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Sample records for gastrointestinal nematode infections

  1. OX40 interactions in gastrointestinal nematode infection.

    PubMed

    Ierna, Michelle X; Scales, Hannah E; Schwarz, Herbert; Bunce, Campbell; McIlgorm, Anne; Garside, Paul; Lawrence, Catherine E

    2006-01-01

    The immune expulsion of gastrointestinal nematode parasites is usually associated with T helper type 2 (Th2) responses, but the effector mechanisms directly responsible for parasite loss have not been elucidated. The intestinal inflammatory response accompanying infection with gastrointestinal helminths is thought to be a contributory factor leading to the expulsion of the parasite. However, we have shown that the intestinal inflammation, which is controlled by interleukin (IL)-4, is not required for parasite expulsion. OX40-OX40 ligand (L) signals have been shown to be important for the development of Th2 immune responses but are also involved in a number of inflammatory diseases including those of the intestine. Here, we have investigated the effect of OX40 and OX40L fusion protein treatment on the induction of protective Th2 responses and enteropathy following infection with the gastrointestinal nematode Trichinella spiralis. Treatment with an OX40-immunoglobulin (Ig) blocking fusion protein resulted in enhanced expulsion of the parasite and an increase in the accompanying mastocytosis, despite unaltered levels of Th2 cytokines. Furthermore, there was a delay in the villus atrophy and crypt hyperplasia usually associated with this infection. In contrast, levels of Th2 cytokines were greatly up-regulated in mice treated with an OX40L-Ig activating fusion protein, yet the expulsion of the parasite and the enteropathy were unaffected. Therefore, OX40 ligation potentiates the Th2 response without enhancing host protective immune responses, whereas blocking the OX40-OX40L interaction enhances host protection without promoting Th2 cytokine responses during Trichinella spiralis infection.

  2. OX40 interactions in gastrointestinal nematode infection

    PubMed Central

    Ierna, Michelle X; Scales, Hannah E; Schwarz, Herbert; Bunce, Campbell; McIlgorm, Anne; Garside, Paul; Lawrence, Catherine E

    2006-01-01

    The immune expulsion of gastrointestinal nematode parasites is usually associated with T helper type 2 (Th2) responses, but the effector mechanisms directly responsible for parasite loss have not been elucidated. The intestinal inflammatory response accompanying infection with gastrointestinal helminths is thought to be a contributory factor leading to the expulsion of the parasite. However, we have shown that the intestinal inflammation, which is controlled by interleukin (IL)-4, is not required for parasite expulsion. OX40–OX40 ligand (L) signals have been shown to be important for the development of Th2 immune responses but are also involved in a number of inflammatory diseases including those of the intestine. Here, we have investigated the effect of OX40 and OX40L fusion protein treatment on the induction of protective Th2 responses and enteropathy following infection with the gastrointestinal nematode Trichinella spiralis. Treatment with an OX40–immunoglobulin (Ig) blocking fusion protein resulted in enhanced expulsion of the parasite and an increase in the accompanying mastocytosis, despite unaltered levels of Th2 cytokines. Furthermore, there was a delay in the villus atrophy and crypt hyperplasia usually associated with this infection. In contrast, levels of Th2 cytokines were greatly up-regulated in mice treated with an OX40L–Ig activating fusion protein, yet the expulsion of the parasite and the enteropathy were unaffected. Therefore, OX40 ligation potentiates the Th2 response without enhancing host protective immune responses, whereas blocking the OX40–OX40L interaction enhances host protection without promoting Th2 cytokine responses during Trichinella spiralis infection. PMID:16423046

  3. The host immune response to gastrointestinal nematode infection in sheep.

    PubMed

    McRae, K M; Stear, M J; Good, B; Keane, O M

    2015-12-01

    Gastrointestinal nematode infection represents a major threat to the health, welfare and productivity of sheep populations worldwide. Infected lambs have a reduced ability to absorb nutrients from the gastrointestinal tract, resulting in morbidity and occasional mortality. The current chemo-dominant approach to nematode control is considered unsustainable due to the increasing incidence of anthelmintic resistance. In addition, there is growing consumer demand for food products from animals not subjected to chemical treatment. Future mechanisms of nematode control must rely on alternative, sustainable strategies such as vaccination or selective breeding of resistant animals. Such strategies take advantage of the host's natural immune response to nematodes. The ability to resist gastrointestinal nematode infection is considered to be dependent on the development of a protective acquired immune response, although the precise immune mechanisms involved in initiating this process remain to be fully elucidated. In this study, current knowledge on the innate and acquired host immune response to gastrointestinal nematode infection in sheep and the development of immunity is reviewed. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Human gastrointestinal nematode infections: are new control methods required?

    PubMed Central

    Stepek, Gillian; Buttle, David J; Duce, Ian R; Behnke, Jerzy M

    2006-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) nematode infections affect 50% of the human population worldwide, and cause great morbidity as well as hundreds of thousands of deaths. Despite modern medical practices, the proportion of the population infected with GI nematodes is not falling. This is due to a number of factors, the most important being the lack of good healthcare, sanitation and health education in many developing countries. A relatively new problem is the development of resistance to the small number of drugs available to treat GI nematode infections. Here we review the most important parasitic GI nematodes and the methods available to control them. In addition, we discuss the current status of new anthelmintic treatments, particularly the plant cysteine proteinases from various sources of latex-bearing plants and fruits. PMID:16965561

  5. Immunological control of gastrointestinal nematode infections.

    PubMed

    Klei, T R

    1997-11-01

    Control of nematode parasitism by an active manipulation of the host immune response has been a goal of veterinary and medical parasitologists for decades. The reality of achieving this goal has been questioned vigorously and demonstrations of the feasibility of using immunological control under field conditions are minimal. Nevertheless, with the rapid growth of modern biotechnology and the identification of novel parasite molecules as vaccine targets, the potential for success in this area has recently generated considerable excitement. The induction and regulation of the ruminant immune response against nematode parasites can be controlled either by management programs which include anthelmintic treatment or by vaccination. Both approaches will be discussed in this session.

  6. Effects of gastrointestinal nematode infection on the ruminant immune system.

    PubMed

    Gasbarre, L C

    1997-11-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) nematodes of ruminants evoke a wide variety of immune responses in their hosts. In terms of specific immune responses directed against parasite antigens, the resulting immune responses may vary from those that give strong protection from reinfection after a relatively light exposure (e.g. Oesophagostomum radiatum) to responses that are very weak and delayed in their onset (e.g. Ostertagia ostertagi). The nature of these protective immune responses has been covered in another section of the workshop and the purpose of this section will be to explore the nature of changes that occur in the immune system of infected animals and to discuss the effect of GI nematode infections upon the overall immunoresponsiveness of the host. The discussion will focus primarily on Ostertagia ostertagi because this parasite has received the most attention in published studies. The interaction of Ostertagia and the host immune system presents what appears to be an interesting contradiction. Protective immunity directed against the parasite is slow to arise and when compared to some of the other GI nematodes, is relatively weak. Although responses that reduce egg output in the feces or increase the number of larvae undergoing inhibition may occur after a relatively brief exposure (3-4 months), immune responses which reduce the number of parasites that can establish in the host are not evident until the animal's second year. Additionally, even older animals that have spent several seasons on infected pastures will have low numbers of Ostertagia in their abomasa, indicating that sterilizing immune responses against the parasite are uncommon. In spite of this apparent lack of specific protective immune responses, infections with Ostertagia induce profound changes in the host immune system. These changes include a tremendous expansion of both the number of lymphocytes in the local lymph nodes and the number of lymphoid cells in the mucosa of the abomasum. This expansion

  7. Interactions Between Nutrition and Infections With Haemonchus contortus and Related Gastrointestinal Nematodes in Small Ruminants.

    PubMed

    Hoste, H; Torres-Acosta, J F J; Quijada, J; Chan-Perez, I; Dakheel, M M; Kommuru, D S; Mueller-Harvey, I; Terrill, T H

    2016-01-01

    Interactions between host nutrition and feeding behaviour are central to understanding the pathophysiological consequences of infections of the digestive tract with parasitic nematodes. The manipulation of host nutrition provides useful options to control gastrointestinal nematodes as a component of an integrated strategy. Focussed mainly on the Haemonchus contortus infection model in small ruminants, this chapter (1) illustrates the relationship between quantitative (macro- and micro-nutrients) and qualitative (plant secondary metabolites) aspects of host nutrition and nematode infection, and (2) shows how basic studies aimed at addressing some generic questions can help to provide solutions, despite the considerable diversity of epidemiological situations and breeding systems.

  8. Influence of season of lambing on gastrointestinal nematode infection of lambs

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Gastrointestinal nematodes (GIN) are a major constraint to sheep production, especially during the summer when the conditions for Haemonchus contortus are ideal. GIN infection is minimal during the winter, but there is little known about differences in GIN control between fall born and winter born l...

  9. Infection with the gastrointestinal nematode Ostertagia ostertagi affects mucus biosynthesis in the abomasum of cattle

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The mucus layer in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract is considered to be the first line of defense to the external environment. Alteration in mucus components has been reported to occur during intestinal nematode infection in ruminants, but the role of mucus in the response to abomasal parasites remai...

  10. Pharmaceutical treatments of gastrointestinal nematode infections of sheep--future of anthelmintic drugs.

    PubMed

    Sargison, N D

    2012-09-30

    Various interacting factors have been identified to explain why health plans for nematode parasite control, based on conventional epidemiological knowledge and involving pharmaceutical treatments of their sheep hosts have become unsustainable. Of these, the emergence of anthelmintic resistance has had a major impact on the economics of sheep farming, necessitating fundamental managemental changes. This review focusses on the use of anthelmintic drugs for the control of gastrointestinal nematode infections in sheep, emphasising the need to develop sustainable strategies in the face of inevitable parasite evolution in response to exposure to anthelmintic drugs and other noxious stimuli, or favourable opportunities resulting from changing animal management and climatic factors.

  11. Seasonal patterns of gastrointestinal nematode infection in goats on two Lithuanian farms.

    PubMed

    Stadalienė, Inga; Höglund, Johan; Petkevičius, Saulius

    2015-03-19

    This study investigated seasonal changes in naturally acquired gastrointestinal nematode (GIN) infections on two Lithuanian goat farms with different parasite control practices. On both farms, nematode faecal egg counts (FEC) and larval cultures were obtained from 15 adult and 10 young goats at bi-weekly intervals from April 2012 to April 2013. Goats on farm A were dewormed with ivermectin (0.3 mg/kg body weight) in October/November 2012, whereas the animals on farm B were left untreated. Thirteen young goats were slaughtered in August/November 2012 and April 2013 and worm burdens in the gastrointestinal tract were enumerated. In goats from both farms, Teladorsagia, Trichostrongylus, Oesophagostomum, Chabertia and Haemonchus were the dominant GIN genera. Herbage contamination with infective third-stage larvae (L3) peaked in July/August and resulted in high FEC in September/October. Parasitological examination at slaughter showed that Teladorsagia spp. and Haemonchus contortus survived the winter, both in the abomasal mucosa as adults and as early fourth-stage larvae (EL4). Deworming on farm A significantly reduced FEC, especially of H. contortus, at the start of the grazing period compared with the untreated farm B (P < 0.05). Goats were heavily infected with several GIN throughout the year. Strategic anthelmintic treatment during housing significantly reduced nematode egg output, in particular by H. contortus, at the start of the grazing season.

  12. Resistance of Santa Inês and Ile de France suckling lambs to gastrointestinal nematode infections.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Raquel A; Amarante, Alessandro F T; Bricarello, Patrizia A

    2005-01-01

    A trial was carried out to determine the resistance to natural infection by gastrointestinal nematodes in 12 Santa Inês and nine Ile de France lambs before weaning. Faecal samples were obtained for faecal nematode egg counts (FEC). Blood samples were collected to determine packed cell volume (PCV), total plasma protein levels and peripheral eosinophil counts. Most Ile de France lambs (77.8%) were treated with an anthelmintic at 43 days of age, while 50% off Santa Inês lambs were treated at weaning, 57 days of age. The mean PCV values were normal in Santa Inês lambs, while in Ile de France lambs showed lower values reaching 22.3% at 43 days of age. The lowest mean plasma protein values were observed in Ile de France lambs (4.13 g/dl) at 43 days of age and in Santa Inês lambs (5.0 g/dl) at 57 days of age. Before weaning, Santa Inês lambs were susceptible to natural infections by gastrointestinal nematodes but with a greater capacity to stand the adverse effects of parasitism compared to Ile de France lambs.

  13. Anthelmintic efficacy and dose determination of Albizia anthelmintica against gastrointestinal nematodes in naturally infected Ugandan sheep.

    PubMed

    Gradé, J T; Arble, B L; Weladji, R B; Van Damme, P

    2008-11-07

    Weight loss, stunted growth, and death caused by gastrointestinal parasites are major constraints to livestock productivity, especially in tropical and developing countries where regular use, and misuse, of anthelmintics has led to nematode resistance. Albizia anthelmintica Brong. (Fabaceae) is traditionally employed throughout East Africa to treat helminth parasitosis in livestock. Reported efficacy has varied from 90% against mixed nematodes to just 19% against Haemonchus contortus alone. The objective of this study was to assess the anthelmintic effect of A. anthelmintica against naturally occurring infections of mixed gastrointestinal parasites, and to establish an effective treatment dose, in sheep under pastoral field conditions of northern Uganda. A. anthelmintica bark was collected and prepared according to local custom and packed into gel capsules. Fifty-five young female local mixed-breed lambs were randomly assigned to six groups, including a positive control group that received levamisole (synthetic anthelmintic) and a negative control group that received no treatment. Following the World Association for the Advancement of Veterinary Parasitology (WAAVP) dose determination guidelines, the other four groups were treated with varying doses of A. anthelmintica. Statistical analyses (using generalized linear models) were performed to assess treatment effect. There was a significant treatment (group) effect on parasite egg/oocyte counts per gram (EPG) for nematodes, but not for coccidia. The most effective dose against nematodes (0.8g, 58.7mg/kg) closely approximates what is usually given by traditional healers, 0.9g/adult sheep. It provided major and significant reduction in EPG as compared to the negative control. Anthelmintic efficacy was estimated using percent faecal egg count reduction (FECR). Other than the positive control, animals in the standard dose group showed the greatest decline in shedding of nematode eggs, with an FECR of 78%. This study

  14. Gastrointestinal nematode infections in adult dairy cattle: impact on production, diagnosis and control.

    PubMed

    Charlier, Johannes; Höglund, Johan; von Samson-Himmelstjerna, Georg; Dorny, Pierre; Vercruysse, Jozef

    2009-09-16

    Due to the intensification of dairy herds and the recognition of subclinical infections with a negative impact on production as disease, control of gastrointestinal (GI) nematodes in adult cows is becoming established in an increasing number of dairy herds. The objectives of this paper are to review the aspects related to the impact on production, diagnosis and control of GI nematodes in adult dairy cattle. During the last decade substantial evidence has been generated that GI nematodes can have a negative impact on the performance of adult animals. The milk-yield response to anthelmintic treatment in recent studies in pastured dairy herds was observed to be around 1kg/cow per day, whereas effects on reproductive performance remain equivocal. GI-nematode infections can be monitored based on Ostertagia ostertagi-specific antibody measurement, which provides information on the level of larval exposure and an indication of the associated production losses. Other diagnostic parameters are considered of limited use in adult cattle. Control relies on anthelmintic treatment and grazing management, which can be used complementary to each other. There are three critical points that need to be considered when developing anthelmintic control recommendations in adult cows: the unpredictability of the treatment response, the timing of treatment and the risk for developing anthelmintic resistance. As a consequence, monitoring of GI-nematode infections is desirable in order to focus anthelmintic treatments on those herds with a high larval challenge and associated production losses. For the future, more studies are needed to evaluate the effects of different control approaches in terms of financial benefits for the farmer and sustainability on the long term.

  15. Climate and the epidemiology of gastrointestinal nematode infections of sheep in Europe.

    PubMed

    Morgan, E R; van Dijk, J

    2012-09-30

    The free-living stages of gastrointestinal nematode parasites of sheep are strongly affected by climate. Thus, extreme heat and cold are detrimental to development and survival, while, within tolerable limits, increasing temperatures generally accelerate development but increase mortality. Moisture is needed for development and translation of larvae from faeces to pasture, and so rainfall is a limiting factor for transmission. Together, these factors underpin seasonal patterns of infection in sheep, as well as geographic variation in the epidemiology and relative importance of different species within Europe. Local knowledge and experience enable treatment to be targeted appropriately to prevent dangerous levels of infection. This traditional know-how can be supplemented by predictive epidemiological models, built on thorough understanding of the influence of climate on larval availability. However, management also has a dominant role in determining patterns of infection, and is itself influenced by climate. Current geographic variation in nematode epidemiology across Europe, and knowledge of systems from outside Europe, can provide only limited perspectives on the likely effects of climate change on disease in future. This is because disease arises from complex interaction between host and parasite factors, and the implementation of optimal control strategies to meet new challenges will be slowed by the inertia of current systems. Approaches to nematode control must therefore take account not only of parasite biology, but also the forces that shape sheep farming systems and management decisions. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. The effect of gastrointestinal nematode infection level on grazing distance from dung.

    PubMed

    Seó, Hizumi Lua Sarti; Pinheiro Machado Filho, Luiz Carlos; Honorato, Luciana Aparecida; da Silva, Bruna Fernanda; do Amarante, Alessandro Fernando Talamini; Bricarello, Patrizia Ana

    2015-01-01

    Avoiding grazing near feces is an efficient strategy to prevent parasitic infection and contamination; therefore, in the evolution of herbivorous species, this behavior may have developed as a mechanism to protect the host against infection by gastrointestinal nematodes. The aim of this study was to assess whether grazing distance from dung is related to the level of parasitic infection in cattle. Based on Fecal Egg Count (FEC) means, 18 castrated male steers, aged 18 months, were divided into three groups: High (FEC ≥ 315); Medium (FEC = 130-160); and Low (FEC = 40-70). To analyze the response to a new natural infection by gastrointestinal nematodes and to standardize infection levels, all animals received anthelmintic treatment at twenty days prior to field observation. Three observers simultaneously collected data on grazing behavior for 2.5 hours/week for 12 weeks. Observers recorded the distance when grazing occurred at less than one meter from dung. Every two weeks, fecal samples were collected for FEC, as well as serum samples to measure immunoglobulin G (IgG) levels against larvae and adult antigens of the parasitic species Haemonchus placei. All groups grazed farther from the dung on days of greater insolation (r = 0.62; P = 0.03). Animals with high levels of parasitism grazed farther from the dung (P < 0.05) but had lower levels (P < 0.0001) of IgG serum levels compared to those with medium and low levels of infection. FEC values varied over the experiment, remaining below 200 for the low and medium group and reaching 1000 (P < 0.01) for the animals with the highest rates of parasitism. Our results indicate that cattle showing high levels of parasitism are more likely to avoid contaminated areas than animals with lower infection levels, and the immune system seems to be involved in such behavior.

  17. The Effect of Gastrointestinal Nematode Infection Level on Grazing Distance from Dung

    PubMed Central

    Seó, Hizumi Lua Sarti; Pinheiro Machado Filho, Luiz Carlos; Honorato, Luciana Aparecida; da Silva, Bruna Fernanda; do Amarante, Alessandro Fernando Talamini; Bricarello, Patrizia Ana

    2015-01-01

    Avoiding grazing near feces is an efficient strategy to prevent parasitic infection and contamination; therefore, in the evolution of herbivorous species, this behavior may have developed as a mechanism to protect the host against infection by gastrointestinal nematodes. The aim of this study was to assess whether grazing distance from dung is related to the level of parasitic infection in cattle. Based on Fecal Egg Count (FEC) means, 18 castrated male steers, aged 18 months, were divided into three groups: High (FEC ≥ 315); Medium (FEC = 130–160); and Low (FEC = 40–70). To analyze the response to a new natural infection by gastrointestinal nematodes and to standardize infection levels, all animals received anthelmintic treatment at twenty days prior to field observation. Three observers simultaneously collected data on grazing behavior for 2.5 hours/week for 12 weeks. Observers recorded the distance when grazing occurred at less than one meter from dung. Every two weeks, fecal samples were collected for FEC, as well as serum samples to measure immunoglobulin G (IgG) levels against larvae and adult antigens of the parasitic species Haemonchus placei. All groups grazed farther from the dung on days of greater insolation (r = 0.62; P = 0.03). Animals with high levels of parasitism grazed farther from the dung (P < 0.05) but had lower levels (P < 0.0001) of IgG serum levels compared to those with medium and low levels of infection. FEC values varied over the experiment, remaining below 200 for the low and medium group and reaching 1000 (P < 0.01) for the animals with the highest rates of parasitism. Our results indicate that cattle showing high levels of parasitism are more likely to avoid contaminated areas than animals with lower infection levels, and the immune system seems to be involved in such behavior. PMID:26039729

  18. Control of infective larvae of gastrointestinal nematodes in heifers using different isolates of nematophagous fungi.

    PubMed

    Silva, Manoel Eduardo da; Araújo, Jackson Victor de; Braga, Fabio Ribeiro; Freitas Soares, Filippe Elias de; Rodrigues, Daniel Sobreira

    2013-01-01

    The effect of different nematophagous fungi [Duddingtonia flagrans (AC001 and CG722) and Monacrosporium thaumasium (NF34)] with regard to controlling infective larvae (L3) of nematodes after gastrointestinal transit in female cattle (3/4 Holstein × Zebu) was evaluated. A total of 24 pubescent female cattle were used, weighing approximately 320 kg each one. There were three treatment groups, each contained six animals that received 150 g of pellets (0.2 g of mycelium), orally in a single dose, in a sodium alginate matrix containing mycelial mass of the fungus D. flagrans (AC001 or CG722) or M. thaumasium (NF34); and one control group (without fungi). Fecal samples were collected from the animals at intervals of 12, 15, 18, 21, 24, 48, and 72 hours. At the end of 17 days, the L3 not subjected to predation were recovered by means of the Baermann method. The fungal isolates tested were capable of destroying the L3 after gastrointestinal transit. It was observed that within 72 hours, the isolates AC001, CG722, and NF34 showed a higher predatory activity (81.2%, 97.3%, and 98.3%, respectively). The results justify the need for studies in the field, and over longer intervals, in order to observe the efficiency of the fungus D. flagrans, or even M. thaumasium, for environmental control over nematodes in naturally infected cattle.

  19. Immunogenomics of gastrointestinal nematode infection in ruminants - breeding for resistance to produce food sustainably and safely.

    PubMed

    Sweeney, T; Hanrahan, J P; Ryan, M T; Good, B

    2016-09-01

    Gastrointestinal nematode (GIN) infection of ruminants represents a major health and welfare challenge for livestock producers worldwide. The emergence of anthelmintic resistance in important GIN species and the associated animal welfare concerns have stimulated interest in the development of alternative and more sustainable strategies aimed at the effective management of the impact of GINs. These integrative strategies include selective breeding using genetic/genomic tools, grazing management, biological control, nutritional supplementation, vaccination and targeted selective treatment. In this review, the logic of selecting for "resistance" to GIN infection as opposed to "resilience" or "tolerance" is discussed. This is followed by a review of the potential application of immunogenomics to genetic selection for animals that have the capacity to withstand the impact of GIN infection. Advances in relevant genomic technologies are highlighted together with how these tools can be advanced to support the integration of immunogenomic information into ruminant breeding programmes.

  20. The relation between input-output transformation and gastrointestinal nematode infections on dairy farms.

    PubMed

    van der Voort, M; Van Meensel, J; Lauwers, L; Van Huylenbroeck, G; Charlier, J

    2016-02-01

    Efficiency analysis is used for assessing links between technical efficiency (TE) of livestock farms and animal diseases. However, previous studies often do not make the link with the allocation of inputs and mainly present average effects that ignore the often huge differences among farms. In this paper, we studied the relationship between exposure to gastrointestinal (GI) nematode infections, the TE and the input allocation on dairy farms. Although the traditional cost allocative efficiency (CAE) indicator adequately measures how a given input allocation differs from the cost-minimising input allocation, they do not represent the unique input allocation of farms. Similar CAE scores may be obtained for farms with different input allocations. Therefore, we propose an adjusted allocative efficiency index (AAEI) to measure the unique input allocation of farms. Combining this AAEI with the TE score allows determining the unique input-output position of each farm. The method is illustrated by estimating efficiency scores using data envelopment analysis (DEA) on a sample of 152 dairy farms in Flanders for which both accountancy and parasitic monitoring data were available. Three groups of farms with a different input-output position can be distinguished based on cluster analysis: (1) technically inefficient farms, with a relatively low use of concentrates per 100 l milk and a high exposure to infection, (2) farms with an intermediate TE, relatively high use of concentrates per 100 l milk and a low exposure to infection, (3) farms with the highest TE, relatively low roughage use per 100 l milk and a relatively high exposure to infection. Correlation analysis indicates for each group how the level of exposure to GI nematodes is associated or not with improved economic performance. The results suggest that improving both the economic performance and exposure to infection seems only of interest for highly TE farms. The findings indicate that current farm recommendations

  1. The unique resistance and resilience of the Nigerian West African Dwarf goat to gastrointestinal nematode infections.

    PubMed

    Chiejina, Samuel N; Behnke, Jerzy M

    2011-02-03

    West African Dwarf (WAD) goats serve an important role in the rural village economy of West Africa, especially among small-holder livestock owners. They have been shown to be trypanotolerant and to resist infections with Haemonchus contortus more effectively than any other known breed of goat. In this paper we review what is known about the origins of this goat breed, explain its economic importance in rural West Africa and review the current status of our knowledge about its ability to resist parasitic infections. We suggest that its unique capacity to show both trypanotolerance and resistance to gastrointestinal (GI) nematode infections is immunologically based and genetically endowed, and that knowledge of the underlying genes could be exploited to improve the capacity of more productive wool and milk producing, but GI nematode susceptible, breeds of goats to resist infection, without recourse to anthelmintics. Either conventional breeding allowing introgression of resistance alleles into susceptible breeds, or transgenesis could be exploited for this purpose. Appropriate legal protection of the resistance alleles of WAD goats might provide a much needed source of revenue for the countries in West Africa where the WAD goats exist and where currently living standards among rural populations are among the lowest in the world.

  2. The unique resistance and resilience of the Nigerian West African Dwarf goat to gastrointestinal nematode infections

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background West African Dwarf (WAD) goats serve an important role in the rural village economy of West Africa, especially among small-holder livestock owners. They have been shown to be trypanotolerant and to resist infections with Haemonchus contortus more effectively than any other known breed of goat. Methods In this paper we review what is known about the origins of this goat breed, explain its economic importance in rural West Africa and review the current status of our knowledge about its ability to resist parasitic infections. Conclusions We suggest that its unique capacity to show both trypanotolerance and resistance to gastrointestinal (GI) nematode infections is immunologically based and genetically endowed, and that knowledge of the underlying genes could be exploited to improve the capacity of more productive wool and milk producing, but GI nematode susceptible, breeds of goats to resist infection, without recourse to anthelmintics. Either conventional breeding allowing introgression of resistance alleles into susceptible breeds, or transgenesis could be exploited for this purpose. Appropriate legal protection of the resistance alleles of WAD goats might provide a much needed source of revenue for the countries in West Africa where the WAD goats exist and where currently living standards among rural populations are among the lowest in the world. PMID:21291550

  3. Advances in the diagnosis of key gastrointestinal nematode infections of livestock, with an emphasis on small ruminants.

    PubMed

    Roeber, Florian; Jex, Aaron R; Gasser, Robin B

    2013-12-01

    Parasitic nematodes (roundworms) of livestock have major economic impact globally. In spite of the diseases caused by these nematodes and some advances in the design of new therapeutic agents (anthelmintics) and attempts to develop vaccines against some of them, there has been limited progress in the establishment of practical diagnostic techniques. The specific and sensitive diagnosis of gastrointestinal nematode infections of livestock underpins effective disease control, which is highly relevant now that anthelmintic resistance (AR) is a major problem. Traditional diagnostic techniques have major constraints, in terms of sensitivity and specificity. The purpose of this article is to provide a brief background on gastrointestinal nematodes (Strongylida) of livestock and their control; to summarize conventional methods used for the diagnosis and discuss their constraints; to review key molecular-diagnostic methods and recent progress in the development of advanced amplification-based and sequencing technologies, and their implications for epidemiological investigations and the control of parasitic diseases.

  4. Galectin-11 induction in the gastrointestinal tract of cattle following nematode and protozoan infections.

    PubMed

    Hoorens, P; Rinaldi, M; Mihi, B; Dreesen, L; Grit, G; Meeusen, E; Li, R W; Geldhof, P

    2011-12-01

    Galectin-11 (LGALS11) has been suggested to play an important role in protective immunity against gastrointestinal nematodes in ruminants. However, in cattle, this molecule has not been characterized in detail. In the current study, it was shown that transcription of LGALS11 was highly inducible in the bovine abomasal mucosa after an Ostertagia ostertagi infection. LGALS11 protein expression was also increased in the abomasal mucosa following O. ostertagi infection and localized to the nucleus and cytoplasm of epithelial cells and the mucus. Using in vitro abomasal epithelial cell cultures, it was shown that LGALS11 induction was associated with the proliferative and dedifferentiated status of cells. However, LGALS11 was not induced following stimulation with O. ostertagi excretory-secretory products. These results suggest that LGALS11 induction in vivo may be an indirect rather than a direct effect of the parasite on the epithelium. In addition, LGALS11 transcript was also detected in the abomasal lymph nodes where it was shown to be transcribed in MHCII+ cells; however, transcription levels in the lymph nodes were not altered after O. ostertagi infection. In addition, LGALS11 was also induced in the small intestine by different types of parasites, including the nematode Cooperia oncophora and the protozoan parasite Giardia duodenalis. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  5. The effects of feeding sericea lespedeza hay on growth rate of goats naturally infected with gastrointestinal nematodes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Goat production is increasing in the United States due to high ethnic demand, but infection with gastrointestinal nematodes (GIN) is a major constraint to the industry. Increasing GIN resistance to chemical anthelmintics world-wide has led to the development of alternative control strategies, inclu...

  6. Resistance of Santa Ines, Suffolk and Ile de France sheep to naturally acquired gastrointestinal nematode infections.

    PubMed

    Amarante, A F T; Bricarello, P A; Rocha, R A; Gennari, S M

    2004-02-26

    A study was conducted to assess the breed resistance against nematode infections in Santa Ines, Ile de France and Suffolk male lambs over a 9-month period in São Paulo state, Brazil. Lambs were born during the winter (year 2000) and were weaned at 2 months of age. The animals were then housed and treated with anthelmintics to eliminate natural infections by gastrointestinal nematodes. In late October 2000, lambs were placed in a paddock, where they stayed until August of the following year. Fecal and blood samples were taken from each animal every 2 weeks. On the same day, a pasture sample was collected to determine the number of infective larvae on the herbage. To prevent deaths, individual treatment with anthelmintics was provided to lambs with fecal egg counts (FEC) higher than 4000 eggs per gram (EPG) or with a packed cell volume (PCV) lower than 21%. In August 2001, all animals were slaughtered and the worms present in samples of the gastrointestinal contents were identified and counted. Most of the Suffolk and Ile de France sheep received three to six anthelmintic treatments over a period of 7 months, while most of the Santa Ines were not treated. Reductions in PCV and plasma protein values associated with high FEC and worm burdens were recorded, particularly, in Suffolk and Ile de France lambs. Haemonchus contortus and Oesophagostomum columbianum burdens and number of nodular lesions caused in the large intestine by O. columbianum larvae were significantly lower in Santa Ines sheep. All three breeds showed similar Trichostrongylus colubriformis worm burdens. The relative resistance of Santa Ines young male sheep was superior to that of Suffolk and Ile de France sheep.

  7. Chronic Gastrointestinal Nematode Infection Mutes Immune Responses to Mycobacterial Infection Distal to the Gut.

    PubMed

    Obieglo, Katja; Feng, Xiaogang; Bollampalli, Vishnu Priya; Dellacasa-Lindberg, Isabel; Classon, Cajsa; Österblad, Markus; Helmby, Helena; Hewitson, James P; Maizels, Rick M; Gigliotti Rothfuchs, Antonio; Nylén, Susanne

    2016-03-01

    Helminth infections have been suggested to impair the development and outcome of Th1 responses to vaccines and intracellular microorganisms. However, there are limited data regarding the ability of intestinal nematodes to modulate Th1 responses at sites distal to the gut. In this study, we have investigated the effect of the intestinal nematode Heligmosomoides polygyrus bakeri on Th1 responses to Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG). We found that H. polygyrus infection localized to the gut can mute BCG-specific CD4(+) T cell priming in both the spleen and skin-draining lymph nodes. Furthermore, H. polygyrus infection reduced the magnitude of delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) to PPD in the skin. Consequently, H. polygyrus-infected mice challenged with BCG had a higher mycobacterial load in the liver compared with worm-free mice. The excretory-secretory product from H. polygyrus (HES) was found to dampen IFN-γ production by mycobacteria-specific CD4(+) T cells. This inhibition was dependent on the TGF-βR signaling activity of HES, suggesting that TGF-β signaling plays a role in the impaired Th1 responses observed coinfection with worms. Similar to results with mycobacteria, H. polygyrus-infected mice displayed an increase in skin parasite load upon secondary infection with Leishmania major as well as a reduction in DTH responses to Leishmania Ag. We show that a nematode confined to the gut can mute T cell responses to mycobacteria and impair control of secondary infections distal to the gut. The ability of intestinal helminths to reduce DTH responses may have clinical implications for the use of skin test-based diagnosis of microbial infections.

  8. Exploring the Genetic Resistance to Gastrointestinal Nematodes Infection in Goat Using RNA-Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Bhuiyan, Ali Akbar; Li, Jingjin; Wu, Zhenyang; Ni, Pan; Adetula, Adeyinka Abiola; Wang, Haiyan; Zhang, Cheng; Tang, Xiaohui; Bhuyan, Anjuman Ara; Zhao, Shuhong; Du, Xiaoyong

    2017-04-01

    Gastrointestinal nematodes (GINs) are one of the most economically important parasites of small ruminants and a major animal health concern in many regions of the world. However, the molecular mechanisms of the host response to GIN infections in goat are still little known. In this study, two genetically distinct goat populations, one relatively resistant and the other susceptible to GIN infections, were identified in Yichang goat and then four individuals in each group were chosen to compare mRNA expression profiles using RNA-seq. Field experiment showed lower worm burden, delayed and reduced egg production in the relatively resistant group than the susceptible group. The analysis of RNA-seq showed that 2369 genes, 1407 of which were up-regulated and 962 down-regulated, were significantly (p < 0.001) differentially expressed between these two groups. Functional annotation of the 298 genes more highly expressed in the resistant group yielded a total of 46 significant (p < 0.05) functional annotation clusters including 31 genes (9 in innate immunity, 13 in immunity, and 9 in innate immune response) related to immune biosynthetic process as well as transforming growth factor (TGF)-β, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), and cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) pathways. Our findings provide insights that are immediately relevant for the improvement of host resistance to GIN infections and which will make it possible to know the mechanisms underlying the resistance of goats to GIN infections.

  9. Exploring the Genetic Resistance to Gastrointestinal Nematodes Infection in Goat Using RNA-Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Bhuiyan, Ali Akbar; Li, Jingjin; Wu, Zhenyang; Ni, Pan; Adetula, Adeyinka Abiola; Wang, Haiyan; Zhang, Cheng; Tang, Xiaohui; Bhuyan, Anjuman Ara; Zhao, Shuhong; Du, Xiaoyong

    2017-01-01

    Gastrointestinal nematodes (GINs) are one of the most economically important parasites of small ruminants and a major animal health concern in many regions of the world. However, the molecular mechanisms of the host response to GIN infections in goat are still little known. In this study, two genetically distinct goat populations, one relatively resistant and the other susceptible to GIN infections, were identified in Yichang goat and then four individuals in each group were chosen to compare mRNA expression profiles using RNA-seq. Field experiment showed lower worm burden, delayed and reduced egg production in the relatively resistant group than the susceptible group. The analysis of RNA-seq showed that 2369 genes, 1407 of which were up-regulated and 962 down-regulated, were significantly (p < 0.001) differentially expressed between these two groups. Functional annotation of the 298 genes more highly expressed in the resistant group yielded a total of 46 significant (p < 0.05) functional annotation clusters including 31 genes (9 in innate immunity, 13 in immunity, and 9 in innate immune response) related to immune biosynthetic process as well as transforming growth factor (TGF)-β, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), and cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) pathways. Our findings provide insights that are immediately relevant for the improvement of host resistance to GIN infections and which will make it possible to know the mechanisms underlying the resistance of goats to GIN infections. PMID:28368324

  10. Gastrointestinal nematode infection does not affect selection of tropical foliage by goats in a cafeteria trial.

    PubMed

    Ventura-Cordero, J; González-Pech, P G; Jaimez-Rodriguez, P R; Ortíz-Ocampo, G I; Sandoval-Castro, C A; Torres-Acosta, J F J

    2017-01-01

    It is important to determine whether gastrointestinal nematodes (GINs) affect foliage choice of goats leading to confirm the expression of a self-medication behavior. This study investigated the effect of GIN infection on tropical foliage selection by goats. During experimental stage 1 (10 days), goats had a natural mixed GIN infection, and at stage 2 (10 days), goats were treated with effective anthelmintics to maintain them free of GIN infection. During stage 1 the twelve adult goats (32 ± 2.3 kg live weight [LW]) were assigned to three groups (n = 4) according to their initial GIN infection status: HI group, with fecal egg count (FEC) between 1450 and 2150 eggs per g/feces (EPG); MI group, medium FEC (592-1167 EPG); and the NI group, free from GIN infection. Fresh foliage of four tropical plants were offered to goats ad libitum for 1 h daily: Gymnopodium floribundum (high condensed tannin [CT] content, 37-40 %), Mimosa bahamensis (medium CT content, 16-17 %), Leucaena leucocephala (low CT content, 3-5 %), and Viguiera dentata (negligible CT content, 0.6-0.9 %). Jacobs' selection indexes (JSIs) were estimated for the experimental foliage based on dry matter (DM), CT, or crude protein (CP) intake. During both study stages, individual fecal egg counts were estimated. The JSI patterns of different plant species, based on DM, CT, or CP, were similar irrespective of infection level during stage 1 (HI, MI, and NI) or no GIN infection (stage 2). Thus, irrespective of GIN infection, goats actively selected M. bahamensis (high CT, low CP content) and V. dentata (negligible CT, high CP content) but avoided G. floribundum (high CT, low CP content) and L. leucocephala (medium CT and high CP content). Thus, natural GIN infection did not influence goats' foliage selection.

  11. Self-medication with tannin-rich browse in goats infected with gastro-intestinal nematodes.

    PubMed

    Amit, M; Cohen, I; Marcovics, A; Muklada, H; Glasser, T A; Ungar, E D; Landau, S Y

    2013-12-06

    Primates self-medicate to alleviate symptoms caused by gastro-intestinal nematodes (GIN) by consuming plants that contain secondary compounds. Would goats display the same dietary acumen? Circumstantial evidence suggests they could: goats in Mediterranean rangelands containing a shrub - Pistacia lentiscus - with known anthelmintic properties consume significant amounts of the shrub, particularly in the fall when the probability of being infected with GIN is greatest, even though its tannins impair protein metabolism and deter herbivory. In order to test rigorously the self-medication hypothesis in goats, we conducted a controlled study using 21 GIN-infected and 23 non-infected goats exposed to browse foliage from P. lentiscus, another browse species - Phillyrea latifolia, or hay during the build-up of infection. GIN-infected goats showed clear symptoms of infection, which was alleviated by P. lentiscus foliage but ingesting P. lentiscus had a detrimental effect on protein metabolism in the absence of disease. When given a choice between P. lentiscus and hay, infected goats of the Mamber breed showed higher preference for P. lentiscus than non-infected counterparts, in particular if they had been exposed to Phillyrea latifolia before. This was not found in Damascus goats. Damascus goats, which exhibit higher propensity to consume P. lentiscus may use it as a drug prophylactically, whereas Mamber goats, which are more reluctant to ingest it, select P. lentiscus foliage therapeutically. These results hint at subtle trade-offs between the roles of P. lentiscus as a food, a toxin and a medicine. This is the first evidence of self-medication in goats under controlled conditions. Endorsing the concept of self-medication could greatly modify the current paradigm of veterinary parasitology whereby man decides when and how to treat GIN-infected animals, and result in transferring this decision to the animals themselves. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Efficacy of oral afoxolaner plus milbemycin oxime chewables against induced gastrointestinal nematode infections in dogs.

    PubMed

    Fankhauser, Rebecca; Hamel, Dietmar; Dorr, Paul; Reinemeyer, Craig R; Crafford, Dionne; Bowman, Dwight D; Ulrich, Michael; Yoon, Stephen; Larsen, Diane L

    2016-07-30

    The efficacy of oral afoxolaner plus milbemycin oxime combination chewables against induced gastrointestinal nematode infections in dogs was evaluated in six separate studies. Two studies were performed to evaluate the efficacy of the product against Toxocara canis, two studies evaluated the efficacy against Toxascaris leonina, one study evaluated the efficacy against Ancylostoma braziliense, and one study evaluated the efficacy against Ancylostoma caninum. In the A. caninum study, the efficacy of milbemycin oxime alone and afoxolaner alone was also evaluated. Dogs in all studies were inoculated with infective eggs or larvae and confirmed to have patent infections based on a fecal examination prior to allocation to study group and treatment. Each study utilized a randomized block design with blocks based on pre-treatment body weight. All dogs were assigned to blocks based on body weight, and then each dog within a block was randomly assigned to treatment group. There were two groups of 10 dogs each in the T. canis, T. leonina, and A. braziliense studies: 1) an untreated (control) group and 2) a group treated with afoxolaner plus milbemycin oxime chewables (NexGard Spectra(®), Merial). This group was treated at a dose as close as possible to the minimum effective dose of afoxolaner and milbemycin oxime (2.5mg+0.5mg per kg body weight, respectively) once on Day 0 using whole chews. There were four groups of 10 dogs each in the A. caninum study: 1) untreated (control), 2) NexGard Spectra(®) as described above, 3) milbemycin oxime alone (dose of at least 0.5mg per kg of body weight) and 4) afoxalaner alone (dose of at least 2.5mg per kg body weight). For parasite recovery and counts, dogs were euthanized humanely and necropsied seven days after treatment. The efficacy of the afoxolaner plus milbemycin oxime combination was ≥98% against T. canis, ≥95.8% against T. leonina, and 90.2% against A. braziliense. Efficacy of the combination against A. caninum was 99

  13. Galectin-11 induction in the gastrointestinal tract of cattle following nematode and protozoan infections

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Galectin-11 (LGALS11) has been suggested to play an important role in protective immunity against gastrointestinal nematodes in ruminants. However, in cattle this molecule has not been characterized in detail. In the current study, it was shown that transcription of LGALS11 was highly inducible in t...

  14. Sunn hemp with chicory or pearl millet to minimize gastrointestinal nematode infection in weaned goats

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Predominantly grass forage systems are typically used throughout the southeastern U.S., but are inadequate for nutritional needs of growing goats, and encourage problems with gastrointestinal nematodes (GIN). Browse predominant forages would be preferable, but are not always available. Selection o...

  15. Resistance of Santa Ines and crossbred ewes to naturally acquired gastrointestinal nematode infections.

    PubMed

    Amarante, A F T; Susin, I; Rocha, R A; Silva, M B; Mendes, C Q; Pires, A V

    2009-11-12

    This trial was carried out in Piracicaba, São Paulo State, Brazil, to comparatively evaluate the degree of resistance to naturally acquired gastrointestinal nematode infections in sheep of the following genetic groups: purebred Santa Ines (SI), SI crossbred with Dorper (DO x SI), Ile de France (IF x SI), Suffolk (SU x SI), and Texel (TE x SI). Fifteen ewes from each group were raised indoors until 12 months of age. At this age, they were moved to pasture that was naturally contaminated by nematode infective larvae and were evaluated from December to May, 2007. Rainfall ranged from 267 mm in January to 37 mm in April. Maximum and minimum mean temperatures ranged from 32.5 degrees C to 19.0 degrees C in March and from 25.9 degrees C to 12.8 degrees C in May. There was an increase in the mean number of eggs per gram of feces (EPG) after animals were placed on pasture with significant difference between the SI (80 EPG) and IF x SI (347 EPG) groups in January; and the DO x SI (386 EPG) and TE x SI (258 EPG) groups in May. The highest mean fecal egg count (FEC), 2073 EPG, was recorded for the TE x SI group in February. All groups showed a progressive reduction in body weight throughout the experiment of 12.0% (TE x SI) to 15.9% (SU x SI). In general, the animals with the highest FEC presented the lowest packed cell volumes (PCV); the highest correlation coefficient between FEC x PCV occurred in the SU x SI sheep in January (r=-0.70; P<0.01). Similarly, there was an inverse relationship between FEC and blood eosinophil values, with the highest correlation coefficient in the TE x SI sheep in February (r=-0.64; P<0.05). Immunoglobulin G (IgG) levels against Haemonchus contortus antigens increased in all groups as a result of the exposure to parasites and remained relatively constant until the end of the study, with the exceptions of SU x SI and TE x SI, which showed a rise in IgG levels during the last sampling that coincided with a reduction in mean FEC. In conclusion

  16. Infection with the gastrointestinal nematode Ostertagia ostertagi in cattle affects mucus biosynthesis in the abomasum

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The mucus layer in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract is considered to be the first line of defense to the external environment. Alteration in mucus components has been reported to occur during intestinal nematode infection in ruminants, but the role of mucus in response to abomasal parasites remains largely unclear. The aim of the current study was to analyze the effects of an Ostertagia ostertagi infection on the abomasal mucus biosynthesis in cattle. Increased gene expression of MUC1, MUC6 and MUC20 was observed, while MUC5AC did not change during infection. Qualitative changes of mucins, related to sugar composition, were also observed. AB-PAS and HID-AB stainings highlighted a decrease in neutral and an increase in acidic mucins, throughout the infection. Several genes involved in mucin core structure synthesis, branching and oligomerization, such as GCNT3, GCNT4, A4GNT and protein disulphide isomerases were found to be upregulated. Increase in mucin fucosylation was observed using the lectin UEA-I and through the evaluation of fucosyltransferases gene expression levels. Finally, transcription levels of 2 trefoil factors, TFF1 and TFF3, which are co-expressed with mucins in the GI tract, were also found to be significantly upregulated in infected animals. Although the alterations in mucus biosynthesis started early during infection, the biggest effects were found when adult worms were present on the surface of the abomasal mucosa and are likely caused by the alterations in mucosal cell populations, characterized by hyperplasia of mucus secreting cells. PMID:21569362

  17. Biological Effect of Leaf Aqueous Extract of Caesalpinia pyramidalis in Goats Naturally Infected with Gastrointestinal Nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Borges-dos-Santos, Roberto Robson; López, Jorge A.; Santos, Luciano C.; Zacharias, Farouk; David, Jorge Maurício; David, Juceni Pereira; Lima, Fernanda Washington de Mendonça

    2012-01-01

    Forty-eight goats naturally infected with gastrointestinal nematodes were randomly divided into four groups (n = 12): negative control (G1) (untreated), positive control (G2) (treated with doramectin, 1 mL/50 Kg b.w.), and G3 and G4 treated with 2.5 and 5 mg/Kg b.w. of a leaf aqueous extract of Caesalpinia pyramidalis (CP). Fecal and blood samples were regularly collected for the evaluation of fecal egg count (FEC), hematological and immunological parameters to assess the anthelmintic activity. In treated animals with CP, there was noted a significant reduction of 54.6 and 71.2% in the mean FEC (P < 0.05). An increase in IgA levels was observed in G3 and G4 (P < 0.05), during the experimental period, suggesting that it was stimulated by the extract administration. In conclusion, the results showed that CP provoked a protective response in infected animals treated with them. This response could be partly explained by the CP chemical composition. PMID:22548117

  18. Gastrointestinal nematode infection in beef cattle of different genetic groups in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, M C S; Alencar, M M; Chagas, A C S; Giglioti, R; Oliveira, H N

    2009-12-23

    Resistance to natural infection by gastrointestinal nematodes was compared in 67 female calves of the following genetic groups: Nelore (NX); 1/2 Senepol+1/2 Nelore (SN); and 1/2 Aberdeen Angus+1/2 Nelore (AN). The NX (n=26), SN (n=23) and AN (n=18) animals were monitored for 14 months, during which they remained without treatment, allowed to graze in a tropical environment. Eggs per gram of feces (EPG), coprocultures and packed cell volume (PCV) were carried out monthly. No significant effects of the interaction between the genetic groups and month/year of collection and the genetic group on the EPG were found, but there was a significant influence of the month of collection (P<0.01). The monthly PCV measurements did not differ for the animals of the three genetic groups and there was no association found between the EPG and PCV. The animals of the SN and NX groups showed similar numbers of EPG with results zero, while for the AN group these numbers were significantly lower (P<0.05). Although the NX group had a large number of EPG with results zero, it also contained many animals with high counts, meaning this group had higher averages during the entire study period. The following nematode genera were found in the coprocultures: Haemonchus, Cooperia, Oesophagostomum and Trichostrongylus, the latter in smallest proportion. There was no significant difference between the genetic groups for averages of all parasites identified, except Cooperia, which were present in higher numbers in the animals of the NX group (P<0.05). The results obtained in this experiment suggest that the use of Bos taurus x Bos indicus crossbreeds can be a good strategy to reduce the use of chemical control in Brazil.

  19. Gastrointestinal nematode infections in roe deer (Capreolus capreolus) from the NW of the Iberian Peninsula: assessment of some risk factors.

    PubMed

    Pato, F J; Vázquez, L; Díez-Baños, N; López, C; Sánchez-Andrade, R; Fernández, G; Díez-Baños, P; Panadero, R; Díaz, P; Morrondo, P

    2013-09-01

    Intestinal contents of 218 roe deer hunted in the northwest (NW) of the Iberian Peninsula during the 2008-2009 hunting seasons were examined in order to provide information on the gastrointestinal (GI) nematode prevalence and intensity of infection and the possible influence of some environmental and intrinsic factors such as climatic conditions, age and sex. All the animals studied harboured GI nematodes, and a total of 20 different species belonging to ten genera were identified. Spiculopteragia spiculoptera/Spiculopteragia mathevossiani, Ostertagia leptospicularis/Ostertagia kolchida and Nematodirus filicollis were the most common. This is the first citation for Chabertia ovina, Cooperia pectinata, Cooperia punctata, Cooperia oncophora, Haemonchus contortus, Nematodirus spathiger, Oesophagostomum venulosum, Teladorsagia trifurcata, Trichostrongylus capricola, Trichostrongylus colubriformis, Trichostrongylus vitrinus and Trichuris capreoli in roe deer from the Iberian Peninsula. Prevalence and intensity were significantly higher in the abomasum, where infections with more than one GI nematode species were the most common; in the other intestinal segments infections with only one GI nematode species were the most prevalent. When considering the influence of the different risk factors on the prevalence of GI nematodes, the highest prevalence for most of the genera were observed in roe deer from coastal areas, where climatic conditions are more favourable for the development and survival of third stage larvae in the environment. Regarding the sex of the animals, the prevalence was, in general, higher in males than in females, probably due to behavioural and physiological sex-related differences. On the contrary, no differences were found in relation to the age of the animals. This study reveals that roe deer from the NW of the Iberian Peninsula are widely and intensely infected with gastrointestinal nematodes, which probably affect the health status of these

  20. Genetic resistance of Barbari and Jamunapari kids to natural infection with gastrointestinal nematodes.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, K K; Rout, P K; Singh, P K; Mandal, A; Singh, S K; Roy, R

    2003-10-01

    An investigation was made in 252 Barbari and Jamunapari kids to assess their resistance to natural infection with gastrointestinal (GI) nematodes and to establish indicator traits for such resistance in Indian goats. The indicator traits, faecal egg counts (FEC) and packed cell volume (PCV) were affected by various genetic and non-genetic factors. There were no breed differences in the FEC or PCV at 3, 6 or 9 months of age. Jamunapari male kids had a higher FEC than the female kids at 6 months of age. However, Barbari female kids had a higher FEC than the respective male kids at 9 months of age. At 6 months of age in both breeds, the kids born in the spring (March-April) had a higher FEC than those born in the autumn (October-November). The FEC of kids at 9 months of age was higher than at 3 or 6 months of age. Sire had a significant effect on PCV at 6 and 9 months of age. The kids born in the autumn had a higher PCV than those born in the spring. The PCV of male Barbari kids differed significantly from that of female kids at all the ages. The correlation coefficient of FEC on both body weight and body weight gain was negative, and there was a loss of body weight in the individuals with a high FEC.

  1. Gastrointestinal nematode infections in small ruminants under the traditional husbandry system during the dry season in southern Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Abebe, Rahmeto; Gebreyohannes, Mebrahtu; Mekuria, Solomon; Abunna, Fufa; Regassa, Alemayehu

    2010-08-01

    A cross-sectional study was conducted from November 2008 to February 2009 to investigate the prevalence and intensity of infection and risk factors of gastrointestinal (GI) nematodes in small ruminants kept under the traditional husbandry system in two districts in southern Ethiopia. Faecal samples collected from a total of 510 small ruminants (284 sheep and 226 goats) and analysed by a modified McMaster technique revealed that 222 animals (43.5%) were found to be infected with one or more GI nematodes. Five identical genera of nematodes were found in both sheep and goats, which in order of predominance were Haemonchus (56.3%), Trichostrongylus (39.6%), Oesophagostomum (22.9%), Trichuris (21.6%) and Bunostomum (10.4%). No significant (p > 0.05) differences were observed between sheep and goats proportions except for Trichuris (p < 0.05). In both sheep and goats, most of the animals were heavily infected showing faecal egg counts (FECs) above 1,200 epg. Sheep had a significantly (p < 0.05) higher mean FEC than goats. In sheep and goats, both the prevalence of GI nematodes and mean FEC were significantly (p < 0.001) associated with body condition score and faecal consistency but not with district, sex and age (p > 0.05 for each factor). In conclusion, the observation of a strong association of GI nematodes with poor body condition coupled with heavy intensity of infection in the majority of infected animals and an abundance of nematode genera of widespread economic and pathological significance warrants the institution of appropriate control measures that should necessarily include improvement of the nutritional status of the animals.

  2. Anthelmintic effects of forage chicory (Cichorium intybus) against gastrointestinal nematode parasites in experimentally infected cattle.

    PubMed

    Peña-Espinoza, Miguel; Thamsborg, Stig M; Desrues, Olivier; Hansen, Tina V A; Enemark, Heidi L

    2016-09-01

    Two experiments studied the effects of dietary chicory against gastrointestinal nematodes in cattle. In Experiment (Exp.) 1, stabled calves were fed chicory silage (CHI1; n = 9) or ryegrass/clover hay (CTL1; n = 6) with balanced protein/energy intakes between groups. After 16 days, all calves received 10 000 Ostertagia ostertagi and 66 000 Cooperia oncophora third-stage larvae (L3) [day (D) 0 post-infection (p.i.)]. In Exp. 2, calves were assigned to pure chicory (CHI2; n=10) or ryegrass/clover (CTL2; n = 10) pastures. After 7 days, animals received 20 000 O. ostertagi L3/calf (D0 p.i.) and were moved regularly preventing pasture-borne infections. Due to poor regrowth of the chicory pasture, CHI2 was supplemented with chicory silage. At D40 p.i. (Exp. 1) and D35 p.i. (Exp. 2) calves were slaughtered for worm recovery. In Exp.1, fecal egg counts (FEC) were similar between groups. However, O. ostertagi counts were significantly reduced in CHI1 by 60% (geometric mean; P < 0·01), whereas C. oncophora burdens were unaffected (P = 0·12). In Exp. 2, FEC were markedly lowered in CHI2 from D22 p.i onwards (P < 0·01). Ostertagia ostertagi adult burdens were significantly reduced in CHI2 by 66% (P < 0·001). Sesquiterpene lactones were identified only in chicory (fresh/silage). Chicory shows promise as an anti-Ostertagia feed for cattle and further studies should investigate its on-farm use.

  3. Prevalence and risk factors associated with gastrointestinal nematode infection in goats raised in Baybay city, Leyte, Philippines

    PubMed Central

    Rupa, Ariel Paul M.; Portugaliza, Harvie P.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Gastrointestinal parasitism is a serious constraint affecting goat production in the Philippines. This study aimed to determine the prevalence and associated risk factors of gastrointestinal nematode infection in goat-populated barangays of Baybay City, Leyte. Materials and Methods: A total of 81 households or farms were interviewed, and 450 goats were sampled for fecalysis. Fecal egg count along with egg morphological identification and coproculture for third stage larvae identification were conducted. Descriptive statistics and logistic regression analyses were carried out to determine the farm- and animal-level prevalence and risk factors. Results: Fecalysis revealed the presence of strongyle and Trichuris spp. with a farm-level prevalence of 100% and 4.94%, respectively; and animal-level prevalence of 96.22% and 4.44%, respectively. The identified strongyle genera per barangay were Haemonchus spp. (34.79%), Trichostrongylus spp. (33.29%), Oesophagostomum spp. (24.21%), Cooperia spp. (6.93%), and Chabertia spp. (0.79%). Goats older than 12 months were four times more likely to present high strongyle burden when compared to goats <6 months. With each month increase in goat’s age, the odds of acquiring strongyle infection also increased by 1.07 times. Animals kept in goat house with cemented flooring have lower odds of acquiring strongyle (odds ratio=0.12). Goats raised for leisure purposes and fed with carabao grass (Paspalum conjugatum) were 8.12 and 5.52 times more likely to acquire Trichuris, respectively. Conclusion: Most of the backyard goat raisers in Baybay City, Leyte, do not practice sound helminth control measures as shown by the high prevalence of gastrointestinal nematodes. The most relevant risk factors for gastrointestinal nematode infection were the age of the goat, type of goat house’s flooring, purpose of raising goats, and feeding practices. PMID:27536034

  4. Natural selection on individual variation in tolerance of gastrointestinal nematode infection.

    PubMed

    Hayward, Adam D; Nussey, Daniel H; Wilson, Alastair J; Berenos, Camillo; Pilkington, Jill G; Watt, Kathryn A; Pemberton, Josephine M; Graham, Andrea L

    2014-07-01

    Hosts may mitigate the impact of parasites by two broad strategies: resistance, which limits parasite burden, and tolerance, which limits the fitness or health cost of increasing parasite burden. The degree and causes of variation in both resistance and tolerance are expected to influence host-parasite evolutionary and epidemiological dynamics and inform disease management, yet very little empirical work has addressed tolerance in wild vertebrates. Here, we applied random regression models to longitudinal data from an unmanaged population of Soay sheep to estimate individual tolerance, defined as the rate of decline in body weight with increasing burden of highly prevalent gastrointestinal nematode parasites. On average, individuals lost weight as parasite burden increased, but whereas some lost weight slowly as burden increased (exhibiting high tolerance), other individuals lost weight significantly more rapidly (exhibiting low tolerance). We then investigated associations between tolerance and fitness using selection gradients that accounted for selection on correlated traits, including body weight. We found evidence for positive phenotypic selection on tolerance: on average, individuals who lost weight more slowly with increasing parasite burden had higher lifetime breeding success. This variation did not have an additive genetic basis. These results reveal that selection on tolerance operates under natural conditions. They also support theoretical predictions for the erosion of additive genetic variance of traits under strong directional selection and fixation of genes conferring tolerance. Our findings provide the first evidence of selection on individual tolerance of infection in animals and suggest practical applications in animal and human disease management in the face of highly prevalent parasites.

  5. Natural Selection on Individual Variation in Tolerance of Gastrointestinal Nematode Infection

    PubMed Central

    Hayward, Adam D.; Nussey, Daniel H.; Wilson, Alastair J.; Berenos, Camillo; Pilkington, Jill G.; Watt, Kathryn A.; Pemberton, Josephine M.; Graham, Andrea L.

    2014-01-01

    Hosts may mitigate the impact of parasites by two broad strategies: resistance, which limits parasite burden, and tolerance, which limits the fitness or health cost of increasing parasite burden. The degree and causes of variation in both resistance and tolerance are expected to influence host–parasite evolutionary and epidemiological dynamics and inform disease management, yet very little empirical work has addressed tolerance in wild vertebrates. Here, we applied random regression models to longitudinal data from an unmanaged population of Soay sheep to estimate individual tolerance, defined as the rate of decline in body weight with increasing burden of highly prevalent gastrointestinal nematode parasites. On average, individuals lost weight as parasite burden increased, but whereas some lost weight slowly as burden increased (exhibiting high tolerance), other individuals lost weight significantly more rapidly (exhibiting low tolerance). We then investigated associations between tolerance and fitness using selection gradients that accounted for selection on correlated traits, including body weight. We found evidence for positive phenotypic selection on tolerance: on average, individuals who lost weight more slowly with increasing parasite burden had higher lifetime breeding success. This variation did not have an additive genetic basis. These results reveal that selection on tolerance operates under natural conditions. They also support theoretical predictions for the erosion of additive genetic variance of traits under strong directional selection and fixation of genes conferring tolerance. Our findings provide the first evidence of selection on individual tolerance of infection in animals and suggest practical applications in animal and human disease management in the face of highly prevalent parasites. PMID:25072883

  6. Effect of gastrointestinal nematode and liver fluke infections on weight gain and reproductive performance of beef heifers.

    PubMed

    Loyacano, A F; Williams, J C; Gurie, J; DeRosa, A A

    2002-08-02

    Spring born, crossbred beef heifers (n=372) were utilized over four years to measure reductions in body weights, reproductive performance and calf weights caused by gastrointestinal nematodes (primarily Ostertagia ostertagi) and the bovine liver fluke (Fasciola hepatica) and to differentiate losses attributable to each type of parasitism. Each year, weaned heifers were allotted to one of the four treatment regimens: Group 1, untreated controls; Group 2, treated for nematodes; Group 3, treated for liver fluke; and Group 4, treated for both nematodes and liver fluke. Nematodes were controlled with subcutaneous injections of either ivermectin (Ivomec, Merial) or doramectin (Dectomax, Pfizer), both at the recommended dose of 200 ug/kg bodyweight. Clorsulon (Curatrem, Merial) drench was given at the recommended rate of 7 mg/kg bodyweight to control flukes. Treatments and fecal collections were initiated at allotment each year and were repeated at 28-84-day intervals until palpation for pregnancy diagnosis. Open heifers were removed from the study at this time. Treatment dates were based on expected length of treatment efficacy, the stage of growth of the heifers and the seasonal risk of infection by the parasites. Pregnant females were pooled and received their assigned treatments prior to their calving and breeding seasons and remained together until their calves were weaned. Heifers treated for nematode infections were heavier and had higher condition scores (P<0.01) than untreated control heifers at initiation of breeding, and maintained that difference through pregnancy diagnosis. Liver fluke infection did not affect heifer gains or condition scores prior to palpation (P<0.01). At palpation, heifers treated for both forms of parasitism had the highest condition scores and weight gains (P<0.01), and also higher pregnancy rates than control heifers and heifers treated for nematodes only (P<0.01). Pregnancy rates for heifers treated for flukes only were not

  7. Effect of gastro-intestinal nematode infection on sheep performance: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Mavrot, Fabien; Hertzberg, Hubertus; Torgerson, Paul

    2015-10-24

    Gastrointestinal nematode (GIN) infections are common in domestic sheep and impact directly and indirectly on the health of infected animals as well as on the associated economic production. In this study, we aim at summarizing the current knowledge on the influence of GIN infections on sheep production by conducting a systematic review. A subsequent meta-analysis of relevant studies was performed to provide an estimate of the effect of GIN infections on weight gain, wool production and milk yield. A literature search was performed on the CAB, Pubmed and Web of Science database for the period 1960-2012. Inclusion criteria were: 1) Measurement of at least one production parameter. 2) Comparison between groups of sheep with different nematode burdens. 3) Same conditions regarding all aspects except parasite burden between groups. 4) Quantitative measurements of one or more production traits. Altogether, 88 studies describing 218 trials were included in this review. The majority of studies (86%) reported that GIN infections had a negative effect on production but this was reported to be statistically significant in only 43% of the studies. Meta-analysis indicated that performances of sheep infected with nematodes was 85, 90 and 78% of the performance in uninfected individuals for weight gain, wool production and milk yield respectively. Our results suggest a possible reporting bias or small study effect for the estimation of the impact of GIN infections on weight gain. Finally, a general linear model provided an estimate for the decrease in weight gain in relation to the increase in faecal egg count of nematodes. This study underlines the importance of GIN infections for sheep production and highlights the need to improve parasite management in sheep, in particular in face of challenges such as anthelmintic resistance.

  8. Comparing different maize supplementation strategies to improve resilience and resistance against gastrointestinal nematode infections in browsing goats

    PubMed Central

    Gárate-Gallardo, Leslie; Torres-Acosta, Juan Felipe de Jesús; Aguilar-Caballero, Armando Jacinto; Sandoval-Castro, Carlos Alfredo; Cámara-Sarmiento, Ramón; Canul-Ku, Hilda Lorena

    2015-01-01

    The effect of maize grain supplementation on the resilience and resistance of browsing Criollo goat kids against gastrointestinal nematodes was evaluated. Five-month-old kids (n = 42), raised worm-free, were allocated to five groups: infected + not supplemented (I-NS; n = 10), infected + maize supplement at 108 g/d (I-S108; n = 8), maize supplement at 1% of body weight (BW) (I-S1%; n = 8), maize supplement at 1.5% BW (I-S1.5%; n = 8), or infected + supplemented (maize supplement 1.5% BW) + moxidectin (0.2 mg/kg BW subcutaneously every 28 d) (T-S1.5%; n = 8). Kids browsed daily (7 h) in a tropical forest for 112 days during the rainy season. Kids were weighed weekly to adjust supplementary feeding. Hematocrit (Ht), hemoglobin (Hb), and eggs per gram of feces were determined fortnightly. On day 112, five goat kids were slaughtered per group to determine worm burdens. Kids of the I-S1.5% group showed similar body-weight change, Ht and Hb, compared to kids without gastrointestinal nematodes (T-S1.5%), as well as lower eggs per gram of feces and Trichostrongylus colubriformis worm burden compared to the I-NS group (P > 0.05). Thus, among the supplement levels tested, increasing maize supplementation at 1.5% BW of kids was the best strategy to improve their resilience and resistance against natural gastrointestinal nematode infections under the conditions of forage from the tropical forest. PMID:26071051

  9. Comparing different maize supplementation strategies to improve resilience and resistance against gastrointestinal nematode infections in browsing goats.

    PubMed

    Gárate-Gallardo, Leslie; Torres-Acosta, Juan Felipe de Jesús; Aguilar-Caballero, Armando Jacinto; Sandoval-Castro, Carlos Alfredo; Cámara-Sarmiento, Ramón; Canul-Ku, Hilda Lorena

    2015-01-01

    The effect of maize grain supplementation on the resilience and resistance of browsing Criollo goat kids against gastrointestinal nematodes was evaluated. Five-month-old kids (n = 42), raised worm-free, were allocated to five groups: infected + not supplemented (I-NS; n = 10), infected + maize supplement at 108 g/d (I-S108; n = 8), maize supplement at 1% of body weight (BW) (I-S1%; n = 8), maize supplement at 1.5% BW (I-S1.5%; n = 8), or infected + supplemented (maize supplement 1.5% BW) + moxidectin (0.2 mg/kg BW subcutaneously every 28 d) (T-S1.5%; n = 8). Kids browsed daily (7 h) in a tropical forest for 112 days during the rainy season. Kids were weighed weekly to adjust supplementary feeding. Hematocrit (Ht), hemoglobin (Hb), and eggs per gram of feces were determined fortnightly. On day 112, five goat kids were slaughtered per group to determine worm burdens. Kids of the I-S1.5% group showed similar body-weight change, Ht and Hb, compared to kids without gastrointestinal nematodes (T-S1.5%), as well as lower eggs per gram of feces and Trichostrongylus colubriformis worm burden compared to the I-NS group (P > 0.05). Thus, among the supplement levels tested, increasing maize supplementation at 1.5% BW of kids was the best strategy to improve their resilience and resistance against natural gastrointestinal nematode infections under the conditions of forage from the tropical forest.

  10. Gastrointestinal nematode infection and performance of weaned stocker calves in response to anthelmintic control strategies.

    PubMed

    Walker, R S; Miller, J E; Monlezun, C J; LaMay, D; Navarre, C; Ensley, D

    2013-10-18

    Gastrointestinal nematode (GIN) parasite control recommendations are in a state of flux because of the increase in anthelmintic resistant cattle parasites, such as Cooperia spp. In addition, Cooperia spp. infection is typically high in warm-season grass pastures and can affect growth performance of grazing stocker calves in the Gulf Coast Region. This study evaluated the effects of moxidectin pour-on, oxfendazole oral suspension, or a combination of the two given at separate times on infection and performance of weaned beef calves grazing summer forages. Steers (n=42) and heifers (n=31) were stratified by sex, d-11 fecal egg count (FEC), and d-1 shrunk body weight (BW) to one of 10 pastures with four anthelmintic treatments and one control. Treatments included: (1) oxfendazole given on d 0 and moxidectin on d 73 (O+M), (2) moxidectin given on d 0 and oxfendazole on d 73 (M+O), (3) moxidectin given on d 0 (M), (4) oxfendazole given on d 0 (O) and (5) no anthelmintic given (CON). Calves grazed for d-110 beginning May 27th. Response variables were FEC (collected on d-11, 14, 31, 45, 59, 73, 87 and 108), coprocultures (evaluated for d 87 and 108), final shrunk BW, shrunk BW gain, average daily gain (ADG), and full BW gain (collected on d 31, 59, 73, 87, and 108). Calves treated with either oxfendazole (O+M and O) or moxidectin (M+O and M) on d 0 had significantly lower (P<0.001) FEC than the CON calves on d 14, 31 and 45. However, the M+O treated calves had significantly higher (P<0.001) FEC than both oxfendazole treated groups. In addition, calves treated with a second dewormer on d 73 (O+M and M+O) had significantly lower (P<0.001) FEC by d 87 than the CON or M treated calves. Shrunk BW gain and ADG were significantly greater (P=0.005) for the O+M compared to the M treated and CON calves, but comparable with the M+O and O treated calves, respectively. Coprocultures sampled on d 87 and 108 for calves not receiving a second dewormer were predominantly Cooperia spp. and

  11. Intestinal smooth muscle cells locally enhance stem cell factor (SCF) production against gastrointestinal nematode infections.

    PubMed

    Morimoto, Masahiro

    2011-06-01

    Smooth muscle cells can produce stem cell factor (SCF) in the normal state for the preservation of mast cells, but it is still unknown whether smooth muscle cells can enhance SCF production in response to the pathological stimuli. The present study showed that smooth muscle cells in mast cell-increased regions around worm cysts of intestinal nematodes significantly enhanced SCF gene expression compared with mast cell non-increased regions in same sample. SCF gene expression in mast cell non-increased regions in nematode-infected mice showed almost the same level as in non-infected control groups. These results indicate that smooth muscle cells can locally enhance SCF gene expression, and may have a role in local immunological reactions as growth factor-producing cells.

  12. A stochastic frontier approach to study the relationship between gastrointestinal nematode infections and technical efficiency of dairy farms.

    PubMed

    van der Voort, Mariska; Van Meensel, Jef; Lauwers, Ludwig; Vercruysse, Jozef; Van Huylenbroeck, Guido; Charlier, Johannes

    2014-01-01

    The impact of gastrointestinal (GI) nematode infections in dairy farming has traditionally been assessed using partial productivity indicators. But such approaches ignore the impact of infection on the performance of the whole farm. In this study, efficiency analysis was used to study the association of the GI nematode Ostertagia ostertagi on the technical efficiency of dairy farms. Five years of accountancy data were linked to GI nematode infection data gained from a longitudinal parasitic monitoring campaign. The level of exposure to GI nematodes was based on bulk-tank milk ELISA tests, which measure the antibodies to O. ostertagi and was expressed as an optical density ratio (ODR). Two unbalanced data panels were created for the period 2006 to 2010. The first data panel contained 198 observations from the Belgian Farm Accountancy Data Network (Brussels, Belgium) and the second contained 622 observations from the Boerenbond Flemish farmers' union (Leuven, Belgium) accountancy system (Tiber Farm Accounting System). We used the stochastic frontier analysis approach and defined inefficiency effect models specified with the Cobb-Douglas and transcendental logarithmic (Translog) functional form. To assess the efficiency scores, milk production was considered as the main output variable. Six input variables were used: concentrates, roughage, pasture, number of dairy cows, animal health costs, and labor. The ODR of each individual farm served as an explanatory variable of inefficiency. An increase in the level of exposure to GI nematodes was associated with a decrease in technical efficiency. Exposure to GI nematodes constrains the productivity of pasture, health, and labor but does not cause inefficiency in the use of concentrates, roughage, and dairy cows. Lowering the level of infection in the interquartile range (0.271 ODR) was associated with an average milk production increase of 27, 19, and 9L/cow per year for Farm Accountancy Data Network farms and 63, 49, and

  13. Interleukin 4 is important in protective immunity to a gastrointestinal nematode infection in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Urban, J F; Katona, I M; Paul, W E; Finkelman, F D

    1991-01-01

    Parasitic helminths typically induce components of immediate-type hypersensitivity, including elevated serum IgE, eosinophilia, and mucosal mast cells. These responses are T-cell-dependent and associated with rapid expulsion of parasitic worms from a sensitized host; existing experimental systems have failed to define the precise role of cytokines in these responses. We report here that anti-interleukin 4 or anti-interleukin 4 receptor antibodies block the polyclonal IgE response to a parasitic nematode, Heligmosomoides polygyrus, and abrogate protective immunity to the infection. In contrast, anti-interleukin 5 antibody prevented H. polygyrus-induced eosinophilia but did not prevent protection. These data provide evidence that a specific cytokine affects the physiology and survival of a parasitic nematode in the host. Images PMID:2062833

  14. Evaluation of reference genes for real-time PCR studies of Brazilian Somalis sheep infected by gastrointestinal nematodes

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Precise normalization with reference genes is necessary, in order to obtain reliable relative expression data in response to gastrointestinal nematode infection. By using sheep from temperate regions as models, three reference genes, viz., ribosomal protein LO (RPLO), glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) and succinate dehydrogenase complex subunit A (SDHA), were investigated in the abomasum, abomasal lymph nodes and small intestine of Brazilian Somalis sheep, either resistant or susceptible to gastrointestinal nematodes infections. Real time PCR was carried out by using SYBR Green I dye, and gene stability was tested by geNorm. RPLO was an ideal reference gene, since its expression was constant across treatments, presented lower variation, and was ranked as the most stable in abomasum and lymph node tissues. On the other hand, SDHA was the most stable in the small intestine followed by RPLO and GAPDH. These findings demonstrate the importance of correctly choosing reference genes prior to relative quantification. In addition, we determined that reference genes used in sheep from temperate regions, when properly tested, can be applied in animals from tropical regions such as the Brazilian Somalis sheep. PMID:21637421

  15. Effect of fall-grazed sericea lespedeza (Lespedeza cuneata) on gastrointestinal nematode infections of growing goats.

