoiding coagulopathy by proactive resuscitation with blood products in a balanced ratio of RBC:plasma:platelets was introduced, and this has been reported to be associated with reduced mortality in observational studies. Concurrently, whole blood viscoelastic hemostatic assays have gained acceptance by allowing a rapid and timely identification of coagulopathy along with enabling an individualized, goal-directed transfusion therapy. These strategies joined together seem beneficial for patient outcome, although final evidence on outcome from randomized controlled trials are lacking. We present how we in Copenhagen and Houston, today, manage patients with massive hemorrhage.

  15. Hemorrhagic Retinopathy Following Spondylosis Surgery and Seizure

    PubMed Central

    Valeshabad, Ali Kord; Francis, Andrew W.; Setlur, Vikram; Chang, Peter; Mieler, William F.; Shahidi, Mahnaz

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To report bilateral hemorrhagic retinopathy in an adult female following lumbar spinal surgery and seizure. Case Report A 38 year old female presented with bilateral blurry vision and spots in the visual field. The patient had lumbar spondylosis surgery which was complicated by a dural tear with persistent cerebrospinal fluid leak. Visual symptoms started immediately following witnessed seizure-like activity. At presentation, visual acuity was 20/100 and 20/25 in the right and left eye, respectively. Dilated fundus examination demonstrated bilateral hemorrhagic retinopathy with subhyaloid, intraretinal and subretinal involvement. At 4 month follow up, visual acuity improved to 20/60 and 20/20 in the right and left eye, respectively. Dilated fundus examination and fundus photography showed resolution of retinal hemorrhages in both eyes. Conclusions The first case of bilateral hemorrhagic retinopathy following lumbar spondylosis surgery and witnessed seizure in an adult was reported. Ophthalmic examination may be warranted following episodes of seizure in adults. PMID:26099062

  16. Subperiosteal orbital hemorrhage following self-strangulation.

    PubMed

    Knox Cartwright, Nathaniel E; Hussin, Hussin M; Biswas, Suman; Majid, Mohammed A; Potts, Mike J; Kabala, Julian; Mayer, Eric J

    2007-01-01

    Subperiosteal orbital hematomas are uncommon. The delayed presentation of such an event is described in an anticoagulated patient who attempted self-strangulation. Despite the initial presence of a relative afferent pupillary defect, excellent visual recovery occurred, demonstrating the importance of prompt recognition and treatment. The causes, mechanism of visual loss, radiographic diagnosis, and treatment of subperiosteal hemorrhages are discussed.

  17. Massive obstetric hemorrhage: Current approach to management.

    PubMed

    Guasch, E; Gilsanz, F

    2016-01-01

    Massive obstetric hemorrhage is a major cause of maternal mortality and morbidity worldwide. It is defined (among others) as the loss of>2,500ml of blood, and is associated to a need for admission to critical care and/or hysterectomy. The relative hemodilution and high cardiac output found in normal pregnancy allows substantial bleeding before a drop in hemoglobin and/or hematocrit can be identified. Some comorbidities associated with pregnancy can contribute to the occurrence of catastrophic bleeding with consumption coagulopathy, which makes the situation even worse. Optimization, preparation, rational use of resources and protocolization of actions are often useful to improve outcomes in patients with postpartum hemorrhage. Using massive obstetric hemorrhage protocols is useful for facilitating rapid transfusion if needed, and can also be cost-effective. If hypofibrinogenemia during the bleeding episode is identified, early fibrinogen administration can be very useful. Other coagulation factors in addition to fibrinogen may be necessary during postpartum hemorrhage replacement measures in order to effectively correct coagulopathy. A hysterectomy is recommended if the medical and surgical measures prove ineffective. PMID:27184441

  18. Unilateral adrenal hemorrhagic infarction in essential thrombocythemia.

    PubMed

    Burnet, G; Lambert, M; Annet, L; Lefebvre, C

    2015-12-01

    Adrenal hemorrhage is a rare disease associated with various conditions. We report a case of a 68-year-old woman with abdominal and back pain. The diagnostic work-up showed a left adrenal gland infarction associated with essential thrombocythemia. Treatment consisted in painkillers and treating the underlying condition in order to prevent further thrombotic events.

  19. Animal Models for Viral Hemorrhagic Fever.

    PubMed

    Falzarano, Darryl; Bente, Dennis A

    2014-04-01

    Viral hemorrhagic fever can be caused by one of a diverse group of viruses that come from four different families of RNA viruses. Disease severity can vary from mild self-limiting febrile illness to severe disease characterized by high fever, high-level viremia, increased vascular permeability that can progress to shock, multi-organ failure, and death. Despite the urgent need, effective treatments and preventative vaccines are currently lacking for the majority of these viruses. A number of factors preclude the effective study of these diseases in humans including the high virulence of the agents involved, the sporadic nature of outbreaks of these viruses which are typically in geographically isolated areas with underserviced diagnostic capabilities, and the requirements for high level bio-containment. As a result, animal models that accurately mimic human disease are essential for advancing our understanding of the pathogenesis of viral hemorrhagic fevers. Moreover, animal models for viral hemorrhagic fevers are necessary to test vaccines and therapeutic intervention strategies. Here, we present an overview of the animal models that have been established for each of the hemorrhagic fever viruses and identify which aspects of human disease are modeled. Furthermore, we discuss how experimental design considerations, such as choice of species and virus strain as well as route and dose of inoculation, have an influence on animal model development. We also bring attention to some of the pitfalls that need to be avoided when extrapolating results from animal models. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  20. Pathologic pulmonary changes in hemorrhagic shock.

    PubMed Central

    Garvey, J W; Hagstrom, J W; Veith, F J

    1975-01-01

    Fifty-seven dogs were subjected to hemorrhagic hypotension by a variety of protocols. Histologic pulmonary changes were studied using the light microscope. Of these 57 dogs, 21 had no demonstrable lesions, 8 had minimal changes, and 28 had moderate or severe lesions, all of a focal nature. No correlation was found between the presence of lesions and mean systemic arterial pressure during shock, the udration of the hemorrhagic period, the fate of the animal, preoperative hematocrits and blood volumes, mean postreinfusion arterial pressure, whether the animals were mongrels or purebred beagles, whether they were awake or sedated, whether they breathed spontaneously or were artifically ventilated, whether they had undergone previous splenectomy or not, whether hilar stripping was performed or not, and finally, whether blood was reinfused after hemorrhage or not. Thus we conclude that multiple factors may exert a harmful effect on the lung in hemorrhagic shock, and that shock probably makes the lungs more vulnerable to other injurious agents rather than there being one single pathogenetic mechanism for the pulmonary damage. The term "adult respiratory distress syndrome" rather than "shock lung" is best used for the human clinical entity since it implies a complex ettiology rather than a discrete pulmonary lesion produced by a single pathogenetic mechanism. PMID:1138638

  1. [Hemorrhagic complications of anti-vitamin K].

    PubMed

    Al-Hajje, A; Calop, N; Bosson, J L; Calop, J; Allenet, B

    2009-03-01

    Adverse events related to oral anticoagulants represent a major public health problem. Hemorrhagic episodes are the most frequent complications and can be life-threatening. A 10 month prospective survey on all cases treated with anti-vitamin K (AVK), and admitted to emergency room of CHU Grenoble, was conducted to identify the hemorrhagic adverse drug events (HADE). The evaluation support was a directive questionnaire and consisted of 3 parts: patient characteristics, patient's medicated treatment and the hemorrhagic event. 216 patients treated with AVK were identified and 68 of them presented a hemorrhagic adverse drug event. 60 patients older than 65 years out of 158, presented HADE (38%); versus 8 patients < or = 65 years out of 58 (RR = 2.75; p = 0.0007). Among the patients who have their INR > or = 5, 79% developed HADE versus 16% in the group who had their INR < 5 (< 0.0001). In the group of patients who had a change in drug therapy within the 7 days preceding their admission, 47% developed HADE versus 25% of patients whose treatment was not modified: Anti-microbial agents were the drug most frequently involved. The patient's knowledge of INR value and signs of excess AVK were significant. Concerning missed dose, 48 patients declared taking the missed dose with the next dose or when they remembered: 35% of them developed HADE (p = 0.49).

  2. Interpretability of the PedsQL gastrointestinal symptoms scales and gastrointestinal worry scales in pediatric patients with functional and organic gastrointestinal diseases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The present study investigates the clinical interpretability of the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventor (PedsQL) Gastrointestinal Symptoms Scales and Worry Scales in pediatric patients with functional gastrointestinal disorders or organic gastrointestinal diseases in comparison with healthy controls....

  3. Unraveling the distinctive features of hemorrhagic and non-hemorrhagic snake venom metalloproteinases using molecular simulations.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Raoni Almeida; Díaz, Natalia; Nagem, Ronaldo Alves Pinto; Ferreira, Rafaela Salgado; Suárez, Dimas

    2016-01-01

    Snake venom metalloproteinases are important toxins that play fundamental roles during envenomation. They share a structurally similar catalytic domain, but with diverse hemorrhagic capabilities. To understand the structural basis for this difference, we build and compare two dynamical models, one for the hemorrhagic atroxlysin-I from Bothrops atrox and the other for the non-hemorraghic leucurolysin-a from Bothrops leucurus. The analysis of the extended molecular dynamics simulations shows some changes in the local structure, flexibility and surface determinants that can contribute to explain the different hemorrhagic activity of the two enzymes. In agreement with previous results, the long Ω-loop (from residue 149 to 177) has a larger mobility in the hemorrhagic protein. In addition, we find some potentially-relevant differences at the base of the S1' pocket, what may be interesting for the structure-based design of new anti-venom agents. However, the sharpest differences in the computational models of atroxlysin-I and leucurolysin-a are observed in the surface electrostatic potential around the active site region, suggesting thus that the hemorrhagic versus non-hemorrhagic activity is probably determined by protein surface determinants. PMID:26676823

  4. Therapeutic Hypothermia and the Risk of Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chih-Hung; Chen, Nai-Chuan; Tsai, Min-Shan; Yu, Ping-Hsun; Wang, An-Yi; Chang, Wei-Tien; Huang, Chien-Hua; Chen, Wen-Jone

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Current guidelines recommend a period of moderate therapeutic hypothermia (TH) for comatose patients after cardiac arrest to improve clinical outcomes. However, in-vitro studies have reported platelet dysfunction, thrombocytopenia, and coagulopathy, results that might discourage clinicians from applying TH in clinical practice. We aimed to quantify the risks of hemorrhage observed in clinical studies. Medline and Embase were searched from inception to October 2015. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing patients undergoing TH with controls were selected, irrespective of the indications for TH. There were no restrictions for language, population, or publication year. Data on study characteristics, which included patients, details of intervention, and outcome measures, were extracted. Forty-three trials that included 7528 patients were identified from 2692 potentially relevant references. Any hemorrhage was designated as the primary outcome and was reported in 28 studies. The pooled results showed no significant increase in hemorrhage risk associated with TH (risk difference [RD] 0.005; 95% confidence interval [CI] −0.001–0.011; I2, 0%). Among secondary outcomes, patients undergoing TH were found to have increased risk of thrombocytopenia (RD 0.109; 95% CI 0.038–0.179; I2 57.3%) and transfusion requirements (RD 0.021; 95% CI 0.003–0.040; I2 0%). The meta-regression analysis indicated that prolonged duration of cooling may be associated with increased risk of hemorrhage. TH was not associated with increased risk of hemorrhage despite the increased risk of thrombocytopenia and transfusion requirements. Clinicians should cautiously assess each patient's risk-benefit profile before applying TH. PMID:26632746

  5. Spontaneous retroperitoneal hemorrhage secondary to subcapsular renal hematoma: MRI findings.

    PubMed

    Balci, N C; Sirvanci, M; Tüfek, I; Onat, L; Duran, C

    2001-10-01

    Spontaneous retroperitoneal hemorrhage is a rare intraabdominal bleeding. In this report we present a case of a nontraumatic retroperitoneal hemorrhage secondary to spontaneous subcapsular renal hematoma. A 54-year-old patient who was under warfarin therapy, developed subcapsular right renal hematoma. Subcapsular and retroperitoneal hemorrhage were low signal on T1- and T2-weighted images consistent with acute stage of blood. The source of subcapsular hematoma was shown to be the rupture of hemorrhagic renal cyst on MRI. Extension of hemorrhage into the retroperitoneal space anterior to right psoas muscle was also successfully shown on MRI. Patient underwent nephrectomy and retroperitoneal blood was evacuated.

  6. Extensive intraalveolar pulmonary hemorrhage in infants dying after surfactant therapy.

    PubMed

    Pappin, A; Shenker, N; Hack, M; Redline, R W

    1994-04-01

    To assess the possible relationship between exogenous surfactant therapy and pulmonary hemorrhage in premature infants, we compared autopsy findings in 15 infants treated with exogenous surfactant and in 29 who died before the introduction of surfactant therapy. Infants who met the following criteria were included: birth weight 501 to 1500 gm, survival 4 hours to 7 days, and no congenital anomalies. Average birth weight, gestational age, and age at death were equivalent for the two groups. High rates of pulmonary hemorrhage were present in both groups (treated 80% vs untreated 83%). The untreated group had higher incidences of interstitial hemorrhage and lung hematomas and significantly more large interstitial hemorrhages: 31% untreated versus 0% treated (p < 0.05). The overall rate of intraalveolar hemorrhage was similar in the two groups, but surfactant-treated infants were more likely to have extensive intraalveolar hemorrhage: 53% versus 14% (p < 0.05). Most surfactant-treated infants who survived more than 24 hours had extensive intraalveolar hemorrhage (8/9). Patients who had extensive intraalveolar hemorrhage, with or without prior surfactant therapy, frequently had clinically significant pulmonary hemorrhage (7/12). These findings indicate that infants who die after surfactant therapy have higher rates of a specific type of pulmonary hemorrhage--extensive intraalveolar hemorrhage.

  7. Thermoregulatory set point decreases after hemorrhage in rats.

    PubMed

    Brown, Justin W; Whitehurst, Marvin E; Gordon, Christopher J; Carroll, Robert G

    2005-03-01

    Hemorrhage in rats causes a drop in body core temperature that is proportional to the hemorrhage volume. We tested the hypothesis that the hemorrhagic hypothermia is due to a downward shift in the thermoregulatory set point. If so, rats subjected to hemorrhage would prefer a cooler ambient temperature to enhance heat loss during the posthemorrhage period. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were fitted with carotid arterial catheters and biotelemetry temperature probes. Two days later, rats were placed in a temperature gradient chamber that allowed the rat to move between ambient temperatures of 15 degrees C to 40 degrees C. Rat location within the gradient was recorded as the selected ambient temperature. After 48 h, a 24 mL/kg hemorrhage was induced via the carotid cannula followed by a 24-h recovery period in the gradient. Body core and selected ambient temperatures significantly decreased after hemorrhage. Within 50 min, selected ambient temperature decreased by 11 degrees C, and returned to normal 100 min after hemorrhage. Within 80 min after hemorrhage, core temperature decreased by 2.3 degrees C, and returned to normal by 8 h after hemorrhage. Expanded analysis of the first hour after hemorrhage showed that reduction in selected ambient temperature preceded the drop in body core temperature. Importantly, the decrease in selected ambient temperature persisted even during the peak decrease in body core temperature. These results indicate that a decrease in thermoregulatory set point contributes to the drop in body core temperature after hemorrhage. PMID:15718921

  8. Retinal hemorrhage after cardiopulmonary resuscitation with chest compressions.

    PubMed

    Pham, Hang; Enzenauer, Robert W; Elder, James E; Levin, Alex V

    2013-06-01

    Retinal hemorrhages in children in the absence of risk factors are regarded to be pathognomonic of shaken baby syndrome or other nonaccidental injuries. The physician must decide whether the retinal hemorrhages in children without risk factors are due to abuse or cardiopulmonary resuscitation with chest compression (CPR-CC). The objective of this study was to determine if CPR-CC can lead to retinal hemorrhages in children. Twenty-two patients who received in-hospital CPR-CC between February 15, 1990, and June 15, 1990, were enrolled. Pediatric ophthalmology fellows carried a code beeper and responded to calls for cardiopulmonary arrest situations. At the scene of CPR-CC, an indirect funduscopic examination was conducted for presence of retinal hemorrhages in the posterior pole. Follow-up examinations were performed at 24 and 72 hours. Of the 22 patients, 6 (27%) had retinal hemorrhages at the time of CPR-CC. Of these 6 patients, 5 had risk factors for retinal hemorrhages. The sixth patient had no risk factors and may have represented the only true case of retinal hemorrhages due to CPR-CC. Retinal hemorrhages are uncommon findings after CPR-CC. Retinal hemorrhages that are found after CPR-CC usually occur in the presence of other risk factors for hemorrhage with a mild hemorrhagic retinopathy in the posterior pole.

  9. Angiographic findings in 2 children with cerebral paragonimiasis with hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhi; Chen, Jingyu; Miao, Hongpin; Li, Fei; Feng, Hua; Zhu, Gang

    2013-05-01

    Hemorrhagic events associated with cerebral paragonimiasis are not rare, especially in children and adolescents; however, angiographic evidence of cerebrovascular involvement has not been reported. The authors describe angiographic abnormalities of the cerebral arteries seen in 2 children in whom cerebral paragonimiasis was associated with hemorrhagic stroke. The patients presented with acute intracerebral and subarachnoid hemorrhage. Angiography revealed a beaded appearance and long segmental narrowing of arteries, consistent with arteritis. In both patients, involved vessels were seen in the area of the hemorrhage. The vascular changes and the hemorrhage, together with new lesions that developed close to the hemorrhage and improved after praziquantel treatment, were attributed to paragonimiasis. Further study of the frequency and mechanism of hemorrhagic cerebrovascular complications associated with cerebral paragonimiasis is needed.

  10. Characterization of hemorrhages in the tenderloins of slaughter pigs.

    PubMed

    Dich-Jørgensen, Kristine; McEvoy, Fintan J; Larsen, Helle Daugaard; Leifsson, Páll S; Jensen, Henrik Elvang

    2016-11-01

    Muscle hemorrhages are regularly observed in especially the tip of the tenderloin muscles of slaughter pigs. In order to characterize the hemorrhages, a macro- and microscopic examination of tenderloins with (n=5) and without (n=4) hemorrhages and the associated vertebral column was carried out. Furthermore, all columns were radiographed and two were CT scanned. Histologically, the muscle hemorrhages contained cells from bone marrow and growth line cartilage. Ventral epiphysiolysis in either the cranial or caudal epiphysis of the first lumbar vertebrae (L1) in 8 out of the 9 vertebral columns was present. In the 5 cases with tenderloin hemorrhage, similar hemorrhage with growth line cartilage was found within the fracture of the epiphysis. The hemorrhages develop secondarily to epiphysiolysis in the lumbar vertebrae, where the tenderloin attaches to the spine. The lesions probably develop around the time of stunning. PMID:27372280

  11. HIV infection and the gastrointestinal immune system

    PubMed Central

    Brenchley, JM; Douek, DC

    2009-01-01

    There has recently been a resurgence of interest in the gastrointestinal pathology observed in patients infected with HIV. The gastrointestinal tract is a major site of HIV replication, which results in massive depletion of lamina propria CD4 T cells during acute infection. Highly active antiretroviral therapy leads to incomplete suppression of viral replication and substantially delayed and only partial restoration of gastrointestinal CD4 T cells. The gastrointestinal pathology associated with HIV infection comprises significant enteropathy with increased levels of inflammation and decreased levels of mucosal repair and regeneration. Assessment of gut mucosal immune system has provided novel directions for therapeutic interventions that modify the consequences of acute HIV infection. PMID:19079157

  12. Gastrointestinal obstruction in penguin chicks.

    PubMed

    Perpiñán, David; Curro, Thomas G

    2009-12-01

    A 7-day-old gentoo penguin (Pygoscelis papua) was found dead and postmortem examination revealed impaction of the ventriculus with feathers. A review of mortality in gentoo penguin chicks from 1997 to 2007 at that institution revealed another case of feather impaction of the ventriculus in a 4-week-old chick, a sibling of the previous chick. A third case of gastrointestinal impaction occurred in a 24-day-old king penguin (Aptenodytes patagonicus) with omphallitis and enteritis. In this chick, a fibrin mat produced a complete obstruction of the intestine at the level of Meckel's diverticulum. PMID:20235460

  13. Changes to the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    2016-08-01

    This article explores changes in the ageing gastrointestinal tract, including: » Diminished sense of taste and smell. » Shrinking of the maxillary and mandibular bones in the jaw. » Slowing of oesophageal peristalsis giving a feeling that something is 'stuck in the throat'. » Relaxation of the lower sphincter leading to gastro-oesophageal reflux. » Reduction in gastric bicarbonate and prostaglandin in mucus increasing susceptibility to stomach ulcers. » Changes in villi in the small intestine reducing the area for absorption. » Overpopulation of bacteria in the small intestine leading to decreased absorption of folic acid and minerals. PMID:27573953

  14. ARTERIAL EPONYMS IN GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT.

    PubMed

    Kutia, S A; Kiselev, V V; Lyashchenko, O I

    2015-01-01

    Eponym--name of the disease, certain structure or method after the person who usually first discovered and described them. Eponyms are widely spread in medicine which appeared to be in the area of a great interest for a lot of scientists. They can serve as a reflection of the evolution of the medical knowledge and making up the majority of anatomical terms. The article describes 12 arterial eponyms of the gastrointestinal tract giving a full anatomical description. It also gives an explanation of why and how those structures were named after certain scientists and what contribution they've made into the development of medicine. PMID:26817114

  15. Management of Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors.

    PubMed

    von Mehren, Margaret

    2016-10-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors had the reputation for poor outcomes because of their lack of response to nonsurgical interventions. The discovery of gain-of-function mutations involving receptor tyrosine kinase growth factor receptors altered the biological understanding and management. Beginning in 2000, management of these tumors has changed dramatically because of the availability of tyrosine kinase inhibitors. The role of surgery continues to be refined. This article reviews how surgery and systemic therapy are being used, incorporating definitions of risk. Decisions on how to treat a patient is based on the risk of progression, pathologic characteristics, and tumor location. PMID:27542643

  16. Cutaneous manifestation of gastrointestinal disease

    PubMed Central

    Kerstetter, Justin

    2016-01-01

    The gastrointestinal (GI) and cutaneous systems are closely linked in origin. Skin manifestations are frequently seen as a part of different GI syndromes. Gastroenterologists play an important role in recognizing the symptoms, patient workup and arriving at appropriate diagnoses, often in consultation with dermatologists. This review discusses the diseases with both cutaneous and intestinal involvement. Hereditary polyposis GI cancers, hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancers (CRCs), hamartomatous disorders, and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are reviewed with emphasis on the genetic basis, diagnostic, histologic findings, screening modalities, and therapeutic options. PMID:27034812

  17. Changes to the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    2016-08-01

    This article explores changes in the ageing gastrointestinal tract, including: » Diminished sense of taste and smell. » Shrinking of the maxillary and mandibular bones in the jaw. » Slowing of oesophageal peristalsis giving a feeling that something is 'stuck in the throat'. » Relaxation of the lower sphincter leading to gastro-oesophageal reflux. » Reduction in gastric bicarbonate and prostaglandin in mucus increasing susceptibility to stomach ulcers. » Changes in villi in the small intestine reducing the area for absorption. » Overpopulation of bacteria in the small intestine leading to decreased absorption of folic acid and minerals.

  18. Vascular malformations and hemangiolymphangiomas of the gastrointestinal tract: morphological features and clinical impact

    PubMed Central

    Handra-Luca, Adriana; Montgomery, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of our study was to describe the morphological features of gastrointestinal vascular malformations (VM) and of hemangiolymphangiomas (HLA) and to establish correlations with clinical characteristics. Significant findings: Fifteen VMs and 12 HLAs that were encountered over a period of 22 years, were retrospectively analyzed. The VMs often involved the colon, small intestine, but also the stomach, whereas none of the HLAs arose in the stomach. VMs were more frequently associated with gastrointestinal bleeding, ulcer and were larger than HLAs (p<0.01 for all comparisons). Intralesional hemorrhage and thrombosis were associated with VM (p=0.02 and p=0.05). Surgical resection was performed for 1 HLA and 14 VMs. Vessel abnormalities such as shunt vessels, wall tufts (excrescences) and arterialized veins were more frequent in VMs (p=0.01, p=0.04 and <0.01, respectively) whereas aneurysm-like cavities were observed in both lesion types. Mucosal abnormal vessels were observed only in VMs, whereas HLAs were associated with mucosal lymphatic clusters (p<0.01). Most HLAs contained a D2-40 hetero-geneously positive lymphatic component, were Glut-1 negative and CD31 reactive. There was no statistical difference in occurrence of associated autoimmune, tumoral and cardiovascular conditions between the two patient groups. Conclusions: The results of our study suggest that morphological features such as increased size, ulcer, thrombosis, hemorrhage and presence of aberrant mucosal vessels favor the diagnosis of VM. Co-existence of other clinical conditions such as cardiovascular disease, encountered in association with both lesion types, might exacerbate a tendency towards hemorrhage. PMID:21738815

  19. Gastrointestinal citrate absorption in nephrolithiasis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fegan, J.; Khan, R.; Poindexter, J.; Pak, C. Y.

    1992-01-01

    Gastrointestinal absorption of citrate was measured in stone patients with idiopathic hypocitraturia to determine if citrate malabsorption could account for low urinary citrate. Citrate absorption was measured directly from recovery of orally administered potassium citrate (40 mEq.) in the intestinal lavage fluid, using an intestinal washout technique. In 7 stone patients citrate absorption, serum citrate levels, peak citrate concentration in serum and area under the curve were not significantly different from those of 7 normal subjects. Citrate absorption was rapid and efficient in both groups, with 96 to 98% absorbed within 3 hours. The absorption of citrate was less efficient from a tablet preparation of potassium citrate than from a liquid preparation, probably due to a delayed release of citrate from wax matrix. However, citrate absorption from solid potassium citrate was still high at 91%, compared to 98% for a liquid preparation. Thus, hypocitraturia is unlikely to be due to an impaired gastrointestinal absorption of citrate in stone patients without overt bowel disease.

  20. Two Hundred Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors

    PubMed Central

    DeMatteo, Ronald P.; Lewis, Jonathan J.; Leung, Denis; Mudan, Satvinder S.; Woodruff, James M.; Brennan, Murray F.

    2000-01-01

    Objective To analyze the outcome of 200 patients with gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) who were treated at a single institution and followed up prospectively. Summary Background Data A GIST is a visceral sarcoma that arises from the gastrointestinal tract. Surgical resection is the mainstay of treatment because adjuvant therapy is unproven. Methods Two hundred patients with malignant GIST were admitted and treated at Memorial Hospital during the past 16 years. Patient, tumor, and treatment variables were analyzed to identify patterns of tumor recurrence and factors that predict survival. Results Of the 200 patients, 46% had primary disease without metastasis, 47% had metastasis, and 7% had isolated local recurrence. In patients with primary disease who underwent complete resection of gross disease (n = 80), the 5-year actuarial survival rate was 54%, and survival was predicted by tumor size but not microscopic margins of resection. Recurrence of disease after resection was predominantly intraabdominal and involved the original tumor site, peritoneum, and liver. Conclusions GISTs are uncommon sarcomas. Tumor size predicts disease-specific survival in patients with primary disease who undergo complete gross resection. Tumor recurrence tends to be intraabdominal. Investigational protocols are indicated to reduce the rate of recurrence after resection and to improve the outcome for patients with GIST. PMID:10636102

  1. Histopathology of gastrointestinal neuroendocrine neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Hirabayashi, Kenichi; Zamboni, Giuseppe; Nishi, Takayuki; Tanaka, Akira; Kajiwara, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Naoya

    2013-01-01

    Gastrointestinal neuroendocrine neoplasms (GI-NENs) arise from neuroendocrine cells distributed mainly in the mucosa and submucosa of the gastrointestinal tract. In 2010, the World Health Organization (WHO) classification of NENs of the digestive system was changed, categorizing these tumors as grade 1 neuroendocrine tumor (NET), grade-2NET, neuroendocrine carcinoma (large- or small-cell type), or mixed adenoneuroendocrine carcinoma (MANEC). Such a classification is based on the Ki-67 index and mitotic count in histological material. For the accurate pathological diagnosis and grading of NENs, it is important to clearly recognize the characteristic histological features of GI-NENs and to understand the correct method of counting Ki-67 and mitoses. In this review, we focus on the histopathological features of GI-NENs, particularly regarding biopsy and cytological diagnoses, neuroendocrine markers, genetic and molecular features, and the evaluation of the Ki-67 index and mitotic count. In addition, we will address the histological features of GI-NEN in specific organs. PMID:23346552

  2. Myxoma of the kidney associated with hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Shah, Abhishek; Sun, Wenbin; Cao, Dianbo

    2013-06-01

    Myxomas are relatively rare tumors and most of them occur in the heart, skin, and soft tissues and bones. Renal myxomas are extremely rare neoplasms and very few cases have been reported in the literature. A review of medical literatures reveals no previous description of renal myxoma complicated with extensive areas of hemorrhage. So, we report such a case in a 43-year-old female. She had a left renal mass incidentally discovered during ultrasonography at a regular health checkup, and further computed tomography scan showed 4.9 × 3.1 cm mass with circular septal enhancement and ill-defined margin with the left psoas major muscle. Radical nephrectomy was performed because of suspected malignant renal tumor. Postoperative histopathology of resected specimen revealed the typical appearance of a myxoma associated with extensive hemorrhage. PMID:24426654

  3. Intracranial hemorrhage associated with methanol intoxication.

    PubMed

    Sebe, Ahmet; Satar, Salim; Uzun, Belkan; Topal, Metin; Yesilagac, Hasan; Avci, Andakkan

    2006-12-01

    Methanol is a common component of gasoline, antifreeze, washer fluid, perfume, household cleaners and various other industrial products. Acute methanol poisoning produces severe metabolic acidosis, serious neurologic sequelae and rarely imaging findings. In this paper, we describe a 35-year-old man with methanol intoxication who was in a comatose stage. Computed tomography (CT) showed widespread brain edema and hemorrhages localized in the supratentorial region of the temporal lobe, nearly 3 x 1 cm in a crescent shape, in the white matter surrounding the capsula externa and extending to the periventricular white matter and occipital lobes. Temporal lobe hemorrhage in our patient might also have been due to the effect of heparinization during hemodialysis, metabolic and lactic acidosis, or formate.

  4. Infection Control During Filoviral Hemorrhagic Fever Outbreaks

    PubMed Central

    Vanessa, N Raabe; Matthias, Borchert

    2012-01-01

    Breaking the human-to-human transmission cycle remains the cornerstone of infection control during filoviral (Ebola and Marburg) hemorrhagic fever outbreaks. This requires effective identification and isolation of cases, timely contact tracing and monitoring, proper usage of barrier personal protection gear by health workers, and safely conducted burials. Solely implementing these measures is insufficient for infection control; control efforts must be culturally sensitive and conducted in a transparent manner to promote the necessary trust between the community and infection control team in order to succeed. This article provides a review of the literature on infection control during filoviral hemorrhagic fever outbreaks focusing on outbreaks in a developing setting and lessons learned from previous outbreaks. The primary search database used to review the literature was PUBMED, the National Library of Medicine website. PMID:22529631

  5. Intracerebral Hemorrhage, Oxidative Stress, and Antioxidant Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Xiaochun; Wen, Zunjia; Shen, Haitao; Shen, Meifen

    2016-01-01

    Hemorrhagic stroke is a common and severe neurological disorder and is associated with high rates of mortality and morbidity, especially for intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Increasing evidence demonstrates that oxidative stress responses participate in the pathophysiological processes of secondary brain injury (SBI) following ICH. The mechanisms involved in interoperable systems include endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, neuronal apoptosis and necrosis, inflammation, and autophagy. In this review, we summarized some promising advances in the field of oxidative stress and ICH, including contained animal and human investigations. We also discussed the role of oxidative stress, systemic oxidative stress responses, and some research of potential therapeutic options aimed at reducing oxidative stress to protect the neuronal function after ICH, focusing on the challenges of translation between preclinical and clinical studies, and potential post-ICH antioxidative therapeutic approaches. PMID:27190572

  6. Viruses Causing Hemorrhagic Fever. Safety Laboratory Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Cobo, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Viral hemorrhagic fevers are diseases caused by viruses which belong to different families, many of them causing severe diseases. These viruses may produce different symptomatology together with a severe multisystem syndrome, and the final result might be the production of hemorrhages in several sites of the body. The majority of them have no other treatment than supportive therapy, although some antiviral drugs can be used in some circumstances. Transmission of VHF has been demonstrated through contact with animal vectors or person-to-person through the contact with body fluids. No risk of transmission has been found during the incubation period, but when the viral load is high the risk of transmission is greatest. Both health care and clinical laboratory workers must safely handle patients and specimens by taking all required precautions during their management. PMID:27014378

  7. Hemorrhagic Encephalopathy From Acute Baking Soda Ingestion.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Adrienne; Brown, Alisha; Valento, Matthew

    2016-09-01

    Baking soda is a readily available household product composed of sodium bicarbonate. It can be used as a home remedy to treat dyspepsia. If used in excessive amounts, baking soda has the potential to cause a variety of serious metabolic abnormalities. We believe this is the first reported case of hemorrhagic encephalopathy induced by baking soda ingestion. Healthcare providers should be aware of the dangers of baking soda misuse and the associated adverse effects. PMID:27625729

  8. Hemorrhagic Encephalopathy From Acute Baking Soda Ingestion

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Adrienne; Brown, Alisha; Valento, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Baking soda is a readily available household product composed of sodium bicarbonate. It can be used as a home remedy to treat dyspepsia. If used in excessive amounts, baking soda has the potential to cause a variety of serious metabolic abnormalities. We believe this is the first reported case of hemorrhagic encephalopathy induced by baking soda ingestion. Healthcare providers should be aware of the dangers of baking soda misuse and the associated adverse effects. PMID:27625729

  9. Advances in fluid resuscitation of hemorrhagic shock

    PubMed Central

    Tremblay, Lorraine N.; Rizoli, Sandro B.; Brenneman, Frederick D.

