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Sample records for gastrointestinal stromal tumors

  1. Gastrointestinal stromal tumor

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Changjun

    2012-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumor has received a lot of attention over the last 10 years due to its unique biologic behavior, clinicopathological features, molecular mechanisms, and treatment implications. GIST is the most common mesenchymal neoplasm in the gastrointestinal tract and has emerged from a poorly understood and treatment resistant neoplasm to a well-defined tumor entity since the discovery of particular molecular abnormalities, KIT and PDGFRA gene mutations. The understanding of GIST biology at the molecular level promised the development of novel treatment modalities. Diagnosis of GIST depends on the integrity of histology, immunohistochemistry and molecular analysis. The risk assessment of the tumor behavior relies heavily on pathological evaluation and significantly impacts clinical management. In this review, historic review, epidemiology, pathogenesis and genetics, diagnosis, role of molecular analysis, prognostic factor and treatment strategies have been discussed. PMID:22943011

  2. Management of Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors.

    PubMed

    von Mehren, Margaret

    2016-10-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors had the reputation for poor outcomes because of their lack of response to nonsurgical interventions. The discovery of gain-of-function mutations involving receptor tyrosine kinase growth factor receptors altered the biological understanding and management. Beginning in 2000, management of these tumors has changed dramatically because of the availability of tyrosine kinase inhibitors. The role of surgery continues to be refined. This article reviews how surgery and systemic therapy are being used, incorporating definitions of risk. Decisions on how to treat a patient is based on the risk of progression, pathologic characteristics, and tumor location. PMID:27542643

  3. What's New in Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor Research and Treatment?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Topic Additional resources for gastrointestinal stromal tumor What’s new in gastrointestinal stromal tumor research and treatment? There ... GIST) Talking With Your Doctor After Treatment What`s New in Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor (GIST) Research? Other Resources ...

  4. Two Hundred Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors

    PubMed Central

    DeMatteo, Ronald P.; Lewis, Jonathan J.; Leung, Denis; Mudan, Satvinder S.; Woodruff, James M.; Brennan, Murray F.

    2000-01-01

    Objective To analyze the outcome of 200 patients with gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) who were treated at a single institution and followed up prospectively. Summary Background Data A GIST is a visceral sarcoma that arises from the gastrointestinal tract. Surgical resection is the mainstay of treatment because adjuvant therapy is unproven. Methods Two hundred patients with malignant GIST were admitted and treated at Memorial Hospital during the past 16 years. Patient, tumor, and treatment variables were analyzed to identify patterns of tumor recurrence and factors that predict survival. Results Of the 200 patients, 46% had primary disease without metastasis, 47% had metastasis, and 7% had isolated local recurrence. In patients with primary disease who underwent complete resection of gross disease (n = 80), the 5-year actuarial survival rate was 54%, and survival was predicted by tumor size but not microscopic margins of resection. Recurrence of disease after resection was predominantly intraabdominal and involved the original tumor site, peritoneum, and liver. Conclusions GISTs are uncommon sarcomas. Tumor size predicts disease-specific survival in patients with primary disease who undergo complete gross resection. Tumor recurrence tends to be intraabdominal. Investigational protocols are indicated to reduce the rate of recurrence after resection and to improve the outcome for patients with GIST. PMID:10636102

  5. Surgical Treatment of Gastric Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Seong-Ho

    2013-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumor is the most common mesenchymal tumor in the gastrointestinal tract and is most frequently developed in the stomach in the form of submucosal tumor. The incidence of gastric gastrointestinal stromal tumor is estimated to be as high as 25% of the population when all small and asymptomatic tumors are included. Because gastric gastrointestinal stromal tumor is not completely distinguished from other submucosal tumors, a surgical excisional biopsy is recommended for tumors >2 cm. The surgical principles of gastrointestinal stromal tumor are composed of an R0 resection with a normal mucosa margin, no systemic lymph node dissection, and avoidance of perforation, which results in peritoneal seeding even in cases with otherwise low risk profiles. Laparoscopic surgery has been indicated for gastrointestinal stromal tumors <5 cm, and the indication for laparoscopic surgery is expanded to larger tumors if the above mentioned surgical principles can be maintained. A simple exogastric resection and various transgastric resection techniques are used for gastrointestinal stromal tumors in favorable locations (the fundus, body, greater curvature side). For a lesion at the gastroesophageal junction in the posterior wall of the stomach, enucleation techniques have been tried preserve the organ's function. Those methods have a theoretical risk of seeding a ruptured tumor, but this risk has not been evaluated by well-designed clinical trials. While some clinical trials are still on-going, neoadjuvant imatinib is suggested when marginally unresectable or multiorgan resection is anticipated to reduce the extent of surgery and the chance of incomplete resection, rupture or bleeding. PMID:23610714

  6. Androgen receptor expression in gastrointestinal stromal tumor.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Lisandro F; Bacchi, Carlos E

    2009-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the expression of estrogen, progesterone, and androgen receptors in a large series of gastrointestinal stromal tumors. Clinical and pathologic data were reviewed in 427 cases of gastrointestinal stromal tumor and the expression of such hormone receptors was investigated by immunohistochemistry using tissue microarray technique. All tumors were negative for estrogen receptor expression. Progesterone and androgen receptors expression was observed in 5.4% and 17.6% of tumors, respectively. We found the higher average age at diagnosis, the lower frequency of tumors located in the small intestine, and the higher frequency of extragastrointestinal tumors to be statistically significant in the group of tumors with androgen receptor expression in contrast to the group showing no androgen receptor expression. There was no statistic difference between such groups regarding sex, tumor size, mitotic count, cell morphology, and risk of aggressive behavior. Considering that the expression of androgen receptors in gastrointestinal stromal tumors is not negligible, further studies are encouraged to establish the role of androgen deprivation therapy for gastrointestinal stromal tumors.

  7. What Are Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors?

    MedlinePlus

    ... the digestive system. The gastrointestinal system The gastrointestinal (GI) system (or digestive system) processes food for energy ... bloodstream. This is the longest section of the GI tract, measuring more than 20 feet. The small ...

  8. HER-2 status in gastrointestinal stromal tumor.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Lisandro Ferreira; Bacchi, Carlos E

    2008-08-01

    Human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER-2) encodes for the transmembrane glycoprotein HER-2 that is involved in activation of intracellular signal transduction pathways that control cell growth and differentiation. HER-2 is overexpressed in approximately 20% of patients with breast cancer and has been associated with poorer prognosis. Since 1998, the anti-HER-2 antibody trastuzumab has been used for the treatment of patients with HER-2-positive breast cancers. However, little information is available about the relationship between HER-2 and gastrointestinal stromal tumors. This study's purpose was to determine the HER-2 status in gastrointestinal stromal tumors. We found that all 477 cases included in this study were negative (score 0) by immunohistochemistry using HercepTest, and no HER-2 gene amplification was detected in 71 cases submitted to fluorescence in situ hybridization. These results show that HER-2 may not have any role in gastrointestinal stromal tumor pathogenesis and that the neoplasm may not be suitable for treatment with trastuzumab.

  9. Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor – An Evolving Concept

    PubMed Central

    Tornillo, Luigi

    2014-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are the most frequent mesenchymal tumors of the gastrointestinal tract. The discovery that these tumors, formerly thought of smooth muscle origin, are indeed better characterized by specific activating mutation in genes coding for the receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) CKIT and PDGFRA and that these mutations are strongly predictive for the response to targeted therapy with RTK inhibitors has made GISTs the typical example of the integration of basic molecular knowledge in the daily clinical activity. The information on the mutational status of these tumors is essential to predict (and subsequently to plan) the therapy. As resistant cases are frequently wild type, other possible oncogenic events, defining other “entities,” have been discovered (e.g., succinil dehydrogenase mutation/dysregulation, insuline growth factor expression, and mutations in the RAS-RAF-MAPK pathway). The classification of disease must nowadays rely on the integration of the clinico-morphological characteristics with the molecular data. PMID:25593916

  10. Gastrointestinal stromal tumor - an evolving concept.

    PubMed

    Tornillo, Luigi

    2014-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are the most frequent mesenchymal tumors of the gastrointestinal tract. The discovery that these tumors, formerly thought of smooth muscle origin, are indeed better characterized by specific activating mutation in genes coding for the receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) CKIT and PDGFRA and that these mutations are strongly predictive for the response to targeted therapy with RTK inhibitors has made GISTs the typical example of the integration of basic molecular knowledge in the daily clinical activity. The information on the mutational status of these tumors is essential to predict (and subsequently to plan) the therapy. As resistant cases are frequently wild type, other possible oncogenic events, defining other "entities," have been discovered (e.g., succinil dehydrogenase mutation/dysregulation, insuline growth factor expression, and mutations in the RAS-RAF-MAPK pathway). The classification of disease must nowadays rely on the integration of the clinico-morphological characteristics with the molecular data. PMID:25593916

  11. Gastrointestinal stromal tumors: the histology report.

    PubMed

    Dei Tos, Angelo P; Laurino, Licia; Bearzi, Italo; Messerini, Luca; Farinati, Fabio

    2011-03-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) represent a mesenchymal neoplasm occurring primarily in the gastrointestinal tract, and showing differentiation toward the interstitial cell of Cajal. Its incidence is approximately 15 case/100,000/year. Stomach and small bowel are the most frequently affected anatomic sites. GIST represents a morphological, immunophenotypical and molecular distinct entity, the recognition of which has profound therapeutic implications. In fact, they have shown an exquisite sensitivity to treatment with the tyrosine kinase inhibitor imatinib. Diagnosis relies upon morphology along with immunodetection of KIT and/or DOG1. When dealing with KIT negative cases, molecular analysis of KIT/PDGFRA genes may help in confirming diagnosis. Molecular evaluation of both genes are in any case recommended as mutational status provides key predictive information. Pathologists also play a key role in providing an estimation of the risk of biological aggressiveness, which is currently based on anatomic location of the tumor, size, and mitotic activity.

  12. Combined Therapy of Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors.

    PubMed

    Rutkowski, Piotr; Hompes, Daphne

    2016-10-01

    Radical surgery is the mainstay of therapy for primary resectable, localized gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST). Nevertheless, approximately 40% to 50% of patients with potentially curative resections develop recurrent or metastatic disease. The introduction of imatinib mesylate has revolutionized the therapy of advanced (inoperable and/or metastatic) GIST and has become the standard of care in treatment of patients with advanced GIST. This article discusses the proper selection of candidates for adjuvant and neoadjuvant treatment in locally advanced GIST, exploring the available evidence behind the combination of preoperative imatinib and surgery. PMID:27591496

  13. Giant gastrointestinal stromal tumor of the stomach.

    PubMed

    Ionescu, Sever; Barbu, Emil; Ionescu, Călin; Costache, Adrian; Bălăşoiu, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are the most common mesenchymal malignancies of the digestive tract. Gastric localization is the most frequent. The aim of this study is to evaluate the importance of immunohistochemical factors (CD117, CD34, α-SMA, vimentin, p53, Ki67) in diagnostic and size tumor and mitotic activity as prognostic factors for these tumors. We present the case of a 66-year-old male patient with a giant gastric GIST. Like in the vast majority, the symptomatology in this patient has long been faint, despite the large tumor size, and when it became manifest, it was nonspecific. Imagery wise, the computer tomography (CT) scan was the most efficient, showing the origin of the tumor from the greater curvature of the stomach, its dimensions, as well as the relations with the other abdominal viscera. Surgery in this patient was en-bloc, according to the principles of GIST. The histological aspect is characterized by a proliferation of spindle cells positive for CD117 and CD34. Despite complete microscopic resection, the size of the tumor (25×20×27 cm) and the mitotic activity (21÷5 mm2) remains important relapse factor.

  14. Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) and second malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Rodriquenz, Maria Grazia; Rossi, Sabrina; Ricci, Riccardo; Martini, Maurizio; Larocca, Mario; Dipasquale, Angelo; Quirino, Michela; Schinzari, Giovanni; Basso, Michele; D’Argento, Ettore; Strippoli, Antonia; Barone, Carlo; Cassano, Alessandra

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Several evidences showed that patients with gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) develop additional malignancies. However, thorough incidence of second tumors remains uncertain as the possibility of a common molecular pathogenesis. A retrospective series of 128 patients with histologically proven GIST treated at our institution was evaluated. Molecular analysis of KIT and PDGFR-α genes was performed in all patients. Following the involvement of KRAS mutation in many tumors’ pathogenesis, analysis of KRAS was performed in patients with also second neoplasms. Forty-six out of 128 GIST patients (35.9%) had a second neoplasm. Most second tumors (52%) raised from gastrointestinal tract and 19.6% from genitourinary tract. Benign neoplasms were also included (21.7%). Molecular analysis was available for 29/46 patients with a second tumor: wild-type GISTs (n. 5), exon 11 (n. 16), exon 13 (n. 1), exon 9 (n. 1) KIT mutations, exon 14 PDGFR-α mutation (n. 2) and exon 18 PDGFR-α mutation (n. 4). KIT exon 11 mutations were more frequent between patients who developed a second tumor (P = 0.0003). Mutational analysis of KRAS showed a wild-type sequence in all cases. In metachronous cases, the median time interval between GIST and second tumor was 21.5 months. The high frequency of second tumors suggests that an unknown common molecular mechanism might play a role, but it is not likely that KRAS is involved in this common pathogenesis. The short interval between GIST diagnosis and the onset of second neoplasms asks for a careful follow-up, particularly in the first 3 years after diagnosis. PMID:27661019

  15. Prevalence and management of gastrointestinal stromal tumors.

    PubMed

    Machado-Aranda, David; Malamet, Matthew; Chang, Yeon-Jeen; Jacobs, Michael J; Ferguson, Lorenzo; Silapaswan, Sumet; Goriel, Yousif; Kolachalam, R; Mittal, Vijay K

    2009-01-01

    The prevalence and characteristics of patients with confirmed gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) in a community hospital over a 6-year period are described. Our objective was to communicate our experience managing this rare tumor of the gastrointestinal tract. A retrospective chart review was performed. Patients were selected based on International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision codes in correlation with their respective confirmational pathology. Patients with a diagnosis of GIST, cells of Cajal tumor, and/or different varieties of gastrointestinal sarcoma were included in this study. These tumors had to have a positive C-kit on immunohistochemistry. Demographic and clinical data were collected from medical records as well as pathology reports. Follow up from attendings' office records and telephone interviews complemented our data. A total of 61 patients was identified in our institution (averaging 10 patients per year). Females represented 63 per cent of our series. The average ages were 70.2 +/- 19.1 years for females and 59.4 +/- 13.5 years for males (P < 0.01). The most common clinical presentation was an intra-abdominal nonobstructing mass followed by an endoscopically detected mass or incidental tumors found during unrelated surgery. Surgical emergencies such as acute abdomen and gastrointestinal bleed were rare. Over half of these tumors were located in the stomach. Other sites were the small intestine, colon, esophagus, and rectal-vaginal septum. Opened surgical resection was performed in two-thirds of treated cases, whereas laparoscopic resection was done in the remainder. Only 18 per cent of these tumors were considered benign, whereas 35 per cent were considered to have some malignant potential and 47 per cent were of undetermined potential. In surgically resected tumors, we found a 42 per cent recurrence rate with a median average time of recurrence of 22 months. Pathologic grading and type of surgery were not predictors of rate and timing

  16. Gastrointestinal stromal tumor presenting with prominent calcification

    PubMed Central

    Izawa, Naoki; Sawada, Takeshi; Abiko, Ryuichi; Kumon, Daisuke; Hirakawa, Mami; Kobayashi, Mika; Obinata, Nobuyuki; Nomoto, Masahito; Maehata, Tadateru; Yamauchi, Shun-ichi; Kouro, Takefumi; Tsuda, Takashi; Kitajima, Satoshi; Yasuda, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Keiichi; Tanaka, Ichiro; Hoshikawa, Masahiro; Takagi, Masayuki; Itoh, Fumio

    2012-01-01

    We present a rare case of a gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) in the stomach with prominent calcification at presentation. A 61-year-old woman visited our hospital because of epigastric discomfort. A spherical calcified lesion with a diameter of about 30 mm was incidentally shown in the left upper quadrant on an abdominal X-ray. Computed tomography demonstrated that the tumor was growing from the upper gastric body, with calcification in the peripheral ring area. A laparoscopic partial gastrectomy was performed, and the resected specimen revealed a well-circumscribed tumor with exophytic growth from the gastric muscularis propria. Microscopic examination revealed spindle-shaped tumor cells with calcification and hemorrhage. Additionally, positive immunoreactivity of the tumor to KIT and CD34 and a low mitotic index resulted in the diagnosis of very low risk GIST. There are a few case reports of heavily calcified GIST, although solitary or punctate calcification of primary GIST has been reported in several case series. Dystrophic calcification of necrotic or degenerative tissue is the supposed cause of primary calcified GISTs. In contrast, appearance of calcification after administration of imatinib mesylate, which may be one indicator of disease response, is possibly caused by a different mechanism. PMID:23112561

  17. LAPAROSCOPIC RESECTION OF GASTROINTESTINAL STROMAL TUMORS (GIST)

    PubMed Central

    LOUREIRO, Marcelo de Paula; de ALMEIDA, Rômulo Augusto Andrade; CLAUS, Christiano Marlo Paggi; BONIN, Eduardo Aimoré; CURY-FILHO,, Antônio Moris; DIMBARRE, Daniellson; da COSTA, Marco Aurélio Raeder; VITAL, Marcílio Lisboa

    2016-01-01

    Background Gastrointestinal mesenchymal or stromal tumors (GIST) are lesions originated on digestive tract walls, which are treated by surgical resection. Several laparoscopic techniques, from gastrectomies to segmental resections, have been used successfully. Aim Describe a single center experience on laparoscopic GIST resection. Method Charts of 15 operated patients were retrospectively reviewed. Thirteen had gastric lesions, of which ten were sub epithelial, ranging from 2-8 cm; and three were pure exofitic growing lesions. The remaining two patients had small bowel lesions. Surgical laparoscopic treatment consisted of two distal gastrectomies, 11 wedge gastric resections and two segmental enterectomies. Mechanical suture was used in the majority of patients except on six, which underwent resection and closure using manual absorbable sutures. There were no conversions to open technique. Results Mean operative time was 1h 29 min±92 (40-420 min). Average lenght of hospital stay was three days (2-6 days). There were no leaks, postoperative bleeding or need for reintervention. Mean postoperative follow-up was 38±17 months (6-60 months). Three patients underwent adjuvant Imatinib treatment, one for recurrence five months postoperatively and two for tumors with moderate risk for recurrence . Conclusion Laparoscopic GIST resection, not only for small lesions but also for tumors above 5 cm, is safe and acceptable technique. PMID:27120729

  18. Divergent gastrointestinal stromal tumors in syndromic settings.

    PubMed

    Ricci, Riccardo; Martini, Maurizio; Cenci, Tonia; Riccioni, Maria Elena; Maria, Giorgio; Cassano, Alessandra; Larocca, Luigi Maria

    2016-01-01

    The vast majority of gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) occur as sporadic tumors. Rarely, however, these neoplasms can arise in syndromic contexts. Under these circumstances, GISTs are often multiple and associated with accompanying signs peculiar of the hosting syndrome. Moreover, syndromic GISTs themselves tend to show heterogeneous features depending on the underlying condition. Multiple inflammatory fibroid polyps (IFPs) and a jejunal spindle-cell GIST were resected in a germline PDGFRA-mutant individual. Although the association of IFP and GIST is typical of this genetic setting (PDGFRA mutations can in fact trigger both these tumor types), PDGFRA-mutant GISTs are usually epithelioid and gastric. This discrepancy was settled evidencing a somatic KIT mutation in the GIST. The awareness of possible somatic mutations can be critical in the management of high-risk/malignant GISTs arising in syndromic settings. GIST features unusual for a given GIST-predisposing syndrome are a valuable tool in the hands of physicians for suspecting these "extra" triggers, which could not be sought for once a diagnosis of GIST-prone syndrome is well established, in a bona fide cost/benefit perspective. PMID:27318444

  19. Succinate dehydrogenase-deficient gastrointestinal stromal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ya-Mei; Gu, Meng-Li; Ji, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Most gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are characterized by KIT or platelet-derived growth factor alpha (PDGFRA) activating mutations. However, there are still 10%-15% of GISTs lacking KIT and PDGFRA mutations, called wild-type GISTs (WT GISTs). Among these so-called WT GISTs, a small subset is associated with succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) deficiency, known as SDH-deficient GISTs. In addition, GISTs that occur in Carney triad and Carney-Stratakis syndrome represent specific examples of SDH-deficient GISTs. SDH-deficient GISTs locate exclusively in the stomach, showing predilection for children and young adults with female preponderance. The tumor generally pursues an indolent course and exhibits primary resistance to imatinib therapy in most cases. Loss of succinate dehydrogenase subunit B expression and overexpression of insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF1R) are common features of SDH-deficient GISTs. In WT GISTs without succinate dehydrogenase activity, upregulation of hypoxia-inducible factor 1α may lead to increased growth signaling through IGF1R and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR). As a result, IGF1R and VEGFR are promising to be the novel therapeutic targets of GISTs. This review will update the current knowledge on characteristics of SDH-deficient GISTs and further discuss the possible mechanisms of tumorigenesis and clinical management of SDH-deficient GISTs. PMID:25741136

  20. [Surgical principles of gastrointestinal stromal tumors at different locations].

    PubMed

    Ye, Yingjiang; Gao, Zhidong; Wang, Shan

    2015-04-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors(GIST) are the most common mesenchymal tumors in gastrointestinal tract. At present, surgical and molecular targeted therapies are the main treatments. Operation is properly the only way of radical resection. The general principles of surgery are complete resection of the tumor, negative margins, as well as no intraoperative tumor rupture. The choice of surgical skills for GIST is obviously affected by different locations. This paper reviews current literatures combined with our experiences, and elaborates relevant contents in detail. PMID:25940165

  1. Gastrointestinal stromal tumors: current translational research and management modalities.

    PubMed

    Huang, R-X; Xiang, P; Huang, C

    2014-10-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are the most common mesenchymal neoplasms of the gastrointestinal tract. In recent years, detection of these subepithelial lesions has improved due to advances in endoscopic imaging techniques. Furthermore, developments in immunohistochemical technologies, allowing for reliable differentiation of GISTs from other subepithelial tumors, have improved the understanding of these lesions significantly. Alongside the emergence of these new technologies, clinical management of GISTs has progressed greatly in the last decade. However, major controversies still exist in various aspects of GIST management, such as diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis. This review article provides the current overview of the research status in the management of GISTs.

  2. Knowns and Known Unknowns of Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor Adjuvant Therapy.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Marín, Virginia; Maki, Robert G

    2016-09-01

    The first 15 years of management of gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) have led to 3 lines of therapy for metastatic disease: imatinib, sunitinib, and regorafenib. In the adjuvant setting, imatinib is usually given for 3 years postoperatively to patients with higher-risk primary tumors that are completely resected. In this review, issues regarding GIST adjuvant therapy are discussed. It is hoped this review will help the reader understand the present standard of care to improve upon it in years to come. PMID:27546844

  3. Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor Arising From a Gastric Duplication Cyst

    PubMed Central

    Machicado, Jorge; Davogustto, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Gastric duplication cysts (GDC) are rarely diagnosed in adults, but previous cases have been associated with malignancy. We present a case of gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) arising from a GDC in a 71-year-old woman who presented with 3 years of early satiety, anorexia, abdominal distention, and weight loss. Abdominal CT showed a 9.3 x 5.2 x 9.5-cm well-circumscribed cystic mass arising 3 cm above the gastroduodenal junction. The cyst was resected, and histopathology was consistent with GDC. Future studies are needed to clarify the malignant potential of GDC and the molecular pathways for its development. PMID:27144196

  4. Primary gastrointestinal stromal tumor of the liver: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Xiao-Li; Liu, Dan; Yang, Jian-Jun; Zheng, Min-Wen; Zhang, Jing; Zhou, Xiao-Dong

    2009-01-01

    We report a case of primary gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) of the liver. A 17-year-old man with a solid mass in the anterior segment of the right liver was asymptomatic with negative laboratory examinations with the exception of positive HBV. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) revealed a hypervascular lesion in the arterial phase and hypoechoic features during the portal and late phases. However, enhanced spiral computed tomography (CT) showed hypoattenuation in all three phases. Following biopsy, immunohistochemical evaluation demonstrated positive CD117. Different imaging features of primary GISTs of the liver are due to pathological properties and different working systems between CEUS and enhanced spiral CT. PMID:19653356

  5. Management of early asymptomatic gastrointestinal stromal tumors of the stomach

    PubMed Central

    Scherübl, Hans; Faiss, Siegbert; Knoefel, Wolfram-Trudo; Wardelmann, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) are the most common mesenchymal tumors of the digestive tract. Approximately two thirds of clinically manifest tumors occur in the stomach, nearly one third in the small bowel, and the rest in the colorectal region with a few cases in the esophagus. GIST originate within the smooth muscle layer in the wall of the tubular gastrointestinal tract and grow mostly toward the serosa, far less often toward the mucosa. In the latter case, ulceration may develop and can cause gastrointestinal bleeding as the cardinal symptom. However, most GIST of the stomach are asymptomatic. They are increasingly detected incidentally as small intramural or submucosal tumors during endoscopy and particularly during endoscopic ultrasound. Epidemiological and molecular genetic findings suggest that early asymptomatic GIST of the stomach (< 1 cm) show self-limiting tumorigenesis. Thus, early (< 1 cm) asymptomatic gastric GIST (synonym: micro-GIST) are found in 20%-30% of the elderly. The mostly elderly people with early gastric GIST have an excellent GIST-specific prognosis. Patients with early GIST of the stomach can therefore be managed by endoscopic surveillance. PMID:25031785

  6. The neo-adjuvant treatment in gastrointestinal stromal tumor.

    PubMed

    Catania, V; Consoli, A; Cavallaro, A; Liardo, R L E; Malaguarnera, M

    2010-08-01

    Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor (GIST) is a rare intra-abdominal tumor, characterized by a specific histological and immunohistochemical pattern. These tumors affect with higher frequency stomach and small bowel and occur at a median age of 60 years with a slight male predominance. An early stage of GIST often don't cause any symptoms, so most GISTs are diagnosed in later stages of the disease. We report a case of GIST diagnosed only with clinical data and positron emission tomography (PET). We demonstrate the usefulness of neoadjuvant treatment with Imatinib mesylate, a newly developed tyrosine kinase receptor inhibitor. The neoadjuvant treatment with Imatinib reduced the mass size and vascularization, making possible a surgical approach. PMID:20707293

  7. Acute Pancreatitis and Gastroduodenal Intussusception Induced by an Underlying Gastric Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Doğan, Ahmet; Koparan, Ibrahim Halil; Adin, Mehmet Emin

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are rare tumors of the gastrointestinal system and comprise only 1% to 3% of all gastrointestinal tract tumors, with the majority of them arising in the stomach. In this report, we present the unique findings of a case of gastroduodenal intussusception caused by an underlying gastric GIST and complicated with severe acute pancreatitis. PMID:27104028

  8. C-Kit-Negative Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor in the Stomach

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Ho Seok; Hyeon, Ji Yeon; Shin, Ok-Ran

    2015-01-01

    C-kit-negative gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are uncommon, and there have been few reports about the diagnosis and treatment of c-kit-negative GISTs in the stomach. We report the case of a patient who was diagnosed with a huge and atypical GIST in the stomach. The GIST was completely resected and finally diagnosed as c-kit-negative GIST based on immunohistochemical staining of tumor cells, which were negative for CD117 and CD34 and positive for Discovered on GIST-1 (DOG1). C-kit-negative GISTs could be treated by complete resection and/or imatinib, which is the same treatment for c-kit-positive GISTs. PMID:26819809

  9. Increased KIT inhibition enhances therapeutic efficacy in gastrointestinal stromal tumor

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Teresa S.; Cavnar, Michael J.; Cohen, Noah A.; Sorenson, Eric C.; Greer, Jonathan B.; Seifert, Adrian M.; Crawley, Megan H.; Green, Benjamin L.; Popow, Rachel; Pillarsetty, Nagavarakishore; Veach, Darren R.; Ku, Anson T.; Rossi, Ferdinand; Besmer, Peter; Antonescu, Cristina R.; Zeng, Shan; DeMatteo, Ronald P.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) is the most common human sarcoma and a model of targeted molecular therapy. GIST depends on oncogenic KIT signaling and responds to the tyrosine kinase inhibitor imatinib. However, imatinib is rarely curative. We hypothesized that PLX3397, which inhibits KIT and CSF1R, would be more efficacious than imatinib in GIST by also depleting tumor-associated macrophages, which are generally thought to support tumor growth. Experimental Design We treated KitV558del/+ mice that develop GIST or mice with subcutaneous human GIST xenografts with imatinib or PLX3397 and analyzed tumor weight, cellular composition, histology, molecular signaling, and fibrosis. In vitro assays on human GIST cell lines were also performed. Results PLX3397 was more effective than imatinib in reducing tumor weight and cellularity in both KitV558del/+ murine GIST and human GIST xenografts. The superiority of PLX3397 did not depend on depletion of tumor-associated macrophages, since adding CSF1R inhibition did not improve the effects of imatinib. Instead, PLX3397 was a more potent KIT inhibitor than imatinib in vitro. PLX3397 therapy also induced substantial intratumoral fibrosis, which impaired the subsequent delivery of small molecules. Conclusions PLX3397 therapy has greater efficacy than imatinib in pre-clinical GIST models and warrants study in GIST patients. The resultant intratumoral fibrosis may represent one of the barriers to achieving complete tumor eradication. PMID:24583793

  10. Perivascular epithelioid cell tumor of the liver coexisting with a gastrointestinal stromal tumor.

    PubMed

    Paiva, Carlos Eduardo; Moraes Neto, Francisco Alves; Agaimy, Abbas; Custodio Domingues, Maria Aparecida; Rogatto, Silvia Regina

    2008-02-01

    Approximately 10% of patients with gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) develop other neoplasms, either synchronously or metachronously. In this report we describe coexistence of a gastrointestinal stromal tumor and a hepatic perivascular epithelioid cell tumor (PEComa) in a 51-year-old woman with no evidence of tuberous sclerosis. A subcapsular hepatic nodule (0.8 cm in diameter) was found during surgery for symptomatic gastric neoplasm (15 cm in diameter) arising from the lesser curvature. Both tumors revealed histomorphological and immunohistochemical features confirming a diagnosis of a small incidental hepatic PEComa and a high risky extramural gastric GIST, respectively. The patient remained disease-free 25 mo after surgery with no evidence of tumor recurrence or new neoplasms. To our knowledge, this is the first report of PEComa in a patient with GIST. Hepatic lesions detected synchronously or metachronously in patients with GISTs may represent histogenetically distinct lesions and should be sampled to confirm or exclude metastatic GISTs.

  11. Laparoscopic resection of gastric gastrointestinal stromal tumors presenting as left adrenal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Shiu-Dong; Chueh, Jeff Shih-chieh; Yu, Hong-Jeng

    2012-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are rare gastrointestinal malignancies. They are rarely seen near the urinary tract. In a literature review, only one case of GIST presenting as a left adrenal tumor was reported. We report two documented cases of gastric GISTs mimicking left adrenal tumors which were successfully treated with pure laparoscopic adrenalectomy and wedge resection of the stomach by excising the tumor from the stomach with serial firing of endoscopic gastrointestinal staplers. The surgical margins were clear, and the patients recovered smoothly. No adjuvant therapy with imatinib was prescribed. During the surveillance for 9 mo and 44 mo respectively, no tumor recurrence and metastasis were documented. Laparoscopic tumor excision, when adhering to the principles of surgical oncology, seems feasible and the prognosis is favorable for such tumors. PMID:22228977

  12. Recurrent epimutation of SDHC in gastrointestinal stromal tumors.

    PubMed

    Killian, J Keith; Miettinen, Markku; Walker, Robert L; Wang, Yonghong; Zhu, Yuelin Jack; Waterfall, Joshua J; Noyes, Natalia; Retnakumar, Parvathy; Yang, Zhiming; Smith, William I; Killian, M Scott; Lau, C Christopher; Pineda, Marbin; Walling, Jennifer; Stevenson, Holly; Smith, Carly; Wang, Zengfeng; Lasota, Jerzy; Kim, Su Young; Boikos, Sosipatros A; Helman, Lee J; Meltzer, Paul S

    2014-12-24

    Succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) is a conserved effector of cellular metabolism and energy production, and loss of SDH function is a driver mechanism in several cancers. SDH-deficient gastrointestinal stromal tumors (dSDH GISTs) collectively manifest similar phenotypes, including hypermethylated epigenomic signatures, tendency to occur in pediatric patients, and lack of KIT/PDGFRA mutations. dSDH GISTs often harbor deleterious mutations in SDH subunit genes (SDHA, SDHB, SDHC, and SDHD, termed SDHx), but some are SDHx wild type (WT). To further elucidate mechanisms of SDH deactivation in SDHx-WT GIST, we performed targeted exome sequencing on 59 dSDH GISTs to identify 43 SDHx-mutant and 16 SDHx-WT cases. Genome-wide DNA methylation and expression profiling exposed SDHC promoter-specific CpG island hypermethylation and gene silencing in SDHx-WT dSDH GISTs [15 of 16 cases (94%)]. Six of 15 SDHC-epimutant GISTs occurred in the setting of the multitumor syndrome Carney triad. We observed neither SDHB promoter hypermethylation nor large deletions on chromosome 1q in any SDHx-WT cases. Deep genome sequencing of a 130-kbp (kilo-base pair) window around SDHC revealed no recognizable sequence anomalies in SDHC-epimutant tumors. More than 2000 benign and tumor reference tissues, including stem cells and malignancies with a hypermethylator epigenotype, exhibit solely a non-epimutant SDHC promoter. Mosaic constitutional SDHC promoter hypermethylation in blood and saliva from patients with SDHC-epimutant GIST implicates a postzygotic mechanism in the establishment and maintenance of SDHC epimutation. The discovery of SDHC epimutation provides a unifying explanation for the pathogenesis of dSDH GIST, whereby loss of SDH function stems from either SDHx mutation or SDHC epimutation. PMID:25540324

  13. Recurrent epimutation of SDHC in gastrointestinal stromal tumors.

    PubMed

    Killian, J Keith; Miettinen, Markku; Walker, Robert L; Wang, Yonghong; Zhu, Yuelin Jack; Waterfall, Joshua J; Noyes, Natalia; Retnakumar, Parvathy; Yang, Zhiming; Smith, William I; Killian, M Scott; Lau, C Christopher; Pineda, Marbin; Walling, Jennifer; Stevenson, Holly; Smith, Carly; Wang, Zengfeng; Lasota, Jerzy; Kim, Su Young; Boikos, Sosipatros A; Helman, Lee J; Meltzer, Paul S

    2014-12-24

    Succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) is a conserved effector of cellular metabolism and energy production, and loss of SDH function is a driver mechanism in several cancers. SDH-deficient gastrointestinal stromal tumors (dSDH GISTs) collectively manifest similar phenotypes, including hypermethylated epigenomic signatures, tendency to occur in pediatric patients, and lack of KIT/PDGFRA mutations. dSDH GISTs often harbor deleterious mutations in SDH subunit genes (SDHA, SDHB, SDHC, and SDHD, termed SDHx), but some are SDHx wild type (WT). To further elucidate mechanisms of SDH deactivation in SDHx-WT GIST, we performed targeted exome sequencing on 59 dSDH GISTs to identify 43 SDHx-mutant and 16 SDHx-WT cases. Genome-wide DNA methylation and expression profiling exposed SDHC promoter-specific CpG island hypermethylation and gene silencing in SDHx-WT dSDH GISTs [15 of 16 cases (94%)]. Six of 15 SDHC-epimutant GISTs occurred in the setting of the multitumor syndrome Carney triad. We observed neither SDHB promoter hypermethylation nor large deletions on chromosome 1q in any SDHx-WT cases. Deep genome sequencing of a 130-kbp (kilo-base pair) window around SDHC revealed no recognizable sequence anomalies in SDHC-epimutant tumors. More than 2000 benign and tumor reference tissues, including stem cells and malignancies with a hypermethylator epigenotype, exhibit solely a non-epimutant SDHC promoter. Mosaic constitutional SDHC promoter hypermethylation in blood and saliva from patients with SDHC-epimutant GIST implicates a postzygotic mechanism in the establishment and maintenance of SDHC epimutation. The discovery of SDHC epimutation provides a unifying explanation for the pathogenesis of dSDH GIST, whereby loss of SDH function stems from either SDHx mutation or SDHC epimutation.

  14. [Gastrointestinal stromal tumor of the abdominal wall. An unusual localization of a rare tumor].

    PubMed

    Thalheimer, A; Meyer, D; Gattenlöhner, S; Timmermann, W; Thiede, A

    2004-07-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) are the most common mesenchymal tumors of the gastrointestinal tract. We describe here for the first time a patient with a huge GIST of the abdominal wall without any relation to the gastrointestinal tract, omentum, or mesentery. With regard to the size of 24 cm and a low mitotic index, this GIST is considered an intermediate risk for metastasis. Radical surgical resection was performed with negative pathologic resection margins. The classic immunohistochemical phenotype of the tumor described facilitates the differential diagnosis to exclude abdominal desmoid tumor and solitary fibrous tumor (SFT). In the case of metastasis, therapeutic nihilism no longer seems justified with the availability of imatinib, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, which shows encouraging results in the therapy of metastatic GIST.

  15. Imaging and Clinicopathologic Features of Esophageal Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Winant, Abbey J.; Gollub, Marc J.; Shia, Jinru; Antonescu, Christina; Bains, Manjit S.; Levine, Marc S.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The purpose of this article is to describe the imaging and clinicopathologic characteristics of esophageal gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) and to emphasize the features that differentiate esophageal GISTs from esophageal leiomyomas. MATERIALS AND METHODS A pathology database search identified all surgically resected or biopsied esophageal GISTs, esophageal leiomyomas, and esophageal leiomyosarcomas from 1994 to 2012. Esophageal GISTs were included only if imaging studies (including CT, fluoroscopic, or 18F-FDG PET/CT scans) and clinical data were available. RESULTS Nineteen esophageal mesenchymal tumors were identified, including eight esophageal GISTs (42%), 10 esophageal leiomyomas (53%), and one esophageal leiomyosarcoma (5%). Four patients (50%) with esophageal GIST had symptoms, including dysphagia in three (38%), cough in one (13%), and chest pain in one (13%). One esophageal GIST appeared on barium study as a smooth submucosal mass. All esophageal GISTs appeared on CT as well-marginated predominantly distal lesions, isoattenuating to muscle, that moderately enhanced after IV contrast agent administration. Compared with esophageal leiomyomas, esophageal GISTs tended to be more distal, larger, and more heterogeneous and showed greater IV enhancement on CT. All esophageal GISTs showed marked avidity (mean maximum standardized uptake value, 16) on PET scans. All esophageal GISTs were positive for c-KIT (a cell-surface transmembrane tyrosine kinase also known as CD117) and CD34. On histopathology, six esophageal GISTs (75%) were of the spindle pattern and two (25%) were of a mixed spindle and epithelioid pattern. Five esophageal GISTs had exon 11 mutations (with imatinib sensitivity). Clinical outcome correlated with treatment strategy (resection plus adjuvant therapy or resection alone) rather than risk stratification. CONCLUSION Esophageal GISTs are unusual but clinically important mesenchymal neoplasms. Although esophageal GISTs and

  16. Endoscopic treatment for gastrointestinal stromal tumor: Advantages and hurdles

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyung Hun

    2015-01-01

    One of the most prominent characteristics of gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) is their unpredictable and variable behavior. GISTs are not classified as “benign” or “malignant” but are rather stratified by their associated clinical risk of malignancy as determined by tumor size, location, and number of mitoses identified during surgical histology. The difficulty in assessing the malignant potential and prognoses of GISTs as well as the increasing incidence of “incidental GISTs” presents challenges to gastroenterologists. Recently, endoscopic enucleation has been actively performed as both a diagnostic and therapeutic intervention for GISTs. Endoscopic enucleation has several advantages, including keeping the stomach intact after the removal of GISTs, a relatively short hospital stay, a conscious sedation procedure, relatively low cost, and fewer human resources required compared with surgery. However, a low complete resection rate and the risk of perforation could reduce the overall advantages of this procedure. Endoscopic full-thickness resection appears to achieve a very high R0 resection rate. However, this technique absolutely requires a very skilled operator. Moreover, there is a risk of peritoneal seeding due to large active perforation. Laparoscopy endoscopy collaborations have been applied for more stable and pathologically acceptable management. These collaborative procedures have produced excellent outcomes. Many procedures have been developed and attempted because they were technically possible. However, we should first consider the theoretical basis for each technique. Until the efficacy and safety of sole endoscopic access are proved, the laparoscopy endoscopy collaborative procedure appears to be an appropriate method for minimally destructive GIST surgery. PMID:25789089

  17. EGFR and gastrointestinal stromal tumor: an immunohistochemical and FISH study of 82 cases.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Lisandro F; Bacchi, Carlos E

    2007-09-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumor is the most common mesenchymal neoplasm of the gastrointestinal tract. Mutually exclusive KIT or platelet-derived growth factor receptor-alpha mutations are key events in gastrointestinal stromal tumor pathogenesis, and specific treatment targeting KIT/platelet-derived growth factor receptor-alpha activation is available. Epidermal growth factor receptor plays an important role in cancer biology and also constitutes a promising molecular target of therapy. Very few reports have been published in the literature about the relationship between gastrointestinal stromal tumor and epidermal growth factor receptor. The aim of this study was to investigate epidermal growth factor receptor immunohistochemical expression and epidermal growth factor receptor gene amplification in 82 consecutive gastrointestinal stromal tumor cases using tissue microarray technique. Hematoxylin- and eosin-stained sections and clinical information were reviewed, and expression of CD117 (KIT), CD34 and epidermal growth factor receptor was investigated by immunohistochemistry. Epidermal growth factor receptor gene copy number was determined using fluorescence in situ hybridization. Immunohistochemistry revealed that CD117 and CD34 were expressed in 96 and 57% of tumors, respectively. Variable epidermal growth factor receptor protein immunohistochemical overexpression was detected in 96% of gastrointestinal stromal tumor cases, but none of the 75 cases with represented tumor tissue cores and countable fluorescence signals exhibited epidermal growth factor receptor gene amplification by fluorescence in situ hybridization. These results show that there is no correlation between epidermal growth factor receptor protein overexpression by immunohistochemistry and epidermal growth factor receptor gene amplification by fluorescence in situ hybridization. Considering that the mechanisms of epidermal growth factor receptor protein overexpression are not well understood and

  18. Cytokeratin expression in gastrointestinal stromal tumor: a clinicopathologic and immunohistochemical study of 687 cases.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Lisandro F; Bacchi, Carlos E

    2012-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumor is the most common clinically significant mesenchymal neoplasm of the gastrointestinal tract. The expression of the intermediate filament cytokeratin in gastrointestinal stromal tumor is not frequently reported in the literature. The aim of this study was to investigate the immunohistochemical expression of several types of cytokeratin in a large number of cases (n=687), including a pan-cytokeratin marker (AE1/AE3 cocktail antibodies), high-molecular weight cytokeratins (34ßE12 antibody), and individual cytokeratins 8 (35ßH11 and CAM5.2 antibodies), 7, 14, and 20. Ki-67 antigen was used for the determination of cell proliferation index, and the correlation between Ki-67 and cytokeratin expression was evaluated. Cytokeratin expression was also correlated with several clinicopathologic parameters. The expression of pan-cytokeratin was observed in 24 (3.5%) cases, with variable intensity. Only 1 of 687 (0.1%) cases showed cytokeratin 14 expression. All 687 cases revealed no expression of high-molecular weight cytokeratins, cytokeratins 7, 8, and 20. No significant statistical association was found between AE1/AE3 immunoreactivity and several clinicopathologic parameters, including sex, tumor location and size, cell morphology, mitotic count, risk of aggressive behavior, and Ki-67 antigen cell proliferation index. However, statistical correlation between AE1/AE3 immunoreactivity and a higher age at diagnosis was detected. These results show that cytokeratin expression is not frequent in gastrointestinal stromal tumor, but caution is necessary to avoid erroneous diagnoses.

  19. Metastatic extra-abdominal presentation of gastrointestinal stromal tumors in a young Hispanic male: a case presentation and literature review.

    PubMed

    Di Marco, Anna; Paulo-Malave, Liza; Alayon-Laguer, Diogenes; Baez, Luis; Conde, Daniel; William, Caceres

    2012-01-01

    This article presents the medical history and management of a 44-year-old Hispanic male with metastatic extra-abdominal gastrointestinal stromal tumor including a literature review on this rare clinical presentation.

  20. Colon Adenocarcinoma Associated with Synchronous Extramural Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor (GIST) of the Ileum

    PubMed Central

    Gavriilidis, Paschalis; Nikolaidou, Anastasia

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Female, 68 Final Diagnosis: Gastrointestinal stromal tumour and colon adenocarcinoma Symptoms: Fatigue Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Right Hemicolectomy and enterectomy Specialty: Surgery Objective: Rare disease Background: GISTs are mesenchymal tumors representing approximately 1% of all gastrointestinal neoplasia. Their concurrence with colorectal cancers is rare. Case Report: We present a case of coexistence of colon adenocarcinoma and GIST of the ileum in a 68-year-old white woman. Conclusions: The coexistence of mesenchymal and epithelial neoplasia is very challenging; further research is needed to clarify the role of oncogenic mutations and signalling pathways in carcinogenesis of neoplasia of various histiogenic origins. PMID:26608682

  1. Genetic analysis of intraoral KIT-positive gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST).

    PubMed

    Kara, M Isa; Ay, Sinan; Goze, Fahrettin; Igci, Mehri; Elagoz, Sahende; Cengiz, Beyhan

    2010-10-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs), mesenchymal neoplasms originating from the cells of Cajal, usually appear in the gastrointestinal tract and abdomen. They often mimic other lesions, including smooth muscle cell tumors and neurogenic tumors. This study presents a case in which a GIST appeared over a 2-month period and was treated by excision and curettage, with no sign of recurrence during the next 42 months. The study also aims to characterize the GIST. Histopathologic analysis and KIT gene amplification and sequencing were performed. On mutation analysis of the GIST material, the novel 69338Tdel mutation was found in exon 11, and the diagnosis of intraoral stromal tumor was made. GISTs in the intraoral region display pathologic properties similar to others developed throughout the gastrointestinal system. Diagnosis is the first step of treatment for a patient. The discovery of oncogenic KIT mutations in GISTs has led to the development of targeted molecular therapy using tyrosine kinase inhibitors. This study investigates the histopathologic and molecular diagnostics of GISTs, and, to the authors' knowledge, it represents the first genetic study of a GIST developing in the intraoral region.

  2. Primary gastrointestinal stromal tumor of the liver: A case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Xiaobin; Chen, Dong; Chen, Wenbin; Sheng, Qinsong

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are the most common mesenchymal tumors located in the alimentary tract. A small portion of GISTs are observed in extra-gastrointestinal regions, primarily in the omentum, mesentery and retroperioneum, and these types of GISTs are referred to as extra-gastrointestinal stromal tumors. The present study reports of a patient with unique primary liver GIST. The patient underwent en bloc resection and post-operative administration of imatinib, and subsequently experienced a good prognosis. The present case is followed by a brief review of reported cases of liver GISTs identified in the literature. The literature revealed that primary liver GISTs are usually large in size and possess a high mitotic index, which contributes to malignant characterization, thus classifying these tumors as high-risk. En bloc resection remains the mainstay of treatment for resectable primary liver GISTs. However, the prognosis of these patients is not favorable. Perioperative administration of imatinib may be useful to a certain extent, and interventional therapy, including radiofrequency ablation, should be considered.

  3. Primary gastrointestinal stromal tumor of the liver: A case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Xiaobin; Chen, Dong; Chen, Wenbin; Sheng, Qinsong

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are the most common mesenchymal tumors located in the alimentary tract. A small portion of GISTs are observed in extra-gastrointestinal regions, primarily in the omentum, mesentery and retroperioneum, and these types of GISTs are referred to as extra-gastrointestinal stromal tumors. The present study reports of a patient with unique primary liver GIST. The patient underwent en bloc resection and post-operative administration of imatinib, and subsequently experienced a good prognosis. The present case is followed by a brief review of reported cases of liver GISTs identified in the literature. The literature revealed that primary liver GISTs are usually large in size and possess a high mitotic index, which contributes to malignant characterization, thus classifying these tumors as high-risk. En bloc resection remains the mainstay of treatment for resectable primary liver GISTs. However, the prognosis of these patients is not favorable. Perioperative administration of imatinib may be useful to a certain extent, and interventional therapy, including radiofrequency ablation, should be considered. PMID:27698856

  4. Hypertensive crisis during wide excision of gastrointestinal stromal cell tumor (GIST): Undiagnosed paraganglioma -A case report-.

    PubMed

    Shinn, Helen Ki; Jung, Jong Kwon; Park, Jay Kim; Kim, Jong Hoon; Jung, In Young; Lee, Hong Sik

    2012-03-01

    Although paraganglioma (PGL), an extra-adrenal retroperitoneal pheochromocytoma (PHEO), is a rare catecholamine-secreting neuroendocrine tumor, it can cause severe hypertensive crisis during anesthesia or surgery if undiagnosed preoperatively. Extraluminal perigastric masses may be presumed to be gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) or soft tissue sarcomas even when histologic confirmation is not possible. Therefore, without a histologic diagnosis or symptoms of excessive catecholamine secretion, PGL may be mistaken for GIST. We report a case of preoperatively undiagnosed PGL which caused hypertensive crisis during anesthesia for retroperitoneal mass excision.

  5. [A Case of Resected Giant Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor Associated with Intraperitoneal Bleeding Following Imatinib Administration].

    PubMed

    Ide, Ryuta; Suzuki, Takahisa; Takakura, Yuji; Oshita, Akihiko; Ikeda, Satoshi; Matsugu, Yasuhiro; Nakahara, Hideki; Urushihara, Takashi; Itamoto, Toshiyuki; Shinozaki, Katsunori

    2016-09-01

    A 76-year-old woman with tarry stool was referred to our hospital for further examination. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography(CT)revealed a heterogeneous 15 cm tumor located in the left upper abdominal cavity. The tumor had a rich vascularity and was associated with intra-abdominal bleeding. Gastroscopy showed a large submucosal tumor in the gastric body. A biopsy was performed, and the patient was diagnosed with a c-kit-positive gastrointestinal stromal tumor(GIST)of the stomach. Imatinib mesylate(400mg/day)was administered for 6 months. Vascularity in the tumor was diminished and no new lesion had emerged, although there was no remarkable reduction in tumor size. The patient underwent partial gastrectomy and splenectomy with curative intent. She is currently alive 1 year and 4 months after surgery with no evidence of recurrence. PMID:27628557

  6. Metachronous Primary Adenocarcinoma of Lung During Adjuvant Imatinib Mesylate Therapy for Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor of Stomach

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Meng-jie; Weng, Shan-Shan; Cao, Ying; Li, Xiao-Fen; Wang, Liu-Hong; Xu, Jing-Hong; Yuan, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) is the most common mesenchymal tumor in gastrointestinal tracts; however, the synchronous or metachronous coexistence of GIST with additional primary malignancy is not common. Here, we present an unusual case of gastric GIST with metachronous primary lung adenocarcinoma diagnosed during his adjuvant treatment with oral receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor imatinib mesylate (400 mg daily). After 6-month use of imatinib, the patient suffered from dry cough and dyspnea. Subsequent lung biopsy demonstrated adenocarcinoma with diffuse interstitial changes. Our research emphasizes the possibility of an additional primary tumor with GIST, and reminds the clinicians to strengthen the surveillance of the additional cancer during the follow-up of GIST patients. PMID:26356712

  7. Gastrointestinal and Extragastrointestinal Stromal Tumors: Report of Two Cases and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Antonopoulos, Petros; Leonardou, Polytimi; Barbagiannis, Nikolaos; Alexiou, Konstantinos; Demonakou, Maria; Economou, Nikolaos

    2014-01-01

    We present two cases, one of a gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) in the stomach and one of an extragastrointestinal stromal tumor (EGIST) in the hepatogastric ligament, which were discovered as incidental findings during computed tomography (CT) scans performed for other reasons. In both cases the diagnosis of the tumor was confirmed histologically and immunohistochemically. During the follow-up CT examinations these tumors proved to have a completely different natural course. The first case refers to an 82-year-old male patient with GIST of the stomach who refused to be operated and was followed by CT scans for a 4-year period. This patient did not show any significant changes in the morphology, size and density of the lesion. The second case refers to a 58-year-old female patient with EGIST of the hepatogastric ligament who presented with simultaneous liver metastases and remained healthy for 2 years after surgical resection, but developed local recurrence later. As a conclusion, both GISTs/EGISTs can be revealed as incidental findings in a CT scan performed for other purposes. Moreover, an untreated GIST located in the stomach can remain unchanged and without metastatic lesions for a long period of time, as in our case for a 4-year period. To our knowledge, this is the first report in the literature in whom a GIST was proved to remain almost unchanged for many years without any treatment, and we therefore attempt a further review of the current literature on stromal tumors. PMID:24707244

  8. Gastrointestinal stromal tumor in Brazil: clinicopathology, immunohistochemistry, and molecular genetics of 513 cases.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Lisandro Ferreira; Ojopi, Elida B; Bacchi, Carlos E

    2008-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the clinicopathological, immunohistochemical, and molecular genetic features of gastrointestinal stromal tumors in Brazil and compare them with cases from other countries. Five hundred and thirteen cases were retrospectively analyzed. HE-stained sections and clinical information were reviewed and the immunohistochemical expression of CD117, CD34, smooth-muscle actin, S-100 protein, desmin, CD44v3 adhesion molecule, p53 protein, epidermal growth factor receptor, and Ki-67 antigen was studied using tissue microarrays. Mutation analysis of KIT and platelet-derived growth factor receptor-alpha genes was also performed. There was a slight female predominance (50.3%) and the median age at diagnosis was 59 years. The tumors were mainly located in the stomach (38.4%). Immunohistochemistry showed that CD117 was expressed in 95.7% of cases. Epidermal growth factor receptor expression was observed in 84.4% of tumors. p53 protein expression was found only in 2.6% of cases but all belonged to the high-risk group for aggressive behavior according to the National Institutes of Health consensus approach. No CD44v3 adhesion molecule expression was detected. KIT exon 11 mutations were the most frequent (62.2%). The present data confirm that gastrointestinal stromal tumors in Brazilian patients do not differ from tumors occurring in other countries.

  9. Imatinib mesylate treatment in a dog with gastrointestinal stromal tumors with a c-kit mutation.

    PubMed

    Irie, Mitsuhiro; Takeuchi, Yoshinori; Ohtake, Yuzo; Suzuki, Hitomi; Nagata, Nao; Miyoshi, Takuma; Kagawa, Yumiko; Yamagami, Tetsushi

    2015-11-01

    A 13-year-old spayed mixed-breed dog was diagnosed with a gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) after histopathological examination of an abdominal mass. Five months after surgical resection of the tumor, we detected the recurrence of GIST with multiple disseminated abdominal lesions. A sequence analysis of cDNA obtained from a biopsy of the recurrent tumors revealed a mutation within exon 9 of the c-kit gene (1523A>T, Asn(508)Ile), which has been shown to cause ligand-independent phosphorylation of the KIT protein in GISTs and canine mast cell tumors (MCTs). Upon detection of the recurrent tumors, we initiated treatment with imatinib mesylate (10 mg/kg, q 24 hr). After 2 months, the dog achieved complete remission. Our findings indicate that canine GIST, and possibly MCT, may be responsive to molecular-targeted therapy.

  10. An Adult Gastric Duplication Cyst Mimicking a Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor.

    PubMed

    Yoda, Takenori; Furihata, Makoto; Nagao, Sayaka; Wada, Tomonori

    2016-01-01

    We herein describe a rare case of a 24-year-old man who presented with severe epigastralgia after consuming a considerable amount of broiled meat. Computed tomography revealed a cystic lesion adjacent to the distal stomach, with high intensity on T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. Upper endoscopy showed a cystic mass measuring 6 cm in diameter, mimicking a submucosal tumor adjacent to the pyloric valve, with duodenum invagination, characteristic of ball valve syndrome. Endoscopic ultrasonography showed that the lesion was contiguous through the first to the third layer of the stomach. Therefore, we performed distal gastrectomy. Pathology showed that the lesion was a gastric duplication cyst without malignancy. PMID:27580540

  11. [Current status and progress of medical imaging in diagnosis of gastrointestinal stromal tumors].

    PubMed

    Wang, Lingjie; Zhang, Ruiping; Li, Jianding

    2015-04-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are derived from non-directed differentiation of gastrointestinal mesenchymal tissue, which lack of typical clinical symptoms, and many asymptomatic GISTs are often found on physical examination. The tumor is primarily through implantation metastasis and blood metastasis. Currently, conventional medical imaging methods, such as X-ray barium meal, US, CT, MRI, PET/CT and ES, are still the main means of diagnosis of GISTs. Early diagnosis and early treatment are key factors of the prognosis in GISTs. Therefore, we need to be proficient in various medical imaging methods, then apply them to the diagnosis of GISTs, and to provide comprehensive and valuable information for clinical practice. Through retrieving and consulting literature of medical imaging associated with GISTs, this paper reviews the current status and progress of medical imaging in diagnosis of GISTs.

  12. Familial and multiple gastrointestinal stromal tumors with fair response to a half-dose of imatinib.

    PubMed

    Bamba, Shigeki; Hirota, Seiichi; Inatomi, Osamu; Ban, Hiromitsu; Nishimura, Takashi; Shioya, Makoto; Imaeda, Hirotsugu; Nishida, Atsushi; Sasaki, Masaya; Murata, Satoshi; Andoh, Akira

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are the most common mesenchymal tumors of the gastrointestinal tract. Since our first report in 1998, approximately 30 families with multiple GISTs due to a germline gain-of-function mutation of c-kit have been reported. We herein present a case of a family with multiple GISTs that have a germline c-kit mutation in exon 11 (Del-Val560) in two siblings. One of the patients showed a fair response to treatment with a half-dose of imatinib (200 mg/day). There are few reports describing the response to imatinib in familial GISTs and this drug appears to be a promising therapeutic option.

  13. Gastric Stromal Tumors in Carney Triad Are Different Clinically, Pathologically, and Behaviorally From Sporadic Gastric Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors: Findings in 104 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lizhi; Smyrk, Thomas C.; Young, William F.; Stratakis, Constantine A.; Carney, J. Aidan

    2013-01-01

    Carney triad, as originally described in 1977, was the association of 3 tumors: gastric epithelioid leiomyosarcoma [later renamed gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST)], extra-adrenal paraganglioma, and pulmonary chondroma. The disorder affected mostly young women and was not familial. We studied the clinical and pathologic features of the gastric neoplasm in 104 patients with the syndrome. Most (88%) were young women (mean age, 22 y), and the usual presentation was gastric bleeding. The tumors, commonly antral-based (61%), were multifocal, and ranged from 0.2 to 18.0 cm in dimension. Most (86%) featured round and polygonal (epithelioid) cells. Metastasis occurred in 49 patients (47%): to gastric lymph nodes (29%), liver (25%), and peritoneum (13%). Immunopositivity was detected in the tumors tested as follows: KIT, 100%; CD34, 75%; PKCy, 21%; PDGFRA, 90%; and smooth muscle actin, 6%. Fourteen patients (13%) died of metastatic GIST at a mean age of 45 years (range, 30 to 69 y). Estimated 10 and 40-year survivals were 100% and 73%, respectively. Median survival time was 26.5 years (range, 16 to 60 y). There was no correlation between the National Institutes of Health tumor risk classification and the tumor behavior. Compared with sporadic gastric GISTs, the gastric stromal tumor in Carney triad showed distinctive features: female predilection, young patient age, epithelioid cell predominance, multifocality, frequent lymph node metastasis, serial tumor occurrence, and unpredictable behavior. Thus, the Carney triad gastric stromal tumor is different clinically, pathologically, and behaviorally from sporadic gastric GIST. PMID:19935059

  14. Accessory spleen arising from the gastric fundus mimicking gastrointestinal stromal tumor following splenectomy: A case report

    PubMed Central

    WANG, GUANGYAO; CHEN, PING; ZONG, LIANG

    2014-01-01

    The current case report presents an accessory spleen mimicking gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) of the stomach in a patient who had undergone a splenectomy ~20 years previously. A 61-year-old male, who presented with upper abdominal discomfort lasting three months, underwent gastrointestinal endoscopy. Gastroscopy and endoscopic ultrasonography revealed a smooth, hemispherical mass of ~2 cm in diameter, with homogenous echogenicity originating from the gastric muscular layer. Abdominal contrast-enhanced computed tomography showed that the well-marginated ovoid mass was ~2.6×1.9 cm in size. The patient was diagnosed with GIST. Subsequent therapy consisted of partial gastrectomy. The pathological results indicated the mass contained splenic tissue, which confirmed it to be an accessory spleen. Changes in the postoperative platelet count were noted. The observations of this case study highlight that platelet count should be used as a routine indicator for monitoring accessory spleen arising from gastric fundus lesion. PMID:24396402

  15. Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors (GIST): A Prospective Analysis and an Update on Biomarkers and Current Treatment Concepts

    PubMed Central

    Koumarianou, Anna; Economopoulou, Panagiota; Katsaounis, Panagiotis; Laschos, Konstantinos; Arapantoni-Dadioti, Petroula; Martikos, George; Rogdakis, Athanasios; Tzanakis, Nikolaos; Boukovinas, Ioannis

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) are the most common sarcomas of the gastrointestinal tract, with transformation typically driven by activating mutations of cKIT and less commonly platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha (PDGFRA). Successful targeting of tyrosine-protein kinase Kit with imatinib, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, has had a major impact in the survival of patients with GIST in both the adjuvant and metastatic setting. A recent modification of treatment guidelines for patients with localized, high-risk GIST extended the adjuvant treatment duration from 1 year to 3 years. In this paper, we review the clinical data of patients with GIST treated in the Oncology Outpatient Unit of “Attikon” University Hospital and aim to assess which patients are eligible for prolongation of adjuvant imatinib therapy as currently suggested by treatment recommendations. PMID:26056505

  16. Endoscopic en bloc resection of an exophytic gastrointestinal stromal tumor with suction excavation technique.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyuk Soon; Chun, Hoon Jai; Kim, Kyoung-Oh; Kim, Eun Sun; Keum, Bora; Jeen, Yoon-Tae; Lee, Hong Sik; Kim, Chang Duck

    2016-06-21

    Here, we report the first successful endoscopic resection of an exophytic gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) using a novel perforation-free suction excavation technique. A 49-year-old woman presented for further management of a gastric subepithelial tumor on the lesser curvature of the lower body, originally detected via routine upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. Abdominal computed tomography and endoscopic ultrasound showed a 4-cm extraluminally protruding mass originating from the muscularis propria layer. The patient firmly refused surgical resection owing to potential cardiac problems, and informed consent was obtained for endoscopic removal. Careful dissection and suction of the tumor was repeated until successful extraction was achieved without serosal injury. We named this procedure the suction excavation technique. The tumor's dimensions were 3.5 cm × 2.8 cm × 2.5 cm. The tumor was positive for C-KIT and CD34 by immunohistochemical staining. The mitotic count was 6/50 high-power fields. The patient was followed for 5 years without tumor recurrence. This case demonstrated the use of endoscopic resection of an exophytic GIST using the suction excavation technique as a potential therapy without surgical resection. PMID:27340363

  17. Imatinib potentiates anti-tumor T cell responses in gastrointestinal stromal tumor through the inhibition of Ido

    PubMed Central

    Balachandran, Vinod P.; Cavnar, Michael J.; Zeng, Shan; Bamboat, Zubin M.; Ocuin, Lee M.; Obaid, Hebroon; Sorenson, Eric C.; Popow, Rachel; Ariyan, Charlotte; Rossi, Ferdinand; Besmer, Peter; Guo, Tianhua; Antonescu, Cristina R.; Taguchi, Takahiro; Yuan, Jianda; Wolchok, Jedd D.; Allison, James P.; DeMatteo, Ronald P.

    2012-01-01

    Imatinib mesylate targets mutated KIT oncoproteins in gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) and achieves a clinical response in 80% of patients. The mechanism is believed to depend predominantly on the inhibition of KIT-driven signals for tumor cell survival and proliferation. Using a mouse model of spontaneous GIST, we found that the immune system contributes substantially to the anti-tumor effects of imatinib. Imatinib therapy activated CD8+ T cells and induced regulatory T cell (T reg) apoptosis within the tumor by reducing tumor cell expression of the immunosuppressive enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (Ido). Concurrent immunotherapy augmented the efficacy of imatinib in mouse GIST. In freshly obtained human GIST specimens, the T cell profile correlated with imatinib sensitivity and IDO expression. Thus, T cells are critical to the anti-tumor effects of imatinib in GIST and concomitant immunotherapy may further improve outcome in human cancers treated with targeted agents. PMID:21873989

  18. The management of gastrointestinal stromal tumors: a model for targeted and multidisciplinary therapy of malignancy.

    PubMed

    Joensuu, Heikki; DeMatteo, Ronald P

    2012-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) has become a model for targeted therapy in cancer. The vast majority of GISTs contain an activating mutation in either the KIT or platelet-derived growth factor A (PDGFRA) gene. GIST is highly responsive to several selective tyrosine kinase inhibitors. In fact, this cancer has been converted to a chronic disease in some patients. Considerable progress has been made recently in our understanding of the natural history and molecular biology of GIST, risk stratification, and drug resistance. Despite the efficacy of targeted therapy, though, surgery remains the only curative primary treatment and cures >50% of GIST patients who present with localized disease. Adjuvant therapy with imatinib prolongs recurrence-free survival and may improve overall survival. Combined or sequential use of tyrosine kinase inhibitors with other agents following tumor molecular subtyping is an attractive next step in the management of GIST. PMID:22017446

  19. Personalized Medicine in Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor (GIST): Clinical Implications of the Somatic and Germline DNA Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ravegnini, Gloria; Nannini, Margherita; Sammarini, Giulia; Astolfi, Annalisa; Biasco, Guido; Pantaleo, Maria A.; Hrelia, Patrizia; Angelini, Sabrina

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) are the most common mesenchymal tumors of the gastrointestinal tract. They are characterized by gain of function mutations in KIT or PDGFRA tyrosine kinase receptors, with their consequent constitutive activation. The gold standard therapy is imatinib that offers a good and stable response for approximately 18–36 months. However, resistance is very common and it is vital to identify new biomarkers. Up until now, there have been two main approaches with focus to characterize novel targets. On the one hand, the focus is on the tumor genome, as the final clinical outcome depends mainly from the cancer specific mutations/alterations patterns. However, the germline DNA is important as well, and it is inconceivable to think the patients response to the drug is not related to it. Therefore the aim of this review is to outline the state of the art of the personalized medicine in GIST taking into account both the tumor DNA (somatic) and the patient DNA (germline). PMID:26184165

  20. A rare case of giant gastrointestinal stromal tumor of the stomach involving the serosal surface

    PubMed Central

    Koyuncuer, Ali; Gönlüşen, Levent; Kutsal, Ahmet Vecihi

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Although rare, gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) are the most common mesenchymal tumors affecting the gastrointestinal tract. Presentation of case Here we report the case of a 43-year-old man complaining of abdominal pain along with a painless and palpable mass, which was confirmed on magnetic resonance and multislice computed tomography. Laparotomy revealed a nodular grayish-white firm noninfiltrative mass (39 × 27 × 14 cm, 6109 g) that was well localized within the extramuscular and peritoneal surface of the anterior wall of the stomach; complete tumor resection was performed. Histopathological examination revealed features typical of GIST, including increased cellularity, increased mitotic activity, and spindle shaped cells as well as positive immunoreactivity for KIT, CD34, and vimentin. Discussion A review of literature revealed that GISTs of the size and weight similar to the present case has been rarely reported. GIST most frequently involves the stomach. Although the etiopathogenesis of this disease remains unclear, few well-documented familial cases have been associated with GIST syndromes. Conclusion The primary treatment preferred is complete surgical excision of the tumor. PMID:26036460

  1. Differentiating gastrointestinal stromal tumors from gastric adenocarcinomas and normal mucosae using confocal Raman microspectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Chih-Wei; Huang, Chia-Chi; Sheu, Jeng-Horng; Lin, Chia-Wen; Lin, Lien-Fu; Jin, Jong-Shiaw; Chen, Wenlung

    2016-07-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are the most common mesenchymal neoplasms of the gastrointestinal tract, and gastric adenocarcinomas are a common cancer worldwide. To differentiate GISTs from adenocarcinomas is important because the surgical processes for both are different; the former excises the tumor with negative margins, while the latter requires radical gastrectomy with lymph node dissection. Endoscopy with biopsy is used to distinguish GISTs from adenocarcinomas; however, it may cause tumor bleeding in GISTs. We reported here the confocal Raman microspectroscopy as an effective tool to differentiate GISTs, adenocarcinomas, and normal mucosae. Of 119 patients enrolled in this study, 102 patients underwent gastrectomy (40 GISTs and 62 adenocarcinomas), and 17 patients with benign lesions were obtained as normal mucosae. Raman signals were integrated for 100 s for each spot on the specimen, and 5 to 10 spots, depending on the sample size, were chosen for each specimen. There were significant differences among those tissues as evidenced by different Raman signal responding to phospholipids and protein structures. The spectral data were further processed and analyzed by using principal component analysis. A two-dimensional plot demonstrated that GISTs, adenocarcinomas, and normal gastric mucosae could be effectively differentiated from each other.

  2. Asian Consensus Guidelines for the Diagnosis and Management of Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Dong-Hoe; Ryu, Min-Hee; Kim, Kyoung-Mee; Yang, Han-Kwang; Sawaki, Akira; Hirota, Seiichi; Zheng, Jie; Zhang, Bo; Tzen, Chin-Yuan; Yeh, Chun-Nan; Nishida, Toshirou; Shen, Lin; Chen, Li-Tzong; Kang, Yoon-Koo

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are the most common mesenchymal tumors originating in the gastrointestinal tract. With the introduction of molecular-targeted therapy for GISTs which has yielded remarkable outcomes, these tumors have become a model of multidisciplinary oncological treatment. Although Western clinical guidelines are available for GISTs, such as those published by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) and the European Society of Medical Oncology (ESMO), the clinical situations in Asian countries are different from those in Western countries in terms of diagnostic methods, surgical approach, and availability of new targeted agents. Accordingly, we have reviewed current versions of several GIST guidelines published by Asian countries (Japan, Korea, China, and Taiwan) and the NCCN and ESMO and discussed the areas of dissensus. We here present the first version of the Asian GIST consensus guidelines that were prepared through a series of meetings involving multidisciplinary experts in the four countries. These guidelines provide an optimal approach to the diagnosis and management of GIST patients in Asian countries. PMID:27384163

  3. Differentiating gastrointestinal stromal tumors from gastric adenocarcinomas and normal mucosae using confocal Raman microspectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Chih-Wei; Huang, Chia-Chi; Sheu, Jeng-Horng; Lin, Chia-Wen; Lin, Lien-Fu; Jin, Jong-Shiaw; Chen, Wenlung

    2016-07-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are the most common mesenchymal neoplasms of the gastrointestinal tract, and gastric adenocarcinomas are a common cancer worldwide. To differentiate GISTs from adenocarcinomas is important because the surgical processes for both are different; the former excises the tumor with negative margins, while the latter requires radical gastrectomy with lymph node dissection. Endoscopy with biopsy is used to distinguish GISTs from adenocarcinomas; however, it may cause tumor bleeding in GISTs. We reported here the confocal Raman microspectroscopy as an effective tool to differentiate GISTs, adenocarcinomas, and normal mucosae. Of 119 patients enrolled in this study, 102 patients underwent gastrectomy (40 GISTs and 62 adenocarcinomas), and 17 patients with benign lesions were obtained as normal mucosae. Raman signals were integrated for 100 s for each spot on the specimen, and 5 to 10 spots, depending on the sample size, were chosen for each specimen. There were significant differences among those tissues as evidenced by different Raman signal responding to phospholipids and protein structures. The spectral data were further processed and analyzed by using principal component analysis. A two-dimensional plot demonstrated that GISTs, adenocarcinomas, and normal gastric mucosae could be effectively differentiated from each other.

  4. State of the Art in the Treatment of Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Garlipp, Benjamin; Bruns, Christiane J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are the most frequently diagnosed mesenchymal neoplasms of the gastrointestinal tract. Despite their biological and clinical heterogeneity, the majority of these tumors are positive for the receptor tyrosine kinase KIT and are driven by KIT- or platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha (PDGFRA)-activating mutations. There are still uncertainties regarding their clinical and molecular characterization and the optimal treatment regimens, making it difficult to establish a universal treatment algorithm for these tumors. Summary From a clinical perspective, the main difference between GISTs and other gastrointestinal neoplasms is that the benign or malignant behavior of GISTs cannot be predicted from histopathology, but instead relies on empirically established scoring systems. Clinical data suggest that malignant potential may be an inherent quality of some GISTs rather than a feature acquired by the tumor during disease progression. Thus, some patients may require prolonged anti-tumor treatment even after complete surgical removal of the tumor. Key Message Although GISTs are the most frequently occurring mesenchymal neoplasms in the gastrointestinal tract, no universal treatment algorithms exist. This paper reviews the current evidence that guides the management of GISTs. Practical Implications The management of localized GISTs involves the use of surgical resection, with the inclusion of preoperative tyrosine kinase inhibitor treatment for locally advanced, primarily unresectable tumors and for resectable cases requiring extensive surgery. Imatinib is also indicated as adjuvant therapy after complete surgical removal of GISTs with a high estimated risk of recurrence unless specific mutations conferring imatinib resistance are present. The optimal duration of adjuvant treatment is still controversial. For patients with metastatic imatinib-sensitive GISTs, imatinib constitutes the first-line standard treatment

  5. Neurofibromatosis type 1 associated with pheochromocytoma and gastrointestinal stromal tumors: A case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    PAN, DONGFENG; LIANG, PEIFENG; XIAO, HONGYAN

    2016-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is a genetic disorder associated with neurofibromin 1 (NF1) gene mutation, which generates an increased risk of variety of tumor types. The current study reports a case involving NF1, pheochromocytoma (PHEO) and gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST). A 56-year-old man presented with abdominal pain and polypnea. Clinical investigation revealed multiple diffuse soft-tissue lesions throughout his body, and pigmented macules on the skin. Imaging analyses revealed thoracic scoliosis, multiple subcutaneous nodules in the abdomen and trunk, and a 7.0×7.7×8.9-cm oval-shaped, cystic mass in the left upper abdominal cavity. Immunohistochemical staining indicated that S-100 protein and synaptophysin were highly expressed in adrenal gland neoplasm, whilst CD117 and CD34 were highly expressed in small intestine tumors. The overall clinical and pathological finding suggested a diagnosis of NF1, giant PHEO and small intestinal stromal tumor. In addition, a literature review was conducted to identify the specific clinical features of patients with this condition. Only 11 similar cases have been reported worldwide. In the present study, paroxysmal hypertension occurred in the majority of patients, and GISTs tended to be located in the small intestine. In addition, the present study demonstrated that many of the patients had a poor prognosis. Therefore, the present study indicates that NF1-PHEO-GIST is a special type tumor with varied clinical symptoms, which may be associated with an increased risk for poor prognosis; however, more studies are required to confirm this. PMID:27347193

  6. A Pleural Solitary Fibrous Tumor, Multiple Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors, Moyamoya Disease, and Hyperparathyroidism in a Patient Associated with NF1.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Yoko; Kodama, Ken; Yokoyama, Shigekazu; Takeda, Masashi; Michishita, Shintaro

    2015-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), also called von Recklinghausen's disease, is a multisystemic disease caused by an alteration of the NF1 gene, a tumor suppressor located on the long arm of chromosome 17 (17q11.2). Loss of the gene function, due to a point mutation, leads to an increase in cell proliferation and the development of several tumors. We report a 60-year-old female patient manifesting hypercalcemia due to hyperparathyroidism, a solitary fibrous tumor (SFT) of the pleura, multiple gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs), and moyamoya disease associated with NF1. The SFT and GISTs were removed by staged operations. Then, hypercalcemia was successfully controlled after resection of the parathyroid adenoma. Based on a literature review, these combinations have never been reported, and the relevant literature is briefly discussed.