    PubMed

    Mechineni, A; Kommuru, D S; Gujja, S; Mosjidis, J A; Miller, J E; Burke, J M; Ramsay, A; Mueller-Harvey, I; Kannan, G; Lee, J H; Kouakou, B; Terrill, T H

    2014-08-29

    High prevalence of anthelmintic-resistant gastrointestinal nematodes (GIN) in goats has increased pressure to find effective, alternative non-synthetic control methods, one of which is adding forage of the high condensed tannin (CT) legume sericea lespedeza (SL; Lespedeza cuneata) to the animal's diet. Previous work has demonstrated good efficacy of dried SL (hay, pellets) against small ruminant GIN, but information is lacking on consumption of fresh SL, particularly during the late summer-autumn period in the southern USA when perennial warm-season grass pastures are often low in quality. A study was designed to determine the effects of autumn (September-November) consumption of fresh SL forage, grass pasture (predominantly bermudagrass, BG; Cynodon dactylon), or a combination of SL+BG forage by young goats [intact male Spanish kids, 9 months old (20.7 ± 1.1 kg), n = 10/treatment group] on their GIN infection status. Three forage paddocks (0.40 ha) were set up at the Fort Valley State University Agricultural Research Station (Fort Valley, GA) for an 8-week trial. The goats in each paddock were supplemented with a commercial feed pellet at 0.45 kg/head/d for the first 4 weeks of the trial, and 0.27 kg/head/d for the final 4 weeks. Forage samples taken at the start of the trial were analyzed for crude protein (CP), neutral detergent fiber (NDF), and acid detergent fiber (ADF) content, and a separate set of SL samples was analyzed for CT in leaves, stems, and whole plant using the benzyl mercaptan thiolysis method. Animal weights were taken at the start and end of the trial, and fecal and blood samples were collected weekly for determination of fecal egg counts (FEC) and packed cell volume (PCV), respectively. Adult GIN was recovered from the abomasum and small intestines of all goats at the end of the experiment for counting and speciation. The CP levels were highest for SL forage, intermediate for SL+BG, and lowest for BG forage samples, while NDF and ADF values

  16. Efficacy of a moxidectin/triclabendazole oral formulation against mixed infections of Fasciola hepatica and gastrointestinal nematodes in sheep.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Valladares, M; Cordero-Pérez, C; Castañón-Ordóñez, L; Famularo, M R; Fernández-Pato, N; Rojo-Vázquez, F A

    2010-11-24

    We have evaluated the efficacy in sheep of a combination drench formulation at the recommended dose rate of 0.2 mg moxidectin/kg bodyweight and 10 mg triclabendazole/kg bodyweight against an experimental infection with Fasciola hepatica and a natural infection with gastrointestinal nematodes. We confirmed that the efficacy of reducing fecal egg output was 98.3% for trichostrongyle eggs and 100% for F. hepatica eggs. Based on adult worm and fluke recovery, the efficacy varied according to the target species. A reduction was found in the number of Teladorsagia circumcincta, Trichostrongylus spp., Nematodirus spp., and Trichuris spp. greater than 95%, but the efficacy for Oesophagostomum spp. varied, with values below 90%. The reduction in F. hepatica was higher than 95% for all stages. The effectiveness of the formulation was also confirmed by an increase in total proteins and albumin following treatment.

  17. Effect of fall-grazed sericea lespedeza (Lespedeza cuneata) on gastrointestinal nematode infections, skin and carcass microbial load, and meat quality of growing goats

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Infection with gastrointestinal nematodes (GIN), particularly Haemonchus contortus, a highly pathogenic blood-feeder, has a major effect on profitability of goat production world-wide. High prevalence of anthelmintic-resistant GIN in goats has increased pressure to find effective, alternative non-sy...

  18. Immunity to gastrointestinal nematodes: mechanisms and myths.

    PubMed

    Grencis, Richard K; Humphreys, Neil E; Bancroft, Allison J

    2014-07-01

    Immune responses to gastrointestinal nematodes have been studied extensively for over 80 years and intensively investigated over the last 30-40 years. The use of laboratory models has led to the discovery of new mechanisms of protective immunity and made major contributions to our fundamental understanding of both innate and adaptive responses. In addition to host protection, it is clear that immunoregulatory processes are common in infected individuals and resistance often operates alongside modulation of immunity. This review aims to discuss the recent discoveries in both host protection and immunoregulation against gastrointestinal nematodes, placing the data in context of the specific life cycles imposed by the different parasites studied and the future challenges of considering the mucosal/immune axis to encompass host, parasite, and microbiome in its widest sense.

  19. Immunity to gastrointestinal nematodes: mechanisms and myths

    PubMed Central

    Grencis, Richard K; Humphreys, Neil E; Bancroft, Allison J

    2014-01-01

    Immune responses to gastrointestinal nematodes have been studied extensively for over 80 years and intensively investigated over the last 30–40 years. The use of laboratory models has led to the discovery of new mechanisms of protective immunity and made major contributions to our fundamental understanding of both innate and adaptive responses. In addition to host protection, it is clear that immunoregulatory processes are common in infected individuals and resistance often operates alongside modulation of immunity. This review aims to discuss the recent discoveries in both host protection and immunoregulation against gastrointestinal nematodes, placing the data in context of the specific life cycles imposed by the different parasites studied and the future challenges of considering the mucosal/immune axis to encompass host, parasite, and microbiome in its widest sense. PMID:24942690

  20. Maternal protein deficiency during a gastrointestinal nematode infection alters developmental profile of lymphocyte populations and selected cytokines in neonatal mice.

    PubMed

    Odiere, Maurice R; Scott, Marilyn E; Leroux, Louis-Philippe; Dzierszinski, Florence S; Koski, Kristine G

    2013-01-01

    Neonatal immune development begins in pregnancy and continues into lactation and may be affected by maternal diet. We investigated the possibility that maternal protein deficiency (PD) during a chronic gastrointestinal (GI) nematode infection could impair neonatal immune development. Beginning on d 14 of pregnancy, mice were fed protein-sufficient (PS; 24%) or protein-deficient (PD; 6%) isoenergetic diets and were infected weekly with either 0 (sham) or 100 Heligmosomoides bakeri larvae. Pups were killed on d 2, 7, 14, and d 21 and dams on d 20 of lactation. Lymphoid organs were weighed. Cytokine concentration in maternal and pup serum and in milk from pup stomachs and lymphoid cell populations in pup spleen and thymus were determined using luminex and flow cytometry, respectively. GI nematode infection increased Th2 cytokines (IL-4, IL-5, IL-13), IL-2, IL-10, and eotaxin in serum of dams whereas PD reduced IL-4 and IL-13. The lower IL-13 in PD dams was associated with increased fecal egg output and worm burdens. Maternal PD increased vascular endothelial growth factor in pup milk and eotaxin in pup serum. Maternal infection increased eotaxin in pup serum. Evidence of impaired neonatal immune development included reduced lymphoid organ mass in pups associated with both maternal infection and PD and increased percentage of T cells and T:B cell ratio in the spleen associated with maternal PD. Findings suggest that increases in specific proinflammatory cytokines as a result of the combination of infection and dietary PD in dams can impair splenic immune development in offspring.

  1. Effects of single or concurrent infections with Eimeria alabamensis and gastrointestinal nematodes on the performance of calves on pasture.

    PubMed

    Larsson, A; Dimander, S-O; Uggla, A; Waller, P; Höglund, J

    2006-06-01

    Twenty-four calves unexposed to pasture were allocated to four groups and inoculated with either two doses of 5 million Eimeria alabamensis oocysts at turn-out (E), 90,000 L3 of Ostertagia ostertagi and Cooperia oncophora divided on six occasions (N) or both oocysts and larvae as above (E + N). A control group was left uninoculated (C). For 10 weeks, the groups grazed in separate uniform paddocks not previously grazed by cattle. By day 5, most calves in groups E and E + N developed clinical coccidiosis that resulted in reduced weight gain compared to C and N. Mean trichostrongylid faecal egg counts in groups N and E + N never exceeded 300 eggs per gram of faeces, and average serum pepsinogen levels were less than 3.8 U tyrosine. This experiment demonstrates the potential impact of E. alabamensis on the performance of previously unexposed calves, whereas no aggravated effects were observed due to concurrent infections with gastrointestinal nematodes.

  2. Long-term effects of drenches with condensed tannins from Acacia mearnsii on goats naturally infected with gastrointestinal nematodes.

    PubMed

    Costa-Júnior, Livio M; Costa, Jailson S; Lôbo, Ítala C P D; Soares, Alexandra M S; Abdala, Adibe L; Chaves, Daniel P; Batista, Zulmira S; Louvandini, Helder

    2014-10-15

    In this study, the long-term effects of exposure to a drench containing condensed tannins (CTs) from Acacia mearnsii on gastrointestinal nematodes in goats were investigated. Male cross-bred Anglo-Nubian goat kids between 3 and 5 months of age were dewormed at the beginning of the experiment. The goat kids were divided into one group that received weekly 24 g oral doses of A. mearnsii bark extract dissolved in water containing 16.7% CTs (GCT group, n = 8) and a second group that did not receive CTs (GC group, n = 8). All of the animals were kept in an Andropogon gayanus pasture and grazed with a herd of 100 naturally infected adult goats. Each animal was supplemented daily with 200 g of a concentrated mixture containing 18% crude protein. Fecal egg counts (FECs) were performed weekly for 192 days, and weight measurements and blood collections were done at two-week intervals in this period. The packed cell volume of the blood was calculated, and the plasma was used to determine the total protein, albumin, and glucose concentrations. After 192 days, the animals were slaughtered and the carcasses evaluated, with nematodes harvested for identification and counting. The FECs of the animals treated with CTs from A. mearnsii (GCT group) remained lower than the FECs of the control group animals for the majority of the first half of the experimental period. An observed increase in the FECs for both groups coincided with increased rainfall in the region where the experiment was conducted. The worm burden, scrotal circumference, carcass weight, leg circumference, carcass size and blood analysis were not significantly different between the groups. The packed cell volume (PCV) was constant in all of the animals throughout the experiment. In conclusion, repeated and prolonged treatment of goats with CTs from A. mearnsii helped to maintain low FECs in a period of low challenge but did not reduce nematode infections in the goats.

  3. [Effect of a single injection of doramectin on gastrointestinal nematode infections of sheep grazing on alpine pastures].

    PubMed

    Hertzberg, H; Meyer, A; Kohler, L; Falconi, F; Ochs, H

    2001-06-01

    The persistent effect of doramectin injectable against gastrointestinal nematodes was investigated in a controlled field study with 70 sheep kept on alpine pastures in Switzerland. After grazing on home pastures for four weeks 50 lambs and 20 ewes were allocated to two equal groups according to age and body weight. At turnout to alpine pasture in June doramectin (0.3 mg/kg) was administered by intramuscular injection to 25 lambs and 10 ewes (Group D), whereas control sheep (Group K) remained untreated. Animals of both groups were kept on separate pastures (altitude: 1100 m) and were rotated between three paddocks during a total grazing period of 13 weeks. After doramectin treatment faecal examinations of Group D sheep showed a marked reduction of the trichostrongyle egg output which remained close to zero for eight weeks. During this period serum pepsinogen levels did not indicate the presence of a substantial immature worm burden in the abomasal mucosa. In the last five weeks of the alpine grazing period the trichostrongyle egg counts increased markedly in the lambs of Group D. Lambs of the control group developed moderate-to-high Haemonchus-infections, and eight animals of this group had to be treated with anthelmintics. Lambs of Group D had gained significantly (P < 0.05) more weight eight weeks after turnout whereas the mean bodyweight stagnated during the last five weeks of the grazing period. The results indicate, that the single administration of 0.3 mg/kg doramectin to lambs and ewes provided good protection against severe infections with gastrointestinal nematodes for a period of approximately eight weeks.

  4. Analysis of risk factors for infections with gastrointestinal nematodes, Eimeria spp. and lungworms in German organic sheep farms.

    PubMed

    Kern, Gesche; Traulsen, Imke; Kemper, Nicole; Krieter, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the risk factors influencing the occurrence of parasitic infections in organic sheep farms in Germany. Therefore, 635 pooled faecal samples from sheep kept on 20 organic farms were collected and examined by standard parasitological analyses for gastrointestinal nematodes (GINs), Eimeria species (spp.) and liver flukes (Fasciola hepatica). Additionally, 128 double-pooled samples were analysed for lungworm larvae. In 60.5% of all samples, parasite stadiums were detected, and 38.3% of the double-pooled samples were lungworm-positive. Production period, months and year of sampling had significant effects on infections with GINs (p < 0.05). The prevalence of GIN infection was lowest in 'dairy'(40.0%) when compared with'meat'sheep (65.4%). The odds of being infected with Eimeria spp. was influenced by the month (p < 0.05). The number of ewes on a farm, the primary purpose or the grazing area showed no significant effects. Infections with lungworms occurred in tendency more often 'after' lambing period.

  5. Improving resilience against natural gastrointestinal nematode infections in browsing kids during the dry season in tropical Mexico.

    PubMed

    Torres-Acosta, J F J; Jacobs, D E; Aguilar-Caballero, A J; Sandoval-Castro, C; Cob-Galera, L; May-Martínez, M

    2006-01-30

    The objective was to determine the effect of supplementary feeding on the resilience and resistance of Criollo kids against natural gastrointestinal nematode (GIN) infections, when browsing native vegetation during the dry season in tropical Mexico. Thirty-three two-month-old Criollo kids, raised nematode free, were included at weaning in a 20-week trial. The kids were placed into four groups. Two groups of eight kids were offered 100g/day soybean and sorghum meal (26%:74% respectively fresh basis) (treated/supplemented (T-S) and infected/supplemented (I-S)). Two groups remained with no supplement for the duration of the trial (infected/non-supplemented (I-NS) (n=9) and treated/non-supplemented (T-NS) (n=8)). Kids in groups T-S and T-NS were drenched with 0.2mg of moxidectin/kg body weight orally (Cydectin, Fort Dodge) every 28 days. Groups I-S and I-NS were naturally infected with GIN. The animals browsed native vegetation for an average of 7h/day together with a herd of 120 naturally infected adult goats. Cumulative live weight gain (CLWG), packed cell volume (PCV), haemoglobin (Hb), total plasma protein and plasma albumin were recorded every 14 days as measurements of resilience. Resistance parameters (faecal egg counts (FEC) and peripheral eosinophil counts (PEC)) were also measured. Bulk faecal cultures were made for each group every 28 days. Every month a new pair of initially worm-free tracer kids assessed the infectivity of the vegetation browsed by the animals. Tracer kids and faecal cultures showed that kids faced low mixed infections (Haemonchus contortus, Trichostrongylus colubriformis and Oesophagostomum columbianum). Under conditions of scarce vegetation, such as those in the present study, supplemented groups (I-S and T-S) had higher growth rates compared to the non-supplemented groups independently of the control of GIN infection with anthelmintic (AH) treatment (P<0.001). Supplementary feeding did not affect FEC or PEC. In the absence of

  6. Anthelmintic efficacy of an oral formulation of Aurixazol against gastrointestinal nematodes of naturally and experimentally infected sheep.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Claudio Alessandro M; Lopes, Welber Daniel Zanetti; Buzzulini, Carolina; Cruz, Breno Cayeiro; Felippelli, Gustavo; de Lima, Roberto Cesar Araújo; dos Santos, Thais Rabelo; Santana, Luis Fernando; de Mendonça, Rafael Paranhos; Soares, Vando Edésio; Henrique, Carlos Henrique; da Costa, Alvimar José

    2013-12-06

    As a result of the need to develop new active principles for the control of endoparasites in ruminants, the present in vivo study evaluated a formulation containing 24% Aurixazol (48 mg/kg), a parasiticide molecule based on disophenolate of levamisole. Two experiments were conducted: one evaluating the anthelmintic efficacy of 24% Aurixazol (48 mg/kg) against gastrointestinal nematodes in naturally infected sheep, compared to an association of ivermectin (0.2mg/kg)+albendazole (5.0mg/kg)+levamisole (7.5mg/kg) (IAL), and a second one which evaluated the persistent efficacy of the same formulation against immature stages (L4) and adults of Haemonchus contortus in experimentally infected animals. In experiment I, against H. contortus, the formulation of Aurixazol and the IAL association reached efficacies (arithmetic means) of 99.32% and 96.11%, respectively. For Trichostrongylus colubriformis, the efficacy values were 88.92% and 98.08% for Aurixazol and the IAL association, respectively. Both formulations were totally effective against Oesophagostomum columbianum (100%). The results of the statistical analysis demonstrated that the mean parasitic burden of treated animals was significantly different (P ≤ 0.05) compared to the average number of helminths diagnosed in animals from the control group for H. contortus, T. colubriformis and O. columbianum. Comparing only the treated groups, it was possible to verify that the average number of H. contortus recovered from animals treated with Aurixazol was different (P ≤ 0.05) when compared to the mean amount recovered from sheep treated with the IAL association. When evaluating the prevention of H. contortus infection in experiment II, Aurixazol did not present preventive efficacy. Up until 21 days after treatment the groups treated with Aurixazol contained less adults and L4 of H. contortus (P ≤ 0.05) when compared to the non-medicated control group. However, future studies will be necessary to assess the

  7. Selection of tannins by sheep in response to gastrointestinal nematode infection.

    PubMed

    Villalba, J J; Provenza, F D; Hall, J O; Lisonbee, L D

    2010-06-01

    Herbivores learn to select compounds that attenuate the aversive effects of plant secondary metabolites (PSM), but can they increase intake of PSM they typically avoid when these PSM provide medicinal effects? We hypothesized that herbivores learn to increase intake of PSM-containing feeds when experiencing a gastrointestinal parasitic infection. Ten lambs with natural gastrointestinal parasitic burdens (PB) and 10 nonparasitized lambs (NP) were offered a choice of alfalfa (Medicago sativa) and alfalfa mixed with 10% quebracho tannin (Schinopsis quebracho-colorado; alfalfa:tannins) before and after they were conditioned with the postingestive effects of tannins. Preference for alfalfa:tannins did not differ between groups before experiencing the postingestive effects of tannins (P = 0.85) or when parasite loads were terminated due to the administration of ivermectin (P = 0.18). In contrast, when tested with a parasite burden, lambs in PB consumed more alfalfa:tannins (P = 0.08), showed greater preference for alfalfa:tannins (P = 0.07), and consumed less alfalfa than lambs in NP (P = 0.06). Ingestion of tannins by lambs in PB was followed by reduced fecal egg counts (FEC; P = 0.006), and there was a direct proportional relationship between preference for alfalfa:tannins and FEC (P = 0.07). In summary, parasitized lambs increased their intake of alfalfa:tannins when they experienced a parasite burden, which suggests they self-medicated with tannins against parasites. Self-selection of PSM has implications for the quest for alternatives to chemoprophylaxis in the treatment and well-being of parasitized wild and domestic animals grazing in pasturelands and in confinement.

  8. Risk factors of gastrointestinal nematode parasite infections in small ruminants kept in smallholder mixed farms in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Odoi, Agricola; Gathuma, Joseph M; Gachuiri, Charles K; Omore, Amos

    2007-04-20

    Helminth infections in small ruminants are serious problems in the developing world, particularly where nutrition and sanitation are poor. This study investigated the burden and risk factors of gastrointestinal nematode parasite infections in sheep and goats kept in smallholder mixed farms in the Kenyan Central Highlands. Three hundred and seven small ruminants were sampled from 66 smallholder mixed farms in agro-ecological zones 1 (humid) and 3 (semi-humid) in the Kenyan Central highlands. The farms were visited once a month for eight months during which a health and production survey questionnaire was administered. Fecal samples were collected at each visit from each animal. Fecal egg counts (FEC) were performed using the modified McMaster technique. Associations between potential risk factors and FEC were assessed using 3-level Poisson models fit in SAS using GLIMMIX macro. Correlations among repeated observations were adjusted for using three different correlation structures. A rise in FEC was observed two months after the onset of rains. Farmer education, age category, de-worming during the preceding month and grazing system were significant predictors of FEC. Additionally, there were significant interactions between grazing system and both de-worming and age category implying that the effect of grazing system is dependent on both de-worming status and age category; and that the effect of de-worming depends on the grazing system. The most important predictors of FEC in the study area were grazing system, de-worming status and education of the farmers. Since several factors were important predictors of FEC, controlling gastrointestinal helminths of small ruminants in these resource-poor smallholder mixed farms requires a sustainable integrated helminth control strategy that includes adoption of zero-grazing and more farmer education probably through extension services. Achieving improved helminth controls in these resource-poor farming systems offers an

  9. Neuroparasitic infections: nematodes.

    PubMed

    Walker, M D; Zunt, J R

    2005-09-01

    Globalization has produced an increase in the number of people at risk for contracting parasitic infection. Central nervous system infection by nematodal parasites can be devastating. Early recognition and treatment of infection can significantly decrease morbidity of the parasitic infection, as well as the risk of secondary superinfection. The clinical presentation, diagnosis, and treatment for five of the more common nematodal infections of the nervous system--Angiostrongylus spp., Baylisacaris procyonis, Gnathostoma spinigerum, Strongyloides stercoralis, and Toxocara spp.--is reviewed.

  10. The efficacy of an ivermectin/closantel injection against experimentally induced infections and field infections with gastrointestinal nematodes and liver fluke in cattle.

    PubMed

    Borgsteede, Fred H M; Taylor, Stuart M; Gaasenbeek, Cor P H; Couper, Alistair; Cromie, Lillian

    2008-08-17

    Three studies were performed to test the efficacy of an ivermectin/closantel injection (200 microg/kg(-1) ivermectin and 5 mg/kg(-1) closantel) in cattle. Two were experimentally induced infections of Ostertagia ostertagi, Cooperia oncophora and Fasciola hepatica in calves, and the third had natural field infections in cattle with several species of gastrointestinal nematodes and F. hepatica. In the two studies with artificial infections, four groups of 8 calves were used. All calves were infected with metacercariae on Day 0. Infection with the nematodes took place on Day 33 in groups 1 and 2 and on Day 54 in groups 3 and 4. Treatment was given to calves of group 1 on Day 63 and to calves of group 3 on Day 84. Calves of groups 2 and 4 served as untreated control groups. Calves of groups 1 and 2 were sacrificed on Day 84, calves of groups 3 and 4 on Day 105. The field study was carried out on a commercial farm in the Netherlands. Six groups of cattle were used. Groups A and B consisted of 10 parasite free calves, introduced to the farm and grazed for four weeks on pastures naturally infected with gastrointestinal nematode larvae and liver fluke metacercariae. Group C were the farmers own calves (15), group D heifers (10), group E dry cows (6) and group F milking cows (20). Treatment was given to animals of group A, C, D and E 10 weeks after housing of group A and B. Animals of groups B and F served as untreated controls. Calves of groups A and B were sacrificed 14 days after treatment. The efficacy of the treatment was calculated on basis of the post-mortem fluke and nematode worm counts in the first two studies and on a combination of post-mortem fluke and nematode worm counts and faecal egg output in the field study. In the two experimental studies, the efficacy of the treatment against F. hepatica was 99.2% and 94.5% for 9-week-old flukes and 98.4% and 99.5% for 12-week-old flukes. For O. ostertagi in both studies efficacy was 100% and against C. oncophora in

  11. Effect of an Orange Oil Emulsion on Gastrointestinal Nematodes in Naturally Infected Sheep

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Increasing levels of anthelmintic resistance in ovine gastrointestinal strongylids, especially Haemonchus contortus, have led many investigators worldwide to examine potential anthelmintic effects of naturally occurring plant products. In previous work, we have shown that 1200 mg/kg of an orange oi...

  12. Comparing the phenotypic susceptibility of Pelibuey and Katahdin female lambs against natural gastrointestinal nematode infections under hot humid tropical conditions.

    PubMed

    Palomo-Couoh, J G; Aguilar-Caballero, A J; Torres-Acosta, J F J; González-Garduño, R

    2017-06-01

    This study compared the phenotypic susceptibility of Pelibuey and Katahdin female lambs against gastrointestinal nematodes (GINs) under grazing conditions in the hot humid tropics of Mexico. The study was performed during the rainy season (August to October, 2014). It included 27 Pelibuey and 12 Katahdin female lambs from 6 months of age and live weight of 21.0 ± 3.7 and 23.3 ± 3.6 kg, respectively. Lambs were reared free of GIN infection before the study. The study lasted 91 days. Animals were weighed and sampled (blood and feces) on days 0 and 28 and every 7 days onwards. Fecal samples were obtained to determine fecal eggs of GIN per gram (EPG), and blood samples were used to determine the packed cell volume (PCV), the peripheral eosinophil counts (PECs), and optical densities (ODs) for IgA. The EPG counts were significantly lower for Pelibuey lambs compared to Katahdin throughout the study (P < 0.001). Similarly, Pelibuey lambs had higher mean PCV (P < 0.01) and PEC (P < 0.05) than Katahdin lambs during the study. The total weight gain and OD for IgA were similar between breeds (P > 0.05). Negative associations (P < 0.05) between EPG and PCV or PEC were moderate to strong for the lambs of both breeds. No association was found between EPG and IgA. In conclusion, Pelibuey lambs showed phenotypic evidence of higher resistance to natural GIN infections compared to Katahdin lambs sharing the same grazing conditions in the hot humid tropics. The most accurate phenotypic markers to identify a difference in susceptibility were EPG and PEC.

  13. The effects of feeding sericea lespedeza hay on growth rate of goats naturally infected with gastrointestinal nematodes.

    PubMed

    Moore, D A; Terrill, T H; Kouakou, B; Shaik, S A; Mosjidis, J A; Miller, J E; Vanguru, M; Kannan, G; Burke, J M

    2008-09-01

    Goat production is increasing in the United States due to high ethnic demand, but infection with gastrointestinal nematode (GIN) parasites is a major constraint to the industry. Increasing GIN resistance to chemical anthelmintics worldwide has led to the development of alternative control strategies, including use of forages containing condensed tannins (CT). An experiment was designed using infected and dewormed male kids (Kiko x Spanish, 6 mo old, 18.9 +/- 3.25 kg) fed diets containing 25% concentrate and either 75% sericea lespedeza [SL; Lespedeza cuneata (Dum-Cours.) G. Don], a high CT forage (87 to 181 g of CT/kg), or 75% bermudagrass [BG; Cynodon dactylon (L.) Pers.] hay (n = 10/treatment). The kids were weighed every 14 d, and fecal and blood samples were taken weekly for fecal egg counts and packed cell volume determination, respectively. Fecal cultures were processed every 14 d to determine CT effect on larval development. At slaughter, adult GIN were collected from the abomasum and small intestines for counting and speciation. Blood samples were also analyzed for plasma urea-N, and ruminal VFA and pH were determined. The infected SL-fed kids had consistently lower (P < 0.05) fecal egg counts than the infected BG goats throughout the trial and greater (P < 0.05) packed cell volume beginning by d 77. Average daily gain was greater (P < 0.001) in kids fed SL- than BG-based diets, regardless of infection status (104.3 +/- 5.0 and 75.5 +/- 4.8 g/d, respectively). Total VFA and acetate concentrations were greater (P < 0.001) in the BG- than in SL-fed goats, whereas propionate levels were unaffected by diet. Acetate:propionate ratio (P = 0.01) and plasma urea-N (P = 0.03) levels were greater in BG-fed goats, whereas rumen pH was greater (P < 0.001) in the SL-fed goats. Feeding SL hay can reduce GIN infection levels and increase performance of goats compared with BG hay.

  14. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in candidate genes associated with gastrointestinal nematode infection in goats.

    PubMed

    Bressani, F A; Tizioto, P C; Giglioti, R; Meirelles, S L C; Coutinho, R; Benvenuti, C L; Malagó-Jr, W; Mudadu, M A; Vieira, L S; Zaros, L G; Carrilho, E; Regitano, L C A

    2014-10-20

    Cytokines are small cell-signaling proteins that play an important role in the immune system, participating in intracellular communication. Four candidate genes of the cytokine family (IL2, IL4, IL13, and IFNG) were selected to identify Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) that might be associated with resistance to gastrointestinal endoparasites in goats. A population of 229 goats, F2 offspring from an F1 intercross was produced by crossing pure Saanen goats, considered as susceptible to gastrointestinal endoparasites, with pure Anglo-Nubian goats, considered resistant. Blood was collected for DNA extraction and fecal samples were also collected for parasite egg count. Polymorphisms were prospected by sequencing animals with extreme phenotype for fecal egg count (FEC) distribution. The association between SNPs and phenotype was determined by using the Fisher exact test with correction for multiple tests. Three of the 10 SNPs were identified as significant (P ≤ 0.03). They were found in intron 1 of IL2 (ENSBTA00000020883), intron 3 of IL13 (ENSBTA00000015953) and exon 3 of IFNG (ENSBTA00000012529), suggesting an association between them and gastrointestinal endoparasite resistance. Further studies will help describe the effects of these markers accurately before implementing them in marker assisted selection. This study is the pioneer in describing such associations in goats.

  15. Risk factors of gastrointestinal nematode parasite infections in small ruminants kept in smallholder mixed farms in Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Odoi, Agricola; Gathuma, Joseph M; Gachuiri, Charles K; Omore, Amos

    2007-01-01

    Background Helminth infections in small ruminants are serious problems in the developing world, particularly where nutrition and sanitation are poor. This study investigated the burden and risk factors of gastrointestinal nematode parasite infections in sheep and goats kept in smallholder mixed farms in the Kenyan Central Highlands. Three hundred and seven small ruminants were sampled from 66 smallholder mixed farms in agro-ecological zones 1 (humid) and 3 (semi-humid) in the Kenyan Central highlands. The farms were visited once a month for eight months during which a health and production survey questionnaire was administered. Fecal samples were collected at each visit from each animal. Fecal egg counts (FEC) were performed using the modified McMaster technique. Associations between potential risk factors and FEC were assessed using 3-level Poisson models fit in SAS using GLIMMIX macro. Correlations among repeated observations were adjusted for using three different correlation structures. Results A rise in FEC was observed two months after the onset of rains. Farmer education, age category, de-worming during the preceding month and grazing system were significant predictors of FEC. Additionally, there were significant interactions between grazing system and both de-worming and age category implying that the effect of grazing system is dependent on both de-worming status and age category; and that the effect of de-worming depends on the grazing system. The most important predictors of FEC in the study area were grazing system, de-worming status and education of the farmers. Conclusion Since several factors were important predictors of FEC, controlling gastrointestinal helminths of small ruminants in these resource-poor smallholder mixed farms requires a sustainable integrated helminth control strategy that includes adoption of zero-grazing and more farmer education probably through extension services. Achieving improved helminth controls in these resource

  16. Epidemiology of gastrointestinal nematode parasitism in Suffolk and Gulf Coast Native sheep with special emphasis on relative susceptibility to Haemonchus contortus infection.

    PubMed

    Miller, J E; Bahirathan, M; Lemarie, S L; Hembry, F G; Kearney, M T; Barras, S R

    1998-01-15

    An eight-year study was conducted to define the epidemiology of gastrointestinal nematode infection in Suffolk and Gulf Coast Native (Native) breeds of sheep, and to determine if the Native sheep is more resistant to infection. For the initial three years, each breed grazed separate pastures where anthelmintic treatments were administered to individual animals on a salvage basis. For the last five years, both breeds grazed concurrently; anthelmintic treatments were administered to individual animals on a salvage basis for the first three years, and to all animals, when treatment criteria were met, for the last two years. The fecal egg count (FEC) and blood packed cell volume (PCV) were monitored, and tracer lamb nematode burdens were determined. Overall, FEC for both breeds increased in the spring (periparturient rise) for most years and in the summer for all years. Under separate grazing conditions, Native ewes and lambs had consistently lower infection levels than Suffolk ewes and lambs. During the haemonchosis season (June-September) each year, Suffolk ewe and lamb PCV decreased, and Native ewe and lamb PCV remained relatively stable. The salvage treatment protocol resulted in 27 treatments for Suffolk and one for Native ewes; similarly for lambs, 13 for Suffolk and zero for Native. Tracer lambs grazed with their respective breed, and the FEC and mean total nematode burden corresponded with the pattern of infection for their respective breed. The predominant nematodes found in Suffolk and Native tracer lambs were Haemonchus contortus and Trichostrongylus spp., respectively. Under concurrent grazing conditions, the same seasonal repeatable pattern of infection was present and was exhibited by both breeds, with the Native ewes and lambs being consistently and significantly (p < or = 0.05) lower for FEC and higher for PCV. The salvage treatment protocol resulted in 57 and zero treatments for Suffolk and Native ewes, respectively; for lambs, 46 and 11. Tracer lamb

  17. Effect of herd management on the contamination of night holding areas (correos) and infections with gastrointestinal nematodes of N'Dama cattle in The Gambia.

    PubMed

    Kaufmann, J; Komma, A; Pfister, K

    1995-05-01

    The densities of infective nematode larvae (L3/m2) in the night holding places (locally called "correos") of 2 traditionally kept N'Dama herds were estimated at weekly intervals throughout an entire rainy season. Herd 1 moved correos every 3 weeks whereas herd 2 remained in the same area for most of the rainy season. Removal to a new correo was invariably accompanied by a drastic drop of L3/m2. Conversely, L3/m2 increased rapidly up to values of more than 1,000 when the herds used the same night holding place for more than 3 weeks. Calves kept in herds with frequent changes of the correo showed significantly lower nematode egg counts and higher growth rates during the rainy season, combined with a reduced weight loss during the following dry season. The results of this study indicate that a regular frequent change of the correo is an effective method of reducing nematode infection risk and increasing calf growth and that this might be a sustainable part of an integrated strategic programme to control gastrointestinal nematode infections wherever correos are used.

  18. Gastrointestinal nematode infections of first-grazing season calves in Western Europe: associations between parasitological, physiological and physical factors.

    PubMed

    Shaw, D J; Vercruysse, J; Claerebout, E; Dorny, P

    1998-02-28

    Analysis of 85 studies on gastrointestinal nematode infections in first-grazing season (FGS) calves is presented. The studies cover a 26-year period and were carried out in 13 countries in Western Europe. Both control and chemoprophylactic-treated (early in the season) FGS calf groups were included. In 53 of the 85 studies, clinical outbreaks of parasitic gastroenteritis (PGE) were observed during the FGS in the control groups. The mean initial age (and weight) of the control calf group was significantly associated with PGE outbreaks: 82% of control calf groups < or = 6 months of age had outbreaks of PGE, compared to only 33% of control calf groups > 6 months of age. In 92% of trials where the geometric mean faecal egg count (MFEC) was > or = 200 EPG on Day 56, PGE outbreaks were observed, but where it was < 200 EPG, only 29% had PGE. The use of these two factors in assessing the likelihood of PGE outbreaks in untreated calf groups in the future FGS is therefore, proposed. No chemoprophylactic-treated groups had PGE, but there was a highly significant negative relationship between maximum faecal egg counts in the chemoprophylactic-treated calves and the proportion of the trial covered by the different chemoprophylactic systems. Higher stocking densities were significantly associated with higher pasture contamination in both control and chemoprophylactic-treated calves. A highly significant positive relationship between the weight gained in the chemoprophylactic-treated groups and the estimated duration of the various chemoprophylactic systems was found, but there were large variations in weight gains (60-160 kg) between groups even with the same chemoprophylactic. Despite this and other highly significant associations, it was not possible to indicate what weight gains were obtained by the end of the FGS, from factors measured early in the FGS.

  19. Efficacy of a single high oxfendazole dose against gastrointestinal nematodes in naturally infected pigs.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Luis; Saumell, Carlos; Fusé, Luis; Moreno, Laura; Ceballos, Laura; Domingue, Gilbert; Donadeu, Meritxell; Dungu, Baptiste; Lanusse, Carlos

    2013-05-01

    The goal of the current experiment was to assess the clinical efficacy of oxfendazole (OFZ) administered as a single oral dose (30 mg/kg) to pigs naturally parasitized with Ascaris suum, Oesophagostomum spp., Metastrongylus spp. and Trichuris suis. Thirty-six local ecotype piglets were divided into three independent experiments, named I, II and III (n=12 each), respectively. Each experiment involved two different groups (n=6): Untreated Control and OFZ treated. Animals were naturally parasitized with A. suum (Experiments I, II and III), Oesophagostomum spp. (Experiments I and II), T. suis (Experiments II and III) and Metastrongylus spp. (Experiment I). Pigs in the treated group received OFZ (Synanthic(®), Merial Ltd., 9.06% suspension) orally at 30 mg/kg dose. At five (5) days post-treatment, animals were sacrificed and the clinical efficacy of the OFZ treatment was established following the currently available WAAVP guidelines for a controlled efficacy test. None of the animals involved in this experiment showed any adverse events during the study. OFZ treatment given as a single 30 mg/kg oral dose showed a 100% efficacy against all the nematode parasites present in the three experiments. In conclusion, under the current experimental conditions, OFZ orally administered to naturally parasitized piglets at a single dose of 30 mg/kg was safe and highly efficacious (100%) against adult stages of A. suum, Oesophagostomum spp., T. suis and Metastrongylus spp.

  20. Excretory/secretory products from the gastrointestinal nematode Trichuris muris.

    PubMed

    Tritten, Lucienne; Tam, Mifong; Vargas, Mireille; Jardim, Armando; Stevenson, Mary M; Keiser, Jennifer; Geary, Timothy G

    2017-07-01

    To better control gastrointestinal nematode infections in humans and animals, it is important to understand the strategies used by these parasites to modulate the host immune system. In this regard, molecules released by parasites have been attributed crucially important roles in host-parasite negotiations. We characterized the excretory/secretory (E/S) microRNA (miRNA) and protein profiles from the mouse gastrointestinal nematode parasite Trichuris muris. Released miRNAs were subjected to miRNA sequencing and E/S proteins were analysed by mass spectrometry. Fourteen miRNAs were identified in T. muris exosome-like vesicles, as well as 73 proteins of nematode origin, 11 of which were unique to this study. Comparison with published nematode protein secretomes revealed high conservation at the functional level. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. IL-13 working through IL-13Ra1 mediates critical functional responses to nematode infection in the gastrointestinal tract

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Nematode infection up-regulates IL-4 and IL-13 and induces STAT6-dependent changes in epithelial function and smooth muscle contractility that promote worm clearance. IL-4 and IL-13 share the same type II IL-4R that contains the IL-13R'1 and the IL-4R' chain linked to STAT6. The role of IL-13 workin...

  2. Dietary copper sulfate for control of gastrointestinal nematodes in goats

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Prevalence of anthelmintic resistance in goats has necessitated studies for alternative means of gastrointestinal nematode (GIN) control. The objective was to determine the effectiveness of dietary copper sulfate for control of GIN in meat goats. Naturally infected buck kids received 0 (LC), 78 (M...

  3. Effects of stocking rates on gastrointestinal nematode infection levels in a goat/cattle rotational stocking system.

    PubMed

    Mahieu, Maurice

    2013-11-15

    Gastrointestinal nematodes (GIN) are increasingly resistant to anthelmintic drugs worldwide, so integrated control methods are more and more needed for the sustainability of small ruminant farming. Such methods rely on knowledge in epidemiology, physiology, and genetics. Ecological studies have highlighted the effect of host density on parasite populations, and in the humid tropics, rotational grazing systems were designed according to the survival of GIN free-living stages. This study aimed to assess the effects of mixed stocking and host stocking rate on host GIN infection level. Four groups of 15-17 Creole male kids were raised on irrigated pasture from weaning (about 3 months) until the age of 7 months, at four partial stocking rates (pSR): 100% (control), 75% (G75), 50% (G50), and 25% (G25) of the total stocking rate of the pasture. The last three groups were associated with weaned Creole heifers to obtain the same overall stocking rate as the control. Animals grazed in a 'leader' goat and 'follower' cattle design: the G25, G50, and G75 paddocks were split into six plots; each plot was grazed by goats for 1 week and by heifers the following week. The pasture then rested for 4 weeks before the animals were returned for a new grazing sequence. Five control plots were grazed rotationally for 1 week, and rested for 4 weeks. This design was repeated three times a year for a total of 10 repetitions. Average faecal egg counts (FEC) decreased according to a power function of the pSR: FEC=1829pSR(3.7). The observed death rate decreased significantly with the pSR (27.6%, 16.4%, 11.9%, and 12.2%). The kids grew faster in G25 (51 g d(-1)) than in G50 (43 g d(-1)) and G75 or control (32 g d(-1), p<0.05). Heifers were not significantly infected with GIN and grew normally (about 0.48 kg d(-1)). Reducing the pSR by associating a non-host species in a rotational stocking system may be a very promising component of integrated GIN control, at least for the humid tropics.

  4. Resistance and resilience of traditionally managed West African Dwarf goats from the savanna zone of northern Nigeria to naturally acquired trypanosome and gastrointestinal nematode infections.

    PubMed

    Behnke, J M; Chiejina, S N; Musongong, G A; Nnadi, P A; Ngongeh, L A; Abonyi, F O; Fakae, B B

    2011-03-01

    A survey was conducted of gastrointestinal nematode infections and trypanosomosis in Nigerian West African Dwarf (WAD) goats from the savanna region of the country. Animals were screened at two markets, Gboko and Akpagher, from the beginning of April until the end of September, coinciding with the end of the dry season and the first 5 months of the wet season. Of 1054 goats that were examined, 80.5% carried gastrointestinal (GI) nematodes belonging to the genera Haemonchus (61.0%), Oesophagostomum (21.0%) and Trichostrongylus (17.9%). Faecal egg counts (FEC) increased very slowly but significantly from April to maximum levels in September, and varied marginally between the two market sources. The majority of goats (68.8 and 70.1% at the two markets) had low FEC not exceeding 50 eggs/g (epg). FEC did not differ significantly between the sexes or between age classes. Packed cell volume (PCV) also declined significantly with month of the study, but was affected by host sex (a significant month x sex interaction) being generally higher in male animals throughout the period. There was a highly significant negative correlation between log₁₀(FEC+1) and PCV, when all other factors had been taken into account. Body condition scores (BCS) also declined with month of the study, but there was a marked difference between the two sexes, with male animals generally showing a greater stability of BCS across the months compared with females. Trypanosome infections were found in only 4% of the goats and only during the rainy season. Most infections (92.86%) were caused by Trypanosoma brucei alone although T. vivax and T. congolense were occasionally detected. Overall, the majority of goats sampled each month maintained generally good body condition (BCS 3.0-5.0), normal or slightly reduced PCV, even when concurrently infected with trypanosomes and GI nematodes. However, four concurrently infected goats showed signs of overt anaemia during periods of peak infection, during the

  5. Neuroparasitic Infections: Nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Walker, M.D.; Zunt, J.R.

    2009-01-01

    Globalization has produced an increase in the number of people at risk for contracting parasitic infection. Central nervous system infection by nematodal parasites can be devastating. Early recognition and treatment of infection can significantly decrease morbidity of the parasitic infection, as well as the risk of secondary superinfection. The clinical presentation, diagnosis, and treatment for five of the more common nematodal infections of the nervous system—Angiostrongylus spp., Baylisacaris procyonis, Gnathostoma spinigerum, Strongyloides stercoralis, and Toxocara spp.—is reviewed. Objectives On completion of this article, the reader should be able to summarize the clinical presentation, diagnosis, and treatment of the common nematodal infections of the nervous system. Accreditation The Indiana University School of Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians. Credit The Indiana University School of Medicine designates this educational activity for a maximum of 1 Category 1 credit toward the AMA Physicians Recognition Award. Each physician should claim only those credits that he/she actually spent in the educational activity. Disclosure Statements of disclosure have been obtained regarding the authors’ relevant financial relationships. The authors have nothing to disclose. PMID:16170738

  6. The effect of rotational grazing for periods of one or two weeks on the build-up of lungworm and gastro-intestinal nematode infections in calves.

    PubMed

    Eysker, M; Boersema, J H; Cornelissen, J B; Kooyman, F N; de Leeuw, W A; Saatkamp, H W

    1993-03-01

    An experiment was carried out with three groups of grazing calves and one housed control group to study the effect of rotational grazing for periods of 1 and 2 weeks on the build up of lungworm and gastro-intestinal nematode infections respectively. The experiment demonstrated that rotational grazing for periods of 1 week on six plots prevented the build-up of heavy lungworm infections. A build up of heavier lungworm infections was observed in a group that was rotationally grazed for periods of 2 weeks on three plots and a group which remained on one plot throughout the grazing season; there was no difference between these two groups. In all three situations, there was an adequate development of immunity against D. viviparus, as measured by worm recovery after challenge infection at the end of the experiment in comparison with worm recovery of the similarly challenged control group. Neither rotational grazing scheme protected the calves against gastrointestinal helminthiasis, because tracer calves, which grazed for 4 days only in August or October, acquired infections which would have resulted in severe illness or even death if necropsy had been postponed for a week.

  7. [Effects of aqueous extracts of Mentha piperita L. and Chenopodium ambrosioides L. leaves in infective larvae cultures of gastrointestinal nematodes of goats].

    PubMed

    De Almeida, Maria Angela O; Domingues, Luciana F; Almeida, Gisele N; Simas, Mônica Mattos Dos S; Botura, Mariana B; Da Cruz, Ana Carla Ferreira G; Da Silva, Ana Valéria Araújo F; Menezes, Taise P; Batatinha, Maria José M

    2007-01-01

    Phitotherapy has been frequently utilized in parasitism control for numerous animal species. The aim of this experiment was to evaluate the in vitro effects of aqueous extracts of Mentha piperita L. and Chenopodium ambrosioides L. leaves in larvae cultures of gastrointestinal nematodes of goats. Six different concentrations of M. piperita extracts (196; 150.7; 115.9; 89.1; 68.5 e 52.7 mg/mL) and C. ambrosioides extracts (110,6; 85; 65,3; 50,2; 38,6 e 29,6 mg/mL) were used for the treatment of larvae cultures, in triple assays. Distilled water and doramectin were used in larvae cultures as negative and positive controls, respectively. The results revealed a reduction of more than 95% of the infective larvae when M. piperita extracts were used in the concentrations of 115.9 and 196 mg/mL, and C. ambrosioides extract in the concentration of 110.6 mg/mL, supporting the effect of these extracts in the in vitro treatment of gastrointestinal nematodes of goats.

  8. Abomasal mucosal immune responses of cattle with limited or continuous exposure to pasture-borne gastrointestinal nematode parasite infection.

    PubMed

    Tuo, Wenbin; Li, Lei; Lv, Yingjun; Carrillo, Jose; Brown, Dedra; Davis, William C; Song, Jiuzhou; Zarlenga, Dante; Xiao, Zhengguo

    2016-10-15

    It has been well documented that cattle raised on pasture are slow in weight gain when compared to those fed with grain. Inflammation in the digestive system commonly caused by pasture-transmitted gastrointestinal (GI) nematode parasites that could negatively impact feed conversion has never been compared in cattle raised with no pasture exposure (NPE, uninfected), limited pasture exposure (LPE, exposure until weaning), or continuous pasture exposure (CPE, life time exposure). In the present study, the abomasal mucosal immune responses and inflammation of LPE and CPE cattle were investigated. Our results indicate that CPE cattle displayed inflamed abomasa with enlarged draining lymph nodes, the presence of Ostertagia ostertagi larvae and higher levels of Ostertagia-specific antibodies in circulation. The level of B cells was elevated in the abomasal mucosa in the presence (nodular) or absence (non-nodular) of Ostertagia-specific pathology, where B cells were 4-fold higher in the nodular mucosa. Foxp3(+) CD4T cells were also noticeably elevated in both the abomasal mucosa and blood, but were only slightly higher in non-nodular mucosa than in the nodular mucosa of CPE animals. In contrast, LPE animals presented no enlargement of abomasal draining lymph nodes and exhibited little to no immune cell infiltration in the abomasal mucosa. Further, CPE animals had higher numbers of mucosal mast cells when compared to LPE animals, though mucosal mast cells were high in all animals. Overall, CPE cattle displayed significantly higher levels of inflammation and pathology in their abomasa and may explain in part slowed weight gain relative to LPE animals. The results of this study emphasize the need for GI nematode parasite control in CPE animals and development and application of vaccines which are compatible with the organic cattle production system. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Gastro-intestinal nematode infection in lambs — A model based on climatic indices for forecasting peak pasture larval contamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paton, G.

    1987-06-01

    The parasite Ostertagia circumcincta is the primary cause of parasitic gastro-enteritis in lambs during their first season at grass. The life-cycle of this nematode parasite involves the development and survival of the free-living stages on pasture. Accordingly the pasture is the site of deposition, development and transmission of infection and meteorological factors affecting the pasture will affect the parasites. In this paper two empirical models for forecasting the timing of the “summer wave” of infective larvae on pasture are presented. These models are similar in form to that described by Starr and Thomas (1980) but involve different approaches to assessing the temperature and moisture components of the daily index value. Further, using the prediction model described by Paton, Thomas and Waller (1984) as an investigative tool, certain tentative suggestions are made as to a general fundamental weakness of empirical index methods.

  10. Natural infection of gastrointestinal nematodes in long-nosed armadillos Dasypus novemcinctus Linnaeus, 1758 from Pantanal wetlands, Aquidauana sub-region, Mato Grosso do Sul State, with the description of Hadrostrongylus speciosum n. gen. et n. sp. (Molineidae: Anoplostrongylinae).

    PubMed

    Lux Hoppe, Estevam G; do Nascimento, Adjair Antonio

    2007-03-15

    This study evaluated the gastrointestinal helminth fauna of long-nosed armadillos, Dasypus novemcinctus, from the Pantanal wetlands, Aquidauana sub-region, Aquidauana County, Mato Grosso do Sul State, Brazil. Thirteen species of nematodes, comprising seven genera and four families, were recovered from their gastrointestinal tracts. The following descriptors of infection were determined: prevalence, variation of intensity, average intensity and abundance. Hadrostrongylus speciosum n. gen. et n. sp. is first described here.

  11. Ovicidal and larvicidal activity of extracts of Opuntia ficus-indica against gastrointestinal nematodes of naturally infected sheep.

    PubMed

    Féboli, Aline; Laurentiz, Antonio C; Soares, Suelen C S; Augusto, Jeferson G; Anjos, Luciano A; Magalhães, Lizandra G; Filardi, Rosemeire S; Laurentiz, Rosangela S

    2016-08-15

    This study describes the in vitro anthelmintic activity of extracts from Opuntia ficus indica against gastrointestinal nematodes of sheep. The anthelmintic activity was evaluated by inhibition of egg hatching, larval development and larval migration assays. The residual aqueous fractions from cladodes and fruits showed higher ovicidal activity with EC50 values of 7.2mg/mL and 1.5mg/mL, respectively. The aqueous, hexane, and ethyl acetate fractions from fruits and the aqueous fraction from cladodes inhibited 100% of larval development at the lowest concentration tested (1.56mg/mL). The crude cladode and fruit ethanolic extracts inhibited larval migration and showed EC50 values of 0.74mg/mL and 0.27mg/mL, respectively. Phytochemical screening detected high concentrations of alkaloids, tannins, flavonoids, and saponins in the fruits and cladodes. The results demonstrated that O. ficus exhibits anthelmintic activity in vitro, suggesting that, beyond its nutritional potential, this plant can also be an ally for parasite control in sheep. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Efficacy of extracts of immature mango on ovine gastrointestinal nematodes.

    PubMed

    Nery, Patrícia S; Nogueira, Flávia A; Oliveira, Neide J F; Martins, Ernane R; Duarte, Eduardo R

    2012-12-01

    The principal health problem in small ruminants is helminthiasis and the rapid development of nematode resistance to anthelminthics has limited the success of control in several countries, stimulating the search for alternatives. In this study, extracts of immature fruits of the mango Mangifera indica L. var Ubá were evaluated for inhibition of larval development and fecal egg count reduction in sheep naturally infected with gastrointestinal nematodes. In the phytochemical analyses, tannins and flavonoids were the metabolites identified. Aqueous extracts of immature fruits at 100 mg ml(-1) showed 100 % inhibition of larval development. The LC(90) of the extract was 35.9 mg ml(-1) and the in vivo anthelminthic efficacy at 0.740 g kg(-1) (BW, orally) was 53 %. The identification of larvae showed that 99.8 % were Haemonchus spp. In vitro and in vivo results indicate that this fruit could assist ovine nematode control.

  13. Phenotypic and genotypic characterisation of Haemonchus spp. and other gastrointestinal nematodes resistant to benzimidazole in infected calves from the tropical regions of Campeche State, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Encalada-Mena, Lisandro; Tuyub-Solis, Henry; Ramirez-Vargas, Gabriel; Mendoza-de-Gives, Pedro; Aguilar-Marcelino, Liliana; López-Arellano, Ma Eugenia

    2014-09-15

    The aim of this study was to identify the presence of anthelmintic resistance to benzimidazole (BZ) in gastrointestinal nematodes (GIN) from naturally infected calves in the tropical regions of Campeche State of Mexico. The faecal egg count reduction test (FECRT) was conducted at 10 livestock farms localised in the Carmen, Candelaria, Champotón, Escárcega and Palizada municipalities of Campeche. The assessed anthelmintic was albendazole. The trial period was between August and November 2012. Infected calves were allocated into two groups, control and treated, on each farm. The number of eggs excreted per g of faeces was estimated by the McMaster technique at 0 and 14 days pre- and post- treatment, respectively. Recovered infective larvae (L3) (pre- and post-treatment) were identified using taxonomic keys and a genomic DNA (gDNA) template from a pool of L3 species prior to BZ treatment. Additionally, BZ-resistance polymorphisms in Haemonchus were determined by Allele Specific PCR (AS-PCR) at codon 200 and by end-point PCR at codons 200, 198 and 167 from isotype 1 of the β-tubulin gene. Morphological identification revealed Haemonchus, Cooperia, Trichostrongylus, Ostertagia and Oesophagostumum L3 species before BZ treatment, and Haemonchus and Cooperia L3 species after treatment. Additionally, of the GIN populations, three exhibited BZ resistance, and seven were BZ-susceptible by FECRT. Molecular analysis identified mutations in Haemonchus populations on nine farms at codon 200 (TTC to TAC) by AS-PCR, while no changes were observed at 167 (TTC to TAC) or 198 (GAA to GCA) codons in any population. In conclusion, resistance to BZ was determined in Haemonchus and Cooperia nematodes in infected cattle in five tropical regions of Campeche State.

  14. Supplementation of moist and dehydrated citrus pulp in the diets of sheep artificially and naturally infected with gastrointestinal nematodes on the parasitological parameters and performance.

    PubMed

    Nordi, E C P; Costa, R L D; David, C M G; Parren, G A E; Freitas, A C B; Lameirinha, L P; Katiki, L M; Bueno, M S; Quirino, C R; Gama, P E; Bizzo, H R; Chagas, A C S

    2014-10-15

    The inclusion of industrial byproducts such as citrus pulp in the composition of animal diets has been widely recommended due to sustainability aspects and their high level of carbohydrates. Limonene is found in citrus pulp and has been described elsewhere as a major compound of citrus essential oils with excellent anthelmintic activity. The objective of this study was to evaluate the parasitological parameters of lambs artificially infected (Experiment 1) with Haemonchus contortus and naturally infected (Experiment 2) by gastrointestinal nematodes, fed diets with dehydrated citrus pulp or silage of moist orange pulp. Both experiments had three treatments (C: control, DP: diet+dehydrated citrus pulp, and MP: diet+silage of moist orange pulp). The diets were isoproteic (11% crude protein) and the concentrate was corrected every 14 days according to animal weight. Parasitological parameters were evaluated for both experiments each 14 days (body weight, body condition; fecal egg counts-FEC, egg hatch assay-EHA, coproculture, and packed cell volume-PCV). Analysis of variance (GLM of the SAS software) was performed with repeated measures in time, and the means were compared by the Tukey test. Gas chromatography with mass spectrometry was used to detect constituents of dry or moist citrus pulp. Dehydrated citrus pulp had 0.02% essential oil (major compounds were 85.9% limonene and 7.6% valencene). Moist orange pulp contained 1.5% essential oil (major compounds were 65.5% limonene and 31.2% alpha- and gamma-terpineol). In both experiments, the weight gain among the treatments was similar (p>0.05) demonstrating that both moist and dehydrated orange pulp can be used to replace corn kernels to feed infected lambs. The supplementation with orange pulp did not decrease natural or artificial infections of gastrointestinal nematodes according to the FEC results (p>0.05). However, PCV increased from animals fed dehydrated and moist pulp in natural infection (Experiment 2, p<0

  15. The effect of supplementary feeding on the resilience and resistance of browsing Criollo kids against natural gastrointestinal nematode infections during the rainy season in tropical Mexico.

    PubMed

    Torres-Acosta, J F J; Jacobs, D E; Aguilar-Caballero, A; Sandoval-Castro, C; May-Martinez, M; Cob-Galera, L A

    2004-10-05

    The objective was to determine the effect of supplementary feeding on the resilience and resistance of Criollo kids against natural gastrointestinal nematode (GIN) infections, when browsing native vegetation during the wet season in tropical Mexico. Thirty-four 2-month old Criollo kids, raised nematode free, were included at weaning in a 22-week trial. The kids were placed into four groups. Two groups of 8 kids were offered 100g/day soybean and sorghum meal (26%:74%, respectively fresh basis) (treated/supplemented (T-S) and infected/supplemented (I-S)). Two groups remained with no supplement for the duration of the trial (infected/non-supplemented (I-NS) (n = 10) and treated/non-supplemented (T-NS) (n = 8)). Kids in groups T-S and T-NS were drenched with 0.2mg of moxidectin/kg body weight orally (Cydectin, Fort Dodge) every 28 days. Groups I-S and I-NS were naturally infected with GIN. The animals browsed native vegetation (for an average of 7h/day) together with a herd of 120 naturally infected adult goats. Cumulative live weight gain (CLWG), packed cell volume (PCV), haemoglobin (Hb), total plasma protein and plasma albumin were recorded every 14 days as measurements of resilience. Resistance parameters (faecal egg counts (FEC) and peripheral eosinophil counts (PEC)) were also measured. Bulk faecal cultures were made for each group every 28 days. Every month a new pair of tracer kids assessed the infectivity of the vegetation browsed by the animals. The T-S group had the highest CLWG, PCV and Hb compared to the other three groups (P < 0.001). The I-S and T-NS group had similar mean CLWG and PCV (P > 0.05), while the I-NS group had the poorest CLWG, PCV and Hb (P < 0.001). The PEC of supplemented kids (I-S and T-S) was higher than in the I-NS and T-NS kids (P < 0.05). No effect of supplementary feeding was found in the FEC. Tracer kids and faecal cultures showed that kids suffered mixed infections with Haemonchus contortus, Trichostrongylus colubriformis and

  16. Anthelmintic activity of Artemisia annua L. extracts in vitro and the effect of an aqueous extract and artemisinin in sheep naturally infected with gastrointestinal nematodes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    There is no effective natural alternative control for gastrointestinal nematodes (GIN) of small ruminants, with Haemonchus contortus being the most economically important GIN. Despite frequent reports of multidrug-resistant GIN, there is no new commercial anthelmintic to substitute failing ones. Alt...

  17. Persistent efficacy of 3.5% doramectin compared to 3.15% ivermectin against gastrointestinal nematodes in experimentally-infected cattle in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Welber Daniel Zanetti; dos Santos, Thaís Rabelo; Sakamoto, Claudio A M; de Lima, Roberto Cesar Araújo; Valarelli, Rodrigo Lechugo; Paiva, Pablo; da Costa, Alvimar José

    2013-04-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the persistent efficacy of a 3.5% doramectin(*) (700 μg/kg) formulation compared to 3.15% ivermectin(**) (630 μg/kg) treatment, administered subcutaneously at a dose of 1 mL/50 kg body weight in cattle experimentally infected with gastrointestinal nematodes. Seventy-two male crossbred Holstein cattle that were negative for helminth infection were divided into nine groups. Treatments of 3.5% doramectin (Groups 2, 4, 6 and 8) and 3.15% ivermectin (Groups 3, 5, 7 and 9) were administered on days 49, 42, 35 and 28 prior to challenge with infectious nematode larvae (L3). Animals in the control group (Group 1) received saline solution on day 49 before challenge. Beginning on day zero, each animal received 50 mL orally of a mixed culture containing approximately 3,000 third stage larvae (L3) of Haemonchus (60%), Oesophagostomum (20%), Cooperia (15%) and Trichostrongylus (5%) for seven consecutive days, resulting in a total challenge of 21,000 larvae/animal. Due to the large number of cattle, autopsies were performed between days 28 and 35 after the last day of inoculation. The formulation containing doramectin (700 mcg/kg) achieved persistent efficacy against H. placei and C. punctata for 49 and 35 days, respectively. The persistent efficacy of ivermectin (630 mcg/kg) against H. placei lasted for 49 days, but this treatment was ineffective against C. punctata. Both formulations demonstrated persistent efficacy against T. axei for 49 days. The persistent efficacy of doramectin (700 mcg/kg) and ivermectin (630 mcg/kg) lasted for 49 and 42 days against O. radiatum, respectively.

  18. Impact of eprinomectin on grazing behaviour and performance in dairy cattle with sub-clinical gastrointestinal nematode infections under continuous stocking management.

    PubMed

    Forbes, A B; Huckle, C A; Gibb, M J

    2004-11-10

    Forty spring-calving cows and heifers (20 of each) were allowed to acquire infection with gastrointestinal (GI) nematodes naturally during grazing. The control group (10 cows and 10 heifers) were compared with 20 similar animals treated with eprinomectin in order to evaluate the effect of GI nematodes on grazing behaviour, milk production, body condition score and live weight. The animals were paired according to parity and milk yield during the week prior to treatment, then within replicate pair randomly allocated to a different treatment group. The grazing area was sub-divided into 20 replicated paddocks of equivalent size and topography. Grazing pairs of either control or treated animals were randomly assigned to each paddock over the duration of the study (one pair per paddock). Grazing behaviour was recorded for both groups over a 10-day period commencing 4 days after treatment with eprinomectin. Milk yield was recorded daily and milk quality was recorded weekly. Live weight and body condition score were recorded on the day of allocation, the day of initial treatment and thereafter at weekly intervals until the end of the 4-week trial. Faecal samples were collected from each animal prior to, and after, allocation and submitted for counts of nematode eggs. Additional faecal samples were taken at the end of the study for culture and nematode identification. Individual faecal samples were also analysed for residual digestibility. Pasture samples for nematode larval counts were taken at the same time as faecal sampling. The parasitological results showed low levels of faecal nematode egg output throughout the study, with the heifers having higher counts than the cows. Faecal culture yielded species of Ostertagia, Cooperia, and Trichostrongylus. Pasture larval levels were very low throughout with no value exceeding 68 larvae/kg dry matter (DM) of herbage. There were significant (P < 0.05) effects of treatment on grazing time, eating time, total bites, total grazing

  19. The activity of albendazole against adult and larval gastrointestinal nematodes in naturally infected calves in the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Borgsteede, F H

    1979-10-15

    The activity of albendazole against gastrointestinal helminths in naturally infected calves in the Netherlands was tested. The calves were in their first grazing season and kept in two groups of ten. One of these groups was grazed alternately with sheep. Five out of each group were drenched with albendazole (7.5 mg/kg) on the day they were housed (November 1). Before and 2, 14, and 28 days after treatment individual faecal samples were taken from all calves and larval cultures were made. Ten calves, six treated and four untreated, were killed for post mortem studies 14 days after treatment. The remaining calves were slaughtered 14 days later. The drug was highly effective in reducing the egg output, measured as the number of larvae cultured per gram of faeces. Compared with the untreated calves, the reduction was more than 99% two days after treatment, 100% at 14 days, and 99% after 28 days. It was shown that egg output 28 days after treatment came from worms which had developed from arrested larvae of Ostertagia ostertagi that had survived treatment. Post mortem results showed an efficacy of 100% against adult O. ostertagi, of almost 100% against Trichostrongylus axei, and 100% against adult and larval Cooperia oncophora. Twenty-eight days after treatment, the reduction of arrested early fourth stages of O. ostertagi was 85% in comparison with the untreated calves. Apparently less effect was found against Trichuris ovis at the given dose rate.

  20. Anthelmintic activity of Cocos nucifera L. against sheep gastrointestinal nematodes.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, L M B; Bevilaqua, C M L; Costa, C T C; Macedo, I T F; Barros, R S; Rodrigues, A C M; Camurça-Vasconcelos, A L F; Morais, S M; Lima, Y C; Vieira, L S; Navarro, A M C

    2009-01-22

    The development of anthelmintic resistance has made the search for alternatives to control gastrointestinal nematodes of small ruminants imperative. Among these alternatives are several medicinal plants traditionally used as anthelmintics. This work evaluated the efficacy of Cocos nucifera fruit on sheep gastrointestinal parasites. The ethyl acetate extract obtained from the liquid of green coconut husk fiber (LGCHF) was submitted to in vitro and in vivo tests. The in vitro assay was based on egg hatching (EHT) and larval development tests (LDT) with Haemonchus contortus. The concentrations tested in the EHT were 0.31, 0.62, 1.25, 2.5 and 5 mg ml(-1), while in the LDT they were 5, 10, 20, 40 and 80 mg ml(-1). The in vivo assay was a controlled test. In this experiment, 18 sheep infected with gastrointestinal nematodes were divided into three groups (n=6), with the following doses administered: G1-400 mg kg(-1) LGCHF ethyl acetate extract, G2-0.2 mg kg(-1) moxidectin (Cydectin) and G3-3% DMSO. The worm burden was analyzed. The results of the in vitro and in vivo tests were submitted to ANOVA and analyzed by the Tukey and Kruskal-Wallis tests, respectively. The extract efficacy in the EHT and LDT, at the highest concentrations tested, was 100% on egg hatching and 99.77% on larval development. The parameters evaluated in the controlled test were not statistically different, showing that despite the significant results of the in vitro tests, the LGCHF ethyl acetate extract showed no activity against sheep gastrointestinal nematodes.

  1. Controlling gastrointestinal nematodes in cattle by Bacillus species.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Natália Berne; de Castro, Leonardo Mortagua; de Almeida Capella, Gabriela; Motta, Tairan Ourique; de Souza Stori de Lara, Ana Paula; de Moura, Micaele Quintana; Berne, Maria Elisabeth Aires; Leite, Fábio Pereira Leivas

    2017-10-15

    In this study, we tested the in vitro and in vivo larvicidal activity of Bacillus species against gastrointestinal nematodes in cattle, and their viability in the presence of anthelmintics. For in vitro tests, cattle feces naturally infected with trichostrongylides were incubated with spore suspensions of Bacillus circulans (Bcir), B. thuringiensis var. osvaldocruzi (Bto), B. thuringiensis var. israelensis (Bti) or B. thuringiensis var. kurstaki (Btk). Subsequently, residual larvae were counted and identified. All of the Bacillus species showed 60% or more larvicidal effects. Bcir and Bti were selected to be incubated with anthelmintics (moxidectin, nitroxynil and levamisole), and after 24, 72, and 144h, their viability was evaluated. Bti showed highest drug resistance, maintaining a concentration of 1×10(7)CFU/mL. Based on this result, Bti was selected for in vivo tests on calves naturally infected with gastrointestinal nematodes. The calves were dived into four groups: Group 1, Bti suspension of ∼1×10(9)CFU orally administered; Group 2, Bti suspension of ∼1×10(9)CFU orally administered with levamisole (subcutaneously, 150mg); Group 3, only levamisole (subcutaneously, 150mg), and Group 4 untreated. Then 24 and 48h after treatment, larvae numbers were counted. We observed a reduction of 84%, 100%, and 100% after 48h of treatment, respectively, for Groups 1, 2 and 3 treatments in comparison with the untreated. The tested Bacillus species showed larvicidal activity against bovine trichostrongylides, and its association with anthelmintics. It may serve as a promising integrated alternative for control of gastrointestinal nematodes in cattle. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Evaluation of Eucalyptus citriodora essential oil on goat gastrointestinal nematodes.

    PubMed

    Macedo, Iara Tersia Freitas; Bevilaqua, Claudia Maria Leal; de Oliveira, Lorena Mayana Beserra; Camurça-Vasconcelos, Ana Lourdes Fernandes; Vieira, Luiz da Silva; Amóra, Sthenia Dos Santos Albano

    2011-01-01

    Phytotherapy may be an alternative strategy for controlling gastrointestinal parasites. This study evaluated the anthelmintic efficacy of Eucalyptus citriodora essential oil (EcEO). The in vitro effects of EcEO were determined through testing the inhibition of egg hatching and larval development of Haemonchus contortus. EcEO was subjected to acute toxicity testing on mice, orally and intraperitoneally. The in vivo effects of EcEO were determined by the fecal egg count reduction test (FECRT) in goats infected with gastrointestinal nematodes. The results showed that 5.3 mg.mL(-1) EcEO inhibited egg hatching by 98.8% and 10.6 mg.mL(-1) EcEO inhibited H. contortus larval development by 99.71%. The lethal doses for 50% of the mice were 4153 and 622.8 mg.kg(-1), for acute toxicity orally and intraperitoneally. In the FECRT, the efficacy of EcEO and ivermectin was 66.25 and 79.16% respectively, on goat gastrointestinal nematodes eight days after treatment. EcEO showed in vitro and in vivo anthelmintic activity.

  3. Survey of gastrointestinal nematode parasites in Saskatchewan beef herds

    PubMed Central

    Jelinski, Murray; Lanigan, Emily; Gilleard, John; Waldner, Cheryl; Royan, Grant

    2016-01-01

    A survey of gastrointestinal parasites in Saskatchewan beef herds was conducted over the summer of 2014. Fecal samples were collected on 3 occasions during the summer grazing season from beef cows and calves from 14 herds. The mean number of strongylid eggs per gram of feces recovered from calves increased 9-fold (95% CI: 4.5 to 18) over the summer period, while egg counts in the cows remained constant over the same period. The prevalence and infection intensities of gastrointestinal nematode parasites in cow-calf herds in Saskatchewan were comparable to what is seen in cattle grazing in the northern regions of the United States and for which anthelmintic treatments have resulted in positive production benefits. PMID:26834267

  4. An evolutionary perspective on gastrointestinal nematodes of sheep.

    PubMed

    Stear, M J; Singleton, D; Matthews, L

    2011-06-01

    The purpose of this paper was to discuss from an evolutionary perspective the interaction between domestic sheep (Ovis aries) and their gastrointestinal nematodes. Although evolution is the central theme of biology, there has been little attempt to consider how evolutionary forces have shaped and continue to shape the relationships between domestic animals and their parasite community. Mathematical modelling of the host-parasite relationship indicated that the system is remarkably robust to perturbations in its parameters. This robustness may be a consequence of the long coevolution of host and parasites. Although nematodes can potentially evolve faster than the host, coevolution is not dominated by the parasite and there are several examples where breeds of cattle or sheep have evolved high levels of resistance to disease. Coevolution is a more equal partnership between host and nematode than is commonly assumed. Coevolution between parasites and the host immune system is often described as an arms race where both host immune response genes and parasite proteins evolve rapidly in response to each other. However, initial results indicate that nematode antigens are not evolving rapidly; the arms race between the immune system and nematodes, if it exists, is happening very slowly. Fisher's fundamental theorem of natural selection states that genes with positive effects on fitness will be fixed by natural selection. Consequently, heritable variation in fitness traits is expected to be low. Contrary to this argument, there is considerable genetic variation in resistance to nematode infection. In particular, the heritabilities of nematode-specific IgA and IgE activity are moderate to high. The reasons for this apparent violation of the fundamental theorem of natural selection are not clear but several possible explanations are explored. Faecal nematode egg counts increase at the beginning of the grazing season - a phenomenon known as the periparturient rise. This

  5. Significance of anti-CarLA salivary IgA antibody in first grazing season cattle naturally infected with gastrointestinal nematodes.

    PubMed

    Merlin, Aurélie; Shaw, Richard; Chauvin, Alain; Bareille, Nathalie; Chartier, Christophe

    2017-08-30

    A carbohydrate larval surface antigen (CarLA) present on infective larvae of all trichostrongylid nematodes is a target antigen for host immunoglobulins (Ig). Levels of anti-CarLA salivary IgA antibody (CarLA-IgA) have been shown to be correlated to the level of protective immunity to GIN in sheep and deer but no information is available in cattle. The first objective of this study was to assess the pattern of CarLA-IgA response in 7 groups (G1-G7) of first grazing season cattle (FGSC) naturally infected with gastrointestinal nematodes. The second objective was to assess the phenotypic correlations between CarLA-IgA level, 3 parasitological indicators (faecal egg count-FEC, pepsinogen level, serum anti-O. ostertagi IgG antibody level-OstertagiaIgG), a clinical indicator (diarrhea score) and average daily weight gain (ADWG). Overall, CarLA-IgA response gradually increased over grazing season and showed large variations in speed and magnitude both between and within groups. Based on the mean group CarLA-IgA response pattern, the 7 groups could be allocated to 3 different classes: (i) 'Late High' class characterized by a high response at housing (G1 and G2); (ii) 'Low' class with a low response over time (G3, G4 and G5); and (iii) 'Early' class with an high initial then stable response (G6 and G7). This classification was consistent with the grazing management practices. In the 'Late High' class, the mean CarLA-IgA at housing was 6.05units/mL and negatively correlated with FEC while no correlation was seen with the other indicators nor ADWG. In the 'Low' class, CarLA response at housing was low (1.95units/mL) and mainly positively correlated with OstertagiaIgG. In the 'Early' class, mean CarLA-IgA ranged from 1.32 to 1.86units/mL during the grazing season and positive correlations were seen with parasitological and clinical indicators. These results suggest that, according to the intensity of larval challenge occurring during the first grazing season, Car

  6. Biological control of gastrointestinal parasitic nematodes using Duddingtonia flagrans in sheep under natural conditions in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Mendoza-De Gives, Pedro; Zapata Nieto, Claudia; Hernández, Enrique Liébano; Arellano, María Eugenia López; Rodríguez, David Herrera; Garduño, Roberto González

    2006-10-01

    This investigation was aimed to evaluate the use of an oral bio-preparation containing Duddingtonia flagrans chlamydospores for the control of sheep gastrointestinal parasitic nematodes under the Mexican cold high plateau conditions. Two groups of gastrointestinal parasitic nematode naturally infected sheep, were randomly selected and located into two free-gastrointestinal nematode larvae paddocks. Group 1 received once a week a supplement containing D. flagrans chlamydospores mixed with oats and molasses. Group 2 received a similar supplement without any fungal material. After 5 months grazing animals were discarded from the experiment and two groups of free-nematode "tracer" sheep were located into the same paddocks to collect larvae from the contaminated pastures. Animals were slaughtered and necropsied and the nematodes were obtained and counted. A screening of the number of gastrointestinal nematode larvae present on the grass was performed and compared between the two grazing areas. The results showed 56% reduction in the Ostertagia (Teladorsagia) circumcincta and 94% reduction in the Nematodirus sp. population of the "tracer" sheep who grazed on the D. flagrans-treated sheep area, compared to the nematode population in animals grazed on the non-treated area. The results of the number of larvae on the grazing pastures showed a 51.1% reduction for H. contortus, and 100% for Cooperia sp. in the area with fungi. In the case of Trichostrongylus sp. no reduction was observed, when compared to the control group.

  7. Impact of rotational grazing on management of gastrointestinal nematodes in weaned lambs

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Gastrointestinal nematode (GIN) control for ‘natural’ or organic lamb production is needed, especially where Haemonchus contortus is prevalent. The objective was to determine the impact of rotational grazing on GIN infection of weaned lambs. In year 1, naturally infected Katahdin lambs (120 days of ...

  8. [Levamisole- and tetramisole-resistant gastrointestinal nematodes in sheep].

    PubMed

    Praslicka, J; Pilko, P; Várady, M; Corba, J

    1995-02-01

    Two experiments were carried out with sheep naturally infected with gastrointestinal nematodes to evaluate efficacy of anthelmintics using in vivo faecal egg count reduction (FECR) test. In experiment 1 with 28 ewes, the following efficacy of anthelmintics given at recommended dose rates was observed: albendazole 99.4%, ivermectin 99.3% and levamisole 81.8%. In experiment 2 with 18 ewes, tetramisole exhibited 71.3% efficacy. Suspected resistance to imidothiazole anthelmintics was confirmed by in vitro larval development test (LDT)--minimal inhibition concentration (MIC) values were estimated at 2.0 micrograms/ml. Infective larvae L3 cultivated from eggs produced by the population of resistant helminths were identified as Ostertagia and Trichostrongylus spp.

  9. The present status of anthelmintic resistance in gastrointestinal nematode infections of sheep in the northwest of Spain by in vivo and in vitro techniques.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Valladares, M; Martínez-Pérez, J M; Robles-Pérez, D; Cordero-Pérez, C; Famularo, M R; Fernández-Pato, N; Castañón-Ordóñez, L; Rojo-Vázquez, F A

    2013-01-16

    The aim of this study was to update the anthelmintic resistance (AR) status in sheep flocks infected by gastrointestinal nematodes (GIN) by means of in vivo and in vitro methods in the northwest of Spain. With this objective, we studied the efficacy of benzimidazoles (BZs), imidazothiazoles (IMs) and macrocyclic lactones (MLs), between 2006 and 2011. The sampling area was the Autonomous Community of Castilla y León but the majority of the flocks were located in the province of León. When the mean of GIN eggs per gram (epg) in faeces in a flock was higher than 150, the in vivo Faecal Egg Count Reduction Test (FECRT) was carried out. According to this test, AR was present in 63.6% of flocks, independently of the anthelmintic used. Flocks were mainly resistant to levamisole (LEV) (59.0%), followed by ivermectin (IVM) (27.3%) and albendazole (13.6%). Multidrug-resistance was also observed in 27.2% of the flocks, one of them being resistant to all anthelmintic families, including long-acting moxidectin. Comparing the evolution of AR in the last decade, between 1999 and 2011, the level of resistance to BZs and MLs was fairly constant throughout the time by means of the FECRT. However, the resistance to LEV increased significantly in only one decade since during the period 1999-2003 the percentage was 38.5%. The AR status was also measured by in vitro techniques in those flocks with an egg output lower than 150 epg. The prevalence of AR to BZs reached the 35.3% by Egg Hatch Assay. However, the level of resistance reported for LEV and IVM was 61.5% and 23.5%, respectively, by using the Larval Feeding Inhibition Assay, percentages very similar to those reported with the FECRT. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Efficacy of albendazole, levamisole and ivermectin against gastro-intestinal nematodes in naturally infected goats at the National Semi-arid Resources Research Institute, Serere, Uganda.