    2001-01-01

    The optimal fluid for resuscitation in hemorrhagic shock would combine the volume expansion and oxygen-carrying capacity of blood without the need for cross-matching or the risk of disease transmission. Although the ideal fluid has yet to be discovered, current options are discussed in this review, including crystalloids, colloids, blood and blood substitutes. The future role of blood substitutes is not yet defined, but the potential advantages in trauma or elective surgery may prove to be enormous. PMID:11407826

  10. [Cerebral hemorrhage associated with the use phenylpropanolamine].

    PubMed

    Barinagarrementería, F; Méndez, A; Vega, F

    1990-10-01

    Phenylpropanolamine is a sympatheticomimetic agent which is widely used in pharmacologic preparations to treat nasal congestion, and to produce and anorexigenic or stimulant action. In the last years complications affecting the nervous system or the general condition have been reported. There is still controversy with regard to the safety of this pharmacologic agent. In this study we report two cases of parenchymal cerebral hemorrhage secondary to phenylpropanolamine administration. In the second case we observed angiographic findings of a reversible vasculopathy.

  11. Delayed postoperative hemorrhage complicating chalazion surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Procope, J. A.; Kidwell, E. D.

    1994-01-01

    Chalazion surgery is a common minor ophthalmic surgical procedure used to treat chalazia after conservative measures have failed. Complications are infrequent and generally easily managed with minimal morbidity. This article presents an atypical case of an elderly woman with a history of hypertension who experienced sudden profuse hemorrhaging 10 days after chalazion surgery. The clinical findings are presented along with a brief overview of the relevant vascular anatomy of the eyelid and a discussion of possible etiologic factors. PMID:7807576

  12. Hemorrhagic Encephalopathy From Acute Baking Soda Ingestion.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Adrienne; Brown, Alisha; Valento, Matthew

    2016-09-01

    Baking soda is a readily available household product composed of sodium bicarbonate. It can be used as a home remedy to treat dyspepsia. If used in excessive amounts, baking soda has the potential to cause a variety of serious metabolic abnormalities. We believe this is the first reported case of hemorrhagic encephalopathy induced by baking soda ingestion. Healthcare providers should be aware of the dangers of baking soda misuse and the associated adverse effects.

  13. Hemorrhagic Encephalopathy From Acute Baking Soda Ingestion

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Adrienne; Brown, Alisha; Valento, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Baking soda is a readily available household product composed of sodium bicarbonate. It can be used as a home remedy to treat dyspepsia. If used in excessive amounts, baking soda has the potential to cause a variety of serious metabolic abnormalities. We believe this is the first reported case of hemorrhagic encephalopathy induced by baking soda ingestion. Healthcare providers should be aware of the dangers of baking soda misuse and the associated adverse effects.

  14. Spinal angiolipoma with acute subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Raghavendra, S; Krishnamoorthy, T; Ashalatha, R; Kesavadas, C

    2007-10-01

    Angiolipoma is a rare tumor of the spine commonly presenting with compressive myelopathy. We report a spinal angiolipoma in a 14-year-old patient with acute spinal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). To our knowledge this is the first reported case of a spinal angiolipoma presenting with SAH, associated with post-subclavian coarctation with diffuse hypoplasia of the descending aorta. This association of coarctation of aorta, aortic hypoplasia and spinal angiolipoma has also not been reported previously.

  15. Two cases of asymptomatic massive fetomaternal hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Peedin, Alexis R; Mazepa, Marshall A; Park, Yara A; Weimer, Eric T; Schmitz, John L; Raval, Jay S

    2015-04-01

    Evaluation of fetomaternal hemorrhage (FMH) in the immediate postpartum period is critical for the timely administration of Rh immunoglobulin (RhIG) prophylaxis to minimize the risk of alloimmunization in D-negative mothers of D-positive newborns. We report a series of two clinically-unsuspected cases of massive FMHs identified at our university medical center. Retrospective records of two cases of massive FMH were investigated using the electronic medical record. After positive fetal bleed screens, flow cytometric analysis for hemoglobin F was performed to quantify the volume of the hemorrhages in both cases. Flow cytometric enumeration with anti-D was also performed in one case. The two patients had 209.5 and 75 mL of fetal blood in circulation, resulting in 8 and 4 doses of RhIG administered, respectively. For the former patient, flow cytometric analysis with anti-D ruled out hereditary persistence of fetal hemoglobin and supported the fetal origin of the red cells. Due to the clinically-silent nature of both hemorrhages, further evaluation of the newborns' blood was not performed. These cases highlight the importance of rapidly obtaining accurate measurements of fetal blood loss via flow cytometric analysis in cases of FMH, particularly in clinically-unsuspected cases, to ensure timely administration of adequate immunoprophylaxis to D-negative mothers. PMID:25736586

  16. Characteristics of uncontrolled hemorrhage in cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Trowbridge, Cody; Stammers, Alfred; Klayman, Myra; Brindisi, Nicholas; Woods, Edward

    2008-06-01

    Patients with uncontrolled hemorrhage require massive transfusion therapy and consume a large fraction of blood bank resources. Institutional guidelines have been established for treatment, but early identification and prevention in susceptible patients remains challenging. Uncontrolled hemorrhage was defined as meeting institutional guidelines for recombinant FVIIa administration. Patients who received rFVIIa were compared with patients who did not require the therapy but who were operated on during the same time period. After institutional review board approval, demographic, operative, and transfusion data were analyzed from a prospective database. Patients receiving rFVIIa were more likely to undergo multiple procedures (2.6 +/- 0.8 vs. 1.8 +/- 0.8; p < .001); aortic surgery (59% vs. 11%; p < .005); have a higher Cleveland Clinic Clinical Severity score (7.8 +/- 2.7 vs. 5.5 +/- 4.0; p < .005); require longer bypass (265 +/- 92 min vs. 159 +/- 63 min; p < .001), cross-clamp (182 +/- 68 min vs. 112 +/- 56 min; p < .001), and circulatory arrest (15 +/- 24 min vs. 2 +/- 7 min; p < .05) times; and require more autotransfusion (2580 +/- 1847 mL vs. 690 +/- 380 mL; p < .05). Uncontrolled hemorrhage is associated with more complex surgery requiring longer bypass times and more autotransfusion.

  17. Hemorrhage control by microsecond electrical pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandel, Yossi; Manivanh, Richard; Dalal, Roopa; Huie, Phil; Wang, Jenny; Brinton, Mark; Palanker, Daniel

    2013-02-01

    Non-compressible hemorrhages are the most common preventable cause of death on battlefield or in civilian traumatic injuries. We report the use of sub-millisecond pulses of electric current to induce rapid constriction in femoral and mesenteric arteries and veins in rats. Extent of vascular constriction could be modulated by pulse duration, amplitude and repetition rate. Electrically-induced vasoconstriction could be maintained at steady level until the end of stimulation, and blood vessels dilated back to their original size within a few minutes after the end of stimulation. At higher settings, a blood clotting could be introduced, leading to complete and permanent occlusion of the vessels. The latter regime dramatically decreased the bleeding rate in the injured femoral and mesenteric arteries, with a complete hemorrhage arrest achieved within seconds. The average blood loss from the treated femoral artery was about 7 times less than that of a non-treated control. This new treatment modality offers a promising approach to non-damaging control of bleeding during surgery, and to efficient hemorrhage arrest in trauma patients.

  18. What's New in Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor Research and Treatment?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Topic Additional resources for gastrointestinal stromal tumor What’s new in gastrointestinal stromal tumor research and treatment? There ... GIST) Talking With Your Doctor After Treatment What`s New in Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor (GIST) Research? Other Resources ...

  19. Upper Gastrointestinal (GI) Tract X-Ray (Radiography)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z X-ray (Radiography) - Upper GI Tract Upper gastrointestinal tract radiography or ... X-ray? What is Upper Gastrointestinal (GI) Tract Radiography? Upper gastrointestinal tract radiography, also called an upper ...

  20. The Nervous System and Gastrointestinal Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Altaf, Muhammad A.; Sood, Manu R.

    2008-01-01

    The enteric nervous system is an integrative brain with collection of neurons in the gastrointestinal tract which is capable of functioning independently of the central nervous system (CNS). The enteric nervous system modulates motility, secretions, microcirculation, immune and inflammatory responses of the gastrointestinal tract. Dysphagia,…

  1. Possible Waardenburg syndrome with gastrointestinal anomalies.

    PubMed Central

    Nutman, J; Steinherz, R; Sivan, Y; Goodman, R M

    1986-01-01

    We describe a patient with possible Waardenburg syndrome associated with anal atresia and oesophageal atresia with tracheooesophageal fistula. Three other published cases with atretic gastrointestinal anomalies associated with the Waardenburg syndrome are reviewed. We conclude that the association between atretic lesions of the gastrointestinal tract and the Waardenburg syndrome may be a significant one. Images PMID:3712396

  2. A 100-year perspective on gastrointestinal motility.

    PubMed

    Szurszewski, J H

    1998-03-01

    This contribution to the centennial commemorative issue of the American Journal of Physiology: Gastrointestinal and Liver Physiology identifies some of the important studies of spontaneous electrical and motor activity in the gastrointestinal tract published in the Journal between 1898 and 1996. Emphasis is given to the contributions made by Walter B. Cannon, Walter C. Alvarez, Emil Bozler, C. Ladd Prosser, and James Christensen.

  3. Interaction between diet and gastrointestinal endocrine cells

    PubMed Central

    EL-SALHY, MAGDY; MAZZAWI, TAREK; HAUSKEN, TRYGVE; HATLEBAKK, JAN GUNNAR

    2016-01-01

    The gastrointestinal endocrine cells are essential for life. They regulate the gastrointestinal motility, secretion, visceral sensitivity, absorption, local immune defense, cell proliferation and appetite. These cells act as sensory cells with specialized microvilli that project into the lumen that sense the gut contents (mostly nutrients and/or bacteria byproducts), and respond to luminal stimuli by releasing hormones into the lamina propria. These released hormones exert their actions by entering the circulating blood and reaching distant targets (endocrine mode), nearby structures (paracrine mode) or via afferent and efferent synaptic transmission. The mature intestinal endocrine cells are capable of expressing several hormones. A change in diet not only affects the release of gastrointestinal hormones, but also alters the densities of the gut endocrine cells. The interaction between ingested foodstuffs and the gastrointestinal endocrine cells can be utilized for the clinical management of gastrointestinal and metabolic diseases, such as irritable bowel syndrome, obesity and diabetes. PMID:27284402

  4. Acute Small Bowel Hemorrhage in Three Patients with End-Stage Renal Disease: Diagnosis and Management by Angiographic Intervention

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Woong; Kim, Jae Kyu; Kim, Heoung Kil; Han, Young Min; Kang, Heoung Keun

    2002-03-15

    Three patients who had undergone hemodialysis for end-stage renal disease, presented with acute small bowel hemorrhage,and were treated with superselective transcatheter arterial embolization via coaxial microcatheters. In all patients pre-procedure upper gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy and colonoscopy had failed to demonstrate the source of the hemorrhage. Selective diagnostic angiography revealed frank extravasations of contrast from the small bowel arteries (one jejunal artery and two ileal arteries). After superselection of feeding arteries with a microcatheter, transcatheter embolization using Gelfoam and microcoils was performed in all three patients. Immediate hemostasis was achieved in all patients and the patients were discharged free from symptoms 3-5 days after embolization. No evidence of intestinal ischemia or infarction was noted, with the time from procedure to last follow-up ranging from 4 to 12 months. We conclude that superselective angiography is a valuable tool for diagnosing and treating acute small bowel hemorrhage inpatients with end-stage renal disease when endoscopic evaluation has failed.

  5. Radiological Features of Gastrointestinal Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Lo Re, Giuseppe; Federica, Vernuccio; Midiri, Federico; Picone, Dario; La Tona, Giuseppe; Galia, Massimo; Lo Casto, Antonio; Lagalla, Roberto; Midiri, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal lymphomas represent 5–20% of extranodal lymphomas and mainly occur in the stomach and small intestine. Clinical findings are not specific, thus often determining a delay in the diagnosis. Imaging features at conventional and cross-sectional imaging must be known by the radiologist since he/she plays a pivotal role in the diagnosis and disease assessment, thus assisting in the choice of the optimal treatment to patients. This review focuses on the wide variety of imaging presentation of esophageal, gastric, and small and large bowel lymphoma presenting their main imaging appearances at conventional and cross-sectional imaging, mainly focusing on computed tomography and magnetic resonance, helping in the choice of the best imaging technique for the disease characterization and assessment and the recognition of potential complications. PMID:26819598

  6. [Functional and motor gastrointestinal disorders].

    PubMed

    Mearin, Fermín; Rey, Enrique; Balboa, Agustín

    2015-09-01

    This article discusses the most interesting studies on functional and motor gastrointestinal disorders presented at Digestive Diseases Week (DDW), 2015. Researchers are still seeking biomarkers for irritable bowel syndrome and have presented new data. One study confirmed that the use of low-dose antidepressants has an antinociceptive effect without altering the psychological features of patients with functional dyspepsia. A contribution that could have immediate application is the use of transcutaneous electroacupuncture, which has demonstrated effectiveness in controlling nausea in patients with gastroparesis. New data have come to light on the importance of diet in irritable bowel syndrome, although the effectiveness of a low-FODMAP diet seems to be losing momentum with time. Multiple data were presented on the long-term efficacy of rifaximin therapy in patients with irritable bowel syndrome and diarrhoea. In addition, among other contributions, and more as a curiosity, a study evaluated the effect of histamine in the diet of patients with irritable bowel syndrome.

  7. [Regression grading in gastrointestinal tumors].

    PubMed

    Tischoff, I; Tannapfel, A

    2012-02-01

    Preoperative neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy is a well-established and essential part of the interdisciplinary treatment of gastrointestinal tumors. Neoadjuvant treatment leads to regressive changes in tumors. To evaluate the histological tumor response different scoring systems describing regressive changes are used and known as tumor regression grading. Tumor regression grading is usually based on the presence of residual vital tumor cells in proportion to the total tumor size. Currently, no nationally or internationally accepted grading systems exist. In general, common guidelines should be used in the pathohistological diagnostics of tumors after neoadjuvant therapy. In particularly, the standard tumor grading will be replaced by tumor regression grading. Furthermore, tumors after neoadjuvant treatment are marked with the prefix "y" in the TNM classification. PMID:22293790

  8. Visceral pain and gastrointestinal microbiome.

    PubMed

    Chichlowski, Maciej; Rudolph, Colin

    2015-03-30

    A complex set of interactions between the microbiome, gut and brain modulate responses to visceral pain. These interactions occur at the level of the gastrointestinal mucosa, and via local neural, endocrine or immune activity; as well as by the pro-duction of factors transported through the circulatory system, like bacterial metabolites or hormones. Various psychological, in-fectious and other stressors can disrupt this harmonious relationship and alter both the microbiome and visceral pain responses. There are critical sensitive periods that can impact visceral pain responses in adulthood. In this review we provide a brief background of the intestinal microbiome and emerging concepts of the bidirectional interactions between the micro-biome, gut and brain. We also discuss recent work in animal models, and human clinical trials using prebiotics and probiotics that alter the microbiome with resultant alterations in visceral pain responses.

  9. A Case of an Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding Due to a Ruptured Dissection of a Right Aortic Arch

    SciTech Connect

    Born, Christine; Forster, Andreas; Rock, Clemens; Pfeifer, Klaus-Juergen; Rieger, Johannes; Reiser, Maximilian

    2003-09-15

    We report a case of severe upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage with a rare underlying cause. The patient was unconscious when he was admitted to the hospital. No chest radiogram was performed. Routine diagnostic measures, including endoscopy, failed to reveal the origin of the bleeding, which was believed to originate from the esophagus secondary to a peptic ulcer or varices. Exploratory laparotomy added no further information, but contrast-enhanced multislice computed tomography (MSCT) of the chest showed dextroposition of the widened aortic arch with a ruptured type-B dissection and a consecutive aorto-esophageal fistula (AEF). The patient died on the day of admission. Noninvasive MSCT angiography gives rapid diagnostic information on patients with occult upper gastrointestinal bleeding and should be considered before more invasive conventional angiography or surgery.

  10. Superficial siderosis is a warning sign for future intracranial hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Linn, Jennifer; Wollenweber, Frank A; Lummel, Nina; Bochmann, Katja; Pfefferkorn, Thomas; Gschwendtner, Andreas; Bruckmann, Hartmut; Dichgans, Martin; Opherk, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Supratentorial superficial siderosis (SS) is a frequent imaging marker of cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA). It is most probably caused by focal subarachnoid hemorrhages (fSAHs). Based on single-case observations, it has been proposed that such fSAHs might be a predisposing factor for future intracranial hemorrhage. Here we tested the hypothesis if a SS as a residue of fSAHs must be regarded as a warning sign for future intracranial hemorrhage. Fifty-one consecutive patients with SS and no apparent cause other than possible or probable CAA were identified through a database search and followed-up for a median interval of 35.3 months (range 6-120 months). Main outcome measures were rate and location of new intracranial hemorrhages. Twenty-four patients (47.1 %) had experienced any new intracranial hemorrhage, 18 patients (35.3 %) had an intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH), and in 13 of them (25.5 %), the hemorrhage was located at the site of pre-existing siderosis. Six patients (11.7 %) had developed a new subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), four of them at the site of siderosis. Patients with SS are at substantial risk for subsequent intracranial hemorrhage. SS can be considered a warning sign of future ICH or SAH, which frequently occur adjacent to pre-existing SS. Prospective studies are needed to confirm these findings.

  11. Spontaneous primary intraventricular hemorrhage: clinical features and early outcome.

    PubMed

    Arboix, Adrià; García-Eroles, Luis; Vicens, Adela; Oliveres, Montserrat; Massons, Joan

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. Primary hemorrhage in the ventricular system without a recognizable parenchymal component is very rare. This single-center retrospective study aimed to further characterize the clinical characteristics and early outcome of this stroke subtype. Methods. All patients with primary intraventricular hemorrhage included in a prospective hospital-based stroke registry over a 19-year period were assessed. A standardized protocol with 161 items, including demographics, risk factors, clinical data, neuroimaging findings, and outcome, was used for data collection. A comparison was made between the groups of primary intraventricular hemorrhage and subcortical intracerebral hemorrhage. Predictors of primary intraventricular hemorrhage were identified by logistic regression analysis. Results. There were 12 patients with primary intraventricular hemorrhage (0.31% of all cases of stroke included in the database) and 133 in the cohort of subcortical hemorrhage. Very old age (≥85 years) (odds ratio (OR) 9.89), atrial fibrillation (OR 8.92), headache (OR 6.89), and altered consciousness (OR 4.36) were independent predictors of intraventricular hemorrhage. The overall in-hospital mortality rate was 41.7% (5/12) but increased to 60% (3/5) in patients aged 85 years or older. Conclusion. Although primary intraventricular hemorrhage is uncommon, it is a severe clinical condition with a high early mortality. The prognosis is particularly poor in very old patients.

  12. Spontaneous Primary Intraventricular Hemorrhage: Clinical Features and Early Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Arboix, Adrià; García-Eroles, Luis; Vicens, Adela; Oliveres, Montserrat; Massons, Joan

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. Primary hemorrhage in the ventricular system without a recognizable parenchymal component is very rare. This single-center retrospective study aimed to further characterize the clinical characteristics and early outcome of this stroke subtype. Methods. All patients with primary intraventricular hemorrhage included in a prospective hospital-based stroke registry over a 19-year period were assessed. A standardized protocol with 161 items, including demographics, risk factors, clinical data, neuroimaging findings, and outcome, was used for data collection. A comparison was made between the groups of primary intraventricular hemorrhage and subcortical intracerebral hemorrhage. Predictors of primary intraventricular hemorrhage were identified by logistic regression analysis. Results. There were 12 patients with primary intraventricular hemorrhage (0.31% of all cases of stroke included in the database) and 133 in the cohort of subcortical hemorrhage. Very old age (≥85 years) (odds ratio (OR) 9.89), atrial fibrillation (OR 8.92), headache (OR 6.89), and altered consciousness (OR 4.36) were independent predictors of intraventricular hemorrhage. The overall in-hospital mortality rate was 41.7% (5/12) but increased to 60% (3/5) in patients aged 85 years or older. Conclusion. Although primary intraventricular hemorrhage is uncommon, it is a severe clinical condition with a high early mortality. The prognosis is particularly poor in very old patients. PMID:22966468

  13. Rare gastrointestinal lymphomas: The endoscopic investigation

    PubMed Central

    Vetro, Calogero; Bonanno, Giacomo; Giulietti, Giorgio; Romano, Alessandra; Conticello, Concetta; Chiarenza, Annalisa; Spina, Paolo; Coppolino, Francesco; Cunsolo, Rosario; Raimondo, Francesco Di

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal lymphomas represent up to 10% of gastrointestinal malignancies and about one third of non-Hodgkin lymphomas. The most prominent histologies are mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. However, the gastrointestinal tract can be the site of rarer lymphoma subtypes as a primary or secondary localization. Due to their rarity and the multifaceted histology, an endoscopic classification has not been validated yet. This review aims to analyze the endoscopic presentation of rare gastrointestinal lymphomas from disease diagnosis to follow-up, according to the involved site and lymphoma subtype. Existing, new and emerging endoscopic technologies have been examined. In particular, we investigated the diagnostic, prognostic and follow-up endoscopic features of T-cell and natural killer lymphomas, lymphomatous polyposis and mantle cell lymphoma, follicular lymphoma, plasma cell related disease, gastrointestinal lymphomas in immunodeficiency and Hodgkin’s lymphoma of the gastrointestinal tract. Contrarily to more frequent gastrointestinal lymphomas, data about rare lymphomas are mostly extracted from case series and case reports. Due to the data paucity, a synergism between gastroenterologists and hematologists is required in order to better manage the disease. Indeed, clinical and prognostic features are different from nodal and extranodal or the bone marrow (in case of plasma cell disease) counterpart. Therefore, the approach should be based on the knowledge of the peculiar behavior and natural history of disease. PMID:26265987

  14. Devil's claw root: ulcers and gastrointestinal bleeding?

    PubMed

    2013-12-01

    Harpagophytum procumbens, or devil's claw, is an African plant whose root is used to relieve minor joint symptoms. Several cases of gastrointestinal bleeding associated with the use of devil's claw root have been reported. A systematic review of the adverse effects of devil's claw root in about 20 randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trials showed mainly gastrointestinal effects: gastralgia and dyspepsia. In practice, devil's claw root exposes patients to the risk of sometimes serious upper gastrointestinal disorders, yet has no established efficacy beyond a placebo effect. It is best avoided. PMID:24600731

  15. Ubiquitin proteasome system research in gastrointestinal cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Jia-Ling; Huang, Chang-Zhi

    2016-02-15

    The ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) is important for the degradation of proteins in eukaryotic cells. It is involved in nearly every cellular process and plays an important role in maintaining body homeostasis. An increasing body of evidence has linked alterations in the UPS to gastrointestinal malignancies, including esophageal, gastric and colorectal cancers. Here, we summarize the current literature detailing the involvement of the UPS in gastrointestinal cancer, highlighting its role in tumor occurrence and development, providing information for therapeutic targets research and anti-gastrointestinal tumor drug design. PMID:26909134

  16. Ubiquitin proteasome system research in gastrointestinal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Jia-Ling; Huang, Chang-Zhi

    2016-01-01

    The ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) is important for the degradation of proteins in eukaryotic cells. It is involved in nearly every cellular process and plays an important role in maintaining body homeostasis. An increasing body of evidence has linked alterations in the UPS to gastrointestinal malignancies, including esophageal, gastric and colorectal cancers. Here, we summarize the current literature detailing the involvement of the UPS in gastrointestinal cancer, highlighting its role in tumor occurrence and development, providing information for therapeutic targets research and anti-gastrointestinal tumor drug design. PMID:26909134

  17. The cutaneous manifestations of gastrointestinal malignancy.

    PubMed

    Schadt, Courtney R

    2016-06-01

    The skin is often the herald of an underlying systemic illness, and gastrointestinal malignancies can present in numerous ways in the skin. Paraneoplastic phenomenon, such as acanthosis nigricans and tripe palm, may be the first indicator of a gastrointestinal malignancy. In addition, gastrointestinal cancers can metastasize to the skin, as described in the well-known Sister Mary Joseph's nodule. Inflammatory systemic conditions such as dermatomyositis and multicentric reticulohistiocytosis can be associated with underlying malignancy. Finally, in numerous genetic syndromes with underlying malignancies, such as Muir-Torre, recognition of the skin signs leads to early diagnosis and screening. PMID:27178686

  18. [Metagenomics in studying gastrointestinal tract microorganism].

    PubMed

    Xu, Bo; Yang, Yunjuan; Li, Junjun; Tang, Xianghua; Mu, Yuelin; Huang, Zunxi

    2013-12-01

    Animal gastrointestinal tract contains a complex community of microbes, whose composition ultimately reflects the co-evolution of microorganisms with their animal host. The gut microbial community of humans and animals has received significant attention from researchers because of its association with health and disease. The application of metagenomics technology enables researchers to study not only the microbial composition but also the function of microbes in the gastrointestinal tract. In this paper, combined with our own findings, we summarized advances in studying gastrointestinal tract microorganism with metagenomics and the bioinformatics technology.

  19. Leakage Sign for Primary Intracerebral Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Hirohata, Masaru; Nakamura, Yukihiko; Takeshige, Nobuyuki; Aoki, Takachika; Hattori, Gousuke; Sakata, Kiyohiko; Abe, Toshi; Uchiyama, Yuusuke; Sakamoto, Teruo; Morioka, Motohiro

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose— Recent studies of intracerebral hemorrhage treatments have highlighted the need to identify reliable predictors of hematoma expansion. Several studies have suggested that the spot sign on computed tomographic angiography (CTA) is a sensitive radiological predictor of hematoma expansion in the acute phase. However, the spot sign has low sensitivity for hematoma expansion. In this study, we evaluated the usefulness of a novel predictive method, called the leakage sign. Methods— We performed CTA for 80 consecutive patients presenting with spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage. Two scans were completed: CTA phase and delayed phase (5 minutes after the CTA phase). By comparing the CTA phase images, we set a region of interest with a 10-mm diameter and calculated the Hounsfield units. We defined a positive leakage sign as a >10% increase in Hounsfield units in the region of interest. Additionally, hematoma expansion was determined on plain computed tomography at 24 hours in patients who did not undergo emergent surgery. Results— Positive spot signs and leakage signs were present in 18 (22%) patients and 35 (43%) patients, respectively. The leakage sign had higher sensitivity (93.3%) and specificity (88.9%) for hematoma expansion than the spot sign. The leakage sign, but not the spot sign, was significantly related with poor outcomes (severely disabled, vegetative state, and death) in all of the patients (P=0.03) and in patients with a hemorrhage in the putamen (P=0.0016). Conclusions— The results indicate that the leakage sign is a useful and sensitive method to predict hematoma expansion. PMID:26931155

  20. Intercellular Cross-talk in Intracerebral Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Egashira, Yusuke; Hua, Ya; Keep, Richard F.; Xi, Guohua

    2015-01-01

    Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is a devastating cerebrovascular disorder with high mortality and morbidity. Currently, there are few treatment strategies for ICH-induced brain injury. A recent increase in interest in the pathophysiology of ICH, has led to elucidation of the pathways underlying ICH-induced brain injury, pathways where intercellular and hematoma to cell signaling play important roles. In this review, we summarize recent advances in ICH research focusing on intercellular and hematoma:cell cross-talk related to brain injury and recovery after ICH. PMID:25863131

  1. Hemorrhage Near Fetal Rat Bone: Preliminary Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigelow, Timothy A.; Miller, Rita J.; Blue, James P.; O'Brien, William D.

    2006-05-01

    High-intensity ultrasound has shown potential in treating many ailments requiring noninvasive tissue necrosis. However, little work has been done on using ultrasound to ablate pathologies on or near the developing fetus. For example, Congenital Cystic Adenomatoid Malformation (cyst on lungs), Sacrococcygeal Teratoma (benign tumor on tail bone), and Twin-Twin Transfusion Syndrome (one twin pumps blood to other twin) are selected problems that will potentially benefit from noninvasive ultrasound treatments. Before these applications can be explored, potential ultrasound-induced bioeffects should be understood. Specifically, ultrasound-induced hemorrhage near the fetal rat skull was investigated. An f/1 spherically focused transducer (5.1-cm focal length) was used to expose the skull of 18- to 19-day-gestation exteriorized rat fetuses. The ultrasound pulse had a center frequency of 0.92 MHz and pulse duration of 9.6 μs. The fetuses were exposed to 1 of 4 exposure conditions (denoted A, B, C, and D) in addition to a sham exposure. Three of the exposures consisted of a peak compressional pressure of 10 MPa, a peak rarefactional pressure of 6.7 MPa, and pulse repetition frequencies of 100 Hz (A), 250 Hz (B), and 500 Hz (C), corresponding to time-average intensities of 1.9 W/cm2, 4.7 W/cm2, and 9.4 W/cm2, respectively. Exposure D consisted of a peak compressional pressure of 6.7 MPa, a peak rarefactional pressure of 5.0 MPa, and a PRF of 500 Hz corresponding to a time-average intensity of 4.6 W/cm2. Hemorrhage occurrence increased slightly with increasing time-average intensity (i.e., 11% for A, 28% for B, 31% for C, and 19% for D with a 9% occurrence when the fetuses were not exposed). The low overall occurrence of hemorrhaging may be attributed to fetal motion (observed in over half of the fetuses from the backscattered echo during the exposure). The mean hemorrhage sizes were 3.1 mm2 for A, 2.5 mm2 for B, 2.7 mm2 for C, and 5.1 mm2 for D. The larger lesions at D may

  2. Spontaneous labyrinthine hemorrhage in sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Whitehead, R E; MacDonald, C B; Melhem, E R; McMahon, L

    1998-09-01

    We report the clinical and MR imaging findings in two African-American patients with manifestations of sickle cell disease affecting the inner ear. Both suffered sudden-onset sensorineural hearing loss and vestibular symptoms, and both had high labyrinthine signal on T1-weighted MR images attributed to labyrinthine hemorrhage. Follow-up studies of the first patient revealed a decrease in abnormal vestibular signal. Careful attention to the labyrinth on T1-weighted MR images can reveal vestibulocochlear clinical findings in sickle cell patients, with important implications for management and prognosis. PMID:9763373

  3. Anterior ethmoidal artery aneurysm and intracerebral hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    da Costa, L B; Valiante, T; Terbrugge, K; Tymianski, M

    2006-09-01

    The association between the formation of intracranial aneurysms and situations of increased blood flow in certain areas of the brain is well accepted today. It has been seen in association with arteriovenous malformations of the brain, carotid occlusion, and Moyamoya disease. The occurrence of aneurysms in small arteries of the skull base, with the exception of the intracavernous carotid artery, however, is rare. We report a case of a 55-year-old woman who presented with an intracerebral hemorrhage caused by a ruptured anterior ethmoidal artery aneurysm. To the best of our knowledge, this is only the second case of documented intracranial bleeding from such a lesion.