  7. A Pleural Solitary Fibrous Tumor, Multiple Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors, Moyamoya Disease, and Hyperparathyroidism in a Patient Associated with NF1.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Yoko; Kodama, Ken; Yokoyama, Shigekazu; Takeda, Masashi; Michishita, Shintaro

    2015-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), also called von Recklinghausen's disease, is a multisystemic disease caused by an alteration of the NF1 gene, a tumor suppressor located on the long arm of chromosome 17 (17q11.2). Loss of the gene function, due to a point mutation, leads to an increase in cell proliferation and the development of several tumors. We report a 60-year-old female patient manifesting hypercalcemia due to hyperparathyroidism, a solitary fibrous tumor (SFT) of the pleura, multiple gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs), and moyamoya disease associated with NF1. The SFT and GISTs were removed by staged operations. Then, hypercalcemia was successfully controlled after resection of the parathyroid adenoma. Based on a literature review, these combinations have never been reported, and the relevant literature is briefly discussed. PMID:26442164

  8. A Pleural Solitary Fibrous Tumor, Multiple Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors, Moyamoya Disease, and Hyperparathyroidism in a Patient Associated with NF1

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Yoko; Kodama, Ken; Yokoyama, Shigekazu; Takeda, Masashi; Michishita, Shintaro

    2015-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), also called von Recklinghausen's disease, is a multisystemic disease caused by an alteration of the NF1 gene, a tumor suppressor located on the long arm of chromosome 17 (17q11.2). Loss of the gene function, due to a point mutation, leads to an increase in cell proliferation and the development of several tumors. We report a 60-year-old female patient manifesting hypercalcemia due to hyperparathyroidism, a solitary fibrous tumor (SFT) of the pleura, multiple gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs), and moyamoya disease associated with NF1. The SFT and GISTs were removed by staged operations. Then, hypercalcemia was successfully controlled after resection of the parathyroid adenoma. Based on a literature review, these combinations have never been reported, and the relevant literature is briefly discussed. PMID:26442164

  9. Perforation of the colon by invading recurrent gastrointestinal stromal tumors during sunitinib treatment

    PubMed Central

    Hur, Hoon; Park, Ae Ryoung; Jee, Sung Bae; Jung, Seung Eun; Kim, Wook; Jeon, Hae Myung

    2008-01-01

    The molecular targets of sunitinib are receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs), and this drug has also been known to exert blocking effects on the activation of KIT, which is similar to the mechanism of action of imatinib. Moreover, sunitinib has an additional anti-angiogenic effect through its inhibition of the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor activation. We report here a 70-year-old patient diagnosed with a recurrent gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST), which invaded the transverse colon and led to a perforation during sunitinib treatment. A computed tomography scan and 3-dimensional reconstruction showed necrosis of the recurrent hepatic mass and perforation of the invaded transverse colon. After percutaneous drainage of the intraperitoneal abscess, antibiotic treatment and restricted diet, the condition of the patient improved. The present case is the first to report that sunitinib, which is administered to treat GIST resistant to imatinib, can cause unexpected colon perforation and subsequent peritonitis. PMID:18932293

  10. Co-occurrence of liver metastasis of gastrointestinal stromal tumor and hepatocellular carcinoma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Kohei; Baba, Yoshifumi; Kurashige, Junji; Iwatsuki, Masaaki; Imai, Katsunori; Hashimoto, Daisuke; Sakamoto, Yasuo; Chikamoto, Akira; Yoshida, Naoya; Beppu, Toru; Baba, Hideo

    2016-12-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are potentially malignant mesenchymal tumors that can give rise to distant metastases, mainly in the liver. The co-occurrence of synchronous primary liver tumors (e.g., hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC)) in patients with GIST is extremely rare. This report describes a 77-year-old male patient with liver metastasis of GIST originating in the small intestine and synchronous HCC. The patient had undergone resection of the small intestine for the primary GIST 3 years earlier and partial hepatectomy and radiofrequency ablation for liver metastases of GIST 1 year earlier. Despite the continuation of adjuvant therapy with imatinib, two new lesions in the liver were detected by follow-up computed tomography scanning, which showed the gradual enlargement of one tumor. A second hepatectomy was performed. Pathological examination revealed that one tumor was a liver metastasis of GIST and the other was a primary HCC. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the synchronous co-occurrence of a liver metastasis of GIST and a primary HCC. PMID:27586263

  11. KIT and PDGFRA mutations and PDGFRA immunostaining in gastrointestinal stromal tumors.

    PubMed

    Barreca, Antonella; Fornari, Alessandro; Bonello, Lisa; Tondat, Fabrizio; Chiusa, Luigi; Lista, Patrizia; Pich, Achille

    2011-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated the association of PDGFRA and KIT mutations as well as PDGFRA immunohistochemical expression with clinicopathologic features and prognosis in a series of gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs). Tumor DNA from 40 GISTs was sequenced for the presence of mutations in KIT exons 9, 11, 13 and 17, and in PDGFRA exons 12 and 18. Tissue sections were stained with polyclonal anti-PDGFRA antibody. KIT mutations occurred in 26 cases. There were 13 deletions, 6 substitutions, 3 deletion-substitutions, 3 duplications and 1 insertion. Tumors with KIT deletions/insertion were large with a high mitotic index (MI), and were associated with a high rate of symptoms at diagnosis, invasion into adjacent organs, distant metastasis, relapse and a short disease-free survival (DFS). PDGFRA mutations occurred in 6 gastric GISTs. There were 4 deletions and 2 substitutions. Tumors with PDGFRA mutations were small, with a low MI and Ki67 score, and were associated with a very low rate of symptoms at diagnosis, invasion into adjacent organs and distant metastasis. PDGFRA immunopositivity was found in 23 cases: a peculiar 'dotlike' staining was found in 5 out of 6 PDGFRA mutated cases. Patients with positive PDGFRA immunostaining had a longer DFS than those with negative staining. Our data confirm that the type of KIT mutation is associated with various clinicopathologic features of GISTs, and indicate that PDGFRA mutations are associated with rather indolent tumors. PDGFRA immunopositivity reflects PDGFRA mutational status and is associated with a favorable outcome. PMID:21461555

  12. Brunner's gland cyst in combination with gastrointestinal stromal tumor: A case report

    PubMed Central

    HUO, XIQIAN; WEI, JISHU; LIU, XINCHUN; WU, JUNLI; GAO, WENTAO; LI, QIANG; JIANG, KUIRONG; DAI, CUNCAI; MIAO, YI

    2016-01-01

    Brunner's gland cysts are rare benign lesions that are mainly observed in the first and the second regions of the duodenum. Patients with Brunner's gland cyst demonstrate no specific symptoms. The present study reports the case of a patient with Brunner's gland cyst located in the duodenum in combination with a gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) in the same region. To the best of our knowledge, the present study reports the first case of Brunner's gland cyst with GIST. A 58-year-old female patient was referred to Tianchang Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine (Tianchang, China) with a one-month history of upper abdominal discomfort, diarrhea and recurrent vomiting following the intake of food. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and a computed tomography scan revealed the presence of a round, cystic-like lesion with internal low density located within the duodenum. Pathological examination revealed that the cyst measured 0.3 cm in diameter and was consistent with a diagnosis of Brunner's gland cyst. Histopathology revealed that the cyst possessed characteristics of GIST. The patient underwent surgical exploration and tumor resection, and was discharged 2 weeks post-surgery. During the 12 month post-operative follow-up period, the outcome of the patient was good. This case study of Brunner's gland cyst combined with GIST enriches the present literature and promotes better understanding of the two diseases. Further investigation is required to explain the mechanism and association between the two rare diseases. PMID:27123125

  13. Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor of the Stomach Presenting as Multilobular with Diffuse Calcifications

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sae Hee; Cho, Byung Sun; Park, Joo-Seung; Han, Hyun-Young; Kang, Dong-Wook

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are the most common primary mesenchymal neoplasms of the gastrointestinal tract and usually appear as a well-circumscribed mass. However, it may be difficult to confirm the extent of the disease for some GISTs. A 70-year-old asymptomatic female presented for a regular physical exam. An esophagogastroduodenoscopy showed a 2.0 cm protruding mass on the gastric fundus. Endoscopic ultrasound revealed an ill-defined heterogenous hypoechoic lesion (3.0×1.5 cm). A computed tomography (CT) scan demonstrated a 4.5 cm multifocal calcified mass at the gastric body as well as at the gastric fundus. Laparoscopic gastric wedge resection was performed according to the extent of multifocal calcifications that are shown on the CT. Intraoperative specimen mammography and intraoperative biopsy might be helpful to obtain a tumor-free margin. Final pathologic diagnosis was an intermediate risk GIST in multilobular form. In patients with diffuse multifocal calcifications in the stomach, the possibility of GIST should be considered. PMID:27104029

  14. Surgical resection for gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST): experience on 25 patients

    PubMed Central

    Boni, Luigi; Benevento, Angelo; Dionigi, Gianlorenzo; Rovera, Francesca; Dionigi, Renzo

    2005-01-01

    Background Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) are infrequent and diagnosis and prognosis could be troublesome. We present short and long term results of surgical resection for GIST at the Department of Surgery, University of Insubria, during a period of 17 years. Materials and methods All patients' data, tumor characteristics, surgical procedure and survival data were analyzed retrospectively. Tumors were divided in risk classes using the classification proposed by Fletcher, based on tumor size and number of mitosis. Results Between 1987 and 2004, 25 patients underwent surgical resection for GIST. Stomach was the most common site of localization. Complete resection was achieved in 88% cases, while in 12% radical resection was not possible. The mean tumor size was 9.2 cm (1.2 – 30 cm): <5 cm diameter in 14/25 cases (56%), 5–10 cm in 5/25 (20%) and >10 cm in 6/25 (24%). Mitotic count was <10/50 HPF in 68% (17/25) and >10/50 in 32% (8/25). Using Fletcher's classification, tumors were divided in very low (11/25, 44%), low (4/25, 16%), intermediate (6/25, 24%) and high-risk (4/25, 16%) groups. The 5-year overall survival was 65% and 34% respectively with a statistically significant difference between tumors <5 cm and >10 cm in diameter and between complete and incomplete resection. High-risk tumors had a significantly shorter survival than low or very low risk. Conclusion Our experience confirms that GIST's are uncommon and aggressive cancers. The prognosis is strictly related to tumor size and number of mitosis. Although significant advances on new chemotherapeutic regimes have been made, to date, only radical surgery offers the chance of long-term survival. PMID:16384538

  15. Interventional digital subtraction angiography for small bowel gastrointestinal stromal tumors with bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yao-Ting; Sun, Hong-Liang; Luo, Jiang-Hong; Ni, Jia-Yan; Chen, Dong; Jiang, Xiong-Ying; Zhou, Jing-Xing; Xu, Lin-Feng

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To retrospectively evaluate the diagnostic efficacy of interventional digital subtraction angiography (DSA) for bleeding small bowel gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs). METHODS: Between January 2006 and December 2013, small bowel tumors in 25 consecutive patients undergoing emergency interventional DSA were histopathologically confirmed as GIST after surgical resection. The medical records of these patients and the effects of interventional DSA and the presentation and management of the condition were retrospectively reviewed. RESULTS: Of the 25 patients with an age range from 34- to 70-year-old (mean: 54 ± 12 years), 8 were male and 17 were female. Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding, including tarry or bloody stool and intermittent melena, was observed in all cases, and one case also involved hematemesis. Nineteen patients required acute blood transfusion. There were a total of 28 small bowel tumors detected by DSA. Among these, 20 were located in the jejunum and 8 were located in the ileum. The DSA characteristics of the GISTs included a hypervascular mass of well-defined, homogeneous enhancement and early developed draining veins. One case involved a complication of intussusception of the small intestine that was discovered during surgery. No pseudoaneurysms, arteriovenous malformations or fistulae, or arterial rupture were observed. The completely excised size was approximately 1.20 to 5.50 cm (mean: 3.05 ± 1.25 cm) in maximum diameter based on measurements after the resection. There were ulcerations (n = 8), erosions (n = 10), hyperemia and edema (n = 10) on the intra-luminal side of the tumors. Eight tumors in patients with a large amount of blood loss were treated with transcatheter arterial embolization with gelfoam particles during interventional DSA. CONCLUSION: Emergency interventional DSA is a useful imaging option for locating and diagnosing small bowel GISTs in patients with bleeding, and is an effective treatment modality. PMID:25548494

  16. A meta-analysis of prognostic value of KIT mutation status in gastrointestinal stromal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Jian; Li, Zhi; Liu, Yingjun; Wang, Daohai; Han, Guangsen

    2016-01-01

    Numerous types of KIT mutations have been reported in gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs); however, controversy still exists regarding their clinicopathological significance. In this study, we reviewed the publicly available literature to assess the data by a meta-analysis to characterize KIT mutations and different types of KIT mutations in prognostic prediction in patients with GISTs. Twenty-eight studies that included 4,449 patients were identified and analyzed. We found that KIT mutation status was closely correlated with size of tumors and different mitosis indexes, but not with tumor location. KIT mutation was also observed to be significantly correlated with tumor recurrence, metastasis, as well as the overall survival of patients. Interestingly, there was higher risk of progression in KIT exon 9-mutated patients than in exon 11-mutated patients. Five-year relapse-free survival (RFS) rate was significantly higher in KIT exon 11-deleted patients than in those with other types of KIT exon 11 mutations. In addition, RFS for 5 years was significantly worse in patients bearing KIT codon 557–558 deletions than in those bearing other KIT exon 11 deletions. Our results strongly support the hypothesis that KIT mutation status is another evaluable factor for prognosis prediction in GISTs. PMID:27350754

  17. Complete pathological response to Imatinib mesylate in an extraintestinal gastrointestinal stromal tumor

    PubMed Central

    Quezada, Nicolás; Acevedo, Francisco; Marambio, Andrés; León, Felipe; Galindo, Hector; Roa, Juan Carlos; Jarufe, Nicolás

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) are the most frequent mesenchymal tumors of the digestive tract. Extraintestinal locations (EGIST) have been described showing similar pattern of immunohistochemical markers than GIST. Inhibitors of tyrosine kinases such as Imatinib or Sunitinib are the mainstay treatment in the management of advanced or metastatic GIST. Complete pathological response to these agents is an extremely rare event, especially in the case of EGIST due to its more aggressive behavior reported. PRESENTATION OF CASE Here we describe the case of a 61 years old woman, with an advanced GIST, who was operated after 10 months of Imatinib mesylate. The biopsy demonstrated the extra intestinal location of the tumor and a complete pathological response was confirmed. DISCUSSION Complete pathological response to Imatinib is a rare event. To our knowledge, this is the first report of complete response in an EGIST. New clinical, radiological and metabolic criteria of tumoral response to neoadjuvant treatment are revised. CONCLUSION EGIST complete pathological response to Imatinib can be achieved. However, recommendation of systematic neoadjuvant therapy with Imatinib remains investigational and more studies are warranted in the future. PMID:25194604

  18. Multiple Gastric Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors in a Patient with Neurofibromatosis Type 1.

    PubMed

    Tomatsu, Makoto; Isogaki, Jun; Watanabe, Takahiro; Yajima, Kiyoshige; Okumura, Takuya; Yamashita, Kimihiro; Suzuki, Kenji; Kawabe, Akihiro; Komiyama, Akira; Hirota, Seiichi

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are relatively common in neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF 1) patients. Approximately 90% of GISTs associated with NF 1 are located in the small intestine, while sporadic GISTs are most commonly located in the stomach. Here we report an extremely rare case of an NF 1 patient with multiple gastric GITs (90 or more) but without multiple small intestinal tumors. A 63-year-old female patient who had a history of NF 1 underwent surgery for a gastric neuroendocrine tumor and gastric submucosal tumor (SMT). During the operation, multiple small nodules were identified on the serosal surface of the upper stomach. SMT and multiple nodules on the serosal surface were diagnosed as GISTs consisting of spindle cells positive for KIT, CD34, and DOG-1. Both GIST and the normal gastric mucosa showed no mutations not only in the c-kit gene (exons 8, 9, 11, 13, and 17) but also in the PDGFRA gene (exons 12, 14, and 18). This patient is being followed up without the administration of a tyrosine kinase inhibitor. PMID:27375917

  19. Extra-gastrointestinal stromal tumor of the pancreas: case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Primary extra-gastrointestinal stromal tumor (EGISTs) arising in the pancreas is extremely rare: only 20 cases have previously been reported in the English literature from 2000 to 2013. We reported a case of EGIST of the pancreas in a 69-year-old woman who presented with abdominal pain and with a solid, heterogeneously enhancing neoplasm in the uncinate process of the pancreas, revealed preoperatively by an abdominal computed tomography scan. A diagnosis of neuroendocrine tumor was suggested. Positron emission tomography with 68Ga-DOTATOC did not show pathological accumulation of the tracer in the pancreas. The patient underwent enucleation, under ultrasonic guidance, of the pancreatic tumor that emerged to the surface of the pancreas. Histopathology and immunohistochemical examination confirmed the final diagnosis of EGIST of the pancreas (CD117+), with one mitosis per 50 high-power fields. Although rarely, GIST can involve the pancreas as a primary site, and this tumor should be considered in the differential diagnosis of pancreatic neoplasms. PMID:24755359

  20. Coexisting and possible primary extra-gastrointestinal stromal tumors of the pancreas and liver: A single case report

    PubMed Central

    LIU, LEI; ZHU, YINGQIAO; WANG, DONGXUAN; YANG, CHANGBIN; ZHANG, QI; LI, XIUKUN; BAI, YANG

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) are mesenchymal neoplasms of the gastrointestinal tract (GI) that are defined, in part, by the expression of CD117, a c-Kit proto-oncogene protein. GISTs emerge outside of the GI at a very low frequency, typically in a single organ or location. GISTs that occasionally emerge outside of the GI are classified as extra-gastrointestinal stromal tumors (EGIST). The present study reports an extremely rare case of EGIST detected in the pancreas and the liver. The pancreatic and liver tumors were 4.5×2.5 cm and 2.0×1.5 cm in size, respectively. Both tumors consisted of CD117-positive spindle cells with a similar mitotic rate of 1–2 per 50 high power fields. The pancreatic and the hepatic EGISTs were at a low risk of malignancy, and both tumors were proposed to be primary stromal tumors. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of likely primary EGIST identified in the pancreas and liver of the same patient. PMID:27123107

  1. Imaging features of primary anorectal gastrointestinal stromal tumors with clinical and pathologic correlation

    PubMed Central

    Koch, M.R.; Jagannathan, J.P.; Krajewski, K.M.; Raut, C.P.; Hornick, J.L.; Ramaiya, N.H.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Purpose: To evaluate the imaging features of anorectal gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) with clinical and histopathologic correlation. Materials and methods: In this Institutional Review Board-approved, Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act-compliant retrospective study, 16 patients (12 men; mean age 66 years (30–89 years)) with pathologically proven anorectal GISTs seen at our institution from January 2001 to July 2011 were identified. Electronic medical records were reviewed to obtain clinical data. Pretreatment imaging studies (computed tomography (CT) in 16 patients, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in 9 patients and fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography (PET)/CT in 8 patients) were evaluated by 2 radiologists until consensus. The location, size and imaging features of the primary tumor and metastases at presentation, if any, were recorded, and correlated with clinical data and pathologic features (histologic type, presence of necrosis, mitotic activity, risk category, immunohistochemical profile). Results: The mean tumor size was 6.9 × 6.0 cm. Of the 16 tumors, 11 (68.7%) were infralevator, 4 (25%) supra and infralevator and 1 (6.3%) supralevator; 9 (56.2%) were exophytic, 6 (37.5%) both exophytic and intraluminal, and 1 (6.3%) was intraluminal. The tumors were iso- to minimally hypoattenuating to muscle on CT, iso- to minimally hypointense on T1-weighted images, hyperintense on T2-weighted images and showed variable enhancement. Necrosis was seen in 4 (25%), and hemorrhage and calcification in 2 (12.5%) patients each. The tumors were FDG avid with a mean maximum standardized uptake value of 11 (8.4–16.8). All tumors were positive for KIT and CD34. Distant metastasis to liver was seen in 1 patient (6.3%) at presentation. Conclusion: Anorectal GISTs are well-circumscribed, non-circumferential, predominantly infralevator, intramural or exophytic, FDG-avid, hypoattenuating masses, and present without

  2. Gastrointestinal stromal tumors as an incidental finding in patients with a presumptive diagnosis of ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz, Mario; Ramirez, Pedro T.; Echeverri, Carolina; Álvarez, Luis Guillermo; Palomino, Maria Alejandra

    2012-01-01

    Objective To report the clinical presentation and oncologic outcomes of a series of patients who presented with an abdominal or pelvic mass and were diagnosed with a gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST). Methods Data were obtained on all patients who presented with an abdominal or pelvic mass between September 2007 and June 2010 and who were ultimately diagnosed with a GIST. The patients' medical records were reviewed. A literature review was also conducted. Results Six patients were identified who met the inclusion criteria. All six patients had a tumor in the intestinal tract arising from the small bowel. The mean tumor size was 12 cm (range, 6 to 22 cm). A complete resection was achieved in five of the six patients. There were no intraoperative complications; one patient had a postoperative complication. Two patients were treated with imatinib after surgery. The mean follow-up time was 32 months (range, 0.3 to 40 months). At the last follow-up, five of the six patients were without any evidence of disease. One patient died of an unrelated hepatic encephalopathy. The incidence in our institution is 3%. Conclusion GISTs are uncommon; however, they should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients presenting with an abdominal or pelvic mass. PMID:22355467

  3. Nestin regulates proliferation and invasion of gastrointestinal stromal tumor cells by altering mitochondrial dynamics.

    PubMed

    Wang, J; Cai, J; Huang, Y; Ke, Q; Wu, B; Wang, S; Han, X; Wang, T; Wang, Y; Li, W; Lao, C; Song, W; Xiang, A P

    2016-06-16

    Nestin is widely expressed in numerous tumors and has become a diagnostic and prognostic indicator. However, the exact mechanism by which nestin contributes to tumor malignancy remains poorly understood. Here, we found marked upregulation of nestin expression in highly proliferative and invasive gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) specimens. Nestin knockdown in GIST cells reduced the proliferative and invasive activity owing to a decrease of mitochondrial intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. Furthermore, nestin was co-localized with mitochondria, and knockdown of nestin increased mitochondrial elongation and influenced the mitochondrial function, including oxygen consumption rates, ATP generation and mitochondrial membrane potential and so on. In exploring the underlying mechanism, we demonstrated nestin knockdown inhibited the mitochondrial recruitment of Dynamin-related protein1 and induced the change of mitochondrial dynamics. Thus, nestin may have an important role in GIST malignancy by regulating mitochondrial dynamics and altering intracellular ROS levels. The findings provide new clues to reveal mechanisms by which nestin mediates the proliferation and invasion of GISTs.

  4. Cutaneous and subcutaneous metastases of gastrointestinal stromal tumors: a series of 5 cases with molecular analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei-Lien; Hornick, Jason L; Mallipeddi, Raj; Zelger, Bettina G; Rother, Joshua D; Yang, Dan; Lev, Dina C; Trent, Jonathan C; Prieto, Victor G; Brenn, Thomas; Robson, Alistair; Calonje, Eduardo; Lazar, Alexander J F

    2009-05-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) rarely metastasize to the skin. We describe 5 patients with GIST with subcutaneous and cutaneous metastases. The mean age at metastasis was 54 years (range 30-68 years) with a male predominance (4:1). Primary tumors occurred in the stomach (n = 3), small bowel (n = 1), and abdomen, not otherwise specified (n = 1). The average time from primary tumor resection to the resection of skin metastases was 59 months (range 11-155 months). The metastases occurred in the scalp (n = 2), cheek (n = 1), and abdomen (n = 2) with 3 patients presenting with solitary nodules and 2 patients with multiple nodules. The average size was 2 cm (range 0.6-4 cm). Histologically, 2 cases were spindled and 3 cases demonstrated mixed epithelioid and spindle cell morphology. All were confirmed to have CD117 reactivity. KIT genotyping was performed in 4 of 5 cases. Two cases harbored a mutation in exon 11, and the remaining 2 cases were wild type in exons 9, 11, 13, and 17. All 5 patients had multiple concurrent or subsequent abdominal and/or hepatic metastases. In 4 patients with an average follow-up of 32 months (range 6-75 months), after the resection of the metastases, 2 were alive with disease and 2 died of disease. Cutaneous metastases seem to be a late complication of GIST, but their presence does not necessarily herald a rapid demise of the patient. PMID:19384074

  5. Integrative Genomic Characterization and a Genomic Staging System for Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Ylipää, Antti; Hunt, Kelly K.; Yang, Jilong; Lazar, Alexander J. F.; Torres, Keila E.; Lev, Dina Chelouche; Nykter, Matti; Pollock, Raphael E.; Trent, Jonathan; Zhang, Wei

    2010-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) were historically grouped with leiomyosarcomas (LMSs) based on their morphological similarities, but recently they have been unequivocally established as a distinct type of sarcoma based on the molecular features and response to imatinib treatment. To gain further insight into the genomic differences between GISTs and LMSs, we mapped gene copy number aberrations (CNAs) in 42 GISTs and 30 LMSs and integrated them with gene expression profiles. Our studies revealed distinct patterns of CNAs between GISTs and LMSs. Losses in chromosomes 1p, 14q, 15q, and 22q were significantly more frequent in GISTs than in LMSs (P < 0.001), whereas losses in chromosomes 10 and 16 as well as gains in 1q, 14q, and 15q (P < 0.001) were more common in LMSs. By integrating CNAs with gene expression data and clinical information, we found several clinically relevant CNAs that were prognostic of survival in patients with GIST. Furthermore, GISTs were categorized into four groups according to an accumulating pattern of genetic alterations. Many key cellular pathways were differently expressed in the four groups and the patients had increasingly worse prognosis as the extent of genomic alterations increased. These findings lead us to propose a new tumor-progression genetic staging system termed Genomic Instability Stage (GIS) to complement the current prognostic predictive system based on tumor size, mitotic index (MI), and KIT mutation. PMID:20818650

  6. Pharmacological inhibition of KIT activates MET signaling in gastrointestinal stromal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Noah A.; Zeng, Shan; Seifert, Adrian M.; Kim, Teresa S.; Sorenson, Eric C.; Greer, Jonathan B.; Beckman, Michael J.; Santamaria-Barria, Juan A.; Crawley, Megan H.; Green, Benjamin L.; Rossi, Ferdinand; Besmer, Peter; Antonescu, Cristina R.; DeMatteo, Ronald P.

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) are the most common adult sarcomas and the oncogenic driver is usually a KIT or PDGFRA mutation. While GIST are often initially sensitive to imatinib or other tyrosine kinase inhibitors, resistance generally develops necessitating backup strategies for therapy. In this study, we determined that a subset of human GIST specimens that acquired imatinib resistance acquired expression of activated forms of the MET oncogene. MET activation also developed after imatinib therapy in a mouse model of GIST (KitV558del/+ mice), where it was associated with increased tumor hypoxia. MET activation also occurred in imatinib-sensitive human GIST cell lines after imatinib treatment in vitro. MET inhibition by crizotinib or RNA interference was cytotoxic to an imatinib-resistant human GIST cell population. Moreover, combining crizotinib and imatinib was more effective than imatinib alone in imatinib-sensitive GIST models. Lastly, cabozantinib, a dual MET and KIT small molecule inhibitor, was markedly more effective than imatinib in multiple preclinical models of imatinib-sensitive and imatinib-resistant GIST. Collectively, our findings showed that activation of compensatory MET signaling by KIT inhibition may contribute to tumor resistance. Furthermore, our work offered a preclinical proof of concept for MET inhibition by cabozantinib as an effective strategy for GIST treatment. PMID:25836719

  7. Succinate dehydrogenase mutation underlies global epigenomic divergence in gastrointestinal stromal tumor.

    PubMed

    Killian, J Keith; Kim, Su Young; Miettinen, Markku; Smith, Carly; Merino, Maria; Tsokos, Maria; Quezado, Martha; Smith, William I; Jahromi, Mona S; Xekouki, Paraskevi; Szarek, Eva; Walker, Robert L; Lasota, Jerzy; Raffeld, Mark; Klotzle, Brandy; Wang, Zengfeng; Jones, Laura; Zhu, Yuelin; Wang, Yonghong; Waterfall, Joshua J; O'Sullivan, Maureen J; Bibikova, Marina; Pacak, Karel; Stratakis, Constantine; Janeway, Katherine A; Schiffman, Joshua D; Fan, Jian-Bing; Helman, Lee; Meltzer, Paul S

    2013-06-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) harbor driver mutations of signal transduction kinases such as KIT, or, alternatively, manifest loss-of-function defects in the mitochondrial succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) complex, a component of the Krebs cycle and electron transport chain. We have uncovered a striking divergence between the DNA methylation profiles of SDH-deficient GIST (n = 24) versus KIT tyrosine kinase pathway-mutated GIST (n = 39). Infinium 450K methylation array analysis of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues disclosed an order of magnitude greater genomic hypermethylation relative to SDH-deficient GIST versus the KIT-mutant group (84.9 K vs. 8.4 K targets). Epigenomic divergence was further found among SDH-mutant paraganglioma/pheochromocytoma (n = 29), a developmentally distinct SDH-deficient tumor system. Comparison of SDH-mutant GIST with isocitrate dehydrogenase-mutant glioma, another Krebs cycle-defective tumor type, revealed comparable measures of global hypo- and hypermethylation. These data expose a vital connection between succinate metabolism and genomic DNA methylation during tumorigenesis, and generally implicate the mitochondrial Krebs cycle in nuclear epigenomic maintenance. PMID:23550148

  8. Succinate dehydrogenase mutation underlies global epigenomic divergence in gastrointestinal stromal tumor.

    PubMed

    Killian, J Keith; Kim, Su Young; Miettinen, Markku; Smith, Carly; Merino, Maria; Tsokos, Maria; Quezado, Martha; Smith, William I; Jahromi, Mona S; Xekouki, Paraskevi; Szarek, Eva; Walker, Robert L; Lasota, Jerzy; Raffeld, Mark; Klotzle, Brandy; Wang, Zengfeng; Jones, Laura; Zhu, Yuelin; Wang, Yonghong; Waterfall, Joshua J; O'Sullivan, Maureen J; Bibikova, Marina; Pacak, Karel; Stratakis, Constantine; Janeway, Katherine A; Schiffman, Joshua D; Fan, Jian-Bing; Helman, Lee; Meltzer, Paul S

    2013-06-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) harbor driver mutations of signal transduction kinases such as KIT, or, alternatively, manifest loss-of-function defects in the mitochondrial succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) complex, a component of the Krebs cycle and electron transport chain. We have uncovered a striking divergence between the DNA methylation profiles of SDH-deficient GIST (n = 24) versus KIT tyrosine kinase pathway-mutated GIST (n = 39). Infinium 450K methylation array analysis of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues disclosed an order of magnitude greater genomic hypermethylation relative to SDH-deficient GIST versus the KIT-mutant group (84.9 K vs. 8.4 K targets). Epigenomic divergence was further found among SDH-mutant paraganglioma/pheochromocytoma (n = 29), a developmentally distinct SDH-deficient tumor system. Comparison of SDH-mutant GIST with isocitrate dehydrogenase-mutant glioma, another Krebs cycle-defective tumor type, revealed comparable measures of global hypo- and hypermethylation. These data expose a vital connection between succinate metabolism and genomic DNA methylation during tumorigenesis, and generally implicate the mitochondrial Krebs cycle in nuclear epigenomic maintenance.

  9. Comparison between air and carbon dioxide insufflation in the endoscopic submucosal excavation of gastrointestinal stromal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Wei-Bin; Wang, Zi-Hao; Qu, Chun-Ying; Zhang, Yi; Jiang, Han; Zhou, Min; Chen, Ying; Xu, Lei-Ming

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the safety and efficacy of CO2 insufflation compared with air insufflation in the endoscopic submucosal excavation (ESE) of gastrointestinal stromal tumors. METHODS: Sixty patients were randomized to undergo endoscopic submucosal excavation, with the CO2 group (n = 30) and the air group (n = 30) undergoing CO2 insufflation and air insufflation in the ESE, respectively. The end-tidal CO2 level (pETCO2) was observed at 4 time points: at the beginning of ESE, at total removal of the tumors, at completed wound management, and 10 min after ESE. Additionally, the patients’ experience of pain at 1, 3, 6 and 24 h after the examination was registered using a visual analog scale (VAS). RESULTS: Both the CO2 group and air group were similar in mean age, sex, body mass index (all P > 0.05). There were no significant differences in PetCO2 values before and after the procedure (P > 0.05). However, the pain scores after the ESE at different time points in the CO2 group decreased significantly compared with the air group (1 h: 21.2 ± 3.4 vs 61.5 ± 1.7; 3 h: 8.5 ± 0.7 vs 42.9 ± 1.3; 6 h: 4.4 ± 1.6 vs 27.6 ± 1.2; 24 h: 2.3 ± 0.4 vs 21.4 ± 0.7, P < 0.05). Meanwhile, the percentage of VAS scores of 0 in the CO2 group after 1, 3, 6 and 24 h was significantly higher than that in the air group (60.7 ± 1.4 vs 18.9 ± 1.5, 81.5 ± 2.3 vs 20.6 ± 1.2, 89.2 ± 0.7 vs 36.8 ± 0.9, 91.3 ± 0.8 vs 63.8 ± 1.3, respectively, P < 0.05). Moreover, the condition of the CO2 group was better than that of the air group with respect to anal exsufflation. CONCLUSION: Insufflation of CO2 in the ESE of gastrointestinal stromal tumors will not cause CO2 retention and it may significantly reduce the level of pain, thus it is safe and effective. PMID:23326136

  10. Tumor abscess formation caused by Morganella morganii complicated with bacteremia in a patient with gastrointestinal stromal tumor.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hsuan-Wei; Lin, Te-Yu

    2012-04-01

    We report the case of a 22-year-old man who presented with a 3-day history of watery diarrhea, abdominal pain, and fever. An image of the abdomen showed a heterogeneously echogenic mass lesion in the pelvis. The results of the blood cultures performed on admission showed the presence of Morganella morganii. Computed tomography-guided tube drainage was performed, and a culture of the drained abscess fluid yielded M. morganii growth. Exploratory laparotomy with segmental resection of the jejunum and excision of the tumor was performed. Pathological examination showed a gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST). A GIST abscess caused by M. morganii was diagnosed on the basis of radiological, microbiological, and histopathological findings. The possibility of an infected GIST should be considered during the differential diagnosis of patients with suspected abdominal neoplasm and bacteremia.

  11. Beyond Standard Therapy: Drugs Under Investigation for The Treatment of Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Alturkmani, Hani J; Pessetto, Ziyan Y; Godwin, Andrew K

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) is the most common non-epithelial malignancy of the GI tract. With the discovery of KIT and later PDGFRA gain-of-function mutations as factors in the pathogenesis of the disease, GIST was the quintessential model for targeted therapy. Despite the successful clinical use of imatinib mesylate, a selective receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) inhibitor that targets KIT, PDGFRA and BCR-ABL, we still do not have treatment for the long-term control of advanced GIST. Areas covered This review summarizes the drugs that are under investigation or have been assessed in trials for GIST treatment. The article focuses on their mechanisms of actions, the preclinical evidence of efficacy, and the clinical trials concerning safety and efficacy in humans. Expert opinion It is known that KIT and PDGFRA mutations in GIST patients influence the response to treatment. This observation should be taken into consideration when investigating new drugs. RECIST was developed to help uniformly report efficacy trials in oncology. Despite the usefulness of this system, many questions are being addressed about its validity in evaluating the true efficacy of drugs knowing that new targeted therapies do not affect the tumor size as much as they halt progression and prolong survival. PMID:26098203

  12. Extragastrointestinal Stromal Tumor during Pregnacy.

    PubMed

    Gözükara, Ilay; Dilek, T U Kutlu; Durukan, Hüseyin; Düsmez Apa, Duygu; Kabil Kucur, Suna; Dilek, Saffet

    2012-01-01

    Extragastrointestinal stromal tumors (EGISTs) are mesenchymal neoplasms without connection to the gastrointestinal tract. Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) and EGIST are similar according to their clinicopathologic and histomorphologic features. Both of them most often express immunoreactivity for CD-117, a c-kit proto-oncogene protein. The coexistence of GIST and pregnancy is very rare, with only two cases reported in the literature. In this paper, we presented the first EGIST case during pregnancy in the literature.

  13. Extragastrointestinal Stromal Tumor during Pregnacy

    PubMed Central

    Gözükara, Ilay; Dilek, T. U. Kutlu; Durukan, Hüseyin; Düsmez Apa, Duygu; Kabil Kucur, Suna; Dilek, Saffet

    2012-01-01

    Extragastrointestinal stromal tumors (EGISTs) are mesenchymal neoplasms without connection to the gastrointestinal tract. Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) and EGIST are similar according to their clinicopathologic and histomorphologic features. Both of them most often express immunoreactivity for CD-117, a c-kit proto-oncogene protein. The coexistence of GIST and pregnancy is very rare, with only two cases reported in the literature. In this paper, we presented the first EGIST case during pregnancy in the literature. PMID:23119199

  14. DOG1 for the diagnosis of gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST): Comparison between 2 different antibodies.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Lisandro F; West, Robert B; Bacchi, Livia M; van de Rijn, Matt; Bacchi, Carlos E

    2010-07-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) is the most common mesenchymal neoplasm of the gastrointestinal tract. Discovered on GIST-1 (DOG1) is a recently described protein expressed in GISTs irrespective of mutation status. The aim of this study was to investigate the immunohistochemical expression of DOG1 using 2 different monoclonal antibodies (DOG1.1 and the commercially available K9 antibody) in 668 GIST cases and to compare the results with the expression of KIT. DOG1 and KIT expression also were studied in most human normal tissues and several nonmesenchymal and mesenchymal tumors other than GIST. KIT was expressed in 643 (96.3%) GISTs. DOG1.1 and K9 were positive in 538 (80.5%) and 642 (96.1%) GIST cases, respectively. In 25 (3.7%) KIT-negative GIST cases, DOG1 was expressed in 5 (20.0%) and 19 (76.0%) using DOG1.1 and K9 antibodies, respectively. Only 0.9% of GISTs were negative for KIT, DOG1.1, and K9. Most normal human tissues did not reveal KIT and DOG1 expression. DOG1.1 was positive in only 2 of 57 synovial sarcomas and 1 of 61 soft tissue leiomyosarcomas. K9 was positive in 5 of 57 synovial sarcomas, 1 of 14 angiosarcomas, 1 of 61 soft tissue leiomyosarcomas, 3 of 4 adenoid cystic carcinomas of the head and neck, and in myoepithelial cells of 9 of 11 fibroadenomas of the breast. In conclusion, the commercially available K9 is of great utility for the diagnosis of most KIT-negative GISTs, and the combination of both KIT and K9 antibody in a panel of immunohistochemistry can define the diagnosis of GIST in more than 99% of cases.

  15. Indian Council of Medical Research consensus document for the management of gastrointestinal stromal tumors.

    PubMed

    Shrikhande, Shailesh V; Sirohi, Bhawna; Barreto, Savio G; Chacko, Raju T; Parikh, Purvish M; Pautu, Jeremy; Arya, Supreeta; Patil, Prachi; Chilukuri, Srinivas C; Ganesh, B; Kaur, Tanvir; Shukla, Deepak; Rath, Goura Shankar

    2014-10-01

    This consensus statement was produced along with the gastric cancer discussions as stomach is the most common site for gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST). The recommendations apply to treatment of GIST.Evaluation of a patient with newly diagnosed GIST should include essential tests: A standard white light endoscopy with 6-8 biopsies (c-KIT testing on immunohistochemistry) from the tumor for confirmation of the diagnosis, a computed tomography (CT) scan (multi-detector or helical) of the abdomen and pelvis for staging with a CT chest or chest X-ray, and complete blood counts, renal function tests and liver function tests. Endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS)/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)/positron emission tomography (PET)-CT are not recommended for all patients.For localized and resectable disease, surgery is recommended. The need for adjuvant treatment with imatinib would be guided by the risk stratification on the histopathological analysis of the resected specimen.For localized but borderline resectable tumors, upfront surgery may be considered only if complications due to the tumor are present such as major bleeding or gastric outlet obstruction. In all other patients, neoadjuvant imatinib should be considered to downstage the disease followed by surgery (with a curative intent, if feasible) in those with stable or partial response. This may be followed by adjuvant imatinib. In those patients with a poor response, further imatinib with dose escalation or sunitinib may be considered.Patients with metastatic disease must be assessed for treatment with imatinib as first-line therapy followed by sunitinib as second-line therapy versus best supportive care on an individual basis. PMID:25538399

  16. Rare presentation of a gastrointestinal stromal tumor with spontaneous esophageal perforation: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Sjogren, Phayvanh P.; Banerji, Nilanjana; Batts, Kenneth P.; Graczyk, Matthew J.; Dunn, Daniel H.

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) of the alimentary canal are malignant tumors with <1% of cases diagnosed in esophagus. These cases require special consideration given their close proximity to vital structures and propensity to be highly aggressive. Management of patients with GISTs has been transformed since the introduction of tyrosine kinase inhibitors. In this report, we present an unusual case of GIST with spontaneous esophageal perforation. PRESENTATION OF CASE A 39-year-old Caucasian male presented to our hospital with complaints of severe chest and abdominal pain. A diagnostic chest radiograph revealed a moderate right-sided pleural effusion. Subsequently, an esophagram demonstrated a perforation proximal to an elongated stricture in the distal esophagus. A left thoracotomy was performed whereby a large mediastinal mass firmly attached to the esophagus and gastroesophageal junction was encountered. The neoplasm involved proximal one-third of the stomach and perforated into the right hemithorax. Histopathological evaluation of the tumor led to a diagnosis of GIST. DISCUSSION GISTs of the gastroesophageal junction are uncommon and may rarely present with esophageal perforation. The standard of care for treating GIST at present includes tyrosine kinase inhibitors. This pharmacologic agent, along with improved surgical techniques and understanding of molecular markers for accurate diagnosis, will assuredly continue to improve overall survival of patients with GISTs. CONCLUSION When stricture or achalasia is detected on imaging, GIST should be considered in the differential diagnosis for individual patients. Additionally, chest and abdomen CT scans of may be performed to confirm presence of a tumor mass, thereby ruling out achalasia. PMID:23702440

  17. Solitary fibrous tumor of the greater omentum, mimicking gastrointestinal stromal tumor of the small intestine: a case report.

    PubMed

    Urabe, Masayuki; Yamagata, Yukinori; Aikou, Susumu; Mori, Kazuhiko; Yamashita, Hiroharu; Nomura, Sachiyo; Shibahara, Junji; Fukayama, Masashi; Seto, Yasuyuki

    2015-05-01

    Solitary fibrous tumor (SFT) is one of the mesenchymal tumors, which rarely arises in the abdominal space. We report a very rare case of abdominal SFT, mimicking another mesenchymal tumor. A 52-year-old Japanese man was referred to our hospital for further evaluation and treatment of gallbladder polyp. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) showed an enhanced nodule within the gallbladder, and incidentally, also showed a well-circumscribed mass adjacent to the small intestine. The mass was depicted as slightly high density in plain CT, and with contrast-enhancement, the mass was partially stained in early phase and the stained area spread heterogeneously in delayed phase. Magnetic resonance imaging showed that the abdominal mass was depicted as slightly high intensity on T2-weighted imaging and low intensity on T1-weighted imaging. With double-balloon endoscopy and capsule endoscopy, we did not find any tumor inside the small intestine. These visual findings lead us to diagnose it as gastrointestinal stromal tumor of the small intestine with extraluminal growth. We planned to resect both the gallbladder polyp and the intraperitoneal tumor at the same time for pathologic diagnosis and treatment. When the operation was performed, we found a milk-white lobulated tumor on the greater omentum and the tumor was entirely resected. Microscopically, the gallbladder polyp was diagnosed as tubular adenoma, and the omental tumor was diagnosed as SFT. It is important to bear in mind that omental SFTs sometimes mimic other mesenchymal tumors and should be included in the differential diagnosis of abdominal tumor not revealed by endoscopy.

  18. Solitary fibrous tumor of the greater omentum, mimicking gastrointestinal stromal tumor of the small intestine: a case report.

    PubMed

    Urabe, Masayuki; Yamagata, Yukinori; Aikou, Susumu; Mori, Kazuhiko; Yamashita, Hiroharu; Nomura, Sachiyo; Shibahara, Junji; Fukayama, Masashi; Seto, Yasuyuki

    2015-05-01

    Solitary fibrous tumor (SFT) is one of the mesenchymal tumors, which rarely arises in the abdominal space. We report a very rare case of abdominal SFT, mimicking another mesenchymal tumor. A 52-year-old Japanese man was referred to our hospital for further evaluation and treatment of gallbladder polyp. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) showed an enhanced nodule within the gallbladder, and incidentally, also showed a well-circumscribed mass adjacent to the small intestine. The mass was depicted as slightly high density in plain CT, and with contrast-enhancement, the mass was partially stained in early phase and the stained area spread heterogeneously in delayed phase. Magnetic resonance imaging showed that the abdominal mass was depicted as slightly high intensity on T2-weighted imaging and low intensity on T1-weighted imaging. With double-balloon endoscopy and capsule endoscopy, we did not find any tumor inside the small intestine. These visual findings lead us to diagnose it as gastrointestinal stromal tumor of the small intestine with extraluminal growth. We planned to resect both the gallbladder polyp and the intraperitoneal tumor at the same time for pathologic diagnosis and treatment. When the operation was performed, we found a milk-white lobulated tumor on the greater omentum and the tumor was entirely resected. Microscopically, the gallbladder polyp was diagnosed as tubular adenoma, and the omental tumor was diagnosed as SFT. It is important to bear in mind that omental SFTs sometimes mimic other mesenchymal tumors and should be included in the differential diagnosis of abdominal tumor not revealed by endoscopy. PMID:26011203

  19. Risk factors for gastrointestinal stromal tumor recurrence in patients treated with adjuvant imatinib

    PubMed Central

    Joensuu, Heikki; Eriksson, Mikael; Hall, Kirsten Sundby; Hartmann, Jörg T; Pink, Daniel; Schütte, Jochen; Ramadori, Giuliano; Hohenberger, Peter; Duyster, Justus; Al-Batran, Salah-Eddin; Schlemmer, Marcus; Bauer, Sebastian; Wardelmann, Eva; Sarlomo-Rikala, Maarit; Nilsson, Bengt; Sihto, Harri; Ballman, Karla V; Leinonen, Mika; DeMatteo, Ronald P; Reichardt, Peter

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Little is known about the factors that predict for gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) recurrence in patients treated with adjuvant imatinib. METHODS Risk factors for GIST recurrence were identified, and 2 risk stratification scores were developed using the database of the Scandinavian Sarcoma Group (SSG) XVIII trial, where 358 patients with high-risk GIST with no overt metastases were randomly assigned to adjuvant imatinib 400 mg/day either for 12 or 36 months after surgery. The findings were validated in the imatinib arm of the American College of Surgeons Oncology Group Z9001 trial, where 359 patients with GIST were randomized to receive imatinib and 354 were to receive placebo for 12 months. RESULTS Five factors (high tumor mitotic count, nongastric location, large size, rupture, and adjuvant imatinib for 12 months) were independently associated with unfavorable recurrence-free survival (RFS) in a multivariable analysis in the SSGXVIII cohort. A risk score based on these 5 factors had a concordance index with GIST recurrence of 78.9%. When a simpler score consisting of the 2 strongest predictive factors (mitotic count and tumor site) was devised, the groups with the lowest, intermediate high, and the highest risk had 5-year RFS of 76.7%, 47.5%, and 8.4%, respectively. Both scores were strongly associated with RFS in the validation cohort (P < .001 for each comparison). CONCLUSIONS The scores generated were effective in stratifying the risk of GIST recurrence in patient populations treated with adjuvant imatinib. Patients with nongastric GIST with a high mitotic count are at a particularly high risk for recurrence. PMID:24737415

  20. Blood Neutrophil-to-Lymphocyte Ratio is Prognostic in Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Daniel R.; Baser, Raymond E.; Cavnar, Michael J.; Balachandran, Vinod P.; Antonescu, Cristina R.; Tap, William D.; Strong, Vivian E.; Brennan, Murray F.; Coit, Daniel G.; Singer, Samuel; DeMatteo, Ronald P.

    2013-01-01

    Background The immune system has been shown to play an important role in gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST). The neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) in blood is an easily assessable parameter of systemic inflammatory response. The aim of this study was to determine whether the NLR is prognostic in GIST. Methods 339 previously untreated patients with primary, localized GIST operated at our institution between 1995 and 2010 were identified from a prospectively collected sarcoma database. NLR was assessed preoperatively. Patients who received adjuvant imatinib treatment were excluded from the analysis (n=64). Cox regression models were calculated and correlation analyses were performed. Results On univariate analysis, NLR was associated with recurrence-free survival (RFS) (P=0.003, hazard ratio = 3.3, 95% confidence interval 1.5-7.4). Patients with a low NLR had a 1- and 5- year RFS of 98% and 91%, compared with 89% and 76% in those with a high NLR. The median RFS was not reached. Positive correlations were found between NLR and mitotic rate (Pearson correlation coefficient (r)=0.15, P=0.03), and NLR and tumor size (r=0.36, P=0.0001). RFS in patients with a GIST > 5 cm with low NLR was significantly longer compared to patients with high NLR (P=0.002). Flow cytometry analysis of freshly obtained GISTs revealed that neutrophils constituted a minimal percentage of intratumoral immune cells. Conclusion NLR is a surrogate for high risk tumor features. Elevated blood NLR appears to represent systemic inflammation in patients with high risk GIST. PMID:23054118

  1. Survival after Resection of Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor and Sarcoma Liver Metastases in 146 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Brudvik, Kristoffer W.; Patel, Sameer H.; Roland, Christina L.; Conrad, Claudius; Torres, Keila E.; Hunt, Kelly K.; Cormier, Janice N.; Feig, Barry W.; Aloia, Thomas A.; Vauthey, Jean-Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Background We investigated outcomes by primary tumor type in patients who underwent resection of liver metastases from gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST), leiomyosarcomas, and other sarcomas. Method Our institutional liver database was used to identify patients who underwent resection from 1998 through 2013. Histopathological, clinical, and survival data were analyzed. Results One hundred forty-six patients underwent resection of liver metastases from GIST (n=49), leiomyosarcomas (n=47), or other sarcomas (n=50). The 5-year overall survival (OS) rates in patients with GIST, leiomyosarcomas, and other sarcomas were 55.3%, 48.4%, and 44.9%, respectively, and the 10-year OS rates were 52.5%, 9.2%, and 23.0%, respectively. The 5-year recurrence-free survival (RFS) rate was better for GIST (35.7%; p=0.003) than for leiomyosarcomas (3.4%) and other sarcomas (21.4%). Lung recurrence was more common for leiomyosarcomas (36% of patients; p<0.0001) than for other sarcomas (12%) and GIST (2%). For GIST, the findings support a benefit of imatinib regarding the 5-year RFS rate compared to resection alone (47.1% vs 9.5%; p=0.013). For leiomyosarcoma, primary tumor location did not affect the 5-year RFS rate (intraabdominal 14.5%; other location 0%; p=0.182). Conclusion Liver metastases from GIST, leiomyosarcomas, and other sarcomas should be assessed separately as their survival and recurrence patterns are different. This is especially important for GIST, for which imatinib is now available. PMID:26001368

  2. Detection of Treatment-Induced Changes in Signaling Pathways in Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors using Transcriptomic Data

    PubMed Central

    Ochs, Michael F.; Rink, Lori; Tarn, Chi; Mburu, Sarah; Taguchi, Takahiro; Eisenberg, Burton; Godwin, Andrew K.

    2009-01-01

    Cell signaling plays a central role in the etiology of cancer. Numerous therapeutics in use or under development target signaling proteins, however off-target effects often limit assignment of positive clinical response to the intended target. As direct measurements of signaling protein activity are not generally feasible during treatment, there is a need for more powerful methods to determine if therapeutics inhibit their targets and when off-target effects occur. We have used the Bayesian Decomposition algorithm and data on transcriptional regulation to create a novel methodology, DESIDE (Differential Expression for SIgnaling DEtermination), for inferring signaling activity from microarray measurements. We applied DESIDE to deduce signaling activity in gastrointestinal stromal tumor cell lines treated with the targeted therapeutic imatinib mesylate (Gleevec). We detected the expected reduced activity in the KIT pathway, as well as unexpected changes in the P53 pathway. Pursuing these findings, we have determined that imatinib-induced DNA damage is responsible for the increased activity of P53, identifying a novel off-target activity for this drug. We then used DESIDE on data from resected, post-imatinib treatment tumor samples and identified a pattern in these tumors similar to that at late time points in the cell lines, and this pattern correlated with initial clinical response. The pattern showed increased activity of ELK1 and STAT3 transcription factors, which are associated with the growth of side population cells. DESIDE infers the global reprogramming of signaling networks during treatment, permitting treatment modification that leverages ongoing drug development efforts, which is crucial for personalized medicine. PMID:19903850

  3. Histopathological Features of Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors and the Contribution of DOG1 Expression to the Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Güler, Beril; Özyılmaz, Filiz; Tokuç, Burcu; Can, Nuray; Taştekin, Ebru

    2015-01-01

    Background: Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) have KIT or platelet-derived growth factor receptor α (PDGFRα) mutations affecting receptor tyrosine kinase activity and do not benefit from classic treatment regimens. Aims: The aim of this study was to review the algorithm that may be followed for the diagnosis and differential diagnosis in GISTs by investigating the histomorphological parameters and expression characteristics of classical immunohistochemical antibodies used in routine tests in addition to DOG1 expression. Study Design: Diagnostic accuracy study. Methods: We reevaluated the histological and immunohistochemical parameters of 37 GISTs. The standard immunohistochemical diagnosis and differential diagnosis panel antibodies (CD117, PDGFRα, CD34, vimentin, desmin, SMA, S-100, and Ki67) were studied on the tumor sections. We also used the popular marker DOG1 antibody with accepted sensitivity for GISTs in recent years and the PDGFRα immune marker for which the benefit in routine practice is discussed. Results: Classification according to progressive disease risk groups of the 37 cases revealed that 54% were in the high risk, 19% in the moderate risk, 16% in the low risk, 8% in the very low risk and 8% in the no risk group. Cytological atypia, necrosis, mucosal invasion and the Ki67 index were found to be related to the progressive disease risk groups of the tumors (p<0.05). Positive immunoreaction was observed with CD117 and PDGFRα in all GISTs in the study (100%). Positivity with the DOG1 antibody was found in 33 (89%) cases. CD34 was positive in 62% (23) of the cases. Conclusion: The CD117 antibody still plays a key role in GIST diagnosis. However, the use of DOG1 and PDGFRα antibodies combined with CD117 as sensitive markers can be beneficial. PMID:26740899

  4. Defects in succinate dehydrogenase in gastrointestinal stromal tumors lacking KIT and PDGFRA mutations.

    PubMed

    Janeway, Katherine A; Kim, Su Young; Lodish, Maya; Nosé, Vânia; Rustin, Pierre; Gaal, José; Dahia, Patricia L M; Liegl, Bernadette; Ball, Evan R; Raygada, Margarita; Lai, Angela H; Kelly, Lorna; Hornick, Jason L; O'Sullivan, Maureen; de Krijger, Ronald R; Dinjens, Winand N M; Demetri, George D; Antonescu, Cristina R; Fletcher, Jonathan A; Helman, Lee; Stratakis, Constantine A

    2011-01-01

    Carney-Stratakis syndrome, an inherited condition predisposing affected individuals to gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) and paraganglioma, is caused by germline mutations in succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) subunits B, C, or D, leading to dysfunction of complex II of the electron transport chain. We evaluated the role of defective cellular respiration in sporadic GIST lacking mutations in KIT or PDGFRA (WT). Thirty-four patients with WT GIST without a personal or family history of paraganglioma were tested for SDH germline mutations. WT GISTs lacking demonstrable SDH genetic inactivation were evaluated for SDHB expression by immunohistochemistry and Western blotting and for complex II activity. For comparison, SDHB expression was also determined in KIT mutant and neurofibromatosis-1-associated GIST, and complex II activity was also measured in SDH-deficient paraganglioma and KIT mutant GIST; 4 of 34 patients (12%) with WT GIST without a personal or family history of paraganglioma had germline mutations in SDHB or SDHC. WT GISTs lacking somatic mutations or deletions in SDH subunits had either complete loss of or substantial reduction in SDHB protein expression, whereas most KIT mutant GISTs had strong SDHB expression. Complex II activity was substantially decreased in WT GISTs. WT GISTs, particularly those in younger patients, have defects in SDH mitochondrial complex II, and in a subset of these patients, GIST seems to arise from germline-inactivating SDH mutations. Testing for germline mutations in SDH is recommended in patients with WT GIST. These findings highlight a potential central role of SDH dysregulation in WT GIST oncogenesis.

  5. The roles of serum CXCL16 in circulating Tregs and gastrointestinal stromal tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Ya-Nan; Zhang, Jun-Yan; Xu, Hui-Mian

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) are the most common sarcomas of the digestive system. Abnormal expression of CXCL16 and its sole receptor, CXCR6, has been demonstrated in many cancers. However, no studies have shown the relationship between CXCL16 or CXCR6 expression and GIST. In this study, we detected CXCL16 and CXCR6 expression in GIST patient samples by using immunohistochemistry analysis and Western blot analysis. Serum CXCL16 level was determined by using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Circulating Tregs were isolated by using flow cytometry. MTT assay, cell cycle assay, and transwell assay were used to test the effects of recombinant CXCL16 on Tregs and GIST cells in vitro. The levels of CXCL16 and CXCR6 protein were higher in cancer tissues than in normal tissues. Serum CXCL16 level and circulating Tregs were higher in GIST patients than that in the healthy volunteers. CXCL16, CXCR6, serum CXCL16, and circulating Tregs were significantly associated with a decreased survival time of patients. Relative to control cells, high concentration recombinant CXCL16 treated Tregs and GIST cells exhibited lower proliferation and mobility rates as assessed by MTT assay and transwell assay, respectively. Taken together, CXCL16 was observed to mediate the inhibitory effects in Tregs and GIST cells, and these involved suppression of the MEK/ERK signaling pathway. PMID:27418838

  6. The impact of additional malignancies in patients diagnosed with gastrointestinal stromal tumors.

    PubMed

    Smith, Myles J; Smith, Henry G; Mahar, Alyson L; Law, Calvin; Ko, Yoo-Joung

    2016-10-15

    A higher incidence of additional malignancies has been described in patients diagnosed with gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST). This study aimed to identify risk factors for developing additional malignancies in patients diagnosed with GIST and evaluate the impact on survival. Individuals diagnosed with GIST from 2001 to2009 were identified from the SEER database. Logistic regression was used to identify predictors of additional malignancies and Cox-proportional hazards regression used to identify predictors of survival. In the study period, 1705 cases of GIST were identified, with 181 (10.6%) patients developing additional malignancies. Colorectal cancer was the most common cancer developing within 6 months of GIST diagnosis (30%). The median time to diagnosis of a malignancy after 6 months of GIST diagnosis was 21.9 months. Older age (p < 0.0001) and extraoesophagogastric GIST (p = 0.0027) were significant prognostic factors associated with additional malignancies. The overall 5-year survival was 65%, with the presence of additional malignancies within 6 months of GIST diagnosis associated with poor overall survival (54%, HR 1.55 1.05-2.3 95% CI, p = 0.04). Predictive factors of additional malignancies in patients diagnosed with GIST are increasing age and the primary disease site. Developing additional malignancies within 6 months of GIST diagnosis is associated with poorer overall survival. Targeted surveillance may be warranted in patients diagnosed with GIST that are at high risk of developing additional malignancies. PMID:27299364

  7. Endoscopic submucosal dissection for silent gastric Dieulafoy lesions mimicking gastrointestinal stromal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xue; Cao, Hailong; Wang, Sinan; Wang, Dan; Xu, Mengque; Piao, Meiyu; Wang, Bangmao

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Dieulafoy lesion is a rare but serious cause of gastrointestinal hemorrhage. However, some cases can be occasionally found without bleeding during the endoscopic screening, and the management remains unclear. The aim of this article was to report the efficacy and safety of endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) for silent gastric Dieulafoy lesions, which presented as protrusion lesions mimicking gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs). Methods: Data from the patients with gastric protrusion lesions who underwent ESD from September 2008 to April 2016 in General Hospital, Tianjin Medical University, China were recorded. Seven cases with pathological diagnosis of Dieulafoy lesion without bleeding were enrolled for further analysis. Results: A total of 7 patients (2 males and 5 females) with mean age of 57.7 ± 4.15 years were pathologically diagnosed as Dieulafoy lesion. Four of the lesions were located in gastric antrum, 2 in the fundus, and 1 in the body of stomach, respectively. The mean sizes of the Dieulafoy lesions under white light endoscopy and endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) were 1.06 ± 0.28 and 0.84 ± 0.29 cm. The origins of these lesions were submucosa (6/7, 85.7%) and muscularis propria (1/7, 14.3%). Three of them appeared with mixed echo under EUS, 3 with hypoechogenicity, and 1 with hyperechogenicity. En bloc complete resection was achieved in all the lesions by ESD with average time of 76.00 ± 16.86 minutes, and no intraoperative bleeding happened. In addition, all patients were followed up for 1 to 53 months, and no recurrence or long-term complications was observed. Conclusion: Therefore, ESD can be an effective and safe treatment for silent gastric Dieulafoy lesions with clinical presentations of submucosal protrusion lesions mimicking GISTs. PMID:27603399

  8. Patterns of Deregulation of Insulin Growth Factor Signaling Pathway in Pediatric and Adult Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Italiano, Antoine; Chen, Junwei; Zhang, Lei; Hajdu, Mihai; Singer, Samuel; DeMatteo, Ronald P; Antonescu, Cristina R.

    2013-01-01

    Background Data regarding the patterns and the mechanisms of deregulation of the insulin growth factor (IGF) pathway in adult and pediatric gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are limited. Methods We investigated the expression profiling of the genes encoding the main components of the IGF signaling pathway in 131 GISTs (106 adult, 21 pediatric and 4 young adult) and 25 other soft-tissue sarcomas (STS) using an Affymetrix U133A platform. IGF2 was investigated for loss of imprinting (LOI) whereas IGF1R was analyzed for copy number aberration and mutation. Results IGF2 was the most highly overexpressed gene of the IGF pathway in GIST. IGF2 expression was also significantly higher than in other STS. IGF2 expression was correlated to the age onset and mutational status of GIST. Indeed, IGF2 expression was significantly higher in the “adult” group than in the “pediatric” and “young adult” groups. Among adult GIST, IGF2 expression was higher in tumors lacking KIT or PDGFRA mutations in comparison with mutated cases. A trend for a higher expression of IGF2 in resistant GIST in comparison to responsive GIST was also found. Overexpression of IGF2 was not related to LOI. Conversely, the expression of the IGF1R gene was significantly higher in the pediatric group than in the adult group. No copy number gains or mutations of IGF1R were observed. Conclusion The IGF pathway is deregulated in GIST with distinct patterns according to age onset and mutational status. The IGF pathway may represent a therapeutic target in patients with primary or secondary resistance to imatinib. PMID:22770876

  9. Is Autophagy Rather Than Apoptosis the Regression Driver in Imatinib-Treated Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors?1

    PubMed Central

    Miselli, Francesca; Negri, Tiziana; Gronchi, Alessandro; Losa, Marco; Conca, Elena; Brich, Silvia; Fumagalli, Elena; Fiore, Marco; Casali, Paolo G; Pierotti, Marco A; Tamborini, Elena; Pilotti, Silvana

    2008-01-01

    Although apoptosis (programmed cell death type I) is more frequently reported in the literature in imatinib-treated gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) cell lines,morphological features consistent with autophagic changes aremore often encountered in surgical specimens of treated patients. Autophagy (programmed cell death type II) is highly regulated by a tumor-suppressor mechanism that mainly involves the genes beclin1, PI3KIII, and bcl2. Being our material not suitable for electron microscopy analysis (not paraformaldehyde-glutaraldehyde-fixed), we evaluated the morphological, biochemical, and immunophenotypical profiles expected to be related to autophagy and apoptosis in a series of surgically resected samples taken from 11 imatinib-treated patients with molecularly characterized GISTs. The samples were examined for imatinib-induced morphological changes, the presence/interactions of the autophagic-related proteins (beclin1, PI3KIII, bcl2, and LC3-II) and the presence of apoptosis-related proteins (caspase 3, caspase 7, and lamin A/C) by means ofWestern blot analysis and coimmunoprecipitation, complemented by immunohistochemistry. We also studied samples of two untreated GISTs used as controls. Sampling areas with different residual cellularity scores fromboth the imatinib-treated and untreated patients showed biochemical and immunohistochemical evidence of high levels of proautophagy beclin1/PI3KIII and low levels of antiautophagy beclin1/bcl2 complexes, together with the presence of LC3-II detected by Western blot analysis, thus supporting the presence of autophagy. There was no expression of cleaved/activated caspase 3 or 7 or cleaved lamin A/C. Our descriptive results support the idea that GISTs activate autophagy rather than apoptosis in response to imatinib treatment and that their molecular makeup includes fingerprints of autophagy. PMID:19043528

  10. Insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor is a potential therapeutic target for gastrointestinal stromal tumors.

    PubMed

    Tarn, Chi; Rink, Lori; Merkel, Erin; Flieder, Douglas; Pathak, Harsh; Koumbi, Daphne; Testa, Joseph R; Eisenberg, Burton; von Mehren, Margaret; Godwin, Andrew K

    2008-06-17

    A subset of gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) lack gain-of-function mutations in c-KIT and PDGFRalpha. These so-called wild-type (WT) GISTs tend to be less responsive to imatinib-based therapies and have a poor prognosis. We identified amplification of IGF1R in a SNP analysis of GIST and thus studied its potential as a therapeutic target in WT and mutant GIST. Expression of IGF1R and downstream effectors in clinical GIST samples was examined by using immunoblots and immunohistochemistry. The roles of IGF1R signaling in GIST and viability were analyzed by using NVP-AEW541, an inhibitor of IGF1R, alone and in combination with imatinib, or via siRNA silencing of IGF1R. IGF1R was strongly overexpressed, and IGF1R amplification was detected at a significantly higher frequency in WT GISTs, including a pediatric WT GIST, compared with mutant GISTs (P = 0.0173 and P = 0.0163, respectively). Inhibition of IGF1R activity in vitro with NVP-AEW541 or down-regulation of expression with siIGF1R led to cytotoxicity and induced apoptosis in GIST cell lines via AKT and MAPK signaling. Combination of NVP-AEW541 and imatinib in GIST cell lines induced a strong cytotoxicity response. Our results reveal that IGF1R is amplified and the protein is overexpressed in WT and pediatric GISTs. We also demonstrate that the aberrant expression of IGF1R may be associated with oncogenesis in WT GISTs and suggest an alternative and/or complementary therapeutic regimen in the clinical management of all GISTs, especially in a subset of tumors that respond less favorably to imatinib-based therapy.

  11. PDGFRA Regulates Proliferation of Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor Cells with Mutations in KIT by Stabilizing ETV1

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Yujiro; Bardsley, Michael R.; Toyomasu, Yoshitaka; Milosavljevic, Srdjan; Gajdos, Gabriella B.; Choi, Kyoung Moo; Reid-Lombardo, KMarie; Kendrick, Michael L.; Bingener-Casey, Juliane; Tang, Chih-Min; Sicklick, Jason K.; Gibbons, Simon J.; Farrugia, Gianrico; Taguchi, Takahiro; Gupta, Anu; Rubin, Brian P.; Fletcher, Jonathan A.; Ramachandran, Abhijit; Ordog, Tamas

    2015-01-01

    Background & Aims In gastrointestinal muscles, KIT is predominantly expressed by interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) and PDGFRA is expressed by so-called fibroblast-like cells. KIT and PDGFRA have been reported to be co-expressed in ICC precursors and gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs), which originate from the ICC lineage. PDGFRA signaling has been proposed to stimulate growth of GISTs that express mutant KIT, but the effects and mechanisms of selective blockade of PDGFRA are unclear. We investigated whether inhibiting PDGFRA could reduce proliferation of GIST cells with mutant KIT via effects on the KIT-dependent transcription factor ETV1. Methods We studied 53 gastric, small intestinal, rectal, or abdominal GISTs collected immediately after surgery or archived as fixed blocks at the Mayo Clinic and University of California, San Diego. In human GIST cells carrying imatinib-sensitive and imatinib-resistant mutations in KIT, PDGFRA was reduced by RNA interference (knockdown) or inhibited with crenolanib besylate (a selective inhibitor of PDGFRA and PDGFRB). Mouse ICC precursors were retrovirally transduced to overexpress wild-type Kit. Cell proliferation was analyzed by methyltetrazolium, 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine incorporation, and Ki-67 immunofluorescence assays; we also analyzed growth of xenograft tumors in mice. Gastric ICC and ICC precursors, and their PDGFRA+ subsets, were analyzed by flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry in wild-type, Kit+/copGFP, Pdgfra+/eGFP and NOD/ShiLtJ mice. Immunoblots were used to quantify protein expression and phosphorylation. Results KIT and PDGFRA were co-expressed in 3%–5% of mouse ICC, 35%−44% of ICC precursors, and most human GIST samples and cell lines. PDGFRA knockdown or inhibition with crenolanib efficiently reduced proliferation of imatinib-sensitive and imatinib-resistant KIT+ETV1+PDGFRA+ GIST cells (half-maximal inhibitory concentration: IC50=5-32 nM), but not of cells lacking KIT, ETV1, or PDGFRA (IC50>230 n

  12. Metachronous Primary Adenocarcinoma of Lung During Adjuvant Imatinib Mesylate Therapy for Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor of Stomach: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Meng-Jie; Weng, Shan-Shan; Cao, Ying; Li, Xiao-Fen; Wang, Liu-Hong; Xu, Jing-Hong; Yuan, Ying

    2015-09-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) is the most common mesenchymal tumor in gastrointestinal tracts; however, the synchronous or metachronous coexistence of GIST with additional primary malignancy is not common.Here, we present an unusual case of gastric GIST with metachronous primary lung adenocarcinoma diagnosed during his adjuvant treatment with oral receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor imatinib mesylate (400 mg daily). After 6-month use of imatinib, the patient suffered from dry cough and dyspnea. Subsequent lung biopsy demonstrated adenocarcinoma with diffuse interstitial changes.Our research emphasizes the possibility of an additional primary tumor with GIST, and reminds the clinicians to strengthen the surveillance of the additional cancer during the follow-up of GIST patients.

  13. Pazopanib in metastatic multiply treated progressive gastrointestinal stromal tumors: feasible and efficacious

    PubMed Central

    Ramaswamy, Anant; Pande, Nikhil; Shetty, Omshree; Shetty, Nitin; Gupta, Sudeep

    2016-01-01

    Background A median progression free survival (PFS) of 18–20 months and median overall survival (OS) of 51–57 months can be achieved with the use of imatinib, in metastatic or advanced gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST). Sunitinib and regorafenib are approved options for patients progressing on imatinib, but with markedly decreased survival. pazopanib is a broad spectrum TKI targeting KIT, PDGFR and VEGFR receptors and has shown promising activity in phase 2 trials in GIST. Methods All patients who received pazopanib for GIST between March 2014 and September 2015 in our institution were reviewed. Patients were assessed for response with CT or PET CT scans. Patients continued pazopanib until progression or unacceptable toxicity. Survival was evaluated by Kaplan Meier product method. Results A total of 11 consecutive patients were included in our study. Median duration of follow up was seven months. The median lines of prior therapy was 2 [1-5]. Partial response (PR) was observed in seven patients and two had stable disease (SD). Two patients died within one month of start of pazopanib. Five of ten patients had progressed during the study with eight patients still alive. The median PFS was 11.9 months and the median OS was not reached. Common adverse events seen were hand-foot-syndrome (HFS) in four patients, anemia in four patients and fatigue in three patients. Grade 3/4 adverse events were uncommon. Three patients required dose modification of pazopanib. Conclusions Pazopanib is a reasonably efficacious well tolerated TKI and can be explored as a treatment option in advanced GIST that has progressed on imatinib. PMID:27563456

  14. Gastrointestinal stromal tumor: an ultrastructural investigation on regional differences with considerations on their histogenesis.

    PubMed

    Min, Kyung-Whan

    2010-05-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) is the most frequent spindle cell tumor in the gastrointestinal tract and may arise from esophagus to rectum. The stomach is the most frequent site, followed by small intestine, rectum, and esophagus. There have been some regional differences reported in their histopathologic and clinical presentations. The purpose of this study is to compare ultrastructural features of GIST, according to its anatomic site, in order to provide additional data to support the current concept of its histogenesis. Fifty-four GISTs (27 from stomach, 23 from small intestine, and 4 from rectum) were included in the study. Histopathologically, gastric GISTs tended to be more frequently epithelioid, particularly those in children, while small intestinal GISTs (SISTs) were mostly spindly in all but three cases. All four of the rectal GISTs were spindly. Ultrastructurally, there seem to be considerable regional differences. In the majority of gastric GISTs, in both epithelioid and spindle types, tumor cells exhibited focal features of myoid differentiation evidenced by the presence of incomplete external lamina (EL) and/or focal accumulations of thin fibers with interrupted electron densities consistent with actin filaments. However, features of myoid differentiation were exceptional for SISTs and rectal GISTs, being present in only one example in each. Some gastric GISTs, particularly those having an epithelioid appearance, showed cell borders luxuriously decorated by long filopods (anemone cell features). Anemone cell features were also present in spindle cell types of gastric GISTs as well as SISTs, albeit it was simpler and less luxuriant. Skeinoid fibers were present in the majority of SISTs and rectal GISTs, but absent in all gastric GISTs except one. These differences appeared to be too significant to propose a uniform histogenesis for all GISTs. Nevertheless, on closer analysis, certain features could be identified to explain a line of

  15. Combination of PLR, MLR, MWR, and Tumor Size Could Significantly Increase the Prognostic Value for Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors.

    PubMed

    Feng, Fan; Tian, Yangzi; Liu, Shushang; Zheng, Gaozan; Liu, Zhen; Xu, Guanghui; Guo, Man; Lian, Xiao; Fan, Daiming; Zhang, Hongwei

    2016-04-01

    Systemic inflammation and immune response were associated with prognosis of tumors. However, data was limited due to the relatively low incidence of gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs). The aim of the present study was to investigate the predictive value of preoperative peripheral blood cells in prognosis of GISTs.From September 2008 to July 2015, a total of 274 GIST patients in our department were enrolled in the present study. Clinicopathological features of GISTs were recorded. The association between preoperative peripheral blood cells and prognosis of GISTs were analyzed.Tumor location, tumor size, mitotic index, intratumoral necrosis, and National Institutes of Health (NIH) risk category were associated with prognosis of GISTs. High neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR), monocyte-to-lymphocyte ratio (MLR), platelet-to-lymphocyte ratio (PLR), neutrophil-to-white blood cell ratio (NWR), monocyte-to-white blood cell ratio (MWR) and low lymphocyte-to-white blood cell ratio (LWR) was associated with poor prognosis of GISTs (76.2% vs 83.7%, P = 0.010. 70.5% vs 98.7%, P = 0.000. 65.7% vs 96.4%, P = 0.004. 78.5% vs 82.5%, P = 0.044. 73.5% vs 97.8%, P = 0.004. 76.6% vs 83.6%, P = 0.012, respectively). However, tumor size was the only independent risk factor for prognosis according to multivariate analysis (P = 0.006). Tumor location, tumor size, mitotic index, and NIH risk category were significantly correlated with the above-mentioned parameters (all P < 0.05). The prognosis of GISTs with tumor size >5 cm, high MLR, high PLR, and high MWR was significantly lower than the remnant patients (P = 0.010).The peripheral blood routine test is convenient, reproducible, and inexpensive. High NLR, MLR, PLR, NWR, MWR, and low LWR were associated with poor prognosis of GISTs. The association between the above parameters and prognosis of GISTs may be attributed to their correlation with tumor size, mitotic index, and NIH risk category. The

  16. Increased Risk of Additional Cancers Among Patients with Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors: A Population-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, James D.; Ma, Grace L.; Baumgartner, Joel M.; Madlensky, Lisa; Burgoyne, Adam M.; Tang, Chih-Min; Martinez, Maria Elena; Sicklick, Jason K.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Most gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) are considered non-hereditary or sporadic. However, single-institution studies suggest that GIST patients develop additional malignancies with increased frequencies. We hypothesized that we could gain greater insight into possible associations between GIST and other malignancies using a national cancer database inquiry. Methods Patients diagnosed with GIST (2001–2011) in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database were included. Standardized prevalence ratios (SPRs) and standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were used to quantify cancer risks incurred by GIST patients before and after GIST diagnoses, respectively, when compared with the general U.S. population. Results Of 6,112 GIST patients, 1,047 (17.1%) had additional cancers. There were significant increases in overall cancer rates: 44% (SPR=1.44) before diagnosis and 66% (SIR=1.66) after GIST diagnoses. Malignancies with significantly increased occurrence both before/after diagnoses included other sarcomas (SPR=5.24/SIR=4.02), neuroendocrine-carcinoid tumors (SPR=3.56/SIR=4.79), non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (SPR=1.69/SIR=1.76), and colorectal adenocarcinoma (SPR=1.51/SIR=2.16). Esophageal adenocarcinoma (SPR=12.0), bladder adenocarcinoma (SPR=7.51), melanoma (SPR=1.46), and prostate adenocarcinoma (SPR=1.20) were significantly more common only before GIST. Ovarian carcinoma (SIR=8.72), small intestine adenocarcinoma (SIR=5.89), papillary thyroid cancer (SIR=5.16), renal cell carcinoma (SIR=4.46), hepatobiliary adenocarcinomas (SIR=3.10), gastric adenocarcinoma (SIR=2.70), pancreatic adenocarcinoma (SIR=2.03), uterine adenocarcinoma (SIR=1.96), non-small cell lung cancer (SIR=1.74), and transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder (SIR=1.65) were significantly more common only after GIST. Conclusion This is the first population-based study to characterize the associations and temporal relationships between GIST and other cancers, both by site and

  17. Gastrointestinal stromal tumor as entry port for S. intermedius causing bacteremia and multiple liver abscesses. Case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Benou, C; Walter, B M; Schlitter, M A; Wilhelm, D; Neu, B; Schmid, R M

    2016-03-01

    We report a case of a previously healthy 52-year-old man who presented with fever and liver lesions suspicious for metastatic disease, which proved subsequently to be abscesses. Further workup revealed a gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) in the gastric corpus as entry port to Streptococcus intermedius-associated bacteremia and liver abscesses. After antibiotic treatment and surgical resection of the tumor, the patient recovered well. This unusual case indicates that gastrointestinal stromal tumors can remain undetected until they cause a life threatening infection. A review of recent literature pertaining to GIST and liver abscesses follows.

  18. Non-Exposed Endoscopic Wall-Inversion Surgery for Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor of the Stomach: First Case Report in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Da Won; Kim, Joon Sung; Kim, Byung-Wook; Jung, Ji Yun; Kim, Gi Jun; Kim, Jin-Jo

    2016-01-01

    Laparoscopic wedge resection of the stomach is a widely accepted treatment for primary resectable gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs). However, it is difficult to determine the appropriate incision line from outside of the stomach, and many attempts have been made to avoid unnecessary resection of unaffected gastric tissues. Recently a technique called non-exposed endoscopic wall-inversion surgery (NEWS) was introduced to avoid exposure of GIST to the peritoneum. Here, we describe the first published case of NEWS for GIST of the stomach practiced in Korea. PMID:26975860

  19. Pancreatic Extra-Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor: An Unusual Presentation of a Rare Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Jitesh; Rustagi, Tarun

    2010-01-01

    Background: Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) rarely develop outside the digestive tract and such tumors are designated extra-GISTs (EGISTs). The majority of EGISTs are located in the mesentery, omentum, and retroperitoneum, and the primary localization in the pancreas has been reported in only about six cases. We describe a patient with a large metastatic pancreatic EGIST that had metastasized to the liver at time of presentation. Case: An 84-year-old male presented with worsening confusion and agitation for the past few days. He also reported progressively increasing abdominal distension for the past 3 years, more so in the past few months. He denied any abdominal pain, nausea, or vomiting. He mentioned one episode of melena 2 months ago. There was a history of unintentional weight loss of 30 pounds over the past few months. Review of systems was otherwise negative. Past medical history was significant for diabetes mellitus and lactose intolerance. Pertinent examination findings included a cachectic appearance, altered mentation without any focal neurologic deficit, and marked abdominal distension with dullness on percussion. Investigations were significant for elevated ammonia level (168 ug/dL), AST/ALT/Alk. phosphatase (424/153/102 U/L), and total bilirubin of 1.7 mg/dL. CEA and CA19-9 were within normal limits. Computed tomography (CT) scan of the abdomen showed an extremely large central heterogeneous mass of 34 × 24 × 27 cm replacing the entire pancreatic tissue and multiple hepatic metastases. Subsequently, a CT-guided liver biopsy demonstrated a spindle cell neoplasm with CD117 (c-kit), CD34, and vimentin-positive cells, consistent with liver metastasis from an EGIST. On day 3, he had massive hematemesis, for which he was transferred to the intensive care unit. His condition rapidly deteriorated with hemodynamic instability and further worsening of mental status. After a thorough discussion about treatment options and prognosis, his family

  20. First Case Report of a Sporadic Adrenocortical Carcinoma With Gastric Metastasis and a Synchronous Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor of the Stomach.