    PubMed

    Byaruhanga, C; Okwee-Acai, J

    2013-07-01

    A study was conducted between April and July, 2011 to determine and compare the efficacy of albendazole (ABZ), levamisole (LVM) and ivermectin (IVM) against gastrointestinal nematodes in naturally infected Mubende and Boer crossbred goats at the National Semi-arid Resources Research Institute in Serere, Uganda. Forty Mubende goats and 31 Boer crosses were each blocked by age and sex and randomly assigned to four groups. The first group of each breed served as the untreated control, the second was treated with albendazole (5mg/kg BW), the third with levamisole hydrochloride and oxyclozanide (7.5 and 15 mg/kg BW) and the fourth with ivermectin (0.2mg/kg BW). Each group included 7-11 animals. Treatments were administered with doses of goats in albendazole and ivermectin, and doses of sheep in levamisole, as recommended by the manufacturers. In the treated groups, goats received anthelmintics basing on individual weights. Fecal egg counts, expressed as eggs per gram and larval cultures were done on day zero before treatment and on day 13 after anthelmintic treatment. Efficacy for each anthelmintic was determined by the Fecal Egg Count Reduction Test (FECRT). In Mubende goats, ABZ, LVM, and IVM reduced FEC by 28.5%, 91%, and 98%, respectively. In Boer crosses, ABZ, LVM, and IVM reduced FEC by 11%, 84.88% and 78.47%, respectively. At a 95% CI, only IVM was more effective in Mubende goats than Boer crosses (t=2.564, p<0.05). This may indicate occurrence of anthelmintic resistance in the goat farming sector in Uganda. Further studies need to be done to clarify the state of efficacy of the commonly used anthelmintics covering different agro ecological zones and species of animals in Uganda. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Gastrointestinal nematode community of spiny mice (Acomys dimidiatus) from St. Katherine, South Sinai, Egypt.

    PubMed

    Soliman, Maha F M; Ibrahim, Mohamed M; Zalat, Samy M

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this work was to study gastrointestinal nematode community infecting Acomys dimidiatus in different wadis of St. Katherine, South Sinai, Egypt. Fieldwork was conducted in three Wadis over a 4 weeks period during April-May, 2003 in St. Katherine, South Sinai, Egypt. Faecal samples from 47 spiny mice were analysed for gastrointestinal nematode community. The nematodes community consisted of four genera Dentostomella spp., Syphacia spp., Aspicularis spp. and Spirurids species. The overall prevalence of infection was 55.3 %. A significant difference in prevalence was found per wadis. Wadi Toffaha showed the highest diversity when compared to other Wadis. Mean species richness was higher in Wadi Tlah (0.87) when compared to other Wadis. Syphacia spp. was frequently found coexisting with other nematodes. A significant interaction was found between both site and co-infection for Aspicularis spp. The spatial stability of nematode community was discussed compared to other related studies. In terms of similarity, the nematode community from Wadi Toffaha was closest to Wadi Tlah. In conclusion, this study showed that there is spatial variation in the distribution of nematode community. Possible factors affecting the stability of parasite community were discussed and further studies are needed.

  12. [The prevalence of gastro-intestinal nematodes in hair goats of the Sanliurfa region].

    PubMed

    Altaş, Mehtap Gül; Sevgili, Murat; Gökçen, Ahmet; Aksin, Nursel; Bayburs, Hüseyin Cahit

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of gastro-intestinal nematodes in hair goats in Sanliurfa region between November 2005 and November 2006. During this period, the alimentary canal from 1 or 2 goats was obtained from the municipal slaughterhouse each week. These were brought into the laboratory and examined for the presence of nematodes. Gastro-intestinal tracts of 100 hair goats were examined. Of these, 83 (83%) were found infected with nematodes. Twenty nematode species were identified in hair goats. A total of 7641 nematodes were collected from infected hair goats. The average number of parasites for each animal was 92.06. The number of nematodes species was found to range from 1-6 in infected hair goats. The listing of 12 nematode species detected, according to their prevalence, was as follows; Marshallagia marshalli (54.21%), Teladorsagia circumcincta (72.40%), T. trifurcata (45.78%), T. occidentalis (14.45%), Haemonchus contortus (39.79%), Gongylonema pulchrum (32.53%), Nematodirus spathiger (33.73%), N. filicollis (13.25%), Trichostrongylus vitrinus (13.25%), Chabertia ovina (25.30%), Trichuris ovis (22.88%) and T. skrjabini (34.93%).

  13. Acidic chitinase primes the protective immune response to gastrointestinal nematodes.

    PubMed

    Vannella, Kevin M; Ramalingam, Thirumalai R; Hart, Kevin M; de Queiroz Prado, Rafael; Sciurba, Joshua; Barron, Luke; Borthwick, Lee A; Smith, Allen D; Mentink-Kane, Margaret; White, Sandra; Thompson, Robert W; Cheever, Allen W; Bock, Kevin; Moore, Ian; Fitz, Lori J; Urban, Joseph F; Wynn, Thomas A

    2016-05-01

    Acidic mammalian chitinase (AMCase) is known to be induced by allergens and helminths, yet its role in immunity is unclear. Using AMCase-deficient mice, we show that AMCase deficiency reduced the number of group 2 innate lymphoid cells during allergen challenge but was not required for establishment of type 2 inflammation in the lung in response to allergens or helminths. In contrast, AMCase-deficient mice showed a profound defect in type 2 immunity following infection with the chitin-containing gastrointestinal nematodes Nippostrongylus brasiliensis and Heligmosomoides polygyrus bakeri. The impaired immunity was associated with reduced mucus production and decreased intestinal expression of the signature type 2 response genes Il13, Chil3, Retnlb, and Clca1. CD103(+) dendritic cells, which regulate T cell homing, were also reduced in mesenteric lymph nodes of infected AMCase-deficient mice. Thus, AMCase functions as a critical initiator of protective type 2 responses to intestinal nematodes but is largely dispensable for allergic responses in the lung.

  14. Variability in the intensity of nematode larvae from gastrointestinal tissues of a natural herbivore.

    PubMed

    van Kuren, Andrew T; Boag, Brian; Hruban, Emilie; Cattadori, Isabella M

    2013-04-01

    The migration of infective nematode larvae into the tissues of their hosts has been proposed as a mechanism of reducing larval mortality and increase parasite lifetime reproductive success. Given that individual hosts differ in the level of exposure, strength of immune response and physiological conditions we may expect the number of larvae in tissue to vary both between and within hosts. We used 2 gastrointestinal nematode species common in the European rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus) and examined how the number of larvae in the tissue changed with the immune response, parasite intensity-dependent constraints in the lumen and seasonal weather factors, in rabbits of different age, sex and breeding status. For both nematode species, larvae from the gastrointestinal tissue exhibited strong seasonal and host age-related patterns with fewer larvae recovered in summer compared to winter and more in adults than in juveniles. The number of larvae of the 2 nematodes was positively associated with intensity of parasite infection in the lumen and antibody responses while it was negatively related with air temperature and rainfall. Host sex, reproductive status and co-infection with the second parasite species contributed to increase variability between hosts. We concluded that heterogeneities in host conditions are a significant cause of variability of larval abundance in the gastrointestinal tissues. These findings can have important consequences for the dynamics of nematode infections and how parasite's life-history strategies adjust to host changes.

  15. A genome-wide survey reveals a deletion polymorphism associated with resistance to gastrointestinal nematodes in Angus cattle

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Gastrointestinal (GI) nematode infections are a worldwide threat to animal health and production. In this study, we performed a genome-wide association study between copy number variations (CNV) and resistance to GI nematodes in an Angus cattle population. Using a linear regression analysis, we iden...

  16. A genome-wide survey reveals a deletion polymorphism associated with resistance to gastrointestinal nematodes in Angus cattle

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Gastrointestinal (GI) nematode infections are a worldwide threat to animal health and production. In this study, we performed a genome-wide association study between copy number variations (CNV) and resistance to GI nematodes in an Angus cattle population. Using a linear regression analysis, we iden...

  17. Doramectin efficacy against gastrointestinal nematodes in pigs.

    PubMed

    Stewart, T B; Fox, M C; Wiles, S E

    1996-11-01

    Four controlled trials with growing pigs were performed to determine efficacy of doramectin against natural and induced populations of nematodes. In Trial 1 (T1), 20 pigs with natural infections were assigned to one of two like groups on the basis of weight, sex and worm egg counts. In Trial 2 (T2), 20 pigs with negative worm egg counts were assigned to one of two groups on the basis of weight and sex. Each pig was subsequently given (per os) 3000 Trichuris suis embryonated eggs; 2000 Ascaris suum embryonated eggs; 10000 Oesophagostomum spp. infective larvae and 10,000 Strongyloides ransomi infective larvae (SC injection). In Trial 3 (T3), 20 pigs with negative worm egg counts were assigned as in T2, and each pig was subsequently given (per os) 2000 A. suum embryonated eggs, 15000 Oesophagostomum quadrispinulatum infective larvae, and 2891 Hyostrongylus rubidus infective larvae. In Trial 4 (T4), 16 pigs with negative worm egg counts were each assigned to one of two groups as in T2 and were given (per os) 2670 T. suis embryonated eggs. On Day 0 of each trial, each pig of the control group was injected IM in the neck with sterile saline at the rate of 1.5 ml 50 kg-1. Each pig in the treated group of each trial was similarly injected with doramectin at the rate of 300 micrograms kg-1. All pigs were necropsied 14 or 15 days post-treatment and parasites recovered by standard parasitological procedures. Efficacies against natural infections were: A. suum, 100%; Oesophagostomum spp. 100%; H. rubidus, 99.4%; and Strongyloides ransomi, 99.9%. Efficacies against induced infections were: 4th stage A. suum, 100%; 4th stage O.dentatum, 99.9%; 4th stage O.quadrispinulatum, 97.1 and 99.6%; 4th stage H. rubidus, 100%; adult S. ransomi, 100%; adult Trichuris suis in mixed infection, 54.1%; and in pure infection, 95.3%.

  18. Role of host and environment in mediating reduced gastrointestinal nematode infections in sheep due to intensive rotational grazing.

    PubMed

    Colvin, A F; Walkden-Brown, S W; Knox, M R

    2012-03-23

    We have previously reported marked reductions in faecal worm egg counts (WECs) and drenching frequency in sheep on an intensive rotational grazing system (IRG) in a cool temperate environment with summer-dominant rainfall. These experiments were designed to determine the role of the host and environmental factors in mediating this. The role of host factors was investigated by administering a fixed larval challenge in each of the 4 seasons of the year to groups of 20 young sheep on three different management systems, including IRG. This comprised a mixed larval challenge containing infective larvae of Haemonchus contortus and Trichostrongylus colubriformis 7 days after short-acting anthelmintic treatment. A range of measurements was then made up to day 35 post-challenge. The role of environmental factors was determined by assessing pasture infectivity in four seasons using faecal worm egg counts (WECs) and pooled faecal culture of worm-free tracer sheep. The management systems were high input (HI) with high fertiliser inputs high stocking rate and relatively long grazing periods; typical New England management system (TYP) with moderate fertiliser inputs and stocking rate and relatively long grazing periods and; Intensive rotational grazing (IRG) with moderate fertiliser inputs and stocking rate but very short (mean 5 days) grazing periods and long (mean 103 days) rest periods. IRG sheep had higher mean WEC at 28 and 35 days after fixed larval challenge than HI and TYP sheep in spring (IRG: 9500 ± 1000; HI: 4000 ± 1000; TYP: 7200 ± 1000 eggs/g, P<0.01) and summer (IRG: 8400 ± 750; HI: 5300 ± 800; TYP: 4400 ± 700 eggs/g; P<0.001) and also had lower live weights during these seasons. There was no difference in WEC after the autumn challenge (IRG: 5100 ± 450 HI: 4500 ± 450; TYP: 4200 ± 450 eggs/g; P ≈ 0.36) but IRG had lower WEC than TYP following the winter challenge (IRG: 2900 ± 400; HI: 2300 ± 400; TYP: 4300 ± 400 eggs/g, P<0.01). The tracer sheep

  19. Recirculating elutriator for extracting gastrointestinal nematode larvae from pasture herbage samples

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Gastrointestinal nematode parasites present an important limitation to ruminant production worldwide. Methods for quantifying infective larvae of GIN on pastures are generally tedious, time-consuming, and require bulky equipment set-ups. This limitation to expedient data collection is a bottleneck...

  20. Effects of parenteral administration of doramectin or a combination of ivermectin and clorsulon on control of gastrointestinal nematode and liver fluke infections and on growth performance in cattle.

    PubMed

    Loyacano, A F; Skogerboe, T L; Williams, J C; DeRosa, A A; Gurie, J A; Shostrom, V K

    2001-05-01

    To compare effects of an injectable doramectin preparation with those of an injectable ivermectin-clorsulon preparation on control of gastrointestinal nematodes and liver flukes and on growth performance in cattle. Randomized complete block design. 60 crossbred calves. Calves (20/treatment group) were treated with doramectin or ivermectin-clorsulon or were not treated. Fecal samples were collected for nematode and Fasciola hepatica egg counts on day 0 and for up to 140 days after treatment. Cattle were weighed before treatment and at 28-day intervals until day 140. From day 7 through day 49, nematode egg counts for calves treated with doramectin or with ivermectin-clorsulon were significantly lower than those for untreated control calves. As the study progressed beyond day 56, the percentages of cattle with fluke eggs in their feces increased, but differences in regard to these percentages were not detected among the 3 groups. Average daily gain for the doramectin-treated cattle (0.79 kg/d [1.74 lb/d]) was significantly greater than that for the cattle treated with ivermectin-clorsuIon (0.71 kg/d [1.56 lb/d]); values for both groups were significantly greater than that for the control cattle (0.62 kg/d [1.37 lb/d]). Results suggest that doramectin had a greater impact on subclinical gastrointestinal tract parasitism in calves, as demonstrated by growth performance, than did ivermectin-clorsulon. In the Gulf Coast region of the United States, spring-born nursing beef calves may have minimal grazing exposure to F hepatica during the peak fluke transmission period; therefore, mature fluke burdens may be negligible at the beginning of the fall season.

  1. Anthelmintic activity of Artemisia annua L. extracts in vitro and the effect of an aqueous extract and artemisinin in sheep naturally infected with gastrointestinal nematodes.

    PubMed

    Cala, Aida C; Ferreira, Jorge F S; Chagas, Ana Carolina S; Gonzalez, Javier M; Rodrigues, Rodney A F; Foglio, Mary Ann; Oliveira, Marcia C S; Sousa, Ilza M O; Magalhães, Pedro M; Barioni Júnior, Waldomiro

    2014-06-01

    There is no effective natural alternative control for gastrointestinal nematodes (GIN) of small ruminants, with Haemonchus contortus being the most economically important GIN. Despite frequent reports of multidrug-resistant GIN, there is no new commercial anthelmintic to substitute failing ones. Although trematocidal activity of artemisinin analogs has been reported in sheep, neither artemisinin nor its plant source (Artemisia annua) has been evaluated for anthelmintic activity in ruminants. This study evaluated the anthelmintic activity of A. annua crude extracts in vitro and compared the most effective extract with artemisinin in sheep naturally infected with H. contortus. A. annua leaves extracted with water, aqueous 0.1% sodium bicarbonate, dichloromethane, and ethanol were evaluated in vitro by the egg hatch test (EHT) and with the bicarbonate extract only for the larval development test (LDT) using H. contortus. The A. annua water, sodium bicarbonate (SBE), ethanol, and dichloromethane extracts tested in vitro contained 0.3, 0.6, 4.4, and 9.8% of artemisinin, respectively. The sodium bicarbonate extract resulted in the lowest LC99 in the EHT (1.27 μg/mL) and in a LC99 of 23.8 μg/mL in the LDT. Following in vitro results, the SBE (2 g/kg body weight (BW)) and artemisinin (100 mg/kg BW) were evaluated as a single oral dose in naturally infected Santa Inês sheep. Speciation from stool cultures established that 84-91% of GIN were H. contortus, 8.4-15.6 % were Trichostrongylus sp., and 0.3-0.7% were Oesophagostomum sp. Packed-cell volume and eggs per gram (EPG) of feces were used to test treatment efficacy. The SBE tested in vivo contained no artemisinin, but had a high antioxidant capacity of 2,295 μmol of Trolox equivalents/g. Sheep dosed with artemisinin had maximum feces concentrations 24 h after treatment (126.5 μg/g artemisinin), which sharply decreased at 36 h. By day 15, only levamisole-treated sheep had a significant decrease of 97% in EPG

  2. Explaining variability in first grazing season heifer growth combining individually measured parasitological and clinical indicators with exposure to gastrointestinal nematode infection based on grazing management practice.

    PubMed

    Merlin, Aurélie; Chauvin, Alain; Madouasse, Aurélien; Froger, Sébastien; Bareille, Nathalie; Chartier, Christophe

    2016-07-30

    The objective of our study was to explain the variability of average daily weight gain (ADWG) due to gastrointestinal nematode (GIN) infection for 291 non treated first grazing season (FGS) heifers, from 12 independent groups in the western part of France, by combining parasitological and clinical indicators at individual level and grazing management indicators at group level. Parasitological indicators were faecal egg count (FEC), anti Ostertagia ostertagi antibody level (Ostertagia ODR), and pepsinogen level. Clinical indicators were diarrhea score (DISCO) and breech soiling score (BSS). At group level, grazing management practice (GMP), based on three variables (supplementation, month of turnout, grazing season duration), was clustered into three categories reflecting low, medium or high exposure (EXP) to GIN. Depending on the groups, turnout was from mid-March to early July and housing was from mid-October to late November, with a FGS duration ranging from 4 to 8.4 months. At turnout, the mean age of heifers was 8 months (range: 6-16 months) and they weighed between 175 and 268kg. In each GMP category, FEC significantly decreased between the mid-season and the housing, while Ostertagia ODR and pepsinogen level increased gradually throughout the grazing season. In contrast, clinical indicators did not show any seasonal variation. In a multivariate linear model, 22% of the ADWG variability was significantly explained by two individual indicators (Ostertagia ODR: 12.6%, DISCO: 4.8%) and by the group indicator (GMP category: 4.8%). ADWG losses due to GIN exposure (Ostertagia ODR) were estimated up to 39kg per heifer for the overall grazing season. For groups within the low EXP category the difference between animals with low (<697g/day) or high (>697g/day) ADWG was explained by the clinical indicator DISCO. In contrast, for groups within the medium and high EXP categories this difference was explained by a parasitological indicator (Ostertagia ODR). This study

  3. Herbal dewormer fails to control gastrointestinal nematodes in goats

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Gastrointestinal nematode (GIN) parasitism is the most important disease of small ruminants. Control is usually based on the use of chemical anthelmintics (dewormers); but these are prohibited from use in organic livestock, and the effectiveness of chemical anthelmintics in conventional operations ...

  4. Garlic exhibits lack of control over gastrointestinal nematodes in goats

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Gastrointestinal nematodes (GIN) continue to hinder small ruminant production because of anthelmintic resistance and lack of effective products for GIN control in organic production. The objective of this study was to examine the effectiveness of a commercially available certified organic garlic pr...

  5. Grazing sericea lespedeza for control of gastrointestinal nematodes in lambs

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Alternatives to chemical dewormers are needed to counter anthelmintic resistance and improve organic management systems. The objective was to examine the effectiveness of grazing sericea lespedeza (SL) compared with grass pastures for control of gastrointestinal nematodes (GIN) in lambs. In Experi...

  6. Fasciola hepatica: Specificity of a coproantigen ELISA test for diagnosis of fasciolosis in faecal samples from cattle and sheep concurrently infected with gastrointestinal nematodes, coccidians and/or rumen flukes (paramphistomes), under field conditions.

    PubMed

    Kajugu, P-E; Hanna, R E B; Edgar, H W; McMahon, C; Cooper, M; Gordon, A; Barley, J P; Malone, F E; Brennan, G P; Fairweather, I

    2015-09-15

    Chronic fasciolosis is often diagnosed by faecal egg counting (FEC), following concentration of the eggs in the sample by a zinc sulphate floatation method. However, concentration by a sedimentation technique gives improved sensitivity. Interpretation of FEC results for fasciolosis is complicated by factors such as the long pre-patent period and irregular egg shedding. Thus, FEC reduction tests (FECRT), when used alone, are not completely reliable for diagnosis of anthelmintic susceptibility or resistance in local fluke populations, especially when parasite burdens are small. A Fasciola hepatica coproantigen ELISA test has been introduced which more accurately reflects the presence of flukes in the host bile ducts in late pre-patent infections, and absence of flukes following successful chemotherapeutic intervention. The aim of the present study was to elucidate the specificity of the F. hepatica coproantigen ELISA technique, particularly regarding potential cross-reactivity with rumen fluke (paramphistome), gastrointestinal nematode and coccidian infections. The method involved parallel testing of a large battery of faecal samples from field-infected cattle and sheep using floatation and sedimentation FECs and coproantigen analysis. No evidence was found for significant false positivity in the F. hepatica coproantigen ELISA due to paramphistome, coccidian and/or gastrointestinal nematode co-infections. With sedimentation FECs less than 10 F. hepatica eggs per gram (epg), the likelihood of a positive coproantigen result for the sample progressively decreased. Diagnosis of fasciolosis should be based on consideration of both FEC and coproantigen ELISA findings, to ensure optimum sensitivity for pre-patent and low-level infections.

  7. Microcapsules formulated in the enteric coating copolymer Eudragit L100 as delivery systems for oral vaccination against infections by gastrointestinal nematode parasites.

    PubMed

    Dea-Ayuela, Maria A; Rama-Iñiguez, Sara; Torrado-Santiago, S; Bolas-Fernandez, F

    2006-09-01

    Microcapsules using the copolymer of methacrylic acid (Eudragit L100) were formulated for oral delivery of vaccines against the enteral/parenteral nematode parasite Trichinella spiralis. Antigenic preparations from first stage larvae (L1) of T. spiralis were microencapsulated in Eudragit L100. The microcapsules prepared by the spray drying method were resistant to acid pH, although the antigen was rapidly released under neutral and basic environmental conditions. The native protein conformation and biological activity was preserved in the microcapsules, as assessed by SDS-PAGE and ELISA. When administered to NIH mice, the antigen loaded microcapsules protected against infection by T. spiralis at both the intestinal and muscular levels, the worm burden diminishing by 45.58 and 53.33%, respectively. Furthermore, following administration of the microparticles an increase of the serum IgG1 response, a marker for the Th2 type response, was evident. These results indicate that microcapsules formulated with anionic biocompatible polymers such as Eudragit may be useful for oral vaccination against nematode infections.

  8. Anthelmintic activity of Indigofera tinctoria against gastrointestinal nematodes of sheep

    PubMed Central

    Meenakshisundaram, Ambalathaduvar; Harikrishnan, Tirunelveli Jayagopal; Anna, Thavasi

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Gastrointestinal (GI) nematodes are considered as a major constraint for successful sheep production. Control of these parasites heavily relies on the use of chemical anthelmintics. Over the past decades, the development of anthelmintic resistance to various groups of anthelmintics and problem of drug residues in animal products has awakened interest in medicinal plants as an alternative source of anthelmintics. Hence, this study was undertaken to evaluate the anthelmintic efficacy of Indigofera tinctoria by scientifically validated in vitro and in vivo tests approved by the World Association for the Advancement of Veterinary Parasitology. Materials and Methods: In vitro assays such as egg hatch assay for ovicidal and larval migration inhibition and larval development assay for larvicidal properties were used to investigate in vitro effect of extracts on strongyle egg and larvae, respectively. Fecal egg count reduction test was conducted in vivo to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of the extracts administered orally at dose rates of 125, 250, 500 mg/kg to sheep naturally infected with mixed GI nematodes. Results: Ethanolic extract of I. tinctoria demonstrated significant (p<0.01) inhibition on egg hatching at concentrations of 40 mg/ml and 80 mg/ml. In in vivo assay, the ethanolic extract of I. tinctoria reduced the fecal egg count ranging between 30.82% and 47.78% at various doses (125, 250 and 500 mg/kg). Although there was a slight variation, all the hematological parameters were within the normal range reported for sheep. Except for alanine transaminase, the overall mean of all the serum biochemical profile was within the normal range for sheep. Conclusion: Based on the results obtained by in vitro and in vivo assay, the ethanolic extract of I. tinctoria possesses anthelmintic activity and could replace the chemical anthelmintics used presently. PMID:27051192

  9. Infection with parasitic nematodes confounds vaccination efficacy.

    PubMed

    Urban, Joseph F; Steenhard, Nina R; Solano-Aguilar, Gloria I; Dawson, Harry D; Iweala, Onyinye I; Nagler, Cathryn R; Noland, Gregory S; Kumar, Nirbhay; Anthony, Robert M; Shea-Donohue, Terez; Weinstock, Joel; Gause, William C

    2007-08-19

    T helper (Th) cells produce signature cytokine patterns, induced largely by intracellular versus extracellular pathogens that provide the cellular and molecular basis for counter regulatory expression of protective immunity during concurrent infections. The production of IL-12 and IFN-gamma, for example, resulting from exposure to many bacterial, viral, and protozoan pathogens is responsible for Th1-derived protective responses that also can inhibit development of Th2-cells expressing IL-4-dependent immunity to extracellular helminth parasites and vice versa. In a similar manner, concurrent helminth infection alters optimal vaccine-induced responses in humans and livestock; however, the consequences of this condition have not been adequately studied especially in the context of a challenge infection following vaccination. Demands for new and effective vaccines to control chronic and emerging diseases, and the need for rapid deployment of vaccines for bio security concerns requires a systematic evaluation of confounding factors that limit vaccine efficacy. One common albeit overlooked confounder is the presence of gastrointestinal nematode parasites in populations of humans and livestock targeted for vaccination. This is particularly important in areas of the world were helminth infections are prevalent, but the interplay between parasites and emerging diseases that can be transmitted worldwide make this a global issue. In addition, it is not clear if the epidemic in allergic disease in industrialized countries substitutes for geohelminth infection to interfere with effective vaccination regimens. This presentation will focus on recent vaccination studies in mice experimentally infected with Heligmosomoides polygyrus to model the condition of gastrointestinal parasite infestation in mammalian populations targeted for vaccination. In addition, a large animal vaccination and challenge model against Mycoplasma hyopneumonia in swine exposed to Ascaris suum will provide

  10. Biological control of infective larvae of a gastro-intestinal nematode (Teladorsagia circumcincta) and a small lungworm (Muellerius capillaris) by Duddingtonia flagrans in goat faeces.

    PubMed

    Paraud, C; Chartier, C

    2003-01-01

    The high prevalence of benzimidazole-resistant nematodes in French grazing dairy goat flocks led to a search for nematode-control schemes based on integrated approaches with non-chemical options, like vaccination, grazing management, or biological control using nematophagous fungi. The effect of the daily feeding of goats with spores of the nematophagous fungus Duddingtonia flagrans on third-stage larvae (L3) of Teladorsagia circumcincta was examined in faecal cultures. In addition, the effect of D. flagrans on the survival of first-stage larvae (L1) of Muellerius capillaris was tested. Twenty-two culled dairy goats previously raised in a zero-grazing system were twice infected at monthly intervals with 5,000 and then 7,500 T. circumcincta L3. Eight animals were infected with a benzimidazole-susceptible (BZs) strain while the remainder received a benzimidazole-resistant one (BZr). Six culled goats naturally infected with M. capillaris were purchased from private farms. All the goats were divided in two groups, one group receiving daily 5 x 10(5) chlamydospores of D. flagrans/kg body weight per goat for seven consecutive days in the food, the other group acting as control. For T. circumcincta-infected goats, individual egg counts and coprocultures (13 days, 25 degrees C) followed by L3 extraction with the Baermann method were performed. For M. capillaris-infected goats, extraction of L1 with the Baermann apparatus was individually performed on day 0 and after coprocultures on days 7, 10 and 14. Reductions in percentage development of T. circumcincta L3 in fungus groups compared with control groups ranged from 84% (BZs strain) to 90% (BZr strain). A decrease in M. capillaris L1 recovery was noted on days 7 and 10 (a reduction of 70% compared with day 0) and on day 14 (85%), but this pattern was similar in both groups, whether receiving the fungus or not. At the dosage of 5 x 10(5) spores/kg body weight, D. flagrans was highly effective in reducing the larval

  11. Cellular proliferation rate and insulin-like growth factor binding protein (IGFBP)-2 and IGFBP-3 and estradiol receptor alpha expression in the mammary gland of dairy heifers naturally infected with gastrointestinal nematodes during development.

    PubMed

    Perri, A F; Dallard, B E; Baravalle, C; Licoff, N; Formía, N; Ortega, H H; Becú-Villalobos, D; Mejia, M E; Lacau-Mengido, I M

    2014-01-01

    Mammary ductal morphogenesis during prepuberty occurs mainly in response to insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and estradiol stimulation. Dairy heifers infected with gastrointestinal nematodes have reduced IGF-1 levels, accompanied by reduced growth rate, delayed puberty onset, and lower parenchyma-stroma relationship in their mammary glands. Immunohistochemical studies were undertaken to determine variations in cell division rate, IGF-1 system components, and estradiol receptors (ESR) during peripubertal development in the mammary glands of antiparasitic-treated and untreated Holstein heifers naturally infected with gastrointestinal nematodes. Mammary biopsies were taken at 20, 30, 40, and 70 wk of age. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen immunolabeling, evident in nuclei, tended to be higher in the parenchyma of the glands from treated heifers than in those from untreated. Insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBP) type 2 and type 3 immunolabeling was cytoplasmic and was evident in stroma and parenchyma. The IGFBP2-labeled area was lower in treated than in untreated heifers. In the treated group, a maximal expression of this protein was seen at 40 wk of age, whereas in the untreated group the labeling remained constant. No differences were observed for IGFBP3 between treatment groups or during development. Immunolabeling for α ESR (ESR1) was evident in parenchymal nuclei and was higher in treated than in untreated heifers. In the treated group, ESR1 peaked at 30 wk of age and then decreased. These results demonstrate that the parasite burden in young heifers negatively influence mammary gland development, affecting cell division rate and parameters related to estradiol and IGF-1 signaling in the gland.

  12. Gastrointestinal nematodes in grazing dairy cattle from small and medium-sized farms in southern Poland.

    PubMed

    Piekarska, J; Płoneczka-Janeczko, K; Kantyka, M; Kuczaj, M; Gorczykowski, M; Janeczko, K

    2013-11-15

    This study aimed to estimate the prevalence of gastrointestinal nematodes and the intensity of infection in grazing dairy cattle from small and medium-sized farms in southern Poland. The level of antibodies against Ostertagia ostertagi in the bulk tank milk (BTM) from the animals was also assessed. Rectal fecal samples collected from 361 cows on 20 farms were examined using Willis-Schlaaf flotation and the McMaster method. BTM samples were tested for the presence of O. ostertagi antibodies using ELISA. Multiplex PCR was used to identify the third-stage larvae (L3) of gastrointestinal nematodes derived from the culture of pooled fecal samples from sampled farms. Gastrointestinal nematode eggs were found in the samples from 18 of the 20 herds with a prevalence range from 20.4 to 94.5%. The average number of eggs excreted in the feces of the herds was 200 eggs per gram (EPG). Antibodies to O. ostertagi were found in 20 of the examined herds (100%), of which 6 had optical density ratios (ODR) greater than 0.5. PCR results showed the presence of three nematode species: Ostertagia ostertagi, Cooperia oncophora and Oesophagostomum radiatum.

  13. Progress in the development of subunit vaccines for gastrointestinal nematodes of ruminants.

    PubMed

    Matthews, J B; Geldhof, P; Tzelos, T; Claerebout, E

    2016-12-01

    The global increase in anthelmintic resistant nematodes of ruminants, together with consumer concerns about chemicals in food, necessitates the development of alternative methods of control for these pathogens. Subunit recombinant vaccines are ideally placed to fill this gap. Indeed, they are probably the only valid option for the long-term control of ruminant parasitic nematodes given the increasing ubiquity of multidrug resistance in a range of worm species across the world. The development of a subunit multicellular parasite vaccine to the point of practical application would be a groundbreaking step in the control of these important endemic infections of livestock. This review summarizes the current status of subunit vaccine development for a number of important gastrointestinal nematodes of cattle and sheep, with a focus on the limitations and problems encountered thus far, and suggestions as to how these hurdles might be overcome.

  14. Occurrences of Eimeria spp. and gastrointestinal nematodes in dairy calves in southern Minas Gerais, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Bruhn, Fábio Raphael Pascoti; Silva Júnior, Fidelis Antônio; Carvalho, André Henrique de Oliveira; Orlando, Débora Ribeiro; Rocha, Christiane Maria Barcellos Magalhães da; Guimarães, Antônio Marcos

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this cross-sectional observational study was to determine the frequency and factors associated with infection by Eimeria spp. and gastrointestinal nematodes in 356 calves on 20 dairy farms located in southern Minas Gerais, Brazil. Ten species of Eimeria spp. were identified, of which E. bovis (37.6%) and E. zuernii (17.9%) were the most frequent. From fecal cultures, four genera of gastrointestinal nematodes were recovered, of which Cooperia spp. (74.6%) and Haemonchus (19.4%) were the most frequent. Variables relating to higher levels of technology used on dairy farms showed a significant association (p < 0.05) with higher OPG and EPG counts, and are discussed in this study.

  15. Imported Infections with Mansonella perstans Nematodes, Italy

    PubMed Central

    Beltrame, Anna; Buonfrate, Dora; Staffolani, Silvia; Degani, Monica; Gobbo, Maria; Angheben, Andrea; Marocco, Stefania; Bisoffi, Zeno

    2017-01-01

    We report 74 patients in Italy infected with Mansonella perstans nematodes, a poorly described filarial parasite. M. perstans nematodes should be included in the differential diagnosis for patients with eosinophilia from disease-endemic countries. Serologic analysis is useful for screening, and testing for microfilaremia in peripheral blood should be performed for parasite-positive patients. PMID:28820369

  16. Gastrointestinal infections in children.

    PubMed

    Mönkemüller, K E; Wilcox, C M

    2001-01-01

    Gastrointestinal infections in children are a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Children living in developing countries are particularly susceptible to infectious diarrhea because of poor standards of hygiene and sanitation. Although the magnitude of diarrheal illnesses in developed countries is less, costly hospital admissions are still frequent. The causal agent of infectious diarrhea is most frequently related to age, geographical location, lifestyle habits, use of antibiotics, associated medical conditions, social circumstances, and degree of immune competence. In this article we present some of the most important articles published in the field during the last year. The role of Helicobacter pylori in the pathogenesis of gastritis and peptic ulcer disease has been shown in adults and children. Information about the natural history of H. pylori, symptomatology, and diagnostic therapeutic approaches for children are being generated constantly; we discuss some of the most relevant information in this review.

  17. Influence of protein supplementation on the resistance and resilience on young hair sheep naturally infected with gastrointestinal nematodes during rainy and dry seasons.

    PubMed

    Louvandini, H; Veloso, C F M; Paludo, G R; Dell'Porto, A; Gennari, S M; McManus, C M

    2006-04-15

    Thirty, 4-month-old entire Santa Ines lambs were grazed on an Andropogon gayanus pasture, during a 34-week period (rainy season weeks 0-20 and dry season weeks 21-34) and allocated in two treatment groups (n = 15) each with different protein supplementation: high protein (HP-19% CP) and low protein (LP-11% CP). These were subdivided into those receiving anthelmintic treatment (c) (n = 7) and without anthelmintic treatment (i) (n = 8). The objective was to evaluate the effects of supplementation with protein on resistance and resilience to natural helminth infection of hair breed lambs. Lamb weight, blood collection and faecal egg counts (FEC) were carried out monthly. The lambs were slaughtered after 34 weeks, when worm burdens, worm length and eosinophil cell counts were taken. The sheep on treatments HPc and HPi were heavier in live weight than those from LPi and LPc (P < 0.05) at the end of the rainy period. The HPc group finished heavier (P < 0.05) than the other groups in the dry season, which had no significant differences between them. The predominant species of nematode found was T. colubriformis followed by H. contortus, Trichuris globulosa and Moniezia expansa. Animals on HPi had lower FEC than LPi (P < 0.05). The number of worms was lower for both HP groups (P < 0.05) with worm length shorter in the HPc group (P < 0.05) compared with all other groups. The number of eosinophils was higher in animals in the LPi group, which also showed anaemia and lower plasma urea at the end of the dry season. Diet supplementation with high protein was able to improve resilience and resistance to natural infection by endoparasites during the rainy season. In the dry season there was a decrease in both of these traits, which were intimately linked to the quality of available forage under tropical conditions.

  18. Epidemiology of gastrointestinal nematodes of sheep managed under traditional husbandry system in Kashmir valley.

    PubMed

    Tariq, K A; Chishti, M Z; Ahmad, F; Shawl, A S

    2008-11-25

    The present study was conducted with the objective to investigate the seasonal epidemiological prevalence of gastrointestinal tract (GIT) nematodes in different age groups, sexes and breeds (genotypes) of sheep through necropsy and faecal analysis over a period of 2 years in Kashmir valley, India. A total of 1533 sheep were examined [faecal examination: 1035 (year 1: 561, year 2: 474); necropsy: 498 (year 1: 232, year 2: 266)]. Out of these, 945 (61.64%) were found infected [faecal examination: 697 (67.34%, year 1: 390 (69.51%), year 2: 307 (46.99%); necropsy: 248 (49.79%, year 1: 123 (53.01%), year 2: 125 (64.69%)] with GIT nematodes. The over all prevalence of GIT nematodes in sheep in year 1 was 64.76 and 58.37% in year 2 (P=0.04). The parasites in decreasing order of prevalence (%) in sheep were Haemonchus contortus (59.6); Ostertagia circumcincta (38.0); Bunostomum trigonocephalum (37.7); Chabertia ovina (37.7); Trichostrongylus spp. (33.9); Nematodirus spathiger (29.4); Oesophagostomum columbianum (28.4); Trichuris ovis (23.5) and Marshallagia marshalli (22.1). Season, sex, age, and genotype were the factors that influenced the epidemiological prevalence of GIT nematodes in sheep in the present study. The maximum nematode infection was observed in summer season and lowest in winter (P=0.0005). Local Kashmiri breed was less infected as compared to other genotypes (P>0.05). Lower age groups were more infected than adult animals (P>/=0.05). Prevalence was higher in rams (males) than eves (females) (P>0.05). The present study will initially be of great significance to add to the existing knowledge of the epidemiology of GIT nematodes of small ruminants and the findings will be quite helpful to devise the appropriate control and prophylactic strategies for GIT nematodiasis of sheep reared under the temperate agro-climatic conditions.

  19. Gastrointestinal nematode species burdens and host mortality in a feral sheep population.

    PubMed

    Craig, B H; Pilkington, J G; Pemberton, J M

    2006-10-01

    Every few years a large proportion of the feral sheep on Hirta, St Kilda die due to food shortage. The effects of malnutrition are exacerbated by gastrointestinal nematodes. As found in sheep flocks in mainland Britain, Teladorsagia circumcincta has long been considered the predominant and most pathogenic nematode species in all age classes of Soay sheep. Previous research indicated that intensity of this species showed a negative association with host age and comprised 75% of the entire gastrointestinal burden. Here we present new data that show Trichostrongylus axei and Trichostrongylus vitrinus to be the predominant worm pathogens in young Soay sheep. In the present study, Trichostrongylus spp. burdens declined with host age whereas T. circumcincta actually increased in burden over the first few age classes. Also, male hosts had significantly higher burdens of Trichostrongylus spp. than females, with this genus making up a higher proportion of the strongyle egg producing community in male hosts than female hosts. These new findings raise questions concerning our previous interpretation of the main nematode species contributing to strongyle egg count in the population, and the contrasting infection patterns of these nematode species in unmanaged St Kilda Soay sheep compared with domestic sheep in mainland Britain.

  20. Genome-wide scan of gastrointestinal nematode resistance in closed Angus population selected for minimized influence of MHC

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Genetic markers associated with parasite indicator traits are ideal targets for study of marker assisted selection aimed at controlling infections that reduce herd use of anthelminthics. For this study, we collected gastrointestinal (GI) nematode fecal egg count (FEC) data from post weaning animals ...

  1. Linear distribution of nematodes in the gastrointestinal tract of tracer lambs.

    PubMed

    Makovcová, Katerina; Langrová, Iva; Vadlejch, Jaroslav; Jankovská, Ivana; Lytvynets, Andriy; Borkovcová, Marie

    2008-12-01

    Forty-eight tracer lambs were killed in 2004-2007. The abomasum, duodenum, small intestine (jejunum and ileum), colon and caecum were collected and processed for parasites enumeration and identification-mucosal scrapings of both abomasums and intestines were digested. Out of 48 gastrointestinal tracts examined, all were found to be positive for nematode infection. Seventeen species of gastrointestinal nematodes were recovered: Bunostomum trigonocephalum, Cooperia curticei, Haemonchus contortus, Chabertia ovina, Nematodirus battus, Nematodirus filicollis, Oesophagostomum venulosum, Teladorsagia circumcincta, Trichostrongylus axei, Trichostrongylus colubriformis, Trichostrongylus vitrinus, Strongyloides papillosus, Trichuris ovis, Trichuris globulosa, Trichuris skrjabini and Skrjabinema ovis. All species were searched for in the entire gastrointestinal tract. Six species of nematodes were recovered from abnormal sites, naturally in small numbers of lambs as well as in small amounts: Nematodirus battus in the abomasums (6.67% of lambs), N. filicollis in the caecum and in the colon (%4 and 8%, respectively), T. axei in the colon (9.52%), T. colubriformis in the colon (13.89%), T. vitrinus in the caecum (16.67%), in the colon (20.00%) and in the abomasum (3.33%). T. ovis was found in one case in the small intestine.

  2. Desiccation tolerance of gastrointestinal nematode third-stage larvae: exploring the effects on survival and fitness.

    PubMed

    Chylinski, C; Lherminé, E; Coquille, M; Cabaret, J

    2014-08-01

    The free-living third-stage larvae (L3) of gastrointestinal nematodes are able to tolerate extreme weather conditions such as desiccation, but little is known about the consequent effects this has on their fitness. This study explored how the desiccation of Haemonchus contortus L3 larvae affected their absolute fitness by examining their success at consequent life cycle stages for a complete generation, and comparing them against a control. The stages examined include establishment, fecundity, larval development and pathogenicity. The results show that while desiccation greatly reduced the survival of the L3 prior to infection in sheep, their absolute fitness was not negatively impacted. Instead, it appears desiccation slightly augmented H. contortus fitness by triggering increases in fecundity. The study further explored what influence different gastrointestinal nematode (GIN) species (H. contortus, Trichostrongylus colubriformis, Teladorsagia circumcincta), isolates and age of L3 had on their capacity to revive following various periods of desiccation. The results showed desiccation tolerance varied as a function of each of these variables. The greatest L3 survival was found in Te. circumcincta followed by Tr. colubriformis and finally H. contortus. Significant variation was observed between individual species isolates and as a function of age. The results of this study carry important practical implications for the epidemiological understanding of gastrointestinal nematode species of economic importance.

  3. Effect of tanniniferous food from Bauhinia pulchella on pasture contamination with gastrointestinal nematodes from goats.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Suzana G; Barros, Lilyan B G; Louvandini, Helder; Abdalla, Adibe L; Costa Junior, Livio M

    2016-02-24

    Tannin-rich plants have been examined as an alternative for controlling the gastrointestinal nematodes in ruminants. In vivo assays typically examine the anthelmintic activity in female fecundity and/or the adult worm burden, without considering other life-cycle stages or the impact on pasture contamination. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the anthelmintic activity of tanniniferous food from Bauhinia pulchella in goats and the potential impact on pasture contamination with the infective larval stage of gastrointestinal nematodes. Sixteen cross breed Boer goats that were naturally infected with gastrointestinal nematodes were fed tanniniferous concentrate from the leaves of B. pulchella and compared to a separate paddock of control animals without condensed tannin supplementation. A range of parasite characteristics were monitored throughout the 63 days of experimentation, including faecal egg count (FEC), egg hatching and relative numbers of hatched helminth larvae on herbage. Worm free tracer animals were used to assess the infective larval stage load of the contaminated pasture. The tanniniferous food did not reduce the combined FEC values, but egg hatching was significantly affected (p < 0.05). The pasture grazed by goats fed with tanniniferous food from B. pulchella showed reduced contamination through infective larval stages. Tracer goats maintained in paddocks grazed with animals fed with tanniniferous food had lower numbers of Trichostrongylus colubriformis than did those in the control group (86 % reduction). Condensed tannin from B. pulchella showed anthelmintic activity, affected egg viability and reduced pasture contamination, which led to the reduced infection of the animals by T. colubriformis.

  4. Interactions between gastrointestinal nematode parasites and diarrhoea in sheep: pathogenesis and control.

    PubMed

    Williams, Andrew R; Palmer, Dieter G

    2012-06-01

    Diarrhoea is a major impediment to profitable sheep production in many countries as it predisposes animals to blowfly strike and contaminates wool and meat carcasses. While it is accepted that nematode parasites are a major cause of diarrhoea in grazing animals, less is known about what facets of the host-parasite relationship lead to diarrhoea and what the most appropriate control strategies are. In this review, the relationship between gastrointestinal nematode infection and diarrhoea is discussed and it is concluded that in many cases, particularly in immunologically mature sheep, diarrhoea is not due to parasite infection per se but rather due to immunopathological processes. Mechanisms that lead to faecal softening in immune sheep are considered, and the question addressed as to whether anthelmintic treatment and selective breeding of naturally parasite-resistant sheep will effectively reduce the occurrence of diarrhoea.

  5. Nutrition-parasite interactions in goats: is immunoregulation involved in the control of gastrointestinal nematodes?

    PubMed

    Hoste, H; Torres-Acosta, J F J; Aguilar-Caballero, A J

    2008-02-01

    Compared to sheep, goats seem to develop a low immune response against the parasitic nematodes of the gastrointestinal tract. Nevertheless, some variability in the host response has been observed either at the individual level or depending on internal (genetic) or external (physiological status, nutrition) factors suggesting the possibility to exploit and manipulate this response. There is good evidence from field studies to suggest that a better plane of nutrition might contribute to improve goat resilience. However, the effects on immunoregulation and host resistance remain less clear. Due to their peculiarities in feeding behaviour ('intermediate browser'), goats represent a valuable model to explore the relationships between the three possible strategies to control nematode infection through nutrition: (i) by increasing the immune response; (ii) by avoiding the infective larvae; and (iii) by selecting plants with direct anthelmintic properties (self medication).

  6. Biological control of gastro-intestinal nematodes--facts, future, or fiction?

    PubMed

    Larsen, M; Nansen, P; Grønvold, J; Wolstrup, J; Henriksen, S A

    1997-11-01

    The potential of using fungi to prevent nematodosis caused by parasites with free-living larval stages is well documented today. In this respect Duddingtonia flagrans, a net-trapping, nematode-destroying fungus, appears to be the most promising candidate. Laboratory experiments and in-vivo studies, where fungal spores have survived passage through the gastro-intestinal tract of cattle and horses, plus field studies with cattle, horses and pigs, demonstrate significant reduction in the number of infective larvae that develop in the faecal environment. In field trials this reduction subsequently leads to reduced infectivity of herbage and also reduced worm burdens in grazing animals. A status of the present situation, primarily based upon work performed in Denmark within the last 6-8 years, plus an outlook for practical implementation of an integrated control strategy including the use of nematode-destroying fungi in the future is discussed.

  7. Anthelmintic resistance in gastrointestinal nematodes of beef cattle in the state of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Fernanda; Portella, Luiza Pires; Rodrigues, Fernando de Souza; Reginato, Caroline Zamperete; Pötter, Luciana; Cezar, Alfredo Skrebsky; Sangioni, Luís Antônio; Vogel, Fernanda Silveira Flores

    2016-04-01

    Gastrointestinal nematodes resistant to anthelmintics have been reported in several regions of Brazil, and they may be associated with economic losses for the cattle industry. This study aimed to evaluate the resistance status of gastrointestinal nematodes from naturally infected beef cattle to several commercially available anthelmintics, as well as to test the efficacy of combinations of anthelmintics against multi-resistant gastrointestinal nematodes. Ten farms located in Rio Grande do Sul state were selected by: farmers' consent; extensive raising system; availability of calves aged from 7 to 9 months naturally infected by gastrointestinal nematodes; absence of anthelmintic treatment for 60 days before the study; and presence of 70-100 calves or more of both genders with ≥ 200 eggs per gram of feces (EPG) (sensitivity of 50 EPG). These calves were distributed into 10 groups (of 7-10 animals) per farm and treated with ivermectin, doramectin, eprinomectin, fenbendazole, closantel, nitroxynil, disophenol, levamisole, albendazole, or moxidectin. Feces were collected 2 days before treatment and 14 days after treatment. Additional groups of 7-10 calves were used to test six different two-drug combinations at four of the studied farms. In general terms, fenbendazole was the most effective drug, followed by levamisole, disophenol, and moxidectin. However, parasite resistance to multiple drugs was found in all herds, especially in the genera Cooperia spp., Trichostrongylus spp., and Haemonchus spp.. Some of the two-drug combinations were effective against nematode populations identified as resistant to the same compounds when used as single drugs. The most effective combinations were moxidectin + levamisole, doramectin + fenbendazole, and levamisole + closantel. In this study, parasites resistant to the main commercially available anthelmintics were found in all herds, and some combinations of two active components belonging to different chemical groups were effective

  8. Anthelmintic resistance in gastrointestinal nematodes of beef cattle in the state of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Fernanda; Portella, Luiza Pires; Rodrigues, Fernando de Souza; Reginato, Caroline Zamperete; Pötter, Luciana; Cezar, Alfredo Skrebsky; Sangioni, Luís Antônio; Vogel, Fernanda Silveira Flores

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal nematodes resistant to anthelmintics have been reported in several regions of Brazil, and they may be associated with economic losses for the cattle industry. This study aimed to evaluate the resistance status of gastrointestinal nematodes from naturally infected beef cattle to several commercially available anthelmintics, as well as to test the efficacy of combinations of anthelmintics against multi-resistant gastrointestinal nematodes. Ten farms located in Rio Grande do Sul state were selected by: farmers' consent; extensive raising system; availability of calves aged from 7 to 9 months naturally infected by gastrointestinal nematodes; absence of anthelmintic treatment for 60 days before the study; and presence of 70–100 calves or more of both genders with ≥200 eggs per gram of feces (EPG) (sensitivity of 50 EPG). These calves were distributed into 10 groups (of 7–10 animals) per farm and treated with ivermectin, doramectin, eprinomectin, fenbendazole, closantel, nitroxynil, disophenol, levamisole, albendazole, or moxidectin. Feces were collected 2 days before treatment and 14 days after treatment. Additional groups of 7–10 calves were used to test six different two-drug combinations at four of the studied farms. In general terms, fenbendazole was the most effective drug, followed by levamisole, disophenol, and moxidectin. However, parasite resistance to multiple drugs was found in all herds, especially in the genera Cooperia spp., Trichostrongylus spp., and Haemonchus spp.. Some of the two-drug combinations were effective against nematode populations identified as resistant to the same compounds when used as single drugs. The most effective combinations were moxidectin + levamisole, doramectin + fenbendazole, and levamisole + closantel. In this study, parasites resistant to the main commercially available anthelmintics were found in all herds, and some combinations of two active components belonging to different chemical groups

  9. Resistance against gastrointestinal nematodes in Crioulo Lageano and crossbred Angus cattle in southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Cristina P; Silva, Bruna F; Trinca, Luzia A; Amarante, Alessandro F T

    2013-02-18

    Gastrointestinal nematode (GIN) infection is a major cause of production losses in cattle. This study was carried out to evaluate the natural resistance against nematode infection in Crioulo Lageano and crossbred Angus male calves. Crioulo Lageano is a local cattle breed in the state of Santa Catarina, in southern Brazil. Ten weaned calves of each breed were grazed together on pasture and naturally infected with nematodes between July 2009 and December 2010. Once every 28 days, we collected fecal and blood samples for parasitological and immunological tests, as well as recording body weights. After 19 samplings, all animals were slaughtered for quantification and identification of GINs. We found that the animals had been infected with the following nematode species, in decreasing order by the mean number of specimens: Trichostrongylus axei, Cooperia punctata, Ostertagia ostertagi, Haemonchus placei, Oesophagostomum radiatum, and Trichuris spp. There were no significant differences between the Crioulo Lageano and crossbred Angus groups in terms of worm burden or nematode fecal egg count, nor in terms of the mean levels of immunoglobulin (G and A) against C. punctata and H. placei antigens, except in IgA mean level in abomasal mucus against H. placei adult worms that was significantly higher in crossbred Angus cattle (p<0.05). At the end of the study, the crossbred Angus cattle were heavier than were the Crioulo Lageano cattle (mean live weight, 507.35 and 390.3 kg, respectively). Comparative parasitological and immunological evaluation revealed no difference between two breeds in terms of their natural resistance against GINs.

  10. Gastrointestinal Parasitic Infections

    PubMed Central

    Embil, Juan A.; Embil, John M.

    1988-01-01

    This article surveys the most important gastrointestinal parasites that affect humans. The modes of acquisition, pathology, epidemiology, diagnosis, and treatment are all briefly examined. Gastrointestinal parasites have become increasingly important in the differential diagnosis of gastrointestinal disease, as a result of a number of circumstances. These circumstances include: increasing travel to developing countries; increased numbers, for one reason or another, of immunocompromised individuals; increased consumption of raw or partially cooked ethnic delicacies; more crowding in day-care centres; increased immigration from developing countries; and an endemic pocket of individuals with certain unhygienic or unsanitary practices. PMID:21253148

  11. Prevalence of gastrointestinal nematodes in growing pigs in Kabale District in Uganda.

    PubMed

    Nissen, Sofie; Poulsen, Idahella H; Nejsum, Peter; Olsen, Annette; Roepstorff, Allan; Rubaire-Akiiki, C; Thamsborg, Stig M

    2011-03-01

    During the last 30 years, pig production in Uganda and neighbouring counties has increased markedly. Pigs are mainly kept as a source of income for small-scale farmers; however, the pig production is subject to several constraints, one of them being worm infections. A study was carried out in rural communities in Kabale District in the South Western part of Uganda in September and October 2007 in order to estimate the prevalence of gastrointestinal nematode parasites in pigs based on coprological examination. Fifty-six households were randomly selected and visited. Housing system and deworming history were recorded. Faeces was sampled from rectum of one to five pigs (age, 3-12 months) per household. A total of 106 pigs were examined coprologically of which 91% excreted nematode eggs. The following prevalences of nematode eggs were recorded: strongyles (89%), Ascaris suum (40%), Trichuris suis (17%) and spiruroid eggs (48%). On household level, rearing pigs on slatted floors in pens significantly reduced the faecal egg excretion of strongyle eggs with almost 80% (p=0.010) and a significant interaction between floor type and anthelmintic treatment was found for spiruroids (p=0.037). Fifteen T. suis egg positive pigs were selected for post-mortem examination of the gastrointestinal tract. The post-mortem examinations revealed that 93% pigs were infected with Oesophagostomum spp. (worm burden, min-max 10-2,180), 73% with A. suum (1-36), 67% with T. suis (6-58), and 20% with Hyostrongylus rubidus (worms not quantified). In general, nematode infections were widespread and polyparasitism common in pigs in Uganda. However, worm burdens were moderate which may be related to recent deworming or to the practice of rearing pigs on slatted floors in wooden elevated pens.

  12. Pilot project to investigate over-wintering of free-living gastrointestinal nematode larvae of sheep in Ontario, Canada.

    PubMed

    Falzon, Laura C; Menzies, Paula I; VanLeeuwen, John; Shakya, Krishna P; Jones-Bitton, Andria; Avula, Jacob; Jansen, Jocelyn T; Peregrine, Andrew S

    2014-08-01

    This study investigated the overwintering survival and infectivity of free-living gastrointestinal nematode (GIN) stages on pasture. The presence of GIN larvae was assessed on 3 sheep farms in Ontario with a reported history of clinical haemonchosis, by collecting monthly pasture samples over the winter months of 2009/2010. The infectivity of GIN larvae on spring pastures was evaluated using 16 tracer lambs. Air and soil temperature and moisture were recorded hourly. Free-living stages of Trichostrongylus spp. and Nematodirus spp. were isolated from herbage samples. Gastrointestinal nematodes were recovered from all tracer lambs on all farms; Teladorsagia sp. was the predominant species. Very low levels of Haemonchus contortus were recovered from 1 animal on 1 farm. The results suggest that Haemonchus larvae do not survive well on pasture, while Teladorsagia sp., Trichostrongylus spp. and Nematodirus spp. are able to overwinter on pasture in Ontario and are still infective for sheep in the spring.

  13. Pilot project to investigate over-wintering of free-living gastrointestinal nematode larvae of sheep in Ontario, Canada

    PubMed Central

    Falzon, Laura C.; Menzies, Paula I.; VanLeeuwen, John; Shakya, Krishna P.; Jones-Bitton, Andria; Avula, Jacob; Jansen, Jocelyn T.; Peregrine, Andrew S.

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the overwintering survival and infectivity of free-living gastrointestinal nematode (GIN) stages on pasture. The presence of GIN larvae was assessed on 3 sheep farms in Ontario with a reported history of clinical haemonchosis, by collecting monthly pasture samples over the winter months of 2009/2010. The infectivity of GIN larvae on spring pastures was evaluated using 16 tracer lambs. Air and soil temperature and moisture were recorded hourly. Free-living stages of Trichostrongylus spp. and Nematodirus spp. were isolated from herbage samples. Gastrointestinal nematodes were recovered from all tracer lambs on all farms; Teladorsagia sp. was the predominant species. Very low levels of Haemonchus contortus were recovered from 1 animal on 1 farm. The results suggest that Haemonchus larvae do not survive well on pasture, while Teladorsagia sp., Trichostrongylus spp. and Nematodirus spp. are able to overwinter on pasture in Ontario and are still infective for sheep in the spring. PMID:25082990

  14. In vitro anthelmintic activity of active compounds of the fringed rue Ruta chalepensis against dairy ewe gastrointestinal nematodes.

    PubMed

    Ortu, E; Sanna, G; Scala, A; Pulina, G; Caboni, P; Battacone, G

    2016-06-22

    Infections by gastrointestinal nematodes negatively affect small ruminant health and at the same time cause substantial economic losses worldwide. Because resistance to conventional anthelmintic compounds is growing, target studies evaluating the effectiveness of alternative ingredients of botanical origin on gastrointestinal nematodes are needed. In this study, we evaluated the in vitro anthelmintic activity of Ruta chalepensis L. extracts on the third-stage larvae of sheep gastrointestinal nematodes. A methanol extract showed the highest anthelmintic activity, with an EC50 = 0.10 ± 0.06 mg/ml after 96 h, while the essential oil had an EC50 = 1.45 ± 1.22 mg/ml after 48 h. Moreover, three secondary metabolites of the essential oil, i.e. 2-decanone, 2-nonanone and 2-undecanone, showed EC50 values of 0.07 ± 0.06, 0.25 ± 0.29 and 0.88 ± 0.73 mg/ml at 24 h, respectively. The present study indicated that the R. chalepensis methanol extract, the essential oil and its metabolites 2-decanone, 2-nonanone and 2-undecanone showed promising anthelmintic activity on gastrointestinal nematodes.

  15. Epidemiological observations and heterosis analysis of gastrointestinal nematode parasitism in Suffolk, Gulf Coast Native, and crossbred lambs.

    PubMed

    Li, Y; Miller, J E; Franke, D E

    2001-07-27

    A crossbreeding program was conducted to evaluate the resistant status to gastrointestinal nematode parasite infection in crossbred (F1) lambs and their Suffolk and Gulf Coast Native (Native) breed counterparts. A total of 253 lambs were included in the study over 2 years. Fecal egg count (FEC) and blood packed cell volume (PCV) of 18-20 monitor lambs of each breed group in each year were collected every other week from birth to 24-30 weeks of age. The FEC and PCV of all lambs were determined at weaning (11-12 weeks of age) and at three subsequent times when anthelmintic treatment was administered. Nematode counts of wether lambs were obtained at 30 weeks of age in the first year. The epidemiological patterns of FEC and PCV of each breed group were similar in both years. The Suffolk group consistently showed the highest FEC and the lowest PCV. Conversely, the Native group had the lowest FEC and highest PCV. For the most part, all parameters for the F1 group fell intermediate to the Native and Suffolk groups. Nematode count followed the same pattern. Heterosis analysis showed that FEC, PCV, nematode count and weight gain of the F1 group favored the Native group. These results suggested that crossbreeding Suffolk to Native sheep may be a suitable way to produce lambs with improved resistance to gastrointestinal nematode infection, but production may be compromised.

  16. Mucocutaneous manifestations of helminth infections: Nematodes.

    PubMed

    Lupi, Omar; Downing, Christopher; Lee, Michael; Pino, Livia; Bravo, Francisco; Giglio, Patricia; Sethi, Aisha; Klaus, Sidney; Sangueza, Omar P; Fuller, Claire; Mendoza, Natalia; Ladizinski, Barry; Woc-Colburn, Laila; Tyring, Stephen K

    2015-12-01

    In the 21st century, despite increased globalization through international travel for business, medical volunteerism, pleasure, and immigration/refugees into the United States, there is little published in the dermatology literature regarding the cutaneous manifestations of helminth infections. Approximately 17% of travelers seek medical care because of cutaneous disorders, many related to infectious etiologies. This review will focus on the cutaneous manifestations of helminth infections and is divided into 2 parts: part I focuses on nematode infections, and part II focuses on trematode and cestode infections. This review highlights the clinical manifestations, transmission, diagnosis, and treatment of helminth infections. Nematodes are roundworms that cause diseases with cutaneous manifestations, such as cutaneous larval migrans, onchocerciasis, filariasis, gnathostomiasis, loiasis, dracunculiasis, strongyloidiasis, ascariasis, streptocerciasis, dirofilariasis, and trichinosis. Tremadotes, also known as flukes, cause schistosomiasis, paragonimiasis, and fascioliasis. Cestodes (tapeworms) are flat, hermaphroditic parasites that cause diseases such as sparganosis, cysticercosis, and echinococcus.

  17. Epidemiology and effect of gastrointestinal nematodes on dairy goats in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Suarez, Victor H; Martínez, Gabriela M; Viñabal, Alberto E; Alfaro, José R

    2017-02-28

    The aim of this work was to study the epidemiology and harmful effects of gastrointestinal nematodes (GINs) on dairy goats maintained in an intensive system. Two groups of goats were studied: untreated group (UG) (subdivided into UGjun goats that kidded in June, and UGjul goats that kidded in July) and treated group (TG) (with no subgroups, treated with monepantel: 3.75 mg/kg, orally, monthly). Eggs per gram (epg) in faeces were counted, faecal culture was performed to differentiate nematode genera and milk production was measured. Differences between groups were compared using least squares means analysis of variance (milk production and milking period length) and Kruskal-Wallis test (faecal egg counts). Nematode infection was moderate, with Haemonchus and Trichostrongylus being the dominant genera; the faecal egg counts reached the level of 2000 only once throughout the study. Goats that kidded in June had higher egg count after parturition (UGjun = 1564 epg), with significant differences (p < 0.04) from those that still had not kidded (UGjul = 962 epg). Over the entire trial period, the mean total milk production of TG (399.5 L ± 34.0 L) was significantly higher (p < 0.05) than that of UG (281.6 L ± 37.5 L), representing an increase of 41.8% in total milk yield. The results of this study show a post-partum peak in egg count and a negative effect of GINs on milk yield, even with moderate infections.

  18. Control of gastrointestinal parasitism with nematodes in dairy goats by treating the host category at risk.

    PubMed

    Hoste, Hervé; Chartier, Christophe; Le Frileux, Yves

    2002-01-01

    Infections of the gastrointestinal tract with parasitic nematodes remain one of the main limiting factors in grazing dairy goats. The usual mode of control of these parasitic diseases has up to now been based on the repeated use of anthelmintics. However, the prevalence rates of anthelmintic resistances, in particular to benzimidazoles, are now particularly high in the French dairy goat production. This situation makes it mandatory to reconsider the usual mode of control of these nematodes and to look for short term, alternative solutions which combine the control of gastrointestinal infections and management of anthelmintic resistances. One of the possible options is to leave a part of the flock without treatment during the grazing season in order to maintain alleles of susceptibility to anthelmintics within the worm populations. Previous epidemiological observations identifying the categories of host populations at risk are presented which provide the rationale for targeted applications of treatments. The results of assays on experimental flocks and from farm surveys examining the advantages and drawbacks of selective treatments are presented. The value of these results in combination with other alternative solutions of control are discussed in order to use minimum treatments with maximum benefits.

  19. Prevalence of common gastrointestinal nematode parasites in scavenging pigs of different ages and sexes in eastern centre province, Burkina Faso.

    PubMed

    Tamboura, H H; Banga-Mboko, H; Maes, D; Youssao, I; Traore, A; Bayala, B; Dembele, M A

    2006-03-01

    The range and infestation intensities of gastrointestinal parasitic nematode species depend on the type of swine production system. The present study focused mainly on nematodes of veterinary importance in scavenging pigs in Burkina Faso, and aimed at determining the prevalence of gastro-intestinal nematode parasites by means of faecal egg per gram (EPG) counts. Between November 2001 and October 2002, faecal samples from 383 pigs of different sexes and ages (< 5 months, 5-12 months and > 12 months) were collected from the rectum and examined for gastrointestinal nematodes parasites using the Mc Master method. Of the 383 pigs examined, 91% were infected by one or more parasites. Ascaris suum (40%; 100-1 400 EPG) was the most prevalent parasite followed by Strongyloides ransomi (21%; 100-4200 EPG), Oesophagostomum spp. (18%; 100-1000 EPG), Hyostrongylus rubidus (11%; 100-1 800 EPG), Globocephalus spp. (10%; 100-400 EPG) and Trichuris suis (1 %; 100-200 EPG). The prevalence was significantly higher in female pigs (n = 239) than in males. In addition, females excreted significantly (P < 0.05) more eggs in their faeces than males, except in the case of Globocephalus spp. The age of the animal had no effect on the prevalence of A. suum whereas there were significant differences in age categories concerning S. ransomi, H. rubidus, Oesophagostumum spp. and Globocephalus spp. Unexpectedly, the high prevalence of these common parasites was not accompanied by elevated EPG values, which suggests the existence of moderate infestations. The present work indicates that the common nematode infestations in pigs do not necessarily need a systematic herd anthelmintic treatment, as only a small number of worms is required to induce immunity. A further study is needed to formulate appropriate and cost-effective strategies for the control of gastro-intestinal nematode parasites in pigs in Burkina Faso.

  20. Observations on the free-living stages of cattle gastrointestinal nematodes.

    PubMed

    Fiel, C A; Fernández, A S; Rodríguez, E M; Fusé, L A; Steffan, P E

    2012-06-08

    A 4-year study on the free-living stages of cattle gastrointestinal nematodes was conducted to determine (a) the development time from egg to infective larvae (L3) inside the faecal pats, (b) the pasture infectivity levels over time, and (c) the survival of L3 on pasture. Naturally infected calves were allowed to contaminate 16 plots on monthly basis. Weekly monitoring of eggs per gram of faeces (epg) values and faecal cultures from these animals provided data for the contamination patterns and the relative nematode population composition. At the same time, faecal pats were shaped and deposited monthly onto herbage and sampled weekly to determine the development time from egg to L3. Herbage samples were collected fortnightly over a 16-month period after deposition to evaluate the pasture larval infectivity and survival of L3 over time. The development time from egg to L3 was 1-2 weeks in summer, 3-5 weeks in autumn, 4-6 weeks in winter, and 1-4 weeks in spring. The levels of contamination and pasture infectivity showed a clear seasonality during autumn-winter and spring, whilst a high mortality of larvae on pasture occurred in summer. Ostertagia spp., Cooperia spp. and Trichostrongylus spp. were predominant and a survival of L3 on pasture over a 1-year period was recorded in this study.

  1. Gastrointestinal nematodes of moose (Alces alces) in relation to supplementary feeding.

    PubMed

    Milner, Jos M; Wedul, Sari J; Laaksonen, Sauli; Oksanen, Antti

    2013-01-01

    Winter supplementary feeding of wildlife is controversial because it may promote parasite and disease transmission by host aggregation. We investigated the effect of winter supplemental feeding of Scandinavian moose (Alces alces) on gastrointestinal (GI) parasite infection in two counties of southern Norway by comparing fecal egg counts of moose using, and not using, feeding stations between January 2007 and March 2010. We identified three different GI nematodes based on egg morphology. All three were found in Hedmark county while in Telemark county we found only Trichuris sp. (prevalence 33%). Prevalence of Trichostrongylidae (65%) and Nematodirus sp. (26%) in Hedmark was not affected by feeding station use. However, the probability of infection varied significantly between years sampled (Trichostrongylidae) and age class (Nematodirus sp.). Fecal egg counts (FEC), a proxy for intensity of infection, of Trichostrongylidae were higher in the year when winter weather conditions were more challenging and prevalence was higher, and decreased with increasing body mass. Adult moose had higher FECs than did juvenile moose, and female juveniles had lower abundances than did male juveniles. Use of feeding stations did not affect probability of infection with any of the nematodes or intensity of infection with Trichostrongylidae. We discuss our findings in terms of parasite life histories and recommend that parasitologic surveillance be included in the monitoring of feeding programs.

  2. The use of FAMACHA in estimation of gastrointestinal nematodes and total worm burden in Damara and Barbados Blackbelly cross sheep.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Konto; Abba, Yusuf; Ramli, Nur Syairah Binti; Marimuthu, Murugaiyah; Omar, Mohammed Ariff; Abdullah, Faez Firdaus Jesse; Sadiq, Muhammad Abubakar; Tijjani, Abdulnasir; Chung, Eric Lim Teik; Lila, Mohammed Azmi Mohammed

    2016-06-01

    The prevalence of gastrointestinal (GI) nematodes and total worm burden of Damara and Barbados Blackbelly cross sheep was investigated among smallholder farms in Salak Tinggi district of Selangor, Malaysia. A total of 50 sheep raised in smallholder farms comprising of 27 Damara cross and 23 Barbados Blackbelly cross were categorized based on their age into young and adults. Fecal samples were collected and examined for strongyle egg count by using modified McMaster technique. Severity of infection was categorized into mild, moderate, and heavy, based on egg per gram (EPG). Five sheep were randomly selected and slaughtered to examine the presence of adult gastrointestinal (GI) nematodes through total worm count (TWC). Faffa Malan Chart (FAMACHA) score was used for investigation of worm load based on the degree of anemia. The study revealed an overall EPG prevalence of 88 %, of which 84.1 % had mild infection. There was a significant difference (p = 0.002) in EPG among the two breeds. Based on age, significant difference (p = 0. 004) in EPG was observed among Barbados Blackbelly cross, but not for Damara cross (p = 0.941). The correlation between severity of infection and the FAMACHA score was significant (r = 0.289; p = 0.042). Haemonchus spp. were the most predominant nematode found in the gastrointestinal tract, followed by Trichostrongylus and Oesophagostomum spps. EPG and TWC for Haemonchus were positively correlated, but not significant (r = 0.85, p = 0.066). From regression analysis, 73 % of the variability in TWC for Haemonchus could be explained by EPG. Thus, it can be concluded that FAMACHA score correlates well with severity of infection of a nematode and can be used to assess the strongyle nematode burden in the different sheep crosses.

  3. Gastrointestinal endoscopy: infection and disinfection.

    PubMed Central

    O'Connor, H J; Axon, A T

    1983-01-01

    The past decade has seen the development of an array of complex flexible fibreoptic instruments for gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy, and an increasing use of these for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. It has been recognised more recently that the use of contaminated endoscopic equipment can lead to serious and occasionally fatal infections. Infection with a wide variety of micro-organisms has been reported following oesophago-gastroduodenoscopy (OGD) and endoscopic retrograde cholangio-pancreatography (ERCP). PMID:6414894

  4. Gastrointestinal Infections and Diarrhea

    MedlinePlus

    ... in and drinking water from contaminated streams or lakes can lead to an infection and chronic diarrhea. ... or camping, never drink from streams, springs, or lakes unless local health authorities have certified the water ...

  5. A comparative study of the effects of four treatment regimes on ivermectin efficacy, body weight and pasture contamination in lambs naturally infected with gastrointestinal nematodes in Scotland

    PubMed Central

    Kenyon, Fiona; McBean, David; Greer, Andrew W.; Burgess, Charlotte G.S.; Morrison, Alison A.; Bartley, David J.; Bartley, Yvonne; Devin, Leigh; Nath, Mintu; Jackson, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Refugia-based drenching regimes have been widely recommended to slow development of anthelmintic resistance but there are few comparisons between different treatment approaches in the UK. The impact of four ivermectin treatment regimes on drug efficacy, lamb body weight and nematode contamination during a 154 day grazing season were evaluated in a consecutive five year field study. Regimes were whole-flock treatment every 4 weeks (NST), targeted selective treatment (TST) based on individual performance, strategic whole-flock treatments at pre-determined times (SPT) or whole-flock treatment when clinical signs were apparent (MT). Mean numbers of ivermectin drenches administered per season were 4.0, 1.8, 2.0 and 1.4 for NST, TST, SPT and MT groups, respectively. The mean anthelmintic efficacy (AE) for each treatment group was based on faecal egg count reduction post-treatment employing a bootstrap sampling based algorithm. Mean AE was 95–98% for all groups in 2006 and mean AE (95% confidence limits) for NST declined to 62% (55%, 68%) in 2010. In comparison, AE for TST, SPT and MT in 2010 were 86% (81%, 92%), 86% (83%, 90%) and 83% (78%, 88%), respectively. Body weight in TST and SPT was similar to NST in all years (p > 0.05), however MT lambs were lighter than NST in 2006–2008 (p ⩽ 0.04). Tracer lamb worm burdens was lowest in NST but was not significantly different between other groups. Overall, both the TST and SPT regimes appeared to maintain animal performance and conserve anthelmintic efficacy compared with a neo-suppressive anthelmintic treatment regime. PMID:24533296

  6. Evaluation of the effect of eprinomectin in young dairy heifers sub-clinically infected with gastrointestinal nematodes on grazing behaviour and diet selection.

    PubMed

    Forbes, A B; Huckle, C A; Gibb, M J

    2007-12-25

    Inappetence is commonly associated with parasitism and has been observed in both housed and pastured ruminants. In seeking a functional explanation for these observations, it has been hypothesised that parasitized animals may feed more selectively in order to proportionally increase the protein content of their diet and thus partially compensate for their reduced feed intake. Support for this theory is found principally in studies in housed animals under carefully controlled experimental conditions. Grazing animals face a far more heterogeneous environment and a multiplicity of potentially confounding factors that could influence diet selection. Controlled grazing of adjacent monocultures of grass and clover can mitigate some of these variables and was used in the current study to examine the dietary preference of dairy heifers with sub-clinical parasitic gastroenteritis when compared to those receiving regular anthelmintic treatments. Grazing behaviour and herbage intake rates were determined through the use of jaw-movement recorders, direct observation and short-term liveweight change. Consistent with previous observations and despite evidence that nematode burdens were low in the untreated control heifers, a reduction in daily grazing time of 56min (P=0.054) was observed in the control animals. There was, however, no evidence that the control heifers showed greater preference for clover compared with ryegrass: partial preference for clover was 73.0% in the untreated controls and 75.5% in the treated heifers. Furthermore control heifers were observed grazing the clover swards significantly (P=0.032) less frequently than the treated heifers. This study provides additional evidence in grazing cattle for parasite-induced inappetence, manifest as a reduction in grazing time and in subtle changes in ingestive behaviour. The observed partial preference for clover in both treated and control cattle was not significantly affected by the level of parasitism.

  7. Survey on anthelmintic resistance to gastrointestinal nematodes in unorganized goat farms of Tamil Nadu.

    PubMed

    Manikkavasagan, I; Binosundar, S T; Raman, M

    2015-06-01

    One of the major problems in small ruminant farms is emergence of anthelmintic resistance (AR) to commonly used dewormers. This study investigated AR to gastrointestinal nematodes affecting goats in 27 unorganized farms in three different agro-climatic zones (Cauvery delta zone, high altitude zone and high rainfall zone) of Tamil Nadu, India. Two anthelmintics viz., albendazole (AZ) and levamisole (LEV) were used in this study as per the dose recommended by the manufacturer. Status of AR was detected by using the faecal egg count reduction test. Results revealed the presence of high level of resistance to both AZ and LEV. In the high rainfall and high altitude zones, all the farm flocks were found to be resistant to LEV. In the Cauvery delta zone, 13 farm flocks were resistant and four farm flocks showed suspect resistance to AZ. Fifteen farm flocks showed resistance and two showed suspect resistance to LEV. Further, morphological characterization of the infective larvae derived from faecal cultures indicated that by far the most predominant gastrointestinal nematode species found in goats was Haemonchus contortus.

