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Sample records for gastrointestinal tract germinal

  1. Evaluation of germination, distribution, and persistence of Bacillus subtilis spores through the gastrointestinal tract of chickens.

    PubMed

    Latorre, J D; Hernandez-Velasco, X; Kallapura, G; Menconi, A; Pumford, N R; Morgan, M J; Layton, S L; Bielke, L R; Hargis, B M; Téllez, G

    2014-07-01

    Spores are popular as direct-fed microbials, though little is known about their mode of action. Hence, the first objective of the present study was to evaluate the in vitro germination and growth rate of Bacillus subtilis spores. Approximately 90% of B. subtilis spores germinate within 60 min in the presence of feed in vitro. The second objective was to determine the distribution of these spores throughout different anatomical segments of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) in a chicken model. For in vivo evaluation of persistence and dissemination, spores were administered to day-of-hatch broiler chicks either as a single gavage dose or constantly in the feed. During 2 independent experiments, chicks were housed in isolation chambers and fed sterile corn-soy-based diets. In these experiments one group of chickens was supplemented with 10(6) spores/g of feed, whereas a second group was gavaged with a single dose of 10(6) spores per chick on day of hatch. In both experiments, crop, ileum, and cecae were sampled from 5 chicks at 24, 48, 72, 96, and 120 h. Viable B. subtilis spores were determined by plate count method after heat treatment (75°C for 10 min). The number of recovered spores was constant through 120 h in each of the enteric regions from chickens receiving spores supplemented in the feed. However, the number of recovered B. subtilis spores was consistently about 10(5) spores per gram of digesta, which is about a 1-log10 reduction of the feed inclusion rate, suggesting approximately a 90% germination rate in the GIT when fed. On the other hand, recovered B. subtilis spores from chicks that received a single gavage dose decreased with time, with only approximately 10(2) spores per gram of sample by 120 h. This confirms that B. subtilis spores are transiently present in the GIT of chickens, but the persistence of vegetative cells is presently unknown. For persistent benefit, continuous administration of effective B. subtilis direct-fed microbials as vegetative

  2. Computed tomography of the gastrointestinal tract

    SciTech Connect

    Meyers, M.A.

    1986-01-01

    This volume presents computed tomography of the major disease states involving the gastrointestinal tract, mesentery, and peritoneal cavity. Computed Tomography of the Gastrointestinal Tract combined experience of l5 authorities includes illustrations (most of these radiographs).

  3. Mucoadhesion and the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Varum, Felipe J O; McConnell, Emma L; Sousa, Joao J S; Veiga, Francisco; Basit, Abdul W

    2008-01-01

    The concept of mucoadhesion is one that has the potential to improve the highly variable residence times experienced by drugs and dosage forms at various sites in the gastrointestinal tract, and consequently, to reduce variability and improve efficacy. Intimate contact with the mucosa should enhance absorption or improve topical therapy. A variety of approaches have been investigated for mucoadhesion in the gastrointestinal tract, particularly for the stomach and small intestine. Despite interesting results in these sites, mucoadhesive approaches have not yet shown success in humans. The potential of the lower gut for these applications has been largely neglected, although the large intestine in particular may benefit, and the colon has several factors that suggest mucoadhesion could be successful there, including lower motility and the possibility of a lower mucus turnover and thicker mucus layer. In vitro studies on colonic mucoadhesion show promise, and rectal administration has shown some positive results in vivo. This review considers the background to mucoadhesion with respect to the physiological conditions of the gastrointestinal tract as well as the principles that underlie this concept. Mucoadhesive approaches to gastrointestinal drug delivery will be examined, with particular attention given to the lower gut.

  4. Lower Gastrointestinal (GI) Tract X-Ray (Radiography)

    MedlinePlus

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z X-ray (Radiography) - Lower GI Tract Lower gastrointestinal tract radiography ... GI Tract Radiography? What is Lower GI Tract X-ray Radiography (Barium Enema)? Lower gastrointestinal (GI) tract radiography, ...

  5. Cannabinoids and the gastrointestinal tract

    PubMed Central

    PERTWEE, R

    2001-01-01

    found to induce "withdrawal" contractions in cannabinoid tolerant guinea pig ileal MPLM. Further research is required to investigate the role both of endogenous cannabinoid receptor agonists and of non-CB1 cannabinoid receptors in the gastrointestinal tract. The extent to which the effects on gastrointestinal function of cannabinoid receptor agonists or antagonists/inverse agonists can be exploited therapeutically has yet to be investigated as has the extent to which these drugs can provoke unwanted effects in the gastrointestinal tract when used for other therapeutic purposes.

 PMID:11358910

  6. [Impairments of gastrointestinal tract in autism].

    PubMed

    Grechanina, Iu B; Grechanina, E Ia; Beletskaia, S V

    2014-11-01

    In the article the peculiarities of the gastrointestinal tract in children with autism. Presents the algorithm for evaluation of children with autism in KhSMGC, the statistical data about the frequency of lesions of the gastrointestinal tract. The main directions of correction of digestive disorders and its results.

  7. Vasculitides of the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Eric; Luk, Adriana; Chetty, Runjan; Butany, Jagdish

    2009-05-01

    Systemic vasculitis is often not considered as a possible diagnosis by clinicians because of its low prevalence compared with other more common diseases. Vasculitis can affect any end organ, and it is therefore often missed early on in disease progression. Gastrointestinal (GI) manifestations of vasculitis are considered rare and the presentation is often nonspecific. However, if there is significant involvement of the major vessels of the gastrointestinal system, life-threatening sequelae, including perforation and bowel ischemia, may occur. This makes early and immediate management crucial to improve long-term morbidity and mortality. Diagnosis of various GI vasculitides often relies on correlation of clinical manifestations with pathology and additional investigations. This paper reviews the various vasculitides that affect the GI tract, including systemic lupus erythematosus, mixed connective tissue disease, Henoch Schönlein purpura, polyarteritis nodosa, Churg-Strauss syndrome, Wegener's granulomatosis, microscopic polyangiitis, enterocolic lymphocytic phlebitis, and Behcet's disease. Segmental arterial mediolysis, mistakenly believed to be a vasculitis, is also discussed.

  8. Lower Gastrointestinal (GI) Tract X-Ray (Radiography)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Site Index A-Z X-ray (Radiography) - Lower GI Tract Lower gastrointestinal tract radiography or lower GI ... of Lower GI Tract Radiography? What is Lower GI Tract X-ray Radiography (Barium Enema)? Lower gastrointestinal ( ...

  9. Unusual foreign bodies of upper gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Nijhawan, S; Rai, R R; Agarwal, S; Vijayvergiya, R

    1995-01-01

    We report management of unusual foreign bodies of upper gastrointestinal tract, namely beer bottle cap, raisins and pistachu, mango peel, betelnut and plum seed at a university hospital in Northern India.

  10. Immunohistochemical features of the gastrointestinal tract tumors

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Hannah H.

    2012-01-01

    Gastrointestinal tract tumors include a wide variety of vastly different tumors and on a whole are one of the most common malignancies in western countries. These tumors often present at late stages as distant metastases which are then biopsied and may be difficult to differentiate without the aid of immunohistochemical stains. With the exception of pancreatic and biliary tumors where there are no distinct immunohistochemical patterns, most gastrointestinal tumors can be differentiated by their unique immunohistochemical profile. As the size of biopsies decrease, the role of immunohistochemical stains will become even more important in determining the origin and differentiation of gastrointestinal tract tumors. PMID:22943017

  11. Alcohol consumption and the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Stermer, Edy

    2002-03-01

    Alcohol is one of the most commonly abused drugs, with a per capita consumption of approximately 10 L pure ethanol per year in the United States and even higher in Spain and France. In terms of mortality, the effect of alcohol on the liver and the pancreas is probably more significant than on the tubular gastrointestinal tract. However, alcohol is a very important cause of morbidity in the tubular gastrointestinal tract. Alcohol influences the motility in the esophagus, stomach and small bowel and has direct effects on the mucosa of the upper tract. While the stimulation of gastric acid secretion is inversely correlated with the alcohol concentration of the beverage, a direct pathogenetic role in peptic ulcer disease has not been demonstrated. Some alcohols, like red wine, have been shown to possess an anti-Helicobacter pylori effect. Alcohol also has a role in the development of tumors of the gastrointestinal tract.

  12. Glutamine and the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, T R; Bazargan, N; Leader, L M; Martindale, R G

    2000-09-01

    The amino acid glutamine has become one of the most intensively studied nutrients in the field of nutrition and metabolic support. A variety of studies in cell culture systems, animal models of gut mucosal atrophy, injury/repair and adaptation and a limited number of clinical trials demonstrate trophic and cytoprotective effects of glutamine in small bowel and colonic mucosal cells. Although the routine clinical use of glutamine-enriched parenteral and enteral nutrient solutions remains controversial, available data demonstrate both the safety and metabolic and clinical efficacy of glutamine treatment in selected patient groups. Basic investigations are elucidating underlying mechanisms of glutamine action in intestinal cells. These will inform preclinical and clinical investigations designed to determine glutamine efficacy in selected gastrointestinal disorders. Emerging clinical trials will further define the utility of adjunctive glutamine supplementation as a component of specialized nutrition support in gastrointestinal disease.

  13. Parasitic infections of the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Noyer, C M; Brandt, L J

    1999-08-01

    Parasitic infections of the gastrointestinal tract are a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Increased international travel means that gastroenterologists are now more likely to care for patients with parasitic diseases. This article reviews various aspects of the more common intestinal parasites and their infections, including epidemiology, life cycle, pathogenesis, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment.

  14. Immunobiology of the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Galant, S P

    1976-06-01

    The interplay between the gut and immune abnormality appears to be a logical extension of the thesis that secretory IgA is the major immunologic line of defense between the outside environment and the host. Thus immunologic deficiency, particularly of IgA and combined T- and B-lymphocyte abnormalites, profoundly influences gut integrity. Conversely, gut pathology is bound to interfere with immunologic function, so that both humoral and cellular immunity may be impaired. Finally, hypersensitivity phenomena in the gut, resulting in immune injury, may cause gastrointestinal disturbances. As better diagnostic tools have become available, more direct evidence of hypersensitivity immune injury has been described.

  15. Computed tomography of the gastrointestinal tract

    SciTech Connect

    Megibow, A.J.; Balthazar, E.J.

    1986-01-01

    New generation CT scans combined with high-detail barium studies have now allowed radiologists to see and gain a more complete understanding of the wall and surrounding structures of the gastrointestinal tract. The editors state that their intent is to ''present in a comprehensive volume an up-to-date evaluation o the role, significance, indications, and limitations of computed tomography of the gastrointestinal tract.'' There is an initial chapter on CT scanning techniques and the use of oral contrast agents. Chapters follow on Ct of the esophagus, stomach, duodenum, small bowel, and colon. The chapters start with a description of the anatomic structures and then cover in detail common pathologic conditions that affect the organ. Indications for examinations are also included in many chapters. There are final chapters on percutaneous drainage of abscesses and fluid collections and on radiologic-patholoic correlation of some of the more common entities.

  16. Hydrogen Sulfide Signaling in the Gastrointestinal Tract

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: The current literature regarding the effects of the gaseous signal molecule hydrogen sulfide (H2S) in the gastrointestinal system is reviewed. Bacterial, host and pharmaceutical-derived H2S are all considered and presented according to the physiological or pathophysiological effects of the gaseous signal molecule. These subjects include the toxicology of intestinal H2S with emphasis on bacterial-derived H2S, especially from sulfate-reducing bacteria, the role of endogenous and exogenous H2S in intestinal inflammation, and the roles of H2S in gastrointestinal motility, secretion and nociception. Recent Advances: While its pro- and anti-inflammatory, smooth muscle relaxant, prosecretory, and pro- and antinociceptive actions continue to remain the major effects of H2S in this system; recent findings have expanded the potential molecular targets for H2S in the gastrointestinal tract. Critical Issues: Numerous discrepancies remain in the literature, and definitive molecular targets in this system have not been supported by the use of competitive antagonism. Future Directions: Future work will hopefully resolve discrepancies in the literature and identify molecular targets and mechanisms of action for H2S. It is clear from the current literature that the long-appreciated relationship between H2S and the gastrointestinal tract continues to be strong as we endeavor to unravel its mysteries. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 818–830. PMID:23582008

  17. Abdominal ultrasonography of the pediatric gastrointestinal tract

    PubMed Central

    Gale, Heather I; Gee, Michael S; Westra, Sjirk J; Nimkin, Katherine

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasound is an invaluable imaging modality in the evaluation of pediatric gastrointestinal pathology; it can provide real-time evaluation of the bowel without the need for sedation or intravenous contrast. Recent improvements in ultrasound technique can be utilized to improve detection of bowel pathology in children: Higher resolution probes, color Doppler, harmonic and panoramic imaging are excellent tools in this setting. Graded compression and cine clips provide dynamic information and oral and intravenous contrast agents aid in detection of bowel wall pathology. Ultrasound of the bowel in children is typically a targeted exam; common indications include evaluation for appendicitis, pyloric stenosis and intussusception. Bowel abnormalities that are detected prenatally can be evaluated after birth with ultrasound. Likewise, acquired conditions such as bowel hematoma, bowel infections and hernias can be detected with ultrasound. Rare bowel neoplasms, vascular disorders and foreign bodies may first be detected with sonography, as well. At some centers, comprehensive exams of the gastrointestinal tract are performed on children with inflammatory bowel disease and celiac disease to evaluate for disease activity or to confirm the diagnosis. The goal of this article is to review up-to-date imaging techniques, normal sonographic anatomy, and characteristic sonographic features of common and uncommon disorders affecting the gastrointestinal tract in children. PMID:27551336

  18. Acid sensing in the gastrointestinal tract

    PubMed Central

    Holzer, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Luminal acidity is a physiologic challenge in the foregut, and acidosis can occur throughout the gastrointestinal tract as a result of inflammation or ischemia. These conditions are surveyed by an elaborate network of acid-governed mechanisms to maintain homeostasis. Deviations from physiologic values of extracellular pH are monitored by multiple acid sensors expressed by epithelial cells and sensory neurons. Acid-sensing ion channels are activated by moderate acidification, whereas transient receptor potential ion channels of the vanilloid subtype are gated by severe acidosis. Some ionotropic purinoceptor ion channels and two-pore domain background K+ channels are also sensitive to alterations of extracellular pH. PMID:17122365

  19. Sense of taste in the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Iwatsuki, Ken; Uneyama, Hisayuki

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances in molecular biology have led to the investigation of the molecular mechanism by which chemicals such as odors and tastants are perceived by specific chemosensory organs. For example, G protein-coupled receptors expressed within the nasal epithelium and taste receptors in the oral cavity have been identified as odorant and taste receptors, respectively. However, there is much evidence to indicate that these chemosensory receptors are not restricted to primary chemosensory cells; they are also expressed and have function in other cells such as those in the airways and gastrointestinal (GI) tract. This short review describes the possible mechanisms by which taste signal transduction occurs in the oral cavity and tastants/nutrients are sensed in the GI tract by taste-like cells, mainly enteroendocrine and brush cells. Furthermore, it discusses the future perspectives of chemosensory studies.

  20. Botulinum Toxin and Gastrointestinal Tract Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Weiser, Kirsten; Kennedy, Abigail

    2008-01-01

    The history of botulinum toxin is fascinating. First recognized as the cause of botulism nearly 200 years ago, it was originally feared as a deadly poison. Over the last 30 years, however, botulinum toxin has been transformed into a readily available medication used to treat a variety of medical disorders. Interest in the use of botulinum toxin has been particularly strong for patients with spastic smooth muscle disorders of the gastrointestinal tract. Patients with achalasia, diffuse esophageal spasm, gastroparesis, sphincter of Oddi dysfunction, and anal fissures have all been treated with botulinum toxin injections, often with impressive results. However, not all patients respond to botulinum toxin therapy, and large randomized controlled trials are lacking for many conditions commonly treated with botulinum toxin. This paper reviews the history, microbiology, and pharmacology of botulinum toxin, discusses its mechanism of action, and then presents recent evidence from the literature regarding the use of botulinum toxin for the treatment of a variety of gastrointestinal tract disorders. PMID:21960915

  1. Microbial and metabolic interactions between the gastrointestinal tract and Clostridium difficile infection.

    PubMed

    Theriot, Casey M; Young, Vincent B

    2014-01-01

    Antibiotics disturb the gastrointestinal tract microbiota and in turn reduce colonization resistance against Clostridium difficile. The mechanism for this loss of colonization resistance is still unknown but likely reflects structural (microbial) and functional (metabolic) changes to the gastrointestinal tract. Members of the gut microbial community shape intestinal metabolism that provides nutrients and ultimately supports host immunity. This review will discuss how antibiotics alter the structure of the gut microbiota and how this impacts bacterial metabolism in the gut. It will also explore the chemical requirements for C. difficile germination, growth, toxin production and sporulation. Many of the metabolites that influence C. difficile physiology are products of gut microbial metabolism including bile acids, carbohydrates and amino acids. To restore colonization resistance against C. difficile after antibiotics a targeted approach restoring both the structure and function of the gastrointestinal tract is needed.

  2. Microbial and metabolic interactions between the gastrointestinal tract and Clostridium difficile infection

    PubMed Central

    Theriot, Casey M; Young, Vincent B

    2014-01-01

    Antibiotics disturb the gastrointestinal tract microbiota and in turn reduce colonization resistance against Clostridium difficile. The mechanism for this loss of colonization resistance is still unknown but likely reflects structural (microbial) and functional (metabolic) changes to the gastrointestinal tract. Members of the gut microbial community shape intestinal metabolism that provides nutrients and ultimately supports host immunity. This review will discuss how antibiotics alter the structure of the gut microbiota and how this impacts bacterial metabolism in the gut. It will also explore the chemical requirements for C. difficile germination, growth, toxin production and sporulation. Many of the metabolites that influence C. difficile physiology are products of gut microbial metabolism including bile acids, carbohydrates and amino acids. To restore colonization resistance against C. difficile after antibiotics a targeted approach restoring both the structure and function of the gastrointestinal tract is needed. PMID:24335555

  3. Mechanosensitive Piezo Channels in the Gastrointestinal Tract.

    PubMed

    Alcaino, C; Farrugia, G; Beyder, A

    2017-01-01

    Sensation of mechanical forces is critical for normal function of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract and abnormalities in mechanosensation are linked to GI pathologies. In the GI tract there are several mechanosensitive cell types-epithelial enterochromaffin cells, intrinsic and extrinsic enteric neurons, smooth muscle cells and interstitial cells of Cajal. These cells use mechanosensitive ion channels that respond to mechanical forces by altering transmembrane ionic currents in a process called mechanoelectrical coupling. Several mechanosensitive ionic conductances have been identified in the mechanosensory GI cells, ranging from mechanosensitive voltage-gated sodium and calcium channels to the mechanogated ion channels, such as the two-pore domain potassium channels K2P (TREK-1) and nonselective cation channels from the transient receptor potential family. The recently discovered Piezo channels are increasingly recognized as significant contributors to cellular mechanosensitivity. Piezo1 and Piezo2 are nonselective cationic ion channels that are directly activated by mechanical forces and have well-defined biophysical and pharmacologic properties. The role of Piezo channels in the GI epithelium is currently under investigation and their role in the smooth muscle syncytium and enteric neurons is still not known. In this review, we outline the current state of knowledge on mechanosensitive ion channels in the GI tract, with a focus on the known and potential functions of the Piezo channels. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Mechanosensitive Piezo Channels in the Gastrointestinal Tract

    PubMed Central

    Alcaino, C.; Farrugia, G.; Beyder, A.

    2017-01-01

    Sensation of mechanical forces is critical for normal function of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract and abnormalities in mechanosensation are linked to GI pathologies. In the GI tract there are several mechanosensitive cell types—epithelial enterochromaffin cells, intrinsic and extrinsic enteric neurons, smooth muscle cells and interstitial cells of Cajal. These cells use mechanosensitive ion channels that respond to mechanical forces by altering transmembrane ionic currents in a process called mechanoelectrical coupling. Several mechanosensitive ionic conductances have been identified in the mechano-sensory GI cells, ranging from mechanosensitive voltage-gated sodium and calcium channels to the mechanogated ion channels, such as the two-pore domain potassium channels K2P (TREK-1) and nonselective cation channels from the transient receptor potential family. The recently discovered Piezo channels are increasingly recognized as significant contributors to cellular mechanosensitivity. Piezo1 and Piezo2 are nonselective cationic ion channels that are directly activated by mechanical forces and have well-defined biophysical and pharmacologic properties. The role of Piezo channels in the GI epithelium is currently under investigation and their role in the smooth muscle syncytium and enteric neurons is still not known. In this review, we outline the current state of knowledge on mechanosensitive ion channels in the GI tract, with a focus on the known and potential functions of the Piezo channels. PMID:28728818

  5. Gastrointestinal complications of renal transplantation. 1. The upper gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed Central

    Archibald, S. D.; Jirsch, D. W.; Bear, R. A.

    1978-01-01

    In 95 consecutive cases of cavaderic renal transplantation followed up for 1 to 83 months (mean 23.1 months) 17 complications developed in the upper gastrointestinal tract of 15 patients; these included duodenal ulcer in 12 and gastric ulcer, esophagitis, hemorrhagic gastritis, small-bowel obstruction and small-bowel perforation in 1 each. The occurrence of a complication was not related to the patient's age, sex, blood group or use of cigarettes or alcohol, the duration of hemodialysis before transplantation, the tissue match or the number of infusions of immunosuppressive medication. One patient died of the complication. The peptic ulcers that developed after transplantation were successfully managed conservatively in 69% of cases. Since surgical treatment in patients whose immune response has been suppressed is associated with an increased frequency of complications such as disruption of suture lines, it is preferable to reserve it for those in whom complications develop that are unresponsive to conservative measures. PMID:367548

  6. Abdominal tuberculosis of the gastrointestinal tract: Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Debi, Uma; Ravisankar, Vasudevan; Prasad, Kaushal Kishor; Sinha, Saroj Kant; Sharma, Arun Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Abdominal tuberculosis is an increasingly common disease that poses diagnostic challenge, as the nonspecific features of the disease which may lead to diagnostic delays and development of complications. This condition is regarded as a great mimicker of other abdominal pathology. A high index of suspicion is an important factor in early diagnosis. Abdominal involvement may occur in the gastrointestinal tract, peritoneum, lymphnodes or solid viscera. Various investigative methods have been used to aid in the diagnosis of abdominal tuberculosis. Early diagnosis and initiation of antituberculous therapy and surgical treatment are essential to prevent morbidity and mortality. Most of the patients respond very well to standard antitubercular therapy and surgery is required only in a minority of cases. Imaging plays an important role in diagnosis of abdominal tuberculosis because early recognition of this condition is important. We reviewed our experience with the findings on various imaging modalities for diagnosis of this potentially treatable disease. PMID:25356043

  7. Physiologic Status Monitoring via the Gastrointestinal Tract.

    PubMed

    Traverso, G; Ciccarelli, G; Schwartz, S; Hughes, T; Boettcher, T; Barman, R; Langer, R; Swiston, A

    2015-01-01

    Reliable, real-time heart and respiratory rates are key vital signs used in evaluating the physiological status in many clinical and non-clinical settings. Measuring these vital signs generally requires superficial attachment of physically or logistically obtrusive sensors to subjects that may result in skin irritation or adversely influence subject performance. Given the broad acceptance of ingestible electronics, we developed an approach that enables vital sign monitoring internally from the gastrointestinal tract. Here we report initial proof-of-concept large animal (porcine) experiments and a robust processing algorithm that demonstrates the feasibility of this approach. Implementing vital sign monitoring as a stand-alone technology or in conjunction with other ingestible devices has the capacity to significantly aid telemedicine, optimize performance monitoring of athletes, military service members, and first-responders, as well as provide a facile method for rapid clinical evaluation and triage.

  8. Physiologic Status Monitoring via the Gastrointestinal Tract

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, S.; Hughes, T.; Boettcher, T.; Barman, R.; Langer, R.; Swiston, A.

    2015-01-01

    Reliable, real-time heart and respiratory rates are key vital signs used in evaluating the physiological status in many clinical and non-clinical settings. Measuring these vital signs generally requires superficial attachment of physically or logistically obtrusive sensors to subjects that may result in skin irritation or adversely influence subject performance. Given the broad acceptance of ingestible electronics, we developed an approach that enables vital sign monitoring internally from the gastrointestinal tract. Here we report initial proof-of-concept large animal (porcine) experiments and a robust processing algorithm that demonstrates the feasibility of this approach. Implementing vital sign monitoring as a stand-alone technology or in conjunction with other ingestible devices has the capacity to significantly aid telemedicine, optimize performance monitoring of athletes, military service members, and first-responders, as well as provide a facile method for rapid clinical evaluation and triage. PMID:26580216

  9. The gastrointestinal tract microbiome, probiotics, and mood.

    PubMed

    Vitetta, Luis; Bambling, Matthew; Alford, Hollie

    2014-12-01

    Mental health is closely linked to physical health. Depression (e.g., major depression) is highly prevalent worldwide and a major cause of disability. In a subgroup with treatment-resistant depression, standard pharmacotherapy interventions provide small if any incremental improvement in patient outcomes and may also require the application of an alternate approach. Therefore, in addition to the standard pharmacotherapies prescribed, patients will also be advised on the benefits of psychological counseling, electroconvulsive therapy, and transcranial magnetic stimulation or increasing physical activity and reducing harmful substance consumption. Numerous nutraceuticals have a beneficial role in treatment-resistant depression and include, herbal medicines of which Hypericum perforatum is the best studied, omega-3 fatty acid preparations, S-Adenosyl-L-Methionine (SAMe), various mineral formulations (e.g., magnesium) and folate (singly or in combination with B group vitamins) are prescribed to a lesser extent. Furthermore, a largely neglected area of research activity has been the role of live probiotic cultures that contribute to repairing dysbiosis (a leaky gut barrier abnormality) in the gastrointestinal tract (GIT). In this commentary, we build a hypothesis that in addition suggests that GIT metabolites that are elaborated by the microbiome cohort may provide novel and significant avenues for efficacious therapeutic interventions for mood disorders. We posit that the microbiome in the gastrointestinal tract is implicit as an important participant for the amelioration of adverse mood conditions via the diverse metabolic activities provided by live beneficial bacteria (probiotics) as an active adjuvant treatment. This activity is in part triggered by a controlled release of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and hence further questions the antioxidant/oxidative stress postulate.

  10. Congenital diseases of the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Lentze, M

    2014-05-01

    With the rapid increase in knowledge on the genetic origin of diseases within the gastrointestinal tract the number of congenital diseases, which already manifest during childhood have drastically increased. Due to the large application of molecular genetics the number is steadily increasing. To make the access to these rare diseases fast and efficient the data base of the National Library of Medicine (Online Mendelian Inheritance of Man - OMIN) is a very helpful online tool, with which all these disease entities can be found easily (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/omim). Detailed tables are given to find most of the congenitally inherited disease, which affect the gastrointestinal tract. A variety of congenital diarrheas with disturbances of digestion, hydrolysis, absorption and secretion is described in detail: lactose intolerance, sucrose intolerance, glucose-galactose malabsorption, fructose malabsorption, trehalase and enterokinase deficiency, congenital chloride and sodium diarrhea, congenital hypomagnesaemia, primary bile acid malabsorption, acrodermatitis enteropathica and Menke's syndrome. Also described in detail are diseases with structural anomalies of the intestine like microvillous inclusion disease, congenital tufting enteropathy and IPEX syndrome. The diagnosis in the disturbances of carbohydrate hydrolysis or absorption can be established by H2-breath tests after appropriate sugar challenge. Treatment consists of elimination of the responsible sugar from the diet. The diagnosis of the congenital secretory diarrheas is established by investigation of electrolytes in blood and stool. Substitution of high doses of the responsible mineral can improve the clinical outcome. In acrodermatitis enteropathica low serum zinc level together with the typical skin lesions guide to the diagnosis. High doses of oral zinc aspartate can cure the symptoms of the disease. The diagnosis of structural congenital lesions of the intestine can be established by histology and

  11. Bacterial biofilms in the human gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Probert, H M; Gibson, G R

    2002-09-01

    Microbial biofilms were first described in 1936 and subsequent research has unveiled their ubiquity and physiological distinction from free-living (planktonic) microorganisms. In light of their emerging significance this review examines the bacterial biofilms within the human gastrointestinal tract. Attention is paid to the nature of these mucosally- associated populations, focusing on the protected environment afforded by the continual secretion of mucus by host epithelial cells. It also examines the attributes possessed by various bacterial species that facilitate habitation of this microenvironment. Additionally, contrasts are drawn between planktonic bacteria of the lumen and sessile (biofilm) bacteria growing in close association with host cells and food particles. In particular the different fermentation profiles exhibited by these two fractions are discussed. The potential role of these communities in host health and disease, as well as the stabilisation of the lumenal population, is also considered. Reference is made to the state of mutualism that exists between these little understood populations and the host epithelia, thus highlighting their ecological significance in terms of gastrointestinal health.

  12. [Subepithelial tumors of the gastrointestinal tract].

    PubMed

    Stupnik, Silvio; Rafaelli, Claudio; González, Graciela Osorio; Pestalardo, María Luján; Quesada, Matías; Viúdez, Pedro

    2009-06-01

    The subepithelial lesions of the gastrointestinal tract are related to mesenchymal tumors and 80% of them are GIST (gastrointestinal stromal tumors). However, there are also other tumors, such as: leiomyomas, schwannomas, lipomas, glomus tumors, carcinoid tumors, aberrant pancreas and polyps or inflammatory tumors. Diagnosis of submucosal tumors is often performed during routine endoscopic examination, they are frequently located at the stomach and in most cases are clinically evidenced by their complications. Endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) is the elected method for their staging; but other imaging diagnosis methods include computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography scan (PET). The differential diagnosis is made by inmunohistochemical techniques, revealing in the GIST the expression of the antigen CD117, and prognostic factors are determined by size and mitotic index. Surgery is the recommended therapeutic, although in small lesions not exceeding 2 cm it has also been suggested the endoscopic resection guided by EUS and a watchful behaviour based on periodical controls in lesions with benignity criteria. The series here exhibited (2 GIST 1 lyposarcoma, 1 schwannoma and 1 inflammatory fibroid polyp) shows that all these tumors were symptomatic; have been diagnosed using endoscopy and recognized by means of histopathology and immunohistochemical analysis after surgery.

  13. Redox signaling in the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Salvador; Taléns-Visconti, Raquel; Rius-Pérez, Sergio; Finamor, Isabela; Sastre, Juan

    2017-03-01

    physiology and pathophysiology of gastrointestinal tract. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Transversal mixing in the gastrointestinal tract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vainchtein, Dmitri; Orthey, Perry; Parkman, Henry

    2015-11-01

    We discuss results of numerical simulations and analytical modeling of transversal intraluminal mixing in the GI tract produced by segmentation and peristaltic contractions. Particles that start in different parts of the small intestine are traced over several contractions and mixing is described using the particles' probability distribution function. We show that there is optimal set of parameters of contractions, such as the depth and frequency, that produces the most efficient mixing. We show that contractions create well-defined advection patterns in transversal direction. The research is inspired by several applications. First, there is the study of bacteria populating the walls of the intestine, which rely on fluid mixing for nutrients. Second, there are gastrointestinal diseases, such as Crohn's disease, which can be treated effectively using a drug delivery capsule through GI tract, for which it is needed to know how long it takes for a released drug to reach the intestinal wall. And finally, certain neurological and muscular deceases change the parameters of contractions, thus reducing the efficiency of mixing. Understanding an admissible range of the parameters (when mixing is still sufficient for biological purposes) may indicate when the medical action is required.

  15. Prion diseases and the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Davies, G A; Bryant, Adam R; Reynolds, John D; Jirik, Frank R; Sharkey, Keith A

    2006-01-01

    The gastrointestinal (GI) tract plays a central role in the pathogenesis of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies. These are human and animal diseases that include bovine spongiform encephalopathy, scrapie and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. They are uniformly fatal neurological diseases, which are characterized by ataxia and vacuolation in the central nervous system. Although they are known to be caused by the conversion of normal cellular prion protein to its infectious conformational isoform (PrPsc) the process by which this isoform is propagated and transported to the brain remains poorly understood. M cells, dendritic cells and possibly enteroendocrine cells are important in the movement of infectious prions across the GI epithelium. From there, PrPsc propagation requires B lymphocytes, dendritic cells and follicular dendritic cells of Peyer's patches. The early accumulation of the disease-causing agent in the plexuses of the enteric nervous system supports the contention that the autonomic nervous system is important in disease transmission. This is further supported by the presence of PrPsc in the ganglia of the parasympathetic and sympathetic nerves that innervate the GI tract. Additionally, the lymphoreticular system has been implicated as the route of transmission from the gut to the brain. Although normal cellular prion protein is found in the enteric nervous system, its role has not been characterized. Further research is required to understand how the cellular components of the gut wall interact to propagate and transmit infectious prions to develop potential therapies that may prevent the progression of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies.

  16. Ventriculoperitoneal shunt perforations of the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Thiong'o, Grace Muthoni; Luzzio, Christopher; Albright, A Leland

    2015-07-01

    OBJECT The purposes of this study were to evaluate the frequency with which children presented with ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt perforations of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, to determine the type of shunts that caused the perforations, and to compare the stiffness of perforating catheters with the stiffness of catheters from other manufacturers. METHODS Medical records were reviewed of 197 children who were admitted with VP shunt malfunction. Catheter stiffness was evaluated by measuring relative resistance to cross-sectional compression, resistance to column buckling, and elasticity in longitudinal bending. Catheter frictional force was measured per unit length. RESULTS Six children were identified whose VP shunts had perforated the GI tract; 2 shunts subsequently protruded through the anal orifice, 1 protruded through the oral cavity, and 3 presented with subcutaneous abscesses that tracked upward from the intestine to the chest. All perforating shunts were Chhabra shunts. Catheter stiffness and resistance to bending were greatest with a Medtronic shunt catheter, intermediate with a Codman catheter, and least with a Chhabra catheter. Frictional force was greatest with a Chhabra catheter and least with a Medtronic catheter. CONCLUSIONS The frequency of perforations by Chhabra shunts appears to be higher than the frequency associated with other shunts. The increased frequency does not correlate with their stiffness but may reflect their greater frictional forces.

  17. A probabilistic gastrointestinal tract dosimetry model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huh, Chulhaeng

    In internal dosimetry, the tissues of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract represent one of the most radiosensitive organs of the body with the hematopoietic bone marrow. Endoscopic ultrasound is a unique tool to acquire in-vivo data on GI tract wall thicknesses of sufficient resolution needed in radiation dosimetry studies. Through their different echo texture and intensity, five layers of differing echo patterns for superficial mucosa, deep mucosa, submucosa, muscularis propria and serosa exist within the walls of organs composing the alimentary tract. Thicknesses for stomach mucosa ranged from 620 +/- 150 mum to 1320 +/- 80 mum (total stomach wall thicknesses from 2.56 +/- 0.12 to 4.12 +/- 0.11 mm). Measurements made for the rectal images revealed rectal mucosal thicknesses from 150 +/- 90 mum to 670 +/- 110 mum (total rectal wall thicknesses from 2.01 +/- 0.06 to 3.35 +/- 0.46 mm). The mucosa thus accounted for 28 +/- 3% and 16 +/- 6% of the total thickness of the stomach and rectal wall, respectively. Radiation transport simulations were then performed using the Monte Carlo N-particle transport code (MCNP) 4C transport code to calculate S values (Gy/Bq-s) for penetrating and nonpenetrating radiations such as photons, beta particles, conversion electrons and auger electrons of selected nuclides, I123, I131, Tc 99m and Y90 under two source conditions: content and mucosa sources, respectively. The results of this study demonstrate generally good agreement with published data for the stomach mucosa wall. The rectal mucosa data are consistently higher than published data compared with the large intestine due to different radiosensitive cell thicknesses (350 mum vs. a range spanning from 149 mum to 729 mum) and different geometry when a rectal content source is considered. Generally, the ICRP models have been designed to predict the amount of radiation dose in the human body from a "typical" or "reference" individual in a given population. The study has been performed to

  18. Evaluation of the gastrointestinal tract in dogs using computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Hoey, Seamus; Drees, Randi; Hetzel, Scott

    2013-01-01

    Abdominal computed tomography (CT) studies of 19 dogs with no history or clinical signs of gastrointestinal disease, and two dogs with a histological diagnosis of gastrointestinal neoplasia were examined retrospectively. Gastrointestinal segments were evaluated subjectively for conspicuity, contrast enhancement, and wall layering after contrast medium administration. In dogs without gastrointestinal disease, there were 62.8% of gastrointestinal segments (serosa to serosa) and 77.7% of gastrointestinal walls (serosa to mucosa) visualized. Wall layering on postcontrast images was seen in 21.8% of gastrointestinal segments. There was significant association between gastrointestinal diameter and wall thickness. There was significant association between weight and gastrointestinal wall thickness in the following regions: gastric fundus, gastric body, gastric pylorus, gastric pyloric antrum, duodenal cranial flexure, jejunum and ascending colon, and between patient weight and gastrointestinal diameter in cranial duodenal flexure, descending duodenum, transverse duodenum, ascending duodenum, and jejunum. Measurements acquired from CT studies correlated well with previously published normal reference ranges for radiographic and ultrasonographic studies. Gastrointestinal neoplasia, diagnosed in two dogs, had a gastrointestinal wall thickness greater than the range of the dogs without gastrointestinal disease. Computed tomography offers identification of the gastrointestinal tract segments in dogs, allows for evaluation of gastrointestinal diameter and aids in investigation of gastrointestinal wall thickness. © 2012 Veterinary Radiology & Ultrasound.

  19. Multimodal pain stimulation of the gastrointestinal tract

    PubMed Central

    Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr; Gregersen, Hans

    2006-01-01

    Understanding and characterization of pain and other sensory symptoms are among the most important issues in the diagnosis and assessment of patient with gastrointestinal disorders. Methods to evoke and assess experimental pain have recently developed into a new area with the possibility for multimodal stimulation (e.g., electrical, mechanical, thermal and chemical stimulation) of different nerves and pain pathways in the human gut. Such methods mimic to a high degree the pain experienced in the clinic. Multimodal pain methods have increased our basic understanding of different peripheral receptors in the gut in health and disease. Together with advanced muscle analysis, the methods have increased our understanding of receptors sensitive to mechanical, chemical and temperature stimuli in diseases, such as systemic sclerosis and diabetes. The methods can also be used to unravel central pain mechanisms, such as those involved in allodynia, hyperalgesia and referred pain. Abnormalities in central pain mechanisms are often seen in patients with chronic gut pain and hence methods relying on multimodal pain stimulation may help to understand the symptoms in these patients. Sex differences have been observed in several diseases of the gut, and differences in central pain processing between males and females have been hypothesized using multimodal pain stimulations. Finally, multimodal methods have recently been used to gain more insight into the effect of drugs against pain in the GI tract. Hence, the multimodal methods undoubtedly represents a major step forward in the future characterization and treatment of patients with various diseases of the gut. PMID:16688791

  20. SnapShot: Hormones of the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Coate, Katie C; Kliewer, Steven A; Mangelsdorf, David J

    2014-12-04

    Specialized endocrine cells secrete a variety of peptide hormones all along the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, making it one of the largest endocrine organs in the body. Nutrients and developmental and neural cues trigger the secretion of gastrointestinal (GI) hormones from specialized endocrine cells along the GI tract. These hormones act in target tissues to facilitate digestion and regulate energy homeostasis. This SnapShot summarizes the production and functions of GI hormones. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. [Absorption of 249Bk from the gastrointestinal tract of rats].

    PubMed

    Zalikin, G A; Nisimov, P G

    1988-01-01

    In experiments with albino mongrel female rats a study was made of the absorption of 249Bk from the gastrointestinal tract after a single per os administration. The bulk of 249Bk (96 per cent) administered either intravenously or per os was mainly deposited in the skeleton and liver. The value of 249Bk absorption from the gastrointestinal tract by days 4 and 8 following administration was 0.05 per cent.

  2. Extensive gastrointestinal tract and thyroid involvement with Wegeners granulomatosis.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Raja Shekhar; Biyyani, Sappati; Pauskar, Privi; Fahmy, Nabil M; King, James F

    2007-01-01

    Wegeners granulomatosis (WG) is a pauci-immune systemic vasculitis involving small to medium sized blood vessels of the respiratory tract and renal vasculature. We report a 34-year-old lady with extensive gastrointestinal tract, pancreas and thyroid involvement. Literature review revealed only two prior reports of esophageal involvement, two reports of pancreatic involvement and few cases of thyroid involvement.

  3. Sonographic investigations of the gastrointestinal tract of granivorous birds.

    PubMed

    Krautwald-Junghanns, Maria-Elisabeth; Stahl, Anja; Pees, Michael; Enders, Frank; Bartels, Thomas

    2002-01-01

    This article describes the sonographic examination of the normal gastrointestinal tract of granivorous birds. Preliminary tests with dead birds were performed to get an idea of the sonographic echotexture of the avian gastrointestinal tract. Later, clinically healthy seedeaters of different weights were examined sonographically. As equipment a convex microcurved scanner with a particularly small coupling surface and an adjustable frequency from 5.5-7.5 MHz was used. For the investigation of the gastrointestinal tract, six sonographic approaches are described. After a starving time of 18 hours in the granivorous birds and water input, the best sonographic image quality could be obtained. Using this method, the crop, ventriculus, intestines, and cloaca could be demonstrated sonographically; whereas, it was not possible to visualize the normal proventriculus in granivorous birds. In contrast to mammals, the different layers of the wall of the gastrointestinal tract could not be visualized with the equipment used. Motility of individual parts of the gastrointestinal tract (GI tract), however, could be well demonstrated.

  4. Lupus Gastrointestinal Tract Vasculopathy: Lupus “Enteritis” Involving the Entire Gastrointestinal Tract from Esophagus to Rectum

    PubMed Central

    Bert, Joseph; Gertner, Elie

    2017-01-01

    Gastrointestinal symptoms are very common in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Lupus “enteritis” is very responsive to treatment but can have devastating consequences if not detected. Most descriptions of enteritis involve the small and large bowel. This is the first report of lupus “enteritis” involving the entire gastrointestinal tract from the esophagus and stomach to the rectum. Lupus “enteritis” is another cause of upper gastrointestinal involvement in SLE (involving even the esophagus and stomach) in addition to involvement of the lower intestinal tract. PMID:28203138

  5. Gastrointestinal decompression after excision and anastomosis of lower digestive tract

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Wen-Zhang; Zhao, Gao-Ping; Cheng, Zhong; Li, Ka; Zhou, Zong-Guang

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To discuss the clinical significance of postoperative gastrointestinal decompression in operation on lower digestive tract. METHODS: Three hundred and sixty-eight patients with excision and anastomosis of lower digestive tract were divided into two groups, i.e. the group with postoperative gastrointestinal decompression and the group without postoperative gastrointestinal decompression. Clinical therapeutic outcome and incidence of complication were compared between two groups. Furthermore, an investigation on application of gastrointestinal decompression was carried out among 200 general surgeons. RESULTS: The volume of gastric juice in decompression group was about 200 mL every day after operation. Both groups had a lower girth before operation than every day after operation. No difference in length of the first passage of gas by anus and defecation after operation was found between two groups. The overall incidence of complications was obviously higher in decompression group than in non-decompression group (28% vs 8.2%, P < 0.001). The incidence of pharyngolaryngitis was up to 23.1%. There was also no difference between two groups regarding the length of hospitalization after operation. The majority (97.5%) of general surgeons held that gastrointestinal decompression should be placed till passage of gas by anus, and only 2.5% of surgeons thought that gastrointestinal decompression should be placed for 2-3 d before passage of gas by anus. Nobody (0%) deemed it unnecessary for placing gastrointestinal compression after operation. CONCLUSION: Application of gastrointestinal decompression after excision and anastomosis of lower digestive tract cannot effectively reduce gastrointestinal tract pressure and has no obvious effect on preventing postoperative complications. On the contrary, it may increase the incidence of pharyngolaryngitis and other complications. Therefore, it is more beneficial to the recovery of patients without undergoing gastrointestinal

  6. Dynamics and establishment of Clostridium difficile infection in the murine gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Koenigsknecht, Mark J; Theriot, Casey M; Bergin, Ingrid L; Schumacher, Cassie A; Schloss, Patrick D; Young, Vincent B

    2015-03-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) following antibiotic therapy is a major public health threat. While antibiotic disruption of the indigenous microbiota underlies the majority of cases of CDI, the early dynamics of infection in the disturbed intestinal ecosystem are poorly characterized. This study defines the dynamics of infection with C. difficile strain VPI 10463 throughout the gastrointestinal (GI) tract using a murine model of infection. After inducing susceptibility to C. difficile colonization via antibiotic administration, we followed the dynamics of spore germination, colonization, sporulation, toxin activity, and disease progression throughout the GI tract. C. difficile spores were able to germinate within 6 h postchallenge, resulting in the establishment of vegetative bacteria in the distal GI tract. Spores and cytotoxin activity were detected by 24 h postchallenge, and histopathologic colitis developed by 30 h. Within 36 h, all infected mice succumbed to infection. We correlated the establishment of infection with changes in the microbiota and bile acid profile of the small and large intestines. Antibiotic administration resulted in significant changes to the microbiota in the small and large intestines, as well as a significant shift in the abundance of primary and secondary bile acids. Ex vivo analysis suggested the small intestine as the site of spore germination. This study provides an integrated understanding of the timing and location of the events surrounding C. difficile colonization and identifies potential targets for the development of new therapeutic strategies. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  7. Stenting of the Upper Gastrointestinal Tract: Current Status

    SciTech Connect

    Katsanos, Konstantinos; Sabharwal, Tarun Adam, Andreas

    2010-08-15

    Minimally invasive image-guided insertion of self-expanding metal stents in the upper gastrointestinal tract is the current treatment of choice for palliation of malignant esophageal or gastroduodenal outlet obstructions. A concise review is presented of contemporary stenting practice of the upper gastrointestinal tract, and the procedures in terms of appropriate patient evaluation, indications, and contraindications for treatment are analyzed, along with available stent designs, procedural steps, clinical outcomes, inadvertent complications, and future technology. Latest developments include biodegradable polymeric stents for benign disease and radioactive or drug-eluting stents for malignant obstructions.

  8. Abdomen: Retroperitoneum, peritoneum, gastrointestinal tract, kidney, and adrenal gland

    SciTech Connect

    Suen, K.C.

    1987-01-01

    In this book the author explores aspiration biopsy as it can be applied to lesions of the retroperitoneum, gastrointestinal tract, kidney, peritoneum, and adrenal gland. With experience from two different institutions - one an acute general care hospital, the other a cancer referral center - Dr. Suen has achieved in creating a text that reflects a wide range of experience. Throughout the work, Dr. Suen stresses pattern recognition of cytologic material. And a chapter on unusual and interesting lesions is included. Contents: Introduction and General Considerations; Abdomen Imaging Techniques; Clinical Relevance; Indentification of Normal ABC; retroperitoneum; Gastrointestinal Tract; Kidney; Adrenal Gland; Unusual Lesions; Immunocytochemistry and Electron Microscopy; Index.

  9. Fluoroscopic studies of the upper gastrointestinal tract: techniques and indications.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Carpintero de la Vega, M; García Villar, C

    2017-01-25

    Fluoroscopic studies of the gastrointestinal tract are becoming increasing less common due to the introduction of other imaging techniques such as computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging and to the increased availability of endoscopy. Nevertheless, fluoroscopic studies of the gastrointestinal tract continue to appear in clinical guidelines and some of their indications are still valid. These studies are dynamic, operator-dependent examinations that require training to obtain the maximum diagnostic performance. This review aims to describe the technique and bring the indications for this imaging modality up to date.

  10. Candida albicans commensalism in the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Neville, B Anne; d'Enfert, Christophe; Bougnoux, Marie-Elisabeth

    2015-11-01

    Candida albicans is a polymorphic yeast species that often forms part of the commensal gastrointestinal mycobiota of healthy humans. It is also an important opportunistic pathogen. A tripartite interaction involving C. albicans, the resident microbiota and host immunity maintains C. albicans in its commensal form. The influence of each of these factors on C. albicans carriage is considered herein, with particular focus on the mycobiota and the approaches used to study it, models of gastrointestinal colonization by C. albicans, the C. albicans genes and phenotypes that are necessary for commensalism and the host factors that influence C. albicans carriage.

  11. Gastrointestinal tract duplications: clinical, pathologic, etiologic, and radiologic considerations.

    PubMed

    Macpherson, R I

    1993-09-01

    Gastrointestinal tract duplications are uncommon congenital abnormalities. By definition, they are located in or adjacent to the wall of part of the gastrointestinal tract, have smooth muscle in their walls, and are lined by alimentary tract mucosa. The lining mucosa is not necessarily that of the adjacent segment of the gastrointestinal tract. The only clinically important ectopic tissues are gastric mucosa and pancreatic tissue. Although ectopic gastric mucosa is found in duplications at all levels of the gastrointestinal tract, it is most prevalent (43%) in esophageal duplications. Peptic ulcer within this ectopic tissue can account for unusual, often misleading symptoms. Ectopic pancreatic tissue is most common (37%) in gastric duplications and is associated with pancreatitis and elevated amylase levels. Detection of associated vertebral anomalies is a helpful clue in the radiographic diagnosis of duplications. Barium studies usually reveal an intraluminal, intramural, or extrinsic mass, and ultrasonography (US) demonstrates its cystic nature. When US findings are inconclusive, computed tomography can be used to show the true nature, location, and extent of the lesion, as well as associated vertebral anomalies and possible other duplications. Technetium-99m pertechnetate scintigraphy provides definitive evidence of a duplication when it contains ectopic gastric mucosa and is particularly useful for suspected esophageal, duodenal, and small bowel lesions.

  12. Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) receptors in the canine gastrointestinal tract

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, R.P.; Gates, T.S.; Mantyh, C.R.; Vigna, S.R.; Boehmer, C.G.; Mantyh, P.W.

    1988-11-01

    Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) is a putative neurotransmitter in both the brain and peripheral tissues. To define possible target tissues of VIP we have used quantitative receptor autoradiography to localize and quantify the distribution of /sup 125/I-VIP receptor binding sites in the canine gastrointestinal tract. While the distribution of VIP binding sites was different for each segment examined, specific VIP binding sites were localized to the mucosa, the muscularis mucosa, the smooth muscle of submucosal arterioles, lymph nodules, and the circular and longitudinal smooth muscle of the muscularis externa. These results identify putative target tissues of VIP action in the canine gastrointestinal tract. In correlation with physiological data, VIP sites appear to be involved in the regulation of a variety of gastrointestinal functions including epithelial ion transport, gastric secretion, hemodynamic regulation, immune response, esophageal, gastric and intestinal motility.

  13. Neonatal abstinence syndrome and the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Maguire, Denise; Gröer, Maureen

    2016-12-01

    Development of a healthy gut microbiome is essential in newborns to establish immunity and protection from pathogens. Recent studies suggest that infants who develop dysbiosis may be at risk for lifelong adverse health consequences. Exposure to opioid drugs during pregnancy is a factor of potential importance for microbiome health that has not yet been investigated. Since these infants are born after an entire gestation exposed to mu opioid receptor agonists and have severe gastrointestinal and neurological symptoms, we hypothesize that these infants are at risk for dysbiosis. We speculate that opioid exposure during gestation and development of NAS at birth may lead to a dysbiotic gut microbiome, which may impair normal microbiome succession and development, and impact future health of these children. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Glucosensing in the gastrointestinal tract: Impact on glucose metabolism.

    PubMed

    Fournel, Audren; Marlin, Alysson; Abot, Anne; Pasquio, Charles; Cirillo, Carla; Cani, Patrice D; Knauf, Claude

    2016-05-01

    The gastrointestinal tract is an important interface of exchange between ingested food and the body. Glucose is one of the major dietary sources of energy. All along the gastrointestinal tube, e.g., the oral cavity, small intestine, pancreas, and portal vein, specialized cells referred to as glucosensors detect variations in glucose levels. In response to this glucose detection, these cells send hormonal and neuronal messages to tissues involved in glucose metabolism to regulate glycemia. The gastrointestinal tract continuously communicates with the brain, especially with the hypothalamus, via the gut-brain axis. It is now well established that the cross talk between the gut and the brain is of crucial importance in the control of glucose homeostasis. In addition to receiving glucosensing information from the gut, the hypothalamus may also directly sense glucose. Indeed, the hypothalamus contains glucose-sensitive cells that regulate glucose homeostasis by sending signals to peripheral tissues via the autonomous nervous system. This review summarizes the mechanisms by which glucosensors along the gastrointestinal tract detect glucose, as well as the results of such detection in the whole body, including the hypothalamus. We also highlight how disturbances in the glucosensing process may lead to metabolic disorders such as type 2 diabetes. A better understanding of the pathways regulating glucose homeostasis will further facilitate the development of novel therapeutic strategies for the treatment of metabolic diseases. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  15. Glucosensing in the gastrointestinal tract: Impact on glucose metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Fournel, Audren; Marlin, Alysson; Abot, Anne; Pasquio, Charles; Cirillo, Carla; Cani, Patrice D.

    2016-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract is an important interface of exchange between ingested food and the body. Glucose is one of the major dietary sources of energy. All along the gastrointestinal tube, e.g., the oral cavity, small intestine, pancreas, and portal vein, specialized cells referred to as glucosensors detect variations in glucose levels. In response to this glucose detection, these cells send hormonal and neuronal messages to tissues involved in glucose metabolism to regulate glycemia. The gastrointestinal tract continuously communicates with the brain, especially with the hypothalamus, via the gut-brain axis. It is now well established that the cross talk between the gut and the brain is of crucial importance in the control of glucose homeostasis. In addition to receiving glucosensing information from the gut, the hypothalamus may also directly sense glucose. Indeed, the hypothalamus contains glucose-sensitive cells that regulate glucose homeostasis by sending signals to peripheral tissues via the autonomous nervous system. This review summarizes the mechanisms by which glucosensors along the gastrointestinal tract detect glucose, as well as the results of such detection in the whole body, including the hypothalamus. We also highlight how disturbances in the glucosensing process may lead to metabolic disorders such as type 2 diabetes. A better understanding of the pathways regulating glucose homeostasis will further facilitate the development of novel therapeutic strategies for the treatment of metabolic diseases. PMID:26939867

  16. Histamine Receptor Expression in the Gastrointestinal Tract of Dogs.

    PubMed

    Schwittlick, U; Junginger, J; Hahn, K; Habierski, A; Hewicker-Trautwein, M

    2017-02-01

    Histamine is an important mediator of many physiological processes including gastrointestinal function that acts via four different histamine receptors (H1R to H4R). Elevated histamine levels and increased HR messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) have been shown in humans with gastrointestinal disorders such as irritable bowel syndrome or allergic intestinal diseases. As there is limited knowledge concerning the distribution of histamine receptors (HR) in dogs, one aim of this study was to investigate the expression of histamine 1 receptor (H1R), histamine 2 receptor (H2R) and histamine 4 receptor (H4R) in the canine gastrointestinal tract at protein level using immunohistochemistry. Histamine 1 receptor, H2R and H4R were widely expressed throughout the canine gastrointestinal tract including epithelial, mesenchymal, neuronal and immune cells. In addition, in situ hybridisation was established for detecting canine H4R mRNA. Results showed H4R mRNA to be present in enterocytes, lamina propria immune cells and submucosal plexus in the duodenum and colon of nearly all investigated animals. The results elucidate the importance of HR in the canine gut and represent the basis for investigating their possible impact on canine inflammatory gastrointestinal disorders.

  17. The use of optical imaging techniques in the gastrointestinal tract

    PubMed Central

    Beg, Sabina; Wilson, Ana; Ragunath, Krish

    2016-01-01

    With significant advances in the management of gastrointestinal disease there has been a move from diagnosing advanced pathology, to detecting early lesions that are potentially amenable to curative endoscopic treatment. This has required an improvement in diagnostics, with a focus on identifying and characterising subtle mucosal changes. There is great interest in the use of optical technologies to predict histology and enable the formulation of a real-time in vivo diagnosis, a so-called ‘optical biopsy’. The aim of this review is to explore the evidence for the use of the current commercially available imaging techniques in the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:27429735

  18. [Surgical policy in gastrointestinal tract foreign bodies].

    PubMed

    Vagner, E A; Subbotin, V M; Davidov, M I; Repin, V N; Titlianova, Z A; Vorontsov, A P

    1999-01-01

    66 patients (45 males and 21 females) who have swallowed 157 foreign bodies (fragments of wire, nails, needles, hafts of spoons, et were treated). If the objects were located in the stomach and the duodenum in the absence of complications endoscopic method of treatment was preferable, with the help of which 31 objects were successfully removed and the terms of treatment were significantly decreased. Conservative treatment (diet rich in fiber and protective substances, barium sulfate administration) resulted in elimination of 58 objects by vias naturals, 53 from which were not more that 8 cm long. Evacuation of the foreign bodies was carried out only during the first 3 weeks after the swallowing. Operative treatment was carried out in 21 patients, in whom 68 foreign bodies were extracted. An urgent operation in the first 6 hours in complications due to foreign bodies (perforation, incarceration, gastrointestinal bleeding) was carried out in 13 patients. An urgent operation in terms from 6 to 24 hours of hospitalization was carried out in 6 patients with large (more that 8 cm) swallowed objects, conglomerates and bunches of foreign bodies. Early removal of these objects prevented development of complications. Elective operation was carried out in failure of conservative treatment as was in 2 patients. No lethality was registered.

  19. Infectious diseases of gastrointestinal tract in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Marsh, W W

    2000-06-01

    This article reviews the following gastrointestinal infections: esophagitis, gastritis, duodenitis including duodenal ulcers, and enteritis (gastroenteritis). The epidemiology, risk factors, microbiology and pathogenesis, diagnosis, treatment, morbidity/mortality, and prevention are discussed in relation to the most important pathogens. The symptoms and pathogenesis of esophagitis caused by Candida albicans and herpes simplex are contrasted with the symptoms of esophagitis caused by Helicobacter pylori and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). The incidence of gastritis and gastric and duodenal ulcers caused by H. pylori is discussed. The treatment regimens of H. pylori infection recommended by the CDC are presented. Endoscopic findings in esophagitis, gastritis, and duodenal ulcers are presented and discussed. The difference in symptoms caused by viral agents (Norwalk virus), bacterial agents (enterotoxigenic E. coli), and parasites (Giardia lamblia and Cryptosporidium parvum) are compared and contrasted. The symptoms of infections of the terminal small bowel caused by Salmonella and Campylobacter jejuni and the symptoms of pure colonic infection, dysentery, caused by Shigella and enteroinvasive E. coli and Entamoeba histolytica are discussed. The treatment regimens for enteritis are presented.

  20. Chewing gum bezoars of the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Milov, D E; Andres, J M; Erhart, N A; Bailey, D J

    1998-08-01

    Children have chewed gum since the Stone Age. Black lumps of prehistoric tar with human tooth impressions have been found in Northern Europe dating from approximately 7000 BC (Middle Stone Age) to 2000 BC (Bronze Age). The bite impressions suggest that most chewers were between 6 and 15 years of age. The Greeks chewed resin from the mastic tree (mastic gum). North American Indians chewed spruce gum. The first manufacturing patent for chewing gum was issued in 1869 for a natural gum, chicle, derived from the Sopadilla tree, indigenous to Central America. Chewing gum sold today is a mixture of natural and synthetic gums and resins, with added color and flavor sweetened with corn syrup and sugar. Chewing gum is big business. A significant amount of the $21 billion US candy industry sales is from chewing gums, many of which appeal almost exclusively to children. Despite the history and prevalence of gum chewing, the medical literature contains very little information about the adverse effects of chewing gum. In the present report, we briefly review gum-chewing complications and describe three children who developed intestinal tract and esophageal obstruction as a consequence of swallowing gum.

  1. Bacterial Succession in the Broiler Gastrointestinal Tract

    PubMed Central

    Lawley, Blair; Tannock, Gerald; Engberg, Ricarda M.

    2016-01-01

    A feeding trial was performed with broilers receiving a diet of wheat-based feed (WBF), maize-based feed (MBF), or maize-based concentrates supplemented with 15% or 30% crimped kernel maize silage (CKMS-15 or CKMS-30, respectively). The aim of the study was to investigate the bacterial community compositions of the crop, gizzard, ileum, and cecum contents in relation to the feeding strategy and age (8, 15, 22, 25, 29, or 36 days). Among the four dietary treatments, bacterial diversity was analyzed for MBF and CKMS-30 by 454 pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. Since the diets had no significant influence on bacterial diversity, data were pooled for downstream analysis. With increasing age, a clear succession of bacterial communities and increased bacterial diversity were observed. Lactobacillaceae (belonging mainly to the genus Lactobacillus) represented most of the Firmicutes at all ages and in all segments of the gut except the cecum. The development of a “mature” microbiota in broilers occurred during the period from days 15 to 22. Striking increases in the relative abundances of Lactobacillus salivarius (17 to 36%) and clostridia (11 to 18%), and a concomitant decrease in the relative abundance of Lactobacillus reuteri, were found in the ileum after day 15. The concentration of deconjugated bile salts increased in association with the increased populations of L. salivarius and clostridia. Both L. salivarius and clostridia deconjugate bile acids, and increases in the abundances of these bacteria might be associated with growth reduction and gastrointestinal (GI) disorders occurring in the critical period of broiler life between days 20 and 30. PMID:26873323

  2. Detecting sweet and umami tastes in the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Iwatsuki, K; Ichikawa, R; Uematsu, A; Kitamura, A; Uneyama, H; Torii, K

    2012-02-01

    Information about nutrients is a critical part of food selection in living creatures. Each animal species has developed its own way to safely seek and obtain the foods necessary for them to survive and propagate. Necessarily, humans and other vertebrates have developed special chemosensory organs such as taste and olfactory organs. Much attention, recently, has been given to the gastrointestinal (GI) tract as another chemosensory organ. Although the GI tract had been considered to be solely for digestion and absorption of foods and nutrients, researchers have recently found taste-signalling elements, including receptors, in this tissue. Further studies have revealed that taste cells in the oral cavity and taste-like cells in the GI tract appear to share common characteristics. Major receptors to detect umami, sweet and bitter are found in the GI tract, and it is now proposed that taste-like cells reside in the GI tract to sense nutrients and help maintain homeostasis. In this review, we summarize recent findings of chemoreception especially through sweet and umami sensors in the GI tract. In addition, the possibility of purinergic transmission from taste-like cells in the GI tract to vagus nerves is discussed.

  3. Practical Immunohistochemistry in Neoplastic Pathology of the Gastrointestinal Tract, Liver, Biliary Tract, and Pancreas.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hanlin L; Kim, Christopher J; Koo, Jamie; Zhou, Wendi; Choi, Eunice K; Arcega, Ramir; Chen, Zongming Eric; Wang, Huamin; Zhang, Lanjing; Lin, Fan

    2017-09-01

    - Immunomarkers with diagnostic, therapeutic, or prognostic values have been increasingly used to maximize the benefits of clinical management of patients with neoplastic diseases of the gastrointestinal tract, liver, biliary tract, and pancreas. - To review the characteristics of immunomarkers that are commonly used in surgical pathology practice for neoplasms of the gastrointestinal tract, liver, biliary tract, and pancreas, and to summarize the clinical usefulness of immunomarkers that have been discovered in recent years in these fields. - Data sources include literature review, authors' research data, and personal practice experience. - Immunohistochemistry is an indispensable tool for the accurate diagnosis of neoplastic diseases of the gastrointestinal tract, liver, biliary tract, and pancreas. Useful immunomarkers are available to help distinguish malignant neoplasms from benign conditions, determine organ origins, and subclassify neoplasms that are morphologically and biologically heterogeneous. Specific immunomarkers are also available to help guide patient treatment and assess disease aggressiveness, which are keys to the success of personalized medicine. Pathologists will continue to play a critical role in the discovery, validation, and application of new biomarkers, which will ultimately improve patient care.

  4. Ingestible wireless capsules for enhanced diagnostic inspection of gastrointestinal tract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasouli, Mahdi; Kencana, Andy Prima; Huynh, Van An; Ting, Eng Kiat; Lai, Joshua Chong Yue; Wong, Kai Juan; Tan, Su Lim; Phee, Soo Jay

    2011-03-01

    Wireless capsule endoscopy has become a common procedure for diagnostic inspection of gastrointestinal tract. This method offers a less-invasive alternative to traditional endoscopy by eliminating uncomfortable procedures of the traditional endoscopy. Moreover, it provides the opportunity for exploring inaccessible areas of the small intestine. Current capsule endoscopes, however, move by peristalsis and are not capable of detailed and on-demand inspection of desired locations. Here, we propose and develop two wireless endoscopes with maneuverable vision systems to enhance diagnosis of gastrointestinal disorders. The vision systems in these capsules are equipped with mechanical actuators to adjust the position of the camera. This may help to cover larger areas of the digestive tract and investigate desired locations. The preliminary experimental results showed that the developed platform could successfully communicate with the external control unit via human body and adjust the position of camera to limited degrees.

  5. Gastrointestinal Tract Perforation: MDCT Findings according to the Perforation Sites

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung Hwan; Jeong, Yong Yeon; Heo, Suk Hee; Kim, Jin Woong; Kang, Heoung Keun

    2009-01-01

    Our objective is to describe the characteristic CT findings of gastrointestinal (GI) tract perforations at various levels of the gastrointestinal system. It is beneficial to localize the perforation site as well as to diagnose the presence of bowel perforation for planning the correct surgery. CT has been established as the most valuable imaging technique for identifying the presence, site and cause of the GI tract perforation. The amount and location of extraluminal free air usually differ among various perforation sites. Further, CT findings such as discontinuity of the bowel wall and concentrated free air bubbles in close proximity to the bowel wall can help predict the perforation site. Multidetector CT with the multiplanar reformation images has improved the accuracy of CT for predicting the perforation sites. PMID:19182505

  6. Therapeutic upper gastrointestinal tract endoscopy in Paediatric Gastroenterology

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Imdadur; Patel, Praful; Boger, Philip; Rasheed, Shahnawaz; Thomson, Mike; Afzal, Nadeem Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Since the first report of use of endoscopy in children in the 1970s, there has seen an exponential growth in published experience and innovation in the field. In this review article we focus on modern age therapeutic endoscopy practice, explaining use of traditional as well as new and innovative techniques, for diagnosis and treatment of diseases in the paediatric upper gastrointestinal tract. PMID:25789087

  7. Clonal Evolution of Stem Cells in the Gastrointestinal Tract.

    PubMed

    Fink, Juergen; Koo, Bon-Kyoung

    The field of gastrointestinal epithelial stem cells is a rapidly developing area of adult stem cell research. The discovery of Lgr5(+) intestinal stem cells has enabled us to study many hidden aspects of the biology of gastrointestinal adult stem cells. Marked by Lgr5 and Troy, several novel endodermal stem cells have been identified in the gastrointestinal tract. A precise working model of stem cell propagation, dynamics, and plasticity has been revealed by a genetic labeling method, termed lineage tracing. This chapter introduces the reidentification of crypt base columnar cells as Lgr5(+) stem cells in the intestine. Subsequently, it will discuss dynamic clonal evolution and cellular plasticity in the intestinal stem cell zone, as well as in stem cell zones of stomach glands.

  8. Enterovirus neutralizing activity in the gastrointestinal tract of piglets.

    PubMed

    Derbyshire, J B

    1974-10-01

    Neutralizing activity against porcine enterovirus strain T80 was demonstrated in the contents of the stomach, duodenum or ileum of four piglets which were suckling dams whose milk contained neutralizing substances against the same virus. No neutralizing activity was detected in the gastrointestinal contents of an unsuckled piglet or in four weaned piglets. Extracts of intestinal tissue from each of the above piglets failed to neutralize the virus. Four weaned piglets were dosed orally with live T80 virus. From nine days after infection virus neutralizing activity was found in extracts of tissue prepared from the duodenum, jejunum, ileum, caecum and colon but not in the contents of the gastrointestinal tract and a serological response to the virus was demonstrated. No virus neutralizing activity was detected in gastrointestinal tissue or contents from four weaned piglets inoculated parenterally with live T80 virus or in four piglets dosed orally with inactivated T80 virus and these piglets did not respond serologically to the virus.

  9. Molecular predictive markers in tumors of the gastrointestinal tract

    PubMed Central

    Papadopoulou, Eirini; Metaxa-Mariatou, Vasiliki; Tsaousis, Georgios; Tsoulos, Nikolaos; Tsirigoti, Angeliki; Efstathiadou, Chrisoula; Apessos, Angela; Agiannitopoulos, Konstantinos; Pepe, Georgia; Bourkoula, Eugenia; Nasioulas, George

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal malignancies are among the leading causes of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Like all human malignancies they are characterized by accumulation of mutations which lead to inactivation of tumor suppressor genes or activation of oncogenes. Advances in Molecular Biology techniques have allowed for more accurate analysis of tumors’ genetic profiling using new breakthrough technologies such as next generation sequencing (NGS), leading to the development of targeted therapeutical approaches based upon biomarker-selection. During the last 10 years tremendous advances in the development of targeted therapies for patients with advanced cancer have been made, thus various targeted agents, associated with predictive biomarkers, have been developed or are in development for the treatment of patients with gastrointestinal cancer patients. This review summarizes the advances in the field of molecular biomarkers in tumors of the gastrointestinal tract, with focus on the available NGS platforms that enable comprehensive tumor molecular profile analysis. PMID:27895815

  10. Gastrointestinal tract access for urological natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Miakicheva, Olga; Hamilton, Zachary; Beksac, Alp T; Berquist, Sean W; Hassan, Abd-elrahman; Holden, Marc; Derweesh, Ithaar H

    2016-01-01

    We conducted a literature review of natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES), focusing on urologic procedures with gastrointestinal tract access, to update on the development of this novel surgical approach. As part of the methods, a comprehensive electronic literature search for NOTES was conducted using PubMed and Cochrane Library from March 2002 to February 2016 for papers reporting urologic procedures performed utilizing gastrointestinal tract access. A total of 11 peer-reviewed studies examining utility of gastrointestinal access for NOTES urologic procedures were noted, with the first report in 2007. The procedures reported in the studies were total/radical nephrectomy, partial nephrectomy, adrenalectomy, and prostatectomy. The transgastric approach was identified in five studies examining total/radical nephrectomy (n = 2), partial nephrectomy (n = 1), partial cystectomy (n = 1), and adrenalectomy (n = 1). Six studies evaluated transrectal approach for NOTES, describing total/radical nephrectomy (n = 3), partial nephrectomy (n = 1), robotic nephrectomy with adrenalectomy (n = 1) and prostatectomy (n = 1). Feasibility was reported in all studies. Most studies were preclinical and acute, and limited by concerns regarding restricted instrumentation and infection risk. We concluded that gastrointestinal access for urologic NOTES demonstrates promise as described by outlined feasibility studies in preclinical models. Nonetheless, clinical application awaits further advancements in surgical technology and concerns regarding infectious potential. PMID:27909547

  11. Gastrointestinal tract cancers: Genetics, heritability and germ line mutations

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Xiao-Peng

    2017-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) tract cancers that arise due to genetic mutations affect a large number of individuals worldwide. Even though many of the GI tract cancers arise sporadically, few of these GI tract cancers harboring a hereditary predisposition are now recognized and well characterized. These include Cowden syndrome, MUTYH-associated polyposis, hereditary pancreatic cancer, Lynch syndrome, Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP), attenuated FAP, serrated polyposis syndrome, and hereditary gastric cancer. Molecular characterization of the genes that are involved in these syndromes was useful in the development of genetic testing for diagnosis and also facilitated understanding of the genetic basis of GI cancers. Current knowledge on the genetics of GI cancers with emphasis on heritability and germ line mutations forms the basis of the present review. PMID:28454282

  12. Aging of the mammalian gastrointestinal tract: a complex organ system.

    PubMed

    Saffrey, M Jill

    2014-06-01

    Gastrointestinal disorders are a major cause of morbidity in the elderly population. The gastrointestinal tract is the most complex organ system; its diverse cells perform a range of functions essential to life, not only secretion, digestion, absorption and excretion, but also, very importantly, defence. The gastrointestinal tract acts not only as a barrier to harmful materials and pathogens but also contains the vast number of beneficial bacterial populations that make up the microbiota. Communication between the cells of the gastrointestinal tract and the central nervous and endocrine systems modifies behaviour; the organisms of the microbiota also contribute to this brain-gut-enteric microbiota axis. Age-related physiological changes in the gut are not only common, but also variable, and likely to be influenced by external factors as well as intrinsic aging of the cells involved. The cellular and molecular changes exhibited by the aging gut cells also vary. Aging intestinal smooth muscle cells exhibit a number of changes in the signalling pathways that regulate contraction. There is some evidence for age-associated degeneration of neurons and glia of the enteric nervous system, although enteric neuronal losses are likely not to be nearly as extensive as previously believed. Aging enteric neurons have been shown to exhibit a senescence-associated phenotype. Epithelial stem cells exhibit increased mitochondrial mutation in aging that affects their progeny in the mucosal epithelium. Changes to the microbiota and intestinal immune system during aging are likely to contribute to wider aging of the organism and are increasingly important areas of analysis. How changes of the different cell types of the gut during aging affect the numerous cellular interactions that are essential for normal gut functions will be important areas for future aging research.