    PubMed

    Kovecsi, Attila; Jung, Ioan; Bara, Tivadar; Bara, Tivadar; Azamfirei, Leonard; Kovacs, Zsolt; Gurzu, Simona

    2015-09-01

    Adrenocortical carcinoma is a rare tumor with high aggresivity that can associate systemic metastases. A 71-year-old man was hospitalized for gastric cancer. The abdominal computed tomography also revealed a tumor above the right kidney. Total gastrectomy and right adrenalectomy were performed. The encapsulated tumor of the adrenal gland weighed 560 grams and presented diffuse tumor architecture under microscope, with capsular, sinusoidal, and vascular invasion. The large tumor cells had a polygonal shape, with slight basophilic, eosinophilic, or vacuolated cytoplasm, pleomorphic nuclei, and a high mitotic rate. In the stomach, the protruded tumor was covered by normal mucosa; under microscope, the tumor cells were observed only in the submucosal layer. In primary adrenal tumor and gastric metastasis the tumor cells were marked by vimentin, inhibin, synaptophysin, neuron-specific enolase, and calretinin. Based on these criteria, the diagnosis of adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) with gastric metastasis and no lymph node metastases was established. A synchronous 10 × 10-mm-sized gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) of the stomach, without mitoses, was also identified. So far, as we know, this is the 15th case of ever reported synchronous/metachronous sporadic ACCs; the ACC-related gastric metastases either synchronous ACC and GIST, has not been reported in the literature previously.

  1. Partial response to imatinib treatment in a patient with unresectable gastrointestinal stromal tumor: A case report and mini literature review

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiaolong; Feng, Libo; Liu, Qing; Xia, Dong; Xu, Liang

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of imatinib mesylate in unresectable gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) and to discuss its therapeutic regimen. A patient with unresectable GIST is described, and several key clinical studies are reviewed, including the clinical trials B2222 and S0033, which contain recently reported results of the long-term clinical outcome of imatinib in patients with unresectable or metastatic GIST. The recent results of the two studies demonstrate the long-term efficacy and safety of imatinib for unresectable or metastatic GIST. A positive response to imatinib treatment was observed in the present patient, which is consistent with the data of the B2222 and S0033 trials. However, further long-term, large-scale, multicenter and controlled trials are required to determine the relative efficacy of combining imatinib agents with surgical procedures or administering imatinib alone.

  2. Partial response to imatinib treatment in a patient with unresectable gastrointestinal stromal tumor: A case report and mini literature review

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiaolong; Feng, Libo; Liu, Qing; Xia, Dong; Xu, Liang

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of imatinib mesylate in unresectable gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) and to discuss its therapeutic regimen. A patient with unresectable GIST is described, and several key clinical studies are reviewed, including the clinical trials B2222 and S0033, which contain recently reported results of the long-term clinical outcome of imatinib in patients with unresectable or metastatic GIST. The recent results of the two studies demonstrate the long-term efficacy and safety of imatinib for unresectable or metastatic GIST. A positive response to imatinib treatment was observed in the present patient, which is consistent with the data of the B2222 and S0033 trials. However, further long-term, large-scale, multicenter and controlled trials are required to determine the relative efficacy of combining imatinib agents with surgical procedures or administering imatinib alone. PMID:27698727

  3. Gastrointestinal stromal tumor and other primary metachronous or synchronous neoplasms as a suspicion criterion for syndromic setting.

    PubMed

    Ponti, Giovanni; Luppi, Gabriele; Martorana, Davide; Rossi, Giulio; Losi, Lorena; Bertolini, Federica; Sartori, Giuliana; Pellacani, Giovanni; Seidenari, Stefania; Boni, Elisa; Neri, Tauro Maria; Silini, Enrico; Tamburini, Elisa; Maiorana, Antonio; Conte, Pier Franco

    2010-02-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) may be sporadic or inherited. Although KIT and PDGFRA activating mutations are the oncogenic mechanisms in most sporadic and inherited GISTs, a small subset of GISTs are negative for both. Besides the classical Familial GIST Syndrome, GIST can occur as part of multi-neoplastic disease. The present study was designed to analyze the synchronous and metachronous tumors developed among GIST patients assessed by our institution for GIST Syndrome setting recognition. Patients (n=141) with primary GIST (77 men and 64 women) were recruited between 1988 and 2007 and their clinical and pathological records were reviewed. Mutation analysis of KIT, PDGFRA, NF1 and MMR genes was performed on somatic and peripheral blood DNA. GISTs occurred associated with other primary malignancies in 46 of 141 (32.6%) patients. The most common neoplasms were gastrointestinal and genitourinary. A novel exon 6 germline large deletion of NF1 was identified in the NF1/GIST kindred. The development of GIST associated with other neoplasms is common and diagnosis of peculiar benign associated-neoplasms warrants the search for familial cancer susceptibility. In particular, syndromic or familial settings have to be suspected in the presence of neurofibroma or lung chordoma in C-KIT and PDGFRA negative GIST patients.

  4. A novel germline mutation in SDHA identified in a rare case of gastrointestinal stromal tumor complicated with renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Quan; Zhang, Yong; Zhou, Yu-Hong; Hou, Ying-Yong; Wang, Jiong-Yuan; Li, Jing-Lei; Li, Ming; Tong, Han-Xing; Lu, Wei-Qi

    2015-01-01

    Succinate dehydrogenase (SDH), which is located on the mitochondrial inner membrane, is essential to the Krebs cycle. Mutations of the SDH gene are associated with many tumors, such as renal cell carcinoma, wild type gastrointestinal stromal tumors (WT GISTs) and hereditary paragangliomas/pheochromocytomas. Herein we present a rare case diagnosed as a WT GIST complicated with a renal chromophobe cell tumor and detected a novel germline heterozygous mutation (c.2T>C: p.M1T) in the initiation codon of the SDHA gene. We also conduct a preliminary exploration for the mechanism of reduced expression of SDHB without mutation of SDHB gene. Our case enriches the mutation spectrum of the SDH gene. After reviewing previous studies, we found it to be the first case diagnosed as a WT GIST complicated with a synchronous renal chromophobe cell tumor and identified a novel germline heterozygous mutation. It was also the second reported case of a renal cell carcinoma associated with an SDHA mutation. PMID:26722403

  5. A gastrointestinal stromal tumor of the third portion of the duodenum treated by wedge resection: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Acar, Fahrettin; Sahin, Mustafa; Ugras, Serdar; Calisir, Akın

    2013-01-01

    A 65-year old woman was admitted to our hospital with abdominal pain. Computed tomography showed a tumor measuring about 3 cm in diameter with no metastatic lesion or signs of local infiltration. Gastroduodenal endoscopy revealed the presence of a submucosal tumor in the third portion of the duodenum and biopsy revealed tumor cells stained positive for c-kit. These findings were consistent with gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) and we performed a wedge resection of the duodenum, sparing the pancreas. The postoperative course was uneventful and she was discharged on day 6. Surgical margins were negative. Histology revealed a GIST with a diameter of 3.2 cm and < 5 mitoses/50 high power fields, indicating a low risk of malignancy. Therefore, adjuvant therapy with imatinib was not initiated. Wedge resection with primary closure is a surgical procedure that can be used to treat low malignant potential neoplasms of the duodenum and avoid extensive surgery, with significant morbidity and possible mortality, such as pancreatoduodenectomy. PMID:24392185

  6. Gastrointestinal stromal tumor with an unusual presentation as an enlarged prostate gland: a case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Deisch, Jeremy K.; Reinke, Dennis D.

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a 78-year-old male who presented with urinary retention, constipation and an enlarged prostate gland. A transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) was performed. Pathologic examination revealed a hypercellular-spindled neoplasm with frequent mitoses, nuclear pleomorphism, and multifocal geographic tumoral necrosis. A pathologic diagnosis of gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) was made based on morphologic and immunohistochemical findings, and was later reinforced by molecular study results. This lesion was initially thought to represent a primary prostatic GIST. To the best of our knowledge, there have been only five cases of primary prostatic GISTs. Subsequent imaging studies revealed the mass to be contiguous with the anterior rectal wall, suggesting the possibility of a rectal primary with extension to the prostate gland. The patient was treated with imatinib mesylate, and after twelve months of follow up failed to demonstrate any evidence of progression or metastatic disease. GIST should be considered in cases of prostatic tumors with a spindled or epithelioid morphology, and immunohistochemistry and possible molecular studies are recommended to aid in diagnosis and guide treatment decisions. PMID:27034816

  7. Post-transcriptional dysregulation by miRNAs is implicated in the pathogenesis of gastrointestinal stromal tumor [GIST].

    PubMed

    Kelly, Lorna; Bryan, Kenneth; Kim, Su Young; Janeway, Katherine A; Killian, J Keith; Schildhaus, Hans-Ulrich; Miettinen, Markku; Helman, Lee; Meltzer, Paul S; van de Rijn, Matt; Debiec-Rychter, Maria; O'Sullivan, Maureen

    2013-01-01

    In contrast to adult mutant gastrointestinal stromal tumors [GISTs], pediatric/wild-type GISTs remain poorly understood overall, given their lack of oncogenic activating tyrosine kinase mutations. These GISTs, with a predilection for gastric origin in female patients, show limited response to therapy with tyrosine kinase inhibitors and generally pursue a more indolent course, but still may prove fatal. Defective cellular respiration appears to underpin tumor development in these wild-type cases, which as a group lack expression of succinate dehydrogenase [SDH] B, a surrogate marker for respiratory chain metabolism. Yet, only a small subset of the wild-type tumors show mutations in the genes coding for the SDH subunits [SDHx]. To explore additional pathogenetic mechanisms in these wild-type GISTs, we elected to investigate post-transcriptional regulation of these tumors by conducting microRNA (miRNA) profiling of a mixed cohort of 73 cases including 18 gastric pediatric wild-type, 25 (20 gastric, 4 small bowel and 1 retroperitoneal) adult wild-type GISTs and 30 gastric adult mutant GISTs. By this approach we have identified distinct signatures for GIST subtypes which correlate tightly with clinico-pathological parameters. A cluster of miRNAs on 14q32 show strikingly different expression patterns amongst GISTs, a finding which appears to be explained at least in part by differential allelic methylation of this imprinted region. Small bowel and retroperitoneal wild-type GISTs segregate with adult mutant GISTs and express SDHB, while adult wild-type gastric GISTs are dispersed amongst adult mutant and pediatric wild-type cases, clustering in this situation on the basis of SDHB expression. Interestingly, global methylation analysis has recently similarly demonstrated that these wild-type, SDHB-immunonegative tumors show a distinct pattern compared with KIT and PDGFRA mutant tumors, which as a rule do express SDHB. All cases with Carney triad within our cohort cluster

  8. Frequence, Spectrum and Prognostic Impact of Additional Malignancies in Patients With Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors1234

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, K.; Wolf, S.; Mayer, B.; Schmidt, S.A.; Agaimy, A.; Henne-Bruns, D.; Knippschild, U.; Schwab, M.; Schmieder, M.

    2015-01-01

    Currently available data on prognostic implication of additional neoplasms in GIST miss comprehensive information on patient outcome with regard to overall or disease specific and disease free survival. Registry data of GIST patients with and without additional neoplasm were compared in retrospective case series. We investigated a total of 836 patients from the multi-center Ulmer GIST registry. Additionally, a second cohort encompassing 143 consecutively recruited patients of a single oncology center were analyzed. The frequency of additional malignant neoplasms in GIST patients was 31.9% and 42.0% in both cohorts with a mean follow-up time of 54 and 65 months (median 48 and 60 months), respectively. The spectrum of additional neoplasms in both cohorts encompasses gastrointestinal tumors (43.5%), uro-genital and breast cancers (34.1%), hematological malignancies (7.3%), skin cancer (7.3%) and others. Additional neoplasms have had a significant impact on patient outcome. The five year overall survival in GIST with additional malignant neoplasms (n = 267) was 62.8% compared to 83.4% in patients without other tumors (n = 569) (P < .001, HR=0.397, 95% CI: 0.298-0.530). Five-year disease specific survival was not different between both groups (90.8% versus 90.9%). 34.2% of all deaths (n = 66 of n = 193) were GIST-related. The presented data suggest a close association between the duration of follow-up and the rate of additional malignancies in GIST patients. Moreover the data indicate a strong impact of additional malignant neoplasms in GIST on patient outcome. A comprehensive follow-up strategy of GIST patients appears to be warranted. PMID:25622906

  9. Oncologic Safety of Laparoscopic Wedge Resection with Gastrotomy for Gastric Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor: Comparison with Conventional Laparoscopic Wedge Resection

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sejin; Kim, You Na; Kim, Hyoung-Il; Cheong, Jae-Ho; Hyung, Woo Jin; Noh, Sung Hoon

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Various laparoscopic wedge resection (LWR) techniques requiring gastrotomy for gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) of the stomach have been applied to facilitate tumor resection and preserve the remnant gastric volume. However, there is the possibility of cancer cell dissemination during these procedures. The aim of this study was to assess the oncologic safety of LWR with gastrotomy (LWR-G) compared to LWR without luminal exposure. Materials and Methods Clinicopathologic and operative results of 193 patients who underwent LWR for gastric GIST were retrospectively analyzed from 2003 to 2013. We stratified the patients into two groups: LWR-G and LWR without gastrotomy (LWR-C). Clinicopathologic features, short-term outcomes, and long-term outcomes were compared. Results A total of 26 patients underwent LWR-G, and 167 patients underwent LWR-C. The LWR-G group showed significantly more anterior wall-located (n=10, 38.5%), intraluminal (n=20, 76.9%), and ulcerative (n=13, 50.0%) tumors than the LWR-C group (n=33, 19.8%; n=96, 57.5%; n=46, 27.5%, respectively). Postoperative short-term outcomes did not differ between the two groups. When tumor staging was compared, no statistical difference was noted. There was no recurrence in the LWR-G group, while 2 patients in the LWR-C group experienced recurrence. The two recurrences in the LWR-C group were found in the liver and in the remnant stomach at 63 and 12 months after the operation, respectively. No gastric GIST-related death was recorded in any group during the study period. Conclusions LWR-G for gastric GIST is an oncologically safe procedure even for masses with ulcerations. PMID:26819802

  10. Approval summary: imatinib mesylate in the treatment of metastatic and/or unresectable malignant gastrointestinal stromal tumors.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Martin H; Farrell, Ann; Justice, Robert; Pazdur, Richard

    2009-02-01

    The purpose of the present application was to fulfill a postmarketing commitment to provide long-term efficacy and safety data on treatment with imatinib mesylate (Gleevec; Novartis Pharmaceuticals, East Hanover, NJ) in patients with CD117(+) unresectable and/or metastatic malignant gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs). In addition, this application also provides evidence to support a change in the label to allow for an escalation of imatinib dosing to 800 mg/day for patients with progressive disease on a lower dose. Two open-label, controlled, multicenter, intergroup, international, randomized phase III studies were submitted -- one conducted by the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (n = 946) and the other by the Southwest Oncology Group (n = 746). These studies compared 400 mg/day of imatinib with 800 mg/day of imatinib. A combined analysis of the two studies was prospectively defined and agreed to by both groups. Both protocols allowed patients randomized to the 400-mg/day imatinib arm to cross over to 800 mg/day imatinib at progression. Objective responses were achieved in >50% of patients receiving either imatinib dose. The median progression-free survival time was approximately 20 months and the median overall survival (OS) time was approximately 49 months. In the combined analysis, 347 patients crossed over to 800 mg/day imatinib at the time of progression. The median OS time after crossover was 14.3 months. The most common adverse events (AEs) were fluid retention, nausea, fatigue, skin rash, gastrointestinal complaints, and myalgia. The most common laboratory abnormality was anemia. Most often the AEs were of mild-to-moderate severity. Fluid retention events and skin rash were numerically reported more often in the 800-mg/day treatment cohort of patients.

  11. Molecular alterations and expression of succinate dehydrogenase complex in wild-type KIT/PDGFRA/BRAF gastrointestinal stromal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Celestino, Ricardo; Lima, Jorge; Faustino, Alexandra; Vinagre, João; Máximo, Valdemar; Gouveia, António; Soares, Paula; Manuel Lopes, José

    2013-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are the most common mesenchymal neoplasms of the gastrointestinal tract, disclosing somatic KIT, PDGFRA and BRAF mutations. Loss of function of succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) complex is an alternative molecular mechanism in GISTs, namely in carriers of germline mutations of the SDH complex that develop Carney–Stratakis dyad characterized by multifocal GISTs and multicentric paragangliomas (PGLs). We studied a series of 25 apparently sporadic primary wild-type (WT) KIT/PDGFRA/BRAF GISTs occurring in patients without personal or familial history of PGLs, re-evaluated clinicopathological features and analyzed molecular alterations and immunohistochemistry expression of SDH complex. As control, we used a series of well characterized 49 KIT/PDGFRA/BRAF-mutated GISTs. SDHB expression was absent in 20% and SDHB germline mutations were detected in 12% of WT GISTs. Germline SDHB mutations were significantly associated to younger age at diagnosis. A significant reduction in SDHB expression in WT GISTs was found when compared with KIT/PDGFRA/BRAF-mutated GISTs. No significant differences were found when comparing DOG-1 and c-KIT expression in WT, SDHB-mutated and KIT/PDGFRA/BRAF-mutated GISTs. Our results confirm the occurrence of germline SDH genes mutations in isolated, apparently sporadic WT GISTs. WT KIT/PDGFRA/BRAF GISTs without SDHB or SDHA/SDHB expression may correspond to Carney–Stratakis dyad or Carney triad. Most importantly, the possibility of PGLs (Carney–Stratakis dyad) and/or pulmonary chondroma (Carney triad) should be addressed in these patients and their kindred. PMID:22948025

  12. Molecular alterations and expression of succinate dehydrogenase complex in wild-type KIT/PDGFRA/BRAF gastrointestinal stromal tumors.

    PubMed

    Celestino, Ricardo; Lima, Jorge; Faustino, Alexandra; Vinagre, João; Máximo, Valdemar; Gouveia, António; Soares, Paula; Lopes, José Manuel

    2013-05-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are the most common mesenchymal neoplasms of the gastrointestinal tract, disclosing somatic KIT, PDGFRA and BRAF mutations. Loss of function of succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) complex is an alternative molecular mechanism in GISTs, namely in carriers of germline mutations of the SDH complex that develop Carney-Stratakis dyad characterized by multifocal GISTs and multicentric paragangliomas (PGLs). We studied a series of 25 apparently sporadic primary wild-type (WT) KIT/PDGFRA/BRAF GISTs occurring in patients without personal or familial history of PGLs, re-evaluated clinicopathological features and analyzed molecular alterations and immunohistochemistry expression of SDH complex. As control, we used a series of well characterized 49 KIT/PDGFRA/BRAF-mutated GISTs. SDHB expression was absent in 20% and SDHB germline mutations were detected in 12% of WT GISTs. Germline SDHB mutations were significantly associated to younger age at diagnosis. A significant reduction in SDHB expression in WT GISTs was found when compared with KIT/PDGFRA/BRAF-mutated GISTs. No significant differences were found when comparing DOG-1 and c-KIT expression in WT, SDHB-mutated and KIT/PDGFRA/BRAF-mutated GISTs. Our results confirm the occurrence of germline SDH genes mutations in isolated, apparently sporadic WT GISTs. WT KIT/PDGFRA/BRAF GISTs without SDHB or SDHA/SDHB expression may correspond to Carney-Stratakis dyad or Carney triad. Most importantly, the possibility of PGLs (Carney-Stratakis dyad) and/or pulmonary chondroma (Carney triad) should be addressed in these patients and their kindred. PMID:22948025

  13. Epidemiology of gastrointestinal stromal tumors in the era of histology codes: results of a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Ma, Grace L; Murphy, James D; Martinez, Maria E; Sicklick, Jason K

    2015-01-01

    To date, all population-based epidemiologic data on gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) in the United States predate the 2001 implementation of GIST-specific histology coding. As such, results from previous studies were limited because of inclusion of non-GIST abdominal or gastrointestinal sarcomas. We used a national cancer registry with modern day histologic codes to gain greater insight into the true epidemiology of GIST in the United States. We identified 6,142 patients diagnosed with GIST between 2001 and 2011 in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database. Incidence, survival, demographic risk factors, and prognostic factors were analyzed. Annual age-adjusted incidence rose from 0.55/100,000 in 2001 to 0.78/100,000 in 2011 and increased with age, peaking among 70- to 79-year-olds (3.06/100,000). GIST was also more common in males than females [rate ratio (RR), 1.35], non-Hispanics than Hispanics (RR, 1.23), and blacks (RR, 2.07) or Asians/Pacific Islanders (RR, 1.50) than whites. The study period had 5-year overall and GIST-specific survival rates of 65% and 79%, respectively. The 5-year overall survival rates for those with localized, regional, and metastatic disease at diagnosis were 77%, 64%, and 41%, respectively. Multivariate analyses demonstrated that older age at diagnosis, male sex, black race, and advanced stage at diagnosis were independent risk factors for worse overall survival. Multivariate analysis also showed the four aforementioned characteristics, along with earlier year of diagnosis, to be independent risk factors for worse GIST-specific survival. As the first population-based, epidemiologic study of histologically confirmed disease, our findings provide a robust representation of GIST in the era of immunohistochemical diagnoses.

  14. Genetic alteration and mutation profiling of circulating cell-free tumor DNA (cfDNA) for diagnosis and targeted therapy of gastrointestinal stromal tumors.

    PubMed

    Yan, Weixin; Zhang, Aiguo; Powell, Michael J

    2016-07-21

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) have been recognized as a biologically distinctive type of tumor, different from smooth muscle and neural tumors of the gastrointestinal tract. The identification of genetic aberrations in proto-oncogenes that drive the growth of GISTs is critical for improving the efficacy of cancer therapy by matching targeted drugs to specific mutations. Research into the oncogenic mechanisms of GISTs has found that these tumors frequently contain activating gene mutations in either platelet-derived growth factor receptor A (PDGFRA) or a receptor tyrosine protein associated with a mast cell growth factor receptor encoded by the KIT gene. Mutant cancer subpopulations have the potential to disrupt durable patient responses to molecularly targeted therapy for GISTs, yet the prevalence and size of subpopulations remain largely unexplored. Detection of the cancer subpopulations that harbor low-frequency mutant alleles of target proto-oncogenes through the use of molecular genetic methods, such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR) target amplification technology, is hampered by the high abundance of wild-type alleles, which limit the sensitivity of detection of these minor mutant alleles. This is especially true in the case of mutant tumor DNA derived "driver" and "drug-resistant" alleles that are present in the circulating cell-free tumor DNA (cfDNA) in the peripheral blood circulation of GIST patients. So-called "liquid biopsy" allows for the dynamic monitoring of the patients' tumor status during treatment using minimally invasive sampling. New methodologies, such as a technology that employs a xenonucleic acid (XNA) clamping probe to block the PCR amplification of wild-type templates, have allowed improved molecular detection of these low-frequency alleles both in tissue biopsy samples and in cfDNA. These new methodologies could be widely applied for minimally invasive molecular testing in the therapeutic management of GISTs.

  15. Hypoglycemia Associated with a Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor Producing High-molecular-weight Insulin Growth Factor II: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Hirai, Hiroyuki; Ogata, Emi; Ohki, Shinji; Fukuda, Izumi; Tanaka, Mizuko; Watanabe, Tsuyoshi; Satoh, Hiroaki

    2016-01-01

    A 61-year-old woman with multiple metastatic and unresectable gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) was referred for investigation of refractory hypoglycemia that developed four months before this hospitalization. On admission, her fasting plasma glucose was 38 mg/dL despite 10% glucose infusion. Investigations revealed that her serum C-peptide, insulin and growth hormone levels were suppressed, and big insulin-like growth factor II was observed. She was diagnosed with non-islet cell tumor hypoglycemia, which resolved after glucocorticoid treatment. Clinicians should thus be vigilant to identify hypoglycemia in patients with large metastatic GISTs because glucocorticoid therapy is useful even if the GIST is inoperable. PMID:27181538

  16. ¹⁸F-FDG PET/CT and contrast enhanced CT in differential diagnosis between leiomyoma and gastrointestinal stromal tumor.

    PubMed

    Hirose, Yasumitus; Kaida, Hayato; Kawahara, Akihiko; Kurata, Seiji; Ishibashi, Masatoshi; Abe, Toshi

    2015-01-01

    In a 49 years old woman a large abdominal tumor was diagnosed by abdominal ultrasound. Dynamic contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CECT) showed a large tumor with minute calcification and poor contrast enhancement in the left abdominal cavity. The fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (¹⁸F-FDG PET/CT) scan showed low ¹⁸F-FDG uptake in the tumor. The SUV max (early image) was 1.90, and that of the delayed image was 2.86. A gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) was suspected. Tumor resection revealed that it was a leiomyoma originating in the major curvature of the stomach. In conclusion, the findings of low ¹⁸F-FDG uptake on ¹⁸F-FDG PET and poor contrast enhancement on CECT in a gastric submucosal tumor suggested of a gastric leiomyoma rather than GIST. PMID:26574696

  17. AMACR amplification and overexpression in primary imatinib-naïve gastrointestinal stromal tumors: a driver of cell proliferation indicating adverse prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chien-Feng; Chen, Li-Tzong; Lan, Jui; Chou, Fong-Fu; Lin, Ching-Yih; Chen, Yen-Yang; Chen, Tzu-Ju; Li, Shau-Hsuan; Yu, Shih-Chen; Fang, Fu-Ming; Tai, Hui-Chun; Huang, Hsuan-Ying

    2014-01-01

    Non-random gains of chromosome 5p have been observed in clinically aggressive gastrointestinal stromal tumors, whereas the driving oncogenes on 5p remain to be characterized. We used an integrative genomic and functional approach to identify amplified oncogenes on 5p and to evaluate the relevance of AMACR amplification at 5p13.3 and its overexpression in gastrointestinal stromal tumors. Thirty-seven tumor samples, imatinib-sensitive GIST882 cell line, and imatinib-resistant GIST48 cell line were analyzed for DNA imbalances using array-based genomic profiling. Forty-one fresh tumor samples of various risk categories were enriched for pure tumor cells by laser capture microdissection and quantified for AMACR mRNA expression. AMACR-specific fluorescence in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry were both informative in tissue microarray sections of 350 independent primary gastrointestinal stromal tumors, including 213 cases with confirmed KIT /PDGFRA genotypes. To assess the oncogenic functions of AMACR, GIST882 and GIST48 cell lines were stably silenced against their endogenous AMACR expression. In 59% of cases featuring 5p gains, two major amplicons encompassed discontinuous chromosomal regions that were differentially overrepresented in high-risk cases, including the one harboring the mRNA-upregulated AMACR gene. Gene amplification was detected in 19.7% of cases (69/350) and strongly related to protein overexpression (p<0.001), although 52% of AMACR-overexpressing cases exhibited no amplification. Both gene amplification and protein overexpression were significantly associated with epithelioid histology, larger size, increased mitoses, higher risk levels, and unfavorable genotypes (all p≤0.03). They were also independently predictive of decreased disease-free survival (overexpression, p<0.001; amplification, p=0.020) in the multivariate analysis. Concomitant with downregulated cyclin D1, cyclin E, and CDK4, AMACR knockdown suppressed cell proliferation and

  18. Gastric inflammatory fibroid polyp mimicking a gastrointestinal stromal tumour.

    PubMed

    Silva, Marco; Albuquerque, Andreia; Cardoso, Hélder; Costa, Jennifer; Macedo, Guilherme

    2016-08-01

    Inflammatory fibroid polyp of the gastrointestinal tract is a rare, benign neoplasm, most frequently located in the gastric antrum. Symptoms depend on the location and the size of the lesion. Biopsies are limited for the diagnosis of inflammatory fibroid polyps and diagnosis may not be possible until resection. The authors present a case of a 55-year-old woman, presenting with an upper gastrointestinal bleeding due to a large gastric inflammatory fibroid polyp imitating a gastrointestinal stromal tumor. PMID:27554383

  19. Feasibility and Timing of Cytoreduction Surgery in Advanced (Metastatic or Recurrent) Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors During the Era of Imatinib

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Shih-Chun; Liao, Chien-Hung; Wang, Shang-Yu; Tsai, Chun-Yi; Chiang, Kun-Chun; Cheng, Chi-Tung; Yeh, Ta-Sen; Chen, Yen-Yang; MA, Ming-Chun; Liu, Chien-Ting; Yeh, Chun-Nan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The prognosis of advanced gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) was dramatically improved in the era of imatinib. Cytoreduction surgery was advocated as an additional treatment for advanced GISTs, especially when patients having poor response to imatinib or developing resistance to it. However, the efficacy and benefit of cytoreduction were still controversial. Likewise, the sequence between cytoreduction surgery and imatinib still need evaluation. In this study, we tried to assess the feasibility and efficiency of cytoreduction in advanced GISTs. Furthermore, we analyzed the impact of timing of the cytoreduction surgery on the prognosis of advanced GISTs. We conducted a prospective collecting retrospective review of patients with advanced GISTs (metastatic, unresectable, and recurrent GISTs) treated in Chang Gung memorial hospital (CGMH) since 2001 to 2013. We analyzed the impact of cytoreduction surgery to response to imatinib, progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS) in patients with advanced GISTs. Moreover, by the timing of cytoreduction to imatinib, we divided the surgical patients who had surgery before imatinib use into early group and those who had surgery after imatinib into late. We compared the clinical response to imatinib, PFS and OS between early and late cytoreduction surgical groups. Totally, 182 patients were enrolled into this study. Seventy-six patients underwent cytoreduction surgery. The demographic characteristics and tumor presentation were similar between surgical and non-surgical groups. The surgical group showed better complete response rate (P < 0.001) and partial response rate (P = 0.008) than non-surgical group. The 1-year, 3-year, and 5-year PFS were significantly superior in surgical group (P = 0.003). The 1-year, 3-year, and 5-year OS were superior in surgical group, but without statistical significance (P = 0.088). Dividing by cytoreduction surgical timing, the demographic

  20. Loss of chromosome 9p21 and decreased p16 expression correlate with malignant gastrointestinal stromal tumor

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yun; Cao, Hui; Wang, Ming; Zhao, Wen-Yi; Shen, Zhi-Yong; Shen, Dan-Ping; Ni, Xing-Zhi; Wu, Zhi-Yong; Shen, Yan-Ying; Song, Yan-Yan

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To investigate loss of heterozygosity (LOH) of chromosome 9p21 and the prognostic relevance of p16 expression in gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST). METHODS: Fifty-one GIST patients (30 men and 21 women; median age 59 years; range 29-80 years) treated surgically within a 10-year period were grouped by aggressive behavior risk (17 with very low and low, 14 intermediate, and 20 high risk). GISTs were characterized immunohistochemically and evaluated for LOH of 9p21 by microsatellite analysis at D9S1751, D9S1846, D9S942, and D9S1748. LOH of 9p21 and immunohistochemical expression of p16 protein encoded at 9p21 were correlated with clinicopathological parameters, and the prognostic significance of p16 alterations was evaluated. RESULTS: Thirty-one (63.3%) cases showed LOH with at least one microsatellite marker. LOH frequency was 37.0% at D9S1751, 37.5% at D9S1846, 42.1% at D9S942, and 24.2% at D9S1748. There was a higher LOH frequency of D9S942 in high-risk than in non-high-risk tumors (P < 0.05, χ2 = 4.47). Gender, age, tumor size and site were not correlated with allelic loss. Ninety percent (18/20) of the GIST patients in the high risk group showed LOH with at least one of the 9p21 markers, while 57.1% (8/14) in the intermediate risk group and 33.3% (5/15) in the very low and low risk groups, respectively (P < 0.05, χ2 = 12.16). Eight (28.5%) of 31 patients with LOH and 1 (5.6%) of 18 patients without LOH died of the disease during the follow-up period. Loss of p16 protein expression occurred in 41.2%, but in 60% of the high risk group and 23.5% of the very low and low risk groups (P < 0.05, χ2 = 4.98). p16 loss was associated with poor prognosis (P < 0.05, χ2 = 4.18): the 3- and 5-year overall survival rates were 84.8% and 70.8% for p16-negative and 100% and 92.0% for p16-positive patients, respectively. CONCLUSION: LOH at 9p21 appears to play an important role in GIST progression; decreased p16 expression in GIST is highly predictive of poor outcome

  1. PK-PD modeling of individual lesion FDG-PET response to predict overall survival in patients with sunitinib-treated gastrointestinal stromal tumor.

    PubMed

    Schindler, E; Amantea, M A; Karlsson, M O; Friberg, L E

    2016-04-01

    Pharmacometric models were developed to characterize the relationships between lesion-level tumor metabolic activity, as assessed by the maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) obtained on [(18)F]-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET), tumor size, and overall survival (OS) in 66 patients with gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) treated with intermittent sunitinib. An indirect response model in which sunitinib stimulates tumor loss best described the typically rapid decrease in SUVmax during on-treatment periods and the recovery during off-treatment periods. Substantial interindividual and interlesion variability were identified in SUVmax baseline and drug sensitivity. A parametric time-to-event model identified the relative change in SUVmax at one week for the lesion with the most pronounced response as a better predictor of OS than tumor size. Based on the proposed modeling framework, early changes in FDG-PET response may serve as predictor for long-term outcome in sunitinib-treated GIST. PMID:27299707

  2. Clinicopathological features and prognosis of omental gastrointestinal stromal tumor: evaluation of a pooled case series

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Fan; Tian, Yangzi; Liu, Zhen; Liu, Shushang; Xu, Guanghui; Guo, Man; Lian, Xiao; Fan, Daiming; Zhang, Hongwei

    2016-01-01

    Clinicopathological features and prognosis of omental GISTs are limited due to the extremely rare incidence. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the clinicopathological features and prognosis of omental GISTs. Omental GISTs cases were obtained from our center and from case reports and clinical studies extracted from MEDLINE. Clinicopathological features and survivals were analyzed. A total of 99 cases of omental GISTs were enrolled in the present study. Omental GISTs occurred predominantly in greater omentum (78/99, 78.8%). The majority of tumors exceeded 10 cm in diameter (67/98, 68.3%) and were high risk (88/96, 91.7%). Histological type was correlated with tumor location and mutational status. The five year DFS and DSS was 86.3% and 80.6%, respectively. Mitotic index was risk factor for prognosis of omental GISTs. Prognosis of omental GISTs was worse than that of gastric GISTs by Kaplan-Meier analysis. However, multivariate analysis showed that the prognosis was comparable between the two groups. The majority of omental GISTs were large and high risk. Mitotic index was risk factor for prognosis of omental GISTs. The prognosis was comparable between omental and gastric GISTs. PMID:27471066

  3. Crosstalk between KIT and FGFR3 Promotes Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor Cell Growth and Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Javidi-Sharifi, Nathalie; Traer, Elie; Martinez, Jacqueline; Gupta, Anu; Taguchi, Takehiro; Dunlap, Jennifer; Heinrich, Michael C.; Corless, Christopher L.; Rubin, Brian P.; Druker, Brian J.; Tyner, Jeffrey W.

    2014-01-01

    Kinase inhibitors such as imatinib have dramatically improved outcomes for GIST patients, but many patients develop resistance to these treatments. While in some patients this event corresponds with mutations in the GIST driver oncogenic kinase KIT, other patients development resistance without KIT mutations. In this study, we address this patient subset in reporting a functional dependence of GIST on the FGF receptor FGFR3 and its crosstalk with KIT in GIST cells. Addition of the FGFR3 ligand FGF2 to GIST cells restored KIT phosphorylation during imatinib treatment, allowing sensitive cells to proliferate in the presence of the drug. FGF2 expression was increased in imatinib-resistant GIST cells, the growth of which was blocked by RNAi-mediated silencing of FGFR3. Moreover, combining KIT and FGFR3 inhibitors synergized to block the growth of imatinib-resistant cells. Signaling crosstalk between KIT and FGFR3 activated the MAPK pathway to promote resistance to imatinib. Clinically, an immunohistochemical analysis of tumor specimens from imatinib-resistant GIST patients revealed a relative increase in FGF2 levels, with a trend towards increased expression in imatinib-naïve samples consistent with possible involvement in drug resistance. Our findings provide a mechanistic rationale to evaluate existing FGFR inhibitors and multi-kinase inhibitors that target FGFR3 as promising strategies to improve treatment of GIST patients with de novo or acquired resistance to imatinib. PMID:25432174

  4. Sunitinib-associated Pancreatic Atrophy in Patients with Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor: A Toxicity with Prognostic Implications Detected at Imaging.

    PubMed

    Shinagare, Atul B; Steele, Erin; Braschi-Amirfarzan, Marta; Tirumani, Sree Harsha; Ramaiya, Nikhil H

    2016-10-01

    Purpose To evaluate the effect and clinical importance of sunitinib on pancreatic volume in patients with gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST). Materials and Methods This retrospective study was approved by the institutional review board and compliant with HIPAA. The requirement to obtain informed consent was waived. The authors evaluated 65 patients with GIST treated with oral sunitinib and a control group of 30 patients with GIST who did not receive any therapy (mean age: 56 years [range, 29-75 years] vs 60 years [range, 27-78 years], respectively; P = .11) seen at their institution from January 2002 through December 2008. Segmented pancreatic volumes of study and control groups were measured with computed tomography by using commercial software by two independent readers who were blinded to study group and the timing of the scan at a median of 6.2 and 6.1 months, respectively. Pre- and posttreatment volumes (Wilcoxon signed rank test) and rate of volume change per month (Wilcoxon rank sum test) were compared. Interobserver agreement was calculated. Associations and prognostic importance of pancreatic atrophy were studied by using multivariate linear regression and Cox proportional analysis, respectively. Results Both readers recorded significant pancreatic volume loss in the study group (respective median pre- and posttreatment volume: 76.1 cm(3) and 58.4 cm(3) for reader 1 and 67.7 cm(3) and 59.0 cm(3) for reader 2; P < .0001 for both) but not in the control group (respective median pre- and posttreatment volume: 79.9 cm(3) and 83.8 cm(3) for reader 1 [P = .43] and 79.9 cm(3) and 84.8 cm(3) for reader 2 [P = .50]). The rate of volume loss per month was greater in the study group than in the control group (reader 1: -2.1% vs -0.1%, respectively, P = .003; reader 2: -2.0% vs -0.3%, P < .0001). Twenty-three of the 65 patients who received sunitinib (35%) showed at least 3% pancreatic volume loss per month, compared with only one of the 30 patients in the control

  5. A novel germline SDHB mutation in a gastrointestinal stromal tumor patient without bona fide features of the Carney-Stratakis dyad.

    PubMed

    Celestino, Ricardo; Lima, Jorge; Faustino, Alexandra; Máximo, Valdemar; Gouveia, António; Vinagre, João; Soares, Paula; Lopes, José Manuel

    2012-06-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are the most common mesenchyme neoplasms of the gastrointestinal tract. Gain-of-function somatic mutations of the KIT or PDGFRA genes represent the most prevalent molecular alterations in GISTs. In Carney-Stratakis dyad, patients portray germline mutations of the succinate dehydrogenase subunits B (SDHB), C (SDHC) and D (SDHD) and develop multifocal GISTs and multicentric paragangliomas (PGLs). We herein report a novel germline SDHB mutation (c.T282A--Ile44Asn) occurring in a 26 years-old patient diagnosed with a spindle cell intermediate risk GIST that did not present KIT/PDGFRA/BRAF gene mutations. Further analyses revealed loss of the wild-type SDHB allele and complete loss of SDHB expression in the tumor tissue. After genetic screening of other family members, we detected in the patient's mother a SDHB mutation without any clinical/laboratorial evidence of GIST or PGL. Altogether, our findings (germline SDHB mutation with absence of PGL in the index case and of GIST and/or PGL in his mother) raise the possibility that this familiar setting corresponds to an incomplete phenotype of the Carney-Stratakis dyad. PMID:22160509

  6. CTHRC1 Acts as a Prognostic Factor and Promotes Invasiveness of Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors by Activating Wnt/PCP-Rho Signaling1

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Ming-Ze; Zhuang, Chun; Yang, Xiao-Mei; Zhang, Zi-Zhen; Ma, Hong; Zhang, Wen-Ming; You, Haiyan; Qin, Wenxin; Gu, Jianren; Yang, Shengli; Cao, Hui; Zhang, Zhi-Gang

    2014-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are the major gastrointestinal mesenchymal tumors with a variable malignancy ranging from a curable disorder to highly malignant sarcomas. Metastasis and recurrence are the main causes of death in GIST patients. To further explore the mechanism of metastasis and to more accurately estimate the recurrence risk of GISTs after surgery, the clinical significance and functional role of collagen triple helix repeat containing-1 (CTHRC1) in GIST were investigated. We found that CTHRC1 expression was gradually elevated as the risk grade of NIH classification increased, and was closely correlated with disease-free survival and overall survival in 412 GIST patients. In vitro experiments showed that recombinant CTHRC1 protein promoted the migration and invasion capacities of primary GIST cells. A luciferase reporter assay and pull down assay demonstrated that recombinant CTHRC1 protein activated noncanonical Wnt/PCP-Rho signaling but inhibited canonical Wnt signaling. The pro-motility effect of CTHRC1 on GIST cells was reversed by using a Wnt5a neutralizing antibody and inhibitors of Rac1 or ROCK. Taken together, these data indicate that CTHRC1 may serve as a new predictor of recurrence risk and prognosis in post-operative GIST patients and may play an important role in facilitating GIST progression. Furthermore, CTHRC1 promotes GIST cell migration and invasion by activating Wnt/PCP-Rho signaling, suggesting that the CTHRC1-Wnt/PCP-Rho axis may be a new therapeutic target for interventions against GIST invasion and metastasis. PMID:24726140

  7. Molecular and Immunohistochemical Study of Platelet Derived Growth Factor Receptor Alpha in KIT Negative Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors; the First Report from Iran

    PubMed Central

    Geramizadeh, Bita; Jowkar, Zahra; Mousavi, Seyed-Javad

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are potentially malignant tumors; however their behavior and response to treatment is dependent on the type of mutation and immunohistochemical expression of antigens. It is recommended to perform routine molecular and immunohistochemical tests in KIT and platelet derived growth factor receptor alpha (PDGFRA) molecules for making decision regarding targeted therapy and prediction of the behavior of the tumor. Objectives: There has been no study from Iran regarding the PDGFRA mutational analysis in GISTs. In this study, for the first time from Iran, we performed immunohistochemical and molecular analysis of PDGFRA molecule on GISTs. METHODS In a cross-sectional study during 7 years (2008-2014) on 50 untreated non-recurrent non-metastatic newly diagnosed GISTs, molecular analysis and immunohistochemical staining for PDGFRA were performed and findings were compared with different clinicopathological characteristics.. RESULTS During the 7 years, 50 cases of GISTs according to the above mentioned criteria were found. 17 cases were negative for KIT mutation. Of them, 15 (30%) were positive for either exon 12 or 18 mutation of PDGFRA. These cases showed more epithelioid morphology and the number of mitotic figures were lower than PDFRA negative GISTs. Also according to the criteria for risk assessment, it seems that PDGFRA mutant GISTs are rarely in the high risk category. CONCLUSION PDGFRA mutant GISTs are common in Iranian population and it is recommended to perform mutation analysis for PDGFRA in every GIST with wild type KIT and epithelioid morphology. PMID:27698973

  8. Molecular and Immunohistochemical Study of Platelet Derived Growth Factor Receptor Alpha in KIT Negative Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors; the First Report from Iran

    PubMed Central

    Geramizadeh, Bita; Jowkar, Zahra; Mousavi, Seyed-Javad

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are potentially malignant tumors; however their behavior and response to treatment is dependent on the type of mutation and immunohistochemical expression of antigens. It is recommended to perform routine molecular and immunohistochemical tests in KIT and platelet derived growth factor receptor alpha (PDGFRA) molecules for making decision regarding targeted therapy and prediction of the behavior of the tumor. Objectives: There has been no study from Iran regarding the PDGFRA mutational analysis in GISTs. In this study, for the first time from Iran, we performed immunohistochemical and molecular analysis of PDGFRA molecule on GISTs. METHODS In a cross-sectional study during 7 years (2008-2014) on 50 untreated non-recurrent non-metastatic newly diagnosed GISTs, molecular analysis and immunohistochemical staining for PDGFRA were performed and findings were compared with different clinicopathological characteristics.. RESULTS During the 7 years, 50 cases of GISTs according to the above mentioned criteria were found. 17 cases were negative for KIT mutation. Of them, 15 (30%) were positive for either exon 12 or 18 mutation of PDGFRA. These cases showed more epithelioid morphology and the number of mitotic figures were lower than PDFRA negative GISTs. Also according to the criteria for risk assessment, it seems that PDGFRA mutant GISTs are rarely in the high risk category. CONCLUSION PDGFRA mutant GISTs are common in Iranian population and it is recommended to perform mutation analysis for PDGFRA in every GIST with wild type KIT and epithelioid morphology.

  9. Tumor suppression by stromal TIMPs.

    PubMed

    Shimoda, Masayuki; Jackson, Hartland W; Khokha, Rama

    2016-05-01

    The tumor stroma has the capacity to drive cancer progression, although the mechanisms governing these effects are incompletely understood. Recently, we reported that deletion of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases (Timps) in fibroblasts unleashes the function of cancer-associated fibroblasts and identifies a novel mode of stromal-tumor communication that activates key oncogenic pathways invoving Notch and ras homolog gene family, member A (RhoA) via stromal exosomes. PMID:27314104

  10. Treatment of non-resectable and metastatic gastrointestinal stromal tumors: experience with the use of tyrosine kinase inhibitors in a third level hospital in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Pimentel Renteria, Alberto; Pluma Jiménez, Miguel; Pérez Martínez, Mario; Martínez Martínez, Gloria; Rivera Rivera, Samuel; Grajales Álvarez, Rocío; Bautista Aragón, Yolanda; Quintana Quintana, Miguel; Alejandro Silva, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Background Stromal tumors of the digestive tract are uncommon malignant diseases, are subclassified as leiomyosarcomas and Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors (GIST) depending on the molecular expression of tyrosine kinase receptor KIT (CD117). GISTs represent 1% of malignant tumors affecting this anatomical site. Localized tumours diseases are reasonably well controlled by surgical resection and several criteria define the need for adjuvant therapy. In the case of metastatic disease a poor prognosis has been reported with systemic treatment based on chemotherapy. Recently, significant advances have been shown since tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) were introduced, with median overall survival close to 5 years. Unfortunately in Mexico, even though the therapy has been long used there are no published data of the experience in the treatment of these tumors. Methods We used an electronic data base to obtain clinical, radiological and histological data of patients diagnosed with GIST and treated in the oncological center of the Mexican Institute of Social Security, patients were subclassified by stage, symptoms at diagnosis as well as the initial and subsequent systemic treatment. Finally we made an analysis for progression free survival and overall survival identifying prognostic factors. Results We obtained information of 71 patients with metastatic, non-resectable or recurrent GIST, treated with a TKI, we observed a predominant relation for women (60.4%) with median age of 58 years. Stage at diagnosis was predominantly metastatic (46.5%), most frequently affected sites were lung, liver and retroperitoneum. Median progression free survival was 30.6 months and overall survival was 81.3 months. All patients were initially treated with imatinib at a dose of 400 mg per day. Treatment was well-tolerated in most cases. Conclusions Metastatic GIST evaluated in our center shows a different affection in gender and age, and our population shows a different response to TKIs

  11. Clinical Outcomes of Patients with Advanced Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors: Safety and Efficacy in a Worldwide Treatment-use Trial of Sunitinib

    PubMed Central

    Reichardt, Peter; Kang, Yoon-Koo; Rutkowski, Piotr; Schuette, Jochen; Rosen, Lee S; Seddon, Beatrice; Yalcin, Suayib; Gelderblom, Hans; Williams, Charles C; Fumagalli, Elena; Biasco, Guido; Hurwitz, Herbert I; Kaiser, Pamela E; Fly, Kolette; Matczak, Ewa; Chen, Liang; Lechuga, Maria José; Demetri, George D

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND To provide sunitinib to patients with gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) who were otherwise unable to obtain sunitinib; to obtain broad safety and efficacy data from a large population of patients with advanced GIST after imatinib failure. METHODS Imatinib-resistant/intolerant patients with advanced GIST received sunitinib on an initial dosing schedule (IDS) of 50 mg/day in 6-week cycles (4 weeks on treatment, 2 weeks off). Tumor assessment frequency was per local practice, with response assessed by investigators per Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors version 1.0. Overall survival (OS) and safety were assessed regularly. Post-hoc analyses evaluated different patterns of treatment management. RESULTS At final data cutoff, 1124 patients comprised the intent-to-treat population; 15% had a baseline Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status ≥2. Median treatment duration was 7.0 months. Median time to tumor progression was 8.3 months (95% confidence interval [CI], 8.0–9.4), and median OS was 16.6 months (95% CI, 14.9–18.0) with 36% of patients alive at the time of analysis. Patients in whom the IDS was modified exhibited longer median OS (23.5 months) than those treated strictly per the IDS (11.1 months). The most common treatment-related grade 3/4 adverse events (AEs) were hand-foot syndrome (11%), fatigue (9%), neutropenia (8%), hypertension (7%), and thrombocytopenia (6%). Treatment-related AEs associated with cardiac function (eg, congestive heart failure and myocardial infarction) were reported at frequencies of ≤1% each. CONCLUSIONS This treatment-use study confirms the long-term safety and efficacy of sunitinib in a large international population of patients with advanced GIST after imatinib failure. PMID:25641662

  12. Long-term results of adjuvant imatinib mesylate in localized, high-risk, primary gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST): ACOSOG Z9000 (Alliance) intergroup phase 2 trial

    PubMed Central

    DeMatteo, Ronald P.; Ballman, Karla V.; Antonescu, Cristina R.; Corless, Christopher; Kolesnikova, Violetta; von Mehren, Margaret; McCarter, Martin D.; Norton, Jeffrey; Maki, Robert G.; Pisters, Peter W.T.; Demetri, George D.; Brennan, Murray F.; Owzar, Kouros

    2014-01-01

    Objective To conduct the first adjuvant trial of imatinib mesylate for treatment of gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST). Summary Background Data GIST is the most common sarcoma. While surgical resection has been the mainstay of therapy for localized, primary GIST, postoperative tumor recurrence is common. The KIT proto-oncogene or, less frequently, platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha (PDGFRA) is mutated in GIST; the gene products of both are inhibited by imatinib mesylate. Methods This was a phase II, intergroup trial led by the American College of Surgeons Oncology Group (ACOSOG), registered at ClinicalTrials.gov as NCT00025246. From 09/2001 to 09/2003, we accrued 106 patients who had undergone complete gross tumor removal but were deemed at high risk for recurrence. Patients were prescribed imatinib 400 mg/day for 1 year and followed with serial radiologic evaluation. The primary endpoint was overall survival (OS). Results After a median follow-up of 7.7 years, the 1-, 3-, and 5-year OS rate was 99, 97, and 83%, which compared favorably with a historical 5 year OS rate of 35%. The 1-, 3-, and 5-year RFS rate was 96, 60, and 40%. On univariable analysis, age and mitotic rate were associated with OS. On multivariable analysis, the RFS rate was lower with increasing tumor size, small bowel site, KIT exon 9 mutation, high mitotic rate, and older age. Conclusion Adjuvant imatinib in patients with primary GIST who are at high risk of recurrence prolongs OS compared to that of historical controls. Optimal duration of adjuvant therapy remains undefined. (NCT00025246) PMID:23860199

  13. Imatinib-induced hyperbilirubinemia with UGT1A1 (*28) promoter polymorphism: first case series in patients with gastrointestinal stromal tumor

    PubMed Central

    Saif, Muhammad Wasif; Smith, Melissa Hennessey; Maloney, Antonia; Diasio, Robert B.

    2016-01-01

    Imatinib, an orally administered protein-tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) is indicated for the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) and gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST). Severe hepatotoxicity associated with imatinib is rare, and relationship to polymorphism of uridine diphosphate glucuronosyltransferase 1A1 (UGT1A1) expression and related frequency of hyperbilirubinemia or toxicity are not well known. We present a case series patients who developed hyperbilirubinemia while on oral administration imatinib for treatment of GIST. Genetic testing for polymorphism of UGT1A1 showed the first patient to be homozygous for the UGT1A1 TA7 (*28) polymorphism and the second patient heterozygous for the UGT1A1 TA1 (*28) polymorphism. The first patient had to stop imatinib due to severe and persistent hyperbilirubenemia peaking >3 despite reducing imatininb to only 100 mg every other day while the second patient improved at this dose. Our case series represent the first data associating UGT1A1 polymorphism and imatinib in patients being treated for GIST. Given the prevalence of Gilbert’s syndrome and the increasing use of imatinib, we encourage physicians to be aware of this possible toxicity as hepatotoxicity can be fatal if not managed in a timely fashion. This association is also timely due to recent FDA requirement for testing UGT1A1 polymorphism for nilotinib, another TKI.

  14. Complete Longitudinal Analyses of the Randomized, Placebo-controlled, Phase III Trial of Sunitinib in Patients with Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor Following Imatinib Failure

    PubMed Central

    Demetri, George D.; Garrett, Christopher R.; Schöffski, Patrick; Shah, Manisha H.; Verweij, Jaap; Leyvraz, Serge; Hurwitz, Herbert I.; Pousa, Antonio Lopez; Le Cesne, Axel; Goldstein, David; Paz-Ares, Luis; Blay, Jean-Yves; McArthur, Grant A.; Xu, Qiang (Casey); Huang, Xin; Harmon, Charles S.; Tassell, Vanessa; Cohen, Darrel P.; Casali, Paolo G.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To analyze final long-term survival and clinical outcomes from the randomized phase III study of sunitinib in gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) patients after imatinib failure; to assess correlative angiogenesis biomarkers with patient outcomes. Experimental Design Blinded sunitinib or placebo was given daily on a 4-week-on/2-week-off treatment schedule. Placebo-assigned patients could cross over to sunitinib at disease progression/study unblinding. Overall survival (OS) was analyzed using conventional statistical methods and the rank-preserving structural failure time (RPSFT) method to explore crossover impact. Circulating levels of angiogenesis biomarkers were analyzed. Results In total, 243 patients were randomized to receive sunitinib and 118 to placebo, 103 of whom crossed over to open-label sunitinib. Conventional statistical analysis showed that OS converged in the sunitinib and placebo arms (median 72.7 versus 64.9 weeks; hazard ratio [HR], 0.876; P = 0.306) as expected, given the crossover design. RPSFT analysis estimated median OS for placebo of 39.0 weeks (HR, 0.505, 95% CI, 0.262–1.134; P = 0.306). No new safety concerns emerged with extended sunitinib treatment. No consistent associations were found between the pharmacodynamics of angiogenesis-related plasma proteins during sunitinib treatment and clinical outcome. Conclusions The crossover design provided evidence of sunitinib clinical benefit based on prolonged time to tumor progression during the double-blind phase of this trial. As expected, following crossover there was no statistical difference in OS. RPSFT analysis modeled the absence of crossover, estimating a substantial sunitinib OS benefit relative to placebo. Long-term sunitinib treatment was tolerated without new adverse events. PMID:22661587

  15. Functional role of the Ca{sup 2+}-activated Cl{sup −} channel DOG1/TMEM16A in gastrointestinal stromal tumor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Berglund, Erik; Akcakaya, Pinar; Berglund, David; Karlsson, Fredrik; Vukojević, Vladana; Lee, Linkiat; Bogdanović, Darko; Lui, Weng-Onn; Larsson, Catharina; Zedenius, Jan; Fröbom, Robin; Bränström, Robert

    2014-08-15

    DOG1, a Ca{sup 2+}-activated Cl{sup −} channel (CaCC), was identified in 2004 to be robustly expressed in gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST). It was rapidly included as a tumor marker in routine diagnostics, but the functional role remained unknown. CaCCs are important regulators of normal physiological functions, but also implicated in tumorigenesis, cancer progression, metastasis, cell migration, apoptosis, proliferation and viability in several malignancies. We therefore investigated whether DOG1 plays a role in the three latter in GIST by utilizing in vitro cell model systems. Confocal microscopy identified different subcellular localizations of DOG1 in imatinib-sensitive and imatinib-resistant cells. Electrophysiological studies confirmed that DOG1-specific pharmacological agents possess potent activating and inhibiting properties. Proliferation assays showed small effects up to 72 h, and flow cytometric analysis of adherent cells with 7-AAD/Annexin V detected no pharmacological effects on viable GIST cells. However, inhibition of DOG1 conveyed pro-apoptotic effects among early apoptotic imatinib-resistant cells. In conclusion, DOG1 generates Cl{sup −} currents in GIST that can be regulated pharmacologically, with small effects on cell viability and proliferation in vitro. Inhibition of DOG1 might act pro-apoptotic on some early apoptotic GIST cell populations. Further studies are warranted to fully illuminate the function of DOG1 and its potential as therapeutic target. - Highlights: • Subcellular DOG1 localization varies between GIST cells. • DOG1 in GIST is voltage- and Ca{sup 2+}-activated. • Known TMEM16A modulators, like A01 and Eact, modulate DOG1. • DOG1 has small effects on cell viability and proliferation in vitro. • DOG1 impact early apoptotic GIST cells to undergo late apoptosis.

  16. Safety, efficacy and prognostic analyses of sunitinib in the post-marketing surveillance study of Japanese patients with gastrointestinal stromal tumor

    PubMed Central

    Komatsu, Yoshito; Ohki, Emiko; Ueno, Naomi; Yoshida, Ai; Toyoshima, Yasuharu; Ueda, Eiji; Houzawa, Hiroyuki; Togo, Kanae; Nishida, Toshirou

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study was conducted to expand the sunitinib safety database in Japanese imatinib-resistant/-intolerant gastrointestinal stromal tumor patients. Retrospective analyses investigated common adverse events as potential prognostic markers. Methods Four hundred and seventy patients who received sunitinib between June 2008 and November 2009 were analyzed for safety, progression-free survival and overall survival; 386 for objective response rate; 88% received sunitinib on Schedule 4/2 starting at 50 mg/day. Results No unexpected safety issues occurred. Grade ≥ 3 adverse events occurred in 70%, most commonly thrombocytopenia (33%), neutropenia (22%) and leukopenia (15%). Objective response rate was 20% (95% confidence interval 16–24). Median progression-free survival was 22.4 weeks (95% confidence interval, 21.7–24.0). The overall survival rate at 24 weeks was 91% (95% confidence interval, 88–94). Higher relative dose intensity (≥70 vs. <70%) during the first 6 weeks and better Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status (0 vs. ≥1) were associated with longer progression-free survival (24.0 vs. 20.1 weeks; P = 0.011; and 24.1 vs. 16.9 weeks; P < 0.001) and higher 24-week overall survival rate (94 vs. 83%; P < 0.001; and 96 vs. 83%; P < 0.001). Increased progression-free survival and overall survival rates were associated with specific adverse events. Cox proportional hazard modeling adjusted for relative dose intensity and performance status established hand–foot syndrome (hazard ratio = 0.636; 95% confidence interval, 0.456–0.888) and leukopenia (hazard ratio = 0.683; 95% confidence interval, 0.492–0.948) occurring within 12 weeks were significantly correlated with increased progression-free survival. Conclusion Sunitinib showed good efficacy and tolerable safety. Factors associated with greater efficacy were relative dose intensity, performance status and specific early adverse events. PMID:26373318

  17. Imatinib treatment for gastrointestinal stromal tumour (GIST).

    PubMed

    Lopes, Lisandro F; Bacchi, Carlos E

    2010-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumour (GIST) is the most common mesenchymal neoplasm of the gastrointestinal tract. GISTs are believed to originate from intersticial cells of Cajal (the pacemaker cells of the gastrointestinal tract) or related stem cells, and are characterized by KIT or platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha (PDGFRA) activating mutations. The use of imatinib has revolutionized the management of GIST and altered its natural history, substantially improving survival time and delaying disease progression in many patients. The success of imatinib in controlling advanced GIST led to interest in the neoadjuvant and adjuvant use of the drug. The neoadjuvant (preoperative) use of imatinib is recommended to facilitate resection and avoid mutilating surgery by decreasing tumour size, and adjuvant therapy is indicated for patients at high risk of recurrence. The molecular characterization (genotyping) of GISTs has become an essential part of the routine management of the disease as KIT and PDGFRA mutation status predicts the likelihood of achieving response to imatinib. However, the vast majority of patients who initially responded to imatinib will develop tumour progression (secondary resistance). Secondary resistance is often related to secondary KIT or PDGFRA mutations that interfere with drug binding. Multiple novel tyrosine kinase inhibitors may be potentially useful for the treatment of imatinib-resistant GISTs as they interfere with KIT and PDGFRA receptors or with the downstream-signalling proteins.

  18. Targeted therapy of gastrointestinal stromal tumours

    PubMed Central

    Jakhetiya, Ashish; Garg, Pankaj Kumar; Prakash, Gaurav; Sharma, Jyoti; Pandey, Rambha; Pandey, Durgatosh

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs) are mesenchymal neoplasms originating in the gastrointestinal tract, usually in the stomach or the small intestine, and rarely elsewhere in the abdomen. The malignant potential of GISTs is variable ranging from small lesions with a benign behaviour to fatal sarcomas. The majority of the tumours stain positively for the CD-117 (KIT) and discovered on GIST-1 (DOG-1 or anoctamin 1) expression, and they are characterized by the presence of a driver kinase-activating mutation in either KIT or platelet-derived growth factor receptor α. Although surgery is the primary modality of treatment, almost half of the patients have disease recurrence following surgery, which highlights the need for an effective adjuvant therapy. Traditionally, GISTs are considered chemotherapy and radiotherapy resistant. With the advent of targeted therapy (tyrosine kinase inhibitors), there has been a paradigm shift in the management of GISTs in the last decade. We present a comprehensive review of targeted therapy in the management of GISTs. PMID:27231512

  19. Characterization of various types of mast cells derived from model mice of familial gastrointestinal stromal tumors with KIT-Asp818Tyr mutation.

    PubMed

    Kajimoto, Noriko; Nakai, Norihiro; Ohkouchi, Mizuka; Hashikura, Yuka; Liu-Kimura, Ning-Ning; Isozaki, Koji; Hirota, Seiichi

    2015-01-01

    Sporadic mast cell neoplasms and gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) often have various types of somatic gain-of-function mutations of the c-kit gene which encodes a receptor tyrosine kinase, KIT. Several types of germline gain-of-function mutations of the c-kit gene have been detected in families with multiple GISTs. All three types of model mice for the familial GISTs with germline c-kit gene mutations at exon 11, 13 or 17 show development of GIST, while they are different from each other in skin mast cell number. Skin mast cell number in the model mice with exon 17 mutation was unchanged compared to the corresponding wild-type mice. In the present study, we characterized various types of mast cells derived from the model mice with exon 17 mutation (KIT-Asp818Tyr) corresponding to human familial GIST case with human KIT-Asp820Tyr to clarify the role of the c-kit gene mutation in mast cells. Bone marrow-derived cultured mast cells (BMMCs) derived from wild-type mice, heterozygotes and homozygotes were used for the experiments. Immortalized BMMCs, designated as IMC-G4 cells, derived from BMMCs of a homozygote during long-term culture were also used. Ultrastructure, histamine contents, proliferation profiles and phosphorylation of various signaling molecules in those cells were examined. In IMC-G4 cells, presence of additional mutation(s) of the c-kit gene and effect of KIT inhibitors on both KIT autophosphorylation and cell proliferation were also analyzed. We demonstrated that KIT-Asp818Tyr did not affect ultrastructure and proliferation profiles but did histamine contents in BMMCs. IMC-G4 cells had an additional novel c-kit gene mutation of KIT-Tyr421Cys which is considered to induce neoplastic transformation of mouse mast cells and the mutation appeared to be resistant to a KIT inhibitor of imatinib but sensitive to another KIT inhibitor of nilotinib. IMC-G4 cells might be a useful mast cell line to investigate mast cell biology.

  20. Clinical efficacy of second-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors in imatinib-resistant gastrointestinal stromal tumors: a meta-analysis of recent clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Lile; Zhang, Zhongqiang; Yao, Hongliang; Liu, Kuijie; Wen, Yu; Xiong, Li

    2014-01-01

    Background Primary and secondary resistance to imatinib, a selective receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI), is a serious clinical problem in the control of advanced gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST). Here we report on a meta-analysis we performed to evaluate the efficacy of second-generation TKIs in the treatment of patients with imatinib-resistant GIST. Methods Randomized controlled trials evaluating the clinical efficacy of second-generation TKIs were identified by searching PubMed and EMBASE from 2000 to February 2014. Outcomes subjected to analysis were progression-free survival and overall survival. Statistical analyses were performed using Review Manager version 5.1.0 (Cochrane Collaboration, Oxford, UK). Weighted hazard ratios (HR) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated for the outcomes. Fixed-effects or random-effects models were used, depending on the degree of heterogeneity across the selected studies. Results Three randomized controlled trials were selected for meta-analysis. Among imatinib-resistant or imatinib-intolerant patients, 541 received second-generation TKIs (sunitinib, nilotinib, or regorafenib) and 267 controls received placebo or best supportive care. Progression-free survival was significantly improved in the TKI-treated group (HR 0.38; 95% CI 0.24–0.59; P<0.0001). No statistically significant difference was detected in overall survival between the treatment group and the control group (HR 0.85; 95% CI 0.71–1.03; P=0.09). In the subgroup of patients who were resistant or intolerant to both imatinib and sunitinib, TKI therapy (nilotinib or regorafenib) improved progression-free survival (HR 0.40; 95% CI 0.19–0.84; P=0.02) but not overall survival (HR 0.83; 95% CI 0.63–1.08; P=0.17). Regorafenib was shown to be effective in terms of progression-free survival across different subpopulations of patients who were resistant to both imatinib and sunitinib. Conclusion Second-generation TKIs (sunitinib, nilotinib, and

  1. Neoadjuvant imatinib in a locally advanced gastrointestinal stromal tumour (GIST) of the rectum: a rare case of two GISTs within a family without a familial GIST syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mandalà, Mario; Pezzica, Ezio; Tamborini, Elena; Guerra, Ugo; Lagonigro, Stefania M; Forloni, Bruno; Barni, Sandro

    2007-08-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumours are rare tumours of the gastrointestinal tract. We describe the case of a 57-year-old man with a locally advanced gastrointestinal stromal tumour of the rectum. We started Gleevec. The pathological examination documented a complete pathological response. An already described mutation in KIT exon 11 was observed in the gastrointestinal stromal tumour of the rectum. At the same time as the treatment of our patient, his brother received a neoadjuvant therapy for a locally advanced rectal adenocarcinoma. During the surgical procedure, a gastric lesion was excised and the pathological examination showed a low-grade gastrointestinal stromal tumour. We analysed DNA extracted from the tumoral mass and normal tissue of both patients. No mutations, either in KIT or in PDGFRA, were detected in the subserosal stomach gastrointestinal stromal tumour. After 18 months, both patients are free from recurrence. Our clinical case suggests that preoperative imatinib therapy may enable radical surgery in patients with an inoperable disease.

  2. CD34 immunoexpression in stromal tumours of the gastrointestinal tract and in mesenteric fibromatoses.

    PubMed

    Monihan, J M; Carr, N J; Sobin, L H

    1994-11-01

    The aim of this study was to explore whether CD34 immunoreactivity can distinguish between different types of gastrointestinal stromal tumour, i.e. smooth muscle and neurogenic. We studied 87 stromal tumours from different sites in the gastrointestinal tract, as well as the omentum and mesentery, using a monoclonal antibody to CD34 (QBEND10). We also determined the immunoexpression of smooth muscle and muscle specific actins, S-100 protein, cytokeratin, desmin and vimentin. In addition, 15 cases of mesenteric fibromatosis were tested for CD34. Immunoexpression of CD34 was observed in 40 of the 87 stromal tumours and correlated with evidence of differentiation towards a smooth muscle phenotype. Large intestinal stromal tumours were less likely than gastric lesions to be CD34 positive. None of 15 cases of mesenteric fibromatosis was positive for CD34. We conclude that CD34 immunoexpression is seen in a proportion of stromal tumors of the gastrointestinal tract, mesentery and omentum, particularly those of smooth muscle type, and it may be useful as part of an immunohistochemical panel in the differential diagnosis of these neoplasms.

  3. Primary extragastrointestinal stromal tumor of the pleura: A case report

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, CAI-QING; LU, DE-GAN; LIU, QING-FA; XIAO, WEI

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are the most common type of mesenchymal tumor of the gastrointestinal tract. The stomach and small intestine are the most common sites of occurrence. GISTs are mesenchymal neoplasms originating from the interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs), and are characterized by positivity for cluster of differentiation (CD) 117, also known as proto-oncogene c-Kit. While the majority of GISTs develop in the alimentary tract, in rare cases they may also be found in extragastrointestinal tissues. This type of GIST is known as an extragastrointestinal stromal tumor (EGIST). Despite the fact that EGISTs have been reported in the mesentery, omentum and retroperitoneum, primary intrathoracic EGISTs, arising from the pleura or lungs, are rare. The patient presented in the current study was a 40-year-old man, who presented with a cough and pyrexia, with pleural effusion on the left side. Multiple nodules throughout the parietal pleura were identified by thoracoscopy and a diagnosis of primary GIST of pleura was established, since they were positive for CD117 and discovered on GIST-1 and there was no evidence of gastrointestinal tumors. Subsequently, the patient was administered with imatinib and had no signs of disease recurrence 2 years later. PMID:27123077

  4. [Regression grading in gastrointestinal tumors].

    PubMed

    Tischoff, I; Tannapfel, A

    2012-02-01

    Preoperative neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy is a well-established and essential part of the interdisciplinary treatment of gastrointestinal tumors. Neoadjuvant treatment leads to regressive changes in tumors. To evaluate the histological tumor response different scoring systems describing regressive changes are used and known as tumor regression grading. Tumor regression grading is usually based on the presence of residual vital tumor cells in proportion to the total tumor size. Currently, no nationally or internationally accepted grading systems exist. In general, common guidelines should be used in the pathohistological diagnostics of tumors after neoadjuvant therapy. In particularly, the standard tumor grading will be replaced by tumor regression grading. Furthermore, tumors after neoadjuvant treatment are marked with the prefix "y" in the TNM classification. PMID:22293790

  5. Discovery of N-(3-((1-Isonicotinoylpiperidin-4-yl)oxy)-4-methylphenyl)-3-(trifluoromethyl)benzamide (CHMFL-KIT-110) as a Selective, Potent, and Orally Available Type II c-KIT Kinase Inhibitor for Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors (GISTs).

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiang; Liu, Feiyang; Wang, Beilei; Zou, Fengming; Chen, Cheng; Liu, Xiaochuan; Wang, Aoli; Qi, Shuang; Wang, Wenchao; Qi, Ziping; Zhao, Zheng; Hu, Zhenquan; Wang, Wei; Wang, Li; Zhang, Shanchun; Wang, Yuexiang; Liu, Jing; Liu, Qingsong

    2016-04-28

    c-KIT kinase is a validated drug discovery target for gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs). Clinically used c-KIT kinase inhibitors, i.e., Imatinib and Sunitinib, bear other important targets such as ABL or FLT3 kinases. Here we report our discovery of a more selective c-KIT inhibitor, compound 13 (CHMFL-KIT-110), which completely abolished ABL and FLT3 kinase activity. KinomeScan selectivity profiling (468 kinases) of 13 exhibited a high selectivity (S score (1) = 0.01). 13 displayed great antiproliferative efficacy against GISTs cell lines GIST-T1 and GIST-882 (GI50: 0.021 and 0.043 μM, respectively). In the cellular context, it effectively affected c-KIT-mediated signaling pathways and induced apoptosis as well as cell cycle arrest. In addition, 13 possessed acceptable bioavailability (36%) and effectively suppressed the tumor growth in GIST-T1 cell inoculated xenograft model without apparent toxicity. 13 currently is undergoing extensive preclinical evaluation and might be a potential drug candidate for GISTs. PMID:27077705

  6. Treatment for Stromal Tumors of the Ovary

    MedlinePlus

    ... Get Involved Find Local ACS Learn About Cancer » Ovarian Cancer » Detailed Guide » Treatment for stromal tumors of the ... saved articles window. My Saved Articles » My ACS » Ovarian Cancer + - Text Size Download Printable Version [PDF] » Treating Ovarian ...

  7. Can Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumors Be Found Early?

    MedlinePlus

    ... problems. Carcinoid tumors often are found incidentally (by accident). These tumors aren’t causing any symptoms but ... Carcinoid Tumors? Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention Early Detection, Diagnosis, and Staging Treating Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumors Talking ...

  8. Characteristics of gastrointestinal stromal tumours, diagnostic procedure and therapeutic management and main directions of nursing practice in gastrointestinal stromal tumours

    PubMed Central

    Głuszek, Stanisław; Kozieł, Dorota

    2014-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GIST) constitute a separate group of mesenchymal neoplasms of the gastrointestinal tract. They have been commonly recognized for a few years, they have created a new problem in medical practice. GIST are more often centred in the stomach. They equally affect female and male patients and occur mainly in patients older than 50 years of age. The clinical picture of the tumour is non-specific. Radical surgical treatment and molecularly targeted therapy with tyrosine kinase inhibitors are used in GIST treatment. Nursing practice with reference to GIST danger is connected with biopsychosocial interventions of perioperative, oncological and palliative procedures and involves the area of health education mainly oriented towards shaping preventive procedures which favour early disease detection and support therapy and recovery. PMID:25784835

  9. Molecular characterization of metastatic exon 11 mutant gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) beyond KIT/PDGFRα genotype evaluated by next generation sequencing (NGS)

    PubMed Central

    Astolfi, Annalisa; Indio, Valentina; Ercolani, Giorgio; Del Gaudio, Massimo; Santini, Donatella; Pirini, Maria Giulia; Fiorentino, Michelangelo; Nannini, Margherita; Lolli, Cristian; Mandrioli, Anna; Gatto, Lidia; Brandi, Giovanni; Biasco, Guido; Pinna, Antonio Daniele; Pantaleo, Maria Abbondanza

    2015-01-01

    About 85% of GISTs are associated with KIT and PDGFRα gene mutations, which predict response to tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Although the outcomes in patients affected by GIST have dramatically improved, tumor progression control still remains a challenge. The aim of this study is the genomic characterization of individual metastatic KIT-exon 11-mutant GIST to identify additional aberrations and simultaneous molecular events representing potential therapeutic targets. Seven patients with metastatic GIST were studied with whole transcriptome sequencing and copy number analysis. Somatic single nucleotide variations were called; however, no shared mutated genes were detected except KIT. Almost all patients showed loss of genomic regions containing tumor suppressor genes, sometimes coupled with single nucleotide mutation of the other allele. Additionally, six fusion transcripts were found and three patients showed amplifications involving known oncogenes. Evaluating the concordance between CN status and mRNA expression levels, we detected overexpression of CCND2 and EGFR and silencing of CDKN2A, CDKN2C, SMARCB1, PTEN and DMD. Altered expression of these genes could be responsible for aberrant activation of signaling pathways that support tumor growth. In this work, we assessed the effect of Hedgehog pathway inhibition in GIST882 cells, which causes decrement of cell viability associated with reduction of KIT expression. Additional genomic alterations not previously reported in GIST were found even if not shared by all samples. This contributes to a more detailed molecular understanding of this disease, useful for identification of new targets and novel therapeutics and representing a possible point of departure for a truly individualized clinical approach. PMID:26544626

  10. Molecular characterization of metastatic exon 11 mutant gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) beyond KIT/PDGFRα genotype evaluated by next generation sequencing (NGS).

    PubMed

    Saponara, Maristella; Urbini, Milena; Astolfi, Annalisa; Indio, Valentina; Ercolani, Giorgio; Del Gaudio, Massimo; Santini, Donatella; Pirini, Maria Giulia; Fiorentino, Michelangelo; Nannini, Margherita; Lolli, Cristian; Mandrioli, Anna; Gatto, Lidia; Brandi, Giovanni; Biasco, Guido; Pinna, Antonio Daniele; Pantaleo, Maria Abbondanza

    2015-12-01

    About 85% of GISTs are associated with KIT and PDGFRα gene mutations, which predict response to tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Although the outcomes in patients affected by GIST have dramatically improved, tumor progression control still remains a challenge. The aim of this study is the genomic characterization of individual metastatic KIT-exon 11-mutant GIST to identify additional aberrations and simultaneous molecular events representing potential therapeutic targets.Seven patients with metastatic GIST were studied with whole transcriptome sequencing and copy number analysis. Somatic single nucleotide variations were called; however, no shared mutated genes were detected except KIT. Almost all patients showed loss of genomic regions containing tumor suppressor genes, sometimes coupled with single nucleotide mutation of the other allele. Additionally, six fusion transcripts were found and three patients showed amplifications involving known oncogenes.Evaluating the concordance between CN status and mRNA expression levels, we detected overexpression of CCND2 and EGFR and silencing of CDKN2A, CDKN2C, SMARCB1, PTEN and DMD. Altered expression of these genes could be responsible for aberrant activation of signaling pathways that support tumor growth. In this work, we assessed the effect of Hedgehog pathway inhibition in GIST882 cells, which causes decrement of cell viability associated with reduction of KIT expression.Additional genomic alterations not previously reported in GIST were found even if not shared by all samples. This contributes to a more detailed molecular understanding of this disease, useful for identification of new targets and novel therapeutics and representing a possible point of departure for a truly individualized clinical approach.

  11. Molecular characterization of metastatic exon 11 mutant gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) beyond KIT/PDGFRα genotype evaluated by next generation sequencing (NGS).