  4. Fatal dengue hemorrhagic fever imported into Germany.

    PubMed

    Schmidt-Chanasit, J; Tenner-Racz, K; Poppert, D; Emmerich, P; Frank, C; Dinges, C; Penning, R; Nerlich, A; Racz, P; Günther, S

    2012-08-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is an arthropod-borne virus (family Flaviviridae) causing dengue fever or dengue hemorrhagic fever. Here, we report the first fatal DENV infection imported into Germany. A female traveler was hospitalized with fever and abdominal pain after returning from Ecuador. Due to a suspected acute acalculous cholecystitis, cholecystectomy was performed. After cholecystectomy, severe spontaneous bleeding from the abdominal wound occurred and the patient died. Postmortem analysis of transudate and tissue demonstrated a DENV secondary infection of the patient and a gallbladder wall thickening (GBWT) due to an extensive edema.

  5. Dengue hemorrhagic fever in Thai society.

    PubMed

    Kantachuvessiri, Aree

    2002-03-01

    Dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) is one of the most important infectious diseases in Thailand for many decades. Knowledge of DHF is vital to its control. Like other tropical countries, Thailand is facing this resurgent disease. The Thai National Dengue Prevention and Control Plan has been recently implemented to prevent and reduce the problems resulting from the spread of DHF. In this paper, a three-pronged strategy is offered that will create social mobilization at family, community, and national level and that will, therefore, reduce the socioeconomic and health impacts of DHF.

  6. Spontaneous retroperitoneal hemorrhage from a ruptured hypernephroma.

    PubMed

    Trivedi, R; Levy, M; Ibrahim, I; Bonacarti, A

    1979-01-01

    The clinical presentation and roentgenographic findings of renal cell carcinoma have been consistently variable. These patients can appear with flank pain mimicking ureteral colic, flank tumors, or symptomatic metastasis [1]. Systemic cardiac manifestations including cardiomegaly with congestive heart failure due to arteriovenous fistula formation have been reported [2] Roentgenographic findings may show the tumor to be either vascular or avascular. It may present as a spontaneous perforation of the pelvic ureteral system which is demonstrated by intravenous pyelography (3). In this article, we describe a case of hypernephroma in a cyst wall causing severe spontaneous hemorrhage in the retroperitoneal space resulting in a state of hypovolemic shock.

  7. Genes and environment in neonatal intraventricular hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Ment, Laura R; Ådén, Ulrika; Bauer, Charles R; Bada, Henrietta S; Carlo, Waldemar A; Kaiser, Jeffrey R; Lin, Aiping; Cotten, Charles Michael; Murray, Jeffrey; Page, Grier; Hallman, Mikko; Lifton, Richard P; Zhang, Heping

    2015-12-01

    Emerging data suggest intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) of the preterm neonate is a complex disorder with contributions from both the environment and the genome. Environmental analyses suggest factors mediating both cerebral blood flow and angiogenesis contribute to IVH, while candidate gene studies report variants in angiogenesis, inflammation, and vascular pathways. Gene-by-environment interactions demonstrate the interaction between the environment and the genome, and a non-replicated genome-wide association study suggests that both environmental and genetic factors contribute to the risk for severe IVH in very low-birth weight preterm neonates.

  8. [Galanin: a new biologically active gastrointestinal neuropeptide].

    PubMed

    Bauer, F E

    1990-03-01

    The 29 amino acid containing neuropeptide galanin is localized in the intrinsic nervous system of the entire gastrointestinal tract and the pancreas. It was found in man and several animal species. Molecular biology studies revealed different molecular forms of galanin in several mammalian species including man. The galanin precursor was also found. Galanin shows several potent pharmacological actions: it inhibits gastrointestinal motility in man. It also has an inhibitory effect on intestinal smooth muscle contractility of several animal species. These actions are mediated directly by opening of potassium channels and indirectly by inhibition of acetylcholine release. In addition galanin inhibits pancreatic hormone secretion (i.e. hypoinsulinemia, hyperglycemia) and partly the release of hormones localized in the gastrointestinal tract. On exocrine glands in man (salivary glands) galanin has hydrokinetic actions. The physiological role of galanin might be regulation of gastrointestinal motility, control of secretory function of intestine and a regulatory role in endocrine and exocrine gland secretion.

  9. METHOD OF SUPPRESSING GASTROINTESTINAL UREASE ACTIVITY

    DOEpatents

    Visek, W.J.

    1963-04-23

    This patent shows a method of increasing the growth rate of chicks. Certain diacyl substituted ureas such as alloxan, murexide, and barbituric acid are added to their feed, thereby suppressing gastrointestinal urease activity and thus promoting growth. (AEC)

  10. The microbiome of the chicken gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Yeoman, Carl J; Chia, Nicholas; Jeraldo, Patricio; Sipos, Maksim; Goldenfeld, Nigel D; White, Bryan A

    2012-06-01

    The modern molecular biology movement was developed in the 1960s with the conglomeration of biology, chemistry, and physics. Today, molecular biology is an integral part of studies aimed at understanding the evolution and ecology of gastrointestinal microbial communities. Molecular techniques have led to significant gains in our understanding of the chicken gastrointestinal microbiome. New advances, primarily in DNA sequencing technologies, have equipped researchers with the ability to explore these communities at an unprecedented level. A reinvigorated movement in systems biology offers a renewed promise in obtaining a more complete understanding of chicken gastrointestinal microbiome dynamics and their contributions to increasing productivity, food value, security, and safety as well as reducing the public health impact of raising production animals. Here, we contextualize the contributions molecular biology has already made to our understanding of the chicken gastrointestinal microbiome and propose targeted research directions that could further exploit molecular technologies to improve the economy of the poultry industry.

  11. [Galanin: a new biologically active gastrointestinal neuropeptide].

    PubMed

    Bauer, F E

    1990-03-01

    The 29 amino acid containing neuropeptide galanin is localized in the intrinsic nervous system of the entire gastrointestinal tract and the pancreas. It was found in man and several animal species. Molecular biology studies revealed different molecular forms of galanin in several mammalian species including man. The galanin precursor was also found. Galanin shows several potent pharmacological actions: it inhibits gastrointestinal motility in man. It also has an inhibitory effect on intestinal smooth muscle contractility of several animal species. These actions are mediated directly by opening of potassium channels and indirectly by inhibition of acetylcholine release. In addition galanin inhibits pancreatic hormone secretion (i.e. hypoinsulinemia, hyperglycemia) and partly the release of hormones localized in the gastrointestinal tract. On exocrine glands in man (salivary glands) galanin has hydrokinetic actions. The physiological role of galanin might be regulation of gastrointestinal motility, control of secretory function of intestine and a regulatory role in endocrine and exocrine gland secretion. PMID:1693024

  12. Can Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumors Be Found Early?

    MedlinePlus

    ... problems. Carcinoid tumors often are found incidentally (by accident). These tumors aren’t causing any symptoms but ... Carcinoid Tumors? Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention Early Detection, Diagnosis, and Staging Treating Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumors Talking ...

  13. Laparoscopic approach in gastrointestinal emergencies.

    PubMed

    Jimenez Rodriguez, Rosa M; Segura-Sampedro, Juan José; Flores-Cortés, Mercedes; López-Bernal, Francisco; Martín, Cristobalina; Diaz, Verónica Pino; Ciuro, Felipe Pareja; Ruiz, Javier Padillo

    2016-03-01

    This review focuses on the laparoscopic approach to gastrointestinal emergencies and its more recent indications. Laparoscopic surgery has a specific place in elective procedures, but that does not apply in emergency situations. In specific emergencies, there is a huge range of indications and different techniques to apply, and not all of them are equally settle. We consider that the most controversial points in minimally invasive procedures are indications in emergency situations due to technical difficulties. Some pathologies, such as oesophageal emergencies, obstruction due to colon cancer, abdominal hernias or incarcerated postsurgical hernias, are nearly always resolved by conventional surgery, that is, an open approach due to limited intraabdominal cavity space or due to the vulnerability of the bowel. These technical problems have been solved in many diseases, such as for perforated peptic ulcer or acute appendectomy for which a laparoscopic approach has become a well-known and globally supported procedure. On the other hand, endoscopic procedures have acquired further indications, relegating surgical solutions to a second place; this happens in cholangitis or pancreatic abscess drainage. This endoluminal approach avoids the need for laparoscopic development in these diseases. Nevertheless, new instruments and new technologies could extend the laparoscopic approach to a broader array of potentials procedures. There remains, however, a long way to go. PMID:26973409

  14. Gastrointestinal complications of diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Babu; Babu, Shithu; Walker, Jessica; Walker, Adrian B; Pappachan, Joseph M

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus affects virtually every organ system in the body and the degree of organ involvement depends on the duration and severity of the disease, and other co-morbidities. Gastrointestinal (GI) involvement can present with esophageal dysmotility, gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD), gastroparesis, enteropathy, non alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and glycogenic hepatopathy. Severity of GERD is inversely related to glycemic control and management is with prokinetics and proton pump inhibitors. Diabetic gastroparesis manifests as early satiety, bloating, vomiting, abdominal pain and erratic glycemic control. Gastric emptying scintigraphy is considered the gold standard test for diagnosis. Management includes dietary modifications, maintaining euglycemia, prokinetics, endoscopic and surgical treatments. Diabetic enteropathy is also common and management involves glycemic control and symptomatic measures. NAFLD is considered a hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome and treatment is mainly lifestyle measures, with diabetes and dyslipidemia management when coexistent. Glycogenic hepatopathy is a manifestation of poorly controlled type 1 diabetes and is managed by prompt insulin treatment. Though GI complications of diabetes are relatively common, awareness about its manifestations and treatment options are low among physicians. Optimal management of GI complications is important for appropriate metabolic control of diabetes and improvement in quality of life of the patient. This review is an update on the GI complications of diabetes, their pathophysiology, diagnostic evaluation and management. PMID:23772273

  15. Laparoscopic approach in gastrointestinal emergencies

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez Rodriguez, Rosa M; Segura-Sampedro, Juan José; Flores-Cortés, Mercedes; López-Bernal, Francisco; Martín, Cristobalina; Diaz, Verónica Pino; Ciuro, Felipe Pareja; Ruiz, Javier Padillo

    2016-01-01

    This review focuses on the laparoscopic approach to gastrointestinal emergencies and its more recent indications. Laparoscopic surgery has a specific place in elective procedures, but that does not apply in emergency situations. In specific emergencies, there is a huge range of indications and different techniques to apply, and not all of them are equally settle. We consider that the most controversial points in minimally invasive procedures are indications in emergency situations due to technical difficulties. Some pathologies, such as oesophageal emergencies, obstruction due to colon cancer, abdominal hernias or incarcerated postsurgical hernias, are nearly always resolved by conventional surgery, that is, an open approach due to limited intraabdominal cavity space or due to the vulnerability of the bowel. These technical problems have been solved in many diseases, such as for perforated peptic ulcer or acute appendectomy for which a laparoscopic approach has become a well-known and globally supported procedure. On the other hand, endoscopic procedures have acquired further indications, relegating surgical solutions to a second place; this happens in cholangitis or pancreatic abscess drainage. This endoluminal approach avoids the need for laparoscopic development in these diseases. Nevertheless, new instruments and new technologies could extend the laparoscopic approach to a broader array of potentials procedures. There remains, however, a long way to go. PMID:26973409

  16. Nutritional management of gastrointestinal disease.

    PubMed

    Zoran, Deb

    2003-11-01

    The gastrointestinal (GI) tract is primarily responsible for acquiring and digesting food, absorbing nutrients and water, and expelling wastes from the body as feces. A proper diet and normally functioning GI tract are integral for the delivery of nutrients, prevention of nutrient deficiencies and malnutrition, repair of damaged intestinal epithelium, restoration of normal luminal bacterial populations, promotion of normal GI motility, and maintenance of normal immune functions (eg, both tolerance and protection from pathogens). The amount of food, its form, the frequency of feeding, and the composition of diet each have important effects on GI function and may be used to help ameliorate signs of GI disease. Although both nutrients and nonnutritional components of a diet are important to GI health, they also may cause or influence the development of GI pathology (eg, antibiotic responsive diarrhea, inflammatory bowel disease, dietary intolerance, or sensitivity and/or allergy). The appropriate diet may have a profound effect on intestinal recovery and successful management of chronic or severe GI disease.

  17. ADAM Proteases and Gastrointestinal Function.

    PubMed

    Jones, Jennifer C; Rustagi, Shelly; Dempsey, Peter J

    2016-01-01

    A disintegrin and metalloproteinases (ADAMs) are a family of cell surface proteases that regulate diverse cellular functions, including cell adhesion, migration, cellular signaling, and proteolysis. Proteolytically active ADAMs are responsible for ectodomain shedding of membrane-associated proteins. ADAMs rapidly modulate key cell signaling pathways in response to changes in the extracellular environment (e.g., inflammation) and play a central role in coordinating intercellular communication within the local microenvironment. ADAM10 and ADAM17 are the most studied members of the ADAM family in the gastrointestinal tract. ADAMs regulate many cellular processes associated with intestinal development, cell fate specification, and the maintenance of intestinal stem cell/progenitor populations. Several signaling pathway molecules that undergo ectodomain shedding by ADAMs [e.g., ligands and receptors from epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)/ErbB and tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) receptor (TNFR) families] help drive and control intestinal inflammation and injury/repair responses. Dysregulation of these processes through aberrant ADAM expression or sustained ADAM activity is linked to chronic inflammation, inflammation-associated cancer, and tumorigenesis.

  18. Potassium Channelopathies and Gastrointestinal Ulceration

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jaeyong; Lee, Seung Hun; Giebisch, Gerhard; Wang, Tong

    2016-01-01

    Potassium channels and transporters maintain potassium homeostasis and play significant roles in several different biological actions via potassium ion regulation. In previous decades, the key revelations that potassium channels and transporters are involved in the production of gastric acid and the regulation of secretion in the stomach have been recognized. Drugs used to treat peptic ulceration are often potassium transporter inhibitors. It has also been reported that potassium channels are involved in ulcerative colitis. Direct toxicity to the intestines from nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs has been associated with altered potassium channel activities. Several reports have indicated that the long-term use of the antianginal drug Nicorandil, an adenosine triphosphate-sensitive potassium channel opener, increases the chances of ulceration and perforation from the oral to anal regions throughout the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Several of these drug features provide further insights into the role of potassium channels in the occurrence of ulceration in the GI tract. The purpose of this review is to investigate whether potassium channelopathies are involved in the mechanisms responsible for ulceration that occurs throughout the GI tract. PMID:27784845

  19. ADAM Proteases and Gastrointestinal Function

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Jennifer C.; Rustagi, Shelly; Dempsey, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    A disintegrin and metalloproteinases (ADAMs) are a family of cell surface proteases that regulate diverse cellular functions, including cell adhesion, migration, cellular signaling, and proteolysis. Proteolytically active ADAMs are responsible for ectodomain shedding of membrane-associated proteins. ADAMs rapidly modulate key cell signaling pathways in response to changes in the extracellular environment (e.g., inflammation) and play a central role in coordinating intercellular communication within the local microenvironment. ADAM10 and ADAM17 are the most studied members of the ADAM family in the gastrointestinal tract. ADAMs regulate many cellular processes associated with intestinal development, cell fate specification, and the maintenance of intestinal stem cell/progenitor populations. Several signaling pathway molecules that undergo ectodomain shedding by ADAMs [e.g., ligands and receptors from epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)/ErbB and tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) receptor (TNFR) families] help drive and control intestinal inflammation and injury/repair responses. Dysregulation of these processes through aberrant ADAM expression or sustained ADAM activity is linked to chronic inflammation, inflammation-associated cancer, and tumorigenesis. PMID:26667078

  20. Alveolar hemorrhage in vasculitis: primary and secondary.

    PubMed

    Cordier, Jean-François; Cottin, Vincent

    2011-06-01

    Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (DAH) in primary and secondary vasculitis occurs when capillaritis is present. The diagnosis of DAH is considered in patients who develop progressive dyspnea with alveolar opacities on chest imaging (with density ranging from ground glass to consolidation) that cannot be explained otherwise. Hemoptysis, a valuable sign, is often absent. A decline of blood hemoglobin level over a few days without hemolysis or any hemorrhage elsewhere should be an alert for DAH. Bronchoalveolar lavage, retrieving bright red fluid, is the best diagnostic clue. Lung biopsy is not recommended. A search for anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies (ANCAs) is mandatory. Once DAH is diagnosed and hemodynamic as well as infectious causes have been excluded, ANCA-associated vasculitis is taken into account (mainly microscopic polyangiitis or Wegener granulomatosis, and, exceptionally, Churg-Strauss syndrome). Drug-induced DAH, especially antithyroid drugs such as propylthiouracil may be coupled with ANCA. Isolated DAH with capillaritis with or without ANCA is rare. DAH in systemic lupus erythematosus is either associated or not with capillaritis. Treatment of DAH should target the underlying disorder. In the primary vasculitides, corticosteroids and immunosuppressants, especially cyclophosphamide, are the mainstay of therapy, but plasma exchange, particularly in severe DAH, is the rule, although evidence of its effectiveness is awaited.

  1. Massive suprachoroidal hemorrhage: Surgical management and outcome

    PubMed Central

    Laube, Thomas; Brockmann, Claudia; Bornfeld, Norbert

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To describe options for vitreoretinal surgery in the management of massive suprachoroidal hemorrhage (SCH). Methods: Visual acuity (VA), ocular findings, timing of surgical intervention, surgical procedures, and outcomes of four patients diagnosed with massive SCH and admitted to the University Eye Clinic Essen were reviewed retrospectively. Results: Four eyes of four patients (mean age, 82 years; range, 74–89 years) were studied. In three cases the occurrence of SCH was related to cataract surgery and occurred intra- or postoperatively. One patient developed spontaneous SCH of unclear origin. Three patients had a history of arterial hypertension; one eye had high myopia, two patients suffered from cardiovascular diseases, and two patients had glaucoma. Postoperative follow up of the patients ranged from 5 to 29.5 months (mean, 19.6 months). Transscleral drainage of SCH was in all cases combined with pars plana vitrectomy, use of heavy liquids (perfluorodecalin) and silicone oil tamponade. The mean time interval from hemorrhage to surgical intervention was 16.5 days (range 5–29 days). Preoperative VA of all eyes was light perception. Two patients achieved a final postoperative visual acuity of 20/20 and 20/320, respectively, one patient improved to hand motion, and one patient resulted in no light perception. Conclusions: Surgical interventions including transscleral drainage of SCH, vitrectomy, and silicone oil tamponade are valuable options in the management of massive SCH to save the eye and possibly improve the otherwise extreme poor prognosis.

  2. Subarachnoid hemorrhage due to retained lumbar drain.

    PubMed

    Guppy, Kern H; Silverthorn, James W; Akins, Paul T

    2011-12-01

    Intrathecal spinal catheters (lumbar drains) are indicated for several medical and surgical conditions. In neurosurgical procedures, they are used to reduce intracranial and intrathecal pressures by diverting CSF. They have also been placed for therapeutic access to administer drugs, and more recently, vascular surgeons have used them to improve spinal cord perfusion during the treatment of thoracic aortic aneurysms. Insertion of these lumbar drains is not without attendant complications. One complication is the shearing of the distal end of the catheter with a resultant retained fragment. The authors report the case of a 65-year-old man who presented with a subarachnoid hemorrhage due to the migration of a retained lumbar drain that sheared off during its removal. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first case of rostral migration of a retained intrathecal catheter causing subarachnoid hemorrhage. The authors review the literature on retained intrathecal spinal catheters, and their findings support either early removal of easily accessible catheters or close monitoring with serial imaging.

  3. Blocking neutrophil diapedesis prevents hemorrhage during thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Hillgruber, Carina; Pöppelmann, Birgit; Weishaupt, Carsten; Steingräber, Annika Kathrin; Wessel, Florian; Berdel, Wolfgang E.; Gessner, J. Engelbert; Ho-Tin-Noé, Benoît

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous organ hemorrhage is the major complication in thrombocytopenia with a potential fatal outcome. However, the exact mechanisms regulating vascular integrity are still unknown. Here, we demonstrate that neutrophils recruited to inflammatory sites are the cellular culprits inducing thrombocytopenic tissue hemorrhage. Exposure of thrombocytopenic mice to UVB light provokes cutaneous petechial bleeding. This phenomenon is also observed in immune-thrombocytopenic patients when tested for UVB tolerance. Mechanistically, we show, analyzing several inflammatory models, that it is neutrophil diapedesis through the endothelial barrier that is responsible for the bleeding defect. First, bleeding is triggered by neutrophil-mediated mechanisms, which act downstream of capturing, adhesion, and crawling on the blood vessel wall and require Gαi signaling in neutrophils. Second, mutating Y731 in the cytoplasmic tail of VE-cadherin, known to selectively affect leukocyte diapedesis, but not the induction of vascular permeability, attenuates bleeding. Third, and in line with this, simply destabilizing endothelial junctions by histamine did not trigger bleeding. We conclude that specifically targeting neutrophil diapedesis through the endothelial barrier may represent a new therapeutic avenue to prevent fatal bleeding in immune-thrombocytopenic patients. PMID:26169941

  4. Diffuse Alveolar Hemorrhage in Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Nanjappa, Sowmya; Jeong, Daniel K; Muddaraju, Manjunath; Jeong, Katherine; Hill, Ebone D; Greene, John N

    2016-07-01

    Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage is a potentially fatal pulmonary disease syndrome that affects individuals with hematological and nonhematological malignancies. The range of inciting factors is wide for this syndrome and includes thrombocytopenia, underlying infection, coagulopathy, and the frequent use of anticoagulants, given the high incidence of venous thrombosis in this population. Dyspnea, fever, and cough are commonly presenting symptoms. However, clinical manifestations can be variable. Obvious bleeding (hemoptysis) is not always present and can pose a potential diagnostic challenge. Without prompt treatment, hypoxia that rapidly progresses to respiratory failure can occur. Diagnosis is primarily based on radiological and bronchoscopic findings. This syndrome is especially common in patients with hematological malignancies, given an even greater propensity for thrombocytopenia as a result of bone marrow suppression as well as the often prolonged immunosuppression in this patient population. The syndrome also has an increased incidence in individuals with hematological malignancies who have received a bone marrow transplant. We present a case series of 5 patients with acute myeloid leukemia presenting with diffuse alveolar hemorrhage at our institution. A comparison of clinical manifestations, radiographic findings, treatment course, and outcomes are described. A review of the literature and general overview of the diagnostic evaluation, differential diagnoses, pathophysiology, and treatment of this syndrome are discussed. PMID:27556667

  5. Neurological involvement in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia.

    PubMed

    Labeyrie, Paul-Emile; Courthéoux, Patrick; Babin, Emmanuel; Bergot, Emmanuel; Touzé, Emmanuel; Pelage, Jean-Pierre

    2016-07-01

    Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by epistaxis, telangiectases, and multi-organ vascular dysplasia. Head and neck localizations of HHT are recurrent, frequent associated with serious complications. The aim of this study was to describe the clinical and imaging patterns of neurological involvement in HHT and to discuss the role of interventional radiology in the management of HHT patients. Based on a multidisciplinary experience of twenty years at our center, we report here the different aspects of neurological involvement of HHT. Depending on the genetic type of the disease, vascular abnormalities may affect different organs. The knowledge of neurological involvement according to specific localization of HHT makes detection easier. As cerebral or spinal arteriovenous fistula may be present in patients with epistaxis or pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (PAVMs), radiologists should be able to detect high-risk lesions and prevent related complications. Finally, we review indications and techniques of embolization for hemorrhagic lesions and emphasize that endovascular therapies are very effective and safe in experienced hands. Head and neck imaging is commonly used for the diagnosis of HHT. Imaging plays also a key role for patient evaluation before treatment as pluridisciplinary management is needed. PMID:27059009

  6. Dengue hemorrhagic fever: clinical manifestations and management.

    PubMed

    Kabra, S K; Jain, Y; Singhal, T; Ratageri, V H

    1999-01-01

    Dengue virus infection may remain asymptomatic or manifest as nonspecific viral infection to life threatening dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF)/dengue shock syndrome (DSS). Patients with DHF/DSS have fever, hemorrhagic manifestations along with thrombocytopenia and hemoconcentration. Thrombocytopenia and hemoconcentration are distinguishing features between DHF/DSS and dengue fever (DF). Some patients with dengue fever may have significant bleed and mild thrombocytopenia but no hemoconcentration. These patients are labelled to have dengue fever with unusual bleeds. Laboratory findings in DHF/DSS include rising hematocrit, thrombocytopenia and transformed lymphocytes on peripheral smear. There may be increased transaminases, hyponatremia, transient increase in blood urea nitrogen and creatinine. In severe disease there may be lab evidence of dissemination intravascular coagulation. X-ray film of the chest may show pleural-effusion. Ultrasonogram of abdomen may detect thickened gall bladder wall with hepatomegaly and ascitis. In some patients there may be abnormality in electrocardiogram and echocardiogram. The diagnosis of DHF/DSS is based on typical clinical findings. For confirmation of dengue virus infection viral culture can be done on blood obtained from patients during early phase of illness. In later part of illness antibodies against dengue virus can be demonstrated by various techniques. The treatment of DF is symptomatic. For control of fever nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs should be avoided. DHF/DSS are managed by intravenous fluid infusion with repeated monitoring of vital parameters and packed cell volume (PCV).

  7. A CAD System for Hemorrhagic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Nowinski, Wieslaw L; Qian, Guoyu; Hanley, Daniel F

    2014-09-01

    Computer-aided detection/diagnosis (CAD) is a key component of routine clinical practice, increasingly used for detection, interpretation, quantification and decision support. Despite a critical need, there is no clinically accepted CAD system for stroke yet. Here we introduce a CAD system for hemorrhagic stroke. This CAD system segments, quantifies, and displays hematoma in 2D/3D, and supports evacuation of hemorrhage by thrombolytic treatment monitoring progression and quantifying clot removal. It supports seven-step workflow: select patient, add a new study, process patient's scans, show segmentation results, plot hematoma volumes, show 3D synchronized time series hematomas, and generate report. The system architecture contains four components: library, tools, application with user interface, and hematoma segmentation algorithm. The tools include a contour editor, 3D surface modeler, 3D volume measure, histogramming, hematoma volume plot, and 3D synchronized time-series hematoma display. The CAD system has been designed and implemented in C++. It has also been employed in the CLEAR and MISTIE phase-III, multicenter clinical trials. This stroke CAD system is potentially useful in research and clinical applications, particularly for clinical trials.

  8. Ehrlichia Meningitis Mimicking Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Dredla, Brynn

    2015-01-01

    Thunderclap headache is a sudden and severe headache that can occur after an aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Subarachnoid hemorrhage is a medical emergency that requires prompt attention and hospitalization. Patients with thunderclap headache often undergo a noncontrast head computed tomography (CT) scan to ascertain SAH bleeding and, if the scan is negative, then undergo a lumbar puncture to look for cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) red blood cells (RBCs), which would be consistent with an aneurysmal leak. If the initial CT is negative and CSF is positive for RBCs, patients are usually admitted to the hospital for evaluation of intracranial aneurysm. We encountered a patient with thunderclap headache whose initial head CT was negative for SAH and whose CSF tested positive for RBCs. The patient was referred to our center for evaluation and management of aneurysmal SAH. However, on careful review of the patient’s medical history, serum laboratory values, and spinal fluid values, the patient was diagnosed with Ehrlichia chaffeensis meningitis. While Ehrlichia meningitis is rare, it is important to recognize the clinical clues that could help avoid formal cerebral angiography, a costly and potentially unnecessary procedure. We present how this case represented a cognitive framing bias and anchoring heuristic as well as steps that medical providers can use to prevent such cognitive errors in diagnosis. PMID:27053985

  9. Gastrointestinal and Hepatic Involvement in Hypereosinophilic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hurairah, Abu

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this investigation was to study the gastrointestinal and hepatic involvement in hypereosinophilic syndrome (HES). Gastrointestinal or hepatic involvement is estimated to affect up to one-third of patients with HES, although most of the clinical evidence has been derived from case reports. In literature, HES presenting with hepatitis and jaundice with subsequent development of colitis is a rare clinicopathologic entity. Given the clinical implications, physicians should include HES among differentials in these types of presentations. PMID:27733964

  10. A 100-year perspective on gastrointestinal motility.

    PubMed

    Szurszewski, J H

    1998-03-01

    This contribution to the centennial commemorative issue of the American Journal of Physiology: Gastrointestinal and Liver Physiology identifies some of the important studies of spontaneous electrical and motor activity in the gastrointestinal tract published in the Journal between 1898 and 1996. Emphasis is given to the contributions made by Walter B. Cannon, Walter C. Alvarez, Emil Bozler, C. Ladd Prosser, and James Christensen. PMID:9565541

  11. Cytokine-induced alterations of gastrointestinal motility in gastrointestinal disorders

    PubMed Central

    Akiho, Hirotada; Ihara, Eikichi; Motomura, Yasuaki; Nakamura, Kazuhiko

    2011-01-01

    Inflammation and immune activation in the gut are usually accompanied by alteration of gastrointestinal (GI) motility. In infection, changes in motor function have been linked to host defense by enhancing the expulsion of the infectious agents. In this review, we describe the evidence for inflammation and immune activation in GI infection, inflammatory bowel disease, ileus, achalasia, eosinophilic esophagitis, microscopic colitis, celiac disease, pseudo-obstruction and functional GI disorders. We also describe the possible mechanisms by which inflammation and immune activation in the gut affect GI motility. GI motility disorder is a broad spectrum disturbance of GI physiology. Although several systems including central nerves, enteric nerves, interstitial cells of Cajal and smooth muscles contribute to a coordinated regulation of GI motility, smooth muscle probably plays the most important role. Thus, we focus on the relationship between activation of cytokines induced by adaptive immune response and alteration of GI smooth muscle contractility. Accumulated evidence has shown that Th1 and Th2 cytokines cause hypocontractility and hypercontractility of inflamed intestinal smooth muscle. Th1 cytokines downregulate CPI-17 and L-type Ca2+ channels and upregulate regulators of G protein signaling 4, which contributes to hypocontractility of inflamed intestinal smooth muscle. Conversely, Th2 cytokines cause hypercontractilty via signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 or mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathways. Th1 and Th2 cytokines have opposing effects on intestinal smooth muscle contraction via 5-hydroxytryptamine signaling. Understanding the immunological basis of altered GI motor function could lead to new therapeutic strategies for GI functional and inflammatory disorders. PMID:22013552

  12. Anticoagulant Therapy-Induced Gallbladder Hemorrhage after Cardiac Valve Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Seong Ho; Lee, Hae Young; Kim, Hyun Su

    2015-01-01

    Anticoagulation therapy is essential after cardiac valve surgery. However, spontaneous bleeding remains a major concern during anticoagulation therapy. Spontaneous gallbladder (GB) hemorrhage (hemobilia) is a rare occurrence during standard anticoagulation therapy. This report presents a case of GB hemorrhage that occurred shortly after initiating oral anticoagulant therapy in a patient who had undergone mitral valve replacement surgery. PMID:26665115

  13. Hemorrhagic enteritis in captive American kestrels (Falco sparverius)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sileo, L.; Franson, J.C.; Graham, D.L.; Domermuth, C.H.; Rattner, B.A.; Pattee, O.H.

    1983-01-01

    Hemorrhagic enteritis and hepatitis of suspected adenovirus etiology were the apparent cause of death of nine captive American kestrels. Cloacal hemorrhage was the only prominent gross lesion: disseminated hepatocellular necrosis, and intranuclear inclusion bodies were evident microscopically. Electron microscopy revealed numerous adenovirus-like particles associated with the hepatic lesions. Attempts to serologically identify the agent were unsuccessful.

  14. Endovascular Therapies for Primary Postpartum Hemorrhage: Techniques and Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Gipson, Matthew G.; Smith, Mitchell T.