  8. Trichostrongylus colubriformis larvae induce necrosis and release of IL33 from intestinal epithelial cells in vitro: implications for gastrointestinal nematode vaccine design.

    PubMed

    Andronicos, Nicholas M; McNally, Jody; Kotze, Andrew C; Hunt, Peter W; Ingham, Aaron

    2012-01-01

    Gastrointestinal nematodes represent a major production problem for ruminant livestock. Enhancing immunity to gastrointestinal nematodes through vaccination is desirable but mechanistic understanding of initial host responses that facilitate gastrointestinal nematode protective immunity is limited. We hypothesise that gastrointestinal nematode invasion induces mucosal epithelium damage and alarmin (e.g. IL33) release, thereby contributing to initiation of protective gastrointestinal nematode immunity. To test this, an in vitro air-liquid interface human HT-29 epithelial cell-Trichostrongylus colubriformis co-culture system was developed. Exsheathed L3 T. colubriformis exhibited both sinusoidal and burrowing motions in the co-culture system. Burrowing parasites, but not ivermectin-paralysed larvae, induced necrotic death of epithelial cells (annexin V(+)/propidium iodide(+)/caspase 3/7(-)). Microscopy confirmed that larvae consumed labelled necrotic epithelial cell contents. Trichostrongylus colubriformis larvae and their post-exsheathment antigens (excretory/secretory products) significantly induced IL33 mRNA expression in the epithelial cells. Immunoblot confirmed that IL33 was released from epithelial cells due to the damage caused by motile larvae. Exposure of HT-29 cells to alum or Sigma proprietary adjuvants induced significant epithelial cell IL33 mRNA expression without inducing cellular necrosis. Hence, the intracellular contents were not released externally where they might exert alarmin activity and this may limit their ability to trigger a protective anti-gastrointestinal nematode response. We conclude that T. colubriformis motion at the infection site induces intestinal epithelial cell necrosis which facilitates the release of intracellular contents, including IL33, and may be fundamental to the initiation of an appropriate host response to gastrointestinal nematodes. Our co-culture model is useful for studying initial epithelial cell

  9. Immunity to helminths: resistance, regulation, and susceptibility to gastrointestinal nematodes.

    PubMed

    Grencis, Richard K

    2015-01-01

    Helminth parasites are a highly successful group of pathogens that challenge the immune system in a manner distinct from rapidly replicating infectious agents. Of this group, roundworms (nematodes) that dwell in the intestines of humans and other animals are prevalent worldwide. Currently, more than one billion people are infected by at least one species, often for extended periods of time. Thus, host-protective immunity is rarely complete. The reasons for this are complex, but laboratory investigation of tractable model systems in which protective immunity is effective has provided a mechanistic understanding of resistance that is characterized almost universally by a type 2/T helper 2 response. Greater understanding of the mechanisms of susceptibility has also provided the basis for defining host immunoregulation and parasite-evasion strategies, helping place in context the changing patterns of immunological disease observed worldwide.

  10. Prevalence of anthelmintic resistance in gastrointestinal nematodes of sheep and goats in Norway.

    PubMed

    Domke, Atle V Meling; Chartier, Christophe; Gjerde, Bjørn; Höglund, Johan; Leine, Nils; Vatn, Synnøve; Stuen, Snorre

    2012-07-01

    In the period of 2008–2009, the efficacies of the benzimidazole (BZ) albendazole and the macrocyclic lactone (ML) ivermectin against gastrointestinal nematodes (GIN) of small ruminants were evaluated by means of the fecal egg count reduction (FECR) test and by post-treatment identification of surviving third stage (L3) larvae after coproculture. Sheep (n=28) and goat (n=28) flocks from three areas of Norway were randomly selected to assess the prevalence of anthelmintic resistance (AR), whereas only lambs from non-randomly selected sheep flocks (n=32) with a farm management that could select for AR were investigated the second year. Only flocks with a mean excretion of nematode eggs per gram feces (EPG) ≥ 150 at time of treatment were included in the survey. In total, 48 (80%) and 13 (46.4%) of the selected sheep and goat flocks, respectively, fulfilled the inclusion criteria. The proportions of flocks classified as resistant (i.e., FECR <95% and with a lower 95% confidence interval of <90%) for the BZ drug albendazole were 10.5% and 31.0% in the randomly and non-randomly selected sheep flocks, respectively. When restricting the area to Rogaland County, eight flocks out of ten (80%) non-randomly selected sheep flocks showed BZ resistance. The efficacy of ML was 100% in all surveyed sheep and goat flocks. In post-treatment coprocultures from the non-randomly selected flocks, the main nematode genera were Teladorsagia/Trichostrongylus in five flocks, Haemonchus in two flocks, and a mixture of these genera in the remaining two flocks. In the goat flocks, the pre-treatment infection levels of GIN were low compared to what was found in the sheep flocks. Still, in one flock, AR against BZ in Teladorsagia/Trichostrongylus was found. New strategies and recommendations to face the emerging AR situation in Rogaland County in order to limit the spread of resistant nematodes within and into other areas are urgently needed.

  11. The strategic use of closantel and albendazole in controlling naturally acquired gastrointestinal nematodes of sheep in the Kenya highlands.

    PubMed

    Maingi, N; Thamsborg, S M; Gichohi, V M; Munyua, W K; Gathuma, J M

    1997-11-01

    The strategic use of closantel, a narrow-spectrum salicylanilide anthelmintic against bloodsucking helminths, and of albendazole, a broad-spectrum benzimidazole anthelmintic, in the control of gastrointestinal nematodes of sheep was investigated on a farm in Nyandarua District in the highlands of Kenya. Thirty Corriedale female lambs aged between 9 and 12 months were assigned to three treatment groups of 10 lambs each. The three groups were set stocked on separate paddocks for 12 months. Lambs in group 1 (strategic treatment group) were treated with closantel and albendazole at the beginning and towards the end of the long rains (April and June, respectively) and towards the end of the short rains. (December). During the intervening dry season, the lambs were treated with albendazole. Lambs in group 2 (suppressive treatment group) were kept 'worm free' by regular deworming with albendazole at 3-weekly intervals for 12 months. The third group of lambs remained untreated (control group). Gastrointestinal nematode infections and pasture infectivity were well controlled in the case of the strategic treatment group. This resulted in higher weight gains, wool production, packed cell volume, and serum albumin and protein concentrations compared with the untreated control lambs. These parameters were comparable between the strategic treatment and the suppressive treatment groups of lambs. It was concluded that worm control strategies based on the epidemiology of the parasites and the sustained anthelmintic action of closantel in combination with broad-spectrum anthelmintics can provide effective control of gastrointestinal nematodes of sheep in the study area.

  12. New weapons in the war on worms: Identification of putative mechanisms of immune-mediated expulsion of gastrointestinal nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Artis, David

    2007-01-01

    Parasitic nematode infections of humans and livestock continue to impose a significant public health and economic burden worldwide. Murine models of intestinal nematode infection have proved to be relevant and tractable systems to define the cellular and molecular basis of how the host immune system regulates resistance and susceptibility to infection. While susceptibility to chronic infection is propagated by T helper cell type 1 cytokine responses (characterised by production of IL-12, IL-18 and interferon-γ), immunity to intestinal-dwelling adult nematode worms is critically dependent on a type 2 cytokine response (controlled by CD4+T helper type 2 cells that secrete the cytokines IL-4, IL-5, IL-9 and IL-13). However, the immune effector mechanisms elicited by type 2 cytokines in the gut microenvironment that precipitate worm expulsion have remained elusive. This review focuses on new studies that implicate host intestinal epithelial cells as one of the dominant immune effector cells against this group of pathogens. Specifically, three recently identified type 2 cytokine-dependent pathways that could offer insights into the mechanisms of expulsion of parasitic nematodes will be discussed: (i) the intelectins, a new family of galactose-binding lectins implicated in innate immunity, (ii) the resistin-like molecules, a family of small cysteine-rich proteins expressed by goblet cells, and (iii) cytokine regulation of intestinal epithelial cell turnover. Identifying how the mammalian immune response fights gastrointestinal nematode infections is providing new insights into host protective immunity. Harnessing these discoveries, coupled with identifying what the targets of these responses are within parasitic nematodes, offers promise in the design of a new generation of anti-parasitic drugs and vaccines. PMID:16620826

  13. Gastrointestinal nematodes and the deworming of mouflon (Ovis aries musimon) from Goleniowska Forest in West Pomerania province, Poland

    PubMed

    Balicka-Ramisz, Aleksandra; Laurans, Łukasz; Jurczyk, Przemysław; Kwita, Ewa; Ramisz, Anna

    Ruminants often live in environments where the natural balance has been disturbed by humans. As a result, there is a transfer of parasitosis to domestic animals and sometimes humans. The aim of the study was to determine the annual species composition and level of gastrointestinal nematode infection of mouflon (Ovis aries musimon) from the half-open breeding colonizing areas of the Goleniowska Forest, and to assess the effectiveness of deworming. The course of the parasitic infection of mouflon depends largely on geoclimatic and breeding factors. These diseases are caused by more than 17 species of nematodes with varying degrees of pathogenicity. Due to the high degree of parasitic infections in deer, both in Poland and abroad, it is necessary to develop specific preventive programs using preparations with a broad spectrum of action.

  14. Faecal egg counts and immune markers in a line of Scottish Cashmere goats selected for resistance to gastrointestinal nematode parasite infection.

    PubMed

    McBean, David; Nath, Mintu; Kenyon, Fiona; Zile, Karina; Bartley, David J; Jackson, Frank

    2016-10-15

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of selection for low faecal egg count (FEC) in Scottish Cashmere goats in comparison to a control line of unselected goats grazing the same pasture. Goats from generations F2 through to F9 were monitored for FEC, bodyweight, peripheral eosinophilia and IgG, IgA and IgE response against Teladorsagia circumcincta from the end of their first grazing season, through winter housing (during which a single artificial challenge dose of 10,000 drug susceptible T. circumcincta was given) and the following full grazing season. The study demonstrated that selected line animals excreted a significantly lower number of parasite eggs (P<0.01) in the majority of generations examined. Liveweight productivity was unaffected by selection. Although selected line animals had greater numbers of circulating eosinophils in many of the generations (four generations of males and six generations of females, P<0.05), there was no direct link between eosinophilia and reduced FEC. Immunoglobulin levels showed no consistent difference between selected and control lines. IgG, IgA and IgE levels were not different between lines over the whole dataset (P>0.05), although the selected line had significantly elevated or reduced levels (P<0.05) for all three within individual generations. There were significant associations between increased IgG and reduced FEC under artificial infection conditions (P=0.02). Increased IgA was also significantly associated with elevated FEC during the second grazing season (P<0.001). The study demonstrates that selection produced a line of goats with consistently reduced FEC compared with control animals, but did not identify a clear relationship between any of the immune markers measured and faecal egg output. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Nematode infection mimicking paratesticular malignancy.

    PubMed

    Kallampallil, Jins; Wood, Sarah J; O'Dempsey, Timothy; Craigie, Ross J

    2013-12-10

    Paratesticular swellings pose a diagnostic dilemma due to concerns over malignancy. We present a case of paratesticular swelling in a 13-year-old boy as a result of Dirofilaria immitis infection. The boy presented with a 2-month history of right testicular discomfort associated with an irregular mass within the scrotum.

  16. Impact of gastrointestinal parasitic nematodes of sheep, and the role of advanced molecular tools for exploring epidemiology and drug resistance - an Australian perspective.

    PubMed

    Roeber, Florian; Jex, Aaron R; Gasser, Robin B

    2013-05-27

    Parasitic nematodes (roundworms) of small ruminants and other livestock have major economic impacts worldwide. Despite the impact of the diseases caused by these nematodes and the discovery of new therapeutic agents (anthelmintics), there has been relatively limited progress in the development of practical molecular tools to study the epidemiology of these nematodes. Specific diagnosis underpins parasite control, and the detection and monitoring of anthelmintic resistance in livestock parasites, presently a major concern around the world. The purpose of the present article is to provide a concise account of the biology and knowledge of the epidemiology of the gastrointestinal nematodes (order Strongylida), from an Australian perspective, and to emphasize the importance of utilizing advanced molecular tools for the specific diagnosis of nematode infections for refined investigations of parasite epidemiology and drug resistance detection in combination with conventional methods. It also gives a perspective on the possibility of harnessing genetic, genomic and bioinformatic technologies to better understand parasites and control parasitic diseases.

  17. Impact of gastrointestinal parasitic nematodes of sheep, and the role of advanced molecular tools for exploring epidemiology and drug resistance - an Australian perspective

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Parasitic nematodes (roundworms) of small ruminants and other livestock have major economic impacts worldwide. Despite the impact of the diseases caused by these nematodes and the discovery of new therapeutic agents (anthelmintics), there has been relatively limited progress in the development of practical molecular tools to study the epidemiology of these nematodes. Specific diagnosis underpins parasite control, and the detection and monitoring of anthelmintic resistance in livestock parasites, presently a major concern around the world. The purpose of the present article is to provide a concise account of the biology and knowledge of the epidemiology of the gastrointestinal nematodes (order Strongylida), from an Australian perspective, and to emphasize the importance of utilizing advanced molecular tools for the specific diagnosis of nematode infections for refined investigations of parasite epidemiology and drug resistance detection in combination with conventional methods. It also gives a perspective on the possibility of harnessing genetic, genomic and bioinformatic technologies to better understand parasites and control parasitic diseases. PMID:23711194

  18. Tetrachlorvinphos as an ineffective feed additive in control of gastrointestinal nematodes of beef cattle.

    PubMed

    Noblet, G P

    1978-06-01

    Tetrachlorvinphos was evaluated for anthelmintic efficacy as a feed additive against gastrointestinal nematodes of cattle. Tetrachlorvinphos was added to the mineral mixture of medicated cattle (n = 13) at the rate of 1.6 mg/day/kg of body weight for a 29-week period beginning May 2, 1975. Data suggest that the level of parasitism, as estimated by the number of nematode eggs per gram of feces, was not reduced by the addition of tetrachlorvinphos to the mineral mixture of medicated cattle. Results obtained from identification and quantification of nematodes recovered at necropsy from 6 medicated and 6 nonmedicated control heifers indicated that tetrachlorvinphos was ineffective as an anthelmintic against gastrointestinal nematodes of cattle.

  19. Genetic resistance to gastrointestinal nematode parasites in Polish long-wool sheep.

    PubMed

    Bouix, J; Krupinski, J; Rzepecki, R; Nowosad, B; Skrzyzala, I; Roborzynski, M; Fudalewicz-Niemczyk, W; Skalska, M; Malczewski, A; Gruner, L

    1998-11-01

    A study was undertaken from 1991 to 1994 on a farm in southern Poland to evaluate the genetic parameters of resistance to gastrointestinal nematodes. The predominant species were Teladorsagia circumcincta and Haemonchus contortus. A total of 32 sires were evaluated, around 15 per year. Faecal egg counts were measured twice during the 4-month grazing season for lambs (total 659 lambs) and three times for their mothers (total 327 ewes). Infection levels were high during the first 2 years and low during the last 2 years. Using an animal model, the heritability of log10(epg+25) increased from 0.20 in August to 0.33 in September for lambs, and from 0.18 in May to 0.25 in September for ewes. The repeatability of ewe faecal egg count between years was 0.25. A genetic correlation of 0.58 was found between faecal egg count in ewes and in 6-7-month-old lambs. A negative genetic correlation (-0.61) was estimated between faecal egg count in September and daily weight gain of lambs from 70 days of age to the end of grazing season (7 months of age). The results confirm the feasibility of genetic selection of sheep for resistance to nematode parasites in an environment where T. circumcincta and H. contortus are the dominant species.

  20. First Report of Anthelmintic Resistance in Gastrointestinal Nematodes of Sheep from Costa Rica

    PubMed Central

    Maroto, R.; Jiménez, A. E.; Romero, J. J.; Alvarez, V.; De Oliveira, J. B.; Hernández, J.

    2011-01-01

    As the prevalence and severity of anthelmintic resistance continue to rise, nematode infections in sheep correspondingly reduce the profitability of the sheep industry. In Costa Rica, sheep production systems are increasing in both number and importance. A field trial study was carried out to detect the level of anthelmintic resistance to albendazole and ivermectin in gastrointestinal nematodes (GIN) of sheep from seven farms in Costa Rica. Resistance was determined using the fecal egg count reduction test (FECRT). Three treatment groups were assessed on each farm: control, albendazole, and ivermectin. Haemonchus spp. (71%), Strongyloides sp. (57%), and Trichostrongylus spp. (43%) presented resistance levels to albendazole, whereas Strongyloides sp. (43%), Haemonchus spp. (29%), and Trichostrongylus spp. (29%) were resistant to ivermectin. Haemonchus spp., Strongyloides sp., and Trichostrongylus spp. were the most resistant GIN to both products. This study suggests that frequency of treatment, exclusive chemical control, and visual estimation of animal weight to calculate dosage may contribute to the high levels of anthelmintic resistance that were observed on the farms analyzed herein. PMID:21772962

  1. Epidemiology, sero-diagnosis and therapeutic studies on nematodes infection in balochi range-sheep at district quetta, balochistan, pakistan.

    PubMed

    Razzaq, Abdul; Ashraf, Kamran; Maqbool, Azhar; Islam, Muhammad; Hanan, Abdul; Awais, Mian Muhammad; Khetran, Munir Ahmad; Jan, Saadullah; Shafee, Muhammad; Essa, Muhammad; Kakar, Hamdullah

    2014-01-01

    Among the infectious organisms of parasitic origin, gastrointestinal nematodes are very important as they have been reported worldwide. The main aim of the present research study to highlight the annual epidemiological contributing factors associated with the prevalence of gastrointestinal nematodes and their control in sheep. A total 1200 faecal samples (100 per month) were collected from farmers holding Balochi-sheep (either sexes, 1-5 years old) during January-December 2012 and analyzed to determine the prevalence of nematodes based on microscopy and ELISA based diagnostic assay. Therapeutic efficacies of different synthetic and herbal medicines against these nematodes were assessed by field trials. Results showed that 23.92% Balochi-sheep were infected with nematodes. Five nematodes infections were recorded with highest prevalence of Haemonchus (7.75%) followed by Nematodirus (7.58%), Strongyloides (4.42%), Trichostrongylus (2.33%) and Trichuris (1.83%). The younger and older ewes (one and five years) presented higher nematodes prevalence with peak during March/April and August/September. Haemonchus and Trichuris positive samples based on coprological examination were also showed 92-100% positive sensitivity for these nematodes by the ELISA. Sheep treated with Ivermectin showed higher reduction (97.76%) in nematode egg counts followed by Atreefal deedan (96.42%) and Oxfendazole (95.44%), respectively. The gastro-intestinal nematodes are prevalent in all age and either sex of Balochi-sheep with peak during summer. The ELISA based diagnosis is more accurte. The synthetic and herbal products are very effective against sheep nematodes.

  2. The genetic basis for the selection of dairy goats with enhanced resistance to gastrointestinal nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Heckendorn, Felix; Bieber, Anna; Werne, Steffen; Saratsis, Anastasios; Maurer, Veronika; Stricker, Chris

    2017-01-01

    Gastrointestinal nematodes (GIN) severely affect small ruminant production worldwide. Increasing problems of anthelmintic resistance have given strong impetus to the search for alternative strategies to control GIN. Selection of animals with an enhanced resistance to GIN has been shown to be successful in sheep. In goats, the corresponding information is comparatively poor. Therefore, the present study was designed to provide reliable data on heritabilities of and genetic correlations between phenotypic traits linked to GIN and milk yield in two major dairy goat breeds (Alpine and Saanen). In all, 20 herds totalling 1303 goats were enrolled in the study. All herds had (i) a history of gastrointestinal nematode infection, (ii) uniform GIN exposure on pasture and (iii) regular milk recordings. For all goats, individual recordings of faecal egg counts (FEC), FAMACHA© eye score, packed cell volume (PCV) and milk yield were performed twice a year with an anthelmintic treatment in between. The collected phenotypic data were multivariately modelled using animal as a random effect with its covariance structure inferred from the pedigree, enabling estimation of the heritabilities of the respective traits and the genetic correlation between them. The heritabilities of FEC, FAMACHA© and PCV were 0.07, 0.22 and 0.22, respectively. The genetic correlation between FEC and FAMACHA© was close to zero and −0.41 between FEC and PCV. The phenotypic correlation between FEC and milk yield was close to zero, whereas the genetic correlation was 0.49. Our data suggest low heritability of FEC in Saanen and Alpine goats and an unfavourable genetic correlation of FEC with milk yield. PMID:28792887

  3. Integrated control of gastrointestinal nematodes in lambs using a bioactive feed × breed approach.

    PubMed

    Werne, S; Isensee, A; Maurer, V; Perler, E; Drewek, A; Heckendorn, F

    2013-12-06

    Forages rich in condensed tannins have repeatedly shown potential to reduce gastrointestinal nematode infection in sheep. Similarly, several breeds of sheep have shown a relative resistance to gastrointestinal nematodes (GIN). We hypothesised that additive or even synergic effects may arise from the combination of a relatively resistant breed and a diet rich in condensed tannins. In study I, 160 lambs of the native Red Engadine Sheep (RES) and 113 lambs of the Swiss White Alpine sheep (SWA) were artificially infected with GIN and subsequently grazed for 52 days. The lambs were then distributed to 2 groups for a 14-day experimental feeding period. One group received a diet with a proportion of 55% sainfoin and was compared to a control group on the basis of faecal egg counts (FEC). In study II, 25 RES and 27 SWA lambs grazed infectious pastures for 37 days and were subsequently fed for 13 consecutive days with approximately 100% sainfoin or control forage. In addition to the FEC determination at the start and the end of the experimental feeding, the 52 lambs in study II were slaughtered and necropsied to determine their worm burden. FEC at the end of the feeding period were significantly lower in sainfoin fed lambs compared to controls in study I (p<0.001) as well as in study II (p=0.012). Breed, animal age, live weight, sex and the interaction of breed and treatment did not affect FEC in either study. The main nematode genera found in the sacrificed lambs of study II were Haemonchus spp., Teladorsagia spp., Nematodirus spp. and Trichostrongylus spp. Overall, RES had a significantly lower Haemonchus spp. (p=0.035) and Trichostrongylus spp. (p=0.003) worm burden compared to SWA. Regardless of breed, sainfoin feeding significantly reduced Teladorsagia spp. (p=0.049) and Nematodirus spp. (p<0.001) worm burden. Although, we could not demonstrate additive or synergic effects when using an integrated breed × sainfoin approach, the finding that a proportion of only 55

  4. Exploring the Gastrointestinal “Nemabiome”: Deep Amplicon Sequencing to Quantify the Species Composition of Parasitic Nematode Communities

    PubMed Central

    Avramenko, Russell W.; Redman, Elizabeth M.; Lewis, Roy; Yazwinski, Thomas A.; Wasmuth, James D.; Gilleard, John S.

    2015-01-01

    Parasitic helminth infections have a considerable impact on global human health as well as animal welfare and production. Although co-infection with multiple parasite species within a host is common, there is a dearth of tools with which to study the composition of these complex parasite communities. Helminth species vary in their pathogenicity, epidemiology and drug sensitivity and the interactions that occur between co-infecting species and their hosts are poorly understood. We describe the first application of deep amplicon sequencing to study parasitic nematode communities as well as introduce the concept of the gastro-intestinal “nemabiome”. The approach is analogous to 16S rDNA deep sequencing used to explore microbial communities, but utilizes the nematode ITS-2 rDNA locus instead. Gastro-intestinal parasites of cattle were used to develop the concept, as this host has many well-defined gastro-intestinal nematode species that commonly occur as complex co-infections. Further, the availability of pure mono-parasite populations from experimentally infected cattle allowed us to prepare mock parasite communities to determine, and correct for, species representation biases in the sequence data. We demonstrate that, once these biases have been corrected, accurate relative quantitation of gastro-intestinal parasitic nematode communities in cattle fecal samples can be achieved. We have validated the accuracy of the method applied to field-samples by comparing the results of detailed morphological examination of L3 larvae populations with those of the sequencing assay. The results illustrate the insights that can be gained into the species composition of parasite communities, using grazing cattle in the mid-west USA as an example. However, both the technical approach and the concept of the ‘nemabiome’ have a wide range of potential applications in human and veterinary medicine. These include investigations of host-parasite and parasite-parasite interactions

  5. Benzimidazole-resistant gastrointestinal nematodes in indigenous Chiapas and Pelibuey sheep breeds from Chiapas, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Liébano-Hernández, E; González-Olvera, M; Vázquez-Peláez, C; Mendoza-de-Gives, P; Ramírez-Vargas, G; Peralta-Lailson, M; Reyes-García, M E; Osorio, J; Sánchez-Pineda, H; López-Arellano, M E

    2015-01-01

    Because of the natural adaptation of Mexican sheep, the aim of the present study was to identify the presence or absence of gastrointestinal parasitic nematodes (GIN) resistant to benzimidazole (BZ) in both Chiapas and Pelibuey sheep breeds on local farms. Both male and female GIN-infected grazing sheep of the two breeds were selected. Sheep faecal samples were collected to obtain infective larvae (L3). This evolving stage of the parasite was used for taxonomic identification of the genus, based on its morphological characteristics. BZ anthelmintic resistance was evaluated using a nematode-compound in vitro interaction bioassay and the allele-specific polymerase chain reaction technique to detect mutations of residues 198 and 200 on isotype 1 of the β-tubulin gene. Three BZ-based compounds (febendazole (FBZ), tiabendazole (TBZ) and albendazole (ABZ)) at concentrations of 1, 0.5, 0.25, 0.125, 0.062 and 0.03 mg/ml were used to estimate the anthelmintic efficacy and lethal dose (LD50, LD90 and LD99) of the drugs. Two parasitic nematodes, Haemonchus and Teladorsagia, were identified in both isolates. Also, the proportions of anthelmintic resistance identified in GIN of the two sheep breeds were 68% in isolates from the Chiapas breed and 71.8% in the Pelibuey breed. The specific lethal activity obtained with FBZ was higher than 90%. However, TBZ and ABZ showed a lethal activity lower than 50%. High variability in the discriminating dose values was found among the BZ drugs. For example, FBZ LD ranged from 0.01 to 1.20 mg/ml; on the other hand, TBZ and ABZ required a dose ranging from 0.178 to 759 mg/ml. In addition, amino acid changes of Phe (TTC) to Tyr (TAC) at codon 200 of the β-tubulin gene, showing resistance to BZ, and no changes at codon 198 Glu (GAA) to Ala (GCA) were observed for both isolates. These results confirmed the presence of a genetic mutation associated with BZ in both Chiapas and Pelibuey nematode isolates.

  6. Salivary IgA: a suitable measure of immunity to gastrointestinal nematodes in sheep.

    PubMed

    Shaw, R J; Morris, C A; Wheeler, M; Tate, M; Sutherland, I A

    2012-05-04

    Infection with gastrointestinal nematodes (GIN) is a major constraint on the productivity of grazing livestock. The development of selection methods to quickly and accurately identify animals capable of developing an effective natural immunity to infection would contribute to the development of sustainable worm control programs. A carbohydrate larval surface antigen (CarLA), present on the infective-stage larvae (L3) of all trichostrongylid nematodes, is a target antigen for host antibody (Ab). The levels of various Ab isotypes in serum and/or saliva of field-grazed lambs were assessed by ELISA, and Ab titres compared with parasite faecal egg counts (FECs) and a range of animal productivity parameters. Levels of anti-CarLA IgA in saliva proved to be the most heritable (h(2)=0.3), and had the closest genetic correlation with FEC (r=-0.5). Those animals identified as having 'high levels' of anti-CarLA IgA typically have 20-30% lower FEC than animals with low or undetectable titres. Furthermore, animals with 'high levels' of anti-CarLA IgA tend to have improved growth rates post-weaning, and have no tendency for increased breech-soiling. The assay performed well regardless of parasite genera present on pasture. The saliva assay has a number of key practical advantages over the use of FEC for selection purposes: animals can be identified without a requirement to withhold anthelmintic treatment; sampling is rapid and easy and there is a significantly reduced barrier to adoption within the farming community. Measurement of anti-CarLA IgA in saliva by ELISA offers a practical, rapid and easy method of selecting for natural immunity to GIN in sheep.

  7. [Spatio-temporal pattern of larvae and eggs of gastrointestinal nematodes in cattle pastures in Veracruz, Mexico].

    PubMed

    Flota-Bañuelos, Carolina; Martínez, Imelda; López-Collado, José; Vargas Mendoza, Mónica; González Hernández, Hector; Fajersson, Pernilla

    2013-12-01

    The spatial and temporal distribution of gastrointestinal nematodes of cattle has been little studied in Mexico. Previous studies have described periods of higher larval presence, vertical and horizontal migration in grasslands, and the frequency of adult nematodes; as well as the effect of pasture trichomes on the migration and survival of Haemonchus larvae. The aim of this study was to determine the time-space layout and spread of gastrointestinal nematode larvae on pasture, and to estimate the effect of ivermectin applied to cattle on the time-dependent abundance of their eggs in a ranch in Veracruz. To determine the spatio-temporal arrangement, monthly morning grass samples were obtained from 30 sampling points from July 2008 to June 2009. Third stage larvae (L3) from each point were counted, and aggregation patterns were estimated through variance/mean and negative binomial K indices. Additionally, the number of eggs per gram in cattle feces was determined, from samples with (CI) and without ivermectin (SI), using standard techniques. A total of 20 276 L(3) larvae were recovered in the pasture, of which an 80% corresponded to Haemonchus contortus. The highest nematode density with more than 5 000L(3)/kgDM was detected in October 2008, and the lowest in February and March 2009. The L3 showed an aggregated spatial pattern of varying intensity throughout the year. The number of eggs in the stool was not reduced with the ivermectin application to cattle, which suggested a failure of control. However, the highest parasite loads were observed from July to November 2008. We concluded that the application of ivermectin was not effective to control nematodes eggs, and that L3 populations fluctuated on pasture for ten months, providing an infection source to grazing animals afterwards.

  8. [Effect of bolus administration of albendazole into the rumen on gastrointestinal nematodes and the Dicrocoelium dendriticum trematode in sheep].

    PubMed

    Corba, J; Krupicer, I; Várady, M; Pet'ko, B

    1994-01-01

    The efficacy of intraruminal albendazole (ABZ) capsules (Proftril-Captec) and the effect of treatment on productivity parameters were studied in two experiments totally on 466 ewes naturally infected with gastrointestinal nematodes and trematodes D. dendriticum. Ovoscopical tests revealed that treated animals remained negative during 10-12 weeks after the administration of capsules and that pasture contamination with helminths was significantly reduced. Necropsy revealed 96.9-99.2% efficacy against nematodes Nematodirus spp., Oesophagostomum spp., Cooperia spp., Trichostrongylus spp. and Trichuris ovis. Priority finding is the efficacy of ABZ capsules against trematodes D. dendriticum which was in the first experiment 88.5% and in the second experiment 91.8%. During the 6-month pasture season treated ewes produced on average 2.56 kg cheese and 0.6 kg wool per ewe more than untreated controls.

  9. Current status for gastrointestinal nematode diagnosis in small ruminants: where are we and where are we going?

    PubMed

    Preston, Sarah Jane Margaret; Sandeman, Mark; Gonzalez, Jorge; Piedrafita, David

    2014-01-01

    Gastrointestinal nematode (GIN) parasites pose a significant economic burden particularly in small ruminant production systems. Anthelmintic resistance is a serious concern to the effective control of GIN parasites and has fuelled the focus to design and promote sustainable control of practices of parasite control. Many facets of sustainable GIN parasite control programs rely on the ability to diagnose infection both qualitatively and quantitatively. Diagnostics are required to determine anthelmintic efficacies, for targeted treatment programs and selection of animals for parasite resistant breeding. This review describes much of the research investigated to date to improve the current diagnostic for the above practices which is based on counting the number of parasite eggs in faeces.

  10. The development of RNA interference (RNAi) in gastrointestinal nematodes.

    PubMed

    Selkirk, Murray E; Huang, Stanley C; Knox, David P; Britton, Collette

    2012-04-01

    Despite the utility of RNAi for defining gene function in Caenorhabditis elegans and early successes reported in parasitic nematodes, RNAi has proven to be stubbornly inconsistent or ineffective in the animal parasitic nematodes examined to date. Here, we summarise some of our experiences with RNAi in parasitic nematodes affecting animals and discuss the available data in the context of our own unpublished work, taking account of mode of delivery, larval activation, site of gene transcription and the presence/absence of essential RNAi pathway genes as defined by comparisons to C. elegans. We discuss future directions briefly including the evaluation of nanoparticles as a means to enhance delivery of interfering RNA to the target worm tissue.

  11. Use of FAMACHA system to evaluate gastrointestinal nematode resistance/resilience in offspring of stud rams

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    High levels of anthelmintic resistance in gastrointestinal nematodes (GIN) of small ruminants have created the need for animals with greater resistance to these parasites. The objective of this experiment was to evaluate the effectiveness of the FAMACHA system in identification of parasite resilien...

  12. Efficacy of copper oxide wire particles against gastrointestinal nematodes in sheep and goats

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Economic sheep and goat production in the USA is severely limited by gastrointestinal nematode (GIN) parasitism, particularly by Haemonchus contortus, a highly pathogenic blood-feeder. Copper oxide wire particles (COWP) have anti-parasitic properties in the diet of small ruminants, but efficacy of ...

  13. Anthelmintic resistance in gastrointestinal nematodes from grazing beef cattle in Campeche State, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Muñiz-Lagunes, Abel; González-Garduño, Roberto; López-Arellano, Maria Eugenia; Ramírez-Valverde, Rodolfo; Ruíz-Flores, Agustín; García-Muñiz, Guadalupe; Ramírez-Vargas, Gabriel; Mendoza-de Gives, Pedro; Torres-Hernández, Glafiro

    2015-08-01

    Production of beef cattle is one of the most important economic activities in Mexico. However, anthelmintic resistance (AR) has affected animal productivity. The aim of this study was to determine the presence of AR in gastrointestinal nematodes (GIN) of beef cattle in Candelaria Municipality of Campeche State, Mexico. Sixty-five-month-old beef calves were selected for the faecal egg count reduction test (FECRT) and the inhibition of egg hatch (IEH) assay. These parameters were determined using albendazole (benzimidazole, BZ), ivermectin (IVM, Macrocyclic lactone, ML) and levamisole (LEV, imidazothiazole, IMZ). Allele-specific PCR (AS-PCR) confirmed polymorphisms at codon 200 of isotype 1 of the β-tubulin gene of Haemonchus placei. The results showed 32 % IVM toxicity by FECRT, indicating problems of AR in the GIN population. In contrast, BZ and LEV showed 95 and 100 % toxicity, respectively, against GIN from infected beef calves. The infective larvae (L3) of Cooperia, Haemonchus and Oesophagostomum were identified before anthelmintic treatment, and Cooperia L3 larvae were identified after treatment with IVM. The IEH assays had lethal dose 50 (LD50) of 187 nM to BZ, confirming the ovicidal effect of BZ. In contrast, the LD50 for LEV and IVM were 3.3 and 0.4 mM, respectively. The results obtained by AS-PCR confirmed two DNA fragments of 250 and 550 bp, corresponding to the resistant and susceptible alleles in the H. placei population. The nematode Cooperia showed AR against IVM, while the toxicity effect of BZ against GIN with both FECRT and IEH was confirmed.

  14. Efficacy of concomitant early summer treatment with fenbendazole and clorsulon against Fasciola hepatica and gastrointestinal nematodes in calves in Louisiana.

    PubMed

    Malone, J B; Williams, J C; Lutz, M; Fagan, N; Jacocks, M; Jones, E; Marbury, K; Willis, E

    1990-01-01

    The efficacy, safety, and compatibility of fenbendazole (FBZ) and clorsulon (CLN) were tested after oral administration of label recommended and of higher (5x) dosage rates to calves naturally infected with gastrointestinal nematodes and Fasciola hepatica. Results for 42 calves allotted to 4 treatment groups indicated a similar efficacy against mature F hepatica by FBZ (5 mg/kg of body weight) and CLN (7 mg/kg) in a combined oral suspension, compared with CLN (7 mg/kg) alone (100 vs 99% reduction). A lesser efficacy was observed against immature flukes (88.6 and 84.9% reduction, respectively). Calves given 25 mg of FBZ/kg and 35 mg of CLN/kg had nearly complete reduction of both mature (99.6%) and immature flukes (99.1%). Fasciola egg counts were reduced by greater than 99.5% in all treated groups. Against Ostertagia ostertagi, the percentage of efficacy of the combined FBZ (5 mg/kg) and CLN (7 mg/kg) treatment was 94.3% against adults and 81.3% against inhibited larvae. Efficacy against all other nematodes was 100%, except against Cooperia spp adults (98.3%) and immature Oesaphagostomum radiatum (88.0%). At 5 x dosage rates for FBZ and CLN, percentage of removal of adults and inhibited larvae of O ostertagi was 99.3 and 99.0%, respectively, and 99 to 100% for other nematodes. Results indicate that FBZ and CLN are compatible when mixed together and administered as an oral suspension to cattle and that the efficacy is similar to that of the drugs individually. On the basis of further results, we suggest that summer treatment may be superior in preventive value for gastrointestinal nematodes and F hepatica, compared with spring treatment, because of seasonal infection dynamics of the major cattle parasites in Louisiana.

  15. The anthelmintic efficacy of plant-derived cysteine proteinases against the rodent gastrointestinal nematode, Heligmosomoides polygyrus, in vivo.

    PubMed

    Stepek, G; Lowe, A E; Buttle, D J; Duce, I R; Behnke, J M

    2007-09-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) nematodes are important disease-causing organisms, controlled primarily through treatment with synthetic drugs, but the efficacy of these drugs has declined due to widespread resistance, and hence new drugs, with different modes of action, are required. Some medicinal plants, used traditionally for the treatment of worm infections, contain cysteine proteinases known to damage worms irreversibly in vitro. Here we (i) confirm that papaya latex has marked efficacy in vivo against the rodent gastrointestinal nematode, Heligmosomoides polygyrus, (ii) demonstrate the dose-dependent nature of the activity (>90% reduction in egg output and 80% reduction in worm burden at the highest active enzyme concentration of 133 nmol), (iii) establish unequivocally that it is the cysteine proteinases that are the active principles in vivo (complete inhibition of enzyme activity when pre-incubated with the cysteine proteinase-specific inhibitor, E-64) and (iv) show that activity is confined to worms that are in the intestinal lumen. The mechanism of action was distinct from all current synthetic anthelmintics, and was the same as that in vitro, with the enzymes attacking and digesting the protective cuticle. Treatment had no detectable side-effects on immune cell numbers in the mucosa (there was no difference in the numbers of mast cells and goblet cells between the treated groups) and mucosal architecture (length of intestinal villi). Only the infected and untreated mice had much shorter villi than the other 3 groups, which was a consequence of infection and not treatment. Plant-derived cysteine proteinases are therefore prime candidates for development as novel drugs for the treatment of GI nematode infections.

  16. Gastrointestinal nematodes of dairy goats, anthelmintic resistance and practices of parasite control in Northern Italy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Gastrointestinal nematodes (GINs) are one of the main constraints to ruminant production worldwide. Anthelmintic resistance (AR) has been reported in goats throughout Europe, yet little is known about the AR status in Italy. The aims of the study were: i) determine the frequency of AR in GINs in goat flocks in Northern Italy, Italy, ii) survey goat farmers on the current practices of parasite control, iii) update the species composition of the gastrointestinal helminthofauna. Thirty three flocks were enrolled and 1288 individual fecal samples were collected. Based on the egg per gram (EPG), 15 flocks were selected to evaluate the presence of AR in GINs with the Fecal Egg Count Reduction Test (FECRT). A questionnaire surveyed 110 dairy goat farmers to acquire information about farm management and drenching practices against GINs. Further, the gastrointestinal tracts of 42 goats were analyzed. Results The FECRs indicated that five of the 15 flocks had problems of AR, which was identified in all two of the anthelmintic classes tested. Resistance and suspected resistance was found in 40% of the flocks selected for AR testing that were treated with benzimidazoles while 20% of the flocks treated with eprinomectin had resistant GINs. Teladorsagia/Trichostrongylus L3 were isolated from the post-treatment coprocultures of all flocks with resistance but not from the flock with suspected oxfendazole resistance. Treatments against helminths were performed once annually in 73.63% of the flocks, but 20.00% of farmers declared not regularly treating their goats every year. Annual treatments usually occurred in autumn or winter at dose rate for sheep. Te. circumcincta, H. contortus, Tr. colubriformis, Skrjabinema caprae and Oesophagostomum venulosum were the most abundant and prevalent species of the gastrointestinal tract. Conclusions Strategies to prevent the development of AR should be widely adopted in Northern Italy. Further, farmers and practitioners should be

  17. Gastrointestinal nematodes of dairy goats, anthelmintic resistance and practices of parasite control in Northern Italy.

    PubMed

    Zanzani, Sergio Aurelio; Gazzonis, Alessia Libera; Di Cerbo, Annarita; Varady, Marian; Manfredi, Maria Teresa

    2014-05-19

    Gastrointestinal nematodes (GINs) are one of the main constraints to ruminant production worldwide. Anthelmintic resistance (AR) has been reported in goats throughout Europe, yet little is known about the AR status in Italy. The aims of the study were: i) determine the frequency of AR in GINs in goat flocks in Northern Italy, Italy, ii) survey goat farmers on the current practices of parasite control, iii) update the species composition of the gastrointestinal helminthofauna. Thirty three flocks were enrolled and 1288 individual fecal samples were collected. Based on the egg per gram (EPG), 15 flocks were selected to evaluate the presence of AR in GINs with the Fecal Egg Count Reduction Test (FECRT). A questionnaire surveyed 110 dairy goat farmers to acquire information about farm management and drenching practices against GINs. Further, the gastrointestinal tracts of 42 goats were analyzed. The FECRs indicated that five of the 15 flocks had problems of AR, which was identified in all two of the anthelmintic classes tested. Resistance and suspected resistance was found in 40% of the flocks selected for AR testing that were treated with benzimidazoles while 20% of the flocks treated with eprinomectin had resistant GINs. Teladorsagia/Trichostrongylus L3 were isolated from the post-treatment coprocultures of all flocks with resistance but not from the flock with suspected oxfendazole resistance. Treatments against helminths were performed once annually in 73.63% of the flocks, but 20.00% of farmers declared not regularly treating their goats every year. Annual treatments usually occurred in autumn or winter at dose rate for sheep. Te. circumcincta, H. contortus, Tr. colubriformis, Skrjabinema caprae and Oesophagostomum venulosum were the most abundant and prevalent species of the gastrointestinal tract. Strategies to prevent the development of AR should be widely adopted in Northern Italy. Further, farmers and practitioners should be educated about the importance of

  18. Effects of age, sex, lactation and social dominance on faecal egg count patterns of gastrointestinal nematodes in farmed eland (Taurotragus oryx).

    PubMed

    Vadlejch, J; Kotrba, R; Čadková, Z; Růžičková, A; Langrová, I

    2015-10-01

    The eland is a large African antelope that can be bred in a temperate climate, under similar conditions and production systems as cattle. However, knowledge of parasites in farmed elands outside the area of their native habitat is still limited, and information concerning factors that influence these parasites is lacking. Therefore, faecal samples from an entire herd of elands, including calves and adult females and males, were examined monthly over a one year period. Almost 84% of the animals were found to be positive for gastrointestinal nematodes. Strongyle-type eggs were most frequently detected (prevalence 75%), followed by Capillaria sp., Nematodirus sp. and Trichuris sp. eggs. Following culturing eggs to infective larvae, Teladorsagia sp., Trichostrongylus sp., Nematodirus sp., Cooperia sp. and Oesophagostomum sp. were identified. Following necropsy of two calves that died during the study one abomasal nematode (Teladorsagia circumcincta), five small intestinal nematode species (Nematodirus helvetianus, N. spathiger, Cooperia oncophora, C. curticei and Capillaria bovis) and two large intestinal nematodes (Oesophagostomum venulosum and Trichuris ovis) were recovered. From these findings, it is evident that the eland harbours nematodes that are typical for domestic cattle and small ruminants. Morphological and morphometric analyses of recovered nematodes revealed that these parasites do not require any special morphological adaptation to establish infection in elands. The faecal output of strongyle-type and Nematodirus sp. eggs was seasonal, with the highest egg production taking place during spring and summer. Calves had higher faecal egg counts (for all the monitored nematode species) than adults did. Lactation in females was significantly (P<0.0001) associated with higher strongyle nematode egg shedding. Social dominance also affected faecal egg count patterns. The lower the hierarchical position among adults (regardless of sex), the higher the risk of

  19. Common Symptoms from an Uncommon Infection: Gastrointestinal Anisakiasis

    PubMed Central

    Muwanwella, Niroshan; Chandran, Sujievvan; Kandel, Gabor

    2016-01-01

    Clinicians can be forgiven for thinking of anisakiasis as a rare condition low in the differential diagnosis of abdominal pain. Gastrointestinal anisakiasis is a zoonotic parasitic disease caused by consumption of raw or undercooked seafood infected with nematodes of the genus Anisakis. Even though the reported cases indicate that this is a rare disease, the true incidence of the disease could be potentially higher than what is reported in the literature as cases can go undiagnosed. Diagnosis and treatment of gastric anisakiasis are made by a compatible dietary history, direct visualization, and removal of the larvae via gastroscopy. Serologic testing and imaging studies are useful in the diagnosis of intestinal anisakiasis and conservative management should be considered. This disease may mimic other diseases and lead to unnecessary surgery. This emphasizes the importance of suspecting gastrointestinal anisakiasis by history taking and by other diagnostic modalities. PMID:27800471

  20. Small ruminant resistance against gastrointestinal nematodes: a case of Haemonchus contortus.

    PubMed

    Saddiqi, Hafiz A; Jabbar, Abdul; Sarwar, Muhammad; Iqbal, Zafar; Muhammad, Ghulam; Nisa, Mahrun; Shahzad, Aasif

    2011-12-01

    Gastrointestinal nematode (GIN) infections are a common constraint to small ruminant industry throughout the world, and among those, haemonchosis has its own significance. Control of GIN primarily relies on the use of anthelmintics, but this approach has become less reliable due to the development of resistance in GINs against commonly used anthelmintics and an increased consumer demand for environmentally friendly animal products. These issues have stimulated investigations to find alternative sustainable control strategies, which are less reliant on anthelmintic input. One of such strategies is breeding of small ruminants for their resistance to the GINs. The susceptibility and resistance of animals to GIN infections varies within and between breeds. Various parasitological, biochemical and immunological parameters are employed to evaluate natural resistance status of animals both in natural pasture and artificial infections. The immune mechanisms responsible for resistance are not completely understood, but it has a significant effect in inherited resistance. Relatively resistant or tolerant animals show better local and generalised immune response as compared to susceptible. Immune response against GINs is influenced by many physiological factors. Determination of specific genes linked with host resistance will provide a valuable approach to find out the molecular mechanism of host resistance to GINs. Resistance has been reported to reduce pasture contamination, which in turn reduces re-infection and thus the requirement of the frequent anthelmintic treatments. The efficiency of control can be increased through objective and accurate identification of genetically tolerant individuals by natural and artificial infections with GINs. Complete resistance is the ultimate solution, but this has generally been ignored as a commercial reality. This paper reviews the published reports on natural resistance in small ruminants and discusses the prospects of developing

  1. Efficacy of combined chemotherapy against gastrointestinal nematodes and Fasciola hepatica in cattle.

    PubMed

    Ibarra-Velarde, F; Vera-Montenegro, Y; Nájera-Fuentes, R; Sánchez-Albarran, A

    2001-08-20

    A controlled trial of the efficacy of several anthelmintic compounds as a combined therapy in the treatment of gastrointestinal nematodes (GIN) and Fasciola hepatica (F. hepatica) in naturally infected cattle was carried out. Twenty crossbred calves, 8-18 months old, were selected for inclusion in the trial based on finding eggs of F. hepatica and GIN in the faeces. They were blocked in four groups of five animals each according to GIN fecal egg counts on day 0. Treatments were sequentially allocated to animals in each block as follows: Group 1 served as non-treated control; Group 2 was treated with netobimin orally at 20 mg/kg; Group 3 received triclabendazole orally at 12 mg/kg and levamisole was applied intramuscularly at 5.5 mg/kg; Group 4 received clorsulon administered subcutaneously (s.c.) at 2 mg/kg and ivermectin s.c. at 200 microg/kg. Six to eight days after treatment the animals were euthanatized in order to collect and identify the parasites. Results showed a reduction of GIN by 87.3, 95.8 and 99.5% in Groups 2, 3 and 4, respectively. The percentage reduction of immature flukes was 0.0, 72.5, and 67.5% and for adult flukes 91.0, 97.5 and 100% for Groups 2, 3 and 4, respectively. Compounds indicated against nematodes showed high efficacy and products directed against F. hepatica acceptably removed adult flukes. However, efficacy against immature stages was generally not satisfactory.

  2. Efficacy of commonly used anthelmintics: first report of multiple drug resistance in gastrointestinal nematodes of sheep in Trinidad.

    PubMed

    George, N; Persad, K; Sagam, R; Offiah, V N; Adesiyun, A A; Harewood, W; Lambie, N; Basu, A K

    2011-12-29

    In Trinidad, small ruminant farms are semi-intensively managed under tropical conditions which support the development and survival of the infective stages of the helminths. Local farmers use anthelmintics to control gastrointestinal nematodes frequently. Frequent use of anthelmintics has the potential to select for populations of nematodes resistance to those chemicals. Hence, an attempt was made to study the efficacy of commonly used drugs on gastrointestinal nematodes of sheep. Three farms situated in different counties in Trinidad were selected. Sheep aged 6-15 months and not treated with anthelmintics for a minimum of six months previous and with faecal egg count (FEC)>150 eggs per gram were selected for study. They were allocated into 5 groups, each consisting 10 animals. The Group TA animals were treated once with albendazole (5mg/kg. b.wt.), group TF with fenbendazole (5mg/kg.b.wt.), group TI animals with ivermectin (200 μg/kg b.wt.), group TL with levamisol (7.5mg/kg b.wt.). The group NTC animals were not given any drug and served as control. The number of nematode eggs per gram of faeces from each animal was determined before treatment and at 14 days after treatment. The anthelmintic susceptibility to different drugs was detected by FECRT (in vivo) with EPG recorded at 14 day post-treatment. The data analysis using FECRT revealed that efficacy of albendazole (46-62%), fenbendazole (44-61%) and levamisol (53-81%) were reduced compared to ivermectin (95-97%). An attempt has also been made to find a suitable method for calculation of FECR (%).

  3. Comparative efficacy and toxic effects of carvacryl acetate and carvacrol on sheep gastrointestinal nematodes and mice.

    PubMed

    Andre, Weibson P P; Ribeiro, Wesley L C; Cavalcante, Géssica S; dos Santos, Jessica M L; Macedo, Iara T F; de Paula, Haroldo C B; de Freitas, Rivelilson M; de Morais, Selene M; de Melo, Janaina V; Bevilaqua, Claudia M L

    2016-03-15

    Carvacrol is a compound isolated from some essential oils. It has been reported to possess anthelmintic activity. Acetylation of this monoterpene has been proposed as a potential way to reduce the toxicity and enhance the pharmacological effects of carvacrol. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of carvacryl acetate (CA) using in vitro and in vivo assays with gastrointestinal nematodes of small ruminants. The egg hatching test (EHT), larval development test (LDT) and adult worm motility (AWM) assessment were conducted to evaluate the effect of the acetylated product and pure carvacrol on Haemonchus contortus eggs, larvae and adults. The structural changes induced in adult H. contortus were assessed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). CA and carvacrol acute toxicity was evaluated in mice. Finally, the efficacy of 250 mg/kg CA and 2.5mg/kg monepantel (positive control) were evaluated in 30 sheep naturally infected with gastrointestinal nematodes by the fecal egg count reduction test (FECRT). In vitro tests were analyzed by analysis of variance (ANOVA) followed by comparison with Tukey's test. The efficacy was calculated by the Boot Street program using the arithmetic average. The number of eggs in feces (epg) of the groups were transformed to log (x+1) and subjected to ANOVA to compare differences among the groups by Tukey's test. The level of significance was P<0.05. CA and carvacrol inhibited larval hatching by 89.3 and 97.7% at doses of 8.0 and 1.0mg/ml, respectively. At the concentration of 2mg/ml, CA and carvacrol inhibited 100% of larval development. At a concentration of 200 μg/ml, CA and carvacrol inhibited the motility of adult worms by 100% and 58.3% at 24h post-exposure, respectively. CA caused cuticle and vulvar flap wrinkling and bubbles to emerge from the tegument. Carvacrol caused more discreet effects on the cuticle and vulvar flap. The LD10 and LD50 of CA were 566.7 mg/kg and 1544.5mg/kg, respectively. The LD10 and LD50 of carvacrol were

  4. Anthelmintic activity of Trianthema portulacastrum L. and Musa paradisiaca L. against gastrointestinal nematodes of sheep.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Altaf; Khan, Muhammad Nisar; Iqbal, Zafar; Sajid, Muhammad Sohail; Khan, Muhammad Kasib

    2011-06-30

    Evaluation of anthelmintic effects of Trianthema (T.) portulacastrum L. (Aizoaceae) whole plant and Musa (M.) paradisiaca L. (Musaceae) leaves against prevalent gastrointestinal worms of sheep was done that may justify their traditional use in veterinary clinical medicine. In vitro anthelmintic activity of the crude aqueous methanolic extract (CAME) of both the plants was determined using mature female Haemonchus (H.) contortus and their eggs in adult motility assay (AMA) and egg hatch test (EHT), respectively. In vivo anthelmintic activity of crude powder (CP) and CAME in increasing doses (1.0-8.0 g kg(-1)) was determined in sheep naturally infected with mixed species of nematodes using fecal egg count reduction test (FECRT) and larval counts. The study design also included untreated as well as treated controls. Fecal egg count reduction and larval counts from coprocultures were performed pre- and post-treatments to assess the anthelmintic activity of the plants. CAME of T. portulacastrum and M. paradisiaca showed a strong in vitro anthelmintic activity and pronounced inhibitory effects on H. contortus egg hatching as observed through AMA and EHT, respectively. Both plants exhibited dose and time dependent anthelmintic effects on live worms as well as egg hatching. M. paradisiaca (LC(50)=2.13 μg mL(-1)) was found to be more potent than T. portulacastrum (LC(50)=2.41 μg mL(-1)) in EHT. However, in vivo, maximum reduction in eggs per gram (EPG) of faeces was recorded as 85.6% and 80.7% with CAME of T. portulacastrum and M. paradisiaca at 8.0 g kg(-1) on 15th day post-treatment, respectively as compared to that of Levamisole (7.5 mg kg(-1)) that caused 97.0% reduction in EPG. All the species of gastrointestinal nematodes (GINs), i.e. Haemonchus contortus, Trichostronglyus spp., Oesophagostomum columbianum and Trichuris ovis which were prevalent, found susceptible (P<0.01) to the different doses of CP and CAME of both plants. The data showed that both T

  5. Characterization of the abomasal transcriptome for mechanisms of resistance to gastrointestinal nematodes in cattle.

    PubMed

    Li, Robert W; Rinaldi, Manuela; Capuco, Anthony V

    2011-11-30

    The response of the abomasal transcriptome to gastrointestinal parasites was evaluated in parasite-susceptible and parasite-resistant Angus cattle using RNA-seq at a depth of 23.7 million sequences per sample. These cattle displayed distinctly separate resistance phenotypes as assessed by fecal egg counts. Approximately 65.3% of the 23,632 bovine genes were expressed in the fundic abomasum. Of these, 13,758 genes were expressed in all samples tested and likely represent core components of the bovine abomasal transcriptome. The gene (BT14427) with the most abundant transcript, accounting for 10.4% of sequences in the transcriptome, is located on chromosome 29 and has unknown functions. Additionally, PIGR (1.6%), Complement C3 (0.7%), and Immunoglobulin J chain (0.5%) were among the most abundant transcripts in the transcriptome. Among the 203 genes impacted, 64 were significantly over-expressed in resistant animals at a stringent cutoff (FDR < 5%). Among the 94 224 splice junctions identified, 133 were uniquely present: 90 were observed only in resistant animals, and 43 were present only in susceptible animals. Gene Ontology (GO) enrichment of the genes under study uncovered an association with lipid metabolism, which was confirmed by an independent pathway analysis. Several pathways, such as FXR/RXR activation, LXR/RXR activation, LPS/IL-1 mediated inhibition of RXR function, and arachidonic acid metabolism, were impacted in resistant animals, which are potentially involved in the development of parasite resistance in cattle. Our results provide insights into the development of host immunity to gastrointestinal nematode infection and will facilitate understanding of mechanism underlying host resistance.

  6. Characterization of the abomasal transcriptome for mechanisms of resistance to gastrointestinal nematodes in cattle

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The response of the abomasal transcriptome to gastrointestinal parasites was evaluated in parasite-susceptible and parasite-resistant Angus cattle using RNA-seq at a depth of 23.7 million sequences per sample. These cattle displayed distinctly separate resistance phenotypes as assessed by fecal egg counts. Approximately 65.3% of the 23 632 bovine genes were expressed in the fundic abomasum. Of these, 13 758 genes were expressed in all samples tested and likely represent core components of the bovine abomasal transcriptome. The gene (BT14427) with the most abundant transcript, accounting for 10.4% of sequences in the transcriptome, is located on chromosome 29 and has unknown functions. Additionally, PIGR (1.6%), Complement C3 (0.7%), and Immunoglobulin J chain (0.5%) were among the most abundant transcripts in the transcriptome. Among the 203 genes impacted, 64 were significantly over-expressed in resistant animals at a stringent cutoff (FDR < 5%). Among the 94 224 splice junctions identified, 133 were uniquely present: 90 were observed only in resistant animals, and 43 were present only in susceptible animals. Gene Ontology (GO) enrichment of the genes under study uncovered an association with lipid metabolism, which was confirmed by an independent pathway analysis. Several pathways, such as FXR/RXR activation, LXR/RXR activation, LPS/IL-1 mediated inhibition of RXR function, and arachidonic acid metabolism, were impacted in resistant animals, which are potentially involved in the development of parasite resistance in cattle. Our results provide insights into the development of host immunity to gastrointestinal nematode infection and will facilitate understanding of mechanism underlying host resistance. PMID:22129081

  7. Alternative approaches for the control of gastrointestinal nematodes in sheep farming: a review.

    PubMed

    Šimpraga, Miljenko; Ljubičić, Iva; Hlede, Jadranka Pejaković; Vugrovečki, Ana Shek; Marinculić, Albert; Tkalčić, Suzana

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal nematodes (GIN) are a serious health problem and represent the most significant constraint in sheep grazing operations. Problems tend to be worse in organic sheep farming systems, as a consequence of a less restricted access of animals to outdoor environment with a higher exposure to infective larvae. In domestic animals, GIN are effectively controlled by an aggressive prophylactic administration of commercially available anthelmintics. As a consequence to a common overdose and misuse of readily available antiparasitic treatments, there is an inevitable development of populations of GIN resistant to all major classes of anthelmintics. Also, the control of GIN that is based entirely on the anthelmintic use, threatens sustainability of the sheep farming worldwide. The combination of the optimized use of anthelmintic drugs and alternative approaches seem to be a reasonable choice in sustainable parasitic control programs that offer a substantial reduction of anthelmintic treatments and conservation of anthelmintic efficacy. In that aspect, a "targeted selective treatment (TST)" directed towards animals clinically diagnosed with GIN, seems to be an effective approach to leave some parasite populations unexposed to anthelmintics (refugia) and to reduce development of anthelmintic resistance. Also, many current research efforts aim to find and validate sustainable non-chemotherapeutic approaches to GIN control, including changes in grazing management, optimized nutrition, dietary supplementation, consumption of plants with anthelmintic properties, biological control by nematophagous fungi, copper oxide wire particles (COWP), and homeopathic treatments. This manuscript outlines (outlines) and discusses relevant alternative approaches for GIN control in modern sheep farming systems.

  8. Establishment rate of sheep gastrointestinal nematodes in farmed red deer (Cervus elaphus).

    PubMed

    Tapia-Escárate, D; Pomroy, W E; Scott, I; Wilson, P R; Lopez-Villalobos, N

    2015-04-15

    To investigate the establishment of sheep gastrointestinal nematodes (GIN) in red deer, five red deer and five sheep aged 5-6 months were challenged with a mixed burden of sheep GIN at a rate of 327L3/kg bodyweight. The LSmean (SE) establishment rates (%) for Haemonchus contortus, Teladorsagia circumcincta, Cooperia curticei, Trichostrongylus spp. and Oesophagostomum+Chabertia spp. were 18.6 (0.03), 35.5 (0.04), 30.7 (0.04), 74.9 (0.05), 19.9 (0.06), respectively in sheep and 10.5 (0.03), 1.0 (0.04), 0.1 (0.04), 1.0 (0.05), 4.8 (0.06) respectively, in deer. Establishment rates were significantly different (p<0.05) between hosts for all genera. No Trichostrongylus colubriformis or Trichostrongylus vitrinus were seen in any deer but were present in all sheep. Trichostrongylus axei were seen in both hosts but there were relatively more which established in sheep than in deer (p<0.01). No Chabertia ovina were seen in any deer but were present in four of five sheep in low numbers. The only species of Oesophagostomum seen in either host was Oesophagostomum venulosum. These results suggest that the sheep GIN most likely to infect red deer grazing the same pastures are H. contortus, T. axei and O. venulosum.

  9. DNA-based methodology for the quantification of gastrointestinal nematode eggs in sheep faeces.

    PubMed

    McNally, Jody; Callan, David; Andronicos, Nicholas; Bott, Nathan; Hunt, Peter W

    2013-12-06

    The presence of gastrointestinal nematode eggs in faecal samples is diagnostic of infection by these parasites. However, this technique cannot be used to distinguish between species of importance. The faecal culture technique and subsequent microscopic analysis of developed larvae is currently used to determine which parasite species are present in the samples, but these techniques take a week to perform and have inherent limitations. To overcome these parasite detection and identification problems, we have developed a DNA extraction method for sheep faeces, and a quantitative multiplex PCR (qPCR) test which can both enumerate and identify Haemonchus, Trichostrongylus and Teladorsagia. We demonstrate that the technique is sensitive to 10 eggs per gram and that dilution of DNA to 0.1 fold can overcome PCR inhibition issues for samples obtained from the field, while maintaining assay sensitivity. Further development of these tests for commercial use is warranted, given their potential to provide consistently faster and more accurate diagnoses of these parasites using simple sample collection and laboratory methods which can be easily adapted for the detection of a variety of pathogens from the same faecal sample. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Efficacy of ivermectin, closantel and fenbendazole against gastrointestinal nematodes of sheep in Kashmir valley.

    PubMed

    Tramboo, S R; Shahardar, R A; Allaie, I M; Wani, Z A; Abbas, Maria

    2017-06-01

    The present work was undertaken to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of ivermectin, closantel and fenbendazole under field conditions against Gastrointestinal Nematodes (GIN) of cross bred merino sheep in Budgam area of Kashmir Valley. A total of 115 sheep having Egg per gram of faeces (EPG) greater than or equal to 150 (mean EPG 258.89) were selected. The animals were randomly divided into four groups comprising of 30 animals each in three treatment groups (ivermectin, closantel and fenbendazole) and twenty-five in fourth untreated infected control group. Faecal samples from the selected animals were collected on day '0' pre treatment and on days 8th and 14th post treatment. Based on Faecal Egg Count Reduction Test (FECRT), ivermectin was found to be 98.80 % effective against strongyles on 8th day post treatment, however an efficacy of 100 % was seen against strongyle worms on 14th day post treatment. 98.80 and 100 % efficacy was observed on day 8th post treatment against strongyles in case of closantel and fenbendazole respectively, however efficacy decreased to 97.60 and 98.8 % respectively on 14th day post treatment. There was no evidence of development of resistance by GIN of cross bred merino sheep in District Budgam of Kashmir Valley to ivermectin, closantel and fenbendazole.

  11. Mapping QTL influencing gastrointestinal nematode burden in Dutch Holstein-Friesian dairy cattle

    PubMed Central

    Coppieters, Wouter; Mes, Ted HM; Druet, Tom; Farnir, Frédéric; Tamma, Nico; Schrooten, Chris; Cornelissen, Albert WCA; Georges, Michel; Ploeger, Harm W

    2009-01-01

    Background Parasitic gastroenteritis caused by nematodes is only second to mastitis in terms of health costs to dairy farmers in developed countries. Sustainable control strategies complementing anthelmintics are desired, including selective breeding for enhanced resistance. Results and Conclusion To quantify and characterize the genetic contribution to variation in resistance to gastro-intestinal parasites, we measured the heritability of faecal egg and larval counts in the Dutch Holstein-Friesian dairy cattle population. The heritability of faecal egg counts ranged from 7 to 21% and was generally higher than for larval counts. We performed a whole genome scan in 12 paternal half-daughter groups for a total of 768 cows, corresponding to the ~10% most and least infected daughters within each family (selective genotyping). Two genome-wide significant QTL were identified in an across-family analysis, respectively on chromosomes 9 and 19, coinciding with previous findings in orthologous chromosomal regions in sheep. We identified six more suggestive QTL by within-family analysis. An additional 73 informative SNPs were genotyped on chromosome 19 and the ensuing high density map used in a variance component approach to simultaneously exploit linkage and linkage disequilibrium in an initial inconclusive attempt to refine the QTL map position. PMID:19254385

  12. Genetic determinants of resistance to gastrointestinal nematodes in ruminants

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Genetic markers for host resistance to gastrointestinal parasites have long been sought by the livestock industry as a way to select more resistant individuals, and alternatively, to help farmers with parasite control because high egg shedders will be removed from the flock and reduce parasite trans...

  13. Leucocyte recruitment during enteric nematode infection.

    PubMed

    McDermott, J R; Grencis, R K; Else, K J

    2001-08-01

    Resolution of infection with the intestinal nematode Trichinella spiralis depends on the host mounting a T helper 2 (Th2) response. It is known that both mast cells and T cells play a crucial role. We have previously shown that efficient migration of mast cells to the gut during infection depends on their expression of the integrin beta 7. beta 7 forms a heterodimer complex with either alpha E or alpha 4 integrin chains, alpha E beta 7 binding to E-cadherin expressed by epithelial cells and alpha 4 beta 7 binding to mucosal addressin cell adhesion molecule (MAdCAM-1) on the endothelium. We were interested to know whether dysfunctional mast cell localization to the gut in the absence of beta 7 was due to the failure of alpha 4 beta 7 to bind to MAdCAM-1 or the failure of alpha E beta 7 to bind to E-cadherin. We used blocking monoclonal antibodies against alpha E (M290) or alpha 4 (PS2) or beta 7 (HB293) during T. spiralis infection of C57BL/6 mice and found that all antibody treatments reduced mastocytosis. In contrast, none of the antibody treatments prevented the migration of CD3(+) T cells into the intestine. These results indicate that during inflammation (a) there is integrin redundancy for lymphocytes but not for mast cells and (b) both alpha E beta 7 and alpha 4 beta 7 are crucial either for the entry of mast cells into the gut or for their maturation once they have entered.

  14. Leucocyte recruitment during enteric nematode infection

    PubMed Central

    McDermott, Jacqueline R; Grencis, Richard K; Else, Kathryn J

    2001-01-01

    Resolution of infection with the intestinal nematode Trichinella spiralis depends on the host mounting a T helper 2 (Th2) response. It is known that both mast cells and T cells play a crucial role. We have previously shown that efficient migration of mast cells to the gut during infection depends on their expression of the integrin β7. β7 forms a heterodimer complex with either αE or α4 integrin chains, αEβ7 binding to E-cadherin expressed by epithelial cells and α4β7 binding to mucosal addressin cell adhesion molecule (MAdCAM-1) on the endothelium. We were interested to know whether dysfunctional mast cell localization to the gut in the absence of β7 was due to the failure of α4β7 to bind to MAdCAM-1 or the failure of αEβ7 to bind to E-cadherin. We used blocking monoclonal antibodies against αE (M290) or α4 (PS2) or β7 (HB293) during T. spiralis infection of C57BL/6 mice and found that all antibody treatments reduced mastocytosis. In contrast, none of the antibody treatments prevented the migration of CD3+ T cells into the intestine. These results indicate that during inflammation (a) there is integrin redundancy for lymphocytes but not for mast cells and (b) both αEβ7 and α4β7 are crucial either for the entry of mast cells into the gut or for their maturation once they have entered. PMID:11529942

  15. Intranasal immunization of lambs with serine/threonine phosphatase 2A against gastrointestinal nematodes.

    PubMed

    Mohamed Fawzi, Elshaima; Cruz Bustos, Teresa; Gómez Samblas, Mercedes; González-González, Gloria; Solano, Jenifer; González-Sánchez, María Elena; De Pablos, Luis Miguel; Corral-Caridad, María Jesús; Cuquerella, Montserrat; Osuna, Antonio; Alunda, José María

    2013-09-01

    Seven 3-month-old, female, helminth-free lambs were immunized intranasally with three doses (1 mg total) of a recombinant part of the catalytic region of the serine/threonine phosphatase 2A (PP2Ar) (group 1 [G1]). In addition, four lambs were used as an adjuvant control group (G2), four as unimmunized, infected controls (G3), and four as unimmunized, uninfected controls (G4). Fifteen days after the last immunization, lambs from G1, G2, and G3 were challenged with 10,000 larval stage 3 (L3) organisms in a plurispecific nematode infection composed of ca. 40% Trichostrongylus colubriformis, 40% Haemonchus contortus, and 20% Teladorsagia circumcincta. All the lambs were clinically monitored throughout the experiment. Parasitological (fecal egg output and immunological response), biopathological (packed-cell volume and leukocyte and eosinophil counts), and zootechnical (live-weight gain) analyses were conducted. On day 105 of the experiment, all the animals were slaughtered and the adult worm population in their abomasa examined. Intranasal administration of PP2Ar with bacterial walls as an adjuvant elicited a strong immune response in the immunized lambs, as evidenced by their humoral immune response. Immunized animals and animals receiving the adjuvant shed significantly (P < 0.001) fewer numbers of parasites' eggs in their feces. The immunization significantly reduced the helminth burden in the abomasa by the end of the experiment (>68%), protection being provided against both Haemonchus and Teladorsagia. Live-weight gain in the immunized lambs was similar to that in the uninfected controls versus the infected or adjuvanted animal groups. Our results suggest that heterologous immunization of ruminants by intranasal administration may be efficacious in the struggle to control gastrointestinal helminths in these livestock.

  16. Intranasal Immunization of Lambs with Serine/Threonine Phosphatase 2A against Gastrointestinal Nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed Fawzi, Elshaima; Cruz Bustos, Teresa; Gómez Samblas, Mercedes; González-González, Gloria; Solano, Jenifer; González-Sánchez, María Elena; De Pablos, Luis Miguel; Corral-Caridad, María Jesús; Cuquerella, Montserrat; Osuna, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Seven 3-month-old, female, helminth-free lambs were immunized intranasally with three doses (1 mg total) of a recombinant part of the catalytic region of the serine/threonine phosphatase 2A (PP2Ar) (group 1 [G1]). In addition, four lambs were used as an adjuvant control group (G2), four as unimmunized, infected controls (G3), and four as unimmunized, uninfected controls (G4). Fifteen days after the last immunization, lambs from G1, G2, and G3 were challenged with 10,000 larval stage 3 (L3) organisms in a plurispecific nematode infection composed of ca. 40% Trichostrongylus colubriformis, 40% Haemonchus contortus, and 20% Teladorsagia circumcincta. All the lambs were clinically monitored throughout the experiment. Parasitological (fecal egg output and immunological response), biopathological (packed-cell volume and leukocyte and eosinophil counts), and zootechnical (live-weight gain) analyses were conducted. On day 105 of the experiment, all the animals were slaughtered and the adult worm population in their abomasa examined. Intranasal administration of PP2Ar with bacterial walls as an adjuvant elicited a strong immune response in the immunized lambs, as evidenced by their humoral immune response. Immunized animals and animals receiving the adjuvant shed significantly (P < 0.001) fewer numbers of parasites' eggs in their feces. The immunization significantly reduced the helminth burden in the abomasa by the end of the experiment (>68%), protection being provided against both Haemonchus and Teladorsagia. Live-weight gain in the immunized lambs was similar to that in the uninfected controls versus the infected or adjuvanted animal groups. Our results suggest that heterologous immunization of ruminants by intranasal administration may be efficacious in the struggle to control gastrointestinal helminths in these livestock. PMID:23761655

  17. Infection with Mansonella perstans Nematodes in Buruli Ulcer Patients, Ghana.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Richard O; Frimpong, Michael; Sarfo, Fred S; Kretschmer, Birte; Beissner, Marcus; Debrah, Alexander; Ampem-Amoako, Yaw; Abass, Kabiru M; Thompson, William; Duah, Mabel Sarpong; Abotsi, Justice; Adjei, Ohene; Fleischer, Bernhard; Bretzel, Gisela; Wansbrough-Jones, Mark; Jacobsen, Marc

    2014-06-01

    During August 2010-December 2012, we conducted a study of patients in Ghana who had Buruli ulcer, caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans, and found that 23% were co-infected with Mansonella perstans nematodes; 13% of controls also had M. perstans infection. M. perstans co-infection should be considered in the diagnosis and treatment of Buruli ulcer.

  18. Infection with Mansonella perstans Nematodes in Buruli Ulcer Patients, Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Frimpong, Michael; Sarfo, Fred S.; Kretschmer, Birte; Beissner, Marcus; Debrah, Alexander; Ampem-Amoako, Yaw; Abass, Kabiru M.; Thompson, William; Duah, Mabel Sarpong; Abotsi, Justice; Adjei, Ohene; Fleischer, Bernhard; Bretzel, Gisela; Wansbrough-Jones, Mark; Jacobsen, Marc

    2014-01-01

    During August 2010–December 2012, we conducted a study of patients in Ghana who had Buruli ulcer, caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans, and found that 23% were co-infected with Mansonella perstans nematodes; 13% of controls also had M. perstans infection. M. perstans co-infection should be considered in the diagnosis and treatment of Buruli ulcer. PMID:24857346

  19. Practices to optimise gastrointestinal nematode control on sheep, goat and cattle farms in Europe using targeted (selective) treatments.

    PubMed

    Charlier, J; Morgan, E R; Rinaldi, L; van Dijk, J; Demeler, J; Höglund, J; Hertzberg, H; Van Ranst, B; Hendrickx, G; Vercruysse, J; Kenyon, F

    2014-09-13

    Due to the development of anthelmintic resistance, there have been calls for more sustainable nematode control practices. Two important concepts were introduced to study and promote the sustainable use of anthelmintics: targeted treatments (TT), where the whole flock/herd is treated based on knowledge of the risk, or parameters that quantify the severity of infection; and targeted selective treatments (TST), where only individual animals within the grazing group are treated. The aim of the TT and TST approaches is to effectively control nematode-induced production impacts while preserving anthelmintic efficacy by maintaining a pool of untreated parasites in refugia. Here, we provide an overview of recent studies that assess the use of TT/TST against gastrointestinal nematodes in ruminants and investigate the economic consequences, feasibility and knowledge gaps associated with TST. We conclude that TT/TST approaches are ready to be used and provide practical benefits today. However, a major shift in mentality will be required to make these approaches common practice in parasite control. British Veterinary Association.

  20. Genetic analysis of resistance to ticks, gastrointestinal nematodes and Eimeria spp. in Nellore cattle.

    PubMed

    Passafaro, Tiago Luciano; Carrera, Juan Pablo Botero; dos Santos, Livia Loiola; Raidan, Fernanda Santos Silva; dos Santos, Dalinne Chrystian Carvalho; Cardoso, Eduardo Penteado; Leite, Romário Cerqueira; Toral, Fabio Luiz Buranelo

    2015-06-15

    The aim of the present study was to obtain genetic parameters for resistance to ticks, gastrointestinal nematodes (worms) and Eimeria spp. in Nellore cattle, analyze the inclusion of resistance traits in Nellore breeding programs and evaluate genetic selection as a complementary tool in parasite control programs. Counting of ticks, gastrointestinal nematode eggs and Eimeria spp. oocysts per gram of feces totaling 4270; 3872 and 3872 records from 1188; 1142 and 1142 animals, respectively, aged 146 to 597 days were used. The animals were classified as resistant (counts equal to zero) or susceptible (counts above zero) to each parasite. The statistical models included systematics effects of contemporary groups and the mean trajectory. The random effects included additive genetic effects, direct permanent environmental effects and residual. The mean trajectory and random effects were modeled with linear Legendre polynomials for all traits except for the mean trajectory of resistance to Eimeria spp., which employed the cubic polynomial. Heritability estimates were of low to moderate magnitude and ranged from 0.06 to 0.30, 0.06 to 0.33 and 0.04 to 0.33 for resistance to ticks, gastrointestinal nematodes and Eimeria spp., respectively. The posterior mean of genetic and environmental correlations for the same trait at different ages (205, 365, 450 and 550 days) were favorable at adjacent ages and unfavorable at distant ages. In general, the posterior mean of the genetic and environmental correlations between traits of resistance were low and high-density intervals were large and included zero in many cases. The heritability estimates support the inclusion of resistance to ticks, gastrointestinal nematodes and Eimeria spp. in Nellore breeding programs. Genetic selection can increase the frequency of resistant animals and be used as a complementary tool in parasite control programs.