    PubMed

    Saponara, Maristella; Urbini, Milena; Astolfi, Annalisa; Indio, Valentina; Ercolani, Giorgio; Del Gaudio, Massimo; Santini, Donatella; Pirini, Maria Giulia; Fiorentino, Michelangelo; Nannini, Margherita; Lolli, Cristian; Mandrioli, Anna; Gatto, Lidia; Brandi, Giovanni; Biasco, Guido; Pinna, Antonio Daniele; Pantaleo, Maria Abbondanza

    2015-12-01

    About 85% of GISTs are associated with KIT and PDGFRα gene mutations, which predict response to tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Although the outcomes in patients affected by GIST have dramatically improved, tumor progression control still remains a challenge. The aim of this study is the genomic characterization of individual metastatic KIT-exon 11-mutant GIST to identify additional aberrations and simultaneous molecular events representing potential therapeutic targets.Seven patients with metastatic GIST were studied with whole transcriptome sequencing and copy number analysis. Somatic single nucleotide variations were called; however, no shared mutated genes were detected except KIT. Almost all patients showed loss of genomic regions containing tumor suppressor genes, sometimes coupled with single nucleotide mutation of the other allele. Additionally, six fusion transcripts were found and three patients showed amplifications involving known oncogenes.Evaluating the concordance between CN status and mRNA expression levels, we detected overexpression of CCND2 and EGFR and silencing of CDKN2A, CDKN2C, SMARCB1, PTEN and DMD. Altered expression of these genes could be responsible for aberrant activation of signaling pathways that support tumor growth. In this work, we assessed the effect of Hedgehog pathway inhibition in GIST882 cells, which causes decrement of cell viability associated with reduction of KIT expression.Additional genomic alterations not previously reported in GIST were found even if not shared by all samples. This contributes to a more detailed molecular understanding of this disease, useful for identification of new targets and novel therapeutics and representing a possible point of departure for a truly individualized clinical approach. PMID:26544626

  12. Differential diagnosis of a gastric stromal tumor: case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Boşoteanu, Mădălina; Boşoteanu, C; Deacu, Mariana; Aşchie, Mariana

    2011-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors account for 0.1-3% of all gastrointestinal neoplasms and are characterized by features that overlap with those of other mesenchymal tumors. We expose the case of a 58-year-old male patient who complained of abdominal pain, weakness and melena. Microscopic examination of surgically resected gastric tumor revealed a neoplastic proliferation composed of spindle cells with eosinophilic cytoplasm, elongated nuclei with rounded ends, palisadic disposition and intracytoplasmic perinuclear vacuoles, low cyto-nuclear polymorphism, mild atypia and mitotic activity of 3-5÷50 HPF. Some histopathological features requested differential diagnosis with schwannoma and tumors of myocytary origin, based on immunohistochemical techniques, which have established a final diagnosis of spindle cell gastric stromal tumor. We also reviewed the GIST-related literature and evaluated the possible methods of preoperative diagnosis of GISTs based on endoscopic biopsy. Proper classification of GISTs based on histopathological criteria and immunohistochemical techniques has a great prognostic and therapeutic utility. Future development of endoscopic biopsy methods will refine the management of gastrointestinal stromal tumors.

  13. [Circulating "tumor markers" in gastrointestinal tumors].

    PubMed

    Borlinghaus, P; Lamerz, R

    1991-09-01

    Tumor markers (TM) of the neoplastic cell can be divided into non-shedded substances and antigens shedded in blood, urine or other body fluids. For clinicians circulating TM are more important. All relevant circulating TM are not useful in screening of asymptomatic patients because of insufficient sensitivity and specificity. With caution they are useful in the observation of risk groups. Circulating TM have their main significance as additional parameters in monitoring symptomatic patients with malignancies. Several follow up determinations are more important than one single measurement. During follow up of tumor patients TM should not be checked automatically if there are no diagnostic or therapeutical consequences. The clinically most important circulating TM in non-hormone secreting tumors of the gastrointestinal tract are the oncofetal antigens CEA and AFP and antigens defined by monoclonal antibodies e. g. CA 19-9 and CA 72-4. AFP is the primary TM in hepatocellular carcinoma, often elevated in hepatoblastoma and always normal in cholangiocellular carcinoma. CEA is the TM of first choice in patients with colorectal carcinomas and liver metastasis. CA 19-9 is TM of first choice in pancreatic carcinoma and additionally of diagnostic value in cholangiocellular carcinoma and tumors of the bile ducts. In cancer of the stomach CA 19-9 and CEA are secondary TM in combination with CA 72-4 as primary TM. Care should be taken that slight and moderate elevations of TM can be observed in benign diseases of liver, pancreas and bowel.

  14. Sex cord-gonadal stromal tumor of the rete testis.

    PubMed

    Sajadi, Kamran P; Dalton, Rory R; Brown, James A

    2009-01-01

    A 34-year-old tetraplegic patient with suppurative epididymitis was found on follow-up examination and ultrasonography to have a testicular mass. The radical orchiectomy specimen contained an undifferentiated spindled sex cord-stromal tumor arising in the rete testis. Testicular sex cord-stromal tumors are far less common than germ cell neoplasms and are usually benign. The close relationship between sex cords and ductules of the rete testis during development provides the opportunity for these uncommon tumors to arise anatomically within the rete tesis. This undifferentiated sex cord-stromal tumor, occurring in a previously unreported location, is an example of an unusual lesion mimicking an intratesticular malignant neoplasm.

  15. How Are Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... can’t be biopsied during the test. Double balloon enteroscopy (endoscopy) This is another way to look ... at the lining of the intestine. Then a balloon on the end of the endoscope is inflated ...

  16. Primary pericardial extragastrointestinal stromal tumor: A case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    ARPACI, TANER; TOKAT, FATMA; ARPACI, RABIA BOZDOGAN; AKBAS, TUGANA; UGURLUER, GAMZE; YAVUZ, SINAN

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are the most prevalent mesenchymal tumors of the gastrointestinal tract. GISTs are considered to originate from the interstitial cells of Cajal, the pacemakers of the peristaltic activity of the gastrointestinal tract. More than 95% of GISTs express KIT protein and discovered on GIST-1. GISTs may also be encountered in locations outside the gastrointestinal tract, in which case they are referred to as extra-GISTs (EGISTs) and often behave more aggressively. This is the case report of a primary pericardial EGIST in a 53-year-old male patient, confirmed by immunohistochemistry. To the best of our knowledge, this is the third case of EGIST diagnosed above the diaphragm, without being associated with the esophageal wall. Two cases of primary EGIST arising from the pleura were reported previously. In addition, this is the first reported case of an EGIST originating from the pericardium. PMID:26137136

  17. What's New in Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumors Research and Treatment?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Topic Additional resources for gastrointestinal carcinoid tumors What’s new in gastrointestinal carcinoid tumor research and treatment? There ... for the causes of , ways to prevent , and new approaches to diagnose and treat GI carcinoid tumors. ...

  18. Unclassified pediatric renal stromal tumor overlapping with metanephric stromal tumor and solitary fibrous tumor with diffuse S-100 protein expression.

    PubMed

    Brancato, Franca; Gurrera, Alessandra; Bisceglia, Michele; Alaggio, Rita; Di Cataldo, Andrea; Di Benedetto, Vincenzo; Magro, Gaetano

    2011-11-15

    Metanephric stromal tumor (MST) is a rare pediatric neoplasm unique to the kidneys that is currently included in the spectrum of metanephric tumors, along with metanephric adenoma and adenofibroma. We herein report an unusual case of pediatric renal stromal tumor overlapping with MST and solitary fibrous tumor (SFT). Histologically, the tumor was composed of bland-looking spindle to stellate cells embedded in a fibro-sclerotic stroma that focally surrounded native entrapped renal tubules or blood vessels with abortive rings or collarettes. Alternating hypercellular and hypocellular areas and a focal hemangiopericytomatous-like vascular pattern imparted to the tumor a resemblance to SFT. Angiodysplasia of intratumoral arterioles was also observed, but juxtaglomerular cell hyperplasia was not a feature. Immunohistochemically, the neoplastic cells showed a polyphenotypic profile, including diffuse expression of vimentin and CD34, and focal immunoreactivity for alpha-smooth muscle actin, EMA, and CD99. However, the most striking finding was diffuse nuclear and cytoplasmic expression of S-100 protein. Although this protein has been reported to stain the heterologous glial and/or cartilaginous components that can be occasionally encountered in MST, this marker has not been previously reported in the fibroblastic component of MST. Pathologist should be aware of similar unusual unclassified tumors to avoid potential confusion with other benign or malignant S-100 protein-positive tumors.

  19. Stages of Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... symptoms of GI carcinoid tumors in the jejunum (middle part of the small intestine) and ileum (last part ... Treatment of GI carcinoid tumors in the jejunum (middle part of the small intestine) and ileum (last part ...

  20. Tumor-associated stromal cells as key contributors to the tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Bussard, Karen M; Mutkus, Lysette; Stumpf, Kristina; Gomez-Manzano, Candelaria; Marini, Frank C

    2016-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment is a heterogeneous population of cells consisting of the tumor bulk plus supporting cells. It is becoming increasingly evident that these supporting cells are recruited by cancer cells from nearby endogenous host stroma and promote events such as tumor angiogenesis, proliferation, invasion, and metastasis, as well as mediate mechanisms of therapeutic resistance. In addition, recruited stromal cells range in type and include vascular endothelial cells, pericytes, adipocytes, fibroblasts, and bone-marrow mesenchymal stromal cells. During normal wound healing and inflammatory processes, local stromal cells change their phenotype to become that of reactive stroma. Under certain conditions, however, tumor cells can co-opt these reactive stromal cells and further transition them into tumor-associated stromal cells (TASCs). These TASCs express higher levels of proteins, including alpha-smooth muscle actin, fibroblast activating protein, and matrix metalloproteinases, compared with their normal, non-reactive counterparts. TASCs are also known to secrete many pro-tumorigenic factors, including IL-6, IL-8, stromal-derived factor-1 alpha, vascular endothelial growth factor, tenascin-C, and matrix metalloproteinases, among others, which recruit additional tumor and pro-tumorigenic cells to the developing microenvironment. Here, we review the current literature pertaining to the origins of recruited host stroma, contributions toward tumor progression, tumor-associated stromal cells, and mechanisms of crosstalk between endogenous host stroma and tumor cells. PMID:27515302

  1. Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Recurrent Sex Cord-Stromal Tumors of the Ovary

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-23

    Malignant Ovarian Epithelial Tumor; Ovarian Granulosa Cell Tumor; Ovarian Gynandroblastoma; Ovarian Sertoli-Leydig Cell Tumor; Ovarian Sex Cord Tumor With Annular Tubules; Ovarian Sex Cord-Stromal Tumor; Ovarian Sex Cord-Stromal Tumor of Mixed or Unclassified Cell Types; Ovarian Steroid Cell Tumor

  2. Treatment for Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors (GISTs) Based on Tumor Spread

    MedlinePlus

    ... treatment are (whether it is to try to cure the cancer, to help you live longer, or to prevent ... in the liver, but are not expected to cure the cancer. Cancers that are no longer responding to the ...

  3. Synchronous Appearance of Adenocarcinoma and Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumour (GIST) of the Stomach: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Pushparaj, Magesh; Masih, Dipti; Pulimood, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Adenocarcinoma is the most common histological type of gastric tumour, accounting for approximately 95% of all gastric carcinomas. Gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs) are rare mesenchymal neoplasms of the digestive tract. Synchronous adenocarcinoma and gastrointestinal stromal tumour (GIST) occurring in the stomach is rare and very few cases have been reported in literature. Synchronous tumours in the stomach are rarely diagnosed preoperatively. A 63-year-old gentleman was diagnosed with a gastric adenocarcinoma on endoscopic biopsy and underwent surgery. Postoperative histopathologic examination revealed 2 synchronous tumours with both adenocarcinoma and GIST. The adenocarcinoma was determined to be the aggressive tumour based on histologic features. GIST was categorized as a very low risk of malignancy, based on its size and mitosis. The patient underwent chemotherapy for adenocarcinoma. He is under follow up and is currently disease free. Careful histopathologic evaluation is required to detect co-existing rare synchronous tumours. Presence of the second tumour may require additional procedures or protocols. PMID:27042477

  4. Synchronous gastric inflammatory myofibroblastic tumour with gastrointestinal stromal tumour of the stomach and hepatic syringious haemangioma

    PubMed Central

    Papadopoulou, D; Chatziralli, IP; Papadopoulos, V; Filitantzi, C; Demertzidis, C

    2012-01-01

    Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumour of the stomach is a very rare lesion. A case of a gastric inflammatory myofibroblastic tumour associated with gastrointestinal stromal tumour of the stomach and hepatic syringious haemangioma is described. We report an 80-year-old male who had an exophytic mass in the area of the pylorus and the duodenum, where hepatic cysts were found in the magnetic resonance (MRI) scan on examination of hypochromic microcytic anaemia, and prolapsus and torsion of the bulb of the stomach found during gastroscopy. During surgical excision of the exophytic mass, a gastrointestinal stromal tumour from the gastric fundus and a syringious haemangioma from the superior hepatic surface were resected. All tumours were treated successfully by surgical excision. The patient had an uneventful recovery. Neither recurrence nor metastasis was found after a 12-month follow-up. To our knowledge, this is the first time that such an association is reported in the literature. PMID:24960722

  5. [Myxoid mesenchymal tumors of uterus: endometrial stromal and smooth muscle tumors, myxoid variant].

    PubMed

    Chesnais, Anne-Laure; Watkin, Emmanuel; Beurton, Daniel; Devouassoux-Shisheboran, Mojgan

    2011-06-01

    Four myxoid variant of uterine mesenchymal tumors are reported. One was a low grade stromal sarcoma with infiltrative margins and the others were well circumscribed tumors corresponding to an endometrial stromal nodule and two leiomyomas. They were hypocellular neoplasms composed of stellated cells with an abundant Alcian Blue positive myxoid matrix. The myxoid nature of the neoplasms obscured their cellular nature and made the distinction between smooth muscle and endometrial stromal tumors difficult. Endometrial stromal tumors, showed very focal areas of small basophilic cells, characteristic of endometrial stroma. The diagnosis was based on the presence of a spiral arteriolar network, a CD10 positivity as well as the absence of h-caldesmon and desmin expression. The two myxoid leiomyomas showed more spindle cells and a desmin expression while h-caldesmon was negative and CD10 focally positive in both cases. Myxoid variant of endometrial stromal tumors does not necessarily exhibit the typical morphology of endometrial stroma. They may demonstrate morphological features of smooth muscle tumors in the uterus. Also, myxoid changes in uterin smooth muscle tumors may modify the classical immunoreactivity of smooth muscle markers in these tumors and make it difficult to distinguish between benign and malignant neoplasms. An immunohistochemical panel of antibodies including CD10, h-caldesmon and desmin may help in establishing the correct diagnosis.

  6. Sheep stromal-epithelial cell interactions and ovarian tumor progression.

    PubMed

    Wang-Johanning, Feng; Huang, Miao; Liu, Jinsong; Rycaj, Kiera; Plummer, Joshua B; Barnhart, Kirstin F; Satterfield, William C; Johanning, Gary L

    2007-11-15

    Previous studies suggest that underlying ovarian stromal cues may regulate the ovarian surface epithelium. However, little is known about the interaction between ovarian stromal cells (OSC) and ovarian surface epithelial cells (OSE) under normal physiologic and pathologic conditions, largely because of the lack of a suitable model. In the current study, the OSC obtained from a sheep were immortalized with SV-40 T/t antigen (designated IOSC) and telomerase reverse transcriptase (designated IOSCH), followed by transfection with the oncogenic allele of the human H-Ras oncogene (designated IOSChR). IOSC cells transfected with H-Ras before immortalization with telomerase were designated IOSCRH. These sheep OSCs were used in both in vitro and in vivo model systems to evaluate mechanisms by which OSCs influence ovarian tumor progression. Normal sheep OSCs were found to inhibit the growth of SKOV3 and OVCAR3 human ovarian cancer cells, but not normal sheep OSE and human OSE cells (hOSE137 cells). In contrast, IOSChR and IOSCRH cells stimulated the growth of normal sheep and human OSE cells, as well as cancer cells. These findings were confirmed by in vivo studies. Our data provide compelling support for the importance of stromal-epithelial cell interactions during tumor progression, and show for the first time that immortalized and transformed OSCs promote growth of ovarian epithelial tumors.

  7. Updates in Tumor Profiling in Gastrointestinal Cancers.

    PubMed

    Perez, Kimberly; Safran, Howard P

    2015-10-01

    In the last decade there has been a focus on biomarkers that play a critical role in understanding molecular and cellular mechanisms which drive tumor initiation, maintenance and progression of cancers. Characterization of genomes by next-generation sequencing (NGS) has permitted significant advances in gastrointestinal cancer care. These discoveries have fueled the development of novel therapeutics and have laid the groundwork for the development of new treatment strategies. Work in colorectal cancer (CRC) has been in the forefront of these advances. With the continued development of NGS technology and the positive clinical experience in CRC, genome work has begun in esophagogastric, pancreatic, and hepatocellular carcinomas as well.

  8. Multipotent Mesenchymal Stromal Cells: Possible Culprits in Solid Tumors?

    PubMed Central

    Johann, Pascal David; Müller, Ingo

    2015-01-01

    The clinical use of bone marrow derived multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (BM-MSCs) in different settings ranging from tissue engineering to immunotherapies has prompted investigations on the properties of these cells in a variety of other tissues. Particularly the role of MSCs in solid tumors has been the subject of many experimental approaches. While a clear phenotypical distinction of tumor associated fibroblasts (TAFs) and MSCs within the tumor microenvironment is still missing, the homing of bone marrow MSCs in tumor sites has been extensively studied. Both, tumor-promoting and tumor-inhibiting effects of BM-MSCs have been described in this context. This ambiguity requires a reappraisal of the different studies and experimental methods employed. Here, we review the current literature on tumor-promoting and tumor-inhibiting effects of BM-MSCs with a particular emphasis on their interplay with components of the immune system and also highlight a potential role of MSCs as cell of origin for certain mesenchymal tumors. PMID:26273308

  9. Study of the Glutaminase Inhibitor CB-839 in Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-18

    Solid Tumors; Triple-Negative Breast Cancer; Non Small Cell Lung Cancer; Renal Cell Carcinoma; Mesothelioma; Fumarate Hydratase (FH)-Deficient Tumors; Succinate Dehydrogenase (SDH)-Deficient Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors (GIST); Succinate Dehydrogenase (SDH)-Deficient Non-gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors; Tumors Harboring Isocitrate Dehydrogenase-1 (IDH1) and IDH2 Mutations; Tumors Harboring Amplifications in the cMyc Gene

  10. Cooperative laparoscopic endoscopic and hybrid laparoscopic surgery for upper gastrointestinal tumors: Current status

    PubMed Central

    Ntourakis, Dimitrios; Mavrogenis, Georgios

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the cooperative laparoscopic and endoscopic techniques used for the resection of upper gastrointestinal tumors. METHODS: A systematic research of the literature was performed in PubMed for English and French language articles about laparoscopic and endoscopic cooperative, combined, hybrid and rendezvous techniques. Only original studies using these techniques for the resection of early gastric cancer, benign tumors and gastrointestinal stromal tumors of the stomach and the duodenum were included. By excluding case series of less than 10 patients, 25 studies were identified. The study design, number of cases, tumor pathology size and location, the operative technique name, the endoscopy team and surgical team role, operative time, type of closure of visceral wall defect, blood loss, complications and length of hospital stay of these studies were evaluated. Additionally all cooperative techniques found were classified and are presented in a systematic approach. RESULTS: The studies identified were case series and retrospective cohort studies. A total of 706 patients were operated on with a cooperative technique. The tumors resected were only gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) in 4 studies, GIST and various benign submucosal tumors in 22 studies, early gastric cancer (pT1a and pT1b) in 6 studies and early duodenal cancer in 1 study. There was important heterogeneity between the studies. The operative techniques identified were: laparoscopic assisted endoscopic resection, endoscopic assisted wedge resection, endoscopic assisted transgastric and intragastric surgery, laparoscopic endoscopic cooperative surgery (LECS), laparoscopic assisted endoscopic full thickness resection (LAEFR), clean non exposure technique and non-exposed endoscopic wall-inversion surgery (NEWS). Each technique is illustrated with the roles of the endoscopic and laparoscopic teams; the indications, characteristics and short term results are described. CONCLUSION: Along with

  11. Irinotecan, Fluorouracil, and Leucovorin in Treating Patients With Advanced Gastrointestinal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-19

    Anal Cancer; Carcinoma of the Appendix; Colorectal Cancer; Esophageal Cancer; Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Gallbladder Cancer; Gastric Cancer; Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor; Liver Cancer; Pancreatic Cancer; Small Intestine Cancer

  12. Resolving Cancer-Stroma Interfacial Signaling and Interventions with Micropatterned Tumor-Stromal Assays

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Keyue; Luk, Samantha; Hicks, Daniel F; Elman, Jessica S; Bohr, Stefan; Iwamoto, Yoshiko; Murray, Ryan; Pena, Kristen; Wang, Fangjing; Seker, Erkin; Weissleder, Ralph; Yarmush, Martin L; Toner, Mehmet; Sgroi, Dennis; Parekkadan, Biju

    2014-01-01

    Tumor-stromal interactions are a determining factor in cancer progression. In vivo, the interaction interface is associated with spatially-resolved distributions of cancer and stromal phenotypes. Here, we establish a micropatterned tumor-stromal assay (μTSA) with laser capture microdissection to control the location of co-cultured cells and analyze bulk and interfacial tumor-stromal signaling in driving cancer progression. μTSA reveals a spatial distribution of phenotypes in concordance with human estrogen receptor-positive (ER+) breast cancer samples, and heterogeneous drug activity relative to the tumor-stroma interface. Specifically, an unknown mechanism of reversine is shown in targeting tumor-stromal interfacial interactions using ER+ MCF-7 breast cancer and bone marrow-derived stromal cells. Reversine suppresses MCF-7 tumor growth and bone metastasis in vivo by reducing tumor stromalization including collagen deposition and recruitment of activated stromal cells. This study advocates μTSA as a platform for studying tumor microenvironmental interactions and cancer field effects with applications in drug discovery and development. PMID:25489927

  13. Recent advances in systemic therapy for gastrointestinal neuroendocrine tumors.

    PubMed

    Pelley, R J; Bukowski, R M

    1999-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors of the gastrointestinal tract are rare tumors which can be classified as amine precursor uptake and decarboxylation tumors (APU-Domas). Although the majority of clinically apparent tumors are malignant, they are frequently slow growing. Despite this characteristic, they may generate disabling hormonal syndromes requiring aggressive treatment to achieve palliation. Recent advances in understanding the pathophysiology of these tumors has led to better medical therapy with chemotherapeutic agents, somatostatin analogues, and biologic therapies. This review will update the recent efforts in systemic therapies of the gastrointestinal neuroendocrine tumors.

  14. Mesenchymal stem cell-based tumor-targeted gene therapy in gastrointestinal cancer.

    PubMed

    Bao, Qi; Zhao, Yue; Niess, Hanno; Conrad, Claudius; Schwarz, Bettina; Jauch, Karl-Walter; Huss, Ralf; Nelson, Peter J; Bruns, Christiane J

    2012-09-01

    Mesenchymal stem (or stromal) cells (MSCs) are nonhematopoietic progenitor cells that can be obtained from bone marrow aspirates or adipose tissue, expanded and genetically modified in vitro, and then used for cancer therapeutic strategies in vivo. Here, we review available data regarding the application of MSC-based tumor-targeted therapy in gastrointestinal cancer, provide an overview of the general history of MSC-based gene therapy in cancer research, and discuss potential problems associated with the utility of MSC-based therapy such as biosafety, immunoprivilege, transfection methods, and distribution in the host.

  15. Interleukin-8 derived from local tissue-resident stromal cells promotes tumor cell invasion.

    PubMed

    Welte, Gabriel; Alt, Eckhard; Devarajan, Eswaran; Krishnappa, Srinivasalu; Jotzu, Constantin; Song, Yao-Hua

    2012-11-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the role of adipose tissue resident stromal cells on tumor cell invasion. Our data show that a subpopulation of adipose tissue derived stromal cells expressing Nestin, NG2, α-smooth muscle actin and PDGFR-α migrate toward the cancer cells. Microarray analysis revealed the upregulation of IL-8 in the migrated cells. We demonstrated that stromal cell derived IL-8 promote the invasion and the anchorage-independent growth of cancer cells. We conclude that human breast cancer cells attract a subpopulation of stromal cells that secrete IL-8 to promote tumor cell invasion in a paracrine fashion.

  16. Management of ovarian and testicular sex cord-stromal tumors in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Kris Ann P; Schneider, Dominik T; Pashankar, Farzana; Ross, Jonathan; Frazier, Lindsay

    2012-05-01

    Pediatric ovarian and testicular sex cord-stromal tumors are distinct from germ cell neoplasms and may present with palpable mass or signs of hormone production. Both may be associated with specific genetic syndromes. Staging for ovarian sex cord-stromal tumors is based on the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics classification for ovarian carcinoma. Treatment for those with high risk disease includes multiagent chemotherapy. Testicular stromal tumors often, though not always, follow a benign course. Additional research will help to define optimal treatment strategies for children with these rare tumors.

  17. Laparo-endoscopic combined approach for excision of gastrointestinal stromal tumour close to the oesophagogastric junction

    PubMed Central

    Vinnicombe, Zak; Little, Max; Wan, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Tumours close to the oesophagogastric junction (OGJ) are difficult to excise due to high risk of complications. Laparoscopic and endoscopic combined surgery allows minimally invasive access while increasing tumour visualization. Computed tomography (CT) scanning of a 68-year-old female demonstrated a lesion suspicious of a gastrointestinal stromal tumour located 2 cm from the OGJ on the posterior gastric wall. Stapled excision was performed intragastrically and followed by endoscopic removal. Gastroscopy 7 months post-op and follow-up CT scan at 5 years demonstrated no recurrence of the primary tumour and no new disease. Laparoscopic and endoscopic combined approach is a safe and effective method of removing tumours close to the OGJ. PMID:26157053

  18. Combined liver transplantation plus imatinib for unresectable metastases of gastrointestinal stromal tumours.

    PubMed

    Serralta, Alfonso S; Sanjuan, Fernando R; Moya, Angel H; Orbis, Francisco C; López-Andújar, Rafael; Pareja, Eugenia I; Vila, Juan C; Rayón, Miguel; Juan, Manuel B; Mir, José P

    2004-11-01

    Therapeutic options for treating unresectable hepatic metastases of leiomyosarcomas were scarce until a few years ago. Recent advances in the study of the biology of intestinal tumours have radically changed our knowledge of their pathogenesis. Many of the tumours previously considered as leiomyosarcomas are now identified as gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs). The introduction of imatinib (an antineoplasic drug that specifically acts on the pathogenesis of these tumours) has shown promising results in patients with advanced GISTs. We present three patients with the initial diagnosis of unresectable hepatic metastases of leiomyosarcomas. They received liver transplants. All three had tumour recurrences after transplantation. Histological re-evaluation identified a stromal origin of the tumours, and the patients were treated with imatinib therapy (400 mg/day). Recurrence occurred in all patients after a mean of 38.3 months, but imatinib treatment achieved control of the tumours. The current survival times with the combination of transplantation and imatinib are 92, 48 and 46 months for the three patients. This series is small and inconclusive, but imatinib treatment showed promising results. The treatment options for patients with unresectable metastases of GISTs must be defined, as in these three patients liver transplantation achieved a disease-free status but all had tumour recurrences before starting the imatinib treatment.

  19. Atypical presentation of a gastric stromal tumor masquerading as a giant intraabdominal cyst: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Ke-Kang; Xu, Song; Chen, Jinzhen; Liu, Gang; Shen, Xiaojun; Wu, Xiaoyang

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are mesenchymal neoplasms that arise in the gastrointestinal tract, accounting for ~1% of gastric malignancies. The present study reports the case of a GIST of the stomach in a 75-year-old man who presented with abdominal distension and anorexia for 1 month. Gastroscopy was unremarkable. Ultrasound and computed tomography (CT) scans showed a giant intraabdominal cystic lesion of unknown origin. The lesion was initially believed to be a duplication cyst, a pancreatic pseudocyst or a liver cyst in the pre-operative diagnosis. Exploratory laparotomy revealed a cystic lesion of the lesser sac originating from the lesser curvature of the stomach. A distal gastrectomy with en bloc resection of the lesion was performed. The intraoperative frozen section showed a spindle-cell GIST and microscopically negative margins. The patient was treated with imatinib for 1 year. The latest CT scan at 14 months post-surgery did not show any recurrence. Although GISTs presenting as predominantly cystic lesions are very rare, they should be considered in the differential diagnosis of cystic lesions of the upper abdomen.

  20. Distinction of endometrial stromal sarcomas from 'hemangiopericytomatous' tumors using a panel of immunohistochemical stains.

    PubMed

    Bhargava, Rohit; Shia, Jinru; Hummer, Amanda J; Thaler, Howard T; Tornos, Carmen; Soslow, Robert A

    2005-01-01

    Endometrial stromal sarcomas are low-grade malignant tumors that may pose a diagnostic challenge, especially when they are present in an extrauterine site. Owing to the presence of an arborizing vasculature and cells with an undifferentiated appearance, endometrial stromal sarcomas can be confused with several soft-tissue neoplasms. We studied 17 endometrial stromal sarcomas, eight hemangiopericytomas, 14 solitary fibrous tumors, and 16 synovial sarcomas immunohistochemically, detecting the following antigens: CD10, estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, bcl-2, CD34, smooth muscle antigen, epithelial membrane antigen and cytokeratin (AE1/AE3). Most endometrial stromal sarcomas stained positively for CD10 (16/17), estrogen receptor (17/17), progesterone receptor (15/17), and bcl-2 (17/17). Staining with antismooth muscle antigen was seen in 11 of 17 cases of endometrial stromal sarcoma, with more intense staining seen in areas showing smooth muscle differentiation. Staining with AE1/3 was seen in four of 17 endometrial stromal sarcomas, with two of the positive cases containing epithelioid cells. None of the endometrial stromal sarcomas expressed epithelial membrane antigen or CD34. More than half of the hemangiopericytomas (4/8) and solitary fibrous tumors (9/14) cases demonstrated CD10 expression either focally or in a patchy cytoplasmic and membranous pattern. Hemangiopericytomas, solitary fibrous tumors, and synovial sarcomas did not express estrogen receptor. Four of eight hemangiopericytomas and seven of 14 solitary fibrous tumors also showed patchy progesterone receptor expression. CD34 expression was identified in six of eight hemangiopericytomas and 13 of 14 solitary fibrous tumors, but we did not find expression of CD34 in synovial sarcoma. Differences between endometrial stromal sarcoma and other soft-tissue tumors were detected for all of the immunohistochemical markers (P<0.05), except anti-bcl-2 and AE1/3. Antibodies against CD10 mark a substantial

  1. Gastrointestinal stromal tumour masquerading as a cyst in the lesser sac

    PubMed Central

    Hamza, Ahmed Mahmoud; Ayyash, Emad Helmi; Alzafiri, Raed; Francis, Issam; Asfar, Sami

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs) are solid tumours of the gastrointestinal tract, mostly found in the stomach and intestine. They rarely present as cystic lesions. A 74-year-old woman referred to the hepatopancreaticobiliary unit, with 3 months history of upper abdominal discomfort. Abdominal ultrasound scan showed a large cystic lesion in the epigastric region suggestive of a pancreatic pseudocyst. The CT-scan showed a 6.6×6×6.3 cm size cyst related to the pancreas and extending to the hepatogastric omentum. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) scan was suggestive of a pancreatic pseudocyst. Aspirated Cyst fluid via EUS showed benign cytology with normal amylase, lipase and tumour markers (CEA, CA-19.9 and CA-125). She was referred as a case of pancreatic pseudocyst. After surgical excision, the histopathology confirmed the presence GIST in the wall of the cystic lesion. The possibility of GIST should be kept in mind in the presence of unusual features of a cyst on abdominal imaging. PMID:27469382

  2. Treatment Options for Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... symptoms of GI carcinoid tumors in the jejunum (middle part of the small intestine) and ileum (last part ... Treatment of GI carcinoid tumors in the jejunum (middle part of the small intestine) and ileum (last part ...

  3. General Information about Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... symptoms of GI carcinoid tumors in the jejunum (middle part of the small intestine) and ileum (last part ... Treatment of GI carcinoid tumors in the jejunum (middle part of the small intestine) and ileum (last part ...

  4. Treatment Option Overview (Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumors)

    MedlinePlus

    ... symptoms of GI carcinoid tumors in the jejunum (middle part of the small intestine) and ileum (last part ... Treatment of GI carcinoid tumors in the jejunum (middle part of the small intestine) and ileum (last part ...

  5. How Are Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumors Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... as symptoms that might be caused by a mass (tumor) in the stomach, intestines, or rectum. Some ... attention to the abdomen, looking for a tumor mass or enlarged liver. If your medical history and ...

  6. Integrins and bone metastasis: integrating tumor cell and stromal cell interactions.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Jochen G; Amend, Sarah R; Weilbaecher, Katherine N

    2011-01-01

    Integrins on both tumor cells and the supporting host stromal cells in bone (osteoclasts, new blood vessels, inflammatory cells, platelets and bone marrow stromal cells) play key roles in enhancing bone metastasis. Tumor cells localize to specific tissues through integrin-mediated contacts with extracellular matrix and stromal cells. Integrin expression and signaling are perturbed in cancer cells, allowing them to "escape" from cell-cell and cell-matrix tethers, invade, migrate and colonize within new tissues and matrices. Integrin signaling through αvβ3 and VLA-4 on tumor cells can promote tumor metastasis to and proliferation in the bone microenvironment. Osteoclast (OC) mediated bone resorption is a critical component of bone metastasis and can promote tumor growth in bone and αvβ3 integrins are critical to OC function and development. Tumors in the bone microenvironment can recruit new blood vessel formation, platelets, pro-tumor immune cells and bone marrow stromal cells that promote tumor growth and invasion in bone. Integrins and their ligands play critical roles in platelet aggregation (αvβ3 and αIIbβ3), hematopoietic cell mobilization (VLA-4 and osteopontin), neoangiogenesis (αvβ3, αvβ5, α6β4, and β1 integrin) and stromal function (osteopontin and VLA-4). Integrins are involved in the pathogenesis of bone metastasis at many levels and further study to define integrin dysregulation by cancer will yield new therapeutic targets for the prevention and treatment of bone metastasis.

  7. Modern Interpretation of Giant Cell Tumor of Bone: Predominantly Osteoclastogenic Stromal Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yuhree; Nizami, Saqib; Goto, Hana

    2012-01-01

    Owing to striking features of numerous multinucleated cells and bone destruction, giant cell tumor (GCT) of bone, often called as osteoclastoma, has drawn major attractions from orthopaedic surgeons, pathologists, and radiologists. The name GCT or osteoclastoma gives a false impression of a tumor comprising of proliferating osteoclasts or osteoclast precursors. The underlying mechanisms for excessive osteoclastogenesis are intriguing and GCT has served as an exciting disease model representing a paradigm of osteoclastogenesis for bone biologists. The modern interpretation of GCT is predominantly osteoclastogenic stromal cell tumors of mesenchymal origin. A diverse array of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines disrupts osteoblastic differentiation and promotes the formation of excessive multi-nucleated osteoclastic cells. Pro-osteoclastogenic cytokines such as receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL), interleukin (IL)-6, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) as well as monocyte-recruiting chemokines such as stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) and monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1 participate in unfavorable osteoclastogenesis and bone destruction. This model represents a self-sufficient osteoclastogenic paracrine loop in a localized area. Consistent with this paradigm, a recombinant RANK-Fc protein and bisphosphonates are currently being tried for GCT treatment in addition to surgical excision and conventional topical adjuvant therapies. PMID:22662295

  8. Mixed epithelial-stromal tumor (MEST) of seminal vesicle: a proposal for unified nomenclature.

    PubMed

    Reikie, Brian A; Yilmaz, Asli; Medlicott, Shaun; Trpkov, Kiril

    2015-03-01

    In contrast to the common tumors of the prostate, seminal vesicle demonstrates low potential for neoplastic proliferation. Of the rare primary seminal vesicle tumors, adenocarcinoma is the most common, but there are also rare seminal vesicle neoplasms which demonstrate epithelial and stromal components. These neoplasms have been described in the literature under various names, including "epithelial-stromal tumor," "cystic epithelial-stromal tumor," "cystadenoma," "cystomyoma," "mesenchymoma," "Müllerian adenosarcoma-like tumor," "phyllodes tumor," and "cystosarcoma phyllodes." The spectrum of reported mixed epithelial-stromal tumors (MEST) of seminal vesicle encompasses low, intermediate and high-grade tumors, but the precise distinction and nomenclature for these tumors remain unsettled. We propose a common nomenclature for these tumors, based on the review of published cases and 2 index cases from our practice, which represent the low-grade category. The first patient was 46 years old and presented with seminal vesicle neoplasm detected on routine rectal examination. The neoplasm measured 4 cm in greatest dimension, and completely replaced the left seminal vesicle. The tumor was circumscribed and consisted of multiple cysts separated by spindle-cell stroma. The second patient was a 60-year-old man, who had an incidental seminal vesicle neoplasm, which was discovered when he underwent a radical prostatectomy for a prostatic adenocarcinoma, (Gleason score 3+4, stage 3a). Both neoplasms contained hypercellular stroma, which was composed of uniform spindle cells, arranged in fascicles and interspersed between the glands. Both tumors lacked worrisome morphology, such as infiltrative borders, cell atypia, increased mitotic activity, hemorrhage, and necrosis. The stromal cells were reactive for estrogen and progesterone receptors, and desmin. The cysts and dilated glands were lined by epithelial cells, which were positive for cytokeratin 7 and were negative for

  9. Malignant Potential of Murine Stromal Cells after Transplantation of Human Tumors into Nude Mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldenberg, David M.; Pavia, Rose A.

    1981-04-01

    Human malignant cancer tumors grafted into nude mice produce tumors containing both human cancer cells and the host's stromal cells. After short-term propagation of these tumors in vitro, the murine mesenchymal cells appear transformed and are tumorigenic in nude mice. However, established human cancer cell lines fail to similarly alter adjacent murine stromal cells when used to produce tumors in nude mice. These experiments suggest that cancer cells may recruit normal cells to become malignant, qualifying the view of the clonal (unicellular) origin of cancer.

  10. The Effect of Stromal Integrin β3-Deficiency on Two Different Tumors in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Reigstad, Inga; Sortland, Kristina; Skogstrand, Trude; Reed, Rolf K.; Stuhr, Linda

    2016-01-01

    There is an increasing focus on the tumor microenvironment in carcinogenesis. Integrins are important receptors and adhesion molecules in this environment and have been shown to be involved in cell adhesion, proliferation, differentiation and migration. The present study aimed to evaluate the effect of stromal integrin β3-deficiency on tumor growth, angiogenesis, interstitial fluid pressure (PIF), fibrosis and metastasis in a murine breast cancer (4T1) and a prostate tumor (RM11) model. We showed that stromal integrin β3-deficiency led to an elevation in PIF that correlated to a shift towards thicker collagen fibrils in the 4T1 mammary tumor. In the RM11 prostate carcinoma model there was no effect of integrin β3-deficiency on PIF and collagen fibril thickness. These findings support the notion that changes in the collagen scaffold influence PIF, and also indicate that there must be important crosstalk between the stroma and tumor cells, in a tumor cell line specific manner. Furthermore, stromal integrin β3-deficiency had no effect on tumor growth or angiogenesis in both tumor models and no effect on lung metastasis in the 4T1 mammary tumor model. In conclusion, the stromal β3 integrin influence PIF, possibly via its effect on the structure of the collagen network, in a tumor cell line dependent manner. PMID:26771643

  11. Diagnostic procedures for submucosal tumors in the gastrointestinal tract

    PubMed Central

    Ponsaing, Laura Graves; Kiss, Katalin; Loft, Annika; Jensen, Lise Ingemann; Hansen, Mark Berner

    2007-01-01

    This review is part one of three, which will present an update on diagnostic procedures for gastrointestinal (GI) submucosal tumors (SMTs). Part two identifies the classification and part three the therapeutic methods regarding GI SMTs. Submucosal tumors are typically asymptomatic and therefore encountered incidentally. Advances in diagnostic tools for gastrointestinal submucosal tumors have emerged over the past decade. The aim of this paper is to provide the readers with guidelines for the use of diagnostic procedures, when a submucosal tumor is suspected. Literature searches were performed to find information on diagnostics for gastrointestinal submucosal tumors. Based on the searches, the optimal diagnostic procedures and specific features of the submucosal tumors could be outlined. Standard endoscppy, capsule endoscopy and push-and-pull enteroscopy (PPE) together with barium contrast X-ray do not alone provide sufficient information, when examining submucosal tumors. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS), computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and fluorodeoxyglucose-labeled positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) are recommended as supplementary tools. PMID:17659668

  12. Molecular and morphological correlation in gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs): an update and primer.

    PubMed

    Chetty, Runjan; Serra, Stefano

    2016-09-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs) are a commonly encountered tumour in routine practice. In the main, the morphology of spindle, epithelioid or mixed are well recognised along with mutations of c-kit However, there are other genes that are mutated resulting in characteristic clinicopathological correlations. GISTs harbouring platelet-derived growth factor receptor α (PDGFRα) gene mutations lead to a typical morphological constellation of findings: gastric and omental location, gross tumour that is cystic and haemorrhagic, composed of epithelioid, plasmacytoid cells exhibiting pleomorphism, low mitotic count and containing characteristic giant cells with peripherally placed nuclei. These cells are set in a myxoid stroma containing several mast cells. In addition, perivascular/intratumoural hyalinisation is often seen. These tumours are CD117 and DOG-1 positive. GISTs with SDH mutations are multinodular/bilobed/dumb-bell shape tumour masses with mucosal ulceration and histologically characterised by fibrous bands around and within nodules of epithelioid or mixed epithelioid/spindle cells. Lymphovascular invasion with lymph node metastases are usual. Immunohistochemically, the GISTs are CD117, DOG-1 positive, SDHA negative (if SDHA mutated), SDHA positive (if SDHA intact) and SDHB negative. BRAF and NF-1 mutated GISTs do not have any characteristic morphological features. PMID:27317811

  13. Primary omental gastrointestinal stromal tumour (GIST) presenting with a large abdominal mass and spontaneous haemoperitoneum

    PubMed Central

    Seow-En, Isaac; Seow-Choen, Francis; Lim, Tony Kiat Hon; Leow, Wei Qiang

    2014-01-01

    A 60-year-old Indonesian woman presented with a 9-day history of increasing abdominal distension, pain and tiredness. Physical examination revealed significant pallor with a palpable mass in the abdomen. CT of the abdomen reported a 22 cm complex mass in the peritoneal cavity with free intra-abdominal fluid. Laboratory results showed anaemia with a raised serum CA 125 level. At laparotomy a large haemorrhagic tumour with blood filled cystic cavities was found attached to both greater omentum and the transverse mesocolon with 2.2 L of blood in the peritoneal cavity. There was no invasion of any part of the stomach or intestines and there were no metastases seen. Histopathology of the resected specimen was consistent with that of a gastrointestinal stromal tumour arising from the omentum. Immunohistochemical studies revealed the tumour to be strongly positive for discovered on GIST-1 (DOG1) but negative for both CD117 and CD34. Platelet-derived growth factor receptor α (PDGFRA) exon 18 mutation D842V was detected. PMID:25368123

  14. Transanal minimally invasive surgery (TAMIS) approach for large juxta-anal gastrointestinal stromal tumour

    PubMed Central

    Wachter, Nicolas; Wörns, Marcus-Alexander; dos Santos, Daniel Pinto; Lang, Hauke; Huber, Tobias; Kneist, Werner

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs) are rarely found in the rectum. Large rectal GISTs in the narrow pelvis sometimes require extended abdominal surgery to obtain free resection margins, and it is a challenge to preserve sufficient anal sphincter and urogenital function. Here we present a 56-year-old male with a locally advanced juxta-anal non-metastatic GIST of approximately 10 cm in diameter. Therapy with imatinib reduced the tumour size and allowed partial intersphincteric resection (pISR). The patient underwent an electrophysiology-controlled nerve-sparing hybrid of laparoscopic and transanal minimally invasive surgery (TAMIS) in a multimodal setting. The down-to-up approach provided sufficient dissection plane visualisation and allowed the confirmed nerve-sparing. Lateroterminal coloanal anastomosis was performed. Follow-up showed preserved urogenital function and good anorectal function, and the patient remains disease-free under adjuvant chemotherapy as of 12 months after surgery. This report suggests that the TAMIS approach enables extraluminal high-quality oncological and function-preserving excision of high-risk GISTs. PMID:27279406

  15. Perioperative and Oncological Outcome of Laparoscopic Resection of Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumour (GIST) of the Stomach

    PubMed Central

    Ronellenfitsch, Ulrich; Staiger, Wilko; Kähler, Georg; Ströbel, Philipp; Schwarzbach, Matthias; Hohenberger, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Background. Surgery remains the only curative treatment for gastrointestinal stromal tumour (GIST). Resection needs to ensure tumour-free margins while lymphadenectomy is not required. Thus, partial gastric resection is the treatment of choice for small gastric GISTs. Evidence on whether performing resection laparoscopically compromises outcome is limited. Methods. We compiled patients undergoing laparoscopic resection of suspected gastric GIST between 2003 and 2007. Follow-up was performed to obtain information on tumour recurrence. Results. Laparoscopic resection with free margins was performed in 21/22 patients. Histology confirmed GIST in 17 cases, 4 tumours were benign neoplasms. Median operation time and postoperative stay for GIST patients were 130 (range 80–201) mins and 7 (range 5–95) days. Two patients experienced stapler line leakage necessitating surgical revision. After median follow-up of 18 (range 1–53) months, no recurrence occurred. Conclusions. Laparoscopic resection of gastric GISTs yields good perioperative outcomes. Oncologic outcome needs to be assessed with longer follow-up. For posterior lesions, special precaution is needed. Laparoscopic resection could become standard for circumscribed gastric GISTs if necessary precautions for oncological procedures are observed. PMID:19343179

  16. Targeting Human Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumour Cells with a Quadruplex-binding Small Molecule

    PubMed Central

    Gunaratnam, Mekala; Beltran, Monica; Galesa, Katja; Haider, Shozeb M.; Reszka, Anthony P.; Cuenca, Francisco; Fletcher, Jonathan A.; Neidle, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    The majority of human gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GIST) are driven by activating mutations in the proto-oncogene KIT, a tyrosine kinase receptor. Clinical treatment with imatinib targets the kinase domain of KIT, but tumour regrowth occurs as a result of the development of resistant mutations in the kinase active site. An alternative small-molecule approach to GIST therapy is described, in which the KIT gene is directly targeted, and thus kinase resistance may be circumvented. A naphthalene dimiide derivative has been used to demonstrate the concept of dual quadruplex targeting. This compound strongly stabilises both telomeric quadruplex DNA and quadruplex sites in the KIT promoter in vitro. It is shown here that the compound is a potent inducer of growth arrest in a patient-derived GIST cell line at a concentration (ca 1μM) that also results in effective inhibition of telomerase activity and almost complete suppression of KIT mRNA and KIT protein expression. Molecular modelling studies with a telomeric quadruplex have been used to rationalise aspects of the experimental quadruplex melting data. PMID:19469547

  17. Surgical management of neuroendocrine tumors of the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lyen C; Poultsides, George A; Norton, Jeffrey A

    2011-08-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors of the pancreas (islet cell tumors) and of the luminal gastrointestinal tract (carcinoids) are a heterogeneous group of epithelial neoplasms that share certain common characteristics. First, they are similar histologically and are difficult to distinguish under light microscopy. Second, they can be associated with hypersecretory syndromes. Third, they are generally slow-growing and have a better prognosis than adenocarcinomas at the same site; however, they do become incurable when they progress to unresectable metastatic disease. Surgery is the only curative treatment and is recommended for most patients for whom cross-sectional imaging suggests that complete resection is possible. This article reviews the surgical management of gastrointestinal neuroendocrine tumors, including the preoperative control of hormonal symptoms, extent of resection required, postoperative outcomes, and differing management strategies as determined by whether the tumor has arisen sporadically or as part of a familial disorder, such as multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1). PMID:21936439

  18. A Survey of DICER1 Hotspot Mutations in Ovarian and Testicular Sex Cord-Stromal Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Conlon, Niamh; Schultheis, Anne M; Piscuoglio, Salvatore; Silva, Annacarolina; Guerra, Esther; Tornos, Carmen; Reuter, Victor E; Soslow, Robert A; Young, Robert H; Oliva, Esther; Weigelt, Britta

    2015-01-01

    Sertoli-Leydig cell tumors are characterized by the presence of somatic DICER1 hotspot mutations. In this study, we sought to define the association between DICER1 hotspot mutations and different morphologic subtypes of ovarian Sertoli-Leydig cell tumors. Furthermore, we aimed to assess whether DICER1 hotspot mutations occur in other ovarian sex cord-stromal tumors, testicular sex cord-stromal tumors, or other female genital tract tumors with rhabdomyosarcomatous differentiation. We subjected a series of ovarian Sertoli-Leydig cell tumors (n=32), Sertoli cell tumors (n=5) and gynandroblastomas (n=5), testicular sex cord-stromal tumors (n=15) and a diverse group of female genital tract tumors with rhabdomyosarcomatous morphology (n=10) to DICER1 hotspot mutation analysis using Sanger sequencing. We also tested 2 gynandroblastomas for the presence of FOXL2 hotspot mutations (p.C134W; c.402C>G). Twenty of 32 (63%) Sertoli-Leydig cell tumors harbored a DICER1 hotspot mutation, of which 80% had the p.E1705K mutation. No association was found between DICER1 mutation status and the presence of heterologous or retiform differentiation in Sertoli-Leydig cell tumors. DICER1 mutations were found at similar frequencies in gynandroblastoma (2/5; 40%) and ovarian Sertoli cell tumors (5/8; 63%; p>0.1), and all mutated tumors harbored a p.E1705K mutation. DICER1 hotspot mutations were also identified in a single cervical rhabdomyosarcoma and in the rhabdomyosarcomatous component of a uterine carcinosarcoma. No DICER1 mutations were detected in testicular sex cord-stromal tumors. Two DICER1 wild-type gynandroblastomas harbored a p.C134W FOXL2 hotspot mutation in both tumor components. In this study we confirmed that DICER1 hotspot mutations occur in over half of ovarian Sertoli-Leydig cell tumors, and are unrelated to tumor differentiation. We also widened the spectrum of ovarian sex cord-stromal tumors with sertoliform differentiation, in which DICER1 mutations are known to occur

  19. A survey of DICER1 hotspot mutations in ovarian and testicular sex cord-stromal tumors.

    PubMed

    Conlon, Niamh; Schultheis, Anne M; Piscuoglio, Salvatore; Silva, Annacarolina; Guerra, Esther; Tornos, Carmen; Reuter, Victor E; Soslow, Robert A; Young, Robert H; Oliva, Esther; Weigelt, Britta

    2015-12-01

    Sertoli-Leydig cell tumors are characterized by the presence of somatic DICER1 hotspot mutations. In this study, we sought to define the association between DICER1 hotspot mutations and different morphologic subtypes of ovarian Sertoli-Leydig cell tumors. Furthermore, we aimed to assess whether DICER1 hotspot mutations occur in other ovarian sex cord-stromal tumors, testicular sex cord-stromal tumors, or other female genital tract tumors with rhabdomyosarcomatous differentiation. We subjected a series of ovarian Sertoli-Leydig cell tumors (n=32), Sertoli cell tumors (n=5) and gynandroblastomas (n=5), testicular sex cord-stromal tumors (n=15) and a diverse group of female genital tract tumors with rhabdomyosarcomatous morphology (n=10) to DICER1 hotspot mutation analysis using Sanger sequencing. We also tested two gynandroblastomas for the presence of FOXL2 hotspot mutations (p.C134W; c.402C>G). Twenty of 32 (63%) Sertoli-Leydig cell tumors harbored a DICER1 hotspot mutation, of which 80% had the p.E1705K mutation. No association was found between DICER1 mutation status and the presence of heterologous or retiform differentiation in Sertoli-Leydig cell tumors. DICER1 mutations were found at similar frequencies in gynandroblastoma (2/5; 40%) and ovarian Sertoli cell tumors (5/8; 63%; P>0.1), and all mutated tumors harbored a p.E1705K mutation. DICER1 hotspot mutations were also identified in a single cervical rhabdomyosarcoma and in the rhabdomyosarcomatous component of a uterine carcinosarcoma. No DICER1 mutations were detected in testicular sex cord-stromal tumors. Two DICER1 wild-type gynandroblastomas harbored a p.C134W FOXL2 hotspot mutation in both tumor components. In this study we confirmed that DICER1 hotspot mutations occur in over half of ovarian Sertoli-Leydig cell tumors, and are unrelated to tumor differentiation. We also widened the spectrum of ovarian sex cord-stromal tumors with sertoliform differentiation, in which DICER1 mutations are known to

  20. Endoscopic resection of superficial gastrointestinal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Marc, Giovannini; Lopes, Cesar Vivian

    2008-01-01

    Therapeutic endoscopy plays a major role in the management of gastrointestinal (GI) neoplasia. Its indications can be generalized into four broad categories; to remove or obliterate neoplastic lesion, to palliate malignant obstruction, or to treat bleeding. Only endoscopic resection allows complete histological staging of the cancer, which is critical as it allows stratification and refinement for further treatment. Although other endoscopic techniques, such as ablation therapy, may also cure early GI cancer, they can not provide a definitive pathological specimen. Early stage lesions reveal low frequency of lymph node metastasis which allows for less invasive treatments and thereby improving the quality of life when compared to surgery. Endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) and endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) are now accepted worldwide as treatment modalities for early cancers of the GI tract. PMID:18698673

  1. Loss of stromal JUNB does not affect tumor growth and angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Braun, Jennifer; Strittmatter, Karin; Nübel, Tobias; Komljenovic, Dorde; Sator-Schmitt, Melanie; Bäuerle, Tobias; Angel, Peter; Schorpp-Kistner, Marina

    2014-03-15

    The transcription factor AP-1 subunit JUNB has been shown to play a pivotal role in angiogenesis. It positively controls angiogenesis by regulating Vegfa as well as the transcriptional regulator Cbfb and its target Mmp13. In line with these findings, it has been demonstrated that tumor cell-derived JUNB promotes tumor growth and angiogenesis. In contrast to JUNB's function in tumor cells, the role of host-derived stromal JUNB has not been elucidated so far. Here, we show that ablation of Junb in stromal cells including endothelial cells (ECs), vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and fibroblasts does not affect tumor growth in two different syngeneic mouse models, the B16-F1 melanoma and the Lewis lung carcinoma model. In-depth analyses of the tumors revealed that tumor angiogenesis remains unaffected as assessed by measurements of the microvascular density and relative blood volume in the tumor. Furthermore, we could show that the maturation status of the tumor vasculature, analyzed by the SMC marker expression, α-smooth muscle actin and Desmin, as well as the attachment of pericytes to the endothelium, is not changed upon ablation of Junb. Taken together, these results indicate that the pro-angiogenic functions of stromal JUNB are well compensated with regard to tumor angiogenesis and tumor growth. PMID:24027048

  2. Prediction of free imatinib concentrations based on total plasma concentrations in patients with gastrointestinal stromal tumours

    PubMed Central

    Haouala, Amina; Widmer, Nicolas; Guidi, Monia; Montemurro, Michael; Leyvraz, Serge; Buclin, Thierry; Eap, Chin B; Decosterd, Laurent A; Csajka, Chantal

    2013-01-01

    Aim Total imatinib concentrations are currently measured for the therapeutic drug monitoring of imatinib, whereas only free drug equilibrates with cells for pharmacological action. Due to technical and cost limitations, routine measurement of free concentrations is generally not performed. In this study, free and total imatinib concentrations were measured to establish a model allowing the confident prediction of imatinib free concentrations based on total concentrations and plasma proteins measurements. Methods One hundred and fifty total and free plasma concentrations of imatinib were measured in 49 patients with gastrointestinal stromal tumours. A population pharmacokinetic model was built up to characterize mean total and free concentrations with inter-patient and intrapatient variability, while taking into account α1-acid glycoprotein (AGP) and human serum albumin (HSA) concentrations, in addition to other demographic and environmental covariates. Results A one compartment model with first order absorption was used to characterize total and free imatinib concentrations. Only AGP influenced imatinib total clearance. Imatinib free concentrations were best predicted using a non-linear binding model to AGP, with a dissociation constant Kd of 319 ng ml−1, assuming a 1:1 molar binding ratio. The addition of HSA in the equation did not improve the prediction of imatinib unbound concentrations. Conclusion Although free concentration monitoring is probably more appropriate than total concentrations, it requires an additional ultrafiltration step and sensitive analytical technology, not always available in clinical laboratories. The model proposed might represent a convenient approach to estimate imatinib free concentrations. However, therapeutic ranges for free imatinib concentrations remain to be established before it enters into routine practice. PMID:22891806

  3. Chronic therapy in gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs): the big gap between theory and practice.

    PubMed

    Saponara, Maristella; Pantaleo, Maria Abbondanza; Nannini, Margherita; Biasco, Guido

    2012-12-01

    The advent of imatinib mesilate, an oral target therapy, has dramatically changed the natural history of gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs). This rare neoplasm has become the paradigm of targeted therapies in solid tumours, also introducing a home-based cure concept in oncology. However, it should be retained that oral drug administration entails new and relevant management problems. Multiple studies have demonstrated the efficacy of imatinib in GISTs associated with a good toxicity profile. However, the efficacy of imatinib, according to its mechanism of action and pharmacokinetics, is closely related to daily assumption. No interruption or "jerky" assumption is permitted in order to avoid efficacy loss. Thus, the issue of treatment adherence is crucial for a successful strategy and should not be overlooked. We think that dealing with the problem means assessing a wide spectrum of not only clinical and general but also psychological and individual aspects. Furthermore, both patient and family should play an active role in the "cure process" and physicians should reduce the distance separating them from their patients due to home-based target therapy, promoting communication and consolidation of a trust-based physician-patient relationship. Several advantages have been introduced by oral target therapies in oncology. However, chronic drug administration, even if generally well tolerated, when prolonged for an undetermined time could heavily impact on patients' quality of life. This could induce non-prescribed drug suspension, with negative impact on disease control. More studies would be necessary in order to detect real patients' adherence, to correlate drug assumption with clinical outcome and to optimize imatinib treatment strategy.

  4. Inhibition of tumor-stromal interaction through HGF/Met signaling by valproic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, Yohsuke; Motoki, Takahiro; Kubota, Satoshi; Takigawa, Masaharu; Tsubouchi, Hirohito; Gohda, Eiichi

    2008-02-01

    Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), which is produced by surrounding stromal cells, including fibroblasts and endothelial cells, has been shown to be a significant factor responsible for cancer cell invasion mediated by tumor-stromal interactions. We found in this study that the anti-tumor agent valproic acid (VPA), a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, strongly inhibited tumor-stromal interaction. VPA inhibited HGF production in fibroblasts induced by epidermal growth factor (EGF), platelet-derived growth factor, basic fibroblast growth factor, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and prostaglandin E{sub 2} without any appreciable cytotoxic effect. Other HDAC inhibitors, including butyric acid and trichostatin A (TSA), showed similar inhibitory effects on HGF production stimulated by various inducers. Up-regulations of HGF gene expression induced by PMA and EGF were also suppressed by VPA and TSA. Furthermore, VPA significantly inhibited HGF-induced invasion of HepG2 hepatocellular carcinoma cells. VPA, however, did not affect the increases in phosphorylation of MAPK and Akt in HGF-treated HepG2 cells. These results demonstrated that VPA inhibited two critical processes of tumor-stromal interaction, induction of fibroblastic HGF production and HGF-induced invasion of HepG2 cells, and suggest that those activities serve for other anti-tumor mechanisms of VPA besides causing proliferation arrest, differentiation, and/or apoptosis of tumor cells.

  5. Stromal Activation by Tumor Cells: An in Vitro Study in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Merlino, Giuseppe; Miodini, Patrizia; Paolini, Biagio; Carcangiu, Maria Luisa; Gennaro, Massimiliano; Dugo, Matteo; Daidone, Maria Grazia; Cappelletti, Vera

    2016-01-01

    Background: The tumor microenvironment participates in the regulation of tumor progression and influences treatment sensitivity. In breast cancer, it also may play a role in determining the fate of non-invasive lesions such as ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), a non-obligate precursor of invasive diseases, which is aggressively treated despite its indolent nature in many patients since no biomarkers are available to predict the progression of DCIS to invasive disease. In vitro models of stromal activation by breast tumor cells might provide clues as to specific stromal genes crucial for the transition from DCIS to invasive disease. Methods: normal human dermal fibroblasts (NHDF) were treated under serum-free conditions with cell culture media conditioned by breast cancer cell lines (SkBr3, MDA-MB-468, T47D) for 72 h and subjected to gene expression profiling with Illumina platform. Results: TGM2, coding for a tissue transglutaminase, was identified as candidate gene for stromal activation. In public transcriptomic datasets of invasive breast tumors TGM2 expression proved to provide prognostic information. Conversely, its role as an early biosensor of tumor invasiveness needs to be further investigated by in situ analyses. Conclusion: Stromal TGM2 might probably be associated with precancerous evolution at earlier stages compared to DCIS. PMID:27600076

  6. Stromal Activation by Tumor Cells: An in Vitro Study in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Merlino, Giuseppe; Miodini, Patrizia; Paolini, Biagio; Carcangiu, Maria Luisa; Gennaro, Massimiliano; Dugo, Matteo; Daidone, Maria Grazia; Cappelletti, Vera

    2016-01-01

    Background: The tumor microenvironment participates in the regulation of tumor progression and influences treatment sensitivity. In breast cancer, it also may play a role in determining the fate of non-invasive lesions such as ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), a non-obligate precursor of invasive diseases, which is aggressively treated despite its indolent nature in many patients since no biomarkers are available to predict the progression of DCIS to invasive disease. In vitro models of stromal activation by breast tumor cells might provide clues as to specific stromal genes crucial for the transition from DCIS to invasive disease. Methods: normal human dermal fibroblasts (NHDF) were treated under serum-free conditions with cell culture media conditioned by breast cancer cell lines (SkBr3, MDA-MB-468, T47D) for 72 h and subjected to gene expression profiling with Illumina platform. Results: TGM2, coding for a tissue transglutaminase, was identified as candidate gene for stromal activation. In public transcriptomic datasets of invasive breast tumors TGM2 expression proved to provide prognostic information. Conversely, its role as an early biosensor of tumor invasiveness needs to be further investigated by in situ analyses. Conclusion: Stromal TGM2 might probably be associated with precancerous evolution at earlier stages compared to DCIS.

  7. The role of targeted therapy for gastrointestinal tumors.

    PubMed

    Rolfo, Christian; Bronte, Giuseppe; Sortino, Giovanni; Papadimitriou, Konstantinos; Passiglia, Francesco; Fiorentino, Eugenio; Marogy, Ghada; Russo, Antonio; Peeters, Marc

    2014-11-01

    Many targeted drugs have been studied to target the molecular pathways involved in the development of gastrointestinal cancers. Anti-VEGF, anti-EGFR agents, and recently also multi-kinase inhibitor regorafenib, have already been available for the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer patients. To date, Her-2 positive, gastric cancer patients, are also treated with trastuzumab, while the multi-targeted inhibitor, sorafenib, represents the standard treatment for hepatocellular carcinoma patients. Finally, sunitinib and everolimus, have been approved for the treatment of the neuroendocrine gastroenteropancreatic tumors. Actually a great number of further drugs are under preclinical and clinical development. The aim of this review is to provide a comprehensive overview of the state of art, focusing on the new emerging strategies in the personalized treatment of gastrointestinal tumors.

  8. Reliability of nutritional assessment in patients with gastrointestinal tumors.

    PubMed

    Poziomyck, Aline Kirjner; Fruchtenicht, Ana Valeria Gonçalves; Kabke, Georgia Brum; Volkweis, Bernardo Silveira; Antoniazzi, Jorge Luiz; Moreira, Luis Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Patients with gastrointestinal cancer and malnutrition are less likely to tolerate major surgical procedures, radiotherapy or chemotherapy. In general, they display a higher incidence of complications such as infection, dehiscence and sepsis, which increases the length of stay and risk of death, and reduces quality of life. The aim of this review is to discuss the pros and cons of different points of view to assess nutritional risk in patients with gastrointestinal tract (GIT) tumors and their viability, considering the current understanding and screening approaches in the field. A better combination of anthropometric, laboratory and subjective evaluations is needed in patients with GIT cancer, since malnutrition in these patients is usually much more severe than in those patients with tumors at sites other than the GIT. RESUMO Pacientes com neoplasia gastrointestinal e desnutridos são menos propensos a tolerar procedimentos cirúrgicos de grande porte, radioterapia ou quimioterapia. Em geral, apresentam maior incidência de complicações, como infecção, deiscência e sepse, o que aumenta o tempo de internação e o risco de morte, e reduz a qualidade de vida. O objetivo desta revisão é abordar os prós e contras de diferentes pontos de vista que avaliam risco nutricional em pacientes com tumores do Trato Gastrointestinal (TGI) e sua viabilidade, considerando o atual entendimento e abordagens de triagem neste campo. Melhor combinação de avaliações antropométricas, laboratoriais e subjetivas se faz necessária em pacientes com câncer do TGI, uma vez que a desnutrição nestes pacientes costuma ser muito mais grave do que naqueles indivíduos com tumores em outros sítios que não o TGI. PMID:27556544

  9. Paclitaxel and Carboplatin or Bleomycin Sulfate, Etoposide Phosphate, and Cisplatin in Treating Patients With Advanced or Recurrent Sex Cord-Ovarian Stromal Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-16

    Ovarian Granulosa Cell Tumor; Ovarian Gynandroblastoma; Ovarian Sertoli-Leydig Cell Tumor; Ovarian Sex Cord Tumor With Annular Tubules; Ovarian Sex Cord-Stromal Tumor; Ovarian Sex Cord-Stromal Tumor of Mixed or Unclassified Cell Types; Ovarian Steroid Cell Tumor

  10. Nuclear Localization of β-Catenin in Sertoli Cell Tumors and Other Sex Cord-Stromal Tumors of the Testis: An Immunohistochemical Study of 87 Cases.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chen; Ulbright, Thomas M

    2015-10-01

    The diagnosis and subclassification of Sertoli cell tumors (SCT) of the testis are often challenging to general surgical pathologists because of the rarity of the tumors. Immunohistochemical study to date has limited diagnostic value. Nuclear localization of β-catenin, which correlated closely with CTNNB1 gene mutation, was recently reported in SCTs. We investigated the utility of β-catenin nuclear localization in diagnosing SCTs and differentiating them from other testicular sex cord-stromal tumors. Immunohistochemical staining for β-catenin was evaluated in 87 cases of testicular sex cord-stromal tumor: 33 SCTs, not otherwise specified (SCT-NOS) (15 with benign and 18 with malignant features), 10 sclerosing SCTs (SSCT), 5 large cell calcifying SCTs (LCCSCT), 6 Sertoli-stromal cell tumors, 10 Leydig cell tumors, 7 juvenile granulosa cell tumors, 4 adult granulosa cell tumors, and 12 sex cord-stromal tumors, unclassified. Twenty-one of 33 (64%) SCT-NOS, 6 of 10 (60%) SSCTs, and 4 of 6 (67%) Sertoli-stromal cell tumors showed strong, diffuse β-catenin nuclear staining. Nuclear β-catenin positivity was more frequent in SCTs-NOS with benign features than in those with malignant features (93% and 39%, respectively, P=0.13) and, in the Sertoli-stromal cell tumors, occurred only in the Sertoli component. All 5 LCCSCTs and all other types of sex cord-stromal tumor were negative for β-catenin nuclear staining. In conclusion, SCT-NOS and SSCT frequently show β-catenin nuclear localization. Positive nuclear staining of β-catenin is specific for SCT-NOS, SSCT, and Sertoli-stromal cell tumor among testicular sex cord-stromal tumors but has limited sensitivity (63%) in this group. The similar reactivity of SCT-NOS and SSCT provides additional support that these 2 variants are not distinct entities.

  11. Heterotopic gastrointestinal mucosa and pancreatic tissue in a retroperitoneal tumor.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Naoki; Hakamada, Kenichi; Narumi, Shunji; Totsuka, Eishi; Aoki, Kazunori; Kamata, Yoshimasa; Sasaki, Mutsuo

    2006-01-01

    We believe that this is the first report of a retroperitoneal tumor consisting of heterotopic gastrointestinal mucosa and pancreatic tissue. The patient was a 19-year-old woman with the chief complaint being occasional back pain. Abdominal computerized tomography demonstrated a 3.1 x 2.5 x 3.2-cm low-density solid and cystic lesion adjoining the left renal vein between the aorta and inferior vena cava. Angiography revealed that the inferior vena cava was displaced by the hypovascular tumor. The retroperitoneal lesion was diagnosed preoperatively as a benign tumor such as a neurogenic neoplasm or lymphangioma. At laparotomy, a cystic tumor was found, which existed behind the inferior vena cava and renal vessels, and contained reddish-brown fluid, suggesting hemorrhage in the past. The cut surface of the tumor showed a unilocular cyst with partially hypertrophic wall. Histopathological examination revealed a cystic tumor lined with heterotopic gastric and duodenal mucosa, with pancreatic tissue in the muscularis propria. In addition, evidence of bleeding from the gastric mucosa was observed in the cystic tumor. External secretion from these tissues could have triggered the hemorrhage and expanded the tumor, possibly resulting in the back pain.

  12. p53 status in stromal fibroblasts modulates tumor growth in an SDF1-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Addadi, Yoseph; Moskovits, Neta; Granot, Dorit; Lozano, Guillermina; Carmi, Yaron; Apte, Ron N.; Neeman, Michal; Oren, Moshe

    2010-01-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor exerts a variety of cell-autonomous effects that are aimed to thwart tumor development. In addition, however, there is growing evidence for cell non-autonomous tumor suppressor effects of p53. In the present study, we investigated the impact of stromal p53 on tumor growth. Specifically, we found that ablation of p53 in fibroblasts enabled them to promote more efficiently the growth of tumors initiated by PC3 prostate cancer-derived cells. This stimulatory effect was dependent on the increased expression of the chemokine SDF-1 in the p53-deficient fibroblasts. Notably, fibroblasts harboring mutant p53 protein were more effective than p53-null fibroblasts in promoting tumor growth. The presence of either p53-null or p53-mutant fibroblasts led also to a markedly elevated rate of metastatic spread of the PC3 tumors. These findings implicate p53 in a cell non-autonomous tumor suppressor role within stromal fibroblasts, through suppressing the production of tumor-stimulatory factors by these cells. Moreover, expression of mutant p53 by tumor stroma fibroblasts might exert a gain of function effect, further accelerating tumor development. PMID:20952507

  13. Prostatic Stromal Tumor of Uncertain Malignant Potential Which Was Difficult to Diagnose

    PubMed Central

    Matsuyama, Satoko; Nohara, Takahiro; Kawaguchi, Shohei; Seto, Chikashi; Nakanishi, Yuko; Uchiyama, Akio; Ishizawa, Shin

    2015-01-01

    Here, we report a case of stromal tumor of uncertain malignant potential (STUMP) that was difficult to diagnose. A 53-year-old male was found to have a hard nodule on digital rectal examination; magnetic resonance imaging revealed a large nodule on the left side of the prostate, indicating prostate cancer. However, pathological diagnosis of the biopsy specimen was benign prostatic hyperplasia. Although a papillary tumor in the prostatic urethra was also seen on urethrocystoscopy, the tumor specimen obtained from transurethral resection was not malignant. The tumor in the prostatic urethra recurred only 3 months after transurethral resection, and pathological findings revealed benign hyperplasia not only in the stromal tissue but also in the epithelium; therefore, the prostate tumor was suspected to be STUMP. It took many prostate pathologists a long time to reach the final diagnosis of STUMP. STUMP is a rare benign tumor, difficult to diagnose, and sometimes transforms into stromal sarcoma. Thus, we should consider radical resection in such cases. PMID:26839730

  14. Stromal interactions as regulators of tumor growth and therapeutic response: A potential target for photodynamic therapy?

    PubMed Central

    Celli, Jonathan P.

    2013-01-01

    It has become increasingly widely recognized that the stroma plays several vital roles in tumor growth and development and that tumor-stroma interactions can in many cases account poor therapeutic response. Inspired by an emerging body of literature, we consider the potential role of photodynamic therapy (PDT) for targeting interactions with stromal fibroblasts and mechano-sensitive signaling with the extracellular matrix as a means to drive tumors toward a more therapeutically responsive state and synergize with other treatments. This concept is particularly relevant for cancer of the pancreas, which is characterized by tumors with a profoundly dense, rigid fibrous stroma. Here we introduce new in vitro systems to model interactions between pancreatic tumors and their mechanical microenvironment and restore signaling with stromal fibroblasts. Using one such model as a test bed it is shown here that PDT treatment is able to destroy fibroblasts in an in vitro 3D pancreatic tumor-fibroblast co-culture. These results and the literature suggest the further development of PDT as a potential modality for stromal depletion. PMID:23457416

  15. Pseudoangio-matous stromal hyperplasia: A rare tumor of the breast.

    PubMed

    Shahi, Kedar Singh; Bhandari, Geeta; Gupta, Rakesh Kumar; Sawai, Malvika

    2015-01-01

    Pseudoangiomatous stromal hyperplasia (PASH) is a benign breast entity described first by Vuitch et al., in 1986. PASH is a benign stromal lesion containing complex anastomosing channels lined by slender spindle cells. It can be mistaken with fibroadenoma on ultrasound examination and histologically with low-grade angiosarcoma and phyllodes tumor. Here, presented is a case report of a 30-year-old female who presented with huge palpable lump in left breast. Ultrasonography revealed the lesion as giant fibroadenoma and fine needle aspiration cytology report was suggestive of cystosarcoma phyllodes. Excision and reduction mammoplasty was done and histopathology report was suggestive of PASH. PMID:26881624

  16. A mouse model of luciferase-transfected stromal cells of giant cell tumor of bone.

    PubMed

    Lau, Carol P Y; Wong, Kwok Chuen; Huang, Lin; Li, Gang; Tsui, Stephen K W; Kumta, Shekhar Madhukar

    2015-11-01

    A major barrier towards the study of the effects of drugs on Giant Cell Tumor of Bone (GCT) has been the lack of an animal model. In this study, we created an animal model in which GCT stromal cells survived and functioned as proliferating neoplastic cells. A proliferative cell line of GCT stromal cells was used to create a stable and luciferase-transduced cell line, Luc-G33. The cell line was characterized and was found that there were no significant differences on cell proliferation rate and recruitment of monocytes when compared with the wild type GCT stromal cells. We delivered the Luc-G33 cells either subcutaneously on the back or to the tibiae of the nude mice. The presence of viable Luc-G33 cells was assessed using real-time live imaging by the IVIS 200 bioluminescent imaging (BLI) system. The tumor cells initially propagated and remained viable on site for 7 weeks in the subcutaneous tumor model. We also tested in vivo antitumor effects of Zoledronate (ZOL) and Geranylgeranyl transferase-I inhibitor (GGTI-298) alone or their combinations in Luc-G33-transplanted nude mice. ZOL alone at 400 µg/kg and the co-treatment of ZOL at 400 µg/kg and GGTI-298 at 1.16 mg/kg reduced tumor cell viability in the model. Furthermore, the anti-tumor effects by ZOL, GGTI-298 and the co-treatment in subcutaneous tumor model were also confirmed by immunohistochemical (IHC) staining. In conclusion, we established a nude mice model of GCT stromal cells which allows non-invasive, real-time assessments of tumor development and testing the in vivo effects of different adjuvants for treating GCT.

  17. Gastrointestinal carcinoid tumor and chylous ascites, a rare association with a poor prognosis. A case report.

    PubMed

    Portale, Teresa Rosanna; Mosca, Francesco; Minona, Elisa; Trovato, Maria Antonietta; Gangemi, Pietro; Bordonaro, Roberto; Puleo, Stefano

    2008-01-01

    Gastrointestinal carcinoid is a rare tumor. The association of this tumor with chylous ascites is uncommon. A review of the English-language literature carried out in 2002 identified only 15 cases. We report a case of chylous ascites, gastrointestinal carcinoid tumor and elevated blood levels of CA-125 in a patient who did not respond to chemotherapy.

  18. Solid tumor therapy by selectively targeting stromal endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shihui; Liu, Jie; Ma, Qian; Cao, Liu; Fattah, Rasem J; Yu, Zuxi; Bugge, Thomas H; Finkel, Toren; Leppla, Stephen H

    2016-07-12

    Engineered tumor-targeted anthrax lethal toxin proteins have been shown to strongly suppress growth of solid tumors in mice. These toxins work through the native toxin receptors tumor endothelium marker-8 and capillary morphogenesis protein-2 (CMG2), which, in other contexts, have been described as markers of tumor endothelium. We found that neither receptor is required for tumor growth. We further demonstrate that tumor cells, which are resistant to the toxin when grown in vitro, become highly sensitive when implanted in mice. Using a range of tissue-specific loss-of-function and gain-of-function genetic models, we determined that this in vivo toxin sensitivity requires CMG2 expression on host-derived tumor endothelial cells. Notably, engineered toxins were shown to suppress the proliferation of isolated tumor endothelial cells. Finally, we demonstrate that administering an immunosuppressive regimen allows animals to receive multiple toxin dosages and thereby produces a strong and durable antitumor effect. The ability to give repeated doses of toxins, coupled with the specific targeting of tumor endothelial cells, suggests that our strategy should be efficacious for a wide range of solid tumors. PMID:27357689

  19. T cells stimulate catabolic gene expression by the stromal cells from giant cell tumor of bone

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, Robert W.; Ghert, Michelle; Singh, Gurmit

    2012-03-23

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Two T cell lines stimulate PTHrP, RANKL, MMP13 gene expression in GCT cell cultures. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CD40 expressed by stromal cells; CD40L detected in whole tumor but not cultures. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Effect of CD40L treatment on GCT cells increased PTHrP and MMP13 gene expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PTHrP treatment increased MMP13 expression, while inhibition decreased expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer T cells may stimulate GCT stromal cells and promote the osteolysis of the tumor. -- Abstract: The factors that promote the localized bone resorption by giant cell tumor of bone (GCT) are not fully understood. We investigated whether T cells could contribute to bone resorption by stimulating expression of genes for parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP), matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-13, and the receptor activator of nuclear-factor {kappa}B ligand (RANKL). Two cell lines, Jurkat clone E6-1 and D1.1, were co-cultured with isolated GCT stromal cells. Real-time PCR analyses demonstrated a significant increase of all three genes following 48 h incubation, and PTHrP and MMP-13 gene expression was also increased at 24 h. Further, we examined the expression of CD40 ligand (CD40L), a protein expressed by activated T cells, and its receptor, CD40, in GCT. Immunohistochemistry results revealed expression of the CD40 receptor in both the stromal cells and giant cells of the tumor. RNA collected from whole GCT tissues showed expression of CD40LG, which was absent in cultured stromal cells, and suggests that CD40L is expressed within GCT. Stimulation of GCT stromal cells with CD40L significantly increased expression of the PTHrP and MMP-13 genes. Moreover, we show that inhibition of PTHrP with neutralizing antibodies significantly decreased MMP13 expression by the stromal cells compared to IgG-matched controls, whereas stimulation with PTHrP (1-34) increased MMP-13 gene expression. These

  20. Stromal cells and integrins: conforming to the needs of the tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Alphonso, Aimee; Alahari, Suresh K

    2009-12-01

    The microenvironment of a tumor is constituted of a heterogenous population of stromal cells, extracellular matrix components, and secreted factors, all of which make the tumor microenvironment distinct from that of normal tissue. Unlike healthy cells, tumor cells require these unique surroundings to metastasize, spread, and form a secondary tumor at a distant site. In this review, we discuss that stromal cells such as fibroblasts and immune cells including macrophages, their secreted factors, such as vascular endothelial growth factor, transforming growth factor beta, and various chemokines, and the integrins that connect the various cell types play a particularly vital role in the survival of a growing tumor mass. Macrophages and fibroblasts are uniquely plastic cells because they are not only able to switch from tumor suppressing to tumor supporting phenotypes but also able to adopt various tumor-supporting functions based on their location within the microenvironment. Integrins serve as the backbone for all of these prometastatic operations because their function as cell-cell and cell-matrix signal transducers are important for the heterogenous components of the microenvironment to communicate.