    2013-01-01

    Interventional radiologists are often consulted for acute management of hemorrhagic complications in obstetric and gynecologic patients. The aim of this article is to review the common indications for vascular embolization in obstetric and gynecologic emergencies, specifically in the setting of primary postpartum hemorrhage, and to discuss the technique and outcomes of endovascular treatment. PMID:24436559

  15. Intravitreal ranibizumab in treating extensive traumatic submacular hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Abdul-Salim, Ismail; Embong, Zunaina; Khairy-Shamel, Sonny-Teo; Raja-Azmi, Mohd-Noor

    2013-01-01

    Herein, we report our experience in treating extensive traumatic submacular hemorrhage with a single dose of intravitreal ranibizumab. A 23-year-old healthy Malay man presented with a progressive reduction of central vision in the left eye of 2 days’ duration following a history of blunt trauma. Visual acuity was reduced to counting fingers. Examination revealed infero-temporal subconjunctival hemorrhage, traumatic anterior uveitis, and an extensive sub-macular hemorrhage with suspicion of a choroidal rupture in the affected eye. He was initially treated conservatively with topical prednisolone acetate 1%. The subconjunctival hemorrhage and anterior uveitis resolved but his vision remained poor with minimal resolution of the submacular hemorrhage at 1 week follow-up (day 12 post-trauma). In view of the poor resolution of submacular hemorrhage, he was treated with a single dose of 0.5 mg intravitreal ranibizumab at day 20 post-trauma. At 4 weeks post-intravitreal ranibizumab, there was an improvement in visual acuity (from counting fingers to 6/45) and complete resolution of the submacular hemorrhage with presence of a choroidal rupture scar temporal to the fovea, which was not seen clearly at presentation due to obscuration by blood. His visual acuity further improved to 6/18 at 3 months post-trauma. Although this single case had a favorable outcome, a large population cohort study is needed to establish the effectiveness of intravitreal ranibizumab in treating extensive traumatic submacular hemorrhage. PMID:23589678

  16. Intracerebral hemorrhage caused by varicella-induced thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Lizarazo, Jairo; Castellanos, María Fernanda; Omaña, Claudia Rosa; Chaín, Miguel; Villamizar, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    We present the case of a previously healthy 44-years-old man with chickenpox, severe thrombocytopenia, mucosal hemorrhage, and intracerebral hemorrhage in the right hemisphere. The patient was treated with platelets and high doses of steroids. He recovered although with persistent left homonymous hemianopsia and epilepsy, which were controlled with medication. PMID:27622799

  17. Intraventricular hemorrhage caused by intracranial venous sinus thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hongbo; Song, Shuijiang; Ouyang, Zhiyuan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) may occur as an isolated event from primary ventricular bleeding or as a complication of brain hemorrhage from another etiology. It is associated with high mortality and morbidity. The underlying risk factors include hypertension and aneurysms, among others. However, not all the exact etiologies are known. In this study, a case of a 24-year-old man who suffered from a headache and a decline in memory has been reported. A brain computed tomography scan suggested the diagnosis of spontaneous intraventricular hemorrhage. However, brain magnetic resonance imaging, magnetic resonance venography, and other tests eventually confirmed cerebral venous sinus thrombosis. Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis may be one of the causes of intraventricular hemorrhage and should be considered for unexplained intraventricular hemorrhage. PMID:27428184

  18. Krypton and argon laser photocoagulation effects in subretinal hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Chino, K; Ohki, R; Noyori, K

    1986-01-01

    Previous studies suggested that krypton laser photocoagulation was more effective in the treatment of macular diseases than argon laser. Furthermore, it could perform photocoagulation more effectively in some lesions with subretinal hemorrhage, because the krypton laser beam was poorly absorbed by hemoglobin. In the present experiment, hemorrhagic retinal detachment was produced in monkey eyes with Q-switched Nd-YAG laser, and 4 weeks later photocoagulation was performed with krypton and argon lasers to compare the differences in the effects of these two lasers. When the subretinal hemorrhage and a heavy coagulation effect was produced in the detached retina, but no coagulation effects were observed in the choroid. Krypton laser beam could go through the hemorrhage and certain coagulation effects were observed in the choroid and the detached retina. It is suggested that krypton laser photocoagulation is more effective in the lesions behind subretinal hemorrhages than photocoagulation with argon laser.

  19. Clinical Features of Liver Cancer with Cerebral Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Lu, Qiuhong; Chen, Li; Zeng, Jinsheng; Huang, Gelun; Qin, Chao; Cheng, Daobin; Yu, Lixia; Liang, Zhijian

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Cerebral hemorrhage is common in patients with cancer, but the clinical features and pathogenesis of liver cancer patients with cerebral hemorrhage are not well known. MATERIAL AND METHODS Liver cancer patients who developed cerebral hemorrhage were recruited from the First Affiliated Hospital of Guangxi Medical University between January 2003 and December 2014. We retrospectively analyzed clinical presentations, results of laboratory tests, and imaging examinations. The clinical features and pathogenesis were summarized. RESULTS Among 11133 patients with liver cancer, 9 patients (0.08%), including 3 females and 6 males met the inclusion criteria. The age range was 48-73 years and the average age was 61.67±8.97 years. Five patients did not have traditional hemorrhage risk factors and 4s had the risk factors; however, all had developed hepatocellular carcinoma, and 3 had developed metastasis. All 9 patients showed elevated tumor markers: an increased AFP level was detected in 6 patients, coagulation dysfunctions in 8 patients, and abnormal liver functions in 6 patients. Five patients had developed cerebral hemorrhagic lesions in the lobes of their brains, while hemorrhagic lesions in the basal ganglia occurred in 3 patients and in the brainstem in only 1 patient. Four patients had clear consciousness, while 5 patients were in coma and showed poor prognosis. CONCLUSIONS Patients who have liver cancer complicated with cerebral hemorrhage usually lack traditional risk factors of cerebral hemorrhage. The site of cerebral hemorrhage is often detected in the lobes of the brain. Coagulation dysfunctions might be the main pathogenesis of liver cancer complicated with cerebral hemorrhage. PMID:27209058

  20. Clinical Features of Liver Cancer with Cerebral Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Qiuhong; Chen, Li; Zeng, Jinsheng; Huang, Gelun; Qin, Chao; Cheng, Daobin; Yu, Lixia; Liang, Zhijian

    2016-01-01

    Background Cerebral hemorrhage is common in patients with cancer, but the clinical features and pathogenesis of liver cancer patients with cerebral hemorrhage are not well known. Material/Methods Liver cancer patients who developed cerebral hemorrhage were recruited from the First Affiliated Hospital of Guangxi Medical University between January 2003 and December 2014. We retrospectively analyzed clinical presentations, results of laboratory tests, and imaging examinations. The clinical features and pathogenesis were summarized. Results Among 11133 patients with liver cancer, 9 patients (0.08%), including 3 females and 6 males met the inclusion criteria. The age range was 48–73 years and the average age was 61.67±8.97 years. Five patients did not have traditional hemorrhage risk factors and 4s had the risk factors; however, all had developed hepatocellular carcinoma, and 3 had developed metastasis. All 9 patients showed elevated tumor markers: an increased AFP level was detected in 6 patients, coagulation dysfunctions in 8 patients, and abnormal liver functions in 6 patients. Five patients had developed cerebral hemorrhagic lesions in the lobes of their brains, while hemorrhagic lesions in the basal ganglia occurred in 3 patients and in the brainstem in only 1 patient. Four patients had clear consciousness, while 5 patients were in coma and showed poor prognosis. Conclusions Patients who have liver cancer complicated with cerebral hemorrhage usually lack traditional risk factors of cerebral hemorrhage. The site of cerebral hemorrhage is often detected in the lobes of the brain. Coagulation dysfunctions might be the main pathogenesis of liver cancer complicated with cerebral hemorrhage. PMID:27209058

  1. An unusual and fatal case of upper gastrointestinal perforation and bleeding secondary to foreign body ingestion.

    PubMed

    Barranco, Rosario; Tacchella, Tiziana; Lo Pinto, Sara; Bonsignore, Alessandro; Ventura, Francesco

    2016-07-01

    We report a fatal case of gastrointestinal perforation and hemorrhage secondary to the ingestion of a foreign body. While engaged in an amateur futsal competition, an apparently healthy young man suddenly collapsed and his respiration ceased. Autopsy revealed a 3-mm circular perforation on the gastric wall fundus with a significant amount of clotted blood within the gastric lumen. On inspection, a foreign body consisting of a bristle-like hair, later identified via electron microscopy to be a cat vibrissa, i.e. a whisker, was found along the perforation margin. Thus, the inadvertent ingestion of fine, sharp objects (even a cat whisker) can lead to gastric perforation and bleeding, which might prove fatal under given circumstances. PMID:27183326

  2. [Intestinal venous vascular malformation: Unusual etiology of gastrointestinal bleeding in pediatrics. Case report].

    PubMed

    Ninomiya, Inés S; Steimberg, Clarisa; Udaquiola, Julia; González, Lucio; Liberto, Daniel; Cieri, Patricio; Peralta, Oscar; Orsi, Marina

    2016-06-01

    Intestinal vascular malformations, especially those in the right colon, are a frequent cause of lower gastrointestinal bleeding in adults, but they are a very rare condition in children. Symptoms include acute hemorrhage, intestinal obstruction, or chronic anemia of uncertain etiology, which is the most frequent form of presentation but the most difficult to diagnose and thus properly treat. We report the case of an 11 year old boy admitted to the Emergency Room with abdominal pain, vomits, hemodynamic decompensation, who required expansion and blood transfusion. With history ofrecurrent bloody stools since infancy with repeated normal endoscopies and Tc99 scintigraphy with chronic anemia and no improvement despite adequate treatment. In the last admission, the videocolonoscopy detected a venous vascular malformation in the ileocecal region. The angiography and the entero multislice computer tomography scanner were valuable tools to confirm the diagnosis and to select the appropriate surgical procedure for this rare condition.

  3. [Functional and motor gastrointestinal disorders].

    PubMed

    Mearin, Fermín; Perelló, Antonia; Balboa, Agustín

    2008-10-01

    Functional gastrointestinal (GI) and motility disorders generate a large volume of consultations in gastroenterology and primary care offices. The present article summarizes the most interesting studies presented in the annual meeting of the American Gastroenterological Association 2008. For all functional GI disorders, studies were presented that evaluated the applicability of diagnostic criteria in clinical practice and new data were presented on physiopathology (for example, mediation by neuromodulators such as serotonin, microinflammation, alterations in intestinal microbiota, and psychological factors). More specifically, the therapeutic results of new prokinetic agents in functional dyspepsia, such as acotiamide, were presented. This agent has been demonstrated to have good efficacy in symptom control, especially in patients with postprandial distress syndrome. In irritable bowel syndrome, data were presented on several drugs that act through diverse mechanisms of action and have been shown to be more effective than placebo in symptom control. These drugs include antiinflammatory agents such as mesalazine, antibiotics such as rifaximin, probiotics with distinct bacterial strains, and prokinetic agents such as lubiprostone. Highly promising results have been obtained in the treatment of constipation with prokinetics such as prucalopride and with novel laxatives such as linaclotide, as well as with techniques that continue to be shown to be effective such as anorectal biofeedback, which is also highly useful in patients with fecal incontinence. Another disorder that is less frequent but highly difficult to treat is gastroparesis. For several years, treatment in the most severe cases has consisted of implantation of a gastric pacemaker. Although the results are far from perfect, new data were presented that allow better patient selection to achieve greater symptom control. The list of new advances, both in knowledge of the physiopathology of these disorders and

  4. Gastrointestinal Bleeding Secondary to Calciphylaxis

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Nancy; Haq, Khwaja F.; Mahajan, Sugandhi; Nagpal, Prashant; Doshi, Bijal

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Female, 66 Final Diagnosis: Calciphylaxis Symptoms: Gastrointesinal haemorrhage Medication: None Clinical Procedure: Hemodialysis • blood transfusions Specialty: Gastroenterology and Hepatology Objective: Rare disease Background: Calciphylaxis is associated with a high mortality that approaches 80%. The diagnosis is usually made when obvious skin lesions (painful violaceous mottling of the skin) are present. However, visceral involvement is rare. We present a case of calciphylaxis leading to lower gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding and rectal ulceration of the GI mucosa. Case Report: A 66-year-old woman with past medical history of diabetes mellitus, hypertension, end-stage renal disease (ESRD), recently diagnosed ovarian cancer, and on hemodialysis (HD) presented with painful black necrotic eschar on both legs. The radiograph of the legs demonstrated extensive calcification of the lower extremity arteries. The hospital course was complicated with lower GI bleeding. A CT scan of the abdomen revealed severe circumferential calcification of the abdominal aorta, celiac artery, and superior and inferior mesenteric arteries and their branches. Colonoscopy revealed severe rectal necrosis. She was deemed to be a poor surgical candidate due to comorbidities and presence of extensive vascular calcifications. Recurrent episodes of profuse GI bleeding were managed conservatively with blood transfusion as needed. Following her diagnosis of calciphylaxis, supplementation with vitamin D and calcium containing phosphate binders was stopped. She was started on daily hemodialysis with low calcium dialysate bath as well as intravenous sodium thiosulphate. The clinical condition of the patient deteriorated. The patient died secondary to multiorgan failure. Conclusions: Calciphylaxis leading to intestinal ischemia/perforation should be considered in the differential diagnosis in ESRD on HD presenting with abdominal pain or GI bleeding. PMID:26572938

  5. Simian hemorrhagic fever virus: Recent advances

    PubMed Central

    Brinton, Margo A.; Di, Han; Vatter, Heather A.

    2014-01-01

    Simian hemorrhagic fever virus (SHFV) is an understudied arterivirus that typically causes asymptomatic, persistent infections in multiple species of African nonhuman primates (NHPs) which are natural hosts but fatal hemorrhagic fever disease in macaques. SHFV genomes found in different species of African primates have recently been sequenced but no biological data for these viruses has yet been reported. The sequence of one SHFV isolate from a long term persistently infected baboon showed a high degree of identity to the genome of SHFV-LVR, the prototype strain isolated in the 1960s. Similar to what was observed in early studies with the prototype SHFV isolate LVR, infection of Japanese macaques with 100 PFU of the baboon isolate efficiently induced fatal hemorrhagic fever disease in macaques. Consistent with the differential infection outcomes observed in macaques and baboons, SHFV infection of macaque macrophages and dendritic cells is more efficiently than that of baboons and infection induces pro39 inflammatory cytokine production in macaque but not baboon cells. A stable full-length SHFV LVR infectious clone was constructed and basic knowledge about the unique functions of SHFV has been expanded by several recent studies. The SHFV genome encodes extra genes compared to those of other arteriviruses; three instead of two papain-like protease one (PLP1) domains are encoded at the 5’ end and two adjacent sets of four minor structural proteins at the 3’ end. SHFV PLP1α, PLP1β and PLP1γ were each shown to be active proteases in vitro and the three expected nsp1proteins were detected in infected cells. The catalytic Cys of PLP1α is adjacent to an Ala instead of canonical Typ and PLP1γ is unique among arterivirus PLPs in being able to cleave at both downstream and upstream sites. Although the duplicated sets of SHFV minor structural proteins were predicted to be functionally redundant, data obtained with a set of mutant infectious clones, each with the start

  6. Surgical Treatment of Gastric Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Seong-Ho

    2013-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumor is the most common mesenchymal tumor in the gastrointestinal tract and is most frequently developed in the stomach in the form of submucosal tumor. The incidence of gastric gastrointestinal stromal tumor is estimated to be as high as 25% of the population when all small and asymptomatic tumors are included. Because gastric gastrointestinal stromal tumor is not completely distinguished from other submucosal tumors, a surgical excisional biopsy is recommended for tumors >2 cm. The surgical principles of gastrointestinal stromal tumor are composed of an R0 resection with a normal mucosa margin, no systemic lymph node dissection, and avoidance of perforation, which results in peritoneal seeding even in cases with otherwise low risk profiles. Laparoscopic surgery has been indicated for gastrointestinal stromal tumors <5 cm, and the indication for laparoscopic surgery is expanded to larger tumors if the above mentioned surgical principles can be maintained. A simple exogastric resection and various transgastric resection techniques are used for gastrointestinal stromal tumors in favorable locations (the fundus, body, greater curvature side). For a lesion at the gastroesophageal junction in the posterior wall of the stomach, enucleation techniques have been tried preserve the organ's function. Those methods have a theoretical risk of seeding a ruptured tumor, but this risk has not been evaluated by well-designed clinical trials. While some clinical trials are still on-going, neoadjuvant imatinib is suggested when marginally unresectable or multiorgan resection is anticipated to reduce the extent of surgery and the chance of incomplete resection, rupture or bleeding. PMID:23610714

  7. Intranasal Osteopontin for Rodent Germinal Matrix Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Malaguit, Jay; Casel, Darlene; Dixon, Brandon; Doycheva, Desislava; Tang, Jiping; Zhang, John H; Lekic, Tim

    2016-01-01

    Germinal matrix hemorrhage (GMH) is the most common and devastating neurological problem of premature infants. Current treatment is largely ineffective and GMH has been nonpreventable. Osteopontin (OPN) is an endogenous protein that has been shown to be neuroprotective, however, it has not been tested in GMH. P7 neonatal rats were subjected to stereotactic ganglionic eminence collagenase infusion. Groups were as follows: (1) sham, (2) GMH + vehicle, (3) GMH + intranasal OPN. Seventy-two hours later, the animals were evaluated using righting reflex, blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability by Evans blue dye leakage, brain water content, and hemoglobin assay. Intranasal OPN improved outcomes after GMH by attenuation of brain swelling, BBB function, re-bleeding, and neurological outcomes. OPN may play an important role in enhancing neuroprotective brain signaling following GMH. These observed effects may offer novel possibilities for therapy in this patient population. PMID:26463952

  8. Bilateral adrenal hemorrhage in polycythemia vera.

    PubMed

    Bhandari, Shruti; Agito, Katrina; Krug, Esther I

    2016-01-01

    Bilateral adrenal hemorrhage (BAH) is a rare complication typically seen in critically ill patients, which can lead to acute adrenal insufficiency and death unless it is recognized promptly and treated appropriately. We describe the case of a 64-year-old man with polycythemia vera found to be unresponsive with fever, hypotension, tachycardia, and hypoglycemia. Electrocardiogram showed ST-elevation with elevated troponin, hemoglobin, prothrombin time, and partial thromboplastin time. He required aggressive ventilator and vasopressor support. Despite primary coronary intervention, he remained hypotensive. Random cortisol level was low. He received stress dose hydrocortisone with immediate hemodynamic stability. BAH was highly suspected and was confirmed by non-contrast abdominal computed tomography. Prompt recognition and timely initiated treatment remain crucial to impact the mortality associated with acute adrenal insufficiency. PMID:27609733

  9. Hepatic Angiosarcoma Associated with Esophageal Variceal Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Zensho; Kajihara, Mikio; Kobayashi, Yasunobu; Kanai, Tomoya; Matsumoto, Yoshihiro; Takakura, Kazuki; Yukawa, Toyokazu; Ohkusa, Toshifumi; Koyama, Seita; Imazu, Hiroo; Arakawa, Hiroshi; Ohata, Mitsuru; Koido, Shigeo

    2016-01-01

    Primary hepatic angiosarcoma is a very rare malignancy with a poor prognosis. Because patients present with no specific symptoms, the cancer can grow undetected and most cases are diagnosed too late for resection. We present the case of a 78-year-old Japanese man admitted to our hospital with massive hematemesis and melena. A total gastrectomy had previously been performed on the patient to treat gastric cancer. Endoscopic injection sclerotherapy was performed to control the bleeding from varices over the anastomosis. Computed tomography revealed the presence of multiple atypical liver nodules in the enhanced image. Histological diagnosis of hepatic angiosarcoma was obtained by percutaneous ultrasound-guided liver biopsy. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a patient with hepatic angiosarcoma and acute variceal hemorrhage. PMID:27721730

  10. Syneresis and vitreous hemorrhage in pseudophacia.

    PubMed

    Wolter, J R

    1983-01-01

    The eye of a 60-year-old man with a clinically very successful lens implant became available for pathological study after a very sudden and uncomplicated death about 6 months following cataract surgery. The following changes were found: slight non-granulomatous uveitis associated with foreign-body reaction to the lens implant and its supporting iris suture, absence of the anterior vitreous face, advanced syneresis of the central vitreous, vitreous hemorrhage with diffuse layering of erythrocytes on the inner aspect of the remaining vitreous crust, vitreous traction on peripheral and central retina with tenting of foveal internal limiting membrane, and some foveal edema without cystoid changes and without foveolar detachment. Knowledge of all these changes is important, because they were compatible with good visual function and caused no clinical problems.

  11. Treatment of intracerebral hemorrhage: the clinical evidences.

    PubMed

    Sterzi, R; Vidale, S

    2004-03-01

    Of all strokes 10% to 15% are intracerebral hemorrhage, primary ICH accounting for more than 75% of cases. A correct evaluation and management must start in the emergency room, in particular for patients who rapidly deteriorate. The diffusion of organized care for stroke patients and the availability of the stroke units in Italian hospitals, may represent a further opportunity to improve the outcome of patients with ICH. Despite the bulk of evidences coming from the randomized clinical therapeutic trials for acute ischemic stroke, the available data for randomized surgical trials are scanty. In these small randomized studies, neither surgical nor medical treatment has conclusively been shown to benefit patients with ICH. Surgical techniques are improving but it is important to find out the time window during which surgical evacuation is most effective with respect to the long-term outcome. The use of thrombolytic therapy to promote the resolution of ventricular blood clots appears to be promising.

  12. Bilateral adrenal hemorrhage in polycythemia vera

    PubMed Central

    Agito, Katrina; Krug, Esther I.

    2016-01-01

    Bilateral adrenal hemorrhage (BAH) is a rare complication typically seen in critically ill patients, which can lead to acute adrenal insufficiency and death unless it is recognized promptly and treated appropriately. We describe the case of a 64-year-old man with polycythemia vera found to be unresponsive with fever, hypotension, tachycardia, and hypoglycemia. Electrocardiogram showed ST-elevation with elevated troponin, hemoglobin, prothrombin time, and partial thromboplastin time. He required aggressive ventilator and vasopressor support. Despite primary coronary intervention, he remained hypotensive. Random cortisol level was low. He received stress dose hydrocortisone with immediate hemodynamic stability. BAH was highly suspected and was confirmed by non-contrast abdominal computed tomography. Prompt recognition and timely initiated treatment remain crucial to impact the mortality associated with acute adrenal insufficiency. PMID:27609733

  13. Pericytes as targets in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia

    PubMed Central

    Thalgott, Jérémy; Dos-Santos-Luis, Damien; Lebrin, Franck

    2015-01-01

    Defective paracrine Transforming Growth Factor-β (TGF-β) signaling between endothelial cells and the neighboring mural cells have been thought to lead to the development of vascular lesions that are characteristic of Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia (HHT). This review highlights recent progress in our understanding of TGF-β signaling in mural cell recruitment and vessel stabilization and how perturbed TGF-β signaling might contribute to defective endothelial-mural cell interaction affecting vessel functionalities. Our recent findings have provided exciting insights into the role of thalidomide, a drug that reduces both the frequency and the duration of epistaxis in individuals with HHT by targeting mural cells. These advances provide opportunities for the development of new therapies for vascular malformations. PMID:25763012

  14. Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever, Mauritania

    PubMed Central

    Nabeth, Pierre; Cheikh, Dah Ould; Lo, Baidy; Faye, Ousmane; Vall, Idoumou Ould Mohamed; Niang, Mbayame; Wague, Bocar; Diop, Djibril; Diallo, Mawlouth; Diallo, Boubacar; Diop, Ousmane Madiagne; Simon, François

    2004-01-01

    From February to August 2003, 38 persons were infected with Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) virus in Mauritania; 35 of these persons were residents of Nouakchott. The first patient was a young woman who became ill shortly after butchering a goat. She transmitted the infection to 15 persons in the hospital where she was admitted and four members of her family. In Nouakchott, two disease clusters and 11 isolated cases were identified. The case-fatality ratio was 28.6%. Of the patients not infected by the first case-patient, almost half were butchers, which suggests that the primary mode of animal-to-human transmission was direct contact with blood of infected animals. The hospital outbreak alerted health authorities to sporadic cases that occurred in the following weeks, which would have probably gone otherwise unnoticed. Studies must be conducted to determine the potential risk for continued sporadic outbreaks of CCHF in humans and to propose prevention measures. PMID:15663851

  15. How a Cerebral Hemorrhage Altered My Art

    PubMed Central

    Sherwood, Katherine

    2012-01-01

    “How a Cerebral Hemorrhage Altered My Art” examines how a massive stroke affected my art practice. The paralysis that ensued forced me to switch hands and become a left-handed painter. It was postulated by several neuroscientists that the “interpreter” in my brain was severely damaged during my CVA. This has had a profoundly liberating effect on my work. Whereas my pre-stroke period had the tendency to be over-intellectualized and forced, my post-stroke art is less self-conscious, more urgent and expressive. The primary subject matter of both periods is the brain. In my practice as an artist, my stroke is a challenge and an opportunity rather than a loss. PMID:22493572

  16. Immunological Features Underlying Viral Hemorrhagic Fevers

    PubMed Central

    Messaoudi, Ilhem; Basler, Christopher F.

    2015-01-01

    Several enveloped RNA viruses of the arenavirus, bunyavirus, filovirus and flavivirus families are associated with a syndrome known as viral hemorrhagic fever (VHF). VHF is characterized by fever, vascular leakage, coagulation defects and multi organ system failure. VHF is currently viewed as a disease precipitated by viral suppression of innate immunity, which promotes systemic virus replication and excessive proinflammatory cytokine responses that trigger the manifestations of severe disease. However, the mechanisms by which immune dysregulation contributes to disease remain poorly understood. Infection of nonhuman primates closely recapitulates human VHF, notably Ebola and yellow fever, thereby providing excellent models to better define the immunological basis for this syndrome. Here we review the current state of our knowledge and suggest future directions that will better define the immunological mechanisms underlying VHF. PMID:26163194

  17. Thermal inactivation of Alkhumra hemorrhagic fever virus.

    PubMed

    Madani, Tariq A; Abuelzein, El-Tayb M E; Azhar, Esam I; Al-Bar, Hussein M S

    2014-10-01

    The physico-chemical and biological characteristics of Alkhumra hemorrhagic fever virus (AHFV) are not yet known. The present study describes the thermal stability of this virus at different temperatures for different periods. The kinetics of thermal inactivation were studied, linear regressions were plotted, the Arrhenius equation was applied, and the activation energy was calculated accordingly. Titers of the residual virus were determined in median tissue culture infective dose (TCID50), and the rate of destruction of infectivity at various temperatures was determined. Infectivity of AHFV was completely lost upon heating for 3 minutes at 60 °C and for 30 min at 56 °C. However, the virus could maintain 33.2 % of its titer after heating for 60 min at 45 °C and 32 % of its titer after heating for 60 min at 50 °C. In conclusion, AHFV is thermo-labile, and its inactivation follows first-order kinetics. PMID:24906524

  18. Surveillance for dengue and dengue hemorrhagic fever.

    PubMed

    Gubler, D J

    1989-01-01

    Dengue and dengue hemorrhagic fever are emerging as major public health problems in most tropical countries. Effective prevention and control programs will depend on improved surveillance designed to provide early warning of dengue epidemics. This article outlines a reasonable approach to dengue surveillance of this kind. Virologic surveillance should be considered the most important element in any such early warning system. Dengue virus transmission should be monitored to determine which serotypes are present, their distribution, and the type of illnesses associated with each. Other key components of an active surveillance system should include monitoring of fever activity and clinical surveillance for cases of severe and fatal disease associated with viral syndromes. Collectively, these three surveillance components can provide an early warning capability permitting emergency mosquito control measures to be implemented and major epidemics to be averted.

  19. [Hemorrhagic fever and the dengue shock syndrome].

    PubMed

    Ramos, C; García, H; Villaseca, J M

    1993-01-01

    Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever (DHF) and Dengue Shock Syndrome (DSS) are the severe and/or fatal clinical manifestations of dengue fever. Epidemics of DHF/DSS occur mainly in the southeast Asian countries where children are seriously affected and high case-fatality ratio is annually reported. Recently significant epidemics of DHF/DSS have been reported in Cuba, Venezuela and Brazil, which means that reinforcements of the epidemiological surveillance in the countries of the American region that show high virus transmission, are urgently needed. The main purpose of the present article is to review relevant information regarding the clinical manifestations, pathology, diagnostic procedures, treatment of cases, pathophysiologic mechanisms and some data related with specific DHF/DSS epidemics.

  20. Trochlear Nerve Schwannoma With Repeated Intratumoral Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pengfei; Bao, Yuhai; Zhang, Wenchuan

    2016-09-01

    Trochlear nerve schwannoma is extremely rare, with only 35 pathologically confirmed patients being reported in the literature. Here, the authors report a patient of trochlear nerve schwannoma in the prepontine cistern manifesting as facial pain and double vision and presenting the image characteristics of repeated intratumoral hemorrhage, which has never been reported in the literature. Total tumor along with a portion of the trochlear nerve was removed by using a retrosigmoid approach. Facial pain disappeared after operation, and the diplopia remained. Follow-up studies have shown no tumor recurrence for 2 years and the simultaneous alleviation of diplopia. Information regarding the clinical presentation, radiological features and surgical outcomes of trochlear nerve schwannoma are discussed and reviewed in the paper. PMID:27607129

  1. Magnesium sulfate administration in subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Suarez, Jose I

    2011-09-01

    Magnesium offers theoretic vascular and neuroprotective benefits for patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage. An electronic literature search was conducted to identify original research studies describing intravenous magnesium treatment in patients with SAH published in English between January 1990 and October 2010. Seventeen articles were identified and reviewed, including one phase III randomized-controlled clinical trial and six phase II randomized-controlled trials. Study quality was low for most of the included studies, with the phase III trial considered to be of moderate quality. Due to inconsistently reported benefits and the occurrence of side effects, phase II data suggested that intravenous magnesium for SAH provided either no overall net benefit or uncertain trade-offs. Benefit was likewise not supported in the single phase III clinical trial. PMID:21748496

  2. Epidemiology and pathogenesis of Bolivian hemorrhagic fever.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Michael; Grant, Ashley; Paessler, Slobodan

    2014-04-01

    The etiologic agent of Bolivian hemorrhagic fever (BHF), Machupo virus (MACV) is reported to have a mortality rate of 25-35%. First identified in 1959, BHF was the cause of a localized outbreak in San Joaquin until rodent population controls were implemented in 1964. The rodent Calomys collosus was identified as the primary vector and reservoir for the virus. Multiple animal models were considered during the 1970s with the most human-like disease identified in Rhesus macaques but minimal characterization of the pathogenesis has been published since. A reemergence of reported BHF cases has been reported in recent years, which necessitates the further study and development of a vaccine to prevent future outbreaks.

  3. Epidemiology and Pathogenesis of Bolivian Hemorrhagic Fever

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, Michael; Grant, Ashley; Paessler, Slobodan

    2014-01-01

    The etiologic agent of Bolivian hemorrhagic fever (BHF), Machupo virus (MACV) is reported to have a mortality rate of 25 to 35%. First identified in 1959, BHF was the cause of a localized outbreak in San Joaquin until rodent population controls were implemented in 1964. The rodent Calomys collosus was identified as the primary vector and reservoir for the virus. Multiple animal models were considered during the 1970’s with the most human-like disease identified in Rhesus macaques but minimal characterization of the pathogenesis has been published since. A reemergence of reported BHF cases has been reported in recent years, which necessitates the further study and development of a vaccine to prevent future outbreaks. PMID:24636947

  4. Hyponatremia in Patients with Spontaneous Intracerebral Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Gray, Jaime Robenolt; Morbitzer, Kathryn A; Liu-DeRyke, Xi; Parker, Dennis; Zimmerman, Lisa Hall; Rhoney, Denise H

    2014-11-20

    Hyponatremia is the most frequently encountered electrolyte abnormality in critically ill patients. Hyponatremia on admission has been identified as an independent predictor of in-hospital mortality in patients with spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (sICH). However, the incidence and etiology of hyponatremia (HN) during hospitalization in a neurointensive care unit following spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (sICH) remains unknown. This was a retrospective analysis of consecutive patients admitted to Detroit Receiving Hospital for sICH between January 2006 and July 2009. All serum Na levels were recorded for patients during the ICU stay. HN was defined as Na <135 mmol/L. A total of 99 patients were analyzed with HN developing in 24% of sICH patients. Patients with HN had an average sodium nadir of 130 ± 3 mmol/L and an average time from admission to sodium <135 mmol/L of 3.9 ± 5.7 days. The most common cause of hyponatremia was syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone (90% of HN patients). Patients with HN were more likely to have fever (50% vs. 23%; p = 0.01), infection (58% vs. 28%; p = 0.007) as well as a longer hospital length of stay (14 (8-25) vs. 6 (3-9) days; p < 0.001). Of the patients who developed HN, fifteen (62.5%) patients developed HN in the first week following sICH. This shows HN has a fairly high incidence following sICH. The presence of HN is associated with longer hospital length of stays and higher rates of patient complications, which may result in worse patient outcomes. Further study is necessary to characterize the clinical relevance and treatment of HN in this population.