  13. Bacterial Community Mapping of the Mouse Gastrointestinal Tract

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Shenghua; Chen, Dandan; Zhang, Jin-Na; Lv, Xiaoman; Wang, Kun; Duan, Li-Ping; Nie, Yong; Wu, Xiao-Lei

    2013-01-01

    Keeping mammalian gastrointestinal (GI) tract communities in balance is crucial for host health maintenance. However, our understanding of microbial communities in the GI tract is still very limited. In this study, samples taken from the GI tracts of C57BL/6 mice were subjected to 16S rRNA gene sequence-based analysis to examine the characteristic bacterial communities along the mouse GI tract, including those present in the stomach, duodenum, jejunum, ileum, cecum, colon and feces. Further analyses of the 283,234 valid sequences obtained from pyrosequencing revealed that the gastric, duodenal, large intestinal and fecal samples had higher phylogenetic diversity than the jejunum and ileum samples did. The microbial communities found in the small intestine and stomach were different from those seen in the large intestine and fecal samples. A greater proportion of Lactobacillaceae were found in the stomach and small intestine, while a larger proportion of anaerobes such as Bacteroidaceae, Prevotellaceae, Rikenellaceae, Lachnospiraceae, and Ruminococcaceae were found in the large intestine and feces. In addition, inter-mouse variations of microbiota were observed between the large intestinal and fecal samples, which were much smaller than those between the gastric and small intestinal samples. As far as we can ascertain, ours is the first study to systematically characterize bacterial communities from the GI tracts of C57BL/6 mice. PMID:24116019

  14. Cubilin expression and posttranslational modification in the canine gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Xu, D; Fyfe, J C

    2000-10-01

    Cubilin is an endocytic receptor of the apical brush border membrane that is essential for intrinsic factor-mediated cobalamin absorption in small intestine. However, cubilin is more highly expressed in kidney and yolk sac, and recent molecular characterization of the receptor has focused on these tissues. The aim of this investigation was to examine tissue-specific cubilin expression and posttranslational modifications with an emphasis on the gastrointestinal tract. Intrinsic factor-cobalamin binding activity, cubilin immunoreactivity, and cubilin mRNA levels were determined in multiple segments of canine gastrointestinal mucosa and other tissues. These aspects of cubilin expression varied in parallel, suggesting that the major determinant of regional cubilin expression in the gastrointestinal tract is modulation of cubilin mRNA. Cell fractionation indicated that ileal cubilin is not strongly membrane associated. An approximately 185-kDa brush border specific and two >400-kDa precursor forms of cubilin were identified. Asparagine-linked oligosaccharide modifications characterized by differential glycosidase digestion of affinity-purified cubilin from ileal mucosa and renal cortex differed, but ileal and renal intracellular cubilin comigrated on SDS-PAGE at approximately 400 kDa after oligosaccharide removal, thus reconciling previous conflicting size estimates of the cubilin polypeptide.

  15. A Microbiological Map of the Healthy Equine Gastrointestinal Tract

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Philip J.; Lopes, Marco A.; Perry, Sonja C.; Lanter, Hannah R.

    2016-01-01

    Horses are exquisitely sensitive to non-specific gastrointestinal disturbances as well as systemic and extraintestinal conditions related to gut health, yet minimal data are available regarding the composition of the microbiota present in the equine stomach, small intestine, and cecum and their relation to fecal microbiota. Moreover, there is minimal information regarding the concordance of the luminal and mucosal microbial communities throughout the equine gut. Illumina-based 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing of the luminal and mucosal microbiota present in seven regions of the gastrointestinal tract of nine healthy adult horses revealed a distinct compositional divide between the small and large intestines. This disparity in composition was more pronounced within the luminal contents, but was also detected within mucosal populations. Moreover, the uniformity of the gut microbiota was much higher in the cecum and colon relative to that in the stomach, jejunum and ileum, despite a significantly higher number of unique sequences detected in the colon. Collectively, the current data suggest that while colonic samples (a proxy for feces) may provide a reasonable profile of the luminal contents of the healthy equine large intestine, they are not informative with regard to the contents of the stomach or small intestine. In contrast to the distinct difference between the highly variable upper gastrointestinal tract microbiota and relatively uniform large bowel microbiota present within the lumen, these data also demonstrate a regional continuity present in mucosal microbial communities throughout the length of the equine gut. PMID:27846295

  16. Fibroblast Growth Factors in the Gastrointestinal Tract: Twists and Turns.

    PubMed

    Danopoulos, Soula; Schlieve, Christopher R; Grikscheit, Tracy C; Al Alam, Denise

    2017-02-15

    Fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) are a family of conserved peptides that play an important role in the development, homeostasis, and repair processes of many organ systems, including the gastrointestinal tract. All four FGF receptors and several FGF ligands are present in the intestine. They play important roles in controlling cell proliferation, differentiation, epithelial cell restitution, and stem cell maintenance. Several FGFs have also been proven to be protective against gastrointestinal diseases such as inflammatory bowel diseases or to aid in regeneration after intestinal loss associated with short bowel syndrome. Herein, we review the multifaceted actions of canonical FGFs in intestinal development, homeostasis, and repair in rodents and humans. Developmental Dynamics, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Mucosal immunology of tolerance and allergy in the gastrointestinal tract

    PubMed Central

    Steele, Lauren; Mayer, Lloyd; Berin, M. Cecilia

    2013-01-01

    The mucosal immune system typically exists in a state of active tolerance to food antigens and commensal bacteria. Tolerance to food proteins is induced in part by dendritic cells residing in the intestinal mucosa and implemented by regulatory T cells. Food allergy occurs when immune tolerance is disrupted and a sensitizing immune response characterized by food-specific IgE production occurs instead. Experimental food allergy in mice requires use of adjuvant or exploitation of alternate routes of sensitization to induce allergic sensitization, and can aid in understanding the mechanisms of sensitization to food allergens and the pathophysiology of gastrointestinal manifestations of food allergy. Recent work in the understanding of mucosal immunology of tolerance and allergy in the gastrointestinal tract will be discussed. PMID:22447352

  18. Effects of staphylococcal enterotoxin A on the rat gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed Central

    Beery, J T; Taylor, S L; Schlunz, L R; Freed, R C; Bergdoll, M S

    1984-01-01

    Staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA) was administered orally (15 micrograms) to two groups of rats. A marked immune reaction was evoked in the stomach and proximal small intestine of the first group. The second group of rats was used to study the absorptive fate and sites of action of orally administered SEA, utilizing immunoperoxidase staining. After oral dosing of the second group of rats. SEA-related immunoperoxidase staining was confined to: (i) neutrophils and macrophages, principally in the duodenum, and (ii) glomerular neutrophils and cells of the proximal convoluted tubules. Peroxidase staining of the kidney was noted within 15 min of exposure, indicating that SEA or some major postabsorption antigenic product can promptly pass through an intact gastrointestinal mucous membrane and become renally localized. Intestinal and renal detoxification and removal was indicated by an absence of detectable antigen in rats 180 min postexposure. Neuronal binding of SEA in the gastrointestinal tract was not demonstrable. Images PMID:6370862

  19. [Metachronous four primary malignancies in gastro-intestinal tract].

    PubMed

    Bae, Jung Min; Kim, Se Won; Kim, Sang Woon; Song, Sun Kyo

    2009-06-01

    Multiple primary malignancy was reported firstly by Billroth in 1889. Recently, multiple primary malignancies are considered to increase due to improved survival rate of cancer patients, advanced diagnostic tools, and increased use of chemotherapy and radiotherapy. In Korea, several cases of triple primary malignancies were reported. However, four primary malignancies in gastro-intestinal tract was rarely reported. Recently, we experienced a 70 year-old male who was diagnosed with metachronous four primary malignancies in rectum, ascending colon, stomach, and ampulla of Vater. We report this rare case of metachronous four primary malignancies with a review of literature.

  20. Antibacterial activity of norfloxacin in the gastrointestinal tracts of rats.

    PubMed Central

    Frimodt-Møller, P C; Jensen, K M; Madsen, P O

    1983-01-01

    The capacities of norfloxacin (MK-0366) and neomycin to reduce the numbers of bacteria in the gastrointestinal tracts of rats were evaluated. Results of a 3-day treatment with norfloxacin were compared with those of a 3-day treatment with neomycin. Both drugs significantly decreased gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria. Norfloxacin effected a significantly greater reduction in numbers of gram-negative bacteria than did neomycin. Norfloxacin also significantly increased the number of anaerobic bacteria. Although neomycin reduced gram-positive bacteria more effectively than did norfloxacin, this difference between the two drugs was not significant. Norfloxacin merits further study for potential as a bowel sterilant. PMID:6228191

  1. Cellular Organization of Neuroimmune Interactions in the Gastrointestinal Tract

    PubMed Central

    Margolis, Kara Gross; Gershon, Michael David; Bogunovic, Milena

    2016-01-01

    The gastrointestinal (GI) tract is the largest immune organ; in vertebrates, it is the only organ whose function is controlled by its own intrinsic enteric nervous system (ENS), but it is additionally regulated by extrinsic (sympathetic and parasympathetic) innervation. The GI nervous and immune systems are highly integrated in their common goal, which is to unite digestive functions with protection from ingested environmental threats. This review discusses the physiological relevance of enteric neuroimmune integration by summarizing the current knowledge of evolutionary and developmental pathways, cellular organization, and molecular mechanisms of neuroimmune interactions in health and disease. PMID:27289177

  2. Child abuse: multiple foreign bodies in gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Wadhera, Raman; Kalra, Vijay; Gulati, Sat Paul; Ghai, Anju

    2013-02-01

    The incidents of foreign body ingestion in infants and children are usually viewed as accidents, but these events may be a form of child abuse. We are reporting a case of child abuse who presented with multiple foreign bodies in the gastrointestinal tract. Physicians are required to report abuse when they have reason to believe or to suspect that it occurred. The purpose of reporting is not punishment of the perpetrator - it is the protection of the child. It is certainly in the best interest of the child, because child abuse is a recurrent and usually escalating problem that exposes the child to substantial risk.

  3. [Eubiosis and dysbiosis of gastrointestinal tract: myths and reality].

    PubMed

    Tsimmerman, Ia S

    2013-01-01

    Current data on eubiosis and dysbiosis of gastrointestinal tract are discussed along with the role of its microflora in human body under normal and pathological conditions. Certain debatable problems are discussed. Classification of colonic dysbiosis is presented with reference to its stages, functions of normal flora, "myths" related to the science of eubiosis and dysbiosis, the authors views of the problem. Diagnostic methods and their informative value are described. The main diseases and syndromes associated with intestinal dysbiosis are discussed. In conjunction with approaches to its correction.

  4. [Carcinoid tumor of gastrointestinal tract: about two clinical cases].

    PubMed

    Blasco, María Del Carmen; Boselli O, F Giuliano; Blasco, Carmelo

    2016-01-01

    Carcinoid tumors belong to the families of neuroendocrine tumors. The major sites are the gastrointestinal tract 65% and lungs 25%. The small intestine, specifically the ileum, is the most common. These tumors although rare, are more common in tumors of neuroendocrine origin gastro-entero-pancreatic. In both cases we observe the different clinical presentations that may have carcinoid tumor; in case 1 ulceration of the tumor mass causing the elimination of melena, and severe diarrhea caused by neuroendocrine secretion. Case 2 typical course, totally asymptomatic incidental finding.

  5. Treatment of vascular malformation of the gastrointestinal tract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waldschmidt, Juergen; Stroedter, L.; Doede, T.; Kischkel, A.

    2000-06-01

    Vascular malformations of the gastrointestinal tract are rare phenomenon. They are generally manifested by upper or lower GI - bleeding and do not resolve spontaneously. Emergency intervention is necessary. This paper reports on 10 cases, treated in the Dept. of Pediatric surgery of the FU Berlin, recorded from 1981 to 1999. We use the Nd:YAG laser 1064 nm, Fibertom 5100, Dornier, Germany, with a 600nm barefiber. Reduction in size of the hemangiomas and stop of the GI-bleeding was achieved in all cases.

  6. Passage of an Anterior Odontoid Screw through Gastrointestinal Tract

    PubMed Central

    Leitner, L.; Brückmann, C. I.; Gilg, M. M.; Bratschitsch, G.; Radl, R.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose. Anterior screw fixation has become a popular surgical treatment method for instable odontoid fractures. Screw loosening and migration are a rare, severe complication following anterior odontoid fixation, which can lead to esophagus perforation and requires revision operation. Methods. We report a case of screw loosening and migration after anterior odontoid fixation, which perforated the esophagus and was excreted without complications in a 78-year-old male patient. Results. A ventral dislocated anterior screw perforated through the esophagus after eight years after implantation and was excreted through the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. At a 6-month follow-up after the event the patient was asymptomatic. Conclusion. Extrusion via the GI tract is not safe enough to be considered as a treatment option for loosened screws. Some improvements could be implemented to prevent such an incident. Furthermore, this case is a fine example that recent preoperative imaging is mandatory before revision surgery for screw loosening. PMID:28194180

  7. Biology of nitrogen oxides in the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Lundberg, Jon O; Weitzberg, Eddie

    2013-04-01

    Throughout the human gastrointestinal tract a variety of reactive nitrogen oxides are continuously formed as a result of a complex interplay between the host, commensal bacteria and dietary factors. These compounds include nitric oxide, nitrite, nitrate, peroxynitrite, S-nitrosothiols, nitrated fatty acids and N-nitrosamines, all of which are bioactive with the potential to affect physiological and pathological processes locally in the gut as well as systemically after absorption. Historically, the literature has been dominated by studies on the formation of potentially carcinogenic nitrosamines, but the focus was shifted in the 1980s with the seminal discovery of the L-arginine-nitric oxide pathway and its profound impact on normal physiological functions. More recently, a nitrate-nitrite-nitric oxide pathway has been discovered, with implications for local host defence and gut mucosal integrity and, intriguingly, also for systemic regulation of cardiovascular and metabolic function. This review discusses recent advances in the understanding of the formation, biochemistry, physiology and pathophysiology of reactive nitrogen oxides in the gastrointestinal tract. In addition, opportunities for nitric oxide-based pharmacological or dietary interventions are highlighted.

  8. Progress in researches about focal adhesion kinase in gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Hao, Hui-Fang; Naomoto, Yoshio; Bao, Xiao-Hong; Watanabe, Nobuyuki; Sakurama, Kazufumi; Noma, Kazuhiro; Tomono, Yasuko; Fukazawa, Takuya; Shirakawa, Yasuhiro; Yamatsuji, Tomoki; Matsuoka, Junji; Takaoka, Munenori

    2009-12-21

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is a 125-kDa non-receptor protein tyrosine. Growth factors or the clustering of integrins facilitate the rapid phosphorylation of FAK at Tyr-397 and this in turn recruits Src-family protein tyrosine kinases, resulting in the phosphorylation of Tyr-576 and Tyr-577 in the FAK activation loop and full catalytic FAK activation. FAK plays a critical role in the biological processes of normal and cancer cells including the gastrointestinal tract. FAK also plays an important role in the restitution, cell survival and apoptosis and carcinogenesis of the gastrointestinal tract. FAK is over-expressed in cancer cells and its over-expression and elevated activities are associated with motility and invasion of cancer cells. FAK has been proposed as a potential target in cancer therapy. Small molecule inhibitors effectively inhibit the kinase activity of FAK and show a potent inhibitory effect for the proliferation and migration of tumor cells, indicating a high potential for application in cancer therapy.

  9. Eosinophilic disorders of the gastro-intestinal tract: an update.

    PubMed

    Ridolo, Erminia; Melli, Valerie; De' Angelis, Gianluigi; Martignago, Irene

    2016-01-01

    Eosinophilic diseases of the gastrointestinal tract, including eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) and eosinophilic gastroenteritis (EGE), are rare chronic pathologies of the digestive system, with an immuno-mediated pathogenesis. Recent data suggest that, together with the "classic" IgE-response to allergens, also a delayed hypersensitivity mechanism could be involved in the development of eosinophilic disorders. EoE and EGE were studied only in the latest decades and as a consequence accurate data are not yet available, concerning not only pathogenesis, but also epidemiology, treatment and outcomes. The diagnosis of EoE is centered on endoscopic findings but the certainty is obtained by histological examination from biopsy samples, that has a sensitivity of 100% when based on five samples. The currently available treatments include topical corticosteroids, specific diets and endoscopic treatment. Concerning EGE, three subtypes (mucosal, muscular, and serosal) were identified. The diagnosis is based, as for EoE, on endoscopic and histological assessment, and the treatment includes pharmacological and dietetic approaches. Further studies are warranted in order to better define the etiology and pathogenesis of eosinophilic diseases of the gastrointestinal tract, and thus to develop more appropriate and specific therapies.

  10. Halofuginone for fibrosis, regeneration and cancer in the gastrointestinal tract

    PubMed Central

    Pines, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Organ fibrosis and architectural remodeling can severely disrupt tissue function, often with fatal consequences. Fibrosis is the end result of chronic inflammatory reactions induced by a variety of stimuli, and the key cellular mediator of fibrosis comprises the myofibroblasts which, when activated, serve as the primary collagen-producing cells. Complex links exist between fibrosis, regeneration and carcinogenesis, and the concept that all organs contain common tissue fibrosis pathways that could be potential therapeutic targets is an attractive one. Because of the major impact of fibrosis on human health there is an unmet need for safe and effective therapies that directly target fibrosis. Halofuginone inhibits tissue fibrosis and regeneration, and thereby affects the development of tumors in various tissues along the gastrointestinal tract. The high efficacy of halofuginone in reducing the fibrosis that affects tumor growth and tissue regeneration is probably due to its dual role in inhibiting the signaling pathway of transforming growth factor β, on the one hand, and inhibiting the development of Th17 cells, on the other hand. At present halofuginone is being evaluated in a clinical trial for other fibrotic indication, and any clinical success in that trial would allow the use of halofuginone, also for all other fibrotic indications, including those of the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:25356039

  11. Risk Factors for Dieulafoy Lesions in the Upper Gastrointestinal Tract

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Hae Jin; Ju, Jong Seok; Kim, Ki Dae; Kim, Seok Won; Kang, Sung Hoon; Moon, Hee Seok; Sung, Jae Kyu; Jeong, Hyun Yong

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims The purpose of this study is to verify the risk factors associated with Dieulafoy lesion formation in the upper gastrointestinal tract. Methods A case-control study was performed by reviewing the electronic medical records of 42 patients who were admitted to a tertiary medical center in the Daejeon region for Dieulafoy lesions from September 2008 to October 2013, and the records of 132 patients who were admitted during the same period and who underwent endoscopic examination for reasons other than bleeding. We analyzed clinical and endoscopic findings retrospectively, and searched for risk factors associated with Dieulafoy lesion formation. Results All 42 patients diagnosed with Dieulafoy lesion had accompanying bleeding, and the location of the bleeding was proximal in 25 patients (59.5%), the middle portion in seven patients (16.7%), and distal in 10 patients (23.8%). Antiplatelet agents (p=0.022) and alcohol (p=0.001) use showed statistically significant differences between the two groups. The odds ratios (95% confidence intervals) of the two factors were 2.802 (1.263 to 6.217) and 3.938 (1.629 to 9.521), respectively. Conclusions This study showed that antiplatelet agents and alcohol consumption were risk factors associated with Dieulafoy lesion formation in the upper gastrointestinal tract. PMID:26064823

  12. Halofuginone for fibrosis, regeneration and cancer in the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Pines, Mark

    2014-10-28

    Organ fibrosis and architectural remodeling can severely disrupt tissue function, often with fatal consequences. Fibrosis is the end result of chronic inflammatory reactions induced by a variety of stimuli, and the key cellular mediator of fibrosis comprises the myofibroblasts which, when activated, serve as the primary collagen-producing cells. Complex links exist between fibrosis, regeneration and carcinogenesis, and the concept that all organs contain common tissue fibrosis pathways that could be potential therapeutic targets is an attractive one. Because of the major impact of fibrosis on human health there is an unmet need for safe and effective therapies that directly target fibrosis. Halofuginone inhibits tissue fibrosis and regeneration, and thereby affects the development of tumors in various tissues along the gastrointestinal tract. The high efficacy of halofuginone in reducing the fibrosis that affects tumor growth and tissue regeneration is probably due to its dual role in inhibiting the signaling pathway of transforming growth factor β, on the one hand, and inhibiting the development of Th17 cells, on the other hand. At present halofuginone is being evaluated in a clinical trial for other fibrotic indication, and any clinical success in that trial would allow the use of halofuginone, also for all other fibrotic indications, including those of the gastrointestinal tract.

  13. Effects of occupational stress on the gastrointestinal tract

    PubMed Central

    Huerta-Franco, María-Raquel; Vargas-Luna, Miguel; Tienda, Paola; Delgadillo-Holtfort, Isabel; Balleza-Ordaz, Marco; Flores-Hernandez, Corina

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this review is to provide a general overview of the relationship between occupational stress and gastrointestinal alterations. The International Labour Organization suggests occupational health includes psychological aspects to achieve mental well-being. However, the definition of health risks for an occupation includes biological, chemical, physical and ergonomic factors but does not address psychological stress or other affective disorders. Nevertheless, multiple investigations have studied occupational stress and its physiological consequences, focusing on specific risk groups and occupations considered stressful. Among the physiological effects of stress, gastrointestinal tract (GIT) alterations are highly prevalent. The relationship between occupational stress and GIT diseases is evident in everyday clinical practice; however, the usual strategy is to attack the effects but not the root of the problem. That is, in clinics, occupational stress is recognized as a source of GIT problems, but employers do not ascribe it enough importance as a risk factor, in general, and for gastrointestinal health, in particular. The identification, stratification, measurement and evaluation of stress and its associated corrective strategies, particularly for occupational stress, are important topics to address in the near future to establish the basis for considering stress as an important risk factor in occupational health. PMID:24244879

  14. Effects of occupational stress on the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Huerta-Franco, María-Raquel; Vargas-Luna, Miguel; Tienda, Paola; Delgadillo-Holtfort, Isabel; Balleza-Ordaz, Marco; Flores-Hernandez, Corina

    2013-11-15

    The aim of this review is to provide a general overview of the relationship between occupational stress and gastrointestinal alterations. The International Labour Organization suggests occupational health includes psychological aspects to achieve mental well-being. However, the definition of health risks for an occupation includes biological, chemical, physical and ergonomic factors but does not address psychological stress or other affective disorders. Nevertheless, multiple investigations have studied occupational stress and its physiological consequences, focusing on specific risk groups and occupations considered stressful. Among the physiological effects of stress, gastrointestinal tract (GIT) alterations are highly prevalent. The relationship between occupational stress and GIT diseases is evident in everyday clinical practice; however, the usual strategy is to attack the effects but not the root of the problem. That is, in clinics, occupational stress is recognized as a source of GIT problems, but employers do not ascribe it enough importance as a risk factor, in general, and for gastrointestinal health, in particular. The identification, stratification, measurement and evaluation of stress and its associated corrective strategies, particularly for occupational stress, are important topics to address in the near future to establish the basis for considering stress as an important risk factor in occupational health.

  15. Age-mediated changes in the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Merchant, Hamid A; Liu, Fang; Orlu Gul, Mine; Basit, Abdul W

    2016-10-30

    Physiological functions of the two extreme ends of the age spectrum, children (<18 y old) and older adults (aged 65 y and over), differ from healthy young adults. This consequently affects the pharmacokinetic profiles of administered drugs, which, in turn, impacts upon clinical practice and drug therapy. The gastrointestinal milieu acts as a distinct and vital organ regulating the dissolution, absorption and metabolism of orally ingested drugs. Age-mediated alteration in the physiology and function of the gut can reshape the pharmacokinetics of certain drugs. However, our understanding of this topic is limited. This article references the gut physiology of healthy adults to capture the available evidence in the literature on the extent and nature of the changes in childhood and older age. The gut, as an organ, is examined with regards to the effect of age on luminal fluid, microbiota, transit and motility, and the intestinal mucosa. Whilst drastic developmental changes were observed in certain aspects of the gastrointestinal environment, the examination reveals significant gaps in our knowledge in the physiology and function of the developing or ageing gut. The revelation of the unknown paves the way towards a better characterization of the human gastrointestinal tract for optimized drug therapy in children and older adults. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Gastrointestinal tract volume measurement method using a compound eye type endoscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimoto, Kayo; Yamada, Kenji; Watabe, Kenji; Kido, Michiko; Nagakura, Toshiaki; Takahashi, Hideya; Nishida, Tsutomu; Iijima, Hideki; Tsujii, Masahiko; Takehara, Tetsuo; Ohno, Yuko

    2015-03-01

    We propose an intestine volume measurement method using a compound eye type endoscope. This method aims at assessment of the gastrointestinal function. Gastrointestinal diseases are mainly based on morphological abnormalities. However, gastrointestinal symptoms are sometimes apparent without visible abnormalities. Such diseases are called functional gastrointestinal disorder, for example, functional dyspepsia, and irritable bowel syndrome. One of the major factors for these diseases is abnormal gastrointestinal motility. For the diagnosis of the gastrointestinal tract, both aspects of organic and functional assessment is important. While endoscopic diagnosis is essential for assessment of organic abnormalities, three-dimensional information is required for assessment of the functional abnormalities. Thus, we proposed the three dimensional endoscope system using compound eye. In this study, we forces on the volume of gastrointestinal tract. The volume of the gastrointestinal tract is thought to related its function. In our system, we use a compound eye type endoscope system to obtain three-dimensional information of the tract. The volume can be calculated by integrating the slice data of the intestine tract shape using the obtained three-dimensional information. First, we evaluate the proposed method by known-shape tube. Then, we confirm that the proposed method can measure the tract volume using the tract simulated model. Our system can assess the wall of gastrointestinal tract directly in a three-dimensional manner. Our system can be used for examination of gastric morphological and functional abnormalities.

  17. The sense of taste in the upper gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Kitamura, Akihiko; Tsurugizawa, Tomokazu; Uematsu, Akira; Uneyama, Hisayuki

    2014-01-01

    Digestion and the absorption of food and nutrients have been considered the only functions of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. However, recent studies suggest that taste cells in the oral cavity and taste-like cells in the GI tract share many common characteristics (taste receptors and transduction signaling). Over the last two decades, it has been revealed that the GI tract is a chemosensory organ that transfers nutrient information via GI hormone secretion (glucagon-like peptide-1, Peptide YY, oxyntomodulin, glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide and others) and the activation of abdominal vagus afferents. In addition, the information relayed via the abdominal vagus nerve plays an important role in autonomic reflexes. This information, both humoral and neural, contributes to the maintenance of homeostasis (digestion, absorption, metabolism and food intake) in the body. In this review, we provide a brief overview of the following: GI chemosensory molecules, their distribution, the effect of nutrients on GI hormone secretion and the activation of vagus afferent nerves. We also focus on the possibility of clinical applications that control abdominal vagus activity.

  18. Histopathologic diagnosis of eosinophilic conditions in the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Hurrell, Jennifer M; Genta, Robert M; Melton, Shelby D

    2011-09-01

    Eosinophils, a constitutive component of the columnar-lined gastrointestinal tract, play an essential role in allergic responses and parasitic infections. The tissue density of these cells also increases in a variety of conditions of uncertain etiology. With the exception of the esophageal squamous epithelium, in which no eosinophils are normally present, the population of normal eosinophils in the remainder of the luminal gut is poorly defined. Therefore, histopathologists must rely on their subjective judgment to determine when a diagnosis of eosinophilic gastritis, enteritis, or colitis should be rendered. Eosinophilic esophagitis is currently the best defined and most studied eosinophilic condition of the digestive tract; therefore, the confidence in accurate diagnosis is increasing. In contrast, the characteristic clinicopathologic features of eosinophilic conditions affecting other parts of the digestive tract remain somewhat elusive. This review was designed to present pathologists with simple and practical information for the biopsy-based histopathologic diagnosis of eosinophilic esophagitis, gastritis, enteritis, and colitis. It was prepared by critically reviewing more than 200 articles on the topic, along with incorporating evidence accumulated through our own collective experience. We anticipate that by increasing pathologists' confidence in reporting these abnormal but often nameless eosinophilic infiltrates, we can help better define and characterize their significance.

  19. Smoothelin expression in the gastrointestinal tract: implication in colonic inertia.

    PubMed

    Chan, Owen T M; Chiles, Lauren; Levy, Mary; Zhai, Jing; Yerian, Lisa M; Xu, Haodong; Xiao, Shu-Yuan; Soffer, Edy E; Conklin, Jeffrey L; Dhall, Deepti; Kahn, Melissa E; Balzer, Bonnie L; Amin, Mahul B; Wang, Hanlin L

    2013-10-01

    Colonic inertia is a frustrating motility disorder to patients, clinicians, and pathologists. The pathogenesis is largely unknown. The aims of this study were to: (1) characterize the expression of smoothelin, a novel smooth muscle-specific contractile protein expressed only by terminally differentiated smooth muscle cells, in the normal gastrointestinal (GI) tract; and (2) determine whether smoothelin is aberrantly expressed in patients with colonic inertia. A total of 57 resections of the normal GI tract (distal esophagus to left colon) were obtained from patients without GI motor dysfunction. Sixty-one colon resections were obtained from patients with a clinical diagnosis of colonic inertia. Smoothelin immunostaining was conducted on full-thickness tissue sections. In the nondysmotile controls, strong and diffuse cytoplasmic staining for smoothelin was observed in both the inner circular and outer longitudinal layers of the muscularis propria (MP) throughout the entire GI tract. The muscularis mucosae (MM) and muscular vessel walls were either completely negative or only patchily and weakly stained. The 1 exception to this pattern was observed in the distal esophagus, in which the MM was also diffusely and strongly stained. In cases with colonic inertia, a moderate to marked reduction of smoothelin immunoreactivity was observed in 15 of 61 (24.6%) colon resections, selectively seen in the outer layer of the MP. The data demonstrate that smoothelin is differentially expressed in the MP and MM of the normal GI tract and suggest that defective smoothelin expression may play a role in the pathogenesis of colonic inertia in a subset of patients.

  20. Persistence and reactivation of human adenoviruses in the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Kosulin, K; Geiger, E; Vécsei, A; Huber, W-D; Rauch, M; Brenner, E; Wrba, F; Hammer, K; Innerhofer, A; Pötschger, U; Lawitschka, A; Matthes-Leodolter, S; Fritsch, G; Lion, T

    2016-04-01

    Reactivation of persistent human adenoviruses (HAdVs) is associated with high morbidity and mortality in paediatric haematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) recipients. Although invasive HAdV infections mainly arise from the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, the specific sites of HAdV persistence are not well characterised. We prospectively screened biopsies from 143 non-HSCT paediatric patients undergoing GI endoscopy and monitored serial stool specimens from 148 paediatric HSCT recipients for the presence of HAdV by real-time PCR. Persistence of HAdV in the GI tract was identified in 31% of children, with the highest prevalence in the terminal ileum. In situ hybridisation and immunohistochemistry identified HAdV persistence in lymphoid cells of the lamina propria, whereas biopsies from five transplant recipients revealed high numbers of replicating HAdV in intestinal epithelial cells. The prevalence of HAdV species, the frequencies of persistence in the GI tract and reactivations post transplant indicated a correlation of intestinal HAdV shedding pre-transplant with high risk of invasive infection. HAdV persistence in the GI tract is a likely origin of infectious complications in immunocompromised children. Intestinal lymphocytes represent a reservoir for HAdV persistence and reactivation, whereas the intestinal epithelium is the main site of viral proliferation preceding dissemination. The findings have important implications for assessing the risk of life-threatening invasive HAdV infections. Copyright © 2015 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Nodular lymphoid hyperplasia in the gastrointestinal tract in adult patients: A review.

    PubMed

    Albuquerque, Andreia

    2014-11-16

    Nodular lymphoid hyperplasia of the gastrointestinal tract is characterized by the presence of multiple small nodules, normally between between 2 and 10 mm in diameter, distributed along the small intestine (more often), stomach, large intestine, or rectum. The pathogenesis is largely unknown. It can occur in all age groups, but primarily in children and can affect adults with or without immunodeficiency. Some patients have an associated disease, namely, common variable immunodeficiency, selective IgA deficiency, Giardia infection, or, more rarely, human immunodeficiency virus infection, celiac disease, or Helicobacter pylori infection. Nodular lymphoid hyperplasia generally presents as an asymptomatic disease, but it may cause gastrointestinal symptoms like abdominal pain, chronic diarrhea, bleeding or intestinal obstruction. A diagnosis is made at endoscopy or contrast barium studies and should be confirmed by histology. Its histological characteristics include markedly hyperplasic, mitotically active germinal centers and well-defined lymphocyte mantles found in the lamina propria and/or in the superficial submucosa, distributed in a diffuse or focal form. Treatment is directed towards associated conditions because the disorder itself generally requires no intervention. Nodular lymphoid hyperplasia is a risk factor for both intestinal and, very rarely, extraintestinal lymphoma. Some authors recommend surveillance, however, the duration and intervals are undefined.

  2. Foreign Material in the Gastrointestinal Tract: Cocaine Packets

    PubMed Central

    Kucukmetin, Nurten Turkel; Gucyetmez, Bulent; Poyraz, Tuncer; Yildirim, Sadik; Boztas, Gungor; Tozun, Nurdan

    2014-01-01

    Smuggling drugs by swallowing or inserting into a body cavity is not only a serious and growing international crime, but can also lead to lethal medical complications. The most common cause of death in ‘body packers’, people transporting drugs by ingesting a packet into the gastrointestinal tract, is acute drug toxicity from a ruptured packet. However, more than 30 years after the initial report of body packing, there is still no definitive treatment protocol for the management of this patient group. The treatment strategy is determined according to the particular condition of the patient and the clinical experience of the treatment center. Surgical intervention is also less common now, due to both the use of improved packaging materials among smugglers and a shift towards a more conservative medical approach. Herein, we report a case of toxicity from ingested packets of cocaine that leaked and, despite surgery, resulted in exitus of the patient. PMID:24574951

  3. Stenting of the Lower Gastrointestinal Tract: Current Status

    SciTech Connect

    Katsanos, Konstantinos; Sabharwal, Tarun Adam, Andreas

    2011-06-15

    Colon obstruction due to colorectal cancer is a major surgical emergency. Patients with acute bowel obstruction are usually poor surgical candidates with 10-20% operative mortality and 40-50% operative morbidity rates. Colorectal stenting is an image-guided, minimally invasive procedure, and typical indications include either palliation of inoperable malignant disease or temporary bowel decompression as a bridge to surgery. Colorectal stenting allows the patient to recover before definite elective surgical resection, reducing perioperative morbidity and mortality, overall hospital stay, and associated health care costs. Palliative stenting improves quality of life compared to surgery. A concise review is provided of contemporary stenting practice of the lower gastrointestinal tract, the colon in particular, and both palliative and preoperative adjuvant procedures are evaluated in terms of relevant patient oncology, insertion technique, available stent designs, technical and clinical outcomes, associated complications, and cost-benefit analysis.

  4. Neurogenic inflammation in the gastrointestinal tract of the rat.

    PubMed

    Sann, H; Dux, M; Schemann, M; Jancsó, G

    1996-11-29

    In contrast to the skin and some visceral organs the capability of capsaicin-sensitive sensory nerves of evoking an inflammatory response in the gastrointestinal tract is equivocal. We have therefore investigated the neurogenic plasma extravasation induced by local application of capsaicin to the stomach, duodenum, jejunum, ileum and colon of the rat. Permeable vessels were visualised histologically with the vascular labelling technique using colloidal silver. In the smooth muscle layer of the small intestine, capsaicin elicited a 3-fold increase in the density of labelled blood vessels (diameter, 7-35 microns). Significant capsaicin-evoked plasma extravasation was also observed in the submucosa of the jejunum and ileum, and in the basal layer of the jejunal mucosa. Capsaicin-induced extravasation was not noted in the stomach and the colon. The data suggest the involvement of capsaicin-sensitive afferents in inflammatory processes in the rat small intestine.

  5. Runx3 expression in gastrointestinal tract epithelium: resolving the controversy.

    PubMed

    Ito, K; Inoue, K-i; Bae, S-C; Ito, Y

    2009-03-12

    We reported earlier that RUNX3 is expressed in human and mouse gastrointestinal tract (GIT) epithelium and that it functions as a tumor suppressor in gastric and colorectal tissues. However, there have been conflicting reports describing the absence of Runx3 in GIT epithelial cells. A part of the controversy may be derived from the use of a specific antibody by other groups (referred to as G-poly). Here, we show further evidence to support our earlier observations and provide a possible explanation for this apparent controversy. We generated multiple anti-RUNX3 monoclonal antibodies and found that RUNX3 antibodies recognizing the RUNX3 N-terminal region (residues 1-234) react with RUNX3 in gastric epithelial cells, whereas those recognizing the C-terminal region (beyond residue 234) did not. G-poly primarily recognizes the region beyond 234 and hence, is unable to detect Runx3 in this tissue.

  6. Review of the gastrointestinal tract: from macro to micro.

    PubMed

    Reed, Kathleen K; Wickham, Rita

    2009-02-01

    To review the normal anatomy and physiology of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, the malignant transformations in GI cancers, and the rationale for targeted therapy for these cancers. Published articles, book chapters and web sources. Oncology nurses require an understanding of normal GI anatomy and physiology, along with an understanding of malignant transformations at the cellular and molecular level, to effectively educate and care for the patient with a diagnosis of a GI cancer. Challenges for the oncology nurse include continuing education related to GI cancer, the development of effective patient education skills, ensuring safe administration of oral agents and remaining current regarding GI clinical trial opportunities. Education of nursing colleagues, development of an area of expertise through specialization, and development of leadership skills are opportunities associated with practicing in the dynamic environment of oncology nursing.

  7. Development of cholecystokinin binding sites in rat upper gastrointestinal tract

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, P.H.; Moran, T.H.; Goldrich, M.; McHugh, P.R.

    1987-04-01

    Autoradiography using /sup 125/I-labeled Bolton Hunter-CCK-33 was used to study the distribution of cholecystokinin binding sites at different stages of development in the rat upper gastrointestinal tract. Cholecystokinin (CCK) binding was present in the distal stomach, esophagus, and gastroduodenal junction in the rat fetus of gestational age of 17 days. In the 20-day fetus, specific binding was found in the gastric mucosa, antral circular muscle, and pyloric sphincter. Mucosal binding declined during postnatal development and had disappeared by day 15. Antral binding declined sharply between day 10 and day 15 and disappeared by day 50. Pyloric muscle binding was present in fetal stomach and persisted in the adult. Pancreatic CCK binding was not observed before day 10. These results suggest that CCK may have a role in the control of gastric emptying and ingestive behavior in the neonatal rat.

  8. Otilonium bromide: a selective spasmolytic for the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Evangelista, S

    1999-01-01

    Experimental studies have shown that otilonium bromide (OB) inhibits both baseline and chemically or physically stimulated gastrointestinal motility. The spasmolytic activity of OB in the gastrointestinal tract occurs at doses that do not affect gastric secretion or produce typical atropine-like side-effects. The mechanism of action is composite: interference with calcium ion movement from intra- and extracellular sites; blockade of calcium channels; and binding to muscarinic receptors and tachykinin neurokinin-2 receptors. Pharmacokinetic studies have shown that OB accumulates in the lower intestine and has poor systemic absorption. Clinical studies have confirmed OB as a potent spasmolytic drug with a good tolerability profile. Studies in patients with irritable bowel syndrome demonstrated OB to be superior to placebo and reference drugs in parameters such as pain, abdominal distension and motility. The composite and local mechanism of OB action reduces hypermotility and modulates visceral sensation: factors thought to be responsible for pain improvement recorded in clinical trials. The compound is marketed worldwide and no serious adverse events have been reported as yet, confirming its excellent tolerability.

  9. Obesity and the gastrointestinal tract: you are what you eat.

    PubMed

    Wolfe, M Michael; Boylan, Michael O

    2014-01-01

    Obesity represents a complex multifactorial syndrome that develops from interactions among genetic and environmental factors and is a leading cause of illness and death. The prevalence of obesity in the United States has increased dramatically since 1975. Although often ignored, the gastrointestinal tract, and the gastrointestinal regulatory peptides in particular, constitutes an ideal starting point for defining and investigating obesity as it represents the route by which all nutrients are ingested, processed, and absorbed. Another important factor to consider when evaluating the etiology of obesity is the capacity for all animals to store nutrients. Insulin is the most potent anabolic hormone, and it appears to have evolved from the need to maximize energy efficiency, obviating the requirement to continuously forage for food. Organisms expressing this important peptide possessed a distinct survival advantage and flourished. During the course of evolution, insulin biosynthesis translocated from the intestine to pancreatic islets, which necessitated a messenger from the intestine to complete the "enteroinsular axis." The eventual development of glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) and other incretins fulfilled this requirement. GIP appears to offer an additional survival benefit by not only stimulating intestinal glucose transport and maximally releasing insulin to facilitate nutrient storage but also by its insulin-mimetic properties, including enhanced uptake of glucose by adipocytes. This physiological redundancy offered by insulin and GIP ensured the survival of organisms during times when food was scarce. As food is no longer scarce, at least in the West, this survival advantage appears to have contributed to the current obesity epidemic.

  10. Influence of Bacillus subtilis C-3102 on microbiota in a dynamic in vitro model of the gastrointestinal tract simulating human conditions.

    PubMed

    Hatanaka, M; Nakamura, Y; Maathuis, A J H; Venema, K; Murota, I; Yamamoto, N

    2012-09-01

    Survival and germination rate of Bacillus subtilis C-3102 spores were investigated in a stomach and small intestine model (TIM-1), while the impact of C-3102 cells that had passed through TIM-1 on human colon microbiota was evaluated in a model of the large intestine (TIM-2). The survival of C-3102 spores in TIM-1 was 99%; 8% of the spores had germinated. Effluent of TIM-1 was subsequently introduced into TIM-2 and a micro-array platform was employed to assess changes in the microbiota composition. The effluent, which contained germinated C-3102 cells, increased some Bifidobacterium species and decreased some Clostridium groups. These changes were greater compared to those obtained by adding C-3102 spores directly to TIM-2. The present study suggests that oral doses of B. subtilis C-3102 spores have the potential to modulate the human colon microbiota. This effect may be caused by germination of the spores in the gastrointestinal tract.

  11. PET/MR Imaging in Cancers of the Gastrointestinal Tract.

    PubMed

    Paspulati, Raj Mohan; Gupta, Amit

    2016-10-01

    PET/computed tomography (PET/CT) is an established hybrid imaging technique for staging and follow-up of gastrointestinal (GI) tract malignancies, especially for colorectal carcinoma. Dedicated hybrid PET/MR imaging scanners are currently available for clinical use. Although they will not replace regular use of PET/CT, they may have utility in selected cases of GI tract malignancies. The superior soft tissue contrast resolution and depiction of anatomy and the functional information obtained from diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) provided by MR imaging in PET/MR imaging are advantages over CT of PET/CT for T staging and follow-up of rectal carcinoma and for better characterization of liver lesions. Functional information from DWI and use of liver-specific MR imaging contrast agents are an added advantage in follow-up of liver metastases after systemic and locoregional treatment. New radiotracers will improve the utility of PET/MR imaging in staging and follow-up of tumors, which may not be [18F]-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose avid, such as hepatocellular carcinoma and neuroendocrine tumors. PET/MR imaging also has application in selected cases of cholangiocarcinoma, gallbladder cancer, and pancreatic carcinoma for initial staging and follow-up assessment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Stability of orally administered immunoglobulin in the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeongmin; Kang, Hae-Eun; Woo, Hee-Jong

    2012-10-31

    Oral administration of immunoglobulin in the colostrum or egg yolk has been considered an effective tool for preventing enterobacterial infection via passive immunization. During this process, the transmission and residence of the active immunoglobulin are the most important conditions for successful protection. We investigated the stability of encapsulated colostrum and egg yolk immunoglobulin for the effective transmission of immunoglobulin in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. First, we measured GI transit time. Contrast media passed through and reached the stomach within 10 min, the small intestine within 3.5 h, and the cecum within 5 h. Both the encapsulated colostrum containing anti-hepatitis A virus (HAV) antibody (IgG) and egg yolk with anti-rotavirus antibody (IgY) showed lower antibody activity than the non-encapsulated colostrum did in the stomach after administration; however, significantly higher antibody activities were observed in the encapsulated groups than in the non-encapsulated groups in the small intestine 3.5 h after the administration. In the large intestine, the antibody activities of the encapsulated groups were maintained or slightly increased in a time-dependent manner; however, the titers of each non-capsulated control were as low as the negative controls. Therefore, this encapsulation is considered a useful tool for the delivery of active antibody through the GI tract.

  13. A systematic review: perivascular epithelioid cell tumor of gastrointestinal tract

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zehong; Han, Siqi; Wu, Jialin; Xiong, Minmin; Huang, Yanqiao; Chen, Jianhui; Yuan, Yujie; Peng, Jianjun; Song, Wu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Perivascular epithelioid cell tumor (PEComa) is a rare entity with distinctive morphology and of expressing myomelanocytic markers. Gastrointestinal tract (GI) is one of the most common anatomic sites of origin and counts for 20% to 25% of all reported cases of perivascular epithelioid cell tumors not otherwise specified (PEComas-NOS). However, the biologic behavior of perivascular epithelioid cell tumors of gastrointestinal tract (GI PEComas-NOS) is still unclear. The aim of conducting this systematic review is to sum up what is known so far of the epidemiology, natural history, management and prognosis of GI PEComas-NOS. A systematic research was performed on PubMed and EMBASE using the following terms: (“perivascular epithelioid cell tumor” or “PEComa”) and (“gastrointestinal tract” or “GI” or “oral ” or “mouth” or “esophagus” or “gullet” or “gastric” or “stomach” or “duodenum” or “jejunum” or “ileum” or “cecum” or “colon” or “colorectal” or “sigmoid” or “rectum” or “anus” or “mesentery”) up to December 1, 2015. Retrieved GI PEComas-NOS publications, which included these terms, contains case reports, case series to case characteristic researches. A total of 168 articles were reviewed, 41 GI PEComa-NOS English studies among which were retrieved for analysis. We reviewed epidemiology, natural history, management and prognosis of GI PEComa-NOS. Generally GI PEComa-NOS is believed to have women predomination. The most frequently involved location is colon with non-specific clinical signs. Pathologically, GI PEComas-NOS shows epithelioid predominance (70%), meanwhile coexpresses melanocytic and muscle markers characteristically, while immunohistochemistry is a useful tool for identify, which indicates that HMB-45 is regarded as the most sensitive reagent. Complete resection served as mainstay of treatment, while chemotherapy should be unanimously considered to apply in malignant

  14. Differential susceptibilities to azithromycin treatment of chlamydial infection in the gastrointestinal tract and cervix

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Evidence from animal studies suggests that chlamydiae may persist in the gastrointestinal tract (GI) and be a reservoir for reinfection of the genital tract. We hypothesize that there may be a differential susceptibility of organisms in the GI and genital tracts. To determine the effect of azithromy...

  15. A pragmatic approach to vasculitis in the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Chetty, Runjan; Serra, Stefano

    2017-06-01

    Although vasculitis involving the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) is an uncommon occurrence, occasionally vasculitis can present as haemorrhagic infarction or ischaemia for which a length of bowel is removed. Invariably, the appropriate clinical history is not forthcoming, or vasculitis is not clinically suspected. The purpose of this overview is to provide the practising gastrointestinal (GI) pathologist with a framework to recognise and diagnose vasculitides within the GIT. The classification may be approached by aetiological agent or size of vessel involved; an international consensus group now favours the latter approach. The symptoms that systemic and/or localised vasculitis may cause in the GIT are protean and non-specific. As a result, pathologists examining resection specimens for unexplained haemorrhagic infarction or ischaemia should be aware that vasculitis may be a potential cause. Several well-known systemic vasculitides such as polyarteritis nodosa, microscopic polyangiitis, eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis or Churg-Strauss syndrome and granulomatosis with polyangiitis or Wegener's granulomatosis can occur in the GIT. The latter three constitute the antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-positive vasculitides. In addition, the so-called solitary organ vasculitis (SOV) can occur in the GIT as the harbinger of later onset systemic vasculitis, and be the cause of the GIT symptoms. In addition, SOV can occur incidentally and coexist with GIT disease such as gallstones or polyps, and there may be no manifestations of systemic vasculitis for years, or not at all. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  16. Telocytes express PDGFRα in the human gastrointestinal tract

    PubMed Central

    Vannucchi, Maria-Giuliana; Traini, Chiara; Manetti, Mirko; Ibba-Manneschi, Lidia; Faussone-Pellegrini, Maria-Simonetta

    2013-01-01

    Telocytes (TC), a cell population located in the connective tissue of many organs of humans and laboratory mammals, are characterized by a small cell body and extremely long and thin processes. Different TC subpopulations share unique ultrastructural features, but express different markers. In the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, cells with features of TC were seen to be CD34-positive/c-kit-negative and several roles have been proposed for them. Other interstitial cell types with regulatory roles described in the gut are the c-kit-positive/CD34-negative/platelet-derived growth factor receptor α (PDGFRα)-negative interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) and the PDGFRα-positive/c-kit-negative fibroblast-like cells (FLC). As TC display the same features and locations of the PDGFRα-positive cells, we investigated whether TC and PDGFRα-positive cells could be the same cell type. PDGFRα/CD34, PDGFRα/c-kit and CD34/c-kit double immunolabelling was performed in full-thickness specimens from human oesophagus, stomach and small and large intestines. All TC in the mucosa, submucosa and muscle coat were PDGFRα/CD34-positive. TC formed a three-dimensional network in the submucosa and in the interstitium between muscle layers, and an almost continuous layer at the submucosal borders of muscularis mucosae and circular muscle layer. Moreover, TC encircled muscle bundles, nerve structures, blood vessels, funds of gastric glands and intestinal crypts. Some TC were located within the muscle bundles, displaying the same location of ICC and running intermingled with them. ICC were c-kit-positive and CD34/PDGFRα-negative. In conclusion, in the human GI tract the TC are PDGFRα-positive and, therefore, might correspond to the FLC. We also hypothesize that in human gut, there are different TC subpopulations probably playing region-specific roles. PMID:24151977

  17. Boundaries, junctions and transitions in the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    San Roman, Adrianna K; Shivdasani, Ramesh A

    2011-11-15

    Contiguous regions along the mammalian gastrointestinal tract, from the esophagus to the rectum, serve distinct digestive functions. Some organs, such as the esophagus and glandular stomach or the small bowel and colon, are separated by sharp boundaries. The duodenal, jejunal and ileal segments of the small intestine, by contrast, have imprecise borders. Because human esophageal and gastric cancers frequently arise in a background of tissue metaplasia and some intestinal disorders are confined to discrete regions, it is useful to appreciate the molecular and cellular basis of boundary formation and preservation. Here we review the anatomy and determinants of boundaries and transitions in the alimentary canal with respect to tissue morphology, gene expression, and, especially, transcriptional control of epithelial identity. We discuss the evidence for established and candidate molecular mechanisms of boundary formation, including the solitary and combinatorial actions of tissue-restricted transcription factors. Although the understanding remains sparse, genetic studies in mice do provide insights into dominant mechanisms and point the way for future investigation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Vascular lesions of the liver and gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Van Beers, B E; Danse, E M

    2002-01-01

    In the liver, imaging can show lesions of large and medium-sized vessels, perfusion disorders related to vascular lesions, and parenchymal lesions including infarcts, regenerative nodules, and focal nodular hyperplasia. In the gastrointestinal tract, vascular lesions often result in bowel ischemia. Imaging can be used to show the vascular lesions and bowel wall abnormalities, including mural thickening, lack of perfusion, and pneumatosis. Doppler sonography, multislice helical computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, and angiography are useful to demonstrate vascular lesions. Doppler sonography offers high spatial and temporal resolution. Information about blood flow and velocity can be obtained. However, the visualization of retroperitoneal vessels is often limited because of intestinal gas. A global view of the abdominal vasculature can be observed by using helical CT. High spatial and temporal resolution are obtained, especially when new multislice CT scanners are used. MR imaging has a better contrast resolution than CT, but its spatial resolution is lower. MR imaging can also be used to measure flow with phase contrast methods. The role of arteriography in the diagnosis of vascular lesions is decreasing. However, its role remains important to definitively demonstrate obstruction of the hepatic artery and to show arterial lesions in acute mesenteric ischemia. In addition, it is used as a problem-solving method to detect lesions in medium-sized vessels and to guide intravascular treatment.

  19. Boundaries, Junctions and Transitions in the Gastrointestinal Tract

    PubMed Central

    San Roman, Adrianna K.; Shivdasani, Ramesh A.

    2011-01-01

    Contiguous regions along the mammalian gastrointestinal tract, from the esophagus to the rectum, serve distinct digestive functions. Some organs, such as the esophagus and glandular stomach or the small bowel and colon, are separated by sharp boundaries. The duodenal, jejunal and ileal segments of the small intestine, by contrast, have imprecise borders. Because human esophageal and gastric cancers frequently arise in a background of tissue metaplasia and some intestinal disorders are confined to discrete regions, it is useful to appreciate the molecular and cellular basis of boundary formation and preservation. Here we review the anatomy and determinants of boundaries and transitions in the alimentary canal with respect to tissue morphology, gene expression, and, especially, transcriptional control of epithelial identity. We discuss the evidence for established and candidate molecular mechanisms of boundary formation, including the solitary and combinatorial actions of tissue-restricted transcription factors. Although the understanding remains sparse, genetic studies in mice do provide insights into dominant mechanisms and point the way for future investigation. PMID:21802415

  20. Mechanisms of cadmium carcinogenicity in the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Bishak, Yaser Khaje; Payahoo, Laleh; Osatdrahimi, Alireza; Nourazarian, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    Cancer, a serious public health problem in worldwide, results from an excessive and uncontrolled proliferation of the body cells without obvious physiological demands of organs. The gastrointestinal tract, including the esophagus, stomach and intestine, is a unique organ system. It has the highest cancer incidence and cancer- related mortality in the body and is influenceed by both genetic and environmental factors. Among the various chemical elements recognized in the nature, some of them including zinc, iron, cobalt, and copper have essential roles in the various biochemical and physiological processes, but only at low levels and others such as cadmium, lead, mercury, arsenic, and nickel are considered as threats for human health especially with chronic exposure at high levels. Cadmium, an environment contaminant, cannot be destroyed in nature. Through impairment of vitamin D metabolism in the kidney it causes nephrotoxicity and subsequently bone metabolism impairment and fragility. The major mechanisms involved in cadmium carcinogenesis could be related to the suppression of gene expression, inhibition of DNA damage repair, inhibition of apoptosis, and induction of oxidative stress. In addition, cadmium may act through aberrant DNA methylation. Cadmium affects multiple cellular processes, including signal transduction pathways, cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. Down-regulation of methyltransferases enzymes and reduction of DNA methylation have been stated as epigenetic effects of cadmium. Furthermore, increasing intracellular free calcium ion levels induces neuronal apoptosis in addition to other deleterious influence on the stability of the genome.

  1. [Treatment of external postoperative fistulas of the gastrointestinal tract].

    PubMed

    Urbanowicz, K; Malinowski, P

    1997-01-01

    In the years 1985-1996 82 patients with postoperative external fistulas of gastrointestinal tract (pefgt) were treated in the Department of General Surgery of Hospital in Olsztyn. The age of the patient varied from 18 to 70 years. 37 patients were women and 45 man. Volume of excreted fluid fluctuated from 100 ml to 3000 ml per day. The most frequent cause of pefgt was dehiscence of the anastomosis of jejunum in 31 patients, and operations of complications of gastric or duodenal ulcer disease in 30 patients. 54 patients underwent medical treatment. It was based on compensation of disorders in water and electrolyte balance and acid-base equilibrium, nutritional treatment, protection of the skin, suction of the excreted fluid, controlling of foci of infection, rehabilitation. 7 patients were reoperated for the purpose of closing the fistula and 21 to drain abscess or to stop bleeding. 57 (70%) out of 82 patients recovered, 25 (30%) died. In this number 14 patients among 54 treated conservatively and 11 out from 28 operated. The most frequent cause of death was sepsis (15 patients). The conservative treatment including TPN is successful in majority of patients with pefgt and indispensable in patients treated operatively. Special attention should be given for coexisting intraperitoneal abscessa, peritonitis and sepsis.

  2. The gastrointestinal tract microbiota of the Japanese quail, Coturnix japonica.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Ngare; Hughes, Robert J; Aspden, William J; Chapman, James; Moore, Robert J; Stanley, Dragana

    2016-05-01

    Microbiota in the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) plays an essential role in the health and well-being of the host. With the exception of chickens, this area has been poorly studied within birds. The avian GIT harbours unique microbial communities. Birds require rapid energy bursts to enable energy-intensive flying. The passage time of feed through the avian GIT is only 2-3.5 h, and thus requires the presence of microbiota that is extremely efficient in energy extraction. This investigation has used high-throughput 16S rRNA gene sequencing to explore the GIT microbiota of the flighted bird, the Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica). We are reporting, for the first time, the diversity of bacterial phylotypes inhabiting all major sections of the quail GIT including mouth, esophagus, crop, proventriculus, gizzard, duodenum, ileum, cecum, large intestine and feces. Nine phyla of bacteria were found in the quail GIT; however, their distribution varied significantly between GIT sections. Cecal microbiota was the most highly differentiated from all the other communities and showed highest richness at an OTU level but lowest richness at all other taxonomic levels being comprised of only 15 of total 57 families in the quail GIT. Differences were observed in the presence and absence of specific phylotypes between sexes in most sections.

  3. Antimicrobial Probiotics Reduce Salmonella enterica in Turkey Gastrointestinal Tracts

    PubMed Central

    Forkus, Brittany; Ritter, Seth; Vlysidis, Michail; Geldart, Kathryn; Kaznessis, Yiannis N.

    2017-01-01

    Despite the arsenal of technologies employed to control foodborne nontyphoidal Salmonella (NTS), infections have not declined in decades. Poultry is the primary source of NTS outbreaks, as well as the fastest growing meat sector worldwide. With recent FDA rules for phasing-out antibiotics in animal production, pressure is mounting to develop new pathogen reduction strategies. We report on a technology to reduce Salmonella enteritidis in poultry. We engineered probiotic E. coli Nissle 1917, to express and secrete the antimicrobial peptide, Microcin J25. Using in vitro experiments and an animal model of 300 turkeys, we establish the efficacy of this technology. Salmonella more rapidly clear the ceca of birds administered the modified probiotic than other treatment groups. Approximately 97% lower Salmonella carriage is measured in a treated group, 14 days post-Salmonella challenge. Probiotic bacteria are generally regarded as safe to consume, are bile-resistant and can plausibly be modified to produce a panoply of antimicrobial peptides now known. The reported systems may provide a foundation for platforms to launch antimicrobials against gastrointestinal tract pathogens, including ones that are multi-drug resistant. PMID:28094807

  4. [Candida and the gastrointestinal tract. A medical-research evaluation].

    PubMed

    Nolting, S; Stanescu-Siegmund, A; Schwantes, P A

    1998-02-28

    In immunocompetent persons, Candida species are members of the normal flora of the gastrointestinal tract. Budding yeasts, in particular Candida albicans, can, however, in patients with a corresponding disposition, spread topically and systemically, that is, they may become pathogenic. In hematological/oncological patients with severe immunodeficiency, for example, the mycelium may infiltrate the muscularis mucosae, with involvement also of the vascular system. The relationships between recurrent diarrhea and Candida are still discussed controversial; various data do, however, suggest that massive colonization with Candida might well represent a(n additional) diarrhea-provoking factor. Similar considerations may also be assumed to apply to diarrhea induced by antibiotic therapy. For immunocompetent persons, guidelines exist for the yeast cell count in the stools. The interpretation of quantitative findings must, however, always be made on an individual basis and against the background of clinical symptoms and/or any particular predisposition of the patient. Reliable treatment of superficial candidasis can be achieved with oral polyene antifungal antibiotics (nystatin, amphotericin B).

  5. Bacillus subtilis isolated from the human gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Hong, Huynh A; Khaneja, Reena; Tam, Nguyen M K; Cazzato, Alessia; Tan, Sisareuth; Urdaci, Maria; Brisson, Alain; Gasbarrini, Antonio; Barnes, Ian; Cutting, Simon M

    2009-03-01

    As part of an ongoing study to determine the true habitat of Bacillus species, we report here the isolation and characterisation of Bacillus subtilis from the human gastrointestinal tract (GIT). Strains were obtained from ileum biopsies as well as from faecal samples and their biotypes defined. 16S rRNA analysis revealed that most isolates of B. subtilis were highly conserved, in contrast to RAPD-PCR fingerprinting that showed greater diversity with 23 distinct RAPD types. The majority of B. subtilis strains examined possessed features that could be advantageous to survival within the GIT. This included the ability to form biofilms, to sporulate anaerobically and secretion of antimicrobials. At least one isolate was shown to form spores that carried an exosporium, a loosely attached outer layer to the mature endospore, this being the first report of B. subtilis spores carrying an exosporium. This study reinforces a growing view that B. subtilis and probably other species have adapted to life within the GIT and should be considered gut commensals rather than solely soil microorganisms.

  6. The pharmacological actions of nicotine on the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Wu, William K K; Cho, Chi Hin

    2004-04-01

    Increasing use of tobacco and its related health problems are a great concern in the world. Recent epidemiological findings have demonstrated the positive association between cigarette smoking and several gastrointestinal (GI) diseases, including peptic ulcer and cancers. Interestingly, smoking also modifies the disease course of ulcerative colitis (UC). Nicotine, a major component of cigarette smoke, seems to mediate some of the actions of cigarette smoking on the pathogenesis of GI disorders. Nicotine worsens the detrimental effects of aggressive factors and attenuates the protective actions of defensive factors in the processes of development and repair of gastric ulceration. Nicotine also takes part in the initiation and promotion of carcinogenesis in the GI tract. In this regard, nicotine and its metabolites are found to be mutagenic and have the ability to modulate cell proliferation, apoptosis, and angiogenesis during tumoriogenesis through specific receptors and signalling pathways. However, to elucidate this complex pathogenic mechanism, further study at the molecular level is warranted. In contrast, findings of clinical trials give promising results on the use of nicotine as an adjuvant therapy for UC. The beneficial effect of nicotine on UC seems to be mediated through multiple mechanisms. More clinical studies are needed to establish the therapeutic value of nicotine in this disease.

  7. [Atypical vascular tumors of the gastrointestinal tract: four uncommon cases].

    PubMed

    Burgos, L; Gutiérrez, J C López; Barrena, S; De la Torre, C; Suárez, O; Luis, A L

    2009-07-01

    A small but significant percentage of vascular tumors may develop at extracutaneous location. They are difficult to detect on the physical exam and usually they require immediate intervention. Pediatric surgeons must have acknowledge of its prognostic and therapeutic implications. We report 4 of these patients. Patient 1 was a healthy newborn who presented in the second week of life, recurrent severe gastrointestinal bleeding, thrombocytopenia and anemia. Diagnosis of multifocal linfangioendoteliomatosis with thrombocytopenia was established. Patient 2 had prenatal diagnosis of ascites and presented at birth sepsis, anemia, thrombocytopenia and hypoproteinemia. Upon laparotomy hemorrhagic ascites and thickening of rectum-sigmoid wall and mesentery were found. Pathologic diagnosis was Kaposiform hemangioendothelioma and the clinical course was consistent with Kassabach-Merrit phenomenon. Patient 3 had at birth, multifocal hepatic GLUT1- hemangiomatosis with severe cardiac insufficiency and coagulopathy. She died while waiting for a liver transplantation. Patient 4 is a girl who presented in the newborn period with vomiting and hematochezia. She required several transfusions and endoscopic biopsies showed a vascular tumor that infiltrated duodenum, jejunum and mesentery. Imaging studies and histologic findings on biopsy led to the diagnostic of juvenile hemangioma GLUT-1+. Vascular tumors of the digestive tract may be difficult to diagnosis and their classification is still incomplete. Pediatric surgeons must be acquainted with these varieties of tumors because they are always involved in diagnosis and therapeutic decision making.

  8. Draft Genome Sequence of Streptococcus orisasini SH06, Isolated from a Healthy Thoroughbred Gastrointestinal Tract

    PubMed Central

    Takagi, Misako; Nakano, Akiyo; Toh, Hidehiro; Oshima, Kenshiro; Arakawa, Kensuke; Nakajima, Fumihiko; Tashiro, Kosuke; Kikusui, Tekefumi; Yanagida, Fujitoshi

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus orisasini SH06 was isolated from a healthy thoroughbred gastrointestinal tract. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of this organism. This paper is the first published report of the genomic sequence of S. orisasini. PMID:26769944

  9. Upper airway tract and upper gastrointestinal tract involvement in patients with pemphigus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Su, Ozlem; Onsun, Nahide; Meric Teker, Aysenur; Cinkaya, Ayse; Yasemin Korkut, Arzu; Seremet, Sila; Davutoglu, Can; Demirkesen, Cuyan

    2010-01-01

    Pemphigus vulgaris (PV) is an autoimmune disease involving the skin and mucous membranes. The frequency of upper airway tract (UAT) and upper gastrointestinal tract (UGIT) involvement in PV is not clearly known. Our aim was to determine the incidence of UAT and UGIT involvement in patients with PV. Thirty-seven patients who were diagnosed with PV and treated between March 2008 and April 2009 at the Dermatology Department of the Vakif Gureba Teaching and Research Hospital were included. All patients were evaluated for UAT manifestations by endoscopic examination, and 22 of 37 patients were investigated for UGIT involvement by gastrointestinal endoscopy. Mucosal biopsies were obtained by UGIT endoscopy for direct immunofluorescence (DIF) examination, and a histopathological examination was conducted in patients with active UGIT mucosal lesions. Thirty-five of 37 patients (94.6%) had active pharyngeal, laryngeal, or nasal PV lesions on endoscopic evaluation. Oral symptoms (83.8%) and active oral PV lesions were the most frequent findings (100%). Pharyngeal lesions (64.9%) were the most commonly present lesions on UAT examination. The frequency for laryngeal and nasal lesions was 51.4% and 21.6%, respectively. Five of 22 patients (22.7%) presented with active laryngeal and esophageal lesions. Twenty-one of 22 (95.4%) patients had positive DIF results. We believe that UAT and UGIT endoscopies are useful and necessary diagnostic methods in patients with PV with or without UAT and UGIT symptoms. UAT and UGIT endoscopies should be performed as standard diagnostic procedures in all patients with PV.

  10. [Historical schedule of management of bleeding from the upper part of gastrointestinal tract].

    PubMed

    Wójtowicz, Jacek; Wojtuń, Stanisław; Gil, Jerzy

    2009-05-01

    Treatment of bleeding from the upper part of gastrointestinal tract were changed many times. First there were waiting (Hipocrates, Sydenham, Stahl), next transfusion of the blood were initiated (Denis, Blundell, Dieffenbach, Bierkowski, Dungren, Hirszfeld). Big (Rydygier) and small (Dragstedt) operations procedures were attempted. Discovery of endoscopy of gastrointestinal tract (Mikulicz) and initiation of elastic scopes (Hirschowitz) and exploration inhibitor of histamine receptors (H2) and proton pump inhibitors with recognition of role Helicobacter pylori in bleeding were permitted elaborate actual schemas of proceedings.

  11. The cryptic plasmid is more important for Chlamydia muridarum to colonize the mouse gastrointestinal tract than to infect the genital tract.

    PubMed

    Shao, Lili; Melero, Jose; Zhang, Nu; Arulanandam, Bernard; Baseman, Joel; Liu, Quanzhong; Zhong, Guangming

    2017-01-01

    Chlamydia has been detected in the gastrointestinal tracts of both animals and humans. However, the mechanism by which Chlamydia colonizes the gut remains unclear. Chlamydia muridarum is known to spread from the genital to the gastrointestinal tracts hematogenously. The C. muridarum plasmid is a key pathogenic determinant in the mouse upper genital tract although plasmid-deficient C. muridarum is still able to colonize the upper genital tract. We now report that plasmid-deficient C. muridarum exhibits significantly delayed/reduced spreading from the mouse genital to the gastrointestinal tracts. C. muridarum with or without plasmid maintained similar levels in the mouse circulatory system following intravenous inoculation but the hematogenous plasmid-deficient C. muridarum was significantly less efficient in colonizing the gastrointestinal tract. Consistently, plasmid-deficient C. muridarum failed to restore normal colonization in the gastrointestinal tract even after intragastric inoculation at a high dose. Thus, we have demonstrated a plasmid-dependent colonization of C. muridarum in the gastrointestinal tract, supporting the concept that C. muridarum may have acquired the plasmid for adaptation to the mouse gastrointestinal tract during oral-fecal transmission. Since the plasmid is more important for C. muridarum to colonize the gastrointestinal tract than to infect the genital tract, the current study has laid a foundation for further defining the host pathways targeted by the plasmid-encoded or -regulated chlamydial effectors.

  12. Probiotics, prebiotics and the gastrointestinal tract in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Vitetta, Luis; Briskey, David; Alford, Hollie; Hall, Sean; Coulson, Samantha

    2014-06-01

    The microbiome located in the human gastrointestinal tract (GIT) comprises the largest community (diverse and dense) of bacteria, and in conjunction with a conducive internal milieu, promotes the development of regulated pro- and anti-inflammatory signals within the GIT that promotes immunological and metabolic tolerance. In addition, host-microbial interactions govern GIT inflammation and provide cues for upholding metabolic regulation in both the host and microbes. Failure to regulate inflammatory responses can increase the risk of developing inflammatory conditions in the GIT. Here, we review clinical studies regarding the efficacy of probiotics/prebiotics and the role they may have in restoring host metabolic homeostasis by rescuing the inflammatory response. The clinical studies reviewed included functional constipation, antibiotic-associated diarrhoea, Clostridium difficile diarrhoea, infectious diarrhoea/gastroenteritis, irritable bowel syndrome, inflammatory bowel diseases and necrotizing enterocolitis. We have demonstrated that there was an overall reduction in risk when probiotics were administered over placebo in the majority of GIT inflammatory conditions. The effect size of a cumulative reduction in relative risk for the GIT conditions/diseases investigated was 0.65 (0.61-0.70) (z = 13.3); p < 0.0001 that is an average reduction in risk of 35 % in favour of probiotics. We also progress a hypothesis that the GIT comprises numerous micro-axes (e.g. mucus secretion, Th1/Th2 balance) that are in operational homeostasis; hence probiotics and prebiotics may have a significant pharmacobiotic regulatory role in maintaining host GIT homeostasis in disease states partially through reactive oxygen species signalling.

  13. Screening for Bacillus Isolates in the Broiler Gastrointestinal Tract

    PubMed Central

    Barbosa, Teresa M.; Serra, Cláudia R.; La Ragione, Roberto M.; Woodward, Martin J.; Henriques, Adriano O.

    2005-01-01

    Spores from a number of different Bacillus species are currently being used as human and animal probiotics, although their mechanisms of action remain poorly understood. Here we describe the isolation of 237 presumptive gut-associated Bacillus spp. isolates that were obtained by heat and ethanol treatment of fecal material from organically reared broilers followed by aerobic plating. Thirty-one representative isolates were characterized according to their morphological, physiological, and biochemical properties as well as partial 16S rRNA gene sequences and screening for the presence of plasmid DNA. The Bacillus species identified included B. subtilis, B. pumilus, B. licheniformis, B. clausii, B. megaterium, B. firmus, and species of the B. cereus group, whereas a number of our isolates could not be classified. Intrinsic properties of potential importance for survival in the gut that could be advantageous for spore-forming probiotics were further investigated for seven isolates belonging to five different species. All isolates sporulated efficiently in the laboratory, and the resulting spores were tolerant to simulated gastrointestinal tract conditions. They also exhibited antimicrobial activity against a broad spectrum of bacteria, including food spoilage and pathogenic organisms such as Bacillus spp., Clostridium perfringens, Staphylococcus aureus, and Listeria monocytogenes. Importantly, the isolates were susceptible to most of the antibiotics tested, arguing that they would not act as donors for resistance determinants if introduced in the form of probiotic preparations. Together, our results suggest that some of the sporeformers isolated in this study have the potential to persist in or transiently associate with the complex gut ecosystem. PMID:15691955

  14. [Nutritional implications of bariatric surgery on the gastrointestinal tract].

    PubMed

    Rubio, M A; Moreno, C

    2007-05-01

    Anatomical change in the anatomy of the gastrointestinal tract after bariatric surgery leads to modification of dietary patterns that have to be adapted to new physiological conditions, either related with the volume of intakes or the characteristics of the macro- and micronutrients to be administered. Restrictive diet after bariatric surgery (basically gastric bypass and restrictive procedures) is done at several steps. The first phase after surgery consists in the administration of clear liquids for 2-3 days, followed by completely low-fat and high-protein content (> 50-60 g/day) liquid diet for 2-4 weeks, normally by means of formula-diets. Soft or grinded diet including very soft protein-rich foods, such as egg, low-calories cheese, and lean meats such as chicken, cow, pork, or fish (red meats are not so well tolerated) is recommended 2-4 weeks after hospital discharge. Normal diet may be started within 8 weeks from surgery or even later. It is important to incorporate hyperproteic foods with each meal, such egg whites, lean meats, cheese or milk. All these indications should be done under the supervision of an expert nutrition professional to always advise the patients and adapting the diet to some special situations (nausea/vomiting, constipation, diarrhea, dumping syndrome, dehydration, food intolerances, overfeeding, etc.). The most frequent vitamin and mineral deficiencies in the different types of surgeries are reviewed, with a special focus on iron, vitamin B12, calcium, and vitamin D metabolism. It should not be forgotten that the aim of obesity surgery is making the patient loose weight and thus post-surgery diet is designed to achieve that goal although without forgetting the essential role that nutritional education has on the learning of new dietary habits contributing to maintain that weight loss over time.

  15. Stable gastric pentadecapeptide BPC 157: novel therapy in gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Sikiric, Predrag; Seiwerth, Sven; Rucman, Rudolf; Turkovic, Branko; Rokotov, Dinko Stancic; Brcic, Luka; Sever, Marko; Klicek, Robert; Radic, Bozo; Drmic, Domagoj; Ilic, Spomenko; Kolenc, Danijela; Vrcic, Hrvoje; Sebecic, Bozidar

    2011-01-01

    Stable gastric pentadecapeptide BPC 157 is an anti-ulcer peptidergic agent, safe in inflammatory bowel disease clinical trials (GEPPPGKPADDAGLV, M.W. 1419, PL 14736) and wound healing, stable in human gastric juice and has no reported toxicity. We focused on BPC 157 as a therapy in peridontitis, esophagus, stomach, duodenum, intestine, liver and pancreas lesions. Particularly, it has a prominent effect on alcohol-lesions (i.e., acute, chronic) and NSAIDs-lesions (interestingly, BPC 157 both prevents and reverses adjuvant arthritis). In rat esophagitis and failed function of both lower esophageal sphincter (LES) and pyloric sphincters (PS), BPC 157 increased pressure in both sphincters till normal and reduced esophagitis. However, in healthy rats, it may decrease (PS) or increase (LES) the pressure in sphincters. It has strong angiogenic potential, it acts protectively on endothelium, prevents and reverses thrombus formation after abdominal aorta anastomosis, affects many central disturbances (i.e., dopamine and 5-HT system), the NO-system (either L-arginine and L-NAME effects), endothelin, acts as a free radical scavenger (counteracting CCl4-, paracetamol-, diclofenac-injuries) and exhibits neuroprotective properties. BPC 157 successfully heals the intestinal anastomosis, gastrocutaneous, duodenocutaneous and colocutaneous fistulas in rats, as well as interacting with the NO-system. Interestingly, the fistula closure was achieved even when the BPC 157 therapy was postponed for one month. In short-bowel syndrome escalating throughout 4 weeks, the constant weight gain above preoperative values started immediately with peroral and parental BPC 157 therapy and the villus height, crypth depth and muscle thickness (inner (circular) muscular layer) additionally increased. Thus, BPC 157 may improve gastrointestinal tract therapy.