  1. Endogenous and exogenous fluorescence of gastrointestinal tumors: initial clinical observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisova, Ekaterina; Plamenova, Lilia; Keremedchiev, Momchil; Vladimirov, Borislav; Avramov, Latchezar

    2013-03-01

    The limitations of standard endoscopy for detection and evaluation of cancerous changes in gastrointestinal tract (GIT) are significant challenge and initiate development of new diagnostic modalities. Therefore many spectral and optical techniques are applied recently into the clinical practice for obtaining qualitatively and quantitatively new data from gastrointestinal neoplasia with different level of clinical applicability and diagnostic success. One of the most promising approaches is fluorescence detection using naturally existing fluorescent molecules or added fluorescent markers. Deltaaminolevulinic acid / protoporphyrin IX is applied for exogenous fluorescent tumor detection in the upper part of gastrointestinal tract. The 5-ALA is administered per os six hours before measurements at dose 20mg/kg weight. Highpower light-emitting diode at 405 nm is used as a source and the excitation light is passed through the light-guide of standard video-endoscopic system to obtain 2-D visualization. Both kinds of spectra - autofluorescence signals and protoporphyrin IX signal are recorded and stored using a fiber-optic microspectrometer, as in endoscopy instrumental channel a fiber is applied to return information about fluorescence signals. In such way 1-D detection and 2-D visualization of the lesions' fluorescence are received. The results from in vivo detection show significant differentiation between normal and abnormal tissues in 1-D spectroscopic regime, but only moderate discrimination in 2-D imaging.

  2. Using polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography to identify tumor stromal fibrosis and increase tumor biopsy yield (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hariri, Lida P.; Adams, David C.; Miller, Alyssa J.; Mino-Kenudson, Mari; Suter, Melissa J.

    2016-03-01

    Tissue biopsy is the principal method used to diagnose tumors in a variety of organ systems. It is essential to maximize tumor yield in biopsy specimens for both clinical diagnostic and research purposes. This is particularly important in tumors where additional tissue is needed for molecular analysis to identify patients who would benefit from mutation-specific targeted therapy, such as in lung carcinomas. Inadvertent sampling of fibrotic stroma within tumor nodules contaminates biopsies, decreases tumor yield, and can impede diagnosis. The ability to assess tumor composition and guide biopsy site selection in real time is likely to improve diagnostic yield. Polarization sensitive OCT (PS-OCT) measures birefringence in organized tissues, such as collagen, and could be used to distinguish tumor from fibrosis. In this study, PS-OCT was obtained in 65 lung nodule samples from surgical resection specimens containing varying ratios of tumor and fibrosis. PS-OCT was obtained with either a custom-built helical scanning catheter (0.8 or 1.6mm in diameter) or a dual-axis bench top scanner. Strong birefringence was observed in nodules containing dense fibrosis, with no birefringence in adjacent regions of tumor. Tumors admixed with early, loosely-organized collagen demonstrated mild-to-moderate birefringence, and tumors with little collagen content showed little to no birefringent signal. PS-OCT provides significant insights into tumor nodule composition, and has potential to differentiate tumor from stromal fibrosis during biopsy site selection to increase diagnostic tumor yield.

  3. Fibroblast Activation Protein Expression by Stromal Cells and Tumor-Associated Macrophages in Human Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Julia, Tchou; Zhang Paul, J; Yingtao, Bi; Celine, Satija; Rajrupa, Marjumdar; Stephen, TL; Lo, A; Haiying, Chen; Carolyn, Mies; June, Carl H; Jose, Conejo-Garcia; Ellen, Puré

    2013-01-01

    Summary Fibroblast activation protein (FAP) has long been known to be expressed in the stroma of breast cancer. However, very little is known if the magnitude of FAP expression within the stroma may have prognostic value and reflect the heterogeneous biology of the tumor cell. An earlier study had suggested that stromal FAP expression in breast cancer was inversely proportional to prognosis. We, therefore, hypothesized that stromal FAP expression may correlate with clinicopathologic variables and may serve as an adjunct prognostic factor in breast cancer. We evaluated the expression of FAP in a panel of breast cancer tissues (n=52) using a combination of immunostain analyses at the tissue and single cell level using freshly frozen or freshly digested human breast tumor samples respectively. Our results showed that FAP expression was abundantly expressed in the stroma across all breast cancer subtypes without significant correlation with clinicopathologic factors. We further identified a subset of FAP positive or FAP+ stromal cells that also expressed CD45, a pan-leukocyte marker. Using freshly dissociated human breast tumor specimens (n=5), we demonstrated that some of these FAP+ CD45+ cells were CD11b+CD14+MHC-II+ indicating that they were likely tumor associated macrophages (TAMs). Although FAP+CD45+ cells have been demonstrated in the mouse tumor stroma, our results demonstrating that human breast TAMs expressed FAP was novel and suggested that existing and future FAP directed therapy may have dual therapeutic benefits targeting both stromal mesenchymal cells and immune cells such as TAMs. More work is needed to explore the role of FAP as a potential targetable molecule in breast cancer treatment. PMID:24074532

  4. Pharmacoepigenetics in gastrointestinal tumors: MGMT methylation and beyond.

    PubMed

    Fornaro, Lorenzo; Vivaldi, Caterina; Caparello, Chiara; Musettini, Gianna; Baldini, Editta; Masi, Gianluca; Falcone, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms are involved in gastrointestinal (GI) cancer pathogenesis. Insights into the molecular basis of GI carcinogenesis led to the identification of different epigenetic pathways and signatures that may play a role as therapeutic targets in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) and non-colorectal GI tumors. Among these alterations, O6-methylguanine DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) gene promoter methylation is the most investigated biomarker and seems to be an early and frequent event, at least in CRC. Loss of expression of MGMT as a result of gene promoter methylation has been associated with interesting activity of alkylating agents in mCRC. However, the optimal methods for the definition of the MGMT status and additional predictive factors beyond MGMT in GI malignancies are lacking. Here we review the current role of MGMT methylation and other epigenetic alterations as potential treatment targets in GI tumors. PMID:26709653

  5. A systematic review: perivascular epithelioid cell tumor of gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zehong; Han, Siqi; Wu, Jialin; Xiong, Minmin; Huang, Yanqiao; Chen, Jianhui; Yuan, Yujie; Peng, Jianjun; Song, Wu

    2016-07-01

    Perivascular epithelioid cell tumor (PEComa) is a rare entity with distinctive morphology and of expressing myomelanocytic markers. Gastrointestinal tract (GI) is one of the most common anatomic sites of origin and counts for 20% to 25% of all reported cases of perivascular epithelioid cell tumors not otherwise specified (PEComas-NOS). However, the biologic behavior of perivascular epithelioid cell tumors of gastrointestinal tract (GI PEComas-NOS) is still unclear. The aim of conducting this systematic review is to sum up what is known so far of the epidemiology, natural history, management and prognosis of GI PEComas-NOS.A systematic research was performed on PubMed and EMBASE using the following terms: ("perivascular epithelioid cell tumor" or "PEComa") and ("gastrointestinal tract" or "GI" or "oral " or "mouth" or "esophagus" or "gullet" or "gastric" or "stomach" or "duodenum" or "jejunum" or "ileum" or "cecum" or "colon" or "colorectal" or "sigmoid" or "rectum" or "anus" or "mesentery") up to December 1, 2015. Retrieved GI PEComas-NOS publications, which included these terms, contains case reports, case series to case characteristic researches.A total of 168 articles were reviewed, 41 GI PEComa-NOS English studies among which were retrieved for analysis. We reviewed epidemiology, natural history, management and prognosis of GI PEComa-NOS. Generally GI PEComa-NOS is believed to have women predomination. The most frequently involved location is colon with non-specific clinical signs. Pathologically, GI PEComas-NOS shows epithelioid predominance (70%), meanwhile coexpresses melanocytic and muscle markers characteristically, while immunohistochemistry is a useful tool for identify, which indicates that HMB-45 is regarded as the most sensitive reagent. Complete resection served as mainstay of treatment, while chemotherapy should be unanimously considered to apply in malignant cases. Eventually, it is necessary for closed and long-term follow-up with endoscope and

  6. A systematic review: perivascular epithelioid cell tumor of gastrointestinal tract

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zehong; Han, Siqi; Wu, Jialin; Xiong, Minmin; Huang, Yanqiao; Chen, Jianhui; Yuan, Yujie; Peng, Jianjun; Song, Wu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Perivascular epithelioid cell tumor (PEComa) is a rare entity with distinctive morphology and of expressing myomelanocytic markers. Gastrointestinal tract (GI) is one of the most common anatomic sites of origin and counts for 20% to 25% of all reported cases of perivascular epithelioid cell tumors not otherwise specified (PEComas-NOS). However, the biologic behavior of perivascular epithelioid cell tumors of gastrointestinal tract (GI PEComas-NOS) is still unclear. The aim of conducting this systematic review is to sum up what is known so far of the epidemiology, natural history, management and prognosis of GI PEComas-NOS. A systematic research was performed on PubMed and EMBASE using the following terms: (“perivascular epithelioid cell tumor” or “PEComa”) and (“gastrointestinal tract” or “GI” or “oral ” or “mouth” or “esophagus” or “gullet” or “gastric” or “stomach” or “duodenum” or “jejunum” or “ileum” or “cecum” or “colon” or “colorectal” or “sigmoid” or “rectum” or “anus” or “mesentery”) up to December 1, 2015. Retrieved GI PEComas-NOS publications, which included these terms, contains case reports, case series to case characteristic researches. A total of 168 articles were reviewed, 41 GI PEComa-NOS English studies among which were retrieved for analysis. We reviewed epidemiology, natural history, management and prognosis of GI PEComa-NOS. Generally GI PEComa-NOS is believed to have women predomination. The most frequently involved location is colon with non-specific clinical signs. Pathologically, GI PEComas-NOS shows epithelioid predominance (70%), meanwhile coexpresses melanocytic and muscle markers characteristically, while immunohistochemistry is a useful tool for identify, which indicates that HMB-45 is regarded as the most sensitive reagent. Complete resection served as mainstay of treatment, while chemotherapy should be unanimously considered to apply in malignant

  7. Distinct effects of SIRT1 in cancer and stromal cells on tumor promotion.

    PubMed

    Shin, Dong Hoon; Choi, Yong-Joon; Jin, Peng; Yoon, Haejin; Chun, Yang-Sook; Shin, Hyun-Woo; Kim, Ja-Eun; Park, Jong-Wan

    2016-04-26

    The lysyl deacetylase SIRT1 acts as a metabolic sensor in adjusting metabolic imbalance. To explore the role of SIRT1 in tumor-stroma interplay, we designed an in vivo tumor model using SIRT1-transgenic mice. B16F10 mouse melanoma grew more quickly in SIRT1-transgenic mice than in wild-type mice, whereas SIRT1-overexpressing one grew slowly in both mice. Of human tumors, SIRT1 expression in stromal fibroblasts was found to correlate with poor prognosis in ovarian cancer. B16F10 and human ovarian cancer (SKOV3 and SNU840) cells were more proliferative in co-culture with SIRT1-overexpressiong fibroblasts. In contrast, SIRT1 within cancer cells has a negative effect on cell proliferation. In conditioned media from SIRT1-overexpressing fibroblasts, matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP3) was identified in cytokine arrays to be secreted from fibroblasts SIRT1-dependently. Fibroblast-derived MMP3 stimulated cancer cell proliferation, and such a role of MMP3 was also demonstrated in cancer/fibroblast co-grafts. In conclusion, SIRT1 plays differential roles in cancer and stromal cells. SIRT1 in stromal cells promotes cancer growth by producing MMP3, whereas SIRT1 in cancer cells inhibits growth via an intracellular event. The present study provides a basis for setting new anticancer strategies targeting SIRT1. PMID:26992208

  8. Distinct effects of SIRT1 in cancer and stromal cells on tumor promotion

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Dong Hoon; Choi, Yong-Joon; Jin, Peng; Yoon, Haejin; Chun, Yang-Sook; Shin, Hyun-Woo; Kim, Ja-Eun; Park, Jong-Wan

    2016-01-01

    The lysyl deacetylase SIRT1 acts as a metabolic sensor in adjusting metabolic imbalance. To explore the role of SIRT1 in tumor-stroma interplay, we designed an in vivo tumor model using SIRT1-transgenic mice. B16F10 mouse melanoma grew more quickly in SIRT1-transgenic mice than in wild-type mice, whereas SIRT1-overexpressing one grew slowly in both mice. Of human tumors, SIRT1 expression in stromal fibroblasts was found to correlate with poor prognosis in ovarian cancer. B16F10 and human ovarian cancer (SKOV3 and SNU840) cells were more proliferative in co-culture with SIRT1-overexpressiong fibroblasts. In contrast, SIRT1 within cancer cells has a negative effect on cell proliferation. In conditioned media from SIRT1-overexpressing fibroblasts, matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP3) was identified in cytokine arrays to be secreted from fibroblasts SIRT1-dependently. Fibroblast-derived MMP3 stimulated cancer cell proliferation, and such a role of MMP3 was also demonstrated in cancer/fibroblast co-grafts. In conclusion, SIRT1 plays differential roles in cancer and stromal cells. SIRT1 in stromal cells promotes cancer growth by producing MMP3, whereas SIRT1 in cancer cells inhibits growth via an intracellular event. The present study provides a basis for setting new anticancer strategies targeting SIRT1. PMID:26992208

  9. Ezrin expression in stromal cells of capillary hemangioblastoma. An immunohistochemical survey of brain tumors.

    PubMed Central

    Böhling, T.; Turunen, O.; Jääskeläinen, J.; Carpen, O.; Sainio, M.; Wahlström, T.; Vaheri, A.; Haltia, M.

    1996-01-01

    Ezrin is a cytoskeleton-associated protein that appears to link actin filaments to the plasma membrane. Immunocytochemical studies suggest that ezrin is expressed in epithelial cells but not in mesenchymal cells. In addition, ezrin is expressed by certain epithelial tumors, such as renal cell adenocarcinomas. Ezrin serves as a tyrosine kinase substrate, and is phosphorylated in epidermal growth factor-stimulated cells. Ezrin may thus mediate regulatory signals in different cell functions. We studied the distribution of ezrin in 104 cases of primary tumors of the central nervous system (CNS) by immunocytochemistry. Special interest was focused on capillary hemangioblastoma, owing to its resemblance to renal cell adenocarcinoma, and on malignant gliomas, owing to their frequent epidermal growth factor receptor amplification. The stromal cells of hemangioblastomas were found to be strongly positive for ezrin. No expression was detected in gliomas and, except for hemangioblastomas, ezrin expression was restricted to those few CNS tumors that show epithelial differentiation, ie, choroid plexus papillomas, craniopharyngiomas, ependymomas, and cysts. The diffuse cytoplasmic expression of ezrin in the stromal cells of capillary hemangioblastoma may indicate that stromal cells overexpress ezrin or express ezrin with deficient binding properties. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:8579099

  10. Lactate is a mediator of metabolic cooperation between stromal carcinoma associated fibroblasts and glycolytic tumor cells in the tumor microenvironment

    SciTech Connect

    Rattigan, Yanique I.; Patel, Brijesh B.; Ackerstaff, Ellen; Sukenick, George; Koutcher, Jason A.; Glod, John W.; and others

    2012-02-15

    Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) are bone marrow-derived stromal cells, which play a role in tumor progression. We have shown earlier that breast cancer cells secrete higher levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6) under hypoxia, leading to the recruitment of hMSCs towards hypoxic tumor cells. We found that (i) MDA-MB-231 cells secrete significantly higher levels of lactate (3-fold more) under hypoxia (1% O{sub 2}) than under 20% O{sub 2} and (ii) lactate recruits hMSCs towards tumor cells by activating signaling pathways to enhance migration. The mRNA and protein expression of functional MCT1 in hMSCs is increased in response to lactate exposure. Thus, we hypothesized that hMSCs and stromal carcinoma associated fibroblasts (CAFs) in the tumor microenvironment have the capacity to take up lactate expelled from tumor cells and use it as a source of energy. Our {sup 13}C NMR spectroscopic measurements indicate that {sup 13}C-lactate is converted to {sup 13}C-alpha ketoglutarate in hMSCs and CAFs supporting this hypothesis. To our knowledge this is the first in vitro model system demonstrating that hMSCs and CAFs can utilize lactate produced by tumor cells.

  11. Peritoneal seeding following incomplete resection of mixed epithelial stromal tumor of the kidney: First case report

    PubMed Central

    Farias, Judy A.; Laryea, Jonathan; Gokden, Neriman; Kamel, Mohamed H.

    2016-01-01

    Mixed epithelial stromal tumor (MEST) is rare and typically benign renal cystic neoplasm that cannot be clinically distinguished from cystic renal cell carcinoma. Its mainstay course of diagnosis and treatment remains surgical excision. Recurrence and malignant transformation is rare but has previously been described. To our best knowledge, we present the first case of peritoneal seeding resulting in a paracolonic MEST following incomplete resection in a patient with benign MEST. This signifies a new pathological behavior for MEST, predominantly, a benign kidney tumor. In addition, documentation with more cases of MEST is needed to further understand its pathogenesis, clinical behavior, malignant potential, and optimal management. PMID:26834418

  12. Regulators of Actin Dynamics in Gastrointestinal Tract Tumors.

    PubMed

    Steinestel, Konrad; Wardelmann, Eva; Hartmann, Wolfgang; Grünewald, Inga

    2015-01-01

    Reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton underlies cell migration in a wide variety of physiological and pathological processes, such as embryonic development, wound healing, and tumor cell invasion. It has been shown that actin assembly and disassembly are precisely regulated by intracellular signaling cascades that respond to changes in the cell microenvironment, ligand binding to surface receptors, or oncogenic transformation of the cell. Actin-nucleating and actin-depolymerizing (ANFs/ADFs) and nucleation-promoting factors (NPFs) regulate cytoskeletal dynamics at the leading edge of migrating cells, thereby modulating cell shape; these proteins facilitate cellular movement and mediate degradation of the surrounding extracellular matrix by secretion of lytic proteases, thus eliminating barriers for tumor cell invasion. Accordingly, expression and activity of these actin-binding proteins have been linked to enhanced metastasis and poor prognosis in a variety of malignancies. In this review, we will summarize what is known about expression patterns and the functional role of actin regulators in gastrointestinal tumors and evaluate first pharmacological approaches to prevent invasion and metastatic dissemination of malignant cells. PMID:26345720

  13. Regulators of Actin Dynamics in Gastrointestinal Tract Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Steinestel, Konrad; Wardelmann, Eva; Hartmann, Wolfgang; Grünewald, Inga

    2015-01-01

    Reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton underlies cell migration in a wide variety of physiological and pathological processes, such as embryonic development, wound healing, and tumor cell invasion. It has been shown that actin assembly and disassembly are precisely regulated by intracellular signaling cascades that respond to changes in the cell microenvironment, ligand binding to surface receptors, or oncogenic transformation of the cell. Actin-nucleating and actin-depolymerizing (ANFs/ADFs) and nucleation-promoting factors (NPFs) regulate cytoskeletal dynamics at the leading edge of migrating cells, thereby modulating cell shape; these proteins facilitate cellular movement and mediate degradation of the surrounding extracellular matrix by secretion of lytic proteases, thus eliminating barriers for tumor cell invasion. Accordingly, expression and activity of these actin-binding proteins have been linked to enhanced metastasis and poor prognosis in a variety of malignancies. In this review, we will summarize what is known about expression patterns and the functional role of actin regulators in gastrointestinal tumors and evaluate first pharmacological approaches to prevent invasion and metastatic dissemination of malignant cells. PMID:26345720

  14. [Medicinal prevention of gastrointestinal tumors: aspirin, Helicobacter and more?].

    PubMed

    Becker, J C; Domschke, W; Pohle, T

    2006-12-01

    Despite the huge number of drugs on the market and recent advances in pharmacotherapy, only a few substances are available for the prevention of gastrointestinal tumors--most of which are not approved for this indication or not validated in appropriately designed randomized trials. General recommendations include lifestyle modifications such as avoidance of smoking, only moderate consumption of alcohol, regular physical exercise and a nutrition rich in fresh fruits and vegetables with limited meat. A global eradication therapy for Helicobacter pylori would be desirable to prevent gastric carcinoma, but this does not seem feasible from the socio-economic point of view. Therefore, at least patients at high risk should be screened and this pathogen eradicated, preferentially in their youth. Hepatitis B vaccination of newborns to prevent the development of hepatocellular carcinoma has already been established in Germany; a specific antiviral therapy should be offered to all patients with hepatitis B or C infections, taking into consideration the risks associated with this treatment. The use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) to prevent gastrointestinal malignancies cannot generally be recommended and should be restricted to patients at high risk and to clinical studies. However, the appropriate substance, dose and duration of NSAID therapy are still being debated. PMID:17075707

  15. Tumor and Stromal-Based Contributions to Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Markwell, Steven M.; Weed, Scott A.

    2015-01-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is typically diagnosed at advanced stages with evident loco-regional and/or distal metastases. The prevalence of metastatic lesions directly correlates with poor patient outcome, resulting in high patient mortality rates following metastatic development. The progression to metastatic disease requires changes not only in the carcinoma cells, but also in the surrounding stromal cells and tumor microenvironment. Within the microenvironment, acellular contributions from the surrounding extracellular matrix, along with contributions from various infiltrating immune cells, tumor associated fibroblasts, and endothelial cells facilitate the spread of tumor cells from the primary site to the rest of the body. Thus far, most attempts to limit metastatic spread through therapeutic intervention have failed to show patient benefit in clinic trails. The goal of this review is highlight the complexity of invasion-promoting interactions in the HNSCC tumor microenvironment, focusing on contributions from tumor and stromal cells in order to assist future therapeutic development and patient treatment. PMID:25734659

  16. The Roles of Mesenchymal Stromal/Stem Cells in Tumor Microenvironment Associated with Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Trivanović, Drenka; Krstić, Jelena; Djordjević, Ivana Okić; Mojsilović, Slavko; Santibanez, Juan Francisco; Bugarski, Diana; Jauković, Aleksandra

    2016-01-01

    State of tumor microenvironment (TME) is closely linked to regulation of tumor growth and progression affecting the final outcome, refractoriness, and relapse of disease. Interactions of tumor, immune, and mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSCs) have been recognized as crucial for understanding tumorigenesis. Due to their outstanding features, stem cell-like properties, capacity to regulate immune response, and dynamic functional phenotype dependent on microenvironmental stimuli, MSCs have been perceived as important players in TME. Signals provided by tumor-associated chronic inflammation educate MSCs to alter their phenotype and immunomodulatory potential in favor of tumor-biased state of MSCs. Adjustment of phenotype to TME and acquisition of tumor-promoting ability by MSCs help tumor cells in maintenance of permissive TME and suppression of antitumor immune response. Potential utilization of MSCs in treatment of tumor is based on their inherent ability to home tumor tissue that makes them suitable delivery vehicles for immune-stimulating factors and vectors for targeted antitumor therapy. Here, we review data regarding intrusive effects of inflammatory TME on MSCs capacity to affect tumor development through modification of their phenotype and interactions with immune system. PMID:27630452

  17. The Roles of Mesenchymal Stromal/Stem Cells in Tumor Microenvironment Associated with Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Krstić, Jelena; Djordjević, Ivana Okić; Jauković, Aleksandra

    2016-01-01

    State of tumor microenvironment (TME) is closely linked to regulation of tumor growth and progression affecting the final outcome, refractoriness, and relapse of disease. Interactions of tumor, immune, and mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSCs) have been recognized as crucial for understanding tumorigenesis. Due to their outstanding features, stem cell-like properties, capacity to regulate immune response, and dynamic functional phenotype dependent on microenvironmental stimuli, MSCs have been perceived as important players in TME. Signals provided by tumor-associated chronic inflammation educate MSCs to alter their phenotype and immunomodulatory potential in favor of tumor-biased state of MSCs. Adjustment of phenotype to TME and acquisition of tumor-promoting ability by MSCs help tumor cells in maintenance of permissive TME and suppression of antitumor immune response. Potential utilization of MSCs in treatment of tumor is based on their inherent ability to home tumor tissue that makes them suitable delivery vehicles for immune-stimulating factors and vectors for targeted antitumor therapy. Here, we review data regarding intrusive effects of inflammatory TME on MSCs capacity to affect tumor development through modification of their phenotype and interactions with immune system.

  18. The Roles of Mesenchymal Stromal/Stem Cells in Tumor Microenvironment Associated with Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Krstić, Jelena; Djordjević, Ivana Okić; Jauković, Aleksandra

    2016-01-01

    State of tumor microenvironment (TME) is closely linked to regulation of tumor growth and progression affecting the final outcome, refractoriness, and relapse of disease. Interactions of tumor, immune, and mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSCs) have been recognized as crucial for understanding tumorigenesis. Due to their outstanding features, stem cell-like properties, capacity to regulate immune response, and dynamic functional phenotype dependent on microenvironmental stimuli, MSCs have been perceived as important players in TME. Signals provided by tumor-associated chronic inflammation educate MSCs to alter their phenotype and immunomodulatory potential in favor of tumor-biased state of MSCs. Adjustment of phenotype to TME and acquisition of tumor-promoting ability by MSCs help tumor cells in maintenance of permissive TME and suppression of antitumor immune response. Potential utilization of MSCs in treatment of tumor is based on their inherent ability to home tumor tissue that makes them suitable delivery vehicles for immune-stimulating factors and vectors for targeted antitumor therapy. Here, we review data regarding intrusive effects of inflammatory TME on MSCs capacity to affect tumor development through modification of their phenotype and interactions with immune system. PMID:27630452

  19. A mixed epithelial and stromal tumor of the kidney in a ringtail lemur (Lemur catta).

    PubMed

    Muller, S; Oevermann, A; Wenker, C; Altermatt, H J; Robert, N

    2007-03-01

    Primary renal tumors are rare neoplasms in nonhuman primates. This report describes a mixed epithelial and stromal tumor of the kidney (MESTK) in a 14.5-year-old female ringtail lemur. The well-demarcated, solid, and cystic mass was located in the pelvis of the left kidney and consisted histologically of both epithelial and mesenchymal components. The mesenchymal cells were arranged in fascicles around cysts lined by a well-differentiated epithelium. Neither the mesenchymal nor the epithelial parts showed significant nuclear atypia or mitotic figures. To our knowledge, only 1 similar case, classified as adenoleiomyofibromatous hamartoma, has been reported in a ringtail lemur. In humans this tumor affects predominantly perimenopausal women and can express estrogen and progesterone receptors. However, neither estrogen nor progesterone receptors could be identified by immunohistochemistry in the tumor of the present ringtail lemur. Therefore, a hormonal mechanism could not be demonstrated in this case.

  20. Recent advances in diagnosis and therapy of neuroendocrine tumors of the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Pelley, R J; Bukowski, R M

    1997-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors of the gastrointestinal tract are rare tumors that can be classified as APU-Domas (amine precursor uptake and decarboxylation). They can be subdivided into the carcinoid tumors of the gastrointestinal submucosa and the islet cell endocrine tumors of the pancreas. Although the majority of tumors that become clinically apparent are malignant, they are frequently slow growing. Despite this, neuroendocrine tumors may generate disabling hormonal syndromes requiring aggressive treatment to achieve palliation. Recent advances in understanding the pathophysiology of these tumors has led to better radiographic imaging and more accurate localization techniques. Medical therapies with somatostatin analogues, omeprazole, and locoregional tumor ablation have made a positive impact on curative and palliative therapy. This review updates the recent efforts made in the radiographic imaging and therapeutics of the gastrointestinal neuroendocrine tumors.

  1. Liver Metastasis of Gastrointestinal Neuroendocrine Tumors: A Single Center Experience

    PubMed Central

    Geramizadeh, Bita; Kashkooe, Ali; Malekhosseini, Seyed Ali

    2016-01-01

    Background Gastrointestinal neuroendocrine tumors (GI-NETs) are potentially malignant tumors, and their most common location of metastasis is the liver. Objectives In this report, we will describe our experience with some clinical and pathologic findings of hepatic metastasis in a group of cases of GI-NETs at the largest referral center of GI and liver diseases in south Iran. Materials and Methods In this four-year study (2011 - 2014), all GI and liver NETs were extracted from the pathology files of hospitals affiliated with Shiraz University of Medical Sciences. After classification based on the world health organization guidelines, the patients were evaluated according to their location, sex, age, and proliferative index. After studying the imaging and clinical charts of liver-NET cases with an unknown primary location, a complete panel of immunohistochemical markers (TTF-1, CDX-2, CK-7, CK-2, etc.) was used to find the primary GI location. Carcinoid tumors from other sites, such as the lung, were omitted from this study. Results The most common primary site of metastatic GI-NET to the liver in our center was the small intestine, which was also the most frequent location of GI-NET without liver metastasis. No cases of appendiceal-NET were found with liver metastasis. In 8 cases (11.6%) with liver-NETs, no primary location was identified. GI-NETs with liver metastasis had a significantly higher grade and proliferative index compared with NETs without liver metastasis. Conclusions Liver metastasis of neuroendocrine tumors in Iran presents in a very similar manner as that seen in western countries. In about 89% of cases with liver-NET, complete imaging, clinical, and pathological studies can help to identify the primary origin of the liver-NET, which is very important in the patient’s management. PMID:27330538

  2. Tumor M2 pyruvate kinase: a tumor marker and its clinical application in gastrointestinal malignancy.

    PubMed

    Hardt, Philip D; Ewald, Nils

    2008-09-01

    Proliferating cells, in particular tumor cells, express a dimeric isoenzyme of pyruvate kinase, termed Tumor M2 pyruvate kinase. In the last few years, much attention has been paid to this novel tumor marker that can be determined in EDTA-plasma and in the feces. It has been used in diagnosis and surveillance of a variety of malignant diseases. As compared with the established tumor markers, Tumor M2-PK in EDTA-plasma proves to have at least equal sensitivity in pancreatic, gastric, esophageal, colorectal and cholangiocellular cancer. In combination with established tumor markers, EDTA-plasma M2-PK is a useful tool in diagnosis and surveillance of gastrointestinal tumors. In colorectal cancer, M2-PK in EDTA-plasma even proves superiority as compared with CEA. Fecal Tumor M2-PK testing resembles a good noninvasive screening parameter for colorectal cancer with a reported sensitivity of 68.8-91.0% and a specificity of 71.9-100%. It is superior to fecal occult blood testing in colorectal cancer screening. Since it is effective, easy to handle and bears rather low costs, fecal Tumor M2-PK testing is recommended for large-scale CRC screening.

  3. Ramucirumab Clinical Development: an Emerging Role in Gastrointestinal Tumors.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Gastaldo, Amparo; Gonzalez-Exposito, Reyes; Garcia-Carbonero, Rocío

    2016-08-01

    Ramucirumab (IMC-1121B, LY3009806) is a fully human G1 monoclonal antibody that specifically targets vascular endotelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR-2) with a substantially greater binding affinity than that of its natural ligands. Early clinical trials in patients with advanced solid tumors demonstrated that biologically relevant blood target concentrations are achievable with tolerable doses, and also showed some preliminary evidence of clinical activity. Several pivotal phase III trials have now been concluded and have led regulatory agencies to grant marketing authorization to ramucirumab for use as second line therapy in patients with advanced gastric or gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) adenocarcinoma (as single agent or in combination with paclitaxel), in patients with advanced colorectal carcinoma (CRC) (in combination with infusional fluorouracil and irinotecan (FOLFIRI regimen)) and in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) (in combination with docetaxel). In contrast, ramucirumab failed to significantly improve survival versus placebo as second line therapy in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The aim of this review is to summarize the clinical development and emerging role of ramucirumab in gastrointestinal (GI) tumors, including relevant aspects of its mechanism of action, pharmacology, safety profile, and antitumor activity in gastric, HCC, and CRC carcinomas.

  4. Ramucirumab Clinical Development: an Emerging Role in Gastrointestinal Tumors.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Gastaldo, Amparo; Gonzalez-Exposito, Reyes; Garcia-Carbonero, Rocío

    2016-08-01

    Ramucirumab (IMC-1121B, LY3009806) is a fully human G1 monoclonal antibody that specifically targets vascular endotelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR-2) with a substantially greater binding affinity than that of its natural ligands. Early clinical trials in patients with advanced solid tumors demonstrated that biologically relevant blood target concentrations are achievable with tolerable doses, and also showed some preliminary evidence of clinical activity. Several pivotal phase III trials have now been concluded and have led regulatory agencies to grant marketing authorization to ramucirumab for use as second line therapy in patients with advanced gastric or gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) adenocarcinoma (as single agent or in combination with paclitaxel), in patients with advanced colorectal carcinoma (CRC) (in combination with infusional fluorouracil and irinotecan (FOLFIRI regimen)) and in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) (in combination with docetaxel). In contrast, ramucirumab failed to significantly improve survival versus placebo as second line therapy in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The aim of this review is to summarize the clinical development and emerging role of ramucirumab in gastrointestinal (GI) tumors, including relevant aspects of its mechanism of action, pharmacology, safety profile, and antitumor activity in gastric, HCC, and CRC carcinomas. PMID:26887374

  5. [Differential diagnosis of tumors of the gastrointestinal tract and retroperitoneal space from abdominal aortic aneurysms].

    PubMed

    Tsakadze, L O

    1981-01-01

    Aneurysm of the abdominal aorta is often erroneously identified as a gastrointestinal or retroperitoneal tumor of cyst. Out of 54 cases of this disease, 22 patients had undergone long-term examinations at various hospitals, oncological establishments included, while exploratory laparatomy had been carried out in 9 patients. The symptoms of aneurysm are described and compared with those of said tumors. Diagnostic procedures for identification of aneurysm and differentiation from gastrointestinal and retroperitoneal tumors and cysts are discussed.

  6. Impressive long-term disease stabilization by nilotinib in two pretreated patients with KIT/PDGFRA wild-type metastatic gastrointestinal stromal tumours.

    PubMed

    Pantaleo, Maria Abbondanza; Nannini, Margherita; Saponara, Maristella; Gnocchi, Chiara; Di Scioscio, Valerio; Lolli, Cristian; Catena, Fausto; Astolfi, Annalisa; Di Battista, Monica; Biasco, Guido

    2012-06-01

    KIT/PDGFRA wild-type (WT) gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs) showed a response rate to imatinib ranging from 0 to 25%. Nilotinib is a new-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitor that has demonstrated clinical activity in pretreated GIST patients. At present, no correlation between nilotinib activity and clinical/pathological/molecular features is available. We report on two WT GIST patients resistant to imatinib and sunitinib, and enrolled in the CAMN107A2201 study who achieved an impressive disease control by nilotinib. Both patients have germ-line mutations in the SDHA gene. In April 2004, a 39-year-old woman presented gastric GIST with multiple liver metastases and was treated with imatinib 400 mg/day, followed by imatinib 800 mg/day and then sunitinib. In August 2007, because of disease progression, she was enrolled in the CAMN107A2201 study and assigned to the nilotinib 800 mg/day arm. In March 2005, a 27-year-old woman started imatinib 600 mg/day and then sunitinib for gastric GIST with multiple liver and lung metastases. In October 2007, because of disease progression, she was enrolled in the CAMN107A2201 study and assigned to the nilotinib 800 mg/day arm. One patient still showed stable disease after 46 months of treatment according to the Response Evaluation Criteria In Solid Tumors, and a partial response after 9 months according to Choi's criteria. The other patient still showed stable disease after 42 months according to Response Evaluation Criteria In Solid Tumors. At present, they continue to receive nilotinib. We report very long-term disease stabilization under nilotinib treatment in two pretreated WT GIST patients. In-vitro studies and clinical analyses are warranted to evaluate a potential correlation between nilotinib activity and WT genotype or other clinical/pathological features.

  7. Patient-derived xenograft models for pancreatic adenocarcinoma demonstrate retention of tumor morphology through incorporation of murine stromal elements.

    PubMed

    Delitto, Daniel; Pham, Kien; Vlada, Adrian C; Sarosi, George A; Thomas, Ryan M; Behrns, Kevin E; Liu, Chen; Hughes, Steven J; Wallet, Shannon M; Trevino, Jose G

    2015-05-01

    Direct implantation of viable surgical specimens provides a representative preclinical platform in pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Patient-derived xenografts consistently demonstrate retained tumor morphology and genetic stability. However, the evolution of the tumor microenvironment over time remains poorly characterized in these models. This work specifically addresses the recruitment and incorporation of murine stromal elements into expanding patient-derived pancreatic adenocarcinoma xenografts, establishing the integration of murine cells into networks of invading cancer cells. In addition, we provide methods and observations in the establishment and maintenance of a patient-derived pancreatic adenocarcinoma xenograft model. A total of 25 histologically confirmed pancreatic adenocarcinoma specimens were implanted subcutaneously into nonobese diabetic severe combined immunodeficiency mice. Patient demographics, staging, pathological analysis, and outcomes were analyzed. After successful engraftment of tumors, histological and immunofluorescence analyses were performed on explanted tumors. Pancreatic adenocarcinoma specimens were successfully engrafted in 15 (60%) of 25 attempts. Successful engraftment does not appear to correlate with clinicopathologic factors or patient survival. Tumor morphology is conserved through multiple passages, and tumors retain metastatic potential. Interestingly, despite morphological similarity between passages, human stromal elements do not appear to expand with invading cancer cells. Rather, desmoplastic murine stroma dominates the xenograft microenvironment after the initial implantation. Recruitment of stromal elements in this manner to support and maintain tumor growth represents a novel avenue for investigation into tumor-stromal interactions.

  8. Virilizing ovarian stromal tumor in a young woman with Carney complex.

    PubMed

    Carney, J Aidan; Stratakis, Constantine A

    2011-10-01

    A woman with Carney complex presented at the age of 22 years with abdominal pain and hirsutism. As a baby, she had undergone excision of a right eyelid lesion, and at age 14 years she had undergone removal of a left lower eyelid nodule that subsequently recurred. Investigation revealed an elevated level of serum testosterone and a 2-cm left ovarian tumor. A left salpingo-oophorectomy was performed. Postoperatively, she experienced relief from abdominal pain, the serum level of testosterone normalized, and the hirsutism ameliorated. The tumor featured sheets of eosinophilic cells with lipochrome pigment, myeloid metaplasia, stromal metaplasia, and markedly abnormal blood vessels. Immunocytochemically, the tumor cells were positive for vimentin, synaptophysin, inhibin-A, and calrenin. Because of the clinical setting in which the neoplasm occurred, it is likely that is occurrence was related to Carney complex. PMID:21934476

  9. Round cell pattern of prostatic stromal tumor of uncertain malignant potential: a subtle newly recognized variant.

    PubMed

    Sadimin, Evita T; Epstein, Jonathan I

    2016-06-01

    Prostatic stromal tumor of uncertain malignant potential (STUMP) is a distinct entity which includes several different patterns. Four patterns of STUMP have been described including stroma with (1) degenerative atypia, (2) hypercellular spindle cells, (3) myxoid spindle cells, and (4) phyllodes-like pattern. The current study identified a novel round cell pattern. We searched our database from 1999 to 2015 and identified 7 patients with round cell pattern out of a total number of 98 patients with STUMP. All 7 cases showed mildly increased stromal cellularity with rounded nuclei, diagnosed on core biopsies in 5 cases, transurethral resection in 1 case, and radical prostatectomy in 1 case. Some degree of glandular displacement was observed in 4 cases. In 2 of the cases, STUMP was not recognized histologically by the referring pathologists and was initially diagnosed as benign prostatic hyperplasia. As has been described with other patterns of STUMP, several cases showed associated epithelial proliferations that in some instances masked the neoplastic stromal process. The round cell pattern of STUMP is a new deceptively subtle pattern that may not be recognized as a neoplasm and may be misdiagnosed as benign prostatic hyperplasia. Although there was no direct evidence in our study that the round cell pattern of STUMP has the same behavior as other variants of STUMPs, increased recognition of this entity will hopefully lead to additional studies to further understand its malignant potential. PMID:26980017

  10. GI Stromal Tumors: 15 Years of Lessons From a Rare Cancer.

    PubMed

    Cioffi, Angela; Maki, Robert G

    2015-06-01

    A confluence of factors, most prominently the recognition of GI stromal tumor (GIST) as a specific sarcoma subtype and the availability of imatinib, led to the "Big Bang" of GIST therapy (ie, the successful treatment of the first patient with GIST with imatinib in 2000). The trail blazed by imatinib for chronic myelogenous leukemia and GIST has become a desired route to regulatory approval of an increasing number of oral kinase inhibitors and other novel therapeutics. In this review, the status of GIST management before and after GIST's "Big Bang" and new steps being taken to further improve on therapy are reviewed. PMID:25918303

  11. TGF-β in jaw tumor fluids induces RANKL expression in stromal fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Chiaki; Aikawa, Tomonao; Okuno, Emi; Miyagawa, Kazuaki; Amano, Katsuhiko; Takahata, Sosuke; Kimata, Masaaki; Okura, Masaya; Iida, Seiji; Kogo, Mikihiko

    2016-01-01

    Odontogenic tumors and cysts, arising in the jawbones, grow by resorption and destruction of the jawbones. However, mechanisms underlying bone resorption by odontogenic tumors/cysts remain unclear. Odontogenic tumors/cysts comprise odontogenic epithelial cells and stromal fibroblasts, which originate from the developing tooth germ. It has been demonstrated that odontogenic epithelial cells of the developing tooth germ induce osteoclastogenesis to prevent the tooth germ from invading the developing bone to maintain its structure in developing bones. Thus, we hypothesized that odontogenic epithelial cells of odontogenic tumors/cysts induce osteoclast formation, which plays potential roles in tumor/cyst outgrowth into the jawbone. The purpose of this study was to examine osteoclastogenesis by cytokines, focusing on transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), produced by odontogenic epithelial cells. We observed two pathways for receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL) induction by keratocystic odontogenic tumor fluid: the cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2)/prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) pathway through interleukin-1α (IL-1α) signaling and non-COX-2/PGE2 pathway through TGF-β receptor signaling. TGF-β1 and IL-1α produced by odontogenic tumors/cysts induced osteoclastogenesis directly in the osteoclast precursor cells and indirectly via increased RANKL induction in the stroma. PMID:27279422

  12. Prognosis and management of adult wild type gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs): A pooled analysis and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, N R; Collins, D; Crotty, P; Ridgway, P F

    2016-09-01

    A pooled review was performed to determine survival in adult WT GIST (Wild Type GastroIntestinal Stromal Tumours) and compare the same with pediatric WT GISTs. Electronic databases were searched using the terms "Wild type" AND "GIST". Eighty-two adult patients from 14 studies were included in the pooled analysis. Cumulative survival was greater than 50% in both age groups, hence medial survival could not be computed. Mean survival in adults was 15.7 years ± 0.78 and in children was 18.8 years ± 1.3 (p = 0.241). Median disease free survival in adults was 10 years while 5-year overall survival was 88%. There was no statistically significant difference in the survival between the two groups (p = 0.241). Overall survival in adults with WT GISTs is favourable compared to other adult GIST subtypes likely reflects a common molecular pathway similar to pediatric GIST. PMID:27566016

  13. Effectiveness of Endoscopic Treatment for Gastrointestinal Neuroendocrine Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Weili; Wu, Siyuan; Han, Xiao; Yang, Chuanhua

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Several recent studies have explored efficacy and safety of different endoscopic treatments for gastrointestinal neuroendocrine tumors (GI-NETs). However, there is no definitive consensus regarding the best endoscopic approach for GI-NETs treatment. Therefore, the present study was conducted to investigate the application of various endoscopic techniques for the treatment of GI-NETs according to the previous conclusions and to summarize the optimal endoscopic modalities for GI-NETs. Ninety-eight patients with 100 GI-NETs removed by endoscopic therapies were reviewed. The pathological complete resection rate (PCRR), complication, local recurrence, and factors possibly associated with the pathological complete resection were analyzed. Twenty-two patients were treated by conventional polypectomy (including 6 cold biopsy forceps polypectomy and 16 snare polypectomy with electrocauterization), 41 by endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR), and 35 by endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD). The PCRRs of conventional polypectomy, EMR, and ESD were 86.4%, 75.6%, and 85.7%, respectively. Sixteen GI-NETs that had a polypoid appearance, with a mean tumor size of 5.2 mm, were removed by snare polypectomy (PCRR 93.8%). The complication rates of conventional polypectomy, EMR, and ESD were 0.0% (0/22), 2.4% (1/41), and 2.9% (1/35), respectively. There were 2 local recurrences after cold biopsy forceps polypectomy treatment and no local recurrences in the EMR and ESD groups (P = 0.049). The results showed that PCRR was only associated with the depth of invasion (P = 0.038). Endoscopic resection of GI-NETs is safe and effective in properly selected patients. For submucosal GI-NETs, ESD was a feasible modality, with a higher PCRR compared with EMR. For ≤5 mm polypoid-like NETs, snare polypectomy with electrocauterization was a simple procedure with a high PCRR. PMID:27082572

  14. Impact of Stromal Sensitivity on Radiation Response of Tumors Implanted in SCID Hosts Revisited

    PubMed Central

    García-Barros, Mónica; Thin, Tin Htwe; Maj, Jerzy; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos; Haimovitz-Friedman, Adriana; Fuks, Zvi; Kolesnick, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice carry a germ-line mutation in DNA-PK, associated with deficiency in recognition and repair DNA double strand breaks. Thus, SCID cells and tissues display increased sensitivity to radiation-induced post-mitotic (clonogenic) cell death. Nonetheless, the single radiation doses required for 50% permanent local control (TCD50) of tumors implanted in SCID mice are not significantly different from the TCD50 values of the same tumors in wild-type hosts. Whereas the tumor stroma is derived from the host, the observation that tumors implanted in SCID mice do not exhibit hypersensitivity to radiation might imply that stromal endothelial elements do not contribute substantially to tumor cure by ionizing radiation. Here we challenge this notion, testing the hypothesis that acid sphingomyelinase (ASMase)-mediated endothelial apoptosis, which results from plasma membrane alterations, not DNA damage, is a crucial element in the cure of tumors in SCID mice by single dose radiotherapy (SDRT). We show that endothelium in MCA/129 fibrosarcomas and B16 melanomas exhibit a wild-type apoptotic phenotype in SCID hosts, abrogated in tumors in SCIDasmase−/− littermates, which also acquire resistance to SDRT. Conversion into a radioresistant tumor phenotype when implanted in SCIDasmase−/− hosts provides compelling evidence that cell membrane ASMase-mediated microvascular dysfunction, rather than DNA damage-mediated endothelial clonogenic lethality, plays a mandatory role in the complex pathophysiologic mechanism of tumor cure by SDRT, and provides an explanation for the wild-type SDRT responses reported in tumors implanted in SCID mice. PMID:20924105

  15. Impact of stromal sensitivity on radiation response of tumors implanted in SCID hosts revisited.

    PubMed

    García-Barros, Mónica; Thin, Tin Htwe; Maj, Jerzy; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos; Haimovitz-Friedman, Adriana; Fuks, Zvi; Kolesnick, Richard

    2010-10-15

    Severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice carry a germ-line mutation in DNA-PK, associated with deficiency in recognition and repair DNA double-strand breaks. Thus, SCID cells and tissues display increased sensitivity to radiation-induced postmitotic (clonogenic) cell death. Nonetheless, the single-radiation doses required for 50% permanent local control (TCD(50)) of tumors implanted in SCID mice are not significantly different from the TCD(50) values of the same tumors in wild-type hosts. Whereas the tumor stroma is derived from the host, the observation that tumors implanted in SCID mice do not exhibit hypersensitivity to radiation might imply that stromal endothelial elements do not contribute substantially to tumor cure by ionizing radiation. Here, we challenge this notion, testing the hypothesis that ASMase-mediated endothelial apoptosis, which results from plasma membrane alterations, not DNA damage, is a crucial element in the cure of tumors in SCID mice by single-dose radiotherapy (SDRT). We show that the endothelium in MCA/129 fibrosarcomas and B16 melanomas exhibits a wild-type apoptotic phenotype in SCID hosts, abrogated in tumors in SCID(asmase-/-) littermates, which also acquire resistance to SDRT. Conversion into a radioresistant tumor phenotype when implanted in SCID(asmase-/-) hosts provides compelling evidence that cell membrane ASMase-mediated microvascular dysfunction, rather than DNA damage-mediated endothelial clonogenic lethality, plays a mandatory role in the complex pathophysiologic mechanism of tumor cure by SDRT, and provides an explanation for the wild-type SDRT responses reported in tumors implanted in SCID mice.

  16. Outcome and Prognostic Factors in Endometrial Stromal Tumors: A Rare Cancer Network Study

    SciTech Connect

    Schick, Ulrike; Bolukbasi, Yasmin; Thariat, Juliette; Abdah-Bortnyak, Roxolyana; Kuten, Abraham; Igdem, Sefik; Caglar, Hale; Ozsaran, Zeynep; Loessl, Kristina; Schleicher, Ursula; Zwahlen, Daniel; Villette, Sylviane; Vees, Hansjoerg

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To provide further understanding regarding outcome and prognostic factors of endometrial stromal tumors (EST). Methods and Materials: A retrospective analysis was performed on the records of 59 women diagnosed with EST and treated with curative intent between 1983 and 2007 in the framework of the Rare Cancer Network. Results: Endometrial stromal sarcomas (ESS) were found in 44% and undifferentiated ESS (UES) in 49% of the cases. In 7% the grading was unclear. Of the total number of patients, 33 had Stage I, 4 Stage II, 20 Stage III, and 1 presented with Stage IVB disease. Adjuvant chemotherapy was administered to 12 patients, all with UES. External-beam radiotherapy (RT) was administered postoperatively to 48 women. The median follow-up was 41.4 months. The 5-year overall survival (OS) rate was 96.2% and 64.8% for ESS and UES, respectively, with a corresponding 5-year disease-free survival (DFS) rate of 49.4% and 43.4%, respectively. On multivariate analysis, adjuvant RT was an independent prognostic factor for OS (p = 0.007) and DFS (p = 0.013). Locoregional control, DFS, and OS were significantly associated with age ({<=}60 vs. >60 years), grade (ESS vs. UES), and International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage (I-II vs. III-IV). Positive lymph node staging had an impact on OS (p < 0.001). Conclusion: The prognosis of ESS differed from that of UES. Endometrial stromal sarcomas had an excellent 5-year OS, whereas the OS in UES was rather low. However, half of ESS patients had a relapse. For this reason, adjuvant treatment such as RT should be considered even in low-grade tumors. Multicenter randomized studies are still warranted to establish clear guidelines.

  17. Cystic nephroma/mixed epithelial stromal tumor: a benign neoplasm with potential for recurrence.

    PubMed

    Sun, Belinda L; Abern, Michael; Garzon, Steven; Setty, Suman

    2015-05-01

    Cystic nephroma (CN) is a rare, benign, renal neoplasm composed of epithelial and stromal elements. Only about 200 cases have been reported since 1892 and recurrence has rarely been observed. We report a 32-year-old Hispanic woman, with a history of a right, complex cystic, renal mass treated by robotic decortication 2 years ago, who presented with flank pain, hematuria, and recurrent urinary tract infection. A magnetic resonance imaging study showed a 3.4-cm multicystic lesion with thickened septa and enhancement at the right kidney. The partial nephrectomy specimen revealed a well-circumscribed, multicystic tumor abutting the renal pelvis, with thick septa and smooth walls, filled with clear fluid. Microscopic examination showed variably sized cysts lined by cuboidal epithelium with focal hobnailing, without significant cytologic atypia and mitosis. The epithelial lining was positive for CK19, high molecular weight cytokeratin, and α-methylacyl-CoA racemase suggesting a primitive tubular epithelial phenotype. Primitive glomeruli-like structures were also present. The ovarian-like stroma was condensed around the cysts and was variably cellular with areas of muscle differentiation and thick-walled vessels. The stroma was positive for desmin, estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, and CD10. We suggest that CN represents a variable mixture of epithelial and stromal elements, immature glomerular, tubular, muscle, and vascular elements, which may be present in variable proportions creating a spectrum of lesions previously described as CN and mixed epithelial and stromal tumors (MEST). This case emphasizes that CN/MEST clinically/radiologically mimics other cystic renal neoplasms, especially cystic renal cell carcinoma and tubulocystic carcinoma, necessitating histopathological examination and immunohistochemial studies for definitive diagnosis. Additionally, CN has the tendency to recur when not completely excised initially. PMID:25525149

  18. [Specificities of sex-cord stromal tumors in children and adolescents].

    PubMed

    Thebaud, Estelle; Orbach, Daniel; Faure-Conter, Cécile; Patte, Catherine; Hameury, Frederic; Kalfa, Nicolas; Dijoud, Frédérique; Martelli, Hélène; Fresneau, Brice

    2015-06-01

    Sex-cord stromal tumors (SCT) are rare pediatric tumors accounting for less than 5% of gonadal tumors in children and adolescents. They differ from those diagnosed in adults by their presentation, histology, evolution and treatment modalities. Testicular SCT occur mostly in infants less than 6 months. Testicular swelling is often the only symptom, but signs of hormonal secretion with gynecomastia may be present. Juvenile granulosa SCT is the main histologic subtype. Sertoli SCTs are much less frequent while Leydig tumors occurred in older children and adolescents. Prognosis is excellent after inguinal orchiectomy. Testis sparing surgery could be performed but indications and modalities have to be strongly defined. Ovarian SCT are diagnosed in older children and adolescents and present with abdominal symptoms and/or signs of hormonal secretion: estrogenic manifestations (isosexual pseudoprecocity, menometrorrhagia) or virilization (hirsutism, amenorrhea). Main histologic subtype is juvenile granulosa (rarely Sertoli-Leydig). If oophorectomy (or salpingo-oophorectomy) may be curative for localized disease, adjuvant cisplatin-containing chemotherapy is mandatory in case of tumor rupture or peritoneal dissemination to prevent recurrences. Because of the rarity of these pediatric tumors, concerted multidisciplinary cares are required to best adapt therapeutic strategy before any surgical intervention. PMID:26028491

  19. Type I Interferons Exert Anti-tumor Effect via Reversing Immunosuppression Mediated by Mesenchymal Stromal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shou, Peishun; Chen, Qing; Jiang, Jingting; Xu, Chunliang; Zhang, Jimin; Zheng, Chunxing; Jiang, Menghui; Velletri, Tania; Cao, Wei; Huang, Yin; Yang, Qian; Han, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Liying; Wei, Lixin; Rabson, Arnold B.; Chin, Y. Eugene; Wang, Ying; Shi, Yufang

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are strongly immunosuppressive via producing nitric oxide (NO) and known to migrate into tumor sites to promote tumor growth, but the underlying mechanisms remain largely elusive. Here, we found that IFNα-secreting MSCs showed more dramatic inhibition effect on tumor progression than that of IFNα alone. Interestingly, IFNα-primed MSCs could also effectively suppress tumor growth. Mechanistically, we demonstrated that both IFNα and IFNβ (type I IFNs) reversed the immunosuppressive effect of MSCs on splenocyte proliferation. This effect of type I IFNs was exerted through inhibiting iNOS (inducible nitric oxide synthase) expression in IFNγ and TNFα-stimulated MSCs. Notably, only NO production was inhibited by IFNα; production of other cytokines or chemokines tested was not suppressed. Furthermore, IFNα promoted the switch from Stat1 homodimers to Stat1-Stat2 heterodimers. Studies using the luciferase reporter system and chromatin immunoprecipitation assay revealed that IFNα suppressed iNOS transcription through inhibiting the binding of Stat1 to iNOS promoter. Therefore, the synergistic anti-tumor effects of type I IFNs and MSCs were achieved by inhibiting NO production. This study provides essential information for understanding the mechanisms of MSC-mediated immunosuppression and for the development of better clinical strategies using IFNs and MSCs for cancer immunotherapy. PMID:27109100

  20. Stromal CCR6 drives tumor growth in a murine transplantable colon cancer through recruitment of tumor-promoting macrophages.

    PubMed

    Nandi, Bisweswar; Shapiro, Mia; Samur, Mehmet K; Pai, Christine; Frank, Natasha Y; Yoon, Charles; Prabhala, Rao H; Munshi, Nikhil C; Gold, Jason S

    2016-08-01

    Interactions between the inflammatory chemokine CCL20 and its receptor CCR6 have been implicated in promoting colon cancer; however, the mechanisms behind this effect are poorly understood. We have previously demonstrated that deficiency of CCR6 is associated with decreased tumor macrophage accumulation in a model of sporadic intestinal tumorigenesis. In this study, we aimed to determine the role of stromal CCR6 expression in a murine syngeneic transplantable colon cancer model. We show that deficiency of host CCR6 is associated with decreased growth of syngeneic CCR6-expressing colon cancers. Colon cancers adoptively transplanted into CCR6-deficient mice have decreased tumor-associated macrophages without alterations in the number of monocytes in blood or bone marrow. CCL20, the unique ligand for CCR6, promotes migration of monocytes in vitro and promotes accumulation of macrophages in vivo. Depletion of tumor-associated macrophages decreases the growth of tumors in the transplantable tumor model. Macrophages infiltrating the colon cancers in this model secrete the inflammatory mediators CCL2, IL-1α, IL-6 and TNFα. Ccl2, Il1α and Il6 are consequently downregulated in tumors from CCR6-deficient mice. CCL2, IL-1α and IL-6 also promote proliferation of colon cancer cells, linking the decreased macrophage migration into tumors mediated by CCL20-CCR6 interactions to the delay in tumor growth in CCR6-deficient hosts. The relevance of these findings in human colon cancer is demonstrated through correlation of CCR6 expression with that of the macrophage marker CD163 as well as that of CCL2, IL1α and TNFα. Our findings support the exploration of targeting the CCL20-CCR6 pathway for the treatment of colon cancer. PMID:27622061

  1. Whole transcriptome profiling of patient-derived xenograft models as a tool to identify both tumor and stromal specific biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Bradford, James R; Wappett, Mark; Beran, Garry; Logie, Armelle; Delpuech, Oona; Brown, Henry; Boros, Joanna; Camp, Nicola J; McEwen, Robert; Mazzola, Anne Marie; D'Cruz, Celina; Barry, Simon T

    2016-04-12

    The tumor microenvironment is emerging as a key regulator of cancer growth and progression, however the exact mechanisms of interaction with the tumor are poorly understood. Whilst the majority of genomic profiling efforts thus far have focused on the tumor, here we investigate RNA-Seq as a hypothesis-free tool to generate independent tumor and stromal biomarkers, and explore tumor-stroma interactions by exploiting the human-murine compartment specificity of patient-derived xenografts (PDX).Across a pan-cancer cohort of 79 PDX models, we determine that mouse stroma can be separated into distinct clusters, each corresponding to a specific stromal cell type. This implies heterogeneous recruitment of mouse stroma to the xenograft independent of tumor type. We then generate cross-species expression networks to recapitulate a known association between tumor epithelial cells and fibroblast activation, and propose a potentially novel relationship between two hypoxia-associated genes, human MIF and mouse Ddx6. Assessment of disease subtype also reveals MMP12 as a putative stromal marker of triple-negative breast cancer. Finally, we establish that our ability to dissect recruited stroma from trans-differentiated tumor cells is crucial to identifying stem-like poor-prognosis signatures in the tumor compartment.In conclusion, RNA-Seq is a powerful, cost-effective solution to global analysis of human tumor and mouse stroma simultaneously, providing new insights into mouse stromal heterogeneity and compartment-specific disease markers that are otherwise overlooked by alternative technologies. The study represents the first comprehensive analysis of its kind across multiple PDX models, and supports adoption of the approach in pre-clinical drug efficacy studies, and compartment-specific biomarker discovery. PMID:26980748

  2. Whole transcriptome profiling of patient-derived xenograft models as a tool to identify both tumor and stromal specific biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Bradford, James R.; Wappett, Mark; Beran, Garry; Logie, Armelle; Delpuech, Oona; Brown, Henry; Boros, Joanna; Camp, Nicola J.; McEwen, Robert; Mazzola, Anne Marie; D'Cruz, Celina; Barry, Simon T.

    2016-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment is emerging as a key regulator of cancer growth and progression, however the exact mechanisms of interaction with the tumor are poorly understood. Whilst the majority of genomic profiling efforts thus far have focused on the tumor, here we investigate RNA-Seq as a hypothesis-free tool to generate independent tumor and stromal biomarkers, and explore tumor-stroma interactions by exploiting the human-murine compartment specificity of patient-derived xenografts (PDX). Across a pan-cancer cohort of 79 PDX models, we determine that mouse stroma can be separated into distinct clusters, each corresponding to a specific stromal cell type. This implies heterogeneous recruitment of mouse stroma to the xenograft independent of tumor type. We then generate cross-species expression networks to recapitulate a known association between tumor epithelial cells and fibroblast activation, and propose a potentially novel relationship between two hypoxia-associated genes, human MIF and mouse Ddx6. Assessment of disease subtype also reveals MMP12 as a putative stromal marker of triple-negative breast cancer. Finally, we establish that our ability to dissect recruited stroma from trans-differentiated tumor cells is crucial to identifying stem-like poor-prognosis signatures in the tumor compartment. In conclusion, RNA-Seq is a powerful, cost-effective solution to global analysis of human tumor and mouse stroma simultaneously, providing new insights into mouse stromal heterogeneity and compartment-specific disease markers that are otherwise overlooked by alternative technologies. The study represents the first comprehensive analysis of its kind across multiple PDX models, and supports adoption of the approach in pre-clinical drug efficacy studies, and compartment-specific biomarker discovery. PMID:26980748

  3. Whole transcriptome profiling of patient-derived xenograft models as a tool to identify both tumor and stromal specific biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Bradford, James R; Wappett, Mark; Beran, Garry; Logie, Armelle; Delpuech, Oona; Brown, Henry; Boros, Joanna; Camp, Nicola J; McEwen, Robert; Mazzola, Anne Marie; D'Cruz, Celina; Barry, Simon T

    2016-04-12

    The tumor microenvironment is emerging as a key regulator of cancer growth and progression, however the exact mechanisms of interaction with the tumor are poorly understood. Whilst the majority of genomic profiling efforts thus far have focused on the tumor, here we investigate RNA-Seq as a hypothesis-free tool to generate independent tumor and stromal biomarkers, and explore tumor-stroma interactions by exploiting the human-murine compartment specificity of patient-derived xenografts (PDX).Across a pan-cancer cohort of 79 PDX models, we determine that mouse stroma can be separated into distinct clusters, each corresponding to a specific stromal cell type. This implies heterogeneous recruitment of mouse stroma to the xenograft independent of tumor type. We then generate cross-species expression networks to recapitulate a known association between tumor epithelial cells and fibroblast activation, and propose a potentially novel relationship between two hypoxia-associated genes, human MIF and mouse Ddx6. Assessment of disease subtype also reveals MMP12 as a putative stromal marker of triple-negative breast cancer. Finally, we establish that our ability to dissect recruited stroma from trans-differentiated tumor cells is crucial to identifying stem-like poor-prognosis signatures in the tumor compartment.In conclusion, RNA-Seq is a powerful, cost-effective solution to global analysis of human tumor and mouse stroma simultaneously, providing new insights into mouse stromal heterogeneity and compartment-specific disease markers that are otherwise overlooked by alternative technologies. The study represents the first comprehensive analysis of its kind across multiple PDX models, and supports adoption of the approach in pre-clinical drug efficacy studies, and compartment-specific biomarker discovery.

  4. MDCT and clinicopathological features of small bowel gastrointestinal stromal tumours in 102 patients: a single institute experience

    PubMed Central

    Shinagare, A B; O'Neill, A C; Krajewski, K M; Hornick, J L; George, S; Ramaiya, N H; Tirumani, S H

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Small bowel (SB) is the second most common site of gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs). We evaluated clinical presentation, pathology, imaging features and metastatic pattern of SB GIST. Methods: Imaging and clinicopathological data of 102 patients with jejunal/ileal GIST treated at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women's Hospital (Boston, MA) between 2002 and 2013 were evaluated. Imaging of treatment-naive primary tumour (41 patients) and follow-up imaging in all patients was reviewed. Results: 90/102 patients were symptomatic at presentation, abdominal pain and lower gastrointestinal blood loss being the most common symptoms. On pathology, 21 GISTs were low risk, 17 were intermediate and 64 were high risk. The mean tumour size was 8.5 cm. On baseline CT (n = 41), tumours were predominantly well circumscribed, exophytic and smooth/mildly lobulated in contour. Of 41 tumours, 16 (39%) were homogeneous, whereas 25 (61%) were heterogeneous. Of the 41 tumours, cystic/necrotic areas (Hounsfield units < 20) were seen in 16 (39%) and calcifications in 9 (22%). CT demonstrated complications in 13/41 (32%) patients in the form of tumour–bowel fistula (TBF) (7/41), bowel obstruction (4/41) and intraperitoneal rupture (2/41). Amongst 102 total patients, metastases developed in 51 (50%) patients (27 at presentation), predominantly involving peritoneum (40/102) and liver (32/102). 7/8 (87%) patients having intraperitoneal rupture at presentation developed metastases. Metastases elsewhere were always associated with hepatic/peritoneal metastases. At last follow-up, 28 patients were deceased (median survival, 65 months). Conclusion: SB GISTs were predominantly large, well-circumscribed, exophytic tumours with or without cystic/necrotic areas. Complications such as TBF, bowel obstruction and intraperitoneal perforation were visualized at presentation, with patients with perforation demonstrating a high risk of metastatic disease. Exophytic

  5. Comparative proteomic analysis of normal and tumor stromal cells by tissue on chip based mass spectrometry (toc-MS)

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    In carcinoma tissues, genetic and metabolic changes not only occur at the tumor cell level, but also in the surrounding stroma. This carcinoma-reactive stromal tissue is heterogeneous and consists e.g. of non-epithelial cells such as fibroblasts or fibrocytes, inflammatory cells and vasculature-related cells, which promote carcinoma growth and progression of carcinomas. Nevertheless, there is just little knowledge about the proteomic changes from normal connective tissue to tumor stroma. In the present study, we acquired and analysed specific protein patterns of small stromal sections surrounding head and neck cell complexes in comparison to normal subepithelial connective tissue. To gain defined stromal areas we used laser-based tissue microdissection. Because these stromal areas are limited in size we established the highly sensitive 'tissue on chip based mass spectrometry' (toc-MS). Therefore, the dissected areas were directly transferred to chromatographic arrays and the proteomic profiles were subsequently analysed with mass spectrometry. At least 100 cells were needed for an adequate spectrum. The locating of differentially expressed proteins enables a precise separation of normal and tumor stroma. The newly described toc-MS technology allows an initial insight into proteomic differences between small numbers of exactly defined cells from normal and tumor stroma. PMID:20205871

  6. Inorganic Arsenic–Related Changes in the Stromal Tumor Microenvironment in a Prostate Cancer Cell–Conditioned Media Model

    PubMed Central

    Shearer, Joseph J.; Wold, Eric A.; Umbaugh, Charles S.; Lichti, Cheryl F.; Nilsson, Carol L.; Figueiredo, Marxa L.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The tumor microenvironment plays an important role in the progression of cancer by mediating stromal–epithelial paracrine signaling, which can aberrantly modulate cellular proliferation and tumorigenesis. Exposure to environmental toxicants, such as inorganic arsenic (iAs), has also been implicated in the progression of prostate cancer. Objective: The role of iAs exposure in stromal signaling in the tumor microenvironment has been largely unexplored. Our objective was to elucidate molecular mechanisms of iAs-induced changes to stromal signaling by an enriched prostate tumor microenvironment cell population, adipose-derived mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (ASCs). Results: ASC-conditioned media (CM) collected after 1 week of iAs exposure increased prostate cancer cell viability, whereas CM from ASCs that received no iAs exposure decreased cell viability. Cytokine array analysis suggested changes to cytokine signaling associated with iAs exposure. Subsequent proteomic analysis suggested a concentration-dependent alteration to the HMOX1/THBS1/TGFβ signaling pathway by iAs. These results were validated by quantitative reverse transcriptase–polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blotting, confirming a concentration-dependent increase in HMOX1 and a decrease in THBS1 expression in ASC following iAs exposure. Subsequently, we used a TGFβ pathway reporter construct to confirm a decrease in stromal TGFβ signaling in ASC following iAs exposure. Conclusions: Our results suggest a concentration-dependent alteration of stromal signaling: specifically, attenuation of stromal-mediated TGFβ signaling following exposure to iAs. Our results indicate iAs may enhance prostate cancer cell viability through a previously unreported stromal-based mechanism. These findings indicate that the stroma may mediate the effects of iAs in tumor progression, which may have future therapeutic implications. Citation: Shearer JJ, Wold EA, Umbaugh CS, Lichti CF, Nilsson CL

  7. Registered report: Biomechanical remodeling of the microenvironment by stromal caveolin-1 favors tumor invasion and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Fiering, Steven; Ang, Lay-Hong; Lacoste, Judith; Smith, Tim D; Griner, Erin; Iorns, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    The Reproducibility Project: Cancer Biology seeks to address growing concerns about reproducibility in scientific research by conducting replicating selected results from a number of high-profile papers in the field of cancer biology. The papers, which were published between 2010 and 2012 were selected on the basis of citations and Altimetric scores (Errington et al., 2014). This Registered report describes the proposed replication plan of key experiments from ‘Biomechanical remodeling of the microenvironment by stromal caveolin-1 favors tumor invasion and metastasis’ by Goetz and colleagues, published in Cell in 2011 (Goetz et al., 2011). The key experiments being replicated are those reported in Figures 7C (a-d), Supplemental Figure S2A, and Supplemental Figure S7C (a-c) (Goetz et al., 2011). In these experiments, which are a subset of all the experiments reported in the original publication, Goetz and colleagues show in a subcutaneous xenograft model that stromal caveolin-1 remodels the intratumoral microenvironment, which is correlated with increased metastasis formation. The Reproducibility Project: Cancer Biology is a collaboration between the Center for Open Science and Science Exchange and the results of the replications will be published in eLife. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04796.001 PMID:26179155

  8. Expression of CD117, DOG-1, and IGF-1R in gastrointestinal stromal tumours – an analysis of 70 cases from 2004 to 2010

    PubMed Central

    Zińczuk, Justyna; Kemona, Andrzej; Guzińska-Ustymowicz, Katarzyna; Żurawska, Joanna; Kędra, Bogusław

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Determination of the type of mutations in gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GIST) plays a major role in assessing the risk of progression of the disease, and also allows determination of the clinical management and treatment. More accurate GIST diagnosis is possible by using simultaneously various types of antibodies to immunohistochemistry methods in routine procedures. Aim To evaluate the expression of CD117, DOG-1, and IGF-1R in patients with gastrointestinal stromal tumours, and analysis of the impact of the examined protein expression on patient survival with emphasis on specific recognition and prognostication of these tumours. Material and methods The protein expression was analyzed in 70 patients who had undergone surgical treatment for mesenchymal tumours of the gastrointestinal tract, using the immunohistochemical method. Results Positive expression of CD117, DOG-1, and IGF1R included 95.71%, 88.57% and 11.43% of study GISTs, respectively. Statistical analysis showed positive significant correlation between DOG-1 expression and histological type of tumour (p = 0.024). Analysis of overall survival curves of 70 GIST patients according to expression of CD117, DOG-1, and IGF1R did not show a tendency towards longer survival of patients with positive expression (p > 0.05). Conclusions Predictive factors determining the survival time of patients are strongly associated with morphological features of tumours. A thorough analysis of each case plays a key role in predicting survival time of patients and may be a clue in targeting the therapeutic procedure. PMID:27350839

  9. Stromal cells in phyllodes tumors of the breast are enriched for EZH2 and stem cell marker expression.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanhong; Liss, Adam L; Chung, Eugene; Pierce, Lori J; Kleer, Celina G

    2016-07-01

    Phyllodes tumors (PTs) of the breast are fibroepithelial neoplasms with stromal hypercellularity, which is the basis for their classification as benign, borderline, and malignant. The histologic diagnosis of PTs is often difficult, and the pathological features may not always predict clinical behavior. The pathobiology of PT remains poorly understood. Enhancer of Zeste 2 (EZH2) epigenetically regulates cell-type identity, cellular differentiation, and breast cancer stem cells. EZH2 exerts oncogenic functions in breast cancer and is associated with metastasis. We hypothesized that in PTs, EZH2 and the stem cell marker ALDH1 may be expressed in stromal cells and may be associated with their degree of differentiation. Forty PTs were histologically characterized at our institution following the World Health Organization criteria. We investigated the expression of EZH2 and ALDH1 by immunohistochemistry and recorded as percentage of positive epithelial and stromal cells. EZH2 was positive when over 10 % of cells exhibited nuclear staining; ALDH1 was positive when over 5 % of cells had cytoplasmic staining. Of the 40 PTs, 24 (60 %) were histologically benign, 8 (20 %) borderline, and 8 (20 %) malignant. Stromal EZH2 was significantly associated with the diagnosis of malignant PT, as it was detected in 1 of 24 (4 %) benign, 3 of 8 (37.5 %) borderline, and 5 of 8 (62.5 %) malignant tumors. Stromal EZH2 was significantly associated with stromal overgrowth (p = 0.01), atypia (p = 0.01), hypercellularity (p = 0.01), and mitoses (p = 0.02), all features of malignant PT. Stromal EZH2 and ALDH1 were significantly associated with grade of PT (p = 0.01 and p < 0.05 respectively). In conclusion, EZH2 and ALDH1 expression in the stroma of PT may mark malignant progression and may be helpful to distinguish histologically benign from borderline and malignant tumors in challenging cases. Our study also suggests that PTs contain mesenchymal stem cells, shedding light

  10. Conservative Resectoscopic Surgery, Successful Delivery, and 60 Months of Follow-Up in a Patient with Endometrial Stromal Tumor with Sex-Cord-Like Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    De Franciscis, Pasquale; Grauso, Flavio; Ambrosio, Domenico; Torella, Marco; Messalli, Enrico Michelino; Colacurci, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    Uterine tumors with sex-cord-like differentiation are extremely rare types of uterine stromal neoplasm. These tumors were classified into two groups with considerable practical relevance because clinical behaviour of uterine tumor resembling ovarian sex cord tumor (UTROSCT) differs widely from its closely related endometrial stromal tumors with sex-cord-like elements (ESTSCLE). Treatment and prognosis of these tumors are unresolved issues because of the exiguous number of reported cases. We describe a rare case of endometrial stromal tumor with sex-cord-like differentiation successfully treated by resectoscopic surgery and conservation of the uterus, in an infertile patient affected by metrorrhagia. This procedure resulted in a pregnancy immediately after treatment and in a successful delivery. During 60 months of follow-up no evidence of recurrence was observed. PMID:27213063

  11. [Complications of benign nonepithelial tumors of the gastrointestinal tract].

    PubMed

    Chupryna, V V; Zaporozhets, V K; Vasilenko, N I

    1976-06-01

    The results of observations over 8 patients with complicated forms of benign nonepithelial tumors of abdominal organs are reported, including leiomyoma--in 7 cases and neurinoma--in 1. Isocomplications of this group of tumors in 5 patients were as follows: invagination of the small intestin--in 1, perforation and malignant transformation of the tumor--in 1. The patients were treated surgically. Resection of the organ involved seems to be preferable.

  12. Fibroepithelioma of Pinkus: Solitary tumor or sign of a complex gastrointestinal syndrome

    PubMed Central

    LONGO, CATERINA; PELLACANI, GIOVANNI; TOMASI, ALDO; MANDEL, VICTOR DESMOND; PONTI, GIOVANNI

    2016-01-01

    Fibroepithelioma of Pinkus (FEP), which is considered to be an uncommon variant of basal cell carcinoma, has been described in association with other systemic diseases. However, no specific studies are currently available on this subject. The aim of our study was to evaluate the clinical and morphological characteristics of FEP and investigate whether this rare tumor is a single entity or seen in the context of a more complex syndrome. We retrospectively analyzed 49 cases of FEP diagnosed and excised in a single academic institution from 1995 to 2011. The tumors were mainly located on the trunk (77.55%), followed by the lower extremities (12.20%) and the head and neck (10.20%). In 9 of the 49 cases (18%), FEP was associated with gastrointestinal tumors. The abovementioned cases are presented in an attempt to make clinicians more aware of a possible association between FEP and gastrointestinal cancer. Although a possible underlying common genetic background between FEP and gastrointestinal tumors was not provided, our study suggests that patients with FEP should be screened for the occurrence of gastrointestinal tumors. PMID:27123282

  13. Enrichment of c-Met+ tumorigenic stromal cells of giant cell tumor of bone and targeting by cabozantinib.

    PubMed

    Liu, L; Aleksandrowicz, E; Fan, P; Schönsiegel, F; Zhang, Y; Sähr, H; Gladkich, J; Mattern, J; Depeweg, D; Lehner, B; Fellenberg, J; Herr, I

    2014-10-16

    Giant cell tumor of bone (GCTB) is a very rare tumor entity, which is little examined owing to the lack of established cell lines and mouse models and the restriction of available primary cell lines. The stromal cells of GCTB have been made responsible for the aggressive growth and metastasis, emphasizing the presence of a cancer stem cell population. To identify and target such tumor-initiating cells, stromal cells were isolated from eight freshly resected GCTB tissues. Tumorigenic properties were examined by colony and spheroid formation, differentiation, migration, MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) assay, immunohistochemistry, antibody protein array, Alu in situ hybridization, FACS analysis and xenotransplantation into fertilized chicken eggs and mice. A sub-population of the neoplastic stromal cells formed spheroids and colonies, differentiated to osteoblasts, migrated to wounded regions and expressed the metastasis marker CXC-chemokine receptor type 4, indicating self-renewal, invasion and differentiation potential. Compared with adherent-growing cells, markers for pluripotency, stemness and cancer progression, including the CSC surface marker c-Met, were enhanced in spheroidal cells. This c-Met-enriched sub-population formed xenograft tumors in fertilized chicken eggs and mice. Cabozantinib, an inhibitor of c-Met in phase II trials, eliminated CSC features with a higher therapeutic effect than standard chemotherapy. This study identifies a c-Met(+) tumorigenic sub-population within stromal GCTB cells and suggests the c-Met inhibitor cabozantinib as a new therapeutic option for targeted elimination of unresectable or recurrent GCTB.

  14. Enhanced tumor development by butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) in liver, lung and gastrointestinal tract

    SciTech Connect

    Witschi, H.P.