  5. Hyponatremia in Patients with Spontaneous Intracerebral Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Robenolt Gray, Jaime; Morbitzer, Kathryn A.; Liu-DeRyke, Xi; Parker, Dennis; Hall Zimmerman, Lisa; Rhoney, Denise H.

    2014-01-01

    Hyponatremia is the most frequently encountered electrolyte abnormality in critically ill patients. Hyponatremia on admission has been identified as an independent predictor of in-hospital mortality in patients with spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (sICH). However, the incidence and etiology of hyponatremia (HN) during hospitalization in a neurointensive care unit following spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (sICH) remains unknown. This was a retrospective analysis of consecutive patients admitted to Detroit Receiving Hospital for sICH between January 2006 and July 2009. All serum Na levels were recorded for patients during the ICU stay. HN was defined as Na <135 mmol/L. A total of 99 patients were analyzed with HN developing in 24% of sICH patients. Patients with HN had an average sodium nadir of 130 ± 3 mmol/L and an average time from admission to sodium <135 mmol/L of 3.9 ± 5.7 days. The most common cause of hyponatremia was syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone (90% of HN patients). Patients with HN were more likely to have fever (50% vs. 23%; p = 0.01), infection (58% vs. 28%; p = 0.007) as well as a longer hospital length of stay (14 (8–25) vs. 6 (3–9) days; p < 0.001). Of the patients who developed HN, fifteen (62.5%) patients developed HN in the first week following sICH. This shows HN has a fairly high incidence following sICH. The presence of HN is associated with longer hospital length of stays and higher rates of patient complications, which may result in worse patient outcomes. Further study is necessary to characterize the clinical relevance and treatment of HN in this population. PMID:26237605

  6. Hyperacute injury marker (HARM) in primary hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, R.; Menon, R.; Warach, S.; Latour, L.L.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The objective of the study was to characterize a previously unreported form of CNS barrier disruption in intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH): hyperacute injury marker (HARM). Methods: In this retrospective cohort analysis of patients presenting with primary ICH, precontrast and postcontrast MRI scans obtained within 5 days of symptom onset were analyzed. The presence of CNS barrier disruption was defined by 1) perihematomal or intrahematomal enhancement visualized on postcontrast T1-weighted MRI or 2) HARM: sulcal or ventricular hyperintensity visualized on postcontrast fluid-attenuated inversion recovery sequences (graded on a 5-point scale). Results: Forty-six patients were included in the analysis. Mean age was 65 years, median NIH Stroke Scale score was 7, and mean ICH volume was 12.2 mL (range 0.3–46.9 mL). HARM was visualized in 85% of patients, and this was moderate to severe in 50%. In all cases, the sulcal enhancement was noncontiguous with the hematoma. Of those patients with postcontrast T1-weighted imaging, perihematomal or intrahematomal contrast enhancement was visualized in 75% of patients. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that HARM occurs in intracerebral hemorrhage and that it likely represents a second type of CNS barrier disruption distinct from parenchymal postcontrast T1-weighted enhancement. Similar to T1 enhancement, this phenomenon may serve as a clinically useful biomarker to test therapies aimed at stabilizing acute ICH and CNS barrier disruption. Future studies are needed to further define the time course and prognostic implications of this finding. PMID:22031531

  7. Digitally quantifying cerebral hemorrhage using Photoshop and Image J.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xian Nan; Berman, Ari Ethan; Swanson, Raymond Alan; Yenari, Midori Anne

    2010-07-15

    A spectrophotometric hemoglobin assay is widely used to estimate the extent of brain hemorrhage by measuring the amount of hemoglobin in the brain. However, this method requires using the entire brain sample, leaving none for histology or other assays. Other widely used measures of gross brain hemorrhage are generally semi-quantitative and can miss subtle differences. Semi-quantitative brain hemorrhage scales may also be subject to bias. Here, we present a method to digitally quantify brain hemorrhage using Photoshop and Image J, and compared this method to the spectrophotometric hemoglobin assay. Male Sprague-Dawley rats received varying amounts of autologous blood injected into the cerebral hemispheres in order to generate different sized hematomas. 24h later, the brains were harvested, sectioned, photographed then prepared for the hemoglobin assay. From the brain section photographs, pixels containing hemorrhage were identified by Photoshop and the optical intensity was measured by Image J. Identification of hemorrhage size using optical intensities strongly correlated to the hemoglobin assay (R=0.94). We conclude that our method can accurately quantify the extent of hemorrhage. An advantage of this technique is that brain tissue can be used for additional studies.

  8. Retinal hemorrhagic lesions from femtosecond visible laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, Cindy D.; Toth, Cynthia A.; Cain, Clarence P.; Noojin, Gary D.; Stolarski, David J.; Rockwell, Benjamin A.; Roach, William P.

    1994-08-01

    We present our clinical evaluation of hemorrhagic and non-hemorrhagic 90 fs single pulses in rabbits and primates. The rabbit and primate eye present unique in vivo models for evaluation of retinal and choroidal laser induced hemorrhages with distinct differences in their retinal anatomy. We found two different hemorrhagic events to occur in the posterior pole with delivery of 90 fs pulses. First, in the Dutch Belted rabbit, we found large amounts of energy per pulse (from 20 to 60 times ED50) were required for formation of subretinal hemorrhages. Second, in the Rhesus monkey, we found significant numbers of small intraretinal hemorrhages from relatively low energy 90 fs pulses. Both the Dutch Belted rabbit and the Rhesus monkey failed to consistently show subretinal hemorrhagic lesions form very high pulse energies. Our findings suggest more energy absorption at the level of the retinal circulation than the choroidal circulation with our pulse parameters. The effects of the laser on the retinal circulation may be due to the use of a wavelength of 580 nm. At this wavelength the oxyhemoglobin to melanin absorption ratio is nearly at its peak (approximately 0.40), perhaps allowing improved absorption in the retinal vasculature. One precaution with this finding, however, are the distinct differences between primate and non-primate ocular systems. Further studies are required to resolve the differences in damage at the level of the RPE and choroid between rabbits and primates.

  9. Vascular access hemorrhages contribute to deaths among hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Ellingson, Katherine D; Palekar, Rakhee S; Lucero, Cynthia A; Kurkjian, Katherine M; Chai, Shua J; Schlossberg, Dana S; Vincenti, Donna M; Fink, Jeffrey C; Davies-Cole, John O; Magri, Julie M; Arduino, Matthew J; Patel, Priti R

    2012-09-01

    In 2007 the Maryland Medical Examiner noted a potential cluster of fatal vascular access hemorrhages among hemodialysis patients, many of whom died outside of a health-care setting. To examine the epidemiology of fatal vascular access hemorrhages, we conducted a retrospective case review in District of Columbia, Maryland, and Virginia from January 2000 to July 2007 and a case-control study. Records from the Medical Examiner and Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services were reviewed, from which 88 patients were identified as fatal vascular access hemorrhage cases. To assess risk factors, a subset of 20 cases from Maryland was compared to 38 controls randomly selected among hemodialysis patients who died from non-vascular access hemorrhage causes at the same Maryland facilities. Of the 88 confirmed cases, 55% hemorrhaged from arteriovenous grafts, 24% from arteriovenous fistulas, and 21% from central venous catheters. Of 82 case-patients with known location of hemorrhage, 78% occurred at home or in a nursing home. In the case-control analysis, statistically significant risk factors included the presence of an arteriovenous graft, access-related complications within 6 months of death, and hypertension; presence of a central venous catheter was significantly protective. Psychosocial factors and anticoagulant medications were not significant risk factors. Effective strategies to control vascular access hemorrhage in the home and further delineation of warning signs are needed.

  10. Gastrointestinal Symptoms in Morbid Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Huseini, Mustafa; Wood, G. Craig; Seiler, Jamie; Argyropoulos, George; Irving, Brian A.; Gerhard, Glenn S.; Benotti, Peter; Still, Christopher; Rolston, David D. K.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Several reports have shown an increased prevalence of gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms in obese subjects in community-based studies. To better understand the role of the GI tract in obesity, and because there are limited clinic-based studies, we documented the prevalence of upper and lower GI symptoms in morbidly obese individuals in a clinic setting. Objective: The aim of our study was to compare the prevalence of GI symptoms in morbidly obese individuals in a weight management clinic with non-obese individuals with similar comorbidities as morbidly obese individuals in an Internal Medicine clinic. Methods: Class II and III obese patients BMI >35 kg/m2 (N = 114) and 182 non-obese patients (BMI <25 kg/m2) completed the GI symptoms survey between August 2011 and April 2012 were included in this study. The survey included 24 items pertaining to upper and lower GI symptoms. The participants rated the frequency of symptoms as absent (never, rarely) or present (occasionally, frequently). The symptoms were clustered into five categories: oral symptoms, dysphagia, gastroesophageal reflux, abdominal pain, and bowel habits. Responses to each symptom cluster were compared between obese group and normal weight groups using logistic regression. Results: Of the 24 items, 18 had a higher frequency in the obese group (p < 0.005 for each). After adjusting for age and gender, the obese patients were more likely to have upper GI symptoms: any oral symptom (OR = 2.3, p = 0.0013), dysphagia (OR 2.9, p = 0.0006), and any gastroesophageal reflux (OR 3.8, p < 0.0001). Similarly, the obese patients were more likely to have lower GI symptoms: any abdominal pain (OR = 1.7, p = 0.042) and altered bowel habits (OR = 2.8, p < 0.0001). Conclusion: These observations suggest a statistically significant increase in frequency of both upper and lower GI symptoms in morbidly obese patients when compared to non-obese subjects. PMID:25593922

  11. Helicobacter pylori and Gastrointestinal Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Venerito, Marino; Vasapolli, Riccardo; Rokkas, Theodoros; Malfertheiner, Peter

    2015-09-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is the principal trigger of gastric carcinogenesis and gastric cancer (GC) and remains the third leading cause of cancer-related death in both sexes worldwide. In a big Japanese study, the risk of developing GC in patients with peptic ulcer disease who received H. pylori eradication therapy and annual endoscopic surveillance for a mean of 9.9 years was significantly lower after successful eradication therapy compared to the group with persistent infection (0.21%/year and 0.45%/year, respectively, p = .049). According to a recent meta-analysis, H. pylori eradication is insufficient in GC risk reduction in subjects with advanced precancerous conditions (i.e., intestinal metaplasia and dysplasia). A microsimulation model suggested screening smokers over the age of 50 in the U.S. for serum pepsinogens. This would allow to detect advanced gastric atrophy with endoscopic follow-up of subjects testing positive as a cost-effective strategy to reduce GC mortality. In a Taiwanese study, the anti-H. pylori IgG-based test-and-treat program had lower incremental cost-effectiveness ratios than that with (13)C-urea breath test in both sexes to prevent GC whereas expected years of life lost for GC were higher and the incremental cost-effectiveness ratios of test-and-treat programs were more cost-effective in young adults (30-69 years old) than in elders (>70 years old). With respect to gastrointestinal malignancies other than GC, a meta-analysis confirmed the inverse association between H. pylori infection and esophageal adenocarcinoma. In a Finnish study, H. pylori seropositivity was associated with an increased risk of biliary tract cancers (multivariate adjusted OR 2.63; 95% CI: 1.08-6.37), another meta-analysis showed a slightly increased rate of pancreatic cancer in patients with CagA-negative strains (OR: 1.30; 95% CI: 1.02-1.65), whereas current data suggest that the association between H. pylori and colorectal neoplasms may be population

  12. Ketamine Sedation in Gastrointestinal Endoscopy in Children

    PubMed Central

    Eskander, Ayman E.; Baroudy, Nevine R. El; Refay, Amira S. El

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Moderate sedation for gastrointestinal endoscopy has traditionally been provided by the endoscopist. Controversy has ensued over safe and efficient sedation practice as endoscopy has increased in numbers and complexity. AIM: To evaluate the safety of ketamine sedation given by non-anesthesiologist during gastrointestinal endoscopy in children. METHODS: A prospective study of 100 paediatric patients with gastrointestinal symptoms who were a candidate for upper or lower gastrointestinal endoscopy in paediatric endoscopy unit at Abo El-Reesh Paediatric Hospital, Cairo University. All children were > 2 years old and weighed > 6 kg. The analysis was performed in terms of sedation-related complications. RESULTS: A total 100 paediatric patients including 53 males and 47 females with mean age of 5.04 years were involved in the study. All children were medicated with ketamine with a mean dose of 3.77mg/kg. No complications occurred in 87% of cases. Desaturation occurred in 13% of the cases and was reversible by supplemental nasal oxygen. Desaturation was more frequent during Upper GI Endoscopy and with the intramuscular route (p value=0.049). No apnea, bradycardia, arrest or emergence reactions were recorded. CONCLUSION: Ketamine sedation found to be safe for paediatric gastrointestinal endoscopy in Egyptian children without co-morbidities. Transient Hypoxia (13%) may occur but easily reversed by nasal oxygen therapy. PMID:27703561

  13. An Unsusual Case of Lower Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Guru, Pramod Kumar; Iyer, Vivek N.

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Female, 81 Final Diagnosis: Gastrointestinal amyloidosis Symptoms: Gastrointesinal haemorrhage • hypotension Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Endoscopy Specialty: Criitcal Care Medicine Objective: Challenging differential diagnosis Background: Amyloidosis is a multisystem disease, and can present with multitude of nonspecific symptoms. Gastrointestinal amyloidosis is common, and gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding in these patients has a wide differential diagnosis. The present case features the distinctive endoscopic finding of submucosal hematoma as a clue to immunoglobin light chain (AL) amyloid involvement of the gastrointestinal tract. Case Report: An 81-year-old woman with AL amyloidosis was transferred to the intensive care unit (ICU) for evaluation of GI bleeding. Prior to the bleeding episode, the patient had undergone paracentesis for management of her ascites related to restrictive cardiomyopathy. Initial evaluation was negative for any intra-abdominal catastrophe related to her recent paracentesis. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy was negative for any source of bleeding. However, colonoscopy showed a ruptured submucosal hematoma, which is a rare but classical finding in patients with amyloidosis. The patient was managed conservatively and did not have any further episodes of bleeding in the hospital. She unfortunately died due to her primary illness 6 weeks after discharge from the hospital. Conclusions: The finding of submucosal hematoma on endoscopy is a rare but sentinel sign for amyloidosis involvement in the GI tract. PMID:26979633

  14. Alveolar hemorrhage after scuba diving: a case report.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Ming-Ju; Tsai, Mee-Sun; Tsai, Ying-Ming; Lien, Chi-Tun; Hwang, Jhi-Jhu; Huang, Ming-Shyan

    2010-07-01

    Self-contained underwater breathing apparatus (scuba) diving is increasingly popular in Taiwan. There are few references in the literature regarding pulmonary hemorrhage as the sole manifestation of pulmonary barotrauma in scuba divers, and no study from Taiwan was found in the literature. We present the case of a 25-year-old man who suffered alveolar hemorrhage related to pulmonary barotrauma as a complication of scuba diving. To our knowledge, this is the first case report describing a Taiwanese subject suffering from non-fatal pulmonary hemorrhage after scuba diving.

  15. A segmentation algorithm of intracranial hemorrhage CT image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haibo; Chen, Zhiguo; Wang, Jianzhi

    2011-10-01

    To develop a computer aided detection (CAD) system that improves diagnostic accuracy of intracranial hemorrhage on cerebral CT. A method for CT image segmentation of brain is proposed, with which, several regions that are suspicious of hemorrhage can be segmented rapidly and effectively. Extracting intracranial area algorithm is introduced firstly to extract intracranial area. Secondly, FCM is employed twice, we named it with TFCM. FCM is first employed to identify areas of intracranial hemorrhage. Finally, FCM is employed to segment the lesions. Experimental results on real medical images demonstrate the efficiency and effectiveness.

  16. Sympathetic storming in a patient with intracranial basal ganglia hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Siu, Gilbert; Marino, Michael; Desai, Anjuli; Nissley, Frederick

    2011-03-01

    Neurologic deficits and medical complications are common sequelae after intracranial hemorrhage. Among the medical complications, sympathetic storming is relatively rare. We describe a case of a patient with an acute right basal ganglia hemorrhage. During the patient's hospital course, he developed tachypnea, diaphoresis, hypertension, hyperthermia, and tachycardia for three consecutive days. A complete laboratory work-up and imaging studies were unremarkable for infectious etiology, new intracranial hemorrhage, and deep vein thrombosis. The patient was diagnosed with sympathetic storming, a relatively uncommon cause of these symptoms. The storming was secondary to a kinked Foley catheter, and subsequent placement of a new catheter resulted in the resolution of his symptoms. PMID:21297401

  17. Characteristics of a dengue hemorrhagic fever outbreak in 2001 in Kaohsiung.

    PubMed

    Lai, Ping-Chang; Lee, Susan Shin-Jung; Kao, Chih-Hsiang; Chen, Yao-Shen; Huang, Chun-Kai; Lin, Wei-Ru; Wann, Shue-Ren; Lin, Hsi-Hsun; Yen, Muh-Yong; Liu, Yung-Ching

    2004-10-01

    A dengue outbreak occurred in Kaohsiung City starting in July in 2001. We studied the clinical profile of all patients admitted to Kaohsiung Veterans General Hospital during this outbreak from July 2001 to January 2002. A total of 25 cases of clinically suspected dengue fever were treated during this period, and 13 of them were confirmed by laboratory results (13/25; 52%). Eleven of the 25 patients (11/25; 44%) were admitted. The mean age of the patients with laboratory confirmation of infection was 53 years (range, 7 to 85 years). Headache (7/13; 53.8%), bone pain (8/13; 61.5%), myalgia (10/13; 76.9%), abdominal pain (7/13; 53.8%), and skin rash (9/13; 69.2%) were the most common presentations. A high proportion of patients were classified as having dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) [6/13; 46.2%] and 2 of these patients had dengue shock syndrome (DSS) based on the World Health Organization criteria. Pretibial petechia (6/13; 46.1%), gastrointestinal bleeding (6/13; 46.1%), and hemoptysis (4/13; 30.8%) were the most common hemorrhagic manifestations. The average hospital stay was 7.1 days. Thrombocytopenia was very common and 84.6% patients had a platelet count less than 100,000/mm3. Monocytosis was found in all patients. Few patients required blood or platelet concentrate transfusion. The 2 patients who developed DSS both survived. All patients recovered completely without any obvious sequela. In conclusion, there was a high percentage of DHF among patients in the dengue outbreak in 2001. Increasing rates of DHF compared to previous reports from Taiwan may be a sign of hyperendemicity (multiple serotypes present) of the dengue virus in Kaohsiung City and its greater likelihood elsewhere in Taiwan. Prevention and control of both dengue fever and DHF have thus become increasingly important.

  18. [Postmortem gastrointestinal ruptures in burn cadavers].

    PubMed

    Schneider, V; Pietrzak, T; Klöppel, I

    1986-01-01

    The report informs on ruptures within the area of the gastro-intestinal tract of two siblings (2 and 3 years of age) that were fatally burned in their apartment. The ruptures are obviously pointing to an "explosive-like" evaporation of the watery part of the gastro-intestinal contents under the influence of the heat, at impeded pressure balance through shrinking of the esophagus caused by the heat in the upper area and the closure of the pylorus. Of significance here is surely also the shrinking of the gastro-intestinal wall caused by the heat and the thin abdominal walls which were not likely to have acted as "heat insulators". These findings are a supplement to the burn hematoma of the stomach as described by Berg and Schumann (1985). PMID:3963991

  19. The Chronic Gastrointestinal Manifestations of Chagas Disease

    PubMed Central

    Matsuda, Nilce Mitiko; Miller, Steven M.; Evora, Paulo R. Barbosa

    2009-01-01

    Chagas disease is an infectious disease caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi. The disease mainly affects the nervous system, digestive system and heart. The objective of this review is to revise the literature and summarize the main chronic gastrointestinal manifestations of Chagas disease. The chronic gastrointestinal manifestations of Chagas disease are mainly a result of enteric nervous system impairment caused by T. cruzi infection. The anatomical locations most commonly described to be affected by Chagas disease are salivary glands, esophagus, lower esophageal sphincter, stomach, small intestine, colon, gallbladder and biliary tree. Chagas disease has also been studied in association with Helicobacter pylori infection, interstitial cells of Cajal and the incidence of gastrointestinal cancer. PMID:20037711

  20. Gastrointestinal and Liver Issues in Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Sundaram, Varun; Fang, James C

    2016-04-26

    Heart failure affects ≈23 million people worldwide and continues to have a high mortality despite advancements in modern pharmacotherapy and device therapy. HF is a complex clinical syndrome that can result in the impairment of endocrine, hematologic, musculoskeletal, renal, respiratory, peripheral vascular, hepatic, and gastrointestinal systems. Although gastrointestinal involvement and hepatic involvement are common in HF and are associated with increased morbidity and mortality, their bidirectional association with HF progression remains poorly fathomed. The current understanding of multiple mechanisms, including proinflammatory cytokine milieu, hormonal imbalance, and anabolic/catabolic imbalance, has been used to explain the relationship between the gut and HF and has been the basis for many novel therapeutic strategies. However, the failure of these novel therapies such as anti-tumor necrosis factor-α has resulted in further complexity. In this review, we describe the involvement of the gastrointestinal and liver systems within the HF syndrome, their pathophysiological mechanisms, and their clinical consequences.

  1. Drug hypersensitivity syndrome with significant gastrointestinal involvement.

    PubMed

    Chung, Wan-Ling; Teo, Lynn; Wang, Yi-Shi; Liu, Tsun-Tsien

    2012-11-01

    Drug hypersensitivity syndrome (DHS) is an idiosyncratic systemic reaction to a drug. The clinical presentation of this syndrome comprises a diverse spectrum, ranging from mild to fulminating organ failure. Nonspecific gastrointestinal symptoms are common in DHS, but severe morbidities and mortalities attributed to gut disease in DHS are rarely described. We present a case of DHS with significant gastrointestinal symptoms of prolonged profuse watery diarrhoea and persistent hypokalaemia requiring judicious intravenous water and electrolyte replacement. The symptoms resolved only after the introduction of intravenous hydrocortisone. It is important to consider intravenous corticosteroids if the gastrointestinal system is involved, as accelerated gut motility and mucosal damage would affect absorption of oral medications. Supportive treatment with the monitoring of fluid and electrolytes status and judicious replacement remains fundamental in the management of DHS patients with gut involvement.

  2. Acute Upper Gastro-Intestinal Bleeding in Morocco: What Have Changed?

    PubMed Central

    Timraz, A.; Khannoussi, W.; Ajana, F. Z.; Essamri, W.; Benelbarhdadi, I.; Afifi, R.; Benazzouz, M.; Essaid, A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective. In the present study, we aimed to investigate epidemiological, clinical, and etiological characteristics of acute upper gastro-intestinal bleeding. Materials and Methods. This retrospective study was conducted between January 2003 and December 2008. It concerned all cases of acute upper gastroduodenal bleeding benefited from an urgent gastro-intestinal endoscopy in our department in Morocco. Characteristics of patients were evaluated in terms of age, gender, medical history, presenting symptoms, results of rectal and clinical examinations, and endoscopy findings. Results. 1389 cases were registered. As 66% of the patients were male, 34% were female. Mean age was 49. 12% of patients had a history of previous hemorrhage, and 26% had a history of NSAID and aspirin use. Endoscopy was performed in 96%. The gastroduodenal ulcer was the main etiology in 38%, followed by gastritis and duodenitis in 32.5%. Conclusion. AUGIB is still a frequent pathology, threatening patients' life. NSAID and aspirin are still the major risk factors. Their impact due to peptic ulcer remains stable in our country. PMID:21991509

  3. Use of Provocative Angiography to Localize Site in Recurrent Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, Ciaran Tuite, David; Pritchard, Ruth; Reynolds, John; McEniff, Niall; Ryan, J. Mark

    2007-09-15

    Background. While the source of most cases of lower gastrointestinal bleeding may be diagnosed with modern radiological and endoscopic techniques, approximately 5% of patients remain who have negative endoscopic and radiological investigations.Clinical Problem. These patients require repeated hospital admissions and blood transfusions, and may proceed to exploratory laparotomy and intraoperative endoscopy. The personal and financial costs are significant. Method of Diagnosis and Decision Making. The technique of adding pharmacologic agents (anticoagulants, vasodilators, fibrinolytics) during standard angiographic protocols to induce a prohemorrhagic state is termed provocative angiography. It is best employed when significant bleeding would otherwise necessitate emergency surgery. Treatment. This practice frequently identifies a bleeding source (reported success rates range from 29 to 80%), which may then be treated at the same session. We report the case of a patient with chronic lower gastrointestinal hemorrhage with consistently negative endoscopic and radiological workup, who had an occult source of bleeding identified only after a provocative angiographic protocol was instituted, and who underwent succeeding therapeutic coil embolization of the bleeding vessel.

  4. Gastrointestinal manifestations in myotonic muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Bellini, Massimo; Biagi, Sonia; Stasi, Cristina; Costa, Francesco; Mumolo, Maria Gloria; Ricchiuti, Angelo; Marchi, Santino

    2006-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy (MD) is characterized by myotonic phenomena and progressive muscular weakness. Involvement of the gastrointestinal tract is frequent and may occur at any level. The clinical manifestations have previously been attributed to motility disorders caused by smooth muscle damage, but histologic evidence of alterations has been scarce and conflicting. A neural factor has also been hypothesized. In the upper digestive tract, dysphagia, heartburn, regurgitation and dyspepsia are the most common complaints, while in the lower tract, abdominal pain, bloating and changes in bowel habits are often reported. Digestive symptoms may be the first sign of dystrophic disease and may precede the musculo-skeletal features. The impairment of gastrointestinal function may be sometimes so gradual that the patients adapt to it with little awareness of symptoms. In such cases routine endoscopic and ultrasonographic evaluations are not sufficient and targeted techniques (electrogastrography, manometry, electromyography, functional ultrasonography, scintigraphy, etc.) are needed. There is a low correlation between the degree of skeletal muscle involvement and the presence and severity of gastrointestinal disturbances whereas a positive correlation with the duration of the skeletal muscle disease has been reported. The drugs recommended for treating the gastrointestinal complaints such as prokinetic, anti-dyspeptic drugs and laxatives, are mainly aimed at correcting the motility disorders. Gastrointestinal involvement in MD remains a complex and intriguing condition since many important problems are still unsolved. Further studies concentrating on genetic aspects, early diagnostic techniques and the development of new therapeutic strategies are needed to improve our management of the gastrointestinal manifestations of MD. PMID:16609987

  5. Candida albicans commensalism in the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Neville, B Anne; d'Enfert, Christophe; Bougnoux, Marie-Elisabeth

    2015-11-01

    Candida albicans is a polymorphic yeast species that often forms part of the commensal gastrointestinal mycobiota of healthy humans. It is also an important opportunistic pathogen. A tripartite interaction involving C. albicans, the resident microbiota and host immunity maintains C. albicans in its commensal form. The influence of each of these factors on C. albicans carriage is considered herein, with particular focus on the mycobiota and the approaches used to study it, models of gastrointestinal colonization by C. albicans, the C. albicans genes and phenotypes that are necessary for commensalism and the host factors that influence C. albicans carriage.

  6. Reconstruction and Visualization of Human Gastrointestinal Tract

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Rong-guo; Guo, Xu-dong; Xu, Changqing

    2012-01-01

    Background: Converting the two-dimensional (2D) cross-sectional photographs into an intuitive three-dimensional (3D) model is a basic task for medical imaging data for auxiliary disease-linked diagnosis purpose. Methods: Reconstruction and visualization process of gastrointestinal cross-sectional photographs includes image preparation, image registration, image segmentation, 3D surface-rendering reconstruction, and implementation of 3D digital visualization. Results: Using the visualization toolkit (VTK), we implemented 3D digital reconstruction and visualization of gastrointestinal tract, whose visualized model can be zoomed, paned, and rotated, including the stomach, the small intestine, and the large intestine. PMID:23675253

  7. Alum irrigation in massive bladder hemorrhage in severe renal failure.

    PubMed

    Modi, K B; Paterson, P J

    1988-09-01

    We report a patient with severe renal failure in whom massive bladder hemorrhage was successfully treated with alum irrigation. There was no substantial potassium or aluminum absorption with alum irrigation.

  8. Cardiovascular and pulmonary complications of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Bruder, Nicolas; Rabinstein, Alejandro

    2011-09-01

    Cardiopulmonary complications after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage negatively affect overall morbidity and mortality. An electronic literature search was performed for English-language articles focused on cardiopulmonary complications with subarachnoid hemorrhage published through October 2010. A total of 278 citations were identified, including 72 clinical studies. In most cases, study quality was low or very low. Cardiac injury, evidenced by an elevation in troponin levels, is reported in about one-third of patients after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. Arrhythmias also occur in about one-third of patients after subarachnoid hemorrhage. The incidence of pulmonary complications, especially neurogenic pulmonary edema, is more difficult to establish from available literature. Cardiopulmonary complications have been linked to worsened clinical outcome, suggesting a role for cardiac monitoring and interventions. PMID:21761273

  9. Acute cerebral paragonimiasis presenting as hemorrhagic stroke in a child.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhi; Zhu, Gang; Lin, Jiangkai; Wu, Nan; Feng, Hua

    2008-08-01

    A hemorrhagic stroke in children is rarely secondary to cerebral paragonimiasis. We describe a 9-year-old boy in whom an intracerebral hemorrhage was the leading clinical indication of acute cerebral paragonimiasis. He was hospitalized because of a sudden onset of headache, right hemiparesis, and dysarthria. A computed tomography scan revealed an intracerebral hemorrhage in the left parietal lobe. Magnetic resonance angiography did not confirm any vascular abnormalities at the location of the hematoma. Four weeks later, he presented with right hemiparesis again, and fever. A diagnosis of cerebral paragonimiasis was based on repeated magnetic resonance imaging of the brain and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for paragonimiasis. The patient gradually recovered with praziquantel treatment. Cerebral paragonimiasis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of hemorrhagic strokes in children in areas where paragonimiasis is epidemic.

  10. [ENT-related diseases in children with hemorrhagic dengue fever].

    PubMed

    Bogomil'skiĭ, M R; Rumiantseva, A G; Sabo, O

    2001-01-01

    ENT affections were studied in 100 children with dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) admitted to children's hospital in Pnompen (Cambodia). Leading clinical symptoms, changes in laboratory findings, incidence rate and kind of ENT affections are described.

  11. The Role of Interventional Radiology in Obstetric Hemorrhage

    SciTech Connect

    Gonsalves, M. Belli, A.

    2010-10-15

    Obstetric hemorrhage remains a major cause of maternal morbidity and mortality worldwide. Traditionally, in cases of obstetric hemorrhage refractory to conservative treatment, obstetricians have resorted to major surgery with the associated risks of general anesthesia, laparotomy, and, in the case of hysterectomy, loss of fertility. Over the past two decades, the role of pelvic arterial embolization has evolved from a novel treatment option to playing a key role in the management of obstetric hemorrhage. To date, interventional radiology offers a minimally invasive, fertility-preserving alternative to conventional surgical treatment. We review current literature regarding the role of interventional radiology in postpartum hemorrhage, abnormal placentation, abortion, and cervical ectopic pregnancy. We discuss techniques, success rates, and complications.

  12. Data Hemorrhages in the Health-Care Sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, M. Eric

    Confidential data hemorrhaging from health-care providers pose financial risks to firms and medical risks to patients. We examine the consequences of data hemorrhages including privacy violations, medical fraud, financial identity theft, and medical identity theft. We also examine the types and sources of data hemorrhages, focusing on inadvertent disclosures. Through an analysis of leaked files, we examine data hemorrhages stemming from inadvertent disclosures on internet-based file sharing networks. We characterize the security risk for a group of health-care organizations using a direct analysis of leaked files. These files contained highly sensitive medical and personal information that could be maliciously exploited by criminals seeking to commit medical and financial identity theft. We also present evidence of the threat by examining user-issued searches. Our analysis demonstrates both the substantial threat and vulnerability for the health-care sector and the unique complexity exhibited by the US health-care system.

  13. Viral tropism and pathology associated with viral hemorrhagic septicemia in larval and juvenile Pacific herring

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lovy, Jan; Lewis, N.L.; Hershberger, P.K.; Bennett, W.; Meyers, T.R.; Garver, K.A.