  16. Adenoviruses in Lymphocytes of the Human Gastro-Intestinal Tract

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Soumitra; Calcedo, Roberto; Medina-Jaszek, Angelica; Keough, Martin; Peng, Hui; Wilson, James M.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Persistent adenoviral shedding in stools is known to occur past convalescence following acute adenoviral infections. We wished to establish the frequency with which adenoviruses may colonize the gut in normal human subjects. Methods The presence of adenoviral DNA in intestinal specimens obtained at surgery or autopsy was tested using a nested PCR method. The amplified adenoviral DNA sequences were compared to each other and to known adenoviral species. Lamina propria lymphocytes (LPLs) were isolated from the specimens and the adenoviral copy numbers in the CD4+ and CD8+ fractions were determined by quantitative PCR. Adenoviral gene expression was tested by amplification of adenoviral mRNA. Results Intestinal tissue from 21 of 58 donors and LPLs from 21 of 24 donors were positive for the presence of adenoviral DNA. The majority of the sequences could be assigned to adenoviral species E, although species B and C sequences were also common. Multiple sequences were often present in the same sample. Forty-one non-identical sequences were identified from 39 different tissue donors. Quantitative PCR for adenoviral DNA in CD4+ and CD8+ fractions of LPLs showed adenoviral DNA to be present in both cell types and ranged from a few hundred to several million copies per million cells on average. Active adenoviral gene expression as evidenced by the presence of adenoviral messenger RNA in intestinal lymphocytes was demonstrated in 9 of the 11 donors tested. Conclusion Adenoviral DNA is highly prevalent in lymphocytes from the gastro-intestinal tract indicating that adenoviruses may be part of the normal gut flora. PMID:21980361

  17. Screening for bacillus isolates in the broiler gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Teresa M; Serra, Cláudia R; La Ragione, Roberto M; Woodward, Martin J; Henriques, Adriano O

    2005-02-01

    Spores from a number of different Bacillus species are currently being used as human and animal probiotics, although their mechanisms of action remain poorly understood. Here we describe the isolation of 237 presumptive gut-associated Bacillus spp. isolates that were obtained by heat and ethanol treatment of fecal material from organically reared broilers followed by aerobic plating. Thirty-one representative isolates were characterized according to their morphological, physiological, and biochemical properties as well as partial 16S rRNA gene sequences and screening for the presence of plasmid DNA. The Bacillus species identified included B. subtilis, B. pumilus, B. licheniformis, B. clausii, B. megaterium, B. firmus, and species of the B. cereus group, whereas a number of our isolates could not be classified. Intrinsic properties of potential importance for survival in the gut that could be advantageous for spore-forming probiotics were further investigated for seven isolates belonging to five different species. All isolates sporulated efficiently in the laboratory, and the resulting spores were tolerant to simulated gastrointestinal tract conditions. They also exhibited antimicrobial activity against a broad spectrum of bacteria, including food spoilage and pathogenic organisms such as Bacillus spp., Clostridium perfringens, Staphylococcus aureus, and Listeria monocytogenes. Importantly, the isolates were susceptible to most of the antibiotics tested, arguing that they would not act as donors for resistance determinants if introduced in the form of probiotic preparations. Together, our results suggest that some of the sporeformers isolated in this study have the potential to persist in or transiently associate with the complex gut ecosystem.

  18. [Role of microbiocenosis of the gastrointestinal tract in the nutrition of grouse].

    PubMed

    Vecherskiĭ, M V; Kuznetsova, T A; Kostina, N A; Gorlenko, M V; Golichenkov, M B; Umarov, M M; Naumova, E I

    2014-01-01

    In order to assess the role of the microbiocenosis of the digestive tract of herbivorous birds in transforming poor forage, the activity of cellulolytic enzymes in all departments of the gastrointestinal tract of the black grouse (Lyrurus tetrix) and Western capercaillie (Tetrao urogallus) was studied. The functional diversity of microbial communities of different departments was also investigated. In both species of birds, nitrogenase and cellobiohydrolase activities were discovered in the digestive tract, with the maximum observed in the cecum.

  19. Klebsiella pneumoniae in Gastrointestinal Tract and Pyogenic Liver Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yi-Tsung; Lin, Jung-Chung; Chen, Te-Li; Yeh, Kuo-Ming; Chang, Feng-Yee; Chuang, Han-Chuan; Wu, Hau-Shin; Tseng, Chih-Peng; Siu, L. Kristopher

    2012-01-01

    To determine the role of gastrointestinal carriage in Klebsiella pneumoniae liver abscess, we studied 43 patients. Bacterial isolates from liver and fecal samples from 10 patients with this condition and 7 healthy carriers showed identical serotypes and genotypes with the same virulence. This finding indicated that gastrointestinal carriage is a predisposing factor for liver abscess. PMID:22840473

  20. Tools for the tract: understanding the functionality of the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Kovatcheva-Datchary, Petia; Zoetendal, Erwin G; Venema, Koen; de Vos, Willem M; Smidt, Hauke

    2009-07-01

    The human gastrointestinal tract comprises a series of complex and dynamic organs ranging from the stomach to the distal colon, which harbor immense microbial assemblages that are known to be vital for human health. Until recently, most of the details concerning our gut microbiota remained obscure. Over the past several years, however, a number of crucial technological and conceptual innovations have been introduced to shed more light on the composition and functionality of human gut microbiota. Recently developed high throughput approaches, including next-generation sequencing technologies and phylogenetic microarrays targeting ribosomal RNA gene sequences, allow for comprehensive analysis of the diversity and dynamics of the gut microbiota composition. Nevertheless, most of the microbes especially in the human large intestine still remain uncultured, and the in situ functions of distinct groups of the gut microbiota are therefore largely unknown, but pivotal to the understanding of their role in human physiology. Apart from functional and metagenomics approaches, stable isotope probing is a promising tool to link the metabolic activity and diversity of microbial communities, including yet uncultured microbes, in a complex environment. Advancements in current stable isotope probing approaches integrated with the application of high-throughput diagnostic microarray-based phylogenetic profiling and metabolic flux analysis should facilitate the understanding of human microbial ecology and will enable the development of innovative strategies to treat or prevent intestinal diseases of as yet unknown etiology.

  1. Computer aided classification of cell nuclei in the gastrointestinal tract by volume and principal axis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagstetter, Ann M.; Camp, Jon J.; Lurken, Matthew S.; Szurszewski, Joseph H.; Farrugia, Gianrico; Gibbons, Simon J.; Robb, Richard A.

    2007-03-01

    Normal function of the gastrointestinal tract involves the coordinated activity of several cell types Human disorders of motor function of the gastrointestinal tract are often associated with changes in the number of these cells. For example, in diabetic patients, abnormalities in gastrointestinal transit are associated with changes in nerves and interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC), two key cells that generate and regulate motility. ICC are cells of mesenchymal origin that function as pacemakers and amplify neuronal signals in the gastrointestinal tract. Quantifying the changes in number of specific cell types in tissues from patients with motility disorders is challenging and requires immunolabeling for specific antigens. The shape of nuclei differs between the cell types in the wall of the gastrointestinal tract. Therefore the objective of this study was to determine whether cell nuclei can be classified by analyzing the 3D morphology of the nuclei. Furthermore, the orientation of the long axis of nuclei changes within and between the muscle layers. These features can be used to classify and differentially label the nuclei in confocal volume images of the tissue by computing the principal axis of the coordinates of the set of voxels forming each nucleus and thereby to identify cells by their nuclear morphology. Using this approach, we were able to separate and quantify nuclei in the smooth muscle layers of the tissue. Therefore we conclude that computer-aided classification of cell nuclei can be used to identify changes in the cell types expressed in gastrointestinal smooth muscle.

  2. Relation of endometriosis and neuromuscular disease of the gastrointestinal tract: new insights.

    PubMed

    Mathias, J R; Franklin, R; Quast, D C; Fraga, N; Loftin, C A; Yates, L; Harrison, V

    1998-07-01

    To investigate the neuromuscular activity of the gastrointestinal tract by antroduodenal manometry in women with endometriosis documented by laparoscopy, to assess the effects of diet and drug therapy on symptoms, and to assess the bacterial overgrowth that is commonly associated with these nerve diseases. Prospective, open-label study. A clinical center for the care of women's health. Fifty women with endometriosis documented by laparoscopy and gastrointestinal tract symptoms characterized by chronic abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, early satiety, bloating and distention, and altered bowel habits. Motility of the gastrointestinal tract was recorded and bacterial overgrowth was assessed. Treatment consisted of dietary changes, including reduction of glycemic carbohydrates, balancing with omega 9 oils, elimination of foods with caffeine and tyramine, and addition of omega 3 fatty acids, as well as drug therapy with clonazepam (0.25 mg 3 times per day). All 50 women showed a characteristic motility change (ampulla of Vater-duodenal wall spasm, a seizure equivalent of the enteric nervous system). Forty of the women showed bacterial overgrowth. There was a significant reduction in the total symptom score after 8 weeks of treatment. This study suggests that endometriosis and gastrointestinal tract symptoms are a result of the dysfunction of hollow organs. Correction of the biochemical imbalance of the eicosanoid system and the hypersecretion of insulin that results from excessive intake of glycemic carbohydrates and lack of essential fatty acids significantly decreases symptoms in patients with endometriosis and associated neuromuscular disease of the gastrointestinal tract.

  3. Tissue engineering and regenerative medicine as applied to the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Bitar, Khalil N; Zakhem, Elie

    2013-10-01

    The gastrointestinal (GI) tract is a complex system characterized by multiple cell types with a determined architectural arrangement. Tissue engineering of the GI tract aims to reinstate the architecture and function of all structural layers. The key point for successful tissue regeneration includes the use of cells/biomaterials that elucidate minimal immune response after implantation. Different biomaterial choices and cell sources have been proposed to engineer the GI tract. This review summarizes the recent advances in bioengineering the GI tract with emphasis on cell sources and scaffolding biomaterials. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Tissue engineering and regenerative medicine as applied to the gastrointestinal tract

    PubMed Central

    Bitar, Khalil N.; Zakhem, Elie

    2013-01-01

    The gastrointestinal (GI) tract is a complex system characterized by multiple cell types with a determined architectural arrangement. Tissue engineering of the GI tract aims to reinstate the architecture and function of all structural layers. The key point for successful tissue regeneration includes the use of cells/biomaterials that elucidate minimal immune response after implantation. Different biomaterial choices and cell sources have been proposed to engineer the GI tract. This review summarizes the recent advances in bioengineering the GI tract with emphasis on cell sources and scaffolding biomaterials. PMID:23583170

  5. Distribution of Tomato planta macho viroid in germinating pollen and transmitting tract.

    PubMed

    Matsushita, Yosuke; Yanagisawa, Hironobu

    2017-09-23

    Vertical and horizontal pollen transmission is important for efficient infection by viroids. Vertical pollen transmission of viroids is attributed to the infection by viroid in the embryo sac through infected pollen. To identify the viroid infection in pollen and pollen tubes elongating through the transmitting tract, we used in situ hybridization to histochemically analyze the distribution of Tomato planta macho viroid (TPMVd) in pollen grains, the stigma, and style of petunia plants. TPMVd was present in the generative nucleus and vegetative nucleus of mature infected pollen grains and germinating pollen grains. During pollen tube growth, TPMVd was present in the vegetative nucleus and two sperm nuclei, which were generated by division of the generative nucleus in the style transmitting tract. These findings indicated that viroid infection in sperm nuclei is responsible for vertical pollen transmission of viroids. TPMVd infection from TPMVd-infected pollen tubes to the transmitting tract was not observed. In addition, TPMVd signals were not confirmed in the stigma and transmitting tract of TPMVd-infected petunia plants, suggesting that viroids may not replicate in these tissues at the stage of mature style. Therefore, TPMVd may leak from the pollen tube somewhere in the ovary, except in the transmitting tract, during the horizontal transmission of TPMVd.

  6. [Neoplasms of the disseminated neuroendocrine cell system of the gastrointestinal tract].

    PubMed

    Klöppel, G

    2015-05-01

    The classification of neuroendocrine neoplasms (NEN) of the gastrointestinal tract and also the pancreas is based on the World Health Organization (WHO) classification from 2010, the site-related TNM stage classification and the clinicopathological characterization. This allows a classification of NEN that is adapted to the individual patient, is of high prognostic relevance and serves the needs of an adequate treatment. This article summarizes the current knowledge on the clinical pathology of gastrointestinal NEN, in order to enable a rapid diagnostic orientation.

  7. Expression of Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator in Ganglia of Human Gastrointestinal Tract

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Ruiqi; Gu, Huan; Qiu, Yamei; Guo, Yong; Korteweg, Christine; Huang, Jin; Gu, Jiang

    2016-01-01

    CF is caused by mutations of the gene encoding the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) which is an anion selective transmembrane ion channel that mainly regulates chloride transport, expressed in the epithelia of various organs. Recently, we have demonstrated CFTR expression in the brain, the spinal cord and the sympathetic ganglia. This study aims to investigate the expression and distribution of CFTR in the ganglia of the human gastrointestinal tract. Fresh tissue and formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded normal gastrointestinal tract samples were collected from eleven surgical patients and five autopsy cases. Immunohistochemistry, in situ hybridization, laser-assisted microdissection and nested reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction were performed. Expression of CFTR protein and mRNA was detected in neurons of the ganglia of all segments of the human gastrointestinal tract examined, including the stomach, duodenum, jejunum, ileum, cecum, appendix, colon and rectum. The extensive expression of CFTR in the enteric ganglia suggests that CFTR may play a role in the physiology of the innervation of the gastro-intestinal tract. The presence of dysfunctional CFTRs in enteric ganglia could, to a certain extent, explain the gastrointestinal symptoms frequently experienced by CF patients. PMID:27491544

  8. Role of parotid amylase in starch digestion in the gastro-intestinal tracts of diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Kurahashi, M; Inomata, K

    1989-09-01

    In order for the role of parotid amylase in starch digestion in the gastro-intestinal tracts of diabetic rats to be clarified, this study investigated the effect of parotid-duct ligation on both amylase secretion from the parotid glands and pancreas into the gastro-intestinal tract and on starch digestion in the gastro-intestinal contents during feedings. In both diabetic rats and control rats, parotid-duct ligation reduced amylase activity in both the parotid glands during fasting and in the gastric contents after feeding. The amylase activity in the intestinal contents after feeding was reduced by parotid-duct ligation in the diabetic rats. Starch digestion in the gastro-intestinal tract after feeding was reduced by parotid-duct ligation in the diabetic rats. The results suggest that most of the amylase activity in the gastric contents and a large part of the amylase activity in the intestinal contents are derived from the parotid glands, and that parotid amylase plays an important role in starch digestion in the gastro-intestinal tracts of diabetic rats.

  9. Recent achievements in stem cell therapy for pediatric gastrointestinal tract disease.

    PubMed

    Bae, Sun Hwan

    2013-03-01

    The field of stem cell research has been rapidly expanding. Although the clinical usefulness of research remains to be ascertained through human trials, the use of stem cells as a therapeutic option for currently disabling diseases holds fascinating potential. Many pediatric gastrointestinal tract diseases have defect in enterocytes, enteric nervous system cells, smooth muscles, and interstitial cells of Cajal. Various kinds of therapeutic trials using stem cells could be applied to these diseases. This review article focuses on the recent achievements in stem cell applications for pediatric gastrointestinal tract diseases.

  10. Recent Achievements in Stem Cell Therapy for Pediatric Gastrointestinal Tract Disease

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The field of stem cell research has been rapidly expanding. Although the clinical usefulness of research remains to be ascertained through human trials, the use of stem cells as a therapeutic option for currently disabling diseases holds fascinating potential. Many pediatric gastrointestinal tract diseases have defect in enterocytes, enteric nervous system cells, smooth muscles, and interstitial cells of Cajal. Various kinds of therapeutic trials using stem cells could be applied to these diseases. This review article focuses on the recent achievements in stem cell applications for pediatric gastrointestinal tract diseases. PMID:24010100

  11. Performance of the immunochemical fecal occult blood test in predicting lesions in the lower gastrointestinal tract

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Tsung-Hsien; Lee, Yi-Chia; Tu, Chia-Hung; Chiu, Han-Mo; Wu, Ming-Shiang

    2011-01-01

    Background: Previous studies have suggested that the immunochemical fecal occult blood test has superior specificity for detecting bleeding in the lower gastrointestinal tract even if bleeding occurs in the upper tract. We conducted a large population-based study involving asymptomatic adults in Taiwan, a population with prevalent upper gastrointestinal lesions, to confirm this claim. Methods: We conducted a prospective cohort study involving asymptomatic people aged 18 years or more in Taiwan recruited to undergo an immunochemical fecal occult blood test, colonoscopy and esophagogastroduodenoscopy between August 2007 and July 2009. We compared the prevalence of lesions in the lower and upper gastrointestinal tracts between patients with positive and negative fecal test results. We also identified risk factors associated with a false-positive fecal test result. Results: Of the 2796 participants, 397 (14.2%) had a positive fecal test result. The sensitivity of the test for predicting lesions in the lower gastrointestinal tract was 24.3%, the specificity 89.0%, the positive predictive value 41.3%, the negative predictive value 78.7%, the positive likelihood ratio 2.22, the negative likelihood ratio 0.85 and the accuracy 73.4%. The prevalence of lesions in the lower gastrointestinal tract was higher among those with a positive fecal test result than among those with a negative result (41.3% v. 21.3%, p < 0.001). The prevalence of lesions in the upper gastrointestinal tract did not differ significantly between the two groups (20.7% v. 17.5%, p = 0.12). Almost all of the participants found to have colon cancer (27/28, 96.4%) had a positive fecal test result; in contrast, none of the three found to have esophageal or gastric cancer had a positive fecal test result (p < 0.001). Among those with a negative finding on colonoscopy, the risk factors associated with a false-positive fecal test result were use of antiplatelet drugs (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 2.46, 95% confidence

  12. Heat Shock Protein Alteration in the Gastrointestinal Tract Tissues of Chickens Exposed to Arsenic Trioxide.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Panpan; Zhang, Kexin; Guo, Guangyang; Sun, Xiao; Chai, Hongliang; Zhang, Wen; Xing, Mingwei

    2016-03-01

    Arsenic (As) is widely distributed in our living environment and is useful for industry, agriculture, medical treatment, and other fields. Arsenic trioxide (As2O3) is an existing form of As. Exposure to As2O3 has a toxic effect on humans and animals. It not only leads to skin cancer, peripheral vascular disease, hyperkeratosis, etc. but also interferes with the functioning of the gastrointestinal tract. The gastrointestinal tract is an important organ for animals to transform the food they eat into the nutrients their body needs for maintenance and growth. Heat shock proteins (Hsps) exist in the non-stress normal cells and their expression increases under stimuli. Therefore, we wonder whether the "stimulus" of As2O3 could change the messenger RNA (mRNA) abundance and expression level of Hsps in the gastrointestinal tract of birds. To investigate the relation between arseniasis and Hsp alterations in the chicken's gastrointestinal tract induced by an As2O3-supplemented diet, we selected 72 one-day-old male Hy-line chickens and randomly divided them into four groups. They were fed either a commercial diet or an As2O3-supplemented diet containing 7.5, 15, and 30 mg/kg As2O3. The experiment lasted for 90 days, and gastrointestinal tract tissue samples (gizzard, glandular stomach, duodenum, jejunum, ileum, cecum, and rectum) were collected at 30, 60, and 90 days. The mRNA contents of Hsps (including Hsp27, Hsp40, Hsp60, Hsp70, and Hsp90) were examined by real-time PCR (RT-PCR). The correlation between As2O3 and Hsp genes was assessed. In addition, the protein expression levels of Hsp60 and Hsp70 in the gastrointestinal tract tissue samples were measured by western blot. The results indicated that the mRNA expression levels and the Hsp expression levels in the gastrointestinal tract tissues of chickens with As2O3 supplementation increased at different time points in a dose-dependent manner (p < 0.05 or p < 0.01). These data suggested that arseniasis influenced the

  13. Does Your Gut Taste? Sensory Transduction in the Gastrointestinal Tract.

    PubMed

    Raybould, Helen E.

    1998-12-01

    The primary sensors in the gut are endocrine cells. They release peptides and amines that stimulate intrinsic and extrinsic neural pathways affecting gastrointestinal motor and secretory function. These regulatory mechanisms alter the digestive and absorptive capacity of the intestine to match the entry of a meal from the stomach.

  14. Trophic factors and regulation of gastrointestinal tract and liver development

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    To understand the role of trophic factors in fetal and neonatal gastrointestinal (GI) and liver growth it is important to first consider the nature of growth. The fetal and neonatal period is the most dynamic period of postconceptual growth and includes critical developmental milestones, such as gas...

  15. Some aspects of the effects of PL-10.1.AK-15 on the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Erceg, D; Simicevic, V N; Kolega, M; Dohoczky, C

    1997-01-01

    PL-10.1.AK-15 is an active fragment of a naturally occurring protein first isolated from human gastric juice. Among its other protective effects, PL-10.1.AK-15 has demonstrated a protective effect on the gastrointestinal tract. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of PL-10.1.AK-15 on two functional parameters of gastrointestinal function: gastric acid secretion and gastrointestinal motility. Gastric acid secretion was assessed in male Wistar rats using a modified method of Shay, while gastrointestinal motility was assessed in male NMRI mice by charcoal propulsion. PL-10.1.AK-15 was given in three different doses (3, 10 and 100 micrograms/kg body weight) in accordance with the experimental protocol. The results of these experiments indicate that PL-10.1.AK-15 in the investigated doses had no influence on gastric acid secretion or gastrointestinal motility.

  16. Characterization of the microbial communities along the gastrointestinal tract of sheep by 454 pyrosequencing analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jin; Fan, Huan; Han, Ye; Zhao, Jinzhao; Zhou, Zhijiang

    2017-01-01

    Objective The gastrointestinal tract of sheep contain complex microbial communities that influence numerous aspects of the sheep’s health and development. The objective of this study was to analyze the composition and diversity of the microbiota in the gastrointestinal tract sections (rumen, reticulum, omasum, abomasum, duodenum, jejunum, ileum, cecum, colon, and rectum) of sheep. Methods This analysis was performed by 454 pyrosequencing using the V3-V6 region of the 16S rRNA genes. Samples were collected from five healthy, small tailed Han sheep aged 10 months, obtained at market. The bacterial composition of sheep gastrointestinal microbiota was investigated at the phylum, class, order, family, genus, and species levels. Results The dominant bacterial phyla in the entire gastrointestinal sections were Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, and Proteobacteria. In the stomach, the three most dominant genera in the sheep were Prevotella, unclassified Lachnospiraceae, and Butyrivibrio. In the small intestine, the three most dominant genera in the sheep were Escherichia, unclassified Lachnospiraceae, and Ruminococcus. In the large intestine, the three most dominant genera in the sheep were Ruminococcus, unclassified Ruminococcaceae, and Prevotella. R. flavefaciens, B. fibrisolvens, and S. ruminantium were three most dominant species in the sheep gastrointestinal tract. Principal Coordinates Analysis showed that the microbial communities from each gastrointestinal section could be separated into three groups according to similarity of community composition: stomach (rumen, reticulum, omasum, and abomasum), small intestine (duodenum, jejunum, and ileum), and large intestine (cecum, colon, and rectum). Conclusion This is the first study to characterize the entire gastrointestinal microbiota in sheep by use of 16S rRNA gene amplicon pyrosequencing, expanding our knowledge of the gastrointestinal bacterial community of sheep. PMID:27383798

  17. Diagnostic procedures for submucosal tumors in the gastrointestinal tract

    PubMed Central

    Ponsaing, Laura Graves; Kiss, Katalin; Loft, Annika; Jensen, Lise Ingemann; Hansen, Mark Berner

    2007-01-01

    This review is part one of three, which will present an update on diagnostic procedures for gastrointestinal (GI) submucosal tumors (SMTs). Part two identifies the classification and part three the therapeutic methods regarding GI SMTs. Submucosal tumors are typically asymptomatic and therefore encountered incidentally. Advances in diagnostic tools for gastrointestinal submucosal tumors have emerged over the past decade. The aim of this paper is to provide the readers with guidelines for the use of diagnostic procedures, when a submucosal tumor is suspected. Literature searches were performed to find information on diagnostics for gastrointestinal submucosal tumors. Based on the searches, the optimal diagnostic procedures and specific features of the submucosal tumors could be outlined. Standard endoscppy, capsule endoscopy and push-and-pull enteroscopy (PPE) together with barium contrast X-ray do not alone provide sufficient information, when examining submucosal tumors. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS), computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and fluorodeoxyglucose-labeled positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) are recommended as supplementary tools. PMID:17659668

  18. Characterization of a gastrointestinal tract microscale cell culture analog used to predict drug toxicity

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The lining of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract is the largest surface exposed to the external environment in the human body. One of the main functions of the small intestine is absorption, and intestinal absorption is a route used by essential nutrients, chemicals, and pharmaceuticals to enter the sy...

  19. Glucagon-like peptide 2 may mediate growth and development of the bovine gastrointestinal tract

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Glucagon-like peptide 2 (GLP-2), secreted by enteroendocrine cells, promotes growth, reduces apoptosis, and enhances blood flow, nutrient absorption, and barrier function in intestinal epithelium of monogastric species. Regulatory functions of GLP-2 in the ruminant gastrointestinal tract (GIT) are u...

  20. [Cytogenetic status of patients with cancer of the gastrointestinal tract before and after treatment].

    PubMed

    Biakhova, M M; Sycheva, L P; Zhurkov, V S; Astrakhantsev, A F; Kosmynin, A Iu; Odishelidze, N V; Biakhov, M Iu

    2014-01-01

    Aim of this study was to analyze the karyological indicators in exfoliated cells in patients with cancer of the gastrointestinal tract. There was revealed statistically significant (p < 0.01) increase of all parameters in buccal and nasal epithelium in such kind of patients compared to healthy persons. These changes were systemic in nature and reflected the general state of the organism.

  1. Characterizing the microbiome across the gastrointestinal tract from steers differing in feed efficiency

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The bovine rumen and lower gastrointestinal tract (GIT) contain diverse microbial ecosystems that are essential for the host to digest plant material and regulate nutrient uptake and utilization. In cattle, optimization of feed efficiency has primarily focused host genetics, management, and diet. ...

  2. Metabolism, Physiological Role, and Clinical Implications of Sphingolipids in Gastrointestinal Tract

    PubMed Central

    Łukaszuk, Bartłomiej; Piotrowska, Dominika M.; Wiesiołek, Patrycja; Chabowska, Anna Małgorzata; Żendzian-Piotrowska, Małgorzata

    2013-01-01

    Sphingolipids in digestive system are responsible for numerous important physiological and pathological processes. In the membrane of gut epithelial cells, sphingolipids provide structural integrity, regulate absorption of some nutrients, and act as receptors for many microbial antigens and their toxins. Moreover, bioactive sphingolipids such as ceramide or sphingosine-1-phosphate regulate cellular growth, differentiation, and programmed cell death—apoptosis. Although it is well established that sphingolipids have clinical implications in gastrointestinal tumorigenesis or inflammation, further studies are needed to fully explore the role of sphingolipids in neoplastic and inflammatory diseases in gastrointestinal tract. Pharmacological agents which regulate metabolism of sphingolipids can be potentially used in the management of colorectal cancer or inflammatory bowel diseases. The aim of this work is to critically the review physiological and pathological roles of sphingolipids in the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:24083248

  3. Metabolism, physiological role, and clinical implications of sphingolipids in gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Kurek, Krzysztof; Łukaszuk, Bartłomiej; Piotrowska, Dominika M; Wiesiołek, Patrycja; Chabowska, Anna Małgorzata; Zendzian-Piotrowska, Małgorzata

    2013-01-01

    Sphingolipids in digestive system are responsible for numerous important physiological and pathological processes. In the membrane of gut epithelial cells, sphingolipids provide structural integrity, regulate absorption of some nutrients, and act as receptors for many microbial antigens and their toxins. Moreover, bioactive sphingolipids such as ceramide or sphingosine-1-phosphate regulate cellular growth, differentiation, and programmed cell death-apoptosis. Although it is well established that sphingolipids have clinical implications in gastrointestinal tumorigenesis or inflammation, further studies are needed to fully explore the role of sphingolipids in neoplastic and inflammatory diseases in gastrointestinal tract. Pharmacological agents which regulate metabolism of sphingolipids can be potentially used in the management of colorectal cancer or inflammatory bowel diseases. The aim of this work is to critically the review physiological and pathological roles of sphingolipids in the gastrointestinal tract.

  4. The clinical and nutritional implications of lipid-lowering drugs that act in the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, David R

    2005-02-01

    A new class of cholesterol-lowering therapy that reduces intestinal sterol absorption has recently been introduced. This increases the number of classes of lipid-lowering agents that directly affect gastrointestinal function and raises questions concerning the overall effect of these agents on absorption and nutritional status. A recent assessment notes a paucity of information concerning the factors that affect the bioavailability and intestinal absorption of lipophilic nutrients. By contrast, the specificity of the mechanisms of action of new drugs acting on the gastrointestinal tract may circumvent some of the detrimental effects on nutrient and drug bioavailability that have been noted with older forms of treatment. The clinical imperative for aggressive control of lipid and metabolic risk factors makes widespread use, alone or in combination, of lipid-lowering agents that affect the gastrointestinal tract seem increasingly likely. Whilst the opportunity for therapeutic synergy is attractive, care will be required to avoid interference with intestinal absorptive function.

  5. Nox enzymes and oxidative stress in the immunopathology of the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Rokutan, Kazuhito; Kawahara, Tsukasa; Kuwano, Yuki; Tominaga, Kumiko; Nishida, Keisei; Teshima-Kondo, Shigetada

    2008-07-01

    Chronic inflammation caused by Helicobacter pylori infection or inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is closely linked to cancer development. Innate immune abnormalities and enhanced production of reactive oxygen species through a phagocyte NADPH oxidase (Nox2) are key issues in understanding the pathogenesis of inflammation-dependent carcinogenesis. Besides Nox2, functionally distinct homologues (Nox1, Nox3, Nox4, Nox5, Duox1, and Duox2) have been identified. Nox1 and Duox2 are highly expressed in the gastrointestinal tract. Although the functional roles of Nox/Duox in the gastrointestinal tract are still unclear, we will review their potential roles in the gastrointestinal immunopathology, particularly in H. pylori-induced inflammation, IBD, and malignancy.

  6. [OVESCO: a promising system for endoscopic closure of gastrointestinal tract perforations].

    PubMed

    Junquera, Félix; Martínez-Bauer, Eva; Miquel, Mireia; Fort, Miriam; Gallach, Marta; Brullet, Enric; Campo, Rafael

    2011-10-01

    Perforations of the gastrointestinal tract are a significant source of morbidity in clinical practice. Surgery has been the standard of care. However, endoscopic treatment with clips can be used when perforations are small. The development of natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) has substantially contributed to research in this field, such as the over the scope clip (OVESCO or OTSC). This system is one of the most promising technologies for closure of perforations of the gastrointestinal tract because of its efficacy, safety and rapidity. Other indications include severe gastrointestinal bleeding, fistulae, anastomotic leaks, and bariatric surgery anastomosis remodelling. This article describes the OVESCO system from its initial design to its introduction in clinical practice.

  7. The effect of selected factors on the survival of Bacillus cereus in the human gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Berthold-Pluta, Anna; Pluta, Antoni; Garbowska, Monika

    2015-05-01

    Bacillus cereus is a Gram-positive bacterium widely distributed in soil and vegetation. This bacterial species can also contaminate raw or processed foods. Pathogenic B. cereus strains can cause a range of infections in humans, as well as food poisoning of an emetic (intoxication) or diarrheal type (toxico-infection). Toxico-infections are due to the action of the Hbl toxin, Nhe toxin, and cytotoxin K produced by the microorganism in the gastrointestinal tract. This occurs once the spores or vegetative B. cereus cells survive the pH barrier of the stomach and reach the small intestine where they produce toxins in sufficient amounts. This article discusses the effect of various factors on the survival of B. cereus in the gastrointestinal tract, including low pH and the presence of digestive enzymes in the stomach, bile salts in the small intestine, and indigenous microflora in the lower parts of the gastrointestinal tract. Additional aspects also reported to affect B. cereus survival and virulence in the gastrointestinal tract include the interaction of the spores and vegetative cells with enterocytes. In vitro studies revealed that both vegetative B. cereus and spores can survive in the gastrointestinal tract suggesting that the biological form of the microorganism may have less influence on the occurrence of the symptoms of infection than was once believed. It is most likely the interaction between the pathogen and enterocytes that is necessary for the diarrheal form of B. cereus food poisoning to develop. The adhesion of B. cereus to the intestinal epithelium allows the bacterium to grow and produce enterotoxins in the proximity of the epithelium. Recent studies suggest that the human intestinal microbiota inhibits the growth of vegetative B. cereus cells considerably. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Modulation of the gastrointestinal tract of infants by human milk. Interfaces and interactions. An evolutionary perspective.

    PubMed

    Goldman, A S

    2000-02-01

    Human milk contains agents that affect the growth, development and functions of the epithelium, immune system or nervous system of the gastrointestinal tract. Some human and animal studies indicate that human milk affects the growth of intestinal villi, the development of intestinal disaccharidases, the permeability of the gastrointestinal tract and resistance to certain inflammatory/immune-mediated diseases. Moreover, one cytokine in human milk, interleukin (IL)-10, protects infant mice genetically deficient in IL-10 against an enterocolitis that resembles necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) in human premature infants. There are seven overlapping evolutionary strategies regarding the relationships between the functions of the mammary gland and the infant's gastrointestinal tract as follows: 1) certain immunologic agents in human milk compensate directly for developmental delays in those same agents in the recipient infant; 2) other agents in human milk do not compensate directly for developmental delays in the production of those same agents, but nevertheless protect the recipient; 3) agents in human milk enhance functions that are poorly expressed in the recipient; 4) agents in human milk change the physiologic state of the intestines from one adapted to intrauterine life to one suited to extrauterine life; 5) some agents in human milk prevent inflammation in the recipient's gastrointestinal tract; 6) survival of human milk agents in the gastrointestinal tract is enhanced because of delayed production of pancreatic proteases and gastric acid by newborn infants, antiproteases and inhibitors of gastric acid production in human milk, inherent resistance of some human milk agents to proteolysis, and protective binding of other factors in human milk; and 7) growth factors in human milk aid in establishing a commensal enteric microflora.

  9. Proteolytic activity and immunogenicity of oral bromelain within the gastrointestinal tract of mice.

    PubMed

    Hale, Laura P

    2004-02-01

    Bromelain is a mixture of proteinases derived from pineapple stem that is marketed by health food stores as a "digestive aid". A number of studies suggest that bromelain may also have anti-inflammatory activity in vivo, including an anecdotal report describing potential efficacy in inflammatory bowel disease. We and others have previously shown that proteolytically active bromelain removes certain cell surface molecules and affects leukocyte migration, activation, and production of cytokines and inflammatory mediators in vitro. The purpose of this study was to determine whether ingested bromelain retains proteolytic activity within the murine gastrointestinal tract in vivo. The proteolytic activity of bromelain was determined in vitro using model substrates or immunofluorescence assays after administration of various doses and formulations orally to mice. Immune responses against bromelain were detected by enzyme immunoassays. When formulated in antacid, oral bromelain retained substantial proteolytic activity throughout the gastrointestinal tract. Bromelain concentrations within the colon were dependent on both dose and formulation and were sufficient to remove bromelain-sensitive molecules from both leukocytes and colon epithelial cells. Peak activity in the stool was observed 4 h after oral dosing. Although anti-bromelain IgG was detected in both serum and stool after long-term oral therapy, these antibodies did not prevent bromelain proteolytic activity within the gastrointestinal tract. These studies demonstrate that bromelain enzymes can remain intact and proteolytically active within the murine gastrointestinal tract. They provide further support for the hypothesis that oral bromelain may potentially modify inflammation within the gastrointestinal tract via local proteolytic activity within the colonic microenvironment.

  10. Targeting the gastrointestinal tract to develop novel therapies for HIV.

    PubMed

    Reeves, R K; Burgener, A; Klatt, N R

    2015-10-01

    Despite the use of antiretroviral therapy (ART), which delays and/or prevents AIDS pathogenesis, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals continue to face increased morbidities and mortality rates compared with uninfected individuals. Gastrointestinal (GI) mucosal dysfunction is a key feature of HIV infection, and is associated with mortality. In this study, we review current knowledge about mucosal dysfunction in HIV infection, and describe potential avenues for therapeutic targets to enhance mucosal function and decrease morbidities and mortalities in HIV-infected individuals.

  11. Microalgal compounds modulate carcinogenesis in the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Amaro, Helena M; Barros, Rita; Guedes, A Catarina; Sousa-Pinto, I; Malcata, F Xavier

    2013-02-01

    Gastrointestinal cancers rank second in overall cancer-related deaths. Carotenoids, sulfated polysaccharides, and polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) from microalgae exhibit cancer chemopreventive features at different stages of carcinogenesis. For instance, sulfated polysaccharides bear a prophylactic potential via blocking adhesion of pathogens to the gastric surface, whereas carotenoids are effective against Helicobacter pylori infection. This effect is notable because H. pylori has been targeted as the primary cause of gastric cancer. Recent results on antitumor and antibacterial compounds synthesized by microalgae are reviewed here, with an emphasis on their impact upon H. pylori infection and derived pathologies accompanying the progression of gastric carcinogenesis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. An Elusive Bullet in the Gastrointestinal Tract: A Rare Case of Bullet Embolism in the Gastrointestinal Tract and a Review of Relevant Literature

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Saptarshi

    2014-01-01

    Bullet embolism within the gastrointestinal system is extremely rare. Such bullet injuries are infrequently covered in the general literature, but the surgeon should be aware of the phenomenon. Smaller caliber bullets are more common in civilian gunshot wound (GSW) events. These bullets are able to tumble through the gastrointestinal tract and cause perforation of the intestinal lumen which is small enough to be easily missed. Bullets retained in the abdominal cavity should not be dismissed as fixed and should be carefully monitored to ensure that they do not embolize within the bowel and cause occult lesions during their migration. We present a unique case wherein a bullet caused a minute perforation in the small bowel, before migrating to the distal colon, which resulted in late presentation of sepsis secondary to peritonitis. PMID:24829839

  13. Salmonellosis and the gastrointestinal tract: more than just peanut butter.

    PubMed

    Crum-Cianflone, Nancy F

    2008-08-01

    Nontyphoidal salmonellosis is the leading cause of foodborne illness in the United States, causing about 1.4 million infections annually. Most cases of salmonellosis are due to ingestion of contaminated food items such as eggs, dairy products, and meats, but almost any foodstuff can be implicated, including peanut butter, as seen during a recent outbreak of more than 600 Salmonella infections. Although outbreaks often gain national media attention, the majority of nontyphoidal Salmonella infections in the United States occur sporadically. Risk factors for salmonellosis include gastric hypoacidity, recent use of antibiotics, extremes of age, and immunosuppressive conditions. Clinical manifestations of the infection most commonly involve self-limited gastroenteritis, but bacteremia and endovascular and localized infections may occur. Most cases of gastrointestinal involvement are self-limited, and antibiotic therapy is reserved for persons at risk for complicated disease. Preventive strategies by both industry and consumers are advocated to further reduce the occurrence of nontyphoidal salmonellosis.

  14. Do gastrointestinal tract infections in infancy increase blood pressure in childhood? A cohort study.

    PubMed

    Martin, R M; Kramer, M S; Dahhou, M; Platt, R W; Patel, R; Bogdanovich, N; Matush, L; Davey Smith, G

    2010-12-01

    It has been hypothesised that dehydration in infancy could permanently increase sodium retention, raising blood pressure in later life. In this study, the association between gastrointestinal tract infection in infancy, a clinically relevant exposure often accompanied by dehydration, and raised blood pressure in childhood was investigated. Data from a cohort study nested within a cluster-randomised trial of breastfeeding promotion in the Republic of Belarus were analysed. 17 046 healthy breastfed infants were enrolled from 31 maternity hospitals. 13 889 (81.5%) children were followed-up at 6.5 years. Exposure measures were any gastrointestinal infection in infancy (to 1 year) and hospitalisations for gastrointestinal infection in infancy and in childhood (1-6.5 years). The outcomes were systolic and diastolic blood pressure at age 6.5 years. The prevalence of any gastrointestinal infection in infancy, and of hospitalisation for gastrointestinal infection in infancy or childhood, was 11.4%, 3.2% and 6.0%, respectively. No associations were observed between systolic blood pressure and any gastrointestinal infection (mean difference in those with minus those without infection -0.04 mm Hg; 95% CI -0.52 to 0.43) or hospitalisation for gastrointestinal infection (difference=-0.22 mm Hg; -1.07 to 0.64) in infancy. Nor were associations observed between diastolic blood pressure and any gastrointestinal infection during infancy or hospitalisation for gastrointestinal infection during infancy or childhood. No evidence was found to prove that hospitalisation for gastrointestinal infection in infancy or childhood leads to raised blood pressure at age 6.5 years in a developed country setting.

  15. Pathomorphological and microbiological studies in sheep with special emphasis on gastrointestinal tract disorders

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sarvan; Jakhar, K. K.; Nehra, Vikas; Pal, Madan

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The present study was envisaged to elucidate the pathomorphological and microbiological aspects of gastrointestinal tract (GIT) disorders of sheep/lambs. Materials and Methods: Samples for research were collected from 12 sheep died with a history of GIT disorders which were brought for post-mortem examination to the Department of Veterinary Pathology, Lala Lajpat Rai University of Veterinary and Animal Sciences, Hisar, for pathomorphological and microbiological examination. Results: Gross pathological changes in various organs noticed were abomasitis, congestion and hemorrhages in intestine; necrotic foci on liver surface; enlarged, hard, and indurated mesenteric lymph nodes, hydropericardium, congestion, hemorrhages and consolidation of lungs and congestion and soft kidneys as the major change. On histopathological examination, there were abomasitis with leukocyte infiltration, enteritis with desquamation of mucosal epithelium and goblet cell hyperplasia, lymphadenitis with depletion of lymphocytes in the germinal center of lymphoid follicle, and splenitis with depletion of lymphocytes in the white pulp. In the liver congestion, degenerative changes in hepatocytes including cloudy swelling, fatty changes, congestion in sinusoids, and dilatation of sinusoids leading to atrophy of hepatocytes. Lungs evidenced edema, congestion, emphysema, serous inflammation, thickening of interlobular septa, fibrinous pleuritis, and peribronchiolar lymphoid follicle formation. Heart revealed sarcocystosis, fibrinous pericarditis, and hyalinization of the myocardium. In kidneys, congestion, focal interstitial nephritis, hyaline degeneration, and coagulative necrosis were seen. For microbiological aspects; cultural isolation was done from samples of liver, abomasum, mesenteric lymph nodes, spleen, heart blood, lungs, and kidneys from the carcasses of sheep/lambs. Escherichia coli was the only bacterium isolated during present studies. E. coli isolates from different tissues of

  16. Distribution of ghrelin peptide in the gastrointestinal tract of stomachless and stomach-containing teleosts.

    PubMed

    Arcamone, Nadia; Neglia, Simona; Gargiulo, Giuliana; Esposito, Vincenzo; Varricchio, Ettore; Battaglini, Pietro; De Girolamo, Paolo; Russo, Finizia

    2009-07-01

    The occurrence and localization of ghrelin peptide in the gastrointestinal tract of Carassius auratus and Dicentrarchus labrax, two fish species that exhibit different feeding behavior, different habitats, and different anatomical organizations of the gastroenteric tract, were examined by immunohistochemical methods and western blotting analysis. All of the gastrointestinal segments studied displayed immunohistochemical localizations of ghrelin peptide. Numerous single or clustered immunoreactive cells were found along the gastric folds, particularly in the pyloric region of Dicentrarcus labrax, whereas scattered ghrelin immunoreactive cells were observed in the intestinal epithelium of both fish species. Double immunolabeling PGP 9.5/ghrelin demonstrated the localization of ghrelin peptide also in nerve fibers and neuronal cells of the submucosal and myenteric plexuses, often in association with vascular structures. Western blotting analysis confirmed the presence of ghrelin peptide in the gatrointestinal tract of both species studied, whose molecular weight was similar to that of the corresponding mammalian prepro-ghrelin. The findings could support the hypothesis that this peptide is an important appetite regulator in fish and could confirm the presence of the ghrelin peptide, starting from its precursor proteins, in the gastrointestinal tract of the goldfish and the sea bass.

  17. Use of Diagnostic Imaging in the Evaluation of Gastrointestinal Tract Duplications

    PubMed Central

    Laskowska, Katarzyna; Gałązka, Przemysław; Daniluk-Matraś, Irena; Leszczyński, Waldemar; Serafin, Zbigniew

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Gastrointestinal tract duplication is a rare malformation associated with the presence of additional segment of the fetal gut. The aim of this study was to retrospectively review clinical features and imaging findings in intraoperatively confirmed cases of gastrointestinal tract duplication in children. Material/Methods The analysis included own material from the years 2002–2012. The analyzed group included 14 children, among them 8 boys and 6 girls. The youngest patient was diagnosed at the age of three weeks, and the oldest at 12 years of age. Results The duplication cysts were identified in the esophagus (n=2), stomach (n=5), duodenum (n=1), terminal ileum (n=5), and rectum (n=1). In four cases, the duplication coexisted with other anomalies, such as patent urachus, Meckel’s diverticulum, mesenteric cyst, and accessory pancreas. Clinical manifestation of gastrointestinal duplication cysts was variable, and some of them were detected accidently. Thin- or thick-walled cystic structures adjacent to the wall of neighboring gastrointestinal segment were documented on diagnostic imaging. Conclusions Ultrasound and computed tomography are the methods of choice in the evaluation of gastrointestinal duplication cysts. Apart from the diagnosis of the duplication cyst, an important issue is the detection of concomitant developmental pathologies, including pancreatic heterotopy. PMID:25114725

  18. The Importance of Interstitial Cells of Cajal in the Gastrointestinal Tract

    PubMed Central

    Al-Shboul, Othman A.

    2013-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) motility function and its regulation is a complex process involving collaboration and communication of multiple cell types such as enteric neurons, interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC), and smooth muscle cells. Recent advances in GI research made a better understanding of ICC function and their role in the GI tract, and studies based on different types of techniques have shown that ICC, as an integral part of the GI neuromuscular apparatus, transduce inputs from enteric motor neurons, generate intrinsic electrical rhythmicity in phasic smooth muscles, and have a mechanical sensation ability. Absence or improper function of these cells has been linked to some GI tract disorders. This paper provides a general overview of ICC; their discovery, subtypes, function, locations in the GI tract, and some disorders associated with their loss or disease, and highlights some controversial issues with regard to the importance of ICC in the GI tract. PMID:23319032

  19. [The choice of the method for restoring gastrointestinal tract continuity in gastric resection for peptic ulcer].

    PubMed

    Us, V G; Miliaev, M M; Zaikina, I D; Kuznetsov, S S; Gazazian, B R

    1992-02-01

    Resection of the stomach was carried out in 299 patients (in 151 for gastric ulcer and in 148 for duodenal ulcer). The method for restoring the continuity of the gastrointestinal tract after gastric resection was individualized according to the location of the ulcer, the patient's age, the character of complications of peptic ulcer, the topographoanatomical conditions in the zone of the operation, and the motility and acid-producing activity of the stomach. The indications and contraindications for various types of gastrointestinal anastomoses are discussed. Direct gastroduodenal anastomosis is considered the operation of choice, if it cannot be established a terminolateral gastroduodenal anastomosis is formed. One patient died after the operation.

  20. Chloroquine-Azithromycin Combination Antimalarial Treatment Decreases Risk of Respiratory- and Gastrointestinal-Tract Infections in Malawian Children

    PubMed Central

    Gilliams, Elizabeth A.; Jumare, Jibreel; Claassen, Cassidy W.; Thesing, Phillip C.; Nyirenda, Osward M.; Dzinjalamala, Fraction K.; Taylor, Terrie; Plowe, Christopher V.; Tracy, LaRee A.; Laufer, Miriam K.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Chloroquine-azithromycin is being evaluated as combination therapy for malaria. It may provide added benefit in treating or preventing bacterial infections that occur in children with malaria. Objective. We aim to evaluate the effect of treating clinical malaria with chloroquine-azithromycin on the incidence of respiratory-tract and gastrointestinal-tract infections compared to treatment with chloroquine monotherapy. Methods. We compared the incidence density and time to first events of respiratory-tract and gastrointestinal-tract infections among children assigned to receive chloroquine-azithromycin or chloroquine for all symptomatic malaria episodes over the course of 1 year in a randomized longitudinal trial in Blantyre, Malawi. Results. The incidence density ratios of total respiratory-tract infections and gastrointestinal-tract infections comparing chloroquine-azithromycin to chloroquine monotherapy were 0.67 (95% confidence interval [CI], .48, .94) and 0.74 (95% CI, .55, .99), respectively. The time to first lower-respiratory-tract and gastrointestinal-tract infections were significantly longer in the chloroquine-azithromycin arm compared to the chloroquine arm (P = .04 and P = .02, respectively). Conclusions. Children treated routinely with chloroquine-azithromycin had fewer respiratory and gastrointestinal-tract infections than those treated with chloroquine alone. This antimalarial combination has the potential to reduce the burden of bacterial infections among children in malaria-endemic countries. PMID:24652498

  1. Regulators of Actin Dynamics in Gastrointestinal Tract Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Steinestel, Konrad; Wardelmann, Eva; Hartmann, Wolfgang; Grünewald, Inga

    2015-01-01

    Reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton underlies cell migration in a wide variety of physiological and pathological processes, such as embryonic development, wound healing, and tumor cell invasion. It has been shown that actin assembly and disassembly are precisely regulated by intracellular signaling cascades that respond to changes in the cell microenvironment, ligand binding to surface receptors, or oncogenic transformation of the cell. Actin-nucleating and actin-depolymerizing (ANFs/ADFs) and nucleation-promoting factors (NPFs) regulate cytoskeletal dynamics at the leading edge of migrating cells, thereby modulating cell shape; these proteins facilitate cellular movement and mediate degradation of the surrounding extracellular matrix by secretion of lytic proteases, thus eliminating barriers for tumor cell invasion. Accordingly, expression and activity of these actin-binding proteins have been linked to enhanced metastasis and poor prognosis in a variety of malignancies. In this review, we will summarize what is known about expression patterns and the functional role of actin regulators in gastrointestinal tumors and evaluate first pharmacological approaches to prevent invasion and metastatic dissemination of malignant cells. PMID:26345720

  2. Mixed Adenoneuroendocrine Carcinomas (MANECs) of the Gastrointestinal Tract: An Update.

    PubMed

    La Rosa, Stefano; Marando, Alessandro; Sessa, Fausto; Capella, Carlo

    2012-01-16

    The systematic application of immunohistochemical techniques to the study of tumors has led to the recognition that neuroendocrine cells occur rather frequently in exocrine neoplasms of the gut. It is now well known that there is a wide spectrum of combinations of exocrine and neuroendocrine components, ranging from adenomas or carcinomas with interspersed neuroendocrine cells at one extreme to classical neuroendocrine tumors with a focal exocrine component at the other. In addition, both exocrine and neuroendocrine components can have different morphological features ranging, for the former, from adenomas to adenocarcinomas with different degrees of differentiation and, for the latter, from well differentiated to poorly differentiated neuroendocrine tumors. However, although this range of combinations of neuroendocrine and exocrine components is frequently observed in routine practice, mixed exocrine-neuroendocrine carcinomas, now renamed as mixed adenoneuroendocrine carcinomas (MANECs), are rare; these are, by definition, neoplasms in which each component represents at least 30% of the lesion. Gastrointestinal MANECs can be stratified in different prognostic categories according to the grade of malignancy of each component. The present paper is an overview of the main clinicopathological, morphological, immunohistochemical and molecular features of this specific rare tumor type.

  3. Mixed Adenoneuroendocrine Carcinomas (MANECs) of the Gastrointestinal Tract: An Update

    PubMed Central

    La Rosa, Stefano; Marando, Alessandro; Sessa, Fausto; Capella, Carlo

    2012-01-01

    The systematic application of immunohistochemical techniques to the study of tumors has led to the recognition that neuroendocrine cells occur rather frequently in exocrine neoplasms of the gut. It is now well known that there is a wide spectrum of combinations of exocrine and neuroendocrine components, ranging from adenomas or carcinomas with interspersed neuroendocrine cells at one extreme to classical neuroendocrine tumors with a focal exocrine component at the other. In addition, both exocrine and neuroendocrine components can have different morphological features ranging, for the former, from adenomas to adenocarcinomas with different degrees of differentiation and, for the latter, from well differentiated to poorly differentiated neuroendocrine tumors. However, although this range of combinations of neuroendocrine and exocrine components is frequently observed in routine practice, mixed exocrine-neuroendocrine carcinomas, now renamed as mixed adenoneuroendocrine carcinomas (MANECs), are rare; these are, by definition, neoplasms in which each component represents at least 30% of the lesion. Gastrointestinal MANECs can be stratified in different prognostic categories according to the grade of malignancy of each component. The present paper is an overview of the main clinicopathological, morphological, immunohistochemical and molecular features of this specific rare tumor type. PMID:24213223

  4. [Severe lower gastrointestinal tract bleeding due to diverticulosis].

    PubMed

    Ríos Zambudio, Antonio; Montoya Tabares, Mariano J; Rodríguez González, José Manuel; Febrero Sánchez, Beatriz; Albaladejo Meroño, Aquilino; Molina, Joaquin; Parrilla Paricio, Pascual

    2010-05-01

    Diverticulosis is the most frequent cause of lower gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding in adults in western countries. The aims of the present study were to analyze: 1) the diagnostic and therapeutic management of patients with severe lower GI bleeding due to diverticulosis; 2) associated morbidity and mortality; 3) the need for surgery, and 4) bleeding recurrence rates after hospital discharge. Were retrospectively reviewed 42 patients with severe lower GI bleeding due to diverticulosis. Patients with rectorrhagia requiring transfusion of at least three packed red blood cell units and those with a decrease in hematocrit of 10 points or more were included. As a control group, we used 133 patients with severe lower GI hemorrhage due to causes other than colonic diverticular disease. All patients were stabilized with conservative measures except one who required emergency surgery. Colonoscopy was performed in 39 patients and the most frequent finding consisted of recent signs of bleeding independently of whether colonoscopy was performed early or was delayed. Endoscopic treatment with Argon laser electrocoagulation was performed in one patient. Bleeding recurrence after hospital discharge occurred in 13 patients (31%); of these, seven (16%) required hospital readmission. Severe lower GI bleeding due to diverticulosis can usually be resolved with conservative treatment although the percentage of bleeding recurrence is high. Early endoscopy is not as important as in the remaining causes of severe lower GI bleeding.

  5. Bacterial microflora of the upper gastrointestinal tract in infants with protracted diarrhoea

    PubMed Central

    Challacombe, D. N.; Richardson, Judith M.; Rowe, B.; Anderson, Charlotte M.

    1974-01-01

    The aerobic and anaerobic bacterial microflora of the upper gastrointestinal tract in infants with protracted diarrhoea has been described and compared with a group of control infants without diarrhoea. The duodenal juice of patients with protracted diarrhoea was rarely sterile and was characterized by an increase in numbers and types of microorganisms and by the presence of coliforms, particularly Esch. coli. In individual patients the same serotypes of Esch. coli were found throughout the intestinal tract. The presence of Esch. coli in the upper small intestine may be as important to the aetiology of protracted diarrhoea as it is to acute diarrhoea. PMID:4598080

  6. [Glutamatergic neurotransmitter system in regulation of the gastrointestinal tract motor activity].

    PubMed

    Alekseeva, E V; Popova, T S; Sal'nikov, P S

    2015-01-01

    The review include actual facts, demonstrating high probability of glutamatergic neurotransmitter system role in the regulation of the gastrointestinal tract motor activity. These facts suggest significant role of the glutamatergic neurotransmitter system dysfunction in forming motor activity disorders of the digestive tract, including in patients in critical condition. The analysis is based on results of multiple experimental and clinical researches of glutamic acid and other components of the glutamatergic neurotransmitter system in central nervous system and autonomic nervous system (with the accent on the enteral nervous system) in normal conditions and with functioning changes of the glutamatergic neurotransmitter system in case of inflammation, hupoxia, stress and in critical condition.

  7. Multimodal treatment of gastrointestinal tract tumors: consequences for surgery.

    PubMed

    Siewert, J Rüdiger; Stein, Hubert J; von Rahden, Burkhard H A

    2005-08-01

    Formerly an exclusive business of surgery, gastrointestinal (GI) tumors are nowadays increasingly approached with multimodal strategies. Neoadjuvant concepts have had a particularly far-reaching impact on surgery and have contributed to improved survival. Modern pre-treatment staging and risk assessment provide the basis for decision on one of three general treatment concepts (1) Early cancers, confined to the mucosal/submucosal layers, are approached with primary surgery, without prior antineoplastic therapy. (2) Systemically metastasized tumors receive merely palliative treatment. (3) Locally advanced cancers are increasingly approached with neoadjuvant strategies. The benefit from these preoperative protocols is proven for diverse entities, but is evidently confined to a specific subgroup patients, i.e., the responders to neoadjuvant treatment. These are the ones benefiting most from subsequent surgical resection, which is required to ensure complete removal of the residual tumor tissue, as complete tumor regression occurs very rarely and cannot be proven without a specimen. The fact that responders will benefit and non-responders will not benefit or will even deteriorate during the neoadjuvant treatment makes early response prediction most demanding. An amazing new approach is the use of position emission tomography with fluro-desoxyglucose (FDG-PET) to assess the "metabolic response," which is possible as early as 14 days after initiation of the neoadjuvant protocol. This strategy offers the chance for modulating the surgical approach in accord i.e., with such metrobolic response termination of the protocol and proceeding to resection in the case of nonresponse. The future of GI cancer surgery is multimodal therapy in a response-based fashion and requires reponse-based trials for further evaluation.

  8. Synchronous occurrence of gastrointestinal stromal tumors and other digestive tract malignancies in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Yuan; Chen, Jiaju; Han, Luyin; Zhang, Bo; Chen, Zhixin; Chen, Jiaping

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims Elderly patients with gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) synchronous with other digestive tract malignancies have been rarely reported. In this study, clinicopathological characteristics were evaluated among elderly patients with GISTs with or without coexisting digestive tract malignancies. Methods A total of 161 patients (≥65 years) were retrospectively reviewed at the West China Hospital, Sichuan University from January 2009 to June 2014. Results Sixty-one patients were diagnosed with synchronous digestive tract malignancies (synchronous group), whereas 100 patients were diagnosed with no synchronous condition (no-synchronous group). The synchronous group exhibited a higher percentage of males (70.49% vs. 53.00%, P = 0.028) and poorer Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status than the no-synchronous group (P = 0.029). The three-year overall survival (OS) rate was significantly lower among patients with synchronous digestive tract malignancies than that among patients without synchronous condition (64.5% vs. 84.0%, P = 0.003). Multivariate analysis showed that the presence of synchronous digestive tract malignancies (P = 0.002), co-morbidity (P = 0.004), and mitotic count ≥10 mitoses/50 high power fields (P = 0.012) were associated with poor OS. Conclusions A synchronous condition with other digestive tract malignancies is common in elderly patients with GISTs. OS primarily depends on synchronous digestive tract malignancies, mitotic count, and co-morbidity. PMID:25826075

  9. Identification of Helicobacter spp. in gastrointestinal tract, pancreas and hepatobiliary system of stray cats

    PubMed Central

    Shojaee Tabrizi, A; Derakhshandeh, A; Esfandiari, A; Ali Atashi, Z

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the presence of Helicobacter species in different parts of gastrointestinal tract, hepatobiliary system and pancreas of stray cats. Six different sites at the level of genus, gastric (H. heilmannii and H. felis) and enterohepatic species of Helicobacter were investigated in six cats using species-specific primers by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Interestingly, DNA of enterohepatic spp. was detected in 1/6 duodenum, 2/6 colon and 1/6 pancreas specimens. Results of sequencing revealed that all of these four positive samples belong to Helicobacter canis. While cats have not been considered as a potential zoonotic danger for non-pylori Helicobacter infections, the results of current study show prompt re-evaluation of that view. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study about distribution of Helicobcater spp. in gastrointestinal tract of cats. PMID:27175206

  10. Statoviruses, A novel taxon of RNA viruses present in the gastrointestinal tracts of diverse mammals.

    PubMed

    Janowski, Andrew B; Krishnamurthy, Siddharth R; Lim, Efrem S; Zhao, Guoyan; Brenchley, Jason M; Barouch, Dan H; Thakwalakwa, Chrissie; Manary, Mark J; Holtz, Lori R; Wang, David

    2017-04-01

    Next-generation sequencing has expanded our understanding of the viral populations that constitute the mammalian virome. We describe a novel taxon of viruses named Statoviruses, for Stool associated Tombus-like viruses, present in multiple metagenomic datasets. These viruses define a novel clade that is phylogenetically related to the RNA virus families Tombusviridae and Flaviviridae. Five distinct statovirus types were identified in human, macaque, mouse, and cow gastrointestinal tract samples. The prototype genome, statovirus A, was frequently identified in macaque stool samples from multiple geographically distinct cohorts. Another genome, statovirus C1, was discovered in a stool sample from a human child with fever, cough, and rash. Further experimental data will clarify whether these viruses are infectious to mammals or if they originate from another source present in the mammalian gastrointestinal tract.

  11. Modulation of the enterohemorrhagic E. coli virulence program through the human gastrointestinal tract

    PubMed Central

    Barnett Foster, Debora

    2013-01-01

    Enteric pathogens must not only survive passage through the gastrointestinal tract but must also coordinate expression of virulence determinants in response to localized microenvironments with the host. Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC), a serious food and waterborne human pathogen, is well equipped with an arsenal of molecular factors that allows it to survive passage through the gastrointestinal tract and successfully colonize the large intestine. This review will explore how EHEC responds to various environmental cues associated with particular microenvironments within the host and how it employs these cues to modulate virulence factor expression, with a view to developing a conceptual framework for understanding modulation of EHEC’s virulence program in response to the host. In vitro studies offer significant insights into the role of individual environmental cues but in vivo studies using animal models as well as data from natural infections will ultimately provide a more comprehensive picture of the highly regulated virulence program of this pathogen. PMID:23552827

  12. Statoviruses, A novel taxon of RNA viruses present in the gastrointestinal tracts of diverse mammals

    PubMed Central

    Janowski, Andrew B.; Krishnamurthy, Siddharth R.; Lim, Efrem S.; Zhao, Guoyan; Brenchley, Jason M.; Barouch, Dan H.; Thakwalakwa, Chrissie; Manary, Mark J.; Holtz, Lori R.; Wang, David

    2017-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing has expanded our understanding of the viral populations that constitute the mammalian virome. We describe a novel taxon of viruses named Statoviruses, for Stool associated Tombus-like viruses, present in multiple metagenomic datasets. These viruses define a novel clade that is phylogenetically related to the RNA virus families Tombusviridae and Flaviviridae. Five distinct statovirus types were identified in human, macaque, mouse, and cow gastrointestinal tract samples. The prototype genome, statovirus A, was frequently identified in macaque stool samples from multiple geographically distinct cohorts. Another genome, statovirus C1, was discovered in a stool sample from a human child with fever, cough, and rash. Further experimental data will clarify whether these viruses are infectious to mammals or if they originate from another source present in the mammalian gastrointestinal tract. PMID:28152382

  13. Identification of Helicobacter spp. in gastrointestinal tract, pancreas and hepatobiliary system of stray cats.

    PubMed

    Shojaee Tabrizi, A; Derakhshandeh, A; Esfandiari, A; Ali Atashi, Z

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the presence of Helicobacter species in different parts of gastrointestinal tract, hepatobiliary system and pancreas of stray cats. Six different sites at the level of genus, gastric (H. heilmannii and H. felis) and enterohepatic species of Helicobacter were investigated in six cats using species-specific primers by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Interestingly, DNA of enterohepatic spp. was detected in 1/6 duodenum, 2/6 colon and 1/6 pancreas specimens. Results of sequencing revealed that all of these four positive samples belong to Helicobacter canis. While cats have not been considered as a potential zoonotic danger for non-pylori Helicobacter infections, the results of current study show prompt re-evaluation of that view. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study about distribution of Helicobcater spp. in gastrointestinal tract of cats.

  14. Dietary pectin up-regulates monocaboxylate transporter 1 in the rat gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Kirat, Doaa; Kondo, Koji; Shimada, Ritsu; Kato, Seiyu

    2009-04-01

    This work was undertaken to study the effect of pectin feeding on the expression level, cellular localization and functional activity of monocarboxylate transporter 1 (MCT1) in the gastrointestinal tract of rats. The results indicated that MCT1 protein level was significantly increased along the entire length of the gastrointestinal tract of pectin-fed rats in comparison with control animals. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed an increase in MCT1 in the stratified squamous epithelia of the forestomach as well as in the basolateral membranes of the cells lining the gastric pit of the glandular stomach of pectin-fed rats when compared with control animals. The parietal cells, which showed barely any or no detectable MCT1 in the control group, exhibited a strong intensity of MCT1 on the basolateral membranes in pectin-fed rats. In the small intestine of pectin-fed rats, strong immunopositivity for MCT1 was detected in the brush border and basolateral membranes of the absorptive enterocytes lining the entire villi, while in control rats, weak reactivity was detected on the brush border membrane in a few absorptive enterocytes in the villus tip. In the large intestine of control animals, MCT1 was detected on the basolateral membranes of the epithelia lining the caecum and colon. This staining intensity was markedly increased in pectin-fed rats, along with the appearance of strong reactivity for MCT1 on the apical membranes of the surface and crypt epithelia of caecum and colon. Our results also showed that MCT1 co-localizes with its chaperone, basigin (CD147), in the rat gastrointestinal tract, and that the pectin feeding increased the expression of CD147. In vivo functional studies revealed an enhanced acetate absorption in the colon of pectin-fed in comparison with control animals. We conclude that MCT1 is up-regulated along the gastrointestinal tract of pectin-fed rats, which might represent an adaptive response to the increased availability of its substrates.

  15. The gastro-intestinal tract as the major site of biological action of dietary melanoidins.

    PubMed

    Tagliazucchi, Davide; Bellesia, Andrea

    2015-06-01

    Emerging evidence from laboratory researches has highlighted the bioactivity of food melanoidins and melanoproteins. Whilst such studies have been carried out with different in vitro systems, information about melanoidins absorption and bio-availability are scarce. However, they are generally considered as poorly absorbable and bio-available compounds. Therefore, we present a review in which the gastro-intestinal tract is hypothesized to be the main site of action of food melanoidins and melanoproteins biological activity. We described recent data supporting this hypothesis both in vitro model systems and in vivo. Importantly, we focused this review only on the effect of melanoidins and melanoproteins extracted from food. Most of the studies had been carried out using water-soluble carbohydrate-based melanoidins isolated from different food sources (beer, barley coffee, coffee). In bakery products, melanoidins are protein-based structure (melanoproteins) which are largely insoluble in water. Dietary melanoidins and melanoproteins have been demonstrated to exert in vitro antioxidant and metal chelating ability in the gastro-intestinal tract reducing the formation of lipid hydroperoxides and advanced lipid oxidation end products during the digestion of meat. The reduction in the formation of these pro-atherogenic compounds has been shown to be followed by a decrease in their absorption in human volunteers. Food melanoidins have also shown in vitro anti-caries and prebiotic activities. We conclude by underlining the possible role of food melanoidins in the prevention of gastro-intestinal tract cancers. We hope this review will stimulate further research on food melanoidins and their biological activities in the gastro-intestinal tract.

  16. Organ-specific eosinophilic disorders of the skin, lung and gastrointestinal tract

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Dagmar; Wardlaw, Andrew; Rothenberg, Marc E.

    2010-01-01

    Eosinophils are multifunctional leukocytes that increase in various tissues in a variety of disorders. Locally, they can be involved in the initiation and propagation of diverse inflammatory responses. In this review, the clinical association of eosinophils with diseases of the skin, lung and gastrointestinal tract is summarized. An approach to determining the causal role of eosinophils in these diseases is presented. Recent findings concerning molecular diagnosis, etiology and treatment are discussed. PMID:20392477

  17. An endoscopic system for the early detection of cancers of the gastrointestinal tract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mckechnie, Tracy; Jahan, Ali; Tait, Iain; Cuschieri, Alfred; Sibbett, Wilson; Padgett, Miles

    1998-06-01

    We report a compact endoscopic imaging system suitable for the early detection of cancers throughout the gastrointestinal tract. The system incorporates a three-color camera to provide a conventional color image, a mercury lamp filtered between 360 and 450 nm to excite the photosensitizer, and an intensified camera to image the resulting fluorescence at 630 nm. Our results on over 30 resected specimens show a high optical contrast between the cancerous and healthy tissue.

  18. [About optimized designs and circuits of autonomous electric stimulators for the gastrointestinal tract].

    PubMed

    Glushchuk, S F

    2004-01-01

    Described in the paper are the key principles of designing of autonomous electrodes for the gastrointestinal tract (AE GT) as well as circuits of stimulating-pulse generators. A shape for the electric-stimulator frame, its geometric dimensions and choice of a material for electrodes are substantiated. The electric- and trauma-safety of AE GT is discussed. The main stimulating current parameters, as well as the flowchart and design of the electric stimulator are presented.

  19. The role of the gastrointestinal tract and microbiota on uremic toxins and chronic kidney disease development.

    PubMed

    Briskey, David; Tucker, Patrick; Johnson, David W; Coombes, Jeff S

    2017-02-01

    It is well-established that uremic toxins are positively correlated with the risk of developing chronic kidney disease and cardiovascular disease. In addition, emerging data suggest that gut bacteria exert an influence over both the production of uremic toxins and the development of chronic kidney disease. As such, modifying the gut microbiota may have the potential as a treatment for chronic kidney disease. This is supported by data that suggest that rescuing microbiota dysbiosis may: reduce uremic toxin production; prevent toxins and pathogens from crossing the intestinal barrier; and, reduce gastrointestinal tract transit time allowing nutrients to reach the microbiota in the distal portion of the gastrointestinal tract. Despite emerging literature, the gut-kidney axis has yet to be fully explored. A special focus should be placed on examining clinically translatable strategies that might encourage improvements to the microbiome, thereby potentially reducing the risk of the development of chronic kidney disease. This review aims to present an overview of literature linking changes to the gastrointestinal tract with microbiota dysbiosis and the development and progression of chronic kidney disease.

  20. Carbon monoxide, hydrogen sulfide, and nitric oxide as signaling molecules in the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Farrugia, Gianrico; Szurszewski, Joseph H

    2014-08-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S) used to be thought of simply as lethal and (for H2S) smelly gaseous molecules; now they are known to have important signaling functions in the gastrointestinal tract. CO and H2S, which are produced in the gastrointestinal tract by different enzymes, regulate smooth muscle membrane potential and tone, transmit signals from enteric nerves, and can regulate the immune system. The pathways that produce nitric oxide, H2S, and CO interact; each can inhibit and potentiate the level and activity of the other. However, there are significant differences between these molecules, such as in half-lives; CO is more stable and therefore able to have effects distal to the site of production, whereas nitric oxide and H2S are short lived and act only close to sites of production. We review their signaling functions in the luminal gastrointestinal tract and discuss how their pathways interact. We also describe other physiological functions of CO and H2S and how they might be used as therapeutic agents.

  1. A metronomic schedule as salvage chemotherapy for upper gastrointestinal tract cancer.

    PubMed

    Roberto, Michela; Romiti, Adriana; Onesti, Concetta E; D'Antonio, Chiara; Milano, Annalisa; Falcone, Rosa; Barucca, Viola; Palombi, Lucia; Righini, Riccardo; Marchetti, Paolo

    2016-02-01

    In recent years, metronomic chemotherapy, consisting of continuous administration of low doses of cytotoxic agents, has being used as rescue therapy for different tumours. The aim of this study was to retrospectively assess the efficacy and safety of low-dose metronomic, oral capecitabine in pretreated or frail patients with recurrent upper gastrointestinal tract cancer. Patients with pretreated upper gastrointestinal tract cancer or who were not candidates for standard chemotherapy because of toxicity concerns received capecitabine at 1500 mg per day continuously until disease progression or occurrence of toxicity. Forty-seven patients (25 oesophagogastric cancer, 22 pancreatobiliary cancer; 25 men, 22 women; median age 69 years, range 42-90) were included in the study. Forty-five percent of the patients had received at least two previous lines of treatment and the median number of previous treatments was 1 (range 0-5). Twelve (31.6%) patients achieved clinical benefit (one partial response, 11 stable disease), whereas nine (23.7%) patients were progression free for at least 6 months. In an exploratory analysis, there was a significant relationship between performance status and clinical benefit (hazard ratio=8.25; P=0.01). The median overall survival was 5 months. A good performance status was associated with a longer survival (hazard ratio=0.26; P<0.01). No severe toxicity or treatment-related death was reported. Metronomic capecitabine showed good safety and moderate activity in frail or pretreated patients with advanced, upper gastrointestinal tract cancer.

  2. Carbon Monoxide, Hydrogen Sulfide, and Nitric Oxide as Signaling Molecules in the Gastrointestinal Tract

    PubMed Central

    Farrugia, Gianrico; Szurszewski, Joseph H.

    2014-01-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S) used to be thought of simply as lethal and (for H2S) smelly gaseous molecules; now they are known to have important signaling functions in the gastrointestinal tract. CO and H2S, which are produced in the gastrointestinal tract by different enzymes, regulate smooth muscle membrane potential and tone, transmit signals from enteric nerves and can regulate the immune system. The pathways that produce nitric oxide (NO) H2S and CO interact—each can inhibit and potentiate the level and activity of the other. However, there are significant differences between these molecules, such as in half-lives; CO is more stable and therefore able to have effects distal to the site of production, whereas NO and H2S are short lived and act only close to sites of production. We review their signaling functions in the luminal gastrointestinal tract and discuss how their pathways interact. We also describe other physiologic functions of CO and H2S and how they might be used as therapeutic agents. PMID:24798417

  3. A wireless platform for in vivo measurement of resistance properties of the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Natali, C Di; Beccani, M; Obstein, K L; Valdastri, P

    2014-07-01

    Active locomotion of wireless capsule endoscopes has the potential to improve the diagnostic yield of this painless technique for the diagnosis of gastrointestinal tract disease. In order to design effective locomotion mechanisms, a quantitative measure of the propelling force required to effectively move a capsule inside the gastrointestinal tract is necessary. In this study, we introduce a novel wireless platform that is able to measure the force opposing capsule motion, without perturbing the physiologic conditions with physical connections to the outside of the gastrointestinal tract. The platform takes advantage of a wireless capsule that is magnetically coupled with an external permanent magnet. A secondary contribution of this manuscript is to present a real-time method to estimate the axial magnetic force acting on a wireless capsule manipulated by an external magnetic field. In addition to the intermagnetic force, the platform provides real-time measurements of the capsule position, velocity, and acceleration. The platform was assessed with benchtop trials within a workspace that extends 15 cm from each side of the external permanent magnet, showing average error in estimating the force and the position of less than 0.1 N and 10 mm, respectively. The platform was also able to estimate the dynamic behavior of a known resistant force with an error of 5.45%. Finally, an in vivo experiment on a porcine colon model validated the feasibility of measuring the resistant force in opposition to magnetic propulsion of a wireless capsule.