  1. Genus-specific PCR for the differentiation of eggs or larvae from gastrointestinal nematodes of ruminants.

    PubMed

    Schnieder, T; Heise, M; Epe, C

    1999-11-01

    Using sequences of the ribosomal second internal transcribed spacer (ITS2), PCR primers were designed for the differentiation of the gastrointestinal nematode genera Ostertagia, Cooperia, Nematodirus, Haemonchus and Trichostrongylus. Single eggs or larvae from faeces could be differentiated without previous DNA extraction. Quantification of the PCR result proved to be difficult because the DNA content between eggs from fresh or 24-h-old faeces varied considerably.

  2. Exploiting parallels between livestock and wildlife: Predicting the impact of climate change on gastrointestinal nematodes in ruminants

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Hannah; Hoar, Bryanne; Kutz, Susan J.; Morgan, Eric R.

    2014-01-01

    Global change, including climate, policy, land use and other associated environmental changes, is likely to have a major impact on parasitic disease in wildlife, altering the spatio-temporal patterns of transmission, with wide-ranging implications for wildlife, domestic animals, humans and ecosystem health. Predicting the potential impact of climate change on parasites infecting wildlife will become increasingly important in the management of species of conservation concern and control of disease at the wildlife–livestock and wildlife–human interface, but is confounded by incomplete knowledge of host–parasite interactions, logistical difficulties, small sample sizes and limited opportunities to manipulate the system. By exploiting parallels between livestock and wildlife, existing theoretical frameworks and research on livestock and their gastrointestinal nematodes can be adapted to wildlife systems. Similarities in the gastrointestinal nematodes and the life-histories of wild and domestic ruminants, coupled with a detailed knowledge of the ecology and life-cycle of the parasites, render the ruminant-GIN host–parasite system particularly amenable to a cross-disciplinary approach. PMID:25197625

  3. [Forming of gastro-intestinal nematodes fauna of free ranging European bison in Bialowieza Primeval Forest during last 17 years (1984-2001)].

    PubMed

    Drózdz, Jan; Demiaszkiewicz, Aleksander W; Lachowicz, Jacek

    2002-01-01

    28 European bison of both sexes and in different age shot in Białowieza Primeval Forest in January 1984, (10 animals), January 1992 (10 animals) and in January and the beginning of February 2001 (8 animals) have been necropsied. The examined animals in mentioned years were of similar age. There were examined abomasa and duodena of shot animals. All necropsied bison were infected with gastro-intestinal nematodes. The highest intensity of infection with nematodes of abomasum was found in 1992 year and with nematodes of duodenum in 2001 year. In the examined period were found as many as 21 species of gastro-intestinal nematodes, and 15 of them occurred in 1984, 16 in 1992 and 17 in 2001; 12 species, namely: Trichostrongylus axei, T. capricola, Ostertagia ostertagi, O. lyrata, O. leptospicularis, O. kolchida, Spiculopteragia boehmi, Cooperia oncophora, Nematodirus helventianus, N. roscidus, N. europaeus and Aonchotheca bilobata occurred in all 3 examined years. The highest mean intensity of infection and the percentage index of intensity of these 12 species of nematodes showed O. leptospicularis which was 45% to 47% of all Ostertagiinae. Beyond of these 12 species of nematodes which occurred in all examined years, there were found 9 species more: Ostertagia antipini, Spiculopteragia mathevossiani, S. asymmetrica, Mazamastrongylus dagestanicus, Cooperia surnabada, C. punctata, C. pectinata, Haemonchus placei and Ashworthius sidemi. They occurred sporadically and in low density. During the examined period, bison have adapted 10 species of parasites from Cervides. Mazamastrongylus dagestanicus - parasite primary typical for moose, was for the first time found in bison.

  4. Anthelmintic resistance in gastrointestinal nematodes in goats and evaluation of FAMACHA diagnostic marker in Uganda.

    PubMed

    Nabukenya, Immaculate; Rubaire-Akiiki, Chris; Olila, Deogracious; Muhangi, Denis; Höglund, Johan

    2014-10-15

    Gastrointestinal nematodes (GIN) are a challenge to goat production globally causing reduced growth, morbidity and mortality. We report here results of the first nation-wide anthelmintic resistance (AR) study and validation of assessment of clinical anaemia with FAMACHA eye scores in goats in Uganda. From August to December 2012 the efficacy of albendazole (7.5mg/kg), levamisole (10.5mg/kg) and ivermectin (0.3mg/kg) against strongyle nematodes was tested on 33 goat farms in Soroti, Gulu, Mpigi, Mbarara and Ssembabule districts of Uganda. Altogether 497 goats were subjected to a total of 45 different faecal egg count reduction tests (FECRT), each involving 5-20 goats. On one farm all substances were tested. Faecal and blood samples were collected and FAMACHA eye scores evaluated on the day of treatment and 15 days later. A questionnaire survey was conducted on frequency, type and dose of anthelmintics used, farm size and grazing management system. Examination of infective third stage larvae (L3) from pooled faecal cultures demonstrated Haemonchus to be the predominant genus (>75%). Resistance to at least one anthelmintic group was detected on 61% of the 33 farms and in 49% of the 45 test groups. Prevalence of resistance to ivermectin, levamisole and albendazole was respectively 58%, 52% and 38%. Correlation between pre-treatment packed cell volume determinations and FAMACHA scores (r(498) = -0.89) was significant. Paddock grazing system (Odds ratio 4.9, 95% CI 1.4-17.3) and large farm size of >40 goats (odds ratio 4.4, 95% CI 1.2-16.1) were significant predictors of AR. In all districts, resistance to all three anthelmintics was higher on large-scale goat farms practising mostly paddock grazing. Interestingly, resistance to albendazole, the most commonly used anthelmintic in Uganda, was lower than that to ivermectin and levamisole. We recommend adaptation of FAMACHA to goats to help restrict anthelmintic treatment to heavily infected individuals. This will limit

  5. Breeding for resistance to gastrointestinal nematodes - the potential in low-input/output small ruminant production systems.

    PubMed

    Zvinorova, P I; Halimani, T E; Muchadeyi, F C; Matika, O; Riggio, V; Dzama, K

    2016-07-30

    The control of gastrointestinal nematodes (GIN) is mainly based on the use of drugs, grazing management, use of copper oxide wire particles and bioactive forages. Resistance to anthelmintic drugs in small ruminants is documented worldwide. Host genetic resistance to parasites, has been increasingly used as a complementary control strategy, along with the conventional intervention methods mentioned above. Genetic diversity in resistance to GIN has been well studied in experimental and commercial flocks in temperate climates and more developed economies. However, there are very few report outputs from the more extensive low-input/output smallholder systems in developing and emerging countries. Furthermore, results on quantitative trait loci (QTL) associated with nematode resistance from various studies have not always been consistent, mainly due to the different nematodes studied, different host breeds, ages, climates, natural infections versus artificial challenges, infection level at sampling periods, among others. The increasing use of genetic markers (Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms, SNPs) in GWAS or the use of whole genome sequence data and a plethora of analytic methods offer the potential to identify loci or regions associated nematode resistance. Genomic selection as a genome-wide level method overcomes the need to identify candidate genes. Benefits in genomic selection are now being realised in dairy cattle and sheep under commercial settings in the more advanced countries. However, despite the commercial benefits of using these tools, there are practical problems associated with incorporating the use of marker-assisted selection or genomic selection in low-input/output smallholder farming systems breeding schemes. Unlike anthelmintic resistance, there is no empirical evidence suggesting that nematodes will evolve rapidly in response to resistant hosts. The strategy of nematode control has evolved to a more practical manipulation of host-parasite equilibrium

  6. Parasitic infections of the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Noyer, C M; Brandt, L J

    1999-08-01

    Parasitic infections of the gastrointestinal tract are a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Increased international travel means that gastroenterologists are now more likely to care for patients with parasitic diseases. This article reviews various aspects of the more common intestinal parasites and their infections, including epidemiology, life cycle, pathogenesis, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment.

  7. Markers/parameters for the evaluation of natural resistance status of small ruminants against gastrointestinal nematodes.

    PubMed

    Saddiqi, H A; Sarwar, M; Iqbal, Z; Nisa, M; Shahzad, M A

    2012-06-01

    The high prevalence of anthelmintic-resistant gastrointestinal nematodes (GINs) throughout the world has led to the need for alternative worm control strategies. One of the possible substitutes to reduce the problems of drug resistance and residue is the evaluation/breeding of small ruminants for greater resistance to the GINs (organically produced), which in turn would be a helpful tool to predict the performance of an animal. At present, the existing diversity in the genetic potential to resist/tolerate GINs infection both within and between breeds has been validated. Successful selection of animals to define the genotype and identified resistance is related to the employed markers. A number of phenotypic traits such as faecal egg count (FEC), worm burden, serum antibodies, peripheral eosinophilia, packed cell volume, live weight, serum protein and albumin concentrations have been used for this purpose both in natural and artificial infections. Relatively resistant/tolerant animals have also been found to have mastocytosis, globule leucocytes, high levels of histamine and immunoglobulin (Ig) A and IgE concentrations. Of these traits, the principal and most practical measurement used to assess resistance status in animals undergoing similar parasite challenges is FEC. FEC has a positive/negative correlation with other biochemical, cellular and immunological parameters; however, the reliability of individual trial is often questioned and valuable information regarding the genetic makeup can be obtained from pooled data of a large number of trials and parameters. This paper covers all the aspects reported in the literature on various parameters considered to evaluate the resistance status of a range of small ruminant breeds.

  8. Efficacy of copper oxide wire particles against gastrointestinal nematodes in sheep and goats.

    PubMed

    Soli, F; Terrill, T H; Shaik, S A; Getz, W R; Miller, J E; Vanguru, M; Burke, J M

    2010-02-26

    Profitable sheep and goat production in the USA is severely limited by gastrointestinal nematode (GIN) parasitism, particularly by Haemonchus contortus. Copper oxide wire particles (COWP) have anti-parasitic properties in the diet of small ruminants, but efficacy of COWP may differ between sheep and goats. In a study with weaned kids (Kiko x Spanish cross, 6 months old) and lambs (Katahdin or Dorper x Blackface crosses, 5 months old), grazing the same pasture area in Central Georgia, 2g of COWP in a gel capsule was given to half the animals of each species, while the other half were given no COWP. Fecal and blood samples were taken weekly to determine GIN fecal egg counts (FEC) and blood packed cell volume (PCV). After COWP treatment, animals were grazed for 4 weeks and then slaughtered, with adult GIN recovered from the abomasum and small intestines for counting and identification to species. For both sheep and goats, COWP treatment reduced EPG (P<0.05), increased PCV (P<0.05), and lowered abomasal GIN numbers (P<0.05). For EPG, these differences were 82.5 and 90.5% for sheep and goats, respectively, 26 days after treatment, while adult H. contortus were 67.2 and 85.8% lower for COWP-treated sheep and goats, respectively. In this study, COWP treatment was equally effective against H. contortus infection in lambs and kids and appears to be an effective method of controlling H. contortus infection for up to 6 weeks in small ruminants following weaning.

  9. Kinetics of capture and infection of infective larvae of trichostrongylides and free-living nematodes Panagrellus sp. by Duddingtonia flagrans.

    PubMed

    da Cruz, Daniela Guedes; Araújo, Flávia Biasoli; Molento, Marcelo Beltrão; Damatta, Renato Augusto; de Paula Santos, Clóvis

    2011-10-01

    Duddingtonia flagrans, a nematode-trapping fungus, has been investigated as an agent for biological control against infective larvae of gastrointestinal nematode parasites of production animals. The initial process of nematode-trapping fungi infection is based on an interaction between the trap structure of the fungus and the surface of the nematode cuticle. This report investigates by light and scanning electron microscopy the kinetics of capture and infection during the interaction of D. flagrans with the infective larvae (L(3)) of trichostrongylides and the free-living nematode Panagrellus sp. D. flagrans was cultivated for 7 days in a Petri dish containing agar-water. L(3) and Panagrellus sp. were inoculated in the Petri dishes and the samples consisting of agar-L(3)-fungi and agar-Panagrellus sp.-fungi were collected after 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, and 70 min and 3, 4, 5, 10, 15, 20, and 25 h of interaction. All samples were observed by light microscopy. The samples with 1, 5, 15, and 25 h of interaction were also analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. The interaction was monitored up to 25 h. An initial differentiation of predation structures was observed after 30 min of interaction. The presence of traps and of captured L(3) or Panagrellus sp. occurred after 70 min. The live captured nematodes were observed up to 3 h of interaction. However, after 4 h, all Panagrellus sp. were dead. It took 15 h of interaction for the fungus to invade the L(3), and the presence of hyphae inside the nematode near the region of penetration was evident. At this time, the hyphae had filled the whole body of Panagrellus sp. The complete occupation of the body of L(3) occurred at 20 h of interaction and with 25 h the nematode was completely damaged except for the cuticle. Although the double cuticle of L(3) slows the penetration of D. flagrans, it was possible to verify that the process of trap formation and capture occurs quickly when both nematodes were tested, suggesting that

  10. Disease transmission in an extreme environment: nematode parasites infect reindeer during the Arctic winter.

    PubMed

    Carlsson, Anja M; Justin Irvine, R; Wilson, Kenneth; Piertney, Stuart B; Halvorsen, Odd; Coulson, Stephen J; Stien, Audun; Albon, Steve D

    2012-07-01

    Parasitic nematodes are found in almost all wild vertebrate populations but few studies have investigated these host-parasite relationships in the wild. For parasites with free-living stages, the external environment has a major influence on life-history traits, and development and survival is generally low at sub-zero temperatures. For reindeer that inhabit the high Arctic archipelago of Svalbard, parasite transmission is expected to occur in the summer, due to the extreme environmental conditions and the reduced food intake by the host in winter. Here we show experimentally that, contrary to most parasitic nematodes, Marshallagia marshalli of Svalbard reindeer is transmitted during the Arctic winter. Winter transmission was demonstrated by removing parasites in the autumn, using a novel delayed-release anthelmintic bolus, and estimating re-infection rates in reindeer sampled in October, February and April. Larval stages of nematodes were identified using molecular tools, whereas adult stages were identified using microscopy. The abundance of M. marshalli adult worms and L4s increased significantly from October to April, indicating that reindeer were being infected with L3s from the pasture throughout the winter. To our knowledge, this study is the first to experimentally demonstrate over-winter transmission of a gastro-intestinal nematode parasite in a wild animal. Potential mechanisms associated with this unusual transmission strategy are discussed in light of our knowledge of the life-history traits of this parasite.

  11. Efficacy of an energy block containing Duddingtonia flagrans in the control of gastrointestinal nematodes of sheep.

    PubMed

    Sagüés, María F; Fusé, Luis A; Fernández, Alicia S; Iglesias, Lucía E; Moreno, Fabiana C; Saumell, Carlos A

    2011-09-01

    The efficacy of the nematode-trapping fungus Duddingtonia flagrans incorporated into an energy block was evaluated for the control of gastrointestinal nematodes in sheep. Four naturally parasitised sheep with average nematode egg counts of 2,470 eggs per gram grazed by pairs on two similar parasite-free paddocks for 30 days. During that period, one pair of sheep (treated animals, T1) received an energy block containing chlamydospores of D. flagrans at a dose of 200,000 chlamydopores/kg bw/day, while the second pair (control animals, C1) received a fungus-free energy block. The animals in both groups were taken off the paddocks after contaminating the pastures for a month with either nematode eggs plus fungal chlamydospores (T1) or nematode eggs alone (C1). Twelve parasite-free sheep were divided into two groups of six animals each, the treated group (T2) was placed on the paddock previously contaminated with parasites and fungus, while the control group (C2) was placed on the parasite-only paddock. These two groups grazed on their respective paddocks during 30 days and were then housed for 15 days, after which period they were slaughtered in order to determine the parasite burden present in each animal. Results showed that animals in group T2 harboured significantly less nematodes than their counterpart in group C2. The efficacy of D. flagrans was 92% against the total parasite burden, 100% against Haemonchus contortus and Teladorsagia circumcincta, 89.9% against Trichostrongylus colubriformis, 87.5% against Cooperia onchopora, and 90% against Trichostrongylus axei. No efficacy was detected against Nematodirus spathiger, Trichuris ovis and T. skrjabini.

  12. Measurement of phenotypic resilience to gastro-intestinal nematodes in Merino sheep and association with resistance and production variables.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Gareth A; Kahn, Lewis P; Walkden-Brown, Stephen W

    2013-03-31

    A cross-over experiment was conducted to compare six different phenotypic measures of resilience to gastro-intestinal nematodes (predominantly Haemonchus contortus) in Merino sheep and their association with resistance and production levels. On each of six farms, 120 ewes born in 2006 and 120 older mixed age ewes were selected at shearing in 2007. Of these, 60 in each mob were serially treated with long-acting anthelmintics to suppress worm populations. The other 60 ewes were managed according to management practices employed on the farm (infected, INF). At shearing in 2008, the experimental sheep had their anthelmintic treatments switched. The experiment concluded at shearing in 2009. Measures of resilience were greasy fleece weight (GFW), live weight gain (LWG) and haematocrit (HCT) when infected and the difference in these variables between infected and suppressed. Resistance was determined from multiple faecal worm egg counts (WEC) when infected. Measures of resilience based on GFW, LWG and HCT were moderately correlated with each other (r=0.25-0.50) suggesting that they represent different traits. Correlations between a measure in infected animals, and the difference in the same measurement between infected and uninfected animals were higher (r=-0.37 to -0.82), indicating that measurement during infection is an adequate measure of resilience. WEC was negatively correlated with LWG and HCT during infection but not GFW. Correlations with resilience measures based on difference between infected and uninfected were positive. Surviving infected sheep were found to have higher haematocrit (HCT), and lower WEC in summer and autumn than sheep that died following the measurement. These results show that measurement of performance traits while infected is a reasonable approximation of measurement of resilience based on the difference in performance between infected and non-infected. They also show that resilience to worm infection is not a single trait, but rather a

  13. Anthelmintic activity of Eucalyptus staigeriana encapsulated oil on sheep gastrointestinal nematodes.

    PubMed

    de Aquino Mesquita, Mayara; E Silva Júnior, João Batista; Panassol, Andressa Machado; de Oliveira, Erick Falcão; Vasconcelos, Ana Lourdes Camurça Fernandes; de Paula, Haroldo Cesar Beserra; Bevilaqua, Claudia Maria Leal

    2013-09-01

    The anthelmintic activity of Eucalyptus staigeriana essential oil has previously been inferred through both in vitro and in vivo tests. Thus, the encapsulation process generally improves oil stability, promotes controlled release in target organs, reduces dosage, and increases efficacy. The aims of this study were to analyze and encapsulate E. staigeriana essential oil and to verify its anthelmintic activity in sheep. The encapsulation process was accomplished through emulsion using a 4% chitosan solution as the matrix. Anthelmintic activity was established through controlled testing using 18 sheep that were separated into three groups: group 1 was treated with a single dose of 365 mg/kg of E. staigeriana encapsulated oil, group 2 was treated with 200 μg/kg of ivermectin, and group 3 was treated with a 4% chitosan solution as a negative control. The sheep were euthanized and necropsied 13 days posttreatment to evaluate worm burden. Limonene was the major oil component (72.91%). The final product was a hydrogel with 36.5% (m/m) E. staigeriana essential oil per gram. Its efficacy on gastrointestinal nematodes was 60.79%. The highest efficacy was against abomasal nematodes, with 83.75% efficacy. Further studies are necessary to explore the possibility of increasing the hydrogel efficacy; nevertheless, we can state that E. staigeriana encapsulated oil had anthelmintic activity and can be used in gastrointestinal nematode control.

  14. In vitro ovicidal and larvicidal activity of Agave sisalana Perr. (sisal) on gastrointestinal nematodes of goats.

    PubMed

    Botura, Mariana B; dos Santos, Jener David G; da Silva, Gisele D; de Lima, Hélimar G; de Oliveira, João Victor A; de Almeida, Maria Angela O; Batatinha, Maria José M; Branco, Alexsandro

    2013-02-18

    This study describes the in vitro anthelmintic activity of aqueous extracts (AE), ethyl acetate extracts (EE), flavonoid fractions (FF) and saponin fractions (SF) obtained from sisal waste (Agave sisalana) against gastrointestinal nematodes of goats. The activity of these extracts was evaluated by performing inhibition of egg hatch (EHA) and larval migration (LMI) assays. The EC(50) results of the EHA corresponded to 4.7, 0.1 and 0.05 mg/mL for EE, EA and FF, respectively. The SF fraction showed no ovicidal activity. The percent efficacies that were observed for the LMI were 50.3, 33.2 and 64.1% for the AE, EE and SF, respectively. The FF fraction did not show activity against the larvae. The analysis of the FF fraction indicates the presence of a homoisoflavonoid. This report suggests that the A. sisalana has activity in vitro against gastrointestinal nematodes of goats. This effect is likely related to the presence of homoisoflavonoid and saponin compounds, which have different actions for specific stages of nematode development.

  15. [Nematophagous fungi used for the biological control of gastrointestinal nematodes in livestock and administration routes].

    PubMed

    Sagüés, María Federica; Purslow, Peter; Fernández, Silvina; Fusé, Luis; Iglesias, Lucía; Saumell, Carlos

    2011-01-01

    The control of gastrointestinal nematodes relies at present mostly on antihelmintic treatments using synthetic molecules. This approach, however, has led to the appearance of resistance to some types of antihelmintics which, together with the need to cut down on the use of chemicals, has fostered the development of other control methods, such as biological control, which is the use of living organisms that are naturally antagonistic to an unwanted species. Among the natural enemies of nematode parasitic larvae is the microfungus Duddingtonia flagrans. Research has shown the ability of this fungus to reduce the number of nematode larvae in faeces, the ability of its chlamydospores to survive the passage through the gastrointestinal tract of livestock and, moreover, to keep its germinative ability, thus facilitating the development of formulations. The present review looks at the species currently used and the different ways of administering already tested nematophagous fungi. Copyright © 2011 Revista Iberoamericana de Micología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  16. Tissue mineral distributions are differentially modified by dietary protein deficiency and a murine nematode infection.

    PubMed

    Tu, T; Scott, M E; Sabally, K; Koski, K G

    2009-03-01

    This study was designed to investigate whether mineral concentrations in the spleen, serum, and liver were modified by challenge infection with a gastrointestinal nematode, by infection dose, or by protein deficiency despite adequate dietary intakes of minerals. BALB/c mice fed protein-sufficient (PS, 24%) or protein-deficient (PD, 3%) diets were infected with 100 L3 of Heligmosomoides bakeri, drug-treated, and then re-infected with either 0, 100, or 200 L3. Protein deficiency and infection, but not dose, independently modified tissue mineral distributions. H. bakeri infection lowered serum iron concentrations in both diet groups. Despite this, PD mice had elevated iron and calcium concentrations and Ca/Zn ratio in the spleen as well as Fe/Zn ratio in liver, but they had reduced calcium, zinc, copper, and sulfur concentrations, and Cu/Zn ratio in the liver. Infection reduced calcium and iron concentrations and the Ca/Zn ratio in the spleen. We suggest that tissue mineral distribution is a consequence of Th2 immune and inflammatory responses induced by infection in PS mice and the switch to predominant Th1 inflammation in PD, nematode-infected mice.

  17. Economic modelling of grazing management against gastrointestinal nematodes in dairy cattle.

    PubMed

    van der Voort, M; Van Meensel, J; Lauwers, L; de Haan, M H A; Evers, A G; Van Huylenbroeck, G; Charlier, J

    2017-03-15

    Grazing management (GM) interventions, such as reducing the grazing time or mowing pasture before grazing, have been proposed to limit the exposure to gastrointestinal (GI) nematode infections in grazed livestock. However, the farm-level economic effects of these interventions have not yet been assessed. In this paper, the economic effects of three GM interventions in adult dairy cattle were modelled for a set of Flemish farms: later turnout on pasture (GM1), earlier housing near the end of the grazing season (GM2), and reducing the daily grazing time (GM3). Farm accountancy data were linked to Ostertagia ostertagi bulk tank milk ELISA results and GM data for 137 farms. The economic effects of the GM interventions were investigated through a combination of efficiency analysis and a whole-farm simulation model. Modelling of GM1, GM2 and GM3 resulted in a marginal economic effect of € 8.36, € -9.05 and € -53.37 per cow per year, respectively. The results suggest that the dairy farms can improve their economic performance by postponing the turnout date, but that advancing the housing date or reducing daily grazing time mostly leads to a lower net economic farm performance. Overall, the GM interventions resulted in a higher technical efficiency and milk production but these benefits were offset by increased feed costs as a result of higher maintenance and cultivation costs. Because the results differed highly between farms, GM interventions need to be evaluated at the individual level for appropriate decision support. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Polyphenols from Pistacia lentiscus and Phillyrea latifolia impair the exsheathment of gastro-intestinal nematode larvae.

    PubMed

    Azaizeh, H; Halahleh, F; Abbas, N; Markovics, A; Muklada, H; Ungar, E D; Landau, S Y

    2013-01-16

    The infection of grazing ruminants with gastro-intestinal nematodes (GINs) is a severe problem in the Middle East. However, goats that graze the south-western slopes of the Carmel Heights in Israel have very low faecal egg counts, despite high grazing density. We hypothesized that polyphenols from Pistacia lentiscus L. and/or Phillyrea latifolia L. - both prevalent woody species of the region that are consumed by goats - have anthelmintic bioactivity. We tested this hypothesis by using the larval exsheathment inhibition assay (LEIA). Extracts were prepared from leaves of either plant species using 70% ethanol (E70), 100% ethanol (E100), or boiling water (W). Larvae were incubated in a phosphate-buffered saline solution with or without plant extract (1200μg/ml) and then exposed to an exsheathment solution expected to elicit 100% exsheathment after one hour. All extraction methods of P. lentiscus were highly effective at inhibiting larval exsheathment, but higher potency was found for the E70 than for E100 extraction method, while W was intermediate. Only the E70 extract of P. latifolia was highly effective relative to the control. The E70 extract of P. lentiscus had more than 7 times the potency of the E70 extract of P. latifolia. Irrespective of solvent and tannin-equivalent used, P. lentiscus contained more than double the quantity of total polyphenols than P. latifolia. The polyphenols of P. lentiscus consisted mainly of galloyl derivatives (63.6%), flavonol glucosides (28.6%), and catechin (7.8%). In P. latifolia, oleuropein and its derivative tyrosol accounted for 49.3 and 23.1% of phenolics, respectively, the remainder being flavones (luteolin and quercetin) and their glucoside derivatives. Results of the LEIA test suggest that extracts of tannin-rich plants interfere with the very early stage of host invasion and that high concentration of galloylated derivatives may explain anthelmintic activity.

  19. Multispecies resistance of cattle gastrointestinal nematodes to long-acting avermectin formulations in Mato Grosso do Sul.

    PubMed

    Borges, Fernando de Almeida; Borges, Dyego Gonçalves Lino; Heckler, Rafael Pereira; Neves, Juliana Paniago Lordello; Lopes, Fernando Gonçalves; Onizuka, Marcel Kenzo Vilalba

    2015-09-15

    The use of long-acting avermectins (AVMs) in cattle to treat infections with gastrointestinal nematodes was common in Brazil until its prohibition by state authorities. The prohibition; however, was rescinded in 2015, but a scientific discussion of the pros and cons of the use of these formulations is necessary. We evaluated the levels of resistance to 1.0 and 3.5% doramectin and to 3.15% ivermectin in cattle. The worms in animals treated with 3.5% doramectin were characterized by the suppression of oviposition and by a higher proportion of adult females carrying no eggs. Haemonchus placei, Cooperia punctata, C. pectinata, C. spatulata, and Oesophagostomum radiatum were resistant to the above compositions. The administration of long-acting AVM formulations did not result in a higher efficacy against these helminth populations.

  20. Gastrointestinal nematodes and anthelmintic resistance in Danish goat herds.

    PubMed

    Holm, Signe A; Sörensen, Camilla R L; Thamsborg, Stig M; Enemark, Heidi L

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of gastrointestinal parasites in Danish goats and the presence of anthelmintic resistance (AR) in 10 selected herds were investigated during April-September 2012. All Danish herds (n = 137) with 10 or more adult goats were invited to participate, and of these 27 herds met the inclusion criterion of more than 10 young kids never treated with anthelmintics. Questionnaire data on management were collected, and faecal samples from 252 kids were analysed by the McMaster technique. From all herds with a mean faecal egg count (FEC) above 300 eggs per g of faeces, pooled samples were stained with peanut agglutinin (PNA) for specific detection of Haemonchus contortus. Strongyle eggs were detected with an individual prevalence of 69%, including Nematodirus battus (3.6%) and other Nematodirus species (15.0%). Eimeria spp. were observed in 99.6% of the kids. H. contortus was found in 11 of 12 (92%) tested herds. Anthelmintics were used in 89% of the herds with mean treatment frequencies of 0.96 and 0.89 treatments per year for kids and adults, respectively. In 2011, new animals were introduced into 44% of the herds of which 25% practised quarantine anthelmintic treatments. In 10 herds the presence of AR was analysed by egg hatch assay and FEC reduction tests using ivermectin (0.3 mg/kg) or fenbendazole (10.0 mg/kg). AR against both fenbendazole and ivermectin was detected in seven herds; AR against fenbendazole in one herd, and AR against ivermectin in another herd. In conclusion, resistance to the most commonly used anthelmintics is widespread in larger goat herds throughout Denmark.

  1. Gastrointestinal nematodes and anthelmintic resistance in Danish goat herds☆

    PubMed Central

    Holm, Signe A.; Sörensen, Camilla R. L.; Thamsborg, Stig M.; Enemark, Heidi L.

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of gastrointestinal parasites in Danish goats and the presence of anthelmintic resistance (AR) in 10 selected herds were investigated during April–September 2012. All Danish herds (n = 137) with 10 or more adult goats were invited to participate, and of these 27 herds met the inclusion criterion of more than 10 young kids never treated with anthelmintics. Questionnaire data on management were collected, and faecal samples from 252 kids were analysed by the McMaster technique. From all herds with a mean faecal egg count (FEC) above 300 eggs per g of faeces, pooled samples were stained with peanut agglutinin (PNA) for specific detection of Haemonchus contortus. Strongyle eggs were detected with an individual prevalence of 69%, including Nematodirus battus (3.6%) and other Nematodirus species (15.0%). Eimeria spp. were observed in 99.6% of the kids. H. contortus was found in 11 of 12 (92%) tested herds. Anthelmintics were used in 89% of the herds with mean treatment frequencies of 0.96 and 0.89 treatments per year for kids and adults, respectively. In 2011, new animals were introduced into 44% of the herds of which 25% practised quarantine anthelmintic treatments. In 10 herds the presence of AR was analysed by egg hatch assay and FEC reduction tests using ivermectin (0.3 mg/kg) or fenbendazole (10.0 mg/kg). AR against both fenbendazole and ivermectin was detected in seven herds; AR against fenbendazole in one herd, and AR against ivermectin in another herd. In conclusion, resistance to the most commonly used anthelmintics is widespread in larger goat herds throughout Denmark. PMID:25076056

  2. Eprinomectin pour-on (EPRINEX® Pour-on, Merial): efficacy against gastrointestinal and pulmonary nematodes and pharmacokinetics in sheep.

    PubMed

    Hamel, Dietmar; Bosco, Antonio; Rinaldi, Laura; Cringoli, Giuseppe; Kaulfuß, Karl-Heinz; Kellermann, Michael; Fischer, James; Wang, Hailun; Kley, Katrin; Mayr, Sandra; Rauh, Renate; Visser, Martin; Wiefel, Thea; Fankhauser, Becky; Rehbein, Steffen

    2017-05-30

    The anthelmintic efficacy of the 0.5% w/v topical formulation of eprinomectin (EPN), EPRINEX® Pour-on (Merial) when administered at 1 mg/kg body weight was evaluated in sheep in two dose confirmation laboratory studies and one multicenter field study. In addition, the pharmacokinetics of EPN when administered at that dosage to adult sheep was determined. In the two dose confirmation studies, which included 10 sheep each, sheep treated with topical EPN had significantly (p < 0.05) fewer of the following nematodes than the untreated sheep with overall reduction of nematode counts by >99%: adult Dictyocaulus filaria, Haemonchus contortus, Teladorsagia circumcincta(pinnata/trifurcata), Trichostrongylus axei, T. colubriformis, T. vitrinus, Cooperia curticei, Nematodirus battus, Strongyloides papillosus, Chabertia ovina and Oesophagostomum venulosum, and inhibited fourth-stage Teladorsagia larvae. A total of 196 sheep harboring naturally acquired gastrointestinal nematode infections were included in the field efficacy study at two sites each in Germany (48 Merino x Ile de France lambs, 52 adult Merino females) and in Italy (adult male and female Bagnolese, Lacaune, Lacaune x Bagnolese, Bagnolese x Sarda sheep; 48 animals per site). Animals were blocked on pre-treatment body weight and within each block, one animal was randomly assigned to the control (untreated) group and three animals were randomly assigned to be treated with topical EPN. Examination of feces 14 days after treatment demonstrated that, relative to the controls, topical EPN-treated sheep had significantly (p < 0.0001) lower strongylid egg counts. Reduction was ≥97% at each site and 98.6% across all sites. Pharmacokinetics of EPN following single treatment with topical EPN were determined in eight ~4.5 year old female Merino cross sheep based on the analysis of plasma samples which were collected from two hours to 21 days following treatment. The main pharmacokinetic parameters were: Cmax 6.20

  3. In vitro effect of condensed tannin extract from acacia (Acacia mearnsii) on gastrointestinal nematodes of sheep.

    PubMed

    Minho, Alessandro P; Bueno, Ives Cláudio Da S; Gennari, Solange Maria; Jackson, Frank; Abdalla, Adibe Luiz

    2008-09-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the inhibitory effects of condensed tannin extract from acacia on the feeding of first-stage larvae (L1) of Haemonchus contortus, Trichostrongylus vitrinus and Teladorsagia circumcincta. The experiment was developed such that the inhibition of feeding for each of the nematode species could be evaluated. L1 recovered from fecal samples from a donor with monospecific infection was incubated in several dilutions of acacia extract (AE). The LD50 was determined for the three species of nematodes. Polyethylene glycol (PEG) was added to all dilutions of AE to inactivate the condensed tannins (CT) from acacia and to confirm their effects on L1. The impact of CT on larval feeding inhibition was detected for all the species of nematodes (H. contortus, T. colubriformis and T. circumcincta). There were differences between the aqueouswater control and CT treated groups (P < 0.01). The LD50 values were 0.043, 0.038 and 0.050 (SE = 0.0024), for H. contortus, T. vitrinus and T. circumcincta, respectively. A difference was detected between the AE and AE + PEG treatments (P < 0.01). Analysis of these results suggested that the direct effect of CT on L1 of the nematodes studied could be used as an alternative means for controlling nematodes in sheep.

  4. [Effectiveness of fenbendazole (Panacur) in cattle invaded by gastrointestinal and pulmonary nematodes].

    PubMed

    Corba, J; Reisz, T; Krupicer, I; Pacenovský, J; Breza, M

    1977-04-01

    The effectiveness of the new anthelmintic fenbendazole (Panacur) produced by Hoechst, W. Germany, was tested in cattle naturally invaded by gastro-intestinal and pulmonary nematodes. The single dose of 5.7 mg per kg or 7.5 mg per kg body weight administered either in the form of a 10% suspension or in pellets containing 1.5% of the active substance gave 100% intenseffectiveness and 100% extenseffectiveness in the control of Dictyocaulus viviparus, Haemonchus contortus, Trichostrongylus spp., Ostertagia spp., Oesophagostomum spp. and Cooperia spp. The animals tolerated the administration of both drug forms without showing any undesirable symptoms.

  5. A genome-wide survey reveals a deletion polymorphism associated with resistance to gastrointestinal nematodes in Angus cattle.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lingyang; Hou, Yali; Bickhart, Derek M; Song, Jiuzhou; Van Tassell, Curtis P; Sonstegard, Tad S; Liu, George E

    2014-06-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) nematode infections are a worldwide threat to human health and animal production. In this study, we performed a genome-wide association study between copy number variations (CNVs) and resistance to GI nematodes in an Angus cattle population. Using a linear regression analysis, we identified one deletion CNV which reaches genome-wide significance after Bonferroni correction. With multiple mapped human olfactory receptor genes but no annotated bovine genes in the region, this significantly associated CNV displays high population frequencies (58.26 %) with a length of 104.8 kb on chr7. We further investigated the linkage disequilibrium (LD) relationships between this CNV and its nearby single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and genes. The underlining haplotype blocks contain immune-related genes such as ZNF496 and NLRP3. As this CNV co-segregates with linked SNPs and associated genes, we suspect that it could contribute to the detected variations in gene expression and thus differences in host parasite resistance.

  6. [The effect of dehelminthizations performed during the year on the seasonal dynamics of natural nematode infections in sheep].

    PubMed

    Kozdon, O; Zajícek, D

    1976-11-01

    In four sheep flocks of two age categories dynamics of natural infections by pulmonary and gastrointestinal nematodes was studied; sheep were kept on a farm in Western Bohemia. Dehelminthizations were performed in different intervals during the grazing period on the basis of the results of quantitative coprologic examinations. Total effectiveness of 80--100% intenseffectiveness (IE) was obtained as a result of single peroral or intraruminal dehelminthization with the following preparations: pyrantel hydrochloricum (Spofa), helmatac (SKF) and nilverm (ICI); the effectiveness concerned gastrointestinal nematodes of the genus Haemonchus, Cooperia, Ostertagia, Trichostrongylus, Bunostomum, Chabertia, Nematodirus, Strongyloides, Oesophagostomum and Trichocephalus. The effectiveness of nilverm on lungworms of D. filaria and P. kochi reached 100%; the preparation was less effective and ineffective on M. capillaris. Dehelminthization practices during three years were more successful as to lowering of incidence of lungworm infections of D. filaria and P. kochi than in gastrointestinal nematodes. If sping dehelminthizations had been postponed till the second half of May or June, the climax of the elimination of ova from summer re-infection was put off till November, with an initial significant increase in September. The third dehelminthization, applied in August, did not result in the increased elimination of ova in autumn, while there was no usual autumnal climax following September dehelminthization. Effective dehelminthization performed at the end of November in all three years maintained low levels of infections during winter housing and significantly influenced the health conditions of ewes before lambing. Dynamics of the elimination of ova after dehelminthization was affected by nematodes with the migration phase in organs and tissues -- S. papillosus, Oesophagostomum sp. and Ostertagia sp.; the same effect was observed, during pasture, in nematodes with relatively

  7. Impact of rotational grazing on management of gastrointestinal nematodes in weaned lambs.

    PubMed

    Burke, J M; Miller, J E; Terrill, T H

    2009-07-07

    Gastrointestinal nematode (GIN) control for 'natural' or organic lamb production is needed, especially where Haemonchus contortus is prevalent. The objective was to determine the impact of rotational grazing on GIN infection of weaned lambs. In year 1, naturally infected Katahdin lambs (120 days of age) were randomly assigned to graze (1) continuous bermudagrass (CB; n=14), (2) rotational bermudagrass moved every 3.5 days and returned to original plot 35 days later for three rotations (RB; n=14), or (3) rotational bermudagrass rotated when forage height fell below 10 cm (RBH; n=7) where first day of grazing=Day 0. In late summer, all lambs were supplemented with 500 g corn/SBM because of poor condition. The following year, similar animals were used and included the CB (n=18) and the RB (n=36) groups only. In both years, fecal egg counts (FECs) and blood packed cell volume (PCV) were determined every 7-14 days and body weight every 28 days. Individuals were dewormed with 0.5 g copper oxide wire particles (COWP) when FAMACHA score increased to 3 or more. Between 0 and 3 deworming treatments per lamb were necessary and there tended to be fewer RB than CB lambs dewormed by Day 84 for both years combined (P<0.001). Worm free tracer lambs were introduced to CB (n=6) and RB (n=8) plots following the last rotation during the first year to determine worm burdens after 20 days of grazing. Abomasal worm burden tended to be greater in RB than CB or RBH tracer lambs (P<0.10), but intestinal worm numbers were similar. Differences may be due to differences in grazing patterns among groups. Body weight gains were similar between CB and RB groups. Economic value between the CB and RB lambs was similar based on number of lambs that could have been marketed as organic. For both years, lambs relied exclusively on COWP for GIN control with the exception of one lamb. In summary, while there was a reduced incidence of deworming in the RB compared with the CB group of lambs, estimated

  8. Efficacy of oral, injectable and pour-on formulations of moxidectin against gastrointestinal nematodes in cattle in New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Leathwick, D M; Miller, C M

    2013-01-31

    The efficacy of moxidectin administered by different routes, against naturally acquired infections of gastrointestinal nematode parasites of cattle, was compared using faecal egg count reduction tests on 14 commercial farms throughout New Zealand. On each farm, groups of 15 calves were sampled for faecal nematode egg count and then treated with ivermectin administered orally, or with moxidectin administered either by the oral, subcutaneous injection or topical (pour-on) route. Samples were again collected 14 days after treatment and efficacy was calculated as the percentage reduction in-group mean egg count between the pre- and post-treatment samples. In addition, efficacy was calculated for individual animals, in order to compare the variability of the different treatments. On four farms untreated control groups were run and five animals from each of the control and all of the moxidectin-treated groups were bled over time to estimate plasma-moxidectin concentrations. Averaged across all tests, the reduction in faecal egg count was significantly greater after treatment with moxidectin oral (91.1%) than following treatment with moxidectin injection (55.5%) or with moxidectin pour-on (51.3%). Low efficacies were invariably against Cooperia oncophora. The oral treatments were significantly less variable in efficacy than the injection and pour-on treatments. Moxidectin concentrations in plasma were highest following subcutaneous injection and lowest following pour-on administration. Plasma levels following oral administration were intermediate, being significantly lower than post-injection and significantly higher than post-pour-on. There was no evidence of transfer of moxidectin to untreated animals through licking. Based on these results, along with those of other studies, it is proposed that oral administration of macrocyclic lactone anthelmintics results in higher concentrations of active reaching the target worms in the gastrointestinal tract than following either

  9. Resistance to gastrointestinal parasite infection in Djallonké sheep.

    PubMed

    Traoré, A; Notter, D R; Soudre, A; Kaboré, A; Álvarez, I; Fernández, I; Sanou, M; Shamshuddin, M; Periasamy, K; Tamboura, H H; Goyache, F

    2017-08-01

    Gastrointestinal parasitism places serious constraints on small ruminant production. The situation has been exacerbated by development of drug resistance in many parasite populations, leading to interest in identification of animals with genetically mediated resistance or tolerance to nematode infections. This study assessed the response to natural infection with gastrointestinal nematodes (GIN) in Djallonké sheep during the rainy season in the Sudan-Guinea Savannah region of Burkina Faso. Haemonchus contortus is the most prevalent GIN at this site and time. Djallonké lambs (n=434) were sampled from 40 households and evaluated at a common location in southern Burkina Faso. Lambs were dewormed with levamisole at 2 to 6 months of age and returned to infected pastures. Fecal egg counts (FEC), packed cell volumes (PCV), and FAffa Malan CHArt (FAMACHA©) scores were determined 28 and 35 days after deworming. Lamb mortality was monitored throughout the experiment. Least-squares means for BW increased from 13.8±0.2 kg at 28 days to 14.0±0.2 kg at 35 days (P<0.01). Simple means and medians for FEC were 615 and 100, respectively, at 28 days and 850 and 175, respectively, at 35 days. The FEC exhibited strong right skewness. Following logarithmic transformation and back-transformation of resulting least-squares means to the original scale, FEC were higher (P<0.01) for males (208±27) than females (122±10). Least-squares means for PCV decreased (P<0.001) from 28 (36.3±0.5%) to 35 days (33.7±0.5%), and were higher (P<0.01) for females (36.0±0.4%) than males (33.9±0.7%). Correlations (r) between repeated measurements of BW, FEC, PCV and FAMACHA scores at 28 and 35 days were all positive (P<0.001). The correlation between FAMACHA scores and PCV was negative at 28 (r=-0.14) and 35 days (r=-0.18) (P<0.001). This study revealed that BW was an easily measured predictor of the ability of the lamb to resist infection with GIN and maintain PCV, and confirmed that FAMACHA scores

  10. Heritable variation in resistance to gastro-intestinal nematodes in an unmanaged mammal population.

    PubMed

    Smith, J A; Wilson, K; Pilkington, J G; Pemberton, J M

    1999-06-22

    The impact of parasites on natural populations has received considerable attention from evolutionary biologists in recent years. Central to a number of theoretical developments during this period is the assumption of additive genetic variation in resistance to parasites. However, very few studies have estimated the heritability of parasite resistance under field conditions, and those that have are mainly restricted to birds and their ectoparasites. In this paper, to our knowledge, we show for the first time in a free-ranging mammal population, Soay sheep (Ovis aries) living on the islands of St Kilda, that there is significant heritable variation in resistance to gastrointestinal nematodes. This result is consistent with earlier studies on this population which have indicated locus-specific associations with parasite resistance. We discuss our results in the context of current studies examining heritable resistance to parasites in domestic sheep and the possible mechanisms of selective maintenance of genetic variation for resistance to gastrointestinal nematodes in the St Kilda Soay sheep population.

  11. Meningomyelitis due to nematode infection in four cats.

    PubMed

    Gómez, M; Mieres, M; Moroni, M; Mora, A; Barrios, N; Simeone, C; Lindsay, D S

    2010-06-24

    Spinal cord parasitic migrations in cats are uncommon. This report describes four cases of chronic hindlimb paraparesis in cats associated with nematode infection. Complete neurologic, hematologic, serum chemistry and radiographic examination was performed on all animals. Computed tomographic (CT)-myelographic examination at the lumbar area in one cat showed a slight swelling of the spinal cord. Necropsy examination of the spinal cord revealed generalized edema and marked submeningeal hemorrhage at the thoracic region in three cats. On histopathologic examination, numerous sections of adult nematodes and eggs were present in histological sections of the affected spinal cord segments in all cats. The morphologic features of the nematode, location and appearance of the lesions suggest that the parasite responsible for the paralysis in these cats is Gurltia paralysans.

  12. Gastrointestinal nematode larvae in the grazing land of cattle in Guwahati, Assam

    PubMed Central

    Das, Meena; Deka, D. K.; Islam, S.; Sarmah, P. C.; Bhattacharjee, K.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To know the prevalence of gastrointestinal nematode larvae (L3) in the grazing land of cattle in Guwahati, Kamrup district, Assam. Materials and Methods: Pastures were collected and examined for the presence of nematode larvae (L3) from six localities of Guwahati at monthly interval from August 2012 to July 2013. The counted larvae were then expressed as per kg dry matter of herbage (L3/kg DM). Results: Examination of pastures revealed presence of nematode larvae (L3) in pastures throughout the year which varied from 4.5 L3/kg DM in January to a maximum of 106.33 L3/kg DM in August. The L3 of Haemonchus contortus, Trichostrongylus spp., Oesophagostomum spp., Cooperia spp., and Mecistocirrus spp. were recovered from pastures. The average pasture larval burden (PLB) was 34.75±3.48 L3/kg DM. Season-wise PLB revealed the presence of 23.89±3.01, 67.54±5.41, 26.67±1.92, and 7.28±0.89 L3/kg DM during pre-monsoon, monsoon, post-monsoon, and winter seasons, respectively. Monsoon season has significant (p<0.05) effect on PLB. However, analysis of variance of different locations with respect to season revealed that there was no significant difference but season-wise it was highly significant (p<0.01). Pearson correlation of environmental variables (temperature, relative humidity, and rainfall) with PLB revealed correlation was statistically significant with rainfall (p<0.05). Conclusion: This study reveals the presence of five nematode larvae (L3) in the pastures of Guwahati, Assam throughout the year, statistically significant during monsoon season. PMID:28096603

  13. Action of sisal (Agave sisalana, Perrine) extract in the in vitro development of sheep and goat gastrointestinal nematodes.

    PubMed

    Silveira, Roberta X; Chagas, Ana Carolina S; Botura, Mariana B; Batatinha, Maria J M; Katiki, Luciana M; Carvalho, Camila O; Bevilaqua, Cláudia M L; Branco, Alexsandro; Machado, Elane A A; Borges, Simone L; Almeida, Maria A O

    2012-06-01

    Active compounds from Agave sisalana with antiparasitic action against gastrointestinal nematodes (GINs) could be an alternative to diversify the range of parasite management methods in the livestock sector. The objective of this study was to evaluate the in vitro action of A. sisalana extract on the development of sheep and goat GINs. The extract, obtained from shredded sisal leaves, was utilized at various concentrations in the egg hatch test (EHT), larval development test (LDT), larval feeding inhibition test (LFIT) and adult motility test (AMT). The LC(50) and LC(95) in the EHT were 6.90 and 24.79 mg/mL, in the LDT were 0.041 and 0.067 mg/mL and in the LFIT were 0.053 and 0.24 mg/mL, respectively, showing a dose-dependent relationship. The development and feeding inhibition on L(1) were both 100% at a dose of 0.12 mg/mL. In the AMT there was 100% inhibition at 75 mg/mL after 24h of exposure. The extract of A. sisalana therefore demonstrated significant action on L(1) at 0.12 mg/mL. So, if part of the A. sisalana extract passes through the animal's gastrointestinal system, this material can have a significant effect on the parasites in the feces. This is an interesting approach because it can drastically reduce the pasture contamination as well as the infection of herds.

  14. Gastrointestinal nematodes of cattle in the northeastern US: results of a producer survey.

    PubMed

    Gasbarre, L C; Stout, W L; Leighton, E A

    2001-10-31

    A questionnaire covering management practices and producer perception of the effects of gastrointestinal nematode infections was sent to dairy and beef producers in the northeastern US. The mailing list was derived from membership in grazing groups and attendance at grazing events. A final total of 474 responses were suitable for analyses. These responses covered 14 states, but for the purpose of analysis were broken into five groups: New England (NE), Vermont (VT), New York (NY), Pennsylvania (PA), and south and west (S and W) of Pennsylvania. Two-thirds of the responses were from dairy producers. The average number of animals for the farms was 50 cows, 27 heifers, and 20 calves. The average acreage used for grazing was 70 acres, and about two-thirds of the responses used rotational grazing for at least the cows. About one-half of the rotational grazers had been practicing rotational grazing for more than 5 years. Most rotational programs for cows involved a daily rotation, but the rotational interval for other age groups was longer. There was a difference of about 2 months (5.25-7.27) in the length of the grazing season as one moved from New England to south and west of Pennsylvania. Parasite control practices varied greatly by location and animal class. Most producers used anthelmintics one to two times per year, but 10-30% of responses said they did not deworm their cattle. The most common time to deworm was in the spring, and the second most common time was the fall. Between 10 and 20% of respondents reported deworming as a response to decreased productivity or body condition. The use of anthelmintics increased as the location moved from New England to south and west of Pennsylvania. Producer perception of parasite effects was closely related to their anthelmintic use, and also increased as the location moved to the south, and is most likely the result of the increased length of the grazing season. Of producers who ascribed estimated a cost of the parasite

  15. Identification of immuno-reactive proteins from a sheep gastrointestinal nematode, Trichostrongylus colubriformis, using two-dimensional electrophoresis and mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kiel, Markus; Josh, Peter; Jones, Alun; Windon, Ross; Hunt, Peter; Kongsuwan, Kritaya

    2007-11-01

    Gastrointestinal nematode infections of livestock animals are prevalent and costly problems worldwide. Currently, infections are controlled by anthelmintic chemicals but increasing drug resistance has prompted research interest to shift towards alternative methods of control such as vaccine development and selection of worm-resistant animals. The present study analyses proteins from Trichostrongylus colubriformis infective L3s that are recognised by IgG of immune sheep. Following protein separation via two-dimensional electrophoresis and Western blot probing with plasma from sheep resistant to T. colubriformis, mass spectrometry-based proteomic analyses were used to identify immuno-reactive protein spots. We were able to identify 28 immune targets, including aspartyl protease inhibitor, enolase, chaperone proteins, galectin, glycolytic enzymes, kinase, phosphatase and structural muscle proteins such as myosin, paramyosin, calponin and DIM-1. The data suggest that immune responses to T. colubriformis are dispersed over a relatively large number of parasite antigens, including several cytoplasmically expressed proteins. The results have new implications for understanding the molecular mechanisms that underpin host-parasite interaction during gastrointestinal nematode infections.

  16. Nitazoxanide, a broad-spectrum thiazolide anti-infective agent for the treatment of gastrointestinal infections.

    PubMed

    Hemphill, Andrew; Mueller, Joachim; Esposito, Marco

    2006-05-01

    Colonisation of the gastrointestinal tract by anaerobic bacteria, protozoa, trematodes, cestodes and/or nematodes and other infectious pathogens, including viruses, represents a major cause of morbidity and mortality in Africa, South America and southeast Asia, as well as other parts of the world. Nitazoxanide is a member of the thiazolide class of drugs with a documented broad spectrum of activity against parasites and anaerobic bacteria. Moreover, the drug has recently been reported to have a profound activity against hepatitis C virus infection. In addition, nitazoxanide exhibits anti-inflammatory properties, which have prompted clinical investigations for its use in Crohn's disease. Studies with nitazoxanide derivatives have determined that there must be significantly different mechanisms of action acting on intracellular versus extracellular pathogens. An impressive number of clinical studies have shown that the drug has an excellent bioavailability in the gastrointestinal tract, is fast acting and highly effective against gastrointestinal bacteria, protozoa and helminthes. A recent Phase II study has demonstrated viral response (hepatitis C) to monotherapy, with a low toxicity and an excellent safety profile over 24 weeks of treatment. Pre-clinical studies have indicated that there is a potential for application of this drug against other diseases, not primarily affecting the liver or the gastrointestinal tract.

  17. Genome-wide scan of gastrointestinal nematode resistance in closed Angus population selected for minimized influence of MHC.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eui-Soo; Sonstegard, Tad S; da Silva, Marcos V G B; Gasbarre, Louis C; Van Tassell, Curtis P

    2015-01-01

    Genetic markers associated with parasite indicator traits are ideal targets for study of marker assisted selection aimed at controlling infections that reduce herd use of anthelminthics. For this study, we collected gastrointestinal (GI) nematode fecal egg count (FEC) data from post-weaning animals of an Angus resource population challenged to a 26 week natural exposure on pasture. In all, data from 487 animals was collected over a 16 year period between 1992 and 2007, most of which were selected for a specific DRB1 allele to reduce the influence of potential allelic variant effects of the MHC locus. A genome-wide association study (GWAS) based on BovineSNP50 genotypes revealed six genomic regions located on bovine Chromosomes 3, 5, 8, 15 and 27; which were significantly associated (-log10 p=4.3) with Box-Cox transformed mean FEC (BC-MFEC). DAVID analysis of the genes within the significant genomic regions suggested a correlation between our results and annotation for genes involved in inflammatory response to infection. Furthermore, ROH and selection signature analyses provided strong evidence that the genomic regions associated BC-MFEC have not been affected by local autozygosity or recent experimental selection. These findings provide useful information for parasite resistance prediction for young grazing cattle and suggest new candidate gene targets for development of disease-modifying therapies or future studies of host response to GI parasite infection.

  18. Genome-Wide Scan of Gastrointestinal Nematode Resistance in Closed Angus Population Selected for Minimized Influence of MHC

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eui-Soo; Sonstegard, Tad S.; da Silva, Marcos V. G. B.; Gasbarre, Louis C.; Van Tassell, Curtis P.

    2015-01-01

    Genetic markers associated with parasite indicator traits are ideal targets for study of marker assisted selection aimed at controlling infections that reduce herd use of anthelminthics. For this study, we collected gastrointestinal (GI) nematode fecal egg count (FEC) data from post-weaning animals of an Angus resource population challenged to a 26 week natural exposure on pasture. In all, data from 487 animals was collected over a 16 year period between 1992 and 2007, most of which were selected for a specific DRB1 allele to reduce the influence of potential allelic variant effects of the MHC locus. A genome-wide association study (GWAS) based on BovineSNP50 genotypes revealed six genomic regions located on bovine Chromosomes 3, 5, 8, 15 and 27; which were significantly associated (-log10 p=4.3) with Box-Cox transformed mean FEC (BC-MFEC). DAVID analysis of the genes within the significant genomic regions suggested a correlation between our results and annotation for genes involved in inflammatory response to infection. Furthermore, ROH and selection signature analyses provided strong evidence that the genomic regions associated BC-MFEC have not been affected by local autozygosity or recent experimental selection. These findings provide useful information for parasite resistance prediction for young grazing cattle and suggest new candidate gene targets for development of disease-modifying therapies or future studies of host response to GI parasite infection. PMID:25803687

  19. The effects of anthelmintic treatments against gastrointestinal nematodes on the performance of breeding ewes and lambs on pasture in semi-arid Kenya.

    PubMed

    Ng'ang'a, C J; Maingi, N; Kanyari, P W N; Munyua, W K

    2009-08-01

    The effects of anthelmintics treatments in controlling gastrointestinal nematodes in breeding ewes in a semi-arid area of Kenya were determined. The study carried out during two breeding seasons, between June 2000 and December 2001 where albendazole was administered to groups of ewes, 2 weeks before mating, 3 weeks to lambing and mid lactation indicated significantly lower nematode egg counts in treated than untreated groups of ewes. In the first breeding season, reduced rainfall resulted in pasture scarcity and weight loss in both groups of ewes through out the gestation period, but losses were higher for the untreated group. In the second season, both groups of ewes showed a steady increase in weight gain during the gestation period and post-partum, but weight gains were higher in the treated group. In lambs, weight gains at 6 weeks were higher for treated ewes than control groups, in both breeding seasons. The results of this trial indicate that anthelmintic treatments in breeding ewes in the study area are beneficial in reducing gastrointestinal nematode infections and improving performance of the ewes and their lambs. In addition to the treatments, breeding ewes should be given feed supplementation particularly during periods of pasture scarcity.

  20. Involvement of tannins and flavonoids in the in vitro effects of Newbouldia laevis and Zanthoxylum zanthoxyloïdes extracts on the exsheathment of third-stage infective larvae of gastrointestinal nematodes.

    PubMed

    Azando, E V B; Hounzangbé-Adoté, M S; Olounladé, P A; Brunet, S; Fabre, N; Valentin, A; Hoste, H

    2011-08-25

    The present study aimed at examining the possible role of tannins and flavonoids on the in vitro anthelmintic properties of the extracts of two plants from the southern area of Western Africa, i.e. Newbouldia laevis and Zanthoxylum zanthoxyloïdes. Extracts of the two plants were prepared by use of acetone/water (70/30) and their anthelmintic activity was measured by use of the larval exsheathment inhibition assay (LEIA) applied on the abomasal species, Haemonchus contortus and the intestinal species Trichostrongylus colubriformis. Three concentrations of extracts were evaluated to examine the possible dose effect. In addition, the possible involvement of tannins and flavonoids was examined by comparing the levels of inhibition of larval exsheathment obtained with the same extracts, after of not addition of PVPP which forms complexes with these compounds. The results indicate significant effects with both plants and both nematode species. In the range of concentrations examined, the results were dose-dependent for N. laevis extracts but not for Z. zanthoxyloïdes because the three doses applied provoked a similar highly significant inhibition whatever the tested dose. The use of PVPP indicated for both plant and nematode species, that tannins and flavonoids are involved partly in the effect but that some other biochemical compounds were also involved in both plants. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Use of a mixed sericea lespedeza and grass pasture system for control of gastrointestinal nematodes in lambs and kids.

    PubMed

    Burke, J M; Miller, J E; Mosjidis, J A; Terrill, T H

    2012-05-25

    Because of a high prevalence of anthelmintic resistance and consumer demand for chemical free meat products, management tools to minimize the need for deworming are needed. The objective was to examine the effectiveness of grazing sericea lespedeza (SL) in a mixed grass or a pure forage system for control of gastrointestinal nematodes (GIN); in other words pasture systems included grass, grass plus SL, or SL alone (Experiments 2 and 3). Selective use of copper oxide wire particles (COWP) based on the FAMACHA(©) system was used to aid in GIN control. In Experiment 1, lambs co-grazed bermudagrass (BG; n=21) or SL in a mixed grass pasture (SLM; n=22) with dams for 14 days. In Experiment 2, lambs grazed BG (n=14), SLM (n=13), or pure SL (SLP; n=13) pastures for 56 days. In Experiment 3, doe kids grazed BG (n=12), SLM (n=13), or SLP (n=13) for 84 days. Animals were fed a 16% crude protein supplement based on NRC requirements and estimated forage quality of pastures, so that 454, 389, and 200 g/lamb (Experiment 2), or 454, 300, and 150 g of supplement/goat (Experiment 3) was fed to BG, SLM, and SLP, respectively. Animals were dewormed with COWP if FAMACHA(©) was >3. Coprocultures were conducted to identify GIN genus. In Experiment 1, FEC were reduced in lambs grazing SLM compared with BG pastures. In Experiment 2, FEC were reduced in SLP compared with BG lambs on all days, and reduced in SLM compared with BG lambs on day 56. Initially, Haemonchus contortus was the predominant nematode, but the population shifted to other species in the SL groups by the end of the study. The mean number of dewormings/lamb was 0.71, 0.20, and 0.21±0.13 for BG, SLM, and SLP groups, respectively. In goats in Experiment 3, Trichostrongylus spp. was the predominant nematode in May and June and H. contortus in July. There was little meaningful effect of forage treatments on GIN infection in kids. Because H. contortus was not the predominant nematode in kids, the integrated approaches used

  2. Genomic regions showing copy number variations associate with resistance or susceptibility to gastrointestinal nematodes in Angus cattle

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Genomic structural variation is an important and abundant source of genetic and phenotypic variation. We previously reported an initial analysis of copy number variations (CNVs) in Angus cattle selected for resistance or susceptibility to gastrointestinal nematodes. In this study, we performed a lar...

  3. Administration of copper oxide wire particles in a capsule or feed for gastrointestinal nematode control in goats

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Widespread anthelmintic resistance in small ruminants has necessitated alternative means of gastrointestinal nematode (GIN) control. The objective was to determine the effectiveness of copper oxide wire particles (COWP) administered as a gelatin capsule or in a feed supplement to control GIN in goa...

  4. A pooled analysis of the efficacy of monepantel, an amino-acetonitrile derivative against gastrointestinal nematodes of sheep.

    PubMed

    Hosking, Barry C; Kaminsky, Ronald; Sager, Heinz; Rolfe, Peter F; Seewald, Wolfgang

    2010-01-01

    Monepantel is the first compound from the amino-acetonitrile derivative class of anthelmintics to be developed for the control of gastrointestinal nematodes of sheep. An analysis of pooled data from a series of controlled studies is reported providing a single point of efficacy (+/- 95% confidence interval) for each gastrointestinal nematode tested at the fourth larval and/or adult stages. For most nematode species, the pooled efficacy was greater than 99%, and for the remaining few species, efficacy was greater than 90%. These data are well supported by field studies conducted across five countries, where the pooled efficacy (on the basis of fecal worm egg count reduction) was in most cases, greater than 99% (depending on the calculation used). Monepantel is highly effective when administered to sheep at 2.5 mg/kg, and its introduction as a new anthelmintic for sheep is timely, given the problems with anthelmintic resistance that the world's sheep farmers are now experiencing.

  5. [Nematode infections in mice--an experimental model of immunoregulation].

    PubMed

    Donskow-Schmelter, Katarzyna; Jóźwicka, Kinga; Doligalska, Maria

    2009-01-01

    There has been a substantial increase in the incidence of autoimmune and allergic diseases in Western countries in the past few decades. However, in the geographic area endemic for parasitic helminth infections, such diseases remain relatively rare. It has been hypothesized that helminths may protect against immune disorders that have been observed in urbanized area. Studies on rodents infected with nematodes Trichinella spiralis, Heligmosomoides polygyrus, Nippostrongylus brasiliensis and Trichuris muris have provided considerable information about immune mechanisms in aspects of host-parasite interaction and immunoregulation. Helminths inducing a long-lasting asymptomatic infection are regarded as major modifiers of the host immune system. Parasitic worms can establish and reproduce in mammalian hosts switching off inflammation and inducing a tolerant response to parasitic antigens. In this review we summarized recent information on the immunoregulation during nematode infection and mechanisms used by nematodes, including the induction of regulatory T cells and apoptosis in the host. The innate immune response seems to determine the different sensitivity of mice to nematode infection. In this review we also discuss results of our own studies on H. polygyrus, demonstrating that it induces different mechanisms in different strains of mice which might play important role in the modulation of immune response. In the slow responder mice apoptosis would play a key role in the outcome of immune response. Contrary to that, in fast responder mice a defensive inflammatory response is mostly down-regulated via endogenous opioids pathway. Understanding the molecular mechanisms that mediate the effects that helminths have on the immune system will provide information that can be exploited to prevent inflammatory diseases.

  6. Activated entomopathogenic nematode infective juveniles release lethal venom proteins

    PubMed Central

    Macchietto, Marissa; Baldwin, James; Mortazavi, Ali

    2017-01-01

    Entomopathogenic nematodes (EPNs) are unique parasites due to their symbiosis with entomopathogenic bacteria and their ability to kill insect hosts quickly after infection. It is widely believed that EPNs rely on their bacterial partners for killing hosts. Here we disproved this theory by demonstrating that the in vitro activated infective juveniles (IJs) of Steinernema carpocapsae (a well-studied EPN species) release venom proteins that are lethal to several insects including Drosophila melanogaster. We confirmed that the in vitro activation is a good approximation of the in vivo process by comparing the transcriptomes of individual in vitro and in vivo activated IJs. We further analyzed the transcriptomes of non-activated and activated IJs and revealed a dramatic shift in gene expression during IJ activation. We also analyzed the venom proteome using mass spectrometry. Among the 472 venom proteins, proteases and protease inhibitors are especially abundant, and toxin-related proteins such as Shk domain-containing proteins and fatty acid- and retinol-binding proteins are also detected, which are potential candidates for suppressing the host immune system. Many of the venom proteins have conserved orthologs in vertebrate-parasitic nematodes and are differentially expressed during IJ activation, suggesting conserved functions in nematode parasitism. In summary, our findings strongly support a new model that S. carpocapsae and likely other Steinernema EPNs have a more active role in contributing to the pathogenicity of the nematode-bacterium complex than simply relying on their symbiotic bacteria. Furthermore, we propose that EPNs are a good model system for investigating vertebrate- and human-parasitic nematodes, especially regarding the function of excretory/secretory products. PMID:28426766

  7. Efficacy of oral moxidectin against benzimidazole-resistant isolates of gastrointestinal nematodes in sheep.

    PubMed

    Kerboeuf, D; Hubert, J; Cardinaud, B; Blond, F

    1995-01-07

    The efficacy of orally administered moxidectin was determined against four benzimidazole-resistant nematode isolates. At the start of the trial, 30 lambs were each infected experimentally with 20,000 third stage larvae (5000 Haemonchus contortus, 7000 Teladorsagia circumcincta, 3000 Trichostrongylus colubriformis and 5000 Cooperia curticei); 28 days later they were allocated randomly to three groups of 10: one untreated group, one group treated orally with fenbendazole (5 mg/kg bodyweight) and one group treated orally with moxidectin (0.2 mg/kg). Samples of faeces were taken five and 10 days after treatment and the lambs were killed 10 days after treatment. Fenbendazole reduced the average number of nematode eggs in faeces by 95 per cent and the average number of worms by 25 to 45 per cent according to the species. The efficacy of moxidectin against these benzimidazole-resistant isolates was 100 per cent. No adverse reactions to either of the drugs were observed.

  8. Prevalence, intensity and risk factors of infestation with major gastrointestinal nematodes in equines in and around Shashemane, Southern Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Seyoum, Zewdu; Tesfaye, Mulualem; Derso, Samuel

    2015-12-01

    Prevalence, intensity and risk factors of major gastrointestinal nematode infestation in equines were studied through a cross-sectional survey in 384 equids from October 2013 to April 2014 in and around Shashemane, southern Ethiopia. Three hundred and fifteen equids (82 %) were demonstrated harbouring one or more gastrointestinal (GIT) nematodes using the faecal flotation technique. The prevalence of GIT nematode infestation was 73.4, 85 and 86.5 % for horses, mules and donkeys, respectively. The identified nematodes were strongyle type (73.4 %), Parascaris equorum (21.4 %) and Oxyuris equi (4.4 %). Species of equines had a significant (χ (2) = 9.35, P < 0.01) association with the occurrence of GIT nematode infestation. Donkeys were two times (OR = 2.3, 95 % CI 1.27-4.28, P < 0.01) more likely getting GIT nematode infestation than horses. Moreover, donkeys had the highest mean faecal egg counts (1831.2 egg per gram (EPG)) followed by mules (915.7 EPG) and horses (772.5 EPG). There was a significant association (P < 0.05) between mean EPG and body condition score in each equine species. In conclusion, this study provides information which might help in designing upcoming control strategies to control nematode infestation in equines. Moreover, suitable tropical climatic conditions, low level of management and owners' awareness, and poor animal health services are expected to contribute for high nematode infestation. Therefore, emphasis should be given to awareness creation about the strategic deworming, animal welfare and management.

  9. Frequency of cattle farms with ivermectin resistant gastrointestinal nematodes in Veracruz, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Alonso-Díaz, M A; Arnaud-Ochoa, R A; Becerra-Nava, R; Torres-Acosta, J F J; Rodriguez-Vivas, R I; Quiroz-Romero, R H

    2015-09-15

    This study reports the percentage of cattle farms with ivermectin (IVM) resistant gastrointestinal nematodes (GINs) in Veracruz, Mexico, and identifies the GIN genera involved in the resistances. It also describes management practices of anthelmintic (AH) use on the surveyed farms. Twenty-one farms were assessed by means of the faecal egg count reduction test using the McMaster technique. Only two farms had GIN populations susceptible to IVM (9.5%). The proportion of farms with IVM resistant GIN was 71.4% (15/21). Seven of these farms had less than 80% egg count reductions. Haemonchus and Cooperia were the genera most commonly found in the resistant populations, followed by Oesophagostomum. Inappropriate AH treatment practices were identified from the completed questionnaires. Further management practices such as selective treatment and quarantine treatments are proposed to further reduce the spread of IVM resistance between farms.

  10. Epidemiology and risk factors for exposure to gastrointestinal nematodes in dairy herds in northwestern Europe.

    PubMed

    Bennema, Sita C; Vercruysse, Jozef; Morgan, Eric; Stafford, Kathryn; Höglund, Johan; Demeler, Janina; von Samson-Himmelstjerna, Georg; Charlier, Johannes

    2010-10-29

    In this survey, the epidemiology of gastrointestinal (GI) nematodes in dairy herds in five northwestern European countries was studied using a standardized Ostertagia ostertagi ELISA applied on bulk-tank milk, and a common questionnaire. The levels of exposure to GI nematodes were high in Belgium, the UK and Ireland, intermediate in Germany and low in Sweden, with a mean (95% confidence interval) ELISA result (ODR) of 0.83 (0.82-0.84) in Belgium, 0.82 (0.79-0.84) in the UK and 0.80 (0.78-0.83) in Ireland; significantly higher than the mean ODR of 0.66 (0.65-0.68) in Germany and 0.52 (0.51-0.53) in Sweden. Taking into account previous literature, these regional differences are likely to be systematic. Regional variations in exposure were significantly explained by differences in management (grazing time per day, mowing, the months of turnout, housing and anthelmintic treatment). However, after controlling for these factors, significant regional differences in levels of exposure remained, suggesting an importance for climate (temperature, rainfall) and unmeasured management factors. This study emphasizes that GI nematode-induced production losses should be considered on a large percentage of northwest European dairy herds. Proposals are made for the development of region-specific monitoring and control strategies. Further advances in this area are likely to come from intervention studies that investigate the feasibility of control measures and from studies on the potential effects of climatic conditions on shifts in levels of exposure between years and regions.

  11. New Insights into Gastrointestinal Anthrax Infection

    PubMed Central

    Owen, Jennifer L.; Yang, Tao; Mohamadzadeh, Mansour

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial infections are the primary cause of gastrointestinal (GI) disorders in both developing and developed countries, and are particularly dangerous for infants and children. Bacillus anthracis is the “archetype zoonotic” pathogen; no other infectious disease affects such a broad range of species, including humans. Importantly, there are more case reports of GI anthrax infection in children than inhalational disease. Early diagnosis is difficult and widespread systemic disease develops rapidly. This review highlights new findings concerning the roles of the gut epithelia, commensal microbiota, and innate lymphoid cells in initiation of disease and systemic dissemination in animal models of GI anthrax, the understanding of which is crucial to designing alternative therapies that target establishment of infection. PMID:25577136

  12. New insights into gastrointestinal anthrax infection.

    PubMed

    Owen, Jennifer L; Yang, Tao; Mohamadzadeh, Mansour

    2015-03-01

    Bacterial infections are the primary cause of gastrointestinal (GI) disorders in both developing and developed countries, and are particularly dangerous for infants and children. Bacillus anthracis is the 'archetype zoonotic' pathogen; no other infectious disease affects such a broad range of species, including humans. Importantly, there are more case reports of GI anthrax infection in children than inhalational disease. Early diagnosis is difficult and widespread systemic disease develops rapidly. This review highlights new findings concerning the roles of the gut epithelia, commensal microbiota, and innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) in initiation of disease and systemic dissemination in animal models of GI anthrax, the understanding of which is crucial to designing alternative therapies that target the establishment of infection. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. [Anthelmintic control of multiresistant nematodes in the gastrointestinal tract of imported goats].

    PubMed

    Corba, J; Várady, M; Praslicka, J; Veselý, L

    1993-01-01

    Multiple resistant strains of Ostertagia and Trichostrongylus were detected in a flock of cashmere and angora goats imported from New Zealand. The ED50 values detected by in vitro EHA test were from 0.27 to 0.36 micrograms/ml (while the reference value of sensitivity is 0.10 microgram/ml TBZ). Multiple resistance to all the types of currently used anthelmintics was confirmed by in vivo FECRT, when the efficacy of recommended doses was lower than 90% (albendazole 74%, levamisole 86%, ivermectin 83%). Two control schemes were investigated. In the simultaneous application of anthelmintics in the double or triple of recommended doses (0.4 mg/kg ivermectin s.c., 30 mg/kg levamisole and 20 mg/kg albendazole p.o.) was effective. Examination of goats 7 and 8 months after treatment revealed the repeated presence of multiple resistant gastrointestinal nematodes. It is the first published case of intercontinental transfer of resistant strains of nematodes when importing small ruminants.

  14. Management of gastrointestinal nematode parasites on sheep farms in New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, K E; Lethwick, D M; Rhodes, A P; Jackson, R; Heuer, C; Pomroy, W E; West, D M; Waghorn, T S; Moffat, J R

    2007-10-01

    To report current farmer opinions and farming practices relating to control of gastrointestinal nematodes and anthelmintic resistance on sheep farms in New Zealand. An interview-based cross-sectional study of grazing management and anthelmintic usage was conducted by veterinarians on 80 randomly selected sheep farms in New Zealand. Useable data were returned by 74/80 (92%) farmers who participated in the study. However, despite contacting 400 farmers the target sample size of 100 farms was not reached. The results indicated that only 31% of farms had previously tested for drench resistance, that effective quarantine-drenching of imported stock was not always carried out, and that farmers were more likely to integrate cattle than ewes into their grazing management of lambs. Furthermore, the number of drenches given to lambs had changed little in 25 years. The use of faecal egg counting by farmers has increased. Dependence on anthelmintics continues to be high on sheep farms in New Zealand. Whilst the number of drench treatments has changed little, there is more widespread use of persistent or long-acting treatments. Farmers need to be encouraged to monitor the resistance status of nematode populations on their farms and use this information to develop strategies aimed at maintaining susceptible alleles within the parasite populations and conserving the efficacy of existing drug families.