    1986-04-03

    Continuous feeding of 0.5% or 0.05% of butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) enhances the development of spontaneously occurring liver tumors in C3H mice, but not in BALB/c mice. In mouse lung, the tumor-enhancing effects of BHT vary with the carcinogen used and in the gastrointestinal tract of mice and rats BHT enhances development of dimethylhydrazine-induced tumors but is without effect on tumors produced by methylnitrosourea. Strain differences, effect upon various carcinogens, paradoxical dose-responses and mechanisms of action remain major questions in the toxicology of BHT. 14 refs., 2 tabs.

  15. Stromal Integrin α11β1 Affects RM11 Prostate and 4T1 Breast Xenograft Tumors Differently

    PubMed Central

    Skogstrand, Trude; Sortland, Kristina; Schmid, Marei Caroline; Reed, Rolf K.; Stuhr, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Purpose It has been implied that the collagen binding integrin α11β1 plays a role in carcinogenesis. As still relatively little is known about how the stromal integrin α11β1 affects different aspects of tumor development, we wanted to examine the direct effects on primary tumor growth, fibrosis, tumor interstitial fluid pressure (PIF) and metastasis in murine 4T1 mammary and RM11 prostate tumors, using an in vivo SCID integrin α11-deficient mouse model. Methods Tumor growth was measured using a caliper, PIF by the wick-in-needle technique, activated fibroblasts by α-SMA immunofluorescence staining and fibrosis by transmission electron microscopy and picrosirius-red staining. Metastases were evaluated using hematoxylin and eosin stained sections. Results RM11 tumor growth was significantly reduced in the SCID integrin α11-deficient (α11-KO) compared to in SCID integrin α11 wild type (WT) mice, whereas there was no similar effect in the 4T1 tumor model. The 4T1 model demonstrated an alteration in collagen fibril diameter in the integrin α11-KO mice compared to WT, which was not found in the RM11 model. There were no significant differences in the amount of activated fibroblasts, total collagen content, collagen organization or PIF in the tumors in integrin α11-deficient mice compared to WT mice. There was also no difference in lung metastases between the two groups. Conclusion Deficiency of stromal integrin α11β1 showed different effects on tumor growth and collagen fibril diameter depending on tumor type, but no effect on tumor PIF or development of lung metastasis. PMID:26990302

  16. Importance of Sideropenic Anemia in the Diagnosis of Gastrointestinal Tract Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Sahovic, Sanela; Vukobrat-Bijedic, Zora; Sahovic, Vahidin

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Sideropenic anemia is a hypochromic, microcytic anemia caused by insufficient iron level in the body. This is the most common anemia. In a large percentage it is the symptom of gastrointestinal tract cancer. Anemia was defined by hemoglobin level <119 g/dl, hematocrit <0.356 for women or hemoglobin level <138 g/dL and hematocrit <0415 for men. Gastric cancer after lung cancer is the second most common malignant tumor in the world. Frequent localization is the antrum, and less frequently in the cardia and fundus. Definite factors in the development of gastric cancer are chronic atrophic gastritis, H. pylori, intestinal metaplasia, and epithelial dysplasia as a precancerous lesion. Strong link between sideropenic anemia and gastrointestinal tract cancers recommend that patients with sideropenic anemia without a clear indication underwent same gastroscopic and colonoscopy examination. The goals were to prove sideropenic anemia, diagnose and histologically confirm tumors, tumors location and correlates anemia with tumor anemia or show the dependence of anemia on tumor Results: The study included 100 subjects (50 from counseling center for hematology that came due to sideropenic anemia and 50 patients from the Clinic for Gastroenterology who had gastrointestinal tract cancer). Respondents had regular laboratory tests and endoscopic examinations, ultrasound of the abdomen, CT of the abdomen and tumor markers. In the group of patients from Counseling center for hematology with sideropenic anemia was found 11 cancerous processes, mostly in form of gastric and colon cancer. In the group of patients hospitalized at the Clinic for Gastroenterology most cancer process were localized in the stomach and colorectum. Conclusion: Tumors of the gastrointestinal tract are the most common cause of sideropenic anemia, due to which the patients often first contact Counseling center for hematology. Sideropenic anemia is more common in men as also the number of digestive

  17. Spectrophotometric Determination of the Characteristics of Stromal and Parenchymal Components of Colon Tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motevich, I. G.; Strekal, N. D.; Shulha, A. V.; Maskevich, S. A.

    2016-05-01

    We consider the dependence of the spectral properties of eosin and hematoxylin (dyes routinely used in histology as contrast agents) on their localization in biological tissues with different levels of pathology: benign and malignant neoplasms and sigmoid colonic crypts. We have analyzed the fluorescent images and fluorescence spectra of the parenchyma and stromal elements. We have established that on going from physiologically normal cells to tumor cells, the contribution to the absorption cross section of histologic sections due to hematoxylin increases. In pathologically altered cells in a colonic crypt, we observe a hypsochromic effect in the fluorescence spectra of the samples with appreciable quenching of the fluorescence, while in the model systems the reverse effect occurs: a shift of the fluorescence maximum toward the red region. We discuss the influence on the indicated effects from local pH and the polarity of the dye environment in the model systems and histologic sections. As the systems modeling the polarity and acidity of the biological media, we use aqueous solutions of the dyes with different pH values and synthetic polyelectrolytes.

  18. Myeloma cells can corrupt senescent mesenchymal stromal cells and impair their anti-tumor activity

    PubMed Central

    Özcan, Servet; Alessio, Nicola; Acar, Mustafa Burak; Toprak, Güler; Gönen, Zeynep Burcin; Peluso, Gianfranco; Galderisi, Umberto

    2015-01-01

    Senescent cells secrete several molecules that help to prevent the progression of cancer. However, cancer cells can also misuse these secreted elements to survive and grow. Since the molecular and functional bases of these different elements remain poorly understood, we analyzed the effect of senescent mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC) secretome on the biology of ARH-77 myeloma cells. In addition to differentiating in mesodermal derivatives, MSCs have sustained interest among researchers by supporting hematopoiesis, contributing to tissue homeostasis, and modulating inflammatory response, all activities accomplished primarily by the secretion of cytokines and growth factors. Moreover, senescence profoundly affects the composition of MSC secretome. In this study, we induced MSC senescence by oxidative stress, DNA damage, and replicative exhaustion. While the first two are considered to induce acute senescence, extensive proliferation triggers replicative (i.e., chronic) senescence. We cultivated cancer cells in the presence of acute and chronic senescent MSC-conditioned media and evaluated their proliferation, DNA damage, apoptosis, and senescence. Our findings revealed that senescent secretomes induced apoptosis or senescence, if not both, to different extents. This anti-tumor activity became heavily impaired when secretomes were collected from senescent cells previously in contact (i.e., primed) with cancer cells. Our analysis of senescent MSC secretomes with LC-MS/MS followed by Gene Ontology classification further indicated that priming with cancer profoundly affected secretome composition by abrogating the production of pro-senescent and apoptotic factors. We thus showed for the first time that compared with cancer-primed MSCs, naïve senescent MSCs can exert different effects on tumor progression. PMID:26498687

  19. The efficacy of Hemospray in patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding from tumor

    PubMed Central

    Pittayanon, Rapat; Prueksapanich, Piyapan; Rerknimitr, Rungsun

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Currently, conventional endoscopic treatments provide an unsatisfactory hemostatic outcome in upper gastrointestinal bleeding from tumor. Hemospray has been shown to be useful in many active gastrointestinal bleeding conditions. This study aimed to compare the efficacy of Hemospray and conventional endoscopic hemostasis. Patients and methods: Fourteen patients with active upper gastrointestinal bleeding from tumor were recruited. Hemospray was applied at the bleeding site until hemostasis was achieved. Four patients were excluded because they prematurely received definitive therapy to prevent further bleeding within 48 hours. Another 10 patients from historical control were matched based on the type of gastrointestinal tumors. The 14-day rebleeding rates, length of hospital stay (LOS) and mortality rate at 30-day follow up were assessed. Results: Baseline characteristics including age, stage of tumor, and Blatchford score did not differ between the two groups. The 14-day rebleeding rate in the Hemospray group was 3 times lower than the control group but not statistically significant (10 % vs. 30 %; P = 0.60). LOS was no different between the 2 groups (28.2 ± 21.2 vs. 23.8 ± 12.5 days; P = 0.26). The 30-day mortality rate in the Hemospray group was 3 times lower than that of in the conventional therapy group but not significant (10 % vs. 30 %, P = 0.7). Conclusions: Hemospray is a promising therapy for initial hemostasis in upper gastrointestinal bleeding from tumor because it can achieve hemostasis during the first 14 days, thus potentially allowing sufficient time before appropriate definitive intervention is considered. PMID:27652296

  20. [Prevalence and trend of gastrointestinal malignant tumors in the elderly over 75 years old in China].

    PubMed

    Zheng, Ying; Wu, Chunxiao

    2016-05-01

    Gastrointestinal malignant tumors are the most common malignant neoplasms among the elderly people over 75 years old in China. There are 122.1 thousand new gastric cases and 78.2 thousand new colorectal cancer cases diagnosed each year in China, which accounts for 42.73% and 18.08% respectively of the cases with same age in the world. The gastric cancer accounts for 25.13% and colorectal cancer accounts for 28.86%of all the malignancies in the elderly. The gastric cancer death accounts for 36.38% and colorectal cancer death accounts for 44.68% in those people over 75 years old in China. It was estimated that the risk of developing gastrointestinal malignant tumors of these elderly people was about 5-6 times and the risk of death of gastrointestinal malignant tumors was about 7-8 times of the general population. Compared with the general population and the people of 55-74 years old, the incidence of gastric cancer in the elderly decreased more slowly and the incidence of colorectal cancer increased more quickly over the past 40 years, which brought significant double burden. The survival rate of gastrointestinal malignant tumors in these elderly was lower than that of the general population. We summarized the incidence, mortality, survival and trend of gastrointestinal malignant tumors in the Chinese elderly, in order to provide data for predicting the age distribution and disease burden in the future, to improve the awareness for cancer prevention and control among these elderly, and to call attention to epidemiology, preclinical and clinical medicine for the elderly, especially in the field of study on the influence between comorbidity and cancer treatment, with the aim of improving survival and quality of life among the elderly.

  1. The efficacy of Hemospray in patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding from tumor

    PubMed Central

    Pittayanon, Rapat; Prueksapanich, Piyapan; Rerknimitr, Rungsun

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Currently, conventional endoscopic treatments provide an unsatisfactory hemostatic outcome in upper gastrointestinal bleeding from tumor. Hemospray has been shown to be useful in many active gastrointestinal bleeding conditions. This study aimed to compare the efficacy of Hemospray and conventional endoscopic hemostasis. Patients and methods: Fourteen patients with active upper gastrointestinal bleeding from tumor were recruited. Hemospray was applied at the bleeding site until hemostasis was achieved. Four patients were excluded because they prematurely received definitive therapy to prevent further bleeding within 48 hours. Another 10 patients from historical control were matched based on the type of gastrointestinal tumors. The 14-day rebleeding rates, length of hospital stay (LOS) and mortality rate at 30-day follow up were assessed. Results: Baseline characteristics including age, stage of tumor, and Blatchford score did not differ between the two groups. The 14-day rebleeding rate in the Hemospray group was 3 times lower than the control group but not statistically significant (10 % vs. 30 %; P = 0.60). LOS was no different between the 2 groups (28.2 ± 21.2 vs. 23.8 ± 12.5 days; P = 0.26). The 30-day mortality rate in the Hemospray group was 3 times lower than that of in the conventional therapy group but not significant (10 % vs. 30 %, P = 0.7). Conclusions: Hemospray is a promising therapy for initial hemostasis in upper gastrointestinal bleeding from tumor because it can achieve hemostasis during the first 14 days, thus potentially allowing sufficient time before appropriate definitive intervention is considered.

  2. Successful treatment of bleeding large duodenal gastrointestinal stromal tumour in a patient under dual antiplatelet therapy after recent drug-eluting coronary stent implantation

    PubMed Central

    Fukuyama, Keita; Fujikawa, Takahisa; Kuramitsu, Shoichi; Tanaka, Akira

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of a 69-year-old man who started dual antiplatelet therapy (APT) with aspirin and clopidogrel after recent implantation of drug-eluting coronary stent and developed massive bleeding due to large duodenal gastrointestinal stromal tumour (GIST). Following endoscopic haemostasis and discontinuation of dual APT, neoadjuvant chemotherapy with imatinib was started under continuation of ‘single’ APT with aspirin. A good chemotherapeutic response was achieved without recurrence of bleeding, and subsequent less invasive surgical resection of the tumour was performed, while preoperative single APT was continued for prevention of stent thrombosis. The patient recovered well without any thromboembolic or bleeding events. Neoadjuvant imatinib therapy and subsequent less invasive surgery under continuation of APT is one of the preferred approaches for patients with duodenal GIST with severe thromboembolic comorbidities, as in the current case. PMID:24777088

  3. An extragastrointestinal stromal tumor originating from the seminal vesicles: A case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Hou, Yi; Wang, Yinhuai; Xu, Ran; Li, Duo; Zhao, Xiaokun

    2013-10-01

    The present study reports a case of an extragastrointestinal stromal tumor (EGIST) originating from the seminal vesicles. A 74-year-old male patient with a tumor in the seminal vesicles underwent a radical spermatocystectomy due to an increased defecation frequency and a huge mass in the seminal vesicles. Ultrasonography and computed tomography (CT) initially diagnosed the mass as a tumor originating from the prostate. However, the mass was ultimately confirmed as an EGIST from the seminal vesicles following a laparotomy. According to the size, mitotic activity, cellularity, necrotic situation and immunohistochemical data, the tumor belonged to a low-risk group. No recurrence or metastasis has been identified during six years of follow-up observations. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to report this particular pathological type of EGIST.

  4. Study on the Evolution of Genes Mutation Related With Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2012-01-05

    Full Gene Sequences of c-KIT、PDGFRA and DOG1 Are Analyzed With the Screening-sequencing Approach; Investigate the Characteristics and Variations Associated With the Different Gene Mutations of c-KIT、PDGFRA and DOG1 in GIST Patients

  5. Stromal deletion of the APC tumor suppressor in mice triggers development of endometrial cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tanwar, Pradeep S.; Zhang, LiHua; Roberts, Drucilla J.; Teixeira, Jose M.

    2011-01-01

    The contribution of the stromal microenvironment to the progression of endometrial cancer (EC) has not been well explored. We have conditionally expressed a mutant allele of adenomatous polyposis coli (APCcKO) in murine uterine stroma cells to study its effect on uterine development and function. In addition to metrorrhagia, the mice develop complex atypical endometrial gland hyperplasia that progresses to endometrial carcinoma in situ and endometrial adenocarcinoma as evidenced by myometrial invasion. Stromal cells subjacent to the carcinoma cells express αSMA with fewer cells expressing PDGFR-α compared to normal stromal cells suggesting that the mutant stromal cells have acquired a more myofibroblastic phenotype, which have been described as cancer-associated fibroblasts and have been shown to induce carcinogenesis in other organ systems. Analyses of human EC specimens showed substantial αSMA expression in the stroma compared with normal endometrial stroma cells. We also show that APCcKO mutant uteri and human EC have decreased stromal levels of TGFβ and BMP activities and that the mutant uteri failed to respond to exogenous estradiol stimulation. The mutant stroma cells also had higher levels of VEGF and SDF signaling components and diminished expression of ERα and PR which is common in advanced stages of human EC and is an indicator of poor prognosis. Our results indicate that de novo mutation or loss of heterozygosity in stromal APC is sufficient to induce endometrial hyperplasia and endometrial carcinogenesis by mechanisms that are consistent with unopposed estrogen signaling in the endometrial epithelium. PMID:21363919

  6. The selective hypoxia inducible factor-1 inhibitor PX-478 provides in vivo radiosensitization through tumor stromal effects

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, David L.; Powis, Garth; Thitai-Kumar, Arun; He, Yi; Bankson, James; Williams, Ryan; Lemos, Robert; Oh, Junghwan; Volgin, Andrei; Soghomonyan, Suren; Nishii, Ryuichi; Alauddin, Mian; Mukhopadhay, Uday; Peng, Zhenghong; Bornmann, William; Gelovani, Juri

    2010-01-01

    Hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) promotes tumor cell adaptation to microenvironmental stress. HIF-1 is up-regulated in irradiated tumors and serves as a promising target for radiosensitization. We initially confirmed that the orally bioavailable HIF-1 inhibitor PX-478 reduces HIF-1 protein levels and signaling in vitro in a dose-dependent manner and provides direct radiosensitization of hypoxic cancer cells in clonogenic survival assays using C6 glioma, HN5 and UMSCCa10 squamous cells, and Panc-1 pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell lines. However, PX-478 yields striking in vivo tumor sensitization to single-dose irradiation, which cannot be explained by incremental improvement in direct tumor cell killing. We show that PX-478 prevents postradiation HIF-1 signaling and abrogates downstream stromal adaptation in C6 and HN5 reporter xenografts as measured by serial ultrasound, vascular magnetic resonance imaging, and hypoxia response element–specific micro–positron emission tomography imaging. The primacy of indirect PX-478 in vivo effects was corroborated by our findings that (a) either concurrent or early postradiation sequencing of PX-478 provides roughly equivalent sensitization and (b) constitutive vascular endothelial growth factor expression maintains refractory tumor vessel function and progression following combined radiation and PX-478. These results confirm that disruption of postradiation adaptive HIF-1 signaling by PX-478 imparts increased therapeutic efficacy through blockade of HIF-1–dependent reconstitution of tumor stromal function. Successful translation of targeted HIF-1 radiosensitization to the clinical setting will require specific consideration of tumor microenvironmental effects and mechanisms. PMID:19372568

  7. High Stromal Carbonic Anhydrase IX Expression Is Associated With Decreased Survival in p16-Negative Head-and-Neck Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Brockton, Nigel; Dort, Joseph; Lau, Harold; Hao, Desiree; Brar, Sony; Klimowicz, Alexander; Petrillo, Stephanie; Diaz, Roman; Doll, Corinne; Magliocco, Anthony

    2011-05-01

    Purpose: Head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is the fifth most common malignancy worldwide. Alcohol use and tobacco use are the most established risk factors; however, human papilloma virus (HPV) infection is a major risk factor for a subset of HNSCCs. Although HPV-positive tumors typically present at a more advanced stage at diagnosis, they are associated with a better prognosis. Tumor hypoxia confers poor prognosis and treatment failure, but direct tumor oxygen measurement is challenging. Endogenous markers of hypoxia (EMHs) have been proposed but have not replicated the prognostic utility of direct oxygen measurement. The expression of endogenous markers of hypoxia may be influenced by oxygen-independent factors, such as the HPV status of the tumor. Methods and Materials: Consecutive cases of locally advanced HNSCC, treated with a uniform regimen of combined radiotherapy and chemotherapy, were identified. Tissue microarrays were assembled from triplicate 0.6-mm cores of archived tumor tissue. HPV status was inferred from semiquantitative p16 immunostaining and directly measured by use of HPV-specific chromogenic in situ hybridization and polymerase chain reaction. Automated quantitative fluorescent immunohistochemistry was conducted to measure epithelial and stromal expression of carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX) and glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1). Results: High stromal CAIX expression was associated with significantly reduced overall survival (p = 0.03) in patients with p16-negative tumors. Conclusions: This is the first study to use quantitative immunohistochemistry to examine endogenous markers of hypoxia stratified by tumor p16/HPV status. Assessment of CAIX expression in p16-negative HNSCC could identify patients with the least favorable prognosis and inform therapeutic strategies.

  8. Gastrointestinal neuroendocrine tumors (NETs): new diagnostic and therapeutic challenges.

    PubMed

    Castaño, J P; Sundin, A; Maecke, H R; Villabona, C; Vazquez-Albertino, R; Navarro, E; Oberg, K

    2014-03-01

    This paper summarizes the current understanding of the biology of somatostatin receptor (sst), role of immunotherapy in neuroendocrine tumor (NET), new agents for PPRT, and methods to assess response and clinical benefit in NET. One of the most interesting aspects of sst biology is the recent discovery of truncated variants of the sst5 receptor subtype with unique tissue distribution and response to somatostatin (SST). These truncated receptors are associated with bad patient prognosis, decreased response to SST analogs, and may be new targets for diagnoses and treatment. IFN remains a cost-effective agent, particularly in classic mid gut carcinoids, and there is interest to continue examining immunotherapy's in this disease. PRRT remains a key strategy for treatment and imaging. In addition to the classic agents, there are a series of new agents targeting other receptors such as the incretin receptors (GLP-1R; GIPR) and other G-protein coupled receptors with great potential. With regards to therapy monitoring, the most commonly used criteria are Response Criteria Evaluation in Solid Tumors (RECIST). However, for different reasons, these criteria are not very useful in NET. Incorporation of other criteria such as Choi as well as functional imaging assessment with PET would be of great interest in this area.

  9. Collection of Biospecimen & Clinical Information in Patients w/ Gastrointestinal Cancers

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2012-05-24

    Gastrointestinal Neoplasms; Gynecologic Cancers; Gynecologic Cancers Cervical Cancer; Gastric (Stomach) Cancer; Gastro-Esophageal(GE) Junction Cancer; Gastrointenstinal Stromal Tumor (GIST); Colon/Rectal Cancer; Colon/Rectal Cancer Colon Cancer; Colon/Rectal Cancer Rectal Cancer; Colon/Rectal Cancer Anal Cancer; Anal Cancer; Hepatobiliary Cancers; Hepatobiliary Cancers Liver; Pancreatic Cancer

  10. Fluorescent Endoscopy of Tumors in Upper Part of Gastrointestinal Tract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisova, E.; Vladimirov, B.; Angelov, I.; Avramov, L.

    2007-04-01

    In the recent study delta-aminolevulinic acid/Protoporphyrin IX (5-ALA/PpIX) is used as fluorescent marker for dysplasia and tumor detection in esophagus and stomach. The 5-ALA is administered per os six hours before measurements at dose 20mg/kg weight. High-power light-emitting diode at 405 nm is used as an excitation source. Special opto-mechanical device is built for LED to use the light guide of standard video-endoscopic system (Olimpus Corp.). Through endoscopic instrumental channel a fiber is applied to return information about fluorescence to microspectrometer (USB4000, OceanOptics Inc.). Very good correlation between fluorescence signals and histology examination of the lesions investigated is achieved.

  11. Membrane Glycolipids Content Variety in Gastrointestinal Tumors and Transplantable Hepatomas in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Jun; Lv, Can Qun; Wang, Bo-Liang; Mei, Ping; Xu, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to investigate the variety of plasma contents of membrane glycolipids in 65 gastrointestinal tumors and 31 transplant hepatomas in mice. Material/Methods The experimental model was a transplantable murine hepatoma. Experimental mice were divided into 3 groups. Results The LSA and TSA content in the 2 groups were significantly difference (p<0.01), and were significantly lower in the therapeutic group than in the control group (p<0.01). Conclusions These results indicate that membrane glycolipids index LSA and TSA are sensitive markers in gastrointestinal tumors. In the transplanted hepatomas in mice, they may be considered as ancillary indicators for judging the therapeutic effect of hepatoma. PMID:27554918

  12. Membrane Glycolipids Content Variety in Gastrointestinal Tumors and Transplantable Hepatomas in Mice.

    PubMed

    Lv, Jun; Lv, Can Qun; Wang, Bo-Liang; Mei, Ping; Xu, Lei

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND The aim of this study was to investigate the variety of plasma contents of membrane glycolipids in 65 gastrointestinal tumors and 31 transplant hepatomas in mice. MATERIAL AND METHODS The experimental model was a transplantable murine hepatoma. Experimental mice were divided into 3 groups. RESULTS The LSA and TSA content in the 2 groups were significantly difference (p<0.01), and were significantly lower in the therapeutic group than in the control group (p<0.01). CONCLUSIONS These results indicate that membrane glycolipids index LSA and TSA are sensitive markers in gastrointestinal tumors. In the transplanted hepatomas in mice, they may be considered as ancillary indicators for judging the therapeutic effect of hepatoma. PMID:27554918

  13. Prognostic Impact of Reduced Connexin43 Expression and Gap Junction Coupling of Neoplastic Stromal Cells in Giant Cell Tumor of Bone

    PubMed Central

    Balla, Peter; Maros, Mate Elod; Barna, Gabor; Antal, Imre; Papp, Gergo; Sapi, Zoltan; Athanasou, Nicholas Anthony; Benassi, Maria Serena; Picci, Pierro; Krenacs, Tibor

    2015-01-01

    Missense mutations of the GJA1 gene encoding the gap junction channel protein connexin43 (Cx43) cause bone malformations resulting in oculodentodigital dysplasia (ODDD), while GJA1 null and ODDD mutant mice develop osteopenia. In this study we investigated Cx43 expression and channel functions in giant cell tumor of bone (GCTB), a locally aggressive osteolytic lesion with uncertain progression. Cx43 protein levels assessed by immunohistochemistry were correlated with GCTB cell types, clinico-radiological stages and progression free survival in tissue microarrays of 89 primary and 34 recurrent GCTB cases. Cx43 expression, phosphorylation, subcellular distribution and gap junction coupling was also investigated and compared between cultured neoplastic GCTB stromal cells and bone marow stromal cells or HDFa fibroblasts as a control. In GCTB tissues, most Cx43 was produced by CD163 negative neoplastic stromal cells and less by CD163 positive reactive monocytes/macrophages or by giant cells. Significantly less Cx43 was detected in α-smooth muscle actin positive than α-smooth muscle actin negative stromal cells and in osteoclast-rich tumor nests than in the adjacent reactive stroma. Progressively reduced Cx43 production in GCTB was significantly linked to advanced clinico-radiological stages and worse progression free survival. In neoplastic GCTB stromal cell cultures most Cx43 protein was localized in the paranuclear-Golgi region, while it was concentrated in the cell membranes both in bone marrow stromal cells and HDFa fibroblasts. In Western blots, alkaline phosphatase sensitive bands, linked to serine residues (Ser369, Ser372 or Ser373) detected in control cells, were missing in GCTB stromal cells. Defective cell membrane localization of Cx43 channels was in line with the significantly reduced transfer of the 622 Da fluorescing calcein dye between GCTB stromal cells. Our results show that significant downregulation of Cx43 expression and gap junction coupling in

  14. GUIDELINE FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF BILE DUCT CANCERS BY THE BRAZILIAN GASTROINTESTINAL TUMOR GROUP.

    PubMed

    Riechelmann, Rachel; Coutinho, Anelisa K; Weschenfelder, Rui F; Andrade DE Paulo, Gustavo; Fernandes, Gustavo Dos Santos; Gifoni, Markus; Oliveira, Maria de Lourdes; Gansl, Rene; Gil, Roberto; Luersen, Gustavo; Lucas, Lucio; Reisner, Marcio; Vieira, Fernando Meton; Machado, Marcel Autran; Murad, Andre; Osvaldt, Alessandro; Brandão, Miguel; Carvalho, Elisangela; Souza, Tulio; Pfiffer, Tulio; Prolla, Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    The Brazilian Gastrointestinal Tumor Group developed guidelines for the surgical and clinical management of patients with billiary cancers. The multidisciplinary panel was composed of experts in the field of radiology, medical oncology, surgical oncology, radiotherapy, endoscopy and pathology. The panel utilized the most recent literature to develop a series of evidence-based recommendations on different treatment and diagnostic strategies for cholangiocarcinomas and gallbladder cancers. PMID:27276097

  15. Fluorescence spectroscopy of gastrointestinal tumors: in vitro studies and in vivo clinical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelova, L.; Borisova, E.; Zhelyazkova, Al.; Keremedchiev, M.; Vladimirov, B.; Avramov, L.

    2013-11-01

    The limitations of standard endoscopy for detection and evaluation of cancerous changes in the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) are significant challenges and initiate development of new diagnostic modalities. Therefore many spectral and optical techniques are applied recently into the clinical practice for obtaining qualitatively and quantitatively new data from gastrointestinal neoplasia with different levels of clinical applicability and diagnostic success. Fluorescence imaging has been one of the most promising technologies in this area. The technique is very topical with its practical application in intra-operative, image-guided resection of tumors, because it permits minimal surgery intervention and friendly therapeutic conditions. The investigations presented here are based on in vitro measurements of excitation-emission matrices (EEM) for GIT neoplasia and in vivo measurements in the frames of initial clinical trial for tumor fluorescence spectra detection, applied for introduction of spectroscopic diagnostic system for optical biopsy of GIT tumors in the daily clinical practice of the University Hospital "Queen Jiovanna - ISUL"- Sofia. Autofluorescence and exogenous fluorescence signals are detected from normal mucosa, inflammation, dysphasia and carcinoma and main spectral features are evaluated. The systems and methods developed for diagnosis and monitoring could open new dimensions in diagnostic and real-time tumor resection. This will make the entire procedure more personal, patient friendly and effective and will help for further understanding of the tumor nature.

  16. Improved sensitivity in the diagnosis of gastro-intestinal tumors by fuzzy logic-based tumor marker profiles including the tumor M2-PK.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Joachim; Bitterlich, Norman; Schulze, Guntram

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to improve diagnostic efficiency in the detection of gastro-intestinal cancers by using fuzzy logic modeling in combination with a tumor marker panel (CEA, CA72-4, CA19-9) including Tumor M2-PK. In this prospective study histologically confirmed colorectal (n=247), esophageal (n=86) and gastric cancer (n=122) patients were investigated and compared to control (n=53) persons without any malignant diseases. Tumor M2-PK was measured in plasma with an ELISA (ScheBoBiotech, Germany); all other markers were measured in sera (Roche, Germany). At 95% specificity, tumor detection was possible by the best single marker in colorectal cancer patients in 48% (Tumor M2-PK), in gastric cancers in 61% (CA72-4) and in esophageal cancers in 56% (Tumor M2-PK). A fuzzy logic rule-based system employing a tumor marker panel increased sensitivity significantly in colorectal cancers (p<0. 001) to 63% (Tumor M2-PK and CEA), in gastric cancers (p<0.001) to 81% (Tumor M2-PK and CA 72-4) and in esophageal cancers (p<0.02) to 74% (Tumor M2-PK and CA72-4). Adding a third marker further improved the sensitivity only marginally. Fuzzy logic analysis has proven to be more powerful than measurement of single markers alone or combinations using multiple logistic regression analysis of the markers. Therefore, with the fuzzy logic method and a tumor marker panel (including Tumor M2-PK), a new diagnostic tool for the detection of gastro-intestinal cancers is available.

  17. RNA Sequencing of Tumor-Associated Microglia Reveals Ccl5 as a Stromal Chemokine Critical for Neurofibromatosis-1 Glioma Growth.

    PubMed

    Solga, Anne C; Pong, Winnie W; Kim, Keun-Young; Cimino, Patrick J; Toonen, Joseph A; Walker, Jason; Wylie, Todd; Magrini, Vincent; Griffith, Malachi; Griffith, Obi L; Ly, Amy; Ellisman, Mark H; Mardis, Elaine R; Gutmann, David H

    2015-10-01

    Solid cancers develop within a supportive microenvironment that promotes tumor formation and growth through the elaboration of mitogens and chemokines. Within these tumors, monocytes (macrophages and microglia) represent rich sources of these stromal factors. Leveraging a genetically engineered mouse model of neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) low-grade brain tumor (optic glioma), we have previously demonstrated that microglia are essential for glioma formation and maintenance. To identify potential tumor-associated microglial factors that support glioma growth (gliomagens), we initiated a comprehensive large-scale discovery effort using optimized RNA-sequencing methods focused specifically on glioma-associated microglia. Candidate microglial gliomagens were prioritized to identify potential secreted or membrane-bound proteins, which were next validated by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction as well as by RNA fluorescence in situ hybridization following minocycline-mediated microglial inactivation in vivo. Using these selection criteria, chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 5 (Ccl5) was identified as a chemokine highly expressed in genetically engineered Nf1 mouse optic gliomas relative to nonneoplastic optic nerves. As a candidate gliomagen, recombinant Ccl5 increased Nf1-deficient optic nerve astrocyte growth in vitro. Importantly, consistent with its critical role in maintaining tumor growth, treatment with Ccl5 neutralizing antibodies reduced Nf1 mouse optic glioma growth and improved retinal dysfunction in vivo. Collectively, these findings establish Ccl5 as an important microglial growth factor for low-grade glioma maintenance relevant to the development of future stroma-targeted brain tumor therapies. PMID:26585233

  18. Feto-maternal outcomes of pregnancy complicated by ovarian sex-cord stromal tumor: a systematic review of literature.

    PubMed

    Blake, Erin A; Carter, Charelle M; Kashani, Banafsheh N; Kodama, Michiko; Mabuchi, Seiji; Yoshino, Kiyoshi; Matsuo, Koji

    2014-04-01

    Sex-cord stromal tumors (SCSTs) are rare ovarian cancers and their behavior during pregnancy is not well understood. To evaluate the maternal and fetal outcomes of pregnancy complicated by ovarian SCST, a systematic literature search was conducted in PubMed/MEDLINE using entry key words "pregnancy" and each type of ovarian SCST ("sex cord stromal tumor," "granulosa cell tumor," "thecoma," "Sertoli-Leydig cell tumor," or "gynandroblastoma") between 1955 and 2012 that identified 46 cases eligible for the analysis. Clinical characteristics, pregnancy outcome, tumor characteristics, and survival outcomes were evaluated. Serious adverse events were defined as complications related to the SCST that resulted in severe morbidity or mortality for mother, fetus, or both. The most common histology was granulosa cell tumor (22.0%), followed by thecoma (18.6%) and Sertoli-Leydig cell tumor (8.5%). Abdomino-pelvic pain (45.7%), palpable mass (30.4%), and virilization (26.1%) were the three most common symptoms. The majority were stage I (76.1%), tumor size <15cm (64.9%), and underwent unilateral adnexectomy (80.4%). Fetal conservation surgery was seen in 54.3%. Most cases had live births (78.3%) at full term (60.9%). Among cases proceeded expectant delay of delivery (45.7%), most cases resulted in live birth (95.2%) with median expectant interval of 20.7 weeks. Maternal and/or fetal serious adverse events (SAEs) were observed in 41.3% with maternal shock/hemoperitoneum being the most common complication (13.0%). Logistic regression test identified younger age (<30 versus ≥30, 73.3% versus 26.7%, odds ratio [OR] 11.7, 95%CI 1.35-101, p=0.026), large tumor (size ≥15cm versus <15cm, 64.9% versus 35.1%, OR 10.0, 95%CI 1.29-26.2, p=0.004), and advanced-stage (stages II-IV versus I, 76.1% versus 23.9%, OR 5.82, 95%CI 2.05-48.9, p=0.022) as risk factors of increased SAE. Overall survival of patients diagnosed with ovarian SCST during pregnancy was comparable to ovarian SCST not

  19. Molecular Genetic Evidence for Different Clonal Origins of Epithelial and Stromal Components of Phyllodes Tumor of the Prostate

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, Ryan P.; Zhang, Shaobo; Bostwick, David G.; Qian, Junqi; Eble, John N.; Wang, Mingsheng; Lin, Haiqun; Cheng, Liang

    2004-01-01

    Phyllodes tumor of the prostate is a rare neoplasm, composed of epithelium-lined cysts and channels embedded in a variably cellular stroma. The pathogenetic relationship of the epithelium and stroma is unknown and whether each is a clonal neoplastic element is uncertain. We studied the clonality of phyllodes tumors from six patients who underwent either enucleation or transurethral resection as their initial treatment. This was followed by total prostatectomy in three of the patients. Laser-assisted microdissection was performed to extract epithelial and stromal components of phyllodes tumor from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue. Polymerase chain reaction was used to amplify genomic DNA at specific loci on chromosome 7q31 (D7S522), 8p21.3-q11.1 (D8S133, D8S137), 8p22 (D8S261), 10q23 (D10S168, D10S571), 17p13 (TP53), 16q23.2 (D16S507), 12q11–12 (D12S264), 17q (D17S855), 18p11.22-p11 (D18S53), and 22q11.2 (D22S264). In each tumor, stroma and epithelium were analyzed separately. Gel electrophoresis with autoradiography was used to detect loss of heterozygosity. All tumors showed allelic loss in one or more loci of both the epithelial and stromal components. The frequency of allelic loss in the epithelial component was 2 of 5 (40%) at D7S522, 2 of 6 (33%) at D8S133, 1 of 5 (20%) at D8S137, 3 of 6 (50%) at D8S261, 4 of 4 (100%) at D10S168, 4 of 6 (67%) at TP53, 2 of 6 (33%) at D10S571, 6 of 6 (100%) at D16S507, 1 of 5 (20%) at D12S264, 1 of 6 (17%) at D17S855, 2 of 6 (33%) at D18S53, and 2 of 5 (40%) at D22S264. The frequency of allelic loss in the stromal component was 2 of 5 (40%) at D7S522, 1 of 6 (17%) at D8S133, 2 of 5 (40%) at D8S137, 3 of 6 (50%) at D8S261, 1 of 4 (25%) at D10S168, 3 of 6 (50%) at TP53, 2 of 6 (33%) at D10S571, 3 of 6 (50%) at D16S507, 1 of 5 (20%) at D12S264, 0 of 6 (0%) at D17S855, 1 of 6 (17%) at D18S53, and 0 of 5 (0%) at D22S264. The pattern of allelic loss is significantly different in both stroma and epithelium statistically

  20. Interferon-γ and Tumor Necrosis Factor-α Polarize Bone Marrow Stromal Cells Uniformly to a Th1 Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Ping; Zhao, Yuanlong; Liu, Hui; Chen, Jinguo; Ren, Jiaqiang; Jin, Jianjian; Bedognetti, Davide; Liu, Shutong; Wang, Ena; Marincola, Francesco; Stroncek, David

    2016-01-01

    Activated T cells polarize mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) to a proinflammatory Th1 phenotype which likely has an important role in amplifying the immune response in the tumor microenvironment. We investigated the role of interferon gamma (IFN-γ) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), two factors produced by activated T cells, in MSC polarization. Gene expression and culture supernatant analysis showed that TNF-α and IFN-γ stimulated MSCs expressed distinct sets of proinflammatory factors. The combination of IFN-γ and TNF-α was synergistic and induced a transcriptome most similar to that found in MSCs stimulated with activated T cells and similar to that found in the inflamed tumor microenvironment; a Th1 phenotype with the expression of the immunosuppressive factors IL-4, IL-10, CD274/PD-L1 and indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase (IDO). Single cell qRT-PCR analysis showed that the combination of IFN-γ and TNF-α polarized uniformly to this phenotype. The combination of IFN-γ and TNF-α results in the synergist uniform polarization of MSCs toward a primarily Th1 phenotype. The stimulation of MSCs by IFN-γ and TNF-α released from activated tumor infiltrating T cells is likely responsible for the production of many factors that characterize the tumor microenvironment. PMID:27211104

  1. Estrogen-producing endometrioid adenocarcinoma resembling sex cord-stromal tumor of the ovary: a review of four postmenopausal cases

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The 4 present cases with endometrioid adenocarcinoma (EMA) of the ovary were characterized by estrogen overproduction and resemblance to sex cord-stromal tumor (SCST). The patients were all postmenopausal, at ages ranging from 60 to 79 years (av. 67.5), who complained of abdominal discomfort or distention and also atypical genital bleeding. Cytologically, maturation of the cervicovaginal squamous epithelium and active endometrial proliferation were detected. The serum estrogen (estradiol, E2) value was preoperatively found to be elevated, ranging from 48.7 to 83.0 pg/mL (av. 58.4). In contrast, follicle stimulating hormone was suppressed to below the normal value. MR imaging diagnoses included SCSTs such as granulosa cell tumor or thecoma for 3 cases because of predominantly solid growth, and epithelial malignancy for one case because of cystic and solid structure. Grossly, the solid part of 3 cases was homogeneously yellow in color. Histologically, varying amounts of tumor components were arranged in solid nests, hollow tubules, cord-like strands and cribriform-like nests in addition to the conventional EMA histology. In summary, postmenopausal ovarian solid tumors with the estrogenic manifestations tend to be preoperatively diagnosed as SCST. Due to this, in the histological diagnosis, this variant of ovarian EMA may be challenging and misdiagnosed as SCST because of its wide range in morphology. Virtual slides http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/6096841358065394 PMID:23190574

  2. Gastrointestinal neuroendocrine tumors: Searching the optimal treatment strategy--A literature review.

    PubMed

    Berardi, Rossana; Rinaldi, Silvia; Torniai, Mariangela; Morgese, Francesca; Partelli, Stefano; Caramanti, Miriam; Onofri, Azzurra; Polenta, Vanessa; Pagliaretta, Silvia; Falconi, Massimo; Cascinu, Stefano

    2016-02-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors of the gastro-entero-pancreatic system (GEP-NETs) are a heterogeneous group of neoplasms, with different malignant potential and behavior. Many treatment options are available. Surgery should be considered for localized tumors and in some selected cases of metastatic disease. Somatostatin analogs, useful for symptoms control in functioning tumors, are also effective to inhibit tumor progression in specific settings. The multi-TKI sunitinib and of the mTOR-inhibitor everolimus are efficacy for metastatic pancreatic NET (P-NET) treatment. Chemotherapy is generally used in symptomatic and progressive NETs. Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) should be recommended after failure of medical therapy. For tumors confined to the liver ablative techniques should be considered. Nevertheless a shared therapeutic sequence for GEP-NET treatment still does not exist. In this review, we analyzed available data trying to identify the better treatment strategy and to suggest potential therapeutic algorithms distinguishing P-NETs from gastrointestinal NETs (GI-NETs). PMID:26643525

  3. Histopathological, immunohistochemical, and image analytic parameters characterizing the stromal component in primary and recurrent giant cell tumor of bone.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Charu Chandra; Safaya, Rajni; Kawatra Madan, Neha; Khan, Shah Alam; Iyer, Venkateswaran K

    2016-01-01

    Giant cell tumor (GCT) of bone is a benign locally aggressive tumor whose biological behavior is unpredictable. Currently, there are no definitive clinical, histological, biochemical, or immunological parameters that can predict its behavior. This study was undertaken to examine whether delineation of reactive and neoplastic stromal component of GCT can help in this regard. 55 cases of GCT (30 primary, 25 recurrent) were subjected to histopathological grading, immunohistochemistry, and image analysis. Spindling of stroma was more frequent in recurrent GCT with 64% cases having more than 50% spindled stroma (p < 0.001). Number of mitosis/10 HPF and higher grade were more in recurrent GCT. Mean percentage positivity for CD68 (38.36%) and α1-ACT (70.86%) was higher in primary than recurrent GCT. PCNA and MiB-1 labeling indices were higher in recurrent (42.62% and 9.18%, respectively) than in primary group (24.75% and 7.7%, respectively). A single numerical parameter encompassing stromal cell population and its proliferation was derived as ratio of PCNA/CD68 and PCNA/α1-ACT. Both ratios were higher in recurrent (0.81 ± 0.38; 1.58 ± 1.50) than in primary GCT (0.58 ± 0.62; 0.34 ± 0.29) (p = 0.002; 0.01). On image analysis, parameters significantly different between the two groups were nuclear area and nuclear integrated optical density. It was thus concluded that recurrent GCT shows higher grade, increased mitosis, more spindling, fewer reactive components, and higher proliferation than primary GCT. Delineation of reactive component (α1-ACT positive) and proliferating component (PCNA positive cells) using immunohistochemistry with calculation of the PCNA/ACT ratio delivers more information than image analysis.

  4. Mixed epithelial and stromal tumor of the kidney (MEST) simulating an upper tract TCC.

    PubMed

    Sountoulides, Petros; Koptsis, Michail; Metaxa, Linda; Theodosiou, Alexandros; Kikidakis, Dimitrios; Filintatzi, Chrysa; Paschalidis, Konstantinos

    2012-02-01

    We present a rare and interesting case of a mixed epithelial and stromal tumour (MEST) of the kidney. The case is unique as it involves a male patient with no history of hormonal therapy presenting with a filling defect in the renal collecting system and positive urine cytology. The patient was diagnosed with transitional cell carcinoma of the renal pelvis and subjected to nephroureterectomy, which revealed a solid tumour arising from the lower calyces and extending into the renal pelvis and upper ureter. Pathology revealed a MEST. The patient was disease-free at the 6-month follow-up.

  5. [In vitro evaluation of the chemosensitivity of malignant gastrointestinal tumors by stem cell assay].

    PubMed

    Scheithauer, W; Temsch, E M; Schieder, H; Funovics, J; Schiessel, R; Grabner, G

    1984-01-01

    The Human Tumor Stem Cell Assay, originally described by Hamburger and Salmon, was shown to be a useful in-vitro technique for predicting response or lack of response in individual patients' tumors. In the present study 34 GI-tumors were assayed for evaluation of in-vitro growth characteristics and sensitivity-patterns to standard chemotherapeutic drugs as well as to recombinant interferon alpha-2(rIF). Sufficient growth for evaluation of anticancer drug activity (greater than 30 colonies/control plate) was obtained in 56% of specimens: 2/9 colorectal, 0/3 stomach, 0/3 pancreatic tumors and 1/4 hepatomas revealed a 50% (or more) decrease of TCFUs, that was considered the minimum for in-vitro efficacy. Our results suggest a very limited overall activity of rIF in gastrointestinal malignancies. Only 1 pancreatic cancer (of 18 evaluable specimens) showed a significant decrease of colony formation (70%), when 100 U of interferon/ml were added to the culture system.

  6. A pharmaco-economic analysis of second-line treatment with imatinib or sunitinib in patients with advanced gastrointestinal stromal tumours.

    PubMed

    Contreras-Hernández, I; Mould-Quevedo, J F; Silva, A; Salinas-Escudero, G; Villasís-Keever, M A; Granados-García, V; Dávila-Loaiza, G; Petersen, J A; Garduño-Espinosa, J

    2008-06-01

    Second-line treatments recommended by the National Cancer Center Network to manage advanced-stage gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GIST) were evaluated to determine the cost and cost-effectiveness of each intervention in the Mexican insurance system, the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social (IMSS). Treatments examined over a 5-year temporal horizon to estimate long-term costs included 800 mg day(-1) of imatinib mesylate, 50 mg day(-1) of sunitinib malate (administered in a 4 week on/2 week rest schedule), and palliative care. The mean cost (MC), cost-effectiveness, and benefit of each intervention were compared to determine the best GIST treatment from the institutional perspective of the IMSS. As sunitinib was not reimbursed at the time of the study, a Markov model and sensitivity analysis were conducted to predict the MC and likelihood of reimbursement. Patients taking 800 mg day(-1) of imatinib had the highest MC (+/-s.d.) of treatment at $35,225.61 USD (+/-1253.65 USD); while sunitinib incurred a median MC of $17,805.87 USD (+/-694.83 USD); and palliative care had the least MC over treatment duration as the cost was $2071.86 USD (+/-472.88 USD). In comparison to palliative care, sunitinib is cost-effective for 38.9% of patients; however, sunitinib delivered the greatest survival benefit as 5.64 progression-free months (PFM) and 1.4 life-years gained (LYG) were obtained in the economic model. Conversely, patients on imatinib and palliative care saw a lower PFM of 5.28 months and 2.58 months and also fewer LYG (only 1.31 and 1.08 years, respectively). Therefore, economic modeling predicts that reimbursing sunitinib over high dose imatinib in the second-line GIST indication would deliver cost savings to the IMSS and greater survival benefits to patients.

  7. Concise review: genetically engineered stem cell therapy targeting angiogenesis and tumor stroma in gastrointestinal malignancy.

    PubMed

    Keung, Emily Z; Nelson, Peter J; Conrad, Claudius

    2013-02-01

    Cell-based gene therapy holds considerable promise for the treatment of human malignancy. Genetically engineered cells if delivered to sites of disease could alleviate symptoms or even cure cancer through expression of therapeutic or suicide transgene products. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), nonhematopoietic multipotent cells found primarily in bone marrow, have garnered particular interest as potential tumor-targeting vehicles due to their innate tumortropic homing properties. However, recent strategies go further than simply using MSCs as vehicles and use the stem cell-specific genetic make-up to restrict transgene expression to tumorigenic environments using tumor-tissue specific promoters. This addresses one of the concerns with this novel therapy that nonselective stem cell-based therapy could induce cancer rather than treat it. Even minimal off-target effects can be deleterious, motivating recent strategies to not only enhance MSC homing but also engineer them to make their antitumor effect selective to sites of malignancy. This review will summarize the advances made in the past decade toward developing novel cell-based cancer therapies using genetically engineered MSCs with a focus on strategies to achieve and enhance tumor specificity and their application to targeting gastrointestinal malignancies such as hepatocellular carcinoma and pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

  8. Detection of tumor cell contamination in peripheral blood by RT-PCR in gastrointestinal cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Noh, Y H; Im, G; Ku, J H; Lee, Y S; Ahn, M J

    1999-12-01

    We analyzed the peripheral blood of patients with gastrointestinal tract cancer at different stages to assess the presence of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) mRNA by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), which we used as an indicator for micrometastatic malignant cells. A total of 35 gastric, 24 colorectal, 4 esophageal and 4 biliary tract cancer patients and nine normal healthy subjects were studied. No CEA mRNA was detected in the nine normal healthy volunteers. CEA mRNA was detected in 100% (10/10) of metastatic, 33.3% (3/9) of early gastric cancer (EGC), and 18.8% (3/16) resectable gastric cancer patients, respectively. In colorectal cancer, 55.6% (5/9) of metastatic cancers were positive for CEA mRNA, and 26.7% (4/15) Duke stage B/C showed positive. One patient with stage III gastric cancer who was negative CEA mRNA initially and turned positive during follow-up, developed multiple bone metastasis one month later. Another stage III patient, who was positive for CEA mRNA, preoperatively revealed early relapse in two months. These results suggest that the identification of circulating tumor cells using RT-PCR for the detection of CEA mRNA is feasible and this analysis may be a promising tool for early detection of micrometastatic circulating malignant cells in patients with gastrointestinal tract cancer.

  9. Tumor-associated Endo180 requires stromal-derived LOX to promote metastatic prostate cancer cell migration on human ECM surfaces.

    PubMed

    Caley, Matthew P; King, Helen; Shah, Neel; Wang, Kai; Rodriguez-Teja, Mercedes; Gronau, Julian H; Waxman, Jonathan; Sturge, Justin

    2016-02-01

    The diverse composition and structure of extracellular matrix (ECM) interfaces encountered by tumor cells at secondary tissue sites can influence metastatic progression. Extensive in vitro and in vivo data has confirmed that metastasizing tumor cells can adopt different migratory modes in response to their microenvironment. Here we present a model that uses human stromal cell-derived matrices to demonstrate that plasticity in tumor cell movement is controlled by the tumor-associated collagen receptor Endo180 (CD280, CLEC13E, KIAA0709, MRC2, TEM9, uPARAP) and the crosslinking of collagen fibers by stromal-derived lysyl oxidase (LOX). Human osteoblast-derived and fibroblast-derived ECM supported a rounded 'amoeboid-like' mode of cell migration and enhanced Endo180 expression in three prostate cancer cell lines (PC3, VCaP, DU145). Genetic silencing of Endo180 reverted PC3 cells from their rounded mode of migration towards a bipolar 'mesenchymal-like' mode of migration and blocked their translocation on human fibroblast-derived and osteoblast-derived matrices. The concomitant decrease in PC3 cell migration and increase in Endo180 expression induced by stromal LOX inhibition indicates that the Endo180-dependent rounded mode of prostate cancer cell migration requires ECM crosslinking. In conclusion, this study introduces a realistic in vitro model for the study of metastatic prostate cancer cell plasticity and pinpoints the cooperation between tumor-associated Endo180 and the stiff microenvironment imposed by stromal-derived LOX as a potential target for limiting metastatic progression in prostate cancer. PMID:26567111

  10. Modeling stromal determinants of 3D tumor growth to inform PDT-mediated combination treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizvi, I.; Anbil, S.; Celli, J. P.; Alagic, N.; Massodi, I.; Hasan, T.

    2013-03-01

    Advanced stage ovarian carcinoma is characterized by poor prognosis and peritoneal micronodules that exhibit treatment resistance. This is partially due to interactions between multifocal disease and the tumor microenvironment, which includes tumor endothelial cells (TECs) and extracellular matrix components (ECM). Here we describe the development of a three-dimensional model of ovarian cancer that incorporates TECs and ECM. A comparison of several methodologies to generate endothelialized ovarian micronodules along with a preliminary physical characterization is described. This model will allow for detailed investigation of tumor-stroma interactions and how they impact disease progression and treatment response.

  11. A 3D in vitro model of patient-derived prostate cancer xenograft for controlled interrogation of in vivo tumor-stromal interactions.

    PubMed

    Fong, Eliza L S; Wan, Xinhai; Yang, Jun; Morgado, Micaela; Mikos, Antonios G; Harrington, Daniel A; Navone, Nora M; Farach-Carson, Mary C

    2016-01-01

    Patient-derived xenograft (PDX) models better represent human cancer than traditional cell lines. However, the complex in vivo environment makes it challenging to employ PDX models to investigate tumor-stromal interactions, such as those that mediate prostate cancer (PCa) bone metastasis. Thus, we engineered a defined three-dimensional (3D) hydrogel system capable of supporting the co-culture of PCa PDX cells and osteoblastic cells to recapitulate the PCa-osteoblast unit within the bone metastatic microenvironment in vitro. Our 3D model not only maintained cell viability but also preserved the typical osteogenic phenotype of PCa PDX cells. Additionally, co-culture cellularity was maintained over that of either cell type cultured alone, suggesting that the PCa-osteoblast cross-talk supports PCa progression in bone, as is hypothesized to occur in patients with prostatic bone metastasis. Strikingly, osteoblastic cells co-cultured with PCa PDX tumoroids organized around the tumoroids, closely mimicking the architecture of PCa metastases in bone. Finally, tumor-stromal signaling mediated by the fibroblast growth factor axis tightly paralleled that in the in vivo counterpart. Together, these findings indicate that this 3D PCa PDX model recapitulates important pathological properties of PCa bone metastasis, and validate the use of this model for controlled and systematic interrogation of complex in vivo tumor-stromal interactions.

  12. Diagnosis and management of gastrointestinal neuroendocrine tumors: An evidence-based Canadian consensus.

    PubMed

    Singh, Simron; Asa, Sylvia L; Dey, Chris; Kennecke, Hagen; Laidley, David; Law, Calvin; Asmis, Timothy; Chan, David; Ezzat, Shereen; Goodwin, Rachel; Mete, Ozgur; Pasieka, Janice; Rivera, Juan; Wong, Ralph; Segelov, Eva; Rayson, Daniel

    2016-06-01

    The majority of neuroendocrine tumors originate in the digestive system and incidence is increasing within Canada and globally. Due to rapidly evolving evidence related to diagnosis and clinical management, updated guidance on the diagnosis and treatment of gastrointestinal neuroendocrine tumors (GI-NETs) are of clinical importance. Well-differentiated GI-NETs may exhibit indolent clinical behavior and are often metastatic at diagnosis. Some NET patients will develop secretory disease requiring symptom control to optimize quality of life and clinical outcomes. Optimal management of GI-NETs is in a multidisciplinary environment and is multimodal, requiring collaboration between medical, surgical, imaging and pathology specialties. Clinical application of advances in pathological classification and diagnostic technologies, along with evolving surgical, radiotherapeutic and medical therapies are critical to the advancement of patient care. We performed a systematic literature search to update our last set of published guidelines (2010) and identified new level 1 evidence for novel therapies, including telotristat etiprate (TELESTAR), lanreotide (CLARINET), everolimus (RADIANT-2; RADIANT-4) and peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT; NETTER-1). Integrating these data with the clinical knowledge of 16 multi-disciplinary experts, we devised consensus recommendations to guide state of the art clinical management of GI-NETs.

  13. Efficacy and safety of regorafenib for advanced gastrointestinal stromal tumours after failure of imatinib and sunitinib: an international, multicentre, prospective, randomised, placebo-controlled phase 3 trial (GRID)

    PubMed Central

    Demetri, George D; Reichardt, Peter; Kang, Yoon-Koo; Blay, Jean-Yves; Rutkowski, Piotr; Gelderblom, Hans; Hohenberger, Peter; Leahy, Michael; von Mehren, Margaret; Joensuu, Heikki; Badalamenti, Giuseppe; Blackstein, Martin; Cesne, Axel Le; Schöffski, Patrick; Maki, Robert G; Bauer, Sebastian; Nguyen, Binh Bui; Xu, Jianming; Nishida, Toshirou; Chung, John; Kappeler, Christian; Kuss, Iris; Laurent, Dirk; Casali, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background To date, only two agents, imatinib and sunitinib, have shown clinical benefit in patients with gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs), but almost all metastatic GISTs eventually develop resistance to these agents, resulting in fatal disease progression. This phase 3 trial assessed efficacy and safety of regorafenib in patients with metastatic and/or unresectable GIST progressing after failure of at least imatinib and sunitinib. Methods Patients were randomised 2:1 to receive either regorafenib 160 mg orally daily or placebo, plus best supportive care in both arms, for the first 3 weeks of each 4-week cycle. The primary endpoint was progression-free survival (PFS). Upon disease progression, patients on placebo could cross over to regorafenib. Secondary endpoints included overall survival (OS), objective response rate, disease control rate (DCR: rate of durable stable disease lasting for ≥12 weeks plus complete or partial responses), and safety. This trial is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT01271712). Results From January to August 2011, 240 patients were screened at 57 centres in 17 countries, and 199 patients were randomised to receive regorafenib (n=133) or matching placebo (n=66). Median PFS per independent blinded central review was 4·8 months and 0·9 months, respectively (hazard ratio [HR] 0·27, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0·19–0·39; p<0·0001). Following progression, 56/66 patients (84·8%) on placebo crossed over to regorafenib, resulting in no significant difference in OS between study arms (HR 0·77, 95% CI 0·42–1·41; p=0·199). A best response of partial response or stable disease was observed in 101/133 patients (75·9%) on regorafenib and 23/66 patients (34·8%) on placebo. DCR was 52·6% (70/133 patients) and 9·1% (6/66 patients), respectively. Drug-related adverse events were reported in 130 (98·5%) of 132 regorafenib patients and 45 (68·2%) of 66 placebo patients. The most common grade ≥3 regorafenib

  14. Lymphotoxin α/β and Tumor Necrosis Factor Are Required for Stromal Cell Expression of Homing Chemokines in B and T Cell Areas of the Spleen

    PubMed Central

    Ngo, Vu N.; Korner, Heinrich; Gunn, Michael D.; Schmidt, Kerstin N.; Sean Riminton, D.; Cooper, Max D.; Browning, Jeffrey L.; Sedgwick, Jonathon D.; Cyster, Jason G.

    1999-01-01

    Mice deficient in the cytokines tumor necrosis factor (TNF) or lymphotoxin (LT) α/β lack polarized B cell follicles in the spleen. Deficiency in CXC chemokine receptor 5 (CXCR5), a receptor for B lymphocyte chemoattractant (BLC), also causes loss of splenic follicles. Here we report that BLC expression by follicular stromal cells is defective in TNF-, TNF receptor 1 (TNFR1)-, LTα- and LTβ-deficient mice. Treatment of adult mice with antagonists of LTα1β2 also leads to decreased BLC expression. These findings indicate that LTα1β2 and TNF have a role upstream of BLC/CXCR5 in the process of follicle formation. In addition to disrupted follicles, LT-deficient animals have disorganized T zones. Expression of the T cell attractant, secondary lymphoid tissue chemokine (SLC), by T zone stromal cells is found to be markedly depressed in LTα-, and LTβ-deficient mice. Expression of the SLC-related chemokine, Epstein Barr virus–induced molecule 1 ligand chemokine (ELC), is also reduced. Exploring the basis for the reduced SLC expression led to identification of further disruptions in T zone stromal cells. Together these findings indicate that LTα1β2 and TNF are required for the development and function of B and T zone stromal cells that make chemokines necessary for lymphocyte compartmentalization in the spleen. PMID:9892622

  15. Periostin expression in intra-tumoral stromal cells is prognostic and predictive for colorectal carcinoma via creating a cancer-supportive niche

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Xiaojie; Ding, Yibo; Luo, Yanxin; Cai, Hui; Liu, Yan; Gao, Xianhua; Liu, Qizhi; Yu, Yongwei; Du, Yan; Wang, Hao; Ma, Liye; Wang, Jianping; Chen, Kun; Ding, Yanqing; Fu, Chuangang; Cao, Guangwen

    2016-01-01

    Periostin (POSTN) expression in cancer cells and circulation has been related to poor prognosis of colorectal carcinoma (CRC). However, the role of POSTN expressed in intra-tumoral stroma on CRC progression remains largely unknown. This study enrolled 1098 CRC patients who received surgical treatment in Shanghai and Guangzhou, Mainland China. In Shanghai cohort, immunohistochemistry score of stromal POSTN expression increased consecutively from adjacent mucosa, primary CRC tissues, to metastatic CRC tissues (P < 0.001), while medium- and high-stromal POSTN expression, rather than epithelial POSTN expression, independently predicted unfavorable prognoses of CRC, adjusted for covariates including TNM stage and postoperative chemotherapy in multivariate Cox models. The results in Shanghai cohort were faithfully replicated in Guangzhou cohort. Stromal POSTN expression dose-dependently predicted an unfavorable prognosis of stage III CRC patients with postoperative chemotherapy in both cohorts. POSTN derived from colonic fibroblasts or recombinant POSTN significantly promoted proliferation, anchorage independent growth, invasion, and chemo-resistance of CRC cells; whereas these effects were counteracted via targeting to PI3K/Akt or Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. CRC cell RKO-derived factor(s) significantly induced POSTN production in colonic fibroblasts and autocrine POSTN promoted proliferation, migration, and anchorage independent growth of fibroblasts. Conclusively, stromal POSTN is prognostic and predictive for CRC via creating a niche to facilitate cancer progression. Targeting POSTN-induced signaling pathways may be therapeutic options for metastatic or chemoresistant CRC. PMID:26556874

  16. Biologically relevant 3D tumor arrays: treatment response and the importance of stromal partners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizvi, Imran; Celli, Jonathan P.; Xu, Feng; Evans, Conor L.; Abu-Yousif, Adnan O.; Muzikansky, Alona; Elrington, Stefan A.; Pogue, Brian W.; Finkelstein, Dianne M.; Demirci, Utkan; Hasan, Tayyaba

    2011-02-01

    The development and translational potential of therapeutic strategies for cancer is limited, in part, by a lack of biological models that capture important aspects of tumor growth and treatment response. It is also becoming increasingly evident that no single treatment will be curative for this complex disease. Rationally-designed combination regimens that impact multiple targets provide the best hope of significantly improving clinical outcomes for cancer patients. Rapidly identifying treatments that cooperatively enhance treatment efficacy from the vast library of candidate interventions is not feasible, however, with current systems. There is a vital, unmet need to create cell-based research platforms that more accurately mimic the complex biology of human tumors than monolayer cultures, while providing the ability to screen therapeutic combinations more rapidly than animal models. We have developed a highly reproducible in vitro three-dimensional (3D) tumor model for micrometastatic ovarian cancer (OvCa), which in conjunction with quantitative image analysis routines to batch-process large datasets, serves as a high throughput reporter to screen rationally-designed combination regimens. We use this system to assess mechanism-based combination regimens with photodynamic therapy (PDT), which sensitizes OvCa to chemo and biologic agents, and has shown promise in clinic trials. We show that PDT synergistically enhances carboplatin efficacy in a sequence dependent manner. In printed heterocellular cultures we demonstrate that proximity of fibroblasts enhances 3D tumor growth and investigate co-cultures with endothelial cells. The principles described here could inform the design and evaluation of mechanism-based therapeutic options for a broad spectrum of metastatic solid tumors.

  17. Calcifying nested stromal-epithelial tumor (CNSET) of the liver: a newly recognized entity to be considered in the radiologist's differential diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Schaffer, Lauren R; Shehata, Bahig M; Yin, Julie; Schemankewitz, Erwin; Alazraki, Adina

    2016-01-01

    Calcifying nested stromal-epithelial tumor (CNSET), an extremely rare tumor found in the liver, was first described in 2001 by Ishak et al. The characteristic imaging features include large size, well-circumscribed, enhancing mass with calcification. To our knowledge, since 2001, there have been 29 reported. Typically arising from the right hepatic lobe, it is primarily found in children and shows clear predilection for females. Emphasizing imaging, we report a 14-year-old female with Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome who presented with CNSET. PMID:26589005

  18. Single cell dual adherent-suspension co-culture micro-environment for studying tumor-stromal interactions with functionally selected cancer stem-like cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Chih; Zhang, Zhixiong; Fouladdel, Shamileh; Deol, Yadwinder; Ingram, Patrick N; McDermott, Sean P; Azizi, Ebrahim; Wicha, Max S; Yoon, Euisik

    2016-08-01

    Considerable evidence suggests that cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) are critical in tumor pathogenesis, but their rarity and transience has led to much controversy about their exact nature. Although CSCs can be functionally identified using dish-based tumorsphere assays, it is difficult to handle and monitor single cells in dish-based approaches; single cell-based microfluidic approaches offer better control and reliable single cell derived sphere formation. However, like normal stem cells, CSCs are heavily regulated by their microenvironment, requiring tumor-stromal interactions for tumorigenic and proliferative behaviors. To enable single cell derived tumorsphere formation within a stromal microenvironment, we present a dual adherent/suspension co-culture device, which combines a suspension environment for single-cell tumorsphere assays and an adherent environment for co-culturing stromal cells in close proximity by selectively patterning polyHEMA in indented microwells. By minimizing dead volume and improving cell capture efficiency, the presented platform allows for the use of small numbers of cells (<100 cells). As a proof of concept, we co-cultured single T47D (breast cancer) cells and primary cancer associated fibroblasts (CAF) on-chip for 14 days to monitor sphere formation and growth. Compared to mono-culture, co-cultured T47D have higher tumorigenic potential (sphere formation rate) and proliferation rates (larger sphere size). Furthermore, 96-multiplexed single-cell transcriptome analyses were performed to compare the gene expression of co-cultured and mono-cultured T47D cells. Phenotypic changes observed in co-culture correlated with expression changes in genes associated with proliferation, apoptotic suppression, tumorigenicity and even epithelial-to-mesechymal transition. Combining the presented platform with single cell transcriptome analysis, we successfully identified functional CSCs and investigated the phenotypic and transcriptome effects induced

  19. Xanthogranulomatous pseudotumor of stomach induced by perforated peptic ulcer mimicking a stromal tumor.

    PubMed

    Lai, Hsin-Yi; Chen, Jeon-Hor; Chen, Chi-Kuan; Chen, Yung-Fang; Ho, Yung-Jen; Yang, Mei-Due; Shen, Wu-Chung

    2006-10-01

    Perforation is a serious complication of peptic ulcer disease occurring in 5% of such patients. Occasionally, the perforation may be sealed off by the omentum or the adjacent organs. Sealed perforated ulcer with pseudotumor formation is very rarely encountered. Here we present a case of gastric pseudotumor induced by perforation of a peptic ulcer. The imaging features in a barium sulfate study and computed tomography mimic an intramural tumor of the stomach.

  20. Stromal fibroblasts in the microenvironment of gastric carcinomas promote tumor metastasis via upregulating TAGLN expression

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Fibroblasts play a critical role in tumorigenesis, tumor progression and metastasis. However, their detailed molecular characteristics and clinical significance are still elusive. TAGLN is an actin-binding protein that plays an important role in tumorigenesis. Results We investigated the interaction between cancer cells and the tumor microenvironment to determine how the fibroblasts from human gastric carcinoma facilitate tumorigenesis through TAGLN. QRT-PCR and Western blot indicated that TAGLN expression was upregulated in gastric carcinoma-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) that promote gastric cancer cell migration and invasion. Using small interfering RNA (siRNA), we found that CAFs enhanced tumor metastasis through upregulated TAGLN in vitro and in vivo. The expression of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) was significantly lower after TAGLN knock-down by siRNA. TAGLN levels were elevated in human gastric cancer stroma than normal gastric stroma and associated with differentiation and lymph node metastasis of gastric cancer. Conclusion CAFs may promote gastric cancer cell migration and invasion via upregulating TAGLN and TAGLN induced MMP-2 production. PMID:23510049

  1. Production of Gastrointestinal Tumors in Mice by Modulating Latent Transforming Growth Factor Beta 1 Activation

    PubMed Central

    Shibahara, Kotaro; Ota, Mitsuhiko; Horiguchi, Masahito; Yoshinaga, Keiji; Melamed, Jonathan; Rifkin, Daniel B

    2012-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) and its signaling pathways are important mediators in the suppression of cancers of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. TGF-β is released from cells in a latent complex consisting of TGF-β, the TGF-β propeptide (LAP) and a latent TGF-β binding protein (LTBP). We previously generated mice in which the LTBP-binding cysteine residues in LAP TGF-β1 were mutated to serine precluding covalent interactions with LTBP. These Tgfb1C33S/C33S mice develop multiorgan inflammation and tumors consistent with reduced TGF-β1 activity. To test whether further reduction in active TGF-β levels would yield additional tumors and a phenotype more similar to Tgfb1-/- mice, we generated mice that express TGF-β1C33S and are deficient in either integrin β8 or TSP-1, known activators of latent TGF-β1. In addition we generated mice that have one mutant allele and one null allele at the Tgfb1 locus, reasoning that these mice should synthesize half the total amount of TGF-β1 as Tgfb1C33S/C33S mice and the amount of active TGF-β1 would be correspondingly decreased compared to Tgfb1C33S/C33S mice. These compound mutant mice displayed more severe inflammation and higher tumor numbers than the parental Tgfb1C33S/C33S animals. The level of active TGF-β1 in compound mutant mice appeared to be decreased compared to Tgfb1C33S/C33S mice as determined from analyses of surrogate markers of active TGF-β, such as P-Smad2, C-Myc, KI-67, and markers of cell cycle traverse. We conclude that these mutant mice provide a useful system for modulating TGF-β levels in a manner that determines tumor number and inflammation within the GI tract. PMID:23117884

  2. Role of Endoscopic Ultrasonography in Guiding Treatment Plans for Upper Gastrointestinal Subepithelial Tumors.

    PubMed

    Moon, Jeong Seop

    2016-05-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) subepithelial tumors (SETs) are usually observed incidentally by endoscopy and have diverse prognoses, varying from benign to potentially malignant. When a GI SET is suspected, endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) is the most accurate diagnostic method to differentiate it from extraluminal compression. To determine the nature of GI SETs, EUS is also the most accurate diagnostic method, and reveals the precise sonographic nature of the lesion. There are some SETs with typical EUS findings of GI SETs, but most hypoechoic lesions are difficult to diagnose based on EUS images alone. EUS is also helpful to determine GI wall involvement in SETs and optimal treatment methods. For the diagnosis of GI SETs, obtaining a proper specimen is essential. EUS-guided cytology or biopsy methods such as fine-needle aspiration, Tru-Cut biopsy, and the newly introduced fine-needle biopsy (FNB) provide good results. To increase the diagnostic yield for GI SETs, cytology with immunocytochemical staining is used for cytological interpretation, resulting in good diagnostic yields. Recently, EUS-FNB using cheese slicer technology has been introduced, and has been reported to provide good diagnostic results for GI SETs.

  3. Interactions of the p53 protein family in cellular stress response in gastrointestinal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Vilgelm, Anna E.; Washington, Mary K.; Wei, Jinxiong; Chen, Heidi; Prassolov, Vladimir S.; Zaika, Alexander I.

    2010-01-01

    p53, p63 and p73 are members of the p53 protein family involved in regulation of cell cycle, apoptosis, differentiation and other critical cellular processes. Here we investigated the contribution of the entire p53 family in chemotherapeutic drug response in gastrointestinal tumors. Real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry revealed complexity and variability of expression profiles of the p53 protein family. Using colon and esophageal cancer cells, we found that the integral transcription activity of the entire p53 family, as measured by the reporter analysis, associated with response to drug treatment in studied cells. We also found that p53 and p73, as well as p63 and p73, bind simultaneously to the promoters of p53 target genes. Taken together, our results support the view that the p53 protein family functions as an interacting network of proteins and show that cellular responses to chemotherapeutic drug treatment are determined by the total activity of the entire p53 family, rather than p53 alone. PMID:20197393

  4. Interactions of the p53 protein family in cellular stress response in gastrointestinal tumors.

    PubMed

    Vilgelm, Anna E; Washington, Mary K; Wei, Jinxiong; Chen, Heidi; Prassolov, Vladimir S; Zaika, Alexander I

    2010-03-01

    p53, p63, and p73 are members of the p53 protein family involved in regulation of cell cycle, apoptosis, differentiation, and other critical cellular processes. Here, we investigated the contribution of the entire p53 family in chemotherapeutic drug response in gastrointestinal tumors. Real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry revealed complexity and variability of expression profiles of the p53 protein family. Using colon and esophageal cancer cells, we found that the integral transcription activity of the entire p53 family, as measured by the reporter analysis, associated with response to drug treatment in studied cells. We also found that p53 and p73, as well as p63 and p73, bind simultaneously to the promoters of p53 target genes. Taken together, our results support the view that the p53 protein family functions as an interacting network of proteins and show that cellular responses to chemotherapeutic drug treatment are determined by the total activity of the entire p53 family rather than p53 alone.

  5. Role of Endoscopic Ultrasonography in Guiding Treatment Plans for Upper Gastrointestinal Subepithelial Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Jeong Seop

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) subepithelial tumors (SETs) are usually observed incidentally by endoscopy and have diverse prognoses, varying from benign to potentially malignant. When a GI SET is suspected, endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) is the most accurate diagnostic method to differentiate it from extraluminal compression. To determine the nature of GI SETs, EUS is also the most accurate diagnostic method, and reveals the precise sonographic nature of the lesion. There are some SETs with typical EUS findings of GI SETs, but most hypoechoic lesions are difficult to diagnose based on EUS images alone. EUS is also helpful to determine GI wall involvement in SETs and optimal treatment methods. For the diagnosis of GI SETs, obtaining a proper specimen is essential. EUS-guided cytology or biopsy methods such as fine-needle aspiration, Tru-Cut biopsy, and the newly introduced fine-needle biopsy (FNB) provide good results. To increase the diagnostic yield for GI SETs, cytology with immunocytochemical staining is used for cytological interpretation, resulting in good diagnostic yields. Recently, EUS-FNB using cheese slicer technology has been introduced, and has been reported to provide good diagnostic results for GI SETs. PMID:27209643

  6. Tumor-initiating label-retaining cancer cells in human gastrointestinal cancers undergo asymmetric cell division.

    PubMed

    Xin, Hong-Wu; Hari, Danielle M; Mullinax, John E; Ambe, Chenwi M; Koizumi, Tomotake; Ray, Satyajit; Anderson, Andrew J; Wiegand, Gordon W; Garfield, Susan H; Thorgeirsson, Snorri S; Avital, Itzhak

    2012-04-01

    Label-retaining cells (LRCs) have been proposed to represent adult tissue stem cells. LRCs are hypothesized to result from either slow cycling or asymmetric cell division (ACD). However, the stem cell nature and whether LRC undergo ACD remain controversial. Here, we demonstrate label-retaining cancer cells (LRCCs) in several gastrointestinal (GI) cancers including fresh surgical specimens. Using a novel method for isolation of live LRCC, we demonstrate that a subpopulation of LRCC is actively dividing and exhibits stem cells and pluripotency gene expression profiles. Using real-time confocal microscopic cinematography, we show live LRCC undergoing asymmetric nonrandom chromosomal cosegregation LRC division. Importantly, LRCCs have greater tumor-initiating capacity than non-LRCCs. Based on our data and that cancers develop in tissues that harbor normal-LRC, we propose that LRCC might represent a novel population of GI stem-like cancer cells. LRCC may provide novel mechanistic insights into the biology of cancer and regenerative medicine and present novel targets for cancer treatment. PMID:22331764

  7. The utility of STAT6 and ALDH1 expression in the differential diagnosis of solitary fibrous tumor versus prostate-specific stromal neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Guner, Gunes; Bishop, Justin A; Bezerra, Stephania M; Taheri, Diana; Zahavi, David J; Mendoza Rodriguez, Maria Angelica; Sharma, Rajni; Epstein, Jonathan I; Netto, George J

    2016-08-01

    Solitary fibrous tumor (SFT) diagnosis in prostate can be challenging on small biopsies. Prostatic stromal tumors of unknown malignant potential (STUMP) and SFT have overlapping features. NAB2-STAT6 gene fusions that were recently identified in various SFTs lead to nuclear translocalization of STAT6. Nuclear STAT6 immunostaining is now considered an adjunct for SFT diagnosis. We evaluated STAT6 and an emerging stemness marker, ALDH1, in the differential diagnosis of SFT versus prostatic stromal lesions. Sixteen STUMPs, 12 SFTs, and 4 prostatic stromal sarcomas (12 needle biopsies, 13 radical prostatectomies, 7 transurethral resections) were retrieved (1995-2015). Sections were stained with polyclonal STAT6 antibody (Santa Cruz Biotechnology, Santa Cruz, CA; S20, 1:100) and monoclonal ALDH1 antibody (BD Biosciences, San Jose, CA; clone 44, 1:250). In STAT6 cases, only unequivocal nuclear staining (with/without cytoplasmic staining) was considered positive. Cytoplasmic ALDH1 staining was counted positive. Ten of 11 evaluable SFTs demonstrated strong and diffuse nuclear STAT6 positivity; 4 of 16 STUMPs had nuclear staining that was weak (1/4) or focal (1/4). ALDH1 positivity was seen in 10 of 12 evaluable SFTs and 3 of 15 STUMPs. Prostatic stromal sarcomas were STAT6 negative (4/4); 2 of 4 were ALDH1 positive. The sensitivity and specificity for STAT6 for the diagnosis of SFT were 91% and 75%, respectively. Coexpression of STAT6 and ALDH1 yielded the same sensitivity but improved the specificity (100%) for the diagnosis of SFT. STAT6 is a useful marker in the differential diagnosis of SFT versus STUMP. Using STAT6 and ALDH1 together increases specificity. STUMPs can show STAT6 positivity, and when they do, it is likely to be weak or focal. PMID:27068523

  8. The utility of STAT6 and ALDH1 expression in the differential diagnosis of solitary fibrous tumor versus prostate-specific stromal neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Guner, Gunes; Bishop, Justin A; Bezerra, Stephania M; Taheri, Diana; Zahavi, David J; Mendoza Rodriguez, Maria Angelica; Sharma, Rajni; Epstein, Jonathan I; Netto, George J

    2016-08-01

    Solitary fibrous tumor (SFT) diagnosis in prostate can be challenging on small biopsies. Prostatic stromal tumors of unknown malignant potential (STUMP) and SFT have overlapping features. NAB2-STAT6 gene fusions that were recently identified in various SFTs lead to nuclear translocalization of STAT6. Nuclear STAT6 immunostaining is now considered an adjunct for SFT diagnosis. We evaluated STAT6 and an emerging stemness marker, ALDH1, in the differential diagnosis of SFT versus prostatic stromal lesions. Sixteen STUMPs, 12 SFTs, and 4 prostatic stromal sarcomas (12 needle biopsies, 13 radical prostatectomies, 7 transurethral resections) were retrieved (1995-2015). Sections were stained with polyclonal STAT6 antibody (Santa Cruz Biotechnology, Santa Cruz, CA; S20, 1:100) and monoclonal ALDH1 antibody (BD Biosciences, San Jose, CA; clone 44, 1:250). In STAT6 cases, only unequivocal nuclear staining (with/without cytoplasmic staining) was considered positive. Cytoplasmic ALDH1 staining was counted positive. Ten of 11 evaluable SFTs demonstrated strong and diffuse nuclear STAT6 positivity; 4 of 16 STUMPs had nuclear staining that was weak (1/4) or focal (1/4). ALDH1 positivity was seen in 10 of 12 evaluable SFTs and 3 of 15 STUMPs. Prostatic stromal sarcomas were STAT6 negative (4/4); 2 of 4 were ALDH1 positive. The sensitivity and specificity for STAT6 for the diagnosis of SFT were 91% and 75%, respectively. Coexpression of STAT6 and ALDH1 yielded the same sensitivity but improved the specificity (100%) for the diagnosis of SFT. STAT6 is a useful marker in the differential diagnosis of SFT versus STUMP. Using STAT6 and ALDH1 together increases specificity. STUMPs can show STAT6 positivity, and when they do, it is likely to be weak or focal.