  4. Ghrelin-immunoreactive cells in the gastrointestinal tract of hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Janiuk, Izabela; Kaleczyc, Jerzy; Kasacka, Irena

    2016-01-01

    Ghrelin, an appetite-stimulating hormone secreted by the endocrine cells of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, has recently been shown to affect the function of the cardiovascular system. This study aimed to assess the number and morphology of ghrelin-immunopositive (GhrIP) cells in the gastrointestinal tract of rats at different developmental phases of experimentally evoked renovascular hypertension. The study involved 40 rats divided into two groups: control (C; n = 20) and rats with experimentally induced hypertension (EH; n = 20). The Goldblatt model of two-kidneys, one clip (2K1C) was used to induce hypertension. Renovascular hypertension was maintained for either 3 (EH1 group; n = 10) or 42 (EH2 group; n = 10) days. Paraffin sections from the cardia, corpus and pylorus of the stomach, as well as from the duodenum, jejunum, ileum and colon were processed for peroxidase immunohistochemistry. The number of GhrIP cells was significantly higher in the cardia and corpus of the stomach as well as the duodenum and jejunum of hypertensive rats compared to that found in the control animals. The increased number of GhrIP cells in the rat gastrointestinal tract after partial unilateral ligation of the renal artery suggests that renovascular hypertension may affect ghrelin secretion, which can contribute to the development of cardiovascular complications.

  5. Impact of the difference in surgical site on the physique in gastrointestinal tract cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Hara, Tsuyoshi; Kubo, Akira; Kogure, Eisuke; Ishii, Takaya

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of the present study was to observe physical function, physique (only BMI), and nutrition status (evaluated by serum albumin levels) from before surgery to after discharge among perioperative patients with gastrointestinal tract cancer and to examine the effect of difference in surgical site (i.e., stomach, colon, and rectum) in these patients. [Subjects and Methods] The study subjects were 70 patients who underwent surgical treatment for gastrointestinal tract cancer [36 males and 34 females, aged 59.3 ± 11.4 years (mean ± SD)]. The subjects were classified into three levels according to surgical site (stomach, colon, and rectum). We evaluated patients' physical function, physique, and nutrition status in the three points: before surgery, after surgery, and after discharge. The 6-minute walk distance was measured for physical function. Body mass index was measured for physique. The serum albumin level was measured for nutrition status. [Results] Significant declines in 6-minute walk distance, body mass index, and serum albumin were observed after surgery among the study subjects. In addition, a significant decline in body mass index was observed after discharge compared with before surgery. Regarding body mass index, a significant interaction between surgical site and evaluation times was observed for ANOVA. [Conclusion] These results suggest that BMI after discharge is significantly less than that before surgery and that body mass index changes from before surgery to after surgery are efficacy the difference of surgical site in patients who undergo surgical treatment for gastrointestinal tract cancer.

  6. Neuroendocrine peptide levels in the gastrointestinal tract of mice after unilateral cervical vagotomy.

    PubMed

    El-Salhy, M; Danielsson, A; Axelsson, H; Qian, B F

    2000-03-17

    The effects of left and right unilateral cervical vagotomy on the content of several neuroendocrine peptides were studied in different parts of the murine gastrointestinal tract, known to receive vagal innervation. The neuroendocrine peptides investigated were secretin, gastric inhibitory peptide (GIP), gastrin, motilin, peptide YY (PYY), somatostatin, substance P, VIP, neurotensin, neuropeptide Y (NPY), and galanin. The neuroendocrine peptide concentration was affected after both left and right vagotomy, and that the changes in the concentrations of the neuroendocrine peptide levels occurred in all the gastrointestinal segments investigated, namely antrum, small and large intestine. However, these changes varied, depending on which side was vagotomized and the interval after vagotomy. It is concluded that the vagus nerve had an important impact on the neuroendocrine system in the murine gut. It is suggested, furthermore that the contradictory results obtained earlier on the effect of vagotomy on the gastrointestinal peptides may depend on differences in the vagotomy methods used and on differences in observation time after vagotomy.

  7. Cannabinoid CB2 receptors in the gastrointestinal tract: a regulatory system in states of inflammation.

    PubMed

    Wright, K L; Duncan, M; Sharkey, K A

    2008-01-01

    The emerging potential for the cannabinoid (CB) system in modulating gastrointestinal inflammation has gained momentum over the last few years. Traditional and anecdotal use of marijuana for gastrointestinal disorders, such as diarrhoea and abdominal cramps is recognized, but the therapeutic benefit of cannabinoids in the 21st century is overshadowed by the psychoactive problems associated with CB1 receptor activation. However, the presence and function of the CB2 receptor in the GI tract, whilst not yet well characterized, holds great promise due to its immunomodulatory roles in inflammatory systems and its lack of psychotropic effects. This review of our current knowledge of CB2 receptors in the gastrointestinal tract highlights its role in regulating abnormal motility, modulating intestinal inflammation and limiting visceral sensitivity and pain. CB2 receptors represent a braking system and a pathophysiological mechanism for the resolution of inflammation and many of its symptoms. CB2 receptor activation therefore represents a very promising therapeutic target in gastrointestinal inflammatory states where there is immune activation and motility dysfunction.

  8. Endoscopic vacuum therapy for various defects of the upper gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Kuehn, Florian; Loske, Gunnar; Schiffmann, Leif; Gock, Michael; Klar, Ernst

    2017-01-11

    Postoperative, iatrogenic or spontaneous upper gastrointestinal defects result in significant morbidity and mortality of the patients. In the last few years, endoscopic vacuum therapy (EVT) has been recognized as a new promising method for repairing upper gastrointestinal defects of different etiology. However, probably due to insufficient data and no commercially available system for EVT of the upper gastrointestinal tract, until the end of 2014, covering of esophageal defects with self-expanding metal stents (SEMS) were still the mainstay of endoscopic therapy. The aim of this article is to review the data available about EVT for various upper gastrointestinal defects. A selective literature search was conducted in Medline and PubMed (2007-2016), taking into account all the published case series and case reports reporting on the use of EVT in the management of upper gastrointestinal defects. EVT works through intracorporal application of negative pressure at the defect zone with an electronic controlled vacuum device along a polyurethane sponge drainage. This results in closure of the esophageal defect and internal drainage of the septic focus, simultaneously. Compared to stenting, EVT enables regular viewing of wound conditions with control of the septic focus and adjustment of therapy. Moreover, endoscopical negative pressure is applicable in all esophageal regions (cricopharygeal, tubular, gastroesophageal junction) and in anastomotic anatomic variants. EVT can be used solely as a definite treatment or as a complimentary therapy combined with operative revision. In total, there are published data of more than 200 patients with upper gastrointestinal defects treated with EVT, showing succes rates from 70-100%. The available data indicate that EVT is feasible, safe and effective with good short-term and long-term clinical outcomes in the damage control of upper GI-tract leaks. Still, a prospective multi-center study has to be conducted to proof the definite

  9. Effect of soaking, germination, and enzyme treatment of whole barley on nutritional value and digestive tract parameters of broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Svihus, B; Newman, R K; Newman, C W

    1997-09-01

    1. An experiment was carried out to determine the effect of soaking at 0 degrees C, soaking at room temperature, germination, or enzyme treatment of whole barley on feeding value and digestive tract parameters of 2- to 4-week old broiler chickens given diets with 700g/kg whole barley. 2. Soaking or germination decreased the soluble and total beta-glucan content (P < 0.05) and, except for soaking at 0 degrees C, the acid extract viscosity of the grain also decreased (P < 0.05). Germination and soaking in the presence of enzymes produced the lowest beta-glucan content and viscosity. 3. Except for soaking in cold water, the soaking, germination and enzyme treatments increased weight gain and decreased food:gain ratio (P < 0.05). Correspondingly, the digestibility of protein, fat, and ash, and the digestible energy content, increased (P < 0.05) after enzyme treatment or germination. 4. Chickens fed on enzyme-treated or germinated barley diets had intestinal contents with a greater proportion of dry matter and lower viscosity than chickens fed on untreated barley (P < 0.05). Consequently, the cages and chickens were cleaner (P < 0.05) and the weight of digestive organs as proportion of live weight was lower. 5. Particle size analysis of excreta revealed that whole barley was efficiently ground by the gizzards of 16-d-old chickens, and very few whole kernels were found.

  10. Spatial Heterogeneity of Gut Microbial Composition along the Gastrointestinal Tract in Natural Populations of House Mice.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Taichi A; Nachman, Michael W

    There is a growing appreciation of the role of gut microbial communities in host biology. However, the nature of variation in microbial communities among different segments of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract is not well understood. Here, we describe microbial communities from ten different segments of the GI tract (mouth, esophagus, stomach, duodenum, ileum, proximal cecum, distal cecum, colon, rectum, and feces) in wild house mice using 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing. We also measured carbon and nitrogen stable isotopic ratios from hair samples of individual mice as a proxy for diet. We identified factors that may explain differences in microbial composition among gut segments, and we tested for differences among individual mice in the composition of the microbiota. Consistent with previous studies, the lower GI tract was characterized by a greater relative abundance of anaerobic bacteria and greater microbial diversity relative to the upper GI tract. The upper and lower GI tracts also differed in the relative abundances of predicted microbial gene functions, including those involved in metabolic pathways. However, when the upper and lower GI tracts were considered separately, gut microbial composition was associated with individual mice. Finally, microbial communities derived from fecal samples were similar to those derived from the lower GI tract of their respective hosts, supporting the utility of fecal sampling for studying the gut microbiota of mice. These results show that while there is substantial heterogeneity among segments of the GI tract, individual hosts play a significant role in structuring microbial communities within particular segments of the GI tract.

  11. Spatial Heterogeneity of Gut Microbial Composition along the Gastrointestinal Tract in Natural Populations of House Mice

    PubMed Central

    Nachman, Michael W.

    2016-01-01

    There is a growing appreciation of the role of gut microbial communities in host biology. However, the nature of variation in microbial communities among different segments of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract is not well understood. Here, we describe microbial communities from ten different segments of the GI tract (mouth, esophagus, stomach, duodenum, ileum, proximal cecum, distal cecum, colon, rectum, and feces) in wild house mice using 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing. We also measured carbon and nitrogen stable isotopic ratios from hair samples of individual mice as a proxy for diet. We identified factors that may explain differences in microbial composition among gut segments, and we tested for differences among individual mice in the composition of the microbiota. Consistent with previous studies, the lower GI tract was characterized by a greater relative abundance of anaerobic bacteria and greater microbial diversity relative to the upper GI tract. The upper and lower GI tracts also differed in the relative abundances of predicted microbial gene functions, including those involved in metabolic pathways. However, when the upper and lower GI tracts were considered separately, gut microbial composition was associated with individual mice. Finally, microbial communities derived from fecal samples were similar to those derived from the lower GI tract of their respective hosts, supporting the utility of fecal sampling for studying the gut microbiota of mice. These results show that while there is substantial heterogeneity among segments of the GI tract, individual hosts play a significant role in structuring microbial communities within particular segments of the GI tract. PMID:27669007

  12. Role of cytopathology in the diagnosis and management of gastrointestinal tract cancers

    PubMed Central

    Conrad, Rachel; Cobb, Camilla

    2012-01-01

    Cytology of gastro-intestinal (GI) tract lesions can be used successfully to diagnose neoplastic and non-neoplastic conditions, especially when combined with biopsies. Cytologic evaluation is widely accepted as a cost-effective method that allows rapid interpretation and triaging of material. Technical advances over the years have allowed simultaneous visualization of abnormal tissue and procurement of needle aspirates, brushings and biopsies from mucosal and deeper seated lesions. Successful cytologic examination of the GI tract is highly dependent on the skill of the endoscopist, specimen preparation, the expertise of the pathologist, and the recognition of the limitations of cytology. This article reviews the key cytologic features of important GI tract lesions, differential diagnoses, and pitfalls, and addresses the advantages and limitations of different collection techniques. PMID:22943018

  13. Stress in gastrointestinal tract and stable gastric pentadecapeptide BPC 157. Finally, do we have a solution?

    PubMed

    Sikiric, Predrag; Seiwerth, Sven; Rucman, Rudolf; Drmic, Domagoj; Stupnisek, Mirjana; Kokot, Antonio; Sever, Marko; Zoricic, Ivan; Zoricic, Zoran; Batelja, Lovorka; Ziger, Tihomil; Vlainic, Josipa; Rasic, Zarko; Bencic, Martina Lovric

    2017-02-20

    Selye's syndrome produced by diverse nocuous agents and "response to damage as such" means Selye's stress triad in stress coping response to reestablish homeostasis. Logically, from the gastrointestinal tract viewpoint, such organoprotective/healing response implies the angiogenic growth factors that commonly signify the healing. Thereby, the gastric pentadecapeptide BPC 157-organoprotection (huge range of beneficial effects) signifies the Selye's stress concept/stress coping response implemented in and from gastrointestinal tract, and BPC 157 as an integrative mediator that integrates the adaptive bodily response to stress. In clinical trials without side effects, LD1 was not achieved, BPC 157 healing in gastrointestinal tract, and particularly the healing of the extra-gastrointestinal tissues (i.e., skin/tendon/ligament/muscle/bone; nerve; cornea/ brain) were referred throughout its integrative capabilities (i.e., ulcerative colitis/multiple sclerosis model equally counteracted), native in gastrointestinal tract, stability in human gastric juice (and thereby, strong efficacy and applicability), its relevance for dopamine-system function (and thereby, counteracting effects of dopamine-system dysfunction and over-function, centrally and peripherally (mucosa maintenance); interaction with serotonin- and GABA-system)), afforded cytoprotection/adaptive cytoprotection/organoprotection (and thereby, beneficial effects on gastric and whole intestinal tract lesions and adaptation, wounds and fistulas healing, blood vessels, somatosensory neurons, NSAIDs-side effects (including also pancreas, liver, brain lesions, and blood disturbances, prolonged bleeding, thrombocytopenia, thrombosis)). Further, we combine such gut-brain axis and the NO-system where BPC 157 counteracts complications of either L-NAME application (i.e., various lesions aggravation, hypertension) or L-arginine application (i.e., hypotension, prolonged bleeding, thrombocytopenia). Also, BPC 157 particularly

  14. Laboratory procedures for the diagnosis of gastrointestinal tract diseases of dogs and cats.

    PubMed

    Matz, M E; Guilford, W G

    2003-12-01

    An increasing number of laboratory tests are available for diagnosis of gastrointestinal tract diseases in dogs and cats. Use of these tests can lead to more accurate and rapid diagnoses. This review discusses laboratory tests, both new and old, and the role they currently play in the evaluation of animals presented with gastrointestinal problems. A minimum database helps assess the severity of the disorder, detect extra-gastrointestinal causes of problems and assists in formulating diagnostic and therapeutic plans. Faecal examination remains one of the most important diagnostic procedures in the investigation of gastrointestinal problems. Zinc sulphate faecal flotation is an excellent routine screening technique for helminth and protozoal infections, including giardiasis. Rectal cytology can assist in the diagnosis of large bowel disorders. Interpretation of faecal immunodiagnostic tests is hampered by insufficient knowledge of test sensitivities and specificities. Routine faecal cultures are not warranted and faecal occult blood tests are rarely indicated. Serum tests for gastric inflammation are now under development. The serum trypsin-like immunoreactivity test remains the gold standard technique for the diagnosis of exocrine pancreatic insufficiency. Breath hydrogen tests can be helpful in assessing the functional relevance of mild abnormalities in small-bowel biopsy specimens. Subnormal concentrations of serum cobalamin appear to be more specific indicators of gastrointestinal disease in cats than in dogs. Tests for small intestinal bacterial overgrowth remain controversial and assessment of gastrointestinal permeability has yet to prove its value in the diagnostic assessment of companion animals with gastrointestinal problems. Faecal alpha1-protease inhibitor shows promise for the diagnosis of protein-losing enteropathy.

  15. Synchronous gastric gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) and other primary neoplasms of gastrointestinal tract: report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Ramneet; Bhalla, Sunita; Nundy, Samiran; Jain, Sunila

    2013-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) are the most common mesenchymal neoplasms of the gastrointestinal tract with a malignant potential. However, uncommonly they can be associated with synchronous tumors of different histogenesis. We herein report two cases of gastric GIST with synchronous tumors. The first case is of a 50-year-old male patient who was suspected with GIST of stomach and was incidentally found to have an associated duodenal neuroendo-crine neoplasm. The second case is of a 62-year-old male who, while undergoing surgery for a primary colon adenocarcinoma, was incidentally detected to have a coexistent gastric GIST initially suspected to be a metastatic nodule. Coexistence of gastric GIST with neuroendocrine tumor is extremely rare. To the best of our knowledge this is the second case of gastric GIST coexisting with duodenal neuroendocrine tumor to be reported in the literature. Similarly, association of GIST with adenocarcinoma is uncommon. We herein analyze the pathological findings of two such cases, and we review the malignant potential of these synchronous tumors.

  16. Chlamydial infection of the gastrointestinal tract: a reservoir for persistent infection

    PubMed Central

    Yeruva, Laxmi; Spencer, Nicole; Bowlin, Anne K.; Wang, Yin; Rank, Roger G.

    2013-01-01

    The mechanism by which chlamydiae persist in vivo remains undefined; however, chlamydiae in most animals persist in the gastrointestinal tract (GI) and are transmitted via the fecal-oral route. Oral infection of mice with Chlamydia muridarum was previously shown to establish a long-term persistent infection in the GI tract. In this study, BALB/c, DBA/2 and C57Bl/6 mice, infected orally with C. muridarum, were infected in the cecum for as long as 100 days in the absence of pathology. The primary target tissue was the cecum although the large intestine was also infected in most animals. A strong serum IgG and cecal IgA antibody response developed. Lymphocyte proliferation assays to chlamydial antigen on mesenteric lymph node cells were positive by day 10 and peaked on days 15–21, but the response returned to baseline levels by 50 days, despite the ongoing presence of the organism in the cecum. Since studies have shown that women and men become infected orally with chlamydiae, we propose that the GI tract is a site of persistent infection and that immune down-regulation in the gut allows chlamydiae to persist indefinitely. As a result, women may become reinfected via contamination of the genital tract from the lower GI tract. PMID:23843274

  17. Structure and function of the gastrointestinal tract of the Florida manatee, Trichechus manatus latirostris.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, J E; Rommel, S A

    1996-07-01

    The Florida manatee, Trichechus manatus latirostris (Sirenia: Trichechidae), is the largest herbivorous marine mammal. Previously, components of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract of the species have been described, but no comprehensive descriptions of the gross and microscopic anatomy existed. This study integrates function and structure of the entire Florida manatee GI tract. The GI tracts of several recently dead Florida manatees were examined from the following viewpoints: gross anatomical studies of preserved and unpreserved specimens, histology and histochemistry, and ultrastructure. The manatee GI tract has an enlarged hindgut, as do other nonruminant herbivores (i.e., hindgut digesters such as horses), but it also has important adaptations not seen in most other mammals. These structural adaptations include a discrete accessory digestive gland (the cardiac gland), submucosal mucous glands along the greater curvature of the stomach, and unkeratinized, stratified squamous epithelial cells overlying the glandular mucosae of the pyloric antrum, midgut cecum, colon, and rectum. The adaptations described above may relate to osmoregulation as well as to herbivory. The Florida manatee GI tract is most similar to those of other members of the Order Sirenia and to that of the herbivorous green sea turtle (Chelonia mydas), but it also shows superficial similarities to those of phylogenetically close Orders, the Proboscidea and Hyracoidea. The immense size of both the manatee and its large intestine suggests that, relative to smaller hindgut digesters, manatees have a slow rate of passage of digesta and efficient breakdown of fibrous plant material.

  18. Bacterial diversity in different regions of gastrointestinal tract of Giant African Snail (Achatina fulica)

    PubMed Central

    Pawar, Kiran D; Banskar, Sunil; Rane, Shailendra D; Charan, Shakti S; Kulkarni, Girish J; Sawant, Shailesh S; Ghate, Hemant V; Patole, Milind S; Shouche, Yogesh S

    2012-01-01

    The gastrointestinal (GI) tract of invasive land snail Achatina fulica is known to harbor metabolically active bacterial communities. In this study, we assessed the bacterial diversity in the different regions of GI tract of Giant African snail, A. fulica by culture-independent and culture-dependent methods. Five 16S rRNA gene libraries from different regions of GI tract of active snails indicated that sequences affiliated to phylum γ-Proteobacteria dominated the esophagus, crop, intestine, and rectum libraries, whereas sequences affiliated to Tenericutes dominated the stomach library. On phylogenetic analysis, 30, 27, 9, 27, and 25 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) from esophagus, crop, stomach, intestine, and rectum libraries were identified, respectively. Estimations of the total bacterial diversity covered along with environmental cluster analysis showed highest bacterial diversity in the esophagus and lowest in the stomach. Thirty-three distinct bacterial isolates were obtained, which belonged to 12 genera of two major bacterial phyla namely γ-Proteobacteria and Firmicutes. Among these, Lactococcus lactis and Kurthia gibsonii were the dominant bacteria present in all GI tract regions. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) analysis indicated significant differences in bacterial load in different GI tract regions of active and estivating snails. The difference in the bacterial load between the intestines of active and estivating snail was maximum. Principal component analysis (PCA) of terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism suggested that bacterial community structure changes only in intestine when snail enters estivation state. PMID:23233413

  19. A microbiota-centric view of diseases of the upper gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Nardone, Gerardo; Compare, Debora; Rocco, Alba

    2017-04-01

    The distinctive anatomy and physiology of the upper gastrointestinal tract and the difficulty of obtaining samples led to the theory that it was bacteria free. However, multiomics studies are indicating otherwise. Although influenced by both oral and gastric bacteria, the resident microbial ecosystem in the oesophagus is dominated by Streptococcus. A shift from Gram-positive to Gram-negative bacteria occurs in oesophagitis and Barrett's oesophagus, and this shift might be involved in the pathogenesis of oesophageal adenocarcinoma. The gastric microenvironment is populated by microbial communities mainly of the Firmicutes, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Proteobacteria phyla and species of the Lactobacillus, Streptococcus, and Propionibacterium genera. The composition of gastric microbiota is highly dynamic, and is influenced by acid suppression, gastric inflammation, and Helicobacter pylori. Duodenal microbes are also implicated in the onset and outcome of coeliac disease. Bacteria of the genera Bacteroides, Clostridium, and Staphylococcus dominate the duodenal flora in active coeliac disease whereas lactobacilli and bifidobacteria decrease. Although knowledge of the composition of the microbiota of the upper gastrointestinal tract has advanced substantially, this information is far from being translated to the clinical setting. In this Review, we assess the data related to the potential contribution of microbes to the susceptibility for and pathogenesis of upper gastrointestinal diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Linear distribution of nematodes in the gastrointestinal tract of tracer lambs.

    PubMed

    Makovcová, Katerina; Langrová, Iva; Vadlejch, Jaroslav; Jankovská, Ivana; Lytvynets, Andriy; Borkovcová, Marie

    2008-12-01

    Forty-eight tracer lambs were killed in 2004-2007. The abomasum, duodenum, small intestine (jejunum and ileum), colon and caecum were collected and processed for parasites enumeration and identification-mucosal scrapings of both abomasums and intestines were digested. Out of 48 gastrointestinal tracts examined, all were found to be positive for nematode infection. Seventeen species of gastrointestinal nematodes were recovered: Bunostomum trigonocephalum, Cooperia curticei, Haemonchus contortus, Chabertia ovina, Nematodirus battus, Nematodirus filicollis, Oesophagostomum venulosum, Teladorsagia circumcincta, Trichostrongylus axei, Trichostrongylus colubriformis, Trichostrongylus vitrinus, Strongyloides papillosus, Trichuris ovis, Trichuris globulosa, Trichuris skrjabini and Skrjabinema ovis. All species were searched for in the entire gastrointestinal tract. Six species of nematodes were recovered from abnormal sites, naturally in small numbers of lambs as well as in small amounts: Nematodirus battus in the abomasums (6.67% of lambs), N. filicollis in the caecum and in the colon (%4 and 8%, respectively), T. axei in the colon (9.52%), T. colubriformis in the colon (13.89%), T. vitrinus in the caecum (16.67%), in the colon (20.00%) and in the abomasum (3.33%). T. ovis was found in one case in the small intestine.

  1. [Expression of neuropeptide Y and long leptin receptor in gastrointestinal tract of giant panda].

    PubMed

    Luo, Qihui; Tang, Xiuying; Chen, Zhengli; Wang, Kaiyu; Wang, Chengdong; Li, Desheng; Li, Caiwu

    2015-08-01

    To study the expression and distribution of neuropeptide Y (NPY) and long leptin receptor (OB-Rb) in the gastrointestinal tract of giant panda, samples of three animals were collected from the key laboratory for reproduction and conservation genetics of endangered wildlife of Sichuan province, China conservation and research center for the giant panda. Paraffin sections of giant panda gastrointestinal tissue samples were observed using hematoxylin-eosin staining (HE) and strept actividin-biotin complex immunohistochemical staining (IHC). The results show that the intestinal histology of three pandas was normal and no pathological changes, and there were rich single-cell and multi-cell mucous glands, long intestinal villi and thick muscularis mucosa and muscle layer. Positive cells expressing NPY and OB-Rb were widely detected in the gastrointestinal tract by IHC methods. NPY positive nerve fibers and neuronal cell were widely distributed in submucosal plexus and myenteric plexus, especially in the former. They were arranged beaded or point-like shape. NPY positive cells were observed in the shape of ellipse and polygon and mainly located in the mucous layer and intestinal glands. OB-Rb positive cells were mainly distributed in the mucous layer and the laminae propria, especially the latter. These results confirmed that NPY and OB-Rb are widely distributed in the gut of the giant panda, which provide strong reference for the research between growth and development, digestion and absorption, and immune function.

  2. The Importance of the Gastrointestinal Tract in Controlling Food Intake and Regulating Energy Balance.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Mariana P; Batterham, Rachel L

    2017-05-01

    The gastrointestinal tract, the key interface between ingested nutrients and the body, plays a critical role in regulating energy homeostasis. Gut-derived signals convey information regarding incoming nutrients to the brain, initiating changes in eating behavior and energy expenditure, to maintain energy balance. Here we review hormonal, neural, and nutrient signals emanating from the gastrointestinal tract and evidence for their role in controlling feeding behavior. Mechanistic studies that have utilized pharmacologic and/or transgenic approaches targeting an individual hormone/mediator have yielded somewhat disappointing body weight changes, often leading to the hormone/mediator in question being dismissed as a potential obesity therapy. However, the recent finding of sustained weight reduction in response to systemic administration of a long-acting analog of the gut-hormone glucagon-like peptide-1 highlights the therapeutic potential of gut-derived signals acting via nonphysiologic mechanisms. Thus, we also review therapeutics strategies being utilized or developed to leverage gastrointestinal signals in order to treat obesity. Copyright © 2017 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Survival and Germination of Bacillus cereus Spores without Outgrowth or Enterotoxin Production during In Vitro Simulation of Gastrointestinal Transit

    PubMed Central

    Ceuppens, Siele; Uyttendaele, Mieke; Drieskens, Katrien; Heyndrickx, Marc; Rajkovic, Andreja; Boon, Nico

    2012-01-01

    To study the gastrointestinal survival and enterotoxin production of the food-borne pathogen Bacillus cereus, an in vitro simulation experiment was developed to mimic gastrointestinal passage in 5 phases: (i) the mouth, (ii) the stomach, with gradual pH decrease and fractional emptying, (iii) the duodenum, with high concentrations of bile and digestive enzymes, (iv) dialysis to ensure bile reabsorption, and (v) the ileum, with competing human intestinal bacteria. Four different B. cereus strains were cultivated and sporulated in mashed potato medium to obtain an inoculum of 7.0 log spores/ml. The spores showed survival and germination during the in vitro simulation of gastrointestinal passage, but vegetative outgrowth of the spores was suppressed by the intestinal bacteria during the final ileum phase. No bacterial proliferation or enterotoxin production was observed, despite the high inoculum levels. Little strain variability was observed: except for the psychrotrophic food isolate, the spores of all strains survived well throughout the gastrointestinal passage. The in vitro simulation experiments investigated the survival and enterotoxin production of B. cereus in the gastrointestinal lumen. The results obtained support the hypothesis that localized interaction of B. cereus with the host's epithelium is required for diarrheal food poisoning. PMID:22923409

  4. Coordinate developmental regulation of purine catabolic enzyme expression in gastrointestinal and postimplantation reproductive tracts

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    Using histochemical detection, we have visualized in situ the complete metabolic pathway for the degradation of purine nucleotides. From the tongue to the ileum, diverse epithelial cell types lining the lumen of the mouse gastrointestinal (GI) tract strongly coexpress each of the five key purine catabolic enzymes. Dramatic increases in the expression of each enzyme occurred during postnatal maturation of the GI tract. Using in situ hybridization, an intense accumulation of adenosine deaminase (ADA) mRNA was detected only within GI epithelial cells undergoing postmitotic differentiation. In a similar manner, at the developing maternal-fetal interface, high level expression of the purine catabolic pathway also occurred in a unique subset of maternal decidual cells previously known to express high levels of alkaline phosphatase and ADA. This induction occurred almost immediately after implantation in the periembryonic maternal decidual cells, shortly thereafter in antimesometrial decidual cells, and later in cells of the placental decidua basalis: all of which contain cell types thought to be undergoing programmed cell death. The expression of the pathway at the site of embryo implantation appears to be critical because its pharmacologic inhibition during pregnancy has been found to be embryolethal or teratogenic. Purine destruction at these nutritional interfaces (placenta and gastrointestinal tract) seem to override any potential economy of purine salvage, and may represent biochemical adaptation to nucleic acid breakdown occurring in the context of dietary digestion or extensive programmed cell death. PMID:1918135

  5. Influence of pH on Drug Absorption from the Gastrointestinal Tract: A Simple Chemical Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickman, Raymond J. S.; Neill, Jane

    1997-07-01

    A simple model of the gastrointestinal tract is obtained by placing ethyl acetate in contact with water at pH 2 and pH 8 in separate test tubes. The ethyl acetate corresponds to the lipid material lining the tract while the water corresponds to the aqueous contents of the stomach (pH 2) and intestine (pH 8). The compounds aspirin, paracetamol and 3-aminophenol are used as exemplars of acidic, neutral and basic drugs respectively to illustrate the influence which pH has on the distribution of each class of drug between the aqueous and organic phases of the model. The relative concentration of drug in the ethyl acetate is judged by applying microlitre-sized samples of ethyl acetate to a layer of fluorescent silica which, after evaporation of the ethyl acetate, is viewed under an ultraviolet lamp. Each of the three drugs, if present in the ethyl acetate, becomes visible as a dark spot on the silica layer. The observations made in the model system correspond well to the patterns of drug absorption from the gastrointestinal tract described in pharmacology texts and these observations are convincingly explained in terms of simple acid-base chemistry.

  6. Nitrogenase diversity and activity in the gastrointestinal tract of the wood-eating catfish Panaque nigrolineatus

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Ryan; Zhang, Fan; Watts, Joy E M; Schreier, Harold J

    2015-01-01

    The Amazonian catfish, Panaque nigrolineatus, consume large amounts of wood in their diets. The nitrogen-fixing community within the gastrointestinal (GI) tract of these catfish was found to include nifH phylotypes that are closely related to Clostridium sp., Alpha and Gammaproteobacteria, and sequences associated with GI tracts of lower termites. Fish fed a diet of sterilized palm wood were found to contain nifH messenger RNA within their GI tracts, displaying high sequence similarity to the nitrogen-fixing Bradyrhizobium group. Nitrogenase activity, measured by acetylene reduction assays, could be detected in freshly dissected GI tract material and also from anaerobic enrichment cultures propagated in nitrogen-free enrichment media; nifH sequences retrieved from these cultures were dominated by Klebsiella- and Clostridium-like sequences. Microscopic examination using catalyzed reporter deposition-enhanced immunofluorescence revealed high densities of nitrogenase-containing cells colonizing the woody digesta within the GI tract, as well as cells residing within the intestinal mucous layer. Our findings suggest that the P. nigrolineatus GI tract provides a suitable environment for nitrogen fixation that may facilitate production of reduced nitrogen by the resident microbial population under nitrogen limiting conditions. Whether this community is providing reduced nitrogen to the host in an active or passive manner and whether it is present in a permanent or transient relationship remains to be determined. The intake of a cellulose rich diet and the presence of a suitable environment for nitrogen fixation suggest that the GI tract microbial community may allow a unique trophic niche for P. nigrolineatus among fish. PMID:25909976

  7. Nitrogenase diversity and activity in the gastrointestinal tract of the wood-eating catfish Panaque nigrolineatus.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Ryan; Zhang, Fan; Watts, Joy E M; Schreier, Harold J

    2015-12-01

    The Amazonian catfish, Panaque nigrolineatus, consume large amounts of wood in their diets. The nitrogen-fixing community within the gastrointestinal (GI) tract of these catfish was found to include nifH phylotypes that are closely related to Clostridium sp., Alpha and Gammaproteobacteria, and sequences associated with GI tracts of lower termites. Fish fed a diet of sterilized palm wood were found to contain nifH messenger RNA within their GI tracts, displaying high sequence similarity to the nitrogen-fixing Bradyrhizobium group. Nitrogenase activity, measured by acetylene reduction assays, could be detected in freshly dissected GI tract material and also from anaerobic enrichment cultures propagated in nitrogen-free enrichment media; nifH sequences retrieved from these cultures were dominated by Klebsiella- and Clostridium-like sequences. Microscopic examination using catalyzed reporter deposition-enhanced immunofluorescence revealed high densities of nitrogenase-containing cells colonizing the woody digesta within the GI tract, as well as cells residing within the intestinal mucous layer. Our findings suggest that the P. nigrolineatus GI tract provides a suitable environment for nitrogen fixation that may facilitate production of reduced nitrogen by the resident microbial population under nitrogen limiting conditions. Whether this community is providing reduced nitrogen to the host in an active or passive manner and whether it is present in a permanent or transient relationship remains to be determined. The intake of a cellulose rich diet and the presence of a suitable environment for nitrogen fixation suggest that the GI tract microbial community may allow a unique trophic niche for P. nigrolineatus among fish.

  8. Mitochondrial enteropathy: the primary pathology may not be within the gastrointestinal tract

    PubMed Central

    Chinnery, P; Jones, S; Sviland, L; Andrews, R; Parsons, T; Turnbull, D; Bindoff, L

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) defects are an important cause of disease. Although gastrointestinal symptoms are common in these patients, their pathogenesis remains uncertain.
AIM—To investigate the role of the mtDNA defect in the production of gastrointestinal dysfunction.
PATIENT—A 20 year old woman who presented at 15 years of age with recurrent vomiting and pseudo-obstruction, who did not respond to conservative management and ultimately had subtotal gastrectomy and Roux-en-y reconstruction. She subsequently presented with status epilepticus and was found to have a mitochondrial respiratory chain disorder due to a pathogenic mtDNA point mutation (A3243G).
METHODS—Resected bowel was studied using light and electron microscopy and mtDNA analysed from both mucosal and muscular layers using polymerase chain reaction generated RFLP analysis. 
RESULTS— Histological and electron microscopic studies revealed no morphological abnormalities in the resected stomach, and molecular genetic analysis failed to identify the genetic defect in either the mucosal or muscle layers.
CONCLUSION—This study suggests that in some individuals with gastrointestinal symptoms associated with established mitochondrial DNA disease, the primary pathology of the mitochondrial enteropathy lies outside the gastrointestinal tract.


Keywords: mitochondrial encephalomyopathy; cyclical vomiting; pseudo-obstruction PMID:11115833

  9. Gastrointestinal tract spindle cell lesions--just like real estate, it's all about location.

    PubMed

    Voltaggio, Lysandra; Montgomery, Elizabeth A

    2015-01-01

    Interpretation of gastrointestinal tract mesenchymal lesions is simplified merely by knowing in which anatomic layer they are usually found. For example, Kaposi sarcoma is detected on mucosal biopsies, whereas inflammatory fibroid polyp is nearly always in the submucosa. Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are generally centered in the muscularis propria. Schwannomas are essentially always in the muscularis propria. Mesenteric lesions are usually found in the small bowel mesentery. Knowledge of the favored layer is even most important in interpreting colon biopsies, as many mesenschymal polyps are encountered in the colon. Although GISTs are among the most common mesenchymal lesions, we will concentrate our discussion on other mesenchymal lesions, some of which are in the differential diagnosis of GIST, and point out some diagnostic pitfalls, particularly in immunolabeling.

  10. Bioaccessibility and degradation of naturally occurring arsenic species from food in the human gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Chávez-Capilla, Teresa; Beshai, Mona; Maher, William; Kelly, Tamsin; Foster, Simon

    2016-12-01

    Humans are exposed to organic arsenic species through their diet and therefore, are susceptible to arsenic toxicity. Investigating the transformations occurring in the gastrointestinal tract will influence which arsenic species to focus on when studying metabolism in cells. Using a physiologically based extraction test, the bioaccessibility of arsenic species was determined after the simulated gastrointestinal digestion of rice, seaweed and fish. Pure standards of the major arsenic species present in these foodstuffs (arsenic glutathione complexes, arsenosugars and short chain fatty acids) were also evaluated to assess the effect of the food matrix on bioaccessibility and transformation. Approximately 80% of arsenic is released from these foodstuffs, potentially becoming available. Hydrolysis and demethylation of arsenic glutathione complexes and arsenosugars standards was observed, but no transformations occurred to arsenosugars present in seaweed. Demethylation of MA and DMA from rice occurs increasing the amount of inorganic arsenic species available for metabolism. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. [New approaches in obesity treatment: the gastrointestinal tract as an endocrine organ].

    PubMed

    Silveira Rodríguez, Manuela Belén; Gómez-Pan, Antonio; Carraro Casieri, Raffaele

    2006-09-02

    The gastrointestinal tract, besides digesting and processing nutrients, is now regarded as an endocrine organ able to modulate appetite, satiety, and carbohydrate metabolism. Several enteroendocrine cells produce numerous peptides codifying either orexigenic (ghrelin, orexins) or anorexigenic signals (pancreatic polypeptide, peptide YY, cholecystokinin, amylin, bombesin homologs, apolipoprotein A-IV, glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide, glucagon-like peptide 1, oxyntomodulin), which interact in a complex network with other peripheral signals of energy balance and with different neuropeptides involved in the central control of appetite and energy homeostasis. The growing knowledge of the actions of these gastrointestinal peptides on appetite regulation and carbohydrate metabolism, and subsequent synthesis of analogs, particularly those derived from amylin and incretins, herald a new era in the therapy of 2 closely related diseases, obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  12. [Endoscopic diagnostics and treatment of submucous tumors of the upper gastrointestinal tract].

    PubMed

    Starkov, Iu G; Solodinina, E N; Shishin, K V; Novozhilova, A V; Kurushkina, N A

    2011-01-01

    The endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) is considered to be the leading method of diagnostic of the submucous gastrointestinal tumors. Results of diagnostics and treatment of submucous tumors of the upper gastrointestinal tract in 38 patients were analyzed. EUS was performed in 37 (97,4%) of patients, which allowed to detect the origin, size and localization of the tumor. The differential diagnostic algorithm was suggested together with certain indications for various surgical treatment modalities. Thereby, endoscopic ablation is reasonable when the tumor invades not deeper than muscle plate of mucosa or the submucose layer. Laparoscopic full-layer resection of the organ wall is necessary when the tumor invades the muscle layer. Larger tumors or those of any size, but with preoperative signs of high malignancy must be eradicated through laparotomy, meeting all principles of oncology.

  13. Probiotics to enhance anti-infective defences in the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Gill, Harsharnjit S

    2003-10-01

    Several clinical studies have demonstrated the therapeutic and/or prophylactic efficacy of specific probiotics against acute viral gastroenteritis and antibiotic-associated diarrhoea (including Clostridium difficile infection). Emerging evidence also suggests beneficial effects against Helicobacter pylori infection. The evidence of efficacy against traveller's diarrhoea remains, however, inconclusive. The precise mechanisms by which probiotics potentiate host gastrointestinal defences and mediate protection are not fully known. There is evidence to suggest, however, that probiotics might contribute to host defence by reinforcing non-immunological defences and stimulating both specific and non-specific host immune responses. Little is known about the relative importance of the probiotic-stimulated mechanisms in host protection. This review summarises the evidence for the anti-infective effects of probiotics and discusses the effect of orally delivered probiotics on non-immunological and immunological defence mechanisms in the host, especially in the gastrointestinal tract.

  14. Horizontal gene transfer in the human gastrointestinal tract: potential spread of antibiotic resistance genes

    PubMed Central

    Huddleston, Jennifer R

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial infections are becoming increasingly difficult to treat due to widespread antibiotic resistance among pathogens. This review aims to give an overview of the major horizontal transfer mechanisms and their evolution and then demonstrate the human lower gastrointestinal tract as an environment in which horizontal gene transfer of resistance determinants occurs. Finally, implications for antibiotic usage and the development of resistant infections and persistence of antibiotic resistance genes in populations as a result of horizontal gene transfer in the large intestine will be discussed. PMID:25018641

  15. A Large-Sized Phytobezoar Located on the Rare Site of the Gastrointestinal Tract

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jee Eun; Kim, Gi Ae; Kim, Ga Hee; Yoon, Da Lim; Jeon, Sung Jin; Jung, Hwoon-Yong; Kim, Jin-Ho

    2013-01-01

    Bezoars are concretions of undigested material and are most often observed in the stomach. They can occur at any site in the gastrointestinal tract; however, duodenal localization is very rare. We report the case of a 71-year-old male who had undergone subtotal gastrectomy with gastroduodenostomy and experienced severe epigastric discomfort, abdominal pain, and vomiting for a few days. An approximately 7×8 cm-sized mass was found on an abdominal computed tomography scan. On following endoscopy, a large bezoar was revealed in the duodenum and was removed using an endoscopic removal technique, assisted by a large amount of Coca-Cola infusion. PMID:23964339

  16. N2-fixing vibrios isolated from the gastrointestinal tract of sea urchins.

    PubMed

    Guerinot, M L; Patriquin, D G

    1981-03-01

    Facultatively anaerobic bacteria, capable of fixing N2 anaerobically or at low O2 concentrations, were isolated from the gastrointestinal tracts of temperate (Strongylocentrotus droebachiensis) and tropical (Tripneustes ventricosus) sea urchins. Morphological and biochemical characteristics, as well as the guanine plus cytosine content of their DNA (45.9 and 48.4 mol%), place these isolates in the genus Vibrio Pacini 1865 in the family Vibrionaceae. Members of this family have not previously been shown to fix N2. These isolates are not identical to any described species in the Vibrio genus and can be distinguished by a combination of biochemical and physiological traits.

  17. Genetic aspects and environmental sources of microsporidia that infect the human gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Heyworth, Martin F

    2017-01-01

    Enterocytozoon bieneusi and Encephalitozoon intestinalis are microsporidia that infect the human gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Each of these microsporidia has been shown to infect various non-human hosts (mammalian and avian), raising the possibility of inter-species transmission, for example, from such hosts to human subjects via waterborne dispersal of microsporidian spores. During the past two decades, genome sequencing has delineated more than 90 genotypes of Ent. bieneusi, and has led to the conclusion that not all the genotypes of this organism infect human subjects. Well documented in the HIV-infected population, GI tract microsporidiosis is also known to occur in immunocompetent, HIV-negative, individuals. The prevalence of HIV-associated microsporidiosis diminished following the introduction of effective anti-retroviral therapy. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene 2017. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  18. Helminths in the gastrointestinal tract as modulators of immunity and pathology.

    PubMed

    Varyani, Fumi; Fleming, John O; Maizels, Rick M

    2017-06-01

    Helminth parasites are highly prevalent in many low- and middle-income countries, in which inflammatory bowel disease and other immunopathologies are less frequent than in the developed world. Many of the most common helminths establish themselves in the gastrointestinal tract and can exert counter-inflammatory influences on the host immune system. For these reasons, interest has arisen as to how parasites may ameliorate intestinal inflammation and whether these organisms, or products they release, could offer future therapies for immune disorders. In this review, we discuss interactions between helminth parasites and the mucosal immune system, as well as the progress being made toward identifying mechanisms and molecular mediators through which it may be possible to attenuate pathology in the intestinal tract. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  19. Classification and functions of enteroendocrine cells of the lower gastrointestinal tract

    PubMed Central

    Gunawardene, Ashok R; Corfe, Bernard M; Staton, Carolyn A

    2011-01-01

    With over thirty different hormones identified as being produced in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, the gut has been described as ‘the largest endocrine organ in the body’ (Ann. Oncol., 12, 2003, S63). The classification of these hormones and the cells that produce them, the enteroendocrine cells (EECs), has provided the foundation for digestive physiology. Furthermore, alterations in the composition and function of EEC may influence digestive physiology and thereby associate with GI pathologies. Whilst there is a rapidly increasing body of data on the role and function of EEC in the upper GI tract, there is a less clear-cut understanding of the function of EEC in the lower GI. Nonetheless, their presence and diversity are indicative of a role. This review focuses on the EECs of the lower GI where new evidence also suggests a possible relationship with the development and progression of primary adenocarcinoma. PMID:21518048

  20. Expression and Regulation of Drug Transporters and Metabolizing Enzymes in the Human Gastrointestinal Tract.

    PubMed

    Drozdzik, M; Oswald, S

    2016-01-01

    Orally administered drugs must pass through the intestinal wall and then through the liver before reaching systemic circulation. During this process drugs are subjected to different processes that may determine the therapeutic value. The intestinal barrier with active drug metabolizing enzymes and drug transporters in enterocytes plays an important role in the determination of drug bioavailability. Accumulating information demonstrates variable distribution of drug metabolizing enzymes and transporters along the human gastrointestinal tract (GI), that creates specific barrier characteristics in different segments of the GI. In this review, expression of drug metabolizing enzymes and transporters in the healthy and diseased human GI as well as their regulatory aspects: genetic, miRNA, DNA methylation are outlined. The knowledge of unique interplay between drug metabolizing enzymes and transporters in specific segments of the GI tract allows more precise definition of drug release sites within the GI in order to assure more complete bioavailability and prediction of drug interactions.

  1. Current status of endoscopic ultrasound for the upper gastrointestinal tract in Asia.

    PubMed

    Yoshinaga, Shigetaka; Hilmi, Ida Normiha; Kwek, Boon Eu Andrew; Hara, Kazuo; Goda, Kenichi

    2015-04-01

    We summarize the current status of endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) for the upper gastrointestinal (GI) tract solely in Asia, focusing on the staging of superficial cancers and the diagnosis of submucosal tumors (SMT), by analysis of questionnaire responses and a literature review. EUS for assessing the depth of superficial cancers of the upper GI tract is useful; however, evidence is lacking to support that EUS is superior to other modalities. The current status of EUS varies across different Asian countries, and standardization of the methods used both during the procedure and for depth subclassification is necessary to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy. Although EUS alone is limited in the diagnosis of SMT, EUS-guided fine-needle aspiration is an effective and safe diagnostic tool. Although there is a role for EUS, there are still many limitations both technically and in terms of accessibility. © 2014 The Authors. Digestive Endoscopy © 2014 Japan Gastroenterological Endoscopy Society.

  2. Helminths in the gastrointestinal tract as modulators of immunity and pathology

    PubMed Central

    Varyani, Fumi; Fleming, John O.

    2017-01-01

    Helminth parasites are highly prevalent in many low- and middle-income countries, in which inflammatory bowel disease and other immunopathologies are less frequent than in the developed world. Many of the most common helminths establish themselves in the gastrointestinal tract and can exert counter-inflammatory influences on the host immune system. For these reasons, interest has arisen as to how parasites may ameliorate intestinal inflammation and whether these organisms, or products they release, could offer future therapies for immune disorders. In this review, we discuss interactions between helminth parasites and the mucosal immune system, as well as the progress being made toward identifying mechanisms and molecular mediators through which it may be possible to attenuate pathology in the intestinal tract. PMID:28302598

  3. Classification and functions of enteroendocrine cells of the lower gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Gunawardene, Ashok R; Corfe, Bernard M; Staton, Carolyn A

    2011-08-01

    With over thirty different hormones identified as being produced in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, the gut has been described as 'the largest endocrine organ in the body' (Ann. Oncol., 12, 2003, S63). The classification of these hormones and the cells that produce them, the enteroendocrine cells (EECs), has provided the foundation for digestive physiology. Furthermore, alterations in the composition and function of EEC may influence digestive physiology and thereby associate with GI pathologies. Whilst there is a rapidly increasing body of data on the role and function of EEC in the upper GI tract, there is a less clear-cut understanding of the function of EEC in the lower GI. Nonetheless, their presence and diversity are indicative of a role. This review focuses on the EECs of the lower GI where new evidence also suggests a possible relationship with the development and progression of primary adenocarcinoma.

  4. Selection of target mutation in rat gastrointestinal tract E. coli by minute dosage of enrofloxacin.

    PubMed

    Lin, Dachuan; Chen, Kaichao; Li, Ruichao; Liu, Lizhang; Guo, Jiubiao; Yao, Wen; Chen, Sheng

    2014-01-01

    It has been suggested that bacterial resistance is selected within a mutation selection window of antibiotics. More recent studies showed that even extremely low concentration of antibiotic could select resistant bacteria in vitro. Yet little is known about the exact antibiotic concentration range that can effectively select for resistant organisms in animal gastrointestinal (GI) tract. In this study, the effect of different dosages of enrofloxacin on resistance and mutation development in rat GI tract E. coli was investigated by determining the number of resistant E. coli recoverable from rat fecal samples. Our data showed that high dose antibiotic treatment could effectively eliminate E. coli with single gyrA mutation in the early course of treatment, yet the eradication effects diminished upon prolonged treatment. Therapeutic and sub-therapeutic dose (1/10 and 1/100 of therapeutic doses) of enrofloxacin could effectively select for mutation in GI tract E. coli at the later course of enrofloxacin treatment and during the cessation periods. Surprisingly, very low dose of enrofloxacin (1/1000 therapeutic dose) could also select for mutation in GI tract E. coli at the later course of enrofloxacin treatment, only with slightly lower efficiency. No enrofloxacin-resistant E. coli could be selected at all test levels of enrofloxacin during long term treatment and the strength of antibiotic treatment does not alter the overall level of E. coli in rat GI tract. This study demonstrated that long term antibiotic treatment seems to be the major trigger for the development of target mutations in GI tract E. coli, which provided insight into the rational use of antibiotics in animal husbandry.

  5. Biodistribution and endocytosis of ICAM-1-targeting antibodies versus nanocarriers in the gastrointestinal tract in mice

    PubMed Central

    Mane, Viraj; Muro, Silvia

    2012-01-01

    Drug delivery to the gastrointestinal (GI) tract is key for improving treatment of GI maladies, developing oral vaccines, and facilitating drug transport into circulation. However, delivery of formulations to the GI tract is hindered by pH changes, degradative enzymes, mucus, and peristalsis, leading to poor GI retention. Targeting may prolong residence of therapeutics in the GI tract and enhance their interaction with this tissue, improving such aspects. We evaluated nanocarrier (NC) and ligand-mediated targeting in the GI tract following gastric gavage in mice. We compared GI biodistribution, degradation, and endocytosis between control antibodies and antibodies targeting the cell surface determinant intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1), expressed on GI epithelium and other cell types. These antibodies were administered either as free entities or coated onto polymer NCs. Fluorescence and radioisotope tracing showed proximal accumulation, with preferential retention in the stomach, jejunum, and ileum; and minimal presence in the duodenum, cecum, and colon by 1 hour after administration. Upstream (gastric) retention was enhanced in NC formulations, with decreased downstream (jejunal) accumulation. Of the total dose delivered to the GI tract, ∼60% was susceptible to enzymatic (but not pH-mediated) degradation, verified both in vitro and in vivo. Attenuation of peristalsis by sedation increased upstream retention (stomach, duodenum, and jejunum). Conversely, alkaline NaHCO3, which enhances GI transit by decreasing mucosal viscosity, favored downstream (ileal) passage. This suggests passive transit through the GI tract, governed by mucoadhesion and peristalsis. In contrast, both free anti-ICAM and anti-ICAM NCs demonstrated significantly enhanced upstream (stomach and duodenum) retention when compared to control IgG counterparts, suggesting GI targeting. This was validated by transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, which

  6. Clinicopathologic characteristics and overall survival in patients with bladder cancer involving the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    D'Souza, Amber M; Phillips, Gary S; Pohar, Kamal S; Zynger, Debra L

    2013-12-01

    Involvement of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract by bladder cancer is rare and documented in only a few case reports with no prognostic information available. The aim of this study was to clinicopathologically characterize patients with pathologically proven bladder cancer in the GI tract. We reviewed pathology reports from cystectomy patients at our institution from 2006 to 2011, identifying those with GI involvement at or after cystectomy. Overall survival (OS) was analyzed using Kaplan-Meier curves and Cox proportional hazard regression models. Twelve patients had surgical pathology specimens with GI involvement (anus, rectum, colon, and small bowel) at (n = 11) or within 4 months (n = 1) of cystectomy. These patients were noted to be pathologically staged inconsistently. GI involvement was a negative predictor of survival, with a 1.5-year OS of 25 versus 62 % without GI involvement (P < 0.001), similar to our pT4 patients (OS 26 %). In node-negative patients, there was a significantly worse 1.5-year OS with GI involvement compared to those without tumor in the GI tract (P = 0.005). We provide the first case series of patients with bladder cancer in the GI tract. GI involvement is a strong negative predictor of survival and behaves comparable to pT4 patients. However, we recommend that pathologists adhere to the current pT staging guidelines, in which GI involvement is not a criterion, until further research is conducted illustrating if and how it should be incorporated.

  7. Expression pattern of the homeotic gene Bapx1 during early chick gastrointestinal tract development.

    PubMed

    Faure, Sandrine; Georges, Maxime; McKey, Jennifer; Sagnol, Sébastien; de Santa Barbara, Pascal

    2013-12-01

    Regulation of the Bone Morphogenetic Protein (BMP) signaling pathway is essential for the normal development of vertebrate gastrointestinal (GI) tract, but also for the differentiation of the digestive mesenchymal layer into smooth muscles and submucosal layer. Different studies demonstrated that Bapx1 (for bagpipe homeobox homolog 1) negatively regulates the BMP pathway, but its precise expression pattern during the development and the differentiation of the GI tract mesenchyme actually remains to be examined. Here, we present the spatio-temporal expression profile of Bapx1 in the chick GI tract. We show that Bapx1 is first expressed in the undifferentiated mesenchyme of the gizzard and the colon. After the differentiation of the digestive mesenchyme, we found Bapx1 strongly expressed in the gizzard smooth muscle and in the submucosa layer of the colon. This expression pattern provides new insights into the roles of Bapx1 during the regionalization of the GI tract and the differentiation of the digestive mesenchyme of the colon and the stomach. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Direct visualization of gastrointestinal tract with lanthanide-doped BaYbF5 upconversion nanoprobes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhen; Ju, Enguo; Liu, Jianhua; Du, Yingda; Li, Zhengqiang; Yuan, Qinghai; Ren, Jinsong; Qu, Xiaogang

    2013-10-01

    Nanoparticulate contrast agents have attracted a great deal of attention along with the rapid development of modern medicine. Here, a binary contrast agent based on PAA modified BaYbF5:Tm nanoparticles for direct visualization of gastrointestinal (GI) tract has been designed and developed via a one-pot solvothermal route. By taking advantages of excellent colloidal stability, low cytotoxicity, and neglectable hemolysis of these well-designed nanoparticles, their feasibility as a multi-modal contrast agent for GI tract was intensively investigated. Significant enhancement of contrast efficacy relative to clinical barium meal and iodine-based contrast agent was evaluated via X-ray imaging and CT imaging in vivo. By doping Tm(3+) ions into these nanoprobes, in vivo NIR-NIR imaging was then demonstrated. Unlike some invasive imaging modalities, non-invasive imaging strategy including X-ray imaging, CT imaging, and UCL imaging for GI tract could extremely reduce the painlessness to patients, effectively facilitate imaging procedure, as well as rationality economize diagnostic time. Critical to clinical applications, long-term toxicity of our contrast agent was additionally investigated in detail, indicating their overall safety. Based on our results, PAA-BaYbF5:Tm nanoparticles were the excellent multi-modal contrast agent to integrate X-ray imaging, CT imaging, and UCL imaging for direct visualization of GI tract with low systemic toxicity.

  9. Dietary Proteins as Determinants of Metabolic and Physiologic Functions of the Gastrointestinal Tract

    PubMed Central

    Jahan-Mihan, Alireza; Luhovyy, Bohdan L.; Khoury, Dalia El; Anderson, G. Harvey

    2011-01-01

    Dietary proteins elicit a wide range of nutritional and biological functions. Beyond their nutritional role as the source of amino acids for protein synthesis, they are instrumental in the regulation of food intake, glucose and lipid metabolism, blood pressure, bone metabolism and immune function. The interaction of dietary proteins and their products of digestion with the regulatory functions of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract plays a dominant role in determining the physiological properties of proteins. The site of interaction is widespread, from the oral cavity to the colon. The characteristics of proteins that influence their interaction with the GI tract in a source-dependent manner include their physico-chemical properties, their amino acid composition and sequence, their bioactive peptides, their digestion kinetics and also the non-protein bioactive components conjugated with them. Within the GI tract, these products affect several regulatory functions by interacting with receptors releasing hormones, affecting stomach emptying and GI transport and absorption, transmitting neural signals to the brain, and modifying the microflora. This review discusses the interaction of dietary proteins during digestion and absorption with the physiological and metabolic functions of the GI tract, and illustrates the importance of this interaction in the regulation of amino acid, glucose, lipid metabolism, and food intake. PMID:22254112

  10. Microgroove cushion of robotic endoscope for active locomotion in the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Gao, Peng; Yan, Guozheng; Wang, Zhiwu; Jiang, Pingping; Liu, Hua

    2012-12-01

    The robotic endoscope the advantage of active locomotion in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, but lacks a suitable contact device to improve the locomotion efficiency and safety. This paper proposes a microgroove cushion for the robotic endoscope to improve its active locomotion ability in the GI tract. Coupons with different microgrooves were designed and tested to verify the contact efficiency of the grooves. Based on experimental investigations, uniform oblique grid grooves were suggested, because they could generate gteater friction than other proposed microgrooves on the intestinal surface. To improve the contact safety of the robotic endoscope, a cushion-type contact device was designed and fabricated. The microgroove cushion was tested under the use of a custom-built robot. An experiment in a rigid tube showed that the robot with cushion had a static friction 65% higher than the robot without cushion; an experiment in the in vitro colonic tract showed that the robot without the cushion produced a more obvious contact appearance than with the cushion. It can be seen that the microgroove cushion provides the robotic endoscope with efficient and safe contact ability. The microgroove cushion is a useful addition to the development of a contact device for the robotic endoscope in the GI tract, although requiring further improvements. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Dietary proteins as determinants of metabolic and physiologic functions of the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Jahan-Mihan, Alireza; Luhovyy, Bohdan L; El Khoury, Dalia; Anderson, G Harvey

    2011-05-01

    Dietary proteins elicit a wide range of nutritional and biological functions. Beyond their nutritional role as the source of amino acids for protein synthesis, they are instrumental in the regulation of food intake, glucose and lipid metabolism, blood pressure, bone metabolism and immune function. The interaction of dietary proteins and their products of digestion with the regulatory functions of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract plays a dominant role in determining the physiological properties of proteins. The site of interaction is widespread, from the oral cavity to the colon. The characteristics of proteins that influence their interaction with the GI tract in a source-dependent manner include their physico-chemical properties, their amino acid composition and sequence, their bioactive peptides, their digestion kinetics and also the non-protein bioactive components conjugated with them. Within the GI tract, these products affect several regulatory functions by interacting with receptors releasing hormones, affecting stomach emptying and GI transport and absorption, transmitting neural signals to the brain, and modifying the microflora. This review discusses the interaction of dietary proteins during digestion and absorption with the physiological and metabolic functions of the GI tract, and illustrates the importance of this interaction in the regulation of amino acid, glucose, lipid metabolism, and food intake.

  12. Surgical endoscopic vacuum therapy for anastomotic leakage and perforation of the upper gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Kuehn, F; Schiffmann, L; Rau, B M; Klar, E

    2012-11-01

    Emergency operations for perforations and anastomotic leakage of the upper gastrointestinal tract are associated with a high overall morbidity and mortality rate. An endoscopic vacuum therapy (EVT) has been established successfully for anastomotic leakage after rectal resection but only limited data exist for EVT of the upper GI tract. We report on a series of nine patients treated with EVT for defects of the upper intestinal tract between March 2011 and May 2012. In four patients, initial endoscopic sponge placement was performed in combination with open surgical revision. Median follow-up was 189 (range, 51-366) days. In total, 52 vacuum sponges were placed in upper GI defects of nine patients. Indication for EVT were anastomotic leakage after esophageal resection or gastrectomy (n = 5) and iatrogenic or spontaneous esophageal perforations (n = 4). The mean number of sponge insertions was six (range, 1-13) with a mean changing interval of 3.5 days (range, 2-5). A successful vacuum therapy for upper intestinal defects was achieved in eight of nine patients (89 %). EVT is a promising approach for postoperative, iatrogenic, or spontaneous lesions of the upper GI tract. If necessary the endoscopic procedure can be combined with operative revision for better control of the local septic focus.

  13. Histological and histochemical analysis of the gastrointestinal tract of the common pipistrelle bat (Pipistrellus pipistrellus).

    PubMed

    Strobel, S; Encarnação, J A; Becker, N I; Trenczek, T E

    2015-04-13

    Bats have a very high mass-specific energy demand due to small size and active flight. European bat species are mostly insectivorous and the morphology of the gastrointestinal tract should be adapted accordingly. This study investigated the general anatomy by histology and the function by analysing carbohydrate distribution in particular of the mucus of the GI tract of the insectivorous bat Pipistrellus pipistrellus. The GI tracts of three individuals were dissected, fixed in formaldehyde, and embedded in paraffin wax. The tissues and cells of the GI tract of P. pipistrellus were analysed by classical (Acid Alizarin Blue, Haematoxylin-Eosin, and Masson Goldner Trichrome), histochemical (periodic acid-Schiff, Alcian blue at pH 2.5) and lectin histochemical (lectins WGA and HPA) staining procedures. The GI tract of P. pipistrellus was organised into the typical mammalian layers. The short, narrow, and thin-walled esophagus was simple with a folded stratified squamous epithelium without glands but mucous surface cells secreting neutral mucus. The stomach was globular shaped without specialisation. Mucous surface cells produced neutral mucus whereas neck and parietal cells secreted a mixture of neutral and acid mucus. Chief cell surface was positive for N-acetylglucosamine and the cytoplasm for N-acetylgalactosamine residues. The intestine lacked a caecum and appendix. The small intestine was divided into duodenum, jejunum‑ileum and ileum‑colon. The epithelium consisted of columnar enterocytes and goblet cells. The large intestine was short, only represented by the descending colon-rectum. It lacked villi and the mucosa had only crypts of Lieberkühn. Towards the colon-rectum, goblet cells produced mucus with N-acetylglucosamine residues increasing in acidity except in colon-rectum where acidity was highest in the base of crypts. Along the tube the surface of enterocytes was positive for N-acetylglucosamine and N-acetylgalactosamine. All over the mucus filling

  14. Histological and Histochemical Analysis of the Gastrointestinal Tract of the Common Pipistrelle Bat (Pipistrellus Pipistrellus)

    PubMed Central

    Strobel, S.; Encarnação, J.A.; Becker, N.I.; Trenczek, T.E.

    2015-01-01

    Bats have a very high mass-specific energy demand due to small size and active flight. European bat species are mostly insectivorous and the morphology of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract should be adapted accordingly. This study investigated the general anatomy by histology and the function by analysing carbohydrate distribution in particular of the mucus of the GI tract of the insectivorous bat Pipistrellus pipistrellus. The GI tracts of three individuals were dissected, fixed in formaldehyde, and embedded in paraffin wax. The tissues and cells of the GI tract of P. pipistrellus were analysed by classical (acid alizarin blue, haematoxylin-eosin, and Masson Goldner Trichrome), histochemical (periodic acid-Schiff, Alcian blue at pH 2.5) and lectin histochemical (lectins WGA and HPA) staining procedures. The GI tract of P. pipistrellus is organised into the typical mammalian layers. The short, narrow, and thin-walled esophagus is simple with a folded stratified squamous epithelium without glands but mucous surface cells secreting neutral mucus. The stomach is globular shaped without specialisation. Mucous surface cells produced neutral mucus whereas neck and parietal cells secreted a mixture of neutral and acid mucus. Chief cell surface was positive for N-acetylglucosamine and the cytoplasm for N-acetylgalactosamine residues. The intestine lacked a caecum and appendix. The small intestine was divided into duodenum, jejunum-ileum and ileum-colon. The epithelium consisted of columnar enterocytes and goblet cells. The large intestine is short, only represented by the descending colon-rectum. It lacked villi and the mucosa had only crypts of Lieberkühn. Towards the colon-rectum, goblet cells produced mucus with N-acetylglucosamine residues increasing in acidity except in colon-rectum where acidity was highest in the base of crypts. Along the tube the surface of enterocytes was positive for N-acetylglucosamine and N-acetylgalactosamine. All over the mucus filling the

  15. Hyaluronic Acid Gel Injection to Prevent Thermal Injury of Adjacent Gastrointestinal Tract during Percutaneous Liver Radiofrequency Ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Hasegawa, Takaaki Takaki, Haruyuki; Miyagi, Hideki; Nakatsuka, Atsuhiro; Uraki, Junji; Yamanaka, Takashi; Fujimori, Masashi; Sakuma, Hajime; Yamakado, Koichiro

    2013-08-01

    This study evaluated the safety, feasibility, and clinical utility of hyaluronic acid gel injection to separate the gastrointestinal tract from the tumor during liver radiofrequency ablation (RFA). Eleven patients with liver tumors measuring 0.9-3.5 cm (mean {+-} standard deviation, 2.1 {+-} 0.8 cm) that were adjacent to the gastrointestinal tracts received RFA after the mixture of hyaluronic acid gel and contrast material (volume, 26.4 {+-} 14.5 mL; range, 10-60 mL) was injected between the tumor and the gastrointestinal tract under computed tomographic-fluoroscopic guidance. Each tumor was separated from the gastrointestinal tract by 1.0-1.5 cm (distance, 1.2 {+-} 0.2 cm) after injection of hyaluronic acid gel, and subsequent RFA was performed without any complications in all patients. Although tumor enhancement disappeared in all patients, local tumor progression was found in a patient (9.1 %, 1 of 11) during the follow-up of 5.5 {+-} 3.2 months (range, 0.4-9.9 months). In conclusion, hyaluronic acid gel injection is a safe and useful technique to avoid thermal injury of the adjacent gastrointestinal tract during liver RFA.

  16. Hyaluronic acid gel injection to prevent thermal injury of adjacent gastrointestinal tract during percutaneous liver radiofrequency ablation.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Takaaki; Takaki, Haruyuki; Miyagi, Hideki; Nakatsuka, Atsuhiro; Uraki, Junji; Yamanaka, Takashi; Fujimori, Masashi; Sakuma, Hajime; Yamakado, Koichiro

    2013-08-01

    This study evaluated the safety, feasibility, and clinical utility of hyaluronic acid gel injection to separate the gastrointestinal tract from the tumor during liver radiofrequency ablation (RFA). Eleven patients with liver tumors measuring 0.9-3.5 cm (mean ± standard deviation, 2.1 ± 0.8 cm) that were adjacent to the gastrointestinal tracts received RFA after the mixture of hyaluronic acid gel and contrast material (volume, 26.4 ± 14.5 mL; range, 10-60 mL) was injected between the tumor and the gastrointestinal tract under computed tomographic-fluoroscopic guidance. Each tumor was separated from the gastrointestinal tract by 1.0-1.5 cm (distance, 1.2 ± 0.2 cm) after injection of hyaluronic acid gel, and subsequent RFA was performed without any complications in all patients. Although tumor enhancement disappeared in all patients, local tumor progression was found in a patient (9.1%, 1 of 11) during the follow-up of 5.5 ± 3.2 months (range, 0.4-9.9 months). In conclusion, hyaluronic acid gel injection is a safe and useful technique to avoid thermal injury of the adjacent gastrointestinal tract during liver RFA.

  17. Effect of Antifungal Treatment in a Diet-Based Murine Model of Disseminated Candidiasis Acquired via the Gastrointestinal Tract.

    PubMed

    Kadosh, David; Najvar, Laura K; Bocanegra, Rosie; Olivo, Marcos; Kirkpatrick, William R; Wiederhold, Nathan P; Patterson, Thomas F

    2016-11-01

    Candida albicans, normally found as a commensal in the gut, is a major human fungal pathogen responsible for both mucosal and systemic infections in a wide variety of immunocompromised individuals, including cancer patients and organ transplant recipients. The gastrointestinal tract represents a major portal of entry for the establishment of disseminated candidiasis in many of these individuals. Here we report the development of a diet-based mouse model for disseminated candidiasis acquired via the gastrointestinal tract. Using this model, as well as an appropriate immunosuppression regimen, we demonstrate that dissemination of C. albicans from the gastrointestinal tract can result in mortality within 30 days postinfection. We also show a significant increase in fungal burden in systemic organs, but not gastrointestinal tract organs, upon immunosuppression. Importantly, we demonstrate that the administration of two widely used antifungals, fluconazole and caspofungin, either pre- or postimmunosuppression, significantly reduces fungal burdens. This model should prove to be of significant value for testing the ability of both established and experimental therapeutics to inhibit C. albicans dissemination from the gastrointestinal tract in an immunocompromised host as well as the subsequent mortality that can result from disseminated candidiasis.

  18. Magnetic marker monitoring: high resolution real-time tracking of oral solid dosage forms in the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Weitschies, Werner; Blume, Henning; Mönnikes, Hubert

    2010-01-01

    Knowledge about the performance of dosage forms in the gastrointestinal tract is essential for the development of new oral delivery systems, as well as for the choice of the optimal formulation technology. Magnetic Marker Monitoring (MMM) is an imaging technology for the investigation of the behaviour of solid oral dosage forms within the gastrointestinal tract, which is based on the labelling of solid dosage forms as a magnetic dipole and determination of the location, orientation and strength of the dipole after oral administration using measurement equipment and localization methods that are established in biomagnetism. MMM enables the investigation of the performance of solid dosage forms in the gastrointestinal tract with a temporal resolution in the range of a few milliseconds and a spatial resolution in 3D in the range of some millimetres. Thereby, MMM provides real-time tracking of dosage forms in the gastrointestinal tract. MMM is also suitable for the determination of dosage form disintegration and for quantitative measurement of in vivo drug release in case of appropriate extended release dosage forms like hydrogel-forming matrix tablets. The combination of MMM with pharmacokinetic measurements (pharmacomagnetography) enables the determination of in vitro-in vivo correlations (IVIC) and the delineation of absorption sites in the gastrointestinal tract. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Antibody transferred from the blood to the gastrointestinal tract and its role in enteric immunity of neonatal calves

    SciTech Connect

    Besser, T.E.

    1986-01-01

    High passive blood immunoglobulin concentrations are associated with decreased infectious enteric disease mortality in neonatal calves. Passive immunoglobulin transferred from the blood to the gastrointestinal tract may explain this protection. To measure the rate at which immunoglobulin G/sub 1/ (IgG/sub 1/) is transferred to the gastrointestinal tract, /sup 125/I-labelled bovine IgG/sub 1/ anti-DNP antibody was administered to calves by intravenous injection. The clearance rate of /sup 125/I-IgG/sub 1/ from the blood was measured and compared to the rate of /sup 125/I-IgG/sub 1/ appearance in the gastrointestinal tract, as measured (1) by the rate of fecal /sup 125/I-IgG/sub 1/ excretion, and (2) by the amount of /sup 125/I-IgG/sub 1/ in the gastrointestinal tract of calves at necropsy. Rotavirus antibody titers in the gastrointestinal contents of 5- and 10-days-old calves correlated with the calves' serum passive rotavirus antibody titers, and were increased in proportion to the amount of colostral antibody fed on the first day of life. In contrast, when colostral rotavirus antibody was fed to 48-hour-old calves, when absorption of passive immunoglobulin does not occur, there was no measurable increase in antibody in the intestine 5 days later. Intestinal antibody in the 5- and 10-day-old calves therefore resulted from blood antibody transferred to the gastrointestinal tract. Rotavirus antibody administered to calves by parenteral injection protected them from infection and diarrhea after rotavirus challenge. These results indicate that passive blood IgG enters the calf gastrointestinal tract, where it contributes to intestinal immunity.