  15. Efficacy of moxidectin pour-on against nematode infections in cattle.

    PubMed

    Hubert, J; Kerboueuf, D; Le Stang, J P; Cardinaud, B; Blond, F

    1995-06-24

    Three groups of eight calves, naturally infected with gastrointestinal nematodes and artificially infected with Dictyocaulus viviparus were used to evaluate the efficacy of moxidectin pour-on at dose rates of 0.35 mg/kg and 0.5 mg/kg bodyweight. With both doses the efficacy was 100 per cent against adult D viviparus, Trichostrongylus axei, Ostertagia species and Nematodirus helvetianus. It was more than 99 per cent against Ostertagia and Nematodirus species fourth stage larvae. A small number of Cooperia species were found after treatment, and for this parasite, the efficacy of moxidectin ranged from 97.6 per cent against the larval stages to 98.8 per cent against the adults. No adverse reactions to the moxidectin treatment were observed.

  16. A controlled study on gastrointestinal nematodes from two Swedish cattle farms showing field evidence of ivermectin resistance

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Anthelmintic resistance (AR) is an increasing problem for the ruminant livestock sector worldwide. However, the extent of the problem is still relatively unknown, especially for parasitic nematodes of cattle. The effect of ivermectin (IVM) (Ivomec inj.®, Merial) was investigated in Swedish isolates of gastrointestinal nematode (GIN) populations showing signs of AR in the field to further characterise the AR status by a range of in vivo and in vitro methods. Methods Three groups, each of 11 calves, were infected with an equal mixture of third stage larvae (L3) of Cooperia oncophora and Ostertagia ostertagi. Group A was inoculated with an IVM-susceptible laboratory isolate and groups B and C with isolates originating from ‘resistant’ cattle farms. Faecal egg counts (FEC) were monitored from 0 to 45 days post infection (d.p.i.), and L3 were harvested continuously for larval migration inhibition testing (LMIT) and species-specific PCR (ITS2). At 31 d.p.i., one calf from each group was necropsied and adult worms were recovered pre-treatment. At 35 d.p.i., calves from all groups were injected with IVM at the recommended dose (0.2 mg/kg bodyweight). At 45 d.p.i., another two animals from each group were sacrificed and established gastrointestinal worms were collected and counted. Results A few animals in all three groups were still excreting eggs (50-150 per g faeces) 10 days post IVM injection. However, there was no significant difference in the FEC reductions in groups A (95%; 95% CI 81-99), B (98%; 92-100) and C (99%; 97-100) between 35 and 44 d.p.i. Furthermore, LMIT showed no significant difference between the three groups. Approximately 100 adult O. ostertagi were found in the abomasum of one calf (group B), whereas low to moderate numbers (400-12 200) of C. oncophora remained in the small intestine of the calves in all three groups at 45 d.p.i. PCR on L3 harvested from faecal samples up to 10 days post treatment showed a ratio of 100% C. oncophora

  17. A controlled study on gastrointestinal nematodes from two Swedish cattle farms showing field evidence of ivermectin resistance.

    PubMed

    Areskog, Marlene; Sollenberg, Sofia; Engström, Annie; von Samson-Himmelstjerna, Georg; Höglund, Johan

    2014-01-08

    Anthelmintic resistance (AR) is an increasing problem for the ruminant livestock sector worldwide. However, the extent of the problem is still relatively unknown, especially for parasitic nematodes of cattle. The effect of ivermectin (IVM) (Ivomec inj.®, Merial) was investigated in Swedish isolates of gastrointestinal nematode (GIN) populations showing signs of AR in the field to further characterise the AR status by a range of in vivo and in vitro methods. Three groups, each of 11 calves, were infected with an equal mixture of third stage larvae (L3) of Cooperia oncophora and Ostertagia ostertagi. Group A was inoculated with an IVM-susceptible laboratory isolate and groups B and C with isolates originating from 'resistant' cattle farms. Faecal egg counts (FEC) were monitored from 0 to 45 days post infection (d.p.i.), and L3 were harvested continuously for larval migration inhibition testing (LMIT) and species-specific PCR (ITS2). At 31 d.p.i., one calf from each group was necropsied and adult worms were recovered pre-treatment. At 35 d.p.i., calves from all groups were injected with IVM at the recommended dose (0.2 mg/kg bodyweight). At 45 d.p.i., another two animals from each group were sacrificed and established gastrointestinal worms were collected and counted. A few animals in all three groups were still excreting eggs (50-150 per g faeces) 10 days post IVM injection. However, there was no significant difference in the FEC reductions in groups A (95%; 95% CI 81-99), B (98%; 92-100) and C (99%; 97-100) between 35 and 44 d.p.i. Furthermore, LMIT showed no significant difference between the three groups. Approximately 100 adult O. ostertagi were found in the abomasum of one calf (group B), whereas low to moderate numbers (400-12 200) of C. oncophora remained in the small intestine of the calves in all three groups at 45 d.p.i. PCR on L3 harvested from faecal samples up to 10 days post treatment showed a ratio of 100% C. oncophora in the calves inoculated with

  18. Maize supplementation of Pelibuey sheep in a silvopastoral system: fodder selection, nutrient intake and resilience against gastrointestinal nematodes.

    PubMed

    Retama-Flores, C; Torres-Acosta, J F J; Sandoval-Castro, C A; Aguilar-Caballero, A J; Cámara-Sarmiento, R; Canul-Ku, H L

    2012-01-01

    This trial evaluated the effect of maize supplementation on the ingestive behavior, nutrient intake and the resilience against gastrointestinal nematode (GIN) infection of hair sheep in a silvopastoral system containing tropical grasses and legume trees. In addition, it attempted to determine the metabolic cost of the natural GIN infection in supplemented and non-supplemented animals. Twenty-nine 3-month-old lambs (male and female), raised nematode free, were allocated to four groups: I-NS (infected, not supplemented, n = 8), I-S (infected, supplemented with maize at 1.5% live weight (LW), n = 7), T-NS (treated with moxidectin 0.2 mg/kg LW every 28 days, and not supplemented, n = 7) and T-S (treated with moxidectin and supplemented with maize at 1.5% LW, n = 7). During the 70-day trial, fodder intake, fodder selection, LW change (LWC), red blood cell counts (RBC), hemoglobin (Hb), hematocrit (Ht) and eggs per gram of feces (EPG) were measured every 14 days. Supplement consumption was recorded daily. Metabolizable energy (ME) and protein (MP) consumption from the feeds were estimated. Maize supplementation helped to improve the resilience of hair sheep lambs against GIN infections. The I-S and T-NS groups showed similar LWC, RBC, Hb and Ht (P > 0.05) and both were higher than those in the I-NS group (P < 0.05). No difference was found in EPG between the I-NS and the I-S groups (P > 0.05). No effect of sex was observed in the different variables. Although all groups showed low dry matter intake (DMI) (< 2% LW), supplemented groups (T-S and I-S) showed higher total DMI (fodder + maize; P < 0.05), hence higher ME and MP intakes than the non-supplemented groups (T-NS and I-NS). All groups showed similar fodder selection patterns. The estimated metabolic cost of parasitism was ME = 0.70 MJ/day and MP = 9.2 g/day in the I-S animals. Meanwhile, the cost in the I-NS animals was ME = 1.46 MJ/day and MP = 12.71 g/day. Maize supplementation was an economically viable strategy

  19. Seasonal variations in the gastro-intestinal nematode populations of Scottish hil sheep.

    PubMed

    Reid, J F; Armour, J

    1975-05-01

    In each of two consecutive years, groups of breeding ewes were removed from a hill farm in the west of Scotland on four occasions, namely late pregnancy, early lactation, autumn and early winter. At slaughter the major nematode genus present in the alimentary tract was Ostertagia, with O circumcincta the predominant species but three species previously found in Scottish hill sheep, Bunostomum trigonocephalum, Strongyloides papillosis and Chabertia ovina were absent. An absolute increase in total nematode burden and faecal egg count was apparent in the ewes commencing in late pregnancy, reaching a maximum during lactation and falling again in autumn and early winter. This peri-parturient increase in the nematode population could not be solely attributed to the maturation of previously inhibited larval stages but was primarily the result of the development of recently ingested infection; the latter situation thought to be due to a temporary relaxation of immunological response by the ewe at parturition or early lactation. Serum pepsinogen values in ewes remained elevated throughout the grazing season and were always higher than those of their lambs, suggesting that the ewe, although allowing few parasites to become established, was under considerable challenge in the autumn. The worm burdens of the lambs were always low in autumn and early winter with Ostertagia spp being the major genus present during the autumn and Trichostrongylus spp being the predominant genus during the early winter.

  20. Comparing different formulae to test for gastrointestinal nematode resistance to benzimidazoles in smallholder goat farms in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Torres-Acosta, J F J; Aguilar-Caballero, A J; Le Bigot, C; Hoste, H; Canul-Ku, H L; Santos-Ricalde, R; Gutiérrez-Segura, I

    2005-12-10

    The objective was to examine the coincidence in the prevalence of benzimidazole (Bz) resistance in smallholder goat herds, as determined by three average-based and two individually-based faecal egg count reduction (FECR) tests. Nineteen smallholder goat herds with more than 30 animals were selected from 84 herds in Yucatan. Animals shedding 150 eggs/g of faeces (EPG) on day zero were randomly divided into two groups. The control group did not receive treatment and the treated group received fenbendazole (10mg/kg body weight per os). Feed was withdrawn for 16 h before treatment. Ten days after treatment, both groups were sampled to determine their FEC. Faecal cultures and identification of infective larvae were performed for estimating the proportions of genera of gastrointestinal nematodes (GIN) present. Presence of resistant GIN was determined with three different average-based FECR (FECR(1), FECR(2) and FECR(3)) and two individually-based FECR (iFECR(1) and iFECR(2)). The prevalence of herds with Bz resistant nematodes (and 95% confidence interval (95% CI)) was calculated using each formula. Coincidence among formulae was estimated with Kappa values. The prevalence (+/- 95% CI) of Bz resistance calculated with FECR(1) (57.89 +/- 22.20) had a high coincidence with iFECR(1) and iFECR(2) (Kappa values of 0.86 and 0.79, respectively). The prevalence with FECR(2) (31.58 +/- 20.90) and FECR(3) (21.05 +/- 18.33) had a low coincidence with FECR(1) (Kappa < 0.50). Trichostrongylids found on Bz resistant farms were mainly Haemonchus spp., however, some Trichostrongylus spp. and Oesophagostomum spp. were found too. The high coincidence between the standard average-based FECR(1) and the individually based formulae is encouraging and may suggest that either formula could be applied to smallholder farmers. Further laboratory studies are needed to confirm the resistance status in the herds.

  1. Evaluation of gastro-intestinal nematode parasite control strategies for first-season grazing cattle in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Dimander, Sten-Olof; Höglund, Johan; Uggla, Arvid; Spörndly, Eva; Waller, Peter J

    2003-02-13

    in 2000 and resulted in an average 65 kg advantage of the ivermectin treated calves compared with the untreated calves.Thus, this three-year grazing experiment has emphasised the importance of subclinical gastrointestinal nematode infections in FSGC in Sweden. In addition, the study has shown that adequate parasite control may be achievable without the use of anthelmintics.

  2. Mucosal immune responses following intestinal nematode infection

    PubMed Central

    Zaph, C; Cooper, P J; Harris, N L

    2014-01-01

    In most natural environments, the large majority of mammals harbour parasitic helminths that often live as adults within the intestine for prolonged periods (1–2 years) 1. Although these organisms have been eradicated to a large extent within westernized human populations, those living within rural areas of developing countries continue to suffer from high infection rates. Indeed, recent estimates indicate that approximately 2·5 billion people worldwide, mainly children, currently suffer from infection with intestinal helminths (also known as geohelminths and soil-transmitted helminths) 2. Paradoxically, the eradication of helminths is thought to contribute to the increased incidence of autoimmune diseases and allergy observed in developed countries. In this review, we will summarize our current understanding of host–helminth interactions at the mucosal surface that result in parasite expulsion or permit the establishment of chronic infections with luminal dwelling adult worms. We will also provide insight into the adaptive immune mechanisms that provide immune protection against re-infection with helminth larvae, a process that is likely to be key to the future development of successful vaccination strategies. Lastly, the contribution of helminths to immune modulation and particularly to the treatment of allergy and inflammatory bowel disease will be discussed. PMID:25201407

  3. Cow-calf herds in eastern Germany: status quo of some parasite species and a comparison of chemoprophylaxis and pasture management in the control of gastrointestinal nematodes.

    PubMed

    Wacker, K; Roffeis, M; Conraths, F J

    1999-09-01

    Infections with gastrointestinal parasites (Eimeria spp., Cryptosporidium spp., Buxtonella sulcata, Fasciola hepatica, Moniezia spp. and trichostrongyles) and lungworms were monitored in five cow-calf herds in the north German lowlands. Estimated prevalences of infections with Eimeria spp. (predominantly Eimeria bovis) ranged between approximately 2 and 48%. The highest prevalences were found during late summer and autumn. On one farm Cryptosporidium spp. were detected in July and August (prevalence: 8.5 +/- 2.7% and 6.7 < 2.0%). The latter finding coincided with diarrhoea in many calves. Buxtonella sulcata was found during the entire study period in highly variable estimated prevalences ranging between zero and 73%, but without any obvious association with clinical disease. Fasciola hepatica was detected on four out of five farms at estimated prevalences of approximately 1-20%. Lungworm infections played a minor role in at least three of five study herds. The estimated prevalence of trichostrongyle infections rose from August until November whereas the intensity of infection did not change significantly. No difference in the intensity of infection could be detected between one farm on which infections with gastrointestinal nematodes were controlled only by moving the animals to an uninfected pasture in July, and three other herds on which strategic anthelmintic control was in place.

  4. Nematode infection of the liver mimicking metastasis of malignant melanoma.

    PubMed

    Maier, M; Tappe, D; Töpfer, C; Rosenwald, A; Gassel, H-J; Timm, S

    2006-08-01

    The differential diagnoses of a circumscribed mass of the liver are varied. Especially if a malignant tumor, capable of setting metastases to the liver, is known in a patient's medical history, there might be difficulties in differentiating the tumor's entity. CASUISTRY: We report a case of a 40-year-old male with a history of malignant melanoma in whom follow-up investigations revealed a mass in the liver. The histopathological and microbiological results, however, showed an infestation of liver tissue with nematodes. Malignant tumor cells could not be detected. Roundworm-infections of the liver can present as lesions suspicious of being malignant. Therefore, along with e.g. microhamartoma, microabscesses and hepatocellular carcinoma, infestation with nematodes should be taken into consideration.

  5. Influence of Salinity on Survival and Infectivity of Entomopathogenic: Nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Thurston, Graham S.; Ni, Yansong; Kaya, Harry K.

    1994-01-01

    Exposure to NaC1, KCI, and CaCl₂ affected the entomopathogenic nematodes Heterorhabditis bacteriophora and Steinernema glaseri differently. Survival, virulence, and penetration efficiency of S. glaseri were not affected by these salts. At high concentrations, however, all three salts inhibited its ability to move through a soil column and locate and infect a susceptible host. Calcium chloride and KCl had no effect on H. bacteriophora survival, penetration efficiency, or movement through a soil column, but moderate concentrations of these salts enhanced H. bacteriophora virulence. NaCl, however, adversely affected each of these parameters at high salinities (>16 dS/m). Salt effects on S. glaseri are attributed solely to interference with nematode host-finding ability, whereas the NaCl effects on H. bacteriophora are attributed to its toxicity and possibly to interference with host-finding behavior. PMID:19279902

  6. Nematophagous fungi for biological control of gastrointestinal nematodes in domestic animals.

    PubMed

    Braga, Fabio Ribeiro; de Araújo, Jackson Victor

    2014-01-01

    Several studies have been conducted using fungi in the biological control of domestic animals and humans. In this respect, a large amount of research has been undertaken to understand the particularities of each fungus used. These fungi have been demonstrated to act on all classes of helminthes. Therefore, they should not only be called nematophagous but also helmintophagous. Evidence of enzymatic action has also revealed their mechanism of action, as well as potential metabolites that could be synthesized as bioactive molecules. Cultural barriers to the use of fungi should be broken down, since the impact on the environment is minimal. In this context, much is already known about the mechanism of interaction of these organisms with their 'targets'. Recent research has pointed to the search for substances derived from nematophagous fungi that have demonstrated their ovicidal and/or larvicidal activity, thus being a global premise to be studied further. Crude extracts derived from nematophagous fungi of predator and ovicidal groups reduce the amount of larvae of gastrointestinal nematodes and prevent the hatching of their eggs, since they have been demonstrated to act with extracellular proteases and other enzymes. Furthermore, the activity of these enzymes has begun to be explored regarding their possible interaction with the exoskeleton of arthropods, which could emerge as an alternative method of tick control. Finally, it should be clear that nematophagous fungi in general are 'old friends' that are ready to the 'fight with our old enemies', the gastrointestinal helminth parasites harmful to human and animal health.

  7. The effect of purified condensed tannins of forage plants from Botswana on the free-living stages of gastrointestinal nematode parasites of livestock.

    PubMed

    Tibe, O; Sutherland, I A; Lesperance, L; Harding, D R K

    2013-10-18

    The effect of condensed tannins (CT) extracted from forage plants from Botswana on the free-living stages of a number of species of gastrointestinal nematode parasites derived from infected sheep were investigated using in vitro assays. Fresh samples of five different plants (Viscum rotundifolium, Viscum verrucosum, Tapinanthus oleifolius, Grewia flava and Ipomoea sinensis) were collected over two summers (February 2009 and 2010). Fractionation of each crude extract on a Sephadex LH-20 column yielded low molecular weight phenolics and CT-containing fractions. The effect of each purified CT fraction on parasites was evaluated using either egg hatch, larval development or larval migration inhibition assays. Three gastrointestinal nematode species (Haemonchus contortus, Trichostrongylus colubriformis and Teladorsagia circumcincta) derived from infected sheep were evaluated in the study. CT from V. rotundifolium and I. sinensis fractions from samples collected in 2009 and 2010 did not inhibit larval development. However, CT isolated from V. verrucosum, T. oleifolius and G. flava collected in 2009 completely inhibited the development of all parasite species. These CT fractions were more potent in inhibiting larval development of H. contortus than fractions from the same plant species collected in 2010. However, a slight effect on larval migration was observed with some CT extracts. The results suggest that CT extracts of some forage plants from Botswana have anti-parasitic properties in vitro, and that further research is required to determine any in vivo efficacy from feeding the plants to goats in a field situation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Nematodes Infect, But Do Not Manipulate Digging By, Sand Crabs, Lepidopa benedicti

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Meera; Faulkes, Zen

    2014-01-01

    We examined sand crabs (Lepidopa benedicti) for endoparasites, and found the only parasite consistently infecting the studied population were small nematodes. Because many nematodes have complex life cycles involving multiple hosts, often strongly manipulating their hosts, we hypothesized that nematodes alter the behavior of their sand crab hosts. We predicted that more heavily infected crabs would spend more time above sand than less heavily infected crabs. Our data indicate infection by nematodes was not correlated with duration of time crabs spent above sand. We also suggest that organisms living in sandy beaches may benefit from relatively low parasite loads due to the low diversity of species in the habitat. PMID:24916475

  9. Prevalence of gastrointestinal helminth infections in free-range laying hens under mountain farming production conditions.

    PubMed

    Wuthijaree, K; Lambertz, C; Gauly, M

    2017-09-11

    1. A cross-sectional study was conducted from September 2015 to July 2016 in South Tyrol, Northern Italy to examine the prevalence of gastrointestinal helminths in free-range laying hens under mountain farming production conditions. 2. A total of 280 laying hens from 14 free-range mountain farms (4 organic, 10 conventional) were randomly collected at the end of the laying period. Faecal samples were taken to analyse faecal egg counts (FEC) and faecal oocyst counts (FOC). The gastrointestinal tracts were removed post mortem and examined for the presence of helminths. 3. In faeces, FEC values averaged 258 eggs per g of faeces, which were dominated by Ascaridia galli and Heterakis gallinarum. Mean FOC was 80 oocysts/g. In the gastrointestinal tract, at least one nematode species was found in 99.3% of the examined hens. H. gallinarum was the most prevalent nematode (95.7%), followed by Capillaria spp. (66.8%) and A. galli (63.6%). Thirty percent of the chickens were infected with cestodes (tapeworms). Correlation coefficients between worm counts of H. gallinarum, Capillaria spp. and A. galli ranged from 0.41 to 0.51. 5. The helminth prevalence did not differ between conventional and organic farms, whereas total worm burden was higher in organic when compared to conventional farms (318.9 vs 112.0). Prevalence and infection intensity did not differ between farms that used anthelmintic treatments and those that did not. 6. In conclusion, free-range laying hens under the studied mountain farming conditions are at high risk of nematode infection, especially in organic systems. The vast majority of hens are subclinical infected with at least one helminth species.

  10. A novel approach to biocontrol: release of live insect hosts pre-infected with entomopathogenic nematodes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    As a new application approach, we tested the efficacy of releasing live insect hosts that were pre-infected with entomopathogenic nematodes against insect pests living in cryptic habitats. We hypothesized that the pre-infected hosts could carry the next generation of emerging nematode infective juv...

  11. A consideration of resistance and tolerance for ruminant nematode infections

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, Stephen C.

    2012-01-01

    Debates on the relative merits of resistance (the ability of the host to control the parasite lifecycle) and tolerance (the net impact of infection on host performance) are often lively and unhindered by data or evidence. Resistance generally shows continuous, heritable variation but data are sparser for tolerance, the utility of which will depend upon the disease prevalence. Prevalence is a function of group mean resistance and infection pressure, which itself is influenced by mean resistance. Tolerance will have most value for endemic diseases with a high prevalence but will be of little value for low prevalence diseases. The conditionality of tolerance on infection status, and hence resistance, makes it difficult to estimate independently of resistance. Tolerance is potentially tractable for nematode infections, as the prevalence of infection is ca. 100% in animals grazing infected pasture, and infection level can be quantified by faecal egg count (FEC). Whilst individual animal phenotypes for tolerance are difficult to estimate, breeding values are estimable if related animals graze pastures of different contamination levels. Selection for resistance, i.e., FEC, provides both direct and indirect benefits from ever decreased pasture contamination and hence decreased infectious challenge. Modeling and experimental studies have shown that such reductions in pasture contamination may lead to substantially increased performance. It is proposed that selection goals addressing nematode infections should include both resistance and performance under challenging conditions. However, there may be benefits from exploiting large datasets in which sires are used across cohorts differing in infection level, to further explore tolerance. This may help to customise breeding objectives, with tolerance given greater weight in heavily parasitized environments. PMID:23248638

  12. Eosinophils mediate protective immunity against secondary nematode infection.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lu; Gebreselassie, Nebiat G; Gagliardo, Lucille F; Ruyechan, Maura C; Luber, Kierstin L; Lee, Nancy A; Lee, James J; Appleton, Judith A

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophils are versatile cells that regulate innate and adaptive immunity, influence metabolism and tissue repair, and contribute to allergic lung disease. Within the context of immunity to parasitic worm infections, eosinophils are prominent yet highly varied in function. We have shown previously that when mice undergo primary infection with the parasitic nematode Trichinella spiralis, eosinophils play an important immune regulatory role that promotes larval growth and survival in skeletal muscle. In this study, we aimed to address the function of eosinophils in secondary infection with T. spiralis. By infecting eosinophil-ablated mice, we found that eosinophils are dispensable for immunity that clears adult worms or controls fecundity in secondary infection. In contrast, eosinophil ablation had a pronounced effect on secondary infection of skeletal muscle by migratory newborn larvae. Restoring eosinophils to previously infected, ablated mice caused them to limit muscle larvae burdens. Passive immunization of naive, ablated mice with sera or Ig from infected donors, together with transfer of eosinophils, served to limit the number of newborn larvae that migrated in tissue and colonized skeletal muscle. Results from these in vivo studies are consistent with earlier findings that eosinophils bind to larvae in the presence of Abs in vitro. Although our previous findings showed that eosinophils protect the parasite in primary infection, these new data show that eosinophils protect the host in secondary infection.

  13. Eosinophils mediate protective immunity against secondary nematode infection1

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Lu; Gebreselassie, Nebiat G.; Gagliardo, Lucille F.; Ruyechan, Maura C.; Luber, Kierstin L.; Lee, Nancy A.; Lee, James J.; Appleton, Judith A.

    2014-01-01

    Eosinophils are versatile cells that regulate innate and adaptive immunity, influence metabolism and tissue repair, and contribute to allergic lung disease. Within the context of immunity to parasitic worm infections, eosinophils are prominent yet highly varied in function. We have shown previously that when mice undergo primary infection with the parasitic nematode, Trichinella spiralis, eosinophils play an important, immune regulatory role that promotes larval growth and survival in skeletal muscle. In this study, we aimed to address the function of eosinophils in secondary infection with T. spiralis. By infecting eosinophil-ablated mice, we found that eosinophils are dispensable for immunity that clears adult worms or controls fecundity in secondary infection. In contrast, eosinophil ablation had a pronounced effect on secondary infection of skeletal muscle by migratory newborn larvae. Restoring eosinophils to previously infected, ablated mice caused them to limit muscle larvae burdens. Passive immunization of naïve, ablated mice with sera or immunoglobulin from infected donors, together with transfer of eosinophils, served to limit the number of newborn larvae that migrated in tissue and colonized skeletal muscle. Results from these in vivo studies are consistent with earlier findings that eosinophils bind to larvae in the presences of antibodies in vitro. Although our previous findings showed that eosinophils protect the parasite in primary infection, these new data show that eosinophils protect the host in secondary infection. PMID:25429065

  14. Parasites, stress and reindeer: infection with abomasal nematodes is not associated with elevated glucocorticoid levels in hair or faeces

    PubMed Central

    Carlsson, A. M.; Mastromonaco, G.; Vandervalk, E.; Kutz, S.

    2016-01-01

    Stress hormones (glucocorticoids), incorporated into hair/fur and faeces, have been proposed as biomarkers of overall health in wildlife. Although such biomarkers may be helpful for wildlife conservation and management, their use has rarely been validated. There is a paucity of studies examining the variation of stress hormones in mammals and how they relate to other health measures, such as parasitism. Parasites are ubiquitous in wildlife and can influence the fitness of individual animals and populations. Through a longitudinal experiment using captive reindeer (Rangifer tarandus tarandus), we tested whether animals infected with Ostertagia gruehneri, a gastrointestinal nematode with negative impacts on fitness of the host, had higher stress levels compared with those that had been treated to remove infection. Faecal samples were collected weekly for 12 weeks (June–September) and hair was collected at the start and end of the study; glucocorticoids were quantified using enzyme immunoassays. Contrary to what was expected, infected reindeer had similar levels of cortisol in hair and slightly lower glucocorticoid metabolites in faeces compared with uninfected reindeer. Faecal corticosterone levels were higher than faecal cortisol levels, and only corticosterone increased significantly after a handling event. These results suggest that reindeer may use a tolerance strategy to cope with gastrointestinal nematodes and raise the question as to whether moderate infection intensities with nematodes are beneficial to the host. By removing nematodes we may have altered the gut microbiota, leading to the observed elevated faecal glucocorticoid metabolite levels in the treated reindeer. These findings demonstrate the importance of considering both cortisol and corticosterone in physiological studies, as there is mounting evidence that they may have different functionalities. PMID:27957334

  15. Exploring the host transcriptome for mechanisms underlying protective immunity and resistance to nematode infections in ruminants.

    PubMed

    Li, Robert W; Choudhary, Ratan K; Capuco, Anthony V; Urban, Joseph F

    2012-11-23

    Nematode infections in ruminants are a major impediment to the profitable production of meat and dairy products, especially for small farms. Gastrointestinal parasitism not only negatively impacts weight gain and milk yield, but is also a major cause of mortality in small ruminants. The current parasite control strategy involves heavy use of anthelmintics that has resulted in the emergence of drug-resistant parasite strains. This, in addition to increasing consumer demand for animal products that are free of drug residues has stimulated development of alternative strategies, including selective breeding of parasite resistant ruminants. The development of protective immunity and manifestations of resistance to nematode infections relies upon the precise expression of the host genome that is often confounded by mechanisms simultaneously required to control multiple nematode species as well as ecto- and protozoan parasites, and microbial and viral pathogens. Understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying these processes represents a key step toward development of effective new parasite control strategies. Recent progress in characterizing the transcriptome of both hosts and parasites, utilizing high-throughput microarrays and RNA-seq technology, has led to the recognition of unique interactions and the identification of genes and biological pathways involved in the response to parasitism. Innovative use of the knowledge gained by these technologies should provide a basis for enhancing innate immunity while limiting the polarization of acquired immunity can negatively affect optimal responses to co-infection. Strategies for parasite control that use diet and vaccine/adjuvant combination could be evaluated by monitoring the host transcriptome for induction of appropriate mechanisms for imparting parasite resistance. Knowledge of different mechanisms of host immunity and the critical regulation of parasite development, physiology, and virulence can also selectively

  16. Interleukin (Il)-18 Promotes the Development of Chronic Gastrointestinal Helminth Infection by Downregulating IL-13

    PubMed Central

    Helmby, Helena; Takeda, Kiyoshi; Akira, Shizuo; Grencis, Richard K.

    2001-01-01

    Expulsion of the gastrointestinal nematode Trichuris muris is mediated by a T helper (Th) 2 type response involving interleukin (IL)-4 and IL-13. Here we show that Th1 response–associated susceptibility involves prior activation of IL-18 and caspase-1 followed by IL-12 and interferon (IFN)-γ in the intestine. IL-18–deficient mice are highly resistant to chronic T. muris infection and in vivo treatment of normal mice with recombinant (r)IL-18 suppresses IL-13 and IL-4 secretion but does not affect IFN-γ. In vivo treatment of T. muris–infected IFN-γ–deficient mice with rIL-18 demonstrated that the inhibitory effect of IL-18 on IL-13 secretion is independent of IFN-γ. Hence, IL-18 does not function as an IFN-γ–inducing cytokine during chronic T. muris infection but rather as a direct regulator of Th2 cytokines. These results provide the first demonstration of the critical role of IL-18 in regulating Th cell responses during gastrointestinal nematode infection. PMID:11489954

  17. The effectiveness of a single dose of doramectin pour-on in the control of gastrointestinal nematodes in yearling stocker cattle.

    PubMed

    Skogerboe, T L; Thompson, L; Cunningham, J M; Brake, A C; Karle, V K

    2000-01-01

    Three field studies were conducted to determine the efficacy of a single dose of doramectin pour-on in the control of gastrointestinal nematode infections in yearling stocker calves on pasture. These 140-day studies were carried out between October 1995 and March 1996 in Tennessee (TN), between January and June 1997 in Louisiana (LA), and between May and September 1997 in Wisconsin (WI). Calves with patent nematode infections were equally allocated to treatments (doramectin pour-on, at 500 microg/kg body weight or untreated control) and pastures as randomized complete-block designs (LA and TN studies) or completely at random (WI study). There were six pasture replicates per treatment at each site, with each pasture replicate accommodating six calves at the TN site (36 calves per treatment), five calves at the LA site (30 calves per treatment), and seven calves at the WI site (42 calves per treatment). Fecal samples for nematode egg counts were collected on Day 0, and at 28-day intervals thereafter. Body weights were recorded on Day 0 and at 28-day intervals until study termination. Nematode egg output of the doramectin-treated groups was reduced over the entire grazing period compared to those in the untreated control groups, resulting in average daily weight-gain advantages of 0.055 kg (p < or = 0.05) for the TN study, 0.208 kg (p < or = 0.05) for the LA study, and 0.116 kg (p < or = 0.05) for the WI study.

  18. Nematode infection among ruminants in monsoon climate (Ban-Lahanam, Lao PDR) and its role as food-borne zoonosis.

    PubMed

    Sato, Marcello Otake; Sato, Megumi; Chaisiri, Kittipong; Maipanich, Wanna; Yoonuan, Tippayarat; Sanguankiat, Surapol; Pongvongsa, Tiengkham; Boupha, Boungnong; Moji, Kazuhiko; Waikagul, Jitra

    2014-03-01

    Trichostrongylids infection has gained significant public health importance since Trichostrongylus spp. infections have been reported in humans in Lao PDR. In this study, gastrointestinal nematodes were identified and the intensity of infections was determined in goats and cattle, which are animals greatly used for meat production in Lahanam Village, Lao PDR. The total number of goats and bovines was 23 and 29, respectively, pertaining to 32 households surveyed in the area. Feacal samples were randomly collected from 14 goats and 11 bovines. Ninety three percent (13/14) of goats and 36% (3/11) of cattle were infected, with an average of 1,728 and 86 eggs per gram of faeces (EPG), respectively. Coproculture showed Trichostrongylus spp. (goats 16%; bovines 48%), Haemonchus spp. (goats 69%; bovines 37%), Cooperia spp. (bovines 8%) and Oesophagostomum spp. (goats 15%; bovines 6%). After performing the necropsy on an adult goat, Trichuris spp. was also found. We confirmed the presence of Oesophagostomum spp., H. contortus and T. colubriformis by morphology and DNA sequencing analysis of the ITS region of rDNA. Due to interactions between humans and goats in Lahanam Village and high EPG results, the diagnosis of species and the intensity of gastrointestinal nematode infection in these animals are important public-health issues. Other ruminant parasites, such as Oesophagostomum and Haemonchus, found in caprines and bovines, are reported to be causes of zoonosis and their presence in humans should be investigated in future field surveys in this area.

  19. IFN-gamma-independent effects of IL-12 during intestinal nematode infection.

    PubMed

    Helmby, Helena; Grencis, Richard K

    2003-10-01

    Expulsion of the gastrointestinal nematode Trichinella spiralis is associated with a pronounced mastocytosis mediated by a Th2-type response involving IL-4, IL-10, and IL-13. When exogenous rIL-12 was administered to T. spiralis-infected NIH mice, this resulted in significant suppression of intestinal mast cell responses, delayed worm expulsion, increased muscle larvae burdens, and a transient, but significant decrease in early Th2 cytokine secretion. rIL-12 treatment also altered chemokine expression in the jejunal mucosa. The effects of exogenous IL-12 administration were largely independent of IFN-gamma as shown by rIL-12 treatment of IFN-gamma knockout mice. Hence, IL-12 may play a significant biological role as a direct negative regulator of intestinal Th2 responses and may act to promote the survival of intestinal parasites in vivo also in the absence of IFN-gamma.

  20. Mechanisms underlying reduced expulsion of a murine nematode infection during protein deficiency.

    PubMed

    Tu, T; Koski, K G; Scott, M E

    2008-01-01

    Balb/c mice infected with the gastrointestinal nematode Heligmosomoides bakeri were fed protein sufficient (PS, 24%) or deficient (PD, 3%) diets to investigate whether diet, infection or dose of larval challenge (0, 100 or 200 larvae) influenced gut pathophysiology and inflammation. Among the PS mice, worms were more posteriorad in the intestine of mice infected with 200 compared with 100 larvae, suggesting active expulsion in the more heavily infected mice. This was consistent with the positive correlation between worm numbers and fluid leakage in PS mice; similar patterns were not detected in the PD mice. Infection also induced villus atrophy, which was more pronounced in PS than in PD mice. Our cytokine screening array indicated that infection in PD mice elevated a wide range of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Whereas serum leptin concentrations were higher in PD mice, monocyte chemotactic protein-5 (MCP-5) in serum increased with increasing larval dose and concentrations were lower in PD than PS mice. We suggest that elevated MCP-5 together with villus atrophy may contribute to the apparent dose-dependent expulsion of H. bakeri from PS mice but that delayed expulsion in PD mice appeared related to a predominant Th1 cytokine profile that may be driven by leptin.

  1. A Large Collection of Novel Nematode-Infecting Microsporidia and Their Diverse Interactions with Caenorhabditis elegans and Other Related Nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Gaotian; Sachse, Martin; Prevost, Marie-Christine; Troemel, Emily R.; Félix, Marie-Anne

    2016-01-01

    Microsporidia are fungi-related intracellular pathogens that may infect virtually all animals, but are poorly understood. The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans has recently become a model host for studying microsporidia through the identification of its natural microsporidian pathogen Nematocida parisii. However, it was unclear how widespread and diverse microsporidia infections are in C. elegans or other related nematodes in the wild. Here we describe the isolation and culture of 47 nematodes with microsporidian infections. N. parisii is found to be the most common microsporidia infecting C. elegans in the wild. In addition, we further describe and name six new species in the Nematocida genus. Our sampling and phylogenetic analysis further identify two subclades that are genetically distinct from Nematocida, and we name them Enteropsectra and Pancytospora. Interestingly, unlike Nematocida, these two genera belong to the main clade of microsporidia that includes human pathogens. All of these microsporidia are horizontally transmitted and most specifically infect intestinal cells, except Pancytospora epiphaga that replicates mostly in the epidermis of its Caenorhabditis host. At the subcellular level in the infected host cell, spores of the novel genus Enteropsectra show a characteristic apical distribution and exit via budding off of the plasma membrane, instead of exiting via exocytosis as spores of Nematocida. Host specificity is broad for some microsporidia, narrow for others: indeed, some microsporidia can infect Oscheius tipulae but not its sister species Oscheius sp. 3, and conversely some microsporidia found infecting Oscheius sp. 3 do not infect O. tipulae. We also show that N. ausubeli fails to strongly induce in C. elegans the transcription of genes that are induced by other Nematocida species, suggesting it has evolved mechanisms to prevent induction of this host response. Altogether, these newly isolated species illustrate the diversity and ubiquity of

  2. Rotational grazing for control of gastrointestinal nematodes of goats in a wet tropical environment.

    PubMed

    Barger, I A; Siale, K; Banks, D J; Le Jambre, L F

    1994-05-01

    A preliminary experiment involving contamination of pasture plots with eggs of Haemonchus contortus, Trichostronglyus colubriformis and Oesophagostomum columbianum every month for a year established that in the tropical environment of the Pacific island of Tongatapu, hatching and development of all species was rapid and continuous, with a short survival on pasture (3-7 weeks) of the resulting infective larvae. These results indicated that a rotational grazing system consisting of ten paddocks grazed in sequence for 3.5 days at a time may permit a reduction in the frequency of anthelmintic treatment of goats. In comparison with an adjacent set-stocked flock which required treatment on three occasions during the year when mean flock egg counts exceeded 2000 eggs per gram (EPG), rotationally grazed goats generally maintained mean egg counts of less than 1000 EPG. Anthelmintic treatment was only given to rotationally grazed goats individually as they kidded, and there were indications that even this precaution was unnecessary. Because of the expense of frequent anthelmintic treatment and the resulting selection of strains of anthelmintic-resistant nematodes, rotational grazing of small ruminants through fencing, tethering or herding deserves further investigation as a nematode control option in wet tropical environments.

  3. Between-breed variations in resistance/resilience to gastrointestinal nematodes among indigenous goat breeds in Uganda.

    PubMed

    Onzima, R B; Mukiibi, R; Ampaire, A; Benda, K K; Kanis, E

    2017-09-13

    Gastrointestinal nematodes (GINs), Haemonchus contortus, are a major health problem in goat production. Resistance to H. contortus, the most prevalent GIN in Uganda, was studied among three indigenous goat breeds to assess their differences. Twelve male goats of each breed approximately 7 months old of small East African (SEA), Mubende, and Kigezi goats from smallholder farmers in Arua, Mubende, and Kabale were assembled for the study. At the station, they were dewormed with a combination therapy of the broad-spectrum dewormers closantel and albendazole to free the goats of gastrointestinal parasites. During experimentation, the goats were kept indoors and ad libitum fed on clean banana peels and napier grass. On attainment of zero-worm-egg status, the goats were artificially infected with 18,000 third-stage (L3) larvae of H. contortus prepared according to Baermann's procedure. Data were collected on fecal egg count (FEC), packed cell volume (PCV), and body weight (BW) on a 2-week basis until 12 weeks post infection and carcass weight and total worm count (WC) in the abomasum at termination of the experiment. The data on FEC, PCV, and BW were subjected to repeated-measure analysis of variance and the others by one-way analysis of variance. FEC between breeds was only significantly different at 12 weeks post infection (p = 0.04). Generally, higher FEC was recorded in Kigezi compared to SEA and Mubende goats. Carcass weight was significantly different among breeds (p < 0.05), with Mubende having the highest carcass weight, followed by Kigezi and SEA. PCV and daily weight gains were significantly different between breeds (p < 0.05). WC was not significantly different between the breeds. FEC and PCV were weakly significant at later stages of the experiment with higher parasite burden suggesting potential variation in resistance to H. contortus. These differences could be exploited in designing breeding programs with disease resistance in indigenous goat

  4. Orsay, Santeuil and Le Blanc viruses primarily infect intestinal cells in Caenorhabditis nematodes.

    PubMed

    Franz, Carl J; Renshaw, Hilary; Frezal, Lise; Jiang, Yanfang; Félix, Marie-Anne; Wang, David

    2014-01-05

    The discoveries of Orsay, Santeuil and Le Blanc viruses, three viruses infecting either Caenorhabditis elegans or its relative Caenorhabditis briggsae, enable the study of virus-host interactions using natural pathogens of these two well-established model organisms. We characterized the tissue tropism of infection in Caenorhabditis nematodes by these viruses. Using immunofluorescence assays targeting proteins from each of the viruses, and in situ hybridization, we demonstrate viral proteins and RNAs localize to intestinal cells in larval stage Caenorhabditis nematodes. Viral proteins were detected in one to six of the 20 intestinal cells present in Caenorhabditis nematodes. In Orsay virus-infected C. elegans, viral proteins were detected as early as 6h post-infection. The RNA-dependent RNA polymerase and capsid proteins of Orsay virus exhibited different subcellular localization patterns. Collectively, these observations provide the first experimental insights into viral protein expression in any nematode host, and broaden our understanding of viral infection in Caenorhabditis nematodes.

  5. Frequency of eprinomectin resistance in gastrointestinal nematodes of goats in canton Berne, Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Murri, Sarah; Knubben-Schweizer, Gabriela; Torgerson, Paul; Hertzberg, Hubertus

    2014-06-16

    Eprinomectin (EPN) is a member of the avermectin class of compounds and the only anthelmintic registered for goats in Switzerland with a zero milk withdrawal period. The aim of the present study was to identify the actual efficacy of EPN in an area with a higher density of goat enterprises. Forty-three randomly chosen farms from canton Berne were investigated. At least eight goats were investigated on every farm. Conditions for inclusion in the study were the absence of anthelmintic treatment during the previous six weeks and a pooled faecal sample showing a mean faecal egg count (FEC) higher than 600 epg faeces. Pre- and 14-16 days post-treatment samples were individually collected directly from the rectum. Animals were treated with the recommended dose of EPN (1 mg/kg body weight) after taking the pre-treatment samples. Efficacy of EPN was tested with the faecal egg count reduction test (FECRT) and faecal cultures were performed on every farm from pooled faeces samples before and after treatment. Additionally the farmers completed a questionnaire. None of the gastrointestinal nematode populations of the 43 investigated farms were susceptible to EPN at the required level. The mean egg count reduction was 40%. None of the typical risk factors, such as production type, stocking rate, animal traffic and quarantine measures showed an association with the level of eprinomectin resistance. It can be concluded with 80% certainty that the prevalence of EPN resistance on goat farms is at least 95% in canton Berne.

  6. Differential expression of genes in fetal brain as a consequence of maternal protein deficiency and nematode infection.

    PubMed

    Haque, Manjurul; Starr, Lisa M; Koski, Kristine G; Scott, Marilyn E

    2017-09-10

    Maternal dietary protein deficiency and gastrointestinal nematode infection during early pregnancy have negative impacts on both maternal placental gene expression and fetal growth in the mouse. Here we used next-generation RNA sequencing to test our hypothesis that maternal protein deficiency and/or nematode infection also alter the expression of genes in the developing fetal brain. Outbred pregnant CD1 mice were used in a 2×2 design with two levels of dietary protein (24% versus 6%) and two levels of infection (repeated sham versus Heligmosomoides bakeri beginning at gestation day 5). Pregnant dams were euthanized on gestation day 18 to harvest the whole fetal brain. Four fetal brains from each treatment group were analyzed using RNA Hi-Seq sequencing and the differential expression of genes was determined by the edgeR package using NetworkAnalyst. In response to maternal H. bakeri infection, 96 genes (88 up-regulated and eight down-regulated) were differentially expressed in the fetal brain. Differentially expressed genes were involved in metabolic processes, developmental processes and the immune system according to the PANTHER classification system. Among the important biological functions identified, several up-regulated genes have known neurological functions including neuro-development (Gdf15, Ing4), neural differentiation (miRNA let-7), synaptic plasticity (via suppression of NF-κβ), neuro-inflammation (S100A8, S100A9) and glucose metabolism (Tnnt1, Atf3). However, in response to maternal protein deficiency, brain-specific serine protease (Prss22) was the only up-regulated gene and only one gene (Dynlt1a) responded to the interaction of maternal nematode infection and protein deficiency. In conclusion, maternal exposure to GI nematode infection from day 5 to 18 of pregnancy may influence developmental programming of the fetal brain. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  7. Digging for gold nuggets: uncovering novel candidate genes for variation in gastrointestinal nematode burden in a wild bird species.

    PubMed

    Wenzel, M A; Piertney, S B

    2015-04-01

    The extent to which genotypic variation at a priori identified candidate genes can explain variation in complex phenotypes is a major debate in evolutionary biology. Whereas some high-profile genes such as the MHC or MC1R clearly do account for variation in ecologically relevant characters, many complex phenotypes such as response to parasite infection may well be underpinned by a large number of genes, each of small and effectively undetectable effect. Here, we characterize a suite of novel candidate genes for variation in gastrointestinal nematode (Trichostrongylus tenuis) burden among red grouse (Lagopus lagopus scotica) individuals across a network of moors in north-east Scotland. We test for associations between parasite load and genotypic variation in twelve genes previously identified to be differentially expressed in experimentally infected red grouse or genetically differentiated among red grouse populations with overall different parasite loads. These genes are associated with a broad physiological response including immune system processes. Based on individual-level generalized linear models, genotypic variants in nine genes were significantly associated with parasite load, with effect sizes accounting for differences of 514-666 worms per bird. All but one of these variants were synonymous or untranslated, suggesting that these may be linked to protein-coding variants or affect regulatory processes. In contrast, population-level analyses revealed few and inconsistent associations with parasite load, and little evidence of signatures of natural selection. We discuss the broader significance of these contrasting results in the context of the utility of population genomics and landscape genomics approaches in detecting adaptive genomic signatures.

  8. Variation in the Ovine Abomasal Lymph Node Transcriptome between Breeds Known to Differ in Resistance to the Gastrointestinal Nematode

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Albin M.; Good, Barbara; Hanrahan, James P.; McGettigan, Paul; Browne, John; Keane, Orla M.; Bahar, Bojlul; Mehta, Jai; Markey, Bryan; Lohan, Amanda; Sweeney, Torres

    2015-01-01

    Texel lambs are known to be more resistant to gastrointestinal nematode (GIN) infection than Suffolk lambs, with a greater ability to limit infection. The objectives of this study were to: 1) profile the whole transcriptome of abomasal lymph node tissue of GIN-free Texel and Suffolk lambs; 2) identify differentially expressed genes and characterize the immune-related biological pathways and networks associated with these genes. Abomasal lymph nodes were collected from Texel (n = 6) and Suffolk (n = 4) lambs aged 19 weeks that had been GIN-free since 6 weeks of age. Whole transcriptome profiling was performed using RNA-seq on the Illumina platform. At the time of conducting this study, a well annotated Ovine genome was not available and hence the sequence reads were aligned with the Bovine (UMD3.1) genome. Identification of differentially expressed genes was followed by pathway and network analysis. The Suffolk breed accounted for significantly more of the differentially expressed genes, (276 more highly expressed in Suffolk v 162 in Texel; P < 0.001). The four most significant differentially expressed pathways were all related to immunity and were classified as: Role of Pattern Recognition Receptors in Recognition of Bacteria and Viruses, Activation of IRF by Cytosolic Pattern Recognition Receptors, Role of RIG-I-like Receptors in Antiviral Innate Immunity, and Interferon Signaling. Of significance is the fact that all of these four pathways were more highly expressed in the Suffolk. These data suggest that in a GIN-free environment, Suffolk lambs have a more active immune profile relative to the Texel: this immune profile may contribute to the poorer efficiency of response to a GIN challenge in the Suffolk breed compared to the Texel breed. PMID:25978040

  9. Improving liveweight gain of lambs infected by multidrug-resistant nematodes using a FECRT-based schedule of treatments.

    PubMed

    Pivoto, Felipe Lamberti; Machado, Fabricio Amadori; Anezi-Junior, Paulo Afonso; Weber, Augusto; Cezar, Alfredo Skrebsky; Sangioni, Luis Antonio; Vogel, Fernanda Silveira Flores

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the liveweight gain of lambs, infected by multidrug-resistant nematodes, treated by conventional schemes of helminth control or using a schedule based on fecal egg count reduction test (FECRT). The flock was selected after a FECRT (experiment 1) which revealed a parasite population resistant to benzimidazoles, imidazothiazoles, macrocyclic lactones (ivermectin), salicylanilides, nitrophenols, and organophosphates. Despite the parasite resistance to ivermectin (an avermectin), the moxidectin (a milbemycin) was effective against the gastrointestinal nematodes (PR > 90%). In experiment 2, 48 suckling lambs were distributed in four randomized blocks (G1, G2, G3, and G4) by previous body weighings. G1 was kept as untreated control; G2 was treated following a FECRT-based schedule with drugs chosen based on fecal analysis (first drench with moxidectin, second drench with a combination of moxidectin and levamisole, and third drench with praziquantel, an anti-cestode drug); G3 and G4 received three drenches with ivermectin or disophenol, respectively. Body weighings and fecal analysis of these lambs were performed every 2 weeks over a 98-day period. An effective control of gastrointestinal nematodes was obtained with two nematicidal drenches following the FECRT-based schedule of treatments. On the other hand, eggs per gram of feces (EPG) counts were no different among untreated control, G3, and G4. Lambs treated using the FECRT-based schedule had the greatest liveweight gain among the groups tested. Additionally, liveweight gain was no different among the groups G3, G4, and G1. The FECRT-based schedule of anthelmintic treatments was beneficial regarding productivity and sustainability of helminth control in lambs infected by multidrug-resistant nematodes.

  10. Effects of supplemental feeding on gastrointestinal parasite infection in Rocky Mountain Elk (Cervus elaphus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hines, Alicia M.; Ezenwa, Vanessa O.; Cross, Paul C.; Rogerson, Jared D.

    2007-01-01

    The effects of management practices on the spread and impact of parasites and infectious diseases in wildlife and domestic animals are of increasing concern worldwide, particularly in cases where management of wild species can influence disease spill-over into domestic animals. In the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem, USA, winter supplemental feeding of Rocky Mountain elk (Cervus elaphus) may enhance parasite and disease transmission by aggregating elk on feedgrounds. In this study, we tested the effect of supplemental feeding on gastrointestinal parasite infection in elk by comparing fecal egg/oocyst counts of fed and unfed elk. We collected fecal samples from fed and unfed elk at feedground and control sites from January to April 2006, and screened all samples for parasites. Six different parasite types were identified, and 48.7% of samples were infected with at least one parasite. Gastrointenstinal (GI) nematodes (Nematoda: Strongylida), Trichuris spp., and coccidia were the most common parasites observed. For all three of these parasites, fecal egg/oocyst counts increased from January to April. Supplementally fed elk had significantly higher GI nematode egg counts than unfed elk in January and February, but significantly lower counts in April. These patterns suggest that supplemental feeding may both increase exposure and decrease susceptibility of elk to GI nematodes, resulting in differences in temporal patterns of egg shedding between fed and unfed elk.

  11. Six costs of immunity to gastrointestinal nematode infections.

    PubMed

    Colditz, I G

    2008-02-01

    The strength of the immune response and the outcome of the interaction of a host with a parasite are influenced by genetic and phenotypic characteristics of both parties, and by environmental variables. Allocation of host resources to immune defence reduces resources available for other life-history traits. This review identifies six potential costs to the host from immune activation. The costs are likely to be broadly applicable to other immune responses in vertebrate species. Five phenotypic costs arise from: (i) increased metabolic activity; (ii) reduced nutrient availability due to anorexia; (iii) altered priorities for nutrient utilization; (iv) change in size and turnover of pools of immune cells and proteins; and (v) immunopathology from inappropriate or excessive immune activation. Subsumed by these costs is the cost of altered efficiency of nutrient use. A sixth cost is the genetic cost which arises from a change in the capacity of offspring to express production and life-history traits following selection for parasite resistance. The sensitivity of immune responses to the phenotypic status of the host, and the role the immune system shares with the neuroendocrine system in controlling use of resources underpin the importance of immunocompetence to the life-history of the host.

  12. Anthelmintic efficacy of pumpkin seed (Cucurbita pepo Linnaeus, 1753) on ostrich gastrointestinal nematodes in a semiarid region of Paraíba State, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Feitosa, Thais Ferreira; Vilela, Vinícius Longo Ribeiro; Athayde, Ana Célia Rodrigues; Braga, Fábio Ribeiro; Dantas, Elaine Silva; Vieira, Vanessa Diniz; de Melo, Lídio Ricardo Bezerra

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to verify the in vivo effectiveness of pumpkin seed (Curcubita pepo Linnaeus, 1753) in naturally infected ostriches in the Cariri zone, semiarid region of Paraíba State, Brazil. Forty-eight ostriches were used, African Black breed, of 14 to 36 months old, naturally infected by gastrointestinal nematodes. These animals were divided into four groups of 12 ostriches. Group 1 consists of animals treated with 0.5 g/kg live weight (l. w.) of pumpkin seed meal; group 2 received 1 g/kg l. w. of pumpkin seed meal; group 3 was treated with Albendazole 5 %, at the dosage of 1 mL/10 kg l. w.; and Group 4 was the control group and do not received treatment. Groups 1 and 2 received the treatment for three consecutive days, orally, at intervals of 7 days, totaling nine administrations. The Albendazole 5 % was administered one time, at the beginning of the experiment, according to the manufacturer's recommendations. The groups treated with pumpkin seed showed a significant decrease in egg counts per gram of feces (EPG), wherein group 2 (1 g/kg l. w.) was the most effective. The control and drug groups showed no reduction in EPG. The results of the present study demonstrate that the administration of pumpkin seed was effective in controlling gastrointestinal helminths in naturally infected ostriches.

  13. Gastrointestinal nematodes in rotationally grazing ewes in the mountainous region of central Mexico.

    PubMed

    Acevedo-Ramírez, P M C; Quiroz-Romero, H; Cruz-Mendoza, I; Ulloa-Arvizu, R; Ibarra-Velarde, F

    2013-03-01

    The aims of this study were to determine the frequency of egg shedding (percentage of egg-positive faecal samples) and faecal egg counts (FEC) over 13 months in two different breeds of ewes, both pregnant and non-pregnant, in a mountainous region of central Mexico. Additionally, the effect of ivermectin and albendazole treatments on FEC reduction was recorded. The study also aimed to relate temperature and rainfall to FEC. The gastrointestinal nematode (GIN) third-stage larvae genera recovered from both faeces and grassland pastures in a temperate region were also assessed. Faecal samples were collected from ewes at monthly intervals for 13 months to investigate the FEC population of GIN larvae, their concentration and genera in grass samples collected from grazed and rested pastures. Egg-shedding frequency ranged from 0 to 92% and FEC from 0 to 12,000 eggs per g faeces (epg), with counts in Suffolk higher than in Dorset ewes. The identified genera were Haemonchus, Trichostrongylus, Teladorsagia, Cooperia, Oesophagostomum, Bunostomum, Nematodirus and Strongyloides. Haemonchus and Trichostrongylus were the most common genera. The number of L3 was higher in grazing lands than in those at rest. The highest FEC were recorded in the dry season due to peripartum, but the highest L3 counts were recorded in the rainy season. The coexistence of species of different geographical distributions at this site may be because there is a confluence of Nearctic and Neotropical geographic regions; thus, despite the temperate climate, tropical species can be found. Additionally, this study suggests that increasing temperatures could favour the presence of different tropical GIN species together with typical temperate-zone GIN species.

  14. Anthelmintic resistance to ivermectin and moxidectin in gastrointestinal nematodes of cattle in Europe.

    PubMed

    Geurden, Thomas; Chartier, Christophe; Fanke, Jane; di Regalbono, Antonio Frangipane; Traversa, Donato; von Samson-Himmelstjerna, Georg; Demeler, Janina; Vanimisetti, Hima Bindu; Bartram, David J; Denwood, Matthew J

    2015-12-01

    Anthelmintic resistance has been increasingly reported in cattle worldwide over the last decade, although reports from Europe are more limited. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of injectable formulations of ivermectin and moxidectin at 0.2 mg per kg bodyweight against naturally acquired gastro-intestinal nematodes in cattle. A total of 753 animals on 40 farms were enrolled in Germany (12 farms), the UK (10 farms), Italy (10 farms), and France (8 farms). Animals were selected based on pre-treatment faecal egg counts and were allocated to one of the two treatment groups. Each treatment group consisted of between 7 and 10 animals. A post-treatment faecal egg count was performed 14 days (±2 days) after treatment. The observed percentage reduction was calculated for each treatment group based on the arithmetic mean faecal egg count before and after treatment. The resistance status was evaluated based on the reduction in arithmetic mean faecal egg count and both the lower and upper 95% confidence limits. A decreased efficacy was observed in half or more of the farms in Germany, France and the UK. For moxidectin, resistance was confirmed on 3 farms in France, and on 1 farm in Germany and the UK. For ivermectin, resistance was confirmed on 3 farms in the UK, and on 1 farm in Germany and France. The remaining farms with decreased efficacy were classified as having an inconclusive resistance status based on the available data. After treatment Cooperia spp. larvae were most frequently identified, though Ostertagia ostertagi was also found, in particular within the UK and Germany. The present study reports lower than expected efficacy for ivermectin and moxidectin (based on the reduction in egg excretion after treatment) on European cattle farms, with confirmed anthelmintic resistance on 12.5% of the farms.

  15. Anthelmintic activity of botanical extracts against sheep gastrointestinal nematodes, Haemonchus contortus.

    PubMed

    Kamaraj, Chinnaperumal; Rahuman, Abdul Abdul; Elango, Gandhi; Bagavan, Asokan; Zahir, Abdul Abduz

    2011-07-01

    The source of chemical anthelmintics (levamisole, flubendazole, and thiabendazole) had limited the success of gastrointestinal nematodiasis control in sheep and goats and thus awakened interest in the study of medicinal plant extracts as alternative sources of anthelmintics. The egg hatching and larvicidal effect of indigenous plant extracts were investigated against the sheep parasite, Haemonchus contortus. The purpose of the present study was to assess the efficacy of leaf, bark, and seed ethyl acetate, acetone and methanol extracts of Andrographis paniculata (Burm.f.) Wall. ex Nees., Anisomeles malabarica (L.) R. Br., Annona squamosa L., Datura metel L., and Solanum torvum Swartz were tested against the parasitic nematode of small ruminants H. contortus using egg hatch assay (EHA) and larval development assay (LDA). The assays were run in 24-well cell culture plates at room temperature with five replicates. All plant extracts showed moderate parasitic effects after 48 and exposure for egg hatching and LDA, respectively; however, 100% egg hatching and larvicidal inhibition were found in the methanol extracts of A. paniculata, A. squamosa, D. metel, and S. torvum at 25 mg/ml and the effect was similar to positive control of Albendazole (0.075 mg/ml) and Ivermectin (0.025mg/ml) against H. contortus, respectively. The EHA result showed the ED(50) of methanol extracts of A. paniculata and D. metel, which were 2.90 and 3.08 mg/ml, and in larval development assay, the ED(50) was 4.26 and 3.86 mg/ml, respectively. These effects remain to be confirmed through in vivo studies.

  16. Anthelmintic resistance to ivermectin and moxidectin in gastrointestinal nematodes of cattle in Europe

    PubMed Central

    Geurden, Thomas; Chartier, Christophe; Fanke, Jane; di Regalbono, Antonio Frangipane; Traversa, Donato; von Samson-Himmelstjerna, Georg; Demeler, Janina; Vanimisetti, Hima Bindu; Bartram, David J.; Denwood, Matthew J.

    2015-01-01

    Anthelmintic resistance has been increasingly reported in cattle worldwide over the last decade, although reports from Europe are more limited. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of injectable formulations of ivermectin and moxidectin at 0.2 mg per kg bodyweight against naturally acquired gastro-intestinal nematodes in cattle. A total of 753 animals on 40 farms were enrolled in Germany (12 farms), the UK (10 farms), Italy (10 farms), and France (8 farms). Animals were selected based on pre-treatment faecal egg counts and were allocated to one of the two treatment groups. Each treatment group consisted of between 7 and 10 animals. A post-treatment faecal egg count was performed 14 days (±2 days) after treatment. The observed percentage reduction was calculated for each treatment group based on the arithmetic mean faecal egg count before and after treatment. The resistance status was evaluated based on the reduction in arithmetic mean faecal egg count and both the lower and upper 95% confidence limits. A decreased efficacy was observed in half or more of the farms in Germany, France and the UK. For moxidectin, resistance was confirmed on 3 farms in France, and on 1 farm in Germany and the UK. For ivermectin, resistance was confirmed on 3 farms in the UK, and on 1 farm in Germany and France. The remaining farms with decreased efficacy were classified as having an inconclusive resistance status based on the available data. After treatment Cooperia spp. larvae were most frequently identified, though Ostertagia ostertagi was also found, in particular within the UK and Germany. The present study reports lower than expected efficacy for ivermectin and moxidectin (based on the reduction in egg excretion after treatment) on European cattle farms, with confirmed anthelmintic resistance on 12.5% of the farms. PMID:26448902

  17. Canine Infections with Onchocerca lupi Nematodes, United States, 2011–2014

    PubMed Central

    Giannelli, Alessio; Latrofa, Maria S.; Dantas-Torres, Filipe; Trumble, Nicole Scotty; Chavkin, Matt; Kennard, Gavin; Eberhard, Mark L.; Bowman, Dwight D.

    2015-01-01

    Infections with Onchocerca lupi nematodes are diagnosed sporadically in the United States. We report 8 cases of canine onchocercosis in Minnesota, New Mexico, Colorado, and Florida. Identification of 1 cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 gene haplotype identical to 1 of 5 from Europe suggests recent introduction of this nematode into the United States. PMID:25897859

  18. Canine Infections with Onchocerca lupi Nematodes, United States, 2011-2014.

    PubMed

    Otranto, Domenico; Giannelli, Alessio; Latrofa, Maria S; Dantas-Torres, Filipe; Trumble, Nicole Scotty; Chavkin, Matt; Kennard, Gavin; Eberhard, Mark L; Bowman, Dwight D

    2015-05-01

    Infections with Onchocerca lupi nematodes are diagnosed sporadically in the United States. We report 8 cases of canine onchocercosis in Minnesota, New Mexico, Colorado, and Florida. Identification of 1 cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 gene haplotype identical to 1 of 5 from Europe suggests recent introduction of this nematode into the United States.

  19. Estimation of genetic parameters for resistance to gastro-intestinal nematodes in pure blood Arabian horses.

    PubMed

    Kornaś, Sławomir; Sallé, Guillaume; Skalska, Marta; David, Ingrid; Ricard, Anne; Cabaret, Jacques

    2015-03-01

    Equine internal parasites, mostly cyathostomins, affect both horse welfare and performance. The appearance of anthelmintic-resistant parasites creates a pressing need for optimising drenching schemes. This optimization may be achieved by identifying genetic markers associated with host susceptibility to infection and then to drench carriers of these markers. The aim of our study was to characterise the genetics of horse resistance to strongyle infection by estimating heritability of this trait in an Arabian pure blood population. A population of 789 Arabian pure blood horses from the Michałów stud farm, Poland were measured for strongyle egg excretion twice a year, over 8 years. Low repeatability values were found for faecal egg counts. Our analyses showed that less than 10% of the observed variation for strongyle faecal egg counts in this population had a genetic origin. However, additional analyses highlighted an age-dependent increase in heritability which was 0.04 (±0.02) in young horses (up to 3 years of age) but 0.21 (±0.04) in older ones. These results suggest that a significant part of the inter-individual variation has a genetic origin. This paves the way to a genomic dissection of horse-nematode interactions which might provide predictive markers of susceptibility, allowing individualised drenching schemes. Copyright © 2015 Australian Society for Parasitology Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Paralysis of nematodes: shifts in the transcriptome of the nematode-trapping fungus Monacrosporium haptotylum during infection of Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Fekete, Csaba; Tholander, Margareta; Rajashekar, Balaji; Ahrén, Dag; Friman, Eva; Johansson, Tomas; Tunlid, Anders

    2008-02-01

    The transcriptional response in the parasitic fungus Monacrosporium haptotylum and its nematode host Caenorhabditis elegans were analysed during infection using cDNA microarrays. The array contained 2684 fungal and 372 worm gene reporters. Dramatic shifts occurred in the transcriptome of M. haptotylum during the different stages of the infection. An initial transcriptional response was recorded after 1 h of infection when the traps adhered to the cuticle, but before immobilization of the captured nematodes. Among the differentially expressed genes were two serine protease genes (spr1 and spr2), and several homologues to genes known to be regulated in other pathogenic fungi. After 4 h, when approximately 40% of the nematodes were paralysed, we identified an upregulated cluster of 372 fungal genes which were not regulated during the other phases of the infection. This cohort contained a large proportion (79%) of genes that appear to be specific for M. haptotylum and closely related species. These genes were of two different classes: those translating into presumably functional peptides and those with no apparent protein coding potential (non-coding RNAs). Among the infection-induced C. elegans genes were those encoding antimicrobial peptides, protease inhibitors and lectins.

  1. High infectivity of an endoparasitic fungus strain, Esteya vermicola, against nematodes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chun Yan; Fang, Zhe Ming; Sun, Bai Shen; Gu, Li Juan; Zhang, Ke Qin; Sung, Chang-Keun

    2008-08-01

    Esteya vermicola, as the first recorded endoparasitic fungus of pinewood nematodes, exhibits great potential as a biological agent against nematodes. However, only two strains of this species have been described so far. In this study, we identified a novel endoparasitic fungal strain, CNU 120806, isolated from infected nematodes in forest soil samples during a survey of nematophagous fungi in Korea. This strain showed similar morphological characteristics and infection mode with the two previously described strains of E. vermicola. All strains are characterized by the ability to produce two types of conidiogenous cells and conidia, and to parasitize nematodes with lunate adhesive conidia. Moreover, the CNU 120806 strain showed 100% identity with E. vermicola CBS 115803 when their partial sequences of 28S rRNA gene were compared. Molecular phylogenetic analysis further identified CNU 120806 as a strain of E. vermicola, by clustering CNU 120806 and E. vermicola CBS 115803 into a single subclade. Culture medium influenced the proportion of dimorphic CNU 120806 conidia, and further changed the adhesive and mortality rates of nematodes. The CNU 120806 strain exhibits high infection activity against nematodes on nutrient-rich PDA medium. Almost all tested nematodes were killed within 8 approximately 10 days after inoculation. This study provides justification for further research of E. vermicola, and the application and formulation of this fungus as a bio-control agent against nematodes.

  2. Biological Control of the Nematode Infective larvae of Trichostrongylidae Family With Filamentous Fungi.

    PubMed

    Zarrin, Majid; Rahdar, Mahmoud; Gholamian, Abbas

    2015-03-01

    Biological control of parasitic nematodes by microorganisms is a promising approach to control such parasites. Microorganisms such as fungi, viruses and bacteria are recognized as biocontrol agents of nematodes. The current study mainly aimed to evaluate the in vitro Potential of various saprophyte soil-fungi in reducing the infective larvae stage of parasitic nematode Trichostrongylidae family. Sheep feces were employed to provide the required third stage larvae source for the experiments. The nematode infective larvae of Trichostrongylidae family including three species of Ostertagia circumcincta, Marshalgia marshali and Heamonchos contortus were collected by Berman apparatus. Fifteen isolates of filamentous fungi were tested in the current study. One milliliter suspension containing 200 third stage larvae of Trichostrongylidae family was separately added to the fungal cultures in 2% water-agar medium Petri-dishes. Every day the live larvae were counted with light microscope (10X) and the number of captured larvae was recorded on different days. Significant differences were observed in the results of co-culture of nematodes larva and fungi after seven days. The most effective fungi against the nematodes larvae were Cladosporium sp., Trichoderma sp., Fusarium equisetti, after seven days of incubation. The studies on fungi could be applied as suitable tools in biocontrol of nematode infections. However, additional surveys are required to select efficient with the ability to reduce the nematode larvae in the environment.

  3. Biological Control of the Nematode Infective larvae of Trichostrongylidae Family With Filamentous Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Zarrin, Majid; Rahdar, Mahmoud; Gholamian, Abbas

    2015-01-01

    Background: Biological control of parasitic nematodes by microorganisms is a promising approach to control such parasites. Microorganisms such as fungi, viruses and bacteria are recognized as biocontrol agents of nematodes. Objectives: The current study mainly aimed to evaluate the in vitro Potential of various saprophyte soil-fungi in reducing the infective larvae stage of parasitic nematode Trichostrongylidae family. Materials and Methods: Sheep feces were employed to provide the required third stage larvae source for the experiments. The nematode infective larvae of Trichostrongylidae family including three species of Ostertagia circumcincta, Marshalgia marshali and Heamonchos contortus were collected by Berman apparatus. Fifteen isolates of filamentous fungi were tested in the current study. One milliliter suspension containing 200 third stage larvae of Trichostrongylidae family was separately added to the fungal cultures in 2% water-agar medium Petri-dishes. Every day the live larvae were counted with light microscope (10X) and the number of captured larvae was recorded on different days. Results: Significant differences were observed in the results of co-culture of nematodes larva and fungi after seven days. The most effective fungi against the nematodes larvae were Cladosporium sp., Trichoderma sp., Fusarium equisetti, after seven days of incubation. Conclusions: The studies on fungi could be applied as suitable tools in biocontrol of nematode infections. However, additional surveys are required to select efficient with the ability to reduce the nematode larvae in the environment. PMID:25893084

  4. Small intestinal nematode infection of mice is associated with increased enterobacterial loads alongside the intestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Rausch, Sebastian; Held, Josephin; Fischer, André; Heimesaat, Markus M; Kühl, Anja A; Bereswill, Stefan; Hartmann, Susanne

    2013-01-01

    Parasitic nematodes are potent modulators of immune reactivity in mice and men. Intestinal nematodes live in close contact with commensal gut bacteria, provoke biased Th2 immune responses upon infection, and subsequently lead to changes in gut physiology. We hypothesized that murine nematode infection is associated with distinct changes of the intestinal bacterial microbiota composition. We here studied intestinal inflammatory and immune responses in mice following infection with the hookworm Heligmosomoides polygyrus bakeri and applied cultural and molecular techniques to quantitatively assess intestinal microbiota changes in the ileum, cecum and colon. At day 14 post nematode infection, mice harbored significantly higher numbers of γ-Proteobacteria/Enterobacteriaceae and members of the Bacteroides/Prevotella group in their cecum as compared to uninfected controls. Abundance of Gram-positive species such as Lactobacilli, Clostridia as well as the total bacterial load was not affected by worm infection. The altered microbiota composition was independent of the IL-4/-13 - STAT6 signaling axis, as infected IL-4Rα(-/-) mice showed a similar increase in enterobacterial loads. In conclusion, infection with an enteric nematode is accompanied by distinct intestinal microbiota changes towards higher abundance of gram-negative commensal species at the small intestinal site of infection (and inflammation), but also in the parasite-free large intestinal tract. Further studies should unravel the impact of nematode-induced microbiota changes in inflammatory bowel disease to allow for a better understanding of how theses parasites interfere with intestinal inflammation and bacterial communities in men.

  5. How nematodes manipulate plant development pathways for infection.

    PubMed

    Gheysen, Godelieve; Mitchum, Melissa G

    2011-08-01

    Sedentary plant-parasitic nematodes establish long term relationships with their hosts. Root vascular cells are transformed into large multinucleate feeding cells from which the nematodes feed for more than one month. Recent transcriptome analyses suggest that feeding cells are different from other plant cell types. Their development, however, remains poorly understood, despite new evidence that appears to confirm previously proposed models, such as the important role of auxin. From the analysis of nematode effector proteins that interact with plant proteins, it has become clear that nematodes manipulate many aspects of plant development, including auxin transport and plant cell differentiation pathways. These studies are also revealing roles for effectors in the inhibition of plant stress and defense responses to establish feeding cells. In the coming years breakthroughs can be expected in our understanding of plant-nematode interactions from the functional analysis of nematode effector genes as well as the involved plant genes. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Infectivity of Two Biotypes of the Citrus Nematode on Citrus and on Some Other Hosts

    PubMed Central

    Baines, R. C.; Miyakawa, T.; Cameron, J. W.; Small, R. H.

    1969-01-01

    The infectivity and development of two biotypes of citrus nematode (Tylenchulus semipenetrans) were compared on highly resistant Poncirus trifoliata selection 'Pomeroy,' moderately susceptible 'Troyer' citrange, and highly susceptible sweet orange selection 'Homosassa' small seedlings in a glasshouse. Biotype-1 was more infective on the above hosts and developed faster on sweet orange and on 'Troyer' citrange than Biotype-2. The differences in infectivity were interpreted to reflect differences in the ability of the nematodes to penetrate the epidermis and hypodermis and become established in host roots. Poncirus selections 'Pomeroy,' 'Webber-Fawcett,' and 'Rubidoux' seedlings were highly resistant to the citrus nematode in California, but seedlings of 'Pomeroy' and 'Rubidoux' were only moderately resistant in Japan. These differences in degree of infection may indicate different biotypes of the nematode. Host range tests with California Biotype-1 indicate that it differs from those occurring in Israel. PMID:19325669

  7. A matter of timing: early, not chronic phase intestinal nematode infection restrains control of a concurrent enteric protozoan infection.

    PubMed

    Rausch, Sebastian; Held, Josephin; Stange, Joerg; Lendner, Matthias; Hepworth, Matthew R; Klotz, Christian; Lucius, Richard; Pogonka, Thomas; Hartmann, Susanne

    2010-10-01

    Infections with parasitic worms are often long lasting and associated with modulated immune responses. We analyzed the influence of the nematode Heligmosomoides polygyrus bakeri dwelling in the small intestine on concurrent protozoan infection with Eimeria falciformis residing in the cecum. To dissect the effects of a nematode infection in the early versus chronic phase, we infected animals with E. falciformis 6 or 28 days post H. p. bakeri infection. Only a concurrent early nematode infection led to an increased replication of the protozoan parasite, whereas a chronic worm infection had no influence on the control of E. falciformis. Increased protozoan replication correlated with the reduced production of IFN-γ, IL-12/23, CCL4, CXCL9 and CXCL10, reduced migration of T cells and increased expression of Foxp3 at the site of protozoan infection. This was accompanied by a stronger nematode-specific Th2 response in gut-draining LN. Protection of mice against challenge infections with the protozoan parasite was not altered. Hence, the detrimental effect of a nematode infection on the control of a concurrent protozoan infection is transient and occurs only in the narrow time window of the early phase of infection.

  8. A 12-month survey of gastrointestinal helminth infections of cervids kept in two zoos in Belgium.

    PubMed

    Goossens, Els; Vercruysse, Jozef; Boomker, Joop; Vercammen, Francis; Dorny, Pierre

    2005-09-01

    Infections with helminths are a major health issue in captive and wild deer. In this study, fecal egg count patterns and clinical signs associated with gastrointestinal nematodes were assessed for 12 mo in nine cervid herds kept under different husbandry conditions at two sites. At site 1, an urban zoo, fecal egg counts remained low and no clinical signs of parasitic gastroenteritis were seen in the herds of fallow deer (Dama dama), Dybowski's deer (Cervus nippon dybowski), pudu (Pudu pudu), and reindeer (Rangifer tarandus tarandus). Helminth infection at this site may have been successfully prevented by daily dung removal of the small sandy-soil enclosures, and applying routine anthelmintic treatment was not justified. At site 2, a wild animal park, involved species were red deer (Cervus elaphus hippelaphus), Nelson's elk (Cervus elaphus nelsoni), Père David's deer (Elaphurus davidianus), European elk (Alces alces alces), and reindeer (Rangifer tarandus tarandus). Nematode eggs were frequently encountered in herds of red deer, Nelson's elk, and European elk, which were kept on larger, grassy enclosures that were irregularly cleaned. The trimodal pattern of fecal egg counts in herds from the wild animal park, consisting of a small spring rise in June, a peak in October, and a small rise in February, indicates that infective larvae on pastures are the main source of infection. In addition, routine anthelmintic treatment with fenbendazole in April and July limited egg shedding, but reinfection rapidly occurred. In two European elk and one reindeer, increasing fecal egg counts were associated with loss of fecal consistency and reduced appetite. Three genera and three species of nematodes were recovered at necropsy of one red deer and three Nelson's elk: Spiculopteragia spiculoptera, Trichostrongylus spp., Nematodirus filicollis, Capillaria spp., Oesophagostomum radiatum, and Trichuris spp., with total worm counts between 950 and 8,700.