    2012-01-01

    Viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) genotype IVa causes mass mortality in wild Pacific herring, a species of economic value, in the Northeast Pacific Ocean. Young of the year herring are particularly susceptible and can be carriers of the virus. To understand its pathogenesis, tissue and cellular tropisms of VHSV in larval and juvenile Pacific herring were investigated with immunohistochemistry, transmission electron microscopy, and viral tissue titer. In larval herring, early viral tropism for epithelial tissues (6d post-exposure) was indicated by foci of epidermal thickening that contained heavy concentrations of virus. This was followed by a cellular tropism for fibroblasts within the fin bases and the dermis, but expanded to cells of the kidney, liver, pancreas, gastrointestinal tract and meninges in the brain. Among wild juvenile herring that underwent a VHS epizootic in the laboratory, the disease was characterized by acute and chronic phases of death. Fish that died during the acute phase had systemic infections in tissues including the submucosa of the gastrointestinal tract, spleen, kidney, liver, and meninges. The disease then transitioned into a chronic phase that was characterized by the appearance of neurological signs including erratic and corkscrew swimming and darkening of the dorsal skin. During the chronic phase viral persistence occurred in nervous tissues including meninges and brain parenchymal cells and in one case in peripheral nerves, while virus was mostly cleared from the other tissues. The results demonstrate the varying VHSV tropisms dependent on the timing of infection and the importance of neural tissues for the persistence and perpetuation of chronic infections in Pacific herring.

  14. Viral tropism and pathology associated with viral hemorrhagic septicemia in larval and juvenile Pacific herring.

    PubMed

    Lovy, J; Lewis, N L; Hershberger, P K; Bennett, W; Meyers, T R; Garver, K A

    2012-12-28

    Viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) genotype IVa causes mass mortality in wild Pacific herring, a species of economic value, in the Northeast Pacific Ocean. Young of the year herring are particularly susceptible and can be carriers of the virus. To understand its pathogenesis, tissue and cellular tropisms of VHSV in larval and juvenile Pacific herring were investigated with immunohistochemistry, transmission electron microscopy, and viral tissue titer. In larval herring, early viral tropism for epithelial tissues (6d post-exposure) was indicated by foci of epidermal thickening that contained heavy concentrations of virus. This was followed by a cellular tropism for fibroblasts within the fin bases and the dermis, but expanded to cells of the kidney, liver, pancreas, gastrointestinal tract and meninges in the brain. Among wild juvenile herring that underwent a VHS epizootic in the laboratory, the disease was characterized by acute and chronic phases of death. Fish that died during the acute phase had systemic infections in tissues including the submucosa of the gastrointestinal tract, spleen, kidney, liver, and meninges. The disease then transitioned into a chronic phase that was characterized by the appearance of neurological signs including erratic and corkscrew swimming and darkening of the dorsal skin. During the chronic phase viral persistence occurred in nervous tissues including meninges and brain parenchymal cells and in one case in peripheral nerves, while virus was mostly cleared from the other tissues. The results demonstrate the varying VHSV tropisms dependent on the timing of infection and the importance of neural tissues for the persistence and perpetuation of chronic infections in Pacific herring.

  15. [Prognostication of gastroduodenal ulcer course complicated by hemorrhage].

    PubMed

    Trofimov, M V

    2014-01-01

    Dynamics of the blood serum level of serotonin in the patients, suffering gastroduodenal ulcer, Complicated by hemorrhage, was analyzed. The highest level of serotonin was observed in gastric ulcer, complicated by hemorrhage. These changes correlate with the blood loss severity enhancement, the achievement of a nonstable state of endoscopic hemostasis, high activity of inducible NO-synthase (iNOS) of periulcerative mucosa. The obtained data analysis permits to prognosticate the pathological process course and to improve the program of treatment.

  16. Hypertension and vulnerability to hemorrhagic shock in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Penny S; Song, Kyle Seokhan; Tamariz, Francisco J; Wayne Barbee, R

    2015-02-01

    Trauma mortality may be increased in the presence of preexisting diseases such as chronic hypertension. We hypothesized that systemic and microvascular alterations accompanying chronic hypertension would increase the vulnerability to hemorrhage relative to normotensive controls in a rat model of hemorrhagic shock. We present a novel comparative hemorrhage model of shock vulnerability, quantified by "vulnerability curves" expressing physiological response to hemorrhage as a function of three matched shock metrics: cumulative blood volume, mean arterial pressure (MAP), and oxygen delivery (Do2). Responses were central hemodynamics and respiratory and muscle oxygenation obtained for one hypertensive (spontaneously hypertensive [SHR]) and two normotensive (Sprague-Dawley, Wistar-Kyoto) rat strains. Hemorrhagic shock was induced by incremental (0.5 mL) hemorrhage to cardiovascular collapse in anesthetized and mechanically ventilated animals. Shock vulnerability of SHR rats was primarily pressure-driven; in general, SHR exhibited the expected patterns of more rapid deterioration in MAP and Vo2 over smaller ranges of blood loss and Do2. Sternotomy-related depression of CO and thus Do2 in SHR meant that we could not test hypotheses related to the role of Do2 and contribution to perfusion differences between normotensive and hypertensive subjects. Insensitivity of lactate to strain effects suggests that lactate may be a reliable biomarker of shock status. Unexpected similarities between Wistar-Kyoto and SHR suggest strain-related effects other than those related to hypertension per se contribute to hemorrhage response; body size effects and genetic relationships could not be ruled out. Future studies should incorporate phylogenetically based methods to examine the role of hypertension and physiological response to hemorrhage across multiple strains.

  17. [Histoplasmin skin test and focal hemorrhagic chorioiditis (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Schildberg, P; Wessing, A; Eller, B

    1975-02-01

    A histoplasmin skin test was performed on 56 patients with focal hemorrhagic choroiditis. The test was negative in 53 choroiditis patients and positive in three patients. The three patients with posi-ive skin test had been living for a long time in the eastern part of the U.S.A. where histoplasma capsulatum occurs endemically. The results of this study suggest that the infection with histoplasmin capsulatum is not the cause of focal hemorrhagic choroiditis in our area.

  18. Post-hemorrhagic hydrocephalus and diabetes insipidus in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Borenstein-Levin, Liron; Koren, Ilana; Kugelman, Amir; Bader, David; Toropine, Arina; Riskin, Arieh

    2014-11-01

    We present two cases of transient central diabetes insipidus in preterm neonates with post-hemorrhagic hydrocephalus. Although the association between intraventricular hemorrhage and diabetes insipidus has been described in preterm infants, the association between diabetes insipidus and hydrocephalus, and the fact that such central diabetes insipidus could be reversible with the reduction of ventricular size, either because of spontaneous resolution or the placement of ventriculo-peritoneal shunt is first described here in neonates.

  19. Gastrointestinal bleeding from vascular malformations: Is octreotide effective to rescue difficult-to-treat patients?

    PubMed

    Iannone, Andrea; Principi, Mariabeatrice; Barone, Michele; Losurdo, Giuseppe; Ierardi, Enzo; Di Leo, Alfredo

    2016-09-01

    Gastrointestinal vascular malformations are responsible for 2-8% of all cases of bleeding and 30-40% of all obscure hemorrhages, being the most frequent cause of occult bleeding in older people. The aim of this review was to provide an up-to-date report about the use of octreotide in bleeding from both hereditary and acquired vascular malformations of the gastrointestinal tract. A systematic literature search was performed, using the keywords "gastrointestinal vascular malformation", "octreotide", "angiodysplasia", "portal hypertensive gastropathy", "gastric antral vascular ectasia", and "hereditary vascular malformations". The first line therapy of acute/chronic bleeding from digestive vascular malformations is endoscopy, followed by angiographic embolization and surgical resection when this is unsuccessful. In the setting of difficult-to-treat patients, octreotide has been proposed as an alternative therapeutic strategy. Studies reported in the literature show a high efficacy and safety of octreotide, but described only a small number of enrolled patients, heterogeneous therapeutic schedules and short-term follow-up, with the exception of acute bleeding from esophageal varices. As a consequence, the use of octreotide is not approved in this setting and it is currently still prescribed as an off-label drug. Studies in larger populations are needed to confirm the promising results observed in the small case series reports, so as to provide physicians with a treatment option for patients without available alternatives. Octreotide could also determine a strong decrease in the management costs of these clinical conditions, and especially, could dramatically reduce hospital admission costs. PMID:27595456

  20. Non-aneurysmal spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage: perimesencephalic versus non-perimesencephalic

    PubMed Central

    Coelho, Luís Guilherme Bastos Silva Aguiar; Costa, José Manuel Dias; Silva, Elsa Irene Peixoto Azevedo

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare the clinical evolution of perimesencephalic subarachnoid hemorrhage and non-perimesencephalic subarachnoid hemorrhage. Methods The study was conducted retrospectively in a tertiary hospital center in the north region of Portugal. Included patients had no identifiable cause for subarachnoid hemorrhage. Several epidemiologic, clinical and imaging aspects were statistically analyzed, taking into account the differences in perimesencephalic subarachnoid hemorrhage and non-perimesencephalic subarachnoid hemorrhage. Results Sixty-two patients met the inclusion criteria (46.8% - perimesencephalic subarachnoid hemorrhage; 53.2% - non-perimesencephalic subarachnoid hemorrhage). Demographic and clinical background characteristics were similar in both groups. Complications were more frequent in patients with non-perimesencephalic subarachnoid hemorrhage - 84.8% of the patients had at least one complication versus 48.3% in perimesencephalic subarachnoid hemorrhage. Vasospasm, infection and hydrocephaly were the most common complications (each was detected more frequently in the non-perimesencephalic subarachnoid hemorrhage group than in perimesencephalic subarachnoid hemorrhage group). Two patients died, both had a non-perimesencephalic subarachnoid hemorrhage. The median inpatient time was longer in the non-perimesencephalic subarachnoid hemorrhage group (21 versus 14 days). No incidents of rebleeding were reported during the follow-up period (mean time of 15 ± 10.3 months). Conclusion Perimesencephalic subarachnoid hemorrhage and non-perimesencephalic subarachnoid hemorrhage are two different entities that have different clinical outcomes, namely in terms of complication rate and median inpatient time. The management of these patients should respect this difference to improve treatment and optimize health care resources. PMID:27410409

  1. What's New in Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumors Research and Treatment?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Topic Additional resources for gastrointestinal carcinoid tumors What’s new in gastrointestinal carcinoid tumor research and treatment? There ... for the causes of , ways to prevent , and new approaches to diagnose and treat GI carcinoid tumors. ...

  2. Pediatric functional constipation gastrointestinal symptom profile compared with healthy controls

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Patient-reported outcomes are necessary to evaluate the gastrointestinal symptom profile of patients with functional constipation. Study objectives were to compare the gastrointestinal symptom profile of pediatric patients with functional constipation with matched healthy controls with the Pediatric...

  3. Lower Gastrointestinal (GI) Tract X-Ray (Radiography)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z X-ray (Radiography) - Lower GI Tract Lower gastrointestinal tract radiography or ... Radiography? What is Lower GI Tract X-ray Radiography (Barium Enema)? Lower gastrointestinal (GI) tract radiography, also ...

  4. Maraviroc-Mediated Lung Protection following Trauma-Hemorrhagic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fu-Chao; Zheng, Chih-Wen

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) pathway exerts anti-inflammatory effects in response to injury. Maraviroc has been shown to have potent anti-inflammatory effects. The aim of this study was to investigate whether PPARγ plays an important role in maraviroc-mediated lung protection following trauma-hemorrhage. Methods. Male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent trauma-hemorrhage (mean blood pressure maintained at approximately 35–40 mmHg for 90 minutes), followed by fluid resuscitation. During resuscitation, a single dose of maraviroc (3 mg/kg, intravenously) with and without a PPARγ inhibitor GW9662 (1 mg/kg, intravenously), GW9662, or vehicle was administered. Lung water content, tissue histology, and other various parameters were measured (n = 8 rats/group) 24 hours after resuscitation. One-way ANOVA and Tukey's testing were used for statistical analysis. Results. Trauma-hemorrhage significantly increased lung water content, myeloperoxidase activity, intercellular adhesion molecule-1, interleukin-6, and interleukin-1β levels. These parameters significantly improved in the maraviroc-treated rats subjected to trauma-hemorrhage. Maraviroc treatment also decreased lung tissue damage as compared to the vehicle-treated trauma-hemorrhaged rats. Coadministration of GW9662 with maraviroc abolished the maraviroc-induced beneficial effects on these parameters and lung injury. Conclusion. These results suggest that PPARγ might play a key role in maraviroc-mediated lung protection following trauma-hemorrhage. PMID:27556035

  5. Vascular stasis, intestinal hemorrhage, and heightened vascular permeability complicate acute portal hypertension in cd39-null mice

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiaofeng; Cárdenas, Andrés; Wu, Yan; Enjyoji, Keichi; Robson, Simon C.

    2009-01-01

    Vasoactive factors that regulate splanchnic hemodynamics include nitric oxide, catecholamines, and possibly extracellular nucleosides/nucleotides (adenosine, ATP). CD39/ectonucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase-1 (NTPDase1) is the major vascular ectonucleotidase that hydrolyzes extracellular nucleotides. CD39 activity may be modulated by vascular injury, inflammation, and altered oxygen tension. Altered Cd39 expression by the murine hepatosplanchnic vasculature may impact hemodynamics and portal hypertension (PHT) in vivo. We noted that basal portal pressures (PPs) were comparable in wild-type and Cd39-null mice (n = 9). ATP infusions resulted in increments in PP in wild-type mice, but, in contrast, this significantly decreased in Cd39-null mice (n = 9) post-ATP in a nitric oxide-dependent manner. We then studied Cd39/NTPDase1 deletion in the regulation of portal hemodynamics, vascular integrity, and intestinal permeability in a murine model of PHT. Partial portal vein ligation (PPVL) was performed in Cd39-null (n = 44) and wild-type (n = 23) mice. Sequential measurements obtained after PPVL were indicative of comparable levels of PHT (ranges 14–29 mmHg) in both groups. There was one death in the wild-type group and eight in the Cd39-null group from intestinal bleeding (P = 0.024). Circulatory stasis in the absence of overt portal vein thrombosis, portal congestion, intestinal hemorrhage, and increased permeability were evident in all surviving Cd39-null mice. Deletion of Cd39 results in deleterious outcomes post-PPVL that are associated with significant microcirculatory derangements and major intestinal congestion with hemorrhage mimicking acute mesenteric occlusion. Absent Cd39/NTPDase1 and decreased generation of adenosine in the splanchnic circulation cause heightened vascular permeability and gastrointestinal hemorrhage in PPVL. PMID:19520738

  6. Sleep, immunity and inflammation in gastrointestinal disorders.

    PubMed

    Ali, Tauseef; Choe, James; Awab, Ahmed; Wagener, Theodore L; Orr, William C

    2013-12-28

    Sleep disorders have become a global issue, and discovering their causes and consequences are the focus of many research endeavors. An estimated 70 million Americans suffer from some form of sleep disorder. Certain sleep disorders have been shown to cause neurocognitive impairment such as decreased cognitive ability, slower response times and performance detriments. Recent research suggests that individuals with sleep abnormalities are also at greater risk of serious adverse health, economic consequences, and most importantly increased all-cause mortality. Several research studies support the associations among sleep, immune function and inflammation. Here, we review the current research linking sleep, immune function, and gastrointestinal diseases and discuss the interdependent relationship between sleep and these gastrointestinal disorders. Different physiologic processes including immune system and inflammatory cytokines help regulate the sleep. The inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor, interleukin-1 (IL-1), and IL-6 have been shown to be a significant contributor of sleep disturbances. On the other hand, sleep disturbances such as sleep deprivation have been shown to up regulate these inflammatory cytokines. Alterations in these cytokine levels have been demonstrated in certain gastrointestinal diseases such as inflammatory bowel disease, gastro-esophageal reflux, liver disorders and colorectal cancer. In turn, abnormal sleep brought on by these diseases is shown to contribute to the severity of these same gastrointestinal diseases. Knowledge of these relationships will allow gastroenterologists a great opportunity to enhance the care of their patients.

  7. Multiple gastrointestinal atresias in two consecutive siblings.

    PubMed

    Gahukamble, D B; Gahukamble, L D

    2002-03-01

    Two consecutive female siblings with multiple gastrointestinal atresias are described. The history of consanguinity in the parents and the presence of extensive typical pathological lesions suggest a genetically-induced developmental fault in the alimentary tract during the early embryonic period.

  8. Endoscopic Management of Gastrointestinal Leaks and Fistulae.

    PubMed

    Willingham, Field F; Buscaglia, Jonathan M

    2015-10-01

    Gastrointestinal leaks and fistulae can be serious acute complications or chronic morbid conditions resulting from inflammatory, malignant, or postsurgical states. Endoscopic closure of gastrointestinal leaks and fistulae represents major progress in the treatment of patients with these complex presentations. The main goal of endoscopic therapy is the interruption of the flow of luminal contents across a gastrointestinal defect. In consideration of the proper endoscopic approach to luminal closure, several basic principles must be considered. Undrained cavities and fluid collections must often first be drained percutaneously, and the percutaneous drain provides an important measure of safety for subsequent endoscopic luminal manipulations. The size and exact location of the leak/fistula, as well as the viability of the surrounding tissue, must be defined. Almost all complex leaks and fistulae must be approached in a multidisciplinary manner, collaborating with colleagues in nutrition, radiology, and surgery. Currently, gastrointestinal leaks and fistulae may be managed endoscopically by using 1 or more of the following modalities: stent placement, clip closure (including through-the-scope clips and over-the-scope devices), endoscopic suturing, and the injection of tissue sealants. In this article, we discuss these modalities and review the published outcomes data regarding each approach as well as practical considerations for successful closure of luminal defects.

  9. Gastrointestinal Disorders in Children with Neurodevelopmental Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Peter B.

    2008-01-01

    Children with neurodevelopmental disabilities such as cerebral palsy (CP), spina bifida, or inborn errors of metabolism frequently have associated gastrointestinal problems. These include oral motor dysfunction leading to feeding difficulties, risk of aspiration, prolonged feeding times, and malnutrition with its attendant physical compromise.…

  10. Eastern Canadian Gastrointestinal Cancer Consensus Conference 2014

    PubMed Central

    Tsvetkova, E.; Sud, S.; Aucoin, N.; Biagi, J.; Burkes, R.; Samson, B.; Brule, S.; Cripps, C.; Colwell, B.; Falkson, C.; Dorreen, M.; Goel, R.; Halwani, F.; Maroun, J.; Michaud, N.; Tehfe, M.; Thirlwell, M.; Vickers, M.; Asmis, T.

    2015-01-01

    The annual Eastern Canadian Colorectal Cancer Consensus Conference was held in Montreal, Quebec, 23–25 October 2014. Expert radiation, medical, and surgical oncologists and pathologists involved in the management of patients with gastrointestinal malignancies participated in presentations and discussions resulting in consensus statements on such hot topics as management of neuroendocrine tumours, advanced and metastatic pancreatic cancer, and metastatic colorectal cancer. PMID:26300681

  11. Sleep, immunity and inflammation in gastrointestinal disorders

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Tauseef; Choe, James; Awab, Ahmed; Wagener, Theodore L; Orr, William C

    2013-01-01

    Sleep disorders have become a global issue, and discovering their causes and consequences are the focus of many research endeavors. An estimated 70 million Americans suffer from some form of sleep disorder. Certain sleep disorders have been shown to cause neurocognitive impairment such as decreased cognitive ability, slower response times and performance detriments. Recent research suggests that individuals with sleep abnormalities are also at greater risk of serious adverse health, economic consequences, and most importantly increased all-cause mortality. Several research studies support the associations among sleep, immune function and inflammation. Here, we review the current research linking sleep, immune function, and gastrointestinal diseases and discuss the interdependent relationship between sleep and these gastrointestinal disorders. Different physiologic processes including immune system and inflammatory cytokines help regulate the sleep. The inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor, interleukin-1 (IL-1), and IL-6 have been shown to be a significant contributor of sleep disturbances. On the other hand, sleep disturbances such as sleep deprivation have been shown to up regulate these inflammatory cytokines. Alterations in these cytokine levels have been demonstrated in certain gastrointestinal diseases such as inflammatory bowel disease, gastro-esophageal reflux, liver disorders and colorectal cancer. In turn, abnormal sleep brought on by these diseases is shown to contribute to the severity of these same gastrointestinal diseases. Knowledge of these relationships will allow gastroenterologists a great opportunity to enhance the care of their patients. PMID:24409051

  12. Sleep, immunity and inflammation in gastrointestinal disorders.

    PubMed

    Ali, Tauseef; Choe, James; Awab, Ahmed; Wagener, Theodore L; Orr, William C

    2013-12-28

    Sleep disorders have become a global issue, and discovering their causes and consequences are the focus of many research endeavors. An estimated 70 million Americans suffer from some form of sleep disorder. Certain sleep disorders have been shown to cause neurocognitive impairment such as decreased cognitive ability, slower response times and performance detriments. Recent research suggests that individuals with sleep abnormalities are also at greater risk of serious adverse health, economic consequences, and most importantly increased all-cause mortality. Several research studies support the associations among sleep, immune function and inflammation. Here, we review the current research linking sleep, immune function, and gastrointestinal diseases and discuss the interdependent relationship between sleep and these gastrointestinal disorders. Different physiologic processes including immune system and inflammatory cytokines help regulate the sleep. The inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor, interleukin-1 (IL-1), and IL-6 have been shown to be a significant contributor of sleep disturbances. On the other hand, sleep disturbances such as sleep deprivation have been shown to up regulate these inflammatory cytokines. Alterations in these cytokine levels have been demonstrated in certain gastrointestinal diseases such as inflammatory bowel disease, gastro-esophageal reflux, liver disorders and colorectal cancer. In turn, abnormal sleep brought on by these diseases is shown to contribute to the severity of these same gastrointestinal diseases. Knowledge of these relationships will allow gastroenterologists a great opportunity to enhance the care of their patients. PMID:24409051

  13. Hydrogen Sulfide Signaling in the Gastrointestinal Tract

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: The current literature regarding the effects of the gaseous signal molecule hydrogen sulfide (H2S) in the gastrointestinal system is reviewed. Bacterial, host and pharmaceutical-derived H2S are all considered and presented according to the physiological or pathophysiological effects of the gaseous signal molecule. These subjects include the toxicology of intestinal H2S with emphasis on bacterial-derived H2S, especially from sulfate-reducing bacteria, the role of endogenous and exogenous H2S in intestinal inflammation, and the roles of H2S in gastrointestinal motility, secretion and nociception. Recent Advances: While its pro- and anti-inflammatory, smooth muscle relaxant, prosecretory, and pro- and antinociceptive actions continue to remain the major effects of H2S in this system; recent findings have expanded the potential molecular targets for H2S in the gastrointestinal tract. Critical Issues: Numerous discrepancies remain in the literature, and definitive molecular targets in this system have not been supported by the use of competitive antagonism. Future Directions: Future work will hopefully resolve discrepancies in the literature and identify molecular targets and mechanisms of action for H2S. It is clear from the current literature that the long-appreciated relationship between H2S and the gastrointestinal tract continues to be strong as we endeavor to unravel its mysteries. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 818–830. PMID:23582008

  14. Androgen receptor expression in gastrointestinal stromal tumor.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Lisandro F; Bacchi, Carlos E

    2009-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the expression of estrogen, progesterone, and androgen receptors in a large series of gastrointestinal stromal tumors. Clinical and pathologic data were reviewed in 427 cases of gastrointestinal stromal tumor and the expression of such hormone receptors was investigated by immunohistochemistry using tissue microarray technique. All tumors were negative for estrogen receptor expression. Progesterone and androgen receptors expression was observed in 5.4% and 17.6% of tumors, respectively. We found the higher average age at diagnosis, the lower frequency of tumors located in the small intestine, and the higher frequency of extragastrointestinal tumors to be statistically significant in the group of tumors with androgen receptor expression in contrast to the group showing no androgen receptor expression. There was no statistic difference between such groups regarding sex, tumor size, mitotic count, cell morphology, and risk of aggressive behavior. Considering that the expression of androgen receptors in gastrointestinal stromal tumors is not negligible, further studies are encouraged to establish the role of androgen deprivation therapy for gastrointestinal stromal tumors.

  15. Numerical simulation of hemorrhage in human injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chong, Kwitae; Jiang, Chenfanfu; Santhanam, Anand; Benharash, Peyman; Teran, Joseph; Eldredge, Jeff

    2015-11-01

    Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) is adapted to simulate hemorrhage in the injured human body. As a Lagrangian fluid simulation, SPH uses fluid particles as computational elements and thus mass conservation is trivially satisfied. In order to ensure anatomical fidelity, a three-dimensional reconstruction of a portion of the human body -here, demonstrated on the lower leg- is sampled as skin, bone and internal tissue particles from the CT scan image of an actual patient. The injured geometry is then generated by simulation of ballistic projectiles passing through the anatomical model with the Material Point Method (MPM) and injured vessel segments are identified. From each such injured segment, SPH is used to simulate bleeding, with inflow boundary condition obtained from a coupled 1-d vascular tree model. Blood particles interact with impermeable bone and skin particles through the Navier-Stokes equations and with permeable internal tissue particles through the Brinkman equations. The SPH results are rendered in post-processing for improved visual fidelity. The overall simulation strategy is demonstrated on several injury scenarios in the lower leg.

  16. Anemia and transfusion after subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Le Roux, Peter D

    2011-09-01

    Delayed cerebral ischemia after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) may be affected by a number of factors, including cerebral blood flow and oxygen delivery. Anemia affects about half of patients with SAH and is associated with worse outcome. Anemia also may contribute to the development of or exacerbate delayed cerebral ischemia. This review was designed to examine the prevalence and impact of anemia in patients with SAH and to evaluate the effects of transfusion. A literature search was made to identify original research on anemia and transfusion in SAH patients. A total of 27 articles were identified that addressed the effects of red blood cell transfusion (RBCT) on brain physiology, anemia in SAH, and clinical management with RBCT or erythropoietin. Most studies provided retrospectively analyzed data of very low-quality according to the GRADE criteria. While RBCT can have beneficial effects on brain physiology, RBCT may be associated with medical complications, infection, vasospasm, and poor outcome after SAH. The effects may vary with disease severity or the presence of vasospasm, but it remains unclear whether RBCTs are a marker of disease severity or a cause of worse outcome. Erythropoietin data are limited. The literature review further suggests that the results of the Transfusion Requirements in Critical Care Trial and subsequent observational studies on RBCT in general critical care do not apply to SAH patients and that randomized trials to address the role of RBCT in SAH are required. PMID:21769459

  17. Bleeding and clotting in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia

    PubMed Central

    Dittus, Christopher; Streiff, Michael; Ansell, Jack

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is a relatively common inherited vascular disorder that was first described in 1864, and is notable for epistaxis, telangiectasia, and arterial venous malformations. While genetic tests are available, the diagnosis remains clinical, and is based on the Curacao criteria. Patients with HHT are at increased risk for both bleeding and clotting events. Because of these competing complications, hematologists are often faced with difficult clinical decisions. While the majority of management decisions revolve around bleeding complications, it is not infrequent for these patients to require anticoagulation for thrombosis. Any anticoagulation recommendations must take into account the bleeding risks associated with HHT. Recent reviews have found that HHT patients can be safely anticoagulated, with the most frequent complication being worsened epistaxis. Large clinical trials have shown that factor IIa and Xa inhibitors have less intracranial bleeding than warfarin, and basic coagulation research has provided a possible mechanism. This article describes the anticoagulation dilemma posed when a 62-year-old female patient with a history of bleeding events associated with HHT was diagnosed with a pulmonary embolism. The subsequent discussion focuses on the approach to anticoagulation in the HHT patient, and addresses the role of the new oral anticoagulants. PMID:25879004

  18. Hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome in Montenegro.

    PubMed

    Gledovic, Z B; Jeknic, A S; Grgurevic, A D; Rakocevic, B B; Bozovic, B R; Mugosa, B V

    2008-09-01

    The objective of the study was to analyze the epidemiological features of hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) in Montenegro. The study included 169 cases of HFRS diagnosed in the period between 1995 and 2005 according to the clinical symptoms and serological confirmation. For the analysis of the demographic characteristics of the cases, as well as of the chronological and topographical features of the disease, a descriptive epidemiological method was employed. The average incidence rate in the observed period was 2.6 per 100,000. In the observed period, 8 people died; the average case fatality rate was 4.8% (range: 0.1-15%). Among the diseased persons, 116 were males and 53 were females; most of the cases were adults. The greatest number of HFRS cases occurred during the summer months. The highest incidence rates were registered in the northeastern, rural part of the country. The most frequent type of hantaviruses in Montenegro were Dobrava-Belgrade and Hantaan, carried by rodent species, i.e., the yellow-neck mouse and the striped-field mouse. It is likely that HFRS in Montenegro will become more common in the near future, unless public health control measures are taken.

  19. Multimodal MRI characterization of experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Sun, Y; Shen, Q; Watts, L T; Muir, E R; Huang, S; Yang, G-Y; Suarez, J I; Duong, T Q

    2016-03-01

    Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. We implemented an in-scanner rat model of mild SAH in which blood or vehicle was injected into the cistern magna, and applied multimodal MRI to study the brain prior to, immediately after (5min to 4h), and upto 7days after SAH. Vehicle injection did not change arterial lumen diameter, apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), T2, venous signal, vascular reactivity to hypercapnia, or foot-fault scores, but mildly reduce cerebral blood flow (CBF) up to 4h, and open-field activity up to 7days post injection. By contrast, blood injection caused: (i) vasospasm 30min after SAH but not thereafter, (ii) venous abnormalities at 3h and 2days, delayed relative to vasospasm, (iii) reduced basal CBF and to hypercapnia 1-4h but not thereafter, (iv) reduced ADC immediately after SAH but no ADC and T2 changes on days 2 and 7, and (v) reduced open-field activities in both SAH and vehicle animals, but no significant differences in open-field activities and foot-fault tests between groups. Mild SAH exhibited transient and mild hemodynamic disturbances and diffusion changes, but did not show apparent ischemic brain injury nor functional deficits. PMID:26708744

  20. Detection of viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Winton, James; Kurath, Gael; Batts, William

    2007-01-01

    Viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) is considered to be one of the most important viral pathogens of finfish and is listed as reportable by many nations and international organizations (Office International des Epizooties 2006). Prior to 1988, VHSV was thought to be limited to Europe (Wolf 1988; Smail 1999). Subsequently, it was shown that the virus is endemic among many marine and anadromous fish species in both the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans (Meyers and Winton 1995; Skall et al. 2005). Genetic analysis reveals that isolates of VHSV can be divided into four genotypes that generally correlate with geographic location with the North American isolates generally falling into VHSV Genotype IV (Snow et al. 2004). In 2005-2006, reports from the Great Lakes region indicated that wild fish had experienced disease or, in some cases, very large die-offs from VHSV (Elsayed et al. 2006, Lumsden et al. 2007). The new strain from the Great Lakes, now identified as VHSV Genotype IVb, appears most closely related to isolates of VHSV from mortalities that occurred during 2000-2004 in rivers and near-shore areas of New Brunswick and Nova Scotia, Canada (Gagne et al. 2007). The type IVb isolate found in the Great Lakes region is the only strain outside of Europe that has been associated with significant mortality in freshwater species.