  20. In Vivo and Ex Vivo Imaging Reveals a Long-Lasting Chlamydial Infection in the Mouse Gastrointestinal Tract following Genital Tract Inoculation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qi; Huang, Yumeng; Gong, Siqi; Yang, Zhangsheng; Sun, Xin; Schenken, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Intravaginal infection with Chlamydia muridarum in mice can ascend to the upper genital tract, resulting in hydrosalpinx, a pathological hallmark for tubal infertility in women infected with C. trachomatis. Here, we utilized in vivo imaging of C. muridarum infection in mice following an intravaginal inoculation and confirmed the rapid ascent of the chlamydial organisms from the lower to upper genital tracts. Unexpectedly, the C. muridarum-derived signal was still detectable in the abdominal area 100 days after inoculation. Ex vivo imaging of the mouse organs revealed that the long-lasting presence of the chlamydial signal was restricted to the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, which was validated by directly measuring the chlamydial live organisms and genomes in the same organs. The C. muridarum organisms spreading from the genital to the GI tracts were detected in different mouse strains and appeared to be independent of oral or rectal routes. Mice prevented from orally taking up excretions also developed the long-lasting GI tract infection. Inoculation of C. muridarum directly into the upper genital tract, which resulted in a delayed vaginal shedding of live organisms, accelerated the chlamydial spreading to the GI tract. Thus, we have demonstrated that the genital tract chlamydial organisms may use a systemic route to spread to and establish a long-lasting infection in the GI tract. The significance of the chlamydial spreading from the genital to GI tracts is discussed. PMID:26099591

  1. Computer-aided decision support systems for endoscopy in the gastrointestinal tract: a review.

    PubMed

    Liedlgruber, Michael; Uhl, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    Today, medical endoscopy is a widely used procedure to inspect the inner cavities of the human body. The advent of endoscopic imaging techniques-allowing the acquisition of images or videos-created the possibility for the development of the whole new branch of computer-aided decision support systems. Such systems aim at helping physicians to identify possibly malignant abnormalities more accurately. At the beginning of this paper, we give a brief introduction to the history of endoscopy, followed by introducing the main types of endoscopes which emerged so far (flexible endoscope, wireless capsule endoscope, and confocal laser endomicroscope). We then give a brief introduction to computer-aided decision support systems specifically targeted at endoscopy in the gastrointestinal tract. Then we present general facts and figures concerning computer-aided decision support systems and summarize work specifically targeted at computer-aided decision support in the gastrointestinal tract. This summary is followed by a discussion of some common issues concerning the approaches reviewed and suggestions of possible ways to resolve them.

  2. Tiliroside, a glycosidic flavonoid, inhibits carbohydrate digestion and glucose absorption in the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Goto, Tsuyoshi; Horita, Mayuka; Nagai, Hiroyuki; Nagatomo, Akifumi; Nishida, Norihisa; Matsuura, Youichi; Nagaoka, Satoshi

    2012-03-01

    Recent studies have reported that tiliroside, a glycosidic flavonoid, possesses anti-diabetic activities. In the present study, we investigated the effects of tiliroside on carbohydrate digestion and absorption in the gastrointestinal tract. This study showed that tiliroside inhibits pancreatic α-amylase (IC₅₀ = 0.28 mM) in vitro. Tiliroside was found as a noncompetitive inhibitor of α-amylase with K(i) values of 84.2 μM. In male ICR mice, the increase in postprandial plasma glucose levels was significantly suppressed in the tiliroside-administered group. Tiliroside treatment also suppressed hyperinsulinemia after starch administration. Tiliroside administration inhibited the increase of plasma glucose levels in an oral glucose tolerance test, but not in an intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test. In human intestinal Caco-2 cells, the addition of tiliroside caused a significant dose-dependent inhibition of glucose uptake. The inhibitory effects of both sodium-dependent glucose transporter 1 (SGLT1) and glucose transporter 2 (GLUT2) inhibitors (phlorizin and phloretin, respectively) on glucose uptake were significantly inhibited in the presence of tiliroside, suggesting that tiliroside inhibited glucose uptake mediated by both SGLT1 and GLUT2. These findings indicate that the anti-diabetic effects of tiliroside are at least partially mediated through inhibitory effects on carbohydrate digestion and glucose uptake in the gastrointestinal tract. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Mobile genetic elements of the human gastrointestinal tract: potential for spread of antibiotic resistance genes.

    PubMed

    Broaders, Eileen; Gahan, Cormac G M; Marchesi, Julian R

    2013-01-01

    The human intestine is an important location for horizontal gene transfer (HGT) due to the presence of a densely populated community of microorganisms which are essential to the health of the human superorganism. HGT in this niche has the potential to influence the evolution of members of this microbial community and to mediate the spread of antibiotic resistance genes from commensal organisms to potential pathogens. Recent culture-independent techniques and metagenomic studies have provided an insight into the distribution of mobile genetic elements (MGEs) and the extent of HGT in the human gastrointestinal tract. In this mini-review, we explore the current knowledge of mobile genetic elements in the gastrointestinal tract, the progress of research into the distribution of antibiotic resistance genes in the gut and the potential role of MGEs in the spread of antibiotic resistance. In the face of reduced treatment options for many clinical infections, understanding environmental and commensal antibiotic resistance and spread is critical to the future development of meaningful and long lasting anti-microbial therapies.

  4. An investigation into the role of mucus thickness on mucoadhesion in the gastrointestinal tract of pig.

    PubMed

    Varum, Felipe J O; Veiga, Francisco; Sousa, João S; Basit, Abdul W

    2010-07-11

    Mucoadhesion in the gastrointestinal tract is a complex phenomenon and both formulation and physiological features need to be well understood and considered. Mucus thickness has been inferred to play a role in this process; however no definitive influence has been established. This study aimed to investigate the influence of mucus thickness on the mucoadhesion process, using a large animal (pig) as a model to closely resemble the human physiological features. The mucus thickness of different regions of the gastrointestinal tract of pig was fully measured by means of a histochemical method (hematoxilin/eosin) employing cryostat sections. Mucoadhesion was evaluated ex vivo on porcine mucosa by tensiometry using a polyacrylic acid polymer (Carbopol 974P NF) as a mucoadhesive model material, both in a dry and swollen state. Mucus was thickest in the stomach (body 67.9+/-54.7 microm) and mucus thickness increased from proximal to distal segments in both the small intestine (duodenum 25.9+/-11.8 microm, ileum 31.0+/-15.7 microm) and large intestine (caecum 19.4+/-8.7 microm, ascending colon 31.9+/-17.2 microm, descending colon 35.1+/-16.0 microm and rectum 40.8+/-12.5 microm). Swollen polymer exhibited lower mucoadhesion than the dry form in all sections analysed. Mucus thickness plays a role on the mucoadhesion, as thicker mucus provides deeper polymer chain diffusion and entanglements; however, other factors are also involved in this complex process.

  5. Review of Pure Endoscopic Full-Thickness Resection of the Upper Gastrointestinal Tract

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Hirohito; Kobara, Hideki; Nishiyama, Noriko; Fujihara, Shintaro; Masaki, Tsutomu

    2015-01-01

    Natural-orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) using flexible endoscopy has attracted attention as a minimally invasive surgical method that does not cause an operative wound on the body surface. However, minimizing the number of devices involved in endoscopic, compared to laparoscopic, surgeries has remained a challenge, causing endoscopic surgeries to gradually be phased out of use. If a flexible endoscopic full-thickness suturing device and a counter-traction device were developed to expand the surgical field for gastrointestinal-tract collapse, then endoscopic full-thickness resection using NOTES, which is seen as an extension of endoscopic submucosal dissection for full-thickness excision of tumors involving the gastrointestinal-tract wall, might become an extremely minimally invasive surgical method that could be used to resect only full-thickness lesions approached by the shortest distance via the mouth. It is expected that gastroenterological endoscopists will use this surgery if device development is advanced. This extremely minimally invasive surgery would have an immeasurable impact with regard to mitigating the burden on patients and reducing healthcare costs. Development of a new surgical method using a multipurpose flexible endoscope is therefore considered a socially urgent issue. PMID:26343069

  6. Current and future role of magnetically assisted gastric capsule endoscopy in the upper gastrointestinal tract

    PubMed Central

    Ching, Hey-Long; Hale, Melissa Fay; McAlindon, Mark Edward

    2016-01-01

    Capsule endoscopy first captivated the medical world when it provided a means to visualize the small bowel, which was previously out of endoscopic reach. In the subsequent decade and a half we continue to learn of the true potential that capsule endoscopy has to offer. Of particular current interest is whether capsule endoscopy has any reliable investigative role in the upper gastrointestinal tract. Much research has already been dedicated to enhancing the diagnostic and indeed therapeutic properties of capsule endoscopy. Specific modifications to tackle the challenges of the gut have already been described in the current literature. In the upper gastrointestinal tract, the capacious anatomy of the stomach represents one of many challenges that capsule endoscopy must overcome. One solution to improving diagnostic yield is to utilize external magnetic steering of a magnetically receptive capsule endoscope. Notionally this would provide a navigation system to direct the capsule to different areas of the stomach and allow complete gastric mucosal examination. To date, several studies have presented promising data to support the feasibility of this endeavour. However the jury is still out as to whether this system will surpass conventional gastroscopy, which remains the gold standard diagnostic tool in the foregut. Nevertheless, a minimally invasive and patient-friendly alternative to gastroscopy remains irresistibly appealing, warranting further studies to test the potential of magnetically assisted capsule endoscopy. In this article the authors would like to share the current state of magnetically assisted capsule endoscopy and anticipate what is yet to come. PMID:27134661

  7. [Study of the influence of Staphylococcus aureus on gastrointestinal tract microbiocenosis in rats].

    PubMed

    Nesvizhskiĭ, Iu V; Bogdanova, E A; Vorob'ev, A A

    2006-01-01

    The authors studied the modifying effect of Staphylococcus aureus on the microbial composition of gastrointestinal tract microbiocenosis. The subjects were female rats in the condition of eubiosis or dysbiosis. The species and quantitative composition of the fecal microflora and the parietal mucin in different parts of the intestine were studied after an intragastral administration of St. aureus suspension. A single introduction of St. aureus into the gastrointestinal tract of rats led to the appearance of this microbe in the feces and parietal mucin in all the parts of the intestine regardless the initial condition of the intestinal microbiocenosis. The indigenous microflora, both in eubiotic and dysbiotic conditions, practically did not respond to an intragastral administration of staphylococcus, except a little decrease in the proportion of bifidobacteria. Meanwhile, there was a significant increase in the incidence of candid detection. The indigenous parietal microflora changed more substantially, which demonstrates a higher sensitivity of the parietal microbiocenosis to a short-time exposure to an exogenous microbial factor.

  8. THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE BACTERIAL FLORA IN THE GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT OF MICE

    PubMed Central

    Schaedler, Russell W.; Dubos, René; Costello, Richard

    1965-01-01

    Selective culture media, and equipment for anaerobic incubation of large numbers of specimens, have been developed to facilitate the quantitative enumeration of the various aerobic and anaerobic bacterial species present in the gastrointestinal tract. The evolution of this flora has been followed in young mice from several colonies by cultivating homogenates of the different parts of the gastrointestinal tract at daily intervals from the time of birth to the time of weaning. It has been found that the lactobacilli and anaerobic streptococci become established immediately after birth and persist in large numbers, not only in the large intestine but also in the stomach and in the small intestine. In contrast, the anaerobic bacilli of the bacteroides group become established only after the 16th day; they multiply only in the large intestine but persist in this organ in very large numbers. Other bacterial species become established at different periods of time after birth, exhibit characteristic anatomic localizations, and greatly fluctuate in numbers. In general, the populations of enterobacilli and enterococci decrease precipitously after having reached a maximum level shortly after the beginning of colonization. PMID:14325473

  9. Microsatellite instability in adenocarcinomas of the upper gastrointestinal tract. Relation to clinicopathological data and family history.

    PubMed Central

    Keller, G.; Rotter, M.; Vogelsang, H.; Bischoff, P.; Becker, K. F.; Mueller, J.; Brauch, H.; Siewert, J. R.; Höfler, H.

    1995-01-01

    We analyzed 66 adenocarcinomas arising in the upper gastrointestinal tract for microsatellite instability at eight microsatellite loci to investigate the role of these genetic alterations in the etiology of these tumors. We identified alterations in at least one locus in 11/46 adenocarcinomas of the stomach, in 2/15 adenocarcinomas arising in Barrett's esophagus, and in 1/5 adenocarcinomas of the duodenum and jejunum. Microsatellite instability in gastric tumors was found in 5/22 of intestinal, 1/3 of mixed, and 5/21 of diffuse type tumors. No relationship to the tumor stage (TNM), age, and survival time of the patients was observed. One patient had two synchronous gastric tumors both exhibiting microsatellite instability at multiple loci. His family history revealed four individuals in the maternal line afflicted with gastric carcinoma in three generations. Our data show that microsatellite instability is a genetic event in 11 to 24% of tumors of the upper gastrointestinal tract. The observation of microsatellite instability and a familial clustering of gastric tumors may suggest a genetic predisposition for a subset of gastric tumors, which may be identified by microsatellite analysis. Images Figure 1 PMID:7677173

  10. The Failure of Absorption of DC Silicone Fluid 703 from the Gastrointestinal Tract of Rats

    PubMed Central

    Paul, J.; Pover, W. F. R.

    1960-01-01

    The intestinal absorption of silicone fluid 703, a methyl phenyl polysiloxane, has been studied in the rat. This silicone was chosen for the present investigation because of its lipid-like character and its solubility in olive oil. The experimental findings demonstrate that very little, if any, silicone is absorbed when fed in olive oil. No silicone was found in the lymph lipids of cannulated rats fed the silicone, and balance experiments by recovery of the organosilicon compound and triglyceride after feeding to rats for three hours showed that 85% of silicone fluid 703 was recovered from the gastrointestinal tract, whereas 70% of the fed triglyceride was absorbed. The unabsorbed silicone was concentrated chiefly in the intestinal lumen. Balance experiments by recovery of the organosilicon compound after long-term feeding gave recoveries of 96% of the silicone. This amount was recovered entirely from the lower part of the gastrointestinal tract and the faeces. No silicon fluid 703 was found in the liver, kidneys, or fat depots. The urine contained no soluble silica. PMID:14430986

  11. Neuroendocrine body weight regulation: integration between fat tissue, gastrointestinal tract, and the brain.

    PubMed

    Boguszewski, César Luiz; Paz-Filho, Gilberto; Velloso, Licio A

    2010-01-01

    Human body weight is maintained at a fairly stable level regardless of changes in energy intake and energy expenditure. Compensatory mechanisms within the central nervous system (CNS), which regulate food intake and energy expenditure, are triggered by other central and peripheral signals. Peripherally, the main sources of those signals are the adipose tissue, gastrointestinal tract, and pancreas. The main signal originating from the adipose tissue is leptin, which promotes the activation of anorexigenic pathways in the CNS. Similarly, the central action of insulin also reduces food intake and stimulates catabolic pathways. The gastrointestinal tract contributes with several peptides that influence food intake, such as ghrelin, glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), peptide YY (PYY), oxyntomodulin (OXM), and cholecystokinin (CCK). Other substances secreted by the pancreas, such as pancreatic polypeptide (PP) and amylin, a hormone co-secreted with insulin, also affect energy balance. More recently, the endocannabinoid system has also been identified as a contributor in the maintenance of energy balance. Better understanding of these mechanistic systems involved in the regulation of energy metabolism will hopefully lead to the development of new therapeutic approaches against obesity, metabolic syndrome, and other nutritional disorders.

  12. Invasive micropapillary carcinoma: A distinct type of adenocarcinomas in the gastrointestinal tract

    PubMed Central

    Guzińska-Ustymowicz, Katarzyna; Niewiarowska, Katarzyna; Pryczynicz, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Invasive micropapillary carcinoma (IMPC) is a rare histological type of tumor, first described in invasive ductal breast cancer, than in malignancies in other organs such as lungs, urinary bladder, ovaries or salivary glands. Recent literature data shows that this histological lesion has also been found in cancers of the gastrointestinal system. The micropapillary components are clusters of neoplastic cells that closely adhere to each other and are located in distinct empty spaces. Moreover, clusters of neoplastic cells do not have a fibrous-vascular core. The IMPC cells show reverse polarity resulting in typical ‘’inside-out’’ structures that determines secretary properties, disturbs adhesion and conditions grade of malignancy in gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Invasive micropapillary carcinoma in this location is associated with metastases to local lymph nodes and lymphovascular invasion. IMPC can be a prognostic factor for patients with cancers of the stomach, pancreas and with colorectal cancer since it is related with disease-free and overall survival. The purpose of this review is to present the characterization of invasive micropapillary carcinoma in colon, rectum, stomach and others site of GI tract, and to determine the immunohistological indentification of IMPC in those localization. PMID:24782612

  13. The fingerprint of the human gastrointestinal tract microbiota: a hypothesis of molecular mapping.

    PubMed

    Tomasello, G; Mazzola, M; Jurjus, A; Cappello, F; Carini, F; Damiani, P; Gerges Geagea, A; Zeenny, M N; Leone, A

    2017-01-01

    The precise etiology of Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IDB) remains unclear and several factors are believed to play a role in its development and progression, including the composition of microbial communities resident in the gastrointestinal tract. Human intestinal microbiota are extensive with at least 15,000-36,000 bacterial species. However, thanks to the new development in sequencing and molecular taxonomic methodologies, our understanding of the microbiota population composition, dynamics, and ecology has greatly increased. Intestinal microbiota play a critical role in the maintenance of the host intestinal barrier homeostasis, while dysbiosis, which involves reduction in the microbiome diversity, can lead to progression of inflammatory disorders, such as IBD and colorectal cancer. It is hypothesized that fingerprinting characterization of the microbiota community composition is the first step in the study of this complex bacterial ecosystem and a crucial step in the targeted therapy. Molecular fingerprinting of human gastrointestinal tract microbiota could be performed by different techniques including the semi quantitation, 16SrRNA, the DNA- microarray as well as other relatively new methods which were developed to study many complex bacterial ecosystems. These techniques provide individual data and profiles, using fast and sensitive tools for the high taxonomic level fingerprint of the human intestinal microbiota and provide estimation of the relative presence of the microbial target groups within each individual. Such personalized information serves as a remarkable and unprecedented opportunity to improve targeted medical treatment and probably develop strategies to prevent disease.

  14. The anatomy of the gastrointestinal tract of the African lungfish, Protopterus annectens.

    PubMed

    Icardo, José M; Wong, Wai P; Colvee, Elvira; Loong, Ai M; Ip, Yuen K

    2010-07-01

    The gastrointestinal tract of the African lungfish Protopterus annectens is a composite, which includes the gut, the spleen, and the pancreas. The gut is formed by a short oesophagus, a longitudinal stomach, a pyloric valve, a spiraling intestine, and a cloaca. Coiling of the intestine begins dorsally below the pylorus, winding down to form six complete turns before ending into the cloaca. A reticular tissue of undisclosed nature accompanies the winding of the intestinal mucosa. The spleen is located along the right side of the stomach, overlapping the cranial end of the pancreas. The pancreas occupies the shallow area, which indicates on the gut dorsal side the beginning of the intestine coiling. In addition, up to 25 lymphatic-like nodes accompany the inner border of the spiral valve. The mesenteric artery forms a long axis for the intestine. All the components of the gastrointestinal tract are attached to each other by connective sheaths, and are wrapped by connective tissue, and by the serosa externally. We believe that several previous observations have been misinterpreted and that the anatomy of the lungfish gut is more similar among all the three lungfish genera than previously thought. Curiously, the gross anatomical organization is not modified during aestivation. We hypothesize that the absence of function is accompanied by structural modifications of the epithelium, and are currently investigating this possibility.

  15. [The role of endoscopy in the therapy for perforations and leakages of the gastrointestinal tract].

    PubMed

    Feisthammel, J; Jonas, S; Mössner, J; Hoffmeister, A

    2013-06-01

    Perforations and leakages of hollow organs of the gastrointestinal tract can occur spontaneously among other causes. They can also develop as complications of an endoscopic intervention or after surgical construction of an anastomosis. For the patient, these situations usually are serious and life-threatening. Standard therapy has always been - and most of the time still is - major surgery. These procedures usually are technically difficult and their mortality and morbidity are not satisfactory due to, among others, the occurrence of local infections. Thus, various endoscopic techniques as therapy for perforations and leakages have been developed over the last years. These include above all the endoscopic placement of clip systems and stents and the relatively new vacuum drainage systems. In case of perforations and leakages of the bile duct and the rectum especially, these minimal invasive techniques are widely used, also increasingly in lesions of the esophagus. However, these new, endoscopic procedures suffer from a lack of evidence. This paper highlights the possibilities and limitations of endoscopic options in therapy for perforations and leakages of organs of the gastrointestinal tract. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  16. Smoothelin is a specific and robust marker for distinction of muscularis propria and muscularis mucosae in the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Montani, Matteo; Thiesler, Thore; Kristiansen, Glen

    2010-08-01

    As tumour specimens and biopsy specimens become smaller, recognition of anatomical structures relevant for staging is increasingly challenging. So far no marker is known that reliably discriminates between muscularis propria (MP) and muscularis mucosae (MM) of the gastrointestinal tract. Recently, smoothelin expression has been shown to differ in MP and MM of the urinary bladder. We aimed to analyse the expression of smoothelin in the gastrointestinal tract in MP and MM in order to define a novel diagnostic tool to identify MM bundles. The expression of smoothelin was analysed immunohistochemically in comparison with alpha-smooth muscle actin (alpha-SMA) in specimens from colon, stomach and oesophagus (n = 107). In contrast to alpha-SMA, which equally stained MM and MP, absent or significantly weaker smoothelin expression was found in MM was found, which was particularly valid in colon and gastric specimens. The combination of smoothelin and SMA represents a robust marker to discriminate MM from MP in the gastrointestinal tract.

  17. Distribution Dynamics of Recombinant Lactobacillus in the Gastrointestinal Tract of Neonatal Rats

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Sujin; Zhu, Libin; Zhuang, Qiang; Wang, Lucia; Xu, Pin-Xian; Itoh, Keiji; Holzman, Ian R.; Lin, Jing

    2013-01-01

    One approach to deliver therapeutic agents, especially proteins, to the gastro-intestinal (GI) tract is to use commensal bacteria as a carrier. Genus Lactobacillus is an attractive candidate for use in this approach. However, a system for expressing exogenous proteins at a high level has been lacking in Lactobacillus. Moreover, it will be necessary to introduce the recombinant Lactobacillus into the GI tract, ideally by oral administration. Whether orally administered Lactobacillus can reach and reside in the GI tract has not been explored in neonates. In this study, we have examined these issues in neonatal rats. To achieve a high level of protein expression in Lactobacillus, we tested the impact of three promoters and two backbones on protein expression levels using mRFP1, a red fluorescent protein, as a reporter. We found that a combination of an L-lactate dehydrogenase (ldhL) promoter of Lactobacillus sakei with a backbone from pLEM415 yielded the highest level of reporter expression. When this construct was used to transform Lactobacillus casei, Lactobacillus delbrueckii and Lactobacillus acidophilus, high levels of mRFP1 were detected in all these species and colonies of transformed Lactobacillus appeared pink under visible light. To test whether orally administered Lactobacillus can be retained in the GI tract of neonates, we fed the recombinant Lactobacillus casei to neonatal rats. We found that about 3% of the bacteria were retained in the GI tract of the rats at 24 h after oral feeding with more recombinant Lactobacillus in the stomach and small intestine than in the cecum and colon. No mortality was observed throughout this study with Lactobacillus. In contrast, all neonatal rats died within 24 hours after fed with transformed E. coli. Taken together, our results indicate that Lactobacillus has the potential to be used as a vehicle for the delivery of therapeutic agents to neonates. PMID:23544119

  18. Spatial dynamics of the bacterial community structure in the gastrointestinal tract of red kangaroo (Macropus rufus).

    PubMed

    Li, Meirong; Jin, Wei; Li, Yuanfei; Zhao, Lingling; Cheng, Yanfen; Zhu, Weiyun

    2016-06-01

    The quantification and community of bacteria in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract (stomach, jejunum, ileum, cecum, colon and rectum) of red kangaroos (Macropus rufus) were examined by using real-time PCR and paired-end Illumina sequencing. The quantification of bacteria showed that the number of bacteria in jejunum and rectum was significantly lower than that in colon and cecum (P < 0.05). A total of 1,872,590 sequences was remained after quality-filtering and 50,948 OTUs were identified at the 97 % similarity level. The dominant phyla in the GI tract of red kangaroos were identified as Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes. At the level of genus, the samples from different parts of GI tract clustered into three groups: stomach, small intestine (jejunum and ileum) and large intestine (cecum and rectum). Prevotella (29.81 %) was the most dominant genus in the stomach and significantly (P < 0.05) higher than that in other parts of GI tract. In the small intestine, Bifidobacterium (33.04, 12.14 %) and Streptococcus (22.90, 19.16 %) were dominant genera. Unclassified Ruminococcaceae was the most dominant family in large intestine and the total relative abundance of unclassified bacteria was above 50 %. In identified genera, Dorea was the most important variable to discriminate large intestine and it was significantly higher in cecum than in stomach, small intestine and colon (P < 0.05). Bifidobacterium (21.89 %) was the only dominant genus in colon. Future work on culture in vitro and genome sequencing of those unidentified bacteria might give us insight into the function of these microorganisms in the GI tract. In addition, the comparison of the bacterial community in the foregut of kangaroos and other herbivores and the rumen might give us insight into the mechanism of fiber degradation and help us exploit approaches to improve the feed efficiency and subsequently, reduce the methane emission from herbivores.

  19. The Dynamic Interactions between Salmonella and the Microbiota, within the Challenging Niche of the Gastrointestinal Tract

    PubMed Central

    Khan, C. M. Anjam

    2014-01-01

    Understanding how Salmonella species establish successful infections remains a foremost research priority. This gastrointestinal pathogen not only faces the hostile defenses of the host's immune system, but also faces fierce competition from the large and diverse community of microbiota for space and nutrients. Salmonella have solved these challenges ingeniously. To jump-start growth, Salmonella steal hydrogen produced by the gastrointestinal microbiota. Type 3 effector proteins are subsequently secreted by Salmonella to trigger potent inflammatory responses, which generate the alternative terminal electron acceptors tetrathionate and nitrate. Salmonella exclusively utilize these electron acceptors for anaerobic respiration, permitting metabolic access to abundant substrates such as ethanolamine to power growth blooms. Chemotaxis and flagella-mediated motility enable the identification of nutritionally beneficial niches. The resulting growth blooms also promote horizontal gene transfer amongst the resident microbes. Within the gastrointestinal tract there are opportunities for chemical signaling between host cells, the microbiota, and Salmonella. Host produced catecholamines and bacterial autoinducers form components of this chemical dialogue leading to dynamic interactions. Thus, Salmonella have developed remarkable strategies to initially shield against host defenses and to transiently compete against the intestinal microbiota leading to successful infections. However, the immunocompetent host is subsequently able to reestablish control and clear the infection. PMID:27437481

  20. Role of enteric neurotransmission in host defense and protection of the gastrointestinal tract

    PubMed Central

    Sharkey, Keith A.; Savidge, Tor C.

    2014-01-01

    Host defense is a vital role played by the gastrointestinal tract. As host to an enormous and diverse microbiome, the gut has evolved an elaborate array of chemical and physicals barriers that allow the digestion and absorption of nutrients without compromising the mammalian host. The control of such barrier functions requires the integration of neural, humoral, paracrine and immune signaling, involving redundant and overlapping mechanisms to ensure, under most circumstances, the integrity of the gastrointestinal epithelial barrier. Here we focus on selected recent developments in the autonomic neural control of host defense functions used in the protection of the gut from luminal agents, and discuss how the microbiota may potentially play a role in enteric neurotransmission. Key recent findings include: the important role played by subepithelial enteric glia in modulating intestinal barrier function, identification of stress-induced mechanisms evoking barrier breakdown, neural regulation of epithelial cell proliferation, the role of afferent and efferent vagal pathways in regulating barrier function, direct evidence for bacterial communication to the enteric nervous system, and microbial sources of enteric neurotransmitters. We discuss these new and interesting developments in our understanding of the role of the autonomic nervous system in gastrointestinal host defense. PMID:24412639

  1. Endoscopic removal of foreign bodies from the upper gastrointestinal tract: 5-year experience

    PubMed Central

    Emara, Mohamed H; Darwiesh, Ehab M; Refaey, Mohamed M; Galal, Sherif M

    2014-01-01

    Background Foreign bodies (FBs) in the upper gastrointestinal tract are produced chiefly by accidental swallowing but rarely produce symptoms. Removal of FBs is not an infrequent challenge for upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. The aim of this study is to elicit our experience in a 5-year period in dealing with FBs in the upper gastrointestinal tract using upper endoscopy. Methods This retrospective study was conducted at Zagazig University Hospitals, Egypt, over a 5-year period. We reviewed all patients’ files with full notations on age, sex, type of FB and its anatomical location, treatments, and outcomes (complications, success rates, and mortalities). Patients with incomplete files and those with FBs not identified at the endoscopic examination were excluded. Results A total of 45 patients were identified. Their ages ranged from 6 months to 102 years. Slight male predominance was noticed (53.3%). The most frequent presentation was a history of FB ingestion without any associated manifestations (44.4%). Coins were the most commonly encountered FBs (14/45). Esophagus was the most common site of trapping (27/45). The overall success rate was 95.6% (43/45). Upper endoscopy successfully resolved the problem by either FB removal (41/43) or dislodgment of the impacted fleshy meat to the stomach (2/43). Two cases were referred for surgical removal. The rate of complications was 6.7%. Furthermore, no mortalities due to FB ingestion or removal had been reported throughout the study. Conclusion Our experience with FB removal emphasizes its importance and ease when performed by experienced hands, at well-equipped endoscopy units, and under conscious sedation in most cases, with high success rates and minor complications. PMID:25053889

  2. Comparison of olestra absorption in guinea pigs with normal and compromised gastrointestinal tracts.

    PubMed

    Daher, G C; Lawson, K D; Long, P H; Tallmadge, D H; Boothe, A D; Vanderploeg, P; Miller, K W

    1997-10-01

    Female guinea pigs (12/group) were given a single dose of [14C]olestra by gavage after consuming either 3% poligeenan in tap water (Compromised group) or just tap water (Normal group) for 5 weeks. A Sentinel group (N = 2) was given 3% poligeenan for 5 weeks. Ten sentinel animals were killed 1 day before and 10 1 day after the other animals were dosed with [14C]olestra and their gastrointestinal tracts were examined by histology. The Compromised and Normal animals were endoscoped just before dosing with [14C]olestra. Urine and feces were collected continuously and CO2 was collected for 7 days after dosing. The samples were analyzed for 14C and urine was also analyzed for [14C]sucrose. Animals (3/group) were killed 1, 3, 7, and 21 days after dosing, and tissues were collected and assayed for 14C. Tissue lipids were extracted, fractionated by high-pressure liquid chromatography, and analyzed for [14C]olestra by liquid scintillation. Animals fed poligeenan showed mucosal edema, congestion, ulceration, and fibrin deposition within the distal colon and rectum. Histology revealed inflammation, epithelial degeneration, and multifocal ulceration of the cecum, distal colon, and rectum. The gastrointestinal mucosae of nonpoligeenan fed animals were normal. No [14C]olestra was detected in liver lipids and no [14C]sucrose was found in the urine for any animal in the Normal or Compromised groups, indicating that intact olestra was not absorbed. The amount, distribution, and elimination of absorbed 14C did not differ between guinea pigs with normal and compromised gastrointestinal tracts. The poligeenan-treated animals displayed mucosal damage similar to that seen in human inflammatory bowel diseases; therefore, these results suggest that patients with inflammatory bowel conditions will not absorb olestra to any greater extent than normal healthy people. Copyright 1997 Society of Toxicology.

  3. Absorption of valproic acid from the gastrointestinal tract of the piglet.

    PubMed

    Nahata, M C; Breech, L; Ailabouni, A; Murray, R D

    1992-01-01

    Valproic acid is a commonly used drug for the treatment of epilepsy. Since valproic acid can only be given orally, its absorption from the gastrointestinal (GI) tract especially in patients with short bowel syndrome (SBS) and in neonates is important. The specific sites of absorption for valproic acid in the small intestine and colon have not been investigated. It is currently unknown whether these patients are able to absorb oral valproic acid sufficiently to maintain a therapeutic serum concentration. The primary objectives of the study were to: (a) determine the relative absorption of valproic acid from specific sites in the GI tract; and (b) investigate the influence of intestinal development on valproic acid absorption using the newborn piglet as a model. Two groups were studied: Group I included 5 piglets 18-21 days of age, and Group II included 5 piglets 1-3 days of age. A valproic acid solution was simultaneously perfused through 5 partitioned segments of the gastrointestinal tract: the duodenum, jejunum, ileum, right colon and left colon. Tritiated [3H] polyethylene glycol was co-administered to monitor water movement across the GI mucosa. Following steady state, samples were collected from each segment, and analyzed by a specific enzyme-mediated immunoassay. The absorption rates (micrograms/min/cm) of valproic acid in Group I were as follows: 9.96 +/- 2.8 duodenum; 11.28 +/- 2.79, jejunum; 9.42 +/- 3.34, ileum; 10.88 +/- 3.35, right colon; 10.96 +/- 2.92, left colon.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. Surgical Endoscopic Vacuum Therapy for Defects of the Upper Gastrointestinal Tract.

    PubMed

    Kuehn, Florian; Schiffmann, Leif; Janisch, Florian; Schwandner, Frank; Alsfasser, Guido; Gock, Michael; Klar, Ernst

    2016-02-01

    Intraluminal therapy used in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract was first shown for anastomotic leaks after rectal resection. Since a few years vacuum sponge therapy is increasingly being recognized as a new promising method for repairing upper GI defects of different etiology. The principles of vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) therapy remain the same no matter of localization: Continuous or intermittent suction and drainage decrease bacterial contamination, secretion, and local edema. At the same time, perfusion and granulation is promoted. However, data for endoscopic vacuum therapy (EVT) of the upper intestinal tract are still scarce and consist of only a few case reports and small series with low number of patients. Here, we present a single center experience of EVT for substantial wall defects in the upper GI tract. Retrospective single-center analysis of EVT for various defects of the upper GI tract over a time period of 4 years (2011-2015) with a mean follow-up of 17 (2-45) months was used. If necessary, initial endoscopic sponge placement was performed in combination with open surgical revision. In total, 126 polyurethane sponges were placed in upper gastrointestinal defects of 21 patients with a median age of 72 years (range, 49-80). Most frequent indication for EVT was anastomotic leakage after esophageal or gastric resection (n = 11) and iatrogenic esophageal perforation (n = 8). The median number of sponge insertions was five (range, 1-14) with a mean changing interval of 3 days (range, 2-4). Median time of therapy was 15 days (range, 3-46). EVT in combination with surgery took place in nine of 21 patients (43 %). A successful vacuum therapy for upper intestinal defects with local control of the septic focus was achieved in 19 of 21 patients (90.5 %). EVT is a promising approach for postoperative, iatrogenic, or spontaneous lesions of the upper GI tract. In this series, EVT was combined with operative revision in a relevant proportion of

  5. Microencapsulation of tannic acid for oral administration to inhibit carbohydrate digestion in the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wei; Iyer, Vidya; Flores, Floirendo P; Donhowe, Erik; Kong, Fanbin

    2013-06-01

    The prevalence of diabetes mellitus and obesity is rapidly rising worldwide. Recently, there is increasing evidence that phytochemicals such as polyphenols in our diet could directly inhibit the activities of key digestive enzymes, representing a novel method of controlling and preventing diabetes mellitus and obesity. More research is required to determine how to effectively utilize phytochemicals within the gastrointestinal (GI) tract to obtain maximum inhibition of digestive enzymes. This study investigated the inhibition efficiency of tannic acid (TA) on α-amylase as compared with other potential inhibitors using an in vitro method. The inhibition mode and kinetics were studied. The results showed that tannic acid (TA) is more effective in inhibiting α-amylase than a commercial starch blocker (Phase 2 Starch Blocker), and some selected flavonoids and polyphenols including quercetin, rutin, and polyphenon from green tea. It is also found that inhibition of α-amylase by TA in the GI tract is difficult if administered orally due to the non-specific and reversible noncompetitive interaction between tannic acid and α-amylase or other proteins. Accordingly, a pH-sensitive delivery system using calcium-alginate microspheres encapsulating tannic acid was successfully developed for oral administration to inhibit carbohydrate digestion in the GI tract. The encapsulated TA in calcium-alginate microspheres could be protected from the proteins in the stomach, and sustain release and inhibit α-amylase activity in the small intestine.

  6. The gastrointestinal tract - a central organ of cannabinoid signaling in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Hasenoehrl, C; Taschler, U; Storr, M; Schicho, R

    2016-12-01

    In ancient medicine, extracts of the marijuana plant Cannabis sativa were used against diseases of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Today, our knowledge of the ingredients of the Cannabis plant has remarkably advanced enabling us to use a variety of herbal and synthetic cannabinoid (CB) compounds to study the endocannabinoid system (ECS), a physiologic entity that controls tissue homeostasis with the help of endogenously produced CBs and their receptors. After many anecdotal reports suggested beneficial effects of Cannabis in GI disorders, it was not surprising to discover that the GI tract accommodates and expresses all the components of the ECS. Cannabinoid receptors and their endogenous ligands, the endocannabinoids, participate in the regulation of GI motility, secretion, and the maintenance of the epithelial barrier integrity. In addition, other receptors, such as the transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 1 (TRPV1), the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα) and the G-protein coupled receptor 55 (GPR55), are important participants in the actions of CBs in the gut and critically determine the course of bowel inflammation and colon cancer. The following review summarizes important and recent findings on the role of CB receptors and their ligands in the GI tract with emphasis on GI disorders, such as irritable bowel syndrome, inflammatory bowel disease, and colon cancer. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. A Multiphase Flow in the Antroduodenal Portion of the Gastrointestinal Tract: A Mathematical Model.

    PubMed

    Trusov, P V; Zaitseva, N V; Kamaltdinov, M R

    2016-01-01

    A group of authors has developed a multilevel mathematical model that focuses on functional disorders in a human body associated with various chemical, physical, social, and other factors. At this point, the researchers have come up with structure, basic definitions and concepts of a mathematical model at the "macrolevel" that allow describing processes in a human body as a whole. Currently we are working at the "mesolevel" of organs and systems. Due to complexity of the tasks, this paper deals with only one meso-fragment of a digestive system model. It describes some aspects related to modeling multiphase flow in the antroduodenal portion of the gastrointestinal tract. Biochemical reactions, dissolution of food particles, and motor, secretory, and absorbing functions of the tract are taken into consideration. The paper outlines some results concerning influence of secretory function disorders on food dissolution rate and tract contents acidity. The effect which food density has on inflow of food masses from a stomach to a bowel is analyzed. We assume that the future development of the model will include digestive enzymes and related reactions of lipolysis, proteolysis, and carbohydrates breakdown.

  8. Lung dendritic cells induce migration of protective T cells to the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Ruane, Darren; Brane, Lucas; Reis, Bernardo Sgarbi; Cheong, Cheolho; Poles, Jordan; Do, Yoonkyung; Zhu, Hongfa; Velinzon, Klara; Choi, Jae-Hoon; Studt, Natalie; Mayer, Lloyd; Lavelle, Ed C; Steinman, Ralph M; Mucida, Daniel; Mehandru, Saurabh

    2013-08-26

    Developing efficacious vaccines against enteric diseases is a global challenge that requires a better understanding of cellular recruitment dynamics at the mucosal surfaces. The current paradigm of T cell homing to the gastrointestinal (GI) tract involves the induction of α4β7 and CCR9 by Peyer's patch and mesenteric lymph node (MLN) dendritic cells (DCs) in a retinoic acid-dependent manner. This paradigm, however, cannot be reconciled with reports of GI T cell responses after intranasal (i.n.) delivery of antigens that do not directly target the GI lymphoid tissue. To explore alternative pathways of cellular migration, we have investigated the ability of DCs from mucosal and nonmucosal tissues to recruit lymphocytes to the GI tract. Unexpectedly, we found that lung DCs, like CD103(+) MLN DCs, up-regulate the gut-homing integrin α4β7 in vitro and in vivo, and induce T cell migration to the GI tract in vivo. Consistent with a role for this pathway in generating mucosal immune responses, lung DC targeting by i.n. immunization induced protective immunity against enteric challenge with a highly pathogenic strain of Salmonella. The present report demonstrates novel functional evidence of mucosal cross talk mediated by DCs, which has the potential to inform the design of novel vaccines against mucosal pathogens.

  9. A Multiphase Flow in the Antroduodenal Portion of the Gastrointestinal Tract: A Mathematical Model

    PubMed Central

    Trusov, P. V.

    2016-01-01

    A group of authors has developed a multilevel mathematical model that focuses on functional disorders in a human body associated with various chemical, physical, social, and other factors. At this point, the researchers have come up with structure, basic definitions and concepts of a mathematical model at the “macrolevel” that allow describing processes in a human body as a whole. Currently we are working at the “mesolevel” of organs and systems. Due to complexity of the tasks, this paper deals with only one meso-fragment of a digestive system model. It describes some aspects related to modeling multiphase flow in the antroduodenal portion of the gastrointestinal tract. Biochemical reactions, dissolution of food particles, and motor, secretory, and absorbing functions of the tract are taken into consideration. The paper outlines some results concerning influence of secretory function disorders on food dissolution rate and tract contents acidity. The effect which food density has on inflow of food masses from a stomach to a bowel is analyzed. We assume that the future development of the model will include digestive enzymes and related reactions of lipolysis, proteolysis, and carbohydrates breakdown. PMID:27413393

  10. Radiological spectrum of late sequelae of corrosive injury to upper gastrointestinal tract. A pictorial review.

    PubMed

    Nagi, B; Kochhar, R; Thapa, B R; Singh, K

    2004-02-01

    To evaluate the radiological spectrum of sequelae of corrosive acid and alkali injury to the upper gastrointestinal (GI) tract using barium contrast examination. Barium contrast radiographic films of 155 patients with a history of corrosive ingestion, acid in 120 and alkali in 35 patients with grade 2b and 3 injury on initial endoscopy, were retrospectively evaluated. Barium contrast examination of the upper GI tract was performed in the course of follow-up, beyond 3 weeks of corrosive ingestion. The esophagus was involved in 131 patients and the stomach in 74. Fifty patients had simultaneous involvement of esophagus and stomach. Radiological findings in the esophagus were solitary or multiple strictures of varying length, intramural pseudodiverticula, and carcinoma in long-standing corrosive injury. The stomach showed cicatrization, predominantly involving the antrum, linitis plastica type deformity with multiple pseudodiverticula. There was no difference in the radiological findings as to the type of corrosive ingested. Barium examination of the upper GI tract is useful in the evaluation of late sequelae of corrosive injury (acid/alkali). There was no difference in the radiological findings as to the type of corrosive ingested. Thus, contrary to general belief, we found that acid and alkali damage both the esophagus and the stomach with equal degree of severity.

  11. Mammalian gastrointestinal tract parameters modulating the integrity, surface properties, and absorption of food-relevant nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Bellmann, Susann; Carlander, David; Fasano, Alessio; Momcilovic, Dragan; Scimeca, Joseph A; Waldman, W James; Gombau, Lourdes; Tsytsikova, Lyubov; Canady, Richard; Pereira, Dora I A; Lefebvre, David E

    2015-01-01

    Many natural chemicals in food are in the nanometer size range, and the selective uptake of nutrients with nanoscale dimensions by the gastrointestinal (GI) tract is a normal physiological process. Novel engineered nanomaterials (NMs) can bring various benefits to food, e.g., enhancing nutrition. Assessing potential risks requires an understanding of the stability of these entities in the GI lumen, and an understanding of whether or not they can be absorbed and thus become systemically available. Data are emerging on the mammalian in vivo absorption of engineered NMs composed of chemicals with a range of properties, including metal, mineral, biochemical macromolecules, and lipid-based entities. In vitro and in silico fluid incubation data has also provided some evidence of changes in particle stability, aggregation, and surface properties following interaction with luminal factors present in the GI tract. The variables include physical forces, osmotic concentration, pH, digestive enzymes, other food, and endogenous biochemicals, and commensal microbes. Further research is required to fill remaining data gaps on the effects of these parameters on NM integrity, physicochemical properties, and GI absorption. Knowledge of the most influential luminal parameters will be essential when developing models of the GI tract to quantify the percent absorption of food-relevant engineered NMs for risk assessment. © 2015 The Authors. WIREs Nanomedicine and Nanobiotechnology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Characterization and comparison of the bacterial microbiota in different gastrointestinal tract compartments in horses.

    PubMed

    Costa, M C; Silva, G; Ramos, R V; Staempfli, H R; Arroyo, L G; Kim, P; Weese, J S

    2015-07-01

    The advance of new sequencing technologies has allowed more comprehensive characterization of complex microbial communities, including the ones inhabiting the intestinal tract. The presence of extreme environmental filters, such as low pH, digestive enzymes and anaerobic conditions along the tract, acts on the selection of unique bacteria in each compartment. The intestinal microbiota has an enormous impact on the maintenance of health. However, data about the bacteria present in the different intestinal compartments of horses are sparse. In this study, high throughput sequencing was used to characterize and compare bacterial profiles from different intestinal compartments of 11 horses scheduled for euthanasia for reasons other than gastrointestinal problems. Marked differences among compartments even at high taxonomic levels were found, with Firmicutes comprising the main bacterial phylum in all compartments. Lactobacillus spp. and Sarcina spp. predominated in the stomach and a marked increase of Streptococcus spp. occurred in the duodenum. Actinobacillus and Clostridium sensu stricto were the most abundant genera in the ileum and '5 genus incertae sedis', a genus from the Subdivision 5 class of the Verrucomicrobia, was the most abundant from the large colon through feces. There was a significant increase in diversity towards the distal gut with similar profiles observed from the cecum through feces at the class level. The bacterial population comprising the equine intestinal tract varies greatly among compartments and fecal samples may be useful as representative of changes occurring in the distal compartments.

  13. Effect of dihydrotestosterone on gastrointestinal tract of male Alzheimer's disease transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Karri, Sritulasi; Acosta-Martinez, Veronica; Coimbatore, Gopalakrishnan

    2010-05-01

    The cause of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is still unknown. While research contributions identifying brain as locus of the disease is growing, evidence of severely impaired gastrointestinal (GI) functions with ageing too is accumulating, there is an equal dearth of information on GI tract in AD condition. The aim of this study was to assess the molecular, histological, morphological and microflora alterations of GI tract in male Alzheimer's transgenic mice. The present study also investigates the effect of dihydrotestosterone (DHT) treatment (1 mg/kg) on AD mice. Histoarchitecture data revealed a significant decrease in the villi number, muscular layer thickness, villi length, width, crypt length, enterocyte length and nuclei length. A shift in colon feces microbial community composition was observed by fatty acid methyl ester analysis. Amyloid precursor protein (APP) expression levels in intestine significantly increased in AD mice revealing its toxicity. DHT treatment attenuated the effect caused by AD on GI morphometrics, APP expression and colon micro flora population. These results for the first time reveal the quantitative and qualitative characteristics of GI tract in male Alzheimer's disease transgenic mice.

  14. Age-Related Changes in Vagal Afferents Innervating the Gastrointestinal Tract

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Robert J.; Walter, Gary C.; Powley, Terry L.

    2009-01-01

    Recent progress in understanding visceral afferents, some of it reviewed in the present issue, serves to underscore how little is known about the aging of the visceral afferents in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. In spite of the clinical importance of the issue--with age, GI function often becomes severely compromised--only a few initial observations on age-related structural changes of visceral afferents are available. Primary afferent cell bodies in both the nodose ganglia and dorsal root ganglia lose Nissl material and accumulate lipofucsin, inclusions, aggregates, and tangles. Additionally, in changes that we focus on in the present review, vagal visceral afferent terminals in both the muscle wall and the mucosa of the GI tract exhibit age-related structural changes. In aged animals, both of the vagal terminal types examined, namely intraganglionic laminar endings and villus afferents, exhibit dystrophic or regressive morphological changes. These neuropathies are associated with age-related changes in the structural integrity of the target organs of the affected afferents, suggesting that local changes in trophic environment may give rise to the aging of GI innervation. Given the clinical relevance of GI tract aging, a more complete understanding both of how aging alters the innervation of the gut and of how such changes might be mitigated should be made research priorities. PMID:19665435

  15. Pro-inflammatory effects of uric acid in the gastrointestinal tract

    PubMed Central

    Crane, John K.; Mongiardo, Krystin M.

    2014-01-01

    Uric acid can be generated in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract from the breakdown of nucleotides ingested in the diet or from purines released from host cells as a result of pathogen-induced cell damage. Xanthine oxidase (XO) is the enzyme that converts hypoxanthine or xanthine into uric acid, a reaction that also generates hydrogen peroxide. It has been assumed that the product of XO responsible for the pro-inflammatory effects of this enzyme is hydrogen peroxide. Recent literature on uric acid, however, has indicated that uric acid itself may have biological effects. We tested whether uric acid itself has detectable pro-inflammatory effects using an in vivo model using ligated rabbit intestinal segments (“loops”) as well as in vitro assays using cultured cells. Addition of exogenous uric acid increased the influx of heterophils into rabbit intestinal loops, as measured by myeloperoxidase activity. In addition, white blood cells adhered avidly to uric acid crystals, forming large aggregates of cells. Uric acid acts as a leukocyte chemoattractant in the GI tract. The role of uric acid in enteric infections and in non-infectious disorders of the GI tract deserves more attention. PMID:24377830

  16. Effects of flunixin and flunixin plus prednisone on the gastrointestinal tract of dogs.

    PubMed

    Dow, S W; Rosychuk, R A; McChesney, A E; Curtis, C R

    1990-07-01

    Flunixin meglumine has been reported to induce gastrointestinal lesions in dogs when administered at therapeutic dosages. We administered flunixin meglumine to dogs daily for 10 days to assess the effect of this drug on the gastrointestinal tract. We also evaluated the possibility of corticosteroid potentiation of gastrointestinal toxicosis by concurrent administration of prednisone to 1 group of dogs. Dogs were monitored for gastrointestinal toxicosis by means of serial endoscopic evaluation, measurement of fecal occult blood, PCV, and total solid concentration, and by physical examination. There were 3 treatment groups of 5 dogs each. Group-1 dogs were given 2.2 mg of flunixin meglumine/kg daily, in 2 divided doses IM; group-2 dogs were given 4.4 mg of flunixin meglumine/kg daily, in 2 divided doses IM; and group-3 dogs were given 2.2 mg of flunixin meglumine/kg daily, in 2 divided doses IM plus 1.1 mg of prednisone/kg/d orally, in 2 divided doses. A fourth group of 5 dogs served as a control group. Endoscopically visible gastric mucosal lesions developed in all treated dogs within 4 days of initiating treatment. Lesions first developed in the gastric pylorus and antrum and lesions at these sites were more severe than those observed elsewhere. Dogs treated with flunixin meglumine plus prednisone developed the earliest and most severe lesions; lesion scores in group-2 dogs were higher than those in group-1 dogs. All dogs treated had occult blood in their feces by day 5 and its presence appeared to correlate more closely with endoscopic findings than did physical examination findings or changes in values for PCV or total solids.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. Protective effects of silymarin on epirubicin-induced mucosal barrier injury of the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Sasu, Alciona; Herman, Hildegard; Mariasiu, Teodora; Rosu, Marcel; Balta, Cornel; Anghel, Nicoleta; Miutescu, Eftimie; Cotoraci, Coralia; Hermenean, Anca

    2015-10-01

    Mucositis is a serious disorder of the gastrointestinal tract that results from cancer chemotherapy. We investigated the protective effects of silymarin on epirubicin-induced mucosal barrier injury in CD-1 mice. Immunohistochemical activity of both pro-apoptotic Bax and anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 markers, together with p53, cyt-P450 expression and DNA damage analysis on stomach, small intestine and colon were evaluated. Our results indicated stronger expression for cyt P450 in all analyzed gastrointestinal tissues of Epi group, which demonstrate intense drug detoxification. Bax immunopositivity was intense in the absorptive enterocytes and lamina connective cells of the small intestine, surface epithelial cells of the stomach and also in the colonic epithelium and lamina concomitant with a decreased Bcl-2 expression in all analyzed tissues. Epirubicin-induced gastrointestinal damage was verified by a goblet cell count and morphology analysis on histopathological sections stained for mucins. In all analyzed tissues, Bax immunopositivity has been withdrawn by highest dose of silymarin concomitant with reversal of Bcl-2 intensity at a level comparable with control. p53 expression was found in all analyzed tissues and decreased by high dose of silymarin. Also, DNA internucleosomal fragmentation was observed in the Epi groups for all analyzed tissues was almost suppressed at 100 mg/kg Sy co-treatment. Histological aspect and goblet cell count were restored at a highest dose of Sy for both small and large intestine. In conclusion, our findings suggest that silymarin may prevent cellular damage of epirubicin-induced toxicity and was effective in reducing the severity indicators of gastrointestinal mucositis in mice.

  18. Functional modifications associated with gastrointestinal tract organogenesis during metamorphosis in Atlantic halibut (Hippoglossus hippoglossus).

    PubMed

    Gomes, Ana S; Kamisaka, Yuko; Harboe, Torstein; Power, Deborah M; Rønnestad, Ivar

    2014-02-19

    Flatfish metamorphosis is a hormone regulated post-embryonic developmental event that transforms a symmetric larva into an asymmetric juvenile. In altricial-gastric teleost fish, differentiation of the stomach takes place after the onset of first feeding, and during metamorphosis dramatic molecular and morphological modifications of the gastrointestinal (GI-) tract occur. Here we present the functional ontogeny of the developing GI-tract from an integrative perspective in the pleuronectiforme Atlantic halibut, and test the hypothesis that the multiple functions of the teleost stomach develop synchronously during metamorphosis. Onset of gastric function was determined with several approaches (anatomical, biochemical, molecular and in vivo observations). In vivo pH analysis in the GI-tract lumen combined with quantitative PCR (qPCR) of α and β subunits of the gastric proton pump (H+/K+-ATPase) and pepsinogen A2 indicated that gastric proteolytic capacity is established during the climax of metamorphosis. Transcript abundance of ghrelin, a putative orexigenic signalling molecule produced in the developing stomach, correlated (p < 0.05) with the emergence of gastric proteolytic activity, suggesting that the stomach's role in appetite regulation occurs simultaneously with the establishment of proteolytic function. A 3D models series of the GI-tract development indicated a functional pyloric sphincter prior to first feeding. Observations of fed larvae in vivo confirmed that stomach reservoir function was established before metamorphosis, and was thus independent of this event. Mechanical breakdown of food and transportation of chyme through the GI-tract was observed in vivo and resulted from phasic and propagating contractions established well before metamorphosis. The number of contractions in the midgut decreased at metamorphic climax synchronously with establishment of the stomach's proteolytic capacity and its increased peristaltic activity. Putative osmoregulatory

  19. Upper gastrointestinal tract cancers as double-cancers in elderly patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ikawa, Hiroaki; Tonogi, Morio; Yamane, Gen-Yuki; Yamauchi, Tomohiro; Tanaka, Yoichi; Sato, Michio; Matsui, Junichi; Ando, Nobutoshi; Katakura, Akira

    2012-01-01

    Against a background of a rapidly aging society, the number of patients with oral cancers in Japan is increasing yearly. The number of double-cancers with oral cancer as the first malignancy is also reportedly on the rise. Esophageal and gastric cancers are the most common second malignancies. At our institution, our policy is to proactively perform upper gastrointestinal (GI) fiberscopy (GIF) in patients with oral cancer. In anticipation of a probable further increase in the number of patients with double-cancers consisting of oral and GI tract malignancies, we retrospectively analyzed the occurrence of upper GI tract cancers in patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). The cohort consisted of 171 patients in whom OSCC had been diagnosed and who had undergone upper GIF between March 1996 and August 2008. Multivariate analysis was performed. Upper GIF identified 8 patients (7 men, 1 woman, totaling 4.7% of 171 patients) with double-cancer in the upper GI tract. One patient had a triple malignancy consisting of oral, esophageal and gastric cancers. Seven patients had esophageal cancer, while two had gastric cancer. An age of over 65 years was significantly higher in patients with double-cancers including esophageal cancer than in patients without esophageal cancer (OR=10.454, 95% CI=1.143-95.621). None of the other analyzed patient factors (sex, smoking habit, drinking habit, site of OSCC, TNM classification, staging results) showed a significant difference. These results indicate that, when treating elderly patients with oral cancers, physicians need to devise suitable treatment plans which take into account the possibility of upper GI tract cancer, particularly esophageal cancer, as a double-cancer.

  20. Clinical relevance of cell-free DNA in gastrointestinal tract malignancy.

    PubMed

    Lan, Yuan-Tzu; Chen, Ming-Huang; Fang, Wen-Liang; Hsieh, Chih-Cheng; Lin, Chien-Hsing; Jhang, Fang-Yu; Yang, Shung-Haur; Lin, Jen-Kou; Chen, Wei-Shone; Jiang, Jeng-Kai; Lin, Pei-Ching; Chang, Shih-Ching

    2017-01-10

    Cell-free DNA (cfDNA) extracted from blood has become a clinically feasible biomarker in various types of cancer. However, the clinical significance of cfDNA in gastrointestinal (GI) tract cancer among Asian populations requires further investigation. The median cfDNA copy number was highest in esophageal cancer, followed by colorectal cancer and gastric cancer, which were all significantly higher than those of healthy individuals. The cfDNA levels were higher in GI tract cancer, followed by those in carcinoma in situ and then healthy individuals (P = 0.019). During the postoperative surveillance, the cfDNA level tended to be more sensitive than the carcinoembryonic antigen level in predicting recurrence. For recurrent gastric cancer, a persistently high cfDNA level and an increasing trend was observed after surgery. For stage IV colorectal cancer, dynamic changes in the cfDNA level were correlated with the responses to chemotherapy and surgery. Blood samples were collected from 95 healthy individuals and from 855 patients diagnosed with GI tract malignancy, including 98 with esophageal cancer, 428 with stomach cancer, 329 with colorectal cancer and 30 with carcinoma in situ. The copy numbers of extracted cfDNA were analyzed and compared among the different types of GI cancers. The cfDNA level can serve as a feasible biomarker for detecting tumors in GI tract cancer. The cfDNA level may play a role in predicting tumor responses to chemotherapy and surgery in colorectal cancer; tumor recurrence should be considered in gastric cancer with a persistently high cfDNA level after surgery.

  1. Keratinocyte growth factor induces proliferation of hepatocytes and epithelial cells throughout the rat gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Housley, R M; Morris, C F; Boyle, W; Ring, B; Biltz, R; Tarpley, J E; Aukerman, S L; Devine, P L; Whitehead, R H; Pierce, G F

    1994-11-01

    Keratinocyte growth factor (KGF), a member of the fibroblast growth factor (FGF) family, was identified as a specific keratinocyte mitogen after isolation from a lung fibroblast line. Recently, recombinant (r)KGF was found to influence proliferation and differentiation patterns of multiple epithelial cell lineages within skin, lung, and the reproductive tract. In the present study, we designed experiments to identify additional target tissues, and focused on the rat gastrointestinal (GI) system, since a putative receptor, K-sam, was originally identified in a gastric carcinoma. Expression of KGF receptor and KGF mRNA was detected within the entire GI tract, suggesting the gut both synthesized and responded to KGF. Therefore, rKGF was administered to adult rats and was found to induce markedly increased proliferation of epithelial cells from the foregut to the colon, and of hepatocytes, one day after systemic treatment. Daily treatment resulted in the marked selective induction of mucin-producing cell lineages throughout the GI tract in a dose-dependent fashion. Other cell lineages were either unaffected (e.g., Paneth cells), or relatively decreased (e.g., parietal cells, enterocytes) in rKGF-treated rats. The direct effect of rKGF was confirmed by demonstrating markedly increased carcinoembryonic antigen production in a human colon carcinoma cell line, LIM1899. Serum levels of albumin were specifically and significantly elevated after daily treatment. These results demonstrate rKGF can induce epithelial cell activation throughout the GI tract and liver. Further, endogenous KGF may be a normal paracrine mediator of growth within the gut.

  2. Concurrent gastrointestinal stromal tumor and digestive tract carcinoma: a single institution experience in China

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Peng; Deng, Rui; Xia, Zefeng; Shuai, Xiaoming; Chang, Weilong; Gao, Jinbo; Wang, Guobin; Tao, Kaixiong

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to review the clinicopathological characteristics and survival outcomes of patients with concurrent gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) and digestive tract carcinoma. Among 585 patients diagnosed with GIST from January 2005 to July 2014, 32 (5.5%) had synchronous digestive tract carcinoma, including 19 (59.4%) men and 13 (40.6%) women. The median age was 64 years (range, 43-84). GIST was located in the stomach (n=24), small intestine (n=6), duodenum (n=1) and retroperitoneum (n=1). GISTs were intra- or postoperatively discovered (n=28) or preoperatively identified (n=4). The tumor size was less than 10 mm (microGIST) in 23 (71.9%) GIST patients. The preoperatively identified GIST subgroup showed a significantly larger tumor size, more mitotic figures and a higher risk grade than the intra- or postoperatively identified GIST subgroup. Concurrent digestive tract carcinomas were most frequently located in the stomach (24 cases, 75%). The other involved sites were the esophagus (n=5), duodenum (n=2) and colon (n=1). With a median follow-up of 32 months (range, 9-80), 24 patients were alive without evidence of disease, 6 patients had died of carcinoma progression, 1 patient had died from an accident, and 1 patient experienced GIST metastasis to the liver. In summary, we discovered that 5.5% of GIST patients also developed a concurrent digestive tract carcinoma in a series of 585 GIST cases. The majority of GISTs are incidentally identified microGISTs. The concurrent carcinoma seems to have a greater unfavorable effect on prognosis than the GIST. However, for a GIST that is identified preoperatively with a high risk of progression, adjuvant therapy is warranted. PMID:26885079

  3. The Dynamic Distribution of Porcine Microbiota across Different Ages and Gastrointestinal Tract Segments

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shuyun; Huang, Jiaojiao; Zhai, Zhengxiao; He, Chuan; Ding, Jinmei; Wang, Jun; Wang, Huijuan; Fan, Weibing; Zhao, Jianguo; Meng, He

    2015-01-01

    Metagenome of gut microbes has been implicated in metabolism, immunity, and health maintenance of its host. However, in most of previous studies, the microbiota was sampled from feces instead of gastrointestinal (GI) tract. In this study, we compared the microbial populations from feces at four different developmental stages and contents of four intestinal segments at maturity to examine the dynamic shift of microbiota in pigs and investigated whether adult porcine fecal samples could be used to represent samples of the GI tract. Analysis results revealed that the ratio of Firmicutes to Bacteroidetes from the feces of the older pigs (2-, 3-, 6- month) were 10 times higher compared to those from piglets (1-month). As the pigs matured, so did it seem that the composition of microbiome became more stable in feces. In adult pigs, there were significant differences in microbial profiles between the contents of the small intestine and large intestine. The dominant genera in the small intestine belonged to aerobe or facultative anaerobe categories, whereas the main genera in the large intestine were all anaerobes. Compared to the GI tract, the composition of microbiome was quite different in feces. The microbial profile in large intestine was more similar to feces than those in the small intestine, with the similarity of 0.75 and 0.38 on average, respectively. Microbial functions, predicted by metagenome profiles, showed the enrichment associated with metabolism pathway and metabolic disease in large intestine and feces while higher abundance of infectious disease, immune function disease, and cancer in small intestine. Fecal microbes also showed enriched function in metabolic pathways compared to microbes from pooled gut contents. Our study extended the understanding of dynamic shift of gut microbes during pig growth and also characterized the profiles of bacterial communities across GI tracts of mature pigs. PMID:25688558

  4. Smooth-muscle-specific expression of neurotrophin-3 in mouse embryonic and neonatal gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Fox, Edward A; McAdams, Jennifer

    2010-05-01

    Vagal gastrointestinal (GI) afferents are essential for the regulation of eating, body weight, and digestion. However, their functional organization and the way that this develops are poorly understood. Neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) is crucial for the survival of vagal sensory neurons and is expressed in the developing GI tract, possibly contributing to their survival and to other aspects of vagal afferent development. The identification of the functions of this peripheral NT-3 thus requires a detailed understanding of the localization and timing of its expression in the developing GI tract. We have studied embryos and neonates expressing the lacZ reporter gene from the NT-3 locus and found that NT-3 is expressed predominantly in the smooth muscle of the outer GI wall of the stomach, intestines, and associated blood vessels and in the stomach lamina propria and esophageal epithelium. NT-3 expression has been detected in the mesenchyme of the GI wall by embryonic day 12.5 (E12.5) and becomes restricted to smooth muscle and lamina propria by E15.5, whereas its expression in blood vessels and esophageal epithelium is first observed at E15.5. Expression in most tissues is maintained at least until postnatal day 4. The lack of colocalization of beta-galactosidase and markers for myenteric ganglion cell types suggests that NT-3 is not expressed in these ganglia. Therefore, NT-3 expression in the GI tract is largely restricted to smooth muscle at ages when vagal axons grow into the GI tract, and when vagal mechanoreceptors form in smooth muscle, consistent with its role in these processes and in vagal sensory neuron survival.

  5. Smoothelin is a specific marker for smooth muscle neoplasms of the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Coco, Dominique P; Hirsch, Michelle S; Hornick, Jason L

    2009-12-01

    Smoothelin is a smooth muscle-specific cytoskeletal protein exclusively found in differentiated smooth muscle cells. This contrasts with other smooth muscle proteins (eg, h-caldesmon, alpha-smooth muscle actin, desmin, smooth muscle myosin), which are expressed in proliferative (early) stages of smooth muscle development and occasionally in other cell types (striated muscle, myofibroblasts, myoepithelial cells, pericytes). Smoothelin has been shown to be expressed predominantly in visceral smooth muscle and to a lesser extent in vascular smooth muscle. Smoothelin expression in mesenchymal tumors of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract has not been evaluated earlier. The purpose of this study was to determine whether immunostaining for smoothelin could help distinguish smooth muscle neoplasms from their morphologic mimics, particularly KIT-negative gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs), desmin-positive GISTs, and desmoid fibromatosis. A total of 150 mesenchymal neoplasms of the GI tract, abdominal cavity, and retroperitoneum were retrieved from consult and surgical pathology archives, including 54 GISTs (8 KIT-negative; 13 desmin-positive), 17 GI leiomyosarcomas (LMS), 11 GI mural leiomyomas, 13 leiomyomas of the muscularis mucosae, 12 gastric schwannomas, 15 inflammatory myofibroblastic tumors, 9 cases of mesenteric desmoid fibromatosis, 10 dedifferentiated liposarcomas, and 9 malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors. Immunostaining for smoothelin was performed on all cases. Cytoplasmic and nuclear staining was recorded. Cytoplasmic expression of smoothelin was present in all 24 (100%) benign smooth muscle tumors (mural leiomyomas and leiomyomas of the muscularis mucosae). In contrast, only 4 (24%) GI LMS showed cytoplasmic staining for smoothelin. None of the GISTs, desmoid tumors, inflammatory myofibroblastic tumors, schwannomas, dedifferentiated liposarcomas, or malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors showed cytoplasmic reactivity for smoothelin. Interestingly, 7

  6. Characterization of a Haemophilus paracuniculus isolated from gastrointestinal tracts of rabbits with mucoid enteritis.

    PubMed Central

    Targowski, S; Targowski, H

    1979-01-01

    The isolation, characterization, and identification of a microorganism isolated from gastrointestinal tracts of rabbits with mucoid enteritis are described. The isolated organism did not grow on standard media. This organism grew around colonies of Staphylococcus aureus and Lactobacillus desidiosus and around disks saturated with diphosphopyridin nucleotide (factor V) on brain heart infusion agar. The growth of this organism was also observed on media supplemented with beta-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide. The organism appeared as gram-negative, pleomorphic rods or coccobacilli. It was positive for urease, oxidase, catalase, glycosidases, porphyrin, and indole, and it fermented glucose and sucrose. All of these characteristics suggest that the organism is a member of the genus Haemophilus. Because of its isolation from rabbits and differences in some characteristics from other species of this genus, the name Haemophilus paracuniculus is proposed for this organism. PMID:429539

  7. Terahertz spectroscopic imaging and properties of gastrointestinal tract in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Ji, Young Bin; Kim, Sang-Hoon; Jeong, Kiyoung; Choi, Yuna; Son, Joo-Hiuk; Park, Dong Woo; Noh, Sam Kyu; Jeon, Tae-In; Huh, Yong-Min; Haam, Seungjoo; Lee, Sang Kil; Oh, Seung Jae; Suh, Jin-Suck

    2014-12-01

    We have investigated basic properties of normal gastrointestinal (GI) tract tissues, including glandular stomach (GS), fore stomach (FS), large intestine (LI), small intestine (SI), and esophagus (ESO), from a rat model using terahertz (THz) reflection imaging and spectroscopy. The THz images collected from stratified squamous epithelia (SSE) of FS and ESO show a lower peak-to-peak value compared to those from columnar epithelia (CE) of GS, LI, or SI because the SSE contains less water than CE. The refractive index and absorption coefficient of FS were less than those of GS or LI, both having values similar to those of water. Additionally, we report internal reflection THz signals from ESO, although we were unable to determine the exact interface for this internal reflection.

  8. Characterization of PrPc-immunoreactive cells in monkey (Macaca fascicularis) gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Marcos, Z; Bodegas, M E; Sesma, M P; Guembe, L

    2005-04-01

    The gastrointestinal tract (GIT) is one of the most likely entry sites for the pathological isoform of prions (PrP(sc)). To understand how PrP(sc) crosses the digestive mucosa, it is crucial to characterize the cells expressing normal prion protein (PrP(c)). By means of double immunofluorescence applied to sections of the monkey GIT, we demonstrated that, in the stomach, PrP(c) immunostaining occurs in subsets of histamine, somatostatin (Som), ghrelin (Ghr), gastrin (G), and serotonin (5HT) cells. In the small and large bowels, PrP(c) cells were found in subpopulations of cells immunolabeled for 5HT, Som, G, and peptide YY (PYY).

  9. Comparative study of PrPc expression in rat, monkey, and cow gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Marcos, Z; Bodegas, M E; Sesma, M P; Guembe, L

    2005-04-01

    The gastrointestinal tract (GIT) appears to be the main site of entry for the pathological isoform of prions (PrP(sc)). To understand how the PrP(sc) internalization process occurs, it is important to characterize the cell types that express normal prion protein (PrP(c)) along the GIT. To do so, we studied the distribution of PrP(c) in the rat, monkey, and cow GIT. Using Western blot analysis, we found that PrP(c) is expressed in all digestive regions of the three species. Immunoreactivity for PrP(c) was found throughout the GIT in epithelial cells sharing the neuroendocrine (NE) phenotype. Immunostained cells appeared scattered throughout the epithelium of fundic and pyloric glands as well as in intestinal villi and crypts.

  10. Endoscopic detection of early malignancies in the upper gastrointestinal tract using laser-induced fluorescence imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukowski, Uwe; Ebert, Bernd; Ortner, Marianne; Zumbusch, Katharina; Mueller, Karsten; Fleige, Barbara; Lochs, Herbert; Rinneberg, Herbert H.

    2001-01-01

    Fluorescence images were recorded simultaneously with white light images to detect dyspasia or early malignancies during regular endoscopy of the upper gastrointestinal tract, after topical administration of 5-aminolaevulinic acid. Biopsies were taken at locations where fluorescence intensity were high compared with the mean fluorescence intensity of the image. Prompt and delayed fluorescence spectra of biopsies were subsequently recorded ex vivo, and normalized fluorescence intensities of Protoporphyrin IX derived from these spectra were compared with routine histology. In contrast to routine endoscopy, one early carcinoma and one signet-ring carcinoma were found in the stomach, and malignancies in a duodenal polyp. In addition, intestinal metaplasia could be visualized in the stomach of two patients, which had not been detected in biopsies taken prior to fluorescence endoscopy.

  11. Genomic analysis of three Bifidobacterium species isolated from the calf gastrointestinal tract

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, William J.; Cookson, Adrian L.; Altermann, Eric; Lambie, Suzanne C.; Perry, Rechelle; Teh, Koon Hoong; Otter, Don E.; Shapiro, Nicole; Woyke, Tanja; Leahy, Sinead C.

    2016-07-29

    Ruminant animals contribute significantly to the global value of agriculture and rely on a complex microbial community for efficient digestion. However, little is known of how this microbial-host relationship develops and is maintained. To begin to address this, we have determined the ability of three Bifidobacterium species isolated from the faeces of newborn calves to grow on carbohydrates typical of a newborn ruminant diet. Genome sequences have been determined for these bacteria with analysis of the genomes providing insights into the host association and identification of several genes that may mediate interactions with the ruminant gastrointestinal tract. The present study provides a starting point from which we can define the role of potential beneficial microbes in the nutrition of young ruminants and begin to influence the interactions between the microbiota and the host. The differences observed in genomic content hint at niche partitioning among the bifidobacterial species analysed and the different strategies they employ to successfully adapt to this habitat.

  12. Long-term exposure to zero-g and the gastro-intestinal tract function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccormack, Percial D.

    1989-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract (GIT) function is described with emphasis placed on its important role to smooth, delay, and modify sudden fluid load stress applied to the fluid distribution control system in the body. Two basic components of the GIT are considered: stomach dynamics, which involves storage, mixing, and discharge of food into the intestine after addition of gastric juices; and absorption of water and electrolytes from the small intestine. A dynamic model of these components is described, along with performance characteristics computed consecutively for one g and zero g conditions. The main impact of the zero g condition appears to be through a change in osmotic driven transport across the gut wall. A dramatic change in transport characteristics is predicted with implication for many body systems (the immune system in particular) during long-term exposure to zero g. Experimental measurements in zero g are needed to evaluate these predictions.

  13. Application autofluorescence diagnosis method in endoscopy for investigation mucosal structure in gastrointestinal tract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varlamova, Larisa; Abramov, Dmitrii; Golovin, Arsenii; Seledkina, Ekaterina

    2017-05-01

    One of the promising methods for early diagnosis of malignant diseases of the respiratory organs and the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) is now considered a fluorescence method. Application autofluorescence phenomenon in endoscopy allows to obtain a fluorescent image of the mucosa, which shows the difference in the intensity of the autofluorescence of healthy and the affected tissue in the green and red regions of the spectrum. The result of the work is to determine on the basis of scientific research and prototyping capabilities of creating fluorescence video endoscope and the development of fluorescent light (illuminator FLU) for videoendoscopy complex. The solution of this problem is based on the method of studying biological objects in lifetime condition.

  14. Pulse Granulomas of the Gastrointestinal Tract and Gallbladder: Report of Five Cases

    PubMed Central

    DeRoche, Tom C.; Gates, Gregory A.

    2017-01-01

    Hyaline rings with admixed multinucleated giant cells characterize pulse granulomas; the term pulse refers to edible seeds of legume vegetables. The etiology has been controversial, with theories including vascular degenerative changes or a reaction to vegetable material; ultrastructural studies and experimentally induced lesions in animals favor the latter. This lesion is typically seen in the oral cavity, with only rare reports in the gastrointestinal tract and gallbladder. We herein describe five cases of pulse granulomas identified in these sites. All cases contained foreign-body giant cells and vegetable debris within or near hyaline rings. Pulse granulomas may form mass lesions but are usually an incidental finding on microscopic examination. In incidentally detected cases, recognition of pulse granulomas can suggest a mural abscess, fistula, or perforation of the gut, findings which may not be grossly apparent. The presence of vegetable material in all five cases further supports an exogenous pathogenesis. PMID:28785500

  15. The role of conjugative transposons in spreading antibiotic resistance between bacteria that inhabit the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Scott, K P

    2002-12-01

    There is huge potential for genetic exchange to occur within the dense, diverse anaerobic microbial population inhabiting the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) of humans and animals. However, the incidence of conjugative transposons (CTns) and the antibiotic resistance genes they carry has not been well studied among this population. Since any incoming bacteria, including pathogens, can access this reservoir of genes, this oversight would appear to be an important one. Recent evidence has shown that anaerobic bacteria native to the rumen or hindgut harbour both novel antibiotic resistance genes and novel conjugative transposons. These CTns, and previously characterized CTns, can be transferred to a wide range of commensal bacteria under laboratory and in vivo conditions. The main evidence that gene transfer occurs widely in vivo between GIT bacteria, and between GIT bacteria and pathogenic bacteria, is that identical resistance genes are present in diverse bacterial species from different hosts.

  16. Mechanosensitive ion channels in interstitial cells of Cajal and smooth muscle of the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Kraichely, R E; Farrugia, G

    2007-04-01

    Normal gastrointestinal (GI) motility is required to mix digestive enzymes and food and to move content along the GI tract. Underlying the complex motor patterns of the gut are electrical events that reflect ion flux across cell membranes. Smooth muscle electrical activity is directly influenced by GI interstitial cells of Cajal, whose rhythmic oscillations in membrane potential in part determine the excitability of GI smooth muscle and its response to neuronal input. Coordinated activity of the ion channels responsible for the conductances that underlie ion flux in both smooth muscle and interstitial cells is a requisite for normal motility. These conductances are regulated by many factors, including mechanical stress. Recent studies have revealed mechanosensitivity at the level of the ion channels, and the mechanosensor within the channel has been identified in many cases. This has led to better comprehension of the role of mechanosensitive conductances in normal physiology and will undoubtedly lead to understanding of the consequences of disturbances in these conductances.

  17. Gastrointestinal tract perforations caused by ingestion of multiple magnets in a dog.

    PubMed

    Hickey, Mara C; Magee, Ashley

    2011-08-01

    To describe a case of gastrointestinal tract perforation, septic peritonitis and coagulopathy caused by ingestion of multiple magnets in a dog. An 8-month-old castrated male Rottweiler, weighing 30.5 kg was presented for evaluation of vomiting and weakness. Abdominal radiography and abdominal ultrasonographic examination identified a metallic foreign object within the gastric lumen, presence of free peritoneal gas, and peritoneal effusion. Septic peritonitis was diagnosed by abdominal fluid analysis. Exploratory celiotomy revealed the presence of an omental abscess, and gastric and colonic perforations. Four magnetic foreign objects were found within the lumen of the perforated stomach. Surgical management including removal of the magnets, abscess debridement and excision, perforation repair, and abdominal drainage combined with intensive medical therapy resulted in complete recovery of this dog. This report describes in detail the case management of a dog that developed both gastric and colonic perforations and severe morbidity secondary to ingesting multiple magnets. © Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society 2011.

  18. Effects of berberine in the gastrointestinal tract - a review of actions and therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chunqiu; Yu, Zhen; Li, Yongyu; Fichna, Jakub; Storr, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Berberine is an isoquinoline alkaloid present in several plant species, including Coptis sp. and Berberis sp. In traditional medicine, extracts of berberine are used in the treatment of diarrhea of different origins. Recent studies have shown that berberine and its derivatives have significant biological effects on gastrointestinal (GI) and other functions and may become therapeutics for the treatment of diarrhea, gastroenteritis, diabetes, hyperlipidemia, cardiovascular diseases and inflammatory conditions. This paper summarizes the current knowledge on the actions of berberine in the GI tract. Binding and target sites, activated intracellular pathways, as well as the absorption and metabolism of berberine are discussed. Effects that may be useful in future clinical treatment, like antidiarrheal, anti-inflammatory and antitumor effects are critically reviewed and potential clinical applications are presented in detail.

  19. Bio-inspired solutions for locomotion in the gastrointestinal tract: background and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Menciassi, Arianna; Dario, Paolo

    2003-10-15

    This paper illustrates a bio-inspired approach to effective, smooth and safe navigation in the human body and, in particular, in the gastrointestinal tract. This idea originates from the medical need to develop more powerful tools for microendoscopy, which is one of the most challenging frontiers of modern medicine. Understanding motion and perception systems of lower animal forms, such as parasites, worms, insects and snakes, can help to design and fabricate bio-inspired robots able to navigate in tortuous, slippery and difficult-to-access cavities of the human body. A preliminary study of a biomimetic adhesion system for the human tissues is presented in this work and some technological implementations are illustrated and discussed. Finally, some issues concerning the goals of smart and reactive locomotion are considered and the most promising and relevant enabling technologies are discussed.

  20. [Length and weight of gastrointestinal tracts of pikas, suncus, millardias, mice and rats].

    PubMed

    Yamanaka, M; Matsuzaki, T; Saito, M

    1983-01-01

    The length and weight of gastrointestinal tracts including contents of ten week old male pikas (Ochotona rufescens rufescens) and suncus (Suncus murinus) were measured and they were investigated and compared with those of millardias, ICR-mice and Wistar-rats. The length from the duodenum to the anus of pikas was much longer and the weight from the stomach to the anus was about 16g per 100g of body weight. The weight of cecum was about 7g per body weight and they were heavier than those of other species. The length from the duodenum to the anus of the suncus was short but the weight of the small intestine plus colon and rectum per body weight did not differ from that of other species. The suncus has no cecum but the weight from the stomach to the anus was almost the same as that of rats.

  1. Campylobacter jejuni PflB is required for motility and colonisation of the chicken gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Kanji, Alpa; Jones, Michael A; Maskell, Duncan J; Grant, Andrew J

    2015-12-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is the leading cause of foodborne bacterial gastroenteritis worldwide. Although the mechanisms by which C. jejuni causes disease are not completely understood, the presence of functional flagella appears to be required for colonisation of the gastrointestinal tract of humans and animals. Therefore much attention has been given to understanding the synthesis and role of flagella in C. jejuni. In this study we report insights into the function of PflB that is essential for Campylobacter motility. We have explored the function of this gene by constructing deletion mutants in C. jejuni strains NCTC11168 and M1, in the genes cj0390 and CJM1_0368, respectively. The mutants were non-motile yet assembled flagella that appeared structurally identical to the wild type. Furthermore the protein is required for C. jejuni colonisation of caeca in a two-week old chicken colonisation model. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The Endocannabinoid System and Its Role in Regulating the Intrinsic Neural Circuitry of the Gastrointestinal Tract.

    PubMed

    Trautmann, Samantha M; Sharkey, Keith A

    2015-01-01

    Endocannabinoids are important neuromodulators in the central nervous system. They regulate central transmission through pre- and postsynaptic actions on neurons and indirectly through effects on glial cells. Cannabinoids (CBs) also regulate neurotransmission in the enteric nervous system (ENS) of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. The ENS consists of intrinsic primary afferent neurons, interneurons, and motor neurons arranged in two ganglionated plexuses which control all the functions of the gut. Increasing evidence suggests that endocannabinoids are potent neuromodulators in the ENS. In this review, we will highlight key observations on the localization of CB receptors and molecules involved in the synthesis and degradation of endocannabinoids in the ENS. We will discuss endocannabinoid signaling mechanisms, endocannabinoid tone and concepts of CB receptor metaplasticity in the ENS. We will also touch on some examples of enteric neural signaling in relation neuromuscular, secretomotor, and enteroendocrine transmission in the ENS. Finally, we will briefly discuss some key future directions.

  3. Bacterial and Archaeal Diversity in the Gastrointestinal Tract of the North American Beaver (Castor canadensis)

    PubMed Central

    Gruninger, Robert J.; McAllister, Tim A.; Forster, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    The North American Beaver (Castor canadensis) is the second largest living rodent and an iconic symbol of Canada. The beaver is a semi-aquatic browser whose diet consists of lignocellulose from a variety of plants. The beaver is a hindgut fermenter and has an enlarged ceacum that houses a complex microbiome. There have been few studies examining the microbial diversity in gastrointestinal tract of hindgut fermenting herbivores. To examine the bacterial and archaeal communities inhabiting the gastrointestinal tract of the beaver, the microbiome of the ceacum and feaces was examined using culture-independent methods. DNA from the microbial community of the ceacum and feaces of 4 adult beavers was extracted, and the16S rRNA gene was sequenced using either bacterial or archaeal specific primers. A total of 1447 and 1435 unique bacterial OTUs were sequenced from the ceacum and feaces, respectively. On average, the majority of OTUs within the ceacum were classified as Bacteroidetes (49.2%) and Firmicutes (47.6%). The feaces was also dominated by OTUs from Bacteroidetes (36.8%) and Firmicutes (58.9%). The composition of bacterial community was not significantly different among animals. The composition of the ceacal and feacal microbiome differed, but this difference is due to changes in the abundance of closely related OTUs, not because of major differences in the taxonomic composition of the communities. Within these communities, known degraders of lignocellulose were identified. In contrast, to the bacterial microbiome, the archaeal community was dominated by a single species of methanogen, Methanosphaera stadtmanae. The data presented here provide the first insight into the microbial community within the hindgut of the beaver. PMID:27227334

  4. Bacterial and Archaeal Diversity in the Gastrointestinal Tract of the North American Beaver (Castor canadensis).

    PubMed

    Gruninger, Robert J; McAllister, Tim A; Forster, Robert J

    2016-01-01

    The North American Beaver (Castor canadensis) is the second largest living rodent and an iconic symbol of Canada. The beaver is a semi-aquatic browser whose diet consists of lignocellulose from a variety of plants. The beaver is a hindgut fermenter and has an enlarged ceacum that houses a complex microbiome. There have been few studies examining the microbial diversity in gastrointestinal tract of hindgut fermenting herbivores. To examine the bacterial and archaeal communities inhabiting the gastrointestinal tract of the beaver, the microbiome of the ceacum and feaces was examined using culture-independent methods. DNA from the microbial community of the ceacum and feaces of 4 adult beavers was extracted, and the16S rRNA gene was sequenced using either bacterial or archaeal specific primers. A total of 1447 and 1435 unique bacterial OTUs were sequenced from the ceacum and feaces, respectively. On average, the majority of OTUs within the ceacum were classified as Bacteroidetes (49.2%) and Firmicutes (47.6%). The feaces was also dominated by OTUs from Bacteroidetes (36.8%) and Firmicutes (58.9%). The composition of bacterial community was not significantly different among animals. The composition of the ceacal and feacal microbiome differed, but this difference is due to changes in the abundance of closely related OTUs, not because of major differences in the taxonomic composition of the communities. Within these communities, known degraders of lignocellulose were identified. In contrast, to the bacterial microbiome, the archaeal community was dominated by a single species of methanogen, Methanosphaera stadtmanae. The data presented here provide the first insight into the microbial community within the hindgut of the beaver.

  5. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon release from a soil matrix in the in vitro gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Van de Wiele, Tom Richard; Verstraete, Willy; Siciliano, Steven Douglas

    2004-01-01

    Soil ingestion is an important exposure route by which immobile soil contaminants enter the human body. We assessed polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) release from a contaminated soil, containing 49 mg PAH kg(-1), using a SHIME (Simulator of the Human Intestinal Microbial Ecosystem) reactor comprising the stomach, duodenal, and colon compartments. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon release was defined as that fraction remaining in the digest supernatant after centrifugation for 5 min at 1500 x g. The PAH release in the stomach digest was only 0.44% of the total PAH present in soil, resulting in PAH concentrations of 23 micrograms PAH L(-1) chyme. The lower PAH releases in duodenum (0.13%) and colon (0.30%) digests, compared with the stomach digest, were thought to be attributed to combined complexation and precipitation with bile salts, dissolved organic matter, or colon microbiota. We studied these complexation processes in an intestinal suspension more in depth by preparing mixtures of 9-anthracenepropionic acid, a Bacillus subtilis culture, and cholin as model compounds for PAHs, organic matter, and bile salts, respectively. Bile salts or organic matter in the aqueous phase initially enhance PAH desorption from soil. However, desorbed PAHs may form large aggregates with bile and organic matter, lowering the freely dissolved PAH fraction in the supernatant. Using the model compounds, mathematical equations were developed and validated to predict PAH complexation processes in the gastrointestinal tract. Contaminant release and subsequent complexation in the gut is an important prerequisite to intestinal absorption and thus bioavailability of that contaminant. The data from this research may help in understanding the processes to which PAHs are subjected in the gastrointestinal tract, before intestinal absorption.

  6. Effects of alfalfa meal on growth performance and gastrointestinal tract development of growing ducks.

    PubMed

    Jiang, J F; Song, X M; Huang, X; Zhou, W D; Wu, J L; Zhu, Z G; Zheng, H C; Jiang, Y Q

    2012-10-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate effects of alfalfa meal on growth performance and gastrointestinal tract development of growing layer ducks to provide evidence for application of alfalfa meal in the duck industry. Two hundred and fifty-six healthy Shaoxing 7-wk old growing layer ducks were selected and randomly allocated to 1 of 4 dietary treatments based on corn and soybean meal and containing 0, 3, 6, and 9% of alfalfa meal for 8 wks. Each treatment consisted of 4 replicates of 16 ducks each. Briefly, birds were raised in separate compartments, and each compartment consisted of three parts: indoor floor house, adjacent open area and a connecting water area. The results showed: i) Growing ducks fed alfalfa meal diet were not significantly different in average daily gain, feed intake and gain-to-feed ratio from those fed no alfalfa diet (p>0.05). ii) Alfalfa meal increased the ratio crop, gizzard to live weight, caecum to live weight, the caecum index of growing ducks (p<0.05). iii) Villus height in duodenum and jejunum of growing ducks increased significantly with the increase of alfalfa meal levels (p<0.05). Crypt depth in duodenum and jejunum of growing ducks decreased significantly with the increase of alfalfa meal levels (p<0.05). This experiment showed that feeding of alfalfa meal to growing layer ducks could improve gastrointestinal tract growth and small intestinal morphology without effect on performance. This experiment provides evidence that alfalfa meal is a very valuable feedstuff for growing layer ducks.

  7. Effects of Alfalfa Meal on Growth Performance and Gastrointestinal Tract Development of Growing Ducks

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, J. F.; Song, X. M.; Huang, X.; Zhou, W. D.; Wu, J. L.; Zhu, Z. G.; Zheng, H. C.; Jiang, Y. Q.

    2012-01-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate effects of alfalfa meal on growth performance and gastrointestinal tract development of growing layer ducks to provide evidence for application of alfalfa meal in the duck industry. Two hundred and fifty-six healthy Shaoxing 7-wk old growing layer ducks were selected and randomly allocated to 1 of 4 dietary treatments based on corn and soybean meal and containing 0, 3, 6, and 9% of alfalfa meal for 8 wks. Each treatment consisted of 4 replicates of 16 ducks each. Briefly, birds were raised in separate compartments, and each compartment consisted of three parts: indoor floor house, adjacent open area and a connecting water area. The results showed: i) Growing ducks fed alfalfa meal diet were not significantly different in average daily gain, feed intake and gain-to-feed ratio from those fed no alfalfa diet (p>0.05). ii) Alfalfa meal increased the ratio crop, gizzard to live weight, caecum to live weight, the caecum index of growing ducks (p<0.05). iii) Villus height in duodenum and jejunum of growing ducks increased significantly with the increase of alfalfa meal levels (p<0.05). Crypt depth in duodenum and jejunum of growing ducks decreased significantly with the increase of alfalfa meal levels (p<0.05). This experiment showed that feeding of alfalfa meal to growing layer ducks could improve gastrointestinal tract growth and small intestinal morphology without effect on performance. This experiment provides evidence that alfalfa meal is a very valuable feedstuff for growing layer ducks. PMID:25049501

  8. Metal concentration in the gill, gastrointestinal tract, and carcass of white suckers (Catostomus commersoni) in relation to lake acidity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haines, T.A.; Brumbaugh, W.G.

    1994-01-01

    Adult white suckers were collected from four lakes in Maine that ranged in pH from 7.0 to 5.4. The gastrointestinal tract and remainder of the carcass of fishes of similar age and size from each lake, and gills from additional fishes of similar size, were analyzed for Al, Cd, Pb, and Zn. Carcasses were also analyzed for Hg. Concentrations of Al, Cd, and Pb were highest in the gastrointestinal tract and lowest in the carcass; Zn concentration was highest in the gill. For carcass, all metals except Al differed significantly among lakes, for gill tissue Cd and Pb differed, and for gastrointestinal tract, only Cd differed among lakes. Where differences were significant, patterns among lakes were similar in each tissue analyzed. Concentrations of Cd, Hg, and Pb were negatively correlated with lake water pH, acid neutralizing capacity (ANC), Ca, and lake:watershed area, and positively correlated with lake water SO4, indicating that concentrations were higher in fish from more acidic lakes. Zinc concentrations in gills were unrelated to lake acidity, and carcass concentrations were higher in the less acidic lakes, which is the opposite of the pattern for the other metals studied. Zinc in gastrointestinal tract did not differ among lakes. Although the lakes we studied were located in undisturbed watersheds and did not receive any point source discharges, fish metal concentrations were comparable to or higher than those reported from waters receiving industrial discharges.

  9. Effects of ergot alkaloid exposure on serotonin receptor mRNA in the smooth muscle of the bovine gastrointestinal tract

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Various serotonin (5HT) receptor subtypes have been located in the gastrointestinal tract and some are associated with gut motility. Cattle exposed to ergot alkaloids through consumption of contaminated feedstuffs have demonstrated signs (e.g. - increased rumen DM content and total content) that sug...

  10. Postmortem Photonic Imaging of Lux-Modified Salmonella Typhimuium Within the Gastrointestinal Tract of Swine Following Oral Inoculation In Vivo

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The study objective was to monitor Salmonella progression by photonic detection through segments of the gastrointestinal tract after oral inoculation. Pigs (~80 kg) were inoculated orally with 3.1 or 4.1 x 1010 cfu of Salmonella Typhimurium transformed with plasmid pAK1-lux for a 6-h (n = 6) or 12-h...

  11. Postmortem photonic imaging of lux-modified Salmonella typhimurium within the gastrointestinal tract of swine following oral inoculation in vivo

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The study objective was to monitor Salmonella progression by photonic detection through segments of the gastrointestinal tract following oral inoculation. Pigs (~ 80 kg) were inoculated orally with 3.1 or 4.1×10*10 colony forming units (cfu) of Salmonella typhimurium transformed with plasmid pAK1-lu...

  12. Role of tyramine synthesis by food-borne Enterococcus durans in adaptation to the gastrointestinal tract environment.

    PubMed

    Fernández de Palencia, Pilar; Fernández, Maria; Mohedano, Maria Luz; Ladero, Victor; Quevedo, Cristina; Alvarez, Miguel A; López, Paloma

    2011-01-01

    Biogenic amines in food constitute a human health risk. Here we report that tyramine-producing Enterococcus durans strain IPLA655 (from cheese) was able to produce tyramine under conditions simulating transit through the gastrointestinal tract. Activation of the tyramine biosynthetic pathway contributed to binding and immunomodulation of enterocytes.

  13. High affinity binding site-mediated prevention of chemical absorption across the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, M V; Barker, T T; Silbart, L K

    2001-12-15

    Preventing mucosal absorption of low-molecular weight compounds such as carcinogens, toxins and drugs could help prevent many diseases. To characterize the effects of dose and timing on high-affinity binding site mediated sequestration of specific chemical ligands in the gastrointestinal tract, avidin was perorally-administered to mice either prior to or mixed with 3H-biotin. Avidin enhanced fecal 3H-biotin excretion in a dose-dependent manner, consistent with the accepted mechanism of egg white-induced biotin deficiency syndrome. Avidin administration up to 4 h before 3H-biotin administration also enhanced fecal 3H-biotin excretion. Activated charcoal (AC) reduced 3H-biotin absorption when mixed with 3H-biotin before ingestion, but was ineffective when ingested prior to 3H-biotin. These studies suggest that ingestion of high-affinity protein binding sites can establish an absorptive barrier at the gastrointestinal mucosa to prevent the uptake of unwanted low molecular-weight chemicals.

  14. Cellulolytic and proteolytic ability of bacteria isolated from gastrointestinal tract and composting of a hippopotamus.

    PubMed

    da Cruz Ramos, Geomárcia Feitosa; Ramos, Patricia Locosque; Passarini, Michel Rodrigo Zambrano; Vieira Silveira, Marghuel A; Okamoto, Débora Noma; de Oliveira, Lilian Caroline Gonçalves; Zezzo, Larissa Vieira; Marem, Alyne; Santos Rocha, Rafael Costa; da Cruz, João Batista; Juliano, Luiz; de Vasconcellos, Suzan Pantaroto

    2016-03-01

    The bioprospection for cellulase and protease producers is a promise strategy for the discovery of potential biocatalysts for use in hydrolysis of lignocellulosic materials as well as proteic residues. These enzymes can increment and turn viable the production of second generation ethanol from different and alternative sources. In this context, the goal of this study was the investigation of cellulolytic and proteolytic abilities of bacteria isolated from the gastrointestinal tract of a hippopotamus as well as from its composting process. It is important to highlight that hippopotamus gastrointestinal samples were a non-typical sources of efficient hydrolytic bacteria with potential for application in biotechnological industries, like biofuel production. Looking for this, a total of 159 bacteria were isolated, which were submitted to qualitative and quantitative enzymatic assays. Proteolytic analyzes were conducted through the evaluation of fluorescent probes. Qualitative assays for cellulolytic abilities revealed 70 positive hits. After quantitative analyzes, 44 % of these positive hits were selected, but five (5) strains showed cellulolytic activity up to 11,8 FPU/mL. Regarding to proteolytic activities, six (6) strains showed activity above 10 %, which overpassed results described in the literature. Molecular analyzes based on the identification of 16S rDNA, revealed that all the selected bacterial isolates were affiliated to Bacillus genus. In summary, these results strongly indicate that the isolated bacteria from a hippopotamus can be a potential source of interesting biocatalysts with cellulolytic and proteolytic activities, with relevance for industrial applications.

  15. Bilateral Mooren's ulcer in a child secondary to helminthic infestation of the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Prakashchand; Singh, Digvijay; Sinha, Gautam; Sharma, Namrata; Titiyal, Jeewan Singh

    2012-10-01

    To report an unusual association of bilateral Mooren's ulcer in a child with helminthic infestation of gastrointestinal tract. A 6-year-old female presented with redness, watering and photophobia in left eye for 2 months and in right eye for 2 weeks. BCVA was 20/200 in OD and 20/400 OS. Superior peripheral corneal ulcer of 8 × 2 mm was present in the right eye and 8 × 3 mm perforated limbal corneal ulcer with staphyloma was present in the left eye. Hemogram revealed microcytic hypochromic anemia, eosinophilia and elevated ESR. No organism was isolated on corneal scraping. Stool examination revealed presence of Ancylostoma duodenale. Therapy included fortified topical antibiotics, cycloplegics, lubricants and oral albendazole. Conjunctival recession and crescentic therapeutic penetrating keratoplasty was done in OD and OS respectively. At 18 months follow up, there was no recurrence in any of the eyes. Bilateral Mooren's ulcer may be present with gastrointestinal hookworm infestation. Prompt and appropriate management may provide optimal therapeutic success.

  16. Degradation of Cry1Ab protein from genetically modified maize in the bovine gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Lutz, Bodo; Wiedemann, Steffi; Einspanier, Ralf; Mayer, Johann; Albrecht, Christiane

    2005-03-09

    Immunoblotting assays using commercial antibodies were established to investigate the unexpected persistence of the immunoactive Cry1Ab protein in the bovine gastrointestinal tract (GIT) previously suggested by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Samples of two different feeding experiments in cattle were analyzed with both ELISA and immunoblotting methods. Whereas results obtained by ELISA suggested that the concentration of the Cry1Ab protein increased during the GIT passage, the immunoblotting assays revealed a significant degradation of the protein in the bovine GIT. Samples showing a positive signal in the ELISA consisted of fragmented Cry1Ab protein of approximately 17 and 34 kDa size. Two independent sets of gastrointestinal samples revealed the apparent discrepancy between the results obtained by ELISA and immunoblotting, suggesting that the antibody used in the ELISA reacts with fragmented yet immunoactive epitopes of the Cry1Ab protein. It was concluded that Cry1Ab protein is degraded during digestion in cattle. To avoid misinterpretation, samples tested positive for Cry1Ab protein by ELISA should be reassessed by another technique.

  17. Understanding the gastrointestinal tract of the elderly to develop dietary solutions that prevent malnutrition.

    PubMed

    Rémond, Didier; Shahar, Danit R; Gille, Doreen; Pinto, Paula; Kachal, Josefa; Peyron, Marie-Agnès; Dos Santos, Claudia Nunes; Walther, Barbara; Bordoni, Alessandra; Dupont, Didier; Tomás-Cobos, Lidia; Vergères, Guy

    2015-06-10

    Although the prevalence of malnutrition in the old age is increasing worldwide a synthetic understanding of the impact of aging on the intake, digestion, and absorption of nutrients is still lacking. This review article aims at filling the gap in knowledge between the functional decline of the aging gastrointestinal tract (GIT) and the consequences of malnutrition on the health status of elderly. Changes in the aging GIT include the mechanical disintegration of food, gastrointestinal motor function, food transit, chemical food digestion, and functionality of the intestinal wall. These alterations progressively decrease the ability of the GIT to provide the aging organism with adequate levels of nutrients, what contributes to the development of malnutrition. Malnutrition, in turn, increases the risks for the development of a range of pathologies associated with most organ systems, in particular the nervous-, muscoskeletal-, cardiovascular-, immune-, and skin systems. In addition to psychological, economics, and societal factors, dietary solutions preventing malnutrition should thus propose dietary guidelines and food products that integrate knowledge on the functionality of the aging GIT and the nutritional status of the elderly. Achieving this goal will request the identification, validation, and correlative analysis of biomarkers of food intake, nutrient bioavailability, and malnutrition.

  18. A Review of Scientific Topics and Literature in Abdominal Radiology in Germany - Part 1: Gastrointestinal Tract.

    PubMed

    Schreyer, A G; Wessling, J; Kinner, S; Juchems, M S; Holzapfel, K; Lauenstein, T C; Konietzke, P; Grenacher, L

    2016-02-01

    The working group for abdominal and gastrointestinal diagnosis is a group of the German Radiological Society (DRG) focusing clinically and scientifically on the diagnosis and treatment of the gastrointestinal tract with all parenchymatous abdominal organs. In addition to the clinical and scientific further development of abdominal radiology, the education of radiologists within this core discipline of radiology is one of the major aims. In this article we give an up-to-date literature review of scientific radiological topics especially covered by German radiologists. This manuscript focuses on the most recent literature on the diagnosis of the stomach, small bowel, colon and rectum. The review with a focus on the most recent studies published by German radiologists concludes with a synopsis of mesenterial bleeding and ischemia followed by a critical appraisal of the current literature on conventional abdominal radiography. Based on recent literature and guidelines there is a change of paradigms regarding the diagnosis of esophagus and gastric cancer towards CT, which is considered equally to endosonography. For small bowel imaging in Crohn's disease ultrasound as well as MRI with a new focus on DWI are the most important imaging modalities scientifically. For colonic diagnosis virtual colonoscopy has replaced the conventional radiological methods. For staging of rectal carcinoma as well as for therapeutic stratification a high resolution MRI of the pelvis is of paramount interest. Multislice CT is considered the most important modality to assess mesenteric ischemia or bleeding. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  19. Investigating different skin and gastrointestinal tract (GIT) pathologies ex vivo by autofluorescence spectroscopy and optical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhelyazkova, A.; Kuzmina, I.; Borisova, E.; Penkov, N.; Genova, Ts.; Spigulis, J.; Avramov, L.

    2016-01-01

    The skin neoplasias are on a second place in the world statistics of cancer incidence, and gastrointestinal tract (GIT) tumours are also in the "top ten" list. For the most of cutaneous and gastrointestinal tumours could be obtained better prognoses for patients, if an earlier and precise diagnostics procedure is applied. One of the most promising approaches for development of improved diagnostic techniques, is based on optical detection, and analysis of the signatures of biological tissues for detecting the presence of pathological alterations in the investigated objects. It is important to develop and combine novel diagnostic techniques for an accurate early stage diagnosis to improve the chances for skin and GIT tumours treatment. Optical techniques are very promising methods for such noninvasive diagnosis of skin and mucosa tumours, possessing the advantages of deep imaging depth, high resolution, fast imaging speed, and noninvasive character of detection. In this study we combine autofluorescence spectroscopy and optical imaging techniques to develop more precise evaluation of the tissue pathologies investigated. We obtain chromophore maps for GIT and cutaneous samples, with better visualization of the tumours borders and margins. In addition, fluorescence spectra give us information about the early changes in chromophores' contents into the tissues during neoplasia growth.

  20. Understanding the gastrointestinal tract of the elderly to develop dietary solutions that prevent malnutrition

    PubMed Central

    Rémond, Didier; Shahar, Danit R.; Gille, Doreen; Pinto, Paula; Kachal, Josefa; Peyron, Marie-Agnès; Dos Santos, Claudia Nunes; Walther, Barbara; Bordoni, Alessandra; Dupont, Didier; Tomás-Cobos, Lidia; Vergères, Guy

    2015-01-01

    Although the prevalence of malnutrition in the old age is increasing worldwide a synthetic understanding of the impact of aging on the intake, digestion, and absorption of nutrients is still lacking. This review article aims at filling the gap in knowledge between the functional decline of the aging gastrointestinal tract (GIT) and the consequences of malnutrition on the health status of elderly. Changes in the aging GIT include the mechanical disintegration of food, gastrointestinal motor function, food transit, chemical food digestion, and functionality of the intestinal wall. These alterations progressively decrease the ability of the GIT to provide the aging organism with adequate levels of nutrients, what contributes to the development of malnutrition. Malnutrition, in turn, increases the risks for the development of a range of pathologies associated with most organ systems, in particular the nervous-, muscoskeletal-, cardiovascular-, immune-, and skin systems. In addition to psychological, economics, and societal factors, dietary solutions preventing malnutrition should thus propose dietary guidelines and food products that integrate knowledge on the functionality of the aging GIT and the nutritional status of the elderly. Achieving this goal will request the identification, validation, and correlative analysis of biomarkers of food intake, nutrient bioavailability, and malnutrition. PMID:26091351

  1. Dietary microparticles and their impact on tolerance and immune responsiveness of the gastrointestinal tract

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Jonathan J; Thoree, Vinay; Pele, Laetitia C

    2009-01-01

    Dietary microparticles are non-biological bacterial-sized particles of the gastrointestinal lumen that occur due to endogenous formation (calcium phosphate) or following oral exposure (exogenous microparticle). In the UK, about 40 mg (1012) of exogenous microparticles are ingested per person per day, through exposure to food additives, pharmaceutical/supplement excipients or toothpaste constituents. Once ingested, exogenous microparticles are unlikely to pass through the gastrointestinal tract without adsorbing to their surfaces some ions and molecules of the intestinal lumen. Both entropy and ionic attraction drive such interactions. Calcium ions are especially well adsorbed by dietary microparticles which then provide a positively charged surface for the attraction (adsorption) of other organic molecules such as lipopolysaccharides, peptidoglycans or protein antigen from the diet or commensal flora. The major (but not only) sites of microparticle entry into intestinal tissue are the M-cell rich lymphoid aggregates (termed Peyer’s patches in the small bowel). Indeed, it is well established that this is an efficient transport route for non-biological microparticles although it is unclear why. We hypothesise that this pathway exists for “endogenous microparticles” of calcium phosphate, with immunological and physiological benefit, and that “exogenous dietary microparticles”, such as titanium dioxide and the silicates, hijack this route. This overview focuses on what is known of these microparticles and outlines their potential role in immune tolerance of the gut (endogenous microparticles) or immune activation (exogenous microparticles) and inflammation of the gut. PMID:17922962

  2. Altered Innate Defenses in the Neonatal Gastrointestinal Tract in Response to Colonization by Neuropathogenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Birchenough, George M. H.; Johansson, Malin E. V.; Stabler, Richard A.; Dalgakiran, Fatma; Hansson, Gunnar C.; Wren, Brendan W.; Luzio, J. Paul

    2013-01-01

    Two-day-old (P2), but not 9-day-old (P9), rat pups are susceptible to systemic infection following gastrointestinal colonization by Escherichia coli K1. Age dependency reflects the capacity of colonizing K1 to translocate from gastrointestinal (GI) tract to blood. A complex GI microbiota developed by P2, showed little variation over P2 to P9, and did not prevent stable K1 colonization. Substantial developmental expression was observed over P2 to P9, including upregulation of genes encoding components of the small intestinal (α-defensins Defa24 and Defa-rs1) and colonic (trefoil factor Tff2) mucus barrier. K1 colonization modulated expression of these peptides: developmental expression of Tff2 was dysregulated in P2 tissues and was accompanied by a decrease in mucin Muc2. Conversely, α-defensin genes were upregulated in P9 tissues. We propose that incomplete development of the mucus barrier during early neonatal life and the capacity of colonizing K1 to interfere with mucus barrier maturation provide opportunities for neuropathogen translocation into the bloodstream. PMID:23798529

  3. Distinct stages during colonization of the mouse gastrointestinal tract by Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Prieto, Daniel; Pla, Jesús

    2015-01-01

    Candida albicans is a member of the human microbiota, colonizing both the vaginal and gastrointestinal tracts. This yeast is devoid of a life style outside the human body and the mechanisms underlying the adaptation to the commensal status remain to be determined. Using a model of mouse gastrointestinal colonization, we show here that C. albicans stably colonizes the mouse gut in about 3 days starting from a dose as low as 100 cells, reaching steady levels of around 107 cells/g of stools. Using fluorescently labeled strains, we have assessed the competition between isogenic populations from different sources in cohoused animals. We show that long term (15 days) colonizing cells have increased fitness in the gut niche over those grown in vitro or residing in the gut for 1–3 days. Therefore, two distinct states, proliferation and adaptation, seem to exist in the adaptation of this fungus to the mouse gut, a result with potential significance in the prophylaxis and treatment of Candida infections. PMID:26300861

  4. Ghrelin in the gastrointestinal tract and blood circulation of perinatal low and normal weight piglets.

    PubMed

    Willemen, S A; De Vos, M; Huygelen, V; Fransen, E; Tambuyzer, B R; Casteleyn, C; Van Cruchten, S; Van Ginneken, C

    2013-12-01

    Ghrelin, the 'hunger' hormone, is an endogenous growth hormone secretagogue that exerts a wide range of physiological functions. Its perinatal presence suggests that ghrelin might be involved in growth and metabolism processes during intrauterine and postnatal life. Intrauterine growth-restricted (IUGR) neonates have altered endocrine and metabolic pathways because of malnutrition during foetal development. These changes might include an altered gastrointestinal presence of ghrelin cells (GCs). As ghrelin is mainly secreted by the stomach, this altered presence might be reflected in its serum concentrations. Small-for-gestational age (SGA) pigs appear to be a natural occurring model for IUGR children. Therefore, the first aim of this study was to investigate the presence of gastrointestinal GCs expressing active ghrelin in normal weight (NW) foetal and postnatal piglets compared with their SGA littermates using immunohistochemical analysis in combination with stereological methods. Second, total ghrelin serum concentrations of these piglets were analysed with a porcine radioactive immunoassay. In addition, the growth of the gastric pars fundica in the NW and SGA piglets was analysed stereologically. Corresponding with humans and rats, it was shown that opened- and closed-type immunoreactive GCs are distributed along the entire gastrointestinal tract of the perinatal NW and SGA piglets. However, in contrast to the rat's stomach, the porcine GCs do not disperse from the glandular base to the glandular neck during perinatal development. Furthermore, stereological analysis demonstrated that the NW neonates have a higher amount of gastric cells expressing active ghrelin compared with the SGA piglets that could result in higher milk consumption during the neonatal period. This finding is, however, not reflected in total serum ghrelin levels, which showed no difference between the NW and SGA piglets. Moreover, the stereological volume densities of the fundic layers

  5. Characterization of the most abundant Lactobacillus species in chicken gastrointestinal tract and potential use as probiotics for genetic engineering.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Fang, Mingjian; Hu, Yanping; Yang, Yuxin; Yang, Mingming; Chen, Yulin

    2014-07-01

    The count and diffusion of Lactobacilli species in the different gastrointestinal tract (GI) regions of broilers were investigated by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, and the probiotic characteristics of six L. reuteri species isolated from broilers' GI tract were also investigated to obtain the potential target for genetic engineering. Lactobacilli had the highest diversity in the crop and the lowest one in the cecum. Compared with the lower GI tract, more Lactobacilli were found in the upper GI tract. Lactobacillus reuteri, L. johnsonii, L. acidophilus, L. crispatus, L. salivarius, and L. aviarius were the predominant Lactobacillus species and present throughout the GI tract of chickens. Lactobacillus reuteri was the most abundant Lactobacillus species. Lactobacillus reuteri XC1 had good probiotic characteristics that would be a potential and desirable target for genetic engineering.

  6. Cellular prion protein is expressed in a subset of neuroendocrine cells of the rat gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Marcos, Zuberoa; Pffeifer, Kristine; Bodegas, María E; Sesma, María P; Guembe, Laura

    2004-10-01

    Prion diseases are believed to develop from the conformational change of normal cellular prion protein (PrPc) to a pathogenic isoform (PrPsc). PrPc is present in both the central nervous system and many peripheral tissues, although protein concentration is significantly lower in non-neuronal tissues. PrPc expression is essential for internalization and replication of the infectious agent. Several works have pointed to the gastrointestinal (GI) tract as the principal site of entry of PrPsc, but how passage through the GI mucosa occurs is not yet known. Here we studied PrPc expression using Western blot, RT-PCR, and immunohistochemistry in rat GI tract. PrPc mRNA and protein were detected in corpus, antrum, duodenum, and colon. Immunoreactivity was found in scattered cells of the GI epithelium. With double immunofluorescence, these cells have been identified as neuroendocrine cells. PrPc immunostaining was found in subsets of histamine, somatostatin (Som), ghrelin, gastrin (G), and serotonin (5HT) cells in stomach. In small and large bowel, PrPc cells co-localized with subpopulations of 5HT-, Som-, G-, and peptide YY-immunolabeled cells. Our results provide evidence for a possible and important role of endocrine cells in the internalization of PrPsc from gut lumen. Copyright The Histochemical Society, Inc.

  7. Novel endomorphin analogues with antagonist activity at the mu-opioid receptor in the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Fichna, Jakub; Gach, Katarzyna; Perlikowska, Renata; Cravezic, Aurore; Bonnet, Jean Jacques; do-Rego, Jean-Claude; Janecka, Anna; Storr, Martin A

    2010-06-08

    Opioid bowel dysfunction (OBD) summarizes common adverse side effects of opiate-based management of pain. A promising therapeutic approach to prevent OBD and other opioid-related disorders of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract is the co-administration of opiates with peripherally-restricted mu-opioid receptor (MOR)-selective antagonists. The aim of this study was to investigate the selectivity and efficacy of three novel peptide antagonists: antanal-1, antanal-2, and antanal-2A at MOR in the GI tract in vitro and in vivo. The effects of the antanals on GI motility were studied in vitro, using isolated preparations of mouse ileum and colon and in vivo, by measuring colonic propulsion in mice. Additionally, in vitro stability against enzymatic degradation and blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability using the hot plate test in mice were examined. The antanals significantly reduced the inhibitory effect of the MOR agonists endomorphin-2, morphine, and loperamide on mouse ileum and colon contractions in vitro and blocked morphine-induced decrease of colonic bead expulsion in vivo. The hot plate test in mice showed that the antagonist activity of all antanals was restricted to the periphery. Antanal-1, antanal-2, and antanal-2A are promising MOR antagonists with limited BBB permeability, which may be developed into future therapeutics of opioid-related GI dysfunction.

  8. Kit signaling is required for development of coordinated motility patterns in zebrafish gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Rich, Adam; Gordon, Scott; Brown, Chris; Gibbons, Simon J; Schaefer, Katherine; Hennig, Grant; Farrugia, Gianrico

    2013-06-01

    Interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) provide a pacemaker signal for coordinated motility patterns in the mammalian gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Kit signaling is required for development and maintenance of ICC, and these cells can be identified by Kit-like immunoreactivity. The zebrafish GI tract has two distinct ICC networks similar to mammals, suggesting a similar role in the generation of GI motility; however, a functional role for Kit-positive cells in zebrafish has not been determined. Analysis of GI motility in intact zebrafish larvae was performed during development and after disruption of Kit signaling. Development of coordinated motility patterns occurred after 5 days post-fertilization (dpf) and correlated with appearance of Kit-positive cells. Disruptions of Kit signaling using the Kit antagonist imatinib mesylate, and in Sparse, a null kita mutant, also disrupted development of coordinated motility patterns. These data suggest that Kit signaling is necessary for development of coordinated motility patterns and that Kit-positive cells in zebrafish are necessary for coordinated motility patterns.

  9. Metabolic Interactions in the Gastrointestinal Tract (GIT): Host, Commensal, Probiotics, and Bacteriophage Influences.

    PubMed

    Vitetta, Luis; Hall, Sean; Coulson, Samantha

    2015-12-17

    Life on this planet has been intricately associated with bacterial activity at all levels of evolution and bacteria represent the earliest form of autonomous existence. Plants such as those from the Leguminosae family that form root nodules while harboring nitrogen-fixing soil bacteria are a primordial example of symbiotic existence. Similarly, cooperative activities between bacteria and animals can also be observed in multiple domains, including the most inhospitable geographical regions of the planet such as Antarctica and the Lower Geyser Basin of Yellowstone National Park. In humans bacteria are often classified as either beneficial or pathogenic and in this regard we posit that this artificial nomenclature is overly simplistic and as such almost misinterprets the complex activities and inter-relationships that bacteria have with the environment as well as the human host and the plethora of biochemical activities that continue to be identified. We further suggest that in humans there are neither pathogenic nor beneficial bacteria, just bacteria embraced by those that tolerate the host and those that do not. The densest and most complex association exists in the human gastrointestinal tract, followed by the oral cavity, respiratory tract, and skin, where bacteria-pre- and post-birth-instruct the human cell in the fundamental language of molecular biology that normally leads to immunological tolerance over a lifetime. The overall effect of this complex output is the elaboration of a beneficial milieu, an environment that is of equal or greater importance than the bacterium in maintaining homeostasis.

  10. Endoscopic Ultrasound of the Upper Gastrointestinal Tract and Mediastinum: Diagnosis and Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, Priyajit; Wittmann, Johannes; Pereira, Stephen P.

    2006-12-15

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) has developed significantly over the last two decades and has had a considerable impact on the imaging and staging of mass lesions within or in close proximity to the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. In conjunction with conventional imaging such as helical computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, the indications for EUS include (1) differentiating between benign and malignant lesions of the mediastinum and upper GI tract, (2) staging malignant tumors of the lung, esophagus, stomach, and pancreas prior to surgery or oncological treatment, (3) excluding common bile duct stones before laparoscopic cholecystectomy, thereby avoiding the need for endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) in some patients, and (4) assessing suspected lesions that are either equivocal or not seen on conventional imaging. In recent years, EUS has charted a course similar to that taken by ERCP, evolving from a purely diagnostic modality to one that is interventional and therapeutic. These indications include (5) obtaining a tissue diagnosis by EUS-guided fine-needle aspiration or trucut-type needle biopsy and (6) providing therapy such as coeliac plexus neurolysis and pancreatic pseudocyst drainage-in many cases, more accurately and safely than conventional techniques. Emerging investigational techniques include EUS-guided enteric anastomosis formation and fine-needle injection therapy for malignant disease.

  11. The Effects of Pharmaceutical Excipients on Gastrointestinal Tract Metabolic Enzymes and Transporters-an Update.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenpeng; Li, Yanyan; Zou, Peng; Wu, Man; Zhang, Zhenqing; Zhang, Tao

    2016-07-01

    Accumulating evidence from the last decade has shown that many pharmaceutical excipients are not pharmacologically inert but instead have effects on metabolic enzymes and/or drug transporters. Hence, the absorption, distribution, metabolism, and elimination (ADME) of active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) may be altered due to the modulation of their metabolism and transport by excipients. The impact of excipients is a potential concern for Biopharmaceutics Classification System (BCS)-based biowaivers, particularly as the BCS-based biowaivers have been extended to class 3 drugs in certain dosage forms. The presence of different excipients or varying amounts of excipients between formulations may result in bio-inequivalence. The excipient impact may lead to significant variations in clinical outcomes as well. The aim of this paper is to review the recent findings of excipient effects on gastrointestinal (GI) absorption, focusing on their interactions with the metabolic enzymes and transporters in the GI tract. A wide range of commonly used excipients such as binders, diluents, fillers, solvents, and surfactants are discussed here. We summarized the reported effects of those excipients on GI tract phase I and phase II enzymes, uptake and efflux transporters, and relevant clinical significance. This information can enhance our understanding of excipient influence on drug absorption and is useful in designing pharmacokinetic studies and evaluating the resultant data.

  12. Metabolic Interactions in the Gastrointestinal Tract (GIT): Host, Commensal, Probiotics, and Bacteriophage Influences

    PubMed Central

    Vitetta, Luis; Hall, Sean; Coulson, Samantha

    2015-01-01

    Life on this planet has been intricately associated with bacterial activity at all levels of evolution and bacteria represent the earliest form of autonomous existence. Plants such as those from the Leguminosae family that form root nodules while harboring nitrogen-fixing soil bacteria are a primordial example of symbiotic existence. Similarly, cooperative activities between bacteria and animals can also be observed in multiple domains, including the most inhospitable geographical regions of the planet such as Antarctica and the Lower Geyser Basin of Yellowstone National Park. In humans bacteria are often classified as either beneficial or pathogenic and in this regard we posit that this artificial nomenclature is overly simplistic and as such almost misinterprets the complex activities and inter-relationships that bacteria have with the environment as well as the human host and the plethora of biochemical activities that continue to be identified. We further suggest that in humans there are neither pathogenic nor beneficial bacteria, just bacteria embraced by those that tolerate the host and those that do not. The densest and most complex association exists in the human gastrointestinal tract, followed by the oral cavity, respiratory tract, and skin, where bacteria—pre- and post-birth—instruct the human cell in the fundamental language of molecular biology that normally leads to immunological tolerance over a lifetime. The overall effect of this complex output is the elaboration of a beneficial milieu, an environment that is of equal or greater importance than the bacterium in maintaining homeostasis. PMID:27682125

  13. Targeting of gastrointestinal tract for amended delivery of protein/peptide therapeutics: strategies and industrial perspectives.

    PubMed

    Pawar, Vivek K; Meher, Jaya Gopal; Singh, Yuvraj; Chaurasia, Mohini; Surendar Reddy, B; Chourasia, Manish K

    2014-12-28

    Delivery of proteins/peptides to the gastrointestinal (GI) tract via peroral/oral route involves tremendous challenges due to unfavorable environmental conditions like harsh pH, presence of proteolytic enzymes and absorption barriers. Detailed research is being conducted at the academic and industrial levels to diminish these troubles and various products are under clinical trials. Several approaches have been established to optimize oral delivery of proteins and peptides and can be broadly categorized into chemical and physical strategies. Chemical strategies include site specific mutagenesis, proteinylation, glycosylation, PEGylation and prodrug approaches, whereas physical strategies comprise formulation based approaches including application of absorption enhancers and metabolism modifiers along with delivering them via colloidal carrier systems such as nanoparticles, liposomes, microparticles, and micro- and nano-emulsions. This review stands to accomplish the diverse aspects of oral delivery of proteins/peptides and summarizes the key concepts involved in targeting the biodrugs to specific sites of the GI tract such as the intestine and colon. Furthermore some light has also been shed on the current industrial practices followed in developing oral formulations of such bioactives.

  14. Design of a wireless anchoring and extending micro robot system for gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wei; Shi, Yuting; Jia, Zhiwei; Yan, Guozheng

    2013-06-01

    Diagnosis and treatment using a conventional endoscope in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract are very common nowadays. However, endoscopy has some disadvantages. This paper describes a wireless micro-robot for active locomotion in the GI tract. After design and analysis of the anchoring-extending gait, two mechanisms were developed to meet the gait requirements. These actuation and transmission mechanisms were demonstrated in detail to explain the gait implementation. The mechanisms were driven by a micro-brush direct current motor with a micro-normal module (m = 0.2 mm) gearbox. The force of the mechanisms was tested to guarantee the sufficiency of the gait and the safety of the robot. After mounting a dedicated video capture unit and wireless power receiving coils, in vitro experiments were conducted to show the feasibility of locomotion by wireless power supply. The assembled micro-robot was 13 mm in diameter and 90 mm in length, with a velocity of 1 mm/s at 500 mW power consumption. The proposed anchoring and extending intestinal micro-robot met the requirements of intestinal disease diagnosis and treatment. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Enhancing the culturability of bacteria from the gastrointestinal tract of farmed adult turbot Scophthalmus maximus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Mengxin; Hou, Zhanhui; Qu, Yanmei; Liu, Bin

    2014-03-01

    Eighteen agar media were tested for the culture of gut-associated bacteria from farmed adult turbot ( Scophthalmus maximus), including 16 agar media with or without 1% gastrointestinal (GI) supernatant, or with 2% or 4% GI supernatant. A total of 1 711 colonies were analyzed and 24 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were identified. The greatest bacterial diversity was isolated on Zobell 2216E/Zobell 2216E+ agar media, whereas MRS/MRS+ agar media produced a low diversity of colonies. Agar media with GI supernatant (1%, 2%, or 4%) showed increased diversity and yielded different profiles of OTUs from the corresponding original media, suggesting that GI supernatant provides substances that enhance the culture efficiency of bacteria from the turbot GI tract. The large majority of the colonies (82%) were γ-Proteobacteria, whereas 15.6% and 2.4% of colonies were Firmicutes and Actinobacteria, respectively. At the genus level, 49.4% of all colonies were assigned to Vibrio. Other potential pathogens, including Pseudomonas, Photobacterium, and Enterobacter, and potential probiotics, including Bacillus, Paenibacillus, and Pseudomonas, were also isolated on agar media. Most cultured bacteria belonged to species that were first described in the turbot GI tract. The impact of these species on turbot physiology and health should be investigated further.

  16. Integrated OCT-US catheter for detection of cancer in the gastrointestinal tract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiawen; Ma, Teng; Cummins, Thomas; Shung, K. Kirk; Van Dam, Jacques; Zhou, Qifa; Chen, Zhongping

    2015-03-01

    Gastrointestinal tract cancer, the most common type of cancer, has a very low survival rate, especially for pancreatic cancer (five year survival rate of 5%) and bile duct cancer (five year survival rate of 12%). Here, we propose to use an integrated OCT-US catheter for cancer detection. OCT is targeted to acquire detailed information, such as dysplasia and neoplasia, for early detection of tumors. US is used for staging cancers according to the size of the primary tumor and whether or not it has invaded lymph nodes and other parts of the body. Considering the lumen size of the GI tract, an OCT system with a long image range (>10mm) and a US imaging system with a center frequency at 40MHz (penetration depth > 5mm) were used. The OCT probe was also designed for long-range imaging. The side-view OCT and US probes were sealed inside one probe cap piece and one torque coil and became an integrated probe. This probe was then inserted into a catheter sheath which fits in the channel of a duodenoscope and is able to be navigated smoothly into the bile duct by the elevator of the duodenoscope. We have imaged 5 healthy and 2 diseased bile ducts. In the OCT images, disorganized layer structures and heterogeneous regions demonstrated the existence of tumors. Micro-calcification can be observed in the corresponding US images.

  17. Lymphomatous involvement of gastrointestinal tract: Evaluation by positron emission tomography with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose

    PubMed Central

    Phongkitkarun, Sith; Varavithya, Vithya; Kazama, Toshiki; Faria, Silvana C; Mar, Martha V; Podoloff, Donald A; Macapinlac, Homer A

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To demonstrate the 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (18F-FDG PET) findings in patients with non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL) involving the gastrointestinal (GI) tract and the clinical utility of modality despite of the known normal uptake of FDG in the GI tract. METHODS: Thirty-three patients with biopsy-proven gastrointestinal NHL who had undergone FDG-PET scan were included. All the patients were injected with 10-15 mCi FDG and scanned approximately 60 min later with a CTI/Siemens HR (+) PET scanner. PET scans were reviewed and the maximum standard uptake value (SUVmax) of the lesions was measured before and after the treatment, if data were available and compared with histologic diagnoses. RESULTS: Twenty-five patients had a high-grade lymphoma and eight had a low-grade lymphoma. The stomach was the most common site of the involvement (20 patients). In high-grade lymphoma, PET showed focal nodular or diffuse hypermetabolic activity. The average SUVmax±SD was 11.58±5.83. After the therapy, the patients whose biopsies showed no evidence of lymphoma had a lower uptake without focal lesions. The SUVmax±SD decreased from 11.58±5.83 to 2.21±0.78. In patients whose post-treatment biopsies showed lymphoma, the SUVmax±SD was 9.42±6.27. Low-grade follicular lymphomas of the colon and stomach showed diffuse hypermetabolic activity in the bowel wall (SUVmax 8.2 and 10.3, respectively). The SUVmax was 2.02-3.8 (mean 3.02) in the stomach lesions of patients with MALT lymphoma. CONCLUSION: 18F-FDG PET contributes to the diagnosis of high-grade gastrointestinal non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, even when there is the normal background FDG activity. Furthermore, the SUV plays a role in evaluating treatment response. Low-grade NHL demonstrates FDG uptake but at a lesser intensity than seen in high-grade NHL. PMID:16437629

  18. Commercial Dairy Cow Milk microRNAs Resist Digestion under Simulated Gastrointestinal Tract Conditions.

    PubMed

    Benmoussa, Abderrahim; Lee, Chan Ho C; Laffont, Benoit; Savard, Patricia; Laugier, Jonathan; Boilard, Eric; Gilbert, Caroline; Fliss, Ismail; Provost, Patrick

    2016-11-01

    MicroRNAs are small, gene-regulatory noncoding RNA species present in large amounts in milk, where they seem to be protected against degradative conditions, presumably because of their association with exosomes. We monitored the relative stability of commercial dairy cow milk microRNAs during digestion and examined their associations with extracellular vesicles (EVs). We used a computer-controlled, in vitro, gastrointestinal model TNO intestinal model-1 (TIM-1) and analyzed, by quantitative polymerase chain reaction, the concentration of 2 microRNAs within gastrointestinal tract compartments at different points in time. EVs within TIM-1 digested and nondigested samples were studied by immunoblotting, dynamic light scattering, quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and density measurements. A large quantity of dairy milk Bos taurus microRNA-223 (bta-miR-223) and bta-miR-125b (∼10(9)-10(10) copies/300 mL milk) withstood digestion under simulated gastrointestinal tract conditions, with the stomach causing the most important decrease in microRNA amounts. A large quantity of these 2 microRNAs (∼10(8)-10(9) copies/300 mL milk) was detected in the upper small intestine compartments, which supports their potential bioaccessibility. A protocol optimized for the enrichment of dairy milk exosomes yielded a 100,000 × g pellet fraction that was positive for the exosomal markers tumor susceptibility gene-101 (TSG101), apoptosis-linked gene 2-interacting protein X (ALIX), and heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) and containing bta-miR-223 and bta-miR-125b. This approach, based on successive ultracentrifugation steps, also revealed the existence of ALIX(-), HSP70(-/low), and TSG101(-/low) EVs larger than exosomes and 2-6 times more enriched in bta-miR-223 and bta-miR-125b (P < 0.05). Our findings indicate that commercial dairy cow milk contains numerous microRNAs that can resist digestion and are associated mostly with ALIX(-), HSP70(-/low), and TSG101(-/low) EVs. Our results

  19. Volunteer Case Series of a New Telemetric Sensor for Blood Detection in the Upper Gastrointestinal Tract: The HemoPill.

    PubMed

    Schostek, Sebastian; Zimmermann, Melanie; Keller, Jan; Fode, Mario; Melbert, Michael; Schurr, Marc O; Gottwald, Thomas; Prosst, Ruediger L

    2016-10-01

    An acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding event is an emergency situation which requires immediate endoscopic assessment and treatment. A new telemetric real-time intracorporeal bleeding sensor can help in the timely diagnosis of an acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding event: The sensor capsule, HemoPill, is swallowed by the patient if gastrointestinal bleeding is suspected. Information about the bleeding status is displayed by telemetric communication of the capsule with an extracorporeal receiver. This is the first evaluation of the HemoPill to detect blood in the upper human gastrointestinal tract. A voluntary test person ate a defined meal with or without the adjunct of his own blood for a total of eight times and afterward swallowed the sensor capsule. The collected spectrometric receiver data were analyzed to assess whether the sensor system was capable of detecting blood and to evaluate the effect of stomach content as an artifact. With its optical sensor, the HemoPill was able to reliably indicate the ingested blood in the stomach. The data transmission from the swallowed sensor capsule to the extracorporeal receiver was achieved consistently. The evaluation of diverse concentrations of ingested blood and the respective sensor signals led to an exponential relationship of these variables. This relationship allows to define thresholds for categories indicating the likelihood of blood presence in the gastrointestinal tract. The HemoPill is a valuable tool to detect an acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding event without the need of endoscopy.

  20. Expression and cellular localization of monocarboxylate transporters (MCT2, MCT7, and MCT8) along the cattle gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Kirat, Doaa; Sallam, Khalid I; Kato, Seiyu

    2013-06-01

    Fourteen members of the monocarboxylate transporter (MCT, SLC16) family have been identified, each having a different tissue distribution and substrate specificity. The expression of monocarboxylate transporters MCT1 and MCT4 have been studied in the gastrointestinal tract of ruminants; however, details of the expression of other MCT isoforms in the various parts of ruminant gastrointestinal tract are lacking. Reverse transcription with the polymerase chain reaction was used to study the regional distribution of MCT2, MCT3, and MCT5-MCT14 in the cattle gastrointestinal tract and verified the existence of MCT mRNA transcripts for MCT2, MCT3, MCT4, MCT7, MCT8, MCT9, MCT10, MCT13, and MCT14 in the ruminal and abomasal epithelia, mRNA transcripts for MCT2, MCT3, MCT4, MCT7, MCT8, MCT10, MCT13, and MCT14 in the jejunum, and mRNA transcripts for MCT2, MCT3, MCT4, MCT7, MCT8, MCT13, and MCT14 in the caecum of cattle. At the cellular level, immunohistochemical studies localized MCT2, MCT7, and MCT8 proteins in the cattle rumen, abomasum, jejunum, and caecum. This is the first study to detect the expression of various MCT isoforms in the gastrointestinal tract of a ruminant species. Our data suggest that these transporter proteins are involved in essential physiologic processes and are possible molecular targets for studying the regulation of the transport of short-chain monocarboxylates, aromatic amino acids, and thyroid hormones across the gastrointestinal tract of cattle.

  1. Effects of differentially fermentable carbohydrates on the microbial fermentation profile of the gastrointestinal tract of broilers.

    PubMed

    Rehman, H; Böhm, J; Zentek, J

    2008-08-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effects of dietary inulin and sucrose on the fermentation profile of the gastrointestinal microflora in chicken. Day-old broilers (n = 80) were assigned to four dietary treatments, either fed a basal diet or the same diet supplemented with sucrose (4%), inulin (1%) or sucrose and inulin. At day 35, birds were killed and pH, lactate, ammonia, short chain fatty acids (SCFA) and biogenic amines were determined in different parts of the digestive tract. Final body weights and the relative weights of liver, pancreas, crop, gizzard and small intestine were not influenced by treatment. The relative weights of the empty caeca and of the caecal digesta were higher with the diets containing inulin while caecal pH and ammonia were reduced. Lactate concentration was reduced in the crop (p < or = 0.01) and gizzard (p < or = 0.001) of sucrose-fed groups, while it was increased (p < or = 0.01) in the jejunum of inulin-fed group. Ammonia in the crop (p = 0.089) and gizzard (p = 0.067) tended to be lower in the group receiving inulin plus sucrose. Amongst SCFA, only acetate was detected in the crop and gizzard contents that tended to be lower (p = 0.09) in the crop digesta of sucrose plus inulin-fed group. N-butyrate (mol %) was higher (p < or = 0.001) in the caecal digesta of inulin-supplemented groups without affecting total SCFA. Dietary inulin elevated the concentration of putrescine in the jejunal and caecal contents. In the caecal digesta, total biogenic amines were increased (p < or = 0.001) in sucrose plus inulin-fed group without affecting production of biogenic amines in the jejunum. In conclusion, inulin could reduce the pH in the lower gastrointestinal tract of broilers, while sucrose had no acidifying influence in the upper digestive tract. Inulin enhanced the concentration or metabolic activity of butyrate-producing bacteria in the caecum. Further studies are needed to investigate the potential effect of inulin on

  2. Removal of foreign bodies in the upper gastrointestinal tract in adults: European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) Clinical Guideline.

    PubMed

    Birk, Michael; Bauerfeind, Peter; Deprez, Pierre H; Häfner, Michael; Hartmann, Dirk; Hassan, Cesare; Hucl, Tomas; Lesur, Gilles; Aabakken, Lars; Meining, Alexander

    2016-05-01

    This Guideline is an official statement of the European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE). It addresses the removal of foreign bodies in the upper gastrointestinal tract in adults. Recommendations Nonendoscopic measures 1 ESGE recommends diagnostic evaluation based on the patient's history and symptoms. ESGE recommends a physical examination focused on the patient's general condition and to assess signs of any complications (strong recommendation, low quality evidence). 2 ESGE does not recommend radiological evaluation for patients with nonbony food bolus impaction without complications. We recommend plain radiography to assess the presence, location, size, configuration, and number of ingested foreign bodies if ingestion of radiopaque objects is suspected or type of object is unknown (strong recommendation, low quality evidence). 3 ESGE recommends computed tomography (CT) scan in all patients with suspected perforation or other complication that may require surgery (strong recommendation, low quality evidence). 4 ESGE does not recommend barium swallow, because of the risk of aspiration and worsening of the endoscopic visualization (strong recommendation, low quality evidence). 5 ESGE recommends clinical observation without the need for endoscopic removal for management of asymptomatic patients with ingestion of blunt and small objects (except batteries and magnets). If feasible, outpatient management is appropriate (strong recommendation, low quality evidence). 6 ESGE recommends close observation in asymptomatic individuals who have concealed packets of drugs by swallowing ("body packing"). We recommend against endoscopic retrieval. We recommend surgical referral in cases of suspected packet rupture, failure of packets to progress, or intestinal obstruction (strong recommendation, low quality evidence). Endoscopic measures 7 ESGE recommends emergent (preferably within 2 hours, but at the latest within 6 hours) therapeutic esophagogastroduodenoscopy for

  3. Endogenous Production of H2S in the Gastrointestinal Tract: Still in Search of a Physiologic Function

    PubMed Central

    Linden, David R.; Levitt, Michael D.; Farrugia, Gianrico

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) has long been associated with the gastrointestinal tract, especially the bacteria-derived H2S present in flatus. Along with evidence from other organ systems, the finding that gastrointestinal tissues are capable of endogenous production of H2S has led to the hypothesis that H2S is an endogenous gaseous signaling molecule. In this review, the criteria of gasotransmitters are reexamined, and evidence from the literature regarding H2S as a gaseous signaling molecule is discussed. H2S is produced enzymatically by gastrointestinal tissues, but evidence is lacking on whether H2S production is regulated. H2S causes well-defined physiologic effects in gastrointestinal tissues, but evidence for a receptor for H2S is lacking. H2S is inactivated through enzymatic oxidation, but evidence is lacking on whether manipulating H2S oxidation alters endogenous cell signaling. Remaining questions regarding the role of H2S as a gaseous signaling molecule in the gastrointestinal tract suggest that H2S currently remains a molecule in search of a physiologic function. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 12, 1135–1146. PMID:19769466

  4. Innate lymphoid cells and natural killer T cells in the gastrointestinal tract immune system.

    PubMed

    Montalvillo, Enrique; Garrote, José Antonio; Bernardo, David; Arranz, Eduardo

    2014-05-01

    The gastrointestinal tract is equipped with a highly specialized intrinsic immune system. However, the intestine is exposed to a high antigenic burden that requires a fast, nonspecific response -so-called innate immunity- to maintain homeostasis and protect the body from incoming pathogens. In the last decade multiple studies helped to unravel the particular developmental requirements and specific functions of the cells that play a role in innate immunity. In this review we shall focus on innate lymphoid cells, a newly discovered, heterogeneous set of cells that derive from an Id2-dependent lymphoid progenitor cell population. These cells have been categorized on the basis of the pattern of cytokines that they secrete, and the transcription factors that regulate their development and functions. Innate lymphoid cells play a role in the early response to pathogens, the anatomical contention of the commensal flora, and the maintenance of epithelial integrity.Amongst the various innate lymphoid cells we shall lay emphasis on a subpopulation with several peculiarities, namely that of natural killer T cells, a subset of T lymphocytes that express both T-cell and NK-cell receptors. The most numerous fraction of the NKT population are the so-called invariant NKT or iNKT cells. These iNKT cells have an invariant TCR and recognize the glycolipidic structures presented by the CD1d molecule, a homolog of class-I MHC molecules. Following activation they rapidly acquire cytotoxic activity and secrete both Th1 and Th2 cytokines, including IL-17. While their specific role is not yet established, iNKT cells take part in a great variety of intestinal immune responses ranging from oral tolerance to involvement in a number of gastrointestinal conditions.

  5. NUTRITIONAL ASSESSMENT AND HAND GRIP STRENGTH OF CANDIDATES FOR SURGERY OF THE GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT

    PubMed Central

    SILVEIRA, Thalita Morgana Guimarães; de SOUSA, Juliana Barbosa; STRINGHINI, Maria Luiza Ferreira; FREITAS, Ana Tereza Vaz de Souza; MELO, Paulla Guimarães

    2014-01-01

    Background The assessment of nutritional status in clinical practice must be done with simple, reliable, low cost and easy performance methods. The power of handshake is recognized as a useful tool to evaluate muscle strength, and therefore, it is suggested that can detect malnutrition. Aim To evaluate the nutritional status by subjective global assessment and power of handshake preoperatively in patients going to gastrointestinal surgeries and to compare the diagnosis obtained by subjective global assessment with traditional anthropometric methods and power of handshake. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted with patients for surgery in the gastrointestinal tract and related organs. Socioeconomic and anthropometric data, applied to subjective global assessment and checked the power of handshake, were collected. The force was obtained by the average of three measurements of the dominant and non-dominant hand and thus compared with reference values ​​of the population by sex and age, for the classification of nutritional risk. Results The sample consisted of 40 patients, 24-83 years, and most women (52.5%) housewives (37,5%) and diagnosed with cancer (45%). According to subjective global assessment, 37.5% were classified as moderately malnourished; 15% were underweight by BMI measurements; 25% had arm circumference at risk for malnutrition (

  6. The Damage Pattern to the Gastrointestinal Tract Depends on the Nature of the Ingested Caustic Agent.

    PubMed

    Ducoudray, Romain; Mariani, Antoine; Corte, Helene; Kraemer, Aurore; Munoz-Bongrand, Nicolas; Sarfati, Emile; Cattan, Pierre; Chirica, Mircea

    2016-07-01

    The mechanisms of damage to the gastrointestinal tract after caustic ingestion are conditioned by the nature of the ingested agent. Whether the nature of the ingested agent has a direct influence on patient outcomes is unknown. From January 2013 to April 2015, 144 patients underwent emergency management for caustic injuries at the Saint Louis Hospital in Paris. There were 51 men (51 %) and the median age was 44 years [39, 48]. The ingested agents were soda-based strong alkali in 85 patients (59 %), strong acids in 36 patients (25 %), and bleach in 23 patients (16 %). Emergency and long-term outcomes were compared according to the nature of the ingested agent. Four patients died (3 %) and 40 patients (28 %) experienced complications. After bleach ingestion, emergency morbidity and mortality were nil, no patient required esophageal reconstruction, and functional outcome was successful in all patients. Acids were more likely to induce transmural gastric (31 vs. 13 %, p =0.042) and duodenal (9 vs. 0 %, p = 0.04) necrosis than strong alkalis, but rates of transmural esophageal necrosis were similar (14 vs. 12 %, p = 0.98). No significant differences were recorded between emergency mortality (9 vs. 1 %, p = 0.15), morbidity (33 vs. 33 %, p = 0.92), the need for esophageal reconstruction (25 vs. 20 %, p = 0.88), and functional success rates (76 vs. 84 %, p = 0.31) after acid and alkali ingestion, respectively. Bleach causes mild gastrointestinal injuries, while the ingestion of strong acids and alkalis may result in severe complications and death. Acids cause more severe damage to the stomach but similar damage to the esophagus when compared to alkalis.

  7. Crospovidone and Microcrystalline Cellulose: A Novel Description of Pharmaceutical Fillers in the Gastrointestinal Tract.

    PubMed

    Shaddy, Sophia M; Arnold, Michael A; Shilo, Konstantin; Frankel, Wendy L; Harzman, Alan E; Stanich, Peter P; Singhi, Aatur D; Yearsley, Martha M; Arnold, Christina A

    2017-04-01

    Crospovidone and microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) are pharmaceutical fillers well known in the pulmonary pathology literature. Fillers are inactive substances incorporated into medications to facilitate drug delivery. By examining 545 consecutive gastrointestinal surgical specimens from 302 patients between September 11, 2015 and October 23, 2015, we identified the fillers in 29 specimens from 26 patients. The control group consisted of an equal number of consecutive site-matched specimens collected during this same time. Pertinent clinicopathologic data were analyzed, and 1 case was subject to special stains. To confirm the histologic diagnosis, a variety of fillers and medications common to the patients were processed. The fillers were found in 9% of all patients, and there were no specific clinicopathologic associations. In the gastrointestinal tract, crospovidone is nonbirefringent and has a coral shape with each segment composed of a pink core and purple coat; MCC is brightly birefringent with matchstick shape and clear color. Identical material was seen in the processed crospovidone and MCC powders, as well as oxycodone-acetaminophen and omeprazole tablets. In summary, crospovidone and MCC are common, biologically inert, and they are most often seen in the small bowel. Their presence outside of the luminal bowel may serve as a surrogate marker for perforation. Awareness of their morphology is important to distinguish fillers from parasites, calcifications, and other medications, particularly those linked to mucosal injury. We report the unique histomorphologic profile of these fillers as a helpful diagnostic aide, and caution that the fillers have slightly divergent features when compared with those described in the lung.

  8. Dissolution media simulating the proximal canine gastrointestinal tract in the fasted state.

    PubMed

    Arndt, Marcel; Chokshi, Hitesh; Tang, Kin; Parrott, Neil J; Reppas, Christos; Dressman, Jennifer B

    2013-08-01

    Human biorelevant media have been shown to be a useful tool in pharmaceutical development and to provide input for in silico prediction of pharmacokinetic profiles after oral dosing. Dogs, in particular Beagles, are often used as animal models for preclinical studies. Key differences in the composition of human and canine gastric and intestinal fluids are described in the literature and underscore the need to develop a discrete set of biorelevant media, adapted to the conditions of the proximal canine gastrointestinal (GI) tract, to improve forecast and interpretation of preclinical results using in vitro dissolution studies. Canine biorelevant media can also be used in the development of oral dosage forms for companion animals, which is a rapidly growing market. The compositions of Fasted State Simulated Gastric Fluid canine (FaSSGFc) and Fasted State Simulated Intestinal Fluid canine (FaSSIFc) are adapted to the physiological composition of the corresponding gastrointestinal fluids in terms of pH, buffer capacity, osmolality, surface tension, as well as the bile salt, phospholipid, and free fatty acid content (in terms of concentration and reported subtypes). It was demonstrated that canine Fasted State Simulated Intestinal Fluid (FaSSIFc) is superior in predicting the solubility of model compounds in Canine Intestinal Fluid (CIF) compared to the human biorelevant media (FaSSIF and FaSSIF-V2). Two different versions of FaSSGFc, composed at pH 1.5 and pH 6.5, offer the possibility to design in vitro studies which correspond to the in vivo study design, depending on whether pentagastrin is used to decrease the gastric pH in the dogs or not. Canine biorelevant media can therefore be recommended to achieve more accurate forecasting and interpretation of pharmacokinetic studies of oral drug products in dogs.

  9. Endoscopic submucosal dissection for the treatment of neoplastic lesions in the gastrointestinal tract

    PubMed Central

    Białek, Andrzej; Wiechowska-Kozłowska, Anna; Pertkiewicz, Jan; Karpińska, Katarzyna; Marlicz, Wojciech; Milkiewicz, Piotr; Starzyńska, Teresa

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the indications, resection rate, and safety of endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) for neoplastic lesions in the gastrointestinal tract at a European referral center. METHODS: We carried out a retrospective analysis of the ESD procedures performed in our center for mucosal neoplastic and submucosal lesions of the gastrointestinal tract. The duration of the procedure, en bloc and complete (R0) resection rates, and complication rates were evaluated. Variables were reported as mean ± SD or simple proportions. Univariate analysis and comparisons of procedure times and resection rates were performed using Mann-Whitney U tests, or χ2 tests for dichotomous variables. RESULTS: Between 2007 and 2011, ESD was performed in a total of 103 patients (46.7% male, mean age 64.0 ± 12.7 years). The indications for the procedure were epithelial tumor (n = 54), submucosal tumor (n = 42), or other (n = 7). The total en bloc resection rate was 90.3% (93/103) and R0 resection rate 80.6% (83/103). The median speed of the procedure was 15.0 min/cm2. The complete resection rate was lower for submucosal tumors arising from the muscle layer (68%, 15/22, P < 0.05). Resection speed was quicker for submucosal tumors localized in the submucosal layer than for lesions arising from the muscularis propria layer (8.1 min/cm2 vs 17.9 min/cm2, P < 0.05). The R0 resection rate and speed were better in the last 24 mo (90.1%, 49/54 and 15.3 min/cm2) compared to the first 3 years of treatment (73.5%, 36/49, P < 0.05 and 22.0 min/cm2, P < 0.05). Complications occurred in 14.6% (n = 15) of patients, including perforation in 5.8% (n = 6), pneumoperitoneum in 3.9% (n = 4), delayed bleeding in 1.9% (n = 2), and other in 2.9% (n = 3). Only one patient with delayed perforation required surgical treatment. During the mean follow-up of 26 ± 15.3 mo, among patients with R0 resection, recurrence occurred in one patient (1.2%). CONCLUSION: ESD is an effective and safe method for resection of

  10. Transformation and bioaccessibility of lead induced by steamed bread feed in the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Kan, Junhong; Sima, Jingke; Cao, Xinde

    2017-03-01

    Accidental ingestion of contaminated soil has been recognized as an important pathway of human exposure to lead (Pb), especially for children through hand-to-mouth activities. Intake of food following the soil ingestion may affect the bioaccessibility of Pb in the gastrointestinal tract. In this study, the effect of steamed bread on the transformation and subsequent bioaccessibility of Pb in two soils was determined by the physiologically based extraction test (PBET). Two compounds, Pb(NO3)2 and PbCO3, were included in the evaluation for comparison. In the gastric phase, Pb bioaccessibility decreased as the steamed bread increased due to the sorption of Pb on the undissolved steamed bread, especially in PbCO3, Pb bioaccessibility decreased from 95.03% to 85.40%. Whereas in the intestinal phase, Pb bioaccessibility increased from 1.85% to 5.66% and from 0.89% to 1.80% for Pb(NO3)2 and PbCO3, respectively. The increase was attributed to the transformation of formed Pb carbonates into soluble organic-Pb complexes induced by the dissolved steamed bread at neutral pH as indicated by MINTEQ modeling. For the PbCO3-contaminated soil, the change in Pb bioaccessibility in both gastric and intestinal phases behaved like that in the pure PbCO3 compound, the steamed bread increased the bioaccessibility of Pb in the intestinal phase, but the decreased bioaccessibility of Pb was observed in the gastric phase after the steamed bread was added. However, in the soil contaminated with free Pb(2+) or sorbed Pb forms, the steamed bread increased the Pb bioaccessibility in both gastric and intestinal phases. This was probably due to the higher dissolved organic carbon induced transformation of sorbed Pb (Pb sorbed by Fe/Mn oxides) into soluble Pb-organic complex. Results from this study indicated that steamed bread had an influence on the Pb speciation transformation, correspondingly affecting Pb bioaccessibility in the gastrointestinal tract.