  9. In vivo anthelmintic activity of an aqueous extract from sisal waste (Agave sisalana Perr.) against gastrointestinal nematodes in goats.

    PubMed

    Botura, M B; Silva, G D; Lima, H G; Oliveira, J V A; Souza, T S; Santos, J D G; Branco, A; Moreira, E L T; Almeida, M A O; Batatinha, M J M

    2011-04-19

    The resistance of gastrointestinal nematodes (GINs) of small ruminants to anthelmintics has required the investigation of new alternatives. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the in vivo anthelmintic activity of an aqueous extract from sisal waste (Agave sisalana) (AESW) against GINs in goats and to observe the animals for toxic effects. Thirty animals that were naturally infected with GINs were distributed into three groups: group I, was treated with daily doses of AESW (1.7 g/kg) for eight days; Group II, the positive control, was treated with a single dose of levamisole phosphate (6.3mg/kg); and group III, the negative control, was left untreated. Faecal eggs counts (FECs), coprocultures and post-mortem worm counts were performed to assess the efficacy of the treatments. Clinical and laboratory analyses were performed to evaluate any toxic effects associated with the treatment. In the goats in groups I and II, a significant reduction (p<0.05) of the number of eggs and infective larvae (L(3)) was observed. The maximum reductions of the FECs were 50.3% and 93.6% for groups I and II, respectively, whereas the percent reductions of the total number of L(3) larvae were 80% (group I) and 85.6% (group II). There was no difference between groups I and III with respect to worm burden, and the percent reductions were 28.8% and 63.4% for Oesophagostomum columbianum and Trichostrongylus colubriformis, respectively. No reduction was detected for the Haemonchus contortus. The positive control group demonstrated a 74% reduction of the parasites that were recovered from the digestive tract. There were no changes in clinical and haematological parameters. The levels of serum urea and creatinine were higher in group I, but remained within the normal range. At necropsy, pale mucous membranes, abomasitis and enteritis were associated with parasitism. In addition, a histological analysis of the liver and kidney did not reveal any changes suggestive of toxicity. A chemical

  10. Impact of integrated gastrointestinal nematode management training for U.S. goat and sheep producers.

    PubMed

    Whitley, N C; Oh, S-H; Lee, S J; Schoenian, S; Kaplan, R M; Storey, B; Terrill, T H; Mobini, S; Burke, J M; Miller, J E; Perdue, M A

    2014-03-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the impact of integrated parasite management (IPM) training, including FAMACHA(©) eyelid color scoring, on the ability of U.S. sheep and goat producers to control gastrointestinal nematodes (GIN) on their farms. A survey was developed and provided to over 2000 producers trained from 2004 to 2008 in IPM with questions involving farm size (number of sheep/goats), location (U.S. state), impact of training on parasite control efforts and parasite problems on farm, and IPM practices used. Responses were divided into U.S. Census regions of the U.S. Descriptive statistics and logistic regression were used to describe results. Most of the 729 respondents were from the southern region of the U.S. (54.3%) and were small-scale producers (50 or less animals; 64.8%). Nearly all of the respondents (95.1%) agreed that IPM workshop attendance made a difference in their ability to control and monitor parasitism in their herd or flock and employed IPM practices to control GIN (96.3%). The most popular practices respondents used were rotational grazing (71.2%), genetic selection (choosing a parasite resistant breed and/or culling susceptible animals; 52.7%), grain supplementation on pasture to improve nutrition (44.0%), and increased height of plants being grazed (41.8%). Although reporting using a practice decreased (P<0.05) the likelihood of reporting fewer problems, for each 1-point increase in the number of practices which producers employed to control internal parasitism in their herd or flock, they were 16% more likely to report fewer GIN problems (P<0.05). Approximately 75% of respondents indicated an economic benefit of IPM on their farm (P<0.05), and those reporting savings of over $80 were more likely to report fewer problems (P<0.05) with parasites after the training while those reporting no economic benefit were less likely to report fewer problems with GIN (P<0.001). Overall, IPM training resulted in positive impacts for

  11. Identification of genes responding to nematode infection in red grouse.

    PubMed

    Webster, L M I; Mello, L V; Mougeot, F; Martinez-Padilla, J; Paterson, S; Piertney, S B

    2011-03-01

    The identification of genes involved in a host's response to parasite infection provides both a means for understanding the pathways involved in immune defence and a target for examining host-parasite co-evolution. Most studies rely on a candidate gene approach derived from model systems to identify gene targets of interest, and there have been a dearth of studies geared towards providing a holistic overview of immune response from natural populations. We carried out an experiment in a natural population of red grouse (Lagopus lagopus scoticus) to manipulate levels of Trichostrongylus tenuis parasite infection. The transcriptomic response of individuals was examined from standard cDNA and suppressive subtractive hybridization (SSH) libraries produced from gut, liver and spleen, enriching for genes expressed in response to T. tenuis infection. A total of 2209 and 3716 unique transcript sequences were identified from the cDNA and SSH libraries, respectively. Forty-five of these had Gene Ontology annotation associated with immune response. Some of these genes have previously been reported from laboratory-based studies of model species as important in immune response to gastrointestinal parasite infection; however, multiple novel genes were also identified. These may reveal novel pathways involved in the host response of grouse to T. tenuis and provide a resource that can be utilized as candidate genes in other species. All sequences described have been deposited in GenBank (accession numbers GW698221-GW706922)

  12. Discrimination of Gastrointestinal Nematode Eggs from Crude Fecal Egg Preparations by Inhibitor-Resistant Conventional and Real-Time PCR

    PubMed Central

    Demeler, Janina; Ramünke, Sabrina; Wolken, Sonja; Ianiello, Davide; Rinaldi, Laura; Gahutu, Jean Bosco; Cringoli, Giuseppe; von Samson-Himmelstjerna, Georg; Krücken, Jürgen

    2013-01-01

    Diagnosis of gastrointestinal nematodes relies predominantly on coproscopic methods such as flotation, Kato-Katz, McMaster or FLOTAC. Although FLOTAC allows accurate quantification, many nematode eggs can only be differentiated to genus or family level. Several molecular diagnostic tools discriminating closely related species suffer from high costs for DNA isolation from feces and limited sensitivity since most kits use only small amounts of feces (<1 g). A direct PCR from crude egg preparations was designed for full compatibility with FLOTAC to accurately quantify eggs per gram feces (epg) and determine species composition. Eggs were recovered from the flotation solution and concentrated by sieving. Lysis was achieved by repeated boiling and freezing cycles – only Trichuris eggs required additional mechanic disruption. Egg lysates were directly used as template for PCR with Phusion DNA polymerase which is particularly resistant to PCR inhibitors. Qualitative results were obtained with feces of goats, cattle, horses, swine, cats, dogs and mice. The finally established protocol was also compatible with quantitative real-time PCR in the presence of EvaGreen and no PCR inhibition was detectable when extracts were diluted at least fourfold. Sensitivity was comparable to DNA isolation protocols and spiked samples with five epg were reliably detected. For Toxocara cati a detection limit below one epg was demonstrated. It was possible to distinguish T. cati and Toxocara canis using high resolution melt (HRM) analysis, a rapid tool for species identification. In human samples, restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) and HRM analysis were used to discriminate Necator americanus and Ancylostoma duodenale. The method is able to significantly improve molecular diagnosis of gastrointestinal nematodes by increasing speed and sensitivity while decreasing overall costs. For identification of species or resistance alleles, analysis of PCR products with many different post

  13. Plant-parasitic nematode infections in rice: molecular and cellular insights.

    PubMed

    Kyndt, Tina; Fernandez, Diana; Gheysen, Godelieve

    2014-01-01

    Being one of the major staple foods in the world, and an interesting model monocot plant, rice (Oryza sativa L.) has recently received attention from molecular nematologists studying the cellular and molecular aspects of the interaction between this crop and plant-parasitic nematodes. In this review, we highlight recent advances in this field, with a focus on the best-studied root-knot nematodes. Histological studies have revealed the cellular changes inside root-knot nematode-induced feeding sites, both in the compatible interaction with Oryza sativa and the incompatible interaction with the related species Oryza glaberrima. After comparing the published data from transcriptome analyses, mutant studies, and exogenous hormone applications, we provide a comprehensive model showing the role and interaction of plant hormone pathways in defense of this monocot crop against root nematodes, where jasmonate seems to play a key role. Finally, recent evidence indicates that effectors secreted from rice-infecting nematodes can suppress plant defense.

  14. Evaluation of the effectiveness of Duddingtonia flagrans and Monacrosporium thaumasium in the biological control of gastrointestinal nematodes in female bovines bred in the semiarid region.

    PubMed

    Silva, Manoel Eduardo da; Braga, Fabio Ribeiro; Borges, Luana Alcântara; Oliveira, Jair Mendes de; Lima, Walter dos Santos; Guimarães, Marcos Pezzi; Araújo, Jackson Victor de

    2014-06-01

    Brazil has a herd of 212 million cattle and 171 million hectares of pastures that produce approximately 96 % of Brazilian beef. The Brazilian production system enables animal infection by endoparasites, which are considered one of the main obstacles for the development of this industry and are responsible for considerable economic losses. The control of parasitic diseases is performed via the administration of antiparasitic drugs, but they leave residues of the products in the treated animal, affect non-target organisms and select resistant strains of the parasites. The species D. flagrans and M. thaumasium are promising and sustainable alternatives for controlling gastrointestinal helminths of ruminants and other herbivores. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of isolates of these species, formulated in a sodium alginate matrix and administered twice a week, to reduce the number of environmental infective larvae of gastrointestinal nematodes that affect prepubescent zebu females. The treated animals presented fewer eggs and a lower number of infective larvae per gram of faeces (p < 0.05). The pastures occupied by treated animals showed a statistically significant reduction (p < 0.05) of the number of L3 and, furthermore, the genera Cooperia sp., Haemonchus sp., and Oesophagostomum sp. were the most prevalent. The average weight of the animals did not differ statistically (p > 0.05) among the treated and control groups. The use of sodium alginate pellets as vehicle for delivery of the fungus mycelia D. flagrans (isolate AC001) and M. thaumasium (isolate NF34A) proved effective in controlling trichostrongylids in prepubescent cows bred in the semi-arid region, with an effective reduction in the number of infective larvae in the pastures.

  15. Chemical signals from plants previously infected with root knot nematodes affect behavior of infective juvenile root knot nematodes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Nematodes are a worldwide problem in agriculture, with losses estimated to $100 billion per year in the US. Damage caused by root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne spp.) (RKN) disrupts the flow of water and nutrients to the plant and increases the plant’s vulnerability to other pathogens. While studies ...

  16. Examination of commercially available copper oxide wire particles in combination with albendazole for control of gastrointestinal nematodes in lambs.

    PubMed

    Burke, J M; Miller, J E; Terrill, T H; Smyth, E; Acharya, M

    2016-01-15

    Control of gastrointestinal nematodes (GIN) remains a critical issue due to the prevalence of anthelmintic resistance. The objective of the experiment was to determine the efficacy of copper oxide wire particles (COWP) from three commercial sources and a combination of COWP and albendazole to control GIN and/or Haemonchus contortus in lambs. Naturally infected Katahdin lambs in early June 2014 and 2015 were randomly assigned to receive no COWP (CON; n=9 and 12) or 2g COWP in a gel capsule as Copasure(®) (COP; n=4 and 17; Animax Ltd.), copper oxide-wire form (AUS; n=7 in 2014 only; Pharmplex), Ultracruz™ (ULT; n=8 and 15; Santa Cruz Animal Health™), no COWP and albendazole (CON+alb; n=10 in 2015 only; 15mg/kg BW; Valbazen(®); Zoetis Animal Health), or COWP+alb (n=7 and 11; in 2014, lambs were administered alb on day 3). Lambs grazed grass pastures as a group and were supplemented with 227g/lamb daily of a commercial grain mix (15% crude protein) and the same amount of alfalfa pellets. Feces were collected on days 0 (day of COWP treatment), 7, and 14 for determination of fecal egg counts (FEC). Pooled (2014) or pooled treatment group feces were cultured on days 0, 7, and 14 (2015 only) to determine GIN genera. Data were analyzed using repeated measures in a mixed model, and FEC were log transformed. The predominant GIN on day 0 was H. contortus (87%) in 2014, and there was a mixed population in 2015. The mean FEC was reduced by day 7 in AUS and ULT lambs (treatment×day, P=0.001), and all of the COWP products were similar. By day 14, the AUS FEC were lower than the CON and COP groups. When examining the combination of COWP and synthetic anthelmintic, the FEC of COWP+alb were reduced to nearly 0eggs/g (back-transformed) and lower than the other groups (treatment×day, P=0.001). The percentage of H. contortus in cultured feces was reduced to a greater extent in the COWP than CON or CON+alb groups of lambs. In a mixed GIN population, the COWP products appeared to

  17. Detection and replication of QTL underlying resistance to gastrointestinal nematodes in adult sheep using the ovine 50K SNP array.

    PubMed

    Atlija, Marina; Arranz, Juan-Jose; Martinez-Valladares, María; Gutiérrez-Gil, Beatriz

    2016-01-20

    Persistence of gastrointestinal nematode (GIN) infection and the related control methods have major impacts on the sheep industry worldwide. Based on the information generated with the Illumina OvineSNP50 BeadChip (50 K chip), this study aims at confirming quantitative trait loci (QTL) that were previously identified by microsatellite-based genome scans and identifying new QTL and allelic variants that are associated with indicator traits of parasite resistance in adult sheep. We used a commercial half-sib population of 518 Spanish Churra ewes with available data for fecal egg counts (FEC) and serum levels of immunoglobulin A (IgA) to perform different genome scan QTL mapping analyses based on classical linkage analysis (LA), a combined linkage disequilibrium and linkage analysis (LDLA) and a genome-wide association study (GWAS). For the FEC and IgA traits, we detected a total of three 5 % chromosome-wise significant QTL by LA and 63 significant regions by LDLA, of which 13 reached the 5 % genome-wise significance level. The GWAS also revealed 10 significant SNPs associated with IgAt, although no significant associations were found for LFEC. Some of the significant QTL for LFEC that were detected by LA and LDLA on OAR6 overlapped with a highly significant QTL that was previously detected in a different half-sib population of Churra sheep. In addition, several new QTL and SNP associations were identified, some of which show correspondence with effects that were reported for different populations of young sheep. Other significant associations that did not coincide with previously reported associations could be related to the specific immune response of adult animals. Our results replicate a FEC-related QTL located on OAR6 that was previously reported in Churra sheep and provide support for future research on the identification of the allelic variant that underlies this QTL. The small proportion of genetic variance explained by the detected QTL and the large number of

  18. Connexin 26 facilitates gastrointestinal bacterial infection in vitro.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Charlotte; Kelsell, David P; Marchès, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    Escherichia coli, including enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC), represents the most common cause of diarrhoea worldwide and is therefore a serious public health burden. Treatment for gastrointestinal pathogens is hindered by the emergence of multiple antibiotic resistance, leading to the requirement for the development of new therapies. A variety of mechanisms act in combination to mediate gastrointestinal-bacterial-associated diarrhoea development. For example, EPEC infection of enterocytes induces attaching and effacing lesion formation and the disruption of tight junctions. An alternative enteric pathogen, Shigella flexneri, manipulates the expression of Connexin 26 (Cx26), a gap junction protein. S. flexneri can open Cx26 hemichannels allowing the release of ATP, whereas HeLa cells expressing mutant gap-junction-associated Cx26 are less susceptible to cellular invasion by S. flexneri than cells expressing wild-type (WT) Cx26. We have investigated further the link between Cx26 expression and gastrointestinal infection by using EPEC and S. flexneri as in vitro models of infection. In this study, a significant reduction in EPEC adherence was observed in cells expressing mutant Cx26 compared with WT Cx26. Furthermore, a significant reduction in both cellular invasion by S. flexneri and adherence by EPEC was demonstrated in human intestinal cell lines following treatment with Cx26 short interfering RNA. These in vitro results suggest that the loss of functional Cx26 expression provides improved protection against gastrointestinal bacterial pathogens. Thus, Cx26 represents a potential therapeutic target for gastrointestinal bacterial infection.

  19. Wastewater quality and the risk of intestinal nematode infection in sewage farming families in hyderabad, India.

    PubMed

    Ensink, Jeroen H J; Blumenthal, Ursula J; Brooker, Simon

    2008-10-01

    Use of sewage or wastewater in agriculture is becoming increasingly common as a result of a global water scarcity. Intestinal nematode infections have been identified as the main health risk associated with this practice. To protect consumer and farmer health, the World Health Organization (WHO) has established an intestinal nematode water quality standard. However, because of a lack of well-designed studies, the validity of this guideline is questioned. This report presents the findings of a study on the risk of intestinal nematode infections in farming families occupationally exposed to untreated and partially treated wastewater in Hyderabad, India. The study found an increased risk of hookworm (odds ratio [OR] 3.5, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.2-5.5), Ascaris lumbricoides (OR = 5.3, 95% CI = 2.0-14), and Trichuris trichiura (OR = 5.6, 95% CI = 1.8-18) infection when untreated wastewater (150 intestinal nematode ova/liter) was used for crop production. Use of partially treated wastewater (28 intestinal nematode ova/liter) was only associated with an increased risk (OR = 3.2, 95% CI = 1.2-8.6) of A. lumbricoides infection. The findings of the study suggest that the current WHO intestinal nematode guideline of 1 ova/liter is sufficient to protect farmer health.

  20. Wastewater quality and the risk of intestinal nematode infection in sewage farming families in Hyderabad, India

    PubMed Central

    Ensink, Jeroen H.J.; Blumenthal, Ursula J.; Brooker, Simon

    2009-01-01

    The use of sewage or wastewater in agriculture is becoming increasingly common as a result of global water scarcity. Intestinal nematode infections have been identified as the main health risk associated with this practise. To protect consumer and farmer health the WHO has set an intestinal nematode water quality standard. However because of a lack of well designed studies the validity of this guideline is questioned. This paper presents the findings of a study on the risk of intestinal nematode infections in farming families occupationally exposed to untreated and partially treated wastewater in Hyderabad, India. The study found an increased risk of hookworm (OR: 3.5, 95% CI 2.2-5.5), Ascaris lumbricoides (OR: 5.3, 95% CI: 2.0-14) and Trichuris trichiura (OR: 5.6, 95% CI: 1.8-18) infection when untreated wastewater (150 intestinal nematode ova/L) was used for crop production. The use of partially treated wastewater (28 intestinal nematode ova/L) was only associated with an increased risk (OR: 3.2, 95% CI: 1.2-8.6) of Ascaris lumbricoides infection. The findings of the study suggest that the current WHO intestinal nematode guideline of 1 ova/L is sufficient to protect farmer health. PMID:18840745

  1. Evaluation and application of a molecular method to assess the composition of strongylid nematode populations in sheep with naturally acquired infections.

    PubMed

    Roeber, Florian; Jex, Aaron R; Campbell, Angus J D; Campbell, Bronwyn E; Anderson, Garry A; Gasser, Robin B

    2011-07-01

    We evaluated the performance of a PCR method for the diagnosis of naturally acquired strongylid nematode infections in sheep (n = 470; in a temperate climatic zone of south-eastern Australia), using a panel of 100 'negative control' samples from sheep known not to harbour parasitic helminths. We compared the diagnostic sensitivity (98%) and specificity (100%) of this assay against a conventional faecal flotation method and also established a system to rank the contribution of particular strongylid nematodes to the faecal egg counts (FECs) from 'mixed infections' in individual sheep. The testing of faecal samples herein revealed that Teladorsagia circumcincta (80%) and Trichostrongylus spp. (66%) were most prevalent, followed by Chabertia ovina (33%), Oesophagostomum venulosum (28%) and Haemonchus contortus (1%). For the majority of sheep in this study, T. circumcincta and Trichostrongylus spp. represented the largest proportion of strongylid eggs in faecal samples from individual sheep. This is the first large-scale prevalence survey of gastrointestinal nematodes in live sheep using a molecular tool. The ability to rapidly rank strongylid nematodes according to their contribution to mixed infections represents a major advantage over routine coprological methods. This PCR tool has the potential to replace the conventional technique of larval culture. Future efforts will focus on enhancing and adapting this molecular method for high throughput application in routine, diagnostic settings.

  2. A survey of the gastrointestinal nematodes of Spanish ibex (Capra pyrenaica) in a high mountain habitat.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Jesús M; Granados, José E; Pérez, M Carmen; Márquez, Francisco J; Ferroglio, Ezio; Rossi, Luca

    2003-04-01

    We analyzed the content of the abomasum (n = 79) and small intestine (n = 83) of Spanish ibex from Sierra Nevada Natural Park, southern Spain. Fifteen species of trichostrongylid nematodes were identified, 4 of which were found for the first time in this host, i.e., Nematodirus fillicollis, N. oiratianus, Ostertagia lyrata, and O. ostertagi. Teladorsagia circumcincta and Marshallagia marshalli were the most abundant abomasal species, whereas N. abnormalis, N. davtiani, and N. oiratianus were dominant in the small intestine. Counts of both abomasal and intestinal nematodes were generally low (year-round-median = 292 and 94 worms, respectively), and significantly lower numbers of M. marshalli, N. davtiani, and N. oiratianus were found in summer. No sex-related differences in helminth abundance were found, but young ibex harbored significantly more N. davtiani and N. oiratianus than adults. The presence of scabies was not related to increased nematode counts.

  3. Using copper oxide wire particles or sericea lespedeza to prevent a peri-parturient rise of gastrointestinal nematodes in sheep and goats

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Gastrointestinal nematodes (GIN) continue to plague the small ruminant industry, especially parts of the world with warm, humid climates. Alternatives to chemicals are needed for GIN control because of anthelmintic resistance of GIN and a desire to reduce chemical residues in meat products. A stud...

  4. In vivo anthelmintic activity of Anogeissus leiocarpus Guill & Perr (Combretaceae) against nematodes in naturally infected sheep.

    PubMed

    Soro, Dramane; Koné, Witabouna Mamidou; Bonfoh, Bassirou; Dro, Bernadin; Toily, Kassédo Bénédicte; Kamanzi, Kagoyire

    2013-07-01

    The identification of new anthelmintic drugs becomes a priority because of the availability of a handful of drugs, cost of treatments, and recent emergence of drug resistance. Medicinal plants are a good source of bioactive compounds for development of drugs. In this study, in vivo efficacy of Anogeissus leiocarpus was assessed in sheep naturally infected with gastrointestinal nematodes. Fecal examination, serological analyses, and necropsy were carried out to determine the egg and worm-burden reduction. The administration of ethanolic extract (single oral dose of 80 mg/kg) of A. leiocarpus induced a moderate fecal egg reduction (81 %) and adult worm-burden reduction (87 %) against Haemonchus contortus and Trichostrongylus colubriformis (82 %). The plant exhibited high efficacy against adult Strongyloïdes papillosus (100 %), Gaigeria pachyscelis (90 %), Cooperia curticei (100 %), and Oesophagostomum columbianum (95 %) but low efficacy against Trichostrongylus axei (67 %) and Trichuris globulosa (79 %). All these helminthes were sensitive to fenbendazole, except O. columbianum which showed a decrease susceptibility (17 %). The plant extract also improved certain biological parameters by increasing bodyweight from 0.7 ± 2.9 to 3.3 ± 1.9 % and improving hematocrit of 6.9 ± 1.6 % 3-week posttreatment. It emerges from the results that the plant possesses significant effectiveness on diarrhea; all treated animals gave normal feces. This study has shown that A. leiocarpus could find an application in the control of multiparasitism in small ruminants.

  5. Field evaluation of the efficacy and safety of emodepside plus praziquantel tablets (Profender tablets for dogs) against naturally acquired nematode and cestode infections in dogs.

    PubMed

    Altreuther, Gertraut; Radeloff, Isabelle; LeSueur, Christophe; Schimmel, Annette; Krieger, Klemens J

    2009-08-01

    A controlled, blinded and randomised multicentre field study evaluated the efficacy and safety of a new anthelmintic tablet formulation containing emodepside plus praziquantel (Profender tablets for dogs) in the treatment of gastrointestinal nematode and cestode infections in dogs in France, Germany, Portugal and Slovakia. Dogs positive for nematodes and/or cestodes (demonstrated by faecal egg counts and/or the presence of proglottids) were treated with emodepside plus praziquantel tablets (n = 239) or the reference product containing milbemycin oxime and praziquantel (Milbemax [n = 115]) at the recommended dose rate. Two faecal samples collected between 7 and 13 days after treatment were evaluated for proglottids, nematode and cestode eggs. No suspected adverse drug reactions were observed in the study. The following parasite species were identified: Trichuris vulpis, Toxocara canis, Toxascaris leonina, Uncinaria stenocephala, Ancylostoma caninum, Dipylidium caninum, Taeniidae and Mesocestoides spp. Geometric mean nematode egg counts in dogs treated with emodepside plus praziquantel tablets were reduced by 99.9 % compared with a reduction of 99.6 % for the reference product. Statistical analysis demonstrated noninferiority of investigational versus reference product (p = 0.0342). None of the dogs treated with emodepside plus praziquantel or reference product remained positive for cestodes after treatment. The study demonstrated that emodepside plus praziquantel tablets are safe and highly efficacious against a broad spectrum of nematodes and cestodes under field conditions.

  6. Prevalence and seasonal incidence of nematode parasites and fluke infections of sheep and goats in eastern Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Sissay, Menkir M; Uggla, Arvid; Waller, Peter J

    2007-10-01

    A 2-year abattoir survey was carried out to determine the prevalence, abundance and seasonal incidence of gastro-intestinal (GI) nematodes and trematodes (flukes) of sheep and goats in the semi-arid zone of eastern Ethiopia. During May 2003 to April 2005, viscera including liver, lungs and GI tracts were collected from 655 sheep and 632 goats slaughtered at 4 abattoirs located in the towns of Haramaya, Harar, Dire Dawa and Jijiga in eastern Ethiopia. All animals were raised in the farming areas located within the community boundaries for each town. Collected materials were transported within 24 h to the parasitology laboratory of Haramaya University for immediate processing. Thirteen species belonging to 9 genera of GI nematodes (Haemonchus contortus, Trichostrongylus axei, T. colubriformis, T. vitrinus, Nematodirus filicollis, N. spathiger Oesopha-gostomum columbianum, O. venulosum, Strongyloides papillosus, Bunostomum trigonocephalum, Trichuris ovis, Cooperia curticei and Chabertia ovina), and 4 species belonging to 3 genera of trematodes (Fasciola hepatica, F. gigantica, Paramphistomum {Calicohoron} microbothrium and Dicrocoelium dendriticum) were recorded in both sheep and goats. All animals in this investigation were infected with multiple species to varying degrees. The mean burdens of adult nematodes were generally moderate in both sheep and goats and showed patterns of seasonal abundance that corresponded with the bi-modal annual rainfall pattern, with highest burdens around the middle of the rainy season. In both sheep and goats there were significant differences in the mean worm burdens and abundance of the different nematode species between the four geographic locations, with worm burdens in the Haramaya and Harar areas greater than those observed in the Dire Dawa and Jijiga locations. Similar seasonal variations were also observed in the prevalence of flukes. But there were no significant differences in the prevalence of each fluke species between the

  7. Protein deficiency and nematode infection during pregnancy and lactation reduce maternal bone mineralization and neonatal linear growth in mice.

    PubMed

    Odiere, Maurice R; Scott, Marilyn E; Weiler, Hope A; Koski, Kristine G

    2010-09-01

    Using a 2 x 2 factorial design, we investigated the combined impact of protein deficiency (PD) and gastrointestinal nematode infection during late pregnancy and lactation on resting metabolic rate (RMR), body composition and bone mineralization, neonatal growth, and the regulatory hormones [corticosterone, leptin, and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1)] and proinflammatory cytokines [interleukin (IL)-1 beta and IL-6] that may drive these processes. Pregnant CD1 mice, fed either a protein-sufficient (PS; 24%) or protein-deficient (PD; 6%) isocaloric diet, were infected 4 times with either 0 (sham) or 100 Heligmosomoides bakeri larvae beginning on d 14 of pregnancy. Dams were killed on d 20 postpartum and pups on d 2, 7, 14, and 21. Diet and infection had largely independent effects. The PD diet elevated corticosterone and upregulated leptin concentration in maternal serum, which was associated with reduced food intake leading to lower body mass, RMR, and body temperature. Infection reduced food intake but elevated maternal serum IL-1 beta and IL-6 and did not affect corticosterone, leptin, RMR, or body temperature. The PD diet decreased maternal bone area and bone mineral content. Infection lowered maternal bone mineral density, consistent with elevated IL-1 beta and IL-6. The elevated serum IL-1 beta and lower IGF-1 in pups of PD dams and lower serum leptin and IGF-1 in pups of infected dams were both consistent with the lower pup body mass and shorter crown-rump length. This mouse model provides a novel framework to study the impact of diet and nematode infection on bone.

  8. Increased intestinal endotoxin absorption during enteric nematode but not protozoal infections through a mast cell-mediated mechanism.

    PubMed

    Farid, Ayman Samir; Jimi, Fumiko; Inagaki-Ohara, Kyoko; Horii, Yoichiro

    2008-06-01

    It is known that hypersensitivity reactions in the gastrointestinal tract, which are primarily mediated by mast cells, are associated with a secretory response of the epithelium and often increased permeability to macromolecules. Studies to date have not examined the effects of hyperpermeability on the absorption of toxic substances normally present in the intestinal lumen such as bacterial LPS. In the present study, we observed that Strongyloides venezuelensis infection in mice decreases the mRNA expression of intestinal epithelial cell junctional molecules (occludin and zonula occludens 1) and increases portal endotoxin levels 4 h after intragastric administration of LPS (20 mg/kg body weight). Furthermore, an increase in the flux of immunoglobulin G into the intestinal lumen was observed 10 days postinfection (PI). An increased rate of LPS absorption was also seen in mice infected with Nippostrongylus brasiliensis on day 14 PI and rats concurrently infected with S. venezuelensis and N. brasiliensis on day 20 PI. On the other hand, infection with Eimeria vermiformis and Eimeria pragensis was not observed to enhance LPS absorption 4 h after intragastric administration of LPS (20 mg/kg body weight), although E. vermiformis infection did inhibit the epithelial cell mRNA expression of zonula occludens 1, but not occludin, on day 9 PI, resulting in a reduced immunoglobulin G flux than that produced by S. venezuelensis infection. Our results suggest that mastocytosis accompanying intestinal nematode infection increases the intestinal absorption of LPS into the portal circulation by suppressing the expression of tight junction molecules.

  9. Effect of changes in the nutritional status on the performances of growing Creole kids during an established nematode parasite infection.

    PubMed

    Ceï, W; Archimède, H; Arquet, R; Félicité, Y; Feuillet, D; Nepos, A; Mulciba, P; Etienne, T; Alexandre, G; Bambou, J C

    2017-04-01

    In this study, we evaluated the effect of changes in the nutritional status on the performances of growing Creole kids during an established experimental gastrointestinal nematode (GIN) infection. Eighteen 6-month-old Creole kids were distributed in two main groups infected (I) and non-infected (NI) and were placed for a period of 4 weeks on each of three diets differing in their nutritional values: (1) fresh grass (FG, 6.7 MJ/kg dry matter (DM) and 7.9% crude protein (CP)) non-supplemented, (2) FG supplemented with a commercial concentrate (CC, 12.2 MJ/kg DM and 20.6% of CP), and (3) FG supplemented with dried banana (Ban, 11.1 MJ/kg DM and 4.3% CP). The experiment was designed as a split-plot with experimental infection (I and NI) as the main plot and the diets (FG, CC, and Ban) as the subplots with three replicates. We showed a significant effect of the diet changes on the fecal egg counts. A higher dry matter intake, digestibility, and growth rate were observed with the CC diet but together with a slight but significant increase of the intensity of the GIN infection. These data suggest that the improvement of the protein nutritional status during an establish GIN infection would improve the animal performance at the expense of the mechanism involved in the control of the infection.

  10. Transcriptional reprogramming by root knot and migratory nematode infection in rice.

    PubMed

    Kyndt, Tina; Denil, Simon; Haegeman, Annelies; Trooskens, Geert; Bauters, Lander; Van Criekinge, Wim; De Meyer, Tim; Gheysen, Godelieve

    2012-11-01

    Rice is one of the most important staple crops worldwide, but its yield is compromised by different pathogens, including plant-parasitic nematodes. In this study we have characterized specific and general responses of rice (Oryza sativa) roots challenged with two endoparasitic nematodes with very different modes of action. Local transcriptional changes in rice roots upon root knot (Meloidogyne graminicola) and root rot nematode (RRN, Hirschmanniella oryzae) infection were studied at two time points (3 and 7 d after infection, dai), using mRNA-seq. Our results confirm that root knot nematodes (RKNs), which feed as sedentary endoparasites, stimulate metabolic pathways in the root, and enhance nutrient transport towards the induced root gall. The migratory RRNs, on the other hand, induce programmed cell death and oxidative stress, and obstruct the normal metabolic activity of the root. While RRN infection causes up-regulation of biotic stress-related genes early in the infection, the sedentary RKNs suppress the local defense pathways (e.g. salicylic acid and ethylene pathways). Interestingly, hormone pathways mainly involved in plant development were strongly induced (gibberellin) or repressed (cytokinin) at 3 dai. These results uncover previously unrecognized nematode-induced expression profiles related to their specific infection strategy.

  11. Nematode infections in dog breeding kennels in The Netherlands, with special reference to Toxocara.

    PubMed

    Overgaauw, P A; Boersema, J H

    1998-01-01

    Faecal samples from 286 adult dogs and 159 pups and dust and soil samples from 32 dog breeding kennels in the Netherlands were examined for nematode eggs. Dogs that shed nematode eggs were found in 41% of the kennels. The kennel prevalence of nematode infection of adult dogs was 33%. The kennel prevalence for infection of adult dogs and pups with nematode species was 21% and 48% for Toxocara canis, respectively, 29% and 0% for Trichuris vulpis, and 20% and 0% for Toxascaris leonina. Kennels with more than two litters per year and with regular import of new animals had a significantly higher prevalence of T. canis (p < 0.01 and p < 0.05 respectively). T. vulpis infections in adult dogs occurred significantly more often in kennels that used deworming products other than benzimidazoles (p < 0.05). Embryonated T. canis ova were recovered from 20% of the house and kennel dust samples and from 50% of the soil samples. This survey shows that the nematode infection rate in dog breeding kennels is high. Better deworming strategies should be used to improve the health status of the dogs and to reduce the risk of zoonotic infection in humans.

  12. Anthelminthic efficacy of banana crop residues on gastrointestinal nematodes of sheep: in vitro and in vivo tests.

    PubMed

    Nogueira, Flávia Aparecida; Oliveira, Lincoln Nunes; da Silva, Rayana Brito; Nery, Patrícia Silva; Virgínio, Gercino Ferreira; Geraseev, Luciana Castro; Duarte, Eduardo Robson

    2012-07-01

    Resistance to anthelminthics is common due to intensive and incorrect use. In searching for alternatives, extracts of banana plant were evaluated for egg hatching inhibition and fecal egg count reduction of sheep nematodes. Aqueous extracts of the leaf, pseudostem, and heart of the banana plant cv. Prata anã were tested at concentrations of 0.31, 0.62, 1.25, 2.5, 5.0, and 10.0 mg ml(-1) in egg hatching inhibition tests. For in vivo analysis, aqueous extracts were evaluated at dosages calculated according to the 10% lethal dose derived from acute toxicity testing in mice. Efficacy was evaluated at two time periods following oral administration. For the banana extracts at 2.5 mg ml(-1), egg hatching was significantly fewer than the negative control, with an LC(50) and LC(90) of 0.19 and 0.84 mg ml(-1), respectively. In vivo analysis for weeks 1 and 2 following a single treatment with aqueous leaf extract showed 33.1% and 32.5% anthelminthic efficacy, respectively. Further research on higher dosages with more frequent administration is needed to evaluate the potential for utilizing banana plant residues in gastrointestinal nematode control.

  13. In vitro and in vivo efficacy of aqueous extract of Caryocar brasiliense Camb. to control gastrointestinal nematodes in sheep.

    PubMed

    Nogueira, Flávia A; Fonseca, Leydiana D; da Silva, Rayana B; de Paiva Ferreira, Adriano V; Nery, Patrícia S; Geraseev, Luciana C; Duarte, Eduardo R

    2012-07-01

    A major problem faced in sheep rearing has been the rapid acquisition of anthelminthic-resistant populations of gastrointestinal nematodes. In the search for alternatives, aqueous extract of the peel of Caryocar brasiliense was evaluated for larval development inhibition, egg-hatching inhibition, and fecal nematode egg count reduction in sheep. For in vivo analysis, the doses were calculated according to a 10% lethal dose derived from acute toxicity tests in mice, and the efficacy was evaluated for two periods following oral administration of the extract. Egg-hatching inhibition at concentrations of 15 and 7.5 mg/ml was significantly higher than observed in negative controls with distilled water. For larval development inhibition, all concentrations showed anthelminthic activity significantly higher than controls and were not significantly different from ivermectin treatment. The LC(90) of larval development inhibition was 53.19 mg/ml. In vivo analysis for first and second weeks after treatment found 32.2% and 33% anthelminthic efficacy, respectively.

  14. Genome-wide scan of gastrointestinal nematode resistance in closed Angus population selected for minimized influence of MHC

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Gastrointestinal (GI) parasitic infection is the main health constraint for small ruminant production, causing loss of weight and/or death. Red Maasai sheep have adapted to a tropical environment where extreme parasite exposure, especially with highly pathogenic Haemonchus contortus, is a constant. ...

  15. Interactions among host diet, nutritional status and gastrointestinal parasite infection in wild bovids.

    PubMed

    Ezenwa, Vanessa O

    2004-03-29

    In this study, I explored the interactions among host diet, nutritional status and gastrointestinal parasitism in wild bovids by examining temporal patterns of nematode faecal egg shedding in species with different diet types during a drought and non-drought year. Study species included three grass and roughage feeders (buffalo, hartebeest, waterbuck), four mixed or intermediate feeders (eland, Grant's gazelle, impala, Thomson's gazelle) and two concentrate selectors (dik-dik, klipspringer). Six out of the nine focal species had higher mean faecal egg counts in the drought year compared to the normal year, and over the course of the dry year, monthly faecal egg counts were correlated with drought intensity in four species with low-quality diets, but no such relationship was found for species with high-quality diets. Comparisons of dietary crude protein and faecal egg count in impala showed that during the dry season, individuals with high faecal egg counts (> or =1550 eggs/g of faeces) had significantly lower crude protein levels than individuals with low (0-500 eggs/g) or moderate (550-1500 eggs/g) egg counts. These results suggest that under drought conditions, species unable to maintain adequate nutrition, mainly low-quality feeders, are less able to cope with gastrointestinal parasite infections. In particular, during dry periods, reduced protein intake seems to be associated with declining resilience and resistance to infection.

  16. Interactions among host diet, nutritional status and gastrointestinal parasite infection in wild bovids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ezenwa, V.O.

    2004-01-01

    In this study, I explored the interactions among host diet, nutritional status and gastrointestinal parasitism in wild bovids by examining temporal patterns of nematode faecal egg shedding in species with different diet types during a drought and non-drought year. Study species included three grass and roughage feeders (buffalo, hartebeest, waterbuck), four mixed or intermediate feeders (eland, Grant's gazelle, impala, Thomson's gazelle) and two concentrate selectors (dik-dik, klipspringer). Six out of the nine focal species had higher mean faecal egg counts in the drought year compared to the normal year, and over the course of the dry year, monthly faecal egg counts were correlated with drought intensity in four species with low-quality diets, but no such relationship was found for species with high-quality diets. Comparisons of dietary crude protein and faecal egg count in impala showed that during the dry season, individuals with high faecal egg counts (???1550 eggs/g of faeces) had significantly lower crude protein levels than individuals with low (0-500 eggs/g) or moderate (550-1500 eggs/g) egg counts. These results suggest that under drought conditions, species unable to maintain adequate nutrition, mainly low-quality feeders, are less able to cope with gastrointestinal parasite infections. In particular, during dry periods, reduced protein intake seems to be associated with declining resilience and resistance to infection. ?? 2003 Australian Society for Parasitology Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. First Report of the Spiral Nematode Helicotylenchus microlobus Infecting Soybean in North Dakota.

    PubMed

    Yan, Guiping; Plaisance, Addison; Huang, Danqiong; Handoo, Zafar A

    2017-03-01

    Spiral nematodes (Helicotylenchus spp.) are common plant-parasitic nematodes in fields of many crops. In June 2015, two soil samples were collected from a soybean field in Richland County, ND. Nematodes were extracted from soil using the sugar centrifugal flotation method (Jenkins, 1964). Plant-parasitic nematodes were identified to genus based on morphological features and counted. Both samples contained spiral nematodes from 1,500 to 3,300 per kilogram of soil. In June and August 2016, 10 soil samples were collected from the same field. Nematodes were extracted, and nine of the samples had spiral nematodes ranging from 125 to 3,065 per kilogram of soil. One soil sample with 1,500 spiral nematodes per kilogram was used to inoculate two soybean cultivars Sheyenne and Barnes each in four replicates. After 15 wk of growth at 22°C in a greenhouse room, the population of spiral nematodes was found to have increased greatly. The final density was 9,300 ± 1,701 spiral nematodes per kilogram of soil for Sheyenne and 9,451 ± 2,751 for Barnes. The reproductive factor in Sheyenne and Barnes was 6.2 and 6.3, respectively, indicating that this spiral nematode infects and reproduces well on these two soybean cultivars. Infected soybean roots had small brown lesions on the surface. Individual spiral nematodes were handpicked and examined morphologically and molecularly for species identification. Morphological measurements of adult females (n = 15) included body length (mean = 708.5 μm, range = 600.0-812.0 μm), stylet (27.6, 26.0-29.0), body width (28.3, 25.0-33.0), lip region end to posterior end of pharyngeal glands (142.5, 130.0-152.0), anal body width (15.8, 14.0-17.5), tail length (20.3, 15.0-25.0), tail annules (11.6, 10.0-14.0), a (25.0, 21.4-27.1), b (5.0, 4.4-5.7), c (35.4, 30.2-41.7), c' (1.3, 1.0-1.6), and V (61.8%, 60.0-63.7). The spiral nematode was identified as Helicotylenchus microlobus according to morphological and morphometric characteristics (Subbotin et

  18. Effect of Moxidectin Treatment at Peripartum on Gastrointestinal Parasite Infections in Ewes Raised under Tropical Andes High Altitude Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Vargas-Duarte, J. J.; Lozano-Márquez, H.; Grajales-Lombana, H. A.; Manrique-Perdomo, C.; Martínez-Bello, D. A.; Saegerman, C.; Raes, M.; Kirschvink, N.

    2015-01-01

    This study tested the impact of moxidectin at peripartum on nematode fecal egg count (FEC) and clinical parameters on ewes in the high altitude tropical Andes of Colombia. FEC and clinical evaluations were performed on 9 occasions in 43 naturally infected ewes before and during gestation and after lambing. Moxidectin (Mox, 200 µg kg−1) was applied at late pregnancy (T1, n = 15) or 48 hours after parturition (T2, n = 14). 14 untreated ewes served as controls (C). Suckling lambs (n = 58) remained untreated and underwent four clinical and parasitological evaluations until 8 weeks after birth. Mox efficacy equaled 99.3% (T1) and 96.9% (T2). Highest mean FEC value reflecting periparturient nematode egg rise (PPER) was recorded in C ewes at 4–6 weeks after lambing. Significant FEC reductions were found in T1 (94.8%) and T2 (96.7%) ewes (p < 0.05). All lambs showed a significant and ewes-group independent increase in FEC before weaning (p < 0.05). Clinical parameters (anemia and diarrhea) showed time- and treatment-related differences (p < 0.05). Monitoring of FEC and clinical parameters linked to gastrointestinal parasite infections allowed demonstrating that postpartum or preweaning are two critical periods to nematode infection for sheep raised under tropical Andes high altitude conditions. Use of Mox as anthelmintic treatment prevented PPER. PMID:26078913

  19. Increased response to cadmium and Bacillus thuringiensis maize toxicity in the snail Helix aspersa infected by the nematode Phasmarhabditis hermaphrodita.

    PubMed

    Kramarz, Paulina E; de Vaufleury, Annette; Zygmunt, Piotr M S; Verdun, Cyrille

    2007-01-01

    To determine the effect of nematode infection on the response of snails to selected toxins, we infected Helix aspersa with 0-, 0.25-, 1-, or 4-fold the recommended field dose of a commercial nematode application for agricultural use. In the first experiment, the snails also were exposed to cadmium via food and soil at concentrations of 0, 30, 60, 120, or 240 mg/kg in a full-factorial design. In the second experiment, snails were infected with nematodes and also fed either Bt (expressing Bacillus thuringiensis toxin) maize or non-Bt maize. The snails were weighed at the beginning and end (after four weeks) of the experiments, and mortality was checked daily. Neither exposure of snails to nematodes nor exposure of snails to cadmium or Bt toxin affected the survival rates of snails. The number of dead snails was highest for combinations of nematode treatments with cadmium concentrations of 120 and 240 mg/kg. In both experiments (Bt and cadmium), the growth rate decreased with increasing nematode dose. The Bt maize was not harmful to the snails in the absence of nematodes, but infected snails grew faster when fed non-Bt maize. The growth rate of snails exposed to cadmium decreased with exposure to increasing Cd concentrations and differed significantly between the no-nematode treatment and the treatments with nematode doses of one- and fourfold the recommended field dose. Snails treated with the highest dose of nematodes accumulated the highest cadmium concentrations.

  20. Transcriptome analysis of resistant and susceptible alfalfa cultivars infected with root-knot nematode Meloidogyne incognita.

    PubMed

    Postnikova, Olga A; Hult, Maria; Shao, Jonathan; Skantar, Andrea; Nemchinov, Lev G

    2015-01-01

    Nematodes are one of the major limiting factors in alfalfa production. Root-knot nematodes (RKN, Meloidogyne spp.) are widely distributed and economically important sedentary endoparasites of agricultural crops and they may inflict significant damage to alfalfa fields. As of today, no studies have been published on global gene expression profiling in alfalfa infected with RKN or any other plant parasitic nematode. Very little information is available about molecular mechanisms that contribute to pathogenesis and defense responses in alfalfa against these pests and specifically against RKN. In this work, we performed root transcriptome analysis of resistant (cv. Moapa 69) and susceptible (cv. Lahontan) alfalfa cultivars infected with RKN Meloidogyne incognita, widespread root-knot nematode species and a major pest worldwide. A total of 1,701,622,580 pair-end reads were generated on an Illumina Hi-Seq 2000 platform from the roots of both cultivars and assembled into 45,595 and 47,590 transcripts in cvs Moapa 69 and Lahontan, respectively. Bioinformatic analysis revealed a number of common and unique genes that were differentially expressed in susceptible and resistant lines as a result of nematode infection. Although the susceptible cultivar showed a more pronounced defense response to the infection, feeding sites were successfully established in its roots. Characteristically, basal gene expression levels under normal conditions differed between the two cultivars as well, which may confer advantage to one of the genotypes toward resistance to nematodes. Differentially expressed genes were subsequently assigned to known Gene Ontology categories to predict their functional roles and associated biological processes. Real-time PCR validated expression changes in genes arbitrarily selected for experimental confirmation. Candidate genes that contribute to protection against M. incognita in alfalfa were proposed and alfalfa-nematode interactions with respect to resistance

  1. Use of pelleted sericea lespedeza (Lespedeza cuneata) for natural control of coccidia and gastrointestinal nematodes in weaned goats.

    PubMed

    Kommuru, D S; Barker, T; Desai, S; Burke, J M; Ramsay, A; Mueller-Harvey, I; Miller, J E; Mosjidis, J A; Kamisetti, N; Terrill, T H

    2014-08-29

    Infection with Eimeria spp. (coccidia) can be devastating in goats, particularly for young, recently-weaned kids, resulting in diarrhea, dehydration, and even death. Feeding dried sericea lespedeza [SL; Lespedeza cuneata (Dum.-Cours.) G. Don.] to young goats has been reported to reduce the effects of internal parasites, including gastrointestinal nematodes (GIN) but there have been no reports of the effects of feeding this forage on Eimeria spp. in goats. Two confinement feeding experiments were completed on recently-weaned intact bucks (24 Kiko-cross, Exp. 1; 20 Spanish, Exp. 2) to determine effects of SL pellets on an established infection of GIN and coccidia. The bucks were assigned to 1 of 2 (Exp. 1) or 3 (Exp. 2) treatment groups based upon the number of Eimeria spp. oocysts per gram (OPG) of feces. In Exp. 1, the kids were fed 1 of 2 pelleted rations ad libitum; 90% SL leaf meal+10% of a liquid molasses/lignin binder mix and a commercial pellet with 12% crude protein (CP) and 24% acid detergent fiber (n=12/treatment group, 2 animals/pen). For Exp. 2, treatment groups were fed (1) 90% SL leaf meal pellets from leaves stored 3 years (n=7), (2) 90% SL pellets from leaf meal stored less than 6 months, (n=7), and the commercial pellets (n=6) ad libitum. For both trials, fecal and blood samples were taken from individual animals every 7 days for 28 days to determine OPG and GIN eggs per gram (EPG) and packed cell volume (PCV), respectively. In Exp. 2, feces were scored for consistency (1=solid pellets, 5=slurry) as an indicator of coccidiosis. In Exp. 1, EPG (P<0.001) and OPG (P<0.01) were reduced by 78.7% and 96.9%, respectively, 7 days after initiation of feeding in goats on the SL pellet diet compared with animals fed the control pellets. The OPG and EPG remained lower in treatment than control animals until the end of the trial. In Exp. 2, goats fed new and old SL leaf meal pellets had 66.2% and 79.2% lower (P<0.05) EPG and 92.2% and 91.2% lower (P<0.05) OPG

  2. Ethanolic extracts of Inula viscosa, Salix alba and Quercus calliprinos, negatively affect the development of the entomopathogenic nematode, Heterorhabditis bacteriophora - A model to compare gastro-intestinal nematodes developmental effect.

    PubMed

    Santhi, Velayudhan Satheeja; Salame, Liora; Dvash, Levana; Muklada, Hussein; Azaizeh, Hassan; Mreny, Raghda; Awwad, Safaa; Markovics, Alex; Landau, Serge Yan; Glazer, Itamar

    2017-05-01

    Heterorhabditis bacteriophora can represent a model system for herbal medication against gastro-intestinal strongylid parasites in determining the recovery and development due to their unique parasitic infectious cycle. The fact that plant extracts impair nematode development is known but their differential impact on stages of the life cycle of H. bacteriophora has never been investigated. We examined the developmental stages resumed from eggs, young juveniles (J1-3), infective juveniles (IJs), young and adult hermaphrodites of H. bacteriophora upon exposure to crude ethanolic extracts of Inula viscosa, Salix alba, and Quercus calliprinos at concentrations of 600, 1200, and 2400ppm. Our results showed that plant extracts were highly toxic to the survival of the eggs and young juveniles J1 to J3 at all concentrations. The plant extracts inhibited their development and were associated with low reproduction parameters (i.e. fecundity and viability of eggs). The IJs, J4, young and developed hermaphrodites displayed concentration-dependent negative effect on development with less egg count, poor vulval muscle development, loss of egg laying capacity and progeny development by matricidal hatching. Plant extract of I. viscosa at low (600ppm) concentration did not impair vulval development. These results suggest that these plant extracts show potential for the control of parasitic rhabditids. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Use of fluorescent lectin binding to distinguish eggs of gastrointestinal nematode parasites of sheep.

    PubMed

    Umair, S; McMurtry, L W; Knight, J S; Simpson, H V

    2016-02-15

    The binding of a panel of 19 lectins to carbohydrates on the eggs of economically important nematode parasites of sheep has been assessed as the basis of a rapid test to distinguish parasite eggs, at least at the genus level. A total of six lectins can be used to identify eggs of six nematode parasites: peanut agglutinin (PNA) for Haemonchus contortus; Lens culinaris agglutinin (LCA) for Teladorsagia sp; Aleuria aurantia agglutinin (AAL) for Trichostrongylus sp; Psophocarpus tetragonolobus‑II (PTLII) for Nematodirus sp; Lotus tetragonolobus lectin (LTL) for Cooperia sp and wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) for Chabertia ovina. For WGA, LCA and LTL, weak binding was also observed to H. contortus and Teladorsagia sp, Trichostrongylus sp and C. ovina eggs, respectively. Nematode eggs in two faecal samples were identically identified by both lectin binding and PCR, except for PCR identification of the eggs of Nematodirus sp, as these did not lyse. Lectins bound best to H. contortus eggs extracted from fresh faecal samples or after storage at room temperature or 4 °C for up to 24 h, but eggs stored at -20 °C or -80 °C did not bind PNA. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Age-related prevalence, intensity and frequency distribution of gastrointestinal helminth infection in urban slum children from Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Bundy, D A; Kan, S P; Rose, R

    1988-01-01

    The gastrointestinal helminth infection status of 1574 children living in a slum area of Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia was assessed by quantitative coprology. Almost two-thirds were infected with Trichuris trichiura, 49.6% with Ascaris lumbricoides, and 5.3% with hookworm. Infection prevalence rose rapidly to a stable asymptote at 7 years of age, and the age-intensity profile was convex with maximal values in the 5-10 year age classes. This pattern was the same for males and females, but differed markedly between different ethnic groups. The frequency distributions of A. lumbricoides and T. trichiura were highly overdispersed (k values were 0.21 and 0.27, respectively), and age-dependent over the 0-8 year age classes. This suggests that the force of infection with these nematodes is lower in infants than in older children.

  5. Alveolar mastocytosis and eosinophilia in lambs with naturally acquired nematode infections of Protostrongylus rufescens and Haemonchus contortus.

    PubMed

    Mansfield, L S; Gamble, H R

    1995-12-01

    Specific-pathogen-free Dorset and St. Croix lambs were placed on pasture contaminated with Haemonchus contortus third stage larvae and slugs carrying third stage larvae of Protostrongylus rufescens for an entire grazing season to evaluate breed differences in acquired resistance to these nematodes. Lambs were evaluated for clinical signs, clinical pathology and histopathologic lesions associated with these infections. Both breeds acquired natural infections with H. contortus and lungworm when allowed to graze contaminated pastures for 5 months during the summer and fall in central Maryland. Dorset sheep maintained heavy abomasal worm burdens of H. contortus throughout the grazing period when compared to St. Croix breed sheep. Seven of 12 Dorset sheep and three of 12 St. Croix sheep on pasture acquired heavy lungworm infections after at least 15 weeks of exposure, as evidenced by shedding of first stage larvae in feces and numerous subpleural lung lesions containing adult P. rufescens found at necropsy. All lungworm infected animals had mild respiratory and gastrointestinal signs, and two of five Dorset sheep with both infections had chronic anemia. All lungworm and H. contortus infected Dorset sheep had decreased numbers of circulating white blood cells. There was mastocytosis in the lungs of lungworm infected Dorset and St. Croix sheep when compared to age- and breed-matched control sheep prevented from acquiring both lungworm and trichostrongyle infections. No difference was noted in the number of mast cells in the abomasum, duodenum and skin of infected and non-infected Dorset sheep. A morphologic range of mast cell forms was observed in the lungs of infected sheep including transitional cells and globular leukocytes. The number of eosinophils was significantly greater in the lungs but not in the abomasum of infected sheep. Despite the pronounced cellular infiltrates surrounding the adult lungworms, they were viable on recovery and appeared undamaged when

  6. Critical role of intestinal epithelial cell-derived IL-25 in enteric nematode infection-induced changes in intestinal function

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The current study investigated the mechanism of immune regulation of IL-25 and the contribution of IL-25 to nematode infection-induced alterations in intestinal smooth muscle and epithelial cell function. Mice were infected with an enteric nematode or injected with IL-25 or IL-13. In vitro smooth m...

  7. Molecular networks associated with host resistance to gastrointestional nematodes in cattle

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Parasitism by gastrointestinal nematodes is a disease severely affecting productivity in ruminants. To unravel mechanisms of host resistance to parasitic infection, we characterized the jejunal transcriptome of the cattle populations displaying resistance phenotypes in response to experimental Coope...

  8. Nematode-associated intramural alimentary nodules in pumas are histologically similar to gastrointestinal eosinophilic sclerosing fibroplasia of domestic cats.

    PubMed

    Eckstrand, C D; Barr, B C; Woods, L W; Spangler, T; Murphy, B

    2013-05-01

    Intramural alimentary nodules in the gastric pylorus and proximal duodenum are a common finding in free-ranging pumas (Puma concolor) in North America, and are often associated with the presence of an indwelling nematode (most commonly Cylicospirura spp.). This study compares the histological, histochemical and immunohistochemical appearance of three proximal gastrointestinal nodules in pumas with four cases of eosinophilic sclerosing fibroplasia in domestic cats. Histologically, the pattern of inflammation and repair was strikingly similar, consisting of lamillated anastomosing trabeculae of dense sclerotic collagen with interspersed inflammatory cells and reactive fibroblasts. The stromal trabeculae were histologically reminiscent of osteoid and were uniformly positive for collagenous protein by Masson's trichrome stain and negative for mineralized osteoid deposits with Von Kossa's stain. Trabecular cells expressed osteonectin, but not osteocalcin immunohistochemically. Collectively, these findings are most consistent with a stroma comprised of dense collagenous trabeculae that resembles, but is distinct, from osteoid. Both the puma and domestic cat lesions demonstrated an eosinophilic inflammatory component; however, eosinophils were present in small numbers in the puma nodules relative to the nodules in domestic cats. These entities likely represent a unique and stereotypic gastrointestinal repair response of felids, given their similar histological, histochemical and immunohistochemical profiles.

  9. A 12-month survey of gastrointestinal helminth infections of lemurs kept in two zoos in Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Rasambainarivo, Fidisoa T; Junge, Randall E

    2010-12-01

    Infections with gastrointestinal parasites may be a major threat to lemurs kept in captivity, as they are a common cause of diarrhea. In this study, fecal egg count patterns and clinical signs associated with gastrointestinal nematodes were assessed for 12 mo in 40 lemurs kept under different husbandry and climatic conditions at two sites in Madagascar. Involved species were black-and-white ruffed lemurs (Varecia variegata), eastern grey bamboo lemurs (Hapalemur griseus), greater bamboo lemurs (Prolemur simus), red-bellied lemurs (Eulemur rubriventer), common brown lemurs (Eulemurfulvus), crowned lemurs (Eulemur coronatus), and Sclater's black lemurs (Eulemur macaco flavifrons). At site 1 (Tsimbazaza Zoological Park), lemurs were kept in small enclosures with daily cleaning of the cement soiling and without routine anthelmintic program, whereas at site 2 (Ivoloina Zoological Park), lemurs received routine anthelmintic prophylaxis and were housed in small enclosure with daily cleaning of sandy soil enclosures. A total of five genera of nematode eggs from the orders Strongylida, Oxyurida, and Enoplida were recovered and identified from 198 out of 240 samples (83%) at site 1 and 79% (189 out of 240) at site 2 with the use of a modified McMaster technique. Significant differences were found for parasites from the order Strongylida between the two sites. The differences may be due to climate conditions and the presumed life cycle of these parasites. No significant differences were found for parasites from the other orders. No significant differences were noted between sexes or between seasons. No clinical signs of parasitic gastroenteritis were seen in either lemur collection.

  10. Piriformospora indica antagonizes cyst nematode infection and development in Arabidopsis roots

    PubMed Central

    Daneshkhah, R.; Cabello, S.; Rozanska, E.; Sobczak, M.; Grundler, F. M. W.; Wieczorek, K.; Hofmann, J.

    2013-01-01

    The beneficial endophytic fungus Piriformospora indica colonizes the roots of many plant species, including the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Its colonization promotes plant growth, development, and seed production as well as resistance to various biotic and abiotic stresses. In the present work, P. indica was tested as potential antagonist of the sedentary plant-parasitic nematode Heterodera schachtii. This biotrophic cyst-forming nematode induces severe host plant damage by changing the morphogenesis and physiology of infected roots. Here it is shown that P. indica colonization, as well as the application of fungal exudates and cell-wall extracts, significantly affects the vitality, infectivity, development, and reproduction of H. schachtii. PMID:23956413

  11. Enteric infections by trematodes and nematodes in Olrog's gull, Larus atlanticus.

    PubMed

    La Sala, Luciano F; Smits, Judit E; Martorelli, Sergio R

    2012-12-01

    Trematodes and nematodes can be pathogenic helminths of birds. Every year during the breeding season, there is variable mortality among chicks from the largest Olrog's gull (Larus atlanticus) colony in Argentina. During two consecutive breeding seasons of Olrog's gull, we studied epidemiological and pathological aspects of infections by digeneans (Microphallidae) and nematodes (Acuariidae) in Olrog's gull chicks. Prevalence of nematode infection was 80.3% in 2005 and 89.2% in 2006, and mean intensity was 23.7 in 2005 and 50.8 in 2006. The risk for infection rose 34.3% and the intensity of infection 6.7% for every increase of 1 mm in head-beak length. The nematodes occupied the proventricular glands and caused disruption of their structure and mild inflammatory proventriculitis. Prevalence of digenean infection was 97.0% in 2005 and 97.3% in 2006. In 10-day-old live chicks, prevalence was 98.0% in 2006 and 95.3% in 2007. Infection was associated with severe catarrhal enteritis, lymphocyte/eosinophil-rich inflammatory responses, extensive fibroblast proliferation around the parasites, and disruption of the architecture of the adjacent crypts.

  12. Bronchopulmonary nematode infection of Capra pyrenaica in the Sierra Nevada massif, Spain.

    PubMed

    Alasaad, S; Morrondo, P; Dacal-Rivas, V; Soriguer, R C; Granados, J E; Serrano, E; Zhu, X Q; Rossi, L; Pérez, J M

    2009-10-14

    The present investigation examined the prevalence and abundance of bronchopulmonary nematodes in 213 randomly hunted Iberian ibexes (Capra pyrenaica) (87 females and 126 males) in the Sierra Nevada mountain range in Spain between 2003 and 2006. Post mortem examination revealed an overall prevalence of 72% for adult nematodes (Cystocaulus ocreatus 44%, Muellerius capillaris 44%, Protostrongylus sp. 40%, and Dictyocaulus filaria 4%). The abundances were 13.45+/-3.97, 5.18+/-2.49, 6.36+/-2.16, and 2.27+/-0.46, respectively. Protostrongylid adults showed similar infection rates, which were statistically different from that of D. filaria. 20% of the examined Iberian ibexes were infected by three protostrongylid nematodes species, 24% of C. pyrenaica were affected by two protostrongylid species, while infestations with only one protostrongylid species were detected in 20% of the examined animals. The overall prevalence of larvae nematodes in the examined animals was 100%, and the overall abundance (number of the first stage larvae per gram) was 86.45+/-20.63. There was a high correlation between the two sets of data (adults and larvae). Results of the present investigation provided foundation for the effective control of bronchopulmonary nematode infection in Iberian ibex.

  13. Therapeutic efficacy of eprinomectin extended-release injection against induced infections of developing (fourth-stage larvae) and adult nematode parasites of cattle.

    PubMed

    Rehbein, S; Baggott, D G; Royer, G C; Yoon, S; Cramer, L G; Soll, M D

    2013-03-01

    The therapeutic efficacy of eprinomectin in an extended-release injection (ERI) formulation was evaluated against induced infections of developing fourth-stage larval or adult gastrointestinal and pulmonary nematodes of cattle in a series of six studies under two identical protocols (three each for developing fourth-stage larvae or adults) conducted in the USA, Germany or the UK (two studies at each location, one per stage). Each study initially included 16 nematode-free cattle. The cattle were of various breeds or crosses, weighed 109-186.5 kg prior to treatment, and were approximately 4-7 months old. The animals were blocked based on pre-treatment bodyweight and then randomly allocated to treatment: eprinomectin ERI vehicle (control) at 1 mL/50 kg body weight or eprinomectin 5% ERI at 1 mL/50 kg bodyweight (1.0 mg eprinomectin/kg) for a total of eight and eight animals in each group. Treatments were administered once on Day 0 by subcutaneous injection in front of the shoulder. In each study, cattle were infected with a combination of infective third-stage larvae or eggs of gastrointestinal and pulmonary nematodes. Inoculation was scheduled so that the nematodes were expected to be fourth-stage larvae or adults at the time of treatment. For parasite recovery, all study animals were humanely euthanized and necropsied 14-15 (adult infections) or 21-22 days after treatment (developing fourth-stage larval infections). When compared with the vehicle-treated control counts, efficacy of eprinomectin ERI against developing fourth-stage larvae and adults was ≥98% (p<0.05) for the following nematodes: Dictyocaulus viviparus, Bunostomum phlebotomum, Cooperia curticei, C. oncophora, C. surnabada, C. punctata, Haemonchus contortus, H. placei, Nematodirus helvetianus, Oesophagostomum radiatum, Oes. venulosum, Ostertagia leptospicularis, O. ostertagi, O. circumcincta, O. pinnata, O. trifurcata (developing fourth-stage larval infections only), Strongyloides papillosus

  14. Effects of farm management practices and environmental factors on bulk tank milk antibodies against gastrointestinal nematodes in dairy farms across Canada.

    PubMed

    Vanderstichel, Raphaël; Dohoo, Ian; Sanchez, Javier; Conboy, Gary

    2012-04-01

    Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) have been used as a diagnostic tool to quantify levels of gastrointestinal nematodes in dairy cattle by measuring Ostertagia ostertagi antibodies in milk. Higher levels of O. ostertagi antibodies measured by ELISA methods, referred to as optical density ratios (ODRs), are associated with decreased milk production in dairy cattle. On-farm management practices (e.g. pasturing techniques and anthelmintic usage) can influence the exposure of cattle to nematode infections and the magnitude of acquired worm burdens. Additionally, environmental and climatic factors, such as land elevation and precipitation, may also influence the levels of gastrointestinal parasitism. This repeated cross-sectional study investigated the effect of farm management practices and surrounding environmental factors on bulk tank (BT) ODRs in herds from provinces across Canada, and further examined the potential effects of various anthelmintic treatment protocols on BT ODRs. A total of 195 herds contributed an average of 3.5 BT samples between December 2003 and April 2005. The farm management practices were recorded from a questionnaire asking producers about their pasturing methods (confined, pastured, etc.), pasture sharing practices (e.g. mixing heifers with milking cows) and anthelmintic treatments. Environmental data were downloaded online from various governmental databases (e.g. Natural Resources Canada, Statistics Canada, Environment Canada, etc.). Statistical models, accounting for repeated measures (multiple BT ODRs for each farm) and for clustering of farms within a region (province or ecoregion), were used to analyze environmental and farm management data. Overall, the greater the exposure that heifers and milking cows had to pasture, the higher the levels of anti-parasite antibodies detected in BT samples. Treating the entire herd or treating milking cows at calving reduced BT ODR values. Farms in areas with higher number of rainy days

  15. Microbiomes associated with infective stages of root-knot and lesion nematodes in soil.

    PubMed

    Elhady, Ahmed; Giné, Ariadna; Topalovic, Olivera; Jacquiod, Samuel; Sørensen, Søren J; Sorribas, Francisco Javier; Heuer, Holger

    2017-01-01

    Endoparasitic root-knot (Meloidogyne spp.) and lesion (Pratylenchus spp.) nematodes cause considerable damage in agriculture. Before they invade roots to complete their life cycle, soil microbes can attach to their cuticle or surface coat and antagonize the nematode directly or by induction of host plant defenses. We investigated whether the nematode-associated microbiome in soil differs between infective stages of Meloidogyne incognita and Pratylenchus penetrans, and whether it is affected by variation in the composition of microbial communities among soils. Nematodes were incubated in suspensions of five organically and two integrated horticultural production soils, recovered by sieving and analyzed for attached bacteria and fungi after washing off loosely adhering microbes. Significant effects of the soil type and nematode species on nematode-associated fungi and bacteria were revealed as analyzed by community profiling using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. Attached microbes represented a small specific subset of the soil microbiome. Two organic soils had very similar bacterial and fungal community profiles, but one of them was strongly suppressive towards root-knot nematodes. They were selected for deep amplicon sequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA genes and fungal ITS. Significant differences among the microbiomes associated with the two species in both soils suggested specific surface epitopes. Among the 28 detected bacterial classes, Betaproteobacteria, Bacilli and Actinobacteria were the most abundant. The most frequently detected fungal genera were Malassezia, Aspergillus and Cladosporium. Attached microbiomes did not statistically differ between these two soils. However, Malassezia globosa and four fungal species of the family Plectosphaerellaceae, and the bacterium Neorhizobium galegae were strongly enriched on M. incognita in the suppressive soil. In conclusion, the highly specific attachment of microbes to infective stages of phytonematodes in

  16. Microbiomes associated with infective stages of root-knot and lesion nematodes in soil

    PubMed Central

    Elhady, Ahmed; Giné, Ariadna; Topalovic, Olivera; Jacquiod, Samuel; Sørensen, Søren J.; Sorribas, Francisco Javier

    2017-01-01

    Endoparasitic root-knot (Meloidogyne spp.) and lesion (Pratylenchus spp.) nematodes cause considerable damage in agriculture. Before they invade roots to complete their life cycle, soil microbes can attach to their cuticle or surface coat and antagonize the nematode directly or by induction of host plant defenses. We investigated whether the nematode-associated microbiome in soil differs between infective stages of Meloidogyne incognita and Pratylenchus penetrans, and whether it is affected by variation in the composition of microbial communities among soils. Nematodes were incubated in suspensions of five organically and two integrated horticultural production soils, recovered by sieving and analyzed for attached bacteria and fungi after washing off loosely adhering microbes. Significant effects of the soil type and nematode species on nematode-associated fungi and bacteria were revealed as analyzed by community profiling using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. Attached microbes represented a small specific subset of the soil microbiome. Two organic soils had very similar bacterial and fungal community profiles, but one of them was strongly suppressive towards root-knot nematodes. They were selected for deep amplicon sequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA genes and fungal ITS. Significant differences among the microbiomes associated with the two species in both soils suggested specific surface epitopes. Among the 28 detected bacterial classes, Betaproteobacteria, Bacilli and Actinobacteria were the most abundant. The most frequently detected fungal genera were Malassezia, Aspergillus and Cladosporium. Attached microbiomes did not statistically differ between these two soils. However, Malassezia globosa and four fungal species of the family Plectosphaerellaceae, and the bacterium Neorhizobium galegae were strongly enriched on M. incognita in the suppressive soil. In conclusion, the highly specific attachment of microbes to infective stages of phytonematodes in

  17. Prebiotics and resistance to gastrointestinal infections.

    PubMed

    Gibson, G R; McCartney, A L; Rastall, R A

    2005-04-01

    Acute gut disorder is a cause for significant medicinal and economic concern. Certain individual pathogens of the gut, often transmitted in food or water, have the ability to cause severe discomfort. There is a need to manage such conditions more effectively. The route of reducing the risk of intestinal infections through diet remains largely unexplored. Antibiotics are effective at inhibiting pathogens; however, these should not be prescribed in the absence of disease and therefore cannot be used prophylactically. Moreover, their indiscriminate use has reduced effectiveness. Evidence has accumulated to suggest that some of the health-promoting bacteria in the gut (probiotics) can elicit a multiplicity of inhibitory effects against pathogens. Hence, an increase in their numbers should prove effective at repressing pathogen colonisation if/when infectious agents enter the gut. As such, fortification of indigenous bifidobacteria/lactobacilli by using prebiotics should improve protection. There are a number of potential mechanisms for lactic acid bacteria to reduce intestinal infections. Firstly, metabolic endproducts such as acids excreted by these micro-organisms may lower the gut pH to levels below those at which pathogens are able to effectively compete. Also, many lactobacilli and bifidobacteria species are able to excrete natural antibiotics, which can have a broad spectrum of activity. Other mechanisms include an improved immune stimulation, competition for nutrients and blocking of pathogen adhesion sites in the gut. Many intestinal pathogens like type 1 fimbriated Escherichia coli, salmonellae and campylobacters utilise oligosaccharide receptor sites in the gut. Once established, they can then cause gastroenteritis through invasive and/or toxin forming properties. One extrapolation of the prebiotic concept is to simulate such receptor sites in the gut lumen. Hence, the pathogen is 'decoyed' into not binding at the host mucosal interface. The combined effects

  18. Prevalence and distribution of gastrointestinal nematodes on 32 organic and conventional commercial sheep farms in Ontario and Quebec, Canada (2006-2008).

    PubMed

    Mederos, A; Fernández, S; VanLeeuwen, J; Peregrine, A S; Kelton, D; Menzies, P; LeBoeuf, A; Martin, R

    2010-06-24

    In order to characterize the epidemiology of sheep gastrointestinal nematodes in organic and conventional flocks in Canada, a longitudinal study was carried out from May 2006 to March 2008 on 32 purposively selected farms in Ontario (ON) and Quebec (QC): 8 certified organic (CO), 16 non-certified organic (NCO), and 8 conventional (C) farms. On each farm, 10 ewes and 10 female lambs were selected. Farm visits were undertaken monthly during the grazing season, and twice in the winter. At each visit, individual fecal samples were taken, and pasture samples were obtained during the grazing season. In addition, body condition score was recorded for all sheep. Fecal egg counts per gram of feces (EPGs) were determined for all fecal samples, and infective larvae (L(3)) were identified in fecal samples (lambs and ewes separately) and pasture samples from farms. Necropsies of 14 lambs from 7 of the 23 Ontario farms were performed at the end of the grazing season in 2006. The mean EPG for year 1 (May 2006 to March 2007) was 181 (range=0-9840) and 351 (range=0-18,940) for the ewes in ON and QC, respectively, and for the lambs was 509 (range=0-25,020) and 147 (range=0-3060) for ON and QC, respectively. During year 2 (April 2007 to March 2008), the mean EPG was 303 (range=0-21,160) and 512 (range=0-22,340) for the ewes in ON and QC, respectively, and for lambs was 460 (range=0-26,180) and 232 (range=0-8280) for ON and QC, respectively. Although the overall mean EPGs were not remarkably high, there were months of higher EPG such as May-June for ewes and July-August for lambs in both provinces. Pasture infectivity was highest in May-June and September. There was a general trend for the CO farms to have lower mean EPG than NCO and C farms. Fecal cultures demonstrated that the most predominant nematode genera were Teladorsagia sp., Haemonchus sp. and Trichostrongylus spp. Pasture infectivity was highest during June-July (984 L3/kg DM) in ON farms and September (mean=436 L3/kg DM) in

  19. [Widespread gastrointestinal CMV infection as the presenting manifestation of AIDS].

    PubMed

    Dayan, K; Neufeld, D M; Lang, R; Novis, B; Bernheim, J; Freund, U

    1993-02-01

    A 53-year-old man is reported who developed a widespread gastrointestinal infection due to cytomegalic (CMV) virus and was found to be suffering from AIDS. He died of overwhelming pulmonary infection. There is need for awareness of the rapid increase of AIDS in our local population, particularly in groups not regarded as at high risk. It is imperative to keep this diagnosis in mind when dealing with patients with gastroenterocolitis not responding to standard treatments. CMV has a broad spectrum of clinical manifestations, from carrier state to life-threatening infection. In the gastrointestinal system it causes inflammation and ulcers in the mucosa that may bleed or perforate. There are increasing numbers of reports of CMV ileocolitis in homosexuals with AIDS. The rate of sero-positive CMV in healthy homosexual populations is 94-100% and in 14% there is active infection. CMV is the main infective agent in patients suffering from AIDS; 90% will develop an infection with this virus and in most cases it will be fatal.

  20. Human Pulmonary Infection by the Zoonotic Metastrongylus salmi Nematode. The First Reported Case in the Americas.

    PubMed

    Calvopina, Manuel; Caballero, Henry; Morita, Tatsushi; Korenaga, Masataka

    2016-10-05

    Pulmonary metastrongylosis, a zoonotic disease found primarily in pigs, is caused by eight different species of the cosmopolitan nematode Metastrongylus genus. To date, only four human cases have been reported, all from Europe. Herein, a severe case of pulmonary infection caused by Metastrongylus salmi in an Ecuadorian man, with successful treatment with ivermectin, is described. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  1. Mechanized Packing and Delivery System for Entomopathogenic Nematodes in Infected Mealworm Cadavers

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This document describes a mechanized system to pack mealworm (Tenebrio molitor) cadavers infected with entomopathogenic nematodes between two sheets of masking tape. The document is also an operation manual for the machine and provides all the machine specifications, and wiring and pneumatic diagram...