  1. Hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome in Montenegro.

    PubMed

    Gledovic, Z B; Jeknic, A S; Grgurevic, A D; Rakocevic, B B; Bozovic, B R; Mugosa, B V

    2008-09-01

    The objective of the study was to analyze the epidemiological features of hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) in Montenegro. The study included 169 cases of HFRS diagnosed in the period between 1995 and 2005 according to the clinical symptoms and serological confirmation. For the analysis of the demographic characteristics of the cases, as well as of the chronological and topographical features of the disease, a descriptive epidemiological method was employed. The average incidence rate in the observed period was 2.6 per 100,000. In the observed period, 8 people died; the average case fatality rate was 4.8% (range: 0.1-15%). Among the diseased persons, 116 were males and 53 were females; most of the cases were adults. The greatest number of HFRS cases occurred during the summer months. The highest incidence rates were registered in the northeastern, rural part of the country. The most frequent type of hantaviruses in Montenegro were Dobrava-Belgrade and Hantaan, carried by rodent species, i.e., the yellow-neck mouse and the striped-field mouse. It is likely that HFRS in Montenegro will become more common in the near future, unless public health control measures are taken. PMID:18806348

  2. Blood Pressure Management in Intracerebral Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Mohammad, Yousef; Qureshi, Adnan

    2016-06-01

    Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is associated with devastating outcomes. Admission to the intensive care unit has been the only proven course to improve outcomes. All other treatment modalities have failed so far. The majority of patients presenting with ICH have an elevated blood pressure (BP). Initial data on the safety and efficacy of BP treatment in acute ICH have been conflicting. This has led to large prospective and randomized clinical trials to assess the safety and efficacy of early BP lowering in acute ICH. These trials showed safety and a tendency toward improved functional outcomes. In fact, the results of three subsequent meta-analyses also showed safety and possible efficacy of early lowering of BP in ICH. Based on the results of the published clinical trials and meta-analyses, the American Heart Association and the European Stroke Association concluded that early intensive treatment of BP in acute ICH is safe and might improve functional outcome. The authors advocate that-pending additional data from ongoing trials-health care professionals should maintain the SBp < 140 mm Hg in patients presenting with acute ICH. PMID:27214702

  3. Intramyocardial Hemorrhage: An Enigma for Cardiac MRI?

    PubMed Central

    Masselli, Gabriele; Monti, Riccardo; Spreca, Matteo; Gualdi, Gian Franco

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) is a useful noninvasive technique for determining the presence of microvascular obstruction (MVO) and intramyocardial hemorrhage (IMH), frequently occurring in patients after reperfused myocardial infarction (MI). MVO, or the so-called no-reflow phenomenon, is associated with adverse ventricular remodeling and a poor prognosis during follow-up. Similarly, IMH is considered a severe damage after revascularization by percutaneous primary coronary intervention (PPCI) or fibrinolysis, which represents a worse prognosis. However, the pathophysiology of IMH is not fully understood and imaging modalities might help to better understand that phenomenon. While, during the past decade, several studies examined the distribution patterns of late gadolinium enhancement with different CMR sequences, the standardized CMR protocol for assessment of IMH is not yet well established. The aim of this review is to evaluate the available literature on this issue, with particular regard to CMR sequences. New techniques, such as positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance imaging (PET/MRI), could be useful tools to explore molecular mechanisms of the myocardial infarction healing process. PMID:25759823

  4. Assessment of dengue hemorrhagic fever in Myanmar.

    PubMed

    Cho-Min-Naing

    2000-12-01

    This study assesses the burden of dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) and effectiveness of an intervention package in Myanmar. Disability adjusted life years (DALYs) lost for fatal and non-fatal DHF cases and DALYs averted due to intervention for DHF from 1970-1997 were estimated. The data are based on reported cases and deaths from DHF extracted from annual reports of the Myanmar vector borne disease control program. Sensitivity analyses were performed for robustness of conclusions. DALYs lost from both fatal and non-fatal DHF cases in Myanmar were estimated as 83.83 DALYs per year per million population (range = 83.33-86.32) for the period 1970-1997. DALYs averted from DHF due to intervention were estimated as 134 DALYs per year per million population (range = 47-159). The burden of DHF in Myanmar for the selected year 1990 was 91.3 DALYs per year per million population (range = 90.1-96.5). A comparison was made with China, India and other Asian countries based on information provided by a World Bank study.

  5. 21 CFR 876.1725 - Gastrointestinal motility monitoring system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Gastrointestinal motility monitoring system. 876... Gastrointestinal motility monitoring system. (a) Identification. A gastrointestinal motility monitoring system is a... include signal conditioning, amplifying, and recording equipment. This generic type of device includes...

  6. 21 CFR 876.5980 - Gastrointestinal tube and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Gastrointestinal tube and accessories. 876.5980... tube and accessories. (a) Identification. A gastrointestinal tube and accessories is a device that..., gastrointestinal string and tubes to locate internal bleeding, double lumen tube for intestinal decompression...

  7. 21 CFR 876.5980 - Gastrointestinal tube and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Gastrointestinal tube and accessories. 876.5980... tube and accessories. (a) Identification. A gastrointestinal tube and accessories is a device that..., gastrointestinal string and tubes to locate internal bleeding, double lumen tube for intestinal decompression...

  8. 21 CFR 876.5980 - Gastrointestinal tube and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Gastrointestinal tube and accessories. 876.5980... tube and accessories. (a) Identification. A gastrointestinal tube and accessories is a device that..., gastrointestinal string and tubes to locate internal bleeding, double lumen tube for intestinal decompression...

  9. 21 CFR 876.5980 - Gastrointestinal tube and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Gastrointestinal tube and accessories. 876.5980... tube and accessories. (a) Identification. A gastrointestinal tube and accessories is a device that..., gastrointestinal string and tubes to locate internal bleeding, double lumen tube for intestinal decompression...

  10. 21 CFR 876.5980 - Gastrointestinal tube and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Gastrointestinal tube and accessories. 876.5980... tube and accessories. (a) Identification. A gastrointestinal tube and accessories is a device that..., gastrointestinal string and tubes to locate internal bleeding, double lumen tube for intestinal decompression...

  11. Functional lumen imaging of the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Lottrup, Christian; Gregersen, Hans; Liao, Donghua; Fynne, Lotte; Frøkjær, Jens Brøndum; Krogh, Klaus; Regan, Julie; Kunwald, Peter; McMahon, Barry P

    2015-10-01

    This nonsystematic review aims to describe recent developments in the use of functional lumen imaging in the gastrointestinal tract stimulated by the introduction of the functional lumen imaging probe. When ingested food in liquid and solid form is transported along the gastrointestinal tract, sphincters provide an important role in the flow and control of these contents. Inadequate function of sphincters is the basis of many gastrointestinal diseases. Despite this, traditional methods of sphincter diagnosis and measurement such as fluoroscopy, manometry, and the barostat are limited in what they can tell us. It has long been thought that measurement of sphincter function through resistance to distension is a better approach, now more commonly known as distensibility testing. The functional lumen imaging probe is the first medical measurement device that purports in a practical way to provide geometric profiling and measurement of distensibility in sphincters. With use of impedance planimetry, an axial series of cross-sectional areas and pressure in a catheter-mounted allantoid bag are used for the calculation of distensibility parameters. The technique has been trialed in many valvular areas of the gastrointestinal tract, including the upper esophageal sphincter, the esophagogastric junction, and the anorectal region. It has shown potential in the biomechanical assessment of sphincter function and characterization of swallowing disorders, gastroesophageal reflux disease, eosinophilic esophagitis, achalasia, and fecal incontinence. From this early work, the functional lumen imaging technique has the potential to contribute to a better and more physiological understanding of narrowing regions in the gastrointestinal tract in general and sphincters in particular. PMID:25980822

  12. Idiopathic Spontaneous Intramedullary Hemorrhage: A Report of a Rare Case of Repeated Intramedullary Hemorrhage with Unknown Etiology

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Byeong Sam

    2015-01-01

    A 48-year-old woman presented with acute voiding difficulty, numbness and weakness of both lower extremities. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed an intramedullary hemorrhagic mass that extended from T9 to T10. T8-T10 laminotomy and surgical removal of the hemorrhagic mass was performed. The pathological diagnosis was hematoma. Her neurological status remained the same after the operation. At 5 days post-operation, the patient suddenly became paraplegic, and MRI that was immediately performed revealed a recurrent intramedullary hemorrhage. Emergent surgical evacuation was performed. Again, histological examination showed only hematoma, without any evidence of abnormal vessels or a tumor. A postoperative MRI revealed no abnormal lesions other than those resulting from postoperative changes. At a 9-month follow up, the patient could walk a short distance with the aid of a walker. Because spontaneous intramedullary hemorrhage with unknown etiology is very rare, it is essential to perform a meticulous inspection of the hemorrhagic site to find the underlying cause. Repeated hemorrhage can occur; therefore, close observation of patients after surgery is important in cases without an apparent etiology. Urgent surgical evacuation is important to improve outcomes in these cases. PMID:26834818

  13. Intracranial Calcifications and Hemorrhages: Characterization with Quantitative Susceptibility Mapping

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Weiwei; Zhu, Wenzhen; Kovanlikaya, IIhami; Kovanlikaya, Arzu; Liu, Tian; Wang, Shuai; Salustri, Carlo

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To compare gradient-echo (GRE) phase magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM) in the detection of intracranial calcifications and hemorrhages. Materials and Methods This retrospective study was approved by the institutional review board. Thirty-eight patients (24 male, 14 female; mean age, 33 years ± 16 [standard deviation]) with intracranial calcifications and/or hemorrhages diagnosed on the basis of computed tomography (CT), MR imaging (interval between examinations, 1.78 days ± 1.31), and clinical information were selected. GRE and QSM images were reconstructed from the same GRE data. Two experienced neuroradiologists independently identified the calcifications and hemorrhages on the QSM and GRE phase images in two randomized sessions. Sensitivity, specificity, and interobserver agreement were computed and compared with the McNemar test and k coefficients. Calcification loads and volumes were measured to gauge intermodality correlations with CT. Results A total of 156 lesions were detected: 62 hemorrhages, 89 calcifications, and five mixed lesions containing both hemorrhage and calcification. Most of these lesions (146 of 151 lesions, 96.7%) had a dominant sign on QSM images suggestive of a specific diagnosis of hemorrhage or calcium, whereas half of these lesions (76 of 151, 50.3%) were heterogeneous on GRE phase images and thus were difficult to characterize. Averaged over the two independent observers for detecting hemorrhages, QSM achieved a sensitivity of 89.5% and a specificity of 94.5%, which were significantly higher than those at GRE phase imaging (71% and 80%, respectively; P < .05 for both readers). In the identification of calcifications, QSM achieved a sensitivity of 80.5%, which was marginally higher than that with GRE phase imaging (71%; P = .08 and .10 for the two readers), and a specificity of 93.5%, which was significantly higher than that with GRE phase imaging (76.5%; P < .05 for both readers

  14. A Novel Polyomavirus (Goose Hemorrhagic Polyomavirus) Is the Agent of Hemorrhagic Nephritis Enteritis of Geese

    PubMed Central

    Guerin, Jean-Luc; Gelfi, Jacqueline; Dubois, Luc; Vuillaume, Aimé; Boucraut-Baralon, Corine; Pingret, Jean-Luc

    2000-01-01

    We have identified the etiological agent of hemorrhagic nephritis enteritis of geese (HNEG), a fatal disease of European geese. HNEG has been recognized in almost all goose breeding areas, with an epizootic pattern, and up to now, the infectious agent has remained unknown. In order to identify the causative agent, infected tissues from HNEG-affected geese were inoculated to 1-day-old goslings, which then developed clinical signs typical of HNEG. Tissue homogenates from these birds were subjected to Freon extraction followed by sucrose density gradient ultracentrifugation. The resulting main band was examined by electron microscopy and consisted of spherical, naked, papovavirus-like particles approximately 45 nm in diameter. The virus was isolated and propagated in goose kidney cell primary culture. Tissue- or culture-purified virus allowed the experimental reproduction of the disease in goslings. Random PCR amplification of viral nucleic acid produced a 1,175-bp fragment which was shown to be associated with field samples collected from geese affected by HNEG on commercial farms in France. Sequence analysis of the PCR product revealed a unique open reading frame, showing 63 to 72% amino acid similarity with the major capsid protein (VP1) of several polyomaviruses. Finally, based on phylogenetic analysis, we conclude that the causative agent of HNEG is closely related to but clearly distinct from other polyomaviruses; we thus have named this newly identified virus Goose hemorrhagic polyomavirus. PMID:10775588

  15. Clinical and laboratory characteristics and risk factors for fatality in elderly patients with dengue hemorrhagic fever.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ing-Kit; Liu, Jien-Wei; Yang, Kuender D

    2008-08-01

    To better understand the clinical and laboratory characteristics and to identify risk factor(s) for fatality in elderly patients with dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF), 66 elderly (age > or = 65 years) and 241 non-elderly adults (age, 19-64 years) with DHF were retrospectively analyzed. Compared with non-elderly adults, elderly individuals had significantly lower incidences of fever (P = 0.002), abdominal pain (P = 0.003), bone pain (P < 0.001), and skin rashes (P = 0.002); higher frequencies of concurrent bacteremia (P = 0.049), gastrointestinal bleeding (P = 0.044), acute renal failure (P = 0.001), and pleural effusion (P < 0.010); higher incidence of prolonged prothrombin time (P = 0.025); lower mean hemoglobin level (P < 0.001); longer hospitalization (P = 0.049); and a higher fatality rate (P = 0.006). Five elderly patients with DHF died. When compared with non-fatal elderly patients with DHF, a significant higher frequency in men (P = 0.019), those with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (P = 0.008), those with dengue shock syndrome (DSS; P < 0.001), and those with acute renal failure (P < 0.001) was found in the elderly counterparts that died. Multivariate analysis showed that only DSS (odd ratio = 77.33, P = 0.001) was an independent risk factor for fatality in elderly patients.

  16. Clinical characteristics and risk factors for concurrent bacteremia in adults with dengue hemorrhagic fever.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ing-Kit; Liu, Jien-Wei; Yang, Kuender D

    2005-02-01

    To better understand the clinical characteristics of concurrent bacteremia (dual infection) in patients with dengue hemorrhagic fever/dengue shock syndrome (DHF/DSS) and identify predictive risk factors for dual infection, 100 patients with DHF/DSS (7 with a dual infection and 93 with DHF/DSS alone [controls]) were enrolled in this study. A patient with DHF/DSS who lacked three or more of the five most frequently observed manifestations other than fever in controls or showed disturbed consciousness was defined as one with unusual dengue manifestations. Patients with a dual infection were older, and tended to have prolonged fever, higher frequencies of acute renal failure, gastrointestinal bleeding, altered consciousness, unusual dengue manifestations, and DSS. Acute renal failure (odds ratio [OR] = 51.45, P = 0.002), and prolonged fever (> 5 days) (OR = 26.07, P = 0.017) were independent risk factors for dual infection. Clinicians should be alert to the potential for concurrent bacteremia when treating patients with DHF/DSS who are at risk for dual infection and manage them accordingly.

  17. [Marburg and Ebola hemorrhagic fevers--pathogens, epidemiology and therapy].

    PubMed

    Stock, Ingo

    2014-09-01

    Marburg and Ebola hemorrhagic fevers are severe, systemic viral diseases affecting humans and non-human primates. They are characterized by multiple symptoms such as hemorrhages, fever, headache, muscle and abdominal pain, chills, sore throat, nausea, vomiting and diarrhea. Elevated liver-associated enzyme levels and coagulopathy are also associated with these diseases. Marburg and Ebola hemorrhagic fevers are caused by (Lake victoria) Marburg virus and different species of Ebola viruses, respectively. They are enveloped, single-stranded RNA viruses and belong to the family of filoviridae. Case fatality rates of filovirus disease outbreaks are among the highest reported for any human pathogen, ranging from 25 to 90% or more. Outbreaks of Marburg and Ebola hemorrhagic fever occur in certain regions of equatorial Africa at irregular intervals. Since 2000, the number of outbreaks has increased. In 2014, the biggest outbreak of a filovirus-induced hemorrhagic fever that has been documented so far occurred from March to July 2014 in Guinea, Sierra Leone, Liberia and Nigeria. The outbreak was caused by a new variant of Zaire Ebola-Virus, affected more than 2600 people (stated 20 August) and was associated with case-fatality rates of up to 67% (Guinea). Treatment of Marburg and Ebola hemorrhagic fevers is symptomatic and supportive, licensed antiviral agents are currently not available. Recently, BCX4430, a promising synthetic adenosine analogue with high in vitro and in vivo activity against filoviruses and other RNA viruses, has been described. BCX4430 inhibits viral RNA polymerase activity and protects cynomolgus macaques from Marburg virus infection when administered as late as 48 hours after infection. Nucleic acid-based products, recombinant vaccines and antibodies appear to be less suitable for the treatment of Marburg and Ebola hemorrhagic fevers.

  18. Diagnostic dilemmas in enlarged and diffusely hemorrhagic adrenal glands.

    PubMed

    Diolombi, Mairo L; Khani, Francesca; Epstein, Jonathan I

    2016-07-01

    We have noted an increasing number of cases of enlarged adrenal glands where the underlying diagnosis was masked by a diffusely hemorrhagic process. We identified from our database 59 cases (32 consults, 27 routine) of adrenal glands with diffuse (>25%) hemorrhage received between 2000 and 2014. Fifty-three adrenalectomies and 6 biopsies were identified. The diagnoses after central review were 41 adrenocortical adenomas, 1 nodular adrenocortical hyperplasia with associated myelolipoma, 1 benign adrenocortical cyst, and 10 nonneoplastic adrenal glands with hemorrhage. A definitive diagnosis for the 6 biopsies was precluded by the sample size. The adrenocortical adenomas (size, 1-13 cm; 25%-95% hemorrhage) showed clear cell change in the neoplastic area (10%-80% of the tumor), 19 showed focal calcification (1 with ossification), 11 showed areas of papillary endothelial hyperplasia, 10 showed scattered lymphoplasmacytic inflammation, 6 showed benign cortical tissue extending beyond the adrenal capsule into soft tissue, 1 showed necrosis in the form of ghost cells, 2 showed lipomatous change, and 6 were associated with incidental benign lesions (1 cortical cyst, 1 schwannoma, and 4 myelolipomas). Twenty-four of the adrenocortical adenomas were consults where the referring pathologist had trouble classifying the lesion. Of the 10 nonneoplastic adrenals (4.5-22 cm; 40%-80% hemorrhage), 2 were consults. In summary, pathologists have difficulties recognizing adrenocortical adenomas in the setting of a massively enlarged and hemorrhagic adrenal gland. Although there is a correlation between adrenocortical malignancy and size, hemorrhage into nonmalignant adrenal glands can result in markedly enlarged adrenals.

  19. Diagnosis of gastrointestinal bleeding: A practical guide for clinicians

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Bong Sik Matthew; Li, Bob T; Engel, Alexander; Samra, Jaswinder S; Clarke, Stephen; Norton, Ian D; Li, Angela E

    2014-01-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding is a common problem encountered in the emergency department and in the primary care setting. Acute or overt gastrointestinal bleeding is visible in the form of hematemesis, melena or hematochezia. Chronic or occult gastrointestinal bleeding is not apparent to the patient and usually presents as positive fecal occult blood or iron deficiency anemia. Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding is recurrent bleeding when the source remains unidentified after upper endoscopy and colonoscopic evaluation and is usually from the small intestine. Accurate clinical diagnosis is crucial and guides definitive investigations and interventions. This review summarizes the overall diagnostic approach to gastrointestinal bleeding and provides a practical guide for clinicians. PMID:25400991

  20. Submacular hemorrhage: A study amongst Indian eyes

    PubMed Central

    Rishi, Ekta; Gopal, Lingam; Rishi, Pukhraj; Sengupta, Sabyasachi; Sharma, Tarun

    2012-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the management outcomes amongst various treatment modalities for submacular hemorrhage (SMH) in Indian subjects. Settings and Design: Retrospective, single-center study. Materials and Methods: Patients presenting with SMH between 1999 and 2006 were included. Treatment modalities included: vitrectomy with subretinal recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (r-tPA) assisted SMH evacuation (group 1, n = 14); pneumatic displacement with intravitreal r-tPA and gas (group 2, n = 25); and pneumatic displacement with intraocular gas (group 3, n = 7). Favorable anatomical outcome was defined as complete displacement of SMH from fovea and favorable functional outcome was defined as a gain of >2 Snellen lines from the baseline. Kruskal–Wallis, analysis of variance (ANOVA), and Chi-square tests were used to compare the three groups, while Mann–Whitney and independent t-test were used to evaluate the influence of duration and size of SMH on outcomes. Results: There was no difference amongst groups in terms of favorable anatomical (P = 0.121) or functional outcomes (P = 0.611). Eyes with median duration of SMH less than 7.5 days had a significantly higher probability of achieving favorable anatomical outcome compared to eyes with SMH >14.5 days (P = 0.042). However, duration of SMH did not influence functional outcome (P = 0.595). Similarly, size of SMH did not affect anatomical (P = 0.578) or functional (P = 0.381) outcome. Median follow-up was 31.5, 6.5, and 2.5 months in the three groups, respectively. Conclusions: Co- existing posterior segment conditions and duration of SMH may influence the choice of treatment modality and treatment outcomes. Pneumatic displacement with r-tPA and r-tPA assisted vitrectomy appear to be favorable options for the management of SMH. PMID:23202390

  1. Postpartum hemorrhage in resource-poor settings.

    PubMed

    Geller, S E; Adams, M G; Kelly, P J; Kodkany, B S; Derman, R J

    2006-03-01

    Despite the strong interest of international health agencies, worldwide maternal mortality has not declined substantially over the past 10 years. Postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) is the most common cause of maternal death across the world, responsible for more than 25% of deaths annually. Although effective tools for prevention and treatment of PPH are available, most are not feasible or practical for use in the developing world where many births still occur at home with untrained birth attendants. Application of many available clinical solutions in rural areas would necessitate substantial changes in government infrastructure and in local culture and customs surrounding pregnancy and childbirth. Before treatment can be administered, prompt and accurate diagnosis must be made, which requires training and appropriate blood measurement tools. After diagnosis, appropriate interventions that can be applied in remote settings are needed. Many uterotonics known to be effective in reducing PPH in tertiary care settings may not be useful in community settings because they require refrigeration and/or skilled administration. Moreover, rapid transfer to a higher level of care must be available, a challenge in many settings because of distance and lack of transportation. In light of these barriers, low-technological replacements for treatments commonly applied in the developed-world must be utilized. Community education, improvements to emergency care systems, training for birth attendants, misoprostol, and Uniject have shown promise as potential solutions. In the short term, it is expedient to capitalize on practical opportunities that utilize the existing strengths and resources in each community or region in order to implement appropriate solutions to save the lives of women during childbirth.

  2. Postpartum hemorrhage in resource-poor settings.

    PubMed

    Geller, S E; Adams, M G; Kelly, P J; Kodkany, B S; Derman, R J

    2006-03-01

    Despite the strong interest of international health agencies, worldwide maternal mortality has not declined substantially over the past 10 years. Postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) is the most common cause of maternal death across the world, responsible for more than 25% of deaths annually. Although effective tools for prevention and treatment of PPH are available, most are not feasible or practical for use in the developing world where many births still occur at home with untrained birth attendants. Application of many available clinical solutions in rural areas would necessitate substantial changes in government infrastructure and in local culture and customs surrounding pregnancy and childbirth. Before treatment can be administered, prompt and accurate diagnosis must be made, which requires training and appropriate blood measurement tools. After diagnosis, appropriate interventions that can be applied in remote settings are needed. Many uterotonics known to be effective in reducing PPH in tertiary care settings may not be useful in community settings because they require refrigeration and/or skilled administration. Moreover, rapid transfer to a higher level of care must be available, a challenge in many settings because of distance and lack of transportation. In light of these barriers, low-technological replacements for treatments commonly applied in the developed-world must be utilized. Community education, improvements to emergency care systems, training for birth attendants, misoprostol, and Uniject have shown promise as potential solutions. In the short term, it is expedient to capitalize on practical opportunities that utilize the existing strengths and resources in each community or region in order to implement appropriate solutions to save the lives of women during childbirth. PMID:16427056

  3. Vaccine Platforms to Control Arenaviral Hemorrhagic Fevers.

    PubMed

    Carrion, Ricardo; Bredenbeek, Peter; Jiang, Xiaohong; Tretyakova, Irina; Pushko, Peter; Lukashevich, Igor S

    2012-11-20

    Arenaviruses are rodent-borne emerging human pathogens. Diseases caused by these viruses, e.g., Lassa fever (LF) in West Africa and South American hemorrhagic fevers (HFs), are serious public health problems in endemic areas. We have employed replication-competent and replication-deficient strategies to design vaccine candidates potentially targeting different groups "at risk". Our leader LF vaccine candidate, the live reassortant vaccine ML29, is safe and efficacious in all tested animal models including non-human primates. In this study we showed that treatment of fatally infected animals with ML29 two days after Lassa virus (LASV) challenge protected 80% of the treated animals. In endemic areas, where most of the target population is poor and many live far from health care facilities, a single-dose vaccination with ML29 would be ideal solution. Once there is an outbreak, a fast-acting vaccine or post-exposure prophylaxis would be best. The 2(nd) vaccine technology is based on Yellow Fever (YF) 17D vaccine. We designed YF17D-based recombinant viruses expressing LASV glycoproteins (GP) and showed protective efficacy of these recombinants. In the current study we developed a novel technology to clone LASV nucleocapsid within YF17D C gene. Low immunogenicity and stability of foreign inserts must be addressed to design successful LASV/YFV bivalent vaccines to control LF and YF in overlapping endemic areas of West Africa. The 3(rd) platform is based on the new generation of alphavirus replicon virus-like-particle vectors (VLPV). Using this technology we designed VLPV expressing LASV GP with enhanced immunogenicity and bivalent VLPV expressing cross-reactive GP of Junin virus (JUNV) and Machupo virus (MACV), causative agents of Argentinian and Bolivian HF, respectively. A prime-boost regimen required for VLPV immunization might be practical for medical providers, military, lab personnel, and visitors in endemic areas.

  4. Cardiovascular and endocrine response to hemorrhage after. cap alpha. /sub 1/-blockade in lambs and ewes

    SciTech Connect

    Block, S.M.; Rose, J.C.; Ernest, J.M.; Flowe, K.; South, S.; Zimmerman, C.

    1987-02-01

    To evaluate the role of the ..cap alpha../sub 1/-adrenergic system in the response to hemorrhage during development, lambs and adult sheep were chronically catheterized and hemorrhaged after pretreatment with prazosin or vehicle. The adults became markedly more hypotensive after ..cap alpha../sub 1/-blockade and hemorrhage than after vehicle and hemorrhage, whereas the lambs were no more hypotensive when hemorrhaged after prazosin. In the adults and the lambs hemorrhage produced elevations in plasma renin activity and arginine vasopressin measured by radioimmunoassay. However, after prazosin, the adults had a far greater increase in arginine vasopressin levels than after vehicle treatment.

  5. Putative Mechanism of Hemorrhage-Induced Leukocyte Hyporesponsiveness

    PubMed Central

    Grutkoski, Patricia S.; Chen, Yaping; Chung, Chun-Shiang; Cioffi, William G.; Ayala, Alfred

    2008-01-01

    Background After hemorrhagic shock, macrophages are less responsive to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) regarding cytokine production and receptor expression. However, mechanisms responsible for this are poorly understood. Suppressors of cytokine signaling (SOCS) proteins have been found to play a prominent role in LPS tolerance and cytokine desensitization in macrophages. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine whether hemorrhagic shock induced SOCS expression. Methods Male C3H/HeN mice were subjected to hemorrhage or sham hemorrhage. Twenty-four hours after each procedure, tissues were harvested, the cells were processed for protein, and SOCS expression was examined. Results Our data show that SOCS-1 expression does not change after hemorrhage, but SOCS-3 is up-regulated in a tissue and cell population (e.g., macrophage)-specific manner. Conclusion These data suggest that cytokines or other inflammatory mediators present during the first 24 hours after the induction of shock have the ability to induce tolerance to LPS or cytokines and suppress the function of immune cells by up-regulating SOCS-3. PMID:15187736

  6. Bilateral large traumatic hemorrhage of the basal ganglion

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Nityanand; Mahapatra, Ashok; Singh, Pankaj Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic bilateral basal ganglia bleed is extremely rare. It is defined as a hemorrhagic lesion located in the basal ganglia or neighboring structures such as the internal capsule and the thalamus. This report describes a 37-year-old man who had large bilateral basal ganglia hemorrhage (BGH) with subdural hematoma and traumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage. With regards to an etiology of bilateral hemorrhage of the basal ganglia, we could not disclose any possible cause except head injury in spite of full diagnostic work-up. Our final diagnosis was bilateral traumatic BGH (TBGH). The pathomechanism of such injuries is still not clear and it is proposed to be due to shear injury to the lenticulostriate and choroidal arteries. Rather than any features of the TBGH itself, duration of coma and/or associated temporal herniation predicted slower recovery and worse outcome. Bilateral TBGH is an extremely rare entity, compatible with a favorable recovery, if not associated with damage to other cortical and subcortical structures and occurring in isolation. TBGH can be considered as a marker of poor outcome rather than its cause. The BGHs seem to be hemorrhagic contusions resulting from a shearing injury, due to high velocity impact. PMID:25685230

  7. Emergency Transcatheter Arterial Embolization for Acute Renal Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hong Liang; Xu, Chun Yang; Wang, Hong Hui; Xu, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The aims of this study were to identify arteriographic manifestations of acute renal hemorrhage and to evaluate the efficacy of emergency embolization. Emergency renal artery angiography was performed on 83 patients with acute renal hemorrhage. As soon as bleeding arteries were identified, emergency embolization was performed using gelatin sponge, polyvinyl alcohol particles, and coils. The arteriographic presentation and the effect of the treatment for acute renal hemorrhage were analyzed retrospectively. Contrast extravasation was observed in 41 patients. Renal arteriovenous fistulas were found in 12 of the 41 patients. In all, 8 other patients had a renal pseudoaneurysm, 5 had pseudoaneurysm rupture complicated by a renal arteriovenous fistula, and 1 had pseudoaneurysm rupture complicated by a renal artery-calyceal fistula. Another 16 patients had tumor vasculature seen on arteriography. Before the procedure, 35 patients underwent renal artery computed tomography angiography (CTA). Following emergency embolization, complete hemostasis was achieved in 80 patients, although persistent hematuria was present in 3 renal trauma patients and 1 patient who had undergone percutaneous nephrolithotomy (justifying surgical removal of the ipsilateral kidney in this patient). Two-year follow-up revealed an overall effective rate of 95.18 % (79/83) for emergency embolization. There were no serious complications. Emergency embolization is a safe, effective, minimally invasive treatment for renal hemorrhage. Because of the diversified arteriographic presentation of acute renal hemorrhage, proper selection of the embolic agent is a key to successful hemostasis. Preoperative renal CTA plays an important role in diagnosing and localizing the bleeding artery. PMID:26496273

  8. Diffuse axonal injury in children: clinical correlation with hemorrhagic lesions.

    PubMed

    Tong, Karen A; Ashwal, Stephen; Holshouser, Barbara A; Nickerson, Joshua P; Wall, Christopher J; Shutter, Lori A; Osterdock, Renatta J; Haacke, E M; Kido, Daniel

    2004-07-01

    An inception cohort of 40 children and adolescents with traumatic brain injury and suspected diffuse axonal injury were studied using a new high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging susceptibility-weighted technique that is very sensitive for hemorrhage. A blinded comparison was performed between the extent of parenchymal hemorrhage and initial clinical variables as well as outcomes measured at 6 to 12 months after injury. Children with lower Glasgow Coma Scale scores (< or =8, n = 30) or prolonged coma (>4 days, n = 20) had a greater average number (p = 0.007) and volume (p = 0.008) of hemorrhagic lesions. Children with normal outcomes or mild disability (n = 30) at 6 to 12 months had, on average, fewer hemorrhagic lesions (p = 0.003) and lower volume (p = 0.003) of lesions than those who were moderately or severely disabled or in a vegetative state. Significant differences also were observed when comparing regional injury to clinical variables. Because susceptibility-weighted imaging is much more sensitive than conventional T2*-weighted gradient-echo sequences in detecting hemorrhagic diffuse axonal injury, more accurate and objective assessment of injury can be obtained early after insult, and may provide better prognostic information regarding duration of coma as well as long-term outcome.