  11. Molecular Characterization of Commensal Escherichia coli Adapted to Different Compartments of the Porcine Gastrointestinal Tract

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Sam; Gordon, David M.; Chin, James; Brouwers, Huub J. M.; Njuguna, Peter; Groves, Mitchell D.; Zhang, Ren

    2012-01-01

    The role of Escherichia coli as a pathogen has been the focus of considerable study, while much less is known about it as a commensal and how it adapts to and colonizes different environmental niches within the mammalian gut. In this study, we characterize Escherichia coli organisms (n = 146) isolated from different regions of the intestinal tracts of eight pigs (dueodenum, ileum, colon, and feces). The isolates were typed using the method of random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and screened for the presence of bacteriocin genes and plasmid replicon types. Molecular analysis of variance using the RAPD data showed that E. coli isolates are nonrandomly distributed among different gut regions, and that gut region accounted for 25% (P < 0.001) of the observed variation among strains. Bacteriocin screening revealed that a bacteriocin gene was detected in 45% of the isolates, with 43% carrying colicin genes and 3% carrying microcin genes. Of the bacteriocins observed (H47, E3, E1, E2, E7, Ia/Ib, and B/M), the frequency with which they were detected varied with respect to gut region for the colicins E2, E7, Ia/Ib, and B/M. The plasmid replicon typing gave rise to 25 profiles from the 13 Inc types detected. Inc F types were detected most frequently, followed by Inc HI1 and N types. Of the Inc types detected, 7 were nonrandomly distributed among isolates from the different regions of the gut. The results of this study indicate that not only may the different regions of the gastrointestinal tract harbor different strains of E. coli but also that strains from different regions have different characteristics. PMID:22798360

  12. In vivo fluorescence imaging of exogenous enzyme activity in the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Fuhrmann, Gregor; Leroux, Jean-Christophe

    2011-05-31

    Exogenous enzymes are administered orally to treat several diseases, such as pancreatic insufficiency and lactose intolerance. Due to the proteinaceous nature of enzymes, they are subject to inactivation and/or digestion in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Here we describe a convenient fluorescence-based assay to monitor the activity of therapeutic enzymes in real time in vivo in the GI tract. To establish the proof of principle, the assay was applied to proline-specific endopeptidases (PEPs), a group of enzymes recently proposed as adjuvant therapy for celiac disease (a highly prevalent immunogenetic enteropathy). A short PEP-specific peptide sequence which is part of larger immunotoxic sequences of gluten was labeled with a fluorescent dye and a corresponding quencher. Upon enzymatic cleavage, the fluorescence emission was dequenched and detected with an in vivo imaging system. PEPs originating from Flavobacterium meningosepticum (FM) and Myxococcus xanthus (MX) were evaluated after oral administration in rats. While MX PEP could not cleave the peptide in the stomach, FM PEP showed significant gastric activity reaching 40-60% of the maximal in vivo signal intensity. However, both enzymes produced comparable fluorescence signals in the small intestine. Coadministration of an antacid drug significantly enhanced MX PEP's gastric activity due to increased pH and/or inhibition of stomach proteases. With this simple procedure, differences in the in vivo performance of PEPs, which could not be identified under in vitro conditions, were detected. This imaging assay could be used to study other oral enzymes in vivo and therefore be instrumental in improving their therapeutic efficiency.

  13. In vivo fluorescence imaging of exogenous enzyme activity in the gastrointestinal tract

    PubMed Central

    Fuhrmann, Gregor; Leroux, Jean-Christophe

    2011-01-01

    Exogenous enzymes are administered orally to treat several diseases, such as pancreatic insufficiency and lactose intolerance. Due to the proteinaceous nature of enzymes, they are subject to inactivation and/or digestion in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Here we describe a convenient fluorescence-based assay to monitor the activity of therapeutic enzymes in real time in vivo in the GI tract. To establish the proof of principle, the assay was applied to proline-specific endopeptidases (PEPs), a group of enzymes recently proposed as adjuvant therapy for celiac disease (a highly prevalent immunogenetic enteropathy). A short PEP-specific peptide sequence which is part of larger immunotoxic sequences of gluten was labeled with a fluorescent dye and a corresponding quencher. Upon enzymatic cleavage, the fluorescence emission was dequenched and detected with an in vivo imaging system. PEPs originating from Flavobacterium meningosepticum (FM) and Myxococcus xanthus (MX) were evaluated after oral administration in rats. While MX PEP could not cleave the peptide in the stomach, FM PEP showed significant gastric activity reaching 40–60% of the maximal in vivo signal intensity. However, both enzymes produced comparable fluorescence signals in the small intestine. Coadministration of an antacid drug significantly enhanced MX PEP’s gastric activity due to increased pH and/or inhibition of stomach proteases. With this simple procedure, differences in the in vivo performance of PEPs, which could not be identified under in vitro conditions, were detected. This imaging assay could be used to study other oral enzymes in vivo and therefore be instrumental in improving their therapeutic efficiency. PMID:21576491

  14. Contribution of different segments of the gastrointestinal tract to digestion in growing Saanen goats.

    PubMed

    Leite, R F; Krizsan, S J; Figueiredo, F O M; Carvalho, V B; Teixeira, I A M A; Huhtanen, P

    2015-04-01

    This study examined mean retention time (MRT) of particulate and liquid matter in different segments of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) of growing Saanen goats of different sexes and subjected to different levels of feed restriction. In addition, feeding behavior and total tract digestibility were determined for all animals ahead of slaughter. In total, 54 Saanen goats (18 each of females, castrated males, and intact males) with initial BW 15.3 ± 0.4 kg were used in a 3 × 3 factorial arrangement comprising the 3 sexes and 3 levels of feed restriction (unrestricted/ad libitum, moderate, and severe restriction). Six blocks per sex group, each consisting of 3 goats, were randomly formed and the goats within each block were randomly allocated to 1 of 3 different feed restrictions. The daily amounts of feed offered to animals subjected to moderate and severe feed restriction (approximately 75% and 50% of ad libitum rate, respectively) were determined within block based on the DMI by ad libitum fed goats on the previous day. The MRT of particulate matter was determined either using Yb-labeled diet or indigestible NDF (iNDF) determined in situ as markers. Mean retention time of the liquid phase was determined by Cr-EDTA. Orthogonal polynomial contrasts were used to determine linear and quadratic effect of feed restriction, while the effect of sex was compared by Tukey test. The effects of sex and the interaction between sex and feed restriction were not significant on most of variables evaluated. Eating, ruminating, and total chewing time per g DM and NDF intake increased linearly as feed restriction increased (P ≤ 0.03). Diet digestibility increased quadratically for DM and OM, and linearly for NDF as feed intake decreased (P ≤ 0.03). The MRT of iNDF in the reticulorumen, omasum, abomasum, colon, and total GIT increased linearly with increased feed restriction (P ≤ 0.01). Mean retention time in the cecum varied quadratically, being greatest for animals with

  15. Gross anatomy of the ringed seal (Pusa hispida) gastro-intestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Smodlaka, H; Henry, R W

    2014-06-01

    The gross anatomical structure of the ringed seal (Pusa hispida) gastrointestinal tract is poorly described and often veterinary anatomical terminology is not used. Although the basic abdominal visceral pattern corresponded to domestic carnivores, significant differences were noted. The stomach was an elongated sharply bent tube (u-shaped) with the pylorus and fundus juxtaposed. The elongated jejunum measured up to 15.6 times body length and had 37 jejunal arteries from the cranial mesenteric artery. The pancreas was asymmetrical with a small right lobe and a large left lobe. The unusually short greater omentum negated formation of deep and superficial leaves. The most remarkable difference was the separation of the liver parenchyma into three physically separate masses, held together by hepatic ducts, veins and arteries. The topography and position of the liver was dependent on the amount of blood in the hepatic sinus (distended hepatic veins and hepatic portion of vena cava). Thus, as the hepatic sinus filled, the lateral liver masses separate from the central mass by moving caudolaterally. This was facilitated by modified coronary and triangular ligaments which did not attach directly to the liver, but instead to the hepatic sinus. These anatomical adaptations are apparently advantageous to ringed seal's survival in a deep marine environment. © 2013 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  16. Methanogen prevalence throughout the gastrointestinal tract of pre-weaned dairy calves

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Mi; Chen, Yanhong; Griebel, Philip J; Guan, Le Luo

    2014-01-01

    The methanogenic community throughout the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) of pre-weaned calves has not been well studied. The current study firstly investigated the distribution and composition of the methanogenic community in the rumen, ileum, and colon of 3–4 week-old milk-fed dairy calves (n = 4) using 16S rRNA gene clone library analysis. The occurrence of methanogens in the GIT of pre-weaned calves was further validated by using PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE), and quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) was applied to quantify the methanogenic community in the rumen, jejunum, ileum, cecum, colon and rectum of 8 3–4 week old animals. Both cloning libraries and PCR-DGGE revealed that phylotypes close to Methanobrevibacter were the main taxon along the GIT in pre-weaned sucking calves. The composition and abundance of methanogens varied significantly among individual animals, suggesting that host conditions may influence the composition of the symbiotic microbiota. Segregation of methanogenic communities throughout the GIT was also observed within individual animals, suggesting possible functional differences among methanogens residing in different GIT regions. This is the first study to analyze methanogenic communities throughout the GIT of milk-fed newborn dairy calves and reveal both their diversity and abundance. The identification of methanogens in the lower GIT of pre-weaned dairy calves warrants further investigation to better define methanogen roles in GIT function and their impact on host metabolism and health. PMID:25483332

  17. Occurrence of microplastics in the gastrointestinal tract of pelagic and demersal fish from the English Channel.

    PubMed

    Lusher, A L; McHugh, M; Thompson, R C

    2013-02-15

    Microplastics are present in marine habitats worldwide and laboratory studies show this material can be ingested, yet data on abundance in natural populations is limited. This study documents microplastics in 10 species of fish from the English Channel. 504 Fish were examined and plastics found in the gastrointestinal tracts of 36.5%. All five pelagic species and all five demersal species had ingested plastic. Of the 184 fish that had ingested plastic the average number of pieces per fish was 1.90±0.10. A total of 351 pieces of plastic were identified using FT-IR Spectroscopy; polyamide (35.6%) and the semi-synthetic cellulosic material, rayon (57.8%) were most common. There was no significant difference between the abundance of plastic ingested by pelagic and demersal fish. Hence, microplastic ingestion appears to be common, in relatively small quantities, across a range of fish species irrespective of feeding habitat. Further work is needed to establish the potential consequences.

  18. Comparison of two effervescent agents for double-contrast upper gastrointestinal tract radiography.

    PubMed

    Agha, F P; Trenkner, S W; Woolsey, E J; Hayes, D

    1985-11-01

    We prospectively evaluated the efficacy in 100 patients of two effervescent contrast agents commonly used in routine double-contrast upper gastrointestinal (GI) tract examinations: Baros and E-Z-Gas II granules. The study was double blinded. Two radiologists, who were not aware of which effervescent agent was being used, objectively evaluated the radiographic studies. Patient ease in swallowing and acceptance of the effervescent granules was 94% for Baros and 68% for E-Z-Gas II granules. The objective evaluation of the radiographs showed adequate gastric distension (Baros, 94%; E-Z-Gas II, 90%) and adequate to excellent mucosal coating for both agents (Baros, 92%, E-Z-Gas II, 94%). Areae gastricae were better seen with Baros (64% vs. 30%), and air bubbles were less of a problem with Baros. We conclude that Baros effervescent granules have certain distinct advantages over E-Z-Gas II granules regarding patient tolerance and acceptance, better visualization of the areae gastricae, and less degradation of the quality of the radiographs by air bubbles. The differences in mucosal coatings for the two agents was insignificant.

  19. Phytic acid increases mucin and endogenous amino acid losses from the gastrointestinal tract of chickens.

    PubMed

    Onyango, Edward M; Asem, Elikplimi K; Adeola, Olayiwola

    2009-03-01

    The influence of the form of phytic acid on the regulation of mucin and endogenous losses of amino acids, nitrogen and energy in chickens was investigated. Forty-eight 10-week-old male broilers were grouped by weight into eight blocks of six cages with one bird per cage. Birds received by intubation six dextrose-based combinations of phytic acid and phytase arranged in a 3 x 2 factorial consisting of phytic acid form (no phytic acid, 1.0 g free phytic acid or 1.3 g magnesium-potassium phytate) and phytase (0 or 1000 units). Each bird received the assigned combination added to 25 g dextrose at each of the two feedings on the first day of experimentation. All excreta were collected continuously for 54 h following feeding and frozen until analysed. Frozen excreta were thawed, pooled for each bird, lyophilised, ground, and analysed for DM, energy, nitrogen, amino acids, mucin, and sialic and uric acids. Chickens fed either magnesium-potassium phytate or free phytic acid showed increased (P < 0.05) loss of crude mucin and sialic acid. The amount of crude mucin lost was significantly greater (P < 0.05) with magnesium-potassium phytate than with free phytic acid treatment. Both phytic acid treatments also increased (P < 0.05) endogenous loss of threonine, proline and serine. In conclusion, the form of phytic acid fed to chickens affects the extent of mucin and endogenous amino acid losses from the gastrointestinal tract.

  20. The endoscopic findings of the upper gastrointestinal tract in patients with Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Yoshiki; Moriichi, Kentaro; Fujiya, Mikihiro; Okumura, Toshikatsu

    2017-08-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) is a type of chronic inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) associated with ulceration, and the main foci of the inflammation in CD patients are typically the terminal ileum and colon. However, in the upper gastrointestinal tract (GIT), including the esophagus, stomach and duodenum, inflammatory lesions are also detected as well, with a relatively high frequency (30-75%). Recent advances in imaging modalities, including endoscopy, have aided in the diagnosis of CD. Various lesions, including aphtha, erosion, ulcers, bamboo-joint-like appearance and notch-like appearance, are detected in the upper GI of CD patients. Of these lesions, the bamboo-joint-like appearance in the gastric cardiac region and notch-like appearance in the second portion of the duodenum are highly specific for CD, regardless of the disease activity at other sites. These two findings, particularly a bamboo-joint-like appearance, have therefore been considered as potential biomarkers for CD. Although proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are administered as an initial treatment for upper GIT lesions of CD, the efficacy of this treatment remains controversial. The administration of mesalazine, steroids, immunosuppressant and biologic agents is expected to be effective for treating such lesions.

  1. A Molecular Basis for Bifidobacterial Enrichment in the Infant Gastrointestinal Tract123

    PubMed Central

    Garrido, Daniel; Barile, Daniela; Mills, David A.

    2012-01-01

    Bifidobacteria are commonly used as probiotics in dairy foods. Select bifidobacterial species are also early colonizers of the breast-fed infant colon; however, the mechanism for this enrichment is unclear. We previously showed that Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis is a prototypical bifidobacterial species that can readily utilize human milk oligosaccharides as the sole carbon source. MS-based glycoprofiling has revealed that numerous B. infantis strains preferentially consume small mass oligosaccharides, abundant in human milks. Genome sequencing revealed that B. infantis possesses a bias toward genes required to use mammalian-derived carbohydrates. Many of these genomic features encode enzymes that are active on milk oligosaccharides including a novel 40-kb region dedicated to oligosaccharide utilization. Biochemical and molecular characterization of the encoded glycosidases and transport proteins has further resolved the mechanism by which B. infantis selectively imports and catabolizes milk oligosaccharides. Expression studies indicate that many of these key functions are only induced during growth on milk oligosaccharides and not expressed during growth on other prebiotics. Analysis of numerous B. infantis isolates has confirmed that these genomic features are common among the B. infantis subspecies and likely constitute a competitive colonization strategy used by these unique bifidobacteria. By detailed characterization of the molecular mechanisms responsible, these studies provide a conceptual framework for bifidobacterial persistence and host interaction in the infant gastrointestinal tract mediated in part through consumption of human milk oligosaccharides. PMID:22585920

  2. Branched Chain Fatty Acids Are Constituents of the Normal Healthy Newborn Gastrointestinal Tract

    PubMed Central

    Ran-Ressler, Rinat R.; Devapatla, Srisatish; Lawrence, Peter; Brenna, J. Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Vernix suspended in amniotic fluid is normally swallowed by the late term fetus. We hypothesized that branched chain fatty acids (BCFA), long known to be major vernix components, would be found in meconium and that the profiles would differ systematically. Vernix and meconium were collected from term newborns and analyzed. BCFA-containing lipids constituted about 12% of vernix dry weight, and were predominantly saturated, and had 11 to 26 carbons per BCFA. In contrast, meconium BCFA had 16 to 26 carbons, and was about 1% of dry weight. Meconium BCFA were mostly in the iso configuration, whereas vernix BCFA contained dimethyl and middle chain branching, and five anteiso BCFA. The mass of BCFA entering the fetal gut as swallowed vernix particles is estimated to be 180 mg in the last month of gestation while the total mass of BCFA found in meconium is estimated to be 16 mg, thus most BCFA disappear from the fetal gut. The BCFA profiles of vernix and meconium show that BCFA are major components of normal healthy term newborn gastrointestinal tract. BCFA are candidates for agents that play a role in gut colonization and should be considered a nutritional component for the fetus/newborn. PMID:18614964

  3. Rapid and Efficient Method for the Detection of Microplastic in the Gastrointestinal Tract of Fishes.

    PubMed

    Roch, Samuel; Brinker, Alexander

    2017-04-07

    The rising evidence of microplastic pollution impacts on aquatic organisms in both marine and freshwater ecosystems highlights a pressing need for adequate and comparable detection methods. Available tissue digestion protocols are time-consuming (>10 h) and/or require several procedural steps, during which materials can be lost and contaminants introduced. This novel approach comprises an accelerated digestion step using sodium hydroxide and nitric acid in combination to digest all organic material within 1 h plus an additional separation step using sodium iodide which can be used to reduce mineral residues in samples where necessary. This method yielded a microplastic recovery rate of ≥95%, and all tested polymer types were recovered with only minor changes in weight, size, and color with the exception of polyamide. The method was also shown to be effective on field samples from two benthic freshwater fish species, revealing a microplastic burden comparable to that indicated in the literature. As a consequence, the present method saves time, minimizes the loss of material and the risk of contamination, and facilitates the identification of plastic particles and fibers, thus providing an efficient method to detect and quantify microplastics in the gastrointestinal tract of fishes.

  4. Cell Aging of Mouse Gastrointestinal Tract Observed by Light and Electron Microscopic Radioautography

    PubMed Central

    Nagata, Tetsuji

    2014-01-01

    The term “cell aging” initially means how the cells change due to their aging. There are two meanings, i.e. how a cell changes when it is isolated from original animals such as in vitro cells in cell culture, otherwise how all the cells of an animal change in vivo due to the aging of the individual animal. We have been studying the latter changes from the viewpoint of the cell nutrients, the precursors for the macromolecular synthesis such as deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), ribonucleic acid (RNA), proteins, glucides and lipids, which are incorporated and synthesized into various cells of individual animals. Therefore, this article deals with only the cell aging of animal cells in vivo, how the metabolism, i.e. incorporations and syntheses of respective nutrient precursors in various kinds of cells change due to the aging of individual experimental animals such as mice by means of microscopic radioautography to localize the RI-labeled precursors. The incorporations and syntheses of various precursors for macromolecules such as DNA, RNA, proteins, glucides, lipids and others in various kinds of cells of various organs in the gastrointestinal tract such as the mouth, esophagus, stomach and intestines are reviewed referring many original papers already published from our laboratory during these 60 years since the late 20th century. PMID:27785275

  5. Biomimetic Gastrointestinal Tract Functions for Metal Absorption Assessment in Edible Plants: Comparison to In Vivo Absorption.

    PubMed

    Lin, Luxiu; Zheng, Fengying; Zhou, Haifeng; Li, Shunxing

    2017-08-02

    A biomimetic gastrointestinal tract, including in vitro digestion and biomimetic biomembrane extraction, has been proposed for absorption assessment of metals from edible plants. However, its validity is still unknown. Herein, two species of edible plants, Anoectochilus roxburghii and Radix astragali, were selected and digested in a bionic mouth, stomach, and intestine, and then trace metals (Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Se, Sr, As, and Pb) were transformed to their final metal species. To check model predictability, in vitro and in vivo metal absorption were imitated and tested by monolayer liposome extraction and rat stomach or single-pass duodenal intestine, respectively. A strong correlation was established between in vivo and in vitro metal absorption ratios, with 0.89 > R(2) > 0.66, and a significant relationship (p < 0.05) was exhibited for stomach, intestine, two plant species, and 10 metal species. Our biomimetic system could be used as low-cost alternatives to animal and clinical studies for multi-metal absorption.

  6. Identification, Recovery, and Refinement of Hitherto Undescribed Population-Level Genomes from the Human Gastrointestinal Tract

    PubMed Central

    Laczny, Cedric C.; Muller, Emilie E. L.; Heintz-Buschart, Anna; Herold, Malte; Lebrun, Laura A.; Hogan, Angela; May, Patrick; de Beaufort, Carine; Wilmes, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Linking taxonomic identity and functional potential at the population-level is important for the study of mixed microbial communities and is greatly facilitated by the availability of microbial reference genomes. While the culture-independent recovery of population-level genomes from environmental samples using the binning of metagenomic data has expanded available reference genome catalogs, several microbial lineages remain underrepresented. Here, we present two reference-independent approaches for the identification, recovery, and refinement of hitherto undescribed population-level genomes. The first approach is aimed at genome recovery of varied taxa and involves multi-sample automated binning using CANOPY CLUSTERING complemented by visualization and human-augmented binning using VIZBIN post hoc. The second approach is particularly well-suited for the study of specific taxa and employs VIZBIN de novo. Using these approaches, we reconstructed a total of six population-level genomes of distinct and divergent representatives of the Alphaproteobacteria class, the Mollicutes class, the Clostridiales order, and the Melainabacteria class from human gastrointestinal tract-derived metagenomic data. Our results demonstrate that, while automated binning approaches provide great potential for large-scale studies of mixed microbial communities, these approaches should be complemented with informative visualizations because expert-driven inspection and refinements are critical for the recovery of high-quality population-level genomes. PMID:27445992

  7. Variations of Phosphorous Accessibility Causing Changes in Microbiome Functions in the Gastrointestinal Tract of Chickens.

    PubMed

    Tilocca, Bruno; Witzig, Maren; Rodehutscord, Markus; Seifert, Jana

    2016-01-01

    The chicken gastrointestinal tract (GIT) harbours a complex microbial community, involved in several physiological processes such as host immunomodulation and feed digestion. For the first time, the present study analysed dietary effects on the protein inventory of the microbiome in crop and ceca of broilers. We performed quantitative label-free metaproteomics by using 1-D-gel electrophoresis coupled with LC-MS/MS to identify the structural and functional changes triggered by diets supplied with varying amount of mineral phosphorous (P) and microbial phytase (MP). Phylogenetic assessment based on label-free quantification (LFQ) values of the proteins identified Lactobacillaceae as the major family in the crop section regardless of the diet, whereas proteins belonging to the family Veillonellaceae increased with the P supplementation. Within the ceca section, proteins of Bacteroidaceae were more abundant in the P-supplied diets, whereas proteins of Eubacteriaceae decreased with the P-addition. Proteins of the Ruminococcaceae increased with the amount of MP while proteins of Lactobacillaceae were more abundant in the MP-lacking diets. Classification of the identified proteins indicated a thriving microbial community in the case of P and MP supplementation, and stressed microbial community when no P and MP were supplied. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD003805.

  8. Diet-induced obesity suppresses ghrelin in rat gastrointestinal tract and serum.

    PubMed

    Sahin, Ibrahim; Aydin, Suleyman; Ozkan, Yusuf; Dagli, Adile Ferda; Akin, Kadir Okhan; Guzel, Saadet Pilten; Catak, Zekiye; Ozercan, Mehmet Resat

    2011-09-01

    The aims of the present study were to examine ghrelin expression in serum and gastrointestinal tract (GIT) tissues, and to measure tissue ghrelin levels and obesity-related alterations in some serum biochemical variables in rats with diet-induced obesity (DIO). The study included 12 male rats, 60 days old. The rats were randomly allocated to two groups (n = 6). Rats in the DIO group were fed a cafeteria-style diet to induce obesity, while those in the control group were fed on standard rat pellets. After a 12 week diet program including an adaptation period all rats were decapitated, tissues were individually fixed, ghrelin expression was examined by immunohistochemistry , and tissue and serum ghrelin levels were measured by radioimmunoassay. Serum biochemical variables were measured using an autoanalyzer. When the baseline and week 12 body mass index and GIT ghrelin expression were compared between DIO and control rats, BMI had increased and ghrelin expression decreased due to obesity. The RIA results were consistent with these findings. Serum glucose, LDL cholesterol, and total cholesterol levels were elevated and HDL cholesterol significantly decreased in the DIO group. A comparison of GIT tissues between the control and obese groups demonstrated that ghrelin was decreased in all tissues of the latter. This decrease was brought about a decline in the circulating ghrelin pool. This suggests that rather than being associated with a change in a single tissue, obesity is a pathological condition in which ghrelin expression is changed in all tissues.

  9. Microbial succession in the gastrointestinal tract of dairy cows from 2 weeks to first lactation

    PubMed Central

    Dill-McFarland, Kimberly A.; Breaker, Jacob D.; Suen, Garret

    2017-01-01

    Development of the dairy calf gastrointestinal tract (GIT) and its associated microbiota are essential for survival and milk production, as this community is responsible for converting plant-based feeds into accessible nutrients. However, little is known regarding the establishment of microbes in the calf GIT. Here, we measured fecal-associated bacterial, archaeal, and fungal communities of dairy cows from 2 weeks to the middle of first lactation (>2 years) as well as rumen-associated communities from weaning (8 weeks) to first lactation. These communities were then correlated to animal growth and health. Although succession of specific operational taxonomic units (OTUs) was unique to each animal, beta-diversity decreased while alpha-diversity increased as animals aged. Calves exhibited similar microbial families and genera but different OTUs than adults, with a transition to an adult-like microbiota between weaning and 1 year of age. This suggests that alterations of the microbiota for improving downstream milk production may be most effective during, or immediately following, the weaning transition. PMID:28098248

  10. Characterising the bacterial microbiota across the gastrointestinal tracts of dairy cattle: membership and potential function.

    PubMed

    Mao, Shengyong; Zhang, Mengling; Liu, Junhua; Zhu, Weiyun

    2015-11-03

    The bacterial community composition and function in the gastrointestinal tracts (GITs) of dairy cattle is very important, since it can influence milk production and host health. However, our understanding of bacterial communities in the GITs of dairy cattle is still very limited. This study analysed bacterial communities in ten distinct GIT sites (the digesta and mucosa of the rumen, reticulum, omasum, abomasum, duodenum, jejunum, ileum, cecum, colon and rectum) in six dairy cattle. The study observed 542 genera belonging to 23 phyla distributed throughout the cattle GITs, with the Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes and Proteobacteria predominating. In addition, data revealed significant spatial heterogeneity in composition, diversity and species abundance distributions of GIT microbiota. Furthermore, the study inferred significant differences in the predicted metagenomic profiles among GIT regions. In particular, the relative abundances of the genes involved in carbohydrate metabolism were overrepresented in the digesta samples of forestomaches, and the genes related to amino acid metabolism were mainly enriched in the mucosal samples. In general, this study provides the first deep insights into the composition of GIT microbiota in dairy cattle, and it may serve as a foundation for future studies in this area.

  11. Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) in the gastrointestinal tract of the pheasant (Phasianus colchicus).

    PubMed

    Pirone, Andrea; Ding, Bao An; Giannessi, Elisabetta; Coli, Alessandra; Stornelli, Maria Rita; di Cossato, Margherita Marzoni Fecia; Piano, Ilaria; Lenzi, Carla

    2012-10-01

    The distribution of Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) was investigated in the gastrointestinal tract of the pheasant using immunohistochemistry. GLP-1 immunoreactive cells were common in the small intestine, in the proventriculus and in the pancreas. Immunostained cells were not seen in the crop, in the gizzard and in the large intestine. Double labelling demonstrated that GLP-1 and pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) were occasionally co-localized only in the duodenal villi. In contrast to what was previously described in the chicken and ostrich, we noted GLP-1 positive cells in the duodenum. These data were consistent with the presence of proglucagon mRNA in the chicken duodenum. Our findings indicate that GLP-1 might have an inhibitory effect on gastric and crop emptying and on acid secretion also in the pheasant. Moreover, the results of the present research regarding the initial region of the small intestine suggest a further direct mechanism of the GLP-1 release during the early digestion phase and an enhancement of its incretin role.

  12. Clinicopathological studies of gastrointestinal tract disorders in sheep with parasitic infection

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sarvan; Jakhar, K. K.; Singh, Satyavir; Potliya, Sandeep; Kumar, Kailash; Pal, Madan

    2015-01-01

    Aim: This study was envisaged to elucidate the parasitological aspects of gastrointestinal tract (GIT) disorders of sheep. Materials and Methods: Fecal, blood and serum samples collected from 31 sheep/lambs of Sheep Breeding Farm, Lala Lajpat Rai University of Veterinary & Animal Sciences, Hisar. Results: Of 25 cases, strongyle eggs (12 cases, 48%) were a major infection, followed by Strongyloides spp. (8 cases, 32%) and Moniezia spp. (5 case, 20%). In one case, massive infection of strongyle particularly Haemonchus contortus and Moniezia spp. was observed. All these animals were found negative for hemoprotozoan parasites in blood smear examination. Hematological studies revealed that significantly decreased values of hemoglobin (Hb), packed cell volume (PCV) and total erythrocytic count (TEC). Absolute leukocytic count revealed significant leukocytosis due to neutrophilia, lymphocytosis, monocytosis and eosinophilia. Serum biochemical profiles of diarrheic sheep/lambs in present study were significant decrease in values of total protein, serum globulin, glucose where as significant increase in the albumin: Globulin ratio, aspartate aminotransaminase (AST), alanine aminotransaminase (ALT), alkaline phosphatise (ALKP) and bilirubin. Conclusions: From the present study, it is reasonable to conclude that major parasitic infection of sheep/lamb observed was strongyle, followed by Strongyloides spp. and Moniezia spp. Hemato-biochemical studies revealed significant leukocytosis and increase in AST, ALT, ALKP and bilirubin. PMID:27046991

  13. Some Gastrointestinal Tract Characteristics of Karayaka Ram Lambs Slaughtered at Different Weights

    PubMed Central

    Yıldırım, Arda; Aksoy, Yüksel; Ocak, Nuh; Ulutaş, Zafer

    2014-01-01

    Thirty-one Karayaka ram lambs were slaughtered at different body weights (30 (n  =  7) , 35 (n  =  6) , 40 (n  =  7) , 45 (n  =  6) , and 50 (n  =  5)  kg of body weight at fast) to evaluate the growth of their gastrointestinal tract (GIT) characteristics, to determine the relationship among slaughter body weight (SBW) and empty body weight (EBW), whole GIT and segments, and the influence of slaughter weight on the pH of rumen, jejunum, and cecal contents. The effects of the SBW on GIT weight (P  <  0.05) , stomach ( P  <  0.001) , and intestine (P  <  0.05) , the body length (P  <  0.001) and caecum (P  <  0.05) , and the relative weights of GIT (P  <  0.05) , stomach (P <  0.001) , and intestine (P  <  0.001) were linear whereas that for the length of intestine were quadratic. The effect of SBW were quadratic (P  <  0.05) on ratios of stomach to GIT weight and intestine length to intestine weight and rumen pH while, for the intestine to GIT weight ratio (P  <  0.001) and caecum pH (P  <  0.05) , this effect was linear. The results indicated that for all parameters studied, with the exception of intestinal length and cecal pH, linear relationships were observed with SBW indicating steady growth rates for these tissues. PMID:25133226

  14. Cellular expression of gut chitinase mRNA in the gastrointestinal tract of mice and chickens.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Masako; Fujimoto, Wakako; Goto, Marie; Morimatsu, Masami; Syuto, Bunei; Iwanaga, Toshihiko

    2002-08-01

    Recently, the second mammalian chitinase, designated acidic mammalian chitinase (AMCase), has been identified in human, mouse, and cow. In contrast to the earlier identified macrophage-derived chitinase (chitotriosidase), this chitinase is richly expressed in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, suggesting its role in digestion of chitin-containing foods as well as defense against chitin-coated microorganisms and parasites. This in situ hybridization study first revealed cellular localization of the gut-type chitinase in the mouse and chicken. In adult mice, the parotid gland, von Ebner's gland, and gastric chief cells, all of which are exocrine cells of the serous type, expressed the gut chitinase mRNA. In the chicken, oxyntico-peptic cells in glandular stomach (proventriculus) and hepatocytes expressed the chitinase mRNA. Because cattle produce the gut chitinase (chitin-binding protein b04) only in the liver, the gut chitinases in mammals and birds have three major sources of production, i.e., the salivary gland, stomach, and liver. During ontogenetic development, the expression level in the parotid gland and stomach of mice increased to the adult level before weaning, whereas in the stomach of chickens intense signals were detectable in embryos from incubation day 7.

  15. Genomic analysis of three Bifidobacterium species isolated from the calf gastrointestinal tract

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, William J.; Cookson, Adrian L.; Altermann, Eric; Lambie, Suzanne C.; Perry, Rechelle; Teh, Koon Hoong; Otter, Don E.; Shapiro, Nicole; Woyke, Tanja; Leahy, Sinead C.

    2016-01-01

    Ruminant animals contribute significantly to the global value of agriculture and rely on a complex microbial community for efficient digestion. However, little is known of how this microbial-host relationship develops and is maintained. To begin to address this, we have determined the ability of three Bifidobacterium species isolated from the faeces of newborn calves to grow on carbohydrates typical of a newborn ruminant diet. Genome sequences have been determined for these bacteria with analysis of the genomes providing insights into the host association and identification of several genes that may mediate interactions with the ruminant gastrointestinal tract. The present study provides a starting point from which we can define the role of potential beneficial microbes in the nutrition of young ruminants and begin to influence the interactions between the microbiota and the host. The differences observed in genomic content hint at niche partitioning among the bifidobacterial species analysed and the different strategies they employ to successfully adapt to this habitat. PMID:27468806

  16. Gingerol activates noxious cold ion channel TRPA1 in gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Yang, Meng-Qi; Ye, Lin-Lan; Liu, Xiao-Ling; Qi, Xiao-Ming; Lv, Jia-Di; Wang, Gang; Farhan, Ulah-Khan; Waqas, Nawaz; Chen, Ding-Ding; Han, Lei; Zhou, Xiao-Hui

    2016-06-01

    TRPA1 channels are non-selective cation channels that could be activated by plant-derived pungent products, including gingerol, a main active constituent of ginger. Ginger could improve the digestive function; however whether ginger improves the digestive function through activating TRPA1 receptor in gastrointestinal tract has not been investigated. In the present study, gingerol was used to stimulate cell lines (RIN14B or STC-1) while depletion of extracellular calcium. TRPA1 inhibitor (rethenium red) and TRPA1 gene silencing via TRPA1-specific siRNA were also used for mechanistic studies. The intracellular calcium and secretion of serotonin or cholecystokinin were measured by fura-2/AM and ELISA. Stimulation of those cells with gingerol increased intracellular calcium levels and the serotonin or cholecystokinin secretion. The gingerol-induced intracellular calcium increase and secretion (serotonin or cholecystokinin) release were completely blocked by ruthenium red, EGTA, and TRPA1-specific siRNA. In summary, our results suggested that gingerol derived from ginger might improve the digestive function through secretion releasing from endocrine cells of the gut by inducing TRPA1-mediated calcium influx. Copyright © 2016 China Pharmaceutical University. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Variations of Phosphorous Accessibility Causing Changes in Microbiome Functions in the Gastrointestinal Tract of Chickens

    PubMed Central

    Tilocca, Bruno; Witzig, Maren; Rodehutscord, Markus

    2016-01-01

    The chicken gastrointestinal tract (GIT) harbours a complex microbial community, involved in several physiological processes such as host immunomodulation and feed digestion. For the first time, the present study analysed dietary effects on the protein inventory of the microbiome in crop and ceca of broilers. We performed quantitative label-free metaproteomics by using 1-D-gel electrophoresis coupled with LC-MS/MS to identify the structural and functional changes triggered by diets supplied with varying amount of mineral phosphorous (P) and microbial phytase (MP). Phylogenetic assessment based on label-free quantification (LFQ) values of the proteins identified Lactobacillaceae as the major family in the crop section regardless of the diet, whereas proteins belonging to the family Veillonellaceae increased with the P supplementation. Within the ceca section, proteins of Bacteroidaceae were more abundant in the P-supplied diets, whereas proteins of Eubacteriaceae decreased with the P-addition. Proteins of the Ruminococcaceae increased with the amount of MP while proteins of Lactobacillaceae were more abundant in the MP-lacking diets. Classification of the identified proteins indicated a thriving microbial community in the case of P and MP supplementation, and stressed microbial community when no P and MP were supplied. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD003805. PMID:27760159

  18. Endoscopic Management of Foreign Bodies in the Gastrointestinal Tract: A Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Andrade, Javier; Twersky, Yitzhak; Iqbal, Shahzad

    2016-01-01

    Foreign body ingestion is a common diagnosis that presents in emergency departments throughout the world. Distinct foreign bodies predispose to particular locations of impaction in the gastrointestinal tract, commonly meat boluses in the esophagus above a preexisting esophageal stricture or ring in adults and coins in children. Several other groups are at high risk of foreign body impaction, mentally handicapped individuals or those with psychiatric illness, abusers of drugs or alcohol, and the geriatric population. Patients with foreign body ingestion typically present with odynophagia, dysphagia, sensation of having an object stuck, chest pain, and nausea/vomiting. The majority of foreign bodies pass through the digestive system spontaneously without causing any harm, symptoms, or necessitating any further intervention. A well-documented clinical history and thorough physical exam is critical in making the diagnosis, if additional modalities are needed, a CT scan and diagnostic endoscopy are generally the preferred modalities. Various tools can be used to remove foreign bodies, and endoscopic treatment is safe and effective if performed by a skilled endoscopist. PMID:27807447

  19. CD95 (Fas/APO-1)/CD95L in the gastrointestinal tract: fictions and facts.

    PubMed

    Sträter, J; Möller, P

    2003-03-01

    CD95 is a member of the tumor necrosis factor receptor family. It is constitutively expressed on the basolateral membrane of intestinal epithelial cells (IEC) and induces apoptosis when cross-linked by its natural ligand, CD95L. The significance of providing such a death-inducing mechanism in IEC is not yet clear. In recent years a multitude of studies have been published addressing the question of where and under which conditions CD95L is produced in the gut in the normal and neoplastic situation. Although some of these studies have considerably influenced our view on the role of the CD95/CD95L system, it appears necessary to critically review published data which are in part confusing and contradictory. To date compelling evidence of CD95L expression in untransformed IEC is lacking, and involvement of the CD95/CD95L system in the physiological epithelial cell turnover appears unlikely. Whereas CD95L is overexpressed in T-cells under inflammatory conditions, its significance for mucosal damage in inflammatory bowel diseases is obscured by possible redundancies in cell death mechanisms. Finally, recent data indicate that the intriguing CD95L counterattack concept in gastrointestinal tract cancer needs to be revised.

  20. The role of microRNAs in cancers of the upper gastrointestinal tract

    PubMed Central

    Song, Shumei; Ajani, Jaffer A.

    2013-01-01

    Cancers of the oesophagus, gastro-oesophageal junction and stomach (upper gastrointestinal tract cancers; UGICs) pose a major health risk around the world. Collectively, the 5-year survival rate has remained <15% and therapeutic improvements have been very slow and small. Therefore, novel molecules for early diagnosis, prognosis, prediction, and therapy are urgently needed. The role that microRNA (miRNA) molecules seem to play in UGICs are worth pursuing. miRNAs are small noncoding RNA molecules that regulate ~60% of coding genes in humans and, therefore, are pivotal in mediating and regulating many physiologic processes. miRNAs are deregulated in many disease states, particularly in cancer, making them important targets. Here, we review the building body of evidence regarding the alterations of miRNAs in UGICs. By suppressing translation and/or promoting degradation of mRNAs, miRNAs can contribute to carcinogenesis and progression of UGICs. In-depth studies of miRNAs in UGICs might yield novel insights and potential novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:23165235

  1. Interstitial cells of Cajal mediate nitrergic inhibitory neurotransmission in the murine gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Lies, Barbara; Gil, Víctor; Groneberg, Dieter; Seidler, Barbara; Saur, Dieter; Wischmeyer, Erhard; Jiménez, Marcel; Friebe, Andreas

    2014-07-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Its main effector, NO-sensitive guanylyl cyclase (NO-GC), is expressed in several GI cell types, including smooth muscle cells (SMC), interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC), and fibroblast-like cells. Up to date, the interplay between neurons and these cells to initiate a nitrergic inhibitory junction potential (IJP) is unclear. Here, we investigate the origin of the nitrergic IJP in murine fundus and colon. IJPs were determined in fundus and colon SMC of mice lacking NO-GC globally (GCKO) and specifically in SMC (SM-GCKO), ICC (ICC-GCKO), and both SMC/ICC (SM/ICC-GCKO). Nitrergic IJP was abolished in ICC-GCKO fundus and reduced in SM-GCKO fundus. In the colon, the amplitude of nitrergic IJP was reduced in ICC-GCKO, whereas nitrergic IJP in SM-GCKO was reduced in duration. These results were corroborated by loss of the nitrergic IJP in global GCKO. In conclusion, our results prove the obligatory role of NO-GC in ICC for the initiation of an IJP. NO-GC in SMC appears to enhance the nitrergic IJP, resulting in a stronger and prolonged hyperpolarization in fundus and colon SMC, respectively. Thus NO-GC in both cell types is mandatory to induce a full nitrergic IJP. Our data from the colon clearly reveal the nitrergic IJP to be biphasic, resulting from individual inputs of ICC and SMC.

  2. Structuring food emulsions in the gastrointestinal tract to modify lipid digestion.

    PubMed

    Singh, Harjinder; Ye, Aiqian; Horne, David

    2009-03-01

    The importance of nutrient lipids in the human diet has led to major advances in understanding the mechanisms of lipid digestion and absorption. With these advances has come new recognition that the matrix in which lipids are presented (i.e. food structure) in the diet could influence the rate of lipid digestion and hence the bioavailability of fatty acids. As a consequence, there is growing interest in understanding how food material properties can be manipulated under physiological conditions to control the uptake of lipids and lipid-soluble components. The lipids in many, if not most, processed foods are normally present as emulsions, which can be end products in themselves or part of a more complex food system. In this review, we discuss the formation and properties of oil-in-water (O/W) emulsions, especially how these emulsions are modified as they traverse through the gastrointestinal tract. Among other factors, the changes in the nature of the droplet adsorbed layer and the droplet size play a major role in controlling the action of lipases and lipid digestion. Greater knowledge and understanding of how the digestive system treats, transports and utilizes lipids will allow the microstructural design of foods to achieve a specific, controlled physiological response.

  3. A wireless capsule system with ASIC for monitoring the physiological signals of the human gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Xu, Fei; Yan, Guozheng; Zhao, Kai; Lu, Li; Gao, Jinyang; Liu, Gang

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents the design of a wireless capsule system for monitoring the physiological signals of the human gastrointestinal (GI) tract. The primary components of the system include a wireless capsule, a portable data recorder, and a workstation. Temperature, pH, and pressure sensors; an RF transceiver; a controlling and processing application specific integrated circuit (ASIC); and batteries were applied in a wireless capsule. Decreasing capsule size, improving sensor precision, and reducing power needs were the primary challenges; these were resolved by employing micro sensors, optimized architecture, and an ASIC design that include power management, clock management, a programmable gain amplifier (PGA), an A/D converter (ADC), and a serial peripheral interface (SPI) communication unit. The ASIC has been fabricated in 0.18- μm CMOS technology with a die area of 5.0 mm × 5.0 mm. The wireless capsule integrating the ASIC controller measures Φ 11 mm × 26 mm. A data recorder and a workstation were developed, and 20 cases of human experiments were conducted in hospitals. Preprocessing in the workstation can significantly improve the quality of the data, and 76 original features were determined by mathematical statistics. Based on the 13 optimal features achieved in the evaluation of the features, the clustering algorithm can identify the patients who lack GI motility with a recognition rate reaching 83.3%.

  4. Enzymatic and morphometric evidence for Crohn's disease as a diffuse lesion of the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Dunne, W T; Cooke, W T; Allan, R N

    1977-04-01

    Intestinal disaccharidase and dipeptidase activities were measured in mucosal biopsies from the proximal jejunum in 20 patients with Crohn's disease apparently confined to the distal ileum or large bowel, 14 patients with ulcerative colitis, and 14 healthy volunteers who acted as controls. The dissecting microscopy and histological appearance of the biopsies were normal (Gd 0-1) except for two which showed grade 2 changes. tbiopsy morphometry showed a reduction of jejunal mucosal surface area and an increase in mucosal volume in patients with Chron's disease when compared with the other two groups. The mucosal enzymes studies demonstrated that patients with Crohn's disease had a significant reduction in brush-border enzymes (disaccharidase) but no change in cytoplasmic enzyme activity (dipeptidases). The enzyme levels in patients with ulcerative colitis did not differ from the healthy controls. The reduction of brush-border enzymes with normal cytoplasmic enzymes in the presence of abnormal morphometry is further evidence of the concept of Crohn's disease as a diffuse lesion of the gastrointestinal tract. It also suggests that there is either specific damage to the microvilli or some other abnormality such as impairment of enzyme synthesis.

  5. [Carbon monoxide in human physiology--its role in the gastrointestinal tract].

    PubMed

    Jasnos, Katarzyna; Magierowski, Marcin; Kwiecień, Sławomir; Brzozowski, Tomasz

    2014-01-30

    Carbon monoxide (CO) is produced endogenously in the body as a byproduct of heme degradation catalyzed by the action of heme oxygenase (HO) enzymes. An inducible form, HO-1, responds to many factors such as oxidative stress, hypoxia, heme, bacterial endotoxins, proinflammatory cytokines and heavy metals. HO-2 is constitutively expressed under basal conditions in most human tissues including brain and gonads. Recent data show that CO is a gaseous mediator with multidirectional biological activity. It is involved in maintaining cellular homeostasis and many physiological and pathophysiological processes. CO shares many properties with another established vasodilatator and neurotransmitter - nitric oxide (NO). Both CO and NO are involved in neural transmission, modulation of blood vessel function and inhibition of platelet aggregation. The binding to guanylate cyclase, stimulation of the production of cGMP, activation of Ca2+-dependent potassium channels and stimulation of mitogen-activated protein kinases are well known cellular targets of CO action. Since CO is nowadays a subject of extensive investigation in many centers worldwide, the aim of the present study was to present the role of CO in various aspects of human physiology with special focus on its activity in the gastrointestinal tract.

  6. Characterising the bacterial microbiota across the gastrointestinal tracts of dairy cattle: membership and potential function

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Shengyong; Zhang, Mengling; Liu, Junhua; Zhu, Weiyun

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial community composition and function in the gastrointestinal tracts (GITs) of dairy cattle is very important, since it can influence milk production and host health. However, our understanding of bacterial communities in the GITs of dairy cattle is still very limited. This study analysed bacterial communities in ten distinct GIT sites (the digesta and mucosa of the rumen, reticulum, omasum, abomasum, duodenum, jejunum, ileum, cecum, colon and rectum) in six dairy cattle. The study observed 542 genera belonging to 23 phyla distributed throughout the cattle GITs, with the Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes and Proteobacteria predominating. In addition, data revealed significant spatial heterogeneity in composition, diversity and species abundance distributions of GIT microbiota. Furthermore, the study inferred significant differences in the predicted metagenomic profiles among GIT regions. In particular, the relative abundances of the genes involved in carbohydrate metabolism were overrepresented in the digesta samples of forestomaches, and the genes related to amino acid metabolism were mainly enriched in the mucosal samples. In general, this study provides the first deep insights into the composition of GIT microbiota in dairy cattle, and it may serve as a foundation for future studies in this area. PMID:26527325

  7. Genomic analysis of three Bifidobacterium species isolated from the calf gastrointestinal tract

    DOE PAGES

    Kelly, William J.; Cookson, Adrian L.; Altermann, Eric; ...

    2016-07-29

    Ruminant animals contribute significantly to the global value of agriculture and rely on a complex microbial community for efficient digestion. However, little is known of how this microbial-host relationship develops and is maintained. To begin to address this, we have determined the ability of three Bifidobacterium species isolated from the faeces of newborn calves to grow on carbohydrates typical of a newborn ruminant diet. Genome sequences have been determined for these bacteria with analysis of the genomes providing insights into the host association and identification of several genes that may mediate interactions with the ruminant gastrointestinal tract. The present studymore » provides a starting point from which we can define the role of potential beneficial microbes in the nutrition of young ruminants and begin to influence the interactions between the microbiota and the host. The differences observed in genomic content hint at niche partitioning among the bifidobacterial species analysed and the different strategies they employ to successfully adapt to this habitat.« less

  8. Immunofluorescent localization of enteroglucagon cells in the gastrointestinal tract of the dog

    PubMed Central

    Polak, Julia M.; Bloom, S.; Coulling, I.; Pearse, A. G. E.

    1971-01-01

    Localization of the endocrine polypeptide cells responsible for `glucagon-like immunoreactivity' in the gastrointestinal tract of the dog has been achieved with an immunofluorescent technique using antibodies raised against porcine pancreatic glucagon. The cells, for which we prefer the term `enteroglucagon', could only be demonstrated by this technique in tissues fixed in carbodiimide. The enteroglucagon cells possess cytological, cytochemical, and ultrastructural characteristics in common with those of the pancreatic α2 cell and they are equivalent in the stomach to the A cell and in the intestine to the L cell of the Wiesbaden terminology. Their distribution, predominantly in fundus and jejunum, correlates precisely with the distribution of glucagon-like immunoreactivity by radioimmunoassay and bioassay. The storage form of enteroglucagon differs in many respects from that of pancreatic glucagon although there are some close resemblances between the two forms of specific hormone-containing granule. Elucidation of the role of enteroglucagon should be assisted by the ability to demonstrate enteroglucagon cells. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 7 PMID:4930155

  9. The Role of Intestinal Alkaline Phosphatase in Inflammatory Disorders of Gastrointestinal Tract

    PubMed Central

    Wojcik, Dagmara; Zahradnik-Bilska, Janina; Mach, Tomasz

    2017-01-01

    Over the past few years, the role of intestinal alkaline phosphatase (IAP) as a crucial mucosal defence factor essential for maintaining gut homeostasis has been established. IAP is an important apical brush border enzyme expressed throughout the gastrointestinal tract and secreted both into the intestinal lumen and into the bloodstream. IAP exerts its effects through dephosphorylation of proinflammatory molecules including lipopolysaccharide (LPS), flagellin, and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) released from cells during stressful events. Diminished activity of IAP could increase the risk of disease through changes in the microbiome, intestinal inflammation, and intestinal permeability. Exogenous IAP exerts a protective effect against intestinal and systemic inflammation in a variety of diseases and represents a potential therapeutic agent in diseases driven by gut barrier dysfunction such as IBD. The intestinal protective mechanisms are impaired in IBD patients due to lower synthesis and activity of endogenous IAP, but the pathomechanism of this enzyme deficiency remains unclear. IAP has been safely administered to humans and the human recombinant form of IAP has been developed. This review was designed to provide an update in recent research on the involvement of IAP in intestinal inflammatory processes with focus on IBD in experimental animal models and human patients. PMID:28316376

  10. Building a three-dimensional model of the upper gastrointestinal tract for computer simulations of swallowing.

    PubMed

    Gastelum, Alfonso; Mata, Lucely; Brito-de-la-Fuente, Edmundo; Delmas, Patrice; Vicente, William; Salinas-Vázquez, Martín; Ascanio, Gabriel; Marquez, Jorge

    2016-03-01

    We aimed to provide realistic three-dimensional (3D) models to be used in numerical simulations of peristaltic flow in patients exhibiting difficulty in swallowing, also known as dysphagia. To this end, a 3D model of the upper gastrointestinal tract was built from the color cryosection images of the Visible Human Project dataset. Regional color heterogeneities were corrected by centering local histograms of the image difference between slices. A voxel-based model was generated by stacking contours from the color images. A triangle mesh was built, smoothed and simplified. Visualization tools were developed for browsing the model at different stages and for virtual endoscopy navigation. As result, a computer model of the esophagus and the stomach was obtained, mainly for modeling swallowing disorders. A central-axis curve was also obtained for virtual navigation and to replicate conditions relevant to swallowing disorders modeling. We show renderings of the model and discuss its use for simulating swallowing as a function of bolus rheological properties. The information obtained from simulation studies with our model could be useful for physicians in selecting the correct nutritional emulsions for patients with dysphagia.

  11. Commensal microbiome effects on mucosal immune system development in the ruminant gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Taschuk, Ryan; Griebel, Philip J

    2012-06-01

    Commensal microflora play many roles within the mammalian gastrointestinal tract (GIT) that benefit host physiology by way of direct or indirect interactions with mucosal surfaces. Commensal flora comprises members across all microbial phyla, although predominantly bacterial, with population dynamics varying with host species, genotype, and environmental factors. Little is known, however, about the complex mechanisms regulating host-commensal interactions that underlie this mutually beneficial relationship and how alterations in the microbiome may influence host development and susceptibility to infection. Research into the gut microbiome has intensified as it becomes increasingly evident that symbiont-host interactions have a significant impact on mucosal immunity and health. Furthermore, evidence that microbial populations vary significantly throughout the GIT suggest that regional differences in the microbiome may also influence immune function within distinct compartments of the GIT. Postpartum colonization of the GIT has been shown to have a direct effect on mucosal immune system development, but information is limited regarding regional effects of the microbiome on the development, activation, and maturation of the mucosal immune system. This review discusses factors influencing the colonization and establishment of the microbiome throughout the GIT of newborn calves and the evidence that regional differences in the microbiome influence mucosal immune system development and maturation. The implications of this complex interaction are also discussed in terms of possible effects on responses to enteric pathogens and vaccines.

  12. Lack of correlation between blood group and HER-2 status in adenocarcinomas of the upper gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Hejna, Michael; Birner, Peter; Preusser, Matthias; Thallinger, Christiane M R; Worel, Nina; Asari, Reza; Dolak, Werner; Schmid, Rainer; Schoppmann, Sebastian F; Raderer, Markus

    2013-11-01

    The assessment of the human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER-2) status has become a routine diagnostic procedure for patients with advanced-stage gastroesophageal adenocarcinoma. The aim of this study was to evaluate the possible correlation between the HER-2 status and the ABO blood group. HER-2 status determination and routine ABO typing was performed according to current standards. We evaluated the correlation between the HER-2 status and the ABO and Rhesus (Rh) system in 100 consecutive patients with adenocarcinoma of the upper gastrointestinal tract. There were no significant differences between HER-2 status and ABO and Rh system. Furthermore, no correlation was observed between the HER-2 status and the ABO and Rh type in patients with adenocarcinoma of the upper gastrointestinal tract.

  13. Isolation of a complete circular virus genome sequence from an Alaskan black-capped chickadee (Poecile atricapillus) gastrointestinal tract sample.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hanna, Zachary R.; Runckel, Charles; Fuchs, Jerome; DeRisi, Joseph L.; Mindell, David P.; Van Hemert, Caroline R.; Handel, Colleen M.; Dumbacher, John P.

    2015-01-01

    We report here the genome sequence of a circular virus isolated from samples of an Alaskan black-capped chickadee (Poecile atricapillus) gastrointestinal tract. The genome is 2,152 bp in length and is most similar (30 to 44.5% amino acid identity) to the genome sequences of other single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) circular viruses belonging to the gemycircularvirus group.

  14. Gastrointestinal and urinary tract pathogenic infections among HIV seropositive patients at the Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital in Ghana

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Gastrointestinal and urinary tract pathogenic infections are aggravating the incidence and progression of the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection into Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) more especially in the developing countries. This study was conducted to assess the common gastrointestinal and urinary infections among HIV/AIDS patients at the Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital (KATH) in Ghana between April and December 2008. Findings This work reports on gastrointestinal and urinary tract pathogenic infections among 500 HIV seropositive and 300 HIV seronegative patients. There was a 35% (175/500) prevalence of intestinal parasites among HIV seropositive patients compared to 4.3% (13/300) in HIV seronegative patients. Giardia lamblia and Cryptosporidium accounted for 19% (95/500) and 14% (70/500) respectively, while Schistosoma mansoni, Strongyloides stercoralis and hookworm together accounted for 2% (10/500) of intestinal parasitic infections among the HIV seropositive patients. There was no significant difference (p > 0.05) in urinary parasitic infection between HIV seropositive 1% (2/500) and seronegative patients 0.7% (2/300). Most, 60 (86%) out of 70, of the urinary tract infection among the HIV seropositive patients was due to bacteria with E. coli being the most predominant isolate, 28 (47%) out of 60. There was no significant difference in infections based on age and gender. Conclusion G. lamblia and Cryptosporidium were the most common gastrointestinal parasites detected while bacteria accounted for majority of the urinary tract infections among the HIV seropositive patients at the hospital. PMID:22909315

  15. Clonal immunoglobulin gene rearrangement in nodular lymphoid hyperplasia of the gastrointestinal tract associated with common variable immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Laszewski, M J; Kemp, J D; Goeken, J A; Mitros, F A; Platz, C E; Dick, F R

    1990-09-01

    The authors report a case of common variable immunodeficiency associated with nodular lymphoid hyperplasia of the gastrointestinal tract in which a clonal population of lymphoid cells was detected by immunophenotypic and genotypic studies on tissue obtained by colonoscopic biopsy. The patient has been followed up for more than 50 months without clinical, radiographic, or pathologic evidence of lymphoma. The significance of clonal rearrangement in the setting of immunodeficiency and the role of genotypic studies in defining lymphoid malignancy are discussed.

  16. Aquaporin-6 is expressed along the rat gastrointestinal tract and upregulated by feeding in the small intestine

    PubMed Central

    Laforenza, Umberto; Gastaldi, Giulia; Polimeni, Mariarosa; Tritto, Simona; Tosco, Marisa; Ventura, Ulderico; Scaffino, Manuela F; Yasui, Masato

    2009-01-01

    Background Several aquaporins (a family of integral membrane proteins) have been recently identified in the mammalian gastrointestinal tract, and their involvement in the movement of fluid and small solutes has been suggested. In this direction we investigated, in some regions of the rat gastrointestinal tract, the presence and localization of aquaporin-6, given its peculiar function as an ion selective channel. Results RT-PCR and immunoblotting experiments showed that aquaporin-6 was expressed in all the investigated portions of the rat gastrointestinal tract. The RT-PCR experiments showed that aquaporin-6 transcript was highly expressed in small intestine and rectum, and less in stomach, caecum and colon. In addition, jejunal mRNA expression was specifically stimulated by feeding. Immunoblotting analysis showed a major band with a molecular weight of about 55 kDa corresponding to the aquaporin-6 protein dimer; this band was stronger in the stomach and large intestine than in the small intestine. Immunoblotting analysis of brush border membrane vesicle preparations showed an intense signal for aquaporin-6 protein. The results of in situ hybridization experiments demonstrate that aquaporin-6 transcript is present in the isthmus, neck and basal regions of the stomach lining, and throughout the crypt-villus axis in both small and large intestine. In the latter regions, immunohistochemistry revealed strong aquaporin-6 labelling in the apical membrane of the surface epithelial cells, while weak or no labelling was observed in the crypt cells. In the stomach, an intense staining was observed in mucous neck cells and lower signal in principal cells and some parietal cells. Conclusion The results indicate that aquaporin-6 is distributed throughout the gastrointestinal tract. Aquaporin-6 localization at the apical pole of the superficial epithelial cells and its upregulation by feeding suggest that it may be involved in movements of water and anions through the epithelium

  17. The Gastrointestinal Tract of the White-Throated Woodrat (Neotoma albigula) Harbors Distinct Consortia of Oxalate-Degrading Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Kohl, Kevin D.; Dearing, M. Denise

    2014-01-01

    The microbiota inhabiting the mammalian gut is a functional organ that provides a number of services for the host. One factor that may regulate the composition and function of gut microbial communities is dietary toxins. Oxalate is a toxic plant secondary compound (PSC) produced in all major taxa of vascular plants and is consumed by a variety of animals. The mammalian herbivore Neotoma albigula is capable of consuming and degrading large quantities of dietary oxalate. We isolated and characterized oxalate-degrading bacteria from the gut contents of wild-caught animals and used high-throughput sequencing to determine the distribution of potential oxalate-degrading taxa along the gastrointestinal tract. Isolates spanned three genera: Lactobacillus, Clostridium, and Enterococcus. Over half of the isolates exhibited significant oxalate degradation in vitro, and all Lactobacillus isolates contained the oxc gene, one of the genes responsible for oxalate degradation. Although diverse potential oxalate-degrading genera were distributed throughout the gastrointestinal tract, they were most concentrated in the foregut, where dietary oxalate first enters the gastrointestinal tract. We hypothesize that unique environmental conditions present in each gut region provide diverse niches that select for particular functional taxa and communities. PMID:24362432

  18. Patients with McCune-Albright syndrome have a broad spectrum of abnormalities in the gastrointestinal tract and pancreas.

    PubMed

    Wood, Laura D; Noë, Michaël; Hackeng, Wenzel; Brosens, Lodewijk A A; Bhaijee, Feriyl; Debeljak, Marija; Yu, Jun; Suenaga, Masaya; Singhi, Aatur D; Zaheer, Atif; Boyce, Alison; Robinson, Cemre; Eshleman, James R; Goggins, Michael G; Hruban, Ralph H; Collins, Michael T; Lennon, Anne Marie; Montgomery, Elizabeth A

    2017-02-10

    McCune-Albright Syndrome (MAS) is a rare sporadic syndrome caused by post-zygotic mutations in the GNAS oncogene, leading to constitutional mosaicism for these alterations. Somatic activating GNAS mutations also commonly occur in several gastrointestinal and pancreatic neoplasms, but the spectrum of abnormalities in these organs in patients with MAS has yet to be systematically described. We report comprehensive characterization of the upper gastrointestinal tract in seven patients with MAS and identify several different types of polyps, including gastric heterotopia/metaplasia (7/7), gastric hyperplastic polyps (5/7), fundic gland polyps (2/7), and a hamartomatous polyp (1/7). In addition, one patient had an unusual adenomatous lesion at the gastroesophageal junction with high-grade dysplasia. In the pancreas, all patients had endoscopic ultrasound findings suggestive of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN), but only two patients met the criteria for surgical intervention. Both of these patients had IPMNs at resection, one with low-grade dysplasia and one with high-grade dysplasia. GNAS mutations were identified in the majority of lesions analyzed, including both IPMNs and the adenomatous lesion from the gastroesophageal junction. These studies suggest that there is a broad spectrum of abnormalities in the gastrointestinal tract and pancreas in patients with MAS and that patients with MAS should be evaluated for gastrointestinal pathology, some of which may warrant clinical intervention due to advanced dysplasia.

  19. Histological features of the gastrointestinal tract of wild Indonesian shortfin eel, Anguilla bicolor bicolor (McClelland, 1844), captured in Peninsular Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Nasruddin, Nurrul Shaqinah; Azmai, Mohammad Noor Amal; Ismail, Ahmad; Saad, Mohd Zamri; Daud, Hassan Mohd; Zulkifli, Syaizwan Zahmir

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to record the histological features of the gastrointestinal tract of wild Indonesian shortfin eel, Anguilla bicolor bicolor (McClelland, 1844), captured in Peninsular Malaysia. The gastrointestinal tract was segmented into the oesophagus, stomach, and intestine. Then, the oesophagus was divided into five (first to fifth), the stomach into two (cardiac and pyloric), and the intestine into four segments (anterior, intermediate, posterior, and rectum) for histological examinations. The stomach had significantly taller villi and thicker inner circular muscles compared to the intestine and oesophagus. The lamina propria was thickest in stomach, significantly when compared with oesophagus, but not with the intestine. However, the intestine showed significantly thicker outer longitudinal muscle while gastric glands were observed only in the stomach. The histological features were closely associated with the functions of the different segments of the gastrointestinal tract. In conclusion, the histological features of the gastrointestinal tract of A. b. bicolor are consistent with the feeding habit of a carnivorous fish.

  20. Draft Genome Sequence of Bifidobacterium lemurum DSM 28807T Isolated from the Gastrointestinal Tracts of Ring-Tailed Lemurs (Lemur catta)

    PubMed Central

    Toh, Hidehiro; Matsubara, Takehiro; Tomida, Shuta; Mimura, Iyo; Arakawa, Kensuke; Kikusui, Takefumi

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bifidobacterium lemurum DSM 28807T was isolated from the gastrointestinal tracts of ring-tailed lemurs (Lemur catta). Here, we report the first draft genome sequence of this organism. PMID:28232445

  1. Draft Genome Sequence of Bifidobacterium lemurum DSM 28807(T) Isolated from the Gastrointestinal Tracts of Ring-Tailed Lemurs (Lemur catta).

    PubMed

    Toh, Hidehiro; Matsubara, Takehiro; Tomida, Shuta; Mimura, Iyo; Arakawa, Kensuke; Kikusui, Takefumi; Morita, Hidetoshi

    2017-02-23

    Bifidobacterium lemurum DSM 28807(T) was isolated from the gastrointestinal tracts of ring-tailed lemurs (Lemur catta). Here, we report the first draft genome sequence of this organism. Copyright © 2017 Toh et al.

  2. Utility of models of the gastrointestinal tract for assessment of the digestion and absorption of engineered nanomaterials released from food matrices.

    PubMed

    Lefebvre, David E; Venema, Koen; Gombau, Lourdes; Valerio, Luis G; Raju, Jayadev; Bondy, Genevieve S; Bouwmeester, Hans; Singh, R Paul; Clippinger, Amy J; Collnot, Eva-Maria; Mehta, Rekha; Stone, Vicki

    2015-05-01

    Engineered metal/mineral, lipid and biochemical macromolecule nanomaterials (NMs) have potential applications in food. Methodologies for the assessment of NM digestion and bioavailability in the gastrointestinal tract are nascent and require refinement. A working group was tasked by the International Life Sciences Institute NanoRelease Food Additive project to review existing models of the gastrointestinal tract in health and disease, and the utility of these models for the assessment of the uptake of NMs intended for food. Gastrointestinal digestion and absorption could be addressed in a tiered approach using in silico computational models, in vitro non-cellular fluid systems and in vitro cell culture models, after which the necessity of ex vivo organ culture and in vivo animal studies can be considered. Examples of NM quantification in gastrointestinal tract fluids and tissues are emerging; however, few standardized analytical techniques are available. Coupling of these techniques to gastrointestinal models, along with further standardization, will further strengthen methodologies for risk assessment.

  3. Taste and move: glucose and peptide transporters in the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Daniel, Hannelore; Zietek, Tamara

    2015-12-01

    What is the topic of this review? Nutrient absorption in the gastrointestinal tract requires membrane proteins embedded in the apical membrane of epithelial cells that allow bulk quantities of nutrients, such as monosaccharides and amino acids, to be moved into epithelial cells. Very recently, a new function of the transporters as nutrient sensors mediating peptide hormone release from enteroendocrine cells has been discovered. What advances does it highlight? The review covers recent advances in membrane transporter functions for the absorption and sensing of dietary peptides and sugars and their putative interplay. Nutrient transporters are integral membrane proteins responsible for uptake into enterocytes and release of nutrients into the circulation. Absorption of food breakdown products, such as fatty acids, monosaccharides or amino acids, requires high-capacity transporters. In the case of glucose, amino acids and peptides, the transporters are electrogenic in nature, coupling substrate flux to ion movement. While glucose absorption is mediated by the Na(+)-dependent SGLT1 protein, uptake of short-chain peptides is mediated by the H(+)-coupled PEPT1 protein. Interestingly, both transporters were recently shown to fulfil an additional role as intestinal 'sensors' in enteroendocrine cells, mediating the release of gastrointestinal peptide hormones into the circulation. Sensing of D-glucose and of di- and tripeptides is particularly relevant for the secretion of the incretins glucose-dependent insulinotrophic polypeptide and glucagon-like peptide 1 that promote insulin output from β-cells and mediate β-cell protection. In addition to these sensing pathways, a variety of G-protein-coupled receptors are involved in sensing of intestinal contents. D-Glucose is sensed not only by SGLT1 but also by the sweet taste receptor T1R2/3 expressed in enteroendocrine cells. Activation of T1R2/3 increases SGLT1 levels and intestinal glucose absorption. Although T1R2

  4. Inflammatory fibroid polyps of the gastrointestinal tract: evidence for a dendritic cell origin.

    PubMed

    Pantanowitz, Liron; Antonioli, Donald A; Pinkus, Geraldine S; Shahsafaei, Ali; Odze, Robert D

    2004-01-01

    Inflammatory fibroid polyps (IFPs) are rare mesenchymal tumors of the gastrointestinal tract that consist of spindle-shaped stromal cells and an inflammatory infiltrate rich in eosinophils. Their etiology and histogenesis remain unknown. Based on previous reports of their immunoreactivity for CD34 and c-kit biomarkers, IFPs have been thought to be related to gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs). After reviewing the current literature and examining IFPs at the light microscopic level, we evaluated a series of IFPs using an extensive panel of immunohistochemical and in situ hybridization markers in an effort to gain insight into their etiology and histogenesis and to determine their true relationship to GISTs. Sixteen routinely processed IFP specimens (14 gastric, 1 ileal, and 1 rectal) were immunohistochemically stained for antibodies to CD34, HMB-45, desmin, smooth muscle actin, calponin, h-caldesmon, anaplastic lymphoma kinase, S-100 protein, epithelial membrane antigen, c-kit (CD117), stem cell factor (SCF/N19 or kit ligand), p53, bcl-2, cyclin D1, and human herpesvirus-8 (HHV8). In situ hybridization for Epstein-Barr virus-encoded RNA (EBER) was also performed. Ten cases were further evaluated for the dendritic cell markers fascin, CD21, CD23, and CD35. Stromal cells were diffusely positive for CD34 and fascin in all (100%) cases, and these stromal cells were, in addition, immunoreactive for calponin and smooth muscle actin in 88% and 25% of cases, respectively. CD35 was also found to be focally reactive in the stromal cells. Cyclin-D1 was overexpressed in all (100%) IFPs. All other immunohistochemical markers and EBER were negative in the stromal cells. These findings suggest that the proliferating stromal cells in IFPs are of dendritic cell origin, with some cases also exhibiting myofibroblastic features. Absence of c-kit, SCF, and h-caldesmon immunoreactivity fails to support a relationship to GISTs. We also conclude that Epstein Barr virus and HHV8 are

  5. Association between oxidative status and the composition of intestinal microbiota along the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Gyuraszova, Marianna; Kovalcikova, Alexandra; Gardlik, Roman

    2017-06-01

    Studies have shown that the microbiota along the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) plays an important role when it comes to the maintenance of its proper functions. Many studies exist that have analyzed the composition of the bacterial community in the different regions of the GIT of humans and model animals. Microbial imbalance leads to several systemic disorders, including cardiovascular and renal disease. The imbalance between the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and their elimination by antioxidants leads to oxidative stress. Oxidative stress plays an important role in a variety of physiological processes, as well as disease. The continuous formation of ROS in the GIT is the result of the interaction between intestinal mucosa, symbiotic bacteria and dietary factors. It has also been proven that ROS play a role in the pathogenesis of several GI disorders, including IBD. We hypothesized that the levels of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) would be the highest in the ileum, caecum or colon, where the microbiota mostly consist of butyrate producing bacteria, Bacterioides, Clostridium, Ruminococcus or Bifidobacterium, which derive energy through carbohydrate fermentation. We also assumed that advanced oxidation protein products (AOPP) mostly act in the segments, where bacteria reside and which are responsible for the amino acid fermentation, such as caecum or colon. Lipid hydroxyperoxides are generated during digestion in the stomach, which contains absorbed oxygen and has a low pH. According to this we hypothesized that the highest concentration of thiobarbituric acid reacting substances (TBARS) could be in the stomach, which, however, has not been confirmed. Because Lactobacilli are able to produce catalase, an endogenous antioxidant, and are abundant in the small intestine, we hypothesized that antioxidant capacity (measured by ferric reducing ability) would be the highest here. The highest levels of AGEs were found in the caecum. The highest level of

  6. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration for suspected malignancies adjacent to the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Gambitta, Pietro; Armellino, Antonio; Forti, Edoardo; Vertemati, Maurizio; Colombo, Paola Enrica; Aseni, Paolo

    2014-07-14

    To investigate the impact of endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) in association with a multidisciplinary team evaluation for the detection of gastrointestinal malignancies. A cohort of 1019 patients with suspected malignant lesions adjacent to the gastrointestinal tract received EUS-FNA after a standardized multidisciplinary team evaluation (MTE) and were divided into 4 groups according to their specific malignant risk score (MRS). Patients with a MRS of 0 (without detectable risk of malignancy) received only EUS without FNA. For patients with a MRS score ranging from 1 (low risk) - through 2 (intermediate risk) - to 3 (high risk), EUS-FNA cytology of the lesion was planned for a different time and was prioritized for those patients at higher risk for cancer. The accuracy, efficiency and quality assessment for the early detection of patients with potentially curable malignant lesions were evaluated for the whole cohort and in the different classes of MRSs. The time to definitive cytological diagnosis (TDCD), accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, and the rate of inconclusive tests were calculated for all patients and for each MRS group. A total of 1019 patients with suspected malignant lesions were evaluated by EUS-FNA. In 515 patients of 616 with true malignant lesions the tumor was diagnosed by EUS-FNA; 421 patients with resectable lesions received early surgical treatment, and 94 patients received chemo-radiotherapy. The overall diagnostic accuracy for the 1019 lesions in which a final diagnosis was obtained by EUS-FNA was 0.95. When patients were stratified by MTE into 4 classes of MRSs, a higher rate of patients in the group with higher cancer risk (MRS-3) received early treatment and EUS-FNA showed the highest level of accuracy (1.0). TDCD was also shorter in the MRS-3 group. The number of patients who received surgical treatment or chemo-radiotherapy was significantly higher in the MRS-3 patient

  7. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration for suspected malignancies adjacent to the gastrointestinal tract

    PubMed Central

    Gambitta, Pietro; Armellino, Antonio; Forti, Edoardo; Vertemati, Maurizio; Colombo, Paola Enrica; Aseni, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the impact of endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) in association with a multidisciplinary team evaluation for the detection of gastrointestinal malignancies. METHODS: A cohort of 1019 patients with suspected malignant lesions adjacent to the gastrointestinal tract received EUS-FNA after a standardized multidisciplinary team evaluation (MTE) and were divided into 4 groups according to their specific malignant risk score (MRS). Patients with a MRS of 0 (without detectable risk of malignancy) received only EUS without FNA. For patients with a MRS score ranging from 1 (low risk) - through 2 (intermediate risk) - to 3 (high risk), EUS-FNA cytology of the lesion was planned for a different time and was prioritized for those patients at higher risk for cancer. The accuracy, efficiency and quality assessment for the early detection of patients with potentially curable malignant lesions were evaluated for the whole cohort and in the different classes of MRSs. The time to definitive cytological diagnosis (TDCD), accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, and the rate of inconclusive tests were calculated for all patients and for each MRS group. RESULTS: A total of 1019 patients with suspected malignant lesions were evaluated by EUS-FNA. In 515 patients of 616 with true malignant lesions the tumor was diagnosed by EUS-FNA; 421 patients with resectable lesions received early surgical treatment, and 94 patients received chemo-radiotherapy. The overall diagnostic accuracy for the 1019 lesions in which a final diagnosis was obtained by EUS-FNA was 0.95. When patients were stratified by MTE into 4 classes of MRSs, a higher rate of patients in the group with higher cancer risk (MRS-3) received early treatment and EUS-FNA showed the highest level of accuracy (1.0). TDCD was also shorter in the MRS-3 group. The number of patients who received surgical treatment or chemo-radiotherapy was significantly

  8. An efficient nano-based theranostic system for multi-modal imaging-guided photothermal sterilization in gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhen; Liu, Jianhua; Wang, Rui; Du, Yingda; Ren, Jinsong; Qu, Xiaogang

    2015-07-01

    Since understanding the healthy status of gastrointestinal tract (GI tract) is of vital importance, clinical implementation for GI tract-related disease have attracted much more attention along with the rapid development of modern medicine. Here, a multifunctional theranostic system combining X-rays/CT/photothermal/photoacoustic mapping of GI tract and imaging-guided photothermal anti-bacterial treatment is designed and constructed. PEGylated W18O49 nanosheets (PEG-W18O49) are created via a facile solvothermal method and an in situ probe-sonication approach. In terms of excellent colloidal stability, low cytotoxicity, and neglectable hemolysis of PEG-W18O49, we demonstrate the first example of high-performance four-modal imaging of GI tract by using these nanosheets as contrast agents. More importantly, due to their intrinsic absorption of NIR light, glutaraldehyde-modified PEG-W18O49 are successfully applied as fault-free targeted photothermal agents for imaging-guided killing of bacteria on a mouse infection model. Critical to pre-clinical and clinical prospects, long-term toxicity is further investigated after oral administration of these theranostic agents. These kinds of tungsten-based nanomaterials exhibit great potential as multi-modal contrast agents for directed visualization of GI tract and anti-bacterial agents for phothothermal sterilization.