  9. The tumor microenvironment modulates tamoxifen resistance in breast cancer: a role for soluble stromal factors and fibronectin through β1 integrin.

    PubMed

    Pontiggia, Osvaldo; Sampayo, Rocio; Raffo, Diego; Motter, Andrea; Xu, Ren; Bissell, Mina J; Joffé, Elisa Bal de Kier; Simian, Marina

    2012-06-01

    Tamoxifen resistance has been largely attributed to genetic alterations in the epithelial tumor cells themselves, such as overexpression of HER-2/Neu. However, in the clinic, only about 15-20% of cases of HER-2/Neu amplification has actually been correlated to the acquisition of endocrine resistance, suggesting that other mechanisms must be involved as well. Using the epithelial LM05-E and the fibroblastic LM05-F cell lines, derived from the estrogen dependent spontaneous M05 mouse mammary tumor, as well as MCF-7 cells, we analyzed whether soluble stromal factors or extracellular matrix components protected against tamoxifen induced cell death. Involvement of signaling pathways was determined by using specific inhibitors and western blot, and phosphorylation of the estrogen receptor alpha by western blot and immunofluorescence. Soluble factors produced by the fibroblastic cells protect the epithelial tumor cells from tamoxifen-induced cell death through a mechanism that involves EGFR and matrix metalloproteinases upstream of PI3K/AKT. Exogenous fibronectin by itself confers endocrine resistance through interaction with β1 integrin and activation of PI3K/AKT and MAPK/ERK 1/2 pathways. The conferred resistance is reversed by blocking β1 integrin. We show also that treatment with both conditioned medium and fibronectin leads to the phosphorylation of the estrogen receptor at serine-118, suggesting stromal factors as modulators of ER activity. Our results show that the tumor microenvironment can modulate tamoxifen resistance, providing an alternative explanation for why patients become refractory to hormone-therapy.

  10. Endoscopic laser surgery of patients with pretumoral diseases and tumors of the organs of respiration and gastro-intestinal tract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poddubny, Boris K.; Ungiadze, G. V.; Kuvshinov, Yury P.; Efimov, Oleg N.; Mazurov, S. T.

    1996-01-01

    The result of treatment of 566 patients with precancerous diseases, cancer and benign tumors of respiratory and gastro-intestinal tract are presented. The `Raduga-1' as a source of laser radiation has been used. The wavelength of radiation 1060 nm. The maximum of basic radiation at the end of lightguide is 50 W. It is shown that the method of endoscopic laser destruction is a highly effective one and may be recommended for radical treatment.

  11. Cellular schwannoma arising from the gastric wall misdiagnosed as a gastric stromal tumor: A case report

    PubMed Central

    WANG, GUANGYAO; CHEN, PING; ZONG, LIANG; SHI, LEI; ZHAO, WEI

    2014-01-01

    Cellular schwannomas have been previously described at almost every anatomic location of the human body, but reports in the gastric wall are rare. The current study presents a rare case of cellular schwannoma originating from the gastric wall. Computed tomography revealed a 5.6×5.3×4.0-cm3 solid mass located in the posterior wall of the stomach. Open laparotomy confirmed its mesenchymal origin. Microscopically, the tissue was composed of spindle-shaped and fascicularly-arranged cells, but mitotic figures were rare. Immunohistochemical staining showed that the tumor was negative for cluster of differentiation (CD)117, CD34, smooth muscle actin and desmin, but positive for S-100 and Ki67. The patient presented no evidence of recurrence and metastasis during follow-up. Gastric cellular schwannomas may be diagnosed by clinical characteristics, histological observations and immunohistochemical markers. PMID:24396458

  12. Interferon-γ differentially modulates the impact of tumor necrosis factor-α on human endometrial stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Spratte, Julia; Oemus, Anne; Zygmunt, Marek; Fluhr, Herbert

    2015-09-01

    The pro-inflammatory T helper (Th)-1 cytokines, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interferon-γ (IFN-γ), are immunological factors relevant at the feto-maternal interface and involved in the pathophysiology of implantation disorders. The synergistic action of the two cytokines has been described with regard to apoptotic cell death and inflammatory responses in different cell types, but little is known regarding the human endometrium. Therefore, we examined the interaction of TNF-α and IFN-γ in human endometrial stromal cells (ESCs). ESCs were isolated from specimens obtained during hysterectomy and decidualized in vitro. Cells were incubated with TNF-α, IFN-γ or signaling-inhibitor. Insulin-like growth factor binding protein (IGFBP)-1, prolactin (PRL), leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF), interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, regulated on activation normal T-cell expressed and secreted protein (RANTES) and monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP)-1 were measured using ELISA and real-time RT-PCR. Nuclear factor of transcription (NF)-κB and its inhibitor (IκBα) were analyzed by in-cell western assay and transcription factor assay. TNF-α inhibited and IFN-γ did not affect the decidualization of ESCs. In contrast, IFN-gamma differentially modulated the stimulating effect of TNF-alpha on cytokines by enhancing IL-6, RANTES and MCP-1 and attenuating LIF mRNA expression. These effects were time- and dose-dependent. IFN-γ had no impact on the initial activation of NF-κB signaling. Histone-deacetylase activity was involved in the modulating effect of IFN-γ on RANTES secretion. These observations showed a distinct pattern of interaction of the Th-1 cytokines, TNF-α and IFN-γ in the human endometrium, which could play an important role in the pathophysiology of implantation disorders.

  13. Tumor Necrosis Factor Improves Vascularization in Osteogenic Grafts Engineered with Human Adipose-Derived Stem/Stromal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hutton, Daphne L.; Kondragunta, Renu; Moore, Erika M.; Hung, Ben P.; Jia, Xiaofeng; Grayson, Warren L.

    2014-01-01

    The innate immune response following bone injury plays an important role in promoting cellular recruitment, revascularization, and other repair mechanisms. Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF) is a prominent pro-inflammatory cytokine in this cascade, and has been previously shown to improve bone formation and angiogenesis in a dose- and timing-dependent manner. This ability to positively impact both osteogenesis and vascular growth may benefit bone tissue engineering, as vasculature is essential to maintaining cell viability in large grafts after implantation. Here, we investigated the effects of exogenous TNF on the induction of adipose-derived stem/stromal cells (ASCs) to engineer pre-vascularized osteogenic tissue in vitro with respect to dose, timing, and co-stimulation with other inflammatory mediators. We found that acute (2-day), low-dose exposure to TNF promoted vascularization, whereas higher doses and continuous exposure inhibited vascular growth. Co-stimulation with platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), another key factor released following bone injury, increased vascular network formation synergistically with TNF. ASC-seeded grafts were then cultured within polycaprolactone-fibrin composite scaffolds and implanted in nude rats for 2 weeks, resulting in further tissue maturation and increased angiogenic ingrowth in TNF-treated grafts. VEGF-A expression levels were significantly higher in TNF-treated grafts immediately prior to implantation, indicating a long-term pro-angiogenic effect. These findings demonstrate that TNF has the potential to promote vasculogenesis in engineered osteogenic grafts both in vitro and in vivo. Thus, modulation and/or recapitulation of the immune response following bone injury may be a beneficial strategy for bone tissue engineering. PMID:25248109

  14. Microcystic Stromal Tumor: A Distinctive Ovarian Sex Cord-Stromal Neoplasm Characterized by FOXL2, SF-1, WT-1, Cyclin D1, and β-catenin Nuclear Expression and CTNNB1 Mutations.

    PubMed

    Irving, Julie A; Lee, Cheng-Han; Yip, Stephen; Oliva, Esther; McCluggage, W Glenn; Young, Robert H

    2015-10-01

    Since our first description of the microcystic stromal tumor (MST) of the ovary, a rare and distinctive neoplasm with a definitional, usually striking microcystic pattern and a CD10+/vimentin+/inhibin-/calretinin- immunophenotype, 3 examples with β-catenin nuclear localization, and CTNNB1 mutation have been reported. We undertook a detailed immunohistochemical study and molecular analysis of CTNNB1 and FOXL2 of 15 cases of MST to further characterize this neoplasm and establish its histogenesis. Diffuse nuclear staining for FOXL2, WT-1, cyclin D1, and β-catenin was present in all tumors tested, and 12/15 were positive for steroidogenic factor-1 (SF-1). Heterozygous missense point mutations in exon 3 of CTNNB1 were detected in 8 of 14 cases, resulting in amino acid changes at codons 32, 34, 35, and 37. There was no correlation between CTNNB1 exon 3 mutation status and tumor immunophenotype. All 14 cases tested showed wild-type FOXL2. Our study establishes that MST of the ovary exhibits a characteristic FOXL2/SF-1/WT-1/cyclin D1/nuclear β-catenin-positive immunohistochemical profile, which may be useful in diagnosis and in the exclusion of histologic mimics. The presence of diffuse nuclear FOXL2 and WT-1 immunostaining in all cases and SF-1 in most supports the classification of MST within the sex cord-stromal category. Aberrant nuclear β-catenin expression, detected in all MSTs, appears to be the result of stabilizing CTNNB1 mutations in 57% of cases, providing further evidence that dysregulation of the Wnt/B-catenin pathway is involved in the tumorigenesis of MST and may involve activation of β-catenin with upregulation of cyclin D1.

  15. The Initiator Methionine tRNA Drives Secretion of Type II Collagen from Stromal Fibroblasts to Promote Tumor Growth and Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Cassie J.; Berg, Tracy J.; Birch, Joanna; Ennis, Darren; Mitchell, Louise; Cloix, Catherine; Campbell, Andrew; Sumpton, David; Nixon, Colin; Campbell, Kirsteen; Bridgeman, Victoria L.; Vermeulen, Peter B.; Foo, Shane; Kostaras, Eleftherios; Jones, J. Louise; Haywood, Linda; Pulleine, Ellie; Yin, Huabing; Strathdee, Douglas; Sansom, Owen; Blyth, Karen; McNeish, Iain; Zanivan, Sara; Reynolds, Andrew R.; Norman, Jim C.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Expression of the initiator methionine tRNA (tRNAiMet) is deregulated in cancer. Despite this fact, it is not currently known how tRNAiMet expression levels influence tumor progression. We have found that tRNAiMet expression is increased in carcinoma-associated fibroblasts, implicating deregulated expression of tRNAiMet in the tumor stroma as a possible contributor to tumor progression. To investigate how elevated stromal tRNAiMet contributes to tumor progression, we generated a mouse expressing additional copies of the tRNAiMet gene (2+tRNAiMet mouse). Growth and vascularization of subcutaneous tumor allografts was enhanced in 2+tRNAiMet mice compared with wild-type littermate controls. Extracellular matrix (ECM) deposited by fibroblasts from 2+tRNAiMet mice supported enhanced endothelial cell and fibroblast migration. SILAC mass spectrometry indicated that elevated expression of tRNAiMet significantly increased synthesis and secretion of certain types of collagen, in particular type II collagen. Suppression of type II collagen opposed the ability of tRNAiMet-overexpressing fibroblasts to deposit pro-migratory ECM. We used the prolyl hydroxylase inhibitor ethyl-3,4-dihydroxybenzoate (DHB) to determine whether collagen synthesis contributes to the tRNAiMet-driven pro-tumorigenic stroma in vivo. DHB had no effect on the growth of syngeneic allografts in wild-type mice but opposed the ability of 2+tRNAiMet mice to support increased angiogenesis and tumor growth. Finally, collagen II expression predicts poor prognosis in high-grade serous ovarian carcinoma. Taken together, these data indicate that increased tRNAiMet levels contribute to tumor progression by enhancing the ability of stromal fibroblasts to synthesize and secrete a type II collagen-rich ECM that supports endothelial cell migration and angiogenesis. PMID:26948875

  16. Dislodgement and gastrointestinal tract penetration of bone cement used for spinal reconstruction after lumbosacral vertebral tumor excision

    PubMed Central

    Nagae, Masateru; Mikami, Yasuo; Mizuno, Kentaro; Harada, Tomohisa; Ikeda, Takumi; Tonomura, Hitoshi; Takatori, Ryota; Fujiwara, Hiroyoshi; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) cement is useful for spinal reconstruction, but can cause complications including new vertebral fractures, neurological disorders and pulmonary embolism. We report a case in PMMA cement used for spinal reconstruction after tumor curettage dislodged and penetrated the gastrointestinal tract. Diagnoses: The patient was diagnosed with a retroperitoneal extragonadal germ cell tumor at age 27 years. After chemotherapy and tumor resection, the tumor remained. It gradually increased in size and infiltrated lumbosacral vertebrae, causing him to present at age 35 years with increased low back pain. Image findings showed bone destruction in the vertebral bodies accompanied by neoplastic lesions. The left and right common iliac arteries and inferior vena cava were enclosed in the tumor on the anterior side of the vertebral bodies. Lumbosacral bone tumor due to direct extragonadal germ cell tumor infiltration was diagnosed. A 2-step operation was planned; first, fixation of the posterior side of the vertebral bodies, followed by tumor resection using an anterior transperitoneal approach, and spinal reconstruction using PMMA cement. After surgery, the PMMA cement gradually dislodged towards the anterior side and, 2 years 9 months after surgery, it had penetrated the retroperitoneum. The patient subsequently developed nausea and abdominal pain and was readmitted to hospital. The diagnosis was intestinal blockage with dislodged PMMA cement, and an operation was performed to remove the cement present in the small intestine. There was strong intra-abdominal adhesion, the peritoneum between the vertebral bodies and intestine could not be identified, and no additional treatment for vertebral body defects could be performed. After surgery, gastrointestinal symptoms resolved. Conclusion: Although this was a rare case, when using bone cement for vertebral body reconstruction, the way of anchoring for the cement must be thoroughly

  17. Recombinant tumor necrosis factor. alpha. and interleukin 1. alpha. increase expression of c-abl protooncogene mRNA in cultured human marrow stromal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, D.F. III; Nemunaitis, J.J.; Singer, J.W. )

    1989-09-01

    Analysis of protooncogene RNA expression in marrow stromal cells from long-term marrow culture demonstrated high levels of c-abl 5-, 6-, and 7-kilobase (kb) RNA transcripts. In experiments on three independently derived simian virus 40-transformed marrow stromal cell lines, the expression of these c-abl transcripts was further increased in response to recombinant tumor necrosis factor {alpha} (1,000 units/ml) and interleukin 1{alpha} (10 units/ml). Although lymphocyte-conditioned medium predominantly up-regulated the 5-kb transcript, interleukin 1{alpha} primarily affected the 6-kb transcript. The up-regulation of the 5-kb c-abl message correlated with up-regulation of the granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor transcript and down-regulation of procollagen I transcripts in transformed cells. These data suggest that c-abl plays roles in the regulation of extracellular matrix expression and in the regulation of hematopoietic growth factors by stromal cells.

  18. Direct Melanoma Cell Contact Induces Stromal Cell Autocrine Prostaglandin E2-EP4 Receptor Signaling That Drives Tumor Growth, Angiogenesis, and Metastasis.

    PubMed

    Inada, Masaki; Takita, Morichika; Yokoyama, Satoshi; Watanabe, Kenta; Tominari, Tsukasa; Matsumoto, Chiho; Hirata, Michiko; Maru, Yoshiro; Maruyama, Takayuki; Sugimoto, Yukihiko; Narumiya, Shuh; Uematsu, Satoshi; Akira, Shizuo; Murphy, Gillian; Nagase, Hideaki; Miyaura, Chisato

    2015-12-11

    The stromal cells associated with tumors such as melanoma are significant determinants of tumor growth and metastasis. Using membrane-bound prostaglandin E synthase 1 (mPges1(-/-)) mice, we show that prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production by host tissues is critical for B16 melanoma growth, angiogenesis, and metastasis to both bone and soft tissues. Concomitant studies in vitro showed that PGE2 production by fibroblasts is regulated by direct interaction with B16 cells. Autocrine activity of PGE2 further regulates the production of angiogenic factors by fibroblasts, which are key to the vascularization of both primary and metastatic tumor growth. Similarly, cell-cell interactions between B16 cells and host osteoblasts modulate mPGES-1 activity and PGE2 production by the osteoblasts. PGE2, in turn, acts to stimulate receptor activator of NF-κB ligand expression, leading to osteoclast differentiation and bone erosion. Using eicosanoid receptor antagonists, we show that PGE2 acts on osteoblasts and fibroblasts in the tumor microenvironment through the EP4 receptor. Metastatic tumor growth and vascularization in soft tissues was abrogated by an EP4 receptor antagonist. EP4-null Ptger4(-/-) mice do not support B16 melanoma growth. In vitro, an EP4 receptor antagonist modulated PGE2 effects on fibroblast production of angiogenic factors. Our data show that B16 melanoma cells directly influence host stromal cells to generate PGE2 signals governing neoangiogenesis and metastatic growth in bone via osteoclast erosive activity as well as angiogenesis in soft tissue tumors.

  19. Tumor markers for diagnosis, monitoring of recurrence and prognosis in patients with upper gastrointestinal tract cancer.

    PubMed

    Jing, Jie-Xian; Wang, Yan; Xu, Xiao-Qin; Sun, Ting; Tian, Bao-Guo; Du, Li-Li; Zhao, Xian-Wen; Han, Cun-Zhi

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the value of combined detection of serum CEA, CA19-9, CA24-2, AFP, CA72-4, SCC, TPA and TPS for the clinical diagnosis of upper gastrointestinal tract (GIT) cancer and to analyze the efficacy of these tumor markers (TMs) in evaluating curative effects and prognosis. A total of 573 patients with upper GIT cancer between January 2004 and December 2007 were enrolled in this study. Serum levels of CEA, CA19-9, CA24-2, AFP, CA72-4, SCC, TPA and TPS were examined preoperatively and every 3 months postoperatively by ELISA. The sensitivity of CEA, CA19-9, CA24-2, AFP, CA72-4, SCC, TPA and TPS were 26.8%, 36.2%, 42.9%, 2.84%, 25.4%, 34.6%, 34.2% and 30.9%, respectively. The combined detection of CEA+CA199+CA242+CA724 had higher sensitivity and specificity in gastric cancer (GC) and cardiac cancer, while CEA+CA199+CA242+SCC was the best combination of diagnosis for esophageal cancer (EC). Elevation of preoperative CEA, CA19-9 and CA24-2, SCC and CA72-4 was significantly associated with pathological types (p<0.05) and TNM staging (p<0.05). Correlation analysis showed that CA24-2 was significantly correlated with CA19-9 (r=0.810, p<0.001). The levels of CEA, CA19-9, CA24-2, CA72-4 and SCC decreased obviously 3 months after operations. When metastasis and recurrence occurred, the levels of TMs significantly increased. On multivariate analysis, high preoperative CA72-4, CA24-2 and SCC served as prognostic factors for cardiac carcinoma, GC and EC, respectively. combined detection of CEA+CA199+CA242+SCC proved to be the most economic and practical strategy in diagnosis of EC; CEA+CA199+CA242+CA724 proved to be a better evaluation indicator for cardiac cancer and GC. CEA and CA19-9, CA24-2, CA72-4 and SCC, examined postoperatively during follow-up, were useful to find early tumor recurrence and metastasis, and evaluate prognosis. AFP, TPA and TPS have no significant value in diagnosis of patients with upper GIT cancer.

  20. Personalized Clinical Decision Making in Gastrointestinal Malignancies: The Role of PET.

    PubMed

    Hess, Søren; Bjerring, Ole Steen; Pfeiffer, Per; Høilund-Carlsen, Poul Flemming

    2016-07-01

    Gastrointestinal malignancies comprise a heterogeneous group of diseases that include both common and rare diseases with very different presentations and prognoses. The mainstay of treatment is surgery in combination with preoperative and adjuvant chemotherapy depending on clinical presentation and initial stages. This article outlines the potential use of fluorodeoxyglucose-PET/CT in clinical decision making with special regard to preoperative evaluation and response assessment in gastric cancer (including the gastroesophageal junction), pancreatic cancer (excluding neuroendocrine tumors), colorectal cancer, and gastrointestinal stromal tumors. PMID:27321031

  1. Stromal matrix metalloprotease-13 knockout alters Collagen I structure at the tumor-host interface and increases lung metastasis of C57BL/6 syngeneic E0771 mammary tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Matrix metalloproteases and collagen are key participants in breast cancer, but their precise roles in cancer etiology and progression remain unclear. MMP13 helps regulate collagen structure and has been ascribed largely harmful roles in cancer, but some studies demonstrate that MMP13 may also protect against tumor pathology. Other studies indicate that collagen’s organizational patterns at the breast tumor-host interface influence metastatic potential. Therefore we investigated how MMP13 modulates collagen I, a principal collagen subtype in breast tissue, and affects tumor pathology and metastasis in a mouse model of breast cancer. Methods Tumors were implanted into murine mammary tissues, and their growth analyzed in Wildtype and MMP13 KO mice. Following extraction, tumors were analyzed for collagen I levels and collagen I macro- and micro-structural properties at the tumor-host boundary using immunocytochemistry and two-photon and second harmonic generation microscopy. Lungs were analyzed for metastases counts, to correlate collagen I changes with a clinically significant functional parameter. Statistical analyses were performed by t-test, analysis of variance, or Wilcoxon-Mann–Whitney tests as appropriate. Results We found that genetic ablation of host stromal MMP13 led to: 1. Increased mammary tumor collagen I content, 2. Marked changes in collagen I spatial organization, and 3. Altered collagen I microstructure at the tumor-host boundary, as well as 4. Increased metastasis from the primary mammary tumor to lungs. Conclusions These results implicate host MMP13 as a key regulator of collagen I structure and metastasis in mammary tumors, thus making it an attractive potential therapeutic target by which we might alter metastatic potential, one of the chief determinants of clinical outcome in breast cancer. In addition to identifying stromal MMP13 is an important regulator of the tumor microenvironment and metastasis, these results also suggest

  2. Regulation of IL-6 and IL-8 production by reciprocal cell-to-cell interactions between tumor cells and stromal fibroblasts through IL-1α in ameloblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Fuchigami, Takao; Kibe, Toshiro; Koyama, Hirofumi; Kishida, Shosei; Iijima, Mikio; Nishizawa, Yoshiaki; Hijioka, Hiroshi; Fujii, Tomomi; Ueda, Masahiro; Nakamura, Norifumi; Kiyono, Tohru; Kishida, Michiko

    2014-09-05

    Highlights: • We studied the interaction between tumor cells and fibroblasts in ameloblastoma. • AM-3 ameloblastoma cells secreted significantly high IL-1α levels. • IL-1α derived from AM-3 cells promoted IL-6 and IL-8 secretion of fibroblasts. • IL-6 and IL-8 activated the cellular motility and proliferation of AM-3 cells. - Abstract: Ameloblastoma is an odontogenic benign tumor that occurs in the jawbone, which invades bone and reoccurs locally. This tumor is treated by wide surgical excision and causes various problems, including changes in facial countenance and mastication disorders. Ameloblastomas have abundant tumor stroma, including fibroblasts and immune cells. Although cell-to-cell interactions are considered to be involved in the pathogenesis of many diseases, intercellular communications in ameloblastoma have not been fully investigated. In this study, we examined interactions between tumor cells and stromal fibroblasts via soluble factors in ameloblastoma. We used a human ameloblastoma cell line (AM-3 ameloblastoma cells), human fibroblasts (HFF-2 fibroblasts), and primary-cultured fibroblasts from human ameloblastoma tissues, and analyzed the effect of ameloblastoma-associated cell-to-cell communications on gene expression, cytokine secretion, cellular motility and proliferation. AM-3 ameloblastoma cells secreted higher levels of interleukin (IL)-1α than HFF-2 fibroblasts. Treatment with conditioned medium from AM-3 ameloblastoma cells upregulated gene expression and secretion of IL-6 and IL-8 of HFF-2 fibroblasts and primary-cultured fibroblast cells from ameloblastoma tissues. The AM3-stimulated production of IL-6 and IL-8 in fibroblasts was neutralized by pretreatment of AM-3 cells with anti-IL-1α antibody and IL-1 receptor antagonist. Reciprocally, cellular motility of AM-3 ameloblastoma cells was stimulated by HFF-2 fibroblasts in IL-6 and IL-8 dependent manner. In conclusion, ameloblastoma cells and stromal fibroblasts behave

  3. Activation of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor in Macrophages Mediates Feedback Inhibition of M2 Polarization and Gastrointestinal Tumor Cell Growth.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Gang; Liu, Liping; Peek, Richard M; Hao, Xishan; Polk, D Brent; Li, Hui; Yan, Fang

    2016-09-23

    EGF receptor (EGFR) in tumor cells serves as a tumor promoter. However, information about EGFR activation in macrophages in regulating M2 polarization and tumor development is limited. This study aimed to investigate the effects of EGFR activation in macrophages on M2 polarization and development of gastrointestinal tumors. IL-4, a cytokine to elicit M2 polarization, stimulated release of an EGFR ligand, HB-EGF, and transactivation and down-regulation of EGFR in Raw 264.7 cells and peritoneal macrophages from WT mice. Knockdown of HB-EGF in macrophages inhibited EGFR transactivation by IL-4. IL-4-stimulated STAT6 activation, Arg1 and YM1 gene expression, and HB-EGF production were further enhanced by inhibition of EGFR activity in Raw 264.7 cells using an EGFR kinase inhibitor and in peritoneal macrophages from Egfr(wa5) mice with kinase inactive EGFR and by knockdown of EGFR in peritoneal macrophages from Egfr(fl/fl) LysM-Cre mice with myeloid cell-specific EGFR deletion. Chitin induced a higher level of M2 polarization in peritoneal macrophages in Egfr(fl/fl) LysM-Cre mice than that in Egfr(fl/fl) mice. Accordingly, IL-4-conditioned medium stimulated growth and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition in gastric epithelial and colonic tumor cells, which were suppressed by that from Raw 264.7 cells with HB-EGF knockdown but promoted by that from Egfr(wa5) and Egfr(fl/fl) LysM-Cre peritoneal macrophages. Clinical assessment revealed that the number of macrophages with EGFR expression became less, indicating decreased inhibitory effects on M2 polarization, in late stage of human gastric cancers. Thus, IL-4-stimulated HB-EGF-dependent transactivation of EGFR in macrophages may mediate inhibitory feedback for M2 polarization and HB-EGF production, thereby inhibiting gastrointestinal tumor growth.

  4. RNA Sequencing of Tumor-Associated Microglia Reveals Ccl5 as a Stromal Chemokine Critical for Neurofibromatosis-1 Glioma Growth1

    PubMed Central

    Solga, Anne C.; Pong, Winnie W.; Kim, Keun-Young; Cimino, Patrick J.; Toonen, Joseph A.; Walker, Jason; Wylie, Todd; Magrini, Vincent; Griffith, Malachi; Griffith, Obi L.; Ly, Amy; Ellisman, Mark H.; Mardis, Elaine R.; Gutmann, David H.

    2015-01-01

    Solid cancers develop within a supportive microenvironment that promotes tumor formation and growth through the elaboration of mitogens and chemokines. Within these tumors, monocytes (macrophages and microglia) represent rich sources of these stromal factors. Leveraging a genetically engineered mouse model of neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) low-grade brain tumor (optic glioma), we have previously demonstrated that microglia are essential for glioma formation and maintenance. To identify potential tumor-associated microglial factors that support glioma growth (gliomagens), we initiated a comprehensive large-scale discovery effort using optimized RNA-sequencing methods focused specifically on glioma-associated microglia. Candidate microglial gliomagens were prioritized to identify potential secreted or membrane-bound proteins, which were next validated by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction as well as by RNA fluorescence in situ hybridization following minocycline-mediated microglial inactivation in vivo. Using these selection criteria, chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 5 (Ccl5) was identified as a chemokine highly expressed in genetically engineered Nf1 mouse optic gliomas relative to nonneoplastic optic nerves. As a candidate gliomagen, recombinant Ccl5 increased Nf1-deficient optic nerve astrocyte growth in vitro. Importantly, consistent with its critical role in maintaining tumor growth, treatment with Ccl5 neutralizing antibodies reduced Nf1 mouse optic glioma growth and improved retinal dysfunction in vivo. Collectively, these findings establish Ccl5 as an important microglial growth factor for low-grade glioma maintenance relevant to the development of future stroma-targeted brain tumor therapies. PMID:26585233

  5. A Peculiar Molecular Profile of Umbilical Cord-Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Drives Their Inhibitory Effects on Multiple Myeloma Cell Growth and Tumor Progression

    PubMed Central

    Ciavarella, Sabino; Caselli, Anna; Tamma, Antonella Valentina; Savonarola, Annalisa; Loverro, Giuseppe; Paganelli, Roberto; Tucci, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (BM-MSCs) are under intensive investigation in preclinical models of cytotherapies against cancer, including multiple myeloma (MM). However, the therapeutic use of stromal progenitors holds critical safety concerns due to their potential MM-supporting activity in vivo. Here, we explored whether MSCs from sources other than BM, such as adipose tissue (AD-MSCs) and umbilical cord (UC-MSCs), affect MM cell growth in comparison to either normal (nBM-MSCs) or myelomatous marrow MSCs (MM-BM-MSCs). Results from both proliferation and clonogenic assays indicated that, in contrast to nBM- and MM-BM-MSCs, both AD and particularly UC-MSCs significantly inhibit MM cell clonogenicity and growth in vitro. Furthermore, when co-injected with UC-MSCs into mice, RPMI-8226 MM cells formed smaller subcutaneous tumor masses, while peritumoral injections of the same MSC subtype significantly delayed the tumor burden growing in subcutaneous plasmocytoma-bearing mice. Finally, both microarrays and ELISA revealed different expression of several genes and soluble factors in UC-MSCs as compared with other MSCs. Our data suggest that UC-MSCs have a distinct molecular profile that correlates with their intrinsic anti-MM activity and emphasize the UCs as ideal sources of MSCs for future cell-based therapies against MM. PMID:25758779

  6. Romidepsin in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Neuroendocrine Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-03

    Gastrinoma; Glucagonoma; Insulinoma; Metastatic Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Pulmonary Carcinoid Tumor; Recurrent Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Recurrent Islet Cell Carcinoma; Regional Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Somatostatinoma

  7. [Succinate dehydrogenase-deficient tumors--a novel mechanism of tumor formation].

    PubMed

    Miettinen, Markku

    2015-01-01

    Succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) is a heterotetrameric enzyme complex participating in the Krebs cycle and electron transfer of oxidative phosphorylation. These tumors, discovered during the past 15 years, often occur in young patients and include 15% of paragangliomas, 7% of gastric gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs), and <1% of renal cell carcinomas and pituitary adenomas. SDH-deficient tumors have lost SDH complex activity via bi-allelic genomic losses or epigenetic silencing. This deficiency is oncogenic, activating pseudohypoxia signaling. SDH deficiency has to be suspected in the above-cited tumor types presenting at a young age. Immunohistochemical testing of tumor tissue for SDHB loss is diagnostic. PMID:26749909

  8. Matrix metalloproteinase-1-mediated mesenchymal stem cell tumor tropism is dependent on crosstalk with stromal derived growth factor 1/C-X-C chemokine receptor 4 axis.

    PubMed

    Ho, Ivy A W; Yulyana, Yulyana; Sia, Kian C; Newman, Jennifer P; Guo, Chang M; Hui, Kam M; Lam, Paula Y P

    2014-10-01

    Human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have the unique ability to home toward injuries or tumor sites. We have previously shown that the tumor-tropic property is dependent on the intrinsic expression and activity of the matrix remodeling gene, matrix metalloproteinase 1 (MMP-1). Herein, crosstalk between MMP-1/protease activated receptor 1 (PAR-1) and the G-protein coupled receptor stromal-derived growth factor 1 (SDF-1)/C-X-C chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR-4) in facilitating cell migration was investigated. Gain-of-function and RNA interference (RNAi) technology were used to evaluate the interplay between the key players. The downstream effect on the tumor-tropic migration of MSCs was investigated using modified Boyden chamber assay. Neutralizing PAR-1 activation using monoclonal antibody and targeted knockdown of MMP-1 using RNAi resulted in decreased expression of SDF-1, which was not observed in control-RNAi-transfected cells. Overexpression of CXCR-4 failed to promote MSC migration; the percentage of migrated cells toward tumor cell conditioned medium was similar to the vector-transduced and the CXCR-4-transduced MSCs. Furthermore, inhibition of SDF-1/CXCR-4 signaling using AMD3100 reduced MSC migration through the deregulation of MMP-1 promoter activities, protein expression, and metalloproteinase activity. Collectively, our results showed that MMP-1-mediated MSC tumor tropism is dependent on crosstalk with the SDF-1/CXCR-4 axis.

  9. High expression of MAGE-A9 in tumor and stromal cells of non-small cell lung cancer was correlated with patient poor survival.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Siya; Zhai, Xiaolu; Wang, Gui; Feng, Jian; Zhu, Huijun; Xu, Liqin; Mao, Guoxin; Huang, Jianfei

    2015-01-01

    Melanoma associated antigen-A (MAGE-A) is an oncogene and correlated with tumor initiation and development. However the roles of MAGE-A9 in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are still unknown. We investigated MAGE-A9 mRNA expression in 18 tumor tissues of NSCLC by qRT-PCR and MAGE-A9 protein expression in 213 NSCLC samples of tissue arrays by immunohistochemical staining. We assessed the relationship between MAGE-A9 expression and clinical parameters. The results showed that the high expression of MAGE-A9 protein in NSCLC tumor cells were commonly present in squamous cell carcinomas (P = 0.030). It was also related to larger tumor diameter, lymph node metastasis and later stage grouping with TNM classification (all P < 0.05). Whereas the expression of MAGE-A9 in stromal cells was higher in squamous cell carcinomas as well. Cox regression univariate and multivariable analysis revealed that MAGE-A9 expression in tumor cells of NSCLC (P < 0.001) is an independent prognostic factor in five-year overall survival rate. We concluded that the molecular assessment of MAGEA9 could be considered to improve prognostic evaluation and to identify eligible patients for potential target therapy.

  10. Gastrointestinal leiomyosarcoma in a pygmy sperm whale (Kogia breviceps).

    PubMed

    Leone, Angelique; Dark, Michael; Kondo, Hirotaka; Rotstein, David S; Kiupel, Matti; Walsh, Michael T; Erlacher-Reid, Claire; Gordon, Nadia; Conway, Julia A

    2013-09-01

    An adult male pygmy sperm whale (Kogia breviceps) was stranded within a tidal pool on Fernandina Beach on the north Florida Atlantic coast (USA) and expired soon after discovery. Necropsy findings included a small intestinal mass markedly expanding the intestinal wall and partially obstructing the lumen. This finding likely led to the malnutrition and ultimately the stranding of this whale. The differential diagnoses for the mass based on gross evaluation included a duodenal adenocarcinoma, leiomyoma/sarcoma, gastrointestinal stroma tumor, and benign/malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor, previously referred to as neurofibromas or schwannomas. The mass was presumptively diagnosed as a leiomyosarcoma via routine histopathology and confirmed by immunoreactivity for desmin and smooth actin (SMA). KIT, a gene name for CD 117, was negative, excluding a gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST). Leiomyosarcomas have been reported within numerous wild and domestic species, although this is the first reported case of any neoplasm in a pygmy sperm whale (K. breviceps).

  11. Pathologic and Molecular Features Correlate With Long-Term Outcome After Adjuvant Therapy of Resected Primary GI Stromal Tumor: The ACOSOG Z9001 Trial

    PubMed Central

    Corless, Christopher L.; Ballman, Karla V.; Antonescu, Cristina R.; Kolesnikova, Violetta; Maki, Robert G.; Pisters, Peter W.T.; Blackstein, Martin E.; Blanke, Charles D.; Demetri, George D.; Heinrich, Michael C.; von Mehren, Margaret; Patel, Shreyaskumar; McCarter, Martin D.; Owzar, Kouros; DeMatteo, Ronald P.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The ACOSOG (American College of Surgeons Oncology Group) Z9001 (Alliance) study, a randomized, placebo-controlled trial, demonstrated that 1 year of adjuvant imatinib prolonged recurrence-free survival (RFS) after resection of primary GI stromal tumor (GIST). We sought to determine the pathologic and molecular factors associated with patient outcome. Patients and Methods There were 328 patients assigned to the placebo arm and 317 to the imatinib arm. Median patient follow-up was 74 months. There were 645 tumor specimens available for mitotic rate or mutation analysis. Results RFS remained superior in the imatinib arm (hazard ratio, 0.6; 95% CI, 0.43 to 0.75; Cox model–adjusted P < .001). On multivariable analysis of patients in the placebo arm, large tumor size, small bowel location, and high mitotic rate were associated with lower RFS, whereas tumor genotype was not significantly associated with RFS. Multivariable analysis of patients in the imatinib arm yielded similar findings. When comparing the two arms, imatinib therapy was associated with higher RFS in patients with a KIT exon 11 deletion of any type, but not a KIT exon 11 insertion or point mutation, KIT exon 9 mutation, PDGFRA mutation, or wild-type tumor, although some of these patient groups were small. Adjuvant imatinib did not seem to alter overall survival. Conclusion Our findings show that tumor size, location, and mitotic rate, but not tumor genotype, are associated with the natural history of GIST. Patients with KIT exon 11 deletions assigned to 1 year of adjuvant imatinib had a longer RFS. PMID:24638003

  12. Endometrial Stromal Nodule: Report of a Case

    PubMed Central

    Fdili Alaoui, F. Z.; Chaara, H.; Bouguern, H.; Melhouf, M. A.; Fatemi, H.; Belmlih, A.; Amarti, A.

    2011-01-01

    Endometrial stromal nodule (ESN) is the least common of the endometrial stromal tumors. They are rare neoplasms which are diagnosed in most instances by light microscopy. Although such nodules are benign, hysterectomy has been considered the treatment of choice to determine the margins of the tumor required for diagnosis and to differentiate it from invasive stromal sarcoma Whose prognosis is totally different. We report a case of a 45 years old woman, with presurgical diagnosis of adnexal mass or uterine tumor. She underwent a total abdominal hysterectomy. Pathologic examination revealed an endometrial stromal nodule. Through this observation, we insist on the fact that the ESNs are rare and benign entities which must be differentiated from the other invasive malignant stromal tumors; this can change the final prognosis. PMID:21423543

  13. Endometrial stromal nodule: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Fdili Alaoui, F Z; Chaara, H; Bouguern, H; Melhouf, M A; Fatemi, H; Belmlih, A; Amarti, A

    2011-01-01

    Endometrial stromal nodule (ESN) is the least common of the endometrial stromal tumors. They are rare neoplasms which are diagnosed in most instances by light microscopy. Although such nodules are benign, hysterectomy has been considered the treatment of choice to determine the margins of the tumor required for diagnosis and to differentiate it from invasive stromal sarcoma Whose prognosis is totally different. We report a case of a 45 years old woman, with presurgical diagnosis of adnexal mass or uterine tumor. She underwent a total abdominal hysterectomy. Pathologic examination revealed an endometrial stromal nodule. Through this observation, we insist on the fact that the ESNs are rare and benign entities which must be differentiated from the other invasive malignant stromal tumors; this can change the final prognosis. PMID:21423543

  14. Development of neuroendocrine tumors in the gastrointestinal tract of transgenic mice. Heterogeneity of hormone expression.

    PubMed Central

    Rindi, G.; Grant, S. G.; Yiangou, Y.; Ghatei, M. A.; Bloom, S. R.; Bautch, V. L.; Solcia, E.; Polak, J. M.

    1990-01-01

    Expression of hormones in endocrine tumors and derived cell lines of transgenic mice carrying insulin-promoted oncogenes has been investigated by histochemical, immunohistochemical, ultrastructural, and radioimmunologic means. Tumors of the pancreas, small intestine, mesentery, and liver were examined. Insulin-immunoreactive cells were prevalent in pancreatic tumors, with a significant subpopulation of pancreatic polypeptide-immunoreactive elements. Conventional ultrastructural and immunogold analysis identified insulin-storing beta granules in pancreatic tumor cells. In contrast, the largest immunoreactive subpopulation of intestinal tumors expressed secretin (53% of total cells), followed by proglucagon-related peptides (15%), glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (7%), gastrin (7%), pancreatic polypeptide (2%), neurotensin (2%), and somatostatin (1%). No detectable immunoreactivity for either insulin or serotonin was observed. Electron microscopy and immunogold labeling showed that intestinal tumor cells contained secretin-storing S-type granules. Lymph node and liver tumors contained secretin-immunoreactive cells with ultrastructural features similar to those of intestinal tumors. In addition, high levels of circulating insulinlike and secretinlike immunoreactants were detectable. Analogous hormone profiles were identified in tumor cell lines and culture media. Large T-antigen immunoreactivity was detected in all the nuclei of neoplastic cells, as well as in insulin-immunoreactive elements of non-neoplastic islets and pancreatic ducts and in some secretin-immunoreactive cells of small intestinal mucosa. These data indicate that neuroendocrine tumors arise both in beta cell and S-cell subpopulations of transgenic mice. Images Figure 5 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 6 PMID:2162628

  15. Gastrointestinal neuroendocrine tumors treated with high dose octreotide-LAR: A systematic literature review

    PubMed Central

    Broder, Michael S; Beenhouwer, David; Strosberg, Jonathan R; Neary, Maureen P; Cherepanov, Dasha

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To review literature on efficacy and safety of octreotide-long-acting repeatable (LAR) used at doses higher than the Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved 30 mg/mo for treatment of neuroendocrine tumors (NETs). METHODS: We searched PubMed and Cochrane Library from 1998-2012, 5 conferences (American Society of Clinical Oncology, Endocrine Society, European Neuroendocrine Tumor Society, European Society for Medical Oncology, North American Neuroendocrine Tumor Society) from 2000-2013 using MeSH and keyterms including neuroendocrine tumors, carcinoid tumor, carcinoma, neuroendocrine, and octreotide. Bibliographies of accepted articles were also searched. Two reviewers reviewed titles, abstracts, and full-length articles. Studies that reported data on efficacy and safety of ≥ 30 mg/mo octreotide-LAR for NETs in human subjects, published in any language were included in the review. RESULTS: The search identified 1086 publications, of which 238 underwent full-text review (20 were translated into English); 17 were included in the review. Studies varied in designs, subjects, octreotide-LAR regimens, and definition of outcomes. Eleven studies reported use of higher doses to control symptoms and tumor progression, although symptom severity and formal quality-of-life analysis were not quantitatively measured. Ten studies reported efficacy, describing 260 subjects with doses ranging from 40 mg/mo or 30 mg/3 wk up to 120 mg/mo. Eight studies reported expert clinical opinion that supported dose escalation of octreotide-LAR up to 60 mg/mo for symptom control and suggested increased doses may be effective at preventing tumor progression. Eight studies reported safety; there was no evidence of increased toxicity associated with doses of octreotide-LAR > 30 mg/mo. CONCLUSION: As reported in this review, octreotide-LAR at doses > 30 mg/mo is being prescribed for symptom and tumor control in NET patients. Furthermore, expert clinical opinion provided support for

  16. Gastro-intestinal autoimmunity: preclinical experiences and successful therapy of fistulizing bowel diseases and gut Graft versus host disease by mesenchymal stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Voswinkel, Jan; Francois, Sabine; Gorin, Norbert-Claude; Chapel, Alain

    2013-07-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) are multipotent adult stem cells with the potential to regenerate tissue damage and inhibit inflammation and fibrosis in parallel. As they are non-immunogenic, MSC can be safely auto- and allotransplanted and consequently represent a therapeutic option for refractory connective tissue diseases and fistulizing colitis like Crohn's disease. Actually, there are more than 200 registered clinical trial sites for evaluating MSC therapy, 22 are on autoimmune diseases and 27 are actually recruiting bowel disease' patients. More than 1,500 patients with bowel diseases like Crohn's disease were treated in clinical trials by local as well as systemic MSC therapy. Phase I and II trials on fistula documented the feasibility and safety of MSC therapy, and a significant superiority compared to fibrin glue in fistulizing bowel diseases was demonstrated. Autologous as well as allogeneic use of Bone marrow as well as of adipose tissue-derived MSC are feasible. In refractory Graft versus host disease, especially in refractory gut Graft versus host diseases, encouraging results were reported using MSC. Systemic MSC therapy of refractory irradiation-induced colitis was safe and effective on pain, diarrhea, hemorrhage, inflammation and fistulization accompanied by modulation of the lymphocyte subsets toward an increase in T regulatory cells and a decrease in activated effector T cells. Mesenchymal stem cells represent a safe therapy for patients with refractory inflammatory bowel diseases.

  17. Impaired Lymphocytes Development and Xenotransplantation of Gastrointestinal Tumor Cells in Prkdc-Null SCID Zebrafish Model.

    PubMed

    Jung, In Hye; Chung, Yong-Yoon; Jung, Dawoon E; Kim, Young Jin; Kim, Do Hee; Kim, Kyung-Sik; Park, Seung Woo

    2016-08-01

    Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice have widely been used as hosts for human tumor cell xenograft study. This animal model, however, is labor intensive. As zebrafish is largely emerging as a promising model system for studying human diseases including cancer, developing efficient immunocompromised strains for tumor xenograft study are also demanded in zebrafish. Here, we have created the Prkdc-null SCID zebrafish model which provides the stable immune-deficient background required for xenotransplantation of tumor cell. In this study, the two transcription activator-like effector nucleases that specifically target the exon3 of the zebrafish Prkdc gene were used to induce a frame shift mutation, causing a complete knockout of the gene function. The SCID zebrafish showed susceptibility to spontaneous infection, a well-known phenotype found in the SCID mutation. Further characterization revealed that the SCID zebrafish contained no functional T and B lymphocytes which reflected the phenotypes identified in the mice SCID model. Intraperitoneal injection of human cancer cells into the adult SCID zebrafish clearly showed tumor cell growth forming into a solid mass. Our present data show the suitability of using the SCID zebrafish strain for xenotransplantation experiments, and in vivo monitoring of the tumor cell growth in the zebrafish demonstrates use of the animal model as a new platform of tumor xenograft study.

  18. Impaired Lymphocytes Development and Xenotransplantation of Gastrointestinal Tumor Cells in Prkdc-Null SCID Zebrafish Model.

    PubMed

    Jung, In Hye; Chung, Yong-Yoon; Jung, Dawoon E; Kim, Young Jin; Kim, Do Hee; Kim, Kyung-Sik; Park, Seung Woo

    2016-08-01

    Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice have widely been used as hosts for human tumor cell xenograft study. This animal model, however, is labor intensive. As zebrafish is largely emerging as a promising model system for studying human diseases including cancer, developing efficient immunocompromised strains for tumor xenograft study are also demanded in zebrafish. Here, we have created the Prkdc-null SCID zebrafish model which provides the stable immune-deficient background required for xenotransplantation of tumor cell. In this study, the two transcription activator-like effector nucleases that specifically target the exon3 of the zebrafish Prkdc gene were used to induce a frame shift mutation, causing a complete knockout of the gene function. The SCID zebrafish showed susceptibility to spontaneous infection, a well-known phenotype found in the SCID mutation. Further characterization revealed that the SCID zebrafish contained no functional T and B lymphocytes which reflected the phenotypes identified in the mice SCID model. Intraperitoneal injection of human cancer cells into the adult SCID zebrafish clearly showed tumor cell growth forming into a solid mass. Our present data show the suitability of using the SCID zebrafish strain for xenotransplantation experiments, and in vivo monitoring of the tumor cell growth in the zebrafish demonstrates use of the animal model as a new platform of tumor xenograft study. PMID:27566103

  19. Advances in the Management of Upper Gastrointestinal Subepithelial Tumor: Pathologic Diagnosis Using Endoscopy without Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hang Lak

    2016-01-01

    Until now, biopsy methods for subepithelial tumors (SETs) have focused on endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided biopsy; however, these methods have several limitations. We devised a simple method for pathologic diagnosis of SETs. SETs are occasionally diagnosed during endoscopy, and lesions are generally small and asymptomatic. It can be challenging to decide on a management plan for large asymptomatic SETs. EUS imaging provides information regarding the size, layer, and echo pattern of the lesions. Patient management plans have traditionally been determined based on EUS images, whereby the endoscopist chooses to either monitor or remove the tumor. However, EUS alone cannot diagnose and evaluate upper gastrointestinal SETs with high accuracy. As sufficient tissue samples are required for the accurate diagnosis of SETs, EUS-guided biopsy techniques such as EUS fine-needle aspiration and trucut biopsy are currently used. However, these methods have a relatively low diagnostic accuracy and do not always provide information upon immunohistochemical staining. Endoscopists can easily detect a submucosal mass after creating an iatrogenic mucosal ulcer, after which tissue sampling is performed by using endoscopic biopsy. Furthermore, pathologic results can differentiate between benign and premalignant lesions. Here, we introduce a simple method for the pathologic diagnosis of SETs. PMID:27246253

  20. Hepatic Arterial Chemoembolization Using Drug-Eluting Beads in Gastrointestinal Neuroendocrine Tumor Metastatic to the Liver

    SciTech Connect

    Gaur, Shantanu K.; Friese, Jeremy L.; Sadow, Cheryl A.; Ayyagari, Rajasekhara; Binkert, Christoph A.; Schenker, Matthew P.; Kulke, Matthew; Baum, Richard

    2011-06-15

    Purpose: This study was designed to evaluate short (<3 months) and intermediate-term (>3 months) follow-up in patients with metastatic neuroendocrine tumor to the liver who underwent hepatic arterial chemoembolization with drug-eluting beads at a single institution. Methods: Institutional review board approval was obtained for this retrospective review. All patients who were treated with 100-300 or 300-500 {mu}m drug-eluting LC Beads (Biocompatibles, UK) preloaded with doxorubicin (range, 50-100 mg) for GI neuroendocrine tumor metastatic to the liver from June 2004 to June 2009 were included. CT and MRI were evaluated for progression using Response Evaluation Criteria In Solid Tumors (RECIST) or European Association for the Study of the Liver (EASL) criteria. Short-term (<3 months) and intermediate-term (>3 months) imaging response was determined and Kaplan-Meier survival curves were plotted. Results: Thirty-eight drug-eluting bead chemoembolization procedures were performed on 32 hepatic lobes, comprising 21 treatment cycles in 18 patients. All procedures were technically successful with two major complications (biliary injuries). At short-term follow-up (<3 months), 22 of 38 (58%) procedures and 10 of 21 (48%) treatment cycles produced an objective response (OR) with the remainder having stable disease (SD). At intermediate-term follow-up (mean, 445 days; range, 163-1247), 17 of 26 (65%) procedures and 8 of 14 (57%) treatment cycles produced an OR. Probability of progressing was approximately 52% at 1 year with a median time to progression of 419 days. Conclusions: Drug-eluting bead chemoembolization is a reasonable alternative to hepatic arterial embolization and chemoembolization for the treatment of metastatic neuroendocrine tumor to the liver.

  1. [Dietary fiber and gastro-intestinal tumors, implications for the Mexican population].

    PubMed

    Parra-Cabrera, S; Fernández-Ortega, M C; Vandale-Toney, S; López-Carrillo, L

    1994-06-01

    Certain nutrients serve as individual influences in the development or protection against chronic and/or degenerative diseases. Specifically, it has been observed that the abundant consumption of dietetic fiber is a protective factor against tumors of the digestive system. Many scientific articles have reported mechanisms by which dietetic fibers exert an important protective effect for colon cancer and in lesser degree against cancer of the stomach and rectum. In Mexico during 1990, neoplasms were the second cause of general mortality for the persons over the age of 65 years. The Fourth National Report of Cancer in Mexico revealed that tumors of the digestive tube were the third most frequent type of neoplasm in the country and that stomach cancer had the greatest incidence among cancers which affect this system. To date, we do not know how much the urban immigration and the consequent changes in food patterns have acted as cofactors for the increase in this type of tumors. During the seventies, a number of national and regional nutritional surveys showed that the Mexican population had a high consumption of fiber, as part of the traditional diet, comprised primarily of tortilla and beans. At the present time, the national dietary patterns have changed; the increasing consumption of high energy foods with a low nutritional value is associated with much less ingestion of dietary fiber. This article points out that the population may have additional digestive cancer risks, due to new food consumption patterns which have reduced the availability of dietary fiber.

  2. Update in Cancer Chemotherapy: Gastrointestinal Cancer, Cancer of the Stomach and Carcinoid Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Jane C.

    1986-01-01

    Cancer chemotherapy in the treatment of advanced gastric cancer provides only palliation with perhaps increased survival time in some patients. The primary treatment of gastric carcinomas is surgical, as this is the only hope for cure. It is estimated that 80 to 85 percent of patients with newly diagnosed cases of stomach cancer will be dead of their disease within five years. Radiation therapy alone is seldom employed, except as a palliative measure to control hemorrhage or pain. There are no data to suggest that postoperative radiation increases survival rates. Single-agent chemotherapy is of temporary palliative value in 20 to 30 percent of cases with a duration of response from three to five months. Combination chemotherapy has shown a somewhat higher response rate than single-agent therapy. In advanced gastric cancer, there is no evidence of improved long-term disease-free survival rates with any combination yet reported. The treatment of carcinoid cancer of the intestinal tract is surgical removal, as this offers the only hope of cure. Radiation therapy is of little benefit, except for moderate palliation in cases of extensive liver metasasis. Carcinoid cancers are moderately sensitive to chemotherapy. While some adjuvant chemotherapy trials suggest improvement, major survival gains remain to be demonstrated. Uncertainty as to the role of chemotherapy in the treatment of gastrointestinal cancers is probably due to lack of data. PMID:3528508

  3. Targeting matriptase in breast cancer abrogates tumor progression via impairment of stromal-epithelial growth factor signaling

    PubMed Central

    Zoratti, Gina L.; Tanabe, Lauren M.; Varela, Fausto A.; Murray, Andrew S.; Bergum, Christopher; Colombo, Eloic; Lang, Julie; Molinolo, Alfredo A.; Leduc, Richard; Marsault, Eric; Boerner, Julie; List, Karin

    2015-01-01

    Matriptase is an epithelia-specific membrane-anchored serine protease that has received considerable attention in recent years due to its consistent dysregulation in human epithelial tumors, including breast cancer. Mice with reduced levels of matriptase display a significant delay in oncogene-induced mammary tumor formation and blunted tumor growth. The abated tumor growth is associated with a decrease in cancer cell proliferation. Here we demonstrate by genetic deletion and silencing that the proliferation impairment in matriptase deficient breast cancer cells is caused by their inability to initiate activation of the c-Met signaling pathway in response to fibroblast-secreted pro-HGF. Similarly, inhibition of matriptase catalytic activity using a selective small-molecule inhibitor abrogates the activation of c-Met, Gab1 and AKT, in response to pro-HGF, which functionally leads to attenuated proliferation in breast carcinoma cells. We conclude that matriptase is critically involved in breast cancer progression and represents a potential therapeutic target in breast cancer. PMID:25873032

  4. Sorafenib Tosylate in Treating Patients With Progressive Metastatic Neuroendocrine Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-11-14

    Gastrinoma; Glucagonoma; Insulinoma; Metastatic Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Neuroendocrine Tumor; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Recurrent Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Recurrent Islet Cell Carcinoma; Somatostatinoma; WDHA Syndrome

  5. Regorafenib in Treating Patients With Advanced or Metastatic Neuroendocrine Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-08-29

    Gastrinoma; Glucagonoma; Insulinoma; Metastatic Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Pulmonary Carcinoid Tumor; Recurrent Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Recurrent Islet Cell Carcinoma; Somatostatinoma

  6. Radiotherapy combined with TLR7/8 activation induces strong immune responses against gastrointestinal tumors.

    PubMed

    Schölch, Sebastian; Rauber, Conrad; Tietz, Alexandra; Rahbari, Nuh N; Bork, Ulrich; Schmidt, Thomas; Kahlert, Christoph; Haberkorn, Uwe; Tomai, Mark A; Lipson, Kenneth E; Carretero, Rafael; Weitz, Jürgen; Koch, Moritz; Huber, Peter E

    2015-03-10

    In addition to local cytotoxic activity, radiotherapy may also elicit local and systemic antitumor immunity, which may be augmented by immunotherapeutic agents including Toll-like receptor (TLR) 7/8 agonists. Here, we investigated the ability of 3M-011 (854A), a TLR7/8 agonist, to boost the antigen-presenting activity of dendritic cells (DC) as an adjuvant to radiotherapy. The combined treatment induced marked local and systemic responses in subcutaneous and orthotopic mouse models of colorectal and pancreatic cancer. In vitro cytotoxicity assays as well as in vivo depletion experiments with monoclonal antibodies identified NK and CD8 T cells as the cell populations mediating the cytotoxic effects of the treatment, while in vivo depletion of CD11c+ dendritic cells (DC) in CD11c-DTR transgenic mice revealed DC as the pivotal immune hub in this setting. The specificity of the immune reaction was confirmed by ELISPOT assays. TLR7/8 agonists therefore seem to be potent adjuvants to radiotherapy, inducing strong local and profound systemic immune responses to tumor antigens released by conventional therapy.

  7. Radiotherapy combined with TLR7/8 activation induces strong immune responses against gastrointestinal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Tietz, Alexandra; Rahbari, Nuh N.; Bork, Ulrich; Schmidt, Thomas; Kahlert, Christoph; Haberkorn, Uwe; Tomai, Mark A.; Lipson, Kenneth E.; Carretero, Rafael; Weitz, Jürgen; Koch, Moritz; Huber, Peter E.

    2015-01-01

    In addition to local cytotoxic activity, radiotherapy may also elicit local and systemic antitumor immunity, which may be augmented by immunotherapeutic agents including Toll-like receptor (TLR) 7/8 agonists. Here, we investigated the ability of 3M-011 (854A), a TLR7/8 agonist, to boost the antigen-presenting activity of dendritic cells (DC) as an adjuvant to radiotherapy. The combined treatment induced marked local and systemic responses in subcutaneous and orthotopic mouse models of colorectal and pancreatic cancer. In vitro cytotoxicity assays as well as in vivo depletion experiments with monoclonal antibodies identified NK and CD8 T cells as the cell populations mediating the cytotoxic effects of the treatment, while in vivo depletion of CD11c+ dendritic cells (DC) in CD11c-DTR transgenic mice revealed DC as the pivotal immune hub in this setting. The specificity of the immune reaction was confirmed by ELISPOT assays. TLR7/8 agonists therefore seem to be potent adjuvants to radiotherapy, inducing strong local and profound systemic immune responses to tumor antigens released by conventional therapy. PMID:25609199

  8. [Mesenchymal tumors of the mediastinum].

    PubMed

    Rieker, R J; Marx, A; Agaimy, A; Ströbel, P

    2016-09-01

    Mesenchymal neoplasms of the thymus and mediastinum account for only 2 % of neoplasms of the mediastinum and are therefore very rare. With very few exceptions the histology, immunohistochemistry and (based on current knowledge) molecular biology of mediastinal soft tissue tumors are not different from their counterparts in other organs. Characteristic features are more concerned with clinical epidemiological and therapeutic aspects as well as the multitude of possible differential diagnoses. With the exception of organ-specific tumors, such as gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST), virtually all entities encountered in peripheral soft tissues can also arise in the mediastinum. Primary mediastinal soft tissue sarcomas (STS) must be distinguished from secondary radiation-induced STS after irradiation, e. g. for breast cancer and Hodgkin's lymphoma and from STS arising as somatic type malignancies in mediastinal germ cell tumors. PMID:27488616

  9. Blood-Based Biomarkers Are Associated with Disease Recurrence and Survival in Gastrointestinal Stroma Tumor Patients after Surgical Resection

    PubMed Central

    Stotz, Michael; Liegl-Atzwanger, Bernadette; Posch, Florian; Mrsic, Edvin; Thalhammer, Michael; Stojakovic, Tatjana; Bezan, Angelika; Pichler, Martin; Gerger, Armin; Szkandera, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    Background Inflammatory blood count biomarkers may improve recurrence risk stratification and inform long-term prognosis of cancer patients. Here, we quantify the prognostic impact of blood-based biomarkers on recurrence risk and long-term survival in a large cohort of gastrointestinal stroma tumor (GIST) patients after curative surgery. Methods One-hundred-forty-nine consecutive GIST patients were followed-up for a median period of 4.8 years. Local recurrence, distant metastasis, and death occurred in 9, 21, and 31 patients, respectively. Time-to-event and competing risk analysis were applied to study the association between haemoglobin (Hb) level, white blood cell count (WBC), neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio (NLR), derived NLR (dNLR), lymphocyte/monocyte ratio (LMR), and platelet/lymphocyte ratio (PLR) with risk of local or distant recurrence (RR), recurrence free survival (RFS), and overall survival (OS). Results A low Hb (p = 0.029), and elevations in the parameters WBC (p = 0.004), NLR (p = 0.015) and dNLR (p = 0.037) were associated with a poor OS in GIST patients in multivariate analysis. Moreover, a low Hb (p = 0.049) and an elevated WBC (p = 0.001), NLR (p = 0.007), dNLR (p = 0.043) and PLR (p = 0.024) were independently associated with decreased RFS after adjusting for Miettinen score. However, only an increase of dNLR/NLR showed a significant association to higher RR (p = 0.048). Inclusion of NLR or PLR to Miettinen risk score did not reasonably improve the clinical risk prediction of 2-year RFS. Conclusion Low Hb, elevated WBC, elevated dNLR, and elevated PLR are independent prognostic factors for a worse clinical outcome in GIST patients after curative resection. PMID:27454486

  10. Effect of Glutamine Enriched Nutrition Support on Surgical Patients with Gastrointestinal Tumor: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Kai; Shu, Xiao-Liang; Zhang, Yong-Sheng; Liu, Xian-Li; Zhao, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Background: Associations between glutamine (Gln) enriched nutrition support and surgical patients with gastrointestinal (GI) tumor remain controversy. The purpose of this meta-analysis was to assess the effect of Gln enriched nutrition support on surgical patients with GI tumor in term of relevant biochemical indices, immune indices, and clinical outcomes. Methods: Six databases were systematically searched to find eligible randomized controlled trials (RCTs) from 1966 to May 2014. When estimated the analysis indexes, the relative risk (RR) was used as the effect size of the categorical variable, while the weighted mean difference (MD) was used as the effect size of a continuous variable. Meta-analysis was conducted with Rev Man 5.2. Results: Thirteen RCTs, involving 1034 patients, were included in the meta-analysis. The analysis showed that Gln enriched nutrition support was more effective in increasing serum albumin (MD: 0.10; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.02–0.18; P < 0.05), serum prealbumin (MD: 1.98; 95% CI: 1.40–2.55; P < 0.05) and serum transferring (MD: 0.35; 95% CI: 0.12–0.57; P < 0.05), concentration of IgG (MD: 1.26; 95% CI: 0.90–1.63; P < 0.05), IgM (MD: 0.18; 95% CI: 0.11–0.25; P < 0.05), IgA (MD: 0.22; 95% CI: 0.10–0.33; P < 0.05), CD3+ (MD: 3.71; 95% CI: 2.57–4.85; P < 0.05) and CD4/CD8 ratio (MD: 0.27; 95% CI: 0.12–0.42; P < 0.05). Meanwhile, it was more significant in decreasing the incidence of infectious complications (RR: 0.67; 95% CI: 0.50–0.90; P < 0.05) and shortening the length of hospital stay (MD: −1.72; 95% CI: −3.31–−0.13; P < 0.05). Conclusions: Glutamine enriched nutrition support was superior in improving immune function, reducing the incidence of infectious complications and shortening the length of hospital stay, playing an important role in the rehabilitation of surgical GI cancer patients. PMID:25591570

  11. [Grading of gynecological tumors : Current aspects].

    PubMed

    Horn, L-C; Mayr, D; Brambs, C E; Einenkel, J; Sändig, I; Schierle, K

    2016-07-01

    Histopathological assessment of the tumor grade and cell type is central to the management and prognosis of various gynecological malignancies. Conventional grading systems for squamous carcinomas and adenocarcinomas of the vulva, vagina and cervix are poorly defined. For endometrioid tumors of the female genital tract as well as for mucinous endometrial, ovarian and seromucinous ovarian carcinomas, the 3‑tiered FIGO grading system is recommended. For uterine neuroendocrine tumors the grading system of the gastrointestinal counterparts has been adopted. Uterine leiomyosarcomas are not graded. Endometrial stromal sarcomas are divided into low and high grades, based on cellular morphology, immunohistochemical and molecular findings. A chemotherapy response score was established for chemotherapeutically treated high-grade serous pelvic cancer. For non-epithelial ovarian malignancies, only Sertoli-Leydig cell tumors and immature teratomas are graded. At this time molecular profiling has no impact on the grading of tumors of the female genital tract. PMID:27379622

  12. GCP-2/CXCL6 synergizes with other endothelial cell-derived chemokines in neutrophil mobilization and is associated with angiogenesis in gastrointestinal tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Gijsbers, Klara; Gouwy, Mieke; Struyf, Sofie; Wuyts, Anja; Proost, Paul; Opdenakker, Ghislain; Penninckx, Freddy; Ectors, Nadine; Geboes, Karel; Van Damme, Jo . E-mail: jozef.vandamme@rega.kuleuven.ac.be

    2005-02-15

    The precise role of chemokines in neovascularization during inflammation or tumor growth is not yet fully understood. We show here that the chemokines granulocyte chemotactic protein-2 (GCP-2/CXCL6), interleukin-8 (IL-8/CXCL8), and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1/CCL2) are co-induced in microvascular endothelial cells after stimulation with pro-inflammatory stimuli. In contrast with its weak proliferative effect on endothelial cells, GCP-2 synergized with MCP-1 in neutrophil chemotaxis. This synergy may represent a mechanism for tumor development and metastasis by providing efficient leukocyte infiltration in the absence of exogenous immune modulators. To mimic endothelial cell-derived GCP-2 in vivo, GCP-2 was intravenously injected and shown to provoke a dose-dependent systemic response, composed of an immediate granulopenia, followed by a profound granulocytosis. By immunohistochemistry, GCP-2 was further shown to be expressed by endothelial cells from human patients with gastrointestinal (GI) malignancies. GCP-2 staining correlated with leukocyte infiltration into the tumor and with the expression of the matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9/gelatinase B). Together with previous findings, these data suggest that the production of GCP-2 by endothelial cells within the tumor can contribute to tumor development through neovascularization due to endothelial cell chemotaxis and to tumor cell invasion and metastasis by attracting and activating neutrophils loaded with proteases that promote matrix degradation.

  13. A rare case of metastatic germ cell tumor to stomach and duodenum masquerading as signet ring cell adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Sundaram, Sridhar; Patil, Prachi; Mehta, Shaesta; Ramadwar, Mukta

    2016-01-01

    Adenocarcinomas are the most common cancers affecting stomach. However gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST), lymphomas and neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) can also affect the stomach. But stomach is relatively rare site of involvement by metastasis. In this case report a rare metastasis of germ cell tumor (GCT) into stomach is described which clinically and endoscopically masquerade as primary gastric cancers. But detailed clinical examination and vigilant histopathological reporting proves the origin of tumor distant from stomach and thereby change the whole approach of management. PMID:27668229

  14. A rare case of metastatic germ cell tumor to stomach and duodenum masquerading as signet ring cell adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Mazumdar, Srijan; Sundaram, Sridhar; Patil, Prachi; Mehta, Shaesta; Ramadwar, Mukta

    2016-08-01

    Adenocarcinomas are the most common cancers affecting stomach. However gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST), lymphomas and neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) can also affect the stomach. But stomach is relatively rare site of involvement by metastasis. In this case report a rare metastasis of germ cell tumor (GCT) into stomach is described which clinically and endoscopically masquerade as primary gastric cancers. But detailed clinical examination and vigilant histopathological reporting proves the origin of tumor distant from stomach and thereby change the whole approach of management. PMID:27668229

  15. Gefitinib in Treating Patients With Progressive Metastatic Neuroendocrine Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-03

    Gastrinoma; Glucagonoma; Insulinoma; Metastatic Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Recurrent Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Recurrent Islet Cell Carcinoma; Somatostatinoma; WDHA Syndrome

  16. Stromal vascularization prevents corneal ulceration.

    PubMed

    Conn, H; Berman, M; Kenyon, K; Langer, R; Gage, J

    1980-04-01

    Experiments were performed with a model of focal, thermal-induced ulceration to test the clinical impression that vascularization prevents ulceration of the corneal stroma. Slow-release polymers containing a vasoproliferase agent (tumor angiogenesis factor) were placed in corneal pockets 2 mm central to the limbus of albino rabbits. These polymers elicited blood vessel ingrowth up to the implant. Control eyes received empty polymers which caused minimal to no vessel growth. Polymers were removed, and each cornea received a focal, thermal burn placed just central to the polymer site. All control corneas ulcerated: most (79%) developed deep stromal or perforating ulcers. Only 25% of prevascularized corneas developed stromal ulcers, and none was deep or perforating. After thermal burns, vessels in both groups grew at the same linear rate toward the burned area. There was a direct relationship between the distance separating the nearest blood vessel and the burned area at the time of burning and the maximum depth of stromal ulceration. Thus prevention of or less severe stromal ulceration is correlated with the earlier presence of vessels in the burned area.

  17. EF5 and Motexafin Lutetium in Detecting Tumor Cells in Patients With Abdominal or Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-15

    Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Carcinoma of the Appendix; Fallopian Tube Cancer; Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor; Localized Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Localized Gallbladder Cancer; Localized Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Localized Resectable Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Localized Unresectable Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Metastatic Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Ovarian Sarcoma; Ovarian Stromal Cancer; Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Recurrent Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Recurrent Gallbladder Cancer; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Recurrent Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Recurrent Small Intestine Cancer; Recurrent Uterine Sarcoma; Regional Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Small Intestine Adenocarcinoma; Small Intestine Leiomyosarcoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Stage 0 Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage I Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage I Colon Cancer; Stage I Gastric Cancer; Stage I Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage I Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage I Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage I Pancreatic Cancer; Stage I Rectal Cancer; Stage I Uterine Sarcoma; Stage II Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage II Colon Cancer; Stage II Gastric Cancer; Stage II Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage II Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage II Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage II Pancreatic Cancer; Stage II Rectal Cancer; Stage II Uterine Sarcoma; Stage III Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage III Colon Cancer; Stage III Gastric Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Rectal Cancer; Stage III Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Adult Soft Tissue Sarcoma; Stage IV Colon Cancer; Stage

  18. The oncometabolite R-2-hydroxyglutarate activates NF-κB-dependent tumor-promoting stromal niche for acute myeloid leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing-Yi; Lai, You-Syuan; Tsai, Hui-Jen; Kuo, Cheng-Chin; Yen, B Linju; Yeh, Su-Peng; Sun, H Sunny; Hung, Wen-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Mutations of isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) and IDH2 in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells produce the oncometabolite R-2-hydroxyglutarate (R-2HG) to induce epigenetic alteration and block hematopoietic differentiation. However, the effect of R-2HG released by IDH-mutated AML cells on the bone marrow microenvironment is unclear. Here, we report that R-2HG induces IκB kinase-independent activation of NF-κB in bone marrow stromal cells. R-2HG acts via a reactive oxygen species/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)-dependent pathway to phosphorylate NF-κB on the Thr254 residue. This phosphorylation enhances the interaction of NF-κB and the peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase PIN1 and increases the protein stability and transcriptional activity of NF-κB. As a consequence, R-2HG enhances NF-κB-dependent expression of cytokines including IL-6, IL-8 and complement 5a to stimulate proliferation of AML cells. In addition, R-2HG also upregulates vascular endothelial adhesion molecule 1 and CXCR4 in stromal cells to enhance the contact between AML and stromal cells and attenuates chemotherapy-induced apoptosis. More importantly, we validated the R-2HG-activated gene signature in the primary bone marrow stromal cells isolated from IDH-mutated AML patients. Collectively, our results suggest that AML cell-derived R-2HG may be helpful for the establishment of a supportive bone marrow stromal niche to promote AML progression via paracrine stimulation. PMID:27577048

  19. The oncometabolite R-2-hydroxyglutarate activates NF-κB-dependent tumor-promoting stromal niche for acute myeloid leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jing-Yi; Lai, You-Syuan; Tsai, Hui-Jen; Kuo, Cheng-Chin; Yen, B. Linju; Yeh, Su-Peng; Sun, H. Sunny; Hung, Wen-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Mutations of isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) and IDH2 in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells produce the oncometabolite R-2-hydroxyglutarate (R-2HG) to induce epigenetic alteration and block hematopoietic differentiation. However, the effect of R-2HG released by IDH-mutated AML cells on the bone marrow microenvironment is unclear. Here, we report that R-2HG induces IκB kinase-independent activation of NF-κB in bone marrow stromal cells. R-2HG acts via a reactive oxygen species/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)-dependent pathway to phosphorylate NF-κB on the Thr254 residue. This phosphorylation enhances the interaction of NF-κB and the peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase PIN1 and increases the protein stability and transcriptional activity of NF-κB. As a consequence, R-2HG enhances NF-κB-dependent expression of cytokines including IL-6, IL-8 and complement 5a to stimulate proliferation of AML cells. In addition, R-2HG also upregulates vascular endothelial adhesion molecule 1 and CXCR4 in stromal cells to enhance the contact between AML and stromal cells and attenuates chemotherapy-induced apoptosis. More importantly, we validated the R-2HG-activated gene signature in the primary bone marrow stromal cells isolated from IDH-mutated AML patients. Collectively, our results suggest that AML cell-derived R-2HG may be helpful for the establishment of a supportive bone marrow stromal niche to promote AML progression via paracrine stimulation. PMID:27577048

  20. Image Analysis of Endosocopic Ultrasonography in Submucosal Tumor Using Fuzzy Inference

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kwang Baek; Kim, Gwang Ha

    2013-01-01

    Endoscopists usually make a diagnosis in the submucosal tumor depending on the subjective evaluation about general images obtained by endoscopic ultrasonography. In this paper, we propose a method to extract areas of gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) and lipoma automatically from the ultrasonic image to assist those specialists. We also propose an algorithm to differentiate GIST from non-GIST by fuzzy inference from such images after applying ROC curve with mean and standard deviation of brightness information. In experiments using real images that medical specialists use, we verify that our method is sufficiently helpful for such specialists for efficient classification of submucosal tumors. PMID:24024188

  1. A multicenter phase II study of pazopanib in patients with advanced gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) following failure of at least imatinib and sunitinib

    PubMed Central

    Ganjoo, K. N.; Villalobos, V. M.; Kamaya, A.; Fisher, G. A.; Butrynski, J. E.; Morgan, J. A.; Wagner, A. J.; D'Adamo, D.; McMillan, A.; Demetri, G. D.; George, S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Advanced GISTs are incurable, but often treatable for years with tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). The majority of GISTs harbor an oncogenic activating mutation in KIT or PDGFRA. Inhibition of this activating mutation with TKIs most often leads to durable disease control for many patients. However, almost all patients develop resistance to these TKIs, typically due to the development of secondary mutations, heralding the need for new therapeutic options. We conducted a phase II study evaluating the efficacy and toxicity of pazopanib, a broad spectrum TKI inhibiting KIT, VEGFRs (−1, −2, and −3), and PDGFR (-α and-β) in patients with advanced GIST following failure of at least imatinib and sunitinib. Methods Patients received pazopanib 800 mg orally once daily. All patients were assessed for efficacy with CT scans every 8 weeks (two cycles). Patients continued pazopanib until progression or unacceptable toxicity. The primary end point was the 24-week nonprogression [complete response+partial response+stable disease (SD)] rate (NPR) per RECIST 1.1. Secondary end points included PFS, OS, and toxicity. Results Between August 2011 and September 2012, a total of 25 patients were treated at two institutions. Median number of prior therapy was 3 (range 2–7). A total of 90 cycles of pazopanib were administered, with a median of two cycles (range 1 to 17+) per patient. Best response of SD at any time was observed in 12 (48%) patients. The NPR was 17% [95% confidence interval (CI) 4.5–37]. All but one patient discontinued protocol either due to PD (n = 19) or intolerance (n = 4). One patient with succinate dehydrogenase (SDH)-deficient GIST exhibited continuing disease control after 17 cycles. The median PFS for the entire cohort was 1.9 months (95% CI 1.6–5.2), and the median OS was 10.7 months (95% CI 3.9–NR). Conclusions Pazopanib was reasonably well tolerated with no unexpected toxicities. Pazopanib as a single agent has marginal activity in unselected heavily pretreated patients with advanced GIST. PMID:24356634

  2. Mesenchymal Stem/Stromal Cells in Stromal Evolution and Cancer Progression

    PubMed Central

    Cammarota, Francesca; Laukkanen, Mikko O.

    2016-01-01

    The study of cancer biology has mainly focused on malignant epithelial cancer cells, although tumors also contain a stromal compartment, which is composed of stem cells, tumor-associated fibroblasts (TAFs), endothelial cells, immune cells, adipocytes, cytokines, and various types of macromolecules comprising the extracellular matrix (ECM). The tumor stroma develops gradually in response to the needs of epithelial cancer cells during malignant progression initiating from increased local vascular permeability and ending to remodeling of desmoplastic loosely vascularized stromal ECM. The constant bidirectional interaction of epithelial cancer cells with the surrounding microenvironment allows damaged stromal cell usage as a source of nutrients for cancer cells, maintains the stroma renewal thus resembling a wound that does not heal, and affects the characteristics of tumor mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs). Although MSCs have been shown to coordinate tumor cell growth, dormancy, migration, invasion, metastasis, and drug resistance, recently they have been successfully used in treatment of hematopoietic malignancies to enhance the effect of total body irradiation-hematopoietic stem cell transplantation therapy. Hence, targeting the stromal elements in combination with conventional chemotherapeutics and usage of MSCs to attenuate graft-versus-host disease may offer new strategies to overcome cancer treatment failure and relapse of the disease. PMID:26798356

  3. Know thy neighbor: stromal cells can contribute oncogenic signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tlsty, T. D.; Hein, P. W.

    2001-01-01

    Although the stroma within carcinogenic lesions is known to be supportive and responsive to tumors, new data increasingly show that the stroma also has a more active, oncogenic role in tumorigenesis. Stromal cells and their products can transform adjacent tissues in the absence of pre-existing tumor cells by inciting phenotypic and genomic changes in the epithelial cells. The oncogenic action of distinctive stromal components has been demonstrated through a variety of approaches, which provide clues about the cellular pathways involved.

  4. Heritable Gastrointestinal Cancer Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Stoffel, Elena M

    2016-09-01

    Although almost all gastrointestinal cancers develop from sporadic genomic events, approximately 5% arise from germline mutations in genes associated with cancer predisposition. The number of these genes continues to increase. Tumor phenotypes and family history provide the framework for identifying at-risk individuals. The diagnosis of a hereditary cancer syndrome has implications for management of patients and their families. Systematic approaches that integrate family history and molecular characterization of tumors and polyps facilitate identification of individuals with this genetic predisposition. This article summarizes diagnosis and management of hereditary cancer syndromes associated with gastrointestinal cancers. PMID:27546846

  5. Next generation sequencing-based expression profiling identifies signatures from benign stromal proliferations that define stromal components of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Multiple studies have shown that the tumor microenvironment (TME) of carcinomas can play an important role in the initiation, progression, and metastasis of cancer. Here we test the hypothesis that specific benign fibrous soft tissue tumor gene expression profiles may represent distinct stromal fibroblastic reaction types that occur in different breast cancers. The discovered stromal profiles could classify breast cancer based on the type of stromal reaction patterns in the TME. Methods Next generation sequencing-based gene expression profiling (3SEQ) was performed on formalin fixed, paraffin embedded (FFPE) samples of 10 types of fibrous soft tissue tumors. We determined the extent to which these signatures could identify distinct subsets of breast cancers in four publicly available breast cancer datasets. Results A total of 53 fibrous tumors were sequenced by 3SEQ with an average of 29 million reads per sample. Both the gene signatures derived from elastofibroma (EF) and fibroma of tendon sheath (FOTS) demonstrated robust outcome results for survival in the four breast cancer datasets. The breast cancers positive for the EF signature (20-33% of the cohort) demonstrated significantly better outcome for survival. In contrast, the FOTS signature-positive breast cancers (11-35% of the cohort) had a worse outcome. Conclusions We defined and validated two new stromal signatures in breast cancer (EF and FOTS), which are significantly associated with prognosis. Our group has previously identified novel cancer stromal gene expression signatures associated with outcome differences in breast cancer by gene expression profiling of three soft tissue tumors, desmoid-type fibromatosis (DTF), solitary fibrous tumor (SFT), and tenosynovial giant cell tumor (TGCT/CSF1), as surrogates for stromal expression patterns. By combining the stromal signatures of EF and FOTS, with our previously identified DTF and TGCT/CSF1 signatures we can now characterize clinically

  6. Delta-ALA-mediated fluorescence spectroscopy of gastrointestinal tumors: comparison of in vivo and in vitro results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vladimirov, B.; Borisova, E.; Avramov, L.

    2007-06-01

    The limitations of standard endoscopy for detection of dysplastic changes of mucosa are significant challenge and initiate development of new photodiagnostic techniques, additional to diagnostic possibilities of standard endoscopic equipment. One of the most widely examined optical modalities is the laser- or light-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (LIFS), because of its rapid and highly sensitive response to early biochemical and morphological changes in biological tissues. In the recent study delta-aminolevulinic acid/protoporphyrin IX is used as fluorescent marker for dysplasia and tumor detection in esophagus and stomach. The δ -ALA is administered per os six hours before measurements at dose 20mg/kg weight. High-power light-emitting diode at 405 nm is used as an excitation source. Special opto-mechanical device is built to use the light guide of standard video-endoscopic system. Through endoscopic instrumental channel a fiber is applied to return information about fluorescence to microspectrometer. The fluorescence detected from in vivo tumor sites has very complex spectral origins. It consists of autofluorescence, fluorescence from exogenous fluorophores and re-absorption from the chromophores accumulated in the tissue investigated. Mucosa autofluorescence lies at 450-600 nm region. The fluorescence of PpIX is clearly pronounced at the 630-710 nm region. Deep minima in the tumor fluorescence signals are observed in the region 540-575 nm, related to hemoglobin re-absorption. Such high hemoglobin content is an indication of the tumors vascularization and it is clearly pronounced in all dysplastic and tumor sites investigated. After formalin conservation for in vitro samples hemoglobin absorption is strongly reduced that increases mucous fluorescence signal in green-yellow spectral region. Simultaneously the maxima at 635 nm and 720 nm are reduced.

  7. Stromal Cell Contribution to Human Follicular Lymphoma Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Mourcin, Frédéric; Pangault, Céline; Amin-Ali, Rada; Amé-Thomas, Patricia; Tarte, Karin

    2012-01-01

    Follicular lymphoma (FL) is the prototypical model of indolent B cell lymphoma displaying a strong dependence on a specialized cell microenvironment mimicking normal germinal center. Within malignant cell niches in invaded lymph nodes and bone marrow, external stimuli provided by infiltrating stromal cells make a pivotal contribution to disease development, progression, and drug resistance. The crosstalk between FL B cells and stromal cells is bidirectional, causing activation of both partners. In agreement, FL stromal cells exhibit specific phenotypic, transcriptomic, and functional properties. This review highlights the critical pathways involved in the direct tumor-promoting activity of stromal cells but also their role in the organization of FL cell niche through the recruitment of accessory immune cells and their polarization to a B cell supportive phenotype. Finally, deciphering the interplay between stromal cells and FL cells provides potential new therapeutic targets with the aim to mobilize malignant cells outside their protective microenvironment and increase their sensitivity to conventional treatment. PMID:22973275

  8. Stromal-Based Signatures for the Classification of Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Uhlik, Mark T; Liu, Jiangang; Falcon, Beverly L; Iyer, Seema; Stewart, Julie; Celikkaya, Hilal; O'Mahony, Marguerita; Sevinsky, Christopher; Lowes, Christina; Douglass, Larry; Jeffries, Cynthia; Bodenmiller, Diane; Chintharlapalli, Sudhakar; Fischl, Anthony; Gerald, Damien; Xue, Qi; Lee, Jee-Yun; Santamaria-Pang, Alberto; Al-Kofahi, Yousef; Sui, Yunxia; Desai, Keyur; Doman, Thompson; Aggarwal, Amit; Carter, Julia H; Pytowski, Bronislaw; Jaminet, Shou-Ching; Ginty, Fiona; Nasir, Aejaz; Nagy, Janice A; Dvorak, Harold F; Benjamin, Laura E

    2016-05-01

    Treatment of metastatic gastric cancer typically involves chemotherapy and monoclonal antibodies targeting HER2 (ERBB2) and VEGFR2 (KDR). However, reliable methods to identify patients who would benefit most from a combination of treatment modalities targeting the tumor stroma, including new immunotherapy approaches, are still lacking. Therefore, we integrated a mouse model of stromal activation and gastric cancer genomic information to identify gene expression signatures that may inform treatment strategies. We generated a mouse model in which VEGF-A is expressed via adenovirus, enabling a stromal response marked by immune infiltration and angiogenesis at the injection site, and identified distinct stromal gene expression signatures. With these data, we designed multiplexed IHC assays that were applied to human primary gastric tumors and classified each tumor to a dominant stromal phenotype representative of the vascular and immune diversity found in gastric cancer. We also refined the stromal gene signatures and explored their relation to the dominant patient phenotypes identified by recent large-scale studies of gastric cancer genomics (The Cancer Genome Atlas and Asian Cancer Research Group), revealing four distinct stromal phenotypes. Collectively, these findings suggest that a genomics-based systems approach focused on the tumor stroma can be used to discover putative predictive biomarkers of treatment response, especially to antiangiogenesis agents and immunotherapy, thus offering an opportunity to improve patient stratification. Cancer Res; 76(9); 2573-86. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27197264

  9. Systemic Inflammation in Cachexia – Is Tumor Cytokine Expression Profile the Culprit?

    PubMed Central

    de Matos-Neto, Emidio M.; Lima, Joanna D. C. C.; de Pereira, Welbert O.; Figuerêdo, Raquel G.; Riccardi, Daniela M. dos R.; Radloff, Katrin; das Neves, Rodrigo X.; Camargo, Rodolfo G.; Maximiano, Linda F.; Tokeshi, Flávio; Otoch, José P.; Goldszmid, Romina; Câmara, Niels O. S.; Trinchieri, Giorgio; de Alcântara, Paulo S. M.; Seelaender, Marília

    2015-01-01

    Cachexia affects about 80% of gastrointestinal cancer patients. This multifactorial syndrome resulting in involuntary and continuous weight loss is accompanied by systemic inflammation and immune cell infiltration in various tissues. Understanding the interactions among tumor, immune cells, and peripheral tissues could help attenuating systemic inflammation. Therefore, we investigated inflammation in the subcutaneous adipose tissue and in the tumor, in weight stable and cachectic cancer patients with same diagnosis, in order to establish correlations between tumor microenvironment and secretory pattern with adipose tissue and systemic inflammation. Infiltrating monocyte phenotypes of subcutaneous and tumor vascular-stromal fraction were identified by flow cytometry. Gene and protein expression of inflammatory and chemotactic factors was measured with qRT-PCR and Multiplex Magpix® system, respectively. Subcutaneous vascular-stromal fraction exhibited no differences in regard to macrophage subtypes, while in the tumor, the percentage of M2 macrophages was decreased in the cachectic patients, in comparison to weight-stable counterparts. CCL3, CCL4, and IL-1β expression was higher in the adipose tissue and tumor tissue in the cachectic group. In both tissues, chemotactic factors were positively correlated with IL-1β. Furthermore, positive correlations were found for the content of chemoattractants and cytokines in the tumor and adipose tissue. The results strongly suggest that the crosstalk between the tumor and peripheral tissues is more pronounced in cachectic patients, compared to weight-stable patients with the same tumor diagnosis. PMID:26732354

  10. Stromal cells can contribute oncogenic signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tlsty, T. D.

    2001-01-01

    The majority of studies of neoplastic transformation have focused attention on events that occur within transformed cells. These cell autonomous events result in the disruption of molecular pathways that regulate basic activities of the cells such as proliferation, death, movement and genomic integrity. Other studies have addressed the microenvironment of tumor cells and documented its importance in supporting tumor progression. Recent work has begun to expand on these initial studies of tumor microenvironment and now provide novel insights into the possible initiation and progression of malignant cells. This review will address the transforming effect of stromal cells on epithelial components. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  11. Stromal microcalcification in prostate.

    PubMed

    Muezzinoglu, B; Gurbuz, Y

    2001-06-01

    Prostatic calcification is most commonly encountered as calculus or intraluminal calcifications within atypical small glandular proliferations. This study was undertaken to detect stromal microcalcifications in prostate tissue. All slides from 194 needle biopsies were retrospectively reviewed. Six cases (3.1%) had stromal microcalcifications constantly associated with mononuclear inflammatory infiltrate around the each focus. Association with prostatic glands was not seen in any of the microcalcification foci. Three cases had simultaneous adenocarcinoma and one had high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia, all of which were apart from the microcalcification foci. In conclusion, stromal microcalcification is a dystrophic, inflammation-mediated, benign process.

  12. Argon plasma coagulation for the endoscopic treatment of gastrointestinal tumor bleeding: A retrospective comparison with a non-treated historical cohort

    PubMed Central

    Wodak, Stephanie; Gusmon, Carla C; Safatle-Ribeiro, Adriana Vaz; Kawaguti, Fabio Shiguehissa; Baba, Elisa Ryoka; Pennacchi, Caterina MP; Lima, Marcelo Simas; Ribeiro, Ulysses; Maluf-Filho, Fauze

    2015-01-01

    Background The endoscopic use of argon plasma coagulation (APC) to achieve hemostasis for upper gastrointestinal tumor bleeding (UGITB) has not been adequately evaluated in controlled trials. This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of APC for the treatment of upper gastrointestinal bleeding from malignant lesions. Methods Between January and September 2011, all patients with UGITB underwent high-potency APC therapy (up to 70 Watts). This group was compared with a historical cohort of patients admitted between January and December 2010, when the endoscopic treatment of bleeding malignancies was not routinely performed. Patients were stratified into two categories, grouping the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status scale: Category I (ECOG 0–2) patients with a good clinical status and Category II (ECOG 3–4) patients with a poor clinical status. Results Our study had 25 patients with UGITB whom underwent APC treatment and 28 patients whom received no endoscopic therapy. The clinical characteristics of the groups were similar, except for endoscopic active bleeding, which was more frequently detected in APC group. We had 15 patients in the APC group whom had active bleeding, and initial hemostasis was obtained in 11 of them (73.3%). In the control group, four patients had active bleeding. There were no differences in 30-day re-bleeding (33.3% in the APC group versus 14.3% in the control group; p = 0.104) and 30-day mortality rates (20.8% in the APC group, versus 42.9% in the control group; p = 0.091). When patients were categorized according to their ECOG status, we found that APC therapy had no impact in re-bleeding and mortality rates (Group I: APC versus no endoscopic treatment: re-bleeding p = 0.412, mortality p = 0.669; Group II: APC versus no endoscopic treatment: re-bleeding p = 0.505, mortality p = 0.580). Hematemesis and site of bleeding located at the esophagus or duodenum were associated with a higher 30-day

  13. Pathology of eyelid tumors

    PubMed Central

    Pe’er, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    The eyelids are composed of four layers: skin and subcutaneous tissue including its adnexa, striated muscle, tarsus with the meibomian glands, and the palpebral conjunctiva. Benign and malignant tumors can arise from each of the eyelid layers. Most eyelid tumors are of cutaneous origin, mostly epidermal, which can be divided into epithelial and melanocytic tumors. Benign epithelial lesions, cystic lesions, and benign melanocytic lesions are very common. The most common malignant eyelid tumors are basal cell carcinoma in Caucasians and sebaceous gland carcinoma in Asians. Adnexal and stromal tumors are less frequent. The present review describes the more important eyelid tumors according to the following groups: Benign and malignant epithelial tumors, benign and malignant melanocytic tumors, benign and malignant adnexal tumors, stromal eyelid tumors, lymphoproliferative and metastatic tumors, other rare eyelid tumors, and inflammatory and infections lesions that simulate neoplasms. PMID:27146927

  14. Pathology of eyelid tumors.

    PubMed

    Pe'er, Jacob

    2016-03-01

    The eyelids are composed of four layers: skin and subcutaneous tissue including its adnexa, striated muscle, tarsus with the meibomian glands, and the palpebral conjunctiva. Benign and malignant tumors can arise from each of the eyelid layers. Most eyelid tumors are of cutaneous origin, mostly epidermal, which can be divided into epithelial and melanocytic tumors. Benign epithelial lesions, cystic lesions, and benign melanocytic lesions are very common. The most common malignant eyelid tumors are basal cell carcinoma in Caucasians and sebaceous gland carcinoma in Asians. Adnexal and stromal tumors are less frequent. The present review describes the more important eyelid tumors according to the following groups: Benign and malignant epithelial tumors, benign and malignant melanocytic tumors, benign and malignant adnexal tumors, stromal eyelid tumors, lymphoproliferative and metastatic tumors, other rare eyelid tumors, and inflammatory and infections lesions that simulate neoplasms. PMID:27146927

  15. Genital soft tissue tumors.

    PubMed

    Schoolmeester, John K; Fritchie, Karen J

    2015-07-01

    Mesenchymal neoplasms of the vulvovaginal and inguinoscrotal regions are among the most diagnostically challenging specimens in the pathology laboratory owing largely to their unique intersection between general soft tissue tumors and relatively genital-specific mesenchymal tumors. Genital stromal tumors are a unique subset of soft tissue tumors encountered at this location, and this group includes fibroepithelial stromal polyp, superficial (cervicovaginal) myofibroblastoma, cellular angiofibroma, mammary-type myofibroblastoma, angiomyofibroblastoma and aggressive angiomyxoma. Aside from the striking morphologic and immunophenotypic similarity that is seen with these entities, there is evidence that a subset of genital stromal tumors may be linked genetically. This review will focus on simplifying this group of tumors and provide the pathologist or dermatopathologist with practical management information. Smooth muscle tumors of the external genitalia will also be discussed.

  16. Diffuse expression of PAX2 and PAX8 in the cystic epithelium of mixed epithelial stromal tumor, angiomyolipoma with epithelial cysts, and primary renal synovial sarcoma: evidence supporting renal tubular differentiation.

    PubMed

    Karafin, Matthew; Parwani, Anil V; Netto, Georges J; Illei, Peter B; Epstein, Jonathan I; Ladanyi, Marc; Argani, Pedram

    2011-09-01

    Over the past decade, 3 novel, typically cystic renal neoplasms have been described: angiomyolipoma with epithelial cysts (AMLEC), mixed epithelial stromal tumor (MEST), and primary renal synovial sarcoma (SS). In all 3 neoplasms, the nature of the cystic epithelium is not clear; some have postulated that the cysts represent cystically dilated, entrapped renal tubular epithelium, whereas an alternative interpretation is that the epithelium represents epithelial differentiation by the stromal component of the neoplasm. The latter is supported by the extrarenal location of the epithelium in some cases. PAX2 and PAX8 are tissue-specific transcription factors expressed primarily in the renal and Müllerian systems and also in Wolffian duct structures (such as seminal vesicle). Their expression has not been examined in these lesions. We performed PAX2 and PAX8 immunohistochemistry on representative sections of cases of AMLEC (8 cases), MEST (8 cases), and renal SS (3 cases). The relative percentage and intensity (none, weak, moderate, and strong) of nuclear labeling were evaluated in both the benign adjacent renal tubules and the lesion's epithelial cysts. In the benign kidney, distal convoluted tubules (DCTs) labeled strongly for PAX2 and PAX8, whereas proximal convoluted tubules labeled minimally. The cystic epithelium of all 8 cases of AMLEC, including 5 that protruded beyond the renal capsule into the perirenal fat, demonstrated strong diffuse labeling for both PAX2 and PAX8. We also identified a mimic of entirely extrarenal AMLEC, angiomyolipoma with endosalpingiosis. PAX2 and PAX8 diffusely and strongly labeled the epithelial component of all 8 cases of MEST, including all architectural (phyllodes-like, large cysts, small cysts, clustered microcysts) and virtually all cytologic (hobnail, flat, cuboidal, columnar, apocrine, and clear cell) epithelial variants present. The epithelial cysts of all 3 cases of primary renal SS labeled diffusely and strongly for PAX2

  17. B7H6-specific chimeric antigen receptors lead to tumor elimination and host anti-tumor immunity

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ming-Ru; Zhang, Tong; DeMars, Leslie R.; Sentman, Charles L.

    2015-01-01

    Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cell therapies have demonstrated durable and potentially curative therapeutic efficacy against B cell leukemia in clinical trials. A CAR strategy can target any tumor surface antigens as long as an antigen-binding receptor can be generated. New CARs which target solid tumors and have the potential to target multiple tumor types are needed. In this study, B7H6, a ligand for the NK cell activating receptor NKp30, was targeted to create a CAR which targets multiple tumor types. B7H6 is expressed on various primary human tumors, including leukemia, lymphoma, and gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs), but it is not constitutively expressed on normal tissues. B7H6-specific CAR T cells have robust cellular cytotoxicity and IFN-γ secretion when co-cultured with B7H6+ tumor cells, and they exhibit little self-reactivity to immature dendritic cells (iDCs) or pro-inflammatory monocytes. In vivo, B7H6-specific CAR T cells greatly enhanced the survival of RMA/B7H6 lymphoma bearing mice. The long-term survivor mice were protected against a B7H6-deficient tumor re-challenge. This CAR therapy also decreased tumor burden in a murine ovarian cancer model. In conclusion, B7H6-specific CARs have the potential to treat B7H6+ hematologic and solid tumors. PMID:25830550

  18. Waking up dormant tumors.

    PubMed

    Tse, Joyce C; Kalluri, Raghu

    2011-06-10

    As appreciation grows for the contribution of the tumor microenvironment to the progression of cancer, new evidence accumulates to support that the participation of stromal cells can extend beyond the local environment. Recently, Elkabets and colleagues demonstrated a systemic interaction between cancer cells and distant bone marrow cells to support the growth of otherwise indolent tumor cells at a secondary site, raising thought-provoking questions regarding the involvement of stromal cells in maintaining metastatic dormancy.

  19. Gastrointestinal Infections.

    PubMed

    Alby, Kevin; Nachamkin, Irving

    2016-06-01

    Gastrointestinal infections in the immunocompromised host are caused by the common bacterial, viral, fungal, and parasitic agents that also cause infections in the immunocompetent host. Of special consideration is that immunocompromised patients may be at increased risk for infection or disease severity and by pathogens not seen in the competent host. This chapter reviews the various agents, risk factors, and diagnostic approaches to detect gastrointestinal infections in this patient population. PMID:27337464

  20. Dystrophin Is a Tumor Suppressor in Human Cancers with Myogenic Programs

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuexiang; Marino-Enriquez, Adrian; Bennett, Richard R.; Zhu, Meijun; Shen, Yiping; Eilers, Grant; Lee, Jen-Chieh; Henze, Joern; Fletcher, Benjamin S.; Gu, Zhizhan; Fox, Edward A.; Antonescu, Cristina R.; Fletcher, Christopher D.M.; Guo, Xiangqian; Raut, Chandrajit P.; Demetri, George D.; van de Rijn, Matt; Ordog, Tamas; Kunkel, Louis M.; Fletcher, Jonathan A.

    2014-01-01

    Many common human mesenchymal tumors, including gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST), rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS), and leiomyosarcoma (LMS), feature myogenic differentiation1–3. Here we report that intragenic deletion of the dystrophin-encoding and muscular dystrophy-associated DMD gene is a frequent mechanism by which myogenic tumors progress to high-grade, lethal sarcomas. Dystrophin is expressed in nonneoplastic and benign counterparts for GIST, RMS and LMS, and the DMD deletions inactivate larger dystrophin isoforms, including 427kDa dystrophin, while preserving expression of an essential 71kDa isoform. Dystrophin inhibits myogenic sarcoma cell migration, invasion, anchorage independence, and invadopodia formation, and dystrophin inactivation was found in 96%, 100%, and 62% of metastatic GIST, embryonal RMS, and LMS, respectively. These findings validate dystrophin as a tumor suppressor and likely anti-metastatic factor, suggesting that therapies in development for muscular dystrophies may also have relevance in treatment of cancer. PMID:24793134

  1. Sleep Dysfunction and Gastrointestinal Diseases.

    PubMed

    Khanijow, Vikesh; Prakash, Pia; Emsellem, Helene A; Borum, Marie L; Doman, David B

    2015-12-01

    Sleep deprivation and impaired sleep quality have been associated with poor health outcomes. Many patients experience sleep disturbances, which can increase the risk of medical conditions such as hypertension, obesity, stroke, and heart disease as well as increase overall mortality. Recent studies have suggested that there is a strong association between sleep disturbances and gastrointestinal diseases. Proinflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor, interleukin-1, and interleukin-6, have been associated with sleep dysfunction. Alterations in these cytokines have been seen in certain gastrointestinal diseases, such as gastroesophageal reflux disease, inflammatory bowel disease, liver disorders, and colorectal cancer. It is important for gastroenterologists to be aware of the relationship between sleep disorders and gastrointestinal illnesses to ensure good care for patients. This article reviews the current research on the interplay between sleep disorders, immune function, and gastrointestinal diseases. PMID:27134599

  2. Sleep Dysfunction and Gastrointestinal Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Khanijow, Vikesh; Prakash, Pia; Emsellem, Helene A.; Borum, Marie L.

    2015-01-01

    Sleep deprivation and impaired sleep quality have been associated with poor health outcomes. Many patients experience sleep disturbances, which can increase the risk of medical conditions such as hypertension, obesity, stroke, and heart disease as well as increase overall mortality. Recent studies have suggested that there is a strong association between sleep disturbances and gastrointestinal diseases. Proinflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor, interleukin-1, and interleukin-6, have been associated with sleep dysfunction. Alterations in these cytokines have been seen in certain gastrointestinal diseases, such as gastroesophageal reflux disease, inflammatory bowel disease, liver disorders, and colorectal cancer. It is important for gastroenterologists to be aware of the relationship between sleep disorders and gastrointestinal illnesses to ensure good care for patients. This article reviews the current research on the interplay between sleep disorders, immune function, and gastrointestinal diseases. PMID:27134599

  3. Paraneoplastic thrombocytosis in gastrointestinal cancer.

    PubMed

    Baranyai, Zsolt; Jósa, Valéria; Tóth, Ambrus; Szilasi, Zsuzsanna; Tihanyi, Balazs; Zaránd, Attila; Harsanyi, Laszlo; Szállási, Zoltán

    2016-06-01

    It has been demonstrated recently in several solid tumors that thrombocytosis at diagnosis may correlate with tumor invasion, metastatic progression and worse outcome. Several details of the pathomechanism of the relationship of thrombocytosis and cancer have been elucidated; however, the complete process is not clearly understood. Several hypotheses have been proposed. Recently, it was suggested that in ovarian cancer elevated IL-6 production by the tumor may induce increased megakaryopoiesis via hepatic thrombopoietin production leading to thrombocytosis. The importance of the prognostic power of elevated platelet count is still debated in gastrointestinal cancer. The aims of this review were to evaluate the prognostic significance of thrombocytosis in gastrointestinal tumors, to see whether clinical practice confirmed the hypotheses and to reveal the causes of the inconsistent findings. PMID:27136385

  4. Paraneoplastic thrombocytosis in gastrointestinal cancer.

    PubMed

    Baranyai, Zsolt; Jósa, Valéria; Tóth, Ambrus; Szilasi, Zsuzsanna; Tihanyi, Balazs; Zaránd, Attila; Harsanyi, Laszlo; Szállási, Zoltán

    2016-06-01

    It has been demonstrated recently in several solid tumors that thrombocytosis at diagnosis may correlate with tumor invasion, metastatic progression and worse outcome. Several details of the pathomechanism of the relationship of thrombocytosis and cancer have been elucidated; however, the complete process is not clearly understood. Several hypotheses have been proposed. Recently, it was suggested that in ovarian cancer elevated IL-6 production by the tumor may induce increased megakaryopoiesis via hepatic thrombopoietin production leading to thrombocytosis. The importance of the prognostic power of elevated platelet count is still debated in gastrointestinal cancer. The aims of this review were to evaluate the prognostic significance of thrombocytosis in gastrointestinal tumors, to see whether clinical practice confirmed the hypotheses and to reveal the causes of the inconsistent findings.

  5. Management of gastric subepithelial tumors: The role of endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Su Young; Kim, Kyoung Oh

    2016-01-01

    With the wide use of esophagogastroduodenoscopy, the incidence of gastric subepithelial tumor (SET) diagnosis has increased. While the management of large or symptomatic gastric SETs is obvious, treatment of small (≤ 3 cm) asymptomatic gastric SETs remains inconclusive. Moreover, the presence of gastrointestinal stromal tumors with malignant potential is of concern, and endoscopic treatment of gastric SETs remains a subject of debate. Recently, numerous studies have demonstrated the feasibility of endoscopic treatment of gastric SETs, and have proposed various endoscopic procedures including endoscopic submucosal dissection, endoscopic muscularis dissection, endoscopic enucleation, endoscopic submucosal tunnel dissection, endoscopic full-thickness resection, and a hybrid approach (the combination of endoscopy and laparoscopy). In this review article, we discuss current endoscopic treatments for gastric SETs as well as the advantages and limitations of this type of therapy. Finally, we predict the availability of newly developed endoscopic treatments for gastric SETs. PMID:27298713

  6. Tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... plants (aflatoxins) Excessive sunlight exposure Genetic problems Obesity Radiation exposure Viruses Types of tumors known to be caused by viruses are: Cervical cancer (human papillomavirus) Hepatocellular carcinoma (hepatitis B and hepatitis C ...

  7. A Study of CD45RA+ Depleted Haploidentical Stem Cell Transplantation in Children With Relapsed or Refractory Solid Tumors and Lymphomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-18

    Ewing Sarcoma; Gastrointestinal Tumor; Germ Cell Tumor; Hepatic Tumor; Lymphoma; Wilms Tumor; Rhabdoid Tumor; Clear Cell Carcinoma; Renal Cell Carcinoma; Melanoma; Neuroblastoma; Rhabdomyosarcoma; Non-rhabdomyosarcoma

  8. Stromal reengineering to treat pancreas cancer.

    PubMed

    Stromnes, Ingunn M; DelGiorno, Kathleen E; Greenberg, Philip D; Hingorani, Sunil R

    2014-07-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma co-opts multiple cellular and extracellular mechanisms to create a complex cancer organ with an unusual proclivity for metastasis and resistance to therapy. Cell-autonomous events are essential for the initiation and maintenance of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, but recent studies have implicated critical non-cell autonomous processes within the robust desmoplastic stroma that promote disease pathogenesis and resistance. Thus, non-malignant cells and associated factors are culprits in tumor growth, immunosuppression and invasion. However, even this increasing awareness of non-cell autonomous contributions to disease progression is tempered by the conflicting roles stromal elements can play. A greater understanding of stromal complexity and complicity has been aided in part by studies in highly faithful genetically engineered mouse models of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. Insights gleaned from such studies are spurring the development of therapies designed to reengineer the pancreas cancer stroma and render it permissive to agents targeting cell-autonomous events or to reinstate immunosurveillance. Integrating conventional and immunological treatments in the context of stromal targeting may provide the key to a durable clinical impact on this formidable disease. PMID:24908682

  9. Stromal myofibroblasts in oral leukoplakia and oral squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    de-Assis, Eliene M.; Pimenta, Luiz G.G.S.; Costa-e-Silva, Edson; Souza, Paulo E.A.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Oral leukoplakia (OL) is the main potentially malignant disorder and oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is the most common malignancy of the oral mucosa. Stromal myofibroblasts play an important role in tumor invasion and metastasis, due to its ability to modify the extracellular matrix. This study aimed to evaluate the presence of stromal myofibroblasts in OL and OSCC. Differences in the presence of myofibroblasts among OL with distinct grades of epithelial dysplasia as well as between histologically high- and low-invasive OSCC were also assessed. Study Design: A total of 30 OL and 41 OSCC from archival formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded specimens were evaluated. 10 samples of normal oral mucosa were used as a control. Myofibroblasts were identified by immunohistochemical detection of alpha smooth muscle actin and its presence was classified as negative, scanty or abundant. Differences in the presence of myofibroblasts among OL with distinct grades of epithelial dysplasia as well as between high- and low-invasive OSCC were analyzed using the Mann-Whitney test. Results: Myofibroblasts were not detected in normal oral mucosa and OL, whatever its histological grade. In OSCC, the presence of stromal myofibroblasts was classified as negative in 11 (26.8%), scanty in 15 (36.6%), and abundant in 15 samples (36.6%). The presence of stromal myofibroblasts was statistically higher in high-invasive OSCC than in low-invasive OSCC (p<0.05). Conclusions: Stromal myofibroblasts were not detected in OL, indicating that these cells are not important during oral carcinogenesis. Nevertheless, stromal myofibroblasts were heterogeneously detected in OSCC and its presence was higher in tumors with a more diffuse histological pattern of invasion. These findings suggest that myofibroblasts are associated with the creation of a permissive environment for tumor invasion in OSCC. Key words:Leukoplakia, oral squamous cell carcinoma, myofibroblast. PMID:22322518

  10. Ubiquitin proteasome system research in gastrointestinal cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Jia-Ling; Huang, Chang-Zhi

    2016-02-15

    The ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) is important for the degradation of proteins in eukaryotic cells. It is involved in nearly every cellular process and plays an important role in maintaining body homeostasis. An increasing body of evidence has linked alterations in the UPS to gastrointestinal malignancies, including esophageal, gastric and colorectal cancers. Here, we summarize the current literature detailing the involvement of the UPS in gastrointestinal cancer, highlighting its role in tumor occurrence and development, providing information for therapeutic targets research and anti-gastrointestinal tumor drug design. PMID:26909134

  11. Ubiquitin proteasome system research in gastrointestinal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Jia-Ling; Huang, Chang-Zhi

    2016-01-01

    The ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) is important for the degradation of proteins in eukaryotic cells. It is involved in nearly every cellular process and plays an important role in maintaining body homeostasis. An increasing body of evidence has linked alterations in the UPS to gastrointestinal malignancies, including esophageal, gastric and colorectal cancers. Here, we summarize the current literature detailing the involvement of the UPS in gastrointestinal cancer, highlighting its role in tumor occurrence and development, providing information for therapeutic targets research and anti-gastrointestinal tumor drug design. PMID:26909134

  12. Synchronous adrenocortical neoplasms, paragangliomas, and pheochromocytomas: syndromic considerations regarding an unusual constellation of endocrine tumors.

    PubMed

    LeBlanc, Melissa; Tabrizi, Mohsen; Kapsner, Patricia; Hanson, Joshua Anspach

    2014-12-01

    The most common clinical syndromes presenting with paragangliomas and/or pheochromocytomas as their endocrine components are multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2, neurofibromatosis, Von Hippel-Lindau syndrome, Carney-Stratakis syndrome, Carney triad, and the recently described hereditary paraganglioma syndrome. Only Carney triad is known to also present with adrenocortical adenomas, currently representing the only described syndrome in which all 3 of the aforementioned tumors are found together. In most cases, prototypical lesions of the triad such as gastrointestinal stromal tumor and pulmonary chondromas are also seen. We present a case of a young woman with synchronous paragangliomas, adrenal/extra-adrenal cortical neoplasms, and pheochromocytoma without genetic mutations for multiple endocrine neoplasia 2, Von Hippel-Lindau syndrome, neurofibromatosis, and succinate dehydrogenase. We speculate that this represents a previously undescribed presentation of Carney triad and, at the very least, indicates the need for monitoring for the development of other tumors of the triad.

  13. Determination of stromal signatures in breast carcinoma.

    PubMed

    West, Robert B; Nuyten, Dimitry S A; Subramanian, Subbaya; Nielsen, Torsten O; Corless, Christopher L; Rubin, Brian P; Montgomery, Kelli; Zhu, Shirley; Patel, Rajiv; Hernandez-Boussard, Tina; Goldblum, John R; Brown, Patrick O; van de Vijver, Marc; van de Rijn, Matt

    2005-06-01

    Many soft tissue tumors recapitulate features of normal connective tissue. We hypothesize that different types of fibroblastic tumors are representative of different populations of fibroblastic cells or different activation states of these cells. We examined two tumors with fibroblastic features, solitary fibrous tumor (SFT) and desmoid-type fibromatosis (DTF), by DNA microarray analysis and found that they have very different expression profiles, including significant differences in their patterns of expression of extracellular matrix genes and growth factors. Using immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization on a tissue microarray, we found that genes specific for these two tumors have mutually specific expression in the stroma of nonneoplastic tissues. We defined a set of 786 gene spots whose pattern of expression distinguishes SFT from DTF. In an analysis of DNA microarray gene expression data from 295 previously published breast carcinomas, we found that expression of this gene set defined two groups of breast carcinomas with significant differences in overall survival. One of the groups had a favorable outcome and was defined by the expression of DTF genes. The other group of tumors had a poor prognosis and showed variable expression of genes enriched for SFT type. Our findings suggest that the host stromal response varies significantly among carcinomas and that gene expression patterns characteristic of soft tissue tumors can be used to discover new markers for normal connective tissue cells.

  14. Local binary patterns for stromal area removal in histology images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alomari, Raja S.; Ghosh, Subarna; Chaudhary, Vipin; Al-Kadi, Omar

    2012-03-01

    Nuclei counting in epithelial cells is an indication for tumor proliferation rate which is useful to rank tumors and select an appropriate treatment schedule for the patient. However, due to the high interand intra- observer variability in nuclei counting, pathologists seek a deterministic proliferation rate estimate. Histology tissue contains epithelial and stromal cells. However, nuclei counting is clinically restricted to epithelial cells because stromal cells do not become cancerous themselves since they remain genetically normal. Counting nuclei existing within the stromal tissue is one of the major causes of the proliferation rate non-deterministic estimation. Digitally removing stromal tissue will eliminate a major cause in pathologist counting variability and bring the clinical pathologist a major step closer toward a deterministic proliferation rate estimation. To that end, we propose a computer aided diagnosis (CAD) system for eliminating stromal cells from digital histology images based on the local binary patterns, entropy measurement, and statistical analysis. We validate our CAD system on a set of fifty Ki-67-stained histology images. Ki-67-stained histology images are among the clinically approved methods for proliferation rate estimation. To test our CAD system, we prove that the manual proliferation rate estimation performed by the expert pathologist does not change before and after stromal removal. Thus, stromal removal does not affect the expert pathologist estimation clinical decision. Hence, the successful elimination of the stromal area highly reduces the false positive nuclei which are the major confusing cause for the less experienced pathologists and thus accounts for the non-determinism in the proliferation rate estimation. Our experimental setting shows statistical insignificance (paired student t-test shows ρ = 0.74) in the manual nuclei counting before and after our automated stromal removal. This means that the clinical decision of

  15. Targeting stromal-cancer cell interactions with siRNAs.

    PubMed

    Aharinejad, Seyedhossein; Sioud, Mouldy; Lucas, Trevor; Abraham, Dietmar

    2009-01-01

    Tumors are composed of both malignant and normal cells, including fibroblasts, endothelial cells, mesenchymal stem cells, and inflammatory immune cells such as macrophages. These various stromal components interact with cancer cells to promote growth and metastasis. For example, macrophages, attracted by colony-stimulating factor-1 (CSF-1) produced by tumor cells, in turn produce various growth factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor, which supports the growth of tumor cells and their interaction with blood vessels leading to enhanced tumor cell spreading. The activation of autocrine and paracrine oncogenic signaling pathways by stroma-derived growth factors and cytokines has been implicated in promoting tumor cell proliferation and metastasis. Furthermore, matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) derived from both tumor cells and the stromal compartment are regarded as major players assisting tumor cells during metastasis. Collectively, these recent findings indicate that targeting tumor-stroma interactions is a promising strategy in the search for novel treatment modalities in human cancer. This chapter summarizes our current understanding of the tumor microenvironment and highlights some potential targets for therapeutic intervention with small interfering RNAs.

  16. Potential Effect of CD271 on Human Mesenchymal Stromal Cell Proliferation and Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Calabrese, Giovanna; Giuffrida, Raffaella; Lo Furno, Debora; Parrinello, Nunziatina Laura; Forte, Stefano; Gulino, Rosario; Colarossi, Cristina; Schinocca, Luciana Rita; Giuffrida, Rosario; Cardile, Venera; Memeo, Lorenzo

    2015-01-01

    The Low-Affinity Nerve Growth Factor Receptor (LNGFR), also known as CD271, is a member of the tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily. The CD271 cell surface marker defines a subset of multipotential mesenchymal stromal cells and may be used to isolate and enrich cells derived from bone marrow aspirate. In this study, we compare the proliferative and differentiation potentials of CD271+ and CD271− mesenchymal stromal cells. Mesenchymal stromal cells were isolated from bone marrow aspirate and adipose tissue by plastic adherence and positive selection. The proliferation and differentiation potentials of CD271+ and CD271− mesenchymal stromal cells were assessed by inducing osteogenic, adipogenic and chondrogenic in vitro differentiation. Compared to CD271+, CD271− mesenchymal stromal cells showed a lower proliferation rate and a decreased ability to give rise to osteocytes, adipocytes and chondrocytes. Furthermore, we observed that CD271+ mesenchymal stromal cells isolated from adipose tissue displayed a higher efficiency of proliferation and trilineage differentiation compared to CD271+ mesenchymal stromal cells isolated from bone marrow samples, although the CD271 expression levels were comparable. In conclusion, these data show that both the presence of CD271 antigen and the source of mesenchymal stromal cells represent important factors in determining the ability of the cells to proliferate and differentiate. PMID:26184166

  17. Potential Effect of CD271 on Human Mesenchymal Stromal Cell Proliferation and Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Calabrese, Giovanna; Giuffrida, Raffaella; Lo Furno, Debora; Parrinello, Nunziatina Laura; Forte, Stefano; Gulino, Rosario; Colarossi, Cristina; Schinocca, Luciana Rita; Giuffrida, Rosario; Cardile, Venera; Memeo, Lorenzo

    2015-01-01

    The Low-Affinity Nerve Growth Factor Receptor (LNGFR), also known as CD271, is a member of the tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily. The CD271 cell surface marker defines a subset of multipotential mesenchymal stromal cells and may be used to isolate and enrich cells derived from bone marrow aspirate. In this study, we compare the proliferative and differentiation potentials of CD271+ and CD271- mesenchymal stromal cells. Mesenchymal stromal cells were isolated from bone marrow aspirate and adipose tissue by plastic adherence and positive selection. The proliferation and differentiation potentials of CD271+ and CD271- mesenchymal stromal cells were assessed by inducing osteogenic, adipogenic and chondrogenic in vitro differentiation. Compared to CD271+, CD271- mesenchymal stromal cells showed a lower proliferation rate and a decreased ability to give rise to osteocytes, adipocytes and chondrocytes. Furthermore, we observed that CD271+ mesenchymal stromal cells isolated from adipose tissue displayed a higher efficiency of proliferation and trilineage differentiation compared to CD271+ mesenchymal stromal cells isolated from bone marrow samples, although the CD271 expression levels were comparable. In conclusion, these data show that both the presence of CD271 antigen and the source of mesenchymal stromal cells represent important factors in determining the ability of the cells to proliferate and differentiate. PMID:26184166

  18. Targeting stromal microenvironment in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma: controversies and promises

    PubMed Central

    Mei, Lin; Du, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a highly lethal disease. Conventional therapeutics targeting pancreas cancer cell compartment using cytotoxics improved patient survival but at the expense of significant toxicity. Microscopically, the tumor is characterized by thick desmoplastic stroma that surrounds islands of pancreatic cancer cells. The tumor microenvironment has been found to play important roles in carcinogenesis, the development of drug resistance, and mediating immunosuppression. The understanding the tumor-stromal interaction has led to the development of novel therapeutic approaches. Here, we review the strategies that are currently in (or, near to) clinical evaluation and the underlying preclinical rationales. PMID:27284483

  19. Stromal Targets for Fluorescent-Guided Oncologic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Boonstra, Martin C.; Prakash, Jai; Van De Velde, Cornelis J. H.; Mesker, Wilma E.; Kuppen, Peter J. K.; Vahrmeijer, Alexander L.; Sier, Cornelis F. M.

    2015-01-01

    Pre-operative imaging techniques are essential for tumor detection and diagnosis, but offer limited help during surgery. Recently, the applicability of imaging during oncologic surgery has been recognized, using near-infrared fluorescent dyes conjugated to targeting antibodies, peptides, or other vehicles. Image-guided oncologic surgery (IGOS) assists the surgeFon to distinguish tumor from normal tissue during operation, and can aid in recognizing vital structures. IGOS relies on an optimized combination of a dedicated fluorescent camera system and specific probes for targeting. IGOS probes for clinical use are not widely available yet, but numerous pre-clinical studies have been published and clinical trials are being established or prepared. Most of the investigated probes are based on antibodies or peptides against proteins on the membranes of malignant cells, whereas others are directed against stromal cells. Targeting stroma cells for IGOS has several advantages. Besides the high stromal content in more aggressive tumor types, the stroma is often primarily located at the periphery/invasive front of the tumor, which makes stromal targets particularly suited for imaging purposes. Moreover, because stroma up-regulation is a physiological reaction, most proteins to be targeted on these cells are “universal” and not derived from a specific genetic variation, as is the case with many upregulated proteins on malignant cancer cells. PMID:26636036

  20. Primary Esophageal Intramural Squamous Cell Carcinoma Masquerading as a Submucosal Tumor: A Rare Presentation of a Common Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sonthalia, Nikhil; Jain, Samit S.; Surude, Ravindra G.; Pawar, Vinay B.; Udgirkar, Suhas; Rathi, Pravin M.

    2016-01-01

    Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) is the commonest primary malignant esophageal tumor, which typically presents as endoscopically visible surface mucosal ulcerations, irregularities, or polyploidal masses. We here report a rare case of primary ESCC with completely intramural growth under a normal looking intact nondysplastic surface squamous epithelium disguising as a submucosal tumor. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy-guided mucosal biopsy was negative for malignancy. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) revealed a heteroechoic solid mass originating from the muscularis propria of the distal esophagus. Cytological study of EUS-guided fine needle aspiration from the mass was suggestive of squamous cell carcinoma, which was confirmed on immunohistochemistry. There was no evidence of metastatic origin of this tumor or continuous cancer involvement from the surrounding structures, including the head, neck, and lungs on bronchoscopy, computed tomography scan, and positron emission tomography scan. Exclusive intramural squamous cell carcinoma with normal overlying mucosa is an exceedingly rare presentation of primary ESCC with only four cases reported in the literature so far. A high index of suspicion is required by the gastroenterologists and pathologists in diagnosing these cases as these tumors closely mimic the mesenchymal submucosal tumors such as lipoma, leiomyoma, and gastrointestinal stromal tumors. EUS is an indispensable tool in making a preoperative diagnosis and therapeutic decision making. PMID:27721663

  1. Fat-forming solitary fibrous tumor of the kidney: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yanyang; Wang, Fen; Han, Anjia

    2015-01-01

    Fat-forming solitary fibrous tumor (SFT) is a rare soft tissue tumor. Herein, we reported a 30-year-old woman was found to have a solid mass measuring 60×45 mm in the right kidney on an abdominal computed tomography scan. The tumor was well-circumscribed and composed of cellular nodules with the classic SFT admixed with clusters and lobules of mature adipocytes. Immunohistochemistry staining showed that the tumor cells were diffusely and strongly positive for CD34 and Bcl-2, focally and weakly positive for CD99 and EMA. Mature adipocytes were positive for S-100 protein. Ki-67 expression was found in approximately 2% of tumor cells. However, tumor cells were negative for cytokeratin, S-100 protein, HMB-45, Melan-A, SMA, and CD117. We made the pathological diagnosis of fat-forming SFT of the right kidney. The differential diagnosis includes angiomyolipoma, liposarcoma, spindle cell lipoma, sarcomatoid renal cell carcinoma, synovial sarcoma, and gastrointestinal stromal tumor. The patient was alive and well without evidence of recurrence or metastasis at 19 months after tumor resection.

  2. Fat-forming solitary fibrous tumor of the kidney: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yanyang; Wang, Fen; Han, Anjia

    2015-01-01

    Fat-forming solitary fibrous tumor (SFT) is a rare soft tissue tumor. Herein, we reported a 30-year-old woman was found to have a solid mass measuring 60×45 mm in the right kidney on an abdominal computed tomography scan. The tumor was well-circumscribed and composed of cellular nodules with the classic SFT admixed with clusters and lobules of mature adipocytes. Immunohistochemistry staining showed that the tumor cells were diffusely and strongly positive for CD34 and Bcl-2, focally and weakly positive for CD99 and EMA. Mature adipocytes were positive for S-100 protein. Ki-67 expression was found in approximately 2% of tumor cells. However, tumor cells were negative for cytokeratin, S-100 protein, HMB-45, Melan-A, SMA, and CD117. We made the pathological diagnosis of fat-forming SFT of the right kidney. The differential diagnosis includes angiomyolipoma, liposarcoma, spindle cell lipoma, sarcomatoid renal cell carcinoma, synovial sarcoma, and gastrointestinal stromal tumor. The patient was alive and well without evidence of recurrence or metastasis at 19 months after tumor resection. PMID:26339447

  3. Gastrointestinal system

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Leo K.; O’Grady, Gregory; Du, Peng; Egbuji, John U.; Windsor, John A.; Pullan, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    The functions of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract include digestion, absorption, excretion, and protection. In this review, we focus on the electrical activity of the stomach and small intestine, which underlies the motility of these organs, and where the most detailed systems descriptions and computational models have been based to date. Much of this discussion is also applicable to the rest of the GI tract. This review covers four major spatial scales: cell, tissue, organ, and torso, and discusses the methods of investigation and the challenges associated with each. We begin by describing the origin of the electrical activity in the interstitial cells of Cajal, and its spread to smooth muscle cells. The spread of electrical activity through the stomach and small intestine is then described, followed by the resultant electrical and magnetic activity that may be recorded on the body surface. A number of common and highly symptomatic GI conditions involve abnormal electrical and/or motor activity, which are often termed functional disorders. In the last section of this review we address approaches being used to characterize and diagnose abnormalities in the electrical activity and how these might be applied in the clinical setting. The understanding of electrophysiology and motility of the GI system remains a challenging field, and the review discusses how biophysically based mathematical models can help to bridge gaps in our current knowledge, through integration of otherwise separate concepts. PMID:20836011

  4. Uterine tumors resembling ovarian sex cord tumors: an update.

    PubMed

    Czernobilsky, Bernard

    2008-04-01

    Tumors of the uterus resembling ovarian sex cord tumors were reported by Clement and Scully in 1976 and were divided in 2 groups: group 1, endometrial stromal tumors, and group 2, mural uterine tumors-both with elements resembling ovarian sex cord tumors. In the former, the sex cord component constitutes a minor portion of an endometrial stromal neoplasm, whereas in the latter, it is the predominant or exclusive component of a uterine wall lesion composed of a variety of mesenchymal elements. An origin from endometrial stromal cells, adenomyosis, stromal myosis, endometriosis, or multipotential cells within the myometrium was postulated in both groups of tumors. In group 1 tumors, the prognosis depends on the type, grade, and stage of the underlying stromal neoplasm. Group 2 tumors seemed to be benign, although because of the occasional recurrence of these tumors, they should be considered of low-grade malignant potential. In recent years, the histological features in group 2 were found to be much more varied than those in group 1 and consisted among others of retiform areas, glomeruloid structures, and Leydig-like cells. In group 1 tumors, the sex cord elements remained limited to cords, trabeculae, nests, and tubules. Eventually, the abbreviation ESTSCLE, or endometrial stromal tumors with sex cord-like elements, was given to group 1 tumors, whereas UTROSCT, or uterine tumor resembling ovarian sex cord tumor, was used for group 2 tumors. The most significant information in recently conducted studies concerns the immunophenotype of these lesions especially of UTROSCT. Out of the plethora of the immunohistochemical stains, a panel of 4 including calretinin, inhibin, CD99, and Melan A has emerged which seemed to be the most characteristic sex cord markers. Positivity for calretinin and at least for 1 of the other above-mentioned markers may thus confirm the diagnosis of UTROSCT. Endometrial stromal tumors with sex cord-like elements, on the other hand, usually

  5. [Gastrointestinal cancer].

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Yutaka

    2004-08-01

    Although their sensitivity is not high, SCC, TPA and IAP are useful for esophageal cancer. The sensitivity of CEA, CA 19-9, is relatively high, especially in well-differentiated adenocarcinoma of gastric cancer with lymph node metastasis. AFP is specific to liver metastasis from gastric cancer, and CA 125 is also specific to peritoneal dissemination. CA 72-4 and NCC-ST-439 are useful markers for advanced staging. CEA, CA 19-9, is useful for colon cancer, especially for predicting preoperative staging. Half-life and doubling time of tumor markers is useful in some cases for the evaluation of operation and chemotherapy. We showed our data concerning postoperative CEA and/or CA 19-9 monitoring after operation for gastric cancer in 120 recurrent patients. Positivities of CEA and CA 19-9 for recurrence were 65.8% and 85.0%, respectively, both of which were significantly higher than the preoperative sensitivities (28.3% and 45.0%, respectively). In most patients with high levels of preoperative CEA and/or CA 19-9, these tumor markers increased again at recurrence. Recurrent diseases were detected between 5 months after detection by diagnostic imagings and 12 months before detection by diagnostic imagings (mean of 3.1+/-3.6 months before detection by diagnostic imagings) and between 10 months after detection by diagnostic imagings and 13 months before detection by diagnostic imagings (mean 2.2+/-3.9 months before detection by diagnostic imagings) by CEA and CA 19-9 monitorings, respectively. These results suggest that CEA and/or CA 19-9 monitoring after operation was useful to predict the recurrence of gastric cancer, especially in almost all the patients with high preoperative levels of these markers.

  6. JAZF1/SUZ12 gene fusion in endometrial stromal sarcomas.

    PubMed

    Hrzenjak, Andelko

    2016-01-01

    Endometrial stromal sarcomas (ESSs) belong to the rarest uterine malignancies (prevalence category <1-9/1,000,000). According to the new 2014 World Health Organisation (WHO) classification, they are separated into four categories; benign endometrial stromal nodules (ESNs), low grade endometrial stromal sarcomas (LG-ESSs), high-grade endometrial stromal sarcomas (HG-ESSs) and undifferentiated uterine sarcomas (UUSs). Due to heterogeneous histopathologic appearance these tumors still represent diagnostic challenge, even for experienced pathologists. ESSs are genetically very heterogeneous and several chromosomal translocations and gene fusions have so far been identified in these malignancies. To date the JAZF1/SUZ12 gene fusion is by far the most frequent and seems to be the cytogenetic hallmark of ESN and LG-ESS. Based on present literature data this gene fusion is present in approximately 75% of ESN, 50% of LG-ESS and 15% of HG-ESS cases. The frequency of JAZF1/SUZ12 appearance varies between classic ESS and different morphologic variants. This gene fusion is suggested to become a specific diagnostic tool, especially in difficult borderline cases. In combination with the recently described YWHAE/FAM22 gene fusion the JAZF1/SUZ12 fusion could be used to differentiate between LG-ESS and HG-ESS. The purpose of this review is to summarize literature data published in last two and a half decades about this gene fusion, as a contribution to our understanding of ESS genetics and pathogenesis. PMID:26879382

  7. Assessment of liver tumor response to therapy: role of quantitative imaging.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Guindalini, Fernanda D; Botelho, Marcos P F; Harmath, Carla B; Sandrasegaran, Kumaresan; Miller, Frank H; Salem, Riad; Yaghmai, Vahid

    2013-10-01

    Quantitative imaging is the analysis of retrieved numeric data from images with the goal of reducing subjective assessment. It is an increasingly important radiologic tool to assess treatment response in oncology patients. Quantification of response to therapy depends on the tumor type and method of treatment. Anatomic imaging biomarkers that quantify liver tumor response to cytotoxic therapy are based on temporal change in the size of the tumors. Anatomic biomarkers have been incorporated into the World Health Organization criteria and the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) versions 1.0 and 1.1. However, the development of novel therapies with different mechanisms of action, such as antiangiogenesis or radioembolization, has required new methods for measuring response to therapy. This need has led to development of tumor- or therapy-specific guidelines such as the Modified CT Response Evaluation (Choi) Criteria for gastrointestinal stromal tumors, the European Association for Study of the Liver (EASL) criteria, and modified RECIST for hepatocellular carcinoma, among many others. The authors review the current quantification criteria used in the evaluation of treatment response in liver tumors, summarizing their indications, advantages, and disadvantages, and discuss future directions with newer methods that have the potential for assessment of treatment response. Knowledge of these quantitative methods is important to facilitate pivotal communication between oncologists and radiologists about cancer treatment, with benefit ultimately accruing to the patient. PMID:24108562

  8. Epithelial-mesenchymal, mesenchymal-epithelial, and endothelial-mesenchymal transitions in malignant tumors: An update

    PubMed Central

    Gurzu, Simona; Turdean, Sabin; Kovecsi, Attila; Contac, Anca Otilia; Jung, Ioan

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) represents conversion of an epithelial cell in an elongated cell with mesenchymal phenotype, which can occur in physiologic and pathologic processes such as embryogenesis (type 1 EMT), wound healing and/or fibrosis (type 2 EMT) and malignant tumors (type 3 EMT). The proliferation rate, metastasizing and recurrence capacity, as also the individualized response at chemotherapics, in both epithelial and mesenchymal malignant tumors is known to be influenced by reversible switch between EMT and mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition (MET). Although much research work has already been done in these fields, the specific molecular pathways of EMT, relating to the tumor type and tumor localization, are yet to be elucidated. In this paper, based on the literature and personal experience of the authors, an update in the field of EMT vs MET in epithelial and mesenchymal tumors is presented. The authors tried to present the latest data about the particularities of these processes, and also of the so-called endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition, based on tumor location. The EMT-angiogenesis link is discussed as a possible valuable parameter for clinical follow-up and targeted therapeutic oncologic management. The paper begins with presentation of the basic aspects of EMT, its classification and assessment possibilities, and concludes with prognostic and therapeutic perspectives. The particularities of EMT and MET in gastric and colorectal carcinomas, pancreatic cancer, hepatocellular and cholangiocarcinomas, and lung, breast and prostate cancers, respectively in sarcomas and gastrointestinal stromal tumors are presented in detail. PMID:25984514

  9. Stromal-Initiated Changes in the Bone Promote Metastatic Niche Development.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xianmin; Fu, Yujie; Loza, Andrew J; Murali, Bhavna; Leahy, Kathleen M; Ruhland, Megan K; Gang, Margery; Su, Xinming; Zamani, Ali; Shi, Yu; Lavine, Kory J; Ornitz, David M; Weilbaecher, Katherine N; Long, Fanxin; Novack, Deborah V; Faccio, Roberta; Longmore, Gregory D; Stewart, Sheila A

    2016-01-01

    More than 85% of advanced breast cancer patients suffer from metastatic bone lesions, yet the mechanisms that facilitate these metastases remain poorly understood. Recent studies suggest that tumor-derived factors initiate changes within the tumor microenvironment to facilitate metastasis. However, whether stromal-initiated changes are sufficient to drive increased metastasis in the bone remains an open question. Thus, we developed a model to induce reactive senescent osteoblasts and found that they increased breast cancer colonization of the bone. Analysis of senescent osteoblasts revealed that they failed to mineralize bone matrix and increased local osteoclastogenesis, the latter process being driven by the senescence-associated secretory phenotype factor, IL-6. Neutralization of IL-6 was sufficient to limit senescence-induced osteoclastogenesis and tumor cell localization to bone, thereby reducing tumor burden. Together, these data suggest that a reactive stromal compartment can condition the niche, in the absence of tumor-derived signals, to facilitate metastatic tumor growth in the bone.

  10. Gastric stromal tumours: a practical approach.

    PubMed Central

    Mihssin, N.; Moorthy, K.; Sengupta, A.; Houghton, P. W.

    2000-01-01

    Recent findings on the pathological diversity of gastric stromal tumours and their unpredictable behaviour prompted us to review our series of 16 patients who had undergone surgery for these tumours from 1991 to 1998. There were 13 benign and 3 malignant lesions. The majority of patients presented with either upper gastrointestinal bleeding or anaemia alone (12 of 16). Endoscopy was an extremely useful diagnostic tool, revealing the lesion as an intraluminal protuberant tumour with or without ulcer in 10 cases and as an ulcer alone in 4 cases, and in 1 case features suggesting an extrinsic mass. All the patients in the series underwent surgery. We used staplers (AutosutureR TA 55) to excise the tumours in 7 cases, all of which on histological examination were benign with clear resection margins. Gastric resections were performed in 5 cases for either large tumours or those situated at the fundus or antrum and local excision of the remaining 4. The mean follow-up of these patients was 24 months. Two patients with malignant lesions died of irresectable recurrences, one 2 months and one 18 months after surgery. There have been no recurrences in the tumours diagnosed as benign on histology. Tumour size, position and the ability to apply the stapler leaving adequate margin below the tumour should be the determinants of extent and type of excision. Reliable determinants of behaviour are tumour size, grade and mitotic index. Images Figure 1 PMID:11103152

  11. Utility of immunohistochemical investigation of SDHB and molecular genetic analysis of SDH genes in the differential diagnosis of mesenchymal tumors of GIT.

    PubMed

    Dubova, M; Sedivcova, M; Michal, M; Kokoskova, B; Ryska, A; Smid, D; Daum, O

    2015-02-01

    Loss of expression of beta subunit of succinate dehydrogenase (SDHB) was proved to be present in a subgroup of KIT/PDGFRA wt gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs). To evaluate possible diagnostic utility of SDHB immunohistochemistry in the differential diagnostics of mesenchymal tumors of gastrointestinal tract (GIT), 11 cases of KIT/PDGFRA wt GISTs, 12 gastric schwannomas (GSs), 20 solitary fibrous tumors (SFTs), 4 leiomyomas (LMs), 16 leiomyosarcomas (LMSs), 5 synovial sarcomas (SSs), 3 endometrioid stromal sarcomas (ESSs), and 1 ileal inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor (IMT) were investigated for SDHB immunoexpression together with molecular genetic analysis of genes encoding succinate dehydrogenase (SDH). Three recent cases of KIT/PDGFRA mutant GISTs were used as controls. Among the 11 KIT/PDGFRA wt GISTs, 6 expressed SDHB, 1 of them harboring a sequence change of SDHD. All SDHB-negative cases were SDHB-D wt. In 1 of the control GIST cases molecular genetic analysis revealed an SDHD sequence change in addition to a mutation in KIT exon 11. No SFT was truly SDHB-negative, but in 2 of them the staining was impossible to analyze. Furthermore, 1 SFT carried an SDHB and another 1 SDHD sequence change. All GSs, LMs, LMSs, SSs, ESSs, and IMT were SDHB-positive or non-analyzable, and SDHB-D wt. Additional factors may play a role in regulating expression of SDHB. Furthermore, SDHB immunohistochemistry alone may be misleading in excluding tumors other than GIST (especially SFT) in the differential diagnosis of KIT/PDGFRA wt mesenchymal tumors of GIT.

  12. Probiotic Therapy in Preventing Gastrointestinal Complications in Patients Undergoing Chemotherapy and Pelvic Radiation Therapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-01

    Cognitive/Functional Effects; Constipation, Impaction, and Bowel Obstruction; Diarrhea; Fatigue; Gastrointestinal Complications; Psychosocial Effects of Cancer and Its Treatment; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  13. Robotic Surgery for Benign Duodenal Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Downs-Canner, Stephanie; Van der Vliet, Wald J.; Thoolen, Stijn J. J.; Boone, Brian A.; Zureikat, Amer H.; Hogg, Melissa E.; Bartlett, David L.; Callery, Mark P.; Kent, Tara S.; Zeh, Herbert J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Benign duodenal and periampullary tumors are uncommon lesions requiring careful attention to their complex anatomic relationships with the major and minor papillae as well as the gastric outlet during surgical intervention. While endoscopy is less morbid than open resection, many lesions are not amenable to endoscopic removal. Robotic surgery offers technical advantages above traditional laparoscopy, and we demonstrate the safety and feasibility of this approach for a variety of duodenal lesions. Methods We performed a retrospective review of all robotic duodenal resections between April 2010 and December 2013 from two institutions. Demographic, clinicopathologic, and operative details were recorded with special attention to the post-operative course. Results Twenty-six patients underwent robotic duodenal resection for a variety of diagnoses. The majority (88 %) were symptomatic at presentation. Nine patients underwent transduodenal ampullectomy, seven patients underwent duodenal resection, six patients underwent transduodenal resection of a mass, and four patients underwent segmental duodenal resection. Median operative time was 4 h with a median estimated blood loss of 50 cm3 and no conversions to an open operation. The rate of major Clavien-Dindo grades 3–4 complications was 15 % at post-operative days 30 and 90 without mortality. Final pathology demonstrated a median tumor size of 2.9 cm with a final histologic diagnoses of adenoma (n=13), neuroendocrine tumor (n=6), gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) (n=2), lipoma (n=2), Brunner’s gland hamartoma (n=1), leiomyoma (n=1), and gangliocytic paraganglioma (n=1). Conclusion Robotic duodenal resection is safe and feasible for benign and premalignant duodenal tumors not amenable to endoscopic resection. PMID:25348238

  14. Zinc and gastrointestinal disease

    PubMed Central

    Skrovanek, Sonja; DiGuilio, Katherine; Bailey, Robert; Huntington, William; Urbas, Ryan; Mayilvaganan, Barani; Mercogliano, Giancarlo; Mullin, James M

    2014-01-01

    This review is a current summary of the role that both zinc deficiency and zinc supplementation can play in the etiology and therapy of a wide range of gastrointestinal diseases. The recent literature describing zinc action on gastrointestinal epithelial tight junctions and epithelial barrier function is described. Zinc enhancement of gastrointestinal epithelial barrier function may figure prominently in its potential therapeutic action in several gastrointestinal diseases. PMID:25400994

  15. Sox10 – A marker for not only Schwannian and melanocytic neoplasms but also myoepithelial cell tumors of soft tissue. A systematic analysis of 5134 tumors

    PubMed Central

    Miettinen, Markku; McCue, Peter A.; Sarlomo-Rikala, Maarit; Biernat, Wojciech; Czapiewski, Piotr; Kopczynski, Janusz; Thompson, Lester D.; Lasota, Jerzy; Wang, Zengfeng; Fetsch, John F.

    2015-01-01

    Sox10 transcription factor is expressed in Schwannian and melanocytic lineages and is important in their development and can be used as a marker for corresponding tumors. Additionally, it has been reported in subsets of myoepithelial/basal cell epithelial neoplasms, but its expression remains incompletely characterized. In this study, we examined Sox10 express-ion in 5134 human neoplasms spanning a wide spectrum of neuroectodermal, mesenchymal, lymphoid, and epithelial tumors. A new rabbit monoclonal antibody (clone EP268) and Leica Bond Max automation were used on multitumor block libraries containing 30–70 cases per slide. Sox10 was consistently expressed in benign Schwann cell tumors of soft tissue and the GI-tract and metastatic melanoma, and was variably present in malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors. In contrast, Sox10 was absent in many potential mimics of nerve sheath tumors such as cellular neurothekeoma, meningioma, gastrointestinal stromal tumors, PEComa, and a variety of fibroblastic-myofibroblastic tumors. Sox10 was virtually absent in mesenchymal tumors but occasionally seen in alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma. In epithelial tumors of soft tissue, Sox10 was expressed only in myoepitheliomas, although often absent in malignant variants. Carcinomas, other than basal cell type breast cancers, were only rarely positive but included rare squamous carcinomas of head and neck and pulmonary small cell carcinomas. Furthermore, Sox10 was often focally expressed in embryonal carcinoma reflecting a primitive Sox10-positive phenotype or neuroectodermal differentiation. Expression of Sox10 in entrapped non-neoplastic Schwann cells or melanocytes in various neoplasms has to be considered in diagnosing Sox10-positive tumors. The Sox10 antibody belongs in a modern immunohistochemical panel for the diagnosis of soft tissue and epithelial tumors. PMID:25724000

  16. Paragangliomas: update on differential diagnostic considerations, composite tumors, and recent genetic developments.

    PubMed

    Papathomas, Thomas G; de Krijger, Ronald R; Tischler, Arthur S

    2013-08-01

    Recent developments in molecular genetics have expanded the spectrum of disorders associated with pheochromocytomas (PCCs) and extra-adrenal paragangliomas (PGLs) and have increased the roles of pathologists in helping to guide patient care. At least 30% of these tumors are now known to be hereditary, and germline mutations of at least 10 genes are known to cause the tumors to develop. Genotype-phenotype correlations have been identified, including differences in tumor distribution, catecholamine production, and risk of metastasis, and types of tumors not previously associated with PCC/PGL are now considered in the spectrum of hereditary disease. Important new findings are that mutations of succinate dehydrogenase genes SDHA, SDHB, SDHC, SDHD, and SDHAF2 (collectively "SDHx") are responsible for a large percentage of hereditary PCC/PGL and that SDHB mutations are strongly correlated with extra-adrenal tumor location, metastasis, and poor prognosis. Further, gastrointestinal stromal tumors and renal tumors are now associated with SDHx mutations. A PCC or PGL caused by any of the hereditary susceptibility genes can present as a solitary, apparently sporadic, tumor, and substantial numbers of patients presenting with apparently sporadic tumors harbor occult germline mutations of susceptibility genes. Current roles of pathologists are differential diagnosis of primary tumors and metastases, identification of clues to occult hereditary disease, and triaging of patients for optimal genetic testing by immunohistochemical staining of tumor tissue for the loss of SDHB and SDHA protein. Diagnostic pitfalls are posed by morphological variants of PCC/PGL, unusual anatomic sites of occurrence, and coexisting neuroendocrine tumors of other types in some hereditary syndromes. These pitfalls can be avoided by judicious use of appropriate immunohistochemical stains. Aside from loss of staining for SDHB, criteria for predicting risk of metastasis are still controversial, and

  17. Acidic extracellular pH of tumors induces octamer-binding transcription factor 4 expression in murine fibroblasts in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Som, Avik; Bloch, Sharon; Ippolito, Joseph E.; Achilefu, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    Octamer-binding transcription factor 4 (OCT-4) is an important marker of cellular de-differentiation that can be induced by environmental stressors, such as acidity. Here we demonstrate that chronic acidic stress in solid tumors induced OCT-4 expression in fibroblasts and other stromal cells in four tumor models. The results have implications for how tumors utilize pH modulation to recruit associated stromal cells, induce partial reprogramming of tumor-associated stromal cells, and respond to therapy. PMID:27302093

  18. Tenascin is a Stromal Marker for Epithelial Malignancy in the Mammary Gland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackie, Eleanor J.; Chiquet-Ehrismann, Ruth; Adams Pearson, Carolyn; Inaguma, Yutaka; Taya, Koji; Kawarada, Yoshifumi; Sakakura, Teruyo

    1987-07-01

    Tenascin is an extracellular matrix glycoprotein that is not present in the normal mature rat mammary gland. The distribution of tenascin was examined by immunohistochemistry in mammary tumors from carcinogen-treated and untreated rats, in virus-induced mammary tumors from mice, and in a variety of mammary gland lesions from humans. Tenascin was detectable in the stroma of the malignant but not of the benign tumors from all species. An inhibition ELISA, testing homogenates of rat tumors, confirmed that tenascin was present in malignant but not in benign tumors. Thus, tenascin was consistently found to be a stromal marker for epithelial malignancy in the mammary gland. It is concluded that tenascin may be involved in the interactions between the epithelial and mesenchyme-derived (stromal) components of the mammary gland, which are known to influence epithelial carcinogenesis in this organ.

  19. Trial of Dasatinib in Advanced Sarcomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-12

    Rhabdomyosarcoma; Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumors; Chondrosarcoma; Sarcoma, Ewing's; Sarcoma, Alveolar Soft Part; Chordoma; Epithelioid Sarcoma; Giant Cell Tumor of Bone; Hemangiopericytoma; Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor (GIST)

  20. A case of feline gastrointestinal eosinophilic sclerosing fibroplasia.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Manabu; Onchi, Miyako; Ozaki, Masakazu

    2013-03-01

    Feline gastrointestinal eosinophilic sclerosing fibroplasia was diagnosed in an 8-month-old Scottish fold that had a primary gastrointestinal mass involving the stomach, duodenum and mesenteric lymph nodes. Histopathologically, the most characteristic feature of this mass was granulation tissue with eosinophil infiltration and hyperplasia of sclerosing collagen fiber. Immunohistochemically, large spindle-shaped cells were positive for smooth muscle actin and vimentin. This case emphasizes the importance of feline gastrointestinal eosinophilic sclerosing fibroplasia as a differential diagnosis of gastrointestinal neoplastic lesions such as osteosarcoma and mast cell tumor in cats. PMID:23723568

  1. Melanoma educates mesenchymal stromal cells towards vasculogenic mimicry

    PubMed Central

    VARTANIAN, AMALIA; KARSHIEVA, SAIDA; DOMBROVSKY, VLADISLAV; BELYAVSKY, ALEXANDER

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are recruited to the tumor, and promote tumor development and growth. The present study was performed to investigate the communication between aggressive melanoma and MSCs in vasculogenic mimicry (VM). Normal human MSCs plated on Matrigel were unable to form capillary-like structures (CLSs). By contrast, MSCs co-cultured with aggressive melanoma cell lines, namely, Mel Cher, Mel Kor and Mel P, generated CLSs. Significantly, MSCs co-cultured with poorly aggressive melanoma cells, namely, Mel Me, failed to form CLSs. To identify factors responsible for VM, the effects of vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA), pro-epidermal growth factor, basic fibroblast growth factor and stromal cell-derived factor 1α on the formation of CLSs by MSCs were tested. VM was induced by the addition of VEGFA, whereas other cytokines were inefficient. To confirm the hypothesis that aggressive tumor cells can increase the vasculogenic ability of MSCs, a standard B16/F10 mouse melanoma test system was used. MSCs isolated from the adipose tissues of C57BL/6 mice with melanoma formed a vascular-like network on Matrigel, whereas MSCs from healthy mice failed to form such structures. This study provides the first direct evidence that melanoma tumors educate MSCs to engage in VM. The education may occur distantly. These findings offer promise for novel therapeutic directions in the treatment of metastatic melanoma. PMID:27313776

  2. Old Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors and Newcomers in Gastrointestinal Cancer Treatment.

    PubMed

    Erika, Giordani; Federica, Zoratto; Martina, Strudel; Anselmo, Papa; Luigi, Rossi; Marina, Minozzi; Davide, Caruso; Eleonora, Zaccarelli; Monica, Verrico; Silverio, Tomao

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal cancer treatment is based more on molecular biology that has provided increasing knowledge about cancer pathogenesis on which targeted therapy is being developed. Precisely, targeted therapy is defined as a "type of treatment that uses drugs, such as monoclonal antibodies or tyrosine kinase inhibitors, to identify and attack specific cancer cells". Nowadays, the United States Food and Drug Administration has approved many targeted therapies for gastrointestinal cancer treatment, as many are in various phases of development as well. In a previous review we discussed the main monoclonal antibodies used and studied in gastrointestinal cancer. In addition to monoclonal antibodies, tyrosine kinase inhibitors represent another class of targeted therapy and following the approval of imatinib for gastrointestinal stromal tumours, other tyrosine kinase inhibitors have been approved for gastrointestinal cancers treatment such as sunitinib, regoragenib, sorafenib and erlotinib. Moving forward, the purpose of this review is to focus on the efficacy data of main tyrosine kinase inhibitors commonly used in the personalized treatment of each gastrointestinal tumour and to provide a comprehensive overview about experimental targeted therapies ongoing in this setting. PMID:26278713

  3. Old Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors and Newcomers in Gastrointestinal Cancer Treatment.

    PubMed

    Giordani, Erika; Zoratto, Federica; Strudel, Martina; Papa, Anselmo; Rossi, Luigi; Minozzi, Marina; Caruso, Davide; Zaccarelli, Eleonora; Verrico, Monica; Tomao, Silverio

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal cancer treatment is based more on molecular biology that has provided increasing knowledge about cancer pathogenesis on which targeted therapy is being developed. Precisely, targeted therapy is defined as a "type of treatment that uses drugs, such as monoclonal antibodies or tyrosine kinase inhibitors, to identify and attack specific cancer cells". Nowadays, the United States Food and Drug Administration has approved many targeted therapies for gastrointestinal cancer treatment, as many are in various phases of development as well. In a previous review we discussed the main monoclonal antibodies used and studied in gastrointestinal cancer. In addition to monoclonal antibodies, tyrosine kinase inhibitors represent another class of targeted therapy and following the approval of imatinib for gastrointestinal stromal tumours, other tyrosine kinase inhibitors have been approved for gastrointestinal cancers treatment such as sunitinib, regoragenib, sorafenib and erlotinib. Moving forward, the purpose of this review is to focus on the efficacy data of main tyrosine kinase inhibitors commonly used in the personalized treatment of each gastrointestinal tumour and to provide a comprehensive overview about experimental targeted therapies ongoing in this setting.

  4. Current Status and Perspective of Immunotherapy in Gastrointestinal Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung Hoon; Kim, Bum Jun; Kim, Hyeong Su; Kim, Jung Han

    2016-01-01

    Cancer immunotherapy is at dawn of the Renaissance after the Medieval Dark Ages. Recent advances of understanding tumor immunology and molecular drug development are leading us to the epoch of cancer immunotherapy. Some types of immunotherapy have shown to provide survival benefit for patients with solid tumors such as malignant melanoma, renal cell carcinoma, or non-small cell lung cancer. Several studies have suggested that immune checkpoint inhibition might be effective in some patients with gastrointestinal cancers. However, the era of cancer immunotherapy in gastrointestinal cancers is still in an inchoate stage. Here we briefly review the current status and perspective of immunotherapeutic approaches in patients with gastrointestinal cancers. PMID:27698896

  5. Current Status and Perspective of Immunotherapy in Gastrointestinal Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung Hoon; Kim, Bum Jun; Kim, Hyeong Su; Kim, Jung Han

    2016-01-01

    Cancer immunotherapy is at dawn of the Renaissance after the Medieval Dark Ages. Recent advances of understanding tumor immunology and molecular drug development are leading us to the epoch of cancer immunotherapy. Some types of immunotherapy have shown to provide survival benefit for patients with solid tumors such as malignant melanoma, renal cell carcinoma, or non-small cell lung cancer. Several studies have suggested that immune checkpoint inhibition might be effective in some patients with gastrointestinal cancers. However, the era of cancer immunotherapy in gastrointestinal cancers is still in an inchoate stage. Here we briefly review the current status and perspective of immunotherapeutic approaches in patients with gastrointestinal cancers.

  6. Modeling Breast Tumor Development with a Humanized Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Arendt, Lisa M

    2016-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment plays a critical role in breast cancer growth and progression to metastasis. Here, we describe a method to examine stromal-epithelial interactions during tumor formation and progression utilizing human-derived mammary epithelial cells and breast stromal cells. This method outlines the isolation of each cell type from reduction mammoplasty tissue, the culture and genetic modification of both epithelial and stromal cells using lentiviral technology, and the method of humanizing and implantation of transformed epithelial cells into the cleared mammary fat pads of immunocompromised mice. This model system may be a useful tool to dissect signaling interactions that contribute to invasive tumor behavior and therapeutic resistance. PMID:27581027

  7. Uterine sarcoma Part II-Uterine endometrial stromal sarcoma: The TAG systematic review.

    PubMed

    Horng, Huann-Cheng; Wen, Kuo-Chang; Wang, Peng-Hui; Chen, Yi-Jen; Yen, Ming-Shyen; Ng, Heung-Tat

    2016-08-01

    Endometrial stromal tumors are rare uterine tumors (<1%). Four main categories include endometrial stromal nodule, low-grade endometrial stromal sarcoma (LG-ESS), high-grade endometrial stromal sarcoma (HG-ESS), and uterine undifferentiated sarcoma (UUS). This review is a series of articles discussing the uterine sarcomas. LG-ESS, a hormone-dependent tumor harboring chromosomal rearrangement, is an indolent tumor with a favorable prognosis, but characterized by late recurrences even in patients with Stage I disease, suggesting the requirement of a long-term follow-up. Patients with HG-ESS, based on the identification of YWHAE-NUTM2A/B (YWHAE-FAM22A/B) gene fusion, typically present with advanced stage diseases and frequently have recurrences, usually within a few years after initial surgery. UUS is, a high-grade sarcoma, extremely rare, lacking