  2. Human Pulmonary Infection by the Zoonotic Metastrongylus salmi Nematode. The First Reported Case in the Americas

    PubMed Central

    Calvopina, Manuel; Caballero, Henry; Morita, Tatsushi; Korenaga, Masataka

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary metastrongylosis, a zoonotic disease found primarily in pigs, is caused by eight different species of the cosmopolitan nematode Metastrongylus genus. To date, only four human cases have been reported, all from Europe. Herein, a severe case of pulmonary infection caused by Metastrongylus salmi in an Ecuadorian man, with successful treatment with ivermectin, is described. PMID:27382078

  3. First description of gastrointestinal nematodes of Barbary sheep (Ammotragus lervia): the case of Camelostrongylus mentulatus as a paradigm of phylogenic and specific relationship between the parasite and its ancient host.

    PubMed

    Mayo, E; Ortiz, J; Martínez-Carrasco, C; Garijo, M M; Espeso, G; Hervías, S; Ruiz de Ybáñez, M R

    2013-09-01

    The gastrointestinal helminth fauna of 24 Barbary sheep or Aoudad (Ammotragus lervia sahariensis) maintained in the Parque de Rescate de la Fauna Sahariana (PRFS, CSIC, Almeria, Spain) was analyzed. Most animals (87.5 %) were parasitized, and multiple infections were highly present. The following species were identified: Camelostrongylus mentulatus, Teladorsagia circumcincta, Marshallagia marshalli, Ostertagia ostertagi, O. leptospicularis, O. lyrata, Haemonchus contortus, Teladorsagia trifurcata, Trichostrongylus vitrinus, T. colubriformis, T. probolorus, T. capricola, Nematodirus spathiger, N. abnormalis, N. filicollis, N. helvetianus, Trichuris spp. and Skrjabinema ovis. Teladorsagia circumcincta was the most prevalent nematode in abomasum (52.6 %) followed by C. mentulatus (50 %). However, this latter nematode had the greater mean intensity and abundance. In the small intestine, T. colubriformis and T. vitrinus had the highest prevalence (36.4 %); the last one showed also the greater mean intensity and abundance. It should be emphasized the presence of Skrjabinema ovis (prevalence 39.1 %) in the large intestine, showing the greater mean abundance and intensity, although with a low values. Camelostrongylus mentulatus could be the most primitive nematode of the family trichostrongylidae recovered in this study; attending to its high prevalence, mean abundance and mean intensity, the possible specificity between this parasite and the Aoudad is discussed.

  4. Ruminant self-medication against gastrointestinal nematodes: evidence, mechanism, and origins☆

    PubMed Central

    Villalba, Juan J.; Miller, James; Ungar, Eugene D.; Landau, Serge Y.; Glendinning, John

    2014-01-01

    Gastrointestinal helminths challenge ruminants in ways that reduce their fitness. In turn, ruminants have evolved physiological and behavioral adaptations that counteract this challenge. Ruminants display anorexia and avoidance behaviors, which tend to reduce the incidence of parasitism. In addition, ruminants appear to learn to self-medicate against gastrointestinal parasites by increasing consumption of plant secondary compounds with antiparasitic actions. This selective feeding improves health and fitness. Here, we review the evidence for self-medication in ruminants, propose a hypothesis to explain self-medicative behaviors (based on post-ingestive consequences), and discuss mechanisms (e.g., enhanced neophilia, social transmission) that may underlie the ontogeny and spread of self-medicative behaviors in social groups. A better understanding of the mechanisms that underlie and trigger self-medication in parasitized animals will help scientists devise innovative and more sustainable management strategies for improving ruminant health and well-being. PMID:24971486

  5. Ruminant self-medication against gastrointestinal nematodes: evidence, mechanism, and origins.

    PubMed

    Villalba, Juan J; Miller, James; Ungar, Eugene D; Landau, Serge Y; Glendinning, John

    2014-01-01

    Gastrointestinal helminths challenge ruminants in ways that reduce their fitness. In turn, ruminants have evolved physiological and behavioral adaptations that counteract this challenge. Ruminants display anorexia and avoidance behaviors, which tend to reduce the incidence of parasitism. In addition, ruminants appear to learn to self-medicate against gastrointestinal parasites by increasing consumption of plant secondary compounds with antiparasitic actions. This selective feeding improves health and fitness. Here, we review the evidence for self-medication in ruminants, propose a hypothesis to explain self-medicative behaviors (based on post-ingestive consequences), and discuss mechanisms (e.g., enhanced neophilia, social transmission) that may underlie the ontogeny and spread of self-medicative behaviors in social groups. A better understanding of the mechanisms that underlie and trigger self-medication in parasitized animals will help scientists devise innovative and more sustainable management strategies for improving ruminant health and well-being.

  6. Development of functional gastrointestinal disorders after Giardia lamblia infection

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGID) may occur following acute gastroenteritis. This long-term complication has previously not been described after infection with the non-invasive protozoan Giardia lamblia. This study aims to characterize persistent abdominal symptoms elicited by Giardia infection according to Rome II criteria and symptoms scores. Methods Structured interview and questionnaires 12–30 months after the onset of Giardia infection, and at least 6 months after Giardia eradication, among 82 patients with persisting abdominal symptoms elicited by the Giardia infection. All had been evaluated to exclude other causes. Results We found that 66 (80.5%) of the 82 patients had symptoms consistent with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and 17 (24.3%) patients had functional dyspepsia (FD) according to Rome II criteria. IBS was sub classified into D-IBS (47.0%), A-IBS (45.5%) and C-IBS (7.6%). Bloating, diarrhoea and abdominal pain were reported to be most severe. Symptoms exacerbation related to specific foods were reported by 45 (57.7%) patients and to physical or mental stress by 34 (44.7%) patients. Conclusion In the presence of an IBS-subtype pattern consistent with post-infectious IBS (PI-IBS), and in the absence of any other plausible causes, we conclude that acute Giardia infection may elicit functional gastrointestinal diseases with food and stress related symptoms similar to FGID patients in general. PMID:19383162

  7. Transmission of Infection by Flexible Gastrointestinal Endoscopy and Bronchoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Frans T. M.; van der Mei, Henny C.; Degener, John E.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Flexible endoscopy is a widely used diagnostic and therapeutic procedure. Contaminated endoscopes are the medical devices frequently associated with outbreaks of health care-associated infections. Accurate reprocessing of flexible endoscopes involves cleaning and high-level disinfection followed by rinsing and drying before storage. Most contemporary flexible endoscopes cannot be heat sterilized and are designed with multiple channels, which are difficult to clean and disinfect. The ability of bacteria to form biofilms on the inner channel surfaces can contribute to failure of the decontamination process. Implementation of microbiological surveillance of endoscope reprocessing is appropriate to detect early colonization and biofilm formation in the endoscope and to prevent contamination and infection in patients after endoscopic procedures. This review presents an overview of the infections and cross-contaminations related to flexible gastrointestinal endoscopy and bronchoscopy and illustrates the impact of biofilm on endoscope reprocessing and postendoscopic infection. PMID:23554415

  8. Effects of Soil Textures on Infectivity of Root-Knot Nematodes on Carrot

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eunji; Seo, Yunhee; Kim, Yong Su; Park, Yong; Kim, Young Ho

    2017-01-01

    This study was conducted to examine infectivity (penetration and gall and egg-mass formations) of the root-knot nematodes, Meloidogyne incognita and M. hapla, on carrots grown in soil conditions of 5 different soil textures consisting of bed-soil (b) and sand (s) mixtures (b-s mixtures) at the ratios of 10:0, 7:3, 5:5, 3:7, and 0:10. For M. incognita, the nematode penetration rates in b-s of 0:10 (100% sand) were significantly higher than in the other b-s mixtures, more greatly at 2 and 5 days after inoculation than at 10 DAI, while no significant differences in the penetration rates were mostly shown for M. hapla at the above DAI. However, for both nematodes, gall and egg-mass formations were remarkably increased in the b-s mixture of 0:10, compared to the other b-s mixtures, which is coincided with the general aspects of severe nematode infestations in sandy soils. This suggests the increased gall and egg-mass formations of M. incognita should be derived from the increased penetration rates in the sandy soil conditions, which provide a sufficient aeration due to coarse soil nature for the nematodes, leading to their mobility increased for the enhanced root penetration. For M. hapla, it is suggested that the sandy soil conditions affect positively on the healthy plant growth with little accumulation of the inhibitory materials and sufficient aeration, enhancing the nematode growth and feeding activities. All of these aspects provide information reliable for the development screening techniques efficient for the evaluation of the nematode resistance in the breeding programs. PMID:28167889

  9. Biochemical changes in grape rootstocks resulted from humic acid treatments in relation to nematode infection

    PubMed Central

    Kesba, Hosny H; El-Beltagi, Hossam S

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of humic acid on nematode infected, resistant and susceptible grapes in relation to lipid peroxidation and antioxidant mechanisms on selected biochemical parameters known as proactive substances. Methods The grape rootstocks, superior, superior/freedom and freedom were reacted differently to Meloidogyne incognita and Rotylenchulus reniformis according to rootstock progenitor. Two weeks after inoculation, two commercial products of humic acid were applied at the rate of (2, 4 mL or grams/plant) as soil drench. After 4 months, nematode soil populations were extracted and counted. A subsample of roots from each plant was stained and gall numbers, embedded stages per root were calculated, final population, nematode build up (Pf/Pi), average of eggs/eggmass were estimated. Subsamples of fresh root of each treatment were chemically analyzed. Results Freedom reduced significantly the nematode criteria and build up. Humic acid granules appeared to be more suppressive to nematode build up on superior and the higher dose on superior/freedom than liquid treatments. On freedom, all treatments reduced significantly the nematode build up regardless to the material nature. The higher dose was more effective than the lower one. As a result of humic acid applications, the malondialdehyde (MDA) and H2O2 contents were significantly reduced after humic acid treatments while the antioxidant compounds glutathione (GSH), ascorbic acid (ASA) and total phenol contents were significantly increased when compared with check. Antioxidant defense enzymes ascorbate peroxidase (APX), superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and polyphenol oxidase (PPO)showed significant increase in their specific activities in treated plants compared with nematode treated check. Conclusions Humic acid treatments improve the yield of grape by increasing the contents of antioxidant compounds and the specific activities of antioxidant enzymes. PMID:23569915

  10. Biochemical changes in grape rootstocks resulted from humic acid treatments in relation to nematode infection.

    PubMed

    Kesba, Hosny H; El-Beltagi, Hossam S

    2012-04-01

    To investigate the effect of humic acid on nematode infected, resistant and susceptible grapes in relation to lipid peroxidation and antioxidant mechanisms on selected biochemical parameters known as proactive substances. The grape rootstocks, superior, superior/freedom and freedom were reacted differently to Meloidogyne incognita and Rotylenchulus reniformis according to rootstock progenitor. Two weeks after inoculation, two commercial products of humic acid were applied at the rate of (2, 4 mL or grams/plant) as soil drench. After 4 months, nematode soil populations were extracted and counted. A subsample of roots from each plant was stained and gall numbers, embedded stages per root were calculated, final population, nematode build up (Pf/Pi), average of eggs/eggmass were estimated. Subsamples of fresh root of each treatment were chemically analyzed. Freedom reduced significantly the nematode criteria and build up. Humic acid granules appeared to be more suppressive to nematode build up on superior and the higher dose on superior/freedom than liquid treatments. On freedom, all treatments reduced significantly the nematode build up regardless to the material nature. The higher dose was more effective than the lower one. As a result of humic acid applications, the malondialdehyde (MDA) and H2O2 contents were significantly reduced after humic acid treatments while the antioxidant compounds glutathione (GSH), ascorbic acid (ASA) and total phenol contents were significantly increased when compared with check. Antioxidant defense enzymes ascorbate peroxidase (APX), superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and polyphenol oxidase (PPO)showed significant increase in their specific activities in treated plants compared with nematode treated check. Humic acid treatments improve the yield of grape by increasing the contents of antioxidant compounds and the specific activities of antioxidant enzymes.

  11. End-season daily weight gains as rationale for targeted selective treatment against gastrointestinal nematodes in highly exposed first-grazing season cattle.

    PubMed

    Merlin, Aurélie; Chauvin, Alain; Lehebel, Anne; Brisseau, Nadine; Froger, Sébastien; Bareille, Nathalie; Chartier, Christophe

    2017-03-01

    A two-year study was carried out to assess the feasibility of a targeted selective treatment to control gastrointestinal nematodes (GIN) in 24 groups of first grazing season (FGS) cattle. A two-step procedure aiming at defining exposure risk at group level and at identifying the most infected individuals within groups through measurement of the average daily weight gain (ADWG) at housing was used. The first step was to define retrospectively, by grazing management practices (GMP) indicators, two levels of groups' exposure to GIN determined by anti O. ostertagi antibody ODR level (cut-off 0.7). For the low level of exposure, no relationship between parasitological parameters and heifer growth was seen, whereas for the high level ADWG was negatively correlated with increasing Ostertagia ODR values. The best classification was obtained with an expert system modelling the number of Ostertagia L3 generations on plots. GMP input for the expert system included standard data (turnout/housing data and supplementary feeding amount) combined with paddock rotation planning and monthly temperatures. The threshold of 3 successive generations of L3 or more on plots allowed identifying the groups according to low or high infection exposure level, except two groups that were misidentified as being highly exposed. In the second step, individual ADWG was found to be negatively associated with Ostertagia ODR in heifers from groups classified as highly exposed (≥3 generations of L3). In these groups, sensitivity and specificity of ADWG thresholds were calculated for several individual Ostertagia ODR thresholds. The best compromise between sensitivity (i.e., correctly treating the heifers that need to be treated) and specificity (i.e., not treating animals that should not be treated) was equivalent respectively to 76% and 56% (AUC≈0.7) and was reached using an end-season ADWG threshold of 683g/day to detect animals exhibiting an Ostertagia ODR cut-off at 0.93. Other ADWG thresholds

  12. Genomic regions showing copy number variations associate with resistance or susceptibility to gastrointestinal nematodes in Angus cattle.

    PubMed

    Hou, Yali; Liu, George E; Bickhart, Derek M; Matukumalli, Lakshmi K; Li, Congjun; Song, Jiuzhou; Gasbarre, Louis C; Van Tassell, Curtis P; Sonstegard, Tad S

    2012-03-01

    Genomic structural variation is an important and abundant source of genetic and phenotypic variation. We previously reported an initial analysis of copy number variations (CNVs) in Angus cattle selected for resistance or susceptibility to gastrointestinal nematodes. In this study, we performed a large-scale analysis of CNVs using SNP genotyping data from 472 animals of the same population. We detected 811 candidate CNV regions, which represent 141.8 Mb (~4.7%) of the genome. To investigate the functional impacts of CNVs, we created 2 groups of 100 individual animals with extremely low or high estimated breeding values of eggs per gram of feces and referred to these groups as parasite resistant (PR) or parasite susceptible (PS), respectively. We identified 297 (~51 Mb) and 282 (~48 Mb) CNV regions from PR and PS groups, respectively. Approximately 60% of the CNV regions were specific to the PS group or PR group of animals. Selected PR- or PS-specific CNVs were further experimentally validated by quantitative PCR. A total of 297 PR CNV regions overlapped with 437 Ensembl genes enriched in immunity and defense, like WC1 gene which uniquely expresses on gamma/delta T cells in cattle. Network analyses indicated that the PR-specific genes were predominantly involved in gastrointestinal disease, immunological disease, inflammatory response, cell-to-cell signaling and interaction, lymphoid tissue development, and cell death. By contrast, the 282 PS CNV regions contained 473 Ensembl genes which are overrepresented in environmental interactions. Network analyses indicated that the PS-specific genes were particularly enriched for inflammatory response, immune cell trafficking, metabolic disease, cell cycle, and cellular organization and movement.

  13. First report of a mermithid nematode infecting the invasive Megacopta cribraria (Hemiptera: Plataspidae) in the United States.

    PubMed

    Stubbins, F L; Agudelo, P; Reay-Jones, F P F; Greene, J K

    2015-05-01

    Megacopta cribraria (Hemiptera: Plataspidae) has become a pest of soybean, Glycine max (L.), in the United States. While several natural enemies of M. cribraria have been reported, our study is the first to report nematodes beneath the pleural membranes in the abdominal cavities of adults. Morphological and molecular analyses suggest this nematode belongs to the family Mermithidae. This first report of a nematode infection in M. cribraria adds to the current inventory of enemies attacking this insect. Our observations provide a basis for future research to examine the impact of nematodes on M. cribraria mortality and to investigate their capacity to reduce populations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Establishment of gastro-intestinal helminth infections in free-range chickens: a longitudinal on farm study.

    PubMed

    Wongrak, Kalyakorn; Daş, Gürbüz; Moors, Eva; Sohnrey, Birgit; Gauly, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to monitor establishment and development of gastro-intestinal helminth infections in chickens over two production years (PY) on a free-range farm in Lower Saxony, Germany. The data were collected between July 2010 and June 2011 (PY1) and July 2011 and January 2013 (PY2), respectively. During PY1, Lohmann Brown classic (LB classic, N = 450) was tested, while in PY2 two different genotypes (230 LB classic, 230 LB plus) were used. The hens were kept in two mobile stalls that were moved to a new position at regular intervals. In both PY1 and PY2, 20 individual faecal samples per stall were randomly collected at monthly intervals in order to calculate the number of internal parasite eggs per gram of faeces (EPG). At the end of the laying periods, approximately 10% (N = 42) or more than 50% (N = 265) of hens were subjected to post-mortem parasitological examinations in PY1 and PY2, respectively. No parasite eggs were found in the faecal samples during PY1, whereas almost all of the hens (97.6%) were infected with Heterakis gallinarum (36 worms/hen) at the end of the period. In PY2, nematode eggs in faeces were found from the third month onwards at a low level, increasing considerably towards the final three months. There was no significant difference between the two genotypes of brown hens neither for EPG (P = 0.456) or for overall prevalence (P = 0.177). Mortality rate ranged from 18.3 to 27.4% but did not differ significantly between genotypes or production years. Average worm burden was 207 worms/hen in PY2. The most prevalent species were H. gallinarum (98.5%) followed by Ascaridia galli (96.2%) and Capillaria spp. (86.1%). Furthermore, three Capillaria species, C. obsignata, C. bursata and C. caudinflata were differentiated. In conclusion chickens kept on free-range farms are exposed to high risks of nematode infections and have high mortality rates with no obvious link to parasite infections. Once the farm environment is contaminated

  15. Anthelmintics for the control of nematode infections in the brushtail possum (Trichosurus vulpecula).

    PubMed

    Ralston, M J; Stankiewicz, M; Heath, D D

    2001-04-01

    To determine the efficacy of eprinomectin, doramectin and a combination of albendazole and levamisole in suppressing or eliminating nematode infections or faecal egg counts (FEC) in possums naturally or experimentally infected with Parastrongyloides trichosuri, Paraustrostrongylus trichosuri and Trichostrongylus colubriformis. To establish an effective dose of eprinomectin, groups of naturally infected possums were treated with 0, 0.5, 2.5, 5.0 or 7.5 mg/kg liveweight (LW) eprinomectin pour-on (n=6 possums/group) and changes in FEC and nematode worm counts at necropsy determined, 18 days later. Efficacy of the 7.5 mg/kg dose was re-examined in a second group of naturally infected possums (n=12) by monitoring FEC weekly for 28 days post-treatment. Persistence of the anthelmintic effect of doramectin injection was tested using nematode-free possums treated with 0, 0.2, 0.4, 0.6 or 0.8 mg/kg LW (n=3 possums/ group), which were experimentally infected 14 days later with T. colubriformis, Paraustrostrongylus trichosuri and Parastrongyloides trichosuri infective larvae. Response to treatment was assessed by FEC and nematode worm counts at necropsy, 42 days posttreatment. Efficacy of a 1.0 mg/kg dose of doramectin was subsequently examined using naturally infected possums (n=11) by monitoring FEC weekly for 28 days post-treatment. To determine the efficacy of a levamisole-albendazole combination drench, possums with naturally acquired nematode infections (n=6) were treated orally with 37.5 mg/kg LW levamisole plus 23.75 mg/kg LW albendazole on 2 occasions, 7 days apart, and response to treatment was assessed by monitoring FEC for 57 days. Eprinomectin 7.5 mg/kg LW reduced Paraustrostrongylus trichosuri worm counts by 98 % (p<0.05). Doramectin 0.6 mg/kg LW reduced Parastrongyloides trichosuri and Trichostrongylus spp worm counts by 99% (p<0.05) and 0.8 mg/kg LW reduced Paraustrostrongylus trichosuri by 100% (p<0.05), in possums challenged with larvae 14 days after

  16. The steppe species of gastrointestinal nematodes of small ruminants, with a focus on Marshallagia: climate as a key determinant.

    PubMed

    Meradi, S; Bentounsi, B; Zouyed, I; Cabaret, J

    2011-08-01

    We intended to relate the geographic distribution of ruminant gastrointestinal nematodes in relation to steppe climate (and vegetation). Data are either from literature or from newly acquired/available results. Simple or more sophisticated meteorological indices were used to characterize the climate. Regression analyses were used to correlate climatic factors and presence of endoparasites from steppe areas. The distribution of one (Marshallagia) out of five endoparasite genera was concentrated mostly in steppic areas whereas other species were found also in other areas. In wild hosts the distribution of Marshallagia was much larger from Sptizberg to New World (northern territories in Canada or extreme south of America). In domestic small ruminants the presence of Marshallagia was identified more frequently and constantly in the area of original domestication and its early diffusion (from Northern Africa to Kashmir, Caucasia). The distribution of this parasite was correlated to low rainfalls which were not the case for all other endoparasites. After host switch (reindeer or south America camelids), it has expanded in other climatic areas, either colder or dryer.

  17. The steppe species of gastrointestinal nematodes of small ruminants, with a focus on Marshallagia: climate as a key determinant

    PubMed Central

    Meradi, S.; Bentounsi, B.; Zouyed, I.; Cabaret, J.

    2011-01-01

    We intended to relate the geographic distribution of ruminant gastrointestinal nematodes in relation to steppe climate (and vegetation). Data are either from literature or from newly acquired/ available results. Simple or more sophisticated meteorological indices were used to characterize the climate. Regression analyses were used to correlate climatic factors and presence of endoparasites from steppe areas. The distribution of one (Marshallagia) out of five endoparasite genera was concentrated mostly in steppic areas whereas other species were found also in other areas. In wild hosts the distribution of Marshallagia was much larger from Sptizberg to New World (northern territories in Canada or extreme south of America). In domestic small ruminants the presence of Marshallagia was identified more frequently and constantly in the area of original domestication and its early diffusion (from Northern Africa to Kashmir, Caucasia). The distribution of this parasite was correlated to low rainfalls which were not the case for all other endoparasites. After host switch (reindeer or south America camelids), it has expanded in other climatic areas, either colder or dryer. PMID:21894268

  18. Risk factors for anthelmintic resistance development in cattle gastrointestinal nematodes in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Suarez, Víctor Humberto; Cristel, Silvina Lujan

    2014-01-01

    Risk factors for anthelmintic resistance (AR) on bovine ranches were studied. Data were derived from a survey made to 50 ranch owners, who had conducted a faecal egg-count-reduction test. The questionnaire contained descriptors of bovine ranch management and nematode control. A case-control design study was undertaken and AR cases were present in 26 herds. Associations between the binary outcome variable (AR versus not AR) and risk factors recorded in the questionnaire were evaluated. Variables associated with the presence of AR at P< 0.15 and/or odds ratio (OR) > 2 were subjected to a multivariable logistic regression model. The main effects contributing to general AR (avermectin AVM and/or benzimidazole) in the final model were total number of annual treatments (OR 7.68; 95% CI 2.4 to 28.3) and use of more than 75% of AVM in the past (OR= 18.6; 95% CI 1.3 to 97.3), whereas for AVM resistance alone were total number of AVM annual treatments (OR= 11.5; 95% CI 2.9 to 45.5) and number of AVM Nov-Jan treatments (OR= 5.8; 95% CI 1.71 to 47.9). The results showed that treatment frequency, date of treatment and frequency of treatment in the past with a single drug were the main risk factors involved in AR development.

  19. IL-1-dependent, IL-1R1-independent resistance to gastrointestinal nematodes.

    PubMed

    Humphreys, Neil E; Grencis, Richard K

    2009-04-01

    IL-1 null mice are unable to expel the intestinal nematode Trichuris muris; whereas WT littermates exhibit sterile immunity. Intriguingly the essential signalling components IL-1R1 and IL-1R accessory protein (AcP) are dispensable for expulsion of this parasite. IL-1 is thus critical for CD4(+) Th2-mediated immunity to T. muris; however, this action is independent of the established IL-1 signalling receptor. We also present data demonstrating that both IL-1alpha and IL-1beta induce measurable effects on T. muris primed cells isolated from IL-1R1 or IL-1R AcP null mice. MLN cells from these mice restimulated with parasite antigen proliferated at a greater rate and produced more cytokines in response to exogenous IL-1. This ability to respond to IL-1 was restricted to these parasite-primed cells and importantly was not evident in cells from naïve gene null mice. These in vitro data are consistent with the observed ability of mice with compromised IL-1 signalling to expel the parasite, bolstering the premise that an alternative IL-1 signalling mechanism is accessible in the context of an intestinal helminth-driven Th2 immune response.

  20. Transcriptomic response of red grouse to gastro-intestinal nematode parasites and testosterone: implications for population dynamics.

    PubMed

    Webster, L M I; Paterson, S; Mougeot, F; Martinez-Padilla, J; Piertney, S B

    2011-03-01

    A central issue in ecology is in understanding the relative influences of intrinsic and extrinsic effects on population regulation. Previous studies on the cyclic population dynamics of red grouse (Lagopus lagopus scoticus) have emphasized the destabilizing effects of either nematode parasites or territorial behaviour and aggression. The potential interacting effects of these processes, mediated through density-dependent, environmentally induced alterations of host immunocompetence influencing susceptibility to parasites have not been considered. Male red grouse at high density are more aggressive, associated with increased testosterone, which potentially could lead to reduced immunocompetence at a stage when parasites are most prevalent. This could depress individual condition, breeding performance and survival and thus drive or contribute to overall reductions in population size. Here, we characterize the transcriptomic response of grouse to nematode parasite infection and investigate how this is subsequently affected by testosterone, using a microarray approach contrasting red grouse with high and low parasite load at both high and low testosterone titre. A suite of 52 transcripts showed a significant level of up-regulation to either chronic parasite load or experimental parasite infection. Of these, 51 (98%) showed a reduced level of expression under conditions of high parasite load and high testosterone. The genes up-regulated by parasites and then down-regulated at high testosterone titre were not necessarily associated with immune response, as might be intuitively expected. The results are discussed in relation to the fitness and condition of individual red grouse and factors influencing the regulation of abundance in natural populations. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  1. Intestinal nematode infections in Turkish military dogs with special reference to Toxocara canis.

    PubMed

    Senlik, B; Cirak, V Y; Karabacak, A

    2006-09-01

    The prevalence and potential zoonotic risk factors of intestinal nematodes of military working dogs, which are used for different military purposes, were assessed. Faecal samples from 352 defined-breed Turkish military dogs were investigated and 107 (30.4%) dogs were found to be infected with one or two nematode species. The following nematodes, with their respective prevalences, were diagnosed in the faecal samples: Toxascaris leonina (21.8%), Toxocara canis (13.3%), Trichuris vulpis (2.9%) and Uncinaria stenocephala (1.2%). Toxocara canis infections were more frequently seen in puppies (0-6 months old). The prevalence of T. canis was significantly higher in male than in female dogs and also higher in dogs which were exercised daily than in those without exercise. The highest prevalence was found in Belgian malinois breed dogs. Toxocara canis infections were not influenced by the floor type of the kennels (i.e. concrete or soil floor). There was no difference in the occurrence of T. canis infection when the last anthelmintic treatment was carried out less or more than 3 months prior to sampling. It is suggested that T. canis infected military dogs would be a threat not only for dog trainers but also for military personnel, notably during national and international operations.

  2. Effects of Oxamyl on the Citrus Nematode, Tylenchulus semipenetrans, and on Infection of Sweet Orange

    PubMed Central

    Baines, R. C.; Small, R. H.

    1976-01-01

    Foliar sprays of 4 μg/ml oxamyl on sweet orange trees in a greenhouse slightly depressed the number of Tylenchulus semipenetrans larvae obtained from roots and soil, but similar treatments were not effective in two orchards. Soil drench treatments decreased the number of citrus nematode larvae obtained from roots or soil of citrus plants grown itt a greenhouse and in orchards. Exposure to 5-10 μg/ml of oxamyl in water was lethal to only a few second-stage larvae treated 10 days, and many second-stage larvae in 2.0 μg/ml oxamyl recovered motility when transferred to fresh water. Aqueous solutions of 50 and 100 μg/ml of oxamyl were toxic to citrus nematode larvae. Additional observations indicate that oxamyl interfered with hatch of citrus nematode larvae and was nematistatic and/or protected sweet orange roots from infection. Oxamyl degraded at different rates in two soils. The number of citrus nematode larvae that infected and developed on sweet orange roots was increased by an undetermined product of the degradation of oxamyl in soil, water, and possibly within plants. This product apparently was translocated in roots. PMID:19308209

  3. Role of an extracellular neutral protease in infection against nematodes by Brevibacillus laterosporus strain G4.

    PubMed

    Tian, Baoyu; Yang, Jinkui; Lian, Lihui; Wang, Chunyan; Li, Ning; Zhang, Ke-Qin

    2007-02-01

    Proteases have been proposed as virulence factors in microbial pathogenicity against nematodes. However, what kinds of extracellular proteases from these pathogens and how they contribute to the pathogenesis of infections against nematode in vivo remain largely unknown. A previous analysis using a strain with a deletion in an extracellular alkaline protease BLG4 gene from Brevibacillus laterosporus demonstrated that BLG4 was responsible for the majority of nematicidal activity by destroying host's cuticle. In recent studies, a neutral protease NPE-4, purified from the mutant BLG4-6, was found to be responsible for the majority of the remaining EDTA-inhibited protease activity. However, the purified NPE-4 and recombinant NPE-4 in a related species Bacillus subtilis showed little nematicidal activity in vitro and were unable to degrade the intact cuticle of the host. It is interesting to note that the addition of NPE-4 improved the pathogenicity of crude enzyme extract from wild-type B. laterosporus but had no effect on the BLG4-deficient mutant. This result suggests that NPE-4 functions in the presence of protease BLG4. Moreover, NPE-4 could degrade proteins from the inner layer of purified cuticles from nematode Panagrellus redivivus in vitro. These results indicated that the two different bacterial extracellular proteases might play differential roles at different stages of infection or a synthetic role in penetration of nematode cuticle in B. laterosporus. This is among the first reports to systematically evaluate and define the roles of different bacterial extracellular proteases in infection against nematodes.

  4. Fighting while Parasitized: Can Nematode Infections Affect the Outcome of Staged Combat in Beetles?

    PubMed Central

    Vasquez, David; Willoughby, Anna; Davis, Andrew K.

    2015-01-01

    The effects of non-lethal parasites may be felt most strongly when hosts engage in intense, energy-demanding behaviors. One such behavior is fighting with conspecifics, which is common among territorial animals, including many beetle species. We examined the effects of parasites on the fighting ability of a saproxylic beetle, the horned passalus (Odontotaenius disjunctus, Family: Passalidae), which is host to a non-lethal nematode, Chondronema passali. We pitted pairs of randomly-chosen (but equally-weighted) beetles against each other in a small arena and determined the winner and aggression level of fights. Then we examined beetles for the presence, and severity of nematode infections. There was a non-significant tendency (p = 0.065) for the frequency of wins, losses and draws to differ between beetles with and without C. passali; non-parasitized individuals (n = 104) won 47% of their fights while those with the parasite (n = 88) won 34%, a 13% difference in wins. The number of nematodes in a beetle affected the outcome of fights between infected and uninfected individuals in an unexpected fashion: fighting ability was lowest in beetles with the lowest (p = 0.033), not highest (p = 0.266), nematode burdens. Within-fight aggression was highest when both beetles were uninfected and lowest when both were infected (p = 0.034). Collectively, these results suggest the nematode parasite, C. passali, is associated with a modest reduction in fighting ability in horned passalus beetles, consistent with the idea that parasitized beetles have lower energy available for fighting. This study adds to a small but growing body of evidence showing how parasites negatively influence fighting behavior in animals. PMID:25830367

  5. Field evaluations of the efficacy and safety of Emodepside plus toltrazuril (Procox® oral suspension for dogs) against naturally acquired nematode and Isospora spp. infections in dogs.

    PubMed

    Altreuther, Gertraut; Gasda, Nadine; Adler, Kerstin; Hellmann, Klaus; Thurieau, Heloise; Schimmel, Annette; Hutchens, Douglas; Krieger, Klemens J

    2011-08-01

    Three controlled, blinded and randomised multicentre field studies evaluated the efficacy and safety of a new formulation containing emodepside plus toltrazuril (Procox® suspension for dogs) against naturally acquired parasite infections in dogs. In two studies dogs positive for gastrointestinal nematodes and/or Isospora spp. were treated with emodepside/toltrazuril suspension (at least 0.45 mg emodepside plus 9 mg toltrazuril per kg body weight) or a reference product containing either milbemycin oxime plus praziquantel (Milbemax®) or sulfadimethoxine (Kokzidiol SD®) at recommended dose rates. The third study investigated efficacy against prepatent natural Isospora spp. infections in comparison to an untreated control group by enrolling Isospora- negative dogs that were at risk to develop a patent infection during the study.No suspected adverse drug reactions were observed in any of the 403 dogs enrolled in the three studies including 234 dogs treated with emodepside/toltrazuril suspension. In dogs treated with emodepside/toltrazuril suspension against nematode infection faecal egg counts were reduced by 100 % (reference product: 99.7 %). Similarly, in the dogs that had been treated against patent Isospora spp. infection, faecal oocyst counts were reduced by 100 % (reference product: 99.0 %). In both studies, statistical analysis demonstrated non-inferiority and even superiority to the reference products (p ≤ 0.009). Dogs treated with emodepside/toltrazuril suspension during suspected prepatent Isospora spp. infection had 98.7 % lower faecal oocyst counts after treatment compared to untreated dogs (p < 0.0001).The studies demonstrated that emodepside/toltrazuril suspension is safe and highly efficacious against nematodes and Isospora spp. under field conditions.

  6. Analysis of putative inhibitors of anthelmintic resistance mechanisms in cattle gastrointestinal nematodes.

    PubMed

    AlGusbi, Salha; Krücken, Jürgen; Ramünke, Sabrina; von Samson-Himmelstjerna, Georg; Demeler, Janina

    2014-08-01

    Effects of the cytochrome P450 inhibitor piperonyl butoxide and the P-glycoprotein inhibitor verapamil on the efficacy of ivermectin and thiabendazole were studied in vitro in susceptible and resistant isolates of the cattle parasitic nematodes Cooperia oncophora and Ostertagia ostertagi. The effects of combined use of drug and piperonyl butoxide/verapamil, respectively, were investigated in the Egg Hatch Assay, the Larval Development Assay and the Larval Migration Inhibition Assay. The effects of piperonyl butoxide and verapamil as inhibitors of thiabendazole and ivermectin responses were particularly marked for larval development, where both inhibitors were able to completely eliminate all differences between susceptible and resistant isolates. Even the lowest concentrations of anthelmintics used in combination with inhibitors caused complete inhibition of development. Differences and/or similarities among responses in different isolates were only obtained in the two other assays: in the Egg Hatch Assay piperonyl butoxide caused a shift in concentration-response curves obtained with thiabendazole to the left for all isolates tested, changing relative differences between isolates. In contrast, an effect of verapamil in the Egg Hatch Assay was only apparent for benzimidazole-resistant isolates. In the Larval Migration Inhibition Assay only ivermectin was tested and piperonyl butoxide shifted the concentration-response curves for all isolates to the left, again eliminating differences in EC50 values between susceptible and resistant isolates. This was not the case using verapamil as an inhibitor, where curves for both susceptible and benzimidazole-resistant isolates shifted to the left in Ostertagia isolates. In Cooperia the picture was more complex with ivermectin-resistant isolates showing a larger shift than the susceptible isolate. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in the β-tubulin isotype 1 gene were investigated. Significantly increased frequencies of

  7. Role of macrophages in the altered epithelial function during a type 2 immune response induced by enteric nematode infection.

    PubMed

    Notari, Luigi; Riera, Diana C; Sun, Rex; Bohl, Jennifer A; McLean, Leon P; Madden, Kathleen B; van Rooijen, Nico; Vanuytsel, Tim; Urban, Joseph F; Zhao, Aiping; Shea-Donohue, Terez

    2014-01-01

    Parasitic enteric nematodes induce a type 2 immune response characterized by increased production of Th2 cytokines, IL-4 and IL-13, and recruitment of alternatively activated macrophages (M2) to the site of infection. Nematode infection is associated with changes in epithelial permeability and inhibition of sodium-linked glucose absorption, but the role of M2 in these effects is unknown. Clodronate-containing liposomes were administered prior to and during nematode infection to deplete macrophages and prevent the development of M2 in response to infection with Nippostrongylus brasiliensis. The inhibition of epithelial glucose absorption that is associated with nematode infection involved a macrophage-dependent reduction in SGLT1 activity, with no change in receptor expression, and a macrophage-independent down-regulation of GLUT2 expression. The reduced transport of glucose into the enterocyte is compensated partially by an up-regulation of the constitutive GLUT1 transporter consistent with stress-induced activation of HIF-1α. Thus, nematode infection results in a "lean" epithelial phenotype that features decreased SGLT1 activity, decreased expression of GLUT2 and an emergent dependence on GLUT1 for glucose uptake into the enterocyte. Macrophages do not play a role in enteric nematode infection-induced changes in epithelial barrier function. There is a greater contribution, however, of paracellular absorption of glucose to supply the energy demands of host resistance. These data provide further evidence of the ability of macrophages to alter glucose metabolism of neighboring cells.

  8. Trichuris muris: a model of gastrointestinal parasite infection.

    PubMed

    Klementowicz, Joanna E; Travis, Mark A; Grencis, Richard K

    2012-11-01

    Infection with soil-transmitted gastrointestinal parasites, such as Trichuris trichiura, affects more than a billion people worldwide, causing significant morbidity and health problems especially in poverty-stricken developing countries. Despite extensive research, the role of the immune system in triggering parasite expulsion is incompletely understood which hinders the development of anti-parasite therapies. Trichuris muris infection in mice serves as a useful model of T. trichiura infection in humans and has proven to be an invaluable tool in increasing our understanding of the role of the immune system in promoting either susceptibility or resistance to infection. The old paradigm of a susceptibility-associated Th1 versus a resistance-associated Th2-type response has been supplemented in recent years with cell populations such as novel innate lymphoid cells, basophils, dendritic cells and regulatory T cells proposed to play an active role in responses to T. muris infection. Moreover, new immune-controlled mechanisms of expulsion, such as increased epithelial cell turnover and mucin secretion, have been described in recent years increasing the number of possible targets for anti-parasite therapies. In this review, we give a comprehensive overview of experimental work conducted on the T. muris infection model, focusing on important findings and the most recent reports on the role of the immune system in parasite expulsion.

  9. Alterations in the Porcine Colon Microbiota Induced by the Gastrointestinal Nematode Trichuris suis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Sitao; Li, Weizhong; Navarro, Karl; Couch, Robin D.; Hill, Dolores; Urban, Joseph F.

    2012-01-01

    Helminth parasites ensure their survival by regulating host immunity through mechanisms that dampen inflammation. These properties have recently been exploited therapeutically to treat human diseases. The biocomplexity of the intestinal lumen suggests that interactions between the parasite and the intestinal microbiota would also influence inflammation. In this study, we characterized the microbiota in the porcine proximal colon in response to Trichuris suis (whipworm) infection using 16S rRNA gene-based and whole-genome shotgun (WGS) sequencing. A 21-day T. suis infection in four pigs induced a significant change in the composition of the proximal colon microbiota compared to that of three parasite-naive pigs. Among the 15 phyla identified, the abundances of Proteobacteria and Deferribacteres were changed in infected pigs. The abundances of approximately 13% of genera were significantly altered by infection. Changes in relative abundances of Succinivibrio and Mucispirillum, for example, may relate to alterations in carbohydrate metabolism and niche disruptions in mucosal interfaces induced by parasitic infection, respectively. Of note, infection by T. suis led to a significant shift in the metabolic potential of the proximal colon microbiota, where 26% of all metabolic pathways identified were affected. Besides carbohydrate metabolism, lysine biosynthesis was repressed as well. A metabolomic analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the luminal contents showed a relative absence in infected pigs of cofactors for carbohydrate and lysine biosynthesis, as well as an accumulation of oleic acid, suggesting altered fatty acid absorption contributing to local inflammation. Our findings should facilitate development of strategies for parasitic control in pigs and humans. PMID:22493085

  10. Diurnal fluctuations in nematode egg excretion in naturally and in experimentally infected chickens.

    PubMed

    Wongrak, Kalyakorn; Gauly, Matthias; Daş, Gürbüz

    2015-03-15

    We investigated whether nematode egg excretion through feces of naturally or experimentally infected chickens follow certain patterns within a day, which may allow determining the most appropriate sampling time for the highest parasite egg concentration. Feces samples (n=864) from chickens (n=36) with naturally occurring mixed nematode infections (trials N1, N2) or with an experimental Ascaridia galli infection (E) were collected quantitatively every 4h for four consecutive days. Number of eggs per gram of feces (EPG) was determined, and accumulative egg output (AEO) at each sampling time as well as total number of eggs excreted within 24h (eggs per day, EPD) were then estimated. At the end of the collection period, the hens were necropsied and their worm burdens determined. Naturally infected hens harbored Heterakis gallinarum (100%), Capillaria spp. (95.7%) and A. galli (91.3%). The experimental A. galli infection produced patent infections in all the birds. In general, both fecal egg concentration (EPG) and the amount of feces increased (P<0.05) sharply from the early morning to early-noon (10:00 a.m.) and remained at a high level until evenings which thereafter decreased to their initial levels during the night both in naturally and experimentally infected birds. This resulted in a more apparent increase or a decrease in AEO at the corresponding time points, respectively, and led to much higher egg excretions during the daytime than the nights. Despite the apparent within day fluctuations in egg excretion, neither EPG (P=0.704) nor AEO (P=0.499) nor EPD (P=0.149) was significantly different among the four collection days. Similarly, there was no significant interaction (P>0.05) between effects of sampling hours and days on EPG and AEO, suggesting the existence of repeatable diurnal fluctuations within each day. Although an association between climatic parameters (e.g., ambient temperature and relative humidity) and the nematode egg excretion was quantified, a

  11. Prevalence of gastrointestinal nematodes and Fasciola hepatica in sheep in the northwest of Spain: relation to climatic conditions and/or man-made environmental modifications

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In the present study we studied and updated the prevalence of the infections caused by gastrointestinal nematodes (GIN) and Fasciola hepatica in grazing sheep in the northwest (NW) of Spain for the last six years (2006–2011), and its relationship with the current climatic conditions. Methods We analyzed faecal samples from 110 flocks located in four different provinces of the Autonomous Community of Castilla y León: 76.4% of them were situated in León, 12.7% in Zamora, 9.1% in Palencia and 1.8% in Valladolid. Results The prevalence of GIN was 100% and the mean of eggs per gram (epg) in faeces was 237.2 (± 375.9) per flock. Regarding climatic conditions, we found a direct relationship between the GIN infection level and the maximum humidity (p<0.05) but inverse with the degree of solar radiation (p<0.05). The prevalence of fasciolosis was 59.3%, with a mean epg of 17.5 (± 33.9) per flock; these values were correlated with the minimum humidity and precipitations (p<0.05). Comparing our results in León with previous studies during the early 1990s, the mean epg of GIN was increased slightly (134.3 epg); regarding fasciolosis, the prevalence rose significantly, from 26.7% to 60.5%. Since the 1990s we observed that the maximum temperature is nowadays 0.45°C higher (17.0°C) and the minimum 0.5°C lower (5.2°C); the rainfall values were very similar in both decades but at the present time the humidity is higher (75.9%). Conclusions We found that the prevalence of GIN and F. hepatica infections was directly influenced by the humidity and also by precipitations in the case of F. hepatica. Comparing the current prevalence with studies carried out in the same area for the early 1990s, we observed that nowadays the mean epg of GIN is higher with a possible cause being the differences in climatic conditions depending on the sampling year. Regarding F. hepatica infection, its prevalence rose significantly probably favoured by an increase in irrigated areas in

  12. Characterization of the abomasal transcriptome for mechanisms of resistance to gastrointestinal nematodes in cattle

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The abomasal transcriptome of Angus cattle in response to parasitic infection was characterized at a depth of 23.7 million sequences per sample using RNA-seq. These cattle displayed a distinctly separate resistance phenotype in terms of fecal egg counts. Approximately 65.3% of the 23,633 bovine gene...

  13. Natural and experimental infection of Caenorhabditis nematodes by novel viruses related to nodaviruses.

    PubMed

    Félix, Marie-Anne; Ashe, Alyson; Piffaretti, Joséphine; Wu, Guang; Nuez, Isabelle; Bélicard, Tony; Jiang, Yanfang; Zhao, Guoyan; Franz, Carl J; Goldstein, Leonard D; Sanroman, Mabel; Miska, Eric A; Wang, David

    2011-01-25

    An ideal model system to study antiviral immunity and host-pathogen co-evolution would combine a genetically tractable small animal with a virus capable of naturally infecting the host organism. The use of C. elegans as a model to define host-viral interactions has been limited by the lack of viruses known to infect nematodes. From wild isolates of C. elegans and C. briggsae with unusual morphological phenotypes in intestinal cells, we identified two novel RNA viruses distantly related to known nodaviruses, one infecting specifically C. elegans (Orsay virus), the other C. briggsae (Santeuil virus). Bleaching of embryos cured infected cultures demonstrating that the viruses are neither stably integrated in the host genome nor transmitted vertically. 0.2 µm filtrates of the infected cultures could infect cured animals. Infected animals continuously maintained viral infection for 6 mo (∼50 generations), demonstrating that natural cycles of horizontal virus transmission were faithfully recapitulated in laboratory culture. In addition to infecting the natural C. elegans isolate, Orsay virus readily infected laboratory C. elegans mutants defective in RNAi and yielded higher levels of viral RNA and infection symptoms as compared to infection of the corresponding wild-type N2 strain. These results demonstrated a clear role for RNAi in the defense against this virus. Furthermore, different wild C. elegans isolates displayed differential susceptibility to infection by Orsay virus, thereby affording genetic approaches to defining antiviral loci. This discovery establishes a bona fide viral infection system to explore the natural ecology of nematodes, host-pathogen co-evolution, the evolution of small RNA responses, and innate antiviral mechanisms.

  14. Natural and Experimental Infection of Caenorhabditis Nematodes by Novel Viruses Related to Nodaviruses

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Guang; Nuez, Isabelle; Bélicard, Tony; Jiang, Yanfang; Zhao, Guoyan; Franz, Carl J.; Goldstein, Leonard D.; Sanroman, Mabel; Miska, Eric A.; Wang, David

    2011-01-01

    An ideal model system to study antiviral immunity and host-pathogen co-evolution would combine a genetically tractable small animal with a virus capable of naturally infecting the host organism. The use of C. elegans as a model to define host-viral interactions has been limited by the lack of viruses known to infect nematodes. From wild isolates of C. elegans and C. briggsae with unusual morphological phenotypes in intestinal cells, we identified two novel RNA viruses distantly related to known nodaviruses, one infecting specifically C. elegans (Orsay virus), the other C. briggsae (Santeuil virus). Bleaching of embryos cured infected cultures demonstrating that the viruses are neither stably integrated in the host genome nor transmitted vertically. 0.2 µm filtrates of the infected cultures could infect cured animals. Infected animals continuously maintained viral infection for 6 mo (∼50 generations), demonstrating that natural cycles of horizontal virus transmission were faithfully recapitulated in laboratory culture. In addition to infecting the natural C. elegans isolate, Orsay virus readily infected laboratory C. elegans mutants defective in RNAi and yielded higher levels of viral RNA and infection symptoms as compared to infection of the corresponding wild-type N2 strain. These results demonstrated a clear role for RNAi in the defense against this virus. Furthermore, different wild C. elegans isolates displayed differential susceptibility to infection by Orsay virus, thereby affording genetic approaches to defining antiviral loci. This discovery establishes a bona fide viral infection system to explore the natural ecology of nematodes, host-pathogen co-evolution, the evolution of small RNA responses, and innate antiviral mechanisms. PMID:21283608

  15. Giardia lamblia infection increases risk of chronic gastrointestinal disorders.

    PubMed

    Dormond, Megan; Gutierrez, Ramiro L; Porter, Chad K

    2016-01-01

    Giardia lamblia is a common parasitic cause of infectious gastroenteritis in the United States and the world and may be linked to an increased risk of chronic gastrointestinal (GI) disorders. We sought to assess the risk of several chronic GI disorders following Giardia infection among active duty US military personnel. This study was designed as a retrospective cohort study in which active duty military personnel with documented G. lamblia infection were assessed for the subsequent risk of developing a chronic GI disorder including irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), dyspepsia and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Post-giardia chronic GI disorder risk was compared to risk in uninfected personnel matched on several demographic characteristics and medical encounter information. Data were obtained from the Defense Medical Surveillance System and exposures (1998-2009) with outcomes identified based on documented medical encounters with specific medical billing codes. Modified Poisson regression was used to evaluate the relationship between G. lamblia infection and chronic GI disorders. A total of 80 Giardia cases were identified for an estimated incidence of 0.55 cases per 100,000 person-years. Cases were matched to 294 unexposed subjects. After adjusting for important covariates, there was an increased risk of IBS (relative risk: 2.1, p = 0.03) associated with antecedent Giardia infection. These data add to a growing body of literature and demonstrate an increased risk of IBS after infection with G. lamblia.

  16. Evaluation of different models to segregate Pelibuey and Katahdin ewes into resistant or susceptible to gastrointestinal nematodes.

    PubMed

    Palomo-Couoh, Jovanny Gaspar; Aguilar-Caballero, Armando Jacinto; Torres-Acosta, Juan Felipe de Jesús; Magaña-Monforte, Juan Gabriel

    2016-12-01

    This study evaluated four models based on the number of eggs per gram of faeces (EPG) to segregate Pelibuey or Katahdin ewes during the lactation period into resistant or susceptible to gastrointestinal nematodes (GIN) in tropical Mexico. Nine hundred and thirty EPG counts of Pelibuey ewes and 710 of Katahdin ewes were obtained during 10 weeks of lactation. Ewes were segregated into resistant, intermediate and susceptible, using their individual EPG every week. Then, data of every ewe was used to provide a reference classification, which included all the EPG values of each animal. Then, four models were evaluated against such reference. Model 1 was based on the 10-week mean EPG count ± 2 SE. Models 2, 3 and 4 were based on the mean EPG count of 10, 5 and 2 weeks of lactation. The cutoff points for the segregation of ewe in those three models were the quartiles ≤Q1 (low elimination) and ≥Q3 (high elimination). In all the models evaluated, the ewes classified as resistant had lower EPG than intermediates and susceptible (P < 0.001) while ewes classified as susceptible had higher EPG than intermediate and resistant (P < 0.001). According to J Youden test, models presented concordance with the reference group (>70 %). Model 3 tended to show higher sensitivity and specificity with the reference data, but no difference was found with other models. The present study showed that the phenotypic marker EPG might serve to identify and segregate populations of adult ewes during the lactation period. All models used served to segregate Pelibuey and Katahdin ewes into resistant, intermediate and susceptible. The model 3 (mean of 5 weeks) could be used because it required less sampling effort without losing sensitivity or specificity in the segregation of animals. However, model 2 (mean of 2 weeks) was less labour-intensive.

  17. Structural Basis for Carbohydrate Recognition and Anti-inflammatory Modulation by Gastrointestinal Nematode Parasite Toxascaris leonina Galectin.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Eun Young; Jeong, Mi Suk; Park, Sang Kyun; Ha, Sung Chul; Yu, Hak Sun; Jang, Se Bok

    2016-12-02

    Toxascaris leonina galectin (Tl-gal) is a galectin-9 homologue protein isolated from an adult worm of the canine gastrointestinal nematode parasite, and Tl-gal-vaccinated challenge can inhibit inflammation in inflammatory bowel disease-induced mice. We determined the first X-ray structures of full-length Tl-gal complexes with carbohydrates (lactose, N-acetyllactosamine, lacto-N-tetraose, sialyllactose, and glucose). Bonds were formed on concave surfaces of both carbohydrate recognition domains (CRDs) in Tl-gal. All binding sites were found in the HXXXR and WGXEER motifs. Charged Arg(61)/Arg(196) and Glu(80)/Glu(215) on the conserved motif of Tl-gal N-terminal CRD and C-terminal CRD are critical amino acids for recognizing carbohydrate binding, and the residues can affect protein folding and structure. The polar amino acids His, Asn, and Trp are also important residues for the interaction with carbohydrates through hydrogen bonding. Hemagglutination activities of Tl-gal were inhibited by interactions with carbohydrates and mutations. We found that the mutation of Tl-gal (E80A/E215A) at the carbohydrate binding region induced protein aggregation and could be caused in many diseases. The short linker region between the N-terminal and C-terminal CRDs of Tl-gal was very stable against proteolysis and maintained its biological activity. This structural information is expected to elucidate the carbohydrate recognition mechanism of Tl-gal and improve our understanding of anti-inflammatory mediators and modulators of immune response.

  18. Comparative in vitro effects of closantel and selected beta-ketoamide anthelmintics on a gastrointestinal nematode and vertebrate liver cells.

    PubMed

    Bacon, J A; Ulrich, R G; Davis, J P; Thomas, E M; Johnson, S S; Conder, G A; Sangster, N C; Rothwell, J T; McCracken, R O; Lee, B H; Clothier, M F; Geary, T G; Thompson, D P

    1998-06-01

    PNU-87407 and PNU-88509, beta-ketoamide anthelmintics that are structurally related to each other and to the salicylanilide anthelmintic closantel, exhibit different anthelmintic spectra and apparent toxicity in mammals. The basis for this differential pharmacology was examined in experiments that measured motility and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) levels in larval and adult stages of the gastrointestinal nematode, Haemonchus contortus, and in a vertebrate liver cell line and mitochondria. PNU-87407 and PNU-88509 both exhibited functional cross-resistance with closantel in larval migration assays using closantel-resistant and -sensitive isolates of H. contortus. Each compound reduced motility and ATP levels in cultured adult H. contortus in a concentration- and time-dependent manner; however, motility was reduced more rapidly by PNU-88509, and ATP levels were reduced by lower concentrations of closantel than the beta-ketoamides. Tension recordings from segments of adult H. contortus showed that PNU-88509 induces spastic paralysis, while PNU-87407 and closantel induce flaccid paralysis of the somatic musculature. Marked differences in the actions of these compounds were also observed in the mammalian preparations. In Chang liver cells, ATP levels were reduced after 3 h exposures to > or = 0.25 microM PNU-87407, > or = 1 microM closantel or > or = 10 microM PNU-88509. Reductions in ATP caused by PNU-88509 were completely reversible, while the effects of closantel and PNU-87407 were irreversible. PNU-87407, closantel and PNU-88509 uncoupled oxidative phosphorylation in isolated rat liver mitochondria, inhibiting the respiratory control index (with glutamate or succinate as substrate) by 50% at concentrations of 0.14, 0.9 and 7.6 microM, respectively.

  19. Clinical significance of isolated cytomegalovirus-infected gastrointestinal cells.

    PubMed

    Yan, Zhen; Wang, Linlin; Dennis, Jake; Doern, Christopher; Baker, Jonathan; Park, Jason Y

    2014-09-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract is associated with high mortality in immunosuppressed patients. However, few studies have correlated blood CMV load with GI histopathological findings. Furthermore, there have been few studies determining the clinical significance of isolated CMV infection. Cases were selected for the diagnosis of GI CMV infection by searching the information system of a tertiary hospital. The electronic medical record was reviewed for each case to determine blood viral load, clinicopathological features at the time of diagnosis and clinical outcomes after discharge. In all, 30 patients with CMV-positive intestinal biopsies confirmed by immunohistochemistry (IHC) were identified. All were immunosuppressed. CMV inclusions were also recognized by hematoxylin and eosin stain in 27% of the cases, and the remaining cases were identified by IHC alone. CMV blood load was only positive in 17% of the cases; 8 cases had only isolated CMV-infected cells (0.1-0.5 IHC count/high-power field), with the following outcomes: worsening symptoms that responded to antiviral therapy (n = 5); clinical improvement without treatment (n = 1); death without treatment (n = 2). CMV infection of the intestines is clinically significant but will not always present with classic viral cytopathic changes. IHC should be considered in any case where there is a clinical suspicion for CMV infection. Identification of isolated CMV infection by IHC should be considered clinically significant. Current blood viral load tests have poor sensitivity in detecting CMV intestinal infection. Future studies will investigate the predictive value of positive peripheral blood viral load in patients with intestinal symptoms. © The Author(s) 2014.

  20. Induction of ulcerative colitis in mice influences the course of infection with the nematode Trichuris muris.

    PubMed

    Vegas-Sánchez, M C; Rollán-Landeras, E; García-Rodríguez, J J; Bolás-Fernández, F

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of infection with the nematode whipworm Trichuris muris on the course of chemically induced acute ulcerative colitis in CBA/J mice, a strain proven to be highly resistant to infection with T. muris. Each mouse was infected with 50 embryonated eggs of T. muris by oral gavage. Acute colitis was triggered by administering 4% dextran sulphate sodium (DSS) in the drinking water for nine consecutive days at different times after infection. Concurrent infection and DSS administration exacerbate the severity of the colitis while favouring the permanence of parasites in the intestine. The induction of ulcerative colitis from days 54 to 62 post-infection (p.i.), when all worms had been expelled, ameliorated the course of the inflammatory disease. When ulcerative colitis was triggered earlier on, from days 27 to 35 p.i., the beneficial effects on inflammatory events were clearly shown with signs of mucosal epithelization and regeneration as early as day 1 after DSS administration. Previous infections by T. muris therefore accelerate recovery from subsequently induced inflammatory bowel disease and such an effect assists the nematode to persist in the intestinal niche.

  1. Two closely related members of Arabidopsis 13-LOXs, LOX3 and LOX4, reveal distinct functions in response to plantparasitic nematode infection

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The responses of two closely related members of Arabidopsis 13-lipoxygenase (13-LOX), LOX3 and LOX4, to infection by the sedentary nematodes root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne javanica) and cyst nematode (Heterodera schachtii) were analyzed in transgenic Arabidopsis seedlings. Tissue localization of LO...

  2. Eosinophils are important for protection, immunoregulation and pathology during infection with nematode microfilariae.

    PubMed

    Cadman, Emma T; Thysse, Katherine A; Bearder, Siobhan; Cheung, Anita Y N; Johnston, Ashleigh C; Lee, James J; Lawrence, Rachel A

    2014-03-01

    Eosinophil responses typify both allergic and parasitic helminth disease. In helminthic disease, the role of eosinophils can be both protective in immune responses and destructive in pathological responses. To investigate whether eosinophils are involved in both protection and pathology during filarial nematode infection, we explored the role of eosinophils and their granule proteins, eosinophil peroxidase (EPO) and major basic protein-1 (MBP-1), during infection with Brugia malayi microfilariae. Using eosinophil-deficient mice (PHIL), we further clarify the role of eosinophils in clearance of microfilariae during primary, but not challenge infection in vivo. Deletion of EPO or MBP-1 alone was insufficient to abrogate parasite clearance suggesting that either these molecules are redundant or eosinophils act indirectly in parasite clearance via augmentation of other protective responses. Absence of eosinophils increased mast cell recruitment, but not other cell types, into the broncho-alveolar lavage fluid during challenge infection. In addition absence of eosinophils or EPO alone, augmented parasite-induced IgE responses, as measured by ELISA, demonstrating that eosinophils are involved in regulation of IgE. Whole body plethysmography indicated that nematode-induced changes in airway physiology were reduced in challenge infection in the absence of eosinophils and also during primary infection in the absence of EPO alone. However lack of eosinophils or MBP-1 actually increased goblet cell mucus production. We did not find any major differences in cytokine responses in the absence of eosinophils, EPO or MBP-1. These results reveal that eosinophils actively participate in regulation of IgE and goblet cell mucus production via granule secretion during nematode-induced pathology and highlight their importance both as effector cells, as damage-inducing cells and as supervisory cells that shape both innate and adaptive immunity.

  3. Eosinophil-derived IL-10 supports chronic nematode infection1

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Lu; Gebreselassie, Nebiat G.; Gagliardo, Lucille F.; Ruyechan, Maura C.; Lee, Nancy A.; Lee, James J.; Appleton, Judith A.

    2014-01-01

    Eosinophilia is a feature of the host immune response that distinguishes parasitic worms from other pathogens, yet a discrete function for eosinophils in worm infection has been elusive. The aim of this study was to clarify the mechanism(s) underlying the striking and unexpected observation that eosinophils protect intracellular, muscle-stage Trichinella spiralis larvae against NO-mediated killing. Our findings indicate that eosinophils are specifically recruited to sites of infection at the earliest stage of muscle infection, consistent with a local response to injury. Early recruitment is essential for larval survival. By producing IL-10 at the initiation of infection, eosinophils expand IL-10+ myeloid dendritic cells and CD4+ IL-10+ T lymphocytes that inhibit iNOS expression and protect intracellular larvae. The results document a novel immunoregulatory function of eosinophils in helminth infection, in which eosinophil-derived IL-10 drives immune responses that eventually limit local nitric oxide production. In this way, the parasite co-opts an immune response in a way that enhances its own survival. PMID:25210122

  4. Survival and Infectivity of the Insect-Parasitic Nematode Heterorhabditis bacteriophora Poinar in Solutions Containing Four Different Turfgrass Soil Surfactants

    PubMed Central

    Hoctor, Terri L.; Gibb, Timothy J.; Bigelow, Cale A.; Richmond, Douglas S.

    2012-01-01

    This laboratory study examined viability and infectivity of the entomopathogenic nematode (EPN) Heterorhabditis bacteriophora Poinar in solutions containing four different turfgrass soil surfactants: Revolution (Aquatrols Corp., Paulsboro, NJ), Aqueduct (Aquatrols Corp., Paulsboro, NJ), Cascade Plus (Precision Laboratories Inc., Waukegan, IL) and OARS (Aqua-Aid Inc., Rocky Mount, NC). Infective juvenile H. bacteriophora were added to solutions containing each of the four surfactants, and nematode viability and infectivity were monitored over time. In one of two trials, nematode survival in solutions containing the surfactants Aqueduct and Cascade Plus was consistently higher compared to the water control and solutions containing Revolution or OARS. Surfactants had no significant influence on nematode infectivity in either trial. Findings indicate that most of the common turfgrass soil surfactants examined should be compatible with EPNs and that some may potentially enhance nematode survival. Results also imply that tank-mixing of EPNs with most turfgrass soil surfactants should not pose a significant risk to the nematodes. The influence of soil surfactants on EPN performance remains to be examined in the field. PMID:26466792

  5. In vitro and in vivo anthelmintic activity of Murraya koenigii against gastro-intestinal nematodes of sheep.

    PubMed

    Molla, Sabir Hossen; Bandyopadhyay, Probir Kumar

    2016-06-01

    The present study have been conducted to evaluate the anthelmintic activity of crude aqueous and crude methanolic leaf extracts of Murraya koenigii. Infection of ruminants with gastro-intestinal (GI) parasite has become a worldwide problem. The parasite causes economic losses in a variety of ways. Previously sheep producers relied heavily on anti-parasitic drugs to control gastro-intestinal parasites of the flocks. But due to misuse of these drugs the parasites become resistant to drugs. Thus created interest in studying medicinal plants as an alternative source of controlling the GI parasites. Adult motility assay (AMA) and egg hatch assay (EHA) have been done for in vitro study, and faecal egg count reduction (FECR) assay have been done for in vivo study. The in vitro study revealed anthelmintic effects of M. koenigii on Haemonchus contortus as evident from their paralytic condition and/or death at eight hour post exposure in different concentrations (12.5, 25, 50 mg/ml) of aqueous and methanolic extracts which exhibit to be dose-dependent. Aqueous and methanolic extracts of M. koenigii were found to have low percent inhibitory effect on egg hatching. It may be concluded that M. koenigii showed significant anthelmintic activity.

  6. Systemic Suppression of the Shoot Metabolism upon Rice Root Nematode Infection

    PubMed Central

    Kyndt, Tina; Denil, Simon; Bauters, Lander; Van Criekinge, Wim; De Meyer, Tim

    2014-01-01

    Hirschmanniella oryzae is the most common plant-parasitic nematode in flooded rice cultivation systems. These migratory animals penetrate the plant roots and feed on the root cells, creating large cavities, extensive root necrosis and rotting. The objective of this study was to investigate the systemic response of the rice plant upon root infection by this nematode. RNA sequencing was applied on the above-ground parts of the rice plants at 3 and 7 days post inoculation. The data revealed significant modifications in the primary metabolism of the plant shoot, with a general suppression of for instance chlorophyll biosynthesis, the brassinosteroid pathway, and amino acid production. In the secondary metabolism, we detected a repression of the isoprenoid and shikimate pathways. These molecular changes can have dramatic consequences for the growth and yield of the rice plants, and could potentially change their susceptibility to above-ground pathogens and pests. PMID:25216177

  7. Systemic suppression of the shoot metabolism upon rice root nematode infection.

    PubMed

    Kyndt, Tina; Denil, Simon; Bauters, Lander; Van Criekinge, Wim; De Meyer, Tim

    2014-01-01

    Hirschmanniella oryzae is the most common plant-parasitic nematode in flooded rice cultivation systems. These migratory animals penetrate the plant roots and feed on the root cells, creating large cavities, extensive root necrosis and rotting. The objective of this study was to investigate the systemic response of the rice plant upon root infection by this nematode. RNA sequencing was applied on the above-ground parts of the rice plants at 3 and 7 days post inoculation. The data revealed significant modifications in the primary metabolism of the plant shoot, with a general suppression of for instance chlorophyll biosynthesis, the brassinosteroid pathway, and amino acid production. In the secondary metabolism, we detected a repression of the isoprenoid and shikimate pathways. These molecular changes can have dramatic consequences for the growth and yield of the rice plants, and could potentially change their susceptibility to above-ground pathogens and pests.

  8. Ice-Active Substances from the Infective Juveniles of the Freeze Tolerant Entomopathogenic Nematode, Steinernema feltiae.

    PubMed

    Ali, Farman; Wharton, David A

    2016-01-01

    Steinernema feltiae is a moderately freezing tolerant nematode, that can withstand intracellular ice formation. We investigated recrystallization inhibition, thermal hysteresis and ice nucleation activities in the infective juveniles of S. feltiae. Both the splat cooling assay and optical recrystallometry indicate the presence of ice active substances that inhibit recrystallization in the nematode extract. The substance is relatively heat stable and largely retains the recrystallization inhibition activity after heating. No thermal hysteresis activity was detected but the extract had a typical hexagonal crystal shape when grown from a single seed crystal and weak ice nucleation activity. An ice active substance is present in a low concentration, which may be involved in the freezing survival of this species by inhibiting ice recrystallization.

  9. Nematode larvae infecting Priacanthus arenatus Cuvier, 1829 (Pisces: Teleostei) in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Kuraiem, Bianca P; Knoff, Marcelo; Felizardo, Nilza N; Gomes, Delir C; Clemente, Sérgio C São

    2016-05-31

    From July to December, 2013, thirty Priacanthus arenatus specimens commercialized in the cities of Niterói and Rio de Janeiro, State of Rio de Janeiro, were acquired. The fish were necropsied and filleted to investigate the presence of nematode larvae. Twenty fish (66.7%) out of the total were parasitized by nematode larvae. A total of 2024 larvae were collected; among them, 30 third-instar larvae of Anisakis sp. showed prevalence (P) = 20%, mean abundance (MA) = 1, and the mean intensity (MI) = 5, and infection sites (IS) = caecum, stomach, liver, and mesentery; and 1,994 third-instar larvae (1,757 encysted and 237 free) of Hysterothylacium deardorffoverstreetorum with P = 66.7%, MA = 66.5, and MI = 99.7, and IS = spleen, caecum, stomach, liver, mesentery, and abdominal muscle. This is the first study to report H. deardorffoverstreetorum and Anisakis sp. larvae parasitizing P. arenatus.

  10. Ice-Active Substances from the Infective Juveniles of the Freeze Tolerant Entomopathogenic Nematode, Steinernema feltiae

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Farman; Wharton, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Steinernema feltiae is a moderately freezing tolerant nematode, that can withstand intracellular ice formation. We investigated recrystallization inhibition, thermal hysteresis and ice nucleation activities in the infective juveniles of S. feltiae. Both the splat cooling assay and optical recrystallometry indicate the presence of ice active substances that inhibit recrystallization in the nematode extract. The substance is relatively heat stable and largely retains the recrystallization inhibition activity after heating. No thermal hysteresis activity was detected but the extract had a typical hexagonal crystal shape when grown from a single seed crystal and weak ice nucleation activity. An ice active substance is present in a low concentration, which may be involved in the freezing survival of this species by inhibiting ice recrystallization. PMID:27227961

  11. Do gastrointestinal tract infections in infancy increase blood pressure in childhood? A cohort study.

    PubMed

    Martin, R M; Kramer, M S; Dahhou, M; Platt, R W; Patel, R; Bogdanovich, N; Matush, L; Davey Smith, G

    2010-12-01

    It has been hypothesised that dehydration in infancy could permanently increase sodium retention, raising blood pressure in later life. In this study, the association between gastrointestinal tract infection in infancy, a clinically relevant exposure often accompanied by dehydration, and raised blood pressure in childhood was investigated. Data from a cohort study nested within a cluster-randomised trial of breastfeeding promotion in the Republic of Belarus were analysed. 17 046 healthy breastfed infants were enrolled from 31 maternity hospitals. 13 889 (81.5%) children were followed-up at 6.5 years. Exposure measures were any gastrointestinal infection in infancy (to 1 year) and hospitalisations for gastrointestinal infection in infancy and in childhood (1-6.5 years). The outcomes were systolic and diastolic blood pressure at age 6.5 years. The prevalence of any gastrointestinal infection in infancy, and of hospitalisation for gastrointestinal infection in infancy or childhood, was 11.4%, 3.2% and 6.0%, respectively. No associations were observed between systolic blood pressure and any gastrointestinal infection (mean difference in those with minus those without infection -0.04 mm Hg; 95% CI -0.52 to 0.43) or hospitalisation for gastrointestinal infection (difference=-0.22 mm Hg; -1.07 to 0.64) in infancy. Nor were associations observed between diastolic blood pressure and any gastrointestinal infection during infancy or hospitalisation for gastrointestinal infection during infancy or childhood. No evidence was found to prove that hospitalisation for gastrointestinal infection in infancy or childhood leads to raised blood pressure at age 6.5 years in a developed country setting.

  12. Impact of drainage and sewerage on intestinal nematode infections in poor urban areas in Salvador, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Moraes, L R S; Cancio, Jacira Azevedo; Cairncross, Sandy

    2004-04-01

    This cross-sectional study was conducted in 1989 among children aged between 5 and 14 years old living in nine poor urban areas of the city of Salvador (pop. 2.44 million), capital of Bahia State, in Northeast Brazil. Three of these areas had benefited from both drainage and sewerage, 3 from improved drainage only, and 3 from neither. The children studied thus belonged to 3 exposure groups regarding their level of sanitation infrastructure. An extensive questionnaire was applied to collect information on each child and on the conditions of the household, and stool examinations of the children 5-14 years old were performed to measure nematode infection. Comparison of the sewerage group with the drainage-only group and the latter with the control (no sewerage or drainage) group showed that, when the level of community sanitation was better, the prevalence of infection among children was less, but risk factors identified for infection were more numerous and more significant. Intensity of infection with Trichuris, but not with Ascaris or hookworm, was also less. The results suggest that sewerage and drainage can have a significant effect on intestinal nematode infections, by reducing transmission occurring in the public domain.

  13. [Investigation of Soil-Transmitted Nematode Infections in Xuchang City of Henan Province in 2012].

    PubMed

    PENG, Jin-hua

    2015-10-01

    The Weidu District, Yanling County and Yuzhou City were selected in Xuchang City for investigation of the status of soil-transmitted nematode infections in 2012, in accordance with the National Monitoring Program for Soil-Transmitted Nematodiasis (2011 Revised Edition). Kato-Katz technique was used to detect soil- transmitted nematodes in feces of residents over 3 years old, and the cellophane tape peri-anal swab method was used to detect pinworm eggs in children between 3-12 years. A total of 2 991 fecal samples were examined. The total infection rate of soil-transmitted nematodiasis was 4.3%(128/2 991), decreased by 63.0% and 55.1% when compared with that in 2010 (11.6%) and that in Henan Province in 2004 (9.5%) respectively. The infection rates of roundworms, whipworms, hookworms and pinworms were 3.7%(110/2 991), 0.3%(9/2 991) , 0.1%(3/2 991) , and 0.2% ( 6/2 991) , respectively, all showing mild intensity of infection. The infection rate of soil-transmitted nematodiasis was highest in farmers (5.5%, 113/2 059), followed by children (3.1%, 3/98).

  14. Change in milk production after treatment against gastrointestinal nematodes according to grazing history, parasitological and production-based indicators in adult dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Ravinet, N; Bareille, N; Lehebel, A; Ponnau, A; Chartier, C; Chauvin, A

    2014-03-17

    To investigate future tools for targeted selective treatment against gastrointestinal nematodes (GIN) in adult dairy cows, we evaluated herd and individual cow factors associated with the post-treatment milk production (MP) response over time. A field trial involving 20 pasturing dairy herds in Western France was conducted in autumn 2010 and autumn 2011. In each herd, lactating cows were randomly allocated to a treatment group (fenbendazole) (623 cows), or a control group (631 cows). Daily cow MP was recorded from 2 weeks before until 10 to 14 weeks after treatment. Individual serum anti-Ostertagia antibody levels (expressed as ODR), pepsinogen levels, faecal egg count (FEC), and bulk tank milk ODR were measured at the time of treatment. Moreover, in each herd, information regarding heifers' grazing and treatment history was collected to assess the Time of Effective Contact (TEC, expressed in months) with GIN infective larvae before the first calving. TEC was expected to reflect the development of immunity against GIN, and TEC=8 months was a cautious threshold over which the resistance to re-infection was expected to be established. Daily MP averaged by week was analyzed using linear mixed models with three nested random effects (cow within herd and herd within year). The overall treatment effect was significant but slight (maximum=+0.85 kg/d on week 6 after treatment), and the evolution of treated cows' MP differed significantly according to several factors. At the herd level, cows from low-TEC herds responded better than cows from high-TEC (≥ 8 months) herds; cows from herds in which the percentage of positive FEC was >22.6% (median value) responded better than those from herds where it was lower. At the individual cow level, primiparous cows, cows with days in milk (DIM) < or = 100 at the time of treatment, and cows with low individual ODR (< or = 0.38) responded better than multiparous cows, cows with DIM>100, and cows with higher ODR, respectively. These

  15. Novel insights in the faecal egg count reduction test for monitoring drug efficacy against gastrointestinal nematodes of veterinary importance.

    PubMed

    Levecke, B; Dobson, R J; Speybroeck, N; Vercruysse, J; Charlier, J

    2012-09-10

    The faecal egg count reduction test (FECRT) is the method of choice to monitor anthelmintic efficacy against gastro-intestinal nematodes in livestock. Guidelines on how to conduct a FECRT are made available by the World Association for the Advancement of Veterinary Parasitology (WAAVP). Since the publication of these guidelines in the early 1990 s, some limitations have been noted, including (i) the ignorance of host-parasite interactions that depend on animal and parasite species, (ii) their feasibility under field conditions, (iii) appropriateness of study design, and (iv) the high detection limit of the recommended faecal egg count (FEC) method. Therefore, the objective of the present study was to empirically assess the impact of the level of excretion and aggregation of FEC, sample size and detection limit of the FEC method on the sensitivity and specificity of the FECRT to detect reduced efficacy (<90% or <95%) and to develop recommendations for surveys on anthelmintic resistance. A simulation study was performed in which the FECRT (based on the arithmetic mean of grouped FEC of the same animals before and after drug administration) was conducted under varying conditions of mean FEC, aggregation of FEC (inversely correlated with k), sample size, detection limit and 'true' drug efficacies. Classification trees were built to explore the impact of the above factors on the sensitivity and specificity of detecting a truly reduced efficacy. For a reduced-efficacy threshold of 90%, most combinations resulted in a reliable detection of reduced and normal efficacy. For the reduced-efficacy threshold of 95% however, unreli