  9. Silica-coated bismuth sulfide nanorods as multimodal contrast agents for a non-invasive visualization of the gastrointestinal tract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Xiaopeng; Shi, Junxin; Bu, Yang; Tian, Gan; Zhang, Xiao; Yin, Wenyan; Gao, Bifen; Yang, Zhiyong; Hu, Zhongbo; Liu, Xiangfeng; Yan, Liang; Gu, Zhanjun; Zhao, Yuliang

    2015-07-01

    Non-invasive and real-time imaging of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract is particularly desirable for research and clinical studies of patients with symptoms arising from gastrointestinal diseases. Here, we designed and fabricated silica-coated bismuth sulfide nanorods (Bi2S3@SiO2 NRs) for a non-invasive spatial-temporally imaging of the GI tract. The Bi2S3 NRs were synthesized by a facile solvothermal method and then coated with a SiO2 layer to improve their biocompatibility and stability in the harsh environments of the GI tract, such as the stomach and the small intestine. Due to their strong X-ray- and near infrared-absorption abilities, we demonstrate that, following oral administration in mice, the Bi2S3@SiO2 NRs can be used as a dual-modal contrast agent for the real-time and non-invasive visualization of NRs distribution and the GI tract via both X-ray computed tomography (CT) and photoacoustic tomography (PAT) techniques. Importantly, integration of PAT with CT provides complementary information on anatomical details with high spatial resolution. In addition, we use Caenorhabditis Elegans (C. Elegans) as a simple model organism to investigate the biological response of Bi2S3@SiO2 NRs by oral administration. The results indicate that these NRs can pass through the GI tract of C. Elegans without inducing notable toxicological effects. The above results suggest that Bi2S3@SiO2 NRs pave an alternative way for the fabrication of multi-modal contrast agents which integrate CT and PAT modalities for a direct and non-invasive visualization of the GI tract with low toxicity.Non-invasive and real-time imaging of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract is particularly desirable for research and clinical studies of patients with symptoms arising from gastrointestinal diseases. Here, we designed and fabricated silica-coated bismuth sulfide nanorods (Bi2S3@SiO2 NRs) for a non-invasive spatial-temporally imaging of the GI tract. The Bi2S3 NRs were synthesized by a facile

  10. Delayed evacuatory function due to specific smooth muscle reactivity in the gastrointestinal tracts of tacrine-treated rats.

    PubMed

    Krustev, A; Sirakov, V; Turiiski, V; Getova, D; Velkova, K; Prissadova, N

    2008-01-01

    Most of the side effects induced by tacrine are associated with the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. The aim of the study was to analyze the nature of radiographically registered, tacrine-induced changes in evacuatory function, as well as to find a possible correlation with the immediate in vitro action of the drug on smooth muscles from the GI tracts of rats. The tacrine dose we used reliably delayed GI passage: contrast matter was not fully evacuated, predominantly from the stomach and cecum. The delay resulted from changes in tone and peristaltic activity, specific for the various regions of the tract. These changes were associated with a superposing of the responses due to the anticholinesterase and noncholinergic action of tacrine.

  11. Effect of surface chemistry on nanoparticle interaction with gastrointestinal mucus and distribution in the gastrointestinal tract following oral and rectal administration in the mouse

    PubMed Central

    Maisel, Katharina; Ensign, Laura; Reddy, Mihika; Cone, Richard; Hanes, Justin

    2014-01-01

    It is believed that mucoadhesive surface properties on particles delivered to the gastrointestinal (GI) tract improve oral absorption or local targeting of various difficult-to-deliver drug classes. To test the effect of nanoparticle mucoadhesion on distribution of nanoparticles in the GI tract, we orally and rectally administered nano- and microparticles that we confirmed possessed surfaces that were either strongly mucoadhesive or non-mucoadhesive. We found that mucoadhesive particles (MAP) aggregated in mucus in the center of the GI lumen, far away from the absorptive epithelium, both in healthy mice and in a mouse model of ulcerative colitis (UC). In striking contrast, water absorption by the GI tract rapidly and uniformly transported non-mucoadhesive mucus-penetrating particles (MPP) to epithelial surfaces, including reaching the surfaces between villi in the small intestine. When using high gavage fluid volumes or injection into ligated intestinal loops, common methods for assessing oral drug and nanoparticle absorption, we found that both MAP and MPP became well-distributed throughout the intestine, indicating that the barrier properties of GI mucus were compromised. In the mouse colorectum, MPP penetrated into mucus in the deeply in-folded surfaces to evenly coat the entire epithelial surface. Moreover, in a mouse model of UC, MPP were transported preferentially into the disrupted, ulcerated tissue. Our results suggest that delivering drugs in non-mucoadhesive MPP is likely to provide enhanced particle distribution, and thus drug delivery, in the GI tract, including to ulcerated tissues. PMID:25449804

  12. Vasohibin-2 modulates tumor onset in the gastrointestinal tract by normalizing tumor angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    propose that VASH2 may modulate the onset of tumors in the gastrointestinal tract by regulating tumor angiogenesis. PMID:24885408

  13. Digestion of fat and fatty acids along the gastrointestinal tract of broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Tancharoenrat, P; Ravindran, V; Zaefarian, F; Ravindran, G

    2014-02-01

    Two experiments were conducted. The first experiment investigated the digestion of fat and fatty acids (FA) from soybean oil and tallow along the gastrointestinal tract of broiler chickens. The second experiment was conducted to determine endogenous fat and FA losses and the FA profile of chicken bile. In experiment 1, 2-wk-old broilers were fed corn-soy diets supplemented with 50 g/kg of soybean oil or tallow for 7 d and digesta were collected from the duodenum, upper jejunum, upper ileum, and lower ileum. Apparent digestibility coefficients were calculated using the titanium marker ratio in diets, and digesta. Digestibility of fat was determined to be negative in the duodenum, indicating marked net secretion of fat into this segment. Fat was rapidly digested in the jejunum, with digestibility coefficients of 0.60 to 0.64 being determined at the end of the jejunum. The digestion of fat continued in the upper ileum. The apparent digestibility coefficient of fat determined at lower ileum in soybean oil diets was higher (P < 0.05) than that in tallow diets (0.82 vs. 0.74). Linoleic acid was digested throughout the intestinal tract, whereas the digestion of palmitic, stearic, and oleic acids started only in the jejunum. Measurements at the lower ileal level showed that the unsaturated FA (linoleic and oleic acids) were well digested (0.90 to 0.94), irrespective of the source of fat. In contrast, the digestibility of saturated FA (palmitic and stearic acids) was influenced (P < 0.05) by the fat source. Digestibility coefficients of palmitic and stearic acids at lower ileum were markedly higher (P < 0.05) in the diet containing soybean oil (0.77 to 0.85) compared with that containing tallow (0.58 to 0.68). In experiment 2, ileal endogenous fat loss was determined to be 1,714 mg/kg of DM intake. Endogenous fat was composed mainly of palmitic (75 g/kg), stearic (131 g/kg), oleic (73 g/kg), linoleic (133 g/kg), and arachidonic (60 g/kg) acids. Fatty acid profile of

  14. Histopathological and parasitological study of the gastrointestinal tract of dogs naturally infected with Leishmania infantum

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to provide a systematic pathological and parasitological overview of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT), including the stomach, duodenum, jejunum, ileum, caecum and colon, of dogs naturally infected with Leishmania. Methods Twenty mongrel dogs naturally infected with Leishmania (Leishmania) infantum and obtained from the Control Zoonosis Center of the Municipality of Ribeirão das Neves, Belo Horizonte Metropolitan area, Minas Gerais (MG) state, Brazil, were analyzed. The dogs were divided into two groups: Group 1 comprised nine clinically normal dogs and group 2 comprised 11 clinically affected dogs. After necropsy, one sample was collected from each GIT segment, namely the stomach, duodenum, jejunum, ileum, caecum and colon. Furthermore, paraffin-embedded samples were used for histological and parasitological (immunohistochemistry) evaluation and a morphometrical study were carried out to determine the parasite load (immunolabeled amastigote forms of Leishmania). The Friedman and the Mann Whitney tests were used for statistical analysis. The Friedman test was used to analyze each segment of the GIT within each group of dogs and the Mann Whitney test was used to compare the GIT segments between clinically unaffected and affected dogs. Results The infected dogs had an increased number of macrophages, plasma cells and lymphocytes, but lesions were generally mild. Parasite distribution in the GIT was evident in all intestinal segments and layers of the intestinal wall (mucosal, muscular and submucosal) irrespective of the clinical status of the dogs. However, the parasite load was statistically higher in the caecum and colon than in other segments of the GIT. Conclusion The high parasite burden evident throughout the GIT mucosa with only mild pathological alterations led us to consider whether Leishmania gains an advantage from the intestinal immunoregulatory response (immunological tolerance). PMID:22166041

  15. Randomized pragmatic trial of nasogastric tube placement in patients with upper gastrointestinal tract bleeding.

    PubMed

    Rockey, Don C; Ahn, Chul; de Melo, Silvio W

    2017-04-01

    The value of nasogastric (NG) tube placement in patients with upper gastrointestinal tract bleeding (UGIB) is unclear. We therefore aimed to determine the usefulness of NG tube placement in patients with UGIB. The study was a single-blind, randomized, prospective, non-inferiority study comparing NG placement (with aspiration and lavage) to no NG placement (control). The primary outcome was the probability that physicians could predict the presence of a high-risk lesion (ie, requiring endoscopic therapy). 140 patients in each arm were included; baseline clinical features were similar in each group. The probability that there would be a high-risk lesion in the control arm was predicted to be 35% compared with 39% in the NG arm (after NG placement)-a probability difference of -4% (95% CI -12% to 3%), which confirmed non-inferiority of the 2 arms (p=0.002). All patients underwent endoscopy and all patients with high-risk lesions had endoscopic therapy. Physicians predicted the specific culprit lesion in 38% (53/140) and 39% (55/140) of patients in the control and NG (after NG placement) groups, respectively. The presence of coffee grounds or red blood in the NG aspirate did not change physician assessments. Pain, nasal bleeding, or failure of NG occurred in 47/140 (34%) patients. There were no differences in rebleeding rates or mortality. In patients with acute UGIB, the ability of physicians to predict culprit bleeding lesions and/or the presence of high-risk lesions was poor. Routine NG placement did not improve physician's predictive ability, did not affect outcomes, and was complicated in one-third of patients. NCT00689754. Copyright © 2017 American Federation for Medical Research.

  16. Survivin −31G>C Polymorphism and Gastrointestinal Tract Cancer Risk: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yan; Li, Lin; Qi, Haiyan; Gao, Yan; Liu, Sha; Xu, Chongan

    2013-01-01

    Background Emerging evidence showed that common functional −31G>C polymorphism (rs9904341 G>C) in the promoter region of the survivin gene is involved in the regulation of survivin expression, thus increasing an individual’s susceptibility to gastrointestinal tract (GIT) cancer; but individually published results are inconclusive. The aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to derive a more precise estimation of the association between survivin −31G>C polymorphism and GIT cancer risk. Methods A literature search of PubMed, Embase, Web of Science and CBM databases was conducted from inception through July 1st, 2012. Crude odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were used to assess the strength of association. Results Nine case-control studies were included with a total of 2,231 GIT cancer cases and 2,287 healthy controls. The results indicated that survivin −31G>C polymorphism was associated with increased risk of GIT cancer. In the stratified analysis by cancer types, significant associations were observed between survivin −31G>C polymorphism and increased risk of colorectal and gastric cancers. However, the lack of association of survivin −31G>C polymorphism with esophageal cancer risk may be due to a lack of a sufficient number of eligible studies and the influence of different genetic and environmental factors. Conclusion Results from the current meta-analysis suggests that survivin −31G>C polymorphism might increase the risk of GIT cancer, especially among gastric and colorectal cancers. PMID:23405077

  17. Chemical coding and chemosensory properties of cholinergic brush cells in the mouse gastrointestinal and biliary tract

    PubMed Central

    Schütz, Burkhard; Jurastow, Innokentij; Bader, Sandra; Ringer, Cornelia; von Engelhardt, Jakob; Chubanov, Vladimir; Gudermann, Thomas; Diener, Martin; Kummer, Wolfgang; Krasteva-Christ, Gabriela; Weihe, Eberhard

    2015-01-01

    The mouse gastro-intestinal and biliary tract mucosal epithelia harbor choline acetyltransferase (ChAT)-positive brush cells with taste cell-like traits. With the aid of two transgenic mouse lines that express green fluorescent protein (EGFP) under the control of the ChAT promoter (EGFPChAT) and by using in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry we found that EGFPChAT cells were clustered in the epithelium lining the gastric groove. EGFPChAT cells were numerous in the gall bladder and bile duct, and found scattered as solitary cells along the small and large intestine. While all EGFPChAT cells were also ChAT-positive, expression of the high-affinity choline transporter (ChT1) was never detected. Except for the proximal colon, EGFPChAT cells also lacked detectable expression of the vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT). EGFPChAT cells were found to be separate from enteroendocrine cells, however they were all immunoreactive for cytokeratin 18 (CK18), transient receptor potential melastatin-like subtype 5 channel (TRPM5), and for cyclooxygenases 1 (COX1) and 2 (COX2). The ex vivo stimulation of colonic EGFPChAT cells with the bitter substance denatonium resulted in a strong increase in intracellular calcium, while in other epithelial cells such an increase was significantly weaker and also timely delayed. Subsequent stimulation with cycloheximide was ineffective in both cell populations. Given their chemical coding and chemosensory properties, EGFPChAT brush cells thus may have integrative functions and participate in induction of protective reflexes and inflammatory events by utilizing ACh and prostaglandins for paracrine signaling. PMID:25852573

  18. Nutritional programming of gastrointestinal tract development. Is the pig a good model for man?

    PubMed

    Guilloteau, Paul; Zabielski, Romuald; Hammon, Harald M; Metges, Cornelia C

    2010-06-01

    The consequences of early-life nutritional programming in man and other mammalian species have been studied chiefly at the metabolic level. Very few studies, if any, have been performed in the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) as the target organ, but extensive GIT studies are needed since the GIT plays a key role in nutrient supply and has an impact on functions of the entire organism. The possible deleterious effects of nutritional programming at the metabolic level were discovered following epidemiological studies in human subjects, and confirmed in animal models. Investigating the impact of programming on GIT structure and function would need appropriate animal models due to ethical restrictions in the use of human subjects. The aim of the present review is to discuss the use of pigs as an animal model as a compromise between ethically acceptable animal studies and the requirement of data which can be interpolated to the human situation. In nutritional programming studies, rodents are the most frequently used model for man, but GIT development and digestive function in rodents are considerably different from those in man. In that aspect, the pig GIT is much closer to the human than that of rodents. The swine species is closely comparable with man in many nutritional and digestive aspects, and thus provides ample opportunity to be used in investigations on the consequences of nutritional programming for the GIT. In particular, the 'sow-piglets' dyad could be a useful tool to simulate the 'human mother-infant' dyad in studies which examine short-, middle- and long-term effects and is suggested as the reference model.

  19. Design of a video capsule endoscopy system with low-power ASIC for monitoring gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Liu, Gang; Yan, Guozheng; Zhu, Bingquan; Lu, Li

    2016-11-01

    In recent years, wireless capsule endoscopy (WCE) has been a state-of-the-art tool to examine disorders of the human gastrointestinal tract painlessly. However, system miniaturization, enhancement of the image-data transfer rate and power consumption reduction for the capsule are still key challenges. In this paper, a video capsule endoscopy system with a low-power controlling and processing application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) is designed and fabricated. In the design, these challenges are resolved by employing a microimage sensor, a novel radio frequency transmitter with an on-off keying modulation rate of 20 Mbps, and an ASIC structure that includes a clock management module, a power-efficient image compression module and a power management unit. An ASIC-based prototype capsule, which measures Φ11 mm × 25 mm, has been developed here. Test results show that the designed ASIC consumes much less power than most of the other WCE systems and that its total power consumption per frame is the least. The image compression module can realize high near-lossless compression rate (3.69) and high image quality (46.2 dB). The proposed system supports multi-spectral imaging, including white light imaging and autofluorescence imaging, at a maximum frame rate of 24 fps and with a resolution of 400 × 400. Tests and in vivo trials in pigs have proved the feasibility of the entire system, but further improvements in capsule control and compression performance inside the ASIC are needed in the future.

  20. Mucoadhesion of polystyrene nanoparticles having surface hydrophilic polymeric chains in the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Sakuma, S; Sudo, R; Suzuki, N; Kikuchi, H; Akashi, M; Hayashi, M

    1999-01-25

    The mucoadhesion of polystyrene nanoparticles having surface hydrophilic polymeric chains in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract was investigated in rats. Radiolabeled nanoparticles were synthesized by adding hydrophobic 3-(trifluoromethyl)-3-(m-[125I]iodophenyl)diazirine in the final process of nanoparticle preparation. The radioiodonated diazirine seemed to be incorporated in the hydrophobic polystyrene core of nanoparticles. The incorporation rate was less than 10%, irrespective of nanoparticle type. The diazirine incorporated in nanoparticles exhibited little leakage from them even though they were mixed with a solution corresponding to GI juice. The change in blood ionized calcium concentration after oral administration of salmon calcitonin (sCT) with nanoparticles showed that the in vivo enhancement of sCT absorption by radiolabeled nanoparticles was the same as that by non-labeled nanoparticles. The GI transit rates of nanoparticles having surface poly(N-isopropylacrylamide), poly(vinylamine) and poly(methacrylic acid) chains, which can improve sCT absorption, were slower than that of nanoparticles covered by poly(N-vinylacetamide), which does not enhance sCT absorption at all. These slow transit rates were probably the result of mucoadhesion of nanoparticles. The strength of mucoadhesion depended on the structure of the hydrophilic polymeric chains on the nanoparticle surface. The mucoadhesion of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) nanoparticles, which most strongly enhanced sCT absorption, was stronger than that of ionic nanoparticles, and poly(N-vinylacetamide) nanoparticles probably did not adhere to the GI mucosa. These findings demonstrated that there is a good correlation between mucoadhesion and enhancement of sCT absorption.

  1. Age and Gender Affect the Composition of Fungal Population of the Human Gastrointestinal Tract

    PubMed Central

    Strati, Francesco; Di Paola, Monica; Stefanini, Irene; Albanese, Davide; Rizzetto, Lisa; Lionetti, Paolo; Calabrò, Antonio; Jousson, Olivier; Donati, Claudio; Cavalieri, Duccio; De Filippo, Carlotta

    2016-01-01

    The fungal component of the human gut microbiota has been neglected for long time due to the low relative abundance of fungi with respect to bacteria, and only recently few reports have explored its composition and dynamics in health or disease. The application of metagenomics methods to the full understanding of fungal communities is currently limited by the under representation of fungal DNA with respect to the bacterial one, as well as by the limited ability to discriminate passengers from colonizers. Here, we investigated the gut mycobiota of a cohort of healthy subjects in order to reduce the gap of knowledge concerning fungal intestinal communities in the healthy status further screening for phenotypical traits that could reflect fungi adaptation to the host. We studied the fecal fungal populations of 111 healthy subjects by means of cultivation on fungal selective media and by amplicon-based ITS1 metagenomics analysis on a subset of 57 individuals. We then characterized the isolated fungi for their tolerance to gastrointestinal (GI) tract-like challenges and their susceptibility to antifungals. A total of 34 different fungal species were isolated showing several phenotypic characteristics associated with intestinal environment such as tolerance to body temperature (37°C), to acidic and oxidative stress, and to bile salts exposure. We found a high frequency of azoles resistance in fungal isolates, with potential and significant clinical impact. Analyses of fungal communities revealed that the human gut mycobiota differs in function of individuals' life stage in a gender-related fashion. The combination of metagenomics and fungal cultivation allowed an in-depth understanding of the fungal intestinal community structure associated to the healthy status and the commensalism-related traits of isolated fungi. We further discussed comparatively the results of sequencing and cultivation to critically evaluate the application of metagenomics-based approaches to

  2. Diet-induced regulation of bitter taste receptor subtypes in the mouse gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Vegezzi, Gaia; Anselmi, Laura; Huynh, Jennifer; Barocelli, Elisabetta; Rozengurt, Enrique; Raybould, Helen; Sternini, Catia

    2014-01-01

    Bitter taste receptors and signaling molecules, which detect bitter taste in the mouth, are expressed in the gut mucosa. In this study, we tested whether two distinct bitter taste receptors, the bitter taste receptor 138 (T2R138), selectively activated by isothiocyanates, and the broadly tuned bitter taste receptor 108 (T2R108) are regulated by luminal content. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis showed that T2R138 transcript is more abundant in the colon than the small intestine and lowest in the stomach, whereas T2R108 mRNA is more abundant in the stomach compared to the intestine. Both transcripts in the stomach were markedly reduced by fasting and restored to normal levels after 4 hours re-feeding. A cholesterol-lowering diet, mimicking a diet naturally low in cholesterol and rich in bitter substances, increased T2R138 transcript, but not T2R108, in duodenum and jejunum, and not in ileum and colon. Long-term ingestion of high-fat diet increased T2R138 RNA, but not T2R108, in the colon. Similarly, α-gustducin, a bitter taste receptor signaling molecule, was reduced by fasting in the stomach and increased by lowering cholesterol in the small intestine and by high-fat diet in the colon. These data show that both short and long term changes in the luminal contents alter expression of bitter taste receptors and associated signaling molecules in the mucosa, supporting the proposed role of bitter taste receptors in luminal chemosensing in the gastrointestinal tract. Bitter taste receptors might serve as regulatory and defensive mechanism to control gut function and food intake and protect the body from the luminal environment.

  3. Live probiotic cultures and the gastrointestinal tract: symbiotic preservation of tolerance whilst attenuating pathogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Vitetta, Luis; Hall, Sean; Linnane, Anthony W.

    2014-01-01

    Bacteria comprise the earliest form of independent life on this planet. Bacterial development has included co-operative symbiosis with plants (e.g., Leguminosae family and nitrogen fixing bacteria in soil) and animals (e.g., the gut microbiome). A fusion event of two prokaryotes evolutionarily gave rise to the eukaryote cell in which mitochondria may be envisaged as a genetically functional mosaic, a relic from one of the prokaryote cells. The discovery of bacterial inhibitors such chloramphenicol and others has been exploited to highlight mitochondria as arising from a bacterial progenitor. As such the evolution of human life has been complexly connected to bacterial activity. This is embodied, by the appearance of mitochondria in eukaryotes (alphaproteobacteria contribution), a significant endosymbiotic evolutionary event. During the twentieth century there was an increasing dependency on anti-microbials as mainline therapy against bacterial infections. It is only comparatively recently that the essential roles played by the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) microbiome in animal health and development has been recognized as opposed to the GIT microbiome being a toxic collection of micro-organisms. It is now well-documented that the GIT microbiome is comprised of a complex cohort of commensal and potentially pathogenic bacteria. Microbial interactions in the GIT provide the necessary cues for the development of regulated signals [in part by reactive oxygen species (ROS)] that promote immunological tolerance, metabolic regulation and stability, and other factors, which may then help control local and extra-intestinal end organ (e.g., kidneys) physiology. Pharmacobiotics, the administration of live probiotic cultures is an exciting growth area of potential therapeutics, developing together with an increased scientific understanding of GIT microbiome symbiosis in health and disease. Hence probiotic bacteria may provide a therapeutic connect with the GIT microbiome that

  4. Can multidetector CT detect the site of gastrointestinal tract injury in trauma? – A retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Panda, Ananya; Kumar, Atin; Gamanagatti, Shivanand; Das, Ranjita; Paliwal, Swati; Gupta, Amit; Kumar, Subodh

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE We aimed to assess the performance of computed tomography (CT) in localizing site of traumatic gastrointestinal tract (GIT) injury and determine the diagnostic value of CT signs in site localization. METHODS CT scans of 97 patients with surgically proven GIT or mesenteric injuries were retrospectively reviewed by radiologists blinded to surgical findings. Diagnosis of either GIT or mesenteric injuries was made. In patients with GIT injuries, site of injury and presence of CT signs such as focal bowel wall hyperenhancement, hypoenhancement, wall discontinuity, wall thickening, extramural air, intramural air, perivisceral infiltration, and active vascular contrast leak were evaluated. RESULTS Out of 97 patients, 90 had GIT injuries (70 single site injuries and 20 multiple site injuries) and seven had isolated mesenteric injury. The overall concordance between CT and operative findings for exact site localization was 67.8% (61/90), partial concordance rate was 11.1% (10/90), and discordance rate was 21.1% (19/90). For single site localization, concordance rate was 77.1% (54/70), discordance rate was 21.4% (15/70), and partial concordance rate was 1.4% (1/70). In multiple site injury, concordance rate for all sites of injury was 35% (7/20), partial concordance rate was 45% (9/20), and discordance rate was 20% (4/20). For upper GIT injuries, wall discontinuity was the most accurate sign for localization. For small bowel injury, intramural air and hyperenhancement were the most specific signs for site localization, while for large bowel injury, wall discontinuity and hypoenhancement were the most specific signs. CONCLUSION CT performs better in diagnosing small bowel injury compared with large bowel injury. CT can well predict the presence of multiple site injury but has limited performance in exact localization of all injury sites. PMID:27924777

  5. Effects of Dietary Selenium on Inflammation and Hydrogen Sulfide in the Gastrointestinal Tract in Chickens.

    PubMed

    Wu, Cong; Xu, Zheng; Huang, Kehe

    2016-12-01

    Selenium (Se) is an essential trace element for humans and animals and is associated with many physiological functions. Previous studies have shown that low-Se diet may affect inflammatory cytokine productions and histology in the digestive system and that sulfide hydrogen (H2S) may contribute to the protection against tissue injury and the inhibition of inflammation in the gastrointestinal tract. In this study, we investigated the relationship between Se deficiency-induced inflammation and H2S production in the small intestine in chickens. One hundred twenty 1-day-old chickens were fed with diets with different Se concentrations (0.15 mg/kg in the control and 0.028 mg/kg in the low-Se-diet group). Chickens were euthanized and small intestinal tissues were extracted. We observed histology, measured H2S concentration, and evaluated the mRNA expression of H2S-producing enzymes cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE), cystathionine β-synthase (CBS), and 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase (3-MST), and inflammatory factors TNF-α, NF-κB p50, COX-2, and PTGES. Our results showed that chickens fed with low-Se diet exhibited histological changes, lower H2S production, and lower mRNA expression of H2S-producing enzymes (CSE, CBS, and 3-MST) whereas higher mRNA expression of intestinal inflammatory factors (TNF-α, NF-κB p50, COX-2, and PTGES) compared to controls. Our results indicate that low-Se diet could impact H2S, H2S-producing enzymes, and inflammatory factors in the small intestine, implying that Se is important in maintaining intestinal functions and H2S production is downregulated in Se deficiency-induced inflammation. The downregulation exacerbates the inflammation and impacts H2S-mediated intestinal functions.

  6. The ontogeny of alpha-fetoprotein gene expression in the mouse gastrointestinal tract

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    The ontogeny of alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) gene expression has been examined in the fetal and adult mouse gastrointestinal tract. AFP mRNA constitutes approximately 0.1% of total mRNA in the fetal gut. The transcripts were localized by in situ hybridization to the epithelial cells lining the villi of the fetal gut. At birth, AFP mRNA declines rapidly to achieve low adult basal levels, which are not affected by different alleles of raf, a gene that determines the adult basal level of AFP mRNA in the liver. The basal level in the adult gut is the consequence of continued AFP transcription in a small number of enteroendocrine cells that are distributed infrequently on the villi. These cells were identified by double antibody staining with antibodies to chromogranin A, an enteroendocrine cell marker and AFP. Previous studies resulted in the generation of a line of transgenic mice containing an internally deleted AFP gene that was greatly overexpressed in the fetal gut. The basis for the inappropriately high level expression of the transgene was shown to be the consequence of very high levels of transcription in the epithelial cells of the villi rather than to expression in inappropriate cell types. The cis-acting DNA sequences required for expression of the AFP gene in the gut were investigated using Caco-2 cells, a human colon adenocarcinoma cell line. These experiments indicated that, with one exception, the regulatory elements required in both the promoter and enhancer regions of the gene coincided with those that are necessary for high level expression in the liver. The one exception was enhancer II, located 5 kbp of DNA upstream of the gene, which exhibited no activity in Caco-2 cells. PMID:1691194

  7. Ex vivo optical coherence tomography and laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy imaging of murine gastrointestinal tract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hariri, Lida; Tumlinson, Alexandre R.; Wade, Norman; Besselsen, David; Utzinger, Urs; Gerner, Eugene; Barton, Jennifer

    2005-04-01

    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) and Laser Induced Fluorescence Spectroscopy (LIF) have separately been found to have clinical potential in identifying human gastrointestinal (GI) pathologies, yet their diagnostic capability in mouse models of human disease is unknown. We combine the two modalities to survey the GI tract of a variety of mouse strains and sample dysplasias and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) of the small and large intestine. Segments of duodenum and lower colon 2.5 cm in length and the entire esophagus from 10 mice each of two colon cancer models (ApcMin and AOM treated A/J) and two IBD models (Il-2 and Il-10) and 5 mice each of their respective controls were excised. OCT images and LIF spectra were obtained simultaneously from each tissue sample within 1 hour of extraction. Histology was used to classify tissue regions as normal, Peyer"s patch, dysplasia, adenoma, or IBD. Features in corresponding regions of OCT images were analyzed. Spectra from each of these categories were averaged and compared via the student's t-test. Features in OCT images correlated to histology in both normal and diseased tissue samples. In the diseased samples, OCT was able to identify early stages of mild colitis and dysplasia. In the sample of IBD, the LIF spectra displayed unique peaks at 635nm and 670nm, which were attributed to increased porphyrin production in the proliferating bacteria of the disease. These peaks have the potential to act as a diagnostic for IBD. OCT and LIF appear to be useful and complementary modalities for imaging mouse models.

  8. Live probiotic cultures and the gastrointestinal tract: symbiotic preservation of tolerance whilst attenuating pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Vitetta, Luis; Hall, Sean; Linnane, Anthony W

    2014-01-01

    Bacteria comprise the earliest form of independent life on this planet. Bacterial development has included co-operative symbiosis with plants (e.g., Leguminosae family and nitrogen fixing bacteria in soil) and animals (e.g., the gut microbiome). A fusion event of two prokaryotes evolutionarily gave rise to the eukaryote cell in which mitochondria may be envisaged as a genetically functional mosaic, a relic from one of the prokaryote cells. The discovery of bacterial inhibitors such chloramphenicol and others has been exploited to highlight mitochondria as arising from a bacterial progenitor. As such the evolution of human life has been complexly connected to bacterial activity. This is embodied, by the appearance of mitochondria in eukaryotes (alphaproteobacteria contribution), a significant endosymbiotic evolutionary event. During the twentieth century there was an increasing dependency on anti-microbials as mainline therapy against bacterial infections. It is only comparatively recently that the essential roles played by the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) microbiome in animal health and development has been recognized as opposed to the GIT microbiome being a toxic collection of micro-organisms. It is now well-documented that the GIT microbiome is comprised of a complex cohort of commensal and potentially pathogenic bacteria. Microbial interactions in the GIT provide the necessary cues for the development of regulated signals [in part by reactive oxygen species (ROS)] that promote immunological tolerance, metabolic regulation and stability, and other factors, which may then help control local and extra-intestinal end organ (e.g., kidneys) physiology. Pharmacobiotics, the administration of live probiotic cultures is an exciting growth area of potential therapeutics, developing together with an increased scientific understanding of GIT microbiome symbiosis in health and disease. Hence probiotic bacteria may provide a therapeutic connect with the GIT microbiome that

  9. Histopathological and parasitological study of the gastrointestinal tract of dogs naturally infected with Leishmania infantum.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Aldair J W; Figueiredo, Maria M; Silva, Fabiana L; Martins, Trycia; Michalick, Marilene S M; Tafuri, Washington L; Tafuri, Wagner L

    2011-12-13

    The aim of this study was to provide a systematic pathological and parasitological overview of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT), including the stomach, duodenum, jejunum, ileum, caecum and colon, of dogs naturally infected with Leishmania. Twenty mongrel dogs naturally infected with Leishmania (Leishmania) infantum and obtained from the Control Zoonosis Center of the Municipality of Ribeirão das Neves, Belo Horizonte Metropolitan area, Minas Gerais (MG) state, Brazil, were analyzed. The dogs were divided into two groups: Group 1 comprised nine clinically normal dogs and group 2 comprised 11 clinically affected dogs. After necropsy, one sample was collected from each GIT segment, namely the stomach, duodenum, jejunum, ileum, caecum and colon. Furthermore, paraffin-embedded samples were used for histological and parasitological (immunohistochemistry) evaluation and a morphometrical study were carried out to determine the parasite load (immunolabeled amastigote forms of Leishmania). The Friedman and the Mann Whitney tests were used for statistical analysis. The Friedman test was used to analyze each segment of the GIT within each group of dogs and the Mann Whitney test was used to compare the GIT segments between clinically unaffected and affected dogs. The infected dogs had an increased number of macrophages, plasma cells and lymphocytes, but lesions were generally mild. Parasite distribution in the GIT was evident in all intestinal segments and layers of the intestinal wall (mucosal, muscular and submucosal) irrespective of the clinical status of the dogs. However, the parasite load was statistically higher in the caecum and colon than in other segments of the GIT. The high parasite burden evident throughout the GIT mucosa with only mild pathological alterations led us to consider whether Leishmania gains an advantage from the intestinal immunoregulatory response (immunological tolerance).

  10. The use of BLT humanized mice to investigate the immune reconstitution of the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Wahl, Angela; Victor Garcia, J

    2014-08-01

    The gastrointestinal (GI) track represents an important battlefield where pathogens first try to gain entry into a host. It is also a universe where highly diverse and ever changing inhabitants co-exist in an exceptional equilibrium without parallel in any other organ system of the body. The gut as an organ has its own well-developed and fully functional immune organization that is similar and yet different in many important ways to the rest of the immune system. Both a compromised and an overactive immune system in the gut can have dire and severe consequences to human health. It has therefore been of great interest to develop animal models that recapitulate key aspects of the human condition to better understand the interplay of the host immune system with its friends and its foes. However, reconstitution of the GI tract in humanized mice has been difficult and highly variable in different systems. A better molecular understanding of the development of the gut immune system in mice has provided critical cues that have been recently used to develop novel humanized mouse models that fully recapitulate the genesis and key functions of the gut immune system of humans. Of particular interest is the presence of human gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT) aggregates in the gut of NOD/SCID BLT humanized mice that demonstrate the faithful development of bona fide human plasma cells capable of migrating to the lamina propria and producing human IgA1 and IgA2. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Functional consequences of microbial shifts in the human gastrointestinal tract linked to antibiotic treatment and obesity.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Ester; Bargiela, Rafael; Diez, María Suárez; Friedrichs, Anette; Pérez-Cobas, Ana Elena; Gosalbes, María José; Knecht, Henrik; Martínez-Martínez, Mónica; Seifert, Jana; von Bergen, Martin; Artacho, Alejandro; Ruiz, Alicia; Campoy, Cristina; Latorre, Amparo; Ott, Stephan J; Moya, Andrés; Suárez, Antonio; Martins dos Santos, Vitor A P; Ferrer, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    The microbiomes in the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) of individuals receiving antibiotics and those in obese subjects undergo compositional shifts, the metabolic effects and linkages of which are not clearly understood. Herein, we set to gain insight into these effects, particularly with regard to carbohydrate metabolism, and to contribute to unravel the underlying mechanisms and consequences for health conditions. We measured the activity level of GIT carbohydrate-active enzymes toward 23 distinct sugars in adults patients (n = 2) receiving 14-d β-lactam therapy and in obese (n = 7) and lean (n = 5) adolescents. We observed that both 14 d antibiotic-treated and obese subjects showed higher and less balanced sugar anabolic capacities, with 40% carbohydrates being preferentially processed as compared with non-treated and lean patients. Metaproteome-wide metabolic reconstructions confirmed that the impaired utilization of sugars propagated throughout the pentose phosphate metabolism, which had adverse consequences for the metabolic status of the GIT microbiota. The results point to an age-independent positive association between GIT glycosidase activity and the body mass index, fasting blood glucose and insulin resistance (r ( 2) ≥ 0.95). Moreover, antibiotics altered the active fraction of enzymes controlling the thickness, composition and consistency of the mucin glycans. Our data and analyses provide biochemical insights into the effects of antibiotic usage on the dynamics of the GIT microbiota and pin-point presumptive links to obesity. The knowledge and the hypotheses generated herein lay a foundation for subsequent, systematic research that will be paramount for the design of "smart" dietary and therapeutic interventions to modulate host-microbe metabolic co-regulation in intestinal homeostasis.

  12. Probiotics and respiratory and gastrointestinal tract infections in Finnish military conscripts - a randomised placebo-controlled double-blinded study.

    PubMed

    Kalima, K; Lehtoranta, L; He, L; Pitkäniemi, J; Lundell, R; Julkunen, I; Roivainen, M; Närkiö, M; Mäkelä, M J; Siitonen, S; Korpela, R; Pitkäranta, A

    2016-09-01

    Military conscripts are susceptible to respiratory and gastrointestinal tract infections. In previous studies probiotics have shown potency to reduce upper respiratory and gastrointestinal infections. The aim was to study whether probiotic intervention has an impact on seasonal occurrence of upper respiratory and gastrointestinal infections in two different conscript groups. In a randomised, double-blinded, placebo controlled study (https://clinicaltrials.gov NCT01651195), a total of 983 healthy adults were enrolled from two intakes of conscripts. Conscripts were randomised to receive either a probiotic combination of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) and Bifidobacterium animalis ssp. lactis BB12 (BB12) or a control chewing tablet twice daily for 150 days (recruits) or for 90 days (reserve officer candidates). Clinical examinations were carried out and daily symptom diaries were collected. Outcome measures were the number of days with respiratory and gastrointestinal symptoms and symptom incidence, number and duration of infection episodes, number of antibiotic treatments received and number of days out of service because of the infection. Statistically no significant differences were found between the intervention groups either in the risk of symptom incidence or duration. However, probiotic intervention was associated with reduction of specific respiratory infection symptoms in military recruits, but not in reserve officer candidates. Probiotics did not significantly reduce overall respiratory and gastrointestinal infection morbidity.

  13. Malignant gastrointestinal neuroectodermal tumor: clinicopathologic, immunohistochemical, ultrastructural, and molecular analysis of 16 cases with a reappraisal of clear cell sarcoma-like tumors of the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Stockman, David L; Miettinen, Markku; Suster, Saul; Spagnolo, Dominic; Dominguez-Malagon, Hugo; Hornick, Jason L; Adsay, Volkan; Chou, Pauline M; Amanuel, Benhur; Vantuinen, Peter; Zambrano, Eduardo V

    2012-06-01

    patients were alive with regional, lymph node, and liver metastases, and 2 patients were alive with no evidence of disease. The tumor described here is an aggressive form of neuroectodermal tumor that should be separated from other primitive epithelioid and spindle cell tumors of the gastrointestinal tract. The distinctive ultrastructural features and absence of melanocytic differentiation serve to separate them from soft tissue clear cell sarcomas involving the gastrointestinal tract. The designation "malignant gastrointestinal neuroectodermal tumor" is proposed for this tumor type.

  14. Risk of Flood-Related Diseases of Eyes, Skin and Gastrointestinal Tract in Taiwan: A Retrospective Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ling-Ya; Wang, Yu-Chun; Wu, Chin-Ching; Chen, Yi-Chun; Huang, Yu-Li

    2016-01-01

    Floods are known to cause serious environmental damage and health impacts. Studies on flood-related diseases have been primarily on individual events, and limited evidence could be drawn on potential health impacts from floods using large population data. This study used reimbursement records of one million people of the Taiwan National Health Insurance program to compare incident diseases of the eyes, skin and gastrointestinal (GI) tract associated with floods. Incidence rates for the selected diseases were calculated according to outpatient/emergency visit data. The incidence rates were evaluated by flood status: in 10 days before floods, during floods and within 10 days after the floods receded. Outpatient/emergency visit rates for the eye, skin and GI tract diseases were highest after floods and lowest during floods. Results from multivariate Poisson regression analyses showed that, when compared with the incidence in 10 days before floods, the incidence rate ratios (IRR) of diseases within 10 days after floods were 1.15 (95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.10-1.20) for eyes, 1.08 (95% C.I. = 1.05-1.10) for skin, and 1.11 (95% CI = 1.08-1.14) for GI tract, after controlling for covariates. All risks increased with ambient temperature. V-shaped trends were found between age and eye diseases, and between age and GI tract diseases. In contrast, the risk of skin diseases increased with age. In conclusion, more diseases of eyes, skin and GI tract could be diagnosed after the flood.

  15. Development of a technique for contrast radiographic examination of the gastrointestinal tract in ball pythons (Python regius).

    PubMed

    Banzato, Tommaso; Russo, Elisa; Finotti, Luca; Zotti, Alessandro

    2012-07-01

    To develop a technique for radiographic evaluation of the gastrointestinal tract in ball pythons (Python regius). 10 ball python cadavers (5 males and 5 females) and 18 healthy adult ball pythons (10 males and 8 females). Live snakes were allocated to 3 groups (A, B, and C). A dose (25 mL/kg) of barium sulfate suspension at 3 concentrations (25%, 35%, and 45% [wt/vol]) was administered through an esophageal probe to snakes in groups A, B, and C, respectively. Each evaluation ended when all the contrast medium had reached the large intestine. Transit times through the esophagus, stomach, and small intestine were recorded. Imaging quality was evaluated by 3 investigators who assigned a grading score on the basis of predetermined criteria. Statistical analysis was conducted to evaluate differences in quality among the study groups. The esophagus and stomach had a consistent distribution pattern of contrast medium, whereas 3 distribution patterns of contrast medium were identified in the small intestine, regardless of barium concentration. Significant differences in imaging quality were detected among the 3 groups. Radiographic procedures were tolerated well by all snakes. The 35% concentration of contrast medium yielded the best imaging quality. Use of contrast medium for evaluation of the cranial portion of the gastrointestinal tract could be a reliable technique for the diagnosis of gastrointestinal diseases in ball pythons. However, results of this study may not translate to other snake species because of variables identified in this group of snakes.

  16. Chemical constituents and pharmacological actions of carob pods and leaves (Ceratonia siliqua L.) on the gastrointestinal tract: A review.

    PubMed

    Rtibi, Kaïs; Selmi, Slimen; Grami, Dhekra; Amri, Mohamed; Eto, Bruno; El-Benna, Jamel; Sebai, Hichem; Marzouki, Lamjed

    2017-09-01

    Carob tree, Ceratonia siliqua L., is a medicinal plant used in Tunisian traditional medicine for the treatment of the gastro-intestinal (GI) disorders. In this respect, a relatively large number of scientific publications on the carob tree have been published in recent years. Therefore, the present review was aimed to analyze the traditional uses, phytochemical constituents and pharmacological activities of Ceratonia siliqua on the GI tract. Indeed, previous investigations on the carob pods and leaves have revealed the presence of a number of compounds including high amounts of carbohydrates, dietary fibers, minerals, polyphenols, flavonoids and low amounts of protein and lipids. This plant possesses anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, anti-diarrheique, antioxidant, anti-ulcer, anti-constipation and anti-absorptive of glucose activities in the gastrointestinal tract. Based on the chemical and pharmacological characteristics of C. siliqua, we concluded that this species has beneficial preventive and therapeutic properties, especially, in digestive tract. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Gross anatomical features of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) of blue-and-yellow macaws (Ara ararauna) - oesophagus to cloaca.

    PubMed

    Aizawa, J; Tivane, C; Rodrigues, M N; Wagner, P G; Campos, D B; Guerra, R R; Miglino, M A

    2013-12-01

    Morphological studies of the gastrointestinal tract of blue-and-yellow macaws (Ara ararauna) are scarce. In view of the paucity of information regarding the digestive tract of macaws, this study aims to describe the gross anatomical features (oesophagus to cloaca) as part of a broad study of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) of these birds. Three animals (two males and one female) adult macaws were anatomically dissected from the oropharynx to the cloaca to expose the GIT. The oesophagus was identified as a muscle-membranous tube continuous with the crop, which was intimately attached to the skin. The internal longitudinal folds of the cervical oesophagus were sparser cranial to the crop and less evident compared to the portion caudal to the crop. The duodenum began in the pylorus and was grey-coloured exhibiting a large lumen. The jejunum was formed by loops in a spiral-fashion model supported by mesojejunum. The ileum was also composed by small loops and was continuous with the colo-rectum forming the large intestine, because the caeca were absent. The large intestine was short, median in position, suspended in the dorsal wall of the abdominal cavity by mesentery and ended in the cloaca. The GIT was similar to the basic patterns in birds, in general, and also presented new unreported morphological data that might be important when studying nutrition and health of the macaws.

  18. Bacteria from drinking water supply and their fate in gastrointestinal tracts of germ-free mice: a phylogenetic comparison study.

    PubMed

    Lee, J; Lee, C S; Hugunin, K M; Maute, C J; Dysko, R C

    2010-09-01

    Microorganisms in drinking water sources may colonize in gastrointestinal (GI) tracts and this phenomenon may pose a potential health risk especially to immunocompromised population. The microbial community diversity of the drinking water was compared with the GI tracts of the mice using phylogenetic and statistical analyses of 16S rRNA gene sequences. A group of germ-free mice were fed with drinking water from public water supply that passed through an automated watering system with documented biofilm accumulation. From drinking water and GI tracts of the germ-free mice, 179 bacteria were isolated and 75 unique 16S rRNA gene phylotypes were sequenced as operational taxonomic unit (OTU, >97% similarity). Three major groups of the genus Acidovorax (21%), Variovorax (42%) and Sphingopyxis (15%) were found in drinking water. Three major groups of the genus Ralstonia (24%), Staphylococcus (20%) and Bosea (22%) were found in GI tracts. Ralstonia (6%, 24%), Sphingopyxis (15%, 2%), Bacillus (3%, 5%), Escherichia coli (3%, 2%) and Mesorhizobium (3%, 5%) were found in both sources - drinking water and GI tract. A lineage-per-time plot shows that the both bacterial communities have convex shape lines, suggesting an excess of closely related ecotypes. A significant F(ST) test (0.00000-0.00901) coupled with an insignificant P test (0.07-0.46) implies that the tree contained several clades of closely related bacteria. Both phylogenetic and statistical results suggest a correlation between the bacterial communities originating in the drinking water and those associated with the GI tracts. The GI tract showed a higher genetic diversity than the drinking water, but a similar lineage-per-time plot was obtained overall. It means a sudden evolutionary transformation and colonization occurred with high selective forces. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Temporal distribution of encapsulated bacteriophages during passage through the chick gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yin-Hing; Islam, Golam S; Wu, Ying; Sabour, Parviz M; Chambers, James R; Wang, Qi; Wu, Shirley X Y; Griffiths, Mansel W

    2016-12-01

    Encapsulation of bacteriophages ("phage") protects phage against environmental deactivation and provides a product that is easy to handle for storage and application with animal feed as an antibiotic alternative. The objective of this study was to evaluate an orally administered, encapsulated phage for efficient phage release in the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) of young chicks receiving feed. An optimized formulation that consisted of 0.8% low molecular weight (MW) alginate, 2% ultra-low molecular weight alginate and 3% whey protein completely released the encapsulated phage within 60 min under simulated intestinal conditions. This product was given to broiler chicks to determine passage time and distribution of the viable phage within the GIT. Following a single oral dose of 10(9) plaque-forming unit (PFU)/chick, the major portion (peak concentration) of the encapsulated phage passed through the chick's GIT and was detected in the feces within 4 h, with low levels being continuously excreted for up to 24 h. In comparison, the passage of free phage through the GIT occurred faster as indicated by a peak concentration in feces after 1.5 h. In assessing the temporal phage distribution, both encapsulated and free phage treatments showed no apparent difference, both having low levels of 10(2) to 10(6) PFU/g of contents along the entire GIT after 1, 2 and 4 h. These low concentrations recovered in vivo led us to examine various exposure conditions (with feed, fecal material, and buffer solutions) that were suspected to have affected phage viability/infectivity during oral delivery, sample recovery, and enumeration by plaque assay. Results showed that the exposure conditions examined did not significantly reduce phage viability and could not account for the observed low phage levels following oral administration in chicks that are on feed. In conclusion, an oral encapsulated phage dose can take more than 4 h to completely move through the GIT of young chicks. Thus

  20. Tumor markers for diagnosis, monitoring of recurrence and prognosis in patients with upper gastrointestinal tract cancer.

    PubMed

    Jing, Jie-Xian; Wang, Yan; Xu, Xiao-Qin; Sun, Ting; Tian, Bao-Guo; Du, Li-Li; Zhao, Xian-Wen; Han, Cun-Zhi

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the value of combined detection of serum CEA, CA19-9, CA24-2, AFP, CA72-4, SCC, TPA and TPS for the clinical diagnosis of upper gastrointestinal tract (GIT) cancer and to analyze the efficacy of these tumor markers (TMs) in evaluating curative effects and prognosis. A total of 573 patients with upper GIT cancer between January 2004 and December 2007 were enrolled in this study. Serum levels of CEA, CA19-9, CA24-2, AFP, CA72-4, SCC, TPA and TPS were examined preoperatively and every 3 months postoperatively by ELISA. The sensitivity of CEA, CA19-9, CA24-2, AFP, CA72-4, SCC, TPA and TPS were 26.8%, 36.2%, 42.9%, 2.84%, 25.4%, 34.6%, 34.2% and 30.9%, respectively. The combined detection of CEA+CA199+CA242+CA724 had higher sensitivity and specificity in gastric cancer (GC) and cardiac cancer, while CEA+CA199+CA242+SCC was the best combination of diagnosis for esophageal cancer (EC). Elevation of preoperative CEA, CA19-9 and CA24-2, SCC and CA72-4 was significantly associated with pathological types (p<0.05) and TNM staging (p<0.05). Correlation analysis showed that CA24-2 was significantly correlated with CA19-9 (r=0.810, p<0.001). The levels of CEA, CA19-9, CA24-2, CA72-4 and SCC decreased obviously 3 months after operations. When metastasis and recurrence occurred, the levels of TMs significantly increased. On multivariate analysis, high preoperative CA72-4, CA24-2 and SCC served as prognostic factors for cardiac carcinoma, GC and EC, respectively. combined detection of CEA+CA199+CA242+SCC proved to be the most economic and practical strategy in diagnosis of EC; CEA+CA199+CA242+CA724 proved to be a better evaluation indicator for cardiac cancer and GC. CEA and CA19-9, CA24-2, CA72-4 and SCC, examined postoperatively during follow-up, were useful to find early tumor recurrence and metastasis, and evaluate prognosis. AFP, TPA and TPS have no significant value in diagnosis of patients with upper GIT cancer.

  1. Gastrointestinal tract development in red deer (Cervus elaphus) calves from 1 to 12 months of age.

    PubMed

    Hammond, K J; Hoskin, S O; Jopson, N B; Mackintosh, C G; Hofstra, G; Thompson, B R; Stevens, D R

    2013-11-01

    This study provides a detailed description of the development of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) of farmed red deer (Cervus elaphus) calves over the first 12 months of age. GIT development was measured using a combination of computerised tomography (CT) scanning and traditional slaughter plus dissection techniques. Red deer calves of a known birth date were randomly assigned to two treatment groups. A group of five animals were repeatedly CT scanned at 31, 63, 92, 135, 207, 275 and 351 days of age to identify GIT organs and determine their volume. From a group of 20 animals, subsets of four individuals were also scanned at corresponding ages (except 135 days of age). They were immediately euthanised and dissected after CT scanning to compare CT-scanned results with actual anatomical measurements. Individual organ weights were compared with their respective organ volumes determined by CT scanning and were found to have a strong, positive relationship. The combined rumen and reticulum (RR) CT-scanned volume was compared with its volume determined by the water-displacement technique and this also showed good correlation between the two techniques (R = 0.92). The allometric growth rates of organs, relative to animal live weight gains, in descending order, were the rumen, omasum, reticulum, abomasum, caecum blind sac, kidneys, spleen and liver. The red deer GIT was continuing to grow and develop when the last measurement was taken at 351 days of age. The greatest growth of the RR, when expressed in terms of empty weight, was between 31 and 92 days of age. Compared with sheep and cattle, it appears that the red deer have a similar or greater rate of RR development up until approximately 60 to 90 days of age; however, the final increments of GIT maturity in deer may take longer to complete, with the empty weight of the RR gaining 7.5 g/day between 275 and 351 days of age. CT scanning was validated in this study as a viable technique to follow GIT development in the same

  2. Prospective evaluation of a clinical guideline recommending hospital length of stay in upper gastrointestinal tract hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Hay, J A; Maldonado, L; Weingarten, S R; Ellrodt, A G

    Upper gastrointestinal tract hemorrhage (UGIH) is a common and potentially life-threatening disorder. Resource utilization can vary without adverse effect on patient outcome. Clinical practice guidelines are a potential solution to reduce variation in practice while improving patient outcomes. To validate prospectively the safety, acceptability, and impact of a clinical practice guideline defining the medically appropriate length of stay (LOS) for patients hospitalized with UGIH. Prospective, controlled time-series study with an alternate-month design. Outcome surveyors and patients were blinded to study group allocation. GUIDELINE: A retrospectively validated scoring system using 4 independent variables: hemodynamics, time from bleeding, comorbidity, and esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) findings to predict risk of adverse events. The quantitative risk for the low-risk subset was 0.6% (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.0%-2.0%) for subsequent complications and 0% (95% CI, 0.0%-0.9%) for life-threatening complications from this retrospective evaluation. A 1000-bed, not-for-profit, university-affiliated teaching hospital. Consecutive adult patients hospitalized for acute UGIH. Concurrent feedback of guideline recommendation (same-day hospital discharge) to physicians caring for patients at low risk for complication. No risk information was provided during control months. Seventy percent (209/299) of UGIH patients achieved low-risk status according to the guideline and were therefore potentially suitable for early discharge from the hospital. Providing real-time quantitative risk information (intervention group only) was associated with an increase in guideline compliance from 30% to 70% (P<.001) and a decrease in mean (SD) LOS from 4.6 (3.5) days to 2.9 (1.3) days (mean reduction of 1.7 days per patient; P<.001). No differences in complications, patient health status, or patient satisfaction were found when measured 1 month after discharge. An independent variable

  3. Bacteria and methanogens differ along the gastrointestinal tract of Chinese roe deer (Capreolus pygargus).

    PubMed

    Li, Zhipeng; Zhang, Zhigang; Xu, Chao; Zhao, Jingbo; Liu, Hanlu; Fan, Zhongyuan; Yang, Fuhe; Wright, André-Denis G; Li, Guangyu

    2014-01-01

    The current study provides the insight into the bacteria in the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) and methanogens presented in the rumen and cecum of the Chinese roe deer (Capreolus pygargus). The ruminal, ileal, cecal, and colonic contents, as well as feces, were obtained from each of the three, free-range, roe deer ingesting natural pasture after euthanasia. For the bacterial community, a total of 697,031 high-quality 16S rRNA gene sequences were generated using high-throughput sequencing, and assigned to 2,223 core operational taxonomic units (OTUs) (12 bacterial phyla and 87 genera). The phyla Firmicutes (51.2%) and Bacteroidetes (39.4%) were the dominant bacteria in the GIT of roe deer. However, the bacterial community in the rumen was significantly (P<0.01) different from the other sampled regions along the GIT. Secondly, Prevotella spp., Anaerovibrio spp., and unidentified bacteria within the families Veillonellaceae and Paraprevotellaceae were more abundant in the rumen than in the other regions. Unidentified bacteria within the family Enterobacteriaceae, Succinivibrio spp., and Desulfovibrio spp. were more predominant in the colon than in other regions. Unidentified bacteria within the family Ruminococcaceae, and Bacteroides spp. were more prevalent in the ileum, cecum and fecal pellets. For methanogens in the rumen and cecum, a total of 375,647 high quality 16S rRNA gene sequences were obtained and assigned to 113 core OTUs. Methanobrevibacter millerae was the dominant species accounting for 77.3±7.4 (S.E) % and 68.9±4.4 (S.E) % of total sequences in the rumen and cecum of roe deer, respectively. However, the abundance of Methanobrevibacter smithii was higher in the rumen than in the cecum (P = 0.004). These results revealed that there was intra variation in the bacterial community composition across the GIT of roe deer, and also showed that the methanogen community in the rumen differed from that in the cecum.

  4. New endoscopic platform for endoluminal en bloc tissue resection in the gastrointestinal tract (with videos).

    PubMed

    Kantsevoy, Sergey V; Bitner, Marianne; Piskun, Gregory

    2016-07-01

    Endoscopic removal of gastrointestinal tract lesions is increasingly popular around the world. We evaluated feasibility, safety, effectiveness, and user learning curve of new endoscopic platform for complex intraluminal interventions. A novel system, consisting of expandable working chamber with two independent instrument guides (LIG), was inserted into colon. Simulated colonic lesions were removed with endoscopic submucosal (ESD) and submuscular (ESmD) dissection. In all nine in vivo models, an intraluminal chamber and its dynamic tissue retractors (via LIG) provided a stable working space with excellent visualization and adequate access to target tissue. Endoscopic platform facilitated successful completion of 11 en bloc ESDs (mean size 43.0 ± 11.3 mm, mean time 46.3 ± 41.2 min) and eight ESmD (mean size 50.0 ± 14.1 mm, mean time 48.0 ± 21.2 min). The learning curve for ESD using this platform demonstrated three phases: rapid improvement in procedural skills took place during the first three procedures (mean ESD time 98.7 ± 40.0 min). A plateau phase then occurred (procedures 4-7) with mean procedure time 42.0 ± 13.4 min (p = 0.04), followed by another sharp improvement in procedural skills (procedures 8-11) requiring only 16.3 ± 11.4 min (p = 0.03) to complete ESD. Especially dramatic (p = 0.002) was the time difference between the first three procedures (mean time 98.7 ± 40.0 min) and subsequent eight procedures (mean time 29.1 ± 17.9 min). A newly developed endoscopic platform provides stable intraluminal working space, dynamic tissue retraction, and instrument triangulation, improving visualization and access to the target tissue for safer and more effective en bloc endoscopic submucosal and submuscular dissection. The learning curve for ESD was markedly facilitated by this new endoscopic platform.

  5. Normalized dose data for upper gastrointestinal tract contrast studies performed to infants

    SciTech Connect

    Damilakis, John; Stratakis, John; Raissaki, Maria; Perisinakis, Kostas; Kourbetis, Nikiforos; Gourtsoyiannis, Nicholas

    2006-04-15

    The aim of the current study was to (a) provide normalized dose data for the estimation of the radiation dose from upper gastrointestinal tract contrast (UGIC) studies carried out to infants and (b) estimate the average patient dose and risks associated with radiation from UGIC examinations performed in our institution. Organ and effective doses, normalized to entrance skin dose (ESD) and dose area product (DAP) were estimated for UGIC procedures utilizing the Monte Carlo N-particle (MCNP) transport code and two mathematical phantoms, one corresponding to the size of a newborn and one to the size of a 1-year-old child. The validity of the MCNP results was verified by comparison with dose data obtained in physical anthropomorphic phantoms simulating a newborn and a 1-year-old infant using thermoluminescence dosimetry (TLD). Data were also collected from 25 consecutive UGIC examinations performed to infants. Study participants were (a) 12 infants aged from 0.5 to 5.9 months (group 1) and (b) 13 infants aged from 6 to 15 months (group 2). For each examination, ESD and dose to comforters were measured using TLD. Patient effective doses were estimated using normalized dose data obtained in the simulation study. The risk for fatal cancer induction was estimated using appropriate coefficients. The results consist of tabulated dose data normalized to ESD or DAP for the estimation of patient dose. Conversion coefficients were estimated for various tube potentials and beam filtration values. The mean total fluoroscopy time was 1.26 and 1.62 min for groups 1 and 2, respectively. The average effective dose was 1.6 mSv for group 1 and 1.9 mSv for group 2. The risk of cancer attributable to the radiation exposure associated with a typical UGIC study was found to be up to 3 per 10 000 infants undergoing an UGIC examination. The mean radiation dose absorbed by the hands of comforters was 47 {mu}Gy. In conclusion, estimation of radiation doses associated with UGIC studies performed

  6. Quality of life of patients on chronic parenteral nutrition before and after gastrointestinal tract continuity restoration.

    PubMed

    Ławiński, Michał; Kot-Mielczarska, Edyta; Gradowska, Aleksandra

    2015-04-01

    The issue of the quality of life considering patients with a temporary or permanent intestinal stoma, as well as the necessity for chronic parenteral nutrition at home remain a poorly understood problem. Daily care of the intestinal stoma and the need to comply with sterile procedures required for parenteral nutrition require such patients to commit their time, which secondarily is associated with the broad aspects of social and personal life. The aim of the study was to analyse the quality of life considering patients with intestinal stomas subjected to chronic parenteral nutrition, before and after gastrointestinal tract continuity restoration. The survey was conducted between May and July, 2014 on a group of 71 patients (33 female and 38 male) who were under the care of the Department of General Surgery and Clinical Nutrition, Warsaw Medical University, operated during the period between 2007 and July, 2014 with a present stoma (32 patients - 45%), as well as after stoma closure (39 patients - 55%). The analysed questionnaire contained 31 questions, and the SF-36 questionnaire was additionally used, determining the quality of life. Analysis of the study material showed differences in the quality of life, considering three most important determinants. Significantly worse assessment of the quality of life was reported by patients with a stoma and subject to intravenous nutrition (83.2±30.5), as compared to those after stoma closure subject to normal nutrition (52.3±33.8). Based on the SF-36 questionnaire differences between patients with a stoma and those without amounted to t(69)=2.84 (p=0.006) demonstrating that those with a stoma reported a lower quality of life. Analysis between younger and older patients, based on the SF-36 questionnaire (t(62.87)=2.49; p=0.016) showed that younger patients achieved lower results, considering dissatisfaction with life (61.55±27.5), as compared to the elderly (80.8±36.9). The group of patients without a stoma seem to be

  7. Safety of carbon dioxide insufflation for upper gastrointestinal tract endoscopic treatment of patients under deep sedation.

    PubMed

    Nonaka, Satoru; Saito, Yutaka; Takisawa, Hajime; Kim, Yongmin; Kikuchi, Tsuyoshi; Oda, Ichiro

    2010-07-01

    It is well known that carbon dioxide (CO(2)) is absorbed faster in the body than air and also that it is rapidly excreted through respiration. This study aimed to investigate the safety of CO(2) insufflation used for esophageal and gastric endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) in patients under deep sedation. Patients with either early gastric or esophageal cancers that could be resected by ESD were enrolled in this study from March 2007 to July 2008 and randomly assigned to undergo ESD procedures with CO(2) insufflation (CO(2) group) or air insufflation (air group). A TOSCA measurement system and TOSCA 500 monitor were used to measure and monitor both transcutaneous partial pressure of CO(2) (PtcCO(2)) and oxygen saturation (SpO(2)). The study enrolled 89 patients and randomly assigned them to a CO(2) group (45 patients) or an air group (44 patients). The mean CO(2) group versus air group measurements were as follows: PtcCO(2) (49.1 +/- 5.0 vs. 50.1 +/- 5.3 mmHg; nonsignificant difference [NS]), maximum PtcCO(2) (55.1 +/- 6.5 vs. 56.8 +/- 7.0 mmHg; NS), PtcCO(2) elevation (9.1 +/- 5.4 vs. 11.4 +/- 5.6 mmHg; p = 0.054), SpO(2) (99.0 +/- 0.7% vs. 99.0 +/- 1.0%; NS), minimum SpO(2) (96.5 +/- 2.4% vs. 95.4 +/- 3.3%; p = 0.085), and SpO(2) depression (2.4 +/- 2.3% vs. 3.3 +/- 2.9%; NS). The PtcCO(2) and SpO(2) measurements were similar in the two groups, but the CO(2) group was better than the air group in PtcCO(2) elevation and minimum SpO(2). The findings demonstrated CO(2) insufflation to be as safe as air insufflation for upper gastrointestinal tract ESDs performed for patients under deep sedation without evidencing any adverse effects.

  8. Effect of dietary nucleotide supplementation on performance and development of the gastrointestinal tract of broilers.

    PubMed

    Jung, B; Batal, A B

    2012-01-01

    1. Two experiments were conducted to determine the effects of dietary nucleotide supplementation on broiler performance, and physical and morphological development of the gastrointestinal tract. 2. Experiment 1: A total of 180 one-d-old male chicks were placed in battery brooders in 3 × 6 replicate pens containing 10 chicks each. Chicks were randomly assigned to one of the three dietary treatments; a maize-soyabean meal based diet supplemented with 0, 0·25, and 0·50% Torula yeast RNA (as a source of nucleotides) from 0 to 16 d of age. 3. Experiment 2: A total of 1344 one-d-old male chicks were placed in floor pens and reared on recycled wood shavings (two flocks) under a high stocking density (0·068 m(2)/bird). Chicks were randomly assigned to one of the 4 dietary treatments (0, 0·25% Torula yeast RNA, 2% and 6% Nupro®) for the starter period (0 to 14 d of age) with 6 replicate pens containing 56 chicks each. All the birds were fed on the same common grower diet with no supplementation of nucleotides from 15 to 32 d of age. 4. Experiment 1: Supplementing the diets with up to 0·50% Torula yeast RNA did not affect broiler performance, or relative intestinal tract weight and length of broilers at any periods measured. 5. Experiment 2: From 0 to 14 d of age, broilers fed on the diets supplemented with 0·25% Torula yeast RNA and 2 and 6% Nupro® were significantly heavier and had improved feed conversion (feed:gain) ratios as compared with the birds fed on the control diet. Supplementing the starter diet only with 2% Nupro® supplementation significantly improved body weight (BW) gain as compared with the control diet over the entire experiment (0 to 32 d of age). Broilers fed on the diets supplemented with 2 and 6% Nupro® from 0 to 14 d of age had better feed conversion (feed:gain) ratios over the entire experiment (0 to 32 d of age) as compared with the birds fed on the control diet, even though the birds were only fed on the diets

  9. Expression, cellular localization, and functional role of monocarboxylate transporter 4 (MCT4) in the gastrointestinal tract of ruminants.

    PubMed

    Kirat, Doaa; Matsuda, Yumi; Yamashiki, Naoko; Hayashi, Hideaki; Kato, Seiyu

    2007-04-15

    This is the first study to determine the precise cellular localization of monocarboxylate transporter 4 (MCT4), along with its co-existence with its chaperone, CD147 in the ruminant gastrointestinal tract. Quantitative Western blot analysis demonstrated that the abundance of MCT4 protein was in the order of forestomach > large intestine > abomasum >or= small intestine. Immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence confocal laser microscopy showed that MCT4 in the forestomach was confined to the cell membranes of strata corneum and granulosum, while diffuse cytoplasmic staining for MCT4 was visualized in strata spinosum and basale. In the epithelium cells lining the abomasum, MCT4 immunoreactive positivities were predominantly localized on the basolateral membranes. In the small intestine, MCT4 was localized at the brush borders and the basolateral membranes of the epithelial cells lining the villi, however it was mostly found on the apical membranes of the crypt cells. In the large intestine, the immunoreactivity for MCT4 differed between the surface epithelium and the crypts; in the surface epithelium, MCT4 was mainly localized at the apical membranes, whereas in the crypts it was predominantly expressed on the basolateral membranes of the lining epithelial cells. MCT4 was remarkably co-existed with CD147 along the bovine gastrointestinal tract. Our results suggest that MCT4 can play an important role in the transport of SCFA. The study also explored the potential functional collaboration between MCT1 and MCT4 and provided new insights into the mechanisms that mediate the transport of SCFA and other monocarboxylates in the different segments of the ruminant gastrointestinal tract.

  10. Distribution of TMEM100 in the mouse and human gastrointestinal tract--a novel marker of enteric nerves.

    PubMed

    Eisenman, S T; Gibbons, S J; Singh, R D; Bernard, C E; Wu, J; Sarr, M G; Kendrick, M L; Larson, D W; Dozois, E J; Shen, K R; Farrugia, G

    2013-06-14

    Identification of markers of enteric neurons has contributed substantially to our understanding of the development, normal physiology, and pathology of the gut. Previously identified markers of the enteric nervous system can be used to label all or most neuronal structures or for examining individual cells by labeling just the nucleus or cell body. Most of these markers are excellent but have some limitations. Transmembrane protein 100 (TMEM100) is a gene at locus 17q32 encoding a 134-amino acid protein with two hypothetical transmembrane domains. TMEM100 expression has not been reported in adult mammalian tissues but does appear in the ventral neural tube of embryonic mice and plays a role in signaling pathways associated with development of the enteric nervous system. We showed that TMEM100 messenger RNA is expressed in the gastrointestinal tract and demonstrated that TMEM100 is a membrane-associated protein. Furthermore TMEM100 immunoreactivity was restricted to enteric neurons and vascular tissue in the muscularis propria of all regions of the mouse and human gastrointestinal tract. TMEM100 immunoreactivity colocalized with labeling for the pan-neuronal marker protein gene product 9.5 (PGP9.5) but not with the glial marker S100ß or Kit, a marker of interstitial cells of Cajal. The signaling molecule, bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) 4, was also expressed in enteric neurons of the human colon and co-localized with TMEM100. TMEM100 is also expressed in neuronal cell bodies and fibers in the mouse brain and dorsal root ganglia. We conclude that TMEM100 is a novel, membrane-associated marker for enteric nerves and is as effective as PGP9.5 for identifying neuronal structures in the gastrointestinal tract. The expression of TMEM100 in the enteric nervous system may reflect a role in the development and differentiation of cells through a transforming growth factor β, BMP or related signaling pathway. Copyright © 2013 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  11. [Interaction between Bifidobacterium bifidum, Proteus vulgaris, and Klebsiella pneumoniae 204 in the gastrointestinal tract of gnotobiotic chicks].

    PubMed

    Timoshko, M A; Vil'shanskaia, F L; Pospelova, V V; Rakhimova, N G

    1981-03-01

    Experiments on gnotobiont chickens indicated that the strains B. bifidum 1/85 phi, P. vulgaris F-30 and K. pneumoniae 204, when introduced simultaneously into the