  9. Lessons Learned for the Resuscitation of Traumatic Hemorrhagic Shock.

    PubMed

    Spinella, Philip C; Perkins, Jeremy G; Cap, Andrew P

    2016-01-01

    The lessons learned regarding the resuscitation of traumatic hemorrhagic shock are numerous and come from a better understanding of the epidemiology, pathophysiology, and experience in this population over 10-plus years of combat operations. We have now come to better understand that the greatest benefit in survival can come from improved treatment of hemorrhage in the prehospital phase of care. We have learned that there is an endogenous coagulopathy that occurs with severe traumatic injury secondary to oxygen debt and that classic resuscitation strategies for severe bleeding based on crystalloid or colloid solutions exacerbate coagulopathy and shock for those with life-threatening hemorrhage. We have relearned that a whole blood-based resuscitation strategy, or one that at least recapitulates the functionality of whole blood, may reduce death from hemorrhage and reduce the risks of excessive crystalloid administration which include acute lung injury, abdominal compartment syndrome, cerebral edema, and anasarca. Appreciation of the importance of shock and coagulopathy management underlies the emphasis on early hemostatic resuscitation. Most importantly, we have learned that there is still much more to understand regarding the epidemiology, pathophysiology, and the resuscitation strategies required to improve outcomes for casualties with hemorrhagic shock. PMID:27215864

  10. Immunomodulatory effect of hypertonic saline in hemorrhagic shock.

    PubMed

    Motaharinia, Javad; Etezadi, Farhad; Moghaddas, Azadeh; Mojtahedzadeh, Mojtaba

    2015-01-01

    Multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) and nosocomial infection following trauma-hemorrhage are among the most important causes of mortality in hemorrhagic shock patients. Dysregulation of the immune system plays a central role in MODS and a fluid having an immunomodulatory effect could be advantageous in hemorrhagic shock resuscitation. Hypertonic saline (HS) is widely used as a resuscitation fluid in trauma-hemorrhagic patients. Besides having beneficial effects on the hemodynamic parameters, HS has modulatory effects on various functions of immune cells such as degranulation, adhesion molecules and cytokines expression, as well as reactive oxygen species production. This article reviews clinical evidence for decreased organ failure and mortality in hemorrhagic shock patients resuscitated with HS. Despite promising results in animal models, results from pre-hospital and emergency department administration in human studies did not show improvement in survival, organ failure, or a reduction in nosocomial infection by HS resuscitation. Further post hoc analysis showed some benefit from HS resuscitation for severely-injured patients, those who received more than ten units of blood by transfusion, patients who underwent surgery, and victims of traumatic brain injury. Several reasons are suggested to explain the differences between clinical and animal models. PMID:26437974

  11. Immunomodulatory effect of hypertonic saline in hemorrhagic shock.

    PubMed

    Motaharinia, Javad; Etezadi, Farhad; Moghaddas, Azadeh; Mojtahedzadeh, Mojtaba

    2015-10-05

    Multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) and nosocomial infection following trauma-hemorrhage are among the most important causes of mortality in hemorrhagic shock patients. Dysregulation of the immune system plays a central role in MODS and a fluid having an immunomodulatory effect could be advantageous in hemorrhagic shock resuscitation. Hypertonic saline (HS) is widely used as a resuscitation fluid in trauma-hemorrhagic patients. Besides having beneficial effects on the hemodynamic parameters, HS has modulatory effects on various functions of immune cells such as degranulation, adhesion molecules and cytokines expression, as well as reactive oxygen species production. This article reviews clinical evidence for decreased organ failure and mortality in hemorrhagic shock patients resuscitated with HS. Despite promising results in animal models, results from pre-hospital and emergency department administration in human studies did not show improvement in survival, organ failure, or a reduction in nosocomial infection by HS resuscitation. Further post hoc analysis showed some benefit from HS resuscitation for severely-injured patients, those who received more than ten units of blood by transfusion, patients who underwent surgery, and victims of traumatic brain injury. Several reasons are suggested to explain the differences between clinical and animal models.

  12. Glioblastoma Multiforme with Hemorrhage Mimicking an Aneurysm: Lessons Learnt

    PubMed Central

    Singla, Navneet; Aggarwal, Ashish; Vyas, Sameer; Sanghvi, Ankur; Salunke, Pravin; Garg, Ravi

    2016-01-01

    Background A sudden onset of neurological symptoms in patients is conventionally thought to be due to vascular phenomenon, with one common differential diagnosis being subarachnoid hemorrhage. Another important differential diagnosis is ischemic stroke. An uncommon cause of such acute symptoms can be hemorrhage in a pre-existing tumor, that is, intratumoral hemorrhage (ITH). Purpose ITH is an important, though uncommon differential diagnosis in cases of sudden onset of neurological deterioration. Methods and Result A 60-year-old male presented with seizures and loss of consciousness 12 h prior to admission. The episode was sudden in onset. After detailed clinical and radiological investigations, the patient was diagnosed with glioma with bleed and was successfully operated upon. Conclusion The combination of hemorrhage and ischemic stroke pointed more towards an aneurysm rather than a tumor bleed. There were pointers both in favor of and against both the diagnosis. Therefore, a complex hemorrhagic cerebral tumor with acute presentation and discordant finding on CT or CT angiography should be characterized preoperatively. A large thrombosed aneurysm remains an important differential diagnosis. PMID:27780994

  13. Gastrointestinal stenting: Current status and imaging features.

    PubMed

    Malgras, B; Lo Dico, R; Pautrat, K; Dohan, A; Boudiaf, M; Pocard, M; Soyer, P

    2015-06-01

    The use of stents in the gastrointestinal tract has been subjected to major changes. Initially, the use of stents was restricted to malignant strictures in patients with metastatic disease. But thanks to reduction of the morbidity and mortality rates, they are now used with curative intention and in patients with benign diseases after careful selection. However, for patients presenting with colon obstruction due to an advanced colon carcinoma, the mortality and morbidity are still high. The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of indications, techniques and further developments of the stents in the gastrointestinal tract and to highlight the predominant role of multidetector row computed tomography (MDCT) in the detection of potential complications. PMID:25953525

  14. Gastrointestinal motility revisited: The wireless motility capsule

    PubMed Central

    Farmer, Adam D; Scott, S Mark

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The wireless motility capsule (WMC) is a novel ambulatory technology that concurrently measures intraluminal pH, temperature, and pressure as it traverses the gastrointestinal tract. Objectives We aim to provide a concise summary of the WMC, detailing the procedure for its administration and the parameters it records. We also review the evidence that has validated the WMC against other methods currently regarded as ‘gold standard’. Conclusions The WMC offers a number of advantages over and above current techniques, especially with respect to patient tolerability, safety, and standardization. The WMC represents a considerable enhancement of the researchers’ and clinicians’ investigatory armamentarium. If this technology becomes widely adopted, coupled with international consensus upon the interpretation of physiological data derived therein, it may herald a new and exciting era in gastrointestinal physiology. PMID:24917991

  15. Mechanisms of disease: defensins in gastrointestinal diseases.

    PubMed

    Wehkamp, Jan; Fellermann, Klaus; Herrlinger, Klaus R; Bevins, Charles L; Stange, Eduard F

    2005-09-01

    Defensins are endogenous antibiotics with microbicidal activity against Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, fungi, viruses and protozoa. In the gastrointestinal tract, defensins help regulate the composition and number of colonizing microbes, and protect the host from food-borne and water-borne pathogens. In health, the normal host relationship with the commensal luminal microbiota is beneficial, but the same commensal bacteria could have a pathogenic role in inflammatory diseases. A disturbance in antimicrobial defense, as provided by Paneth cells of the small intestine, seems to be a critical factor in the pathogenesis of ileal Crohn's disease, an inflammatory disease of the intestinal tract. The disruption of the critical balance between antimicrobial peptides and luminal bacteria might also explain other gastrointestinal infections and diseases. Elucidating the underlying mechanisms involved in the regulation and biology of defensins could open up new therapeutic avenues.

  16. Gastrointestinal Symptoms among African Americans Undergoing Hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Daniels, Glenda; Robinson, Janie R; Walker, Charles; Pennings, Jacquelyn S; Anderson, Staci T

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of end stage renal disease is more than three times higher in African Americans. Treatment regimens contribute to gastrointestinal (GI) complaints. This study's purpose was to examine the incidence of GI symptoms in African-American patients undergoing hemodialysis. Younger participants were more likely to report mild indigestion, while older participants reported severe indigestion or none at all. Females were more likely to report gastrointestinal symptoms. Commonly reported co-morbidities included hypertension, diabetes, and heart disease. Time on hemodialysis ranged from 1 to 279 months. Those who had been on hemodialysis the longest were more likely to report acid reflux, stomach rumbling and mild diarrhea. This study provides a foundation for early identification of GI symptoms in African-Americans patients undergoing hemodialysis.

  17. Complementary and alternative medicine for gastrointestinal disorders.

    PubMed

    Tillisch, Kirsten

    2007-06-01

    Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is a growing area of public interest. With increasing numbers of patients using these modalities, it is essential that Western medical practitioners become familiar with the available CAM literature to facilitate better patient care. While the volume of CAM research in gastrointestinal disorders has increased, there are still few modalities for which definitive conclusions can be made. This review will provide an overview of current knowledge of CAM therapies for functional gastrointestinal disorders, inflammatory bowel disease and liver disease. An understanding of this evolving literature is useful in discussing these therapies with patients who use, or are considering using, them. As we learn more about these CAM modalities, integration of those shown to be effective into our conventional practice and avoidance of those shown to be risky or of little use will be of benefit both to patients and practitioners.

  18. [Gastrointestinal human myiasis caused by Eristalis tenax].

    PubMed

    Kun, M; Kreiter, A; Semenas, L

    1998-08-01

    The myiasis observed in Bariloche are characterized and the probable conditions under which the infestations took place established. The larvae obtained from faeces of 2 patients were identified as Eristalis tenax (Diptera: Syrphidae) according to Hartley (1961) and Organización Panamericana de la Salud keys (1962). These 2 cases of human gastrointestinal myiasis were the first to be registered in Bariloche (Patagonia, Argentina) and their characteristics were similar to those described for this species in other parts of the world. The lack of specific control measures in the domestic water supply system was the most probable cause of the infestation. This event extends the distribution of E. tenax and human gastrointestinal myiasis in South America to 41 degrees 03' S.

  19. Gastrointestinal stromal tumors: the histology report.

    PubMed

    Dei Tos, Angelo P; Laurino, Licia; Bearzi, Italo; Messerini, Luca; Farinati, Fabio

    2011-03-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) represent a mesenchymal neoplasm occurring primarily in the gastrointestinal tract, and showing differentiation toward the interstitial cell of Cajal. Its incidence is approximately 15 case/100,000/year. Stomach and small bowel are the most frequently affected anatomic sites. GIST represents a morphological, immunophenotypical and molecular distinct entity, the recognition of which has profound therapeutic implications. In fact, they have shown an exquisite sensitivity to treatment with the tyrosine kinase inhibitor imatinib. Diagnosis relies upon morphology along with immunodetection of KIT and/or DOG1. When dealing with KIT negative cases, molecular analysis of KIT/PDGFRA genes may help in confirming diagnosis. Molecular evaluation of both genes are in any case recommended as mutational status provides key predictive information. Pathologists also play a key role in providing an estimation of the risk of biological aggressiveness, which is currently based on anatomic location of the tumor, size, and mitotic activity.

  20. Current status of familial gastrointestinal polyposis syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Ioan; Gurzu, Simona; Turdean, Gligore Sabin

    2015-01-01

    Because of the rarity of familial gastrointestinal cancer-predisposing syndromes, their exploration in literature is not extensive. In this review, an update of the clinicopathological and molecular criteria of gastrointestinal familial polyposis syndromes with potential malignant transformation is performed. In addition, a guide for screening and surveillance was synthesized and a distribution of gene mutations according to the specific syndromes and geographic distribution was included. The following inherited polyposes syndromes were analyzed: familial adenomatous polyposis, the hamartomatous familial polyposes (Juvenile polyposis, Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, Cowden syndrome, Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalcaba syndrome, hereditary mixed polyposis syndrome, Gorlin syndrome, Birt-Hogg-Dube syndrome, neurofibromatosis type I and multiple endocrine neoplasia syndrome 2B), Li-Fraumeni syndrome, and MUTYH-associated adenomatous polyposis. For proper medical care, subspecialization of gastroenterologists, pathologists, and genticists in the field of familial diseases should be introduced in the medical curriculum. PMID:26600934

  1. Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor – An Evolving Concept

    PubMed Central

    Tornillo, Luigi

    2014-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are the most frequent mesenchymal tumors of the gastrointestinal tract. The discovery that these tumors, formerly thought of smooth muscle origin, are indeed better characterized by specific activating mutation in genes coding for the receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) CKIT and PDGFRA and that these mutations are strongly predictive for the response to targeted therapy with RTK inhibitors has made GISTs the typical example of the integration of basic molecular knowledge in the daily clinical activity. The information on the mutational status of these tumors is essential to predict (and subsequently to plan) the therapy. As resistant cases are frequently wild type, other possible oncogenic events, defining other “entities,” have been discovered (e.g., succinil dehydrogenase mutation/dysregulation, insuline growth factor expression, and mutations in the RAS-RAF-MAPK pathway). The classification of disease must nowadays rely on the integration of the clinico-morphological characteristics with the molecular data. PMID:25593916

  2. Gastrointestinal stromal tumor - an evolving concept.

    PubMed

    Tornillo, Luigi

    2014-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are the most frequent mesenchymal tumors of the gastrointestinal tract. The discovery that these tumors, formerly thought of smooth muscle origin, are indeed better characterized by specific activating mutation in genes coding for the receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) CKIT and PDGFRA and that these mutations are strongly predictive for the response to targeted therapy with RTK inhibitors has made GISTs the typical example of the integration of basic molecular knowledge in the daily clinical activity. The information on the mutational status of these tumors is essential to predict (and subsequently to plan) the therapy. As resistant cases are frequently wild type, other possible oncogenic events, defining other "entities," have been discovered (e.g., succinil dehydrogenase mutation/dysregulation, insuline growth factor expression, and mutations in the RAS-RAF-MAPK pathway). The classification of disease must nowadays rely on the integration of the clinico-morphological characteristics with the molecular data. PMID:25593916

  3. Gastrointestinal stem cell up-to-date.

    PubMed

    Pirvulet, V

    2015-01-01

    Cellular and tissue regeneration in the gastrointestinal tract depends on stem cells with properties of self-renewal, clonogenicity, and multipotency. Progress in stem cell research and the identification of potential gastric, intestinal, colonic stem cells new markers and the signaling pathways provide hope for the use of stem cells in regenerative medicine and treatments for disease. This review provides an overview of the different types of stem cells, focusing on tissue-restricted adult stem cells.

  4. Management of gastrointestinal involvement in scleroderma

    PubMed Central

    Nagaraja, Vivek; McMahan, Zsuzsanna H.; Getzug, Terri; Khanna, Dinesh

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal tract (GIT) commonly affects patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc). The GI involvement is quite heterogeneous varying from asymptomatic disease to significant dysmotility causing complications like malabsorption, weight loss and severe malnutrition. This review focuses on the management of GI involvement in SSc and has been categorized based on the segment of GIT involved. A brief discussion on the role of patient reported outcome measures in SSc-GI involvement has also been incorporated. PMID:26005632

  5. Gastrointestinal tract modelling in health and disease

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Dong-Hua; Zhao, Jing-Bo; Gregersen, Hans

    2009-01-01

    The gastrointestinal (GI) tract is the system of organs within multi-cellular animals that takes in food, digests it to extract energy and nutrients, and expels the remaining waste. The various patterns of GI tract function are generated by the integrated behaviour of multiple tissues and cell types. A thorough study of the GI tract requires understanding of the interactions between cells, tissues and gastrointestinal organs in health and disease. This depends on knowledge, not only of numerous cellular ionic current mechanisms and signal transduction pathways, but also of large scale GI tissue structures and the special distribution of the nervous network. A unique way of coping with this explosion in complexity is mathematical and computational modelling; providing a computational framework for the multilevel modelling and simulation of the human gastrointestinal anatomy and physiology. The aim of this review is to describe the current status of biomechanical modelling work of the GI tract in humans and animals, which can be further used to integrate the physiological, anatomical and medical knowledge of the GI system. Such modelling will aid research and ensure that medical professionals benefit, through the provision of relevant and precise information about the patient’s condition and GI remodelling in animal disease models. It will also improve the accuracy and efficiency of medical procedures, which could result in reduced cost for diagnosis and treatment. PMID:19132766

  6. Gastrointestinal parasites of free-range chickens.

    PubMed

    Tomza-Marciniak, Agnieszka; Pilarczyk, Bogumiła; Tobiańska, Berenika; Tarasewicz, Natalia

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the prevalence and intensity of parasitic gastrointestinal infections in free-range chickens from the West Pomerania province. Experimental material for the study was taken from 10 farms. Breeds raised in farms participating in the study included miniature chickens called Polish Lilliputians and Green- legged Partridge. A total of 104 samples of faeces were examined. The Willis-Schlaff flotation method was used to assess the prevalence of infection, and McMaster's method to evaluate the intensity. The presence of gastrointestinal parasites was found in 9 of the 10 farms. Oocysts of the genus Eimeria and eggs of gastrointestinal nematodes Ascaridia galli, Heterakis gallinarum and Trichostrongylus tenuis were isolated from the chicken faeces. Coccidiosis was found to be dominant parasitosis. The prevalence of infections on these farms with protozoa of Eimeria spp. was on average 32.7%, while for nematode species they amounted to 9.6% for Ascaridia galli, 5.7% for Heterakis gallinarum and 12.5% for Trichostrongylus tenuis. The results indicate the need to take preventive measures, designed to eliminate/reduce the risk of parasitoses in poultry from free-range systems. Focus should be placed on the hygiene of the farming conditions.

  7. Gastrointestinal problems in the handicapped child.

    PubMed

    Chong, S K

    2001-10-01

    Gastrointestinal issues are a major chronic problem in 80 to 90% of children with cerebral palsy and in children with neurodevelopmental disabilities who are at special risk of developing malnutrition because of uncoordinated swallowing, gastroesophageal reflux, and constipation. In addition to poor linear growth, there is a decrease in muscle strength and coordination, impaired cerebral function leading to decreased motivation and energy. Significant neurodevelopmental progress can be achieved with improved nutritional status. A multidisciplinary approach, with input from neurologists, gastroenterologists, nurses, occupational therapists, and dieticians, can make a major contribution to the medical wellbeing and quality of life of these children. Different neurological diseases ( eg, spinal dysraphism, syringomyelia, tethered cord syndromes) can give rise to gastrointestinal dysfunction and symptoms that may need different gastrointestinal or surgical management. The introduction of new drugs, including proton pump inhibitors and innovative endoscopic and surgical techniques in the management of gastroesophageal reflux disease and constipation also may have an impact on the treatment of neurologically handicapped children in the future.

  8. Gastrointestinal helminths in raccoons in Texas.

    PubMed

    Kresta, Amy E; Henke, Scott E; Pence, Danny B

    2009-01-01

    Raccoons (n=590) were collected from October 1999 to August 2003 from 35 counties across Texas, and gastrointestinal tracts were examined for helminth parasites. Prevalence was calculated and differences in mean abundance were examined among habitat ecoregions, age classes, and between sexes. Twenty different species of helminths (13 nematodes, two cestodes, two acanthocephalans, and three trematodes) were positively identified in the gastrointestinal tracts of 590 raccoons in Texas. Five of the 20 helminth species collected (Physaloptera rara, Placoconus lotoris, Molineus barbatus, Atriotaenia procyonis, and Macracanthorhynchus ingens) had a prevalence >20%. The total number of individuals of these five species (n=22,777) accounted for over 86% of the total number of individuals of all helminth species (n=26,426) collected. Subsequent analyses were based on these five helminths. Mean abundance differed among habitat ecoregions, age classes, and between sexes for all five parasites evaluated. This study is the most comprehensive statewide survey ever done of gastrointestinal helminths of raccoons across Texas. The five most prevalent helminths identified have all been reported in at least one previous survey, indicating that these parasites are not new to Texas and that raccoons are not naïve to the effects these parasites have on them. It may be helpful to wildlife rehabilitators, trappers, wildlife biologists, and other professionals to be aware of parasite abundance in raccoons from different areas of the state, as frequent human-raccoon interactions occur, and some of these parasites could be harmful to humans and domestic animals.

  9. Abdominal ultrasonography of the pediatric gastrointestinal tract

    PubMed Central

    Gale, Heather I; Gee, Michael S; Westra, Sjirk J; Nimkin, Katherine

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasound is an invaluable imaging modality in the evaluation of pediatric gastrointestinal pathology; it can provide real-time evaluation of the bowel without the need for sedation or intravenous contrast. Recent improvements in ultrasound technique can be utilized to improve detection of bowel pathology in children: Higher resolution probes, color Doppler, harmonic and panoramic imaging are excellent tools in this setting. Graded compression and cine clips provide dynamic information and oral and intravenous contrast agents aid in detection of bowel wall pathology. Ultrasound of the bowel in children is typically a targeted exam; common indications include evaluation for appendicitis, pyloric stenosis and intussusception. Bowel abnormalities that are detected prenatally can be evaluated after birth with ultrasound. Likewise, acquired conditions such as bowel hematoma, bowel infections and hernias can be detected with ultrasound. Rare bowel neoplasms, vascular disorders and foreign bodies may first be detected with sonography, as well. At some centers, comprehensive exams of the gastrointestinal tract are performed on children with inflammatory bowel disease and celiac disease to evaluate for disease activity or to confirm the diagnosis. The goal of this article is to review up-to-date imaging techniques, normal sonographic anatomy, and characteristic sonographic features of common and uncommon disorders affecting the gastrointestinal tract in children. PMID:27551336

  10. Abdominal ultrasonography of the pediatric gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Gale, Heather I; Gee, Michael S; Westra, Sjirk J; Nimkin, Katherine

    2016-07-28

    Ultrasound is an invaluable imaging modality in the evaluation of pediatric gastrointestinal pathology; it can provide real-time evaluation of the bowel without the need for sedation or intravenous contrast. Recent improvements in ultrasound technique can be utilized to improve detection of bowel pathology in children: Higher resolution probes, color Doppler, harmonic and panoramic imaging are excellent tools in this setting. Graded compression and cine clips provide dynamic information and oral and intravenous contrast agents aid in detection of bowel wall pathology. Ultrasound of the bowel in children is typically a targeted exam; common indications include evaluation for appendicitis, pyloric stenosis and intussusception. Bowel abnormalities that are detected prenatally can be evaluated after birth with ultrasound. Likewise, acquired conditions such as bowel hematoma, bowel infections and hernias can be detected with ultrasound. Rare bowel neoplasms, vascular disorders and foreign bodies may first be detected with sonography, as well. At some centers, comprehensive exams of the gastrointestinal tract are performed on children with inflammatory bowel disease and celiac disease to evaluate for disease activity or to confirm the diagnosis. The goal of this article is to review up-to-date imaging techniques, normal sonographic anatomy, and characteristic sonographic features of common and uncommon disorders affecting the gastrointestinal tract in children. PMID:27551336

  11. HER-2 status in gastrointestinal stromal tumor.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Lisandro Ferreira; Bacchi, Carlos E

    2008-08-01

    Human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER-2) encodes for the transmembrane glycoprotein HER-2 that is involved in activation of intracellular signal transduction pathways that control cell growth and differentiation. HER-2 is overexpressed in approximately 20% of patients with breast cancer and has been associated with poorer prognosis. Since 1998, the anti-HER-2 antibody trastuzumab has been used for the treatment of patients with HER-2-positive breast cancers. However, little information is available about the relationship between HER-2 and gastrointestinal stromal tumors. This study's purpose was to determine the HER-2 status in gastrointestinal stromal tumors. We found that all 477 cases included in this study were negative (score 0) by immunohistochemistry using HercepTest, and no HER-2 gene amplification was detected in 71 cases submitted to fluorescence in situ hybridization. These results show that HER-2 may not have any role in gastrointestinal stromal tumor pathogenesis and that the neoplasm may not be suitable for treatment with trastuzumab.

  12. Imatinib treatment for gastrointestinal stromal tumour (GIST).

    PubMed

    Lopes, Lisandro F; Bacchi, Carlos E

    2010-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumour (GIST) is the most common mesenchymal neoplasm of the gastrointestinal tract. GISTs are believed to originate from intersticial cells of Cajal (the pacemaker cells of the gastrointestinal tract) or related stem cells, and are characterized by KIT or platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha (PDGFRA) activating mutations. The use of imatinib has revolutionized the management of GIST and altered its natural history, substantially improving survival time and delaying disease progression in many patients. The success of imatinib in controlling advanced GIST led to interest in the neoadjuvant and adjuvant use of the drug. The neoadjuvant (preoperative) use of imatinib is recommended to facilitate resection and avoid mutilating surgery by decreasing tumour size, and adjuvant therapy is indicated for patients at high risk of recurrence. The molecular characterization (genotyping) of GISTs has become an essential part of the routine management of the disease as KIT and PDGFRA mutation status predicts the likelihood of achieving response to imatinib. However, the vast majority of patients who initially responded to imatinib will develop tumour progression (secondary resistance). Secondary resistance is often related to secondary KIT or PDGFRA mutations that interfere with drug binding. Multiple novel tyrosine kinase inhibitors may be potentially useful for the treatment of imatinib-resistant GISTs as they interfere with KIT and PDGFRA receptors or with the downstream-signalling proteins.

  13. Transcatheter Embolization for Delayed Hemorrhage Caused by Blunt Splenic Trauma

    SciTech Connect

    Krohmer, Steven J. Hoffer, Eric K.; Burchard, Kenneth W.

    2010-08-15

    Although the exact benefit of adjunctive splenic artery embolization (SAE) in the nonoperative management (NOM) of patients with blunt splenic trauma has been debated, the role of transcatheter embolization in delayed splenic hemorrhage is rarely addressed. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of SAE in the management of patients who presented at least 3 days after initial splenic trauma with delayed hemorrhage. During a 24-month period 4 patients (all male; ages 19-49 years) presented with acute onset of pain 5-70 days after blunt trauma to the left upper quadrant. Two had known splenic injuries that had been managed nonoperatively. All had computed axial tomography evidence of active splenic hemorrhage or false aneurysm on representation. All underwent successful SAE. Follow-up ranged from 28 to 370 days. These cases and a review of the literature indicate that SAE is safe and effective for NOM failure caused by delayed manifestations of splenic arterial injury.

  14. Impaired fibrinolysis in the pathogenesis of dengue hemorrhagic fever.

    PubMed

    Van Gorp, Eric C M; Setiati, Tatty E; Mairuhu, Albert T A; Suharti, Catharina; Cate Ht, Hugo ten; Dolmans, Wil M V; Van Der Meer, Jos W M; Hack, C Erik; Brandjes, Dees P M

    2002-08-01

    The mechanisms contributing to bleeding complications in dengue hemorrhagic fever were studied by investigating the pattern of activation of the coagulation and fibrinolytic systems in 50 children with severe dengue hemorrhagic fever. Thirteen patients (26%) died, and activation of coagulation was most pronounced in the deceased group. Fibrinolysis was also activated, but this activation was relatively weak compared with that of coagulation as a result of persistently high plasminogen activator inhibitor levels. Plasminogen activator inhibitor also prevented a switch from the procoagulant to the profibrinolytic state in lethal dengue hemorrhagic fever, which was further enhanced by an acquired protein C deficiency. The present study is the first to demonstrate such a mechanism in a viral infection. This imbalance between coagulation and fibrinolysis may be used as a prognostic marker, but it may also be a target for future therapeutic intervention.

  15. Innocent blood: a history of hemorrhagic disease of the newborn.

    PubMed

    Obladen, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Hemorrhages occurring in the newborn without trauma have been observed by obstetricians since the 17th century, but have been considered different diseases depending on their location. Umbilical hemorrhage associated with obstructed bile canals was described by Cheyne in 1802. Grandidier in 1871 and Townsend in 1894 grouped together various forms of neonatal bleeds and associated them with disturbed coagulation. When the clotting system became better understood in the last decade of the 19th century, effective symptomatic treatment was developed: gelatin, serum injection, and the transfusion of fresh blood. In 1935, Dam detected the function of vitamin K in the coagulation system and 4 years later, Waddell introduced vitamin K administration into therapy and prevention of neonatal hemorrhagic disease. Kernicterus occurred when high doses of synthetic water-soluble vitamin K analogues were given to preterm infants, reminding physicians that progress in neonatal therapy rests on the cornerstones of controlled trials and follow-up.

  16. Host genetic diversity enables Ebola hemorrhagic fever pathogenesis and resistance.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Angela L; Okumura, Atsushi; Ferris, Martin T; Green, Richard; Feldmann, Friederike; Kelly, Sara M; Scott, Dana P; Safronetz, David; Haddock, Elaine; LaCasse, Rachel; Thomas, Matthew J; Sova, Pavel; Carter, Victoria S; Weiss, Jeffrey M; Miller, Darla R; Shaw, Ginger D; Korth, Marcus J; Heise, Mark T; Baric, Ralph S; de Villena, Fernando Pardo-Manuel; Feldmann, Heinz; Katze, Michael G

    2014-11-21

    Existing mouse models of lethal Ebola virus infection do not reproduce hallmark symptoms of Ebola hemorrhagic fever, neither delayed blood coagulation and disseminated intravascular coagulation nor death from shock, thus restricting pathogenesis studies to nonhuman primates. Here we show that mice from the Collaborative Cross panel of recombinant inbred mice exhibit distinct disease phenotypes after mouse-adapted Ebola virus infection. Phenotypes range from complete resistance to lethal disease to severe hemorrhagic fever characterized by prolonged coagulation times and 100% mortality. Inflammatory signaling was associated with vascular permeability and endothelial activation, and resistance to lethal infection arose by induction of lymphocyte differentiation and cellular adhesion, probably mediated by the susceptibility allele Tek. These data indicate that genetic background determines susceptibility to Ebola hemorrhagic fever.

  17. [Severe hemorrhagic forms of Rift Valley fever: about 5 cases].

    PubMed

    Salem, Mohamed Lemine Ould; Baba, Sidi El Wafi Ould; Fall-Malick, Fatimetou Zahra; Boushab, Boushab Mohamed; Ghaber, Sidi Mohamed; Mokhtar, Abdelwedoud

    2016-01-01

    Rift Valley fever (RVF) is an arbovirus caused by an RNA virus belonging to family Bunyaviridae (genus phlebovirus). It is a zoonosis that primarily affects animals but it also has the capacity to infect humans, either by handling meat, runts of sick animals or, indirectly, by the bite of infected mosquitoes (Aedes sp, Anopheles sp, Culex sp). In most cases, RVF infection in humans is asymptomatic, but it can also manifest as moderate febrile syndrome with a favorable outcome. However, some patients may develop hemorrhagic syndrome and/or neurological damages with a fatal evolution. We present a case study of the development of 5 patients with RVF associated with hemorrhagic fever syndrome admitted to the internal medicine department at National Hospital Center in Nouakchott (Mauritania), in October 2015. The outcome was favorable for two of the five patients. The other 3 died, two of hemorrhagic shock and one of septic shock. PMID:27642413

  18. A schizophrenic patient with cerebral infarctions after hemorrhagic shock

    PubMed Central

    Yanagawa, Youichi; Ohara, Keiichiro; Tanaka, Yasutaka; Tanaka, Ryota

    2013-01-01

    We herein report the fourth case of cerebral infarction, concomitant with hemorrhagic shock, in English literature. A 33-year-old male, who had been diagnosed with schizophrenia and given a prescription for Olanzapine, was discovered with multiple self-inflicted bleeding cuts on his wrist. On arrival, he was in hemorrhagic shock without verbal responsiveness, but his vital signs were normalized following infusion of Lactate Ringer's solution. The neuroradiological studies revealed multiple cerebral ischemic lesions without any vascular abnormality. He was diagnosed with speech apraxia, motor aphasia, and dysgraphia, due to multiple cerebral infarctions. As there was no obvious causative factor with regard to the occurrence of cerebral infarction in the patient, the hypoperfusion due to hemorrhagic shock, and the thromboembolic tendency due to Olanzapine, might have acted together to lead to the patient's cerebral ischemia. PMID:23493336

  19. Pulmonary hemorrhage following anabolic agent abuse: Two cases.

    PubMed

    Hvid-Jensen, Helene S; Rasmussen, Finn; Bendstrup, Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    Numerous adverse effects follow anabolic agent abuse. Pulmonary hemorrhage is not considered one of them. We present two cases of young male bodybuilders who developed diffuse alveolar bleeding as a result of anabolic steroid abuse. Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage associated with anabolic agent abuse has not been described previously in the literature. Both patients developed acute dyspnea and hemoptysis with consistent radiological findings. In both cases symptoms promptly resolved with cessation of exposure and no medical intervention was required and no signs of persistent lung damage were seen. It is crucial to be aware of pulmonary hemorrhage as an acute complication of anabolic agent abuse. It should be considered an important differential diagnosis in the athletic patient presenting with respiratory symptoms.

  20. [Massive alveolar hemorrhage due to cytomegalovirus (CMV) and HIV infection].

    PubMed

    Cortés, A; Peña, E; Vega, R; Reyes, G; Bautista, E

    2011-03-01

    Alveolar hemorrhage may be a complication of diseases with local and systemic manifestations. Both share the same pathophysiological concept: damage to the alveolar microcirculation. It is a clinical entity that generates a diagnostic challenge for the physician. Early recognition favors aggressive treatment, which can improve the outcome. Despite the technological advances in its diagnosis and treatment, it is still a condition having high morbidity and mortality. We present the case of a 42-year old woman diagnosed of massive alveolar hemorrhage induced by cytomegalovirus (CMV) and HIV infection. Its presentation is atypical because most reported cases have occurred as a pneumonic process, episodes of massive hemorrhage being uncommon. The diagnosis was documented by bronchoscopy with bronchoalveolar lavage and etiological diagnosis with molecular techniques using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction.